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Full text of "Carpenter"

Ill I •^mmmmmm 





FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




P.LW^RTiN 



D D CALENDAR 


FOR 1948 DD 




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12 3 
8 9 10 


JUL 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


OCT 




4 5 6 7 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 




11 12 13 14 15 16 17 




11 12 13 14 15 16 17 




11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16; 




18 19 20 21 22 23 24 




18 19 20 21 22 23 24 




18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23| 


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25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


MAY 


25 26 27 28 29 30 -■ 


AUG 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


NOV 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 




12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


"12 3 4 5 6 
78 9 10 11 12 13 




15 16 17 18 19 20 21 




9 10 11 12 13 14 15 




15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


i 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 




22 23 24 25 26 27 28 




16 17 18 19 20 21 22 




22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


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29 




23 24 25 26 27 28 29 




29 30 31 






28 29 30 -■ - 





MAR 




JUN 




SEP 




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-- 1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


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6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 




12 3 4 
8 9 10 11 


5 6 7 




14 15 16 17 18 19 20 




13 14 15 16 17 18 19 




12 13 14 15 16 17 18 




12 13 14 15 16 17 18 




21 22 23 24 25 26 27 




20 2122 23 24 25 26 




19 20 21 22 23 24 25 




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28 29 30 31 




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2627 28 29 3031 -- 



J A X U A R Y, 19 4 8 



• * • 



SOCIALISM OR THE REPUBLIC? 



WHICH BEST SERVES THE NATION: 



WHICH BEST SERVES THE CITIZEN: 




IN THE 

WORLD 

THERE ARE: 



2 

BILLiCN 
PEOPLE 



4«^ 



^^ Mi'UON 
SQ. MILES OF LAND 



MILLION 
PASSENGER AUTOS 



jTjW^ WUJON 
^^-^ _ BARRELS 

OF OIL (Pniductd YtrortW 



DAILY NEVrSPAPERS 




5i 

MILLION 
TELEPHONES 



^ 605 

^ BILLION 
K.W. HOURS 

ELECT RICITY (Y«giT) 



UNITED 

STATES 

HAS: 



6.1^0 



6ro 



ONE FOR 

5 

PBtSONS 



SA.l^'c 



t,763 



ONE FOR 

5 

PSSONS 



45^ 



RUSSIA 
HAS: 



gig 

SIS 

[BRITAIN 

HAS 



16ro 



ONE FOR 

1,671 

PERSONS 



lO.lro 



28 



ONE FOR 

125 

POISONS 



%^ 



2.1r« 



.18ro 



ONE FOR 

25 

PBtSONS 



.03^0 



121 



OME FOR 

12 

PBtSONS 



79<> 




ONE FOR 

20 

PBtSONS 



TO BUY 
THE ESSENTIALS 



I THE I THE 

AVERAGE AVERAGE 

AMERICAN RUSSIAN 

WORKS W ORKS 



BEEF 

(1 Pound] 



BREAD 

(1 Pound) 



^5^ BUTTER 



(1 Pound) 



SUGAR 

(1 Pound) 



AAAN'S 
SUIT 



SHOES 



VWOAAAN'S 
COAT 



32 

MINUTES 



6 

MINUTES 



37 

MNUTES 



5 

AAINUTES 



36f 

HOURS 



8 



48 

HOURS 



5i 

HOURS 



HOURS 



HOURS 



lU 

HOURS 



333 

HOURS 



112 

HOURS 



298 

HOURS 



17 

HOURS 



in 

HOURS 



45 

HOURS 



22 

HOURS 



1,250 

HOURS 



708 

HOURS 



1,083 

HOURS 



The figures for Great Britain do not 
reflect the record of Its new Socialist Gov- 
ernment since its record Is yet to be made. 
Further, the chart cannot show the con- 
trast between nations as to intangible 
values such as free thought and action, 
which permit creative and cultural pro- 
gress, the choice of employment, free 
press, free travel, etc., and the sum of 
these in providing the invention and skills 
to strengthen and defend the nation. 



The distinction between "Ra- 
tioned Prices" and Commercial 
Prices" today in Russia Is com- 
parable to that between wartime 
"Ceiling Prices" and "Black Mar- 
ket Prices" in the U. S. After ful- 
filling his production quota, the 
Russian farmer is allowed to sell 
surpluses on the open market 
above rationed prices. Clothing 
(mostly used) also is sold in this 
manner. 



• * * 



pa-?^"ararry^^ Ml, , , , . , ^ 1 I , ^ I) , 1 , 1 , , . ^ „■., —,-,-.„ 



»i 



fe 






^JJ14^ ^^xxdMA44/je ^IcfotUuf, ^aiieite^ 




ingenious, efficient, time-tested! 

The Upson Floating Fastener is another reason 
for the continned and increasing acceptance of 
Upson quality panels. 

Applied direct to studs. Upson Floating 
Fasteners anchor the panels securely from the 
back. They ciimplelely eliminate ugly face nailing. 

The Upson Floating Fastener speeds construc- 
tion time. Saves precious hours usually spent 
in countersinking and filling nail holes. 

Carpenters everj'where endorse the Upson Float- 
ing Fastener. You'll like it, too; write us for 
information. 



What corpenfers 
say : 

"I used the Upson 
Fasteners to insure the 
most attractive job pos- 
sible because they 
eliminate unsightly nail 
marks and other sur- 
face blemishes that no 
painter can hide suc- 
cessfully." 

G. J. LeN'. 

"Not a single mark can 
be found on any of the 
work to indicate wliere 
it was fastened." 
I. ,T. 



THE UPSON COMPANY • Lockport, New York 





THE^^^NTCR 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Cai-penters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVIII — No. 1 



INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Where Your $450 Disappeared - 



8 

Through a realistic budget worked out by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, facts and 
figures show that the cost of maintaining an average working man's family increased 
by about $450 per year from March, 1946, to June, 1947. 



Davie — NAM'S Mortimer Snerd 



10 



David Lawrence, joy and pride of the National Association of Manufacturers, creates 
the impression that labor is almost exclusively to blame for the high cost of building 
at present. Not knov/ing a purlin from a stringer, it is pretty clear to anyone connected 
with the industry that he is indulging more in wishful thinking and less in factual data. 



Termites At Work 



13 



Now that they have pretty much nullified the Wagner Act through passage of the 
Taft-Hartley Act, the anti-!abor forces of the nation are mobilizing their forces for an 
attack on the Wages and Hours Act. The forty-hour v/eek is their first objective, and 
all the chiseling sweat-shop employers in the nation are backing them up. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane GossiiJ 

Editorials 

Official 

In Meiiioi'iaiii 

Correspondence 

Craft Problems 



8 
16 
19 
33 
33 
27 



Inde.\ to Avertisers 



33 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your OMm busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have bad a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 
and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you excimine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name tmd address clesu'Iy and 
give your age, suid trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building CIS, Denver 2, Colorado 



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IN TEN SECONDS!! All 11 
lengths and cuts of rafters 
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Just set dial to "pitch" & 
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Unlike rafter tables, run is 
"set directly in feet and in- 
ches. There is no need to 
adjust later for thickness 
of ridge board. Cuts giv- 
er\ in degrees and squcfre 
readings. 

RAFTER DIAL $1.95 Order from: E. Weyer, Dept. H, 

P.O. Box 153, Planefarium Station, New York 24, N. Y. 




H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

BUILDING TRADES D ICTIONARY.— Has 3S0 p. 
670 il., and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 il. Koof framing 
complete. Other problems, including saw filing. $2.00. 

BUILDING. — Has 210 p. and 495 11.. covering form 
building, finishing, stair building, etc. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p.. 754 11., covering general 
house carpentry, estimating and other subjects. $2.5n. 

The above five boobs support one another. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— Illustrated prose. Only $1.00. 

FREE.— With 2 books, one $1.00 book free, with 
4 books, two, and with 5 books, three. Books auto- 
evaphed. 

C.O.D. orders will have postage added. 

Order u U ClCr^CI IC 222 So. Const. St. 
today. "• ri« alt\aCI_t Emporia, Kansas 



MAKE $35 

TO $50 A DAY 



Be Your Own Boss 



Right now — cash in on the building 
boom with an American Floor Sander! 
Hundreds of men have found they can 
make $35 to $50 a day in floor surfac- 
ing work with an American. Pleasant, 
inside work . . . heated quarters . . .no 
scafiFolding to climb . . . steady income 
year 'round. 
'-'"* - / / American Sanders 

are easy to operate 
-no big overhead 
: ^no special school- 
"v ing. Sendcouponfor 
^ money- making 
booklet. 




v,^^ ^=, -^ ._^ ->- . ^ 

MERICAN 

FLOOR MACHINES 



American Floor Surfacing Machine Co. 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo 3, Ohio 

Enclosed find 2 5c in stamps orcein for book- 
let "Opportunities in Floor Surfacing", telling 
how I can start my own floor sanding business. 

Name 



Street 
Cit>... 



.State. 




STEEL SQUARE 



HAND 
BOOK 



Completely Revised 



This concise and liandy little book illustrates and describes the best methods of using 
the carpenter's steel square in laying out all kinds of carpentry work. It is easy to 
understanil as a picture of the square laying directly on the work shows exactly how the 
various cuts are made. Its compact and handy size makes it convenient to carry in the 
pocket for quick reference. 

"For ready reference carry Postpaid Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 
this convenient 50 page SEND $1.50 CHECK OR 

pocket size (4ix6i) guide TiT/-wTVTT7,ir /-wT>-rwT-.T. 

to your job." MONEY ORDER 



I D. A. ROGERS 

5344 Clinton Avenue 
I Minneapolis 9, Minn. 

I Name Address 



Enclosed $1.50. Forward by return mail your Carpenters & 
Builders' Practical Rules for Laying Out Work. 



I Town. 



— PRICK LIST — 



Label and Emblem Novelties 



Card Cases (Label) S .10 

Key Chains (Label) 15 

Fobs (Label and Emblem) 50 

Gavels (Label) 1.25 

Pins (Emblem) 1.00 

Buttons (Emblem) 2.00 



Ladies' Auxiliary Pins 1.75 

Cuff Links, pair (Roman or White) Gold. 1.50 

Belt Loop and Chain, Rolled Gold 75 

Match Box Holders 15 

Automobile Radiator Emblem 1.25 



In ordering these goods send all orders and make all remittances paj/ahle to 

FRANK DUFFY, General Secretary 

Carpenters' Building 

222 East Michigan St., Indianapolis, Ind. 




FREE: Blue Print Plans and Booklet: 
"How To Read Blue Prints" 

Find out now — by this Free Trial Lesson — how easy 
it is to learn the technical side of Building. No 
charge for this lesson either now or later. 

PREPARE TO GET AHEAD 

As a carpenter or builder, with practical experience, you will be 
able to progress rapidly, after you learn tliis "headwork" side of 
Building. Successful builders — foremen, estimators, superin- 
tendents, master builders and contractors — must understand blue 
prints, building construction and estimating building costs. 
Send today for Free Trial Lesson or Booklet: "How to Read 
Blue Prints" and a set of Blue Print Plans. See for yourself how 
easy it is for a practical man to get ahead by the time-saving, 
low cost C.T.C. methods. 



Chicago Technical College 

A-120 Tech BIdg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 16, III. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to I 
Read Blue Prints" and information about how I can train 




LEARN AT HOME 
in YOUR SPARE TIME 

Learn how to lay out and run a building job, 
how to read blue prints, how to understand 
specifications, how to estimate costs. .Tust 
use the blue prints, specifications and 
easy lessons we furnish — same as the 
contractor uses. Pits in with your 
daily experience. This practical plan is 
the result of 4.3 years of experience in 
training practical builders. 



ai nome. 

.NTame 

Address 

(Mty 


Zone__ 


Age 

- Occupation 

-. State 


cHieAGa 

TEC H N 1 C A L C O L L E G E 

tech Building, 2000 South Michigan Ave. 
Chicagoie, iliinols A. 



Where Your $450 Disappeared 

• • 

IF YOU have four people in your family and you live on a scale that 
is average for a worker's family, the annual cost of maintaining your 
little brood jumped something like $450 from March, 1946, to June 
1947, according to a comprehensive report recently released by the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics, a sub-division of the Department of Labor. For 
example, if you live in the city of AVashington, D. C, the budget that 
would have cost 3'ou $2,985 at the prices prevailing in March, 1946, would 
have nicked your bankroll for $3,458 at June, 1947, prices. 

The budget worked out by the Bureau in its new report is a compara- 
tively realistic one. It is 1:)ased on the actual spending habits of workers' 
families; which means that it cov- . 



ers the items which working people 
usually buy. Smoked turkey, shad 
roe, and a host of other luxury items 
that appeared in former budgets are 
left out. Bread and milk and pea- 



tempt to describe the measure of 
a modest but adequate American 
standard of living." 

That the budg-et is not a luxury 



nut butter and stew meat and the one is amply attested to by allow- 
things working people really eat ances made for many items. For ex- 
ample, the wife is allowed but one 
small lipstick per year. Beer con- 
sumption is limited to a few bottles 
a month. The tobacco part of the 
budget is held to fifteen packs of 
cigarettes a month plus a few tins 
of smoking tobacco and about a 
cigar every two weeks for the man 
of the house. Even the food budget 
is modest. About this part of the 
report, Mr. Ewan Clague, Commis- 
sioner of Labor Statistics savs : 



are the ones covered. Clothing 
items and household necessities are 
treated in a similarly realistic man- 
ner. 

In undertaking its survey, the 
Bureau first had to determine what 
constituted an average w o r k i n g 
man's family. After some study, 
the Bureau decided that a four- 
member family with the father as 
the sole wage earner constituted the 
most satisfactory unit for its re- 
search purposes. In its own words: 
"The budget was designed to repre- 
sent the estimated dollar costs re- 
quired to maintain this family at a 
level of adequate living — to satisfy 
prevailing standards of what is nec- 
essary for health, efficiency, the nur- 
ture of children and for participa- 
tion in community activities. This 



"You will realize that this is. in 
fact, a fairly modest food budget, 
when I tell you that it provides for 
six loa\'es of bread a week for the 
family, twelve quarts of milk, or 
about three per person per week, 
about twenty eggs a week, and about 
a pound and a half of butter or mar- 
gerine. These quantities are below 
is not a 'subsistence' budget, nor is the average per capita consunijition 
it a 'luxury' budget; it is an at- for the United States as a Avhole. 



THE CARPENTER 



"When it comes to meat, these 
families can buy about nine pounds 
of all kinds of meat per week, or a 
little over two pounds per person. 
This is about two-thirds of the aver- 
age per capita consumption of meat 
in the United States in 1946, 
which was 185 pounds. About three- 



ty-three pounds a year are provided. 
This means that there is just about 
enough for a turkey or some good 
cut of meat for Thanksgiving, 
Christmas, and New Years Day." 

Clothing items in the budget are 
equally stringent. About this part 
of the budget, Mr. Clague says: 



CITY AVORKER'S FAAULY BUDGET 



City and State 



June 


1947 


March 


1946 


Total Cost 


Estimated 


Total Cost 


Estimated 


of Goods 


Total Co.st 


of Goods 


Total Cost 


& Services 


of Budget 


& Services 


of Budget 


$3111 


$3458 


$2718 


$2985 


3054 


3388 


2660 


2913 


3019 


3347 


2583 


2820 


2988 


3317 


2575 


2811 


2981 


3310 


2598 


2842 


2974 


3293 


2578 


2813 


2973 


3291 


2535 


2761 


2965 


3282 


2550 


2779 


2965 


3282 


2561 


2793 


2964 


3317 


2582 


2853 


2944 


3260 


2565 


2797 


2928 


3247 


2580 


2824 


2925 


3276 


2557 


2826 


2919 


3241 


2563 


2804 


2912 


3220 


2524 


2750 


2910 


3251 


2512 


2766 


2904 


3251 


2521 


2781 


2904 


3223 


2542 


2776 


2897 


3200 


2495 


2712 


2894 


3200 


2511 


2735 


2870 


3168 


2494 


2711 


2867 


3203 


2442 


2681 


2866 


3163 


2422 


2623 


2855 


3150 


2502 


2721 


2854 


3161 


2521 


2748 


2853 


3150 


2475 


2691 


2844 


3136 


2415 


2615 


2843 


3135 


2466 


2677 


2837 


3132 


2481 


2700 


2830 


3119 


2467 


2678 


2790 


3098 


2440 


2667 


2746 


3020 


2345 


2532 


2739 


3010 


2405 


2603 


2734 


3004 


2381 


2573 



Washington, D. C._. 

Seattle, Wash. 

New York, N. Y 

Milwaukee, Wise. _. 

Boston, Mass. 

Detroit, Mich 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Minneapolis, Minn. . 

Chicago, 111. 

San Francisco, Calif.. 

Baltimore, Md. 

St. Louis, Mo 

Mobile, Ala. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Memphis, Tenn. — 
Los Angeles, Calif. _. 
Birmingham, Ala. _. 

Richmond, Va. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Me. 

Denver, Colo. 

Philadelphia, Pa. _. 

Scranton, Pa. 

Savannah, Ga. 

Portland, Ore. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Jacksonville, Fla. _. 
Manchester, N. H. _. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Indianapolis, Ind. _. 

Houston, Texas 

Kansas City, Mo 

New Orleans, La 



fifths of the budget for meats is 
made up of what is ordinarily fair- 
ly low-cost meat — stews, hamburger, 
frankfurters, and fish, for example. 
About one-fourth of the meat allow- 
ance provides for roast, round steak 
or pork chops, wdiich might be 
classed as medium-priced meats. 
When it comes to steak and other 
typically high-cost meats, only thir- 



"These dollar amounts do not 
provide very large clothing replace- 
ments in a year. The husband, for 
example, has a new overcoat once 
every seven years. The wife can 
buy two housedresses each year — 
one for summer and one for winter 
— but her coat must last her four 
years. Clothes for the children are 
to some extent hand-me-downs. In 



THE CARPENTER 



the case of shoes, it is necessary to 
buy three pairs a year for the boy 
and four pairs for the .girl, but these 
are necessary because the rapid 
growth of children at this ag"e Cboy, 
13; girl, 8) soon makes a pair of 
shoes too small, even if it has not 
entirely worn out." 

In spite of the modestness of the 
budget, such a budget at June. 1947, 
prices required an income of $3,004 
per year in New Orleans, the lowest 
cost of the thirty-four cities sur- 
veyed, in order that a family of four 
might break even. In Seattle, the 
second highest cost city, the figure 
was $3,388. How much price in- 
creases since June have raised these 
figures can only be estimated. 
^M^olesale prices advanced around 
six per cent during the last half of 
last year. As a rough guess, there- 
fore, the budget at today's prices 



would run at least five per cent 
higher. 

The Bureau of Habor Statistics 
intends to keep the budget abreast 
of conditions as they change. It 
also intends to work out the budget 
for families of different sizes, if 
Congress does not further curtail 
Department of Labor appropria- 
tions. Last year Congress dealt the 
Department a severe blow by lop- 
ping millions from the Depart- 
ment's budget. 

The preceding table shows what 
happened to living costs in the thir- 
ty-four cities surveyed by the Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics in compil- 
ing its report. It should be borne 
in mind, of course, that this budget 
is not a luxury one in any sense of 
the word, but rather a minimum 
one commensurate with accepted 
American living standards. 



I 



Willamette D. C. Rapidly Going Full-Beneficial 

Brotherhood lumber workers in the Willamette A'alle\', one of the 
nation's major lumber producing areas, are rapidly assuming full-bene- 
ficial status in the Brotherhood. At a meeting of the Willamette \'alley 
District Council of Lumber and Sawmill Workers, held in Eugene, Ore- 
gon, on November 8th and 9th. the delegates present adopted a motion 
recommending that all affiliated Local Unions immediately apply to the 
General Office for full-beneficial status. Since that time some nineteen 
Locals have voted to comply with the recommendation. Other Locals 
have the matter under advisement and are expected to take similar action 
in the near future. Consequenth- the day when all lumber workers in the 
\'"alley will be in the full-beneficial classification is rapidly approaching. 

In addition to applying for full-beneficial status, a number of ^^'illa- 
mette Valley Locals have also applied for affiliation with the Oregon State 
Council of Carpenters, a move which they expect to be mutually advan- 
tageous. 

Some fort3-odd Local Unions are affiliated with the \\'illamette Valley 
District Council. Total membership exceeds 7.500. Within the last ten 
years the \\'illamette A'alley Council and affiliates have been instrumental 
in tripling wage rates within their jurisdiction. In addition, working condi- 
tions have been improved greatly and many new benefits, such as annual 
vacations with pay, have been introduced into the industry. 



SIP 



TBDERES AI.WA\^ EXGLAXT) 

For all its woes, England still seems 
to keep the ship of state on an even 
keel. The spouters and spielers who 
long since made Hyde park famous are 
still orating ftom their soap boxes. An 
American recently brought back the 
following story: 

Walking in the park one day, he came 
to a throng gathered around a fire- 
eating orator. The speaker blamed 
ererything on the ruling classes. "The 
House of Commons should be burned," 
he screamed. "Buckingham Palace ought 
to be burned." Nearby a policeman 
stood by unconcernedly. Approaching 
the policeman, the American asked: 

"Do you hear what he is saying?" 

"Sure," said the policeman. 

"Aren't you going to break it up?" 

"Xo." 

"But I want to get past." 

"That's different," said the Bobby. 
Turning to the crowd he shouted: "All 
right, break it up, now. All them as 
wants to bum the "ouse of Commons 
step to the left. Them as wants to burn 
Buckingham Palace, step to the right." 

With a good-natured smile the crowd 
dispersed. 




Ju^t because you cirry ike mail ali 
day like that i« no reason — 



SURE FFRE 

Today sixty million Americans are 
working in the mines, mills and factor- 
ies. They are producing . much, much 
more than they eTer produced before. 
This has been going on for two years. 
Still prices stay as high as erer. When 
OPA was killed the industrialists told 
us production would solve all our prob- 
lems. Month by month production has 
climbed but so have prices. Now the 
head of General Motors wants us to 
dump the forty-hour w^eek. According 
to him this will increase production, 
and production will solve our problems. 

The attitude of today's industrialists 
sort of reminds us of the fellow who 
was proposing to his girl. 

"Refuse me," he panted, "and I will 
die." 

She refused him and sixty- seven years 
later sure enough he died. 



SAMM OLiD BL.AKXET 

Although 1948 is still in its infancy, 
many of the politicians and Brass Hats 
who worked tooth and toenail against 
organized labor in the last session of 
Congress are now beginning to gush all 
over the place about how much they 
love labor. The closer it comes to 
election day, the harder they will work 
at being "friends" of the working man. 
Then, once election day is over and 
they are once more in the saddle, they 
will go right back to promoting all 
kinds of anti-union legislation — ^always 
pointing out that it is "for labor's own 
good." 

Most of their malar key is about as 
sincere as the clerk who w^orked behind 
the cosmetic counter. One day a very 
faded spinster walked up to the counter. 
"BLave you any cream for restoring 
the complexion?" she asked. 

"Restoring, miss? Surely you mean 
preserving," said the clerk. 

And the old maid bought ten dollars 
w^orth. However, we doubt if labor is 
going to be quite so gullible. 



THE C A 11 !• E N T E K 



NO BI^ESSING 

Overruled by the NLRB on his deci- 
sion that all AFL officers would have 
to sign anti-Communist affidavits be- 
fore any affiliated union would be eli- 
gible to appeal to the Board, General 
Counsel Denham has changed his mind 
on the matter and is now going along 
with the Board in the matter. If he 
thinks he has thereby won the blessings 
of organized labor, we want to repeat 
an old story Thackeray, the famous man 
of letters, used to tell on himself. 

Passing an old Irish beggar woman 
one day, she happened to notice him 
putting his hand in his pocket. Expect- 
ing a coin, she murmured, "May the 
blessing of God follow you." But when 
she. noticed all he pulled out was a can 
of snuff, she hastily added, "And may 
it never overtake you." 



AIN'T SEEN NOTHING YET 

As this is being written, relations 
between Russia and the democratic 
part of the world are getting no better. 
The Reds are still opposing every con- 
structive idea put forth by countries 
interested in nothing save permanent 
peace and prosperity for all. Recently 
Vishinsky, Soviet representative, lam- 
basted everybody — including the Pope 
— as a war-monger. He was mad at 
everybody and everything. So far the 
United States has remained patient and 
forebearing, but there is a limit to 
everything. To show Vishinsky what 
can happen, we herewith reprint the 
story of the pullman porter. 

A traveler approached the porter 
early one evening and said: "I am get- 
ting off at Buffalo. The train gets 
there at four a.m. I am aAvfully hard 
to waken at that hour. Here is ten 
dollars to get me off eA'^en if you have 
to carry me to the station." 

The porter promised to get the man 
off. However when the traveler awoke 
next morning he found himself in New 
York. He cursed the porter, the rail- 
road and everything in general. When 
he finally left, the conductor said to 
the porter: "I believe that is about the 
maddest man I ever saw." 

"Yes, sir, Boss, he sure is mad," re- 
plied the porter, "but I don't think he is 
nearly as mad as that guy I carried off 
the train at Buffalo." 



ALREADY GONE BY 

We see that the National Association 
of Manufacturers is still predicting that 
prices will be coming' down after 
awhile. 

Like the little boy who asked his 
mother when his daddy wotild be home, 
we would like to know, when is after 
awhile? And there is no use telling us 
it is pretty soon because that is already 

^^'^- • • • 

EVERYWHERE PROFITEERS 

As the little man crept into the movie 
theatre and took his seat in the last row 
it was obvious from his doleful expres- 
sion that he had much on his mind 
and was sadly in need of recreation. 

On the screen an old-fashioned melo- 
drama unfolded, a production doubt- 
less made long ago and now "reissued." 
Came the scene where the heroine, Itxred 
all unsuspecting to the villain's lair, 
suddenly realized with horror that his 
intentions were anything but honorable. 
Providentially she discovered the handy 
carving-knife. 

"Stand back, yoti unspeakable cad," 
she cried, brandishing the weapon. "I 
may be only a poor, weak, friendless 
woman — but, by HeaA'^en, I shall sell 
my honor dearly!" 

"Profiteers," shouted the troubled 
little man. "Everywhere you go, it's 
high prices." 

And with that he bolted out of the 
theatre and disappeared into the night. 




^fy Secretary ii^ jii.st uotuhrfiil at 
finding a inisfiled letter. 



10 



Davie— NAM'S Mortimer Snerd 



OF ALL the columunists who for one reason or another find it 
profitable to excoriate organized labor day after day, David Law- 
rence, joy and pride of the National Association of Manufacturers, 
is the most vicious. He is the most vicious because he resorts most often to 
persiflage, half-truths and subtle innuendo. Lack of factual data never 
seems to worry I\Ir. Lawrence when he takes it into his head to belabor 
unions and union members for any of our numerous economic ills. At 
the drop of a hat he can lay the blame for anything from the high rate of 
juvenile delinquency to the decline in game fish in the upper Mississippi at 
the doorstep of organized labor. Sometimes he almost busts an adverb 
doing it, but he gets it done. 



Take for example his column of 
November 25th. In that piece of 
misinformation, he neatly creates 
the impression that labor is almost 
exclusively to blame for the high 
cost of building at present. He 
probably does not know a purlin 
from a stringer, but still he can tell 
you anything and everything about 
building. That is exactly what he 
does in his November 25th column. 

He starts out by saying '"a na- 
tional survey of about sixty cities" 
proves that low labor productivity, 
coupled with high wages, is respon- 
sible for today's stratospheric build- 
ing costs. A\^ho made the survey, 
what questions were asked, and 
who asked the questions he does not 
reveal. But still he goes on quoting 
a number of figures as though they 
were taken from the Good Book 
itself. Using the same technique, 
we might well say that a "national 
survey" shows that forty per cent 
of all columnists are drunkards, 
twenty-two per cent beat their 
wives, and seventy-two per cent 
have B. O. Nobody could check up 
on us or dispute us any more than 



we can dispute Lawrence's phoney 
"survey." 

However, taking Lawrence at his 
word let us examine his column. If 
high building costs are exclusively 
labor's fault, how does he account 
for the fact that the house that cost 
$4,500 to build twenty years ago is 
now selling for $10,000? When it 
was built two decades ago the house 
probably had about $1,500 dollars 
worth of direct labor in it. yet today 
it is on the market for $10,000. To 
let Mr. Lawrence in on a secret, it 
was just plain, common greed that 
drove the price from $4. 500 to 
$10,000. 

The same forces of greed that 
practically tripled the price of an 
old house are at work today on new 
construction. And they are doing 
the same thing to new house prices 
that they did to old house prices. 
To begin with, it is necessary to 
have a lot on which to place a house. 
The lot that sold for $500 six years 
ago is now on the market for $1,500. 
The lumber that sold for eighty dol- 
lars per thousand is now bringing 



Tiri-: CAKPEXTER 



11 



I 



twice that much. Most other build- 
ing- materials are also far out of 
line. Does Mr. Lawrence take cog- 
nizance of these items? Heck no! 
He has his "survey" showing it is 
all labor's fault. 

And just to bring Mr. Lawrence 
up to date, we want to refer him 
to the testimony a large contractor 
recently presented at a House hear- 
ing. 

The head of a big construction 
company (name on request) which 
has erected hundreds of homes for 
veterans on Long Island, told a 
congressional committee headed by 
Representative Ralph W. Gwinn 
that practices in the distribution of 
building materials are adding as 
much as Tf^Vs per cent to the price 
of homes. 

He declared that a $7,500 house 
could be sold for $5,000 if it were 
not necessary to pay profits running 
over 50 per cent to middlemen, who 
frequently never even see the mate- 
rial. 

When he said that $2,500 could 
be knocked off the price by elimi- 
nating the "gravy" of dealers, dis- 
tributors and wholesalers, he knew 
what he was talking- about — because, 
to protect himself, he has secured 
control of two supply houses. 

"It's a shame and a disgrace," he 
declared, adding that some practices 
of the unions are unreasonable, but 
that it is grossly unfair to blame 
the workers when middlemen are 
principally responsible. 

Maybe it is just prejudice on 
our part but we are more inclined 
to take the word of the contractor 
who builds and has built thousands 
of houses than the word of Mr. 
Lawrence who would not know a 
butt miter from a hopper joint, even 
if he had a "survey" to fall back on. 
We are not disputing the fact that 



building costs are high; but we do 
resent the implication that labor is 
mainly to blame inasmuch as land 
and building materials and fixtures 
have climbed three and four times 
as fast as wages. 

On the whole question of labor 
productivity in the building trades, 
Dick Gray, president of the Build- 
ing and Construction Trades De- 
partment, in a recent speech before 
the Construction Advisory Council 
of the Chamber of Commerce of the 
United States, stated labor's case 
clearly and concisely as possible. 
In part. Brother Gray said: 

"Any objective student of the 
building and construction industry's 
record will agree that productivity 
is not a measure of the performance 
of the workers alone. It is deter- 
mined by a combination of factors, 
including the quality of manage- 
ment responsible for the work, the 
supply of materials, the change in 
methods, the form of contract, and 
the efificiency of labor. Even when 
the measure itself ma}- be in terms 
of the output per man per hour, 
that measure reflects the combina- 
tion of all the factors in construc- 
tion and it not limited solely to the 
performance of the workers. 

"It should also be recognized 
that there is no comprehensive fac- 
tual information providing a direct 
measure of productivity in construc- 
tion. There is, however, a set of re- 
liable indirect measurements of pro- 
ductivity based on the construction 
estimates of the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics and other sources. 

"Broadly speaking, the review of 
the record of recent years leads to 
the following general conclusions: 

"First, during the years of recov- 
ery from the depression, 1933-39, 
productivity was steadily rising 
with a high record of output 



12 



THE C A K P E X T E II 



achieved on practically every type 
of construction. 

"Second, during the war period 
of 1940-45 productivity was in gen- 
eral at a low level. This was due to 
a number of causes. Chief among 
them was the fee-contracting sys- 
tem. Contract fees based on cost 
proved to be an incentive for high 
cost contracts. Payment of fees 
based on the percentage of the cost 
further enhanced the incentive for 
inefficiency. Alaterial shortages and 
transportation difficulties also con- 
tributed to the lower rate of out- 
put. Efficiency of the workers also 
dropped. Selective Service resulted 
in the withdrawal of younger men 
from the construction labor force. 

"Third, during the period extend- 
ing from the end of the war to the 
Spring of 1947 productivity re- 
mained at a low ebb. Two major 
causes were responsible for this. 
Most important of all was the con- 
tinuing lack of essential building 
materials and delays in the supply 
of these materials to the site. Much 
of the work was greatly protracted 
by these delays and shortages. Also 
important w^as the fact that the war- 
time methods of contracting were 
often carried over into post-war pri- 
vate building. The cost-plus-per- 
centage fee system was by no means 
uncommon in commercial as well 
as housing construction. It was also 
a period of readjustment in the in- 
dustry's labor force. Black market 
wages offered in some areas, far in 
excess of the union wage standards, 
helped to demoralize the labor 
market. 

"Fourth, with the beginning of 
the new construction season in 
April of this year, a marked im- 
provement in productivity can be 
noted. To be sure, many problems 
of readjustment evident in the pre- 
ceding two vears are still with us. 



But the available facts indicate that 
there has been a health}- increase in 
productivity. 

"Let us consider these fact.-. The 
Bureau of Labor Statistics and the 
Department of Commerce prepare a 
joint estimate each month of the 
value of work performed in each 
principal type of construction. The 
value of work performed for all 
types of building construction was 
estimated at $603 million for April 
of last year. For September this 
rose to S814 million, an increase of 
35 per cent. These figures, deflated 
to 1939 building prices to provide a 
correction for price changes from 
Spring to Fall, show an increase 
of 27-I per cent from April to Sep- 
tember in the actual physical work 
performed. 

"In the light of this it is signifi- 
cant that the increase in average 
hours worked in the building and 
construction industry and total em- 
ployment in the contract construc- 
tion was much smaller. Average 
hours worked per week in private 
contract building construction rose 
from April to September 1947 less 
than 2j per cent. According to the 
BLS, total employment in the 
contract construction industry in- 
creased from 1,685,000 in April to 
1,900,000 in September, a rise of 
only about I2f per cent. Taken to- 
gether these figures indicate an in- 
crease in manhours worked of 15-5 
per cent in contrast with the in- 
crease in the physical work per- 
formed of 2/i per cent. This fact, 
that by using only 15^ per cent 
more man hours of labor from April 
to September the industry was able 
to increase the physical volume of 
construction by 2y^ per cent, pro- 
vides conclusive evidence that pro- 
ductivity in the building and con- 
struction industry as a whole is 
sharply on the increase." 



13 



At Work 



* * 

NEXT to the Wagner Act, the Wag^es and Hours Act has been the 
object of the most intensified attack by vested interests of any 
labor law designed to protect employes, and in the Soth Con- 
gress its enemies have made more headway toward its destruction than in 
any earlier session. This is at the time when profits are at an all-time high 
and business can easily afford the overtime beyond 40 hours, and when 
the 40-cent minimum wage is virtually meaningless, except for a few 
sweatshop-standard industries. 

Following up the amendments of the last session which, under the 
guise of outlawing "portal-to-portal" pay suits, actually struck a body 
blow at the enforcement of the basic wage-hour law, a subcommittee of the 
House Labor Committee has renewed the offensive in recent weeks. 

This committee, virtually all of 

whose members are avowed foes 
of the act and a few of whom are 
outspoken enough to admit that 
they wish its complete repeal, has 
been hearing a parade of witnesses 
from the chiseling followers of 
business who want a return of 
sweatshop standards. 

True, there has been a hand- 
ful of witnesses from labor who 
were graciously allowed to appear 
only to be given a going over treat- 
ment by the committee's eminent 
counsel, Irving McCann, the man 
who slugged Joseph Padway, late 
counsel of the AFL. Yes, McCann 
is still on the committee staff. 

The pattern of testimony of the 
business interests is clear, although 
they vary somewhat in their frank- 
ness and in their individual ap- 
proach. Only a few are blunt 
enough to demand outright repeal 
of this law which sets a minimum 
wage standard of 40 cents an hour 
and a weekly hours maximum of 40 
hours before overtime. The net ef- 
fect, however, of the proposed 



amendment by the various spokes- 
men is to wreck the wage and hour 
protections of the law. 

Major onslaught of the business 
interests, with the coal industry 
prominently represented, is against 
the overtime provisions of the law. 
There are several tricky schemes to 
limit overtime, among them one by 
the coal spokesmen which, after 
raising the present minimum wage 
from 40 to 64 cents, would then fix 
all overtime at time and a half 
based on the 64-cent figure instead 
of the actual rate of pay. In other 
words, it is proposed that workers' 
overtime be no more than 96 cents 
an hour. 

It was further proposed by James 
Haley, representing the National 
Coal Association, that the law be 
amended to exempt workers who 
are covered by collective bargain- 
ing contracts. This would let or- 
ganized workers continue to draw 
whatever overtime their contracts 
specified so long as the contracts 
are in eft'ect. 



14 



THE CARPEXTER 



However, since under Haley's 
other amendment overtime paid un- 
org-anized workers would be limit- 
ed to time and a half the new sug- 
gested minimum of 64 cents, instead 
of the traditional custom of basing 
overtime on the actual pay rate, the 
exemption proposal would offer an 
opening wedge for destruction of 
overtime standards. It would mean, 
for instance, that contracts could be 
signed permitting a lower rate of 
overtime than the laAv now requires. 

Newly organized groups of work- 
ers would find it more difficult to 
negotiate the now standard over- 
time clause sinc€ the law would per- 
mit a lower standard. Even those 
workers who now have proper over- 
time in their contracts would be at 
the mercy of the lower rate when 
their contracts expire. In other 
words, this is a subtle indirect at- 
tack on the overtime section of the 
law. 

Another neat little trick which the 
committee has under serious con- 
sideration calls for limiting the cov- 
erage of the law so as to eliminate 
as many millions of workers as pos- 
sible. This attempt to reduce the 
coverage is made in the face of the 
fact that the law now covers only 
about 40 per cent of the nation's 
w^orkers. Outside the law are many 
big food processing plants, con- 
struction firms, retail shops, service 
establishments, seamen, fisheries, 
and many other borderline outfits 
that claim exemption on the grounds 
of not being engaged in interstate 
commerce. 

The committee is also toying with 
the idea of making enforcement 
more difficult b}^ limiting the time 
within which cases must be filed, 
by placing restraints on the author- 
ity of inspectors who check factory 
payrolls, by restricting the rights 



of workers to sue for back pay, and 
in other ways. It is, in fact, 
ver}' plain that what the committee 
would do to the AVages and Hours 
Act is a parallel to what the 8oth 
Congress did to the Wagner Act 
when it passed the NAM-Taft-Hart- 
ley Act. 

Then, after committing this may- 
hem on one of the three basic acts 
of the federal labor code (the emas- 
culated Wagner Act and the Norris- 
La Guardia Anti-Injunction Act be- 
ing the other two), the committee 
is toying with the idea of raising 
the minimum wage to 65 cents an 
hour. This is the political sop it 
would throw to organized labor at a 
time when a 65-minimum is mean- 
ingless for workers in major indus- 
tries. 

Intent of the saboteurs of the 
AVages and Hours Act is to limit 
the overtime, or eliminate it alto- 
gether if possible, so as to enable 
chiseling employers to work their 
present crews whatever hours they 
wish without penalty. It would be 
once again the old story of some 
workers sta3^ing on the job 50, 60 
and 70 hours a week while millions 
of others walked the streets in 
search of jobs. 

Thus, by permitting unlimited 
overtime without extra cost to em- 
ployers, the suggested amendments 
would actually create unemploy- 
ment where none now exists. This 
would put pressure on wage stand- 
ards and weaken labor's bargaining 
power — the real object of 'the foes 
of the AA'ages and Hours Act. 

Attitude of the committee was 
clearly reflected in its sympathetic 
comment on testimony of anti-labor 
witnesses, while it hurled a barrage 
of critical questions at union 
witnesses. Incidentally, committee 
members were supplied with ques- 



THE C A R P K X T E K 



15 



tions written out in advance (evi- 
dently by Counsel McCann) so they 
would not be at a loss when grill- 
ing the union spokesmen. 

One witness who delighted the 
committee was Prof. Paul H. Ny- 
strom, Columbia University and 
president of the Limited Price Va- 
riety Stores Association, who asked 
outright repeal of the law. He 
stated flatly that he was against 
raising minimum wages because it 
might tend to force wages upward 
in the levels above the lowest.- He 
also attacked the 40-hour week as 
"sheer waste of human resources" 
although recent official studies show 
that production lags when hours are 
lengthened. 

Members of the subcommittee 
beamed on Nystrom. Rep. Wint 
Smith (R. Kans.) said his statement 
had repaid the burden of Smith's 
coming 1,700 miles back to Wash- 
ington for the hearings, and that he 
agreed with Nystrom's recommen- 
dations for outright repeal. An- 
other who said he "enjoyed" Ny- 
strom's views was Rep. O. C. Fisher 
(D., Tex.). 

Exemption in whole or in part 
from the law was also sought by 
spokesmen of the newspapers, lum- 
ber, telephone, telegraph, retail coal 
dealers, sand and gravel, trucking, 
milk handlers, shipping interests, 
paper and pulpwood firms, farm 
equipment dealers, and many simi- 
lar lines of business. In addition, 
the committee lent eager ears to 
pleas from "borderline" industries, 
where coverage of the law is in dis- 
pute, for clarification to let them 
out from under. The various busi- 
ness interests were backed by an 
overall statement from the U. S. 
Chamber of Commerce. 

A\'hen labor witnesses finally got 
their da^' in court thev tore into 



shreds the arguments of the s])ecial 
interests that want a return^ to 
sweatshop wage and hour standards 
and strongly proposed enlarging 
the scope of the act and increasing 
the minimum wage to 75 cents on 
the ground that the present 40-cent 
figure has been completely outmod- 
ed by the rising cost of living. It 
was pointed out to the committee 
that it would take at least 75 cents 
now to keep the same standard as 
40 cents meant when it first came 
into effect. 

Presenting the detailed economic 
case for immediate upward revision 
of the minimum to 75 cents an hour, 
Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach 
described the 40-cent rate as "clear- 
ly obsolete" and said upward revi- 
sion is now necessary merely to 
keep pace with the general advances 
in wages and living costs since 1938 
when the law was enacted. 

Citing the rise in living costs as 
justification for the proposed in- 
crease in the minimum, Schwellen- 
bach said the index figure has risen 
65 per cent since 1939 and for food 
100 per cent. For families at the 
lower end of the wage scale, which 
this law is intended to protect, he 
added, living costs have risen even 
higher because they spend propor- 
tionately more on food and vital 
necessities. 

"The economy of our country can 
absorb with ease an increased wage 
bill of the size which would be 
occasioned by a 75-cent minimum," 
Schwellenbach declared. "W'e are 
now working at a rate which would 
produce an annual income of ap- 
proximately 200 billion dollars. The 
increase in wages resulting from the 
new minimum level would represent 
only one per cent of the Nation's 
waere bill." 



Editorial 




Let the Left Hand Know 
Anyone having a sense of humor that runs toward the grisl}' probably 
is getting man}^ good laughs out of the shadow-boxing efforts being made 
in \\'ashington to combat inflation. Both the President and the Republican 

Congressmen in the closing da3's of the last session advanced bills suppos- 
edly aimed at stopping inflation. These contained lots of fancy words and 
made fine reading but insofar as combatting inflation was concerned they 
were hardly worth the paper thej' were written on. In fact no kind of a 
bill can be devised to stop inflation so long as the government continues 
to pursue the inflation making policies it embarked on at the start of the 
war. Plainh' stated, ofiicialdom does not want prices to come down. 

There is hardly a paper in the nation that has not carried pictures of 
government emploA'es pouring kerosene on potatoes to make them unfit 
for human consumption. The spuds were being destroyed for no other 
reason than to keep the price from dropping a little because high produc- 
tion was threatening to catch up with the market. The same sort of thing 
is being done in many other commodities. Still Congress talks seriously 
about passing bills to curb inflation. If it were not so tragic in these days 
of world-wide shortages, it would all be rather laughable inasmuch as it 
resembles nothing so much as a dog trying to catch his tail. 

Take the wool situation for an example. Men's suits will be made in 
much smaller numbers from now. As a matter of fact the conservative 
New York Times predicts a decline of from twenty to twenty-five per 
cent in suit production during the coming Spring. For a large number 
of American males, suits have already been priced out of reach. However, 
with the prospect of today's thirty-five dollar suit selling for fifty dollars 
next Spring, manufacturers are looking for an even greater decline in 
buying. To avoid being stuck with an excess inventory of high-priced 
merchandise, they intend to curtail production. 

But the pa3*oif in the whole situation is the government's wool sup- 
port program. Uncle Sam is currently guaranteeing wool growers a price 
of forty-two and three tenths cents per pound. Last April there was 
something like four hundred million pounds of wool stored in govern- 
ment warehouses, wool bought and paid for with your mone}' and mine to 
keep prices from sagging. Plainly put, you and I and the rest of the 
taxpayers are shelling out mone}' every week to keep wool prices high. 
In return for this we get the privilege of paying higher prices for the 
wool clothes we buy. The higher the prices of suits go, the fewer are 
the people who can buy them. This in turn means larger surpluses of 
wool; which in turn means more tax money poured out to keep prices 
from sagging and more wool piling up in government warehouses. Gov- 
ernment planning brings about many strange results. About the only 
clear thing in the whole picture is the very obvious fact that officialdom is 
opposed to any price reductions. 



THE CARPENTER 17 

Recently a trade agreement was negotiated between the United States 
and a number of other countries. Among the items in the treaty which 
are to receive special consideration in the form of lower tariffs is woSl. 
Does this mean that we are now going to be compelled to subsidize the 
wool growers of Australia and Canada too? Does it mean that govern- 
ment warehouses are going to have to start making- room for foreign as 
well as domestic wool which Uncle Sam wants to keep from g^oing into 
low priced suits that people might be able to afford to buy? Frankly, we 
do not know. All we know is that the time has come for Washington to 
do a little serious thinking. For too long the left hand has had no idea 
what the right hand was doing. If we want to retain the free enterprise 
system we ought to be giving it a chance to operate. If not, at least the 
people should be told that a government-planned economy is here and free 
enterprise is gone the way of the dodo. 

• 

The Leopard Has Not Changed His Spots 

The army of press agents maintained by the National Association 
of Manufacturers has done it again. Each time the NAM meets in con- 
vention, the regiment of typewriter-beaters on the pa^^roll is given the 
job of selling the general public on the liberalism and progressiveness of 
NA]M policies. This year the adjective peddlers did a particularly effec- 
tive job. Newspapers all over the nation carried stories detailing the 
great liberalism of the NA]\I and the policies it formulated at the con- 
vention. A typical headline proclaimed: "NAM Reaffirms Liberal Policy." 

A little probing below the window-dressing verbiage gotten out by the 
high-powered press agents shows that the leopard has not changed his 
spots to any appreciable extent. What does this great Nx\M liberalism so 
widely proclaimed consist of? As formulated by resolutions adopted at 
the convention and by utterances made b}' top-flight officials, it consists of 
the following recommendations : 

1. A year's "moratorium" by labor on all demands and desires for in- 
creases in wages to keep pace with increases in living costs. 

2. Retention of all the features of the Taft-Hartley Act which are most 
restrictive on labor, and the imposition of even stronger curbs on 
anything even remotely resembling real collective bargaining. 

3. Emasculation of the Wages and Hours Act through the establish- 
ment of a longer work week and the abolition of overtime pay 
beyond the traditional forty-hour work week. 

4. Lower taxes for the wealth}* (with a consequent shifting of the tax 
load to the poor) in order that more "risk capital" may be made 
available' for the expansion of industry. 

Broadly speaking, that sums up about what the press agents palmed 
oft' on the public as a "liberal" policy. If that is liberalism, then Stalin's 
policies in Russia are democracv. 

Principal speaker at the convention was Charles E. Wilson, head of 
General ]\Iotors. His major theme was a plea for the abolition of the 
forty hour week. Branding such legislation as "a heritage of the day of 
planned scarcity," he insisted employers should no longer be compelled 



18 THE CARPENTER 

to pay overtime for work performed in excess of the statutory limit. 
Having- in mind the "welfare" of wage earners, he flatly declared that 
such provisions interfere with the rights of many workers to earn a 
better living (although he failed to make clear how a worker can improve 
his lot by working for straight time instead of time and a half). 

That utterances and actions such as these can be palmed off on American 
newspapers as "liberal" is no compliment to either their integrity or intel- 
ligence. Certainly few American workers will be fooled by the thick 
veneer of press agentry that has been applied to the same old hard core of 
stand pat reaction. . ^ 

Denham Playing At Being Caesar 

From coast to coast it is becoming increasingly clear every day that 
repeal of the Taft-Hartley Act has become the prime objective of all 
organized labor. Nothing short of total repeal of the act will satisfy the 
millions upon millions of men and women who through unions of their 
own choosing and through the practice of genuine collective bargaining 
freed themselves from exploitation, insecurity and economic slavery. In 
cities, towns and hamlets, workers are mobilizing their forces for a 
showdown on the question of whether collective bargaining shall endure 
or whether it shall be permanently replaced b}^ political decisions made 
and administered from Washington. To them the Taft-Hartley Act and all 
it implies is no mere academic question; rather it is life-and-death propo- 
sition, for by the ultimate outcome will be determined whether men 
shall remain free to choose their destinies and promote their own welfares 
or whether they must follow the dictates of political appointees clothed 
with authoritarian powers. 

While the act is only a few months old, the difficulties which labor 
predicted long- before the act was passed are beginning to materialize. 
Already the Board is showing signs of bogging down although the case 
load is probably no more than ten per cent of what it will be when 
operations move into high gear. Some cases have already been before the 
Board for two months without being any closer to a decision than they 
were. 

However, the most irritating and disgusting aspect of the matter to 
date has been the biased, arbitrary, and oftentimes vindictive attitude that 
General Counsel Denham has been displaying. Judging solely from his 
actions to date, Denham seems bent on driving a wedge between labor and 
management. In several recent speeches — presumably made at public ex- 
pense — he has gone far out of his way to smear unions and blacken the 
labor movement. Instead of adopting a neutral attitude and devoting his 
best efforts toward trying to administer a difficult and complex law, he 
has elected to carry the ball for the most reactionar}^ and violently anti- 
union elements in American life. Partisanship on the part of a public offi- 
cial is incompatible with traditional American standards of justice and 
fair plav. In the case of the Taft-Hartley Act, such partisanship will in- 
evitably serve to make an extremely complicated law entirely unworkable. 

Before being elevated to his present position of unwarranted power, 
Denham was an obscure lawyer. The sooner he is sent back to being an 
even more obscure attorne}^, the better off the nation will be. 



Official Information 




Cioncral Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of C ARPEXTERS and JOIXERS 

of AMERICA 



Genkkai- Office : Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Oenerat, Ppesident 

WM. L. IHTf'HESOX 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M, A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECONn General Vice-Pre-sikent 

.TOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E, 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 

Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 



REPORT OF THE DELEGATES TO THE THIRTY- 
NINTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE UNION 
LABEL TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE 
A. F. OF L. 

To the General Executive Board, 
Brothers: 

The Thirty-ninth Annual Convention of the Union Label Trades Department 
of the A. P. of L. was held in the St. Frances Hotel, San Francisco, Calif., on 
October 3, 1947. 

One hundred and eleven delegates were in attendance from forty-two National 
and International Unions. 

Tlie Executive Board in its report said in part: 

We open the Thirty-ninth Convention of The Union Label Trades Department, 
American Federation of Labor, amid strange and stirring times. We find that 
despite labor's magnificent contribution in industrial production during the war, 
it is beset upon all sides by hostile forces who seek to weaken, if not destroy our 
movement. In view of present international trends, this is a sliort-sighted. if not a 
fatal policy. 

Unquestionably we shall live in a legalistic atmosphere for some years to come 
and our trials will be severe and costly. It is, therefore, all the' more incumbent 
upon us to gird our belts and prepare to do battle on every field of organized labor's 
activities. Particularly is that true at this time and with the enactment of the 
Taft-Hartley Bill into a law. In some respects, the future use of the Union Label 



20 THE CARPENTER 

is now restricted or limited as a means of refusing to handle non-imion made 
material or services in the completion of an article to bear the Union Label. Time 
and experience can best tell how far or effective such restrictions or limitations may 
be and to what extent the use of the Union Label, Shop Card, and Service Button 
may come within the prohibitions of the boycott terms of the Taft-Hartley Law. 

We must carefully and scrupulously analyze and understand the legal barriers 
sought to be erected not only by our national government, but as well by our 
.several state governments. With and within that knowledge, we must then deter- 
mine the strategy and procedures we are to follow so we may avoid present pitfalls 
and lead ourselves again to the road of complete freedom of action. 

For the past thirteen years, the Department has established new services in 
order that we could take advantage of the facilities offered us through the press, 
motion pictures, radio and electrical transcriptions for expanding our public rela- 
tions. 

The over-all objectives of your Department are to publicize Union Labels, 
Shop Cards, and Service Buttons and to promote the sale of union-made products 
and the use of union services. 

Our immediate problem is to retain the interest of Union Label conscious 
consumers and carry on a vigorous campaign to increase the demand for Union 
Label goods and Union services. "Eternal vigilance" is necessary to maintain 
American union standards. At this time, it is vital to the entire labor movement 
to continue our eiforts by urging all members of unions and their families to con- 
stantly demand the Union Label, Shop Card, and Service Button. 

Established union firms and newly unionized industries will be urged to place 
the Union Label on their products. 

By withholding their support from unfair manufacturers and mechandisers 
and by patronizing only those firms that display the Union Label, Shop Card, and 
Service Button, American workers have the best guarantee for security of their 
jobs, wages, and v^orking conditions. They have the best assurance of creating 
higher labor standards now being advocated by the American Federation of Labor 
and which help to make up what is known as the "American way of life." 

Then follow other matters of importance such as: 

Union Label Leagues. 

Union Label Catalogue Directory. 

Radio Programs. 

Union Label Weeks held in different cities, with Union Label Exhibits and the 
interest taken in them by the public. 

Women's Auxiliaries. 

Future Work, etc. 

New afiiliations during the past year follow: 

The United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of Plumbing and Pipe 
Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada and the International Brother- 
hood of Firemen and Oilers. 

The income and expenses for the year were given in detail. 

After careful consideration the Report of the Executive Board was adopted. 

It was unanimously resolved, 

That the Union Label Trades Department of the American Federation of 
Labor, in convention assembled, hereby acknowledges and expresses appreciation 
of the generous amount of space contributed by the labor newspapers, the official 
labor journals and other labor publications to the Union Label Trades Department. 

It was also unanimously resolved. 

That the Unioil Label Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor 
proposes that a vigorous nationwide educational and public relations program be 
conducted, calling upon State Federations of Labor, Central Labor Unions, Union 
Label Leagues and Women's Auxiliaries to cooperate in holding Union Label weeks 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



and Union Label exhibits for tlie period beginning with ^lay 10, 1948, and culmi- 
nating on Labor Day. on wlaich day all labor in the United States and Canada 
will sponsor rallies, radio programs and mass meetings for the purpose of soliciting 
public support in repealing the Taft-Hartley law and other obnoxious labor legis- 
lation in the various states, and at the same time inform the public that the 
best way to maintain our high American labor standards is by directing their 
purchasing power to firms and establishments that display the Union Labels, 
Shop Cards and Service Buttons. 

The following Resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, by this convention that we recommend this slogan to our member- 
ship: "There will never be legislation passed to force any one to buy non-union 
made goods when they prefer union-made goods;" and be it further 

Resolved, That our labor papers, journals, magazines and other printed litera- 
ture feature this slogan whenever possible and consistent. 

The following ofiicers were elected for the coming term: 

President Matthew Woll, Photo Engravers. 

First Vice-President Jno. J. Ward, Boot and Shoe Workers. 

Second Vice-President Jos. P. McCarty, Garment Workers. 

Third Vice-President Jas. I\I. Duffy, Operative Potters. 

Fourth Vice-President Herman Winter, Bakers. 

Fifth Vice-President Dave Beck, Teamsters. 

Secretary-Treasurer I. ^l. Ornburn. Cigar Makers. 



Respectfully submitted. 



M. A. HUTCHESOX. 
TED KENNEY, 

Delegates. 



Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of January, February and 
March, 1948, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to 
all Local Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in 
receipt of this circular should notify Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 



2 403 Three Rivers. Que.. Can. 

2405 Kalispell, Mont. 
3055 Goshen, Ind. 

2406 Hibbing, Minn. 

30 57 Tee-Lake, So. Tamiscamingue. 
Que., Can. 

2407 Rochester, X. Y. 
2409 Helena, Mont. 

3058 Marysville, Calif. 

3059 Crescent City, Calif. 

2411 Laurel, Miss. 

2412 Melville, Sask., Can. 
2446 Kalispell, Mont. 

2413 Lauzon, Que., Can. 



2414 Cleveland, Miss. 

2418 Pawtucket, R. I. 

2 420 Wilmington. Del. 

2421 Philippi. W. Va. 

2422 El Verano, Calif. 
3068 Strathroy, Ont., Can. 

2423 Chicago. 111. 
2426 Lamar,. Colo. 

2428 Macon, Mo. 

2429 Fort Payne, Ala. 

2430 Wetaskiwin, Alta.. Can. 
3073 Oroville, Calif. 

3080 High Point, N. C. 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory. 

Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



%t&i in :it»^a:r^ 



The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother JOHN ALTMUELLER, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother FOSTER AZEVEDO. Local No. 35, San Raphael, Cal. 
Brother ADOLPH BOLDT, Jr., Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother TOM BURGESS, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother JAMES CAVENDAR, Local No. 29, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Brother JOHN CLIFFORD, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Cal. 
Brother ARTHUR COLLETT, Local No 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother ANDER H. CRISIPIN, Jr., Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother GEO. CURDELAIR, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother ISOM DILLON, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Brother RALPH DUTTER, Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Brother LAWRENCE ENDRES, Local No. 1154, Algonac, Mich. 
Brother J. W. FANNING, Local No. 1880, Carthage, Mo. 
Brother ROY B. FERRIS, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother W. A. FERGUSON, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Cal. 
Brother EDWARD W. FINNEY, Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Brother HENRY FISHER, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Cal. 
Brother JOHN GREAVES, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Cal. 
Brother WILLIAM HALL, Local No. 29, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Brother WILFRED HALLAWAY, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother EDGAR HOSACK, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother FRANCIS M. HAWKINS, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Brother LONNIE J. HINES, Local No. 187, Geneva, N. Y. 
Brother ARTHUR HOLLAND, Local No. 29, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Brother CHARLES W. HOLLANDER, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 
Brother ELZA M. HOUGHTON, Local No. 1815, Santa Ana, Cal. 
Brother JAMES JOHNSON, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother WALTER KENNERUP, Local No. 281, Binghampton, N. Y. 
Brother AUGUST KUPFERER, Local No. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
Brother T. LEHTOVARRA, Local No. 2638, Fort William, Ont., Can. 
Brother J. Q. MALONEY, Local No. 1072, Muskogee, Okla. 
Brother ESTES MAXWELL, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
Brother THOMAS A. NOLAN, Local No .51, Boston, Mass. 
Brother GEORGE O'DONNELL, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother ALBERT REINHARDT, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Cal. 
Brother GEORGE H. RICHTER, Local No. 1366, Quincy, 111. 
Brother JESSE RISK, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Brother JACOB SCHAUB, Local No. 417. St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother JOE SCHLAG, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother L. H. SCOTT, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
Brother JOSEPH SIEBER, Local No. 1365, Cleveland Ohio 
Brother J. J. SOISSON, Local No. 417, St Louis, Mo. 
Brother ABRAHAM STARR, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother CHALMER STONE, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother JOSEPH TERBROCK, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother WALTER E. TUTTLE, Local No. 1324, Rochester, N. H. 
Brother CHARLES WALIHAN, Local No. 904, Jacksonville, 111. 
Brother FRANK WALTER, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother CHARLES WARTER, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 
Brother GEORGE WATT, Local No. 1365, Cleveland, Ohio 
Brother M. H. WEDDELL, Local No. 417, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother WILLIAM YEAPLE, Local No. 301, Newburgh, N. Y. 
Brother FRANK R. ZILKA, Local No. 1372, Easthampton, Mass. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Jouraal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

LOCUS No. 526 AND 213 SPONSOR JOINT PICNIC 

Carpenters' Local Union No. 526, of Galveston, and Local No. 213, of Houston, 
were hosts at a Bai'beque and Dance for members and families, at Galveston 
County Park, Leagiie City, Texas, on November 22, 19 47. The all day picnic was 
given for the purpose of promoting the sale of Poll Taxes. 

City and County Officials of both communities were among the invited guests, 
as were officials of other union organizations. 

Brother Paul Sparks, secretary of the Houston Building and Trades Department, 
and Vice-President of the 9th District, Texas State Federation of Labor, was 
master of ceremonies. Interesting talks were given by Brother Roy Bruce, busi- 
ness agent for both Locals 52 6 and 213 in the Freeport area; C. P. Driscoll, Inter- 
national Representative of the Brotherhood of Carpenters; and Jimmie Vasek, 
Commissioner of Galveston County The principal address of the day was given 
by Otto Mullinax, of the firm of Mullinax, Barbaria and Ball, of Dallas, legal 
advisors to the Texas State Federation of Labor. 

Races and games were enjoyed by the children, and the menu of Barbeque 
with all the trimmings was enjoyed by all. Dancing was from 3 to 8 p.m. 

Busses were provided by both organizations for those having no other trans- 
portation, and a record crowd was present in spite of the bad weather. 

The arrangement committee consisted of Bros. Howe, Jordan, Wallace and 
Brown of Galveston, and Bros. Lucas, Bryant, Dozier and Wilson of Houston. 



LOCAL, No. 210 CELEBRATES GOLDEN JUBILEE 

More than 300 people jammed the banquet hall of Hugo's Restaurant, Stam- 
ford, Connecticut, on the evening -of October 2 3rd to commemorate the founding 
of Local 210 on October 23, 1897. A turkey dinner with all the trimmings was 
served. Rev. John P. McNerney of St. John's Church, who gave the invocation, 
spoke later in commemoration of the Local's anniversary. 

General Representative Wni. J. Sullivan, who represented the General Office, 
spoke at some length on the history of Local 210 and the Taft-Hartley Bill. 

Mayor of the City of Stamford, Charles E. Moore, urged the union workers to 
stick together and to fight to keep the advances in working conditions brought 
about in the years gone by. 

First Selectman George T. Barrett said a great power has been put into the 
hands of the working people of the country and asked that they use it wisely. 

Two of the original members of the Local, Brothers Henry Lindstrom and 
Victor Sacrision, were honored at the anniversary celebration as were twenty- 
four other members of thirty-five or more years standing. 

Seated at the head table were represntatives of the Connecticut Federation of 
Labor and the Stamford Building Employees Association. 

Dancing until 1:00 A.M. followed the dinner. A huge cake was brought to 
the celebration symbolizing the fifty years of Local 210. 

President of the Local, Louis H. Hardvall, welcomed the members and their 
friends. The toastmaster was Brother George Robinson. Those who organized 
the celebration were: Louis H. Hardvall, George E. Lockwood, George Friend, 
Owen S. Ladd and Fran Barry. 



24 THE CARPENTER 

LOOAX. Xo. 246 HOLD ANNUAL. HONOR ROLL. CEREMONY 

On the night of November 17th, Local Union No. 246 of New York City held 
its twenty-eighth annual Honor Roll Ceremony to pay tribute to the members of 
the Union who served their country in the two "World Wars. Originiated by 
Brother A. Darmstadt right after the termination of World War 1, the Honor 
Roll Ceremony has been an annual event with Local Union No. 246. Its only 
purpose is to demonstrate to veteran members that their contributions have not 
been and never will be forgotten. 

Feature of this year's ceremony was the unveiling of a beautiful bronze plaque 
on which are engraved the names of all members of the Union who served in either 
of the two World Wars. Brother George Henjes, president of the Local, unveiled 
the plaque. The Reverend Father Darby invoked a blessing on the plaque and 
commended the veterans for their faith and sacrifices. A few moments of silent 
prayer were offered to the memory of those Brothers who made the supreme sacri- 
fice. 

Special guests and speakers included: Mr. Fishback of the American Red Cross; 
Wm. McGill, secretary of the Typogi'aphical Union Executive Board; H. C. Cooper, 
assistant manager of the Social Security Administration; J. B. G'Roiirke, State 
Compensation attorney; Mr. Shane, past commander of the Unknown Soldier Post 
of the American Legion; and General Representative Sam Sutherland who repre- 
send the General Office. All delivered enlightening and entertaining speeches. 

As climax of the evening, Brother Darmstadt, as Master of Ceremonies, called 
the roll of the thirty-five Brothers who served in World War 1, of whom twelve 
are still active members, and the ninety-nine Brothers who served in the recent 
war, sixty-nine of whom are still active members. As a special token of esteem, 
a donation of three months' dues was made to every veteran still active in the 
union. 

In conclusion, a standing vote of thanks was given to the veterans, the eve- 
ning's speakers, and especially to Brother Darmstadt whose untiring efforts made 
this and all other preceding Honor Roll Ceremonies great successes. 



BRISTOL LOCAL SPONSORS PARTY FOR VETS 

To pay honor to the members who served in the Armed Forces and those 
veterans who became members after being discharged from the Services, Local 
Union No. 952 of Bristol, Connecticut, on Sunday, November 2nd, sponsored an out- 
ing and picnic as a sort of welcoming home party. About ten a.m. members and 
guests began assembling. Recreation and a general good time were the order 
of the day. 

At one-thirty a sumptuous chicken dinner was served and everyone present 
fell to with gusto. Following dinner, ball games, card playing and music kept 
things lively all afternoon. The party broke up in the early evening with every- 
one voting it an unqualified success. 



LOCAL UNION No. 343 CELEBRATES 60tJi BERTHBAY 

October 6, 1947, marked the Diamond Jubilee of Local 343 of Winnipeg, 
Canada. On October 9th 300 members and their wives celebrated the occasion 
in the form of a banquet and concert which was held in the Royal Alexandra Hotel. 

President John Simm acted as Chairman. District Representative, Brother 
Andrew Cooper of Toronto was guest speaker and he delivered an interesting 
address which was well received. 

At the conclusion of his address Brother Cooper asked Brother Simm to accept 
a suitably inscribed gavel which is to be handed on to suceediug Presidents of 
Local 343. 



THE CARP EXTER 25 

Our Business Agent, Brother J. B. Graham, was the recipient of a 25-year or 
longer badge which was also presented by Brother Cooper. 

A feature of the evening was the presence of John Manson who is the only 
known living charter member and Brothers Wm. Proffit and Alex Jackson each 
of whom has over 50 years membership to his credit. 

In addition to the Executive at the Head Table were representatives of the 
Province of RIanitoba, the City of Winnipeg, Department of Labor, and Builders 
Exchange. 

A very pleasant evening was spent. 



NEW MEXICO COUNCIL CONVENTION BLASTS ANTI-LABOR LAAVS 

The 19 47 convention of the New Mexico State Council of Carpenters was held 
in Carpenters Hall, Carlsbad, on October 8th. Some twenty-six delegates repre- 
senting thirteen affiliated Local Unions were in attendance. A large number of 
matters pertaining to the welfare of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and the craft 
of carpentry came before the convention and were disposed of in an expeditious 
manner. Particular emphasis was laid on the need for greater political activity 
on the part of workers throughout the state. Because the labor vote failed to turn 
out at the last election a "Right to Work" measure was passed by the state. The 
convention adopted a resolution urging every Local Union to Investigate the back- 
ground and attitude on labor matters of every candidate seeking public office in 
the future. 

All officers of the Council were unanimouslj' reelected and Santa Fe was 
selected as the site of the 19 48 convention. 



LOC.\L 1782 HOLDS 40th ANNm^RSARY JUBILEE 

On a recent Saturday Local 1782 of Newark, N. J., held its 40th Anniversary 
Jubilee at the Continental Ballroom, Newark. The affair was a huge success and 
about 12 charter members were in attendance. Chairman for the evening's festivi- 
ties was Philip Israel, Financial Secretary and one of the youngest members of the 
Local. Toastmaster was Louis Tarchis, president of the Local and one of the charter 
members. 

The Essex County District Council was represented in full force from President 
Andy Green and John Walsack, Secretary-Treasurer, to all the business agents 
and District Council delegates. There were also representatives from all the Local 
Unions comprising the district. Locals 2212. 429, 1613. 349, 306, 119 and 1209. 
A large delegation from Local 1073, Philadelphia, also attended. There were also 
representatives from Locals 383 Bayonne. and 1157 Passaic, N. J. Total attend- 
ance was 450 persons. 

A grand meal was served and the audience was enthusiastic over the wonderful 
entertainment which was presented. 

The main theme followed by all the speakers was the unification of all organ- 
ized labor in the fight against the Taft-Hartley Bill. 



LOCAL 2061 HONORS 61 CHARTER MEMBERS 

Proud of the achievements it has chalked up in its first decade of existence, 
Local Union No. 2061, Austin, Minnesota, recently celebrated the tenth anniversary 
of its founding by sponsoring a banquet and get together at the Knights of Colum- 
bus Hall. Sixteen charter members who are still active were paid a special tribute. 



26 THE CARPENTER 

Elmer Schaffer, Local 361, Duluth, and president of the newly-organized State 
Carpenters Council was principle speaker of the evening. Other speakers included 
A. S. Ihrig, St. Paul, secretary of the State Council, and Harold Atwood, field repre- 
sentative of the Apprentice Training Service, Winona. Atwood revealed that thirty- 
six apprentices were now in training in Austin under the program. 

The evening was not only entertaining but also inspirational and the friends 
and guests who attended went home prouder than ever of the achievements of 
Local Union No. 2061. 



OLD TIME BAY CITY MEMBER AND WIFE HONORED 

Carpenters Hall, Bay City, Michigan, was the scene of an unusual event on 
October 19th when Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Roth celebrated their Golden Wedding 
there with a family dinner. By coincidence Brother Roth was close to celebrating 
fifty years of membership in the Brotherhood at the same time, having rounded 
out forty-eight years of continuous membership. In his almost half a century 
of membership he has held various offices in the Union. Although not an officer at 
present he is still active in union affairs. Local Union No. 116 wishes Brother 
and Mrs. Roth many more years of happy life together. 



ST. LOUIS LOCAL HONORS VETS AT BIRTHDAY PARTY 

Carpenters Hall, St. Louis, Missouri, on the night of November 15th was the 
scene of much merriment and hilarity as Local Union No. 602 celebrated the 
forty-fourth anniversary of its founding. The occasion was also something in the 
nature of a home-coming to honor the thirty-nine members of the union who 
served in the Armed Forces during the war. Adding a solemn note to the evening, 
special tribute was paid to the memories of Brothers Adolph Hunecke and John 
Walker who made the supreme sacrifice during the recently concluded struggle to 
preserve democracy and decency. 

Dancing, refreshments and food were provided in abundance and the hun- 
dreds of members and guests who attended kept things going at a merry clip 
until late Sunday morning. Speaker of the evening was General Representative 
George Ottens who extended the greetings of General President William L. 
Hutcheson Avho was unable to attend. Brother Ottens reviewed the achievements 
of the Brotherhood and touched on the threat that anti-labor legislation currently 
presents. 

During the evening, each of the members who served in the Armed Forces dur- 
ing the war was presented to the gathering. Six other Brothers, all of whom 
have been with the union since its infancy, were also recognized. They are: Fred 
Bauman, Charles Gipfert, Henry Schnell, Al. Langmer, O. Garside, and C. Clark 

The evening was voted an outstanding success by all who attended. 



PLEASANTVILLE LOCAL HOLDS ANNUAL GET TOGETHER 

On Friday evening, November 14th, members of Local Union No. 842,^ Pleasant- 
ville, New Jersey, held their annual Get Together Dinner. Wives and guests of 
members were invited and as a result a large and congenial crowd was on hand to 
participate in the eAJ^ening's festivities. Highlight of the affair was a splendid 
turkey dinner which included all the traditional trimmings. Following the dinner 
there was a well-rounded program of entertainment. A smooth band played dance 
music for those who cared to dance and the evening wound up on a pleasant and 
convivial note. Members and guests departed better acquainted with their fellow 
workers and their families and convinced that not the least of the advantages of 
belonging to an organization such as the United Brotherhood is good fellowship. 
Everyone congratulated the entertainment committee on a job well done. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 232 
By H. H. Siegele 

I am showing three kinds of shingling 
gauges in Fig. 1. The one to the left 
has a slot into which the blade of the 
hatchet slips, and with the setscrew it 
is clamped to the hatchet in such a 
manner that it will gauge the width of 
the shingle courses. The one to the 
right has a different shape, but is also 
clamped to the blade of the hatchet. 
The one at the center is fastened to the 
blade by means of holes, through 
which the threaded part passes, and 
when the gauge is tightened it clamps 
itself to the hatchet blade. 

Had it not been for the invention of 
the shingling gauge, I would not be 
■writing this lesson now, nor would I 
ever have written anything for publica- 
tion. And here is the way it happened. 

When I was a young man a new con- 
tractor came to town. I was the second 
carpenter he hired. He was rather ner- 
vous, and acted as if he had lost money 





Fig. 1 

on perhaps a previous contract. This 
job was a four-room house, and the 
first one that he had since coming to 
town. The first week we put up the 
framework and were ready for shin- 
gling. However, toward the end of the 
week he fired the other carpenter. On 
Monday morning we were to start shin- 
gling. When I got to the job a "floater" 
Avas there, whose tools consisted of a 
shingling hatchet with a shingling 
gauge attached. It was the first shin- 
gling gauge I had ever seen. After giv- 
ing the instructions, the boss left and 
did not return until the afternoon. 



While I was putting up the scaffold- 
ing, (the floater did not need scaffold- 
ing) the floater sharpened his hatchet, 
made a shingling stool, and carried 
shingles up onto the roof where he 
intended to work. When I had the scaf- 
fold finished, I carried a few bunches 
of shingles up onto the roof and started 




Fig. 2 

putting on the double course. I was 
shingling with a line and soon discovereid 
that I would have to do my very best 
to keep up my end. By increasing my 
speed I managed to hold my own with 
the floater. Between 2 and 3 o'clock 
we had one side of the roof shingled 
about as shown by Fig. 2. The floater 
was a little to the right of the center, 
as indicated by the X, w^hile I was at 
the point marked X, just above the 
H. H. 

Just then the boss came back, and 
stepping away from the building he 
looked up at us. Evidently he con- 
cluded that I had shingled only the 
part to the right that is unshaded and 
marked "H. H." At the same time he 
gave the floater credit for the rest of 
the shingling that had been done. In 
this way the floater got credit for all 
of his own work, the unshaded part to 
the left, and about half of the work 
that I had done, or the part shown 
shaded on the drawing. The boss's nerv- 
ousness took on the form of resolution, 
and up the ladder he came. "Is that the 
best you can do'?" he asked. "That's my 
best," I answered. Without further 
questioning he fired me off the job. 



28 



THE CARPEXTER 



I A\'as unmarried, ^vith nobody but 
myself to take care of. So without any 
further explanation. I picked up my 
tools, with a strong feeling that that 




Fig. 3 

contractor (his name was Kelley, and I 
never saw him again) could go to Ha- 
waii, or some warmer climate. I would 
get me some books and read. When I 
got to my room I put away my tools and 
went to the book store and bought 
Webster's Unabridged International Dic- 
tionary, an encyclopedia, and. a few 
other books. Armed with these I set- 
tled down to do some of the things that 




I really wanted to do. Not until the 
following spring did I touch my tools 
again, and then only after an old head 
came to my room and begged me to 
help him out. And that was the way I 
got started in the direction of writing 
craft problem articles. 

The floater who got credit for about 
half of the shingling I did that day, 
was really not a first-class shingler. (I 
did not learn his name, and never saw 
him again.) While he got his courses 
reasonably straight, he did not bring 
the butts of the shingles to a straight 
line. They were up and down, much on 



the order of what is shown in Fig. 3. 
The reason for this was that he did not 
hold his hatchet at the right place w'hen 
he gatiged the shingle. That is, he 
gauged the shingle with the hatchet at 
the center of the butt, as shown in Fig. 
4. which did not bring the butts in line 
at point A. 

The right way to gauge a shingle is 
shown bj" Fig. 5. Here the hatchet con- 
tacts the shingle at the front corner. 




while at the same time the btttts are 
made to line at point A. In order to do 
this, it often becomes necessary to 
spread the shingles a little at the joint, 
or, on the other hand, it might become 
necessary to dress the edges a little. 
Care should be taken that no joint will 
be open more than one-eighth of an 
inch. 

Fig. 6 shows how shingling with a 
gauge is done. At the bottom, left. S C 




Fig. 6 

stand for starting course. AVhen this 
course is on, the shingler starts from 
8 to 12 courses (in this case I show 9 
courses) and carries them all across the 
roof. The number of courses that a man 
can conveniently carry, depends on the 
man himself. If he is a short man, he 



T ir K C A K T» E X T K R 



29 



can not carry as many coursps as a tall 
man can. For that reason no hard and 
fast rnle should be laid down. 

When a strip of shingling has been 
done from one end of a roof to the 
other, the shingler should sight along 
the last course, and if there are any 
crooks, they should be straightened out, 
as shown by Fig. 7. Here the hatchet at 
A shows how to drive the shingles up in 
case of a downward bulge, while the 
hatchet at B shows how the shingles 
are driven down in case of an upward 
bulge. In driving shingles down, the 
workman should be careful so as not to 
split the shingles. The handle of the 
hatchet should be parallel with the sui'- 
face of the roof and with the line of the 
courses when the hatchet strikes the 




Fig. 7 

shingle. To go at this work as if one 
were killing snakes, is abusing a prac- 
tice that i^ entirely justifiable when 
done with care. 

Fig. 8 shows the oldtime method of 
shingling with a line, that I was using 
when I got fired, and unwittingly got 
started on the road to writing craft 
problem articles. The old heads will 
remember when this method was used. 



After the double course was on, the 
shingler would strike two chalk lines, 
as shown between 1 and 1, and betwee^i 




Fig. S 

2 and 2. The upper line was struck first 
and then the bottom one. Two courses 
of shingles were then put on from one 
end of the roof to the other. The first 
course was brought to the first line, 
while the second course was put on over 
it, and brought as nearly as possible in 
line with the second chalk line. Occa- 
sionally one met a shingler who struck 
three lines, which is shown by the addi- 
tional line between 3 and 3. But the 
third course of shingles, while it threw 
off the water, seldom was straight. The 
dotted lines on the drawing indicate 
where the lines were covered with 

shingles. 

o 

Wants to KiioAV 

A reader wants a table covering the 
roof pitches shown in the first column 
of Fig. 1. He wants to know the fig- 
ures to use in obtaining the edge bevel, 
which are shoAvn by the second column. 
The figures to the right give the length 
of the rafter for a foot run, and when 
these figures are used with 12, they 



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THEY HAVE 

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Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
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and brace tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 
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Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
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Price $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
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MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

2105 N. Burdick St., Dept. I, Kalamazoo 81. Mic'' 



30 



THE CARPEXTER 



give the edge bevel. The third column 
gives the difference in the lengths of 
jack rafters spaced 16 inches, while the 



Rooi 


Pihh 


Edge 


Bev«l 


/e'Spate 


Z'5pace 


12 t 


2 


1? 


S' 


12 V/t 


16 >^ 


24 •*/« 


12. •+- 


?^/» 


1? 


-^ 


12 '/A 


16 f/< 


24 '/z 1 


12. * 


3 


i? 


i- 


I2'/S 


16 /a 


24 '/+ ! 


12 4- 


<1^» 


1? 


4- 


t2 /2 


16 '//« 


25 1 


12 4- 


4 


■ 12 


«f 


? > 


(6 '/s 


25 i^ 


12 '+• 


^i'a 


: 12 


-4- 


2 % 


\7 7/t ■ ■ 


25^ 


2 V 


,^ 


' 1? 


+ 


3 


17 -a/Zb 


L^y 


1 + 


v?;!^ 


1? 


4- 


3 '/+ 


17 V/t, 


26 5^ 


Z H- 


6 


1? 


H- 


3 '//* 


\r Vi 


26 J'J 


1 ^ 


f,li 


' 1?. 


<f 


3 'Ab 


18 -V/6 


27 ya 


2 "4- 


7 


/J 


t 


3 '/8 


18 ^t ' 


27 ■'/4 


12 «f 


7 '/i 


1? 


f 


14 V/* 


/a va 


2«J/S 


/2 * 


8 


' 12 


4- 


4 y/t 


IS V/6 : 


28 //| 


12 <^ 


a/? 


1? 


4- 


-f '//< 


13 »A« : 


23 V» 


/2 <*- 




/? 


4' 


J 


20 


30 


l2 + 


^>', 


12 


4- 


5 '//A 


20 J/i 


30 -^. 


11 4- 


10 


12 


f 


5 -^A 


20 V4 


31 '/4 


It 1- 


/o ;i 


12 


■4- 


J -V/* 


21 J/A 


31 r/i 1 


li 4- 


/I 


12 


4- 


6 '/f 


LI ^8 


32/2 1 


/2 4- 


II J4 


12 


V 


6^/« 


22 '/I 


33 ^4 j 


/2 ^ 


11 


12 


4' 


^ 


22 »//« 


34 1 



Fig. 1 

fourth column gives the difference in 
the lengths when spaced 2 feet. The 
figures given in the table vrere obtained 
by measuring the diagonal distance of 
the square, between the figures giving 
the varioiis rises and 12. For the dift'er- 



Fig. 2. to the right, shows a square 
with the diagonal distance shown for 
three pitches; one-half, one-third, and 
one-sixth. The lengths of the rafters 
per foot run are given just above the 
diagonal lines for each of the pitches. 
The difference in the lengths of jack 
rafters spaced 16 inches for the pitches, 
is given between the tongues of the two 
squares marked A and B. The way this 
is done is simple. Apply the square for 
one foot run, mark along the blade 
and then slide the square forward from 
12 to 16. or from position A to position 
B, keeping the blade on the line. Now 
the diagonal distance between 16 and 
the point where the tongue intersects 
with the line giving the pitch, is the 
dift'erenee in the lengths of the jack 
rafters spaced 16 inches on center. 

To the dipper left are shown two 
squares applied to a timber, using 12 
and 12, on half pitch. Twice the diag- 
onal distance between 12 and 12, is 
the difference in the lengths of jacks 
spaced 2 feet on center for a half pitch. 




Fig. 2 

ence in the length of the jacks for rhe 
2-foot spaces the length of the rafter 
for a foot run was doubled, while for 
the 16-inch spaces, one-third of the 
length of the rafter was added. 



Wants to Kdow 

A reader sends a pencil sketch of a 
truss, giving the terms of the dift'erent 
members, including the roof joists and 
roof sheeting, on one-half of the truss, 
leaving the other half for me to write in 
the practical terms of the same parts. 

The drawing shows to the left, the 
terms as given on the sketch, and to 
the right, the terms that. I stipplied 
before sending the drawing back, to- 
gether with the following suggestions: 

Truss rafter is a better term than 
principal. Principal is used primarily 
as an adjective, as in, principal post, 
principal beam, principal wall, and so 
forth. If a truss rafter is called prin- 



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Simplified for yuiek understanding. 

Roof pitch ; dormers ; gambrel roof : how to deter- 

Framing: how to frame mine lengths of roof rafters; a curved rafter 

a gable roof; a roof of equal pitch; problems roof; a conie roof; hopper bevels; rake aud 

'or practice; how to frame a roof of unequal level mouldings; questions for review. 




Partial Contents l2S,1n^l'' 



270 PAGES 

116 ILLUSTRATIONS 

CLOTH BINDING 



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cipal, unless one knew from some other 
source what was meant, one could hard- 
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BE READY FOR 
A BETTER JOB 
AT BIGGER PAY 






Tr^u Rofte 




Fig. 1 

itself. On the job simple terms that are 
readily understood should be used . . . 
Sheathing is a poor choice word, better 
say sheeting . . . The timbers to which 
the roof sheeting is nailed, when they 
are placed as shown by the illustration, 
are roof joists. . . A purlin is a timber 
that supports rafters about halfway be- 
tween the seat and the comb. . . Either 
brace or strut is correct, but brace is 
commonly understood and therefore the 
better term. . . A beam is a girder that 
supports joists or some other weight, 
while a chord is the bottom member of 
a truss, and in lattice trusses both the 
top and the bottom members are chords 
. . . Bolt is a good word to use in the 
construction of beams, but rod is the 
better choice in this case. 



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Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

American Floor Surfacing Ma- 
chine Co., Toledo, O 3 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 4th Cover 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 32 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

Master Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y 31 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore. 32 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn 3rd Cover 

E. Weyer, New York, N. Y 3 

Carpentry Materials 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._ 1 

Technical Courses and Books 

American School, Chicago, 111 31 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y.__3rd Cover 
Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 4 

Frederick J. Drake & Co., Chi- 
cago, 111. 30 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 29 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 4 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 3 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo— 3 




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1880 South 12th Street 



j4a^^ffUiZii:> FRAMING SQUARE 



Stanley No. 5/^2 Hammer 





Works with you... 
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• Stanley has designed this nail hammer to 
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How to use the steel square — IIow to 61e and set 
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estimate costs — How to build houses, bams, gar- 
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--''^ plans — Drawing up specifications — How_ to ex- 

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skylights — How to build stairs— How to put on 
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lay floors — How to psint 
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Occu-ation— 



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FEBRUARY, 1948 



This Amazing 
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A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Merabers of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Micliigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Establi^h^^d in 1881 
Vol. LXYIII — No. 2 



ESDIAXAPOLIS, FEBRUAKY, 1948 



One Dollar Per Tear 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Co nt ent s — 



The Call to Action 



After consideration of the matter of anti-labor legislation, the General Executive 
Board, at its last regular meeting, recommended participation in the American Federation 
of Labor program for setting up "Labor^s League for Political Education," with the 
further recommendation that Local Unions and District Councils offiliated with the Broth- 
erhood take an active part in defeating and repealing any and all legislation inimical 
to the best interests of organized workers. 



Another Fallacy Exposed 



Although the Taft-Hartley Act Is less than six months old, some very interesting ex- 
periences are developing. Despite the obstacles to union shop set up In the act, 
backers of union shop provisions in working agreements are v/inning in ninety-nine 
elections out of a hundred being held by the NLRB. 



General President Honored 



12 



President Truman names William L. Hutcheson member of Labor-Management Panel 
which consists of six outstanding labor statesmen and six leading management repre- 
sentatives of the nation. 



Retired and Aged Workers 



14 

A recognized authority takes a look at the problem confronting the senior citizens 
of our country and recommends some sound changes in our present setup. 



• • • 



OTHER DEPART3IEXTS 

Plane Gossip 
Official 
^ Editorials 

In Menioriaiu 
Craft Problems - 



10 
15 
16 
26 
27 



Index to Advertisers - 



31 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limifecJ 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such 'ime as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22. 1915. at IXDIAXAPOLIS. IXD., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress. Aug. 24. 1912. Aceeptanc-e for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3. 1917, authorized on Julv 8. 1918. 



•9^ 

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THE CALL TO ACTION! 

* • 

IN LINE with the action taken by the October convention 
of the American Federation of Labor estabHshing Labor's 
League for PoUtical Education, the General Executive 
Board, at its regular meeting last month, approved the prin- 
ciples of concerted political education as the surest means of 
preventing further usurpation of labor's legitimate rights by 
anti-labor legislation. The Board devoted considerable time to 
the question of anti-labor legislation. The program of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor w^as discussed and digested thoroughly. 
In the end, the minutes of the General Executive Board show 
the following- action taken. 

"The General President submitted to the General Ex- 
ecutive Board the proposed program of the American 
Federation of Labor for setting up Labor's League for 
Political Education. 

"After due consideration the Executive Board recom- 
mends that we participate in the principles of the program, 
and also recommends that Local Unions and District 
Councils affiliated with the Brotherhood take an active 
part in defeating and repealing any and all anti-labor 
legislation. 

"Local Unions and District Councils will be advised of 
the procedure that will be followed by the International 
organization regarding this program." 

In accordance with the action of political action of any kind, the 

the General Executive Board, a Na- United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

tional Committee of the United Non-partisan Committee will be 

Brotherhood of Carpenters and financed by voluntary contributions 

Joiners of America, consisting of from members and friends of the 

the General Officers, members of Brotherhood. All services will be 

the General Executive Board, and rendered on a voluntary basis. Be- 

the assistant to the General Secre- ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ p^^. 

tary, has been established. This r ^, .^^ -n , _ 

•' . ... , , , srram of the committee will be com- 

committee will be known as the , , , ^ ■, ^ n t i 

«TT -^jo^ii-jr/^ J. pleted and presented to all L^ocal 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters f:.. . t^. . , <^ r^ •, 

Non-partisan Committee For the Unions, District and State Councils 

Repeal and Defeat of Anti-labor ^^^ ^^^'^ cooperation and participa- 

legislation." tion. 

Since the Taft-Hartley Act pro- In the final analysis, the extent to 

hibits the use of union funds for which the program succeeds will 



THE CARPEXTER 



depend in larg^e part on the support 
which Councils and Local Unions 
gfive it. Effective political action 
must stem primarily from the grass- 
roots — the congressional districts, 
wards and even precincts. The Na- 
tional Association of Manufactur- 
ers, the Power Lobby, and other 
basically anti-labor pressure groups 
have long recognized this principle 
and devoted much of their energies 
toward trying to influence public 
opinion on the local level. For its 
own protection, organized labor 
must follow suit. 

Passage of the Taft-Hartley Act 
vividly brings into focus the need 
for American workers to organize 
their political strength as effective- 
ly as they have organized their eco- 
nomic strength. All the legislative 
gains made by labor in the last half 
century are today in jeopardy. 
There is hardly a state legislature 
that has not during the past five 
years mulled over from one to a 
dozen anti-labor bills. There is 
hardly a piece of legislation that is 
beneficial to labor on the Federal 
statute books but what is under at- 
tack. The Taft-Hartley Act largely 
nullified the Wagner Act. The 
AVages and Hours Act is now fac- 
ing the assaults of the vested inter- 
ests. Tomorrow the Norris-LaGuar- 
dia Act will feel the hammer blows 
of organized attack from those 
forces which want nothing less than 
the complete enslavement of Amer- 
ican workers. 

The threat is real and the threat 
is serious. That which was consti- 
tutional, right and proper for labor 
yesterday is to day unlawful and 
illegal. Unless labor marshalls its 
forces for an effective defense of 
its rights the pendulum will swing 
even farther toward reaction, and 
the rights of today will become the 



crimes of tomorrow. The forces 
that want labor regimented, sub- 
dued and thoroughly under the con- 
trol of management exclusively are 
well organized. They have their 
puppets in Washington who re- 
spond readily to the slightest pull 
of the strings they hold in their 
hands. Against that kind of oppo- 
sition labor can compete success- 
fully only by building up an even 
more effective organization. 

Through the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters Non-partisan Com- 
mittee for the Repeal and Defeat of 
Anti-labor Legislation, Local Un- 
ions and District and State Coun- 
cils and the members thereof will 
have an opportunity to make their 
collective political strength felt in 
the proper places. They will have 
an opportunity to express their 
views on such pressing problems as 
high prices, high taxes, health, 
housing, monopoly growth and all 
the other vital issues that dis- 
turb the mind of the average work- 
er. They will have an opportunity 
to help build an America in which 
fear and insecurity and exploitation 
are unknown. 

However, this is a program which 
must have the backing of each indi- 
vidual before it can succeed. When 
it comes on the floor of your Local 
Union you must be ready to do your 
part. You must be ready and will- 
ing to join hands with your fellow 
workers for political organization 
as wholeheartedly as you did to 
build up an organization based on 
economic strength. Goon squads and 
spies and company stooges did not 
stop American workers from build- 
ing free, independent and voluntary 
unions. Inactivity, apathy or dis- 
interest must not allow politicians 
to tear them to pieces by legislative 
chicanery. 



Another Fallacy Exposed 

• • 

ALTHOUGH THE Taft-Hartley Act has been in operation less than 
six months, already some interesting statistics are developing. 
At the time the measure was pending before Congress, proponents 
of the bill waxed long and loud about the "emancipation" features con- 
tained therein. In the newspapers and over the air waves they hailed their 
pet bill as a sort of ]\Iagna Charta for the ordinary worker and union mem- 
ber. Thev claimed that it would forever remove Joe Worker from the 
"domination" and "tyranny" of the big, bad labor leaders whom they 
termed "czars" and "Caesars." 



Last August the bill became law. 
By December the measure was hit- 
ting its stride. Recently the Labor 
Board released statistics covering 
the business transacted during that 
month. Contained therein are some 
very interesting figures in light of 
the kind of build up which pre- 
ceded the railroading of the meas- 
ure through Congress over the 
President's veto. 

During the month of December, 
some 521 union-shop authorization 
elections Avere conducted under the 
auspices of the Board. Each was 
based upon the consent of the par- 
ties involved. In the 521 elections, 
ninety per cent of the workers eli- 
gible to vote did so. In national 
presidential elections, total ballots 
cast rarely exceed sixty to sixty- 
five per cent of the total eligible 
vote. 

Now comes the interesting part: 
out of the total of 521 elections, the 
union shop received the support of 
the majority of employes in 518 
out of the '21. In other words, 
workers voted in favor of a union 
shop in better than ninety-nine per 
cent of the elections. The results 
are even more astounding when one 
bears in mind that under procedures 
set up by the Taft-Hartley Act the 
union-shop must win a majority of 
employes eligible to vote rather 



than a straight majority of those 
actually voting. Practically speak- 
ing, this means that all eligible 
votes not cast are automatically 
counted as "no" votes. Under this 
sort of voting, a candidate for the 
presidency of the United States 
would have to received somewhere 
in the neighborhood of forty-two or 
forty-three million votes, since there 
are around eighty-four million eli- 
gible voters in the nation. Yet in 
the greatest landslide in recent his- 
tory the successful candidate re- 
ceived only something like twenty- 
seven million votes. 

In the 521 elections, some 72,878 
valid ballots were cast. Ninety- 
three per cent of them, or 67,752 
were cast in favor of authorization 
of a union-shop provision. In each 
case the ballot offered workers the 
choice of voting "yes" or "no" on 
the following question: "Do you 
wish to authorize the union named 
below to enter into an agreement 
with your employer which requires 
membership in such union as a con- 
dition of employment?" Signifi- 
cantly, 332 of the elections were 
won by aftiliates of the American 
Federation of Labor. 

Added together, all these things, 
to our way of thinking, indicate 
that about ninety-nine per cent of 



8 



THE C A R P E X T E R 



American workers are strong not 
only for unionism but for the union- 
shop as well. Certainly there is 
nothing in the experiences of the 
Board to date to contradict this 
contention. Despite the unfair re- 
strictions set up by the Taft-Hartley 
Act, despite ballots not actually cast 
automatically falling into the "no" 
category, ninety-nine per cent of 
union-shop elections have resulted 
in victories for union-shop provi- 
sions. 

To anyone close to the labor pic- 
ture during recent years, these re- 
sults are no surprise. To those who 
know nothing about labor except 
what appears in the newspapers and 
comes out of the radio they may be 
some^svhat startling. Certainly these 
strongly pro-union results are at 
variance ^?rith the kind of propa- 
ganda Fulton Lewis, David Law- 
rence and Westbrook Pegler have 
long been peddling. Thanks to the 
pernicious poison these columnists 
and commentators have handed out 
for years, the average citizen prob- 
ably pictures the average union 
member as a sort of pathetic Caspar 
Milquetoast cringing before the 
leaders of his union and paying 
dues onh^ because his job depends 
on it. A lot of Congressmen must 
have fallen for the same sort of 
propaganda or otherwise the Taft- 
Hartley Act never viould have 
found its way into the statute books. 

The plain fact of the matter is 
that American viorkers belong to 
unions because they have found out 
through bitter experience that un- 
ionism represents the only sound 
road to economic justice. Through 
collective bargaining they have in- 
creased their wages and bettered 
their working conditions and estab- 
lished a little bit of security and 
continuity in their jobs. These are 



the things they want to maintain, 
and they know that there is no 
possible wa}^ of maintaining them 
except through membership in a 
strong, democratic, efficient union. 

Through the years they have also 
learned that the union-shop repre- 
sents the most effective way of 
eliminating chiselers. free-riders, 
deadbeats, bums, and company 
stooges. Year in and year out they 
have written union-shop clauses in- 
to their agreements. When the Taft- 
Hartle}" Act came along and threw 
many obstacles into the pathw^ay of 
securing a union-shop clause, the 
workers merely tightened their 
belts a little and went right on de- 
manding such clauses. 

But the anti-labor elements still 
are not through trying to picture the 
average union member as a brow- 
beaten little gTiy paying dues under 
protest, going out on strike against 
his will, and belonging only because 
it is mandator}- to belong. In the 
past iev: years these fallacies have 
been exposed one hj one, but the 
Peglers and Lawrences and Lewis 
keep right on peddling them just 
the same. 

When the War Labor Board 
w-as in existence, union-shop con- 
tracts were mostly written vidth es- 
cape clauses. Workers w^ho did not 
want to belong to unions could re- 
sign \^-ithin a given time. Although 
hundreds of these agreements were 
written only a handful of workers 
in all American industry" took ad- 
vantage of the escape clauses. Cer- 
tainly- that should have proved to 
anyone's satisfaction that w-orkers 
belong to unions because they want 
to and because they knovi- that union 
membership pays big dividends. 

Under the impression that union 
members are dominated b}^ their 
leaders and forced to folloA^^ the 



THE CARPENTER 



dictates of these leaders whether 
they will to do so or not, Congress 
passed the Smith-Connally Act. The 
reasoning behind the passage of the 
Act was based on the great miscon- 
ception that union members do only 
what their leaders tell them to do. 
The bright boys in Congress who 
listened too much to Lewis and 
Lawrence figured they had a cure- 
all. Their logic went something like 
this: union leaders are making 
members go out on strike; if we 
give the members a chance to vote 
on strikes by secret ballot, there 
will be no more strikes. 

The Smith-Connally Act was 
passed. Instead of decreasing the 
number of strikes, the number in- 
creased substantially under the Act. 
The Act gave the men a chance to 
express their sentiments and they 
expressed them in no uncertain 
terms — nine times out of ten in 
favor of a strike when all other 
methods failed. The government 
soon found itself running a sort of 
strike bureau so that eventually 
Congress had to nullify the Act by 
cutting out funds. If the Smith- 
Connally Act should have proved 
anything it is that union members 
strike not because their leaders tell 
them to but because they want eco- 
nomic justice where none is forth- 
coming through less drastic meth- 
ods. 

The great fallacy behind the pas- 
sage of the Taft-Hartley Act was 
the misconception that union-shop 
clauses create union members rather 
than that union members create 
union-shop clauses. Those who lis- 
tened to the peddlers of anti-union- 
ism figured that if union members 
were given an opportunity to vote 
on whether or not they wanted 
union-shop conditions, the bulk of 
them would vote no. They passed 



the Act and they put as many ob- 
stacles as possible in the way of 
securing a union shop. Now the re- 
sults are showing that despite these 
obstacles union members are voting 
for union-shop by about loo to one. 

