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Full text of "Carpenter"

m MPENTER 

^^ ^ FOUNDED 1881 

^^'"^tW^^" *»' *'"' ""'♦««' Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of Ameri 



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JUARY 1960 1960 FEBRUARY 1960 



1960 OCTOBER 1960 



1960 NOVEMBER 1960 



1960 DECEMBER 1960 I 



YOUR FUTURE'S AT 
STAKE — 



When You Gamble With Safety 




DON^T TAKE CHANCES 



You Can't Beat The Odds 



On Accidents 




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Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



] 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor /Il«M«ESS| 





Carpenters' 


Building, 


222 


E 


Michigan Street, 


Indianapolis 4, 


Indiana >«3J 


jbbS^ 


Established In 1881 
Vol. LXXX— No. 1 








JANUARY, 1960 




One Dollar Per 
Ten Cents a 


Year 
Copy 


o^^*" 



— Contents 



1959 — A Year Of Great Progress 



Despite the current highly anti-union climate, despite passage of the Griffin-Landrum 
Bill, our Brotherhood managed to malce 1959 a year of real progress in the areas 
of yt/aget, organizing, and protecting our jurisdiction, the three bread-and-butter meas- 
uring sticks by which we can really measuro our effectiveness. 

8 

The Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, D. C, provides a notable 
exception to the trend of our times wrhen architecture places little value on beauty, 
permanence or quality construction in the o!d tradition of genuine craftsmanship. 

11 

A review of the growing pains that our nearest northern neighbor has been under- 
going since the end of World War II, and some of the gains hoped for by unions with- 
in the next few years. 

15 

Some statistics on why many of those in the highly competitive field of construction 
contracting go bankrupt. 

19 



Monument To God's Glory, Man's Skill 



Construction Industry In Canada 



Why Contractors Fail 



These Movies Are Yours — Enjoy Them 



Local Unions and Councils that have not booked showings of the many fine films 
produced by our Brotherhood are passing up a good opportunity to educate and in- 
form their members regarding the breadth and scope of our organization's operations. 

22 

National attention has recently been focused on a program between Buffalo's 
District Council and three local employer associations that tests job applicants for 
qualifications for employment on a basis that is fair to everybody. 

32 

The final article in a series dealing with inter-relationship of drug manufacturers, 
pharmacists and doctors, who scratch each other's backs to extract the lost possible 
penny from the consumer in providing modern drugs. 



Buffalo Testing Plan Works Well 



Why Do Drugs Cost So Much? 



• * • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Outdoor Meanderings 

Correspondence 

To Our Ladies 

Craft Problems 

Index to Advertisers 



• * • 



20 
24 
28 
29 
30 
36 
40 
41 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class maU matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8, 1918. 



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1959— A Year Of Great Progress 

• • • 

In any human institution, a solid past is 
the greatest guarantee of a sound future- 
General President M. A. Hutcheson 

THE above words were spoken by General President Hutcheson on the 
occasion of our 75th Anniversary celebration. Appropriate as they were 
at that time, they are even more appropriate right now, as we enter 
the decade of the 60's with all its uncertainties, insecurities and challenges. 

A solid past, indeed, is the fundamental ingredient for a good future. It 
is impossible to erect a sound structure without a solid foundation to build on. 
The better the foundation, the sounder and more solid the structure must be. 

Within the framework of this kind of thinking, it is interesting to assess 
the operations of our Brotherhood during the past year. It goes without say- 
ing that 1959 was not a kind year to 

organized labor. At no time since the fields that really count for working 



turn of the century was labor at- 
tacked on as many fronts as it was 
during 1959. Newspapers, radio and 
TV incessantly blasted the labor 
movement with or without justifica- 
tion. Congressional investigating com- 
mittees leaned over backward to mag- 
nify every isolated union misdeed in- 
to a major scandal. Even the Presi- 
dent of the United States went on 
television to recount the misdeeds of 
a few unions without bothering to 
point out that the overwhelming ma- 
jority of unions have no truck with 
such shenanigans. 

The culmination of all this anti- 
union hysteria was passage of the 
Landrum-Griffin Bill with all its re- 
strictive and punitive provisions. 

Yet in this antagonistic climate our 
Brotherhood made steady progress on 
all fronts, at a time when many un- 
ions were losing ground steadily. A 
roundup of ofiicial figures for the year 
1959 shows that the United Brother- 
hood of Garpenters and Joiners of 
America was leading the parade in 



people. 

Take the matter of wages. Our 
United Brotherhood not only nego- 
tiated the largest wage increase in 
the building trades, but a higher per- 
centage of our members bettered 
their wages than any other trade in 
the construction industry. 

Nearly all building trades agree- 
ments are reopened in the Spring 
months. Spring figures released by 
the Department of Labor show that 
our members increased their wages 
by 11.9 cents per hour as compared 
to 9.9 cents for all the building 
trades. The same figures show that 
79% of our members advanced their 
rates last year as compared to 55 to 
67 per cent for most trades. Here is 
the way a Department of Labor news 
release dated August 3 summarized 
the picture: 

"Hourly wage scales of union build- 
ing trades workers rose an average 
of 3 per cent during the 3 months 
ended July 1, the U. S. Labor De- 
partment's Bureau of Labor Statistics 



T HE C A R P E N T E R 



reported. The gain was greater than 
in the second quarter last year, but 
less than the 3.4 per cent rise in the 
1957 period. 

"Reflecting numerous spring and 
early summer contract reopenings, 
wage increases in the quarter raised 
the average hourly scale 9.9 cents. 
Gains for the individual trades var- 
ied from 4.2 cents for painters to 11.9 
cents for carpenters. The average 
union rate for all building trades 
workers was estimated at $3.50 an 
hour on July 1. 

"Higher scales were reported for 
2 of every 3 construction workers in- 
chided in the Bureau's quarterly sur- 
vey of 7 major building trades in 100 
cities. Rates advanced for 79 per cent 
of the carpenters, 75 per cent of the 
bricklayers, 73 per cent of the build- 
ing laborers, and from 55 to 67 per 
cent of the workers in each of the 
other surveyed trades except paint- 
ers. About 38 per cent of the painters 
had scale increases." 

No figures are as yet available for 
the shop industries covered by our 
Brotherhood, but all indications are 
that our members led the wage pa- 
rade in the industrial branches too. 

From the foregoing it is evident 
that our Brotherhood is not allow- 
ing anti-labor propaganda, Landrum- 
Grifiin, Right-To-Work, or any of the 
other anti-labor drives to interfere 
with our primary purpose— to win for 
our members a fairer share of the 
v» ealth they produce. 

On the jurisdictional front, too, our 
Brotherhood chalked up a commend- 
able record during 1959. Of 411 
cases involving our Brotherhood pre- 
sented to the Joint Board for the 
Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes 
during the first 11 months of 1959, 
we came out on the short end only 
123 times. The record shows that our 



organization presented 204 cases be- 
tween January 1 and November 30. 
Other crafts presented 200, and the 
employers instituted seven. 

An analysis of Joint Board deci- 
sions shows that our Brotherhood 
gained 215 complete victories and 73 
partial victories. In 123 cases we lost 
out to the other trade. 

Jurisdiction is the lifeblood of any 
building trades union. It is the differ- 
ence between working or not work- 
ing for many of our members. With 
the techniques and materials in the 
construction game changing constant- 
ly, the matter of maintaining our tra- 
ditional jiu'isdiction is of utmost im- 
portance. The figures conclusively 
show that our Brotherhood is con- 
sistently doing a good job defending 
the jurisdiction of our members from 
the onslaughts of ambitious trades 
which are constantly pressing to take 
over work that rightfully belongs to 
us. 

In the matter of processing wage 
predeterminations our Brotherhood 
also made 1959 a fruitful year. Dur- 
ing the year, the General Office pro- 
cessed some 35,000 wage predeter- 
minations issued by the Department 
of Labor. Some 5,000 of these were 
found to be incorrect in that the rate 
quoted by the Department of Labor 
did not jibe with the negotiated rate 
in the area involved. These predeter- 
minations were protested to the De- 
partment of Labor and in 90 per cent 
of the cases the necessary upward 
adjustment was made. There is no 
way of measuring the amount of 
wages thus salvaged for our mem- 
bers, but it must run into many, many 
millions. 

Organizing is another activity 
which is of prime concern to union 
members. The existence of non-union 
operations constantly holds back the 



THE CARPENTER 



progress that organized operations 
can make. Consequently, every non- 
union plant that is organized consti- 
tutes a step forward for the labor 
movement. 

In the field of organizing, our 
Brotherhood made solid progress 
during 1959. The ofiicial figures tell 
the story. NLRB statistics for July, 
August, and September indicate that 
unions won only 57.8% of the elec- 
tions they entered during that period. 
Our Brotherhood's percentage stood 
at 69% for the first 11 months. 

The statistics also show that our 
Brotherhood is among the most active 
unions in initiating NLRB elections. 
In 1958, only one international union 
participated in as many as 220 elec- 
tions during the year. However, pre- 
liminary figures indicate that we will 
reach that plateau during 1959. 

The figures thus prove not only 
that we are initiating more NLRB 
elections than virtually any other un- 



ion, but also that we are winning 
away more than the average number 
of the elections we enter into. In this 
day and age of strongly organized 
anti-unionism, this constitutes real 
achievement. 

In summation, wages, jurisdiction, 
and organizing are the yardsticks by 
which union progress can be meas- 
ured. Applying these yardsticks to the 
activities of our Brotherhood for the 
year 1959 brings out the fact that 
we have moved a long way forward 
in spite of the hostile climate that 
existed. 

If, as General President Hutcheson 
states, a solid past is the greatest 
guarantee of a bright future, we have 
little to fear so long as we maintain 
the impetus and momentum that 
placed us in the vanguard of progres- 
sive unions last year, and stick by the 
sound union principles that served us 
so well for over three-quarters of a 
century. 



ACCIDENT RATE HITS SIX YEAR HIGH 

The all-manufacturing injury-frequency rate for the third quarter of 1959 
was 13.4— the highest since 1953— according to preliminary reports compiled 
by the Labor Department. 

This rate was 14 per cent above the third quarter of 1958, when disabling 
injuries were occurring at the rate of 11.8 per million man-hours worked in 
manufacturing. 

The gradual downward trend in injury-frequency rates in manufacturing 
apparently had run its course by mid-1958. Except for the usual seasonal de- 
cline in November and December, 1958, the monthly rates moved progres- 
sively higher, to reach a peak of 14.4 in August, 1959— the highest rate since 
August, 1953. Though September showed about the usual seasonal decline, 
to 12.9, this rate was still the highest September figure since 1953. 

The July and August increases were more than seasonal, and indicate a 
continuation of the current upward trend in injury rates. 

Despite the general upward trend in injury rates, 8 of the 138 individual 
industries for which data were available recorded decreases of 1 full point or 
more in their averages for the first 9 months of 1959, compared with the same 
months of 1958. 

Increases of 1 full point or more, however, were reported by 74— over half 
—of the industries, and 56 showed little change between 1958 and 1959. 



Monument To God's Glory, Man's Skill 

• • • 

SO rapid is the tempo of change today that architects in some cities 
give consideration to demohtion problems even as they design build- 
ings yet to be erected. It is not uncommon for an architect, even though 
the first batter board has yet to be placed, to run off an extra set of phms 
for the man who will be tearing the structure down 25 or 30 years hence to 
make way for something more elaborate. 

In such a climate, the pride of craftsmanship, the feeling of permanency, 
the touch of immortality that inspired building tradesmen in bygone days is 
absent. Too often these days a building is just a building; it is neither a work 
of art nor an exhibition piece for skills and crafts laboriously mastered and 







Several years ago the Shrine looked like this as building tradesmen translated the archi- 
tects' dreams into marble and stone. 



lovingly passed on from generation 
to generation. 

An outstanding exception is the 
National Shrine of the Immaculate 
Conception in Washington, D. C. 
Since 1919 the firm of Maginnis and 
Walsh has been drawing plans for 
the Shrine. Both Maginnis and Walsh 
are dead but their firm, now Magin- 



nis, Walsh, and Kennedy, is still de- 
signing additions to and refinements 
for the Shrine that may not material- 
ize for generations to come. 

Shortly after the turn of the cen- 
tury, the Catholic Bishops of the Unit- 
ed States decided that a monumental 
church should be raised in honor of 
the National Patroness of the United 



THE CARPENTER 9 

States, The Blessed Mother, Mary. Height of Campanile to top of 

The National Shrine of the Immacu- Cross 329 

late Conception was the fruition of Height of Roof 120 

the Bishops' plan. Height of Dome to top of Cross 237 

A campaign for voluntaiy contribu- Height of Dome, interior meas- 

tions among the Catholics of the urement 159 

United States was undertaken. As Height of Nave, interior meas- 

funds became available, construction urement 100 

was begun. Last month the first con- Diameter of Dome, outside 

struction goal was reached. The measurement 108 

Shrine now stands as one of the con- Diameter of Dome, inside meas- 

struction marvels of our time. A few urement 89 






The 175-foot boom on the crane at left gives 

statistics point up the splendor and 
glory of the Shrine. Here are some 
of them: 

Feet 
Length, outside measurement- _ 459 

Length, inside measurement 399 

Width, outside at Transepts 240 

Width, inside exclusive of 

Porches 180 

Width across Nave, outside 

measurement 157 

Width of Nave 58 



some idea of the magnificence of the Shrine. 



Capacity Seated— approximately 3,000 
Capacity Total _'_6,000 

However, the Shrine is far from 
completed. Eleven more chapels are 
on the drawing board at the present 
time awaiting funds for their comple- 
tion. The east and west walls will be 
torn down when the construction of 
these additional chapels gets under 
way. Six are planned for the west 
side and five for the east. 



10 THE CARPENTER 

Built on the order of ancient Euro- for years to come, the liuilding trades- 

poan cathedrals, the Shrine is of solid men of the Washington, D. C. area 

masonr\-. No structural steel of any will have an opportunity to work on 

kind is' involved. When finished, the ^ structure dedicated to beauty, per- 

roof will be mission tile and the dome manency, and the glory of God. Sons 

•11 1 11 ..1 will follow fathers and fathers will 

\\ili be polvclirome tile. , „ ,„ ., . . .i ,. 

^ ' follow grandfathers m contnbutmg 

As planned at present, the Shrine craftsmanship and skill to a struc- 
will never be completely finished, ture whose glory will last until ma- 
Refinements and additions will be add- sonry and stone have crumbled to 
ed perpetually as funds permit. So dust. 



JOHN L. LEWIS TO RETIRE 

John L. Lewis is stepping down as president of the United Mine Workers. 

The colorful leader of the Miners, a key figure in the meaningful and 
turbulent labor history of this century, announced his plans in a letter to 
UMW members. His successor, under the union constitution will be vice 
president Thomas Kennedy. Lewis will be 80 years old on February 12. 

The beetle-browed head of the Miners has served the union as its presi- 
dent for 40 years. He made an indelible mark in labor history during this 
period. 

"The years have been long and individual burdens oppressive," Lewis 
M'rote the membership through the United Mine Workers Journal. "At first, 
your wages were low, your hours long, your labor perilous, your health dis- 
regarded, your union weak, your fellow citizens and public representatives 
indifferent to your wrongs. 

"Today, because of your fortitude and deep loyalty to your union, your 
waiges are the highest in the land, your working hours the lowest, your safety 
assured, your health more guarded, your old-age protected, your children 
equal in opportunity with their generation, and your union strong with mate- 
rial resources." 

Lewis rose to early prominence working for Samuel Gompers, founding 
president of the AFL, from 1910 to 1916. Later he was assigned to his first 
post in the international office of the UMW as a statistician. 

He became president of the UMW on February 7, 1920. This was the era 
of grim depression for the American coal industry and the coal miners fought 
to hold together their organization with a Lewis-coined slogan: "No back- 
ward step." 

During the 1930's he was the leader and guiding spirit of the CIO and 
pLued a major role in the organization of the steel, rubber and other indus- 
tries. He left the CIO in 1940 and later rejoined the AFL only to disaffiliate. 
In recent years the UMW has been an independent union. 

Kennedy, 62, first joined the UMW in 1900. He was named to the union's 
executive board in 1925 as secretary-treasurer to succeed William Green, who 
became president of the AFL. 

In 1934 he was elected Lieutenant Governor of the State of Pennsylvania. 
In 1947 he was elevated to the UMW vice presidency. 



11 



Construction Industry In Canada 

By John Brewin 

* * • 

CANADA, since the end of the second World War, has undergone the 
growing pains that afflict all adolescents. 
Hit hard by the depression of the 'thirties', Canada was barely more 
than a collection of scattered communities, that produced primary goods for 
her two bigger cousins, the United States and Great Britain. 

The war, far from destroying what economic machinery the country 
had, built and stimulated Canada. In 1945 the nation stood on the threshold 
of an economic and industrial boom unparalleled among her allies. The 
financial, governmental, economic and investing machinery had been geared to 
a wartime economy and the switch to consumer goods kept the country from 
falling back into pre-war stagnation. 

Since 1945, Canadians have "never 
had it so good," in terms of gross 
national wealth and production. 
There has been marked shift of popu- 
lation to the cities that has provided 
the new secondary industries with la- 
bor and consumers. 

This whole trend is clearly evident 
in the construction industry. Cana- 
dians have invested heavily in resi- 
dential and non-residential capital 
goods, while American investors too 
have played a major part in this in- 
dustrial and capital growth. 

Let the figures tell the story: 

Construction Expenditures 1951 

Residential 

New Construction $ 947,000,000 

Repair and Maintenance $ 221,000,000 
Non-Residential 

New Construction $1,924,000,000 

Repair and Maintenance $ 717,000,000 

Total $3,809,000,000 




The timber wealth of Canada is tremendous 
and its full potential is yet to be developed. 



1958 

$1,782,000,000 
$ 289,000,000 

$4,174,000,000 
$ 868,000,000 

$7,113,000,000 



New construction has more than years of prosperity, Canadians have 

doubled in seven short years. And been told by their economic sooth- 

whereas Pharaoh in Biblical days sayers that the present trend will 

faced seven lean years after the seven more or less continue, barring, of 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



course, an atomic war or the gross 
mismanagement of our economy by 
governments and big business. 

The recent Royal Commission on 
Canada's economic prospects, popu- 
larly known as the Gordon Commis- 
sion, has predicted an investment of 
$43.7 billion in housing alone during 
the next 25 years. 

But let's deal with the future later. 
What has been happening, more spe- 
cifically, in recent years? 



only a small number of contractors 
and construction workers with any 
substantial experience in house build- 
ing. Building materials were also in 
short supply. 

To this alarming situation, there 
soon was added another problem. 
Marriages and births far exceeded ex- 
pectations in the early postwar years 
and there was heavy immigration. 

The housing industry did have 
some clear advantages. There was no 



•'•Ml';' 



,^1 ^ 1'. - -^A-^ 




Canadian cities are growing by leaps and bounds. Montreal, shown above, rates as one of the 
world's 10 greatest. 



Housing has been an important sec- 
tor of the construction industry since 
the war. Nearly 1.3 million housing 
units were completed between 1945 
and 1958, averaging 100,000 units a 
year. 

At the end of the war, Canada's 
housing stock was in short supply. 
Its growth had been impeded by the 
depression, and the war and the de- 
mands on the existing supply of 
houses were intensified by the return 
of the veterans. Moreover, there were 



shortage of land, or mortgage money. 
The National Housing Act, first passed 
in 1944, enabled lenders to find a 
market for investment funds and en- 
abled many families to get mortgages 
at relatively low rates of interest. 

As a result, the past decade has 
seen an expansion of Canada's con- 
struction unlike anything that went 
before— and it has covered all types of 
construction and building. The fu- 
ture, too, offers great potential. 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



There will probably be a continu- 
ing need for construction of all types. 
Certainly the housing shortage is far 
from solved and population experts 
say the wartime boom in marriages 
will soon be felt in terms of second 
generation families. University enroll- 
ments will double in the next ten 
years and that means there will be 
an equivalent boom in family forma- 
tions. Immigration shows no sign of 
slackening off and obsolescence (10 
per cent of Canadian homes were 



ning wide support for their demands 
that low-rental housing be given a 
priority and, after years of shilly- 
shallying, action in this field may be 
forthcoming. 

Non-housing construction, too, gives 
no indication of falling off. The Gor- 
don Commission predicts that $47.5 
billion will be invested in that sector 
of the economy in the next 25 years 
as companies and corporations reap 
the profits of their investments in the 
past 15 years. 





A vast road building program is opening up wilderness areas rich in natural resources of all 
kinds. 



built before 1880) will produce new 
housing needs. 

There is a further demand for sin- 
gle family dwellings as more and more 
Canadian workers move into income 
brackets that can afford the homes 
which the construction industry has 
been building. 

Finally, low-cost and low-rental 
housing, almost completely neglected 
in the past, may finally receive the 
attention of both public and private 
groups in the next decade. Labor, 
church and welfare groups are win- 



Yet despite the glowing prospects, 
many clouds loom on the horizon that 
must be solved if the potential is to 
be fulfilled. 

The whole picture, of course, would 
be changed if Canada and the rest 
of the world became involved in a 
catastrophic world war. Canadians of 
all walks of life, including the con- 
struction trades, must do what they 
can to avoid this. 

Also, a major economic dislocation 
would shatter the dreams outlined by 
the Gordon Commission. Mismanage- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



ment of the economy either l^y the 
!^o\'ernment or by big business would 
Ining the construction industry down 
with CA'erything else. 

Some problems are particularly 
pressing in the industry itself: 

Tight money. High interest rates 
have slowed down demand in 1959 
with the result that housing starts 
are behind 1958. The government is 
trying to balance the budget and has 
cut off mortgage money for the re- 
mainder of the year, thereby cut- 
ting off virtually the only source of 
money available. Unless this problem 
is solved now it will continue to 
plague the industry. Lack of money 
wjir effectively put the lid on demand 
and will curtail or retard expansion. 

Winter construction. Canada's cli- 
mate (many parts of the country 
donl see the sunny side of 32 degrees 
above zero for three months each 
winter) makes construction difficult. 
Lately, the industry in co-operation 
with federal and provincial govern- 
ments and with building trades unions 
have attempted to tackle the problem 
with some success. 

Shortage of land. It is hard to visu- 
alize Canada short of land, but on 
consideration it is clear that serviced 
and serviceable land around urban 



centres is hard to come by these days. 
The industry has been working on a 
surplus of available land in the past 
and has not faced the problem before. 
There is the further complication that 
speculators have pushed up land 
prices beyond reason. 

Influencial pressure groups demand 
a shortage. Real estate operators in 
most municipalities here are in the 
driver's seat and don't mind keeping 
the supply down. As a result local 
government particularly is slow to im- 
plement low-rental measures for ex- 
ample. Nor are major governments 
free from pressures to limit the money 
supply for construction. 

From the unions' point of view the 
chief task of the next few years lies 
in joining with other grovips to avoid 
the pitfalls listed above and to see 
that the fruits of the boom in con- 
struction Canadians so confidently ex- 
pect are shared fairly with those who 
do the work. 

In the past the construction worker 
often couldn't afford the houses he 
helped to build. The land speculators 
and the real estate operators, along 
with the large contractors were the 
chief beneficiaries. Perhaps a worth- 
while goal would be a prosperity 
more evenly divided among all con- 
cerned. 



HIGH INTEREST RATES TO HURT HOUSING IN 1960 

High interest rates brought on by the Administration's tight money policies 
will cut private housing starts by 10 to 12 per cent in 1960, the National Asso- 
ciation of Home Builders predicted. 

The builders association said the expectation is that funds for FHA and 
VA mortgages will dry up in light of the higher interest rates for government 
securities and other investments. 

The builders' prediction came as the U. S. Treasury accepted bids for its 
issue of $1.2 billion of 91-day bills at an average interest rate of 4.638 per cent, 
a new record for this type of issue. 

The tight money policy was reflected also in an announcement by the 
Bankers Trust Co. of New York which declared a 100 per cent stock dividend 
and increased the quarterly dividend on current stock. 



15 



Why Contractors Fail 

• • 

TO a large degree, contracting in the construction field is a dog-eat- 
dog business. The strong prosper and the weak and inefficient go 
down the drain sooner or later. That is what makes contracting a 
rugged game. It also is what makes contract construction the cheapest and 
fastest method yet devised. 

A recent survey by Dun and Bradstreet, pace setter in the field of business 
statistics, sheds some interesting light on failures in the contracting business. 
Some 2,162 contractors went to the wall in 1958. They wound up owing a 
total of $115,115,000 to creditors. During the first nine months of 1959, the 
failure rate was running somewhat 



lower than the 1958 pace. However, 
about 40 firms a week were throwing 
in the sponge anyway. 

Carpentry, apparently, is one of the 
more stable fields in the contracting 
game. Only 37 carpentry contractors 
were involved in the 1,551 firms that 
failed during the first nine months of 
this year. By way of contrast, 261 
were heating, plumbing and air con- 
ditioning contractors. General con- 
tractors accounted for 540 of the fail- 
ures between January and October. 
Some 86 were excavation and foun- 
dation contractors, 76 were electrical, 
and 87 roofing and sheet metal. 

Analyzing the reasons for the 2,162 
failures in 1958, Dun and Bradstreet 
found that incompetence was respon- 
sible for the greatest number of fail- 
ures. Inexperience was the second 
greatest cause of business breakdowns. 
Inadequate sales forced a great many 
firms to boards. Unrealistic bookkeep- 
ing procedures took a heavy toll, too. 
Competitive weakness and inability 
to keep inventories properly adjusted 
also tripped up many. 

In this day and age when admin- 
istered prices and fair trade agree- 
ments keep prices artificially high in 
many industries, construction con- 



tracting is still a fiercely competitive 
game. There are no guaranteed prof- 
its or fixed over-ride. Each job is a 
make-or-break proposition. 

Though strikes and labor troubles 
are often pictured as a major cause 
of business failures. Dun and Brad- 
street's figures show that only one- 
tenth of one per cent of the failures 
in construction during 1958 stemmed 
from strikes. 

If any conclusions can be drawn 
from the statistics developed by Dun 
and Bradstreet, it is that contracting 
is a highly competitive game that re- 
quires well rounded experience in all 
phases of business— not just the pro- 
duction end. Proper financing ar- 
rangements, tight bookkeeping pro- 
cedures and efficient inventory con- 
trols are musts. The most efficient 
builder in the world can easily go 
broke if leaks in the office end eat 
away the profits earned on the job 
site. 

The following three tables com- 
piled by Dun and Bradstreet tell the 
whole story in a few simple figures. 
Members dreaming of the day when 
they can branch out for themselves 
would do well to study them care- 
fully. 



16 T IT E C A R P E N T E R 

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION FAILURES 
1934-1958 

Year Number Liabilities 

1934 826 $ 26,341,000 

1935 686 22,151,000 

1936 507 28,228,000 

1937 584 11,625,000 

1938 625 10,081,000 

1939 646 11,031,000 

1940 760 13,311,000 

1941 701 10,671,000 

1942 748 10,232,000 

1943 S99 5,455,000 

1944 164 2,376,000 

1945 92 3,559,000 

1946 139 4,340,000 

1947 239 7,211,000 

1948 439 15,609,000 

1949 838 27,245,000 

1950 912 25,851,000 

1951 957 37,473 000 

1952 838 36,145,000 

1953 1,024 43,327,000 

1954 1,305 56,829,009 

1955 1,404 83,179,000 

1956 1,834 100,803,000 

1957 2,105 110,312,000 

1958 2,162 115,115,000 

Source: Business Economics Department, Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. 

This record includes those businesses that ceased operations following 
assignment or bankruptcy; ceased with loss to creditors after such actions as 
executions, foreclosure or attachment; voluntarily withdrew leaving unpaid 
obligations; were involved in court actions such as receivership, reorganiza- 
tion or arrangement; or voluntarily compromised with creditors. 



THECARPENTER 17 

CONSTRUCTION FAILURES IN THE UNITED STATES 
January to September, 1959 vs. January to September, 1958 

First 9 Months, 1959 First 9 Months, 1958 
Line of Construction Number Liabilities Number Liabilities 

(000) (000) 

General Building Contractors 540 $51,130 654 $47,207 

Building Sub-Contractors 889 32,272 890 31,256 

Heating, Plumbing, Air Conditioning 261 8,505 280 9,092 

Painting & Papering 73 1,624 57 1,054 

Electrical 76 2,923 94 4,764 

Masonry & Stone Work 47 1,697 45 1,733 

Plastering & Lathing 26 1,288 22 566 

Terrazzo & Tile, etc 19 484 19 415 

Carpentering 37 1,097 40 701 

Flooring 37 613 30 526 

Roofing & Sheet Metal 87 2,223 88 2,913 

Concreting 33 1,596 48 1,280 

General Building Maintenance 9 165 14 177 

Structural Steel Erection 16 1,365 11 819 

Ornamental Iron & Steel Work 7 194 4 60 

Glass & Glazing 13 477 17 1,055 

Excavation & Foundation 86 6,141 52 2,695 

Wrecking & Moving 11 396 9 651 

Installing of Machinery & Equipment. 3 372 14 461 

Miscellaneous 48 1,112 46 2,294 

Other Contractors 122 8,760 90 10,340 

Highway & Street 67 6,134 32 5,958 

Heavy Construction (Sewers, Dams, 
Water Mains, etc.) 24 1,512 22 2,077 

Marine Construction 3 155 2 356 

Water Wells 4 165 10 244 

Miscellaneous 24 794 24 1,705 

Total Construction 1,551 $92,162 1,634 $88,803 

Source: Business Economics Department, Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. 

This record includes those businesses that ceased operations following 
assignment or bankruptcy; ceased with loss to creditors after such actions 
as executions, foreclosure or attachment; voluntarily withdrew leaving un- 
paid obligations; were involved in court actions such as receivership, reorgan- 
ization or arrangement; or voluntarily compromised with creditors. 



18 



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19 



These Movies Are Yours— Enjoy Them 

• 

Over the past 10 years our Brotherhood has completed a series of instruc- 
tive and entertaining movies showing various phases o£ our operations. No 
member can truly appreciate the breadth and scope of our Brotherhood until 
he has seen these films. 

These films are yours to use and enjoy. Any of them may be booked for a 
showing by making arrangements with General Secretary Richard E. Living- 
ston, 222 E. Michigan St., Indianapolis 4, Ind. Why not set up a program for 
showing a film a month this year? 

While these movies are particularly designed to enlighten our own mem- 
bers as to the variety of skills and know-how our members must possess to 
meet the demands of an ever-changing age, they are ideally suited for show- 
ing at lodge meetings, PTA's, and especially at high school Career Days. They 
make excellent good will ambassadors for the labor movement in general 
and our Brotherhood in particular. Here is a list of films available from the 
General Office: 



THE CARPENTER. A dramatic 54-minute 
film showing the many types of work per- 
formed by our members from the woods to 
the finished structure. Should be seen by 
every member. 

BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION. A 23-minute 
film featuring the many phases of work 
Brotherhood members carry on under and 
above water in the construction of bridges 
and piers. 

PORCELAIN ENAMEL PANELS. A 24- 

minute film graphically showing the uses 
of this type of material in both new and 
remodeling work. 

SLIP FORM CONSTRUCTION. A short 
but complete course in this type of con- 
struction. 

FLOOR COVERINGS. This short film cov- 
ers the work of floor laying from A to Z, 
whether hardwood, tile, or carpeting is in- 
volved. 



THE CARPENTERS HOME. A 25-minute 
film showing the Home for Aged Members 
at Lakeland, Florida in operation, providing 
the kind of care that makes it a model 
institution of its kind. 

ACOUSTICAL INSTALLATIONS. A film 
that shows acoustical application in its many 
forms, and the skills that our members dis- 
play in making such applications, 

HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION. This film 
outlines the many types of work done by 
Brotherhood members in the construction 
of modem highways. 

BOWLING ALLEYS. Bowling alleys have 
been springing up like mushrooms all over 
the nation. This 20-minute film shows all 
the detailed work involved in erecting a 
bowling alley— from laying the alleys to 
assembling automatic pin spotters. 

LIFT-SLAB CONSTRUCTION. A pictorial 
summation of this dramatic new method of 
construction. 



Films are booked on a first come, first served, basis. Be sure to request 
films well in advance to insure getting the date you desire. All films are 16 
mm in color and sound. 



p 




LANE U OSS IP 



THERE'S NO WINNING 

When the L a ndruni- Griffin Bill was 
passed, someone dubbed it "a full employ- 
ment bill for lawyers." Subsequent events 
are proving that evaluation to be more 
truth than poetry. Dozens of petty suits 
against unions are being filed all over the 
eountr\^ on the flimsiest grounds. From ehas- 
ing ambulances, the shysters are switching 
to chasing union members who think they 
have a grievance. Under Landrum-Griffin, 
with its confusing, ambiguous language, 
fast-buck lawyers can conjure up a case out 
of almost anything. In fact, the law even 
tells them how in some instances. 

Reminds us of the farm girl who was 
walking down a country lane with a boy 
\\ho had a pail in one hand, a cane in the 
other, a chicken under one arm, and a goat 
on the end of a piece of rope. As they 
came to a woods, the girl said, "I'm not go- 
ing into the woods with you. You might 
try to kiss me." 

"With a pail, a cane, a chicken and a 
goat? How in the world could I?" 

"Well," replied the girl, "you might push 
the cane in the ground, tie the goat to the 
cane and put the chicken under the pail." 




"Here's another one, Ed! Now 
stop me if you've heard this 
one—'' 



TOO MANY BRANDS 

A Kansas woman tells of going to the 
city to attend a cattlemen's convention. 
She made up her mind she would have 
something unusual to wear on the trip, so 
she made herself a blouse and embroidered 
it with every cattle brand she knew of. 

In the hotel where the cattle folks were 
staying, she waited while her husband reg- 
istered, and noticed two old cattlemen 
really giving her blouse the once-over. Fin- 
ally one of them remarked in a voice that 
could be heard way up the canyon: "That 
critter sure has changed hands a lot, ain't 
she?" 

* * • 

ONE WAY OF LOOKING AT IT 

A medical researcher finds that cheerful 
people resist disease better than surly ones, 
and they recuperate more quickly in case 
they do get sick. 

In other words, "the surly bird catches 
the germ." 

• * • 

WE KNOW WHAT THE KNOGKING IS 

In an effort to create a better climate of 
understanding between labor and manage- 
ment, the AFL-CIO has suggested a "sum- 
mit meeting" between the top echelons of 
the two groups. The Secretary of Labor has 
endorsed the idea. However, the U. S. 
Ghamber of Commerce has shown little en- 
thusiasm for such a meeting up to now. 
NAM wants to dictate in advance the terms 
under which it will meet. 

If tlie project falls through because of 
the bullheadedness of some employer 
groups, a fine opportunity to build a more 
effective framework of collective bargaining 
will be lost. 

This gives us an opportunity to tell about 
the college girl who was out riding with 
her boy friend. As they were driving 
through a lonely stretch of road, the car 
developed a loud knock. 

"I wonder what that knocking is?" the 
boy asked. 

"I'm sure I don't know," replied the girl, 
"but I can tell you one thing. It ain't 
opportunity." 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



UP AND AT EM 

With elections only a few months off, 
labor faces the difficult task of trying to 
pick reliable candidates to back. This is not 
an easy thing to do because it is difficiolt 
to find a man who thinks right on all issues. 

However, passage of the Landrum-Griffin 
Bill made the task much easier insofar as 
the incumbents are concerned. Those who 
voted against it are our friends; those who 
voted for it, our enemies. This makes us 
something like the recruit at bayonet drill. 

It was an extremely hot day, and the 
sergeant in charge of bayonet drill was try- 
ing hard to get his listless men to attack 
the stuffed dummies with more energy. 
Finally he halted the drill and said, "Listen 
men, those dummies are the enemy. They 
have burned your house and killed your 
parents. They carried away your sisters, stole 
all your money and drank up all of the 
whisky in the house." 

The sergeant then stepped back and mo- 
tioned the recruits forward toward the row 
of dummies. The line surged ahead with 
new purpose. The men with grim looks on 
their faces showed eagerness to attack. One 
recruit, his eyes stern and his lips drawn 
back over his teeth in a snarl, paused to 
ask: "Sergeant, which one drank that 
whisky?" 

• * • 

AFTER CHRISTMAS THOUGHT 

No wonder Santa's fat and jolly, 

It's me that pays the bills, by golly. 

• * • 

EVERYONE HAS A TALENT 

God gave each of us special talents. Who 
is to say any are superior? All contribute 
to the general good according to their gifts. 
In the sight of Him we are all equal! The 
proud and pompous need but remind them- 
selves that Jesus was a carpenter. Moham- 
med was a shepherd, and Moses was a 
keeper of the flocks. The skill of each of us 
is of importance to all of us. Let him who 
looks down upon the farmer try to grow 
his own food, or him who snubs the car- 
penter try to build his own shelter, or him 
who derides the tailor try to make his own 
clothes, or him who belittles the laundress 
try to iron his own shirts. Then he would 
acquire respect for all God's children and 
admiration and appreciation for the special 
contribution each makes to our way of life. 
—Millard Cass, Deputy Under Secretary of 
Labor. 



GOOD QUESTION 

The current Congressional investigation 
of the drug manufacturing industry is pro- 
ducing some mighty interesting drama as 
manufacturers, druggists, wholesalers, etc. 
try to blame each other for the fact 
that a bottle of pills that cost 30c to make 
sometimes nicks the consumer as much 
as $15.00. Everybody is a great, unselfish 
benefactor of the human race, but "the 
other guy" is the chiseler who makes drugs 
cost so much. 

Somehow or other the situation re- 
minds us of the old one about the doctor 
who was walking home from church with 
his wife when a slinky chick with painted 
eyebrows and skin-tight dress gave him a 
big smile and a throaty "hello." 

"Who was that?" enquired the wife. 

"Oh, just a girl I met professionally." 

"Yours or hers?" asked the wife acidly. 

• • • 

THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

If you don't think this is a funny world, 
consider the following item as reported in 
LABOR: 

Civil War?— In Memphis, Tenn., Ulysses 
S. Grant was fined $11 for drunkenness 
after a lawyer named Robert E. Lee re- 
fused to defend him. Explaining the turn- 
down, attorney Lee commented. "What 
would people here say if I lost the case?" 



519 




"I'm new here. Where do I 
hide when I'm caughl up 
with my work?" 



Buffalo Testing Plan Works Well 

By Al Spincller 
(reprinted from the Buffalo Courier-Express) 

* * 

A SECTION of the collective bargaining agreement between Buffalo's 
Carpenters District Council and three local employer associations has 
been attracting national attention in recent months. 
The part of the agreement which has aroused the interest of employer 
groups and unions in the construction field spells out a program for testing 
the qualifications of men applying for jobs as carpenters. 

It's a plan designed to certify qualified carpenters for employment and 
weed out the unskilled job applicants. 

Roger R. Logan, executive vice president of the Construction Industry 
Emplo)'ers Association, and President Herman F. Bodewes of the Carpenters 
District Council, say it is the first 



program of its type in the country. 

That's why they've been getting 
enquiries from many parts of the 
United States seeking details of the 
agreement and how it works. 

The plan is an outgrowth of the 
1958 contract negotiations between 
the union and the CIEA, the Niagara 
Home Builders Association and the 
Lumber Mill Owners Association. 

Its purpose, as stated in the agree- 
ment, is "to enable the employer to 
secure at all times sufficient forces of 
skilled workmen, to eliminate uneco- 
nomical employment practices occa- 
sioned by the hire of unskilled men 
and to preserve classifications of the 
various skills of the carpentry craft." 

A Joint Policy and Qualification 
Board, consisting of an equal number 
of employer and union representa- 
ti\es, was created to guide the over- 
all administration of the program. 

Several panels, also with joint la- 
bor-management representation, test 
the job applicants in the residential, 
commercial and mill fields to deter- 
mine if they are qualified for their 
specialty. If the man passes the test, 
he's considered a skilled craftsman 
and is certified for employment. 



Those who fail the first test are 
entitled to a re-examination within 
30 days. If they fail that one too, they 
have the right to appeal the decision 
to an appeal board headed by Dr. 
Ernest Notar, dean of Erie County 
Technical Institute. 

More than 70 job applicants have 
been tested in the seven months the 
program has been in effect. Half 
of them have passed the examination 
and were certified as qualified car- 
penters. The other 50 per cent 
failed and were denied employment 
as carpenters. And in every case taken 
to the appeal board, the findings of 
the panels have been upheld. 

Union membership or the lack of 
it has no bearing on deciding whether 
a man is a qualified carpenter, Bo- 
dewes said. 

"The panels determine each case 
strictly on the basis of what the ap- 
plicant knows about his craft," he ex- 
plained. 

Bodewes believes the qualifying 
system will increase the importance 
of the joint union-employer appren- 
ticeship program, which requires 
young men to study night courses at 



THECARPENTER 23 

ECTI in addition to the practical plained. "If the employers don't get 

training they get on the job. top workers, they are not getting 

He points out that if a man were ^hat they should for their money." 

able to get a job as a carpenter with- This, he said, would be detrimen- 

out adequate training, it would un- tal to the industry and in the long 

dermine the apprenticeship program. run would have an adverse effect 

,„,^ , , , - „ , upon the union and its members. 

Wed have dithculty convmcmg a \ i . i t, i 

boy he should serve four years of %- Logan agreed with Bodewes com- 

prenticeship at reduced wages and ^ents. We have long felt the need 

study at night if he could earn jour- ^°^ ^ ^ona fide method of passmg 

neyman wages without that training," "P°^ l^^ qualifications of employes 

he noted ^ establishing basic qualm- 
cations of skilled craftsmen upon 

Furthermore, Bodewes believes, whom our industry must depend for 
the qualifying plan will assure the efficient construction," he said, 
employers of workmen who are skill- ^j^^ employers' representative he- 
ed m the craft of carpentry. j-^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ program will raise the 

"They are paying top rates and are standards of carpenter craftsmen in 

entitled to skilled workers," he ex- this area. 



HIGHBROW JURISDICTION 

Oxford University's governing body has come up with a beauty of a 
jurisdictional dispute. 

It is debating whether to permit Jews to teach Hebrew at the university. 
Since 1630 only a Church of England clergyman has occupied the chair. It's 
suggested that the post be opened to others. "This is the thin edge of the 
wedge," one professor said. "They will be getting Greeks to teach Greek next." 



IN A BIKINI, WE HOPE 

Hot Diggety, Men, Marilyn Monroe may be walking the picket line next month! 

Some of the most famous men and women in the world may go on strike January 30. 

On that date the current contract between the AFL-CIO Screen Actors Guild and 
the Association of Motion Picture Producers expires, and so far there are no signs the 
industry is willing to compromise on its firm opposition to a basic demand by the actors. 

The Guild wants a formula for paying actors a share of the profits made by the 
movie moguls if and when they sell movies for use on television. This is the key issue, 
although the Guild is also seeking health and pension programs and other contract im- 
provements. 

The strike, if it comes, could have world-wide implications because several producers 
have threatened to take all their production to foreign countries. 

The union is preparing to meet this threat by working with the International Con- 
federation of Free Trade Unions to set up an entertainment industry council composed 
of unions throughout the world, and one aim of the SAG would be to get the cooperation 
of other actors in other countries to refuse to act as "scab labor." 

The actors want payment for movies made after August, 1948, and sold to TV. 

The present contract permits the actors to strike if any firm now sells movies to TV 
without first agreeing to pay their actors for performances in such movies. 

Several deals for post- 1948 films have already been made, but the employer associa- 
tion is resisting any move to make these arrangements formally wdth the Guild. 

The Screen Writers Guild of America is already on strike against independent motion 
picture studios over the same issue. 



Editorial 




The Housewife Has Her Own Yardstick 

It is no secret to any housewife that the cost of Hving is cHmbing con- 
stantly. She needs no government statistics to tell her so. Her efforts to feed 
and clothe the family on the old paycheck prove it every week at the grocery 
or clothing store as the struggle gets harder and harder. 

Uncle Sam tells her that the cost of living rose 3.6 points between De- 
cember, 1957, and September, 1959. But she figures it in how many fewer 
quarts of milk or pairs of sox the paycheck will buy, and comes up with the 
same answer. 

The 3.6 figure issued by the government is not nearly as reliable a conclu- 
sion as that arrived at by the harried housewife. The Bureau of Labor Statistics 
makes a heroic effort to make its consumer price index a realistic one, but 
in spite of all it can do its index fits very few actual cases. A drop in the price 
of carpets or water heaters doesn't mean much to most families, but a 
change in the price of canned peas or work shirts means a great deal. 

Industry, of course, is making an all-out effort to pin the blame for infla- 
tion on wages. However, a study of the consumer price index shows some 
\'erv definite indications that administered prices are the real culprit. "Admin- 
istered prices" is a new term that has come into use to describe those prices 
that are fixed by undercover agreement between competitors in the same field. 
This sort of thing is illegal under the anti-trust laws, but apparently it goes on 
all tlie time in industries where a few firms dominate the field and have the 
capacity to hold prices regardless of demand. 

In the 1958 recession, despite a shrinking demand in many lines of goods, 
prices stayed up and, in some instances, even increased in defiance of all laws 
of supply and demand. Administered rather than competitive prices must be 
the answer. 

A check of the 1957-1959 consumer price index uncovers some significant 
paradoxes. Wages, generally speaking, have advanced pretty uniformly 
throughout all industries during the past two years. Yet in some lines prices 
have actually decreased while in others they have climbed drastically. 

For example, in fabrics, where a competitive battle is going on between 
natural and synthetic fibers, prices dropped between 1957 and 1959. Wool 
blankets that rated 126.7 points on the index in 1957 dropped to 122.4 by 1959. 
Wool Axminister rugs slid from 156.9 to 151.7. 

By way of contrast, the price of private cars CLIMBED from 128.6 to 
135.3 in the two year period. Street shoes jumped from 131.5 to 138.5. 

However, it was in the field of medical care that the greatest increases 
showed up. All medical care skyrocketed from 140.8 to 152.2. Hospital care 
jumped from 193.5 to 210.4 Dentists' fees scrambled up nearly seven points— 
from 128.6 to 135.1. Needless to say, the medical profession has the closest 
thing to a monopoly that exists in the nation today. 



TTIECARPENTER 25 

Another thing the figures point up is that the members of our organization 
are not culprits in the inflation picture. For example, the index for bedroom 
suftes (a category where our members are employed) DECREASED from 
101.0 to 97.9 in the period. 

In view of these selected items picked out of the consumer price index, it 
is obvious that labor's wages are not the contributing factor to inflation that 
business likes to claim. Working people are the victims rather than the insti- 
gators of inflation. And nobody knows it better than the housewife struggling 
to make the paycheck do the essential job. 



We Need Our Own Summit Meeting 

It is too bad that the National Association of Manufacturers and the U. S. 
Chamber of Commerce cannot see the value of a summit meeting between 
labor and management, as recently proposed by the AFL-CIO. Such a meet- 
ing is desperately needed. Relations between industry as a whole and organ- 
ized labor have never been more strained. The steel strike, the pending 
battle on the railroads, passage of the Landrum-Grifiin Bill, all contributed 
something to development of the current hostile climate that exists in labor 
relations. 

A top echelon meeting to frame some general rules and principles is needed 
to clear the atmosphere. Such a meeting would hardly solve specific problems, 
but it could provide a vehicle for establishing broad principles of policy and 
procedure. 

To say that such a meeting is unrealistic because chances of success are 
small is evading responsibility. After all, there is little hope that the summit 
meeting President Eisenhower has been working for so desperately will cul- 
minTite in universal and lasting peace. But the administration is pursuing the 
idea doggedly, hopeful that at least better understanding between nations 
will result. If a summit meeting between labor and industry resulted in 
nothing more concrete than better understanding, it would be well worth- 
while. 

The American economic system has reached a rocky place in the road. 
The Russian threat poses a challenge from without that is paramount. Auto- 
mation, taxes, tight money, etc. add up to a domestic roadblock that can spell 
disaster if not properly handled. Both management and labor have a vital 
stake in the answers that are developed. 

Fortunately, the ultimate aim of management and labor is the same- 
preservation of the free enterprise system and progressive economic growth. 
These things can be achieved only if both management and labor are pros- 
perous. There must be balance. But management seems determined to grind 
the labor movement into the dust. Steel is demanding the surrender of all 
forms of job security as the price for industrial peace. The railroads give ever}^ 
indication of following suit when new negotiations fall due this Spring. "Clob- 
ber Labor" seems to be the tlieme song of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce 
and NAM. 

This kind of hostility can only lead to prolonged and costly strife that 
will help no one but the Reds. 



26 THEOARPENTER 

Labor and industry need to face the fact that we are in the midst of an 
era of tremendous industrial and social upheaval. Automation and electronic 
wizardry are making many products and many skills obsolete overnight. There 
is little security for either side in such a situation. The factory manager who 
suddenly finds his plant or product obsolete is as worried as the skilled trades- 
man who wakes up one morning to find his skill outmoded. Both are going 
to fight back as effectively as they can to maintain what they have. 

This makes it mandatory that some new rules be laid down for introducing 
change, Progress cannot be stopped. Nor, indeed, should it be. But there 
ought to be order and gradualism in the process. This is where a summit 
meeting could lay down some broad rules aimed at orderliness in industrial 
change. If the worker knows that the plant will not be uprooted suddenly 
and moved to a distant state without "by your leave" in his direction, he 
can plan his future with some confidence. On the other hand, if management 
can feel that labor will not arbitrarily hamstring essential modernization 
plans unnecessarily, it, too, can plan ahead intelligently. 

A summit meeting cannot evolve a magical formula that will eliminate all 
problems at once. But it can set up a framework of procedure within which 
some of the tensions, fears, and head-butting can be reduced. If the U.S. 
C. of C. and NAM pass up the chance to establish such a framework they 
simply will be breeding scabs on their noses that will cost them dearly in the 
years ahead. 

• 

'Twas Ever Thus 
According to Senator Kefauver, who heads the committee investigating 
the drug business, the drug makers spend $750,000,000 a year courting the 
doctors and cultivating their good will. This, of course, is added to the cost 
of drugs. It averages out to about $5,000 per doctor. Figuring that there are 
somewhere in the neighborhood of 45,000,000 families in the nation, this works 
out to around $16 or $17 per year that the average family must pay unneces- 
sarily for drugs. No wonder that some drug companies charge $15 per gram 
for preparations that cost them 14c to make. 

Some promotional effort on the part of drug companies is justified, of 
course. But an expenditure of $5,000 yearly per doctor is fantastic. Included 
are free junkets to lush summer and winter resorts for the medics and their 
families, free golf tournaments with prizes for practically everybody, ex- 
pensive presents, etc. Naturally, doctors eat up this kind of treatment. In 
return, they prescribe by brand name rather than by the basic drug. Since the 
druggist cannot substitute, the doctor's word is law. The drug companies can 
charge whatever they want for their brand-named drugs so long as doctors 
write prescriptions calling for them rather than the basic drugs involved. 

The drug manufacturers defend their prices by pointing out that they carry 
on considerable research to develop new drugs and improve old ones. Un- 
less this research leads to a new or better product, it is lost money, they 
insist. Up to a point their argument is a valid one. Research is expensive and 
often it pays no dividends when expected results fail to materialize. However, 
the fact remains that the industry spends three or four dollars buttering up 
doctors for every dollar it spends on research. 



THE CARPENTER 27 

However, what really fascinates us is the $750,000,000 figure. There are 
somewhere in the neighborhood of 18,000,000 union members in the United 
States and Canada. If their average union dues are $4.00 per month, or $48 
per year, the total amount they pay into their unions is $720,000,000, or 
$30,000,000 less than the drug companies extract from the general public for 
promotional purposes. 

There is another interesting contrast. If all the conclusions drawn by 
the McClelland Committee regarding pilfering of union treasuries were true 
(and most conclusions were nothing but conjecture and implication), some- 
one once figured out that not more than $10,000,000 over the past 10 years 
would be involved. This, of course, provides no absolution for the chiselers 
in. the labor movement. A single dollar diverted to private gain is a sin. But 
the fact remains that the investigations of labor unions uncovered a maximum 
of $10,000,000 of possible chicanery compared to a $750,000,000 "promotional" 
bite put on the public annually by the drug manufacturers. 

It is interesting further to note that the newspapers, radio, TV, etc. set 
up a furore and a hue and cry that even had the President of the United 
States on the air pleading for "reform" legislation for labor. If there is any 
clamor for similar legislation to regulate the pricing of drugs, it is the quietest 
campaign in history. And we strongly advise that you not hold your breath 
until such a campaign develops. 



HOW DO WE SHOW OUR STRENGTH?? 

By John S. Wyse, Local Union 2172, Santa Ana, Cal. 
Sometimes we hear the complaint that the Union is weak. So often this 
claim is voiced the loudest by some brother who has never done a thing for 
the Union except pay his dues— grudgingly. He never attends Union meetings 
—not even the special ones called for elections or negotiations. He refuses to 
serve as a steward, or committeeman, or officer, or delegate— "Let George 
do it: I'm busy." 

It is not unusual for such a member to come to the hall after he has 
been laid off or fired and complain that he has not been paid scale, or that 
he has been working overtime for straight-time pay, and then state that if 
the Union amounted to anything— why do they allow this? Can the Union 
collect for him? 

But why did this member fail to come in with his check stubs the first 
time he got a below-scale paycheck and file a grievance in writing? 

A close investigation of such cases usually reveals two things. First, he 
was sure that this "private deal" he had with his employer was a way of 
making a "fast buck," and he was certain his employer would keep him as 
long as he did not say anything about the discrepancy. Second, he was among 
those who were telling his coworkers, and the boss too, that the Union was 
weak or no good and interested only in his dues payments with which he 
was usually behind as far as possible! 

Well, Brother, the Union is only as weak or as strong as you are. If you 
fail to abide by the working rules and trade agreements, then what can you 
expect of your brothers, or of your Union because you are THE UNION. 



Official Information 




General 0£Bcers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

FRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 



Second District, RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventh District, LYLE J. HILLER 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Eighth District, J. F. CAMBIANO 
17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fourth District, HENRY W. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
1834 N. 78th St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HUTCHBSON, Chairman ; R. E. LIVINGSTON, Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The Quarterly Circular for the months January, February and March, 
1960, containing the quarterly password, has been forvs^arded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this circular should notify the General Secretary, Carpenters Building, Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana. 

• 

IMPO RTANT NO TICE 

In the issuance of clearance cards, care should be taken to see that they are 
properly filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary 
of the Local Union issuing same as well as the Local Union accepting the clear- 
ance. The clearance cards must be sent to the General Secretary's Department 
without delay, in order that the members' names can be listed on the quarterly 
account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained therein 
must be used. 



Jin M^ttntfxisctn 



Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more. 



S^Bt itt P^ar^ 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



ACKERMAN, NELS, L. U. 434, Chicago, 111. 

ARNOLD, HOMER, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

ARROWSMITH, GUY, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

BARR, JOSEPH, L. U. 1167, Smithtown, N. Y. 

BARSCHEWSKI, STANLEY, L. U. IS, Hack- 
ensack, N. J. 

BECKER, JAMES F., L. U. 2131, PottsviHe, Pa. 

BETTIS, ORA H., L. U. 769, Pasadena, Cal. 

BOGART, WILLIAM C, L. U. 19, Detroit, 
Mich. 

BOLDEBUCK, OTTO M., L. U. 558, Elmhurst, 
111. 

CALAHAN, ROY, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

CHAMPAGNE, RAY, L. U. 2396, Seattle, Wash. 

CHAUNCEY, WILLIAM, L. U. 2396, Seattle, 
Wash. 

CHURKA, WENDELL, L. U. 2164, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

CLEMONS, HANNIBAL C, L. U. 101, Balti- 
more, Md. 

COUTTS, ALLAN, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 

CRONK, EMERSON L., L. U. 982, Detroit, 
Mich. 

CRUEA, CURTIS W., L. U. 592, Muncie, Ind. 

CURTIS, ROBERT J., L. U. 169, East St. Louis, 
111. 

DEATON, ROBERT L., L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 

DELO, MERLE, L. U. 2396, Seatt'e, Wash. 

DERRICOTT, EARL, L. U. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 

DUBREE, HOLLIS, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

EADLER, EVERETT, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

FELTON, ROBERT, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 

FEW, ROSWELL, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

FISHER, EMANUEL, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

GAGNIER, CHARLES, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 

GARD, EUGENE, L. U. 434, Chicago, 111. 

GARDNER, CHARLES, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

GARDNER, ESPIE, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

GIDLUND, EDWIN, L. U. 1394, Ft. Lauder- 
dale, Fla. 

GORDON, HENRY, L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 

GUTHRIE, LEE, L. U. 1786, Chicago, III. 

HALL, S. v., L. U. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 

HAMMON, ADOLPH, L. U. 2396, Seattle, 
Vi/ash. 

HANTELMAN, EMIL A., L. U. 937, Dubuque, 
Iowa 

HELLSTERN, WILLlAM T., L. U. 1849, Pasco, 
Wash. 

HERDEL, CHARLES, L. U. 1296, San Diego, 
Cal. 

HILLELSON, PHILIP, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 

HIMES, DAN Sr., L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

HOFFERBER, CHARLES R., L. U. 1938, Crown 
Point, Ind. 

HURST, SOD, L. U. 841, Carbondale, 111. 

IVANOFF, JOHN, L. U. 982, Detroit, Mich. 

JENSEN, VICTOR T., L. U. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 

KLUMP, FRED, L. U. 440, Buffalo, N. Y. 

KREITZER, IRVIN, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

LANE, ALFRED B., L. U. 2396, Seattle, Wash. 

LEWIS, JOHN H., L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 

MARSHALL, RAYMOND, L. U. 104, Dayton, 
Ohio 



McGINNIS, HOWARD L., L. U. 2396, Seattle, 

Wash. 
McKINLEY, T. H., L. U. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 
McNEAL, GEORGE, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 
MERCER, CHARLES, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
NUMMER, JOHN C, L. U. 19, Detroit, M'xh. 
OHLUND, FRANK, L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 
OLSON, LEO, L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 
OSTERLUND, EMIL, L. U. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 
PAAGANEN, JOHN, L. U. 366, New York, 

N. Y. 
PASTOREK, STEVE, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 
PEDERSON, ANDREW, L. U. 188, Yonkers, 

N. Y. 
PHILIPS, LYLE, L. U. 2396, Seattle, Wash. 
POLIVICK, JOHN, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 
POSEY, CLINE, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 
QUISENBERRY, CLARENCE, L. U. 162, San 

Mateo, Cal. 
RANDALL, C. J., L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 
REED, IRVEN, L. U. 169, East St. Louis, IH. 
RICHISON, GUY E., L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 
ROBERTS, HANSFORD, L. U. 982, Detroit, 

Mich. 
ROBERTSON, GEORGE, L. U. 19, Detroit, 

Mich. 
RUTLEDGE, THOMAS R., L. U. 1849, Pasco. 

Wash. 
SARVER, NOEL, L. U. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 
SNEDIKER, CHARLES F., L. U. 104, Dayton, 

Ohio 
STANLEY, ROXIE, L. U. 169, East St. Louis, 

111. 
SZABO, JULIUS, L. U. 434, Chicago, 111. 
THORESEN, PETER, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 
VALESTIN, LOUIS, L. U. 1786, Chicago, 111. 
VALETT, HAROLD, L. U. 1849, Pasco, Wash. 
WALLIN, HELGE, L. U. 791, New York, N. Y. 
WALTON, FRANK, L. U. 104, Dayton, Ohio 
WARRENDER, ALEXANDER, L. U. 2164, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
WELLBANKS, MORLEY, L. U. 340, Hagers- 

town, Md. 
WEST, L. E., L. U. 1665, Alexandria, Va. 
WESTHAVER, NAPEAN, L. U. 275, Newton, 

Mass. 
WHITE, LAWRENCE M., L. U. 331, Norfolk, 

Va. 
WIK, ALFRED, L. U. 787, New York, N. Y. 
WILEY, CHARLES, L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 
WILLIAMS, A. Y., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, 

Texas 
WILLIAMS, EMMET, L. U. 387, Columbus, 

Miss. 
WILLIAMS, WRENNIE, L. U. 710, Long 

Beach, Cal. 
WINKLER, JOSEPH, L. U. 15, Hackensack, 

N. J. 
WOERTH, HENRY F., L. U. 1849, Pasco, 

Wash. 
WOLLERSHEIM, PETER, L. U. 657, Sheboy- 
gan, Wise. 
WOOD, CLAYTON G., L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 





/Weanderingl 



By Fred Goetz 



According to the judges, it was a tough 
job picking the ^vinning title for these jot- 
tings. Almost all of the titles submitted 
could have applied. But one had to be 
chosen, and it shall head these writings 
from here on out: OUTDOOR MEANDER- 
INGS. 

The title was submitted by Richard W. 
Kiejci of Central City, Iowa. Runner-up 
winners for the Jensen lure packs were: 
Eric Gudat, Box 12, Union Street, Wash- 
ingtonville, Ohio; Frank Coffen, 237 Craig- 
miller Ave., St. Johns, Newfoundland, Can- 
ada; and Lewis Kindig, P. O. Box 49, 
Bozeman, Montana. 

Congrats to the wirmers. Sorry everybody 
couldn't win. 

— o— 

Glenn Pickering of Newton, Iowa, a 
member of Local 1133, has a 6% ft. glass 
spin rod and Pfluegar Pelican reel. He asks 
for some verbal ramblin' on spinning and 
bass fishing. We're happy to throw some 
threadline philosophy on the fire for what 
it's worth, and we'll cover the bass fishing 
at a later date. 

— o— 

The Siwash Indians were the first Amer- 
icans to use a spinning reel. It was a crude 
aflFair, naturally. Just an oblong frame about 
three inches wide and six inches long, with 
the line vnrapped around. The lure and 
weight were attached to this line and the 
line peeled off the frame. 

No gears to this contrivance and the 
line was retrieved the hard way. Couldn't 
have gone over very big with the Siwash 
for they gave it up in the 17th century 
and started using a more advanced method 
—the net. 

— o— 

Trying to eliminate line twist in a spin- 
ning outfit would be like trying to eliminate 
the necessity of using oil in the old tin can. 
It can't be done, not completely. 

The following will help you cut line 
twist down to a minimum. Don't wind the 
reel when the fish is taking out Une. Change 
lures occasionally with reverse spin-actions. 
This will compensate twist. Don't use spin- 
ners in fast drifts for more than two casts. 



Use keel weights for small plastic rudders. 
If excessive line twist develops, remove all 
gear and strip free line into the current, 
retrieving line under slight pressure. This 
operation will remove most all of the twist. 
— o— 

The following question and answer from 
Dick Warner may be of some value to 
otlier readers: 

Q. I want to buy a good spinning rod, 
but want to get some idea on what is the 
best type. Can you help me out? 

A. The type of rod depends on the type 
of fishing you intend to do. For brush creek 
work, would recommend a light, 6-"^ foot 
rod with a fast tip so you can feel the 
slightest tap of that fish nibbling on your 
night crawler or single egg. For medium 
spinning in coastal angling, we suggest a 7 
foot medium action stick with good back- 
bone in the tip. For winter, or steelliead 
fishing, an 8 or 9 foot rod is best. Plenty of 
backbone is needed here, enough to set a 
good sturdy cluster-egg hook. For work in 
heavy fast water, I urge a heavy spinning 
outfit with as heavy a Une as you can man- 
age to cast efficiently. Nothing is so ex- 
asperating to your fellow angler as to be 
inconvenienced by waiting a half-lT^ur while 
a spin fisherman plays a big fish on too 
light gear. 

— o— 

One of the greatest assets to the deer 
species is provided by Mother Nature to 
the doe bearing young. Her newly bom 
fawns have no odor, which protects them 
from tlie many marauding forest predators 
equipped with powerful sniffers. Naturalist 
Eugene Burns told of a trained dog that 
passed within a few feet of an infant fawn 
deer and failed to detect it. Other protec- 
tive wildlife gimmicks are the sensitive 
hearing with which some animals are en- 
dowed. 

The dog is considered by many to have 
the most perfect sense of hearing in the 
animal kingdom, far better than that of the 
human. Scientific tests have proven diat a 
dog can recognize a quarter tone on the 
piano, where many humans cannot recog- 
nize a whole tone. (I couldn't recognize a 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



whole tone until I learned to play the 
ukelele, so tliere.) Another outstanding j^ro- 
tective device is demonstrated when a dog 
meets a cat. For instance: Dog sees cat. 
Dog rushes at cat. Cat arches her back, 
raises her hair, spits. The dog bristles. The 
cat's tail goes up. The dog barks and moves 
closer. The cat spits more \'igorously. 
What's all this? Just a big bluff. The cat's 
bluff is the protective process. Sounds rea- 
sonable, doesn't it? 

If the cat did not have that protective 
process, could be the dog would have ex- 
terminated the cat long ago. 

— o— 

The following illustration is that of a 
Shyster lure— one of the fish-gettinest lures 
ever, we're told. 

We would like to send all readers of this 
column a pair of these angler's deUghts— 
FREE! 



Here's a smattering of "take-cm-for-what- 
they-are- worth" tips for scattergunners: 

1. Wait 'til the birds are in range bo- 
fore you shoot. Shooting at birds too far 
away doesn't add up to clean kills. 

2. Use the correct shot size with maxi- 
mum loads to insure a clean kill. Waterfowl 
are hardy, tough birds to drop— you should 
know. 

3. Line up downed birds carefully, us- 
ing trees, stumps, patches of vegetation or 
other like-landmarks. Seek the downed 
wingers as soon as possible. 

4. For maximum waterfowl-hunter effi- 
ciency use a good retriever dog. A good 
retriever will eliminate a lot of bone chill- 
ing work for yourself, and will cvit down 
loss of crippled birds. If you can't take the 
dog, be equipped to wade with sound, high 
boots— and a change of socks, just in case 
an emergency arises. 




All you have to do to get one is to 
drop us a few lines and accompanying 
photo about an interesting hunting or fish- 
ing or camping experience you've had. A 
snapshot will do, and it doesn't have to 
be a current one. 

Write to: Fred Goetz 
Dept. OM 
404 Times Bldg. 
Portland 4, Oregon 

This offer is open to all members in good 
standing and members of their families. 

One pair of lures to a person, and please 
state your union affiliation. 
— o— 

Brother Carl A. Binder of 2043 Francisco 
St. in Berkeley, California, tells about the 
fish following his lure on tlie retrieve— but 
faihng to strike. 

Well, Carl, I've had die same trouble, 
especially on minnow-simulating lures. I 
guess that fish are just curious, as are all 
wild critters. Occasionally when this hap- 
pens, I have provoked a strike by stopping 
the retrieve; letting the lure sink to the 
bottom; and then jigging it gingerly near the 
bottom. Try it the next time you run into 
that problem. 



W^iile on tlie subject of migratory water- 
fowl, we note that a solution to a per- 
plexing mystery concerning wild geese has 
finally been solved. 

From SYLVA, delightful publication of 
the Ontario Dept. of Land and Forests, 
comes the following question— excerpt from 
a teacher's report: "In the fall, why do 
wild geese fly south?" 

It stimulated the following answer from 
a logical Ontario schoolboy: "Because it is 
too far to walk." 

Wouldn't life be a lot easier if we could 
all think as clearly as the young 'uns? 



Here's a chart on the 
of wildlife that might set! 
or future argument. 



"Young and Old" 
le an old, current 





Male 


Female 


Young 


Elk 


Bull 


Cow 


Calf 


Deer 


Buck 


Doe 


Fawn 


Antelope 


Buck 


Doe 


Fawn 


Coyote 


Male 


Bitch 


Whelp 


Fox 


Dog fox 


Vixen 


Kit 


Goose 


Gander 


Goose 


Gosling 


Pheasant 


Cock 


Hen 


Chick 


Steelhead 


Buck 


Doe 


Fry 



Fred C. Larsen of 2069 Dayton Drive, 
Lemon Grove, California, a member of 
Local 1300, is a trailer and angHng fan. 
He claims tliere should be more trailer 
facilities in vacation and fishing areas. 
Anyone want to join Fred in a crusade? 



Why Do Drugs Cost So Much? 

By David W. Angevine 

(Third and last of a series on the drug business). 

* * 

SUGGESTIONS thus far advanced for arresting the cost of prescription 
drugs are not encouraging. 
The drug industry can hardly be expected to halt its dizzying pur- 
suit of bonanza profits. A course to help physicians peer through the fog of 
pharmaceutical merchandising is now offered at only one of the nation's 85 
medical schools and, though hopeful, is essentially long-range. 

New laws that might halt the flow of ineffective and unnecessary prescrip- 
tion drugs without putting the industry and indeed the whole practice of 
medicine in a strait jacket have not yet been devised. And physicians— either 
as a profession or as a significant group within the profession— are unlikely 
to bite the hand that feeds and fon- 

their responsibility for the enlight- 
ened care of their patients, and by 
so doing to regain for the practice of 
medicine its lost prestige. 

Armed with the doctor's prescrip- 
tion for a drug, rather than a prod- 
uct, the fellow who's going to pay the 
bill can then undertake a brief shop- 
ping tour among nearby drug stores 
and find out who will charge the 
least. He is now well on his way to 
reducing his prescription costs. 



dies them, the drug makers. 

In such a situation, it may well be 
that the people who pay the prescrip- 
tion bill and who support the whole 
drug industry and the medical profes- 
sion may need to take matters into 
their own hands. 

Through their labor unions, co-ops, 
and community health centers, sev- 
eral million people have already hired 
physicians whose job it is to keep 
them well. The American Medical 
Association has recently given up its 
long and bitter struggle to suppress 
these groups, and an AMA investi- 
gating team has publicly recognized 
that they frequently provide their 
members with the highest type of 
medical service. 

In such a group, the person who 
pays the prescription bill not only has 
a right to demand that his physician 
surrender none of his responsibilities 
to the purveyors of drugs but he has 
the means at his disposal to enforce 
that demand. 

He may require the team of physi- 
cians who serve him to prescribe 
drugs and not products, to reassert 



WANNA BET? 

The current investigation of the drug 
industry makes this series of articles 
extremely timely. Evidence already pre- 
sented at the hearings indicates that the 
charges of abuse made in these articles 
are extremely mild. Investigators have 
heard that some companies get $15 or 
$16 for pills that cost 30c to make; that 
the industry spends as much as $5,000 
per doctor per year courting good will; 
that small producers are frozen out by 
the giant firms that dominate the bus- 
iness. 

We presume that Congressmen Griffin 
and Landrum are busy dravdng up a 
"reform" bill for the drug industry pat- 
terned after the labor bill they spon- 
sored. Wanna bet? 



THE CARPENTER 



33 



For example, if your doctor pre- 
scribes Squibb's Raii-Sed, each drug- 
gist will probably quote the same 
price, thanks to the so-called fair 
trade laws. Or, if your doctor calls 
for Merck's Roxinoid, each druggist's 
price will probably be identical. 

On the other hand, if your physi- 
cian prescribes reserpine and the 
druggist knows you're demanding a 
little competition, he can give you 
Rau-sed, Roxinoid, Serpasil (Ciba), 
Cyrstoserpine (Smith-Dorsey), Reser- 
poid (Upjohn), Raurine (LD&W), Re- 
sercen (Central), Serfin (Parke-Davis), 
Serpanray (Panry), Serpena (Haag), or 
some other brand-name product, 
whichever is cheapest. For each of 
them is reserpine, which your doctor 
prescribed. 

To save this shopping around and 
yet hold down prescription costs, 
some people have organized non- 
profit drug stores. Sometimes they've 
made them part of their he?lth co- 
op. In other places, such as suburbs 
near Washington, D. C, and San 
Francisco, the people who buy pre- 
scriptions are operating their own 
modern pharmacies. 

When they buy their prescriptions, 
they may pay slightly more than it 
costs to stock and handle the drugs, 
but at the end of each year they put 
this margin back in their own pockets 
through the co-op refund. 

These consumer-owned drug stores 
in Maryland have recently figured out 
how to save their customers' money 
even if the doctor prescribes by brand 
and despite the state's fair trade law. 

Suppose your doctor prescribes 
Brand X and it comes in 100-capsule 
bottles. If you buy 100 capsules, the 
law says the co-op must charge you 
what everyone else does. If you buy 
25 capsules, the co-op will charge you 
one-fourth of the fair trade price for 
100 but eliminate the standard "pro- 



fessional fee" that nearly all druggists 
add for transferring pills from a big 
bottle to a little bottle, typing the 
prescription, filing it, and so forth. 

Retail druggists quite naturally 
look on prescription buyers who serve 
themselves with something akin to 
horror. Even in the Stone Age, the 
Ancient Order of Grinders and Chip- 
pers of Flint threw the young war- 
riors who made their own arrow- 
heads into the volcano. The druggists 
have ever been in the vanguard of 
co-op opponents, and as consumer- 
owned drug stores and dispensaries 
multiply, they can be expected to re- 
double their opposition. 

They may even bring pressure on 
the giant drug makers to find legal 
or quietly illegal ways for withhold- 
ing their products from co-op stores. 
With such concentrated ownership as 
exists in the drug industry today, a 
few firms could make the boycott 
quite effective. 

To survive, the co-ops would need 
to find their own sources of raw ma- 
terials. They would probably find 
themselves kicked into drug-making 
—just as they found themselves kicked 
into oil refining, crude oil production, 
generation of electricity, phosphate 
mining, and nitrate production. 

This is where Celo Laboratories 
may come in handy. 

In 1948 several health co-op leaders 
asked Harry Abrahamson to find out 
whether they could benefit by pool- 
ing their needs for drugs and vita- 
mins they dispensed to their members. 

Abrahamson was running the chem- 
ical products division of National Co- 
operatives, and they felt this might 
be expanded into pharmaceuticals. 

After a 2-year investigation, Abra- 
hamson reported to directors of Co- 
operative Health Federation of Amer- 
ica (since merged into Group Health 
Association of America) that they 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



could get their drugs considerably 
cheaper if they would buy them di- 
rect. 

Meanwhile, National Cooperatives 
underwent a retrenchment that elim- 
inated the chemical division, and 
Abrahamson was free to organize the 
drug co-op with CHFA help. He and 
an assistant moved from Chicago to 
Celo, N. Car.— one of the nation's 
idyllic spots— and there founded Celo 
Laboratories. 

The two men agreed to run the co- 
op and pay themselves $250 a month. 
They knew the co-op would have no 
money at all for salaries while they 
were building the business and ac- 
quiring an inventory. This proved to 
be correct, and at first the two men 
and their families depended entirely 
on other resources. 

Such was the promise of Celo Lab- 
oratories, however, that Tom Lea, a 
successful and retired businessman 
living in Celo, joined the staflF on the 
same salaries-when-we-can basis. To- 
day the co-op in more than making 
ends meet and has repaid most of the 
back salaries it owes Abrahamson and 
Lea. 

Celo has slowly built up a sizeable 
mail order business— all by one satis- 
fied customer's telling his neighbor. 
Today more than 4,000 families reg- 
ularly write Celo for vitamins and 
drugs they want. This is nearly a thu'd 
of the co-op's sales. 

The co-op doesn't recommend that 
anyone take vitamins. It does say that 
if you do, you can probably buy them 
cheaper from Celo. This matter-of- 
fact approach contrasts vividly with 
the ordinary drug firm's assurance 
that its vitamin products will correct 
everything from skin blemishes to 
sexual impotency. 

Whether people need extra vita- 
mins is a much debated question. A 
careful Agriculture Department sur- 



vey of the diets of 6,000 representa- 
tive families recently showed that 
25% were short on Vitamin C, 19% 
on Vitamin B2, and 17% on Vitamin 
Bi. These deficiencies showed up 
everywhere— high and low income 
families, small and large families, city 
and farm families. 

No one argues with American Med- 
ical Association when it says, "No 
vitamin-mineral preparation even re- 
motely begins to compare with good, 
wholesome food." From this, how- 
ever, AM A concludes: "If you're well 
nourished, you need no extra vita- 
mins. If you're not, you need medical 
advice." 

From this viewpoint, there is sharp 
dissent. Some doctors believe many 
people who aren't in the best health 
suffer borderline vitamin deficiencies 
that won't show up in a clinical exam- 
ination. 

Compared with others, Celo's vita- 
mins are clearly a bargain. Under the 
labels of Squibb, Parke-Davis, or Eli 
Lilly, 100 Vitamin A capsules, each 
with 25,000 standard units, cost $4.10. 
The same capsules under the Co-op 
label cost 75c. 

Squibb's Theragran costs $9.45 for 
100 capsules, whereas Co-op Hi-Po- 
tency Vitamin with exactly the same 
formula costs $3.60 for 100 capsules. 
Eli Lilly's Cevalin costs $1.98 for 100 
tablets, whereas Co-op Vitamin C 
costs 65c for 100 identical tablets. 
Upjohn's Unicaps sell for $3.11 a hun- 
dred, and Co-op Multiple Vitamin for 
$1.50. 

For its mail order customers and 
co-op supermarkets, Celo handles 
only 34 standard products. For co-op 
pharmacies and dispensaries, it han- 
dles a considerably larger number, in- 
cluding several injections. 

Celo buys these standard prepara- 
tions in capsule, tablet, powder, or li- 



THECAItPENTER 35 

quid form from the big drug makers. As in so many co-ops, there's no waste 

It then transfers these preparations or lost motion, nothing that approach- 

from big bottles to little bottles and es the "hard sell," and no mumbo- 

ships them out on order. jumbo about the way Celo operates. 



DIVIDENDS LEAD PARADE AS 1959 ENDS 

As 1959 came to an end, the statistics show that chief beneficiaries of 
the year's recovery were recipients of dividend and interest income. Wages 
and salaries came in third, while farm income plunged disastrously. 

November figures issued by the Department of Commerce show that per- 
sonal income through November was running at a record rate of $385 billion, 
about $1 billion above the previous peak in June, the last full month not 
affected by the steel strike. 

The breakdown showed: 

Wages and Salaries running at the rate of $260.2 billion, or 7 per cent 
higher than in 1958. 

Dividends running at a rate of $13.7 billion, or 10 per cent higher than 
in 1958. 

Personal interest income running at a rate of $23.5 billion for a boost of 
10 per cent over 1958, and 

Farm income running at a $10.4 billion rate or 26 per cent lower than in 
1958. 

Unemployment compensation payments were up slightly, mostly due to 
heav}' benefits in the automobile industry which was hard-hit by the steel 
strike. 

On the dividend front every major industry showed gains, the only ex- 
ception being mining where dividends dropped about 10 per cent instead of 
conforming with the general 10 per cent increase shown by the rest of the 
economy. 

The sharp 10 per cent boost in interest income due to the "tight money" 
policy has been reflected on the banking front by what the Wall Street Journal 
called a "rash of increased dixidends, year-end extras and stock dividends." 
At least nine New York banks boosted dividends from 2 per cent to 100 per 
cent while banks in other financial centers such as Boston and Philadelphia 
also boosted their dividend payments substantially. 

The banking boom also was reflected in the stock market with bank 
group stock averaging 20 per cent higher than the low point for the year. 

Meanwhile, news from the job front was not so encouraging. The Depart- 
ment of Labor reported that both new and insured unemployment under 
State prcjgrams rose sharply during the week ending December 5. Jobless 
\\-orkers filed 345,200 initial claims, almost 40,000 more than during the previ- 
ous week. In all, 40 states showed increases. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

LOCAL UNION No. 680 HONORS FIFTY-YEAR MEMBERS 

At special ceremonies held recently, Local Union 680 of Newton Highlands, Mass., 
paid tribute to five of its members who have more than fifty years of membership in our 
Brotherhood. 

Trustee John Drinkwater presented 50-year pins to the old timers and, on behalf of 
Local 680, expressed the union's appreciation of the contributions these men have made 
over die years. The Local was honored to have the District's Business Agent, Edward 
Gallagher, present for the ceremonies. 




Four of the five members of Local 680 who received 50-year pins are shown above. From 
left to right are Alfred Albee, Joseph Allison, Angus McDonald, Michael McDonald. Business 
Agent Edward Gallagher is on the extreme right. 

Festivities were held at Ken's Steak House, where the membership and their guests 
enjoyed a delicious dinner preceding the ceremonies. 



PENNSYLVANIANS ORGANIZE TO HELP SENIOR CITIZENS 

Earlier this year, in response to an inquiry from Senator McNamara (D., Mich.), chair- 
man of the Senate committee studying problems of the aged. President Hutcheson set 
forth some of the obstacles to be overcome in our present society in order to give older 
citizens a better deal. President Hutcheson's program was printed in full in the September 
issue of The Carpenter. 

In at least one section of the country the problem was already being considered from 
many angles at that time, and a plan of constructive action being initiated. 

For some 9 months prior to last September members of the Central Labor Union in 
Monroe and Pike Counties of Pennsylvania were working toward a solution in ^eir own 
backyard for some of the unhappy situations that older people were experiencing. 

It began when Thomas D. Douglas, a member of Local Union 501 at Stroudsburg 
and delegate to the Central Labor Union, was- asked to form a Senior Citizens Committee 
for Monroe and Pike Counties. As chairman of the new Committee Brother Douglas, with 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



the able help of Eugene B. Striink, president of the Committee and financial secretary of 
Locar Union 501, touched off the months of research to follow. 

They found that in the two counties there were "8,200 people of 70 years and over 
who needed to feel that they ha\'e not outlived their usefulness." They got in touch with 
all tlie clubs that they felt would be interested in learning more of the problems of the 
aged and in giving aid. They canvassed churches of all denominations of Stroudsburg 
and East Stroudsburg, with the endorsement of the burgess and council of both cities, 
who fully approved of the program. Next, Brothers Douglas and Strunk, with the coopera- 
tion of other interested persons, got in touch with most of the local factories "to see if 
there was any possibility of doing something for our senior citizens." The result was that 
a number of programs were discussed, with management sympathetic. Brother Douglas is 
of the opinion that factory officials contacted will have sometliing worthwhile to ofEer 
in the way of aid for the elderly. As he puts it, "They feel as we do that the senior citi- 
zen does not get enough in his old age pension." 

The offshoot of the above spadework was the organization of the Senior Citizens 
Club on September 23, 1959 at the sponsoring Central Labor Union Club in East Strouds- 
burg. Over 40 jiersons from Monroe and Pike Counties attended this initial meeting. It 
was voted tliat regular meetings would be held twice a month to provide entertainment 
and companionship for the older members of the community. 

The organizational meeting program included remarks by Chairman Douglas; the 
invocation and benediction by Father John A. Essef, assistant pastor of St. Matthew's 
Roman Catholic Church; and a welcoming speech by Stuart Pipher, CLU president. 
Robert P. Lonergan, community welfare planning consviltant of the Ofiice for Aging of 
the state's Department of Welfare, spoke on the topic "Objectives of a Senior Citizen's 
Club." 

Also on tlie committee for the new club are Stuart Pipher, Carl Woolever, James 
Robert, Ethel Ruth, George Rung, Glenn Klinger, Robert Westbrook, Mary Jones and Ida 
Krebs. 

The club is open to all senior citizens of Pike and Monroe Counties, regardless of 
race, creed or color. Through the efforts of the club it is hoped a better day will be in- 
augurated for the older citizens of the area. 



EIGHT MEMBERS OF SAVANNAH LOCAL RECEIVE PINS 

At a special meeting in October, Roy B. Horton, president of Local Union 256 of 
Savannah, Georgia, present- 
ed t\^^enty-five year pins to 
eight members of long stand- 
ing. Shown in accompanying 
picture are seven of these 
members. 

Reading from left to right 
(front row): 

J. A. Echols, initiated July 5, 
1933; J. E. Stevens, May 1, 
1924; Thomas Davis, April 18, 
1923. 

(Back row): J. W. Readdick, 
initiated January 21, 1930; C. 
O. Frisbee, November 10, 
1925; E. Hoagland, December 
29, 1925; and Alex H. Gray, 
September 16, 1924. 

Not shown in the picture was L. D. Chestnut who was initiated on November 9, 1926. 




CHICAGO GRADUATES 113 APPRENTICES 

The Chicago District Council on November 12, 1959, held graduating exercises for 
113 apprentices and awarded them Journeyman Certificates attesting to the completion 
of their training in a difficult field. As in each previous ceremony of the sort, each gradu- 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



ating apprentice also received congratulations from the co-sponsoring Builders Association 
of Chicago. 

The excellence of the city's apprentice training program was thereby again demon- 
strated. The joint efforts of the Chicago District Council and the Builders Association of 
Chicago have for many years turned out a steady supply of competently trained young 
men capable of holding their own in any situation the construction game can present. 

In Chicago, graduating exercises are a semi-annual affair. This class of 113 is one of 
the largest ever graduated in the area. Representatives from all the District's affiliated 




local unions were in attendance to wish Godspeed to the young men entering journeyman 
ranks. 

They were addressed by a number of guests, among them General Vice President 
John R. Stevenson, who, as usual, brought an interesting and informative message to the 
assemblage. Vice President Stevenson recalled for the younger men his vast experience 
in the construction field starting with his own apprenticeship in Scotland over half a 
century ago. 

Other guests who spoke at the event were: representatives of tlie Chicago District 
Council; representatives of the Employers Association; the Chicago Building Trades 
Council; the Illinois State Federation of Labor; the Bureau of Apprenticeship, and the 
principals and staffs of the several schools concerned with the advancement of the training 
program. 

Co-chairmen for the occasion were Council Secretary Charles Thompson and President 
Ted Kenney, who provided a wholesome buffet luncheon for those present. 

As can be seen clearly in the faces of those pictured above, the evening was a complete 
success, enriched by the continviing interest of the sponsors in apprenticeship affairs as well 
as by the maxim "Competency Through Training" that has been the byword literally prac- 
ticed by all those who helped to make each successive group of Chicago journeymen as 
well equipped to meet their future career requirements as is humanly possible. 



SIX RECEIVE 50- YEAR PINS-LOCAL 25 

Last October, Local Union No. 25, Los Angeles, awarded 50-year pins to six old 
timers who joined the union away back when carpenters had to ride to work in horse- 
drawn streetcars. The six members honored for their half century of faithful service were 
Cameron Bracken, Otto Kraude, WilUam D. Smith, Joe Giandini, W. W. Grouse, and 
Carl Meister. 



THE CARPENTER 



39 



Brothers Bracken, Kraude, Smith and Giandini were present at the ceremonies to re- 
ceive their recognition pins from the hands of Local Union President E. G. Daley and 
Past President Amrose Connors. Unfortunately, illness prevented Brothers W. W. Grouse 
and Garl Meister from attending. Arrangements were made to deliver their pins to them 
at a later time. 




As the camera recorded the presentation ceremonies, the above picture shows (left to right) : 
Amrose Connors, past president; E. G. Daley, president; old timers Cameron Bracken, Otto Kraude, 
Willieim D. Smith, and Joe Giandini. On the extreme right is financial secretary James L. Keen. 

Local Union No. 25 is especially proud of its roster of great old timers who helped 
to carry the union through many trying days early in the century. 



HISTORIC STEP FOR LOCAL 2683 
Pictvued below is a group of officers of Local Union No. 2683 and officials of the Vir- 
ginia Metal Products Company of Orange, Virginia, affixing first United Brotherhood labels 




From left to right in the picture are: Stanley Gallihugh, secretary. Local No. 2683; Tom Davis, 
Local president; Harvey Tinsman, Local vice president; Larry Felder, president, Virginia Metal 
Products Company; W. A. Johnson, Brotherhood Representative; and Tom Lee, vice president 
in charge of production for the company. 

to products turned out by tlie firm. Recently the management and the union entered 
into an agreement giving the company the right of displaying our Brotherhood's label on 
the products it makes. 




ACTIVE AUXILIARY CELEBRATES 20th ANNIVERSARY 

To the Editor: 

Greetings from Auxiliary No. 347, Van Nuys, California. 

The members of this auxiliary send greetings to all sister auxiliaries. We are a very 
active auxiliary, working very hard to live up to the obligation we all took when we became 
members. 

We are sponsored by Local No. 1913, Van Nuys, and are very proud of our lovely 
meeting hall and the furnishings tliat they have provided for us. We have found them to 
be very cooperative on our many money-raising events, etc. We serve refreshments on the 
fourth Friday, and they very generously pay us $20.00 to cover the expense. In return, 
we make every eflFort to be a cooperative auxiliary, and hope we have succeeded to the 
extent that they are proud to sponsor us. 

We are affiliated with the Carpenters Ladies State Council of California and are a 
charter member. We are proud to report that we have had one of our members serving 
on the executive board of the State Council each year. At the present time our president. 
Ruby Goodwin, is serving as board member of the Third District. 

We are also affiliated with tlie Los Angeles Union Label Council, and send two dele- 
gates to each montlily meeting. Several members work hard each year, donating time at 
die Union Label and Union Industries show when it is held in Los Angeles. We have 
ten members who volunteered to work this year when the show was held in October. 

Our auxiliary is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year. We still have a few charter 
members active in the auxiliary. 

We also worked hard on the Save Our State Committee this past year, against tlie 
Right-to-Work bill, and were delighted when the bill was defeated in California. 

We have several money-making events each year. The main one is a Fall Festival 
held each year in October. We have many social events, some in the daytime and some 
in the evening when the men can attend. 

We contribute to many worthwhile charities. At the present time, in addition to tlie 
many charity drives that we donate to, we send $60 a year to the San Fernando Valley 
Association for Retarded Children for their scholarship fund. 

We welcome visits from members of odier auxiliaries. We meet tlie second and fourtli 
Friday evening at 8:00 P.M. in the Carpenters Hall, 7500 Van Nuys Blvd. 

We had a very wonderful installation evening this year in July. Local No. 1913 invited 
us to join them for a joint installation of officers, and the event included as guests our 
husbands and their wives. After tlie installation ceremony we all enjoyed a very delicious 
catered buffet dinner which had been provided by the Local. 

Fraternally, 

Inez M. Edwards, Secretary 
6538 Costello Avenue 
Van Nuys, California 



Craft Probloms 




Carpentry 

LESSON 374 

By H. H. Siegele 

Pantries.— There are still a great many 

pantries in daily use, and there are still 

many housewives who would not do with- 




Fig. 1 

out tlieir pantry. Pantries are not coming 
back in the sense that every new home 
will have one, but the housewife who has 
a conveniently located and well arranged 
pantry, will continue to use it, and it is 






FAMOWOOD ... the AMAZING 

ALL-PURPOSE PLASTIC for wood finishes! 

''^SIIj1~JL2SI Applies like putty . . . 
Stiel<s like glue! 

FAMOWOOD Is the answer . . 
where wood finishes are important. 
Simple to use . . . efflcient, last- 
ing, time-saving, when filling wood 
cracks, gouges, nail and screw holes 
or correcting defects. Dries quickly, 
does not shrink. Stays put under 
adverse conditions. 

FAMOWOOD sands easily, does not gum up Sander. 
Takes spirit dye stains freely. Waterproof and weather- 
proof when properly applied. Beady to use . . . "right 
ijiit of the can." Fifteen matching wood colors with 
matchless wood finishes. Dept. 705 

BEVERLY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

9118 South Main Street Los Angeles 3, Calif. 



quite likely that if she ever has a part in 
making plans for a new home, she will 
insist on a pantry, or something that will 
answer as a substitute for a pantry. 

A plan of the pantry tliat went with the 
pattern kitchen, which was discussed in the 




previous lessons of this series, is shown 
by Fig. 1. Fig. 2 shows an elevation of 
the left wall of tliis plan. Here we have 
three shelves that are intended to hold rath- 
er large utensils or other large objects that 
are necessities in a home, especially in the 



SAVE HOURS OF TIME INSTALL- 
ING HINGES 

VIX YIX centering drill 

CENTERING holder takes work out 

BIT HOLDER °^ drilling screw holes. 

CENTERS, PLUMBS, 



Insert tool in electric 
or hand drill and away 



you go. Place hinge in 
position, zip, holes are 
centered and pliunb to cor- 
rect depth. Screws all fit 
snug. Eliminates twisted 
bits and crooked holes. 
Skilled cabinet makers and 
carpenters save hours with 
Vix tools. Use one and 
you'll never be without it. 
Quality through out. Bit 
replaceable. Only $2.95 

VICK TOOL CO. Minneapolis, Minii! 




42 



THE CARPENTER 



kitchen. To the left is shown a place for 
brooms, mops, cleaners and so forth. This 
is located to the left of the pantry entrance. 
To the right of the drawing there is floor 
and wall space for storing card tables and 



dow and under the shelving of the wall to 
the right. 

East 




/'/'/'/'x'/V/W/'-V/'A'/'/". 



Fig. 3 

the like. Fig. 3 gives a cross section of 
tlie pantry, showing the window in the 
outside wall. The shelving to the left is 
for large things, as already mentioned, but 
to the right the shelving arrangement will 
accommodate small and medium articles. 
There is also storage space below the wan- 



NOW! FILE YOUR OWN SAWS 



SAVl 



HAND SAW FILER 

Do it yourself. Precision fil- 
ing easy without experience. 
Positive pitch and angle with 
this handy guide. Fits any 
hand saw. Complete with 
file. Guaranteed. §2.95. 

JOINTER and SAW SET 

Now you can joint and set your circular 
saws with ease. Gets blades absolutely 
round . . . the set uniform and accurate. 
Takes 6' to 12" saws with 1/2" to 7/8" 
centers. Complete with file. $4.95. 

THE spEEP corp.*^.^:^»t:^' 

Dept. A, p. O. Box 61, lynwood, Calif. 



TIME 

TROUBIE 

MONEY 



M^^l^ POWER SAW FILER 

f^^^ sharpen circular saws like an 

'S0f expert- Two simple adjust- 

fii^' nientsfor6" to 12" blades witJi 

1/2' to 13/16" centers. Keeps 

saw true and sharp. Complete 

with file, S6.95. 




2 SIMPLE 
ASSEMBLIES 





Fig. 4 West 

Modernizing Homes.— This is a field, as 
mentioned in a previous lesson, in which 



Books That Will Help You 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION.— Has 163 p., 439 11.. 

covering concrete work, form building, screeds, reinforc- 
ing, scaffoiding and otiier temporary construction. No 
otiier book like it on the market. $3.50 

CARPENTRY.— Has 307 p. 767 il., covering general 
house carpentry, estimating, making window and door 
frames, heavy timber framing, trusses, power tools, and 
other important building subjects. $3.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p. 670 
11., and about 7,000 building trades terms and expres- 
sions. Defines terms and gives many practical building 
suggestions. You need this book. $ 4.00. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS. — Covers sharpening and us- 
ing tools. An Important craft problem for each tool ex- 
plained. One of the top-best of my books — you should 
have it. Has 156 p. and 394 11. $3.50. 

THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p.. 498 11., cover- 
ing all important steel-square problems. The most 
practical book on the square sold today. Price $3.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 220 p. and 531 11., covering several 
of the most Important branches of carpentry, among 
them garages, finishing and stair building. $3.50. 

ROOF FRAMING. — 175 p. and 437 11., covering every 
branch of roof framing. The best roof framing book on 
the market. Other problems. Including saw filing. $3.50. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION. — Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems — many of them worth the price 
of the book. Has 256 p. and 686 11. $3.50. 

You can't go wrong If you buy this whole set. A five- 
day money-back guarantee. Is your protection. 

THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Only $1.50. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Revised, illustrat- 
ed by Stanley Leland. Only $2.00. 

THE WAILING PLACE.— This book Is made up of 
controversial prose and the fable, PUSHING BUT- 
TONS. Spiced with sarcasm and dry humor. Illustrated 
by the famed artist. Will Rapport. $3.00. 

FREE.— With 8 books, THE WAILING PLACE and 
2 poetry books free; with 5 books, 2 poetry books free 
and with 3 books, 1 poetry book free. 

With 2 books. THE WAILING PLACE for $1.00, 
and with 1 book, a poetry book for half price. 

NOTICE. — Carrying charges paid only when full re- 
mittance comes with order. No C.O.D. to Canada. 

Order U U CIC^FI F 222 So. Const. St. 
Today. "■ ■■■ ^It^attt Emporia, Kansas 
BOOKS — For Birthday gifts, etc. — BOOKS 



THE CARPENTER 



43 




Fig. 5 North 

the progressive carpenter can carry on and 
build up a business of his own. This sug- 
gestion should be remembered by the stu- 
dent, as he reads and studies these lessons. 
Almost any well-built house, no matter 
how old-fashioned it might be, can be 
modernized. What such householders want 
is somebody who can first work out the 
details, and tlien do the work in a man- 
ner that will be a credit to himself and 
satisfactory to the householder. 



Aeeupammi^EViliim 



for FOOTINGS-FLOORS 

The old reliable water level is now 
modernized into an accurate low- 
cost layout level. 50 ft. clear tough 
vinyl tube gives you 100 ft. of leveling in each , 
set-up, and on and on. With its new poly- 
ethylene container-reservoir, the LEVELEASY 
remains filled and ready for fast one-man leveUng. 
Compact, durable and simple, this amazing level 
is packed with complete Ulustrated instructions on 
modem liquid leveling. If your dealer has not yet 
stocked the LEVELEASY, use our prompt mail serv- 
ice. Send your check or money order today for only 
.S7.9.5. Postal charges wUl be added on C.O.D. orders. 
Money back guarantee. 



s - o" 





HYDROLEVEL 



925 De Soto Ave., Ocsan Springs, Miss. 




44 



THE CARPENTER 



Bathroom.— Fig. 4 gives the floor plan of 
the modernized bathroom that belonged to 
the old-fashioned home taken here as an 
over-all pattern for tliese lessons. The 



1-8 






1 
1 
1 


jj J i 

"si 


\ 1 


ri n-ruec.ruif 


rd P 





Fig. 7 

changes were: Batlitub with fixtures, cab- 
inet lavatory, stool, and tile floor. Fig. 5 
shows additional changes that were made 
on the north wall, namely, two built-in 




Section of 
Clothes Cmutc 



Fig. 8 

cabinets for towels and other bathroom 
necessities, a mirror with a light to the 
right and left, and the tile wainscoting. Fig. 
6 shows a cross section and the east wall. 
Here, by dotted lines, is shown how the 



cabinets are built into the wall, with part 
of them extending into the room. The cab- 
inet shown to the left is built into the 
north wall, while the medicine cabinet 
shown to the right is built into the south 
wall. A cross section is given on this fig- 
ure of tlie lavatory and the cabinet that 
supports it. 

Clothes Chute.— The clothes chute shown 
toward the bottom of Fig. 6, is given in de- 
tail in Figs. 7 and 8. Fig. 7 shows the floor 
plan of that part of the lavatory cabinet, 




South IV^ll 
Fig. 9 

where the clothes chute is located. The 
drawing specifies %-inch plywood, but the 
chute can be made of ordinary lumber 
with good results. Fig. 8 shows how to 
build the chute so it will drop the clothes 
where they should be, rather than directly 
under it. The part marked A was cut away 
as shown at B, from the part marked C. 

Medicine Cabinet.— Fig. 9 shows the ele- 
vation of the south wall. Here are shown 
the wainscoting, the medicine cabinet and 
the different dimensions of this figure. Fig. 




Sharpening 
Hand Saws 



Tlie Foley Saw Retoother 
cuts perfect new teeth right 
over old ones in less than 1 minute, 
without removing saw handle. Makes filing 
easy. Takes all hand saws 4 to 16 points per inch. Relieves 
eye- strain. No experience needed. 

^^m^gr Foley Price Guide of saw sharpening charges. 
« Fk^hAh Send coupon today. No Salesman will call. 

FOLEY MFG. CO. Minneapolis is, minn. j 

Send FREE Price Guide and Foley Retoother circular. I 



Name _- 

Address 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



10, to the right, shows a face view of 
the medicine cabinet without the doors in 
place. The doors are to be slab doors, such 
as have been shown for the kitchen in the 




^ 



/iCj Plywoob Buck 



'■Vs She 



1 



3/^ MATE 






a'- 6" 



Fig. 10 

previous lessons. They are hung with con- 
cealed hinges. The shelving here is made 
of %-inch material, while the frame is 
made of %-inch boards. To the left is shown 



A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is l^ 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease y^ inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width Is Va. inch and they increase 
1/4" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof Is 48'-9i4" wide. Pitch 
is IVz" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and jjj qj^j, MINUTE ^'^^ ^"^^ 
Let us prove It, or return your money. 

Gtttlni tht Unithi of ra(tcr> by th* tpan and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
teeted by tht 1917 tL IS44 Copyrlshts. 

Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C. O. D. pay $2.95 

Calif omians Add 10c. Money back privilege. 

Canadians use Money Orders. 

A. RIECHERS 



p. O. Box 405 



Palo Alto. Calif. 



a cross section of the right half of the 
medicine cabinet. Notice the small shelves, 
which make possible additional storage 
space for small objects, such as small 
bottles, boxes, and so forth. The doors are 
indicated by the dotted hne to the left. 

The student should remember that the 
explanations and the drawings of these les- 
sons are hypothetical, and therefore open 
for modifications— they should not be taken 
as hard and fast. 




— DEIVIAND THE UNION LABEL— 



Ain't it 

a grand and 

glorious f eelin' ! 

You were scared. You thought 
you had cancer. So you did the 
thing every intelligent person 
does — you went to a doctor for 
a checkup. 

And it wasn't cancer after all! 
Ain't it a grand and glorious 
f eelin' ! 

Scientists are making progress 
against cancer. To keep this 
work going, money is needed. 
So fight cancer with a check — 
and a checkup. Give to your 
Unit of the American Cancer So- 
ciety, or mail your gift to cancer, 
c/o your town's Postmaster. 



American 

Cancer 

Society 



In Hollow Walls 



and ceilings — sheet rock, 
structural tile, thin paneling, 
or lath and plaster. 

Secure Fastening 

for cabinets bathroom fixtures, 
shelving, partitions, mirrors, 
hook strips, etc. 

Is Sure and Easy 

with the device that's made 
for the job in 5 head styles. 
Bolt sizes from Vs" thru 1/2' 



You'll save time 




NEW BELSAW MULTI- DUTY POWER TOOL 





SA>VS PLANES MOUDS, 




Now you can use this ONE power feed shop 
to turn rough lumber into high-value moldings, 
trim, flooring, furniture. ..ALL popular patterns. 
RJP... PLANE. ..MOLD. ..separately or all at once 
by power feed... with a one horsepower motor. 
Use 3 to 5 HP for high speed commercial output. 

LOW COST. ..You can own this MONEY MAKING 
POWER TOOL for only...*30®'* down payment. 

Send coupon today 

J '1 

I BELSAW POWER TOOLS 940 Field Bldg.. Kansas City 11. Mo. 

Send me complete fa(' -. ~..»u - 

Tool. No obligofion. 



I Send me complete facts on the MULTI-DUTY Power 



Name. 



j Address- 
! City 



.State- 



NOTICE 

The Dubllshers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. In their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membersliip of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and .Joiners of America. 

All contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penier." including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 
City, Mo. 4-46 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, lU. 47 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 44-47- 

3rd Cover 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. 43 

Irwin, Wilmington, Ohio 3rd Cover 

Paine Co., Addison, 111 46 

Skil Corp., Chicago, III 1 

Speed Corp., Lynwood, Cal 42 

Swanson Tool Co., Oak Lawn, 111. 48 

S. E. Vick Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 41 

Yates-Amerlcan Machine Co., 

Beloit, Wise. 3rd Cover 

Carpentry Materials 

Beverly Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Cal. 41 

Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 48 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Cal 45 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kan 42 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y 4 

U. S. General Supply Corp., 

New York, N. Y 48 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



New Estwing Supreme unbreakable 

LATH HATCHET with 
Replaceable Blade 




# Forged One-Piece Head-Handle 

of Finest Tool Steel 

# Strongest Construction Known 

# Scored Face— Prevents glancing 

Blows— Flying Nails 

# Rounded corners prevent cut 

and bruised fingers 



0US 



#E3-L List $6.75 
Extra Blades 
Razor Sharp 
Pack of 4-$1.00 



Exclusive Nylon-Vinyl Deep 
Cushion Grip— 

# Molded on— will never loosen, 

come off, age, or wear out 

• Large Grip— gives complete 

comfort and handling ease 

Replaceable blade for easy sharpening. 
Special Tool Steel— Razor Sharp for 
easy scoring, necessary in breaking 
Rocklath. Ideal for all lathing work. 



Made by the Inventors and World's Only Specialists in Unbreakable Tools 
"MARK OF THE SKILLED" 

ESTWING MFG. CO. Dept. C-1 Rockford, 111. 



FILE SAWS EASILY, AUTOMATICALLY 



▼ ▼ 




You don't need special "know-how" or previous 
experience to get perfect results when you use the 
Foley Automatic Saw Filer. Mechanically accu- 
rate, easy to operate — merely foUow step-by-step 
instructions. Used by saw manufacturers them- 
selves. The new 1959 model 200 Foley Saw Filer 
is the first and only machine that files hand, band 
and both "combination" and cross-cut circular 
saws. Foley shows how to establish a profitable 
saw filing service, how to get business, etc. 

The Foley Saw Filer files all hand saws, "com- 
bination" and cross-cut circular saws from 4" to 
24" in diameter, and all band saws to 43^" wide — 
with 3 to 16 points per inch. Exclusive Foley 
jointing action returns uneven teeth to perfect 
size, spacing and alignment. 



SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET 



i FOLEY MFG. CO., 118-0 Foley BIdg., Minneapolis 18, Minn. 

j Please send complete information on Foley Saw Filer and how 
I to succeed in saw filing business. 

' Name^ 

I Address 

I City 

I 



_State_ 




FOR "TOP" OR 'PLUMB" CUTS 
PIVOT here: - MARK HERE 




ROOF FRAMING MADE EASY 

WITH THE NEW ALL PURPOSE 

SWANSON SPEED SQUARE 

Made of Cast Aluminum— Rust Proof- -Light 

and Strong Black Numerals— Easy to Read 

-Non Glare Finish 

A simplifled precision made 
tool which makes roof framing 
as easy as your Joists or studs. 
Gives the angles for all cuts 
of rafters, roof boards, etc. 
Only one number (the pitch 
number) to remember. Pivot 
the square, swing around to 
number, mark, that's all ! All 
the rafter lengths, for any size 
building given in the rafter 
length booklet furnished with 
each square. Indispensable for 
inside trim work and home 
workshop. Is 3/16 in. thick. 
Use as a gauge for electric 
handsaw. No carpenter, home 
owner or farmer handy man 
should be without this modern 
tool. Sold on a money -back 
guarantee. No C.O.D. orders to 
Canada. 



