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Full text of "Carpenter"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/carpenter87unit 



Officiai Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



FOUNDED 1881 



JANUARY, 1967 








GENERAL OFFICERS OF 



GENERAL OFFICE: 



THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA ioia.^totionAv^., N.W.. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

first general vice president 
Ftnlay C. Allan 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 
WiLLUM SiDELL 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRia BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 
10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 
55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 
64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

American Bank Building 

621 S.W. Morrison St., Room 937 

Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 7, Ont 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. HuTCHESON, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mall list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling oat this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be ?iven. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



Zip Code Number 



THE 



(3Za\[S[? 




VOLUME LXXXVII No. I JANUARY, 1967 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Brotherhood Sponsors Manpower Program 2 

Building Tradesmen Have Center Stage at Expo 67 4 

Foreman Flunk Moves Up Sam Dalba 6 

New Wood Research Unit 10 

Great ideas in Windows The Craftsman's Legacy 16 

St. Louis Carpenters Participate in Unique Training School 18 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 9 

Editorials 13 

Canadian Report 14 

Plane Gossip 17 

We Congratulate 19 

Local Union News 20 

Home Study Course, Blueprint Reading, Unit VIII 27 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred O. Goetz 28 

Pin Presentations 30 

In Memoriam 36 

What's New? 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS AnENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20013, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D- C. Subscription price; United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20$ in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Nature's quick-change artist — ■ 
snow — dazzles the eye, dehghts far- 
mers, inspires poets, and unnerves 
suburbanites. It's a major feature of 
the month of January. 

Every state, including Hawaii, 
gets some snow, the National Geo- 
graphic Society tells us. In the agri- 
cultural West, a deep snowfall is like 
gold. Snow provides water for irri- 
gation, drinking, and electric power. 

In the metropolitan East, how- 
ever, a snowfall can be unbelievably 
expensive. Snow paralyzes traffic, 
disrupts communications, isolates 
surburbs and closes schools. The 
great storms in January, 1966, cost 
one city — Washington, D.C. — al- 
most a million dollars. 

However, the urbanite's headache 
is the poet's muse. The American 
classic "Snowbound," written exact- 
ly a century ago by John Greenleaf 
Whtttier, idealizes a rustic environ- 
ment long since vanquished by mod- 
ern technology. 

Children probably enjoy snow 
most of all. The two kids on our 
January cover are among millions 
who build snow men and snow forts, 
pitch snowballs, and push sleds 
down countless hills in the full flush 
of winter fun. 

Skiing has become a major Amer- 
ican winter sport, too, and the yel- 
low skis of the youngsters on the 
cover are typical of many which 
can be purchased at local hardware 
and sporting goods stores to add to 
the enjoyment of the month of 
Janus. 




'"~ffjp>*' 



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Participating in tlie orientation program at the General Office, December 5, were, 
left to right, above: Harry Schwarzer, Coordinator, Manpower Development and Training 
Administrator; Charles Atkinson, Coordinator, M.D.T.A.; H. E. Morris, Secretary, 
Miami, Florida, District Council; Cecil Beam, Coordinator, M.D.T.A.; George Prince, 
Coordinator, Apprenticeship and Training, United Brotherhood; William Oviedo, Coordi- 
nator, Apprenticeship and Training, United Brotherhood; Gene Baraby, United States 
Employment Services; Roland Williams, Office of Industry Promotion; Finlay C. Allan, 
First General Vice President, United Brotherhood; Reginald Moore, Coordinator, 
M.D.T.A. Project; Anthony Ochocki, Project Coordinator, M.D.T.A.; Leo Gable, Technical 
Director, Apprentice Training; Peter Terzick, General Treasurer, United Brotherhood; 
Lowell King, Comptroller, United Brotherhood; and Stanley Fink, Special Assistant to the 

Administrator, B.A.T. (Bureau of Apprenticeship Training). 



Brotherhood to Sponsor Major 
Manpower Development Program 



Two-year plan expected to train 2,000 skilled craftsmen; 

program will offer instruction to both journeymen and 

pre-apprentices under 2.9-milHon-dollar contract 



OUR Brotherhood's efforts to 
meet the growing demand for 
properly trained mechanics received 
a substantial shot in the arm, last 
month, when a 2.9-million-dollar 
contract was signed with the U.S. 
Department of Labor (Bureau of 
Apprenticeship and Training) and 
the Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare to promote and 
expand apprenticeship and training 
in the United States, under the Man- 



power Development and Training 
Act. 

Under the provisions of the con- 
tract our Brotherhood will have the 
responsibility for initiating pre- 
apprenticeship programs in areas 
where they are needed and asked 
for, and also for promoting ad- 
vanced skill programs. 

The contract will run for two 
years and is expected to produce 
an additional 2000 skilled crafts- 



men. The program will permit the 
establishment of pre-apprenticeship 
programs of 26 weeks duration. 
These programs will be institutional 
at the start; that is, the young men 
will be given eight weeks of class- 
room instruction in subjects in which 
they may be deficient, as well as 
basic instruction in the use of car- 
pentry tools. 

Upon the completion of this work 
they should be qualified to enter the 



THE CARPENTER 



regular apprenticeship program in 
the area. The training will be geared 
to achieve this end, and each pro- 
gram should supplement the other. 

A second type of program will 
give established joint apprenticeship 
programs in an area an opportunity 
to set up classes designed to teach 
additional skills to existing journey- 
men. 

It should be pointed out that this 
new venture into training will in no 
way conflict with or overlap existing 
apprenticship programs. Pre-appren- 
ticeship programs or advanced skill 
programs will only be set up in areas 
which ask for them and demonstrate 
a need for this type of supplemen- 
tary program. Applications for such 
programs have already been re- 
ceived from several dozen localities. 

To direct the overall project, 
General President Hutcheson ap- 
pointed Anthony Ochocki of Detroit 
as the Coordinator. In addition, five 
members have been appointed to 
carry out the coordinating functions 
of the program in the field. They 
are Brothers Cecil Beam, Reginald 
Moore, Charles Atkinson, Harry 
Schwarzer and H. E. Morris. 

It will be the responsibility of 
these field men to work with local 
joint apprenticeship and training 
committees , local unions, district 
councils and employer associations 
to determine the needs for pre- 
apprenticeship, apprenticeship and 
advanced training for journeymen. 
They also will be preparing the sub- 
contracts which will have to be 
entered into before a training pro- 
gram can be put into operation in 
any given area. 

During the week of December 5, 
these staff members, who will be 
responsible for the implementation 
of the program, attended an orienta- 
tion session at the General Office. 
They were briefed on the intent and 
purpose of the program and the 
procedures to be followed in the 
establishment of subcontracts in 
given areas. 

A number of officials of the De- 
partment of Labor and various sub- 
divisions thereof met with the group 
a number of times to explain the 
procedures connected with establish- 
ing programs in the field. 




Why More 

Apprentices 

Must Be Trained 



Underscoring the growing need 
for more skilled craftsmen of all 
kinds, a recent speech by Charles 
Luckman, prominent architect and 
engineer, contains some rather 
startling figures which have con- 
siderable significance for ail build- 
ing trades workers. 

On the basis of wide study, Mr. 
Luckman concluded: 

• By the year 2000 (only half 
a lifefime away) fhe Unifed States 
population will top 350 million. 

• By 1985, one half of the peo- 
ple will live in cities not yet built. 

• The American building indus- 
try will be required to double its 
capacity by the year 2000. Four- 
fifths of the population will then be 
city dwellers. 

• Total expenditures for institu- 
tions of higher education will dou- 
ble by 1974. 

• Many of the children now in 
school will hold jobs which as yet 
have neither name nor classifica- 
tion, because they will be the result 
of an invention yet to come. 

What ail these statistics translate 
themselves into insofar as future 
need for carpenters is concerned 
can only be guessed at. However, 



First General Vice President Allan 
summarized the challenge facing 
our organization when he ad- 
dressed the awards banquet fol- 
lowing the 8th Annual Western 
Region Apprenticeship Contest in 
August of last year. In part, he 
said: 

"for make no mistake about it. 
Either we start turning out well- 
trained journeymen in much greater 
numbers than we have before, or 
it will not be long before we start 
suffering the consequences in de- 
clining membership, more non-un- 
ion competition, decreasing bar- 
gaining power, and eventually low- 
er wages and poorer working con- 
ditions, if we lose our ability to pro- 
vide the industry with competent 
craftsmen. 

"From the point of view of the 
unfriendly employer, non-union men 
may not be any better; but they 
are cheaper. To keep on getting 
first-rate wages and conditions with- 
out providing first-rate mechanics 
just isn't in the cards. It takes time 
to turn out good journeymen; and 
the longer we wait to face up to 
the problem, the harder it's going 
to be to catch up when events 
finally do force us to face the issue 
squarely." 



JANUARY, 1967 



building trades workers 
have center stage as expo &7 
nears completion 



THE Expo 67 exposition in 
Montreal, Canada, now en- 
tering its final phase of construc- 
tion, is a sidewalk superintend- 
ent's dream. Everywhere there 
is activity — from the hammering 
and sawing at the 140-foot high 
wood and plywood Theme Build- 
ing to the giant 100-ton cranes 
that raise and lower steel beams 
into place at the Russian pavil- 
ion. 

Currently, an army of build- 
ing tradesmen, including 3.000 
men from 14 Brotherhood local 
unions are closing in on the tar- 
get date for the opening of Expo 
67 on April 28, 1967. 

Construction at Expo 67's 
1,000 acre site on two islands 
in the St. Lawrence River, less 
than two miles from downtown 
Montreal, is now 90% com- 
pleted. 

Besides the $311 million price 
tag on the exposition that is 
benefitting the Canadian econ- 
omy in general and the building 



and construction industry in par- 
ticular. Expo 67 is having a 
beneficial side effect by stimulat- 
ing public and private construc- 
tion in the area. The Province 
of Quebec has built extensive 
expressways to link the Trans- 
Canada Highway north of Mon- 
treal with the city and the ex- 
position site. The city has 
carried out wholesale bridge, 
street and other work with fair 
vistiors in mind. The exposition 
has sparked an estimated $2 bil- 
hon in construction that has vir- 
tually rebuilt downtown Mon- 
treal. Currently Montreal's 
construction industry is working 
at close to 100% of capacity and 
promises to be for some time to 
come, compared with a normal 
work load of 70%. 

In carrying out its work, Expo 
faced problems beyond those of 
other fairs. 

One was lack of time. Not 
until four years and four months 
before Expo's scheduled opening 




April 28 did Parliament pass the 
bill establishing the exposition. 
Brussels, by contrast, was se- 
lected for the 1958 fair.in 1948, 
giving a decade to get ready. 
Shortness of time required 
Expo's preparations to be tele- 
scoped, with all the compUca- 
tions of overlapping construction. 

An additional problem was the 
matter of site. Both the Brus- 
sels and New York events were 
staged on the site of previous ex- 
hibitions and had a basic net- 
work of roads and improve- 
ments. Montreal's site, on the 
other hand, was not only unim- 
proved but much of it didn't 
even exist. Of Expo's 1,000 acre 
site, a Venice-like affair mostly 
located in the St. Lawrence 
River, only 237 acres existed 
when work started. The rest is 
all claimed from the river. 



Shades of Jules Verne is the 

Gyrotron (near photo), a new 

concept in amusement park 

ride design. Visitors to the 

$2.8 million ride will board 

specially-built cabins for a 

voyage through space which 

will take them inside a 215-ft. 

high pyramid and then carry 

them deep into the boiling 

crater of the volcano. At the 

right is the British Pavilion 

with the Expo 67 monorail 

passing across the top of photo. 




THE CARPENTER 







^V^ 



Despite all these drawbacks, 
construction on Expo 67 had 
two big things going for it. One 
was the complete cooperation of 
the Canadian unions working on 
the project and the other was the 
use of a computer to schedule 
construction work to eliminate 
any delays. With the aid of the 
computer, engineers can deter- 
mine what effect the progress of 
one job has on others. It re- 
moves as far as possible the hu- 
man element of opinion from 
planning. 

Expo 67 is the first activity of 
its kind to be sanctioned by the 
Bureau of International Exposi- 
tions in the Western Hemi- 
sphere. The Bureau has given 
the exposition a "first category" 
rating. Expo 67 is expected to 
draw the participation of some 
70 countries of the world, the 
largest number ever to take part 
in a world exhibition. It will be 
the highlight of the celebration 



of the 100th anniversary of the 
Canadian Confederation. 

Of especial interest to Amer- 
ican visitors to Expo 67 (sur- 
vey's indicating 55% of Mon- 
treal's visitors will be Ameri- 
can's) will be the United States 
exhibit. 

The $9.3 million U. S. exhibi- 
tion will be housed in a geodesic 
dome — a so-called "sky break 
bubble" — sheathed in clear 
acryUc plastic. The geodesic 
dome will be the largest ever 
built. It will have a diameter of 
250 feet, an actual height of 200 
feet and a surface area of 141,- 
000 square feet. The interior 
exhibits will be selected from 
outstanding and unusual speci- 
mens of folk art, from collec- 
tions of historic and contempo- 
rary items reflecting aspects of 
America, from the fine arts and 
the cinema, and of course from 
the field of science as typified by 
our experiments in space. 



The theme of Expo 67 is "Man 
and His World." This theme will 
be expressed through five sub- 
themes: Man the Creator, the 
Explorer, the Producer, Man and 
the Community, and Man the 
Provider. These themes will be 
developed in all pavilions, show- 
ing how man adapts and controls 
his environment. 

A few seconds after midnight 
on the first day of this month, 
church bells began to ring and 
giant bonfires were lit in Can- 
ada's youngest province, New- 
foundland, marking the begin- 
ning of a year of high-spirited 
celebrations commemorating 
Canada's 100th birthday. 

The bell-ringing and bonfire- 
lighting quickly spread across 
the 4,000-mile Dominion as the 
seconds ticked away in each of 
Canada's five different time 
zones. And the highpoint of these 
celebrations wiU be reached on 
April 28th when Expo 67 opens. 




Built-up girders of laminated 
wood and plywood form the 
pine-tree-shaped Theme 
Building. Near photo is a view 
from the 65-acre park on He 
Notre Dame, a rest area on 
the site of Expo 67. Inverted 
pyramid in the center of near 
photo is one of Canada's 
exhibition buildings called 
Katimavik (Eskimo for "the 
gathering place"). Canada has 
earmarked $21 million for the 
construction of its exhibit. 



JANUARY, 1967 




Fo)ii^®itfiiiaiini Fltutmik 



BY SAM DALBA 



Mo)V@s Vp 



Let me say right here that Herman 
Flunk was ambitious even if his educa- 
tion was limited to the upper grades 
of grammar school. 

Herman Flunk was a construction 
man. The first job he ever had was 
with Nu-Way Construction Company, 
Inc., and, as the company grew, 
Herman became foreman of a con- 
struction gang. Today he is still there, 
a foreman for Nu-Way Construction. 

In a way, it was fortunate for 
Herman to have become a foreman, 
because he did not appear to have the 
type of body that would stand very 
many long periods of heavy work. He 
had a stringy build with a bunchy 
paunch that was way out of place on 
his thin frame. And his legs would 
have looked quite at home swinging 
through the trees in search of bananas. 

But Foreman Flunk had a goal. His 
constant dream and desire was to be- 
come a big man in Nu-Way. "Gotta 
get to the top" was his by-word. And 
to achieve this goal he had developed 
little schemes of economies that he 
felt sure would some day attract the 
attention of some company big-wig, 
scouting for someone from the ranks 
ready for a spot up top. 

Foreman Flunk was the type of man 
who would make use of every tidbit 



. . or how to become a wheel 

in the company by minding 

all the nuts and bolts 



of material he had on hand, with the 
absolute minimum of waste. He was 
a past master of make-do. There were 
little things he used to do with the 
time sheet, like appearing not to have 
noticed how close it was to quitting 
time, and having the men pick up their 
tools a few minutes after the whistle 
blew, and sometimes forgetting to put 
in a half-hour overtime. Naturally, 
he was usually spoken to quite firmly 
by the men about their missing time. 
But once in a rare while he would get 
away with one of these little quirks 
of memory. At those times he felt he 
had made another step toward his 
desired goal. 

He was often seen picking up short 
pieces of lumber or other debris that 
might be used some place at some 
time, if he happened to have them 
then. At such times he could be heard 
to mutter "Such waste!" And if some- 
one happened to be close by, he could 
be heard to mutter and mumble "Such 
waste" many times during the day. 



That the company or even his im- 
mediate super did not know or care 
about these little deeds had never 
entered his mind. He felt that his 
unending effort and devotion to the 
welfare and prosperity of Nu-Way 
would eventually come to light. 

It also might be said, as many had 
said, that he was "hard to work for." 
Some of his men had said this of him, 
and other things too. 

At this particular plateau of his 
career Foreman Flunk was working 
on was known as the "West End Proj- 
ect." The project was nearing com- 
pletion. 

A Heap of Bolts 

This morning. Foreman Flunk, in 
his travels about the job, had salvaged 
a heap of bolts and nuts that had been 
used and then discarded here and 
about. So there he was, happily and 
busily chirping and humming and fil- 
ing and cleaning the damaged threads 
of the bolts. And as the events which 



THE CARPENTER 



led to this tale occur, he had accumu- 
lated a fair pile of assorted bolts and 
nuts that were, in a sense, usable. 

As he looked up, his eyes met those 
of Rocco Caponi, a real big wheel in 
Nu-Way, standing there not 20 feet 
away, talking to his Super but looking 
at him. "This might be it!" he thought 
as he wheeled about and shouted a 
few authoritative orders to some men 
already diligently at work. As he re- 
turned to his cache of bolts, he glanced 
at Mr. Caponi, who was staring straight 
at him as he entered his chauffeur- 
driven company car. 

The Magic Envelope 

Knowing what we know about Fore- 
man Flunk, it is understandable that 
a few days later, while looking through 
his mail (which his wife usually did) 
he noticed an envelope with the letter- 
head of the executive offices of Nu- 
Way, Inc. Nervously he tore it open, 
and there were the words screaming 
at him: "Your presence is respectfully 
requested at a meeting to elect officers, 
approve changes in personnel, and 
consider new business. . . ." He read 
no further. "This is it, my promotion, 
my promotion!" he shouted, as if to 
someone, but there was no one there 
but him. 

(We must explain at this time that, 
years ago, Nu-Way had offered com- 
mon stock to its employes in limited 
quantities. At that time. Foreman 
Flunk had bought five shares. But 
since he had never received a dividend, 
and since his wife had filed the annual 
invitations to stockholder meetings in 
the usual place without as much as a 
mention. Foreman Flunk had forgotten 
completely that he was a stockholder 
in the company.) 

And so it happened that on the 
noted date we find our man in his old 
Victoria sedan driving as fast as the 
law allows to his appointment at the 
Nu-Way executive offices. As fate 
would have it, he never missed a red 
light, and what with a flat tire en 
route, he was a mite late as he parked 
at the beautiful new office building. 

After displaying his invitation, he 
was ushered into the stockholders 
meeting. Though unfamiliar with such 
surroundings, he made himself as com- 
fortable as possible. He was aware that 
they were discussing net worth, profits 
and expenses and stuff, and there was 
a lot to do about voting for people 
for different jobs. 

Abruptly there was a motion made 
to adjourn. Hearing this Foreman 
Flunk was quite shaken. No mention 
had been made of him! Perhaps his 



name had been called before he ar- 
rived. Thinking he might have missed 
his big chance, he became quite agi- 
tated. His mind was in a state of 
bedlam. 

At this point, in the midst of the 
orderly gathering he burst out loud: 
"The bolts, no one has said about me 
and the bolts!" 

Needless to say, this caused a com- 
motion in the about-to-end meeting. 
One of the officers, with the color 
drained from his face, rushed to him 
and muscled him into a side office. 
There he questioned him about his 
outburst. 

But all that the distraught Flunk 
could get out was "I'm Foreman, West 
End job . . . the bolts, you gotta know 
about the bolts. Caponi he knows — 
he seen — " 

Appearing to have understood this 
gibberish perfectly, a Mr. Cooper, who 
was chief expediter and responsible for 
equipment and materials being on the 
job as they were needed, was in a 
near state of hysteria as he rushed into 
the inner office of Company Comp- 
troller E. J. Flank. 

(At this point the reader should 
know that, due to a careless oversight 
by Mr. Cooper, an entire shipment of 
bolts that was to have been embedded 
in four feet of concrete (as per design) 
were still resting intact at the company 
warehouse. You can imagine the plight 
of Mr. Cooper when he discovered the 
bolts and realized that the concrete 
had already been poured without the 
bolts. Amazingly, neither engineers, 
resident architect, inspectors or com- 
pany brass had noticed the absence of 
the vital bolts.) 

Thus, Mr. Flank decided, after 
learning of the entire situation, that 
if the omission of the bolts were dis- 
covered, the company would face a 
heavy loss at West End, and, worse, 
much damage to the reputation of Nu- 



Way because of careless work perform- 
ance could be expected. 