But still the peddlers of anti- 
unionism — probably working on 
Hitler's theory that a lie repeated 
often enough will eventually be- 
come accepted as the truth — are 
handing out the same old propa- 
ganda about the czarism of union 
leaders and the tyranny of unions. 
They go on knocking labor and be- 
smirching everything connected 
with it. Despite the fact they have, 
been proved wrong time after time 
a lot of people still believe them. 

The sooner everyone in the na- 
tion realizes three things, the sooner 
will any rough places in our pres- 
ent industrial picture be ironed out. 
These three things are : 

1. Union members belong to un- 
ions because they want to and 
not because of any compul- 
sion. 

2. Union-shop clauses do not cre- 
ate union members but rather 
union members create union 
shop conditions. 

3. Strikes are not instituted by 
union leaders but rather by 
union members who fail to get 
a square deal out of the em- 
ployer by peaceful and less 
costly methods. 

Most of the bad legislation of 
recent years has come about because 
our representatives did not under- 
stand these three things. By now 
they certainly should be learning 
that the propaganda of the anti- 
unionists is based more on wishful 
thinking and less on hard facts. 



MORE TO COME 

As labor predicted, the Labor Board 
is beginning to bog down under the load 
of business brought on by passage of 
the Taft-Hartley Bill. If it is swamped 
now, how will it handle the case load 
that is sure to develop when present 
contracts, signed before the law becanie 
effective, begin to expire? To our way 
of thinking, the Board is going to be 
about like a certain conductor. One 
day a woman with six kids got on his 
train and the youngsters gave him so 
much trouble that at the end of the 
trip he was moved to remark: "Madame. 
It's a wonder you don't leave half your 
children home." 

With a morose look the woman eyed 
him and Quietly said: "I did." 
• • • 
QUITE RIGHT 

A visitor at the Capitol was accom- 
panied by his small son. The little boy 
watched from the gallery when the 
House came to order. 

"Why did the minister pray for all 
those men. Pop?" 

"He didn't. He looked them over and 
prayed for the country." 




Step bach in the car, please. 



OPTEVnSTIC HEXRY 

Like the optimistic rookie who claim- 
ed everybody else in the regiment was 
out of step, Henry Wallace has an- 
nounced his candidacy for president be- 
cause everybody except he and Mous- 
tache Joe is wrong. With the possible 
exception of Moscow, this news was 
greeted throughout the world with 
something less than earth-shaking en- 
thusiasm. However, Henry seems deter- 
mined to go through with the idea. For 
sheer optimism, the only person we can 
think of in Wallace's class is the little 
boy of a friend of ours. 

When a sewing course was introduced 
into little Tommie's class, he refused to 
execute a single stitch, deeming the 
exercise beneath the dignity of a nine- 
year-old gentleman. 

"George Washington sewed." pleaded 
the teacher, "and he was a great man. 
Do you consider yourself better than 
George Washington?" 

"T don't knoAv," reasoned Tommie; 
"time will tell." 

• • -A- 

DOIXG HIS PART 

Down in the Louisiana swampland 
two boys were caught operating a big 
moonshine still. 

"We 'uns ain't moonshiners." pro- 
tested one of the youngsters; "we air 
jest a-tendin' this here still for Uncle 
Sorky Peters. 

"Why doesn't Peters run his own 
still?" demanded the revenue officer. 

"Oh, he air in town this week," ex- 
plained the older boy: "'He's a-settln' 
on the Grand .Jury." 

• • • ' 
TRUTH COMES TO LIGHT 

She: "You look very downcast." 

He: "Yes, my wife has been away for 
six weeks, and she's just come back." 

She: "And does that make you so 
unhappy?" 

He: "'Well. I told her I spent all my 
evenings at home — and today the light 
bill came. It's for 5 cents." 



THE CARPENTER 



11 




An excellent interpretation of both the 
Spanish Fiesta and the meat shortage. 



THE TRUTH OF IT 

The Democrats are blaming the Re- 
publicans, and the Republicans are 
blaming the Democrats, and day after 
day prices continue to go up. If Con- 
gressmen devoted half the energy to 
combating inflation that they are now 
devoting to lambasting the opposition 
for inflation, the nation might make 
some progress. The verbal shadow- 
boxing now going on in Congress brings 
to mind one of our favorite stories, 
which goes something like this: 

In a certain mid-western court a man 
was suing the local traction company for 
injuries allegedly received in a street- 
car accident. The truth of the matter 
was that he had actually received his 
bruises when his auto collided with a 
telegraph-post. And this had happened 
a full mile from the street-car line. 

The plaintiff's witnesses swore to the 
facts of the accident, and things were 
going very nicely for him, when one 
of their number was suddenly beset with 
an attack of conscience and during a re- 
cess repaired to the judge's chambers 
and confessed to the frame-up. 

The judge rushed back into the 
courtroom with fire in his eye, deter- 
mined to make an immediate public 
revelation of the perjurers. But he was 
brought up short in his resolution when 
the traction company's attorney sudden- 
ly produced three witnesses prepared to 
swear that the plaintiff was drunk when 
he boarded the street-car! 



A WONDERFUIv VIEW 

One of the large corporations — a 
manufacturer of electrical equipment — 
has announced a price rollback of some- 
thing like three per cent on most of 
its products. This is the company's "an- 
swer" to inflation. Naturally the press 
and radio gave it a big play. From the 
way ,they handled the matter, one could 
almost assume that the firm's action 
had broken the back of inflation. (Inci- 
dentally, the company probably got 
three dollars worth of free advertising 
for every dollar it cost to shave a few 
cents from its prices.) 

All in all, however, the whole thing 
represents a step in the right direction. 
The company deserves a genuine pat on 
the back. Maybe if more firms followed 
sviit the high cost of living could be 
checked. But the newspapers' idea that 
a small reduction in one particular line 
of goods represents progress against in- 
flation moves us to nothing more than 
a tolerant smile. 

Somehow or other the whole thing 
brings to mind the guide who had a 
novice mountain climber atop a five 
thousand foot cliff. 

"Be very careful not to fall here, 
because its very dangerous," warned 
the guide. "But if you do fall, remem- 
ber to look to the left — you get a won- 
derful view." 

• • • 
SURPRISE 

The man was buying a fountain pen 
for his son's graduation gift. 

"It's to be a surprise, I suppose," 
said the clerk. 

"I'll say it is," said the father. "He's 
expecting a convertible coupe." 

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posuge extra.) 

THE SPEED COMPANY 

Dept. A 2025 N.E.Sandy, Portland 12, Ore. 



Mo'^^ 







12 



THE3 CARPENTER 



General President Honored 

General President "William L. Hutcheson was signally honored recently 
when he was named a member of the National Labor-Management Panel 
by Harry S. Truman, President of the United States. One of the six out- 
standing labor leaders of the nation elected to such office, General Presi- 
dent Hutcheson will serve until December 18, 1949, while continuing to 
carry on his duties as General President of the Brotherhood. 

The National Labor-Management Panel was created as a part of the 
Labor-Management Relations Act of 19 47 (Taft-Hartley Act). Its duties, 
as outlined in Section 205, Paragraph B, of the Act are defined as follows: 
"It shall be the duty of the panel, at the request of the Director, to 
advise in the avoidance of Industrial controversies and the manner in 
which mediation and voluntary adjustment shall be administered, particu- 
larly with reference to the general welfare of the country." The panel 
consists of twelve members, six representing management and six repre- 
senting labor. Section 20 5, Paragraph A, of the Act provides for the panel 
as follows: "There is hereby created a National Labor-Management Panel 
which shall be composed of twelve members appointed by the President, 
six of whom shall be selected from among persons outstanding in the field 
of management and six of whom shall be selected from among persons 
outstanding in the field of labor." 

Few people in or out of labor opposed passage of the Taft-Hartley 
Act as consistently and as thoroughly as did General President Hutcheson. 
He made many trips to Washington to combat the legislation. He 
appeared before several committees of both the House and Senate to 
voice his objection. Passage of the Act did not change his views. He is 
still as inexorably opposed to the Act and all other discriminatory legis- 
lation as ever. 

However, the Taft-Hartley Act is now law, and the law provides for 
a National Labor-Management Panel, a body that will wield considerable 
influence in labor relations. As one of the outstanding labor statesmen 
of the day he has been appointed a panel member by the President. As 
a duty not only to the United Brotherhood which he has served so long 
and so faithfully but to the rest of organized labor as well, he has 
accepted the responsibility of panel membership. 

To the thousands upon thousands of union people who know him 
best. General President Hutcheson's appointment is a source of real satis- 
faction. They know his integrity and forthrightness. They know his 
unwillingness to compromise a single union principle under any circum- 
stances. They know his ability to fight for what is right and his deter- 
mination in the face of pressure. They remember his single-handed fight 
against Thurman Arnold and his anti-trust suits at a time when many less 
courageous union leaders were voluntarily capitulating because of the 
drastic penalties conviction could bring. They know that sound unionism 
will have an unyielding champion on the panel. 

On behalf of the entire membership of the Brotherhood and millions 
of union men and women throughout the nation. The Carpenter extends 
congratulations to President Hutcheson on his appointment and best 
wishes for a happy and productive term in office. 



T ir E C A K P E N T E K 



13 




^"SBp^, 



WILLIAM L. HUTCHESON 



As a climax to a long and dis- 
tinguished career in the labor 
movement, General President 
William L. Hutcheson has been 
appointed a member of the 
twelve-man Labor-Management 
Panel by President Harry S. Tru- 
man. One of the six outstanding 
labor statesmen of the nation 
named to such a post, Brother 
Hutcheson will serve until De- 
cember 18, 1949, while continu- 
ing to fulfill his duties as General 
President of the Brotherhood. 



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14 



Retired and Aged M^orkers 



* * * 



AT A RECENT public hearing held in New York City by the State 
Joint Legislative Committee of which Senator Thos. G. Desmond 
of Newburgh is chairman on the question of "Retired and Aged 
"W^orkers." Dr. Thos. G. Klumpp, President of the W'inthrop-Stearns, Inc., 
claimed that a "realistic but humane program to handle the fast-growing 
number of individuals over 45 years of age is necessary." 

He said in part: 



"The whole problem is the ad- 
justment of the number of available 
workers to jobs; to attempt to strike 
a balance by eliminating all work- 
ers over a certain age is an unfair 
penalty on age and experience. 

"In a refined and delicate way it 
is a perpetuation of the jungle law 
of fang and claw, where the leaders 
of the pack survive only until the 
younger beasts grow fierce enough 
to eliminate them. In modern civil- 
ization we are less violent but in the 
end the result is approximately the 
same." 

By 1980, there will be 60 million 
individuals over 45 years of age in 
this country, and 21 millions over 
65. In fact, "the number of individ- 
uals over 45 years of age in 1980 
will exceed our present record em- 
ployment of 60,000,000." 

"We must not lose sight of the 
fact that someone must support 
those we retire into idleness. The 
more workers we retire, and partic- 
ularly if we should lower the retire- 
ment age, the greater will be the 
economic burden on those who con- 
tinue to work." 

The necessity for shorter work- 



ing hours is an indispensable pre- 
requisite for adjusting jobs to man- 
power. 

He called for expansion of volun- 
tary retirement plans in which em- 
ployer and employe share the cost, 
and a system of transferring re- 
tirement benefits without loss when 
an employe changes jobs. For those 
not covered by adequate retirement 
programs, the present social secur- 
ity benefits should be increased. 

"Compared with the tax burden 
of war and armaments, the cost of 
these social advances is negligible. 
Even this tax burden can be les- 
sened by permitting capable and 
willing older workers to continue 
working, and finding more places 
in industry and government for 
those partially disabled. 

"If we will employ one-fifth of 
the 21 million people over 65 years 
of age we will have by 1980, at an 
average of $2500 per annum, it will 
mean $10,500,000,000 they will earn 
for themselves, and which load of 
support will be taken off the should- 
ers of other younger workers, 
whether by taxes or direct contribu- 
tions." 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of A3IERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Generai, President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill B. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. • 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District. HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 



REGULAR MEETING OF GENERAL EXECUTIVE 

BOARD 

Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, Florida. 
January 8, 1948. 

Since the previous meeting of the General Executive Board the following 
trade movements were acted upon: 

October 2 3, 19 47 

Asheville, N. C, L. U. 384.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 ^/^ 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 1, 19 48. Official sanction granted. 

Sparta, 111., L. U. 479. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% to 
$1.60 per hour, effective December 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Railway, N. J., L. U. 537. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.10 to 
$2.50 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Enid, Okla., L. U. 763. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective December 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Hartford, Conn., L. U. 1941. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 
to $1.40 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Temple, Texas, L. U. 1971. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective November 29, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Seaford, Del., L. U. 2012. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 1/2 
to $1.87% per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Columbia, Miss., L. U. 2188.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective December 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

(Continued on page 19) 



Editorial 




The Pause That Does Not Refresh 

While 194S may still be in its swaddling clothes, it is alread}^ becoming 
clear that this is going to be the year of decision for not only America 
but for the whole civilized world as well. Starved and beaten Europe is 
staving off complete chaos and collapse only b}^ the promise of moral and 
material support from the United States. At home skyrocketing prices 
and inflationary pressures are causing the entire economy to bulge at the 
seams. If ever in its history the United States needed bold, fearless, self- 
disciplined leadership and statesmanship, that time is right now. 

Yet all indications are that Congress intends to pursue the same 
wishy-v\ashy, opportunistic, ineffectual course it pursued last year. From 
any standponit except that of bigger and better profits for business, the 
1947 version of Congress Avas close to a total flop. Nothing Avas done to 
stem the inexorable upward pressure of prices. Nothing was done 
tOAvard implementing a sane, feasible, continuing program of aid to devas- 
tated Europe. In fact the only matter on Avhich Congress shoAA^ed any 
dispo.-ition to act concertedly Avas the matter of anti-labor legislation. 

That Avorking people of this nation are not the only ones Avho are 
alarmed over the state of aft"airs at present can be readih' ascertained from 
CA^en a cursor}^ examination of ncAA'spapers and periodicals printed outside 
of the United States. For example, in its JanuarA^ 14 issue, the Vancouver 
B. C. Daily Province carried an editorial that pretty much hit the nail on 
the button. Under the head "All The A\"orld A\'aits On U.S. Politics" it 
said : 

"By next Ncav Year Ave may know that the tragedy of 1948 AA^as the 
fact that it AA'as the year of the U.S. presidential election, a A'ear in Avhich 
the AA^orld's most poAA^erful nation paused in its job of world leadership 

to play domestic politics. 

"The session of Congress just opened is slated to be one of the busiest 
and most crucial in U.S. history, but it is equally certain that the presi- 
dential election at the end of the year Avill oA-ershadoAv almost eA^ery 
moA-e. , 

"Canada, starA'ing and diA-ided Europe and AA'ar-torn China — in fact all 
the AA^orld — aa^II haA^e to AA^ait on the postponements and delays synonymous 

AAdth practical politics. 

"Already it is indicated that a second 'stop-gap' bill may be needed to 
help Europe because the ^Marshall plan may not be approved, AA'hateA-er 
its form, before June and may not be A'oted on until after Congress 
reconvenes in August, after both Republican and Democrat national con- 
ventions haA'e had an opportunity to 'sample' party feelings. 



THE CARPENTER 17 

"The 522 million dollars Congress voted before adjournment of its spe- 
cial session last month was intended to carry France, Italy and Austria 
only to March 31, when the Marshall plan is supposed, theoretically, to 
come into effect. 

"Canada and other trading countries badly in need of U.S. dollars, as 
well as hungry Europe, will be adversely affected if the Marshall plan 
is delayed. And Communism will undoubtedly exploit the situation to the 
full. 

"Although U.S. labor is preparing to demand new wage boosts to keep 
pace with steadily rising living costs, there is no likelihood that Congress 
will attempt any wage or price control measures until after the presi- 
dential elections. Continued inflation will both reduce the amount of 
actual assistance offered by the Marshall plan and make the U.S. taxpayer 
less amenable to the idea of paying for Europe's rehabilitation. 

"The Republican majority in both Houses also is bent on a politically 
popular policy of tax reduction, this despite President Truman's $39,- 
669,000,000 "cold war" budget which reflects greater foreign aid and 
national defense costs. 

"These are some of the things that are making the man on the street, 
in Canada and the United States, resigned to the belief that our big 
neighbor is not really going to get down to the facts of life until after the 
presidential election. 

"All we can do is hope that the unpleasant facts of our times will wait 
that long." 

— — — — • 

The Sad Plight of Mr. X 

If high prices, high taxes, and decreasing purchasing power of the 
dollar are interfering with your sleep, do not let them worry you into a 
case of stomach ulcers. Even if the Mrs. has to do without those new 
shoes she had her heart set on and Junior has to forego getting his teeth 
fixed because the grocer and milkman get all the old pay check, do not 
despair too much. It could all be much, much worse. For example you 
might be making $25,000 a year instead of $2,800 or $3,000, and then you 
would really know what suff'ering is. You can read all about it in the 
January issue of Fortune Magazine. That wortlw publication takes the 
cases of some seven families in the $25,000 per year class and in an article 
that would wring tears from a statue outlines their struggles with priva- 
tion and hardship. 

Consider the case of Mr. X of Fort Worth who knocks down exactly 
$25,000 per. Taxes nick him for $5,988 right off' the bat. That leaves him 
a piddling $19,012 per year to struggle by on. Maybe $19,000 may sound 
like a lot of money, but when you break it down, it is barely $365 per week. 
If by now your tears have not made it impossible for you to read farther, 
we will give you more details of his sad plight. For "pin money" he is 
limited to a paltry $1,909 per year, and for "recreation" he only spends 



18 THECARPENTER 

S2.760 per year. By this you can easily realize that his shirt must always 
be flapping open because he cannot afford pins, and undoubtedly he has 
had to forego his weekly game of pool at the corner emporium because 
obviously you cannot get much recreation on fifty-two or three dollars a 
week. 

But for all his hardships, Mr. X of Fort Worth is better off than Mr. 
Y of Boston. ]Mr. Y makes $26,000 per year but he has been going into 
the hole at the rate of $3,690 per year, whereas Mr. X has only gone into 
the red by about Sioo, even though ]\Ir. Y has only bought $1,050 worth of 

pins. 

And so it goes. The Fortune article shows that it is just next to im- 
possible to raise a family on $25,000 per year any more. Here are four 
budgets on the income and outgo of four typical families in the $25,000 

per year class : 

Boston Seattle Ft. A\'orth Atlanta 

Income $26,000 $25,000 $25,000 $28,458 

Taxes 7,1Z^ 6,048 5.988 8,931 

Food 3,600 3,000 2,085 4,043 

Clothing 2,400 I '353 2,000 1,900 

Home Operation 1,768 4,649 1-538 1,600 

Servants 576 1,020 1,385 2,530 

Automobiles 300 2,380 750 640 

Medical Expense 300 750 350 300 

Education 2.000 1,800 

Contributions 1.200 300 631 i,359 

Recreation 2,500 3,280 2,760 3, 112 

Insurance 6,200 750 3,904 4,39^ 

Pinmoney 1-050 i,795 i,909 1,680 

Total $29,690 $25,280 $25,100 $30,491 

In the red by $ 3,6 go $ 280 $ 100 $ 2,03s 

There you have it. So the next time the Little Lady begins beefing 
about the old paycheck not being enough to make ends meet, just shove the 
above figures under her nose. Show her how much worse oft' she could be 
if she had to struggle along with a paltry $25,000 per. Ask her how she 
would like having to scrimp along with not more than $1,795 a year for 
pin money or $3,280 for recreation purposes. That ought to take most of 
the wind out of her sails. 

That the people in the $25.00 per year bracket have been hard hit cannot 
be denied. A\'hat was practicalh' a princely income in 1940 has shrunk 
to something considerably less in recent years. But it is pretty hard for 
people in the $2,800 or $3,000 bracket to work up much sympathy for them 
in view of the Department of Labor survey which shows it takes better 
than $3,000 a year to keep a family of four living on a very modest 
workingf-class standard. 



THE CARPENTER 19 

(Continued from page IS) 

Wrangell, Alaska, L. U. 2362. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $2.00 per hour, effective October 23, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

October 31, 1947 

Kewanee, 111., L. U. 154. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 14 
to $1,871/2 per hour, effective December 21, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Poison, Mont., L. U. 670. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Pontiac, 111., L. U. 728. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$1.90 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Frankfort, Ind., L. U. 1465. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 
to $1.85 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Atchison, Kan., L. U. 1980. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Lakeland, Fla., L. U. 2217. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37l^ 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

November 10, 1947 

Perth Amboy, N. J., L. U. 6 5. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.10 
to $2.50 per hour, effective February 1, 1948 Official sanction granted. 

Texarkana, Texas, L. U. 379. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective December 23, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Beardstown, 111., L. U. 741. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37^ 
to $1.62% per hour, effective November 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Poplar Bluff, Mo., L. U. 1049. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.37% to $1.75 per hour, effective January 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Thermopolis, Wyo., L. U. 1241. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective November 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Brownsville, Texas, L. U. 1316. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective January 10, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Jonesboro, Ark., L. U. 1440. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 (commercial) $1.37% (residential) per hour, effective February 1, 1948. 
Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Monroe, La., L. U. 1811. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Henryetta, Okla., L. U. 1943. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective January 3, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

El Dorado, Kan., L. U. 2278. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.25 to $1.62% per hour, effective November 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

November 20, 1947. 

Norfolk, Va., L. U. 3 31. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1 75 per hour, effective January 1, 19 48. Official sanction granted. 

Mattoon, 111., L. U. 347. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective January 16, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y., L. U. 1015. — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, 
without financial aid 

El Reno, Okla., L. U. 1431. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.52% 
to $1.80 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

December 3, 1947 
Paris, 111., L. U. 2040. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $2.00 

per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Tiffin, Ohio, L. U. 243. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.58 to 

$1.80 per hour, effective December 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



20 THECARPENTER 

El Paso, Texas, L. U. 425. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 i/^ 
to $1.87% per hour, effective February 1, 1948. OflBcial sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Marion, 111., L. U. 508. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Elwood, Ind., L. U. 652. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.65 per hour, effective January 17, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Sullivan, Ind., L. U. 70 6. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective December 14, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Rome, N. Y., L. U. 1016. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87 ^/^ to 
$2.00 per hour, effective January 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

S. Pittsburg, Tenn., L. U. 1608. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
?1.50 to $1,721/^ per hour, effective December 3, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Liberal, Kan., L. U. 1724. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.87% per hour, effective December 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Lubbock, Texas, L. U. 188 4. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.87% per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Frederick, Okla., L. U. 1893. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 3, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Greensboro, N. C, L. U. 2230.- — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1,37% to $1.50 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Fort Myers, Fla., L. U. 2261. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

December 17, 1947 

Portsmouth, Ohio, L. U. 437. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 19 48. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Taylorville, 111., L. U. 748. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Wichita Falls, Texas, L. U. 9 77. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.75 to $1.87% per hour, effective February 3, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Overton, Texas, L. U. 1327. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Athens, Ohio, L. U. 1720. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Gladewater, Texas, L. U. 1775. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Oberlin, Ohio, L. U. 1968. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87% 
to $2.00 per hour, effective February 13, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Green River, Wyo., L. U. 2025. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective January 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Odessa, Texas, L. U. 2206. — Movement for an increase in Avages from $1.62% 
to $1,87% per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Cornwall, Ont., Can., L. U. 2307. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.10 to $1.25 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, with- 
out financial aid. 

Springfield, 111., D. U. 16. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.8 7% 
to $2.25 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Portsmouth, Va., L. U. 303. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Prairie du Chien, "Wise, L. U. 39 4. — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $1.40 to $1.50 per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, 
without financial aid. 



THE CARPENTER 21 

San Angelo, Texas, L. U. 411. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ogden, Utah, L. U. 450. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 1/2 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective January 2, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Mt. Morris, N. Y., L. U. 662. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $1.91 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Sterling, 111., L. U. 695. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Laconia. N. H., L. U. 12 47.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37^/2 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ballston Spa, N. Y., L. U. 13 21. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.30 to $1.65 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Kingsville, Texas, L. U. 16 6 6. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.75 to $2.00 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Melbourne, Fla.. L. U. 1685. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective December 23, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Paris, Texas, L. U. 1885. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.6214 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Anna, 111., L. U. 2010. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 1,2 to 
$1.62% per hour, effective January 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, L. U. 3 64. — ^Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1,621/2 to $1.90 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Camden, Ark., L. U. 529. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective March 5, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Mt. Vernon, 111., L. U. 999. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective December 31, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Delaware, Ohio, L. U. 128 7.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

New Bedford, Mass., L. U. 1416. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.65 to $1.85 per hour, effective January 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Albany, Ga., L. U. 2171. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective December 31, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

January 2. 1948 
Freeport, 111., L. U. 719. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.6 2% 
to $1.90 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Biloxi, Miss., L. U. 166 7. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 2, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Benld & Gillespie, 111., L. U. 1769. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.85 per hour, effective January 18, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Carpenters' Home, Lakeland. Florida 
January S. 19 48 

The General Executive Board met in regular session at Carpenters' Home, 
Lakeland, Florida, on the above date. 

The Report of the Delegates to the Sixty-Second Annual Convention of the 
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada, held in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in 
September, 19 4 7, was filed for future reference, as it has been published in the 
December, 19 47 issue of "The Carpenter" for the information of our members. 

Report of the Delegates to the Fortieth Annual Convention of the Building 
and Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor, held 
in San Francisco, California, in October, 1947, was filed for future reference as 
it has already been published in the December, 1947 issue of "The Carpenter" 
for the information of our members. 

Report of the Delegates to the Sixty-Sixth Annual Convention of the American 
Federation of Labor held in San Francisco, California, in October, 1947, was 



22 THECARPEXTER 

filed for future reference as it has already been published in the December, 1947 
issue of "The Carpenter" for the information of our members. 

Report of the Delegates to the Thirty-Ninth Annual Convention of the Union 
Label Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor, held in San Fran- 
cisco, California, in October, 1947, was filed for future reference as it has been 
published in the January, 19 4 8 issue of "The Carpenter" for the information of 
our members. 

Notification from the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada with reference to 
increase in per capita from the present 1% cents per member per month to 2i/4 
cents per member per month, effective January 1, 1948. 

Also notification from American Federation of Labor concerning the change 
in rate of per capita tax to 3 cents per member per month, effective January, 1948, 
in accordance with action taken by 66th Annual Convention held in San Francisco 
was received and the Board ordered compliance therewith. 

Local Union 525, Coshocton, Ohio, requests the Board to increase the present 
pension twenty per cent. The Board decided to Inform Local Union 525 that it 
has no authority to do so. 

Renewal of Public Liability Insurance on General Office Building, 222 E. 
Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, for one year ending October 12, 1948, 
through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Mary- 
land was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Workmens' Compensation covering General Representatives in the 
States of Oregon and Washington through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty 
Company of Baltimore, Maryland for one year ending October 12, 1948, was 
referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Workmens' Compensation covering employees of General Office at 
222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, and employees of the Printing Plant 
at 516 Hudson Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, as well as General Representatives, 
through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, 
for one year ending October 12, 1948, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Public Liability Insurance on Printing Plant, 516 Hudson Street, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, for one year ending October 12, 1948, through the United 
States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, was referred to 
our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Public Liability Insurance on property owned by the Brotherhood 
at Headquarters, known as 523-525 North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, 
for one year ending October 15, 19 48, through the United States Fidelity and 
Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, was referred to our Legal Department. 

The General President called the Board's attention to the revised application 
for membership, which is in accordance with action taken by the Board at a 
previous session. The Board instructs Local Unions to return their unused appli- 
cations which will be replaced with the revised applications without cost. 

The General President appointed the following Committee to inspect the rooms 
of the Home: 

FRANK DUFFY 
S. P. MEADOWS 
ARTHUR MARTEL 

He also appointed the following Committee on the inspection of Mocks and 
supplies: 

M. A. HUTCHESON 
HARRY SCHWARZER 
R. E. ROBERTS 

Balance of the members of the Board to audit the books and accounts of the 
Home. 

Audit of books and accounts of the Home commenced. 

January 9, 1948 

Correspondence from Seventh-Day Adventists Council on Industrial Relations 
as to their denominational teachings regarding the relationship of their members 



THE CARPENTER 23 

to organized labor, and requesting our cooperation. The General Executive Board 
decided that there was no real reason for complying with their request inasmuch 
as the laws, rules and regulations of the Brotherhood in no way interfere with 
their members carrying out their religious beliefs — especially in these days when 
we have established the five-day week. The General President to reply accord- 
ingly. 

In a previous session of the Board, due consideration was given to the Metro- 
politan District Council of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, appointing a Committee in 
connection with erecting a memorial to P. J. McGuire — promoted by a publicity and 
advertising agency, in which the Board did not concur. The General President 
called the Board's attention to a letter, advising that the Metropolitan District 
Council of Carpenters has withdrawn its delegates and likewise withdrawn as 
sponsors of the P. J. McGuire Memorial Committee. Same was filed for future 
reference. 

On the purported appeal submitted to the General Executive Board signed by 
Michael O'Grady, a member of Local Union 608, New York City, purporting to be 
an appeal against the action of the New York District Council in reference to 
their action taken on the recommendations of the Trial Committee that heard the 
charges which were filed against Michael O'Grady; further alleging to appeal 
against the action of the District Council in concurring in the aforementioned 
recommendations, and further alleging to appeal from the decision of the General. 
President of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America for 
not accepting a communication that was received at the General Office July 9, 
19 47 from Michael O'Grady, that did not conform to the procedure as set forth 
in the General Constitution governing appeals, and which the record shows 
Michael O'Grady was notified to that effect July 31, 1947 in which communication 
he was notified that Section 5 7 of the General Constitution provides that an 
appeal must be filed within thirty days of the action complained of, and his com- 
munication, which was received July 9, 19 47, did not conform to that provision. 
Furthermore the document that he submitted was not made out in the form of 
an appeal as provided for in the General Constitution and that when a member 
appeals he must be governed by the provisions of that Section. It is further 
shown by his communication of November 21, 1947, addressed to the General 
Executive Board, that said communication does not conform to the provisions of 
the General Constitution in reference to appeals. 

Therefore the General Executive Board cannot consider the communication as 
an appeal and dismissed same. 

It has come to the attention of the General Executive Board that many of our 
Local Unions throughout the jurisdiction of the Brotherhood have accepted to 
honorary membership applicants who have never worked at any branch of the 
trade, and who, by no stretch of imagination are qualified for membership as per 
the qualifications set forth in the General Constitution, and therefore, the Board 
goes on record as declaring that no applicant can be admitted as a member unless 
he can qualify as being competent to work at some branch of the trade. 

Appeal of William Lesko of Local Union 490, Passaic, N. J., to the General 
Executive Board from the decision of the General President in the case of 
William Lesko versus the Essex County and Vicinity District Council wherein 
the General President sustained the action of the Essex County and Vicinity Dis- 
trict Council and dismissed the appeal, after giving careful consideration to this 
case the decision of the General President was sustained. 

The appeal of S. J. Coder of Local Union 3 74, Buffalo, N. Y., to the General 
Executive Board against the decision rendered by the General President under 
date of February 28, 1947 cannot be considered for the reason that the General 
Constitution sets forth than an appeal must be taken within thirty days from 
the date of grievance complained of, and inasmuch as the decision was rendered 
February 28, 19 47 and the appeal not taken until the date of September 25, 1947. 
does not comply with the provisions of the General Constitution and, therefore, 
cannot be considered by the Board. 



24 THECARPEXTER 

January 10, 1948 
Lake Charles, La., Local Union 9 5 3. — Movement for an increase in wages from 

$1.75 to $2.00 per hour (Carpenters), $1.75 to $2.00 (Millwrights) effective 

April 10, 1948. OfRcial sanction granted without financial aid. 

Norman, Okla., Local Union 1063. — Movement for an increase in wages from 

$1.55 to $1.75 per hour, effective February 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 
Corinth, Miss., Local Union 2352. — Movement for an increase in wages from 

$1.25 to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

January 12, 1948 

Brothers Joe O'Sullivan and Dave Ryan, President and Secretary respectively 
of the Bay Counties District Council of Carpenters, San Francisco, California, 
appeared before the General Executive Board upon invitation of the Board to 
confer in reference to method and procedure to follow in order to enforce their 
Local By-Laws and Trade Rules. 

Cleburne, Texas, Local Union 923. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective March 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Murphysboro, 111., Local Union 604. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective March 12, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Harlingen, Texas, Local Union 2190. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective March 7, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

New Iberia, La., Local Union 2269. — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $1.25 to $1.50 per hour, effective March 5, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Meadville, Pa., Local Union 556. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.75 to $2.25 per hour, effective February 14, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

January 13, 19 48 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

January 14, 19 48 

Appeal of Local Union 735, Mansfield, Ohio, from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the death claim of Mrs. Ho Berry, wife of Brother 
Harry R. Berry, a member of said Local Union was referred back to the General 
Treasurer for further consideration. 

Appeal of Local Union 2087, Crystal Lake, Illinois, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the death claim of Mrs. Otilla Bieber, wife of 
Geo. C. Bieber, a member of said Local Union, for the reason that Brother Bieber 
was out of benefit standing at the time of her death, was carefully considered. The 
decision of the General Treasurer was sustained and appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Local Union 178 2, Newark, New Jersey, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late Sam 
Mindlin, for the reason that he was not in benefit standing at the time of death, 
was carefully considered. The decision of the General Treasurer was sustained and 
the appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Local Union 3 5 6, Marietta, Ohio, from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late Harry O. 
Hackman, for the reason that he was not in benefit standing at the time of death, 
was carefully considered. The decision of the General Treasurer was sustained 
and the appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Local Union 9 04, Jacksonville, Illinois, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late 
Charles Walihan, for the reason that he was not in benefit standing at the time 
of death, was carefully considered. The decision of the General Treasurer was 
sustained and the appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Local Union 1588, Sydney, N. S., Canada, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the Death Claim of William MacAdam, a 
former member of said Local Union, was carefully considered, after which the 
decision of the General Treasurer was sustained on grounds set forth therein and 
the appeal was dismissed. 

Audit of books and accounts completed and found correct. 



THE CARPENTER 25 

January 15, 1948 
The General President appointed a sub-committee of the General Executive 
Board, consisting of First Vice-President, M. A. Hutcheson, Board Member John- 
son of the First District and Board Member Kelly of the Second District to con- 
sider the case of Local Union 101, Baltimore, Maryland and Local Union 1126, 
Annapolis, Maryland, regarding the question of jurisdiction. The Committee 
recommended: 

"That a hearing be held by the sub-committee of the General 
Executive Board, giving all parties an opportunity to be heard re- 
garding the subject." 

The recommendation was unanimously concurred in by the Board. 

The same Committee had referred to it for consideration the protest of Local 
Union 537, Rahway, New Jersey, regardinng the matter of consolidation, and 
recommended the following: 

"That the special report of Representative O. Wm. Blaier to the 
General President on September 5, 1947 be approved and that Local 
Union 53 7, Rahway, New Jersey consolidate with Local Union 715, 
Elizabeth, New Jersey, and that the territory previously, and now 
under the jurisdiction of Local Union 537 be governed by Local 
Union 715, Elizabeth, New Jersey." 

The recommendation was concurred in unanimously by the Board. 

Gadsden, Ala., Local Union 1371. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective January 10, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

North Hampton, N. H., Local Union 1652. — Movement for an increase in 
wages from $1.37 1/^ to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction 
granted. 

Fostoria, Ohio, Local Union 1766. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.80 to $2.30 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Local Unions Nos. 905, Freeland, Pennsylvania and 1439, McAdoo, Pennsyl- 
vania were directed by the General President on August 26, 1947 to confine their 
activities to their own immediate jurisdiction as the Middle Anthracite District 
Council no longer exists and to discontinue infringing upon the jurisdiction of 
Local Union 129, Hazelton, Pennsylvania and the Wyoming Valley District 
Council, but as they have not done so, the General Executive Board herewith 
instructs these Local Unions to comply with the orders of the General President 
without further delay and so notify the General Office, otherwise further action 
will be taken. 

The General President submitted to the General Executive Board the pro- 
posed program of the American Federation of Labor for setting up Labor's League 
for Political Education. 

After due consideration the Executive Board recommends that we participate 
in the priciples of the program, and also recommends that Local Unions and Dis- 
trict Councils affiliated with the Brotherhood take an active part in defeating 
and repealing any and all anti-labor legislation. 

Local Unions and District Councils will be advised of the procedure that will 
be followed by the International organization regarding this program. 

There being no further business to be acted upon the Board adjourned to 
meet at the call of the Chairman. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK DUFFY, Secretary. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 

3081 Ukiah, Oregon 30 8 3 Grants, New Mex. 

2431 Sumter, S. C. 2432 Park Palls, Wis. 



Jin ^itntttvxntn 

Xot lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Xot dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



!H^si in l^txttt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother CECIL O. ALLEN, Local No. 200, Columbus, Ohio 

Brother W. C. APPLEWTHITE, Local No 1622, Hay ward, Calif. 

Brother JOSEPH BALLOU, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother O. BERKEY, Local No. 430, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Brother JOHN C. BLAIR, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, California 

Brother FRANK BOSSI, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother \VM. H. BRADT, Local No. 210, Stamford, Conn. 

Brother FRED CANNADY, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother DAVID CHELLMAN, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother J. C. CLIFTON, Local No. 2079, Houston, Texas 

Brother WALTER COFFEE, Local No. 1622, Hay ward, Calif. 

Brother ANDREW CRISPIN, Jr., Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother J. J. CUSHMAN, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, California 

Brother FREDERICK DeBAUN, Local No. 964, Suffem, N. Y. 

Brother AUGUST DeGREGORY, Local No. 871, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Brother HUGH DRUMMOND, Local No. 1373, Flint, Mich. 

Brother GEORGE DUSENBERRY, Local No. 301, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Brother RALPH DUTTER, Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 

Brother WILLIAM FREDERICKS, Local No. 964, Suffem, N. Y. 

Brother EUGENE GILKERSON. Local No. 44, Champaign-Urbana, IlL 

Brother M. O. GOEBEL, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother EDWARD GRIMSHAW, Local No. 1305, Fall River, Mass. 

Brother EDWARD GROSSCURTH, Local No. 3, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Brother LEWIS H. HAWKINS, Local No. 198, Dallas, Texas 

Brother WILLIAM H. HEAD, Local No. 343, Winnipeg, Man. Canada 

Brother E. T. HEARRELL, Local No. 1671, KiLgore, Texas 

Brother ROBERT IRELAND, Local No. 2163, New York, N. Y. 

Brother OLE L. JORGENSEN, Local No. 513, Port Albemi, B. C. Cam. 

Brother FRANK M. KNAUF, Local No. 1209, Newark, N. J. 

Brother B. KOELLE, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 

Brother WILLIAM B. KOHL, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 

Brother HERMAN KUNZ, Local No. 200, Columbus, Ohio 

Brother LaVERN LaGORE, Local No. 871, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Brother WILLIAM LEE, Local No. 16, Springfield, 111. 

Brother LLOYD LOWERY, Local No. 871, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Brother HUGH MacLENNON, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother JOHN J. McCARTY, Local No. 200, Columbus, Ohio 

Brother EDWARD McFARLAND, Local .No. 430, Wilkinsburg, Pa, 

Brother JOSEPH McINNIS, Local No. 67, Roxbur>-, Mass. 

Brother JOHN T. McMULLEN, Local No. 1373, Flint, xMich. 

Brother ANTON MEDITZ, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother GEORGE MESSICK, Local No. 200, Columbus, Ohio 

Brother FRANK MILLER. Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother ALBERT E. MOORE, Local No. 67, Roxbur>-, Mass. 

Brother GEORGE C. MORRILL, Local No. 40. Boston, Mass. 

Brother RAYMOND PAYSUER, Local No. 1169, Gastonia, N. C. 

Brother J. N. PERRY, Local No. 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

Brother JOHN PINCH, Local No. 176, Newport, R. I. 

Brother ABBE P. RAY, Local No. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 

Brother FRED SARRUP, Local No. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Brother HARRY LEE SAWYER, Local No. 1324, Rochester, N. H. 

Brother GEORGE SCOTT, Local No. 964, Suffem, N. Y. 

Brother ARCHIE SIMPSON, Local No. 1665, Alexandria, Va. 

Brother TITUS STUDT, Local No. 333, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Brother WILLIAM P. SWEENEY, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother C. E. THOMPSON, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother DANIEL TIDLUND, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, California 

Brother W. A. TOVrXE, Local No. 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

Brother CARL L. VANCE, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother WILLIAM WALKINGTON, Local No. 44, Champaign-Urbana, 111. 

Brother WILLIAM WALTERS, Local No. 2287, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother STANLEY WASIURA, Local No. 824, Muskegon, Mich. , 

Brother GEORGE WHITE, Local No. 200, Columbus, Ohio 

Brother THEODORE WINKLER, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother GEORGE P. YELTON, Local No. 61, Kansas Citv, Mo. 

Brother L. A. ZUMSTEG, Local No. 1622, Hayward, Calif. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 233 
By H. H. Siegele 

There are so many different kinds of 
wrecking bars in use that it would 
be difficult to present them all. How- 
ever, all of them are to a great extent 
based on the same principle. Besides 
that, the wrecking bar is called by dif- 
ferent names. Originally it was the 
crowbar with a chisel point, bent 




Fig. 1 

enough to give it leverage. The crowbar 
is also called pinch bar. The pinch bar, 
so far as carpenter's tools are concerned, 
originally was a light straight bar with 
a chisel point slightly bent. Later this 
bar was made with claws on one end 
for pulling nails, but it was still a 
straight bar. Then came the wrecking 
bar with a slightly bent chisel point on 
one end and a hook with claws on it 
for pulling nails, on the other end. 
This is the bar that is used now by 
carpenters and by wreckers, rather than 




Fig. 2 

the straight pinch bar. This bar is 
also called, gooseneck bar, ripping bar, 
and frequently, pinch bar. 

Fig. 1 shows the gooseneck wrecking 
bar at the top and the straight pinch 



bar at the bottom. For packing in a 
tool case the straight bar has advan- 
tages over the gooseneck bar, but for 
giving service the bar shown by the 
upper drawing is a leader. 




Fig. 3 

One of the things that the gooseneck 
bar is used for is shown in Fig. 2. Here 
we show 3 floor joists that originally 
were not setting in an upright position, 
which is often found when the joist 
material is ih a wind. At A we show 
a joist that has been brought to an 
upright position and is being held in 
place with a nail and tie board. The 
dotted lines show the original position. 
At B we show how the gooseneck bar 
is used in bringing the joist to the 




Fig. 4 

right position. • The dotted lines give 
the starting point. The two arrows show 
how the bar is pulled in order to bring 
the joist to the upright position. At C is 
shown a joist that is yet to be straight- 
ened out. The dotted lines indicate the 
right position. 

Fig. 3 shows how to use the goose- 
neck for twisting a 2x4 in order to re- 
move it from its position, or to adjust it. 
The arrow shows how the bar is pulled 
when the twisting is done. 

Fig. 4, the upper drawing, shows a 
wrecking bar that has advantages and 
disadvantages over the gooseneck bar. 



THE CARPENTER 



TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 



M^ONPCAN 



\4 



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To the left i= .sho^n a sort of sectional 
view. The teeth in the hook should be 
of good steel In order to give satisfac- 
tory results. When these teeth are 
sharp the bar gives excellent service for 
removing pipe and so forth. The bar is 
especially suitable for taking up floor- 
ing. It should be stated here, that I 
am not specifying any particular length 
or size, for those things necessarily must 



be determined by the workman who has 
the bar made, or is buying it. 

The bottom drawing In Fig. 4, shows 
a face view of what is called a clap- 
board chisel. The flat point is bent about 
on the order of the point of a wrecking 
bar. This chisel is suitable for prying 
loose light moldings, siding boards, and 
so forth. The wide point, if the chisel is 



Save your wrist . . . use your weight 



• J.Iake screw 
driving easy as nail 
dri\ing. With a '"Yankee", 
the spiral drives and draws, using 
your weight instead of your muscle. 
Three sizes, each with 3 different size 
bits. For faster action and for one-hand 
driving in narrow places, the 130A 
'"Yankee"' with the quick-return spring. 
Write for the "YANKEE" Tool Book 



and a 




"YANKEE" 



SPIRAL 
SCREW DRIVER 



[STANLEY] 



V. NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., Philadelphia 33, Pa. 




STEEL SQUARE 



Completely Revised 



HAND 
BOOK 



This coacise and handy little book illustrates and deseribes the best methods of usine 
the eaipaiter's steel sqnaie in laying out all kinds of earpentry wotfe. It is easy to 
understand as a pietore at the sonare laying directly on Qie woik shot^ exactly bow the 
Tarions cots are made. Its eompaet and handy size makes it etmTQuent to carry in the 
pocket for qui^ reference. 

Pestpafd. Maney back guarantee if Dot entirely satisfied 



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fcr Laving Out Work. 



Address.- 

State- 



used carefully, prevents marring- the 
material. 

Fig. 5 shows the bar shown in Fig. 4, 




Fig. 5 

used as a pipe wrench. The arrows in- 
dicate how the workman pulls the bar. 




^^ 



3 



Stripping Cfi/iel''^'^ 
Fig. 6 



The upper drawing of Fig. 6 shows 
a double claw bar, which gives excellent 




Fig. 7 

service for pulling nails and the like. 
The bottom drawing shows a face view 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 11. Root framing 
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BUILDING.— Has 210 p. and 495 11.. covering form 
building, finishing, stair building, etc. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p., 754 11., covering general 
house carpentry, estimating and other subjects. $2.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p. 
670 11., and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

The above five books support one another. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— Illustrated prose. Only $1.00. 

FREE. — With 2 books, one $1.00 book free, with 
4 books, two, and with 5 books, three. Books auto- 
graphed. 
C.O.D. orders will have postage and C.O.D. fee added. 



today. 



H. H. SIEGELE \ 



mporia, Kansas 



NOW! aft^42^fM42ii> 

FRAMING SQUARE 



SOLVES All 
fRAtMHG PROBLEMS 
INSTANTLY! ' 



C?ENLARGEO 
SECTION 
Rafter Table 




AJAa you need to KNOAV is WIDTH 
OF BUILDING AND PITCH OF ROOF 

Now one tool solves all roof framing 
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Sharp's Automatic Framing Square 
does it all. Just set tool to pitch of 
roof and it automatically solves every 
problem and provides direct marking 
guide for all cuts. Gives exact figures 
for length of rafters. Cuts given in 
square readings and in degrees for 
power saw work. Opens to 9 0-deg. 
angle. 



One Setting gives you the marking 
for both Plumb Cut and Mitre Cut 



Blade gives 

marking for 

Plumb Cut of 

Common and 

Hip Rafter. 





Bevel Bar 

automotically 

adjusts itself 

for all 

Mitre Cuts on 

Hip, Valley 

or Jack Rafters. 



A sturdy, all-metal tool that folds up into 
one compact unit ... 1 foot long, 2 inches 
wide. Fits in poclset easily. No sharp corn- 
ers to catch on clothing. 

GUARANTEE : If you are not completely 
satisfied with Sharp's Automatic Framing 
Square, return the tool within 30 days and 
your money will be refunded. 



Prepaid 



*12«5 



UOYD I. CROWLEY 

1880 South 12th Street 

Salem, Oregon 
Manufacturer and Distributor 



/fu^^^,ui2ii> FRAMING SQUARE 



30 



THE CARPEXTER 



of a stripping chisel, which is also 
called a ripping chisel. The flat point is 
bent on the order of a pinch bar point. 

Fig. 7 illustrates how the double 
claw bar is used for pulling nails. The 
dotted lines show the bar in position for 
starting to pull a nail, while the shaded 
drawing shows the position of the bar 
after the nail has been pulled in part. 
In case of ordinary nails, one operation 
will pull the nail completely, but for 
large spikes two operations often are 
necessarj-. 

Fig. S shows the bar in position for 
completing the pulling of the spike that 
was partly pulled by the operation 
shown in Fig. 7. One of the advantages 
of the double claws, is that it is not 



necessary to bring the bar down almost 
to a level with the floor to catch the 




ww/w///w/'/"//w//////////y///////////////////^//7, 
Fig. 8 



nail, 
pull 



In other words, the workman can 
nails with this bar without com- 



S1.25 with 7 Blades ^i^^p/C*;, 



CARPENTERS 

Demand the Bert 



The Genuine 



f5:RM. 






^^,u^Ai„„^^^fi <^t>,S F- P- l^- SAWS AND BLADES 



.'M, 



■^VJf*'' 



^ 



The Saw of Superior Quality with a National Beputation. Mann- - 
factuied by a member of U. B. of C. & J. of A. No. 1. 
If your dealer does not handle, write direct to me. 

P. P. MAXSOX, Sole Manufacturer 

3722 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO, ILL 




FREE: Blue Print Plans and Booklet: 
"How To Read Blue Prints" 

Find our novr — by this Free Trial Lesson — hew easy 
it is to learn the technical side of Building. ZSTo 
charge for this lesson either now or later. 

PREPARE TO GET AHEAD 

As a carpenter or builder, with practical experience, you wUl be 
able to progress rapidly, after you learn this "headwork" side of 
Building. Successful builders — foremen, estimators, superin- 
tendents, master builders and contractors — must understand blue 
prints, building construction and estimating building costs. 
Send today for Free Trial Lesson or Booklet: "How to Bead 
Blue Prints" and a set of Blue Print Plans. See for yourself how 
easy it is for a practical man to get ahead by the time-saving, 
low cost C.T.C. methods. 



M Al L C O U PON NO W 



Chicago Technical College , 

B-120 Tech Bldg,, 2000 So. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 16, 111. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to I 

Read Blue Prints" and information about how I can train ' 



Xame Age- 
Address Occupation 

Ci-.T Zone SUte 



LEARN AT HOME 
in YOUR SPARE TIME 

L^arn how to lay out and run a building job, 
hovr to read blue prints, how to understand 
specifications, how to estimate costs. Just 
use the blue prints, specifications and 
easy lessons we furnish — same as the 
contractor uses. Fits in with your 
daily experience. This practical plan is 
the result of 4.3 years of experience in 
training practical builders. 



CHICAGO 

TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

Tech Bunding, 2000 South Michigan Ave. 
Chicago 16, Illinois 




pletely stooping over to hook tlie bar 
D.nto the nail. 

Most of the. wrecking bars that one 
finds on the market do not have the 
tiook bent enough. In fact, they are 
bent for pulling nails only — the matter 
of straightening out joists, twisting 
.2x4's, or adjusting other timbers with 
the hook of a wrecking bar, seems to 
have been left out of the consideration 
altogether by the manufacturers. This 
writer has never seen a wrecking bar 
on the market that he would want to 
use very long without having it worked 
over by a blacksmith. The manufactur- 
ers evidently got their idea for the 
wrecking bar from someone other than 
a carpenter. The wise workman will 
have his wrecking bar made to order; 
that is, he will have it made so it will 
do the things he wants it to do. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 
Bensen Square Co., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 32 

Carlson Rules 31 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 32 

Greenlee Tools, Rockford, 111 1 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 3 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

Master Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y. 1 

F. P. Maxson, Chicago, 111. 30 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles. 

Cal. 32 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 28 

Sargent & Co., New Haven, Conn. 4 
Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 29 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 11 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore._ 31 
Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 
E. Weyer, New York, N. Y 32 

Carpentry Materials 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._2nd Cover 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City Ind. 4th Cover 

Overalls 

The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, 
Mo. 3 

Technical Courses and Books 

American School, Chicago, 111 32 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 31 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 30 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 28 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 28 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 29 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 3 




FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Leam to draw plans, eatlmate, be a Uve-wlre buUder, do 
remodeling, take contracting Jobs. These 8 practical, pro- 
fusely Illustrated books cover subiects that wUl help you 
to get more work and make more money. Architectural de- 
sign and drawing, estimating, steel square, roof framing, 
construction, painting and decorating, heating, air-condi- 
tioning, concrete forms and many other subjects are included. 

UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books ar« 
the most up-to- 
date and complet* 
we have ever pub- 
lished on thei* 
many subjects. 
Examination 



BETTER JOBS- BETTER PAY 

The Postwar building boom is In full 
swing and trained men are needed. 
Big opportunities are always for MEN 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- 
ply quick, easily understood training and 
handy, permanent reference information 
Ihat helps solve building problems. 

Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For 



\MERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Vocational Publishers since 1898 
Dept. G236 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 

You may ship me the XJp-to-Date edition ol your eight 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charge! 
only, and If fully satisfied In ten days, I will send you 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 is paid. I am not obligated tn anr 
way unless I keep the books. 



Name . 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home addreai. 



SAW ClAMP "" 



%pee6 Up Saw Filing! 




Money-Back 
r^^ Guarantee vj 



Money with or- 
der, prepaid. 
C.O.D. postage extra 
Grips entire length of saw . . a full 30 inches. Attaches 
or releases from work bench In only 15 seconds. Also can 
be used for band saws. Made to last a lifetime. Sturdy, 
all steel construction. Gripping edges ground to hold en- 
tire length of saw true with no vibration. 

THE SPEED CORPORATION 
2025-A N.E. SANDY PORTLAND 12. ORE. 



CHANGE BLADES 
IN 10 SECONDS 



'Quick-change blades are 

featured on all Carlson Rules. 
CHIEF available in 6-, 8- and 10- 
ft., lengths; WHITE CHIEF and 
HOBBY in 6- and 8-ft. Keep a 
"spare" replacement blade on hand. 
SOLD BY LEADING HARDWARE DEALERS 




CARLSON 



STEEL TAPE RULES 



White Chief Tape Lines Are Mftd Under U.S. Pat. 2089209 



SIDE CUTS ON RAFTERS 

AUTOMATICALLY! 




Patent in U. S, A. 

5 TOOLS IN ONE \ 

Actual Size 2" wide. 14" long:. 
>L1DE OF XICKiX SII.\'ER 

1. TEE ■'^E'y?ZS SOrAEE" ATTOilATICAlXY 
GITE? THE ?rDE CTT A>'GLE OX P.AFTEES 
SrCH A? JACK. HIP. TALI.ZT- ETC BY SET- 
TXN'G TEE BLADE TO TEE PLr:^.i:B CrT 
AXGLE. 



i. 2I;rr :;:i:; -.' irrrr; ~ill lock in posiUan). 
5. ErTil £;j:re :=r. ;= :r". :: irj angle). 
The Bensen Square is "a tool" all carpenters 
u'ill appreciate. 

S6.00 post paid. 

Guaraji"teed to give perfett satisfaction or ycur money 
refunded. Send Money Order or Cheek fNo stamps). 

BENSEN SQUARE COMPANY 

951 56th Street. Brooklyn 19. X. T. 



SUPER HAM-R-ADZ NO. 10 




Tool steel attachment 
quickly converts car- 
penter's hammer into 
eflBcient adz. Ideal for 
rough framing, scaf- 
folding — ^form build- 
ing. Easy to use and 
kf-ep sharp. Fits poc- 
ket. Get yours today . 



SUPER SQUARE GAGE NO. 49 




AsiiTi aral 



Only .75 the pair! At Dealers' t>r Postpaid. 



LOS ANGELES 14, CAL. 



SOLVE ROOF PROBLEMS l>^STANTiY 

IN TEN SECOSDSn All 11 
lengths end cuts cf rafters 
for simple and hip roofe. 
Just set did to "pitch" & 
"run," and the other fig- 
ures show up in windows. 
Unlike rafter tcbles, run is 
■set directly in feet and in- 
ches. There is no need to 
adjust later for thickness 
of ridge board. Cuts giv- 
en in degrees and square 
readings. 

RAFTER DIAL Sl.95 Order from: E. Weyer, Depf. H, 
P.O. Box 153, Pfanefarium Station, New York 24, N. Y. 




loMakeMONE]^ 



'■31ADE .'1 :;^ : rS- 9 MOXTHS"— says W. A. T.— 



-r, M-. 



REPEAT CASH BUSINESS-PART OR FULL TIME 



SEND FOR FREE PLAN 




FOLEY MFG. CO.. 
218-8 Foley BIdg., Minneapciis 
.Sen(J FREE PLAN c- F, 
Sharpener busiiiess. 

Xame 

Address 



1-r.. Livrn MoTver 



BE READY FOR 
A BETTER JOB 
AT BIGGER PAY 




Thousands of 

Troined Men 

Will Be Needed 



The Buildir-g O'. c m is Treli under way. Xew homes 
and other structurfe.s to be built will provide a tre- 
mendous number of well-paid jobs. Men trained 
in Architecture. Drafting. Contracting. Carpen- 
trv and related building trades will cash in BIG 
cr. their knowledge and skill. TOU can train in 
srsre time at home, at low cost, for a big-pay 
;:b in this rich field. American School can help 
yo'i to success just as it has helped others dur- 
ing- it 51 years. Check, fill in and mail coupon 

'^'11'^ 111 l-F— ^_i.^i?£PH'i2R:_ 

AMERICAN SCHOOL 

Dept. E244, Drexel Ave. at I1\'n St., Chicago 37, III. 
.Sr-i —-- F?:E^ ir.::r-i : - i _;: tjut special trainine 

Achltecture & Building Z Automotive Engineering 



n Drafting and Design 

ZI Contracting 

!Z Practical Plumbing 

C Air Conditioning 

!Z Refrigeration 

C Electrical Engineering 



Diesel Engineering 
_ Mechanical Engineering 
_ Plastics Engineering 
!Z Aviation _ Radi* 

n Business Management 
_ High School Cowries 



'm^^'^^ 



l£SS 




-^ Every stroke counts with a Stanley Chisel. Takes a 
sharp edge and holds it longer because it's first quality chisel 
steel, carefully heat treated. Tempered all the way back to 
the shank for repeated re-grindings. Made in all the popular 
styles and sizes . . .^with leather-capped hickory handles, 
composition handles and composition capped with steel. 
Stanley Tools, 163 Elm St., New Britain, Conn. 



Stanley Wood Chisel 
No. 750 




THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

[STANLEY] 

Reg. U.S. Pal. Off. 

HARDWARE HAND TOOLS ■ ELECTRIC TOOLS 




Every cutting job— cross-cutting, ripping, dadoing, 
angle cutting, bevel cutting, mutiple cutting, mortis- 
ing, scoring, or cutting light g^uge metals — can be 
done faster . . , better . . . cheaper with an Electric 
MallSaw. 4 Models with capacities of 2, l\ 2| 
and \\ inches. All have Universal motors. 

Ask Hardware Dealer or write Power Tool Division. 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 Soufh Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 
26 Years of "Better Tools for Better Work." 



AIJDELS Cai*penters 
and Builders Guides 

4vois.^6 




Intid* Trad* Informstlon 

Jot Cnrptntcrs. Buildtr,. Join- 
ers. Buildinc Mechanics and 
Kll Woodworktrs. These 
Guides give you the short-cut 
instructions that you want— 
Incladinz new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money savinc suf cesttons. Aiv 
easy proKreesive course for the 
apprentice and student. \ 
practical daily helper and 
Quick Reference for the master 
worker. Carpenters every- 
where are uninc these Guides 
ae a Helpinc Hand to Easier 
Work. Belter Work and BeU 
ter Pay. To »et this assist- 
■ • • hll 



Inside Trade Information 0ns pon teiow 

How to use the steel square — How to file and set 
saws — How to build furniture — How to use S 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How to us9 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpentera 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems^Es- 
timatine strength of timbers — How to set girders 
end sills— How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate—How to use settings 12, 13 and 17 on the 
eteel sauare — How to build hoists and scaffolds— 
Bkylights — How to build stairs — How to put oa 
interior trim — How to hanit doors — How to lath- 
lay floors — How to paint 




AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10. N. Y. 

IMail Audels barpenters and Builders Guides. 4 vols., on 7 days fre« 
trial. If OK I will remit $1 in 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 is paid. 
Otherwise I will return them. No obUBation unless I am satisfied. 



Employed by_ 



CAR 





„OVERHt^D D°f^,ere 'ns^°"y,sers 
^"'^^Id service .^ e _^^^, ^ep^" enS'" 

■'" °" nd Vines* "^"'f' DOOR '^ . ^ ond 
o co«>p\e\^ aures and 



• Any •OVcfiHEAD DOOR" ^^Zc^ 
may be manuo//y or e/ec- ^>^5^ 
fficaify operaied. Sold by ^^j^^Sr. 
Nation-WidB Sales — Instal- 
lation — Service, 



WITH THE 



MIRACLE WEDGE 



OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION • Hortford City^ Indiana, U. S. A. 




THE 




MPENTEi 



FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




MARCH, 1948 



THE ONLY FACTORY METHOD 



IMXVf FASTENED TO ANY 
WORK BENCH OR TABLE 




One Size, 



Weight 116 Lbs. 
9Vi Inches Long 



5PEBDY* ACCURATE • EFFORTLESS • TESTED • PROVED 

Carefully Designed, Sturdily Constructed . . . Simplifies Saw Setting 



• QUALITY MATERIALS 

working parts of hardened steel with rust-proof 
plating; sturdy, well assembled. 

• AUTOMATICALLY TRIPPED 

pressure delivered equally at each stroke so that 
saw is set perfectly uniform throughout its entire 
length; keeps saw blade in perfect alignment. 



SEE YOUR DEALER OR SEND 
CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO: 

ACCURATE DIE & TOOL CO. 

1934 ST. CLAIR AVENUE 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 



• SIMPLIFIED OPERATION 

pressure of foot on treadle automatically trips 
set; easy to mount on bench or table. 

• ADJUSTABLE, SAVES MONEY 

adjustable for circular sow. 6, 7, and 8, and -2 
man cross-cut saws. Increose the lifetime of 
tools by properly conditioning them without 
wear or damage. 



f9S0 



EACH 



POST PAID 
Money Back Guarantee 



SIDE CUTS ON RAFTERS 

AUTOMATICALLY! 




Patent in U. S. A. 

5 TOOLS IN ONE ! 

Actual Size 2" wide, 14" long. 
MADE OF XICKEL SILA ER 

1. THE "BEXSEX SQt'ARE" AUTOMATirALLY 
GI^'ES THE .SIDE CVT AXOLE OX RAFTERS 
SrCH A.S JACK. HIP. VALLEY. ETC. BY SET- 
TIXG THE BLADE TO THE PLLTirB CUT 
AXGLE. 

2. The Bensen Square will also give the miter cut 
for polygons from 3 to 8 sides by setting the 
blade against the desired polygon marked on base. 

3. Can be used as a common square (90 degrees). 
(Will lock in position). 

4. Miter square (45 degrees). (Will lock in position). 

5. Bevel square (can be set to any angle). 

The Bensen Square is "a tool" all carpenters 
will appreciate. 

$6.00 post paid. 

Guaranteed to give perfect satisfaction or your money 
refunded. Send Money Order or Check (No stamps). 

BENSEN SQUARE COMPANY 

951 56th Street, Brooklj-n 19, X. Y. 



LEARN TO estimate! 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- ; 
ness and be your own boss the "Tsunblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating I 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and i 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing { 
and arithmetic you can master our System i 
in a short period of your spare time. The ! 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. i 

By the use of this System of Estimating you , 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of i 
the author's 40 years of practical experience ! 
reduced to the language you understand. | 
You will never find a more opportune time ; 
to establish yourself in business than now. ' 
Study the course for ten days absolutely : 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep ] 
it just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 , 
and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you \ 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy i 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- , 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it j 
to be after you examine it is the only thing i 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. ! 
Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building CIS, Denver 2, Colorado 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

earn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you 
lat the way to the top-pay jobs and 
, access in Building is to get thorough 
jlnowledge of blue prints, building con- 
itruction and estimating. 

In tliis Chicago Tech Course, you learn to 
■ad blue prints — the universal language of the 
jilder — and understand specifications — for all 

^•pes of buildings. 

■ You learn building construction details : 
lundations, walls, roofs, windows and doors, 

irches, stairs, etc. 

You learn how to lay out work and direct 
uilding jobs from start to finish. You learn 

iD estimate building costs quickly and accurate- 
ly. Find out how you can pre- 

jare at home for the higher- 

[aid jobs in Building, or your 
wn successful contracting busi- 
ess. Get the facts about 

his income-boosting Chicago 

'ech training now. 

i/IAIL COUPON NOW 



Prepare for more pay, greater suc- 
cess. Learn how to lay out and run 
building- jobs, how to read blue prints, 
how to estimate building costs. Prac- 
tical training with complete blue print 
plans and specifications — same as used 
by superintendents and contractors. 
Over 43 years of experience in train- 
ing practical builders. 

INCREASE YOUR INCOME 

Hundreds have quickly advanced to fore- 
man, superintendent, inspector, estimator, 
contractor, with this Chicago Tech train- 
ing in Building. Your practical experi- 
ence aids your success. Get the technical 
training you need for promotion and in- 
creased income. 



FREE 



Blue Prints 
and Trial Lesson 




Send today for Trial Lesson: "How to 
Read Blue Prints," and set of Blue Print 
Plans — sent to you Free. See for yourself 
how this Chicago Tech Course prepares 
you to earn more money, gives you the 
thorough knowledge of Building required 
for the higher-up jobs and higher pay. 
Don't delay. Mail the coupon today in an 
envelope or use a penny postcard. 



C H I C AG O TEC H N I C A L C O LL E G E 

C-120, tECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Chicago Technical College 

C-ISO Tech BIdg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 16, 111. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read Blue Prints" 
with information about how I can train at home. 

Name Age 

Address Occupation 

City Zone State 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Caii>enters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVIII — Xo. 3 



INDIANAPOLIS, MARCH, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Co nt ent s — 



Food For Thought 



Ohio Tees Off 



Bad as the Taft-Hartley Act is for organized labor, it represents only a straw in 
the winds of reaction that are sweeping not only Washington but many of our state 
legislatures as well. The same monopoly interests that pot over the Taft-Hartley Act 
are now subtly working to wreck the Wages and Hours Act, Social Security, and just 
about every other piece of pro-labor legislation passed in the last half a century. 

8 

Tw^o thousand union leaders from all over Ohio converge on Co'umbus February 
8th to take up the matter of anti-union legislation. In a fighting mood the assembled 
delegates serve notice on one and all that organized labor will never surrender its rights 
without a fight to the finish. Under the banner of the Ohio State Federation they adopt 
a comprehensive program for mobilizing the political strength of the state's workers 
against union-wrecking interests wherever they may be. 

- - - 12 

There are two lobbyists in Washington right now for every Congressman. With un- 
limited slosh funds at their disposal, these pressure experts are putting over the vari- 
ous programs of the vested interests— which exp ains why measures such as the Taft- 
Hartley Act ore passed. Furthermore it expla.ns why labor must undergo a political 
awakening. 

15 

An article of interest to every skilled worker in the nation. Because a manufacturer 
cannot get an American artisan to fill a job at about half the wage the job calls for, he 
applies for permission to import a foreign worker. 



Government By Pressure 



It's the Pay That's Short 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Menioriajii 

CoiTespondence 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



10 
16 

19 
20 
21 
24 
26 



Index to Advertisers 



30 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



the acot^ 




is a piker, 



This photograph 
shows (he long , 
tough cane fibres 
which, when Ferox*- 
treated against dry 
rot and termites, 
form the base lor 
many Celotex build- 
ing products. 

♦ BEG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



When it comes to sprouting things big, the 
acorn is a piker alongside the node from 
which sugar cane grows. For the acorn 
only fathers an oak . . . but the sugar 
cane node, through production of tough 
cane fibre, has sired three of the 
greatest advances in building history — 

1 building insulation — From cane fibre 
in 1921 came Celotex cane fibre board . . . 
combining low thermal conductivity 
with great structural strength. 
Today, because of Celotex pioneering, 
heat-leaking buildings are obsolete. 

sound conditioning — In 1924 came 
another great advance from cane fibre — 
Acousti-Celotex perforated cane fibre 
tile . . . combining high sound absorption 
with paintability. Today, because of 
Acousti-Celotex, noise in business and 
industry is on its way out. 

single-'vv'all construction — More 
recently the trend toward single-wall 
construction in residences and industrial 
buildings has been accelerated by the 
development of Cemesto ... a fire-and- 
moisture-resistant asbestos cement wall 
unit with a cane fibre core. Cemesto 
permits the erection of industrial buildings 
with light-weight economical "curtain" 
walls, partitions and roof decks. 

more to come — These three 
contributions of cane fibre to building 
progress illustrate the continuing 
objective of engineering research at 
Celotex ... to give you better building 
products — at lower cost. 

THE CELOTEX CORPORATION, CHICAGO 3. ILLINOIS 



CJeeoteX 

^^^^^^^ RFa n <; PAT OFF 



BUILDING BOARD... INSULATING SHEATHING AND LATH...CELO-ROK ANCHOR LATH AND PLASTER 
CEMESTO . CELO-ROK W AULB O A R D . . . I NT ER I O R FINISH B O A R D S . . . TR I P LE-S E A LE D SH I N G LES . . . FLEXC E LL 




BE YOUR OWN BOSS! 

Big profits for you — be a floor 
surfacing contractor and sand both 
new and old floors! Prospects every- 
where — that's why hundreds of men 
make $35 to $50 a day in floor sur- 
facing w^ork w^ith an American Floor 
Sander. Easy to operate — no big 
overhead — no large investment — no 
special schooling. Just be your own 
boss and get ahead! 

SEND COUPON 

FOR 

MONEY-MAKING 

BOOKLET. 




The American Floor Surfacinp Machine Co. 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo 3, Ohio 
Enclosed find 25c in stamps or coin for 
booklet "Opportunities in Floor Surfacing", 
telling me how I can start my own floor 
sanding business. 

Nfttne .•.•••••.■.••.•.••*•«•*.••••••*-.•-•••.••• 

Street • 

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Food For Thought 

(An open letter to all our readers) 



Dear Reader: 

For many months now we have been telling- you of the need for a 
political awakening on the part of organized labor. In the months ahead 
we probably will be emphasizing this point even more. If this constant 
repetition has not become monotonous to you already, there is every chance 
that it may do so before November 2nd. However, if it does, we ask you to 
bear with us and realize that we like being repetitious even less than you 
like us to be. 

We are not constantly harping on this particular subject because we 
feel it amusing or enlightening or enterprising or entertaining, but rather 
because we know only too well how dangerously close we are to losing all 
the social gains labor has made in the last fifty years. Not only are the 
hard-won rights of labor in jeopardy, but also all the progressive legisla- 
tion passed in the last half century to preserve our natural resources 
and protect us from the evils of monopoly control is in imminent danger 
of being wiped out. The vested interests are in control of Washington 
and they will never be satisfied until they have emasculated organized 
labor and paved the way for their own looting of all of our natural 
resources. 

There are many straws which tell us which way the winds of reaction 
are blowing. The Taft-Hartley Act — as bad as it is — is only one of them. 
There are many more bills equally vicious, equally contemptuous of the 
rights and heritages of the common people, kicking around Washington 
awaiting only the election of a few more NAM-dominated Congressmen 
for sufficient support to put them over. 

Certainly enough has been written about the Taft-Hartley Act by 
now so that every worker is familiar with its vicious provisions. From 
now on workers everywhere will be finding out from actual experience 
how harmful it is to collective bargaining and how deviously it places 
obstacles in the pathway of unions which seek to improve the lot of their 
members. 

What few workers realize is that the Wages and Hours Act is now 
under attack as heavily as the Wagner Act was in the days when the Taft- 
Hartley Act was before Congress. In the last session of Congress a 
House committee spent some time considering amendments to the Wages 
and Hours Act. Among these amendments was one to raise the minimum 
wage from forty to sixty-four cents per hour with the provision that all 
overtime should be based on the sixty-four cent rate. In other words, this 
amendment proposes that all overtime should be limited to ninety-six 
cents an hour regardless of the straight time rate. Other proposals would 



6 THECARPENTER 

limit the coverage of the law and permit the sig-ning of contracts provid- 
ing for lower overtime rates than those now mandatory under the Act. 

The real intent of the attackers of the Wages and Hours Act is to limit 
overtime or eliminate it altogether. This would enable chiseling employers 
to work their crews whatever hours they wished without any fear of 
penalty. It would once more be the old story of some workers staying on 
the job fifty to seventy hours a week while other men walked the streets 
in idleness. Thus, by permitting unlimited overtime without penalty to 
employers, the suggested amendments would create unemployment where 
none now exists. This in turn would exert pressure on wage standards and 
weaken labor's bargaining power to the enhancement of profits. 

While the attack on Social Security is not so far advanced as the attack 
on Wages and Hours Act seems to be, it is nonetheless, seething under the 
surface on Capitol Hill. There is a well organized and well oiled machine 
seeking to destroy the effectiveness of the Social Security Act. Unem- 
ployment benefits and old age benefits cost the emplo3^ers money and 
anything that costs the vested interests money they do not like. When 
they deem the time propitious they will move swiftly and efficiently to 
nullify the Act. 

The vested interests are too canny to demand outright repeal of either 
the Wages and Hours Act or the Social Security Act. Such a course 
would engender too much opposition. Instead they seek to accomplish 
the same ends by having clever amendments passed. All they need now to 
nullify both acts is a few more Congressmen willing to do their bidding 
to add to the many they already control in Washington. 

However, labor legislation is not the only field in which the interests 
of the common people are threatened. Take the matter of taxes, for 
example. There is a well oiled machine in Washington endeavoring to 
shift the bulk of the tax load from the rich to the poor. For the poor there 
is a sugar-coating of a fifty-cent-a-week reduction in taxes while the same 
measure usually grants the wealthy tax reductions up to thousands of dol- 
lars a week. The vested interests expect the sugar-coating to sell the pill 
to the common people. In truth such a measure would mulct the ordinary 
wage earners in the long run. As soon as revenues became inadequate, 
new taxes would have to be devised, and rest assured these new taxes 
would place the bulk of the burden on the back of the little fellow, if 
the vested interests can control a few more Congressmen. 

But for all of these things, it is in the field of natural resources thai, 
the vested interests are working the hardest. There is a bill pending to 
sell all of the nation's grazing lands to stockmen for from three to fifty 
cents an acre. Under the existing setup grazing lands are under the con- 
trol of the government. Big and little stock raisers alike contract for 
grazing rights each year at a fair cost. However, the big cattle interests 
do not like this arrangement. They want to buy the land for a few cents 
an acre and thereby control it permanently. If they succeed in their efforts, 
the next step will undoubtedly be for the timber interests to buy our 
national forests for a song. 

Tidewater oil lands have also caught the e^'e of the vested interests. 
Under our ocean shores there are vast oil resources. To date these have 



THECARPEXTER 7 

belonged to Uncle Sam but there is a well financed effort being made to 
get them out of the hands of the government into the hands of the oil 
companies. The scheme by which this is to be done is too long and com- 
plicated to discuss here, but the end aim is to get the oil into the hands 
of the monopolies. 

Another bill kicking around in Washington is one to exempt railroads 
from provisions of the anti-trust law. Anyone over fift}' years old can 
remember what a stranglehold the railroads had on the economy of the 
nation around the turn of the centurv. Freight rates constituted a big 
part of the cost of living in those days : and if some people have their 
way those days will be brought back again. 

There are other ways, too, in which reeds of reaction are bending in 
the wind. Recently two high-ranking officials in Washington were fired; 
one because he wanted the banking system to function on a sound basis 
and the other because he wanted the airlines operated safely and strictly 
for the benefit of the general public. Of course other reasons were given 
for the discharging of these men but basically they were fired because the 
policies they advocated put public welfare before profits. 

These are only some of the things that are brewing in Washington. 
However, they should give you a good indication of the way things are 
going. Is it any surprise, then, that we are interested in arousing our 
readers to the dangers involved? The vested interests can be stopped, 
but they can be stopped in only one way — through the ballot box. And 
the ballot box can be an eftective weapon only if the common people 
realize their danger and make up their minds to register and vote. 

From now until election time we will continue to harp on the need 
for a political awakening on the part of organized labor. But that is about 
as far as we can go. What is done about these growing dangers to our 
welfare depends on what you as an individual do about registering and 
voting. 

Through the "Brotherhood of Carpenters Non-partisan Committee for 
the Repeal and Defeat of Anti-Labor Legislation"' which was set up by 
the General Executive Board at its last meeting, your fellow workers are 
organizing to combat the reactionary trend which is threatening to wipe 
out every social gain instituted in the last fifty years. Your own Local 
Union or District or State Council is an important cog in this program and 
must play its part. You can do your bit by helping to get ^-our Local Non- 
partisan Committee organized and functioning. 

In this American system of ours, the man standing at the ballot box 
with a vote in his hand is kingpin. Political parties, political committees, 
and political action are all necessary adjuncts to our democratic system, 
but the man who really runs the show is the man with the vote in his hand. 
You are that man. You and your fellow workers will determine in the 
final analysis whether we knuckle down to the vested interests or whether 
we stand up and demand a way of life in which all men are free economic- 
ally as well as politically and avenues of self-betterment are open to all 
people and all classes at all times. Think it over. 

Fraternally yours, 

Peter E. Terzick. Asst. Editor. 



Ohio Tees Off 



i 



•k ir ir 



THE HALF MILLION American Federation of Labor workers 
in Ohio have literally dotted their coats and rolled up their 
sleeves for a showdown fight against the forces of reaction in both 
the United States Cong-ress and the Ohio General Assembly. On Sunday. 
February 8th. more than 2.000 union men. representing CA'ery craft and 
trade in the state, tilled ^lemorial Hall in Columbus to capacity to act on 
the proposal of the Ohio State Federation of Labor to establish the Ohio 
State Federation of Labor League for Political Education. By a unani- 
mous vote, the conference approved 



the program, and Ohio thus prob- 
ably became an early state in the 
union to mobilize the forces of its 
union people for direct and effec- 
tive action against the reactionary 
trend which threatens to wipe out 
every social gain made by labor 
since the turn of the century. 

The program of the Ohio Federa- 
tion is simple. Its objectives are 
uncomplicated. One aim of the pro- 
gram is to bring home to every 
worker in the state the seriousness 
of the threat contained in such anti- 
labor legislation as the Taft-Hart- 
ley Act. The other aim is to impress 
upon every worker the need for 
him to register and vote so that 
through the ballot box American 
workers can maintain their forward 
march to richer, better and more 
secure lives for themselves and 
their families. 

Practically every industrial cen- 
ter in Ohio was represented at the 
February 8th meeting. At least 500 
Brotherhood delegates from Local 
L^nions and District Councils 
throughout the state were in at- 
tendance. Special buses carried 
seventy-five Brotherhood members 
from Cincinnati to the conference. 



Over a hundred Carpenters from 
Cleveland were in attendance. To- 
ledo. Dayton. Youngstown and all 
the other more populous centers had 
strong Brotherhood representations 
on hand and practically every local- 
ity in which a Brotherhood Local 
exists had at least one delegate at 
the meeting. All told, at least a 
quarter of the 2.000 present were 
Brotherhood men. However, all the 
other crafts in and out of the build- 
ing trades were all well represented. 

For enthusiasm, unity and down- 
right determination to get things 
done with a minimum of lost mo- 
tion, the meeting set a new high. 
Phil. Hannah, secretary of the Ohio 
State Federation and also secretary 
of the Ohio Federation's League for 
Political Action, sounded the key- 
note of the conference when he 
said : ""We're well organized in the 
industrial field. Let's do as well in 
the political field." Mercilessly 
attacking the reactionary forces 
which seem bent on emasculating 
organized labor or destroying it all 
together. Hannah declared : 

'AVe know who our enemies are 
and we will remember them. Let us 
dedicate ourselves to electing our 



THE CARPENTER 



9 



friends and defeating our enemies. 
This is not a pro-Democratic meet- 
ing, nor is it a pro-Republican 
meeting, and we surely do not be- 
long in a third party. This is a pro- 
union meeting." 

With these fighting words ring- 
ing in their ears, the delegates 
quickly and unanimously adopted 
the Ohio Federation's program for 
a "League for Political Education." 
Objectives of the League are five- 
fold: 

1. A program of general educa- 
tion of the electorate. 

2. A drive to get voters to reg- 
ister and vote. 

3. A campaign of education con- 
cerning the Taft-Hartley Law, 
state and national anti-labor 
laws, and other measures 
harmful to the public welfare. 

4. Activities in connection with 
general election campaigns. 

5. To carry on an educational 
program in the field of indus- 
trial relations. 

To make effective the foregoing 
expressed desires of the delegates 
and to carry out the policies laid 
down by the last convention of the 
American Federation of Labor, the 
meeting organized the Ohio Federa- 
tion's League for Political Educa- 
tion in the following manner: 

Officers of the League shall be 
the officers of the Ohio State Fed- 
eration. The executive committee of 
the League shall be the president 
and secretary-treasurer of the State 
Federation together with the seven 
vice-presidents of the State Federa- 
tion. With them shall work the 
League's State Advisory Committee 



consisting of the president and sec- 
retary of each of the state's forty- 
four Central Labor Unions. Con- 
gressional District Committees 
shall be organized in each congres- 
sional district. These shall be com- 
posed of the president and secretary 
of each Central Labor Union in each 
respective congressional district. 
Local unions shall also set up their 
own committees to carry on the 
work of the League at the local 
level. Within the committee of each 
local union a shop stewards' com- 
mittee shall also be organized to 
help activate the League's program 
at the ward and precinct level. 

In this manner it is the hope 
of the Ohio State Federation that 
every member of the Federation 
can be contacted personally and ac- 
quainted with the need for register- 
ing and voting if labor's traditional 
rights are to be preserved and 
avenues of self-betterment are to be 
kept open to American workers. 

If the Columbus meeting can be 
used as any sort of criterion, the 
organized workers of Ohio mean 
business. They have organized 
early and well and other states 
will be watching their progress with 
genuine interest. 



Ballots Defend 
Your Freedom 



BE SURE TO VOTE 

THIS YEAR AND 

EVERY YEAR 




isipl 



DOX'T FEXCE ME IX 

The other day, an extremely stout 
woman attired in a rather roomy pair 
of slacks passed by the Farmers' Market 
down in Birmingham. She was moving 
at a surprisingly fast pace, and the 
strange spectacle she presented from the 
rear seemed to excite the risibilities of 
an old farmer standing nearby. 

Catching the eye of another spectator, 
he observed with a chuckle: '"Bud, I 
never thought I'd live to see a sight 
like that — looks like two little boys 
a'fightin' under a blanket." 

• • • 

BLOWING THE LID OFF 

First Devil: "Ha, ha! Ho, ho!" 

Satan: "Why do you laugh?" 

First Devil: "I just put a woman into 

a room with a thousand hats and no 

mirror." 

• • • 
QUICK AXSWER 

A teacher was giving his class a lec- 
ture on charity. "Willie," he said, "if I 
saw a boy beating a donkey and stopped 
him from doing so, what virture should 
I be showing?" 

Willie Tpromptly) : "Brotherlj- love." 




/ don't mind him thiyiking he's Sa- 
poleon, but he-'s taken up icith a Jose- 
phine. 



BB 



XEW DEFIMTIOX 

As this is being written, income tax 
reduction is a hot subject in Congress. 
Senator Taft is backing a measure that 
would reduce taxes from twenty to 
thirty per cent for all income tax- 
payers. Against this the president in 
his state of the union speech offered a 
substitute proposal which gives every 
taxpayer a reduction of forty dollars for 
each dependent. 

Under the Taft program those in the 
upper brackets would get tax reductions 
as high as $75,000 and S 8 0,0 00 while 
the average worker would get from 
thirty cents to a couple of dollars a 
week in tax relief. Under the presi- 
dent's proposal, everybody would get 
forty dollars deduction per dependent. 

Xow the strange part of the whole 
thing is that Taft went on the air 
right after the president made his pro- 
posal. In a blistering speech he called 
the president's tax proposal "discrimi- 
natory." 

Seems like Taft's idea is that any- 
thing that gives the poor the same 
thing as the rich is discriminatory. 

• • • J 

A BETTER SETLT 

As this is being written, blood is 
flowing throughout the length and 
breadth of Palestine as Arab and Jew 
dig in for desperate showdown on the 
Palestine question. Ever since U.X. de- 
cided to partition the Holy Land there 
has been more or less open warfare be- 
tween the opposing factions. 

To date U.X. has been saying much 
but doing little about Palestine. The 
way the U.X. has been avoiding the 
tough nut of Palestine to concentrate 
on other less difficult world problems 
sort of reminds us of the young girl who 
acquired a poet for a boy friend. 

"Father is pleased that you are a 
poet," said she to her new heart inter- 
est. 

"I'm glad," retorted the boy friend. 
"Is he a lover of poetry?" 

"Xo," confessed the sweet young 
thing, "but my last boy friend he tried 
to throw out was a wrestler." 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



TAKE YOUR CHOICE 

Now that the war has been over for 
several years, our State Department has 
finally decided to let the people know 
what was going on in the days before 
Hitler turned on Russia. From cap- 
tured German documents it has been 
revealed that Adolph and Joe were 
closer than Jack Benny in the early 
stages of the war. They were heiling 
and toasting each other in a sort of 
mutual admiration society while Ger- 
many was pounding England and 
France and Belgium — which was about 
the same time U.S. Communists were 
calling it an imperialistic war. 

Anyway, Mustache Joe is very un- 
happy about the State Department's dis- 
closures. The Red press is mumbling 
something about forgeries and coming 
up with a half dozen different explana- 
tions. It all sort of brings to mind the 
old one about the wife who met her hus- 
band at the door along about two a.m. 

"I want an explanation, and I want 
the truth," she demanded. 

"Well," replied the spouse, "make up 
your mind which; you can't have both." 

• • • 
VOICE OF EXPERIENCE 

"The only thing worse than having 
your wife find in your pocket a letter 
you forgot to mail," says Joe Paup, the 
poolroom philosopher, "is having her 
find one you forgot to burn." 

• • • 
REVISED VERSION 

Write this down, son, and get it 
right," William Jennings Bryan told a 
reporter at the beginning of his political 
career. "You can quote me as as say- 
ing a man simply cannot make a million 
dollars honestly." 

Bryan's silver-tongued oratory paid 
off well, and added to his lecture fees, 
which were large and numerous, his 
profits in real estate transactions and 
from other sources eventually made him 
a very rich man. 

Years later, Bryan met the same re- 
porter, now an editor, at a political con- 
vention, and the newspaper man was 
quick to slyly inquire of the veteran 
politician, "Do you know what you once 
told me about rich men?" 

Bryan laughed. 

"Yes," he replied, "I said a man 
simply cannot make two million dollars 
honestly." 



LET THEM SPEAK 

Alarmed by the gradual usurpation 
of civil power by the military brass, a 
number of scientists and prominent lay- 
men have lifted up their voices in warn- 
ing that such a course will eventually 
lead to dictatorship. They point out that 
military influence is increasing in such 
fields as foreign policy, budget, science, 
education, selective service and even 
public relations. Such a course, they 
say, was followed by Japan in the pre- 
war years and it was this very sort 
of thing that lead to the eventual down- 
fall of the Nip empire. 

How much truth there is in their 
allegations it is hard to say. However, 
the men who are back of the move are 
among the nation's most brilliant and 
therefore it might not be amiss to 
adopt the attitude of the Irishman who 
collapsed on the street one day. No 
sooner was he down than a crowd quick- 
ly gathered. Practically every person in 
the crowd had a suggestion. One, Mag- 
gie O'Riley kept shouting, "Give the poor 
man whiskey," but little attention was 
paid to her. Finally the agonized voice 
of the Irishman rose above the din. 

"Will the lot of ye hould yer tongues 
and let Maggie O'Riley spake," the vic- 
tim fairly shouted. 



THE HISTORY OF AX,L WARS 

Preparations 

Rations 

Reparations 




It's when he lies on the other side 
that the nickels roll out. 



12 



Government by Pressure 



By RUBEN LEVIN 



LIKE TOPSY, the army of lobbyists in A\'ashington is growing with 
each session of Congress. Not long ago, the total number registered 
under the terms of the Lobby Regulation Act enacted a year ago 
reached the 1,000 mark. Thus, there are almost twice as many admitted lob- 
byists in Washington as there are members of Congress. 

'But that hardly tells the whole stor}'. There are hundreds of others 
who confine their lobbying to government departments, and since they 
don't directly seek to actuate legislation, the}* need not register. 

There are also '"tixers'' galore who operate in devious ways, and there 
are many high-toned and high-paid Washington lawyers who don't appear 

before congressional committees, 

but who exercise the kind of deft pears to be still true. Top salary 
and astute influence that differs among the registered lobbyists goes 
little from the blunter forms of lob- to Purcell L. Smith, of the National 
bying. Association of Electric Companies. 

Thus, lobbying in its oflicial and He gets $65,000 a year, plus ex- 
unofQcial varities ranks easily as a penses. 

"Big Business" in the nation's cap- Another Power Trust lobbyist is 

ital. in Number 2 place. He is Stephen 

Just about the biggest and high- M. Walters, who lists his income as 
est-paid of the hordes of lobbyists 850,000, received partly from the N. 
are those of the Power Trust, the A. E. C. and partly from 13 indi- 



Railroads, the Realtors, the National 
Association of Manufacturers, the 
Natural Gas Interests and the so- 
called National Tax Equality Asso- 



vidual utility companies. 

The N. A. E. C. has a flock of 
other registered lobbyists and law- 
yers in the capital, all of them 



ciation. The latter spearheads the handsomely paid. At the last reg- 

campaign against cooperatives. ular session of Congress, the N. A. 

While each lobby has its own spe- E. C. recorded its outlays at over 

cial axe to grind, there's a good Siqo.ooo. 

deal of collaboration when it comes That's not the whole picture. ^lany 

to putting over anti-labor legisla- private utilties also have their own 

tion or fighting for lower taxes for W^ashington ''representatives.'" For 

the rich. On such issues, many of instance, the big Pacific Gas and 

the lobbyists work hand in glove. Electric Company has a battery of 

For instance, the N. A. ^M. lobby- high-powered agents in the capital. 

ists had a major hand in drafting All told, the power lobby undoubt- 

and promoting the Taft-Hartley edly spends a half million dollars 

''slave labor" law, but a lot of other each session of Congress, 

outfits joined in to help whisk that The Railroad Lobby is no piker 



measure through Congress. 

Traditionally the Power Trust 
has been one of the biggest spend- 
ers in the lobbying field. That ap- 



either. Its chief front man is J. 
Carter Fort, of the Association of 
American Railroads, who gets S40.- 
000 a year and expenses. ]vlany in- 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



dividual carriers also maintain reg"- 
istered lobbyists in Washington. All 
told, there are dozens looking after 
the interests of the "Iron Horse." 

The rail lobby list also includes 
such false-face railroad propaganda 
outfits as the Transportation Asso- 
ciation of America. Its chief lobby- 
ist is Donald D. Conn, who draws a 
salary of $20,000, plus $80,000 in 
expenses. 

One of the most vicious of all is 
the lobby maintained by the Na- 
tional Association of Manufactur- 
ers. It has a little "army" of Wash- 
ington representatives — among 
them, Weaker Chamblin, Jr., at $25,- 
000 a year; Samuel Bledsoe, at $18,- 
000; R. T. Compton, at $15,000 and 
others at somewhat lesser salaries, 
but all with comfortable expense 
accounts. 

It is generally known that the 
N. A. M. factotums sat in with the 
congressional framers of the Taft- 
Hartley Act and practically wrote 
the whole law. 

For gall and ruthlessness the 
Real Estate Lobby undoubtedly 
should get the prize. It is led by 
the National Association of Real 
Estate Boards, but lined up with it 
are such outfits as the National As- 
sociation of Home Builders and the 
United States Savings and Loan 
League. This lobby has blocked all 
efforts to put through the Wagner- 
Taft-Ellender long-range housing 
bill, as well as other measures de- 
signed to ease the housing shortage 
and bring costs of homes within 
reach of those who need shelter. It 
has also conducted a violent cam- 
paign to wreck rent controls. 

So shocking have been its activi- 
ties that President Truman last 
summer, in a message to Congress, 
accused it of a "ruthless disregard 
of the public welfare." 

"It is intolerable that this lobby 



should be permitted by its brazen 
operations to block programs so es- 
sential to the needs of our citizens," 
Truman said. "Nothing could be 
more clearly subversive of repre- 
sentative government. I urge the 
Congress to make a full investiga- 
tion of the activities of this selfish 
and short-sighted group." 

So far. Congress has done noth- 
ing about the Chief Executive's ap- 
peal for such a probe — and undoubt- 
edly will continue to do nothing. 

A particularly illuminating ex- 
pose of the Real Estate Lobby op- 
peared in a recent issue of the 
ultra-conservative American maga- 
zine, written by Nathan Strauss, 
former administrator of the United 
States Housing Authority. 

"For two years the House Bank- 
ing Committee (which handles 
housing legislation) has bottled up 
every housing proposal that was 
frowned upon by the Real Estate 
Lobby, while tumbling over, itself 
to endorse everything the Real Es- 
tate Lobby liked," Strauss pointed 
out. 

"The harsh fact is that our hous- 
ing 'policy' in Congress, in recent 
years, has been shaped largely by 
the Real Estate Lobby. 

"Almost any day that Congress is 
in session you can find at least 25 
real estate lobbyists scurrying about 
Capitol Hill making 'contacts.' And 
that is counting only those who have 
officially admitted they are lobby- 
ists, by registering. 

"The actual paid staffs of the 
Real Estate Lobby in Washington 
run into hundreds. 

"The most famous member of the 
Real Estate Lobby is not even reg- 
istered as a lobbyist. He is Herbert 
U. Nelson, spokesman for the '^J- 
000 realtors in the National Associa- 
tion of Real Estate Boards. Nelson 
has a Washington staff of 28, hun- 



14 



THE CARPEXTER 



dreds of thousands of dollars at his 
disposal, and has five registered 
lobbyists Avorking" under his direc- 
tion. 

"A\'hile Xelson holds the spot- 
light, the industry's most influen- 
tial lobbyist is Morton Bodfish, a 
crony of many key Cong-res=men. 
Bodhsh is paid by the 3.600 build- 
ings or savings and loan associa- 
tions afiiliated with the U.S. Sav- 
ings and Loan League. 

"Last year, at the peak of the 
lobby's battle to get the legislation 
it wanted. Bodfish staged a gala 
hotel banquet which drew so many 
Congressmen that it took Bodfish 
45 minutes to introduce them all I 

"The third member of the Big 
Three of the AA'ashington Lobby is 
Frank \V. Cortright, who speaks for 
the 10.000 major homebuilding con- 
tractors affiliated with the National 
Association of Home Builders. He 
has elaborate offices in Washington. 

"There are dozens of other regis- 
tered realty lobbyists. Here are 
some of the leading outfits that 
sponsor them : National Home and 
Property Owners Foundation, Na- 
tional Retail Lumber Dealers Asso- 
ciation. National Lumber IManu- 
facturers Association, National 
Apartment Owners Association, 
National Association of Housing 
Manufacturers, Home Owners Pro- 
tecting League, ^Mortgage Bankers 
Association of America and Build- 
ing Products Institute." 

Another lushly-financed lobby 
that has its tenacles spread out over 
Washington and the country is the 
miscalled "National Tax Equality 
Association," which under the slo- 
gan of "equalizing taxes" is seeking 
legislation to crush the fast-grow- 
ing cooperative movement. The 
amount of propaganda it has poured 
out has been enormous. 

An examination of the lobby 



registrations shows AVashington is 
infested not only with lobbyists on 
the direct N.T.E.A. payroll, but 
with scores of others representing 
state units of the association, and 
many others who operate under the 
smokescreen of '"small business" or- 
ganizations. They hold forth in the 
city's swankiest hotels. I 

On top of that, the N. A. E. A. 
employes a crew of high-powered 
press agents, operating under the 
names of \'ernon Scott and Loring 
A. Schuler, "organizers and coun- 
selors." The Scott and Schuler out- 
fit has been holding forth in a 
super de luxe suite at the Statler 
Hotel in Washington, and from 
there, doing the "practical work" 
for the N. T. E. A. That "practical 
work" is understood to consist of 
royal entertainment for members of 
Congress to sell them the N. T. E. 
A. "line." 

How can the N. T. E. A. operate 
so lavaishly? The answer can be 
found in the fact that the organiza- 
tion has been recognized by the In- 
ternal Revenue Bureau as an "edu- 
cational" association. Thus, contri- 
butions to it are tax-exempt. That's 
an incentive for rich business men 
to make liberal donations, since 
they can deduct that from their tax 
liabilities to Uncle Sam. 1 

Thus, in efitect, the Government 
is subsidizing the N. T. E. A. AVhat 
the Government loses in taxes un- 
der this setup, the taxpayers must 
make up. 

To list all the other elaborate lob- 
bies functioning in Washington 
would take space far beyond the 
limits of this article. The fact is, 
however, that just about every spe- 
cial interest in this country is well 
represented. Government -by -lobby 
has now reached such great pro- 
portions as .almost to drown out the 
voiceof the ordinary people. — I.3I.J. 



THE CARPENTER 15 



IT'S THE PAY THAT'S SHORT 

* * 

Early this year. Local No. 1312, New Orleans, La., received a letter 
from the U.S. Immigration Office in that city. In part that letter said: 

"This Service has received an application from one B 



M , operating a shop in New Orleans, designing and niaiiu- 

factuiing reproductions of antique furniture, for permission to im- 
port to the U.S. from France a skilled cabinet designer and builder. 
The man sought to be imported has more than twenty-five years ex- 
perience in the designing and building of reproductions of antique 
furniture. The importer has stated that he has advertised nationally 
for a person of such skill and has not been able to secure a United 
Stat-es citizen to fill this job. The alien to be imported will, also, 
teach appi-entices who ai"e now Avorking in the shop of the imijoi-ter 
in New^ Orleans. The wage it is contemplated paying this man will be 
$1.35 per hour for a forty hour week AA'ith the regular pi*escibed pay- 
ment for any overtime Avork perfonned. It appears that locally no 
such skilled ai-tisan can be found; hoAvever, before this Sei-vice can 
giAe penuission for the imijortation of the alien described, it is nec- 
essai-y that Ave ascertain from your Union whether you are able to 

furnish to INIr. M a person AA'itli the skill and experience 

described." 

To all skilled workers in America the above letter poses an interest- 
ing problem. A manufacturer advertises for a highly skilled man at a 
wage rate about fifty per cent below what such skill should command, 
and then because he cannot find such an artisan he applies to the Immi- 
gration Service for permission to import an alien. If such a program 
becomes general, our skilled workers can look forward to a wage scale 
no higher than the lowest in the world, because that will be the ultimate 
result. When a contractor cannot find carpenters to work for fift}- cents an 
hour, if he can import some from Japan. American carpenters will soon 
have the choice of working for fifty cents an hour or bucking the bread- 
lines. The same holds true of every other trade. 

The difticulty of the manufacturer in the above case is not that there 
is a shortage of artisans in America but rather that there is a shortage of 
about a dollar and a quarter an hour in the wage scale he is offering. Under 
the circumstances labor can have little sympathy with his proposal to im- 
port help. For too many years around the turn of the century corporations 
used imported help to beat down wage scales. Those days must never be 
allowed to return. 