Will Square 
8" Material 



Square with Rafter Book Postpaid 

and construction folder $4.25 



C.O.D. (Send $1.00 Deposit with Orders.) 
Extra Rafter Length Books can be Ordered if Needed. 50c 

SWANSON TOOL CO., 9] 13 S. SSrd Ave., Dept. HB, Oak Lawn, III. 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 
4vois.^8 




Inside Tridi Infonnitlon lor 
C3rpenters, Builders, Joiners, 
Building Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Guides 
give you the short-cut In- 
structions that you want-In- 
cluding new methods. Ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for 
the apprentice ... a practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere ara 
using these Guides as a Help- 
ing Hand to Easier Work, Bet- 
ter Work and Better Pay. ACT 
NOW . . . fill In and mall tlit 
FREE COUPON below. 



Inside Trade Information On: 

How to use the steel square — How to 
file and set saws — How to build fur- 
niture—How to use a mitre box — 
How to use the chalk line — How to 
use rules and scales — How to make Jointi 
—Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensu- 
ration problems — Estimating strength of 
timbers — How to set girders and .sills — 
How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs. — How to build houses, 
bams, garages, bungalows, etc. — How to 
read and draw plans — Drawing up speci- 
fications — How to excavate — How to use 
•ettlngs 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square 
—How to build hoists and scaffolds — sky- 
lights — How to build stairs. 



AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St, New York 10. N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vob., on 
7 days" free trial. If O.K. I will remit J 2 in 7 days and $2 ' 
monthly until J8, plus shipping charge, is paid. Otherwise 
I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfied. 




Cmploy»d by_ 



D 



SAVE SHIPPING CHARGESI Enclose Full Payment 
With Coupon and We Poy Shipping Charges. C-1 



SAVE MONEY 

Up to 50% off on 
FAMOUS BRAND TOOLS 

for CARPENTERS 
BUILDERS 
APPRENTICES 



HAND AND POWER TOOLS 

FOR HOME, FARM, SHOP, 

BUSINESS 

Tools made by the country's 

Foremost Manufacturers 
Before you buy — check our 
big, beautifully illustrated 
catalog. You can save hun- 
dreds of dollars a year on all 
types of band tools : power 
and manual. Nationally 
known makes, finest quality, 
lowest cost. 

Make extra money selling to 
friends, neighbors, fellow 
workers. Everyone you ap- 
proach is a prospect. NO 
STOCK TO CARRY. Show 
catalog and take orders. We 
ship direct to you. 

.lust pin $1 to this ad for 
NEW WHOLESALE TOOL 
CATALOG TODAY. ($1 re- 
fundable on first order) 

U. S. GENERAL SUPPLY 
Dept. 283, 149 Church St., New 



^^umis 



Black - Decker 
Channellock 
Plomb 
Disston 
Irwin 
Kennedy 
Marshalltown 
Miller Falls 
Lufkin 
Proto 
Wiss 
Stanley 
Thor 

Vise Grip 
Xcelite 
CORP. 
York, N. Y, 




faster boring 

in electric drills 



NEW IRWIN SPEEDBOR 

New spade type electric drill bit with Va" 
shank bores faster, cleaner in wood, plaster, 
plastics. Bore at any angle. Irwin's exclusive 
hollow ground point starts holes easier. 
Forged in one piece from solid bar of special 
analysis steel and heat tempered full length 
for longest life. Available in 17 sizes, V4" to 
1'/^", and roll kit sets. Sizes V4" to 1" only 
$.75 each. Sizes V/s" to V/2" only $1.25 
each. Buy from your Irwin Hardware or 
Building Supply dealer. 

Fastest Boring 62T Hand Brace 
Type. Only 16 turns to bore 1" 
holes through 1" wood. Double- 
cutter action, medium fost screw 
pitch, solid center design. Sizes 
'A" to 11/2". As low as $1 each. 




every bit as good 
as the name 

At Wilmington, Ohio, since 1885 



IRWIN 



with these 2 machines you can sharpen 
ALL HAND AND POWER LAWN MOWERS 

Here's a business where you can make a CASH PROFIT right 
away. The Foley Lawn Mower Sharpener handles up to 3 or 
4 reel type mowers per hour. Prices run $2.00 to $3.00 for 
hand mowers, $5.00 to $8.00 for power mowers. Tou get 99c 
profit out of each dollar. 

With the Foley Grinder you can sharpen rotary power mow- 
er blades, rip, cross-cut and combination circular saws, dado 
heads, ice skates, knives, scissors, shears, all sharp-edged tools. 
^jM^nl FBEE PLAN tells how to put yourself right into a 
I A0UV0 1 home business that will pay you $3 to $6 an hour. 
I mSbS I ^^"'^ coupon today for FREE BOOK on how to 
l***^ I sharpen power mowers and Special Combination Mon- 
ey Saving Offer No Obligation — no salesman will call. 




FOLEY MFG. CO., loi-oFoley Bld(., Minneapolis 18, Minn, 

Send Free Plon en lawn mower business ond Special 
Combination Offer. 



^ov)« "Vo^^ 



^0M« "VO^A. 




^AV\ NG^ 



• 



^^ 







^o\JR "v^^^^ 




"^^/JVING^ 



. THE 



MPENTER 

y FOUNDED 1881 

Officio/ ?\ih\\cQi\on of fhe 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America ^ 

FEBRUARY, 1960 






Protect 
Your Rights 




VOTE 



Copynghf 7955— THf MACHINIST lAl' 



,>M' 



United Brdtherhddd df Carpenters 
AND Joiners of America 



222 E. MICHIGAN ST., INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



PUZZLE: FIND AL 



Al's got himself lost in his job. 

He does his work. He draws his pay. 
He gripes, and hopes, and waits. But 
the big breaks never seem to come. 

You have to- hunt hard for Al. He's 
in a rut I 

Then, who's the figure standing out 
in tlie picture? That's Tom. Tom grew 
tired of waiting. He decided to act. He 
took three important steps: 

1. Wrote to I.C.S. for their three fa- 
mous career books. 

2. Enrolled for an I.C.S. job-related 
course. 

3. Started to apply— on the spot— what 
he was learning. 

Tiie otliers began to say, "Ask Tom, he 
knows." The supervisor began to take 
notice. The boss began to receive re- 
ports on Tom's progress. And Tom began 
to move! 

It's a fact worth remembering: An 
I.C.S. student always stands out! 
P. S.— You'll find men like Al everywhere 
—griping, hoping, waiting— reading this 
and skipping on. But forward-looking 
fellows like Tom will take time to inves- 
tigate, will mark and mail the coupon 
and get the three valuable career books 
free. They're men of action. And a few 
short months from now, you'll see them 
start to move I 



For Real Job Securily-Get an I. C. S. Diploma! I. C. S., Scranton 15, Penna. 




Accrediled Member, 
National Home Study Councit' 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 



BOX 03715B, SCRANTON 15, PENNA. (Partial list of 258 courses) 

Without tost of olilieaHor), send me "HOW to SUCCEED" and Ihe opportunity booklet about the field BEFORE which i have marked X Cp'us sample lesson): 



ARCHITECTURE 



D HealiriE 
D PainlinE ContracI 

D Plumbing ^ ^ 
D Reading Arch. Blueprints q si 

ART M 

D Commercial Art D T 

D Magazine lllus. c 

D Show Card and n A 



D Business Administration 
n Business Management 
D CosI Accounting 
D Creative Salesmanship 
D Managmg a Small Busines 
G Professional Secretary 



D Purchasing Agent 



ENGINEERING 



D Surveying and Mapping 

DRAFTING 
D AircraH Drafting 



D Electrical Drafting 
D ivieclianical Dralling 
D Sheet Metal Drafting 



1 School MalhemalicJ 



D Industrial Metallurgy 
D Industrial Safety 
D Machine Shop Practice 
D Mechanical 



n Industrial Electronics 

n Practical Radio-TV EngVg 

D Practical Telepltony 

D Radio-TV Servicing 

RAILROAD 

n Car Inspector and Air Brak 

a Diesel Electrician 

D Diesel Engr. and Fireman 

□ Diesel Locomotive 

STEAM and 
DIESEL POWER 

D Combustion Engineering 
D Power Plant Engineer 
D Stationary Diesel Engr, 
D Stationary Fireman 



D Aulo Body Rebuilding 



I Gas Prod, and Trans. 



D Pulp ana Paper Making 



D Practical Lineman Air Condilioning p, Te-ijie Fimshinp & Ovein 

a Professional EnHineer (Elec) D Tool Design D Tool Making ^ Throwing 

HIGH SCHOOL RADIO, TELEVISION D Warping and Weaving 

D High School Diploma D General Electronics Tech. □ Worsted Manulacluring 



. Special low monthly tuiti 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor /1UB0»PRESS| 





Carpenters' 


Building, 


222 


E. Michigan 


Street, 


Indianapolis 


4, 


Indiana >^ 


^ 


Established in 1881 
Vnl. LXXX— Xo. 2 






FEBRUARY, 1960 






One Dollar Per 
Ten Cents a 


Tear 
Copy 


.^. 



— Co nt ent s — 



Look What Science Finds In Trees! 



Once simply a source of lumber, wood long since has become the basic row mate- 
rial for a host of everyday products ranging from car tires to animal foods. And the 
surface has scarcely been scratched, the boys with the test tubes proclaim. 



Gleason's Dream House Of Wood 



8 



TV comedian Jackie Gleason doesn't do any joking >vhen it comes to selecting mate- 
rials for his new dream home. He chooses wood not only for its warmth and beauty, 
but also for its unbeatable acoustical properties and flexibility. At some future date 
you may be seeing Jackie broadcasting from his self-designed, 20th century palace. 

Shared Work Project Aids Youngsters - - 12 

Hundreds of Youngstown small fry will enjoy the pleasures of camp life next 
summer because organized labor successfully completed a rebuilding program at the 
Father Kane Camp during the past year. 

Labor Explores Prepaid Legal Aid - - - 16 

Organized labor pioneered in the field of prepaid medicine. It took many years of 
hard fighting to break down Medical Association opposition to group hea'th plans. 
Now different unions are experimenting with prepaid legal plans to combat the high 
price of legal aid. 

Victoria Member Makes Sailing History - - 21 

Brother John Guzzwell, a member of Local Union No. 2527, Victoria, recently wrote 
the greatest saga in the history of small boat sailing. In four years he piloted a 20- 
foot sailboat of his own make some 33,000 miles around the world. 

The Carpenter And His Eye Glasses - - 32 
"Business" Way Isn't Always Best - - - 34 



• • • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
What's New 
Official 
Editorials 
In Memoriam 
Outdoor Meanderings 
Correspondence 
Craft Problems 

Index to Advertisers 



* * • 



14 
19 
23 
24 
28 
30 
36 
41 

46 



COVER PHOTO: Tug hauling several million feet of logs from the newly-opened Nass River 
section of British Columbia. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

iu SectioD 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8. 1918. 



-J 



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Look What Science Finds In Trees! 




* * * 

HEN Pioneer IV plunged into outer space on March 3, 1959, it might 
well have gotten its final boost into eternity from a tree— a western 
hemlock or a southern pine. 

Whether yes or no, the Army isn't saying. But a form of cellulose— "the 
chemical from the tree"— might have provided the final charge for flinging the 
missile into perpetual orbit around the sun. For nitro-cellulose, a powerful 
explosive, is but one of the many uses to which science has put the tree's 
major chemical. 

Comprising 50% of the tree, cellulose is so important to man that one 
authority reports "no hot or cold war can be won without it." For cellulose is 




A 300 SL TAKES THE LEAD. Over 99% of the world's land speed records have been set 
on cellulose cord tires like those on car 38 above. — Photo courtesy of Mercedes-Benz. 



more widely used in our civilization 
than any other basic commodity with 
one exception: water. 

As common as clay, as abundant as 
air, cellulose is likely to be in the 
food you eat, the clothes you wear, 
the car you drive, even in the filter 
of your cigarette. 

It is in the photofilm you shoot, 
the bed you sleep in— and in scores 



of places you would least expect to 
find it. 

A finished cellulose product can be 
as soft as plush— like rayon or surgi- 
cal gauze. Or hard and tough like 
the casing of your telephone or 
the steering wheel in your car. Too, 
it can be durable and shock resistant 
like Tyrex cord for your auto and 
truck tires. 



THE C A 11 P E N T E R 



It may be transparent as it is in 
cellophane— or a powder in a deter- 
gent where it locks out dirt. It might 
be the casing of a hot dog, a "leath- 
erette" case for a camera or the coat- 
ing of a vitamin pill. 

It could be the lining in your best 
shoes, the substance of a sponge, a 
tool handle, or a plastic dish or cup. 
It is in lacquers and your shotgun 
shells and in just about every corner 



and weeds. (For reasons of economy, 
commercial cellulose comes from 
trees.) However, its simplicity stops 
there. As a very basic form of living 
matter, it holds one of Nature's high- 
ly guarded secrets. For scientists have 
yet to make a particle of cellulose 
synthetically. Perhaps that's why they 
approach it with such healthy respect. 
Nonetheless, within the past cen- 
tury, millions of tons of cellulose 




JUMBO! Weighing in at 7 to 12 tons, finished cellulose looks like white blotting paper. How- 
ever, one gram of cellulose contains over 5,000,000 chemical fibers. — Photo from Rayonier. 

of vour home— perhaps your home it- 
self. 



Chemically, cellulose is a carbohy- 
drate. The formula for its basic unit 
is exactly the same as the sugar "glu- 
cose," minus one molecule of water. 
A cellulose molecule is made up of 
hundreds of these basic units linked 
together in long chains. 

Physically, cellulose is more easily 
described. It is the skeleton of all 
plant life— of the rose as well as of 
the giant redwood; of grass, shrubs 



from western hemlock and southern 
pine— two popular sources— have been 
turned out for hundreds of industries 
producing over 6500 useful, everyday 
products. 

Science calls cellulose a "polymer," 
or giant molecule. It is from the 
chemistry of polymers that come all 
our synthetics, plastics and "miracle" 
fibers in their wide range of colors 
and textures. 

As a natural resource of unimagin- 
able potential, cellulose is unique in 



THE CARPENTER 



that it is replenishable. Unlike min- 
erals or petroleum, cellulose is readily 
replaceable— simply by growing new 
trees. 

One company, Rayonier, which pro- 
cesses over a billion pounds of cellu- 
lose a year, maintains vast tree farms 
in the U. S. A. and Canada where 
the land is re-seeded in a dynamic 
and continuing conservation pro- 
gram. 

The same company also conducts 
extensive research, exploring the pos- 
sibilities of cellulose as well as its 
potentially interesting "kissin' cou- 
sins" only recently named tlie "silvi- 
chemicals." 

Researchers believe these silvi- 
chemicals— tree chemicals other than 
cellulose— can eventually become to 
the forest products industries what 
petro-chemicals today are to the oil 
industry: valuable co-products. Ray- 
onier is now marketing five of them. 
One, for example, is important to oil 
well drilling. 

No one knows, and fewer still will 
predict, what the future of these 
amazing "chemicals-that-grow" may 
be. However, in the wastes of the 
cellulose industry perhaps lies a new 
way to help feed the human race. 
For right now some of these silvi- 
chemicals are providing a new origin 
for animal feeds. 

And there are hints that whole 
families of chemical-medicinal com- 
pounds may emerge from this new 
science of silvichemistry. 

Such tree chemicals as tall oil, an- 
other cellulose co-product, account 
for a varied group of industrial chem- 
icals whose applications, though nu- 
merous, are growing vigorously. Tall 
oil is nov/ in hundreds of products 
ranging from paints, varnishes and lu- 
bricants to linoleum and soap. 

Meanwhile the expanding uses of 
cellulose tell much about the scien- 



tific progress of a country— and even 
more about its living standard. For 
cellulose is intimately associated with 
better living: the more consumed, the 
higher a nation's standard of living. 

In the U. S. A., for example, we 
use about 430 lbs. per person a year 
—the world's top consumption. On the 
other hand, a Russian "comrade" 
squeaks by on just 27 lbs., and Red 
China uses a scant three pounds per 
capita annually. But a Chinese living 
in Free Formosa consumes 14 lbs. a 
year! 

Chemists are the least inclined to 
make predictions. However, they will 




FALLEN GIANT. In the Northwest the big 
trees are today's econonmical source of cellulose. 
But in the South smaller, faster-growing south- 
ern pine provide the chemicals. 

go this far: "There is no limiting rea- 
son why chemicals from trees can't 
be further developed and marketed 
to help fill almost all the basic wants 
of the human race, at economical 
prices." A pretty startling statement 
when you analyze it. 

But even as the scientists uncover 
an ever-expanding storehouse of 
chemical raw materials in wood, lum- 
ber—the primary product of trees- 
goes on improving, too. There is 
every reason to believe that extruded 
lumber— tailor-made to specifications 
of density, hardness, and tensile 
strength— is just around the corner. 



Gleason's Dream House Of Wood 

• • 

TELEVISION and Stage Star Jackie Gleason, who is accustomed to 
doing things in a big, spectacular way, has just completed building him- 
self a new house— and by every count, it measures up to another "spec- 
tacular." It also adds up to a tremendous tribute to the versatility, beauty, and 
permanence of wood construction. 






Seated like a huge dome cakepan on a rocky bluff overlooking the Hudson River is 
Jackie Gleason's flamboyant new home of wood and glass. Called Round Rock, the half million 
dollar spectacular echoes the personality of a man racing to become a true legend of Broadway 
in the same tradition as Ziegfeld and George M. Cohan. 

The house sits high on the rocky, forested hills that overlook the Hudson 
River above New York City. The massive structure, weighing around 700 tons 
with an overall length of 175 feet, is cantilevered from the hillside on trusses. 
At night, with lights pouring from its floor-to-ceiling windows, the house 



THE CARPENTER 



seems to be weightless, hovering alone 
in space like a giant oblongated fly- 
ing sphere. 

Architect Gerard Silverman, of 
New York City, who translated Jackie 
Gleason's thoughts and plans into a 
flowing marble, wood, and glass 
shovi^place, had to come up with a 
new architectural category to describe 
the Gleason design concept for news- 
men. The word he found was "musi- 
cal." 

And "musical" is the key to the 
"why's" and "how's" of Jackie Glea- 
son's new architectural creation. 

The job he put before the archi- 
tects was a demanding one. The 
house, he said, must be acoustically 
perfect, so he could rehearse and 
broadcast many types of shows— pan- 
tomimes, dramatic sketches, dancing 
and singing numbers. 

The house was two years in the 
building. It is of wood construction 
except for some of its terraces, ramps, 
and a small portion of the total floor 
area; and being essentially circular in 
form, the woods used in it have been 
shaped to follow the curved pattern. 

Even the three-quarter-inch wood 
flooring planks have been individual- 
ly laid into a continuous curve to 
conform to the outlines of the rooms. 
Solid wood doors have been care- 
fully curved to carry out this circu- 
lar over-all plan, as have the doors 
of each bookcase and cabinet. 

Because of wood's acoustical qual- 
ities, as well as its beauty of grain 
and texture, the architects designed 
laminated boat-shaped rafters and 
floor joists, employing them both for 
structural support and for diffusion of 
sound and light in a building whose 
first need was for acoustical perfec- 
tion. Laminated wood was shaped 
out into compound curved railings to 
serve the numerous ramps between 
the house's three levels. Wood desks, 



cabinets, chairs and tables were es- 
pecially designed to conform to the 
unique requirements. 

The room lay-out is a complex pat- 
tern of interweaving circles and semi- 
circles. 

The heart of the structure is the im- 
mense studio-living room area of the 
middle level. The room measures 55 
feet from the front windows to the 
rear wall— and connects with the rec- 
reation room. Light shines into it 




In this room on the upper level of the studio, 
Jackie Gleason works at his semi-circular desk 
(in right foreground) and can look at the short- 
wave and television receivers housed in blond 
wood cabinets at the left of the picture. Stout 
wooden grill in rear of picture supplies graceful 
decoration and added structural strength. At 
top, note the boat-shaped rafters and, at right 
top, the curved, suspended canopy of wood. 

from all sides. Connections for mi- 
crophones and other broadcasting 
equipment were set inconspicuously 
into its floor. A television projector 
and a large screen for life-size tele- 
vision showings have been built into 
the studio ceiling, to come down or 
retract by electrical control. 

Along the front wall of the studio 
stands a massive chimney of white 
Carrara marble, with two interior 
fireplaces facing into the room and a 
third one, for outdoor barbecues, fac- 
ing on a terrace. This 240-ton chim- 
ney, custom-made in Italy, stands 40 
feet high. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



A circular area about 30 feet in 
diameter occupies the rear portion of 
tlie combined living room and studio. 
Around tlie edge of the circle runs a 
1,500 gallon aquarium, its glass top 
set flush with the floor. Small bass, 
perch, and pike, caught in a nearby 



Wooden canopies, suspended from 
the ceilings of several rooms, house 
speakers and indirect lighting. Each 
was carefully fabricated into a com- 
pound curve pattern at an outside 
shop before being shipped to the site 
for installation. 




A far cry from the coldwater flat of Ralph Cramdon, this is the heart of Gleason's castle, 
reached by a curving wooden stairway from the upper level. Where piano is, Gleason will put on 
broadcasts and rehearsals. Note slim laminated wooden supporting columns with aluminum foot- 
ings. At top, a central light well and the boat-shaped rafters with sound and light equipment 
set in. — All photos by National Lumber Manufacturers Association. 



brook on the nine-acre estate, swim 
around in the semi-circular tank. 
Banks of plants and vines grow 
along the edge of the room, as they 
do on several front terraces and in 
other rooms. 

The Gleason House abounds in 
spectacular features. 



Gleason's "work desk" is an eleven- 
foot-long curved wood showpiece. 
The desk is so planned that sitting 
behind it on a revolving chair, he can 
swing around to compose a tune on 
an electric organ without getting up. 

The bedroom is ranged around a 
vast circular bed, eight feet, seven 



THE CARPENTER H 

inches in diameter. A laminated wood ter to keep them clear of ice and 

"canopy" has been placed directly snow. 

over the bed with a television set xhe house sports a 20-ton air-con- 
built into it. The screen is slanted for ditioning unit and an electrical sys- 
direct viewing by the occupant of the tem, planned to handle broadcasting 
bed who can select the programs and from the site, which require 600 
adjust the image by remote control amperes to operate. A high-fidelity 
without getting out of bed. sound system can send music through- 

A handsome 22-foot bar has stools out the building from an automatic 

carved from solid wood. selection of 400 recordings. 

Marble terraces along the front of The recordings, of course, are Jack- 

the building at the upper and lower ie's own compositions and arrange- 

levels are electrically heated in win- ments. 



POVERTY STILL HAUNTS MILLIONS IN U. S. 

The glittering picture of an America filled with prosperity and comfort 
—a picture painted by much of the press and many political leaders— is bit- 
terly false for nearly a fifth of all Americans, or over 32 million people. 

That's the conclusion of a study of the nation's "low income population" 
prepared for the Congressional Economic Committee by Robert J. Lampman, 
economics professor at the University of Wisconsin. 

Using official figures, Lampman found that in 1957 fully 19 per cent of 
all Americans had poverty incomes. He defined such incomes as $2,500 a year 
or less (at 1957 prices) for a family of four— and correspondingly less or more 
for smaller or larger families. For a family of two, for example, the poverty 
income level would be $1,638 or less a year. 

Thus, nearly a fifth of all Americans live in deep poverty. In addition, 
Lampman found, 30 million more live on the fringe of poverty— making less 
than enough to maintain modest but "adequate" living standards. 

This minimum "adequate" income is officially estimated at $4,000 a year 
(at 1957 prices) for a family of four. In 1957, Lampman found, 36 per cent of 
all Americans— 62,000,000 people— had less than this minimum "adequate" 
income. 

The bright side of Lampman's report is that between 1947 and 1957 several 
million Americans did manage to rise out of the lowest poverty level. The 
percentage of all Americans below "the poverty level dropped from 26 per 
cent in 1947 to 19 per cent in 1957, Lampman said. 

* 

LABOR TO HELP PROBE HOSPITAL COSTS 

Organized labor in the Chicago area is backing a study of the constantly rising costs 
of hospital care. 

President William A. Lee of the Chicago Federation of Labor took the initiative in 
calling a meeting attended by President John M. Fevvkers of the Chicago Teachers Union, 
who is chairman of the Federation's Health and Welfare Committee as well as represen- 
tative of the medical profession. 

A committee was set up to study the situation. It included representatives of labor, 
the Chicago Medical Society, the Chicago Hospital Council and the Blue Cross-Blue Shield 
hospital and medical care plans. 

The meeting, which was the first of its kind to be held in the Midwest area, voted to 
invite representatives of management to participate in its work. 



12 



Shared Work Project Aids Youngsters 

• • 

A150UT this time of the year )oungsters begin dreaming seriously about 
l-\ summer eamp and the joys of getting back to nature. Youngstown, 
-^ -^ Ohio, voimgsters are no exception. And many of them from under- 
prix'ileged homes will have their dreams fulfilled next summer because the 
Building Trades Unions and the Steel Workers of Youngstown spent a good 
deal of time last year expanding and refurbishing the Father Kane Camp. 

The Father Kane Camp is operated by the Diocese of Youngstown and is 
open to all youths 7 to 16 regardless of race, creed or color. Year by year 
the camp facilities hav^e been insufficient to meet the growing demands made 
on it. Last summer the Building 
Trades Unions and Steel Workers de- 
cided to take a hand. 

They set up a program under which 
the Steel Workers donated the neces- 
sary material and the Buildinsf trades- 
men donated the working time nec- 
essary to expand and modernize the 
camp. 

The job started May 2, 1959, and 
was completed July 2, 1959. The vari- 
ous crafts worked for eight straight 
Saturdays and Sundays to complete 
the job. 

The five cabins, on the camp site 
\\hen the job was started, were com- 
pletely remodeled with new asphalt 
roofs, and general repairs were made. 
Two toilets, two lavatories and a 
drinking fountain were installed in 
each cottage. Each cabin had a com- 
plete paint job. 

The dining hall was painted inside 
and out. A completely new shower 
room, 20 ft. x 20 ft., was built with 
16 showers and a dressing room. 
They also built five completely new 
cottages with toilets, lavatories and 
drinking fountains. The swimming 
pool and other camp equipment were 
all painted. A completely new sewer 
system was installed, and slag drives 




Brotherhood members in Youngstown demon- 
strating that the word has a real place in our 
name. 

were made around and through the 
camp at a total cost of a little over 
$40,000. 

Locals within the Building Trades 
whose members donated many hours 
of work include: Carpenters of Local 
No. 171; Bricklayers of Local No. 8; 
Painters of Local No. 476; Electri- 
cians of Local No. 64; Laborers of 
Local No. 125; Plumbers of Local No. 
87; Sheetmetal workers of Local No. 
5, plus men from the Steelworkers 
who helped handle material on the 
job and served lunches to the work- 
men. In all, nearly 500 workmen had 
a hand in making this project a suc- 
cess. 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



Father William Slipski, director of 
the camp, in accepting the unions' 
gift, said: 

"Our prayers have been answered. 
The public should be grateful,, as I 



motive for our youngsters. Their ded- 
ication should never be forgotten." 

Charles Bishop, executive secretary 
of the Carpenters District Council 
and president of the United Labor 




This is the spic and span environment in which many under-privileged Youngstown youngsters 
will spend many happy hours this summer. 



am, that we have such public-spirited 
AFL-CIO leaders of all faiths, who 
have joined together and undertaken 
this project out of a humanitarian 



Congress, served as chairman of the 
project committee. Carl DeNiro, 
Steelworkers staff representative, act- 
ed as committee secretary-treasurer. 



BUYING POWEK TOO LOW, SURVEY SHOWS 

Consumer sentiment to purchase new cars, appliances and other products 
"must improve considerably during the next few months if 1960 is to be a 
really good year" for durable goods, the Survey Research Center of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan reports. 

The findings are based on a survey during October and November which 
found that the steel strike had spread uneasiness and caution among con- 
sumers. But aside from the steel dispute, said the survey, "the recovery in 
sentiment from the 1958 recession was slower than the recovery from the 
1953-54 recession." 

In 1954, it noted, a sharp upsurge in optimism stimulated consumer de- 
mand. In November, 1959, consumer expectations were not "sufficiently 
buoyant" to provide the buying push in line with the rising level of spending 
indicated by income trends. 

Other factors giving rise to uncertainty among consumers are rising inter- 
est rates and uneasiness over inflation. The high interest rate concern is re- 
flected in a drop in the number of families planning to purchase homes in 
1960, the survey said. 




SSI P 



OF CONGRESSMEN AND CATS 

Congressman Albert Rains of Alabama 
has introduced a new housing bill designed 
to prop up the sagging home buying mar- 
ket. Tight money brought on a serious de- 
cline in housing starts last year and all 
indications point to further declines in 
1960 as tight money policy jells more 
solidly. 

Congressman Rains' bill undoubtedly will 
get lip service from many colleagues in 
preliminary skirmishes, but when the chips 
are down on a final vote, most of them 
will chicken out in one way or another. 

The situation sort of reminds us of the 
tomcat who was courting a real lovely. 

"I love you so much I would gladly die 
for >"0u," he breathed in her shell pink ear. 

Being a very practical kitten, she asked: 
"How many times?" 

That's how it is with labor legislation; the 
last \ote is the one that really means 
something. 

* * • 

CANDID COMiMENTS 

Think nothing of the rudeness all around 
you tliese days, for it is almost impossible 
to be polite without someone wondering 
■\^'hat >ou want. 




'*My last name is PRAUFITZl" 



QUESTIONABLE BARGAIN 

The exodus of northern firms to the 
south on the promise of free taxes, docile 
labor, no unions, etc., continues unabated 
even though many such firms have found 
out that cheap labor and inexpensive labor 
are not always the same thing. A large In- 
dian rubber plant recently sueeumbed to 
the lure of no taxes and unorganized labor 
proffered by a southern state. 

The firms that swallow such bait are not 
the only ones disillusioned at times. Many 
southern towns that pirated northern in- 
dustry found that their costs for more 
schools, more sewers, more police and fire 
protection more than over-balanced the ad- 
vantages of an additional industry. 

Every time we hear of such a case we 
think of an Irishman who bought a broken- 
down horse at the county fair for next to 
nothing. When he got the nag home he 
offered it a bucket of oats, but it refused 
to eat. Then he offered it a bucket of water 
and it refused to drink. 

Turning to his son with a greedy gleam 
in his eye, the Irishman said: 

"Son, if he turns out to be a good worker, 
we really got ourselves a bargain." 

• * • 
CASE DISMISSED 

The judge was righteously indignant. 

^"I can't think of anything worse than a 
man beating up his wife," he said to the 
defendant sternly, "What made you do it?" 

"Well," said the man, "she kept saying: 
'Hit me! Go ahead and hit me! I'll have 
you brought before that bald-headed old 
baboon of a judge in court, and he'll fix 
you!" 

• • • 
SEE-WORTHY 

On the beach a genial fat man watched 
a group of shapely young ladies in scanty 
swim suits as they went through their morn- 
ing setting-up exercises. 

"Do you think this sort of thing is real- 
ly good for reducing?" a sour-visaged ac- 
quaintance demanded. 

"Unquestionably," beamed the fat man. 
"Why, I walk three miles every morning 
to watch it." 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



SOMETHING TO REMEMBER 

Not long ago, a beautiful waitress in a 
Western town was awarded $10,000 in a 
breach of promise suit against a wealthy 
banker. As she was leaving the court a 
car ran her down and fractured eight of 
her ribs. In the same court she eventually 
was awarded $17 in damages for the in- 
juries she sustained. 

Actually, there is not much to this story 
except for the fact it contains a moral: 
never play with a woman's heart— kick her 
in the ribs instead. 

* • * 
CANDID COMMENTS 

Nobody is lonelier than the parents in a 
one-car family with teenage children. 

• • • 
FEATHERBEDDING AT ITS WORST 

Having milked the "corruption" angle for 
all it was worth, the Big Business spokes- 
men are svdtching to "featherbedding" as 
their new propaganda weapon against la- 
bor. Day in and day out, unions are pic- 
tured as obstructionists to progress who in- 
sist on more men than a job demands. 

Years ago such pipe dreams as bricklayers 
laying only a specified number of bricks 
per day and carpenters tearing down cab- 
inets only to reassemble them were proved 
to be hogwash. But they are still being 
bandied about by paid propagandists. 

And every job that doesn't have a man 
working every second— regardless of the fact 
that safety of life, limb and property may 
be involved by his presence— is termed 
featherbedding. 

Apparently England, too, is having a rash 
of featherbedding propaganda, because a 
union official recently wrote the following 
piece after attending a band concert: 

For considerable periods the four flute 
players had nothing to do. The number of 
flutes should be reduced and the work 
spread more evenly over the whole concert 
to eUminate peaks and valleys of activity. 

All 12 violins were playing identical notes. 
This makes 11 featherbedders. If larger 
volume is required, an electronic amplifier 
could be used. 

There was much needless repetition, too. 
Scores could be pruned drastically. No use- 
ful purpose is served by having the horns 
repeat a passage that was just played by 
the strings. 

By putting in all these efficiency meas- 
ures, the two-hour concert can be reduced 
to 20 minutes with a 75% cut in stafi^. 



NOT YET, BUT SOON 

The encroachments of automation can 
no longer be escaped even in death. 

According to a clipping from the labor 
press, a "mechanical grave digger" is now 
at work in St. Louis. It can dig a grave in 
half an hour— a task which is reported 
formerly to have required eight hours for 
two men with the traditional pick and 
shovel. 

Even the toughest ground, previously re- 
quiring loosening with compressed air 
equipment, gives way before the machine, 
it is said. 

So far, there are no reports of mechan- 
ized clergy presiding at the services. But 
don't under-estimate Bell Telephone Com- 
pany. 

* * • 
LIFE'S LIKE THAT 

A new lawyer had just opened up his 
office. "All! A client already," he thought 
as he saw the door opening. "I must impress 
him." 

He picked up tlie telephone. "No, I'm 
very sorry. I can't take your case, even for 
$1,000," he said. "I'm too busy." 

He replaced the receiver and looked at 
his caller. "And now, what can I do for 
you?" he asked briskly. 

"Nothing, really," was the reply. "I just 
came to connect your telephone." 




"Union meeting?... Gosh, I'd 
like lo, Fred, but I don't have 
time!" 



16 



How To Buy Wisely 



LABOR EXPLORES PREPAID LEGAL AID 

* * 

By SIDNEY MARGOLIUS 

Labor's Consumer Expert 

L\BOR UNIONS, which pioneered prepaid medical care for working 
families, now are investigating the possibility of providing prepaid legal 
■care. Los Angeles hotel and restaurant unions recently surveyed mem- 
bers'* legal problems and are exploring ways to make available legal aid on a 
prepaid basis. Other local unions have developed a number of methods of pro- 
viding such help. The AFL-CIO Community Services Activities also is survey- 
ing the various ways unions and other civic organizations provide legal help for 
members as part of the CSA consumer-guidance program. 

Undoubtedly your family, if it's at all typical, from time to time could 
use legal protection and advice if it were available at reasonable cost. Many 
of the financial scrapes working fam- 



ilies get into would be avoided if 
they could afford to consult a lawyer 
first. No businessman ever signs a 
contract without having a lawyer 
read it first. No moderate-income 
family ever does have a lawyer read 
a contract, except in rare instances. 

Many consumer frauds in the sale 
of cars, home repairs, furniture and 
other goods and services have their 
roots in tricky contracts. Many con- 
sumers don't even read contracts 
themselves before signing. Even when 
they do, the legal language is hard to 
understand. Sometimes buyers even 
sign contracts in blank, thus leaving 
themselves open to serious over- 
charges for finance fees. At the end 
of this report you'll find a checklist of 
gyps based on contract tricks, which 
buyers need to beware of. 

Consumer frauds are this depart- 
ment's major concern, but aren't the 
only reason a family may need legal 
help. An analysis of the Los Angeles 
survey by Paul Mendenhall of the 
Community Services Activities staff, 
found that the most frequent prob- 
lems requiring ur-gent legal help 



were traffic cases, followed by mari- 
tal problems; cases involving collec- 
tion of money; naturalizations; sales 
of homes; non-job personal injuries; 
landlord disputes, and violations of 
law other than traffic cases. 

Just as group health insurance pays 
your medical bill if you get sick, the 
Los Angeles plan would "insure" 
wage-earners against legal expenses. 
Workers and their employers would 
contribute to a fund. Then a family 
would get legal help when needed 
without further cost or by payment of 
only a modest fee. 

One of the most important values 
of such a group legal plan is that it 
could provide "preventive" legal care, 
just as the checkups provided by 
group medical plans help prevent 
small illnesses from becoming seri- 
ous ones. 

One problem is that a legal-care 
plan may face the same opposition 
from lawyers' associations— bar as- 
sociations — that group medical - care 
plans got from the American Medical 
Association for many years. 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



However, a number of individual 
lawyers have announced approval of 
the legal-care proposal. Los Angeles 
attorney James Denison has pointed 
out that without some such system, 
in actual practice genuine justice is 
only for the rich. A lawyer may un- 
dertake a big case, such as a serious 
accident injury, on a contingent basis. 
That is, his fee would be a percen- 
tage of the settlement if you win, say, 
25-40 per cent. But it won't pay him 
to take a small case on this basis. 
Thus, moderate-income families who 
have suffered some personal or finan- 
cial wrong often must lick their 
wounds in silence because legal ex- 
penses come too high, Denison ob- 
serves. 

But the bar associations have a "can- 
on of ethics" which opposes giving 
legal help without fee to members of 
an organization, by a lawyer em- 
ployed by the organization. 

Many union locals and lodges now 
do have informal or even organized 
methods of providing legal help. One 
common method simply is to send 
the member to the local's own attor- 
ney who will provide at least an ini- 
tial consultation with little or no fee. 

Another method some unions use is 
to provide a legal clinic one night a 
week, when members can consult a 
lawyer. Such a plan especially can 
help avoid consumer frauds, if mem- 
bers can be convinced to wait a few 
days before they sign contracts. No 
reputable seller tries to pressure buy- 
ers into signing contracts right away, 
but is willing to let you take the doc- 
ument home to study. 

One international union's legal de- 
partment now conducts a column in 
the union's newspaper discussing le- 
gal problems sent in by members. Its 
popularity is another evidence of the 
need for legal help for wage-earners. 



Without such organizational serv- 
ices, families without much money 
have a problem. There are Legal Aid 
Societies in some large cities, but they 
mostly take only the cases of nearly- 
destitute people. Nor do they provide 
the preventive advice people need to 
keep out of legal jams. 

Some local bar associations have a 
referjal service for people of moder- 
ate means. This provides names of 
local attorneys who will take cases at 
"minimum" fees. This system may be 
of some help to you if need arises. 
But it doesn't feally solve the prob- 
lem. There is no insurance against 
catastrophic legal problems in which 
anyone can get involved, and the 
"minimum" fees themselves are only 
relatively moderate. In many cities 
lawyers now charge $20 to $25 an 
hour for their services if you pay the 
full going fee. 

In case of a serious legal involve- 
ment in which you or a member of 
your family might have to stand trial, 
some cities have the Public Defender 
system. This is a great liberal concept 
since it guarantees defense for an ac- 
cused person with little means. But in 
reality, the Public Defender's office 
often is understaffed and over-crowd- 
ed with cases. Still, the Public De- 
fender, where available, is considered 
a more thorough plan than the court- 
appointed lawyers used in some areas 
to defend people without means. 

Without a legal-care plan, it's dou- 
bly important to watch contracts 
closely. Here are tips on some tricks 
you need to guard against: 

—Most installment-purchase con- 
tracts nowadays are turned over by 
the dealer to a bank or finance com- 
pany. Do you have written assurance 
from the dealer that he will make 
good on the guarantee or replace the 
merchandise if it is defective? You 
also need to read the guarantee itself 



IS THECARPENTER 

carefully. Some complaints are now tution." So you've got to pay whether 

being received from used-car buyers you get the promised bonuses or not. 

that warranties are worded so that re- t> ^ -^ • „ ^ ^^^^A "^^ 

„ , 1 11 —Beware signmg so-called re- 

pans arent really guaranteed on all • 4. " i,- u n- « -^ 

^ p , ^ ^ ceipts which canvassers sellmg ew- 

parts or the car. 1 . i « v^ ' , 

^ elry or watches on approval may 

-Add-on contracts are a special ^q^^ r^^vese often are actually pur- 
problem in the installment furniture ^hase contracts which include an as- 
business. The new purchase is added signment of your wages if you fail to 
on to the old contract. This means p^y or try to return the merchandise, 
you can lose goods all or mostly paid -Don't sign an FHA completion 
for, if you default on the most recent certificate of a home-repair job until 
purchase. ^^ jq]^ actually has been completed 

—Beware referral schemes which to your approval. 

promise you a bonus if you send in t 1 r ..i • i. • 

^ r .1 { r 1 —Look tor the wage assignment m 

names ot other prospects tor such „ t 1 i i 

goods as garbage-disposers or fire- installment contracts. It may be hard 

alarm systems. One contract this writ- *« 6^^^?^ '^ garnishee if an assign- 

er recently saw, says specifically that ^ent is included, as it often is. Some- 

"The referral program does not re- times a wage assignment may be 

fleet or have any bearing on your palmed off on you at the bottom page 

monthly payment to the lending insti- of the contract you are signing. 



DRUG FIRMS EXPECT NO REFORM BILL 

Exposures of price gouging and shocking profiteering in the drug industry 
are not worrying the drug makers, if a survey conducted by the Wall Street 
Journal is correct. The drug companies fear neither Congressional curbs nor 
crack-down action by the Federal Trade Commission. 

"Drug makers say they have rarely felt better," the Wall Street paper 
reported after querying officers of 16 big drug manufacturers. "Drug pro- 
ducers insist the (government) inquiries will bring little if any change in 
present research and marketing activities . . . the companies have apparently 
made no change in their business methods." 

Behind the big drug makers' optimism, the WSJ indicated, lies the sub- 
stantial rise in sales and profits they achieved in 1959 over the already high 
1958 figures. "They look for more of the same in 1960," the Wall Street paper 
added. 

The Senate probers, after focusing first on anti-arthritis drugs, will also 
hold hearings on high-priced antibiotics, tranquilizers and anti-diabetic drugs. 
The drug makers expect a few "uneasy moments" from this, the WSJ indicated. 

But the drug manufacturers note that after Kefauver and his group, in 
previous years, exposed profiteering and price-fixing in steel and autos, neither 
Congress nor the courts did anything to stop it. Drug makers, said the WSJ, 
"take comfort" in that fact. 

The fact that abuses uncovered in a few unions brought on the labor 
"reform" bill apparently does not upset the drug makers. They realize that 
a tremendous anti-labor campaign was necessary to put over the Landrum 
Bill, and certainly Big Business has no intention of financing a similar cam- 
paign against one of its own. 



WhaVsJNev^ 

This column is devoted to new developments in materials and products of interest to members 
of crafts which are a part of the United Brotherhood. The articles are presented merely to inform 
our readers, and are not to be considered an endorsement by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. 

For information concerning products which are described in this column, please do not write to 
THE CARPENTER or the General Office, but address all queries to the manufacturer, whose name 
appears at the close of each article. 



Williold Casein Glue is a new protein 
glue for laminating beams, bonding oily 
woods, and for use where joints are not 
perfectly fitted. Bonds are said to be water- 




iUllHCIIOI 



tmesf quaitfy 



CASEIN GLUE No. 541-A 
POR WOOD LAMINATING 

fEDERAL SPECIRCAIiON MMM-A-'-S 
Type I itrtd i 




and mold-resistant. The product mixes in 
cold water and can be used at low tempera- 
tures above freezing to over 100 °F. Com- 
plies with Federal Specification MMI\I-A125. 
Available in 5 Tb. cans and 50 IB. bags. 
Write Wilhold Products Co., Div. of Acorn 
Adhesive Co., Inc., Los Angeles 31 or Chi- 
cago 44. 

• 

Shown is a new corner bar attachment to 
run shower curtains around corners where 
gaps between wall and curtain may allow 
water to escape to the floor. A circular 




clamp connects corner bar to curtain rod 
wdth screw and bolt. Available from Forest 
Specialties Co., 13000 Athens Ave., Cleve- 
land 7, Ohio. 



A new lightweight %" drill with %" ca- 
pacity in steel and %" in hardwood is 
claimed to give 50% more torque than 
%" models. It featmres a series 2.6 amp 
1,000 rpm motor, double reduction steel 




)) 



V_;' 



gears and special bronze bearings, and 
comes equipped with lock-type release trig- 
ger switch, six-foot cord and auxiliary han- 
dle. Write Portable Electric Tools, Inc., 
320 W. 83rd St., Chicago 20, 111. 



A new burglar-proof window lock allows 
ventilation and safety without possibility of 
entry and can be installed on either side of 
any double-hung window. Free acting on 



'fl 




rJ 




PATEkT 
PENDING- 



downward motion of sasli, the lock has posi- 
tive locking position every two inches up to 
eight inches when lower sash is raised. 
Product of Foldo Products, 5846 Haverford 
Ave., Indianapolis 20, Ind. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



A new unit of a line of automatic equip- 
ment for building complete, pre-assenibled 
door and jamb units is the Turn-A-Bore 
Hardware Application Machine, which cuts 
time required to attach hinges, lock and 
striker plate to two minutes, it is said. 
The door is placed in the machine, where it 
is mechanically positioned to successive re- 
quirements as operator activates the power 




screw gun, suspended from machine's bal- 
anced radial arm, to apply hardware. Ma- 
chine is also used to mortise door and jamb 
for hinge butts, mortise and drill for striker 
plate, drill for lock, mortise and drill for 
lock piston, it is claimed. Address Dept. E, 
Turn-A-Bore Equipment Co., P. O. Box 
7072, Fort Worth, Texas. 



One of a new line of 7 chain saws, the 
McCulloch ONE/60 is a gear drive saw 
for bucking pulpwood, cutting sileage, saw- 
ing railroad ties, mine timbers or dock pil- 
ings, and other jobs where extra power is 
needed, cutting to within SVi" of ground. 
The manufacturers also claim that two oil- 




ing systems keep chain well lubricated in 
any type of wood. Comes with either regu- 
lar cutting bar or plunge bow. McCulloch 
Corp., 6101 W. Century Blvd., Los Angeles 
45. Calif. 



The Post Anchor protects wood posts rest- 
ing on concrete slabs from termite rot and 
deterioration. Type "A" has built-in anchor 
for presetting on forms prior to pouring 
slab. Anchor is automatically imbedded in 
the concrete, and af- 
ter the forms are 
stripped a standoff 
plate which keeps the 
post off the bottom is 
inserted in the metal 
box. Weep holes 
drain any water flow- 
ing down the post. 
Type "O" anchor is 
available without built-in anchor and at- 
taches to existing slabs for drilling for a V2" 
shield and bolting with a lag screw. Write 
to Advance Metal Products, Inc., 2445 N. 
W. 76th St., Miami 47, Fla. 




Two easily installed models of the auto- 
matic Hydra-Close will fit most inside doors 
and feature a hood that conceals the work- 
ing unit for greater attractiveness. Of brass 




finish, the closer's hydraulic action is her- 
metically sealed for life and never needs 
oiling or adjustment, it is claimed. Ad- 
dress T & R Service & Manufacturing Co., 
P. O. Box 52, Dept. 25, Crystal Lake, 111. 



A new precision-made extension for elec- 
tric drill bits, the Irwin E88 is said to fit 
all makes of power bits with Vi" shanks 
and to provide an extra 12" reach. An Allen 






wrench is supplied for tightening set screw 
that securely locks extension to bit shank. 
Two E88's can also be locked together by 
set screw for 24" reach. For heavy duty 
use. Manufactm-ed by the Irwin Auger Bit 
Co., Wilmington, Ohio. 



21 



Yictoria Member Makes Sailing History 

• • 

WHEN the unpaid bills pile up, when the job becomes monotonous, 
when the hurry, hurry, hurry o£ modern living becomes nearly 
unbearable, have you ever dreamed of chucking it all and heading 
for far-off places? Do names like Mozambique, Tambora, and Savaii set your 
blood to coursing faster? 

If you are such a person (and who isn't?) the exploits of Brother John 
Guzzwell of Local Union No. 2527, Victoria, B. C, must hold a special 
appeal. Last Fall, Brother Guzzwell sailed his tiny 20-foot yawl, the Trekka, 
back into Victoria Harbor after a 33,000 mile, four-year jaunt around the 
world. All Victoria accorded him a tremendous welcome, since his sailing 
feats surpassed anything ever attempted by any other sailor. 

Brother Guzzwell left Victoria in — — — — — 

Within two years the Trekka, as 

neat and trim a yawl as ever sliced 
through the waters of Victoria Har- 
bor, was completed. Shortly there- 
after he embarked on his record-shat- 
tering journey that took him to most 
of the remote corners of the earth. 

Now Brother Guzzwell is back in 
Victoria re-employed at his old job 
and an active member of Local Un- 
ion No. 2527 once more. The Trekka 
rides at her moorage as stout and as 
sound as the day she first hit the 
water. But dusts and the memories of 
far-off places still cling to them both. 

Nearly two-thirds of Page 1 of the 
Victoria Colonist was devoted to a 
welcome-home story about Brother 
Guzzwell and his unprecedented feat 
of seamanship. It is the hope of Local 
Union No. 2527 that the Provincial 
Government can be prevailed upon to 
purchase the Trekka and preserve it 
as a monument to commemorate the 
historic saga chalked up by the daunt- 
less cabinetmaker-sailor. 

Only a sailor can appreciate the ob- 
stacles Brother Guzzwell had to over- 
come in making his epic journey; the 
problems of storm and tide and navi- 



m 

September, 1955, and reached Hawaii 
in 29 days— fast time even for the 
biggest ocean-going yachts. From Ha- 
waii he sailed on to New Zealand, 
Australia, the Barrier Reef, across the 
Indian Ocean to Durban, South Af- 
rica, around the Cape of Good Hope 
to Barbados, and through the Panama 
Canal back to Hawaii. He was crew, 
cook, navigator and captain. The ship 
he commanded was not much bigger 
than the average rowboat people 
drag around on the tops of their 
cars on weekend fishing jaunts. Small 
wonder the sailing fraternity looks 
upon his trek as the greatest feat in 
the history of small boat sailing. 

Brother Guzzwell was born in Eng- 
land 29 years ago. He learned his 
trade (cabinetmaking) there. In 1953 
he migrated to Canada and settled 
in Victoria, where he deposited hi^ 
Amalgamated Society of Woodwork- 
ers card in Local Union No. 2527. 
Brother Guzzwell was employed as a 
joiner by the Ace Furniture and Fix- 
ture Manufacturing Company. The 
son of a small boat sailing enthusiast, 
he naturally began working on a boat 
of his own. 



1 1 I'] C A K V K N T E R 



gation. But e\'en a landlubl^er who 
ne\er saw a bodv of water bi2"2:er than 
a bathtub can appreciate the loneh- 
ness of weeks at sea without a soul to 
talk to, the constant danger of sickness 
or accident without any hope of med- 



sailor of note. It was from him that 
brother Guzzwell learned both sail- 
ing and navigation. When John was 
but three his father sailed him and his 
whole family from England to Cape- 
town and back in a fifty-footer. 




ical aid, and the perilousness of bob- 
bing about in a vast ocean in a craft 
scarcely larger than a modern auto. 

Sailing comes naturally to Brother 
Guzzwell. His father was a small craft 



Our sincerest congratulations to 
Brother Guzzwell, a man who has 
both the skill and the intestinal for- 
titude to do things most of us only 
dream about. 



Official Information 




General OflBcers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 
of AMERICA 



Gexeral Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Gexerai. President 

M. A. HUTCHEisON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIEK 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

FRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill B. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 



Second District, RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventh District, LYLE J. HILLER 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Eighth District, J. P. CAMBIANO 
17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fourth District, HENRY W. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

1834 N. 78th St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HUTCHESON, Chairman ; R. E. LIVINGSTON. Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 

Canadian Laboxu* Congress 
CONVENTION CALL 

To All AfBliated and Chartered Unions, Labour Councils, and Federations of Labor. 

GREETINGS: 

The Third Constitutional Convention of the Canadian Labour Congress will be held 
in the Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Montreal, beginning at 10:00 a.m., Monday, April 25, 1960, 
and contmmng until its business is concluded. 



IMPO RTANT NO TICE 

In the issuance of clearance cards, care sliould be taken to see that they are 
properly filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary 
of the Local Union issuing same as w^ell as the Local Union accepting the clear- 
ance. The clearance cards must be sent to the General Secretary's Department 
without delay, in order that the members' names can be listed on the quarterly 
account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained therein 
must be used. 



Editorial 




The Chickens Come Home To Roost 

The steel strike has been settled. It is no exaggeration to say that the 
Steelworkers achieved a fairly complete victory. They received something in 
the neighborhood of 40c an hour in wage increases; but even more important, 
the steel companies backed down from their original demand for sole authority 
to set and enforce work rules. 

Monday Morning Quarterbacking a strike is, generally speaking, a profit- 
less gesture, but in this instance so many basic principles were involved and 
so many morals can be drawn that a rehash seems advisable. 

Fii'st, it ought to be noted that solidarity won the strike. The newspapers 
are endeavoring to credit the strike settlement to Vice President Nixon, who 
is pressing hard for the Republican nomination next summer. But the cold 
facts show that the steel companies yielded only when a Taft-Hartley strike 
vote loomed big on the horizon. Consensus is that the vote would have been 
from 80 to 85% in favor of resuming the strike at the end of the enforced 
cooling off period. Needless to say, the steel moguls were as aware of this 
fact as anyone else. 

An overwhelming vote for a resumption of the strike would have exploded 
the steel companies' contention that the strike was an unpopular one insti- 
gated and promoted by union "bosses." They knew, too, that the Steel- 
workers, fortified by several months' pay checks, would stay out another 
116 days if necessary. They also knew the labor movement was solidly lined 
up behind the Steelworkers. So they capitulated. 

The first lesson is: solidarity wins strikes. 

A second conclusion that can be drawn from the strike is that the steel 
companies allowed their antagonism toward unionism to get in the way of 
theii- good judgment. An offer of eight or ten cents an hour in the beginning 
probably would have been accepted by the steel workers. A token decrease 
in the price of steel (entirely feasible in face of steel profits) would have 
strengthened the steel companies' pleas that all have a duty to fight inflation. 
The price cut could have been recaptured a few months later without much 
criticism. 

However, the steel moguls decided to try the union on for size. They 
not only refused to offer any wage increase, they even insisted on a wage 
cut in the form of revisions in the cost-of-living escalator clause. To make sure 
the union could not accept their offer they demanded almost complete con- 
trol over work rules. So the union had no alternative but to strike. 

Five months later, five months of bitterness, lost production, and costly 
strife, the steel companies granted a package wage increase several times 
higher than the eight or ten cents that might have averted a strike in the 
beginning. And they backed away from their original demand for sole con- 
trol of work assignments. 



THECARPENTER 25 

The second moral pointed up by the steel strike is that collective bargain- 
ing works effectively only when both parties come into negotiations with clean 
hands and open minds. The side that hopes to put something over on the 
other party invariably stubs its toe. 

The third lesson that can be drawn from the steel strike is that all organ- 
ized labor shared in the victory of the Steelworkers. Had the companies suc- 
ceeded in starving their employes into submission all other industries would 
have been quick to follow the example set by steel. The right of any and 
every union to have some say in work assignments would have been chal- 
lenged. In this day of automation and far-reaching technological changes such 
results would have sounded the death knell for many, many jobs, many trades 
and many skills. 

When all is said and done, the big question facing American workers in 
the days ahead is simply this: shall the fruits of technological progress be 
divided in such a way that part of the benefits accrue to working people 
and the public, or shall management gobble them all up? If the benefits of 
technological progress can be divided to help everybody, manager, worker, 
and consumer, automation can be a boon. Otherwise, it can become a Frank- 
enstein. 

Labor has neither the power nor the desire to stop the march of techno- 
logical progress. All it wants is some voice in the determinations that are 
made in order that working people have at least a semblance of protection 
during the transition period. Essentially, that is what the steel strike was all 

about. 

• 

Who Is Guilty Of What? 

Last month a clerk in a New York brokerage house was arrested for em- 
bezzling some $4,000 or $5,000 per month from the firm over a period of 
several years. The chap developed an ingenious scheme for latching on to 
part of his employer's funds. Every few days the firm would send him to the 
postoffice with a check to deposit against the postage used by the mailing 
meter. Only instead of depositing the full amount, the clerk usually took a 
percentage in stamps, which he peddled to other people at a discount. For 
example, if he had a check for $1,000 he might deposit $750 to the credit of 
the meter and take $250 in stamps for resale to a fence. 

The scheme worked beautifully for four or five years. Except for the fact 
that he got too greedy around Christmas time, he might still be getting 
awav with his pilfering. But someone noticed the December postage bill 
jumped enormously. This led to an investigation and the jig was soon up for 
the clerk. 

On the surface this is just another case of a trusted employe turning sour. 
It happens all the time. But what made us sit up and take particular notice 
was the fact that after nearly 15 years of employment by the brokerage 
house the clerk was getting the munificent salary of $62 per week take-home 

pay- 
Stealing is stealing, and there is no logical justification for it on moral or 
ethical grounds. But certainly a bilked employer who pays a 15-year employe 
$62 per week evokes no spontaneous outburst of outraged tears. In the eyes 



26 THECARPENTER 

of the law there is no doubt who is guiltier, but in the eyes of God we believe 
it might rate as a tossup. 

If the employer, could pay no more, it would be one thing. But a firm 
that can sustain a loss of $40,000 or $50,000 per year for years without missing 
it can hardly plead poor-mouth. Certainly if we were on a jury we would 
like to know what the owners were paying themselves during the years the 
clerk was stealing. 

An employe of a financial institution can hardly wear overalls to work. 
He must be well dressed at all times. And suits, shirts, hats, overcoats, etc., 
must be neat and clean too. All this costs money. Also it costs money to get 
to and from work; probably 50c or 75c per day. Brokerage houses being on a 
five and a half day week, this item alone shoots a sizeable hole in the weekly 
$62. Then there is the matter of lunches; six of them a week. 

Add all these essentials together and the residue left for the clerk to main- 
tain his family on becomes brutally inadequate. Even under these circum- 
stances his crime is not condonable; but certainly it becomes understandable. 
Each of us can be goaded and tempted only so much. In some of us the 
breaking point may be high, in some of us it may be low, but we all have a 
breaking point. 

As we see it, only the Lord can determine who is guilty of what in this 
case. The employer cannot escape all responsibility in view of the kind of 
treatment he handed out to his clerk for 15 years. If he had invested only five 
per cent of the amount stolen as a pay increase for the clerk no theft ever 
might have occurred. 

In law there is a doctrine called "attractive nuisance" which holds that 
a home owner is guilty of neglect if a neighbor's child wanders onto his 
property and gets hurt playing with a tempting object. That the home owner 
warned the child to stay away does not constitute exoneration of responsi- 
bility. 

It seems to us that some such doctrine applies here. The clerk committed 
a very serious crime, but he had serious provocation in the form of starva- 
tion wages. 

But perhaps the first and biggest mistake the clerk made was in docilely 
accepting peon wages year in and year out, without making any effort to 
correct the situation. In the days before unions all workers got just this kind 
of treatment from management. But the skilled craftsmen and production 
workers found a solution. They formed unions, and through those unions 
they won for themselves decent wages, fair treatment and agreeable working 
conditions. The same pathway is open to all the white collar workers and all 
the $62 men in the country. Sooner or later they will become smart enough 
to realize it. 



A Beautiful Thought 

In interviewing Marian Anderson, widely acclaimed Negro singer, whose 
voice has thrilled people all over the world, a reporter for a national maga- 
zine recently asked her why she always used the editorial "we" in talking of 
her musical accomplishments. "After all," said the reporter, "the voice is yours. 
God gave it to you. You developed it. Why, then, do you always say 'we' 
when you talk about your concerts?" 



THECARPENTER 27 

To this question Miss Anderson replied approximately as follows: "The 
voice is mine, but without the aid of my inspired accompanist it would not 
mean much. And without the beautiful music someone else wrote, there would 
be nothing to sing. Furtliermore, the skilled craftsmen who made the piano 
with loving care contributed an ingredient that is indispensable." 

\\^hat a profound and beautiful thought! No man or woman achieves suc- 
cess in a vacuum. He or she always has an army of dedicated little people 
backing him or her up. The men and women who chopped down the trees 
and mined the metal to make the piano that accompanied Miss Anderson 
contributed something that was absolutely necessary. So did the people who 
made the paper the music was printed on and erected the building in which 
the concert was held. If you think about it long enough, you come to the 
conclusion just about everybody contributed something to Miss Anderson's 
success. 

If every successful person mulled this fact over occasionally, this might 
be a much better world, containing a great deal less arrogance, tyranny and 



Business Morals (Canadian Version) 

(Reprinted from "Canadian Labour") 

The morals and political activities of a large Canadian industry were ex- 
posed to public view during the combines' charges against Canadian Brewer- 
ies Ltd., before the Ontario Supreme Court recently. 

In a memo from Carlings to E. P. Taylor, chairman of the Brewing Corpor- 
ation of Canada (now Canadian Breweries) price cutting is described as "the 
most vicious form of competition that we could possibly engage in, as, event- 
ually, nobody benefits but the consumer." 

When Mr. Taylor decided to move into Alberta in 1950 his first step was 
a friendly visit. "I would also like to see my friend, the Attorney-Ceneral, and 
if possible the Premier," wrote Mr. Taylor to a colleague. 

Later he urged the appointment of W. R. MacKenzie as general manager 
of Western Canada Breweries, terming him "an extremely capable brewing 
operator, in addition to which he knows how to handle the political side 
with the provincial government." 

In a letter, read to the court by the prosecution, Mr. Taylor, as far back 
as 1934, boasted about the power he had in the brewing industry. 

"I am sure," Mr. Taylor wrote, "we now have the power to control prices 
and sales practices of the industry and while it may be necessary to start 
local price wars here and there to discipline a small competitor, I am sure 
the profits will prove most gratifying to the shareholders." 

Another letter from Mr. Taylor to a fellow businessman reads as follows: 

"As you are aware, any contemplated change in the laws of the province 
will require the expenditure of a considerable sum of money for propaganda 
to produce a favorable background for the government to take the necessary 
action. 

"In order to insure secrecy I felt it would be better under the circum- 
stances to only ask the following to subscribe to the fund: . . . ." and here 
he listed seven major Canadian breweries. 



Jin 0ittnifvxsLtn 



Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more. 



S^jBt in l^mtt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



ALLAN, CLARENCE, L. U. 642, Richmond, 

CaL 
ALLISON, F. H., L. U. 1752, Pomona, Cal. 
ALLUMS, FRED, L. U. 642, Richmond, CaL 
ANDERSON, AGNER, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
ANDERSON, ALBIN I., L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
ANDERSON, OSCAR, L. U. 355, Buffalo, N. Y. 
ANDRE, GUS A., L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
ARMSTRONG, NATHANIEL, L. U. 15, Hack- 

ensack, N. J. 
ARNESEN, JENS, L. U. 791, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
ASHWORTH, WILLIAM, L. U. 316, San Jose, 

Cal. 
BARDSLEY, WALTER, L. U. 1323, Monterey, 

Cal. 
BARLETTA, ENRICO, L. U. 493, Mt. Vernon, 

N. Y. 
BEDMARCZYK, PETER, L. U. 20, New York, 

N. Y. 
BENDA, JOSEPH, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 
BENSON, ARTHUR, L. U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 
BERG, ARNE, L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
BERGIN, THOMAS F., L. U. 350, New Ro- 

chelle, N. Y. 
BERNIQUEZ, ANDRE, L. U. 93, Ottawa, Ont. 
BERNSTROM, FOLKE, L. U. 246, New York, 

N. Y. 
BLOUGH, WILLIAM W., L. U. 16, Springfield, 

111. 
BOBO, CLAUDE, L. U. 929, Los Angeles, Cal. 
BORKOWSKI, JOHN, L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
BORMANN, LOUIS, L. U. 257, New York, 

N. Y. 
BRENNER, HENRY, L. U. 1154, Marine City, 

Mich. 
BRILL, HENRY, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
BRITT, EDDIE, L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
BRODEUR, EDGAR, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
BUSCH, JOSEPH, L. U. 355, Buffa'o, N. Y. 
BUTLIN, HAROLD, L. U. 1154, Marine City, 

Mich. 
CARLSON, CARL J., L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
CARTER, DEE WOOD, L. U. 1590, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
CASSERLY, JOHN, L. U. 16, Springfield, III. 
CAULEY, HARRY H., L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
CECIL, CLYDE E., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
CHERRIE, JOHN H., L. U. 1844, Cloquet, 

Minn. 
CHICHKAM, RALPH, L. U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 
CHRISTMAN, PHILIP, L. U. 198, Dallas, 

Texas 
CHRISTOPHER, WILLIAM F., L. U. 101, 

Baltimore, Md. 
CLARK, ALEXANDER, L. U. 787, New York, 

N. Y. 
CLEMENT, JOHN E., L. U. 867, Milford, Mass 
COFFMAN, CLAUDE, L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
COON, ELZA E., L. U. 200, Columbus, Ohio 



COONEY, JOHN J., L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
CORDTZ, HEROLD A., L. U. 2020, San Diego, 

Cal. 
CORNISH, CHESTER H., L. U. 642, Richmond, 

Cal. 
COUCH, J. ERNEST, L. U. 2020, San Diego, 

Cal. 
CRAWFORD, CLYDE, L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
CRUMERINE, RAY, L. U. 133, Terre Haute, 

Ind. 
CRUMRIN, RAYMOND, L. U. 133, Terre 

Haute, Ind. 
DAVIDSON, H. A., L. U. 743, Bakersfield, Cal. 
DAVIS, WALTER H., L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
DeCAMP, GROVER, L. U. 316, San Jose, Cal. 
DeLUCIA, GUIDO, L. U. 1939, Clifton, N. J. 
DESIDERIO, LOUIS, L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
DeSTORIES, THOMAS, L. U. 15, Hackensack, 

N. J. 
DILLEY, CHARLES A., L. U. 13, Chicago, III. 
DOLLENMAYER, CHARLES J., L. U. 854, Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio 
DONAHOO, FOREST L., L. U. 1752, Pomona, 

Cal. 
DOUCETT, LEO, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
DOWNS, GEORGE W., L. U. 642, Richmond, 

Cal. 
DOWNS, JESSE A., L. U. 1480, Bou'der, Colo. 
DRANGSLAND, ANDERS, L. U. 787, New 

York, N. Y. 
Dubois, ALVA, L. U. lOOe, New Brunswick, 

N. J. 
DUER, ARTHUR, L. U. 316, San Jose, Cal. 
DUNDER, VICTOR, L. U. 620, Madison, N. J. 
DYER, JAMES, L. U. 715, Elizabeth, N. J. 
DYKER, WILLIAM, L. U. 490, Passaic, N. J. 
EASTERLING, O. E., L. U. 256, Savannah, Ga. 
ELLIS, EARL, L. U. 184, Salt Lake City, Utah 
FANNING, JOE, L. U. 1400, Santa Monica, Cal. 
FENSTER, JOSEPH, L. U. 257, New York, 

N. Y. 
FRITZ, JOHN W., L. U. 1407, Wilmington, Cal. 
FRY, M. B., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas 
GALLETTA, JOSEPH, L. U. 20, New York, 

N. Y. 
GARRETSON, F. M., L. U. 1323, Monterey, Cal. 
GERWE, FREDERICK, L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
GLASS, BENJAMIN, L. U. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
GORDON, DAVID H., L. U. 184, Salt Lake 

City, Utah 
GRAY, ERNEST E., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
GROVER, PAUL, L. U. 133, Terre Haute, Ind. 
GUDICKSEN, WALTER, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 

111. 
GURULE, ANDREW G., L. U. 2020, San Diego, 

Cal. 
HALVORSEN, LARS G., L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



HANLEY, THOMAS M., L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
HANRON, JOSEPH P., L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
HARFEN, MICHAEL, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
HELBURG, VICTOR P., L. U. 1480, Boulder, 

Colo. 
HEPFNER, GEORGE W., L, U. 1489, Burling- 
ton, N. J. 
HERRING, JESSE F., L. U. 764, Shreveport, 

La. 
HIPPOLITUS, JOSEPH, L. U. 493, Mt. Vernon, 

N. Y. 
HOFFMAN, ARTHUR M., L. U. 1752, Pomona, 

Cal. 
HOOPER, F. E., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
HUNT, JAMES C, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
HUNT, RALPH, L. U. 512, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
HUTCHENSEN, OLIVER, L. U. 184, Salt Lake 

City, Utah 
JENSEN, AXEL, L. U. 65, Perth Amboy, N. J. 
JOHNSON, CHARLES, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
JOHNSON, JOHN T., L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
JORDAN, ARTHUR, L. U. 122, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
JOSEFF, SAMUEL, L. U. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
JUDD, LEON E., L. U. 190, Klamath Falls, Ore. 
KAPES, JOHN, L. U. 129, Hazleton, Pa. 
KAUFMAN, ABRAHAM, L. U. 246, New York, 

N. Y. 
KING, V. C, L. U. 1400, Santa Monica, Cal. 
KOOIMAN, ABRAM, L. U. 490, Passaic, N. J. 
KORNOVITCH, FRANK, L. U. 35, San Rafael, 

Cal. 
KRIER, HARRY Sr., L. U. 122, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
KURTH, FRANK, L. U. 1138, Toledo, Ohio 
LANCE, ELLIS B., L. U. 122, Philadelphia, Pa. 
LAND9N, JAMES O., L. U. 768, Kingston, 

Pa. 
LARMORE, GEORGE, L. U. 122, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
LAW, JOHN H., L. U. 1846, New Orleans, La. 
LAWHORN, H. W., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
LAYN, JOHN, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 
LEA, FORREST J., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
LEITHUESSER, WILLIAM, L. U. 155, Plain- 
field, N. J. 
LENHART, CLAY C, L. U. 642, Richmond, 

Cal. 
LEONARD, JAMES, L. U. 715, Elizabeth, N. J. 
LEONARD, MARSHALL, L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
LICURSI, EMIL, L. U. 20, New York, N. Y. 
LINARDY, JOHN, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
LINDSTEDT, CARL, L. U. 2020, San Diego, 

Cal. 
LOFGREN, JOHN, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
LOONEY, A. B., L. U. 1400, Santa Monica, 

Cal. 
LUFKIN, RAYMOND, L. U. 316, San Jose, 

Cal. 
MADDOX, ERNEST L., L. U. 1400, Santa 

Monica, Cal. 
MAKIEL, WALTER, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
MARCANTONIO, NICHOLAS, L. U. 620, 

Madison, N. J. 
MARQUARDT, WILLIAM O., L. U. 1752, 

Pomona, Cal. 
MARTAN, JAMES, L. U. 1786, Chicago, 111. 
MAURER, LOUIS, L. U. 2094, Forest Park, 111. 
McGAUGHEY, O. R., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, 

Texas 



cmarmtu 

McMillan, JAMES, L. U. 715, Elizabeth, N. J. 
McNUTT, H. v., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
McVEAN, V. N., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas 
MEINERSMAN. WILLIAM, L. U. 715, Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 
MERRITT, T. S., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
MEYER, JOHN, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 
MOSEL, WILLIAM, L. U. 2094, Forest Park, 

III. 
MYLES, JOHN A., L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
NARDONE, POMPILIO, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
NEIL, GILBERT T., L. U. 599, Hammond, Ind. 
NELSON, HENNING, L. U. 2164, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
NELSON, JOHN, L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
NEWBRECH, JACOB, L. U. 1397, Roslyn, N. Y. 
NIX, CLEMENT E., L. U. 1752, Pomona, Cal. 
NORDQUIST, ERIK, L. U. 257, New York, 

N. Y. 
ORUM, MARLIN D., L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
PAGE, FREDERICK, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
PATTON, FAY G., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
PAYNE, JOHN T., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
PEACOCK, BILL, L. U. 1394, Ft. Lauderdale, 

Fla. 
PEDERSON, GEORGE, L. U. 155, Plainfield, 

N. J. 
PEVZNER, HARRY, L. U. 715, Elizabeth, 

N. J. 
PRESTIGIOVANNI, G., L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
PREVITI, NUNZIO, L. U. 257, New York, 

N. Y. 
RANDOLPH, JAMES T., L. U. 1518, Gulfport, 

Miss. 
REBECK, JOHN, L. U. 65, Perth Amboy, N. J. 
RILEY, A. C, L. U. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
RINTALA, JOHN, L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
RITCHIE, LEWIS, L. U. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 
ROBERTS, HUBERT E., L. U. 1400, Santa 

Monica, Cal. 
ROBERTS, WILLIAM C, L. U. 621, Bangor, 

Me. 
ROBERTSON, J. F., L. U. 1400, Santa Monica, 

Cal. 
ROBINSON, GERALD M., L. U. 13, Chicago, 

111. 
ROBSON, J., L. U. 1244, Montreal, Que. 
ROOKE, ROUNDELL, L. U. 93, Ottawa, Ont. 
ROSE, LESLIE E., L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
ROSSON, E. A., L. U. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
RYAN, FRANK, L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
SALO, VICTOR, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 
SALOMON, FRANK, L. U. 72, Rochester, N. Y. 
SCHLEGEL, LEVI, L. U. 1138, Toledo, Ohio 
SCHOLER, EDWARD A., L. U. 190, Klamath 

Falls, Ore. 
SCHWEIZER, MAX, L. U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 
SELBY, EDWARD F., L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
SERGOTT, JOHN F., L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
SHAW, JAMES, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
SHUMAN, CLIFTON, L. U. 133, Terre Haute, 

Ind. 
SILVERIA, JOHN J., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
SKEEN, GLEN, L. U. 1397, Roslyn, N. Y. 
SMITH, FRANCIS O., L. U. 642, Richmond, 

Cal. 
YANCEY, A. L., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas. 
YOZWIAK, CLEMENT, L. U. 514, Wilkes- 

Barre, Pa. 
ZAKOVEC, FRANK, L. U. 1433, Detroit, Mich. 





utcfoor ,^x^ 

/Weanderingl 




By Fred Goetz 



Knowing that a goodly portion of our 
readerfolk are ironhead fishermen the fol- 
lowing palaver is keyed to an important, 
current subject, winter steelheading— Great 
Lake or West Coast style: 

If you're in a spot where Mr. Steelhead 
has taken great gobs of line from your reel 
on his downstream dash and you are, by 
virtue of some stream bank impediment, 
unable to follow him, try slacking off line- 
not too much, say about 15 yards or so. 

Chances are your slack-ofiF will be car- 
ried downstream by the current creating 
a bowed-line in back of the sulking steel- 
head. This bowed-line, under pressure from 
tlie stream's current, will be pulling in 
back of the hooked fish and it is this 
pressure that oftentimes prods the steel- 
head into a panicky upstream dash— to- 
ward you! 

When this occurs, reel like mad, regain- 
ing the slack line as quickly as possible. 
When you're back in a "tight line" position, 
the steelie will in all probability be con- 
siderably farther upstream and in a much 
better position for working to beach. 

That's one advantage of the slack-off 
method but we're not overlooking the fact 
that it sometimes ends in fruitless effort. 
If you happen to be slacking off in fast 
water where the stream bottom is irregular 
or snag-infested, you stand a mighty good 
chance of hanging up and if you do, you've 
had it and so has Mr. Steelhead— his free- 
dom! 

"Nothing ventured, nothing gained!" 
« « * 

One of the most noble and hunt-worthy 
specimens of big game in this land is the 
elk. 

Unlike the deer, the elk has not been 
able to adjust itself to advancing civiliza- 
tion. Elk have found that the best place 
for them is away from hunters' guns, in 
high, isolated country. 

For the most part, they are above the 
foothills, in the "elk belt" just below timber 
line. If the vidnter is mild, they stay real 
high. When the winds of winter kick up a 
fuss, they drive the elk down to lower 



slopes and the hunter has a better chance 
of meeting up wath one of these majestic 
critters. 

Funny about the name "elk." In Europe 
the elk is called "moose." The nearest rela- 
tive of our so-called elk is the red deer of 
Europe. Quite a few years back, the Indian 
name of "wapita" was substituted, but "elk" 
is so well established that it will stick. 

Elk take to heavy forest cover during the 
daylight hours, especially during the hunt 
season when the guns are a-booming. A 
good trick is to get to some high lookout 
point at the crack of dawn. You may be 
lucky enough to observe a herd moving into 
the forest thickets for the day. Then you can 
soft-foot it through the woods, a-stalking 
the wary critter; you stop, pick up a sign, 
listen a spell (elk make a racket when they 
move), soft-foot some more, listen and 
so on. 

Stalking must be done with least possible 
noise. They seem to have a keener aware- 
ness than deer. If they are spooked, they 
really move out— not like a deer, which 
may circle around, not leaving the immedi- 
ate area. Elk, when alarmed, leave the 
country— not hundreds of yards, but miles. 



We would like all 
our readers to have a 
pair of these SHY- 
STER lures free. All 
you have to do to 
qualify for these Im-es 
is dig down in your 
old photo file and 
mail us a fishing or 
hunting snapshot and 
a few words as to 
what the photo is all 
about. Write to: 
Fred Goetz 
Dept OM 
404 Times Bldg. 
Portland 4, Oregon 

This offer is open to all members in good 
standing and the members of their family. 

Please state your union affiliation. 




THE CARPENTER 



31 



Sir Henry Wotton, friend of Izaak Wal- 
ton, recognized the therapeutic value of 
angling long ago. 

He defined angling as a rest to tlie mind; 
a cheerer of spirits; a diverter of sadness; a 
calmer of unquiet thoughts; a moderator of 
passions, and a procurer of contentedness. 

Speaking of the therapeutic value of fish- 
ing brings to mind a true story told to 
me by and about Frankie Carle when he 
appeared in Portland, Oregon, in connec- 
tion with the Pacific International Livestock 
event. 

It seems that Carle, nationally famous 
piano ^'irtuoso and author of "Sunrise Sere- 
nade," had suffered a complete breakdown 
some years ago and for many months 
couldn't move a muscle. 

Hospitalized for months, his progress was 
painfully slow. When he was barely able to 
walk, his doctor prescribed a "stay" at a 
nearby lake resort and insisted that he go 
fishing at least once a day. Carle was du- 
bious. 

Reluctantly at first, he started fishing, but 
as the days wore on he developed a fond- 
ness for the prescribed medicine of sun- 
shine, relaxation and lots of fishing. 

He picked up strength in the warm sum- 
mer days, gaining all the pleasantries, as 
described by Wotton, and in a few weeks 
was completely well. 

"Carle's been a confirmed fisherman ever 



If you have a tank type vacuum cleaner, 
you can quickly dry your rubber boots by 
inserting the long hose down into the toe 
of the boot and leave the current on until 
the, boot is entirely dry. Leather boots may 
be dried in this manner without danger of 
the leather hardening. 

# « # 

Here's one of several questions from 
readers we've answered and from time to 
time we'll throw them on tlie piscatorial 
bonfire for what they are worth: 

Q. How can I tell the difference be- 
tween a fresh-run Chinook salmon and a 
steelhead? 

A. There are quite a few outstanding 
exterior differences, such as: The mouth 
lining of a steelliead is Hght in color, al- 
most always white, whereas the Chinook's 
mouth is dark. The dorsal fin of a steel- 
head is rather heavily spotted; the salmon's, 
lightly spotted. The tail of a steelhead is 
square; the salmon's is crescent shaped. The 
anal fin of a steelhead (underside next to 



the tail) has from 10 to 12 rays; the salmon, 
13 to 17. You can pick a Chinook up by 
grasping it firmly above the tail. Try to do 
this with a steelhead and you will fail. 

The anal-fin ray count is the least vari- 
able exterior characteristic and should be 
heavily counted upon in the final analysis. 



ANYBODY INTERESTED? 

Dear Fred: 

The only hunting I do anymore is for 
my bifocals, Gunsmoke on TV, and a 
sure cure for rheumatiz, but there was a 
day when my Dad and I spooked half 
the game in Central British Columbia 
every Fall. Natural bias aside, I guess 
my Dad was about the best camp cook 
west of Powder River. He could do 
more tricks with a handful of rice, two 
spuds, and a hunk of venison than the 
chef at the Waldorf could do with a 
carload of beef tenderloin. 

In those days we had to pack in every- 
thing we needed. So the Trapper Nelson 
pack board was always long on beans 
and rice but mighty short on butter and 
henfruit. But the Old Man always came 
up with meals that put a strain on the 
belt buckle. 

Maybe the backyard grill will be the 
only place I can try them, but how about 
a contest to pick the best recipes for 
camp cooking? I mean the kind of stuff 
that can be whomped up when the near- 
est A & P is 25 miles away. None call- 
ing for pate de foie gras (I don't even 
know how to spell it) or oregano or a 
pre-heated oven of 450 degrees. 

As a starter, does anyone have a good 
recipe for bannock, the bread made in a 
frying pan? I can still remember tlie 
kind the Old Man made. When she was 
all nice and fluffy and golden brown she 
was about as digestible as buckshot, but 
she sure tasted good. 

So how about a recipe contest? Fish, 
game, berries, and bearfat okay; anchovy 
paste, truffles, cooking sherry nix. 

This reminds me of the old prospector 
who was given a cookbook for a present. 
Some time later a friend asked him how 
he liked it. 

"She ain't worth a hoot," the ridge 
runner replied. "Every recipe starts the 
same— 'Take a clean dish'— and right 
there's where she threw me every time." 

Pete Terzick, Ye Ed. 



32 



The Carpenter And His Eye Glasses 



by Ivan Sandrof 



^ HE VISUAL requirements of the carpenter's trade are perhaps as 
complex as any could be. The work involves seeing from a large 
number of positions— overhead, straight down, at arm's length, side- 
ways or even at an angle, as in roofing. 

An additional factor, often overlooked, are the hazards inherent in car- 
pentry; the splitting board, flying splinters or slipping tools. No carpenter has 
to have these dangers pointed out, but how many of them include a pair of 
safety spectacles as part of the equipment in their kit? 

In considering the seeing needs of carpenters who wear glasses, probably 
the first requirement should be that the spectacles worn during working hours 




A thousand times a day the average car- 
penter must twist or turn his head to accom- 
modate his vision to the work he is doing. 
Those who wear glasses have a particularly dif- 
ficult problem. Properly made glasses can ease 
the strain and provide eye safety as well. 

have hardened lenses. Eyes cannot 
be replaced like broken hammers, and 
the minor additional cost of heat 
treating a prescription is a very small 
price to pay for the protection 
afforded. 

Hazards are everywhere on the con- 
struction job and the experts advise 
the use of Piano or No-Power safety 
spectacles in such areas, even by those 
who normally do not wear them. 



If much outdoor work is performed, 
tinted (sunglass) lenses reduce glare 
and aid eye comfort. There are a sur- 
prising number of eyeglass wearers 
who do not realize that sunglasses 
cannot only be obtained hardened 
and in their own prescriptions, but 
with bifocal or trifocal lenses as well. 
If much work is done under the sun, 
tinted glasses will certainly make the 
job easier. 

Due to the diversity of the work 
performed in the construction field, 
there can be no such thing as a hard 
and fast rule as to what type of lenses 
are best for carpenters. However, 
there are an infinite variety of lenses, 
in both bifocals and trifocals, that can 
be prescribed by the eye care profes- 
sions to cover most of the seeing 
needs of the individual case. 

As an example, a man who does as 
much overhead work as he does look- 
ing down, might be given a double 
segment bifocal which has an area at 
the top and bottom of the lens for 
close vision and the center portion 
allowing for distance seeing. If there 
is little overhead work, a single seg- 



T H E C A R P E N T E R 33 

meiit at the bottom of the lens may seems to be to walk in and say, "Doc, 

be all that is required. I think I need glasses; can you fix 

It is important when having an eye "^^ ^^P- 
examination that you explain the see- Next time you stop in, remember 

ing requirements of your job to the to mention that you are a carpenter, 

eye doctor. He can best evaluate, that you do a lot of sawing at arm's 

from what you tell him, what lenses length, or do close finish work, or 

will best serve your needs. whatever it is you do the most of 

An amazing number of people, on the job. Knowing these facts, the 

when they feel that glasses are need- eye specialist can really give you 

ed, never think of occupational re- glasses, custom-tailored to your occu- 

quirements. The standard procedure pational requirements. 



CALIFORNIA DECISION UPHOLDS MAJORITY RULE 

In an important decision that buttresses the right of a majority to protect 
itself from the disruptive efforts of a dissident minority, a California state court 
last month ruled that a union can properly discipline a member who backs a 
right-to-work law in direct contradiction to the expressed will of an over- 
whelming majority of the union. 

Superior Judge Jesse J. Frampton denied a petition by two machinists 
asking the court to order the International Association of Machinists to re- 
instate them as members and pay them $111,000 in damages for the humil- 
iation they suffered. 

The members were expelled from the lAM last year in accordance with 
the union's constitution as an outgrowth of their active campaign in favor of 
right-to-work when virtually all the rest of the lAM was bitterly opposed 
to the measure. In . addition to supporting the right-to-work measure, the 
members denounced the union and its officers. 

In denying their petition, the court said a union has the right to regard 
right-to-work laws as a threat to its strength, if not its very existence; and 
that members who support such laws can be justifiably classified as disloyal 
to the union. 

In the present climate, the case assumes real importance; first, because 
it reaflfirms the principle that a majority has some rights too (something the 
Landrum-Griffin Act tends to ignore), and second, because it has an impor- 
tant jurist recognizing that right-to-work laws are a threat to union strength, 
if not to the very existence of unions. 



SAFETY TIPS FOR TEENAGERS 

Tlie Department of Labor has just published a booklet telling young 
workers how to save fingers, toes, eyes, and, possibly, their lives through safe 
work habits. The pamphlet, entitled "We're Never Too Young To Learn 
Safety," is the outcome of Departmental concern over the comparatively high 
rate of work injuries among teenagers. 



34 



"Business'' Way Isn't Always Best 

* * 

DURING the past seven years the great slogan of the administration 
has been "to get the government out of business." 
Joyfully supported by the Chamber of Commerce and the NAM, 
which look upon the Federal Government as some foreign monster whose 
whole purpose in life is to plague the American people and especially the 
businessman, the campaign has made considerable strides. 

"Business can do it better," "business can do it cheaper," 'let's save mil- 
lions for the taxpayer" have been the slogans under which the Government 
has been steadily divesting itself of many of the jobs that in the course of 
the years it has found it necessary to take over. 

How true are the slogans? 



How much better has business 
done certain jobs than Government? 

How much more cheaply? 

Gradually evidence has been accu- 
mulating giving strong proof that the 
slogans are not always true, by any 
means. 

Right now a Senate committee un- 
der Senator Stuart Symington (D., 
Mo.) has been investigating the cost 
of storing surplus grain by the Agri- 
culture Department. 

When the Eisenhower administra- 
tion came into office, millions of tons 
of grain were stored in government 
bins. Even surplus World War II 
ships laid up for want of use were 
pressed into service. It was estimated 
that the over-all cost to the Govern- 
ment of storing such grain in its own 
facilities averaged about three cents 
a bushel. 

But that was the big, bad Federal 
Government and private interests in 
the grain business wanted the busi- 
ness for themselves. They got it, and 
now Senator Symington is discover- 
ing that the cost to the taxpayer, 
who was supposed to be getting a 



break, has shot up to 18 cents a 
bushel. 

"The Senator Was Astonished," 
said the headlines, and well he might 
be. 

Testimony brought out that private 
grain storers were making profits that 
ranged from 69 to 167 per cent a 
year. What's more, they had been 
granted special financial enticements 
to make these huge profits, such as 
fast tax write-offs and even loans. 
While government bins lay empty, 
new bins were being built in order 
that their private builders could lease 
them back to the Government at such 
fantastic profits that within a year or 
two they had become taxpayers' gifts. 

But this is only money— taxpayers' 
money. 

What is even more serious is the 
way in which the peacetime develop- 
ment of atomic energy in the United 
States is being hampered by the de- 
termination of the business commun- 
ity, especially the power groups, not 
to permit its full development until 
private business can skim the cream 
from the milk. 



THE CARPENTER 



35 



E\ery time there is atomic energy 
legislation before Congress, powerful 
business groups immediately appear. 
They assure everyone that private en- 
terprise will take care of the develop- 
ment of atomic power for peacetime 
use. They limit the role of the Gov- 
ernment to the expensive preliminary 
research and they fight every effort to 
place patents in the public domain. 

The sad fact is that peacetime 
power will not be developed in the 
United States until the private power 
interests in the country can see their 
way clear to making money out of it. 

Evidence to this effect already has 
been given by Rep. Chet Holifield 
(D., Cal.), who is on the Joint Com- 
mittee on Atomic Energy and is prob- 
ably the best informed political fig- 
ure on the subject in the country. 

Only recently Holifield told the 
Electric Consumers Information Com- 
mittee: 

"As of this date not one watt of 
civilian power is being generated in 
the United States by atomic reactors," 
except for one small government ex- 
perimental reactor. 



Holifield charged that the admin- 
istration and the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission too often ignore vital scien- 
tic requirements to concentrate on 
political matters such as "budgeteer- 
ing" (keeping costs down), truckling 
to "private enterprise" atomic power 
utilities, and "haggling over con- 
tracts." 

All this means, he declared, that the 
United States is likely to wake up 
some morning "to find that we are in 
second or third place in the world." 

These are pretty serious charges. 
We live, of course, in a private enter- 
prise economy and private enterprise 
has accomplished miracles. But there 
are areas in the economy where the 
private enterprise system need not 
necessarily take precedence over the 
government itself. The immense suc- 
cess of the Tennessee Valley Author- 
ity is one example. 

The story of grain storage and our 
failure to develop peacetime uses of 
atomic energy are sharp warnings 
that we can't afford to dump every- 
thing into private profit enterprise 
when the Government can do the job 
better and more cheaply.— PAI 



THE MUSIC AIN'T "WESTERN' 



The American Federation of Musicians charge that the music on 16 TV series— 10 of 
them Westerns— is produced and recorded in foreign countries. 

Among these shows are Bat Masterson, Black Saddle, The Dupont Show, Johnnie 
Ringo, Lassie, The Lock-Up, Men Into Space, Richard Diamond, The Rifleman, Robert 
Taylor's Detectives, Sea Himt, Tales Of The Plainsmen, Tombstone Territory, Wanted 
Dead or Alive, Wichita Town and Zane Grey Theatre. 

While foreign musicians can be hired much cheaper than unionized American musicians, 
they don't pay U. S. federal, state and local taxes; they don't spend their wages at 
American stores and for American services; they don't support American churches and 
charities; they don't give free concerts in U. S. parks on Sunday evenings and play "for 
free" in patriotic parades. Nor, in a crisis, do the>- fight for tlie U. S. A. as American 
musicians have done down through the decades. 

May we suggest to our TV viewers that they write to the sponsors of all shows which 
use foreign canned music and protest against this practice? You don't have to buy tlie 
soap, beer, tobacco, toiletry, cars and other items these TV shows plug. 

If this "Hire Foreign But Bu>' American" practice continues to expand in other fields 
as well, the time will come when millions of unemployed Americans won't have the 
money needed to buy these products, and TV won't be able to put on such shows because 
of a lack of sponsors.— St. Louis Labor Tribune. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 



CHICAGO DISTRICT'S HENRY J. MOCK HONORED 

Over 500 friends gatliered together in the Saddle and Sirloin Club of Stockyard Inn, 
Chicago, on the night of December 16 to pay tribute to one of the grand old timers of 
the Chicago District Council. 

The honored guest at the testimonial dinner was Brother Henry J. Mock, for 37 years 
business representative of Carpenters Local Union No. 242. 

While Brotherhood members and fellow workers of Brother Mock dominated the gath- 
ering, practically every trade in the city was represented. 

Over the years his efforts have helped not only the members of his own organiztition 
but also all working men in the City of Chicago and the State of Illinois. 

Featured speakers during the evening were First General Vice President John R. 
Stevenson; J. Earl Welch, president of the Illinois State Council; H. Mayne Stanton, 
executive secretary of the Builders Association of Chicago; Earl J. McMahon, president of 




In the picture, from left to right, are Earl Welch, Earl McMahon, Jack Stevenson, guest of 
honor Henry J. Mock, Toastmaster Ted Kenney, Mayne Stanton, Stanley L. Johnson, and Msgr. 
F. Mock, brother to Henry. 

the Chicago and Cook County Building and Construction Trades Council; and Stanley L. 
Johnson, executive vice president of tlie Illinois State Federation of the AFL-CIO. 

The Invocation was asked by Monsignor Ferdinand Mock, a brother of the guest of 
honor. 

At the dinner a gold business card was presented to Brother Mock by First Vice 
President Stevenson on behalf of the Local Union. In addition, the union voted him the 
status of Business Representative Emeritus. 

Few men have worked harder in the interests of die labor movement than Henry J. 
Mock. The good wishes of untold thousands of working people go with him in his retire- 
ment. 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



APPRENTICE BUREAU HONORS NASHVILLE MEMBER 

Tlie U. S. Department of Labor recently issued a certificate of meritorious service to 
John E. Gatlin of Naslnille, Tennessee, Carpenter's Local 507. The certificate, signed by 




Pictured at Nashville, left to right: I. L. Sewell, business agent. Middle Tennessee District 
Council of Carpenters; Pat Meloan, chairman, Regional Staff Committee, U. S. Department of 
Labor; Harry M. Garrett, John E. Gatlin, and Stanton E. Smith, president, Tennessee AFL-CIO. 

Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell and BAT Director W. C. Christensen, commends Mr. 
Gatlin for his many years of service to the craft as Chairman of the Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee. The certificate was presented by Harr>' M. Garrett, State Supervisor, BAT, 
U. S. Department of Labor. 



CHICAGO LOCAL HONORS 50- YEAR MEMBER 

Another milestone has come and gone for Local Union 434 of Chicago. The occasion 
was a meeting held in Novem- 
ber, when another gold pin 
presentation was made, this 
time to honoree Nels Akerman 
who served the union long and 
well during 50 years of mem- 
bership. 

The occasion was also an 
opportunity for Brother Aker- 
man and fellow members Leon 
Druse, business agent of Chi- 
cago District Council, and 
George McPhail, president of 
Local 484, to get together and 
talk about old days and the 
changes that time has wrought, 
both in the national and inter- 
national scene and in the con- 
struction industry. 

Also brought out was the 
fact that between the three 
union brothers mentioned there 

is a total of close to 150 years of service— a record of which Local Union 434 can well be 
proud. 




Pictured, from left to right, are: Leon Druse, George 
McPhail and Nels Akerman, the honored guest of the event. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



60th ANNIVERSARY DINNER GIVEN BY LOCAL 282 

Late last year, Local Union No. 282, Jersey City, New Jersey, celebrated its 60th 
Anniversary with a dinner and social evening. A large attendance turned out to help the 
union mark another important milestone in its long and honorable career. 

Feature of the evening was the presentation of Achievement Trophies to five old 
tuners whose efforts over the years contributed much to the progress of the union. 




Pictured are four of the five old time members of Local Union 282 who received Achievement 
Trophies from the union as tokens of esteem for fine records of continuous membership. From left 
to right they are: Harry Tompkins, Jr., Fred C. Russ, Fred Bollhardt and John Hansen. At the 
extreme right is John Lynch, president of the Local Union, who made the awards. He is hold- 
ing the trophy of Julius Kustner who was unable to attend the dinner. 

The brothers so honored were Harry Tompkins, Jr., whose membership dates back 
more than 46 years; Fred C. Russ, with 56 years of continuous membership; Fred Boll- 
hardt, 46 years; John Hansen, 47 years, and Julius Kustner, 49 years. 

The Achievement Trophies are gold statuettes mounted on a wooden base which 
bears a plaque outlining the service record of the member. They are sure to become 
cherished family heirlooms. 

During the course of tlie evening a number of speakers recalled the long and often 
bitter struggles that the local union had to overcome in its march to its present pinnacle 
of success. 

With the trophies awarded to the old timers went the good wishes of all the mem- 
bers in the area. 



FIVE MEMBERS OF CINCINNATI LOCAL HONORED 



Due respect was paid to five long- 
term Brotherhood members at a picnic 
a few months ago when Millwright Lo- 
cal Union No. 1454 of Cincinnati pre- 
sented each with a pin, symbol of 
years of selfless service on behalf of the \ 
local union. One of the honorees, Wal- 
ter Ernst, has served a total of 50 dedi- 
cated years, and the remaining four have 
had 25 years of membership apiece. 

Shown in the picture as they took 
their place in the sun for the commemo- 
rative occasion are, from left to right, 
John Sper, 25 years; I. R. Wilkerson, 25; 
Walter Ernst, 50; Earl Malphrus, 25, 
and Charles Linville, 25. 




THE CARPENTER 



39 



MT. VERNON LOCAL CELEBRATES 70th BIRTHDAY 

Local Union 493 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
held its 70th Anniversary Celebration at the Turn Hall Restaurant, Mount Vernon, New 
York, on Saturday evening, October 24, 1959. 

A fine turn-out of members of the Local as well as guests from other Local Unions 
tliroughout the county of Westchester were present. Mrs. John Reinheardt gave the Invo- 
cation. __ , ..... ... _,. . . 

Five who were honored for 
Mty consecutive years' mem- 
bership in the Local were 
James Bennett, Thomas Don- 
achie, Archie Kersalake, George 
Gredney and Andrew Hamil- 
ton. These brothers were 
awarded gold membership 
cards. 

President John M. j^lexander 
of Local Union 493 was pre- 
sented a gold ring for his twen- 
ty-two years of faithful, coop- 
erati\e service to the union. 
He had long served as vice 
president and, for the past 
seven years, as president. 

Brother Donald Rose was 
awarded a silver ring for his 
seventeen straight years of ser- 
vice as warden. 




Three of the five members recently awarded Gold Mem- 
bership cards are pictured above, seated from left to right: 
James Bennett, Thomas Donachie, and Andrew Hamilton; 
seated to their left is Business Agent Joseph L. Corcione. 

Standing, from left to right: Recording Secretary Chester 
Merola, President John Alexander, Treasurer and Chairman 
of the 70th Anniversary Celebration Nils Larson, and Vice 
President Anthony Vacca. 



Treasurer Nils Larson, the 
dean of all officers, was given 
a gold watch by the Local for his 38 years as treasurer. Brother Larson served as chair- 
man of the Dinner-Dance Committee, with Recording Secretary Chester Merola serving 
as Dinner-Dance Secretary and also chairman of the Souvenir Journal. 

Other committee members were: Joseph L. Corcione, business agent of Local 493; 
President John Alexander; Vice President Anthony Vacca; Financial Secretary E. C. 
Barletta, trustees; Anthony Pellicrio, Dominvi Vitro, and Joseph Cioffi. Also: Sal Pelliccio, 
Harold Sparti, Donald Rose, Joseph Mottola, Robert Crentsberger, Julius Silano, Edward 
Stanley, Frank Masiello, John Reinheardt, Fred Bates, and Anthony Barletta. 



A GREAT NIGHT FOR N. CALIFORNIA OLD TIMERS 

Retired carpenters from 42 counties, the first to become eligible for annual pensions 
under the Carpenters Pension Trust Fund for Northern California, were honored at a 
Presentation Dinner, Monday, January 4, at 7:00 p.m. at the Elks Club, San Francisco. 

Pension checks were awarded 79 members, among them four men who have served 
their union and industry for more than half a century, according to E. A. Brown of 
Santa Rosa, Trust Fund chairman. 

Harry Pretty, 84, of 1823 Thomas Avenue, Fresno, is the oldest member and has been 
in Fresno Carpenters Local No. 701 for 56 years. Harry S. Lefliolz, 81, of 43 May Lane, 
Los Altos, has been in Palo Alto Local No. 668 for the same length of time, and Enoch 
Rhodes of 4672 East Madison Avenue, Fresno, has also been a member with Pretty of 
Fresno Local No. 701 for 56 years. Adam Klingman of 724 42nd Street, Sacramento, has 
been in his Local No. 586 for 52 years. 

Industry Co-chairman of the Fund is J. I. Hennessy of Oakland, who is Executive 
Secretary of the Associated Home Builders of Greater East Bay, Inc. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Members of the Dinner Committee included Paul Lofton of Stockton, Union Trustee 
from the San Joaquin District Council of Carpenters, and J. A. Stinson, Executive Secre- 
tary of the General Contractors and Builders Association of the East Bay. 

Among the distinguished invited guests were: Joseph F. Cambiano, of San Francisco, 
8th District General Executive Board member of the Brodierhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners, AFL-CIO; John F. Henning, State Industrial Commissioner representing Governor 
Edmund G. Brov^^n; C. R. Bartalini, of Oakland, State Council of Carpenters president; 
Fund Attorneys Thomas E. Stanton, for industry, and Charles P. Scully, for labor; Carroll 
Lynch, resident partner of Martin E. Segal & Co., actuaries and consultants to the Fund, 
and C. Bruce Sutlierland, Fund Administrator. 




THIRD CONSECUTIVE SOFTBALL TROPHY WON BY LOCAL 1050 

During 1959 softball was kingpin among sports as far as local unions affiliated with 
tlie Metropolitan District Council of Philadelphia were concerned. 

A large number of crack teams sponsored by various locals in the Council kept compe- 
tition keen and interest high. The season's activities were marked with a sense of friend- 
ly competition and fair play. 
Those who witnessed the 
games agreed it was nip and 
tuck all tlie way through, vdth 
tlie outcome uncertain until the 
very end. 

However, Local Union 1050 
of Philadelphia emerged victor 
for the third consecutive year. 
The signal victory retired the 
league's revolving trophy. 

Very fine teams were fielded 
by Local Union 1906 of Pliila- 
delphia, whose players finished 
second for the second straight 
year; and by Philadelphia Lo- 
cals 122, 454 and 1856, and 
by Local 1462 of Bristol. All 
games are played under the 
watchful eyes of the South- 
eastern Pennsylvania Umpires 
Association. 

Completion of the successful 
season was celebrated on November 27th at the Fourth Annual Banquet of the District 
Council Softball League, held at Palumbo's Restaurant in Philadelphia. Second General 
Vice President O. William Blaier, as honored guest and principal speaker of the evening, 
paid tribute to the Philadelphia Council and to its Educational Committee for their ac- 
complishments in fostering friendship, mutual respect and unity of purpose among mem- 
bers of the District. 

The large attendance at the banquet gave visible proof that the program is succeeding. 
Over 500 people, including members and their lovely wives, were on hand for the 
occasion. 

Local Union 1050's team and bat boys were presented with sweaters from their Local 
in appreciation of their accomplishments. 

Following the delicious dinner and the presentations, a very fine floor show was pre- 
sented by the management of Palumbo's, generally recognized as one of the best night 
clubs in the East. A truly enjoyable evening was topped off with dancing. 

The Metropolitan District Council's plans for 1960 include a new revolving trophy 
to be placed in competition. Already, several more teams have been pledged by Locals 
that did not participate in 1959. So it looks as if the new year will be a banner year, not 
only for the sports-minded but for each individual Brotherhood member as well, all of 
whom will surely reap the benefit of the fellowship program inaugurated by the Council. 



Shown are four members of Local Union 1050 who par- 
ticipated in the Fourth Annual Banquet of the Metropolitan 
District Council of Philadelphia. 

From left to right are: Financial Secretary Roger Parker, 
banquet manager; B. A. Sam Turco, president; Michael Car- 
disio, manager of the Local's championship team; and Gen- 
eral Representative Ray Ginnetti, recording secretary and a 
member of the championship team. 



Craft Probloms 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 375 

Power Tools.— The time is here when the 
field carpenter can compete, on a legiti- 
mate basis, with the mill carpenter. There 
are, of course, many things that tlie mills 
can do that the field carpenter, as a rule, 
can not do. Therefore, the competition that 
is mentioned here, will not hurt the mill- 



without power tools would have been dis- 
carded as scraps. The same carpenter, when 
he built his home shaped all of the out- 
side finishing material that he needed, and 



Pl/»te Glass 




16-0" 




Fig. 1 

worker, while it does help the field car- 
penter. Properly equipped with power tools, 
the use of wood will hold its own. For in- 
stance, a few weeks before this writing. 




Fig. 2 
did a great many other tilings with his 
power tools, in the interest of economy. He 
had this advantage: He got just what he 
wanted, since he made the things the way 



Glass 




5/LL- 



VeNTIL(MION Ahib bRAlNAdB 



Fig. 3 



a neighbor with power tools literally used 
scrap lumber and built two stair rails for 
his basement stair. The newel rails and 
spfrdlcs were all made of material that 



he wanted tliem— result, a well appearing 
home that is different, because many of the 
features are the product of his own orig- 
inality. 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



A Simple, Small Store Front.-Fig. 1 

shows a plan of a very simple front for a 
little store. The entrance is placed to one 
side, for two reasons: First, it leaves all 
of the display space in one piece; and 



Plaster I MGO v.; 




second, this arrangement is more econom- 
ical than placing the door at the center, 
which is frequently done. 



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BUILDING.— Has 220 p. and 531 11., covering several 
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All Wood Setting for Plate Glass.-It is 

not often that one sees all-wood settings for 
show windows, but in this case the windows 
are small, and that makes wood practical, 
and at the same time economical. Fig. 2 
shows a cross section of a simple wood set- 
ting for plate glass. This construction is 
not new. The sill projects IV4 inches be- 
yond the face of the wall on which it rests. 




Fig. 5 

The glass rests on a leather cushion, and is 
held in place with a quarter-round. On the 
inside of the glass, a small gutter is shown 
—the slanting dotted lines indicate holes 
bored for draining off water that might 
come into the gutter due to condensation 
on the plate glass. The holes should be 
bored at intervals from 12 to 24 inches, de- 
pending on the amount of water that will 
come into the gutter. If the air in the room 
is dry, tliere will be little condensation, but 



DivisroN Bar 




Fig. 6 

if there is a large amount of humidity in 
the air, then the window condensation will 
be increased accordingly. Fig. 3, to the 
left, shows the same cross section, vdth the 
glass indicated by the dotted lines and the 
quarter-round stop omitted. Here the leath- 
er cushion is pointed out— the drain is also 
pointed out, which again is indicated by 
dotted lines. To the right we have a face 
view of what is shown to the left. Here 
are pointed out the glass line, the leather 



THE CARPEXTER 



43 



cushion, and the hole for ventilation and 
drainage. Study these drawings with what 
is shown by Fig. 2. 