But since it had appeared that the 
bolts were not missed, they had noth- 
ing to lose by sitting tight and hoping 
that the project would be accepted "as 
is." Another thought Mr. Flank shared 
with Mr. Cooper was, that if they 
scraped through this, they still had the 
bolts, valued at a tidy sum, plus the 
savings in hundreds of man-hours of 
labor for installation. If all went well, 
this blunder could happily turn into 
an added profit for Nu-Way. And 
thus the situation stood, until the ar- 
rival of Foreman Flunk upon the 
scene. 

As Mr. Cooper entered and closed 
the door, Mr. Flank inquired, "Well, 
Coop, what was all the commotion?" 

The flustered Mr. Cooper groaned; 
"There's a guy trying to shake down 
Nu-Way. He knows about the bolts, 
and he knows Caponi knows, and his 
name is Flunk!" 

Mr. Flank, thinking this a brazen 
implication because of the similarity 
of names, jumped up shouting; "Are 
you trying to be cute with me? This 
fiasco was all your responsibility! I've 
gone along, but, if this mess hits the 
fan, believe me, I'll throw you to the 
wolves!" 

Hastily, Mr. Cooper explained that 
the man outside the office was a stock- 
holder, also he was a foreman on the 
West End job and somehow he knew 
about the bolts and his name was 
Herman Flunk. 

Give Him a Raise! 

At this, Flank said; "Give him any- 
thing he wants. Make him a phony 
vice president in charge of something 
minor that won't get us in trouble. 
Give him a raise, expenses, and a com- 
pany car. But get him away from here 
for at least three weeks. We should 
have an acceptance on the West End 
deal by then." 




One of the officers, with the color drained from his 
face, rushed to him and muscled him into a side office. 



JANUARY, 1967 




SAM DALBA, other- 
wise Salvatore D'AIba, 
author of this short 
story, has been a mem- 
ber of Local 56, Boston, 
Mass., for the past 10 
years. He's employed by 
the Marine Division of 
the Perini Corp., East 
Boston. This is his first 
published short story. 



"How about shipping him out to 
the Acme job?" Cooper asked of Flank. 
"That's just the spot!" he answered 
"Get him out there fast!" 

And so it was that ex-Foreman 
Flunk was informed that he was being 
moved up, that he was needed at the 
Acme job and that he was to leave 
in the morning. He was also advised 
that, though his responsibilities might 
seem slight, he was to put his energy 
to work as though this was the most 
important chore of the company. If 
he performed well, bigger and better 
things were in store for him. 

The following day a determined Ex- 
ecutive Flunk was met at the Furges- 
ville bus stop, shown his suite at the 
best rooming house in town and given 
use of the company car. 

The Odor Was Strong 

Next morning, as Mr. Flunk was 
driving to the Acme plant, he could 
not help noticing an unpleasant odor as 
he neared the job site. As he approach- 
ed the plant, he read the sign at the 
entrance: "Acme Fertilizer and Chem- 
ical Company." The odor was so 
strong that he was breathing hard from 
long periods of holding his breath as 
he entered the Nu-Way Field Office. 
Inside the office it was not so bad. 
Fans were whirring, which made it 
somewhat bearable. 

He learned that Nu-Way had con- 
tracted to build a wing on the fertilizer 
plant and that the job was months be- 
hind schedule. As he was the next-to- 
top-man, he was put in charge of bills 
of ladings, invoices, and manifests of 
materials. 

Though any extended walk outside 
his office made him quite sick, he re- 
membered that he must put his ener- 
gies to work. So he steeled himself to 
check personally every truck and 
trailer, both coming and going. 

In the evenings Mr. Flunk had to 
fortify himself with an hour or two 
at the local gin mill. He found this 
quite necessary. Without it, all his 
food smelled and tasted of Acme Fer- 
tilizer. 

This was his daily routine for three 
horrible weeks at Acme. His condition 



now was pitiful. He -had red-rimmed 
eyes from his preparations to dine, 
and he had lost considerable weight 
from malnutrition. At this point, if 
he was asked, he might have blurted 
out that he was quite fed up with 
"being on top." 

One thing is sure. Flunk was no 
quitter. He even asked for other as- 
signments to keep himself more oc- 
cupied. Now, besides his other work, 
he was checking the daily construction 
work force. Of course, this duty forced 
him out in that evil-smelling air. It 
got so bad, that he doubted that he 
could last until the completion of the 
job. And at the rate the men were 
quitting, this job might go on forever. 
Most of the men had the same com- 
ment when they quit: "The pay is 
good, but the conditions stink!" In 
checking on the work crew, Mr. Flunk 
came in close contact with the men 
and work he was familiar with. So, 
just to keep in practice, he watched 
the work progress to see if he could 
cut corners and save time. 

He asked a labor foreman, "Why 
are so many men using picks and so 
few men shovehng?" The foreman 
said: "I gotta plenty picks but I no 
gotta 'nuff shovels. I ordered haf a 
dozen ova month, no get-um-ayet." 

That afternoon Mr. Flunk felt pretty 
sick and decided to quit early in order 
to have more time to prepare himself 
for dinner. He eased into the local 
pub and had a few fast ones, followed 
by a few a bit slower. Looking at his 
image in a mirror across the bar, he 
took stock of himself. Here he was, 
Number Two Man at the Acme job. 
He had been here two weeks. And 
though he had put his energies to 
work, he had done nothing to speed 
up the job. 

Just then he thought of the labor 
foreman and the men standing around 
idle because of the shortage of shovels. 
He decided to take the bull by the 
horns-. Stepping into the phone booth, 
he called the main office of Nu-Way 
and asked for Mr. Flank. When told 
that Flank had been out all day, he 
asked for Mr. Cooper. He was in- 
formed that Mr. Cooper was in con- 
ference with the company lawyers and 
representatives of the West End Proj- 
ect. He then asked to be connected 
with Mr. Bill Cash at the equipment 
yard, whom he knew. When Bill an- 
swered, Mr. Flunk's speech had be- 
come quite thick from the stuff at the 
bar plus the heat of the closed phone 
booth. 

He spoke up: "Say Bill, thish is 
Mr. Flonk up at Acme. Thish job 



slowin' down to a stop: gotta have six 
shovels right away!" 

Without another word, Mr. Flunk 
hung up. 

At the equipment yard. Bill Cash 
said to his assistant; "That was Mr. 
Flank. He's up at the Acme job. There 
must be a lot of excavation holding 
up that job. He wants six shovels. 
We only got three not in use. You 
better get on the phone, rent three 
more, and get them out there fast!" 

Mighty Diesel Power 

In 24 hours, mighty diesel-powered 
shovels began rolling into the Acme 
job site. Five arrived that day and the 
following morning an old obsolete 
coal-fired job limped in, the only other 
one Bill Cash could find on rental. 

It wasn't long before the phones be- 
gan buzzing at Nu-Way and in a short 
time the company had all the facts con- 
cerning the moving-up of Foreman 
Flunk. 

Mr. Caponi was ordered to replace 
Mr. Flunk at Acme. And quietly 
Foreman Flunk was sent back to the 
West End project. 

In another part of the city at the 
same time Mr. Flank and Mr. Cooper 
were having difficulties filling out their 
Unemployment Compensation Forms. 

The following Monday morning 
Foreman Flunk was back on the job, 
flitting about and getting into the 
swing of things. The project being 
almost completed, there was little to 
do except shipping out surplus mater- 
ials and equipment and clean up 
around the jobsite. 

He nodded greetings to his men. 
Some said they had missed him (in a 
way). But if these men were asked 
pointblank just what it was they missed 
about him, it is possible they could not 
have truthfully answered just what it 
was. 

While roaming around, Foreman 
Flunk came upon a heap of rubbish 
destined for the dump. Instinctively 
he poked in the pile and uncovered 
scraps of lumber, empty cartons, crates 
and assorted land-locked flotsam and 
jetsam. 

Amidst all this trash he spotted a 
shiny new bolt with nut attached. As 
he reached to salvage it, the remem- 
bered stench of Acme Fertilizer as- 
sailed his nostrils and he realized that 
those other salvaged bolts were directly 
responsible for those three distasteful 
weeks at Acme. With an angry grunt 
he kicked the bolt (with nut attached) 
high into the air. And as he did, (if 
you were standing near) you could 
have heard him mutter reluctantly: 
"SUCH WASTE!" 



THE CARPENTER 




Washington ROUNDUP 



SAFETY LAST— Ralph Nader, the young attorney who took on the automotive industry 
in a safety crusade (and won) , has called on Congress to enact legislation com- 
pelling drivers to have basic safety defects in their autos called to their 
attention and repaired. Nader told interviewers in the Capitol that only 42 
percent of the defective 1.8 Chevrolets and Chevelles with potentially dangerous 
sticking- throttle conditions had been turned into dealers for free repairs, 
although all owners had been notified. 

GOVERNAAENT JOBS INCREASING— Government employment has gained 31 percent in the 
past five years while service industry jobs increased only 25 percent. Agricul- 
tural employment dropped by four million jobs. Government employment has in- 
creased far more than any other category of jobs. 

MONSTROUS BONFIRE— The House Post Office and Civil Service Subcommittee reported 
that, if one government record were burned each second, it would take 2,000 years 
to get rid of them all. It urged a reduction in the amount of paperwork, which 
requires 15 billion copies of 360,000 government forms each year. __ Computers are 
churning out even more paper confusion. A computer can produce as much as a 20- 
foot-high stack of records a day... the output of about 100 average departmental 
clerk-tjrpists. The subcommittee didn't help the situation much; its report was 
70 pages long. 

STILL UP, BUT SLOWER— Business investment is scheduled to continue its rise, but to' 
slow its pace, during the first part of 1967, according to Department of Commerce 
figures. The percentage slowdown, attributed at least in part to suspension of 
the seven percent investment tax credit, is not expected to be too significant. 
The Commerce Department said business investment began slowing in 1966 and, 
instead of the estimated $60.9 billion, only $60.6 billion was invested. 

AFL-CIO FINANCES HOMES— Construction is expected to start in February on 568 homes 
for workers in Guyana, formerly British Guinea, on the north coast of South 
America. The homes will be financed by $2 million loan by the AFL-CIO and af- 
filiated unions. This is the second big foreign housing project so financed. 
First was the $10 million Kennedy development in Mexico City. 

BARGAINING PATTERNS EMERGE— The Labor Department forecasts that bargaining in 
1967 will revolve primarily on wages rather than fringe benefits as workers seek 
to keep pace with the decreasing purchasing power of the dollar. "Unofficial 
blessings" of the Administration will, it appears, be pegged at about 5% rather 
than the outworn 3.2%. 

CONSTRUCTION SLOWDOWN?— Labor analysts fear that the administration's cutbacks 
on spending to help finance the Viet Nam war, coupled with a tight mortgage 
market, will seriously curtail construction. November construction unemployment 
was 9.3%, up almost 50% from July's 6.9% although a certain percentaige might 
logically be ascribed to the onset of wintery weather in some sections of the 
: country. 

^MEDICARE CRASH PROGRAM— The government is planning an all-out effort to spur 
training of medical workers because of mounting medicare needs. Chief targets 
are nurses .and sub-professional people like orderlies, technicians, aides. 
Experts aver there is a need for 275,000 more nurses and others; 20% more than at 
present. 

JANUARY, 1967 i 








Hard Wisconsin winter did not stop members of Local 314 as they «ork trom scaffolding 
(top photo) to install connecting beams between legs of 50-foot high laminated wood arch. 
Closed-in room of pilot plant (bottom photo) oifers unobstructed work space for research. 



m)MW w®®® iHn^niiiBceia ^mm 



PHYSICAL testimony to the effi- 
cacy of wood and wood products 
is exemplified in the 42,000 square 
foot building shown on these pages 
that will serve as a research site for 
new and better uses of pulp and paper. 
The building, a joint venture of the 
Forest Service and the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, is located at the 
University of Wisconsin at Madison. 
Construction on the unique struc- 
ture began in the winter of 1965. 
And a bitter cold and brutal winter it 
was when the two dozen members of 
Local 314 started work on the first 
major addition of the U. S. Forest 
Products Laboratory in 35 years. The 



$4 million pilot plant will be the first 
part of a planned three-phase expan- 
sion program. 

On the drawing board are also plans 
for a new chemistry research building 
and remodeling of the present main 
building. A third addition, for re- 
search in adhesives, preservatives, fire- 
proofing, veneer and plywood, lami- 
nating, seasoning, and wood machin- 
ing, is also in the rejuvenation pro- 
gram for the aging physical plant. 

The additions to the Forest Products 
Lab are a stitch in time if the eco- 
nomic projections of Dr. Edward 
Locke, FPL director, are realized. He 
notes that by the year 2000 our grow- 



ing population will need 2.7 times the 
paper and paperboard that was con- 
sumed in 1962. 

One of the most unusual aspects of 
the pilot plant are the glued laminated 
wood arches that allow a maximum 
of unimpeded floor space. Arches of 
two sizes were required. The larger 
ones tower 50 feet above their con- 
crete bases, which in turn extend down 
to bedrock. They consist of two legs 
bolted and lag-screwed to a connecting 
beam. Into each arch went some 10,- 
600 board feet of lumber, enough for 
the average six-room home. For half 
the length of the building, these arches 
span its full 60-foot width. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




Installing one of 700 wood-framed windows in pilot plant. 

In the other half of the building, concrete foundation 
walls extend to a second floor. The arches enclosing this 
area, therefore, are only half as high as the big ones while 
spanning the same 60-foot width. All are finished with a 
hazel-brown stain and varnish. 

In all, 11 tall aches and 13 shorter ones were installed 
20 feet apart, center to center. Every third 20 foot 
area between aches is a window bay — and every window 
bay has a center framed with lumber studs, sheathed with 
plywood, insulated, and sided with redwood. 

If the arch is the design key, another Laboratory intro- 
duction in structural concepts, the stressed-skin panel, is 
the housing that encloses it. 

This lightweight, glued-together combination of lum- 
ber frame and plywood faces literally does enclose the 
walls. The internal voids in the panels are filled with 
insulation consisting of molded polystyrene. The 214- 
inch-thick panels are mostly 4 by 8 in area. About 850 
panels were used to enclose the building. The exterior 
face of the panels were covered with a tough plastic film 
to combat the weather. 

When the building is completed this spring it will signal 
the start of a new long-term experiment in modern wood 
design and construction, along with expanded research 
in paper and other wood-fiber products. Another trans- 
lation reads — more jobs for the members of our Brother- 
hood! 

Nearly completed plant (below) is long as one and a half 
football fields. Members (right) install redwood siding. 





JANUARY, 1967 



11 




The 90+h Congress con- 
venes this month. A lot 
of labor's staunchest friends 
will be missing when the roll 
is called — the victims of a 
remarkable comeback by the 
GOP in the National elec- 
tions this past November. 
Yet we learned one im- 
portant lesson — there 
is no letup in politics. 
Liberalism must constant- 
ly battle to establish it- 
self with the electorate. On 
the strength of their congres- 
sional performance in terms of serv- 
ice to their constituents and the 
nation, most of the liberals who were 
defeated deserved to be re-elected. Yet, 
they lost. Taking their places, in many 
instances, are legislators with backgrounds 
ranging from conservative small businessmen to 
radical right extremists. Already the right-to- 
work supporters are aiming their siege guns at 



the 3 I states where workers are 
free to sign union shop contracts. 
To combat onslaughts such as this we 
must all dig in and support the cause 
of labor in Congress during this session. 
You can do your part by purchasing your CLIC 
button from your local union secretary. And just 
as Important, keep yourself informed and let your 
Congressman know you care. It will take all of the 
skill and energy possessed by the American labor 
movement, and its members, to successfully fight 
off the twin threats of expanded and more vicious 
Taft-Hartley strike injunctions, and more state open 
shop laws in the year 1967. One thing is certain! We 
are all going to be playing defensive ball, until we 
get another opportunity to go into the voting booth. 



Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 



12 



THE CARPENTER 





EDITORIALS 



^ start Moving tor '68 

We hope the lesson of the last election has been 
well learned. Complacency at the polls wins few elec- 
tions, and lack of interest between elections pulls 
the rug out from under the- working effectiveness of 
any legislator, no matter who put him in office. The 
outcome of the election promises no great social 
advances, unless there are some surprises in store 
from a more conservative House. Despite this, there 
is a great deal that can be done by every individual 
to salvage something of value out of partial defeat. 

First of all, consider keeping informed on the is- 
sues. Without a background of solid knowledge on 
the issues affecting labor's place in society today, you 
can hardly hope to persuade anyone, Congressman 
or not, to your point of view. 

Secondly, once well-informed, you can let the influ- 
ential leaders in your own community as well as the 
national level in on your views. Don't like what you 
see happening to the cost of living? Let your local 
elected officials, newspapers, and community leaders 
know, as well as your representatives in the U. S. 
House and Senate. When written carefully, thought- 
fully, yet sincerely written, letters do have an impact 
on those who are looking forward already to the next 
crack at the polls. 

Thirdly, you can start active campaigning for the 
next election yourself. Not as a candidate — unless 
you have the inclination and energy — but as a shirt- 
sleeve campaigner for your local labor program. It 
won't have begun to focus on individual candidates 
yet, but the machinery should already be moving. 

Put these three basic ingredients together, and 
you've got the floor plan for a better-than-nothing 
1967-68, and what could materialize into better-than- 
1966 slate of new faces in Congress after the next 
presidential election. 

Remember, too, that The Brotherhood's efforts for 
legislation and Washington representation are cen- 
tralized in CLIC — the Carpenter's Legislative Im- 
provement Committee. Your contributions, through 
your local union, to this organization can go a long 
way toward improving the lot of the carpenter and 
of the working man and his family in general in the 
years ahead. 



^ New Saiety Standard 

At long last, a generally recognized safety standard 
for powder-actuated tools is available for the protec- 
tion of our many members who use such tools. It has 
just been published by the USA Standards Institute 
(formerly American Standards Association) as "Safety 
Requirements for Explosive-Actuated Tools, A-10.3- 
1966." Your Brotherhood was actively concerned in 
the development of this standard; and, while we are 
not satisfied that it is the best possible standard, we 
are satisfied that it is the best that could be obtained 
at this time. It does represent a big step forward in 
providing a basis for the protection of our members 
who use these dangerous tools. No Brotherhood mem- 
ber should settle for less protection than compliance 
with this standard will provide. The General Office 
is purchasing a limited supply and will be glad to 
send a copy to any local or council which needs and 
will make good use of it. 

The A 10.3 is the first part to be published of the 
new and badly needed AlO Construction Safety Stand- 
ard. We hope that in the next year or so many other 
standards on various phases of construction will be- 
come available. We will keep you advised as these 
new standards are completed. 



% 



Pledge oi Support 



AFL-CIO President George Meany, in his New 
Year's Statement, has reiterated organized labor's 
support of President Johnson's efforts to achieve a 
just and honorable peace in Viet Nam. Said he: 

"The great majority of Americans have learned the 
unwelcome lesson that the pursuit of peace, freedom 
and progress must sometimes be defended by force 
of arms. They have learned that this is so, not only 
when the United States is subjected to direct attack, 
but also when freedom anywhere is attacked. For, to 
paraphrase a motto out of labor history, a loss of 
freedom for one is the concern of all." 

The United Brotherhood, at its 30th General Con- 
vention in Kansas City, stated its support of the Presi- 
dent's efforts. It reiterates its support as we begin a 
new year. 



JANUARY, 1967 



13 



1 4^ Eanadian Report 



Lumber-Sawmill 
Pact in Ontario 

The Lumber and Sawmill Workers 
Union, affiliated with the Brotherhood 
and covering northern Ontario's log- 
ging industry, closed out 1966 by get- 
ting a solid two-year agreement with 
seven major pulp and paper companies 
retroactive to September 1st. 

This contract could mark a new deal 
in labor-management relations between 
the union and the companies whose 
disputes over the years have seen many 
stormy times. One of the most con- 
troversial matters, the contracting out 
of operations, was resolved in favour 
of the union when the company agreed 
that all contractors come under the 
terms of the agreement. 

The basic monetary settlement was 
a 25 cents an hour increase in each 
of the two years retroactive to the 
first of September for almost all the 
hourly rated employees. In addition 
day workers engaged in cutting opera- 
tions will get an adjustment of five 
cents an hour; skilled workers will re- 
ceive 10 to 17 cents an hour by way 
of adjustment, while fringe benefits 
will add another 12 cents an hour in 
the first year, paid for by the com- 
panies. 

Previous to this agreement, the labor 
rate was $2.12. the average for hourly 
rated workers was $2.54 while piece- 
workers averaged $3.84. The latter will 
get an increase of 6'/4 percent in each 
of the two years. 

Tight Money Hurts 
Canadian Housing 

The cutback in home-building in 
1966 is going to have serious effects 
in 1967. 

Someone miscalculated and again 
the finger is pointed at the federal 
government. 