Editorial 




Another Position Vindicated 

From all indications the so-called "A\'orld Federation of Trade 
Unions" is quietly g-asping^ its last breath. Organized some three years 
ago amid a great hoopala of Communist propaganda and promotion, 
it has creaked along in a very erratic and unpredictable manner ; unpredic- 
table, that is. to all but the Communists. Now the sands have all but run 
out for the "World Federation." a 

Last month Arthur Deakin, head of the powerful British Transport and 
General Workers Union, let loose a bitter blast against the W.F.T.U. 
that virtually sounded its death knell. Significantly, Deakin is president 
of the W.F.T.U. For a long time Deakin and the rest of the non-Com- 
munist trade union members in England have grown increasingly sour on 
the AWF.T.U. because of its insistence on following the line laid down 
by the Kremlin. The straw that finally broke the camel's back was the 
recent refusal of the A\'.F.T.U. secretariat to call a meeting of the execu- 
tive bureau to discuss the Marshall Plan. Deakin charged that this refusal 
to call a meeting for the purpose of discussing a plan that ofi:ers the only 
hope of salvation for most European workers was due to orders from 
Moscow. 

"If the position of the organization now is that the World Federation 
of Trade Unions is to be merely a political body dealing with those 
questions acceptable to Soviet Russia, then we know where we stand," he 
declared in his blast. 

Deakin did not recommend an immediate withdrawal of British trade 
unions from the Federation, but such a move seems inevitable in view 
of the bitterness which has grown up against the organization in most 
official union circles in England. When and if the British unions with- 
draw, W.F.T.U. will collapse in short order. AMien W.F.T.U. was first 
organized many British union leaders opposed affiliation. However, the 
consensus of opinion was that such an alliance might help to win the 
war, inasmuch as Russian workers and English workers were battling 
a common foe. While the war lasted and the defeat of Hitler was the 
main objective of everyone, the A\\F.T.U. bumbled along jwathout too 
much internal strain. But once Hitler was out of the way, it soon became 
apparent that the World Federation was merely a tool of the Kremlin 
and just another of the innumerable Communist vehicles for softening up 
the rest of the world for Soviet domination. British unionists are about 
fed up, and Deakin's blast may well be the fuse that touches ofif the 
powder keg, inasmuch as he is president of the organization. 

In view of the developments, it is interesting to remember that the 
American Federation of Labor has opposed the W.F.T.U. ever since it 



T IT T. C A R P K X T E R 17 

was org^anized. Some of the party-liners in the AFL tried to stampede it 
into accepting W.F.T.U. but their efforts did not get ver>- far. The 
Executive Council repeatedly pointed out that the Soviet government- 
dominated unions which affiliated with W.F.T.U. en masse could by no 
stretch of the imagination be regarded as "free." Now the position of the 
Council is being vindicated. B}' now it is cle^r :c everx^one that the 
Russian unions are not free and they are not in \\ .F.T.U. to promote 
union principles but rather to carry out the subversive dictates of the 
Kremlin. And it is equally interesting to remember that the CIO has been 
part and parcel of the W.F.T.U. ^ince its inception. 



Without A Crystal Ball 

Early last month the inf.i:^ - .u.,>; ..;;'' ur r:'." " >;.- v"' ' '. 
into felt the first pinprick c: ii~i::cr_ v/r.cii iimmii::- :, r.ti :^z :.^t 
violently and quickly on virtually all exchanges. Within z. ;e.v days 
prices on such items as com, w^heat, soj'beans and cotton r -t :: ed by 
about one-third. And the confusion and consternation the.: rt u.red in 
many places made some of the most amusing reading since Texas Gtiinan 
was having her fling and parting the easy marks from their rolls. 

On the very day when prices fell most precipitously a well known 
columnist was ranting about the unfairness of the labor press in blaming 
high prices on high profits. As neatly as you please he was proving that 
high wages were at the bottom of all high prices, and that prices were 
not really too high considering the "fantastic" wages workers were getting. 
He summed up the whole situation by saying that prices would never 
come down until the unions agreed to reduce wages. 

The same day another high-pow^ered typewriter beater (who also prol>- 
ably writes his column a week or so in advance) was blasting the adminis- 
tration for asking authority to reimpose controls on certain scarce com- 
modities. Business was already doing a fine job of keeping down prices 
and distributing scarce materials, he insisted. Boiled down to a single 
sentence, his theme was: our whole economy is being w^ell managed by 
business and who the devil does the President think he is that he should 
intimate that the government could do the job better than business can? 

By the fifth or sixth day of declining prices the typewriter hatchet 
men caught on to the idea it was time to turn the record over and play 
the other side. Overnight the commodity price collapse became a "healthy" 
thing and an inevitable aftermath of reconversion. A note of journalistic 
joy reminiscent of the "prosperitj- is just around the comer" era of the 
early thirties per\'aded the press and radio. The papers were vying with 
each other to be the first to tell how rapidly prices were declining in the 
grocery store and butcher shop. In Indianapolis an over-enthusiastic radio 
announcer was telling one and all that bacon could be bought for thirty- 
nine cents a pound retail. Your editor did a little checking. A half dozen 
phone calls revealed that the cheapest sliced bacon could be bought for 
retail was seventy-nine cents a pound. Even that gastronomical monstros- 



18 THECARPENTER 

ity known in the mining and logging camps of the west as "sow-belly" 
cost fifty-nine cents a pound. In the end the grocers and butchers got so 
many calls for thirty-nine cent bacon that the announcer had to make a 
correction in order to take the heat ofif the merchants. 

We are going to be unique about the whole business of falling com- 
modity prices. We are not going to tell you exactly what it all means 
because frankly we do not know (although we seem to be the only person 
owning a typewriter in that unhappy circumstance). About all we know 
is this : 

1. The fall in commodity prices is not reflected in prices 
at the butchers and grocers as yet. 

2. Wages are still out of line with living costs and if the 
latter do not come down before long the former must 
go up again if purchasing power is to be maintained 
and if millions of people are to avoid downright hard- 
ship. 

3. Whichever way things go it will be the working people 
who will take it on the chin hardest in the long run. 

This may not add up to much but in the final analysis it will prove to be 
a lot more than most of our twelve-cylinder economists can foretell with 
any degree of certainty. 



A Valiant Fight for a Great Cause 

While many International Unions, including our Brotherhood, are in- 
volved in legal cases that eventually may become tests of the validity of 
the Taft-Hartley Act, it is the Typographical Union which is really carry- 
ing the brunt of the burden at the present time. For many weeks the 
Chicago Typos have been on the bricks fighting for the very existence of 
their union which the publishers are threatening to destro}^ through the 
medium of the Taft-Hartley Act. 

Bluntly put, the employers are trying to establish the right to hire 
non-union help in shops which have been 100% union since time imme- 
morial. If they succeed they will eventually be able to break down 
seniority and all semblance of job protection. 

However, there is little likelihood of their succeeding. The whole 
Printers' Union has voted an assessment of four and a half per cent of 
every member's monthly earnings for a special defense fund to carry on 
the fight. Four and a half cents out of every dollar seems like a high 
assessment but the Printers know what is at stake and they are determined 
to see the fight through. More power to them. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District. R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland. O. 



Sixth District, A, W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 



NOTICE TO ALL LOCAL UNIONS 

The attention of all Local Unions is hereby directed to the action 
taken by the General Executive Board at its meeting held in Lakeland 
last January relative to the admission to membership of individuals not 
qualified to follow some branch of our trade. The action of the Board — 
as contained in the official minutes, was as follows : 



"It has come to the attention of the General Executive 
Board that many of our Local Unions throughout the juris- 
diction of the Brotherhood have accepted to honorary mem- 
bership applicants who have never worked at any branch of 
the trade, and who, by no stretch of imagination are qualified 
for membership as per the qualifications set forth in the Gen- 
eral Constitution; therefore, the Board goes on record as 
declaring that no applicant can be admitted as a member 
unless he can qualify as being competent to work at some 
branch of the trade." 



5^ n 4M 

Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



txnorxsctn 



They still live in our memory, 
And will forever more 



%tBi in ^tsctt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother FRANK ABAR, Local No. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

Brother JOSEF BAER, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother PAGE BENJAMIN, Local No. 281, Binghamton, N. Y. 

Brother CHARLES BLACKBURN, Local No. 1445, Topeka, Kansas. 

Brother ALEX BUCHANAN, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

Brother FRED BURTOFT, Local No. 184, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Brother JOHN F. CARR, Local No. 298, Long Island City, N. Y. 

Brother VINCENT DeHATE, Local No. 1067, Port Huron ,Mich. 

Brother JOHN DENGLER, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother HENRY DEWEESE, Local No. 734, Kokomo, Ind. 

Brother VERNON FAIRBANKS, Local No. 1587, Hutchinson, Kans. 

Brother PETER FETTIG, Local No. 930, St. Cloud, Minn. 

Brother WILLIAM D. FRAZEE, Local No. 716, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Brother ANTHONY GALLO, Local No. 298, Long Island City, N. Y. 

Brother JOHN HACIK, Local No. 490, Clifton, N. J. 

Brother CHARLES HANSEN, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother ERNEST HETZLER, Local No. 298, Long Island City, N. Y. 

Brother E. F. ILSCHNER, Local No. 610, Port Arthur, Tex. 

Brother GERVE JANSSON, Local No. 51, Boston, Mass. 

Brother J. M. KING, Local No. 529, Camden, Ark. 

Brother FLOYD KINNER, Local No. 1067, Port Huron, Mich. 

Brother ALBERT H. KRUEGER, Local No. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 

Brother LEO KUHN, Local No. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

Brother ANTHONY KUPS, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

Brother MICHAEL LAWLER, Local No. 20, Staten Island, N, Y. 

Brother NATHAN LEVITT, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother ALFONSO LIQUORI, Local No. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother CHARLES LOBELLO, Local No. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Brother NORMAN L. MacLEOD, Local No. 1144, Danvers, Mass. 

Brother EDWARD McKENNA, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother CHARLES MITCHELL, Local No. 930, St. Cloud, Minn. 

Brother CHAUNCEY MORRIS, Local No. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

Brother WALTER MURRAY, Local No. 878, Beverly, Mass. 

Brother OLAF NELSEN, Local No. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Brother JULIUS PLETSCHER, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother DAVID PLOTKIN, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother ALPHONSE PLOURDE, Local No. 1210, Salem, Mass. 

Brother WALTER RADSCHWEIT, Local No. 448, Waukegon, lU. 

Brother ERNEST RICHARDS, Local No. 1210, Salem, Mass. 

Brother HENRY RYPKEMA, Local No. 490, Clifton, N. J. 

Brother CLARENCE SANDEL, Local No. 716, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Brother W. F. SHAFFER, Local No. 1565, Abilene, Texas 

Brother TIMOTHY D. SHEEHAN, Local No. 860, Framingham, Mass: 

Brother WALTER STOWE, Local No. 888, Salem, Mass. 

Brother PAUL TAUBER, Local No. 51, Boston, Mass. 

Brother W. F. THOMASSON, Local No. 1565, Abilene, Texas. 

Brother WALTER WOOD, Local No. 30, New London, Conn. 

Brother JOSEPH WOLF, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother EMIL WUORIO, Local No. 30, New London, Conn. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Xot Responsible J^or Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

XORTH SHORE HONORS VETERAN OFFICER 

On Saturday evening, Januarj' 17th, a testimonial banquet was held in honor 
of Ted Thompson, Business Agent for the North Shore District Council. 

Brother Thompson, a member of the Brotherhood for forty-four years, has 
been Business Agent since 1921. During that time he has held office as President, 
Treasurer, Financial Secretary and Recording Secretary. He was also President of 
the Massachusetts States Council of Carpenters for three years, and a member 
of the State Executive Board for eighteen consecutive terms. 

Ted has also been interested in politics, having served for ten years as alder- 
man for the city of Beverly, and as a Representative to the General Court for three 
years. 

During the past war Ted served on the Beverly Draft Board for seven years 
and was appointed by the Mayor of Beverly to help bring the building code up to 
date. 

After the formation of the Beverly Appeal Board he was elected chairman of 
that body, and is still serving with distinction. 

Recently he was elected one of two delegates for the International Conference 
of Odd FelloAvs to be held in London, England this coming May. 

Over three hundred guests attended the dinner which was turkey and all the 
trimmings. Seated at the head table was Ted's entire family including a brother 
and grand-daughter. 

Telegrams of congratulations were received from U.S. Senator Henry Cabot 
Lodge and Congressman George J. Bates, who are personal friends of Ted. 

Mayor Dan McLean of Beverly and City Council President Wilfred Poitras 
of Salem extended the greetings of their respective cities to the guest of honor. 
Former Mayor Ed. Coffey of Salem also congratulated Ted. 

The Master Builders of this district had a large representation present, and 
their spokesman went on record as saying that he thought our union did more to 
raise the standard of living than any politicians. 

General Representative Bill Francis presented Ted with a beautiful Hamilton 
watch and chain, as a gift from the district carpenters and their friends. 

President Herb Lyman of Ted's home Local, No. 878, presented him with a 
Carpenters' emblem ring. 

"Warren Haskell, President, North Shore District Council, presented I\Irs. 
Thompson with a lovely bouquet of flowers. 

President Jim Golden, Massachusetts State Council, gave an inspiring talk and 
had with him a large delegation from Lowell. 

Guests were present from Lawrence, Haverhill. Gloucester, Newburyport, 
Boston, New Bedford, and from every local on the North Shore. 

Dancing was enjoyed after the speaking program, until a late hour, 

• 

HUGE PROJECT FOR FEATHER RR'ER AREA 

Within the jurisdiction of the Sierra Nevada Foothill District Council in the 
Feather River region of California, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company is mak- 
ing preparations for the construction of a one hundred and thirty-five million 
dollar project. As contemplated at present, the project will be one of the biggest 
imdertaken in peacetime since Coulee Dam was completed. 

However the Sierra Nevada Council warns that no men are needed at the 
present time. Brothers going to the area will be out their expenses. When men 
are needed the Council will notify all sister councils and supply them with all perti- 
nent information. 



22 THE CARPENTER 

TOMPKIXSVLLLE LOCAL, HONORS A GREAT PIONEER 

At the meeting of Local Union No. 20, Tompkinsville, New York, held Decem- 
ber 8, 19 47, the assembled membership paid a special tribute to Brother William 
Housman who has compiled a long and honorable career as a member of the 
Brotherhood. Eighty years of age, Brother Housman has practically rounded out 
half a century of union membership in good standing. 

In his many years as a member. Brother Housman has served in various offices. 
Including that of financial secretary-treasurer. At present he is using his vast 
knowledge and good judgment as a member of the Union's examining committee. 
Not only in his own Local Union but throughout much of the New York labor 
movement he is represented as one of the great pioneers of unionism who have 
done so much to make the movement what it is today. 

Local Union No. 20 wishes Brother Housman many more years of health and 
happiness. 



LOCAL 1351 IVLIRKS 30 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

On Thursday night, October 2 3, some 250 people, members, wives and friends 
of Local Union No. 1251, New "Westminister, B. C, gathered in Canadian Legion 
Hall to help the Union celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of its founding. For 
several hours the trials and tribulations of the workaday world were forgotten 
"While all concentrated on having a good time. 

Included in the program was the introduction of four of the five original charter 
members of the union who took out cards in September, 1917, and remained in the 
union. They were A. E. Corbett, George Brown, Robert Adams and William 
Moodie. The fifth member, Thomas Blackledge, was unable to be present. 

The affair, which was managed by a committee headed by Arlie Forman, took 
the form of a turkey dinner, a few and very brief speeches, a fioor show and danc- 
ing. Stanley Durance, president, was in the chair. 

William Page, Vancouver, brought greetings from the international body. He 
congratulated the New Westminster Local on having an agreement which called 
for the highest wage scale in Canada, Toronto being in second place. The fact 
that the carpenters owned their own hall — the Labor Temple on Seventh street 
and Royal avenue — was also another feather in the cap of the Local. Mr. Page 
presented a new gavel, suitably engraved, to Mr. Durance. 

Jack Stevenson, president of the Provincial Council of the Brotherhood, spoke 
briefly, while William Moodie responded for the five charter members and told 
of the organizing program in 1917. 



MUNCIE ME>1BERS TLTIN A SHACK INTO A HOME 

A week or so before Christmas last year a Muncie, Indiana, newspaper carried 
a touching story regarding the sad plight of a woman with four children who was 
forced by adverse circumstances to live with her brood in a small one-room 
shack. The shack did not even boast of a door. On Saturday morning, December 
20, the woman received unexpected guests. They were Judson Beck, business 
agent for Local No. 592, and Harry Dye, Cleo Ullom, and Noel Barber, members 
of the Union. With them they had their tools and some side boarding and tin 
flashing. By evenirig the shack was weather tight and comparatively comfortable. 

The Juvenile Aid Division had been pondering about what to do with the 
family for some time when the Local Union decided to take a hand. Some sixty 
dollars was raised by the JAD for the purchase of materials. A women's organiza- 
tion of a nearby church donated a door, and the Local Union took on the task of 
putting the place into liveable shape. By this cooperative effort an unfortunate 
family was given the finest Christmas present of all — a half-way decent place to 
live. While much of the credit for the project goes to the Juvenile Aid Division, 
Local Union No. 592 and its four civic-minded members deserves a real pat on the 
back for a well done job. 



T H E C A R P E X T E R 23 

LOC.\Jy 1876 ME^rBERS DO A FIXE CIVIC JOB 

A few weeks ago Wicomico Children's Home, Salisbury, Maryland, was some- 
thing of a fire hazard. Today two well constructed fire escapes make the home 
a safe and modern institution; and in the erection of the two fire escapes lies a 
story of cooperation, generosity and downright good unionism on the part of the 
officers and members of Local Union No. 18 76 of Salisbury. 

Recently the county fire warden served notice on the home that two fire 
escapes were needed immediately to prevent the building from becoming a death 
trap in case of fire. The home's auxiliary group was confronted with something of 
a financial problem in the matter of the fire escape. Hearing of the plight of the 
institution, Local Union No. 18 76 decided that something should be done. 
Saturday morning, December 13, twelve members of the Union showed up at 
the home with their tool boxes. Timber and millwork donated by business firms 
was at the site. The Brotherhood men rolled up their sleeves and went to work. 
By evening the fire escapes were well along. The following Saturday another 
twelve members of the Union were on the job to help complete the project And 
so through the generositj" of the members of Local Union No. 1876 who donated 
their services and several firms which donated materials, the home now boasts of 
two fine fire escapes. 

Pegler or Fulton Lewis will never mention this incident but it is just another 
fine example of union men doing a civic duty in the spirit of brotherhood on which 
true unionism is founded. 



LANCASTER LOCAL STAGES GSrd BIRTHDAY PARTY 

With some 250 members, friends and guests present. Local Union No. 59 of 
Lancaster, Pa., celebrated the sixty-third anniversary of its chartering with a 
banquet and entertainment at Arcadia Hall on the night of November 2 5th. Fine 
food, able speaking, and general goodfellowship made the affair a memorable one 
for all w^ho attended. 

Local 59 President A. Z. Horner, was toastmaster and started the program by 
asking the group to rise In a moment's silence as a tribute to- Edward Finney, 
President of the Pennsylvania State Council, who passed away recently. Labor 
lost a great leader through the death of Mr. Finney. 

A baked ham dinner was served and an orchestra furnished music throughout 
the evening. 

William Kelly, Pittsburgh Executive Board Member, was the main speaker 
He told the group, "Organized labor must forget its outdated phrase, 'A Living 
Wage' and start striving for 'A Saving Wage.' " Mr. Kelly also told of recent 
actions affecting carpenters at the A. F. L. Convention in San Francisco, and dis- 
cussed the Taft-Hartley Law and recent suits brought under its provisions. 

Guests present were as follows: Richard O'Driscoll. Frank Gravener, John J. 
Cregan, Metropolitan District Council; Charles Shedaker, Benjamin T. Gray, Local 
359 of Philadelphia; Frank Clarkson, Joseph Gressang, Jules Fisher, John Pen- 
tony and Wm. Kendrick, Local 8 of Philadelphia; H. E. Ross, Wm. Hosttetter, John 
Lengel, Chas. Bowers, Local L^nion 49 2, Reading; J. M. Swanger, Earl Hoffman, 
Mart Swanger, Local Union 2 8 7, Harrlsburg. 



AXAHEOI BIDS FOR A CHA3IPIOXSHIP 

Members of Local Union No. 2203, Anaheim, Cal., do things in a big way. As 
proof of this statement the members are pointing to the accomplishments of 
Brother Arthur Jungkeit and his wife, who recently became the parents of an 
exceptional pair of twins. The babies, David Herman and Donna Lee, weighed 
more than eighteen pounds at birth. David Herman weighted ten pounds, four 
ounces, and Donna Lee checked in at eight pounds, one and a half ounces. 

Needless to say the Juugkeits are receiving congratulations from far and 
wide. 




KIvICKITAT LADIES SPOXSOR LO\*EI.Y CHRISTMAS PARTY 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Auxiliary Xo. 45 3 of Klickitat, Washington! We meet the 
second Tuesday of each month at the Club Room of the Gymnasium. Beginning at 
eight p.m. "pre have our business meeting and after this is disposed of we have our 
social function. We have been organized since April 26, 1946. 

We held our annual Christmas Party on December 9th. The party follovred 
our regular monthly meeting. Husbands vrere invited and quite a number of 
them attended. Several Christmas games were played vrith prizes for the winners. 
There was also a door prize, a huge stick of peppermint candy which will probably 
last the winner until next Christmas. The decorations were outstanding; little red 
and green baskets at each place together with a little Santa, all filled with candy. 
A lovely centerpiece of silvered pine cones, candles and Santa Clauses graced the 
middle of the table. Each Auxiliary member brought a gift to the party. Xames of 
movie stars were pasted on each present and then a drawing of names was held. 
Each person drawing a name received the present bearing the same name. The 
gifts were all useful as well as beautiful. Following the exchange of gifts a 
lovely luncheon was served. 

Fraternally, Dorothy M. Scott, Rec. Sec. 



FORT COKLIXS LADIES DO A GREAT JOB 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies Auxiliary Xo. 404, Fort Collins, Colorado. 

We would like to report on our very successful pie social. The purpose of our 
social was to raise funds enough to buy the hospital in Fort Collins a baby incu- 
bator since they only had one. We made SI 5 2. 5 0, which was a little more than 
enough to buy the incubator. It is now in use at the hopsital. 

Fraternally yours, Mrs. Eloise Mills, Rec. Sec. 



SPRENGFIELD, ELL., LADIES EXTEXD GREETIXGS 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary Xo. 230 of Springfield, Illinois, wishes to send greetings to all 
other Auxiliaries everywhere. 

We meet the first and third Fridays at 2:00 P.M., in I. 0. 0. F, Temple. The 
first meeting is a business meeting; the second is a social one. We have a pot-luck 
dinner then and a short meeting with a bunco party following. 

We have added quite a number of new members in the past year and are 
hoping to get a number more before this year is over. 

We also have a number of ladies who quilt. They meet every Friday. They 
have sent several quilts to the Carpenters' Home. 

We are now making plans for our ISth Anniversary dinner which will be held 
December 6th. We celebrate each anniversary with a turkey dinner having the 
families as guests. We are planning on about 9 this year. 

We hold card parties often to raise extra funds. 

We donate to all worthy causes. 

We still have eleven of our charter members. 

Fraternally yours. 

Xenia Xewlin, Recording Secretary. 



THE CAR P ENTER 25 

LADIES OF 467 RE^MEMBER THE AGED 

The Editor: 

Fraternal greetings to all sister organizations from Auxiliary No. 467, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Since being organized, we have held a few bingoes and a dance, all of which 
were highly successful. At Christmas, we enjoyed giving $25.00 in fruits, candy 
and cigarettes to th6 Blue Plains Home for the Aged. Mrs. Anna Keller of our 
Auxiliary, was kind enough to make cookies and doughnuts to be given also. 
Our President, Mrs. Stumpe and sister Keller distributed the above, personally, 
to each of the inmates. 

We are making plans to have a dinner-dance for our members and their hus- 
bands in honor of our first anniversary. 

We would enjoy hearing from our sister organizations. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Dorothy E. Chase, Rec. Sec. 



CHICAGO LADIES AID MANY CHARITIES 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Auxiliary No. 249, Chicago. Our Auxiliary, the only one in 
our city, meets twice a month. One meeting we devote to business affairs but 
our second meeting usually leans toward the social or cultural. During these 
latter meetings we have readings, debates, or any of the various types of enter- 
tainment — plus, of course, refreshments. Our Brothers are always guests at 
these socials. Occasionally we have a social at their meeting place, serving re- 
freshments -to all. 

Our funds go to charities such as the Red Cross, March of Dimes, Crippled 
Children, and all important fund drives that come up. We always accept commit- 
tees from the city that come to us seeking donations; provided, of course, that 
they are armed with proper credentials. We all enjoy reading The Carpenter — 
especially "To The Ladies." 

Fraternally, Frieda Greenfield, Pres. 



BLOOAUNGTON, IND., LADIES DO GOOD WORK 

The Editor: 

The members of Auxiliary No. 25S of Bloomington, Indiana send greetings to 
all Sister Auxiliaries of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America. 

We meet the second and fourth Tuesday evenings of each month in the Labor 
Temple. We are not a very large group, though we are at this time conducting a 
membership contest which is increasing our number. In August we participated 
in a family picnic held jointly with the carpenters of Local No. 16 64. 

We hold an Auxiliary party once each quarter and a family social twice yearly; 
and try to have an all day meeting, usually a pot-luck luncheon once each month 
in some member's home. 

Our turkey dinner, Christmas party and gift exchange held for our families in 
December was a great success and attended by 100 persons. We will hold our 
anniversary party in February. 

Besides giving to Red Cross, Community Chest and other charitable drives we 
gave individual gifts at Christmas time to the old folks at the County Home. 

We also try to have at least two educational programs, lectures or something of 
that nature during the year. 

To defray expenses, build up our treasury and flower fund we have held two 
candy sales and a bazaar. We also hold rummage sales and white elephant sales 
to help in this way. 

We would be very glad to hear from any of the sister auxiliaries and would 
appreciate any helpful idea you may give us. 

Fraternally yours, 

Mrs. Myrtle Hollingsworth, Rec. Sec. 



Craft Probloms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1948) 

LESSON 234 • 
By H. H. Siegele 

Drilling for plugs and chiseling out 
mortar from walls of masonry for plug- 
ging is not really work that can be 
called carpentry work, but it is work 
that carpenters have to do quite often. 
The tools that are used for this work 
are drills and plugging chisels. 

The star drill, shown by the upper 
drawing in Fig. 1, is widely used for 




Fig. 1 

drilling holes into concrete, stone, brick 
and other masonry. It makes a perfect- 
ly round hole for the plug, and it cuts 
reasonably well, but is not the fastest 
cutting drill in use. It is well adapted 
for drilling holes for the shells of ex- 
pansion bolts. Its over all usefulness 
as a drill, however, places it at the top 
of the list. 

Fig. 2 illustrates how the drill is 
used. To the left we show it in position 




Fig. 2 

for drilling a hole into a wall. The 
symbol of a hand shows it is held with 
one hand, while the arrow shows how 
the blows of the hammer strike it. Just 



below this we show how the sand and 
dust fall to the floor, indicating that 
the drill cleans out the sand and dust 
from the hole automatically. To the 



T 



9 



Scaid-Dust 




§■ 



Fig. 3 

right the drill is shown in position for 
drilling a hole into a cement floor. Such 
holes are not cleaned out automatically, 
but some special means must be em- 



•7Tn Cayi 




Fig. 4 

ployed for cleaning out the dust, other- 
wise a dust cushion will retard or even 
stop the progress of the work. 

Fig. 3 shows the same layout, except- 
ing that the drills have been removed, 
and we show a time pump being used 
for blowing out the dust from one of the 
holes. This is practical. Removing the 
dust in this way keeps the concrete 
dry, and when the wood plug is driven 
into the hole, it does not swell. When 
a plug is driven into a hole where the 
concrete is wet, it swells, and when it 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



dries out again, it becomes too small for 
the hole, which damages and in some 
cases, destroys its holding power. 

Fig. 4 shows a layout similar to what 
has been shown in the two foregoing- 
illustrations. Here water is used for 
cleaning the dust out of the holes, 
which has its advantages and its dis- 
advantages. Water softens the concrete, 
which in turn makes the drill cut faster 
— it also washes the dust out of the 
hole constantly, so that the drilling is 
never retarded by reason of the accu- 
mulated dust in the hole. The disadvan- 
tages are, first that in case of wooden 
plugs, it will swell the plugs, the re- 
sults explained in Fig. 3, and second, 
that the water causes splashing unless 
some means of preventing it is employed. 




Fig. 5 

I am showing two ways of preventing 
splashing. To the left is shown a large 
leather washer slipped onto the shank 
of the drill, which does not prevent 
splashing completely, but prevents it 
from splashing upward, as a study of 
the illustration will reveal. To the right 
is shown perhaps the best methods of 
preventing splashing. Here a tin can is 
slipped onto the shank of the drill, just 
over a small leather washer. The hole 
in the tin can through which the drill 
slips should be large enough so that the 
can will not lift off the floor when the 
drill is pulled up. This hole would per- 
mit some of the splashing to escape, 
were it not for the leather washer that 
Is shown where the tin can has been 
cut out on the illustration. 

Fig. 5 shows by the top drawing a 
side view of a plugging chisel, and by 
the bottom drawing an edge view of the 
same chisel. This chisel can be made 
out of tool steel by any blacksmith. 
The thickness of the blade is about 3/16 
of an inch, more or less, depending on 
the kind of joints the plugging is to be 
done in. 

Fig. 6 shows a brick wall in part. 
showing at A how the plugging chisel 
is used for cutting out the mortar from 
a horizontal joint. At B we have a face 



view, heavily shaded, of the joint 
with the mortar removed, ready for the 
wooden plug to be inserted. At C is 



_;1_ 







Fig. 6 

shown how the chisel is used in cutting 
out the mortar from a perpendicular 
joint, while at D is shown, also shaded, 
such a joint with the mortar removed, 
ready for the wooden plug. 

Fig. 7 shows by the top drawing a 
side view of a drill with a chisel point. 
At A, the bottom drawing, we have to 




Fi£ 



the left a view of the chisel point drill. 
looking straight at the point, and to 
the right we have an edge view of the 
point of a chisel point drill. To the left 
of B, we have the point, looking straight 
at it, of a C drill, and to the right we 
have a view of the hollow part. This 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 U. Roof framing 
complete. Other problems, including saw filing. $-.00. 

BUILDING. — Has 210 p. and 495 11.. coTering form 
building, finishing, stair building, etc. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p., 754 il., covering general 
house carpentry, estimating and other subjects. $2.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p. 
670 il., and about 7.000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

The above five books support one another. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Only SI. 00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— Illustrated prose. Only $1.00. 

FREE. — With 2 books, one $1.00 book free, with 
4 books, two, and with 5 books, three. Books auto- 
graphed. 

C. 0. D. orders, postage and C. O. D. fee added. 
Order u U CIITf^C'l IT 222 So. Const. St. 
today. ■■• ■■• Olt^attt Emporia, Kansai 



28 



THE C A R P E X T E R 



drill cuts faster and makes a more near- 
ly round hole than the chisel point drilL 
jnst explained. As C. to the left, we 
show the point of an S drill, looking 




straight at the point, and to the right 
we liave a side xiew of the same point. 
TMs drill, if made of good steel, cuts 
fast and also makes a reasonably good 
hole. 

All 01 :::e dr:::s repr^ = rn:ed bj F:?. 7. 
and also :!:-; \j\'i^2:i-^z chi-rl ;l:o".vi^ :n 
Fig. 5 can be made by any blacksir.;:::. 
In fact, these drills and plugging chi.sels 




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should frequently be resharpened by 
a blacksmith, in order to give them 
the proper form. Othervrise, they are 
sharpened with a grinder or with a file. 
Fig. 8 shows by the top drawing a 
ball peen hammer, which is commonly 
used for driving plugging chisels and 
drills. The bottom drawing shows a 
machinist's or blacksmith's hammer, 
which is also used for driving plugging 
chisels and drills, but not as much as 
the ball peen hammer. 



—PRICE LIST— 

Label and Emblem Novelties 



Card Cases i Label i S .10 

Key Chains (Label) 15 

Fobs (Label and Emblem i . .50 

Gavels (Labels) 1.25 

Pins I Emblem I 1.0 

Eijiitons (^Emblem,! 2.00 

Cufi: Links (^Emblemi 1.50 

;Ma:ch Bos Holders ( Label > .15 

Belt Loop and Chain (.Label) .75 

I-'ins. Ladies Auxiliary i Em- 
blem; 1.75 

Auto Badiaror Emblems. . . 1.25 



In Ordering These Goods Send All Orders 
and Make All Remittances Payable to 

FRANK DUFFY, Gen. Sec, 

Carpenters' Bid.. 222 E. Michigan St. 
Lndiiuiapolis, Ind. 




STEEL SQUARE 



HAND 
BOOK 



Completely Revised 






;rence carry SI. 50 postpaid 

x6?) gutde Personal eheek or rawey order acceptable. 

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Self -Examination 

By H. H. Siegele 

(Copyriglit HI 48) 

All of the information in this self- 
examining test pertains to carpentry or 
to some other building trade. This 
check-up on yourself will help fix the 
right answer in your mind, and at the 
same time you can make it an inter- 
esting pastime. The questions are fol- 
lowed by multiple choices, A, B, C, 
and D. Check the answer you think 
correct, and when you have them all 
checked, consult the answers below, 
which should be covered while you are 
doing the checking. 

1. The rise per foot run of a one- 
fourth pitch roof is — A, 8 inches; B, 
6 inches; C, 10 Inches; D, 7 inches. 

2. A rowlock course of brick is laid 
— A, on end with the length vertical 
and width at right angles; B, length 
parallel with the face of the wall: C, 
on edge with end exposed; D, on edge 
with side exposed. 

3. The scrub plane is used mostly to 
— A, cut the tongue off hardwood floor- 
ing; B, to smooth off a piece of timber; 
C, to make door jambs fit tight against 
the wall; D, to fit doors. 

4. The most common miter cut is — 
A, 40 degrees: B, 45 degrees; C, 50 
degrees; D, 3 5 degrees. 

5. The sum of the rise and run of a 
step in stair building is approximately 
— A, 17 inches: B, 14 inches: C. 18 
Inches; D, 16 inches. 

6. What is called a check in lumber 
is — A, a patch of bark partially or 
wholly Inclosed in the wood: B. distin- 
tegration of the wood substance, due 
to the action of wood destroying fungi; 
C, any irregularity occurring in or on 
wood; D, a lengthwise separation of the 
wood, which usually occurs across the 
rings of annual growth. 

7. A left-hand door, on opening it. 
swings — A, both ways: B, clockwise; 
C, counterclockwise; D on rollers. 

8. Shingles 16 inches long for roofs 
should not be exposed to the weather 
more than A, ^Yz inches: B, 5 inches; 
C, 6 inches; D, 4 inches. 

9. The most common way of showing 
the size of windows on a blue print is — 
A, glass size; B, width of rough open- 
ing; C, sash size; D, width of sill. 

10. The sides of window sash are 
called — A, muntins; B, stiles; C, meet- 
ing rails: D, mullions. 

The answers are: 

1, B; 2, C; 3, D; 4, B; 5, A; 6, D; 
7, C; 8, B; 9, A; 10, B. 



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• Completely enclosed 
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Va" hand drill No. 104 

Celebrating 80 Years of Toolmaking 



HANG THAT DOOR THE PROFESUONAl WAY! 



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"The Carpenter" 
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COMES 
LEATHESrrTE CAiE 



Index of Advertisers 



Cai-penters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 
Accurate Die & Tool Co., Cleve- 
land, Ohio 2nd Cover 

American Floor Surfacing Ma- 
chine Co., Toledo, Ohio 4 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. ^th Cover 

Bensen Square Co., Brooklvn, 

N. Y. J_2nd Cover 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 32 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

Master Ru.e Mig. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y. 31 

E. Z. Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 30 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, Mass. 30 

Ohlen-Bishop, Columbus, Ohio 29 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crov,-ley, Salem, Ore. 4 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 28 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore — 31 
Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 
Stow Metal Products Co., Stow, 

Ohio 29 

E. Weyer, New York, N. Y 31 

Carpentry Materials 

The Celotex Corp., Chicago, 111 3 

Johns -Man ville Corp., New York, 
N. Y. 32 

Technical Courses and Books 

American School, Chicago, 111. 32 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago. 111. 31 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, III. 1 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 30 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 28 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 27 

Tambiyn System, Oenver, Colo._2nd Cover 



TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 




^30UR CHART Blu.pr^nt27"X36'- 

"The FRA-AUXG SQL\ARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
to find lengths of any rafter and make its tuts; 
find any angle in degrees: frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cu-t Its mitres: read beard feet rafter 
and brace tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 
able Information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Sa* Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
i-*: i-.".---i\ and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have t-i; ;-:-*., Now printed on both sides, makes about 
13 sg-5-e ftet :f printed data showing squares full size. 
Priee $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



.SLIDE CAIXTTEATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a einch: Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet: longT- lengths are 
found by doubling, C:'. = -; :7 di = ;-er;t fi:::.;;. S-:*; :^^c:;o3 
of hies and va;!;>;. ■; '.r.T: ;n':, ;a:k',;. s"d gi.^: :'; :^:; "'ir 
each pitch, also :-.'-. a":l; in cegrees a'd r. ",.:;•:. F = ;:;vt 



met? 



d known, el.mir,; 
an read numbers 
de Calculator de 
rs and Architects 



iHiO 



■en ^.- it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
ignej especially for Carpenters, Con- 

trsctcrs and Architects. Lnusinds in use. PriCC $2.&0 

postpaid. Check or M. 0., no stamps. 



MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 
2105 N. Burditk St, Dept. 3, Kalamazoo 81, Mirfi. 



SAWCUMP ^ "^ 



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Grips entire length of saw . . a full 30 inclies. Attaches 
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Just set dial to "pitch" & 
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Unlike rafter tables, run is 
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readings. 



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'-/ya:m\ '^E^^.W examination 

Learn to driw plans, estimate, be a Uve-wlre builder, do 
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Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For Examination 

AMERICAN TEcFNicAT SOCIETY ~Vocatio~allubiishcrs since" 1898 
Dept. G336 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 

You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your eight 
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Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
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For Real Accuracy on the Job 



..MASTER 




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Many mechanics whose jobs call for real accuracy are now using the 
Master Brite-Blade. This outstanding steel tape rule has a trim, nickel 
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The contrasting jet black graduations on the snow white, non-peeling, non- 
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Blade can be used for inside 



measure, too, and blades can be \ 
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tapes. See your hardware or 
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> - . REG;U.S.PAT.OFF.^- - / i 



MASTER RULE MFG. COMPANY, INC., Dept. E-3 
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Gentlemen: Please send me D 6 ft. Brite-Blade 
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MACHINE SAW FILING 

•with the Foley Automatic 
Saw Filer is the modern way 
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The Foley is the ONLY machine 
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A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Micliigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



EstablishPfl in 1881 
Vol. Lxvni — Xo. 4 



IXDIAXAPOLLS APRIL, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Building Trades Adopt Pact 



The Building Trades Department and the National Association of Employers for the 
construction industry adopt an agreement which sets up o National Joint Board for the 
settlement of jurisdictional disputes. The agreement is in no way an endorsement of 
the Taft-Hartley Act and our Brotherhood is participating only with that understanding. 



Clean the Slate in '48 



Walter Mason, AFL Legislative Representative, summarizes the rank failure of the 
present Congress to meet the challenge of the times. The only definite program that has 
come from Capitol Hill in the past year is a program designed to wreck organized labor 
and nullify every piece of pro-labor legislation enacted since the turn of the century. 



They Aren't Satisfied 



12 

Passage of the Taft-Hartley Act has not satisfied the vested interests which wrote 
it and had it enacted into law. They are now out to wreck the unemployment insurance 
program, the Fair Labor Standards Act, Social Security and all the other pro-labor legis- 
lation on the statute books. All they need is a few more rubber stamps in the House 
and Senate to odd to the many whom they already control. 



NLRB Starts Floundering 



15 

Thanks to the unworkable features of the Taft-Hartley Act, the National Labor Rela- 
tions Board is already beginning to flounder under the heavy case load even though the 
maximum load is still some months away. In the end the NLRB is certain to bog down 
in red tape, boondoggling and delay just as the War Labor Board did during the war. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriani 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



10 
16 
19 
20 
21 
24 
26 



Index to Advertisers 



28 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IXD., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of po.stage provided for 

in Section li03, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



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^ BUILDING TRADES ADOPT PACT 



M 



EETING in Washington, D. C, Thursday, March nth, the presi-^, 
dents of the nineteen National and International Unions which 
comprise the Building- and Construction Trades Department of 
'I the American Federation of Labor placed their stamp of approval on an 
agreement which sets up a National Joint Board for the settlement of 
jurisdictional disputes. Signatories to the agreement are the National 
il Association of Employers in the construction industry and the Building 
and Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of 
Labor. 

As outlined in the preamble, objectives of the agreement are few and 
simple: (a) continuous operation of the industry with a minimum of 
, government interference; (b) provision for a final and authoritative dis- 
I position of jurisdictional disputes with assurance that such disposition will 
\ be made by an impartial but informed tribunal that is fully familiar with 
I the industry and its methods and problems rather than by political appoin- 
, tees or hirelings; (c) stabilization of the industry in the best interests of 
the employers, the unions and the general public. The agreement is not 
in any way an endorsement of the Taft-Hartley Act, and our Broth- 
erhood became a party thereto only with that understanding. The em- 
ployers and the Building Trades Unions were working on such an agree- 
ment long before the Taft-Hartley Act was passed. For the past several 
, years they have been exchanging views and ideas, and one of the impor- 
' tant points the unions had in mind constantly was the elimination of poli- 
tical direction of labor relations in the construction industry, — especially 
the arbitrary, unworkable kind of direction contained in the Taft-Hartley 
Act. 

Under the terms of the agreement as now adopted there is established 
a National Joint Board for the settlement of jurisdiction disputes in the 
construction industry. It is to consist of an impartial chairman and two 
members of the Building Trades Department. There is also set up a labor 

I and industry pool of twenty-four members ; twelve representing the em- 
ployers and twelve representing the Building Trades. The latter are to be 
the eight vice presidents of the Building and Construction Trades Depart- 

I ment, plus four General Presidents of the National or International Unions 
affiliated with the Department. 

When a dispute has been referred to the Joint Board, the chairman thereof 

: shall select from the industry and labor pool two members from each 

group, subject to the approval of the labor and industry members of the 

Board of Trustees, who shall sit with him and assist him in passing judg- 

, ment and rendering decisions. In making these selections from the indus- 



6 THECARPEXTER 

trv and labor pool, the two men selected from each group must be in no 

Avay in\-oIved in the particular dispute to be handled. 

The agreement also creates a Board of Trustees consisting of the Joint 
Board Chairman and eight members — four representing labor and four 
representing the employers. These industry and labor trustees shall have 
the duty of selecting the impartial chairman for handling individual cases 
as outlined above. The Board of Trustees shall first investigate the claims 
of the disputing parties to determine whether or not a disposition of the 
dispute in question has been made by a previous decision of record or 
recorded agreement between the parties. For this purpose, all agreements 
and decisions recognized under the provisions of the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department shall be considered as constituting the record 
on which the Board of Trustees will issue its ruling. The Board of Trus- 
tees is also vested with the authority' to establish such precedural regula- 
tions and administrative practices as may be deemed necessary for the 
effective administration of the agreement ; same to be consistent with the 
expressed terms of the agreement. 

First General \"ice President, ]\I. A. Hutcheson, has been nominated 
as a labor member of the highly important Board of Trustees. The cost 
of administering the entire program is to be borne jointh' by the National 
Association of EmploA'ers in the construction industry and the Building 
and Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of 
Labor. 

The agreement represents the fruit of much serious discussion between 
the employers and the Building and Construction Trades Department over 
a period of many months. At the last convention of the Building and 
Construction Trades Department, held in San Francisco last October, a 
detailed report of progress was presented to the delegates by the officers 
in their annual report, and since that time work has been carried on with 
all possible speed. Last month the presidents of the National and Inter- 
national Unions that make up the Building and Construction Trades 
Department met in Washington, D. C, and voted acceptance of the agree- 
ment as finally drafted. The agreement is to go into effect as soon as the 
machinery therein provided for has been set up and declared ready to 
begin operations. It is to remain in full force and effect until December 
31st and for each year thereafter unless one signatory notifies the other in 
writing at least thirt}' days before the end of any 3^ear that changes or 
termination is desired. However, b\^ mutual consent, the agreement may 
be amended at any time. 

The agreement is the answer of the construction industry to those who 
have long criticized and belittled both unions and the emploj^ers for what- 
ever disagreements have developed from time to time. These people have 
never lost an opportunity to magnify and distort every dispute to their 
own ends; nameh' to place industrial relations under the domination of 
political bureaus and political hirelings. Under the agreement, construc- 
tion people will solve construction problems, and the college professors, 
ward heelers and professional politicians will be left to wield their influ- 
ences in other fields. 



Why Labor Must- - 

Clean The Slate in '48 

By W.4X,TER MASON, AFL Legislative Representative 

(Excerpts front a speech delivered before the mid-winter political action meeting of the Indiana 
State Federation of Labor held in Indianapolis February 2Jst and 22nd.) 

ir ir ic 

I WANT TO SAY that this Congress has directly or indirectly 
repealed practically every piece of legislation that benefited labor and 
the working class people in this country in the last 60 years. 
In order to point out to you the significance of what has actually hap- 
pened I would like you to bear with me while I make a brief summary of 
what they actually have done. 

The Taft-Hartley Act is only one act and a lot of people look at it as 
one act. It is really an accumulation of 30 various anti-labor bills put into 
one omnibus bill. ■ — 



It was back in 1913 that the or- 
ganized labor movement was recog- 
nized as a part of our society. At 
that time the Organic Act of labor 
was enacted and it was signed by 
the late President Taft, the father 
of this distinguished Senator from 
Ohio, who is the author of the Taft- 
Hartley Act. 

Through the Organic Act the 
Department of Labor was establish- 
ed. It was set up to promote the 
affairs and the welfare of the work- 
ers and to provide for them profit- 
able employment, and over the pe- 
riod of years it has done a swell 
job. 

Then in 1914 the Clayton Act was 
enacted, the Clayton Act, which de- 
termined that human labor was not 
a commodity in commerce and not 
subject to suits under our anti-trust 
laws. 

Prior to the enactment of that act 
our organized labor movement had 
many trials and tribulations. When 
we went out on strike to better 
our standards it was considered by 
the courts as a criminal conspiracy. 
Our union officers were imprisoned 
and everybody that went out on 



strike was fined. I can relate to you 
a decision in New York where 400 
organized workers struck for an in- 
crease in wages and they were fined 
by a court of New York and found 
guilty of conspiring for higher wag- 
es and each one of them was fined. 
But after that it only strengthened 
our movement to fight further. We 
banded together in a demand for 
better conditions, and then we had 
the Norris-LaGuardia Act, but prior 
to that in 1914, and 1916 and '17, 
when we entered the war, the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor stood be- 
hind our government all through 
that war and we turned out the 
implements and weapons that were 
necessary for the successful prose- 
cution of the war and at that time 
the American Federation of Labor 
had between four and five million 
members. 

What happened after the war? It 
is ironic with that same force that 
is moving today. We were faced 
with drastic wage cuts, we were 
forced to strike, and the only differ- 
ence between the strikes in 1919 and 
the strikes in 1946 was that we lost 
the strikes in 1919. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



"Why did we lose the strikes? 
Because when a plant was struck 
our union ofr.cers were imprisoned. 
Injunctions by the courts were is- 
sued against the strikers and ^ve 
were not permitted to picket our 
places of employment. As a result 
we lost most of the strikes, and as 
a further result the membership of 
our movement gradually decreased. 

But then the Norris-LaGuardia 
Act was enacted, "«-hich declared 
and recognized the labor unions, 
that they had a right to strike as 
a result of a labor dispute, and no 
court was empowered to issue a 
temporary or restraining order or 
in;unct:or.. Following that the 
Da"."i5-Bacon Act w^as enacted, the 
Vv'alsh-Healey Act v.-as enacted and 
the Fair Labor Standards Act was 
enacted. Those three acts set Tip 
minimum hours and wage standards 
for the benefit of the people who 
toiled, and they benefited most the 
unorganized groups. 

Then we come to the National 
Labor Relations Act. which v.-as set 
uo on sound principles and gave 
the workers the right to organize 
and forced the employers to sit 
down and bargain with them if it 
was determined that they were the 
bargaining representatives and rep- 
resented a majority of the employes 
in a particular establishment. 

I point these gains out to you in 
an effort to point out the struggles 
that were made bj' some of us here 
and by our forefathers. 

Xov\-. I want to say that all of 
those benefits and all of those laws 
that I just mentioned, by the Taft- 
Hartley Act and other pieces of 
legislation that vrere enacted in this 
last session of Congress have been 
directly or indirect-ly repealed. 

Let me show you how that was 
done. Thev didn't want to come out 



and directly repeal these individual 
laws, so I will take first the Organic 
Act of Labor, which set up the De- 
partment of Labor. In 1946 they 
had an appropriation of S37 million 
for the Department of Labor which 
proved grossly inadequate to serv- 
ice 50 milion w-orkers. So the Sec- 
retar}^ of Labor asked for a higher 
appropriation. What did Congress 
do? Congress, instead of accepting 
the recommendations of the Secre- 
tary of Labor, reduced the appro- 
priation to $18 million. Eighteen 
million dollars to service 50 million 
wage earners ! It makes the depart- 
ment practically inoperative. It 
took away from the Department of 
Labor our conciliation service. It 
took aw-ay the w^age and hour office. 
It took away the United States Em- 
ployment Service. And now the De- 
partment of Labor and the Secre- 
tary of Labor, who in my opinion 
should be the top man of the Presi- 
dent's cabinet, now operates as a 
mere shell \vith no funds. 

Then the portal-to-portal pay act 
w^as enacted. I don't think to many 
of us realize the importance of that 
act. We hear so much Taft-Hartley 
that we forget about some of the 
other anti-labor legislation that was 
enacted. Well, let me say in just a 
few^ w^ords that the portal-to-portal 
pay act practically, either directly 
or indirectl}-, repealed the Davis- 
Bacon Act, the Walsh-Healey Act 
and the Fair Labor Standards Act. 
It weakened those acts to a point 
where the}- are now inoperative. 

Let me mention some of the few 
assinine provision of the act. They 
endeavored to define compensable 
Avorking time, so here is what they 
did. They say that compensable 
working time is governed by previ- 
ous custom and practice and that is 
that if an employer violated the 
law now under the portal-to-portal 



THE CARPENTER 



act he is in cempliance with the 
law. It tells another employer he 
has to comply with the law, that 
you still have to comply with that 
law. It puts an honest employer at 
a disadvantage with the employer 
who deliberately violated the law. 
In another provision they say that 
if an employer violates the law in 
good faith he is not liable. Now, 
who is going to determine whether 
an employer violates the law in 
good faith or bad faith? 

Provisions of that kind question 
the intelligence of the average 
American workman. It limits and 
reduces the statute of limitations 
whereby under the old law the stat- 
ute of limitations was governed by 
the states, which average was a pe- 
riod of five years where you could 
still collect damages owed to you 
by your employer. So they re- 
duced that to two years. If you 
owed an employer or owed anybody 
any money under your state laws, 
he had five or six years under the 
state law to collect it. But if the 
employer ow^es you anything, you 
only have two years. 

Well, I could go on and mention 
several other provision of the act, 
but I don't want to take up too 
much of your time. 

Now I come to the Taft-Hartley 
Act. The Taft-Hartley Act has di- 
rectly or indirectly repealed the 
Clayton Act, and the Norris-La- 
Guardia Act. 

Under the Clayton Act now your 
union can be sued, your treasuries 
can be drained; and believe me, if 
that law stands on the book long 
enough the employers will see that 
they are drained. 

Now, under the Norris-LaGuardia 
Act. as amended by the Taft-Hart- 
ley Law, we now have government 
by injunction. If you are on strike 
now the NLRB can petition the 



courts for an injunction. They have 
endeavored to shackle labor. They 
have handcuffed us to a point that 
we cannot operate freely under our 
democratic system. 

There is one other point that 
might interest you, to show you that 
this Congress is not only concerned 
about labor unions, but they are con- 
cerned about a selective group that 
has to pay taxes. 

We had a school lunch program 
which was in operation for several 
years. In 1946, 75 million dollars 
was provided for that program. It 
was insufficient and could only serv- 
ice five million of our 25 million 
school children. The Secretary of 
Agriculture recommended six hun- 
dred million dollars. A project of 
this kind was in operation in Eng- 
land. England provides three hun- 
dred million dollars each year to 
service only about one-sixth the 
number of school children that we 
have in this country. So instead of 
appropriating sufficient funds to op- 
erate that program properly so that 
it would cover all of our school 
children, they reduced it from 75 
million to 65 million with the cost 
of living during the period between 
1946 and 1947 increasing over 25 
per cent; it means now that hun- 
dreds of thousands of our school 
children that were receiving bene- 
fits under the school lunch program 
will now be deprived of those bene- 
fits. 

That is a summary of about 
everything that Congress did in the 
last session. They have destroyed 
and practically repealed every piece 
of legislation that was on the books 
to benefit labor. In addition, they 
did nothing about our critical hous- 
ing shortage. They did nothing 
about our national health insurance. 
They did little or nothing about our 
veteran legislation. 



J] I l-J 



THE DENHAM DANCE 

Robert Denham, High Pasha of the 
National Labor Relations Board, is con- 
tinuing to pour ink on the muddy 
waters surrounding the doings of the 
Board under the Taft-Hartley Act. Al- 
though admitting that union shop agree- 
ments have contributed stability to the 
construction industry, the all-seeing, 
all-wise counsel for the Board insists 
that union shop elections in the con- 
struction industry will be held on a 
regional basis; this despite the fact 
construction has never been definitely 
classified as interstate commerce. 

An obscure lawyer before being ele- 
vated to the key job in the new Labor 
Board setup, Denham seems to have an 
infinite capacity for doing the wrong 
thing at the right time or vice versa. 
The way he has been hopping around 
on various issues sort of reminds us 
of the little boy who was sent to danc- 
ing school. When he got home from 
his first lesson his mother asked him 
how he got along. 

Oh, dancing is easy," replied the tot, 
"all you have to do is turn around once 
in a while and keep wiping your feet." 




Pay the finance company first . . . they 
can take our furniture back, but the 
doctor can't put Junior's tonsils bach. 



NO LAUGHING MATTER 

Although it is probably news to the 
little woman who does the shopping in 
your household, the cost of living has 
declined. At least the Department of 
Labor says so. Maybe the trouble is 
that the manager of the store where we 
do our shopping has never read the 
Department of Labor reports because 
so far as we can see a dollar's worth of 
groceries still cost about two dollars 
and seventy-five cents. A few more 
months of present prices and we will be 
finding ourselves in the same position 
as the Denver worker whose debts piled 
up on him. After receiving a couple of 
particularly nasty duns from one firm, 
the worker sent the company the follow- 
ing letter: 

"Once a month we put all our out- 
standing bills on the table, draw six at 
random, and pay them. If we receive 
any more of your impudent duns, you 
won't even get a place in the shuffle 
next month." 



WHO IS GENEVIEVE? 

As this is being written, debate on 
the Marshall Plan is reaching a climax. 
So far as we can see, there is no alter- 
native to the plan but to leave all Eur- 
ope to the tender mercies of Mustache 
Joe. On the other hand it was not long 
ago that England was granted some 
four billions in loans that were to put 
her on her feet and several hundred 
millions v/ere allocated to save Greece 
Yet today England and Greece are as 
deeply in the economic mire as they 
ever were. So that leaves us about like 
the sweet young thing who had just 
accepted an engagement ring from her 
chosen young man. 

"There's just one thing that bothers 
me," she said. 

"What is that?" enquired the young 
man. 

"Well, when you called me that first 
time and got the wrong number and 
asked for Genevieve and I answered — 
who is Genevieve?" 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



NO MYSTERY 

Wallace knows where he is going," 
announce headlines in a left-wing paper. 

Yeh! about like the student navigator 
who was carrying out exercises on the 
Arizona desert. After pouring over his 
charts and figures for a long time he 
finally turned to his pilot and said: 
"Take off your hat." 

"Why?" asked the pilot. 

"Because," replied the student, "if 
we are where my calculations say we 
are, we're in the middle of St. Paul's 
Cathedral." 

• • >* 

PAUP COMES THROUGH AGAIN 
"Woman," says Joe Paup, famous 
beer-barrel philsopher and washroom 
poet, "is a ereature who starts out by re- 
sisting a man's advances and ends up 
by blocking his retreat." 

• • • 

NO HALF-B.\KED THEORY 
After messing around in his labora- 
tory for several years, a scientist has 
come forth with the theory that the 
bleaching agent universally used to 
make flour white is causing insanity 
among bread and cake eaters. 

Maybe so; but we have our doubts. 
We still hold to the theory that if there 
is anything about bread and cake that 
makes people go nuts it is the prices 
that are being charged for these com- 
modities today. 

• • • 

THE NEW LOOK IN MUTTON CHOPS 
Restaurant prices in the nation's capi- 
tal are still on the rise. One fashion- 
able eating place raised the price of its 
meat dishes and then advertised in all 
the daily newspapers: "Our lamb chops 
have that 'New Look.' Their panties 
have been lengthened two inches.' " All 
that remains now is for some other 
vise guy to raise his prices and explain 
that he's now putting bustles on his 
rump steaks. 

• • • 
NOTHING NEW 

A novelty making firm has applied 
for a patent on a toy that moos and 
can actually be milked. 

We do not know whether or not the 
patent office knows it but there is al- 
ready such a creature — the taxpayer. 

• * • 

More people are run down by gossip 
than by automobiles. 



ALL GOOD BUT THE MUSIC 

At a recent editorial dinner in In- 
dianapolis, a Republican Congressman 
from Indiana spent an hour and a half 
telling the assembled guests what a 
wonderful record the present Congress 
has achieved. To hear him tell it, the 
80th Congress has solved all our prob- 
lems. It all sounded fine, and except 
for the fact that our Congressmen have 
done nothing about inflation, housing, 
budget reduction, runaway profits and 
a few "minor" items of that kind, it 
is all pretty straight stuff. 

As we read Congressman's speech, 
about all we could think of was one of 
our favorite stories concerning a little 
boy attending a music recital. 

The music teacher was proudly pre- 
senting her pupils in a recital. After 
the extended musical program, ice 
cream, cake, and fruit were served. 
One of the young musicians had brought 
her little brother along as a guest. 

As the youngster was taking his de- 
parture the teacher asked: "Well, Jim- 
mie, did you enjoy the recital?" 

"I sure did," Jimmie replied, "that 
is, all but the music." 

• • • 
NO EXPERIENCE 

"A man should be the master of his 
own home or know the reason why," 
says a widely known psychologist. 

Apparently the man is a batchelor, 
because most wedded men aren't mas- 
ters of their homes and they know the 
reas&n why. 




I think he's going crazy, Warden. He 
keeps saying, "A whole room tO inyaelf 
and a 10-year lease." 



12 



They ^ren V Satisfied 

* * 

As THIS JOURNAL predicted long ago, passage of the Taft-Hartley 
Act has not satisfied the vested interests which wrote it and had 
it enacted into legislation through Congressmen under their con- 
trol. They are not satisfied because the Taft-HartleA' Act represents only 
a minor skirmish in their overall battle campaign for wrecking organized 
labor and wiping ofi: the statute books every piece of progressive legisla- 
tion enacted in the last half a centurj-. 

In a recent issue we described the plans these selfish groups have 
worked out for wrecking the forty-hour and overtime provisions of the 
Fair Labor Standards Act. They intend to do this through clever, sugar- 
coated amendments. One ?mendment they are backing is an enactment 
which would enable employers to • 



negotiate contracts with their em- 
employes calling for less than the 
precribed time-and-a-half for over- 
time. In other words, instead of 
being assured by law of time-and-a- 
half for everything over forty hours 
as they now are, workers would 
have to negotiate with em-ployers 
for this privilege; or put another 
Avay, under the amendment,- work- 
ers would have to fight for the very 
thing that they now get through the 
Fair Labor Standards Act. Still an- 
other amendment would limit all 
overtime to ninety-six cents an 
hour regardless of the straight time 
rate. These amendments are right 
now kicking around in Congress. 
All the vested interests are waiting 
for is a few more Congressmen 
whom they can handle. There is 
still a fighting minority in both 
houses which stand in their way. 
Their hope is that in the forthcom- 
ing elections they will be able to 
e!ect a few more Charley ^IcCar- 
thys which will "assure them of clear 
sailing. 

But the Fair Labor Standards Act 
is not the only piece of legislation 



beneficial to labor which is under 
attack. A well integrated plan for 
Avrecking unemployment insurance 
is also taking shape in Washington. 
A bill that could certainly do the 
wrecking job thoroughly is pend- 
ing on Capitol Hill right now. 
Sponsored by A. L. Reeves, Jr., of 
Missouri, it is known as H.H. 4800. 
At the present time, the unem- 
ployment insurance program is ad- 
ministered by the various states 
under federal supervision. It is finan- 
ced by a three per cent payroll tax 
which is paid entirely by employ- 
ers. Ninety per cent of the revenue 
derived from the tax goes to the 
individual states while ten per cent 
goes to the federal government 
which bears all the expenses of 
administration incurred by the 
states. Legislation now pending 
would completely eliminate the 
federal government from the pro- 
gram and wipe out all the safe- 
guards that now surround the ex- 
penditure of unemployment insur- 
ance funds. One of these safe- 
guards surrounding expenditures 
of unemployment insurance reserve 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



funds is a provision that these funds 
can be spent for no purpose other 
than paying- unemployment insur- 
ance to qualified workers. The pro- 
posed legislation would wipe out 
this safeguard and thus make the 
reserve funds easy prey to the con- 
niving of clever politicians. 

A\'hen one realizes that there is 
something like seven billion dollars 
piled up in unemployment insur- 
ance reserve fund, it is not difficult 
to realize that state political ma- 
chines would have the biggest slush 
fund of all time at their disposal 
once the proposed legislation be- 
came laAv. Those who became un- 
employed through no fault of their 
own might never be able to collect 
unemployment benefits, despite the 
fact they had benefits coming, be- 
cause the money would have van- 
ished long since in the mysterious 
way political machines have of mak- 
ing funds disappear. 

This tampering with unemploy- 
ment insurance is an important mat- 
ter to all Avorkers. Good times may 
not alwa^^s be with us. Under the 
present setup, sizeable reserve 
funds have been collected. Pro- 
tected by proper safeguards such 
as exist at present, these reserves 
should be ample to see the pro- 
gram through a stretch of several 
lean years. Let the politicians get 
their hands on them once, and the 
funds would soon go up in smoke, 
and at the very time when workers 
need the cushion of unemployment 
insurance most none would be 
forthcoming because of no funds be- 
ing available. 

But these safeguards surrounding 
unemployment insurance funds are 
not the only important provisions 
of the present law under attack. 
Under the law as now constituted, 
a worker cannot be denied benefits 
if he refuses to take a job in a 



strike-bound plant, or in a plant 
that pays sub-standard wages, or in 
an industry where his union mem- 
bership might be jeopardized. These 
important provisions, too would 
disappear if pending amendments 
to the Fair Labor Standards Act 
are passed. 

The size of the reserve fund is 
the ammunition which the vested 
interests are using in their sly fight 
to knock out the protective fea- 
tures of the law and get the seven 
billion dollars into the hands of state 
political machines. They maintain 
that seven billion dollars is "an enor- 
mity of funds." Actually this is not 
so. Unemployment has been negli- 
gible during the past six or seven 
years and returning veterans have 
been provided for through the GI 
Bill of Rights. Otherwise the re- 
serve funds might not be so large. 

Furthermore, benefits have not 
been increased any despite the fact 
it takes two dollars today to buy 
what one dollar could buy when 
present benefits were established. 
But most important of all, it is 
vital that adequate reserves be 
maintained at all time so that the 
unemployment insurance program 
can be kept on a solvent basis in 
case of a slump. 

Contrary to the wishes of the 
vested interests, the Social Security 
Board recommends that in case re- 
serve funds do become too great 
that benefits be upped, coverage be 
extended, the pay period length- 
ened, and provision be made for 
taking into consideration forced 
idleness due to sickness. If these 
things were done the seven billion 
dollars would look much less like 
an enormity; in fact it might well 
look to be pitifully inadequate. 

Commenting on the efforts of the 
vested interests to emasculate the 
entire unemployment insurance pro- 



14 THE CARPENTER 

gram and get the reserve funds passed. They will also succeed in 

into the hands of political machines, wrecking the Fair Labor Standards 

Representatives Dingell of Michi- Act and the unemployment insur- 

gan recently said: ance program unless organized la- 

"This plan, if adopted, would bor becomes cognizant of the dan- 
mark the disintegration of the sys- ger. The next election will probably 
tern of unemployment compensation tell the story. If the vested inter- 
as we know it in this country today, ests put a few more of their rubber 
It is in fact an insidious and danger- stamps into Congress, labor will lose 
ous attack upon a system which is its shirt. On the other hand if labor 
designed to afford a measure of eco- undergoes a political awakening 
nomic security to workers." and elects its friends and defeats 

The vested interests succeeded its enemies, the trend toward reac- 

in getting the Taft-Hartley Act tionism can be halted. 



"Study World Slave Labor" AFL Asks UN 

AFL leaders joined with other prominent citizens in calling upon the United 
Nations for a searching inquiry into slave labor conditions throughout the world 
and urged an end to the practice of slave labor everywhere. 

The statment, signed by more than 300 citizens, was released by Rev. Donald 
Harrington, national chairman for the Workers Defense League. 

Included among those backing the WDL action were William Green, president 
of the AFL; Matthew Woll, AFL council member; Max Zaritsky, president of the 
United Hat, Cap and Millinery Workers Union; Arnold S. Zander, president of the 
State, County and Municipal Employes Union; H. L. Mitchell, president of the 
National Farm Labor Union; A. Philip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood 
of Sleeping Car Porters; and other AFL officials. 

Rev. Harrington declared the primary emphasis of the inquiry must be on the 
investigation of slave labor in Russian concentration camps where at least half of 
the world's modern slaves are located. 

Charging that the number of slave laborers in the world has increased to an 
estimated 20,000,000, the signers of the statement publicly expressed their soli- 
darity with these workers. 

On the basis of the facts disclosed, the conscience of humanity must be mobi- 
lized," the statement says. "Free labor is not secure while slave labor exists. 
We assert that it is the positive duty of the United Nations to investigate and 
publicize the facts about slave labor. We ask for the facts, and we demand the 
end of slave labor everywhere in the world. 

A delegation representing the Workers Defense League presented the statement 
to Trygve Lie, secretary-general of the United Nations. It is expected that the 
action of the WDL and its backers will add an impetus to consideration of the 
slave labor problem by the UN, discussion of which was postponed by the Economic 
and Social Council until July. 



DEATH CAIiLS FORMER BOILERMAKER PRESIDENT 

Death last month ended the long and active labor career of Joseph A. Franklin, 
prominent official of the Boilermakers Union. Mr. Franklin was serving as presi- 
dent emeritus of his organization at the time of his demise. In the year 1908, 
Mr. Franklin was first elected active president of his union. He served in that 
capacity until 1929. The following year he was again placed at the helm of the 
Boilermakers and remained in that position until 19 44. 

Mr. Franklin served on President Wilson's War Labor Board during World 
War 1, acting as assistant director of labor disputes. He was 79 at the time of 
his death. 



16 



N L R B Starts Floundering 

* * 

As predicted by AFL leaders the National Labor Relations Hoard has 
been literally swamped with work since enactment of the Taft-Hartley 
law. 

A statistical report covering the board's activities in the first 6 months 
under the legislation reveals that 12,500 cases were filed since August 22, 
1947, more than were brought to the NLRB in any one of the board's first 
full II years. 

Under this avalanche of business, which is continuing at an ever 
increasing rate, the backlog of cases pending disposition by the NLRB 
rose to 9,500 nearly 2^ times the number of cases pending when the Taft- 
Hartley law became effective. 

Of this number, 1,600 cases were filed under the Wagner Act which 
means that the 6-months accumulation of cases under the new law has 
hit the astounding total of 7,900. Put in simple terms the NLRB at the 
end of February was twice as far behind with Taft-Hartley cases alone 
as it was after 11 years operation under the Wagner Act. 

The 7,900-case Taft-Hartley backlog is broken down in 1.400 unfair 
labor practice cases and 6,470 petitions for various types of elections. 
Analysis of the election petitions received in the 6-month period shows 
4,910 were for union shop authorization polls, 1,420 asked for collective 
bargaining decisions, while 140 petitions for decertification elections were 
filed. 

H these statistics presented in the NLRB report seem amazing, the 
predictions for the future loads of "red tape" in store for the board are 
fantastic. Paul M. Herzog, NLRB chairman painted a dismal picture. 

He predicted that the board will be swamped with over 60,000 cases 
during the next fiscal year, beginning July i. That's more than 6 times 
as much as the board handled annually under the Wagner Act. 

Of the total, Herzog estimated 30,000 will be petitions for "union shop" 
elections. 

The board chairman forecast that 3,900 charges of ''unfair labor prac- 
tices" will be filed against unions and about 4,000 against employers, or 
almost 50-50. That disclosure pretty much demolishes the propaganda 
that employers "will not make much use of the act to harass unions." 

To the millions of American workers who remember the war years, 
the growing backlog of business piling up before the National Labor 
Relations Board is very discouraging. 

From all indications the NLRB is headed even deeper into the mire, 
thanks to the cumbersome, unworkable, untenable provisions of the Taft- 
Hartley Act. That the NLRB is doomed to eventually strangle in its own 
red tape seems inevitable. Before it does so. however, injustices, compli- 
cations and delays may make a shambles of industrial relations. 



Editorial 




Avoid the Trojan Horse 

Torn asunder by two cataclysmic wars in a single generation, the 
world is slow to return to normalcy. Almost three years have elapsed 
since the last shot was fired, yet the brave new world all of us dreamed of 
in the trying days of 1944 and 1945 is still mostly a mirage. Tension, 
mistrust, and ill will still exist between nations and peoples. Hunger, 
want and hardship are still the lot of a major portion of the civilized 
world. Yet the picture is not without its promising touches. 

In India the teeming millions have achieved independence if not 
harmony. The Indian constitution sets a new standard for liberalism 
and individual freedom. That it is largely meaningless to date cannot 
discount the fact that it is the basic factor in the Indian pathway toward 
independence. It may take years or it may take generations, but in the 
end Indians will learn to honor and respect and be governed by the historic 
document, just as the Philippines are becoming adjusted to their outright 
freedom. In other parts of the world, too, signs are encouraging. In 
Java and Borneo and French Indo-China the people are working toward 
independence and democracy. Even in Europe, confused as the situation 
is, the news is not all bad. 

Throughout substantial portions of the old world organized labor is 
gradually arising Phoenix-like from the ashes of the old ruins. The 
hardships are many and the obstacles are numerous but the workers of 
Europe are rebuilding their great unions which were among the finest 
in the world in the days before the war. Progress may be slow and set- 
backs may be numerous, but the European unions are marching forward. 
There is no other way of building strong and independent labor unions. 
It took plenty of blood and tears to build the labor movement in this 
country, and even today, in this supposedly enlightened age, trade union- 
ism is under attack from the vested interests. Determination and states- 
manship are still needed in America to keep organized labor from falling 
prey to the interests which want unionism saddled with the 3''oke of 
government control. 

To the unions of Europe which are rebuilding under extremely adverse 
conditions, our problems may seem insignificant. But in reality they are 
not. At home or abroad, the fundamental principle of unionism must 
be independence. The same Communistic influences that are trying to 
wreck our unions here with a hoary Trojan horse disguised as "unity" 
are working in the European unions, only on a much grander scale. With 
their phony cry of "unity" the Kremlin agents are seeking to undermine 
and destroy every vestige of genuine trade unionism on the continent. 

In America, the working people have been too generously endowed 
with common sense to fall for the fancy propaganda of the Communists. 



THE CARPENTER 17 

We sincerely hope that our European brothers are equally discerning. 
The pathway of Communism ^\'ith its misleading cry of "unity" is the 
pathway to serfdom and eventual slavery. On the other hand, the pathway 
of genuine free and independent unionism is the pathway' to peace and 
prosperity and a decent way of life for all who toil for a living. May our 
European brothers always remember that. 

• 

One Asset We Dare Not Dissipate 

Recent government figures reveal that unemployment hit the two and 
a half million mark shortly after the first of the year. While they might 
have a hard time convincing the two and a half million who are jobless 
that it is so, economists insist, nevertheless, that the unemployment situa- 
tion is nothing to get alramed about. They point out that seasonal layoffs, 
workers changing jobs, etc. keep several million temporarily out of work 
even in the best of times. Be that as it may. joblessness is never very 
pleasant to the people who are victims of it. That the economy of the 
nation is in a healthy condition is small consolation to a man or woman 
who does not have a weekly pay check coming in these" days when high 
prices make it difficult to live decently even with a steady income. 

However, the saddest part of the whole situation is that unemploy- 
ment is most prevalent among workers in the older age brackets. In fact 
men and women over fifty-five constitute the vast bulk of the jobless pool. 
Not only are more of them unemplo^-ed proportionately, but also it takes 
much longer to place them on new jobs that it does younger workers; 
this despite the fact that wartime experience proved older workers safer, 
steadier and more conscientious employes in many industries. This trend 
was in effect long before the war and apparenth^ it is going to continue 
unless steps are taken to prevent workers still in the prime of their lives 
from being dumped on the scrap heap for no reason other than that they 
have reached an arbitrary age limit. If the problem is not recognized and 
solved before very long serious consequences may develop. 

It is estimated that by 1980 there will be some sixty million people in 
this nation over the age of forty-five. Around twenty-one million of these 
will be over sixty-five. At the present time the total number of people 
employed is in the neighborhood of sixty million. This means that by 
1980, if employers continue refusing to employ people over forty-five, 
our total unemployed army will be approximately as big as our whole 
working force is at the present time. If people are not working, they 
must be supported by one means or another. How and when will the 
nation be able to carry the financial burden in 1980 if the present trend of 
forcibly retiring middle-aged workers continues? 

The whole idea of arbitrarily refusing to hire men at any given age 
is a silly and uneconomic one. Some men are youthful and spry at seventy 
and others are comparatively old at fifty. While speed in some lines may 
diminish with advancing years, skill and know-how increase as long as a 
man lives. In the long run, older workers can generally hold their own 
with their younger brothers. 

In addition to the billions we have already spent, within the next few 
years we are going to spend some seventeen or eighteen billions more to 



18 THE CARPENTER 

rehabilitate the peoples of other nations. Is it too much to ask that we 
start figuring out ways and means of takrng care of our own discarded 
workers, — men and women who through their work and tax contributions 
built America and made it. strong-? Than the skill and brains of our 
people, America has no greater asset. I" i ■ economically sound to dissi- 
pate this asset just as we have dissipated much of our forests and farm- 
land? Certainly the answer is a loud unequivocal "no." 

The solution does not lie in a pittance or a dole of some kind. It lies 
in making available work opportunities to all who are capable and willing 
to work, whether they are eighteen or eighty, with the assurance that when 
he or she has reached the end of his working days reasonable security 
from poverty and want will be assured. 

Perhaps this is an ambitious program. But if we can spend billions to 
take care of people in other lands, surely we can spend a few dollars to 
take care of our own displaced workers in their declining years. 



The Figures Belie the Propaganda 

The people of the nation now have had a full six month dose of the 
Taft-Hartley Act, and to those who earn their living with the sweat of 
their brows it has proved to be a bitter dose indeed. The framers of the Act 
and those who supported it are diligently trying to sell it to workers as 
a piece of beneficial legislation, but facts and figures belie their propa- 
ganda efiforts. 

According to the Labor Board's own figures, the number of represen- 
tation elections it conducted in first four months after passage of the 
Act dropped sharply. Out of the 1,395 requests by newly organized 
groups during that period, the Board held only 507 representation elec- 
tions. In the pre-Taft-Hartley era the average ran somewhere in the 
neighborhood of 3,500 elections. In other words, whereas something like 
3,500 groups of workers got a chance to get a union going before passage 
of the Act, today only 507 groups are given that opportunity. Putting it 
c-nother way, workers' chances of getting a union recognized and ready to 
bargain for them have dropped practically eighty-five per cent under the 
Act. 

Furthermore, due to the "free speech for employers" provisions of 
the Act, the "no union" vote in representation elections has increased 
substantially. Judging by some employer letters we have recently seen, 
about the only thing an employer is now prevented from doing is telling 
workers bluntly that they will be fired if they vote for a union. He can 
hint and imply the same thing but if he does not say so flat-footedly 
there is no coercion involved. The increasing "non-union" ballots show 
the results. 

Yet in spite of these things, the Balls and the Tafts and the Hartleys 
have the effrontery to tell workers that the Act is a good for them. But 
the above figures belie their propaganda efforts: Bluntly put, for those 
who believe in ■ free and independent unions, the Taft-Hartley Act is 
poison; for those who believe in company unions or no unions at all, 
the Act is a good thing. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretart 
FRANK DUFFY 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 
S. P. MEADOWS 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, 



Ind. 



Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON. JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can, 

Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 

712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 



Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of April, May and June, 1948, 
containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local Unions 
of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of this 
circular should notify Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 





NEAV CHAJITERS 


ISSUED 




2433 


Sumter, S. C. 


2442 


Dothan, Ala. 


2437 


AumsviUe, Ore. 


3090 


Norway, Ore. 


2434 


Moor Lake, Ont., Can. 


2444 


Pecos, Texas 


2435 


Inglewood, Calif. 


2445 


Sacramento, Calif. 


2438 


Columbus, Ohio 


2447 


Montreal, Que., Can 


2439 


Guymon, Okla. 


2448 


Fleischmanns, N. Y. 


2440 


Montreal. Que., Can. 


2449 


Tola, Kans. 


3085 


Hobart Mills, Calif. 


3093 


Memphis, Tenn. 


2441 


Corydon, Ind. 







VOTE -- TO PRESERVE A FREE AMERICA 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



%t&i in l^tsctt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother HERBERT F. ANDERSON, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother GERALD W. ARNOLD, Local No. 2065, Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Brother FLOYD G. BAILEY, Local No. 335, Graiid Rapids, Mich. 

Brother OTTO BAUMAN, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

Brother VERNON BEST, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 

Brother WILLIAM BIER, Local No. 672, Clinton, Iowa. 

Brother STANLEY LE BLANC, Local No. 1846, New Orleans, La. 

Brother L. N. CAIN, Local No. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 

Brother D. CEFARATT, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother OSBORNE A. COX, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother JOSEPH DALTON, Local No. 2163, New York, N. Y. 

Brother W. W. DAVISON, Local No. 11, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Brother SALVATORE DI NATALE, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother GEORGE DOWDING, Local No. 83, Halifax, N. S., Can. 

Brother C. F. FERRELL, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother HENRY F. FISCHBACK, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother ERNEST E. FREDRICKSON, Local No. 13, Chicago, IlL 

Brother WM. E. FREIBURG, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother JOHN FRENZEL, Local No. 672, Clinton, Iowa. 

Brother CARL G. FULTON, Local No. 665, Amarillo, Tex. 

Brother AGUSTUS L. GARREN, Local No. 384, Asheville, N. C. 

Brother HARRY W. GIPPLE, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

Brother WILLIAM GRABDUNKEL, Local No. 210, Stamford, Conn. 

Brother JAMES C. GREENWAY, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brother ARTHUS HUDSON, Local No. 306, Newark, N. J. 

Brother CORNELIUS KEIVITT, Local No. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

Brother JOSEPH J. LENTZ, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother ISAAC LEWIS. Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother C. W. LINDSEY, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother ALBERT LUCKE, Local No. 672, Clinton, Iowa. 

Brother JOE C. MACHADO, Local No. 190, Klamath Falls, Ore. 

Brother THOMAS MATHIESON, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 

Brother RAYMOND MEADOWS, Local No. 1447. Vero Beach, Fla. 

Brother HARRY MEAKIN, Local No. 2163, New York, N. Y. 

Brother FRED MEEKER, Local No. 190, Klamath Falls, Ore. 

Brother CHAUNCEY MORRIS, Local No. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

Brother CHARLES MOSELEY, Local No. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

Brother PAUL MULLER, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother R. NOESEN, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 

Brother DONALD PAXTON, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brother A. J. PEES, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 

Brother WILFRED PETTIPAS, Local No. 83, Halifax, N. S., Can. 

Brother HAROLD E. PUTMAN, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother ALBERT RASCHE, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother A. A. RAUSH, Local No. 133, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Brother GEORGE O. ROPER, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother CHARLES J. SCHIRMEISTER, Local No. 657, Sheboygan, Wise. 

Brother STEVE SILVAGE, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother ALEXANDER SMITH, Local No. 306, Newark, N. J. 

Brother PERRY L. STANDLEY, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother REUBEN L. SYKES, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 

Brother FRANK J. VOGG, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JOHN WALDING, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother W. A. WALSMITH, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 




HALIFAX LOCAL, CELEBRATES 63 AEARS OP PROGRESS 

Over 400 members, friends and guests of Local Union Xo. 83, Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, filled the dining hall of the Nova Scotia Hotel on the night of February 4 
to help the union celebrate the sixty-third anniversary of its founding. From 
beginning to end, the evening was a grand success, with a real feed of Nova 
Scotia turkey high on the agenda. 

George A. Smith, president of the Local, outlined the history of the carpenters 
union in Halifax, stressing the Local's unique record in making great progress with- 
out having a single strike in 2 9 years. 

Mr. Smith spoke of the early days of the union, and compared conditions 
in those times with conditions existing today. 

James H. Dwyer, International Representative of the union, addressed the 
assembly on some of the principles of trade unionism. 

L. D. Curry, Provincial Minister of Labor, spoke on "social security," and 
described a healthy trade union as one of the greatest factors in assuring work- 
ing people of economic independence. 

Brief speeches were made by J. E. Ahern, Mayor of Halifax, and A. C. Pettipas, 
Mayor of Dartmouth. 

A highlight of the evening was presentations to those members of the Local 
who had attained 30 years membership. These were Oliver Grey, Raymond Webber, 
H. S. Home, Benjamin Hollett, George Collins, Henry Marks, Jacob Snelgrove, 
Ernest Appleby, Stanley Meisner, Harry Blunden, Robert Simpson, Benjamin 
Purcell and Joseph Clattenburg. In recognition of their long service, they were 
presented with wallets and cash gifts. 

« 

PHILABELPHLl LOCAL MARKS 60th MILESTONE 

Local Union No. 359, Philadelphia, on the night of February 21st, celebrated 
the sixtieth aniversary of its founding with a gala banquet and show at the 
Broadwood Hotel in that city. Among the crowd of better than 1,300 were such 
notables as M. A. Hutcheson, First General Vice President; Lewis G. Hines, Legis- 
lative Representative of the American Federation of Labor; and James L. McDevitt, 
President of the Pennsylvania State Federation. Each of them in a brief speech 
outlined the need for an immediate political awakening on the part of organized 
labor. Brother Hutcheson gave a short resume of the plans which the United 
Brotherhood Non-partisan Committee is developing for active participation in the 
forthcoming campaigns. Brother McDevitt outlined the activities of the organiza- 
tion he heads along the same lines, while Brother Hines painted a vivid picture of 
what is going on in Washington where employer groups are calling the tune. Each 
emphasized the fact that labor must this year elect its friends and defeat its 
enemies. A highlight of the evening was a preview of the two movies produced 
by the General Office. One movie shows the General Office in operation, while 
the other takes the audience on an extended tour of the Home at Lakeland. Both 
were declared excellent by all who saw them, and it was the consensus of opinion 
that they would do much good in giving the general public a better understanding 
of organized labor and what it is accomplishing. 

During the course of the evening, on behalf of the Local. Brother Hutcheson 
presented a small token of esteem to John Otto, whose fiftj^-one years of continuous 
membership makes him the Number One member. 

General Representative William O. Blaier acted as honorary chairman of the 
committee on arrangements and toastmaster of the evening. Assisting him on 
arrangements were Chairman Shedaker and Secretary Gray. 



22 



T H E CARPEXTER 



LOCAL 61 DEDICATES HAND CARVED MASTERPIECE 

Some 1,600 members, guests and friends of Local Union No. 61, Kansas City, 
Mo., filled Scottish Rite Temple to capacity on the night of December 12, when the 
union dedicated its magnificent Honor Roll in tribute to the 429 members who 

served in the armed forces during 
World War II. Over ten feet long and 
over six feet wide, the Honor Roll rep- 
resents a masterpiece of the fast disap- 
pearing art of wood carving. Hand 
carved of the finest walnut obtainable, 
the plaque represents almost six months 
of exacting work and highest quality 
craftsmanship. 

The dedication ceremonies opened 
with an invocation by the Reverend 
Northrip, former Army chaplain, who 
also spoke on the necessity of winning 
a lasting peace that the sacrifices of 
the men who served may not have been made in vain. Father Lorenz, also a 
former Navy chaplain, emphasized that the lessons of tolerance and brotherhood 
which the war taught all people must not be lost. As taps was sounded, Father 
Lorenz read the names of the members who made the supreme sacrifice. 

Special guest of the evening was John R. Stevenson, 2nd General Vice Presi- 
dent, who extended the greetings of the Genral Officers. In a stirring address he 
outlined the vital part played by Brotherhood members in the war, and he closed 
by urging all members to take an active part in the union and civic affairs in 
order that unionism and democracy can grow and prosper. 

After the benediction the 1,600 guests retired to the dining room where a 
sumptuous banquet was waiting. Fine food and fine drink made the evening a 
complete success. Chairman O. E. Masoner presided. Pat Dunn, noted baritone, 
led the crowd in singing. 




>L^LRIETTA MARKS 58th BIRTHDAY 

Observance of the fifty-eighth anniversary of the founding of Local Union No. 
356, Marietta, Ohio, was held last month in the form of a get-together at Labor 
Union Hall on Front St. Owing to extremely bad weather and icy roads attendance 
was cut down materially. However, some fifty odd members braved the elements 
and enjoyed a fine evening. 

Highlights of the event, presided over by Rod Brackenridge, chairman, in- 
cluded a number of talks. A. R. Ritchie, president of the central body, spoke 
briefly on the subject of "Organization"; James Stewart, president of the Inter- 
national Chemical Workers, used the topic "Elect Your Friends and Defeat 
Your Enemies"; James Cross, president of the Printers' Local, discussed the sub- 
ject "Strength in Union"; Bob Skipton gave a talk concerning the safety depart- 
ment of the State of Ohio. 

The evening's program was in charge of a committee consisting of Art Stroud, 
chairman, Joe Dyer and Fred Legleitner. The refreshment committee consisted of 
Jo Strahler and Don Spindler. 



BEDFORD LOCAL CELEBRATES 45th BIRTHDAY 

On February 6, 1903, Charter No. 1380 was installed at Bedford, Indiana. 
Forty-five years later, on the night of February 20, 1948, over 100 members, 
wives and friends of Local No. 138 gathered together in spacious Odd Fellows 
Hall to commeorate the forty-fifth anniversary of that memorable occasion. 
Chicken prepared in the inimitable Indiana style was the highlight of the banquet 
and the way the chicken disappeared attested to the fact that carpenters are 
generally as adept with the knife and fork as they are with the hammer and 
square. 



THE CARPEXTER 23 

Two charter members. Brothers H. W. Green and Oliver P. Hunter, were special 
guests. During the evening they were presented with cash awards as a token of 
the esteem in which they are held by their fellow members. 

The Reverend E. L. Hutrhens. pastor of the Methodist Church was also an 
honored guest. He opened the banquet by asking Grace and later in the program 
he delivered a short address on the contribution made to human progress bj' the 
carpenter from the time of the greatest of them all, Jesus of Nazareth. 

Brothers M. L. Chitwood and Lee Beaty of Local 16 64, Bloomington, were 
special guests. General Representative C. O. Van Horn delivered the address of the 
evening. 



Condolence 



Wilkes-Barre, Pa., November 21, 1947. 
"Whereas, God in His wisdom has rem.oved by death Brother Edward 
W. Finney from his labor as a member of the Local Union 514 of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, and 

"WTiereas, as Brother Finney has faithfully served and safeguarded 
the Interest of the brothers of the United Brotherhood as a member of 
Local Union 514 and Business Agent of the Wyoming Valley District 
Council, President of the Penn.«ylvania State Council of Carpenters and 
General Representative of the Brotherhood, serving in offices for years, 
exemplifying to a high degree of efficiencj- and honesty in the offices, and 

"Whereas, realizing our loss in the death of Brother Finney, we humbly 
bow to the Divine Will of Him who guides the destiny of men and 
nations, 

Tlierefoi*e Be It Resolved, by the Local Union that we extend his 
widow and family our sincere sympathy in this, their hour of bereavement 
and commend them to the keeping of him that knoweth and doeth all at 
His Will, and 

Be It Further Resolved, that a copy of these condolences be forwarded 
to the family of our deceased Brother and also that they be spread upon 
the minutes of the Local Union. 

R. M. WILLIAMS. 
STANLEY ECKENRODE. 
J. A. FRET, 

Committee. 



KANSAS CITY MILLWRIGHTS STAGE BIRTHDAY BALL 

To celebrate the thirty-fifth anniversary of its founding, Local Union No. 
1529, Kansas City, Kans., sponsored a mammoth party and social evening on the 
night of February 21st. Several hundred members, wives, and friends of the 
Union were in attendance and throughout the evening they enjoyed fine speaking 
and fine entertainment. A fine list of guest speakers — headed by R. E. Roberts, 
General Executive Board Member and Perrin D. McElroy, secretary of the Kansas 
City Building Trades, — congratulated the Union on the progress it has made and 
outlined the struggles that lie ahead for organized labor. Officers of the Union 
were introduced in a short ceremony. 

Following the speakers, a delicious buffet supper was served as a prelude to 
the dancing which continued far into the night. All who attended had such a 
fine time eating, dancing and visiting together that plans are now being made to 
have the party scheduled as a regular annual affair. 

Local Union No. 1529 is composed of millwrights and machinery erectors in 
Kansas City and vicinity. 




PORT CHESTER LADIES CELEBRATE BIRTHDAY 

The -Editor: 

Greetings from Auxiliary No. 78, Port Chester, N. Y., the only one in West- 
chester County that I know of. 

We meet every third Wednesday in the month, at the Carpenters' Hall. 

We only have thirteen members, and two of them live in Florida and one in 
Bethlehem, Conn., but we usually have a good turn out at that. 

March 17th, we celebrated our twenty-sixth anniversary, which was to be 
February 14th but the weather was too bad. 

We went to the theatre in the afternoon and at 6:30 P.M. we met our husbands 
and families and went to the A'illage Inn, a restaurant across from the Hall. We 
all had a very enjoyable dinner. 

After the dinner we all went back to the Hall and had speaking by some of 
the men, which was very interesting. And then we played games and gave prizes. 

Before going home we served coffee and cake. 

I enjoy reading about our Ladies very much. I have only been in the Order 
five years and president the second term. 

Fraternally yours, Mrs. W. Follest, President. 



HARLINGEX AUXLLLIRY WORKS OX OB-JECTIVES 

The Editor: 

We would like to report some of the activities of Ladies Auxiliary No. 4 79 of 
Harlingen, Texas, which was recently organized with a charter membership of 
twenty-five. 

Our meetings are held the first and third Mondays of each month. We always 
start each month with an objective. August's objective was to find out how 
many union label items are carried by our local merchants. We answered roll 
call by naming these union made products. We had representation at the All 
Unions Trade Day celebration in Brownsville on September 1st and participated 
in the parade and program. 

At the second meeting of the month we entertained our husbands with a pro- 
gram using the union label theme. Our speaker was Colonel Lockhead of Browns- 
ville. 

October's objective was a drive for new members, with the person signing 
most applications to win an Auxiliary pin. At our October social meeting we 
held a fish fry which everyone enjoyed immensely. Over eighty were in attendance. 

November's objective was also a membership drive and our husbands were on 
hand to watch us initiate twenty-five new members as a result. Our new Degree 
Team put on an initiation and drill that opened the eyes of the members of Local 
Union No. 219 0. 

December's objective was a Christmas party and turkey dinner. The fact that 
almost 150 were on hand for the party shows how successful it was. Interest 
shown in our attendance is very encouraging. To stimulate attendance we have 
an attendance prize, five minute readings, short discussions on parliamentary 
law and a secret sister plan. We invite anyone visiting these parts to join us in 
our activities. 

Fraternally yours, Mrs. J. J. Sprague. 



Craft Probloms 




Carpentry 

(CopyriKht 1948) 

LESSON 235 
By H. H. Siegele 
When I started work as a carpenter 
apprentice, the 2-foot rule was com- 
monly used by carpenters. It was used 
mostly for measuring short distances. 
The longer measurements, speaking of 
general house carpentry, were made 
with measuring poles, 10-foot, 12-foot, 
and 16-foot poles. A few years later the 
3-foot folding rule came on the market, 
which met with such approval by car- 
penters in general, that it soon put the 
2-foot rule into second place, and to- 
day the latter is rarely seen in the 
hands of carpenters. 




Fig. 1 

Fig. 1 is a drawing of a 2-foot brass 
bound rule, folded. While it is true 
that this rule has been practically 
forced out of use, so far as carpenters 
are concerned, the oldtimers will prob- 
ably agree that when it was discarded, 
something that was practical went out 
with it. The 2-foot rule was handy for 
gauging margins, and so forth. Such 
margins as 3/16 of an inch were gauged 



Fig. 2 

with a single thickness of the rule; % 
of an inch margins were gauged with a 
double thickness of the rule; V^-inch 
margins were gauged by using the width 
of a single fold, while 1-inch margins 
were gauged with the full width of the 
rule, folded. The 3-foot rule was used 
for the same gauging purposes, but be- 
cause of its length it was just a little 
unwieldy. 

Fig. 2 is a drawing of a brass bound 



3-foot folding rule. It held a popular 
lead for several decades in the field of 
carpentry, then the zigzag rule took 
over. 




Fig. 3 

Fig. 3, to the right, shows how a 
single fold of brass bound rule was 
used to gauge a spread of 3/16 of an 
inch, while to the left is shown a two- 




Fig. 4 

fold part of a rule for gauging a % 
of an inch spread. These two uses of the 
folding rule were applied to so many 
different things that they cannot all be 
enumerated. 

Fig. 4 shows to the right the folding 
rule used for gauging a spread of V2- 
inch, while to the left is shown the 
rule used for making a 1-inch spread. 

Fig. 5 is a sort of diagram showing 
how the folding rule was used in deter- 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



mining the amount of fall in a platform, 
floor, roof, and so forth. The proce- 
dure was something like this: The work- 
man placed the straightedge somewhat 
as shown by the diagram, the long dot- 
ted line representing the bottom edge, 
then he slipped the rule under the low 
end, about as shown at A by dotted 
lines. In this case i/2-inch is used, while 
in practice the workman would use 
the width that most nearly would bring 




Fig. 5 

the straightedge to a level position. If 
it were found that the end of the 
straightedge resting on the rule was 
low, the rule would be moved to the 
left until the straightedge would be in 
a level position, or as shown by the 
diagram, from A to B, which is indi- 
cated by the arrow and the dotted line. 
The straightedge in a level position, 



/)c?H^e/\rX 




do^el-^J>\ 



Fig. 6 

the amount of fall could be obtained at 
the end of the platform by measure- 
ment. 

Every carpenter who has examined a 
new folding rule has discovered that it 
is provided with three dowels, similar 
to what is shown by Fig. 6. These dow- 
els are practical, so far as I can see, 
only while the rule is on the market, 
for they hold the folds compactly to- 
gether. But after the rule gets into 



the hands of a workman, those little 
dowels are more of a handicap than 
of serving any useful purpose. After I 
discovered that, I always pulled the 



Fig. 7 

dowels out and threw them away, when- 
ever I got a new rule. 

For measuring purposes the zigzag 
rule is so far ahead of the folding rules, 
that despite the advantages of the fold- 
ing rules, pointed out in the foregoing 
paragraphs, it holds first place with the 
average carpenter. Fig. 7 is a drawing 
of a zigzag rule folded. The 6-foot zig- 
zag rule is probably the most popular; 




l.^l..l.,!lTl.J.Kj.Kl.l,l,l,l.?J^I,l,l,l,l,f,l,f.l.Ll . 




Fig. 8 

however, it can be obtained in lengths 
running from 3 feet to 8 feet. 

Fig. 8 shows the zigzag rule partly 
unfolded. There is a way of unfolding a 
zigzag rule that is almost as fast as 
pulling out the end of a tape line. Hold 
the folded rule in your right hand in 
such a manner that your fingers cover 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

BUILDING. — Has 210 p. and 495 11.. covering form 
building, finishing, stair building, etc. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p., 754 11., covering general 
house carpentry, estimating and other subjects. $2.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p. 
670 11., and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 11. $2.50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 il. Roof framing 
complete. Other problems, including saw filing. $2.00. 

The above five books support one another. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS. — Illustrated prose. Only $1.00. 

FREE. — With 2 books, one $1.00 book free, with 
4 books, tvpo, and with 5 books, three $1.00 books free. 

Books autographed. 

C. O. T>. orders, postage and C. 0. D. fee added. 
Order u U CIFr^FI F 222 So. Const. St. 
today. ■■■ ■■■ ^if^ttt imporia, Kansai 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



all of the edges of the folds on one 
side. Then with the left hand, pull out 
the end of the top fold and keep on 
pulling, at the same time release fold 
after fold by slipping the fingers of your 
right hand down the side of the rule. 
This is a trick, and must be practiced 
a great deal in order to make it work. 
If you are not careful with this trick, 
you can easily break a rule in two 
while trying to unfold it. On the other 



I 



I 



I 



/nTn'.rr|MTNri'iTPT.T"i3;r''i^'rnriTriT.Tn n 

fu.,iH..'.l.,.i.,,i.,.i;nl.i,i,i,i,,.i:i?l.,.u.i,iTI,i,i,i,i,i ,iai,ia 



^ 




bowel -^S^ 



r I '1 



Fi£ 



hand, if you can develop the skill it 
takes to do this expertly, you won't 
want to unfold a zigzag rule in any 
other way. 

Fig. 9 shows one of the advantages 
of a zigzag rule. Here, to the left, is 
shown the first fold of the rule in a 
right angle position, and used for meas- 
uring across a small opening in a wall 
far above the reach of the workman. 
To the right is shown a small-scale 
drawing of the rule in position for meas- 
uring the same opening. The illustra- 
tion shows the rule applied for measur- 
ing a rather short distance, but it will 
give good results for measuring up to 
18 inches, or even up to 24 inches. 
However, in making the longer meas- 
urements, the joints of the rule must 
be tight enough to hold the rule at a 
right angle. When the joints become 



too loose to hold a right angle, then 
it is time for the workman to buy a new 
rule. 



Ma^® 



Day 



Every 



WITH A 



MODEL 
60 






Carpenters everywhere finish 
more work . . . faster . . . easier 
with a Model 60 MallSaw. It 
cuts w^ood and metal . . . 
grooves mortar joints . . . cuts 
and scores tile, concrete and 
other aggregate compositions. 
When set in special stand it 
can be used as table saw, 
shaper, bench grinder or Sand- 
er. Also larger models. ^„^ 





6" Blade — 2" Capacity 
Ask Dealer or Write Portable Power Tool Division. 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 S*«rth ChiMso Ave., Cbicas*, 19, M. 