Side Jamb.— Fig. 4 gives a section of the 
side jamb, showing the glass, inside and out- 
side stops, the sill, wall, and plastering. It 
should be noted that the outside stops, 
which are common quarter-rounds, are fas- 




Pi. ate 



Fig. 7 

tened v.ith round-head screws. This makes 
it possible for the workman to give the 
glass just a little pla>'— that is, to prevent 
the stop from holding the glass too tight. 
When these stops are put on with nails, it 
becomes difficult to loosen them if the nail 
draws the stop too tight to the glass, often 
resulting in cracks. 

Corner and Division Bars.— What we are 

showing by Figs. 5, 6, and 10, are sections 
of bars inade of wood, because the show 
windows for this little store front are small. 



The wood used for these bars should be 
stout wood that will not split easily— per- 
haps white oak or its equal would fill the 
requirements. The two parts, the inside 
and the outside, can easily be shaped with 




Fig. 8 
a power tablesaw. These two parts are fas- 
tened together with round-head screws. For 
these screws holes should be bored, full 
size for the outside part. For the inside 
part of the bar, the holes should be small 
enough to give the threads of the screws 
ample anchorage. It should be remembered 
that the purpose of using screws is to make 



Accurate, EasvLBVEUMG 



lor FOOTINGS -FLOORS 

The old reliable water level is now 
modernized into an accurate low- 
cost layout level. 50 ft. clear tough 
vinyl tube gives you 100 ft. of leveling in each 
set-up, and on and on. With its new poly- 
ethylene container-reservoir, the LEVELEASY 
remains filled and ready for fast one-man leveling. 
Compact, durable and simple, this amazing level 
is packed with complete illustrated instructions on 
modern liquid leveling. If your dealer has not yet 
storked the LEVELEASY, use our prompt mail serv- 
ice. Send your check or money order today for only 
$7.95. Postal charges wLU be added on C.O.D. orders. 
Money back guarantee. 





HYDROLEVEL 



925 De Soto Ave., Ocean Springs, Miss 



EM PIRE 




Check these ffeaturess 



1. 300% More visibility. 

2. Patented "Snap-In" viol holders. 

3. Vials exposed end to end. 

4. Closed end plate construction. 
Patents Pending 



5. Shock-proof— Shatter-proof 
Mounting. 

6. No shadows— no reflections. 

7. Luminosity factor vial fluid. 

8. Reinforced heat treated frame. 



AMERICA'S MOST ADVANCED level line since 1919. Wri7e /or literature. 

WMlRlt^E, LEVEL. MFG. CO. Milwaukee 13, Wisconsin 
TOOIS FOR THE NATION'S CRAFTSMEN 



Model 252-M — Magnesium 
Model 252-A— Aluminum 

24" 58.80 

28" $10.00 

30" S10.50 

42" $15.50 

48" $16.00 

78"t $27.00 

f Magnesium only 




44 



THE CARPENTER 



possible proper gauging of the pressure on 
the glass. The dimensional figures shown 



booR Post 




■JflMB 



6lAS5' 

Fig. 9 

by Fig. 6, should also be applied, respec- 
tively, to Figs. 5 and 10. 

Fig. 7 shows the chord in part, and the 
setting for the glass, which is practically 
tlie same as what is shown by Fig. 4. 

Another Plan.— Fig. 8 shows a plan that 
is the same as what is shown by Fig. 1, 
witli one exception— the glass to the left is 



set at a 30-degree angle. Fig. 9 shows tlie 
relationship of the jamb, at this angle, with 
the door post, while Fig. 10 shows the 
angle bar. 



/^N6tE-BAR 





6LA55^ Fig. 10 
It should be noted that in this lesson we 
are showing the simplest of store fronts, 
and because the windows are small, we 
are showing all-wood settings. The joints 
and concealed surfaces of all-wood settings 
should be well painted before they are put 
in place, while the exposed parts should also 
be properly painted. If this work is pains- 
takingly done, small show windows with 
wood settings will be substantial and will 
have a pleasing appearance. 





TKEY HAVE 
OUR CHART 

BLUEPRINT 27" x 36" 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how to find 
lengths of any rafter and make its cuts; find any 
angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 16 sides, 
and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter and brace 
tables, octagon scale. Gives other valuable informa- 
tion. Also includes Starting Key and Radial Saw 
Chart for changing pitches and cuts into degrees and 
minutes. Every carpenter should have this chart. Now 
printed on both sides, malces about 13 square feet of 
printed data showing squares full size. See your hardware 
dealer or your local business agent. If they can not supply 
you — send $1.25 to Mason Engineering Service, 2105 N. 
Burdick, Kalamazoo, Mich. Free Catalog of Books and 
Tools with order. For Canadian prices write Curry's Art 
Store 756 Yonae St., Toronto 5. 



wffh these 2 machines you can sharpen 
ALL HAND AND POWER LAWN MOWERS 

Here's a business you can start right at home and begin 
making a CASH PROFIT right away. The Foley Lawn 
Mower Sharpener handles up to 3 or 4 reel type mowers per 
hour. Prices run $2.00 to $3.00 for hand mowers, $5.00 to 
$8.00 for power mowers. Tou get 99c profit out of each dollar. 

With the Foley Grinder you can sharpen rotary power mow- 
er blades, rip, cross-cut and combination circular saws, dado 
heads, ice skates, knives, scissors, shears, all sharp-edged tools. 
FREE PLAN tells how to put yourself right into a 
I lin\llfR \ home business that will pay you $3 to $6 an hour. 
^SJijlSend coupon today for FREE BOOK on how to 
I mvtnK* I gjjappgf, power mowers and Special Combination Mon- 
ey Saving Offer No Obligation — no salesman will call. 

FdlElTMFGTco" 201-oFoley BIdg, Minneapolit 18, Minn.| 

Send Free Plan on lawn mower business and Special | 
Combination Offer. | 



NEW 



"Up-to-Date" Combination 

RABBET-ROUTER 

PLANE 

With Built-in 

GAUGE-MARKER 

and SQUARE 

You've always wanted such a plane— nothing like it! Ideal 
for setting hinges and locks perfectly . . . also for ALL tine, 
intricate carpentry work. Carves where other plades can t 
reach! %" tool steel blade will cut to 1/2' depth. Light, 
precision steel construction — heavy nickel C ^^^ /C 
plate. Full 73/4" long. Weighs 17 ounces. .^ ^^ ■ ■ «« 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. Order ^^POST 

BY MAIL TODAY! WE PAY SH IPPING ! ^ PAID 




USABLE 
Where Other 
Planes Won't Work 



ILLINOIS STAMPING & 

Dept. C-25, Box 8639, 

Pnone RO-4-5447 



MFG. CO. 

Chicago 80, III. 




FASTER STOCK REMOVAL 

Millers Falls two brand-new belt sanders 
offer carpenters a wide range of advanced 
features — several of them Millers Falls 
exclusives — including: Unique drive 
mechanism with internal bearing • 
Powerful MF-built motors • Ball and 
needle bearings throughout • Slip-proof 
timing belt drive • "Fine thread" track- 
ing adjustment • Anti-gouge backrest — 
and many others. Model No. 830 — 3" x 
21" belt; % H.P. motor . . . priced at 
$74.50. Model No. 840 ... a big capacity 
Sander designed to permit flush sanding 
up to vertical surfaces. 4" x 21" belt; 1 
H.P. motor . . . $84.50. Write Millers 
Falls Company, Dept. C-32, Greenfield, 
Mass., for details. 



NEW BELSAWlHULTI- DUTY I'OWEX ^^^^ 






SA>VS PLANES MOLDS 




b 



O 

Now you can use this ONE power feed shop 
to turn rough lumber into high-value moldings, 
trim, flooring, furniture.. .ALL popular patterns. 
RIP. ..PLANE. ..MOLD. ..separately or all at once 
by power feed... with a one horsepower motor. 
Use 3 to 5 HP for high speed commercial output. 

LOW COST.. .You can own this MONEY MAKING 

POWER TOOL for only...*30**® down payment. 

Send coupon ioday 



BELSAW POWER TOOLS 940 Field Bide., Kansas City 11. Mo. 
Send me complete fads on ihe MULTI-DUTY Power 
Tool. No obligation. 



NarriC- 



Address. 

City 



.State_ 



Set a Hand Saw 
in 32 seconds 



FOLEY Power 

SAW SETTER 




for hand and fiand saws 

Tlie Foley Auoomatic Power 
Setter lias exclusive "twin 
hammer" action (one for 
each side of saw), operat- 
ing from a single sorlnit, 
insuring utmost accuracy. 
ONCE through turns out a 
perfectly set, true cutting 
I saw. No tooth breakage, 
1 relieves eye strain. Sets all 

h..nd saus (uith handles left on) and band saws from 

-1 111 li> puuio pii inch. 

FREE — Foley Price Guide of saw sharpening charges, 

also Foley Setter circular. Time Payments if desired. 

Write tofla.v — no salesman will 



"*».«^i 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 



281-0 Foley BIdg. 
Minneapolis 18, Minn. 



HOW TO TIE KNOTS AND SPLICE MANILA ROPE 




Beautiful designed pocket 

size booklet. Over thirty of 

the most essential rigging 

knots and splices known. 

Bowlines. SeaflEold Hitch, 

Barrel Pliteh, Carrick Bend, Becket Hitch, 

Catspaw and many others. Fully illustrated. 

explaining how to tie and splice step by step. 

Price .?1.00 per copy postpaid. Order from, 

SECURITY MANILA KNOT CO. 
27 North 44th Street Belleville, 111. 

AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 
4vois.^8 

Inildt Tradt Inftmatleii lor 
Carpenters, Builders, Joiners, 
Building Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Guides 
give yo\i the short-cut In- 
structions that you want-in- 
cluding new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for 
the apprentice ... a practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer* 
ence for the master worker. 
...^■i* -s «« Carpenters everywhere are 

Inside Trade Information on: using these Guides as < Keip- 

How to use the steel square — How to Ing Hand to Easier Work, Bel- 
flle and set saws— How to build fur- tfl..*""^ *.'}? .8«"».' "y-. *?t 
niture— How to use a mitre box — 
How to use the chalk line — How to 
use rules and .scales — How to make Joints 
—Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensu- 
ration problems — Estimating strength of 
timbers — How to set girders and .sills- 
How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, 
bams, garages, bungalows, etc. — How to 
read and draw plans — Drawing up speci- 
fications — How to excavate — How to use 
Bettings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square 
— How to build hoists and scaffolds — sky- 
lights — How to build stairs. 





AUDEL, Publishers. 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10. N. Y. 

Mai! Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 
7 days' free trial. If O.K. I will remit }2 in 7 days and $2 ' 
monthly until J8, plus shipping charge, is paid. Otherwise 
I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfied. 



employed by— 



D 



SAVE SHIPPING CHARGESI Enclose Full Payment 
With Coupon and We Pay Shipping Chorget. C-2 



NOW 



I Earn Better Pay This Easy Way 

CARPENTRY 
ESTIMATING 



...QUICK.. .EASY. ..ACCURATE 

\yith this simplified guide! 

You can earn higher pay when you know how 
to estimate. Here is everything you need to 
know to "take off" a bill of materials from set 
of plans and specifications for a frame house. 
Saves you time figuring jobs, protects you 
against oversights or mistakes that waste 
materials and cost money. Nothing complicated 
— just use simple arithmetic to do house car- 
pentry estimating with this easy-to-use ready 
reference handbook. 

SIMPLIFIED 
CARPENTRY ESTIMATING 

Shows you, step by step, how to figure mate- 
rials needed for (1) foundation, (2) framing, 
(3) exterior finish, (4) interior finish, (5) 
hardware, and (6) stairs. Gives definite "take- 
off"' rules, with many quick-reference tables and 
short-cut methods that simplify the work. 

CPrPIA! FPATIIDrC- Lumber Checking List. Mlll- 
OrtbinL r CHI unco. „ork checking List. Hard- 
ware Checking List. Materials Ordering Information. Quick- 
Figuring Tables for estimating concrete footings and walls, 
concrete piers, window frames, door and window areas, 
sasli weights, nail quantities. How to Ugure labor hours 
per unit of work Rules for linear, area and volume 
measurement. Mathematical reference tables, including dec- 
imal equivalents, lumber reckoner, conversion of weights and 
measures, etc. New chapter, "How to Plan a House," gives 
useful data for contractors and material dealers. 

TURN TO CHAPTER 8 Z^r Z" "tl^r^-E^^^S 

Short Cuts" you can use for quick figuring of board foot- 
age. Here are simplified ways to estimate lumber needed 
for floors, walls, ceilings, roof, door and window frames, 
inside trim for these frames, inside trim for inside doors, 
and drawers and cabinets. Tiiis chapter alone can be worth 
the entire price of the book to youl 

__j<;.s<S No Risk Trial — Act Now! 

Just fill in and mail cou- 
pon below to get your 
copy of "Simplified Car- 
pentry Estimating." See 
for yourself how this 
valuable, easy-to-use ref- 
erence handbook can tell 
you everything you need 
to know about all phases 
of carpentry estimating. 







MAIL THIS COUPON 



SIIHMONS-BOARDMAN Pub. Corp., Dept. C-260 
30 Church Street, New York 7, N. Y. 

Send me "Simplified Carpentry Estimating" with 
the understanding that it I am not completely sat- 
isfied I can return it in 10 days for FULL 
REFUND. 

enclosed is $3.75 D 'heck D money order 

Name 

Address 

City Zone 

State 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter." including those stipulated as non-can- 
tellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 

City, Mo. 4-45 

Empire Level Mfg. Co., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 43 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III. 48 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 44.45.47 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. 43 

Illinois Stamping & Mfg. Co., 

Chicago, 111. 44 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 3rd Cover 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 45 

Yates-American Machine Co., 

Beloit, Wis. 4 

Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 45 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

Cline-Sigmon, Publishers, Hick- 
ory, N. C 47 

L. F. Garlinghouse Co., Inc., 

Topeka, Kansas 48 

International Correspondence 

Schools, Scranton, Pa 1 

Mason Engineering, Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 44 

Security Manila Knot Co., Belle- 
ville, 111. 45 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. 42 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y 46 

U. S. General Supply Corp., New 

York, N. Y. 47 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



SIGMON'S 

''A FRAMING GUIDE 
and STEEL SQUARE" 



^ • 


312 Pages 




229 Subjects 


tffiiffiR ® 


Completely Indexed 


IhHi • 


Handy Pocket Size 


SbB 9 


Hard Leatherette 


■nm^^n 


Cover 


IHH • 


Union Shop Printed 


^^H 


Useful Every Minute 



A literal gold mine of practi- 
cal, aiitlientic information for 
arcliitects, carpenters and 
building meclianics, in easy 
concise forms you can under- 
stand and use daily. 

Dozens of tables on measures, 
weiglits, mortar, brick, con 
Crete, rafters, stairs, nails, 
cement, steel beams, tile, in- 
terest rates and many otliers. 
Insiiuctioas on use of steel square, square root tables, 
solids, windows, frames, every building component and part. 
It's complete I 

Revised Bdition Now Ready 

ORDER $3. 00 Postpaid, or COD, you 

TODAY *■* pay charges. 

SATISf ACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY REFUNDED 

CLINE-SIGMON, Publishers 

Department 50 
P. O. Box 367 Hickory, N. C. 



SAVE MONEY 

Up to 50% off on 
FAMOUS BRAND TOOL^ 

forCARPENTERS 
BUILDERS 
APPRENTICES 



HAND AND POWER TOOLS 

FOR HOME, FARM, SHOP, 

BUSINESS 

Tools made by the country''. 

Foremost Manufacturers 

Before you buy- — check our 
big, beautifully illustrated 
catalog. You can save hun- 
dreds of dollars a year on all 
types of hand tools : power 
and manual. Nationally 
l<iui\vi) nialies, finest quality, 
lowest cost. 






Make extra money selling to 
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proach is a prospect. NO 
STOCK TO CARRY. Show 
catalog and take orders. We 
ship direct to you. 

•lust pin $1 to this ad for 
NEW WHOLESALE TOOL 
CATALOG TODAY. ($1 re- 
fundable on first order) 

U. S. GENERAL SUPPLY CORP. 
Dept. 286, 149 Church St., Nev/ York, N. Y. 



Black - Decker 

Channellock 

Plomb 

Disston 

Irvi/in 

Kennedy 

Marshalltown 

Miller Falls 

Lufkin 

Proto 

Wiss 

Stanley 

Thor 

Vise Grip 

Xcelite 



RETIRED 





Are you looking for part-time work? The 
only machine that files hand, band, com- 
bination and crosscut circular saws is the 



FOLEY 



AUTOMATIC 



SAW FILER 



When you are no longer on a full-time regular job, 
perhaps you would like something to do for a few 
hours a day and pick up a little extra money, too. 
Your carpenter friends would be glad to have you 
sharpen their saws for them, especially with the pre- 
cision work done by the Foley Saw Filer. F. M. Davis 
wrote us: "After filing saws by hand for 12 years, 
the Foley Saw Filer betters my best in half the time." 
Exclusive jointing action keeps teeth uniform in size, 
height, spacing — and new model 200 Foley Saw Filer 
is the only machine that sharpens hand, band, both 
combination and crosscut circular saws. 



SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET 



FOLEY MFG. CO. 



218-0 Foley BIdg. 



Minneapolis 18, Minn. 
Please send literature on Foley Saw Filer and Time Pay- 
ment Plon. 

NAME 



WRITE FOR INFORMATION 

You can set up a Foley Saw Filer in your 
garage or basement. A small cash payment 
will put a Foley in your hands, and you can 
handle monthly payments with the cash 
you take in. Operating expense is low — only 
7c for files and electricity to turn out a 
$1.00 or $1.50 saw filing job. Send us your 
name and address on coupon for complete 
information on the Foley Saw Filer. 



New ESTWING SUPREME Unbreakable 

Sheeting and Framing 



One-Piece 

Forged Solid Steel 

Strongest 
Construction 
Known 




HAMMER 

King-Size Length 
Gives 50% More POWER 
22 oz. Head-Length 16" 



1 






Greater Reach 
for framing 

Extra Leverage 
for PulHng Nails 
Scored Face 
Prevents Glancing 
Blow^s— 



plus 

Exclusive NYLON-VINYL 

Deep Cushion Grip 

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Made by the Inventors and World's Only Specialists in Unbreakable Tools 
"Mark Of The Skilled" 



E3-22SM $6.35 
E3-22S (Smooth Face) $5.55 



EwSTWING MFG. CO. Dept. C2 Rockford, 111. 



Save Money — Time On Home Plan^ Pj^ 



Overl, 

Different 

Builders 
Plans 

New Type-Black 
on White Paper 

Ready to Mail 
Immediately 




See them All In 



I Special! 

All 18 books - $8.00 Post- 
paid for Cash with Order. 
With heavy duty binder 
$10.95 



HOME PLAN BOOKS 

All sizes and styles of homes suitabk" 
to every locality and for most builders. 
If you do Custom Building— 
THESE BOOKS CAN HELP YOU SELL. 



LOW COST Builder's Plans for 
every plan — over 1,000 — mailed 
same day order is received. 



JUST PUBLISHED 
"Masonry Homes" 



r' 



ORDER YOUR CHOICE - OR ALL BOOKS - CHECK THOSE WANTED - CLIP AND MAIL TODAY 



□ Ranch & Suburban — New, 

125 Hanch type plans 50c 

□ Income & Retirement Homes — 

125 homes, multiple units 50c 

□ Choice Selected Homes — 114 plans. 
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□ Homes In Brick — 114 plans of 
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□ All American Homes — 120 plans in 
varied types of construction 50c 

□ Deluxe Small Homes — Our largest 
selection of moderns 50c 



□ Blue Ribbon Homes — 116 of our 
most popular plans 50c 

□ Cape Cod and Colonial Homes — 

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n Homes For Narrow Lots — Over 60 
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room. 50c 

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levels and 18 contemporary 50c 

□ New American Homes — 110 of our 
large liomes; popularity tested-$l.00 

□ Sunshine Homes — 58 appealing 
plans. Many without basements-50c 



n Masonry Homes — over 60 de- 
signs concrete blocks, brick 
and stone 50c 

□ America's Best — Over 120 plans 
Outstanding; 2 and 3 bedrooms-50c 

□ Plans For New Homes — 84 very 
desirable plans; 2 to 4 bedrooms. 50c 

□ Lake Shore & Mountain Cottages — 
58 year-round, summer designs-50c 

□ Lawn &. Garden Ideas — 32 pages. 
Patios, fences, trellises, etc 50c 

□ Superior Fireplaces. — Indoor types. 
Correct construction detaU. $1.00 



MAIL ORDER TO: L. F. GARLi 



I 



USE CO., INC. Box UB-20, Topeka, Kansas > 




Only the best wood rules merit this seal 



Luf kin Red Ends are the favor- 
ite extension rides of practical 
workers everywhere. Take the 
X46, for example. You can see 
its quality ... its natural wood 
finish, brass extension slide and 



bold, black markings. You can 
hear it in the decisive "snap" 
of joints and strike plates. 
You'll find four Red Ends on 
the Luf kin Turnover Target at 
your hardware store . . . one 
to fit your job. 



BASIC MfASUfitNG TOOLS 

mr^ — r m^:~: 1 



jfa^ f/j: 



a/ways look for the 

LUFKIN TARGET' 

where your hardware man 
displays his finest 
measuring tools. 



J@B5HI t%^^ 




a too 

= «3 







^.. 



^4klnWW JA^ M ^9 





United BROTHERHaaD df Carpenters 

AND JDINERS df AMERICA 

222 E. MICHIGAN ST., INDIANAPOLIS 4, INDIANA 



kLuOTfU- 







LET'S GET DN WITH THE JDB DF MAKING 
DUR TOWNS AND CITIES DECENT 
PLACES TO LIVE FDR 
ALL PEOPLE 



New low cost SKIL Plane 



CUTS PLANING TIME IN HALF! 

Easy-to-handle when fitting doors, 
screens, windows, storm sashes, and 
edging cabinet work. Has %" depth 
adjustments, 2%" width of cut. 




converts in seconds to a routor... 



THE CARPENTER-SIZE ROUTER 

Light-weight — just slightly over 5 
pounds. Full % hp motor has power to 
spare. Assures accurate, fast jamb mor- 
tising when used with new SKIL No. 
17070 Hinge Butt -Template Kit, 




you get both for only ^104^^ 



Save important tool dollars ! Get 
the new SKIL 296 Plane-for 
just $89.50. Then add only 
$14.50 more for the SKIL No. 
17067 Router Base— and you've 
got a powerful, versatile router 
to boot! You save approximately 
$100 over the combined price of 
similar tools. And if you now 
own a SKIL No. 297 Router, 
you can convert it to a plane for 
the low $44.50 price of the SKIL 
No. 3650 Plane Attachment! 
Ask your SKIL dealer for a 
demonstration. 



SAt/l 



...and SKI LS AW 
Power Tools 



FREE! 58-PAGE INDUSTRIAL TOOL CATALOG 



SKIL Corporation, 
Dept. CAT-30 
5033 Elston Ave., 
Chicago 30, Illinois 



In Canada: 
3601 DundasSt., 
West, Toronto 9, 
Ontario 



n Please send me name of nearest distributor. 

n Please send me FREE catalog on SKIL power tools. 

Name 



Address- 
City 



.Zone. 



.State. 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor Rvkmm^f 



Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street. 


Indianapolis 4, Indiana >5uii!iijJjr 


v'r",xxx-NrJ''3 MARCH, 1960 


One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 


<,^sa 



Con tents- — 



Which Way Business Ethics? 



Recent disclosures of questionable practices in TV, advertising, drugs, and food 
processing raise the all-important question, what responsibility does business have 
toward the general public as a by-product of making money? A century ago, "let the 
buyer beware" was the motto of all business. Is this attitude making a comeback? 



British Woodworkers Aim For Security 



10 

Finlay C. Allan, assistant to General President Hufcheson, outlines some of his im- 
pressions of the British construction industry and the part the Amalgamated Society 
of Woodworkers is playing in building a good life for our carpenter brothers across 
the Atlantic. Mr. Allan visited the Society late la.t year as part of an assignment 
dedicated to strengthening bonds between the Society and our Brotherhood. 



Dick Gray Resigns 



15 



After 17 years of outstanding service, Dick Gray finds it necessary to resign his 
post as president of the Building and Construction Trades Department. A four-man com- 
mittee, which includes General President Hutcheson, seeks a successor. 



Anti-Unionism Crosses Into Canada 



20 



Canadian unionists face the same kind of legislative opposition that brought about 
Landi-um-Griffin and right-to-work laws in the United States. But Canadian unions are 
fighting back intelligently and effectively. 



• • • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
What's New 
Editorials 
OfiBcial 

In Memoriam 
Outdoor Meandcrings 
CoiTcspondence 
To Oiu- Ladies 
Craft Problems 



Index to Advertisers 



• • * 



18 
22 
24 
28 
29 
31 
34 
38 
39 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mall matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailins at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

Learn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you that 
the way to the top-pay jobs and success in 
Building is to get tliorough knowledge of 
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Which Way Business Ethics? 

* * * 

THE Congressional investigations of TV and the drug industry continue 
making headlines. The Kefauver Committee digs up new evidence of 
fantastic markups in tranquilizers, and the Harris Committee is just 
scratching the surface in its probings of "payola" in the record business. 

But for all the headlines that the drug and TV investigations are making, 
a quiet and relatively unpublicized struggle now going on between the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission and advertising agencies ultimately may determine 
how much protection the general public can expect from shady business prac- 
tices. In recent weeks the FTC has issued a number of complaints against 
prominent TV advertisers. The FTC charges that real sandpaper is not used 

in the tests showing a safety razor 

scraping a piece of sandpaper clean 
after lathering with a canned shaving 
cream. It also maintains that some of 
the filter "tests" used by cigarette 
companies are phony; that Brand X 
aluminum foil is deliberately torn; 
that the "flavor buds" bragged about 
by a margarine maker are artificial. 

In reprisal, some of the advertising 
agencies are attacking FTC right and 
left. Some agencies are taking full 
page newspaper ads of their own to 
blister FTC for interfering with what 
they call "imaginative selling." Be- 
hind the scenes, tremendous pressure 
is being exerted on the government to 
call off the FTC dogs. 

Like the FTC, the Pure Food and 
Drug Administration is getting be- 
hind-the-scene lumps from food proc- 
essors because it dared to condemn 
tainted cranberries last fall and pro- 
test the use of hormone preparations 
in the fattening of chickens for the 
broiler market. Some processors seem 
to think it is un-American for govern- 
ment agencies to demand that food 
products be free of injurious chemi- 
cals and cancer-prone preparations. 

All this brings up a logical ques- 
tion: which way business morality? 



The drug investigations showed 
unmerciful price gouging of people 
least able to pay— the sick and the in- 
firm. The TV probings uncovered 
rigged quizzes and widespread pay- 
ola. FTC protests against misleading 
and downright untruthful advertising 
evoke cries of Gestapoism from the 
advertising agencies doing the deceiv- 
ing. The Food and Drug ban on food- 
stuffs treated with dangerous agents 
sets up a hue and cry for scalps in 
the administrative agency. Added to- 
gether these things do not present a 
very pretty picture of the level of 
ethics prevailing in business. 

Apparently other people have 
asked the question, "Whither business 
ethics?" because several publications 
recently have commented on the sub- 
ject. One was a publication of the 
National Industrial Conference Board; 
the other was a pamphlet compiled 
by the School of Business at Indiana 
University from opinions expressed by 
businessmen themselves. 

The words in both pieces were 
fancy and involved, and perhaps we 
misinterpreted some of them, but the 
conclusion we reached after reading 
each of them is that the most impor- 



THK CARPENTER 



tant responsibility of business man- 
agers is to make money. 

Certainly there is no quarrel with 
the proposition that business should 
make money. But if making money is 
to be the one and only goal of busi- 
ness there is small hope for survival 
of the free enterprise system. 

Away baek in the middle years of 
the last century, the philosophy of 
business was that anything goes so 
long as it is profitable. Many business- 
men considered the ideal wage a 
wage that was high enough to pro- 
\ide the worker with sufficient food 
to keep him going, and strong enough 
to do his job: more than that would 
only lead to drunkenness, idleness and 
mischief. Before there were unions 
most business enterprises operated on 
this theory. 

With the appearance of unions, the 
picture was gradually changed. Em- 
]:)loyes gained some rights and privi- 
leges. Companies sought to establish 
reputations for integrity, honesty and 
fair dealing. Are we now coming 
around the full circle, when making 
money again becomes the be-all and 
end-all of business, and to hell with 
employes, dealers, and the general 
public? 

All the questionable practices we 
have named above resulted in extra 
profits for the people involved. Are 
the practices, therefore, to be con- 
doned? Are the men who instigated 
them to be looked up to as successful, 
admirable business managers? If mak- 
ing money is to be the sole measuring 
stick, then certainly the answer must 
be "yes." 

However, we cannot believe that 
business ethics has retrogressed so 
far so fast. Many companies must be- 
lieve that thek prime responsibility is 
to put out a product or service so 
good that people will buy it at a 
profitable price year in and year out. 



Some of them must feel they owe 
an obligation to the community they 
grew up in, even if competitors pull 
up stakes, lock, stock and barrel, to 
move to greener, low wage pastures. 
Some must even have a sense of re- 
sponsibility and obligation to the em- 
ployes who helped them grow over 
the years. 

But the payola boys, the drum 
beaters who call outright prevarica- 
ting "imaginative selling," the super- 
salesmen who employ call girls, set a 
pace that eventually may force all 
others to descend to their class. That 
is why the nation needs to ask itself 
the question, "Which way business 
ethics?" 

And there are those who insist that 
unions, too, are falling prey to the 
"success at any price" philosophy. Is 
this assumption valid? Of course a 
few chiselers were found in respon- 
sible positions in two or three unions. 
In their fast-buck operations these 
union officials took a page from the 
book of many so-called business ty- 
coons. They put a fast buck ahead of 
loyalty or principle. 

But wrongdoers in labor were sur- 
prisingly small in number. By innu- 
endo and implication the McClellan 
Committee besmirched the names of 
many honest union officials. However, 
the number actually caught with a 
hand in the till could be counted on 
the fingers of one hand. Certainly 
payola, chiseling and under-the-table 
deals touched only a very few organ- 
izations. 

Where organized labor may be sub- 
ject to some finger pointing is in the 
slot machine concept of unionism that 
has been allowed to grow up in the 
minds of too many union members— 
you put in so many pennies per year 
in union dues and drag out so many 
dollars in wage increases and fringe 
benefits. 



THE CARPENTER 



Wages, of course, are important, 
but wages are not the only benefits 
members receive from unions. Most 
union members would get full value 
received for their union dues if they 
never got a penny in increased wages. 

Actually, the labor movement is the 
only effective force working for the 
general welfare of the working man. 
Most people will agree that the Fo- 
rand Bill (which would establish med- 
ical services for retired workers as a 
part of Social Security) is a good 
thing. Who other than labor is actu- 
ally fighting for this bill? The church- 
es? The lodges? The bowling clubs? 
The Rotary clubs? Here and there 
one of these organizations may be 
plugging for the bill, but, by and 
large, most of them do not even 
know it exists. Labor is providing 
nine-tenths of the strength behind the 
measure. 

The same is true in the fields of 
better housing, more schools, greater 
safety, more realistic unemployment 
insurance, a higher minimum wage, 
etc. All these things are beneficial to 
the working man; and the labor move- 
ment is the only effectively organized 



force fighting for them. When we 
achieve them the lion's share of the 
credit must go to organized labor. 

In addition to these items of na- 
tional import, many unions provide 
benefit programs for their members. 
They operate credit unions and recre- 
ational programs; they sponsor health 
plans and fellowship parties; they 
maintain homes for aged members 
and benefit programs to help the less 
fortunate. 

Added together, these things make 
a union card a bargain if no wage in- 
creases were involved. But too few 
union members realize this fact be- 
cause they have never thought the 
matter through. 

Business may feel its prime respon- 
sibility to be the making of money 
by any means not strictly illegal. But 
the vast bulk of the labor movement 
considers service to the membership 
the only excuse for its existence. 
Wages may be a part of that service, 
but only a part. And to the ex- 
tent that organized labor forgets that 
wages are only a part, it makes a 
grave mistake. 



WHERE ARE THE JOBS COMING FROM? 

Ten years from now there must be thirteen and a half miUion more jobs than there 
are today if full employment is to be achieved. 

The nation's total work force, now estimated at seventy-three and a half million, will 
grow to eighty-seven million by 1970, predicts a new Department of Labor pamphlet 
entitled "Manpower: Challenge of the 1960's." This increase of thirteen and a half million 
represents a 20% growth in the size of our work force. 

In view of the fact automation is eliminating jobs nearly as fast as new workers are 
entering the work force, a better title for the pamphlet might be "Where Are The Jobs 
Coming From?" 

This, however, seems not to be the major concern of the Department. In fact, the De- 
partment seems to be more worried about how industry vdll be able to recruit enough 
workers to man all jobs adequately. 

In releasing the booklet, Secretary of Labor Mitchell said the changes in the labor 
force will "require a major overhaul in the employment policies of many businesses." 

"Employers who do not abandon policies against hiring workers because of age, sex, 
race, reUgion or nationality, or because they may be handicapped in some way, may have 
real trouble finding enough workers in the decade ahead," Mitchell warned. 

(Note: "Manpower: Challenge of the 1960's" may be obtained from the Superintendent 
of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C, at 25 cents a copy.) 



10 



British Woodworicers Aim For Security 

By FINLAY C. ALLAN, Assistant to the General President 

THE ties between the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America and the Amalgamated Society of Woodworkers are both 
long-standing and close. 

Over the years the two organizations have worked together closely on many 
matters aflFecting the welfare of building trades workers throughout the world. 
A substantial number of our members once held Society membership before 
migrating to the U. S. or Canada. 

Therefore, I was very happy when General President Hutcheson assigned 
me, late last year, to visit the Amalgamated Society to discuss mutual problems 

and further cement these fraternal ~ — — -7 — ; 

In general, I found that construc- 
tion methods used in England are 
very similar to ours except that self- 
supporting tubular scaffolding is used 
to a greater degree. The exterior of 
this entire job was scaffolded to its 
full height, and all trades used the 
scaffolding when necessary and will 
continue to do so until the job is 
completed. 

The head safety engineer, a car- 
penter by trade, escorted me through 
the entire project. It appeared to me 
that safety is given a great deal of 
emphasis in English construction, and 
employers seem to cooperate enthusi- 
astically in the prevention of job ac- 
cidents. 

Housing, in particular, appeared to 
be very active in the British Isles. I 
was taken to an apartment project 
being constructed for the London 
County Council, consisting of a great 
many apartment buildings— some of 
them 18 stories high. The structures 
are of reinforced concrete, and the 
exterior walls are pre-cast concrete, 
with exposed aggregate finish in white 
calcined flint, supported on rails bolt- 
ed to the structure. All exterior win- 
dows and balconies have been de- 



ties. Several months previously, Mr. 
E. Stan Taylor, an executive council 
member of the Society, visited our 
General Office for the same purpose. 

My visit to the Society was a re- 
warding and instructive experience. 
The resident officers of the Society 
were courteous and patient in brief- 
ing me on the problems confronting 
British carpenters and the steps the 
Society is taking to solve them. I also 
was given an opportunity to visit a 
number of typical construction pro- 
jects. 

I feel that the impressions I gained 
of the construction industry in Britain 
and the operating methods of the 
Amalgamated Society may be of some 
interest to our own members— par- 
ticularly those who once may have 
held membership. 

Generally speaking, construction in 
England is booming. I visited one 
project in London employing some 
2800 building tradesmen. The project 
is a 26 story layout undertaken by the 
Shell Oil Company. It consists of 
office building, stores, theatres, and 
underground parking facilities to ac- 
commodate 1500 cars. 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



signed so that maintenance and re- 
painting can be done without the 
need of exterior scaffolding. Most 
buildings contain 68 2-bedroom apart- 
ments. 

From London I traveled to Wake- 
field, a town o£ approximately 60,000 
population located 200 miles north of 
London in a coal mining district. 
Here, too, work appeared to be good 
for building tradesmen; I noticed a 
good deal of store modernization. The 
self-serve system of our chain stores 
seems to be invading much of Eng- 
land. 

From Wakefield I traveled to Thur- 
so, at the northern tip of Scotland. A 
new fast breeder reactor atomic plant 
was put into operation while I was 
there. A housing project for the per- 
sonnel necessary to operate the plant 
was under construction in the area. 
Many of the houses were what we 
would call 2 story duplex homes. The 
exterior walls were constructed of ce- 
ment blocks, over which a coating of 
rough cement, plaster, or stucco was 
applied. Dry wall was used almost 
exclusively in the interior. It is my 
opinion that these apartments and 
homes are well constructed. However, 
they lack some of the modern con- 
veniences and appliances that we are 
accustomed to in the United States. 

For all the housing activity in the 
British Isles, I failed to see any large 
scale, speculative single-home build- 
ing. A large number of single homes 
were under construction, but as far as 
I could find out, practically all of 
them were being custom built. Specu- 
lative building apparently is not pop- 
ular in the British Isles. 

As to working conditions in the 
British construction industry, the 44- 
hour week seems to prevail rather 
generally. The hourly rate is approxi- 
mately 70c an hour. I found that over- 
time is the general rule rather than 



the exception. I was also surprised to 
learn that incentive pay, or a bonus 
system, prevails on a good deal of 
heavy construction such as the afore- 
mentioned Shell Oil Company project. 
I was told that the building trades- 
men on this job average $17 per week 
bonus pay above the basic hourly 
rate. 

Wages and working conditions are 
negotiated on a nationwide basis 
through the machinery of the National 
Joint Board for the Building Industry 
which, as the name implies, is made 
up of representatives from manage- 
ment and labor. Although some local 
variations are permitted under un- 
usual conditions, generally speaking 
all building tradesmen work under 
the same basic agreement. 

The basic journeyman rate for all 
crafts is 4s. 6d. (61.6c). However, the 
wage rate is tied to the retail price 
index. The 61.6c rate is based on a 
retail price index of 100. For every 
two points the index goes up, wages 
are increased }4d. (about ^c). Cur- 
rently, the index was high enough to 
bring the basic rate up to about 70c 
per hour. 

On top of the basic rate, there is a 
rather complicated scale of premium 
pay. This amounts to about 6.6c per 
hour for work assignments involving 
discomfort, inconvenience, or risk 
(high work, underground, wet, or 
dirty work). Premium pay also pre- 
vails on assignments involving extra 
skill or responsibility. Several other 
regulations provide for premium pay 
for work requiring extra know-how, 
effort, or inconvenience. 

A particularly interesting feature of 
the working rules is the tool allow- 
ance provision. British carpenters re- 
ceive a tool allowance of about 4.4c 
per day to compensate for wear and 
tear, loss, and other hazards that con- 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



struction work entails for tools. A shift 
differential of 5.5c per hour also seems 
to be standardized. 

The work week varies slightly from 
district to district and according to 
seasons. Ho\\'ever, 44 to 46j/^ hours, 
including a half day Saturday, seems 
to be standard. Overtime rates are 
figured at IV4 times the regular rate 
for the first 2 hours, and then from 
V/z to 2 times as the overtime mounts 
up. 

Other features of the British sys- 
tem I found interesting were vaca- 
tions, national holidays, and pay for 
lost time. Annual vacations and pub- 
lic holidays with pay are covered by 
agreements. The agreements set up a 
centralized fund to provide paid va- 
cations and holiday pay for workers 
of the building and civil engineering 
contracting industries. Although the 
bookkeeping is done separately for 
vacations and for paid holidays, the 
administration is handled in the same 
way. 

Each worker is given a book which 
he deposits with his current employ- 
er, who credits him weekly with his 
allotted time. If the worker goes to 
a new employer he takes his book 
with him. 

When the benefits fall due, the 
worker is paid by his cuiTcnt em- 
ployer, who in turn is reimbursed by 
the central fund. 

Each worker receives a two- week 
vacation with pay equal to his week- 
ly allotted sum, times the number of 
weeks he has been employed. Holi- 
days vary from locality to locality, but 
a worker's holiday pay is determined 
by the credit he accumulates in cov- 
ered employment. 

An especially interesting feature of 
the British agreement is the clause 
covering pay for lost time. A current- 
ly employed worker who loses time 
because of bad weather, breakdown. 



lack of materials, etc., is paid for half 
the time lost, or a guaranteed week- 
ly minimum of 32 hours' pay. How- 
e\^er, he must be present and ready to 
work during his normal hours, and 
must be willing to perform any other 
building trades work of which he is 
capable, or accept employment on 
another site where work is available. 

Travel pay also is covered by the 
agreement. The general purpose of 
the travel clause is: a. To pay a work- 
er for his time (one way) spent in 
traveling to a job site beyond the nor- 
mal working area. Such pay is at 
straight time. b. To pay him for any 
expenses, fares and lodgings incurred 
in traveling outside of his normal 
area. The lodging allowance is 8s. 
($1.12 per night). " 

Working conditions are spelled out 
rather precisely in the agreement. The 
agreement contains a code covering 
conditions of work in regard to shel- 
ter from bad weather, accommoda- 
tions for clothing and meals, washing 
facilities, sanitary conveniences, first 
aid, etc. 

All in all, it seemed to me that con- 
ditions of work are spelled out quite 
broadly in the agreement, and the 
British workers have ample protec- 
tion from over-zealous bosses and the 
normal hazards of construction work. 

Apprenticeship is also administered 
by the National Joint Council of the 
Building Industry through a Joint 
Apprenticeship Board. This national 
board sets standards, supervises the 
general plan, and serves as an appeal 
board from decisions of the regional 
joint apprenticeship committees. All 
crafts are covered by the one plan. 

Wage rates and working conditions 
of apprentices are regulated by the 
National Joint Council. Wage rates for 
apprentices are expressed as a percent- 
age of journeyman pay, and are grad- 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



uated according to the age of the ap- 
prentices. The apprentice pay rate 
ranges from 25% at age 15 to 87M% at 
age 20. The period of apprenticeship is 
5 years. This may be reduced by one 
year by the completion of a "full pre- 
apprenticeship course," or by two 
years by completing "whole time sen- 
ior day course of not less than two 
years." 

Attendance at technical classes is 
required until age 18. Employers pay 
class fees and pay the apprentice rate 
for time spent in class. Apprenticeship 
may begin at 15 or 16 (depending on 
the region) with a 6 month probation 
period. The apprentice must finish his 
training between his 20th and 21st 
birthday, although some exceptions 
may be made by the committee in 
unusual circumstances. 

An agreement between the National 
Federation of Building Trades Em- 
ployers and the National Federation 
of Building Trades Operatives (work- 
ers) spells out the manner in which 
disputes must be handled. The agree- 
ment binds the parties to try to joint- 
ly prevent work stoppage and to ex- 
pedite the resumption of work when 
a stoppage does occur, pending refer- 
ence of the dispute to an appropriate 
conciliation board. 

The agreement outlines the various 
steps a dispute must follow, starting 
at the local level and carrying on 
through the regional machinery to the 
national level. A Joint Emergency 
Dispute Commission is the highest 
tribunal to which a dispute can be ap- 
pealed. Such a commission makes a 
report with recommendations to the 
National Executive Committee, which 
may approve or disapprove, in whole 
or in part. 

If both parties on the committee 
approve, the decision is put into ef- 
fect. If not, further and indefinite 
steps are provided for, but no final or 



binding decision can be imposed on 
anyone. 

As I mentioned before, safety regu- 
lations are spelled out rather compre- 
hensively in a safety code. A Chief 
Inspector of Factories is charged with 
the responsibility for policing the reg- 
ulations. The code provides that any 
contractor who normally employs 50 
persons or more at one time must ap- 
point an experienced worker to su- 
pervise general safety and ensure that 
all work is done in accordance with 
the prescribed regulation. 

The safety regulations cover every- 
thing from lighting to safety nets and 
dust. 

All in all, I gained the impression 
that British construction workers are 
well protected in all areas: job haz- 
ards; lost time through bad weather, 
breakdowns, etc.; and excessive work 
loads. 

By our standards, British wage 
scales appear to be low, but tradition- 
ally Old World unions have concen- 
trated more on security than on hour- 
ly rates. In the area we term "fringe 
benefits" the British carpenters have 
built a solid program that affords 
them a considerable degree of pro- 
tection against the hazards and un- 
certainties of building trades work. 
Many of the protections the British 
building tradesmen enjoy we also 
have achieved since the war: health 
and welfare plans, paid vacations, 
paid national holidays, pensions, etc. 

Altogether, it appeared to me that 
our British brothers have built a satis- 
factory way of life for themselves. It 
must be appreciated, of course, that 
the British standard of living does not 
include some of the appliances and 
gadgets the average American work- 
ing family seems to think normal and 
necessary. 

I found the oflBcers of the Amalga- 
mated Society to be keen, dedicated, 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



hard working trade unionists. They 
extended me every consideration and 
courtesy. General Secretary G. F. 
Smith and Assistant General Secre- 
taiy W. J. Martin were very cooper a- 
tiAc ill arranging visits to construction 
projects for me. 

I also had the pleasure of renewing 
acquaintance with Su* Richard Cop- 
pock, president of the National Build- 
ing Trades Council, whom I had pre- 
\'iously met at an ILO conference in 
Rome in 1949, and at a Building 
Trades Convention in Hamburg in 
1953. During my stay in London, the 
executive council of the National 
Building Trades Council was in ses- 
sion. I was invited to pay them a 
visit and the executive council re- 
cessed while I was introduced. 

Since the Executive Council of the 
Society was also in session while I 
was there, I had an opportunity to 
meet all Council members. 

I found the district members of the 
Council- J. C. Hill, First District; E. 
Stan Taylor, Second District; J. H. 
Mills, Third District; J. Youngs, 
Fourth District; and G. I. Brinham, 
Fifth District— to be informed and co- 
operative buHding trades workers. 
From them I learned a great deal 
about the aims and ideals of the Brit- 
ish labor movement. 



If there is any particular section of 
the world that truthfully can be des- 
ignated the "cradle" of trade union- 
ism, I believe that section is England. 
Industrialization advanced faster in 
England than in any other nation dur- 
ing the previous century. Consequent- 
ly, British workers faced the ills of 
an industrial society long before most 
other workers did. 

From the time of the Tolpuddle 
martyrs, British workers have been 
diligently building a union structure 
capable of providing workers safety, 
security, and a decent living standard 
in a highly impersonal social and eco- 
nomic structure. 

It was obvious to me that the 
Amalgamated Society is working in 
this great tradition. Regardless of the 
obstacles and challenges that may lie 
ahead, I am sure the Society can be 
counted on to continue fighting the 
good fight for a better tomorrow for 
all workers in general and building 
tradesmen in particular. 

I certainly appreciate the oppor- 
tunity General President Hutcheson 
gave me to enhance my knowledge of 
the Amalgamated Society and the 
program it is pushing for the well- 
being of its members and the safety 
and security of the nation. 



APPRENTICESHIP STAMP MERITS SUPPORT 

AJl the people connected with apprenticeship training in Idaho— in cooperation with the 
State AFL-CIO— have undertaken a campaign to persuade the Post Office Dept. to issue a 
special commemorative stamp as a tribute to the whole concept of apprenticeship training. 

The idea is an excellent one. And the Idaho people already have an appropriate design. 
Several years ago they drew up a windshield sticker bearing the legend "Apprenticeship 
(is) The Nucleus Of Craftsmanship." The design is attracti\'e and the message is appro- 
priate. It would make an attractive and eye-catching postage stamp. 

Commemorative stamps ha\e been issued on behalf of causes far less worthy than 
apprenticeship training. There is no logical reason why this important phase of our indus- 
trial life shouldn't get the same kind of recognition. Untold thousands of people in many 
walks of hfe devote long and dedicated hours to promoting apprenticeship training. The 
only reward involved is the satisfaction of seeing young men develop diemselves both as 
craftsmen and as disciplined human beings. 

Already we have sent letters boosting the idea of an apprenticeship stamp to tlie Post- 
master-General and the Secretary of Labor. We sincerely hope diat all readers who believe 
in tlie princii>les of apprenticeship training will do likewise. 



15 



Dick Gray Resigns 

* * 

A FTER some 17 years of outstanding service, Richard J. (Dick) Gray last 
/-\ month resigned his post as president of the Building and Construction 
-^ -*- Trades Department of the AFL-CIO. Brother Gray tendered his resig- 
nation at the Department's Executive Council meeting in Miami Beach to 
become effective March 1. 

Brother Gray became acting president of the Department in 1943. Three 
years later he became its permanent president. Consequently fate tagged him 
to guide the destinies of the Department through some of the most turbulent 
years in its history. 

During his tenure in office the con- 
cluding campaigns of World War II 
were fought. Wage freeze and man- 
power regulations were at their 
height. Then came the readjustment 
years of peace, complicated by mate- 
rials shortages and the rise of anti- 
union hysteria. The Korean War 
brought new wage controls and gov- 
ernment restrictions. Mergers added 
additional problems. 

Through all these trials and tribu- 
lations Brother Gray conducted him- 
self in a statesmanlike manner. At 
every turn in the road he fought un- 
ceasingly to protect the best interests 
of the people he represented. 

He haunted the corridors of the 
House and Senate Office Buildings to 
acquaint Congressmen with the injus- 
tices that were accruing to building 
trades workers through government 
edicts. He fought passage of the Taft- 
Hartley Act to the bitter end, and 
not a man on Capitol Hill could say 
that he did not know how strongly 
the Building Trades Department op- 
posed the Landrum Bill of last year. 
In every crisis for the labor move- 
ment Dick Gray was in the thick of 
things, swinging with both hands. 




His resignation was accepted with 
regret by the Executive Council. A 
four-man administrative committee 
was named by the council to select a 
successor to Mr. Gray. The committee 
consists of Maurice A. Hutcheson, 
General President of our Brother- 
hood; Peter T. Schoemann, head of 
the Plumbers; Gordon Freeman, pres- 
ident of the Electrical Workers; and 
Peter Fosco, secretary-treasurer of the 
Laborers. 

The very best wishes of the entire 
labor movement, and especially the 
building trades union, go to Dick Gray 
on the occasion of his retirement. 



16 



Progress Report 



OUR NEW HOME TAKES SHAPE 




The architect's concept of what our new headquarters building in Washington, D. C. will look like when 
completed early next year. 




An aerial view of the lot before construction got under way. 



17 




WiTED BROnSVOCD, OM>r«»b • il 

JMIA. nut Baw o 



Another February 15 view looking toward Washington Monument 



p 




LANE UQ^SSIP 



HOPELESS CASE 

A frustrated man walked into the office 
ot a psychiatrist and told him he was mis- 
erable. "I have two cars, a swimming pool, 
and a very attractive girl li\ing next door. 
But still I'm unhappy." 

"But why aren't you happy?" asked the 
doctor. 

"Because," replied tlie patient, "I lost my 
driver's license, I can't svnm and the attrac- 
tive girl next door is married." 

* * l«f 
THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

If you don't think this is a funny world, 
consider the following items as reported 
in LABOR: 

Back-Seat— David Jenkins got into his 
car in Scarborough, England, and immedi- 
ately the woman in the back seat began 
bawhng him out for being late. She only 
stopped when she suddenly realized she was 
in the wrong car, having mistaken Jenkins' 
auto for her husband's. 

Theft— Burglars who broke in at a St. 
Louis auto dealer's took only one item— 
a camera hidden there by police to trap 
burglars. 




-saBEBs- 



''The clause in \he union con- 
trac\ that vou object to, sir, 
was copied from Lincoln's 
Emancipation Proclamation! " 



NO PROBLEM 

Thanks to a continuation of the adminis- 
tration's tight money policy, residential 
building is slowing down to a walk. Last 
month Congressman Rains, a real authority 
on the subject, pointed out that we are 
building a third less houses today than we 
built in 1925. In 1925 we were building 
110 new houses per 100,000 population; to- 
day we are down to 76. 

We are frank to admit that high finance 
is over our heads. Inflation, money man- 
agement, credit controls, etc. are mostly 
just words to us. But we do know that 
millions of new houses are needed, and that 
house building is a major factor in our na- 
tional prosperity. Housing cannot be stifled 
for very long without economic repercus- 
sions. How the administration hopes to keep 
prosperity rolling while house building with- 
ers on the vine baffles us. 

To our way of thinking, it is something 
like the movie producer who proposed to 
make the most spectacular movie of all 
times. The battle scene was to have 10,000 
extras on each side. 

"But how in the world will you be able 
to finance such a project?" asked a friend. 

"Easy," answered the producer, "I intend 
to use real bullets." 

* * • 
WHAT KINSEY DOESN'T KNOW 

Bennett Cerf credits a Wall Street statis- 
tician with producing a Kinsey report of 
his own. According to this statistical genius, 
a man's relationship with the opposite sex 
can be divided into seven stages: 
1. Wha-a-a! I want my mummy! 

G'wan, beat it. We don't want no old 

girls playing with usf 

Gee, Alice, you're beautiful! 

If you don't marry me, I'll shoot 

myself! 

All right, go home to mother and 

see if I care! 

I admit she is considerably younger 

than me, Alice, but she understands 

me. 

Kichy-koo! Did you hear that, Alice? 

She said "grandpa" as plain as any- 
thing. 



6. 



7. 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE'S 
MOUTH 

Last month a Congressional committee 
was delving into the status of our missile 
program and the adequacy of our defense 
set-up. No two generals seemed to agree 
as to our military strength compared to the 
Russians'. If anything, the hearings only 
made a confused situation more confused. 

However, diere is one thing of which 
we can be certain: Our Air Force has better 
bartenders, valets, and houseboys than the 
Russians. A New York newspaperman un- 
covered a bulletin published by the Air 
Force that tells enlisted men how to serve 
tea gracefully, how to sterilize garbage cans, 
and how to mix cocktails. The object of the 
bulletin is to provide generals and other 
top brass with properly trained flunkeys. 
The flunkeys, of cotirse, come from the en- 
listed ranks. 

But getting back to the investigation, 
hardly any two generals seem to agree as 
to the state of our preparedness. The situa- 
tion sort of brings to mind the story of the 
sergeant who was chauffeiu: to Marshal 
Foch during World War I. Every day news- 
men quizzed the sergeant to find out if the 
marshal had given any hint of when the 
war would be over. Every day the sergeant 
replied that the marshal said nothing. 

This went on for months, but one day the 
sergeant excitedly announced that the mar- 
shal had finally spoken. 

"What did he say?" the newsmen all de- 
manded. 

"Today," replied the sergeant, "he said to 
me, 'Pierre, when do you think this war is 
going to end?' " 

* * * 
STRICTLY FAIR 

A news dispatch says that record com- 
panies are getting many phone calls these 
days from disc jockeys that go something 
like this: "This is Curley McBurley, DJ on 
Station xyz. I just remembered that $500 
I borrowed from you. I've just dropped a 
check in the mail." The investigation of 
TV certainly improved a lot of memories 
in a hurry. 

Reminds us of an old-time Nevada judge 
who one day opened his court with the fol- 
lowing statement: 

"Gentleinen, I have in my hand a check 
—a bribe you might call it— from the plain- 
tiff for $10,000, and another from the de- 
fendant for $15,000. I propose to return 
$5,000 to the defendant and decide the 
case on its merits." 



DOUBTFUL IMPROVEMENT 

Business magazines, corporation presi- 
dents, and various other spokesmen for big 
business are vying with each other trying 
to picture the endless prosperity that the 
Sixties will bring. 

With four million out of work, debt at a 
record high, farm prices at a new post- 
war low, and automation eliminating jobs 
constantly, our enthusiasm is a little more 
restrained. If the Sixties are going to be so 
fabulous, things are going to have to get 
moving before long. We hope the Wall 
Street drum beaters are right, but our fing- 
ers are crossed. 

Most of all, we hope it doesn't turn out 
to be like the case of the St. Louis grocer 
who moved to Arizona for his health. After 
a few months in the west he up and died. 
The body was returned to St. Louis, and 
two friends were paying their respects at 
the mortuary. 

"My," said one, "he certainly looks good." 

"Doesn't he?" replied the other. "Ari- 
zona must have done him a world of good." 

• * • 

KEFAUVER COMMITTEE FINDS THE 

ANSWER 

If you ever wondered why diey call some 
of the new drugs "miracle" drugs, the cur- 
rent Congressional investigation of the drug 
manufacturing industry supplies a logical 
answer. 

It is a miracle anybody can afford them 
at the prices that are being charged. 




516. 



^*They call us the office force. 
Thai's a laugh! We'll never be 
a 'force' unless we organize 1" 



20 



Anti-Unionism Crosses Into Canada 

• • • 

A DELAYED action bomb wrapped up in the Ontario Select Committee 
Report on Labor Relations may well explode some of the cherished 
rights possessed by building trades unions in this province. 
This committee's 64-page report was issued last February but the Ontario 
government deferred action. Now it seems ready to embody many of the 
committee's anti-union recommendations in amendments to the Labor Rela- 
tions Act, amendments it will try to push through the Legislature. 
What does the committee propose? 

Take picketing, for example. The committee's report erects a veritable 
hedgerow of obstacles. 




Building trades are seriously concerned about changes which might be made to Ontario Labor 
Act, In addition to series of meetings which they are holding across the province, various Labor 
Councils are backing up the OFL campaign to educate the MPPs and the public about Labor's 
policies. Here is group at Toronto and District Labor Council meeting in Carpenters Hall, Jan- 
uary 12th: seated. Chairman Henry Weisbach, Regional Director of Education, Canadian Labor 
Congress, and guest speaker Doug Hamilton, secretary-treasurer, Ontario Federation of Labor, 
which is coordinating the campaign. Standing, left to right: P. Schlotzhauer, IBEW; A. L. Agate, 
Ironworkers Local 721; Ken Rose, IBEW; Fred Leach, Carpenters Local 3233; M. Kostynyk, IBEW 
Local 353; U. Davidoff, V. Guy and A. Jeneveaux, Laborers Union Local 506. 



The report suggests a ban on or- 
ganizational picketing. It urges the 
same sort of ban on jurisdictional 
picketing. 

Thus unions would be prevented 
from applying pressure to a non-union 
employer and deprived of a tradi- 



tional method of protest against incur- 
sions of a rival. 

The committee also introduces a 
drastic provision limiting other picket- 
ing to those actually in the bargaining 
unit of the employer aflFected. With 
such a regulation in effect, a small 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



unit in a composite building trades 
local could be cut off from support 
and destroyed. 

The committee's report takes dead 
aim at the right to strike itself. It rec- 
ommends a ban on strikes where es- 
sential services are involved. 

But who is to determine what are 
"essential services"? The government, 
the labor board, the courts, lawyers? 

What would stop some vaguely 
constituted authority from ruling as 
essential a hospital construction job 
faced by a Carpenters' Union strike? 

The committee proposes a tougher 
hurdle for unions seeking to organize 
new units. Instead of the present 55 
per cent, the report urges a sign-up 
of 75 per cent of the employees in a 
bargaining unit before certification is 
granted without a vote. 

And if there is a vote, the commit- 
tee wants to assure "freedom of 
speech" for the employer. This recom- 
mendation would permit the employer 
to call meetings to "explain" his point 
of view. 

With such a "captive audience" for 
the employer, how could union repre- 
sentatives compete? Even now unions 
must often operate in an atmosphere 
bristling with covert threats and 
promises traced to the employer. 

The committee report embraces a 
little-noted section which would make 
it virtually impossible for building 
trades unions to reach pre-job con- 
tracts. 

This section rules out a contract 
with a closed shop or union shop pro- 
vision unless the union is first certified 
by the labor board as bargaining 
agent of the unit affected. If a car- 
penter or bricklayer local had to wait 
out such board procedure, the project 
might be completed in the interim. 

The report does nothing to speed 
up conciliation procedure; in fact, it 
does the opposite in some cases. 



It suggests that in matters "affecting 
the public interest," a new industrial 
inquiry commission be superimposed 
on the normal conciliation procedure 
with no strike to be called until such 
a commission reports. 

The committee makes a strange so- 
journ into the union welfare and pen- 
sion fund field. It proposes that all 
such funds and those financed jointly 
by unions and employers be invested 
and retained in Canada. 

For many of the international 
building trades unions, this would be 
impossible. How could they separate 
and withhold a portion of the dues 
which go to provide and maintain rest 
and retirement homes in the U. S., for 
example? 

In what seems like a sweeping invi- 
tation to endless delay, the committee 
winds up by urging that all labor 
board decisions be open to appeal in 
the courts. This might be paradise for 
lawyers but it would undercut union 
organization. 

To counter any government move 
to introduce such broad new curbs on 
unions, the Ontario Federation of La- 
bor has organized a massive postcard 
and publicity drive in favor of its own 
proposals for improving the labor act. 

Mass meetings of building trades- 
led off by a session sponsored by the 
Stonemasons, Bricklayers and Marble, 
Tile and Terrazzo Workers— are being 
held in support of this campaign. 

Doug Hamilton, the federation's 
secretary-treasurer, has indicated that 
Canadian management is aping the 
U. S. pattern of focusing on the tiny 
fraction of labor misdeeds: "If you 
cry wolf often enough, you'll get some 
action." 

Ontario unions seem convinced 
now it's time to do some shouting of 
their own ff they're to fend off the 
threat to their continued Iffe and 
growth. 



What's New 

This column is devoted to new developments in materials and products of interest to members 
of crafts which are a part of the United Brotherhood. The articles are presented merely to inform 
our readers, and are not to be considered an endorsement by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. 

For information concerning products which are described in this column, please do not write to 
THE CARPENTER or the General Office, but address all queries to the manufacturer, whose name 
appears at the close of each article. 



Greatly improved protection against lad- 
dcr slipping and tilting is provided by a set 
of ladder shoes now^ available from Mine 
Safety Appliances Co., Pittsburgh. Called 
M-S-A Rialto Safety Ladder Shoes, the at- 
tachments are equipped with ten suction 
cups to provide firm gripping on wet, 
greasy, muddy, or uneven surfaces. En- 




larged level contact area increases protec- 
tion against tipping of ladder in slanted 
area. Three connecting bolts provide perma- 
nent attachment of shoes to the ladder. For 
furtlier information write Mine Safety Ap- 
pliances Co., 201 N. Braddock Ave., Pitts- 
burgh 8, Pa. 



A clamp diat holds work firmly on any 
surface, without being limited to positions 
near the edge, has been marketed recently. 
The clamp attaches to 
any wood or metal work 
surface by means of a 
bolt spotted in the mid- 
dle or along the edge of 
the work area. Slot in "^-r_fl | A | 
base of clamp engages 
protruding head of 
holding-bolt so that 
clamp slides into work • - 
position instantly. When not in use, clamp 
may be removed, leaving work area unob- 
structed. For either production set-ups or 
quick-change operations on drill press or 
machine table, holding-bolt fits into "T"- 
slots or existing holes to hold work solidly. 
Additional information about the 1623 "Jor- 
gensen" Hold-down Clamp is available from 
the manufacturer. Adjustable Clamp Com- 
pany, Dept. HC-1, 417 N. Ashland Ave., 
Chicago 22, 111. 




Timber Engineering Company, Washing- 
ton, D. C, recently introduced a new line 
of joist and beam hangers for various size 
wood members. Unique 
design utilizes only the 
metal actually necessary 
to provide proper bal- 
ance between the load 
capabilities of the 
hangers and the load 
limitations of the joist 
or beam. To eliminate 
any chance of error 
through improper 
choice of nails, special 
nails designed to provide maximum shear 
value are fiurnished with each carton of 
hangers. A booklet giving load values and 
design information is available upon request 
from Timber Engineering Co., 1319 18th 
St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. 



General Industrial Company of Chicago 
has developed a circular slide rule designed 
to make simple calculations easy in multipli- 
cation, division, and proportion. The com- 
pany has offered to provide our readers with 




one free of charge. For your free circular 
slide rule write on your business letterhead 
to General Industrial Co., 1788J Montrose 
Ave., Chicago 13, 111., and be sure to men- 
tion the name of this magazine. 



23 



What Is The Construction Picture? 



Expert Sees Tripled Volume In 60'$ 

• • 

THE next decade will see the U. S. spend more money on new con- 
struction— $670 billion— than was paid out for that purpose in the 
previous 35 years. 

Forecast by the professional building magazine, Architectural Forum, this 
coming expenditure far exceeds the total value of all goods and services pro- 
duced by U. S. industry in 1959. It is more than twice as big as the national 
debt, and 60 per cent more than the money spent on new construction during 
the 1950's. 

Holding the building spotlight in the decade to come will be the trend of 
private non-residential construction. The annual rate of expenditures in this 
category is slated to increase 71.8 per 



cent between now and 1960 to almost 
$15 billion. The total of this kind of 
building for the decade is expected to 
be $125 billion. 

Forum's ten-year forecast for the 
major categories of private non-resi- 
dential building construction: indus- 
trial, up 72 per cent; commercial, up 
48 per cent; religious, up 11 per cent; 
hospitals and institutions, up 62 per 
cent. 

Private residential building expend- 
itures, while they will be larger than 
those for non-residential buildings, 
will rise only 27 per cent to an annual 
rate of $28 billion by 1969. The total 
for the decade will be $248 billion, of 
which new dwelling unit construction 
will account for over $180 billion. 

By the end of tho next ten years. 
Forum says, total annual expenditures 
for new construction (in 1959 dollars) 
will be close to $80 billion— about 46 
per cent higher than in 1959. 

By 1969, the government's share in 
construction expenditures will be 
about 33 per cent as compared to 29 
per cent during the 1950's. The an- 
nual rate of public building will have 
reached $24.8 billion, up 52.8 per cent 
from 1959, and total government out- 



lays during the decade will be at 
least $200 billion. 

The major category of public build- 
ing construction is educational. Ex- 
penditures in this field will increase 
72.1 per cent to an annual rate of 
$4.5 billion. 

Despite its staggering size, the $670 
billion forecast is "quite conserva- 
tive," says Forum. For one thing, it 
is measured in 1959 dollars and does 
not take any future inflation into ac- 
count. 

Also, it is based on the assumption 
that future building activity will pro- 
vide no faster improvement in living 
standards and industrial capacity than 
has taken place over the last decade. 
If, as seems likely, there is an increase 
in the U. S.'s rate of economic growth, 
then there will probably be more 
building than the forecast indicates. 



If construction is to achieve the mira- 
cles Usted above, action must be initiated 
soon. There can be no more slavish ad- 
herence to the policy of save now, cure 
unemployment later; save novi', eliminate 
slums later; save now, purge our streams 
later; save now, educate later; save now, 
build housing later— as a recent New Re- 
public editorial points out. 



Editorial 




This Story Won't Be In Your Daily Paper 
You won't read anything about this story in your daily paper because it 
demonstrates how cooperative and civic minded a good union can be. If an 
officer had dipped into the till or taken a bribe from someone, the chances 
are good your local paper would have had it on page one. But in this case the 
union was bailing out an employer facing bankruptcy, so you will have to 
read it here or never hear about it. 

Herkimer is a small town in upstate New York. The Chamber of Com- 
merce lists its population at 10,000. For years one of its leading industries has 
been the Standard Furniture Company, a family-owned firm that makes top- 
notch \\'ooden desks and office furniture. For three-quarters of a century the 
firm has given employment to some 300 citizens of Herkimer. They long have 
been organized in Local Union No. 3115. 

In recent years, however, bad times have befallen the firm. Jerry-built 
desks and fixtures made at home and abroad began cutting into their market 
substantially. In this price-conscious age, when price rather than quality 
governs a good deal of buying, such competition becomes rough. 

For the past several years the company has lost money. By last month 
the finances of the company were stretched to the breaking point. Samuel D. 
Earl, company head and grandson of the firm's founder, called on the mayor 
to announce that the firm had to close its doors unless it could raise $150,000 
iminediately. 

This was tragic news for the town. But when the news got out things 
began to happen. A citizens' committee was formed to organize a fund drive. 
Local Union No. 3115 called a meeting that brought out virtually every mem- 
ber. The plight of the company was laid before the members honestly and 
fairly. Before the meeting was over, some $75,000 was pledged by members to 
help bail out the company. Another $12,000 was raised among supervisors and 
office personnel. Canvassers secured enough other pledges to bring the total 
up to $100,000 in jig time. 

The plan for raising the money entails the sale of bonds bearing a six 
per cent interest rate. Bondholders are to have representation on the board 
of diiectors. 

So the Standard Furniture Company will continue turning out first class 
wooden office furniture for a long time to come. Company prospects for the 
year 1960 appear to be good now that the financial crisis has been averted. 

The whole community deserves credit for the effective job done in saving 
an important industry. However, without the efforts of Local Union No. 3115, 
the campaign might never have gotten off the ground. The union not only 
raised a lion's share of the necessary funds from its own membership but it 
also provided committee members and canvassers for the general appeal. 



THE CARPENTER 25 

This is the story of Local Union No. 3115 you will never read about any 
place but here. But if there ever comes a clay when a Herkimer unionist gets 
in trouble, you'll get the story with your coffee next morning. Probably on 
page one too. 

• 

Make Your Voice Heard On The Forand Bill 

The Forand Bill (technically known as HR 4700) is scheduled to come up 
for action before the House Ways and Means Committee before long. As we 
have pointed out before, this is the bill that would include medical care for 
retirees under the Social Security system. 

The medical societies, the insurance companies, and many powerful in- 
dustries are opposed to the bill and actively fighting it. Unless there is a great 
outpouring of grass roots demand for its passage, the bill well may die in 
committee. 

To make your voice heard on the matter, a letter to your Congressman is 
the most eflFective weapon you have at your command. If your Congressman 
is a member of the House Ways and Means Committee— well and good. If he 
is not, send him a letter anyway, telling him you favor passage of the bill. And 
be sure to mail a copy to the chairman of the committee. 

Here are the names of the House Ways and Means Committee members: 

Wilbur D. Mills, Arkansas, Chairman 

Aime J. Forand, Rhode Island James B. Utt, California 

Cecil R. King, California Jackson E. Betts, Ohio 

Thomas J. O'Brien, Illinois Bruce Alger, Texas 

Hale Boggs, Louisiana Albert H. Bosch, New York 

Burr P. Harrison, Virginia William J. Green, Jr., Pennsylvania 

Victor A. Knox, Michigan John C. Watts, Kentucky 

John W. Byrnes, Wisconsin Frank Ikard, Texas 

Howard H. Baker, Tennessee Thaddeus M. Machrowicz, Michigan 

Thomas B. Curtis, Missouri James B. Frazier, Jr., Tennessee 

Eugene J. Keogh, New York John A. Lafore, Jr., Pennsylvania 

Frank M. Karstein, Missouri Lee Metcalf, Montana 

A. S. Herlong, Jr., Florida Noah M. Mason, Illinois 

To reach any member, all the address you need is: House OflBce Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

• 

Wildlife And Water 

Like humans and all other living things, wUdlife needs water. This need, 
varying with requirements of different birds and mammals, is highlighted 
during the annual observance of National Wildlife Week, March 20-26, spon- 
sored by the National Wildlife Federation and its state affiliates. 

Northern potholes, or small water areas where waterfowl nest, are being 
drained with an inevitable reduction in the overall numbers of ducks and 
geese. Marsh areas all over the nation are being filled to create residential 
or industrial sites, destroying habitat for fur-bearers as well as waterbirds. 
Reservoirs are being drained of all water to satisfy questionable irrigation 
requirements, despite enormous fish losses. 



26 THECARPENTER 

Theme of the National Wildhfe Week observance this year is: "Water- 
Key to Your Survival." Certainly, water is the key to survival of many species 
of wildlife. 

The value of wildlife cannot be computed entirely by dollar-and-cent 
standards. Fur-bearers, of course, have a definite economic worth. And, many 
resort areas and businesses dealing with transportation and sporting goods 
enjoy specific gain from recreational activities based upon fish and wildlife. 
Most of all, however, these wild creatures are important because of the 
pleasure they provide people. Fishing and hunting, based directly upon fish 
and wildlife, offer recreation to millions. Wildlife is also an important part 
of the enjoyment of those who participate in boating, picnicking, hiking, 
camping, nature study, etc. 

It is recognized that water must be used for such purposes as municipal 
supplies, industry, agriculture, navigation, power generation, etc. But should 
these special uses of water be to the complete exclusion of wildlife and 
other public recreational values? Under the appropriation doctrine of water 
rights, widely applied in the western United States, fish and wildlife and 
other recreations are not considered "beneficial" uses of water. Eastern and 
midwestern states, some of which are considering modifications of their ri- 
parian water rights doctrines in favor of special use benefits, might well keep 
this fact in mind. 

Water conservation means "'wise use." In view of conflicts of interest 
arising from demands of an increasing population, adequate provision must be 
made for wildlife. This requires intelligent planning. It also calls for pollu- 
tion abatement, siltation control, and halting abuses which damage or destroy 
values of water for beneficial purposes. 

There is an old poem that tells how a kingdom was lost for want of a 
horseshoe nail. For want of sufficient useable water our industrial progress 
eventually may be slowed down to a crawl. The hour of decision faces us now. 



Why Dishonesty In Organized Labor? 

By PIERRE DeNIO, President, Local Union No. 1600, Cannonsville, N. Y. 

For nearly a century the American labor movement struggled for survival 
against almost insurmountable odds. Many times the men waging that struggle 
were killed in action. During the strike of the American Railway Union against 
the Pullman Palace Car Company in 1894, 25 men were killed and 60 others 
were injured, but there was no charge of dishonesty leveled at the leaders. 
Those pioneers in the work of building our unions— men who died for their 
ideals and loyalty— made it possible for the workers of the present time to 
enjoy a way of life that to those union men could be only visualized. 

Those pioneer union men, who sacrificed their time and effort, took an 
active role in developing the labor unions and their status in society. No 
scandalous or dishonest activity was tolerated. Years later when the Wagner 
Act was made the law of the land the labor unions were at a very low point 
numerically. Soon after, however, the demand for all kinds of workers, espe- 
cially skilled, began to reach unprecedented numbers. Men by the thousands 
came into the different unions. 

The stage for corruption affecting a very few leaders of organized labor 
was set by this influx of hundreds of thousands of new members who have 



THE CARPENTER 27 

no particular interest in their union other than it guarantees them union 
wages. They draw their weekly pay check, go to the store where they buy 
television sets and fast automobiles, but they send their wives to the union 
office to pay their dues. 

Over 30 years of membership in organized labor I have tried to under- 
stand the government of the unions. The constitutions and bylaws of the trade 
unions are democratic documents, all conform to the laws of our country. 
These constitutions set forth clearly the rights and privileges of the member- 
ship. Any corruption found during all the political fanfare and investigation 
that has been carried on by the McClellan Committee would never have been 
there had the laws of the unions been enforced. 

What has happened during the past four or five years that has given the 
opponents of the trade unions the weapons with which to suppress us? It is 
our own irresponsible attitude toward our own organization; the organization 
that assures us a decent and respectable way of living and earning our bread 
and butter. 

Now we are faced with the nullification of decades of work and sacrifice 
in building a better society. The concentrated wealth and power in America 
are dedicated to the abrogation, by legislative action, of the American labor 
movement that they have been unable to destroy by direct action. 

The amazing fact that has emerged from all the investigations during the 
past three years of congressional hearings relative to alleged corruption in 
organized labor, is that out of the thousands of leaders in responsible positions 
one may ccTunt on the fingers of one hand the men who have betrayed their 
trust. 

Unions are made up of human beings who are subject to the same urges 
and desires as other human beings such as bankers or ministers. When the 
right man finds himself in a position where he has access to millions of dol- 
lars and no one seems to care about what he does with those dollars, then 
the union members themselves must share the shame of any dishonesty that 
prevails. 

I was a member of one local for five years that had, at times, as many as 
500 members. This union held meetings twice each month and if 30 members 
were present it was a cause for wonder. Three hours each month couldn't 
be given to the union that made it possible for them to live as men should— 
with dignity and self-respect. 

Last year there appeared a letter published in one of the nationally known 
magazines, in which the writer stated: "I don't give a damn what (an officer) 
does as long as he furnished me with a job at union wages." There is the 
answer to the McClellan Committee and to Senator Goldwater that explains 
well the reason for bad actions by a few leaders in one or two unions. 

The only time the general membership gets the least bit excited about 
their union is when they get out of work; then they come to the union office 
with blood in their eye. 

When the members of all the unions pay as strict attention to the conduct 
of their union as they do to the "funny" papers or the racing form, the troubles 
of unions will be over. 



Official Information 




General OfiBcers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

M. A. HUTCHEbON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

FRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, M6. 



Second District, RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventh District, LYLE J. HILLBR 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Eighth District, J. F. CAMBIANO 
17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fourth District, HENRY W. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
1834 N. 78th St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HUTCHESON. Chairman; R. E. LIVINGSTON, Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



LOCAL UNIONS 



2476 
2595 
2598 
2599 
2612 
2614 
3266 



Cornell, Wisconsin 
Winnfield, Louisiana 
Caldwell, Idaho 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Pine Falls, Manitoba, Canada 
Fayetteville, New York 
Grants, New Mexico 



CHARTERED 

3108 New York, New York 

3267 Toronto, Ontario, Canada 

2641 Barberton, Ohio 

2662 Alliance, Ohio 

2644 Louisville, Kentucky 

2665 Santa Ana, California 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



In the issuance of clearance cards, care should be taken to see that they are properly 
filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary of the Local Union 
issuing same as well as the Local Union accepting the clearance. The clearance cards must 
be sent to the General Secretary's Department without delay, in order that the members' 
names can be listde on the quarterly account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained tlierein must be used. 



^ n 0.ttnortntn 



Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more. 



The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



ABRAMSON, ANDREW, L. U. 361, Duluth, 

Minn. 
ALLAIRE, OVILLA, L. U. 778, Fitchburg, 

Mass. 
ANDERSON, EDWIN, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
ANDRE, NORMAN, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
ANDRE, VICTOR, L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
ARNOLD, LAYNE, L. U. 710, Long Beach, Cal. 
ARTKOP, JOHN, L. U. 998, Berkley, Mich. 
ARVIN, GEORGE L., L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
ASPELUND, LUDWIG, L. U. 361, Duluth, 

Minn. 
ATKINS, T. S., L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 
AXELSON, JOHN, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
BADEN, H. P., L. U. 403, Alexandria, La. 
BALL, HENRY T., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
BARRON, HENRY L., L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
BAUMGARTNER, HENRY, L. U. 946, Los 

Angeles, Cal. 
BID WELL, REUBEN, L. U. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
BISHOP, HENRY E., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
BOISSONAULT, JOE N., L. U. 361, Duluth, 

Minn. 
BOURGEAU, PERRIE, L. U. 998, Berkley, 

Mich. 
BOUTILIER, CLARENCE I., L. U. 67, Rox- 

bury, Mass. 
BOYD, WILLIAM, L. U. 1162, Flushing, N. Y. 
BRANIGAN, HARRY, L. U. 329, Oklahoma 

City, Okla. 
BUTLER, J. T.. L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
CARR, DEAVER P., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
CARY, E. H., L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
CASTELLI, GUISEPPE, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
CATER, R. C, L. U. 225, / tlanta, Ga. 
CHERRY, J. W., L. U. 250, Jackson, Tenn. 
COLEMAN, F. S., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
COLLET, PIERRE, L. U. 1941, Hartford, Conn. 
COSNER, C. A., L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
CREE, A. W., L. U. 710, Long Beach, Cal. 
CROSTHWAIT, EDWARD J., L. U. 268, 

Sharon, Pa. 
DANIELSON, MARTIN C, L. U. 361, Duluth, 

Minn. 
DARBY, C. MILTON, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
DAVIDSON, J. H., L. U. 710, Long Beach, Cal. 
DAVIS, GEORGE W., L. U. 198, Dallas, Texas 
DECKERT, AUGUST, L. U. 512, Ann Arbor, 

Mich. 
DEWSBURY, T. A., L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
DICKENS, JOSEPH L., L. U. 710, Long Beach, 

Cal. 
DISTAFANO, JOSEPH, L. U. 1204, New York, 
N. Y. 



DOCTER, LOUIS A., L. U. 169, East St. Louis, 

III. 
DOLLARD, AUSTIN. L. U. 1529, Kansas City, 

Kans. 
EHRICK, WILLIAM C, L. U. 828, Menlo Park, 

Cal. 
EPPES, S. O., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
ERICKSON, EDWARD, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
FARRELL, O. S., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
FERRELL, J. T., L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
FIGLUZZI, LOUIS, L. U. 350, New Rochelle, 

N. Y. 
FLETCHER, ALTON, L. U. 998, Berkley, Mich. 
FRIEDEL, JOHN Jr., L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
GILL, H. L., L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
GRAY, EVERETT, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
HALL, JOHN W., L. U. 132, Washington, D. C. 
HALLDEN, CHARLES, L. U. 791, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
HANSEN, VIGGO E., L. U. 1478, Redondo 

Beach, Cal. 
HAUER, MERVIN C, L. U. 191, York, Pa. 
HAWKINS, A. S., L. U. 132, Washington, D. C. 
HEATH, OSCAR, L. U. 1941, Hartford, Conn. 
HEDEMANN, OSCAR, L. U. 710, Long Beach, 

Cal. 
HELGETUN, OLE J., L. U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 
HENCH, HAROLD L., L. U. 1478, Redondo 

Eeach, Cal. 
HICKS, R. T., L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
HILTZ, BERNARD B., L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
HINDMAN, GEORGE R., L. U. 225, Atlanta, 

Ga. 
HOLMES, PATRICK H., L. U. 132, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
HOLT, CARL W., L. U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 
HOOD, GEORGE, L. U. 1906, Philadelphia, Pa. 
HOWELL, M. A., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
HUFFMAN, ROY, L. U. 1202, Merced, Cal. 
HUNTER, WILLIAM C, L. U. 627, Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 
INGRAM, SHELDON B., L. U. 1749, Anniston, 

Ala. 
JOHNSON, CHARLES M., L. U. 710, Long 

Beach, Cal. 
JOHNSON, FRANK, L. U. 350, New Rochelle, 

N. Y. 
JOHNSON, OLLIE M., L. U. 184, Salt Lake 

City, Utah 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM, L. U. 299, Union City, 

N. J. 
JONES, C. W., L. U. 2214, Festus, Mo. 
JONES, PERCY C, L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla, 
JONES, RUFUS, L. U. 28, Missoula, Mont. 
JOST, PETER P., L. U. 828, Menlo Park, Cal. 
KEAG, JOHN D., L. U. 828, Menlo Park, Cal- 
KEEN, CHARLES A., L. U. 329, Oklahoma 
City, Okla. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



REISER, HENRY, L. U. 1172, Billings, Mont. 
KILLEN, RALPH, L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
KILLIP, FRED, L. U. 72, Rochester, N. Y. 
KOHEN, YOKIM, L. U. 1513. Detroit, Mich. 
KOHLER, ALFRED, L. U. 998, Berkley, Mich. 
KRAFT, CONRAD, L. U. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
KRAUSE, A. H., L. U. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 
LANSFORD, EARL W., L. U. 329, Oklahoma, 

City, Okla. 
LARSON, CARL O., L. U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 
LAWHORN, H. W., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
LEARY, PAUL C, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
LEATHERY, HARRY R., L. U. 191, York, Pa. 
LEMING, MARION, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
LeROY, RUEBIN, L. U. 184, Salt Lake City, 

Utah 
LINDSTROM, JOHN A., L. U. 388, Richmond, 

Va. 
LINVILLE, WILLIAM, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
LOCKRIDGE, LESTER B., L. U. 946, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 
LONG, W. J., L. U. 1478, Redondo Beach, Cal. 
LUOMA, LEVI, L. U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 
MacDONALD, JOHN A., L. U. 40, Boston, 

Mass. 
MADREY, JOHN C, L. U. 982, Detroit. Mich. 
MASON, L. P., L. U. 1518, Gulfport, Miss. 
MATHESON, RODERICK, L. U. 2164, San 

Francisco, Cal. 
MAYOTTE, ALBERT, L. U. 2466, Pembroke, 

Ont. 
McDONALD, JAMES £., L. U. 388, Richmond, 

Va. 
MICKA, MARTIN J., L. U. 764, Shreveport, 

La. 
MOON, G. T., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
MOORE, SAM, L. U. 998, Berkley, Mich. 
MORGAN, JAMES E., L. U. 388, Richmond, 

Va. 
MORIN, ALFRED J., L. U. 28, Missoula, 

Mont. 
MOTLEY, B. D., L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
NEWHOUSE, LUTHER, L. U. 998, Berkley, 

Mich. 
NEWMAN, V. O., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
NOREN, AUGUST, L. U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 
OCUTO, JOSEPH, L. U. 1397, Roslyn, N. Y. 
OLSEN, OLE, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
OMAN, A. W., L. U. 583, Portland, Ore. 
OZENBAUGH, W. A., L. U. 1055, Lincoln, Neb. 
PARKHILL, EARL M., L. U. 982, Detroit, 

Mich. 
PARKS, ALBERT W., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
PETERSEN, AXEL J., L. U. 314, Madison, Wis. 
PETERSON, ARTHUR C, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 

111. 
PETERSON, MARTIN S., L. U. 361, Duluth, 

Minn. 
PILON, EDMOND, L. U. 10, Chicago, III. 
PRATER, R. W., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
PUGLIS, ANTHONY, L. U. 299, Union City, 

N. J. 
PUTNIN, RUDOLF, L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
RAPPAPORT, ELI, L. U. 1204, New York, 

N. Y. 
REIF, PENCHAS, L. U. 1367, Chicago, III. 
RIEHM, GEORGE, L. U. 79, New Haven, Conn. 
RINKER, HARRY, L. U. 998, Berkley, Mich. 



Icmoriam 

ROBICHARD, EDMUND, L. U. 67, Roxbury, 

Mass. 
ROBINSON, ARTHUR, L. U. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
ROYSTER, G. H., L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
SADBERRY, MURL, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
SALE, H. L., L. U. 388, Richmond, Va, 
SAMPLE, T. E., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
SCOTT, WILLIAM H., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
SEMINOFF, ALEX, L. U. 35, San Rafael, Cal. 
SEVERTSEN, AXEL, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
SIEGEL, SAM, L. U. 1204, New York, N. Y. 
SIMS, D. T., L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
SINATRA, CHARLES, L. U. 821, Union, N. J. 
SISMEY, LEWIS, L. U. 72, Rochester, N. Y. 
SMITS, GIRARD, L. U. 355, Buffalo, N. Y. 
SMYSER. GEORGE H., L. U. 191, York, Pa. 
SNELGROVE, AMBROSE, L. U. 33, Boston, 

Mass. 
SODERSTROM, KARL, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
SOLTIS, THOMAS, L. U. 10, Chicago, 111. 
SPANIER, EMIL, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
SPILLERS, TOM, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
STAMEY, IRA F., L. U. 512, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
STAMPFL, JOHN, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 
STARRY, FLOYD O., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
STEEVES, RALPH B., L. U. 67, Roxbury, 

Mass. 
STEINBACH, FRANK, L. U. 336, La Salle, 111. 
STEINER, HAYDEN, L. U. 1138, Toledo, Ohio 
STEVENS, HENRY, L. U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 
STEWART, F. L., L. U. 198, Dallas, Texas 
STONE, MORTON H., L. U. 388, Richmond, 

Va. 
STUEBER, HERMAN, L. U. 419, Chicago, lU. 
SWENSON, BERNT O., L. U. 20, New York, 

N. Y. 
TAYLOR, C. O., L. U. 2020, San Diego, Cal. 
THIELEN, GUST, L. U. 1478, Redondo Beach, 

Cal. 
THOMAS, BIRD P., L. U. 1478, Redondo Beach, 

Cal. 
THOMPSON, CHARLES G., L. U. 213, Hous- 
ton, Texas 
THOMPSON, FLOYD C, L. U. 184, Salt Lake 

City, Utah 
THORBERG, ALLEN A., L. U. 361, Duluth, 

Minn. 
TOMICH, PAUL, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
TOWNSEND, WARREN, L. U. 767, Ottumwa, 

Iowa 
TREY, HERMAN, L. U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 
TURNER, ROBERT I., L. U. 621, Bangor, Me. 
UITSLAGER, CORNELIUS, L. U. 2020, San 

Diego, Cal. 
VALENTINE, TOM, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
VANDERAH, ARTHUR, L. U. 937, Dubuque, 

Iowa 
VERNOLD, CHARLES, L. U, 12, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 
VIZZARD, W. J., L. U. 743, Bakersfield, Cal. 
VOCK, ALBERT, L. U. 1784, Chicago, III. 
WADDELL, ALEXANDER, L. U. 2164, San 

Francisco, Cal. 
WAHL, AUGUST, L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
WAIBEL, ERNEST, L. U. 316, San Jose, Cal. 





utdoor 

/Weanderingi 




By Fred Goetz 




Joe Zelenka of Benld, Illinois, a member 
of Local 1267, had an unusual experience. 
Seems like Joe caught 
a nice mess of catfish 
on a trot line in Gil- 
lespie lake, Gillespie, 
IlUnois. Here's his story: 

"We caught a nice 
mess of catfish on our 
trot hne, Fred, and put i 
tliem on a cotton string- 
er. When we got the 
boat into shore, I Hfted 
the fish up to wash 
them oflF. The stringer broke and the fish 
got away. We looked high and low for 
tliem and couldn't find tliem. 

"Next morning we ran tlie hne again and 
the string of fish was caught on the trot 
hne— all but one fish, as I recall, the small- 
est one. 

"I'm enclosing a picture of the fish to 
prove my point as I guess that wouldn't 
happen again in a thousand years." 

» # # 

Here's a question and matching answer 
we're passing along to all: I would hke to 
know the difference between strip casting 
and bait casting outfit, also the methods. 

Answer: A customary strip-fishing outfit 
would consist of a single action fly equipped 
with 8-pound, limp monofilament nylon and 
an 8^/^ -foot fly rod with a fairly stiff tip. 
The strip-caster strips off the reel the 
amount of line he wants to cast and by 
virtue of light weights (anywhere from 3/0 
split shot to a V2 ounce) can cast distances 
almost as great as the spin fisherman. The 
strip-caster retrieves his hne by pulling it 
back through the guides. This method re- 
quires practiced technique when it comes 
to controlling the accumulated line on the 
cast and with a fish on. There are many 
variations of strip fishing; the aforemen- 
tioned is but an average set-up. A con- 
ventional bait-casting rig consists of a level 
wind casting reel having a capacity of 100 
yards of braided nylon and a medium ac- 
tion 5-foot casting rod. Casting weights 
vary from Va ounce to 2 ounces, depend- 



ing upon tlie heft of your equipment. This 
remains currently as the most popular form 
of angling in America. Aside from the 
foregoing, it can be said that any time an 
angler casts bait, he is performing the 
bait-casting method. 

» * # 

Carpenter Hugo Frank of Boise, Idaho, 
a member of Local 635, is an avid fisher- 
man. He's 70 years young but still hkes to 
pack in to those Idaho wilderness lakes. 
Last time out, last year, he took some 
dandy rainbow trout, many of 'em going 
over 14 inches, but he ran into a little 
difficulty with a black bear. Seems like he 
surprised the critter in a turn of the road. 

Hugo recalls that the bear was just as 
frightened as he was, though. He let out 
a war whoop and took off for parts soutli 
—and Mr. Bruin took the north road. 
Hugo says that bear made the wide open 
spaces as stuffy as a phone booth and he 
doesn't care to meet up with any more. 

* * * 

Clifford L. Storms asks the following: 
"I often wondered if it is wise to return 
the small fish to the river after they have 
been hooked. Seems to me that they will 
die anyway." 

Answer: I personally believe it is a good 
idea to return the small fish to the water. 
It is an established fact that a lightly 
hooked and gently handled trout is seldom 
harmed. In a recent survey conducted by a 
well known Canadian biologist. Dr. Richard 
B. Miller of Alberta, it was found that of 
the 151 trout caught and released only 
eight died. The few fatalities were no doubt 
from deeply hooked fish. 

# « * 

A study of returns from banding opera- 
tions conducted by "Ducks Unlimited" re- 
vealed the mallard as the "Mr. Smith" of 
the duck world. The streamline pintail 
proved next most numerous. A list of tlie 
other species in order of abundapce were 
as follows: Bluewinged teal, lesser scaup, 
shoveller, baldpate, canvasback, green-wing- 
ed teal, gadwell, redhead, ringneck and 
ruddy. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



The oldest wild duck on record was shot 
on the Sartain Ranch in California on De- 
cember 27, 1952. It was banded at Lake 
Merritt, California, on December 8, 1932, 
making it over 20 years old when downed. 

# » # 

When our good friend and fishin' and 
huntin' buddy, Harold Bell, took the knot- 
tying plunge, he made the slow walk down 
the long, narrow corridor after a whirlwind, 
six years' courtship. (Ratlier impulsive fel- 
low.) 

Friends in attendance showed their ap- 
preciation after the ceremony by auctioning 
off the bridegroom's fishing and hunting 
equipment. Bell put up a violent struggle 
protesting the sale, but the missus adopted 
a philosophical take-it-as-it-comes attitude. 

Oh well, Mr. Bell, there's always model 
airplane building. 

# * # 

Brother Raymond Hansen, a member of 
Local 1089, Phoenix, Arizona, says the 
greatest recreation in .m». ' " 

the world for young- -^^ 

sters is tlie great out- - * r • .' 

doors. The famous 
Judge Long, who pre- 
sides over the juvenile 
court in Seattle agrees 
vidth Ray and contends 
that of all the boys that '« 

have come before his 
court, few, if any, have 1 

had the opportunity of J 

participating in fisliing "^ 

and hunting sport with their dud. 

Brother Hansen sent in the following 
photo of him and the youngster resting 
during a fishing outing at Lake Prescott in 
Arizona. Ray's son's favorite pastime is fish- 
ing and his activities are limited as he is a 
heinophiliae. 

We tip our topper to Ray and his boy 
for their fishing prowess. 



Some of the duck hunters have better 
alibis than fishermen. Take, fer instance, 
die honker stalker who was caught afield 
with a gun in hand but no license in the 
pocket. He was taken before the judge, and 
when asked for an explanation, produced 
a bankroll of $1,600 in cold cash. He de- 
clared he needed the gun to protect the 
dough. 

The judge proceeded to relieve him of 




The old belief that a whale spouts water 
is a misconception. After making a dive, the 
whale comes to the surface, exhaling 
through his nasal openings in the top of his 
head. This column of warm air immediately 
condenses to water vapor upon contact with 
the surrounding cool atmosphere. 



'Tis often said that fishing and hunting 
have never been considered as a branch of 
medical science, but it can sure cure many 
ills that pills can't touch. Anyway, that's 
what I keep tellin' the little woman. 



If the following applies to any reader of 
this column, the similarity is purely coin- 
cidental. 

"Who's the stranger. Mother dear? 
Look— he knows us. Ain't he queer?" 
"Hush, my son, don't talk so wild; 
He's your father, dearest child." 

"He's my father? No such thing! 
Father died 'way back last spring." 
"Father didn't die, you dub. 
Father joined a Fishing Club." 

"But now the season's closed, so he 
Has no place left to go, you see. 
No place left in the fields to roam 
So that is why he's come back home. 
Kiss him— he won't bite you, child; 
All those fishing nuts look wild!" 

# » # 

Conservation officers of the Utah Depart- 
ment of Fish and Game recently observed 
one of nature's oddities— a mallard duck 
nesting high in a tree. The mama mallard 
occupied an old magpie nest and six duck- 
lings resulted from a clutch of seven eggs, 
the little ones apparently successfully sur- 
viving what to them was a high tumble from 
the nest. 

# » « 

The oldest known eastern brook trout in 
the world were recovered during a fish and 
game study of Castle Lake, Siskiyou 
County, California. The brookies were 
planted as fingerlings in 1947 and were 
more than 10 years old when taken. 

# # « 

Bill Eisenmenger recently killed a Canada 
goose at Forest Lake in Minnesota tlrat was 
carrying a stick embedded in its breast. 
The 20-incli stick, three-quarters of an inch 
in diameter, protruded from the breast on 
either side and apparently had been em- 
bedded for a considerable time. 



THEOARPENTER 33 



BE READY FOR YOUR CENSUS TAKER 

Some time within the next few weeks every family head and 
single householder in the United States will receive a census form to 
fill out as a part of the 1960 population census. The census officially 
gets under way April 1. 

With something like 180,000,000 people in the country, the job of 
counting noses naturally is a tremendous one. It can succeed only if 
citizens show a willingness to cooperate with the census takers. 

The Bureau of Census has asked this publication to alert its readers 
to the importance of cooperating with the census takers. This we 
are most happy to do because the statistics developed by the census 
form the basis for all sorts of intelligent actions by Congress and 
state legislatures. Only when lawmakers know what conditions actu- 
ally are can they frame workable legislation, whether it be in the field 
of social legislation, school planning or farm policies. The 10-year 
census gives tiiem the information they need. 

This year the census will include a check of occupations followed 
by working citizens. Every fourth household will be asked to answer 
the question, "What kind of work was he doing?" for each person 
14 years of age or older. 

In order that the occupational statistics be developed as accurately 
as possible, the Census Bureau has asked that we pass along to our 
readers a reminder that this question on occupation should be an- 
swered completely and precisely. In most cases the answer should 
consist of at least two words to properly pinpoint the specific kind of 
work followed. The Bureau cites the following examples as acceptable 
entries for the section of the questionnaire dealing with occupation: 

Cabinet maker 

Sanding-paper-machine operator 

Carpenter 

Millwright 

Ship caulker 

Apprentice carpenter 

If every citizen will cooperate in the census, the statistics devel- 
oped thereby can lay the groundwork for the building of a stronger, 
l;iealthier and more prosperous nation. Please do your part. 



CorrospondQncQ 





This Journal is Not Responsible tor Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

FRANKFORT, INDIANA LOCAL HONORS 2 OLD TIMERS 

Two members whose skill and know-how helped to build Frankfort, Indiana from a 
sleepy town to a bustling city were honored by the officers and members of Local Union 
1465 on the night of December 12th. 

The two old timers so hon- 
ored were Merton Dimmitt and 
Nathan Ruch, each of whom 
has a record of more than 50 
years of continuous membership 
in tlie United Brotherhood. 

Brother Ruch joined tlie 
Brotherhood in Tulsa, Oklaho- 
ma, 53 years ago, while Broth- 
er Dimmitt first joined at Ko- 
komo, Indiana some 56 years 
ago. 

A dinner party at the Izaak 
Walton cabin was the site of 
the happy affair. A large turn- 
out enjoyed a fine dinner and 
joined in paying tribute to the 
two old timers. Fifty-year mem- 
bership pins were presented to 
Brothers Ruch and Dimmitt by 
George Cloud, president of tlie 
Local. 

All in all, it was a grand evening for everyone, especially for the two old timers, 
whose efforts over the years contributed much to the development of botli Local Union 
No, 1465 and the community of Frankfort. 

• 

AWARDS GO TO 2 OLD TIMERS OF LOCAL UNION 153 

During the banquet held in connection 
with the 44th Annual Convention of the 
Montana State Council of Carpenters at 
Helena, Montana, two long-time mem- 
bers of Local Union No. 153, Helena, 
were singled out for special honors. 

The members so honored were Broth- 
ers Herman Lindstrom and Mitchell 
Lovely. Both brothers joined Local Un- 
ion 153 as apprentices in the year 1909. 
Both have maintained continuous mem- 
bership ever since. Both members have 
been pillars of strength in the Local 
Union. Over the years tliey have filled 
virtually all offices within the union. 

Brother Lovely served as recording 
secretary for many, many years, and 
Brother Lindstrom is, and has been, 
treasurer for the past 25 years. In 50 
years of membership Brother Lovely has never taken a clearance card. 



Shown, from left to right, are Brothers Nathan Ruch 
and Merton Dimmitt, who are receiving 50-year member- 
ship pins from George Cloud, president of Local 1465. 




Although ill health prevented Brother Mitchell 
Lovely from attending the banquet, his heart and 
soul were both there. 



THE CARPEXTER 



35 



Local Union 153 has lived through many rugged times during the past 50 years, and 
in every challenge or crisis that 
confronted the union Brothers 
Lindstrom and Lovely vi'ere al- 
ways ready and willing to de- 
vote tlieir time and effort to 
periDetuating and building the 
union. 

Those attending the banquet 
gave tliem a tremendous ova- 
tion when Board Member Lyle 
Hiller presented them with 
50-year pins. Unfortunately, 
Brother Lovely was unable to 
attend because of ill health, 
and his award had to be made 
in absentia. 

Local Union 153 is supreme- 
ly proud of its two veteran 
members who have never hesi- 
tated manning the laboring oar 
whenever tliere was a job to be done for the labor movement in the State of Montana. 
The best wishes for many more happy years of useful life were extended to botli veteran 
members by the entire delegation of the Montana State Council of Carpenters. 




Board Member Hiller in the above picture is congratu- 
lating Brother Herman Lindstrom upon his fine record of 
service to the United Brotherhood as his charming wife, 
Mrs. Lindstrom, looks on. 








JOHN TANK HONORED BY SANTA ROSA COUNCIL 

Last montli, the North Coast Counties District Council of Carpenters, Santa Rosa, 
California, suspended the regular order of business to pay tribute to an old timer whose 
faithfulness and dedication must set some sort of a record. 

The man so honored was 
Brotlier John Tank, a delegate 
to the Council for some 14 
years. 

The meeting was held on 
Brother Tank's birthday. After 
the usual reports had been 
made by Council ofBcials, 
Brother Tank was asked to 
come forward and take his 
place at the head of the table. 
The delegates were then ad- 
vised that the day was Broth- 
er Tank's Birthday. 

A review of Brother Tank's 
record as a delegate to the 
Coimcil from Local Union No. 
1040, Eureka, showed that he had attended 156 meetings. Since it is 167 miles from 
Brother Tank's home to the Labor Temple in Eureka, each meeting represents a round 
trip of 334 miles; multiphed by 156 trips, this adds up to a grand total of 52,104 miles 
traveled to attend meetings of the North Coast Counties District Council. 

The reading of this record evoked a tremendous round of applause from Council dele- 
gates. Brother Tank was then advised that tlie delegates had a birthday present for him. 
Business Representative Max Vance of Local Union 1040 came forward v^ddi a salmon 
trolling rig— rod, reel, line, leader, hooks, sinker, and even a frozen herring for bait. The 
outfit was presented to Brother Tank, together with a birthday card signed by many mem- 
bers who were in on the plan to honor him. 

In response Brother Tank said that he enjoyed every meeting he had attended and 
that he hoped to continue on as a delegate for many more years and drive many more 
thousands of miles in the interest of tlie Council. 





36 



THE CARPENTER 



NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS HONORS ITS OLD TIMERS 

Recently Local Union No. 275, Newton, Massachusetts, took time out from its routine 
business to honor a large group of veteran members whose dedication and loyalty over 

the years made continuing sue- 

cess of the Local possible. 

Three veteran members 
whose membership dates back 
more than 50 years were 
awarded 50-year membership 
pins, and some 27 members 
whose records of continuous 
membership date back more 
than a quarter of a century, 
were awarded 25-year pins. 

Too often days slip into 
months, and months slip into 
years while the efforts of hard- 
working people are appreciated 
but not properly acknowledged. 
The intention always is to do 
something "nice," but the time 
never seems appropriate, and 
soon those who should be hon- 
ored are gone. Then it be- 
comes too late to show any 
appreciation. 

Local Union No. 275 determined that this should not happen to its fine old timers, 
who helped to carry the union through many perilous times. Consequently, the award 




Pictured, from left to right, at Local Union 275's pre- 
sentation ceremony are: General Repf-esentative Harry 
Hogan, Mrho presented the 50-year pins, and old timers 
Angus MacLean, George Knox, Sr., and Peter J. Dwyer. 




Those members of Local 275, Newton, Mass., who received 25-year pins are shown, from left 
to right: 

First roiu— John DiFlorio, Henry Poirier, Walter Elkins, Ernest Ruggles, Clyde Nunn, Harry 
Oldford, Douglas Gregg, and Guy Hopwood. Second row — John Arsenault, Charles Henley, Henry 
Belliveau, Joyce Hirtle, Anton Cubranich, George Knox, Jr., Ear'e Littlefield, Aubrey Morash, 
Philias Guillette, Harry Myra, Johan Wood, and Riley Uh'man. Third row — Fred Atwell, Felix 
Arvisais, Willis Brett, John O. Brown, Pearce Boone, Paul Butles, and Robert Desrochers. 

ceremony was carried out and the Local Union had an opportunity to show its apprecia- 
tion for those who contributed a great deal over a long period of time. 



CENTRAL MASS. DISTRICT COUNCIL HOLDS BANQUET 

On the theory that all work and no play is no better for a union than it is for an indi- 
vidual, the Central Massachusetts District Council has inaugurated an annual banquet. 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



This year's affair was held in the Monticello Restaurant in Framini^hLtm on November 
4th. All Local Unions affiliated with the Council had representatives in attendance, and a 
wonderful evening was enjoyed by all present. 




Featured speaker of tlie evening was General Representative Harry Hogari. 

A fine banquet opened the festivities, and a splendid show provided topnotch enter- 
tainment. Approximately 150 guests were present for the occasion. 

So much good fellowship and fraternal feeling has stemmed from these banquets that 
it is the hope of the Council to carry them on for many, many years to come. 



"IN APPRECIATION OF YOUR LONG AND EFFICIENT SERVICE" . . . 

The history of Local Union No. 83, Halifax, Nova Scotia, dates back many, many 
years. The charter of the Union was installed January 23, 1885, and the membership 
history of Harvey S. Home as a member of the Union reaches back nearly as far. 

Brother Home has been a 
faithful and dedicated member 
of the Union for 52 years. As 
a member of the Union he has 
helped to solve many problems 
and overcome many difficulties. 
At the last meeting of tlie 
Local, held on January 5th, a 
scroll was presented to Brother 
Home as an expression of 
gratitude from his brother 
members. The scroll reads as 
follows: 

"In appreciation of your long 
and efficient service with this 
organization since your initia- 
tion, August 20, 1907; also, 
your period of office as finan- 
cial secretary from 1927 to 
1957. Kindly accept with our 
best wishes for continued good 
health and happiness, this ac- 
companying gift." 

The presentation was made by Brothers Barker Cruickshanks, president, and Reginald 
Doyle, vice president. 

Brother Home is one of the oldest members of the Halifax labor movement, and his 
influence over the years has helped to advance the movement to its present position of 
progress. 