Facing what it thought was a serious 
inflationary threat, the government 
took measures to deal with it. 'Tight 
money" policy was again introduced. 
Interest rates went up. Available funds 
went where the rates were highest. 
Housing suffered. Home construction 
was curtailed. 

A serious housing shortage has oc- 
curred and its going to get worse. The 
contradiction in the whole situation 
is that, instead of heading off inflation. 



tight money has caused inflation in 
housing costs. Especially in metropoli- 
tan areas, the cost of homes has soared 
to record heights. Potential home buy- 
ers have been forced into apartments. 
Apartments, despite rapid construction, 
are in short supply. The shortage has 
forced up rents. 

Higher housing costs and higher 
rentals have brought about the very 
inflation which the tight money policy 
sought to avoid. It has actually forced 
up the cost of living. 

Mortgage Interest 
Reaches Record High 

Trying to make amends for its first 
false move, the federal government in 
December increased the interest rate 
under the National Housing Act to 
IVi percent, a record high. The idea 
behind this was that a higher rate 
would encourage more money to flow 
into housing. It might, but so far there 
is no evidence of this. But it has had 
the effect of again adding to the cost 
of homes. 

A year ago the NHA rate was 614 
percent. The extra one percent in in- 
terest adds about $3,000 to the total 
cost of a house over a period of 30 
years at 7?4 percent will cost the 
homeowner a total of $36,000 — $15,- 
000 in principal, and $21,000 in inter- 
est. This means that only people with 
incomes of about $10,000 a year or 
more can afford to buy. 

This is one of the reasons why hous- 
ing starts in urban areas were down 
23 percent last year. As one housing 
expert said, "We have a housing policy 
of socialism for the rich and free en- 
terprise for the poor." 

The Economic Council of Canada 
warned the government that the drop 
in housing starts would have serious 
consequences. The Council, Canada's 
authoritative economic adviser to the 
government, said in its third annual re- 
view, that "in the absence of an early 
upturn in new residential construction, 
a severe housing shortage could emerge 
very quickly in Canada, and rent in- 
creases could become a powerful new 
factor accentuating the rise in living 
costs and in wage demands." 
The shortage is here. 

What Canada needs is massive resi- 
dential construction, non-stop for many 
vears to come. 



Canada's Unit Labor 
Costs Are Steadiest 

It came by way of Washington, but 
the report said that Canada's unit 
labor costs are the steadiest among 
nine nations surveyed. In short Cana- 
dian labor costs have not gone up too 
high or too fast compared with these 
other nations. 

The report came from the U.S. De- 
partment of Labor. It showed that 
Canada is the only one among the 
nine nations surveyed which has cut 
costs in manufacturing since 1957, the 
base year. 

The other nations in the report are 
the United States, France, the Nether- 
lands, West Germany, Italy, Sweden, 
Japan and the United Kingdom. 

Engineers Call for 
Safety Measures 

Engineers in the province of Que- 
bec have expressed serious concern 
over the series of accidents on various 
construction projects and demanded 
increased safety measures for work- 
ers as well as for the public. 

The president of the Corporation 
of Engineers of Quebec has asked that 
legislation be passed to define respon- 
sibility concerning safety on construc- 
tion. He named three projects where 
formwork collapsed. 

The engineers' organization believes 
that a joint committee of engineers, 
construction industry and labor repre- 
sentatives should establish rules and 
recommend their enactment to the 
government. 

Ontario, its neighboring province, 
has adopted good safety legislaton. Ac- 
cidents through faulty construction still 
happen, but someone does bear the 
blame — and the penalties 

Consumer Fights 
Price Battle, Too 

With all the uproar about soaring 
food costs, the consumer is being asked 
to share some of the responsibility. 
Processed foods are in high demand, 
but cost more. Get back to making 
beef stew starting with the basic in- 
gredients instead of serving heated-up 
TV dinners; and bake a cake starting 
with flour and eggs and baking powder 
and vanilla etc. instead of buying 
readymades; and buy packaged skim 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



milk instead of bottled whole milk to 
get all the nutrition and none of the 
fat; and use old fashioned oatmeal 
instead of high cost corn flakes, and 
so on and so on. 

Get back to grandma's day? It's 
more fun to buy the fancy foods and 
kick about the costs. 

But it must be admitted that the 
house wife is doing a good job of using 
the democratic process to protest her 
beefs. If she ever decides to take polit- 
ical action, watch out! 

Five Unionists 
Released from Jail 

The last of 25 Canadian unionists 
sentenced to jail for an anti-injunction 
demonstration at the strike-bound Tilco 
Plastics plant, Peterborough, Ontario, 
have been released. 

Within an hour the five men, with 
their wives and children took a turn 
on the picket line at the still strike- 
bound plant where the Textile Work- 
ers Union struck a year ago against 
sub-standard wages. 

The five men, as they left prison, 
were greeted by reporters, television 
cameramen and leading Canadian 
union leaders for whom the Tilco 
prison sentences represent a crude use 
of an injunction against labor organi- 
zations in Canada. 

The released men were: William 
Mulders and George Rutherford of 
the Steelworkers; Stanley Rouse, a 
member of the Machinists; and Victor 
Skurjat and Bud Clark, both repre- 
sentatives of the TWUA. 

TWUA President William Pollock, 
in a wire from New York, told Sku- 
rjat: 

"Your ordeal is finally over, and 
our union and the entire labor move- 
ment in Canada and the United States 
is proud of your courageous stand 
against anti-picketing injunctions." 

The five men said that they would 
go back to prison if a good cause arose 
again and if this would gain anything 
for that cause. 

The consensus was that their time 
behind prison bars had been worth- 
while. Skurjat said: "We brought to 
the fore the unfairness of injunctions 
in labor disputes. And the demonstra- 
tors were instrumental in having a 
Royal Commission set up to examine 
the broad spectrum of labor legisla- 
tion including injunctions in labor dis- 
putes." 

Among the briefs to be heard by 
former Supreme Court Justice Ivan C. 
Rand, who will start his inquiry into 
the province's labor laws in January, 
will be one from the Peterborough 
demonstrators. 




These 
FREE BLUE PRINTS 

have started thousands toward 

BETTER PAY AND PROMOTION 



That's right! In all fifty states, men who 
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tendents and building contractors. They've 
landed these higher-paying jobs because they 
learned to read blue prints and mastered 
the practical details of construction. Now 
CTC home-study training in building offers 
you the same money-making opportunity. 

LEARN IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

As you know, the ability to read blue prints 
completely and accurately determines to a 
great extent how far you can go in building. 
What's more, you can learn plan reading 
simply and easily with the Chicago Tech 
system of spare-time training in your own 
home. You also learn all phases of building, 
prepare yourself to run the job from start 
to finish. 



CASH IN ON YOUR EXPERIENCE 

For over 63 years, building tradesmen and 
beginners alike have won higher pay with 
the knowledge gained from Chicago Tech's 
program in blue print reading, estimating, 
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Don't waste a single day. Start preparing 
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MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Chicago Technical College 
A-13;i Tech BIdg.. 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: *' 
Blue Prints" with information about how 
at home. 

Name 



How to Read 
I can. train 



-Age- 



Address— 



City 

Occupation.- 



-Zone State- 



JANUARY, 1967 



15 







IT all started with a hole in the wall 
— but what progress the window 
has made! Now tons of ail-climate in- 
sulating windows form the walls of 
gleaming skyscrapers, but ages ago they 
were nothing more than tiny slits — 
the smaller the better to keep arrows 
and savage beasts out of the cave. 

Shedding a little light on the history 
of the window, the ancient Chinese 
used panes of rice paper: the Romans 
thin sheets of marble. Early English 
castles had them, set high in the thick 
walls, to defend against arrows, scaling 
ladders and battering rams. But win- 
dows didn't really see the light of day 
until men stopped holing up fearfully 
in fortresses and started living in wall 
towns. 

By the end of the 3rd century, win- 
dow glass was being mentioned by 
contemporary writers. Lactantius. in 
A.D. 290. writes that our soul sees and 
distinguishes objects by the eyes of the 
body as through windows filled with 
glass. Saint Jerome, A.D. 331, speaks 
of sheets of glass produced by casting 
on a large flat stone — probably the 
earliest forerunner of modern plate 
glass manufacture. 

The first crude plate glass windows 
must have been frustrating to mothers 
calling their children in from the street 
— for the windows were set immovably 
in the walls and could not be opened. 
But if mama had no freedom of ex- 
pression short of banging on the win- 
dow, glaziers certainly did — they cre- 
ated highly decorative stained glass 
windows. 

These glorious windows, built up of 
a multitude of small pieces of stained 
glass set in strips of lead, appeared in 
churches all over Europe during the 
6th and 7th centuries. By the 12th 
century pictorial designs had been in- 
troduced — making the windows liter- 
ally sermons in glass. At first the glass 
was dyed during melting by adding 
metallic oxides. Later, enamel was ap- 
plied to the surface. 

The principle of staining or tinting 
glass for windows is as important to- 
day as it ever was in the history of 
glassmaking — but for entirely different 
reasons. For as the scores of gleaming 
glass and steel skyscrapers rise all over 
the country, there is an ever-increasing 



need for a tinted all-climate insulating 
glass which cuts glare at the same time 
it provides adequate light transmission. 
Solarban Twindow, a new product by 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass, was developed 
to perform this job. 

But even more important, Solarban 
— which is made up of two panes of 
glass separated by one-quarter inch of 
near vacuum — substantially reduces 
conducted heat loss or heat gain, 
measurably reducing heating and cool- 
ing costs. 

Temperature control and glare re- 
sistance, however, are only part of the 
total picture of unique properties 
possessed by today's glass windows — 
which have added new dimension and 
utility to modern living for occupants 
of schools, hospitals, office buildings, 
homes, and vehicles. 

Safety glass, for example, which 
originated way back in 1855 in Eng- 
land in the form of wired glass, has 
saved countless lives and prevented 
injuries to millions. Actually, the evo- 
lution of safety glass alone involves 
three great ideas in windows. The first 
consists of embedding a wire mesh in 
the glass — providing excellent fire pro- 
tection in buildings. Laminating a sheet 
of plastic between two sheets of glass 
is another common type of safety win- 
dow. When the glass is struck a heavy 
blow, as in a car accident, splinters re- 
main firmly adhered to the intermedi- 
ate plastic layer. Bullet-resistant glass 
is a multi-layered form of this lami- 
nated glass. 

A new tempering technique known 
as the "gas hearth process," has made 
possible a third important type of 
safety glass, which answers the in- 
Continued on Page 24 




The 
Craftsman's 
Legacy 




N 




'X^ 1 ^ 







3^ 



' %1$^' ..■ 






Materials We Work With V 



The first mention of stained glass win- 
dows is in the writings of 4th-century 
Latin and Greek authors. TOP photo 
is a fine 19th-century example of the art. 
The oriel-window, center, is part of a' 
Victorian mansion in New York City., 
The highly ornamented beef-eye shaped" 
dormer window, bottom, graces the ma- 
jestic Hotel des Invalides — thought by 
many to be the most impressire building 
in Paris. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




"^ 



o 



'JkMM 



m 




SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES' MAIL TO PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONST. AVE., N, W. WASH.. D. C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT.) 



Matter of Faith 

The pastor of the church was tele- 
phoned by the Internal Revenue Serv- 
ice, the caller explaining that the IRS 
was auditing the return of a parish- 
ioner. "He has listed a $500 donation. 
Did he make this donation?" the IRS 
man asked. The clergyman hesitated 
a moment before replying: "hie will 
... he will!" 

BE AN ACTIVE UNIONIST 




Huggin' 'n Chalkin' 

Sailor (on leave): "1 met my old 
girl today. Hadn't seen her in 10 
years." 

Howie: "Has she kept her girlish 
figure?" 

Sailor: "Kept it? She's doubled 
it!" 

BUY ONLY UNION TOOLS 

Somebody's Sugar? 

Note to busy executives; A husband 
who keeps busy as a bee may dis- 
cover some day that his honey is 
missing! 

U R THE "U" IN UNION 

Proper Medicine 

The mother took her small boy with 
her to the doctor. She never cor- 



rected the kid and, as she talked 
to the doctor, the brat was ran- 
sacking the inner office to the sound 
of breaking glass. "I hope you don't 
mind Junior playing around in your 
office, doctor" she simpered. "Not 
at all," replied the doctor calmly. 
"He'll quiet down in a little while 
when he gets to the poison cabinet." 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Unexpected View 

During the last election campaign, 
J. H. "Rip" Snorter, in a speech de- 
claimed: "I tell you, ladies and gentle- 
men, we owe much to the working 
classes! It Is the working classes which 
have made this country what it is 
today!" He paused, awaiting ap- 
plause from his audience of organized 
labor. But from the rear Howie 
shouted: "That's right . . . blame 
everything on the poor folks!" 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION! 

Dead Wrong 

The guide was showing a group 
through the museum. "This is 'Venus 
at the Bath' — executed in terra cotta." 
In the back row a woman said: "What 
a pity! How barbarous those Asians 
are!" 

REGISTER TO VOTE 



This Month's Limerick 

A tailor of highest repute 

Once sewed a suit for a suitor from 
Butte. 
But when donned, the suit parted 
And the suitor then started 

A suit for the suit that didn't suit. 

— John T. Freeman, L.U. 22 



End of His Rope 

A boomer carpenter met up with 
an old friend and asked about a mu- 
tual friend of years past. "He's dead 
. . . fell through some scaffolding," 
he was told. "That's too bad. What 
was he doing at the time?" "Being 
hanged!" 

REGISTER TO VOTE 




Spotty Conversation 

"You must have been up pretty 
late last night, Mrs. Felding. I saw 
your light on at 3 a. m." 

"Oh, I was just removing some 
spots from Irving's pants." 

"At that hour? Were they very 
big?" 

"Not very; — just two lO-spots and 
a five-spot!" 

BE UNION— BUY LABEL 

Guess Who? 

Two starlets met at the movie 
studio commissary one noon, and the 
following dialogue ensued: "Guess 
who I ran into at the track yester- 
day?" "My ex-husband?" "No." 
"Your ex-husband?" "Wrong again." 
"Our ex-husband?" "Right!" 



JANUARY, 1967 



17 




Instructor Gus Uthoff (center) explains a fine point in roof framing to a class of apprentice carpenters in a new classroom. 

St. Louis Carpenters Participate In Unique Training School 




From left to riglit: Maury Rubin, editor-publisher, St. Louis Labor Tribune; Perry 
Joseph, business representative, Carpenters' District Council; Robert S. Saunders, 
president, Carpenters' District Council of St. Louis; Erwin C. Meinert, sec.-treas., 
Carpenters' District Council; J. O. Mack, General Executive Board Member; 
D. Richard Adams, business manager, St. Louis CDC; Ollie W. Langhorst, business 
representative, St. Louis CDC; P. G. Jenkins, business representative, St. Louis CDC; 
Gus Uthoff, instructor. Carpenters' Apprentice School; Joe Pijut, instructor. Carpet 
and Linoleum Layers Apprentice School; James Watson, business representative, 
St. Louis CDC. 




Mr. Hunt Benoist, President, Associated General Contractors of St Louis, making 
the speech of dedication at the new St. Louis training school. 



The free enterprise system in action 
and a lesson in labor and management 
cooperation are both embodied in the 
unique new training school recently 
dedicated in St. Louis, Missouri. 

The Construction Training School 
is a child of necessity, since its birth 
came about to meet a critical need 
for skilled craftsmen in the St. Louis 
area. The trades involved include the 
Carpenters, Cement Masons, Iron 
Workers, Operating Engineers and 
Laborers. 

Each trade at the two-story, 
$575,000 ultra-modern school has its 
own individual work shop. The car- 
pentry shop occupies 1440 square feet 
of the building's total of nearly 30,000 
square feet. In this shop, apprentices 
will be taught door hanging, lock in- 
stalling, trimwork, roof framing, stair 
building, use of carpentry tools and 
job layouts. These will be imple- 
mented in the classrooms by blue- 
print reading, mathematics, plane and 
level work, labor history, first aid, 
safety and related subjects. 

The school is unique in that it is 
financed by 1500 contractors who con- 
tribute 2 cents for every hour worked 
by members of four of the trades and 
a penny for members of the laborers' 
union. This method of financing elimi- 
nates the need for excessive control 
by federal government bureaus or 
excessive local taxation to provide 
what is not always an adequate 
training. 

The school is governed by a board 
of trustees with the programs spon- 
sored and administrated by the Asso- 
ciated General Contractors of St. 
Louis. There are three full-time and 
13 part-time instructors paid partially 
by the St. Louis School Board and 
supplemented by the A.G.C. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




(DffldiffaftDauafl^ 



DO 



^000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



northern Alberta. Thus, he is embarked 
on a new career at a time when most 
men are content to "call it a day". 
Brother Metcalfe joined Local 1325 on 
June 1, 1928, and 
retired on pension 
from the Edmonton 
Public School Board 
at the age of 70, 
when he moved to 
Valleyview. He serv- 
ed as president of 
Local 1325 for three 
terms and was busi- 
ness agent for two 
years. 




,,.*«v<**^'' 




Metcalfe 



MDA SUPPORTER - Nick Santiago, Jr., 
president of Local 3108, New York City, 
accepts a Citation of Merit from Muscu- 
lar Dystrophy Associations of America 
for his work with the labor movement 
in the Greater New York area on behalf 
of the Jerry Lewis Labor Day Telethon 
for Muscular Dystrophy. Paul Cohen, 
president of MDA, makes the presenta- 
tion at an awards luncheon at the Ameri- 
cana Hotel. 

FIRST SCHOLARSHIP-Unions continue to 
expand their support of higher education. 
First to receive a 
scholarship award 
under a scholarship 
program recently 
launched by Local 
1772, Hicksville, 
N. Y., was Miss 
Linda Michaelsen, 
shown here, daugh- 
ter of Brotherhood 
Member Michael 
Miss Michaelsen Michaelsen. Miss 
Michaelsen was picked from a class of 
15 high school graduates, and she is now 
attending college. 

Many local unions of the United Broth- 
erhood are now establishing special funds 
for annual scholarship awards to the 
children of members. 

HIS HONOR, THI MAYOR-This year, at 
the age of 74, Russell J. Melcalfe of 
Local 1325, Edmonton, Alberta, was 
elected mayor of Valleyview, a town in 



SCOUT SPONSORS-In 1962 Local Union 
3130 of Hampton, South Carolina, began 
sponsoring Boy Scout Troop 486. At that 
time, Johnnie Brunson became a tender- 
foot Scout and in four short years re- 
ceived the highest honor a Boy Scout 
can receive — the Eagle Award. During 
the four years Johnnie received 22 merit 
badges, and in 1964 he received the God 
and Country Award. 

Johnnie is the Son of Mrs. Peggy 
Brunson and the nephew of Mr. and Mrs. 
K. P. Mosley, all of whom are members 
of Local Union 3130. 





JOHNNIE BRUNSON, front, Mary 
Jane and K. P. Mosley; and Peggy Brun- 



UNION CARPENTERS' 

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WITH this kit you can keep 
your taxes DOWN! All you have 
to do is follow the instructions. 



KIT INCLUDES: 

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• Detailed instructions 

• Simplified work sheets 
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Please rush my tax return kit. 
Enclosed is $20.00 D Check D M.O. 
If not completely satisfied, I may return 
the kit. 



Name- 



Address. 

City 

State 



..Zip- 



JANUARY, 1967 



19 



/ 




UNION NEWS 



3000 Years Spanned 
In 3-Weeks Work 

POMONA, CALIF.— The feat of span- 
ning 3000 years in three weeks time was 
accomplished this year at the Los Angeles 
County Fair Grounds, Pomona. 

The Tri-County Exhibit at the annual 
fair needed a realistic reproduction of a 
life-size redwood tree. Carpenters of the 
area were called upon to produce one. 

Participating in the project were Frank 
Biedler. Local 75L Santa Rosa: Carl 
Smith. Local 1752. Pomona, and Adolf 
Van Der Burg. Local 1507. El Monte. 

The "tree" was fabricated on the Fair 
Grounds, inside the Exhibits Building. It 
was 12 feet in diameter at the base and 
40 feet tall. 

1. The initial construction of tlie cir- 
cular frames. 

2. Tiie skeletal framework assembly. 

3. The finished "tree," covered with 
slabs of genuine redwood bark, erected 
and in place. 




New Home for California Local 

COSTA MESA, Calif. — A grand opening was scheduled last 
month at the new ofSce of Local Union No. 1453, located at 
8302 Atlanta Avenue, Huntington, Beach. Financial Secretary 
CjTil Fritz reports that the local union has been operating 
from the new building since September. 