SOLVE ROOF PROBLEMS INSTANTLY 

IN TEN SECONDS!! All 11 
lengths and cuts of rafters 
for simple and hip roofe. 
Just set dial to "pitch" & 
"run," and the other fig- 
ures show up in windows. 
Unlike rafter tables, run is 
set directly in feet and in- 
ches. There is no need to 
adjust later for thickness 
of ridge board. Cuts giv- 
en in degrees and squcfr* 
readings. 

RAFTER DIAL $1.95 Order from: E. Weyer, Dept. H, 
P.O. Box 153, Planetarium Station, New York 24, N. Y. 




$1.25 with 7 Blades 




g S.PAT. OPp 



F.RM 







CARPENTERS 

Demand the Best The Genuin* 

F. P. M. SAWS AND BLADES 

The Saw of Superior Quality with a National Reputation. Manu- 
factured by a member of U. B. of C. & J. of A. No. 1. 

If your dealer does not handle, write direct to me. 

P. P. MAXSON, Sole IVIanufacturer 

3722 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO. ILL 




Yes, and equally effi- 
cient while planing, 
drilling and sawing. Stow Met* 
al dor-V-ise is sturdily built to firmly 
hold any size door. Rubber padded 
jaws increase grip and prevent dani« 
age. ^ ide non-skid feet \\ill hold on 
any working surface. 

• Heavy duty • 20 inches long 

• Cast aluminum • Easy to operate 

• Weighs only 2^/4 lbs, • Use any place 



m PAY POSTAGE 

SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER 

(ALL C.O.V. ORViPS $9.65 PLUS POSTAL) 




STOW METAL PRODUCTS CO. 



ft ' Paine ^y^^LETiti. 




PAINE 

FASTENING i\ f U I f f C 
and HANGING 1/ C If I L C 3 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" teserre the 
right to reject all adTenlnng matter which may 
be. is their lodgment, unfair cr objectionable to 
the membership of the TTnlted Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracu for adrertising space In "The Car- 
pecur," Inclading those stipulated at Don-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved right* of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Carlson Rules 30 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 32 
Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 30 

Greenlee Tools. Rockford, 111 31 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 27 

F. P. Ma.xsoa, Chicago, lU 27 

Master Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y 29 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phila^ Pa.__ 31 

The Paine Co., Chicago, III. 28 

Sargent & Co., New Haven, Conn. 1 
Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 3 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 30 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore 28 

Standard Wood Products Co., 

Dundee, 111. 29 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 

Stow Metal Products Co., Stow, O. 28 

E. Weyer, New York, N. Y 27 

Carpentry Materials 
Johns-Majiville Corp., New York, 
N. Y. 32 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._2nd Cover 

Doors 
Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Ind. 4th Cover 

OTeralls 
The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, 

Mo. 3rd Cover 

Teehnical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 31 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 4 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 29 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 30 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. 26 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo 32 



SAWCIAIKIP '"' 



Speed Up Saw Filing! 




Money-Bock 






Money with or- 
der, prtpaid. 
C.O.D. postage extra 
Grl'- ''.-ire Irr.i^ii. r,f taw . . a fuD i - :r.:he--. Af-icbes 
or reUi:e.- '.-rim vr-jrs be:;rh In oniy 13 £K;r,df. Also can 
te U'ei f'r iand saws. Made to .ii: £. life-.lsie. Sturdy, 
an s:ee! c;r. -.ruction. Gripping izzri gr:^i to bold en- 
lire leng-.r^ of sa-s- true with no T-;trs:icc-. 

THE SPEED CORPORATI ON 
2025.A N.E. SANDY PORTLAND 12, ORE. 



"MASTER ^^ea^yn^^te. glvCS mC 

quick, accurate measurements" 







^ays Mr. Larry Klohs 

36 Van Wort Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 



"Streamline proves indispensable for 
the many measurements I make on the 
job and in my home workshop." 

Mr. Klohs, a master carpenter, 
knows the value of a dependable, accu- 
rate measuring instrument. He chooses 
Streamline for its superior features, 
attractive appearance, and sturdy de- 
sigTi. Graduations on both sides of 



RETAILS 



$200 




BLADES REPLACEABLE 

blade, lever brake for holding reading, 
inside-outside measure. 

You can own the Streamline, outstand- 
ing in its class, by asking for it at your 
hardware dealer, or by using the coupon. 

I MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC., Dept. E-4 I 

I 201 Main Street, White Plains, N. Y. I 

I Gentlemen: | 

II enclose D $2.00 for the 6 ft. Streamline. ■ 

I enclose G $2.50 for the 8 ft. Streamline. I 

(NAME I 
ADDRESS I 

CITY STATE | 



TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 




THEY HAVE 

OUR CHART Blueprint 27" X 36 

"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
to find lengths of any rafter and make its cuts; 
find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter 
and brace tables, octajon scale. Gives other valu- 
able information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, malces about 
13 square feet of printed data showing squares full size. 
Price $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 

Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths art 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastart 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters, Coa- 
tractors and Architects. Thousands in use. Price $2.00 
postpaid. Check or M. 0., no stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

2105 N. Burdick St., Dept. 4, Kalamazoo 81, Mich. 



ITS EASY lO HOLD YOUR GUIDE LINE 



yfifh^ 




TfiNSiV < Y i 'i\' i ',\\\\\\\WS 



HAKE MONEY 

SELLING 
TRULINERS 

Sell on Sight — Use one 
and every man on the 
iob will want one. Ask 
us for the special dozen 
deal— only for "Carpen- 
ters' readers. ■ 



Ltruliners 



TRULINERS clamp on any corner— jtay in place— and 
hold your line toot. TRULINERS are easy to move 
and simple to adjust- A "Most" in the kit of every 
carpenter, mason, or painter At yoor dealer's or 
Write for yours today to 

Standard Wood Products, Inc., Dundee, III. 




Enjoy the Economy of Quality 

The saw most 
carpenters use 



iC-* 



DISSTON D-8 HANDSAW 

Medium Weighf, Skew Back 




404 Tacony, 



MWalO'fOOTttf ^'S?i?J^ SAW FILER 

with Standard SixeBlade 



TOP QUALITY ' ™*- 
inside-.T, esiuring rule with 
srurc-: e:cr,ed steel blade and 
s:.ir.;i.-d size caie ^-'ith tnple- » t chamgi blade 

(-■---— ^ -■'-^-' '^-jish \'50 |K| - jj "* ^^ SECONDS 

metric —easures. Cirlscn & 
Sullivin.Ir^c. Monrovia. Cal:: 
SOLD BY LEADING HARDV/ARE STORES 



>K»*K 



u^^^OKf*' 




Saves You Time, Money 

New TOQ can do exptn saw ^licg et 
bosic. L ' 'fr : } r?, g too! rn2.kes precision 
£Ung caj^T for eiea the niosi inexperi- 
eoced. Two simple a-djcLSiiEients eru-kt 
tcT rrpc CLXEd saw. Keep joor 

L Spetd Saw Filer. Ccrtnplcic -wixh 6Je, 
I rrz d T to UJ.C. MoC'Cj bz^ gutruitec. 
Cisb wr^ order, prepaid. (CO-D. 
postage 

THE SPEED COMPANY 

D«pl. A S(M5 H.E. iandy, Porliarvd 12, Or»i 



STEEL TAPE RULES 




STEEL SQUARE 



HAND 
BOOK 



Completely Revised 



e?" tr^thods of using 

":ri: It is easy to 

; Tiactty bow the 

-Lt". :; cany in the 



Sl.oO postpaid 

Personal chsck cr money order acceptable. 



■F:r -eady rrferenee eirry 
•his convenient 50 page 
cotket size '4^x6^) juide 
to ycur job." Monev back guarantee if not entirely ^^atisfied 



I D. A. ROGERS ^ 



:344 Clinton Avenue 
Minn ea PC' lis 9, Minn, 



Turn 



Forward by reium mail your Cansemers ic 
lai Bides for Laying Out Woii. 



AddrMt 

Ststt. 




FOR FAST, ACCURATE 
WORKMANSHIP 



GREENLEE 22 is a name it will pa/ 
you well to remember whenever you 
boy Auger Bits. For it assures you 
sharp cutting edges, accurate siz> 
ing, bright, high finish, and that 
smooth, easy action so necessary 
In fine craftsmanship. You can 
be certain, too, that every 
GREENLEE 22 Solid-Center 
Auger Bit is "factory sharp" 
when it reaches you. For 
each is "Plastic-Sealed" with 
3 special protective coating 
to keep it in perfect condi- 
tion for you. To buy top 
quality, buy GREENLEE. 



TOOLS FOR CRAFTSMEN 




SPECIAL OFFER... ONLY IO4 FOR 
HANDY WOODWORKING CALCULATOR 

Quick solutions to countless woodworking problems. Just 
set dial: convert linear feet to board feet; compare cliarac- 
teristics and workability of various woods. Also stiows bit 
sizes; nail specifications; tool sharp- 
ening hints; etc. Heavily varnished 
cardboard, 6' diameter. Send 10c to 
Greenlee Tool Co., 2084 Columbia 
Avenue, Rockford, Illinois, U. S. A. 




8BIG BUILDING BOOKS 



7m:vi'i\ ^\^ EXAMINATION 

Lesm to draw plana, eBtlmate, be a lire-wire builder, da 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 8 practical, pro- 
fusely illustrated books cover subjects that will help 70U 
to get more work and make more money. Architectural di- 
sign and drawing, estimating, steel square, roof rraming, 
CQpstructlon, painting and decorating, heating, alr-condl- 
tlonlng. concrete forma and many other subjects are Included. 

BETTER JOBS -BETTER PAY "p-^.®?!" 

The Postwar building boom ii la full t U I T I U N 
swing and trained men are needed. These books art 
Big opportunities are always for MEN the most up-to- 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- date and compleU 
ply quick, easily understood training and we have ever pub- 
handy, permanent reference information llshed on these 
that helps solve building problems. many subjects. 
Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For Examination 

AMERICAN TicHNicArSOclETT ~Vocatio~al"publishers sine" 1891 
Dept. G436 Drexel at 58th Street, Ctiicago 37, III. 

You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your elKlit 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery chargM 
only, and if fully satisfied in ten days, I will send yoo 
J2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 Is paid. I un not obligated in tat 
way unless I keep the books. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one buslnasi 
man as reference. Men In service, also give home addreif. 



Drill pilot holes 
with one hand and a 



\\ 



YANKEE 



If 




No. 41 Automatic Drill 

A "Yankee" No. 41 drills pilot 
boles in wood with a few easy 
pushes. Spring automatically re- 
turns handle after every stroke 
and revolves drill point to clear 
away chips. Magazine in handle 
holds 8 drill points . . . V16 to 
1144 • • • easy to select, re- 
move and replace. Improved 
chuck prevents drill points pull- 
ing out in use, yet releases 
them with one, easy motion. 
All exposed parts chromium 
plated ... a lifetime tool. 

Wrile for "Yankee" Tool Book 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia 33, Pa. 



YANKEE TOOLS 
NOW PART OF 



[STANLEY] 



THE TOOL BOK 
OF THE WORLD 



This popular asbestos roof is fireproof, 

rotproof, and.. 




You could actually lay American Colonial 
Shingles blindfolded! No chalk lines or 
measuring necessary. 




V;S~ '''^^'^"""^^ It's an Asbestos Strip 



Johns-Manviile 




^^t^m^ 



Only 80 pieces per square— 
the same as an asphalt strip 
Automatic alignment — self- 
spacing 

Only 4 nails per shingle in pre- 
punched holes 
Easy-to-use Shingle Cutters 
speed application 



Asbestos Sliingles 




B 



0SINES5 



MAKE A GOOD LIVING IN YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS — sharpening saws with the 
the F'oley Automatic Saw Filer. It makes 
old saws cut like new again. All hand saws, 
also band saws and cross-cut circular 
saws can be filed on this ONE machine. 

THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF SAWS TO 
BE FILED in your own neighborhood, used 
by farmers, carpenters, homes, schools, 
factories, etc. W. L. Tarrant writes : "I 
left my old job last September and in 10 
months have filed 2,159 saws. We have a 
lovely business worked up and cannot 
keep up with the work." 

IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 

Start your own business 
now, in spare time. FREE 
PLAN shows how, — 
no experience need- 
ed, no canvassing. 
Send coupon today. 



¥QllY^2ai^,za^SAyi FILER 



^ rULCI mrU. bU. Minneapolis 18, Minn. 
k Send Free Plan on Saw Filing business — no 
k obligation, 
k Name 




LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your ovm busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits euad guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 
Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
It, just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 
and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and cotn- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name emd address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building Cl6, Denver 2, Colorado 



for fine ^lork * 



• ALL THE BEST IDEAS of skilled workers in 
wood for over 70 years have been built into 
these Stanley Planes. Naturally they feel 
right and work right. Stanley Tools, 163 Elm 
Street, New Britain, Connecticut 

THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 



[stanleyI i 

Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. 

mOWAM- HAND TOOLS ■ ELECTRIC TOOLS 




No 5 Plane 



UNION-MADE 



Lee 



• Lee Exclusive 
Tailored Sizes 

• Lee Sturdy 
Fabrics 

• Sanforized 

• Money-Back 
Guarantee! 

• World's Larg. 
est Makers of 
Union - Made 
Work Clothesl 



CARPENTER'S 
OVERALLS 




I TlieH.D.LEECo. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
\ ' Trenton, N. J. 
'South Bend, Ind. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
{ San Francisco, Calif. 

Salina, Kans. 




AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vois.*6 




InsideTrade liriormatioa 

for Carpenters, Boilders. Join- 
ers, Boilding Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Gaidaa 
grive you the short-cnt instrric- 
tions that yoa want— including 
Dew methods, ideas, solotiona. 
plans, systems and money saT- 
iDcr anffgestions. An eafiy pro- 



daily helper _ _ _ , 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpentera everywhere are n»- 
ing these Goides as a Helpmc 
Hand to E^ier Work, Better 
Work and Better Pay. To Bet 
this assistance for yoQrs«lf» 
. _ ^ . ,^ Bimply fill in and 

Inside Trade Information On : mail feee coupon beiow. 

How to use the steel square — How to file and 

set saws — How to build furniture — How to use 

a mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How 

to use rules and scales — How to make joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic— Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength of timbers — - 

How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, bams, garages, bungalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaffolds — skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on Interior trim — . 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors — How to paint. 




AUDEL, Publishers. 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10. N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 7 days' frM 
trial. II OK I will remit $1 in 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 is paid. 
—Otherwise I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfled. 



Name- 



CAR 



"oons 



'<»« "lANr 



""ceNcr 



• The "OVERHEAD DOOR" with the Miracle Wedge 
meets every requirement for service. Engineered for 
fast, smooth operation, dependable at all times, this 
quality door contributes to efficiency and speeds op- 
erations. It is weathertight and tamperproof and is 
furnished as a complete unit for industrial, commercial 
and residential use. Specify it to obtain increased ef- 
ficiency in the use of any structure. 

TRACKS AND HARDWARE OF 
SALT SPRAY STEEL 



-J^": 



n 



NIMH 
illlilll 



■iini 
mil 



MIBAi 



DGE 



Copyright, 1948. Overhead Door Corporation 

• Any ^OVERHEAD DOOR" may be manualiy 
or electrically operated. Sold and installed by 
Nation-Y/ide Sales — I nstatlation — Service. 



OVERH€AD DOOR CORf»|^^TION • HARTFORD CITY, INDIANA, U.S.A. 




^ 



f^AIPENTER 

^ ^ >^ FOUNDED 188t 

Officio/ PufaMcof/on of fhe 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters ond Joiners of America 

M .^ V 1 <> 1 S 





THE ONLY FACTORY METHOD 



EASILY FASTENED TO ANY 
WORK BENCH OR TABLE 




Weight IVi Lbs. 
One Size, 9Vi Inches Long 



SPEEDY •ACCURATE • EFFORTLESS • TESTED • PROVED 

Carefully Designed, Sturdily Constructed ... Simplifies Saw Setting 



• QUALITY MATERIALS 

working parts of hardened steel with rust-proof 
plating; sturdy, well assembled. 

• AUTOMATICALLY TRIPPED 

pressure delivered equally at each stroke so that 
saw is set perfedly uniform throughout its entire 
length; keeps saw blade in perfect alignment. 



SEE YOUR DEALER OR SEND 
CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO: 

ACCURATE DIE & TOOL CO. 

1934 ST. CLAIR AVENUE 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 



• SIMPLIFIED OPERATION 

pressure of foot on treadle automafically trips 
set; easy to mount on bench or table. 

• ADJUSTABLE, SAVES MONEY 

adjustable for circular saws. 6", 7", ond 8", and 
2 man cross-cut saws. Increase the lifetime of 
tools by properly conditioning them without 
wear or damage. GUARANTEED 



$^50 



EACH 



POST PAID 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you e«-e ambitious to have your own ba«i- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 

' first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 

I of coaiplete buildings just as you would do ; 
it in a contractor's office. I 

! By the use of this System of Estimating you ' 

; avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of ' 

! the author's 40 years of practical experience ■ 

reduced to the language you understand. 

You will never find a more opportune time 

to establish yourself in business than now. 

1 Study the course for ten days absolutely 
I free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
It, just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 
i and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
; plete course. On request we will send you 
: plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
' of the Building Labor Calculator, suid com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
five your age, and trade experience. 

j TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C-17, Denver 2, Colorado 




^/CImz^^^^^ Yes, and equally effi-, 
/^'"^ cienl while planing, 

drilling and saving. Stow Met- 
al dor-V-i»e is sturdily built to firmly 
hold any size door. Rubber padded 
jaws increase grip and prevent dam* 
age. Wide non-;kid feet will hold on 
any working surface. 

• Heav-y duty • 20 inches long 

• Cast aluminum • Easy to operate 

• Weighsonly 2^/4. lbs. • Use anv place 



m PAY POSTAGE 

SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER 

iALL C.O.V. OkV£T^ S9.65 PLUS POSTACf) 




METAL PRODUCTS GO. 



^^uXbU 



-liSf^ 



'~>-L 






There's an Easier Way to 
turn out a good day's work 



cent. Next time you c 
— boss ten him'^rhis." 

Look. If y„„ py^ 

fte asks you what 
kind. Just say 

'Speedmatic." 
And here's why. 




ipeedmatic one 
and Power Saw. 
4 a d e in 4 
lade sizes: 7i", 
", lOi", 12". 



matic SAW 

is perfect for ONE-HAND operation 



VLan, it's a honey ! Practically handles 
tself. For one thing, it's got BAL- 
ANCE. The handle is in exactly the 
ight place for easier handling. 
:ts got SPEED. Blade enters cut at 
'000 RPM. This means you don't have 
o "push." Practically feeds itself, 
^uts composition and light metal, 
-t's STEADY. The broad shoe is 
)laced just right for steady rest. 
3oesn't veer . . . doesn't twist . . . 
loesn't tip. 



And it's VERSATILE. You can ad- 
just it for any angle or depth-cut. 
Rips, cross cuts, bevels, mitres, dados 
and grooves. You don't even have to 
pre-mark your wood for a square cut. 
You can always see just where you 
are going. 

SPEEDiiiatic saves your back 

. . . gives your boss clean work. 

ASK him for a SPEEDinatic 

today. 



PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO. 



1760-5 N. Salina St., SYRACUSE N. Y. 




TER 



miiiiii:":"; . ', "V : "'„:'.' : " ^ \;;ji 

A Monthly Journal, Ovmed and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 

Established in 1881 
Vol. LXTIII — Xo. 5 



IXDIAXAPOLIS, MAY, 1948 



One Dollar Per Tear 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Co nt ent s — 



The Danger Grows 



In a blistering minority report, four Congressmen, members of the Joint Committee 
on Labor-Management Relations, violently disagree with the majority's contention that 
the Taft-Hartley Act is working out nicely. Point by point they show that the majority's 
report is biased and misleading. In the end they recommend immediate repeal of the 
Act. 

An Old Problem Returns ----- 9 

The problem of imported foreign workers is becoming an acute one in Canada. In 
a letter to the Honorable Humphrey Mitchell, Canadian Minister of Labor, First Gen- 
eral Vice-President Hutcheson summarizes the dangers involved and calls attention to the 
disturbing features of an imported labor program. 



Redwood Saga Ends 



14 



Almost ^A'o years and three months to the day from the date v/hen it was called 
the Redwood strike is terminated. While the strikers may not have achieved all their 
objectives insofar as the few hold-out companies are concerned, they did manage to 
clean up and alleviate a sorry situation in the area. 



Here They Are Again 



19 

Non-union Canadian shingles are once again cutting into the American market and 
thereby jeopardizing the v/ages and working conditions v/on by Brotherhood shingle 
v/eavers in both the United States and Canada. 



OTHER DEPARTMEXTS 

Plaine Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems - 



12 
16 
21 
22 
22 
26 
37 



Index to Advertisers 



30 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-tv/o pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this v/ill have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at I^TDIANAPOLIS, IXD., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 2-i, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of po.stage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 




Ed Clanin Built 

A Money- Making 

Floor Sanding 

Business 



ED CLA NIN of Monroe, Mich- 
igan — wanted a business of his own. 

He started by talking with friends and 
lined up a number of jobs in advance — 
then started on his first job the day his 
American Floor Sanders were de- 
livered! His equipment includes an 
American Standard 8 Floor Sander, 
two American Spinner Edgers and an 
American DeLuxe Maintenance Ma- 
chine. 



1^ 



(^> 



to^< 



cA^ 



M^' 




Today, in 1 1/2 years, Ed Clanin has become 
an established floor surfacing contractor 
in a progressive community. His work 
has w^on the respect of painters and dec- 
orators. And now — he has become inde- 
pendent enough to build his ow^n home! 
In the same w^ay — you can build a money- 
making business sanding floors. No special 
training needed. Floor sanders are easy 
to operate. No big overhead — no large 
investment. Be your own boss and get 
ahead! Send 2 5cfor money-making book- 
let "Opportunities in Floor Sanding". 



MERICAN 

FLOOR MACHINES 



The American Floor Surfacing: Machine Co. 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo 3, Ohio 
Enclosed find 25c in stamps or coin for 
booklet "Opportunities in Floor Surfacing", 
telling me how 1 can start my own floor 
sanding business. 



"I always carry a 



Sc7VS 

Mr. Charles A. Fuller 




"The Streamline is per- 
fect for quick, accurate 
measurements. It's my first 
choice in steel tape rules." 

Whether you are a home 
hobbyist or professional me- 
chanic, it pays to be accurate 
. . . and 3'ou'll find Stream- 
line's accuracy unquestion- 
ed. Graduations on both 
sides of blade and lever 
brake for holding reading 
. . . inside-outside measure. 

Ask your hardware or build- 
ing supply dealer about the 
Streamline today or use the 

coupon to order yours. 




REG. O.S.'PAT. OFF. 



:W0OD JkimSJ^^l TAPf tillES 



MASTER RULE MFa CO., INC., Dept. E-5 
201 Main Street, Wtite Plains, N. Y. 

1 enclose ~; S2.00 f&f Hit 6 ft. Str£aB;!iac. 

I enelase Q 2.50 for tlie 8 ft. StreaBtliae. 



ADDRESS 

CITY . 



n 



STATE 



NOW! atn4u!^»ui2ii> 

FRAMING SQUARE 



PKAMIMG rVOBlEMS 
WSTAM-TLT! 




auj you xeed to kxow is width 
of buildixg axd pitc^ of roof 

Now one tccl ^''rr-r- a'.'- roo: fvs.rr.ir.z 
probleE-^ I": : : - . ->: ^_ui t^, 

rafter tabl^H. i-;:l-> i:..'.-^ i.::A ^.\^~i ^y.- 

traS' to carry vrhile f:i:\;r::ii r::;^. 
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The Danger Grows 



IN A BLISTERING, factual minority report that concludes "our anal- 
ysis compels us to recommend the immediate repeal of the (Taft- 
Hartley) Act to avoid the serious injury to our economy we foresee" 
four members of the Joint Committee on Labor-Management Relations 
ripped to shreds the majority report of the committee which maintains 
that .the Taft-Hartley Act is working out satisfactorily. Point by point 
the minority report explodes the theory that the Taft-Hartley Act is cut- 
ting down the number of strikes ; that wages are not being adversely 
affected by the Act; and that labor-management relations are improvinng 
because of the Act. In fact the mi- 



nority report finds that the Taft- 
Hartley Act is not only harming 
the 60,000,000 workers of the nation 
but the whole economy of the coun- 
try as well. 

Set up by Congress as a sort of 
"watch-dog" committee, the Joint 
Committee on Labor-Management 
Relations is charged with the re- 
sponsibility of making a continu- 
ous study of industrial relations and 
making periodic reports thereon. 
After considerable attention to the 
matter, a majority of the committee 
released a report on March 29th cov- 
ering the first six months of exist- 
ence of the Act. That report laud- 
ed the Taft-Hartley Act to the 
skies. It cited the Act as a boon 
to the nation. Four members of the 
committee disagreed, however. In 
a cold, hard-hitting analysis of 
what has transpired since the Act 
was passed, these four members 
proved point by point that organ- 
ized labor and the whole U. S. 
economy are in serious jeopardy un- 
less the Act is repealed without de- 
lay. Senators James E. Murray and 
Claude Pepper, together with Con- 
gressmen John Lesinski and Au- 
gustine B. Kelley signed the mi- 
nority report. 



The minority report covers the 
Act and the effect it has had thus 
far on industrial relations from A 
to Z. Substantially it reiterates 
what organized labor has maintain- 
ed from the beginning — namely, 
that the act is a distinct threat to 
the very existence of organized la- 
bor; that it is bringing back the 
era of indiscriminate use of injunc- 
tions in labor disputes and that, it 
compels unions to contribute to 
their own destruction. AVhile the 
entire report is too long for re- 
printing here, it contains a summary 
which boils down the contents to 
twelve essential points. Because of 
its concise, and timely contents, we 
herewith reprint that summary: 

SUMMARY 
We have carefully examined the 
majorit3^'s report in the light of 
experience thus far under the La- 
bor-Management Relations Act of 
1947. We find the report partisan 
in its approach and misleading in 
its findings. We find that the ma- 
jority's conclusions are not war- 
ranted by the experience under the 
Taft-Hartley Act. Our analysis 
compels us to recommend the im- 
mediate repeal of the act to avoid 
the serious injury to our economy 



THE CARPENTER 



we foresee. We have outlined below 
some of the reasons for these con- 
clusions. 

The summary findings presented 
here are amply supported by the 
evidence appearing in the body of 
this report, with which they should 
be read for a full understanding of 
the situation. 

1. The act has not resulted in a 
reduction of strikes. On the con- 
trary, the act has already been the 
direct cause of work stoppages 
throughout the country. Moreover, 
through the encouragement offered 
to anti-union employers and through 
the justified suspicion and resent- 
ment engendered among the wage 
earners, the act has laid the basis 
for industrial unrest. 

2. The majority's conclusion that 
the act had not adversely affected 
wages fails to take into account a 
number of factors that shed a dif- 
ferent light on the conclusion made 
by the majority. These include the 
fact that during the initial period of 
the act's operation workers have 
not fared as well as other segments 
of our population for wages have 
lagged behind the rise in the cost 
of living and behind the tremendous 
increase of profits earned by busi- 
ness. 

3. Experience with restrictions on 
union security agreements has 
already revealed serious defects. 
These restrictions have resulted in 
widespread resort to "bootleg" con- 
tracts and they have created special 
problems in industries such as the 
maritime and building trades. 

4. The tremendous number of 
union-shop elections has impaired 
the ability of the NLRB to dis- 
charge its functions; union-shop 
elections have resulted in an extrav- 
agant waste of taxpayers' money ; 
and the results of union-shop elec- 



tions thus far establish the fact that 
the American worker is not op- 
posed to union security agreements 
as claimed by the sponsors of the 
act. 

5. The increasing backlog of 
Board cases, which has reached a 
figure almost double the largest in 
the Board's history, is seriously de- 
laying the expeditious settlement of 
disputes. 

6. The existing sweeping prohi- 
bition against secondary boycotts is 
restricting legitimate trade-union 
activities. It compels unions to con- 
tribute to their self-destruction and 
bars them from taking effective ac- 
tion against secondary employers 
whose resources are being utilized 
to defeat union bargaining demands. 

7. Immediate repeal of the pro- 
hibition against union political ac- 
tivity is necessary to prevent the 
continued invasion of constitutional 
rights. 

8. A disturbing pattern is being ^ 
created in the use of labor injunc- 
tions which fully justifies the con- 
clusion that the era of Government 
by injunction is being revived. 

9. The enlargement of the mean- 
ing of coercion to a point where it 
now includes legitimate trade-union 
activities confirms the fear that this 
provision, when applied to labor or- 
ganizations, would provide a weap- 
on for improper interference with 
labor's legitimate concerted activi- 
ties. 

10. The report of the majority 
intrudes dangerously on the execu- 
tive and judicial powers. 

11. The report of the majority 
intrudes unwisely on existing bar- 
gaining relations in a number of in- 
dustrial plants. 

12. A pattern has already evolved 
for harassing trade unions by liti- 
gation. 



An Old Problem Returns 



Kanada wirbt in Deutschland gegenwartig 700 Schiflfbauer und 
Zininierleute an, die bei einer Wasserkraft-Gesellschaft in Ontario 
beschaftigt werden sollen. 

The above advertisement appeared in the January 17 issue of the Bre- 
men, Germany, newspaper, Weser-Kurier. For the benefit of those who 
may not be able to read German, the ad can roughly be translated as fol- 
lows : 

"Canada wants from Germany approximately 700 shipbuilders and 
carpenters at the Watercraft project in Ontario. Work available at once." 

Reprinted herewith is an exact copy of a letter forwarded to the Hon- 
orable Humphrey Mitchell, Canadian Minister of Labor, by First General 
Vice President M. A. Hutcheson on the matter of unrestricted importa- 
tion of foreign labor to Canada. In a nutshell it summarizes the problem 
of the imported foreign worker — something that concerns the United 
States almost as much as it does Canada. 



The Honorable Humphrey Mitchell, 
Minister of Labor, Dominion of Canada, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 

Honorable Sir : 

From a former member of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America now residing in Germany, I recently received a letter 
enclosing a want ad from a German newspaper. The ad offered jobs 
in Canada to some 700 skilled construction workers. Upon checking 
with our Canadian representatives I was informed that not only is the 
ad a legitimate one but also that large numbers of displaced European 
building mechanics are already at work on various Canadian projects. 

This is a matter oi grave concern to this office and to the tens of thou- 
sands of members of our Brotherhood in Canada. The extravagant impor- 
tation of foreign workers constitutes a serious threat to the welfare, 
prosperity and future of Canadian workmen and to the security of the 
nation. Furthermore it retards the rehabilitation of devastated European 
nations at the very time when we are straining our resources to the utmost 
in an effort to get them on their feet again. 

From the standpoint of the Canadian wage earner, the importation of 
foreign workers on any substantial scale gives rise to serious and well 
grounded fears. He knows that these are exceptional times. Jobs are 
plentiful and the demand for labor is brisk. But he also knows that a 
boom is inevitably followed by a bust, and he wonders what his position 



10 T H E C A R P Z X T E R 

will be then v.-hen :h:u5£.r-'l5 of importees will be competing with him for 
what jobs there are Fur errrre. he remembers the days in the earlier 
part of this cerirurv vher. ;ii:plcads of coolie and other low-priced labor 
flooded the nation and exerted tremendous downward pressure on wage 
scales and living standards. Above all, he does not want a return to 
those days because bitter experience has taught him that in our competitive 
society the cheapest labor tends to drag all labor do^m to its level. 
Whether imported on a temporary or permanent basis, he knows that 
foreign labor brought into Canada on any sizable basis jeopardizes his 
prosperity and welfare. 

The pinnacle of production achieved by the good people of Canada 
during the late war was truly one of the genuine miracles ^rhich hastened 
the day of victory substantially. Farmers, housew^ives, and school boys 
without any kind of industrial experience, went into the factories, mills 
and construction projects and in a short while they vs^ere holding their 
own w^ith any w^orkers in the world. I do not belies e i: is any exaggeration 
to say that during the ^war Canada became of industrial age. Thousands 
upon thousands of highly competent, highly skilled trkers were devel- 
oped. These people must be given an opportunity t utilize their newly- 
found skills. To ask them to compete w^ith imported iaiir is fair neither 
to them nor the nation. In the pre-war years there ere scarceh" enough 
jobs to occupy the skills of Canadiart mechanics. With many thousands of 
newly trained workers turned :ut 03' the war, any recession from the 
present high point of economic activity wll create a serious employment 
situation for skilled workers. Add imported workers to the labor pool 
and any downward trend may w^ell mean disaster for Canadian mechanics. 

In addition to the thousands of Canadians trained in war industries, 
other thousands of veterans were given years of highly specialized training 
in the armed forces. Above all others, these men and w^omen are entitled 
to cash in on their new skills not only during these lush times, but also 
in less favorable days that may lie ahead. To alloi^ even one foreign 
worker to keep out of work for a single day a veteran who gave so much 
to his country is unthinkable. 

But apart from the employment angle there are other considerations 
that merit serious study. Right now both Canada and the United States 
are straining their resources to the limit to oSer all possible aid to an 
impoverished and ailing Kurope. The reconstruction -job facing the bat- 
tered continent is almost insurmountable. The skill and energy of every 
Eurt ,ean citizen is desperately needed to get the job done. Yet if we 
are t: siphon off the cream of the iEuropean mechanics how w^ill the devas- 
tated nations ever get back on their feet? To pour money and supplies into 
these nations on one hand while on the other hand luring away the people 
w^ho can and must do the rebuilding job partakes somewhat of pounding 
sand down a rathole. Europe needs every trained man she has. Kvery 
European who leaves his native land for Canada or the United States 
retards the rebuilding of the continent by just that much. So, in the final 
analysis, every German or Austrian or Italian vrho is imported to this con- 
tinent poses a threat to the prosperity and welfare of American workers 



THE CARPENTER 11 

and at the same time adds to the difficulties of putting Europe back on its 
feet. 

And there is yet another consideration. In a brilliant series or articles, 
Don Cameron, Windsor Star Staff Correspondent, has recently analyzed 
the serious threat Communism constitutes in Canada. No one can read 
those articles without realizing that the time is at hand to stop once and 
for all the boring from within that jeopardizes our democratic institu- 
tions and all they stand for. I assume that there is a more or less rigid 
screening of all workers brought to Canada, but at the same time there is 
a real danger of Communist agents slipping in among such importees. 
Communists go where they are sent. Invariably they are sent to those 
areas where their work can be most fruitful. Canada is a prime Communist 
target and it is too much to expect that the Communist directors would not 
sieze the opportunity to smuggle at least a few of their agents among 
work battalions headed for Canada. All of us know only too well how 
clever they are at disguising their Communist memberships and assum- 
ing democratic poses. In view of the seriousness of the Red menace as 
disclosed by Mr. Cameron, every additional Communist agent smuggled 
into Canada presents a grave danger. 

Under these circumstances, we naturally are very concerned over the 
importation of foreign labor. I believe the yardstick for measuring the 
progress and growth of Canada, — or any nation, for that matter, — is not 
the number of citizens that the nation boasts of, but rather how well her 
citizens are cared for and how optimistically they can face the future. To 
merely increase population at the sacrifice of living standards is uneco- 
nomic and unwise. A better and more prosperous Canada is the goal of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and to that end 
we dedicate ourselves. To that end this letter is written. 

Because of the vital concern of our members in this entire matter of 
foreign workers, I am asking that you furnish us with a complete outline 
of the Canadian government's policy in regard to same. How many workers 
have already been imported and how many more are to be imported and on 
what basis? Our members have much at stake and therefore their interest 

^^ ^^^"- Sincerely yours, M. A. HUTCHESON, 

First General Vice-President. 



Corporations More Than Double Wealth 

Corporations have increased their wealth two and one-half times since 
1939, according to figures published by the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission. 

To measure the wealth, the commission uses the best "yardstick" — the 
corporations' "net working capital." 

That is figured by subtracting their "current liabilities" from their 
"current assets," leaving the amount of money and other wealth they own 
free of debt. 

From $24.5 billion in 1939, the "net working capital" went up steadily 
during and after the war, to $60.4 billion on September 30, 194", the last 
date for which figures are available. 



SIP 



EASY TO FIGURE 

Although Congress has put through a 
patched up version of a rent control 
bill, the Real Estate Lobby is still work- 
ing tooth and toenail trying to put over 
the idea that no controls are needed. 
How does anyone know there is really a 
housing shortage, a spokesman for the 
lobby demanded recently. 

About the best answer we can give is 
by reprinting the old one about the 
meek little guy on the witness stand in 
a railroad accident case. 

The argument waxed hot. "Sir," 
stormed the defense attorney, "you have 
admitted you were seated on the right 
side of the passenger coach where you 
couldn't see the extra track. Will you 
explain to the jury how you can swear 
the line was double-tracked?" 

"Well," meekly observed the witness, 
"I could look across the aisle and 
through the opposite coach window. 
Every once in a while I saw a train 
whizz by and I assumed that either 
there was a track under it or else the 
railroad has some exceptional railroad- 
ers." 



r^JlJoIloeMIL; 



ySl©''©^!^; 




^X^'^^^ 



One of these days, Joe, we're gonna 
wake 7ip and find ourselves back in the 
junk business. 



THE RED SOLUTION 

Last month tension between Russia 
and the United States reached a new 
high as Moustache Joe's cohorts sur- 
rounded the American zone in Berlin 
with a steel curtain of bayonets. This 
was a new move in the Soviet effort to 
block us out of Europe while placing on 
our backs the task of rebuilding the 
continent. 

Being particularly dumb about inter- 
national affairs, the whole Russian pro- 
gram mystifies us no end. But it sort 
of reminds us of the days when Mus- 
tapha Kemal was ruling Turkey. In sev- 
veral affairs Turkish soldiers slaugh- 
tered Armenian nationals until finally 
the United States was moved to protest. 
When the U.S. Ambassador called on 
the Mustapha, the latter listened courte- 
ously. Finally he asked: "What does 
the U.S. want?" 

"My country," replied the ambassa- 
dor, "feels that instead of these poor 
people being killed, homes should be 
provided for them." 

For a few moments Mustapha Kemal 
was thoughtful. Then a smile broke out 
on his face. 

"I quite agree with you," he said. 
"Let the United States provide the 
homes and we will provide the Arme- 
nians." 

• • • 

POSITIVE PROOF 

With butter still hovering around the 
dollar per pound mark, an Indianapolis 
restaurant has hit on a new economy 
wrinkle; the place now serves your 
bread already buttered. To say that it 
is meagerly buttered is a masterpiece of 
understatement. The other day a lunch 
patron picked up a piece of his pre-but- 
tered bread, looked it over carefully and 
turning to the waitress casually re- 
marked: 

"You know, when I was a little boy 
my mother used to tell me I didn't know 
which side my bread was buttered on, 
and danged if I don't think she was 
right." 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



A LITTLE CONFUSING 

As an armchair general during the 

jwar we had no trouble directing our 
armies all over the globe. We followed 
them all over the Pacific islands, and, 
sitting before our radio, we helped Pat- 

[ ton and Bradley and Eisenhower sweep 
through Germany without too much 
trouble. But all this peacetime maneu- 
vering has us stymied. The armed forces 
say we ain't got no Army or Navy and 

■ yet they spent an appropriation of 
eleven billion dollars last year. On one 

, page of the paper we read the next 
war is going to be a push-button war 
and on the next page it says we have 
to have military training to teach our 
boys how to march and drill. The 
whole thing is mighty confusing, and it 
sort of puts us in the same position as 
the hill-billy on the witness stand. 

Under cross-examination by the plain- 
tiff's attorney, the mountaineer was 
asked if he could read. 

"Only figures," he replied. 
"How do you mean?" counted the 
lawyer. 

"Well, it's like this," drawled the 
hill billy, when I goes places and sees 
the signs along the road, I kin read how 
fur but not whur to." 

I • • • 

FIFTY-FIFTY 
Recently a district court ruled that 
an International Union which had been 
pursuing a "no contract" policy was vio- 
lating the spirit of the Taft-Hartley Act. 
The judge ordered the Union to start 
negotiating with Its employers for a 
contract. 

In view of the numerous dodges an 

' employer can resort to if he does not 
care to sign a contract which his union 
wants, we begin to see the "fairness" of 
the Labor Relations Act. 

Mr. Taft insists his brain child is fair 
to labor and management. However, Mr. 
Taft is the sort of gent who thinks na- 
ture is perfect; the rich have ice in the 
summer and the poor have it in the 
winter, and that makes everything fair. 

• • • 
SPLITTING HAIRS 

Even a casual reading of the many 
labor papers in the nation discloses the 
fact that labor is undergoing a genuine 
political awakening. From border to 
border and coast to coast unions of all 
kinds are rolling up their sleeves and 



getting ready for a ding-dong political 
campaign to elect labor's friends and de- 
feat its enemies. It all looks very en- 
couraging. The only fly in the ointment 
seems to be that some are putting all 
their emphasis on Congressional elec- 
tions and forgetting state legislative 
elections. 

In view of the fact that some twenty- 
odd states have already passed anti- 
labor measures as bad or wor-se than 
the Taft-Hartley Act, it would seem wise 
for labor not to overlook state elections. 
A bad state law can be as crippling as 
a bad federal law. Choosing between 
the importance of state and federal elec- 
tions is cutting hairs pretty fine. And 
this gives us a chance to tell the one 
about the little girl who was left to 
watch a bakery shop while the owner 
ran an errand. An elderly lady entering 
the shop and seeing the little girl in 
charge remarked: 

"Aren't you tempted to eat some of 
the sweets while you are alone?" 

"Oh, no," replied the girl. "That 
would be stealing. All I do is lick them 
once in a while." 

• • • 
PAUP ON POLITICS 

"Looking over the average election," 
says Joe Paup, the Aristotle of the flop 
house, "there is but one comment an 
honest citizen can make — namely, thank 
God only one of the candidates can be 
elected." 




It says a pomid of heans all right, but 
are you sure she meant jelly heansf 



14 



REDWOOD SAGA ENDS 

* * 

THE LONGEST STRIKE in modern labor history is over. Away 
back on January 14, 1946, Brotherhood members in the Redwood 
lumber industry of northern California, unable through protract- 
ed collective bargaining to secure wages and conditions comparable to 
those established by the Union in other sections of the Pacific Goast lumber 
industry, were forced to employ economic action as a last resort. Last 
month, almost two years and three months to the day from the date when 
they took that action, the Redwood workers voted to terminate their strike. 
By that time only some six or seven . 



firms out of the hundred odd that 
were originally struck were still in- 
volved. All the others had long 
since negotiated agreements with 
the union that were satisfactory in 
all respects. And thus one of the 
bitterest and most courageously 
fought labor disputes of all time 
came to a close. 

Through two winters and two 
summers the Redwood workers car- 
ried on their fight. There were in- 
timidations and arrests and eco- 
nomic pressures brought to bear 
against the union men, but they 
steadfastly stuck by their guns. 
While they may not have gained all 
of their objectives from the hold- 
out companies, they did clean up 
what was a very nasty situation in 
the Redwoods. For years to come 
not only Redwood lumber workers 
but also lumber workers in all other 
sections of the nation will be enjoy- 
ing benefits established by the cour- 
ageous fight that has just concluded. 

The Redwood section of North- 
ern Galifornia is comparatively iso- 
lated. 

For generations the entire area 
has been dominated by a few com- 
panies and a few individuals who 



owned these companies. Down the 
years these individuals fought a 
perennial war to keep exclusive 
control of their vast empire and 
keep unionism out. Efforts to or- 
ganize the industry in the early days 
of the century were met with brass- 
knuckled resistance on the part of 
companies. It was not until the 
early 1940's, when the Brotherhood 
organized the Redwood w'orkers in- 
to sound, militant unions, that the 
empire barons realized they were 
meeting their match. Brotherhood 
unions in other sections of the Pa- 
cific Coast lumber industry were 
making tremendous strides in im- 
proving wages and working condi- 
tions, but every improvement en- 
tailed a long and bitter struggle in 
the Redwood empire where the 
tight monopoly clung to its tradi- 
tional policy of all-out resistance to 
unionism. By the end of 1945 the 
Redwood workers, persistent and 
peaceful in all their efiforts to ne- 
gotiate and conciliate, were far be- 
hind other sections in wages and 
conditions. In January 1946, they 
took the only other course open to 
them. The Redwood industry went 
down. 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



The strike is now over and the 
Redwood territory is a far different 
place from what it was three years 
ago. For one thing-, wages are now 
$1.40 low as compared to the 82-|c 
that prevailed prior to the strike. 
For another thing, the monopoly 
of the Redwood barons has been 
shaken. Scores of new companies 
moved into the territory during the 
strike. These new firms are all un- 
der agreement with the Union. They 
are all paying union wages and 
meeting union conditions. It is 
estimated that there are something 
like 175 Union Shop agreements in 
effect in the Redwood territory at 
the present time. The number of 
Local Unions in the area has grown 

; from twenty-six before the strike 
to thirty-nine at the present time. 
Membership increased by about 
eighty per cent. Considering all 
these things, the long struggle of 
Redwood workers will pay divi- 
dends for years to come. 

r To the Redwood workers who 
held their lines intact over a period 



of some twenty-seven months, the 
labor movement owes a vote of sin- 
cere thanks for the determined and 
magnificent battle they waged for 
union conditions and union princi- 
ples. Thanks must go, too, to the 
hundreds of Local Unions, District 
and State Councils which supported 
the strikers morally and financial- 
ly. Hundreds of thousands of dol- 
lars were made available to the Red- 
wood workers during their long 
siege. Dollar per member per 
month assessments were passed by 
numerous Local Unions and Dis- 
trict Councils. Others periodically 
voted contributions to the Redwood 
cause. Thanks to this fine support, 
the monopoly of the Redwood bar- 
ons has been broken, wages have 
been raised by some eighty-three 
per cent, a large part of the Red- 
wood industry has been signed to a 
genuine Union agreement, and no- 
tice has been served on the world 
that unionism is in the Redwood 
industry to stay. 



Brotherhood Fights Treacherous Amendments 

Urging an increase in the statutory minimum wage from forty cents 
an hour to seventy-five cents an hour, and pressing for a broadening of 
coverage, our Brotherhood last month expressed its vigorous opposition 
to the proposed Ball Subcommittee amendments to the Wages and Hours 
Law. The Ball proposals would raise the minimum wage from forty cents 
to somewhere between fifty and seventy cents an hour. They would 
narrow coverage and set up certain limitations on overtime. Inasmuch as 
an indeterminate number of Brotherhood members would be adversely 
affected by some of these amendments, our Brotherhood voiced its opposi- 
tion in no uncertain terms at a hearing held by the Ball Subcommittee 
last month. 

Assigned a half-hour spot in the hearings, our Brotherhood presented 
a plain spoken brief prepared under the direction of First \'ice President 
M. A. Hutcheson. This brief called attention to the confusing, unfeasible, 
retrogressive features of Senator Ball's proposals. It urged the defeat of 
these and substitution in their stead of amendments more in keeping with 
current conditions. 



Editorial 




An Argument For Unionism 

A Philadelphia correspondent recently sent us the following- clipping 
from the help-wanted columns of the Inquirer: 

BRICKLAYER — Master Mechanic not less than lo yrs. exp. 
to supervise apprentice training for local institution. Sal. 
$4500 yr. State age, education, exp. T-372 Inquirer. 

Perhaps balanced between embarking upon a career as a bricklayer or 
professor of engineering, the correspondent asked: "How many colleges 
could offer this much for a full professorship in any of the engineering 
courses?" 

In a report of the President's Scientific Research Board we found at 
least a partial answer to this question. We think you and our correspond- 
ent will find it illuminating. Plere it is : 

"Two-thirds of all college and university science professors and instruc- 
tors received salaries under $4,000 in 1946. ... In the smaller schools 
(that includes most of therri) even the men with 30 years' experience had 
(median) incomes of only $3,300. In the larger schools men with 15 years' 
experience had a median income of $4,500, men with 30 years' experience 
an income of $4,700." 

If you want to get ahead in a material way, the answer seems fairly 
clear. Become a professor of bricklaying rather than a professor .of engi- 
neering. Or get busy and do something effective to change the deal. 



The foregoing appeared on the editorial page of the April 10 issue 
of Business Week. If anyone has written a better piece on the value of 
organization, it has not yet come to our attention. The bricklayer has 
been a union man while the college professor has been going it alone. 
Therein lies the crux of the whole story. The bricklayer can get $4,500 
a year for his services while the professor, reaping the "blessings" of the 
rugged individualism and "free Americanism" Fulton Lewis, Jr., and 
Cecil B. DeMille love to preach about, considers himself lucky to knock 
down $3,500 in anything but one of the major colleges. 



American Worker Still the Envy of the World 

For all its shortcomings, our economic way of life is still the envy 
of the world. Our free enterprise system produces more of the good 
things in life for more people than any other system devised by the mind 
of men. We all work less, earn more, and enjoy more than any other 
people on the face of the earth. This fact was recently emphasized by the 



THE CARPENTER 17 

visit of a number of "working- party" committees from England, sent 
here to study American standards and American productivity. 

The reports of these committees showed some startling- contrasts be- 
tween Eng-lish and American production. They found that the British 
output per man hour lag-s behind ours by eighteen to forty-nine per 
cent in spinning; eighty to eighty-five per cent in winding; seventy-nine 
to eighty-nine in beaming; and fifty-six to sixty-seven per cent in weaving. 
Despite the fact that the textile industry got its start in the British 
Isles, the committees found that the American workman now produces 
approximately twice as much as his British brother. 

In the boot and shoe industry a visiting committee found that produc- 
tion is "three quarters as high again" per man as it is in England. Another 
group found that production per worker in the apparel industry is from 
a quarter to a half higher here than it is in British factories. Surprisingly 
enough, the committee also determined that American quality is on a par 
or above English. Although it must have been a blow to innate English 
pride, the committees found that while an English textile worker turns 
out around 1,835 linear yards of material per year, his American brother 
turned out something like 3,633 yards in 1945. 

Because his production is greater, the American workman enjoys a 
higher standard of living; for only out of production can come either 
wages or profits. In the days when Karl Marx was bemoaning the plight 
of the working people, production, because of poor tools, was low. His 
"solution" was the elimination of profits. But even if the workers got all 
the profits and all the fruits of their labor in those days their living 
standard would still have been piteously low. Marx saw the picture as 
it really was but his diagnosis of the cause was erroneous. The invention 
of the steam engine did more to take children out of the mines and textile 
mills than all the politicians of all time. The Communists of today are 
making the same mistake Marx did a hundred years ago. Production is 
still the only basis on which either decent wages or decent profits can be 
created ; and year after year America has proved free men can outproduce 
any others. 

Admittedly there are sore spots and imperfections in our economic 
setup, but they are only of a temporary nature. Whatever the yardstick, 
the American worker is in a class by himself — in earnings, in living 
standards and in productivity. Those who think otherwise are like the 
dog in the fable who dropped the fine bone he had in his mouth to grasp 
at the magnified reflection of it in the pond. 



A Day of Reckoning Is Inevitable 

Ever since V-J Day, various employer associations have periodically 
predicted that prices would "soon" start levelling off and seeking a more 
normal stratum. Like the "prosperity" of the 1930's, however, price reduc- 
tions are mighty slow in rounding the theoretical corner. The cost of 
living is still creeping upward and new all-time highs are in prospect in 
the very near future unless there is a reversal in the inflationary trend. 
A few months ago commodity prices broke on the various exchanges and 



18 THE CARPENTER 

there was a great deal of hub-bub on the part of various propaganda 
agencies which employers maintain to butter up public opinion. "This is 
it," the agencies gleefully announced. "The inflationary spiral is broken. 
Prices are on their way down." 

Prices did decline a little in various lines, but the decline was neither 
very substantial nor very long lived. During the last few months prices 
have continued their steady upward spiral. With the nation about to 
embark on another armament program, the chances are good that the 
upward climb will continue. 

In view of the serious inflationary pressure that haunts us, the annual 
report of the National City Bank on corporate profits — just issued for the 
year 1947 — presents some interesting reading. According to this report, 
the 3,102 companies studied made an average profit in 1947 some thirty- 
seven per cent higher than in 1946. This was after taxes, depreciation, in- 
terest AND RESERVES. The same companies upfped their returns on 
book net worth from nine and a half per cent in 1946 to twelve and a sixth 
per cent in 1947 — an increase of almost twenty-eight per cent. Forty-two 
cotton goods producers increased their profits fifty-nine and a half per 
cent. Twenty-three shoe and leather goods firms upped their incomes by 
almost thirty-nine per cent. Twenty meat packing corporations earned 
twenty-one per cent more in 1947 than they did in 1946. 

Twenty-one lumber firms upped their return on net worth from a 
little over twenty-one per cent in 1946 to almost thirty-two per cent in 
1947. Fifteen furniture firms jumped from less than ten per cent to 
more than sixteen per cent. Except for the airlines and railroads, most 
of the other industries studied did practically as well. 

From 1946 to 1947, while industry was increasing its profits by almost 
thirty-seven per cent, wages increased by a scant twelve per cent. These 
figures pretty much tell the story. Prices are drastically outrunning pur- 
chasing power. Perhaps the nation can, because of an expanding work 
force, maintain an even economic keel under conditions of this kind, but 
we seriously doubt it. Sooner or later the total amount of purchasing 
power fails to take care of the nation's production and then serious trouble 
sets in. Unless prices, profits and wages can be brought into balance 
shortly, a day of reckoning is inevitable. 



Competition Goes Into Reverse 

Competition has always been the backbone of our way of life. Lately, 
however, competition seems to have gone into reverse. When a Senate 
committee last month was investigating the recent increase in steel prices 
an interesting example of this reversal came to light. Senator O'Mahoney, 
implacable foe of monopoly, was asking ]\Ir. Homer, president of Bethle- 
hem Steel, how his company happened to raise prices. He explained that 
a salesman came into the office and- reported U.S. Steel had raised its 
prices five per cent. 

Trying to find out why Bethlehem raised its prices by exactly the same 
amount. Senator O'Mahoney asked: "Why did you have to do it?" 

"Oh, we have to be competitive," replied Mr. Homer. 



1» 



Here They are ^gain 



NON-UNION cedar shingles from Canada are once more beg-inningf 
to jeopardize the fine wages and working conditions established 
by our Brotherhood in the shingle mills of Oregon, Washington 
and California. Years ago some Washington bureaucrat in his infinite 
wisdom decreed that Canadian shingles should be admitted into the United 
States duty-free. Ever since that time the Canadian provinces have pro- 
vided grossly unfair competition for shingles produced under union con- 
ditions. During the war these non-union products were lost in the shufifle; 
but now that the war is over they 



are once more making an appear- 
ance in American markets. Recently 
a single shipment of some fifty car- 
loads was reportedly delivered to 
the California market. 

Among the earliest branches of 
the lumber industry to be organized, 
shingle-making is still a sizeable 



can be to organized mills is plainly 
shown by a comparison of wages 
and conditions in the two kinds of 
operations. The table of wage rates, 
taken at random and representing 
neither the highest nor the lowest 
in either type of mill, shows the 
wide discrepancy that exists: 



]oh 



Non-Union Canadian Rate 



American Rate 



Blockpiler 
Bolterman 
Millwright 
Cutoff Man 
Cleanup Man 
Minimum 



•99i 


per 


hour 


1.154 


per 


hour 


i.o7i 


per 


hour 


1-192 


per 


hour 


•95 


per 


hour 


•95i 


per 


hour 



$1.72-1 per hour 
2.07^ per hour 
1-742 per hour- 
1-972 per hour 
1.52^ per hour 
1.52^ per hour 



craft in the western states where 
cedar is plentiful. For all the sub- 
stitutes that have been devised in 
recent years, Red Cedar shingles 
still remain a preferred product in 
many sections of the country where 
their many good qualities are rec- 
ognized. Thousands of Brotherhood 
men still earn their livelihoods 
turning the giant cedar trees of the 
west into shingles and shakes. 

How unfair the competition of 
non-union Canadian shingle mills 



These wage comparisons were 
made as of rates in effect January 
16, 1948. However, the difference in 
wage rates does not tell the whole 
story. There is also a wide discrep- 
ancy in working conditions. For 
example, workers in American un- 
ion shop plants are paid standby 
time at the rate in effect in each 
classification. Union workers are 
also paid make-ready time at the 
straight time rate for all work per- 
formed in preparing their machines 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



for a job or operation. Union work- 
ers also receive an extra four cents 
per hour in lieu of vacations with 
pay. (The union is now negotiating 
for a paid vacation clause in the 
new agreement.) Canadian non- 
union mills work a forty-hour week 
whereas as mills under Brother- 
hood agreement work six hours a 
day six days a week, with time and 
a half for the sixth day. Added to- 
gether, all these things mean that 
non-union workers work for about 
half what Brotherhood members 
work for. Naturally the products 
of the non-union mills create gross- 
ly unfair competition for union- 
made shingles under a duty-free 
arrangement. 

Virtually the entire shingle in- 
dustry in Oregon, Washington, and 
California is organized under the 
Brotherhood banner. Not only are 
the products of these mills made 
under union conditions, but practi- 
cally all of them bear the union 
label of our Brotherhood as well. 
Users of cedar shingles are cau- 
tioned to look for the Brotherhood 
label whenever buying shingle pro- 
ducts. That is the safest way of 
making sure that the products are 
union made. With the six hour day, 
standby time, and a host of other 
fine working rules. Brotherhood 
shingle weavers are pointing the 
way to better conditions to a large 
part of American industry. How- 
ever, non-union made shingles from 
Canada are jeopardizing all of their 
gains. Already some union mills 
are curtailing because low-wage, 
non-union shingles are usurping a 
sizeable portion of the market. 

The menace which duty-free shin- 
gles constitute to the welfare and 
prosperity of unionized American 
shingle weavers has been called to 
the attention of the government re- 
peatedly. So far Uncle Sam has 



turned a deaf ear, and there seems 
to be little chance of a change of 
heart in the near future. Conse- 
quently the task of keeping non- 
union products from breaking down 
the wages and working conditions 
of organized plants must fall to the 
people who use them. 

From all indications, most non- 
union shingles are now going to the 
California market although ship- 
ments reportedly have been made to 
nearly all sections of the United 
States. In view of the fact that vir- 
tually all plants in the Pacific Coast 
states are organized, it is an easy 
matter to spot non-union shingles : 
if they do not bear the Brotherhood 
label, they are non-union made. 
Consequently the man who believes 
in unionism, who knows that an 
attack on the wage scale of one 
worker is an attack on the wage 
scale of every other worker will 
look for the Brotherhood label 
whenever buying shingle products. 
So long as tariff laws do not offer 
any protection to the wages and 
conditions of organized shingle 
weavers, labor will have to do the 
job itself. 



The Right to 

VOTE 

Is Your) 

Don't Fail to Use It 



Official Information 




General OflRcerg of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOESERS 

of A3IERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executitz Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District. R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

NOTICE TO ALL LOCAL UNIONS 

The attention of all Local Unions is hereby directed to the action taken by the 
General Executive Board at its meeting held in Lakeland last January relative to 
the admission to membership of individuals not qualified to follow some branch of 
our trade. The action of the Board — as contained in the official minutes, was as 
follows: 

"It has come to the attention of the General Executive Board that 
many of onr Local Unions throughout the jurisdiction of the Brotherhood 
have accepted to honorarj' membership applicants who have nevei* ^vorked 
at any branch of the trade, and who, by no stretch of imagination are 
qualified for membership as per the qualifications set forth in the Gen- 
eral Constitution; therefore, the Board goe^ on recard as declaring that 
no applicant can be admitted as a member unless he can qualify as being 
competent to work at some branch of the trade." 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 

2450 Plaster Rock, N. B., Can. 3094 Quitman, Miss. 

2451 Dailey, W. Va. 3097 Century, Fla. 

2452 Montreal, So., Que., Can. 2459 Roanoke. Va. 

2453 Oakridge, Ore. 2527 Victoria, B. C, Can. 

2454 Trenton, Ont., Can. 3095 High Point, N. C. 

2455 Crescent City, Cal. 2460 Wordstock, Ont., Can. 

2457 Drummondville, Que., Can. 2596 Baldwin, Mich. 

2458 Nelson & Dist., B. C. Can. 



^tt 0i 



txncvxnnt 



Brother T. L. ANDREWS, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother IGNATZ BALTUSKIS, Local No. 13, Chicago, IlL 

Brother GEORGE W. BARCE, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

Brother ERIC BENSON, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

Brother JOHN W. BERG, Local No. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 

Brother JOHN BESEMER, Local 325, Haledon, N. J. 

Brother J. H. BETTIS, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother R. BINGHAM, Local No. 198, Dallas, Texas 

Brother IRA BLEVINS, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother WESLEY E. BOSORE, Local No. 651, Jackson, Mich. 

Brother FRED BRECKNER, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Calif. 

Brother RICHARD BREITENBACH, Local No. 1784, Chicago, 111. 

Brother MARTIN BROWN, Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Brother FERDINAND BRUHBACH, Local No. 1784, Chicago, III. 

Brother LEO CALDERALLA, Local No. 246, New York City, N. Y. 

Brother CLARENCE CLAY, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Calif. 

Brother S. W. CLEMENTS, Local No. 1768, Jacksonville, Tex. 

Brother W. A. COFFELT, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother ROBERT COOPER, Local 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother W. L. COOPER, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother W. J. COLLARD, Sr., Local No. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas 

Brother A. H. CRAGO, Local No. 1563, Monessen, Pa. 

Brother JAMES A. DAVIS, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

Brother JOHN R. DIXON, Local No. 16, Springfield, 111. 

Brother JACOB DUMELLE, Local No. 1784, Chicago, 111. 

Brother C. C. DURHAM, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother BUFORD R. ELLIOTT, Local No. 190, Klamath Falls, Ore. 

Brother PERRY FISHER, Local No. 143, Canton, Ohio 

Brother THOMAS FLYNN, Local No. 246, New York City, N. Y. 

Brother AUGUST GAEDKE, Local No. 13, Chicago, IlL 

Brother HARRY GIPPLE, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

Brother C. C. HALLMARK, Local No. 1890, Conroe, Tex. 

Brother C. B. HAVENS, Local No. 2067, Medford, Ore. 

Brother L. H. HAYNES, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother HENRY HEDLICKA, Local 298, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother FRANK M. HOLM, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother H. L. JOHNSON, Local No. 7, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brother WM. PAT JOHNSON, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother JOHN JORGENSEN, Local No. 298, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother MAX KATZMAN, Local No. 51, Boston, Mass. 

Brother FRANK KNOR, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother OTTO KOESTER, Local No. 1784, Chicago, IlL 

Brother PETER KUTT, Local No. 298, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother CARL LANDBERG, Local No. 7, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brother ELMER LICHAVE, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

Brother WM. LONGLEY, Local No. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 

Brother HARRY P. LUTZ, Local No. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 

Brother W. BUTLER MAHAN, Local No. 16, Springfield, 111. 

Brother JOHN McCONNELL, Local No. 143, Canton, Ohio 

Brother FRED MEEKER, Local No. 190, Klamath Falls, Ore. 

Brother A. E. MILLER, Local No. 2067, Medford, Ore. 

Brother WM. NEISS, Local No. 143, Canton, Ohio 

Brother ARTHUR J. NEWSTROM, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother ED NOLDN, Local No. 143, Canton, Ohio 

Brother HERMAN OSTHEIMER, Local No. 298, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother JAMES PAGE, Local No. 35, San Rafael, Calif. 

Brother BENJAMIN PALANGE, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Calif. 

Brother ANDERS PETERSON, Local No. 35, San Rafael, Calif. 

Brother EDGAR PHILLIPS, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother HENRY PICK, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 

Brother PETER PRATL, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 

Brother ADAM REICHARD, Local No. 1784, Chicago, 111. 

Brother ALDERIC RENAUD, Local No. 874, New Bedford, Mass. 

Brother WILLIAM J. RIORDAN, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Calif. 

Brother W. H. ROBINS, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother FRANK ROSETSKI, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

Brother CHARLES A. RUPERT, Sr., Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Brother JOHN SAVAGE, Local No. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 

Brother ULISSE SAMARTIN, Local No. 246, New York City, N. Y. 

Brother JAMES J. SHINNORS, Local No. 454, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brother JOHN SIVERTSON, Local No. 7, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brother JOSEPH STOPKA, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 

Brother ARCHIE D. STORM, Local No. 651, Jackson, Mich. 

Brother CLAY TAYLOR, Sr., Local No. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas. 

Brother THOMAS TAYLOR, Local No. 42, San Francisco, Calif. 

Brother N. L. THOMPSON, Local No. 74, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Brother JIMMIE K. TURNER, Local No. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas 

Brother RUSSELL TURNER, Local No. 143, Canton, Ohio 

Brother JOHN WADEMANN, Local No. 298, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother W. G. WAGNON, Local No. 1371, Gadsden, Ala. 

Brother JAMES E. WALKER, Local No. 1048, Duquesne, Pa. 

Brother ED. WARRING, Local No. 7, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brother PARK WEST, Local No. 143, Canton, Ohio 

Brother MORTON WICKLUND, Local No. 7, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brother HENRY H. WICKS, Local No. 1149, Oakland, Calif. 



CorrQspondQRCQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

ESSEX-MIDDLESEX CONFERENCE HELD AT LAKELAND 

The Essex-Middlesex, Massachusetts, County Conference of Carpenters was held 
in Lakeland, Florida, this winter. Traveling by chartered Greyhound bus, the 
delegates left Salem on a Friday evening, arriving in Lakeland two days later. 
There they were met by Marshall Goddard, assist superintendent of the Home. 
The party made its headquarters at the Thelma Hotel but much of its spare time 
was spent visiting the Home. 

Mr. Goddard conducted the party on an inspection tour of the Home, the groves, 
dairy plant, truck garden, etc. After the tour a luncheon was served at the home 
so that the visitors could mix with the Home guests from their district. The fol- 
lowing day the Adams Packing Company, which processes the bulk of the citrus 
fruits from the Brotherhood groves, sent a bus for the party and conducted it 
through its Immense packing plant. This was followed by an evening barbeque 
at the groves, the whole party winding up the evening as guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Goddard at their home. 

Side trips were made to Tampa, St. Petersburg, Ocala, Silver Springs, some 
even going as far as Miami. Only two in the party had even seen the Carpenters 
Home before and there were expressions of amazement on all sides over the 
splendid way in which the organization is taking care of its veteran members. 
Several in the group were critical about the need for maintaining the Home when 
they started but they returned full of enthusiasm for the fine job it is doing. 

Edward Thomson, business manager of the North Shore District Council, was 
in charge of the conference. With the assistance of a committee he made the 
entire affair a complete success. The party left Lakeland Friday afternoon and 
arrived home the following Sunday. 



NEW JERSEY LOCALS MARK CONSOLIDATION 

An anniversary dinner was held by Local 537 in Greven's Hotel in Rahway, N. 
J., on March 13, 1948 to mark the 48th and last year of its existence as a unit, it 
having voted to consolidate with Local 715 of Elizabeth. 

Practically the entire membership of Local 537 were present and many broth- 
ers from Local 715. At the conclusion of the dinner. President James Dyer of 5 37 
handed the gavel to Raleigh Rajoppi, President of the New Jersey State Council of 
Carpenters, who acted as toastmaster. He called upon the visiting brothers for a 
few words and outlined the efforts he had expended in bringing about the formali- 
ties of consolidation. 

Brother George F. Coughlin, Business Agent of 715 and Chairman of the 
Board of Business Agents, welcomed the brothers of 537 into his Local and assured 
them that with their support and devotion their new Local would become the most 
successful in the State. 

Brother Eric Shoelpple, Business Agent of 53 7, expressed the sentiment that 
the consolidation would bring greater benefits and gains to all its members. 

Brother O. William Blaier, General Rrepresentative of the United Brotherhood, 
paid homage to Brother Rajoppi by saying that he was one of the best Presidents 
the State Council of Carpenters had, that he gave unstintingly of his time and 
efforts, that he was constantly visiting Locals and lending of his services graci- 
ously and willingly in all situations. He expressed the hope that Brother Rajoppi 
would continue in his position and his good work. Brother Blaier expressed him- 



24 THE CARPENTER 

self in favor of consolidation throughout this small and compact State of New 
Jersey, either on a County basis or in greater areas. "This," he said, "would give 
us greater strength to fight our enemies and also enable us to establish uniform 
conditions throughout the State." 

Nathan Duff, Counsel for Local 5 3 7, spoke of the necessity for Labor to take 
an active part in the forthcoming political campaign. The Taft-Hartley Act. and 
other anti-social legislation now pending in Congress, he said, was passed and 
would be passed not by the Republican Party nor the Democratic Party, but by 
a combination of both and hence both parties must bear the guilt equally. We of 
Labor must shed our partisan label to protect ourselves, our children and our way 
of life and vote for those men who are dedicated to protect Labor, and against 
those who are avowedly or suspiciously anti-Labor. 

Others called upon to speak were Harold Hansen, Business Agent Local 155 
of Plainfield; N. J. Cantwell, Secretary of New Jersey State Council of Carpenters 
and Secretary of Local 715; and the officers of 537, James Dyer, President; Jacob 
Tornrath, Vice-President; Louis Scirrotto, Recording Secretary; Burt Lanphear, 
Treasurer; William Crane, Financial Secretary; Max Prietz, Conductor; William 
Jenner, Warden; and Clarence Heller, one of the Trustees. 

The anniversary and consolidation committee consisted of: James Dyer, Eric 
Shoelpple, Burt Lanphear, Louis Scirrotto, Frank Telmanyi, Clarence Heller and 
Stephen Heyburn. 

• 

LOCAL. No. 124 MARKS GOLDEN JUBILEE 

In honor of attaining its fiftieth milestone. Local No. 124, Bradford, Pa., on 
the night of January 29th, sponsored a banquet and social evening for its host 
of members and friends. The Local Union's Charter bears the date of December 
31, 1897. In the years since that time the union^has seen good times and bad, 
but day in and day out the officers and members have constantly worked to make 
the union and the city, state and nation better and more prosperous in every way. 

Approximately 170 guests sat down to dinner; among them Mayor Hugh Ryan 
who delivered the address of welcome. Also present were members of the clergy, 
members of contracting firms and Mr. Wm. Zerley, manager of the district Social 
Security Boad, who spoke briefly on the benefits of the Social Security program. 
The General Officers were represented by General Representative Jack O'Donnell 
who proved himself to be an able and forceful speaker. Brother Kenneth Anderson 
did a fine job as toastmaster. 

Special tribute was paid to a fine group of old timers whose continuous mem- 
bership adds up to 209 years. They are: Carl W. Larson, forty-eight years; Lewis 
Larson, forty-six years; H. M. Kelly, forty-six years; O. L. Shelgren, forty-four 
years; and Alfred Nelson, forty-five years. The last charter member, Brother J. L. 
Brothers, passed away in April of last year. As the member with the longest 
record of continuous membership. Brother Carl Larson was presented with a fine 
gift. 



HOLLAND UNIONS SPONSOR JOINT BANQUET 

In conjunction with Bricklayers Local Union No. 19, Local Union No. 1908 
of Holland, Michigan, on the night of February 28th sponsored a banquet and 
social evening. Some 200 people, including members, friends and guests of the 
two organization filled the American Legion Memorial Club to near capacity. A 
reception committee greeted guests at the door and wives of union members were 
presented with pink carnation corsages. Tables were decorated with center- 
pieces of sweet peas and snapdragons, tulips and daffodils. 

Ben Hulst was master of ceremonies for the evening. Brief talks were given 
by John Van Dyke, Harold Vander Bie, Jack Ritsema, Martin Plockmeyer, Floyd 
Kraai, H. Gerritsen and Gerrit Schipper. 

Following the banquet a variety of interesting games were played with clever 
prizes awarded to the winners. All in all, the guests enjoyed themselves greatly 
and the evening was unanimously considered a complete success. 



THE CARPENTER 25 

MANSFIEL.D MEMBERS HONOR ANOTITER BIRTHDAY 

To honor the forty-seventh anniversary of its existence, Local Union No. 735, 
Mansfield, Ohio, on the night of February 2 8th, sponsored a birthday banquet. 
Approximately 200 guests sat down to a family style chicken dinner at the Blue 
Goose Tavern. Combining lots of good food with lots of good fellowship, the affair 
proved to be a great success. 

Brother Ben Godfrey, representative of the Industrial Relations and Safety 
and Hygiene Department of the State of Ohio gave a short talk on the State 
Safety Code. An hour's entertainment consisting of singing and dancing was pre- 
sented by a troupe from Columbus. With plenty of visiting by friends and neigh- 
bors, the 1948 version of Local No. 735's annual birthday party proved to be out- 
standing. 

The arrangements committee consisted of Grover C. Lake, John Coon and 
Floyd Meyers. 

• 

DETROIT PAYS TRIBUTE TO BROTHER ALLAN 

Saturday night, April 3rd, was "Finlay Allan Night" in the Fountain Room of 
the Masonic Temple, Detroit, when over 1,000 union members, friends and guests 
paid a glowing tribute to the new secretary-treasurer and business manager of the 
Detroit Building Trades Council. The occasion was really the annual banquet of 
Detroit members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters but it mainly served as 
a vehicle for paying the respects of the Detroit labor movement to Finlay Allan 
who recently resigned as secretary-treasurer of the Detroit District Council of 
Carpenters to assume a similar capacity with the Detroit Building Trades Council. 

Many dignitaries both in and out of labor, were on hand to pay tribute to 
Brother Allan. Frances X. Martel, president of the Detroit Building Trades Council 
delivered the keynote address of the evening. He described Allan as "one of the 
outstanding young labor leaders in the city whose talents have been recognized 
on a national scale." He told the assemblage that when Allan took over as 
secretary-treasurer of the Detroit District Council the membership barely topped 
3,000. Under his stewardship of seven short years the membership has grown 
to better than 11,000 and working conditions and wages compare with the best 
in the nation. It was only natural, he said, that when death called Ed. Thai, secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Detroit Building Trades Council that Allan should be drafted 
to fill his shoes. 

During the course of the eA^ening a liberal purse was awarded Brother Allan 
as a token of esteem from his fellow Carpenters. Among the special guests 
attending were Mike Sexton, president of the Chicago District Council, Andrew 
McFarlane, president and business manager Laborers Local 3 34; Marion Macioce, 
business representative Sheet Metal Workers Locals 2 81 and 292; Archie Virtus, 
business agent Plumbers Local 98; Frank Riley, business manager Electrical Work- 
ers Local 58; Clifford Sparkman, president Detroit Typographical Union No. 18; 
James Collins, general organizer Painters International Union; Irving Bronson, 
Painters District Council; Patrick Brady, Laborers Union international representa- 
tive, and County Auditor Archie Leadbetter. 



SAN MATEO PLUGS APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING 

At special ceremonies held in American Legion Hall of the San Mateo Civic 
Center, thirty young men who have completed their apprenticeship training 
were awarded Certificates of Completion and welcomed into the craft of carpentry 
by officers and members of Local Union No. 16 2. On hand were a number of 
prominent citizens active in government, labor and civic affairs. A. J. Mooney, chief 
of the state division of apprenticeship standards delivered the principal address. 

Apprenticeship training has long been close to the heart of Local No. 162. 
Eleven years ago the Local inaugurated such a program and during that time 
a large number of first class mechanics has been educated. The program started 
by Local No. 162 has grown to the point where some 600 young men are now 
taking the course in that area. Three classes, one at Sequoia High School, Redwood 
City; one at San Mateo Junior College; and one at South San Francisco have 
developed from the original start. 




SAN RAFAEL, LADIES START OFF WITH A BANG 

The Editor: 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 495 of San Rafael, Cal., celebrated the installing of its 
charter on Monday, January 12th by sponsoring a party and social evening. A 
large gathering of ladies, husbands and friends were on hand to help make the 
affair a huge success. W.O.W. Hall was almost filled to capacity and everyone on 
hand declared the party was a four-star affair. 

A folk dancing group from San Rafael entertained the members and guests 
with a wide variety of old and modern dancing. At times the members joined in 
the fun. Shortly after eleven very welcome refreshments were served. The eve- 
ning broke up on a high note of fraternal good feeling. 

The formation of a Ladies Auxiliary in San Rafael is going to help the brothers 
of our city in more way than one as we intend to cooperate with them in every 
way we possibly can. 

Fraternally yours, 

Dorothy Perkins, Rec. Sec. 



BINGHAMPTON LADIES GET AUXILIARY UNDER WAY 

The Editor: 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 490 of Carpenters Local No.' 281, Binghampton, N. Y., 
was installed at the Labor Temple on November 13, 1947. Following the official 
organization of the Auxiliary, nomination and election of officers took place. 

Officers were installed as follows: president, Hazel Smith; vice president, Mary 
Miller; recording secretary, Leah Kelly; financial secretary and treasurer, Beva 
Matthews; conductress, Emily Morrow; warden, Molly Lambert; trustees, Peg 
Skinner, Florence Reed, and Mrs. Hauser. 

Our meetings are held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday nights of each month. 
We have a bingo game on the last meeting night of the month. Small gifts are 
donated by the members to be used as prizes. We also have a white elephant affair 
each meeting night; the winner bringing the prize for the next meeting. 

The proceeds go into the treasury and are used for sunshine baskets and 
flowers for the sick; also for flowers for members and their families in case of 
death. 

We are having a card party at the Labor Temple on March 18 followed by a 
luncheon. 

Our Auxiliary being in its infancy, we would welcome letters and ideas from 
any Sister Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally yours, 

Leah Kelly, Rec. Sec'y. 



RISING PRICES DISTORT FIGURES 

"National production" hit a new peak of $230 billion in 1947, a rise of 13 
per cent over 19 46. 

"National income" also set a record, rising from $178 billion in 1946 to $203 
billion in 1947. 

But, explains a Department of Commerce report, there's a "catch" in all those 
figures. Both production and income were measured in dollars, and the rises were 
mainly caused by increasing prices. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1948) 

LESSON 236 
By H. H. Siegele 

In a previous lesson I took up the 
matter of snapping a chalk line, but in 
this lesson I want to discuss fastening 
lines. While I have in mind the ordinary- 
line, the principles can be applied to 



Fig. 1 




sash cords and ropes, depending some- 
what on the circumstances under which 
they are being' used. 

Fig. 1 shows how to fasten a line to 
a stake. This is called the friction hitch. 
It is easy to make — a one and one-half 
wrap around the stake, crossing the 
line somewhat as shown to the right 
is all that is needed. When the line is 
to be removed you simply unwrap it 
and it is loose. This fastening, if the 




stake is firm, will keep the line in a 
definite position all the time. Compare 
this with the fastening shown by Fig. 9, 
which is sometimes used for fastening 
lines. 

Fig. 2 gives the first and second op- 



erations for fastening a line to a nail 
by means of a friction hitch. First you 
loop the line over the index finger of 
the right hand, and then give it about 
three rotary twists, away from you at 




the top and toward you at the bottom, 
as indicated by the arrows and symbols 
of hands at the bottom. If this is prop- 
erly done, the loop will be twisted about 
as shown by Fig. 3. The loop is then 
hooked over the nail, about as shown by 
Fig. 4. Now hold the line tight with 
the left hand, and with the right hand 
give the end of the line a quick jerk, in 
the direction of the arrows and on past 
the nail. This will roll the line up into 
a little ball at the nail. Then slowly re- 




lax the pull on the end of the line, which 
will leave the twist at the nail about as 
shown by Fig. 5. This hitch will hold 
the line without slipping, and when you 
are ready to take off the line, give the 
end of the line a quick jerk, as indicat- 
ed by the arrows, and the line will come 
off the nail with ease. The student is 
advised to practice making this hitch 
until he can make it automatically. 

The nail hitch can be used on both 
ends of the line. It should be remem- 
bered, however, that the line must be 
kept tight all the time, in order to ob- 
tain the best results. After the first 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



hitch is made in the manner explained 
above, the hitch on the other end is 
made in exactly the same way, but be 
sure that the line is as tight as you want 




it before you knot the hitch at the nail. 

Another good way to fasten the first 
end of a line to a nail is by means of 
a permanent loop on the end of the 
line. There are different ways of making 





Fig. 6 

such a loop, but the method shown in 
Fig. 6 will keep the loop and line prop- 
erly centered, which is important when 
accurate lining is to be done. To the left 




is shown the first operations. The curved 
line with the arrow heads, shows how 
the end of the line is pulled through 
the loop, around the line and back 



through the loop again. This will give 
you a loose knot, about what is shown 
at the center. To the right is shown 
the loop completed with the knot tight- 
ened, but not as tight as it should be. 
Fig. 7 shows the loop, the making of 
which has just been explained, hooked 
onto a nail. 

Fig. 8 shows how a line should be 
fastened to a batter board. At A is 
shown, partly by dotted lines, a saw 




Fig. 8 



kerf with enough of the wood cut out 
to show the bottom of the kerf. At B 
the line is shown fa'stened to a batter 
board by means of a saw kerf. 

Fig. 9 shows how not to fasten a 
line to a stake, post, bar, studding, etc. 
This fastening can not be depended 
upon to hold the line permanently in 
the same place. The knot is shown 
rather loose, which can be tightened. 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

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CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p., 754 il., covering general 
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THE CARPENTER 



29 



but even then it is not as good a hitch 
as the one shown by Fig. 1. Compare 
the two hitches again. 

Fig. 10 shows how to fasten lines 
with bricks by wrapping the line around 




one brick a few times and weighting 
that brick down with another brick. 
To the left, at a smaller scale, is shown 
how the weighting brick is sometimes 
set, but there is little advantage in it, 
in fact the brick in this position is like- 
ly to fall over. 




Fig. 10. 

Sometimes when the line has to be 
stretched very tight, two or more bricks 
are used to weight the first brick down. 
On the other hand, on very short dis- 
tances, weighting down the line-holding 
brick is not altogether necessary, how- 
ever, to be safe, it is always advisable 
to weight down line-holding brick. 

I worked for a man once who had to 
have lines strung, as it were, every- 
where. At any rate there were so many 
lines, that it was hard to move around 
without stumbling over some of them, 
after which they had to be reset. This 
over use of lines is all unnecessary, 
especially when chalk lines can be used 
instead. The advantage in a chalk line 
lies in the fact that after it has been 
made it stays put. Whenever a chalk line 
will answer the purpose, it should be 
used rather than a regular stretched 
line. 



As to the size of chalk lines: For 
shingling and other rough work, a line 
about 3/32 of an inch thick is com- 
monly used. But for striking chalk lines 
on boards for ripping with a hand rip 
saw, a smaller line will give more ac- 
curate results. I have seen fish lines 
used for chalk lines, and they give es- 
pecially good service. They are strong 
and make a well-defined chalk line. 



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Tiis book gives the Entire Length of 
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The flattest pitch is a ^a inch rise to 12 
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There are 2.400 different spans or vridths 
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NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Accurate Tool & Die Co., Cleve- 
land, O 2nd Cover 

American Floor Surfacing Machine 

Co., Toledo, Ohio 3 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Blue Star Products, Fairfield, la. 5 
Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Calif. 28 
Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 32 

Hesse & Co., Chicago, 111 29 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

Master Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y 4 

A, D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 30 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, Mass. 31 

Ohlen-Bishop, Columbus, Ohio 31 

The Paine Co., Chicago, III 32 

Porter-Cable Machine Co., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y 1 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 4 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 32 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore 30 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 
Stovr Metal Products Co., Stow, 0.2nd Cover 

Transglo Co., Little Neck, N. Y. 31 

E. Weyer, New York, N. Y 32 

Sporting Goods 

Mark Seymour, Seattle, Wash 30 

Teclinical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 31 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- j 

cago, 111. 6 i 

Frederick J. Drake & Co., Chicago, 

111. 32 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Calif 30 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 29 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo 2nd Cover ■ 



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475 Fact Filled Pages 
Over 300 Illustrations 



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Inside Trade Information On: 

How to use the steei square — How to file and 
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problems — Estimating strength of timbers — - 
How to set girders and sills — How to frame 
houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — ^Ho w 
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— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 
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CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 

OflHeial Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 

• • * 



REMEMBER 




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THE 



iCii 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXTII — No. 6 



IXDIAXAPOLIS, JUXE, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Two Important Victories 



Two separate court decisions involving tv/o widely separated Local Unions of the 
United Brotherhood give organized labor new hope that the Taft-Hartley Act eventually 
may be largely invalidated as contrary to constitutionally established rights and pre- 
rogatives of collective bargaining. In a precedent-making decision, a Denver judge rules 
that construction of a local nature does not come under the Taft-Hartley Act because it 
is not interstate in character despite the fact materials from other states may be used 
en the job. In a case involving Local Union No. 74 of Chattanooga, the Tennessee Su- 
preme Court holds that the Local Union has a right to picket a firm in v/hich it has no 
members despite the anti-boycott provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act. These decisions 
mean that ultimately all or a large part of the construction industry may be moved out 
from under the Taft-Hartley Act and that Its anti-boycott provisions may be invalidated. 



Labor Starts Rolling 



10 

From results to date it is becoming increasingly clear that organized labor is going 
to wield a substantial influence in this year's political scene. In primary elections held 
up to April, labor emerged victorious in nineteen instances; in five instances the results 
can be considered a tie because labor support was divided; and in eleven other in- 
stances the labor-backed candidate went down to defeat. While this record is not too 
bad, neither is it anything to gloat about, considering what the workers of the nation 
have at stake. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Official 

Editorials 

In Memorlam 

Craft Problems 



13 
16 



26 



Index to Advertisers 



30 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will hove to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, INT)., as second class mail nmtter, under Act of 

Congress, Au?. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



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Against Taft-Hartleyism Labor Scores 



TWO IMPORTANT VICTORIES 



SEPARATE courts last month handed down two far-reaching deci- 
sions — one of which may ultimately move the entire construction 
industry out from under provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act, the 
other of which may lead to nullification of certain most objectionable parts 
of the Act as unconstitutional. The cases involved two widely-separated 
Locals of the United Brotherhood — Local 55 of Denver and Local 74 of 
Chattanooga. In the Tennessee case, the Tennessee Supreme Court upheld 
a decision handed down by the Chancellor in Tennessee which had pre- 
viously found that Chattanooga Local Union No. 74 had a right to picket 
an establishment in which no "labor 



dispute" in the statutory sense ex- 
isted, • even though such picketing 
resulted in damage to the business 
of the employer. In the Colorado 
case, the Colorado Supreme Court 
decided that local construction pro- 
jects are not, strictly speaking, in- 
terstate commerce, despite the fact 
materials from other states may be 
used on the job, and not subject, 
therefore, to provisions of the Taft- 
Hartley Act. 

The Tennessee decision was the 
outgrowth of controversy between 
the Ira A. Watson Company and 
Local Union No. 74. The company 
maintained a business in Chatta- 
nooga which included among its 
services the laying of linoleum 
in homes and newly constructed 
houses. Some eight men were em- 
ployed in this fashion. Early in 
1947 the Union made an effort to 
organize these employes. However, 
the move met with very little suc- 
cess. The men did not avail them- 
selves of the opportunity to join 
the Union. Thereafter the Union 
established a picket line before the 
entrance of the company. The com- 
pany liled suit and the whole con- 



troversy revolved around the ques- 
tion: "Can a union peacefully pick- 
et a place of business where it has 
no members simply for the purpose 
of inducing potential customers to 
not patronize such establishment?" 

The Chancellor held that such 
picketing was not for illegal pur- 
poses but for purposes beneficial to 
the union, and such picketing is 
protected by the Federal Constitu- 
tion despite the anti-boycott provi- 
sions of the Taft-Hartley Act. 

In making his ruling the Chan- 
cellor referred to numerous deci- 
sions both federal and state which 
clearly set forth that peaceful pick- 
eting is the working man's means of 
communication. As such, the court 
reasoned, peaceful picketing re- 
mains the prerogative of working 
people who are pursuing legitimate 
objectives in spite of any language 
contained in the Taft-Hartley Act. 
That the picketing Union may not 
have any members in the plant or 
firm being picketed does not mate- 
rially change the picture; this ques- 
tion having been settled by the U.S. 
Supreme Court several years ago. 
In that famous case the court said: 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



"... one need not be in a 'labor dis- 
pute' as defined by state law to 
have a right under the Fourteenth 
Amendment to express a grievance 
in a labor matter by publication un- 
attended by violence, coercion or 
conduct otherwise unlawful or op- 
pressive." On these grounds the 
Chancellor in Tennessee held that 
Local Union No. 74 was within its 
rights in picketing the Watson 
establishment. 

The matter was appealed to the 
Supreme Court of Tennessee. That 
august body reviewed the case care- 
fully and last month handed down a 
decision upholding the Chancellor. 
The decision is especially impor- 
tant to labor because it is directly 
contrary to the recent decisions of 
some trial examiners under the Na- 
tional Labor Relations Board that 
picketing of this character and with 
this objective is illegal under the 
Taft-Hartley Act. 

In the Denver case, the status of 
the construction industry under the 
Taft-Hartley Act was involved. The 
decision, a highly important one, 
may ultimately have a great bearing 
on whether or not construction of a 
local nature can be considered as 
"affecting interestate commerce" — 
the yardstick by which the juris- 
diction of the Taft-Hartley Act is 
measured. 

Involved in this precedent-set- 
ting case were the Denver Building 
and Construction Trades Council 
and an electrical contracting firm 
known as Gould and Preisner. For 
some time the firm and the Build- 
ing Trades Council were unable to 
resolve their differences. Finally 
the firm was placed on the "Unfair 
List" by the Council. Shortly there- 
after, union craftsmen employed on 
a Denver construction project on 
which Gould and Preisner were the 



electrical sub-contractors refused to 
work with non-unionists employed 
by that firm. The union men walked 
off the job and began picketing 
the site. 

Gould and Preisner then filed an 
"unfair" labor charge against the 
Building Trades Council and its' 
affiliates with the regional office 
of the National Labor Relations 
Board — a procedure that was legal- 
ized by passage of the Taft-Hartley 
Act. On instructions from Robert 
N. Denham, General Counsel for 
the National Labor Relations 
Board, a complaint was issued, and 
in addition, Denham's representa- 
tives applied to the Federal court 
for an injunction against the unions 
and their picket line on the grounds 
that they were violating the "anti- 
boycott" sections of the Taft-Hart- 
ley Act. 

In the Federal court, the matter 
came before Judge Symes. Primar- 
ily involved was the question as to 
whether or not a local construction 
project could be construed as "af- 
fecting interstate commerce," since 
only those businesses "affecting in- 
terstate commerce" fall within the 
jurisdiction of the Taft-Hartley 
Act. In his precedent-making rul- 
ing, Judge Symes denied the peti- 
tion for an injunction against the 
unions on the grounds the Taft- 
Hartley Act's injunction provisions 
could not be applied because the 
firm was not actually engaged in in- 
terstate commerce, despite the fact 
it was handling materials manufac- 
tured in states other than Colorado. 
He further ruled that the posting 
of an "Unfair List" is lawful and 
protected by the "free speech" sec- 
tions of the Taft-Hartley Act. 

Should Judge Symes' findings be 
sustained by the higher courts — and 
there is every reason to hope that 



T H E C A R P E N T E R 9 

they will be — a substantial part, if pretations of administrative officers 

not all, of the construction industry, of g^overnment Labor agencies, 

may be eventually removed from One by one, fundamental and 

the jurisdiction of the Taft-Hartley well-established rights of Labor 

Act. have been sold down the river by a 

The importance of both the Chat- reactionary Congress. But Labor is 

tanooga and Denver cases cannot not giving them up without a fight. 

be overestimated. They both reaf- The Chattanooga and Denver cases 

firm and strengthen the protections represent two important victories 

afforded American citizens by the and they foreshadow the kind of 

United States Constitution. Fur- fight Labor intends to wage to pro- 

thermore, they place direct and bad- tect the working people of America 

ly-needed limitation on the extrava- from discriminatory, arbitrary and 

gant and often arbitrary legal inter- .Constitution-evading legislation. 



Our Constitution Is On File 

Owing to the confused and often ambiguous language of the Taft- 
Hartley Act, a number of Local Unions and District Councils have sub- 
mitted copies of the Constitution and By-Laws of the United Brother- 
hood to the Department of Labor. This is unnecessary. All that is required 
is that the General Office file a copy with the Department. This has been 
done. Consequently Local Unions and District Councils need not con- 
cern themselves with this particular matter. The following letter from 
the Director of the Division of Labor Standards to General Secretary 
Duffy in this regard is self-explanatory: 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 
Division of Labor Standards 

May 19, 19 48 

Mr. Frank Duffy, General Secretary, 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

Dear Mr. Duffy: 

We are returning under separate cover a number of copies of the Con- 
stitution of your Union, which were submitted to us by your Locals. 

In the future, it will not be necessary for each of your Local Unions to 
submit a copy of the International Constitution providing the International 
has one on file. However, any amendments to your Constitution should of 
course be filed with us. 

Very truly yours. 

WILLIAM L. CONNOLLY, Director. 



10 



In the political field 



LABOR STARTS ROLLING 

* * 

ON THE EVE of the nominating- conventions of the two dominant 
political parties it is becoming increasingly apparent that labor 
will be a potent force in the national political scene. North, South, 
East and West, the working people of the nation are awakening to the 
imperative need for informed, intelligent action on election day. And it 
is organizations such as the United Brotherhood of Carpenters Non-par- 
tisan Committee for the Repeal and Defeat of Anti-labor Legislation that 
are arousing the wage earners of America to the realization that their wel- 
fare, and happiness stand in serious jeopardy because of the insidious 
rise of the Hamiltonian concept of 



democracy which places property 
rights above human rights. 

Writing in the May issue of the 
Federationist, Joseph D. Keenan, 
Director of Labor's League for Po- 
litical Education, summarized the 
dangers which are inherent in the 
present trend toward reaction and 
Hamiltonianism. In part he said: 

"If we have a Congress that is 
slavishly responsive to the wishes 
of the avaricious few, we can't ex- 
pect favorable action on legislation 
to provide housing for the 30,000,- 
000 American desperately in need 
of decent housing. 

"If we have a Congress whose 
thinking is perfectly attuned to the 
thinking of the National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers, we can't ex- 
pect favorable action on legislation 
to curb the inflation which has been 
grinding down millions upon mil- 
lions of our low-income people and 
which gives numerous signs of 
growing even worse. 

"The same thing applies all down 
the line. A Congress whose major- 
ity leaps obediently when the N.A.- 



be expected to be seriously con- 
cerned about the economic problems 
of the average man and woman 
whose sole income is the weekly 
pay envelope. The wishes of the 
greedy and the wishes of the many 
are absolutely incompatible. 

"This is the explanation of why, 
in addition to no action on inflation, 
no action on housing and no action 
on raising the minimum wage, the 
Eightieth Congress has failed to 
pass many other worthwhile bills 
favored by labor — not only for the 
benefit of labor, be it emphasized, 
but for the benefit of our nation as 
a whole. 

"For let it never be forgotten 
that what injures labor injures all, 
while what benefits labor benefits 
all. What promotes the well-being 
of the laboring man and his family 
is good also for the merchant, for 
the farmer, for the professional man 
and for all other segments of our 
interdependent economy." 

In larger cities and smaller ham- 
lets, w^orking people are awakening 
to the fact that the complexion of 



M. and the Chamber of Commerce the present Congress bodes no good 
merely whisper their desires can't either for those whose skills and 



THE CARPKNTER 



11 



sweat produce the commodities that 
make up commerce or for the na- 
tion as a whole. They are awaken- 
ing also to the inescapable fact that 
we, the people, determine who and 
how we shall be represented in 
Congress and the State Legisla- 
tures. 

Although labor's program to edu- 
cate its own people is still far from 
completed, by last month the labor 
vote was no small factor in the 
primary elections held up to that 
time. Of some thirty-five political 
contests in which labor was inter- 
ested, the labor candidate came out 
on top in nineteen instances. In five 
contests the results can be consid- 
ered as ties since labor was split as 
to whom it was supporting. In elev- 
en other contests, the man carrying 
the endorsement of organized work- 
ers went down to defeat. Conse- 
quently the score to date is as fol- 
lows: nineteen wins and five ties 
for labor as opposed to eleven loses. 

Considering the urgency of the 
present situation in which the dic- 
tates of the vested interests super- 
cede the rights of the common peo- 
ple, the above record is not too sat- 
isfactory. Yet it does show that 
organized labor is slowly but surely 
becoming cognizant of the need for 
effective political action. More en- 
couraging still, the sizeable vote 
cast in the primary elections indi- 
cates that . more people are regis- 
tered and taking an active interest 
in the outstanding privilege of de- 
mocracy. 

However, the task of educating 
union members to the point where 
they can realize the importance of 
registering and voting has hardly 
begun. In a free and independent 
nation such as ours, progress de- 
pends on an enlightened and in- 
formed citizenry. If the people are 
not fully and accurately informed 



as to the issues involved and the 
political records and backgrounds 
of the men running for office, how 
can they vote intelligently? Until 
every individual in the nation is 
kept up to date on the issues con- 
fronting the nation, on the legis- 
lation that needs passing or repeal- 
ing, on the merits or demerits of 
specific alternatives in specific situ- 
ations, the educational task of or- 
ganized labor will never be com- 
pleted. 

The United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters Non-partisan Committee for 
the Repeal and Defeat of Anti- 
labor Legislation is set up for and 
dedicated to the task of disseminat- 
ing useful political information and 
carrying on the necessary educa- 
tional activities that will insure 
each member of the Brotherhood 
being in a position to make intelli- 
gent decisions on election day. The 
response from Local Unions and 
District and State Councils has been 
encouraging. To date, some 420 
Local Unions and District Councils 
have cooperated in the program by 
setting up non-partisan committees 
within their own jurisdictions and 
setting up machinery for solicit- 
ing voluntary contributions. Some 
thirty District Councils are actively 
mobilizing the political strength of 
their afiiliated Local Unions. 

In view of the seriousness of the 
present trend toward reaction, how- 
ever, it is regrettable that every 
subordinate bod}^ within our Union 
is not 100% politically aroused. The 
Taft-Hartley Act has nullified many 
of labor's hard-won rights. Many 
more stand in jeopardy at the pres- 
ent time because a reactionary Con- 
gress seems ready to do the bid- 
ding of the vested interests. The 
few tried and true friends of or- 
ganized labor in both the House and 
the Senate are sadly outnumbered. 



12 THE CARPENTER 

Unless the complexion of Con2:ress pletely there is nothin.g- to fear. But 

can be chang-ed at the next election, it will take only a little neg-lig-ence 

most of the progressive labor legis- or "let George do it" attitude to 

lation passed in the last half a cen- plunge us all into a bottomless 

turv may be wiped out. abyss of reaction. This is one case 

where the individual will have to 

Political education can do the ^^^^ ^^^ initiative. Each one of us 

job: but It can do the job only if ^g ^ ^-^j^g^ ^^^ ^ worker will have 

people at the local level cooperate ^q accept the challenge and the re- 

and respond. The welfare of every sponsibility. Only in that way can 

individual worker is hanging in the the march of reaction be halted and 

balance. If each of us can under- the march of progress toward better 

stand that fact thoroughlv and com- and richer lives for all be resumed. 