From left to right are shown: Parker Cruickshanks, pres- 
ident of Local Union 83, Halifax, N. S., and Reginald Doyle, 
vice president of the Local, who are congratulating Harvey 
S. Home for his 52 years of dedicated service. 




MILWAUKEE AUXILIARY 713 PAYS FIRST VISIT 

To the Editor: 

We noticed that in your Carpenter magazine you have an article about the ladies once 
in a while. 

We would like you to know that we have been organized from Local 1741 (Milwaukee) 
since February of 1955 and we have twenty members. 

Last October we gave four special chairs for the transporting of crippled children 
to and from cars bound for various places, including therapy treatment at the Curative 
Workshop in Milwaukee. This cost one hundred and fifty-four dollars, which we donated. 

Sincerely, 

June Mcintosh, Secretary 
1501 S. 84th St. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 



SASKATOON AUXILIARY CAN BOAST OF ACTIVITY IF NOT NUMBERS 

To the Editor: 

Greetings from Auxiliary 727, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. 

The members of this Auxiliary send greetings to all sister Auxiliaries. We are a small 
but active group with a membership of about 12. But we work hard; in 1959 we raised 
considerable money, which we have put to good use. In fact, we raised nearly enough to 
furnish the kitchen in the new Trades & Labour Hall with dishes and stainless steel pots 
and pans for a dinner that we put on for 100 people. 

We cooked and served several turkey dinners at Christmas; we sponsored the Christ- 
inas Party for the children of the Carpenters Local, and a real old-fashioned Christmas 
Concert. We also had a bake sale. One of our members, who is also a secretary in the 
Carpenters Local, sells coffee to the Carpenter members who come into the office. 

We meet once a month in the Trades & Labour Hall and have a lunch and fellowship 
period after our meeting. The occasion is enjoyed by all. 

We would love to hear from any Auxiliary with new or old ideas. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Mabel Pederson, Recording Secretary 
614 Walmer Road 
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 



Editor's Note: We of the Carpenter staff thank those of you who have been contribut- 
ing to your Ladies Auxiliaries pages and want at this time to say again that we publish 
all such letters received. We especially welcome pictures with your letters. Do not hesi- 
tate to make your activities known to the rest of us through this column. To let your 
sister auxiliaries know what you are doing and to learn what they are doing can be an 
invaluable means of lending zest and imagination to the plans and activities of all, if 
you choose to help make it so. The point is that each auxiliary's doings are different in 
some respect from all others,' and that's what makes your individual contributions inter- 
esting. These pages are reserved for you. Why not exchange your ideas and the benefit of 
your practical experience? 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 376 
Store Fronts.— Here is a field for the 
mechanic who has imagination— the man 
who can work out something original that 
will at the same time be practical, does not 
need to look farther- his field is here before 
him. Go through the business section of 
any town or city, and see the many dif- 
ferent layouts you can find in store fronts. 
Then see how many of them really need 
working over, and how many of those 
fronts you could remodel in such a way that 
they would have a pleasing appearance, 
and gi\e the proprietor something that will 
draw customers to his place of business. If 
you have the stuff in you that will do 
these things, >ou are on die map for mak- 
ing money, and leaving behind satisfied 



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customers. A well worked-out new store 
front will work wonders for any business 
establishment that will undertake the ven- 
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And what is a well worked-out store 
front? It all depends on the nature of the 
business. A grocery store needs a front 
that is suitable for a grocery business— a 




Fig. 1 

jewelry store needs a display window that 
is in keeping with the jewelry business, and 
a clothing store has its own particular needs 
for displaying that line of merchandise. In 
the same way all the other merchants have 




Fig. 2 

their ovni individual needs for displaying 
their wares. 

Plans of Store Fronts.— Fig. 1 shows a 
simple layout for a show window in a store 
front. Here a liberal amoimt of space is 
provided for displaying merchandise. The 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



vestibule gives considerable shelter for pros- 
pective customers, in case of inclement 
weather. Fig. 2 shows a modification of the 
layout shown in the previous figure. This 



/Metal 




Fig. 3 



layout provides less display room and has 
a wider opening to the street, increasing, 
as one would say, the welcome for window 
shoppers. 



Bar 




Metal Angle Bars.— The top drawing of 
Fig. 3 shows a perspective view of a 
metal corner bar in position for holding 
the plate glass. The bottom drawing shows 
a plan of a similar but not the same bar 

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as shown in the upper drawing. It should 
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MetalCorner Bar 




Glass 



metal corner and angle bars, moldings, and 
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any particular metal as being the best for 



Metal AHfiLE Bar 



Fig. 6 




window settings. Those things must be de- 
cided by the builder himself. The advice 
given here is for the builder, or his repre- 
sentative, to check on the different kinds of 
window settings on the market, and choose 
the setting that wdll give him the best 



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THE CARPENTER 



41 



service, making sure at the same time, that 
he is doing business with a reputable dealer 
—one who will stand back of his merchan- 
dise. 

Fig. 4 shows a section of a metal angle 
bar that is in reverse of tlie angle bars 
shown by Fig. 3. Fig. 5 shows in perspec- 
tive a little different design of a comer bar, 
the reverse of which is shown by Fig. 6. 
Fig. 7 shows tlie same design in a metal 
division bar. 



MfTAL bmsoH 



ventilation and drainage. Drainage is nec- 
essary in order to carry away water, due 
to condensation on the plate glass. Fig. 9 
gives a section of the side jamb, which is 
similar to what is shown for the head. 

The Bulkhead.— There are a great many 
materials used in the construction of 
show-window bulkheads, such as stone, tile, 




Moldings for Metal Window Settings.— 

Fig. 8 shows tlie head, the glass in part, 
and the sill. The wood sill is covered on 
the face witli a veneer of metal. The mold- 
ings of this setting are held in place with 
screws, as tlie drawings show. All metal set- 
tings should be provided with openings for 




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Fig. 8 

brick, marble, and many others, especially 
artificial. The bulkhead shown in Fig. 10 

I Name — j is made of wood, covered with a veneer of 

metal. The material used, however, for con- 



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Tools with order. For Canadian prices write Curry's Art 
Store 756 Yonae St., Toronto 5. 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



structing bulkheads must be determined by 
the builder or his representative. 

Important Consideration.— One of the 
things that must be taken into considera- 
tion that is of paramount importance in re- 
modeling or building store fronts, is tlie 



provided for by giving the plate glass ample 
play to prevent damage, due to the inevita- 




Fig. 9 

rough opening for the shovi^ vdndow. In 
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it supports will go down with it. Of equal 
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show window. If this beam sags or goes 
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pressure wall come onto the plate glass, 
there will be trouble. In all of these mat- 
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settlings, slight saggings, shrinkage, and ex- 
pansion and contraction, which must be 




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Section of Bulkhead 



Fig. 10 

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does not shrink. Stays put under 
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FAIHOWOOD sands easily, does not gum up sander. 
Takes spirit dye stains freely. Waterproof and weather- 
proof when properly applied. Ready to use . . . "right 
out of the can." Fifteen matching wood colors with 
matchless wood finishes. Dept. 715 

BEVERLY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

9118 South Main Street Los Angeles 3, Calif. 




"SMITTY'S MITERED CASING CLAMP" 

It pulls door and window casing joints 
together and holds them securely in place 
without shifting while nailing. Beginners 
get a good joint and the experienced get 



a good joint easier. 
and you'll wonder 
how you ever did 
without it. 

POSTPAID 

(cosh with order) 

or C.O.D. plus postage. 

Only $2.95 

SMITTY'S CLAMP 

1924 Adirondack, 
Duluth 11, Minn. 



Use it for a week 




Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is V2 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease V2 Inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width Is ^ inch and they Increase 
V4," each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Flip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof Is AS'-9V4." wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and ^^ qjjj, mINUTE ^'^^ *'"^^- 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 

Gcttlni th« Itnithi of r»n»n by the ipan ud 
tht mathod of settint up the tables It fully pro- 
teeted by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrlfhts. 

Price $2.50 Poptpaid. If C. O. D. pay $2.95 

Californians Add 10c. Money back privilege. 

Canadians use Money Orders. 



A, RIECHERS 



p. O. Box 405 



Palo Alto. Calif. 



HANG DOORS EASIER 

with the New 

BUTT MORTISE PLANE 




—Saves Time 
— Accurate 

You can make clean, even mortises of 
uniform depth and with smooth square 
corners. 

SIMPLE TO USE 

1. Use chisel as illus- 
trated 

2. Using hinge butt as 
gauge, set blade for 
proper depth 

3. Plane remainder of 
wood by using plane 
in both directions. 

"A Corpenter's Too/ Designee/ fay a Carpenter" 

If your dealer cannot supply you, send us 
your check or Money Order and we will ship 
prepaid or C. O. D. plus postage and charges. 

R. M. RU/VIBOLD CO. 

Box 233 
Thornton, III. 




MY HOBBY MAKES ME 

$5^ an hour 
CASH PROFIT 




START YOUR OWN RETIREMENT BUSINESS 

You can turn your spare time into Big Cash 
Profits witii your own COMPLETE SHARPEN- 
ING SHOP . . . Grind saws, knives, scissors, 
skates, lawn mower blades ... all cutting 
edges. Your own Cash Business with no In- 
ventory . . right at home ... no ex- 
perience needed. 

FREE BOOK tells how you can start your 
own retirement business while you 
are still working at your regular 
job Low Cost — time payments only 
$15.00 a month. Send coupon today. 

BELSAW Sharp-All Co., 7120 FieldBldg., Kansas City 11, Mo "i 
Send Free Book "LIFETIME SECURITY". No obligation, 

Name ^_^ 




Address- 



I City- 



-State. 



Combination 




JOINTER, 
SANDER 



•The Mobile Workshop" 

FOR THE WORKSHOP OR ON-THE-JOB 

(.8" SAW .10" SANDER 

INCLUDES j ^ ^„ JOINTER . % H.P. MOTOR 

. EASY TO OPERATE • INSTANT CHANGE- 
OVER « MAXIMUM SAFETY • RUGGED 
CONSTRUCTION • TOP PERFORMANCE 



OVER 75 YEARS SERVICE TO INDUSTRY 




803 4th ST. 



BELOIT, WISCONSIN 



□ Please send complete information to: 

□ Send information on complete line of 
woodworking machinery: 




enlarging hole with 
round file 



K'EWf 



making rabbet cut 
with drum tool 



a Stanley 'SURFORM 
fool for every 
surface forming job 



ff(. 



These are the SURFORM tools now on 
sale wherever Stanley tools are sold. 

Surform Plane— $3.69 

Surform Convex Plane— $3.69 

Surform File with regular cut, flat blade — 
$2.69 

Surform File with regular cut, half-round 

blade— $2.89 
Surform File with fine cut, flat blade — 

$2.69 
Surform Pocket Tool with fine cut, flat 

blade— $1.59 
NEW! Surform Pocket Tool with fine cut, 

half-round blade— $1.79 
NEW! Surform Round File— $2.39 
NEW! Surform Drum Tool— $2.29 

Replacement blades and new abrasive 
sanding blades from 75<!i to $1.19. 



See Surform tools. Try Surform tools. Buy 
the Surform tools you need. They'll do the 
work. For free folder write Stanley Tools, 
Dep't 2603, New Britain, Conn. 



STANLEY 



® 




FASTER STOCK REMOVAL 

Millers Falls two brand-new belt sanders 
offer carpenters a wide range of advanced 
features — several of them Millers Falls 
exclusives — including: Unique drive 
mechanism with internal gearing • 
Powerful MF-built motors • Ball and 
needle bearings • Slip-proof timing belt 
drive e "Fine thread" tracking adjustment 
• Anti-gouge backrest — and many others. 
Model No. 830 - 3" x 21" belt; % H.P. 
motor . . . priced at $74.50. Model No. 840 
... a big capacity sander designed to per- 
mit flush sanding up to vertical surfaces. 
4" X 21" belt; 1 H.P. motor . . . $84.50. 
Write Millers Falls Company, Dept. C-33, 
Greenfield, Mass., for details. 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 
4vois.^8 




ImKi TrM* IfrttraiatiM for 

Carpenters, Builders, Joiners, 
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five you the short-cut in- 
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cluding new methods. Ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money savinf sufgestlons. Ail 
easy progressive course for 
the apprentice ... a practical 
dally helper and Quick Refer- 
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Carpenters everywhere are 
using these Guides as a Help- 
ing Hand to Easier Work, Bet- 
ter Work and Better Pay. ACT 
NOW . . . fill In and mall Uit 
FREE COUPON below- 



lnsld« Trade Information On: 

How to use the steel square — How to 
file and .set saws — How to build fur- 
niture—How to use a mitre box — 
How to use the chalk line — How to 
use rules and .scales — How to make joints 
— Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensu- 
ration problems — Estimating strength of 
timbers — How to set girders and sills — 
How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, 
barns, garages, bungalows, etc. — How to 
read and draw plans — Drawing up speci- 
fications — How to excavate — How to use 
Bettings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square 
— How to build hoists and scaffolds — sky- 
lights — How to build stairs. 



AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St. New York 10. N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 
7 days' free trial. If O.K. I will remit $2 in 7 days and 12 ' 
monthly until $8, plus shipping charge, is paid. Otherwise 
I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfied. 




employed liy. 



D 



SAVE SHIPPING CHARGES! Enclose Full Payment 
With Coupon and We Pay Shipping Charges. C-3 




NOW-- Add to your "know how" of 

HOUSE CONSTRUCTION 
DETAILS 

Save Money and Time with these Latest 
Professional Methods 

Here Is an exact working guide on every detail of house 
construction from foundation to finlsli. Tells you dimensions, 
materials, processes, step-by- step working methods. Hun- 
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easy to follow. Quick-reference index enables you to find 
Instantly any construction detail on which you want modern, 
authoritative guidance. Can be used for alterations in a 
set of stock plans, for making additions or clianges in a 
building, or tor complete construction of a dwelling. Con- 
forms with modern practice and building regulations in all 
parts of the country. Gives you helpful Ideas on how to 
build In accordance with latest developments In painting, 
carpentry methods, materials, heating and air conditioning. 
Insulation and sound-proofing. 

The guidance you get on even a single house construction 
detail can repay you a hundred times the small cost of thi: 
remarkable volume. Send for your copy today. Mail coupon 
below. 

Every Step Explained and Illustrated: 
Excavations — Foundations, forms, footing, drainage — 
Sills — Girders — Joists — Subflooring — Exterioi 
wall framing — Interior wall framing — Ceiling Joist; 

— Roof construction — Cornices and porches — Ex- 
terior walls of wood — Exterior walls of brick — In 
terior wall covering: wood, NEW ENLARGED EDITION 
plaster — Interior trim — jusj PUBLISHED ! 
Stair construction — Win- 
dows — Doors — Builders' 
hardware — Scaffolds and 
hoists — Closets, shelves, 
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— Fireplaces, chimneys — 
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Heating — Air conditioning 

— Painting and finishing — 
Prefabrication — Barns — 
Poultry equipment — Gar- 
den boxes, walls, fences, trel- 
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384 Pages, Size St/j x II. 
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FULL REFUND. Mail the coupon below. 

. MAIL THIS COUPON 

' Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corp., Dept. C-360 
I 30 Church Street, New York 7, N. Y. 

I Send me "House Construction Details" with the under- 
I standing that if I am not completely satlfied I can re- 
I turn it in ten days for FULL REFUND. 




Enclosed is $5.95. 



□ check □ money order 



City- 



Zone State- 



NOTICE 

The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of tlie United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," Including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rlglits of tlie publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 

City, Mo. 40-44 

Black & Decker, Towson, Md. 6 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 42 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, 111. 5 

Evans Rule Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 43 
Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 41-48 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. 41 

Irwin, Wilmington, Ohio 43 

Dan C. Laub, Minneapolis, Minn. 42 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 4 
Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 45 

Milwaukee Electric Tool, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 47 

R. M. Rumbold Co., Thornton, 

111. 44 

Ed Schlecht, Los Angeles, Cal. 40 

Skil Corp., Chicago, 111 1 

Smitty's Clamp, Duluth, Minn.__ 43 
Stanley Works, New Britain, 

Conn. 45 

True Temper Corp., Cleveland, 

Ohio 3rd Cover 

Yates-American, Beloit, Wis 44 

Carpentry Materials 

Beverly Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Cal. 43 

Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 45 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

L. F. Garlinghouse Co., Inc., 

Topeka, Kans. 48 

Mason Engineering, Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 41 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Cal 43 

H. H. Siege'e, Emporia, Kans.__ 39 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y. 46 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



PREFER 




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Exclusive coaster-brake 
clutch drive to prevent 
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gears, shafts, and motor. 

One-piece wrap-around 
steel shoe. Helical-cut, 
hardened steel gears. 

All ball and roller 
bearings. 

Clear-view sighting of 
biade edge. 

Telescoping biadeguard. 

No-slip, balanced grip. 

Miter cuts up to 4-5°. 



Here's why: They're precision-designed for greatest 
accuracy . . . super-powered for high-speed, heavy-duty 
day-in-and-day-out use, and perfectly balanced for eas- 
ier handling. They're rugged and functionally styled to 
handle any type of construction work faster and easier. 

Dollar-for-dollar, no other circular saws can match 
MILWAUKEE for quality and performance that pays 
off in superior workmanship and more dependable, 
trouble-free service. 

See your MILWAUKEE Distributor or write for 
Bulletin SW-27. 

iVIIL>VAUKEE ELECTRIC TOOL CORP. 

5360 West State Street • Milwaukee 8, Wisconsin 



Available in 

3 popular sizes, 

115 or Z30 volts 



6 1/2" dia 


- - 


$69.50 


71/4" dia. - - - 


$79.50 


8'/4''dia. - 


$89.50 


— complete with r 


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• 
'•/a 


look under 
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Save Money — Time On Home Plans w_^ 



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r 

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ORDER YOUR CHOICE - OR AIL BOOKS - CHECK THOSE WANTED - CLIP AND MAIL TODAY 



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□ Ranch & Suburban — New, 

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□ Choice Selected Homes — 114 plans. 
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□ Homes In Brick — 114 plans of 
medium and large homes $1.00 

□ All American Homes — 120 plans in 
varied types of construction 50c 

□ Deluxe Small Homes — Our largest 
selection of moderns 50c 



n Blue Ribbon Homes — 116 of our D 

most popular plans 50c 

□ Cape Cod and Colonial Homes — 

Cape Cod, Southern, Colonial 50c □ 

n Homes For Narrow Lots — Over 60 
Plans. Many sizes. 2 & 3 bed- Q 
room. 50c 

□ Split Level Homes — Shows 41 split □ 
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□ New American Homes — 110 of our Q 
large homes; popularity tested-$l.00 

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Laue Shore &. Mountain Cottages — 
58 year-round, summer designs. 50c 
Lawn &. Garden Ideas — 32 pages. 

Patios, fences, trellises, etc 50c 

Superior Fireplaces. — Indoor types. 
Correct construction detail. $1.00 



MAIL ORDER TO: L. F. GARLINGHOUSE CO., INC. Box UB-30, Topeka, Kansas 



FOLEY 



AUTOMATIC 



SAW FILER 



CARPENTERS-This is the FIRST and ONLY Machine that files 

• HAND Saws • COMBINATION Circular Saws 

• BAND Saws • CROSS-CUT Circular Saws 

Foley's exclusive jointing action restores irregular teeth to 
uniform size, spacing and alignment — keeps saws sharp and 
perfect. Adjustments are simple and without eye strain — 
anyone can learn them easily. Over a half-century of design 
and engineering progress are in the new Model 200 Foley 
Saw Filer — the only machine which files hand saws, band 
saws, and both combination and cross-cut circular saws 
automatically. Saw factories and leading saw repair shops 
rely on Foley for saws that cut smoother, faster and cleaner. 
Send coupon for literature. i " 




FILING 

CIRCULAR 

SAWS 



FILING 

BAND 

SAWS 



In addition to all 
hand saws, the 
Foley files all 
combination and cross- 
cut circular saws 4" to 
24" in diameter. It joints 
as it files, keeping the 
saw perfectly round and 
all teeth uniform in height 
and spacing. Every tooth 
cuts, saw runs cooler and 
breakage is eliminated. 





The Foley takes all 
band saws to 4 H" wide, 
3 to 16 points per inch 
—up to 24 feet long. Its 
jointing action restores 
uneven teeth to perfect 
size, spacing, and align- 
ment. Sawing produc- 
tion increases 25% to 
40% and work quality 
improves. 



SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET 



FOLEY MFG. CO. 318-0 Foley BIdg., Minneapoli* 18, Minn. 

Send full information on Foley Sow Filer. 



City. 



-State. 



(Booklet tells how to start money-making saw filing business.) 




ROCKET engineering gives you 
A BETTER WAY TO DRIVE A NAIL 



That's right. Modern engineering created 
Rocket hammers to make man's oldest 
tool basically better four ways — 

More Driving Power — beautifully bal- 
anced, with power concentrated in head. 

Far More Durable — outlasts ordinary 
hammers many times. Boron-alloy tubu- 
lar steel handle is strongest ever made. 
Forged-steel head is heat-treated three 
ways for strength at eye section, hard- 
ness of face, correct temper in claws. 

Much Safer — the head can't loosen or 
fly off. Grip won't slip in wet or sweaty 



hand, or when you're wearing gloves. 

Less Tiring, Too — with a handle that 
absorbs shock and a cushion grip that 
feels just right in your hand. 

True Temper makes the Rocket and 
Jet Rocket with the same patented con- 
struction, special steels, superb workman- 
ship. Rocket has fancy octagon neck 
and poll. Jet Rocket has popular bell- 
face design. 

They're both real buys, and your 
hardware dealer has them. (See them 
in rippers, ball peins, and hatchets, 
too.) True Temper, Cleveland 15, Ohio. 



TrUeTemper. 



THE RIGHT TOOL 
FOR THE RIGHT JOB 



If You're Blasting 



Off For The Moon 




Never Mind Registering 



BUT if you expect to 
live and woric and raise 
your family here 



Be Sure To REGISTER 
And VOTE 

The Future You Protect Will Be Your Own 



CARPENTER 

^ FOUNDED 1881 

Officio/ Pubffcafi'on of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 

APRIL, 1960 






we all want 
a better America! 

We all want to vote for liberal, forward-looking candi> 
dates who believe in all the people, not in just the rich few. 

And we all can IF . . . We are registered. Are YOU? 

Check with election officials at your city hall or county 
court house and see what the registration dates are. 

Then BE SURE to register. 

Published in the public interest by COMMITTEE ON POLITICAL EDUCATION, AFL-CIO 

815 16th Street, N.W., Washington 6, D. C. 



ATM ST/ 

Custeut lliod e shoe 
for Carpenters 




MORE COMFORT 

Made of soft but extra tough glove- 
tanned leather to give pliability and 
ease of movement. Steel shank insures 
shift-long support. Lace-to-toe fea- 
ture provides comfort in any working 
position. Leather lining in vital areas 
adds to correct "feel". 



M4.95 

Sold on money back guarantee 
Sizes 6 to 13. Widths B, D, EE 



MORE WEAR 



Reinforced in spots where carpenters 
punish shoes most. Extra leather 
patch at ankles. Tough Neoprene 
soles defy wear. Uppers riveted to 
shank. Double-stitched wherever 
strain occurs. Riveted eyelets and 
rawhide laces end troubles from this 
source. This is the shoe carpenters 
asked for. Union made, of course. 



MORE SAFETY 



Glove fit adds to sure-footedness. The 
best non-skid sole yet invented. Grips 
on oily and slippery surfaces where 
others fail. In case of accident, one 
swipe with pocket knife cuts shoe 
loose. Semi-hard toe protects without 
cramping. 




MAIL COUPON TODAY I 



CONSTRUCT-O-WEAR SHOE 
P. O. Box No. 1431 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



CO. 



Please send me postage paid pairs of Construct- 

O-Wear shoes at S14.95 per pair. I understand my 
money will be refunded if I am not completely 
satisfied. 

State size and width 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Enclosed find check __ Money order 



L!: 



Send COD 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor /lUBOl MESSl 



Carpenters' 


Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana >*Sjihj»7 


Established in 1881 
v.. I. LXXX— No. 4 


APRIL, 1960 One Dollar Per Tear 

Ten Cents a Copy 


o^. 



— Con tents 



General Office Negotiates Bond Program - 5 

As the result of a great deal of negotiating and comparative shopping the General 
Officers procured a bonding plan that meets Landrum-Griffin provisions and yet only 
costs a fraction of the $11.25 rate the commercial bonding companies suggested In 
their "blue book." This plan undoubtedly v/ill set the pattern for the v/hole labor 
movement. 

Biggest Building Trades Conference - - 7 

Some 3,500 delegates attended the Building Trades Conference in Washington last 
month. For four days the delegates concentrated on hammering out a legislative pro- 
gram capable of getting the country's economy back in high gear. Some 400 Brother- 
hood delegates held a conference of their own in the form of a dinner sponsored 
by the General Office and presided over by Second Vice President O. Wm. Blaier. 

Cape Canaveral, Showcase Of Skills - - 9 

Whenever a missile soars skyward from Cape Canaveral the skills and know-how 
of hundreds of Brotherhood members help to make the event possible. Many of our 
members are employed at Cape Canaveral not only in erecting new facilities but also 
in remodeling and maintaining old ones. The missile range is a fabulous product of 
the space age. 

Elastic Roof Adds Plastic Bag - - - 19 

A huge plastic balloon is being used to enable workmen to start installing deli- 
cate machinery before the "elastic roofed" post ofTice at Providence is even fin- 
ished. The balloon is as big as three football fields. 



Know Your Social Security 



31 

Many people are losing Social Security benefits because they do not know all that 
is involved and the rules the Social Security Administration follows in granting bene- 
fits. However, there are many harsh standards the Administration sticks to to make dis- 
ability benefits almost impossible to collect. A campaign for more liberal standards 
in this area is definitely in order. 



• * • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
What's New 
Editorials 
Official 

In Memoriam 
Outdoor Meanderings 
Correspondence 
Craft Problems 



Index to Advertisers 



* • * 



16 
22 
24 
28 
29 
34 
37 
40 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




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and Trial Lesson 



Send today for Trial Lesson: "How to Read 
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Chicago Technical College 

D-132 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, Illinois 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read Blue Prints" with in- 
formation about how I can train at home. 



Name 

Address Occupation. 

City Zone State 



Age- 



Supreme 

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Made By The Inventors and [Vorld's Only Specialists In 

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ESTWING MFG. CO. Dept.BH rockford. Illinois 



General Office Negotiates Bond Program 

* * * 

As the result of a great deal of investigating, negotiating and comparative 
shopping, the General Officers have succeeded in securing a bonding 
^ arrangement that fulfills the strict bonding requirements of the Lan- 
drum-Griifin Bill and still keeps costs within reasonable limits. 

As outlined in the synopsis of the new law which was distributed in pam- 
phlet form last October, the officers and employees of a labor organization 
must be bonded. The amount of the bond is based on the funds or other 
property the ofiicer or employee handled during the last preceding fiscal year 
of the organization which he serves. 

annual fidelity bond rate is $7.50 per 
year per $1,000. The requirement of 
the new law that our bonds cover 
faithful discharge of duties increases 
that rate to $11.25 per year per $1,000. 

Under the plan now being nego- 
tiated by the General Office, the esti- 
mated total cost to subordinate bod- 
ies will be approximately $6.00 per 
year per $1,000. 

Furthermore, if each subordinate 
body handled its own bonding prob- 
lems, the administrative work in- 
volved would impose a substantial 
and unnecessary burden upon the 
individual Local Unions and Coun- 
cils and their officers. 

In addition, by maintaining central 
control and a centralized records sys- 
tem of all bonding information, the 
possibility of Local Union or Coun- 
cil officers or employees failing to be 
in compliance with the law, through 
inadvertence or otherwise, will be 
minimized as a continuing check can 
be made of the records to insure cov- 
erage of all individuals who have 
been reported to the General Office 
as being subject to the bonding re- 
quirements of the law. 

Because of the amount of work in- 
volved in establishing procedures and 



The General Office is completing 
arrangements with a surety company 
which qualifies under the strict re- 
quirements of the law to provide for 
the bonding of officers and employees 
of Local Unions and State and Dis- 
trict Councils so that they will be in 
compliance with the provisions of the 
law. Although the law does not apply 
in Canada, the bonding procedure 
which is being established will also 
cover Local Unions and District and 
Provincial Councils in Canada, so that 
a uniform bonding procedure will be 
available to all subordinate units of 
the United Brotherhood. (The surety 
company is licensed to do business in 
all provinces in Canada). 

The General Executive Board, act- 
ing pursuant to the provisions of Sec- 
tion 15 K of the Constitution and 
Laws of the United Brotherhood, de- 
cided to establish this bonding pro- 
cedure for all subordinate bodies for 
several reasons. Among the more im- 
portant considerations is the fact that 
with such over-all coverage the total 
premium, and, therefore, the indi- 
vidual cost to each subordinate body, 
will be substantially less than that 
which would be charged to any Local 
Union or Council which obtained its 
own bonds. For example, the usual 



THE CARPENTER 



records systems, some time will be 
required before actual bonding can 
begin. It is intended and expected 
that all necessary bonds will be is- 
sued and in effect by July 1, 1960. 

All officers and employees author- 
ized to handle funds and subject to 
the law will be covered by the bond 
obtained by the General Office. Cov- 
erage will be obtained by each Local 
Union and Council submitting to the 
General Office the name and other 
pertinent data concerning each per- 
son to be bonded. 

The bond premium will be paid 
initially by the General Office. After 
analysis of all pertinent information, 
each Local Union and Council will 
be notified of the cost of the bond 
covering its officers and employees, 
based on the number of its personnel 
who are bonded and the amount of 
funds which they handle. The esti- 
mated total cost to each Local Union 
and Council, as noted above, will be 
approximately $6.00 per year per 
$1,000 of bond coverage reduced to 
2V2 X $6.00, or $15.00, for a three- 
year period. All bonds will be issued 
for a three -year period. 



The basis for determining the 
amount of the bond coverage for each 
subordinate body is illustrated by the 
following example: If a Local Union 
had income of $100,000 during its 
last fiscal year and has assets (other 
than real estate and other fixed as- 
sets) of $25,000, the bond coverage 
will be $12,500, which is 10% of the 
$125,000 total of income and assets. 
The premium will be 12.5 x $15.00 
for a total of $187.50 for the period 
July 1, 1960 to June 30, 1963. 

There is no doubt but that the 
bonding provisions of the Landrum- 
Griffin Bill are unnecessarily harsh 
and expensive, since they call for 
"faithful performance of duty" rather 
than merely financial honesty. How- 
ever, the Act is the law of the land, 
and our Brotherhood has respected 
law and constituted authority for all 
the 79 years of its life. The Landrum 
Bill will be no exception. Since the 
Bill calls for a specified type of bond- 
ing, our General Officers have made 
provision for that kind of bonding at 
a rock-bottom price that represents a 
real triumph of careful shopping and 
negotiation. 



NLRB FROWNS ON LOCKOUT THREATS 

A lockout or threat of a lockout as a means of forcing acceptance of a management 
Avage offer has been outlawed by the National Labor Relations Board. 

A tliree-man Board panel agreed with an NLRB Trial Examiner that in the case before 
it, it was clear that "the threat of a lockout and the lockout itself, were resorted to pri- 
marily not as an economic weapon necessitated by a strike hazard, but for the purpose 
of forcing a quick acceptance of the employer's contract proposals. 

This, the Board held, was inadmissible. It ordered the employer to cease and desist," 
and to reimburse employees for the wages they had lost during a four-day lockout. 

Tlie case involved Locals 19, 57, 348 and 466 of the Plumbers and the Utah Plumb- 
ing and Heating Contractors Association of Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Testimony before the Board showed that the Association had threatened a lockout 
unless the union's negotiators gave assurances that the employers' wage offer would be 
given a favorable recommendation. The negotiators refused and the lockout followed. 
Eventually the union membership accepted the offer and the lockout ended. 

However, the Board ruled the threat of the lockout and the subsequent lockout were 
unfair practices inasmuch as there was no threat of a strike at the time the lockout was 
ordered. 



Biggest Building Trades Conference 

• • 

IN 1955, barely 1,000 delegates showed up for the first legislative confer- 
ence sponsored by the Building and Construction Trades Department. 
Last month, some 3,500 delegates from all 50 states swarmed into Wash- 
ington to make the sixth such conference the biggest and most successful in 
history. 

For four days, from March 14 through March 17, the delegates concen- 
trated on promoting a legislative program capable of getting the economic 
gears of the country back into high. The first day of the conference was de- 
voted to pinpointing the legislative reforms needed to eliminate the many 
injustices existing in the building trades. The program adopted by the con- 
ference called for a strengthening and 
broadening of the Davis-Bacon Act 
to make prevailing wage provisions 
more automatic on all construction fi- 
nanced indirectly, as well as directly, 
by Federal funds. It urged reversal 
of the Denver case, which placed a 
curb on the right of a union or un- 
ions to picket a job site when a sub- 
contractor violates established union 
work rules. This ruling has in effect 
forced union building tradesmen to 
work side by side with non-union 
men. For years it has been a millstone 
around the necks of building trades 
unions. 

The conference further implored 
the government to initiate immedi- 
ately a broad program aimed at en- 
couraging the construction of badly 
needed schools, hospitals, airports, 
and slum redevelopments. The atten- 
tion of the government was also fo- 
cused on the tremendous need for 
millions of additional middle-class 
homes— a need that is being unmet 
because of tight money policies that 
discourage speculative building in 
this category. 

In addition, the conference backed 
the entire legislative program of the 
AFL-CIO, including a higher mini- 




Vice President Blaier addressing the Broth- 
erhood get-together-^pAofo courtesy of Merkle 
Press. 

mum wage, aid to depressed areas. 
Federal standards for unemployment 
insurance, and medical insurance for 
retirees through Social Security. 

For two days the various state dele- 
gations roamed the House and Senate 
office buildings urging support for 
these measures. Practically every Sen- 
ator and Congressman was called on 
by constituents from his own district. 
Some delegations were warmly re- 
ceived; some got lukewarm treat- 



THE CARPENTER 



ment. But by tlie time the confer- 
ence was over, no Congressman could 
say that he did not know and under- 
stand labor's position on the vital eco- 
nomic questions of the day. 

The last day of the conference the 
various state delegations reported 



wires when issues of vital interest to 
working people are up for action. 

Included among the conference 
delegates were some 400 members of 
our Brotherhood. Brotherhood mem- 
bers from virtually every state in the 
union were in attendance. 




The cameraman catches Ueft to right) Board members Joe Cambiano and J. O. Mack; General 
Secretary Dick Livingston; Air Force Colonel James Tracy, and Solicitor of Labor Harold Nystrom 
chatting before the dinner — photo courtesy of Merkle Press. 



back to the conference the kind of 
receptions they received from their 
Congressmen. From these reports it 
^^ as obvious to all delegates that the 
^•isits paid off handsomely in increased 
support for labor's program. 




Board member Rajoppi at Brotherhood dinner 
— photo courtesy of Merkle Press. 

However, politicians have notori- 
ously short memories, and the 
groundwork laid by the visits to Con- 
gressional offices needs to be supple- 
mented with follow-up letters and 



Wednesday evening, March 16, the 
General OfBce sponsored a dinner at 
the Statler Hotel for the Brotherhood 
delegation. Some 420 in all attended. 
Special guests at the dinner included 
O. William Blaier, Second General 
Vice President; R. E. Livingston, 
General Secretary; General Executive 
Board members Raleigh Rajoppi, J. 
O. Mack, and Joe Cambiano; Colonel 
James Tracy of the Air Force; and 
Harold Nystrom, Solicitor of Labor. 
The occasion enabled Brotherhood 
members from widely scattered parts 
of the country to meet each other and 
share experiences. It was a highlight 
of the conference for the Brotherhood 
inembers who were included among 
the delegates. 

The conference itself enhanced the 
prestige of organized labor on Capi- 
tol Hill. But it also emphasized the 
need for more concerted and effective 
political action on the part of labor 
if a sound and constructive legislative 
program is to be enacted to get a grow- 
ing economy under way once more. 



Cape Canaveral, Showcase Of Skills 

• • • 

WHEN a missile is about to be launched at Cape Canaveral, Florida, 
some 15,000 to 20,000 people literally hold their breath. All of them, 
in one way or another, have contributed something to the climactic 
moment represented by the launching. Some are scientists, some are military 
personnel, some are clerical and maintenance people. For long periods of time 
all their efforts, their skills and knov^-how were directed toward this moment. 
If the launching goes smoothly, all feel a glow of pride; if it fizzles, they 
feel frustrated and let down. 

Among the people who make Cape Canaveral tick are some 1,200 building 
tradesmen— a sizeable percentage of whom are Brotherhood members. They 
constantly are adding new installa- 
tions and remodeling old ones to ac- 
commodate the changing needs of 
rocket and missile development. Hun- 
dreds of other Brotherhood members 
who are millwright specialists help to 
maintain the complex and far-flung 
mechanical component of the project. 
Every rocket and missile that hurtles 
into the sky owes something to men 
who carry the same kind of union 
card that you and L do. 

But Cape Canaveral is only a part 
of the Atlantic missile project, official- 
ly known as Air Force Missile Test 
Center. The Center extends from 
Cape Canaveral clear to the Ascen- 
sion Island off the Coast of Brazil. A 
series of tracking stations stretch all 
along the 5,000-mile range. Each has 
its complement of specialists— includ- 
ing Brotherhood members. 

The dateline "Cape Canaveral" has 
become world-famous— a symbol of 
the free world's missile progress. Lo- 
cated 15 miles north of Patrick Air 
Force Base, Cape Canaveral— official- 
ly called the Cape Canaveral Missile 
Test Annex— is where the AFMTC 
checks out and launches missiles. 

Nine years ago, except for a light- 
house and a handful of people, this 




Major-General Yates — Official U. S. Air Force 
photo. 

15,000-acre tract was largely uninhab- 
ited scrubland. Today, more than 
8,000 people work at the Cape. Along 
its southern edge a deep water port 
has been developed for missile track- 
ing and recovery vessels and the ships 
and submarines needed for the Navy's 
POLABIS program. 

When missiles arrive at the Cape 
they are sent directly to the Indus- 
trial Area, where nineteen large mis- 
sile hangars and supporting facilities 
are assigned to missile contractors for 
missile component check-out and fin- 
al assembly before launching. These 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



hangars are similar to aircraft hang- 
ars, \\'ith extra shop space on either 
side, and modified to meet the user's 
needs. 

The Cape is presently divided into 
three main missile launching areas. 
Along the northeast border there are 
the TITAN and ATLAS ICBM 
launching pads. The southern border 
is used for medium-range missiles. 
These include launch pads and serv- 
ice facilities for the Air Force's THOR 





f 


j 


1 



Service towers, or gantries, sometimes are as 
tall as ll-story buildings — OfUcial U. S. Air 
Force photo. 

and JUPITER, the Navy's POLARIS, 
and the VANGUARD satellite vehi- 
cles. 

At the tip of the Cape are located 
the launch pads for cruise-type mis- 
siles such as the Air Force's SNARK, 
the BOiMARC and MATADOR, as 
well as small experimental rockets. 

Launch facilities for the Air Force's 
MINUTE MAN ICBM and the 
Army's PERSHING missile and the 
SATURN booster are now being con- 
structed at the Cape. 

The launching pads for cruise mis- 
siles and small experimental rockets 
are comparatively simple affairs. They 
consist of a paved area for mounting 
a zero-length launcher and a block- 



house from where the launch is con- 
trolled. 

Launching facilities for flight-testing 
ballistic missiles, on the other hand, 
are more complex. For example, the 
ATLAS service tower or gantry is al- 
most eleven stories high. It and near- 
by supporting facilities provide a 
work tower, fuel, compressed gases, 
electrical power and coolant water. 

Service towers are usually mount- 
ed on rails. Thus they can be posi- 
tioned over the launch pads or 
moved away to permit firing. Plat- 
forms at various levels enable missile 




Reinforced concrete, often several feet thick, 
predominates in much of the construction at 
Cape Canaveral — Official U. S. Air Force photo. 

crews to perform final check-out and 
servicing operations. In the newer 
TITAN launch pads, the service tow- 
ers work on the erector principle. 
They are raised for pre-launch ser- 
vicing operations and then lowered 
for the launch. 

Near each pad is located the block- 
house, a steel-reinforced concrete 
building in which action is taken to 
launch the missiles. In the case of the 
ATLAS, the blockhouse is about 750 
feet from the launch pad. It was de- 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



signed to withstand an explosion 
equivalent of 50,000 pounds o£ TNT 
at a distance of 50 feet. 

During a flight test, the blockhouse 
is occupied by the launching agency. 
In the case of the TITAN, for ex- 
ample, Martin crews are used. Even- 
tually, military crews of the Air 
Force's Strategic Air Command will 
launch TITAN missiles. 



After launch action has been ac- 
complished at the blockhouse, Cen- 
tral Control again takes over and su- 
pervises the flight data collection 
activities. 

Coordination is the key factor in 
the success achieved by the Air Force 
Missile Test Center. Launching site 
and tracking stations must work as a 
highly polished team. This they do to 




Form work can get pretty complicated in some of the structures— Oflicia/ U. S. Air Force 



photo. 

When a missile is readied for firing, 
over-all direction for the test ema- 
nates from the Central Control Build- 
ing at the Cape. Here all of the in- 
strumentation and other essential 
preparations are coordinated, infor- 
mation on range clearance and safety 
established, and the final O. K. for 
the launch passed on to the block- 
house. Central Control is literally the 
nerve center for operations on the 
Atlantic Missile Range during a flight 
test. 



a remarkable degree, despite the com- 
plexity of the operation. 

The man responsible for the high 
degree of efficiency is a tough, sea- 
soned Air Force veteran— Major-Gen- 
eral Donald N. Yates, Commander of 
the Center. General Yates has been 
in command of the Center since 1954. 
Under his leadership the vast project 
has been developed and brought to 
its present peak of excellent perform- 



ance. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Over the years Geiieral Yates has 
proved himself to be fair, consci- 
entious and understanding of civihan 
prol:)lems. Only shoddy performance 
and neglect of responsibility arouse 
his iie. In his dealings with organized 



labor he has never adopted a superior 
attitude or tried to throw his weight 
around. Military personnel and civil- 
ian workmen alike respect him for his 
fairness and dedication to principle. 

Next month: A description of the tracking 
station chain. 



C. J. Haggerty Succeeds Dick Gray 

• • 

C. J. Haggerty, a long-time stalwart of the West Coast labor movement, 
on April 1st succeeded Richard J. Gray as president of the AFL-CIO Building 
Trades Department. Gray recently retired after 17 years' exemplary leader- 
ship of the Department. 

Haggerty, former California AFL-CIO executive secretary-treasurer, brings 
to his new job a wealth of experience that began with his membership in the 
Los Angeles Lathers Union, where he served as president of his Local. Later 
he became West Coast organizer for his international and was elected an inter- 
national vice president. Eventually he 
became secretary of the Los Angeles 
Building Trades Council, and then 
secretary-treasurer of the former AFL 
state body. 

When the California AFL and CIO 
bodies merged to form the California 
State Federation, he was named ex- 
ecutive secretary-treasurer. 

Born in Boston in 1894, Hag- 
gert^''s sound relations over the years 
with prominent California political 
figures and his zeal to promote the 
best interests of labor were invalu- 
able aids to the successful 1958 cam- 
paign to defeat "right-to-work" legis- 
lation in that state. In the same year 
he led labor's fight to elect as gover- 
nor Edmund C. Brown, a Democrat, 
with whom he is on intimate terms. 
With similar spii-it of dedication to 
the task at hand, Mr. Haggerty has 
served his community well in many 
capacities. 

It is apparent to all who are ac- 
quainted with the new president that 




the Building Trades Department has 
been fortunate, indeed, to acquire a 
man of his experience and stature to 
take over the exacting job relin- 
quished by Dick Gray. 

THE CARPENTER extends con- 
gratulations to Mr. Haggerty and 
best wishes for a long and successful 
term in office. 



13 



Pankonien Bequest Enriches Library Fund 

* * 



o 



SCAR PANKONIEN was a good union member in life. And even in 
death his dedication to the principles of brotherhood, charity, and 
concern for one's fellowman shines through. 

Brother Pankonien passed away in 1952. For years he had been a tower of 
strength in Philadelphia Local Union No. 454 and the Metropolitan District 
Council. He served his Local Union long and well in many capacities. When 
he passed away eight years ago, it was found that by the terms of his will the 
residue of his estate was to be equally divided between the Jefferson Medical 
College of Philadelphia and the Library Fund of our Home For Aged Mem- 
bers after certain primary obligations had been fulfilled. 
General 



Recently, the General Executive 
Board was notified that the primary 
obligations of the will had been car- 
ried out and that the Home Library 
Fund was to share equally with Jef- 
ferson Medical School in a residue of 
some $16,000 in cash and 90 shares of 
American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company stock. 

Board minutes for January, 1960 
contain the following notation: 

"General Executive Board was ad- 
vised of the bequest of Oscar Pan- 
konien, Local Union 454, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania to the Library 
Fund at Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, 
Florida, in the amount of $8,073.33 
and 45 shares of American Telephone 
and Telegraph stock. 

"It was moved, seconded and car- 
ried unanimously that an article be car- 
ried in THE CARPENTER advising 
the members of this bequest and that 
a scroll be placed in the library com- 
memorating this bequest. Preparation 
and placing of the scroll is to be left 
in the hands of the First General Vice 
President John R. Stevenson." 

Brother Pankonien's bequest came 
at a very fortunate time. The Library 
Fund was virtually exhausted as of 



the first of this year. There was bare- 
ly enough money in the Fund to re- 
new magazine subscriptions for 1960. 
However, thanks to Brother Panko- 
nien's concern for his union brothers, 
a Fund crisis has been temporarily 
averted. 

The Home library is one of the 
most popular features available to 
Home occupants. It is used very ex- 
tensively. 

The Library Fund was started in 
1946, after the Home and Pension 
Committee recommended such a fund 
to the 25th General Convention, 
which voted full approval. Establish- 
ment of the Fund was publicized in 
THE CARPENTER and the response 
was immediate. Local Unions and 
Councils immediately began making 
contributions. Ladies Auxiliaries were 
particularly active in supporting the 
Fund. Some $10,000 was raised to 
build up the Home Library. 

Over the past 10 years this money 
has been used to provide a variety of 
magazines for Home occupants. Since 
there are some five reading rooms in 
the Home, each of which requires a 
copy of a magazine, the drain on the 
Fund is heavy. As we mentioned be- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



fore, the Fund was all but depleted 
after magazine subscriptions for the 
year were renewed. 

Brother Pankonien's bequest has 
put the Fund back in the black, but 
another crisis is inevitable unless con- 
tributions keep coming in from time 
to time. A few dollars donated to the 
Librar^' Fund can contribute more to 
the contentment and welfare of Home 
occupants than almost any other one 
thing. 

Anv donations to the Fund should 
be sent to the Carpenters Home Li- 
brary Fund. In some instances Lo- 
cal Unions and Auxiliaries have paid 
directly for magazine subscriptions. 
This has led to an excess number of 
some magazines and a shortage of 
others. Only by having the Fund it- 
self responsible for all magazines and 
periodical purchases can a balanced 
program be maintained. 

However, there is a way in which 
contributions can be made directly to 
the Home Library. Home occupants 
are particularly fond of small books, 
popularly referred to as "pocket edi- 
tions." Any number of these can be 
used by the Home— westerns, who- 
dunits, histories, adventure stories, 



travel books, etc. Such books may be 
forwarded directly to: 

Mr. CM. Goddard 

(for Carpenters Home Library) 

P. O. Box 80 

Lakeland, Florida 
Thanks to the Library Fund, our 
Home has built up one of the best 
libraries to be found in any compar- 
able facility. Brother Pankonien's be- 
quest has given it a needed shot in 
the arm. His bequest may be small 
compared to some grants made by 
great tycoons such as Carnegie and 
Ford. But his came from the heart 
while some of the bigger philanthro- 
pies stemmed from guilty consciences 
brought on by exploitation of employ- 
ees who created the wealth. And 
there is room for suspicion that some 
of them even were motivated by tax 
advantages. 

Brother Pankonien gave because 
he wanted to give. With such an ex- 
ample the Library Fund is destined 
to endure and even grow for years to 
come, giving pleasure and content- 
ment to old timers who fought the 
good fight for a higher standard for 
the trade of carpentry and a better 
world for all people to live in. 



NATIONAL LABOR MUSEUM CONSIDERED 

The AFL-CIO is exploring the possibility of setting up a National Labor 
Museum in Washington, D. C. to tell the full story of the American labor 
movement through books, records and exhibits. 

The idea, presented to the Executive Council by the AFL-CIO Commun- 
ity Services Committee, calls for the gathering together in one place of mate- 
rial on the history of the labor movement where "the stories of the men and 
women who built it can be found by the scholar, the student, the union mem- 
ber or the interested citizen." 

One of the proposals for the name of such a museum is "Labor Hall of 
Fame," but AFL-CIO President George Meany told reporters that he felt 
that it should be broader than simply a tribute to prominent labor leaders 
and should serve as a needed center for the vast amount of material on 
labor's history, including its great figures, that is now scattered in many places. 
He expressed hope that such a museum could be set up. 



15 

Sometimes You Can Win 

Lyons, Oregon 
Mr. Peter E. Terziek, Editor 

Dear Mr. Terziek: 

I always find something of interest to me in "The Carpenter" and some- 
times information that means more immediate cash in my pocket. 

One such article was the recent series dealing with the inter-relationship 
of doctors and drug manufacturers. 

I am taking a drug (stilbestrol, 50 mg., one tablet twice daily) that cost 
me over $14.00 for a month's supply. 

After reading the final article in the series, "Why Do Drugs Cost So 
Much?" I asked my doctor to please write for me another one of his prescrip- 
tions for the 50 mg. stilbestrol tablets, because I would like to shop around 
to find out which drug store might charge less than I was paying. 

As I was then in Portland, where I had just seen my doctor at the Vet- 
erans Administration Hospital, I was going to do my first shopping at the 
Consumers Drug Corp., only to find out that it had moved to southern Cali- 
fornia because it could not make a go of it in Portland. 

Then on my way home from Portland, I tried shopping in Salem. I found 
one druggist (after his checking about 15 minutes) who could supply the 
drug to me for a little over eleven dollars per month. But I still felt that was 
too much. 

So I made a side trip to another town (Lebanon) on my way home. After 
a short bit of checking, a druggist there said he could give me a month's 
supply for $3.60. So I told him to please give me enough for two months. 
"Well, for a two months' supply we could make it an even $7.00," he said. 
To which I wanted to ask about a year's supply. 

So by just reading "The Carpenter," I now save enough each month on 
my little pills to pay my Union dues for two months, with money left over 
to pay my gasoline bill in making the trip after my little pills. 

I was so pleased with it all that I had to tell all our members at the 
Union meeting today, and I just thought you might like to know that your 
printing of the series, "Why Do Drugs Cost So Much?" was of much value. 

The current investigation of the drug industry raises the question in my 
mind as to just how many ways (that are assumed by the American people to 
be legal, and by many as even fair) there are of becoming unreasonably or 
excessively wealthy. I can only think of three ways: 

First way— over-charge those whom one serves. 

Second way— under-pay those who serve us. 

Third way— do both the first two ways at once. 

Can you or any of the readers of "The Carpenter" tell me of other ways 
(that are considered as legitimate by much of the American general public) 
that one may use, whereby he can amass or accumulate an excessive amount 
of monetary wealth? 

Just because much of the American general public is gullible and lack- 
ing in the ability to think straight, can that make a thing right or just? 

Very truly yours, 

L.D. 



p 



LANE 



UD 




HERE WE GO AGAIN 

As this column was being written, dis- 
armament talks were being resumed for the 
umpteenth time. Meanwhile, all nations 
were frantically trying to develop more and 
bigger missiles. The only comment we see 
fit to make is to tell the story of the lieu- 
tenant who had a company of soldiers out 
on a hike. After a full day of marching it 
finallj^ dawned on the looie that they were 
hopelessly lost. So when they came to a 
farmhouse the officer stopped to ask how 
far it was to camp. "About tliree miles," 
replied the farmer. 

So the marching resumed; but after a 
couple of hours had elapsed the officer 
again stopped at a farmhouse to ask how 
far it was to camp. Again the reply was, 
"About three miles." 

Several more hours of hoofing brought the 
company to another farmhouse instead of 
the camp. When the officer asked the usual 
question, he got the usual answer— "About 
three miles." 

Turning to his men, the shavetail re- 
marked: 

"One thing about it, boys, at least we're 
holding our own." 




153-SlEEHS- 



''llo, I didn't ask for thai raise 
today. I got laid off before 
1 had a chance lo see any- 
one about it!" 



HARD TO WIN 

At long last the daily press seems to 
recognize the threat that foreign-made 
goods create for American workers. More 
and more papers are editorializing on the 
need for a careful look at our whole for- 
eign trade policy. 

As we have pointed out many times be- 
fore, foreign trade is an exceedingly knotty 
problem. When foreign goods enter the 
United States and Canada at too low a 
price, the jobs of our workers are jeopar- 
dized. 

On the other hand, many American work- 
ers depend on exports for their livelihood. 
If we do not buy from foreign nations, 
they cannot buy from us, and thus the jobs 
relying on exports are undermined. 

The experts who have to hammer out 
our trade policies thus are impaled on the 
horns of a dilemma; if they do, they are 
damned; if they don't, they are also 
cussed. 

Their plight brings to mind the story 
of the hillbilly grandmother who was ad- 
vising her granddaughter on the eve of her 
wedding. 

"Child," said Granny, "I hope you have 
it easier than I did. All my wedded life I 
had two burdens to carry— Pa and the wood 
stove. Every time I turned to look at one, 
the otlier went out." 

• * * 

NO TRICK AT ALL 

According to official figures, the cost of 
living dropped a fraction of a point for 
January. However, January, 1960, was still 
nearly a point and a half higher than 
January, 1959. If it's any comfort to you, a 
travel magazine reports that the price of 
polo ponies has decreased, too. Swimming 
pools and pipe organs show little change. 

We never report on living costs but what 
we think of the story of the traveling sales- 
man who was called on the carpet by the 
auditor because of his expense account. 

"Your expense account amazes me," said 
the auditor. "Tell me, how do you manage 
to spend $16 a day for food?" 

"That's easy," replied the traveling man. 
"I skip breakfast." 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



NO SHOW, NO GO 

To add to the woes of the drug manu- 
facturers, brought on by recent Congres- 
sional price-gouging investigations, a for- 
mer researcher for one of them testified 
that many people will be killed by "mira- 
cle" drugs because drug firms are free to 
advertise in any way they see fit to doctors. 

Still, we hear no great clamor for a 
Landrmii-Griffin bill for the drug industry. 
Instead, the industry probably will be ad- 
monished to regulate itself. But don't hold 
your breatia until all this is accomplished. 

For no reason we can think of, this seems 
to be an appropriate place to tell of an 
incident that recently happened in Aus- 
tralia. 

An Australian newspaper reports that one 
morning not long ago a man called a taxi 
company and complained that a cab he 
ordered to take him to the Kingsford-Smith 
airport had not arrived. 

The girl who took the call apologized. 
"I'm very sorry the cab isn't there yet, sir," 
she said. "But don't worry. The plane is 
always late." 

"Well, it certainly vdll be this morning," 
the caller said sharply. "I happen to be 
the pilot." 

• • • 

TOMORROW MAY BE TOO LATE 

The war against water pollution suffered 
a serious setback last month when the Presi- 
dent vetoed a measure that would have 
obligated Uncle Sam to provide financial 
aid to communities interested in eliminat- 
ing the sources that contribute to contam- 
inated streams and lakes. 

Since a great deal of pollution stems from 
industrial wastes dumped into rivers and 
streams wdthout prior treatment. Big Busi- 
ness was opposed to the measure. And the 
Big Business point of view prevailed. 

Pollution already is a serious problem. 
With populations destined to increase dra- 
matically in the next generation, the prob- 
lem cannot help but become intolerable. 
Prompt action now might have avoided a 
national crisis at some future date. 

To our way of thinking, veto of the 
anti-pollution bill puts us in the position 
of the fisherman who wanted to send home 
a box of fish during a particularly warm 
September. He carefully boxed the fish and 
addressed the box to his wife. But he also 
affixed a label saying: "If not delivered in 
five days— never mind." 



THE PAUP FORMULA 

Shortly, the President's Conference on 
Children will be meeting to consider ways 
and means of combatting juvenile delin- 
quency and providing a more wholesome 
climate for youngsters to grow up in. 

Far be it from us to pose as experts in 
child rearing, but we like old Joe Paup's 
analysis of the current situation. 

"The juvenile problem," Joe once said, "is 
not so much ruling youngsters with a firm 
hand as it is using a firm hand with the 
ruler." 

• * • 

ALMOST A CINCH 

After several years of deficits, the budget 
seems to be headed for a fairly sizeable 
surplus. And the great debate is on as to 
what should be done with the extra money. 
Some want it used to reduce the national 
debt, others want the money spent to make 
the nation stronger tlirough conservation, 
public works, etc. A few even advocate tax 
cuts for next year. 

One way or another, the surplus will be 
gobbled up. And taxes will continue to bear 
down as hard as ever. Herb Shriner, In- 
diana's gift to TV, probably summed it up 
best when he said: 

"I think Congress will do something 
about hidden taxes this year. They won't 
do away with tliem, but they probably will 
hide tliem better." 







"He obeys my every command, 
J.B.I — Egad! If his kind 
could only volel" 




■•GREATE5T,AMMUAL LABOR-MAMAGEMENT SHOW OM EARTH 



Sfu».»^»cd»ndf,n^ccd6^ UNION LABEL AND SERVICE TRADES DEPT., AFL-CIO 



REMEMBER UNION INDUSTRIES SHOW 

, .^'^^^^i?"*^""' D. C, as the nation's Capital, is used to spectacles, promotions, and 
exiiibits. They are relatively common occurrences. But during the week of May 6 to 11, 
the Capital will see something entirely different when the Union Industries Show opens 
its doors at the Armory. 

The Union Industries Show is unique because it is staged jointly by management and 
labor. Through its multi-million-dollar array of ghttering exhibits the productive miracles 
American know-how can achieve when management and labor work in harmony are 
presented to the world in an endless array of unexcelled goods and services. Foreign 
legations and their staffs would do well to pay the Show a visit. Here, the fruitfulness of 
free enterprise will be spelled out, not in words or propaganda, but in products and services 
that set a standard for the world. 

As usual, our Brotherhood will sponsor one of the largest and most extensive exhibits 
m the Show. The District Council, with the advice and guidance of the General Office, is 
working hard to make our exhibit outstanding. It gives every promise of being just that. 

Those who live in the vicinity of Washington or expect to be in the area that week 
should reserve a date for attending the Show. It is all free and there is a tremendous list 
of free prizes and souvenirs. Remember the time and place: the Armory, during the week 
of May 6—11. 



19 



Elastic Roof Adds Plastic Bag 

* * 

A HUGE balloon that will never get free of the ground is helping speed 
completion of the new $20,000,000 "elastic roofed" post office at Provi- 
■ dence, Rhode Island, described in the November, 1959 issue. 
Actually a giant floating building within a building, it is designed to enable 
workmen to begin installation of sensitive electro-mechanical equipment while 
the hustle of construction of the new post office building continues around it. 

The inflated structure is the largest of its type in the world, measuring 200 
feet long, 80 feet wide and 40 feet high. 

The complex building plans for the post office called for roofing the struc- 
ture before the walls were erected. The roof, which is about the size of three 




'': .■''f-f !■/■'' 




A giant vinyl-covered nylon balloon being inflated at Providence, R. I., by technicians to 
speed up the installation of delicate machinery while construction work on the new post ottice 
continues. — ITT 



football fields, is nearing completion, 
but the builders were faced with the 
problem of how to install some deli- 
cate machinery even before the walls 
were up. Readers of the previous arti- 



cle will remember the "elastic" feature 
of the roof. 

Engineers of International Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Corporation's 
Intelex Systems, Inc., decided to lit- 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



erally take to the air. The result is a 
vinyl-covered nylon building, support- 
ed only by air and enclosing 12,500 
square feet of space. 

The inflated building took weeks of 
careful design which, in itself, posed 
special problems for engineers since 
die top center of the balloon is a 
saddle-back, dipping 14 feet in con- 
tour to permit clearance under a giant 
crossbeam which is part of the sup- 
port for the concrete roof. 



the door is closed behind it, and then 
the second door into the interior is 
opened, thus preventing the air from 
escaping and destroying the lifting 
power. 

Workmen enter through two small- 
er doors, each resembling the type 
found aboard naval vessels, and the 
doors snap-seal themselves once a 
person has moved past them. 

Within the balloon, workmen are 
beginning the installation of the first 






Automatic sorting and mail handling equipment being installed inside the giant inflated 
balloon, 200 feet long, 80 feet wide and 40 feet high. The balloon is used to protect equipment 
and men from cold weather and dust while the walls of the new automatic post office are erected. 
Trucks and workmen enter through air locks to prevent loss of pressure.— ITT 



Inflated by three motor-driven cen- 
trifugal fans, the balloon building, de- 
signed as a hyperbolic paraboloid, 
holds approximately a half million cu- 
bic feet of air. Pressure within the 
balloon is a half pound more per 
square inch than the normal pressure 
at sea level of nearly 15 pounds. 

As the balloon is inflated, its desire 
to soar is frustrated by anchors im- 
bedded 46 inches apart in the concrete 
floor. Each anchor is capable of re- 
sisting 500 pounds of lift. 

Much like a submarine, the balloon 
building has two air locks at either 
end to permit trucks and machinery 
to enter. A truck moves into the lock, 



of eleven semi-automatic letter sort- 
ers, each more than 64 ft. long and 11 
ft. high. The sorters will be a part of 
the electronic equipment that will 
make up this post office of tomorrow. 

And, although the weather outside 
has been below freezing, the men in- 
side the balloon work at room tem- 
perature in an atmosphere carefully 
controlled to provide freedom from 
dust and moisture changes. 

Completion of the structure seems 
to be "in the bag" for this fall. 
The unresolved question remains: 
what is going to become of the 
men the electric mail handlers dis- 
place? 



Progress Report 

Bad weather during late February and early March interfered with work 
on our new headquarters building in Washington a bit. However, work is still 
ahead of schedule. These two shots show what the job looked like on March 15. 




'., c. c. 

s sow, *!«MtrsCTj 
», 19*0 C^J riX S 




What's Ne\^ 



This column is devoted to new developments in materials and products of interest to members 
of crafts which are a part of the United Brotherhood. The articles are presented merely to inform 
our readers, and are not to be considered an endorsement by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. 

For information concerning products which are described in this column, please do not write to 
THE CARPENTER or the General Office, but address all queries to the manufacturer, whose name 
appears at the close of each article. 



Now available for the first time are 
adjustable shelf and pole brackets which 
eliminate notching and fitting. These brack- 
ets aie adjustable to fit closets with or 
\\itliout hook strips, say the manufacturers. 




The bottom section of the bracket swings to 
one side, leaving an open space for easy 
mounting. Contact Raymond Products Co., 
1536 West County Road B, St. Paul 13, 
Minn. 



A precision instrument to replace the old 
cornering system in staking out foundation 
lines has been introduced under the name 
"Minute Man Batterboard." The new bat- 




terboard is made of steel and aluminmn 
and comes equipped with sliding, built-on 
le\'els and retractable rules for each arm. 
A ball-and-socket corner joint allows level- 
ing of each horizontal arm independently 
without distortion to the other. Made by 
Richcy Manufacturing Co., 2801 Rochester 
Road, Springfield, 111. 



A new marking device called the No. 133 
Giant Magic Marker has 
been developed to write 
clearly and durably on all 
difficult surfaces such as 
concrete, rough lumber, 
metals, wall materials, wir- 
ings, etc. It has a stainless 
steel, ball-type, instant 
valve-action head on an un- 
breakable and refillable po- 
lyethylene "squeeze" bottle 
container. It writes with a 
new heavy lacquer- base 
opaque ink called Speedry 
D/O Ink. Colors available: 
black for light surfaces, 
white and yel- 
low for dark 
surfaces. Prod- 
ucts of Speedry Products, Inc., P. O. Box 
97, Richmond Hill, Jamaica 18, N. Y. 




A new 5% x 7-inch SpeedTable intro- 
duced by Speedway Division of Thor 
Power Tool Company converts SpeedWay 
No. 17 portable electric jig saw into sta- 
tionary jig. The SpeedTable is fastened to 
the edge of the workbench by means of 
screws and the inverted jig saw attached, 
beneath the jig table, by means of locking 




nut and bolt. A variety of difficult cuts are 
made with the portable jig thus fastened in 
stationary position. Jig table can be left at- 
tached to the bench and jig saw removed 
for portable use. Write the company for 
further information at: 1421 Barnsdale Rd., 
LaGrange Park, 111. 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



A Duplex Rabbet Plane and Fillester has 
been introduced by Great Neck Saw Manu- 
facturers, Inc. of Mineola, New York. Called 
the RP-8, this rabbet plane has two cutter 
seats: one for regular work, the other for 
buUnose work. An adjustable fence which 
can be used on either side of the plane 
regulates width of cut. A depth gauge is 
also included to regulate depth of cut. The 
rabbet plane can cut with or across the 




grain. The blade is made of special chrome 
alloy tool steel. Handle and body are cast in 
one piece. The body is black Japan finished 
and parts are plated against rust. Overall 
length— 8^/4 "; cutter is 1%". For further 
information write to Michael Fain Advertis- 
ing, 381 Fourth Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 



Stanley Tools, one of the oldest names in 
the business, has introduced a new forming 
tool called Surform No. 297. This new 
round file-type tool enlarges holes in wood, 
aluminum, plastic tile, etc., and cuts the 




same materials with controlled ease on 
decorative work, according to the makers. 
Rounds edges and cuts half circles on the 
edges of boards and beams. For further in- 
formation write Stanley Tools, Dept. PD, 
111 Elm St., New Britain, Conn. 



Activated by daylight and dark, an elec- 
tronic device automatically controls lights 
and other electrical appliances in home and 
industry. The MAJ-I switch comes in two 
models, M-lOO, equipped with cord and 




plug-in attachment for domestic installation, 
and M-200, a three-wire circuit for perma- 
nent outdoor use. It is further described as 
having 500 watt capacity and weighing less 
than 10 ounces. Address manufacturers, Po- 
laris Electronics Corp., 2600 Grand Ave., 
Kansas City, Mo. 



If you are interested 
in a handbook on car- 
pentry offered by D. A. 
Rogers, 5344 Clinton 
Ave., Minneapolis 
19, Minnesota, the au- 
thor claims this pocket 
sized book covers near- 
ly all the practical 
rules for laying out 
work. Can be carried 
in the pocket or tool 
chest. Write D. A. Rogers at above address. 




A ne\y tool set for mounting locks prac- 
tically eliminates the chances of error, say 
its manufacturers. Time Saver Tools, Inc., 




^Hordened steel 
drill guide socket 



Hardened steel 

drili guide socket 



Door Face adapte 
plate 



27 E. Park Ave., Mundelein, 111. Cylinder 
hole bits are available in sizes from Wa" 
to 2Vs" . Write the company for further in- 
formation. 



Editorial 




God Ain't Scientific In New Jersey 

One of these days there is going to be a big, fat revolution in this country: 
not a revolution against the government or the Constitution, but against the 
growing and increasingly arrogant band of head shrinkers who equate human 
beings with guinea pigs and believe that human emotions and reactions can 
be measured with the scientific precision of jelly bean-sorting. In this cate- 
gory falls the growing army of testers, prodders, interviewers, psychologists, 
motivational researchers, advertising experts, and all the other broad A guys 
who claim they can analyze and classify human beings the way a farmer 
candles eggs. 

More and more these egg-domed guys dominate our lives. They confront 
us on the job with questionnaires, aptitude tests, intelligence tests. They 
throw at us so-called scientific incentive plans and wage determinations. At 
home they blare at us from the TV set and through magazines and news- 
papers. In schools they harass and bedevil our youngsters with treatment that 
differs little from the treatment a bug on the end of a pin gets from a zoology 
student. 

Whichever way we turn they are analyzing us, measuring us, prodding us, 
and generally poking into our innermost souls. One of these days, enough 
people are going to get so fed up there is going to be an explosion. 

And to our way of thinking, the case of little Alice Mary Combs is going 
to hasten that day considerably. 

If you read the newspapers at all, you know that Alice Mary is a four- 
year-old girl who has lived with the Combs family of New Jersey since she 
was a baby. The arrangement originally was made by the Welfare Board. 
Over the years the family became attached to Alice Mary and asked to adopt 
her legally. But the Welfare Board decided otherwise. It came to the con- 
clusion that Alice Mary is too bright to be left in the hands of the Combs 
family. She wouldn't get an opportunity to develop her full potential while 
living in the Combs' home, they insist. 

God Himself must have some qualms in determining what children to 
allocate to whom, but not the New Jersey State Board of Child Welfare. Its 
oflBcials have all the answers. With their "scientific" tests, proddings, ques- 
tionnaires, etc. they know exactly who belongs where in this life. You under- 
stand that God does not have the advantages of the "scientific" measurements 
psychologists and sociologists have developed for them. 

Maybe Alice Mary is bright. But the Combses are no dumbbells either. 
He is a sheet metal apprentice whose take-home pay is $102 a week. He 
and Mrs. Combs have two daughters of their own. The Welfare Board has 
not yet suggested taking them away from the Combses, too, but the thought 
mav occur to them later if they succeed in recapturing Alice Mary. For all 
we know, they may be dreaming of the day when they take over from God 



THE C A K P E X T E R 25 

the job of deciding who should ha\e children and how many and what kind, 
because His ^^-ork isn't scientific. 

What this case all adds up to is this: how do }'0u measure the worth of a 
human being, and who is qualified to do the measuring? The W'elfare Board 
says the Combses are not suitable parents for Alice Mary because they do not 
have a lot of books in their home. 

Is the inference that people who own books are better than those who 
do not? Seems to us we read somewhere that Abe Lincoln's parents were 
prett}" short on books, too, but thev raised quite a son anvhow. On the other 
hand, Leopold and Loeb lived in houses filled with books, but thev com- 
mitted one of tlie most \^icious and senseless killings in Chicago historv. 

And juvenile delinquency no longer breeds exclusively in tenements and 
slums. More and more the silk stocking areas are responsible for a sizeable 
share of the rapists, hoodlums, unwed mothers, and juvenile coiu-t cases in any 
city. And not even the head shrmkers have been able to come up with any 
statistics proving that book readers are better citizens than non-readers. 

The Board also appears concerned that the Combses may not be inclined 
or financially able to send Alice ^L^ry to college. Is the inference that college 
people are superior or more desirable than those who do not get there? And 
if able kids from workinsi: class homes cannot aflFord colleo;e, doesn't the 
answer lie in re\'ising the educational s\'stem to make abilit\^ to learn rather 
than ability to pay the onh.- ^'ardstick for college entrance? 

It seems to us this is one time the head slirinkers ha\^e gone too far. 
Neither books nor college nor fanc\' surroundings make a good citizen. Hon- 
esty, sincerity and willingness to work do. And these characteristics can be 
found south of the railroad tracks just as readily as they can north. Nobody 
has a patent or a monopoly on them. 

And there is no way of measuring the true worth of an individual human 
being. If you use money as a measuring stick, Elvis Presley is the most im- 
portant man in the country because he will earn over a million in the next 
12 months. If an epidemic thi-eatens, the doctor is temporarily tlie most im- 
portant man in the community; if a dam threatens to flood a cit}% it is the 
man who can use dynamite; if it is a building that threatens to collapse, it is 
the carpenter who can do a fast shoring job. The truth of the matter is that 
every kind of work is important, and e\'ery person performing the work hon- 
estly and eflBciently is, too. 

For the head shrinkers to assume the role of God is just too much. On 
behalf of all the Combses everywhere we hope the Welfare Board gets its 
ears pinned back properly. 

The Future You Protect Will Be Your Own 
Last month the Building Trades Department held its annual legislative 
conference in the nation's capital. Thousands of building tradesmen from all 
50 states spent four days telling their Congressmen what labor needs and 
wants in the way of decent legislation to bulwark our sagging economy and 
get our people back to work. 

The legislative conference is a fine thing. It gives union leaders a chance 
to buttonhole their Congressmen and indoctrinate them ^^^th a few basic 

o 



26 THECARPENTER 

truths about economic facts of life. But other groups— some of whose aims 
are completely contrary to ours— buttonhole Congressmen in their offices, too. 
In fact, they do it almost daily. Against this kind of opposition, our lobbying 
ejfforts are comparatively puny. 

Why are they puny? Because most politicians know that working people 
often are lax about registering and voting. From 40% to 50% of all eligible 
voters fail to cast ballots on the average election day. The politicians know 
that the bulk of the non-voters come from the ranks of working people. So 
they downgrade suggestions of labor leaders proportionately. 

The program spelled out by the Building Trades Department and the 
AFL-CIO is not only a sound one, but also a necessary one if the economy is 
to get oflF dead center. For several years we have been barely holding our 
own while school needs grow, slums in our cities develop faster than they 
are being eliminated, and depressed areas sink farther into economic stag- 
nation. A bold new approach is needed. Such an approach is offered by 
organized labor's program. 

The Building Trades Conference got the ball rolling by carrying the 
story to Capitol Hill. But we doubt if this is enough. The real showdown 
will come on election day. If enough working people register and vote for 
candidates who have the welfare of all the people at heart, the economic 
bandwagon can be started along the pathway of progress once more. If they 
stay home as usual, more marking time will follow. 

Working people are gradually waking up to the fact that the ballot box 
has a very close connection with their future welfare. The various right-to- 
work campaigns and anti-labor drives have stung them into action. The 
percentage of working people registering and voting is increasing encourag- 
ingly. 

However, there still is a very long way to go. Too many reactionary Con- 
gressmen and State Legislators are elected by default because the working 
class voters too often say, "Let George do it." 

Registering and voting are two things citizens must do for themselves. 
No one else can do it for them. It takes a little time and individual initiative, 
but it is a very small price to pay for the privilege of being free and having 
a voice in one's own destiny. 

In other parts of the world, untold thousands of people are fighting and 
dying right now, trying to establish the right to vote. In the face of this, it 
seems incredible that millions of Americans could forego the right to vote 
without a twinge of conscience— particularly since our own right to vote was 
purchased at a high price in blood and tears by those who went before. 
However, such is the sad case. 

Next month, a number of states will be holding primary elections. If you 
live in such a state, time is running short. But whenever your particular state 
holds its primary, make sure you are qualified to vote. And equally important, 

make sure you do vote. 

• 

If This Ain't Deception, What Is? 

(Reprinted from News For Electric Consumers) 

The chairman of the Illinois commerce commission doesn't want to "in 
any way try to deceive the public." But he thinks the state regulatory agency 



THECARPENTER 27 

and utility companies "should more closely cooperate" on the "timing" of rate 
increase announcements and profit reports. 

Writing in a recent issue of Public Utilities Fortnightly, George R. Perrine 
declares "the usual timing of the average rate order release is wrong so far 
as the Illinois commission is concerned. The last six major rate cases that it 
has resolved have been rather large in dollar amount even though small per- 
centagewise." 

Perrine adds: "Blaring headlines have covered the front page of the daily 
major newspapers announcing the multimillion-dollar increases. Down in 
the main part of the story, if the reader gets that far, he can determine about 
how much this means to the individual consumer per month or year, which 
invariably is not a great amount of money, and quotes from remarks by the 
commission chairman or the president of the utility involved are frequently 
included." 

Now comes what is apparently the real sensitive spot: "Then," says the 
Illinois commission head, "as one turns to the financial page, he invariably 
finds that the utility concerned has just announced its quarterly earnings are 
far in excess of the year before." 

But Perrine isn't blaming the newspapers. "So far as the timing of these 
orders, there is no one to blame but the utility and the regulators. But I think 
this is one area where perhaps the commission and the company should more 
close]}' cooperate." 

"Mind you," he carefully points out, "I am not saying it should in any 
way try to deceive the public— I do not mean to imply this at all— but be- 
cause of the lack of public knowledge in regard to these matters, I think it 
would be highly advisable that the news releases be further spaced in point 
of time. 

"It is unfortunate that the average reader can see only the blaring head- 
lines that 'Utility Rates Are Increased by Millions' and does not pursue the 
article to see how little he is actually affected as an individual consumer." 

Despite his disclaimer about not wanting "to deceive the public," we sug- 
gest that it is unfortunate that the chairman of the Illinois agency which is 
supposed to protect consumers by properly regulating utilities, actually pro- 
poses what is, in effect, collusion by the commission and utility companies on 
the timing of rate increase announcements and profit reports. 

Perrine urges this "because of the lack of public knowledge in regard to 
these matters." We suggest that Perrine would be better serving the people 
and the state of Illinois-and in the long run, the utilities themselves-if he 
instead made some effort to counter the "lack of public knowledge in regard 
to these matters." 

Consumers are not stupid. If Perrine and other regulators would give them 
the facts, consumers would more often than not reach conclusions which 
would be just to the utilities, to the regulators and to themselves. 

But as long as regulators use the alibi of "lack of public knowledge" to 
justify manipulation of utility news, they will be suspect. They will give cre- 
dence to the popular consumer belief that too many regulators are controlled 
by the utilities they are supposed to regulate. And they will make consumers 
wonder if someone is indeed trying to "deceive the public." 



Official Information 




General OfiBcers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

M. A. HUTCHEhON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIEK 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

PRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New Yorlj 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 



Second District, RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventh District, LYLE J. HILLBR 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 



Eighth District, J. F. CAMBIANO 
17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fourth District, HENRY W. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
1834 N. 78th St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HUTCHESON, Chairman ; R. E. LIVINGSTON, Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of April, May and June, 
1960, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this circular should notify the General Secretary, Carpenters Building, Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana. 

« 

IMPO RTANT NO TICE 

In the issuance of clearance cards, care should be taken to see that they are 
properly filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary 
of the Local Union issuing same as well as the Local Union accepting the clear- 
ance. The clearance cards must be sent to the General Secretary's Department 
without delay, in order that the members' names can be listed on the quarterly 
account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained therein 
must be used. 



i 



Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 



^tntfvxHtn 



They still live in our memory, 
And vv'ill forever more. 



IS^0t in l^mtt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



AHLIN, OSCAR L., L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

ARCHIBALD, EARL, L. U. 450, Ogden, Utah 

ARNOLD, JAMES W., L. U. 1913, Van Nuys, 
CaL 

BAER, LELAND, L. U. 414, Nanticoke, Pa. 

BARCHESKI, CHARLES F., L. U. 129, Hazle- 
ton. Pa. 

BARONINS, JOHN, L. U. 1325, Edmonton, 
Alta. 

BARTELL, LEW, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 

BENELEIT, GUSTAV A., L. U. 143, Canton, 
Ohio 

BIDDLE, RAYMOND H., L. U. 311, Joplin, Mo. 

BLAKEMAN, JAMES, L. U. 115, Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

BLENDAUER, E. J., L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

BONACCORSl, PETER, L. U. 1050, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

BOND, LEWIS E., L. U. 1140, San Pedro, Cal. 

BRABEC, FRANK, L. U. 1786, Chicago, 111. 

BRANDENBERG, CHARLES, L. U. 1, Chicago, 
111. 

BROLIN, WILLIAM, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

BROWN, HENRY, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

BUCHER, ALFRED, L. U. 253, Omaha, Neb. 

BURMEISTER, RICHARD R., L. U. 2288, Oak- 
dale, La. 

BURNETT, CLYDE, L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

BURNETT, OTTO, L. U. 103, Birmingham, 
Ala. 

CALABRO, DEMETRIO, L. U. 1050, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

CAMERON-STUART, CLYDE C, L. U. 1, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

CAMPBELL, JOHN LEONARD, L. U. 472, 
Ashland, Ky. 

CARLSON, EINAR, L. U. 2094, Forest Park, 
111. 

CARLSON, NICHOLAS, L. U. 257, New York, 
N. Y. 

CHAPMAN, EARL N., L. U. 767, Ottumwa, 
Iowa 

CHEATHAM, CAP, L. U. 103, Birmingham, 
A!a. 

COZZOLINO, GIRO, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

CRANDALL, JOHN, L. U. 950, New York, 
N. Y. 

CRAVEN, ARTHUR, L. U. 266, Stockton, Cal. 

CRONIN, RICHARD, L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

CUPP, LUTHER, L. U. 1880, Carthage, Mo. 

DAVENPORT, LOUIS, L. U. 1846, New Or- 
leans, La. 

DAVIS, WILLIAM E., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

DEMPSTER, JAMES, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

DePALO, ANDREW, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

DESANTO, ANTHONY, L. U. 129, Hazleton, 
Pa. 

DICKEY, J. E., L. U. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

DiGIRALAMO, JOSEPH, L. U. 1050, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

DITMAN, MAURICE S., L. U. 101, Baltimore, 
Md. 



DIXON, H. M., L. U. 144, Macon, Ga. 
DOCKERY, C. C. Sr., L. U. 764, Shreveport, 
La. 

EHRNLUND, NILS, L. U. 257, New York. 
N. Y. 

ESCHBACK, CONRAD, L. U. 495, Streator, III. 

ESPOSITO, SALVATORE, L. U. 1050, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

ETTORE, LOUIS, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 

FAHEY, G. L., L. U. 1140, San Pedro, Cal. 

FINE, O. v., L. U. 266, Stockton, Cal. 

GAHMAN, OTTO, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

GERAGHTY, MICHAEL, L. U. 13, Chicago, 
III. 

GILBERT, H. W., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

GLENN, HARDING, L. U. 90, Evansville, Ind. 

GORES, JACK, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

GRABOWITH, FRED, L. U. 419, Chicago, 111. 

GRIFFIN, H. G., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

HALFORD, W. W., L. U. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 

HALL, M. W., L. U. 1371, Gadsden, Ala. 

HAMRICK, A. C, L. U. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

HANSEN, CHRISTIAN, L. U. 257, New York, 
N. Y. 

HANSEN, MAURICE A., L. U. 1913, Van Nuys, 
Cal. 

HARDIN, CLAUDE Sr., L. U. 103, Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

HARRIS, E. L., L. U. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 

HECKER, CLARENCE, L. U. 2435, Inglewood, 
Cal. 

HENDERSON, WILLIAM, L. U. 1050, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

HENDRICKSON, JAMES, L. U. 1880, Carthage, 
Mo. 

HENRICKSON, PAUL, L. U. 1913, Van Nuys, 
Cal. 

HILTZ, B. B., L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

HOFFMAN, FRED, L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

HOLLAND, C. T., L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 

HOLLANDER, ALFRED E., L. U. 253, Omaha, 
Neb. 

INGRAM, A. A., L. U. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

JACKS, F. A., L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 

JAEGER, FRED H., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

JANKOWSKI, STANLEY, L. U. 13, Chicago, 
111. 

JENSEN, HARRY C, L. U. 253, Omaha, Neb. 

JOHNSON, CHARLES, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 
111. 

JOHNSON, LEON, L. U. 311, Joplin, Mo. 

JOHNSON, LEONARD G., L. U. 4, Davenport, 
Iowa 

JOHNSTON, E. M., L. U. 1325, Edmonton, 
Alta. 

KARLSEN, REIDAR, L. U. 787, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

KEENAN, THOMAS, L. U. 465, Ardmore, Pa. 

KNIGHT, F. G., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas 

KORING, JOHN L., L. U. 90, Evansville, Ind. 

KOWALIG, PETER, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 

KREWUSIK, STEVE, L. U. 1325, Edmonton, 
Alta. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



LAIDMAN, DAVE, L. U. 1367, Chicago, III. 

LANE, WILLIAM H., L. U. 281, Binghamton, 
N. Y. 

LaRIVIERE, W. E., L. U. 266, Stockton, Cal. 

LARSH, LEO, L. U. 13, Chicago, lU. 

LEO, JOSEPH, L. U. 2094, Forest Park, III. 

LINDEBLADE, SIGFRIED, L. U. 495, Streator, 
111. 

LINDOFF, GUSTAV, L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

LIVINGSTON, BRUCE L., L. U. 103, Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

LOBB, PAUL, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

LORDEN, LEO P., L. U. 2164, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

LUEPKE, GERHARD, L. U. 1913, Van Nuys, 
Cal. 

LUGGI, ARMAND, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

LUND, ROBERT, L. U. 787, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MASON, TERRY, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 

MAZZUCCA, FRANK, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

McCRACKEN, ERNEST, L. U. 1880, Carthage, 
Mo. 

McDonald, WILLIAM a., L. U. 337, Detroit, 
Mich. 

MICHON, ALBERT M., L. U. 1, Chicago, III. 

MILLAGE, ELMER C, L. U. 166, Rock Is- 
land, IP. 

MILLER, ALBERT A., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

MIXON, A. G., L. U. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

MIZE, CLARENCE E., L. U. 974, Baltimore, 
Md. 

MORALES, RAFAEL E., L. U. 1967, Santurce, 
San Juan, P. R. 

MORAN, ELMUS T., L. U. 101, Baltimore, 
Md. 

MOSHER, CLARENCE, L. U. 1449, Lansing, 
Mich. 

MOTT, NELSON G., L. U. 2288, Oakdale, La. 

MUNDIE, WILLIAM, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

MURAWSKI, ANTHONY S., L. U. 1160, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

MURTHA, MICHAEL, L. U. 115, Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

MYERS, JOHN B., L. U. 230, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MYRICK, J. F., L. U. 1518, Gulfport, Miss. 

NELSON, FRED, L. U. 2288, Oakdale, La. 

NOCELLA, PASQUALE, L. U. 1050, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

OLSEN, SVERRE, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 

OLSON, CHARLES, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 

OLSON, OSCAR B., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

PATANE, JOSEPH, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

PETERSIMES, LEO, L. U. 2435, Inglewood, 
Cal. 

PILLA, FRANK, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PUGH, CLIFFORD, L. U. 200, Columbus, 
Ohio 

RAVE, WILLIAM A., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

RAWLETT, HENRY E., L. U. 132, Washington, 
D. C. 

REICHENBACK, ROBERT, L. U. 115, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

RIDDLE, V. L., L. U. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

RINNE, SULO, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 

RIVERA, JOSEPH, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

ROCKWELL, A. K., L. U. 546, 0!ean, N. Y. 

RUFI, TROY PHILLIP, L. U. 1478, Redondo 
Beach, Cal. 

RUOPP, FRITZ, L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

SALLEY, DAVID R., L. U. 1846, New Or- 
leans. La. 



cmoriattt 

SAND, NELS, L. U. 1325, Edmonton, Alta. 
SCHULTZ, FRED C, L. U. 4, Davenport, 

Iowa 
SHAW, L. A., L. U. 144, Macon, Ga. 
SHE WRY, ARTHUR, L. U. 416, Chicago, 

111. 
SINDONI, JOSEPH, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
SMITH, A. H., L. U. 1371, Gadsden, Ala. 
SMITH, COYLE S., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
SMITH, FRANK, L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 
SMITH, JAMES LLOYD, L. U. 225, Atlanta, 

Ga. 
SMITH, O. J., L. U. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 
SMITH, ROBERT, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
SOLLEE, C. H., L. U. 1913, Van Nuys, Cal. 
SPIERS, THOMAS B., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 
STALLA, FREDERICK, L. U. 1426, Elyria, 

Ohio 
STRAIT, GEORGE E., L. U. 1, Chicago, 111. 
STUBSTAD, BERNT, L. U. 787, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
THOMPSON, CHARLES, L. U. 257, New York, 

N. Y. 
TIBBS, EVERETT C, L. U. 90, Evansville, Ind. 
TOWNSLEY, WILLIAM G., L. U. 1325, Ed- 
monton, Alta. 
TWIGG, CLYDE VINCENT, L. U. 4, Davenport, 

Iowa 
URQUEHART, IRA P., L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Van NAMEE, SIMON, L. U. 495, St: eator. 111. 
VEGHTE, THEO. F., L. U. 1913, Van Nuys, 

Cal. 
WAKELIN, GARDNER, L. U. 1752, Pomona, 

Cal. 
WALDEN, L. A., L. U. 1964, Vicksburg, Miss. 
WALLSTROM, R. Sr., L. U. 266, Stockton, CaL 
WATERS, S. C. L. U. 225, Afanta, G^. 
WATSON, RALPH, L. U. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 
WEBER, NICK M., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
WEED, FRED, L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
WELCH, EARL T., L. U. 1055, Lincoln, Neb. 
WELSCH. ROY, L. U. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
WENTZELL, JAMES S., L. U. 33, Boston, 

Mass. 
WEST, BEN, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
WESTBERG, OSCAR, L. U. 15, Hackensack, 

N. J. 
WHITMAN, E. R., L. U. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
WIDEMARK, AXEL, L. U. 791, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
WILLIAMS, E. L., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
WILLIAMS, J. v., L. U. 642, Richmond, Cal. 
WIMMER, LEONARD O., L. U. 169, East St. 

Louis, II. 
WISKOW, WILLIAM, L. U. 299, Union City, 

N. J. 
WISNER, CHARLES, L. U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
WOFFORD, J. W., L. U. 266, Stockton, Cal. 
WOMBOLD, S. J., L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
WOOD, LAWRENCE M., L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
WOODWORTH, W. R., L. U. 213, Houston, 

Texas 
WYSOCKI, JOSEPH J., L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
YARBROUGH, RAY, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 
YODELIS, VICTOR, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
ZALISAK, THEODORE, L. U. 13, Chicago, III. 
ZARIN, ALEX, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 
ZILLI, ALBERT, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
ZORN, PAUL C, L. U. 260, Waterbury, Conn. 
ZUNIGA, RICHARD, L. U. 266, Stockton, Cal. 



31 



Ho\^ to Buy 



Know Your Social Security 

• • 

By Sidney Margolius, Labor's Consumer Expert 

SOME people who became eligible for Social Security payments under 
recent changes still haven't applied, officials report. 

One of the largest groups believed to be passing up benefits is elderly 
parents who were dependent on deceased workers. Another group that some- 
times fails to apply is totally disabled workers. 

Ex'en wives do not always realize they and the children can get payments 
if tlieir breadwinner dies. Too, families often are unaware the children can 
have payments if a working mother dies even though the father still lives. 

But while many people forfeit benefits for lack of knowledge, harsh rules 
and secretive procedures have blocked many disabled workers who did apply. 
Representatives of several unions and 
the AFL-CIO Social Security Depart- 
ment have protested present rules un- 
der which a disabled worker in one 
state may qualify for benefits, while 
officials in another state may deny a 
similar claim. 

Let's first get the record straight 
on dependent parents. If you pro- 
vide more than half the living ex- 
penses of an elderly parent, he or she 
can get payments if anything happens 
to you. Under the 1958 amendments 
your parent is eligible even though 
you also leave an eligible child or 
wife. 

In fact, dependent parents of cov- 
ered workers who died any time 
since 1939 can still apply for pay- 
ments. 

In the case of disabled workers, tlie 
Social Security Administration has 
screened its files to locate those made 
eligible by the recent easing of work 
requirements. But from some, it never 
got applications and can't tell who 
they are. Workers disabled even as 
long ago as October, 1941 still have 
until June 30, 1961 to get full benefits. 



Young disabled workers can't get 
payments until they're 50. But they, 
too, need to apply by June 30, 1961 
to have their wage records frozen 
retroactively. A worker who had not 
accumulated enough coverage to be 
fully insured when he became dis- 
abled, could lose all rights to pay- 
ments if he doesn't apply for the 
"freeze." 

The 1958 amendments also made 
eligible for payments the dependent 
children of disabled workers getting 
benefits, and their wives if over 62 
or with dependent children in their 
care. 

The disability payments are really 
one of the most important features 
of modern Social Security. They pro- 
tect you against a universal fear of 
workers— that they may become crip- 
pled by accident or illness and unable 
to earn a living. 

But there are two big loopholes 
which have frustrated many disabled 
workers and urgently need fixing. 

One is the present requirement that 
you must be 50 to get payments. Ac- 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



tually, younger disabled workers need 
payments even more than older ones. 
They generally have more depend- 
ents. The age-50 reqiurement could 
be eliminated without increasing the 
present disability-insurance tax you 
pay, deputy Social Security Commis- 
sioner George Wyman recently said. 

The other loophole is the present 
vague rule about what constitutes "to- 
tal disability," and the fact that Con- 
gress left it to the state rehabilitation 
agencies to determine who is wholly 
disabled. 

An Alabama union official, Ther- 
mon Phillips, recently charged that 
the law is being administered "on the 
assumption that a claimant for disa- 
bility benefits or for a wage freeze 
must practically be dead." He re- 
vealed that some workers disabled 
enough to qualify for company pen- 
sions have been turned down for So- 
cial Security disability benefits. 

Similarly, a worker in West Vir- 
ginia qualified for insurance company 
benefits but was denied Social Secur- 
ity payments, U. S. Representative 
Cleveland M. Bailey of that state re- 
ports. 

In Oregon, reported the late Sena- 
tor Richard L. Neuberger, the state 
rehabilitation division rejects 50 per 
cent of the Social Security disability 
claims compared to a national average 
of 38 per cent. 

In Montana, U. S. Representative 
Lee Metcalf has said, miners consid- 
ered totally disabled by state silicosis 
boards have been denied Social Se- 
curity benefits. Dr. William A. Saw- 
yer, medical consultant for the Inter- 
national Association of Machinists, 
also has testified to Congressional in- 
vestigators that a common set of dis- 
ability standards is needed by Federal 
and State agencies and that the state 
examiners and reviewers need more 



training to help solve the Social Se- 
curity disability argument. 

There's even at least one case in 
which a man approved for a V. A. dis- 
ability pension was turned down by 
Social Security. 

The real problem is that Congress 
never defined "total and permanent 
disability" very closely, and the pres- 
ent interpretation is a severe one. A 
legless man who can't work at his 
usual occupation still might be able 
to run a newsstand, thus, might be 
denied benefits. That's what a Social 
Security official told this reporter. 

If you ever do become disabled, 
note that the ofiicials check closely 
into your ability to travel to a job, 
even if you haven't got one. If you're 
able to come to the Social Security 
office to make your claim, there's al- 
ready a question in their minds. The 
officials will further try to determine 
whether you can do any "substantial 
gainful work" even at home. 

That doesn't mean they can tell a 
skilled worker he can address enve- 
lopes even if housebound. They're not 
supposed to reduce your work status 
that much. But they'll still evaluate 
how much work of any kind you may 
be able to do. 

Even the American Bar Association 
has criticized the fact that the stand- 
ards used to determine disability 
aren't revealed to the public, and that 
the advice medical consultants give 
examiners is kept secret from claim- 
ants. 

The AFL-CIO Social Security De- 
partment is battling to get this prob- 
lem straightened out through more 
liberal standards and giving the Fed- 
eral Social Security agency final say 
in judging whether a worker is dis- 
abled. At present the Federal agency 
merely can "suggest" that a state give 
further consideration if it feels state 
officials were too severe. 



T II E C A R P E N T E R 33 

Even if turned down on a Social strata your disability. Alxnit one out 
Security claim you can ask for an ap- of seven such recent disability ap- 
peal—on other types of claims as well peals was successful. The rate of 
as disability. You'll then get a hear- success on Social Security appeals 
ing before an impartial examiner, and of all types is a bit higher— about 
a chance to tell your story or demon- one out of six. 



FEDERAL STANDARDS FOR JOBLESS PAY ESSENTIAL 

'The states have failed" in setting up adequate unemployment insurance 
laws and "it is now clearly up to Congress to enact legislation that will put a 
floor under the state programs." 

This analysis of the jobless benefits system in the United States, was made 
by the AFL-CIO Executive Council in a statement calling on Congress for 
prompt action. 

"Unless Congress enacts permanent improvements this session," the state- 
ment warned, "it will be too late to be of any help for the unemployed of 
the next recession. The business decline predicted to begin in 1961 leaves 
barely enough time for action by Congress and subsequent response by the 
states," 

The statement called sharp attention to the fact that in 1954 President 
Eisenhower called on state legislatures to extend protection to more workers, 
to 26 weeks where they were lower than that. 

"When the President made this plea, no state had met these goals," the 
statement declared. "Today— six years later— only one state has met them. 

"By the President's own standards, the states have failed. In these six 
vears this country has been through two recessions with millions of unem- 
ployed suffering from the shortcomings of the state programs." 

The Council declared that it is only by the Federal government laying 
down adequate standards "that the competition for low-cost (and therefore 
low-benefit) programs between states can be halted. Employer contributions 
average only one-third of the tax rate of 20 years ago. The weekly benefit 
amounts have declined substantially in every state relative to that wage loss 
which jobless payments are supposed to restore." 

The Council endorsed the Federal Standards bill now before the House 
and Senate and called for urgent action. 



ANOTHER MYTH GOES 

.\nother employer myth has blown up— the myth that unemployment compensation 
for strikers would "encourage more strikes." 

New York and Rhode Island are the only states that give jobless benefits to strikers. 
Yet, figures from the U. S. Labor Department show that those two states have fewer 
striicers, per capita, than New Jersey. 

Between 1956 and 1958, latest figures available, total man-days in New Jersey lost 
in strikes as a percentage of the total working time were higher than those for New York 
and Rhode Island, were equal to the national average in 1956 and 1958, and above the 
national average in 1957. 

The figures were cited by Paul Krebs, president of the New Jersey Industrial Union 
Council, in tagging management charges as "specious." The Council is pushing a proposal 
in New Jersey to authorize jobless payments for strikers. 





/WcanderingH 



By Fred Goetz 




In the February issue of THE CAR- 
PENTER, ye old editor, Peter E. Terzick, 
came up with what I think is a good idea. 
He suggests sending in some good old- 
fashioned recipes for camp cooking . . . the 
kind of stick-to-the-rib vittles that can be 
whomped up without the aid of one of 
those built-in ovens— pre-heated jobs. 

You know, something involving fish, 
game, berries and the like. 

So get out your outdoor-cooking memo 
book, or dream up one on the spur of the 
moment and send it along to: 



Fred Goetz 
Dept. OMLK 
920 S.E. 11th St. 
Beaverton, Oregon 



The six best recipes will receive one of 
the illustrated Luhr Jensen Lure Kits. 

This outdoor-recipe contest is open to all 
members of the Carpenters Union in good 
standing and the members of their family. 

Be sure to state your Union AFFILIA- 
TION! 

Deadline for judging the recipes shall be 
May 5th and the winners will be announced 
in the July issue. 

o o * 

Here's some take-it-for-what-it's worth 
data to shooters: 

"In dry shooting when pointing at a mov- 
ing target with your UNLOADED rifle, al- 
ways swing a bit ahead of it before pulling 
the trigger. And be sure to follow through 
with your swing after the hammer falls. 
You cannot hit a moving target by shooting 
straight at it, so remember that the "follow 
through" is as important in shooting as it 
is in golf. Shooting behind the target is a 
very common error, generally caused by 
stopping the swing of the rifle. 
« « « 

Betcha didn't know that in 1913, robins 
were classed as game birds in some south- 
ern states . . . The snapping turtle never 
feeds out of water because it cannot swal- 



low unless its head is submerged . . . The 
nuthatch is the only tree-climbing bird that 
climbs down the trunks of trees— head first 
. . . The goby, a curious frog-like fish of 
Africa, climbs trees to feed on wood ants. 
Often one goby will climb while others 
stay below to nab dislodged victims. 
* * « 

A letter from B. D. Patton of 4645 N. 
Harrison Street, Fresno, California, says that 
his dad, a Journeyman Carpenter of Local 
701, is one of the most avid of bass fisher- 
men. 

According to the following photo he 
sent in, his dad is also one of the most 
ingenious for sneaking up on those big 
largemouth in the hard-to-get, seldom-fished 

places. 




We've heard of a few other guys that 
have got up a similar rig and most of them, 
to give them more get-up-and-go, use 
swim fins on their feet and keep a ping- 
pong paddle handle handy for on-the-dime 
maneuvering. 

» « * 

Here's some verbal meandering concern- 
ing the frequently asked question, "Can fish 
hear?": 

In the laboratory tests it was discovered 
that fish were perfectly capable of hearing 
many of the frequencies of human speech. 
However, out on the stream it's a different 
story, for there a great loss in intensity 
occurs when sound passes from air to water. 
So, unless your stream partner is a basso- 
profundo and shouting at the top of his 
voice, I don't think it is necessary to good 
fishing that he shut up. 

Boat fishing presents a somewhat differ- 
ent problem. Using the bottom of the boat 



THE CARPENTER 



35 



as a soundboard, vibrations like the drop- 
ping of a tackle box or the scraping of 
hard-soled shoes are transmitted directly 
to the water. Again in stream fishing, the 
impact of a heavy foot on hard bottom 
streams acts as a vibration-transmitter. 

Remember, if you put any sound vibra- 
tions in the water, the fish can hear all 

about it. 

* « * 

A letter from Mrs. R. Markstrom, wife 
of Ruben Markstrom, a member in good 
standing of Local 181, Chicago, for 30 years, 
tells us that she and Ruben are among 
the most outdoor -minded folk ever. 

Ruben built a 14-foot, 225-pound out- 
board in the living room— of their second- 
floor apartment! With the aid of friendly 
neighbors they succeeded in getting it out 
of the back window, down on the street 
and onto a trailer. 

They also built a cabin in Minnesota, 
town of Emily, Chain o' Lakes region, about 
600 miles from Chicago. 

Mrs. Markstrom says: "It was built for 
our retirement in about four years— Lord 
willing— and provides real outdoor pleasure 
for us, our nephews, brothers and their 
wives and children. We prescribe outdoor 
meandering for the healthy, the ill, the 
young and the old— it's good for all." 




Here's a photo of Ruben and his fishing 
pals, George and Mike, doing a little pis- 
catorial prospecting with the new boat on 
Ruth Lake, near their cabin home. 

Ketchin' any, fellows? 
« * « 

Didja know that: The largest reptile in 
modern times is the leatherback, a marine 
turtle. Specimens have weighed almost 1,- 
500 pounds and measured eight feet in 
length . . . The trumpeter swan, with maxi- 
mum weight of 40 pounds, is the heaviest 
flying bird in North America . . . While the 
owl cannot move its eyes in their sockets, 
it does have a great area of vision because 
it can rotate its head 273 degrees. . . . 



A recent survey on a famous eastern 
brook trout stream indicated the following: 
Fly fishermen were more than twice as effi- 
cient as bait fishermen in taking large trout; 
almost four times as efficient as bait fisher- 
men in taking small trout. Fly fishermen 
also consistently took bigger brookies than 
bait fishermen. 

One of the most philosophical attitudes I 
have ever heard concerning the piscatorial 
arts was brought out by an old-timer, a' 
fishin' fer crappies. 

In reply to my inquiry— "Having any 
luck?" he said, "Ketchin' is turrible. Son, 
but the fishin' is always good." .... 

# « « 

"Conservation is not a subject to be writ- 
ten about merely as recreation, something 
you can take or leave, turn on or off." 

"Conservation is an attitude, a part of our 
living, as important as the air we breathe." 

"Conservation is a way of life; conserva- 
tion is a crusade. ..." 

# » « 

The Secretary of the Michigan United 
Conservation Clubs says the term "litter- 
bug" is much too innocent-sounding for the 
fellow who clutters up our land and water 
with bottles, cans, papers, etc. 

He suggests the name "Litter Bum." 

# e o 

Somebody once said: "If a gal is in love 
with a fisherman, she should learn to fish." 
It means she's sharing his fun on a partner- 
ship basis— a good start for a happy mar- 
riage. 

« * # 

Following is one man's answer (your writ- 
er's) to the question: How do you use a wet 
and dry fly, fishing for trout v/ith a spin- 
ning outfit? 

Answer: There are several productive 
methods of fishing wet and dry flies with 
a spinning outfit. The most popular method 
of spin-fishing with a wet fly is to use a 
moderately light line around 4-pound test, 
a 4-foot leader, 2 to 3-pound test. Use split 
shot, enough to get the cast out, placed 
about 18 inches from the fly, and drift it 
on the bottom. 

A small, clear plastic bubble widi a re- 
movable cap for inserting weight is used 
in spin-fishing with a dry fly. Again a 4- 
pound test line, a 4-foot leader of 3-pound 
test with the weighted bubble at the end. 
The fly is secured in the junction loop of 
line and leader by virtue of an 8-inch 
dropper line. 



36 



T ME C A R P E X T E R 




GUARD YOUR FAMILY 




EISMISIMl^MD 




I ^,1.".-., ,-^ '■"■'■. i'.- 1'^3V'-7C..S?^--" .^ ^ ."'A «&-,• T.Ti^iPSSKS; .", •„', 



CorrospondQncQ 




This Journal is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 



DETROIT COUNCIL GRADUATES 183 APPRENTICES 

Some 400 guests were present at the Detroit District Council's 14th Annual Apprentice 
Graduation Banquet to help welcome some 183 young men into journeyman status. 

This was one of the largest apprenticeship classes ever graduated by the Detroit Dis- 
trict Council. 

Representatives of management, education and municipal government, as well as 
many distinguished labor officials, were on hand to pay tribute to the young men who 
have tlie skill and tenacity to finish a difficult task they set themselves 4 years before. 







JJ 


A 


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'» %,^ J- \ 


^ m wfH* ^' ' '^ '" *v ' *• '■^' # ■ ■'*' Vy \**-" "% 



Featured speakers of the evening were Finlay C. Allan, Assistant to General President 
Hutcheson and a former secretary-treasurer of tlie Detroit Building Trades Council; L. M. 
"Boots" Weir, secretary-treasurer of the Carpenters District Council and president of tlie 
Michigan State Building Trades Council. 

Short addresses were also delivered by Corporation Council Nathan H. Goldstick, 
pinchhitting for an ailing Mayor Louis C. Miriani. 

Graduating Apprentice Donald Murray acted as spokesman for the class. 

Brother Allan extended the best wishes of General President Hutcheson and all tlie 
officers of the United Brotherhood. To the graduating apprentices he said: "You are the 
young men to whom we must look to take over tlie construction industry and use your 
talent and skills to advance current metliods." 

He pointed out to the new journeymen tliat tlie way was open to them to go as far 
and as fast in the construction industry as their talents and ambitions will take them. He 
urged them to take an active part in union affairs and help tlie organization elevate tlie 
status of carpentry to the high pinnacle it deserves. He pointed out that pure economic 
conditions had caused a setback in construction over the past 2 years, but tliat in 1959 
the Carpenters Union had gained some 600 members in the five-county area surrounding 
Detroit: an indication that the industry is bouncing back with vigor. 