20 



THE CARPENTER 



M.:, 



V;sS5Si(I^SSiS#«*^6^#?^!%^S9^^?S^i«s:?V5,^S;^^ 



W>^m 




At the head tables for the Local 9 celebration were: BOTTOM ROW, left to right, Mayor and Mrs. Frank Sedita, Rev. Msgr. 
Stanley Kulpinski, Gen. Secretary Richard E. Livingston, Buffalo District Council Pres. Buddy Bodewes and Mrs. Bodewes, 
President Local No. 9 John McMahon, and Buffalo District Council Legal Advisor Thomas McMahon. CENTER ROW, Rev. 
Alfred M. Goehle, Business Representative Herman J. Bodewes and Mrs. Bodewes, Buffalo District Council Secy.-Treas. Paul 
Walters and Mrs. Walters, Executive Vice President Contractors Industrial Employers Association Robert R. Logan and Mrs. 
Logan. TOP ROW, District Council Unemployment Consultant Michael Ricci, Mrs. William A. Miller, Mrs. Alfred J. Lang- 
felder, Banquet Chairman Alfred J. Langfelder, Mrs. William Burke, and Local 1978 Pile Drivers Business Representative 
William Burke. 

Buffalo's First Local Union Marks 85th Anniversary 



£^i! 






^W 



■•1.. s . 



A view of some of the hundreds of guests at the 85th anniversary celebration in Buffalo. 



BUFFALO, N.Y.— Local No. 9 is 
the first organized carpenters' union in 
the City of Buflfalo and one of the charter 
locals of the Brotherhood. The first re- 
corded meeting of the local was held 
August 31, 1880, and the local became 
known as the Carpenters and Joiners of 
Buflfalo. The international charter was 
received on January 31, 1882. The pre- 
fix "United" was added in 1888, when 
the young international union was con- 
solidated with another group of union 
carpenters. The district council was or- 
ganized in April, 1890. 

Local No. 9 recently celebrated its 85th 
Anniversary with a banquet. Distinguished 
visitors to the commemoration included 
Buffalo Mayor Frank Sedita, General 
Secretary Richard E. Livingston, and 
many local and area labor and civic 
leaders. 

Social Security Tax Up 

WASHINGTON, D. C. -— The com- 
bined social security-medicare payroll 
tax rose by two-tenths of 1 percent on 
Jan. 1 for both workers and employers 
— going from 4.2 to 4.4 percent of earn- 
ings up to $6,600 a year. 

AFL-CIO Social Security Dir. Ber- 
trand Seidman notes that the increase 
amounts to only 23 cents a week for 
the average factory worker. Three- 
fourths of the increase is earmarked 
for the medicare basic hospitalization 
program; the balance goes to finance 
old age, survivors and disability insur- 
ance benefits. 




i> -i.' 



it'sJVflV...it'$"GOiD 

IT HAS STUDMARKINGS... 

AND IT'S U/ 

FROM Vboldblatt 



Vs' notches in the iM'x 
H*x22V2' head let you cut 
the full width of a wall- 
board panel in one sivipe! 
No more torn or ragged 
corners on the panels — 
you get a clean cut right 
up to the very edge of the 
panel every time. 

Use the marking holes at 
16', 24' and 32' to mark 
Btud centers without I if t- 
ing T-Square — saves 
time, makes it almost 
impossible to miss a stud 
when nailing up panels. 

The blade is same width 
as a standard outlet 
box. You cut both sides 
of the hole with perfect 
accuracy without mov- 
ing: the T-Square. 




CATALOG! 

You'ir find »\\ th« ratnt, 
newejt, best drywall tools 
in the bif. all-new Gold* 
blattTool CataloE. Just 
check and mail coupon for 
you r copy— it's you n Free ! 



ITWILL HELP YOU HANG DRYWALL 
BETTER— EASIER— FASTER! 

New "Gold" T-Square will make those walls and ceilings go up faster— and 
easier, 2 xH xjlh' blade of heat-treated flexible aluminum alloy lies flat 
against board for fast, clean cuts. And the new anodized gold color finish 
makes numbers and markings show up with greater contrast for easy at-a- 
glance reading. Large numbers read from either end of the blade to make 
time -wasting mental arithmetic a thing of the past. The handsome gold 
finish also makes a T-Square that's weather- and stain-resistant — a T- 
Square that's lightweight, yet rugged, and built to last. 

N o. 05 12 M7 Only $9.0O 

NEW IMPROVED 16'' CHECKER-HEAD 
ADZE-EYE WALLBOARD HAMMER 

\ Properly rounded and checkered head dimples wallboard perfectly 

,\ for best possible nailing and easier spotting — without bruising 

paper. Fits -your- hand, offset hickory handle eliminates rapped 

knuckles. Full 16' length gives better balance, makes easy 

rough gauge for 16' centers too. Plus a handy nail puller in 

the wedge-shaped blade. Usethisthin. strong; bladetoshiftor 

pry boards into place. Adze-eye head holds handle securely. 

No. 05 164 M7 Only $6.50 

See Your Favorite Coldblatt Dealer or 

Use the Coupon Below to Order Direct. 

Goldblatt Tool Company, 521 a Osage St., Kansas City, Kans. 661 lol 
I Please send me the following tools postpaid 
I I enclose check or money prder for $ _____ ^"^' Shipping Charges— • 




1-1 Q^T,^ i?Di?c r^ijui **-rT. T/- * 1 S^'^ BOTH T-SQUAHE AND 

3 Send FREE Goldblatt Tool Catalog. HAMMER For J15 50 Postoaid 




Quantify 
Wanted 



Stock Number, 
As StiowR Ab3ve 



05 120 M7 



05 164 M7 



Price 
Each 



$9.00 
$6.50 



Osage St., 



Kansas City, , (■ 
Kans. 66110 I— 



NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY.. STATE . 



.ZIP. 



JANUARY, 1967 



21 



LAYOUT LEVEL 




• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Sove Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 



In jast a few minutes you accurately set batters 
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ceilings, forms, fixtui'es, and check foundations 
for i-emodeling. 

HYDROLE\^L is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
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clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
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1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
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obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate *|fc|'i*' 
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thousands of carpentei"s, buLldei"s, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
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Ask your tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow the usual dealer discount on }i I3oz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSoto, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 




You'll Like Being a 
SKILLED 

LOCKSMITH 



EARN MORE. LIVE BETTER 
than Ever Before in Your Life 
You'll enjoy your work as a Lock- 
smith. It's more fascinating than a 
hobby — and liighly paid besides ! 
A.S a Locksmith year after year, in 
good times or bad you'll be the 
man in demand in an everRrowiiig 
field offering big pay jobs, big 
profits as your own boss. What more 
could you askl 

Train at Home- 
Earn Extra $$$$ Right Away! 
All tliis can be yours FAST regard- 
less of age. education, minor phys- 
ical handicaps. Job enjoyment and 
earnings can begin AT ONTE. Yon 
learn quickly, easily. CASH IN on 
all kinds of locksmithing jobs. All 
keys, locks, parts, picks, special 
tools and etiuipment supplied. Li- 
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cppp Illustrated Book 
■ "^^^ Sample Lesson Pages 
Locksmithing Institute grariuates now 
earning, enjoying life iimre every- 
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from only school of its kind: Lie. by 
N. J. State Dept. of Ed.. Accredited 
Member. Nafl. Home Studv Coun- 
cil. VA Approved. LOCKSMITHING 
INSTITUTE, Div. of Technical 
Home Study Schools. Dept. l-llh- 
017. Little Falls. N..I. (17424. 






"$642 
WHILE 
LEARN- 
ING 
N'oir r 
average 

$3.25 an hour at 
locksniitlnng in my 
spare time With 
your instinction, 
any one can do it." 
K. Ted fiilToid 

llnliilisnn. III. 




quipro»nt t 

LOCKS, MCKS*' 

and TOOLS : 

(or uM t 
wifh £t>uri* A 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE. Dept. I-1 18-017 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Op- 
portunities in Locksmithing," complete equipment 
folder and sample lesson pages — Free of all obliga- 
tion — (no salesman wlU call). 

Name 

(Please Print) 

Address 

City State Zip 

□ Check here if eligible for Vet. benefits 



Colorado Local Celebrates 63rd Anniversary 




GOLDEN, COLORADO — The membership of Local 1396 held a double-barreled 
celebration recently when they commemorated their 63rd anniversary and also hon- 
ored 25- and 50-year members of the local at a special dinner dance. General Execu- 
tive Board Member Leon Greene, seated, fourth from left, presented emblems to eight 
25-year members and one 50-year member. Others shown, seated, left to right, are: 
Leslie Prickett, president. Carpenters District Council; Matt Weaver, president, 
Colo. State Council of Carpenters; Howard Stafford, 50-year member; Greene; 
Fred A. Nichols, Master of Ceremonies; Standing, left to right: Jay D. Shiflet, Fin. 
Sec'y.f Business Representative, L.U. 1396; Ivan Huffman, Wm. McNealy, Harvey 
Hayes, George Pech, George Eraser, and Neal DeKok, all 25-year members; and 
Levine Morris, President. L.U. 1396; Not shown, Frank Rice and Clyde Loper, both 
25-year members. 



Local 191 Presents First Pension Checks 




YORK, PA. — Local 191 recently cele- 
brated a first when pension checks un- 
der the local's pension trust fund were 
presented. Pictured above are pensioned 
members who attended a dinner to cele- 
brate the occasion. Seated (1. to r.): 
Daniel Smeltzer, N. J. Gross, Pierce 
Krebs, John Gohn, John Ehrhart and 
William Reigart. Standing: Paul Klein- 
ard, M. W. Shoft, Joe Lovell, Paul Smith, 
Dan Rehmeyer, Edward Knisely, Carroll 
Volland and N. W. Weigard. Smaller 
photo shows Donald Moore of the pension 
committee presenting the first pension 
check to John Ehrhart while Gen. Rep. 
Ray Ginnetti looks on. Receiving pension 
checks but not shown are Charles Day- 
holf, Elliott Ricker, Fred Klippel. Charles 
King and S. J. Miller. 




ATTEND YOUR LOCAL UNION 

MEETINGS REGULARLY! 

BE AN ACTIVE /MEMBER! 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Baltimore Members' Sons Win Scholarships 




BALTIMORE, MD. — The sons of two Baltimore Local 101 members recently won 
college scholarships under a Construction Industry Advancement Program spon- 
sored by the Associated General Contractors of America. Four scholarships are 
presented annually to the son of a member of the Carpenters, Laborers and Cement 
Masons who qualifies. Shown above are the winners and their proud fathers (left to 
right): Booker T. Washington, Sr., Cement Mason Local 3; Thomas E. Grey, chair- 
man of the CIAP Board of Trustees who made the scholarship presentations at a 
dinner given in the winners honor; Booker T. Washington, Jr., (attending Morgan 
State College); Earl Robert Smith (Morgan State); Earnest Owens, Riggers Unions; 
Lawrence Lehmann (Univ. of Md.) and his father Charles of Local 101; Rodney 
Harrill (Univ. of Md.) and his father Luther, also of Local 101; and T. Courtenay 
Jenkins, president of the Baltimore Chapter of the A.G.C. Harrill has received a 
scholarship award from the program for three consecutive years. 



Banquet Honors Veteran Local 1095 Members 




SALEVA, KANSAS — The above photo shows some of the more than 100 members 
and their guests who attended a recent pin presentation banquet that honored 
veteran members of Local 1095. In the photo below are pictured those eligible 
for pins. Standing (1. to r.): Paul Gaiser, Samuel Curd. Int'l. Rep. who made the 
pin presentations, Seighardt Deines and G. W. Byars. All received 25-year service 
pins. Seated: Francis Lott, Edward Lott, Russell Tunnell, and Phil Vermillion. All 
received 25-year pins except Edward Lott, who received a 45-year pin. Eligible for 
a pin but not present was Elgie Stahlman. 







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23 



Those receiving certificates of completion at Chicago, most of whom are shown above, included: Gerald A. Ammenhauser, 
L. U. 1889; Robert W. Axelson. L. U. 141; Richard Bending, L. U. 839; Larry Berg, L. U. 1185; Andrew Boersma, L. U. 
62; Kenneth Brady, L. U. 181; Benjamin Bresette. L. U. 839; Dennis Centracchio, L. U. 1185; Thomas Charleston, L. U. 839; 
Kenneth Crane, L. U. 1185; Richard Dankert, L. U. 62; Theodore R. Day, L. U. 839; Dwain Dehmlow, L. U. 419: James A. 
Dekker. L. U. 434; Dennis Donati, L. U. 1185; Roy Engstrom, L. U. 58; Ervil Fox,*L. U. 461; Charles Gargola, L. U. 141; 
Bruce K. Giden, L. U. 1307; Walter Grandt. L. U. 2014; Terrence Grandys, L. U. 54; Fred Hackleman, L. U. 1185; Kenneth 
Hanson. L. U. 62; Jerry Head, L. U. 10; John HeflEernan, L. U. 1922; Edward D. Janeczek, L. U. 1185; Henry Janeczek, L. U. 
1185: William Kalchbrenner, L. U. 62; Clinton Koehler, L. U. 839; Thomas R. Kopacz, L. U. 1527; Dale Kropke, L. U. 58; 
Edward R. Krupski, L. U. 1185: Robert E. Larson, L. U. 839; Joseph J. Lozano, L. U. 448; Russell Malinowski, L. U. 1784; 
Russell Miceli, L. U. 1185; John Narr, L. U. 558; Walter H. Olejnik, L. U. 434; William Olsen, L. U. 58; Vincent Pacetti, 
L. U. 199: George Peterson, L. U. 1185; Frank Pozdol, L. U. 1185; James Rausa, L. U. 181; Raymond R. Rodway, L. U. 
1185; Daniel C. Ruschke, L. U. 558; Richard Schwager, L. U. 58; William Scott, L. U. 1; Francis Seidel, L. U. 62; Robert 
Shearer, L. U. 839; Larry Shetlar, L. U. 272; John Skamra, L. U. 1185; Anthony E. Stepuncik, L. U. 434; Ted A. Stone, L. U. 
62; Roger Sutton, L. U. 272; John A. Teufel, L. U. 181; Roger D, Towery, L. U. 1996; William Trier, L. U. 1185; Frank 
Unhold, L. U. 1784; Robert Volkart, L. U. 1922; Peter Weber, L. U. 839; James Williams, L. U. 62; William Wise, L. U. 
1185; Raymond Wisniewski, L. U. 1185; Dwight Wood, L. U. 1307; Daniel Yukus, L. U. 448; Gerald Zelisko, L. U. 1185. 

Chicago Council Awards Certificates of Completion 

Welfare and Pension Funds; the Con- 
struction Employers Association, 

Among others were officers of the 
Council as well as the General Counsel 
for the Chicago District Council. 

Following the issuance of the Certifi- 
cates to the group, all present joined in 
an evening of fun and reminiscing, inter- 
spersed with much fine food. 

GREAT IDEAS 

Continued from Page 16 

creased demand for larger expanses of 
glass in living areas. When the glass 
does break it crumbles into small 
round pieces without sharp edges. 

One-way glass is still another great 
idea in windows that has found many 
important uses. This type of window is 
used with great success by teachers, 
psychologists, therapists, police investi- 
gators, and even by toy manufacturers 
testing their products. 

Finally, a new float glass is helping 
to revolutionize the glass industry. 
While regular plate glass for windows 
would normally have to be ground and 
polished to make it smooth and clear, 
this unique type of glass is actually 
floated out of the ovens over a bath of 
molten tin, and emerges in a continu- 
ous ribbon of perfectly flat, exception- 
ally brilliant glass. 

It may have all started with a hole 
in the wall, but the unique wonders 
of glass have made the saga of windows 
more than an open-and-shut case — as 
you can clearly see! 



CHICAGO, ILL. — On November 
10th, 1966. the annual apprentice grad- 
uation exercises were conducted by the 
Chicago District Council. Sixty-six ap- 



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prentices were awarded certificates of 
completion at a special meeting, all of 
whom, with the exception of a few now 
in military, were present at the affair. 
In attendance were all of the officers of 
the District Council and all of the busi- 
ness agents of the Chicago area, as well 
as a number of officers from the various 
local unions. 

Also in attendance were a number 
of guests who were present to wish God- 
speed to the graduating class. Among 
these guests were General Vice President 
Finlay Allan and General Vice President, 
Retired, John R. Stevenson, both of 
whom addressed the meeting, as did a 
number of others in attendance repre- 
senting the Contractors Association; the 
Chicago Building Trades Council; the 
Board of Education; the Department of 
Labor; Bureau of Apprenticeship; the 
Illinois State Council; the Carpenters 




First General Vice President Finlay 
Allan addresses the graduates of the 
Chicago training program. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



Research Director is Radio Show Guest 




High interest rates and the scarcity of mortgage money are deepening the 
depression in the home-building industry, Carpenters' Research Dir. Donald 
Danielson (center) told Stanley Levey (left) of the Scripps-Howard Newspapers 
and Alan Adams of Business Week on Labor News Conference. The weekly 
AFL-CIO-produced public service interview is broadcast nationwide on the 
Mutual Radio Network. 



What You, As A Citizen 
Can Do to Fight Pollution 

If you are concerned about the con- 
dition of air in your community, here are 
some suggestions that you or an organi- 
zation you belong to can undertake in 
conducting an air pollution control cam- 
paign: 

1. Learn the facts on the extent of air 
pollution in your community from the 
State control agency, industries, and lo- 
cal officials. 

2. Present the air pollution picture — 
its shortcomings and needs — to the pub- 
lic through study groups, community 
polls, and area conferences. 

3. Solicit all news media for radio 
and television public service time and 
newspaper space. 

4. Consult educational leaders to pro- 
mote information sessions in the schools. 

5. Possibly form a Stamp Out Smog 
(SOS) organization, as has been done in 
California. 




Dead fish on a polluted shoreline. 



6. Participate in National Cleaner Air 
Week during October. 

7. Urge your state to pass legislation 
permitting tax relief to industry for the 
purchase price of air pollution controls. 

8. Write your Congressman and urge 
him to consider legislation to increase 
the present Federal tax relief from 14 
per cent to at least 25 per cent on the 
purchase of air pollution control. 

9. Extend your organization's air pol- 
lution efforts beyond the local level and 
into the state, district and region. 



Woodcraft— The Dying Art 

DETROIT, ILL.— Local 1452 in De- 
troit, has a segment of its membership 
that specializes in the painstaking skill 
of woodcarving. Alfred Hancock is the 
head of the only major company in De- 
troit still speciahzing in handcarved 
woodwork. Hancock's shop employs 
some 40 woodcarvers from Germany, 
Italy, England, Scotland, Poland and 
Czechoslovakia. He notes that U. S.-born 
carvers are rare. 

When Hancock joined the firm in 
1915, it had 150 craftsmen and dozens 
of competitors. Both the American-born 
craftsmen and the competition have vir- 
tually disappeared. Hancock's biggest 
competition comes from plastics that look 
like wood. One reason for the industry's 
decline is cost. A handcarved Brazilian 
rosewood beam or ornate wainscoting 
have upper-bracket prices. 

But Hancock thinks there are enough 
people who want the elegance of richly 
carved wood to keep his busy shop go- 
ing for some time to come. 



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2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, ^" to 
3". Only $4.40. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, %" to }%". Only $4.00. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
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JANUARY, 1967 



25 



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Members Donate Labor On Homestead Cabin 




LINCOLN, NEB. — All the work on the above cabin, which was placed on the 
Nebraska State Capitol grounds during a "Nebraskaland" days celebration, was 
donated by members of Local 1055. The building of the pioneer days cabin, includ- 
ing the sodding of the roof, took only eleven hours. 

Executive Board of Connecticut Local Union 




THOMPSONVILLE, CONN.— Local 234, Thompsonville, held its 65th Annual 
Banquet, October 29th, at Shaker Park Ballroom, Enfield, Conn. Present were 
40 members and their wives. Shown above is Local 234's executive board, seated, 
left to right: George Davis, sec.-treas.; Onier Simon, president; Clement Starr, 
business representative; and Walter Gutkowski, vice president. Standing, left to 
right: Richard Clark, trustee; Theodore Bryda, trustee; George Buckley, trustee; 
Clyde Lucia, warden; and Lawrence Clark, conductor. 



NEW JOURNEYMAN 

MURRAY, KY. — A journeyman certifi- 
cate was recently presented to Ronald 
Rogers, a member of Local Union 1734, 
Murray, by Ed Weyler, General Repre- 
sentative. The certificate was presented 
during a regular business meeting of the 
local union. 




26 



THE CARPENTER 



^OME STUDY COURSE 




BLUEPRINT READING-UNIT VIM 



Unit VIII confinues fhe use of fbe plans, and specifica- 
tions. In some instances, references will have to be made 
to specifications to complete your answers. It may be nec- 
essary to review your plans and specifications entirely 
prior to beginning your search for specific answers. It 
should be noted that any errors or omissions in your 
answers should indicate to you an area of further study. 