Brotherhood Shows Strength in Union Shop Vote 

In the first union shop elections in the building and construction indus- 
try held ^lay lo. members of five AFL unions overwhelmingh' author- 
ized the signing- of Taft-Hartley Act union shop clauses with Western 
Pennsylvania construction companies. 

The union shop was approved b^- Si per cent of the eligible voters, 
and by 88 per cent of those voting. Of the 2,709 eligibles. 2,214 voted for 
the union shop, and 269 voted "no." 

The results broken down by unions are as follows : Hod Carriers and 
Common Laborers; Eligible — 1.455. y^s — ^1.136, no — 203. Teamsters: Eli- 
g-ible — 227, yes — -179, no — 20. Carpenters: Eligible — 381, yes — 352, no — 10. 
Operating Engineers: Eligible — 588, yes. — 489, no — 36. Pile drivers: Eli- 
gible — 58, yes — 58, no — o. 

The voting was conducted by 25 teams of NLRB employes. An obser- 
ver for the Contractors Association of A\'estern Pennsylvania, the repre- 
sentative of the participating contractors, reported that the elections went 

oft with ''remarkable smoothness." 

The parties reportedly had agreed to sign a union shop contract if the 
election vote favored such an agreement. 

The May 10 elections in Western Pennsylvania involved heavy con- 
struction and highway building projects. A second "pilot" union shop vote 
will be conducted shortly in the urban building trades industry, probably 
in Detroit. 

Significant in this first vote was the lo^^alty and union-mindedness of 
the Brotherhood men involved. Of the Carpenters voting, ninety-seven 
per cent voted in favor of the union shop. The pile drivers voted 100% 
and the vote was 100% for the union shop. By contrast, only eighty-three 
per cent of the Laborers, eig^hty-nine per cent of the Teamsters, and ninety- 
three per cent of the Operating- Engineers casting ballots voted for the 
union shop. Thus once more United Brotherhood members point the way 
to honest, loval unionism. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Generai, President 

WM. L. HUTCHBSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District. O. WM. BLAIER 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
PRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 



REGULAR MEETING OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE 

BOARD 

Schroeder Hotel 
Milwaukee, Wis., 
May 9, 1948. 

Since the previous meeting of tlie General Executive Board the following trade 
movements were acted upon: 

January 26, 1948. 

Centralia, 111., L. U. 367. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 1/^ 
to $1.87% per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Bar Harbor, Me., L. U. 459. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 20, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Herrin, 111., L. U. 581. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective March 26, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Pana, 111., L. U. 648. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to $1.50 
per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Chickasha, Okla., L. U. 653. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Clinton, Iowa, L. U. 772. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62^2 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Hot Springs, Ark., L. U. 891. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $2.00 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 



14 THE CARPENTER 

Louisiana, Mo., L. U. 1008. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.90 to 
$2.25 per hour, effective April 7, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Columbus, Ind., L. U. 1155.^ — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Big Spring, Texas, L. U. 1634. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Macomb, 111., L. U. 1883. — Movement for an Increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Columbia, 111., L. U. 1997. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective March 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

White River Jet., Vt., L. U. 2256. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1,371/2 to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Erwin, Tenn., L. U. 2324. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 to 
$1.65 per hour, efiEective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

February 2, 1948 

Lancaster, Pa., L. U. 59.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Coshocton, Ohio, L. U. 525. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Cody, Wyo., L. U. 585. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective February 15, 1948. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Dubuque, Iowa, L. U. 678. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Percy, 111., L. U. 733. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hour, effective March 20, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Carbondale, 111., L. U. 841. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.6214 
to $2.00 per hour, effective April 1. 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Seminole, Okla., L. U. 855. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Morgantown, W. Va., L. U. 1339. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.75 to $2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Charlotte, N. C, L. U. 1469. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 (Carpenters) $1.75 to $2.00 (Millwrights) per hour, effective March 20, 
1948. Official sanction granted. 

Providence, Pawtucket and Central Falls D. C, R. I. — Movement for an increase 
in wages from $1.65 to $2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction 
granted. 

February 11, 1948. 

Wheeling, W. Va., L. U. 3. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$2,271/2 (Mill) $1,871/2 to $2.50 (Construction) per hour, effective April 1, 1948. 
Official sanction granted. 

Niles, Mich., L. U. 1033. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.80 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Salina, Kansas, L. U. 1095. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 2, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Hutchinson, Kansas, L. U. 1587. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Bicknell, Ind., L. U. 1712. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1,621/^ per hour, effective March 12, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Winnfleld, La., L. U. 1813. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 



THECAKPENTER 15 

MoundsAnlle, W. Va., L. U. 1830. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Hinton, W. Va., L. U. 1874. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1,621/^ per hour, effective February 2, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Monticello, 111., L. U. 1999.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.00 
(machine operator), $.89 (common laborer) and $.79 (female) to $1.25 (machine 
operator), $1.14 (common laborer) and $1.04 (female) per hour, effective May 
1, 194S. Official sanction granted. 

Logansport, Ind., L. U. 2060. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 
to $1.80 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Essex County D. C, N. J. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.25 (inside) and $2,50 to $3.00 (outside) per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Offi- 
cial sanction granted. 

February 16, 19 48. 

Lebanon, Pa., L. U. 677. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.57 1/^ 
to $1,871/^ per hour, effective February 14, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Metropolis, 111., L. U. 803. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Sioux City, Iowa, L. U. 948. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.70 
to $2.10 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Parkersburg, W. Va., L. U. 1755. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.90 to $2.25 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Plymouth, Ind., L. U. 1816. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Elko, Nev., L. U. 1819. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
^2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

February 20, 1948. 

Erie, Pa., L. U. 81. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.25 
per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Marietta, Ohio, L. U. 3 5 6. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 20, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Boonville, Ind., L. U. 694. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.6214 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Corsicana, Texas, L. U. 731. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.3 7% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Worland, Wyo., L. U. 883. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.87 ^2 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Warren, Pa., L. U. 1014. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.85 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Girard, 111., L. U. 1234. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.00 to 
$1.25 per hour, effective February 20, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Nashville, 111., L. U. 1221. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Franklin, Mass., L. U. 1230. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Fort William, Ont., Can., L. U. 1669. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.20 to $1.60 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

(continued on page 19) 



Editorial 




A Blow At Organized Labor 

Is the Department of Labor headed for the scrap heap? 
Probably no one in Washington could be induced to admit such a 
thing, yet if the dismembering process started by the' Both Congress con- 
tinues, it is inevitable that the Department will eventually fade out of 
the picture. In less than two years the Department has been reduced to a 
hollow shell. Its appropriations have been slashed unmercifully; one by 
one its functions have been transferred to other agencies ; what functions 
still remain are in the Department only because the Congressmen who 
want them allocated to other branches of the government have not yet 
mustered enough voting strength to get their way. Considering the butch- 
ering job that has already been done on the Department and the dismem- 
bering process that is currently going on, it is not beyond the the realm 
of possibility that the Department itself may be eliminated as unnecessary 
before long. 

' Last year Congress slashed appropriations for the Department from 
the thirty-five millions of the previous year to a mere eighteen million 
dollars. The Secretary of Labor had asked for a fifty million dollar appro- 
priation. The response to his request was spectacular. Instead of an in- 
crease from thirty-five millions to fifty millions as he suggested, the appro- 
priation was reduced to eighteen millions. Under the Taft-Hartley Act 
the Conciliation Service was divorced from the Department. One by one 
other functions of the Department have been curtailed or transferred. 
Now the Keefe Bill proposes to remove the U.S. Employment Service 
from the Department of Labor and place it under the Federal Security 
Agency. If this becomes an accomplished fact, the Department will be all 
but finished. 

When one considers the years of struggle it took on the part of organ- 
ized labor to get the Department of Labor established, the present butcher- 
ing of the Department becomes a frightening thing. Down the years the 
Department has performed a vast service to xA.merican workers. Adminis- 
tration of the Department has ranged from very good to very bad, but 
in the overall picture the Department has been a great boon to all who 
toil for a living. This probably explains the current attacks on the Depart- 
ment. The vested interests which seem bent on destroying organized labor 
completely recognize that annihilation of the Department would contribute 
considerably to the elimination of organized labor as an effective force. 

Last year the Bureau of Labor Statistics worked out a family budget 
which showed that a worker with a wife and two children needed an in- 
come of at least $3,200 to maintain his family on a modest but decent living 
standard. Since that time the Bureau (an arm of the Department of Labor) 
has had to fight for its very life. In vain it has sought sufficient money 



THE CARPENTER 17 

to broaden its budget studies. Apparently some influential people do not 
Avant that kind of information presented to the people. 

Of course the people who are fostering all these moves against the 
Department have hne-sounding arguments for their actions. It is always 
■"economy" or "increased efficiency" they are after. To anyone not ac- 
quainted with all the facts, their reasons sound plausible. But to those who 
know labor and what labor had to go through to get the Department 
established and what assistance the Department has been ever since, the 
move is an indirect blow at the heart of unionism. We must recognize it 
as such and act accordingly. 



A Threat To Our Future 

As the first half of the year rounds out, it becomes increasingly evident 
that no decline in the cost of living can be expected in 1948. Toward the 
end of last 3-ear the upward spiral in prices halted momentarily, but the 
halt was a short lived one. IVIonth by month prices have climbed slowly 
but inexorably upward since Januar}' ist. With the nation now on the 
verge of another gigantic rearmament program, there is every possibility 
that prices will again skyrocket precipitously. The defense plants will 
again be usurping scarce commodities and scarce manpower; which means 
that civilian production will suffer correspondingly. The inevitable result 
will be further upward pressure on merchandise prices of all kinds. 

If it is necessary for the nation to rearm, then nothing must stand in the 
way of the job being completed as SAviftly and as efficiently as possible. 
That some peoplemay be hurt in the process is immaterial. Liberty is 
worth any price. Neither higher prices nor a greater scarcity- of goods is 
too high a fee to pay for its preservation, so long as the fee is legitimate. 
But the people want to know that an}' penalties which accrue to them as 
a result of the rearmament program are legitimate penalties and not the 
illegitimate progeny of avarice and greed. Profiteering and plundering 
been all too prevalent during the recent war and the period of reconver- 
sion that followed it. 

Than the leech who saps the strength of the nation through profiteer- 
ing at the Aery time the nation is fighting for its existence, there is no 
more despicable character. In a recent speech, the Honorable Humphrey 
Mitchell, Canadian ^linister of Labor, branded such individuals the great- 
est threat to the preservation of free enterprise. Regarding them he said: 

"Obviousl}^ there are in this country a number of individuals who will 
take advantage of any situation to profit unduly at the expense of fellow 
citizens. All they are interested in is making money. The Government 
intends to deal with them as they should be dealt with. 

"I submit to you that such persons are doing our country a great deal 
of harm. To us who believe in the system of free enterprise which has 
made this country great, the unfortunate fact is that there is evidence of 
irresponsibility on the part of those who should know better .... It looks 
to me as if we should embark on an educational campaign on the benefits 



18 THECARPEXTER 

of free enterprise. We will not make a success of such a campaign unless 
we deal severely with the greedy ones no matter who they are. It is this 

class which, more than anythin.g else, threatens the future of this system 
in Canada and in other parts of the world." 

The urgencies of war and of rearmament create situations which are 
made to order for consciousless indiA'iduals. AA'ith all emphasis on speed 
rather than economy, those who do not know the meaning of either pat- 
riotism or honesty find it easy to line their own pockets at the expense of 
the people and the common good. The}- must be stopped where possible, 
and caught and punished severely Avhere they have not been stopped. 

If the price of national security must be higher prices, let them come. 
But ever}- penn}- exacted from the people through profiteering not only 
lowers the living standards of the people by that much, but, even worse, 
it weakens the very system we are trying to save. AVe must not let profit- 
eering become the rotten apple that infects the whole barrel. 



The Need Is For Political Action 

Organized labor was dealt another "belov\--the-belf'' blow last month 
Avhen the National Labor Relations Board in a three-to-two decision voted 
that it is not empowered to hold union shop elections in those states which 
have laws of their own go^-erning such matters. The ruling says that the 
Taft-Hartley Act "in effect removes all federal restrictions upon existing 
AXD FUTURE state legislation prohibiting compulsory unionism even 
Avhere such legislation may affect employes engaged in interstate com- 
merce.'' 

Bluntly put, this means that in those states where state statutes are 
even stiffer than Taft-Hartley requirements, the former will prevail in 
union shop elections. For example, in Colorado, the state law requires 
that a union must carry a union shop election by a three-fourths majority. 
The Taft-Hartley Act arbitrarily demands a majority of those eligible to 
vote. Under the Board's new ruling, therefore, any union seeking a union 
shop clause in Colorado must capture three-fourths of the votes instead 
of the grossly unfair majority of eligible votes as prescribed by the Taft- 
Hartley Act under whose rules the National Labor Relations Board con- 
ducts elections. 

However, there are a number of state statutes v\-hich forbid all forms 
of union security clauses. In these states the Board will not even hold 
union shop elections. In other words, so long as present statutes remain 
on the books in these states, union shop clauses are out entirely. States 
with this type of law are: Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Nebraska, 
North Carolina, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and A'irginia. 
The ruling will also apply to states that pass similar laws in the future. 

All this vividl}- points up the need for effective political action 
on the part of labor at the next elections. And the political action must 
cover state elections as well as federal elections. 



THE CARPENTER 19 

(continued from page IS) 

Monahans, Texas, L. U. 1923. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 I/2 
to $1.87% per hour, effective April 3, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Columbia, Mo., L. U. 1925. — Movement for an increase in w^ages from $1.50 to 
$1.87 V^ per hour, effective May 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

St. Genevieve, Mo., L. U. 2030. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.25 to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Mt. Vernon, 111., L. U. 3140. — Movement for an increase in wages from $.78 to 
$1.03 per hour, effective April 4, 1948. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

February 24, 1948. 
Lower Anthracite D. C, Girardville, Pa. — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

February 26, 1948. 
Canton, 111., L. U. 293. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1,621,2 to 
$1.87% per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

East Palestine, Ohio, L. U. 294. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1,371/2 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Okmulgee, Okla., L. U. 1399. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Stillwater, Okla., L. U. 1686. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Jacksonville, Texas, L. U. 1768. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.25 to $1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

March 17, 1948. 

Newark, Ohio, L. U. 136. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.87% per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Stamford, Conn., L. U. 210. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87% 
to $2,12 1/2 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Fort Madison, Iowa, L. U. 373. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 5, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Brazil, Ind., L. U. 431. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hour, effective May 1, 19 48. Official sanction granted. 

Ashland, Ky., L. U. 472. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Sparta, 111., L. U. 479. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 to $1.85 
per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Gardner, Mass., L. U. 570. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Manchester, N. H., L. U. 625. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.87% per hour, effective May 3, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Pekin, 111., L. U. 644. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to $2.25 
per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Jackson, Mich., L. U. 651. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.80 to 
$2.25 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Key West, Fla., L. U. 6 5 5. — Movement for an Increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.87% per hour, effective April 19, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Little Rock, Ark., L. U. 690. ^Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Muscatine, Iowa, L. U. 717. — Movement for an increase in wages from 81c to 
$1.10 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted without financial 
aid. 



20 THE CARPENTER 

Red Lodge, Mont., L. U. 744. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Waycross, Ga., L. U. 779. — Movement for an increase in wag&s from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective March 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ironton, Ohio, L. U. 1111. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Marshalltown, Iowa, L. U. 1112. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Borger, Texas, L. U. 1201. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$1.87% per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Huntington, N. Y., L. U. 1292. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$2.10 to $2.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Kent, Ohio, L. U. 1499. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.12% per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Miles City, Mont., L. U. 1524. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Moscow, Idaho, L. U. 1605. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.85 
to $2.06% per hour .effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Minerva, Ohio, L. U. 1611. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Clarksville, Tenn., L. U. 1818. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 
to $1.65 per hour, effective May 17, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ravenna, Ohio, L. U. 1829. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $2.12% per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ames, Iowa, L. U. 1948. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 to 
$l'75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Iron Mountain, Mich., L. U. 2065. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Okawville, 111., L. U. 2106. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.35 (residential) $1.50 (commercial) per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official 
sanction granted. 

Libby, Mont., L. U. 2225. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 to 
$1.80 per hour, effective March 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Seward, Alaska, L. U. 2304. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.25 
to $2.60 per hour, effective April 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

March 23, 1948. 

Roanoke, Va., L. U. 319. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 (Millwrights) $1.50 to $1.75 (carpenters) per hour, effective July 1, 1948. 
Official sanction granted. 

Anderson, Ind., L. U. 352. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$1.9 7% per hour, effective April 5, 19 48. Official sanction granted. 

Hopkinsville, Ky., L. U. 442. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 
to $1.65 per hour, effective March 28, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ottawa, 111., L. U. 661. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Baltimore, Md., L. U. 974. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Smithtown Br., N. Y., L. U. 1167. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.80 (Millmen) and $2.10 to $2.50 per hour, effective May 3, 1948. 
Official sanction granted. 

Peru, 111., L. U. 1197. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.17 to $1.50 
per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 



THE CARPENTER 21 

Laramie, Wyo., L. U. 1432. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.70 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Mankato, Minn., L. U. 1464. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.55 
to $1.85 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Caspar, Wyo., L. U. 15 64. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 24, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Baltimore, Md., L. U. 1754. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$1.90 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Lewistown, Mont., L. U. 1949. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ada, Okla., L. U. 2013. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective May 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

De Ridder, La., L. U. 2284. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, eft'ective May 24, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

March 31, 1948. 

Jamestown, N. Y., L. U. 66. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 i^^ 
to $2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Wichita, Kan., L. U. 201. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$1.87^,2 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Kingston, Ont., Can., L. U. 249. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.18 to $1.40 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

St. Louis. Mo., L. U. 795. — Movement for an increase in wages from 80c-$1.25 
to 98c-$1.43 per hour (Boxmakers) effective May 3, 1948. Official sanction granted, 
wtihout financial aid. 

Marion, Ohio, L. U. 976. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective July 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Flora, III., L. U. 1404. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 to 
$1.65 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ashtahula, Ohio, L. U. 1629. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to 
$2,12 1,2 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Front Royal, Va., L. U. 2033. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.65 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Tupelo, Miss., L. U. 218 3. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

April 7, 1948. 

Great Falls, Mont.. L. U. 286. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87^4 
to $2.25 per hour, effective April 7, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Windsor, Ont., Can.,L. U. 494.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 
to $1.65 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Centerville, Iowa, L. U. 59 7. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Lorain, Ohio, L. U. 705.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to 
$2.25 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Junction City, Kans., L. U. 750. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Brainerd, Minn., L. IT. 951. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.55 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 



22 THE CARPENTER 

Thermopolis, Wyo., L. U. 1241. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.75 to $2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Gulfport, Miss., L. U. 1518. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 31, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Norwalk, Ohio, L. U. 2273. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective April 20, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Buffalo, New York, D. C. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to 
$2.25 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

April 19, 1948 
Newport, R. I., L. U. 176. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$1.90 per hour, effective June 7, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Pittsfield, Mass., L. U. 444. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.70 
to $2.00 per hour, effective April 22, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Oil City, Pa., L. U. 830. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 i/^ to 
$2.00 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted without finan- 
cial aid. 

Longview, Texas, L. U. 1097. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $2.00 per hour, effective June 19, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Wilkes-barre, Pa., L. U. 1225. — Movement for an increase in wages from 80i/^c 
to $1.30 to $1.05% -$1.55 per hour, effective May 1, 19 48. Official sanction granted. 

Washington, Iowa, L. U. 1398. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 15, 1948. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Shelby, Mont., L. U. 1568. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Ottumwa, Iowa, L. U. 2300. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.09 
to $1.40 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

April 28, 1948. 
Grand Rapids, Mich., L. U. 335. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.80 to $2.25 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Denison, Texas, L. U. 371. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective June 15, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

New Canaan, Conn., L. U. 409. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1,871/2 to $2.25 per hour, effective June 17, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Olean, N. Y., L-. U. 546. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 1/^ 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 28, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Muskegon, Mich., L. U. 824. — Movement for an increase in wages of 20c over 
the present rate, effective May 1, 19 48. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Gloversville, N. Y., L. U. 1107. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.60 to $1.80 per hour, effective July 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Malvern, Ark., L. U. 1764. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.3 7% per hour, effective June 21, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Hartford City, Ind., L. U. 1738. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.65 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Scottsbluff, Neb., L. U. 2141.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective July 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Austin, Minn., L. U. 2061. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Robinson, 111., L. U. 2253.- — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $2.00 per hour, effective July 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 



T II K C AR P EN TER 23 

South Shore D. C, W. Sayville, N. Y. — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $2.10 to $2.50 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

May 7, 1948. 
Decatur, 111., L. U. 742. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87^/^ to 
$2,121/2 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 



Shroeder Hotel, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

May 9. 1948 

The General Executive Board met in regular session at the Schroeder Hotel, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin on May 9, 1948. 

Minutes of Special Meeting of the General Executive Board held in the 
Washington Hotel, Washington, D. C., March 8, 19 48 show that very careful 
and serious consideration was given to a plan drafted by representatives of 
the Building and Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of 
Labor and the representatives of the National Associations of Employers in the 
Building and Construction Industry to set up a National Joint Board for the 
settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes in the Building and Construction Industry. 

This Board to be composed of an impartial Chairman — two members of the 
Building and Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor 
and two members of the Employers Associations. 

The Joint Board shall consider and decide all jurisdictional disputes in the 
Building and Construction Industry which are properly referred to it. 

However, it must first be determined whether or not an agreement has already 
been reached on the dispute in question and if so that agreement takes precedent. 

If no agreement has been reached, then the dispute goes to the Joint Board 
for hearing and decision. In the meantime there shall be no stoppage of work 
arising out of a jurisdictional dispute. 

On March 11, 19 48 the Building and Construction Trades Department of the 
American Federation of Labor adopted the proposed plan for the settlement of 
jurisdictional disputes in the Building and Construction Industry. 

The Laborers International Union asked for a clearer understanding relative to 
the handling of materials on construction work as per the action of the General 
Executive Board under date of January 7, 1947. The Chair appointed a sub- 
committee of the Board consisting of First General Vice-President M. A. Hutcheson, 
Board Member Chas. Johnson, Jr. of the First District and Board Member Harry 
Schwarzer of the Third District to meet with the representatives of the Laborers' 
International Union to consider the matter. 

The adjustment of the payment of per capita tax to the American Federation 
of Labor was referred to the General President. 

The question of increasing the advertising rates in our official monthly journal 
THE CARPENTER was referred to the General President. 

Our Chief Counsel and his assistant reported fully on the cases still pending 
in Court especially the San Francisco case and whether an appeal should be taken 
on this case after which tlie matter was left in the hands of the General President 
with full power to act. 

The Board approved the action taken at the Special Meeting. 



The General President reported that Board member Wm. J. Kelly of the 
Second District resigned to take effect March 16, 1948, and in accordance with 
the provisions of the General Constitution he appointed O. Wm. Blaier a member 
of Local Union 359, Philadelphia, Pa., to fill the vacancy on the General Execu- 
tive Board; effective April 1, 1948. The appointment was unanimously approved. 



24 THECARPEXTER 

Rene^wal of Bond of General Treasurer S. P. Meadows in the sum of $50,000.00 
for one year expiring February 1, 19 49 through the United States Fidelity and 
Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Bond on Assistant Superintendent of Carpenters' Home. Lakeland, 
Florida, in the sum of $20,000.00 through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty 
Company of Baltimore, Maryland, for one year ending March 10, 1949 was re- 
ferred to our Legal Department. 

New policy on IMotion Picture Projector, Screen, Loud Speaker, film and equip- 
ment in the sum of $94.5.00 for three years ending February 11, 1951 through 
the Buckeye Union Fire Insurance Company of Columbus, Ohio, was referred to 
our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Workmans Compensation Insurance for the State of Texas for one 
year ending March 13, 19 49 through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty 
Company of Baltimore, Maryland, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Bond of Chief Clerk C. A. Meloy in the sum of $10,000.00 through 
the Capitol Indemnity Insurance Co., of Indianapolis, Indiana, for one year end- 
ing April 1, 1949 was referred to our Legal Department. 

The General Secretary submitted his report for the year ending December 31, 
194.7 and it was filed for future reference. 

A communication from Robert N. Dedaker and Co., Certified Public Account- 
ants, Indianapolis, Indiana, dated February 12, 1948, announcing the demise of 
Robert N. Dedaker, the head of the firm was considered after which the General 
Executive Board decided to continue the contract with this firm for quarterly audit 
of our books and accounts. 

Local Union 13 6 3, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. — Full accounting of appropriation made 
to this Local Union for strike purposes was received and filed. 

May 10, 19 48 

In conformity with the action of the G. E. B. on January 15, 1948 regarding the 
question of jurisdiction between the Local Union 101, Baltimore, Maryland, and 
Local Union 112 6, Annapolis, Maryland, the sub-committee appointed to investigate 
this matter recommended "That the jurisdictional lines between Local Union 101 
and the Washington District Council as representative to Local Union 112 6 remain 
as it is, the same as it has been for the past several years." 

"The Committee further recommended that arrangements be made so that 
the members of Local Union 101, Baltimore, Maryland may obtain temporary 
working cards from the Washington District Council without the necessity of 
driving all the distance to Washington, D. C, covering the area formerly policed 
by Local Union 112 6." 

The recommendations of the sub-committee were approA'ed and the matter 
was referred to Board rvlember 0. Wm. Blaier, Second District, with instructions 
to bring about a mutual understanding. 

Correspondence was read by the General President from Matthew Woll con- 
cerning activities of the Free Trade Union Committee wherein he asked for 
further financial assistance. After discussion it was decided to refer the matter to 
the General President for such action as he deemed proper. 

Dodge City, Kans., L. U. 1542. — Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective May 17, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Indianapolis D. C, Indianapolis, Ind. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.97% to §2.35 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Kalamazoo, Mich., L. U. 2 9 7. — Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 8 
to $2.20 per hour, effective May 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 



THECARPEXTER 25 

May 11, 1948. 

Atlanta, Ga., L. U. 225. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$1.7714 per hour, effective July 1, 1948. Ofllcial sanction granted. 

Greenville, Pa., L. U. 1000. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 1^ 
to $1.75 per hour, effective July 10, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Berea, Ky., L. U. 1270. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% to 
$1.75 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Watertown, S. D., L. U. 1690. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 
to $1.50 per hour, effective July 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Dumas, Texas, L. U. 2369. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$1.87 V2 per hour, effective April 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Concord, N. H., L. U. 538. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 to 
$1.65 per hour, effective July 1, 1948. Official sanction granted. 

Middletown, Ohio, L. U. 1477. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.90 
to $2.10 per hour, effective June 1, 1948. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

May 12. 1948 

Claim from Local Union 1839, Lake Charles, La., for death benefits of Elmas 
Gable held in abeyance for the reason that the Local Union failed to comply with 
the Laws of the Brotherhood was carefully considered. The Board referred the 
case back to the General Treasurer for further consideration. 

Appeal of Local Union 1590, Washington, D. C, from the decision of the Gen- 
eral Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late Eugene 
Ed Stoesser. The claim was referred back to the General Treasurer for further 
consideration. 

Appeal of Local Union 1822, Fort Worth, Texas, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the disability claim of Brother R. A. Hefner for 
the reason that the evidence shows that his disability was not caused by accidental 
injuries as provided for in Section 51-A of the General Laws. The decision of the 
General Treasurer was sustained and the appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Local Union 8 3 6, Janesville, Wisconsin, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donations of the late 
Otto Kirchoff. The claim was referred back to the General Treasurer for further 
consideration. 

Appeal of Local Union 1119, Ridgefield, Connecticut, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late 
William Watt. The claim was referred back to the General Treasurer for further 
consideration. 

Two appeals of Chris Wilson, a member of Local Union 1780, Las Vegas, Nevada, 
from the decisions of the General President in the case of Chris Wilson versus 
Local Union 1780, and after giving careful consideration to these appeals, the 
decisions of the General President were sustained on the grounds set forth therein 
and the appeals were dismissed. 

After due consideration, the General Executive Board decided to establish an 
Educational Committee of the Brotherhood; the General Officers of the Brother- 
hood and the Secretary-Treasurer of the Non-Partisan Committee to serve as 
officers. 

There being no further business to be acted upon, the Board adjourned to meet 
at the call of the Chairman. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK DUFFY, Secretary. 



^n m 



tmoivtunt 



Brother JOHN ANDERSON, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother PIERRE MARC AURELE, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother WILLIAM BATTERSON, Sr., Local No. 1379, No. Hemstead, N. Y. 

Brother L. C. BLANCHARD, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother Z. C. BRYANT, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother GUIDE CARFAGNA, Local No. 20, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JAMES CIRLISLE, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother SAMUEL L. CLARK, Local No. 910, Glouchester, Mass. 

Brother T. R. CLARK, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother J. B. COLLET, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother ROSWELL C. CRAMER, Local No. 2435, Inglewood, Calif. 

Brother K. W. CROMBIE, Local No. 226,Portland, Oregon. 

Brother W. H. CUMMINGS, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother W. F. CUMMINS, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother H. G. DILLON, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother EDWARD ECKLUND, Local No. 1379, No. Hemstead, N. Y. 

Brother CHARLES D. FERGUSON, Local No. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas. 

Brother JACOB FISHER, Local No. 612, Union Hill, N. J. 

Brother FRANK E. GAPENS, Local No. 1339, Morgantown, W. Va. 

Brother W. R. GARRISON, Local No. 1371, Gadsden, Ala. 

Brother JAMES GIOVANNILE, Local No. 20, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JULIUS GORGEY, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother DAVID PORTER GROCE, Local No. 525, Coshocton, Ohio. 

Brother GEORGE GRUBER, Local No. 937, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Brother E. D. HALL, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother Z. P. HARDAGE, Local No. 764, Shreveport, La. 

Brother ISAAC B. HAWK, Local No. 734, Kokomo, Ind. 

Brother WILLIAM HITTENMILLER, Local No. 937, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Brother ERNEST HOFFMAN, Local No. 2375, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother ALBERT IMOBERSTEG, Local No. 125, Utica, N. Y. 

Brother H. W. JOHNSON, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother CHARLES JONES, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother J. P. JONES, Local No. 1278, Gainesville, Fla. 

Brother ALBERT KING, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother V/ALTER J. KIRKHOFF, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother EARL LANE, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother THOMAS LEAMY, Local No. 336, New York. N. Y. 

Brother ALLEN MacDONALD, Local No. 885, Woburn, Mass. 

Brother GRANT MacNEIL, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother JONATHAN MARTIN, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother DONALD MacKAY, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother P. J. McGINNIS, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother NEAL McKAY, Local No. 2079, Houston, Texas. 

Brother JACOB MEYERS, Local No. 306, Newark, N. J. 

Brother LEOPOLD F. MIHM, Local No. 101, Baltimore, Md. 

Brother WM. MURRAY, Local No. 210, Stamford, Conn. 

Brother JOHN PARIS, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother CHARLES ALLEN PERRY, Local No. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 

Brother R. B. PERRY, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother HJALMAR PETERSON, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother LOUIS PICART, Local No. 2375, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother FRANK REINER, Local No. 1397, North Hemstead, N. Y. 

Brother C. A. RICKERD, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother E. E. ROBERTSON, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother CLARENCE ROTH, Local No. 937, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Brother CHRIST SCHROEDER, Local No. 81, Erie, Pa. 

Brother LEROY M. SHEPARD, Local No. 860, Framingham, Mass. 

Brother EDWARD SILVA, Local No. 2375, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother W. W. SMITH, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother HERBERT STINSON, Local No. 860, Framingham, Mass. 

Brother JAMES J. SULLIVAN, Local No. 858, Clinton, Mass. 

Brother ALEX THOMSON, Local No. 81, Erie, Pa. 

Brother PATRICK TIERNEY, Local No. 306, Newark, N. J. 

Brother CLARENCE J. TOOPS, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother STNLEY USAITIS, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother EDWARD VAN NAME, Local No. 20, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JAMES A WARD, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother CHARLES E. WILLIAMS, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brother D. F. WILLIAMS, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother L. T. WINNOR, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother W. E. WRIGHT, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brother JERRY YANCY, Local No. 1371, Gadsden, Ala. 

Brother PHILIP ZARETSKY, Local No. 1784, Chicago, 111. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1948) 

LESSON 327 
By H. H. Siegele 

There are a great many knots, speak- 
ing of knots that are made with cords, 
ropes, and so forth. Many of these 
knots are used by carpenters and other 
building tradesmen. In fact, a carpenter 
who does not know how to make the 
knots that are essential to his trade, 
could hardly be called a fully trained 
mechanic. Ropes and cords are often 
used in carpentry, which means that 





Fig. 1 



they must be fastened to objects, or 
tied one to another. Every carpenter 
should know, when it comes to fasten- 
ing a cord or rope, what knot or hitch is 
the right one to use in making the 
connection. In cases where the knot 
must be made and unmade, he should 
not only know what knot will be safe, 
but he should be able to choose one 
that can be unmade easily. 

Fig. 1 gives three views of a simple 
knot, also called a single knot. At 
number 1 the knot is shown rather 
loose, which shows clearly how it is 
made. Number 2 shows it tightened into 
a hard knot, and number 3 shows how 
it is used in fastening a sash cord to a 
window sash — only the part of the sash 
where the cord is fastened is shown. 

Fig. 2 shows how to make the steve- 
dore knot. To the left is shown a rope 
running through a hole in a plank or 



board, with a stevedore knot in the pro- 
cess of being made. After the little loop 
is formed and the rope has been wound 
around the main part, as shown, the 




Stevedore 

Fig. 2 

end is pulled through the little loop, aa 
indicated by the arrow. The completed 
knot with the plank resting on it is 
shown to the right. The stevedore knot 




''y??^:^-^s.\\v.ws\\\\ 



is also used for fastening sash cord to 
sash, especially for rather heavy sash. 
For light sash the simple knot shown 
by Fig. 1, is the most economical, for 
the amount of cord necessary to make 




C\\\\\\\\\\\S\\\\\\U\\SW\Xl 



Fisherman'i knot 
Fig. 4 

that knot is kept at a minimum. But 
when it comes to heavy sash, and so 
forth, then economy should give way to 
substantial construction, in which case 
the stevedore knot will fill the require- 
ments. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Fig. 3 gives three views of the figure- 
8 knot. At A it is shown in a loose 
form, at B it has been tightened up 




^SESSSSSSSSSv 



Fig. 5 

somewhat, while at C it is shown pulled 
into a hard knot. This knot is used for 
the same purposes that the simple knot 
shown in Fig. 1 is used, excepting that 
the figure-8 knot is more reliable 
and therefore more substantial. It is a 
good knot to use on the end of sash 
cord that is to be fastened to window 
sash. 




'ec^\\\\\\\v\\\\vv's\\v 



Fig. 6 



I Fig. 4 shows two views of the fisher- 
man's knot, or as it is also called, the 
English tie. In reality it is a double 
knot. The upper drawing gives the knot 
in a rather loose form, so as to show 
the making of it, while the bottom 
drawing shows it pulled together into 
a tight hard knot. This is one of the 
best knots for tying two ropes or cords 




Grannij knot 

Fig. 7 

together, whether they are of the same 
or of different sizes. For ordinary pur- 
poses, it is easy to untie by simply pull- 
ing on the two ends, but if especially 
heavy strain is put on the knot, the 
untying becomes more difficult. 



The sheet bend knot is shown by Fig. 
5. This knot is also called, becket bend, 
hawser bend, and mesh knot. It is used 
for tying two ropes or cords together 
and is easy to make and also easy to 
unmake. The upper drawing gives a 
loose form, showing how to make it, 
while the bottom drawing shows the 
knot tightened into a rather hard knot. 

Two views of the square knot are 
shown by Fig. 6. This knot is also 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p.. 754 il.. covering general 
house carpentry, estimating and other subjects. $2.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p. 
670 il., and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 210 p. and 495 il.. covering form 
building, finishing, stair building, etc. $2.50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 il. Roof framing 
complete. Other problems, including saw filing. $2.00. 

The above five books support one another. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— Illustrated prose. Only $1.00. 

FREE. — With 2 books, one $1.00 book free, with 
4 books, two, and with 5 books, three $1.00 books free. 

Books autographed. 

C. O. D. orders, postage and C. O. D. fee added. 
Order U U CUTr^ETI F 222 So. Const. St. 
today. "" "• 31t\atl-C. Emporia, Kansas 




GENUINE ROE on/>< 

100 ft. steel $4.95 
measuring tape /ess fAan l^ cost 

This famous tape generally sells for 
$10.95. We'll sell it to you for only $4.95. 
Guaranteed to be brand new, genuine 
Roe 100 ft. steel tape in all-steel, creel- 
type case. Supply limited. Buy as many 
as you like while they last. First come, 
first served. Orders from dealers invited. 
Cash, check or money order. Postage paid. 

■W\r\X'MT TTWT^n 1759 E. Colorado Street 

UKjyy IINL'. pasadena a, calif. 



EARN MORE 

Learn To Be A Lumber 
Grader or Tallyman 
Send TODAY for a copy of — 
"PRACTICAL LUMBER 
GRADING & TALLYING" 
by S. W. Agee, experienced Lumber, 
Grader and member of Pacific Lumber 
Inspection Bureau. Contains 60 pages 
(pocket size) of condensed, authentic in- 
formation never before in such under- 
standable language and ready-reference 
form. 

Send $2.00 for single copy (or 2 copies,; • 
$3.00; 3 copies. $4.50; 6 copies or more 
$1.20 each for local unions or lumber - 
companies) to: 

NORWOOD PUBLISHERS 

902 First Ave., Seattle 4, Wash. 



known as reef knot and flat knot. It is 
used for tying two ropes or cords to- 
getlier, and Is easily made and unmade. 
The upper drawing gives a loose form, 
while the bottom drawing shows the 
knot tightened into a hard knot. 



HANG THAT DOOR THE PROFESSIONAL WAY ! 





Fig. 8 

The granny knot, shown by Fig. 7, 
slips, or when it does not slip, it tight- 
ens into so hard a knot that it is difficult 
to untie. The upper drawing shows how 
the knot is made, while the bottom one 
shows it pulled into a tight knot. 

Fig. 8 gives two views of a bowline 
knot. The upper drawing gives a loose 



AVWWU^UVV'v'vW W'vW) 



Double knot 




\^SI 



A\\\\\\\\^V\\V\\\\lUVvW\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\V? 




Fig. 9 

form, showing how the knot is made, 
while the bottom drawing shows the 
knot tightened. This is one of the most 
practical and most reliable knots shown 
in this lesson. It is extensively used 
for fastening sash cord to window 
weights. No matter how tight the knot 




^^^^^^ss^ssssasss 



might be pulled, it can always be loos- 
ened with ease. 

A double knot is shown by Fig. 9. 
The top view shows it in the making, 
which is the same as the making of the 
single knot shown in Fig. 1, excepting 
that the end of the rope is brought 



YOU DO THIS 




E-Z Mark Butt Gauge 

You get a clean cut deeply etcheil prolila. 

Remove clilps. Repeat operation on Jamb. 
HanK (liior. THAT'S ALL- 
NO MORK! 



AND GET THIS 

• Hang more doors better. 

• Noadjustments.Noerrors. 

• Used and approved by Master 
mechanics. 

• Comes in 3i" and 4" (standard) sizes. 

• Precisian made. 
Cost ONLY $1.75 ea.. or .$3.50 a set 
at your hdw. store. If dealer can't sup- 
ply, send only $1.00 with order and pay 
postman balance, plus postage C.O.D. In Can 

E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377 Dept. C, Los Angeles 16. C«l. 




COMES WITH 
lEATHEREHE CASI 

,$3.75 (noC.O.U.) 



SAW CLAMP ^"^ 



Speed Up Saw ff'/ing.' 




Money-Back 
;V>Guarante« vj 



IMoney with or- 
der, prepaid. 
C.O.D. postage extra 
Grips entire length of saw . . a full 3C Inches. Attaches 
or releases from work bench in only 15 seconds. Also can 
be used for band saws. Made to last a lifetime. Sturdy, 
all steel construction. Gripping edges ground to hold en- 
tire length of saw true with no vibration. 

THE SPEED CORPORATION 
2025-A N.E. SANDY PORTLAND 12, ORE. 




CARPENTERS 

and 

BUILDERS' 
HANDBOOK 



This new and re- 
vised edition of Car- 
penters and Build- 
ers' Practi^^al Rules 
for Laying Out 
Work consists of 
short but practioal 
rules for la.ving out 
roofs, ceilings, hop- 
pers, stairs and arches with tables of 
board measure, length of common, hiii, val- 
ley and jack rafters, square measure, cube 
measure, measure of length, etc. — also, 
rules for kerfing, drafting gable molding, 
getting the axis of a segment, laying off 
gambrel roof and explaining the steel 
square. 

$1.00 postpaid 

Personal check or money order acceptable. 
Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 



D. A. ROGERS 

5344 Clinton Avenue 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



Enclosed $1.00, Fonvardby 
return mail your Carpenters 
& Builders' Practical 
Bules for Laying Out Work. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



twice around the main part of the rope 
or cord, instead of only once. At the 
bottom the knot is shown pulled into a 
tight hard knot. This knot is used for 
the same purposes as the single knot. 
but it is a much better knot. However, 
it takes just a little more time and ma- 
terial to make it. 

Fig. 10. the upper drawing, shows a 
slip knot, and the bottom drawing shows 
the beginning of this knot, which is 
called a bight. In everyday language a 
bight is a sort of loop, often called a 
loop. 

To make a slip knot the quick way, 
hold the rope in the left hand with 
about 2 feet of the end hanging down. 
Now form the bight by placing the end 
of the rope between the index finger and 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your o"wti busi- 
ness and be your o-vra boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your -way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 

avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherw^se send us $8.75 
and pay the balance of S30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. \\Tiat we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that n^atters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building CIS, Denver 2, Colorado 



thumb of the left hand. This done, slip 
your right hand into the loop and bring 
it up over the part held with the thumb 
and index finger in such a way that you 
can grab the other part of the bight 
and pull it back through the loop, which 
will make a loose slip knot. When this 
knot is straightened out and tightened 
it will be like the one shovs-n in Fig. 10. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 
Carlson & Sullivan, Inc., Mon- 
rovia, Cal. 32 

Henr>- Disston & Sons, Inc.,, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 5 

Dow Inc., Pasadena, Cal 28 

Flormaster Flormachines Co., 

Chicago, 111. 3 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 32 

Greenlee Tools, Rockford, 111 ■ 6 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 29 

Master Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y 5 

F. P. Maxson, Chicago, III 30 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 31 

North Bros. .Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 31 

The Paine Co., Chicago, 111 31 

Sargent & Co., New Haven, 

Conn. 1 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 6 

The Speed Co., Portland. Ore 31 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore. 29 
Stanlev Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 

E. Weyer, .New York, N. Y 32 

Cai-pentry Materials 

Johns-ManvUle Corp., X. Y.,N.Y. 32 
The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y 2nd Cover 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford, 

City, Ind. 4th Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 31 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 4 

Norwood Publishers, Seattle, 

Wash. 28 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 29 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo 30 



SI. 25 with 7 Blades ^S^^f'T/Q^ 



RRk'Kl 



. , .^ CARPENTERS 

^^,-kj M'D^ Demajid the Best The Genulna 

l^V g F. P. M. SAWS AND BLADES 

f*^^ rne Sa'J^ cf Sureri-.r Q-.;a:::j Brl-.h a Xa-.icnal Repu:.a-.icn. ilanu- 

C(- -^S^ factored by a member of 17. B. of C. & J. of A. >"o. 1. 
'C' r P \v?^ If your dealer does not handle, write direct to me. 

F. P. MAXSOX, Sole Mannfactrrrer 

372.2 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO, ILL 



Get behind a 



SPIRAL SCREW 
DRIVER 



and get ahead 
of the job 




Let the spiral 
o the heavy 
wrist work. A 
simple push on a 
sturdy "Yankee" 
drives or draws the 
screw with a spinning 
Good for years 
smooth, willing part- 
nership with your good 
hand. Three sizes, 
each with 3 size bits. Pop- 
ular 30A size, range of 
screws #2 to #8. For one- 
hand operation, buy the 130A 
Yankee" with the "quick- 
return" spring in the handle. 
Send tor the "Yankee" Tool Book 

NORTH BROS. MFG. OO. 

Philadelphia 33, Pa. 




SUPER HAM-R-ADZ NO. 10 

Tool steel attachment 
quickly converts car- 
penter's hammer into 
efficient adz. Ideal for 
rough framing, scaf- 
folding — form build- 
i n g. Easy to use and 
keep sharp. Fits poc- 
ket. Get yours today . 

SUPER SQUARE GAGE NO. 49 

Again available for instant 
attachment to carpenter's steel 
squares. Perfect for laying 
out stair stringers and other 
saw cuts. Precision-made 
light weight Dural fixtures 
with brass thumb screws. 
Only .75 the pair! At Dealers' or Postpaid. 
939 W. 6th St.. Dept. C 
LOS ANGELES 14, CAL. 




themmep saw. filer 



Noi^^ 






Saves You Time/ Money 



Now you cao do experc saw filing at 
home. Lifetime lool makes precisioa 
filing easy for even the most inexperi- 
enced. Two simple adjustments make 
It fit any type hand saw. Keep your 
I extra sharp and true-cutting with 
ft Speed Saw Filer. Complete with Ble, 
ady to use. Money back guarantee. 
Cash with order, prepaid. (CO.D. 
(>osuge extra.) 

THE SPEED COMPANY 

Dept. A 202S N.E. Sandy, Portland II, Or*. 

ORDER TODAY! 





FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Learn to draw plana, eitlmate, b« a live-wire builder, da 
remodellDK, take contracting Jobs. Tbeae 8 practical, pro- 
fusely illustrated books cover subjects that will help you 
to get more work and make more money. Architectural de- 
sign and drawing, estimating, steel square, roof framing, 
construction, painting and decorating, heating, alr-condl- 
tlonlng. concrete forms and many other subjects are Included. 

UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books ar* 
the most up-to- 
date and complete 
we have ever pub- 
lished on tbaM 
many subjecta. 
Examination 



BETTER JOBS - BETTER PAY 

The Postwar building boom le In full 
swing and trained men are needed. 
Big opportunities are always for MEN 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- 

Ely quick, easily understood training and 
andy, permanent reference information 
Ihat helps solve building problems. 

Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For 



(VMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Vocational Publishers since 1898 
Dept. GA36 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 
You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your eight 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charges 
only, and If fully satisfied in ten days, I will send yon 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 Is paid. I am not obligated in *sa 
way unless I keep the books. 



Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one buslneu 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home addreu. 



tt ' Paine jjyLLETWi. 




PAINE 



FASTENING f) C ]/ I f C C 
and HANGING U L V 1 K C J 



This popular asbestos roof is fireproof, 

rotproof, and.. 




You could actually lay American Colonial 
Shingles blindfolded! No chalk lines or 
measuring necessary. 




It's an Asbestos Strip 



Johns-Manville 



^^^^ 



Only 80 pieces per square— 
the same as an asphalt strip 
Automatic alignment — self- 
spacing 

Only 4 nails per shingle in pre- 
punched holes 
Easy-to-use Shingle Cutters 
speed application 



Asbestos Shingles 




CASH© 

MACHINE SAW FILING PAYS UP TO 
$2 or $3 an hour. With a Foley Saw 
Filer you can file all hand saws, also 
band and cross-cut circular saws. It is 
easy to operate-^simple adjustments — 
no eyestrain. Start AT HOME in base- 
ment or garage. Patented jointing prin- 
ciple evens up all irregular teeth and 
makes an old saw cut just like new. 



SOLVE ROOF PROBLEMS INSTANTLY 

IN TEN SECONDS'.! All 11 
lengths and cuts of rafters 
for simple and hip roofs. 
Just set dial to "pitch" & 
"run/' and the other fig- 
ures show up in windows. 

n-> Aj-te^-- •-»^ ^---~/t=^ o ^"'''^® rafter tables, run is 
^i^^^mm ~~</^-JJ'4 jgf directly In feet and in- 
V^ [ | [II |( III II ^^ ches. There is no need to 

/■ 11 III li m i l t adjust later for thickness 

of ridge board. Cuts giv- 
en in degrees and square 
readings. 

RAFTER DIAL $1.95 Order from: E. Weyer, Dept.ii 
P.O. Box 153, Planetarium Stotion, New York 24, N. Y.j 





Send Coupon for 

FREE PLAN 

No canvassing necessary — "J ad- 
vertised in our local paper and 
got in 93 saws — I only work spare 
time at present" says M. 

L. T., OUo. L. H. M.f — " 

New York, writes: "I 
made about $900 in spare 
time last year." Tou can 
get IMMEDIATE DE- 
LIVERY on a Foley Saw 
Filer. Send coupon today 
— no obligation. 



FOLEY MANUFACTURING CO. 

618-8 Foley BIdg., Minneapolis 18, Minnesota 

Send Free Plan on Saw Filing business, no obllgatiiin. 

Name 

Address , - - 




Buy 

CARLSON RULE 



WITH 10-SECOND 
BLADE CHANGE 



SAVE 



CARtSOW 



NJC^ith a Carlson Rule, when a 
blade is accidentally damaged or 
numerals become worn, you 
don't have to buy a ne'w rule. 
Just get an extra blade and in- 
sert it. In 10 seconds, a "new" 
rule for Vi the cost! 
Carlson & Sullivan. Inc., Monrovia, Cafif. 



STEEL TAPE RULES 




Stanley No. 233 
Aluminum ievel 



USE-FULL 

.more ways, more places, 
more years! 



This Stanley No. 233 Aluminum Level is light for 
easy handling, yet strong, thanks to the Stanley 
truss construction. Extra metal around the glasses 
and at all stress points. All four sides milled square. 
Six cat's-eye glasses, under heavy glass covers, are 
fully adjustable to any angle and for degree of 
pitch to the foot. Dust- and water-tight. All parts 
easily replaceable. 

Useful more ways, more places and more years 
than just an ordinary level. Stanley Tools, New 
Britain, Conn. 

THE TOOL, BOX OF THE WORLD 

[$tanley"3 

Reg. U.S. Pol. Off. 

BARDWARB -imi) TOMS -mCTIUC TOOLS - 



/sNake 



Day 



Every 
Work 



^A$l^^ 



WITH A 



60 



Carpenters everywhere finish 
more work . . . faster . . . easier 
with a Model 60 MallSaw. It 
cuts wood and metal . . . 
grooves mortar joints . . . cuts 
atnd scores tile, concrete and 
other aggregate compositions. 
When set in special stand it 
can be used as table saw, 
shapcr, bench grinder or san 
er. Also larger models. 





6" Blade — 2" Capacity 
Ask Dealer or Wrife Portable Power Tool Division. 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Av«., Clu«ago, 19, IIL 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vois.*6 

Inside Trade Into t ii iaU oa 

for Carpenters. Builders, Join- 
ers, Baild.'ng Mechanics and aJI 
Woodworkers. Tne&e Goides 
give yea the sbort-cut instruc- 
tioDS that yoo want— inciodinff 
new metlKKls, ideas, solotions, 
plans, systems and money sav- 
ing sngKestions. An easy pro- 
gressive course for the appren- 
tice and etodent. A practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker- 
Carpenters everywhere are am* 
ing these Guides as a Helpine 
Hand to Easier Work, Better 
Work and Better Pay. To get 
this assistance for yooraelf* 
a..^.. . .K Bimply fill in and 

Inside Trade Information On: maiiFBEE coupon b«i<m. 

How to use the steel square — How to file and 

set saws — How to build furniture — How to use 

a mitre box — ^How to use the chalk Une — How 

to use rules and scales — ^How to make joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength ol timbers — 

How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, bams, garages, bungalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

spectficationa — How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to biilld hoists and scaHolda — skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on interior trim — 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors^How to paint. 





AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 7 days' fre« 
trial. II OK I will remit SI in 7 days and SI monthly until S6 is paid. 
—Otherwise I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfied. 



Name- 



Employed by- 



CAK 




I k* 



this qua '7 ° ., any str"^'"'®- . ', ipdos- 
,ria\ and res. 



Copyright, 1948, Overhead Door Corpo 





t?V£;-<H£AD OOOR" 

fee manually or e/ec- 

r*Vclfy cperafed. Sold by 

iNafton-Wide Sales— Insial- 

Joffofl — Service. 




MIRACLE WEDGE 



OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION • Hartford City, Indiana, U. S. A. 



OfHeial Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 





YOUR OPINION 
IS IMPORTANT... 



hui 



THEY ONLY 

COUNT 

BALLOTS! 




When Election Day rolls around/ 
will be only as big as 



Needs ONLY ONE HAND 




» 



vttR*"®- 



,YllSliH6' 



,VP?I»6: 



instead of TWOI 



PO'^m-CABU 



Ask any 10 carpenters and 8 will tell you there's 
no saw like Speedmatic. It's light! Fast! Easy 
on the hand! You don't have to grab the 
SPEEDMATIC with two hands . . . and then wish 
you had another to hold the wood. Not SPEED- 
MATIC! It practically runs itself. . . straight to 
the line. 

AT ANY ANGLE, the SPEEDMATIC is always 
perfectly balanced because the handle Is above 
the center of gravity. In any working position 
it's easy to guide. 

With SPEEDMATIC, there's absolutely no 
"power reaction" on your wrist or arm. Helical 
gear drive accounts for that. And at the same 
time it delivers 11% more power to the saw 
blade. 

SPEEDMATIC'S broad shoe permits steady rest. 
Prevents cramping. One hand holds it straight 
and true. 



FOR GREATER UTILITY, just at- 
tach the SPEEDMATIC to a Porter- 
Cable Radial Arm. The rig has all 
the advantages of a parallel swing, 
mitre and rip saw. Permits angles, 
compound angles and other precise 
work on identically cut pieces. And 
you can always see the guide line. 




SPEEDMATIC 



Porter-Cable Radial Arm firmly anchored to 
stand, increases Speedmatic utility. 



saves your back . . . puts more skill in any man's hand 
. . . gives your boss clean vrork. Ask him for a 
SPEEDMATIC today. 



PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO. 



1760-7 N. SAtlNA ST. 



SYRACUSE 8, N. Y. 





THB^^^NTXR 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 232 E. Micliigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVIII — No. 7 



INDIANAPOLIS, JULY, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



Contents — 



Let's Close Our Ranks 



Twin hurricanes of reaction and depression are blowing our way, according to un- 
mistakable signs. No^ is tKe time when we must build and strengthen our union and 
mobilize our political strength to stave off possible destruction. 

10 

A well-integrated program for apprenticeship training is worked out to provide a 
balanced schedule of on-the-job and classroom work in proper proportions for the best 
possible results. 



California Steps Out 



The Construction Outlook 



16 



Unless skyrocketing prices dry up new markets, construction promises to set a new 
all-time record in 1948. 

20 

The struggle between human rights and property rights is rapidly drawing to a head. 
The need is for a national policy to clearly define the duties and responsibilities of 
economic organizations as compared to human duties and responsibilities. 



Corporations vs. Men 



Relief for the Disabled 



28 



In a report by the Advisory Committee on Social Security, a recommendation is made_ 
for the amendment of the Social Security program to include benefits for permanently dis- 
abled workers. 

• • • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriani 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladies 

Graft Problems - 



14 
24 
33 
34 
35 
39 
41 



Index to Advertisers 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

iLearn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you 
that the way to the top-pay jobs and 
success in Building is to get thorough 
knowledge of blue prints, building con- 
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



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H-120 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave., I 

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with information about how I can train at home. ' 

Name Age ' 

Address Occupation ■ 

City Zone State | 



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Celebrating 80 Years of Toolmaking 




LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness Eind be your own boss the "Teunblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
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of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

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avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
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Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 
and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
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course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
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Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building CI 9, Denver 2, Colorado 



[» 



Let's Close Our Ranks 

BY MAURICE A. HUTCHESON 

First General Vice-President 

* * * 

WHEN hurricane warnings go up in those sections of the world 
which are subject to devastating winds, the wise citizens make 
plans accordingly. They batten down their porches and board 
up their windows and make everything ship-shape as possible to withstand 
the lashing and buffeting that come with the storm. In that wa}^ they 
protect their lives and their propert^^ Storms come and storms go but 
by foresight and preparedness the citizens withstand the onslaughts and 
go on living their lives in an even tenure. While there is no danger, they 
work and live and love in a manner little different from people all over 
the world; but the minute hurricane warnings go up the}' spring into 

action. They bolster up the weak — — • 

spots in their houses and they forti- are pending on Capitol Hill. The 
f}' their property with boards and hurricane of reaction is building 
timbers and nails. Whatever the}^ up and gaining momentum day by 
can think of to do to make their day. It is time we took warning. 



structure more impregnable they do 
as swiftly and as thoroughly as pos- 
sible. In that way they survive and 
even prosper. 

An individual who lived in the 



On the economic front, too, wind 
pressure is increasing. As mounting 
profits drive prices steadily upward, 
the gap between prices and wages 
grows ever wider. That pathway 



hurricane belt but paid no attention leads to eventual disaster. Sooner 

to storm warnings would certainly or later the purchasing power of 

be looked upon as being lacking in the people becomes insufficient to 

good common sense. And justifi- buy the goods of industry at their 

ably so. Not to prepare for a blow profit-swollen prices, and then the 

that is inevitable cannot be classed bottom falls out of the economy. It 

as anything but foolhardy. How- happened in 1929 and it will happen 

ever, some of us are making that again as surely as night follows 

very mistake. day if prices and wages are not 

There is a hurricane of reaction brousfht into better balance. It may 



and possible economic disaster on 
its way in this country. The signs 
are numerous and unmistakable. A 
reactionary Congress has already 



take months or it may take years, 
but sooner or later a hurricane of 
deflation will hit us. 

With the hurricanes on their way, 
legislated away many of the basic it is imperative that we start pre- 
rights which workers won only after paring ourselves and building up 
years of struggle. A hundred other our defenses. If labor history teach- 
bills which would place further es us an3'thing, it is that the pro- 
shackles on organized wage earners gress and welfare of working people 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



He in strong, militant unions dur- 
ing periods of social and economic 
disturbances. When unions have 
been strong and aggressive, social 
and economic disturbances have spent 
themselves without seriously disrupt- 
ing the wages and working condi- 
tions of America's workers ; when 
unions have been weak and ineffect- 
ual, working people have paid a heavy- 
price in starvation wages and ex- 
ploited conditions whenever the 
economic pendulum has swung 
downward. The real tragedy of the 
last depression was the fact that 
outside of the building trades, or- 
ganized labor was too enervated to 
hold back the tide of wage slash- 
ing and condition butchering which 
took place. Those who were thrown 
out of work had no purchasing 
power, naturally. But even worse, 
those who were working had no 
purchasing power either because 
their wages and working conditions 
were so beaten down that they could 
scarcely keep body and soul to- 
gether. 

What the days ahead have in 
store, no one can say with any 
degree of assurance. But one thing 
is certain — as we preserve and build 
our unions, so shall we protect and 
preserve our future welfare, regard- 
less of what transpires. The fight 
of unionism for a place in the sun 
for working people has been an up- 
hill fight every inch of the way. 
The Taft-Hartley Act is merely a 
new manifestation of an old pro- 
blem — anti-labor legislation. For 
seventy-five years anti-labor legisla- 
tion and anti-l^bor legal interpreta- 
tions have worked against organized 
labor. Away back in 1894 labor was 
slapped with an injunction in the 
railroad case and for many years 
afterward every effort of workers 
to improve their lot brought on a 



stringent court injunction. But the 
unionists of that day kept their pow- 
der dry. Against all kinds of intim- 
idations such as the discharge and 
blacklist they kept their ranks 
closed. With the weapons they had 
at their command, they fought back 
and the labor movement survived. 

A few years later — in 1907 to be 
exact — a court ruled that the hat- 
ters in Danbury were in conspiracy 
because they wanted their wages 
and working conditions improved. 
Damages were awarded the hat 
companies and union members lost 
their bank accounts and their homes 
as judgements were filed against 
them. But again the unionists stood 
fast and the labor movement sagged 
but never bowed. There followed 
the era of the yellow dog contract 
and the "American Plan". The 
unions took a beating but they kept 
fighting ba-rk. Just before the re- 
cent war, anti-trust suits threat- 
ened the very existence of organ- 
ized labor, but under the leadership 
of our United Brotherhood and our 
General President, the suits were 
ft^ught to a standstill and beaten 
all the way down the line. The labor 
movement survived because our Bro- 
therhood was strong and headed by 
a man not afraid to fight. 

Today, The Taft-Hartley Act and 
a thousand other pieces of anti-labor 
legislation pending in Congress and 
the state legislatures threaten the 
very lifeblood of organized labor. 
Again we must close our ranks and 
prepare to fight back with every- 
thing we have. This is a fight in 
which every member must carry his 
full share of the responsibility. 
Like the citizen living in the hurri- 
cane belt, he must take the initia- 
tive for making his individual con- 
tribution to the welfare and survi- 
val of his community. It must be 
a matter between him and his con- 



THE CARPENTER 



science. The c{uestions he must ask 
himself are these: 

Am I registered and eligible to 
vote? Are all the members of my 
family and all my friends similarly 
prepared? Am I attending union 
meetings often enough? Is every 
worker within the jurisdiction of 
my union who is eligible to join 
under Section 7 of the Constitution 
a member? Am I defending my 
urtion vigorously enough against 
my neighbors who may believe the 
anti-union propaganda printed in 
the papers against organized labor? 
Am I serving my union as fully and 
as capably as I could? Am I an as- 
set or a liability to my union? 

I honestly believe that the work- 
ers of America are right now at the 
cross-roads. One road leads to de- 
pression and privation and exploi- 
tation with a weak and ineffectual 
labor movement. The other road 
leads to continued progress and 
freedom with a sound and militant 
labor movement. There can hardly 
be any middle ground — it must be 
one or the other. As each of us 
gives the correct answers to the 
above questions, so shall the deci- 
sion be made as to which road the 
workers of America intend to travel. 

Today conditions are good. Work 
is comparatively plentiful and pro- 
blems are comparatively few. His- 
tory shows that in times such as 
these the labor movement suffers 
its worst setbacks. Lethargy inevit- 
ably creeps in. "Let George do it" be- 
comes the motto of too many mem- 
bers. One union after another loses 
its fine edge. Then when the tide 
turns these unions find that the pre- 
vious easy times enervated them and 
sapped them of their energy and 
strength. The price such a procedure 
exacts in the end is always tremen- 
dously high. We must guard against 
it and prevent it at all costs. 



The hurricanes of reaction and 
depression are building up. Warn- 
ings can be seen on all sides. Soon- 
er or later they will be unleashing 
their fury, and only those who are 
prepared will be safe. In the hur- 
ricane belt, the calm before the 
storm is the period of greatest act- 
ivity and preparation. Years of ex- 
perience have proved the necessity 
of following such a course. It is the 
only guarantee the people have of 
continued existence. 

Like the citizens of the hurricane 
belt we must not allow the present 
calm to lull us into a sense of false 
security. When the winds start 
howling it will be too late to start 
boarding up our windows and bat- 
tening down our porches. The job 
can and must be done now. 

Now is the time for us to close the 
gaps in our ranks. Now is the time 
to see that every eligible worker is 
made a member. Now is the time 
to see that all of our jurisdiction 
is protected. Now is the time to see 
that our organization is built up and 
strengthened. Now is the time to 
see that all of our political strength 
is mobilized and made ready to fight 
for our friends and against our 
enemies. Now is the time for all 
of us to boost and build our union. 



Ballots Defend 
Your Freedom 



BE SURE TO VOTE 

THIS YEAR AND 

EVERY vYEAR 



10 



In apprenticeship training — 



CALIFORNIA STEPS OUT 

by WILLIAM P. KELLY, Apprentice Coordinator, 

Bay Counties District Council of Carpenters, Executive Board 
Member California State Council of Carpenters 



WITH THREE of the four sets of books completed and available 
for purchase, and the fourth set nearing- completion, California's 
carpentry apprenticeship training prog-ram will soon be operat- 
ing smoothly -with a complete set of instructional materials for each year 
of the four-year apprenticeship period. 

The books are being- prepared by the Instructional Materials Labora- 
tory- of the Bureau of Trade and Industrial Education, a division of the 
California State Department of Education. The work of the laborator^^ 
is under the direction of ]\Iiles H. Anderson, who has been a supervisor 
and teacher in the apprenticeship program in California for a number of 
.\ state educational advisorv 



years, 

committee for the carpentry trade 
composed of AVilliam P. Kelly, San 
Francisco, Executive Board ]Mem- 
ber, California State Council of 
Carpenters and Joiners; Georg-e B. 
Buckley, Los Ang-eles, Associated 
General Contractors ; James Skel- 
ton, Los Ang-eles, Executive Board 
Ivlember, California State Council 
of Carpenters and Joiners ; and Mil- 
ton Morris, San Francisco, Associ- 
ated Home Builders, has guided the 
developm.ent of the project from its 
inception in September, 1946. 

Each of the books has been writ- 
ten by an expert in the carpentry 
trade recommended by the advisory 
committee, and the material is all 
presented from the point of view of 
the practical builder. 

In the apprentice training- pro- 
g-ram the carpentry apprentice 
learns the manipulative skills on the 
job under the supervision of his 
foreman or a skilled journeyman, 
while he learns the technical knowl- 
edge related to this work in trade 
extension classes conducted bv the 



public schools. Conducting such 
classes is quite difficult using tradi- 
tional teaching methods, such as a 
series of lectures followed by dis- 
cussions and textbook assignments. 
Some of the difficulties encountered 
are : 

1. Individual differences 
Carpentry apprentices vary in 
in their ability to learn, some 
being able to learn rapidly, 
others requiring more time to 
learn. 

2. Class turnover 

The carpentry apprentice class 
roll is subject to change all 
during the year due to the hir- 
ing of new apprentices and the 
graduation of those w^ho have 
completed their work, 

3. Mixed classes 

^Most apprentice classes are 
made up of first, second, third, 
and fourth year apprentices, 
each group working on a dif- 
ferent course of study. 
In order to teach an apprentice 
class successfully in spite of these 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



difficulties, it has been found desir- 
able to use individual or small 
group instruction rather than the 
traditional method in which an at- 
tempt is made to teach the entire 
class the same information at the 
same time. Individual instruction is 
almost impossible unless the teacher 
is provided w^ith printed instruc- 
tional materials that can be used by 
the apprentice as a guide in learn- 
ing the course of study. The mate- 
rials provided must be very efficient 
in making it possible for the ap- 
prentice to learn well with a mini- 
mum of assistance from the teacher, 
who must divide his time fairly 
among the apprentices in his class. 

The instructional materials pre- 
pared for the use of carpentry ap- 
prentices consist of: 

1. Mimeographed course outline 

This is the basic course out- 
line, divided into four parts, 
each part coinciding with one 
year of apprenticeship in the 
carpentry trade. This outline is 
the basis for the printed books 
that are subsequently devel- 
oped, and is the product of the 
thinking of the State Edu- 
cational Advisory Committee 
meeting as a group. 

2. Workbook 

The workbook is for the use of 
the apprentice, and consists of 
a series of assignments cover- 
ing the topics in one part of 
the course outlined. There will 
be four workbooks in the com- 
pleted carpentry course, three 
of which are now available. 
The men who prepare the 
workbooks take each topic in 
the outline and work out means 
whereby the apprentice can 
learn the topic through select- 
ed reference books, experi- 
ments, films, or other sources of 



information. If readily avail- 
able sources cannot be found, 
they write and illustrate the 
information themselves. To get 
the most out of the course it is 
imperative that the apprentice 
be required to purchase the 
necessary technical books list- 
ed in the back of the workbook, 
as he is referred to them con- 
stantly as he pursues the 
course. 

3. Testbook 

The testbook is also for the 
use of the apprentice, but is 
only given to him when he 
completes a topic in his work- 
book, at which time he takes 
a short test on the topic just 
completed. The main purpose 
of the test is to evaluate the 
apprentice's mastery of the 
topics and to discover mis- 
understandings and learning 
difficulties while there is still 
time for the teacher to take 
remedial action. 

4. Final Examination 

A final examination consisting 
of 150 to 200 objective-type 
questions is prepared for each 
part of the course, and must 
be passed by the apprentice be- 
fore advancing to the next 
part. The final examination is 
often used by the local appren- 
tice committees in conjunction 
with a rating of the appren- 
tice's work on the job in decid- 
ing whether the apprentice 
should receive his advance- 
ment. 

5. Progress chart 

The progress chart is a wall 
chart on which space is pro- 
vided for entering the names 
of the apprentices. Opposite 
their names the teacher enters 
their grades for each topic 



12 T H E C A R P E X T E R 

Studied in appropriate squares. Course in Carpentry; First Year: 
There is a separate chart for Foundations and Framing: 

each year of apprenticeship in Workbook Si.oo 

carpentry, with the study top- Testbook i.oo 

ics already printed in the Final Examination 15 

blanks along the top edge. The Course in Carpentry, Second Year: 
teacher uses the chart as a Roof Framing, Exterior Trim. 

teaching tool that enables him Workbook Si.oo 

to see at a glance what each Testbook i.oo 

apprentice has accomplished Final Examination 15 

and what he is to do next. Such q^^,,^ ^^ Carpentry, Third Year: 
charts are essential when deal- Interior Finish 'and Stairbuild- 

ing with a mixed group, -^q. 

6. Teacher's guide Vorkbook $1.00 

The teacher s guide is a man- Te=tb''i''k i 00 

^al i'--'r the use of the teacher Final' Examination"^ '! ' ^i; 

in which the apprenticeship „ • r- t- 1 ^^ " 

1 . ^ ^. 1 ^ Course m Carpentrv. Fourth Year: 
program, tne instructional mat- -n ■ - ,^ ' , xt 

. ? J ^ - , Kemtorced Concrete and Heavv 

erials, and correct use 01 the _. , ^ . .^ 

■ 1 ■ 1 • J T Ml limber Construction, (in pro- 

materials IS explained, it v.-ili . . ^ 

, ., 1 1 -1 1 cess 01 preparation.) 

not be available until early r- t- j 

summer. Orders should be addressed to: 

7. Answer sheets Bureau of Textbooks and 

Correct answers for all exam- Publications. 

ination questic-tis are provided California State Department of 

in the answer sheets. Education, 

8. Record cards Sacramento. 14. California. 

It is vital to the success of an -n u ^ -n i, j 

, . ,1 r^urchase oraers v^-ill be accepted 

apprenticeship program that - ,-,. ■ \ n 1. 

^^ ^, , f . , irom public agencies. All others 

accurate records be kept 01 tne ■ 1 j • -^u j 

.^. must include remittance with orders, 

apprentice's accomplishments c 1 1 ^ j t, ^ j 

,1 , ■ 1 1 ■ ,1 ^cnool stores operated by student 

both on the lob and m scnool. 1 j- -j 'j ut 

„ , , , .- . . boQies are not considered public 

Onh' bv this means can it be • , • 1 j -^ 

, - .- , , . , agencies and must include remit- 

determmed whether the ap- ^ ■ u j tu 1 

, , J . f. tance with orders, i he state sales 

prentice has had the Avell- ^ .-ujjj hj 

^ , , . , .,, tax must be added on all orders to 

rounded experience that will , ^ , . ^ . 

..... ^ . be sent to places withm Calitornia. 

quality him as a lournevman , - , 

^ - - „, - , - , except orders tor resale purposes, 

crattsman, i he record caras ■ , . , , , u u u 

, . . , , m which case the order should be 

are so designed that the ap- , , ,-,t-- -n , >. , ^, , 

*. ■ 1 • marked r or Resale and the sales 

prentice's entire apprenticeship ^ v -u \ 

^ . , . if f tax permit number.) 

period 15 recorded on one card, , ' , , 

and the svstem of keeping it Progress cnarts, record cards, and 

up is such that work of doing ^^^=^^'^^ ^^eets will be turmshed 

it is handled bv the apprentice ^'^"i^hout charge to _ school systems 

himself, which' eliminates cost- ^^^^? '"^^ , instructional materials. 

ly secretarial work for record- Requests snould be addressed to : 
keeping. The carpentry ap- Instructional ^Material 

prentice instructional materi- Laboratory, 

als now available and in pre- 2129 Grove St., Room 201 

paration follow : Oakland 12, California 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



These instructional materials have 
been very effective in making Cali- 
fornia's carpentry apprentice train- 
ing- program a successful one. At 
the present time there are 4,175 
carpentry apprentices enrolled in 
school classes in the state, making 
up a total of 155 classes. More are 
being enrolled every day, as there 
are several thousand on the waiting 
list for new classes. The chief ob- 
stacle to be overcome is the diffi- 
culty being experienced in finding 
competent journeymen carpenters 
to serve as teachers. 

A noteworthy phase of the in- 
structional materials program is the 
interest being taken by many jour- 
neymen carpenters. A recent survey 
in California indicates that there 
are several hundred journeymen 
signed up to take the same courses 
offered for the apprentices, with 
some classes already in operation. 



The classes for journeymen are set 
up separately from those for ap- 
prentices, of course. 

Enforcement of attendance of ap- 
prentices in school classes is no 
problem when the instructional mat- 
erials are used, as they find their 
studies interesting and immediately 
applicable in a practical way to their 
work on the job. The tests are prov- 
ing invaluable to advisory commit- 
tees in evaluating an apprentice's 
work, and have been adjudged by 
many as being one of the most use- 
ful phases of the program. 

To date 9,723 sets of the carpentry 
instructional materials have been 
sold, and reports from schools and 
locals all over the nation that have 
adopted the courses indicate that 
they are being of real assistance in 
putting over the biggest apprentice- 
ship training program in the nation, 
the carpentry apprentice program. 



Death Calls Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach 

Secretary of Labor Lewis B. Schwellenbach is dead. 

A cabinet officer since July i, 1945, he was appointed by President 
Truman to his labor post. To accept the post, he resigned a Federal judge- 
ship which meant security and assured income for life. Although far from 
being wealthy, he accepted without hesitation the President's call. 

The Secretary of Labor died at Walter Reed hospital, Washington, 
,D. C, at 4:40 a.m. June 10 after a long illness. He had been a patient at 
the hospital since May 28. 

As Secretary of Labor, Schwellenbach gave his greatest efforts toward 
securing the rights of labor, attaining industrial peace within the frame- 
work of free collective bargaining, and building toward world peace 
through cooperation among the labor movements of the world. He opposed 
enactment of the Taft-Hartley Act and advised the President to veto the 
law. 

Schwellenbach resigned from the Senate where he had served for five 
years to become United States District Judge for the Eastern District of 
Washington, serving as a Federal judge from 1940 to 1945 and resigned 
that life-time position to accept the appointment as Secretary of Labor. 




SIP 



EXPENSIVE IS THE WORD FOR IT 

From all indications, another "Teapot 
Dome" scandal is brewing in Wash- 
ington. A few months ago the Supreme 
Court ruled that the oil under the tide 
lands of California, Texas and other 
maritime states belongs to Uncle Sam. 
This, however, made the big oil com- 
panies very unhappy and recently the 
House voted 259 to 29 to overturn the 
court's decision. The oil companies want 
the oil in the hands of the various 
states and they are not going to rest 
until they get their way. 

In view of the fact we are spending 
billions to obtain access to Arabian oil 
while at the same time we are playing 
fast and loose with our own oil re- 
sources, another "Teapot Dome" affair 
may eventually develop. Our costly and 
sometimes blundering efforts to main- 
tain adequate oil reserves reminds us 
of the two Scotchmen whose twice- 
widowed friend married for a third 
time. 

"I hear Angus is married again," 
said one. 

"Aye," retorted the other, "and a 
scandalous expensive friend he is to 
have — two wreaths and three wedding 
presents in seventeen years." 







o 







"Ask your Mother, Junior, perhaps 
she'll know where the other skate is." 



IT PAYS TO BE SAFE 

Last month's issue of one of the larg- 
er financial papers carried a long article 
knocking labor's decision to indulge im 
a little political activity. Labor will only 
hurt itself by entering the political 
arena, the article intimated, as it went 
on to explain that labor is already 
wielding its maximum influence in 
Washington. 

Maybe the next Congress will pay at- 
tention to labor's wishes, but person- 
ally we feel like the little boy who was 
at the zoo with his dad. Standing be- 
fore the tiger's cage, the father spent 
some time impressing on his son how 
dangerous the beast was. The lad was 
very attentive but finally he said: 

"Daddy, if it got out of the cage and 
ate you up, what bus would I take to get 
home?" M v w 

♦ * ♦ I 

TAX FORM GENEROSITY | 

Estimating that some seven or eight 
billion dollars a year in revenue is lost 
to Uncle Sam through various sorts of 
income tax chiseling, a Congressman re- 
cently asked that ten thousand new 
agents be employed by the Treasury 
Department to check returns more 
closely. I 

How much chiseling there is in In- ll 
come tax returns we are in no position 
to know. However, a friend of ours who 
works for the Treasury Department and 
gets to look over a lot of returns re- 
cently said: 

"If the churches of the country get 
half the donations claimed on income 
tax returns, there can't possibly be a 
one of them in debt." 



THE ROGERS TOUCH 

Along about two or three years after 
World War 1, the late Will Rogers once 
remarked: "There is only one way we 
could be worse off with Europeans, and 
that is if we helped them out of two 
wars instead of one." 

Somewhere in this there ought to be 
a fine moral but somehow or other it 
escapes us just for the moment. 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



MAYBE IT IS COIXCIDEXrE 

Maj-be it is merely coincidence, but 
shortly after this country makes up 
its mind that there is going to be no 
more backing down for anybody (and 
implements that decision with appro- 
priations for a first rate army and air 
force) Russia announces that she is in- 
terested in nothing except peace. We 
sincerely hope Moustache Joe is sincere 
In this latest pronouncement. However, 
until events prove otherwise, we are 
skeptical and inclined to class Joe with 
the attorney who wanted a new trial for 
tiis client. 

"Why do you want a new trial?" asks 
the judge. 

"On grounds of newly discovered evi- 
dence," replies the attorney. 

"What is the nature of it?" 

"My client has dug up $400 I didn't 
know he had." 



partment. In view of the butchering 
which Congress has been doing, it is 
not beyond the realm of possibility that 
the Department itself may soon be elim- 
inated as unnecessary since one by one 
its functions have been turned over to 
some other agency. 

This continual chopping away at the 
Department of Labor has so incensed 
some Congressmen that Representative 
Chet Holifield of California last month 
introduced a bill to convert the De- 
partment of Labor Building into a 
pigeon loft. 

Whether or not the Department of 
Labor Building will eventually become 
a pigeon loft we are not prepared to 
say; but one thing we can state without 
reservation — if anti-labor Congressmen 
think organized labor is going to sit idly 
by and watch the Department of Labor 
be torn to pieces they have bats in their 
belfries. 



AFTER THE BALL IS OATER 

Senator Ball of Minnesota, who is 
often referred to as "Jumping Joe" 
(probably because he is so fast to 
jump on any propaganda wagon the 
vested interests line up), is still mak- 
ing speeches about the "fairness" of the 
Taft-Hartley Act. 

Correct or not, persistent rumors to 
the effect that Joe will accept a lucra- 
tive public relations job with the Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers if 
he is defeated in 1948 keep cropping up 
here and there. 

About the only comment we can think 
of is to tell the story about the little 
boy Avho went to 'hear the ventriloquist. 
When he got home, his mother asked: 

"What did you think of the ventrilo- 
quist?" 

"Oh, I didn't think much of him," 
replied the boy, "but the little guy on 
his knee sure was smart." 



THEY AVILL GET THE BIRD 

Last year Congress reduced appropria- 
tions for the Department of Labor from 
thirty-five million dollars to eighteen 
million dollars. The Conciliation Serv- 
ice has been divorced from the Depart- 
ment of Labor and now Congress is 
making an effort to also remove the 
U.S. Employment Service from the De- 



JOE SHOULD KXOAV 

The season being Spring, Joe Paup, 
Fourth Party candidate for president, 
running on a platform of fiA^e-cent 
beers and bigger dill pickles with liver- 
wurst sandwiches, recently wiped the 
sawdust and foam from his beard and 
opined: 

"Although it is contrary to the laws 
of gravity, it is much easier to pick a 
girl up than it is to drop her. 




•'/ know Cts twenty, but I took off 
withhoJding tax." 



16 



The Construction Outlook 

By RICHARD J. GRAY 

President, Building and Construction 
Trades Department, A. F. of L. 

JOINT PREDICTIONS of the Departments of Labor and Commerce 
are that new construction in the present year will amount to around 
$15.2 billion. 
In 1947 about $13 billion was spent on new construction, of which 
close to $5 billion went into housing. If the expected volume is realized, 
there will be about 2,150,000 workers employed by construction contractors 
in the peak month of September. This will represent an increase of 250,- 
000 over the number at work in September, 1947. 

In March of this year construc- 
tion employment had reached i,- 
600,000, or 94,000 more than report- 
ed in the previous month, and an in- 
crease of 126,000 over March, 1947. 
During- the first three months of 
this year, expenditures for new 
construction, public and private, 
were 25.3 per cent above the figures 
for the corresponding period in 
1947. This does not, of course, mean 
an equal increase in physical vol- 
ume of construction, since a consid- 
erable part of the dollar volume 
gain is accounted for by the in- 
crease in construction costs. 

Housing will again be the great- 
est single factor in the building pro- 
gram of 1948 unless, of course, it 
must be shunted aside to make way 
for defense or war construction, or 
unless high prices destroy the mar- 
ket. The need for housing has hard- 
ly been touched as yet. We entered 
the war with a housing deficit, 
which grew at an alarming rate dur- 
ing the war years, and is still in- 
creasing. It will take years to build 
houses to replace worn-out dwell- 
ings alone. 

But each year newly established 



families add to the need for homes. 
Last year, accordi^ng to the Bureau 
of the Census, 1,250,000 new fami- 
lies or households were established. 
While the prewar rate of marriages 
was about 1,400,000 a year, it was 
1,900,000 for 1947 and is estimated 
at around 1,700,000 for 1948. The 
birth rate also increased consider- 
ably in 1947, and it is expected to 
remain high during the present 
year. 

Estimates are that we will need 
to build from 1,000,000 to 1,500,000 
homes each year for the next ten 
years, but that slightly less than 
1,000,000 private homes will be be- 
gun this year — which will, however, 
been an all-time high for new pri- 
vately financed housing units put 
in place. 

The construction industry will 
obviously contribute in a very im- 
portant fashion to maximum pro- 
duction and employment through- 
out the entire economy. There are 
certain elements in the present sit- 
uation in the industry, however, 
which are definitely threatening. 

The first question, in considering 
the prospects of the industry, is 



THE CARPEXTER 



17 



whether it can meet the demands of 
the expected high volume of pro- 
duction? Will labor and materials 
be available? As far as labor is con- 
cerned, I can say, with complete 
confidence, that it will be. Sufficient 
labor was available for an even 
greater volume of construction back 
in 1942, despite war conditions. In 
addition, the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department and 
its affiliated national and interna- 
tional unions have recently taken 
two steps which are designed to 
increase the supply of skilled labor 
and to maintain a high degree of 
productivity per man. 

First, we have, largely upon the 
initiative of the unions, stepped 
up our apprentice-training program. 
On February 29 of this year, ac- 
cording to the Apprentice-Training 
Service of the Department of La- 
bor, there were close to 3,000 Joint 
Apprenticeship Committees in oper- 
ation in the building and construc- 
tion industry throughout the coun- 
try, with about 115,999 apprentices 
at work under agreements. 

This number is increasing each 
month. Many of the apprentices are 
veterans. In order to make this 
training available to veterans, a 
number of the national and inter- 
national building and construction 
trades unions have removed any age 
limit for the admission of veterans 
to apprentice training. This pro- 
gram is bound to have a decided 
effect upon the supply of skilled 
labor in the industry within the 
next few years. At the same time, 
it will assure the maintenance of a 
high degree of skill among building 
tradesmen. 

We know that, for many reasons, 
productivity per man was lowered 
during the war years. Labor alone, 
of course, does not determine pro- 
ductivity. 



Many factors — the supply of ma- 
terials, the quality of management, 
the method of contracting, the 
equipment and methods used in the 
work, as well as the efficiency of 
labor — enter into productivity. 
A\'hat we can do, and are doing, is 
to plan in advance to maintain an 
adequate supply of highly skilled 
labor. 

Secondly, we have, after months 
of negotiations with the Associated 
General Contractors and associa- 
tions of subcontractors and special- 
ty contractors, entered into an 
agreement for the settlement of ju- 
risdictional disputes. We anticipate, 
without any doubts whatever, that 
this agreement will reduce jurisdic- 
tional disputes to a minimum and 
will almost entirely do away Avith 
stoppages of work because of such 
disputes. The plan was to go into 
effect May i. I am sure it will act as 
an important stabilizing influence in 
the industry. 

Mr. John T. Dunlop, an associate 
professor of economics at Harvard 
University and during the war the 
public member of the Wage Adjust- 
ment Board for the building and 
construction industry, has been se- 
lected as the impartial chairman of 
the Joint Board to hear disputes 
and make decisions. 

The question of materials cannot 
be answered so readily. While the 
material supply situation has eased 
considerably in the past year, some 
materials are still in short supply, 
especially nails, gypsum products. 
pipe, lumber products and plumb- 
ing and heating products in which 
steel and scrap are important fac- 
tors. The present rate of produc- 
tion, however, is expected to over- 
come these shortages by the end 
of the year. 

It is neither the supply of labor, 
then., nor of materials, which is the 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



i 



major obstacle to the construction 
program. High costs constitute the 
major difficulty and danger. This is 
especially true of the housing por- 
tion of the program, but high costs 
influence non-housing projects as 
well as housing projects, and public 
as well as private construction. ]\Ia- 
terial dealers must assume a large 
share of the responsibiltiy for the 
present price situation, although la- 
bor is too often blamed as the sole 
cause of high prices. Material prices 
have increased far more rapidly 
than have wages (between June, 
1939, and January, 1948, union wage 
rates in the industry rose 52 per 
cent, according the Department of 
Labor). 

Building materials, according to 
the Department of Labor, were at 
the highest ever recorded in Janu- 
ary, 194S, and there seems little 
promise of significant reduction, 
despite a slight drop in February. 
The over-all building material in- 
dex for February, 1948, compared 
Avith August, 1939, Avas 214.8. 

Lumber must still to a large ex- 
tent be held responsible for the 
greatly increased costs. In February 
of this year, on the basis of August, 
1939, the index for lumber stood at 
337.2. Price increases such as these 
cannot be borne by any industry 
without an inevitable curtailment of 
volume. 

About half of the veterans who 
want housing want to rent, not buy, 
but only about 15 per cent of the 
units begun in 1947 were two or 
more family units, as compared 
with the 1920s, when rental units 
made up some 40 per cent of all 
the housing built. 

Of all construction, about one- 
third has normally gone into public 
works. In March of this year, how- 
ever, public building accounted for 
only about 21 per cent of total con- 



struction, and there is apparently 
little chance that public construc- 
tion will reach its normal propor- 
tions during the year. 

There is, of course, a large back- 
log of public works of both federal 
and local governments, just as there 
is of private construction of all 
kinds, Some of the public works 
now ready to go into construction, 
while they are undoubtedly neces- 
sary, can, we believe, be postponed. 
The Building and Construction 
Trades Department is urging, at 
least for the immediate future, that 
public works be planned and per- 
formed on as long-range a basis as 
possible, and that those projects 
which can be deferred be held over 
for the future, in order to channel 
into private building as much as 
possible of the available supply of 
materials. 

There are naturally certain public 
works which cannot be deferred. 
New housing creates demands for 
increased water supply systems, 
sewage disposal systems, electrical 
power developments, telephone ex- 
tension. These increased demands 
must be met. Flood control should 
not be postponed. New hospitals are 
needed at once, as are many new 
schools. 

But there are other public works 
projects which can and should be 
held off. Additions to postoffices, 
many other public buildings and the 
building of certain roads can well 
be held over. 

This does not mean that we fail to 
recognize and emphasize the con- 
tinued need for long-range plan- 
ning, not only on a national but on 
a state, county and municipal basis. 
Wt mean only that, to be of maxi- 
mum service to the economy as a 
whole, public construction should 
be kept as low as possible during a 
time like the present, when normal 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



full employment is available on pri- works in such a situation. Long- 

vate construction projects. This range planning of this kind is a 

helps, too, to build up a reserve of type of job insurance we take out 

projects to be undertaken when pri- Jn good times, to see us through 

vate industry falls off. bad times. Like other insurance, we 

Our experience with federal con- must take care of how we cash it in 

struction during the depression of and save it, as far as possible, for 

the 1930s showed the value of public the bad times. 



Meet O. Wm. Blaier, New G.E.B. Member 

Brother O. Wm. Blaier the new 
member of the General Executive 
Board, Second District, was born in 
Wilmington, Del., on July 17, 
1897. 

He joined Local Union 359, 
Philadelphia, on May 29, 1918 
where he completed his appren- 
ticeship. He was elected Finan- 
cial Secretary of that Local Union 
in June 1920 and held that office un- 
til June 1937. 

He was business representative of 
the Philadelphia District Council 
from 1932 to 1937 and a delegate to 
the Central Body for several years. 
He was a delegate to the Building 
and Construction Trades Council of 
Philadelphia for five years and 
served as its Vice-President. 

He was also a delegate to the 
Pennsylvania State Council of Carpenters and the State Federation of 
Labor for several years. 

In May 1937 he was appointed a General Representative b}- President 
Hutcheson and has filled that office ever since faithfully and well. 

He was a delegate from Local Union 359, Philadelphia, Pa., to the Gen- 
eral Conventions in 1924, 1936 and 1946. 

He is a man of vast experience in the Labor Movement. No one under- 
stands it better. 

When Brother Wm. J .Kelly resigned as Board member from the 
Second District in March 1948, General President Hutcheson appointed 
Brother Blaier to fill that office for the unexpired term. The General 
Executive Board unanimously approved this appointment and Brother 
Blaier is now the member of the General Executive Board for the Second 
District. 




20 



Corporations Versus Man 

By JOSEPH O. O'MAHONEY U.S.8. 
(Excerpts from a recent speech before tfie American Bar Association) 



NEVER in the history of civilization was production more needed 
than it is now — not even during the war. The winning of the fight- 
ing war with all its expenditure of blood and treasure, will have 
been a complete anticlimax unless we also win the peace. The peace can- 
not be won without production because the war through which we have 
come was a total war involving the destruction of the productive capacity 
of mankind upon a scale never before approximated. 

We know now that the devastated areas of the world cannot be restored 
to prewar standards of production without great expenditure of time and 
capital, because modern man depends no longer upon the simple handi- 
crafts which were sufficient in centuries past, but upon the complex dis- 
coveries and inventions of the 20th 



century. Modern efforts of millions 
of workers and the raw materials 
of many areas must be brought into 
harmonious action under expert 
management. The basic organiza- 
tion to make this possible is essen- 
tially the work of the lawyer, for 
what is needed is the overall frame- 
work of law to enable all branches of 
the economy to function efficiently 
in freedom and unity. 

The rules by which mankind has 
been able to function in social units 
have always been laid down by mem- 
bers of this profession, and man- 
kind has always reserved its highest 
rewards for the lawgivers. From 
the time of Moses the greatest hon- 
ors that men can pay have gone to 
the leaders who have had the vision 
and the courage to frame the law 
by which all the elements of society 
could co-operate to the best advan- 
tage of the greatest number in the 
business of daily living. 

Since I am a lawyer I may be 
forgiven for saying to a group of 
my own profession that the modern 



lawyer has failed as yet to provide 
the rule of order the modern world 
requires. Within the past 40 years, 
the scientist and the engineer have 
given us a wholly new world, but 
the lawyer has lagged behind. He 
fills our legislative assemblies, both 
state and national, just as he filled 
the Constitution Convention in 1787, 
but he has not yet devised the rule 
of order whereby the complex parts 
of the modern economic machine 
may be geared together to serve the 
welfare of men. Not since the Fed- 
eral Constitution itself was drafted 
have the lawyers of any generation 
had a greater opportunity than we 
have now to provide the legal sys- 
tem within which the whole modern 
world may operate to advance the 
freedom and the standard of living 
of all. 

Every American lawyer is loyal 
to the Federal Constitution and to 
the principles of human liberty up- 
on which it was based. Every law- 
yer knows that when that instru- 
ment was signed and submitted to 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



the people of the states for ratifica- 
tion, a great fear arose that the new 
central government might become 
so powerful as to encroach upon the 
liberty of the people, and because 
of this fear the Constitution was 
ratified only upon condition that a 
Bill of Rights should be adopted 
to make it perfectly clear that the 
new government would be an in- 
strument to serve the people but not 
to rule them. Every lawyer knows 
that the civil liberties of the indi- 
vidual in his economic and political 
life constitute the basis of our sys- 
tem of government. It is personal 
liberty that is now threatened every- 
where. 

If I were to ask an}^ law3^er at 
this convention the question: 

"Is man made for the state or is 
the state made for man?" the answer 
would be unanimous — the state is 
made for man and is his servant, 
not his master. 

If, however, I were to ask another 
question: 

"Is man made for the economic 
system or is the system made for 
man?" The answer would neither be 
so clear nor so prompt, because the 
truth is, there are many lawyers, as 
there are many businessmen, who, 
if they do not actually believe that 
man was made to serve the econo- 
mic system, sometimes talk and act 
as if they did. 

A curious error has crept into our 
thinking as lawyers. We have failed 
to differentiate between the natural 
person, man, and the artificial per- 
son, the corporation. We go about 
our daily business in our law offices 
and in our legislative offices con- 
fusing the rights of the corporation 
with the rights of man. The con- 
sequence is that the modern cor- 



poration, in some instances, has be- 
come more powerful even than the 

state. 

The task of the lawyer in the 
current political and economic crisis 
is to produce the rule of order 
which, in the modern world will 
preserve the benefits of corporate 
organization — and they have been 
very great — while at the same time 
making certain that it shall not be- 
come the master of the people. AVe 
must begin b}^ recognizing the in- 
disputable fact that the modern cor- 
poration comes into existence solely 
by reason of a grant from govern- 
ment. The corporation has no life 
except that which it obtains from 
some state, and since the state is the 
servant of society and derives its 
powers "by consent of the gov- 
erned," so also must the corpora- 
tion be content to be the servant of 
the people who are the authors of 
government itself. 

Can there be any doubt that the 
modern corporation has become 
more powerful, economically speak- 
ing at least, than the states which 
have brought it into existence? 

The American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company employs 704.- 
381 individuals. Its stockholders al- 
so number 700,000. On the basis of 
the number of employees alone, it 
is an economic unit with a popula- 
tion greater than that of each of 12 
states in the Federal Union. On 
the score of assets, however, there 
are only six states within whose 
borders the total assessed valuation 
of all real and personal property is 
greater than the $7,381 billion at 
which A. T. and T. fixes the value 
of its assets. Stated in another way, 
all the property in each of 42 states 
is assessed at less than the asset 
value of A. T. and T. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



But the telephone company is a 
natural monopoly and must serve 
the whole country, so it is only to 
be expected that it would rank high 
even in comparison with the states. 
Let us, however, take a corporation 
which is not a natural monopoly, 
like United States Steel or General 
Motors. The asset value of United 
States Steel exceeds $2 billion, and 
that of General Motors is almost $2 
billion. There are only 21 sovereign 
states which outrank either United 
States Steel or General Motors in 
wealth. Here again more than half 
of all the states rank below either 
United States Steel or General Mo- 
tors in the assessed value of their 
property. 

It may be conceded that in many 
states, if not in 'most, property, both 
real and personal, is not assessed 
at full value. The moral, however, 
remains the same. The economic 
power of these units is unquestion- 
ably greater by far than that of 
most of the states and cities in which 
the people attempt to govern them- 
selves and make their living. 

It is in the impact of the modern 
corporate organization upon the 
ability of men to make their living 
that the principal modern problems 
of government and economics arise. 
No one will more readily acknow- 
ledge than I that the modern cor- 
poration is an essential unit in mo- 
dern society. Indeed, I go further. 
The modern industrial corporation 
is the characteristic economic insti- 
tution of our time. But because as 
lawyers we liave failed to provide 
the rule of economic order within 
which it shall serve the people, it 
is now concerned primarily in serv- 
ing itself first, and therein lies the 
heart of all modern turbulence and 
disorder. People make and unmake 



governments in order to live. Eco- 
nomic systems are not immune. 

Let us refer again to United 
States Steel as an example of cor- 
porate power. We all know how 
that production is being restrained 
because we do not have enough steel. 
We know that the fiscal managers 
of United States Steel recently 
raised prices. We know that even 
General Motors has curtailed the 
production of automobiles in the 
Cadillac, Pontiac and Chevrolet fac- 
tories for lack of steel. We know 
a score of industries scattered across 
the entire face of the country, in- 
cluding the oil industry, are unable 
to get the steel they want. And so 
we have posed two conflicting ob- 
jectives — the objective of the people 
who want more steel, and the objec- 
tive of the fiscal managers of the 
corporation who want more profit. 
The people, the business and the 
industries which want more steel 
have no recourse because an exceed- 
ingly small group of corporations. 
United States Steel and nine other 
companies, account for 88 per cent 
of all the capital investment in steel 
producing facilities in the countr3^ 

Four of these corporations on 
January i, 1945, held almost 6^ per 
cent of the total American steel in- 
got producing capacity. Thus the 
managers of concentrated steel own- 
ership can tell our whole society 
how much of this basic commodity 
we may have. Surely it is clear that 
the very existence of such a power 
to control a commodity so essential 
to our whole structure, demon- 
strates the need of new adjustment 
between the people and the eco- 
nomic organizations that were cre- 
ated to serve them. 

Now as lawyers we know that a 
great industrial corporation like any 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



of these steel companies depends 
wholly upon two grants of privileg- 
es from the governments of the 
people. They depend in the first 
instance upon the grant of the cor- 
porate charter which brought them 
into existence. In the second place, 
they depend upon the grant of pat- 
ent rights made by the people's gov- 
ernment under the authority of the 
Constitution of the United States. 

What consideration should they 
offer in return for these essential 
favors they have received at the 
hands of the people? Certainly they 
should produce at a price that will 
help to expand the economy. And 
certainly the country sadly needs a 
system that will permit such expan- 
sion. 

I do not say that the managers of 
the giant corporations do not recog- 
nize their social responsibility, but 
I do say that because of the con- 
fused thinking of which I have spok- 
en, by which the rights of man are 
mistaken to be the rights of the 
corporation, the modern American 
corporation and its legal advisers 
are failing to realize the supreme 
necessity of our time for a law 
which will gear our great industrial 
and commercial organizations into 
the economic system that will serve 
the needs of the people in the new 
age of science and technology. . , . 

The failure to lay down this rule 
of social responsibility, the failure 
to draft the frame of harmony with- 
in which modern economic organi- 
zations must work, like the state, 
for the benefit of the people, is the 
cause of the agitation for the est- 
ablishment of totalitarian political 
power. It is the cause of the appear- 
ance of the national labor union. 
It is the cause for the demand, when- 



ever it comes, for broader powers in 
government. 

Thus it has become clear, if only 
we are willing to take ofif the blind- 
ers of our daily habits of thought, 
that the modern corporation for 
lack of a rule of economic order 
has gained control over the mater- 
ials by which men live, and is able 
to hand them out or shut them off 
as the managers of the corporation 
desire. 