Brother Weir summed up his address by saying: "I think you have chosen a good 
trade and I think it will be good to you." 

All the new journeymen are graduates of the Detroit Apprenticeship Training School. 
The class was composed of 145 carpenters, 31 floor decorators, and 7 millwrights. 

The Detroit District Council traditionally has devoted a great deal of time and effort 
to the promotion of apprenticeship training, and the size and quahty of the current gradu- 
atini: class is an indication that the program is progressing steadily. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



DENVER OLD TIMERS ARE RUGGED LOT 

Maybe it's the pure mountain air, maybe it's the good working conditions estabUshed 
by tlie union, or maybe it's a combination of the two, but whatever the cause, Denver 
seems to provide a healtliy environment for carpenters. Denver Local Union No. 55 on 
the night of February 17 tendered a testimonial dinner to its old timers. Believe it or not, 
32 Brothers were eligible to attend as 50-year members. Length of membership ranged 
up to 60 years. 

It was a fine affair. Nineteen of tlie old timers were able to be present. The other 
13 were indisposed or out of towoi. Board member J. O. Mack was on hand to help make 
the evening a success. Following an excellent dinner. Board member Mack presented the 
old timers with 50-year commemorative pins. 




Pictured above and reading from left to right, are some of the old timers whom Local Union 
No. 55 recently honored. 

First row — Otto Anderson, 52 years' membership; Walter A. Jouno, 58; Marco Sparks, 59; 
John E. Corcoran, 59; Lewis Jones, 51; Harry Stratton, 55; and James Garrison, President of the 
Local. 

Second row — Michael Sweeney, 54 years' membership; Axel Hanson, 51; Iver Villa, 52; 
Arthur English, 52; George Walton, 51; and Ben Mi.ler, 51. 

Third row — George Peterson, 50 years' membership; Oscar Ekblad, 53; Richard O. Shively, 
Financial Secretary; Charles Moore, 51; Edward Amos, 54; Anthony Epping, 50; M. E. Strom- 
quist, 54; Robert England, 55; J. O. Mack, General Executive Board member. Sixth District; and 
Harry Stewart, Local vice president. 

Members unable to be present and, therefore, not in the picture are: John Groholek, 52 years' 
membership; I. L. Martz, 52; William A. Slaughter, 53; Harry E. Allen, 60; G. A. Carlson, 
58; C. A. Stromquist, 60; John Anderson, 55; John D. Clark, 55; E. Lindstrom, 56^ H. A. 
Redford, 54; A. H. Ruehmann, 55; A. R. Millington, 51; and Andy Rumpeltes, 51. 

Denver was barely more than a western frontier town when most of these old timers 
joined the United Brotherhood. Over the past half-century they helped change Denver from 
somediing resembling a movie set for "Gunsmoke" into a thriving, bustling city that domi- 
nates a vast section of the Rocky Mountains. And they helped to pilot Local Union No. 
55 through many perilous and uncertain times. Naturally, the union is proud of every one 
of its half-century veterans. 

Percentagewise, it is doubtful if any union in our Brotherhood has a higher proportion 
of 50-year members. And the Local is looking forward to the day when it will be able 
to award 75-year pins to some of its rugged old timers. 



EIGHTEEN ATTAIN JOURNEYMAN RANK IN TUCSON 

In view of the rapid changes that are taking place in technology and materials, no 
one can definitely say what the construction industry will be like a generation from now. 

Whatever changes take place, southeastern Arizona can be assured of an adequate supply 
of really skilled craftsmen, thanks to the apprenticeship training program jointly maintained 
by the Southeastern Arizona District Council and their employers. 

At an apprentice initiation meeting held on February 2, Local Union 857 welcomed 
18 graduating apprentices into journeyman status. These young men, through four years of 
rigorous training, proved their ability to handle any carpentry job that may come up. 



THE CARPENTER 



39 



Fifteen 
Union 857 



of the eighteen who recently were initiated into journeyman status by Local 
of Tucson, Arizona, are shown in the picture, reading from the left to right: 




Front row — Alfonso Macias, Everett Nelson, Tony Rodriquez, Carlos Hava, Frederic Roof, 
Walter Roszko, and Georgfe Reitz. 

Back row — -Carl Nesbitt, John Rigas, Gerald Pelaar, Edward Blankenheim, Gerald Kornelle, 
Robert Lamb, Harold Yettaw, and Richard Ward. 

Initiated but not shown in this picture were: Raymond LaRue, John Lopez, and Harry Millsap. 
Scheduled for initiation at this meeting but unable to attend were Clyde Baker and Edward 
Mager. 

• 

TESTIMONIAL DINNER HONORS 6 OLD TIMERS 

Late last fall, Local Union No. 762, Quincy, Mass., tendered a testimonial dinner to a 
group of its members who have devoted more than 50 years of their lives to the advance- 
ment of tlie trade of carpentry and the growth of the United Brotherhood. 

Six oldtimers were the 
guests of honor. The roster of 
veteran members was headed 
by Victor Olson whose mem- 
bership dates back 61 years. 
Other veteran members hon- 
ored included George A. Oster, 
with 50 years of membership, 
who is president and business 
representative of the union; 
John Mattson, 54 years a mem- 
ber, and Dave Wohlander, 50 
years a member; Charles Child- 
stedt, only living charter mem- 
ber, and Gustav Oster, who 
was president of the Local for 
a quarter of a century. Unfor- 
tunately, Brothers Childstedt 
and Oster were unable to at- 
tend because of ill health. 

Si>eakers of the evening in- 
cluded Mike Harrington of Lo- 
cal No. 56, who is president 

of the Suffolk Council of Carpenters, Congressman James Burke; Quincy Mayor Amelio 
Delia Chiesa; City Council President James Mclntj're; Councillor John J. Quinn; Tom 
Foley, president of the East Massachusetts Council of Carpenters; and Karl Lowell, business 
representative of the South Shore District Council. 

The speakers emphasized the great odds that the Union had to overcome in bygone 
years and pointed out that the younger members of today could profitably take inspira- 
tion from the achievements of old timers such as those being honored at the occasion. 




Shown in the photo, from left to right, are: Victor Olson, 
Ed Gallagher, George A. Oster, John Mattson and Dave 
Wohlander. 



Craft Probloms 




llllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll I ililllllllll 



By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 377 

Window Shoppers.— The best and most 
inexpensive advertising that any merchant 
can utihze in his business is the show vdn- 
dow. Here is the place where real customers 
are made. If the windows and display 
space, together with the arrangement of the 
displays, are made attractive, customers will 
come to that place of business; first, to see 




Fig. 1 

the merchandise on display, and then to 
enter the store and talk business with tlie 
sales people. 

If the store is on a busy street, especially 
one that receives a great deal of pedestrian 
traffic, the depth of the show-window vesti- 




Fig. 2 

bule should provide ample space for win- 
dow shoppers to observe and study the 
various displays. Here is where the artist 
belongs— one who is a good showman. For 
if he can quicken the imagination of the 
shoppers to a real sense of beauty, his ar- 
tistic productions will realize substantial 



dividends for his employer. Primarily a 
window shopper is in quest of beauty, and 
when he has found it he will not abandon 
it, but will forthwith make arrangements to 
acquire the objects of loveliness that he has 
found. The same principle will apply when 
the purpose of the merchandise on display 
is that of utility, rather than beauty. 
i-j'-o\ r'-o' 



, s-Q' j 



25- 0" 



1 



10-0 l a-c , 



Fig. 3 

Plans of Display Space.— The design 
shown by Fig. 1 is suitable for a rather 
large store on a busy street. Here the right 
half is shown in full, while the other half 
is a duplicate in reverse of what is shown. 
This design provides a liberal amount of 
space for displaying merchandise, such as 




Fig. 4 

clothing for men, women, and children. 
Only one double-door entrance to the store 
is provided in this design, but there are 
two sidewalk entrances to the vestibule, one 
on the drawing shown, and the other on the 
part that is omitted here. 

Fig. 2 is a sort of perspective elevation 
of the front of the design shown by Fig. 1, 



THE CARPENTEIl 



41 



in plan. The name and sign panels above 
the show windows and sidewalk entrances 
to the vestibule, should be finished in keep- 
ing witli the face finish of the bulkhead. 
These spaces are left blank here, because 
the material used must be determined by 
the owner. Here are a few suggestions: 




Fig. 5 

Brick, stone, tile, stucco or some other 
available material could be used. It is im- 
portant that the finish used above and 
below the show windows is carefully se- 
lected. Figs. 1 and 2 should be compared 
and studied. 




Fig. 6 

Fig. 3 is a modification of what is shown 
by Fig. 1. This design has the advantage 
of two double-door entrances to the store, 
although only one is shown by the drawing. 
The other entrance is in the duplicate half, 




Fig. 7 

in reverse, to the left, that is omitted here. 
The island showcase, shown to the bottom, 
left, has a center screen, indicated by dot- 
ted lines, which can be omitted if desired. 
A front elevation in perspective is shown by 
Fig. 4. Here can be seen the advantage of 



having the doors to the store straight 
ahead from the sidewalk entrance to the 
vestibule. 

Car Display Room.-A plan of a car dis- 
play room with a corner entrance is shown 
by Fig. 5. Here the display space thai 
joins the show windows is rather narrow. 
The purpose is to display small articles that 




Fig. 8 

will leave a full view of the car on display. 
A wide door is provided, so that cars can 
be driven in or out of the room. To the 
left is shown a driveway with an overhead 
door. The arrow at the bottom, left, indi- 
cates that another display room is planned, 
to the left of the driveway. A different car 
display room is shown in part by Fig. 6. 
The overhead door, 8 feet wide, provides 



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42 



THE CARPENTER 



an entrance where cars can be taken in or 
out of the room. The display space next to 
the windows is narrow, and must be kept 
rather close to the floor, in order not to ob- 




Fig. 9 

struct a full view of the cars on display. 
A small office room is shown, and to the 
light of it is tlie driveway with an over- 
head door. 



MATHEMATICS 
CARPENTRY 

Compiled and published by 

the United Brotherhood of 

Carpenters and Joiners of 

America 

75c per copy 

This book contains valuable in- 

fonnation and assistance for all 

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minutes. Every carpenter should have this chart. Now 
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Store Front Stairway Problems. Fig. 7 
shows a small store front plan. Here an 
outside stairway leading to the second 
floor, creates a problem. One solution is 
shown by this drawing. This layout gives a 
maximum amount of display room for the 
show window. Fig. 8 gives another solu- 
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store is placed as far away from the stair- 
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Deep Show Window.— Fig. 9 shows a lay- 
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dows, and a display island between them. 
This arrangement would lend itself favor- 
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fic. It provides ample display room for a 
number of different kinds of merchandise. 
The display island makes possible view- 
points from every direction. This alone 
would make it a special attraction. 







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479-0 FOLEY BLDG., 
MINNEAPOLIS 18, MINN. 
Send FREE Price Guide and Foley Retoother circular. 



FOLEY MFG. CO. 



I Name 



Aiidregg __- \ 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 
4vols.^ft 




Intldt Tredi Inhnnttln for 

Carpenters, Builders, Joiners. 
Building Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Guides 
give you the short-cut In- 
structions that you want-in- 
cluding new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. Aji 
easy progressive course for 
the apprentice ... a practical 
dally helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere are 
using these Guides as a Help- 
ing Hand to Easier Work, Bet- 
ter Work and Better Pay. ACT 
NOW. . . fill in and mail tht 
FREE COUPON oelow. 



Inside Trade Information On: 

How to use the steel square — How to 
file and set saws — How to build fur- 
niture — How to use a mitre box — 
How to use the chalk line — How to 
use rules and .scales — How to make joints 
— Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensu- 
ration problems — Estimating strength of 
timbers — How to set girders and sills — 
How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, 
barns, garages, bungalows, etc. — How to 
read and draw plans — Drawing up speci- 
fications — How to excavate — How to use 
settings 12. 13 and 17 on the steel square 
— How to build hoists and scaffolds — sky- 
lights — How to build stairs. 



AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St, New York 10, N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 
7 days' free trial. If O.K. I will remit S2 in 7 days and f 2 ' 
monthly until J8. plus shipping charge, is paid. Otherwise 
I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfied. 




Cmployvd l»y. 



D 



SAVE SHIPPING CHARGESI Enclose Full Payment 
With Coupon ond We Poy Shipping Charges. C-4 



Greatest Handbook of 
Building Facts and 
Methods Ever Published! 



Richey's 
Reference Handbook 

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1,640 Pages • 400 Tables 
544 Drawings • 500,000 Words! 



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or methods tliat years of ex- 
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and efficient. RICHEY warns 
you of costly pitfalls you must 
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crammed with thousands of 
clear detailed drawings and 
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Packed with Up-to-date 
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50% SAVINGS from list price 

Mail coupon below this month and get this valu- 
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MAIL COUPON TODAY 

SImmons-Boardman Books, Dept. C-460 
30 Church Street, New York 7, N. Y. 

Send me "Richey's Reference Handbook" with the un- 
derstanding that if I am not completely satisfied I can 
return it in 10 days for FULL REFUND. 
Enclosed is $4.98 □ check D money order 



Name 

Address — . 



City Zone State. 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
riglit to reject all advertising matter which mas 
be. In their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membersliip of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 

City, Mo. 43-47 

Black & Decker Mfg. Co., Tow- 
son, Md. 44 

Construct-O-Wear Shoe Co., Ind- 
ianapolis, Ind. 1 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 43 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, 111. 4 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 45-3d Cover 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. 45 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 48 

Milwaukee E'ectric Too!, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 43 

R. G. Nicholas Apron Co., Hunt- 
ington Park, Cal. 45 

Simplex Level Co., Hanover, Mich. 47 

Stanley Works, New Britain, 

Conn. 47 

Yates-American Machine Co., 

Beloit, Wis. 3d Cover 



Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 45 

Belton School, Chicago, 111 43 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

Cline-Sigmon, Publishers, Hick- 
ory, N. C. 43 

Mason Engineering, Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 42 

Security Manila Knot Co., Belle- 
ville, 111. 43 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 41 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y. 46 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



WHICH KIND OF 

carpenter 



ARE YOU? 




No. ST 1 1/2 
16 oz. Curved Claw 
Other weights and ripping 
claw models available 

The man of steel naturally prefers all-steel 
hammers. He likes the cushioned grip, the 
perfect balance, the chrome alloy handle, the 
steel feel of the whole hammer. And because 
he's a carpenter — a professional craftsman — 
he prefers Stanley's "Steelmaster" Hammers. 




No. n 1/2 

16 oz. Curved Claw 

Other weights, octagon handles, 

and ripping claw models 

available 

Carpenters work with wood every day. They 
know it and like it. Some of them naturally 
prefer wood-handled hammers. The selected 
straight grained hickory feels good in the 
hitting hand, they like the balance and the 
heft of the hammer. And because they're 
carpenters — professional craftsmen — they 
prefer Stanley's "100 Plus" Hammers. 



Whether you're the man of steel or the sturdy 
oak, if you're a carpenter your best hammer 
buy is by Stanley. 



STANLEY 



® 

THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

Stanley Tools, Division of 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 




IMPROVED 78 INCH 

MAGNESIUM LEVEL 

6 VIAL 

WAS $17.45 NOW $15.95 

CHECK THESE FEATURES: 
Featherweight • Made 
of lough, durable mag- 
nesium • Extruded (- 
beam shape with flanged 
edges turned down full 
length for complete ri- 
gidity • No warp • No 
bend • Non-gouge edges 
• Beveled sides • Ex- 
cellent close-line straight 
edge. 

Plumb and 
level Pyrex 
viols imper- 
vious to light 
and temper- 
ature changes • Mounted with anodized 
brackets In protected, beautifully lacquered 
body of level • Easy to read • Permanent 
occuracy • Shockproof • Vials replaceable 
on the job if broken. 

LIBERAL DISCOUNTS TO SPARE TIME DEALERS 
OTHER SIZES FOR EVERY JOB 
78"-$l7.45-IO vials 48"-$l0.50-6 vials 
72"-$l5.45- 6 vials 42"-$ 9.50-6 vials 
60"-$l2.95- 6 vials 28"-$ 4.95-6 vials 

Extra vial assemblies 50c each 

MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

SIMPLEX LEVEL CO. 

HANOVER, MICHIGAN 





MY HOBBY MAKES ME 

$522 an hour 
CASH PROFIT 






— Grover Squires 




START YOUR OWN RETIREMENT BUSINESS 

You can turn your spare time into Big Casti 
Profits with your own COMPLETE SHARPEN- 
ING SHOP . . . Grind saws, knives, scissors, 
skates, lawn mower blades ... all cutting 
edges. Your own Cash Business with no In- 
ventory . . . right at home ... no ex- 
perience needed. 

FREE BOOK tells how you can startyour 
own retirement business while you 
are still working at your regular 
job. Low Cost — time payments only 
$15.00 a month. Send coupon today, j 

I BELSAWSharp-AIICo.,7120FieldBldg.,KansasCityll,Mo. \ 
I Send Free Book "LIFETIIVIE SECURITY". No obligation. 





Name_ 



I Address- 

I 

I City 



-State- 




Only the best wood rules merit this seal 



Luf kin Red Ends are the favor- 
ite extension rules of practical 
workers everywhere. Take the 
X46, for example. You can see 
its quality ... its natural wood 
finish, brass extension slide and 



bold, black markings. You can 
hear it in the decisive "snap" 
of joints and strike plates. 
You'll find four Red Ends on 
the Luf kin Turnover Target at 
your hardware store . . . one 
to fit your job. 



:«ASiC MiASURiNCr TOOIS 



jE^m... 



^'^^^n l^-^^-^Ji^ r^" l^ ^J. 



always look for the 

LUFKIN'TARGET 

where your hardware man 
displays his finest 
measuring tools. 



QUALITY 

WOODWORKING 

MACHINES 

FOR THE WORKSHOP... 
OR ON-THE-JOB 





Over 75 years service to industry 

Sll MACHINE COMPANY 
803 4TH ST., BELOIT, WISCONSIN 



TEAR OFF AND MAIL .NOW 



Q Please send complete information to: 

n Send information on complete line of 
woodworking machinery: 



Your Hand Saw 
Sharpened 




This offer is made to 

demonstrate to carpenters, the 

precision work of the 

FOLEY SAW FILER 



If you file your own saws by hand, or if the man 
who does your sharpening doesn't use a Foley 
Saw Filer — you are invited to send us one of your 
hand saws, either cross-cut or rip. We'll file it free 
of charge — all you do is pay postage both ways. 
When your saw comes back to you, note the 
perfect size, spacing and alignment of teeth. Look 
at the accurate set and see how smooth, true and 
clean it cuts. You'll like it. 

FOLEV RETOOTHER FOR BAD SAWS 

If you have a hand saw so bad 
you can't use it, send it in for 
us to run through a Foley 
Retoother. Whether the teeth 
are large, small or broken a 
Foley Retoother will fix it by 
cutting oif the old irregular 
teeth and punching in a row of 
brand new ones. These new 
teeth are then finish-filed on 
the Foley Saw Filer for proper 
hook, bevel, etc. 

SEND YOUR SAW... OR WRITE FOR DETAILS 

Once you have used a Foley-filed saw, nothing else wiU 
do. Mail us yovu" saw today. Be sure to put your 
name and return address on the package. Mail coupon 
separately with return postage enclosed. 



FOLEY FILE-A-SAW OFFER 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 41i.-0 Foley BIdg., Mpls. 18, Minn. 

n Send me informafion on the Foley Saw Filer 
D I on' sending hand saw for you to file free. Enclosed 
is 40c for return postage and handling. 

Nome 




City_ 



_State_ 



How To Vote For Your Enemies 




You vote in every election. If you go to the polls, 
you can vote for the candidates you favor. If you 
stay home, you cast a default vote for your enemies 
by making it one vote easier for them to get elected. 
So whether you stay home or go to the polls, you 
vote every election day. 

This year, make sure you cast your ballot for can- 
didates interested in your welfare rather than in the 
welfare of a privileged few. The first step is to get 
registered and qualified to vote. The next step is to 
go to the polls on election day and vote for the men 
you know are interested in the well-being of all the 
people. Remember, if you don't, you really will be 
casting a ballot for your enemies. 



REGISTER and VOTE 



AT MST/ 

Custetit Miad e shoe 

for Carpenters 




MORE COMFORT 

Made of soft but extra tough glove- 
tanned leather to give pliability and 
ease of movement. Steel shank insures 
shift-long support. Lace-to-toe fea- 
ture provides comfort in any working 
position. Leather lining in vital areas 
adds to correct "feel". 



*14.95 

Sold on money back guarantee 
Sizes 6 to 13. Widths B, D, EE 



MORE WEAR 



Reinforced in spots where carpenters 
punish shoes most. Extra leather 
patch at ankles. Tough Neoprene 
soles defy wear. Uppers riveted to 
shank. Double-stitched wherever 
strain occurs. Riveted eyelets and 
rawhide laces end troubles from this 
source. This is the shoe carpenters 
asked for. Union made, of course. 



MORE SAFETY 



Glove fit adds to sure-footedness. The 
best non-skid sole yet invented. Grips 
on oily and slippery surfaces where 
others fail. In case of accident, one 
swipe with pocket knife cuts shoe 
loose. Semi-hard toe protects without 
cramping. 




MAIL COUPON TODAY! 



CONSTRUCT-O-WEAR SHOE 
P. O. Box No. 1431 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



CO. 



Please send me postage paid pairs of Construct- 

O-Wear shoes at $14.95 per pair. I understand my 
money will be refunded if I am not completely 
satisfied. 

State size and width . 



Name 

Address 

City State 

Enclosed find check __ Money order . 



Send COD __ 




New 2-speed saw speeds remodeling! 

Skil Recipro Saw obsoletes hand, keyhole and hacksaws 



If ever a power saw was de- 
signed with remodeling work in 
mind, the 2-speed SKIL Re- 
cipro Saw (Model 700) is it. 
Cutsright through nails, plaster, 
studding, steel lath — anything 
that can be sawed by hand, key- 
hole and hacksaws, 5 to 20 
times faster. 

Use it to make openings for re- 
location of walls, partitions . . . for 
dormer work, louvers, built- ins, 
recessed fixtures, ductwork, room 
additions . . . for cutting nails 
holding headers and studs with- 



out weakening wall structures. 

Two speeds — low for fast 
metal cutting with less blade 
wear -high for wood and com- 
positions. Off-center blade cuts 
close to walls and corners. Two- 
position, hinged shoe greatly 
increases blade life. 

Contact your SKIL distrib- 
utor today for a demonstration. 
He's listed under "Tools — 
Electric" in the Yellow Pages 
Or write: Skil Corporation, 
Dept. 152-E, 5033 Elston Ave., 
Chicago 30, 111. 




Comes complete with 
steel carrying case and 
8 assorted blades. 



f^^^. 



K..and SKILSAW POWER TOOLS 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. i^^tnonnr.^ 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor G^WK^ 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana ^SSSSj' 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXXX — No. 5 



MAY, 1960 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



Conten t s — 



Look Who Thinks We're Important Now - 5 

NATION'S BUSINESS, a magazine that has bitterly opposed every round of wage 
increases since the day it was founded (by the U. S. Chamber of Commerce), suddenly 
finds that the high earnings of skilled workers make up a new, important pool of buying 
power. "Go after the blue-collar buck" is the advice the magazine gives advertisers. 



This Is Enlightened Management? 



8 

Every day some drum beater for big business is saying unions are no longer neces- 
sary because management has become enlightened and far-sighted. The farm industry 
shows just how enlightened management can be when there is no strong, established 
union to stand up for the >fvorkers. 



Cape Canaveral, Showcase Of Skills 



11 

Cape Canaveral is only a small cog in a vast network of installations that make 
up the Atlantic Missile Range. Scientists, technicians and skilled craftsmen, including 
many Brotherhood members, man these installations that stretch from Florida to the 
South Atlantic far below the equator. 



Bozeman Member's Son Wins Scholarship 



15 

Joseph F. Cullen, son of Brother Joseph T. Cullen of Local Union No. 557, Bozeman, 
Mont., walks off with one of labor's most coveted scholarships. It will enable him to 
complete four years of college work— compliments of the labor movement. 



The Bridges Of Man 



18 

Remnants of bridges still standing give an important clue to the kind of civilizations 
that built them. Today, America is embarked on the greatest era of bridge building in 
human history. A thousand years from now, some of these will still be standing. 



Hazards Of Heavy Lifting 



* • * 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Outdoor Meanderings 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence 

Craft Problems 

Index to Advertisers 



• * * 



31 



16 
22 
24 
28 
29 
35 
39 

46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in SectioD 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

Learn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you tliat 
the way to the top-pay jobs and success in 
Building is to get thorough knowledge of 
blue prints, building construction and esti- 
mating. 

In this Chicago Tech Course, you learn to 
read blue prints — the universal language of the 
builder — and understand specifications — for all 
types of buildings. 

You learn building construction details : 
foundations, walls, roofs, windows and doors, 
arches, stairs, etc. 

You learn how to lay out work and direct 
building jobs from start to finish. You learn 
to estimate building costs quickly and accurate- 
ly. Find out how you can pre- 
pare at home for the higlier- 
paid jobs in Building, or your 
own successful contracting busi- 
ness. Get the facts about 
this income-boosting Chicago 
Tech training now. 

MAIL COUPON NOW 




Prepare for more pay, greater success. 
Learn how to lay out and run building 
jobs, how to read blue prints, how to 
estimate building costs. Practical train- 
ing with complete blue print plans and 
specifications— same as used by superin- 
tendents and contractors. Over 56 years 
of experience in training practical build- 
ers. 

INCREASE YOUR INCOIVIE 

Hundreds have quickly advanced to foreman, 
superintendent, inspector, estimator, contractor, 
with this Chicago Tech training in Building. 
Your practical experience aids your success. 
Get the technical training you need for promo- 
tion and increased income. 



Blue Prints 
and TriaS Lesson 



Send today for Trial Lesson: "How to Read 
Blue Prints," and set of Blue Print Plans- 
sent to you Free. See for yourself how this 
Chicago Tech Course prepares you to earn 
more money, gives you the thorough know- 
ledge of Building required for the higher-up 
jobs and higher pay. Don't delay. Mail the 
coupon today in an envelope or use a postal 
card. 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Chicago Technical College 

E-132 Tech BIdg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, Illinois 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read Blue Prints" with in- 
formation about how I can train at home. 

Name Age 

Address Occupation 

City Zone State 




REACH FOR THE 

RBDEND 



MADE ONLY BY 



UFKiN 



Only the best wood rules merit this seal 



Luf kin Red Ends are the favor- 
ite extension rules of practical 
workers everywhere. Take the 
X46, for example. You can see 
its quality ... its natural wood 
finish, brass extension slide and 



bold, black markings. You can 
hear it in the decisive "snap" 
of joints and strike plates. 
You'll find four Red Ends on 
the Luf kin Turnover Target at 
your hardware store . . . one 
to fit your job. 




Look Who Thinks We're Important Now 

• • • 

BRACE YOUR FEET, Brother, the advertising "geniuses" are zeroing 
in their heaviest artillery on your pay check and mine. We have become 
the No. 1 pigeons for the guys with the grey flannel suits and the purple 
worsted mouths. 

We, the skilled workers of the nation, are the new mass market at which 
the big sales pitches will be aimed from now on. The computer boys have 
suddenly found that we make pretty good money and that we buy a lot of 
the goods that roll off the assembly lines. Their immediate aim is to sell us a lot 
more. 



The whole thing was explained in 
a recent issue of NATION'S BUSI- 
NESS, the slick magazine published 
by the U. S. Chamber of Commerce. 
Blue collar workers, the magazine 
pointed out, now make up the na- 
tion's biggest market for luxury mer- 
chandise and services. They buy more 
autos, watches, jewelry and air con- 
ditioners than any other single class. 
They want quality too, and the bar- 
gain basement approach is out of 
date. Here is how the magazine puts 
it: 

"Formerly it was easy for the econ- 
omist to grade people on an income 
basis and assume that the white- 
collar people and business and pro- 
fessional people were the best— often 
the only— market for many products. 
Now surveys in metropolitan Chi- 
cago—which indicate a national con- 
dition—show that the income of the 
average skilled blue-collar worker is 
equal to that of the average white- 
collar worker. What's more, the elite 
of the skilled blue-collar groups earn 
considerably more family income than 
the average white-collar worker and 
the intelligentsia. Particularly do they 
have more choice in spending it. 

"A recent study of the whole field 
of savings in metropolitan Chicago 



showed more families with savings ac- 
counts in banks and savings and loan 
associations in the blue-collar group 
than any other. Banks from one end 
of the country to the other are chang- 
ing their strategy to appeal to this 
market which helped the savings and 
loan associations grow so rapidly. 

"Not only do these people ha\e 
money to spend but they far out- 
number the white-collar workers. On 
the basis of census studies, we find 
that 64 per cent of the people li\'ing 
in metropolitan Chicago are in this 
group. The same proportion holds for 
innumerable cities." 

Had this piece appeared in a maga- 
zine other than NATION'S BUSI- 
NESS it might have left a better taste 
in the mouth. NATION'S BUSINESS, 
being a venture of the U. S. Chamber 
of Commerce, has been particularly 
vehement in fighting every wage in- 
crease organized labor has gained 
during the past 20 years. Ever\^ in- 
crease was going to fan the fires of 
inflation, drive businesses to the wall, 
price us out of the world market, dis- 
courage expansion, and just about 
bring on the end of the free enter- 
prise system. These same old argu- 
ments have been used over and over 
until they sound like a broken record. 



THE CARPEXTER 



Look Where We Are 




Percentage 
bought 


Business 

and 

Professional 


White- 
collar 
Workers 


Skilled 
Craftsmen 


Unskilled 
Labor 


T. V. sets 




13% 


25% 


44% 


16% 


Food freezers 




15 


25 


45 


10 


Washers 




15 


28 


43 


13 


Room air conditioners 


28 


22 


46 


4 


Vacuum cleaners 




13 


31 


49 


7 


Refrigerators 




14 


26 


48 


9 


New furniture 




20 


32 


38 


9 


New rugs & carpets 




14 


29 


44 


11 


Landscaping & shrubbery 


25 


35 


31 


7 


Boats 




31 


34 


25 


6 


New luggage 




28 


35 


31 


6 


New autos 




21 


34 


36 


7 


New watches 




21 


31 


35 


12 


Auto insurance 




16 


34 


41 


7 


New homes 




19 


39 


36 


6 


Home remodeling 




21 


31 


37 


10 


Bus travel 




9 


24 


47 


19 


Life insurance 




16 


32 


42 . 


10 


Railroad travel 




27 


31 


30 


11 


Jewelry 




27 


32 


33 


8 



THE CARPENTER 



Now, suddenly, the magazine that 
opposed these increases so bitterly 
finds that they have created a huge 
new mass market for luxury goods. 
By and large, blue-collar workers are 
union workers. And the unions are 
the instruments through which their 
wage scales are set. The magazine 
could have substituted the term "un- 
ion worker" for 'T^lue-collar worker" 
as easily as not. At any rate, the mag- 
azine is now gloating about the abil- 
ity of skilled workers to buy and pay 
for first class goods and services even 
though it bucked the upward march 
of labor all the way. 

Change your advertising pitch to 
appeal to the blue-collar worker and 
his wife, is the magazine's advice to 
manufacturers. For instance, it points 
out: 

"The blue-collar worker is much 
less likely than the white-collar work- 
er to dream about investments and 
travel abroad. He has more concrete 
needs and wants which are well met 
in advertising such as that of depart- 
ments stores, drug chains and grocery 
chains. This advertising may have a 
complete lack of creative esthetics in 
the copy and art, it may completely 
fail with the Colonel's lady, but it 



certainly gets through to Judy O'- 
Grady. It is worth emphasizing that 
one thing to be avoided in communi- 
cation to this market is to suggest a 
lower status. If you want to show the 
worker on the job, be sure that his 
ego and dignity are protected. Also, 
these women are quick to see immor- 
ality where others might see only 
sophistication." 

So look ahead to a barrage of ad- 
vertising aimed at your pay check. 
The models won't be wearing patched 
overalls that are common on most 
jobs, but they won't be wearing tux- 
edos either. And the women won't 
have fingernails two inches long when 
they are trying to sell a craftsman's 
wife who is up to her elbows in dish- 
water and diaper washings most of 
the day. All of us blue-collar work- 
ers can take this new attention from 
the advertising fraternity as a compli- 
ment, but little thanks for this state of 
affairs goes to NATION'S BUSINESS 
which always did its utmost to stymie 
the upward march of skilled workers. 
In the long run, the credit goes to 
organized labor that had to battle 
publications like NB every inch of 
the way to put the blue-collar man 
where he is. 



INCOME GAINS SLOW DOWN IN MARCH 

Personal income during March was only slightly higher than in February, with the 
year so far showing a slowdown from the sharp increases of last November and December. 

Wages and salaries, at an annual rate of $269 billion, were about the same as for 
February, with gains in State and local payrolls and the hiring of 160,000 temporary 
Census workers being ofiFset by decreased construction, automobile and aircraft payrolls. 
The over-all wage and salary picture for the year thus far showed a gain of 7 per cent as 
compared with the first three months of 1959. 

Business and professional income showed a 5 per cent gain during the first quarter as 
compared with the same period in 1959, while dividends were up 6 per cent. As usual, 
personal interest income, due to the Eisenhower tight money policy, led tlie procession \\dth 
a 14.6 per cent gain for the year so far. 

Farm income, which is down 9 per cent for the first quarter over a year ago, 
dropped again in March as compared with both January and February. Farm income 
for March was running at an annual rate of $10.3 billion. A year ago during the same 
month it was running at a $12 bilhon rate. 



This Is Enlightened Management? 

• • • 

HAVE UNIONS outlived their usefulness? More and more, right-to- 
workers, business magazines, and various and sundry other apologists 
for big business argue that unions are no longer needed. 
The gist of their argument runs about as follows: 

"Unions probably were necessary in the bad old days when employers 
were unenlightened and short-sighted. But over the years employers have 
seen the light. They now know that high wages make for prosperity. They 
know that good pay and good working conditions increase efficiency. There- 
fore, the need no longer exists for unions." 

Anyone who has served on a union negotiating committee knows how 
l^aseless such arguments are. Every nickel pay raise generally involves more 
frustration, ulcers, sweat and tears 



than anything other than a fire or 
flood. A session or two at the bargain- 
ing table probably could do more to 
straighten out the thinking of these 
authors than a thousand hours of ar- 
gument. It is at the bargaining table 
that you find out how enlightened 
and far-sighted many employers are. 

Another argument the anti-union- 
ists present is that many unorganized 
plants pay as good wages as organ- 
ized plants. Figures compiled by the 
x\FL-CIO knock this argument in the 
head by proving that union wages top 
non-union wages by anywhere from 
lie to 20c an hour on the average. 
However, some non-union plants do 
meet union wage scales, but they only 
do so to forestall organization. Gen- 
erally, they more than make up the 
difference by imposing impossible 
work loads, ignoring seniority, and 
hiring and firing in an autocratic 
manner. But the main point is that 
the union negotiating committees set 
the wage pace. Anything else any- 
body gets is dictated by the wage 
scale set by the union. 

For an example of how enlightened 
and far-sighted employers can be in 



an industry that is virtually unorgan- 
ized, take a look at farming. And 
don't fall for the argument that farm- 
ing is not big business today. Hired 
farm workers in 1958 totaled 2,319,- 
000. The bulk of these people worked 
for "factory farms" where farming in- 
cludes processing, freezing, packing, 
etc. Texas offers an example of what 
is happening. Due to the growth of 
super-farms, the average farm size in 
the Lone Star State has grown from 
250 acres in 1930 to 500 acres today. 
Twelve per cent of the farms grossed 
60 per cent of farm products in 1954. 
Since then, concentration has in- 
creased even faster. 

What kind of progress have farm 
workers made in this industry where 
they depend almost entirely on the 
enlightenment and far-sightedness of 
the employer? The 1959 report of the 
National Sharecroppers Fund, an or- 
ganization of citizens dedicated to 
elevating the status of farm labor, 
sheds some interesting light. The fol- 
lowing excerpts are reprinted from 
the report: 

Housing. A Maryland study reports 
that a 1957 state survey of housing 



THE CARPENTER 



conditions found that 66 per cent of 
the camps had unapproved water sys- 
tems; that privies in 72 per cent of 
the camps were below minimum sani- 
tary standards. The newspaper report- 
er found a camp with migrants hving 
in small shacks, 8 by 10 feet, equipped 
with cots, a small cook stove, and a 
light bulb. Swarms of mosquitoes and 
flies made a depressing picture which 
can be duplicated across the country. 

Health. Both the poverty of the mi- 
grants and the temporary nature of 
the situations in which they live in- 
crease their health hazards. The U. S. 
Public Health Service found that state 
residence requirements for aid pro- 
vided a major obstacle. "Major differ- 
ences between requirements for pub- 
lic health and public welfare services 
nullify, in some instances, the tuber- 
culosis efforts of the health agencies," 
it said. There is hope in news out of 
Washington that proposals are being 
made for federal aid in "general as- 
sistance" programs and to modify or 
end the residence qualifications of the 
various states. 

Accidents. Agriculture still ranks as 
the third most hazardous industry. 
In highly industrialized New Jersey, 
farming had more work accidents in 
1958 than any other industry— more 
than 100 a month. The latest over-all 
figures, compiled by the National 
Safety Council, are: Farm death rates 
per 100,000, 54.3; total farm resident 
fatalities, 11,300; injuries, 950,000. 
Agriculture is the only industry in 
which the death rate has risen over 
the 10-year period 1948-58, with a 
rise of 4%. 

But no statistics can convey the 
horror of the death of a 12-year-old 
girl working on an Idaho farm, caught 
in a potato-digging machine. (The lo- 
cal school system was having a "har- 
vest vacation" so that the children 
could work in the fields). Nor could 
a system of workmen's compensation 



make adequate recompensation. But 
when accidents occur, it is worth re- 
flecting that in most states agricul- 
tural workers, despite their high 
liability to accident, are not in- 
sured as are industrial workers— one 
more senseless "exclusion." 

Federal Aid. One of the problems is 
that most federal aid continues to go 
to the bigger farms and corporations. 
Senator Williams of Delaware has 
called attention to the 250 cotton pro- 
ducers who received government 
price-support loans of $100,000 or 
more on 1958 crops. The largest of 
these was nearly $1,500,000 (Westlake 
Farms, Inc., California). 

Foreign Workers and Domestic 

Wages. The first illustration of this 
problem given in last year's report 
was of peaches in Sutter County, Cali- 
fornia; for this year (1959) the peach 
crop aroused national attention, with 
press reports of the crop rotting due 
to a shortage of peach pickers. 

Background is important. When 
miscalculations on the part of grow- 
ers combined with weather conditions 
which runted the crop, peach grow- 
ers felt the only place left to cut ex- 
pense, to save profits, was on harvest 
wages. 

But the growers were frightened 
by two possibilities: 1) an organizing 
campaign was going on among farm 
workers, who wanted better instead 
of worse wages; 2) a scandal in tlie 
state placement service regarding its 
handling of the Mexican program 
threatened the supply of Mexican 
workers used in previous years to 
keep wages down. 

Hence a dramatic publicity cam- 
paign was developed; 30 newspaper 
men and editors were flown into the 
area in chartered planes; the cry of 
ruin was raised. The union consistent- 
ly reported domestic workers avail- 
able, but the grower pressure was 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



successful; the Mexicans arrived. The 
wage rate (which last year dropped 
from 15-18 cents a box to 12 when 
Mexican workers arrived) this year 
started at 15 (14 in Sutter County) 
and at times was only 12. The do- 
mestic workers never had a chance. 
Agricultural wages in the United 
States are in a relatively worse posi- 
tion than similar wages are for most 
other industrial nations. This is shown 
in a report in the International La- 
bour Review for November, 1959, 
which points out that farm wages in 
the U. S. have gone up less in the ten- 
ye<u' period, 1948-1957, than in any 
other of the western nations. 

<f * 

The above excerpts from the 1959 
report of the National Sharecroppers 



Fund give some indication of how 
well workers fare in an industry 
where a union has not been able to 
gain a solid toehold— the modern 
enlightenment and far-sightedness of 
employers notwithstanding. 

Furthermore, farming provides a 
good example of how unorganized 
people can expect to make out under 
automation. Automation has advanced 
faster in farming than it has in any 
other single industry. The above re- 
port spells out how farm workers have 
"benefited" therefrom while depend- 
ing on the enlightenment of 20th Cen- 
tury employers. 

Enlightenment and far-sightedness 
of employers you can have— we'll take 
a strong, democratic, militant union. 



ANOTHER REASON FOR A SHORTER WORK WEEK 

As a promotion stunt to advertise its products, the manufacturer of pre- 
hung doors sponsored a contest at a convention of the Michigan Retail Lumber 
Dealers Association. Starting with the rough opening, the object of the con- 
test was to see which delegate could un- 
crate and install a door, its casement, the 
knob, and the lock hardware in the short- 
est possible time. A transistor radio was top 
prize. 

When the contest was over, it was found 
that the winner had turned the trick in 
three minutes and 16 seconds. 

The whole thing was a publicity gag, of 
course, and there is little relationship be- 
tween conditions prevailing at the contest 
and on the job. However, there are sober- 
ing implications nevertheless. 

A door installed in three and a quarter 
minutes means 17 doors an hour; 136 a day; 
680 a week. 

Looking at it from another angle, three 
and a quarter minutes' work at an hourly 
wage of $3.50 makes the cost of hanging the door somewhere around 20c 
—about half what it was when wages were $2.00 per day and a man was hump- 
ing to hang five doors in a day. 

Anybody got a better argument for a shorter work week and higher pay? 




11 



Cape Canaveral, Showcase Of Skills 

* * 

THE DATELINE on any stories dealing with missile firing on the 
Atlantic Coast usually reads "Cape Canaveral." This is only natural 
because Cape Canaveral is where the firing actually takes place. 
However, there is a vast network of tracking stations and check centers 
stretching 5,000 miles into the South Atlantic. Cape Canaveral and these 
eleven other stations together make up the Atlantic Missile Range operated 
by the United States Air Force. Each station has a definite part to play in 
the successful launching of a missile because the highest degree of teamwork 
is absolutely essential. 

And Brotherhood members are using their skills wherever these centers 
are located. Old facilities constantly are being refurbished and new ones 
built. The Brotherhood members who work anywhere in the vast complex 
that makes up the missile range are 
helping to bring the space age one 
step nearer. 

The Cape Canaveral Missile Test 
Annex is Station 1 of the Atlantic 
Missile Range. Station 2 is located 
about 100 miles south of the Cape 
at Jupiter Inlet, Florida. In addition, 
there are also several small tracking 
sites on the Florida mainland which 
are manned only during flight tests. 

The first oflF-shore station on the 
range is Station 3 at Crand Bahama 
Island. Stations 4 through 9 are at 
Eleuthera Island, San Salvador, Moy- 
aguana, Grand Turk, the Dominican 
Republic and Puerto Rico, respective- 
ly. Station 9.1 at Antigua was estab- 
lished primarily for ballistic missile 
programs. Station 10 at St. Lucia, on 
the other hand, was used for cruise 
missile tests and is presently on a 
standby status. 

Farther south on the Brazilian Is- 
land of Fernando de Noronha is lo- 
cated Station 11. It is 230 miles of 
the coast of Brazil, and 3,900 miles 
from Cape Canaveral. The last island 
tracking station is at Ascension Is- 
land, a British Crown Colony in the 



South Atlantic Ocean, over 5,000 
miles from the Cape. 

At a typical down-range station, 
there are from 120 to 160 full-time 
technicians and maintenance person- 
nel. Because the stations are located 
on small, sparsely populated islands, 
there is often no local economy to 
support them. Thus, practically all of 
the necessities of life must be brought 
in by boat or aircraft along with the 
electronic parts, supplies and techni- 
cal equipment needed to operate 
them. At many of the tracking sta- 
tions rain water must be used for 
fresh water. Where rain is infrequent 
such as at Fernando de Noronha, sea 
water is distilled to meet the station's 
requirements. 

Each down-range station is com- 
manded by an Air Force officer who 
also serves as the Range Safetv 
Ofiicer. 

The AFMTC's down-range stations 
are unusual communities of technical 
personnel. The size of each station, 
the type of buildings and even its 
location is dependent on the type 
and quantity of the tracking instru- 



12 



T ri E CARPENTER 



'"^^^v%. 




The domes and blockhouses are mighty heavy construction. 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



mentation required at a particular 
location. 

However, all of the stations have 
certain similar instrumentation. This 
usually includes tracking radars used 
to track missiles in flight and record 
their position, and a telemetry re- 
ceiver site to "listen" to and record 
functions taking place inside the mis- 
sile. Each station also has a timing 
signal generation which ties together 



investment. With it, the numlier of 
launchings required from prototype 
to operational missile in a given pro- 
gram has been reduced to a mere 
fraction of what they were less than 
ten years ago. 

The primary purpose of the Cen- 
ter's flight tests is to record the per- 
formance of missiles under the most 
exacting laboratory conditions. Dur- 
ing lift-off and up to about a mile 




to a split second all of the instrumen- 
tation at all of the stations being 
used for a particular test. 

THE INSTRUMENTATION 

The instrumentation needed to 
gather missile flight data at the At- 
lantic Missile Range is the most so- 
phisticated of its kind in the world. 
It is designed so that at precisely any 
given instant the performance of a 
missile can be determined. From a 
cost standpoint, this instrumentation 
represents a major portion of the Cen- 
ter's half-billion-dollar capital plant 



from the launch pad, it is relati\"ely 
easy to measure a missile's position 
to an accuracy of inches by using 
high speed cameras. Beyond this 
point, and up to 15 miles, theodolites 
and long-range cameras are used for 
an accuracy within about 30 feet. 

However, the problem becomes far 
more difficult when the missile reach- 
es an acceleration of from 10.000 to 
15,000 miles per hour at altitudes 
of several hundred miles. For these 
measurements a system called Azusa 
is used by the AFMTC. Azusa pro- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



\'ides what has been called the ulti- 
mate in electronic phase comparison 
techniques. Located at Cape Canav- 
eral, the Azusa system can collect 
precision data on missile position and 
velocity at the rate of 10 impulses 
per second with exceptional accu- 
racy. This information is gathered by 
eight ground antennas housed in pres- 
surized radomes. It is then fed into 
an IBM high-speed digital computer. 
In addition to the velocity and the 
position information, Azusa is also 




Concrete igloos challenge carpentry skills. 

used for safety purposes since it pro- 
vides a continuous prediction on 
where a missile will impact at any 
given instant should its flight be ter- 
minated. 

However, it is telemetry which is 
the primary means used by AFMTC 
to obtain missile flight data. Up to 
75 per cent of the information gath- 
ered during a missile flight test is ob- 
tained by telemetry. 

The principle of telemetry is com- 
paratively simple. It consists of small 
radio transmitters placed inside the 
missile which send information on as 
many as 175 separate functions on 



each flight. This information is picked 
up by receiver stations where it is re- 
corded on magnetic tape. Thus, long 
after the actual flight the Center can 
re-fly a missile in the laboratory again 
and again. Examples of some of the 
information obtained through teleme- 
try include missile altitude, attitude, 
battery voltage, temperature, vibra- 
tion and acceleration. 

After a test launch, all of the data, 
the magnetic tapes, the radar plots, 
and other information are rushed to 
the Center's data reduction facility at 
the Technical Laboratory at Patrick 
AFB. Here the raw data are fed 
through automatic reduction process- 
es and in a matter of days the end 
product of thousands of man-hours 
expended on a specific test is avail- 
able. This is the flight test report, 
which takes the nation one more step 
forward in its missile development 
program. 

THE AFMTC's ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

In recent years a spectacular record 
of "firsts" in the nation's military mis- 
sile and space programs has been 
compiled at the AFMTC. Among 
them are the first firing of a U. 
S. Satellite, the first full-range AT- 
LAS intercontinental ballistic missile 
launching, remote firings of the BO- 
MARC interceptor missile in conjunc- 
tion with the Air Force SAGE system, 
and many more. 

All of the nation's long-range mis- 
siles have been or are scheduled to be 
tested at the Atlantic Missile Range. 

Against this backdrop of spectacu- 
lar achievements, even more impor- 
tant military, satellite and space pro- 
grams of the Armed Forces, the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Admin- 
istration, and the Advanced Research 
Projects Agency are now underway at 
the Air Force Missile Test Center. 



15 



Bozeman Member's Son Wins Scholarship 

* * 

IT is very likely that man will make his first trip to the moon within a 
few years. And it is entirely possible that the problems of such travel 
will be solved by a member of our Brotherhood. It well may be Joseph 
F. Cullen, the son of Joseph T. Cullen, a long-time member of Local 557 
of Bozeman, Montana. 

Young Cullen recently was chosen the winner of an AFL-CIO Merit 
Scholarship in a nation-wide competition. 

Each year the AFL-CIO offers six 4-year scholarships to outstanding 
students who demonstrate their ability to profit by college work. These 
scholarships allow winners to enroll in any accredited college or uni\"ersit}^ 
in the United States, and no limita- 



tions are placed on the courses of 
study they may want to pursue. 

The AFL-CIO scholarship program 
is part of an over-all effort by Amer- 
ican trade unions in this field. Many 
trade unions, from the local level to 
the national and international level, 
offer various types of scholarships that 
run well over $500,000 per year. 

In announcing the award winner, 
AFL-CIO President George Meany 
said: "The AFL-CIO looks forward to 
the day when all of America's young 
people will be able to complete a 
college education. Federally financed 
scholarships for college study would 
be a long step forward toward a 
stronger democracy and would show 
the world that in America opportuni- 
ties are equal." 

However, this day may be some 
distance off. In the meantime, the la- 
bor movement is doing its utmost to 
make it possible for bright students 
to go on to college through scholar- 
ship awards. 

Winner Joseph Cullen has elected 
to enter the California Institute of 
Technology where he will major in 
Chemical Engineering in preparation 
for a career as an industrial scientist. 



In addition to being an outstanding 
student, young Cullen has been ac- 
tive in many constructive activities. 
He is a fine musician and a member 
of the Musicians Union. He has 
played in the school band and the 
City Concert Band. In addition, he 
has held a number of offices in stu- 
dent legislative assembly and is class 
treasurer. Other activities include 
treasurer of the Key Club and the 
Latin Club, representative to Boys 
State, and the head of the Prom Com- 
mittee. He has manifested an interest 
in collecting stamps and coins and in 
promoting arts and crafts. In his spare 
time he has helped other youngsters 
advance their musical training by gi\"- 
ing lessons. Altogether, he achieved a 
fine record, both in book work and 
in student activities at Bozeman High 
School. 

Young Cullen is the son of Mr, and 
Mrs. Joseph T. Cullen. Brother Cullen 
has been a member of the United 
Brotherhood for 17 years and has al- 
ways maintained an active interest in 
the welfare of his organization. Con- 
gratulations to the entire Cullen fam- 
ily, and especially to young Joseph 
F. Cullen. 



Pla-H 



fCr 







JUMPING AT CONCLUSIONS 

Unemployment took another unhealthy 
jump of 275,000 between February and 
March, a period during which the Depart- 
ment of Labor expected joblessness to de- 
cline. But the experts had a fast explanation: 
storms. Unseasonable storms kept plants and 
industries from expanding their operations 
as quickly as expected. 

We hope tlie explanation is the correct 
one, although we wouldn't want to bet 
much on it. 

We see an analogy between this case 
and tlie case of the ofRce boy who produced 
a pocket knife when the boss wanted one. 
It seems the boss asked all his office staff 
to loan him a knife. Not a one of the 
clerical help could produce one. It seems 
they all had left their knives at home. Fin- 
ally the boss asked the office boy, and he 
immediately produced one. 

"Now there's the smartest guy of the 
staff," boasted the boss. "He didn't forget 
his knife." 

"It ain't that I'm smart," replied the office 
boy, "it's just that you don't pay me 
enough to have more than one pair of 
pants; so I always have my knife with me." 




"Why, yes, it will be a steady 
job— unless my wife sees 
you!" 



IT'S EASY TO BE FOOLED 

These things were said— in testimony be- 
fore a House subcommittee— by retailer 
spokesmen who don't want their workers 
brought under wage-hour coverage and who 
don't want the wage floor raised to $1.23 
an hoiu": 

A Michigan store owner said he saw no 
need to extend or raise the minimum wage 
because "not one" of his employes "ever 
starved" on pay of less than $1 an hour. 

An Illinois retailer claimed tliat most store 
clerks don't have to work and "these are 
the people mostly responsible for the so- 
called two-car family." He acknowledged 
under questioning that he didn't know if any 
of his employes, who started at 85 cents an 
hour, have two cars. 

Remarkable what employers think people 
can do with 85c an hour. And speaking of 
thinking, remember the old one about the 
young gal who went swimming in the nude 
in a quiet mountain lake? She thought she 
was all alone, but when she looked up she 
spotted a couple of fishermen peering out of 
the bushes. Thoroughly flustered, the sweet 
young thing pondered what to do, but then 
she saw an old wash tub in the lake bottom. 
Holding it up in front of her, she began 
backing toward her clothes. 

"Don't you have anything better to do?" 
she shouted at the peckers. "Do you know 
what I think?" 

"Yes, ma'am," replied one of the Peeping 
Toms. "You think there's a bottom in that 
wash tub." 

• * * 
PRACTICAL EXPLANATION 

The negotiating session was bogged down 
over the wording of the seniority clause. 
Agreement could not be reached as to 
whether the word "qualified" or "able" 
should be used in a particul..r sentence. The 
wrangling went on and on. Finally some- 
one asked: 

"Just what is the difference between 
'qualified' and 'able'?" 

For a long time no one said anything. 
At last a weather-beaten old boy from the 
union's side of the table piped up: 

"The way I see it is this: my wife is able, 
but Marilyn Monroe is qualified." 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



WHEN DUTY CALLS 

A young fellow in the naval reserve was 
telling several friends that if he was ever 
called for active duty he would like to be 
assigned as commander of an LMD. 

"What's an LMD?" asked a friend. 

The young fellow quickly replied: "Why, 
it's a Long Mahogany Desk." 

• • • 

THEN THE WAR WAS ON 

Shucks! The strike of film actors has been 
won wdthout Marilyn Monroe appearing on 
the picket line once. The Screen Actors 
Guild concluded a satisfactory contract af- 
ter one month of strike. It not only was the 
first strike in the history of tiie entertain- 
ment imion, but also one of the quietest in 
labor annals. Since all the top talent was 
involved in the walkout, it was not even 
necessary to maintain a picket line. The ac- 
tors merely stayed home and that was it. 

Naturally, we are overjoyed that the ac- 
tors came out on top, but the idea of some 
of the million-a-year glamour dolls walking 
a picket line did have a certain amount of 
appeal. Somehow or other, the situation 
brought to mind the old one about the 
Texan who was driving an eastern visitor 
through that arid and barren part of the 
state where everything that doesn't bite 
you pricks you. 

Mile after mile they diove along in si- 
lence. Finally a gaudy and brightly hued 
bird darted across the road. 

"What was that?" asked the visitor. 

"Bird of Paradise," replied the rancher. 

The next mile or two was driven in 
silence. 

"Pretty long way from home, isn't it?" the 
easterner finally commented. 

• * • 

A WORD TO THE WISE 

This being an election year, union mem- 
bers once more are being reminded tliat 
registering and voting are essential parts 
of good citizenship. Besides, the last few 
years prove that bad legislation can nulUfy 
many of the gains won at the bargaining 
table. 

Every union member should ponder the 
words of a West Coast worker who wrote: 

"Unless we elect a liberal Congress this 
fall, I foresee a rapid return of the small 
community store. After all, I ran a corner 
A & P myself back in the Thirties— Apples 
and Pencils." 



KEEPING THINGS STRAIGHT 

Thirteen years after passage of the Taft- 
Hartley Law the NLRB is finally getting 
around to holding an election in the con- 
struction industry, if our information from 
Tennessee can be trusted. As this was being 
written, the Board was scheduled to hold 
an election among the employees of the 
Trammell Construction Company of Bristol, 
Virginia. The Board found that the com- 
pany only keeps about five regular employ- 
es on the payroll all the time. However, 
these five served as a nucleus for the for- 
mation of work crews that included as many 
as 652 construction workers in the past 
three years. So the Board ruled that many 
of these men have worked for the company 
long enough and often enough to have a 
continuing interest in company working con- 
ditions. 

Maybe this case vdll become an entering 
wedge whereby building trades unions may 
yet gain tlie status of first-class citizenship 
from the NLRB. To date, the NLRB and 
construction unions have plowed separate 

fxUTOWS. 

In this connection, we keep thinking 
about tlie carpenter who was filling out an 
application for insiuance. After he finished 
he handed it to the salesman. After study- 
ing it a moment the salesman said: 

"Everything is fine except for one thing. 
You'll have to change this part where it 
asks the relationship of Mrs. Smith to your- 
self. You should write 'wife' instead of 
'strained.' " 




C^-^eL Sp!Mli>ir-2. 



*'Yes, I see, J.B. Your arduous 
struggles for success has 
put you way out in front 1" 



IS 



The Bridges Of Man 

• • 

IT MAY have happened this way: 
Lightning flashed across the skies as a cave dweller stared in terror 
from his shelter. 

One streak cracked loudly into a tree nearby. Its trunk groaned loudly . . . 
then fell with a mighty crash across an adjoining stream. 

After the storm the cave man examined Nature's violent act. Then he 
realized: a way to cross the treacherous stream at last! 

Thus— quite by accident— Neolithic man probably learned the advantage 
of a felled tree across a waterway. And that's how man's first bridges came 
to be. 




General view of George Washington Bridge, 
Century bridge engineering, looking toward the 

Generations later, the world's first 
"engineers" laid log beams across high 
stones they had placed in a stream. 
These were the first many-spanned 
l^ridges- complete with intermediate 
piers. 

In the tropics strong swimmers 
braved rapids with long lines 
clenched in their teeth. These ropes 
were connected with a woven mat— a 
bridge floor. 



considered by many a classic example of 20th 
Jersey side of the Hudson River. 

From ancient India: another new 
idea. Parallel cables— suspenders of 
thin rope— were hung vertically. These 
supported a roadway platform at a 
lower level. It was the world's first 
suspension bridge! 

The true arch was born in Meso- 
potamia, around 4000 B.C. Legend 
has it that a Sumerian, erecting an 
arch of horizontal bricks, playfully 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



turned them on end. The arch ring 
stayed in place! 

But the warrior Romans spurred 
bridge-building as did no people be- 
fore them. Caesar and Hannibal built 
pontoons for advancing armies . . . 
stone bridges were constructed to last 
tlu'ough the centuries. And last they 
did; their semi-cii-cular, massive piers 
were made so that if one was de- 
stroyed, the others would still stand. 

While their bridges survived, the 
Roman Empire crumbled. Barbarians 



bridge that would span the Thames. 
The project began in 1176. Thirty- 
three years later: the old London 
Bridge. 

For 600 years it knew no peer. Its 
19 pointed arches held many shops 
and dwellings; it was the exciting cen- 
ter of London life. 

But time wore even this magnifi- 
cent structure down; in 1831 it was 
to be replaced by the new London 
Bridge, still considered one of the 
world's outstanding spans. 




What skill and know-how can accomplish. One of the nunierous new bridges on the Erie 
Thruway. 



roamed Europe, destroying and pil- 
laging . . . many civilized people fled 
to the sanctity of monasteries to 
record wisdom in elaborate manu- 
scripts. 

Travel was so disordered— and 
dangerous— as the 12th century ended 
that Central European churchmen 
formed a "Brotherhood of Bridge- 
builders" to aid voyagers. 

In France a similar group was 
founded. One of its masterpieces: the 
picturesque bridge at Avignon. 

At the same time an English monk, 
Peter of Colechurch, proposed a 



Even London Bridge meets its 
match when it comes to romance- 
Florence's charming Ponte Vecchio. 
In Longfellow's words, it "described 
itself": 

"Taddeo Gaddi built me; I am old. 
Five centuries old. I plant my foot 

of stone 
Upon the Arno, as St. Michael's own 
Was planted on the dragon, fold bv 

fold ... 
And when I think that Michaelangelo 
Hath leaned on me, I glory in myself." 

Ponte Vecchio was one of the great 
Renaissance bridges which reflected 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



the spirit of surrounding communities. 
Others of that age include the Ri- 
alto over Venice's Grand Canal . . . the 
Ponte Notre Dame, over the Seine. 
The bridge builder became, for the 
first time, a "civil" engineer. 

A new era for bridge-building 
dawned in the 18th and 19th cen- 
turies. Jean Perronet perfected the 
masonry arch . . . covered bridges 



Gate. . . New York's George Washing- 
ton Bridge . . . Germany's Cologne . . . 
Brazil's Florianapolis. These suspen- 
sion bridges span more than 1000 feet 
across waters; connect formerly im- 
possible-to-close gaps. 

But modern bridge-building recent- 
ly saw yet another innovation: the 
first prefabricated bridges. A Pitts- 
burgh firm decided in 1953 that even 




Rough terrain and dizzy heights challenge the 
job done. 

came into vogue; many still dot our 
New England countryside— a remnant 
of the more romantic past. 

Wrought iron bridges were an at- 
tempt at improvement— but a dismal 
failure. They were not only unattrac- 
tive, but often failed to survive strong 
\\'ind blasts or heavy loads. 

In 1878: a new concept. A steel 
bridge was built in remote Glasgow, 
S. D. It answered the need for a 
modern, sturdy, easy-to-build bridge. 

It led to some of the world's great- 
est bridges— San Francisco's Golden 



bridge builder of today. But they always get the 

the slight margin for error in steel 
bridge-building was too much; that 
if bridges were assembled in their 
own fabricating plant, perfect fits 
could be assured when sections are 
hoisted in place. 

It's not easy to imagine a sizeable 
highway bridge— put together and 
complete— inside a building. But it's 
no trick at all. It just takes know-how 
and a mighty large building. 

The time and effort pay off on the 
job site, when the sections arrive 
ready for assembly. The bridge goes 



THE CARPENTER 21 

Up fast and sure, and the erecting advance can be measured by its 

crew know that everything will match bridges. 

exactly with no pieces left over. ^oday, thousands of Brotherhood 

What next m the constant restless- members are devoting their know- 

ness of our bridge-building pioneers? how and skills to the erection of 

It's difficult to say. But one thing's bridges that will be standing when 

certam: then: creations stand as sym- the year 3000 rolls around. If bridges 

bols of the triumph of human spirit really are a symbol of civilization, 

and mgenuity. these Brotherhood members are leav- 

From the first tree that fell across ing an indelible imprint of theii- 

a waterway to the artistic prefab craftsmanship on the saga of our 

bridge of our generation, civilization's times. 

• 

AFRICAN HIGH SCHOOL NEEDS INSTRUCTION BOOKS 

If you have any spare books on woodworking, carpentry, masonry, plumb- 
ing, or construction in general, there is a wonderful way in which you can put 
them to good use. 

Brother Isadore Friedman, who is part-time instructor in woodworking at 
Peninsula School, Menlo Park, California, writes of a challenging project that 
the institution has undertaken. Peninsula School is interested in helping to 
get a struggling new high school launched in East Nigeria. Among the most 
pressing needs of African teachers is for instruction books on construction. 

Owa-Omammu High School in East Nigeria was started by Dr. Ben U. 
Nzeribe, a graduate of Stanford University. The students made their own 
bricks and erected theii- own simple structures. With very little financial aid 
available from the government, the school is struggling to make it on its own. 
Since the policy of the school is not to turn anyone away because of race, 
color, creed, or financial standing, the going is rough. A few donated text- 
books on construction crafts could help the school greatly. 

Peninsula School is willing to act as a forwarding agent for any books 
donated. Here is a chance to get rid of those old books that have been clutter- 
ing up the house and catching dust. Simply wrap them up and mail them to 
Brother Isadore Friedman, Peninsula School, 2747 Xavier St., Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia. So long as they help teach a construction trade they will be welcome. 

« 

72% OF U. S. AGREEMENTS PROVIDE 7 OR MORE PAID HOLIDAYS 

The percentage of collective agreements in the United States that granted 
seven or seven and a half paid holidays a year increased from 40 to 44, and 
the percentage that granted eight or eight and a half days increased from 11 
to 20 between 1957 and 1960, according to a survey by the Bm-eau of National 
Affairs, Inc. 

The agreements providing nine or more paid holidays increased from 6 
to 8 per cent of the total, while the percentage of agreements granting six or 
six and a half days dropped from 30 to 16. The proportion that provided for 
no paid holidays fell from 10 per cent to 9 per cent. 

Premium pay for work done on paid holidays was specified in 94 per cent 
of the agreements. 

The survey was based on a continuing analysis of 400 representative union 
contracts. 




utdoor 



/Weanderin£pl 





By Fred Goetz 



A very practical little device for remov- 
ing fish scales can be made by nailing a 
]x)ttle cap to a short piece of wood and 
dragging the ragged edges of the cap cross- 
grain to the fish scales. Scaling should be 
done as soon as possible after the fish are 
caught. Let the fish cool off and the scal- 
ing operation can get mighty tough, espe- 
cially on bass, crappies, shad, etc. 
« « « 

One of the oldest members of Local 690 
in Little Rock, Arkansas is J. T. Bono. He's 
been a member since 1916, a good carpenter 
and an avid fisherman to boot. 

In his varied out- 
door career, J. T. has 
sampled the outdoor 
bounties of this na- 
tion's far-flung states 
from the mountains of 
Oregon to the lakes of 
Arkansas. 

He likes to take 
things slow and easy 
now and, although he 
clings to fond memo- 
ries of strenuous 
mountain deer hunts, 
he still derives the greatest of pleasure 
from dunking a worm in the home state 
waters of Arkansas. 

Here's a photo that J. T. sends in, show- 
ing him with a nice string of bass and 
crappie that he coaxed from Lake Ouachita 
in Arkansas. 

His son owns a tackle shop thereabouts, 
selling all kinds of bait, lures and other nec- 
essary gear. 

J. T. hopes to catch "old granddad," a 
six-pound largemouth, from the lake this 
year and we wish him the best of luck. 

We're sending jou along a pair of lures, 
J. T., that we hope will help you turn the 
trick. 



Lewis Elliott of 12 South Lawton Street 
in Tulsa, Oklahoma, a 20-year member of 
Local 943, says the best thing in the world 
with which to bait up a trot line for chan- 
nel cats is cut shad and branch frogs. 




Before trying your luck on opening day, 
make sure this year you're gonna put your 
best foot forward. In other words, check 
your fishing tackle and relative items com- 
pletely: 

The reeh— Take it completely apart. 
Cleanse all parts with gasoline and wipe 
dry. Oil the parts and assemble. Introduce a 
good grade, highly refined grease to all 
working parts of the reel (nylon reels ex- 
cepted). If you have a spinning reel, it is 
imperative that you check the roller bearing 
in the bail or pick-up arm. A nicked roller 
will ruin a line in short order. 

The rod:— Check the guides thoroughly. A 
chipped guide will destroy a new Hne. 

The line:— If it's a fly line, remove last 
summer's dirt and grease with a solution of 
warm water and mild, alkaline-free soap. 
Redress the line with graphite, after making 
sure that there are no breaks in tlie varnish. 

A monofilament or braided casting or 
spinning line should be gone over, every 
inch of it, for nicks and abrasions. Don't 
take a chance on a slightly frayed line— re- 
place it. 

Boots:— Make sure there are no leaks in 
your boots or waders. It's no fun fishing all 
day with your feet in cold water. 

Spinners, wobblers, etc.:— "Shine 'em up." 

Hooks:— Make sure they are "needle 
sharp." 

And last, but far from least, don't be like 
some guys (I won't mention any names), 
who did all these things last opening day, 
but like the football player who ran 90 
yards for a touchdown— without the ball— 
— and left the fishing license home! ! ! 



A strong contender as the most frequent- 
ly asked question among fishermen is, "What 
is the best lure?" This query could pertain 
to any type of game fish, and a lure might 
well be anything from a garden worm to a 
gold-plated "Doodad." Tons upon tons of 
literature have been written by outdoor 
writers on the subject, plus an equal amount 
of illustrated descriptive material designed 
by lure manufacturers to glorify their prod- 
uct. Old timers— lovable old tobacco-juice 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



fishermen— will tell you that their concoc- 
tion is top fish-bait and go on to prove their 
point with limit catches. Then there's the 
guy who is so good he can catch fish out 
of a mop bucket and credits his peculiar 
brand of lure as the one and only fish- 
getter. 

Now giving the question much thought 
and wdth respect to all parties, this writing 
man concludes that the angler's lure is sec- 
ondary, and the most important thing is 
"confidence." What I mean is, faith in what- 
ever you are using as fish bait. Consider the 
water conditions that prevail, choose a lure 
that is a proven fish taker, whether it is 
bait or hardware; use it long enough to 
become acquainted with its action, and be- 
fore long you'll hit on a winning combina- 
tion. Coining a piscatorial proverb, I would 
sum up the entire situation and say, "Fickle 
fishermen fetch few fish. . . ." 
« « « 

The son of Tom 
Barnett of Almont, 
Michigan, a member 
of Local 674, is an 
ardent follower and 
an accurate one with 
the knife-edged trian- 
gle and shaft. 

No species of game 
is too swift for his 
prowess. Here's a 
photo of Tom Ben- 
nett's 13-year-old young un' with a rabbit 
he nailed from a way off. He also employs 
the bow and arrow in carp fishing and, 
mark our word, one of these days we're 
gonna hear about this lad knockin' off a 
bear with the longbow. 

Nice going, lad. 

« o « 

When a wife persuades her husband to 
go fishing, that's news. 

When that same little wifey brags about 
her husband's prowess as an angler, that's 
news also. But when a husband comes right 
out and says that the little woman is the 
champion fisherman in the family, that is a 
banner headline. 

Such is the case, according to Joe Mi- 
keska of 3920 N. W. 11th St., a member of 
Local 329, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Joe says the missus fished the Bull Shoals 
Lake in Arkansas for three days last year 
and came home with 150 pounds of fish— 
crappie, black bass and walleye. 

A tip of the topper to you, Joe; you're a 
lucky guy in more ways tlian one. 



Shades of last year's deer hunt, here's a 
photo from H. Caruthers of Twist, Wash- 
ington, a member of Local 2894. He's a 
buck stalker from the word "go." And so 
is the missus. 





H. C. admits that he nailed his buck last 
year but humbly concedes that the little 
woman got the biggest one. 

« « « 

A letter from reader John Baxter reminds 
us that a fishing creel made of old-fashioned 
wicker is the best of the lot. He had one for 
10 years and kept it so clean that his wife 
got the bright idea to use it for a sewing 
basket. It seemed the logical thing for tlie 
missus to use, placing the ball of yam in 
the basket and running the free end through 
the hole in the lid where the fish are placed. 

Last we heard, the creel is being used fcr 
fish again, and a near tragedy just missed 
the divorce courts. 



A highway store in Texas offers the fol- 
lowing "Creek Bank Special": Fi«h-hne, 
hook, cane pole, float, sinker and a 12- 
cent can of snuff or package of plug to- 
bacco—all for 78 cents. Seems like there 
are still places in the world where a man 
can do a lot of living for a small investment. 
* a « 

Clifford Scherf of 
7115 Garden Street 
in Fremont, Ohio, the 
president of Local 
116, says the pickerel 
fishing around tlie is- 
lands of western Lake 
Erie hasn't been good 
in the last couple 
years but, according 
to rehabilitation ef- 
forts and recent test nets set in that area, 
the fishing should be hot this year. 

We hope so. Cliff. 




Editorial 




Foreign Trade Policies Need Overhauling 

Last year saw imports of foreign-made goods jump nearly 20 per cent 
during the time when unemployment in our nation was hovering at around 
5 per cent. This tremendous increase in the influx of foreign goods was not 
counterbalanced by any comparable increase in exports. 

During 1959 foreign countries doing business with the United States added 
a record total of 3.7 billion dollars to their gold and United States currency 
holdings through their stepped-up sales here. 

No method is available for translating this vast amount of money into 
the number of jobs that are represented thereby— jobs that were taken away 
from American workers and exported to foreign workers. However, the figure 
must be very substantial. 

But the vast growth in dollar value of imports does not tell the whole 
story. More and more, foreign nations are exporting finished products rather 
than raw materials to us. In 1950, finished products made up only about 18 
per cent of the goods we imported. By last year the figure had climbed to 
34 per cent. 

So we are not only importing many billions more of foreign goods than 
we used to, but also a much greater percentage of the goods we do import 
comes in the form of finished products, with all the work already done. 
Consequently, thinking people are becoming very seriously alarmed about 
our import situation. Last year's increase in imports was something of a 
bombshell. And a continuation of this pace can spell only disaster for Amer- 
ican workers. 

Recently, John A. Barr, Chairman of Montgomery Ward Company, touched 
on the seriousness of the situation in a speech before Harvard Graduate School 
of Business. In part, he said: 

"We of the United States have long been substantial importers of goods 
and materials. We have imported raw materials which were not domestically 
available in needed quantity, and we have imported manufactured goods to 
satisfy a domestic demand for fashion, design, or quality. In the past, price 
has not been a major motivation for importing goods. However, as inflation has 
pushed our general price level higher and higher, more and more buyers have 
gone abroad to purchase at lower prices. At Ward's, about thirty of our buy- 
ers will make trips abroad this year. Ten years ago, in 1950, none of our buy- 
ers went abroad. We would much prefer to buy American goods, but we 
are being forced to buy more and more foreign merchandise because such 
goods better serve our customers' needs. . . . 

"The evil of this is that it means less products and, consequently, fewer 
jobs in this country. . . . 

"It is high time and extremely urgent, in my opinion, that organized labor 
recognize the seriousness of this menace. Labor must join forces with man- 



THE OAR.PENTER 25 

agment in our manufacturing industries to develop a program to meet this 
tlireat to our economy. . . ." 

We agree completely with Mr, Barr. The situation is serious and becoming 
even more serious month by month. However, what Mr. Barr fails to point out 
is that American industry, itself, is largely responsible for this growth in im- 
ports. American firms are building subsidiary factories in foreign lands at an 
unprecedented pace. Those that are not building foreign factories are nego- 
tiating sales contracts with foreign firms. Thus they protect themselves against 
any and all eventualities. If they sell their American-made goods, they make 
a profit. But they also make a profit if they sell their foreign-made goods. 
And there is some indication that they do better on the sales of their goods 
made abroad. Thus the situation holds little worry for them. 

It is the American workers who are bearing the brunt of the evils brought 
on by the foreign-goods invasion. There was a time when the American worker, 
because of his technological superiority, could out-produce a foreign worker, 
despite the fact that he might be getting two or three times the wages. But 
there has been a tremendous narrowing of the technological gap between the 
United States and foreign producers. Foreign workers often work on machines 
identical with those used at home. 

The tremendous growth of foreign factories, financed by American firms, 
made this process inevitable. The firms that built factories in foreign lands 
naturally equipped them with the newest and most efficient machinery they 
could find. In some cases, the foreign factories are even better equipped than 
the parent factories at home, because they are newer. 

All these things point up the need for a prompt re-evaluation of our entii-e 
foreign trade policy. 

The problem has been a nagging one for years, but the explosive increase 
in foreign imports in 1959 indicates that the problem can no longer be ignored. 
Automation is shrinking jobs at home fast enough. When imports make addi- 
tional inroads on the job market at the same time, prompt action is needed. 

To date, all the Administration has seen fit to do is to try to stimulate the 
sales of our goods to foreign countries. This is well and good. Exports make 
jobs too. But over the long haul the real menace is almost limitless imports. 

First, there needs to be some sort of legislative governor added to the 
foreign-trade mechanism. 

Second, some system is needed to discourage, or at least slow dov/n, the 
exodus of American productive capacity to foreign lands. If American firms 
want to build factories abroad, certainly they should be permitted to do so. 
But they should not be allowed to use those factories as springboards for 
flooding the American market with low-cost products. 

o 

Arch-Conservatives Seek To Dominate The Church 
Probably satisfied that they have the vast percentage of the daily press, 
TV, and other methods of communication safely in their pockets, the big- 
business arch-conservatives of the nation appear to be moving in on the 
churches. 

More and more, evidence is accumulating that powerful men with un- 
limited bankrolls are putting pressure on ministers and priests to discourage 
them from involving themselves in social issues. 



26 THECARPEXTER 

At a recent convention in Chicago, J. Howard Pew, 78, a multi-millionaire 
from Pennsylvania whose fortune is estimated to run into nine figures, re- 
jjorted that a number of heavy contributors were threatening to withhold 
contributions from the Presbyterian Church because of some of its recent 
pronouncements on matters such as collective bargaining and civil rights. 

Among the church's pronouncements that roused the ire of multi-million- 
aii'e Pew was the General Assembly's indorsement of the principle of collec- 
tive bargaining and its defense of union security contracts. 

Recently, the New York Times carried almost a full-page story on the 
pressures that are being exerted on the church by wealthy individuals who 
contribute generously. 

The whole proposition was touched off by the recent uncovering of an 
Air Force Manual that warned of high echelon infiltration of churches by 
Communists. The manual has been withdrawn by the Air Force, but tiie 
arch-reactionaries are still using it to club ministers into line. 

A number of pastors have been courageously fighting the efforts of the 
arch-conservatives to gag ministers. But the trend seems to be growing rather 
than diminishing. 

The Times article disclosed that there are a number of church-based 
organizations actively attacking the churches and ministers who speak out 
against social injustices. All of these anti-social-progress groups are financed 
by contributions from arch-conservatives. 

The article cited one small radio station in Illinois being offered $5,000 a 
week to broadcast a radio program sponsored by one of these groups. 

Oddly enough, some of the most outspoken critics of the churches' partici- 
pation in secular affairs have no objection when the churches' pronounce- 
ments follow the ultra-conservative line. Pew, who threatened the crack- 
down on churches that "meddle in secular affairs," himself has helped lavish- 
ly in financing an organization called "Christian Freedom, Incorporated." 

One of the publications issued by this group is called "Christian Eco- 
nomics," and is sent to over 175,000 Protestant ministers. By and large, the 
publication confines itself to beating the drums for the most reactionary type 
of economics. Recently, "Christian Economics" has been repeating the feather- 
bedding charges made against the railroad unions by railroad management. 
No effort is made to present the workers' side. This, Mr. Pew does not seem 
to find objectionable. In fact, his contributions helped to start the publica- 
tion. So his objection is not to the church taking note of economic issues so 
long as the Big Business line is followed. It is only when a church thinks 
that some social conditions need overhauling that he sees red and threatens 
to bring his purse into play. 

Fortunately, high church officials are not being stampeded, either by the 
mounting criticism and economic pressure from the extreme right, or by the 
unsupported charges of Communist infiltration from other areas. Some 
churches may receive substantial percentages of their financial support from 
wealthy donors. But we, the working people, make up the vast percentage 
of all congregations. If men of wealth are going to try to subvert churches 
into mouthpieces for arch-conservatism, we face a challenge that we must 
meet head on, lest the churches become as subservient to the Big Business 
point of view as many newspapers and magazines are. 



THE CAKP ENTER 27 

Credit Can Be An Untender Trap 

The man who invented the term "easy credit" belongs in the Burhngton 
Liars Chib. Credit has been getting harder and harder as finance charges are 
jacked up through various devices, many of them hidden. This has inspired 
Senator Douglas to introduce a bill calling for full disclosure of finance 
charges. 

Every time credit has been "eased" the down payment has been made 
smaller, but the interest rate has been stepped up, so that over the long haul 
the buyer has had to pay out bigger and bigger sums for the privilege of 
installment buying. 

This system has just about run its course. Look at the ads in the average 
newspaper and count those that feature the plirase, "no down payment," in 
large type. You will notice that most ads offer this sort of inducement. Cer- 
tainly, it is impossible to go any farther along this line unless merchants start 
actually giving a cash bonus for taking merchandise on the installment plan. 
This they may well do because many no longer make their profits from selling 
the merchandise but rather from the interest they collect on installment 
purchases. 

We have not been able to uncover any reliable statistics regarding the 
amount of income the average working-class family contributes to installment- 
buying interest. But it must run rather high. The man with take-home pay of 
$100 per week probably is paying $20 to $30 per month interest on a mort- 
gage. If he is buying a car on time, the interest nick could be nearly as high 
because car rates run considerably steeper. If there is a TV or electrical 
appliance involved, another $10 can be gobbled up by finance charges. All 
told, it is easy for a family to get jockeyed into the position where it is paying 
from 15% to 20% of its disposable income in finance charges. 

This money is always siphoned off the purchasing power of the family. 
The $15 a week that goes into the interest charges cannot be used to purchase 
additional goods the family may need or desire. 

With the market for gadgets constantly shrinking, the sales pressure mounts, 
and it becomes increasingly difficult for a family to maintain a sensible atti- 
tude toward installment buying. In fact, it becomes downright difficult not 
to get sucked into the credit whirlpool too deeply. 

Here are a couple of rule-of-thumb measurements for evaluating your 
credit purchases. These are the measuring sticks that bankers use in making 
loans. 

First, never allow your installment purchases to tie up more than 15% of 
your discretionary, disposable income— that is, the income you have left after 
you pay the rent, utilities, and other fixed charges. 

The second good rule is to never allow your total installment purchases to 
exceed an amount equal to 10% of your income for two years. That is, if your 
income is $400 per month, do not get yourself on the hook for more than $960 
at one time. This, of course, does not include mortgage payments which, gen- 
erally speaking, count as rent. 

We merely pass along these two rules-of-thumb for measuring your own 
credit transactions. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, In-d. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

FRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, ln<d. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 



Second District, RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventh District, LYLE J. HILLER 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Or€. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 



Eighth District, J. P. CAMBIANO 
17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fourth District, HENRY W. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
1834 N. 78th St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HUTCHESON, Chairman ; R. E. LIVINGSTON, Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



IMPO RTANT NO TICE 

In the issuance of clearance cards, care should be taken to see that they are 
properly filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary 
of the Local Union issuing same as well as the Local Union accepting the clear- 
ance. The clearance cards must be sent to the General Secretary's Department 
without delay, in order that the members' names can be listed on the quarterly 
account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained therein 
must be used. 



LOCAL UNIONS CHARTERED 

2732 Columbus, Georgia 



2577 Salem, Indiana 
2620 Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 2745 

2666 Plymouth, Indiana 2757 

2692 Columbia, Mississippi 3268 

3269 Inez, Kentucky 



Santurce, Puerto Rico 

London, Kentucky 

Hawkesbury, Nova Scotia, Canada 



^n 0ittnoxt^tn 



Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more. 



The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



ALEXANDER, LINWOOD W., L. U. 388. Rich- 
mond, Va. 

ANDREWS, PHILIP, L. U. 1595, Conshohocken, 
Pa. 

ARTHUR, JOHN W., L. U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 

BACKMAN, REINHOLD, L. U. 22, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

BAGBY, SAMUEL M., L. U. 110, St. Joseph, 
Mo. 

BARNHILL, STROUD R., L. U. 1822, Ft. 
Worth, Texas 

BEARDEN, WILLIAM A., L. U. 1587, Hutchin- 
son, Kans. 

BEURNEZ, FERNAND, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

BOHM, ERIC A., L. U. 15, Hackensack, N. J. 

BOUDREAULT, CLEO., L. U. 93, Ottawa, Ont. 

BOYTON, FRANK E., L. U. 710, Long Beach, 
Cal. 

BRITNELL, ROBERT E., L. U. 388, Richnjond, 
Va. 

BRITTAIN, JAMES E., L. U. 1423, Corpus 
Christi, Texas 

BYSTRY, WILLIAM, L. U. 101, Baltimore, 
Md. 

CANFIELD, CLARENCE D., L. U. 281, Bing- 
hamton, N. Y. 

CARLSEN, K., L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

CARTER, HAROLD E., L. U. 388, Richmond, 
Va. 

CASSELS, GEORGE, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

CAWLEY, MARTIN J., L. U. 401, Pittston, Pa. 

CHARLES, WILLIAM T., L. U. 710, Long 
Beach, Cal. 

CHERRY, J. W., L. U. 259, Jackson, Tenn. 

CHRISTENSEN, ALBERT, L. U. 1456, New 
York, N. Y. 

CICCARELLI, FRED, L. U. 218, Boston, Mass. 

CLAUSON, SVEN J., L. U. 10, Chicago, 111. 

COLOGGI, JOSEPH, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, 
N. Y. 

COSTANZO, NICK, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

CRAMER, HENRY G., L. U. 388, Richmond, 
Va. 

CRAWFORD, HAROLD S., L. U. 226, Portland, 
Ore. 

CROCKER, ALBERT P., L. U. 16, Springfield, 

111. 
CROCKETT, VERN M., L. U. 583, Portland, 

Ore. 
CUNNINGHAM, ALEX A., L. U. 350, New Ro- 

chelle, N. Y. 
DAMMER, PHIL, L. U. 266, Stockton, Cal. 
DANGERFIELD, CLAUDE, L. U. 10, Chicago, 

111. 
DATZENKO, MICHAEL, L. U. 1595, Consho- 
hocken, Pa. 
DAVIS, LYNN, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
DAWSON, EMERSON, L. U. 253, Omaha, Neb. 
DeLEO, ANTHONY, L. U. 1921, Hempstead, 

N. Y. 
DE-MOUGIN, LAWRENCE, L. U. 133, Terre 
Haute, Ind. 



DISTEFANO, LORETO, L. U. 608, New York, 

N. Y. 
DOOLEY, HERMAN T., L. U. 2024, Miami, Fla. 
EADIE, ALEXANDER, L. U. 72, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
EDBROOKE, HARRY, L. U. 44, Champaign- 

Urbana, 111. 
EMERSON, JOSEPH, L. U. 493, Mt. Vernon, 

N. Y. 
ERICKSON, EDWIN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
ESCHBACK, WILLIAM, L. U. 10, Chicago, 111. 
EWING, W. H., L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 
FAROTTE, GRANT, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
FEDORCZAK, HARRY, L. U. 711, Mt. Carme', 

Pa. 
FLINN, RALPH, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
FORD, GEORGE, L. U. 608, New York, N. Y. 
FOSTER, JOHN F., L. U. 16, Springfield, 111. 
FOSTER, WALTER E., L. U. 44, Champaign- 

Urbana, 111. 
FRAZER, LOUIS W., L. U. 289, Lockport, N. Y. 
FREEMAN, AUGUST, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
FRIDHOLM, CARL, L. U. 493, Mt. Vernon, 

N. Y. 
FRIESE, WILLIAM, L. U. 710, Long Beach, 

Cal. 
GAUDET, DENNIS, L. U. 218, Boston, Mass. 
GIBSON, HAROLD, L. U. 602, St. Louis, Mo. 
GIERE, MAURICE, L. U. 1176, Fargo, N. Dak. 
GIRARD, F. J., L. U. 22, San Francisco, Ca!. 
GOLDING, LESTER C. Sr., L. U. 19, Detroit, 

Mich. 
GRAFTON, THOMAS A., L. U. 764, Shreveport, 

La. 
HALLERAN, JOSEPH, L. U. 1921, Hempstead, 

N. Y. 
HALLIDAY, CLARENCE, L. U. 769, Pasadena, 

Cal. 
HARBISON, R. I., L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 
HELMICK, JASON, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 
HENDERSON, CALVIN, L. U. 218, Boston, 

Mass. 
HENDRICKSON, WILLIAM, L. U. 2416, Port- 
land, Ore. 
HILLMAN, WILLIAM G., L. U. 289, Lockport, 

N. Y. 
HIRSCH, SEBASTIAN, L. U. 608, New York, 

N. Y. 
HOHMAN, EDWARD, L. U. 72, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
HUBER, JOSEPH W., L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
HUGHES, ALBERT, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
HUNT, B. T., L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 
IKE, CHESTER, L. U. 1176, Fargo, N. Dak. 
INCE, A. L., L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
JACOBSON, ARVID, L. U. 218, Boston, Mas-. 
JEFFORDS, FRANK, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
JOHANSON, JOHAN, L. U. 10, Chicago, 111. 



THE CARPENTER 



Jlln ,Mcm0X-ium 



JOHNSON, ELIEL, L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
JOHNSON, JOHN O., L. U. 10, Chicago, l\\. 
KELLY, JOHN J., L. U. 1921, Hemi.stearl, 

N. Y. 
KISCH, WILLIAM, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 
KRAUTH, ALOIS, L. U. 10, Chicago, 111. 
LAMMERS, JOHN G., L. U. 1527, Wheaton, 

111. 
LANE, FRED, L. U. 493, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
LASWELL, SAMUEL, L. U. 16, Springfield, 

III. 
LEA, W. H., L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 
LEACH, DAVID, L. U. 16, Springfield, III. 
LENGE, GEORGE, L. U. 493, Mt. Vernon, 

N. Y. 
LIVERMAN, HARDY, L. U. 331, Norfolk, Va. 
LORINZINI, JOHN, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 
LOWRY, CHARLES O., L. U. 1480, Boulder, 

Colo. 
MARSTON, ARTHUR, L. U. 72, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
MARYNOSKI, STANLEY, L. U. 1921, Hemp- 
stead, N. Y. 
MASTERS, THOMAS, L. U. 72, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
MATTSON, ALEX, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
MAYTA, RUDOLPH M., L. U. 22, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
McCLURE, ROY W., L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
McGRAW, V. L., L. U. 226, Portland, Ors. 
McGUIGAN, LAWRENCE, L. U. 60S, New 

York, N. Y. 
McKAY, ALDEN, L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 
MILLER, RAYMOND K., L. U. 19, Detroit, 

Mich. 
MITCHELL, JAMES H. Sr., L. U. 974, BaUi- 

more, Md. 
MOHN, DAVID, L. U. 1138, Toledo, Ohio 
MOORE, ARTHUR, L. U. 218, Boston, Mass. 
MORAN, MICHAEL J., L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
MORGIS, EDWARD, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
MORIARTY, EUGENE, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
MORROW, HOMER E., L. U. 767, Ottumwa, 

Iowa 
MOUGHLER, ROY, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
MULLOY, FRANK H., L. U. 10, Chicago, 111. 
NAAZ, WILLIAM, L. U. 1921, Hempstead, 

N. Y. 
NAWROCKI, NICHOLAS, L. U. 493, Mt. Ver- 
non, N. Y. 
NEELEY, FRANK A., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, 

Texas 
NORBY, WILLIAM A., L. U. 583, Portland, 

Ore. 
NOYES, GEORGE A., L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
PARKER, GEORGE U., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
PARSONS, GEORGE, L. U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 
PATTERSON, ALEX, L. U. 2024, Miami, Fla. 
PATTERSON, DUNCAN C. Sr., L. U. 331, 

Norfolk, Va. 
PERSON, E. S., L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 
PETZOLD, WILLIAM, L. U. 133, Terre 

Haute, Ind. 
PFEIFFER, FRED, L. U. 16, Springfield, 111. 
POTTER, LEWIS, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
RAINEY, JASPER P., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 



RAMSEY, C. L., L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 

REINIKKA, JOE A., L. U. 2416, Portland, Ore. 

RIDDLE, JAMES R.|, L. U. 132, Washington, 
D. C. 

RIDING, ABEL S., L. U. 22, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

ROSS, DICK, L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 

ROSS, JOHN, L. U. 44, Champaign-Urbana, 
III. 

RUGER, HOFFMAN, L. U. 289, Lockport, N. Y. 

RUNDBERG, ARTHUR, L. U. 1456, New York, 
N. Y. 

SATARIANO, JOSEPH M., L. U. 22, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

SCHAFFER, JOHN, L. U. 129, Hazleton, Pa. 

SCHOOLCRAFT, DANIEL, L. U. 22, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

SCHRODT, PAUL, L. U. 117, Albany, N. Y. 

SCOTT, JAMES N., L. U. 218, Boston, Mass. 

SEESTEDT, ANDREW, L. U. 87, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

SENG, HENRY, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 

SHAW, CLARENCE B., L. U. 2416, Portland, 
Ore. 

SHELTON, ERNEST, L. U. 2039, New Or- 
leans, La. 

SMITH, PERCY L., L. U. 1595, Conshohocken, 
Pa. 

SMITH, RAYMOND A., L. U. 1423, Corpus 
Christi, Texas 

SMITH, WILLIAM C, L. U. 218, Boston, 
Mass. 

SNYDER, CHARLES A., L. U. 239, Easton, 
Pa. 

SNYDER, FRANK, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

SODERSTROM, HERMAN, L. U. 35, San Ra- 
fael, Cal. 

SOLES, FRANK, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

SONJU, EUGENE J., L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

SPINNIETS, ARTHUR, L. U. 1921, Hempstead, 
N. Y. 

STEIGLER, GEORGE, L. U. 1921, Hempstead, 
N. Y. 

STEPHENS, THEODORE, L. U. 2287, New 
York, N. Y. 

SVEJSTRUP, KARL, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

SVENNINGSEN, JOHN, L. U. 1456, New York, 
N. Y. 

TANNER, J. M., L. U. 1394, Ft. Lauderdale, 
Fla. 

TARBELL, EARL, L. U. 871, Battle Creek, 
Mich. 

TEDDER, MARVIN G., L. U. 1394, Ft. Lauder- 
dale, Fla. 

THINIUS, ED L., L. U. 710, Long Beach, Cal. 

THOMAS, ANDREW C, L. U. 1478, Redondo 
Beach, Cal. 

TUCKMAN, LOUIS, L. U. 132, Washington, 
D. C. 

TURNER, J. T., L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 

ULIONE, CAESAR, L. U. 15, Hackensack, N. J. 

VANDERKIN, PETER C, L. U. 2416, Port- 
land, Ore. 

VAUGHAN, RUFUS, L. U. 710, Long Beach, 
Cal. 

VI VINO, FLOYD, L. U. 15, Hackensack, N. J. 

WAGNER, RAY, L. U. 335, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

WARD, ELBERT, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

WARREN, HENRY, L. U. 22, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



31 



Hazards Of Heavy Lifting 

By Dr. W. Schweisheimer 

* * 

A MAN was going to move a heavy timber. He looked around for help 
but everybody was tied down with another job. 
He didn't feel there was time to wait for help, so he lifted it himself 
impatiently to "get it over with." 

He felt a strange sensation, a kind of sudden pain in the groin on his 
right side. The pain did not disappear. 

The next day he saw his doctor who found a hernia on his right side. 
It was probably caused or at least aggravated by the heavy lifting of the day 
before. 

Lifting heavy loads is part of the routine job for the carpenter, the wood- 
worker, the man in the furniture in- 
dustry, for everyone working with 
wood. Excessive strain is placed on 
back, shoulders, abdominal (belly) 
muscles and heart muscle. Proper pre- 
cautions should be taken either by 
providing mechanical lifting appli- 
ances where practicable, or if lifting 
operations are done by hand, provid- 
ing suitable aids in order to reduce 
vertical lift as much as possible. 

How Lifting Affects the Heart 

A healthy heart, well trained by 
long practice, will not revolt against 
extra strain imposed upon it by heavy 
lifting. A man can be an excellent 
woodworker or lumberman without 
being athletically built. His heart may 
do a good job for the average kind of 
work, while it may suffer under ex- 
aggerated strain. The heart is a mus- 
cle; it may get tired by overstrain 
just as arm or leg muscles get tired. 

Experts have figured out that men 
should not lift loads more than 130 
lbs. in weight, and women should not 
lift loads of more than 65 lbs. for in- 
termittent work and 50 lbs. for con- 
tinuous work. Raising a load from the 
feet is particularly difficult. 



Repeated overstrain may produce 
enlargement of the heart muscle. 
Such enlargement caused by excess 
physical exertion is referred to as 
Athlete's Heart. Excessive exertion 
gives rise in a healthy man to signs 
of breathlessness, palpitation of the 
heart, giddiness, fatigue. Pain in the 
region of the heart may result. Such 
signs are the normal answer of the 
body to physical strain. Healthy 
woodworkers require considerable ex- 
ertion before the feeling of distress 
appears; weaker men require much 
less exertion. 

The best advice is to avoid over- 
exertion and call a fellow worker for 
assistance when lifting heavy loads. 
A man who feels he has overstraiiied 
himself had better put in a few days 
of rest. Of all remedies and cures this 
is the best way to bring the heart 
back to normal. 

How Lifting Affects Nerves 

A woodworker overstretched his 
right arm while he was carrying a 
heavy load, probably in connection 
with a brisk movement. The next day 
he felt a dull pain in and below the 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



right shoulder. An important nerve 
had been under pressure because of 
the heavy load. He could not move 
his arm in the normal way; all arm 
movements were weakened. Despite 
different kinds of treatment the con- 
dition did not improve for quite some 
time. 

The nerve fibres which join muscles 
and brain, are mostly wrapped in a 
good layer of fat or connecting tis- 
sues. On some places, though, they 
are more superficial, and strong pres- 
sure may hurt and injure the fibres. 
Traction on the arm, a fall on the 
shoulder, or pressure on the shoulder 
from above by a heavy load may af- 
fect one or several nerves. 

The muscles in that part of the 
arm then feel weak. They may lose 
strength. The arm or hand may be- 
come paralyzed. A nerve going to the 
muscles of the shoulder is the long 
thoracical nerve. When it has been 
injured by excessive strain such as 
carrying a heavy sack, some time may 
be required for full recovery. Proper 
treatment and avoiding heavy lifting 
will restore the normal function of the 
nerve. 

A Cause of Backache 

The onset of acute backache (lum- 
bago) may be dramatic in its sudden- 
ness. A woodworker or carpenter lifts 
a load too heavy for him which puts 
an excessive strain on the muscles of 
his back. Some muscle fibres are rup- 
tured, and he is struck with agoniz- 
ing pain in the small of the back. No 
movement is possible, he must lie 
down on the floor, cannot get up. 
Later the pain eases. He can move 
again. Others are not as fortunate. 
They cannot move by themselves. 
Particularly while working in stooped 
or twisted positions, a sudden move- 
ment may be suflBcient to injure the 
back muscles. 



Although lumbago is a very acute 
and disabling ailment, return to nor- 
malcy may be quick. There is every 
reason not to repeat the heavy exer- 
tion for a long time. People who have 
suffered from lumbago are suscep- 
tible to a recurrence for several 
months. 

Advantages of Material-Handling 
Devices 

Knock-knees and other leg condi- 
tions are less frequent today, due pri- 
marily to the use of mechanical de- 
vices instead of mere hands and arms. 
Many jobs of lumbermen and wood- 
workers are performed more sat- 
isfactorily by means of a mechan- 
ical aid. Where this is not possible, 
the best means of lifting the loads 
by hand have to be decided, taking 
into account whether construction of 
platforms, racks, benches or similar 
aids will reduce the amount of verti- 
cal lift required. 

Continuous standing at hard work 
and lifting heavy loads may produce 
weak foot and flat foot. Taxi drivers 
and desk workers are hardly ham- 
pered by flat feet. Lumbermen and 
wood workers are on their feet for 
many hours. They may suffer from 
pain in foot and back, cramps in the 
calves, and burning sensations in the 
soles of the feet unless something is 
done to relieve the trouble. 

The feet carry the weight of the 
whole body. Additional overweight in 
lifting loads presses the arches down. 
After repeated strain they stay down, 
flat feet develop. An inborn tendency 
to flat feet is made worse by heavy 
lifting. Arch supports in one form or 
another may bring relief. Many work- 
ing people have good results with this 
method. There are factory-made arch 
supports of different size and shape, 
and there are individually construct- 
ed arch supports. It is advisable to 
provide non-slip material for the floors 



T II E C A R P E N T E R 33 

in tliose areas where lifting opera- whose injury we have described was 

tions are carried out. a small lump under the skin. Normal- 

r tj • ^y *^® belly muscles are one firm wall. 

Causes ot Herma g^^^ sometimes there are small gaps 

If a lumberman or carpenter feel between the muscle fibres. Here the 

unfit to perform weight-lifting opera- content of the belly may press for- 

tions, he better be careful. People are ward in the groin or just below the 

more prone to accidents and injuries groin on the thigh. 

due to muscular strain when they are a • i ^ i.- i ^ .. • 

.J. 1 T • 1 1. 11111 A violent exertion, a sudden strain, 

indisposed. Lio;nter work should be i-r^. i . i i i 

Fj J c 1 ■ T-. . lirtmg or pushing a heavy load may 

provided lor sucli occasions. Experi- , ° ^i ^ ° ■, ^ i . 

^ J ^ T 1 ^ , enlarge the gap and cause a hernia, 

enced carpenters can do much good -rxri ° u i. i j- 

, J \_ ^- n 11 Whoever has a natural disposition 

by demonsti-atmg the correct methods .i . iii . Vv,- 

^ ,.r . * to herma should not over-exert him- 

°' self. Trusses are not always sufiicient 

A hernia or rupture is a protrusion to keep the hernia back. An opera- 

of a loop of intestine through a weak tion may be necessary to restore full 

spot on the muscle wall of the abdo- working capacity and efficiency to a 

men. This loop cannot be seen as it man suffering from a hernia and who, 

is covered with skin and fat. All that being a carpenter or woodworker, 

could be seen in the woodworker cannot avoid lifting heavy loads. 



DRUG MAKERS GET NEW LUMPS 

During the past month a long string of top-flight scientists testified that 
the drug manufacturers are pursuing a public-be-damned policy in advertis- 
ing as well as price. Following is some of the testimony presented to the 
Kefauver Committee by men who have an intimate knowledge of the business. 

Dr. Chauncey D. Leake, president of the nation's largest scientific society 
—the American Association for the Advancement of Science— accused the drug 
industry of treating doctors as "simpletons" by flooding them with "flamboyant, 
exaggerated advertisements." 

Dr. Dale Console of Princeton, N. J., the former medical director of a large 
pharmaceutical house, said the drug industry is foisting many "relatively 
worthless" but expensive drugs and medicines on doctors and their patients 
with high-pressure sales pictures. 

He called for restrictive, new Federal legislation, saying that at present 
a drug can be marketed "if it cannot be shown that it will kill too many 
people." 

Console served for five years as an executive of E. R. Squibb & Sons, divi- 
sion of Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation. 

Dr. Frederick H. Meyers of the University of California told the sub-com- 
mittee that many drug advertisements were "at best incomplete and at worst 
dishonest." 

"Some ads become so expensive that they approach 'payola,' " he declared. 

Dr. William Bean of the University of Iowa Medical School said the drug 
companies were trying to profit on the "quick pill"— medicines that he consid- 
ered only partly tested. 



34 



Progress Report 

By the time oui- new headquarters building in Washington, D. C. is 
completed it probably will be the best "superintended" building ever erected 
there inasmuch as members from many states and provinces have looked it 
over while visiting the Capital. For the rest of us who have not had the 
opportunity, these pictures show what the project looked like on April 30. 





UNITED BfiorHEmom, caw^kters « joi»cbs 

WASHINOTCW, D, 0. 

HOLAB IPD A ROOT, A8CMITCCTS 

go* A. vau5 GOuMtt 

APRIL IjTB, ^«0 (WirOBO. i* 





leASHUARTERS BUIUHNB 

UNITED BnOmEnHOID, CAHPEMTERJ t JOINERS.- 
MA^HINSrON, 0. C, 

HOLASIRD anOOr, AMMITKTS I 

MUt A. VOIK OOMW '' ■] 

APRIL ijni, <»M Mora «k It -J 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

CAL. RETIREES GET INITIAL "FUND" BENEFITS 

Long and constant effort to attain retirement benefits for Southern Counties veteran 
Union Carpenters became a material reaUty on March 7th at a Special Presentation Awards 
banquet held in Biltmore Bowl, Los Angeles, California. 

Approximately 600 guests paid honor to 152 members of the Brotherhood eligible for 
benefits under the Carpenters Pension Trust. 

Of this number, 101 were present to receive first checks, presented by William Sidell, 
co-chairman of the Pension Fund's Board of Trustees and secretary-treasurer of the Los 
Angeles County District Council. 

The occasion marked realization of joint endeavor by the union and management asso- 
ciations to provide pension benefits for qualifying veterans and in recognition of long years 
of service given to the building construction industry. 

In a welcoming address John ^V. Bernard, Pension Trust co-chairman, representing 
Associated General Contractors, told of the Trust's prime object— to furnish maximum bene- 
fits to the greatest number of members. 

In his introduction of guests who included union and contractor officials. Pension Trust 
personnel, administrators, counselors and their wives, Bernard commended all those whose 
accomplishments, he said, followed more than five years of arduous work. 

Especially congratulated was the 10-member joint Board of Trustees whose benevolent 
efforts were given without remuneration, Bernard emphasized. 

Joining in tlie welcome. Co-chairman Sidell said, "it was a pleasure to see so many 
there— especially the veteran members and their wives. 

"Evidenced from their dancing ability here tonight, there's lots of Hfe left in these 'old 
timers'," he commented. 

He remarked on the great number of contractors present, lauding those who helped 
establish the Pension Trust. In their attendance they demonstrate "respect for our retiring 
veterans who ha\e given so much to the industry, and cooperation with the pension pi'o- 
gram," the Council official said. 

Sidell regretted that a previous commitment prevented attendance of tlie Brotherhood's 
General President, M. A. Hutcheson, who, however, was represented by Joseph Cambiano, 
General Executi\e Board member, who was introduced. 

Also introduced were Chris T. Lehman, General Representative; Harry Harkleroad, 
secretary of the State Council; Joseph J. Christian, executive secretary, Los Angeles 
Building and Construction Trades Council; Tom Randall, AFL-CIO staff representative; 
Federal Mediator Earl Ruddy, and Willis A. Smith, business manager, Sheet Metal Work- 
ers Local No. 108. 

^AJso present were staff representati^•es of the Los Angeles District Council, officials of 
numerous local unions and their wives. 

General Executive Board member Cambiano extended congratulations to the veteran 
pensioners. "In this great occasion we owe these old timers a debt of gratitude," he said. 

He emphasized their early trails in tlie labor mo\ement \^■hicll helped clear a less-rugged 
road. 

"I know the loyalty of these old-time members and I hope the younger men will credit 
them for progress we have made." 

Cambiano paid tribute to those contractors who have proved to be right— and coopera- 
tive. "No place in our nation is tliere a better contract than here in California, and through 
our Master Agreement much has been gained, including the Pension Plan," he declared. 



86 



THE CARPENTER 



State Public Relations Officer John Henning conveyed regards from Go\ernor Edmund 
G. Brown, who was unable to attend because of Sacramento legislative commitments. 

Regarding retirement provisions, Henning asked: "Who among us here tonight thought 
they would live to see tlie day when Carpenters would receive pensions?" 