1. Make a list of the steel beams to be used. 

2. What will be the length of the joists over the garage? 

3. Will there be any exterior wood finish on the first 
floor powder room window? 

4. How is the second floor overhang finished? 

5. How is the siding applied on the south wall of the 
library? 

6. How is the siding applied on the second floor walls? 

7. How is siding applied on the gables? 

8. How are exterior door frames to be made? 

9. What finish is indicated between the garage roof 
and porch roof? 

10. How is siding to be nailed? 

11. What grades of wood shingles are to be used? 
What are their lengths? 

12. What is to be the amount of shingle exposure to 
the weather? 

13. Are the medicine cabinets furnished by a sub- 
contractor? 

14. What cabinets are to be painted? 

15 What interior trim is to be painted? 

16. What is the total number of each kind of door 
indicated on the plans? 

17. Steel balusters are shown intermingled with wood 
balusters in both elevations of the main stairway. Why? 

18. Who furnishes the steel balusters under this con- 
tract? 

19. What is meant by "newel posts shall be turned 
as directed" in the specifications? 

20. How many balusters are required for the main 
stair railing? 

21. How much lower are the concrete floors under 
the bath rooms than the finish floor level? Why? 

22. What is the thickness of the setting bed for blue 
stone? 

23 What is the depth of the setting bed of the marble 
hearth for the Living Room fireplace? 

24. Who furnishes the finishing hardware? 



25. What type of lath is used? 

26. What is the size of the rubber tile to be laid 
on the Kitchen floor? 

27. Which type door used in the construction of this 
home is not shown on the door schedule? 

28. What type of light is used on the front porch? 

29. What is the purpose of the 10' — 0" long wall that 
extends South from the Garage? 

30. How are the bottoms of the C. I. porch columns 
fastened? 

31. When a detail and an elevation do not agree as to 
finished appearance, which has preference? 

32. What will be the length of the ornamental columns 
for the porch? 

33. What will be the length of the column for the 
front entrance? 

34. What is the run of the common rafters over the 
master bedroom? What is the length of the common 
rafter? 

35. What is the run and the length of the common 
rafters over the guest bedrooms in the Northeast and 
Southwest corners of the building? 

36. What is the run and length of the common rafters 
over the Maid's Bedroom? 

37. How would the rafters over the Maid's Bedroom 
be framed? 

38. Are sufficient details provided for the case on the 
North wall of the Library? 

39. What is the "stock type balustrade" referred to 
in the Specifications? 

40. What kind of a joint is required between the 
risers and stringers on open faces? 

Answers to Questions are on Page 38 



STUDY MATERIAL AVAILABLE 

The Mathematics Home Study Course has been com- 
piled into a pamphlet and is now available at a cost 
of 500 per copy. Requests for the pamphlet, Tlie Car- 
pentry Supplemental Mathematics Workbook, should 
be sent to: General Secretary R. E. Livingston, United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 101 
Constitution Avenue, Washington, D. C. 20001. 

The Blueprints and Specifications for the Home Study 
Course in Blueprint Reading and Estimating are also 
available. The price for these is $2, and they also may 
be ordered from the General Secretary's office. 



JANUARY, 1967 



27 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at Box 508, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



At this time of year nimrods are either 
preparing for the last hunts of the season 
or reminiscing about past hunts — yester- 
day, or a day, month or year ago. We 
therefore dip into the memory sack, 
bringing out past hunt recollections of 
the Brotherhood and their famihes. 

■ Bench-Legged Buck 

Creede White of 235 S. Market Street, 
Garten, Colorado, a retired member of 
the Brotherhood, Local 1407, Wilming- 
ton, California, is enjoying his retirement 
and getting his long-awaited share of 
hunting. Here's a pic of Brother White 
with a bench-legged buck he downed in 
the high country north of Mancas, 
Colorado in November. 




Creede White and his buck. 

■ . Hill-Country Buck 

Henry J. Miller of Galveston, Texas 
is another high-country hunter. He 
downed his buck in the hills northwest 
of Galveston in the Lone Star state. 
Brother Miller is a member of Local 526. 

■ Busy Beaver 

Tom Shamberger of Brackney, Pa., a 
member of Binghamton Local 281, is an 



avid coon and cat hunter and proud of 
his well-kept hounds which accompany 
him on all sortees. He's also trapped his 
share of paddletails, and his success in 
this pursuit, according to wife Kay, has 
earned him the appropriate nickname of 
"Beaver." Top weight for him in this 
category, "the beaver of beavers," was a 
moose-of-a-specimen that tipped the scales 
at 61 pounds. 

■ Pheasant Brace 

Joseph Chovit of Johnson City, New 
York, a member of Local 298, Long 
Island, is a well-rounded outdoorsman. 
When the fishing season is over on inland 
waters, he gets out old Betsy and is off 
to the woods for upland game birds. 
Judging from following pic of Brother 
Chovit with a brace of pheasants, I'd 
say he get his birds. 

■ California Bucks 

Chalk up a pair of bucks for Cal 
Ramsey and his Missus, both downed out 




Joseph Chovit and pheasant brace. 



Paul Straulin and his buck. 



of Fortuna, Humboldt County, Cali- 
fornia, on the Graham Ranch. Brother 
Ramsey resides in Alameda, and is a 
retired member of Local 34 in San 
Francisco. 

■ Michigan Buck 

Paul Strauhn of Chicago, Illinois, a 
member of Local 643, can look back to 
many enjoyable deer-hunting junkets to 
the back country of Michigan. Here's 
photographic record of one hunt: Brother 
Straulin with a nice buck he brought 
down in the Bark River country, about 
12 miles west of Escanaba, Michigan. 

■ Backyard Blast 

Edward J. Smith of Warren, Ohio, 
member of the Brotherhood since 1938, 
recalls a past boondock sortee in com- 
pany with favorite hunt dog Bab. They 
hunted long and hard in far-away fields 
but came home with nary a bird or 
critter. As they approached the house, 
Bab darted over to an abandoned stump 
and flushed out two pheasant and a pair 
of rabbits, all of which fell to subsequent 
blasts from Brother Smith's scattergun, 
which proves the nimrod's grass is some- 
times greener in his own back yard. 

■ Another Texas Item 

Credit a pair of bucks and a wildcat 
to W. J. Worley of Houston, Texas, and 
his son, all downed near Uvalde. Brother 
Worley is a member of Local 213. 
(Thanks for kind words about Outdoors 
Meandering, W. J.) 

■ Squirrels Galore 

Roy Wren, 14-yr. old youngster of 
Millard, Nebraska recalls a memorable 
small-game excursion when a resident 
of Oklahoma. In company with dad, 
Otis Wren, a member of the Brother- 
hood, and uncle, A. Heath, they bagged 
a total of 22 squirrel. 

■ Earn A Pair 

Members can earn a pair of fishing 
lures by sending in a photo of a hunt- 
ing scene — and a few words as to what 
the photo is about. Send it to: 

Fred Goetz, Dept. OMLW; 
Box 508, 

Portland, Ore. 97207. 
Please mention your local number. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



■ First-Day Fox 

Ambrose E. Hoffman of Newtown, 
Pa., a member of Local 1906, got more 
than he bargained for on a past hunt 
junket. Here's a pic of Brother Hoffman 
with his first fox, downed the first day 
of the hunt season. 




Anthony Hoffman and the fox. 
■ Believe It or Not 

Dipping down into the memory bag 
again, we not an account of a long- 
past hunting trip to Africa by Louis 
Vecchione of Orange, New Jersey, a 
member of Local 349. Lou sent in a 
snapshot depicting one of his hunt part- 
ners, gagging it up with his foot in an 
alligator's mouth. Lou says they set out 
to trap the 'gator but things got out of 
hand, and it had to be shot. Scene of 
the hunt was the Lake Victoria area, 
where they also bagged some hippos. 




Louis Vecchione and 'gator. 
JANUARY, 1967 



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City- 



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29 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




(1) DAYTON, OHIO — The annual 
picnic of Local 104 was the occasion 
for the presentation of service pins to 
a group of local union veterans. 
Eighty-eight members were eligible 
for the pins with service in the 
Brotherhood ranging from 25 to 38 
years. Seven good reasons for the 
success of the picnic are shown in the 
top picture under No. 1 — the mem- 
bers of the Picnic Committee. From 
the left are John H. Collins, Ralph 
Blakeley, Don Brown, Wayne Stone, 
Richard Thomas, Leonard Funderburg 
and Ray Evans. In the other photo, 
those receiving 25-year pins are stand- 
ing, left to right: Richard B. Taylor, 
Lewis Ensinger, Ervin E. Sponsel, 
Everett Dailey, Fred Echultheis, Wil- 
lard H. Springer, William H. Schulte 
and Cary (Red) Mustard. Those on 
their knees, left to right: Edgar B. 
Hayes, Walter Teckenbrock, John F. 
Stout, Leo M. Weber, William Len- 
harr and Louis Evans. 

(2) LONGVIEW, TEXAS — Twenty- 
five, 30- and 50-year service pins were 
recently awarded to members of Local 
1097 at a special presentation cere- 
mony. In the top photo under No. 2 
are those members receiving 25-year 
service pins. Back row, left to right, 
are Rev. L. K. Brashier, A. E. Brown, 
R. M. Crow, S. B. Class, E L. Harvey, 
Gid McConald, B. H. Moon, and Con- 
rad Morgan. Front row, left to right: 
H. C. Carter, Sr., R. E. Northcutt, Ted 
Parish, Thurnian Payne, E. E. Si- 
monds, Jr., C. T. Sypert, William Utz- 
man, Jr., and John Waddell. In the 
center photo under No. 2 are Local 
1097 members who received 30-year 
service pins, back row, left to right: 
R. L. Cheney, B. N. Clark, I. M. Clark, 
G. A. Dowden, D. C. EUerd, N. F. 
Graves, E. C. McAlpine, W. S. McEl- 
roy, and L. L. McWhorter. Front row, 
left to right: George Mitchell, Sr., 
Dozia Pliler, H. E. Rogers, L. B. Sat- 
terwhite, R. L. Thompson, W. W. Utz- 
man, Sr., F. W. White, Guy Wicker- 
sham, and M. D. Wooten. In the bot- 
tom photo under No. 2 are four senior 
members of Local 1097. They are 
from the left: Clarence Hill and C. H. 
Leach, both 35-year members; D. L. 
Brown, 40-year member; and Carl 
Larson, a member of the Brotherhood 
for 50 years. 




#j»« 




30 



THE CARPENTER 



(3) BARDOIVIA, NEW YORK— A blue 
ribbon list of guests that included Gen- 
eral Secretary R. E. Livingston, and 
members of the political and religious 
communities were among the 500 who 
attended Local 964's Sixth Annual 
Dinner Dance. A highlight of the 
evening was the awarding of pins to 
members with service ranging from 
25 to 50 years. A 50-year pin was 
awarded to William Zipp and twenty- 
five year pins were awarded to Ralph 
Burris, Kenneth Gremli, Joseph Mor- 
eno, Patsy Spicci, Arthur Tveit and 
Andrew Weka. Seated in the picture 
are, top row , left to right : Gen. Rep., 
George Welsch, Gen. Sec'y., R. E. Liv- 
ingston, Ass't. to Gen. Pres. Patrick J. 
Campbell, Gen. Exec. Board Member 
from the First District Charles John- 
son, Jr., Business Rep., Frank X. 
Kearsey, and Business Rep., William 
Sopko. Lower row, left to right: Gen. 
Rep., William Lawyer, Director of Ap- 
prenticeship New York State, James E. 
Egan, Judge John J. Reilly, New York 
State Rep., Joseph Lia, Monsignor 
James Cox, Rabbi Abraham Krantz 
and Rev. Ernest Churchill. 

(4) ARDMORE, PA Gen. Rep. Ray. 

mond Ginnetti and Robert Gray, sec- 
retary-treasurer of the Met. District 
Council, attended a special called 
meeting of Local 465 to present serv- 
ice pins to 25- and 50-year members. 
In the group photo are pictured mem- 
bers who received service pins with 
their length of service in parenthesis. 
First row, left to right: Robert John- 
son (29), Edward Krawmer (50), 
Raymond Brooks (50), Anthony Dad- 
dona (25), and Henry Sheller (28). 
Second row: Charles Fink (44), O. B. 
Fetters (60), Harry Grube (59), Rob- 
ert Stroup (25), and Clair Hendricks 
(25). Third row: Alex Duff (52), 
Powell Siter (31), George Moore (47), 
EUwood Reiss (28), and Al Evans 
(30). Standing: Philip Bartels (29), 
Herbert Green (49), Clement Andes 
(47), Hunter Wolfe (49), Anthony 
Nasella (29), Owen Laurence (32), 
John Alstrom (42), Joseph Cubit 
(38), Adam Annett (42), Gunner Ny- 
strom (42), Alfred Wannop (58), and 
Charles Boyer (42). L^nable to attend 
the pin presentation but eligible for 
service pins are: Mathew McConnell 
(54), Marcello Davia (28), Albert 
Guenst (29), John Hubert (27), Her- 
man Kirst (27). Joseph Maguire (27), 
William McElivee (37), John Myers 
(33), Samuel Sorenson (30), Carl 
Peterson (42), Roy Coldren (41), 
Levi Dreisback (27), and Carlton Her- 
bert (52). In the two smaller photos 
under No. 4, the inside picture shows 
Raymond Ginnetti (right), presenting 
50-year pins to Edward Kraemer and 
Raymond Brooks. The other photo 
shows Robert Gray (center), with the 
two senior members of Local 465. 
They are O. B. Fetters (left), age 88 
and a 60-year member and Alex Duff, 
age 85 and a 63-year member. 





(Caption for this photo on following pa^e) 



JANUARY, 1967 



31 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 







(Continued from page 31) 




(5) ALLENTOWN, PA. — These mem- 
bers of Milbiien Local 1285 were the 
recipients of ZS-year service pins at 
a recent presentation ceremony held 
by the local. Shown, seated, left to 
right: R. Ritter, and F. Rrodbeck, 
P. Bellesfield. Standing: H. Steven- 
back, A. Bellesfield, F. Madl, and J. 
Jenkins. Unable to attend the cere- 
mony but presented pins personally 
by the local were Joseph Rader, Luther 
Snyder and Harold Gernerl. 

(6) HICKSVILLE, N. Y. — Twenty-five 
and 50-year pins were awarded to 
these members of Local 1772. Top 
row, left to right: August Ponticello, 
Dominic Francis, Salvatore De Prisco, 
William Hill, Stephen Slanina, Alfred 
Brandt, Olaf Stensland, Edwin Funf- 
geld, and Francis X. Savoy. Seated, 
bottom row: Louis Renaldo, Oscar T. 
Olsen, Harry Hicks, Glen Kerbs, Rich- 
ard Eisemann, and Joseph DePano. 
The following were absent due to ill- 
ness: Carmine Clement, Thomas Pye, 
Raymond Kunesh, and Julian Martin- 
sen, a 35-year member, now retired 
and living in Norway. Brothers Olsen 
and Hicks are 50-year members. 
Brother Olsen has been Secretary and 
Business Agent continuously for the 
past 49 years. 

(7) AMSTERDAM, N. Y. — Thirteen 
members of Local 6 received 50- and 
25-year pins at a recent buffet and 
presentation ceremony. Left to right, 
front row, are: Robert Bates, 42 years; 
Joseph Ciskanow, 27 years; Francis 
Gilmaier, 27 years ; William Frenz, 50 
years; Samuel Douglas, 50 years; 
Seren Hansen, 43 years; Leonard 
Krutz, 43 years. Back row: Walter 
Leroy, 25 years; Edwin Leavenworth, 
43 years; Joseph Rothmund, 41 years: 
Emil Yoos, 40 years; Arthur Otto, 41 
years; Fred Kreisel, 47 years. Others 
qualifying for the awards but unable 
to attend were Albert Gilmaier, 50 
years; Gilbert Otto, 41 years; Harry 
Ropka, 28 years, and John Zehrs, 27 
years. These members represent a 
collective total of 665 years of con- 
tinuous membership. The local, headed 
by Pat Sapone as president, and David 





Tus: II 



MIT^DBRothe 



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RMnc 



8. 



Downey, business agent, also has a 62- 
year member, two 60-year members 
and six others with 55 years or more 
of service. 

(8) ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO — 
Members of Local 38 were honored at 
a recent pin presentation ceremony. 
Members receiving pins ranged in serv- 
ice to the Brotherhood from 25 to 
56 years. The members honored on 
this occasion were as follows: Bill 
McLean, 56 years; Joe Mueller, 49 
years (absent) ; Charles Baines, 47 
years; Irvin Wood, 44 years (absent); 
Bill Bowman, 43 years ; Frank Murphy, 
41 years (absent) ; Art Slote, 30 years 



(absent); Fred Skrydstrup, 29 years; 
Carl Dowel, 28 years (absent) ; Ernie 
Nielsen, 28 years; Bill Phillips, 26 
years ; Tony Sakavitelus, 26 years ; 
Mike Garamy, 26 years; Tom Brady, 
25 years; and John Warren, 25 years. 
St. Catharines was chartered in the 
year 1883, only two years after the 
formation of the Brotherhood. They 
proudly possess the third oldest char- 
ter. At the time the charter was in- 
stalled the hourly rate was 17^4 cents 
per hour with a 12 hour day. Brother 
Frank Reid was the guest speaker with 
Secretary McCurdy extending fraternal 
greetings from the Ontario Provincial 
Council. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



(9) TOLEDO, OHIO — Twenty members 
of Local 248 were honored with 25 year 
pins at the local's recent Anniversary 
Party. Seated and receiving 25 yr. pins 
from left to right are: Donald Gonya, 
Andrew Rasmussen, Willard Gam, 
Charles Osborn, William Schwartz, Sec- 
Treas. of the Maumee Valley District 
Council; Philip Mankin, Fred Schackel- 
ton, Ernie Gargac, O. C. Meinka, How- 
ard Sheidler, Vernal Zwayer, Marion 
Price, Urban Haslinger, Vernard Smith, 
Trustees of Local 248, and Carl Herzig. 
Standing are the Exec. Board Members 
of Local 248, left to right: Emory Hugue- 
let, B. R.; Frank Coughlin, Rec. Sec; 
Milan Marsh, Sec.-Treas of the Ohio 
State Council of Carpenters; William Lis- 
termann. Fin. Sec; Donald Hartman, Vice 
Pres.; Harold Helle, Trustee; Frank 
Whalen, President; and Bernard Walker, 
Conductor. Members not in picture but 
receiving 25 year pins were August 
Meinka, Lawrence Baker, Albert Barnes, 
Emerson Ebersole, and Donald Wag- 
goner. 

(10) MARTELL, CALIF.— Sixteen mem- 
bers of Local 2927 of Martell were hon- 
ored at a dinner and presented with 25 
year service pins by Brotherhood Repre- 
sentative Clarence E. Briggs, acting as 
host. The gala affair was held at Bus- 
caglia's Restaurant, Jackson Gate, on 
Saturday evening, November 26. Twenty- 
one members were eligible for the pins 
but five were unable to attend the dinner 
and will receive their pins later. Front 
row (1. to r.): Joe Tirapelle, Dave Mc- 
Daniel, Frank Jay, Jack Smallfield, C. B. 
Owens, E. J. Phillips, Cord Moller and 
R. A. Datema, business agent. Second 
row (!• to r.): Worth Sanford, Thomas 
Craig, H. M. Belyea, Brotherhood Rep- 
resentative Clarence E. Briggs. Back row 
0. to r.): Elmer Harritt, R. J. Williams, 
Dan Schaefer, Jesse Croft, Edward War- 
drip, Frank Podesta, president of 2927, 
and Delbert Seeman. 

(11) NEW PHILADELPHIA, OHIO — 
Shown are members of Local 1802 who 
were honored recently with 25 and 50 
year pins. Also included in the picture 
is a man who has 52 years in the Broth- 
erhood. Seated left to right are: Carlisle 
UpdergrafE who joined the Brotherhood 
in 1914. Next to him are Emil Pedersen, 
William L. Smith, and Cletus Troyer who 
all received 25 year pins. Standing left 
to right are: Harold Douglass, President 
of Local 1802; Gerald Bussey, Business 
Representative of Local 1802; Donald 
Rowan, Homer Cooper and Roy Hen- 
drickson, all also received 25 year pins. 
Next is Burris Tschudy who is receiving 
a 50 year pin and making the presenta- 
tion is Milan P/Iarsh, Executive Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Ohio State Council of 
Carpenters. 

(12) INGLEWOOD, CALIF. — Local 
2435 held a 25 year pin celebration on 
Sept. 13, 1966. The below listed 25 year 
members received their Silver Lapel Pins 
for continuous membership to the Broth- 
erhood: Paul Braunbeck, Anthony Fierro, 




JANUARY, 1967 



33 



Recent Pin 




Presentations 

David W. Olsson, Louis Roser, Robert A. 
Domenico, Hershell A. Banks, Owen S. 
White, George A. Hobson, Joaquin Al- 
varado, James VV. Browning, Paul D. Gil- 
bert, Louis Rudd, John C. Brown, Louis 
Ortiz, Francis L. Tucker, C. E. Patton, 
L. P. Byrne, Jean Martin, Chas. H. Or- 
miston, and Everett D. AUee. 