Many of you gentlemen gathered 
here today know much about the oil 
business. Many of you have ap- 
peared at committee meetings of 
the Senate at which I also was pre- 
sent. Many of you no doubt have 
heard me praise the petroleum in- 
dustry for the manner in which it 
co-operated with the government to 
produce the oil that was necessary 
to win the war. I am ready to re- 
peat those compliments anywhere. 
The patriotism of the executives of 
the oil industry, and the patriotism 
of the executives of every other 
American industry is not to be 
questioned. \\^hat is lacking is a 
comprehension of the basic fact that 
the modern economy bequeathed to 
us by the engineers and the scien- 
tists is an economy of organization, 
for which we as lawyers have not 
provided the necessary frame of har- 
mony. 

Let us look at the facts with re- 
spect to petroleum, just as we have 
looked at the facts with respect to 
steel. There has been such a concen- 
tration of ownership of the oil re- 
serve of the world that a few com- 
panies now have the power to turn 
on or off the flow of oil that both 
the people and their government 
need, and the power to state at what 
price the people may obtain that oil. 

(continued on page 31) 



I. 



Editorial 




Be A One-Man Committee 

If there is any department in which organized labor has been particu- 
larly weak, that department is public relations. During the past ten years, 
organized labor has grown faster and accomplished more than in any 
comparable ten-year period in history. Yet today there is more antip- 
athy toward labor on the part of the general public than there has been 
since the turn of the century. Why should this be? 

Largely it is because labor has failed to do a public relations job. Pro- 
fessional labor knockers such as Pegler and Lawrence and Fulton Lewis, 
Jr., have hammered away at labor day in and out, and undoubtedly their 
tirades against unionism have had some effect in molding public opinion. 
However, a lot of honest, sincere newspapermen and radio commentators 
who recognize labor as the constructive social force it is, have done even 
more to alienate public favor from organized labor. And they' have done it 
unwittingly and unknowingly, simply because they have been ignorant 
concerning the labor movement and how it is constituted. 

Their chief sin is that they have failed to differentiate between good 
unionism and bad. There are close to sixteen million men and women 
in the labor movement. They belong to several hundred national and inter- 
national organizations. As in every other human institution there is good 
leadership and bad in organized labor. No one can deny that in the last ten 
or twelve years bad leadership in some of the crackpot fringe CIO unions 
has created all sorts of unnecessary disturbances. But their antics have 
worried the stable, constructive elements in labor (which constitute 95%) 
more than anyone else. Yet many respectable, fair-minded editors and 
publications have made no distinction between the two; for the transges- 
sions of the wild-eyed few they have tarred all labor with the same brush 
of condemnation. Over the years, this sort of thing has had its effect. 

There are Communist-minded leaders at the head of a few fringe 
unions; but there are also Communist-minded publishers at the head of 
a few newspapers. To condemn the entire press because a few papers are 
in the hands of nincompoops would be as illogical as it is for the press 
to condemn all labor for the transgressions of a small minority. Yet year 
in and year out, the hundreds of stable, constructive unions have suffered 
because of the shortcomings of the irresponsible few. The general tend- 
ency in both radio and press has been to play up items which discredit 
labor and play down those which reflect credit. Too often (editorials on 
labor matters have been written by writers whose knowledge of labor has 
been very sketchy at best. Down the years, labor publicity has been 
pretty consistently bad — nine times out of ten without any provocation. 

Under the circumstances, it is no wonder labor has many enemies and 
few friends. Yet what can be done to remedy the circumstances? Labor 



THECARPENTER 25 

has no money to spend for gigantic advertising programs or appeals for 
public opinion. In fact all organized labor has is its own enthusiasm and 
self-respect. But perhaps these are enough. If we can communicate them 
to our friends and neighbors perhaps we can accomplish more than all 
the advertising campaigns and publicity campaigns money can buy. If 
each of us appoints himself a one man committee to get the facts before 
the people he comes in contact with, the union point of view may domin- 
ate the nation in a very short while. On the street cars and busses, in lodge 
halls and meeting places, in restaurants and bars, in fact wherever the 
general public congregates, there is always anti-union talk going on. In- 
variably the speaker poses as an authority. Just as invariably he knows 
nothing about labor. Ask him where he gets his data and immediately 
you have him behind the eight ball. It is time we shut him up. The way to 
shut him up is to ask him for facts and figures rather than opinions. The 
next time you hear one of these orators spouting off about strikers, ask 
him how much time was lost by strikers last year. Fifty to one he will 
not know. The next time you hear him cussing unions because commodi- 
ty prices are high, ask him how much profit industry made last year and 
how last year's profits compared with pre-war years. He will not know 
the answer to that one either. Roughly, one-half of one per cent of total 
working time was lost through strikes last year. Industry profits topped 
seventeen billion dollars — a figure that is almost three time higher than 
the figure for any of the immediate pre-war years. 

If each of us will appoint himself a one man committee to straighten 
out friends and neighbors who may have misconceptions about organized 
labor we can do the kind of public relations job the labor movement 
desperately needs. 



The Labor Vote "Myth" Is No Myth 

Organized labor continues to come through at the ballot box. Last 
month the organized working people of Iowa and Florida served notice 
on all politicians that, the propaganda that the labor vote is a "myth" is 
in itself a myth. By comfortable majorities, the workers of the two states 
defeated men who made no bones about their opposition to unionism. 

Iowa is one of the chief agricultural states in the union. Of late years 
it has attracted considerable manufacturing to its major cities, but by 
and large it still remains preponderately agricultural. Despite this fact, 
several candidates with anti-labor sentiments were decisively voted out 
of office in the primaries held early last month. With the support of 
most unions, Williams Beardsley was nominated for governor on the Re- 
publican ticket. Opposing him was incumbent Robert Blue. Blue had the 
backing and blessing of a powerful state machine. He thought it would 
be popular to go all out against organized labor and he proceeded to do so. 
For his pains he received the worst drubbing any politician received in 
Iowa in recent years. 

Another Iowa politician unsympathetic toward labor also took a de- 
cisive licking in the primaries. In the Third Iowa Congressional District, 
organized labor went after the scalp of Congressman Gwynne whose four- 



26 THECAKPEXTER 

teen year old labor record in the House is almost ioo';"c bad. Probablv 
his worst performance was his effort to get the \\'age-Hour Act changed 
so that unscrupulous employers could violate the Act with relative im- 
punity, and avoid payment of wage claims through a stringent statute of 
limitations. In any event, labor bucked the renomination of Gwynne. 
When the ballots were tabulated it was found that Gwynne was literally 
snowed under by H. R. Gross, a former radio broadcaster. 

In Florida, labor again trounced Tom Watson, former Attorney General 
of :he state who spent much of his campaign crusading against unionism 
and the union shop. After being thoroughly beaten in his bid for nomina- 
tion as governor, the idea of separating himself from the public payroll be- 
came obnoxious and he nled for justice of the State Supreme Court. With 
labor pretty much caught off guard, he almost made it in the first primary. 
But in the runoff with T. Frank Hobson he did not even come close. 

Iowa and Florida have shovrn what organized labor can do when it 
mobilizes its political strength. Gwynne. Blue and Watson can now testif)'' 
from first hand knowledge that the "'abor -.'ote''' is no m3^th. They chose to 
harpoon labor at every opportunity.- and they are now out of office talking 
to themselves. 

That organized labor must change the complexion of the present Con- 
gress and many state legislatures should be clear by now to every worker 
and every wage earner in the nation. Iowa and Florida have shown w^hat 
can be done. It is up to workers in each of the forty-eight states to see 
that a real housecleaning job is done in November. 

• 

He Has a Job Right at Home 

Last month a Xew York attorney named Iserman got himself consid- 
erable publicity by recommending to Congress a drastic revision of the 
Taft-Hartley Act. Mr. Iserman seem.s to think the Act is too complicated. 
The remedy he proposes is simple; let the law be revised to curb union 
shop, industry-v.ide bargaining, pension plans, and. of course, strikes. He 
did not recommend abolition of union meetings by law but that might 
merely have been an oversight. 

Who this rr.an Iserman is. we do not knovr. However, in all probability 
he does not know us either; so we start out even. But we do recognize 
what Mr. Iserman sa^'s as typical of the thinking of a large number of 
intelligent professional people. They are the doctors and dentists and 

law^'ers who say: *"Of course I'm for labor, BUT Following the 

"but" there is usualh* a long list of qualifications until, like the famous 
''Alister Hinnissey" each would like to see unions with no dues, no de- 
m.ar. is, r.: meetings, and darn few members. At the same time these pro- 
fess::: a. ar: ir abor experts belong to professional associations which 
have :'. :std -..a arrar_gements which make any union contracts we have 
ever see:: str: ::'.;■ aaaateurish. 

The doctor who beats his breast over the fact a worker is sometimes 
required to pay dues, because a majority of his fellow workers want it that 
way, belongs to an association that controls the medical profession from 
A to Z The young man just out of medical school joins the association 



T II E C A R P E X T E R 27 

or he plays Ned trying- to get started. The association promotes fee 
schedules, promotes standards for prospective candidate's to the profes- 
sion, and otherwise works to keep the profession a closed corporation. 

Lawyers and dentists and other professional men belong- to similar 
groups. Last month a fig-ht developed in Pennsylvania because a g-roup of 
lawyers in a rich community had a working- arrangement for keeping- out 
other lawyers who were trying- to horn in on the lucrative business. They 
did not call their arrangement a closed shop but it was more closed shop 
than any union agreement ever written. 

Let's go even farther. Let's take a look at business. The directors 
of General ^vlotors probably have no use for the union shop. Yet what 
happens when a man takes on a franchise to sell Pontiacs? Does General 
Motors permit him to sell Studebakers too if he wants to? Certainly not. 
He deals exclusively with the Pontiac Division of General Motors or he 
soon loses his dealership. If that is not closed shop, what is it? General 
Motors does not worry about the fact that the dealer might be able to 
make more money by selling Studebakers as well as Pontiacs. He deals 
exclusively with Pontiac or out he goes. 

And so it goes all the way down the line. There is a closed shop 
arrangement in every business and profession. While professional men or 
business men indulge in it, it is perfectly all right; but the minute work- 
ing people want the same thing it immediately becomes coercive, un- 
American, and unconstitutional. The doctor, lawyer and business man 
lose no time in demanding passage of a measure to outlaw such effrontry 
on the part of labor. 

Probably if someone suggested to ]\Ir. Iserman that a law should be 
passed to make illegal closed shop arrangements in medicine or law or 
business he would be appalled. However, he is ver^-- vociferous in his 
demands that closed shop arrangement be prohibited to carpenters and 
bricklayers and electricians and teamsters. Until Mr. Iserman changes the 
Bar Association to the point where an attorney can belong or not belong, 
can charge fees of his own choosing, can get his son or friend into the 
profession without fulfilling requirements promoted by the Bar Associa- 
tion, he has a big job right in his own bailiwick. After he has accom- 
plished that is time enough for him to start recommending restrictions on 
labor. 



Yesterday's Heritage Is Today's Pottage 

If there were some way of compiling the figures, it would be inter- 
esting to know how many men in the histor}^ of the world died to establish 
the right of every citizen to vote. The number would probably run into 
many, many millions. Yet today millions of Americans each election fail 
to utilize the ballot which was bought so dearly by their forefathers. 
Somehow or other it seems inconceivable, but unfortunately it is the truth. 
It is also the truth that in those nations where voters have been negligent 
the}- eventually lost the right to vote. Italy and Germany under Benito 
and Adolph are but two recent examples. Certainly the moral is too 
obvious to require any further comment. 



28 



A step is made toward 



Relief For The Disabled 

• • 

MOXTHLY benefits to workers deprived of earning power because 
of permanent and total disability have been recommended to the 
Senate Committee on Finance in the second of a series of reports 
prepared b}' the Advisory Council on Social Security. 

Protection against the risk of permanent and total disabilit}", the 
Council points out, is one of the most urgent economJc needs of American 
workers. Fev.- workers, the Council said, can save enough to support them- 
selves and their families during a long period of total disablement — a 
period which ma}" last for the rest of the v.orker's life. 

Monthly benefits, according to the 
recommendations, would be paid 
under the Social Security Act's old- 
age and survivors insurance pro- 
gram when a person covered by the 
program becomes permanently and 
totally disabled, just as benefits are 
now paid to insured workers in old 
age. 

Headed by Edvv-ard R. Stettinius, 
Jr., the Advisory Council is com- 
posed of 17 prominent citizens 
named 'oy the Senate Committee last 
fall. In presenting its report on 
disability insurance to Chairman 
Eugene D. Millikin of the Senate 
Committee on Finance, the Council 
pointed to the close relationship be- 
t«-een this report and its 22-point 
program presented in April for ex- 
panding and modernizing the old- 
age and survivors insurance system. 
That program looks to the exten- 
sion of coverage to practically all 
■^-orkers and to average benefits at 
more than twice the present levels. 
Today's proposals, the Council stat- 
ed, round out the measures neces- 
sary to give old-age, survivors, and 
disability insurance protection to 
practically all persons in the coun- 
trv who are g-ainfullv occupied. 



The economic consequences of 
total disability are frequentl}" even 
more serious than retirement or 
death, the Council said. The prob- 
lem of the disabled younger w^ork- 
er is particularh^ difiicult. since he 
is likely to have young children and 
not to have had an opportunity to 
acquire any significant savings." 

Stressing its belief in contribu- 
tory social insurance rather than 
public assistance as the most sat- 
isfactory long-range method of 

achieving social security, the Coun- 
cil said that the disabled person 
should not have to be virtually des- 
titute before he can become eligible 
for benefits. ''Certainly there is as . 
great a need to protect the re- 
sources, the self-reliance, dignity, 
and self-respect of disabled work- 
ers as of any other group."" 

Few of the Nation's workers now 
have any protection against perma- 
nent and total disability, according] 
to the Council. There is protection 
for railroad workers, some Federal, 
State, and local government em- 
ployees; and veterans; and a small 
number of persons have purchased 
disability protection from private 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



insurance companies. State work- 
men's compensation acts provide 
compensation for disabilities which 
are the result of a man's employ- 
ment. More than 95 per cent of all 
total disabilities, the report points 
out, however, result from causes not 
connected with the worker's em- 
ployment. Most workers who be- 
come disabled now have to rely on 
relief. 

Difficulties in extending social 
insurance to cover permanent and 
total disability were admitted by 
the Council. Because of these diffi- 
culties, the recommendations are for 
what is described as a ''highly cir- 
cumscribed program" which will 
permit the development of adminis- 
trative experience under relatively 
favorable conditions. Stating it was 
impressed with the seriousness of 
the problem of permanent and total 
disability and that experience to 
guide the administration of dis- 
ability insurance is available from 
workmen's compensation, commer- 
cial insurance, the various special 
disability programs in this country, 
and from foreign systems, the 
Council said that the time had come 
to extend the social insurance sys- 
tem to afford protection against 
disability. 

Costs of the recommended pro- 
gram are expected to be very low. 
About i/io to J of I per cent of 
payroll would cover the "level- 
premium" costs of the proposed 
benefits, and even smaller amounts 
would be required in the early 
years. Level costs of the old-age 
and survivors insurance recommend- 
ed by the Council in its earlier re- 
port range from 5 to 7 per cent of 
payroll. 

Major points in the recommended 
permanent total disability insurance 
program are: 
I. Disability protection to "insur- 



ed" workers who have 10 years 
or more of work in jobs covered 
by the law and who also have 
had employment in at least one- 
half the time after 1948 and be- 
fore becoming disabled and also 
half the time within the period 
immediately before the disabil- 
ity begins. 

2. To receive benefits, an insured 
person must be "permanently 
and totally" disabled for more 
than 6 consecutive months. His 
disability must be one which 
can be medically proved by ob- 
jective tests and which is likely 
to last for a long and indefinite 
time. 

3. Monthly benefits to the worker 
equal to the ameunt he would 
receive if he were entitled to a 
retirement benefit under the old- 
age insurance part of the law. 
No benefits for dependents 
would be provided. 

4. Preservation of the disabled per- 
son's rights to full old-age and 
survivorship protection so that 
he and his dependents could not 
lose this protection, as now 
sometimes happens when a work- 
er becomes disabled. 

5. Rehabilitation of beneficiaries if 
that service will help them to re- 
turn to gainful work. 

6. Benefits to be stopped if the dis- 
abled persons recovers, refuses 
to accept rehabilitation services 
or refuses to undergo periodic 
medical examinations to prove 
that he is still disabled. 

No benefits should be paid, the 
Council recommended, during any 
period for which compensation is 
payable under a workmen's compen- 
sation law. The Council's program 
is not intended to duplicate the pro- 
tection aft'orded by workmen's com- 
pensation or to interfere with the 
development of such programs. 



30 THECARPEXTER 

The recommended benefits are not month waiting- period recommended 

intended to cover disability which by the Council is certain to work 

is temporary or which at the end an unnecessary hardship in forty- 

of six months shows definite signs nine out of fifty cases of total dis- 

of probable recovery. Cases eligible ability. Too. the Council's recom- 

for payment would be of long-term mendations make no provisions for 

chronic nature making- a worker in- dependents. A disabled single man 

capable of self-support. would get the same benefits as a 

Therein lies the chief v^-eakness disabled married man with several 

of the program. Few, if any, work- children. Furthermore, payment 

ers can finance themseh'es for a six- schedules are not very realistic in 

month period while waiting for dis- light of today's prices. Disability 

ability benefits to begin. A man who insurance is a humane and desirable 

loses his eyesight is as blind six social step forward; but it should 

da}^s after his sight goes as he is be broad enough to meet the needs 

six months later. The arbitrarv six- of the times. 



1948 Headed For New Highs 

Net income of 297 industrial manufacturers for the first quarter of 1948 
"was 26 per cent above the comparable period last year, according to a sur- 
vey conducted by the New York Times. 

^Meanwhile, the latest figures on the cost of living released by the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics show a continued rise. The consumers' price 
index for April was 8. 4 per cent higher than a year ago: 27 per cent over 
June. 1946, and 71.7 per cent above the level of August, 1939. 

The Times reported net income of $895,132,357 for the 297 industrial 
firms on the basis of their official earnings statements. This compared 
very favorably with the $709,651.80 earned in the first three months of 1947. 

The newspaper account cited the continued heav^* demand and higher 
prices as the principal factors for the good earnings reported. Prime ex- 
ample of this was seen in the petroleum industry where several companies 
reported record profits for the first three months of 1948. 

The Times survey showed that the combined net income of 20 oil 
concerns totaled $241,326,500, exceeding the March, 1947, quarter by 109 
per cent. 

The report declared that the large foreign aid program and heav}^ 
expenditures for national defense would be sustaining factors for a period 
of "relatively good earnings in certain industries." 

The March output of manufactured goods amounted to 198 per cent, 
compared with 197 per cent for February and January, based on the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board's yardstick of factory output, taking 1935-39 ^s 100. 
It was only 2 per cent belovr the post-war peak reached last October, but 
1.5 per cent above the March rate, last year. 

Manufacturers' sales also were higher during March, reaching an esti- 
mated Si8,200,ooo,ooo for a gain of $2,200,000,000 over February. Month- 
end inventories were carried at a book value of $28,900,000,000 against 
$28,800,000,000 a month earlier. Inventories of durable and nondurable 
goods industries at some $13,600,000,000 and $15,300,000,000, respectively. 
advanced about $100,000,000. 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



Corporations vs. Men 

(continued from page 23) 

The armed services of this country 
still lack commitments from the 
oil industry for the delivery of oil 
that is necessary to maintain our 
fleet, our army, and our air force, 
even for the balance of this year. 
This. I understand, is largely a ques- 
tion of price. Let us not forget that 
if the power to tax is the power to 
destroy, the power to fix prices is 
likewise the power to destroy. 
When concentrated economic power 
fixes prices to serve its own pur- 
poses without public responsibility, 
it undermines the very foundations 
of society, "The man who writes 
the price tag," Robert Wood John- 
son, the industrialist, tells us, "con- 
trols the throttle of business." . . . 

Our petroleum reserves are esti- 
mated at 20.8 billion barrels. The 
major companies now own 8i per 
cent of the reserves which are great- 
er by 4 million barrels than the re- 
serves of which they owned 65 per 
cent nine years ago. That, gentle- 
men, is the progress of concentra- 
tion of ownership of a natural re- 
source without which our standard 
of living and of business would be 
impossible. 

But the story is not yet told. 
There are great reserves in Latin 
America and across the sea in the 
Near East. In Iran, Iraq, and Saudi 
Arabia there is a greater total prov- 
en reserve than here at home, and 
a half dozen corporations control 
these reserves also. 

Let there be no misunderstanding. 
These reserves, so essential to the 
progress of the world, would not 
be known if it weren't for the oil 
corporation, i t s management, i t s 
scientific staff, its trained techni- 
cians, and its workers. All credit 
goes to them, and as an American 



I am proud of the fact that the dis- 
covery and the development of these 
reserves is primarily an achievement 
of American resourcefulness and 
skill. It remains true, however, that 
the petroleum situation in the Near 
East demonstrates beyond any pos- 
sibility of contradiction that the 
modern oil corporation has taken 
on the function and power of gov- 
ernment itself. It is hard to draw 
the line where one begins and the 
other ends. . . . 

Spokesmen for the modern Amer- 
ican corporation sometimes delude 
themselves into the belief that it is 
a thoroughly democratic organiza- 
tion. Just a few months ago during 
the Telephone Hour on the NBC 
radio program, the commercial an- 
nouncement, written for and doubt- 
less approved by A. T. and T., point- 
ed with pride to the fact I have al- 
ready mentioned, that the number 
of its stockholders approximate 
700,000 : 

"In that great crowd of stock- 
holders," the announcer purred, 
"you'd see school teachers and nur- 
ses, bakers and grocers, farmers, 
housewives, bankers, salesmen, and 
many others ; more than one-half of 
them would be women. You'd see 
citizens from every state in the 
Union — from Maine and Oregon, 
Illinois, and Texas, Maryland and 
North Dakota. Five states have 
more than 50,000 stockholders each. 
Twenty-six states nave more than 
5,000, and no state has fewer than 
500." 

All this is true, but the signifi- 
cance is all contained in the next 
sentence. I quote : 

"More than 650,000 of these stock- 
holders have less than 100 shares 
each, and no one of them holds as 
much as one-half of i per cent of 
the total stock." 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



This is characteristic of the giant 
corporate organizations which carry 
on the interstate and foreign com- 
merce of this country. It is true of 
Standard of New Jersey. It is true 
of General Motors. It is true of 
United States Steel. The average 
stockholdings are small, but if we 
were to determine the median own- 
ership instead of the average, we 
would find a much more remarkable 
situation. The average holding of 
the Standard of New Jersey is only 
167 shares, but one-half of the 164,- 
000 stockholders own less than 30 
shares each. The average holdings 
of United States Steel is only 51 
shares, but one-half of the 243,674 
stockholders own less than 14 
shares each. 

This makes it clear how it is 
that in the modern corporation own- 
ership and management have been 
completely separate i. Far from hav- 
ing a typically American institu- 
tion, we have an institution the very 
nature of which requires a planned 
economy in the formulation of 
which neither the stockholders nor 
the people of the United States have 
any effective participation. 

The corporations employ mil- 
lions. General Motors alone has 
300,000 employees ; United States 
Steel, 266,000; Bethlehem Steel, 
143,000; General Electric 143,000 — 
more workers than there are people 
in most cities and in many states. 
These are people without economic 
freedom because in the first place 
they lack the tools, with which to 
support themselves, and, in the sec- 
ond place, they exercise no influ- 
ence in determining the economic 
policy to which they must submit. 
Whatever we think about it, how- 
ever we may feel about it, in this 
crisis of civilization when the whole 



world seems to be trembling upon 
the very brink of chaos, we must re- 
member the solemn fact that the 
proletariat is nothing more nor less 
than a population without economic 
freedom. 

When the American Constitution 
was written and the Bill of Rights 
passed, the lawyers of America be- 
lieved that they were establishing 
what Abraham Lincoln at Gettys- 
burg called a government "of," 
"by," and "for the people." During 
the whole first 80 years of the exist- 
ence of this Republic every presi- 
dent at one time or another referred 
to this government as an experi- 
ment, because never before had 
there existed upon earth a govern- 
ment in which the people had made 
themselves the masters. 

Now we are facing the crisis 
early statesmen had in mind when 
they referred to our government as 
an experiment. They were fearful 
that the time might come when for 
one reason or another the people 
would in fact lose control and the 
government pass into the hands of 
some group, or class, or man. . . . 

We must draft a national law to J 
define the powers, the duties and re- 
sponsibilities of all economic organ- 
izations. Failure to do it will mean J 
only continued conflict between ■ 
management and labor, and a grow- 
ing demand for government action 
which can end only in disaster for 
the American system. ... 

If capitalism would save itself it 
must first help to save democracy. 
The writing of the rule by which 
this can be achieved is the task of 
the modern lawyer if he would take 
a place of honor in the memory of 
his countrymen with the framers of 
the Constitution. 



Official Information 




General Offioi'rs of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of ( ARPENTERS and JOES'ERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, O. WM. BLAIER 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 

Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Sixth District. A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of July, August and September, 
ig48, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt 
of this circular should notify Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 



SPECIAL. NOTICE 

A check of the records at the General Office shows that some Local 
Unions and District Councils are not awarding a Certificate of Journeyman- 
ship to apprentices who have completed their prescribed training. The 
Twenty-fourth General Convention decreed that each apprentice fulfilling 
all the qualifications of apprenticeship training should be awarded such a 
certificate upon assuming the status of a journeyman. Application for such 
a certificate should be made to the General Office whenever an apprentice is 
ready for transfer into the journeyman classification. (See Section 4 2 of 
the General Constitution.) 



2461 Cleveland, Tenn. 

2462 Las Vegas, N. Mex. 
2482 Grayburg, Texas 

2464 Ishpeming, Mich. 
2604 Erwin, Tenn. 

2465 Wilmar, Minn. 
2467 Florence, Colo. 



NEAV CHARTERS ISSUED 

2468 Eugene, Ore. 

2469 SwiftCurrent,SaslJ.,Can. 

2470 TuUahoma. Tenn. 
2641 M^ple Creek, Calif. 

2471 Lake Andes, S. D. 
2649 Rlggins, Ida. 



2472 Savannah, Ga. 



2473 Bristol. Tenn.-Va. 

2474 Trail. B. C, Can. 

2475 Hillside, N. J. 

2476 Grand Rapids. Minn. 
2642 Tuolumne, Calif. 
2678 Camden. Ark. 

2478 Hollister, Calif. 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



%t&i in ^tatt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother JACOB ANDERSON, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother SAM BASCHIN, Local No. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother WESLEY E. BASORE, Local No. 651, Jackson, Mich. 
Brother HARRY L. BEARD, Local No. 1489, Burlington, N. J. 
Brother EUGENE BUCKLEY, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother VITORRIO CARDUCCL Local No. 2236, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES DIEZEL, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 
Brother WM. O. DONNELL, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother CHARLES EISENHART, SR., Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
Brother JESSE W. FISH, Local No. 2067, Medford, Ore. 
Brother JOHN FLETCHER, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother BEN FREDRICKSON, Local No. 2236, New York, N. Y. 
Brother BEN GARBER, Local No. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother LUDWIG HABLE, Local No. 419, Chicago ,111. 
Brother A. J. JOHNSON, Local No. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
Brother D. L. KAUFFMAN, Local No. 288, Homestead, Pa. 
Brother HENRY KIRSCHNER, Local No. 1365, Cleveland, Ohio 
Brother ROBERT KLIGMAN, Local No. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother DAVID LAUKKAUEN, Local No. 2236, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CARL LINDQUIST, Local No. 2236, New York, N. Y. 
Brother WILLIAM L. LYONS, Local No. 1765, Orlando, Fla. 
Brother GUIDO MANUCCI, Local No. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother FRED L. McNALL, Local No. 1335, Wilmington, Cal. 
Brother DOMENICK MISANTONE, Local No. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother CHARLES H. MOORE, Local No. 1489, Burlington, N. J. 
Brother PETER OYPT, Local No. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
Brother HENRY PETERSON, Local No. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
Brother AMBROSE PFEIFFER, Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
Brother MICHAEL PIENTA, Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
Brother JAMES PINCH, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother THOMAS H. PIPER, Local No. 288, Homestead, Pa. 
Brother CHARLES L. PITCHER, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother GEORGE QUICK, Local No. 2236, New York, N. Y. 
Brother C. A. RICKERD, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
Brother AUGUST SALO, Local No. 2236, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JOSEPH SCHNELL, Local No. 1209, Newark, N. J. 
Brother JACOB SCHOESCHE, Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
Brother C. M. SCOTT, Local No. 201, Wichita, Kan. 
Brother SAM SELIGSON, Local No. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother JAMES SMITH, Local No. 612, Union Hill, N. J. 
Brother COLOGERO SOLDANO, Local No. 2236, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JASPER C. STIMSON, Local No. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother ARCHIE D. STORM, Local No. 651, Jackson, Mich. 
Brother SAMUEL N. STROOP, Local No. 288, Homestead, Pa. 
Brother E. E. TOWNE, Local No. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 
Brother ERNEST WERBKAY, Local No. 298, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JOHN SCOTT WILEY, Local No. 44, Urbana, IlL 
Brother J. A. WILLMORE, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn, 
Brother GEORGE WITT, Local No. 1922, Chicago, 111. 



CorrospondoncQ 



nii 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

AVALLA WALLA WORKS EL\RD OX APPREXTICESHIP 

The Walla Walla, Washington, Area Carpenters' Joint Apprenticeship Committee 
held its first Apprenticeship Banquet on March 17, 1948, at which time two new 
journeymen, Paul Good and Forrest Mcintosh, received their Certificates of Com- 
pletion. The banquet was well attended. Some seventy-five members of Local 
Union No. 1214, employers and guests were on hand for the ceremonies. It was 
the culmination of a lot of hard work on the part of the Union, the employers and 
government officials. Walla Walla Local No. 1214 has had only one goal in mind 
— the building of skilled craftsmen and better citizens through careful and com- 
petent training, the maintaining of the proper ratio between journeymen and 
apprentices, and general advancement of the trade of carpentry. 

Added significance was given to the banquet by the presentation of Certificates 
of Meritorious Service to committee members Secretary Alex G. Weber, John Cun- 
ningham, and E. L. (Tex) Walters and employer members Dave Mcintosh, H. E. 
Gross and Gordon Gilmore by the Western Washington Apprentice Council, the 
first presentations of their kind in the state. Through the efforts of Local 1214, 
the Walla Walla High School and the Bureau of Apprenticeship, a pre-apprentice- 
ship class has been started in the high school. It is the hope of the Union that this 
course will prove of value to many young men looking toward the trade as a 
career. 

It is the sincere hope of the officers and members of Local Union No. 1214 
that the result of its emphasis on apprenticeship will eventually pay big dividends 
to the community, the nation and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters. 

♦ 

PHELADELPHIA LOCALS SPONSOR JOINT ANXrVERSARY PARTY 

Local Unions 443 and 1823 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America, celebrated their 10th anniversary with a gala dinner, show and 
dance on April 2, 19 48, at the Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The almost overflow crowd of 500 people that congregated was signally hon- 
ored by the presence of General Executive Board Member O. William Blaier, who 
presided as Toastmaster. 

James L. McDevitt, President of the Pennsylvania Federation of Labor, gave 
one of his usual sterling addresses and counseled all present on the vital necessity 
of defeating all Anti-Labor Legislators at the forthcoming elections. 

Joseph A. McDonough, Business Manager of the Philadelphia Central Labor 
Union, addressed the gathering on the local level regarding municipal affairs in 
Philadelphia. 

Included among the distinguished guests were the following: Joseph F. Burke. 
President of the Philadelphia Building Trades; William A. Kendrick and Theodore 
P. O'Keefe of the Pennsylvania State Council; John J. Cregan, Richard O'DriscoU, 
Frank Gravener and Edward Kane of the Metropolitan District Council of Carpen- 
ters; James Patterson, Business Representative of Local Union 2212, Newark, New 
Jersey; James J. Sweeney and Edward Rank, Business Representatives of Local 
Union 22 9 5, New York City and Benjamin Goldberg, Business Representative of 
Local Union 2241, Brooklyn, New York. 

The affair was rounded out with a well balanced show and the committee 
headed by George Forbes and Fred Davis as co-chairmen, and Donald Scott and 
James F. Cassidy as co-secretaries is to be complimented for its diligent efforts 
in making the anniversary celebration such a wonderful success. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 
LOCAL NO. 740 DEDICATES HEROES' PLAQUE 



On March 19, 1948, Mill- 
wright and Machinery Erec- 
tors' Local No. 740, New 
York, dedicated a bronze 
plaque in honor of its mem- 
bers who served in the arm- 
ed forces of World War No. 
2. Charles W. Hanson, 
President of the New York 
District Council of Carpen- 
ters, was the master of cere- 
monies. General Represen- 
tative John Flynn was the 
guest speaker and Charles 
Johnson, General Executive 
Board Member of the First 
District, after an inspiring 
speech, dedicated and un- 
veiled the plaque. The re- 
marks of our three distin- 
guished guests were very 
timely and were well taken 
by our membership. 






Reading left to right — George F. Welsch, Business Repre- 
sentative of Local No. 740; Charles W. Hanson, President 
of the N. Y. District Council of Carpenters; Charles John- 
son, General Executive Board Member of the First District; 
John Flynn, General Representative. 



SIXTIETH ANMVERSARY OF LOCAL No. 419 

May 8, 1948 marked another milestone in the Chicago history of organized 
labor. On that day, Local 419 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America, celebrated its Sixtieth Anniversary. A large gathering, consisting 
of officers and members of the various Locals from the Chicago area, joined in the 
festivities. General President William L. Hutcheson expressed his deepest regrets 
in being unable to attend but sent his sincere congratulations and best wishes for 
a successful evening. 

The absence of President Hutcheson was compensated for by the appearance of 
the well known and well liked Jack Stevenson, former President of the Chicago 
District Council, now 2nd Vice-President at the General Office. Brother Stevenson's 
timely speech commanded the full attention of all present and upon completion 
received tremendous applause. 

Among the celebrants attending were George C. Ottens, President, Illinois State 
Council of Carpenters, with Gordon Shelton, Vice-President, District No. 2; W. C. 
Hill, Secretary-Treasurer; Mike Sexton, President, Chicago District Council, with 
Secretary Johnson, Vice-President Andrup and Business Agents Butler, Kenney 
and Johanson. Others, too numerous to mention, also contributed to a pleasant 
evening. 

The success of the celebration can largely be attributed to the combined efforts 
of the Committee headed by Joseph Lehnert, President of Local 419, supported by 
Vice-President Ed Pauls, Warden Herman Bluethner, Conductor Joseph Meyer who 
acted as reception committee; Paul Schroeder, Recording Secretary who extended 
invitations and arranged for the disbursing of tickets; Henry Goerling, Financial 
Secretary who supervised the serving of refreshments; William H. Koehne, Treas- 
urer, who performed splendidly as Master of Ceremonies and was responsible for 
decorations; and Trustees, Brothers Walter Badekow, Arthur Kuehn, Wilhelm 
Schmidt who capably handled the financial affairs; and last but not least Brothers 
Tony Clancy and William Grusdat and many others who contributed so unselfishly 
to the final success. 



When did you last read Section 7 of our Constitution? Is every eligible 
worker in your jurisdiction a member? 



1 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



MIDDL.ETOWX HONORS GRAND OLD TIMER 

In honor of one of the really fine old timers in the labor movement, Local Union 
No. 1512, Middletown, Connecticut, on the night of April 22, sponsored a fine testi- 
monial dinner and social evening. Honored guest was Archibald W. Johnson, grand 
old man of Local No. 1512. 

Brother Johnson was born June 2 7, 18 67. He is not only the oldest living mem- 
ber of the Local Union but also the longest time member. He Joined the Union in 
September, 1906. The following year he was elected Financial Secretary, and ex- 




cept for a few months when he worked in another jurisdiction, he has held that 
office ever since. In forty-two years he has never been in arrears and he has seldom 
missed a meeting. 

During the course of the evening, many fine tributes were paid to Brother 
Johnson. Joseph M. Rourke, secretary-treasurer of the State Federation, recalled 
many years of harmonious relationship with Brother Johnson. Michael Misenti, 
vice president of the State Federation, lauded Brother Johnson as the daddy of the 
Central Labor Union. Vincent Scamporino, legal advisor for the Middletown 
Central Labor Union, also paid high tribute to the loyalty, integrity and devotion 
to duty displayed by Brother Johnson during the past forty years. 

John Prout, president of Local No. 1512 also gave a brief talk outlining the 
many contributions made by Brother Johnson. At the conclusion of his address 
he presented Brother Johnson with an appropriate card and purse. 



liOOAIi No. 189 HONORS 8 FINE OLiD TIMERS 

More than 250 members of Local Union 189, Quincy, Illinois, their wives and 
invited guests gathered in St. Francis school hall Saturday night, April 15, to 
honor eight veteran members of the union who have held membership for more 
than fifty years. The dinner also observed the sixty-second anniversary of the 
affiliation of the local with the international union. 



38 THE CARPENTER 

The oldest member present was Peter Bruenger, 89, who has been a regular 
member of the Local since December 3, 1897. Mr. Bruenger was a charter mem- 
ber of the Local when It was organized in April, 1886. He later dropped his mem- 
bership, but renewed it in 18 97. 

Louis Klyensteuber, 84, and Henry Ledebrink, 84, are the next oldest members. 
Mr. Kleyensteuber has been a member of the Local since November 25, 1897, and 
Mr. Ledebrink since April 14, 189 8. 

Other members honored included John Henry Boge, 80, a member since Febru- 
ary 24, 1898; August Wolfmeyer, 75, a member since December 9, 1897; Ben 
Kuhlman, 75, a member since April 14, 1898; Edward P. Meyer, 74, a member 
since December 9, 1897, and Gerry Kemner, 71, a member since December 9, 1897. 

The event was of special interest to Mr. Meyer as it occurred on his 74th birth- 
day. It also served as a reunion for Mr. Meyer, Mr. Wolfmeyer, and Mr. Kemner, 
all of whom were taken into the union on the same day, December 9, 189 7. 

Ray Eickelschulte, vice-president of the Local, presided as toastmaster at the 
dinner and introduced the various officers and distinguished guests. Present offi- 
cers of the Local are Fred Stevens, president; Mr. Eickelshulte, vice-president, 
Ray Brinkman, recording secretary; Oscar Trine, financial secretary; Art Sexauer, 
warden; Frank Littleton, conductor, and Bernard Eberle, Herbert Rakers and 
Robert Waterkotte, trustees. 

George C. Ottens of Elmhurst, president of the Illinois State Council of Car- 
penters, representing William L. Hutcheson, general president, was the principal 
speaker. Several of the honored guests told of their early experiences in carpen- 
tering in Quincy. 

Following the dinner there was dancing for the remainder of the evening. 



LOCAIj No. 3038 SCHEDULES DANCE 

With a 383 to 15 victory in a recent NLRB election under its belt, Local Union 
No. 3038 of Bonner, Mont., is looking forward to bigger and better things. On the 
night of March 20th, the Local Union was scheduled to hold a dance which was 
arousing considerable interest among members. 

Following the regular meeting of March 14, the ladies came through again. 
After the business session was concluded, the ladies served a light lunch consisting 
of coffee and cake — both of which were delicious. Three cakes were raffled off by 
Li. R. Christman. Everyone present went home well satisfied. 



CHARLEROI CELEBRATES 46 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

Charleroi, Pa., Local Union No. 1044 celebrated its Forty-sixth Anniversary on 
the night of March 18th with a banquet and social evening. Some 175 members, 
friends and guests, including three charter members of the Union, were on hand 
to help make the evening a memorable one. The Presbyterian Church of Charleroi 
was the scene of the festivities and all who attended unanimously voted the evening 
a complete success. 

Principal speaker of the evening was James L. McDevitt, president of the State 
Federation of Labor. Brother McDevitt touched on the evils inherent in the Taft- 
Hartley Act and other anti-labor legislation. Earlier in the evening he delivered 
a broadcast on the same subject for the Monongahela Central Trades Council over 
Station WESA of Charleroi. 

Another guest of honor was Brother William J. Kelly, representative of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters, who delivered his remarks to the wives. It was 
up to the wives, he said, to see that their husbands got out and voted on election 
day. No one, he said, was going to tell them whom they must vote for, but he 
stressed the importance of every American worker voting so that labor can regain 
what it has lost through indifference on election day, State Senator Lane of Wash- 
ington County and Representative Reese of the same county were also among 
the guests. 




CALIFORNIA STATE COUNCIL OF CARPENTER AUXILIARIES 

The Editor: 

Greetings from the California State Council of Carpenters Auxiliaries to all 
Auxiliaries and State Councils. 

We would like you to know we are very active out here on the west coast, 
having organized a State Council in 1941. 

We have just closed our fifth council convention in Hollywood, California, hav- 
ing had to discontinue our convention in the war years due to the lack of transpor- 
tation and hotel reservations. 

We have twenty-three Auxiliaries affiliated with the State Council, and forty 
delegates and officers present at the convention. 

We discuss and exchange ideas of how to keep the members of our respective 
Auxiliaries interested, and ways of raising money to carry on the work for chari- 
table and social affairs. 

We have a resolution committee, legislation committee, finance committee, and 
constitution and by-laws. We also appoint a memorial committee and pay silent 
respect to all members of Auxiliaries who have passed away during the year. 

We have divided the state into four districts, and elected a board member for 
each district. 

It is the duty of all officers to visit sister Auxiliaries, form new Auxiliaries, 
and encourage them to join in the State Council. 

Any Carpenter's local in California which wishes to form an Auxiliary can get 
in touch with these ladles who will help them organize same. 

At this time we would like to extend an invitation to all Carpenter's Auxiliaries 
in California to join the State Council. 

The per capita tax is five cents per month, for each member in good standing, 
payable quarterly. Our first quarter began March 1st. 

We will gladly send all information to any California Carpenter's Auxiliary 
which would care to receive it. 

We would also appreciate hearing from any other State Council, or Auxiliary 
which would care to write or form a State Council. 

Fraternally yours, 

Mae C. Hoover, President, 

State Council Carpenter's Auxiliary. 



GARY LADIES CELEBRATE 1st ANNIVERSARY 

The Editor: 

Local Ladies Auxiliary No. 471 of Gary, Indiana, last month celebrated its First 
Anniversary with a Bunco and Pinochle Party for the families of the Auxiliary at 
the Labor Temple. 

Serving on the Committee were: Mrs. Edward Fleezle, Mrs. Alvis Avirett, Mrs. 
Gust Jarabek. 

The table was decorated with figures of carpenters and a large cake which read 
"First Anniversary of Ladies Auxiliary No. 471." Coffee, sandwiches, cake and ice 
cream were served. Mrs. Alvis Avirett and Mrs. Gust Jarabek poured. 

Prizes in Bunco were won by: Mrs. Ina Schwartz, Mrs. Lucille Rled, Mrs. Minnie 
Sharp. 



40 THE CARPENTER 

Prizes in Pinochle were won by Mr. Frank Schwartz, Mr. Herbert Schwartz, 
Mrs. Amy Flaherty. 

Door Prizes were won by Miss Hazel Reid, Mrs. Alvis Avirett. 

The Auxiliary meets the 3rd Thursday of each month at 7:30 P.M. at the 
Labor Temple. 

We would welcome wives, mothers, and sisters to join our Auxiliary of Car- 
penters Local 985. 

The Auxiliary is active in the Labor League Political Education Committee. 

We are planning a drive in the near future to secure more members for our 
Auxiliary. 

Ida Schwartz, Recording Secretary. 
• 

SANTA ROSA WINDS UP BIG YEAR 

The Editor: 

Auxiliary No 470 would like to send greetings to all Ladies' Auxiliaries from 
Santa Rosa, California. 

We are one year old now and we think we hav« accomplished quite a bit in 
that time. Early last year we put on a turkey dinner with all the trimmings for 
Carpenters's Local No. 751, when they were hosts to the Redwood District Council. 
Late in the summer we helped the brothers have a very nice carpenter's picnic along 
the Russian River. In the month of November we held a raffle of a doll and chest 
in conjunction with a bazaar. 

Our town was trying to raise money to build a big new hospital, so from our 
bazaar and raffle we donated $150.00. 

We entertain the brothers quite often with small plays. They seem to enjoy 
them very much. 

We meet the first and third Fridays of every month at the Labor Temple. 

We would like to hear from any Auxiliary which would like to write to us. 

Fraternally yours, 

Leona Faoro, Recording Secretary. 



ORLANDO LADIES SEND GREETINGS 

The Editor: 

Auxiliary No. 142 of Orlando, Florida sends greetings to all Sister Auxiliaries. 
We have one meeting a month, the first Friday night of each month. 

On the fifteenth of April we celebrated the twenty-third anniversary of our 
Charter with a supper at the Y. M. C. A. restaurant. 

We have one social get-together each month when we honor the birthdays of 
the members in that month, either with a picnic or luncheon at one of the honore's 
houses. We have thirty-two members. 

Our Auxiliary would like to hear from other Sister Auxiliaries. 

With our very best wishes and sincere regards, we are 

Fraternally yours, 

Mrs. Garcia Barksdale, Recording Secretary! 



HERIVIISTON, ORE., LADIES SPONSOR PARK IMPROVEMENT 

The Editor: 

Here is what Ladies' Auxiliary No. 429 of the Carpenters' Local No. 933 have 
been doing in Hermiston, Oregon. 

In December we gave a big Christmas party for the Carpenters and their 
families. In January we didn't do so much. In February we gave a pie social on 
which we made $52.00. In March we had an Easter party for the ladies. In April 
we had a cooked food sale on which we made $22.00. 

We are going to build a fire place out at the city park, and have a plaque put 
up with the name of our Auxiliary on it. We are going to have it built some 
time next month. That is why we are having these sales. We have voted to have 
a social each Thursday from 2 P.M. until 3 P.M. 

We would like to have other Auxiliaries visit us. 

Florence Russell, Recording Secretary. 



i 



Craft ProblQms 



I 




Carpentry 

LESSON 328 
By H. H. Siegele 



The difference between knots, such, as 
I dealt with in the last lesson, and 
.hitches, such as I am giving here, can 
easily be pointed out. A knot is a fas- 
tening made by interlacing two flexible 
lines, as strings, cords, ropes, etc., 
which, where the interlacing is done, 
forms a sort of knob and ties the two 
together, or, if only one line is used, it 
merely forms a knob. A hitch is a way 
of applying or twisting a line, as a 
string, cord, rope, etc., onto some ob- 
ject or some other line, so as to fasten 
the two together. In other words, a 
knot is used for tying lines together or 
fastening them to other objects, while 




Fig. 1 

the hitch is more nearly a temporary 
fastening that depends more or less on 
the pull of the line for its holding quali- 
ties. In short, a knot is used principally 
for tying, while a hitch is a means of 
fastening by hooking onto or by twist- 
ing the line in a manner that will make 
the friction produce a safe connection. 

Fig. 1, at A, shows a loop formed 
with a rope. This is one step farther 
along than what is called a bight, shown 
by the last drawing of the previous les- 
son. At B is a double loop, which if it 
were turned over and slipped onto a 
pole, as shown at C, would give a loose 
form of the clove hitch. A tightened 



clove itch is shown at D. This hitch is 
used most for cases where both ends of 
the rope are subjected to strains. For 
example, you have one long rope, if it 
were fastened at the center with a clove 
hitch to the top of a pole, the two 



Half Hiich 



^\K^\\\\\\^\\K\\KK\\\K\\\y 




^utle Hal/ Hii 
Fig. 2 



loose parts of the rope would answer 
for two guys. 

Fig. 2 shows at ttie top a half hitch 
in the making. If this is tightened, it 
makes a pretty good hitch. At the bot- 
tom, is shown a double half hitch, which 
is just a little better than the single half 
hitch shown at the top. The drawing 
shows this hitch in a loose form, which 
would have to be tightened before it 
will produce a perfectly safe connection. 




^VVV\V\\\V\\\\W\\^V^V\VVVV\\\V\\\V^ 



Tinier HiUk 



v^V\v^^^.^^^^^^^\ ^^^^^^^WT^^^^\^\^^\^^\^^j^ 



Fig. 3 

Fig. 3 shows two views of perhaps the 
most practical hitch used by building 
tradesmen. It is called, timber hitch. 
The top view shows the hitch in a rather 



42 



THE CARPEXTER 



loose form, vrhile at the bottom it is 
sh.o-wii tightened onto a round piece of 
timber. This hitch is easy to make and 
easy to unmake, but besides that, it is 
perfectly safe. 

The upper dra-vring of Fig. 4 sho"nrs 
what is called a sheepshank. This hitch 
is used for shortening ropes. It can be 
made as long as necessary to take up 
the unneeeded length in ropes. It is 
easy to make and is safe, "while the un- 
making is simpler than the making. The 
bottom drawing shovrs another way to 
shorten a rope. This method is espe- 
cially suitable when only a little short- 
ening is needed. The peg must be of 
strong enough material so that it will 
not break when the strain is put on the 
rope. 

The making of a scanold hitch is 
shown by Fig. 5. The dotted lines show 
the position of the scaffold plank. The 



<tsssss 



rope up over the top, making them 
cross each other as shown. Then pull 





Sheepskcnk 



Fig. 4 

two upward running parts of the rope 
are tied together with a bowline knot, 
as shown toward the top in Fig. 6. Here 
the scaffold hitch is shown more nearly 
as it appears when tightened onto the 
scan'old plank. 




Fig. 5 

Fig. 7 shows how to start to make 
the barrel hitch. Set the barrel onto 
the rope and bring the two parts of the 



Szclfdd Hlloh 




Fig. 6 



the two bent parts, as indicated by the 




Fig 



downward pointing arrows, and slip the 
rope down about one-third from the top 



r 



THE CARPEXTER 



43 



of the barrel, making it engirdle the 
barrel. Then bring the two loose parts 
up, as the upward pointing arrows indi- 
cate, and tie them together with a bow- 
line kn,ot, as shown at the top in Fig. 



Barrel 

HitcK 




When it is tightened, it is one of the 
best hitches for fastening sash cord to 
window weights that is in use. In real- 
ity this hitch is made just the same as 
the figure 8 knot explained in the last 
lesson. 

The different fastenings that are 
shown in this lesson and in the two pre- 
vious lessons are of such importance 
that no apprentice of the building trades 
can afford td pass them up without be- 
ing sure that he can make any of them, 
whenever or wherever he might be 
called upon to do so. It is suggested 




Fig. 9 

that the student take a sash cord or a 
rope and practice the making of the 
various knots and hitches shown in 
these lessons until the process of mak- 
ing them becomes habitual with him. 



Fig. 8 

8. Here is shown the hitch in place 
and the rope tightened, ready for lifting 
the barrel. This is a useful hitch for 
building tradesmen to use and should be 
practiced by the student until he can 
make it automatically. 

Fig. 9 shows three important hitches. 
At 1 is shown a single Blackwall hitch, 
which is used for fastening a rope to a 
hook, as shown by the drawing. At 2 
the double Blackwall hitch is shown, 
which is just a little better than the 
single hitch shown to the left. At 3 a 
simple hitch is shown for fastening sash 
cord to a sash weight. It is shown in 
the making, and is in a loose form. 



MARKING RAISED MOLDIXGS 

A reader wants to know the best 
way to mark and cut raised moldings 
for panels. I never call my solutions 
the best. I try to be practical by giving 
methods that I have found to give good 
results. 

Fig. I shows a corner of a panel, 
with a sort of templet to the right in 
place for marking the points to measure 
from. The templet is made of a piece 
of the molding to be used in the panel, 
a cross section is shown inset, toward 
the top. The dotted lines show the 
templet in the second position. 

Fig. 2 shows the same corner of the 
panel, where at A and at B the straight 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



lines that cross each other were made, 
guided by the templet. The dotted 




obtaining the cut for the joint. The 
marking should be done with a welP 
sharpened pencil and accurately. The 
cutting is usually done with a miter 
box, however, it can be done with a 
fine saw without the aid of a miter 



Sti/e 



Ra)} 

Fig. 1 

lines show the position of the molding 
when it is in place. In marking the 
points, the templet is placed as shown 
in Fig. 1 to the right for marking the 



Arnffl 




A 


\ 

\ 
\ 



^h\k 



B 



^all 



Fig. 2 



perpendicular lines, and then as shown 
by dotted lines for marking the hori- 
zontal lines. Each of the corners of 
the panel must be marked in this way. 
If the panel is perfectly square, either 
the point where the lines cross at A, 
or where they cross at B, can be taken 
to obtain the measurements for the dif- 
ferent pieces of molding. But if the 
panel is irregular, then the point at 
A and the point at B must be used for 




Fig. 3 

box. A finished joint is shown by fig- 
ure 3. 

Fig. 4 shows the miter cut after a 
piece of molding has been put in place. 




Fig. 4 

The shaded part shows where a little 
backing with the block plane often is 
necessary in order to make the face of 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p. 

670 il., and about 7.000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 11. $2.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 210 p. and 495 il.. covering form 
building, finishing, stair building, etc. $2.50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 il. Roof framing 
complete. Other problems, including saw filing. $2.00. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p., 754 il., covering general 
house carpentry, estimating and other subjects. $2.50. 

The above five books support one another. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— Illustrated prose. Only $1.00. 

FREE. — With 2 books, one $1.00 book free, with 
4 books, two, and with 5 books, three $1.00 books free. 

Books autographed. 

C. O. D. orders, postage and 0. O. D. fee added. 
Order u u Cir/^E*! F 222 So. Const. St. 
today. ■■■ ■■■ ait\atl_t Emporia, Kan»a« 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



the joint fit tight. At a, by dotted line, 
is shown somewhat exaggerated, how 
the point of the shoulder should be cut 
off, and at b, also exaggerated, is shown 
how sometimes a little backing is nec- 
essary to make the lip of the molding 
fit tight against the stile. In case the 
pieces do not go in place without forc- 
ing them, a shaving or two with the 
rabbet plane should be taken off the 
shoulder of the molding. 

A little study of these illustrations 
and what is between the lines in the 
text will help to make the different 
points clear. 



WANTS MORE EXAMINATIONS 

A brother writes from Oregon, after 
seeing the self-examination given in the 
iMarch-19 48 issue of The Carpenter, ask- 
ing for more test questions covering 
the building trades. 

As in the other examination article, 
the questions are followed by four sug- 
gested answers, (a), (b), (c), (d), but 
only one answer in each of the ten 
questions is right. Keep the answers be- 
low concealed until you have checked 
the ten answers you think correct. 

1. Birch wood is (a) a soft clear- 
grained wood, white in color; (b) a 
hard wood with a fine grain and resem- 



IF YOU ARE A CARPENTER 

and have had some experience In lumber YOU CAN 
LEARN TO ESTIMATE CARPENTER WORK In a 

surprisingly sliort time. 49 years experience in lumber- 
ing and general construction brings to light new born 
methods such as grading labor on lumber and other 
items to prevent the estimator, or contractor, from 
serious hidden disaster. Until you have used grading 
labor on lumber you will still be in the dark. 
Having some experience in lumber, that is the best 
place to start, the rest will come much easier after 
getting a sound footing. 

If your spare time is going to waste, you can make 
valuable use of it. 

These new born methods will give you the answer, 
from farm building to skyscraper, or homes, remodel- 
ing, repairs, wrecking, etc. 

On a post card, print your name and address plainly, 
by return mail you will receive further information. 

E. W. HOPFNER 
SS19 N. Clark St. Chicago IS, lU. 



bles cherry in color; (c) light in weight 
and slightly reddish in color; (d) very 
heavy and strong, finishing in a beauti- 
ful brownish color. 

2. A standard size brick is (a) 2% 
inches by 4 inches by 7 Vz inches; (b) 
2 inches by 4 inches by 8 inches; (c) 
2*4 inches by 3 % inches by 8 inches; 
(d) 2% inches by 3 14= inches by 7% 
inches. 

3. The Polygon commonly used in car- 
pentry work is the (a) hexagon; (b) 
pentagon; (c) heptagon; (d) octagon. 

4. The width of the tongue of a stan- 
dard steel square is (a) 2 inches; (b) 
1% inches; (c) 1% inches; (d) 1 Va 
inches. 

5. Scissors trusses are mostly used in 
(a) industrial building; (b) homes; (c) 
churches; (d) barns or sheds. 

6. Moldings are usually sold by the 
(a) square foot; (b) board foot; (c) 
lineal foot; (d) bundle. 

7. The piece of wood shown in cross 




Fig. 1 



Fig. 2 



section. Fig. 1, has been (a) plowed; 
(b) splayed; (c) rabbeted; (d) fluted. 

8. The most common and satisfactory 
spacing for wood lath is (a) % inch; 
(b) V2 inch; (c) 3/16 inch; (d) % 
inch. 

9. The joint shown in Fig. 2 is called 
(a) butt joint; (b) shoulder joint; (c) 
tongue-and-groove joint; (d) half miter 
joint. 

10. Anchors for joists spaced 16 inch- 
es on center are usually spaced every 
(a) eight joists; (b) fourth joist; (c) 
fifth joist; (d) sixth joist. 

The answers are: 

1, (b); 2, (c); 3, (d); 4, (d); 5, (c); 
6, (c); 7, (d); 8, (a); 9, (b); 10, (c). 




AUTOMATIC 
SAW SET 

saw teeth automatically 
on hand or band saws 
— 400 per minute 
without effort. Per- 
fect hammer and anvU 
action sets teeth uniformly 
— No tooth breakage. 

BURR MFG. COMPANY 



* 



WRITE 
TODAY 



AUTOMATIC 
RETOOTHER 

Cuts new saw teeth in 50 
seconds — any size 4 to 16 
points. Old teeth fall ofT 
as chips. Easy to operate. 
A perfect Job. 

8945-B Venice Blvd. 
Los Angeles 34, Cal. 





NO'*'. 



ya^rO^" 



SAW FILER 

Saves You Time, Money 

Now yotj cao do ciptn saw Sling at 
home. Lifetime ioo\ makes precisioa 
tling e25T for ereti the most iDcip-eri- 
enced. Two simple adjuitmciits make 
£i any typ< band law. Keep joar 
saws 6X1X2 sharp and irae-cacring with 
a Speed Siw Filer. Conpleie wi-Ji tje, 
■ ready to use. Mo2e7 back guarantee. 
Caih with order, prepaid- (CO.D. 
posuge extra-) 

THE SPEED COMPANY 

pt. A 20JS N.E. Sondy, Portlond 12, Or«. 




HANG THAT DOOR THE PROFESSIONAL WAY ! 



rOU DO THIS 




E-Z Mark Butt Gauge 

f>-. Bepfcai operation on jamb. 
Hang ivji. THAT'S AIO,— 

yo jiobe: 



AND on THIS 

• Hang more doors better. 

• No adjustments. No errors. 

• Used and approved by Master 
meehanies. 

• Comes in 3i" and 4" (standard) size*. 

• Precision made. 
Cost OXLY ?1.7.5 ea., or S3. 50 a set 
a: ycjr r.t-r. ::':re. If dealer c-an't 6UP- 
llT. ;-r.t -r.:- f-.i''''' '.Ti:r. crier ai^d pay 
por.man balir.^e, p!u£ I'.v.z-ii CO.D. In Can., $3.75 (noC.O.D. 

E-Z ]»LyiK TOOLS, Box 8377 DepL C, Los Angeles 16, CiL 




COMES NVITH 
lEATHERFrTE CASE 




CARPENTERS 

and 

BUILDERS' 
HANDBOOK 

This nevr and re- 
vised edition of Car- 
r>rii-ers and Build- 
er.s' Practical Rules 
frit Laying Out 
Wi; rk consists of 
s^-r- bijt prar-tical 
r::-- : r :^:-;r_- ^ut 

pers, .^tairs and arches v-itn :<iDies of 
board measure, length of common, hip. val- 
ley and jack rafters, sqnare measnre, cube 
measure, measure of length, etc. — also, 
rales for kerfing, drafting gable molding, 
getting the axis of a segment, laying off 
gambrel roof and explaining the steel 
square. ""^^^^^ 

SI. 00 postpaid 

Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 



D.A.ROGERS 

5344 Clinton Avenue 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



Er.clcsed $1.00. Forward bv 
return rQaiirour Carpenters 
& Builders' Practical 
Eules for Laying Out Work. 



Name 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the TTnited Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

AU Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the abore 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories - 

American Floor Surfacing Ma- 
chine Co., Toledo, Ohio 6 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Bensen Square Co_ Brooklyn 

N. Y. :_: 4s 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 45 

Flormaster Flonnachines Co^ 

Chicago, III. 4 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 48 

J. E. Gaskell, Toledo, Ohio 47 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 46 

Master Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y 5 

A. D. McBumey, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 47 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, Mass. 6 

Ohlen-Bishop, Columbus, 0hio__ 48 

The Paine Co., Chicago, 111 47 

Porter-Cable Machine Co., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 1 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 5 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 46 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore. 47 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn 3rd Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 47 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y.__3rd Cover 
Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

E. W. Hoffner, Chicago, 111 45 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Cal 48 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 46 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 44 

Tajnblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 6 



Address 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IX THE FA]VIILrY! 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



"^Cout/a "rou UHCw 
SAWCIAMP ''' 



Speed Up Saw Filing! ^^^ 

Money-Back 

Money with or- 
der, prepaid. 
C.O.D. postage extra 
Grips entire length of saw . . a full 30 inches. Attaches 
or releases from work bench in only 15 seconds. Also can 
be used for band saws. Made to last « lifetime. Sturdy, 
all steel construction. Gripping edges ground to hold en- 
tire length of saw true with no vibration. 

THE SPEED CORPORATION 
2025-A N.E. SANDY PORTLAND 12, ORE. 





SUPER HAM-R-ADZ NO. 10 

Tool steel attachment 
quickly converts car- 
penter's hammer into 
efficient adz. Ideal for 
rough framing, scaf- 
folding — form build- 
ing. Easy to use and 
keep sharp. Fits poc- 
ket. Get yours today . 

SUPER SQUARE GAGE NO. 49 

Again available for Instant 
attachment to carpenter's steel 
squares. Perfect for laying 
out stair stringers and other 
saw cuts. Precision-made 
light weight fixtures with 
brass thumb screws. 
At Dealen' or Postpaid. 

An MitRIIDNrV 939 W. 6th St.. Dept. C-9 
. u. mcDunnci los angeles i4, cal. 




Only .75 the pair! 



NEW LOW PRICE 
PAINE 

SUDDEN DEPTH 

CARBOLOY TIPPED 

DRILL BITS 

Round Shank sizes 
from 3/16" through f 

NEWFLUTEDDRILLS 

Now add to our line of "Sudden 
Depth" Drill Bits, sizes from 
r through iV. 

\X/ P T T T? ^^^ NEW PRICE AND 
VV X\.X X XU CATALOG SHEET 



PAINE 

FASTENING DCUIfLC 
and HANGING UlYILlJ 



2967 CARROLL AVE., CHICAGO 12, ILL. 




FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Learn to draw plani, estimate, be a live-wire builder, ds 
remodeling, take contracting Jobi. Tbeae 8 practical, pro- 
fusel; illustrated books cover subjects that will help 70U 
to get more work and make more money. Architectural da- 
sign and drawing, estimating, eteel square, roof framing, 
eonstruction, painting and decorating, heating, air-condi- 
tioning, concrete forms and many other subjects are includad. 

UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These booki ar« 
the most up-to- 
date and complet* 
we bare ever pub- 
lished on theu 
many subject!. 



BETTER JOBS - BETTER PAY 

The Postwar building boom li In full 
swing and trained men are needed. 
Big opportunities are always for MEN 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- 
Ply quick, easily understood training and 
handy, permanent reference information 
Jhat helps solve building problems. 



Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For Examination 

AMERICAN TEcFNicAT SOcIeTY ~ VoatioMllulblishers siiice" 1891 
Dept. GB36 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 
You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your eight 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to bi^. I will pay the delivery chargai 
only, and if fully satisfied in ten days, I will send yoa 
J2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 is paid. I am not obligated In any 
way unless I keep the books. 

Name - 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home address. 



Door Hinges Mortised in Minutes 

^^>t MORTISE-AID 

^"^^^^^^Ad'iusts 3 Ways For All 
Hinge and Door Sizes 




f . Adjustable for 1 W to 1 Va" doort. 

2. Adjustable for 3" SVz" and 4" butt*. 

3. Adjuttoble to required mortise depth. 

Just clamp on door — anyone can chisel per* 
feet mortise quickly and simply. Will pay for 
itself on one house job. Made of lightweight 
but durable aluminum. Mailed promptly 
post paid. 



J. E. GASKELL 

R. R. 4-TOLEDO 7, OHIO 



Full Length Roof Framer 

This book gives the Entire Length of 
the Common, Hip, Valley and Jack Kafters 
for 48 different pitches. 

The flattest pitch is a % inch rise to 12 
inches of run. Pitches increase % inch of 
rise each time until they reach 24 inches of 
rise to 12 inches of run. There are 48 
pitches, all told. 

There are 2,400 different spans or widths 
of buildings given for each pitch. The small- 
est span is % inch, and they increase % 
inch each time until they reach a span of 
50 feet. There is a different rafter length 
for each V^ inch of span ; therefore there 
are 2,400 Common and 2,400 Hip Rafter 
lengths, or 4,800 rafter lengths for each 
pitch ; or 230,400 rafter lengths can be had 
for the 48 pitches. 

By doubling or trebling the spans, the 
range of this book can be increased to meet 
the requirements of any building or bridge, 
even should the span run in the hundreds 
of feet. 

The 144 Tables will give the Entire 
length of the Common, Hip, "Valley or Jack 
Rafter to Vs inch, for positively any span, 
be it in odd feet, odd Inches, or odd frac- 
tions of an inch. 

The cuts and bevels for all the roof work 
are given with each of the 48 pitches. 

Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 



Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C.O.D. pay $2.78. 
Money back privilege 



A. RIECHER5 



p. O. Box 405 



Palo Alto, Calif. 



INDEPENDENCE 
AFTEn40/\ 



This FREE BOOK shows 
How to Win It 

"INDEPENDENCE AFTER 40" is a 

book giving you a proven, prac- 
tical way to make $20 to $30 a 
week in spare time — sharpening 
saws with the Foley Automatic 
Saw Filer. Start at home in 
basement or garage — you can 
turn out perfect cutting saws 
right away — no experience 
needed. 

The Free Book gives you a 
plan based on facts, with 
only a small investment, no 
overhead, no stock of goods 
to carry. There are thou- 
sands of saws in . 

every community C^ 
to keep sharp. ^^ 
Begin in spare time — 
develop into a full- 
time business of your own later oa 
Take the first step towards being your 
own boss — send the coupon for this 
book — read it carefully. 



^^m£„ 




Se^td e^ici^uutJoxJ^U, BOOK 



Foley Mfg. Co., 718-8 Foley BIdg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Send FREE BOOK— "Independence After 40" 

Name 

Address 



SIDE CUTS ON RAFTERS 

AUTOMATICALLY! 




Patent In U. S. A. 

5 TOOLS IN ONE ! 

Actual Size 2" wide, 14" long. 
MADE OP NICKEL SILVER 

1. THE "BENSEN SQUARE" AUTOMATICALLY 
GIVES THE SIDE CUT ANGLE ON RAFTERS 
SUCH AS JACK, HIP, VALLEY, ETC. BY SET- 
TING THE BLADE TO THE PLUMB CUT 
ANGLE. 

2. The Bensen Square will also give the miter cut 
for polygons from 3 to 8 tides by setting the 
blade against the desired polygon marked on base. 

3. Can be used as a common square (90 degrees). 
(Will lock In position). 

4. Miter square (45 degrees). (Will lock In position). 

5. Bevel square (can be set to any angle). 

The Bensen Square is "a tool" all carpenters 
will appreciate. 

$6.00 post paid. 

Guaranteed to give perfect satisfaction or your money 
refunded. Send IHoney Order or Cliecic (No stamps). 

BENSEN SQUARE COIVIPANY 

951 56th Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 




CHARLES H. BARR, Heof-Treafing 

The tempering process 
is important in the 
manufacture of Ohlen- 
Bishop saws. Only men 
with experience are as- 
signed to the heat 
treating furnaces. 
Charley Barr is such 
a man— with Ohlen- 
Bishop over 15 years, he guards the heat- 
treating to assure top quality. 





906 Ingleside Ave. 



Columbus 8, Ohio 





M£t^' 




Stanley Screw Driver No. 25 



• If you have ever tried a Stanley No. 25 Screw 
Driver, you'll know the one we mean. It's the kind 
of a screw driver you reach for first - the sturdy, 
hand-fitting tool that does so many kinds of screw 
driving jobs quickly, securely, the way you want 
them done. 

The polished, alloy-steel blade is tempered its 
entire length. Patented bolster construction anchors 
blade in hardwood handle. Tips are accurately 
crossground to size. Handle is fluted for sure grip. 
Eight sizes for a choice. Buy a No. 25 next time -and 
good Stanley Tools always. STANLEY TOOLS, 
163 Elm Street, New Britain, Connecticut. 

THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

[STANLEY'^ 

Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 

HARDWARE- HAND TOOLS- ELECTRIC TOOLS 



i 




THAT CUTS 
EVERYTHING 



This one tool— its com- 
panion table stand— and 
its many accessories 
equip you with a hand 
saw . . . table saw . . . 
shaper...face or drum 
Sander . . . wire brush 
. . . and grinder. See if 
of your Dealer's TO- 
DAY. 



MiCtL TOOL COMPANY 

m51 South Chicago Avenue, Chicago, 19, Illinois 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vois.$6 

Inside Trade lirf ormation 

for Carpenters , BaQders, Jots- 
ers, Buildins Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Gaides 
give yoD the short -cat instrac- 
tions that yon want — inctudinff 
new methods, ideas, eolations, 
plans, systems and money sav- 
ing soEgestions. An easy pro- 
gressive course for the appren- 
tice and etodent. A practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere are us- 
ing: these Gaides as a Helpinc 
Hand to Easier Work, Better 
Work and Better Pay. To get 
this assistance for yooxsalf, 
■ >«v ■■• .. ^ simply fill in and 

Inside Trade Information On : mail f&ee coupon beion. 

How to use the steel SQuare — How to file and 

set saws — How to build lurnlture — How to use 

a mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How 

to use rules and scales — ^How to make joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength ol timbers — 

How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — ^How 

to build houses, barns, garages, bungalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — ^How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12. 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaffolds — skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on interior trim — 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors — ^How to paint. 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10. N. Y. 

Mail Audeis Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 7 days' free 
trial. If OK I will remit $1 in 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 Is. paid. 
•Otherwise I will return them. No oblieation unless i am satisfied. 





Employed by- 



CAR 




ATKINS 

makes the job 
EASIER from 
start to finish 



Yes, for every sawing job there's a particular 
Atkins Saw to make that job easier. ..a saw that 
cut's faster, cleaner. In it all the skill, knowledge and 
improvement gained in 91 years of saw-making ex- 
perience combine with Atkins' famous"Silver Steel" 
to give you a saw of superb cutting performance. 

Atkins saws have the design and balance that 
makes them handle better, the extra keenness that 
bites through wood smoothly, y/ith less effort. Be- 
cause they are made of "Silver Steel", Atkins 
require fewer sharpenings to keep them at their 
smooth cutting best. 

For a better saw that stays on the \ob, to lighten 
your job, get Atkins. 



5 Favorites from the Complete 

Atkins Line of Saws for Every Cutting Job 



Ajkins No. 400 Straight Back— Beautifully balanced blade 
has mirror polish. Solid rosewood handle In "Perfection" pat- 
fern that prevents wrist strain. Taper grounds gauges for 
easy clearance. Carefully hardened and tempered. Filed 
and set ready for use. Ship point pattern. 




No. 65 Straight Back — Fine quality for general carpentry. Taper 
ground. Damaskeen polish blade, filed and set for use, Carved 
apple handle. Ship pattern. 






No. 2000 Straight Back — Light but stiff tempered blade, 
taper ground, polished and etched. New "Perfect-Grip" 
apple handle is close to blade for easy handling. Ship 
pattern. 



No. 37 Compass Sav/ — 17 x I 8 

gauge bladehardened, tempered 
and polished. 8i points per Inch. 
Filed and set. Plastic handle. 




No. 39 Keyhole Saw — Ground 
18x19 gauge for easy clearanc* 
with minimum set. 10 points perirtj, 
Uniform temper. Filed and set^ 
Plastic handle. 



HOME OFFICE AND FACTORY: 



E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY • 402 S. UlinOU street, IndianapoMs 9, Indian* 
BRANCH FACTORY: Porilond, Ore. • BRANCH OFFICES: Allaiya, Chicago, New Orleans, New York, San Francisco 



ATKINS 



IH'S AlWHYS AUUb" 



MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM^^ 



CROSSCUTS • CIRCULAR SAWS • HACK SAWS • BACK SAWS • COPING SAW 



CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 



OfReial Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




AUGUST, 1948 




YOUR OPINION 
IS IMPORTANT... 



but 



THEY ONLY 

COUNT 

BALLOTS! 




When Election Day rolls around, 
will be only as big as 

rom WYES' 



5 Day Free Trial 




'THE MACHINE 
THAT NEEDS NO HELPER" 

No special power hook-ups... 

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No heavy weight lifting. 

It's Labor-Saving, Time-Sav- 
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MAKES MORE PROFIT. 

REPRESENTATIVES WANTED... 




Prove to Yourself 
How Much Better It Is 

BETTER . . . because it does the work of two 
machines. No need for a second machine for 
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BETTER . . . because of light weight and ease 
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31 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

CaiiJenters' Building, 222 E. llichigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Establishfd in 1S51 
Vol. LXVIII — No. S 



IXDIAXAPOUS, ArGIJST, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Beware the Siren Song 



General President William L. Hufcheson analyzes f'he ■world situation and comes to the 
conclusion that free, strong and independent trade unions offer the greatest hope for a 
democratic, peaceful and prosperous future. 



The Miracle Bark 



11 



Redv/ood trees have been around for a million years or so One of the things thot en- 
abled them to survive glaciers and droughts for thousands of years on end was the fact 
that rev/ood bark has many peculiar qualities. Fungus cannot touch it; fire cannot harm 
it. Now science is finding out that these qualities make redwood bark an ideal soil 
conditioner. 



Opportunity Lies Everywhere 



- - - 16 

A survey of incomes in both rural and urban areas shov/s that the chances of a 
person to acquire a decent income are as good in a small town os they are in a big 
city. 



Building Can Be Fun 



18 



A new type of model home offers young and old an opportunity to get acquainted 
with what is involved in home construction. Every problem the regular home builder 
would run into is involved in putting together this clever model. 



You Are in Politics 



30 



Whether you like it or not, your are in politics because everything the government 
does affects your personal welfare and progress. By keeping registered and voting in- 
telligently, you can help to safeguard your own future. 



OTHEPi DEPAIIT]!HEXTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Menioriam 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladies 

Graft Problems 



14 
21 
32 
33 
34 
38 
41 



Index to Advertisers - 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIAN" APOLIS, INT)., as Eeeond class mail matter, trnder Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 191", authorized on July 8, I&IS. 



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Beware The Siren Song 



N 



By WILLIAM L. HUTCHESON, General President 

* * * 

EVER IN MODERN HISTORY have turmoil and unrest 
been so widespread throughout the civilized \v()rld as they 
are today. On all five continents divergent political phil- 
osophies are struggling for mastery. Even in such remote sections 
as Java and Indo-China the old order of things is tottering under 
the impact of new political ideas. It recjuires no student of world 
politics to realize that the future of mankind is toda}' being 
weighed in the balance of human ingenuity and human astuteness. 
A new order is in the making; whether that order will add to the 
sum total of mankind's liberty, prosperity and happiness, or wheth- 
er it will once more relegate human beings to subservience to 
centralized authority depends on the wisdom of all people in gen- 
eral and American people in particular. The die is now being 
cast. Only time will tell the results. 

If this anah'sis is correct, then it seems to me that the impor- 
tance of organized labor to mankind's future welfare assumes a 
newer and greater role; for it is through organized labor that the 
little people all over the world will articulate their aims and be- 
liefs and aspirations just as they have done in years gone b^^ It is 
through organized labor that they will promote and foster an 
economic and social order capable of achieving lasting peace and 
prosperity. Increasingly our government and State Department 
are coming to realize that the rebuilding of a democratic Europe 
can scarcel}' be achieved without the foundation of a free and 
independent European labor movement. The first free institu- 
tions which Hitler and Mussolini destroyed in their ruthless march 
to power were the free trade unions. Now it appears that the first 
free institutions which must be rebuilt before Europe can emerge 
democratic are the trade unions. 

Day after dav the news from Europe revolves around trade 
unions in Italy, Germany, France and Austria. Where the unions 
are under the domination of Communists, the news is invariably 
bad. Where democratic forces have succeeded in building free 
and independent unions, the news is uniformly good. In the final 
analysis, success or failure of the democratic forces in the Europ- 
ean labor movement will govern the success or failure of demo- 
cracy in Western Europe. 



THE C A R P E X T E R 

What is true of Europe is also true of South America and South 
Africa and Australia and Japan. For that matter, is true of this 
nation tO'j. The buhvark against totalitarianism all over the Avorld 
is free and independent trade unions. AA'hatever weakens or under- 
mines free organized labor — v.-hether in Xew York or Prague or 
Kobe — deals a blovr to the democratic cause all over the world. 

No one has been more cognizant of the truth of these things 
than Joe Stalin, How often in recent months have the headlines 
proclaimed; "Communists Lead French Dock A\'orkers on Strike" 
or ''Red Fostered General Strike Paralyzes Italy" or "Austrian 
Reds Prepare to V\'reck Marshall Plan.'"'' These things were no 
mere chance happenings without any relation to each other. Far 
from it. Rather they were and are coordinated moves in an overall 
Communist plan aimed at crippling the rise of European demo- 
cracy through domination and eventual destruction of trade union- 
ism in Europe. Stalin is fully av-are that the Red program for 
total European usurpation depends almost entirely on the ability 
of natr-.'e Communists to discredit, disrupt and eventually destroy 
the trade unions in their individual countries. This is the plan on 
vrhich Joe is pinning virtually all his hopes. 

In the field of world affairs, the United States has assumed un- 
questioned leadership. In the field of unionismi. the American 
labor movement m.ust similarly accept the responsibility of pre- 
eminence. By precept and example, the American labor movem.ent 
m.ust educate and inspire the organized workers of the world 
toward democracy, human dienity and the brotherhood of man. 
This being so. we in the American labor movement — officers and 
miembers alike — have a new responsibility — a responsibility which 
we must not take lightly. The dangers involved are too great. 

As I see it. the American labor movement is threatened from 
three sides. First there is the very definite threat of the vested 
interests. For purposes of their own these special interest groups 
are anxious to shackle, if not entirely destroy, the American labor 
movement. They are working through Congress and the forty- 
eight state legislatures. They have emasculated the Department of 
Labor; they have put over the Taft-Hartley Act; and they have 
made any form of union security illegal in a number of states. 
At the present time they have half a hundred other legislative 
schemes for curbing the effectiveness of unions which they will 
be promoting in Washington and the state capitols from now on. 
These vested interests are a distinct threat to American organized 
labor. However, they are not hard to handle. They are effective 
only so long as they exert plenty of control in Congress and the 
state legislatures. A politically aroused labor movement can soon 



THE C" A K !• E N T E R 

chani!;"e all that. By electing- its friends and defcatin:^;- its enemies, 
labor can block the current wave of anti-labor legislation. 

The second danger to labor in this country is Communism. 
By their infiltration tactics. Communists have moved into positions 
of power in some American unions. They are constantly trying 
to gain a footing in many others. While the number of actual 
Communists in American labor is very small, the amount of dis- 
ruption they can breed is all out of proportion to their number. 
This is so only because the rank and file in many unions is too 
lackadaisical to do anything about the situation, when it arises. 
Rank and file disinterest is the meat upon wdiich Communists 
feed. AMienever it arises in any union the Communists are not 
slow in taking advantage of the fact. 

However, the labor movement is not unaware of the Communist 
threat. Right now the government is gravely concerned with the 
problem of checking Communism, but unions such as our Brother- 
hood recognized the threat of Sovietism twenty-five vears ago. 
We took steps to keep it from disrupting our movement. In that 
respect we are two decades ahead of our government. 

But it takes eternal vigilance to keep Communism from infil- 
trating into unions. The rank and file as well as the officers must 
be alert, for Communists never stop trying to worm their way into 
places where they can do the most damage. To the extent that eith- 
er the officers or the rank and file members of a union adopt a com- 
placent attitude toward Communism, to that extent they jeopar- 
dize the democratic cause at home and abroad. 

The third and by far the most subtle and dangerous threat to 
unionism is the "something for nothing" philosophy that seems 
lately to have influenced the thinking of so many people in and 
out of labor. By the "something for nothing" philosoph}^ I mean 
the theory that the government owes you or me something, or the 
theory that somebody ought to look after us and lead us around 
by the hand and take care of our problems for us. To my way of 
thinking, this is the gravest problem of all. It is the most danger- 
ous threat because it has such a generous sugar-coating of tem- 
porary benefits. In reality, however, the price of the benefits is 
always tremendously high. The Italians and Germans can amply 
testify to this fact. 

Neither Hitler nor Mussolini captured the popular fancy by 
promising the people economic and social chains. Indeed not. 
They wooed and Avon the support of numerous workers by prom- 
ises of benefits, — higher wages, better conditions, greater security, 
etc. Perhaps the people got some of those things and perhaps 



10 THE CARPENTER 

they did not. But it is an incontrovertible fact that in the end the 
people got chains, chaos, and ruin. 

No Mussolini or Hitler will ever rise in this virile country. 
But the same end results can be achieved by too many people fall- 
ing for the "something for nothing" theory. Neither this govern- 
ment nor any government ever gave away anything without taking 
back something in return. What government always takes back 
from the people is freedom, the most precious item of them all. 

Argentina offers a good example of how the "something for 
nothing" program works out. When Peron first went into power, 
he used mostly force to get there. But he began giving and pro- 
mising benefits, and eventually he got back into office by popular 
vote. The workers got wage increases but prices went up twice 
as fast as wages. The workers got better working conditions but 
they lost their independent unions in as much as the government 
has virtually taken them over. The people got better hospitals and 
highways but they lost the freedom of the press because, one by one, 
opposition papers have been put out of business. Ironically enough, 
Peron is still tremendously popular with a vast segment of the 
people. This is so because he has given the people a few material 
benefits while he has taken away a host of intangible benefits 
which add up to freedom. Such has been the history of every dic- 
tator and every dictatorship. Even Mussolini made the trains run 
on time; but in the end the Italian people woke up without trains. 

We have no Peron here ; but we do have a host of people who 
think the government should and can look after us and pamper us 
from the cradle to the grave. The pathway along which they beckon 
us may have a little different scenery from the pathway along 
which Peron is leading the people of Argentina but they both end 
up at the same place. No one yet has been able to lift himself by 
his own boot straps. Neither has any government been able to give 
its people one thing without taking away something else, for in the 
final analysis everything any government gets it must get from the 
people. If regimentation and totalitarianism ever come to America 
they will ride in on the "something for nothing" philosophy. 

With American labor, like America itself, dedicated to world 
leadership, a tremendous responsibility devolves upon every union 
officer and every union member; a responsibility to keep our 
labor movement strong, free and independent; a responsibility to 
combat the anti-democratic philosophies ; a responsibility to turn 
deaf ears to the siren song of the "something for nothing" phil- 
osophy. As we individually and collectively succeed in meeting 
these obligations, so shall the democratic cause succeed in growing 
and expanding in a world shot through with totalitarianism. 



11 



THE MIRACLE BARK 

By Jonas AVillianis 
* * * 

IF YOU HAPPENED to 
have been around a million 
or so years ago, there are a 
few things living on earth today 
which you would recognize al- 
most immediately. Among them 
are the giant redwood trees (Se- 
quoia sempervirens) of Califor- 
nia. 

The redwoods were among the 
principal plants of the Dinosaur 
age, huge trees against which 
the big reptiles rubbed their 
backs, and whose foliage those 
that weren't meat eaters reached 
up to nibble. Drought and the 
glaciers put an end to the dino- 
saurs, but some of the redwoods 
lived on. For some unknown 

reason, these trees survived only on the west slope of the Pacific coastal 
range, although at the time Columbus came to America a few still grew 
in New England. The redwoods are unlike any modern tree. They are 
gigantic strangers from a lost world, and they possess all the character- 
istics of the mysterious age which produced them. Their life span is 
longer than anything else on earth. Some redwoods are 6,000 years 
old, and many of those now standing were healthy trees at the time 
of Christ and maybe even Confucius. They contain no pitch. Redwood 
lumber is waterproof and fire-re- 




Girl admires flowers grown with redwood barky 
once a useless nuisance. 



sistant. Houses built of redwood 
lumber withstood the San Francisco 
fire well. And the redwood bark has 
properties found in no other bark. 
It not only withstands heat, cold, 
water, time, but it actually has an 
antiseptic quality which keeps in- 
sects and fungi away from the tree 
as well. 

All of this of course, was extreme- 
ly interesting to the scientist and 
the tourist, but it was a pain in the 



neck to the lumber companies. The 
redwood lumber was fine and 
brought a good price, but the red- 
wood bark, a waste product which 
had to be stripped off, presented 
a problem. The bark had no com- 
mercial value, and it was almost 
impossible to get rid of the stuff. 
It possessed the same indestructi- 
bility that caused the redwood to 
survive for millions of years. When 
left lying around, it didn't decom- 
pose like other self-respecting 



12 



THE CARPEXTER 



barks It wouldn't burn. Termites 
wouldn't eat it. So for 85 years the 

redwood bark just piled up. 

Then, in 1940, a few smart lum- 
bermen began to look around. They 
noticed that wherever the waste red- 
wood bark had piled up on the 
forest floor, it soon was covered 
with a dense growth of new scrub. 
Whenever a redwood log was left 
lying in the woods, fresh vegetation 
sprouted from the bark. Obviously 
there was something in the redwood 
bark which promoted the groAvth of 
young plants. 

These lumbermen ground up the 
redwood bark, mixed it with dif- 
ferent types of soil and began to ex- 
periment. They discovered some in- 
teresting things, especially the fact 
that any plant will grow in redwood 
bark mixed with any kind of soil. 
They took hard, baked, alkaline 
adobe earth from the California de- 
sert, a clay in which not even cactus 
could grow. They added the ground 
redwood bark. They planted seeds. 
A few months later, delicate alstro- 
emeria plants were growing beauti- 
fully and healthily in the adobe. 
The lumbermen-experimenters im- 
mediately formed a company in 
Santa Cruz, Calif., bought up the 
waste piles of redwood bark for 
almost nothing, and put the product 
on the market for agricultural use. 

According to the U. S. Bureau of 
Soils, practically all soils contain 
sufficient plant foods for good crop 
production. It is the texture of the 
soil, rather than its chemical com- 
position, which counts. The inde- 
structible redwood bark permanent- 
ly gives any soil the loose, fluffy, 
spongy, texture which holds water 
and air in the proper proportions, 
and allows the microbes to perform 
their all-important work on the 
plant roots. It does not decompose 



rapidly and become a part of the 
soil, like manure and leaf mold 
fearlier soil "conditioners"). It does 
not sink in the wet weather the way 
sand, another loosening agent, does. 
And it does not itself absorb the 
water, which was the principal com- 
plaint against peat moss. Redwood 
bark, after tvv'o years in the soil, is 
as sprightly as it vras on its 2,000th 
birthday, except for giving off a 
slightly acid reaction. This neut- :J 
ralizes the excess of alkalinity gen- l 
erally present in bad soils. 

Xo sooner did the redv.-ood bark 
get on the market than encouraging 
reports came in from all over the 
country. 

Frank Reinelt, a well-known hor- 
ticulturist from Capitola, Calif., was 
trying to raise begonias for the Los 
Angeles, and San Francisco mark- 
ets. Capitola is in that section of 
California which experiences heavy 
dews. In fact, the dews were so • 
heavy that they nearly washed away ^ 
his greenhouses several times, and I 
each year they destroyed as much 
as Go% of his begonia seedlings. 

It Avasn't so much the moisture 
that proved fatal to the sensitive 
little plants as a certain fungus 
which thrives on the dampness in 
the soil. This fungus attacks the 
tiny seedlings when they are young 
and very weak and literally smoth- 
ers them to death. Ordinarily no- 
thing can be done about it. But Mr. 
Reinelt had heard about the red- 
wood bark and he got the idea. He 
mixed 80 per cent leaf mold and 20 
per cent redwood bark into the seed 
beds. Then he lightly spread more 
redwood bark on the surface. This 
was in January, 1942. That spring, 
Reinelt got the finest crop of begon- 
ias ever seen in that part of Cali- 
fornia. In fact, he got 100 per cent 
termination. Xot a sinsrle seedling 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



was attacked by the funo;us just as 
for 1.000,000 years not a sing-le red- 
wood tree had been attacked. 

x\fter the Reinelt disco\'erv, other 
reports poured in. A rose grower in 
Pennsylvania was losing all his 
roses one summer because of the 
unusual heat. He spread a one-inch 
thickness of redwood bark over the 
soil in one bench of greenhouse 
roses. The redwood bark acted as 
an effective insulation against the 
heat. Not only that, but the redwood- 
treated rose stems w^ere two inches 
longer than he had produced before 
and they were completely free of 
"black spot," a rose disease caused 
by high daytime temperatures fol- 
lowed by cool evening-s and nights. 
Another grower in Minnesota had 
the same experience in reverse. "The 
only thing that saved my bulbs from 
the excessive cold of last winter," 
he wrote, "was the unusual and un- 
expected insulating quality which 
I discovered in redwood bark. 

An amateur gardener in Lake- 
wood, Ohio, found that redwood 
bark in the soil completely elimi- 
nated the moss coatinsr that had 



been ruining his chrysanthemum 
beds. A nuseryman in Fredericks- 
burg, Va., wrote, "Without the red- 
wood bark, I could not have saved 
my pompons through this hot 
weather with one shower in 80 
days." 

A nationally known horticultur- 
ist in Santa Barbara, Calif., dis- 
covered that you can grow practical- 
ly anything in a flowerpot merelv 
by placing a little redwood bark in 
the bottom of the pot. One of the 
country's best-known orchid ex- 
perts, E. O. Orpet. went on record 
shorriy thereafter informing all the 
horticulturists of America that he 
had had amazing results with red- 
wood fiber. "Orchids," he wrote on 
July 3, 1943, "generally are watered 
to death. It is impossible to over- 
water orchids growing in redwood 
fiber. Furthermore, there is no de- 
cay." 

With redwood bark, housewives 
are now raising corsage orchids for 
themselves in flowerpots at home. 

(Reprinted by permission oi Col- 
lier's, the National Weekly.) 



Older Workers Have Best Records 

Men and women in the 45-or-more age group ofter distinct advantages 
to employers over their younger fellow-workers, according to an article in 
the July issue of the Monthly Labor Review, official publication of the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

The article points out that not only may the worker in the 45-and-over 
age group offer more highly de\eloped skills, more mature judgment and 
more settled work habits as against the stamina and agility of youth, but 
he is frequently less likely to be absent and is less prone to injury than the 
younger worker. 

In a study of the work records of about 17.800 workers of all ages, in- 
cluding 1.309 women, it was revealed that the highest aljsenteeism rate was 
found among younger workers. 

Workers included in the study were emplo\-ed in 109 manufacturing 
plants at a variety of occupations, mostly productive. Records from which 
the studv was made covered at least 6 months in everv instance. 




5 P 



THE REAL TEST 

According to a government announ- 
cement, the Army and Navy now have a 
plane that has definitely broken through 
the sound barrier. The new plane, about 
which Uncle Sam is extremely secre- 
tive, travels faster than sound. 

Apparently there is no end to the 

marvels of science. First thing you know 

they will be building a plane that can 

travel faster than bad news, 

• • • 

ABOUT THE SIZE OF IT 

Tito, dictator of Yugoslavia, once the 
bright and shining light in the Soviet 
orbit, seems to have kicked up his heels 
at Kremlin domination. Although news 
from Yugoslavia is extremly scarce, it 
is evident that the once subservient 
Tito is doing a little bit of thinking on 
his own — the greatest crime of all in 
the Communist credo. The Red papers 
are lambasting him up one side and 
down the other, and in the Communist 
scheme of things that is a fine baro- 
meter. The harder the Red press goes 
after an individual, the more certain 
you can be that that individual is trait- 
orous enough to the Red cause to har- 
bor a thought or two of his own. 

Just what the trouble is between Tito 
and Moustache Joe is, we have no way 




of knowing, but somehow or other we 
cannot help but feel that Tito must 
have suddenly realized that he was in 
a position about like a long married 
man who was attending a musical. 
Looking sad and lonely sitting in a 
corner, he finally touched a responsive 
cord in the hostess. Approaching him in 
her politest manner, she said: "Do you 
play any instrument?" 

"Not away from home," replied the 
guest. 

"How peculiar," continued the host- 
ess, "and what instrument do you play 
at home?" 



"Second fiddle, 
with a grin. 

• 
TiaiE MAKES 

Since labor has 



confessed the guy 



Uey, Jane! What's Harry got dat I 
ain't gott 



• • 

A DIFFERENCE 

scored a number of 
sucesses at the polls in recent primar- 
ies, it is amusing to note the large num- 
ber of candidates who have suddenly 
become "friends" of labor. These poli- 
tical "friends" of labor have always 
been with us. While they are running 
for office, they are concerned about labor 
and its problems; as soon as they get in 
they do not give a hoot for unions or 
the people who make them up. And this 
brings to mind a story often told by Dr. 
Harry Emerson Fosdick. 

The distinguished clergyman was 
awakened about two a. m. one cold 
morning by a loud banging on his door. 
Looking out his window he perceived 
an exceedingly drunken young man do- 
ing the pounding. 

"Who are you, and what do you 
want?" called down the clergyman. 

"Doctor," the visitor replied, "I would 
like you to explain the difference be- 
tween Modernism and Fundamentalism 
to me." 

"Young man," counseled Dr. Fosdick, 
"if you will go home and sober up and 
come here at a more appropriate hour, 
I would be glad to explain the difference 
to you." 

There was a short moment of silence 
before the inebriate replied: "The 
trouble with that is. Doctor, that when 
I'm sober I don't give a d — n." 



THE C A K I* E N I" E R 



15 



SEEMS LOGICAL 

Maybe it was only coincidence, but 
one day last month an Indianapolis 
paper had two stories side by side which 
might have more than a little connec- 
tion. 

One headline read "Meat Prices Go Up 
15%". The other headline right beside 
it announced "State Mental Hospitals 
25% Overcrowded." 

• * • 

LOOKS NOT SO GOOD 

As this is being written, shooting is 
once more rife in Palestine, the Russian 
blockade of Berlin is becoming more 
oppressive, Yugoslavia is flexing its mus- 
cles, and all over the world tension and 
mistrust are mounting apace. 

Perhaps things can go on the way 
they are without another world war 
breaking out, but we seriously doubt it. 
The law of averages is against it. Sooner 
or later a little dispute grows into a big 
one. Right now we feel about like the 
patient who was undergoing an opera- 
tion. 

"What are my chances of recovery, 
Doctor?" he asked. 

"Not very good." replied the medico. 
"Medical records show that one out of 
every hundred succumbs to this opera- 
tion. Yours is my hundredth such op- 
eration. All the others lived, and you 
know statistics are statistics." 



A LITTLE DISCOURAGING 

"Time Proving Taft-Hartley Act Foun- 
dation for Stable Industrial Relations" 
says a headline in a national financial 
paper. Everything but facts and figures 
indicate this, say we. Actually there 
have been more disputes, more turmoil, 
more unrest under the Taft-Hartley Act 
than in any comparable period in recent 
labor history. The only stable thing 
about the Act is that it smells like the 
back end of one. 

The truth of the matter is that it 
puts organized labor about in the same 
position as the little boy who came from 
his first day at school very discouraged. 
Flatly he announced: "Ain't going to- 
morrow! " 

"Why not, dear?" wheedled his wor- 
ried mother. 

"Well," replied the lad, "I can't read 
and I can't write and they won't let me 
talk — so what's the use?" 



SOMETHING TO GLOAT ABOUT 

The wish probably being the father to 
the thought, Russian newspapers are 
carrying stories describing the terrible 
depression that is going on in this coun- 
try. The way they tell it, millions of 
unemployed are walking our streets 
looking for jobs and downright hard- 
ship is the lot of most of our people. 

Far be it for us to impugn the ver- 
acity of Russia's press, but if we are in 
the midst of a depression, Avhat con- 
stitutes good times? We can't help but 
wonder what the average Russian would 
think if he had a chance to visit this 
country. He would probably feel like 
the American who was Avandering 
around in the Sahara Desert in his bath- 
ing trunks. Pretty soon an Arab came 
along on a camel. 

"Where are you going, effendi?" asked 
the Arab. 

"For a swim," replied the American. 

"A swim," echoed the Arab in aston- 
ishment, "but the ocean is a thousand 
miles from here." 

"A thousand miles," gasped the Amer- 
ican. "Boy, oh, boy, is this some beach." 
• • • 
PALT FOR PRESIDENT 

On his way to his summer vacation in 
Maine to rest up for his fall presidential 
campaign as Nineteenth Party candidate 
for the White house, Joe Paup crawled 
out from under the rods long enough 
to give the world the following gem: 

"Maybe you can't make a silk purse 
out of a sow's ear, but a silk stocking 
certainly does improve a calf." 




/ don't kiioic htjic Idikj you'll have to 
inilurc it! I'm just the landlord — not a 
weather prophet! 



L 



16 



Survey of rural and urban earnings proves 

OPPORTUNITY LIES EVERYWHERE 

• • 

MORE THAN FOUR out of every ten non-farm families with in- 
comes of $5,000 a year or more live in small towns — cities with 
populations of under 50,000 and rural non-farm areas. This is 
shown in data recently made public by the U. S. Bureau of the Census on 
the distribution of family income in the United States by size of place 
of residence. 

The other families in this income class live in the larger cities. Even 
here, however, the big cities do not have a preponderant edge, indicating 
that big family incomes and big 



cities do not necessarily go together, 
any popular notion to the contrary. 

The figures show, for example, 
that only about two out of every 
ten of the families in the 85,000 
a year income class live in the big- 
gest cities, those Avith populations 
of a million or more. More than 
three out of every ten of such fam- 
ilies are residents of cities ranging 
in population from 50,000 to a mil- 
lion. As to the latter group, there 
is a relatively small difference in 
number and percentage of these 
families who live in cities grouped 
in the 50,000 - 250,000 population 
range and those living in cities with 
populations of 250,000 to a million. 

The middle income brackets of 
$3,000 to $5,000 a year show equally 
interesting results. The Census 
Bureau figures disclose that a large 
number and percentage of families 
in this income bracket live in the 
smaller cities and rural areas com- 
bined than in the large cities and big 
metropolises. However, the number 
of families in the income brackets 
under 83,000 a year parallels the 
size of place of residence, with the 
largest number of such families in 
rural areas and the smallest number 
in the biggest cities. 