"We're writing history— and we've come a long way," he said. 

In the awards ceremony which followed, each of the 101 veteran members were greeted 
with sustained applause as they received their first pension check benefits from Fund 
Trustee Member Sidill, who added his congratulations. 



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Honored at the special Presentation Awards Banquet were these retired Southern 
California Brotherhood veterans who received first Pension benefits issued by the Car- 
penters Pension Fund of Southern California embracing 11 southern counties. Those shown 
in the photo include: 

John W. Anderson, Walter R. McCoy, John A. Boyce, Charles T. Ellhaesser, Adolph W. 
Erickson, John Gunsten, Lee R. Hackney, Henry W. Hagen, James F. Kearns, Alexander 
V. Kerr, Jack Kupersmith, John J. Langenegger, Martin C. Lehmann, Louis A. Marcotte, 
Lloyd E. Miller, R. W. Nelson, WiUiam R. Pollock, Benjamin T. Price, Earl D. Sutherland, 
Verne Armstrong, Ehme H. Aukes, Berend Barton, Harry Beal, George C. Bentson, 
Claude M. Biddick, James S. Bird, B. S. Brannan. 

Lyle W. Brown, Einar E. Carlson, Asa B. Chelf, Herbert M. Craw, Albert E. Croft, Axel 
G. Day, William Doran, William A. Dowse, Robert Dunsmoir, James R. Pryor, Alex 
Roseman, Andrew H. Fram, Joe Ginsberg, Alfred J. Godden, James S. Guier, George 
Hammond, Edward H. Hoffman, Lawrence R. Howard, James Jack, Otis L. Jackson, A. 
Roy Joyce, Harry Karlin, Otto A. Keister, A. C. Leonard, Boyd C. Lee, Hilbert O. Lee. 

Carl Lindquist, William Madill, George M. Naughtin, Hayman Pinsky, Melvin T. Saffell, 
George F. Smith, Abe M. Trester, Romie Urban, William Watson, Andrew J. Williams, 
Roy E. Wilson, Richard L. Brookbank, George V. Prong, James Girton, Max Witt, Axel N. 
Carlson, Eli Hyman, Baxter McFall, Alvin J. Miller, Frank Rosenberg, Peter W. Ross, 
George B. Sandifer, Raymond S. Schneider, Gilbert T. Serfass, Carl C. Sherwood, Herbert 
L. Shipley. 

Harry Slaferman, John N. TuUis, Morris Wax, Thomas B. Wilson, David Morrison, 
Herschell C. Fulk, Thomas J. Alnes, Duncan A. Mackintosh, Samuel E. Froman, Nathan 
Smookler, George A. McCoy, John Vance, Ern S. Upright, William Bibby, Leslie N. Po- 
land, Jake Kleiner, James M. Pryor, Alex Roseman, Clifton Mace, and Max Witt. 

Fifty-year Brotherhood members include James M. Dupes, Clyde D. Allen, Robert G. 
McLeod and Edmund E. Holm. Fred C. Ohlrich has served 46 years as a union craftsman. 



PHILADELPHIA LOCAL HONORS SENIOR MEMBERS 

Recently, Local Union No. 359, Philadelphia, took time out from its routine activities 
to pay special tribute to a group of old timers whose memberships date back more than 
half a century. Commemorative gold pins were awarded to the old timers. 

The affair was highlighted by a speech given by Second General Vice President O. 
William Blaier. Vice President Blaier reminded the audience that organized labor lived 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



through many troubled times during the past half-ecntury, and a great deal of the credit 
for the progress made in these tough times must go to the old timers who stuck by their 
organization through thick and thin. There were anti-labor drives before, and tiierc were 
anti-labor laws in the past, but the members who kept their shoulders to the wheel rolled 
the union bandwagon over all the rough spots. 

"Members such as those we are honoring here on this occasion provide an inspiration 
and a challenge to the younger members that cannot be over-estimated," Blaier said. 




The historic occasion is captured in the above picture. The 50-year members being 
honored are seated in the front row; from left to right they are Ralph J. Smith, 54 years; 
Albert Kesten, 50 years; Louis Maurer, 54 years (and still working); John F. Otto, 63 
years (known to many as a former United Engineers foreman); Joseph Urban, 50 years; and 
George Lockard, 55 years. 

In the second row, presenting the pins, are: L. U. 359 officers. Treasurer George 
Pauley, Recording Secretary Charles Shedaker, and President Benjamin Gray; Vice 
President Blaier (a No. 359 member for 44 years); Financial Secretary Harry Fletcher, 
and District Council Secretary R. H. Gray. 



ROSCOE J. CONKLIN OF LOCAL 1973 HONORED 

Recently, Local Union 1973, Riverhead, New York, took time out from its routine 
business to pay special tribute to one of its great old timers. The man so honored was 
Brother Roscoe J. Conklin, who for 41 years served the union as an officer. 

The history of the union and the history of Brother Conklin are nearly one and the 
same. Through the years he has diligently worked for the betterment of the organization, 
and the high degree of respect that the union enjoys today can be traced to the efforts of 
men like Brother Conklin. 

While serving as financial secretary. Brother Conklin recently wrote a brief history of 
the tips and downs of the union and the changes in conditions the union has established. 

In his history he tells of a job he worked on in 1910, when he had to take a 6:00 a.m. 
train to Manor, take his bicycle out of the freight shed, ride three miles to tlie job, put in 
nine hours, ride the bicycle back to the freight shed, and take the 6:00 p.m. train home. 
For this kind of a day the wage was $3.00 for the whole day. But out of this had to 
come 54c for carfare. 

By contrast, Brother Conklin shows that the union elevated wages from $2.10 per hour 
in 1948 to $4.40 per hour in 1959. The story of the union's progress is well told in these 
figures. And nnich of die credit must go to the old timers like him who never faltered in 
their union loyalty. 



THE CARPENTER 



At the testimonial dinner for Brother ConkHn the union voted him a special pension 
of $15 per month although the union has no pension fund. His pension is paid from the 
Contingent Fund and is an indication of the high esteem in which he is held by his 
brother members. Although in his 84th year, Brother Conklin still takes a very active inter- 
est in the affairs of the organization he helped to build. 



LOCAL 606 DEDICATES NEW HEADQUARTERS BUILDING 

Saturday, February 27th, was "United Brotherhood Day" in Virginia-Eveleth, Minne- 
sota. On that date Local Union No. 606 dedicated its great new headquarters building. 
Prominent labor officials from all over the state were on hand to help the union ofiBcially 
dedicate its new headquarters. 

Union "get-togethers" in a "House of Labor" open to all unions help improve labor 
unity, International Representative Elmer SchaflFer of Duluth said at the ceremonies. 

Schaffer, carrying congratulations from international headquarters at Indianapolis, said 
Virginia-Eveleth Local 606 had every right to be proud of its new building. He recalled 
the progress Carpenters in the two cities have made since they merged their once- 
separate locals. 
f^ In Schaffer's opinion, there is a 
'~X^ A m ESk clear need for more such buildings 

V . ifcA LJ rS Ba ». . where various union craftsmen and 

their families can get together to 
"learn and understand each other's 
problems better." 

Leon Green, St. Paul, secretary- 
treasurer of the Minnesota State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters, said no other Car- 
penters Building in Minnesota can 
compare with the facilities at Vir- 
ginia. He reviewed the financial trou- 
bles Local 606 encountered in getting 
the project started. 
' Minnesota AFL-CIO PubUc Rela- 
tions Director Jerry Schaller of St. 
Paul called the building a symbol re- 

yl J^g^l^*"'''hsW -'^^^^B iW»' • > minding younger unionists that the 
i?^HPv^j^Hr^^^ff' 17^* advantages they enjoy today are due 

^IrWKnr " JWw^MH frtV^' *° ^^^ efforts of labor pioneers who 

'flj^^^^p S^^^^^^H p preceded them and they therefore 

^^^^Ksmi w f^^^H^K have an equal obligation to protect 

such advantages for the next genera- 
tion of union members. 

Virginia Mayor John Vukehch and 
6th District St. Louis County Com- 

Leaders at the recent dedication of the new Virginia niissioner Ernest Luoma termed the 
( Minnesota > Carpenters Building included, as shown i .u- „ « i i." 4. iU \7: „.•„,■ 

'^ * building a real asset to the Virginia 

Local 606 Business ' Agent Leonard Snell, Duluth area. Local 606 President Roy Ran- 

Local 361 Business Agent Otto High, State Council yj^ jold the audience the building's 
Secretary-Treasurer Leon Green, and International Rep- j , . 

resentative Elmer Schaffer. At the right is John Ross- purpOSe WaS tO advance and improve 

man, business manager of the Iron Range Building the position of all Organized labor 

throughout the East Iron Range. 

The Reverend Father William Lutar of Virginia gave the invocation and benediction. 
Milton Pry served as master of ceremonies. 

Congratulations were extended by Charles Gardner, Hibbing, president of the Iron 
Range AFL-CIO Labor Assembly; Joseph Wiesinger, representing the Duluth AFL-CIO 
Central Body; Roy Marino of the Hibbing area Carpenters; Tom Cunningham of the Grand 
Rapids area Carpenters; Otto High of the Duluth Carpenters; John Rossman, Virginia, 
business manager of the Iron Range Building Trades Council; Joe Bergman, Duluth, of 
Operating Engineers Local 49; Gus Pappas, Duluth, of Iron Workers Local 563; Henr> 
Pappone of Virginia Steelworkers Local 1938; Tony Sante of the Biwabik Steelworkcrs: 
Gil Ewer of Retail Clerks Local 1116; and several other union delegates to the dedication. 




Craft ProblQm s 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 378 
Store Front Field.— How big is the store 
front field, and what is it? Let's take it store 
by store as they come to mind: grocery, 
meat market, hardware, clothing, jewelry, 
china, drug, sporting goods, dr>' goods, 
paint, book, haberdashery, shoe, milUnery, 




Fig. 1 



automobile accessories, variety, ready-to- 
wear, cigar, fishing tackle, dime stores, and 
many others. Most of these stores can be 
put into two classifications, large and small. 

Requirements.— The requirements of store 
fronts are many, and they vary in many 
ways. What is suitable for one store, sel- 




dom meets tlie requirements of some other 
store. In many cases the similarities in the 
layouts are inevitable, but these can be 
concealed by differentiating the outstand- 
ing features. In the first place, available 



space is an important factor, especially for 
small stores. This is hardly a problem for 
large stores, nevertheless it is the designer's 
job to utilize space to the best advantage. 
Available materials and their cost must be 
considered, from the standpoint of the 
owner's means and wishes in the matter. 
Before the advent of air conditioning, open- 
ings in the sign-and-name panels over the 
show windows provided ventilation for the 
store. Now these openings are unnecessary, 
and the panels can be used primarily for 
attracting public attention. One of the most 
important considerations is the height of 
the display platform. Stores such as cloth- 



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40 



THE CARPENTER 



ing and furniture stores should have low 
platforms, which would mean that the bulk- 
heads also would have to be low. On the 
other hand, shoe stores, jewelry stores, and 




Fig. 3 



stores that deal in trinkets, need higher 
platforms. 

Comer Entrance.— Taking up the illustra- 
tions. Fig. 1 shows a plan of a store, in 
part, that has a corner entrance. Tables are 




pointed out to the upper left. At the lower 
right is shown an island showcase, directly 
in front of the entrance to the store. Here 
a round steel column is indicated by the 
heavy shaded circle. Another steel column 
is shoviTi 20 feet to the left of the corner. 
The arrow at the bottom, pointing to the 



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left, indicates that there is a long show 
window adjoining tlie sidewalk, with but 
a small vestibule at tlie corner. Fig. 2 gives 
a perspective view of the layout shown by 
Fig. 1. This view shows the island show- 




I — I 



! ' i' 



Variation fok Show Window 

Fig. 5 



case directly in front of the doors to the 
store. The dotted perpendicular lines indi- 
cate the location of the steel columns. Fig. 
3 is a modification of tlie design shown by 
Fig. 1. The island showcase and the steel 
column at the corner are omitted here, and 
a brick column is shown. The steel column 
20 feet to the left of the corner is used again 
in this design. Fig. 4 is a perspective view 
of the front shown in plan by Fig. 3. 

Detail of Dividing Rail.— A detail of the 
dividing rail between the sign-and-name 



.2-2-6x7- 




ELIASON TOOL C0/„T„er^!,'i^r23^. MTnl 



Fig. 6 

panels and the show window is shown by 
Fig. 5. The drawing, omitting the dotted 
lines, gives a detail of the dividing rail over 
the entrances to the vestibule. Including the 
dotted lines in the drawing, the detail shows 
two methods of ceiling the show rooms and 
the vestibule. 

Spacious Show Rooms.— A store front with 
spacious show rooms and two entrances to 
the store, is shown by Fig. 6. The showcase 
between tlie two double doors has almost 
the effect of an island showcase. This front 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



would be especially suitable for a clothing 
store. Fig. 7 is a perspective ele\ation view 
of the front shown in plan by Fig. 6. 

Details of Bulkheads.— Fig. 8 shows to the 
left, a cross section of a show window bulk- 
head constructed of wood and faced with 




4%" X 4y4" tile. To tlie right is a face view 
of what is shown to tlie left. Another ver- 
sion of a tile facing for a bulkhead is 
shown by Fig. 9. Fig. 10 gives a cross sec- 
tion and a face view of a bulkhead con- 
structed of brick. The height of tlie bulk- 
heads shown here is 18 inches, a good 




y— GlA55 V.^^,— ^ 




■ 


I * 














. 






y 


-TlLE^ 


u 






- 












- 


















!;••:'>■- 


:.:-■:. 


i -.4".-.' 


■.'•".■ -^ ■ '' 


::rV-.. 


.»1,?. 




^i 



Fig. 8 

average height. The height of any bulkhead 
should be carefully worked out with the 
proprietor of the store, for he, as a rule, 
should have the last word on tliis matter. 
The details of bulkheads as given here 



MATHEMATICS for 
CARPENTRY 

Compiled and published by 

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Carpenters and Joiners of 

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75c per copy 

This book contains valuable in- 
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should not be taken as hard-and-fast- 
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Publicity.- In advertising there is always 
present a strong urge for that which is dif- 




Fig. 9 

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Fig. 10 

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Ilange Cabinet. Sliding-Door Cabinet. Adjustable shelf 
Cabinet. JNIix-Center Wall Cabinet. Over-lhe-Sink Cabinet. 
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Cabinet. Combination Sink Cabinet. Tray and Bread Cabi- 
net. Platter Cabinet. Laundry Hamper. Screen bottom 
\ I'Kulalilo Drawers. I'op-up mix- 
er .Slielf. ]'>eside-the-ltange Touel 
Hack. Rolling Vegetable Bin. 
Sink Pull-out Hacks. Kevolving 
nail Cabinet. Lifting - cou n t e i 
Cabinet, l^ass-through Serving 
Center. Canned Goods Storage 
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pon below now ! 



I Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corp., Dept. C-560 

I 30 Church Street, New York 7, N. Y. 

" Send me "How to Build Cabinets for the Modern 

I Kitchen" with the imderstanding that if I am not 

I completely satisfied I can return it in ten days for 
FULL REFUND. 

I Enclosed is $4.95 O Check Q Money Order 







NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
rellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertise 


rs 

ories 


Carpenters' Tools and Access 




Page 


Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 




City, Mo. 


41 
42 


Black & Decker, Towson, Md 


C. & B. Miter Co., Blue Island, 
111. 


43 
id Cover 


Construct-O-Wear Shoe Co., In 
dianapolis, Ind. 2i 


Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 


40 
44 


Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, II1._ 


Evans Rule Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 


44 


Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 


47 
45 


Irwin, Wilmington, Ohio 


Dan C. Laub, Minneapolis, Minn. 


47 


Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 


4 


Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 


45 
47 


Paine Co., Addison, 111 


Skil Corp., Chicago, 111 


1 


Swanson Tool Co., Oak Lawn, 111. 


43 


True Temper Corp., Cleveland, 
Ohio 


48 
45 


Yates-American Machine Co., 
Beloit, Wise. 


Carpentry Materials 


Beverly Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 


47 
rd Cover 


Nichols Wire and Aluminum Co., 
Davenport, Iowa 3 


Technical Courses and Books 


Audel Publishers, New York, 
N. Y. 


43 
3 


Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 


A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Cal 


44 


H. H. Siege'e, Emporia, Kans 


39 


Simmons-Boardman Publishing 
Corp., New York, N. Y 


46 



Zimc State 



LI 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



FAMOWOOD ... the AMAZING 

ALL-PURPOSE PLASTIC for wood finishes! 

Applies like putty . . . 
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FAMOWOOD Is the answer . . 
where wood finishes are important. 
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craclis, gouges, nail and screw holes 
or correcting defects. Dries quickly, 
does not shrink. Stays put under 
adverse conditions. 

FAMOWOOD sands easily, does not gum up sander. 
Takes spirit dye stains freely. Waterproof and weather- 
proof when properly applied. Keady to use . . . "right 
out of the can." Fifteen matching wood colors with 
matchless wood fini.'ihes. Dept. 725 

BEVERLY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

9118 South Main Street Los Angeles 3, Calif. 




"LAUB" Roofing Knife 6V4 in. 

Two knives in one, with a double renewable 
hook blade. Handiest knife for trimming, 
Hips, Val- 
leys, Gables, 
and Starters, 
One Dollar 
for 1 knife, 
hook blades, $1.50 a Dozen. 





"LAUB" Siding & Insulation Knife 7 in. 

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sulation, In- 

sulating sid- 

L?Sl^^ I ^ I T I I rfT j/^ ing, wood 
shingles, alum- 
inum foil. Built-up roofing, cork. Rock lath and Dry 
Wall. Double renewable blade. Strong light metal han- 
dle. $1.00 for 1 knife. Extra blades, 3 for $1.00. 

If your local Hardware or Roofing Supply Dealer 
cannot supply you, send $1.00 for 1 knife to: 

DAN C. LAUB, 6326 45th Av. N., Minneapalis27, Minn. 



In Hollow Walls 

and ceilings — sheet rock, 
structural tile, thin paneling, 
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rate, easy to operate— merely follow step-by-step 
instructions. Used by saw manufacturers them- 
selves. The new model 200 Foley Saw Filer is 
the flt'St and ovly machine that files hand, banr 
and both "combination" and cross-cut circula- 
saws. Foley shows how to establish a profitable 
saw filing service, how to get business, etc. 

The Foley Saw Filer files all hand saws, "com- 
bination" and cross-cut circular saws from 4" to 
24" in diameter, and all band saws to 4% " wide- 
with 3 to 16 points per inch. Exclusive Fole} 
jointing action returns uneven teeth to perfect 
size, spacing and alignment. 



SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET 



I FOLEY MFG. CO., 518-0 Foley BIdg., Minneapolis 18, Minn. I 



Please send complete information on Foley Sow Filer and how j 
to succeed In saw filing business. | 



Address. 
City 



_State_ 



HEFT A 
MAN'S 



HAMMER 

Heft a ROCKET. It seems 

to have a liveliness all its own. 

Grip it. It's as secure in your 

hand as if it were gripping back. 

Swing it. The balance is perfect. You'll 

feel its shock-absorbing action 

as it delivers a power-centered blow. 

If you are a professional workman, the 

ROCKET is your hammer. . . the finest 

hammer made. Polished head is permanently 

locked to a handle of tubular steel. 

Cushion grip won't slip, wet or dry. Heft 

this superb tool at your hardware or 

building-supply store today. True Temper, 

1623 Euclid Ave., Cleveland 15, Ohio. 




Rippers, hatchet and 
ball peins, too, in 
famous ROCKET design 
that has proved its 
worth in the hands of 
so many proud users. 16 
and 20 oz. rippers; ball 




RUE lEMPER 



THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE RIGHT JOB 



A VO I ELgUST SHOTS 





USE RUSTPROOF 



nichols 



ALUMINUM 

Nails 

• ECONOMICAL — no countersinking or puttying required 

• STRONG — easy to drive — comply with F.H.A. requirements 
A type and size for USE where insurance against rust spots is desired. 

ALUMINUM 

building corners 

A complete line— all types and sizes. New straight- 
line design. Packed in convenient job-size boxes. 

ROLL VALLEY • FLASHING • TERMITE SHIELD 

NICHOLS WIRE & ALUMINUM CO. 

DAVENPORT. IOWA 




How To Vote For Your Enemies 




You vote in every election. If you go to the polls, 
you can vote for the candidates you favor. If you 
stay home, you cast a default vote for your enemies 
by making it one vote easier for them to get elected. 
So whether you stay home or go to the polls, you 
vote every election day. 

This year, make sure you cast your ballot for can- 
didates interested in your welfare rather than in the 
welfare of a privileged few. The first step is to get 
registered and qualified to vote. The next step is to 
go to the polls on election day and vote for the men 
you know are interested in the well-being of all the 
people. Remember, if you don't, you really will be 
casting a ballot for your enemies. 



REGISTER and VOTE 



AVOID RUST 








''7/ 




USE RUSTPROOF 



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ALUMINUM 

Nails 

• ECONOMICAL — no countersinking or puttying required 

• STRONG — easy to drive — comply with F.H.A. requirements 
A type and size for USE where insurance against rust spots is desired. 

ALUMINUM 

building cornel's 

A complete line— all types and sizes. New straight- 
line design. Packed in convenient job-size boxes. 

ROLL VALLEY • FLASHING • TERMITE SHIELD 

NICHOLS WIRE & ALUMINUM CO. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA 





Only the best wood rules merit this seal ^iQJjp 



Luf kin Red Ends are the favor- 
ite extension rules of practical 
workers everywhere. Take the 
X46, for example. You can see 
its quality ... its natural wood 
finish, brass extension slide and 



bold, black markings. You can 
hear it in the decisive "snap" 
of joints and strike plates. 
You'U find four Red Ends on 
the Luf kin Turnover Target at 
your hardware store . . . one 
to fit your job. 




Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor ^UBOLPiUKI 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 




Established in 1881 
Vol. LXXX— No. 6 



JUNE, 1960 



One Dollar Per Tear 
Ten Cents a Copy 



C onten t s — 



Convention Call -____- 5 

The ofFicial call for the forthcoming convention. 

Are Wages Jeopardizing Our Exports? - - 7 

For a long time Epokesmen for Big Business have been predicting national calamity 
because hiqh American wages are pricing our goods out of world markets. A University 
of Michigan professor gives the proposition a long, hard look and concludes that poor 
merchandising practices and not union wage standards are the fly in the ointment in- 
sofar as world trade is concerned. 

Union Show Plays To Great, Humble - - 10 

Hundreds of thousands of visitors thronged National Guard Armory, Washington, 
D. C, to marvel at the miracles American industry can produce when management 
and labor work together harmoniously. As usual, our Brotherhood's exhibit was among 
the largest and best. 



Outstanding Architects Plan Our New Home 



15 

Hoiabird and Root, one of the nation's top architectural firms, began business in 
Chicago a scant 12 months after our Brotherhood was born there. Over the years the 
firm has won many signal honors. Now it is utilizing all its experience and skill in de- 
signing and supervising the erection of our new headquarters building in Washington, 
D. C. 



First Intelligent Approach To Automation 



20 

Haloid Xerox, a Rochester photographic supply manufacturer, finances the learning 
of a new skill for men whose [obs are destined to fall prey to automation. And 
the company pays them an average wage while they are going to school. 



* * • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials 
Official 

In Memoriam 
What's New 
Outdoor Meanderings 
Correspondence 
To Our Ladies 
Craft Problems 

Index to Advertisers 



* * • 



18 

24 
28 
29 
32 
33 
35 
39 
41 

46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103. Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



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BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




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STANLEY 



<e) 



CONVENTION CALL 

May 23, 1960 

TO THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF LOCAL UNIONS OF THE 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA. 

Greetings: 

You are officially notified that in accordance with the action of the 
General Executive Board on January 20, 1960, a Special General Con- 
vention of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
will convene on September 26, 1960 and continue in session until Sep- 
tember 30, 1960, at the Morrison Hotel, Chicago, Illinois. 

This Special General Convention is being called in order that the 
International may more effectively carry out the purposes and duties of 
the organization under present working methods and requirements of 
State, Provincial and Federal Laws relating to labor organizations, and 
in particular to comply with the requirements of Labor- Management 
Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959, Public Law 86-257. 

To recodify and adopt new form of Constitution, General By-Laws, 
General Laws, and rules for subordinate bodies. 

To consider and act upon all other matters which may properly be 
brought before a General Convention under the Constitution and Laws 
of the United Brotherhood now in effect, to receive and act upon a re- 
port of committee or committees appointed by the General President to 
consider and recommend to the Special General Convention provisions 
for the Brotherhood Constitution, General By-Laws, General Laws and 
rules for subordinate bodies. 

To approve form of this notice and ratify calling of Special General 
Convention. 

The basis of representation in the convention in accordance with Sec- 
tion 18 C is: "One hundred (100) members or less shall be entitled to one 
delegate; more than one hundred (100) members and less than five hun- 
dred (500), two delegates; more than five hundred (500) members and 
less than one thousand (1,000), three delegates; one thousand (1,000) or 
any greater number of members, four delegates." 



THE CARPENTER 

A Local Union owing two months' tax to the General Office is not 
entitled to representation in the convention. 

Names of delegates elected are to be in the General Office not later 
than August 26, 1960. 

A member to be eligible as a delegate or alternate and in order to be 
in full compliance with our General Constitution and Laws, we direct 
your attention to Section 18 and Section 31 D, which provides in part 
that the member has been twelve consecutive months a member in good 
standing of the Local Union and a member of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America for three years immediately prior 
to nomination, unless the Local Union has not been in existence the time 
herein required. 

All delegates are to be elected by secret ballot. 

Each delegate will be entitled to one vote. Proxy representation is not 
allowed. Each delegate establishes claim to a seat in the convention 
through official credentials supplied by the General Office which must 
be properly filled out and signed by the President and Recording Secre- 
tary of the Local Union which he represents, with the seal of the Local 
Union affixed thereto. 

A delegate must have his Due Book with him to show that he has 
been a member in good standing twelve months prior to his election 
and the expense of each delegate attending the convention is to be paid 
by the Local Union he represents. 

The Recording Secretary must report at once to the General Secretary 
the name and post office address of the delegate and alternate under 
penalty of fine as provided in Section 18 F of our General Laws. When 
the name and address of the delegate is reported to the General Office 
and the elected delegate's membership is found to be in compliance with 
our Laws, blank credentials and further information will be sent to the 
delegate. 

All proposed amendments to the General Constitution must be sub- 
mitted in accordance with Section 63 D and E. 

Fraternally yours, 

General President. General Secretary. 



Are Wages Jeopardizing Our Exports? 

• • • 

THE IMAGINATION some employers can muster to resist a wage 
increase often puts fiction writers to shame. 
Twenty years ago the writer of this article served on a committee 
studying the feasibility of increasing the statutory minimum wage in the ply- 
wood industry from 30c an hour to 40c. One of the employer representatives 
pointed out that Brazil was developing a process for making a substitute for 
plywood out of surplus coffee beans. This, he insisted, was going to demoralize 
the plywood market, and any increase in plywood wage rates would spell com- 
plete elimination of the industry. 

With coffee now selling at close to a dollar a pound, the episode seems 

fantastic, but it actually happened. 

mittee for Economic Development 
(CED). 

In his Journal article, Dowd cites 
Michigan's prominence in world trade 
as one reason for believing wages 
alone are not handicapping develop- 
ment of international markets for 
American manufacturers. While 
Michigan has the highest average 
wage rates of any state, it originates 
the largest volume of exports, he 
notes. 

Moreover, for the U. S. as a whole, 
some of the largest volume exporters 
are the highest wage industries— coal 
($3.02 hourly), tires and tubes ($2.74), 
and metal working machines ($2.56), 
for example. 

Since 1953, he adds, foreign wages 
have risen at the same or faster rates 
than the U. S. "To charge all the de- 
cline in our exports to high wages is 
simply a lazy man's excuse," he com- 
ments. 

Nor is there evidence that the U. S. 
has "priced itself out" of world mar- 
kets, he continues, even though some 
firms may have lost markets by try- 
ing to maintain a high margin for 
overhead, interest and profits. 



What brought it to mind is the cur- 
rent campaign of many business pub- 
lications predicting complete loss of 
our export market if American wages 
go up any more. Their theme song is 
that American wages are increasing 
so fast our goods cannot compete in 
world markets. The fact that govern- 
ment figures show little change in ex- 
port volume year by year does not 
dampen their ardor. 

Are American wage scales jeopar- 
dizing our important export business? 

Poor marketing practices are a big- 
ger barrier to expansion of America's 
exports than high wages and prices, 
a University of Michigan expert con- 
tends. 

In an article prepared for The Jour- 
nal of Marketing, Laurence P. Dowd 
(Ph. D.) of the U-M School of Busi- 
ness Administration declares, "Very 
few American industries can attribute 
their loss of overseas markets to their 
price structure, and even fewer can 
attribute it to wage costs." 

Dowd directs the Michigan Busi- 
ness Executives Research Conference, 
a group of 35 Michigan companies 
studying international business with 
the financial support of the Com- 



THE CARPENTER 



"If the U. S. were being priced out 
of world markets, there would be 
definite changes, in the composition of 
our exports— finished manufactured 
goods would decline, while raw and 
semi-finished materials would in- 
crease," he declares. 

"This has not happened. With the 
exception of 1956 and 1957, finished 
goods have steadily increased as a 
share of our total export volume. 

"In 1956 and 1957, several unusual 
conditions prevailed— our cotton ex- 
port prices were lowered, stimulat- 
ing heavy shipments overseas; large 
volumes of wheat were used to allevi- 
ate famine in Asia, and oil exports 
soared during the Suez crisis. 

"Firms and industries which have 
reported continued declines in ex- 
ports in recent years include some 
for which there had been high prod- 
uct demand in the postwar period and 
which enjoyed an essentially monopo- 
listic position in world markets," he 
continues. "In some instances, these 
companies have failed to recognize 
the revival of foreign competition, 
both in terms of increased production 
and in application of modern market- 
ing techniques." 

Among the specific shortcomings of 
American marketing overseas which 
Dowd cites are-: 

Product planning: "The glamour 
of American products as such has 
weU nigh disappeared." 

Advertising and sales promotion: 
"Few firms undertake real campaigns 
of this type in foreign countries. In- 
stead of training salesmen to secure 
orders, they commonly wait for cus- 
tomers to come to them." 

Credit: "How long would an Amer- 
ican firm which insisted on cash in ad- 
vance of shipment remain in business 
when its domestic competitors grant- 
ed liberal credit terms? Yet these are 
precisely the terms used in selling 



foreign firms and insisting on a letter 
of credit." 

Currency: "We insist on quoting 
dollar prices and usually require pay- 
ments in dollars. No wonder we are 
losing business to competitors who 
are willing to quote prices and ac- 
cept payments in foreign currency." 

Delivery: "Traditionally, American 
suppliers have had the reputation of 
prompt and promised delivery. In re- 
cent years this tradition seems to have 
been disappearing overseas." 

Service: "All too frequently, the 
basic policy of American suppliers is 
to maintain stocks only in the U. S. 
Foreign suppliers— especially British, 
German, and Japanese— are establish- 
ing parts supplies close at hand to 
serve customers quickly." 

All of these factors are more im- 
portant than mere price in the buying 
decisions of foreign customers, Dowd 
adds. "If we are not expanding ex- 
port markets, it is not because of price 
but because we are failing to apply 
the principles of modern management 
we know are vital in domestic mar- 
keting." 

Other factors which handicap this 
expansion, Dowd says, include: 

Raw material prices: "With various 
forms of government intervention . . . 
raw materials constantly are becom- 
ing more costly to American industry 
competing in world markets." 

High margins: "During 1958, when 
many foreign firms reduced prices on 
world markets despite increased costs, 
many American companies still quot- 
ed high export prices to maintain 
profit margins or cover overhead ex- 
penses." 

Taxes: "American producers bear 
an exceptionally heavy burden of 
taxes . . . heavier than that on any of 
our major foreign competitors. One 
substantial advantage enjoyed by 
some foreign producers is the remis- 



THE CARPENTER 9 

sion of taxes on products sold in ex- From the foregoing arguments of 

port markets." Professor Dowd it is apparent that the 

Productive organization: "Tradi- business publications are not above 

.. n A -J u 1 drawing on the imagination a bit to 

tionally, American producers had an , o ^ ° r t^i 

^ ^ T. -, . . rr> . make a case tor a wage freeze. Ine 

outstanding advantage m efficient ^ ^^^^ ^^^j, ^J ^^^^ A^^^. 

plant and management. But this ad- .^^^ workers are the exports of jobs 
vantage is disappearing, for our for- ^^ ^^e low-wage areas where Amer- 
eign competitors are building mod- jcan corporations are building factor- 
ern plants and studying our manage- ies to make goods for the American 
ment methods intensively." market. 

• 

Conference For Fund Trustees Scheduled 

What The 6th Annual National Workshop 

Who Sponsored by the National Conference of Health, Welfare and 

Pension Plans 

When October 10, 11, 12, 1960 

Where Fontainebleau Hotel, Miami Beach, Florida 

Why For Study, to Inform Management and Union Trustees and 

Administrators on "Health, Welfare and Pension Fund 
Management." 

The objective of the Workshop is to give the welfare and pension trustees 
the latest information, to give them a cross-section of ideas from all parts of 
the country, to make them aware of what pitfalls should be avoided, to have 
experts educate trustees, and in general to make sure that all trustees and 
administrators are well informed so that they can do a good job. 

The National Conference is a non-profit group, and its Workshops are 
attended by usually an equal number of union and management trustees who 
sit down to 3 days of intensive study with a common goal in mind. Delegates 
at the past sessions have come from approximately 42 of the 50 states. Since 
it must, of necessity, be limited to 750 conferees, interested trust plans are 
advised to take the necessary action now to send delegates to the Conference 
Workshop next fall. 

» 

IT'S THE UNION PIN THAT PAYS OFF 

In London, England, Mrs. Margaret McKay, top woman leader of the 
British Trades Union Congress, had some strong words to say to England's 
working class girls in a speech to a woman's conference of the Amalgamated 
Engineering Union. 

Said Mrs. McKay, "You marriage-crazy girls are undermining the trade 
union movement. Teen-age girls today think of nothing but getting married as 
quickly as possible. Training for a career is hardly considered." 

Her eloquence rising to a dramatic climax, Mrs. McKay concluded: "The 
working girl's best friend is her trade union. In fact, most young girls would 
be better off today with a trade union pin rather than a wedding ring." 



10 



Union Show Plays To Great, Humble 

• • 



CROWDS are nothing new to the 
D. C. Many important events h 
echoed to the chimp of Army 
But during the week of May 6—11 it 
excitement, and 
showmanship. 

The occasion 
was the 1960 ver- 
sion of the annual 
Union - Industries 
Show. From noon 
until late at night 
thousands of visi- 
tors meandered 



National Guard Armory, Washington, 
ive been held there. For years it has 
boots as reserve units drilled there, 
witnessed a new high in crowds, in 



through the long 
aisles admiring 
and marveling at 
the myriad exam- 
ples of craftsman- 
ship displayed by 
the various exhibits. 
The theme of 
this year's show 
was "Democracy 
at Work." A more 
appropriate theme 
could hardly be se- 
lected, for the Ar- 
mory was bulging 
with goods and 
services exemplify- 
ing the productive 
mar\'els that Amer- 
ican labor and 
management can 
achieve when they 
work together 
within the frame- 
work of our tradi- 
tional collective bargaining system. 
On e\'ery hand the visitor saw union 
craftsmanship in action and the fruits 
of such craftsmanship. Even the 



DEATH CALLS B. B. BLACKBURN 

A pall was cast over the entire 
Union Industries Show by the sud- 
den death of B. B. Blackburn, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer of the Washington, D. 
C. and Vicinity District Council. 

He was struck down by a sudden 
heart attack while at the Show on 
Sunday, May 8, and passed away be- 
fore medical aid could be summoned. 

Born near Richmond, Virginia, 
Brother Blackburn joined the United 
Brotherhood there in 1922. In 1926 
he moved to Washington and trans- 
ferred his membership to Local Un- 
ion No. 132 of that city. His keen 
interest in union affairs and his ca- 
pacity for hard work soon won him 
many loyal friends. He served as 
president of the District Council, and 
in 1943 he was elected secretary- 
treasurer, a post he held at the time 
of his death. 

As a delegate to several general 
conventions and many state meetings, 
he acquired a wide acquaintanceship 
throughout our Brotherhood, and his 
passing will be mourned in many, 
many areas. 

Brother Blackburn leaves a wife, 
Mary, and two daughters, Mrs. Mar- 
ian B. Humphrey and Mrs. Alma G. 
McCann, and a son, Raymond E. 
Blackburn, a member of Local 132. 
He also leaves six grandchildren and 
a host of friends. 

Services were held Wednesday, 
May 11, with burial in Mitchell Me- 
morial Park Cemetery, Falls Church, 
Virginia. 



President of the 
United States was 
amazed by the 
scope and breadth 
of American pro- 
ductivity as under- 
scored by the ple- 
thora of outstand- 
ing products and 
services exhibited 
at the show. 

And the citizens 
of Washington and 
vicinity were im- 
pressed, too. Every 
day they kept the 
Armory jam-pack- 
ed. Even a hard, 
pelting rain on 
Sunday did not 
keep them away. 
Closing time had 
to be extended to 
get the hall cleared. 



For the first time 
in history the show 
was a "sell-out" 
weeks before op- 
ening day. Some 
375 exhibitors in 
all participated in 
the show. Music, 
souvenirs, and 
drawings for thou- 
sands upon thousands of dollars' 
worth of merchandise— all of it union 
made— permeated the show with a 
carnival atmosphere. Everyone learn- 



THE CARPENTER 



11 




President Eisenhower cuts the ribbon to officially open the show. 




General Officers help place the last label replica in our Brotherhood's exhibit. Reading from left 
to right: Second General Vice President O. Wm. Blaier; General Secretary Richard E. Livingston; 
General President M. A. Hutcheson; First General Vice President John R. Stevenson; and General 
Representative Tom Murray. 



12 



THE C A It I» 1'". X T r. 11 



Apprenticeship training 
got plenty of emphasis. 




Hardwood flooring won 
many friends, too. 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



ed something about the value of 
craftsmanship as represented by the 
union label. Everyone had fun. And a 
large number of lucky winners went 
away loaded with loot. 

As usual, our Brotherhood spon- 
sored one of the largest and finest 
exhibits in the show. The project was 
a joint venture of the General Office 



of apprenticeship training and the 
part our Brotherhood is playing in 
developing an adequate supply of 
properly trained craftsmen for the 
future. 

A display of union label en- 
largements was the handiwork of 
Brother George P. Ratte, Local Un- 
ion 2456. 




Located in the center of the Show, our Brotherhood's exhibit was generally surrounded by 
crowds of visitors. 



and the Washington, D. C. and Vicin- 
ity District Council. Located in the 
center of the huge hall, our exhibit 
dramatically demonstrated the quality 
and craftsmanship that are inherent in 
goods bearing our label. There were 
examples of custom-made millwork, 
fine fixtures, and quality floors cre- 
ated by Brotherhood craftsmen. 
There were booths demonstrating 
what trained mechanics can achieve 
with the aid of modern tools. 

One booth demonstrated the intri- 
cate work that can be achieved with 
modern glued-lamination techniques. 
Another— set up with the cooperation 
of the U. S. Forest Service— told the 
conservation story and emphasized 
the need for husbanding our forest 
and water resources carefully. A 
large booth vividly told the story 



All in all, our exhibit impressed 
hundreds of thousands of visitors with 
the unquestionable fact that a Broth- 
erhood label on a piece of merchan- 
dise stamps that product as the out- 
put of a properly trained man or 
woman enjoying an American stand- 
ard of living. 

Impressive ceremonies opened the 
show. The Reverend Monsignor 
George G. Higgins of the National 
Catholic Welfare Council deli\'ered 
the invocation. J. J. Mara, president 
of the Boot and Shoe Workers and 
president of the Trades and Label De- 
partment; Joe Lewis, director of the 
Department; and AFL-CIO president 
George Meany delivered short ad- 
dresses. The most important guest in 
the show's history— the President of 
the United States— made a brief tour 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



of the show. In an off-the-cuff address 
he said: 

"After touring the show, the reac- 
tion I had was that of reahzing anew 
what can be achieved by real co- 
operation." 

As a memento of his visit to the 
show, President Eisenhower was pre- 
sented with a pair of union made golf 



shoes and a pair of hunting boots 
from the Boot and Shoe Workers. By 
the time the show was over, hundreds 
of dignitaries from labor, government, 
and even foreign embassies, toured 
this outstanding exhibit of the pro- 
ductive might of America. 

Next year's show will be held at 
Detroit. 



"Stagnating Economy"— 

FACTORY WORKER WORSE OFF THAN YEAR AGO 

Despite claims of a prospering economy, the average American factory 
worker was worse off in April than he was a year ago. 

A combination of a record high increase in the cost of living and cutbacks 
in the auto, metals and machine industries served not only to drive down 
take-home pay as compared with April, 1959 but to decrease purchasing power 
as well. 

Based on latest figures of the Department of Labor, spendable earnings 
for factory workers fell by about 85 cents a week or 1 per cent during the 
month of April, to $80.20 for a worker with three dependents and to $72.66 
for a worker without dependents whose income taxes are higher. 

"The decline," said the Department of Labor, "resulted from shorter hours 
of work, which reflected cutbacks in the auto, metals and machinery indus- 
tries, and to some extent the occurrence of religious holidays in the survey 
week. The drop in spendable earnings, together with a rise in consumer prices, 
cut factory workers' purchasing power by 1.5 per cent over the month." 

Compared with a year ago, cash take-home pay was down about 50 cents 
a week, while purchasing power was down 2.5 per cent. 

Heaviest blow to the workers' pocketbook came with a four-tenths per 
cent boost in living costs, raising the Consumer Price index to a new record 
high of 126.2, again contradicting claims that the inflationary thrust has been 
blunted by wise Administrative policies, including "tight money." 

The Department of Labor reported that most of the April increase resulted 
from a 1.5 per cent boost in food prices, the sharpest since March, 1958, 
when bad weather caused the price of fresh fruits and vegetables to shoot up. 

This April, all foods went up in price except dairy products and some 
vegetables. Prices rose mostly for meats, particularly pork, eggs and tomatoes. 

Prices for most other products and services went up slightly, being count- 
ered by another sharp drop in the price of used cars which are suffering heav- 
ily from competition with the new compact cars. New car prices, however, 
continued stable although they usually drop at this time of year. 



15 



Outstanding Architects Plan Our New Home 

• • 

SCARCELY a year after 36 delegates, representing 14 independent unions, 
met in Chicago in 1881 to form the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America, two of the city's outstanding architects, WilHam 
Holabird and Martin Roche, decided to go into business together. Now, nearly 
80 years later, the architectural firm that they created in Chicago in 1882 is 
supervising the erection of our United Brotherhood's new headquarters build- 
ing in Washington, D. C. 

The histories of the United Brotherhood and the architectural firm of 
Holabird and Root (as it is now known) closely parallel each other. Both were 
born in Chicago. Both soon will be celebrating their 80th year in existence. 




University of Illinois Research & Educational Hospitals, Chicago.— //cdrfcA-B/essing 



Both have grown and prospered over 
the years. Consequently, it is fitting 
and proper that they should be col- 
laborating in the designing and erec- 
tion of a great, new United Brother- 
hood headquarters building in the 
nation's capital. 



Third generation descendants of 
the founders are directing the afiaii's 
of Holabird and Root today. The firm 
survived the great depression of the 
late Twenties and early Thirties, 
when many architectural firms went 
to the wall. Since then, it has made 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



new strides into public housing, And the firm has long since out- 

into radical changes in design of hotel grown its Chicago environment. To- 
accommodations, and into the rela- day the firm is supervising work all 




Tamanaco Hotel, Caracas, Venezuela. Another example of H & R versatility. — Hedrich-Blessing 

tively new fields of air conditioning over the United States and in many 
and cold cathode lighting. It has pio- foreign lands. The vast and magnifi- 
neered improvements in the design cent New India Center of Delhi was 




New India Assurance Bldg., New Delhi, India, shows the H & R touch. 

and functional utility of skyscrapers, designed by the firm. So was the 
laboratories, research centers, and American Battle Monument at Henri- 
government buildings called on to ac- Chapelle, Belgium, and the Intercon- 
commodate whole armies of workers. tinental Hotel at Istanbul, Turkey. 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



The towering First National Bank 
Building of Minneapolis now abuild- 
ing originated on the drawing boards 
of Holabird and Root. Buildings on 
many college campuses, such as Notre 
Dame, Northwestern, and Illinois dis- 
play the Holabird and Root touch. 

And the firm is no stranger to the 
designing and erecting of union 
headquarters. In recent years it has 
been responsible for the planning and 
erection of new homes for the Team- 
sters, the Operating Engineers and 
the Bakers. 




'Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wis., 
a Holabird and Root creation. — Hedrich- 
Blessing 

The firm of Holabird and Root has 
many architectural "firsts" to its cred- 
it. In the year 1887 it designed the 
Tacoma Building, a Chicago show- 
place at the time of its erection. Ac- 
cording to Colonel W. A. Starrett, 
late president of the George A. Fuller 
Company, the Tacoma Building was 
"the first structure in which any outer 
wall carried no burden and served 
no purpose other than ornamental 
and keeping out wind and weather, 
which became one of the fundamen- 
tals of skyscraper design." 

The work of the firm ranges from 
modernistic art galleries and libraries 
to traditional office buildings of con- 



ventional design. It has developed 
new silhouettes and improved on old 
ones. It is at home plowing new de- 
sign furrows or adhering to old ones. 

Over the years the firm has devel- 
oped specialists in many fields. If a 
complicated kitchen is a problem, 
they have a specialist in this field. 
Or if air conditioning an unusual 
space poses unusual difficulties, they 
have a man on the payroll who has 
solved the problem before. Thus the 
firm renders a complete service. 

The standing of the firm in the 
architectural profession is attested to 
by numerous awards that ha\'e been 
awarded the company over the years. 
The latest was two years ago. At the 
American Institute of Architects Con- 
vention in Cleveland in July, 1958, 
John Wellborn Root was awarded the 
Gold Medal of Honor. The citation 
reads as follows: 

THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE 

OF ARCHITECTS 

in bestowing the highest accolade 

within its gift 
THE GOLD MEDAL OF HONOR 

hails a master architect 
JOHN WELLBORN ROOT, FAIA 

Distinguished son of a distingiiislicrl father, 
it has heen your good fortune to lire and 
practise in a time of abrupt change, vhen 
architecture opened a neu: chapter in /f,s- /n'x- 
torg. Though inang scorned the lessons of the 
past, gou JieUl resolutelg to its basic trutlis 
and built afresh upon a tested foundation. 
For gour crumples over a wide range of func- 
tion and geographg gour contemporaries raise 
a paean of thanksgiving. You have demon-'itrat- 
cd that the broad path of architecture need not 
become a dead-end street. 

All this skill and experience has 
been brought to bear on the design- 
ing and erection of our new head- 
quarters building in Washington, D. 
C. The firm is constantly revie^^■ing 
and checking the progress of the 
building, and when it is completed it 
will be a monument not only to offi- 
cers and members of the United 
Brotherhood but to the firm of Hola- 
bird and Root as well. 



Pl/#i 




DQC^ I D 



THINGS AIN'T ALL BLACK 

A fashion editor predicts that the Bikini 
bathing suit will make a strong comeback 
this year; which just goes to show you can 
usually find something encouraging in the 
papers if you get past Page One with 
all its stories of international tensions and 
potential human extinction. 

Anyway, this gives us a chance to tell 
the one about the delegate to the state 
council convention who was trying to find 
a gift to take home to his missus. In an ex- 
clusive women's shop a saleslady hauled 
out a frothy pink number. 

"Now here's something real cute," she 
said. "If you take off tlie jacket, you have 
a play suit. If you take off the skirt, you 
have a sun suit. If you remove anything 
else, you have a lawsuit." 

* • * 
TO THE POINT 

Recently, Judge J. Edgar Murdock gave 
the Massachusetts Bar Association an ex- 
ample of how to write a brief opinion. A 
tax case was involved. The defendant testi- 
fied: "As God is my judge, I do not owe 
this tax." 

But the judge's answer was: "He is not; 
I am; you do." 




-^iBEEs- 



^'Wav/, I could never scab, 
Mister — Vc^ mother and 
father were married!" 



NO TIME FOR DAWDLING 

Business activity has advanced steadily 
since last December's low point, but un- 
employment continues to hover around five 
per cent of the work force. Long-term job- 
lessness last month was about 40%, above 
1956-1957 levels. The number of insured 
unemployed is 10% above what it was three 
or four years ago. 

Despite these unhappy figures, the bill 
aimed at helping distressed areas get back 
on their feet was killed last month by 
presidential veto. 

For the better part of two years unem- 
ployment has been running over five per 
cent. It is a situation that cannot be tol- 
erated much longer if further economic 
shrinkage is to be avoided. 

The whole thing brings to mind the 
story of the struggling young artist who 
was in hock up to his ears. For days he 
dodged the landlady, but the time inevit- 
ably came when she cornered him in th^ 
hall. 

Putting on a bold front, the artist said: 
"Just think, Mrs. Kelly, in a few years 
people will look at this house and say, 
'Kilroy, tlie artist, used to work here.' " 

To which the landlady replied: 

"If you don't pay up your back rent by 
tonight, they will be able to say it to- 
morrow." 

* * • 
SOUNDS LOGICAL 

Did you hear the newest twist on the 
Man from Mars? 

It seems this Man from Mars landed on a 
New York street. Although he was only 
four feet tall, he headed for the nearest 
building. Just as he was about to open the 
door a tall, willowy, and beautiful blonde 
walked out; whereon the M from M said: 

"Lead me to your ladder. I'll see your 
leader later." 

• * * 
IT SAYS HERE 

Ever hear of the sanitary engineer who 
willed his brain to Indiana University Med- 
ical School? 

They were very happy to get it because 
for a long time they had been looking for a 
filtering man's thinker. 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



AN ANCHOR MAN IS MISSING 

Last month, as the summit conference got 
under way, a mighty voice was absent. Old 
Winston Churchill, whose presence loomed 
large in every other post-war meeting, was 
taking his ease on the French Riviera. 

Churchill, in addition to being a great 
statesman, able writer, and fine orator, pos- 
sesses a keen sense of humor. He often has 
told the following story on himself. 

One evening during the war, he hailed a 
taxi and asked to be taken to the British 
Broadcasting studios. 

"Sorry, Mister," said tlie cabbie, "but Mr. 
Churchill is broadcasting in a few minutes 
and I wouldn't miss it for all the fares in 
London." 

Greatly flattered, Churchill pressed a 
pound note into the cabbie's hand. The 
cabbie took a startled look, then threw 
open the door. 

"You're a bit of all right, sir," he ex- 
claimed. "Hop in and to 'ell with Mr. 
Churchill." 

• ilk- • 
ANYWAY, IT SEEMS THAT WAY 

The great debate on our educational sys- 
tem is still raging. Some insist our educa- 
tional system is weak as dishwater; others 
insist it is the best in the world. 

In our estimation, old Joe Paup summar- 
ized tlie situation best when he said: 

"Today, it takes more money to keep a 
child amused than it did to get his father 
educated." 

^ T^ * 
SO IT GOES 

About this time of the year. Congress 
makes a great show of paring the budget to 
the bone. By the use of numerous legisla- 
tive tricks, the impression is given that size- 
able cuts are being worked out. Usually, 
however, these are merely paper cuts, be- 
cause "additional" or "supplemental" appro- 
priations are made later to restore the fic- 
titious cuts. This hocus-pocus is liberally in- 
dulged in by both parties. 

It always reminds us of the story of the 
Irishman who was shipwrecked on a de- 
serted island. When he looked around he 
noticed the island was already inhabited 
by the biggest bear he ever saw. As the 
bear headed toward him, the Irishman be- 
gan legging it toward the only tree on the 
island. The lowest branch on this tree was 
20 feet above ground, but the son of Erin 
gave the greatest leap of his life. 

He missed it going up but caught it on 
the way down. 



TOUGH NUT TO CRACK 

Last month a Philadelphia judge ruled 
that a run-away shoe plant did not termi- 
nate all its responsibilities to its organized 
workers just because it closed its union- 
ized plant to concentrate its production in 
a non-union plant under a different corpo- 
rate name. The court held that the new 
corporation was merely the "alter ego" of 
the original partnership. 

The case was a real victory for the Shoe 
Workers Union, but until such time as tlie 
dismissed union workers are put back to 
work, it is only a moral one. 

Sooner or later Congress must face up 
to the growing problem of run-away plants 
that toss employes on the scrap heap, leave 
communities without anticipated tax rev- 
enue, and generally undermine the eco- 
nomic health of surrounding areas. 

Men buy homes on the strength of their 
jobs, communities build schools on the as- 
sumption that local industries are stable. 
When a plant pulls up roots for greener 
pastures, the whole area is thrown into tur- 
moil. Plants must remain free to migrate 
for legitimate reasons, but not to evade 
responsibilities. 

Admittedly, it is a tough problem, but one 
that merits study— else we may find ourselves 
in the position of the tramp who never 
married. When asked why, he replied: 

"Once I was seriously engaged to a young 
lady. She was strong-willed but homely. 
When I was drunk she wouldn't marry me 
and when I was sober I wouldn't marry 
her. So there you are." 







**Et lu, Professor? 



•?" 



20 



Rochester's Haloid Xerox Co. comes up with— 




first Intelligent Approach To Automation 

(Reprinted from Industrial Bulletin, N. Y. State Dept. of Labor) 
* * 

QUIET experiment under way in Rochester, N. Y., may have an 
important bearing on the future of American industry's "displaced 
person"— the man whose job is captured by a machine. 

Eight hours a day, five days a week, a dozen employes of Haloid Xerox, 
Inc., are being retrained to take new jobs— jobs which do not exist yet. Mean- 
while, the company is preparing to automate their old jobs out of existence. 

If the plan works— and both employes and employer are highly enthusi- 
astic over its chances— a pattern may be paved in Rochester for other rela- 
tively painless job switchovers elsewhere. 

Haloid Xerox was founded in 1906 and enjoyed modest prosperity for 

tliree decades as a manufacturer of 

sensitized photographic and photo- 
copy papers and photocopy machines. 

In 1950 the Haloid Co., as it was 
known then, introduced its first ma- 
chine employing the xerographic pro- 
cess—a high-speed, dry-paper copying 
technique based on the reaction to 
light of metal charged with elec- 
tricity. 

Since then, sales have nearly tripled 
-from 1950's $10 million to about 
$27V2 million in 1958— and profits have 
jumped from about $400,000 to $1.6 
million. 

Company oflBcials attribute at least 
80 per cent of the increase to xero- 
graphy sales (the firm now holds 
about 169 patents in the field and 
maintains a research staff of nearly 
300 persons), and it was no accident 
that the word "Xerox" was added to 
the corporate name in 1958. 

Meanwhile, the sensitized paper in- 
dustry was holding its own, even ad- 
vancing modestly. But company offi- 
cials felt xerography held far more 
growth potential. Furthermore, the 
sensitized paper department's busi- 
ness had become increasingly com- 
petitive. 



Both management and Haloid's un- 
ion could see that increasing auto- 
mation, and relatively decreasing em- 
ployment, were in the cards if the 
paper department were to continue 
prosperous. 

Of course automation— or, perhaps 
more accurately, increasing mechani- 
zation—is no stranger to Rochester 
industry, although it has been esti- 
mated that only about 8 per cent of 
the nation's workers are employed in 
plants which approach total automa- 
tion. Always known as a city with a 
highly skilled labor force and a pre- 
ponderance of machine-tool and other 
precision jobs, Rochester has seen its 
output-per-worker rise tremendously 
since World War II 

One of the advantages of automa- 
tion, in labor's eyes, is that it requires 
long and careful planning because of 
the heavy capital outlays involved. 
The interim between thought and ex- 
ecution leaves enough time for ex- 
haustive labor-management studies 
and conferences on the probable ef- 
fects of the new machines. 

One such study is now in its early 
stages at Aimour & Co., the giant 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



meat-packing firm. A contract signed 
last September with two unions pro- 
vides that the company shall contrib- 
ute one cent for each hundred- 
weight of meat slaughtered, to a fund 
which eventually is expected to reach 
$500,000. Controlled by a joint labor- 
management committee, the fund will 
finance a program designed to offset 
the job dislocation which automation 
may bring. 

However, while the Armour confer- 
ences and studies were still in their 
early stages, Haloid's plans were be- 
ing completed. They were spelled out 
by the company's president, Joseph C. 
Wilson, during a Saturday morning 
meeting of the photographic depart- 
ment's 586 employes: 

1.— Paper department employes with 
at least ten years' consecutive service 
would be eligible to apply for an in- 
tensive, six-week, company-paid re- 
training course in machine shop tech- 
niques and mechanical assembly at 
the Rochester Institute of Technol- 
ogy- 

2.— Trainees would be paid their 
regular wages up to $2.50 an hour 
(the over-all company average) forty 
hours a week for the full six weeks. 

3.— Upon satisfactory completion of 
the course, the employes would be 
assigned temporarily to job classifica- 
tions determined by the company, 
with the understanding that they 
would be re-assigned to the machine 
or assembly shops as soon as jobs de- 
veloped there, either through normal 
turnover or creation of new jobs in 
the expanding assembly lines. 

4.— Other eligibility criteria would 
include union seniority and the em- 
ploye's success with two tests, one 
for mechanical aptitude and the other 
for intelligence. 

A recitation of the proposal's terms 
fails to reflect the enthusiasm for the 
program evinced by the union, the 



trainees and the Rochester Institute 
of Technology, a highly-regarded in- 
stitution which offers Associate in 
Arts Degrees and advanced technical 
training in subjects ranging from 
printing to pottery. 

RIT revamped its normal night 
school schedule of shop theory, shop 
mathematics, blueprint reading and 
their practical applications to con- 
form with Haloid's daytime require- 
ments. At the company's request it 
added the mechanical assembly 
course, which has proven to have so 
much potential for regular students 
that RIT officials hope to add it to the 
regular night school curriculum. 

Associate Professor Frederick Bueh- 
ler, coordinator of the Haloid pro- 
gram, is trying to interest other Roch- 
ester industries in similar daytime 
plans. Among other things, he said, 
the daytime programs would prove 
beneficial to RIT by reducing the 
"down time" for the school's $250,000 
experimental machine shop, which 
until now has been used largely for 
evening classes. 

Instructor Kenneth R. Hood, a 
tool-and-die man by trade and a gun- 
smith by avocation, is pleased by 
trainee attitudes and aptitudes. 

"They're really good, diligent stu- 
dents," he said of the first class which 
completed training January 29. "Not 
one of them missed an hom-'s class 
time. They're even more conscientious 
than we thought they'd be." 

Mr. Hood said the trainees had 
some difficulties adjusting to school 
work and particularly the mathemat- 
ics—which is natural, since their aver- 
age age is about forty and many of 
them had been out of school as many 
as twenty-five years— but indicated 
that handicap seemed to be offset by 
their desire to learn. 

The trainees are pleased at the 
chance to gain— at an estimated cost 



THE CARPENTER 



to Hiiloid of $1,750 per man— the op- 
portunity to move to better jobs in an 
expanding field. 

"It hasn't been a picnic," said Fran- 
cis Hurtubis, a veteran of nineteen 
years with Haloid. "The first couple 
of nights my son and daughter had 
to help me with the math. But it's a 
wonderful thing. It's our living and 
we're not kids anymore." 

Herbert Smith, another nineteen- 
year veteran in the paper department, 
said he and two other trainees con- 
ducted "cram sessions" two or three 
nights a week to help themselves 
over the mathematical rough spots. 

"I've been talking to a friend of 
mine at the plant," Mr. Smith said, 
"and he just can't wait until he's got 
ten years (of service, the eligibility 
minimum) so he can apply." . . . 

The Haloid union is Local 14A of 
the Amalgamated Photographic Sup- 
ply Workers of America, an affiliate 
of the Rochester Joint Board of the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of 
America. 

The training program's broad out- 
lines came into existence during talks 
between the manager of the Joint 
Board, Abraham D. Chatman, and 
Mr. Wilson. . . . 

Haloid's president, Mr. Wilson, said 
he has been pleased by progress re- 
ports on the program, but pointed out 
that it is, frankly, experimental. 

Its distinction lies, first of all, in the 
fact that it exists at all. National stud- 
ies show widespread interest in auto- 
mation and its effects in terms of job 
displacement and retraining, but few 
firms have established formal pro- 
grams to deal with the problem. 

Haloid's plan also is unusual in its 
emphasis on classroom training. Most 
retraining plans, where they exist at 
all, depend on in-plant instruction. 



Sometimes the instruction comes from 
company supervisors, sometimes from 
outside experts, but rarely have com- 
panies invested as much in tuition and 
lost-time wages as has Haloid. 

The company's retraining program 
also is unusual because of the broad 
and basic differences between the em- 
ployes' pre-training skills and those 
they are expected to acquire. This dif- 
ference in skills comes from the com- 
pany's position as a producer of differ- 
ent sets of products which require in- 
creasingly divergent skills to manu- 
facture. 

The final evaluation of Haloid's first 
class is several months away, Mr. 
Wilson reported, since trainees must 
return to their old jobs, then be re- 
assigned to mechanical department 
posts, then spend some time on the 
job before the program's success can 
be determined. 

Asked about the company's heavy 
investment— $400 tuition per man, 
plus more than $600 in school-time 
wages, plus short-term recruiting and 
training costs for replacements— Mr. 
Wilson replied: "In a sense, I don't 
think we'll ever get it back." 

Part of the investment, he said, 
must be written off as a payment for 
"the intangibles of goodwill." But he 
added that the program was worked 
out and begun midway between 
union-management bargaining ses- 
sions, so that there would be no ef- 
fort on either side to convert either 
the plan's terms or the goodwill into 
contractual provisions. 

The program's goal, as Mr. Wilson 
sees it, is to "clear the road" toward 
automation and, along the way, to 
"create real confidence" in employer- 
employe relations. 

He listed three conditions he felt 
were necessary before a program like 
Haloid's could be put into effect— 



THECARPENTER 23 

an expanding company sales and Perhaps the best clue to the success 

profit position, proximity of educa- or failure of the program came from 

tional facilities like RIT's, and a his- a trainee: "It's a good deal. They're 

tory of good company-union coop- doing their- best for us, now we'll do 

eration. our best for them." 



1959 ACCIDENT FIGURES ARE FRIGHTENING 

Accidents at work killed 13,800 persons in 1959, an increase of 4 per cent 
over 1958, and injured 1,950,000, up 150,000 from 1958. 

The cost was $4,100,000,000. This includes cost of interrupted production 
schedules, time lost by workers other than the injured, as well as wage loss, 
medical expense and the overhead costs of insurance. 

Workers' deaths by accidents off the job totaled 29,800, and the injured 
totaled 4,300,000, up 5 per cent from 1958. The time lost, including indirect, 
amounted to 285,000,000 man-days, equivalent to the shut-down of plants 
with more than 1,000,000 workers. 

In short, more were killed on the job and off the job, and more were in- 
jured, than in 1958. 

The total national accident fatality toil for 1959 was 91,500, up 1 per cent 
from 1958. The total injury figure was 9,300,000, and the total cost came to 
$12,600,000,000. 

This includes wage loss, medical expense, overhead of insurance for all 
accidents, interrupted production schedules, time lost by workers other than 
the injured, etc., due to work accidents and property damage in traffic acci- 
dents and fires. 

Fatal falls— 18,300— were the same as in 1958; burns, up 1 per cent, to 7400; 
drownings, down 1 per cent to 6500; fatal firearms accidents, up 1 per cent to 
2200. 

Public accidents (not motor vehicles) caused 16,500 deaths, same as in 
1958, and injuries came to 2,050,000, at an estimated cost of $800,000,000. 
There were decreases in the 15-24 and 25-44 age groups; increases in the 45- 
64 and 65 and over groups; no change in the 0-4 and 5-14 age groups. 

The eight-month total of railroad deaths in accidents was 1346, a slight 
drop, while injuries at 13,127 rose. Grade crossing accidents kffled 728, a drop 
of 7 per cent; injuries totaled 1961, up 5 per cent. 

Eight fatal accidents on scheduled airlines killed 198 passengers and 28 
crew members. 

Home accidents killed 26,500, same as in 1958, and injured 4,000,000, at a 
cost of $900,000,000. 

9 

NEW THREAT TO UNIONS 

Sen. Dirksen of Illinois, the Republican Senate leader, has filed a menacing little bill 
that would handle the problems of people faced with automation joblessness by depri^'ing 
them of protections existing under the Norris-La Guardia and other federal laws. 

It would be impossible, under Dirksen's bill, for a union to bargain legally on tlie 
question of layoffs. It would be impossible, under the Dirksen proposal, for workers to 
strike to protect job continuity and enforce safeguards in regard to layoflFs and job rights. 

The presumption must be that Dirksen's bill arises from railroad lobbyists protesting 
a Supreme Court decision upholding the right of workers on the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railroad to strike against a management decision to close stations. 



Editorial 




One Failure Need Not Mean Permanent Despair 

Last month, a summit conference to which the world had looked with 
considerable hope blew up before it even got started. It is not our purpose 
to go into the ramifications that contributed to the demise of the conference. 
But having had some experience with the art of negotiating, we deem our- 
selves competent to make a few observations. 

To anyone who has participated in collective bargaining to any extent 
it was obvious from the beginning that the conference had little chance of 
succeeding. Both sides were going into the conference with avowed reserva- 
tions. Both sides publicly announced positions from which they would not 
retreat under any circumstances. Both sides began jockeying for position long 
before the conference got under way. Under such circumstances no kind of 
collective bargaining session can be very productive. 

Whether our security and the security of the free world were enhanced 
or undermined by the collapse of the conference we have no way of knowing. 
But we are positive of this: some sort of collective security must be worked 
out soon, for the future of mankind hangs in the balance. 

Science and technology are advancing at a fantastic rate. These advances 
can make living easier, better, and happier; or they can make life impossible. 
Man has learned to tame his oldest enemy— nature— but he has made woefully 
slow progress in taming himself in controlling greed, lust, and selfishness. 

Herein lies the big paradox. The greater man's control becomes over the 
forces of nature, the more important self-control becomes. The more power 
man can control, the more essential it becomes that he be equipped to control 
that power wisely, generously, and humanely. 

Atomic energy is a case in point. The release of atomic energy has given 
man the greatest power factor in human history. The potential for good or 
evil is almost limitless. Atomic energy can be used to eradicate the pestholes 
of the world by draining the swamps, irrigating the deserts, and conquering 
the jungles. Or it can be used to eradicate mankind. With this tremendous 
power at his command, man can turn the world into one massive, fruitful 
garden. Or into a mass of smoldering, stinking iiibble. 

In the final analysis, which course he pursues depends on the degree of 
control he can muster over his basic instincts. 

The May conference failed. But this is nothing new in collective bargain- 
ing. The bargaining session that comes up with a signed contract at the first 
meeting is the exception rather than the rule. Agreements are usually ham- 
mered out after many failures. With the survival of mankind at stake, last 
month's failure should not become the end of the line. 

Admittedly, negotiating with an adversary as arrogant and as power-hungry 
as Khrushchev is no cinch. In the Communist lexicon, decency and considera- 



T II E C A R P E N T E R 25 

tidn are merely words in the dictionary. The end justifies any means. A milhon 
lives sacrificed to gain a Communist objective is a desirable bargain. 

Against this kind of thinking the nation that is motivated by compassion 
and humanitarian considerations operates at a distinct disadvantage, much as 
a boxer trying to adhere to the Queensbury rules, while battling an opponent 
not above using brass knuckles, elbows, and horseshoes in the gloves. But we 
are well aware of Russian tactics. Power is the only language they really 
understand. Power we must have to negotiate successfully. Because the May 
conference failed is no reason for not trying again at some future date. Mean- 
while, we must not only keep our powder dry but also build up our stockpiles. 



A Step In The Right Direction 

Elsewhere in this issue is a story telling how one progressive company 
in Rochester, N. Y. is meeting the problems of automation in a humane and 
intelligent manner insofar as its employes are concerned. The company is 
Haloid Xerox, Inc., a firm making photographic supplies and duplicating 
equipment. 

Recently, Plaloid inaugurated a comprehensive retraining program for 
emplo^"es slated to lose their jobs to automation sometime in the future. 
The Haloid program is no hit-or-miss affair aimed only at giving the appear- 
ance that the company is showing some concern for its workers. Rather it is 
a comprehensive program drawn up and administered by the Rochester Tech- 
nical Institute, one of the better technical schools in the nation. 

Under the Haloid program, the trainees spend several months going to 
school full time. During this period they are paid at the rate of $2.50 per 
hour— the average wage in the plant. Having their financial needs thus taken 
care of, the trainees are free to devote all their mental energies to absorbing 
the new knowledge and skills the retraining course offers them. Like other 
students, they burn the midnight oil. When they have completed the course 
they return to their current jobs. However, they are equipped to take on dif- 
ferent jobs when automation wipes out their present ones. 

According to Haloid management, the company invests something like 
$1,700 in retraining each employe. But the price is small compared to the 
security and peace of mind it brings to the employes. In this company, at 
least, workers are able to face up to the uncertainties of automation without 
getting knots in their stomachs. 

This is the kind of approach to automation this journal has long advocated. 
When management makes a decision to automate it expects to spend big 
chunks of money. Machinery with years of serviceability has to be scrapped. 
More often than not, new facilities have to be erected. All this is figured in 
the cost of moving into automation. Our contention is that "retreading" em- 
ployes ought to be a legitimate cost of automation, too. Whatever the yard- 
stick—morality, justice, or plain common sense— the workers who made all the 
wealth for a company merit at least as much consideration as machinery or 
equipment. 

We have often said that automation will fulfill the rosy promises ascribed 
to it only if everyone benefits in every direction— company, consumer, and 
employes. If any one group hogs all the benefits, automation will become a 
headache rather than a blessing. 



26 THECAKPENTER 

To date, there has been all too little concern shown for the workers dis- 
placed by automatic machinery. The Haloid plan is a first big step in the right 
direction. Let ns fervently hope that it sets a pattern for all industry. Time is 
running out on this matter of machines replacing men. Machines may be able 
to produce faster than men, but only men can consume. Sooner or later, work- 
ers must be looked upon as consumers as well as sources of skill and brawn. 
Otherwise, machines eventually must become the masters rather than the 
slaves. 



Creating Jobs With Union Funds 

Recently, the administrators of the Northern California Pension Trust Fund 
decided to invest a sizeable portion of their trust funds in FHA and VA mort- 
gages. The deal was worked out between Brotherhood organizations in the area 
and local home builders associations participating in the fund. According to 
press releases, something like $25,000,000 will be channeled into the moitgage 
market through the plan at the rate of $400,000 a month. First purchases will 
yield about 5.6%. 

It seems to us this is a great example of killing two birds with one stone. 
Tight mortgage money is one of the major roadblocks that has been holding 
back home construction, and thus making it more difficult for all our mem- 
bers to keep employed. The injection of sizeable chunks of new money into 
the market from the pension trust fund ought to pep up things considerably 
in northern California. The money in the trust fund comes from Caipenters 
and their employers. Provided that interest returns are right, how could 
this money be invested more beneficially than in guaranteed mortgages that 
are bound to increase the tempo of home building? 

Of course, the first responsibility of all fund trustees is to produce the 
highest possible return from those funds. All decisions must be measured by 
this yardstick. But whenever the mortgage market ofters returns as attractive 
as those provided by other forms of investment, trustees of Carpenter trust 
funds have a fine opportunity of grabbing off an additional dividend— more 
work for our members. Northern California was quick to take advantage of 
such an opportunity. 

Perhaps other areas have taken similar action without our knowing it. Be- 
cause of its size the Northern California program received considerable public- 
ity. And all those who engineered it are entitled to sincere congratulations. 

Mortgage rates have been climbing steadily. At the same time, stocks and 
bonds have been skittery and subject to considerable fluctuation— all of which 
makes the mortgage market more attractive month by month. Administrators 
of Carpenter trust funds ought to keep a careful watch on developments. 

There is another area where union funds possibly can be used to stimulate 
construction. Section 302 of the Housing Act allows non-profit organizations 
to enter into long-term financing arrangements for the construction of special 
housing facilities for the aged. The non-profit organization needs to provide 
only a very small percentage (as low as 2%) of the funds; the rest can be 
borrowed on a very long-term arrangement. 

Housing for the aged is a real problem in most areas. It is a problem that 
is certain to grow. And it is one that affects many retired union members. If 
a union can help alleviate the situation by the investment of surplus funds 



THE CARPENTER 27 

in a special housing venture, and at the same time stimulate construction, the 
proposition seems to be one that merits exploration. A number of Indianapolis 
churches already are embarked on developing housing for the aged under 
Section 302. And the Central Labor Union has the matter under study. 

This is an extfemely complicated age we live in. Money is becoming more 
and more powerful. Few unions are fat with funds. But if the surplus funds 
held by unions can be managed so as to meet pressing needs and at the same 
time create jobs, all avenues of promise ought to be explored. 



Work Laws Are Losing Their Shine 

The states which stampeded to the lure of gold shining in the "right-to- 
work" hills are finding that it is fool's gold. It has the shine and the glitter 
but not the substance. 

Latest expert to turn up with a disappointing assay for the right-to-work 
claim-stakers is Professor Milton J. Nadworny of the University of Vermont. 
Businessmen who favor right-to-work laws in their states as a means of 
attracting industry had better think twice, in the opinion of Professor Nad- 
worny. 

In a study recently concluded. Professor Nadworny found that right-to- 
work laws are causing hundreds of thousands of skilled workers to migrate to 
freer industrial regions for higher wages and better working conditions. He 
declared that as a result, industrial expansion in many states, particularly in 
the South, is being crippled. 

Pointing to the heavy outflow of workers from the South, where "right-to- 
work" predominates. Professor Nadworny declared that the search for "better 
emjjloyment opportunities" ordinarily means higher wages "and the right of 
membership in strong, responsible trade unions whose right of collective 
bargaining with management is not restricted by right-to-work laws and anti- 
labor community attitudes." 

We are glad to hear Professor Nadworny say it, but we knew it all along. 
In spite of automation and thinking machines, skilled workers still are a vital 
cog in industry. And any scheme that aims at short-changing such workers 
defeats itself in the long run. 

Apparently, the fact that right-to-work promises do not pan out in practice 
is well known. George Craig, former Republican governor of Indiana, the 
first truly industrial state to adopt right-to-work, recently warned his party 
it would go down to defeat in November if it insisted on adhering to a right- 
to-work platform in the face of growing demand for repeal of the law. 

Indiana statistics tend to bear out the findings of Professor Nadworny. A 
right-to-work law does not attract industry; it repels it by disturbing the reser- 
voir of skilled workers, the one ingredient in high productivity that cannot be 
substituted for or glossed over by measures rooted in expediency. 

Like the farmer who tried to fool his horse with sawdust painted green, 
right-to-workers are finding that you can't skimp on the feed and get re- 
sults' too. 



Official Information 




General OfiGcers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

FRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 



Second District, RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventh District, LYLE J. HILLER 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 



Tliird District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 



Eighth District, J. F. CAMBIANO 
17 Ara^on Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fourth District, HENRY W. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

1834 N. 78th St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HUTCHESON, Chairman ; R. E. LIVINGSTON, Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



IMPO RTANT NO TICE 

In the issuance of clearance cards, care should be taken to see that they are 
properly filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary 
of the Local Union issuing same as well as the Local Union accepting the clear- 
ance. The clearance cards must be sent to the General Secretary's Department 
without delay, in order that the members' names can be listed on the quarterly 
account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained therein 
must be used. 



CONVENTION CALL APPEARS ON PAGE FIVE 

The attention of all subordinate bodies is directed to the Convention Call 
appearing on Page Five of this issue. The time, place, and full details regard- 
ing the convention are contained in the Call. 

A careful study of the Call may avoid embarrassing mistakes and un- 
necessary correspondence. 



Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



£:xntfxxntn 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more. 



S^0t in P^ar^ 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



ANDREASON, NILS, L. U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
AUDAS, BARNEY, L. U. 1016, Rome, N. Y. 
BABB, LEWIS I., L. U. 1108, Cleveland, Ohio 
BALLABON, HYMAN, L. U, 608, New York, 

N. Y. 
BARRY, DAVID G., L. U. 1068, Vallejo, Cal. 
BASS, JOE S., L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
BEYSTER, GEORGE, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 
BOOHER, CHARLES B. Sr., L. U. 1400, Santa 

Monica, Cal. 
BOOKS, PAUL, L. U. 1590, Washington, D. C. 
BOOTHE, CHARLES A., L. U. 360, Galesburg, 

111. 
BOURCIER, LIONEL, Sr., L. U. 96, Springfield, 

Mass. 
BRANDLEIN, HENRY, L. U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C. 
BUCHMAN, USHER, L. U. 246, New York, 

N. Y. 
BUNDY, CHARLES, L. U. 161, Kenosha, Wise. 
BYRNE, WILLIAM, L. U. 161, Kenosha, Wise. 
CADENHEAD, SHERWOOD, L. U. 2024, Miami, 

Fla. 
CAMERINO, MICHAEL, L. U. 385, New York, 

N. Y. 
CARL, HERROLD, L. U. 1497, E. Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
CHRISTENSEN, ANDERS, L. U. 1172, Billings, 

Mont. 
CHRISTENSEN, HERMAN, L. U. 12, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 
CHRISTIAN, FRED, L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
CLABES, ALBERT, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
CLARK, WILSON, L. U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 
CLAUSEN, BERGE, L. U. 608, New York, 

N. Y. 
COHEN, SIDNEY, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 
CONNELL, JAMES, L. U. 298, New York, 

N. Y. 
CUNHA, FRANCIS J., L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
CYCKOWSKI, JOHN, L. U. 972, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
DAVENPORT, GILBERT, L. U. 1497, E. Los 

Angeles, Ca!. 
DAVIDSEN, DAVID, L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
DAVIS, HENRY, L. U. 42, San Francisco, Cal. 
DelFAVERO, GIORDANO, L. U. 385, New York, 

N. Y. 
DeWITT, HORATIO B., L. U. 257, New York, 

N. Y. 
DOBBIN, MARTIN, L. U. 161, Kenosha, Wise. 
DONADIO, JOSEPH, L. U. 257, New York, 

N. Y. 
DONNELS, J. D., L. U. 1846, New Orleans, La. 
DUNN, ROBERT H., L. U. 743, Bakersfield, 

Cal. 
EARL, WILLIAM R., L. U. 2084, Astoria, Ore. 
ELLIS, ZERBA, L. U. 169, E. St. Louis, 111. 
ENGLE, BONARD C, L. U. 200, Columbus, 

Ohio 
ERICKSON, EMIL, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 
ERICKSON, GOTTFRIED, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 

111. 



EVENSON, MOSE, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, 

Wise. 
FABIAN, J. R., L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
FAUK, GUS, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 
FLINCHBAUGH, WILLIAM H., L. U. 191, 

York, Pa. 
FORBERG, H. C, L. U. 1172, Billings, Mont. 
FRENCH, AUBREY, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 
GALENTINE, WILLIAM A., L. U. 1400, Santa 

Monica, Cal. 
GALLING, C. N., L. U. 1098, Baton Rouge, 

La. 
GESSWEIN, GEORGE, L. U. 246, New York, 

N. Y. 
GILLENWATERS, DAVID CLAUDE, L. U. 50, 

Knoxville, Tenn. 
GUERRIER, EDWIN, L. U. 1497, E. Los An- 
geles, Cal. 
HABECK, ERVIN A., L. U. 264, Milwaukee, 

Wise. 
HAND, CARLTON, L. U. 1743, Rio Grande, 

N. J. 
HARRINGTON, D. L., L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, 

Texas 
HELBING, CHARLES, L. U. 42, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
HEYSE, EMIL, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wise. 
HOGAN, JAMES H., L. U. 1480, Boulder, Colo. 
HUDGINS, HILLIARD H., L. U. 3110, Black 

Mountain, N. C. 
HULSE, SEYMOUR L., L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
HYDEN, VICTOR, L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
JENKINS, JAKE M., L. U. 50, Knoxville, Tenn. 
JENNINGS, JOHN T., L. U. 200, Columbus, 

Ohio 
JEPERTINGER, ADOLPH, L. U. 264, Milwau- 
kee, Wise. 
JOHNSON, EDWARD O., L. U. 982, Detroit, 

Mich. 
JOHNSON, LEE, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 
JOHNSTON, FRANK L., L. U. 200, Columbus, 

Ohio 
JONES, IRA A. Sr., L. U. 982, Detroit, Mich. 
KEHOE, HOWARD, L. U. 169, E. St. Louis, 111. 
KELLACHOW, MICHAEL C, L. U. 982, De- 
troit, Mich. 
KELLY, EARL, L. U. 50, Knoxville, Tenm 
KELLY, MILTON F., L. U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
KIMBAL, RAY W., L. U. 1400, Santa Monica, 

Cal. 
KIMMELMAN, MOSES, L. U. 385, New York, 

N. Y. 
KING, WILLIAM A., L. U. 191, York, Pa. 
KIRK, JOSEPH L., L. U. 198, Dallas, Texas 
KOCH, KARL F., L. U. 512, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
KREFT, PAUL, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wise. 
KRUEGER, ROY, L. U. 161, Kenosha, Wise. 
KRZYWICKI, JOHN, L. U. 246, Njw York, 

N. Y. 
KUEHL. RUEBEN, L. U. 2466, Pembroke, Ont. 
LANDGRAF, JOHN, L. U. 972, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



LATRELL, FRANCIS J., L. U. 1590, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

LAWERENCE, WILLIAM, L. U. 1016, Rome, 
N. Y. 

LEIB, HIRAM, L. U. 1497, E. Los Angeles, Cal. 

LEVINE, ISEK, L. U. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 

LEWIS, IRA, L. U. 169, E. St. Louis, 111. 

LIND, CHARLES, L. U. 42, San Francisco, Cal. 

LINDEMAN, KARL, L. U. 1456, New York, 
N. Y. 

LINDER, FRED, L. U. 1497, E. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

LOHEIDE, FRED, L. U. 436, New Albany, Ind. 

MALLEN, O. L., L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 

MALPASS, JOHN, L. U. 42, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

MARSHALL, WALTER D., L. U. 94, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

MARSHALL, WILFRED, L. U. 162, San Ma- 
teo, Cal. 

MASELLA, GAETANO, L. U. 385, New York, 
N. Y. 

McCOY, ALFRED, L. U. 1497, E. Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

MESEROL, JOSEPH J., L. U. 594, Dover, N. J. 

MILLER, CLYDE WESLEY, L. U. 2274, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

MILLER, M. J., L. U. 1098, Baton Rouge, La. 

MOREY, CLAUDE, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 

NELSON, JOHN N., L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 

NELSON, (HUGO) WALFRED, L. U. 101, 
Baltimore, Md. 

NEWMAN, HOWARD, L. U. 1590, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

NICHOLS, RICHARD, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 

NOONAN, WILLIAM, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 

OLSEN, BIRGER, L. U. 1162, Flushing, N. Y. 

OLSEN, GUNNI, L. U. 791, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

OLSON, FRED, L. U. 791, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

O'NEILL, TERENCE, L. U. 1456, New York, 
N. Y. 

OSTROM, AXEL, L. U. 1590, Washington, 
D. C. 

OTT, JOHN, L. U. 436, New Albany, Ind. 

PACE, JOSEPH, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 

PARRISH, L. B., L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

PATTERSON, ALEXANDER, L. U. 514, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. 

PEARSALL, NELSON D., L. U. 1397, Roslyn, 
N. Y. 

PETERSON, MARTINE, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, 
Wise. 

PFAU, WILLIAM J., L. U. 1497, E. Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

PIERSON, FRED, L. U. 490, Passaic, N. J. 

RIDGWAY, JOHN, L. U. 132, Washington, 
D. C. 

RIOS, SALVADOR, L. U. 42, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

ROGERS, JOEL L., L. U. 50, Knoxville, Tenn. 

RULEFF, WILLIAM, L. U. 1846, New Orleans, 
La. 

SANDERS, HANFORD, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

SCHREPFER, FRANK, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, 
Wise. 

SCHWEIGER, FRANK, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 
111. 

SEAMAN, ART, L. U. 743, Bakersfield, Cal. 



letnariatn 

SENECZKO, WALTER, L. U. 494, Windsor, 

Ont. 
SEVENNING, SVEN, L. U. 298, Long Island 

City, N. Y. 
SHEPHERD, CHARLES, L. U. 12, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 
SMALL, ELDREDGE A., L. U. 94, Providence, 

R. I. 
STEEL, DAN, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 
STEINKRAUS, CHARLES, L. U. 1330, Grand 

Rapids, Mich. 
STEPHENS, WILLIAM, L. U. 42, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
STILLION, FRANK, L. U. 1400, Santa Monica, 

Cal. 
SUOMINEN, JOHAN A., L. U. 2084, Astoria, 

Ore. 
SWAN, ROBERT P., L. U. 200, Columbus, 

Ohio 
SWANSON, PAUL, L. U. 791, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
SZCZERBA, JACOB, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
THRON, FREDERICK, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
TUNNEY, DANIEL, L. U. 608, New York, N. Y. 
TUPPER, LESTER, L. U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 
VanGIESEN, ARCHIE J., L. U. 545, Kane, Pa. 
VINTON, ARTHUR, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
WASHAM, T. H., L. U. 1683, El Dorado, Ark. 
WATERHOUSE, FRANK, L. U. 275, Newton, 

Mass. 
WATERS, LEIGHTON W., L. U. 1277, Bend, 

Ore. 
WEATHERSBEE, LAMAR, L. U. 1202, Merced, 

Cal. 
WELLS, JOSEPH R., L. U. 1478, Redondo 

Beach, Cal. 
WESTFALL, E. E., L. U. 2288, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
WHITLEY, FRED F., L. U. 1082, Ft. Worth, 

Texas 
WIBEL, H. C, L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 
WIEBE, A. L., L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
WIECHMAN, R. C, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
WIGG, JOHN P., L. U. 2288, Los Angeles, Cal. 
WILLIAMS, CHARLES, L. U. 22, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
WILLIAMS, ERNEST J., L. U. 246, New 

York, N. Y. 
WILLIAMS, HARVEY, L. U. 337, Detroit, 

Mich. 
WILLIAMS, HUDSON TAYLOR, L. U. 345, 

Memphis, Tenn. 
WILSON, HARRY, L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
WINCHEL, JAMES, L. U. 90, Evansville, Ind. 
WINDFELDT, W. P., L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
WINUP, PETER, L. U. 22, San Francisco, Cal. 
WOLD, ALBERT, L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 
WOLF, WILLIAM E., L. U. 1138, Toledo, 

Ohio 
WOOD, EARL C, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
WOODS, JOSEPH I., L. U. 22, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
WOODS, LYMAN, L. U. 710, Long Beach, Cal. 
YETMAN, MOSES, L. U. 608, New York, N. Y. 
YOUNGS, HARRY, L. U. 871, Battle Creek, 

Mich. 
ZUCCHI, JAMES, L. U. 15, Hackensack, N. J. 




31 



Progress Report 

The pictures below show the status of our new headquarters building in Washington, 
D. C, on May 15th. By comparing with the pictures in last month's issue it is obvious 
that tlie work is progressing rapidly and smoothly. 




ltiro»«TIOI»L (CAaiMffTERa '»<J1'^"^„,^ 
INITED fflOritPtfjaD, CABPEttreRo « Joneis 

UUBIRD • ROOT, AROilTECTa 

,nu A. vOLPE coiPAUy 

WY 15th, 19M> Pt^O NO.. « 




IMTEHNATIQIWL ICAaiJARTERa BUILDJNfi ' 

uniTQj enjTHEFiHinD, CAnrenTBti t jatiCRi 

ttAc^lNlirjN, D, c. 

HULAE IRO t ROOT, ARCHITECT* 

jj«j A. vjuc cjwAm 

ukv i;tii, 19M mora Mb. •( 



What's Nev^ 

This column is devoted to new developments in materials and products of interest to members 
of crafts which are a part of the United Brotherhood. The articles are presented merely to inform 
our readers, and are not to be considered an endorsement by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. 

For information concerning products which are described in this column, please do not write to 
THE CARPENTER or the General Office, but address all queries to the manufacturer, whose name 
appears at the close of each article. 



The Masonite Corporation reports that a 
Florida construction company has devel- 
oped a time-saving method of installing 
supplementary attic vent panels in both 
residential and commercial construction. 
Rather than enclosing the roof overhang 
itself, workmen nail cleats made of scrap 
lumber to the rafters between the plate 
and roof sheathing. The openings between 
the rafters (approximately 7 V2 " high and 




14" wide) are filled with Masonite Vi" 
standard Peg-board. Known as "bird stops," 
the panels keep out wildlife and provide 
roof ventilation at lower cost. The per- 
forated panels are painted to harmonize 
with the wall. For more information, write 
the Lawrence H. Selz Organization, Inc., 
221 N. LaSalle St., Chicago 1, 111. 



A new router tem- 
plate for installing 
door butts on interior 
or exterior doors is 
designed primarily to 
assemble pre- hung 
doors on the job site. 
However, it is said to 
be practicable for the 
finish carpenter on re- 
modeling jobs as well 
as on new construc- 
tion. Of aluminum 
construction, it is compact, with simple de- 
sign. For more information write Personal- 
ized Builders, Inc., 112 N. Park, Valley 
Center, Kansas. 




Described as a straight-edge guide for 
portable power saws, saber saws, router, 
knife and other tools, the "Skripedge" can 
be used when cutting sheetrock, plywood, 
and Masonite. Used without attachments, 
it is said to be useful for all forms of lay- 
out work, for clamping work for gluing, and 
for a jamb level when any short type "I" 




beam level is attached. It will lock on the 
cutting mark or on an angle when needed. 
A 3-foot extension for the standard 6-foot 
size is also available. Write Brotherhood 
member H. O. Skripsky of Skrip Construc- 
tion Co., P. O. Box 26, Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, for more information. 



Now offered is a newly designed drawer 
roller that allegedly achieves smoother and 
quieter operation for cabinet, table and 
desk drawers. The manufacturer claims an 
indefinite life span for these polyethylene 
rollers which come in either black or white. 
Also stressed is simplicity of installation. 



No. 1001 




requiring one brad per roller and usually 
2 rollers to a drawer. This product. No. 100 
L, is sold only through wholesale hard- 
ware jobbers, 50 pairs to a box or in indi- 
vidual bags, 20 pairs to the box. For in- 
formation, write to Swenson Mfg. Co., P. O. 
Box 2066, South Station, Downey, Calif. 
For a sample roller, send 35c to cover 
mailing, to same address. 



V V V 




utdoor 



/WeanderingH 





By Fred Goetz 



Following are a few questions from read- 
ers that may be of interest to you at this 
time of year: 

One asked— what is the best way to mark 
the waterline on a boat? Well, here's our 
answer to the problem: 

Set your boat, right side up, on a level 
floor. Cut a two-by-four to a length from the 
floor to the boat's normal waterline. Secure 
a pencil to the top side of the two-by-four, 
slowly, carefully moving the two-by-four 
along the side of the bow from stem to 
stern, marking as you go. 

Another reader wanted to know how to 
remove rust from the inside of the gas tank. 
To that I'd say get yourself a small chain 
(dog leash would be all right), and secure it 
to the end of a 12-inch-long stick. Drop the 
chain into the gas tank, letting it coil at tlie 
bottom. Swirl the chain arovmd vigorously. 
Remove chain from tank and rinse out with 
clear gasoline. Repeat until liquid run-off is 
clear. Before storing your motor away this 
year, put in a mixture of oil, swish it around 
in tank, then let it stand 'til next season or 
whenever you intend to use it again. The 
mixture of oil will discourage rust from 

forming. 

* # « 

Philip Bach of R.R. 
#2, Box 53 IC, Man- 
chester, Mo. is a jour- 
neyman carpenter that 
can boast of a 36-year 
membership in Local 
47 of St. Louis. 

But one thing he's 
done longer than that 
—it is fishing. 

He encloses a pic- 
ture of his partner Ben on the left and 
himself on the right. This was the day they 
trolled around one spot on Eagle lake in 
Canada. They took ninety-three pounds of 
fish— all northern pike. 

Phil recalls the odd thing about the two- 
day trip was that on the second day in 
that same area they raised one fish— six 
inches long. But after all, he says, that's 
fishing. 

Right you are, Phil. 




Getting ready for the pre-summer goin' 
over of the family boat? Following are a 
few suggestions that might come in handy: 

1. . . . Pre-painting, surface-conditioning is 
a must! If the surface looks bad, make up 
your mind you're going to sand it down to 
the bare wood or metal— whatever the case 
may be, 

2. . . Don't wait 'til the weather is too hot! 
Hot temperatures are likely to cause blister- 
ing or wrinkling to the paint job. Ideal boat- 
painting temperatures are between 45 to 50 
degrees. 

3. . . It is well to bear in mind that most 
paint and varnish removers are highly flam- 
mable. This is a point to remember when 
using the blowtorch later. The paint and 
varnish remover liquid should be allowed to 
dry thoroughly before the blowtorch opera- 
tion. 

4. . . Painting surfaces should be com- 
pletely clean, free from oil and grease. 

5. . . Invest in a first-class primer. For, if 
the primer coat is inferior and breaks dovm, 
so will the finish coats— no matter how good 
tliey may be. 

6. . . Seam cement should be applied to 
all necessary places (nail and screw holes, 
too) after putting on tlie primer coat. If you 
apply the seam cement before the primer 
coat, the dry wood will absorb tlie linseed 
oil and the seam cement will eventually 
crumble and fall out. 

7. . . Do not shake varnish before apply- 
ing. Doing so creates air bubbles, which are 
difficult to brush out. A good temperatxure 
for applying varnish is around 60 degrees. 
Wait until undercoat is thoroughly dry be- 
fore applying each succeeding coat. 

« « « 

Q. What is meant by Cuttyhunk line? 

A. A Captain Crandall of Ashaway, R. 
I., developed Cuttyhunk hne. It was hand- 
twisted, made from the best imported lin- 
ens obtainable. A very famous fishing club 
of the early days, the Cuttyhunk Fishing 
Club purchased all of the line of this type 
that Cap Crandall could produce. The name 
"cutt>'hunk" was consequently applied to 
linen lines of fine quality. Today almost all 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




line nianufacturt'is use the word "cutty- 
hunk" on the labels of even their cheapest 
lines, so the term has since lost its true 

meaning. 

# « # 

Q. Should I use green, mist or camou- 
flaged line? 

A. There might be a few occasions 
^^'here a certain color of line might be used 
to match a condition in the water, such as 
green leader where algae are present; light 
blue leader when you are fishing an open 
stream and a light blue sky prevails; camou- 
flaged leader if fishing a brushy creek with 
matching overhanging fohage. My personal 
choice is a light colorless leader that will 
blend well into any surrounding area in- 
stead of trying to match the color of any 
leader to the varying conditions of the 

stream. 

# * * 

Bill Strickler of 408 
N. Windsor Drive, a 
member of Local 272 
of South Chicago 
Heights, Illinois, 
sends in this photo 
that kinda eases the 
pain to those of you 
who just can't wait to 
stalk the wary deer 
come this fall. 
Bill nailed this "mulie" in the Big Horn 

Mountains, north of Sheridan, Wyoming. 
This deer, in the trophy class, proved the 

biggest rack of horns in that particular area 

for the season. 

# # # 

Herman Mathews of 2797 Johnstown 
Road in Columbus, Ohio, a member of Lo- 
cal 200, has an unusual fish tale to relate. 
He says: 

"I'd been out fishing with the boys for 
several days and everybody was catching 
fish except me. I guess I must have been 
holding my mouth the wrong way 'cause I 
was using practically the same gear as they 
were using and we were trolling and casting 
in the same area. 

"Just for a joke, one of my fishing bud- 
dies picked up an old beer can opener, at- 
tached a hook to the end of it, and suggest- 
ed that the fish might be thirsty and that I 
might try using it. 

"Just to go along with the gag, I took 
him up on it, secured the contraption to 
my line and sluffed it over the side. I had 
no sooner got the slack out of my line when 
'wham-o' I had a strike. 




"I worked the whatever-it-was-at-the- 
other-end-of-the-line in, and it turned out 
to be the biggest fish of the expedition— a 
five-and-a-half-pound bass caught on a rusty 
can opener!" 

# # » 

In our first column 
in THE CARPEN- 
TER, we pointed to 
the value of parent- 
children outdoor pur- 
suits as a tool against 
juvenile delinquency. 
More and more law 
enforcement authori- 
ties are realizing tliis. 

One fella' that will 
go along with us on this contention is 
Lawrence Mereness of 611 Soper Avenue, 
Rockford, Illinois, a member of Local 792. 

He sends in this photo of his daughter 
Diana taken when she caught her first fish 
at the age of two— a nice crappie, or is it 
a sunfish, Lawrence? 

Anyway, Diana, now 12 years of age, is 
the most avid of anglerettes and prefers to 
take her fishing light and easy with ultra 
light spin gear. 

Another youngster who is an avid fol- 
lower of the angling arts is Bob Luehrs 
whose dad. Art Luehrs, is a carpenter and 
affiliated with Local 
1289 in Seattle. 
Young Bob caught 
this nice looking bass 
the old-fashioned way 
—on bamboo pole and 
line. No reel was in- 
volved. 

The bass was taken 
from his grandfath- 
er's farm pond out of Fremont, Nebraska. 

Bob says his granddad has really made a 
successful pond and that it also contains 
saucer-size crappie. 



No doubt a few of you folks ha\e been 
out scattergunnin' after those big Canadian 
honkers this year. If you've missed more 
than your share, console yourself with the 
information that the critters can pom- on 
the coal to the extent of 60 miles per hour! 

This figure was derived by following one 
of the wingers in an airplane and checking 
its speed against the plane's. 

Also, you may be interested to know that 
the honker's altitude is a mere 29,000 feet 
—nearly five and a half miles! 




CorrospondQncQ 




This Journal is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

LOCAL 87 CELEBRATES DIAMOND JUBILEE 

Seventy-five years ago, a small group of dedicated carpenters in St. Paul, Minnesota, 
fed up with the many abuses in the construction industry, got together to apply for a 
charter in the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

On February 17th, Local Union 87 celebrated the 75th Anniversary of that event with 
a Banquet and Dance at the Prom Center. Approximately 3,000 members of Local Union 
87, their wives, friends and guests, attended the affair, to enjoy one of the most im- 
pressive, labor-sponsored events in the history of the Twin Cities. 

Following a cocktail hour, dinner was served in the huge dining room on the main 
floor of the Center. Special guests of honor were the old timers, those with 50 years or 
more of membership in the union. Fourteen such members were presented or honored in 
absentia. They are: 




A part of the 3,000 who made the affair one to remember. 

George Anderson, Charles Borg, Ragnor Erickson, William Stille, Alfred Carlson, Mike 
Kammerer, John L. Olson, Carl Aronson, Berger Dolen, Alfred Munson, John Benson, 
Frank Christopherson, Andrew Morgan, and Joseph Sobkowiak. 

These old timers helped to transform St. Paul from a busy little city to a thriving 
modern metropolis, and they also helped to build tlie stature of Local Union No. 87 
to its present pinnacle. 

Special guests at the affair were Finlay C. Allan, Assistant to General President 
Hutcheson; Donald D. Danielson, Director of Research at the General Office; the Honor- 
able Carl F. Rollvaag, Lieutenant Governor, State of Minnesota; Earl M. Elmquist, 
Editor, Minnesota Union Advocate; and D. G. Reamer, Director of the Credit Union. 

Howard Christensen, president of the local union, acted as master of ceremonies. In a 
short address he summarized the early struggles of the union and recounted the many 
obstacles that were overcome to reach today's success. 

Finlay Allan delivered to the gathering the personal, good wishes of General President 
Hutcheson and all tlie officers at the General Office. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



It is from such local unions as No. 87 that the United Brotherhood draws its strength, 
he told the gathering. 

Over the years this local union has always been ready and willing to do its part in 
any program aimed at- strengthening our Brotherhood or advancing the status of those 
who follow our trade, he continued. 

Se\enty-five years is a long time in human affairs, and the fact that Local 87 has not 
only survived but also prospered for three-quarters of a century is a tribute to the quality 
of the men who make it up, both at the officer level and member level. 




In the background, a view of the speakers table at the 75th Anniversary Dinner of Local No. 
87. In the foreground, the special old timers' table. 

Research Director Danielson, a member of Local 87, recalled his many happy asso- 
ciations with the officers and members of the union. 

"The challenges that lie ahead are varied and numerous, but the proud history of Local 
Union No. 87 is an indication that the challenges will be met and overcome," he told the 
audience. 

"Tempered by 75 years of ups and downs, this union has acquired a toughness and 
a unity of purpose that will enable it to meet future obstacles witliout flinching. I am really 
proud to be a member of it." 

Following the dinner, the Jules Herman Orchestra provided dancing until the early 
hours of the morning. Those who did not dance spent many hours reminiscing vdth old 
friends and recalling memorable events from the past. It wa« a get-together that will 
be remembered by all who attended for many, many years to come. 



FIVE HUNDRED FRIENDS HONOR PAT CAMPBELL 

Over 500 members, civic dignitaries, and state officials filled the dining room of 
Singer's Hotel, Spring Valley, New York, to overflowing on the night of Saturday, April 
•30th, to pay tribute to one of the real stalwarts of the United Brotherhood in upstate 
New York. 

The man so honored was Pat Campbell, General Representative of tlie United Brother- 
hood, and president of Local Union 964, Rockland County and Vicinity, since 1954. It 
was "Pat Campbell Day" for the labor movement of the area. Union officials came from 
all over the area to pay tribute to the honored guest whose efforts have done much 
to advance the cause of organized labor in Rockland County and surrounding area. 

Among the prominent guests were Charles Johnson, Jr., General Executive Board mem- 
ber for the First District, and Richard E. Livingston, General Secretary, who flew from 
Minnesota to be present for the occasion. 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



Speaking was held to a minimum, but Board member Johnson, in a brief address, 
summarized the outstanding work that Representative Campbell has performed in his 
territory. "He is a favorite protege of mine," Johnson told the gathering. "I have watehed 
his rise in the labor movement with a great deal of satisfaction because I became sold on 
his talents early in the game. The size of this gathering and the enthusiasm displayed here 
are ample proof that all of you share my high regard for Brother Campbell." 

General Secretary Livingston similarly paid high tribute to the dedication and capacity 
for hard work that make up a substantial part of Representative Campbell's nature. 

"He can abvays be depended on to do a job thoroughly and competently," he said of 
Brother Campbell. "I only vdsh that we had many, many more like him in the labor 
movement." 




Board member Johnson (left) and General Secretary Dick Livingston (right) admire plaque 
with honored guest Campbell. 

Other special guests were Ed Maguire, former judge, also acting labor advisor to three 
mayors in New York City and now co-counsel for New York State AFL-CIO; Sheriff J. 
Henry Mock; Republican Chairman Milton J. Grant, and Pat Damiani of the Electrical 
Workers. 

The Right Reverend Monsignor Charles L. Giblin rendered the invocation, and Repre- 
sentative Abe H. Saul, who is responsible for directing the Brotherhood's organizing 
activities in the territory, acted as master of ceremonies. Both acquitted themselves with 
rare distinction. 

In a ^•ery short speech of response Representative Campbell said, "Looking at the 
man on this dais, I can't help but think: only in America could a boy from the East Side 
with a limited education receive such a great honor." 

Saturday, April 30, was Pat Campbell Day at Singer's Hotel, but every day will be 
Pat Campbell Day for the tliousands of unionists he has helped over the years. 



OLD TIMERS NIGHT AT LOCAL 58, CHICAGO 

On March 22nd Local No. 58 of Chicago observed its 64th Anniversary by present- 
ing 50-jear membership pins to twenty-two of its members who have reached that goal 
this year. Fourteen of these old timers were present to receive their pins. Local 58 
has at present 134 living members with 50 years or more membership. Three of these 
have 62 years. Out of a total membership of 2,232, 408 are on the pension roll. 

A special invitation had been sent to all members who had had 30 years or more 
of membership to come and take part in the evening's festivities. 

Present to represent the Chicago District Council was President Ted Kenney, and also 
Business Representative Al Robertson. Several neighboring local unions were represented 
by Llicir officers, as well. 



38 T n E C A R P E N T E R 

Before the president of the Chicago District Council presented the pins, he delivered 
a short talk in which he stressed the present generation's gratitude to the old timers 
for their sacrifices and their perseverance in establishing the kind of union conditions that 
are today enjoyed in the City of Chicago, and for building and supporting their local 
union. 

The old timers honored at the ceremonies included: Martin Swanson, Axel Johnson, 
John B. Carlson, Walter Huss, Martin Olsen, Arthur Olin, David Carlsen, John Goss, 
Otto Arnold, Richard Johnson, Arvid Johnson, Gunner Fagerman, John Chellman, Emil 
G. Nelson, and H. G. Gathercoal. 




Pictured above is a portion of the crowd which attended Old Timers Night, sponsored by 
Local No. 58. Many of the members in the audience themselves can boast 30 or more years' 
membership in the union. 

After the presentation all adjourned to partake of the traditional treat of this local: a 
sumptuous smorgasbord. On an occasion like this, many an old timer meets up with 
friends he knew and worked with years ago. You could see this by the handshaking that 
was going on throughout the evening. 

Eligible 50-year members who were unable to attend were: John Martin, E. L. Fors- 
berg, Robert Johnson, Herman Anderson, Dan Bennie, Gust A. Widman, Carl Olson and 
Hilding Larson. 



15 RECEIVE PINS AT DE KALB, ILLINOIS 

Among the usual Christmas 
presents which a dozen old-time 
members of Local 965, De Kalb, 
Illinois, received last Christmas 
was one that most of them un- 
doubtedly cherish above all else. 

During the Christmas season 
the Local Union held a special 
party for the purpose of honor- 
ing some 15 members whose 
membership dates back more 
than a quarter of a century. 

Highlight of the affair was 
the presentation of the 25-year 
pins to the brothers who are 
shown in the photo. 

With the pins went the very 
best wishes of the entire mem- 
bership of the Local Union, 
which appreciates the contribu- 
tions all these old timers made. 




From left to right, front— Neo Johnson, Russell Erickson, 
Fred Norman, and Carl E. Anderson. 