Included in the photograph are the fol- 
lowing officers of Local 2435: Clifford 
Lager, President; Kelson Melick, Rec. 
Sec; Lester Weizer, Treas.; S. F. Marka- 
sich, Fin.-Sec; Robert B. Clubb and Lyle 
C. Rothenburg, Business Representatives; 
J. Willemsen, Conductor; M. Fink, War- 
den; G. Carver, Trustee; and G. Dobbiiw, 
Trustee. Visiting officers in the photo- 
graph are Terry Slawson, of the LADCC, 
and L. H. Pattison, Carpenters Local 929, 
South Gate, CaUf. 

(13) MURRAY, KY. — At a regular 
meeting Local 1734 honored 25 year 
members by presenting them with serv- 
ice pins. Front row, left to right: Edgar 
WiUferson, Lennis Ward, John W. 
Hughes, Jessie M. Davidson, Roy Gream. 
Back row: R. W. Nix, Edd Weyler, Gen. 
Rep., and Scottie Hart. Two members, 
C. S. EUdns and James A. Taylor, were 
not present. 

(14) SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. — Local 
Union 1511 recently presented 50 year 
pins to two of its oldest members. Pic- 
tured from left to right are Eugene Hal- 
sey, age 74; George Brown, age 90, for 
services rendered to the Local Union. 
The 50 year pins are being presented by 
past President Lewis Tooker, age 73. 

(15) STATE COLLEGE, PA.— Eighteen 
members were honored at the 40th An- 
niversary Banquet of L.U. 1333. Mem- 
bers receiving 25 and 50 year pins were, 
left to right: Robert E. Miller, Carl Mil- 
ler, Charles Brown, James A. Kunes, all 
25 year pins; W. H. Garman, 50 year pin; 
George Walish, Pres., Pa. State Council, 
who made the presentation; Russell Hack- 
enberger, R. S. Kolb, Weaver Witmer, 
and Benjamin Gussler, all 25 year mem- 
bers. Members not present but eligible 
for 25 year pins: Garfield Edwards, Sr., 
Richard Grafius, Frederick Miller, John 
Oestreich, Wilbert Walters, Earl McClel- 
lan, Robert Chamberlain, Eldon Ilgen, 
and William McAlevy. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



(16) COLUMBUS, IND. — Local 1155 
pin presentation. Left to right, front row: 
Cecil Shuey, Board Member, 3rd District; 
Frank Quick, 65 years; Charles Bray, 65 
years; George Kramer, 55 years; Alfred 
Vonstrobe, 30 years; Otto Knoke, 30 
years. Second row: Deon Macy, Presi- 
dent; Carl Emmert, 30 years; Clayton 
Lackey, 30 years; Newton Good, 29 
years; Ezra Young, 27 years; Lee Steel, 
28 years; Ray Boas, 27 years. Sec. of Lo- 
cal; H. M. Williams, General Rep.; 
Franklin Smith, Joint Rep. Third row: 
Carl Debold, 25 years; Fielda Whitting- 
ton, 25 years; Leslie Guthrie, 25 years; 
Raymond Guthrie, 25 years; Bernard 
Kaue, 25 years; Roy Teague, 25 years. 

(17) CENTERVI.LLE, IOWA — James 
Apple, Vice President of Local 597, pre- 
sents a 50 year button to Victor Ander- 
son at a regular meeting of the local. 
Anderson has been a member of Local 
597 continuously since July 16, 1916. 

(18) NORWICH, CONN.— Receiving his 
50 year pin is Arthur Bessette of Local 
137. It is being presented by Treasurer 
Henry Pukallus (right). Also, Herman 
Pukallus (second from left) was presented 
a letter of commendation on being a 
member for 61 consecutive years. This 
was also presented by his brother, Henry 
Pukallus. Looking on is Business Agent 
Charles Beauregard. 

(19) ST. ALBANS, W. VA.— Local 128 
recently had a special call meeting for 
presentations of 50 year and 25 year 
pins. The bottom picture shows, left to 
right: Rex Pruden, a chartered member of 
Local 128 and 53 year member, and Al- 
bert Wolfe, 49 years. Both were pre- 
sented 50 year pins. There were two 
other members that were not able to be 
present, they were L. W. McNealy and 
A. H. Caldwell, Sr. Bro. McNealy being 
a member for 49 years and Bro. Caldwell 
a member for 48 years. The top pic- 
ture shows, left to right, those that were 
present and received 25 year pins: Back 
row, H. E. Lee, John C. Dooley, C. C. 
Arnold, Harold J. Walker, Henry Parsley, 
Clay Quails. Seated are C. A. Pring, E. 
L. Bayes, Wm. K. Davis, and Franklin 
Allen. Those that were not present and 
received their 25 year pin were: Earl 
Tackett, John W. Tabor, Troy D. Sutler, 
Herbert Offenbarger, J. L. McDermitt, R. 
C. Jordan, Roy Erskine, Lewis G. Dill- 
man, James O. Davis, Percy D. Boiling, 
and Guy O. Baker. 



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JANUARY, 1967 



35 




I ISL Jyl EMQ RJLA M 



L.U. No. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Ruggiero, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 23, 
DOVER, N. J. 

Hansen, Hans 

L.U. NO. 33, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Campbell, William D. 
Chamberlain, Walter 
Handrahan, John J. 
Hardy, Andrew 
Mozzicato, Salvatore 
Pilger, John W. 

L.U. NO. 42, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Carlson, Oscar 
Cruise, Joseph J. 
MacDonald, Finley 
Medus, Peter 
Moore, Henry G. 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Newman, Phillip H. 

L.U. NO. 53, 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 

Combs, Fred 
See, Ernest 

L.U. NO. 65, 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

Kunzman, Fred 

L.U. NO. 87, 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Awe, Robert 
Bred, William 
Burdash, Joe 
Hedman, Daniel 
Klicker, Evert 
Larson, Robert M. 
Logajan, George 
Schultz, C. M. 
Witzel, Harold 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Byron, Charles H., Sr. 
Clayton, Talmadge W. 
Evans, John B. 
Kress, Irwin A. 
Leddon, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 122, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Class, Jacob R. 
Lorenzon, Dante 
Patruska, John 

L.U. NO. 135, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Blumenthal, Abraham 
Breskin, Nathan 
Casella, Frank 
Nozick, Leo 
Teitler, Morris 
Wiig, Hans H. 
Zechosh, John 

L.U. NO. 141, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson. Berger 
Codd, William H. 



DeBok, Jacob 
Doherty, Joseph 
Hansen, William J. 
Hedrick, David 
Iverson, H. John 
Kovach, Frank S. 
Krstich, Crist 
Lysen, Clifford 
Schriner, H. C. 

L.U. NO. 144, 
MACON, GA. 

Davis, L. L. 

L.U. NO. 155, 
PLAINFIELD, N. J. 

Allen, Charles 
Cederberg, Knut 

L.U. NO. 183, 
PEORIA, ILL. 

DeLong, Charles 
Frericks, Herman 
Sams, Charles 
Steinke, William 
Wilson, Earl 

L.U. NO. 186, 
STEUBENVILLE, OHIO 

Stewart, James B. 

L.U. NO. 211, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Crissman, Dewey M. 
Fink, Charles T. 
Galambos, Charles 
Heckert, James F. 
Stoof, Michael 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Bickell, Harold 
Pasko, R. 1. 
Wheatley, Percy 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Bellia, Fehce 
Teitz, Morris 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Arvidson. Axel 
Bergius, Oscar 
Borgeson, Charles 
Mitola, Ralph 
Sohlman, Waino 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HGTS., ILL. 

Moore, Jewett 

L.U. NO. 287, 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Kelchner, Harold L. 
Zimmerman, Robert C. 

L.U. NO. 297. 
KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

Block, George 
Reading, Lowell 
Zook, Gordon R. 

L.U. NO. 298, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Linitz, George 
Rettermaier, Eugene 



L.U. NO. 299, 
UNION CITY, N. J. 

Kresicki, Joseph 
Nelson, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 301, 
NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Hamel, Arthur B. 
Itschner, Andrew P. 

L.U. NO. 359, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Andersch, Aurel 
Leppigen, Harry 
McCrea, Albert C. 

L.U. NO. 368, 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Miller, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 372 
LIMA, OHIO 

Elliott, Arthur 
Emmerling, Charles 

L.U. NO. 432, 
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

Colangelo, Concezio 
CoUinc, Leroy 
Devine, Edward 
Farr, Joseph 
Hand, Ralph 
Hunt, Floyd 
Kummel, Gustave 
Lavenka, John 
Leister, Clarence 
Robinson, George 

L.U. NO. 486, 
BAYONNE, N. J. 

Gallagher, Atillio 
Keggan, Peter 
Quinn, William 

L.U. NO. 563, 
GLENDALE, CALIF. 

Craig, Teddie O. 
Foster, A. L. 
Graham. C. J. 
James, John A. 
Kilgore, Thomas 
King, Raymond H, 
McConnell. Fred A. 
Muesing, Vincent W. 
Parr, Carl 

Smethurst, William A. 
Sprunk. Steve M. 
Valentine, Arthur H. 
Van Oost, Ray A. 
Waters, Sam H. 

L.U. NO. 569, 
PASCAGOULA, MISS. 

Goram. William H. 
Peetz, Emil F. 
Shoemake. Dozier E. 

L.U. NO. 576, 
PINE BLUFF, ARK. 

Brunson, Bobby 
Gray, Larry Joe 
Huett, Orie 
Nichols, Wade 
Owen, Howard 
Patterson, Gussie R. 
Whiteaker, John 



L.U. NO. 579, 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Stanley, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 620, 
MADISON, N. J. 

Giambatistta, Horace 
Gustafson, Elmer 
Marra, Frank 
Van Riper, Everett 

L.U. NO. 715, 
ELIZABETH, N. J. 

Crowell, Fred 
Motuz. Daniel 
Palmer, Asher 
Prietz, Max 
Thorpe, Livingston 

L.U. NO. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Alfort, Harry 

L.U. NO. 810, 
WAKEFIELD, R. L 

Riley, Cyril W. 
Stedman, William G. 

L.U. NO. 854, 
MADISONVILLE, OHIO 

Stanforth, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1006, 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

Heffron, James 

L.U. NO. 1035, 
TAUNTON, MASS. 

Audet, Odilon J. 

L.U. NO. 1140, 

SAN PEDRO, CALIF. 

Beattie, Alex D. 
Burkett, E. G. 
Carlsen, Carl H. 
Dunkin, O. K. 
Dutiel, E. T. 
Flynn, Leslie G. 
Golden, Earl 
Johnson, Charles 
McLane, M. W. 
Peterson, G. Fred 
Roberts, Ronald L. 
Slack. George 
Van Lienen, Nick 
Woolie, Mat 

L.U. NO. 1162, 
COLLEGE POINT, N. Y. 

Abbate, Albert, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 1167, 
SMITHTOWN, N. Y. 

Burr, Richmond 
Voss, Albert 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Schrupp, August 
Wilson, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Danko, Steve, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 1382, 
ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Miller, Patrick, Sr. 
Sawyer, Merle B., Jr. 



L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Furlong, Carl 

L.U. NO. 1453, 
COSTA MESA, CALIF. 

Hastings, Clyde C. 
Mills, Wilham M. 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Dressier, Otto 
Glavicich, Anton 
Gustavson, Walter 
Hendriksen, Louis 
Henrikson, John 
Jacobsen, Torvald 
Johnson, Elmer 
Lambert, Nils 
Miller, Henry 
Skjelbred, Johannes 
Spitznagel, John 

L.U. NO. 1483, 
PATCHOQUE, N. Y. 

Mortensen, Axel 

L.U. NO. 1507, 

EL MONTE, CALIF. 

Ferguson, Ed C. 
Flinn, Albert 
Taylor, Omar L. 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B. C. 

Butcher, Erm'e 

L.U. NO. 1683, 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

Mason, G. W. 

L.U. NO. 1835, 
WATERLOO, IOWA 

Bonfig. Fay 

L.U. NO. 1846, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Callahan, Pierre L. 
Scafidel, Kelly 

L.U. NO. 1881. 
FREMONT, NEBR. 

Siercks, Clarence E. 

L.U. NO. 1937, 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N. Y. 

Dunnder. Magnus E. 
Grassman, John 

L.U. NO. 2046, 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Allison, Billy 
Condeff, Harry 
Estes, Francis 
Lippy, Edward 
Mooney, Archie 
Richardson, Kenneth 

L.U. NO. 2094, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Hetzel, Aleck 
Rozhon. George, Sr. 
Ryden, Carl 

L.U. NO. 2274, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Caputo, Antonia 
Norczyk, Joseph 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



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CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



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We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
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You don't need to send lessons back and forth ; 
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The labor cost data which we supply is not 
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The M-S-A Any-Hat Eyeshield is 
available in clear or tinted versions and 
will provide pro- 
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where safety gog- 
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The tinted ver- 
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snapped up or 
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any protective hat or cap, the eyeshield 
can be attached to dielectric type hats 
in the field by use of double back pres- 
sure sensitive tape provided with the 
hinge assembly. 

For non-dielectric type hats or caps, 
rivets are provided with the eyeshield 
kit with instructions for attaching. 

In either the up or down position, the 
eyeshield is held under tension and can- 
not flop. 

LUCITE HANDBOOK 

A new booklet, "Architectural Glazing 
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three-dimensional, formed glazing. Such 
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comparison weights, weather and impact 
resistance, as well as the availability of 
colors and patterns, are discussed. In ad- 
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and cleaning, design tables based on wind 
loads, and standard design detail drawings 
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CABINETS AND BUILT-INS.— Tliis new book 
has 102 payes. 193 illustrations, covering kitchen 
cabinets, built-ins, bathroom cabinets, closets. 
Lazy Susan features. Paperback $1.50. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
using tools. An important craft problem for each 
tool eiplained. One of the top-best of my books 
—you should have it. Has 156 p. and 394 il. 
$3.50. 

THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p.. 498 il.. 
covering all important steel-square problems in- 
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practical book on tlie square sold today. Price 

$3.50. 

OFF THE CHEST. — This book covers a wide range 
of subjects, first published in the Emporia Gazette, 
made famous by William Allen IVhite. Satisfaction 
guaranteed or money back. The book has 126 pages, 
is interestingly illustrated, and sells for $3-00, post- 
paid. 

THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Only $1.50. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT. — 3rd edition, poetry, 
$2.00. 

NOTICE. — You can't go wrong if you order the 

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SPECIAL.— Closing out, THE WAILING TLACE, 
(a $3.00 book) while they last, $1,00. 

FREE.— With 6 books. OFF THE CHEST free; 
with 5 books, 2 poetry books free, and with 3 

books, 1 poetry book free. 

With 2 books. THE WAILING PLACE for 50c, 
and with 1 book, a poetry book for half price. 

NOTICE. — Five-day money back guarantee on all 
books. Postage paid only when full remittance 
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Today. "• "• JiCwtLt Emporia, Kansas 

BOOKS BOOKS 

— For Birthday gifts, etc. — 



JANUARY, 1967 



37 



Home Study Course 

Answers for Unit VII, Page 27 

1. One 10" — 15# beam over the ther- 
mopane window (Designated 10" B15#, 
First Floor Plan, Sheet 1) One 8"— 10# 
beam over the kitchen window; Two 10" 
— 21 # beam in the ceiling of the dining 
room; One 10" — 15# beam in the ceihng 
of the dining room; Two 10" — 15# 
beam in the ceiling of the hall; One 6" — 
12# beam over the arch in the living 
room; One 10" — 21 # beam over the en- 
trance door; One 10" — 15# beam over 
the bay window in the living room; One 
10" — 15# beam in the ceiling of the 
kitchen. The inch dimension (6", 8", 10") 
designates the beam height. The pound 
amount (10#, 12#, 15#, 21 #) indicates 
the unit weight of one foot of beam 
length.) 

2. 2"xl0" ceiling joists 24'-0" long. 
(Section Thru Garage Door, Sheet #3; 
Floor Plan, Sheet #2) 

3. No exterior wood trim will be 
used on the first floor powder room win- 
dows. (Section Thru Toilet Window, 
Sheet #6) 

4. The second floor overhang is fin- 
ished by the use of \"x4" T&G shaped 
to fit curve of ellipse. (Detailed on 
Sheet #6) 

5. The siding will be applied vertically 
over %" sheathing. (Plan Detail at 
Southwest Corner of Library, Sheet #6; 
Specifications, CARPENTRY AND 
MILLWORK, Rough Carpentry, Siding) 

6. Horizontal siding will be placed 
over %" sheathing. Metal flashing is to 
be placed under siding at the corners. 
(Section Thru Entrance, Front Entrance, 
Sheet #2; Specifications, CARPENTRY 
AND MILLWORK, Rough Carpentry, 
Siding) 

7. Flush ship-lap wood boards cut 
from r'xlO" stock are placed over 
sheathing at gables. (Elevations, Sheets 
#4 and #5; Specifications, CARPEN- 
TRY AND MILLWORK, Rough Car- 
pentry, Siding) 

8. Exterior door frames shall be cut 
from l%" stock with rabbets for doors 
and screens. Specifications, CARPEN- 
TRY AND MILLWORK, Exterior Doors 
and Frames, Paragraph 1) 

9. The roof is fabricated from 2"x6" 
rafters with 2"x4" bridging members to 
form an egg crate. There is no top cover- 
ing provided. (Second Floor Plan, Roof 
Plan, Sheet #3) 

10. Siding is to be nailed with 8d 
cement coated nails. (Specifications, 
CARPENTRY AND MILLWORK, 
Rough Carpentry, Siding) 

11. Shingles to be used will be of red 
cedar heartwood 100% edge grain. They 
are to be 16" long, approximately. (Speci- 
fications, CARPENTRY AND MILL- 
WORK, Materials, Paragraph 2, and 
Rough Carpentry, Shingles) 

12. Shingles are to be laid 5" to the 
weather. (Specifications, CARPENTRY 
AND MILLWORK, Rough Carpentry, 
Shingles) 



13. No, by the general contractor. 
(Specifications, CARPENTRY AND 
MILLWORK, Accessories and Glass and 
Glazing, Accessories) 

14. All cabinets which are mill built 
are to be painted. (Specifications, PAINT- 
ING AND DECORATING, Priming) 

15. All interior wood trim will be 
painted, except in the Library. (Specifica- 
tions, CARPENTRY AND MILL- 
WORK, Interior Finish, Paragraph 4; 
PAINTING AND DECORATING, 
Priming) 

16. Total Doors: Thirty-Three — Six 
Type A, Seven Type B, Six Type C, One 
Type D, Two Type E, Five Type F, Two 
Type FA, One Type G. Three 6-Panel 
Doors. The letter designation is found on 
1st Floor Plan, Sheet 2. The type is indi- 
cated on Door Elevations and Door 
Schedule Key, Sheet 4. 

17. Steel balusters are used for addi- 
tional strength. 

18. The contractor who furnishes the 
miscellaneous metal will furnish the steel 
balusters. (Specifications, STRUCTURAL 
AND MISCELLANEOUS METAL, 
Steel Balusters) 

19. The newel posts are to be turned 
and shaped as directed by the Architect. 

20. There are 65 balusters. Balusters 
are to be added on second floor from top 
of stairs around to the East wall. (Second 
Floor Plan, Sheet #3) 

21. 2". This is the required allowance 
for the setting bed for ceramic tile. 

22. U/2" (Section "G-G", Sheet #1) 

23. 4" (Fireplace Details, Section, 
Sheet #6) 

24. Finishing hardware shall be se- 
lected by Architects and paid for by the 
owner. The contractor shall install the 
finishing hardware. (Specifications, CAR- 
PENTRY AND MILLWORK, Finishing 
Hardware) 

25. Metal lath shall be applied straight 
and without buckles, with longer dimen- 
sions across supports. All joints are to 
be staggered. (Specifications, LATHING 
AND PLASTERING, Metal Lath) 

26. Tile shall be 9"x9"x3/16" thick. 
(Specifications, RUBBER TILE, Mate- 
rials, Paragraph 1) 

27. The 6 - horizontal - panel door 
used in the basement. 

28. A recessed ceiling light. (Section 
Thru Front Entrance, Sheet #2) 

29. The purpose of this wall is for 
privacy in the back porch area. 

30. The bottoms are to be set in 
lead. (Section Thru Porch at Library, 
Sheet #3) 

31. A detail drawing will have prefer- 
ence over an elevation when in disagree- 
ment. 

32. The length of the steel columns 
on the porch outside the Library is ap- 
proximately 8'-5%". (Section Thru Porch 
at Library, Sheet #3) 

33. The length of the column for the 
front entrance is approximately S'-5%". 
(Section "G-G", Sheet #1; Section Thru 
Front Entrance, Sheet #2) 



34. 10'-4" is the run over the master 
bedroom. The computed length of the 
common rafter is ir-6%". No allowance 
has been made for ridge thickness or 
eave. 