The figures for middle income 



and upper bracket families indicate 
a remarkably wide geographical dis- 
tribution of larger incomes among 
the nation's families, irrespective 
of the size of community. Since 
personal earnings represent by far 
the greatest part of most family in- 
comes, the figures likewise indicate 
the widespread extent of economic 
opportunity throughout the nation. 
Such a situation is of the utmost 
consequence to the nation socially, 
politically and economically and is 
a tribute to the workings of our 
free institutions and enterprise sys- 
tem. 

The Census Bureau defines in- 
come in its study as total money in- 
come which includes receipts from 
investments and other sources as 
well as income from a job or busi- 
ness. The figures are for 1946 and 
are the result of a survey made last 
year. Location of the smaller cities 
or rural areas in relation to the big 
cities is not broken down. Undoubt- 
edly many of these communities are 
in, or within commuting distance of, 
the larger metropolitan areas where 
a substantial number of family 
heads may earn their livelihood. 
However, the number of families 
in the middle and upper income 
brackets who live in the small cities 
and rural areas is so large, some 7 



THE (• A H P E X T E R 



17 



million in the ag-greg-ate. as to indi- 
cate the fundamental importance of 
local sources of earnings in the in- 
comes of their residents. 



400,000 WOMEX HEAD 

$5,000 INCOME HOMES 



Bureau of the Census figures show 
that out of over 3 million families of 
which a woman was the head of the 
household, 400,000 had incomes of 
So. 000 a year or more in 19 46. Of 
these about 50,000 had incomes of 
SI 0,000 a year or over. Approx- 
imately one out of every eight of 
such families in the §5,000 and over 
income bracket lived in rural non- 
farm areas and the rest in the cities. 

There were nearly 700,000 fam- 
ilies headed by women with incomes 
of $3,000 to $5,000 a year of whom 
about one out of every nine lived in 
rural areas. The $3,0 and under 
income bracket had more than 2.000,- 
00 of such families of whom about 
one out of every four lived in rural 
areas. 

The following table gives the est- 
imated number of families headed by 
women (000 omitted) distributed by 
income level and place of residence: 

Income Level Urban Rural Total 

Under $3,000 1,700 500 2,200 

$3,000-$5,000 600 100 700 

$5,000 & Over 300 100 400 

Source: Bureau of the Census 



The hgoires show about 9^ million 
families living' in urban and rural 
non-farm areas combined with in- 
comes of between $3,000 and 85,000 
a year in 1946, Of these, jj per cent 
lived in the cities and the rest in 
rural districts. Of the urban group. 
36 per cent of such families lived in 
the small cities, those with popula- 
tions of under 50,000. Twenty-two 
per cent lived in cities of a million 
and over, and i per cent each in 



cities of 250,000 to a million and 
50,000 to 250.000. In number and 
percentag"e. the rural areas were 
second to the smallest cities in the 
number of such families. 

There are more than 5 million 
families in the $5,000 and over in- 
come class of which approximately 
4i million lived in cities and close 
to a million in rural areas. Of the 
urban group, the larg"est number of 
such families, amounting- to nearly 
1.4 million, lived in the small cities 
of under 50,000 population. Xext 
came the big metropolises with 
about I.I million of such families. 
Rural areas were third. Cities of 
250,000 to a million had over 900,- 
000 of such families. The cities 
with populations of 50,000 to 250.- 
000 had about 800,000 of such fam- 
ilies. 

The great majority of these well- 
to-do families, about 87 per cent, 
had incomes of between $5,000 and 
Sio,ooo a year. The Census Bureau 
study indicated there were approx- 
imately 700.000 families in the Sio.- 
000 a year and over income brack- 
ets. The largest per cent, lived in 
the smallest cities with populations 
of 2.500 to 50,000. The second larg- 
est number, representing 22 per 
cent, resided in rural non-farm 
areas. The big metropolises were 
third with 19 per cent. 

The following table gives the esti- 
mated number of urban and rural 
non-farm families (000 omited ) dis- 
tributed by total annual money in- 
come in 1946 and size of place of 
residence : 

INCOME BRACKET 



T.OCATION Under S3,0OO 

I'lban «Sr Rural 15.100 

I'iban 10,300 

1,000,000 & Over 1,700 

250,000-1,000.000 2.000 

50,000-250,000 2.100 

2,500 to 50,000 4.500 

Rural 4,80O 

Source: Bureau of the Census. 





$5,000 


S3.0O0-S5,0O0 


& Over 


0,500 


5,200 


7,300 


4.200 


1.60O 


1,100 


1,500 


900 


1,600 


800 


2,600 


1.400 


3,200 


1,000 



18 




Photo by "American Lumberman and Building 
Products Merchandiser." 

Judg^es examining entry in Fort Wayne, 
Ind., model home contest. 



BUILDING CAN BE FUN 

* * 

WANT TO BUY a new house, 
and with quick delivery! 
Simple enough — the postman 
delivers 3^ou a house, in knock-down 
form, right along with the telephone bill. 

And if father or son or both are clever 
at working jig saw puzzles there are a 
lot of interesting evenings to be spent in 
putting the thing together. Learn a lot, 
too. 

No hammer or saw are needed — the cutting of the lumber has been done 
in the shop. 

The model houses, built to exact scale of a real man-sized house, are 
the product of the "Tru-Models, Inc.," 426 East Terrace Street, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

The house is delivered as a package — a bundle of 2100 tiny wooden 
pieces. There are printed directions to follow in using a tube of glue, a 
bit of sand paper and a pocket knife in erection of the house. There are 
no nails to drive. 

It is intended that erection of the 
houses be instructive and inspira- 
tional to youth. Junior may want 
to call for help from his father or 
neighborhood pal, but only because 
he would want to share the fun in 
figuring out what it takes for good 
house construction. 

The Tru-Models, Inc., has sold 
2,000 of the model house kit in the 
past year. That isn't enough pro- 
duction to make the business profit- 
able, but those who have promoted 
the idea and provided the limited 
capital are dependent on other jobs 
for their pay-envelope. For the 
present Robert E. Russell, presi- 
dent of Tru-Models, and his friend- 
ly associates, are more interested 
in promoting the idea as a hobby 
than as a money maker. They con- 
sider they are doing a lot of good 



for youth and for the present that 
is sufiicient compensation. 

Mr. Russell, graduate of the 
Business School. Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1934, says he always has been an 
amateur craftsman as a hobby. His 
friends says he is an expert drafts- 
man, though he has not followed 
that professionally. He served in 
the war as a technical observer with 
the Fifth Air Force in the south- 
west Pacific. Most of his twenty- 
six months overseas were spent in 
New Guinea. He had a lot of dreams 
for the future while away, but it 
was in 1945 while employed in pub- 
lic relations work for the Indiana 
Lumber and Builders Supply Asso- 
ciation that he developed the model 
house kit. He is now managing edi- 
tor of the "American Lumberman, 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



139 North Clark street, Chicag-o, but 
uses spare time in sales promotion 
of the model houses made in his 
home town of Indianapolis. 

"In 1945 there was public criti- 
cism, much unjustified, of the build- 
ing industry — contractors, workers 
and suppliers of materials," com- 
mented Russell. "I thought much of 
the criticism was due to lack of 



more than making simple things 
like book shelves or ironing boards. 
As a lumberman I thought boys 
should know more about wood and 
its uses. I thought too it is impor- 
tant boys learn fundamentals of 
construction. 

"I developed plans for our first 
model. But the plans we now use 
represent a reproduction of the 47-I 






Photo by "American Lumberman and Building Products Merchandiser.' 
This cut-away model shows the completeness of the industry engineered model house. 
It is perfect in every detail, and putting it together involves every problem that w^ould be 
encountered in erecting a full size home. The youngster or adult who puts together such 
a model home has a better knowledge of what is involved in home construction than he 
could get from reading any number of books or listening to any number of lectures. 



information. Most persons had no 
idea of what it takes in time and 
material to build a house. Few 
knew of the carpenter's skill. Most 
persons know nothing of the con- 
struction features of a house. They 
do not appreciate that modern de- 
sign and methods are up to date as 
those relating to any other product. 
Good mechanics are important to 
the country. Too many shops of vo- 
cational schools were doing- little 



Industry-Engineered House which 
employs the principles of modu- 
lated coordination. 

"These kits contain approximate- 
ly 1200 pieces of accurately scaled 
miniature lumber of standard di- 
mensions. They also contain about 
900 miniature thick-butt shingles, 
termite shield, sill bolts, pattern 
stock for millwork, concrete blocks 
for top of foundation wall, and 
all other materials — tiny parts — -re- 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



quired to build an absolutely au- 
thentic model house." 

"Our kits are built from a series 
of three dimensional drawings rath- 
er than blue prints. These drawings 
show in perspective the exact posi- 
tion of every house member. This 
was done to enable persons unfa- 
miliar with blue print reading to 
understand how a house goes up, 
and is one of the unique features of 
the kit. X'ocational teachers say a 
study of these drawings makes an 
excellent background for a later 
study of blue print reading and 
drafting. 

Otto Reifeis. 729 Orange street, 
Indianapolis, is a die maker by 
trade, employed by the ]\Ioran Elec- 
tric Company. In odd hours he de- 
signed the special machinery and 
multiple saws used in cutting, mass 
production style, of the many pieces 
needed in assembling the model 
houses. His three sons. Robert L., 
Otto. jr.. and Edward, all mechan- 
ical engineering students of Purdue 
University, have been the chief part- 
time workers in the factory. J. B. 
Candy, a CleA-eland oil company 
salesman, and Harrold H. Gerrard, 
an Indianapolis business man. are 
other associates. 

A single model house kit sells at 
S12.50, post-paid, though a better 
price is given on quantity sales. 

The late Father Flanagan Avas 
among the tirst customers, purchas- 
ing several models for instructional 
purposes in his famed Boys' Town. 

St. Louis lumber dealers bought 
500 models, presenting most of them 
to Boy Scouts, public school voca- 
tional shops and city recreational 
centers where fathers joined sons in 
assembly work. The Chicago park 
board bought the tiny houses for 
eight recreation centers. Union car- 
penters have co-operated in inter- 



esting boys, including their own 
sons, in the models. 

In Fort Wayne the Lumber and 
Supply Dealers' Club bought the 
models and fostered the teaching of 
house construction and knowledge 
of wood to 600 boys in the school 
shops. The boys can now talk the 
language of 2x6x16 and 2x4x12, 
studs and jack rafters. The Fort 
W ayne boys participated in a con- 
test, shop tools for prizes. Fred 
AA itte, business representative of 
the Fort A\'ayne carpenters' local, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America, was among 
the prominent citizens to serve as a 
judge. 

The roof of a model is portable — 
the lifting of the roof gives a bor a 
better chance to study the interior. 

"Boys become so fascinated in 
learning the mysteries of building 
through these model houses that 
they have no time to indulge in the 
mischief that comes through idle- 
ness," commented President Rus- 
sell. "Good mechanics are always 
good citizens." 



The Right to 

VOTE 



Is Your 




Don't Fail to Use It 



i 



Editorial 




An Expensive Lesson 

As more primary elections come- and go in the various states it becomes 
increasingly clear that the labor vote is going to be a tremendous factor 
in the general elections next November. Candidates who placed their 
hopes during primary elections on anti-la1)or acts and utterances have 
fared badly in virtually all sections of the nation. On the other hand, many 
candidates who displayed sympathy toward and understanding of the 
aims and objectives of organized labor came out on top with active labor 
support. That is as it should be. The most vital problem facing workers 
and unions today is the legislative crisis created by the Eightieth Con- 
gress. Many hard won rights and prerogatives of labor have been legis- 
lated away by Congress and the state legislatures. Many others are in 
jeopardy unless men more sympathetic to the labor viewpoint are elected 
to office to replace the reactionaries who dance to any tune called by Big 
Business. 

In 1946, the Eightieth Congress, listening to NAM propaganda, aban- 
doned all efforts to keep prices in check. The NAM insisted that "if OPA 
is permanently discontinued the production of goods will mount rapidly 
and prices will quickly adjust themselves to levels that consumers are 
willing to pay." The result has been that prices have increased a full 
thirty per cent since 1946. The Federal Reserve Board discloses the fact 
that one fourth of American families are now finding it necessary to dip 
into savings each month to get by. The Department of Commerce discloses 
that wage and salary income has increased only six per cent during the 
past three years while profits have advanced sixty per cent. 

All these things add up to the fact that American workers are taking 
a terrific beating. It amounts to around twenty-fi\'e billion dollars a year. 
In the last two years skyrocketing prices have taken some fifty billion 
dollars out of the pay envelopes of working people. To all intents and 
purposes the results of Congressional failure to hold back prices are the 
same as if a consumers' tax of twenty-five billion dollars a year had been 
levied against workers' pay checks. 

It all came about because fifty-six million eligible American voters 
failed to go to the polls in 1946. As a result, agents of Big Business 
obtained a majority in Congress and the little people have been paving 
the price ever since. The last twenty-four months have provided vou and 
me with a fifty billion dollar lesson in citizenship. 

With labor's rights standing in jeopardy, with inflation squeezing the 
lifeblood out of most workers, it ought to be clear to all of us that political 
education stands as the paramount issue of the year. The crisis of our 
time is political in nature. The solution will have to be political, too. It 
consists simply of electing labor's friends and defeating its enemies. 



22 THECAKPEXTER 

For years our Constitution and standing decisions of the General 
Executive Board have forbade discussions of political or sectarian matters 
in union meetings. That is as it should be. Partisan politics as such have 
no place in a great democratic organization such as our Brotherhood 
which is composed of all races, creeds, colors, and honest political beliefs. 
However, the present crisis transcends partisan politics. It is a matter of 
life or death to our union. It is a matter of prosperity or depression to 
millions of our people. 

Under the circumstances, the present crisis ought rightfully to be con- 
sider as a matter for union discussion, — for the \'ery future of the union 
is at stake. The discussion need not be — nor should it be — partisan in 
nature. It should adhere to the traditional policy of rewarding friends and 
punishing enemies. In all parties labor has both friends and foes. By 
intelligent discussion union members can ferret them out and act accord- 
ingly. Once they have separated the sheep from the goats, they should 
and must back their friends to the limit and fight their enemies to the 
bitter end. That is the American A\'ay. It is the Union way. It is also the 

effective way. 

• 

Confusion Unlimited 

Back in April, 1946, during the Twenty-fifth Annual Convention of 
our Brotherhood, George ^leany, Secretary-Treasurer of the American 
Federation of Labor, wound up a masterly speech with these words: "Our 
experiences during the war have told us better than anything else that one 
thing labor must fight in this post-war period and one thing labor must 
eliminate is control of labor relations by people in the political field." 
How true the past three years have proved those words to be I More and 
more in the last thirty-six months Congress and the government have in- 
jected themselves into labor relations. And the more they have tried to 
bring about industrial harmony through legislation and rule making, the 
more confused and unsettled the labor picture has grown. 

The crowning achievement of the political labor "experts" was passage 
of the Taft-Hartley Act. This one piece of legislation incorporates all 
the ideas, theories, guesses and crystal-gazing conclusions of all the poli- 
tical labor "experts" of the Eightieth Congress. Nine months after the 
law went into effect neither the backers of the law, the men who were 
selected to administer it, nor the people who are supposedly bound b}' it 
can agree as to what it means or what it covers or what it provides. Even 
the Wall Street Journal, mouthpiece of Big Business, calls it "collective 
litigation which replaces collective bargaining." Better than anything else 
the Taft-Hartley Act validates George Meany's contention that people 
in the political field have no business in labor relations. 

This entire issue of The Carpenter would not be big enough to enu- 
merate all the contradictions, inconsistencies and conflicts Avhich have 
developed since the Act became laAv. The Act prohibits secondary boy- 
cotts, but no one has yet been able to determine vvdiat a secondary boycott 
consists of. There are as many opinions as there are Field Examiners, 

(Continued on page 27) 



At Reasonable Cost 




UPSON DOBL-THIK FIBRE-TILE 




NO VISIBLE 
FACE NAILING 

This amazing Upson Float- 
ing Fastener is designed to 
compensate for normal 
structural movement of 
studs or furring strips. 
Carrying capacity of 
fasteners, applied as 
directed, actually is 12J^ 
times the weight of Upson 
Dubl-Thik Fibre-TUe. 




a 




I REMEMBER" 



Some reminiscences from 35 years 

in the building industry by W. H. Upson 



If you iiave been doing carpenter 
work as long as we have been 
making unfinished tileboard, you 
can smile wdth us at the first crude 
tileboard products. 
Remember the thin, spongy boards 
— the skimp3^ mouldings? We 
thought they were pretty good then 
because they were the best anyone 
knew how to make. 
I can remember when people ques- 
tioned composition roofing. But see 
how good it is today! Can you re- 
member any building product which 
did not meet \\'ith a lot of resist- 
ance when it was new? 
People are just naturally inclined 
to be skeptical about products used 
in building their homes. That is why 
it takes time to convince people 
about new building products. 
Take our tileboard! The Upson 
Dubl-Thik Fibre-Tile of today is a 
far cry from the product of many 
3"ears ago. It is as much better than 



our early product as a 1948 model 
automobile is better than an old 
two-cyhnder car. 

MiUions of feetof Upson Dubl-Thik 
Fibre-Tile are in use tccay in tens 
of thousands of baths and kitchens. 
It gives us real satisfaction to know 
Upson Dubl-Thik Fibre-Tile has 
made it possible for so many people 
to enjoy tile-like cleanUness and 
enduring beauty at reasonable cost. 
I know that you, as a carpenter, 
must get much the same feeling 
when you apply our product. 
I Like to get letters from carpenters. 
Won't you write to me about any 
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STATE 



THECAKPENTER 27 

(Continued from page 22) 

Administrators and Officials. The Act covers places of employment "affect- 
ing interstate commerce." Already there have been more definitions of 
the phrase "affecting interstate commerce" than Heinz has pickles. 

As an illustration of what can happen under the present confused and 
complicated labor relations picture, the DiGiorgio case takes the cake. 
Some ten months ago, thousands of fruit and vegetable workers in lower 
California struck against the unsatisfactory wages and working condi- 
tions existing at the DiGiorgio holdings, an absentee-ownership, mass- 
production farm enterprise. The workers belong to the National Farm 
Laborers Union. Early in the strike the union was reliably informed that 
it did not come under the provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act because its 
members were employed in "agriculture." The first of last month, how- 
ever, NLRB General Counsel Denham took a hand in the dispute. He 
asked for an injunction against the Farmers Union and several other inter- 
national unions on the grounds that a secondary boycott was involved. The 
fact that no one had ever defined just what constitutes a secondary boy- 
cott did not bother Denham. He made up his own. 

So the Farm Workers Union found itself in a very peculiar situation, 
thanks to the political labor "experts." 

When and if the farm workers wanted certification privileges under 
the Act, they were not a "labor organization." On the other hand when a 
strike situation became serious, Mr. Denham argued that they constituted 
a "labor organization" under the Act and were therefore subject to injunc- 
tion procedures set up in the Act. 

This is the sort of thing that happens when politicians take charge of 
labor relations. No wonder George Meany objects so strenuously. 



Everybody Wants to Get in the Act 

(Althouj)rh written prior to the Republican and Democratic conventions, the following editorial is 
comparatively timeless in as much as it deals with a new political trend.) 

Have you noticed that all God's candidates got liberalism these days? 

Even Taft. AYe have just noticed a handout from the National Taft- 
For-President Club which announced in a newspaper quote that "Taft is a 
Conservative-Liberal." 

Franklin Roosevelt was a Liberal, of course; he practically copyrighted 
the label. And since Tom Dewey campaigned in 1944 on the basis that he 
could do everything that Franklin did, only better, he must be some kind 
of a Liberal too. Maybe a sort of Blue Serge Efficiency-Liberal. 

Hank Wallace is of course a Totalitarian Liberal. Truman is a Liberal- 
Democrat. Stassen is a Liberal ; you can't be anything else from the dairy 
country — a Native-Soil-Liberal. 

Then there's Vandenberg. Some meanie is reported to have remarked 
that his voting record shows he has been on both sides of most everything. 
That would make him at least a Part-Time-Liberal. 



28 THECAKPEXTER 

Even the dark horses are Liberal. Since Franklin Junior and Elliott 
are out for Eisenhower, he must be one, whether he likes it or not. Prob- 
ably some columnist will start calling- him a Military-Liberal pretty soon. 

Alf. ]\I. Landon was given permission by the Federal Communications 
Commission to operate a radio station in Liberal, Kansas. That must mean 
something-, and vou can't get a darker horse than Alf, unless a'ou want to 
consider this proposal to nominate Mrs. Roosevelt for President and 
Walter Reuther of the auto workers' union for Mce President. "Creat- 
ing." says labor lawyer Louis AA'aldman, "a home for the Liberal home- 
less." What a housing shortage ! 

}^Ian and boy, the writer of this editorial has been around Washington 
for nigh onto 40 years. Remembers Taft the Elder floating over the pave- 
ment in his patent leather shoes, as full of shrimp creole as one of those 
jolly balloons in Mac3^'s Parade is of helium. And Theodore Roosevelt, 
smiling like a 1948 Buick. And AA'oodrow Wilson's solemn high-school- 
gothic facade. And Harding, who. in a silk hat, looked more like a Great 
Statesman than even a Great Statesman could. Yes, sir; back there the 
Tw^eedledums and Tweedledees stood up like men and were counted. You 
could tell them apart. They weren't all Liberals. 

Once, during a certain campaign in that far-off heroic time, a beery 
sage named Henr}^ Mencken who lives in a place called Balmermerlin 
said the Republicans could win with a Chinaman. 

It may be that 1948 will prove the words of the prophet true. But if 
the Republicans try it, he'll have to be a Liberal-Chinaman. 

(P. S. Don't ask us what the word means these days!) — A\''ashington 
News. 



Much Fiction, Little Fact 

As the national political kettle begins bubbling, the name of General 
President AVilliam L. Hutcheson keeps cropping up in the news. First one 
publication then another confidentially predicts that he and the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters Non-partisan Committee will jump on one 
band wagon or another. All such statements are pure conjecture and 
without foundation of fact. 

As the name implies, the United Brotherhood Non-partisan Committee 
for the Repeal and Defeat of Anti-labor Legislation is set up for the sole 
purpose of repealing and defeating legislation detrimental to the best 
interests of all workers in general and organized carpenters in particular. 
As president of the Non-partisan Committee, General President Hutcheson 
is similarly dedicated. To achieve these desirable ends, some commit- 
ments may eventually become necessary. When and if they do, members of 
the United Brotherhood will be the first to be appraised of the situation. 

Li the meantime, stories allegedly giving the inside dope about what 
General President Hutcheson is going to do can be treated as pure fiction ; 
for that is what they are. 



29 



PENNSYLVANIA STARTS REFORESTATION PROGRAM 



PENNSYLVANIA is embarking on the largest reforestation program 
in its 267-year history. The State Department of Forests and \\^aters 
disclosed last month that it has started a program to raise at its six 
nurseries some 50,000,000 seedlings yearly. The program which has a 
scope sufficient to reforest 50,000 acres of denuded lands yearly, aims at 
starting the State back on the road as an important lumber producer. In 
1681, when Charles II granted a charter for the new colony of Penn's 
Woods," the Commonwealth's 45,331 square miles were covered by forest 
primeval. By i860, Pennsylvania led all other states in lumber production 
and for the next three decades lum- 



bering surpassed all other indus- 
tries in the State. By the turn of 
the century, however, the woods- 
man's axe had taken its toll. From 
then on its forests failed to meet 
the State's needs and Pennsylvania 
has imported lumber ever since. 

Forests still cover just one-half 
of Pennsylvania's countryside — at 
last count in 1944 just 52 per cent. 
Much of these woodlands are pro- 
ducing very little lumber. 

The U. S. Department of Com- 
merce in 1945 reported Pennsyl- 
vania's production as 463,688,000 
board feet, or less than two per cent. 

The bulk of this production came 
from privately owned lands, al- 
though some 70,000,000 board feet 
of lumber came from State-owned 
forests during the war years, a 
source that has now virtually dried 
up. 

On the 1,750,000 acres of State- 
owned forests, selective cutting has 
been the rule since the forest acqui- 
sition program was initiated in 1897 
with the purchase of 40,000 acres 
at the headwaters of the Delaware, 
Susquehanna and Allegheny Rivers. 

On Commonwealth tracts, forest- 
ers mark mature, damaged and un- 
desirable trees. No others may be 



removed by timbering contractors. 

The State's augmented seedling 
program gets under way with its 
nurseries scraping the bottom of the 
barrel because of war years scarci- 
ties. The 1948 production of nurser- 
ies at Mont Alto in Clearfield 
County, Greenwood Furnace in 
Huntingdon County and Potter's 
Mills in Centre County amount to 
only 5,000,000 seedlings and trans- 
plants. 

This year, the State has acquired 
the former U. S. Soil Conservation 
Service nursery at Howard, Centre 
County, and a lOO-acre farm at 
Kutztown State Teachers College. 

At the six locations, 6,000 pounds 
of tree seeds have been planted in 30 
miles of four-foot seed bed. This 
represents 60,000,000 seedlings, of 
which 50,000,000 are expected to be 
made available for replanting. 

The bulk of this production will 
be made available to land owners at 
cost or less. 

On minimum orders of 1,000, the 
new price is $6 a thousand for one or 
two-year-old seedlings and $15 a 
thousand for three to four-year-old 
transplants. A thousand, planted 
six feet apart, will reforest about an 
acre. — Philadelphia Bulletin 



30 



Whether you like it or not 



You Are In Politics 

* * 

So YOU DON'T LIKE what the 8oth. Congress did to you in the last 
two years. You didn't get better schools for your children, you didn't 
get an increased old age pension, you didn't get a higher minimum 
wage, you didn't get a home at a price you could afford. But you did 
get dollar a pound butter, a tax law that made the rich richer and did 
nothing for you, and you got an unworkable labor law that stripped 
you of all your hard won gains since 1932. 

What are you going to do about it? Public opinion polls show that 
the working man takes less interest than anyone else in politics. It may 
seem fantastic. . . .but many of our own A. F. of L. members think that 
a reactionary sweep in the November election is inevitable. They assume 
that there is some magic wand that • 



swings elections one way ojr an- 
other. The plain truth of the matter 
is that if the 43 million of us wage 
and salary workers would quit sit- 
ting around grumbling about our 
sorry fate, and get out the vote 
starting right now, we could easily 
bring in a liberal Congress by an 
overwhelming vote. 

"He also serves who only stands 
and waits" does not apply to poli- 
tics. The one day in the year when 
all men are equal is on election day. 
Your vote is as good as anyone 
else's ... be he a captain of industry 
or the last apprentice hired. 

If you don't vote, nobody else can 
do it for you. Just as in a UNION 
SHOP Election where failure to 
vote is a vote for NO union, failure 
to vote on election day is a betrayal 
of your champion in Congress and 
a boost to his reactionary opposi- 
tion. 

Elections are won in the precinct 
. . .by ballots in the box. Every re- 
actionary politician knows that so 
long as his opposition does not 
build a flesh and blood organization 



in every precinct to turn out the 
votes on election day, he has no- 
thing to worry about. 

War and politics are a lot alike. 
Neither is won by threats and re- 
solutions. Both are won by well 
organized armies in the field. That 
is why the United Brotherhood 
Nonpartisan Committee for the Re- 
peal and Defeat of Anti-Union Leg- 
islation was formed. But just as in 
war so in political action, it is not 
the General but the men in the line 
who win the victories. That is why 
we must have active local commit- 
tees organized jointly by all the 
local unions in each community and 
Congressional District in this coun- 
try. National and State committees 
are not enough. 

There are more than 100,000 pre- 
cincts in this country. Just as we 
have a shop steward in every A. F. 
of L. shop, we must have a Union 
Political Steward in every one of 
the 100,000 precincts to protect our 
political interests. Every Steward 
must head a committee of trade 
union volunteers each with his as- 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



signed area within his neighbor- 
hood. Success or failure of our pro- 
gram depends on these front line 
volunteers. It is up to them to get 
their neighbors registered, their 
poll tax paid, and out on election 
day to vote for labor's friends. 

The alibi of the non-voter or the 
wrong voter is that he didn't know 
anything about the candidates. It 
is up to our committees and our 
precinct committeemen to tell these 
people why and how to vote and get 
their ballots in the box on election 
day. 

Many of us shrug off our political 
responsibilities by saying politics is 
a dirty business and neither major 
party puts up worthy candidates. 
Well, whether you like it or not. . . 
you are in politics right now. Gov- 
ernment is a huge enterprise today 
spending 40 billions a year making 
laws that affect our lives every min- 
ute of the day. You can't avoid gov- 
ernment or politics by walking away 
and sticking your head in the sand. 
Politics is everybody's business be- 
cause it affects everybody. If you 
want to have any say in how you 
are governed you have to demon- 



strate your right to self govern- 
ment by exercising your right to 
vote. 

Any party and any candidate can 
be changed. Corrupt unrepresent- 
ative machines are the fault of lazy 
disinterested citizens. When we 
have a permanent army of trade 
union political committeemen in 
every precinct in the country ready 
to inform the voting public when 
a Congressman betrays the people 
and ready to turn out the vote on el- 
ection day, then the complexion of 
politics, public offfce holders, and 
the laws passed will change for the 
better. 

You can't continue to enjoy the 
rights of democracy unless you ac- 
cept the responsibilities of demo- 
cracy. . .that/ means registering and 
voting intelligently. 

Let's get into action now. . .not 
next year or next week. Time is 
running out. Where can you do 
the biggest and best job for victory? 
The answer is. . . .right in your own 
community and precinct. Get in 
touch with your local Non-Partisan 
Committee and volunteer to help 
deliver the vote in your own neigh- 
borhood and precinct. 



Inflation Slows Up Bond Sales 

The government had to pay out $40,000,000 more than it took in on 
Series E savings bonds (the kind little people bu}') during April, May and 
June, despite the "stop-inflation" security loan drive from April 15 to 
June 30. 

However, sales of F and G savings bonds, also covered in the drive, 
ran $213,000,000 higher than cash-ins for the three months. Thus the gov- 
ernment came out $173,000,000 ahead on the dri\'e. No advance goal was set. 

Treasury records showed that for E bonds alone, April through June, 
sales totaled $968,000,000 while redemptions totaled $1,008,000,000, includ- 
ing accumulated interest. For the E, F and G Series combined, sales were 
$1,397,000,000; cash-ins, $1,224,000,000. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of A3IERICA 






General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Genkrai. President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First Gexeeai. Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

SEf OND General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis. Ind. 

General Teeasteer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON. JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St.. New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, O. WM. BLAIER 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11. Pa. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIB 
Box 1168. Santa Barbara. Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave.. Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. I-a-wrence, Montreal. Que.. Can. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretar.v 



CORRECTION 

111 an editorial in the June issue, Oregon was listed as one of the states 
prohibiting all forms of union security by state statute. This was an error. 
Oregon has no anti-union-shop law at the present time. The editorial in 
question was based on information received from a high-powered A\'ash- 
ington analytical agency which erroneousl}^ included Oregon among the 
states banning union shop. If this proves anything it is that the high- 
powered boys can make mistakes, too. 

At any rate, we extend apologies to our Oregon readers with the sin- 
cere hope they will never have to cope with an anti-union-shop law. 



CONATJNTION CALL, 

In accordance with, the provisions of the Constitution, you are hereby informed 
that the Sixty-third Annual Convention of the Trades and Labor Congress of 
Canada will be held in the Siroco Club, View Street, Victoria, British Columbia. 
beginning at 10 a.m. (City Time) Monday, October 11, 1948 and continuing 
daily until the business of the Convention has been completed. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 



2686 
2272 
2479 

2480 
2481 



Issaquah, Wash. 
Warren Pa. 
Fairfield 111. 
Cleveland Ohio 
Alliance Ohio 



2731 St. Malo, Que., Can. 

2815 Brookings, Ore. 

1171 Shakopee, IMinn. 

2482 Greensboro, N. C. 



3(n M 



ttnoviam 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Not dead, just gone before; And will f Oliver more 



%.tBi in l^tntt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother CLIFTON ANDERSON, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother W. R. ARMSTRONG, Local No. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

Brother KRINE BAKER, Local No. 490, Passaic, N. J. 

Brother MORRIS BLUMENTHAL, Local No. 385, New York, N. Y. 

Brother SAM A. BRENTNALL, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother BRUCE CARR, Local No. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Brother W. I. CARTWRIGHT, Local No. 198, Dallas, Tex. 

Brother ANTHONY DALMOLIN, Local No. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

Brother DAVID DAVIS, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother WALTER W. DAVISON, Local No. 11, Cleveland, Ohio 

Brother JOSEPH DEUTSCHMAN, Local No. 808, New York, N. Y. 

Brother E. C. DOYLE, Local No. 198, Dallas, Texas 

Brother H. L. DURHAM, Local No. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

Brother WM. FRENDREIS, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 

Brother ROY A. GRAVES, Local No. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Brother E. E. HARRIS, Local No. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Brother CHESTER G. HOOVER, Local No. 190, Klamath Falls, Ore. 

Brother J. J. HUMBLING, Local No. 470, Tacoma. Wash. 

Brother HOWARD HURLBURT, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother G. T. JOHNSON, Local No. 103, Birmingham, ALA. 

Brother CHARLES KING, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother LOUIE LARSON, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother EARL McCLEARY, Local No. 1497, E. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother WILLIAM MALONEY, Local No. 1577, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Brother GEORGE E. MAUGER, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Tex. 

Brother CHARLES S. MEEKS, Local No. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 

Brother ANGELO MENTESANA, Local No. 385, New York, N. Y. 

Brother WILLIAM W. MOXHAM, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother B. J. MURPHY, Local No. 764, Shreveport, La. 

Brother JOHN NILSSON, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother WALTER O'SHEA, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother WENZEL OTTO, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother C. A. PARRY, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother H. PEDERSON, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother PERCY T. PERKINS, Local No. 1652, Hampton, N. H. 

Brother C. M. PITTMAN, Local No. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

Brother WM. R. POMEROY, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

Brother W. L. POWELL, Local No. 198, Dallas, Tex. 

Brother SAM C. PYATT, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother NICK ROESCH, Local No. 419, Chicago, III. 

Brother WALTER J. ROGERS, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother W. A. ROWE, Local No. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

Brother H. L. ROWLAND, Local No. 764, Shreveport, La. 

Brother CARL SCHNELL, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother H. O. SMITH, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brother HORACE P. SMOTHERMAN, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brother E. W. SNYDER, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother GUS A. STERNER, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother CHRISTOPHER STICKEL, Local No. 808, New York, N. Y. 

Brother BERT TAYLOR, Local No. 1497, E. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother ELMER C. TEDFORD, Local No. 14, San Antonio, Tex. 

Brother C. R. TIMMERMAN, Local No. 1497, E. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother JOHN TYO, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother FRANK J. WOLFE, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 

Brother JOHN YORK, Local No. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother JAQUES ZAPF, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 




CorrospondoncQ \ 

This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

TEXAS STATE COUNCIL. HOLDS FIRST ANNUAL, CONCXAVE 

The Texas State Council of Carpenters held its first annual convention in Fort 
Worth during June 17th, 18th and 19th. 

The Convention was attended by 8 4 delegates from 35 Local Unions. Fifty- 
three Locals are afiiliated but owing to so much construction throughout the State, 
many Locals were unable to get delegates to the Convention. Harmony prevailed 
throughout the torrid three days. Much constructive business was handled at this 
First Convention. Proceedings will be off the press in the near future. 

Reports from many sections of the State lead us to believe that labor has 
wakened up politically and will take time out to vote for friends of labor. We in 
this great State are having our greatest growth and are trying to meet the many 
issues that go with such a growth. 

One of the most constructive things accomplished at the Convention was the 
setting up of a committee to work for State-wide universal apprentice training. 
Our apprentice training should be one of much interest to the Brotherhood in as 
much as many youths seek membership in our Locals. Our General Contractors 
are demanding skilled workmen and through this medium we can supply the 
demand if we but meet the issue. 

Our Convention attracted several prominent speakers and much attention was 
paid Mr. L. M. D. Wells of the law firm of Mullinax-Wells-Ball, attorneys for the 
Texas State Federation of Labor. Mr. Wells used the Taft-Hartley Act for his 
principal address and explained in detail many parts of the law and answered many ' 
inquiries by several delegates. 

The Council received pleasant greetings from several sources that were greatly 
appreciated, and looks forward to a better and bigger Convention in 1949, when we 
will meet in Beaumont, Texas, in June. We wish to invite our friends to be with us. 



SAN DIEGO LOCAL DEDICATES FINE NEAV HOME 

Because officers and members of Local Union No. 1296, San Diego, past and 
present, living and dead, had foresight and vision, the Union today is operating 
in one of the finest Labor Temples on the Pacific Coast. Located at Broadway and 
Twenty-third Street, the new home of Local Union No. 12 9 6 is a model of beauty 
and efficiency. Highlight of the building is an auditorium which can seat 1,200. 

Saturday, May 1st, Local Union No. 129 6 dedicated its new home with an all 
day open house and evening ceremony. Literally thousands of members and 
friends filled the building from early morning until dancing broke up at midnight. 
At the evening ceremony Mayor Harley E. Knox paid tribute to the accomplish- 
ments of Local Union No. 129 6 as did DeGraf Austin, chairman of the Board of 
Supervisors, Judge Joe Shell, Judge Dean Sherry, and a host of other prominent 
civic and labor dignitaries. 

Consisting of a hiring hall, a small meeting hall in addition to the main audi- 
torium, ladies' clubroom, men's clubroom, kitchen, stage and dressing rooms, and 
a number of offices, the new headquarters building of Local Union 129 6 is a show- 
place. In addition to Local Union No. 1296, the new building will house the Dis- 
trict Council of Carpenters; Millmen's Local No. 20 20; Boatbuilders' Local No. 
1300; Floorlayers' Local No. 2074; and Roofers' Local No. 553. 

The entire labor movement of Southern California is proud of the achievement 
of Local No. 129 6. 



THE CARPEXTER 



35 



IVirSKEGOX PAYS TRIBUTE TO OLD TrVIERS 

At a special meeting held on the night of April 6, Local Union No. 100, Muske- 
gon, Michigan, paid loving tribute to a large group of old timers, each of whom 
has anywhere from thirty-one to forty-five years of membership to his credit. By 
special arrangement, cars were provided for the benefit of the old timers. They 
were picked up and brought to the meeting and returned home at its conclusion. 



—% 




Front Row: Robert Wackernagel, Sr., 43V-> years; George Dausey, 51 yecirs; Roy 
Hurson, 45 1>^ years; George Hagen, 44 years; and Alex. Gainer 45^0 years. 

Back Row: Edward Zagers, 41 years; Edward Langing, 41 years; Chris, Bergsma, 32^2 
years; Joseph Dawson, 39 years; Ernest Rollenhagen, 31 years; Walter Neady, 34 years; 
Bert Wheeler, 31 years; John Rustad, 37 years; and Theodore Musgrave, 31 ^^ years. 

Absent from picture: Henry Chartrand, 45% years; Lauritz Hansen, 42 years; Francis 
Zimmer, 32 years; and John DeYoung, 31 years. (Apologies to Brother DeYoung for being 
overlooked in the search for old timers.) 

For several of them it was their first visit to the fine new home which the Union 
recently completed and dedicated. A fine turnout was on hand to greet and renew 
old acquaintances. 

During the course of the evening many fine tributes were paid to the old timers. 
Highlight of the meeting was the presentation of a gift to each old timer by the 
Union. Not all the old timers were able to attend but it is hoped to get them all 
together before the end of the summer. 



ARKANSAS STATE LI^TMBER WORKERS ROLL UP THEIR SLEEVES 

Saturday and Sunday, May 15 and 16, the Arkansas State Council of Lumber 
and Sawmill Workers held its annual convention at Hot Springs. In a down-to- 
business mood, delegates attacked a full agenda of business connected with the 
welfare of the membership. The whole two days were spent in considering vital 
problems and acting thereon. 



36 T H E r A R P E X T E R 

Primarily the convention made plans for organizing the State's forty thousand 
lumber -workers whose wages and conditions are among the poorest in the South. 
To implement the organizing program, the constitution was amended to increase 
the per capita tax by ten cents, the same to be used for the hiring of a full time 
organizer to work with Representatives in the territory. The vice presidential 
setup was also changed — an Executive Board consisting of eight members from an 
equal number of districts replacing the old five-man vice presidential plan. 

A large number of important resolutions were adopted. Among them were 
resolutions: 

Asking all members to join and support labor's political action program. 

Requesting Congress to place American Facism in the same category 
as Communism and reiterating our organization's opposition to any and all 
groups seeking overthrow of our government by any unconstitutional means. 

Condemning all anti-labor legislation and opposing all form of invol- 
untary servitude. 

Advocating election of the President of the United .States by direct ballot. 

Advocating promotion of our Brotherhood Label. 

Requesting that election days be made general holidays. 

The Lumber and Sawmill "Workers of Arkansas have a big job ahead of them, 
but if the determination of the delegates to the convention can be used as a 

yardstick, eventual success is a foregone conclusion. 



OHIO STATE COUXCTL HOLDS BEST MEET 

On Wednesday morning, April the twenty-first, the Twenty-eighth Annual Con- 
vention of the Ohio State Council of Carpenters '"c.~ ca^l-d into -e-=:on 07 Presi- 
dent Harry Schwarzer, in the Ball Room of the Miami Hotr". in layton, Oiiio. 
There were forty-one Local Unions and three District Council- :-::---n:-d by one 
hundred and twenty-five delegates, accounted for. On Thursday evenirie. the dele- 




gates and tneir wives were guests of the Miami Talley Di~t:i't Coun' il at a bancuet 
held in the ball room of the hotel. Brother Charles Eiatton. Easiness Represen- 
tative of the District Council, acted as Toastmaster and introduced the oScers 
and board members of the State Council. 

Brother Albert E. Fischer, assistant to the General Secretary delivered the 
principal address and explained at length the provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act. 
The great surprise of the evening was the showing of the Teclmicolor picture of 
the business activities of the General Office of the United Brotherhood and the 



THE CARPENTER 37 

Home at Lakeland, Florida, with its services and comforts given to our aged 
members. 

The convention was the most harmonious and enthusiastic ever held. A resolu- 
tion was adopted expressing the condolences of the members upon the passing of 
Board member Walter Davison, former Sec'y of the Cuyahoga District Council. 

Brother Harry Schwarzer, member of the General Executive Board and Presi- 
dent of the State Council, was commended for his untiring efforts to improve the 
conditions of the members he represents. In a voluntary contribution the delegates 
to the convention sent three hundred and eight-two dollars to the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters Non-Partisan Committee for the Repeal and Defeat of Anti- 
Labor Legislation. 

The incumbent officers were reelected by the unanimous vote of the delegates 
and the convention adjourned to meet in Springfield, Ohio, in 1949. 



LOCAL, No. 2350 SPONSORS LADLES' NIGHT 

Monmouth County Carpenters Local Union No. 2250 of Red Bank, New Jersey 
held its Annual Ladies Night in its auditorium on Saturday evening, June 5, 1948. 
Several hundred members and their wives attended and enjoyed an evening of 
professional entertainment, dancing and refreshments. The auditorium was gayly 
decorated for the occasion. 

General Executive Board member O. Wm. Blaier and Mrs. Blaier attended as 
honored guests and Brother Blaier gave an interesting and enlightening address 
which was well received by all present. 

During the festivities, Mrs. Dangler, wife of Business Agent Frank A. Dangler, 
was presented with an orchid corsage and three pieces of luggage in appreciation 
of her services to the organization. After a very enjoyable evening those attend- 
ing acclaimed the party a huge success. 

• 

SLSTIETH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATED BY LOCAL NO. 424 

Local Union 424, Hingham, Massachusetts, held its Sixtieth Anniversary Ban- 
quet on May 25th at Kimball's Lobster Emporium in the beautiful adjoining town 
of Cohasset on the South Shore. This place is famous for its lobster dinners. There 
is a large wooden tank in the center of the building elevated three feet above the 
floor where the lobsters can be seen crawling around in sea water pumped up from 
below. 

At 9:00 P.M. thirty-five members and invited guests, including delegates from 
the South Shore District Council and Business Agents from Brockson, Quincy and 
the South Shore, sat down and enjoyed the banquet. Committee Chairmen called 
on some of the guests and members who responded with short speeches and story 
telling. The Secretary gave a short sketch of conditions as they existed in May 10, 
1888, when Local 424 was organized, and in July 25, 1892 when he joined, and 
the condition of things as they exist today, with advanced wages and the forty- 
hour week. 

Let us hope that old Local 42 4 will carry on for many years to come and 
never have to give up the old charter that hangs on the wall. A good time was 

enjoyed by all. ♦ ■ 

PAYETTE LOCAL SPONSORS ANNUAL BANQUnET 

Ninety members, friends and guests of Local Union No. 42 6, Payette, Idaho, 
journeyed across the state line on the night of February 17th to celebrate the 
Union's annual banquet at the Moore Hotel in Ontario, Oregon. With plenty of 
good food and good fellowship those who attended enjoyed a really large evening. 

In the absence of president R. M. Boyd who was unable to attend, representa- 
tive Don Oilman acted as toastmaster. Representative B. W. Sleeman was on hand 
to give one of his stellar talks. Other guest speakers included AFL organizer C. F. 
Smith, Mrs. Dean Smith, and Leonard Hall, executive secretary of the Idaho State 
Federation. Oflicers of the Union in attendance were: trustees George D. Wood, 
Carl Jones, and Robert A. Moore; vice president D. I. Fitts; treasurer R. M. 
Sparkman; financial secretary and business manager A. L. Blocher. Illness pre- 
vented recording secretary J. W. Enterkine from attending. 

All who attended enjoyed themselves so much it was the unanimous wish that 
another banquet be held next year. 




WATERLOO L-IDIES KEEP THESGS HUlVOnNG 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies Auxiliary No. 345, Waterloo, Iowa. 

We have at present 43 members, much, less than we had at one time, but 
during the war so many moved away and others made changes which accounted 
for our loss in members. We meet the fourth Friday evening of each month in 
Labor Temple for our business meeting. After the meeting our husbands join us 
and a lunch is served. The second Friday of the month is our social meeting at 
which time we do any one of a number of things such as potlucks and picnics with 
all of our families attending; card, bunco and bingo parties; dessert luncheons etc. 
At many of them we can bring a guest and sometimes we charge, with the proceeds 
going to the ausiliaiT. 

To stimulate perfect attendance at business meeings we present a Ladies pin 
to each member having perfect attendance for a year. Those who have a pin 
receive honorable mention. We find the plan very successful. Twice a year, Jan- 
uai-y and June, we have a birthday dinner and party honoring the members having 
birthdays the sis months previous. It is celebrated by members only at a local 
hotel or tea room. Gifts are exchanged by those honored, followed by a short 
progi'am and games with prizes. Last month we voted to present a gift to the 
members signing up the most applicants for membership during the year to be 
presented at the January birthday party. We hope by this plan to increase our 
membership. 

Last December we had our annual Christmas party for members and their 
families. The Auxiliary furnished roast turkey dinner and all of the trimmings 
followed by a program, singing, treats for the children. Over 100 were present. 

We contribute to all civic and charitable activities. We have sent books, quilts 
and money to the Home at Lakeland, Florida. We send flowers to all sick mem- 
bers and a gift to each new baby and also help any member in distress in any way 
we can. We did Red Cross sewing during the war — we made many quilts and 
garments for foreign relief, sent boxes to Veterans Hospitals and also subscribed 
to many magazines for them. 

To build up our treasury and defray the expenses of our work we have had 
rummage sales, paper and brush demonstrations; bazaars, bake sales; luncheons, 
sold greeting cards and wrappings, food savers, name labels, note paper etc.; 
raffled off a chest of linen, cakes and a rug. In fact we raise funds in any way 
we can think of and we are very proud of our treasury and the Savings Bonds we 
have bought which make us feel secure in being able to continue our good work 
in the future as we have in the past. Even though we have worked we have had a 
lot of fun doing it! 

R,osa Somer, Recording Secretary. 



MEVIPHLS AUXILIARY JOEVS A.F.W.A.L. 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies' Auxiliary No. 3 3 7, Memphis Tennessee. It has been 
several years since we have written THE CARPENTER, and we want everyone to 
know we are still flourishing. Our membership is small, but we welcomed three 
new members this month and we are hoping to gain more new members eacb 
month. 



THE C A R P E V T E R 3? 



: saber's inc : 



luzed. We Hunk : 
- ' T twice a year 
these parties. 

:"-j: for our meir': 

; --ritli a par-: 









ELBELNTt ATTXTLIARY dFF TO CrOOD STAP.T 
The Editor: 

Ladies AusHis." J": :". : :: V;:'-i:-:= L:::.'. ;": L: ? H;'. '. :Li' ?r:ii-:;:; 
I "Was organized im ";.-_; : 7 L r ^ " ': 7 ]■": - .-_:il; T; :l: rir ::t: "~i: : "* ; ^ ^'.- - -i ? : -■ 
demt. We liave r~rr.:7-: : -7 riTrr/:-:- ; : . 1 '^:;- : : ^;-"t i:::-; 7:: -'z^ =v— "^ 
moBtlis "we meeu : z : -^ i r: : ^ : !i ~^' t : _ ;. 1 ; : in 11 ;. r t ^ _. - t i i. 1 1:1 '-r : 7 ~ - . . 

At omr me^::- r :~ ]'->.7 ~^ -;- ^ r_:-r ^- v;,;;- -■:--' t:: ]lz- 7::t^ : -t 1; . . t: 
I wlio moved ": ?.::!ili~i "^■';,;i.:::r:m. iiii 3i:ii~=i i lusi^e ^n:i i^'- 1; -- '._ 
ladies, and I~z..i "^1; .--r^rZ 

"We aI=-C" !i;.i -> ■;::z :; :f::-7; in Mayas foIlo-wsrMiiiinie JoIitisoii. p7--_iT~: 
--EHeii Ci:". -:~ ".. — :.--. Itl: ?. .=- ." iakovicli, reeorii-r 5^:7^:1:7 Z-Ir".Ti ~'.7_ 
ainnen. ±L;.L::i". =t.;t".-.7 7:11 2-77^::-7 Mafei, txeasicr^t 

TT^ — iili "^t1::iit 1t::t7- 7.7.7 17-;; 77 71m other 1 : -.- 

S Z z. '.---— z .. ~ ^7 71T^« 

iMiiuiie Johnson, Rec SeeY* 

223©^ 4th Axe-. West 



POETLIVT* AUXELLIRY L'FF T" FIVE -TART 
' The " ii: : r : 

F77-7.7:7 r777::-r5 :: ~:_-7r: 1 7^-^:7:7^-.: ; -- :::ii Ladies' Atiilliary No. 48f, 

'1 1 : ; -. : ": er 17, 1947, ~ - : 7. = : >. ■.:-?d onr charter, the ffli^ F:^: : t i I : : : 7. ^ 7 '„ ; ; 7 : : 
Car7 7 7.:T7^ 7-7 -Joiners A'7 7:.':7:7 :7. :ne fair City of Roses, -^r : ---7- ~r L-7^t 
tM77^- = :7: .77:7; monrgr:_7 7.7.7 ^ : pe to sain many ne^ 77 ^t - 7:7; ::7r 
eorr777. r 7777 

"^ - 7_ 77: :77 7 Tie third Friday eTenins of ereiy month in iJie L.i:;: 77~7.- I ir 
77 77:77 7 ' . issions inclnde, among other thingg;, fair labor praaiiees, baying of 



40 T H E C A R P E X T E R * 

union label goods, registering to vote and voting. At each meeting we hold a 
raffle of some nice article to increase our funds. We draw names for Secret Pals to 
•whom "^ve send anonymous gifts and cards throughout the year. 

After the business meeting vre play cards and bingo and have light refreshments. 

At Christmas we had a nice party for our husbands and children. The ladies 
exchanged gifts; the children received big red socks of candy, fruit and nuts from a 
Santa they adored. Refreshments were served to all. 

We donate to charities, and hope to have many good times together, and to 
do good in the coming year. 

Please write to us. We will be glad to hear from 3'ou, and will appreciate ideas 
and suggestions to improve our organization. 

Fraternally and sincerely, 

Betty Lake, Recording Secretary 






M0XTG05IERY LADIES UAVE ACTR'E PR0GRA:\I 

The Editor: 

Greetings from newly organized Ladies' Auxiliary 4 7 4, Montgomery, Alabama. 
We have twenty-five charter members and hope to have many more. We meet 
on the first and third Mondays of each month, right across the hall from where 
the Carpenters meet on Monday nights, and we serve refreshments when both 
meetings have ended. We would like to pass on our money-making scheme to our 
Sister Auxiliaries. 

We ordered eighty boxes of every day Greeting Cards to sell, giving a prize to 
the member who sold the most cards. We paid $40.00 for the eighty boxes and put 
S 8 0.00 back in our treasury. With this money we are buying drapes, dishes, table 
cloths, and things to "pretty" up our meeting room; also a gas stove to fix our 
coffee on. 

Hope you give our "Big Organization" honorable mention in THE CARPENTER 
real soon. 

Fraternally yours, 

Mrs. L. F. Stanaland, Vice-President. 



ROCKFORD AUXILIARY ROUXDS OET 12th YEAR 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all sister Auxiliaries from Rockford, Illinois, Auxiliary Xo. 280. 

We are now beginning our twelfth year. We meet every second Friday in the 
month. At our meetings we discuss the current problems of the day. We have a 
label committee, legislative committee, sick committee and membership committee. 
We also send a delegate to the Rockford Federation of Labor. Have two delegates 
to the "League for Political Education." These committees are very conscious of 
the Taft-Hartley Bill, and always have interesting information to report. We are 
sure the women will be a big factor in helping defeat the candidates who voted for 
the Taft-Hartley Bill. 

Our label committee contacts the stores in search of union label merchandise. 
Our sick committee sends flowers and cards and visits the sick. 

We cooperate with the Carpenters in a picnic and Christmas party every year. 
We also have an annual banquet to which our families are invited. 

To raise money we have rummage sales, white elephant sales and fancy work 
sales. 

We appreciate the courteous welcome extended our si.?ter Betty Xyman when she 
visited the Galveston, Texas Auxiliary. 

Sister Ellen Fairclough passed away June 9th. She was an active member up 
to the veiw last. 

We will be glad to hear from any sister Auxiliary, also from any Auxiliary that 
wishes to organize in our vicinity. 

Fraternally yours, 

Mary E. Fairclough, President. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

LESSON 3 29 
By H. H. Siegele 

In this brief dicussion of First Aid I 
am confining myself to a few practical 
treatments of injuries that are common 
to carpenters in general, but by no 
means unknown in other walks of life. 
In short, first aid is knowing the right 
thing to do. in case of accident, and 
doing it, regardless of what the injury 
might be. 

An injury that does not break the skin 
is called a bruise. A bruise is painful 




and usually causes swelling and discol- 
oration. Dipping the bruised part into 
hot water or applying a hotwater bottle 
to it will ease the pain. This is a simple 
first aid, that can be applied by anyone. 
Those who use this treatment shcruld 
first trj- it on themselves, to make sure 




that the water is not too hot. 

A woimd is an injurj- in which the 
skin is broken. Such an injury is more 
dangerous than a bruise, for if the 
bleeding is strong and can not be 
stopped, it will result in death through 



loss of blood. Besides that, there is 
danger of infection. To guard against 
infection the wound should not be 




Fig. 3 



touched, nor washed with soap and 
water. A course in First Aid is the 
best way to find out what is the right 
thing to do in case of accident. The un- 
trained person usually does too much, 
and seldom the right thing. Nature has 
prepared the best first aid for wounds 




L 
Fig. 4 

that are not of a serious nature, bleed- 
ing. In case of severe wounds a physi- 
cian should be called or consulted. 

Early in my experience as a carpenter, 
I was cutting a metal corner bead. I 
clipped the two flanges and then broke 
the bead in two. But in doing so I 
tore the skin on my right wrist. It 
bled until my wrist was covered with 
blood. The blood was beginning to clot 
when I went to the office and asked the 
bookkeeper for water to wash off the 
blood and bandage the wound. But he 
advised me to do neither. He said, "Na- 



L 



42 



T HE (A 11 P K N T E R 



ture has put something into blood that 
is healing. Just let the blood clot and 
form a scab, and if it does not become 
inflamed or begin to fester, you won't 
have to ■worry about it." Fortunately I 
have never had a severe wound on my 
body, but the little "wounds that I have 
had since, I have always treated accord- 
ing to the advice of that bookkeeper. Of 
course, I used disinfectants whenever it 
was possible to do so, but often the 
only remedy was the scab formed by the 
blood. Xot one of the little wounds that 
I treated in this way ever festered. The 
scabs were not disturbed until the 
wounds had healed, when they came off 
without aid. 



I took hi.s advice, and in a s 
the pain and the sliver had di 
— Nature disposed of them. 



hort time 
sappeared 





Fig. 5 

Fig. 1 shows how a ruling pen can be 
used for extracting slivers. Slivers per- 
haps are responsible for more injuries 
to carpenters than any other one thing. 
After a sliver has been extracted, a good 
disinfectant should be applied. Once af- 
ter pulling a sliver from a finger I 
found that a small part of it was still in 
the flesh. I could feel it and it gave me 
pain whenever I pressed the place. I 





Fi£ 



went to a doctor and when he noticed 
that there was no inflammation or fes- 
tering, he said that probing for a small 
sliver often did more harm than good 
— that Nature would take care of it. 
He cautioned me, however, that if it 
should become inflamed, to come back. 




Fig. 2 shows how foreign bodies, if 
not embedded in the eyeball or eyelid. 






Fig. 8 



can usually be taken from the eye. The 
natural reaction, if anything gets into 
the eye, is that the lids will close. But 
the illustration shows the eye wide open 
with a symbol of a hand taking a pinch- 
hold of the upper lid to pull it out and 
down over the lower lid. To the right 
is shown the upper eyelid pulled down, 
which should be held in that position 
for half a minute, or until the eye 
waters enough to cariT the foreign par- 
ticle out. The arrow at 1 points to the 
particle in the eye, while the arrow at 
2 points out the same particle riding a 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



tear out of the eye. If you do not rub 
the eye, this little operation will solve 
the problem, usually in the first at- 
tempt. 

Fig. 3 shows another way of removing 
a small particle from the eye. The ar- 
row at 1 points to the particle. At the 
upper right is shown a match with a 
loop made of human hair tied to one 
end. ((Sterlize, if possible). This loop 
is slipped along the eyeball in such a 
manner that it will catch the annoying 
particle. This is shown by the small- 
scale match, held by the symbol of a 
hand. When the hair loop contacts the 
particle, the operator gives it a quick 
jerk, which should bring the particle 
flying into the air, as pointed out by 
the arrow at 2. If this fails, drag the 
particle with the loop to the edge of 
the eyelid and out over it. 

How to make triangular bandages is 




shown by Fig. 4. At A the square cloth 
is spread out on a flat surface. The 
straight dotted line shows where the 
first bend is made for folding, while 
the arrows in the curved dotted line 
show how the upper corner is brought 
to the bottom corner. This will make a 
folded trianglar bandage. In case you 
want single-ply bandages, cut the folded 
bandage shown at B, from corner to 
corner where the crease is made. The 
next three steps in folding this bandage 
are shown at C, D, and E, respectively. 

Fig. 5 shows two side views of head 
bandaging. The square knot is used for 
tying the ends of bandages together, in 
most cases. 

Fig. 6, to the left, shows how to 
bandage an eye, while to the right is 
shown a head bandage above the eyes. 

Fig. 7 shows the first step in bandag- 
ing a hand. The curved dotted line and 
arrows show how the earner is carried 
back over the hand, bringing it into the 
position shown at A, Fig. 8. At B the 
bandage is shown one step farther ad- 
vanced, while at C the bandage is on 
the hand and tied. 

Fig. 9, to the left, shows the first 



step in bandaging a foot. The straight 
dotted line shows where the bend will 
be, while the curved dotted line and 
arrows show how the corner of the 
bandage is brought over the foot, giv- 
ing about what is shown to the right. 





Fig. 10 

In the drawing to the right, the curved 
dotted lines and arrows show how the 
lower left corner of the bandage ig 
brought around the leg, in order to give 
what is shown at A, Fig. 10. Here the 
dotted lines and arrows indicate how 
the other corner is brought around the 
leg to complete the bandaging. At B 
the foot is shown with bandage in 
place. 

Nothing has been said about broken 
bones. In such cases a doctor should 
be called and the patient kept as com- 
fortable as possible. This advice also 
applies to other serious injuries. 

There are a number of good disinfect- 
ants, but in these matters the reader is 
advised to consult some standard work 
on First Aid, or obtain information 
from his doctor or druggist. 



SIZING TENONS 

The carpenters who still make mor- 
tise and tenon joints might find some- 
thing new in this article, or it might be 







I'lg. 1 



just one of those things that just nat- 
urally come to mechanics without ever 
having seen them done before. At any 
rate, that is the way we got it. We were 
making panel doors for a cupboard, and 
while we were planning the work, we 
decided to try sizing the tenons with a 
router plane, and it worked. It was 
entirely new to us. 

First we jointed a board just the 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



right width, so it would make a top and 
a bottom rail when ripped in two. This 
is shown by the upper drawing in Fig. 
1. The bottom drawing shows how the 
two edges were grooved for the panel 
board, and marked for the rails, allow- 
ing for the tenons, as shown. 

The upper drawing of Fig. 2 shows 
the same board Avith the shoulders for 




the tenons sawed, while the bottom 
drawing shows, heavily shaded, rough- 
ing out for the tenons done, and to the 
right we show a router bit, exaggerated, 
in position for sizing the tenon. 

The upper drawing of Fig. 3 shows the 
same board again with the tenons sized 




and the board ripped and cut as to 
make top and bottom rails. The bottom 
drawing shows the top and bottom rails 
with the tenons completed, excepting 
cutting out the parts of the tenons that 
leave the haunches. This is indicated 
by dotted lines. 

The shoulders of the tenons can be 
cut in a miter box, or they can be cut 
with a fine hand saw. 



THE BROADAX 

A Texas broadaxman writes that he 
has never used a line for hewing logs. 
After the ends of the log have been 
marked, he splits off the slabs by start- 
ing them with an iron wedge, as shown 
by Fig. 1, and then "pulls" the slab 
with wooden wedges. Usually two slabs 
are pulled before the hewing is started. 
The side to be hewed is scored with an 
ax, and the hewer follows, hewing the 



side by sight from one end of the log 
to the other. In the same way the other 
three sides are finished. This axman 
says that when he is through with a 
log there are left no ax marks from the 
scoring, and the size of the timber does 
not vary one-eighth of an inch in size. 
He hews with the hewed part before 
him, moving backward as he works, 
which is just the opposite from what 
I show in lesson 223. The drawing at 
the bottom of Fig. 1 shows the finished 
timber free from ax marks and perfect 
in shape. 

Fig. 2 shows to the left the face side 
of the broadax the Texan suggested 
with a pencil sketch. To the right is an 
end view of the ax, showing that the 



.Iron Wed(je 



Wooden Wedge 




Fig. 1 

back side is straight. The handle of a'| 
broadax is bent, as suggested by the': 
dotted line. When a left-handed man ; 
uses the broadax a left-handed handle; 
must be used, which is inserted fromS 
the other end. Some broadax handles/ 
are made for both left and right-hand- i 
ed persons. In such cases the handle is: 
simply taken out ond inserted from the j 
other end when some other-handed per-' 
son is to use it. 

The hewers that I knew when I was a- 
youngster, used a chalk line and theyji 



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THE CARPENTER 



45 



hewed moving forward. They did not 
split off the slabs as explained above, 
but as shown in the lesson covering 
hewing. It would have been impossible 
to split off the slabs from one end of 
a log to the other, for they hewed logs 




running up to 30 feet in length, and 
hard to split. My Texas friend says 
that he hews cross ties for railroads, 
and that the logs in that locality, as 
a rule, split easily. (See lesson 223 in 
the April 1947 issue of "The Carpen- 
ter".) 



WANTS TO KNOW 

An apprentice wants to know why, 
\ when he files his saws, the teeth have a 
tendency to turn out, alternately one 
big tooth and one little tooth, and so 
on. The reason for this is in the file 
and in the fact that the man handling 
the file does not know how to prevent 
this tendency. 

If you will examine a three-cornered 
file, you will notice that the teeth of the 
file are all slanted the same way on all 
three sides, as shown by the main draw- 
ing in Fig. 1, where the file is in posi- 
tion for filing. The little detail to the 
left, shows that those slanting teeth 
strike the saw tooth on the left side 
like the front of a sled runner, conse- 
quently the left side of the file has a 
tendency to lift itself up, which reduces 
the cutting efficiency of that side of the 
file. At the same time the teeth of the 
file on the right side strike the saw 
tooth as shown by the little detail to 
'the right. That is, the file teeth strike 
ithe saw tooth, not like a sled runner, 
but like a plow, which increases the 
cutting efficiency on that side of the 
j file. The arrows shown with the de- 
iitails indicate the direction the file is 
jipushed when the filing is done. When 
one side of a saw has been filed, and 
it is turned for filing the other side, 
the fast-cutting side of the file again 
will cut on the little teeth, while the 
slow-cutting side will contact the large 
teeth. To remedy this situation, the 
saw filer brings pressure onto the file 
while filing, in the direction of the two 
arrows, shown one toward the top and 



one toward the bottom on the main 
drawing. Fig. 2 further illustrates this. 
Here are shown two diagrams, A and B, 
which are cross sections of the main 
drawing in Fig. 1. The one at A shows 
by the little cir- 
cling arrows the 
tendency of the file 
to roll, or pull to the 
right. The slanting 
arrow indicates the 




Fig. 1 



direction of the side pressure, which Is 
necessary to increase the cutting of 
the file on the left side, and decrease it 
on the right. It will take practice to 
acquire the skill necessary to always 
obtain uniformly shaped saw teeth in fil- 
ing saws. At B the circling arrows also 
show the rolling pull of the file, while 
the two slanting arrows indicate that 



Buy a 

CARiSON RULE 

• - and 



WITH 10-SECONO 
BLADE CHANGE 



SAVE 

50% 

BY GETTING 
AN EX;tRA 




CARI.SON 



With a Carlson Rule, when a 
blade is accidentally damaged or 
numerals become worn, yoo 
don't have to buy a new rule. 
Just get an extra blade and in- 
sert it. In 10 seconds, a "new" 
rule for Yz the cost! 
Carlson & Sullivan. Inc.. Monrovia. Cafif. 



STEEL TAPE RULES 




SAW FILER 



when a saw is in the shape shown by 
this diagram, there must be applied a 
Saves You Time, Money double pressure in the direction of the 



Noff^ 



%7^. 



t cc 


ol 


-it;: 


.-tc;s:^n 


C^C 




■ r-_;;- 


-ttptri- 






iV ■■':.; 


-i: .-.th 




r : 


-.z.f-t 


^:■.n£J^ 


Mo 


:t1 


tide J 


-iraEttc 


-d« 


. P 


epiid. 


(COJD. 



THE SPEED COMPANY 

K 2025 N.E. Sand/, Portland 12, Or*. 




IF YOU ARE A CARPENTER 

z:.L :.=-- :;: = -:-; -T--i.--e in :-■:-: YOU CAN 
LEARN TO ESTIMATE CARPENTER WORK ;r. a 



Et:..-- ..'.'. :. \..i\^r Until >:^ ha^e used jrading 
labor en lumber >ou Vtill still be in tre darl<. 

Betting a sound footing. 

A little of yooT spare time win do it. 

These new bom metbods will give jon the answer, 
frran farm building to skyscraper, or homes, remodel- 
ing, repairs, wrecking, etc. 

On a post card, print TO>ir name and sddr«€S plainly, 
&y retnzn mail yon will receive furtter information. 

B. W. HOFFXER 
3319 X. Clark St. Chicago 13, 111. 



SUPER HAM-R-ADZ NO. 10 




Tool steel attachment 
ijiiickly converts car- 
'^titer'; I.an;rr.(-r ir.to 
f-iEcient adz. Ideal for 
roufh franil.'s. soaf- 
foldins — form build- 
ing". Easy to use and 
keep sharp. Fits poc- 
ket. Get yours todav . 



SUPER SQUARE GAGE NO. 49 




ain aT2i.i-..e 



:;er,;er'5 !teel 



Only .75 the pair! 



At Dealers' or Postpaid. 
J39 W. eth St., Dect. C-10 
LOS ANGELES 14, CAL. 



HANG THAT DOOR THE PROFESSIONAL WAY ! 



VOU DO THIS 



E-Z Mark Butt Gauge 




• Hang more doors better. 

• Noadjustments. No errors. 

• Used and approved by Master 
mechanics. 

• Comes in Si" and 4" ^standard 

• Precision made. 
Cost OXLT $1.75 ea.. or $3.50 a iei 
at your hdw. store. If dealer can't sup- 
ply, send only $1.00 with order and pay 
postman balance, pi'js Fcstage C.O.D. In C^n., S-i.Tj r.;C.O.D.i 

\-l MARK TOOLS. Box bS" Dept. C. Los .\ngeles 16, ClL 



ccmes with 

UATHE«TTE CASe 




Fig. 2 

arrows in order to unify the size of thei 
teeth. The drawing in Fig. 1 and thosel 
in Fig. 2 should be studied together 

until the student understands what thej 
author is trying to convey. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Pate 

Carlson & Sullivan, Inc., Mon- 
rovia, Cal. 45 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 5 

Flormaster Flormachines Co., 

Chicajro, 111. 1 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 48 

Greenlee Tools, Rockford, III 5 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 46 

.Ma.iter Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y 6 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 46 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 47 

The Paine Co., Chicago, III. 47 

S. B. L. Saw Works, Santa Ana, 

Cal. 47 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 4 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore. 46 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore. 47 
Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 

Carpentry Materials 

Johas-Man\*ille Corp., New York, 

.N. Y. 4« 

The Upson Co.. Lockport, N. Y. 23-24-25-26 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corporation, 

Hartford City, Ind. 4th Cover 

Ot era lis 

The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, 

Mo. 6 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 47 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

E. W. Hoffner, Chicago, 111 46 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 48 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 44 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 6 




PAINE 



SPRING 
WING 



TOGGLE 
BOLT 



The Paine Spring Wing Toggle Bolt — a must item for 
hanging anything to hollow material such as wood, 
gypsum, marble, lath, plaster, tile and sheet rock — 
it's easy to install — drill hole — slide wing end through 
— tighten bolt and you have a sturdy positive anchorage. 

Send for the complete catalog on 
Paine fastening and hanging de- 
vices. 




THE PAINE CO. '^,% 



cago 12, ILL. 



PAINE 

td HANGING I/LWILlJ 





The only easy way to cut a currej 

is with the SBL Coved Keyhole f 
saw — the only saw to cut its own arc. 
Teeth on both edges of saw makes it pos- 
;ible to cut right and left arc by turning 
saw over; 9 point teeth is for smoother cut- 
ing without jumping. Saw blade is spring tool steel mar- 
empered, making it tough for holding edge Slavs sharp 
onger without filing. Saw is machine filed and set 
•"INISH: Luster black for rust prevention. 
JUAKANTEED against defects in material and workman- 
hip. (If your dealer does not handle, order direct from us ) 



>. B. L. Saw Works, 
112 W. Fourth St., 
Santa Ana, Calif. 

Sole Manufacturers) 
I (Agents wanted) 



Inclosed $1.95. Forward by return 
mail one SBL Keyhole Saw ; Prepaid. 

Name Town 

Please Print. 
Address State 




FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 

Learn to draw plans, estimate, be a live-wire builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting Jobs. These 8 practical, pro- 
fusely illustrated books cover subjects that will help you 
to get more work and make more money. Architectural de- 
sign and drawing, estimating, steel square, roof framing, 
construction, painting and decorating, heating, air-condl- 
tloning. concrete forms and many other subjects are included. 

UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books ara 
the most up-to- 
date and completa 
we have ever pub- 
lished on thesa 
many subjects. 
Examination 



BETTER JOBS •■ BETTER PAY 

The Postwar building boom IB In full 
swing and trained men are needed. 
Big opportunities are always for MEN 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- 
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handy, permanent reference information 
that helps solve building problems. 

Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For 



AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Vocational Publishers since 1898 
Dept. GC36 Drexel at 58th Street Chicago 37, 111. 

Tou may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your eight 
big books. "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charges 
only, and if fully satisfied in ten days, I will send you 
J2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 is paid. I am not obligated in anj 
way unless I keep the books. 



Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one buslneiS 
man as reference. Men In serrice. also give home address. 



SAWCiAMP >""' 



%peed Up Saw Filingi 




Meney with or- 
der, prepaid. 
COD. postage extra 

(jrips entire length of saw a full 6( inches. Attaches 
or releases from work bench in only 15 seconds. Also can 
be used tor band saws. Made to last a lifetime. Sturdy, 
all steel construction. Gripping edges ground to hold en- 
tire length of saw true with no vibration. 

THE SPEED CORPORATION 

2025-A N.E. SANDY PORTLAND 12, ORE. 



Save your wrist 



# Make screw 
driving easy as nail 
driving. With a "Yankee", 
the spiral drives and draws, using 
your weight instead of your muscle. 
Three sizes, each with 3 different size 
bits. For faster action and for one-hand 
driving in narrow places, the 130A 
"Yankee" with the quick-return spring. 

Write for the "YANKEE" Tool Book 



. use your weight 
anda"YANKEE" 

SPIRAL 
SCREW DRIVER 



YANKEE' TOOLS NOW PART OF 

[stanleyI i 



THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 



V, NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., Philadelphia 33, Pa. 



This popular asbestos roof is fireproof, 

rotproof, and... 




You couid actually lay American Colonial 
Shingles blindfolded! No chalk lines or 
measuring necessary. 




It's an Asbestos Strip 



JoJins-Manviile >^ 



ico^ 



fcuiHSS^-^ 



Only 80 pieces per square — 
the same as an asphalt strip 

Automatic alignment — self- 
spacing 

Only 4 nails per shingle in pre- 
punched holes 
Easy-to-use Shingle Cutters 
speed application 



Asbestos Shingles 




$900 

IN SPARE TIME 



••I dia rerj •fell las: 
year with my Foley 
equipments about 9-50 
saws and 240 lami ! 
mowers, in my spare 
time. About S900 for 
me." L. H. II.. Xew 
York. 

Carpenters Make up to .$2 or S3 an hour in 
-Spare Time. Witli a Foley Automatic Saw 
Filer rou can file hand, band and circular 
saws better than the most expert hand filer. 
Cash business, no canvassing. Xo eyestrain, 
no exiierience needed. 

FREE BOOK 

"IMDEPEHDENCE AFTER 40" 

shows just how y o 11 
can start at home in 
spare time, vrith small 
investment, no 
overhead. — and 
develop into a 
full - time repair 
shop. Send coupon 
today for this 
practical plan. 



Send e^Mfuui 'Pox FREE BOOK 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 818-8 Foley Bldg., 

Minneapolis 18, Minn. 

Send FREE BOOK — -'Independence After 40" 





CARPENTERS 

and 

BUILDERS' 
HANDBOOK 



This new and re- 
vised edition of Car- 
lienters and Build- 
nrs' Practical Rules 
for Laying Out 
Work consists of 
short but practical 
rules for laying out 
roofs, ceilings, hop- 
pers, stairs and arches with tables of 
board measure, length of common, hip, val- 
ley and jack rafters, square measure, cube 
measure, measure of length, etc. — also, 
rules for kerfing, drafting gable molding, 
;:etting the axis of a segment, laying off 
gambrel roof and explaining the steel. 
si|uare. ^^"^^^~~ 

SI. 00 postpaid 

Monej' back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 



Name . 
Address 



D.A.ROGERS 

5344 Clinton Avenue 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



Enclosed-?!. an. Forwardby 
return mail your Carpenters 
& Builders' Practical 
Bules for Laying Out Work. 



Sfon/ey No. 51V7 Hammer 




~\ 




Works with you... ^ 

Makes work easier! 



• Stanley has designed this nail hammer to 
swing along with you, to get the job done 
faster, easier. Drop forged head. Pre-shrunk, 
straight grain hickory handle double wedged 
in the head. Stanley Tools, 163 Elm St., 
New Britain,-' Conn, 



THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

[STANLEY^ 

Reg. U.S. Pol. 0». 

HARDWARE- HAND TOOLS- MECTRIC TOOLS 



GUTSv. 

Everything 

From Wood 
To Steel! 



MODEL 60 




Handy for building 
and repairing . . . also 
for sharpening tools 
n^ other odd jobs. Cuts wood, metal, steel, con- 
'ete, glass and tile; and when set in a sturdy 
o«r stand, can be used as a table saw, a shaper 
t a bench grinder— depending on accessories used, 
•pwates from any regular outlet. 
tk Hardware Dealer or write Power Tool Division. 

I/IALL TOOL COMPANY 

751 South Chicago Avenue, Chicago, 19, Illinois 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vois.*6 




InsideTrade Information 

for Carpenters, Builders, Join- 
ers, BQildiDET Mechanics and all 
V/oixiworkers. These Guides 
firive yea the short-cat instruc- 
tions that yon want— includine 
new methods, ideas, solutions, 
plans, systems and money sav- 



:ical 



daily helper _ _ _ , 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere are us- 
ine these Guides as a Helping 
Hand to Easier Work, Better 
Work and Better Pay. To get 
this assistance for yooraolf. 
■ .•^•.- . .M. simply fill in and 

Inside Trade Information On : mail free coupon beiow. 

How to use the steel square — How to file and 

set saws — How to build luralture — How to use 

a mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How 

to use rules and scales — How to make Joints — - 

Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength of timbers — 

How to set girders and sills — How to trame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, barns, garages, bungalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — How to excavate— How to use 

Bettings 12. 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaffolds — skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on Interior trim — ■ 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay Iloors— How to paint 




AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St.. New York 10, N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 7 days' free 
trial. If OK I will remit $1 in 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 is paid. 
—Otherwise I will return them. No oblieation unless I am satisfied. 



Employed by- 



CAR 



iiC:,::;v'tl 










Copyright. I9*B. Ovorheatl Ooor Cofporetton 






• The "OVERHEAD DOOR" with the Miracle Wedge 
has been proved completely adequate under continued, rigorous 
usage. Its construction is of the highest quality. This door is 
weathertight and is engineered for perfect balance in every posi- 
tion. Specify The "OVERHEAD DOOR" for industrial, commercial, 
or residential use. Any "OVERHEAD DOOR" may be manually 
or electrically operated. 

TRACKS AND HARDWARE OF S^ALT SPRAY STEiL 



NATION-WIDE 

SALES 

INSTALLATION 

SERVICE 




OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION • Hartford City, Indiana, U. S. A. 



iCMPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 



Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 





A c pi/ 8 X ie' Upton 
Slrcng-Ejii Pan«i goe» 
through Mr. Slan<i<iig(' 
dcor to maite ctittiiKfiv 
walls and eeitin^s of lo 
ing beauty. Con be 
applisii any month of 
the yeor. 



Beautiful crackpn 
ings for Mr. Blandin^ 
Upson Strong-Bitt Pcm 
are used in thousondi 
hemes alt over the Ian 
—give adde<j volue to 
any house— stay free 
from continuing expeni 



ant yard scene from 
the moHon picture, "Mr. 
Blandings' Dream House" 
starring Cory Grant, 
Myrna toy and Melvyn 
Douglas. 



Mr. BLANDINGS and UPSON Build a 




UPSON 
PKODUaS 



UPSON 

e.afti/'ffafe</ 

PANELS' 



Another signat recognition for Upson Products! 

Replicas of "Mr. Blandings' Dream House" as it appears in 
the motion picture have been built in 60 American cities. 
The Upson Company is the only manufacturer of interior wall « 
ceiling materials officially designated by RKO Radio Pictures, Ir 
and the Selznick Releasing Organization, producers and 
distributors of the motion picture, to supply wall and ceiling 
panels for local Blandings houses. Above is a typical Blandings 
Dream House erected in Atlanta, Georgia with interior walls 
and ceilings of Upson Strong-Bilt Panels. 

THE UPSON COMPANY 

(000) Upson Point, Lockport, New York 




is a piker.. 



• 



this photograph 
shows fhe long, 
tough cone fibres 
which, when Ferox*- 
treated against dry 
rot and termites, 
form the base for 
many Ce/ofex build- 
ing products. 

• REO. u. s. PAT. orr. 



When it comes to sprouting things big, the 
acorn is a piker alongside the node from 
which sugar cane grows. For the acorn 
only fathers an oak . . . but the sugar 
cane node, through production of tough 
cane fibre, has sired three of the 
greatest advances in building history — 

building insulation — From cane fibre 
in 1921 came Celotex cane fibre board . . . 
combining low thermal conductivity 
with great structural strength. 
Today, because of Celotex pioneering, 
heat-leaking buildings are obsolete. 

2 sound conditioning — In 1924 came 
another great advance from cane fibre — 
Acousti-Celotex perforated cane fibre 
tile . . . combining high sound absorption 
with paintability . Today, because of 
Acousti-Celotex , noise in business and 
industry is on its way out. 

3 single-wall construction — More 
recently the trend toward single-wall 
construction in residences and industrial 
buildings has been accelerated by the 
development of Cemesto ... a fire-and- 
moisture-resistant asbestos cement wgdl 
unit with a cane fibre core. Cemesto 
permits the erection of industrial buildings 
with light-weight economical "curtain" 
walls, partitions and roof decks. 

more to come — These three 
contributions of cane fibre to building 
progress illustrate the continuing 
objective of engineering research at 
Celotex ... to give you better building 
products — at lower cost. 

THE CELOTEX CORPORATION, CHICAGO 3, ILLINOIS 



CeiloteX 

^^■^^^^ REG. U S. PAT. OFF. 



BUILDING BOAR D . . . IN SU UATI NG SHEATHING AND L AT H . . . C 6 LO - R O K ANCHOR LATH AND PLASTER 
CEMESTO.. CELO-ROK W A L LBO A R D . . . 1 NT E R I O R FINISH B O A R DS . . . TR I P LE - S E A L E D S H I N G L E S . . . PL E X C E LL 





TIKC^^^TCR 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building;, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Establishpd in 1881 
Vol. LXVIII — No. 9 



INDIANAPOLIS, SEPTEMBER, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



Con tents — 



At Last— A Boost 7 

Sam Pettengill, a columnist and radio commentator whose writings on labor are 
usually critical, takes a look at our Brotherhood and likes what he sees. 

Pattern for Peace ------ 9 

A group of the world's top philosophers and social scientists gets together to decide 
how and why international tensions and differences develop to such an extent that 
war becomes the next logical step. 

14 

Heavy construction has long been an exact science, but engineering principles have 
never really been applied to house building. To correct this shortcoming, the Bureau 
has compiled a book that serves as a good start toward solving the problem. 



Kngineering in Housing 



Milestone or Millstone? 



16 



Age Is No Factor 



With something of a trend developing toward contracts containing cost-of-living 
clauses, the AFL research department analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of 
contracts of this kind. 

18 

A survey by the Department of Labor discloses the fact that older workers can hold 
their own when It comes to production. 

21 

Although the American labor movement has always held to the partnership con- 
cept rather than the "class struggle" theory, those who are trying to shackle labor 
may change things. 



Does USA Face Class Struggle? 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Menioriani 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladles 

Craft Problems - 



12 
24 
30 
32 
33 
38 
40 



Index to Advertisers 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

Learn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you 
that the way to the top-pay jobs and 
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In this Chicago Tech Course, you learn to 
read blue prints — the universal language of the 
builder — and understand specifications — for all 
types of buildings. 

You learn building construction details : 
foundations, walls, roofs, ■windows and doors, 
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You learn how to lay out work and direct 
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ly. Find out how you can pre- 
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own successful contracting busi- 
ness. Get the facts about 
this income-boosting Chicago 
Tech training now. 

MAIL COUPON NOW 




Prepare for more pay, greater sue 
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how to estimate building costs. Prac 
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Over 44 years of experience in train 
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INCREASE YOUR INCOME 

Hundreds have quickly advanced to fore 
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ing in Building. Your practical experi 
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creased income. 



FREE 



Blue Prints 
and Trial Lesson 



Send today for Trial Lesson: "How t 
Read Blue Prints," and set of Blue Prin 
Plans — sent to you Free. See for yoursel 
how this Chicago Tech Course prepare 
you to earn more money, gives you th 
thorough knowledge of Building requirei 
for the higher-up jobs and higher pay 
Don't delay. Mail the coupon today in a: 
envelope or use a penny postcard. 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Chicago Technical College 

lVI-120 Tech Bldg., 3000 So. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 16, 111, 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read Blue Prints" 
with information about how I can train at home. 

Name Age 

Address Occupation 

City Zone State 



L- 



eONCnETE 

eoNSTnueTiON 

A Timely Book for Carpenters and Builders, 
Form Builders and Concrete Workers .—- ^^-^ 



DOES IT 

AGAIN! 



m Concrete ^^'''" 
b Cbnstruction 



Complete in One Book — Covers all 
Form Building and All Concrete 
WorlcAII Materials, Mixes and 
Methods 

Only 92.^o 

Add to your knowledge and craft experience with Siegele's 
new book — Concrete Construction. Just published — it is 
the most up to date and most thoroughly practical book 
on the subject. It is the last word on the temporary work 
that is necessary to erect permanent concrete structures. 
It covers bo*7i form building and concrete work. It tells 
all about the aggregates, sand, gravel, crushed rock ; the 
proportions to use ; how to mix ; how to test ; how to re- 
pair and all about re-inforcing ; shores ; needling ; scaf- 
folding and other subjects. 

FOR APPRENTICES, JOURNEYMEN, BUILDERS 

Easy to read. Easy to understand. Helps you do a better 
job, easier, quicker, make more money. Use for study or 
reference. Can easily be worth many times the cost of 
the book on one single job. 

160 PAGES • FULLY ILLUSTRATED • JIFFY INDEX 

Covering Form Building Tools and Equipment, Staking 
Out, Batter Boards, Tie Wires, Squaring, Columns, 
Beams, Slabs, Shores, Metal and Wood Pans, Hollow Tile, 
Waters and Tie Rods, Formulas, Forms for Tanks, Cir- 
cular and Other Concrete Stairs, Footings and Sidewalks. 
Screeds, Mixing Concrete, Concrete Worker's Tools, Lifts, 
Hoists, Runways, Reinforcing, Removing Forms. Shoring, 
Underpinning, Plugging, Setting Bucks, Bracing Frames, 
Scaffolding, and Other Subjects. 

"Extra Money Help"— Order Today 

Order Concrete Construction and other books by Siegele 
on the coupon below. Your money back if you are not 
fully satisfied. Rush coupon to Frederick J. Drake and 
Co., 600 W. Van Buren St., Chicago 7, 111. 



nn^ 





OTHER 
PRACTICAL 
BOOKS! 
Include Them In Your Order! 



ROOF FRAMING 

Covers all types of roof construction I 
with full explanation of all terms, 
400 illustrations and diagrams and ' 
over 500 lines of index for quick loca- 
tion of every subject. Cloth binding 
$2.50 

CARPENTRY 

Carft Problems. Pracitcal, helpful so- 
lutions to hundreds of carpentry prob- 
lems. Valuable to carpenter and ap- 
prentice alike. 302 pages. 700 illug. 
Cloth binding. $2.50 

BUILDING 1 

Practical instruction on farm building, j 
scaffolding, stairs, roofs, and finish- 
ing. Simplified. Easy to use. 210 
pages. 495 illustrations. Colth bind- 
ing. $2.50 

BUILDING TRADES 
DICTIONARY 

Gives over 6800 definitions of words, 
terms and phrases used in the trade. 
A book for every carpenter and build- 
er. 380 pages. 670 illustrations. 
Cloth binding. $3.00 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION 

Practical Building Methods. Commoil 
sense instruction on hundreds of build- 
ing problems. 250 pages. 670 illus. 
Cloth binding. $2.50 

THE STEEL SQUARE 
by Hodgson. Complete, 475 pages. 
300 illustrations. $2.50 



fluiff 



7i<ie m^'^ixptdu ^au^f M AIL IT T O DAY ! 



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AT LAST - A BOOST 

Editor's Note — One hundred and four newspapers of the United States proclaimed the 
Americanism and patriotism of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America in their July 22 issue. The article was written by Samuel B. Pettengill, well 
known newspaper syndicate writer and once-a-week radio commentator on 252 stations. 
In one of his radio broadcasts he repeated much of his newspaper article in praise of 
the Carpenters' Brotherhood. Mr. Pettengill's newspaper articles, usually appearing 
under the caption, "Inside Congress", are syndicated by "America's Future, Inc.," 205 
East Forty-second street. New York City. He was once a member of Congress. 

• • • 

1; By Samuel B. Pettengill 

WHILE patriotic Americans are being- kicked out of Communist- 
dominated unions, there is one big union that has refused mem- 
bership to Kremlinites, and has done so for years. 
I refer to the Carpenters — the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America — headed by William L. Hutcheson. Long before the 
politicians in Washington saw their mistake in cuddling up to the reds and 
pinks, the Carpenters took steps to keep these gentry out of their union. 

As a part of their ritual, the candidate for membership is required to 
declare that "he is not now, and never -will become a member of any revo- 
lutionary orsfanization." If he does, . 



he forfeits his membership. 



At the instigation of Congi-ess- 
man Woodi-uff, representing the 
Michigan Tenth District, this ar- 
ticle was reprinted in the August 
2nd issue of the Congi-essional 
Record with the unanimous con- 
sent of all House menihers present 
at the time. In view of the fact 
that most of 3Ir. Pettengill's writ- 
ings on labor haA^e been more or 
less critical, this tribute to the 
integi'ity and Americanism of the 
United Brotherhood of Cai-penters 
and Joiners of America under Gen- 
eral President WUliani L. Hutch- 
eson is doubly significant. That 
Congressman Woodniff has seen fit 
to have it reproduced in the Con- 
gressional Record, adds further 
to the enviable position which our 
Brotherhood has aehieved in the 
current American scene. 



This is no sudden conversion to 
the American faith. Twenty years 
ago, they revoked the charter of one 



of their locals in New York City 
because it had fallen under Com- 
munist control. 

When the Carpenters advocate 
Americanism, they command re- 
spect. For theirs is the fourth larg- 
est union in the United States with 
737,000 members in 2,700 locals. 

At a time when the public is sore 
at labor stoppages, violence and 
Communist saboteurs in union 
ranks, don't forget the Carpenters. 
There is a lot to be said in their 
favor. 

As recently advised from their 
Indianapolis international headquar- 
ters, there was not single carpenter 
on strike between the two oceans. 
They were hitting the nail on the 
head — building homes, putting up 
factories, apartment houses, stores, 
hotels and places in which to live 
and work. Long before Governor 
Stassen in Minnesota, or any other 
politician, anywhere, had come out 
for a "cooling off" period in indus- 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



trial disputes, this had been stand- 
ard practice in this union for forty 
3'ears. 

Nor can a handful of officers or 
members proclaim a strike. The un- 
ion's by-laws recjuire the following 
procedure. If any demand is con- 
templated as to wages, hours, etc., 
each member of the local is notified 
by mail of a special meeting and the 
purpose of the meeting is stated. 
All members must attend the meet- 
ing. Members who do not attend are 
fined, unless illness or some other 
valid reason is given. Except for 
the fine for non-attendance, this is 
like the New England town meeting 
which we have always thought of as 
democracy at its best — government 
at the grass roots. 

On any question which may re- 
sult in a strike, the vote is by secret 
ballot, and 55% must vote "yes." 
Then conferences between the local 
and the employer take place. If 
these do not result in an agreement, 
a representative from general head- 



quarters is called in. If the parties 
still fail to agree, no strike can be 
called for 60 days. And then only 
if it is authorized by national head- 
quarters. 

As far back as 1916, the national 
headquarters suspended 61 locals in 
New York City, with 17,000 mem- 
bers, for going out on an unauthor- 
ized strike. 

The Carpenters raised no hue and 
cry against the Mundt-Nixon Bill 
that was designed to bring the fol- 
lowers of the "Communist line" into 
the open. 

They would never raise any ob- 
jection to a committee of Congress 
asking one of their members if he 
is a Communist. If he is, and has 
been lying about it, the Carpenters 
are as anxious as any Congressman 
to find that out, and fire him from 
the union. 

The American flag is always on 
display in their meetings. No other , 
flag is seen there. 



Soaring Profits and Prices Cause Inflation 

Senator J. Howard McGrath declared that soaring profits and exhorbi- 
tant prices have "reduced the actual purchasing power of factory workers 
despite higher wages," and are a major cause of our inflation. 

Attacking the usual practice of blaming labor for price raises foisted 
on the public by big business, the Senator singled out the steel industry 
as an example. He said: 

"Increases in the price of steel since the end of price controls two 
years ago total more than the entire annual payroll of the steel industry 
during the past year. Yet everytime the steel companies raise prices, the '■ 
blame is placed on the worker who won a small wage increase. 

In support of the attack on the steel industry the McGrath statement 
noted that United States Steel granted a 13-cent-an-hour wage increase to 
its workers which, if followed by others in the industry, would boost the t 
steel wage bill $130,000,000 annually for non-salaried workers. The total 
payroll for the industry, including the salaried employes, would come to 
$162,500,000, based on Iron and Steel Institute work-hour estimates, he 
said. 

"The wage increase will cost the steel industry $162,500,000," he said. 
"But the price increase will cost American consumers $588,953,781." 



PATTERN FOR PEACE 

Editor's Note: At the end of June, Uiiesco brought to Paris eight eminent social sci- 
entists to consider tlie causes of nationalistic aggression and the conditions necessary for 
international understanding. The following statement, signed by each of them, j)resents 
the opinions on which all could agree. Its significance lies in the fact that a series of im- 
portant propositions on tlie causes of international tensions has been formulated and 
agreed to by social scientists widely differing in their ideological allegiances. 

The folio-wing men signed the statement : 
Gordon W. All/jort, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University ; Guvcrto Frriire. Honor- 
Professor of Sociology, University of Bahia, Brazil ; Georges Gurvtich, Professor of Soci- 
ology, University of Strasbourg, France; Maj; llorkheimer. Director of the Institute of 
Social Research, New York City ; Arne Xaess, Professor of Philosophy, University of Oslo, 
Norway ; John R'lckman, M.D., Editor. "British Journal of Medical Psychology ; Harry 
Stack Sullivan, M.D., Chairman. Council of Fellows, Washington School of Psychiatry, 
USA ; Alexander Szalai, Professor of Sociology, University of Budapest, Hungary. 



MAN has now reached a stage in his history where he can study 
scientifically the causes of tensions that make for war. The meet- 
ing- of this little group is itself symptomatic, representing as it 
does the first time the people of many lands, through an international 
organization of their own creation, have asked social scientists to apply 
their knowledge to some of the major problems of our time. Although we 
differ in the emphases we would give to various parts of our statement and 
in our views as to its comprehensiveness and implementation, no one of us 
would deny the importance of any part of it. 
We agree to the following twelve paragraphs: 
(A) To the best of our know- 



ledge, there is no evidence to indi- 
cate that wars are necessary and in- 
evitable consequences of "human 
nature" as such. While men vary 
greatly in their capacities and tem- 
peraments, we believe there are vital 
needs common to all men which 
must be fulfilled in order to estab- 
lish and maintain peace: men ever}^- 
where want to be free from hunger 
and disease, from insecurity and 
fear; men everywhere want fellow- 
ship and the respect of their fel- 
lowmen ; the chance for personal 
growth and development. 

(B) The problem of peace is the 
problem of keeping group and 
national tensions and aggressions 
within manageable proportions and 
of directing them to ends that are at 
the same time personally and social- 



ly constructive, so that man will no 
longer seek to exploit man. This 
goal cannot be achieved by surface 
reforms and isolated efforts. Fun- 
damental changes in social organ- 
ization and in our ways of thinking 
are essential. 

(C) If we are to avoid the kind 
of aggression that leads to armed 
conflict, we must among other 
things, so plan and arrange the 
use of modern productive power 
and resources that there will be 
maximium social justice. Economic 
inequalities, insecurities and frus- 
trations create group and national 
conflicts. All this is an important 
source of tensions which have often 
wrongly led one group to see an- 
other group as a menace through the 
acceptance of false images and over- 



10 



THE CARPEXTER 



simplified solutions and by making 
people susceptible to the scapegoat- 
ing appeals of demagogues. 

(D) ^Modern wars between nations 
and groups of nations are fostered 
by many of the myths, traditions 
and symbols of national pride hand- 
ed down from one generation to an- 
other. A great many current so- 
cial symbols are still nationalistic, 
hindering the free movement of 
thought across political boundaries 
of what is, in fact, an interdepen- 
dent world. 

CE) Parents and teachers find it 
difficult to recognize the extent to 
which their own attitudes and loval- 
ties — often acquired when thev were 
young and when conditions were 
difir'erent — are no longer adequate 
to serve as effective guides to action 
in a changing world. Education in 
all its forms must oppose national 
self-righteousness and strive to 
bring about a critical and self-disci- 
plined assessment of our own and 
other forms of social life. 

(Fj The development of modern 
means of swift and wide range com- 
munication is potentially a great aid 
to world solidarity. Yet this devel- 
opment also increases the danger 
that distortions of truth will reach 
a great many people who are not in 
a position to discriminate true from 
false, or to perceive that thev are 
being beguiled and misled. It must 
be a special responsibility of U.N. 
organizations to utilize these means 
of mass communication to encour- 
age an adequate understanding of 
the people in other countries. This 
must always be a two-way traffic. It 
will aid the cause of peace if nations 
are enabled to see themselves as 
others see them. 

(G) The prospect of a continuing 
inferior status is essentially unac- 
ceptable to any group of people. For 



this and other reasons, neither col- 
onial exploitation nor oppression of 
minorities within a nation is in the 
long run compatible with world 
peace. As social scientists we know 
of no evidence that any ethnic group 
is inherently inferior. 

fH) Many social scientists are 
studying these problems. But so- 
cial scientists are still separated by 
national, ideological and class dif- 
ferences. These diiterences have 
made it difficult for social scientists 
to resist effectively the emergence 
of pseudo-scientific theories which 
have been exploited by political 
leaders for their own ends. 

(I) Objectivity in the social sci- 
ences is impossible to achieve when- 
ever economic or political forces in- 
duce the investigator to accept nar- 
row, partisan views. There is ur- 
gent need for a concentrated ade- 
quately financed international re- 
search and educational program. 

(Jj We recommend, for example, 
the co-operation of social scientists 
on broad regional and international 
levels, the creation of an interna- 
tional university and a series of 
world institutes of the social sci- 
ences under international auspices. 
We believe that international scien- 
tific fact-finding studies could con- 
tribute useful information concern- 
ing the cultures of all nations and 
bring to light dangerous insecuri- 
ties and sources of tension, as well 
as legitimate aspirations of people 
all over the world. Equally certain 
to be rewarding are studies of edu- 
cational methods in the home, the 
school, and in youth organizations 
and other groups by which the— 
minds of the young are oriented to^ 
ward war or toward peace. From 
the dissemination of the informa- 
tion resulting from these studies, 
we may anticipate the emergence 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



of concrete proposals for the m"uid- 
ance of national programs of educa- 
tion. 