Back row: Jack Leslie, Thure Hallgren, Art Parkhouse, 
Albert Tadd, Harold Walker, Walt Masterson, and Adrian 
Jacobson. 

Not present were: Frank Merry, Andrew Hallgren, Jacob 
Jacobson, and Torvald Nesse. 

Brother Carl E. Anderson is the dean of the group inas- 
much as he previously received his 50-year pin. 




C. e06A» KETTUIN6. Ylo-Friildaiit 
JUSTIN 0. HANNEN, Vlc«-rr«tld»i>t 
UtS. EOWAID E. CASS, Vle«-rriiidtat 



Denver Uso Service Mens Centers 



7J0-I5TH 


STREET MAIN 3-9112 




.9.. 


OKLIATEO ASENCIES 




CMrolIc durm.i 




IU5 enm 




Jewlih Community C»nt«n 




1475 Wllll.mi 




S«1r«tien Amy 




IMI Cnrlii 


To the Editor 


Varaltn Aid 


The Carpenter 




United Brotherhood of Carpenters 




and Joiners of America 


■< W. C. A. 


222 E. Michigan St. 


' 545 Trtmont PI 


Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



DENVER 2, COLORADO 



January 25, I960 



Dear Sir: 

We would like you to know that the Woniehs 
Auxiliary #157 of the Carpenter's Union here in Denver 
has been one of our most loyal supporters. Under the 
leadership of Mrs. Lalon L. Byan (4385 Zenobia St.) the 
ladies have given us 15 dozen cookies every aonth since 
WB opened in the Spring of 19521 

Our cookie jar sits on the front counter of 
our USO Center and the serricsmen are welcoica to help 
themselves — this is a real touch of home for so many 
of the young men who are stationed in nearby posts. It 
is only through the continued support of such organizations 
as the Auxiliary that we can continue to offer hospitality 
to the men in service. 

The '/Roman's Auxiliary is one of the iaoet 
faithful groups which keep our cookie jar supplied. If 
you have a place in your magaiiae for tha activities and 
service projects of the Auxiliaries, would you please 
print an article about this group? He really appreciate 
their iwlp and think thay should have a little recognition. 

Siacersly yours, 

MM-Jorla MeCalloch 
PrograM Cireatar 



SAN RAFAEL LADIES HOST CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE DINNER 

To the Editor: 

The members of AuxiUary No. 495, San Rafael, CaHfornia, send greetings to sisters of 
all Auxiliaries from our Twelfth Birthday Anniversary dinner. 

We are a small unit compared to some, but have an active group of workers. Each 
year we have a Rummage Sale, and also join with our brother members of Local No. 35 
in sponsoring a Christmas party for members and their families of our Local and Auxiliary. 
Right now we are hard at work planning our Corned Beef and Cabbage Dinner. This in 
a family affair for all union members in Marin County. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



We meet at 8 p.m. on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the Carpenters 
Hall, 647 Lindaro Street, San Rafael, and extend a welcome to any wife of a member of the 
United Brotherhood who wants to join our organization. Following the order of business 
some members of our sponsoring Local No. 35 joined with us for refreshments. 

Fraternally, 

Edna Borges, Secretary 
112 Hawthorne Way, San Rafael, Calif. 



HUSBANDS ARE MEMBERS, TOO, IN MARYSVILLE, CAL. 

To the Editor: 

We, the ladies of Carpenters' Auxiliary No. 748 of Marysville, California, hope to 
find our way into the CARPENTER magazine again. 

Just three years ago, we 
formed our Auxiliary, sponsored 
by our brother Carpenters of 
Local 1570. In this time we 
have sent two delegates to con- 
ventions during 1958 and 1959, 
and this year we are sending 
three to the convention. We 
have also become affiliated 
with the Foothills District 
Council. 

Each year we hold three 
rummage sales, also bake sales. 
We serve a Christmas dinner 
for our husbands and families 
each year. And we pick a needy 
family and buy them a Christ- 
mas dinner. In September, 
1959, we proudly took seven of our husbands into our Auxiliary as members. 

Those who appear in the adjacent picture are our new members. They are (back raw) 
from left to right: Boyd Belk, Ben Cravens, Dan Lee, and Victor Turney. Front row: 
President Anna Lee, Arlie Davis, Harry Emerson, and Leroy Wab. 

Sincerely, 

Anna Lee, President 
P. O. Box 1565, Marysville, Cahfornia 




VARIED CALENDAR OF EVENTS IN PORT ARTHUR 

To tlie Editor: 

Greetings again from Auxiliary 740, Port Ar- 
thur, Ont. We would hke to show off our little 
friend Ronnie, who celebrated his 7th birthday 
in the Fort William Sanatorium recently. Three 
of our members, Mrs. E. Young, Mrs. S. Balyk 
and myself, helped him celebrate this event with 
the usual cake, ice cream, chocolate milk and 
party favours. 

Among other events taking place here are our 
Tea and Bake Sale, April 16th; our Rummage 
Sale early in May, and our Annual Scholarship 
dance and social on May 27. 

It's interesting to read of the activities of 
other Auxiliaries, and we wish the best of luck to 
you. 



Yours truly, 

Mrs. Irma Nowosad, Rec. Sec. 

R. R. No. 2, Port Arthur, Ont. 




Ronnie (in striped housecoats showing 
off his loot with Mrs. Elsie Young. Also 
his young brother Billy. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

By n. H. Siegele 
LESSON 379 
A Fertile Field.— In a previotis discussion 
of built-in cabinets, reference was made to 
old kitchens in this writer's neighborhood 
that were modernized recently. One of those 
kitchens will be used as a pattern for a 
series of four lessons dealing with modern- 
izing old kitchens. It should again be point- 
ed out that this is a wide and fertile field 



sirable as a means of succeeding in business. 
"Cheap" and "economical" are not synony- 
mous in the sense that they are used here. 
The businessman who wants to succeed 
must furnish something that will fill the 
needs of his customers, at a cost that the 
customers can afi^ord. 

Old Kitchen.— Fig. 1 shows the old kitch- 
en that is used as an example of kitchens 
tliat should be modernized. The drawing 




for tlie carpenter who is prepared for it, 
for there are a great many old kitchens in 
every vicinity tliat should be made modern. 
First, the carpenter who would make this 
his special field must be able to give the 
prospective customers original ideas in re- 
modeUng kitchens; and second, he must be 
in a position to do tlie work economically 
and well. Poor workmanship and excessive 
costs are among the worst advertising means 
that any businessman can employ. However, 
thjs does not mean diat cheap work is de- 



Fig. 1 



gives the arrangement of the furniture and 
the old cupboards, one a corner cupboard 
and the other one with an opening through 
the wall from the kitchen to tlie dining 
room. After studying tliis arrangement, turn 
to Fig. 2, which shows the arrangement af- 
ter the remodeling was completed. A triple 
window replaces a single window tliat 
pre\'iously provided light for the stove and 
table. The present arrangement gives ample 
light for the stove, and for the counter 
on eitlier side of tlie stove. The sink is 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



placed in front of a single window, shown 
to tlie left of the drawing. This setup leaves 
the area for traffic and portable kitchen 
furniture unobstructed. . 



14-0 



B-B, as indicated on Fig. 2. Here, from left 
to right, we have the outside door; a counter 
cabinet with two drawers, and a hung cab- 
inet above; the cabinet under the sink and 




Sections.— Fig. 3 shows section A-A, as 
indicated on Fig. 2, showing the face view 
of the counter, the triple window, and the 
hung cabinets. Here we have the stove at 
the center, with a set of drawers on either 
side. There is a door to the right and an- 
other to the left, opening to counter cab- 




Fig. 4 Section B-6 

the window above; a one-door cabinet and, 
to the extreme right, a cross section of the 
iz'- o" 



Se-ction A- a 

Fig. 3 

inets. To the extreme right and left are 
shown cross sections of the counter. Above 
we have, from left to right, a cross section 
of a cabinet, the front of another cabinet, 
the triple window, and still another cabinet. 
Just below the ceiling, to the left, is shown 
a cross section of the soffit. A face view of 
the soffit is shown above the triple window 
and the two cabinets. Fig. 4 shows section 




Section C 



cabinet and the soffit abo\e; also a cross 
section of a set of the drawers in the count- 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



cr. Section C-C, Fig. 5, to the left, shows a 
cross section of tlie counter and a hung 
cabinet above. The refrigerator and the door 
to tlie dining room are shown toward the 
center. 

Details of Cabinets.— Fig. 6 shows a cross 
section, in a larger scale, of the counter 
and hung cabinet above it. Here we have 
the counter 30 inches high, with a 4- 



.fc=== 



.:St 



SHfETROC'*'' 







U/tlll'llUi 



\i>j/j^fj^rf^Ajr/^»/jr ; 




2-0" 



'/4 PLV*N/O0b 



Irr^ 



Toe Room 



inch base, allowing 3"x4" for toe room; 
a %-inch plywood cabinet bottom; %-inch 
plywood shelf and door, and a plywood 
counter top, covered v^dth suitable counter- 
top finish. (There are a number of counter- 
top finishing materials on the market that 
give excellent service, which should be se- 
lected by the owner so as to conform with 
his tastes and means. It should also be re- 



membered that the manufacturers of such 
materials are constantly on the look-out for 
still better materials.) The bottom of the 
hung cabinet is 16 inches above the counter 
top. The shelves should be noted, which are 
gained into the sides of the cabinet. The 
little shelf at the bottom is very practical 
for holding small canned goods. It should 



[ 



KSU^^ '' 



I 

.,, , ■„■■ ,J c! 



Fig. 7 
be pointed out that the sheetrock, used on 
the soffit, forms the top of the hung cabinet. 
In anotlier lesson this construction will be 
compared with another construction of cab- 
inets. 



Books That Will Help You 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION.— Has 163 p., 439 11., 

covering concrete work, form building, screeds, reinforc- 
ing, scaffolding and other temporary construction. No 
other boolc lil^e it on the market. $3.50 

CARPENTRY.— Has 307 p. 767 H., covering general 
liouse carpentry, estimating, making window and door 
frames, heavy timber framing, trusses, power tools, and 
other Important building subjects. $3.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p. 670 
11., and about 7,000 building trades terms and expres- 
sions. Defines terms and gives many practical building 
suggestions. You need this book. $ 4.00. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS. — Covers sharpening and us- 
ing tools. An important craft problem for each tool ex- 
plained. One of the top-best of my books — you should 
have it. Has 156 p. and 394 11. $3.50. 

THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p., 498 11., cover- 
ing all important steel-square problems. The most 
practical book on the square sold today. Price $3.50. 

BUILDING. — Has 220 p. and 531 11., covering several 
of the most important branches of carpentry, among 
them garages, finishing and stair building. $3.50. 

ROOF FRAMING. — 175 p. and 437 11., covering every 
branch of roof framing. The best roof framing book on 
tlie market. Other problems, including saw filing. $3.50. 
QUICK CONSTRUCTION. — Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems — many of them worth the price 
of the book. Has 256 p. and 686 IL $3.50. 

Tou can't go wrong if you buy this whole set. A five- 
day money- back guarantee, is your protection. 
THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Only $1.50. 
TWIGS OF THOUGHT. — Poetry. Bevised, illustrat- 
ed liv Stanley Leland. Only $2.00. 

THE WAILING PLACE.— This book Is made up of 
controversial prose and the fable, PUSHING BUT- 
TONS. Spiced with sarcasm and dry humor. Illustrated 
by the famed artist. Will Bapport. $3.00. 

FREE. — With 8 books, THE WAILING PLACE and 
2 poetry books free; with 5 books, 2 poetry book! free 
and with 3 books, 1 poetry book free. 

With 2 books, THE WAILING PLACE for $1.00, 
and with 1 book, a poetry book for half price. 

NOTICE. — Carrjrlng charges paid only when full re- 
mittance comes with order. No C.O.D. to Canada. 

Order U U CIFf^E'l F 222 So. Const. St. 
Today. ■■■ ■■" ^It^attt Emporia, Kansas 
BOOKS — For Birthday gifts, etc. — BOOKS 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



How would you 
explain it 
to a child? 

What do you tell him after 
the crash — "Daddy isn't 
coining home any more"? 
Does that explain even one 
death ... let alone 40,000 in 
traffic accidents last year? 




Here's how you can help: 

^P Drive safely, courteously yourself. 
Observe speed limits, warning signs. 
Where traffic lows are obeyed, 
deaths go DOWNI 

\^ Insist on strict enforcement of all 
traffic laws. They work for you, not 
against you. Where traffic lows are 
strictly enforced, deaths go DOWNI 

Support your local Safety CouadI 




The front of the counter cabinet under 
the sink is shown by Fig. 7. The sxurface of 
the doors is kept flush with the surface 
of the frame. This can be seen to the right, 
where a cross section of a door to another 
cabinet is shown. At the bottom is shown 
a cross section of the toe room. A section 
cut through e-e, is shown by Fig. 8. This 
detail also shows the door flush with the 
frame. The figures here give the information 




necessary to construct this cabinet. The 
space under tlie sink, as indicated on the 
drawing, is used for storage purposes. 

This, the first lesson of this series on 
built-in cabinets, deals largely with basic 
things. As we go along more and more de- 
tails will be presented, until at the end, 
those who read carefully, both the lines and 
between the lines, will be able to construct 
built-ins that will give satisfactory service. 



Set a Hand Saw 
in 32 seconds 




FOLEY Power 

SAW SETTER 



for hand and band saws 

The Foley Automatic Power 
Setter has exclusive "twin 
hammer" action (one for 
each side of saw), operat- 
ing from a single spring, 
insuring utmost accuracy. 
ONCE through turns out a 
perfectly set, true cutting 
saw. No tooth breakage, 
relieves eye strain. Sets all 

liand saws (with handles left on) and band saws from 

4 to 16 points per Inch. 

FREE — Foley Price Guide of saw sharpening charges, 

also Foley Setter circular. Time Payments if desired. 

Write today — no salesman will call. 

681-0 Foley BIda. 
Minneapolis 18. Minn. 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 




YOURS FREE! — A fitted belt holster with 
each EVANS "White-Tape" that you buyl 
Metal-reinforced holster provides great on- 
the-job convenience — clips to the belt, 
for easy carrying and quick measuring. 
On Evans Tapes only 
at your hardware dealer 



^/a7i4. 



RULE CO. 



Factories at: 
Elizabeth, N. J. and Montreal, Que. 



HOW TO TIE KNOTS AND SPLICE MANILA ROPE 




Beautiful designed poclvet 

size booklet. Over thirty of 

the most essential rigging 

knots and splices known. 

Bowlines. Scaffold Hitch, 

Barrel Hitch, Car rick Bend, Beckct Hitch, 

Catspaw and many others. Fully illustrated. 

explaining how to tie and splice step by step. 

Price $1.00 per copy postpaid. Order from, 

SECURITY MANILA KNOT CO. 
27 North 44th Street Belleville, 111. 



Make $20 to $30 EXTRA 
on each STAIRCASE 




ELIASON STAIR GAUGE 

Sives Its cost in ONE day — does a better job 
in half time. Kach end of Eliason Stair gauge 
slides, pivots and locks at exact length and angle for per- 
fect fit on stair treads, risers, closet shflves, etc. Guaran- 
teed — made of nickel plated steel. 

Postpaid (cast) witli order) or C.O.D. plus d>10Q!^ 
oostane. only tpiZi.^a 



postage, only 




ELIASON TOOL CQ.ttLl^^^^'il m^":.. 



LOOK! 
fastest 




cuttin g 



The perfect tool for cutting in 
dormers, windows, walls . . . 100 
and 1 uses. 634 lbs. 141/^" long. 
Full Ya hp, Milwaukee-built 
motor. Needs no starting hole 
in wood or like materials. 
Cuts any shape . . . clean 
<2»and fast ... 37 strokes 
a second! Rugged 
SAWZALL pays for 
itself fast. 
With assorted 
blades and 
carrying case. 



hacksaw 



On//^94?il 



you can buy! 




SAVVZAll 

Jinrf m.- ,. '-^^'^ER /See your Milwaukee distributor, 

«™ ma/ijr 0% mterials /'"■ """''« /<"■ folder swe. 

MILWAUKEE ELECTRIC TOOL CORP. 
5360 W. State St., Milwaukee 8, Wis. 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 
4vois.^S 




Building Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Guides 
give ^ou the short-cut in- 
structions that you want-in- 
eluding new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for 
the apprentice ... a practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere are 
using these Guides as a Help- 
ing Hand to Easier Work, Bet- 
ter Work and Better Pay. ACT 
NOW . . . till In and mail the 
FREE COUPON balow- 



Inside Trade Information On: 

How to use the steel square — How to 
file and .set saws — How to build fur- 
niture — How to use a mitre box — 
How to use the chalk line — How to 
use rules and .scales — How to make Jolntj 
—Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensu- 
ration problems — Estimating strength of 
timbers — How to set girders and sills — 
How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, 
barns, garages, bungalows, etc- — How to 
read and draw plans — Drawing up speci- 
fications — How to excavate — How to use 
settings 12, 13 and 17 on the .steel square 
— How to build hoists and scaffolds — sky- 
lights — How to build stairs. 



AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St.. New York 10. N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides. 4 vols., on 
7 days' free trial. If O.K. I will remit J2 in 7 days and $2 I 
monthly until J8, plus shipping charge, is paid. Otherwise 
I will return them. No obligation unless 1 am satisfied. 




■mployvd by. 



D 



SAVE SHIPPING CHARGESI Enclose Full Payment 
With Coupon and We Pay Shipping Charges. C-6 



NOW 



I Earn Better Pay This Easy Way 

CARPENTRY 
ESTIMATING 



...QUICK.. .EASY. ..ACCURATE 

with this simplified guide! 

You can earn higher pay when you know how 
to estimate. Here is everything you need to 
linow to "talie off" a bill of materials from set 
of plans and specifications for a frame house. 
Saves you time figuring jobs, protects you 
against oversights or mistakes that waste 
materials and cost money. Nothing complicated 
— just use simple arithmetic to do house car- 
pentry estimating with this easy-to-use ready 
reference handbook. 

SIMPLIFIED 
CARPENTRY ESTIMATING 

Shows you, step by step, how to figure mate- 
rials needed for (1) foundation, (2) framing, 
(3) exterior finish, (4) interior finish, (5) 
hardware, and (6) stairs. Gives definite "take- 
off'' rules, with many quick-reference tables and 
short-cut methods that simplify the work. 

CDCniAl CCATIIDCC' Lumber Checking List. Mill- 
OrCUIAL r CHI unco, vrork Cliecting List. Hard- 
nare Cliecking List. Materials Ordering Information. Quick- 
Figuring Tables for estimating concrete footings and walls, 
concrete piers, window frames, door and window areas, 
sash weights, nail quantities. How to figure labor hours 
per unit of work. Rules for linear, area and volume 
measurement. Mathematical reference tables. Including dec- 
imal equivalents, lumber reckoner, conversion of weights and 
measures, etc. New chapter, "How to Plan a House," gives 
useful data for contractors and material dealers. 

Til D II TA f'UADTCD K when you receive this book, 
lUnn lU bllHriCn O and see the "Estimating 
Siiort Cuts" you can use for quick figuring of board foot- 
age. Here are simplified ways to estimate lumber needed 
for floors, walls, ceilings, roof, door and window frames, 
inside trim for these frames. Inside trim for inside doors, 
and drawers and cabinets. This chapter alone can be worth 
the entire price of the book to youl 

^_«»;s<* No Risk Trial — Act Now! 

Just fill in and mail cou- 
pon below to get your 
copy of "Simplified Car- 
pentry Estimating." See 
for yourself how this 
valuable, easy-to-use ref- 
erence handbook can tell 
you everything you need 
to know about all phases 
of carpentry estimating. 



1» * ;■ ■ii>83^.-S.!i-*<:^'iji; ■ 



MAIL THIS COUPON 



SIMMONS-BOARDMAN Pub. Corp., Dept. C-660 
30 Church Street, New York 7, N. Y. 

Send me "Simplified Carpentry Estimating" with 
the understanding that it I am not completely sat- 
isfied I can return it in 10 days for FULL 
REFUND. 
enclosed is $3.95 Q 'heck D money order 

Name 

Address 

City Zone 

State 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 

City, Mo. 47 

Disston Div., H. K. Porter Co., 

Inc., Philadelphia 35, Pa 3rd Cover 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 45 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III. 47 

Evans Rule Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 45 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 44-48 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. 48 

Illinois Stamping & Mfg. Co., 

Chicago, 111. . 47 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 1 

Milwaukee Electric Tool, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 45 

Smitty's Clamp, Duluth, Minn 47 

Stanley Works, New Britain, 

Conn. 4 

Yates-American, Beloit, Wis 4 

Carpentry Materials 

Nichols Wire & Aluminum Co., 

Davenport, Iowa 2nd Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 45 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

Cline-Sigmon Publishers, Hick- 
ory, N. C 48 

Security Manila Knot Co., Belle- 
ville, 111. ___: 45 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 43 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y 46 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



YOU CAN HAVE A $4000 a DAY 
RETIREMENT BUSINESS 



Make Big Cash 
Profits In Your 
Home. Sharpen- 
ing Household, 
Gardening and 
Shop Tools. 



Turn yoor retirement into Big Cash Profits with new 
Belsaw Sharp-All. No experience needed to sharpen 
knives, scissors, shears, ice skates, mower blades, 
hedge trimmers, axes, chisels and circular saws . . . 
Learn how easily you can start your own retirement 
business. Amazing low cost easy-payment plan. Send 
Postcard today for FREE BOOK. 

BELSAW SHARP-ALL CO 
7120 Field BIdg., Kansas Ctiy 11, Mo. 




NEW 




"Up-to-Dote" Combination 

RABBET-ROUTER 

PLANE 

With Built-in 
GAUGE-MARKER 
and SQUARE 

You've always wanted such a plane— nothing like it! Ideal 
for setting hinges and locks perfectly . . . also for ALL fine, 
intricate carpentry work. Carves where other planes can't 
reach! %" tool steel blade will cut to 'A" depth. Light, 
precision steel construction — heavy nickel C^^ 7f% 
plate. Full 7%" long. Weighs 17 ounces. ^^■■I«# 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. Order ^^ POST 

BY MAIL TODAY! WE PAY SH IPPING ! ^PAID 

ILLINOIS STAMPING & MFG. CO. 

Dept. C-26, Box 8639 Chicago 80, III. 

Phone RO-4-5447 



USABLE 
ere Other 
Planes Won't Work 




POSTPAID 

$2.95 each 

or 

$5.75 in pairs 



SMITTY'S MITERED CASING CLAMP 

Makes it easier to get tight 
joints on all door and window 
casings, as it pulls the joints up 
tight before nailing and pre- 
vents shifting while driving the 
last nail down through the 
header. 




SMITirS CLAMP 

1924 Adirondack St. 
Duluth 11, Minn. 



New Estwing Supreme unbreakable 



r' 



One-Piece 

Forged Solid Steel ^^^ 

Strongest 
Construction 
Known 

plus 

Exclusive NYLON-VINYL 

Deep Cushion Grip 

Molded To Steel Shank 

To Never Loosen, Come Off 

Or Wear Out - 

Absorbs ALL Shock 

Easy On the Hands 




Sheeting and framing 

HAMMER 



King-Size Length 
Gives 50% More POWER 
22 oz. Head-Length 16" 

Greater Reach 
for framing 

Extra Leverage 
for Pulling Nails 

Scored Face 
Prevents Glancing 
Blows— 

E3-22SM $6.35 
E3-22S (Smooth Face) $5.55 



Made by the Inventors and World's Only Specialists in Unbreakable Tools 
"Alark Of The Skilled" 

ESTWING MFG. CO. Dept. C6 Rockford, 111. 




Aecunate. iasvtBVEUNG 



for FOOTINGS-FLOORS 

The old reliable water level is now 
modernized into an accurate low- 
cost layout level. 50 ft. clear tough 
vinyl tube gives you 100 ft. of leveling in each 
set-up, and on and on. With its new poly- 
ethylene container-reservoir, the LEVELEASY 
remains filled and ready for fast one-man leveling. 
Compact, durable and simple, this amazing level 
is packed with complete illustrated instructions on 
modern liquid leveling. If your dealer has not yet 
stocked the LEVELEASY, use our prompt mail serv- 
ice. Send your check or money order today for only 
$7.95. Postal charges will be added on C.O.D. orders. 
Money back guarantee. 

VHYDROLEVEL 92s OeSoto Ave., Ocean Springs, Miss. JJ 
FIRST IN LIQUID LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 ^^ 




MATHEMATICS ior 
CARPENTRY 

Compiled and published by 

the United P.rotli<'rhood of 

Carpenters and .Toiners of 

America 

75c per copy 

This book contains valuable in- 
formation and assistance for all 
carpenters. It is a liberal refresher 
course. 

Send order and remittance to: 

R. E. Livingston, General Sec'y. 

222 E. Michigan St., Indianapolis 4, Ind. 



Know More! Work Be»fer! (orn More! Mrith SIGMON'S 

: ^;,s'Z... "A FRAMING GUIDE 

: HrrvtJrt:- and STEEL SQUARE" 



Union Shop Printed 



ORDER TODAY! 
$0.00 Postpaid 

or COD, you pay charges. 

Write For Quantity 
Discounts! 



A literal gold mine of practical, authentic infor- 
mation for architects, carpenters and building me- 
chanics, in easy concise forms you can understand 
and use daily. 

Dozens of tables on measures, weights, mortar, 
brick, concrete, rafters, stairs, nails, cement, steel 
beams, tile, interest rates and many otheos. 

CLINE-SIGMON, ?Mh\iQx% 

Department 6 
P. O. Box 367 Hickory, N. C. 



RETIRED CARPENTERS! 




Are you looking for part-time work? The 
only machine that files hand, band, com- 
bination and crosscut circular saws is the 



FOLEY 



AUTOMATIC 



SAW FILER 






When you are no longer on a full-time regular job, 
perhaps you would like something to do for a few 
hours a day and pick up a little extra money, too. 
Your carpenter friends would be glad to have you 
sharpen their saws for them, especially with the pre- 
cision work done by the Foley Saw P'iler. F. M. Davis 
wrote us: "After filing saws by hand for 12 years, 
the Foley Saw Filer betters my best in half the time." 
Exclusive jointing action keeps teeth uniform in size, 
height, spacing — and new model 200 Foley Saw Filer 
is the only machine that sharpens hand, band, both 
combination and crosscut circular saws. 



SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET 



FOLEY MFG. CO. 



618-0 Foley BIdg. 

Minneapolis 18, Minn. 
Please send literature on Foley Saw Filer and Time Pay- 
ment Plan. 

NAME 



WRITE FOR INFORMATION 

You can set up a Foley Saw Filer in your 
garage or basement. A small cash payment 
will put a Foley in your hands, and you can 
handle monthly payments with the cash 
you take in. Operating expense is low — only 
7c for files and electricity to turn out a 
$1.00 or $1.50 saw filing job. Send us your 
name and address on coupon for complete 
information on the Foley Saw Filer. 



THE CONTRACTOR'S BUY OF THE YEAR ... and it's a 

Save $1285 




It's a great buy! The Disston D-725 has 
more power and capacity than any 
other 1}4" saw. 2 H.P., 13 amp. motor 
with 6700 RPM free speed. A D-725 
cuts 2%" vertical and 2hi" at 45° . . . 
more than most 8" saws. 

CONTRACTOR'S BUY OF THE YEAR Now, 
you get this FREE Bonus offer with 
the D-725 ... a Disston, all metal $9.75 
carrying case and extra $3.10 combi- 
nation blade, free while kits last. You 
save $12.85. 

DELUXE FEATURES Your new D-725 in- 
cludes: A fool-proof clutch, adjustable 
against burnout . . . telescoping guard 



DISSTON DIVISION 



Disston D-725 Saw. . . Carrying Case . . . 
Two Disschrome Combination Blades... 
Rip Fence ... 10' Power Cord . . . Arbor 
Wrench. ..included in one special price! 

on nylon bearings . . . lever action for 
fast bevel setting . . . helical gears for 
smooth power at highest speeds . . . baU 
and roller bearings through-out . . . 
3-wire cord, detaches at handle, 

DISSTON PLYWOOD 

BLADE — When you buy 

your new D-725, ask 

about the Disschrome 

Plywood blade . . . cuts 

a "sanded" smooth edge 

. , . stays sharp longer 

... no saw "scream." 

Priced at $7.50, $6.40 and $6.40 these 

8", IW and 6K" chrome plated blades 

fit 34 leading portable electric, bench 

and radial saws. Take one with you. 

Disston Division, H. K. Porter Company, 

Inc., Philadelphia 35, Pa. 





H. K. PORTER COMPANY, INC. 



PORTER SERVES INDUSTRY with steel, rubber and friction products, asbestos textiles, high voltage electrical equipment, electrical wire 
and cable, wiring systems, motors, fans, blowers, specialty alloys, paints, refractories, tools, forgings and pipe fittings, roll formings and 
stampings, wire rope and strand. 








"Fill it up!" 




"Fill it up!" 




(/y\ C\rtOr/A^ 



Fill it up!" 



nriHlF 

ililJC/ 



'AMPFWTFIR 

y FOUNDED1881 

Officio/ Publicafion of the 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 

JULY, 1960 



^m^ 





ROCKET engineering gives you 
A BETTER WAY TO DRIVE A NAIL 



That's right. Modern engineering created 
Rocket hammers to make man's oldest 
tool basically better four ways — 

More Driving Power — beautifully bal- 
anced, with power concentrated in head. 

Far More Durable — outlasts ordinary 
hammers many times. Boron-alloy tubu- 
lar steel handle is strongest ever made. 
Forged-steel head is heat-treated three 
ways for strength at eye section, hard- 
ness of face, correct temper in claws. 

Much Safer — the head can't loosen or 
fly off. Grip won't slip in wet or sweaty 



hand, or when you're wearing gloves. 

Less Tiring, Too — with a handle that 
absorbs shock and a cushion grip that 
feels just right in your hand. 

True Temper makes the Rocket and 
Jet Rocket with the same patented con- 
struction, special steels, superb workman- 
ship. Rocket has fancy octagon neck 
and poll. Jet Rocket has popular bell- 
face design. 

They're both real buys, and your 
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A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. ^-Mnnrnnnr^ 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor GuMOM^ 

Carpenters' Building. 222 E. Michigan Street. Indianapolis 4, Indiana tSS^SJ' 



Established In 1881 
Vnl. LXXX— No. 7 



JULY, 1960 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Co nt ent s — 



The Case For Safety In The 'Sixties 



The President's Conference on Safety comes to the conclusion that safety constitutes 
one of the real challenges of the next decade because of growing, rapidly changing 
nature of jobs and techniques. Only a teamwork approach involving teachers, workers, 
employers and government and private agencies can meet the challenge. 



New Ruling On Travel Expenses 



The Internal Revenue Service issues a new interpretation regarding deductibility of 
expenses incurred while working away from home. While the new interpretation does 
not set down hard and fast rules a construction worker can use, it does provide some 
better guideposts. 

11 

When a missile is about to be launched at Cape Canaveral a long and complicated 
procedure— known as the countdown— is set in motion. A hundred checks have to be 
made before the blast-off takes place, but once the button is pushed, "Go Baby, Go," 
becomes the watchword. 



The Countdown, Moment Of Agony 



Veterans Pension Program Is Revised 



18 



What's To Cure Drug Prices? 



Retired members (or members about to retire) v^ho served in one of the World Wars 
or the Korean War would do well to acquaint themselves with the revised pension pro- 
gram for veterans which became effective July 1. Widows of veterans, too, are affected. 

20 

Previous articles in THE CARPENTER disclosed some of the reasons why drug prices 
are so high. This article reviews some of the avenues thai ars open to Congress for 
breaking up the alliance between doctors and drug manufacturers that lead to unreason- 
able prices. 

Report Of Delegates To Canadian Labor Congress 29 

The Third Constitutional Convention of the Canadian Labor Congress considered many 
important problems airecling the welfare of Canadian workers. 



• • • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials 
Official 
In Memoriam 
What's New 
Outdoor Meanderings 
Correspondence 
To Our Ladies 
Craft Problems 



Index lo Advertisers 



* * * 



16 
24 
28 
32 
34 
35 
36 
39 
41 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mall matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103. Act of October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8. 1918. 



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President's Conference Explores— 



The Case For Safety In The 'Sixties 



1 



* * 

"^ HE SUPREME safety challenge of the 'sixties is to detect and control 
the hazards of man's swiftly changing environment— an environment 
largely created by research and development whose products are so 

recent as to be hard for scientist and layman alike to understand and relate 

to further discoveries to come. 

The dilemma of the decade is how to meet the increasing demand of our 
complex technology for highly skilled personnel from a growing supply of 
less experienced workers. This dilemma places a premium on education and 
training, including safety training. The investment by the worker, his em- 
ployer, and the Nation in the acqui- 
sition of his skill will be higher than 
ever before and the challenge to the 
safety movement will be to prevent its 
loss through avoidable work injury. 

In an attempt to face, and at least 
partially to meet, the safety chal- 
lenge, the President's Conference on 
Occupational Safety through its work- 
shops reached certain conclusions. 

For educators, safety— a quality or 
characteristic of whatever human be- 
ings do, rather thari a distinct entity 
—is always of concern. 

Safety education involves principles 
of learning applicable to all school 
program areas. Learning of safe be- 
havior occurs mostly within the scope 
of basic learnings— with little addi- 
tional teaching. 

Schools strive to develop the nec- 
essary knowledge, attitudes, habits, 
and skills to prepare youth to live 
in reasonable safety in the modern 
world. 

Industry has a vital interest in 
school safety. It prefers graduates 
who have good safety attitudes; know 
that safety on the job will be re- 
quired; have an accident-free school 
record; have had teachers who inte- 
grated safety training; have learned 



self-discipline and been taught to un- 
derstand and live with authority. 

The meeting heartily endorsed all 
of the recommendations adopted at 
the 1959 Office of Education Confer- 
ence on School Shop Safety, with par- 
ticular emphasis on some of the key 
recommendations, including: (1) cre- 
ation of a National Steering Commit- 
tee under Office of Education aus- 
pices to promote development of 
school-shop safety programs at state 
and local levels; (2) appointment by 
the U. S. Commissioner of Education 
of a specialist in safety education to 
coordinate work of the National Steer- 
ing Committee; and (3) recognition 
of the urgent need for continuing re- 
search in the school safety area. 

Accident-prevention experience of 
the past 40 years has been assembled 
in many forms, safety standards be- 
ing one of great importance. Existing 
industrial standardizing agencies are 
equipped to meet the challenge of the 
future. 

The changes occurring in the skills 
of workers, in machines and in proc- 
esses, and the introduction of new 
materials require not only more ex- 
tensive use of existing standards but 



THE CARPENTER 



also early dcNelopment of many new 
standards. Also, more emphasis" on 
basic principles of accident preven- 
tion, and building into new machines 
such principles available from tech- 
nical information contained in exist- 
in 2; and new standards. 

Standards must be maintained in 
tlie most acceptable and useful form. 
Manufacturers, regulatory agencies, 
consumer groups, and educational in- 
stitutions all have responsibilities and 
opportunities to promote safety 
tl trough standards. 

Significant underlying human fac- 
tors in most accidents are: (1) an un- 
developed sense of responsibility— or 
passive attitude; (2) consequences of 
temporary emotional stress. These 
call for improved motivation, im- 
proved communication, and increased 
participation in educational programs. 

For first-line supervisors, training 
in human relations looms even more 
important than in the past. Supervi- 
sors should be trained to spot indica- 
tors of potential accidents in their 
men, including such factors as chang- 
es in usual manners and simple habits, 
abnormal work performance, frequent 
absences, and frequent visits to the 
medical or personnel office. 

Training and communications 
should not, however, dominate the 
safety program. Equally important is 
analyzing and engineering the envi- 
ronment to eliininate or control haz- 
ards. The safety specialist's training 
should include knowledge of control 
techniques and the basic engineering 
sciences as well. 

Occupational safety work likely 
\\in develop as two separate types 
of functions: (1) specialist, who will 
need depth of knowledge in narrow 
areas of hazard control; and (2) man- 
ager, who will work to persuade oth- 
ers, generr.lly line managers, to meet 
their safety responsibilities. 



Safety training should be consid- 
ered equal in importance to other 
phases of job training. 

Records indicate that, in general, 
high accident-rate industries have 
some or all of the following charac- 
teristics in common: seasonal or cas- 
ual employment, outdoor work, shift- 
ing site of employment, heavy man- 
ual labor, relatively small establish- 
ments, and relatively low plant invest- 
ment per worker. 

Low accident-rate industries, on the 
other hand, are generally character- 
ized by steady employment, indoor 
work, large establishments, a rela- 
tively small amount of heavy physical 
labor, "new" industries, and high 
plant investment per worker. 

There is compelling need, there- 
fore, to develop practical safety pro- 
grams for: 

1. Establishments with less than 
oOO employees. 

2. Activities which invoh'e strenu- 
ous physical effort. 

3. Activities which must be per- 

formed outdoors. 

4. Activities which involve shift- 
ing employment, casual or sea- 
sonal. 

Seasonal and business-cycle pat- 
tern injury rates are sensitive; all-out 
industry-wide safety efforts have up- 
set the traditional picture; there is 
reason to think that this can be done 
in other industries. 

These patterns should not be used 
to excuse poor safety performance. 

Three major environmental hazards 
in r.:i accelerating technology are 
noise, chemicals, and radiation; these 
are increasingly important in both 
the occupational and non-occupa- 
tional environment. 

Noise— Establishment of specific 
noise standards is difficult because of 
the complexity of the total noise 



THE CARPENl'ER 



problem. The need for protective 
criteria has been recognized and 
interim standards proposed which 
will encourage preventive measures. 

Chemicals— With approximately 500 
new chemicals coming on the market 
each year, the chemical world around 
us is constantly expanding. Increasing 
home as well as industrial and agri- 
cultural use of chemicals add to the 
problem. 

Needed action includes: new toxic- 
ity studies; tests to predict elfects of 
long-term exposures; diagnostic tech- 
niques to detect changes in man be- 
fore permanent damage occurs; better 
labeling of toxic products to alert 
users to the hazards; greater efforts 
to control water pollution and atmos- 
phere contamination. 

Radiation— The cumulative effects 
of radiation, and the increasing num- 
ber and variety of its sources, urgent- 
ly require adequate safeguards for 
workers and for the general public. 
There is need for more industrial per- 
sonnel trained in the evaluation and 
control of harmful exposures; for 
effective state regulatory control to 
keep necessary exposures within max- 
imum allowable limits; for study of 
adequate methods for disposal of ra- 
dioactive wastes. 

An advancing economy places in- 
creased emphasis on human values; 
therefore accident rates commonplace 
a few decades ago cannot be tolerat- 
ed today. Sustained safety leadership 
on the job and in the community is 
essential if present accident rates are 
to be lowered. 

Safety leadership, initially impelled 
by economic considerations, must in- 
creasingly be motivated by human 
factors to be successful. 

In some firms, particularly smaller 
ones, there is need for basic safety in- 
formation, and for safety practices 



that exceed the minimum require- 
ments of existing legislation. 

In some areas, the safety programs 
of schools and other community agen- 
cies are well established and are per- 
forming an excellent service. Adop- 
tion of such programs in the majority 
of communities, where such safety 
activities are now limited, is a major 
need. Where safety induction pro- 
grams exist they should be evalu- 
ated and where necessary strength- 
ened. Firms without induction pro- 
grams should install them. 

The idea of safety should be ex- 
panded to a "total safety concept," 
embracing all segments of safety. 

Special importance attaches to fos- 
tering safety programs and safety 
communications among small busi- 
ness operations. 

Underlying factors in efiFective safe- 
ty communication include the follow- 
ing: sustained management interest, 
prompt action, two-way communica- 
tion, constant repetition, explain 
"why," relate to employee goals, con- 
tinuous evaluation, and avoidance of 
safety program "fatigue." 

A "multiple media" approach 
should be used, including: safety 
meetings, slogans, house organs, com- 
mittees, posters, and man-to-man dis- 
cussion. 

(Although not included in its re- 
port, the entire panel on Communica- 
tion made two additional recommen- 
dations to Secretary Mitchell of the 
U. S. Department of Labor following 
the Conference: 

1. Conclusions and results of the 
Conference should be circulated as 
widely as possible through all avail- 
able media, extending as a well or- 
ganized, information program over 
the 2-year period leading to the next 
Conference. 



THE CARPENTER 



2. Special attention should be giv- 
tn to communicating Conference re- 
sults and the importance of safety 
programs and safety communications 
tit small businesses.) 

Accident investigation serves many 
]urposes. From the viewpoint of the 
President's Conference, however, its 
primary purpose is to develop facts 
\\ hich will aid in accident prevention. 

Investigation should be made quick- 
1\ after the event has occurred by 
persons familiar with the work, work 
practices and equipment involved. 
The injured employee's supervisor 
sliould certainly be one of the inves- 
tigators. 

Much useful information for pre- 
\ ention is obtainable through investi- 
gating non-disabling accidents and 



"near misses," as well as off-the-job 
accidents. 

Industrial medical programs, in- 
volving the "team approach," can 
make a vital contribution to the re- 
duction of accidents and the improve- 
ment of worker health. Benefit of 
such programs, both economic and 
human, need wider appreciation. 

The occupational nurse plays a 
vital role in occupational health serv- 
ice; she should receive medical super- 
vision and management support. 

Medicine and engineering should 
combine forces, extending research 
into man's behavior and his relation 
to the occupational environment. 

A major problem is acquainting 
smaller business establishments with 
the advantages of occupational health 
programs. 



SURPRISE! RICH OWN MOST STOCKS 

A survey of stock ownership and income on a family basis has revealed 
thjit. while stock ownership has broadened in recent years, it remains highly 
concentrated in upper-income families. 

The report issued by the University of Michigan Survey Research Center 
was based on interviews with a representative sample of 4,773 families con- 
dacted between November, 1959 and February, 1960. 

It found that slightly over 14 per cent of America's families now own 
publicly traded common stock, compared to less than 10 per cent in 1955 and 
less than 6 per cent in 1952. 

But, it added, comparison with a study based on 1955 data shows there 
has been "no substantial change" in the concentration of stock ownership by 
dollar value in upper income families. 

A total of 46.5 per cent of the families surveyed fell in the unJor-$5,000 
income category. Only 6 per cent of these low-income families held stock and 
tills totaled only 10 per cent of the dollar value of all the stock. 

In contrast, over half of the 4.5 per cent of families in the $15,000-or-over 
income group held stock and it amounted to 42 per cent of the total stock 
dollar value. Over one-third of the 10 per cent of families in the $10,000- 
•^15,000 group held stock worth 22 per cent of the total dollar value. Thus the 
$10,000-and-over income groups owned 66 per cent of all common stock by 
dollar value. 



remember- ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT. FOREST FIRES! .^^^^ 





New Ruling On Travel Expenses 

• • 

FOR years the question of deductibility of away-from-home living ex- 
penses for building trades workers has been a bone of contention. The 
Internal Revenue Department has not had any clearly defined set of 
rules regarding this matter, and many of our members have run into difficulties 
trying to settle their income taxes. 

On June 27, 1958 the Building and Construction Trades Department pre- 
sented testimony before a subcommittee of the "Committee on Government 
Operations of the House of Representatives" in support of the proposi- 
tion that the Internal Revenue Service should prepare and issue an appro- 
priate ruling on this subject. 



In April of this year the Depart- 
ment also spearheaded an industry- 
wide petition to the Commissioner of 
Internal Revenue asking for a clarifi- 
cation of the rules governing away- 
from-home expenses of construction 
workers. 

Recently the Internal Revenue Serv- 
ice released a new statement on the 
subject. What this interpretation does 
is re-emphasize the fact the key is- 
sue is whether or not the work away- 
from-home-base is "temporary" or "in- 
definite." And one year is the major 
line of demarcation. However, each 
case will still be determined on its 
own merits. 

If the employment is temporary, 
generally speaking, the Revenue Serv- 
ice will permit the deducting of such 
expenses if other requirements out- 
lined in the ruling are satisfied. And 
anything under one year gives strong 
evidence of temporariness. 

On the other hand, if the work is 
considered indefinite or permanent, 
such expenses will be questioned, par- 
ticularly if the employment runs over 
a year. 

The ruling, like its predecessors, 
sets down no hard and fast measure- 
ments for determining whether a 



work assignment is temporary or in- 
definite. Obviously, all construction 
jobs eventually end. Therefore, they 
are "indefinite" by their nature. But 
the Internal Revenue Service consid- 
ers each worker's case on its own 
merits, weighed against the one year 
provision. 

However, the new ruling does pro- 
vide some better guideposts. The fol- 
lowing excerpt from the ruling should 
be of interest to every member who 
works away from home during all or 
part of a year. It sets forth the think- 
ing of the Internal Revenue Depait- 
ment on the matter of awa}'-from- 
home expenses. It reads as follows: 

"Although neither the Service nor 
the courts have attempted to pre- 
scribe any specific length of time as 
representing the usual line of demar- 
cation between temporary and non- 
temporary periods for traveling ex- 
pense purposes, an employment or 
stay of anticipated or actual duration 
of a year or more at a particular loca- 
tion must be viewed by the Service 
as strongly tending to indicate pres- 
ence there beyond a temporary pe- 
riod, and cases involving such em- 
ployment or stay will normally for 
that reason alone be subjected to 



10 



THE C A K P E X T E R 



close scrutiny. Cases involving antici- 
pated or actual periods of almost a 
full year may, as a factual matter, be 
opened to question in nearly the same 
degree, especially since there might 
be little real difference between a 
taxpayer's expectations in such a case 
and one in which his employment or 
stay at a particular location is expect- 
ed to continue for a year or more. 
Nevertheless, in the interest of prac- 
tical and fair administration, in cases 
in\"oh"ing substantially the same facts 
as Case (1) the Service will normally 
raise no question concerning the tem- 
porary nature of an employment or 
stay at a particular location if both its 
anticipated and actual durations are 
for less than one year, unless the facts 
concerning the frequency of employ- 
ments away from the city where 
business contacts are maintained dis- 
close a pattern suggesting that the 
taxpayer may have sought without 
real business justification to take ad- 
vantage of an assumed lenience on 
the part of the Service concerning tax 
avoidance abuses in this area." 

We again want to point out that the 
one-year rule is not conclusive. A 
construction worker may be able to 
prove that he is engaged in temporary 
employment although such employ- 
ment has lasted more than one year, 
and conversely, he may be consid- 
ered engaged in indefinite employ- 
ment even though the employment 
period may be less than one year. 
The Internal Revenue Service han- 
dles each individual situation as a 
separate case and the burden of proof 
rests on the taxpayer. 

However, the new ruling does elim- 
inate some of the frustrations that 
heretofore existed. For one thing, the 
construction worker is deemed to be 
carrying on a trade or business in his 
employments. Also, he is no longer 
required to show that the traveling 



expenses are required "by the exigen- 
cies of the employer's business" in 
order to deduct them as expenses. 
These two interpretations clarify an 
issue that has given many of our 
members headaches in the past. 

Furthermore, the new ruling rejects 
the theory that the construction work- 
er's "home for tax purposes is the 
place where he works." Rather it 
holds that the man's tax home is 
where his family resides. In this re- 
spect the ruling states: 

"... in the absence of clear evi- 
dence to the contrary, it is normally 
to be presumed from common ex- 
perience that a man with a wife and 
children would prefer to work regu- 
larly in or near the locality where his 
family resides so that he may be with 
them during off-duty hours. That a 
worker has a family with a fixed resi- 
dence should therefore tend to show 
that he takes jobs at distant points 
for business rather than for personal 
reasons. . . " 

"It is not meant by this example to 
indicate that a construction worker 
must be married in order to be rec- 
ognized as having a 'home' where he 
maintains his place of abode and 
makes his employment contacts. . . " 

The excerpts quoted above contain 
the real meat of the new ruling. How- 
ever, each case will still be judged on 
its individual merits and the entire 
ruling will be taken into consideration 
by the Internal Revenue people. 

This information is being made 
available to all our members in order 
to acquaint them with the provisions 
contained therein and, particularly, to 
assist members who at present may 
be involved in conferences or litiga- 
tions with the Internal Revenue Serv- 
ice on the subject of traveling ex- 
penses. 



11 



A hundred Cape Canaveral skills all point to— 



The Countdown, Moment Of Agony 

* * 

IT is 12:30 a. m. as the hne of cars approaches the entrance to the Air 
Force Missile Test Center's Cape Canaveral missile launching site. 
It is not a shift-change time. The men passing through the guard line 
at the entrance to the Air Force installation are engineers and technicians 
employed on the Air Force ATLAS program. This is the start of a launch day 
for the ATLAS intercontinental ballistic missile at the Atlantic Missile Range. 

The men have a long day ahead. On some of the early test flights the 
countdown extended for more than 12 hours. On more recent flights it has been 
as short as two and one-half hours. 

The long countdown is an impor- 
tant part of the research and develop- 
ment phase of a missile. Later, when 
the weapon system becomes opera- 
tional, the countdown will be meas- 
ured in minutes rather than in hours. 

But while the complex missile is 
being tested, the Air Force and Con- 
vair obtain exhaustive minute-by-min- 
ute data on each firing. 

That is why, during the long hours 
of a night before a flight, scores of 
valves and electrical connections and 
instruments and circuits and tanks 
and lines and hoses are checked one 
by one. Then, when the critical indi- 
vidual parts have been okayed, the 
testing turns to subsystems and then 
to entire systems. 

At 1:30 a. m., the countdown starts. 
Carefully following his list— a volume 
more than 60 typewritten pages long 
—the test conductor and his launch 
crew begin checking the missile, its 
ground equipment and the test and 
control equipment inside the block- 
house. 

The test conductor starts down his 
list, perhaps instructing the crew to 
check a valve. He waits until he ob- 
tains reports that it can be actuated 
remotely from within the blockhouse, 
and that the control panel shows 




It anything goes wrong, the missile is de- 
stroyed at the flip of one of numerous switches. 

whether it is open or closed. Then he 
checks the next item on the list, and 
then the next. 

Periodically a voice breaks into 
these activities to announce: "T minus 
130 minutes and counting;. " Or "T 
minus 100 minutes and counting." 

As the minutes tick by, the onlv 
sounds in the blockhouse are the 
voices of the test conductor as he 
continues running down his checklist, 
and answers from the panel operators. 
There is no extraneous talkins;. 



THE CARPENTER 



E\crvthin<i has 2;one smoothly; 
tlicre have been no "holds." With only 
a little more than an honr to go, the 
huge eight-story service tower that 
surrounded the missile is rolled back 



After checking to determine that 
the area is seciu-ed, the test conduc- 
tor orders tlic missile to be prepared 
for tanking licjiiid oxygen. 

"T minus 35 minutes and count- 
ing," he announces a few minutes 
later. 

Soon a white plume rises on high 
from the missile, indicating to watch- 




to its transfer table, then rolled on 
railroad tracks to an area about 800 
feet from the missile. The area around 
the launching pad is cleared of per- 
sonnel. 



These are some of the Buck Rogers de- 
vices needed to track a missile and keep it 
under control. 

ers in the blockhouse that the vent 
valve is open. 

"T minus 15 minutes and counting." 

The tension that has been build- 
ing up almost imperceptibly now is 
felt by everyone present. The an- 
nouncement comes: 



r H E C A K P E X T E K 



13 




Dozens of pairs of eyes watch hundreds of instruments as zero hour approaches. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



"T minus ten minutes and count- 
ing." 

The test conductor receives favor- 
able reports on the weather, on range 
instrumentation, and from the Range 
Safety OfHcer. He checks a few more 
details about the missile. 

"T minus two minutes and count- 
ing." 

Missile electrical circuits are 
s\\"jtched to internal power sources. 

"T minus one minute 15 seconds 
and counting." 

The test conductor checks with sev- 
eral panel operators. 

"Missile power," he says. 

"Go," says the panel operator. 

"AMR telemetry." 

"Go." 

"Propulsion." 

"Go." 

"T minus 60 seconds and counting." 

"\\'ater flow to full." 

"Range Ready light on." 

"T minus 40 seconds and counting," 
is announced by the test conductor. 

"Final status check," says the test 
conductor; then he checks for the last 
time with the engineers operating the 
control panels. 

"Pressurization," he says. 

"Go," replies the panel operator. 

"LOo tanking." 

"Go." 

"\^^ater systems." 

"Go." 

"Range operations." 

"Go." 

The test conductor checks his con- 
sole. Every light is on, indicating each 
major system is ready to go. 

He pushes a button on his con- 
sole. This is the last human act nec- 
essary for launching the missile. For 
the next 18 seconds an automatic se- 
quencer will do all the work. 



Only if something goes wrong will 
there be human action now— action to 
stop the test. 

"T minus 20 seconds and counting." 

Panel operators keep their eyes 
glued to their dials and charts, moni- 
toring information being relayed to 
them electronically. 

"T minus 15 seconds and counting." 

The waterflow over the flame buck- 
et is now at its full force of 35,000 
gallons per minute. 

Some of the automatic cameras 
around the stand begin operating. 

"T minus ten seconds and count- 
ing." 

"Nine, eight, seven. . ." 
Another set of cameras starts. 
"Six, five, four. . . " 

The two small vernier engines on 
the side of the missile start. 

"Three, two, one." 

The last set of cameras starts. 

"Zero." 

Seven hundred and fifty feet away, 
rocket engines developing hundreds 
of thousands of pounds of thrust have 
roared into life and are belching great 
streams of flame. 

But the engine roar does not pene- 
trate the thick walls of the block- 
house. Here all is quiet as each man 
intently watches his dials and record- 
ings. 

The clicking of the relays in the 
sequencer is the only noise. The se- 
quencer is timed to hold the missile 
on the pad momentarily before re- 
leasing it to give the crew time to 
make sure everything is operating. 

Then comes the word from the 
periscope observers. 

"First motion." 

The arms holding the missile on 
the launching pad fly back. 

"Liftoft." 



THE CARPENTER 15 

All heads turn from the panels to joined by others in the blockhouse, 

the TV monitors. rises to a shout: 

The test conductor stands to get a "Qq baby go " 

better view as the missile rises slow- . , , i r i i 

ly, its tail of flame and smoke beat- ^^^ thousands of other workers, 

ing down on the launching pad. wherever they may be in the vast 

"^^ 1 1 „ » 1 • 1 missile range complex, echo the cry 

Go, baby, go, he says m a low, , . . ° .^,,,ii 

tense voice origmates m the blockhouse— 

The missile goes straight up with- ' X' § • 
out a waver. It is accelerating rapid- It takes the skills of the scientists, 
ly. The flames no longer bear on the the technicians, the electrician and 
pad. carpenter, the millwright and plumb- 
Now the missile begins to pitch er to get the launching pad and the 
over from its vertical flight to take missile in shape to start the count- 
the proper angle for its 5,(X)0-mfle down. If the shot succeeds, all heave 
trip down the Atlantic Missile Range, a sigh compounded of pride and re- 
The test conductor now is pound- lief; if it fails, all silently vow to do 
ing his desk with his fist. His voice, their own jobs better and faster. 

• 

WE LIVE BY LABELS 

We are great believers in labels. Most of our lives are guided by labels; 
whether we are driving a car, shopping, or cooking a meal, we are dependent 
upon labels. We do not place people in the category of canned goods, but 
even people live and move under labels. 

Some are given labels, and we know thereby who they are and what they 
stand for. Others hitch their lives onto certain labels and neglect to live up 
to them. Still others deliberately hide behind wrong labels. It is possible to 
wear a label without the proper product behind it, but you who wear the 
Union Label, see that you buy and support the Union Label. For only by 
so doing can you get better conditions for yourself and family and members 
of your union. 

Be sure to vote for backers of your Union Label. 

Paul Dean, Member of Local No. 1S65 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

• 

SAFETY IS 24-HOUR JOB 

"Safety . . . Everywhere . . . All the Time" is the slogan of a new, continuing campaign 
of the National Safety Council. 

The campaign, aimed at making safety an around-the-clock family afiFair, will save 
industrial concerns from conducting separate, on-the-job and off-the-job safety campaigns 
which often compete for employes' attention. 

Kick-off for the campaign is a 23-minute, full-color film depicting tlie involvement of 
a factory worker and his family in a near-tragic boating accident. Symbol of the campaign 
is a black circle within a yellow diamond. 

The recall device is one of several items available to remind employes of the campaign 
—key tags, posters, leaflets, pocket protectors and safety scoreboards for plant and home. 

Further information about the campaign and availa'ble materials, as well as suggestions 
on how to start a "Safety . . . Everywhere . . . All the Time" campaign, may be obtained 
from the National Safety Council, 425 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 



p 



LAN E 



SLIGHTLY OPTLMISTIC 

Month after month the Department of 
Labor issues glowing reports about how 
many Americans are at work. Only at the 
bottom of the story is there any mention of 
the fact that fi\e per cent of the labor force 
remains unable to find work. 

The May report was no exception. It 
showed 67.2 million gainfully employed. 
Howe\-er, it also showed one worker out of 
20 jobless because of no job available. Since 
unemployment was running at about five 
per cent a year ago, we seem to be bogged 
down at this figure. And glowing reports 
cii.nnot alter the picture. 

The whole situation brings to mind the 
story of the teacher who rented a Volks- 
wagen to tour Europe. For a long time she 
got along Zm, but one day the car quit 
dead out in the provinces. 

In the best American tradition, the teach- 
er got out and lifted the hood. While she 
was pondering the situation, another teacher 
drove up in a Volkswagen, too. 

"Having trouble?" she asked. 

"Am I," replied the first. "Why, some- 
one stole the engine from my car." 

"Don't worry," cheerfully retorted the 
good sa^iiaritan, "I've got an extra one in 
the back of mine." 



EMPLOYMENT 





-etSp3- 



''The tools I can handle 
best are a knife and forkt'' 



WE AIN'T ALONE 

Don't get lipset if you find a typograph- 
ical error in THE CARPENTER. It happens 
in the best regulated publications— as wit- 
ness a few dillies reported by Archie in 
the UNION REGISTER: 

"Mrs. Shirley Baum, who went deer hunt- 
ing with her husband, is very proud that she 
was able to shoot a fine buck as well as her 
husband. 

"The ball struck Berra in the right tempio 
and knocked him cold. He was taken to 
the hospital. X-ray pictures of Berra's head 
showed nodiing. 

"Mrs. Anderson has recovered from her 
broken collarbone, but her knee is still in 
the hands of the doctor. 

"When a gentleman and lady are walk- 
ing in the street, the lady should walk in- 
side the gentleman." 

• • • 

PAUP MAKES A COMEBACK 

After a stroll through the park on a 
balmy summer's night, Joe Paup observed: 

"Canned and frozen juices are becoming 
more and mofe popular, but I notice most 
guys still like to squeeze their own toma- 
toes." 

* • • 
WHO'S ON FIRST? 

Several months have passed since the 
U-2 incident startled the nation, but the 
furore rages on in Congress without let-up. 
The government is criticized for using spy 
planes, and in the same breath it is roasted 
for not closing the missile gap. Some Con- 
gressmen apparently expect the nation to 
know what the Russians are doing without 
spying; which is the equivalent of expect- 
ing students to have the answer for ques- 
tions that haven't been asked. 

The whole hassle brings to mind the 
story of the logger who was overpaid $20 
one week. The guy said nothing. The next 
week the $20 was deducted from his pay 
and he protested loudly to the paymaster. 

"Look," said the paymaster, "you were 
overpaid $20 last week and you said noth- 
ing. This week the $20 was deducted and 
you complain." 

"Okay," replied tlie logger, "I can over- 
look one mistake, but when it happens 
twice, it's time to squawk." 



THE CARPEXTER 



17 



TWELVE RULES FOR RAISING 
DELINQUENT CHILDREN 

1. Begin with infancy to give the child 
everything he wants. In this way he will 
grow up to believe tlie world owes him a 
living. 

2. When he picks up bad words, laugh 
at him. This will make him think he's cute. 
It will also encourage him to pick up 
"cuter" phrases that will blow oflE tlie top 
of your head later. 

3. Never give him any spiritual training. 
Wait until he is 21 and then let him "decide 
for himself." 

4. Avoid use of the word "wrong." It 
may develop a guilt complex. This Avill con- 
dition him to believe later, when he is 
arrested for stealing a car, that society is 
against him and he is being persecuted. 

5. Pick up everything he leaves lying 
around— books, shoes and clothes. Do every- 
thing for him so that he will be experienced 
in throwing all responsibility on others. 

6. Let him read any printed matter he 
can get his hands on. Be careful that the 
silverware and drinking glasses are steri- 
lized, but let his mind feast on garbage. 

7. Quarrel frequently in the presence of 
your children. In this way tliey will not be 
too shocked when the home is broken up 
later. 

8. Give a child all the spending money 
he wants. Never let him earn his own. 
Why should he have things as tough as 
you had them? 

9. Satisfy his craving for food, drink 
and comfort. See that every sensual desire 
is gratified. Denial may lead to frustration. 

10. Take his part against neighbors, 
teachers, policemen. They are all prejudiced 
against your child. 

11. When he gets into real trouble, 
apologize for yom-self by saying, I never 
could do anything with him. 

12. Prepare for a life of grief. You will 
be Ukely to have it. 

* * ^ 

SHE HAS REASONS 

A recent survey indicates that the main 
reasons why a woman buys a product in a 
store are as follows: 

1. Because her husband says she can't 
have it. 

2. It will make her look thin. 

3. It comes from Paris. 

4. Her neighbors can't afford it. 

5. Nobody has one. 

6. Everybody has one. 



STATISTICS CAN PROVE ANYTHING 

In the field of economics, the man has 
finally bitten the dog. A Michigan State 
professor of economics recently concluded 
that automation maybe isn't going to usher 
in the era of perpetual milk and honey we 
have been hearing so much about from 
others. 

There are three claims about automation 
that are nothing but myths, says this MS 
expert. The first is that automation creates 
jobs faster than it destroys them. This is 
hogwash, says the professor. Statistics to 
date show more jobs go down the drain 
than new machinery creates. 

The second claim is that automation will 
come slowly. This, too, is a myth, says the 
gentleman. It is racing ahead under a full 
head of steam. 

The third claim knocked in the head is 
the myth that automation will demand 
greater and greater skills. No such thing, 
says the expert. Machines that learn by ex- 
perience are just around the corner, and 
engineers and junior executives better bat- 
ten down their hatches. 

All this we long suspected, and we make 
no claim of being an expert. Anything can 
be proved with statistics; even that auto- 
mation benefits everybody. 

Sort of reminds us of the Russian who 
was boasting that his factory increased pro- 
duction 756% in a single year. WTiat he 
failed to mention was that the factory 
turned out signs reading "Out of Order." 




''I didn't read the fine print ^^ 
in our new working agreement!' 



IS 



Veterans Pension Program Is Revised 

* * * 

VETERANS of World War I, World War II, or the Korean War who are 
on the verge of retiring or ha\'e already retired would be wise to look 
into the matter of veterans' pensions. The pension program has been 
re\ised, and the revisions became effective on the first day of this month 
(Julv). While the changes are not drastic, they do offer retired veterans a 
chance to supplement minimum income with a small veteran's pension if 
qualified. 

Under the terms of the revised pension program, single veterans of 
retii'ement age (65 or older) can draw a pension provided they do not have 
an income of more than $1,800 a year. The smaller the income, the larger 

tlie pension, up to a maximum of $85 

per month. The following scale of The interpretation the law places 

pensions tells the story: on "income" is rather strict. Social Se- 

^'ETERAN— NO DEPENDENTS curity benefits, any pensions received 

Monthly from a company, any annuities, and 
Income Payment even interest on savings are consid- 

Not over $ 600 $85 ^red income. However, the law does 

Not over $1,200 70 recognize that some of these forms of 

Not over $1,800 40 income were paid for by the veteran 

Over $1,800 None while working. So benefits from an- 

For veterans with dependents, the ""^^i^^ ^^ Social Security received by 
pension scale is somexvhat higher, ^^^^ ^^^^ran after retirement are not 
both as to benefits and maximum al- considered mcome until he has gotten 
lowable income. For example, a mar- ^ack a sum equal to the total contri- 
ried veteran of retirement age with butions he made during his working 
a wife dependent on him can have y^^^^; ^^ '^'''^ ^/^^es this means that 
an annual income of $2,999 and still Social Security benefits will not be 
draw a small veteran's pension. Here considered as part of income dur- 
is the breakdown: i"§ the first year following retire- 

VETERAN-WITH DEPENDENTS "^^'''l ^"".°"^" ^''''^, annuities wi 1 

-WIFE OR CHILDREN ^^""^^^ ^"^'^"^^ 71 l^l i J 
,-.,,„ ^ eran has recovered his total invest- 
Monthly Payments x. ■ ^.u 
r^ -^ ri rT^^ ment in the annuity. 
One Two Three , r i 
Depend- Depend- Depend- ^^ ^^e veteran s wife has an income 
Income ent ents ents of her own, the law provides that all 
Not over such income over $1200 must be 
S1,000 $90 $95 $100 counted as part of his income unless 
Not over ^^ can be shown that the excess 
$2 000 75 75 75 amount was offset by unusual circum- 
Not'over stances such as expensive illness, etc. 
$3,000 45 45 45 Veterans who already had qualified 
Over for a pension prior to July 1, 1960, 
83,000 None None None have the option of remaining under 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



the old law or switching to the new 
one, whichever offers them the great- 
er benefits. However, once the elec- 
tion is made, there can be no switch- 
ing back and forth. 

The amended law also changes the 
benefit provisions for widows and de- 
pendent children under the age of 18. 
Widows and children of veterans who 
died after service in any of the last 
three wars are eligible for pensions if 
they come within the prescribed in- 
come brackets. The following table is 
typical: 

WIDOW-NO DEPENDENTS 
Income Monthly Payment 

Not over $ 600 $60 

Not over $1,200 45 

Not over $1,800 25 

Over $1,800 None 

The law is rather rigid in defining 
income received by veterans' widows. 
With very few exceptions, receipts of 
money, whatever the source, are tak- 
en into consideration in figuring an- 
nual income. However, the widow has 
some discretion as to how she can fig- 
ure her personal income as opposed to 
the income allocated to her children. 
Each case is treated as a separate en- 
tity and decided on its merits. Here is 
the schedule for a widow and child: 

WIDOW AND CHILD 
Income Monthly Payment 

Not over $1,000 _$75 

Not over $2,000 60 

Not over $3,000 40 

Each additional child gets $15. 

CHILDREN-NO WIDOW, OR 
WIDOW INELIGIBLE BECAUSE 

OF TOO MUCH INCOME 

Number of Monthly 

Children Payment 

One child $35 

Each additional child 15 

In general, there are a number of 
items which the law does not recog- 
nize as income: 



1. Payments of the six months' 
death gratuity by the Service 
Department. 

2. Donations from public or pri- 
vate relief or welfare organiza- 
tions. 

3. Payments of compensation or 
pension by the VA. 

4. Government life insurance pay- 
ments and payments of service- 
men's indemnity. 

5. Social Security lump sum death 
payments. 

6. Payments to an individual un- 
der public or private retirement, 
annuity, endowment or similar 
plans equal to the amount he 
contributed thereto. 

7. Proceeds of fire insurance poli- 
cies. 

8. In the case of widows or chil- 
dren of a deceased veteran 
there are excluded amounts 
equal to the amounts paid for 
settlement of the veteran's just 
debts, the expense of his last ill- 
ness, and the expenses of the 
veteran's burial, less the amount 
reimbursed by the VA. 

The facts set forth above merely 
represent an effort on our part to 
summarize the provisions of the re- 
vised law. They cannot be consid- 
ered as authentic or final. The Vet- 
erans Administration will determine 
each case on its own merits and we 
are printing this information merely 
to alert our members who may be af- 
fected to contact their nearest VA 
office and secure the complete and 
authentic details. It costs nothing to 
find out. 

The Veterans Administration main- 
tains offices in most large cities. If 
none is handy, a letter to the Veterans 
Administration in Washington, D. C, 
should get full details. 



£0 



What's To Cure Drug Prices? 

• • 

By Erma Angevine 

CAN the government do anything to hold down drug prices without 
discouraging the search for new drugs to keep us healthy? 
That essentially is the question a Senate subcommittee has been 
trying to answer for six months— and the end is not yet. The big question 
has a number of variations, some that you've probably asked yourself after 
reading the articles on pricing practices in the drug industry carried in previ- 
ous issues of THE CARPENTER. A few might be: 

How does the doctor's new way of prescribing medicines by brand name 
affect prices? Would it help if pharmacists had more leeway in filling prescrip- 
tions? How can we encourage compe- 



tition and discourage price-fixing in 
the drug industry? 

How much high-priced drug pro- 
motion is wasteful? Do drug makers 
hiirass price-cutting retailers? Why do 
identical drugs cost more here than 
o\"erseas? Would it bring prices down 
if drug makers had to cross-license 
any essential drug they patented? Are 
some drugs introduced just to force 
older and cheaper drugs off the mar- 
ket? 

Regarding quality, the senators 
have asked such questions as these: 
Does Food & Drug Administration re- 
Iv too heavily on drug makers' affi- 
da'^its in licensing new drugs? Does 
FDA learn. all it should about possible 
harmful side-effects before licensing a 
new drug? Should Congress give any 
federal agency the power to keep use- 
less drugs off the market? 

Senator Estes Kefauver (D. Tenn.) 
is comimittee chairman. Other mem- 
bers are John Carroll (D. Colo.), 
Everett Dirksen (R. Ill), Philip Hart 
(D. Mich.), Thomas Hennings (D. 
Mo.), Roman Hruska (R. Nebr.), Jo- 
sepli O'Mahoney (D. Wyo.), and Alex- 
ander Wiley (R. Wis.). 



Prescription prices climbed more 
than one-third in the past ten years, 
rose more than one-sixth in the past 
two. One-fourth of the $16.4 billion 
spent on medical care in the U. S. in 
1958 went for dru^s. 

Doctors, druggists, and consumers 
wrote 5,000 letters to the committee 
shortly after the hearings opened last 
December. Most of them complained 
about drug prices. 

Drug makers say they can't cut 
their profit margins on new drugs if 
they're to continue searching for cures 
for many painful and fatal diseases. 
They say competition keeps profits on 
standard items marginal. New drugs 
are always high-priced, they say, and 
by their nature are monopolies. This 
monopoly is short-lived because com- 
j^etitors develop new drugs, and each 
advance makes the old drug obsolete. 

Others say it's improper to inflate 
drug prices, even for research, since 
it makes the sick and unemployable 
bear the industry's burden. 

The federal government finances 
half the cost of public health research. 
This includes research work of the 
Health, Education and Welfare De- 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



partment, the armed forces, Veterans 
Administration, National Science 
Foundation, and Atomic Energy 
Commission. Industry finances more 
than a quarter of the research load, 
and universities and private founda- 
tions finance the rest. 

In general, indmstry tends to con- 
centrate on promising leads that seem 
likely to turn a dollar tomorrow. 
Other laboratories are willing to try 
the unknown where success is less 
frequent but discoveries, when they 
occur, seem like miracles. The gov- 
ernment backs the longest-shot re- 
search gambles of all, such as testing 
for cancer. 

Some who've testified before the 
Senate subcommittee claim the drug 
makers include the expense of "de- 
tail" men in their research figures. 
These are salesmen whose job is to 
convince doctors to use brand names 
in writing prescriptions. 

The president of one company told 
just how effective they are. He said 
his firm and other top drug makers 

can charge sLx times what their small 

o 

competitors can because doctors and 
pharmacists rely on their reputations 
to supply quality products. 

Said Senator Wiley, "You fellows 
charge all the traffic will bear." An 
even larger question is: If we have 
drug standards, why aren't drugs that 
meet that standard equal, no matter 
who pastes on the label? 

Can the government do anything 
about high drug prices without wreck- 
ing the industry? To answer that 
question, the Senate subcommittee 
has examined several of the biggest 
drug firms. One of these is Sobering 
Corporation of Bloomfield, N. J. 

Schering, a former German-owned 
firm seized as enemy property during 
World War II, was sold to a syndicate 
of U. S. investors in 1952 for $29,- 
132,000. Kefauver showed that the 



company made profits after taxes of 
$31,959,000 in its first 51/2 years, more 
than recouping the purchase price. 

Francis Brown, Schering president, 
laid much of the firm's success to its 
development of two cortisone drugs 
for arthritis— prednisone and predni- 
solone. While Schering hasn't yet 
been able to patent the drugs, it made 
3-year cross-licensing agreements in 
1955 with other large drug makers. 

These agreements provided that 
Merck, Pfizer, Parke-Davis, Upjohn, 
and CIBA pay Schering a 3% roy- 
alty. Committee members questioned 
whether collecting royalties on a pat- 
ent that didn't exist was legal. Brown 
said he thought it was. 

The licensing agreement allowed 
the two drugs to be distributed only 
in package form ready for retail sale. 
This in effect kept small companies 
from getting the drugs in bulk for 
three years. 

The committee's patent expert and 
counsel both said they believed 
Schering and the other firms in the 
cross-licensing agreement violated the 
anti-trust laws. Brown denied this and 
challenged the subcommittee's power 
to study "whether there has been a 
violation of a law." 

Brown said that if Schering or one 
of the other firms won the patent, it 
would control the bulk market. 

Under the cross-licensing agree- 
ments Schering and the other firms 
charged retail druggists $18.50 for 100 
prednisolone tablets. When a Mexi- 
can firm started producing predniso- 
lone and selling to smaller drug com- 
panies, they charged retail di'uggists 
$4.50 for 100 tablets. 

It costs Schering $1.60 to make up 
100 tablets of meticortelone. It sold 
100-tablet packages to drugstores for 
$17.90 with a recommended retail 
price of $29.83. Nysco Laboratories, 



THE CAKPENTER 



a smaller company, sells the same 100 
tablets to druggists for $2.70. 

Scherino; boucjht estradiol from a 
French drug firm. After putting the 
drug into tablets and bottles, Scher- 
ings costs were 11.7 cents for a 60- 
tablet bottle. Schering sold this bottle 
to druggists for $8.40 and suggested 
it retail for $14. 

Schering sold one of its wonder 
drugs to the Veterans Administration 
for S136 a thousand tablets under a 
"negotiated" contract. When forced to 
l^id competitively, Schering dropped 
the price to $23.63 a thousand. Drug- 
gists pay $170 a thousand for the 
drug. 

Brown said the committee's figures 
don't include all the costs. They don't 
include research, he said, nor the 
"service" the company renders doc- 
tors by sending detail men to urge 
them to use Schering products. 

Brown said Schering earns 16 cents 
profit after taxes on each dollar's 
worth of products it sells. He said its 
prices are "not excessive." 

"Schering is a business corporation 
and must be operated as such. When 
we invent products that advance 
medicine, we try to sell them at a 
profit. We try to do as well as other 
responsible companies in the industry. 

"Some people find it difficult to pay 
for needed medication. They also 
have diflBculty meeting their rent and 
food bills. This is a matter of inade- 
quate income rather than excessive 
prices." 

Brown denied that Schering has 
any responsibility for cutting prices 



so persons with meager incomes can 
afford drugs. He said the public must 
pay high prices to finance research. 
"Today's consumers must contribute 
to future benefits. The public cannot 
afford to hamper research that has 
advanced the cause of medicine so 
significantly." 

Brown said smaller companies can 
charge less because they don't have 
as high overhead as Schering. One of 
Schering's biggest expenses is the 530 
detail men who visit doctors and 
druggists to promote Schering prod- 
ucts. Each earns about $9,000 a year. 
These salesmen must also have liter- 
ature and samples to hand out. Brown 
said Schering spent more than $25 
million a year on such "education." 

Senator George Smathers (D. Fla.) 
said high drug prices suggest "exploi- 
tation at the expense of the aged and 
infirm, the sick, and the public gen- 
erally." He said it's "shameful" that 
many persons with low incomes have 
to "tolerate pain and suffering" be- 
cause the products of medical re- 
search cost so much. 

Senator Alexander Wiley said a 
firm that claims to have a remedy has 
"a moral responsibility to see that the 
poor and needy aren't taken for a 
ride." 

Commented Kefauver, "This coun- 
try has the best drugs in the world. 
Yet it would appear from letters the 
subcommittee receives that many of 
our citizens can't afford to buy them." 

This is the first in a series of two articles 
exploring the dilemma faced by the Senate 
committee investigating drug prices and profits. 
The second will appear next month. 



INTEREST KEEPS ON INFLATING 

May, 1960 income figures show that money lending continued to score the highest rate 
of g,ain during the past year. 

Wages and salaries were running at a $272.1 billion rate for a 5.5 per cent gain over 
I'^Jod, while personal interest income was running at a $25.2 billion rate for a 12 per cent 
gain over 1959. 

Other sources of income remained stable. Farm income, ho\yever, went up half a billion 
clullars between April and May, mostly due to the sale of fresh vegetables. 



23 



Progress Report 

Here is the way our new International Headquarters Building in Washington, D. C. 
looked as of June 15th. A comparison with the pictures which appeared in last month's 
issue shows that the project is proceeding nicely. 




WTIONAL >CAIUIJABTEFU> BUILIMM 

ITED BRiTriCRHOm, CARPENtas, * 
,^j i!V4T0N, D. C. 
XhBIRD 1 ROOT, ARCHITECTS 
•jiM A. VOLPE ciPANV 
-J£ 15™, 1960 WOrO NO. .. «* 




mERNATIONM. ttADyUARTERS BUILDIM2 

MiTEu exar>cRHcxxi, carfcnters. < joncm 
MoHiicroN, tt. 0. 

KXAB IRD * nxr, iMMITCBa 
JC»« A-. KOJC I 
JUNE (fru. 



Editorial 




Today's Youngsters Will Be Our Leaders Or Executioners 

Our entire school system, from the first grade through college, constantly 
is being bombarded with literature and brochures produced and financed by 
big ])usiness. Needless to say, this material never downgrades the management 
point of view. Some of the material is even designed to serve as a teaching 
aid, thereby guaranteeing its acceptance and use. 

Then, too, most cities have Business and Industry Day, when school is let 
out to enable teachers to visit local business establishments where they are 
gixen the red carpet treatment (plus generous doses of company propaganda) 
by top officials. 

The theory behind this program is that teachers need to be educated in the 
fundamentals of our free enterprise system and the things that make it tick. 
With this theory we have no quarrel. The more teachers know and understand 
a])out our economic system, the more effectively they can explain it to our 
youngsters. But we do decry the one-sided picture which yoimgsters get. We 
have seen a good jdeal of the material furnished to schools by Chambers of 
Commerce and various giant corporations. None that we ever saw gave unions 
more than passing mention. And we ne\'er heard of a Business and Industry 
Day that included a trip through a union office. What most school-age chil- 
dren know about unions, they get from the daily papers. And there is no use 
commenting on how accurate and unbiased this information is. 

Who is to blame for this unhappy state of affairs? Certainly not business, 
which is grasping an opportunity to promote its point of view. Certainly not 
the school authorities, who welcome every aid for indoctrinating youngsters 
in the way our economic system works. That places the blame squarely on our 
own shoulders for not doing a better job of counterbalancing the lopsided 
picture painted by business literature planted in the school system. School 
authorities that accept Chamber of Commerce literature can hardly deny us 
the same privilege if we have the material available. 

Our handicap is that we do not have the money or manpower to devote 
to the cause that business does. However, despite this handicap, we can do 
much more to get our story presented if we work at it. We can provide speak- 
ers for career days. We can put our labor papers and magazines in school 
libraries. We can urge our school officials to include visits to unions in Busi- 
ness and Industry Days. It might take a little doing to achieve these things, 
but the efforts should pay off in the long run. 

Happily, more and more union officials are awakening to the ur- 
gency of the situation. They are visiting schools and making talks on the 
part labor plays in making life better and richer for all. 

Recently, William J. Landry, president of the Evangeline District Council, 
addressed the senior class at Washington, Louisiana. In a letter to THE 



THECAKPEXTEK 25 

CARPENTER he summed up the whole need for greater activity in this field 
in tlie follo^^'in2[ words: 

"OAr youngsters, in the near future, will be the leaders of our movement, 
or, if not informed, our executioners. All of us who are more or less dedi- 
cated ^^'Ould do well to expand this phase of our activities. As a sequel, it 
might not be amiss for the internationals to form educational units, either 
nationally or locally, to improve and exploit this program. The cost might 
appear higher than warranted in its original phases, but Vk^ould unquestion- 
ably pay dividends in the future. 

"In the past we have been more or less complacent, assuming that as 
various phases of construction progressed we would get our share of the pro- 
ceeds by the very nature of the fact that we were more skilled and more 
available than the unorganized. This is becoming less true each day! Better 
"too much, too soon," than "too little, too late!" 



Krebiozen Merits A Fair Test 

If ^ ou want to read somethinf]; that will curl your hair, get hold of a 
book called "A Matter of Life and Death," by Herbert Bailey. It is an 
account of the long, frustrating, and so far unsuccessful struggle that a dedi- 
cated group of people has made to get "Krebiozen," a controversial, anti- 
cancer drug, tested and evaluated by the medical profession. 

Krebiozen first appeared on the scene about ten years ago. It was dis- 
covered by a doctor named Stevan Durovic. From the beginning. Dr. Durovic 
and the American Medical Society did not see eye to eye as to how the di^ug 
should be handled and developed. The differences grew rather than dimin- 
ished. Consequently, Krebiozen never received the attention a promising 
cancer drug deserves. 

In 1951 and 1952 a medical committee examined the claims made for 
Krebiozen and tm'ned in a negative report. This report, say the backers of 
the drug, was unscientific, biased, and filled with errors. Year after year 
since that time these boosters of Krebiozen have been trying to get a new 
clinical study made of the drug. But the AMA hierarchy insists on setting 
up its own ground rules for any study it will approve. There the controversy 
rests today; the backers of Krebiozen want a free, broad and thorough test 
made on a national basis, while AMA wants to start with a committee to 
determine whether or not a test is appropriate. 

In the meantime, three independent groups have experimented with Kre- 
biozen, and their findings have been uniformly encouraging. All cases treated 
were in their final stages. Some cures were reported and a great many slow- 
downs were claimed. 

Not being medical authorities, we are unqualified to comment on the 
merit or lack of merit in Krebiozen, But it seems to us the position of the 
American Medical Association is a vulnerable one. If, as it claims, Krebiozen 
is worthless as a cancer cure, wouldn't the quickest and easiest way to 
establish this fact once and for all be a comprehensive and scientific test 
of the drug over a prolonged period? To us, it seems as basic as this— if the 
drng is as useless as claimed, prove it by fair tests. Otherwise, the natural 



26 THECARPENTER 

suspicion arises that perhaps the AM A committee stuck its neck out in 1951 
in vetoing the drug and the Association is now afraid of losing face should 
the drug prove practical. 

Bureaucracy is a funny thing. Sometimes it can get bogged down in petty 
details that completely obliterate the points at issue. This should not be 
allowed to happen to Krebiozen. 

The American Medical Association is made up of dedicated and respected 
men who devote their lives to the greatest cause of all— human health. They 
work terrible hours and undergo physical strains that would break down the 
average laborer in a few weeks. To intimate that such men could callously 
pass up a beneficial product is unthinkable. Yet many people on the side of 
Krebiozen are as well trained, medically, and as dedicated as any doctors in 
the AMA bureaucracy that discount the drug. In fact, one of them, Dr. 
Andrew C. Ivy, was head of the Illinois Medical School and a world-renowned 
cancer specialist when he first took up the Krebiozen cause. Since then, he 
has been shorn of many of his honors and positions for steadfastly refusing to 
downgrade Krebiozen. 

In view of all this, the only logical conclusion that can be drawn is that 
Krebiozen deserves a fair and thorough test— and to heck with who said what 
in the past and who did what over the years. 



Apprenticeship and Delinquency Are Incompatible 

In the last few weeks thousands of young men received their journeyman 
certificates attesting to their successful completion of apprenticeship training. 
Needless to say, there were few, if any, juvenile delinquents among them. 
Apprenticeship training and delinquency are pretty much incompatible. 

We have no statistics to prove this point, but we doubt if statistics are 
necessary. The young man who enters apprenticeship training has a goal in 
life. And those who have constructive goals seldom stray very far from the 
straight and narrow path. Furthermore, apprenticeship involves a substantial 
degree of self-discipline, the basic ingredient for constructive living. 

According to the FBI, muggings, robberies, assaults and other crimes of 
violence are on the increase. And an ever-larger share of them is being com- 
mitted by youngsters under 21. Gang wars and race riots haunt the waking 
hours of law enforcement officers in many large cities. There are jungles in 
some cities where honest citizens dare not walk alone after dark, and even 
policemen patrol in pairs. 

This is a sad commentary on the state of our society, but facts are facts. 
Sociologists ascribe the shocking increase in juvenile delinquency to a host 
of reasons— broken homes, poor environment, poor housing, etc. All these 
things undoubtedly make a contribution. But it is our feeling that lack of a 
hopeful future drives more youngsters to crime than any other one thing. 
The untrained youngster faces a bleak prospect— low-paid and uncertain jobs, 
frequent layoffs, and irregular paychecks stretching endlessly into the future. 

By contrast, the young man learning a trade through apprenticeship train- 
ing has a definite goal ahead of him. Once he has mastered his trade the 
avenues opened up to him are almost limitless. He knows that his wages and 



T II E C A K r E X T E R 27 

working conditions will be adequate at least. He knows his services will be in 
demand even though there are occasional slack periods. He knows he can 
hold his head up as a producer, consumer, and stalwart citizen of his 
community. 

And in the process of learning his trade he also learns self -discipline. It 
takes application, study, and patience to become a qualified journeyman in 
any line from printing to construction. The lad who is busy trying to learn 
the ins and outs of a trade that has hundreds of years of development behind 
it has little time or inclination to roam the streets or run with lawless gangs. 

So, in addition to providing a reservoir of skilled craftsmen for the future, 
perhaps apprenticeship training makes an equally important contribution to- 
day, by giving young men purpose, direction, and hope for the future. At 
least that is the way it appears to us. 



Hands Across The Sea 

This year the Amalgamated Society of Woodworkers celebrates its Hun- 
dredth Anniversary. Our congratulations to our British counterparts who, 
over the past century, fought the good fight through wars and peace, good 
times and bad, for a richer and fuller life for the people we represent. 

Their initial efforts planted deep the seeds of militant and dedicated 
unionism. The furrows tliey plowed in the previous century provided guide- 
lines by which American unions set their first faltering courses. Over the 
years the Amalgamated has been the training ground for many unionists who 
achieved prominence in our own labor movement. There is a bond between 
the Amalgamated Society and the United Brotherhood that spans oceans and 
defies time. 

Tlie Society was born in an era of turmoil and strife. In 1859 the London 
Master Builders locked out all their employes. When the lockout ended, the 
yellow dog contract put in an appearance. All workers were required to sign 
a document reading as follows: 

"I declare I am not now, nor will I during the continuance of my engage- 
ment with you, become a member of or support any society which directly 
or indirectly interferes with the arrangements of this or any other establish- 
ment or the hours or terms of labour, and that I recognize the right of em- 
ployers and employed individually to make any trade engagements on which 
they may choose to agree." 

This was the final blow that led a group of dedicated and fearless men 
to form a union that developed into the Amalgamated Society. From that day 
to this, the Society has worked tirelessly for economic justice for all workers 
in general and woodworkers in particular. 

As the theme of its centenary celebration, the Society has adopted the 
slogan: "Let's make 100% organization our goal for our 100th birthday." That 
is a big order, but an organization that has endured the vicissitudes of time 
and changing fortune for a full century is entitled to stand tall and plan 
boldly. In the final analysis, nothing succeeds like success. 

Our warmest felicitations to our British Brothers on this happy occasion as 
thev embark on their second century of growth and expansion. 



Official Information 




General OflBcers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



Gkneeal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

R. B. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

FRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 



Second District, RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventh District, LYLE J. HILLER 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 



Eighth District, J. F. CAMBIANO 
17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fourth District, HENRY W. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
1834 N. 78th St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HUTCHESON, Chairman ; R. E. LIVINGSTON, Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 

Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of July, August and September, 
1960, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this circular should notify the General Secretary, Carpenters Building, Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana. 

e 

IMPO RTANT NO TICE 

In the issuance of clearance cards, care should be taken to see that they are 
properly filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary 
of the Local Union issuing same as well as the Local Union accepting the clear- 
ance. The clearance cards must be sent to the General Secretary's Department 
without delay, in order that the members' names can be Hsted on the quarterly 
account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained therein 
must be used. 



29 



REPORT OF THE DELEGATES TO THE THIRD 

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OF THE 

CANADIAN LABOR CONGRESS 



THE Third Constitutional Convention of the Canadian Labor Congress 
was held in the City of Montreal, Quebec, during the week of April 
25th to the 29th, 1960. 
Some 1750 delegates from the ten provinces attended. All sessions were 
held at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel. 

His Eminence Cardinal Paul Emile Leger, Archbishop of Montreal, gave 
the opening invocation. 




Canadian Labor Congress officers are shown at CLC Third Constitutional Convention in Mon- 
treal, April 29th, casting ballots for election of vice presidents. General Executive Board member 
Andrew Cooper was one of four elected from Ontario. 

Full slate of Congress officers elected is: president, Claude Jodoin; executive vice presidents, 
William Dodge and Stanley Knowles; secretary-treasurer, Donald MacDonald; general vice presi- 
dents, George Burt, WiLiam Mahoney, William Jenoves and Frank Hall; regional vice presidents, 

D. J. Gannon and Mr. MacLeod of the Atlantic region; Miss Huguette Plamondon, Roger Provost 
and Louis Laberge of the Quebec region; Andrew Cooper, Larry Sefton, W. J. Smith and Harold 
Daoust of the Ontario region; C. Reimer and Donovan Swailes of the Prairies; Joseph Morris and 

E. P. O'Connor of British Columbia. 



Many informative and interesting 
addresses were made by civic, provin- 
cial and Federal government officials. 

Notable among those addressing 
the Convention was the Honorable 



Antonio Barrette, Premier of Quebec 
and Minister of Labor for the prov- 
ince, who is also a member of the 
International Association of Machin- 
ists. The Minister of Labor for the 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Canadian Government, the Honorable 
Michael Star, outlined the work his 
department is doing for the Canadian 
people. 

Fraternal greetings were extended 
by Mr. George Harrison on behalf 
of the American Federation of Labor 
and Congress of Industrial Organiza- 
tions, and bv Sir Thomas Williamson 
and Robert Wills on behalf of the 
British Trade Union Congress. 

Traditional greetings were given 
by Mr. Arne Geijer, President of the 
International Confederation of Free 
Trade Unions. 

Some eighteen resolutions dealt 
with amendments to the Constitution 
of the Canadian Labor Congress. Un- 
doubtedly the resolution to amend 
the Constitution so that the affiliated 
unions would pay an increase on the 
per capita tax on their membership 
from $0.07 to $0.10 per member, was 
of the outmost concern to the dele- 
gates representing the Building 
Trades International Unions. The 
amendment received the necessary 
two-thirds majority for adoption, but 
not without some opposition. 

Additionally, the Convention con- 
sidered 445 resolutions dealing with 
legislative matters, organization prob- 
lems, economic questions, education, 
international affairs, human rights, 
plus several other special resolutions. 

One of the special resolutions was 
on the present strife taking place in 
South Africa, and called on all affili- 
ated unions and chartered locals to 
join in a world-wide boycott of South 
African consumer goods to start May 
1st, 1960. 

The Report of Social Security Com- 
mittee received the fullest of atten- 
tion, for it dealt with the following 
subjects: 

a) Unified System of Social Secur- 
ity. 

b) Health Insurance. 



c) Drugs. 

d) Hospitals. 

e) Old Age Security. 

The Report of the Political Educa- 
tion Committee created the ruggedest 
debate, for the recommendations con- 
tained the following proposal: to au- 
thorize the executive officers of the 
Canadian Labor Congress to call a 
founding convention for the purpose 
of establishing a new political party. 

It was also agreed in the Conven- 
tion that affiliation to the new party 
shall be on a voluntary basis for 
the C.L.C. -affiliated organizations and 
chartered local unions and their mem- 
bership. It was further determined 
that the Canadian Labor Congress, 
being a national labor center for all 
its affiliates, shall not itself become 
an integral part of the new party, 
but it shall cooperate with the new 
party with the fullest assistance, and 
encourage the affiliation of Canadian 
Labor Congress affiliates with the 
new political party. 

While there was some opposition 
to the proposal to create a new politi- 
cal party, the opposition was very 
light and the recommendations of the 
Political Education Committee were 
adopted by an almost unanimous 
vote. 

The attack on labor in Canada 
came under full review early in the 
Convention. Arising out of the reso- 
lutions on this subject, the Conven- 
tion adopted all-embracing resolu- 
tions that would provide for the 
Canadian Labor Congress to institute 
a vigorous public-relations program 
to expose the aims and intent of the 
attack of the Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, Canadian manufacturers 
associations, and the Canadian con- 
struction associations against organ- 
ized labor. 

The Seafarers International Union 
was under suspension prior to the 



THE CARPENTER 31 

Convention for the charge of raiding, turned to office. Executive Board 

The Seafarers International Union member A. V. Cooper was returned 

made no appeal at the Convention as Regional Vice President for the 

and was expelled by vote of the Province of Ontario, 

delegates. Respectfully submitted by 

The International Brotherhood of Wm. Stefanovitch 
Teamsters had been similarly charged Regional Director 
and AA'as given thirty days to with- 
draw from seeking certain bargain- ^^^ ^^^ on behalf of the fol- 
ing certificates it had applied for lowing Brotherhood Repre- 
or stand expelled for raiding. sentatives: 

There was a very large support for -^' ^- Cooper, G.E.B.M. 

the Teamsters in the Convention, Geo. R. Bengough, G.E.B.M. 

principally from the Building Trades E. Larose, Rep. 

Unions, but their vote was not sufii- F. A. Acton, Rep. 

cient to offset the expulsion vote. F. Reid, Rep. 

All the executive officers of the M. Raymond, Rep. 

Canadian Labor Congress were re- A. Coleman, Rep. 



UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES DOUBLE IN TWO YEARS 

Labor-management tensions have reached the point where the filing of un- 
fair labor practice complaints before the National Labor Relations Board has 
more than doubled during the past two years. 

"The spectacular upward trend of unfair labor practice cases which began 
in fiscal 1958 continued unabated during fiscal 1959:" 

That is the way the NLRB's 1959 annual report begins and from then on 
the statistics show a series of new records, each indicating a continuing break- 
down in industrial peace. 

There were 12,239 unfair practice cases filed in fiscal 1959. This was a 
new record in the 24-year history of the NLRB and represented a 32 per 
cent boost over the number of complaints filed in 1958 and a 122 per cent 
boost over the number filed in 1957. 

Charges against employers numbered 8,266 for an increase of 36 per cent 
as compared with 3,862 charges against labor unions, for an increase over the 
year of 24 per cent. 

Four-fifths of the charges against employers involved accusations of "il- 
legally discriminating against employees because of their union activities or 
because of the lack of union membership." Most of the rest involved charges 
that employers failed to bargain in good faith. 

Complaints against employers were issued in 1,283 cases and complaints 
against unions in 818 cases. 

For the second consecutive year, charges filed by individuals represented 
a majority— 59 per cent— of all unfair labor practice charges. Of the 7,176 com- 
plaints filed by individuals, 4,664 were filed against employers and 2,512 were 
against labor organizations. 

The Board handed down 764 unfair practice decisions, the highest in any 
year during its history. 



Tin m 

Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 



ttntfxxntn 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more. 



The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



AALTO, A. A., L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
ADAMS, GEORGE V., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
ALLDREDGE, A. L., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
ALTENBERG, JOSEPH, L. U. 930, St. Cloud, 

Minn. 
ANDERSON, ROBERT C, L. U. 1478, Redondo 

Beach, Cal. 
ARES, CHRIST, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
ARNOLD, HARRY E., L. U. 1665, Alexandria, 

Va. 
ARTS, GEORGE, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
BABCOCK, FREDERICK, L. U. 964, Rockland 

Co. & Vic, N. Y. 
BARNHILL, MATT, L. U. 1822, Fort Worth, 

Texas 
BEARDSLEY, HOWARD, L. U. 1449, Lansing, 

Mich. 
BEAVERS, J. O., L. U. 198, Dallas, Texas 
BERG, CARL, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wise. 
BERG, EMIL, L. U. 594, Dover, N. J. 
BERMAN, PHILIP, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 
BIELINUS, PETER, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
BLACKBURN, B. B., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
BLAIR, L. B., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
BOWMAN, JESS, L. U. 16, Springfield, 111. 
BOWMAN, JOE, L. U. 2949, Roseburg, Ore. 
BRAUN, EUGENE, L. U. 1292, Huntington, 

N. Y. 
BROWN, BENNIE, L. U. 133, Terra Haute, 

Ind. 
BRUEGEMAN, MARTIN, L. U. 272, Chicago 

Heights, 111. 
BUDDENMEYER, C. H., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
BURKARD, CONRAD L., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
BURKELL, RAYMOND. L. U. 1508, Lyons, 

N. Y. 
BUTTS, WILLIAM H., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
CALLICOATE, A. M., L. U. 764, Shreveport, 

La. 
CAMILLI, THOMAS, L. U. 272, Chicago 

Heights, 111. 
CAREW, WILLIAM, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
CASA, GAETANO T. Sr., L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
CHANDLER, HARRY J. Sr., L. U. 61, Kansas 

City, Mo. 
CLEEK, DAVID H., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
CLARK, DARWIN, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
CONLIN, JOHN K., L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
COSGROVE, JAMES, L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
CRANK, V. C, L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 
CREEDON, WILLIAM, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
CZISNY, FRANK, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wise. 
DANIELSON, CHARLES, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
DARROW, E. R., L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 



DAY, LEWIS, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wise. 
DeLORD, ALBERT, L. U. 1846, New Orleans, 

La. 
DEPREY, DAVID J., L. U. 132, Washington 

D. C. 
DREFKE, WILLIAM, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
DUEBER, GEORGE C, L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
DUKE, WALLACE HALL, L. U. 272, Chicago 

Heights, 111. 
DUVALL, DeWILTON S., L. U. 132, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
DYE, HUGH v., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
EDMUNDS, DAVID, L. U. 414, Nanticoke, Pa. 
ERNST, CHARLES, L. U. 281, Binghamton, 

N. Y. 
ESPENBAUM, FELIX, L. U. 1292, Huntington, 

N. Y. 
FAULKNER, CLYDE, L. U. 1255, ChiUicothe, 

Ohio 
FEIKERT, WILLIAM, L. U. 2027, Rapid City, 

S. D. 
FISCHER, FREDERICK O., L. U. 1846, New 

Orleans, La. 
FOSTER, DEWEY, L. U. 925, Salinas, Cal. 
FREDERICK, E. A., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
FREDRICK, KARL, L. U. 257, New York, N. Y. 
FUNK, GUSTAV, L. U. 366, New York, N. Y. 
GABY, H. L., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
GALLOWAY, C. B., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
GAUTHIER, JOSEPH, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
GERDES, MARTIN, L. U. 16, Springfield, 111. 
GIOVANAZ, DANIEL, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, 

Wise. 
GLENESK, JAMES, L. U. 1513, Detroit, Mich. 
GOLDEN, WILLIAM M., L. U. 1323, Monterey, 

Cal. 
GOTTSCHALK, FLOYD, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, 

Wise. 
GRONDIN, LEON A., L. U. 1478, Redondo 

Beach, Cal. 
GROW, GEORGE, L. U. 769, Pasadena, Cal. 
HAHN, CHARLES L., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
HALACKA, JOSEPH, L. U. 1786, Chicago, 

111. 
HALLIDAY, STEWART C, L. U. 132, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
HAMILTON, J. A., L. U. 2006, Los Gatos, Cal. 
HANNA, T. M., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
HARDING, WILLIAM L., L. U. 132, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
HARRELL, RUBEN, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
HATLEY, R. W., L. U. 452, Vancouver, B. C. 
HEIDLE, CHRIST, L. U. 355, Buffalo, N. Y. 
HERNANDEZ, PETE D., L. U. 2006, Los Gatos, 

Cal. 
HEYDEN, WILLIAM F., L. U. 72, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
HEYSE, EMIL, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wise. 
HINES, GUY, L. U. 770, Yakima, Wash. 
HOEHN, ADOLPH, L. U. 72, Rochester, N. Y. 
HUGHEN, H. O., L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 



THE CARPENTER 



33 



HUGHES, ALFRED, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
HUNTLEY, ELMER, L. U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 
HURST, JOHN J., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
JACKSON, ROBERT C, L. U. 1407, Wilming- 
ton, Cal. 
JILLETT, WALTER, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
JODREY, DANIEL J., L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
KEMPE, WALTER, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
KIRSCHMER, HENRY, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 

IlL 
KLAUD, CHARLES, L. U. 1786, Chicago, IH. 
KLAUS, HARRY, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
KLEIN. JOHN P., L. U. 272, Chicago Heights, 

IlL 
KNOTH, CALVIN, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
KOEFPE, ARTHUR, L. U. 13, Chicago, lU. 
KRETZMER, THEODORE, L. U. 15, Hacken- 

sack, N. J. 
LAKE. A. H., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
LAMARCH, ERVIE J., L. U. 13, Chicago, IlL 
LAMPERT, LLOYD L., L. U. 930, St. Cloud, 

Minn. 
LANDER, RALPH H., L. U. 702, Grafton, W. 

Va. 
LANGMEAD, URIAH, L. U. 579, St. John's, 

Newf. 
LaROSSA, FREDERICK, L. U. 33, Boston, 

Mass. 
LARSON, CHARLES A., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
LEM, SAMUEL H., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
LINDHOLM, THEODORE, L. U. 1456, New- 
York, N. Y. 
LOPATOWSKI, WALTER S., L. U. 13, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
MALMROS, VICTOR, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
MARTIN, CHARLES S., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
MARTIN, H. A., L. U. 2949, Roseburg, Ore. 
MAUPIN, W. S., L. U. 198, Dallas, Texas 
MAY, LESTER, L. U. 133, Terre Haute, Ind. 
McADOO, ROY A., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
McCOMBS, CLIFFORD, L. U. 166, Rock Island, 

111. 
McGILVRAY, JOSEPH, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 
McMULLIN, JAMES C, L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
McPARTLAND, PATRICK, L. U. 950, New 

York, N. Y. 
MILLER, G. W., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
MOHR. FRANK J., L. U. 355, Buffalo, N. Y. 
MORAN, FRANK P., L. U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
MOYA, JOZ R., L. U. 1353, Sante Fe, N. Mex. 
MURPHY, JAMES F., L. U. 1846, New Orleans, 

La. 
MYLAR, JAMES H., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
NELSON, EDWARD, L. U. 871, Battle Creek, 

Mich. 
NEWTON, W. A., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
NIELSEN, OLAF R., L. U. 253, Omaha, Neb. 
NOONAN, EDWARD, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
NOVAK, BARNET, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
NUESLEIN, FRED, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
OROPEZA, JUAN, L. U. 1407, Wilmington, 

Cal. 
PAGE, MARVIN HALE, L. U. 764, Shreveport, 

La. 
PERDUE, Z. G., L. U. 1228, Bluefield, W. Va. 
PERLMAN, DAVE, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 
PETERS, REX J., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
PHILLIPS, H. E., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 



emotixtin 

PIERCE, ANDREW, L. U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 
RALEY, H. D., L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
RAWLITT, H. E., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
REICHERT, EDWARD, L. U. 355, Buffalo, 

N. Y. 
ROBERT, ULYSSES, L. U. 1846, New Orleans, 

La. 
ROBERTS, WALTER C, L. U. 2164, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
ROBINS DN, JESSE G., L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
ROSS, TI.'HODORE, L. U. 1846, New Orleans, 

La. 
RUCKEL, WILLIAM, L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
RUSSO, ANTHONY, L. U. 1613, Newark, N. J. 
SANTIN, VINCENT, L. U. 1939, Clifton, N. J. 
SARSOK, JOSEPH, L. U. 1786, Chicago, 111. 
SCHIMPF, WALLACE B., L. U. 964, Rockland 

Co. & Vic, N. Y. 
SCHULMAN, HARRY, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
SCIGLIANO, GENNARO, L. U. 494, Windsor, 

Ont. 
SCOTT, W. A., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
SEHRT, WALT., L. U. 1022, Parsons, Kans. 
SENITTE, ROBERT, L. U. 1172, Billings, 

Mont. 
SMITH, ARTHUR C, L. U. 1846, New Orleans, 

La. 
SMITH, CLAIR R., L. U. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 
SMITH, JOSEPH C, L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
SPANN, GEORGE A., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
STARK, E. B., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
STEVENSON, J., L. U. 452, Vancouver, B. C. 
STOVAUGH, JOHN, L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
STROM, AXEL, L. U. 964, Rockland Co. & 

Vic, N. Y. 
SUNDSTROM, CHARLES, L. U. 488, New York, 

N, Y. 
SWART, E., L. U. 72, Rochester, N. Y. 
SWEET, EDWARD, L. U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 
SWENLIN, CHARLES, L. U. 121, Vineland, 

N. J. 
TERREL, C. W., L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
THOMAS, WILLIAM B., L. U. 61, Kansas 

City, Mo. 
THOMSEN, PETER, L. U. 253, Omaha, Neb. 
TIFFEY, GEORGE, L. U. 253, Omaha, Neb. 
TOMPKINS, CHARLES W., L. U. 61, Kansas 

City, Mo. 
TRANGMAR, RAYMOND, L. U. 764, Shreve- 
port, La. 
VICTOR, HIMAN, L. U. 13, Chicago, IlL 
WALL, FRANK J., L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
WARNER, JAMES H., L. U. 72, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
WEBER, PAUL, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wise. 
WELCK, ARTHUR P., L. U. 930, St. Cloud, 

Minn. 
WHEATON, SPENCER, L. U. 33, Boston, 

Mass. 
WIENBERG, FRED, L. U. 15, Hackensack, N. J. 
WILLIAMS, TOMMY J., L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
WINGLER, ALONZO, L. U. 2949, Roseburg, 

Ore. 
WINTERS, JAMES W., L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
WUSNICK, FRED, L. U. 72, Rochester, N. Y. 



What's New^ 



This column is devoted to new developments in materials and products of interest to members 
of crafts which are a part of the United Brotherhood. The articles are presented merely to inform 
our readers, and are not to be considered an endorsement by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. 