35. The run of the rafter over the 
guest bedroom in the Southwest corner 
is 8'-10%" and the common rafter 
length is 9'-\VA". The run of the rafter 
over the guest bedroom in the Northeast 
corner is 9'-8" and the common rafter 
length is 10'-9%". No allowance made 
for ridge thickness or eave. 

36. The run of the common rafters 
over the maid's bedroom is 9'-8". The 
length of the common rafters over the 
niaid's bedroom is W-9^A". The North/ 
South Ridge Section over the Maid's Bed- 
room has a flat portion which is shown 
on the Roof Plan. The run used in com- 
puting the rafter length is not half of 
the span of the building at this point. 

37. Common rafters are framed with 
deck construction at the ridge. 

38. No. Details do not indicate 
whether these doors are sliding or hinged. 
The Architect will have to furnish this 
information. 

39. The "stock balustrade" is one 
which is regularly made and supplied by 
the mill which does this type of work. 

40. The joint is to be dove-tailed and 
mitered. (Specifications, CARPENTRY 
AND MILLWORK, Stairs, Paragraph 1). 



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38 



THE CARPENTER 



—LAKELAND XEWS — 

Joseph Scheff of Local Union 242, Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home Nov. 1, 
1966. 

C. T. Christensen of Local Union 1447, Vero Beach, Florida, arrived at the Home 
Nov. 10, 1966. 

Albert Buerkin of Local Union 599, Hammond, Indiana, arrived at the Home 
Nov. 10, 1966. 

Edward O'Dowd of Local Union 608, New York, N. Y., arrived at the Home 
Nov. 10, 1966. 

Ralph McPherson of Local Union 22, San Francisco, Calif., arrived at the Home 
Nov. 14. 1966 

Nelson R. Roeder of Local Union 132, Washington. D. C arrived at the Home 
Nov. 21, 1966. 

Pearl L. Gould of Local Union 240, East Rochester. N. Y., arrived at the Home 
Nov. 23, 1966. 

William Voiers of Local Union 29, Cincinnati, Ohio, arrived at the Home 
Nov. 25, 1966. 

Joseph J. Bozovsky of Local Union 341, Chicago, 111., passed away Nov. 14, 
1966 and was buried in Chicago, 111. 

Edward J. Wheeling of Local Union 16, Springfield, 111., passed away Nov. 29, 
1966 and was buried in Springfield, 111. 

Members who visited tlie Home during November 

Louis A. Miller, L.U. 2422, Sonoma, Cahf. 

Mr. Rolsted, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111, 

Kenneth Gilding, L.U. 1449. Lansing, Mich. 

John A. Verbugt, L.U. 91, Racine, Wise. 

Carl H. Verbugt, L.U. 309, Waukesha, Wise. 

Arthur Hebert, L.U. 801, Woonsocket. R. I. 

Ed M. Wilson, L.U. 1236, Michigan City, Ind. 

William F. Kocher, L.U. 1285, Allentown, Pa. 

Ray T. Lindburg, L.U. 210, Stamford, Conn. 

Selby S. Cornell, L.U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herbert Brant, L.U. 268, Sharon, Pa. 

Charles Beyer, L.U. 104, Dayton, Ohio, now living in Plant City, Fla. 

William Tank, L.U. 4, Davenport, Iowa 

Frank Wagoner, L.U. 1815, Santa Ana, Calif. 

A. Remer, L.U. 1, Chicago, 111., now living in Sarasota, Fla. 

R. E. Draghon. L.U. 819, West Palm Beach. Fla. 

Jacob Venderbrook, L.U. 819, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Charles S. Rinz. L.U. 12. Syracuse, N. Y., now living in Bradenton, Fla. 

William Hajek, L.U. 1235, Modesto, Cahf. 

Raymond D. Watson, L.U. 287, Harrisburg, Pa. 

L. H. Brewer, L.U. 183, Peoria, III., now living in Lakeland, Fla. 

Clyde B. Gentry, L.U. 101, Baltimore. Md. 

D. A. Willkens, L.U. 1164, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wilbert T. Huffman, L.U. 422, Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Vernon Casebeer, L.U. 1445, Topeka, Kan. 

Charles Braum, L.U. 1164, Clearwater, Fla. 

Harry Mclntyre, L.U. 1278, Gainsbille, Fla. 

Ester L. Woods, L.U. 1509, Miami. Fla. 

Sylvester Woods, L.U. 993, Hialeah, Fla. 

John W. Barfield, L.U. 1846, New Orleans, Louisiana 

A. Beal. L.U. 183. Peoria, 111., now living in Lake Worth. Fla. 

L. H. Brewer, L.U. 183, Peoria, III., now living in Lakeland, Fla- 

G. E. Hayden, L.U. 1275, Clearwater. Fla. 

Paul A. Long, L.U. 1510, Tampa, Fla. 

Harry Knoll, L.U. 335, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Audel, Theodore 25 

Belsaw (Multi-Duty) 37 

Belsaw (Sharp-All) 39 

Carpenter Tax Kit 19 

Chicago Technical College 15 

Construction Cost Institute 37 

Eliason Stair Gauge 39 

Estwing Manufacturing 26 

Foley (Saw Sharpening) 29 

Foley Manufacturing 23 



Garlinghouse, L. F 23 

Goldblatt 21 

Hydrolevel 22 

Irwin Aurgur Bit 25 

Kant-Slam 38 

Locksmithing Institute 22 

Miller Sewer Rod 24 

Siegele, H. H 37 

National Tuberculosis Assn 24 

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JANUARY, 1967 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Ring Out the Old Year and Ring In the New 



OLD Father Time has a way of coming back 
to stare us full in the face each January, as 
a 12-month cycle is completed. We mark another 
year of service as a craft brotherhood, and each 
of us becomes . . . sometime during 1967 ... a 
year older. 

The pictures of the old man with the scythe 
and the lantern leading the newborn babe into 
a new year reminds us oldtimers in the Brother- 
hood that there are a lot of young men coming 
into the craft . . . young men who will some day 
take over the helm of our great organization. 

This year, throughout the wide realm of our 
union across North America there are young ap- 
prentices taking up the trade for the first time . . . 
young apprentices who, sometime in the Twenty- 
First Century, will take over the leadership of their 
local unions, their district councils, and eventually 
top offices in the Brotherhood itself. 

These young men need to know the history of 
our organization. They need to know how we ob- 
tained better wages and working conditions for our 
craft. 

Our major article in this issue of "The Carpen- 
ter" tells of the Brotherhood's initiation of a man- 
power training program — a program which we 
feel will bring increased stability to the building 
and construction industry. We are heartened by 



management's increased concern with apprentice 
and journeyman training programs. 

We quote a prominent architect (Page 3) as 
predicting that the American building industry 
will be required to double its capacity by the year 
2,000. Four-fifths of the population will be city 
dwellers, he estimates. 

No matter what comes to pass population-wise. 
North America and the world will continue to need 
highly qualified craftsmen. 

As I told our 30th General Convention, we 
need to take into membership all qualified men 
working at our trade. In addition, we need to 
train far greater numbers of young men through 
our apprenticeship program. We have initiated 
plans for a continent-wide apprenticeship com- 
petition. We hope that by 1968 a truly Interna- 
tional Apprenticeship Contest in our craft will 
become a reality. We must encourage top-quality 
work among all areas of our craft jurisdiction. 

Let's make it a firm resolution for 1967 to ring 
in the new by lending active support to our man- 
power program and our traditional apprentice- 
ship training program. 

Let's give a helping hand to the young men in 
our organization — who will undoubtedly face 
problems in the decades ahead which we have 
never dreamed of. By doing this, we will be help- 
ing ourselves as well as the generation to come. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




Half the world is hungry — 

Will you help, for today and tomorrow? 



Unless steps are taken to make the future better than the past, the need can never 
end. CARE does more than deUver food to keep people aUve. It also uses food to 
nourish school children and preschool youngsters to full mental and physical 
growth, or as "pay" while villagers build roads, water systems. It adds tools to help 
the hungry feed and otherwise support themselves — seeds and farming implements, 
work and training tools for other jobs, materials to build more schools, educational 
supplies for students. It sends doctors and nurses to give the sick the health to 
work and learn, and to train local medical personnel. In all these ways, the money 
you give to CARE saves lives and makes those lives worth living. Mail your check. 




CARE 

660 First Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 10016 

or your local CARE office 



// you prefer, you may specify the CARE program you wish to 
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any case, CARE reports how and where your money was used. 
Contributions are tax-exempt. Make checks payable to CARE. 



PUBLISHED AS A PT7B1,IC SERVICE 




Take Your Choice of Footwear 



Most work shoes cost about the same. A safety-toe shoe costs little or no more than an 
ordinary shoe. Only one type of footwear is considerably more expensive: the kind they 
put on you after a foot injury you would have avoided if you had been wearing safety- 
toe shoes! You may wear safety shoes for I 5 years and never need them but sometimes 
the shoe's on the other foot . . . you may get a crushed foot the first 1 5 minutes on the 
job without them. Play safe ... it doesn't cost any more. Buy and wear safety shoes! 



UNITED BROTXERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



THE 



FOUNDED 1881 



FEBRUARY, 1967 








GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

FiNLAY C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

WlLLL\M SroELL 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 
10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 
55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 
64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
American Bank Building 
621 S.W. Morrison St., Room 937 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 7, Ont 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



Zip Code Nimiber 



THE 



(§ZI\[S[? 




VOLUME LXXXVI No. 2 FEBRUARY, 1967 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

A Theater Becomes a National Shrine 2 

Billion-Dollar Construction Job in Viet Nam 6 

Pension Program for California Carpenters 9 

The Pleasure Walkers Dorothy Russell 12 

Testimonial for Retiring GEB Member Cooper 14 

1967 Apprenticeship Contest Shaping Up 17 

Two Members Claim to Have Solved Riddle of Stairway .... 20 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 5 

Editorials 11 

Plane Gossip 15 

Home Study Course, Blueprint Reading, Unit IX 16 

Canadian Report 18 

Local Union News 21 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred O. Goetz 27 

In Memoriam 30 

What's New? 32 

Service to the Brotherhood 34 

Lakeland News . 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington. D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

On November 19, 1863, President 
Lincoln journeyed to Gettysburg. Pa., 
from Washington, D. C, to deliver an 
address at the dedication of the mili- 
tary cemetery at Gettysburg. The pre- 
vious summer, on July 1-3, U, S. 
forces engaged members of the Con- 
federate army in the bloodiest battle 
of the bloodiest war in the annals of 
history. Forty-three thousand men 
from both sides were killed, and many 
of their bodies now lay beneath the 
soil at Gettysburg. 

President Lincoln was preceded on 
the speakers' platform by Edward 
Everett, the 69-year-old former presi- 
dent of Harvard, Secretary of State 
and Senator from Massachusetts and 
one of the nation's great orators. 

Then Lincoln spoke and his address 
was so brief that the photographer on 
hand to film the historic occasion did 
not have time to adjust his camera. 
When accounts of the dedication ap- 
peared in the newspapers of the day, 
Everett's address was given full front- 
page attention, but the greatness of 
Lincoln's immortal Gettysburg Ad- 
dress, a copy of which is shown on 
our cover this month, was immediately 
recognized. 

Our cover, this month, calls atten- 
tion to the 158th observance of the 
birthday of the 16th President of the 
United States (born February 12, 
1809), and it also sets the stage for 
our feature story on the restoration of 
Ford's Theatre in Washington, where 
Lincoln was assassinated. 






Carpenters help to rebuild the old roof. 
Original beams were about all that was 
strong enough to be retained. 



Almost from the very beginning 
its life as a building site, the lot on 
Washington's Tenth street, one block 
from famous Pennsylvania Avenue, 
seemed jinxed. And within the first 
60 years of its useful life, there were 
three major tragedies on the site. One 
of them killed 22 people and partially 
gutted the interior, another reduced 
the structure to smoking ruins, and the 
third snuffed out the life of the 16th 
President, Abraham Lincoln. 

The assassination of a President has 
assured the perpetual preservation of 



Ford's Theatre, opened in its present 
configuration in 1863. Members of 
local unions in the District of Colum- 
bia Council have been busy for the 
past two years helping to restore it, as 
nearly as possible, to its appearance 
at the time of Lincoln's death. 

John T. Ford, original owner of the 
theater, first appeared on the Washing- 
ton scene in 1861. A successful Balti- 
more theater operator, he was looking 
for a roof to put over his shows, and 
liked the Tenth Street Baptist church, 
which was up for lease at that time. 



Artist's rendering shows the theater 

and adjacent Star Saloon, where John 

Wilkes Boothe had a final drink 

before the assassination, as they were 

when Lincoln was shot, except for 

the finished cornice and pediment. 

Photos and sketches courtesy 

National Park Service. 




Construction craftsmen have few plumb lines 
to guide them as they recreate the 
Ford's Theatre of Abraham Lincoln's Day. 



The congregaiion that had built the 
church in 1833 had since merged with 
another, idling the building. When 
Ford offered to lease the church, one 
of the members of the church board 
objected violently, predicting dire con- 
sequences if the hallowed ground were 
put to use as a place of entertainment. 
He seems to have been gifted with 
Divine insight. 

John Ford had been producing plays 
in the old church building for less 
than a year after its complete renova- 
tion in 1862. when a defective gas 
meter in the basement ignited the 
building. Fed by the combustible ma- 
terials in the dressing rooms, and the 
stage scenery, the conflagration lit the 
Washington twilight of December 30. 
and completely gutted the building. 
Just a few walls were left standing. 
It was fortunate that there was no 
play under way in the theater at the 
time, for it would certainly have been 
a human tragedy of major proportions. 

Undaunted, Ford boldly plunged 
ahead with plans for a new threater. 
despite the wartime scarcity of build- 
ing materials. President Lincoln, who 
had attended the theater in the church 
building, had set a policy of maintain- 
ing the life of the capital city to "show 
the people of this Nation the continu- 
ing strength of the Union." 

Accordingly. Ford had plans drawn 
up (which have subsequently disap- 
peared) and by August, 1963, was 



able to open the doors of the new 
Ford's Theatre. There were outward 
signs of the wartime construction ma- 
terial shortages in the exposed wooden 
lookouts that should have supported 
the missing cornice and pediment. 
Careful examination of the building 
by Army engineers later showed the 
front wall of the building bowed in- 
ward by about 6 inches at the center. 
This was a wall left standing when the 
church was destroyed, and on its ex- 
terior a new wall had been built that 
was straight. There were also weak- 
nesses in the foundation, possibly dic- 
tated by wartime scarcities, which were 
fully revealed in 1930 excavations for 
an adjacent building. 

Lincoln had attended the theatre 
for the first time when it was in the 
old church building, and altogether 
spent eight evenings in the old and new 
buildings before the assassination on 
April r4. 1865. 

Ford attempted to put on one per- 
formance after the conspirators had 




.lolni l.:iiiip, left, I.ocul 1590, and Martin 
.Sizeniore, Lucal 1665, put a side on one 
of the spectator boxes. 



been hanged, but because of the com- 
motion over threats to burn the struc- 
ture down if it were re-opened as a 
place of entertainment, it was closed 
by the Secretary of War. A little over 
a year later, it was purchased by the 
Government, and the interior com- 
pletely remodelled. Ford's Theatre be- 
came the Army Medical Museum and 
the records center for Civil War vet- 
erans" pensions. 

On June 9, 1893, a 40-foot section of 
the front ot the building collapsed from 
the third floor. Twenty-two government 
employes were killed and 65 injured as 
desks, heavy filing cabinets and debris' 




The scene at left, as recreated in Washington's V\av 
Museum, took place in the box framed in the right-hand 
arch, above. Assassin Boothe received his famous leg 
injury in the jump from the box to the stage. 





The weak foundation of the South Wall, adjacent to the restored Star Saloon, 
was shored with piles. Photo by Abbie Rowe, National Park Service. 



A view of the gutted interior of the theater 
as foundation work got under way. 



plunged into the cellar. It was the inquiry 
into the soundness of the structure follow- 
ing this disaster which revealed the bowed 
front wall, and other defects in the build- 
ing. 

With its three disasters behind it, the 
site seems now at rest. With a number of 
minor modifications through the succeed- 
ing years, the building served as a publi- 
cations depot for the Adjutant General, 
and a Lincoln museum, with small offices 
in the upper stories. 

Interest in restoring the structure to 
its original appearance on the night that 
Lincoln was shot solidified in 1955, when 
Congress authorized a preliminary engi- 
neering study. This was followed by 
money for a more intensive study a few 



years later, and in June of 1964. Congress 
appropriated over $2 million for the job. 
Coe Construction Company, Inc., of 
Washington, the prime contractor, moved 
onto the site in January, 1965, and 
since then just about everything but the 
original walls has been torn out and 
rebuilt. Walls and foundations have been 
strengthened. Windows and doors have 
been restored to original dimensions 
where they had been changed, or blocked 
in. The roof of the theater was com- 
pletely removed and replaced. The origi- 
nal, heavy beams of the roof were 
strengthened with steel tie rods. Cross- 
braces were replaced with fire-resistant 
beams, and new roofing, slate and insula- 
tion added. 



Last month, members of the Brother- 
hood finished most of the grounding for 
moldings and decorations, and plasterers 
were starting the final phase of their 
work. For Coe Construction foreman 
John Powell, a member of Local 132 
since 1934, and for a small peak work 
force of 8 to 10 Brotherhood members, 
it has been a rare job. For one thing, 
the original building had few plumb lines. 

When trying to take measurements 
off that bowed front wall, Powell says, 
"you could swear that it was moving." 
Throughout the structure, walls and open- 
ings are out of plumb, and to keep the 
restoration authentic, craftsmen were in- 
structed to follow the out-of-plumb lines. 
Continued on page 28 




Above, James Viars, Local 1665, and Joel Jones, Local 1145, 
work on a box, and, below, Fred Chewning, Local 132, and 
George Reed, Local 1665, hang a beam. 





Wayne Dye, Local 528, works on a deck. 




Washington ROUNDUP 



INCOME TAX MISTAKES— Government auditors working on 3 . 5 million 1966 tax returns 
found underpayment errors in 54.2 percent, up from 49 percent last year, and 
representing $3.1 billions in deficient taxes. But there were 7.5 percent who 
paid too much and Uncle Sam returned S279 million, down from the 13 percent and 
$337 million in rebates on 1965 returns. 

HIRED HAND'S PAY RISES— Average farm wages topped $1 an hour for the first time, 
last year. This is eight cents higher than 1965, 13 cents higher than in 1964. 

GOVERNMENTESE SPOKEN HERE-Acronyms (initials of a title spelling a word) are 
"upping." TAP is "Talent for America's Progress", a pool of government career 
men. Operation MUST is "Maximum Utilization for Skills and Training in Govern- 
ment." JUMPS is "Joint Uniform Military Pay System." PEP is "Postal Efficiency 
Plan." VIM is "Vertical Improved Mail" (for speeding deliveries in tall office 
buildings.) And "Fanny Mae" (Federal National Mortgage Association) now has a 
playmate; "Dotty" (the newly-formed Department of Transportation.) 

AH, SO!— "Made in Japan" is still a tip off on low wages, but the fact is that wages 
there are going up faster than they are in the United States. A study just com- 
pleted by the U.S. Department of Labor and the Japanese Ministry of Labor shows 
that "real wages" — after taking into account rising prices — went up 54 percent in 
Japan between 1953 and 1964, compared to a 26 percent increase in the United 
States during the same period. The study hastens to point out that it is 
extremely difficult to compare wages in the two countries because of difference 
in prices and consumer preferences. With this warning, the study shows that 
factory workers in Japan earn the equivalent of about $100 a month as compared 
with $108 a week for factory workers in the United States, or just about one- 
fourth. This is about the difference in national per capita income between the 
two countries. The study also points out that age, length of service, and other 
personal factors play a much more important part in determining wages in Japan 
than in the United States where emphasis is on occupation and productivity. 
Regular workers are hired in Japan when they leave school and usually stay with 
the same firm until they retire. 

PROJECT HOPE NEEDS HELP-So successful has been the career of the famed hospital 
ship "Hope" which has brought modern medicine to many parts of the world that 
efforts are now in progress to commission another ship for the same purpose. The 
original "Project Hope" has special meaning for organized labor in the United 
States. From its inception six years ago, the project received the strong support 
of the AFL-CIO. But money is a serious problem. With operating costs running 
some S5 million a year, funds — especially contributions from private citizens — are 
badly needed. Donations are tax-free and can be sent to Project HOPE, Box A, 
Washington, D.C. 

TAB ON ASPIRIN — The Food and Drug Administration said recently that all children's 
aspirin bottles sold after next July 1 will contain no more than 36 tablets each. 
This ruling is made in an effort to reduce accidental overdoes. The restriction 
was one of several steps announced jointly by the FDA and 32 drug firms after 
a conference aimed at curbing childhood deaths and illnesses. Also agreed on was 
a limitation in the potency of children's aspirin. Some now range as high as 5 
grains a tablet. The new limit will be 1.25 grains. 