(K) The physical and biological 
sciences in recent years have pro- 
vided impressive demonstrations of 
the effect of research. Some of the 
practical results have been rather to 
dismay and disquiet the civilized 
world than to reduce its tensions. 
The scientists whose research has 
been used in the development of 
atomic and biological warfare are 
not themselves responsible for 
launching a curse upon the world. 
The situation reflects the forces now 
determining the uses to which sci- 
ence can be put. While other factors 
are concerned, we hold that the 
chances for a constructive use of the 
potentialities of scientific and tech- 
nological developments will im- 
prove if and when man takes the 



responsil^ility for understanding the 
forces \vliich work u])nn him and 
society both from within and from 
without. 

(L) In this task of acquiring self- 
knowledge and social insight, the 
social sciences — the sciences of Man 
— have a vital part to play. One 
hopeful sign today is the degree to 
which the boundaries between these 
sciences are breaking down in the 
face of the common challenge con- 
fronting them. The social scientist 
can help make clear to people of all 
nations that the freedom and wel- 
fare of one are ultimately bound up 
with the freedom and welfare of all, 
that the world need not continue to 
be a place where men must either 
kill or be killed. Effort in behalf of 
one's own group can become com- 
patible with effort in behalf of hu- 
manitv. 



I 



Death Calls Frank Fenton, AFL Official 

When the Grim Reaper called Francis P. Fenton August loth, another 
stalwart in the American labor movement bowed out of the picture. Brother 
Fenton was stricken with a heart attack while working in his office. A 
short time later he passed away despite all that medical science could do 
for him. 

International representative of the American Federation of Labor at 
the time of his death, BrotherFenton served the Federation for many 
years in many capacities. Starting :; " 

his union career in Massachusetts, 
he worked his way up to the presi- 
denc}^ of the Boston Central Labor 
Union. Later he became regional 
director for the Federation. Then 
in 1939 he was appointed director of 
organization for the AFL, a post he 
held until recently named interna- 
tional representative to fill the va- 
cancy created b}^ the untimely death 
of Brother Bob Watt. 

With a host of prominent labor 
officials present, Brother Fenton 
was laid to rest in Cedar Hill Ceme- 
tary, Washington, D, C. 



Ballots Defend 
Your Freedom 



BE SURE TO VOTE 

THIS YEAR AND 

EVERY YEAR 




ANE 




SIP 



COMPLICATED ECOXO^OCS 

In July prices hit a new all-time high. 
During August they climbed even high- 
er, and from all indications each month 
from now on is going to set a new rec- 
ord. The Republicans are blaming the 
Democrats, the Democrats are blaming 
the Republicans, and everybody is blam- 
ing Wallace. Some want price controls, 
some want credit limitations and some 
want higher interest rates but actually 
nobody seems to know how the tide can 
be stopped. The way the whole thing is 
working out is about like the two jewel- 
ers and the bracelet. 

Jeweler A bought a bracelet for 
$400. However, since he specialized in 
watches, he thought it best to get rid 
of the bracelet, so he sold it to another 
jeweler for $450.00. The next day he 
decided he had made a silly move inas- 
much as bracelets were in heavy de- 
mand, so he bought back the trinket for 
$500.00. This crazy series of transac- 
tions continued for several weeks with 
regular price increases. Finally jeweler 
B reported he had sold the bracelet at 
retail for $900.00. 

"Oh, you shouldn't have done that," 
exclaimed jeweler A, "we were both 
making a nice living out of that brace- 
let." 




/ h(jpe lie's your Pop and not mine.- 



TERRIBLY AFRAID 

"I am afraid car prices will have to 
go up again," a financial paper recently 
quoted a leading car manufacturer as 
saying. He is afraid all right — about 
like the lass walking down the country 
lane with the handsome farm lad one 
evening. It seems the lad was carrying 
a large pail on his back, holding a 
chicken in one hand and a cane in 
the other and leading a goat by a rope. 
As they approached a particularly se- 
cluded spot, the young lady said: 

"I'm afraid to walk in here with 
you. You might try to kiss me." 

Said the farm lad: "How could I with 
all these things I'm carrying?" 

"Well," replied the girl, "you might 
stick the cane in the ground, tie the 
goat to it, and put the chicken under 
the pail." 

• • • 

ISO CIXCH 

Many newspapers and national maga- 
zines continue to scoff at labor's avowed 
determination to have its say in this 
year's elections. These publications 
never pass up an opportunity to belittle 
organized labor as a political force. 

However, results to date in this year's 
primary elections belie the theory that 
labor is politically impotent. Up to last 
month nineteen candidates carrying the 
backing of labor were successful in the 
primaries. Five with partial labor sup- 
port came through with flying colors, 
while some eleven men whom labor 
opposed made the grade. Considering 
the fact that organized labor is not 
really politically awakened as yet, the 
record is not too bad. By November it 
should be much better. 

And we never think of politics but 
what we think of the story of old Sena- 
tor Watson, hard-boiled reactionary. 
Once he told his audience: "I have 
given you the facts; now you can vote 
for me or go to hell." 

When someone was relating the story 
to President Coolidge, he laconically 
commented: "Difficult choice, wasn't 
it?" 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



AND A COMMISSION WAS BORN 

About this time each election year, 
in addition to "lovin' labor," practically 
every politician suddenly gets highly 
economy minded. He continually spouts 
about the need for reducing the cost of 
government. Usuallj^ when he gets elect- 
ed about the first thing he starts think- 
ing about is how he can crack down on 
labor and how he can squeeze a few 
more of his friends and relatives on the 
government payroll. 

In this connection they tell a good one 
about a certain southern Senator who 
had a hard time getting elected. One day 
he was approached by one of his more 
ardent supporters. 

"Senator," said the man, "you prom- 
ised me a job." 

"But there are no jobs open," count- 
ered the Senator. 

"Well, you said you would give me 
one," persisted the man. 

The Senator thought a moment. 'Tell 
you what I'll do," he finally said. "I'll 
appoint a commission to investigate why 
there are no jobs and you can work on 
that." 

• • * 

HARD TO DEAL WITH 

As this is being written, representa- 
tives of England, France and the United 
States are meeting in the Kremlin with 
Moustache Joe or some of his lieuten- 
ants regarding the German situation. 
Utmost secrecy surrounds the meetings 
but indications seem to be that a four- 
power meeting to iron out pressing dif- 
ferences may result eventually. In the 
meantime, the Russian blockade contin- 
ues unabated. 

Perhaps if another four-power meet- 
ing is held, Russia can be brought to 
some sort of reasonable agreement. How- 
ever, we remain skeptical. Time after 
time the western nations have made 
concessions to the Reds, but each time 
old Moustache Joe wound up demand- 
ing more. To our way of thinking he is 
about like the dead-beat roomer who 
kept stalling his landlady. Every time 
she tried to collect some rent he had a 
new story to give her but never any 
money. Finally, in desperation, she said 
to him: "Look here, Mr. Blank, I'll 
meet you half way. I am ready to for- 
get half of what you owe." 

"Fine," replied the tenant. "I'll meet 
you. I'll forget the other half." 



SORT OP BLACK 

A lot of small business men who were 
enthusiastic about the Taft-Hartley Bill 
when it was being debated in Congress 
have changed their minds of recent 
months. Under General Counsel Den- 
ham's interpretation of the Act, virtu- 
ally no business is too small to escape 
the attention of the NLRB. Firms doing 
only a few thousand dollars worth of 
interstate commerce a month are being 
ruled subject to the Act, and as a result 
a lot of small operators are finding 
themselves involved in the Act with all 
of its complexities and contradictions. 
To our way of thinking, they outsmarted 
themselves in their enthusiastic support 
of the bill; about like P. T. Barnum 
did when he bought the Vermont cat. 

The famous circus owner received a 
wire from a Vermonter saying that he 
had a cherry-colored cat for sale for 
1200.00. Barnum immediately sent the 
money. In return he received a coal 
black cat, with a note attached to its 
neck saying: "I neglected to tell you 
that Averment cherries are always 
black." . 

VISUAL PROOF 

The automobile industry claims a new 
record output for last month — close to 
half a million cars. 

We believe the auto makers are tell- 
ing the truth because every one of the 
cars was on Highway 3 7 last Sunday 
when we were returning from the picnic. 




•y/i/.s is the Radio Chcrking Biirenu 
. . . I'hat Radio Program are you listen- 
ing to — Sirf" 



14 



National Bureau of Standards for 



Engineering In Housing 



CRITICAL NEEDS of the Building industry today have caused 
builders to focus their attention on methods for saving material : 
however, available service records do not provide accurate criteria 
for judging how much excessive material is being used. In carrying out 
an extensive research program on building materials and structures, the 
National Bureau of Standards has made an initial attempt to apply an 
engineering approach to house design w^hich does much toward solving 
this problem. A complete report of this research is contained in a new 
book. Strength of Houses : Application of Engineering Principles to Struc- 
tural Design, just issued by the Bureau. 

Buildiner material is as costly as 



the labor required to shape and fit 
it into place. Application of engi- 
neering principles to the design of 
houses presents a complete and log- 
ical method for determining allow- 
able loads for w^alls, floors, and 
roofs. This, in turn, makes it prac- 
ticable to develop structural designs 
and to make use of nonconventional 
building materials that provide suf- 
ficient strength but require a mini- 
mum amount of material and labor. 
Such procedures have been follo^s^ed 
in the construction of bridges and 
other large structures. Intensities 
of service loads are first estimated, 
then each material is selected to 
serve a specific function and to pro- 
vide adequate strength at a mini- 
mum cost. In the Bureau's report, 
technical information (in combina- 
tion Tvith applicable engineering 
principles and design practices) is 
utilized for the benefit of dwelling 
houses. 

For each element of a house, com- 
pressive, transverse, and racking 
loads "w^ere computed for typical 
one-and two-stor\' frame houses in 
several locations representative of 



extreme wma ana snow loaas m tne 
United States. Allowable safe loads 
for IOC wall, partition, floor, and 
roof constructions were then com- 
pared Tvith assumed actual loads for 
the two tA pes of houses in three lo- 
cations. Comparisons showed that 
some had insufficient strength while 
others w^ere much stronger than nec- 
essary-. Fundamental data on the 
wind, snow% and occupancy loads 
that are likely to be imposed have 
also been obtained, and convenient 
computational methods developed 
for estimating the manner in which 
these service loads are distributed 
to the different structural elements 
of houses. 

The stud3' thus fulfills a long-felt 
need. Intelligent research, based on 
sound engineering principles, has 
reduced heavj- construction to an 
exact science. The skA^scraper or 
bridge or dam of today is a marvel 
of efficiency. Each piece and part 
is designed to perform its job safe- 
ly', efficiently and cheaply. There is 
no waste of materials. If an eight- 
inch I-beam can perform an ade- 
quate job in a particular place, an 



I 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



eig-ht-inch I-beam is. used because a 
ten-inch or twelve-inch beam would 
cost considerably more to buy and 
install without adding any advan- 
tages to the structure. This is pos- 
sible because the stress and strain 
on each component part of a struc- 
ture is worked out exactly through 
engineering principles. 

In housing, these engineering 
principles heretofore have never 
been adequately worked out. No 
complete data has ever been com- 
piled as to the load various parts of 
a house have to carry, nor to the 
pressures snow, wind or weather 
conditions will subject walls, raf- 
ters or joists. Consequently house 
building has never been as scientific 
in its approach as heavy construc- 
tion has been. 

The new publication of the Bu- 
reau of Standards takes a big step 



toward the elimination of this defi- 
ciency. It analyzes the construction 
of a house, and through engineering 
principles, determines the allowable 
loads for walls, floors, and roofs. 
Builders can thus determine more 
accurately the amount and kind of 
materials that are needed to do the 
job in each part of a house. With 
enough data of this kind, building 
costs may eventually be lowered on 
housing through conservation of 
building materials. 

BMS 109, Strength of Houses: 
Application of Engineering Prin- 
ciples to Structural Design, by Her- 
bert L. Whittenmore, John B. Cot- 
ter, Ambrose H. Stang, and Vincent 

B. Phelan ; 132 large two-column 
pages ; 35 tables and 53 figures, 
available from the Superintendent 
of Documents, U. S. Government 
Printing Office, Washington 25, D. 

C, $1.50 per copy. 



New Labor Secretary Blasts T-H Act 

The Taft-Hartley law was assailed as a "blow at unionism" by the new 
Secretary of Labor, Maurice J. Tobin, at his first press conference held 
since he was sworn into ofiice. 

Singling out the law's ban on the closed shop and the prohibition 
against the expenditures of union funds in political campaigns for special 
criticism, he declared that the statute generally was "impractical" and con- 
ducive to a "lot of bootlegging and dealing under the table." 

"The closed shop has been in existence in the United States for more 
than a century," he said, "and was relied upon by employers as well as 
employes to create stable conditions of employment and to obtain and 
maintain an adequate supply of qualified workers in skilled trades and 
occupations. 

"Under the Taft-Hartley law, the closed shop is declared illegal and 
cannot be contracted for by those employers who desire it and consider it 
mutually advantageous." 

Even the union shop is not permitted, he added, until both sides have 
submitted to the "cumbersome arrangements of the act and an election 
of employes is conducted at public expense." 

"A union could not even pay for a hall for the purpose of conducting a 
meeting to discuss candidates or issues in national elections. A court has 
held that a union cannot buy newspaper advertising space or radio time 
for this purpose under the provisions of the Taft-Hartle}^ Act." 



16 



Milestone or Millsfonef 

• • 

IX A'lEAV OF THE FACT that one of the largest corporations in 
America TGeneral Motors) recently signed an agreement with its em- 
ployes basing wage rates on living costs, considerable interest has 
been revived in this type of wage agreement. College professors, labor 
students, and industrial relations engineers have been, as a class, pretty 
generally in favor of such arrangements. They argue that a wage agree- 
ment coupling wages with living costs is fair to both sides, that it elimi- 
nates friction, and that it results in greater benefits for wage earners as 
well as employers. 

A\'hile there are some merits to cost-of-living wage contracts, there are 
also many drawbacks. Unions contemplating entering into such agree- 
ments should carefully study all the angles before taking the final step. 

Recently the Research Department 

crease won by the union is directly 
controlled by a formula linking 
wages to the Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics Consumers' Price Index. The 
implications of this arrangement for 
collective bargaining require special 
attention. 

"Upon first examination, the prin- 
ciple of tying wages to living costs 
appears to offer a union certain defi- 
nite advantages. Assuming the sta- 
tistical index used is a reliable indi- 
cator of living costs, the principle 
makes certain that the earnings of 
workers will not lag for long be- 
hind the rising cost of living. In 
fact, if wage adjustments based on 
a cost of living index are made at 
relatively frequent intervals, it is 
possible that the average earnings 
of workers will be higher than the 
earnings in other plants. 

'"However, before any union de- 
cides to offer or accept such an ar- 
rangement, it should carefully study 
the consequences because it might 
later rearret anv hastv action. 



of the American Federation of La- 
bor made a study of this matter. It 
analyzed the situation as follows : 

'■'A number of commentators have 
hailed this (General ^lotorsj agree- 
ment as a milestone in union-man- 
agement relations and have indicat- 
ed that it might well serve as a 
model for other companies and 
unions. 

"Although this agreement has 
proved a valuable peace-maker in 
the automobile industry, tmion ofii- 
cials should examine it closely be- 
fore proposing that it be applied 
to other collective bargaining situa- 
tions. 

"The two-year agreement incor- 
porates one very significant provi- 
sion ; namely, two 3c-an-hour wage 
increases "for an improved standard 
of living.'"" one eft'ective immediate- 
ly and the other after a year. 

"However, outside of this recog- 
nition that Avages must rise Avith 
increased efticiencA", the Avasre in- 



THE CARI» ENTER 



17 



"By tying wag"es to living costs, 
a union is in effect saying to the 
worker: (By adopting this principle 
you will be guaranteed that the pur- 
chasing power of your present wage 
will not be dissipated or reduced by 
an increase in living costs. How- 
ever, this also means that the pur- 
chasing power of your present wage 
will not be increased. You will not, 
for example, be able to obtain the 
benefits to which you otherwise 
would be entitled, of increased effi- 
ciency resulting from the introduc- 
tion of new equipment, better sche- 
dules, less waste and other improve- 
ments.) 

"By tying wages to living costs, 
the worker automatically forfeits 
his right to participate in the ever 
increasing American Standard of 
living. It is possible, of course, that 
the benefits of increased efficiency 
might be passed along to the worker 
in the form of lower prices, but 
judging from recent actions of 
American businessmen, this is not 
very likely. 

"Another serious criticism of this 
principle is that it weakens the col- 
lective bargaining process. Under a 
cost of living adjustment formula, 
changes in wage rates are auto- 
matic; once the original negotia- 
tions are completed the union plays 
no part in the determination of 
wage changes. Wage changes are 
taken out of the hands of the parties 
directly concerned and given to a 
third party whose only concern is 
the compilation of a statistical in- 
dex. 

"A cost of living formula leaves 
no room for any consideration of 
the individual employer's ability to 
pay or of the competitive wage level 
in other plants, industries or locali- 
ties. In fact, the operation of a cost 
of living formula is such that wage 



differentials might easily become 
more pronounced. 

"Although the BLS Consumers' 
Price Index is the best available in- 
dex of its type, it definitely under- 
states the increase in the average 
worker's cost of living. The portion 
of the index which is supposed to 
represent changes in rent is particu- 
larly weak. 

"The index does not measure the 
additional costs of housing which 
landlords have been forcing tenants 
to bear. A recent survey by the Cen- 
sus Bureau indicates that from 
April, 1940-April, 1947, the average 
rent paid by American families in- 
creased 36.7 per cent but the in- 
crease in the BLS rent index for 
this period amounts to 4.3 per cent. 

"Because of these considerations, 
tying wages to prices becomes a 
risky business. Unless a union is 
particularly careful, this so-called 
milestone of labor relations could 
easily become a millstone around 
the necks of unionism and collective 
bargaining." 



The Right to 

¥<ITE 



Is Your) 




Don't Fail to Use It 



18 



When it comes to efficiency 



Age Is No Factor 



Dept. of Labor study reveals 
* * * 

LAST SPRIXG Ewan Clague, then head o£ the Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics, U. 5. Department of Labor, predicted that workers over 45 ■■ 
years of age, who represent more than one-third of the nation's 
work force, will be hit hard by any slowdoAvn in business activity resulting 
in unemployment. 

If some employers are thinking in that senseless direction, the Ameri- 
can movement is going to disillusion them. It is hardly likely that our 
unions are going to let employers revert back to a vicious, arbitrary policy 
of indiscriminately laying off workers over 45 years because of their age 
alone, unless they are adequately 



compensated through some equiva- 
lent like more liberal retirement 
plans. Certainly the present old age 
pension compensation under our 
Social Security laws are far too 
miserly to assure the pensioners a 
decent living, the very least that 
the worker over 65, who gave the 
best years of his life to our indus- 
trial progress, is entitled to. 

Labor simply won't relinquish 
seniority provisions, unless there is 
what the lawyers call a quid pro 
quid, or something of equivalent 
A'alue. 

The July issue of the ]\Ionthly 
Labor Reviev,-. put out by the U. 
S. Department of Labor, had an in- 
teresting article on this topic. It 
stated that the results of an inten- 
sive national survey showed that 
men and women in the 45 or more 
age group offer distinct advantages 
to employers over their younger 
fellow Avorkers. 

The article pointed out that 
not only may the worker in the 



45 and over age group oft'er more, 
highly developjed skills, more ma- 
tured judgment and more settled 
work habits a; against the stamina , 
and agility of youth, but he is much 
less likely to be absent and is less 
prone to injury than is the younger 
worker. 

In a study of the work records 
of about 17.800 workers of all ages, 
including 1.309 women, it was found 
that the highest rate of absenteeism 
was among the younger workers. 
A\^orker5 co\'ered in the study were 
employed in 109 manufacturing 
plants at a variety of occupations, 
mostly productive, and covered af' 
least six months in every instance. 

The frequency rates of both dis- 
abling and non-disabling injuries I 
were also highest in the lower age | 
groups — which to my mind calls for 
more and better accident prevention 
education and devices. 

The survey showed that lesser in- 
juries especially declined steadily 
as the age of the worker increased. 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



indicating that the older worker 
was more attentive on the job and 
had learned how to protect himself 
better than had the young-er work- 
er. In this accident survey, the 
only thing- in which the younger 
worker excelled, was his ability to 
recuperate faster from his injury. 

Another paradoxical fact revealed 
by the survey was that younger 
workers were more inclined to take 
advantage of the facilties of plant 
clinics for relief of minor discom- 
forts not caused directly by their 
work. The frequency of such visits 
declined with increasing age, reach- 
ing its lowest level for workers 
aged 55 or over. In other words, 
the older workers had learned how 
to "take it" better. From a dollar 
and cent viewpoint, this fortitude on 
the part of the older worker was 
profitable to the employer. 

Medical doctors, psychologists 
and sociologists have frequentl}^ de- 
rided and shown up this age fantasy 
which afflicts the country in so 
many forms, for what it is, namely 
an unscientific obsession. Except in 
the case of forbidding child labor, 
and regulating the type of employ- 
ment for minors, this age standard 
is no accurate measure of anything. 
Some men and women are old at 
40; others are young and vigorous 
at 60. Most of the men who head 
our corporations are men over fifty; 
and when a man below that age man- 
ages to rise to that proud position, 
he is referred to as a remarkable 
young man. 

\ There are some occupations in 
which youth must be served. That 
is true in the arena of sports like 
baseball and football; and in some 
instances, in the entertainment 
world. But even today, most of 
the "great lovers" in the movies are 
"young fellows" of forty, fifty or 



more, who manage to give that illu- 
sion of youth on the screen they 
don't have off it. 

Certainly its wonderful to be 
young. We all are for it, and are 
sorry old Ponce De Leon never 
found his Fountain of Youth. Most 
of us try to stay that way as long 
as we can. But age has its compen- 
sations too, and without the balance 
wheel of maturity, our civilization 
wouldn't last very long. 

The war was the best proving 
ground to debunk this arbitrary 
age taboo which some doddering 
tycoons set for their own industries. 
The older workers over 45 did an 
awful lot to make our unequaled 
war effort a success while the 
healthy and strong young men were 
away doing the fighting; just as 
they have done a lot to make our 
peacetime production unparalleled. 

As long as a man is fit and able 
to do the work allotted to him, he 
is entitled to hold the job. That is 
the only real criterion that should 
govern employment policies and 
union-management relations. And 
sound seniority rules are one way to 
see to it that a man's right to a job 
is protected. 

If and when that recession should 
come, and as man}^ predict it will, 
the worker over 45 who is a mem- 
ber of a strong union will find much 
greater job protection than the one 
who does not belong to such a union. 
But over and beyond that, by edu- 
cation of the employers we should 
strive to eliminate this age fetish 
which has destroyed the character, 
health, useful services and skills of 
so many hale and hearty workers 
long before they were ready for the 
so-called scrap heap. 

To most men who have their 
vigor, employment is the oil that 
keeps them from rusting and get- 



20 T H Z C A R P E X T E R 

ting old. You and I. from personal That is insult added to injury: and 

observation, knew of men who stay- it certainly is not a practice that 

ed young while they worked at a should be tolerated in a democracy 

job they loved, but Avho suddenly l^ke ours. 

grew old and soon passed on when ^^'e don"t judge Stan Musial's 

forced into retirement. '^^^ue as a ball player by the num- 
ber he has on the back of his 

But the biggest tragedy of all is ,1^,;^. j, ^g -^^^^ ^ cvpher to keep 

to tell a hale, hearty and vigorous track of his 'great batting average 

man over forty, with young chii- on the score card. And that is 

dren and a family dependent upon what age is. just a number on the 

him. that he is "'too old'' for a job. back of vour shirt. 



World Labor Committee to Protect ERP 

The InternatiC'^a. Trade Uni-or. Cor.ierence on the European Recovery 
Program laid the g-r<juno-/. 'irk for an aggressi'.'e in:ernaiional labor organ- 
ization to counter Communist attacks on the U. S. sponsored Marshall plan. 

Delegates from i6 nations voted to establish an office in Pa;r:5 to work 
with the Organization for European Economic Cooperation. 

Playing a major role in this new development were David Dubinskv. 
president of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, and George 
M. Harrison, president of the Brotherhood of Railway Clerks, v.ho repre- 
sented the American Federation of Labor at the international labor parley. 

The action of the conference, American delegates said, provided the 
nucleus of an American- Western European front against the Communist- 
controlled labor organizations in Europe. The}' predicted the move would 
hasten the dissolution of the Soviet-dominated World Federation of Trade 
Unions. 

The new central labor committee will, in the v/ords of the resolution 
adopted by the conference group, "give guidance to national centers in the 
mobilization and coordination of their activities" in support of the Euro- 
pean Recovery Program. 

In addition, the committee is expected to take the lead in an aggres- 
sive campaign to counteract Communist propaganda and sabotage against 
the Marshall Plan. 

The committee will be headed bj* Leon Jouhaux. head of the French 
labor organization. Force Ouvriere, w^hich broke away from the Commu- 
nist-controlled General Confederation of Labor. He will be assisted by 
A'incent Tewson. secretary of the British Trade Union Congress, and 
Evert Kupers of The Nethelands. 

Britain's powerful Trades Union Congress, which fathered the WFTU, 
was brought around to pledging active support of the new central com- 
mittee. After the British indicated they would side with the Americans, 
other European labor organizations subscribed to the program. 

Britain and the others will remain in the WFTL for the present, it v.as 
explained, but the Americans predicted that the bod}' would lose influence 
and support rapidly when the central committee began functioning. 



21 



I 



DOES U.S.A. FACE CLASS STRUGGLE? 

By George Meaiiy 
Secretary-Treasurer, American Federation of Labor 



IN THE EARLY YEARS of the American Federation of Labor, labor's 
holiday was regarded primarily as a day on which it was fitting to give 
serious thought to the problems confronting the millions who work 
in order to live. The true meaning of Labor Day was never overlooked. 

In recent years there has been a tendency to forget the real significance 
of Labor Day and to use it for purposes of recreation or pleasure exclu- 
sively. It would be entirely fitting if, on this Labor Day of 1948, we who 
toil for a living were to observe the holiday in the older way. For surely it 
must be clear that organized labor today is face to face with situations 
which are as grave as any that bedeviled our predecessors. 
This statement may seem rather 



sweeping, but it is no overstatement. 
Quite the contrary. Today our 
movement, whose development has 
meant so much to our country in 
her rise to pre-eminence among the 
nations of the w^orld, faces the 
threat of destruction. There are 
always those who are loath to 
admit unpleasant facts, and there 
are those who question whether the 
enemies of labor are actually seek- 
ing to destroy us. But the hand- 
writing is on the wall, and those 
who will take the trouble to read it 
must see that the goal of labor's 
foes is the annihilation of the or- 
ganized labor movement as it has 
existed on the soil of free America. 
Already, although their power is 
still far less than they expect it to 
be a little later on, the reactionaries 
of Big Busines and Big Politics 
have lamed the working people of 
America with oppressive anti-labor 
legislation. They have put over not 
only the Taft-Hartley Act but state 
laws that also cripple the wage- 
earner. Let us not lose sight of the 
fact that the reactionaries have been 



having a field day in the past three 
years in a number of state legisla- 
tures, with the result that today hos- 
tile state laws, of varying degrees 
of severit}^ are operative in more 
than half the states of the Union. 

The injuries inflicted upon the 
tens of millions of average wage- 
earning citizens since the end of 
World War II have been dealt out 
to us by the reactionaries of busi- 
ness and politics whose grip on fed- 
eral and state law-making bodies is 
not yet complete. There are quite a 
few items on their program for the 
American labor movement which 
they are keeping veiled for the pres- 
ent. While for the most part the Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers 
and its unholy agents and allies 
have done a good job of guarding 
the secrets of their future warfare 
against organized labor, enough has 
leaked out to make clear that labor's 
enemies have in store new measures 
so drastic as to make even the Taft- 
Hartley Act look mild by contrast. 

Yes, American labor does have 
serious matters to consider on this 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Labor Day. To my mind, the most 
serious problem of all is one that 
must be of concern not only to 
workers but to all other Americans 
who believe — really and truly be- 
lieve, in their hearts — that the free 
American way of life is the best 
way of life to be found on our 
planet. 

Our x\merican way of life is in- 
deed the best ever devised by the 
minds of men, and it is the best 
not simpl}- because we have the 
most telephones and automobiles 
and bathtubs and skyscrapers. There 
is much more to it than that. The 
American way of life is best for 
various reasons and in various ways, 
but the most important point about 
America is that we have been free 
from the blig-ht of what is often 
termed "the class struggle." 

The nations of Europe know 
what the class struggle means. The 
class struggle has been going on 
over there for decades. It is one of 
the sad facts of European life. 

American labor, as represented 
by the American Federation of La- 
bor, has always rejected the con- 
cept of the class struggle. We have 
never been out to destroy the em- 
ployers. On the contrary, we have 
always recognized and defended 
the legitimate rights of employers. 
No stauncher defenders of our 
American free enterprise system 
exist than the 7,500,000 American 
working men and women who make 
up the American Federation of La- 
bor. We have asked and fought for 
recognition of labor's rights. AVe 
have asked and fought for economic 
justice. But we have always recog- 
nized that decent, fair employers 
were fully entitled to decent, fair 
treatment at labor's hands. 

AA'here the class struggle idea 
calls for "war to the death" between 



employers on the one side and 
workers on the other side, our idea 
in the American labor movement has 
been "live and let live." In the past 
100 years, millions of people left 
Europe and came to America be- 
cause the}' were sick of the class 
struggle. Xo circumstance has con- 
tributed more directly or more vital- 
ly to the phenomenal rise of our 
nation than the absence of the ruin- 
ous class struggle. America has 
grown mighty and it has prospered, 
and none has prospered more than 
the employers of the nation. 

And yet today the National Asso- 
ciation of ^Manufacturers and cer- 
tain legislators have permitted their 
hatred of organized labor to blind 
them to this fundamental fact. Like 
the totalitarians of the Left, but 
without the same deliberate plan- 
ning and awareness of what they 
are doing, the controlling clique of 
the NAM and their federal and 
state legislative cohorts have been 
taking steps to bring the nation ever 
closer to the precipice of the class 
struggle. 

American labor has always re- 
fused to believe that this deadly di- 
sease will ever catch hold here. We 
have never wanted it. A\'e do not 
want it now. The class struggle is 
an evil thing, as the tragic experi- 
ences of other peoples, in other 
lands, have amply shown. 

But the NAM and other reaction- 
aries who are driving to bring about 

a condition in which the emergence 
of the class struggle concept would 
be inevitable even in democratic 
America had better stop and reflect 
for a moment — if they can spare 
that much time from their plot- 
tings against working men and wo- 
men. 

Let them ponder and ponder Avell 
that, if there is going to be a class 



THE CARPENTER 23 

struggle in America, it can have today, I am confident that we can 

only one result, only one outcome — soon again move forward on the 

not the crushing of labor, as they road to a better day for America's 

desire, but the utter defeat of the workers. The past record of the 

initiators of the struggle, the pow- American Federation of Labor in- 

erful reactionary wing of Big Busi- dicates beyond question that strong 

ness. opposition will bring out even 

Despite the menace which we face stronger labor's will to progress. 



Court Upholds Political Spending Ban 

Federal District Court Judge Carroll C. Hincks upheld the Taft- 
Hartley law's ban on the use of union funds for political expenditures. 

In a case deliberately designed to test the law. Judge Hincks refused to 
dismiss indictments brought against Local 481 of the AFL's Brotherhood 
of Painters, Decortators and Paperhangers, charging the union and its 
president, John R. O'Brien, with violating the law by spending union 
funds for a political advertisement in a Hartford newspaper and for a 
political radio broadcast. 

The union announced it will appeal the case to the Supreme Court, if 
necessary. 

The court's ruling against the union asserted: 

"In the light of the legislative history of the act, in silhouette against 
the contemporary background, I hold, first, that the act was well within 
the limits of Federal legislative power and, second, that it was not invali- 
dated by its incidental effect in restraint upon the freedoms protected by 
the First Amendment." 

The union sought dismissal of the indictments on the grounds that the 
challenged section of the Taft-Hartley law violated the guarantees of free 
speech and a free press in the First Amendment to the Constitution. 

Both the advertisement and the broadcast, which were paid for out of 
regular union funds, were directed gainst the Presidential aspirations of 
Senator Robert A. Taft, Republican, of Ohio, one of the authors of the 
Taft-Hartle}^ law. and called for the defeat of Connecticut members of 
Congress who voted for it. 

Judge Hincks held that the case differed from that of the Congress 
of Industrial Organizations and its president, Philip iSIurray, in which 
the Supreme Court ruled last month that unions could spend their funds 
for some political purposes. 

The CIO case. Judge Hincks stated, involved "only expenditures by a 
union to meet the costs of publishing an issue of a weekly union periodical 
containing expressions of political advocacy and opinion in connection 
with a congressional election and distributing the same." 

In the Hartford case, the judge said, "union monies were expended for 
publication of expressions of political advocacy intended to affect the 
result of the election and the action of the convention in an established 
newspaper of general circulation and for a broadcast by a commercial 
radio station. 



Editorial 




Free Men Never Surrender Freedom 

As thrilling as anything written by our better detective story authors, 
the twin spy probes being conducted by House and Senate committees are 
turning up one sensation after another. Startling confessions are becom- 
ing commonplace and big names in Washington are being drawn into the 
investigations week after week. Charges and counter-charges are flying 
so thick and fast that it is difficult to determine just what is going on. 
About the only certain thing to come out of the investigations to date is 
the fact that Uncle Sam has been asleep at the switch lo these many years 
insofar as security measures are concerned. People of the most question- 
able loyalty have worked their way into high places in government circles. 

How they did it remains an unsolved mystery — especially to the aver- 
age worker who entered a defense plant during the war. Although he 
never came in contact with anything more important than a machine or a 
department, the average defense worker was fingerprinted, photographed, 
quizzed, investigated, and practically bisected, dissected and examined 
under a microscope. Yet all the while known rats were worming their way 
into positions of utmost trust in Washington. Somehow or other it all fails 
to add up. 

Hogging the headlines at the present time are two Russian school 
teachers. Brought to this country to teach in schools established for the 
benefit of Russian embassy employees, the teachers disappeared when an 
order came from the Kremlin that they should return to Russia. Having 
gotten a taste of democracy at work, and having seen first hand the bless- 
ings that freedom bestows upon people living under it, the Russian teach- 
ers balked at the idea of returning to the bleakness and terror of Red 
Russia. They simply disappeared and are now under the protective cus- 
tody of this nation. 

Their disappearance created something of an international crisis. By 
hook or crook the Russian embassy has endeavored to get them back into 
its clutches. So far the United States has refused to turn them over to 
Russian diplomats. What fate awaits the two teachers if they ever fall 
into Russian hands again is not hard to imagine. They have committed the 
greatest crime of all in the Russian lexicon — they questioned the omnipo- 
tence of Stalin and the Kremlin. 

The furore which the Russian embassy is creating over the disappear- 
ance of two obscure school teachers is a tip-off to the ultimate fate of 
Communism. In recent years a dozen Communist envoys sent to this 
country have kicked over the traces and deserted the Communist fold. 
Some of them have been high-ranking Communists of long standing. One 
and all they found themselves unable to stomach the oppression and regi- 
mentation of Communism after having seen an example of what freedom 



THE CARPENTER 25 

and liberty bring to a nation. 'I'hese peo])le constitute the handwriting 
on the wall for Communism, for people inherently want to be free 
whether they are Russian or Greek or Abyssinian. Threats, force and 
secret police may prevail with any people for a short while, but the will 
for freedom never dies. In the end it trimuphs over all the coercion the 
mind of man can invent. The Russian secret police can punish or liquidate 
or imprison these two liberty-loving teachers today but four will spring 
up in their place tomorrow. Ultimately they will crumble the entire struc- 
ture of Communism. 

And in all this there is a moral for anti-labor forces in this nation. 
Compulsion and force are the two weapons they are bringing to bear 
against organized workers. Compulsion and force are the motivating gears 
in the Taft-Hartley Act. With their long unbroken history of freedom, 
American workers are less amenable to compulsion and force than any 
other workers in the world. Those who are seeking to place shackles on 
American workers are merely building up a back-log of resentment that 
some day will burst whatever legislative dams may be devised. And the 
ensuing flood well might cruml)le the entire structure of free enterprise 
which has no more ardent support than free organized labor. 

■ • 

Paging Jack Benny 

Wage negotiations are always about money. 

People don't work to get money — they work for what the money will buy. 
They work for a lilgher standard of living . . . that is, for more meat on the table 
and better cuts, for more orange juice, better clothes, a better house, a bigger car, 
more life insurance, better plumbing, for the right to give bigger tips if they feel 
like it. 

You could double the money w'ages people get, but if these workmen produced 
no more, the cost of wliat they make and therefore their prices would ultimately 
double, and so even with twice the money, the w^orkmen could buy no more steak, 
no bigger car, no better plumbing. 

If prices go down, the workman could buy more steak, bigger cars, better 
plumbing. And prices A\ill go down if the workmen ijroduce more efficiently. That 
reduces cost, and j)rices follow. 

So, in the final result, it is the workmen who detennine (by how well tliey 
produce) how much of evei-jihing they can buy. That's what is meant by real wages. 
They ai'e the only kind of wages that matter to the man Avho gets them. And he is 
the man who determines them. 

He ought to pay more attention to steak and plumbing than to dollars. 

— Pamphlet distributed to employes 
of the Missouri Pacific Lines 

* * * 

Bob Hope and Abbott and Costello being off the air, we thought our 
readers ought to be entitled to one good laugh this summer: hence the 
above pearly gem from the Missouri Pacific house organ. According to 
this worthy publication, money is filthy stuff'. It causes only grief and 
trouble. Workers ought not bother themselves with the vile stuff at all. 

• For people who believe that sort of thing (if they do) railroad directors 
are behaving somewhat strangely. In 1947 the railroads of the nation made 



26 THE CARPENTER 

seventy-one million dollars more than they made in 1946. Hating- money 
as badly as they do, one would think they would have been satisfied. 
However, this year they gave their passenger rates a very healthy kick 
upwards. (It did not state in the article how this contributes to the wel- 
fare, happiness and prosperity of the working- man who has to travel.) 
Furthermore the railroads have worked tooth and toenail for the Bull- 
winkle Bill, a measure designed to move the railroads out from under 
provisions of the anti-trust laws so that they can fix up rates between 
themselves without fear of prosecution. 

For people who go around handing out literature about the worthless- 
ness of money, the railroad directors of America are certainly chasing the 
dollar for all it is worth. With the idea that working people gain nothing 
from wage increases if prices increase even faster than wages, we have no 
quarrel. The past several years have proved that point conclusively. How- 
ever, with the idea that the cost of labor controls the cost of commodities 
we differ radically. Nobody has proved this point better than the railroads. 
Despite an increase of seventy-one million dollars in 1947 profits over the 
preceding year, they have raised passenger fares substantially. 

For the past several years all industry has been desperately endeavor- 
ing to place all blame for high prices on labor costs. However, facts and 
figures belie their contentions. Recently the AVall Street Journal — cer- 
tainly no pro-labor publication — analyzed the financial reports of some 140 
publicly-held utilities, excluding transportation and public utilities, and 
they found that net profits during the April-through-June quarter of this 
year exceeded profits for the same period last year by better than twenty- 
five per cent. But this was chicken feed compared to the haul made by the 
oil companies. January to June profits for some twenty-seven leading oil 
companies jumped by some eighty-two per cent for the first six months 
of this year as compared to last 3'ear. In industry after industry the pic- 
ture has been the same. In fact. Business Week, one of the slicker finan- 
cial publications, last month predicted that net profits this year will hit 
the twenty billion dollar mark if the last half of the year maintains the 
pace set during the first half. 

To understand what twenty billion dollars in net profits means it is 
necessary to do a little comparing. For example, in 1932, the total national 
income was around forty-four billion dollars; which means that industry 
profits this year will come close to equalling half the total national income 
of 1932. In other words, net profits this year will equal nearly half the 
total money all people received from wages, profits, dividends and all 
other sources in 1932. Still industry is trying to pin the blame for high 
prices on labor costs. 

The fact of the matter is that wages are lagging far behind prices, and 
even farther behind profits. From 1945 to 1947, wages increased less than 
29 per cent on the average. During the same period, profits increased by 
116 per cent and prices jumped by 60 per cent. Even some of the most con- 
servative financial papers are finally conceding these things. Recently 
"The Outlook," financial publication put out by Standard and Poor's, 
admitted that profits have outrun wages considerably. "Wages and salaries 
consumed a smaller proportion of the sales dollar last year than they did 



THECARPENTER 27 

in 1946," the publication reported. In an analysis of several hundred cor- 
porations, it showed that wage and salary payments amounted to only 
24.6 per cent of gross sales in 1947 as compared to 27.5 per cent in 1946. 

The back of our hand to the ^Missouri Pacific's propaganda writers who 
must think working people cannot read facts and figures any better than 
thev can railroad timetables. 



If They Want Mandates, Let's Give Them Some 

After two weeks of thumb-twiddling, the special session of Congress 
adjourned early last month. A few desultory efforts were made by some 
of the more progressive members to attack the pressing problems of the 
day. but the vast bulk of the members of both the House and Senate spent 
more time playing party politics than worr3^ing about the welfare of the 
American people. A badly-needed measure to get U.N. headquarters into 
construction was passed, and so were a few mild credit and money con- 
trols. Outside of that, the Congressmen might just as well have stayed 
home. 

Repeatedly Congressional leaders stated that there was no emergency, 
and, therefore, no need for a special session. Perhaps for men on the Con- 
gressional payroll at $15,000 per 3^ear there is no emergency; but for the 
average worker who is trying to raise a famih' on eighty, seventy, or even 
sixty dollars a week, there is an emergency- of the first water. It is an emer- 
gency that involves the actual health and welfare of his family inasmuch 
as an adequate diet and sufficient clothing at today's prices are beyond the 
reach of many wage earners. Recently the Department of Commerce re- 
vealed that at least a fourth of lower-income American families are dip- 
ping into savings to get by. When in order to eat a man has to cut into 
savings he laid away to meet unexpected set-backs or provide for old age, 
that is an emergency; and the sooner Congressmen realize it the better. 

Just as the leaders of the 8oth Congress insisted at the time the Taft- 
Hartley Act was up that the American people gave them a "mandate" to 
shackle labor, so at the special session they insisted that the people gave 
them a mandate to lay oft' any inflationary controls. On both scores they 
have been 100% wrong. The only mandate the 8oth Congresss got was 
from the vested interests which put them in office when labor failed to do 
its duty at the polls in 1946. These mandates of Big Business have been 
to hamstring labor, allow unrestricted price gouging, and kick the little 
people in the teeth. 

November 2nd brings up a new shuft'le of the cards. If it is mandates 
that Congress wants, let us give them some. Let us give the hidebound 
reactionaries and NAM stooges a mandate to get out of office and stay 
out. Let us give our friends in Congress a mandate to go back to A\'ash- 
ington and continue fighting for all the people. Let us give all our law- 
makers, in the state legislatures as well as in ^^'ashington, a mandate to 
remember this is a government '"of the people, by the people and for the 
people." 

We can do this only if every worker is ready and willing to vote. Are 
vou? 



28 



Of Carpenters 



• • 

THERE is something- about the carpenter's trade that you find no- 
where else in all our workaday world, a gentle kindliness about 
the craft. The blacksmith is perhaps more famous, but the trade 
of the smith is a blustery trade, full of harsh noise and clangor. He works 
in a gloomy darkness lit up by the dancing flare of his fire. The iron which 
he works upon must be heated fiercely and treated with a sort of rude 
violence. The sounds of the carpenter's trade are nothing rougher than the 
sing of the saw and the purr of the plane. There, instead of flying sparks 
to send the watching children scurrying back, are great curly shavings 
tempting the most timid hands to catch them as they fall. 
The memory of the old carpenter 



shop of my childhood is still strong 
enough to tug inwardly wherever 
I see a carpenter at the bench. It 
was a long, sunny room with a bench 
all along one side. Against the other 
wall were piles of window sashes 
and frames, wheelspokes and sled- 
runners, and a hundred other things 
to set children guessing at their 
uses. Over everything lay a powder 
of golden dust like the glamor of 
dreams. It lay thick on the window 
panes and added more gold to the 
entering sunlight. It danced in the 
slanting rays and seemed inextric- 
ably mixed with the sweet pungent 
odor of seasoned wood. 

The carpenter was an almost ideal 
carpenter. His work was truly a la- 
bor of love; every movement of his 
hands upon his work was like a 
caress. No rough handling of un- 
responsive iron this, but a mild 
smoothing of hands over wood that 
had been shaped quietly and gently, 
and surely. I have never seen a 
more placid, kindly gaze than his. 

I know another carpenter now, 
too. I visited him the other day, 
and as I entered his shop and saw 



the same pile of gold over all, and 
inhaled the fragrance of the wood, 
I mentioned something of what it 
meant to me. He glanced at me with 
an understanding light in his eye 
and went on measuring his material. 
"I remember," he said, "a great 
many years ago when I was a bit 
of a boy, five or six years old I must 
have been for I was starting to 
school. Every day that our work 
was well done, our teacher gave us 
a little stamp with "reward for 
merit" lettered on it. When we had 
ten of these we received a little 
card. Ten of these cards brought us 
a large card with a colored picture 
upon it. Whenever possible the 
teacher would let us pick out the 
picture that pleased us most. I re- 
member the first card that I got. I 
picked out one that had a picture of 
a carpenter's bench and a chubby 
little carpenter in a big white apron 
working at the bench. He was using 
a plane and a great shaving curled 
up from it. It must have been that 
shaving that took my eye." 

He thrust the rule he had been 
using into the pocket of his overall, 



THE CARPENTER 29 

and gazed out throug-h the dusty and filled the room with its cheerful 

window with a faraway look in his voice. 

eye as he continued. "Then one day I came away musing on his words 
someone asked me what I was going and thinking what a wonderful ear- 
to be when I got to be a man," and penter's shop that must have been 
I said. "I'm going to be a carpenter. i„ Nazareth. There must have been 
Jesus was a carpenter and I'm going little children around the door 
to be a carpenter, too, when I grow watching the big shavings go curl- 
up." They'd taught me that in v^un- j^g down just as in every carpen- 
day School, and the chubby little ter's shop. Perhaps that is why car- 
fellow with the shaving had done penters have that something that 
the rest. I've kept that card to this other trades have not, the kindly 
day. It's home in my room now. gentleness that vests the craft. I 
He turned to me again with a like to think it is the peace of that 
twinkle in his eye. "It's a great busi- workshop of long ago which colors 
ness being a carpenter. Whenever the dust of every shop and gives an 
you read about a carpenter you'll added mellowness to the sunlight 
find that he is always poor but hon- shining through its tranquil win- 
est. Poor but honest, that's us." Pie dows. — (Courtesy Christian Science 
chuckled as he reached for his saw Monitor) 



High Prices Slowing Up Housing 

The number of new homes started and the number of permits issued 
for future building dropped in July, according to preliminary estimates of 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Thus, while reports show that the dollar valuation of new construction 
has reached record heights, the physical volume of new housing being put 
under construction is shrinking. 

BLS figures placed the total number of housing starts during the month 
at 94,000, below June levels by 2,000 units, and 3,000 under the month of 
May when 97,000 homes were started to set the record for 1948. 

Compared to 1947, housing activity in July, which was the 4th consecu- 
tive month during which housing starts exceeded 90,000, showed an increase 
of 12,900 units or 16 per cent, the bureau said. For the first 7 months of the 
year, housing starts are running about 28 per cent ahead of 1947 and total 
well over 550,000, the report declared. 

Discussing the number of building permits issued in July, the BLS 
estimate said : 

"Early reports to the bureau indicate a slight downturn in the number 
of local permits issued in July for new home construction. Among the 
larger cities showing a substantial drop were Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleve- 
land, Dallas, Miami, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, San Antonio, and Wash- 
ington. Marked increases, on the other hand, were reported for Charlotte, 
Detroit, Houston, Kansas City, Mo., Memphis, and Seattle. 

"Duplicating last year's performance, the city of Los Angeles issued 
more permits during the first 7 months of the year than any other city 
in the country. New York City repeated in second place. Three Texas 
cities (Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio) were among- the leading 10 in 
both 1948 and 1947." 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of A3IERIOA 

General Offite : Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 

General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



FiBST General Tice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STETENSOX 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind, 

General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Eiecctiti: Board 



First District. CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District. R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Se<^ond District. O. "WM. BLAIER 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Third District. HARRY SCHWABZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. La-prrence, Montreal, Que., Cein. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



i 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

CONVENTION CALL 

You are hereby notified that, in pursuance of the Constitution of the 
American Federation of Labor, the Sixty-seventh Convention of the 
American Federation of Labor will be held in the Hall of ^Mirrors. Nether- 
land-Plaza Hotel. Cincinnati. Ohio, beginning- at io:oo o'clock Monday 
morning, November 15. 1948. and will continue in .-ession from day to 
day until the business of the Convention shall have been completed. 



NEW CTIARTERS ISSUED 



2484 BlyttLeville, Ark. 

2455 Orange, Va. 

2456 Sudbury, Out., Can. 
2S33 Truckee, Calif. 



248 7 Yorkton, Sask., Can. 

2853 Joseph, Ore. 

28 5 8 Marysville, Calif. 

24S9 Lorain, Ohio 



NOVEMBER 2, 1948 

MAKE IT LABOR'S DAY — BE SURE YOU VOTE! 



CI T^TJlJTJTrLTTLTjn_.TjTjnjTrLTjTJTrLmTJTJTjTjT_rLrLP 



Films Available 





By authorization of the General Executive 
Board, two short movies have been made. One 
deals with activities at General Headquarters, 
and the other covers operations of the Home for 
Aged Members at Lakeland. These films are 
available for showing at Local Union and Coun- 
cil meetings. Ten copies of each are on file at 
the General Office. Copies are loaned to Brother- 
hood affiliates on a "first come first served" basis. 

These films afford every member a rare oppor- 
tunity to see the General Office and the Lakeland 
Home in action. There is no charge for use of the 
films. Local Unions and Councils interested in 
showing them should address inquiries to : 



Maurice A. Hutcheson, 

First General Vice-President, 
222 E. MICHIGAN ST., INDIAXATOLIS 4, IXD. 



These are i6 MM Elms with sound. 

They are in color. 

Running time is 40 minutes for both Blms — 75 min- 
utes for the General Headquarters him and 2^ 
minutes for the Home him. 



Lh^~vrLrLnj^^\sins^JiJiJiJiJi^^ 



31 




n znttnaxxntn 



Not lost to those that lore them, They still live in our memory, 

Xot dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



^tst in Intact 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother MAURICE ALVORD, Local No. 454, Philadelphia, Pa- 
Brother HANS ANDERSON, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother I. H. BEASLEY, Local No. 1813, Winnfield, La. 
Brother CHAS. O. BENNETT, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 
Brother VICTOR BENSON, Local No. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 
Brother JOSHUA CARTY, Local No. 842, Pleasantville, N. J. 
Brother M. W. CLARK, Local No. 452, Vancouver, B. C, Can. 
Brother CHAS. CREAGER, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother EDWARD F. ENSIGN, Local No. 1335, Wilmington, Cal. 
Brother LOUIS GRISS, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JOHN GRUMHOLTZ, Local No. 1126, Annapolis, Md. 
Brother EDWARD L. HARACICH, Local No. 1335, Wilmington, Cal. 
Brother G. HERZOG, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 

Brother ALEXANDER HILDERMAN, Local No. 226, Portland, Ore. 
Brother C. C. HOLLAND, Local No. 1126, Annapolis, Md. 
Brother JOSEPH C. JACK, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Brother O. B. JENKINS, Local No. 2288, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Brother JOHN KELTNER, Local No. 2808, Areata, Cal. 
Brother GREGORY KLEBANOFF, Local No. 24€, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES KUSTERKO, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES A. LEUSSOW, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Brother MICHAEL MADARAS, Loced No. 203, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Brother FRANK MASSEY, Local No. 2524, Longview, Wash. 
Brother W. H. MEAD, Local No. 1126, Annapolis, Md. 
Brother CARL NICHOLS, Local No. 1846, New Orleans, La. 
Brother JOSEPH B. POLITSKI, Local No. 2288, Los Angeles, CaL 
Brother JOHN ROWE, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother NICK SCHNUR, Local No. 1206, Norwood, Ohio. 
Brother CHARLES SCHWAB, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Brother WILMER SEASTROM, Local No. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 
Brother JACK N. SEMINOFF, Local No. 2288, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Brother KARL SICH, Local No. 2827, Port Arthur, Ont., Can. 
Brother WARREN W. SNEAD, Local No. 2983, Waynesboro, Va. 
Brother GEORGE H. STERLING, Local No. 1126, Annapolis, Md. 
Brother GEORGE TYSON, Local No. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 
Brother FRED WAHL, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother J. WALTERS, Local No. 1365, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Brother EDWARD WATT, Local No. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Brother ARTHUR WILLIAMS, Local No. 2288, Los Angelees, CaL 
Brother GEORGE E. WOOLEY, Local No. 1126, Annapolis, Md. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

LOCH, 2388 IMEMBERS COMMENDED FOR VALOR 

When fire of incendiary origin all but destroyed the E. J. Stanton and Son lum- 
ber yard in Los Angeles, heroic efforts by members of Local Union No. 2 288 kept 
the plant from becoming a total loss. "Within minutes after the fire was discovered, 
many members of the union were on the job moving equipment and fighting the 
flames. In appreciation of the fine job they did, L. H. Stanton, president of the 
firm, sent the following letter to the union: 

June 10, 1948. 

EXCLUSIVE TO LUMBER & SAWMILL WORKERS 
UNION, LOCAL No. 2288, and AFFILIATES 

The following employees of E. J. Stanton & Son, Inc. who are members of the" 
Lumber and Sawmill Workers Local No. 22 88 have won the gratitude of this* 
company by the loyalty and initiative which they showed during the terrible fire* 
in our yard which was started by an arsonist on Sunday, May 16. 

Bill Baughman and Mel Wilbourn were on duty at the time the fire was dis- 
covered. Bill, the watchman, reported the fire promptly and got the gates open 
and then joined Mel to move trucks, hysters and carriers out of the yard. Frank 
Regan, Eddie Oakey, Carlos Garcia, Jack Thomas, Jim Goodland, Robert Kuhn 
and Nate Miller got to the yard witliin a matter of minutes after the Superin- 
tendent called them and assisted in the removal of equipment and operation of fire 
fighting equipment until the fire was extinguished. 

Although we lost most of our warehouses and a large part of our inventory, the 
good work on the part of the fire department and of our conscientious employes 
saved the tools tliat we need to work with and will make it possible for us to re- 
build our plant and serve our customers in the usual Stanton way. 

Leroy H. Stanton, Pres. 



BUTLER LOCAL HONORS VETERAN IMEMBER 

Recently Local Union No. 500, Butler, Pennsylvania, sponsored a testimonial 
dinner in behalf of their retired business agent, Brother John E. Cross. Brother 
Cross served as business agent for the Local Union for over twenty years. During 
all that time he fulfilled his position with faithfulness and integrity. He has some 
forty-seven years of continuous membership in the United Brotherhood to his 
credit. Year in and year out he has never been too busy to devote his time and 
effort to any program designed to promote and build Local Union No. 500 and 
the United Brotherhood. 

Three hundred members, wives, and guests filled the banquet hall to capacity. 
Special guests included William J. Kelly former General Executive Board member 
and now manager of the Pittsburgh District Council; Charles Slinker, president of 
the Pennsylvania State Council; and William Birch, Charles McGowan. Paul 
Mitchell, and Ivan Larimer of the Pittsburgh District Council. 

Highlight of the evening was the presentation of a fine radio to Brother Cross 
by president D. J. Larimer as a slight token of the esteem in which both the officers 
and members of the Local Union hold him. Following the banquet there was a 
floor show and dancing. All who attended declared the evening an unqualified 
success. 



34 



THE CARPZXTER 



MOLIXE LOC-II. CELEBRATES GOLDEX AXXITERSARY 
Early in July. Local Union No. 2 41 of Moline, Illinois, celebrated the Golden 
AnniversaiT of its founding. Several hundred members, friends and guests filled 
the banquet hall of Scottish Rite Cathedral for the occasion. Appointments for 
the evening were described as ■well nigh perfect by all who attended. Gold decora- 
tions adorned the tables and banquet hall. Each lady attending received a gardenia 
corsage, and each male guest received a badge as a momento of the occasion. Fol- 
lowing a splendid dinner, a first rate floor show amused and entertained the guests 
for several hours. 

A feature of the dinner was the presentation of a Fifty-Year Gold Pin to 




Brother Eric Wyman who holds fifty years of continuous membership in good 
standing in Local No. 241. In the half a century of service to his union. Brother 
Wyman has earned the respect of his fellow workers and a thunderous ovation 
greeted his few words of thanks for the honor rendered him. Three other members 
of the union will be eligible for Fifty-Year Pins next year. They are: Carl Johnson, 
Robert Crowley, and Carl Brissman. Local Union No. 241 is justly proud of its 
fine old timers. 

Special guests at the anniversary celebration were: Michael Sexton and Stanley 
Johnson, president and secretary, respectively, of the Chicago District Council; 
Jack Hill of Peoria, secretary of the Illinois State Council; General Representative 
George Ottens; and Secretai-y DeYoung of the Tri-City Federation of Labor. In 
brief addresses they complimented the union on its great record of progress and 
predicted many years of continued growth and service. The high regard in which 
the entire community holds Local 241 is a tribute to the honorableness and 
integrity of its officers and members, past and present. 

Current officers of the union are: William Cowley, president; J. P. Hermes, 
recording secretary; J. Cuchanek. financial secretary; Charles Wellnitz, treasurer; 
John Romme, conductor; Nels Pierson, warden; and Charles Skinner, Cliff Swim, 
and Oscar Jones, trustees. 



COLL-ALBLl, ILL.. LOCAL 3IARKS 25th AXXR-ERSART 
On the evening of April 24th, Local Union No. 1997, Columbia, 111., commemo- 
rated the twenty-fifth anniversary of its founding with a public dance. A large 
crowd was on hand to help the Local Union celebrate its silver birthday. Among 
the guests was the Honorable A. C. Metter, Mayor of the City of Columbia, who 
extended congratulations to the union and its oflBcers and members. 

Local Union No. 1997 was founded on March 24, 1923. Eighteen carpenters 
signed the charter application. Of this original eighteen, three are still active 
members with twenty-five years of continuous membership behind them. They 



T If E C A K P E N T E R 



35 



are Brothers George Kremmel. Hugh McMullan, and Arthur Beckmann. Oldest 
member of the Local Union in point of membership is Brother Charles L. Weisen- 
stein "nho has a record of forty-five years membership in the United Brotherhood 




of Carpenters. Recently EroT-ier Weisenstein received unusual publicity because 
of a hobby or his. Since 1&''S he has saved every "weatherbird" weather predic- 
tion printed in the Post-Di.spaich. 

In the first quarter century of its existence, Local Union Xo. 199 7 has earned 
the admiration and respect of the entire community, and the officers and members 
are looking forward to litany more years of useful service on the pan of the organ- 
ization. 



DOULAKS FOB POLITICAI^ ACTION 

The carpenters of Cincinnati are not satisfied with the record made by the 
Eightieth Congress. Furthermore, they are determined to do something about it. 




Pictured above are members of Cincinnati Local Union Xo. 1602 laying their dol- 
lars on the line to back up United Brotherhood of Carpenters Xon-partisan Com- 
mittee for the Repeal and Defeat of Anti-labor Legislation. The photographer 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



snapped this picture at a political action meeting held in Woodlawn Hall on the 
night of May 13. Some $115.00 in voluntary contributions was collected at this 
meeting. At a previous political action meeting $72.00 was collected, which brings 
to ?1S7.00 the total voluntary contributions Local Union No. 1602 has made to the 
progress and welfare of unionism. 

All fifteen local unions in the Cincinnati area which comprise the Ohio Valley 
District Council, are conscious of the need for concerted political action. They have 
worked out a fine cooperative program for mobilizing the political strength of the 
United Brotherhood in the territory. To date they have raised some $1,500.00 in 
voluntary contributions to fight for labor's rights. 



DAXEELSOX LOCAI. :MARKS 45 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

On April 17, 1948, over one hundred members and friends of Local No. 623 
enjoyed a full course Turkey Dinner served by the grill committee of the Local 
K. of C. council at the K. of P. hall in Danielson, Conn., to celebrate the forty- 
fifth anniversary of the Local, and to honor the one remaining charter member of 
the Local. He is Brother Joseph Halle who has been verj' active in the local and 




Reading fi'oni left to right: Mr. and 3Lrs. Joseph Halle, Miss Messier, Brother 
Dieudonne Messier of Local No. 623, Rev. Father Arthur Brodeur, Brother John J. 
Egan, Conuiiissioner of Labor, Brother Cliarles Johnson, Jr., Executive Board 
Member of the 1st District; Brother William J. Sullivan, General Representative; 
Brother Thomas Yoczik, Apprentice Training Council; Herbert R. Harriott, Busi- 
ness Agent, Local Xo. 623; George Lockvrood, President, Connecticut State Coun- 
cil of Cai-penters; William Fargo, Business Agent, Local Xo. 30 of Xew London and 
Vice President, Connecticut State Federation of Labor. 



in the carpenter's union in the eastern part of the State. Brother Halle has held 
an office in the Local most of the time that he has been a member: Secretary 1905- 
06, President 1906-16, Recording Secretary and Treasurer 1942-47. 

Among those present were, Brother Charles Johnson, Jr., member of the 
General Executive Board for the first district: Brother William J. Sullivan, General 
Representative for this district; Mr. John J. Egan, Commissioner of Labor for the 
State of Connecticut; George Lockwood, President of the Connecticut State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters; Joseph M. Rourke, Secretary-Treasurer of the Connecticut State 
Federation of Labor; Brother Michael J. Barry, President of the Connecticut State 
Building and Construction Trades Council; Brother Thomas Yoczik, Chief of the 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



Connecticut Apprentice Training Council; Rev. Father Arthur Brodeur, M. S. of 
St. James Church; members of the Executive Board of the Connecticut State 
Council of Carpenters; and Perly Hovey, State Mediation Board. 

After the dinner there were brief talks by Brothers Johnson and Sullivan on 
the Taft-Hartley law, and by Mr. Egan on the state of Labor Relations, after which 
an orchestra furnished music for dancing. 



A UMQIE CEREMONY 

The members of Local Union No. 10 4, Dayton, Ohio, who attended the June 
11th regular business meeting witnessed a unique and inspiring ceremony when 
Charles Flaum, union president, gave the obligation to the Kramer triplets. As far 
as is known, the three Kramer boys are the first set of triplets in the United Broth- 
erhood to receive the obligation simultaneously. 




Pictured above are the Kramer triplets, Heni"}-, John, and Fred, Jr., receiving 
the oath of obligation from Charles Flauni (left) president of Dayton, Ohio, Local 
No. 104. The boys are apprentices and the sons of Fred Kramer, Sr., a long time 
cai-penter and members of Local No. 104. 

The Dayton triplets, Henry, John, and Fred, Jr., are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Kramer, Sr. The father has been a member of Local Union No. 104 for 
twelve years. The boys, only children of Mr. and Mrs. Kramer, were born Decem- 
ber 20, 19 28. All are graduates of Wilbur Wright High School. More recently 
they have been studying at the University of Dayton. Since they are all working 
for the same construction firm, their marked facial resemblance causes some con- 
sternation to the foremen and other workers on the job since only their parents 
can really tell them apart. 

The Carpenter extends congratulations to Brother Kramer and his three fine 
sons as well as to Local Union No. 10 4. 



AUSTRALIA GOES ON 40-HOlR WEEK 

The forty-hour week became standard industrial policy throughout Australia 
with the announcement of a decision by an arbitration court to grant the shorter 
workweek, replacing the forty-four hour week in effect over the last 20 years. 

Nearly 1,000,000 Australians will benefit from the change when the new hours 
take effect next January. 






W ^^^^^^rrr^r^^^r?/^ //^. 



\s\ P\R 



PORTXiAXD LADIES ELECT OFFICERS 

The Editor: 

Auxiliarj^ Xo. 4S9, Portland, Oregon had a meeting July 18 and held an elec- 
tion of officers. Geneva Grebbe and Margie Prater for President, Geneva Grebbe 
being elected. Willa Erickson and Mrs. Batzer for Vice-President, Mrs. Erickson 
being elected. Sally Ptobinson was re-elected for Financial Secretary. Margaret 
Frederick elected for Recording Secretary. Betty Stanton and Mrs. Tjoller for 
Warden, Betty Stanton being elected. Dorothy Shipman elected Conductor. Mrs. 
Frank Wagner elected Trustee. 

We are having installation July 2, and haven't received nevr quarterly password. 
Fraternally, Margaret Frederick, Recording Secretary. 



SAX PEDRO AUXILIARY CARRIES OX GOOD WORK 

The Editor: 

Well, it's a year since our Auxiliary (Xo. 130, San Pedroj pulled up a chair 
and had a chat with our sister Auxiliaries. We are still a very busy, happy organ- 
ization. During the past year we have added a number of new members to our 
group, and the interest recently has been marked. This, we believe, is due to the 
fact that the members of the Local 1140 gave a party in May, especially honoring 
the Ladies, not only of the Auxiliary, but wives of all the Local Members. There 
were over 400 present at the party and floral decorations and entertainment, all 
arranged by the men, were something that will long be remembered and discussed. 
Lunch of baked ham, barbecued beef, potato chips, pickles, olives and lots of 
other good things was prepared and served by a caterer. Dancing was the closing 
entertainment of the evening. We were justlj' proud of our Local, and since most 
of them read the CARPEXTER, we wish again to thank them here for their 
wonderful cooperation with us, not only that evening, but at all times. 

We still have our old ladies ward at General Hospital as our pet project; and 
a willing committee, backed by a group of grand women, visits the ward twice 
each month, writes letters, distributes magazines, gives them little personal gifts, 
and tries in every way possible to make life for these very old ladies just a little 
brighter. There are approximately thirty-four of them all well past seventy. 

We meet on the second and fourth Fridays of each month. Second Friday is 
business only, fourth Friday we follow the business meeting with a social hour 
and refreshments, to which the men are cordially invited. We have lovely times. 

Drop in on us some time, wont you? Hope to be with you on the pages of the 
magazine again next year. Fraternally yours. Angle Jonto. President, 

San Pedro, California. 



WEXATCHEE GROUP YOUXG BUT ACTIVE 

The Editor: 

Ladies Auxiliary of Carpenters Xo. 81 of Wenatchee is just a little over a year 
old but in that short time we have accomplished a lot. We have thirty-two members 
in good standing. 

The attendance of Local 2205 has gone up a great deal since our formation. 
Our men realize that we women spend three-fourths of the pay check and when 
we are union-minded we will insist on union-made goods, and they help our 
auxiliary in every way possible. The men also enjoy our social night in each month. 



THE CARPENTER 



39 



We were verj^ happy to have our Recording Secretary, Lucille Johnson elected 
Vice-President of the Washington State Council of Carpenters' Auxiliaries at the 
convention this year. 

We would like to hear from our sister Auxiliaries. We have a wonderful group 
of women in our Auxiliary, and we will be glad to exchange ideas on how to raise 
money and wise ways of spending it. 

Fraternally, Ladies Auxiliary of Carpenters No. 81, 

Labor Temple, Wenatchee, Wash. 



BAY CITY AUXILIARY INSTALLS OFFICERS 

The Editor: 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 468, Bay City, Michigan, on the night of July 21, installed 
Mrs. Alice Schnell as President to succeed Mrs. Marjorie Page. Other officers in- 
clude: Mrs. Velma Sutherland, 1st Vice-President; Mrs. Grace Lang, 2nd Vice- 
President; Mrs. Henrietta Ziegler, Recording Secretary; Mrs. Nellie Frover, Finan- 
cial Secretary and Treasurer; Mrs. Bertha Morin, Conductress; Mrs. Virginia Weiss, 
I Warden; Mrs. Ellen Lord as Chaplain. 

Trustees are Mrs. Fidelis Brown, Mrs. Esther Groulx, and Mrs. Thelma Horner. 
f Mrs. Agnes Ruhlig is Publicity Chairman. 

' Corsages, arranged by Mrs. Sophie Matuszewski, marked places for retiring 
and incoming Presidents and a gift was given the retiring President by Mrs. Matus- 
zewski. Afterwards games with prizes got under way to round out the evening. 
Our Auxiliary meets the third Wednesday of each month. Our next meeting 
\ will be held on August 18, 1948. 

Sincerely, Mrs. Agnes Ruhlig, Publicity Chairman. 



TOLEDO LADIES HOLD INSTALLATION PARTY' 

I The Editor: 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 2 of Carpenters' Local 1138, Toledo, Ohio, on their last 
meeting night, July 14, held a supper for members and their families preceding 
their regular meeting and installation of officers. We had a nice attendance and 
a very enjoyable evening. Past President, Ruby Semoff, installed the following 
officers: President, Celia Walker; Vice-President, Elsie Her; Recording Secretary, 
Bernice McDaniel; Financial Secretary and Treasurer, Bertha Lietz; Conductress, 
Jennie Groff; Warden, Marguerite Flory; Trustees, Pearl Alender, Jennie Groff 
and Gertrude Suter. 

Our meetings are held the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 
8 P.M. at Carpenters' Hall, 628 N. Erie St. 

Bernice McDaniel, Recording Secretary. 



BROTHERHOOD MEMBER INVENTS NEW TYPE AVINDOW 

Brother George H. Slook, for the past eight years president of Local No. 43 2 of 

Atlantic City, has invented a new type of 
window that is not only cheaper to build but 
also easier to repair. With this new patent- 
ed frame and sash the outside of the window 
glass may be washed from the inside. Each 
sash works up and down on two weights held 
by a bronze tape or cable (being pointed to 
in the picture by Brother Slook). Weights 
can be replaced in a matter of minutes with- 
out removing the stop or trim, and Brother 
Slook claims his new window to be both 
airtight and watertight. He further claims 
that his new type sash will not stick after 
painting. 

Brother Slook's new window is stirring 
up considerable interest in building circles 
throughout the nation. 




Craft Problems 




Carpentry 

LESSON 240 
By H. H. Siegele 

The Steel Square. — Everybody knows 
■what a steel square Is; that is, he 
knows that it has a large arm and a 
smaller one branching off from it at a 
right angle. The large arm is 2 inches 



the tongue in the right, keeping the 
square approximately on a level and 
the heel from you, the face side of the 
square will be up. 

Roof Framing Table. — I have never 
used the roof framing table on the 
square for any practical purpose, but I 
will explain it. The student should ob- 




wide and 2 4 inches long, while the 
smaller arm is only 1 % inches wide and 
16 inches long. The large arm is called 



tain a square that has the table on it, 
as shown by Fig. 2, and lay it before 
him. He will find to the left on the 




Fig. 2 



the body, and the small one is called 
the tongue. The intersection of the out- 
side edges of the two arms is called 
the heel. The face side of a steel square 
is the side on which the manufacturer's 
name is stamped. The side opposite to 
the face side is called the back. The 
square shown by Fig. 1 has the face 
side up. In other words, if the body of 
the square is held in the left hand and 



body, the top line, these words: "Length 
of main rafters per foot run," just as 
shown by the drawing. Right under the 
edge figure 18 he will find 21.63, which 
means that the length of the main, or 
common rafter, per foot run and 18 
inches rise, is 21.63 inches long. To 
find the length of the rafter, multiply 
21.63 by the number of feet in the 
run of the roof. 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



Diagonal Scale. — Fig. 3 is a drawing 
of the diagonal scale, which is used to 
measure hundredths of an inch with a 



-< i" -*. 


-* 1" 




•< 1 *■ 




///////// 










c 


N 


\ 


M 


}6 


^Pfi 


\ 


Ml 


\ 


I 


1 


f " 


fa 


VW 



1.44 inches since each space up adds 
one one-hundredth of an inch to the 
distance. In other words, the distance 
between a and a is 1.40 inches, but the 




Fig. 5 



four spaces up add .0 4 inch to it, mak- 
ing the distance between b and b 1.44 
inches. If the compass were set to 
points c and c, the distance would be 
1.66 inches. The student should use a 
compass and practice with it on measur- 
ing different distances to the hundredth 
part of an inch. 

Application of the Square. — Fig. 4 
shows the square applied to a timber, 



Fig. 3 

compass. The compass shown has the ^ 
points set at a and a. Each space in 
the diagonal scale from left to right 
counts 10 one-huudredths of an inch. 




Fig. 



The distance then between the points 
of the compass, as shown, would be one 
whole inch plus four spaces of the diag- 




Fig. 6 



using 12 on the tongue and 18 on the 
body, to obtain the length of the rafter 
per foot run, which is 21.63 inches, 
just as the table gives it. 

Hips and Valleys. — The second line of 
the table gives the lengths of hips and 
valleys per foot run of the common raf- 
ter. (The run for hips and valleys per 
foot run of the common rafter is 17 
inches, minus — the exact figure being 




Fig 



onal scale, or 1.40 inches. If the com- 
pass were set four spaces up, as be- 
tween b and b, the distance would be 



16.97 inches.) Under the edge figure 
18, the second line, will be found 24.74, 
or the length in inches of a hip or 



^2 



THE CARPENTER 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

BUILDING.— Hai 110 p. tnd 496 11.. cererlnc form 

tjuildlnf. flniihinf. ttilr bulldlnc. »*<• 12-50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 17S p. uid 437 U. Boor rrimine 
romplete. Other problemi. including law filing. $2.00. 

CARPENTRY.— Hn 302 p., 754 11., eorerlnf ««oeril 
houie carpentiT, Mtlmitlnc ind other lubjecti. 12.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Hti »iO p. 
670 11., »nd mbout 7,000 building tr«de lermi. tS.OO. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— CoTen hundredi of prie- 
llcal building problems, hii 252 p. ind 670 11. $2.50. 

The iboTe flTe booki lupport one mother. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Onlj $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS. — llluitrated prose. Only $1.00. 

FREE. — With 1 booki. one $1.00 book free, with 

4 booki, two, and with 5 booki, three $1.00 booki free. 

Books autographed. Five-day Money-back guarantee. 

C. O. D. orden, poitige and C. 0. D. fee added. 

K H. H. SIEGELE ^!^i:;^ 

QUANTITIES — 12 or more books. 20% off, f.o.b. Chicago 



valley rafter per foot run of the common 
rafter. Fig. 5 shows the square applied 
to a timber using 12 on the tongue and 
the length of the common rafter per 
foot run, or 21.63 inches, on the body 
of the square. The diagonal distance, 
as shown, is 24.74 inches, or the length 
of hips or valleys per foot run of the 
common rafter, the same as shown by 
the table. 

Difference in Lengths of Jacks.- — The 
third line of the table gives the differ- 
ence in the lengths of jacks spaced 16 
inches on center, or 28.84 inches. Fig. 
6 shows the square applied to a timber 
showing how that figure is obtained. If 
the rafters were spaced 12 inches on 
center, the difference in the lengths of 




nT^s 3 




12. 



Fig. 8 

the jacks would be 21.63 inches, or the 
length of the common rafter per foot 
run, as shown by the square marked 
A. But the space is 16 inches, which is 
4 inches more than 12, as shown by 
the square marked B. Four inches is 
one-third of 12, so by adding one-third 
of 21.63 inches to itself, the result will 
be the difference in the lengths of the 
jacks, or 28.84 inches, the same as the 
diagonal distance shown by the square 
in position B. 



Jacks Spaced Two Feet.— The fourth 
line of the table gives the difference in 
the lengths of jacks, if spaced 2 feet 
on center, or 43.27 inches. Fig. 7 shows 
how this figure was obtained. Each of 
the two squares, A and B, gives the 
difference in the lengths of jacks if 
spaced 12 inches, or 21.63 inches. Then 
if they are spaced 2 feet, the difference 
in the lengths of jacks would be just 
twice 21.63 inches, or 43.27 inches, as 
shown by the diagram. 

Edge Bevel for Jacks. — The fifth line 
of the table gives the figure to be used 
with 12, in order to get the edge bevel 
for the side cut of jacks, or 6 11/16. 
How the square is applied is shown by 
Fig. 8 Tsquare marked A). To the left 




Fig 



one of the two-way arrows points to the 
V-shaped mark that indicates the point 
to be used with 12. The enlarged part 
is a reproduction from Fig. 2, where to 
the right the edge figure 6 is shown. 
The square marked B shows how one 
foot run and the length of the rafter 
per foot run will give the same bevel. 

Edge Bevel for Hips and Valleys. — 
The sixth line of the table gives the 
figure to be used with 12 to obtain the 
edge bevel for the side cut of hips and 



CARPENTERS and 
BUILDERS' HANDBOOK 

consists of short but practical 
rules for laying out roofs, ceil- 
ings, hoppers, stairs and arches 
'.vith tables of board measure, 
length of common, hip, valley 
and jack rafters, square meas- 
ure, etc. — also, rules for kerf- 
ing, laying off gambrel roof and 
explaining the steel square. 
Money back if not satisfied 

$1.00 postpaid 

D.A.ROGERS 

5344 Clinton Avenue 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 




THE CARPENTER 



valleys, or 8*4. One of the two-way 
arrows (Fig. 9) shows the X that indi- 
cates the point to be taken. The en- 
larged part with the edge figures 7, 8, 
9 on it is reproduced from the part to 
the right of Fig. 2, — compare the two. 
The square shown by dotted lines, shows 
how 17 (the diagonal distance of 12 
and 12) and the length of the hip or 
valley per foot run of the common raf- 
ter, will give the same bevel. 



WANTS TO KNOW 

By H. H. Siegele 

An apprentice wants to know how to 
get the difference in the lengths of 
gable studding, when the run and the 
rise of the roof are known. 

As a rule the apprentice carpenter 
makes this problem harder than it 
really is^in fact, it is simple. Let's 
put it in simple terms: The roof, say, 
has a 12 and 8 pitch; that is, 12 inches 
run and 8 inches rise. Now if the stud- 
ding were spaced 12 inches on center, 
the difference in the lengths of the gable 
studding would be 8 inches. And if the 
studding were spaced 24 inches on cen- 
ter, then the difference in the lengths of 
the studding would be twice 8, or 16 
Inches. But in case the studding are 




Fig. 1 



spaced 16 inches on center, because 16 
is one-third less than 2 4, the difference 
in the lengths of the studding would be 
one-third less than for the 24-inch spac- 
ing, or 10% inches. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
how what has just been explained, can 
be gotten by means of the steel square. 
The square in position A, shows a 12- 
inch run and an 8-inch rise — the rise is 
the difference in the lengths of gable 
studding spaced 12 inches on center. 
Position B shows the tongue of the 



square by dotted lines, giving the differ- 
ence in the lengths of the studding for a 
16-inch spacing, or 10% inches, while 
position C gives the difference in the 
lengths of the studding for a 24-inch 
spacing, or 16 inches. The student 
should apply the square to a board as 
shown, and think through and compare 
the two explanations given here. 



NEW THE RAFTCUT FOR RAFTERS 




Chart with Folder 



A simplified method fm- speed and aceuraey in figiirins the 
length of Common. Hip or Valley rafters. Especially for 
Apprentices. Carpenters and Builders. 

The Raftciit gives you 12 different pitclies. ranging from 
4 to 18 inch rise. It will give you 2'iJlQ different lengths 
of rafters and also all cuts required for these pitches. 

Instruction for this Baftcut are given on reverse side. 



Raftcut Chart 

$1.00 



Order from L. LANDRY 

P. O. Ereeau, Ontario, Canada 



SUPER HAM-R-ADZ NO. 10 




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quickly converts car- 
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keep sharp. Fits poc- 
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SUPER SQUARE GAGE NO. 49 




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A. D. McBURNEY 



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WILLIAM BRYANT •• Master Saw Maker 

For thirty-two years, "Billy" Bryant has 
been making saws at our Lawrenceburg 
plant. He's become an expert saw filer 
and is proud of every saw that passes 
through his hand. One reason why the 
name "OHLEN-BISHOP" on a saw 
means quality workmanship and superior 
design. 




906 Ingleside Ave. 



Columbus 8, Ohio 



IF YOU ARE A CARPENTER 

and have had some experience in lumber YOU CAM 
LEARN TO ESTIMATE CARPENTER WORK in a 

Burprisingly short time. 49 years experience in lumber- 
ing and general construction brings to light new bom 
methods such as grading labor on lumber and other 
items to prevent the estimator, or contractor, from 
eerious hidden disaster. Until you have used grading 
labor on lumber you will still be in the dark. 
Having some experience in lumber, that is the best 
place to start, the rest will come much easier after 
getting a sound footing. 

A little of your spare time will do it. 
These new born methods will give you the answer, 
from farm building to skyscraper, or homes, remodel- 
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On a post card, print your name and address plainly, 
by return mail you will receive further information. 

E. W. HOFFNER 
3319 N. Clark St. Chicago 13, Dl. 



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Full Length Roof Framer 

This book Rives the ExTinE Length of 
tlie Couiuion, Ilii), Valley and Jack Rafters 
for 4S different pitches. 

The flattest pitch is a % inch rise to 12 
inches of run. Pitches increase Va inch of 
rise eacli time until they reach 24 inches of 
rise to 12 inches of run. There are 48 
pitclies, all told. 

There are 2,400 different spans or widths 
of buildings given for each pitch. The small- 
est span is 14 inch, and they increase V4 
inch each time until they reach a span of 
50 feet. There is a different rafter length 
for each M inch of span ; therefore there 
are 2,400 Common and 2,400 Hip Rafter 
lengths, or 4,800 rafter lengths for each 
pitch ; or 230,400 rafter lengths can be had 
for the 48 pitches. 

By doubling or trebling the spans, the 
range of this book can be increased to meet 
the requirements of any building or bridge, 
even should the span run In the hundreds 
of feet. 

Tlie 144 Tables will give the Entire 
length of the Common, Hip, Valley or Jack 
Rafter to Vs inch, for positively any span, 
be it in odd feet, odd inches, or odd frac- 
tions of an inch. 

The cuts and bevels for all the roof work 
are given with each of the 48 pitches. 

Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 



Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C.O.D. pay $2.78. 
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ROOF FRAMING 

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CORWELD SUPPLY COMPANY 

P. 0. Box, 561, Hyde Park Station, Los Angeles 43, Cal. 




NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserTe the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

American Floor Surfacing Mach- 
ine Co., Toledo, Ohio 47 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 44 
Corweld Supply Co., Los Angel- 
es, Cal. 46 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 48 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 47 

Ma.ster Rule Mfg. Co., White 

Plains, N. Y. 48 

F. P. Maxson, Chicago, 111 44 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 43 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 44 

Nicholls Mfg. Co., Ottumwa, 

Iowa 47 

Ohlen Bishop, Columbus, Ohio 44 

The Paine Co., Chicago, III 45 

Porter-Cable Machine Co., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 6 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 5 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore. — 45 

The Speed Corp., Portland, Ore. 44 
Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 
Stevens Level Co., Newton Falls, 

Ohio 45 

Carpentry Materials 

The Celotex Corp., Chicago, Ill._ 1 
The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._2nd Cover 

Overalls 
The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, 

Mo. 45 

Technical Courses and Books 

American School, Chicago, 111 45 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, III. 47 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y — 3rd Cover 
Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

Commercial Trades Institute, 

Chicago. 111. - 43 

Frederick J. Drake & Co., Chi- 
cago, 111. 4 

E. W. Hoffner, Chicago, 111 44 

L. Landry, Ereeau, Ont., Can 43 

A. Reichers, Palo Alto, Cal 46 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 42 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. — 42 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 48 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY! 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



d 



MAKE $35 

TO $50 A DAY 



Be Your Own Boss 



Right now — cash in on the building 
boom with an American Floor Sander! 
Hundreds of men have found they can 
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inside work , . . heated quarters . . . no 
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year 'round. 

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are easy to operate 
— no big overhead. 
— no special school- 
ing. Send coupon for 
i^mohey- making 
booklet. 



meIkiaI 

FLOOR MACHINES 



American Floor Surfacing Machine Co. 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo 3, Ohio 

Enclosed find 25c in stamps or coin for book- 
let "Opportunities in Floor Surfacing", telling 
how I can start my own floor sanding business. 



Name 
Street 
City... 



.State. 




12th Edition for 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Laam to draff plans, estimate, be ■ live-wire bulMer, do 

remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 9 practical, pro- 
fusely illustrated books cover subjects that will help you 
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BETTER JOBS -BETTER PAY "^"^"fi" 

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Ply quick, easily understood training and we have ever pub- 
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Coupon Brings Nine Big Books For Examination 



\MERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Vocational Publishers since 1898 
Dept. G636 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, 111. 

You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your nine 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charges 
only, and if fully satisfied In ten days, I will send you 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 Is paid. I am Dot obligated In any 
way unless I keep the books. 



Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one buslneii 
man as reference. Men In service, also give home addreii. 




Any user will fell you thai Nicholls 100-A Square 
(shown here) is the finest square a carpenter can 
own. No other square carries all the information 
shown on this square. Here's strictly a Master- 
Mechanic's Tool accurately mode by master crafts- 
men. See it at your local hardware store. 

NICHOLLS MANUFACTURING CO. 

OTTUMWA, IOWA 



HANG THAT DOOR THE PROFESSIONAL WAY ! 



YOU DO THIS 




E-Z Mark Butt Gauge 

a clean cut deeply etched proiile. 

hips. Repeat operation on jamb. 
Hang door. THAT'S ALL- 
NO MORE! 



AND GET THIS 

• Hang more doors better. 

• No adjustments. No errors. 

• Used and approved by Master 
mechanics. , . . ., , 

• Comes in 3i" and 4" (standard) sizes 
9 Precision made. 

Cost ONLY $1.75 ea.. or $3.50 a set 
at your hdw. store. If dealer can't sup- 
ply, send only $1.00 with order and pay 
postman balance, plus postage C.O.D. In Can. ,$3.. 5 (noC.O.D. 

E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377 Dept. C, Los Angeles 16, Cal 




COMES WITH 
UATHEREHE CASE 



5()(, mm or 




of MEASURING. 



ICCURACY! 



Mechanics and craftsmen will wel- 
come Brite-Blade's accuracy as well as 
its flashing white blade which simpli- 
fies reading. The nickel plated, zinc al- 
loy case will take the toughest punish- 
ment with ease. You can get a Brite- 



Blade at all good hardware stores or 
building supply houses — or if you pre- 
fer, use coupon. 



HI 



i^Wi^S w'fB mm 

WOODi AND TAPE] RULES 



MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 

201 Main Street, White Plains, New York 
Please send me 

306W- 6 U. Bnfe-Blade-$1 .75 
308V/- 8 ff. Brife-Blade-$1 .90 
3/OW-JO ff. BrHe-Blade-$2.25 

My check (or Money Order) is enclosed. 

NAME 



E-9 



ADDRESS- 



CITY_ 



-STATE_ 



INDEPENDENCE 



This FREE BOOK shows 
How to Win It 

"INDEPENDENCE AFTER 40" 
book giving you a proven, prac- 
tical way to make $20 to $30 a 
■week in spare time — sharpening 
saws withi tlie Foley Automatic 
Saw Filer. Start at home in 
basement or garage — you can 
turn out perfect cutting saws 
right away — no experience 
needed. 

The Free Book gives you a 
plan based on facts, with 
only a small investment, no 
overhead, no stock of goods 
to carry. There are thou- 
sands of saws in 
every community 
to keep sharp. 
Begin in spare time 
develop into a full- 
time business of your own later 
Take the first step towards being your 
own boss — send the coupon for this 
book — read it carefully. 



AJktPEM^fc. 




Se*td g<xu^<ut 'Pox FREE BOOK 



Foley Mfg. Co., 918-8 Foley BIdg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Send FBEE BOOK— "Independence After 40" 

Name 

Address 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand.' 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 
Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 
and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what yoii find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly, and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C-21, Denver 2, Colorado 




m^^ 



^sf 



Stanley Screw Driver No. 25 



• If you have ever tried a Stanley No. 25 Screw 
Driver, you'll know the one we mean. It's the kind 
of a screw driver you reach for first - the sturdy, 
hand-fitting tool that does so many kinds of screw 
driving jobs quickly, securely, the way you want 
them done. 

The polished, alloy-steel blade is tempered its 
entire length. Patented bolster construction anchors 
blade in hardwood handle. Tips are accurately 
crossground to size. Handle is fluted for sure grip. 
Eight sizes for a choice. Buy a No. 25 next time — and 
good Stanley Tools always. STANLEY TOOLS, 
163 Elm Street, New Britain, Connecticut. 

THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

- [STANLEY] 

Keg. U. S. Pat. Off. 

HARDWARE ■ HAND TOOLS- ELECTRIC TOOLS 



Make Every 
Day's ^ork 



fiTH A 



MODEL 
60 



^/i^y^tSkur 



Carpenters everywhere finish 
more work . . . faster . . . easier 
with a Model 60 MallSaw. It 
cuts wood and metal . . . 
grooves mortar joints . . . cuts 
and scores tile, concrete and 
other aggregate compositions. 
When set in special stand it 
can be used as table 
shaper, bench grinder or 
er. Also larger models. 





6" Blade — 2" Capacity 
Asfc Dealer or Vlt'iie Portable Power Tool Division. 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 



AUDELS Carpenters 
^nd Builders Guides 

4vois.^6 

Inside Trade Information 

for Carpenters, Builders, Join- 
ers. Building jMeclianics and all 
Woodworkers. These Guides 
give yoQ the short-cut instruc- 
tions that yoa want — including 
new methods, ideas, solutions. 
plaBS, systems and money sav- 
ing suggestions. An easy pro- 
gressive course for the appren- 
tice and eta.'ent. A practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere are us- 
ing these Guides as a Uelpinfl: 
Hand to Easier Work. Better 
Work and Better Pay. To get 
this assistance for yourself. 

Inside Trade Information On: m^f fB£E°coopoNbeiow. 

How to use the steel square — How to flle and 

set saws — How to build lurniture — How to use 

a mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How 

to use rules and scales — How to make joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength of timbers — 

How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, barns, garages, bungalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaffolds — skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on Interior trim — • , 

Bow to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors — How to paint. 





AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 7 days' tree 
trial. II OK I will remit $1 in 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 Is paid. 
••Otherwise I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfied. 



Name- 



Employed by- 



CAR 




Even without its name 

you^d know If was an ATKINS 

On every Atkins "Silver Steel" Saw that's Sold, the Atkins name 
appears prominently. It stands for honest craftsmanship and sav/ing 
performance that has never been excelled. Yet even without its name^ 
men who know and use saws would probably recognize an Atkins... 
By the way it looks — its perfect balance — its free and easy cutting 
— above all by the way its "Silver Steel" blade holds its edge . . . 
These are the "trade marks" of an Atkins just as surely as its name. 
"Look" for them the next time you buy-^any sow. 



5 Work Savers 
from the Complete 

ATKINS Line 





No. 400 Straight Bock 

Mirror polish blade. "Perfection" handle pre- 
vents wrist strain. Taper ground 5 gauges for 
easy clearance. Ship point. 



^:~jm:::z 



No. 65 Straight Bacic 

Fine quality for general carpentry. Damas- 
keen polish blade. Toper ground. Ship point. 



w: 








No. 2000 Straight Bacit 

light but stiff blade, taper ground, polished 
ond etched. "Perfect-Grip" apple handle. 
Ship point. 



No. 37 Compass Saw 

17 X 18 gouge blade hardened, 
tempered and polished. 8 points 
per inch. Filed and set. Plastic 
handle. 




No. 39 Keyhole Saw 
(not shown) 

18 X 19 gouge for easy clearance 
10 points per in. Uniform temper. 
Filed and set. Plastic handle. 




"$^ ^'SAWS 1 -^ 



E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY • Home off.c 

Factory: 402 S. Illinois Street. Indianapolis 9. Indiona 
fironch Factory; Portland, Oregon • Branch Offices: 
Atlanta - Chicaoo • New Orleans • New York • San Francisco 



noicB 



MAKERS OF BETTER SAWS fOR EVERY CUTTING fOB 



CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 

OCTOBER, 1948 



YOU'VE GOT TO PITCH 



BALL GAMES 



w 



ELECTIONS 




801!^ CONGRESS SCORE BOARD 



,Nmi;?s 2/0400200 



LABOR 00000000 



It's the Last of the Ninth . . 

For your own soke • For Lobor's soke 




REGISTER AN 

ELECTION DAY - NOVEMBER 2,1948 



BEING USED EVERYWHERE 



UPSON 

DUBL-THIK 
Fibre-Tile 





Coeaa^al 



D 





Gives you an unmarred wall — free from visible 
holes. 

You simply nail Upson Floating Fasteners 
studs or furring strips to anchor panels securely / 
the back. Special smooth surface makes an i< 
base for beautiful enameling job. 

Gives you a rugged crackproof wo//— more than 
thick. Our 5-ply laminated panel is tough and str 
— not brittle — will not chap or loosen. Positi 
crack-proof. Millions of feet in use for many ye 
F. H. A. accepted. 

Costs the customer less — opens up a new fi< 
Check up! Comes in 4' widths — standard lei 
Get Upson Dubl-Thik Fibre-Tile from your l|{j 
dealer or mail the coupon below. 



Easily Identified By The Famous BLUE Center. 

rti 1 ^■^•- :>.. 

THE UPSON COMPANY 

310 Upson Point, Lockport, New York 

Send me your t>ooklef "Gleaming Magic," and Direction Slieets for applying Upson 
' Thik Fii>re-Tile. 
NAME 



STREET 



STATE 



mnm cohverts 

UMEAR FEET 
TO BOftRO EEET 






GREENLEE 




Solves many other 
woodworking problems 
in seconds 1 AC 

onl/ Iv 

Easy to use. Fast . . simply set dial 
of GREENLEE Handy Calculator to get 
measurements; slope per foot in de- 
grees; comparative hardness, weights 
and workability of various woods; 
bit sizes; nail specifications; tool 
sharpening hints. 6" diameter heavy 
varnished cardboard. Special offer 
by maker of famous GREENLEE tools. 
Send IQi^ to Greenlee Tool Co., 2090 
Columbia Avenue, Rockford, Illinois. 





fAML COUPON! 

American Floor Surfacing Machine Co. 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo 3, Ohio 

Please send latest catalog on the following: 

D American Sanderplane Belt Sander 

n American Speedy Spinner Disc Sander 



Name . 
Street. 
City . . 



State 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 

Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVIII — No. 10 



INDIANAPOLIS, OCTOBER, 1948 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Over time- O n- Over time 



When the Supreme Court last June handed down its decision in the famous "overtime- 
on-overtime" case considerabie interest developed among both employers and unions, 
A large number of Local Unions have written the General Office asking how the decision 
is going to affect them. In response to these inquiries the legal department of the Broth- 
erhood has prepared a detailed analysis of the ruling. 



Chicago D. C. Honors Frank Duffy 



10 

With the members of the Executive Council of the American Federation of Labor, 
and the Officers and Board Members of the United Brotherhood present, the Chicago Dis- 
trict Council pays tribute to Brother Frank Duffy who on July 31st stepped down as Gen- 
eral Secretary of the Brotherhood after 47 years of loyal and faithful service. 



It's Now or Never 



13 



Because millions of working people failed to go to the polls In 1946, a rabidly reac- 
tionary Congress assumed power. In the 24 months since then, American v^orkers have 
paid dearly for their neglect. Price increases a one have gouged the nation's pay en- 
velopes of some fifty billion dollars. On November 2nd, the workers will have a chance 
to rectify their mistake of 1946. If they take advantage of the opportunity, better days 
are ahead; but if they let the election go by default once more the future will look 
gloomy Iniieed. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems - 



24 
33 
38 
39 
42 
43 



• • • 



Index to Advertisers 



47 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

Learn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you 
that the way to the top-pay jobs and 
success in Building is to get thorough 
knowledge of blue prints, building con- 
struction and estimating. 

In this Chicago Tecli Course, you learn to 
read blue prints — -the universal language of the 
builder — and understand specifications — for all 
types of buildings. 

You learn building construction details : 
foundations, walls, roofs, windows and doors, 
arches, stairs, etc. 

You learn how to lay out work and direct 
building jobs from start to finish. You learn 
to estimate building costs quicljly and accurate- 
ly. Find out how you can pre- 
pare at home for the higher- 
paid jobs in Building, or your 
own successful contracting busi- 
ness. Get the facts about 
this income-boosting Chicago 
Tech training now. 

MAIL COUPON NOW 




Prepare for more pay, greater suc- 
cess. Learn how to lay out and run 
building jobs, how to read blue prints, 
how to estimate building costs. Prac- 
tical training with complete blue print 
plans and specifications — same as used 
by superintendents and contractors. 
Over 44 years of experience in train- 
ing practical builders. 

INCREASE YOUR INCOME 

Hundreds have quickly advanced to fore- 
man, superintendent, inspector, estimator, 
contractor, with this Chicago Tech train- 
ing in Building. Your practical experi- 
ence aids your success. Get the technical 
training you need for promotion and in- 
creased income. 



FREE 



Blue Prints 
and Trial Lesson 



Send today for Trial Lesson: "How to 
Read Blue Prints," and set of Blue Print 
Plans— sent to you Free. See for yourself 
how this Chicago Tech Course prepares 
you to earn more money, gives you the 
thorough knowledge of Building required 
for the higher-up jobs and higher pay. 
Don't delay. Mail the coupon today in an 
envelope or use a penny postcard. 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Chicago Technical College 

N-120 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 16, 111. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read Blue Prints" 
with information about how I can train at home. 

Name Age 

Address Occupation 

City Zone State 



L. 



SHARP'S Automatic framing Square 

NOW ONLY 



'bO 



:^: 



i^^- 



iss^ 



v3- 



S- 



9K^ 



C? ENLARGED 
SECTION 
Rafter Table 



Q 



Volume Production Brings New Low Price! 



One Setting gives you the mart(ing 
for botli Plumb Cut and Mitre Cut 



Blade gives 

marking for 

Plumb Cut o-f 

Common and 

Hjp Rafter. 





Bevel Bar 

automatically 

adjusts itself 

for all 

Mitre Cuts on 

Hip, Valley 

or Jack Rafters. 




THOUSANDS WERE SOLD AT $12.95 

NOW YOU CAN GET THE SAVINGS 

Why struggle with rafter tables, slide rules 
and bulky squares while figuring roofs when 
you can do a faster and more accurate job with 
Sharp's Automatic Framing Square for only 
$8.95. All you need to know is the width of the 
building and the" pitch of the roof. Just set 
the tool to your pitch and it automatically 
solves every problem and provides direct 
marking pattern for all cuts. Gives exact 
figures for length of rafters. Also gives cuts 
in degrees for power saw work. Opens to _ 
90-degree angle. A sturdy, all-metal tool that 
folds up into one compact unit ... 1 foot long, 
2 inches wide. Fits in pocket easily ... no sharp 
corners to catch on clothing. 

GUARANTEE: If not completely satisfied, return 
tool within 30 days and your money will be refunded. 

t^%K YOUR HARDWARE DEALER 
or write to LLOYD L. CROWLEY 
1880 So. 12th Street, Salem, Oregon 

MANUFACTURER and DISTRIBUTOR 



>^^«9s^^^^ FRAMING SQUARE 




Your Name 
Engraved on the 

WORLD'S FINES