For information concerning products which are described in this column, please do not write to 
THE CARPENTER or the General Office, but address all queries to the manufacturer, whose name 
appears at the close of each article. 



There is now a clamp on the market de- 
signed especially for door and window cas- 
ings and manufactured by a brother of 
Local 361, Duluth, Minn., for getting a 
good joint with those twisted hardwood 
casings that would otherwise be discarded. 
The clamp allows time for glue to set. The 
maker claims that brief experience with the 
clamp enables the user to get a glued joint 




with the professional look and that experi- 
enced trimmers say they wouldn't be with- 
out the product after a few days of use. 
Also said to be handy in dividing up the 
margin when used in pairs. Sold by mail 
only. Made under the name of Smitty's 
Mitered Casing Clamp at 1924 Adirondack, 
Duluth, Minn. 



A new plane is being offered by Great 
Neck Saw Manufacturers, Inc. of Mineola, 
New York. Named the GM-O, it's a minia- 
ture plane that can be securely palm-held 



J^ 


A 


^3>^_^ 


^^ 


[ : Ni^^^^ 


d 



for complete control of fine wood work- 
ing. Only 3 y2 " in length, the 1-inch cut- 
ter is made of alloy tool steel and is claimed 
to be accurate for finishing in small, close 
work. Write the manufacturer for details. 



Manufactured by the Speed Corporation, 
P. O. Box 61, Lynwood, California, is tlie 
Speed Sharpener, designed especially for 
the beginner but equally efficient in the 
hands of the expert. It sharpens cross cut, 




hollow ground, combination and rip saw 
blades, and can be used with practically 
any circular saw blade of 6" to 12". Simple 
calibrations on the holder of the guide arm 
are said to make the sharpener foolproof. 
Available by mail order, the sharpener comes 
complete with one 3-cornered file, four 
mandrels and detailed working instructions. 



Now available is a high-torque, fully 
reversible drive attachment (H352) for Vi- 
inch and larger electric drills that increases 
the drill's power for driving and removing 




screws, nuts and bolts and for heavy-duty 
drilling. A hand clutch commands full con- 
trol of power and safety at all times, it is 
said. Address Dept. PD, Stanley Tools, di- 
vision of The Stanley Works, 111 Elm St., 
New Britain, Conn. 





/Weanderingll 



By Fred Goetz 



ILLNESS FLOORS FRED GOETZ 

We regret to announce that Fred 
Goetz, author of this column, has suf- 
fered a breakdown in health. He will 
be out of action for an indefinite period. 
This column is made up of unused mate- 
r'al previously submitted. 

We have asked that Mrs. Goetz for- 
ward to this office the recipes submitted 
in the camp cookery contest. A group of 
outdoor enthusiasts will be asked to 
judge them and their decision will be 
announced as soon as possible. 

In the meantime, all of us join in 
wn'shing Brother Goetz a swift and com- 
plete recovery. 



Probably one of the toughest ducks ever 
to grace the hunter's table was a male black 
shot o\er the Munuscong marshes of the 
upper peninsula country of Michigan. The 
winger, bearing a federal leg band, was 
dowT/ed by a blast from the scattergun of 
Alphonse LeLievre of Sault Ste. Marie, 
early in the season. 

Examination of tlie leg band showed the 
quaekcr was 13 years old! 
» « # 

T]ie abiUty of some people, especially 
hunters and anglers, to over-estimate the 
v/cight of fish and wildlife is well known. 
A sportsman's club in Pennsylvania, how- 
ever, proved the point in a live black bear 
weight-guessing contest conducted to raise 
funds for a game-feeding project. The high- 
est giiess was 1,650 pounds, but many 
people estimated the bear weighed as 
much as 700. The actual weight was 320 V2 ! 
» * « ' 

George W. Reynolds, editor of Wyoming 
Wildlife, defines conservation this way: 
"ConserN'ation is, when all the fat's boiled 
out, wise use. Conservation is enjoying 
without waste. Conservation is resource use 
with an eye on tomorrow. 

Conservation is the thing we practice now 
so that we can enjoy its benefits now and 
next >ear. Conservation is just common 
se!?£e backed by teclmical know-how." 



After using your outboard motor in salt 
water, it should be thoroughly flushed out 
by a few minutes' operation in a barrel or 
tank of fresh water. If this is not done, the 
salt water will not only start corrosion at 
critical points inside the motor but will also 
deposit a salt cake which may plug up the 
water pipes and water passages. 

The outside of the motor should then be 
wiped dry with a slightly oily rag before it 
is put away. Care of this kind will avoid 
trouble in operation and also give the motor 
longer life. 

While corrosion-resisting alloys and metal 
are extensively used in outboard motors 
and special protective chemicals employed 
to resist corrosion, some corrosive action is 
bound to take place sooner or later. 

* « » 

Early settlers in our country used deer 
meat as the main fare. 

Bear oil was a cure-all for cuts and burns 
of all kinds. It also found high favor as an 
axle grease. It also went into the making 
of candles, soap and hair oil. It was used 
in cooking and frying. And, on those cold 
winter nights, bearskins were used as over- 
coats and bed clothing. 

Another use that the present day house- 
wife may disagree with was pointed out by 
the early historian, William Byrd. He said: 

"Bears are black and so is their dung, 
but it will make linen white, being a toler- 
able soap without any preparation except 

drying." 

* » # 

The minimum length of a trailer, in rela- 
tion to boat length, should be several feet 
less than the boat. For most boats, however, 
a trailer at least as long as the hull is pre- 
ferred. Otherwise, no transom support is 

possible. 

* » « 

DIDJA KNOW THAT . . . The flight of 
the Canada goose is heavy but powerful. It 
averages about 55 miles per hour. Among 
ducks the pintail is one of the strongest and 
fastest fliers. A flock of 22 pintails landed 
on Palmyra Island, 1,100 miles south of 
Hawaii in 1942 and one wore a band placed 
on it in Utah 82 days earlier. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

33 APPRENTICES AWARDED CERTIFICATES AT PHILADELPHIA 

On April 29tli the playing of the "Star Spangled Banner" opened the Sixth Annual 
Carpenters Joint Apprentice Committee Banquet in honor of the 1960 apprentice gradu- 
ates. The banquet was held in the Burgundy Room of the Bellevue Stratford Hotel, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Groups represented were: 

Carpenters District Council, management, industry, government, and construction, as 
well as many employers of the apprentices -who were on hand to oflFer congratulations. 

The Right Reverend Monsignor Francis J. Furey, rector of St. Helena's Church, gave 
the Invocation. He was also among the principal speakers, who included: Colonel Weldon 




At a banquet held to honor the 1960 graduating class of the Philadelphia Carpenters Joint 
Apprentice Committee, the leading students were awarded prizes in honor of their achievements. 

From left to right, seated, are: Joseph Farrell, contractor meniber of Apprentice Committee; 
O. Wm. Blaier, Second General Vice President of the Carpenters' Brotherhood; Col. Weldon 
Snow, A.G.C. secretary of Apprentice and Training Committee; Robert H. Gray, secretary-treas- 
urer of the District Council; Francis Tuscano, Carpenter Class, first prize winner of $100, and 
the second prize winner of $50 in the same class, Walter Ziegler. 

Standing, are: John McNamara, first prize winner of $60 in the Mill-Cabinet Class; Anthony 
Oliveri, winner of second prize of $40, M. C; M. Belperio, $25 award for Effort and Perseverance; 
L. Gavi, $25 award for 4 years of perfect school attendance; and J. Kalbach, a $25 award for 
skill in blueprint reading. 

A Snow, manager of the Building Div., Associated General Contractors of America, and 
secretary of the A.G.C. Apprentice and Training Committee; O. William Blaier, Second 
General Vice President of the Brotherhood; Elmer H. Briggs, principal of the Murrell 
Dobbins Vocational-Technical School. Robert H. Gray, the toastmaster and secretary- 
treasurer of the District Council, as well as secretary of the Joint Apprentice Committee, 
was introduced by Joseph R. Farrell, Sr., representing the General Building Contractors 
Association. 



THE CARPENTER 



'37 



Awards in recognition of exceptionally fine records were presented. Francis Tuscano, 
Walter Ziegler and Michael Giantisco received $100, $50 and $25, respectively, from the 
Cari>enters Company of Philadelphia and vicinity. The two Mill-Cabinet prize winners 
were John McXama, who won first prize of $60, and Anthony Oliveri, second prize 
winner who received $40. The latter prizes were offered by Locals 359 and 1050. 

Leonard Gavi received his $25 award for perfect attendance for four years. The 
perseverance and effort exercised by Michael Belperio during his school term, too, re- 
ceived recognition. Third winner was John Kalbach who was awarded $25 for his interest 
and skill in blueprint reading. 




Group of graduate apprentices who were awarded completion certificates at gala affair in Phila- 
delphia last April. 

An electric saber saw was donated as door prize by H. K. Porter Company. Joseph 
Bailey was the lucky winner. 

Each graduate received, as well as his Completion Certificate, a congratulatory letter 
from the Secretary of Labor and Industry, a laminated identification card, and a 50-foot 
tape from the Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Committee. 

Speakers stressed the "a b, c's" vital to the success of the apprentice: "a"— the praise- 
worthy ambition which keeps a young man faithfully attending class two nights a week 
for four full years; "b"— his zest and spirit for laying the foundation for his chosen skill, 
and "c"— the cooperation which he must show his instructors, fellow apprentices and man- 
agement. Everyone agreed that the graduating apprentices had certainly ranked high in 
all these attributes! 



ABILENE SPONSORS SPECIAL ANNIVERSARY PROGRAM 

Rtcently, Local Union 1565, Abilene, Texas, sponsored a special Anniversary program 
to honor its past presidents and to award 25-year service pins to some seven members. 

During the evening two Brotherhood certificates were also awarded to graduate 
apprentices. 

Receiving the 25-year pins were George Cramer, J. E. Sanders, Cy Moore, E. O. Nail 
and Ro\' Jones, all of Abilene; John Mayfield of Clyde, and T. R. Tegart of Hamlin, Texas. 
Wylie Wyatt and Tommy Landreth were :given certificates of completion of apprenticeship 
training. 

Brotherhood certificates were presented by Cleve Culpepper, state supervisor of the 
Bureau of Apprentices, and the Department of Labor certificates were given by Dwain 
Unxue, apprenticeship committeeman of the local union. 

Past presidents of the local are George Cramer, R. L. McClain, Tommy Thorn, R. T. 
Chambers, Fred Busby, J. B. Yawn, C. H. Sanderson, H. B. Davis, C. C. Duncan, Bennie 
C. Woodrow, H. L. Bradberry and EUery Smith (deceased). 

Main speaker was Travis J. Lewis of Dallas, with the U. S. Department of Labor. 
Mar-hall T. Jones of Abilene was master of ceremonies. 



THE CARPENTER 



Among those present were Hugh Welch, executive secretary for the Associated Gen- 
eral Contractors; Herman Whatley, with the electricians union; and W. A. (Bill) Cam- 
field, of the U. S. Department of Labor at Austin. 



LOCAL UNION 490 CELEBRATES ITS 72nd ANNIVERSARY 

Seventy-two years ago last March, a small group of Carpenters in Passaic, New 
jersey took the obligation of the United Brotherhood to bring into being Local Union 
No. 490. 

On March 12, 1960, the 72nd Anniversary of that occasion was celebrated with a 
dinner-dance held at the Casino De Charles, Totowa Borough, New Jersey. 





Shown attending the 72nd Anniversary Dinner of Local Union 490 are, from left to right: 

First row: Raleigh Rajoppi, Second District Board member; Cornelius P. Warner, recording 
secretary of the local; George Collura, president; Fred Lombardo, treasurer. 

Second row: William Bonnema, business agent; Isaac Greenblatt, warden; George Hazekamp, a 
50-year member; Ted Bannon, vice president, and Marvin Kramme, financial secretary. 

A large turnout was on hand to make the evening a memorable one. A special guest 
at the affair was Second District Board Member Raleigh Rajoppi, who congratulated the 
union on its outstanding record of ser\'ice for nearly three quarters of a century. 

Another revered guest was Brother 
August Eberhardt, 91 years of age, who 
was awarded a 50-year pin as a token 
of appreciation for the many years he 
faithfully upheld the principles and ideals 
of the union. 

Seventy-two years is a long time. The 
United Brotherhood was only 7 years old 
when Local Union No. 490 was char- 
tered. The first airplane was still nearly 
20 years away, and the first ship to go 
through the Panama Canal was not even 
on the drawing board. 

Through the years Local Union 490 
contributed a great deal, both to the 
growth of the United Brotherhood and 
the development of the area it covers. 
With its solid history behind it, there is 
little doubt but that the union is des- 
tined to continue contributing to a big- 
ger and better labor movement and a stronger nation for many years to come 




Shown receiving his 50-year pin from Raleigh 
Rajoppi, Second District Board member, is George 
Hazekamp. Others in the group are William Bon- 
netna, business agent, and George Collura, presi- 
dent of Local 490. 




SAN DIEGO LADIES REALIZE FULL PROGRAM 

To die Editor: 

Auxiliary No. 506, San Diego, California, send greetings to all sister Auxiliaries 
tliroughout the Brotherhood and invite you to visit us. We meet the second and fourth 
Mondays at Carpenters Hall, 23rd and Broadvi^ay, at 7:30 p.m. 

We have been an active Auxiliary since organizing in 1948, always striving to uphold 
the dignity of labor and remembering our obligations as members. 

Our president, Marie Duncan, has worked faithfully to keep us informed on what is 
union and non-union, and what is fair and unfair. We have sold many types of union- 
labeled cards, invitations, address stickers, playing cards, ties, belts and socks— all carrying 
the Union Label. This not only realizes a nice profit for the Auxiliary, but what is more 
important, it spreads the message of Union Label buying. 

Our welfare committee is always busy making and collecting garments and delivering 
them, with other donations, to our local Children's Hospital. We also have purchased 
and given to a Tijuana, Mexico orphanage new blankets, together with other articles of 
bedding, clothing and food donated by members. We help needy members and contribute 
to tlie United Fund, Tri-Hospital Fund, and other coinmunity projects. We donate two 
popular recordings and magazines monthly to the Naval Hospital. 

Last Christmas, attractive trays were made up with fruit and Christmas delicacies, also 
small, personal gifts, and delivered to older members of our Auxiliary and our brother 
Locals. 

We always help our brother Local No. 1296 (San Diego) with their Christmas party 
by helping fill 1,000 stockings, taking charge of the program, trimming the tree, etc. We 
also help each year on the San Diego County Labor Council party for 2,500 under- 
privileged children. This party was telecast this year and carried from coast to coast on 
Christmas Eve. Perhaps some of you viewed it. 

Our sunshine committee remembers all members who are ill or shut in with cards, 
flowers or gifts. 

Our Historian keeps our history book up to date with clippings and pictures; our 
membership roster is corrected annually and a booklet made for each member, with 
birllidays and anniversary dates noted. 

Our ways and means committee members are active in their fund-raising affairs, mainly 
rummage sales, annual bazaar and dinner, luncheon and card parties, union-made candy 
and union-labeled articles. 

We are a member of our local Travelers Aid Society, with one of our members serving 
as secretary of the Board of Directors. 

We are affiliated with the Women's Auxiliar>^ Council of the San Diego County Labor 
Council, with one of our members now serving as president, and the Women's Activities 
Division of COPE, with active delegates always keeping abreast of what is going onj 
within the labor movement in our district. We also have active delegates to the San Diego 
County Labor Council, with other members attending City Council and Board of Super- 
visors meetings and bringing back reports to share with all of us at our Auxiliary meetings. 

We are affiliated with the Carpenters Ladies Auxiliary State Council of California, and 
our Srst Auxiliary president, Marie Hiatt, is now serving as District No, 1 board member. 



40 THE CARPENTER 

We feel that much benefit is deri\'ed from our afBHation with the State Council and 
would urge any Auxiliary which has not already done so to not hesitate to affiliate with its 
local Council. There can be so much more done in unity of numbers. 

We have always wdrked in harmony with our sponsor. Local No. 1296, and lia\e found 
them very cooperative in every way. We try our best to reciprocate. They are always in- 
vited to our Installation, Christmas parties, anniversary dinner, and for refreshments after 
our first meeting of each month. They provide us with our Ladies Lounge and with 
kitchen rent-free, also giving us the use of other rooms when needed for our own or sister 
Auxiliaries' affairs. We are proud of and grateful to our brother Local 1296. 

We hope other Auxiliaries and members derive as much pleasure as we do from 
husbands, fathers, sons and brothers being carpenters. We think it is a privilege to enjoy 
tlie benefits from their belonging to the Brotherhood. 

Sincerely, 

Marg Whitely, Secretary 

1710 E. 4th, National City, Cal. 



ALASKA AUXILIARY GAINING GROUND 

To the Editor: 

At the request of the other members of Auxiliary 527 of Mt. View, Alaska, I am 
writing this letter as explanation of tlie activities of our organization for the past year. 

A partially unsuccessful attempt was made in the fall of 1958 to gain additional mem- 
bers and new interest in the Auxiliary. It was successful to the extent of electing new 
officers, and tentative plans were made for an all-out drive for membership in the spring 
of 1959. However, because of the pending Carpenters' strike, this was not followed tlirough. 

During the strike, however, it was apparent that several of the members of the Broth- 
erhood were in dire circumstances and that assistance of some nature was necessary. An 
appeal was made and we were able to obtain large supplies of groceries which were dis- 
tributed to those who were in need. During the strike the members worked closely to- 
gether, united in tills one cause. 

After the strike, however, the interest waned and no meetings were held in October, 
November and December. The first of the year, a special meeting was held to determine 
the future of the Auxiliary. At that time it was decided by all to make a concentrated and 
conscientious effort to obtain new members and to plan new and interesting projects. Our 
members now number close to twenty and we have several new prospects— it is like a 
chain reaction, each new member is bringing other new members. 

Very truly yours, 

(Mrs.) Audrey A. Mitchell, Secretary 
Box 5402, Mt. View, Alaska 



AUXILIARY No. 370 REPORTS SPECIAL EVENT 

To the Editor: 

Greetings from the Carpenters Auxiliary No. 370 of Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Our Auxiliary was hostess to the wives of the delegates to the Iowa State Couiicil of 
Carpenters' Convention at Hotel Ottumwa, April 20, 21 and 22. 

On Wednesday, April 20, a tea was held in the Auxiliary rooms from 2:00 until 4 
o'clock. Then on Thursday we chartered a bus and viewed construction work In some 
residential districts and took John Morrell and Company's special tour, ending with a 
luncheon with our members and out-of-town guests at the Corn Picker. A really enjoyable 
time was thus spent. 

On Thursday evening, at 6:30, a banquet was served in the Hotel Ottumwa's ballroom, 
with all delegates and local guests present, and with the local Carpenters Union members 
as hosts. A variety of entertainment followed. 

We meet the second Monday night of each month for a business meeting, and try 
to have a montlily co-op supper with games and a program. Each occasion is enjoyed by all. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. W. K. Baird, Recording Secretary, 
720 Johnson Ave., Ottumwa, Iowa. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 380 
Old Fashioned Houses.— Many of the 
younger readers might wonder why kitchens 
and, for that matter, houses were built a 
few generations ago as tliey were. The an- 
swer is simple: In those days they built, 
just as we are doing today, die best that 
they could with the materials available and 
the means wth which such materials could 



base. Properly sized ys-inch material is set 
on edge, which receives the first floor and 
supports the cabinet and what is in it. 
Sometimes the piece that is nailed against 
the wall, marked X, is omitted, without 
damaging results. In the same way, the 
cross pieces, marked Y, can be omitted, us- 
ing only the front and back supports for the 
floor. 

Fig, 10 shows the same layout, after the 
floor is in place. Here the clotted lines 




4- 



ST OVE 

■Toe Room 

BASE OF COUNTER CABINETS 



be secured. Basic, natural building materials 
were plentiful and, as a rule, were avail- 
able at reasonable costs. The same was true 
of labor. Most of the processed building 
materials that we ha\"e were unknown to 
them, while processed materials that they 
knew and used, with few exceptions, are 
obsolete or unknown to us. It is this writer's 
opinion that in the next few generations 
the changes in processed building materials 
will be much greater and more revolution- 
ary than they were in the last few genera- 
tions. The builders then will wonder about 
the builders of today. 

Built-in Cabinet Base.— Fig, 9 is a plan 
sliowing, in part, the things that are done 
first in erecting built-in kitchen cabinets. 
VT-.it is shown here is the rough part of tlie 



Fig. 9 



should be noted. Cross sections of the 
frames for the front of the cabinets are 
shown shaded, and the doors for the cab- 
nets are indicated by dotted lines. The 
supports to which the frames are fastened 
are pointed out. These support the front of 
the counter top. The ledgers, shown by 



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42 



THE CARPENTER 



dotted lines, reinforce the counter between 
tlie front support and the wall, leaving the 
space open under the counter, so that the 
corner area can be utilized. Sometimes, one 
or both of these counter supports are made 
of solid partitions, similar to the optional 
partition indicated by dotted lines. When 
both of tliese parts of the counter are sup- 
ported by partitions it renders the corner 
area useless. The end of the counter next 
to the stove is made of %-inch plywood, 
and supports that part of the counter top. 



top and the stove should be from %-inch to 
5/16-incli. This size opening is just right 
for using a piece of weather stripping for 
closing the crack between the stove and 
the counter top, after the stove is in posi- 
tion. Fig. 13 shows, to the left, a cross sec- 
tion of the weather stripping, and to the 
right we have a side view. How the weatli- 
er stripping goes into the crack is shown 
by Fig. 14. The upper drawing gives a cross 
section and the bottom one is a plan, in 
part. This particular kind of weather strip- 




Shblves 



STOve 
SHELF AND DRAWER SPACE 



Fig. 10 



-i 

Section d-d is shown in detail by Fig, 11, 
giving tlie construction of the base around 
the toe room. It also shows how the V4-inch 
plywood floor is joined to the %-inch piece 
over the toe room. 

Counter Top.— Fig. 12 shows the counter 
top of the part we are using here as a 

5 




K^ 



SCCTION d- d 

Fig. 11 

pattern for constructing these cabinets. The 
width, as shown, is 2 feet. This width makes 
the material work out with a minimum of 
waste. The allowance between the counter 



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THE CARPENTER 



43 



pirg is a\ailablc at almost all hardware 
store?. 



_J 



y 



Counter Top 



Fig. 12 



Sections b-b and c-c— Fig 15 is a cross 
section through b-b in Fig. 12. Here we 
have tlie width of the counter given as 




2 feet, and the height as 30 inches. The 
3"x4" toe room is shown at the bottom, left. 
The otlier figures from top down are 1 inch 
for the counter top nosing, 1 V2 inches for 

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Cabinet 



Stove 



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3tove 



Fig. 14 



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44 



THE CARPENTER 



the head piece of the frame, 5 inches for 
the top drawer, 1 inch for the top cross 
bar, 7 inches for the second drawer, 1 inch 
for the second cross bar, 9% inches for the 




Fig. 15 
bottom drawer, and 4 inches for toe room; 
in all, 30 inches. Fig. 16 is a cross section 
through c-c, as shown by Fig. 12. This gives 

AUDELS Carpenters 
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4vols.^8 

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How to use the chalk line— How to "" ""'^°'* ""*■ 
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the figures of the important parts of the 
cabinet. The two quarter-width and one 
half-width shelves make this part of the 
cabinet an excellent storage place for small- 
can canned goods. Then there is space on 
and below the front half of the half-width 
shelf for containers such as bottles, etc., 
that cannot be stored in the smaller spaces. 
In front of the shelves there is space for 
things that need a great deal of head- 
room, as it were. 




Section c-c 
Fig. 16 

Important.— This lesson is the second of 
this series of four lessons, dealing with 
built-in cabinets. It is important that those 
who are interested in this subject should 
keep on file their copy of "The Carpenter," 
for it will be necessary to refer to illustra- 
tions that have previously appeared, as we 
go on. 



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NOTICE 

The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
tlie membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
ceilabie, are only accepted subject to the aljove 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 

City, Mo. 44-45 

Black & Decker, Towson, Md 3rd Cover 

Oisston Div., H. K. Porter Co., 

Philadelphia 35, Pa 4 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 43 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, Ill._ 48 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 47 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Wise. 45 

Irwin, Wilmington, Ohio 45 

Dan C. Laub, Minneapolis, Minn. 43 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 47 

Skil Corp., Chicago, 111 1 

True Temper Corp., Cleveland, 

Ohio 2nd Cover 

Versa-Vise, Orrville, Ohio 45 

Yates American Machine Co.j 

Beloit, Wise. 46 

Carpentry Materials 

Beverly Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 41 

Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 44 

Builders Publications, Inc., 

Arcadia, Calif. 43 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Calif 47 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 42 



KEEP THE MONEY 
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PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 




WORLD'S 
BEST 



Millers Falls Mitre Boxes set the standard for 
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Dept. C-3S 

MILLERS FALLS COMPANY 

Greenfield, Mass. 



MILLERS FALLS 
TOOLS ^ 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
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and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is V^, 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease Vz inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
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width is ^/4 inch and they increase 
'/i " each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
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A hip roof Is 48'-9i/4" wide. Pitch 
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Jacks and ,jj ^^^ MINUTE ^^^ ^'"^S- 
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teeted by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 

Price $2.50 Postpaid-C.O.D. fee extra. 
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Californians add 4% 

A. RIECHERS 

p. O. Box 405 Palo Alto. Calif. 



FOLEY 



AUTOMATIC 



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CARPENTERS— This is the FIRST and ONLY Machine that fifes 
• HAND Saws • COMBINATION Circular Saws 



• BAND Saws • CROSS-CUT Circular Saws 

Foley's exclusive jointing action restores irregular teeth to 
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anyone can learn them easily. Over a half-century of design 
and engineering progress are in the new Model 200 Foley 
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rely on Foley for saws that cut smoother, faster and cleaner. 
Send coupon for literature. 






FILING 

CIRCULAR 

SAWS 




FILING 

BAND 

SAWS 



In addition to all 
hand saws, the 
Foley files all 
combination and cross- 
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24" in diameter. It joints 
aa it files, keeping the 
saw perfectly round and 
all t«etb uniform in height 
and spacing. Every tooth 
cuts, saw; runs cooler and 
breakapt- is eliminated. 





The Foley takes all 
band saws to 4 H" wide, 
3 to 16 points per inch 
—up to 24 feet long. Its 
jointing action restores 
uneven teeth to perfect 
size, spacing, and align- 
ment. Sawing produc- 
tion increases 2.5% to 
40% and work quality 
improves. 



SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET 



FOLEY MFG. CO.. 718-0 Foley BIdg., MiniiMpolit 18, Minn. 

Send full information on Foley Saw Filer. 

Name 

Addfwn 



City. 



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(Booklet tells how to start money-making saw 6ling business.) 



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Nice Spot fsra Picnic? 




It was . . . just a short while 
ago. People came here to relax 
and enjoy the cool green of the 
forest. There were squirrels, 
deer and birds. There were 
fish in the streams. 

But now there is nothing . . . 
nothing but desolation. 

How did this fire get start- 
ed? It wasn't lightning or some 
other natural cause. Someone 



was careless. Someone flipped 
a cigarette from a car window, 
left a campfire smoldering, or 
tossed away a match that "ap- 
peared" to be out. 

It's the same story across 
the nation. Forest fires burned 
10 million acres of America's 
valuable timber last year. And 9 
out of 10 of these fires were 
caused by people , . . mostly 



good people like you. One mo- 
ment of carelessness, in each 
case, did the job. 

Be careful in the woods this 
year. Be sure every flame, ev- 
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your smokes, drown your camp- 
fires. When you drive use the 
ash tray in your car. Be care- 
ful. Please. 



Remember — only you can 



PREVENT FOREST FIRES! 




Apprenticeship— nucleus of craftsmanship 



YOUR FUTURE'S AT 
STAKE — 



When You Gamble With Safety 




DON'T TAKE CHANCES 



You Can't Beat The Odds 



On Accidents 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

Learn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you that 
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLOC, 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Chicago Technical College 

K-132 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, Illinois 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: 
formation about how I can train at home. 



'How to Read Blue Prints" with rn- 



Name Age. 

Address Occupation 

City Zone State 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor ^UI0«M£SJ| 





Carpenters' 


Building, 


222 


E. 


Michigan Street, 


Indianapolis 4, 


Indiana >*SI 


JMJSf 


Established in 1881 
A'o]. LXXX— No. 8 








AUGUST, 1960 




One Dollar Per 
Ten Cents a 


Tear 
Copy 





— Con tents — 



Top Builder Erecting Our New Headquarters - 3 

The John A. Voipe Construction Co.. erectors of our new headquarters building in 
Washington, began as a two-man operation 26 years ago. Today it is rated among the 
top 100 construction firms in the nation. John A. VoIpe started as a hod carrier and 
served his apprenticeship as a plasterer. Today he still makes the final decisions for 
the firm although he has a large corps of outstanding engineers on his payroll. At 
51, he is a \widely kno\vn leader as well as an efficient builder. In fact he is the Repub- 
lican nominee for Governor of Massachusetts. 

The Auto Is Deadlier Than War . - _ 6 

Labor Day, which was conceived and dedicated as a day of relaxation and reflec- 
tion for working people, has become a nightmare of slaughter on streets and highways. 
If statistics run true to form, 400 Americans will die in traffic accidents this Labor Day 
weekend. All this tragedy will occur because drivers ignore a few basic safety rules. 
To stay alive this Labor Day, stay alive behind the wheel. 



New Canadian Labor Party 



8 



Disgusted with the buck-passing performances of the two old political parties, the 
Liberals and Conservatives, the Canadian labor movement has undertaken the establish- 
ment of a new labor party in cooperation with other progress-minded, liberal groups. 



Redevelopment — Challenge Of Our Time 



- 11 

slums and blight have downgraded many American cities to the point where vast 
areas need to be completely rebuilt. Through redevelopment authorities, many cities are 
making excellent progress in rooting out dilapidated and broken-down sections and re- 
placing them with bright, airy, modern structures. Philadelphia is a cose in point, 
as this article dramatically shows. 

Proposed Changes In Our Constitution And Laws 15 

A summary of the changes proposed by subordinate bodies for the consideration of 
our forthcoming convention in Chicago beginning September 26. 



• • • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Official 
Editorials 
In Memoriam 
Outdoor Meanderings 
Correspondence 
Craft Problems 



Index to Advertisers 



* * * 



14 
24 
35 
37 
39 
40 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103. Act of October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8, 1918. 



Top Builder Erecting Our New Headquarters 

• • 

4 S A sequel to an article published in the June issue entitled, "Outstand- 
AA ing Architects Plan Our New Home," we thought our members would 
■^ -^ enjoy a story about the builders of our new headquarters building 
because they, too, are leaders in their field. 

The John A. Volpe Construction Company of Maiden, Massachusetts, has 
been working diligently to get our new building completed so that the head- 
quarters for the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
can be occupied as soon as possible to serve you in a more eflBcient manner. 

The young founder of the construction company bearing his name is still 
its young president and is active in the top management of the company. Yet 




Large jobs or small, Volpe Construction Co. has experience in all of them. This is an ex- 
ample of a larger job — Cafeteria and Dormitory Building, Georgetown University. 



he can find the time in a 24-hour day 
to serve as a director in many types 
of business such as banks, news- 
papers, railroads, insurance companies 
and on the boards of several educa- 
tional and charitable institutions. 

The Honorable John A. Volpe at 
age 51 was recently nominated as the 
Republican gubernatorial candidate in 
Massachusetts. His candidacy guaran- 



teeing an honest, efficient and moral 
administration based on sound busi- 
ness principles appealed to the Re- 
publican delegates to the convention 
in Worcester and resulted in a unani- 
mous vote for the nomination. 

The John A. Volpe Construction 
Company has had an excellent record 
of cooperation with labor, probabh' be- 
cause the high principles of unionism 



THE CARPENTER 



were instilled in John A. Volpe during 
his service as a hod carrier, an ap- 
prentice plasterer and, subsequently, 
a full-fledged union plasterer at the 
early age of twenty. This union activ- 



man of the Labor Relations Commit- 
tee of the Associated General Con- 
tractors of America. 

During March of this year, John A. 
Volpe was installed as national presi- 




Traditional or modern, the John A. Volpe Construction Co. is at home in either field — as 
these photographs graphically illustrate. Above, Philosophy Buildingc, Boston College; below. 
School of Law, Howard University. 




ity was accomplished prior to the 
completion of his formal education, 
and his interest in labor has continued 
throughout his business career, even 
ele\ating him to the position of chair- 



dent of the Associated General Con- 
tractors of America, which was the 
culmination of many years of activity 
in this representative organization. 
Starting years ago as a member of 



THE CARPENTER 



the Massachusetts Associated General 
Contractors organization, he served 
successfully as vice president and 
president of the local Massachusetts 
section and continued climbing the 
ladder of success in this organization 
to national vice president and, as stat- 
ed, is now its national president. 

In addition to the foregoing, and 
working chronologically backwards, 
John A. Volpe has successfully served 
as, president of the Boston Chamber 
of Commerce, the first Federal High- 
way administrator, Massachusetts 
commissioner of Public Works for 
about four years, national president of 
the Society of Military Engineers, and 
on many committees, educational pan- 
els, fund raising drives, all for the 
public good. 

You may ask how a man with so 
much public spirit could possibly be 
a success in business. His secret has 
been to develop an organization that 
can operate with a minimum of effort 
on his part. He learned early in life 
that to become successful one must 
delegate a tremendous amount of the 
work load to trusted subordinates to 
give himself time to make the proper 
decision for expansion. 

The John A. Volpe Construction 
Company has been in business for 
over twenty-six years and has risen 
from a two-man outfit to a concern 
that is now listed in the Architectural 
Forum's Directory of the one hun- 
dred largest contractors in the nation. 
The company is concerned primarily 
with the construction of buildings but 
has entered the hea\y construction 
field in several instances, such as the 
Limestone Air Base in Maine and the 
Bomarc Missile site in Bangor, Maine. 

Many beautiful buildings, long 
since completed and now in constant 
use, stand as a testimonial to this 
contracting company. They like to 
consider themselves monumental type 



builders who can be proud of their 
accomplishments for years to come. 

The mainstays of the company who 
carry on while the boss is busy in 
other fields are: Frank Marcucella, 
vice president and general manager, 
an M.I.T. graduate, who is today 
rated as one of the top building con- 
struction executives in the country; 
S. Peter Volpe, treasurer of the com- 
pany, ^vith twenty-five years' experi- 
ence in the building construction busi- 
ness, and who was recently installed 
as vice president of the Massachu- 
setts section of the A.G.C. He also 
has a force of young, energetic esti- 
mators and project engineers headed 
by Merrill Carter, a chief engineer of 
well known repute, and field super- 
intendents, some of whom have been 
with the company since its inception. 

The main ofiice of this growing 
company is located in Maiden, Massa- 
chusetts, on the exact spot where 
John A. Volpe and his brothers were 
raised. The Washington office headed 
by Glen H. Ballowe, a George Wash- 
ington engineering graduate, is re- 
sponsible for the direct super\ision 
of our new Carpenter's Union head- 
quarters building. 

Now this company is planning a 
Miami, Florida, office to handle work 
in the southeast section of the 
country. 



r 



INVEST IN 




YOUR FUTUHE 



The Auto Is Deadlier Than War 



^^^^^ 



* * 

IF statistics run true to form, some 400 Americans who start this Labor 
Day hohday with high hopes and ambitious plans will lie cold and stiff 
on marble slabs come September 6. They will die on super-highways 
and country lanes, in city streets and village squares, because somebody 
tliought he could jump a signal, cut a corner, hold another drink, or drive 
another hour. 

In a sense these will be the lucky ones, for thousands of others will be 
smashed and maimed beyond repair and doomed to living out a few pain- 
wracked years lame, halt, and broken. 

This is not a pretty picture, but it 
is an accurate one. Labor Day, the 
only national holiday dedicated to 
honoring the workers of the nation 
who create all the wealth and gran- 
deur we enjoy, has become a night- 
mare of slaughter on the highways. 

Since the first automobile huffed 
and puffed its erratic way down a 
cobblestone street, some 62,000,000 
people have been killed, maimed or 
crippled. More blood has been spilled 
on the highways than on all the bat- 
tlefields enshrined in American his- 
tory. And traditionally the Labor Day 
weekend is the bloodiest of all. 

It is the last holiday of the summer. 
People are anxious to make the most 
of it. They drive farther and try to 
crowd in more activities than at any 
other time of the year. The result is 
more and deadlier accidents. 

Increasingly, organized labor has 
become concerned over the transition 
of Labor Day from a holiday devoted 
to rest and contemplation to a week- 
end of carnage. The labor movement 
is joining hands with many other or- 
ganizations promoting safety in an ef- 
fort to reduce Labor Day traffic acci- 
dents. But the task is a monumental 
one. Slogans, pledges and statistics 
seem to have little lasting effect. Ev- 
eryone seems to think the slogans and 
posters are aimed at the other fellow 




Bsfor* thU happ«nad, h* drova 43 houri nonttop.' 



exclusively. So accidents go on in- 
creasing. Only when everyone who 
takes the wheel of a car appreciates 
the terrible, destructive power of the 
modern automobile will the needless 
slaughter diminish. 

This Labor Day holiday, make sure 
you do not contribute to the horrible 
statistics. If you are going somewhere, 
start in plenty of time so you do not 
need to speed in crowded traffic con- 
ditions. Observe the traffic rules. Stay 
away from the wheel if you have been 
drinking. Don't try to set endurance 
records on the road. 

To stay alive over Labor Day week- 
end, stay alive behind the wheel. 



THE CARPENTER 




THE FACTS OF '59 

37,600 Deaths 

900 More than 1958 

2,870,000 Injuries 

45,000 More than 1958 

8,200 Pedestrians Killed 

500 More than 1958 

914,690 Casualties from Speeding 

15,110 Deaths Occurred on Weekends 
More than 40% of the Total 

28.7% of the Drivers Involved in Fatal Accidents 
Were Under 25 Years of Age 



More than 80% of the Fatal Accidents Occurred 
on Dry Roads and in Clear Weather 

More than 85%o of the Vehicles Involved in 

Personal Injury Accidents were Passenger Cars 

Almost 3,000 Pedestrians v^ere Killed while 
Crossing Between Intersections. 



Cartoons and statistics courtesy The Travelers 



New Canadian Labor Party 

• • 

EARLY in June, the 48th Annual Convention of the Ontario Council of 
Carpenters, representing 40,000 Brotherhood members in the province, 
voted unanimously to support the political policy of the Canadian 
Labor Congress— the formation of a new, liberal, political party. The council 
will ask the International Brotherhood convention in September to amend the 
constitution to allow Canadian Carpenters to participate in the "new party." 

"The Canadian Labor Congress endorses the active participation of organ- 
ized labor in the formation of the new party, and it is apparent to every 
section of the trade union movement that it must become politically active," 
the council resolution read. 




The delegates to the 48th Annual Ontario Provincial Convention of the Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners, who endorsed the formation of a new political party. 



More than 150 delegates voted to 
support "the formation of a new poli- 
tical party expected to merge ele- 
ments of the Co-operative Common- 
wealth Federation, labor and farm 
groups, small businessmen and pro- 
fessional groups." 

At a press conference after the coun- 
cil sessions, a spokesman said that the 
delegates took this stand "because of a 
long-overdue realization" that they 
could not stay out of the political field 
without eventually damaging their 



own cause. The council signed the On- 
tario Federation of Labor's Statement 
of Support for the new party. 

The council also sent a wire to 
Premier Leslie Frost of Ontario 
strongly condemning the premier for 
refusing Brotherhood Representatives 
a hearing on the recently-passed 
amendments to the Ontario Labor 
Relations Act. It was the first time 
since the council was formed 48 years 
ago that a provincial premier has re- 
fused to hear a carpenters' delegation. 



THE CAILP ENTER 



"If this is the unalterable policy of 
the Ontario government, our members 
will be urged to express their conster- 
nation in a fitting manner in every 
constituency of the province in the 
next provincial election," the telegram 
to Premier Frost said. 

What is the new party and what 
will Brotherhood support mean and 
involve? At the 1958 convention of 
the CLC, a suggestion was endorsed 
that all levels of the trade union 
movement discuss with the CCF, 
farmers, and other progressive Cana- 
dians the possibility of forming a new 
political party in Canada. 

Since then a draft program has been 
drawn up, a constitution formulated, 
and more than 300 schools, seminars, 
conferences and conventions have de- 
bated the proposal. Supporters of the 
new party believe that in neither of 
the "old parties," the Liberals or Con- 
servatives, is labor welcomed except 
for the votes that it brings. When in 
power the old parties listen much 
more readily to business interests and 
business money than to the trade 
union movement. 

As an important group in the com- 
munity, organized labor has much to 
offer Canada's political life. Thus, new 
party advocates claim, we should have 
a party of our own— not only to en- 
sure better labor laws (which are des- 
perately needed in most provinces), 
but also to forward labor's broader 
goals, social security, full employment 
and human rights. Trade unions have 
proposals to make regarding unem- 
ployment, slums, ill health, and fall- 
ing educational standards. 

The old parties don't seem too inter- 
ested in these proposals, so organized 
labor, as a body of responsible citi- 
zens, should form a party with other 
like-minded groups to bring these 
ideas into the councils of government. 



At the 1980 CLC convention, the 
delegates voted almost unanimously 
to authorize a founding convention of 
the party, probably in 1961. While the 
founding convention will determine 
the official policy and constitution of 
the party, a number of points of in- 
terest are already evident. There ap- 
pears to be general acceptance of the 
idea, for example, that one can join 
the party either as an individual or 
through one's union. 

In the latter case, a union wiU vote 
on the question of affiliation and if 
that decision is affirmative, each mem- 
ber, unless he signifies otherwise, will 
become an affiliate member of the new 
party. His union or local will send to 
the party 60 cents a year as member- 
ship fees. In other words, unionists 
will be encouraged to support the 
party, but if they wish, they can pull 
out. No one will have to pay money 
to the party against his wishes and he 
certainly won't have to vote for it. 

The membership of the Canadian 
Labor Congress is 1,100,000. And most 
of these members have, tlirough their 
delegates to conventions or at their 
own conventions, signified their sym- 
pathy with the general idea of a trade 
union-sponsored party in Canada. Yet 
it is also clear that the union move- 
ment alone cannot hope to win politi- 
cal power in Canada. Only with the 
cooperation of other "liberally-mind- 
ed" Canadians will the new party 
become one of the major political par- 
ties in the country. 

It is said that there is no difference 
between the Liberals and Conserva- 
tives—that the ballot therefore has 
little meaning. The union movement 
in Canada is determined to correct 
that condition and provide for the 
Canadian electorate a strong, effec- 
tive and progressive alternative to the 
existing governments, whatever politi- 
cal name they parade under. 



10 



Progress Report 

Here is the way our new headquarters building appeared on July 15. Obvi- 
ously, another month will see the exterior pretty well completed and the cam- 
eraman will face the difficult task of taking inside pictures to show the progress 
of the buildins; as it is being finished out. 




iTI WL ISaD^LWITEPj bUiLDINS 
. l■^1T^i.mX!L, OARPE..TtRo i JOINERJ 

J., U. C. 
' u I RXK, AfiCHITECTci 
.. jLPE vJlPAW 
0TH,156o PHjTQ NO. ..50 




KiTtflNATIONM ^EAa(UM^TD^S BUIUJINO 
HlXABIRO > ftXK, hwiiioan 

MM A. t<ut. pagwg ^ 



11 



Redevelopment— Challenge Of Our Time 



• • • 



K I ^ HE middle years of the Twentiedi Centuiy have become known as the 
I "Space Age." In most respects the name is appropriate. We have mis- 
-»- siles that can be hurled into the outer atmosphere. We have planes 
that can fly faster than sound, and the airfields to accommodate them. We have 
factories to turn out the marvelous gadgets that sever all connections with the 
past. 

However, there is one area where the title "Space Age" is misapplied. That 
is in the development and growth of our cities. The cramped, crowded, and 
often dilapidated metropolitan centers of our day scarcely have a nodding 
acquaintance with "space." Designed in a horse and buggy era, most cities 




are ill equipped to cope with the 
automobile, let alone the airplane and 
the missile. Streets are too narrow, 
parking space is inadequate, and 
buildings are outmoded and ineffi- 
cient. Housing accommodations— some 
dating back to the Spanish-American 
War— are decrepit and obsolete in vast 
sections of the average city. 

Practically all of our cities were 
born in the 18th and 19th centuries. 
They were planned and laid out to 
fit a horse and buggy economy. As 
science and technology drastically 
changed conditions, the cities patched 
and improvised. They tackled the im- 
mediate problems and allowed the 




The photo on the left pictures the general 
condition of the neighborhood at 22nd & the 
Parkway before being purchased by the Author- 
ity for redeveloping. 

The photo above is the same area after the 
site had been improved with four apartment 
buildings containing 970 units, underground 
parking, shopping center, and swimming pool. 

long-range problems to fend for them- 
selves. The result has been a patch- 
work and hodgepodge of moderniza- 
tion on a hit-or-miss basis. 

But now time on improvisation and 
expediency has run out. Great sec- 
tions of most cities have to be razed 
and rebuilt with modern structures. 
Happily, most cities are awake to 
the problems facing them. Over 400 
American cities have redevelopment 
boards in operation today. All of these 
boards are struggling with problems 
of rehabilitating slum areas and re- 
placing them with Twentieth Cen- 
tury structures. 



12 



TirE CARPENTER 



B\ and large, these redevelopment 
commissions are doing an excellent 
job— especially when the enormity of 
the task facing them is taken into con- 
sideration. Many members of our own 
organization are serving as commis- 
sioners in various cities. 

Philadelphia is a case in point. 
Brother Bob Gray, secretary-treasurer 
of the Metropolitan District Council, 
long has served as a member of the 
Philadelphia Redevelopment Board. 



work because of the contribution he 
is making toward its rebirth." 

Since its inception the Philadelphia 
Board has transformed many slum- 
ridden sections of the city into mod- 
ern housing and industrial develop- 
ments. The dramatic "before" and "af- 
ter" pictures accompanying this arti- 
cle demonstrate some of the spectacu- 
lar changes that have been made. As 
secretary of the Board, Brother Gray 
signed contracts putting some $700,- 




Another accomplishment of Redevelopment was the reclaiming of the land shown above beingr 
used for squatters' shacks — to make it available for the building of the new Food Distribution 
Center. 

j^t the same time, the moving of these merchants from Dock St., made that area available for a 
50 miilion dollar project.^Washington Square East^which is now in the land-clearing stage. 



Recently the Mayor reappointed him 
for another five-year term. In mak- 
ing the appointment, Mayor Dil worth 
said: 

"He is a constant fighter for the la- 
boring man— who is also concerned 
with the over-all welfare of our great 
cit}'. I am happy and proud to reap- 
point him to this vital agency job with 
full knowledge and confidence that 
Philadelphia will become increasingly 
a better place in which to live and 



000,000 worth of redevelopment work 
into operation over the past five years. 
In the process, thousands of jobs for 
our members were created. 

Some of the major projects under- 
written by the Philadelphia Redevel- 
opment Authority include: 

1. A $100 million city project in 
the southeastern part of the city, 
which changed 380 acres of swamp- 
lands, burning dumps and squatters' 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



shacks into an efficient "Food Distri- 
bution Center," first of its kind in the 
United States. 

2. Park Towne Place, a $17 milHon 
improvement to the town's Parkway, 
This 18-story luxury apartment project 
with shopping colony, swimming pool 
and other modern facilities replaced 
old-fashioned brownstones, two junk- 
yards, and a vulcanizing factory. 

3. Washington Square East rede- 
velopment project, bordering Phila- 
delphia's Sixth Sti-eet, where build- 
ings are being razed to make way for 
apartments, town houses, and reha- 
bilitated colonial structures. This proj- 
ect alone will add nearly 1500 dwell- 
ing units to the city's housing inven- 
tory—bringing the City more taxes 
and building-trades workers more 
jobs. The total cost is estimated at 
nearly $50 million. 

In an article published in "On The 
Square," the sprightly little paper put 
out by the Metropolitan District 
Council, Second General Vice Presi- 



dent O. William Blaier emphasized 
the need for officers of our organiza- 
tion becoming active in redevelop- 
ment work in their localities. Vice 
President Blaier pointed out that most 
cities need to be completely rebuilt 
to meet the growing demands of pop- 
ulation increases. How fast this will 
be done depends on the effectiveness 
of the redevelopment commissions. By 
serving on such boards our members 
can hasten the process. 

"Our Brotherhood has never oper- 
ated in a vacuum," Brother Blaier 
pointed out. We should continue to 
help, as we have in the past, to bring 
a better way of Iffe to everyone, 
everywhere. When we do this, we 
ourselves— directly or indirectly— 
benefit by these activities. 

"More construction work for our 
members— to build a better city 
through redevelopment— is a good ex- 
ample of how a service to the com- 
munity can, at the same time, be a 
benefit to the membership." 



UNION LABEL PRESIDENT JOHN J. MARA IS DEAD 

President John J. Mara of the AFL-CIO Union Label and Service Trades De- 
partment, who also was president of the Boot and Shoe Workers, died at Wellesley, 
Massachusetts, last month at the age of 73. 

Mr. Mara, who was a union man for more tlian half a century, had a distinguished 
career in the service both of die Boot and Shoe Workers and in the union label 
department, where he fought vigorously for the union label. 

Joining the Boot and Shoe Workers in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1905, Mr. Mara 
worked his way up in various local offices, attended all the conventions of his union 
as a delegate since 1919, and became president of the union in 1929. 

He became a 5th vice president of the Union Label and Service Trades Depart- 
ment in 1932, and was elected president by Board action in 1956 on the death of the 
late President Matthew WoU. He was re-elected to the presidency last year. 



1959 PROFITS UP THREE TIMES AS MUCH AS WAGES 

Corporation profits during 1959 went up three times as much as did wages and salaries 
during the same year. 

Revised statistics of the Department of Commerce show that wages and salaries ad- 
vanced more than $20 billion during the year for a gain of 8 per cent. Profits after taxes in- 
creased $4.7 billion over 1958 for a gain of 25 per cent. Interest income, profiting by "tight 
money" policies of the present Administration, increased $1.7 billion for a gain of 11%. 

Gross national product for 1959 was $482 billion with the national income reaching 
$400 billion, both figures setting a new high record. Constant dollar gross national prod- 
uct was 7 per cent higher tlian in 1958. 



Official Information 




General OflScers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



Gexekal Officb : Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Gexeuai, Pkksiuent 

M. A. HUTCHEbON 

Carpenters' Building. Indiunapolis, Ind. 



First Genekai. Vice President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Generai, Secuetauy 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice President 

O. WM. BLAIER 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Generai, Treasurer 

PRANK CHAPMAN 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



District Board Members 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22ud St., New Yorli 10, N. Y. 



Sixth District, J. O. MACK 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 



.Second District, RALEIGH RA.IOPPI 
I'rosiiect I'lace, Springfield, New Jersey 



Seventli District, LYLE J. HILLER 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland G6, Ore. 



Tliird District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
oOlo Cliester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 



Eighth District, J. F. CAMBIANO 
17 Aragou Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 



Fuurth District, HENRY ^V. CHANDLER 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Ninth District, ANDREW V. COOPER 
13.3 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., Canada 



Fifth District, LEON W. GREENE 
lb Norbert Place, St. Paul 1(5, xVliuu. 



Tenth District, GEORGE BENGOUGH 
2o28 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. HLTCllESON, Chairman ; R. B. LIVINGSTON, Secretary 
All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



LOCAL UNIONS CHARTERED 

1163 Rochester, New York 2764 Cuba, New Mexico 

2813 Memphis, Tennessee 3270 Page, Arizona 

1189 Colimibia County, Ohio 2774 Pinellas Park, Florida 

2792 Sorel, Quebec, Canada 2795 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

In the issuance of clearance cards, care should be taken to see that they are 
properly filled out, dated and signed by the President and Financial Secretary 
of the Local Union issuing same as well as the Local Union accepting the clear- 
ance. The clearance cards must be sent to the General Secretary's Department 
without delay, in order that the members' names can be listed on the quarterly 
account sheets. 

While old style Due Book is in use, clearance cards contained therein 
must be used. 



THECARPENTER 15 

Proposed Changes in Our Constitution and Laws 

The following changes in our Constitution and Laws have been proposed by various 
subordinate bodies in accordance with the provisions set forth in the Convention Call. 
Whenever new phraseology is proposed, the new language is printed in bold face type. 

Submitted by Calgary District Council, Calgary, Alta., Can. 

Proposing that this convention amend Section 2, "Objects of the General Constitution" 
to provide for and definitely outline adequate education in the duties of Local Unions, 
District, State and Provincial Council officers as an object of our United Brotherhood, and 

allocate responsibility for same. 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Local Union 1735, Prince Rupert, B. C, Canada. 

Proposing to amend that part of Section 3 entitled "Labor Legislation" to read as 
follows: 

Labor Legislation 
"Resolved, That it is of the greatest importance that members vote intelligently, hence 
the members of this Brotherhood shall strive to secure legislation in favor of those who 
produce the wealth of the country, and all discussions and resolutions in that direction 
shall be in order at any regular meeting, but party politics must be excluded, except that, 
where a party is endorsed by the Canadian Labour Congress in Canada or the AFL-CIO 
in the United States, sympathetic to Labor and our objectives. Local Unions and their 
members may actively support candidates of such party to assure they are elected to 
office in the government of the country." 

Also submitted by Vancouver, New Westminster and Fraser Valley D. C, Vancouver, 

B. C, Can. 

ft « * « « 

Submitted by the Northern Ontario District Council. 

Proposing that this Special Convention of our Brotherhood amend that portion of 
Section 3 titled "Labor Legislation" by deleting the words, "but party politics must be 
excluded" for Canadian Locals, and further, that our ritual be amended so as to delete 
all reference to politics or political opinions except those concerning Communism in the 
preamble to the obligation for Canadian Locals. 

« # # # # 

Submitted by the Northern Ontario District Council. 

Proposing that that part of Section 3 of our Constitution titled, "Our Principles", be 
amended to read: 

"Resolved, That we, as a body thoroughly approve of the objects of the AFL-CIO 
and the Canadian Labour Congress, and pledge ourselves to give them our earnest and 

hearty support." 

« » <f « t» 

Submitted by Local Union 2486, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. 

Proposing that the last six words in the paragraph titled, "Labor Legislation", in Sec- 
tion 3 be deleted and that the word, "political", be deleted from Paragraph A of Section 
58, and also delete the words, "partisan politics" from paragraph F, Section 58. 

« # » « # 

Submitted by Local Union 681, Oakville, Ontario, Canada. 

Proposing that all clauses in the General Constitution and Laws restraining members 
from political activity be deleted and, specifically, that the clause, "but party politics 
must be excluded," shall be deleted from the paragraph titled "Labor Legislation" on 
page 3; that the words, "or for political" be deleted from Section 58 A; that the words, 
"for partisan politics or" be deleted from Parliamentary Rule 4." 

ft # # » » 

Submitted by Vancouver, New Westminster and Fraser Valley D. C, Vancouver, B. C. Can. 
Proposing we change the third paragraph of Section 3 of tlie Constitution and Laws 
of the United Brotherhood as follows: 

"That it is of the greatest importance that members vote intelligently, hence the mem- 
bers of this Brotherhood shall strive to secure legislation in favor of those who pro- 



16 THECARPENTER 

chite the wealth of the country, and all discussions and resolutions in that direction shall 
be in order at any regular meeting, but party politics must be excluded, except that, 
where a party is endorsed by the Canadian Labour Congress in Canada or the A. F. of L.- 
C. I. O. in the United States, sympathetic to Labor and our objectives, Local Unions 
and their members may actively support candidates of such party to assure they are 
elected to office in the Government of the country." 

Also submitted by Local Union 1735, Prince Rupert, B. C, Can. 

« « « « » 

Submitted by LoCal Union 343, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can. 

Proposing that Section 3 be amended as follows: 

Strike out all words after "legislation" in the third line and replace with the following 
sentence: 

"From any Political Party whose policy is favorable to the Trade Union Movement, 
provided it is in no way connected with the Communist or any other Revolutionary 

Part\." 

«t # « # # 

Submitted by Local Union 262, San Jose, Calif. 

Proposing that a new subsection be added to Sec. 6 as follows: 

"The General President together with the General Executive Board shall establish and 

define the jurisdiction of each segment of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 

Joiners of America." 

« # « # # 

Subiiiitted by Indiana State Council. 

Proposing that Section 7, Paragraph B, be amended to read as follows: 

"When the term 'carpenter and joiner' is used, it shall mean all the industrial workers 

and sub-diWsions of the trade and so stamped on due book to designate same." 

# # * # # 

Submitted by Local Union 343, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can. 

Proposing to amend Section 7, by adding Paragraph C as follows: 

"That any Local Union of our Brotherhood shall upon request to the Jurisdictional 
Committee of the General Executive Board be supplied with copies of any or all Agree- 
ments and Rulings pertaining to Jurisdictional Disputes." 

# « # » # 

Submitted by the Northern Ontario District Council. 

ProiDosing to amend Section 8, Paragraph A, to recognize the difference in government 
and laws between the United States and Canada, and proposing that our Constitution be 
divided into live parts, viz. . . Constitution; General By-Laws, U.S.A.; General By-Laws, 
Canada; General Laws, U.S.A.; and General Laws, Canada, so there will be no confusion 
as there is at present when some section of the Constitution cannot apply due to Gov- 
ernmental Laws and there will be no danger of vicious, anti-labor legislation in either 
country being enforced on the members in another country. 

# # # « # 

Submitted by Local Union No. 1735, Prince Rupert, B. C., Canada. 

Proposing that Section 9 of the General Constitution be amended so that Board 
Members be elected by a referendum vote of the members in the district to be represented 
and any eligible member may be nominated by his own Local to stand for said office. 

# » # o « 

Submitted by Local Union 1280, Mountain View, Gal. 

Proposing Section 9, Paragraph A be amended to read as follows: 
General Officers of the United Brotherhood shall consist of a General President, First 
and Second General Vice-Presidents, a General Secretary, a General Treasurer, and an 
Executive Board of one member from each district of the United Brotherhood, who shall 
be exempt from all duties in their respective Local Unions and shall n6t hold office in any 
subordinate organization chartered under the Constitution and Laws of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 



THE CARPENTER 17 

Submitted by Local Union 35, San Rafael, Cal. 

Proposing that Section 9, Paragraph B of the General Constitution be amended to 
read as follows: 

"The General Officers except members of the General Executive Board, shall be elected 
at the General Convention by a plurality vote of the delegates present and voting by secret 
ballot. Each Executive Board member shall be elected at the General Convention by a 
plurality vote of the delegates present from his district alone and voting by secret ballot. 
The nominations shall be made on the third day of the first week of the Convention and 
tlie election shall be held on the fourth day of the first week of the Convention." 

Also submitted by Local Union No. 1710, Mill Valley, Cal. 

« * « « o 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Cal. 

Proposing to amend Section 9, Paragraph B, by striking out the first two lines and 
the first three words and the period in line three and inserting the following wording: 

"The General President, the First and Second Vice Presidents, the General Secretary, 
and the General Treasirrer shall be elected at the Convention by a plurality of the dele- 
gates present and voting by secret ballot. An Executive Board of one member from each 
district who shall be members of the General Officers of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America shall be elected by the delegates of the individual districts 
at the General Convention by a plurality vote of the delegates from each district present 
and voting by secret ballot." 

» # « # ft 

Submitted by Local Union 681, Oakville, Ont., Canada. 

Proposing that the following sentence be added to tlie end of Section 9, Paragraph B: 
"All delegates shall be entitled to vote for General Officers, but for General Executive 

Board members only those delegates from the district involved shall be entitled to vote." 

Submitted by Local Union 1280, Mountain View, Cal. 

Proposing Section 9, Paragraph B, be amended to read as follows: 

"The General Officers, with the exception of the Executive Board members, shall be 
elected at the General Convention by a plurality vote of the Delegates present and voting 
by secret ballot. The Executive Board members will be elected at the General Conven- 
tion by the Delegates of the Local Unions within the District the Board member will repre- 
sent and by a plurality vote of the aforementioned Delegates present and voting by a 
secret ballot. The nominations shall be made on the third day of the first week of the 
Convention and the election shall be held on the fourth day of the first week of the 
Convention;" 

Also proposing if this Section is further amended and this Constitutional Amendment 
is carried, the intent of this Section shall be clearly codified into our Constitution and Laws. 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Local Union 2203, Anaheim, CaUf. 

Proposing Section 9, Paragraph C, be re- written as follows: 

"The election shall be conducted by an Election Committee, the members of which 
shall be appointed by the General President. No nominee for General Office shall be eli- 
gible to serve on said Committee. Upon completion of the tabvdation of votes, the Election 
Committee shall report to the General President the names of the General Officers elected 
and the same shall be reported to the Convention, and those elected shall hold office for 
a maximum of two (2) terms of four years duration each, after which time, their successors 
must be duly chosen and qualified." 

Also proposing that this rule shall apply to nomination and Election in Subordinate 
Bodies with the exception of the Trustees, who shall be elected in such manner that tlie 
term of one trustee shall expire annually. 

« * « « 9 

Submitted by the Northern Ontario District Council. 

Proposing that Section 9, Paragraph G, be amended to allow semi-beneficial members 
to stand for election as General Officers. 



IS TIIECAKPEXTEIl 

Si?bmitted by Local Union 2486, Sudbury, Ont., Canada. 

Proposing to amend Section 9, Paragraph G, by deleting the entire paragraph and 
substituting therefor the following language: 

"All members shall be eligible for nomination and election as a General Officer." 

« « « « 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif, 

Proposing that Section 15, Paragraph A, be amended by adding the following wording 
at the end of the paragraph: "As provided in Section 9-B of the International Constitution 
and B>-Laws." 

» « » « » 

Submitted by Local Union 35, San Rafael, Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 18, Paragraph A, by inserting the following sentence 
after the first sentence: "Such Convention shall be held not more than once in any District 
until there has been a Convention held in each District of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America." 

The entire paragraph, as amended, would read as follows: 

The United Brotherhood shall meet in General Convention quadrennially, on a date 
set by the General Executive Board, and the Board shall provide a suitable place for hold- 
ing such Convention. Such Convention shall be held not more than once in any District 
imtil there has been a Convention held in each District of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. The General Convention, while in session, shall be 
vested with all the legislative and judicial authority of the United Brotherhood. The 
General President, the General Secretary, and the General Treasurer shall act as the Com- 
mittee on Credentials one day in advance of the Convention." 

Also submitted by Local Union No. 1710, Mill Valley, Calif. 

« « * « * 

Submitted by Summit, Medina and Portage Counties District Council, Ohio. 

Proposing to amend Section 26, Paragraph D, of the General Constitution by having 
the following paragraph added: 

"When a District Council Charter is issued, all the autonomy of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America be granted with the Charter, within the territorial 
bounds, granted to the District Council." 

The paragraph then will read as follows: 

The jurisdiction of the District Council shall be as provided for by the Constitution and 
Laws of the United Brotherhood and named in their Charter. When a District Council 
Charter is issued, all the autonomy of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America be granted with the Charter, within the territorial bounds, granted to the District 
Council. 

# # # # « 

Submitted by Indiana State Council. 

Proposal to study Section 26, Paragraph F. 

We the Indiana State Council of Carpenters would like to recommend to the Consti- 
tution Committee, to study Section 26, Paragraph F of the Constitution and Laws of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, and make the necessary 
changes so that all members in the Brotherhood have representation for taxation paid. 

« » # # « 

Submitted by Northern Ontario D. C. 

Proposing Section 29 of the Constitution shall be amended to read: 

"More than one Local Union may be chartered in the same city, provided no reason- 
able objections are offered by the Local Union or District Council in said locality. More 
than one Local Union will not be chartered to accommodate a separation or segregation of 
workmen on the basis of race, colour, creed, or national origin." 



THE CARPENTER 19 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 31, Paragraph A and B, to specifically designate whether 
the elected office of business representative is part of the "officers" and whether it is en- 
titled to an equal voice and vote with the officers at all times. 

# * * « » 

Submitted by Local Union 701, Fresno, Calif. 

Proposing amendment of Section 31, Paragraph A, to read as follows: 
"The officers of a Local Union shall be a President, Vice-President, Recording Secre- 
tary, Financial Secretary, Treasurer, Conductor, Warden and three Trustees, and shall 
constitute the Executive Board of the Local Union and be responsible for the afFairs of the 
Union. Business Representatives can be invited in when needed." 

# # # # * 

Submitted by Local Union 1478, Redondo, Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 31, Paragraph A, to read as follows: 

"The officers of a Local Union shall be a President, Vice-President, Recording Secretary, 
Financial Secretary, Treasurer, Conductor, Warden, Business Representative or Represen- 
tatives and three Trustees. Seven members shall constitute a quorum. 

Proposing also that the General Constitution be amended accordingly to conform with 
this amendment. 

# » # # « 

Submitted by Local Union 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 31, paragraph D, by adding the words, "retired members 
excepted" after the word, " Organization", line seven. 

ft « # # # 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council, Calif. 

Proposed that the following clarification be inserted in Section 31, Paragraph D; after 
the word "organization": 

"nor shall a contracting member be eligible unless notification is given to the Local 
Union in wnriting twelve consecutive months in advance of nominations to the effect that 
he is no longer engaged in contracting work. In States where contractors' licenses are re- 
quired, it will necessitate cancellation of that license twelve consecutive months prior to 
nominations." 

# # ft # * 

Submitted by Local Union 25, Los Angeles 57, Calif. 

Proposing Section 31, Paragraph D be changed to read as follows: 

"Any member in good standing, with membership of at least three years in the United 

Brotherhood and at least 12 months consecutive membership in the Local Union prior to 

nomination, shall be eligible to run for office, unless he holds a contractor's license or is 

retired." 

ft ft ft ft ft 

Submitted by Local Union 701, Fresno, Calif. 

Proposing the amendment of Section 31, Paragraph F, to read: 

"When there are more than two candidates for the same office, and no one receives a 
majority of all votes cast, a run-olf election will be held between the two candidates 
having the highest vote, except when the Australian ballot system is used; then the candi- 
date receiving the highest number of votes shall be declared elected. 

ft ft ft ft ft 

Submitted by Local Union 314, Madison, Wise. 

Proposing that the Convention go on record changing Section 32, Paragraph B of tlie 
Constitution to comply with the Labor-Management Disclosures Act of 1959 if an election 
must be held, and 

Further proposing that if the unexpired term be one year or less the President may 
fill the vacancy pro tem. 



20 T II K C A K P E N T E R 

Subirdtted by the Los Angeles County District Council of Carpenters, Calif. 

Proposing that a portion of Section 36, Paragraph C, after the word, "employed", on 
the sL\th line, be deleted in its entirety, thus making Paragraph C to read as follows: 

"The Financial Secretary shall not accept dues from any member working or residing in 
any other district unless said dues are accompanied with a statement from the Business 
Representative or Secretary of the Local Union or District Council that the member is 
complying with the rules of the locality where the member resides or is employed." 

Further proposing to delete the following: "The Financial Secretary shall not re- 
cei\e the dues of members in the interim between meetings. After the last meeting in the 
mondi. the Financial Secretary shall receive dues at home or office up to and including 

the last day of the month." 

« » # « » 

Submitted by the Monterey Bay District Council of Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 36, paragraph C, by deleting the second and third sentences. 

» « * * « 

Submitted by the Los Angeles County District Council, Calif. 

Proposing that Section 40, Paragraph C, be changed to read as follows: 
"The Trustees shall audit all books and accounts of the Financial Secretary and 
Treasurer, and examine the bank book of the Treasurer monthly, and see that it is correct, 
and shall report to the Local Union in writing, unless an outside auditor is employed by 
the Local Union. They shall also report semi-annually to the General Secretary on forms 
supplied from the General Office and shall see that all officers required under law are 
bonded through the General Office, and perform such other duties as are provided for in 
the Constitution and Laws of the United Brotherhood, and perform any other duties their 
Local Union may direct. The Trustees shall be responsible for the audit of all receipts and 
accounts of any other persons authorized to collect fimds." 

# « * # # 

Submitted by Northern Ontario D. C. 

Proposing Section 42, Paragraph J shall be amended to read: 

"Candidates applying for admission in any Local Union under the jurisdiction of the 
United Brotherhood, must be citizens of one of the Countries included in said jurisdiction, 
or, must furnish proof of their intentions to become citizens in the Country where they 
make application for membership. Candidates shall not be denied the right to member- 
ship because of the particular race, colour, creed or national origin. 

"All applications of candidates shall give the date and place of court wherein they 
took out their first citizenship papers, and after five years from the said date, if they 
have not taken out their final papers, they shall be dropped from the roll of organization." 

# # # # # 

Submitted by the Los Angeles County District Council, Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 42, Paragraph K, to establish the age of apprentices as 
between seventeen and thirty years. 

Also proposing that the financial structure of Section 42, Paragraph K, be revised to read 
as follows: 

"The minimum initiation fee for a fii'st-year apprentice shall be not less than 25% 
of journeyman fee. When admitted as a second-year apprentice, or advanced to second- 
year apprentice, an additional 25% of journeyman, or a total of 50%, initiation fee shall 
be paid. When admitted as a third-year apprentice, or advanced to third-year apprentice, 
an additional 25% of journeyman initiation fee shall be paid, making, a total of 75% 
of journeyman initiation fee. When admitted as a fourth-year apprentice, or advanced to 
fourth-year apprentice, an additional 12 12 % of journeyman initiation fee shall be paid, or 
a total of 87 ^2 % of journeyman initiation fee. An apprentice before receiving a journey- 
man's card, must have 100% of the journeyman initiation fee paid." 

« « « ft « 

Submitted by Local Union 751, Santa Rosa, Calif. 

Proposing that Section 42, Paragraph K, Line two (2) be amended to read: 
" eighteen (18) and thirty (30) years may be admitted to member " 



THE CARPENTER 21 

Submitted by Local Union 1280, Mountain View, Cal. 

Proposing Section 42, Paragraph M of the General Constitution be amended to read 
as follows: 

All Apprentices shall hold Agreement between the Apprentice Committee of the Dis- 
trict Council or Local Union having jurisdiction and the Employer, and when Federal and 
State Laws govern apprenticeship an apprentice shall hold Agreement as required in said 
Laws. Any Apprentice who violates a valid Agreement shall be subject to charges and 
trials as outUned in the General Constitution and if found guilty of violation of this Sec- 
tion may be expelled from the Brotherhood. 

"Any Apprentice who can be continuously employed by one Employer and who 
violates such Agreement may be expelled or debarred from further membership in the 
United Brotherhood, urdess such Apprentice shall have sufficient cause to make complaint 
to the District Council or Local Union or Joint Apprentice Committee against the Em- 
ployer and the complaint upon investigation is sustained." 

# e # # « 

Submitted by the San Diego County District Council, Cal. 

Proposing that Section 42, Paragraph V, be changed to eliminate the phrase, "or any 
mixed union of building tradesmen". The paragraph then would read as follows: 

"No member of the United Brotherhood can remain in or become a member of more 
than one Local Union of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, or 
any other organization of carpenters and joiners, under penalty of expulsion. Any member 
who accepts employment under non-union conditions during the time of a strike or lock- 
out, shall not be entitled to any donations." 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council, Calif. 

Proposed that Section 43 Paragraph B, be changed to read: 

"The application of the candidate (except first year apprentices), must be presented 
to the Financial Secretary with the full initiation fee, which shall be not less than Fifteen 
($15.00) Dollars and a sum equal to the current month's dues, and before the candidate 
can be obligated, shall lay over one week for investigation, and shall be referred to a 
special committee of three, who shall in the meantime inquire into the candidate's quali- 
fications to become a member and report at the next regular meeting of the Local Union, 
making such recommendations as they deem proper, or the candidate may be elected 
and initiated at the same meeting if the investigating committee reports favorably." 

# e * « « 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council, Calif. 

Proposed that Section 43, Paragraph F be changed to read as follows: 
"When an applicant for initiation has reached the age of sixty (60) years or over, or 
who has received disability donations, said applicant shall be admitted only as an honor- 
ary member at a fee of not less than $25.00, etc." 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council, Calif. 

Proposing that the last sentence of Section 43, Paragraph Q, be amended to read as 
follows: 

"A contracting member, or member holding a valid contractor's license in States where 
same is required by law, shall not be eligible as an officer or delegate of the Local Union, 
or eligible to vote for officers, and shall not have a vote on the wage question." 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Indiana State Council. 

Proposed that Section 44, Paragraph A of the Constitution and Laws of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America be amended to read as follows. 

Beneficial and semi-beneficial members shall not pay less than Three Dollars ($3.00) per 
month dues, excepting retired and pension members which shall be left to the discretion 
of the local um'on. Five Cents (.05c) of which shall be paid by each of such members as 
subscription to the official monthly journal, "The Carpenter", and shall be so applied. No 
officer or member shall be exempt from paying dues or assessment, nor shall the same be 
remitted or cancelled in anv manner. 



22 Til E C A K P E N T E R 

Submitted by Local Union 230, Waterbury, Conn. 

Proposal to amend Section 44, Paragraph A as follows: Beneficial and Semi-Beneficial 

members or be cancelled in any manner. Pension Members shall be exempt from 

pa>ing Per Capita Tax to the General Office. 

« * » * » 

Submitted by Local Union 452, Vancouver, B. C, Can. 

Proposed that Section 44 A be amended as follows: Add the words "Except that any 
member showing proof to the Financial Secretary of not having worked for any full cal- 
endar month shall pay not less than one dollar ($1.00) per month dues", after the words 
'per month dues' in the second line. 

» « « « « 

Submitted by Local Union 72, Rochester, N. Y. 

Amend Section 44, par. A by: 

Deleting the word "No officer or member shall be exempt from paying dues or 
assessments, nor shall the same be cancelled in any manner." 

Add the following: 

"When a member has had 40 years of continuous membership and has reached the 
age of 70 years, he shall be given a life membership in the United Brotherhood and no 
further dues or per capita tax shall be charged against him by any Local Union, District 
Council or the International Office." 

Submitted by Local Union 452, Vancouver, B. C, Can. 

Proposed that Section 44 C of the Constitution and Laws be amended as foUov/s: 
Add at the end of the Clause the words "Except that any member showing proof to the 
Financial Secretary of not having worked for any full calendar month will be charged 
onh- sixty cents (60c) per capita for that month. The sixty cents (60c) to be placed in the 
special fund for 'Home and Pension' purposes ". 

» » a # ft 

Submitted by Local Union 1735, Prince Rupert, B. C. 

Amend Section 44, Paragraph A to read as follows: 

"Beneficial and semi-beneficial members shall pay not less than Three Dollars ($3.00) 
per month dues. Five Cents (5c) of which shall be paid by each of such members as sub- 
scription to the official monthly Journal, "The Carpenter", and shall be so applied. 

No officer or member shall be exempt from paying dues or assessments, nor shall tlie 
same be remitted or cancelled in any manner." 

.•Use submitted by Vancouver, New Westminster and Fraser Valley D. C, Can. 

« # # « » 

Submitted by Finger Lakes D. C, Geneva, N. Y. 

Amend Section 44, Paragraph C, as follows: 

Pro\ide for an adequate increase in per capita tax to make such a Thirty Dollar 
(S3U.O0) a month pension possible. 

ft « # # « 
Submitted by Finger Lakes D. C, Geneva, N. Y. 

Amend Section 44, Paragraph C to pro\ide for an adequate increase in per capita 
tax to make change in Section 54, Paragraph D possible. 

e * * » » 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council. 

^\mend Section 44, Paragraph F. 

Proposed that the General Office allow a credit of two months' tax in cases where it was 
paid on a member who never pays any of his arrearages and goes suspended, except in 
cases where benefits have been provided under the provisions of the Constitution, such as 
funeral or disability benefits, prior to members going in arrears. 



THE CARPENTER 23 

Submitted by Local Union 1478, Redondo, Calif. 

Amend Paragraph F of Section 44 to read as follows: 

A member who owes a sum equal to three (3) months dues must be reported to the 
General Secretary as being in arrears for the third (3) month and per capita tax shall be 
deducted for that month and at this time the General Secretary shall credit the Local 
Union with two (2) months payment per capita tax. 

» » » » » 

Submitted by Local Union 1205, Indio, Calif. 

Proposed that Section 44 F be amended as follows: 

Charge each member going in arrears the sum of $10.00 additional to be paid when 
arrears are squared, and that a member owing a Local Union four months' dues be 
charged an additional $5.00 to be paid when arrears are squared. Above $10.00 or $15.00 
to be used by Local Unions for general operating expense of the Local Union. 

Above amendment concurred in by San Bernardino and Riverside Counties D. C, Cal. 

# » # # # 

Submitted by Local Union 2410, Red Deer, Alberta, Can. 

Amend Section 44, Paragraph (g) and Section 44, Paragraph (h) by adding after the 
word "district" on the second line of both Section 44, Paragraph (g) and Section 44, Para- 
graph (h) the words, "State or Provincial Council". 

Also submitted by Calgary D. C, Alta., Can. 

Also submitted by Local Union 1779, Calgary, Alta., Can. 

Also submitted by Local Union 2103, Calgary, Alta., Can. 

Also submitted by Local Union 2560, Calgary, Alta., Can. 

# # # » « 

Submitted by Local Union 2006, Los Gatos, Calif. 

Proposing that Section 45 be amended to include Paragraph C as follows: 

"Any member suspended for non payment of dues, may apply for reinstatement with all 

benefits, vdthin ninety (90) days of suspension, upon the payment of all arrearages and 

twenty-five dollars ($25.00) reinstatement fee." 

« # # # # 

Submitted by Local Union 72, Rochester, N. Y, 

Amend Section 45, par. A as follows: 

"A member who owes the Local Union two months dues shall be notified by mail at 
the last known address by the Financial Secretary during the third month of such delin- 
quency." 

Add the following: 

"but no member shall be notified more than once in any three month period." 

« » # # # 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council, Los Angeles Calif. 

Proposing that the $5.00 reinstatement fee be handled through the General Office, and 
that Section 45, Paragraph B, be changed to require the Local Union accepting the mem- 
ber to collect and forward to the International Secretary this Five ($5.00) dollar fee; and 

That the International Secretary, upon receiving the application, inform the Local 
Union where membership was formerly held that this person has rejoined and the Local 
has been credited for the Five ($5.00) dollars. A credit slip could be enclosed that this 
Local could use when paying their next payment of per capita tax. 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Los Angeles District Council, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Proposing that Section 45, Paragraph B be changed to read as follows: 

"Members owing a Local Union a sum equal to six (6) months' dues shall ha^■e their 

names stricken from the list of membership immediately following the last day of the sixth 

(6th) month without a vote of the Local Union, etc." 

f Continued on page 28) 



Editorial 




Nigerian School Needs More Books 
In the May issue we published an appeal from the Community Grammar 
School in East Nigeria for trade and technical books. Apparently the response 
has been good. Recently, Dr. Ben Nzeribe, head of the school, wrote a letter 
of thanks that points up the handicaps faced by the struggling young institu- 
tion. Here are a few excerpts: 

"This letter is focused on the library and the consignment of excellent 
books and funds which you recently sent to us. Our school library now has 
about 1400 volumes. Though it is a modest library by American standards, 
it is a truly fine one by Nigerian standards. In number and range we have 
one of the finest libraries in the Eastern region, exceeded only by a few gov- 
ernment-operated institutions in the largest cities. . . . 

'It seems that libraries and laboratories are the keys to much of the Ni- 
gerian student's problems. His childhood has not been full of erector sets, 
junior chemistry labs, block, or any toys for that matter. The bright story 
books and picture books and the literature which often make an American 
childhood an exciting adventure, are non-existent here. This might help to 
explain why it is so difficult for him to visualize scientific ideas and grasp 
their practical applications. 

"A lab or library could do a lot to help him achieve much of the lost 
education of his childhood, but few schools can afford glassware, chemicals, 
apparatus and books, when every penny for teacher salaries, food, and nec- 
essary building programs must be carefully counted. 

"So the student memorizes and practices. Painfully and slowly he learns 
to draw flasks and test tubes, copying the diagrams of the teacher— thus 
describing the miracle of oxygen being prepared in the lab and collected over 
water. But he never quite believes it will happen; and a more tragic fact is 
that he has missed the excitement, the great thrill, of taking some white pow- 
der and turning it into a miraculous, invisible gas that will cause a glowing 
splint to burst into flame. 

"Armed with a heavy load of English-made textbooks and a bottle of ink 
balanced on his head, and a pen safely tucked over his ear, the young Ni- 
gerian—intelligent and eager— plods through his schooling, memorizing and 
filling his head with facts that seem unrelated to the world he knows. 

"He has learned his Latin; he can speak and write English creditably, and 
he can solve a mathematical problem. But he has not tested the delights and 
adventure of a laboratory, and he has not explored the works which a library 
can reveal. Nations and people, the exciting and inspiring lives of great men, 
the mystery and beauty of human life captured by great authors, remain un- 
known. Most of our students at Community Grammar School have never 
looked through a magnifying glass nor had the pleasure of learning through 
a National Geographic Magazine. 



THECARPENTEK 25 

"Now you may realize why we are so grateful for the books you sent. Per- 
haps you can begin to feel our needs and share our excitement in working 
here and seeing our school grow from a feeble and uncertain beginning to its 
present stature. We have heard the cheers of our students and shared their 
excitement when a new box of books from the United States has arrived. 

"Most of our students know little about the affairs of the world in these 
critical years; and yet these students will lead a nation which may itself lead 
a continent. We want to do everything possible to train our students for lead- 
ership and responsibility. Our dream is that in time the school will become 

an international center to which guests from other countries will come to 

o 

teach and study. These aspirations are new in Nigerian education. 

"We cannot thank you fully enough." 

Brother Isidore Friedman who works at Peninsula School, Menlo Park, 
California, is heading the book collection project. Any spare books on car- 
pentry, construction, or trade subjects can be sent to him, and he will see that 
they are forwarded to the East Nigerian school. As Dr. Nzeribe's letter indi- 
cates, any and all books will be put to good use helping young Africans catch 
up \^'ith the Twentieth Century. 

• 

Forand-Type Health Bill Still Possible 
The fact that Congress took a recess this summer gives labor a wonderful 
opportunity to make a last-ditch fight for a decent health bill for senior citizens. 
Just before the recess, the House turned down any Forand-type program and 
approved instead a practically meaningless substitute measure that includes 
a means test, thus placing health care for older people on a par with poor 
relief. The bill was acted on under a closed rule which prohibited amend- 
ments from the floor.. Liberal members of the House thereby had their hands 
tied, so the measure went through unchanged. 

Meanwhile, the Senate Finance Committee was holding hearings on social 
security. On June 30, Senator Clinton P. Anderson, joined by Senators Hum- 
plirey and McCarthy, introduced an amendment which would make health 
care for the aged a part of social security. This bill has a better chance of 
passage than any of the other Forand-type proposals. There the matter rests 
as Congress reconvenes. 

Provisions of the Anderson Amendment 

The Anderson amendment makes payments for health care available as 
a matter of right, to be paid from a special account in the social security 
fund. This account would be made up from an increase of ^4% in both the 
employers' and employees' social security tax. The benefits are in some re- 
spects broader than in the Forand bill, and with this wider scope, other limita- 
tions were added in order to hold down the cost. 

Persons Eligible: All OASDI beneficiaries at age 68 (nearly 9 million). 

Benefits: Hospital care up to 365 days, with initial deductible of $75, re- 
peated after 24 days. 

Special services in hospital: laboratory, X-ray, private duty 
nurses, physical restoration. 

Skilled nursing home care during recovery: 180 days. 
Visiting nurse services: 365 days. 



26 THECARPENTER 

Prospects for Senate Action 

The Senate will convene on August 8, and the Senate Finance Committee 
is expected to report out a social security bill shortly thereafter. 

Labor's aim is to have the Anderson amendment adopted if possible by 
the Committee, and, failing that, by floor amendment. The Anderson proposal 
can be broadened to bring railroad workers into the program. 

The majority of the aged would have the new form of protection, and 
some improved assistance would be made available to others through the 
medical care provisions of the House bill. 

* » » 

The only type of legislation that can adequately meet the health needs of 
older people is a Forand-type bill— that is, one that makes health care a part 
of the social security system, which workers pay for and get as a matter of 
right rather than charity. 

Pressure for passage of an oldsters' health bill apparently is terrific. 
Otherwise, the wishy-washy measure passed by the House (HR 125S0), which 
only goes through the motions of providing health care, would not have been 
introduced. Its real purpose was to stymie Forand-type legislation. A last- 
ditch fight for Forand-type legislation may carry the day yet this year. 

The closer it gets to election day, the more receptive Congressmen are 
to letters and wires from home. At this particular time, a gigantic cam- 
paign of letters and wires demanding passage of Forand-type legislation 
could get the job done. 

Except for the recess, Forand-type legislation probably would have been 
a dead duck this year. But the recess provided us a new lease on life. If we 
fail to take advantage of it, it will be our own fault. 

An all-out campaign of letters and wires (particularly to Senators) by 
union members, pastors, oldsters, youngsters, and everyone else interested in 
seeing our old timers get the medical care they deserve, urging adoption of 
Forand-type legislation, can get the job done. 

What are YOU going to do about it? 



Look Who's Talking 

Whatever newspaper or magazine you pick up, chances are good you 
will find a full page ad by the private power companies complaining that 
public power is milking the United States treasury. The way they tell the 
story, the private companies are paying big taxes and supporting the govern- 
ment, while public power projects are siphoning monies out of the treasury. 

This is an old argument that has been answered so many times we scarce- 
ly need to belabor it here. But what we do want to do is call your attention 
to a gimmick the private power companies have worked out for getting their 
own snouts in the trough. 

When Congress re-convenes this month, one of the bills pending on the 
House calendar will be HR 7201. 

If passed, the bill would require the federal government to pay a private 
power company operating a dam upstream from a federal dam for Ijenefits 
which the private dam gives to the federal dam. This would be a re\ersal of 



T II E C A R P E N T E R 27 

existing law and the historic philosophy that the federal government does not 
have to pay tribute to a private dam owner who was granted the privilege 
of using the water which belongs to the nation to make a profit. 

"Such a payment would be requiring the American people to pay rent on 
their own property," five Congressmen declared. 

For a group that has been so concerned over the plight of the U. S. 
treasmy, this seems an odd way to seek a special windfall. And passage of 
HR 7201 indeed would confer a sizeable windfall on many private power 
companies that got their damsites for free from the government. 

In a recent letter to backers of the bill, Mr. Clyde T. Ellis, general man- 
ager of the National Electric Cooperative Association, wrote: 

"Please remember that these federal power sites have been given to the 
power companies without charge. They have never compensated the govern- 
ment for them as contemplated under the law. Please remember that most of 
the dams on which the power companies now ask these subsidies have already 
been partially or wholly amortized." And, Ellis added, "please remember that 
the consumers who purchase the federal power, including nearly two million 
rural families, will have to pay this subsidy to the power companies in their 
increased rates." 

So the next time you read a big ad by the private power companies shed- 
ding crocodile tears for the U. S. treasury, remember HR 7201. Public dams 
do not pay taxes as such, but they make many payments in lieu of taxes. 
What the private companies want, apparently, is to levy their own taxes on 
public power where they control upstream rights— this despite the fact they 
got the rights from the people themselves in the first place. 



Labor Gives Jim Mitchell A Fine Send-Off 

No event in recent years drew more top echelon labor leaders than did the 
Jim Mitchell testimonial dinner on June 29th. Nearly a thousand of them 
filled the banquet hall to overflowing to pay their respects to a dedicated 
Secretary of Labor. 

Over the years Jim Mitchell has filled a difficult post with fairness and 
understanding. The tools he has had to work with were not always good, 
but he used them capably and judiciously. As a cabinet member, his responsi- 
bility was to administer the laws passed by Congress. He got some of the 
worst labor laws of all time to police. This did not make his job an easy one, 
but he met every issue squarely and without hedging. And, good or bad, he 
tried to administer the laws handed him as fairly and as equitably as possible. 

There is a small coterie of important men in the nation who achieved a 
deep understanding of unionism without ever having belonged to a union. 
Jim Mitchell is numbered among this select group. He knows as much about 
the aims and aspirations of the labor movement and the collective bargaining 
process as any in the nation. This understanding showed through in all the 
actions he took. 

In singing his swan song. Secretary Mitchell said: "On noon of January 20, 
I become a private citizen again but still enlisted in the fight for an end of 
discrimination, fairer treatment for farm labor, and job opportunities for all." 

Vv^e'll bet those are not empty words or banquet oratory. 



28 THECARPENTER 

(Continued from page 23) 

Submitted by Local Union 2235, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Amend Section 46: 

Change tliis Section to tlie end that clearance cards as they exist today be eliminated. 

# « » « # 

Submitted by Local Union 1280, Mountain View, Calif. 

Amend section 46, in which a procedure for the use of a Travelers Card will be out- 
lined as follows: 

"any member in good standing having one year's membership in the Brotherhood 
shall be eligible for a Traveler's Card; this Travelers Card to be issued by the member's 
home Local and only a minimum charge ($2.00 suggested) to cover monthly per capita 
tax will be chai'ged by the issuing Local and the member carrying the Travelers Card wall 
be required to pay the difference between the minimum charge in the home Local and 
the regular monthly dues to the Local Union having jurisdiction over the job site; such 
Travelers Card must be accepted for periods of three months and after this time can be 
renewed only upon approval of the Local Union having jurisdiction over the job site; 
dues in the issuing Local must be paid for the full term of the Travelers Card prior to the 
issuance of the Card; all dues in the accepting Local must be paid in advance of the month 
for which they are due in order for the Travelers Card to be valid; Travelers Cards will 
be made available to the Local Unions through the office of the General Secretary and 
shall be issued by the Financial Secretary." 

In addition to the above, requirement of Section 46 governing the issuance and accept- 
ance of Clearance must be complied with prior to the issuance and acceptance of a 
Travelers Card, and Section 46 be recodified to exclude the use of Permit Fees in lieu of 

the Travelers Card. 

» # » # # 

Submitted by North Coast Counties D. C, Santa Rosa, Calif. 

Proposed tliat Section 46, Paragraph A shall be amended as follows: Substitute the 
words "Service Fee" for the words "Working Permit" in the last sentence. 

« # « « « 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council, Calif. 

Amend Section 46, Paragraph A, third sentence be changed to read as follows: 

"All dues in excess of month of issue shall be refunded to the member or be refunded 

upon request to the Local Union accepting Clearance." 

# # * # # 

Submitted by Millwrights Local Union 102, Oakland, Calif. 

, Proposing that Section 46 remain as is, except that in Paragraph A, the last sentence 
be deleted and the follovidng substituted: "It shall not be mandatory for the member to 
pay for such Work Permit in the jurisdiction where work is secured." 

# » # # # 

Submitted by North Coast Counties D. C, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Proposed that Section 46, Paragraph C be amended to read: 

"A member who desires to work in the jurisdiction of a Local Union other than the one 
he holds membership in shall, before going to work, deposit his membership book and 
clearance card, with the Financial Secretary of the Local Union having jurisdiction of the 
job on which he intends to work. (Excepting that a District Council, by referendum vote 
of the membership of all affiliated Local Unions, may waive this requirement within the 
area of jurisdiction of such District Council). When a member so deposits his Membership 
Book and Clearance Card with the Financial Secretai-y of a Local Union and informs said 
Financial Secretary that he does not desire to have his membership transferred into said 
Local Union his Membership Book and Clearance Card shall be held on deposit and shall 
be returned to him upon demand and payment of a Service Fee of not less than Two 
Dollars ($2.00) nor more than the regular monthly dues of the Local Union, provided, 
however, that in the event that his Membership Book and Clearance Card have been on 
deposit for a period of ten (10) days or less, the Service Fee shall not exceed the minimum 
Two Dollars ($2.00) set forth above. 

Members working outside the jurisdiction of the Local Union in which they hold mem- 
bership under the provisions of this paragraph shall be subject to the provisions of Para- 



THE C A K 1* E X T E 11 29 

graph F below and shall also be subject to all local assessments levied exclusively for di- 
rect trade purposes by and for the use of the Local Union or District Council in whose 
jurisdiction they are working." 



Submitted by Millwrights Local Union 102, Oakland, Calif. 

Sec. 46, Paragraph C be amended to read as follows: 

"A member who secures work outside his jurisdiction who returns home daily, or who 
does not desire to transfer membership, shall, before going to work secure a Working 
Permit in writing from the Local Union or the District Council in the jurisdiction where 
work is secured, and the member shall not be charged a fee for such Working Permit 
or any Assessment in lieu of svich Working Permit, but if less than two years a member 
shall pay any difference in initiation fee". 

« « « « » 

Submitted by Local Union 1507, El Monte, CaUf. 

Amend Section 46, Paragraph C as follows: 

"It shall not be mandatory for any member to transfer his membership or pay any 
additional fees to be eligible to work in another jurisdiction; provided, however, that wage 
scales and working conditions are applied uniformly to a given area of several Local 
Unions and/ or District Councils, in accordance with a recognized Labor Agreement. A 
member of less than two years would be required to pay any difference in initiation fee." 

» # * » » 

Submitted by Local Union 1408, Redwood City, Calif. 
Proposing that Paragraph C, Section 46 be deleted. 

» # » * * 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 46, Paragraph C, by rewording as follows: 
"A member who desires to work in another jurisdiction and return home daily, or 
who does not desire to transfer membership, shall before going to work clear with the 
Local Union having area jurisdiction, and shall conform to all provisions of the collective 
bargaining agreement effective in the district. No member shall be charged a permit to 
work in any given area, but a service charge equivalent to local operational cost per 
member, may be collected by the Local Union. Such charge, however, shall not include a 
sum equivalent to the per capita tax paid to the International through his home local." 

# # # «f * 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council. 

Proposing that Section 46, Paragraph F, be amended to read: 

"A member of a Local Union taking out a Clearance Card before foui* (4) years a 
member, shall pay, where the initiation fee is higher, into the Local Union accepting the 
Clearance Card, a sum equal to the difference in initiation fee before the Clearance Card 
can be accepted." 

« # # 4 # 

Submitted by Indiana State Council. 

Proposed: That Section 46, Paragraph G of the Constitution and Laws of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America be amended to read as follows: 

"On entering a local union a member vdth a clearance card shall present same with 
due book to the President who shall appoint a committee of three (3) to give a written 
examination to the applicant for his qualification into the division or sub-division of the 
trade he chooses to work in (only if division or sub-division is different from which mem- 
ber is transferring from) and examine applicants due book and report at once. If the 
applicant passes the written examination and applicant's clearance card and dues book are 
found correct and the identity of the member established to whom the clearance card is 
granted, the member shall be admitted to the local union as a member thereof, provided 
there is no strike or lockout in effect in that district." 



30 THECARPENTER 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council. 

Proposing that Section 46, Paragraph G be changed to read as follows: 
"Upon entering a Local Union, a member with a Clearance shall present same, and 
if Clearance Card and Due Book are found correct, and the identity of the member 
established to whom the Clearance is granted, the member shall be admitted to the 
Local Union at once as a member thereof, provided there is no strike or lock-out in 
effect in that district." 

# * # « « 

Submitted by Local Union 2592, Eureka, Calif. 

Proposing that Paragraph A, Section 47, be changed to read as follows: 
"A member can withdraw or sever his connection with the United Brotherhood by 
resigning in writing, and it shall require a majority of members present at a regular 
meeting to accept a resignation. A member resigning shall be given a Resignation Card, 
which shall indicate an honorary withdrawal from the United Brotherhood. Such card shall 
be furnished by the General Secretary on application by the Local Union, on the presenta- 
tion of the member's dues book, and on payment of One Dollar ($1.00) for each card. 
A member who resigns may reinstate his membership by depositing the honorable with- 
drawal card within 2 years from the date of issue with the Local Union together with 
the payment of one month's dues plus a One Dollar ($1.00) reinstatement fee. This card 
and the reinstatement fee of One Dollar ($1.00) shall be forwarded to the General Secre- 
tary who will return the dues book to the Local Union. However, all Benefits, Donations, 
and Home and Pension Benefits in the Local Union and in the United Brotherhood shall 
cease on the date the member is granted the honorable withdrawal and when reinstated 
these benefits shall begin as a new member as of the date of his reinstatement." 

Also submitted by Local Union 3184, Fresno, Calif.; Local Union 2561, Fresh Pond, 
Calif.; Local Union 2804, Klickitat, Wash.; Local Union 2172, Santa Ana, Calif. 

# # j» # # 

Submitted by Local Union 262, San Jose, Calif. 

Amend Section 47, Paragraph A, to include: 

"A member who has returned to the Brotherhood within a period of two years, but 
not less than six months may re-deposit his resignation card upon payment of a fee of 
Ten Dollars ($10.00), five of which shall be forwarded to the General Secretary." 

# # # # ft 

Submitted by Los Angeles County District Council. 

Proposing that the last two sentences of Section 47, Paragraph B, be eliminated. 

ft ft ft * ft 

Submitted by Local Union 2486, Sudbury, Ont., Can. 
Proposing to change Section 47, Paragraph B: 

Insert the word (illegal) before the word "sale" in line 10 and 12. 

ft ft ft ft ft 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

Proposing that Sections 49 and 50 be changed as follows: 

BENEFICIAL MEMBERS 
Present Donation Recommended Donation 

1 year membership $100 $100 

2 " " $200 $300 

3 " " $300 $500 

4 " " $400 $700 

5 " " $600 $1000 

SEMI-BENEFICIAL MEMBERS 

2 year membership $ 50 $100 

3 " " $100 $300 
5 " " $150 $500 

10 " " $250 $1000 



THE CAR'PENTER 31 

HUSBAND OR WIFE DONATION 

1 year membership $ 50 $100 

2 " " $100 $200 

3 " " $150 $300 

• « « « « 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif. 
Amend Section 54, Paragraph B as follows: 
Strike out the last two words of this paragraph which reads as follows: "Thirty years" 

and substitute "Twenty-Five years." 

• « « « « 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

To delete Section 54, Paragraph B and other affected paragraphs or sentences for the 
following reasons: 

That the carpenters' home in Lakeland, Florida, be sold to the best possible advantage, 
and at the earliest possible date, and the monies so obtained be placed in the pension 
fund, then to be invested in interest-bearing securities, with the view in mind that the 
pensions of all our retired members be raised to the full amount that the increased fund 
can tolerate, consistent with good business practices. 

That homes for the present residents be provided, but no new applicants to the home 
be admitted as of December 31, 1960. 

That the fimd now known as the Home and Pension fund and the administration 
thereof be separated, and in the future be called "The Pension Fund" and "the Retired 
Carpenters' Home Fund." The Carpenters' Home Fund to be finally eliminated upon the 
liquidation of the home, and the final assignment of its funds to tlie Pension Fund. 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

Amend Section 54, Paragraph D, as follows: 

Delete the amount of $15.00 on the third line, replace it by $25.00, and add: Plus a 
paid-up lifetime membership. 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Finger Lakes D. C, Geneva, N. Y. 

Amend Section 54, Paragraph D, as follows: 

Provide for a Thirty Dollar ($30.00) a month pension for those members with thirty 
(30) years continuous membership and having reached the age of sixty-five (65) years. 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Finger Lakes D. C, Geneva, N. Y. 

Amend Section 54, Paragraph D, as follows: 

To provide that a member having held twenty (20) years continuous membership in the 
Brotherhood and having reached sixty-five (65) years of age shall receive one-third {%) of 
that amount provided as pension for a member having thirty (30) years continuous mem- 
bership in the Brotherhood and having reached the age of sixty-five (65) years. 

Further that a member having twenty-five (25) years continuous membership in the 
Brotherhood and having reached sixty-five (65) years of age shall receive two-thirds {%) of 
that amount provided as pension for a member having thirty (30) years continuous member- 
ship in the Brotherhood and having reached the age of sixty-five (65) years. 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Spokane D. C, Spokane 1, Washington. 

Proposed amendment to change Section 55, Paragraph I to read as follows: 
"All fines imposed and assessments legally levied by any Local Union or District Coun- 
cil on a member of an outside District shall be charged and collected from the member 
by the Local Union and forwarded to the District Council or Local Union where violation 
of rules occurred, under penalty or suspension." 

« « « « « 

Submitted by Calgary D. C, Alta., Can. 

Proposing that Sections 55, 56 and 57 be amended and re-edited: 

That these three sections be reviewed and re-edited with all matter brought into an 

orderly sequence, and that section 56 be revised by inserting an established orderly trial 

pH'tc-dure. 



32 T H E C A R P E N T E R 

Submitted by Local Union 27, Toronto, Ont., Can. 

Amend Section 56, Paragraph A to read: 

That all charges laid within a local union, tliat the Local must endorse the charge before 
it is turned over to the District Council, with the exception of violations of trade or 
working conditions. 

# # « # # 

Submitted by Monterey Bay D. C, Calif. 

Amend Section 56, Paragraph C as follows: 

To include the use of Certified mail when notifying members of charges. 

# * # # # 

Submitted by Local Union 681, Oakville, Ont., Can. 

Amend Section 57, Paragraph E by adding the following sentence: 

"Unless decisions on appeals to the General President are rendered within thirty (30) 

days of receipt of same, the conviction shall be quashed". 

# * # # # 

Submitted by Local Union 681, Oakville, Ont., Can. 

Amend Section 57, Paragraph H, as follows: 

Include after the words "General President's decision," the following sentence. "Unless 
decisions on appeals to the General Executive Board are rendered within ninety (90) days 
of receipt of same, the conviction shall be quashed. 

# # » * # 

Submitted by Local Union 2203, Anaheim, Calif. 

Pioposing that Section 59, be re-written as follows: 

General Strikes and Lock-outs. 
A. Section 59, Strikes inaugurated and conducted according to the following rules, 
shall be sanctioned by the General Executive Board and Financial aid extended to the 
Local Union or District Council involved. 

3. Job or shop strikes are to be conducted on rules made by the District Council or 
Local Union where a District Council does not exist. 

C. When any demand for an increase of wages, reduction of hours or enforcement of 
trade rules is contemplated by a Local Union, District Council, Job and/or Shop, each 
eligible member (as provided under Section 42, paragraph W) affected, must be notified 
by mail to attend a special called meeting of the Local Union. When two or more Local 
Unions are involved in the Job or Shop, the District Council shall call a special meeting 
of the members working under that job or shop agreement. 

D. If a majority of eligible members voting, vote by secret ballot to put any proposed 
demand into effect, the President or Executive officer of the Local Union or District Coun- 
cil shall appoint a conference committee of not less than three (3) nor more than five (5) 
members (the majority of whom must not be solely employed by the Local Union or Dis- 
trict Council) to meet with the Employer or Employers with a view to adjust the difficulty 
or dispute. 

E. After each week of negotiations; the negotiating committee shall report to the Local 
Union. Ten days after expiration of existing contracts, a strike vote shall be taken. A ma- 
jority of the members affected must vote in favor of calling a strike before a strike can 
be called. 

F. When the majority of the affected members vote in favor of a strike, or in tlie case 
of a lock-out, the Local Union or District Council shall immediately picket all affected job 
sites and/or shops, and shall send a list of all members affected by a strike or lock-out to 
the General Office. Upon receipt of said list of members by the General Office, the Gen- 
eral Executive Board shall order the General Secretary to draw on the General Treasurer 

funds in the amount equal to %, of each affected members weekly pay. Such 

amount shall be forwarded to the affected Local Union or District Council each week for 
(he duration of any strike or lock-out. 

G. The term "Affected members" referred to in any Paragraph of Section fifty-nine (59) 
shall be only those members who are called out on strike or lock-out. 



THE C A RJ» ENTER 33 

Submitted by Local Union 2486, Sudbury, Ont., Can. 

Proposing that Section 62, Paragraph B, be changed to read as follows: 
"Being aiRIiated as the Canadian Section of the United Brotherhood with the Canadian 
Labour Congress, it is the duty of all Local Unions to affiliate with Local Labour Coun- 
cils and Provincial Federations of the Canadian Labour Congress. Tax to the Congress to 
be paid direct from General Office. 

« « # « « 

Submitted by Local Union 1622, Hayward, Calif. 

Proposing to amend Section 63 by adding a new paragraph E to read as follows: 
"It shall be unlawful for any Local Union to report members as having voted on any 
referendum unless they are present and voting. Any Local Union or Union Official that 
conspires to wilfully make a false report on votes cast on a referendum shall be subject to 
cliarges under Section No. 55 of the Constitution and By-Laws of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of Amerlc"!." 

# # # « « 

Submitted by Local Union 35, San Rafael, Calif. 

Proposing that the second sentence of Paragraph A, Section 63, be amended to read as 
follows: 

"It shall require a majority vote of the members voting, by secret ballot to decide, 
and said general vote, together with a registration list of the members voting under the 
seal of the Local Union, shall be returnable to the General Secretary within six weeks 
from date of circular calling for the vote, and the result, pro or con, in each Local Union 
shall be published in pamphlet form, containing a copy of amendment or amendments 
voted on and distributed to all Local Unions in the same manner as the monthly financial 
statement." 

Also submitted by Local Union 1710, Mill Valley, Calif. 

# # » # « 

Submitted by Boston District Council. 

Proposed amendments to the Constitution and Laws of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

Add to Paragraph F-Sec. 25, the following: where wilful collusion occurs. 

Sec. 31, Par. B,— add: trustees shall be nominated and elected to be simultaneous and 
concurrent in time and tenure, with the other officers of the Local Union. 

Add to Par. C, Sec. 31: and to be in conformity with the Labor-Management Laws, 

Sec. 26, Par. G,— add: subject to acquiring knowledge of general carpentry. 

Add to Par. B, Sec. 32: in compliance with the Labor-Management Act of 1959. 

Sec. 27, Par. A,— Add: and such affiliation is mandatory. 

Far. F-Sec. 42,— transpose— "must not be" to must be— (third line front). 

Sec. 28j Par.A,— add: the area jurisdiction of each D. C. should be on their Working 
Cards. 

Par. F,— Sec. 42, add into second last line: and installation of any such material. 

Sec. 31, Par. A,— Add: and Business Agent (s) 

Par. J.— Sec. 42, add: in second last line: and/or, complied with Immigrations Laws. 

Par. K,-Sec. 42, second line, add: through, before "twenty-four". 

Par. S,-Sec. 42, add: by duly obtaining a Privilege Card. 

Sec. 31, Par. I, Amend: to conform to the Labor-Management Act as may be required.* 

Par. U,-Sec. 42, add: in conformity with the Landrum-Griffin Act o