FEBRUARY, 1967 




Construction Job 
In South Vietnam 

U.S. companies are breaking construction rec- 
ords to aid the war effort and bolster the econ- 
omy of Southeast Asia 



Among Americans in Saigon there is a wry joke 
that perhaps the easiest solution to the problem of 
Vietnam is to pave over the country and forget it. 
In a sense we are doing just that, but we are hopeful 
that the end result will have a more utilitarian result 
for future generations of Vietnamese. 

Currently an army of workers, including 22,000 
U.S. Army Engineers and Navy Seabees, supple- 
mented by additional thousands of native workers, 
are building airfields and port facilities, power plants, 
hospitals, highways and bridges. Included among 
the construction battalions are many members of our 
own Brotherhood who have given up the good life 
to help win the war and build for the day when peace 
will return -to this Asian nation. 

The kingpin in this massive billion dollar construc- 
tion job is a combine of four construction companies 
— Raymond International of New York; Morrison- 
Knudsen of Boise. Idaho; Brown & Root of Houston, 
Texas; and J. A. Jones of Charlotte, North Carolina. 

When the war is over, a lot of this construction 
will also have peacetime value; indeed, it will repre- 
sent a capital investment vastly beyond the capacity 
of the South Vietnamese themselves to supply. As 
such, it is one of the most significant steps the U.S. 
is taking to assure the long-term economic viability of 
South Vietnam. 

The statistics of the program are no less heroic 
than the spectacle. RMK-BRJ's work force of 51,700 
is the biggest ever assembled for a U.S. construction 
program; it is made up of 4,200 Americans, 41,800 
Vietnamese, and 5,700 "free-world journeymen," 
mainly Koreans and Filipinos. The consortium's 
machines move enough earth every month (more than 
five million cubic yards) to fill up two Pentagons. 
RMK-BRJ has imported 150 million board feet of 
lumber, enough to build 147,000 average one-family 
houses, and 1,628 miles of water pipe. It is importing 
nearly 10,000 pieces of construction equipment worth 
$142 million, draining U.S. manufacturers so dry 
that other deliveries have been delayed up to six 
months. Its monthly cement consumption — 50,000 
tons, mostly from Taiwan — is enough for thirty miles 
of four-lane highway. At airfields alone, RMK-BRJ 
is installing 1,262 acres of paving. 

That the program is on schedule is even more 
remarkable than its proportions. The deadline for 
completion of every project now authorized is No- 
vember. 1967, and it looks if if this will be met, 
despite the enormous difficulities. Vietnam's working 
conditions have always ranked among the worst in 
the world: disease is rife in the tropical heat, and 
physical resources are so primitive that RMK-BRJ 
is spending $10 million simply to drill wells for fresh 
water. 

How will all this construction affect the future of 
Vietnam? An American newspaperman who has 
been covering Asia for more than twenty years pretty 
well sums it up. "We saw it in Japan, and then in 
Korea and Taiwan," he said. "Once the voice of the 
bulldozer is heard throughout the land, it is never the 
same again." 

THE CARPENTER 







Much of the "real estate" being 
used as landing strips of our fighter- 
bombers »as claimed from the sea 
— such as the one at Tuy Hoa air 
base (left photo). Marine guards 
V. C. (center) who was dressed as a 
woman and carried a grenade. 
Plane flies into Tuy Hoa (right) as 
construction continues. 





Construction staple in 
Vietnam is the familiar 
bulldozer (left) shown 
here crossing sand to tow 
supplies from landing ship 
docked at waters edge. 
Vietnamese laborers (cen- 
ter) distribute bags of ce- 
ment as they prepare a 
soil-cement base of alu- 
minum runway matting. 
Local labor helps erect 
pre-fab buildings (top 
right), and (below right) 
a sketch entitled "Roof- 
tops, Danang," where one 
of our northernmost bases 
is located. Sketches by 
Marine Corps Capt. John 
T. Dyer. Defense Depart- 
ment Photographs. 





■ J 













! . . ^IT vV -ff > "5^3^; 






^m^V 



FEBRUARY, 1967 




All are engineered to meet your needs 

Production saws in 6V2", 71/4", 81/4" sizes, full PA HP at tine blade. 
Spring-loaded clutch drive protects gears, shafts and motor. All 
gears are helical-cut, hardened steel. Steel shoe for firm support. 

Contractor saws are lightweight, under IO1/2 lbs., and IVa usable HP. 
Left and right hand miter and cut-off models. Dual trigger control 
for easy handling. Spring-loaded clutch drive doubles gear life. 

Worm Drive saw has added torque of worm drive and 2 HP output 
at blade. Hardened and ground worm. Handles are separate from 
motor housing. Sturdy, accurate miter and depth adjustments. 

Take your pick! All Milwaukee saws have ball and roller bearings, 
are built for continuous, heavy-duty work. Learn more about them 
from your Milwaukee distributor; see the Yellow Pages under 
"Tools, Electric". Or write for catalog. 

MILWAUKEE ELECTRIC TOOL CORPORATION 




Ask about Milwaukee's 
New Power Miter Table 
for Finish Carpenters. 



13189 W. LISBON ROAD 



BROOKFIELD, WISCONSIN 53005 



THE CARPENTER 



Labor Supports Social 
Security Improvements 

The hopes of millions of Social Se- 
curity retirees for benefits that will help 
them meet today's living costs now rest 
on a special message sent to Congress 
by President Johnson calling for im- 
portant improvements in the Social 
Security Act. 

The President has recommended, 
effective July 1 of this year: 

» A 20 percent increase in Social 
Security payments. 

• An increase of 59 percent for the 
2,500.000 people now receiving mini- 
mum benefits — to $70 for an individ- 
ual and $105 for a married couple. 

• An increase of at least 15 percent 
for the remaining 20,500,000 bene- 
ficiaries. 

• An increase to $150 in the 
monthly minimum benefit for a retired 
couple with 25 years coverage — to 
$100 a month for an individual. 

• An increase in the special bene- 
fits paid to more than 900.000 persons 
72 or over, who have made little or 
no Social Security contribution — from 
$35 to $50 monthly for an individual: 
from $52.50 to $75.00 for a couple. 

• Special benefits for an additional 
200,000 persons 72 or over, who have 
never received benefits before. 

The President's program brought 
commendation from the AFL-CIO. 
President George Meany said; 

"The President has wisely recom- 
mended a series of measures which 
should bring new hope to more than 
19,000.000 elderly Americans. The 
AFL-CIO will support the President's 
proposal to raise over-all Social Se- 
curity benefits by at least 20 percent. 
Like him, we consider this a vital and 
necessary improvement." 

Meany said that the boost would 
"lift large numbers of the elderly from 
the sub-poverty levels at which they 
are now forced to eke out the declin- 
ing years of their lives." 

"A 20 percent increase," he de- 
clared, "would represent a substantial 
down payment on what we firmly be- 
lieve is the needed 50 percent rise in 
benefits which should go into effect as 
soon as they can be adequately financed 
without detriment to other high pri- 

Continued on Page 10 





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carpen1;ers...goad v\/ork 



and Lufkin Red End® rules are a natural combination. Careful crafts- 
men who set high standards for themselves demand the best in the 
tools they use. One tool that has been a favorite of carpenters for many 
years is the Lufkin X46 extension rule. The features listed below are 
some of the reasons why. 

Durable epoxy coating, proved superior to any other, gives extra pro- 
tection for long wear. 

Brass slide, with black-filled graduations and figures, makes it possible 
to take inside measurements. 

Spring joints have mating slots and projections for triple locking that 
helps to prevent end play. 

Bold figures, embedded in the wood, are easy to read; 16" (stud) centers 
are marked in red figures. 

Solid brass strike plates on each section take all of the sliding friction, 
save abrasion of figures. 
Look for Lufkin at your favorite hardware store or lumber yard. 



THE LUFKIN RULE COMPANY/ SAGINAW. MICHIGAN 

MASTER RULE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. INC.,.Middletown. New Yof k • THE LUFKIN RULE COMPANY of Canada 
Limited. Barrie. Ontario • ANSON STICK CO.. Madison. Maine • LUFMEX. S. A,, Mexico City. Mexico • LUFKIN CARIBE 
INC.. Ponce. Puerto Rico • LUFKIN SPECIALTIES. INC., Jackson, Tennessee " LUFKIN INSTRUMENTS, Cleveland, Ohio 




FEBRUARY, 1967 



Labor Supports 



Continued from Page 9 

ority domestic and foreign commit- 
ments." 

Coupled with this endorsement of 
the proposed 20 percent boost was 
AFL-CIO criticism of Republican pro- 
posals that the increase be limited to 8 
percent. Bert Seidman, the AFL-CIO"s 
Director of Social Security, told inter- 
viewers on "Labor News Conference" 
that 8 percent was "entirely inade- 
quate." 

Seidman pointed out that 5,000,000 
elderly Americans are now below what 
the Social Security Administration has 
established as its "poverty levels": 
$1,500 for a single person and $1,850 
for a couple. In addition, it is only 
Social Security benefits that "keep an 
additional 5,500,000 people out of 
poverty." 

Linked with his proposals for broad 
improvements in benefits, the President 
recommended a number of measures 
to remove present "inequities." These 
would include liberalizing the amount 
of money a retiree can earn without 
losing benefits from the current $1,500 
a year to $1,680; adding 500.000 farm 
workers to the Social Security rolls 
and applying federal service credits to 
Social Security credits for federal 
workers who leave their jobs before 
becoming eligible for civil service 
benefits. 

To finance his proposals, the Presi- 
dent recommended a three step in- 
crease in the amount of annual earn- 
ings credited toward benefits — to 
$7,800 in 1968; to $9,000 in 1971 and 
to $10,800 in 1974. In addition, the 
scheduled rate increase to 4.4 percent 
in 1969 would be revised to 4.5 per- 
cent and the scheduled 4.85 percent 
increase in 1973 be revised to 5 per- 
cent. (PAI) 

• 

The United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners of America urges your 
continued support of the educational, 
service, and research programs of the 
American Heart Association. 



give . . . 

so more will live 
HEART FUND 




Proposed Amendments to the Constitution & Laws 



... as submitted by Local Union 452, 
once with Section 63-A is hereby pu 
of the Carpenter. 



Vancouver, B.C., Canada in accord- 
blished in the February, 1967 issue 



The first amendment: 

To delete the proposed new seclion 
"Pension Plan for Officers and Em- 
ployees of affiliated Local Unions and 
Councils." (Section 65) 
The second and third amendments 
relate to "Home and Pensions Per 
Capita Increase." 

To amend Section 54, Paragraph 
D, to delete $30.00 per month and to 
insert $15.00 per month. 

Section 54-D to read: 

Members not wishing to avail 
themselves of the privilege of entering 
the Home may apply for a Pension 
not to exceed Fifteen Dollars ($15) 
per month payable quarterly. 

To amend Section 44. Paragraph 
C, to delete $2.65 and to insert $2.05; 
to delete $1.20 and insert 60j?. 



— R. E. Livingston, General Secretary. 

Section 44-C to read: 

Each beneficial Local Union shall 
pay to the General Secretary Ten 
Dollars ($10) on each new member 
admitted excepting first year appren- 
tices. Two dollars and five cents 
($2.05) per month for each member 
in good standing. One dollar and 
forty-five cents ($1.45) of which shall 
be used as a fund for the general 
management of the United Brother- 
hood and payment of all death and 
disability donations prescribed by the 
Constitution and Laws of the United 
Brotherhood together with all legal 
demands made upon the United 
Brotherhood. The balance of 60c^ 
together with monies received from 
new members to be placed in a spe- 
cial fund for "Home and Pension" 
purposes. 



Powell's Successor 



Perkins, New House Labor Head, 
Has Always Backed Union Cause 




REP. CARL D. PERKINS, the new 
chairman of the House Committee on 
Labor and Education, calls himself a 
country boy from the mining country 
of Eastern Kentucky but he has de- 
voted much of his time in Congress 
to the cause of labor. 

Organized labor has had few more 
ardent champions in Congress than 
Perkins, who succeeded to his new post 
when the Democratic caucus in the 
House ousted Rep. Adam Clayton 
Powell of New York. 

In 1959, during the bitter debate 
over the Landrum-Griffin Act, Perkins 
was one top-ranking member of the 
committee who could and did work 
closely with the labor movement. 

He was one of a small group of 
solidly pro-labor members of the 
House who refused to accept the final 
version of the measure although it 
might have been politically expedient 
for him to do so. 

But expediency has never been a 
part of Perkins' makeup. 



Despite the fact that much of his 
district is conservative and not given 
to deep feelings of racial tolerance, he 
voted for such controversial measures 
as civil rights, fair housing, rent sup- 
plements and demonstration cities. 

On strictly labor issues he was in the 
forefront of the fight — both in com- 
mittee and on the floor — for repeal of 
Section 14(b) of Taft-Hartley and 
championed situs picketing legislation. 

In his district there are numerous 
open shop mines but he has been a 
leader in the fight for mine safety. 

After his first election to Congress 
in 1948, when he was largely an un- 
known political factor despite earlier 
service in the Kentucky Assembly, he 
has had steady labor support in re- 
election campaigns. 

Hard-working, conscientious, Per- 
kins is a modest, unassuming man. 
If he has a passion it might be educa- 
tion — and related to it, the war against 
poverty. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 





EDITORIALS 



^ Labor-ComMnerce Marriage? 

In his State of the Union message, last month, 
President Johnson raised some eyebrows when he 
made a proposal to merge the Department of Labor 
and the Department of Commerce. His reasons were 
"to create a more economical, efficient and modern 
instrument to serve a growing nation." 

As in the case of the automobile stick shift, we have 
now gone full circle. Back in 1913 the Department of 
Labor was founded to eliminate a form of second- 
class citizenship for workers whose interests then were 
relegated to a bureau in the Department of Commerce. 

Both Labor Secretary Wirtz and former Commerce 
Secretary Connor expressed favor for the proposal. 
Wirtz claims he was privileged to join in recommend- 
ing it and that it has the full support of everyone in the 
Department. 

Organized labor's reaction was one of caution while 
the two big business associations, the U.S. Chamber 
of Commerce and the National Association of Manu- 
facturers, came out strongly against the plan. Their 
reason was simple and expected: "Labor would domi- 
nate." 

AFL-CIO President Meany termed the proposal a 
matter of special interest to the labor movement. 
Since the proposal is such a far-reaching one he urged 
an intense and open-minded study when specific pro- 
posals of the President are made public, avoiding 
hasty and uninformed judgements. 

In a matter of such consequence, this is the path that 
organized labor must choose for itself. 



^i- 



R Bad Reviewir 



Down through the years organized labor has be- 
come use to the role of the underdog. So it's not 
surprising when we read about a survey that showed 
textbooks used by high school students give a distorted 
and unfavorable view of the American labor move- 
ment. 

The survey, conducted by the University of Cali- 
fornia, studied 70 textbooks with 115 editions used 
by Los Angeles high school seniors. A series of topics 
was selected by the researchers and each textbook 
was studied to find how the topics were treated. 



The survey showed, for example, that on the issue 
of strikes virtually every textbook emphasized the 
violence angle. Other drawbacks to the books were 
also noted. For example, definitions of such highly 
important terms as "closed shops" and "arbitration" 
are seldom used and the role of unions in politics, as 
the instigators of social change, is largely ignored. 

It seems a little ironic to us that the public school 
system, which owes much of its very existence to the 
efforts of organized labor, would not. at the very 
least, show fair play to the trade union movement and 
to what it has meant in the development of this great 
nation of ours. 

^ i Hereby Resolve . . . 

On a "man-in-the-street" type television interview 
we were watching on New Year's Day the reporter 
asked several people if they had made any New 
Year's resolutions. From the reaction the reporter 
received, it appears that resolutions went out the 
window with the five-cent cigar. 

But one resolution we would like to encourage our 
membership to make and to keep this year — "I promise 
to always be safety conscious." 

We don't mean just on the job, but safety conscious 
at all times. At work, at play, in the home, driving, 
all our waking hours. We all know that our type of 
employment, construction, is one of the most hazard- 
ous. We pointed this all out in a recent editorial. But 
what we probably didn't realize is that "Home Sweet 
Home" is the scene of more than twice as many 
accidental injuries and death as work! In 1964 there 
were 2.050.000 work injuries as compared to 4,350,- 
000 injuries in the home and 28,200 people died as 
the result of home accidents while 14,200 were killed 
on the job. 

And of course the best pickings for the Grim 
Reaper have always been our nation's highways. 
Nearly 50,000 were wiped out on our roads last year. 
Our best advice here is to drive as if every other 
driver on the road is a raving maniac and give him all 
the leeway possible. 

If we may end with a pun on such a grim subject as 
accidental death and injury — we would have this to 
say — To break this resolution could be a grave mistake. 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



11 




The Pleasure "Walkers 



by DOROTHY RUSSELL 



Was it the nmk of Satan 

or harsh ivork rules which 
caused the Single Brothers 
to take a walk ? 



■ "They will be the laughing-stock of the town," said 
the pastor. "Don't distress yourself. By evening they 
will all come back with their heads hanging in shame." 

He was speaking of what was perhaps the first labor 
strike in America. It was the second day of April, 1778, 
in Wachovia (now Winston-Salem), North Carolina, 
and the master of the shops had just come to Bishop John 
Michael Graff with the news that 12 young journeymen 
had walked out without warning and had gone off to 
neighboring towns "or to the woods" or somewhere. Such 
insubordination was unheard of in this well-ordered com- 
munity of the Moravian United Brethren. 

"They have been complaining that the raise in wages 
is not enough, since their board was raised too," explained 
the master. 

"A bold stand for them to take," observed Brother 
Graff, a note almost of admiration creeping into his voice. 
These young men, it seemed, were showing some of the 
staunchness of their fathers who, against all odds, had 
shaped a sound and enduring town out of the raw stuff 
of the wilderness a decade earlier. 

"The elders and you masters have labored earnestly 
over this matter of wages for the Single Brothers. The 
young men should know they cannot force us to dance to 
their piping by such childish behavior. They were all 
brought up in the Brotherhood, and they know the prob- 
lems," the bishops added. 

The problems were those of sheer survival. The early 
Moravian towns in colonial America (notably Bethlehem 



in Pennsylvania) were communalistic in the original sense 
of the word. For the purpose of survival, not wholly 
as a matter of philosophy, the United Brethren set up an 
"Oeconomie," or common housekeeping, within which 
each member of the Congregation was required to work 
and to follow the strictest rules of behavior. 

"It was MoUer who spoke up in the meeting yester- 
day," said the master. "He was the only one who ob- 
jected at that time to the four shillings a day. But there 
was a lot of arguing and complaining in the Single 
Brothers House afterward. It must have been Moller 



who egged them on,' 



"Moller," repeated Brother Graff. "He has no right. 
He no longer even ranks as a Brother since he answered 
the call to muster and signed the oath to the new govern- 
ment. . . . Still," he mused, "we must consider the 
strains that have been put upon the young men these 
days." 







■ The War of the 
Rebellion had 
brought hard 
times for the 
United Brethren. 
Torn between 
their rule of abso- 
lute obedience to 
the law of the 
land and their 
vows of non-vio- 
lence, they had 
not yet come (as they would later) to the point of allow- 
ing each man to follow his own conscience on the ques- 
tion of bearing arms and signing oaths of allegiance. 

All day long, as the men and women of the town went 
quietly about their assigned tasks, they watched and 
waited for the return of the journeymen. They stopped, 
unaccustomedly, and talked in groups of three or four, 
and though they felt the situation was grave, they could 
not help a surreptitious laugh now and then. 



An Old Siilem home kiwivii as the 
Lick-Boner House 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



"Those boys! How will we keep our faces straight 
when we see them?" The amusement was tempered with 
a commiserating apprehension, for they all knew how re- 
bellious spirits had in the past been humbled, for the good 
of the Congregation, by weight of authority, invincibly 
kind. 

"Maybe they'll stick it out in the woods," suggested 
one. 

"Never fear! Just look at the weather!" The day, 
the second of April, was raw and stormy. "It's going to 
be a cold, cold night in the open." 

There are records of this incident, written day by day 
and on the spot by persons involved in it. The Moravians 
were indefatigable record keepers. The archives of the 
towns they created are rich 
in diaries, letters, memora- 
bilia, mercantile accounts, 
and minutes of meetings. 
In the daily logs, usually 
written by the pastors, are 
set down, one after the 
other with slight emphasis 
one over the other, such 
incongrvious items as births 
and deaths, the weather, 
the cooperations and con- 
flicts with the colonial 
government, the schooling 
of the children, the music 







Sfiiiritisc in 
Boys School 



and love-feasts of the church, the piping of water through 
wooden conduits, the search for a source of candle wax, 
who suffered snakebite, and who was entitled to sole right 
to earn his living by supplying the gingerbread. 

■ The story of the strike by the Single Brothers is told on 
Pages 1203 to 1259 of Records of the Moravians in North 
Carolina, translated from the German, edited by the late 
Adelaide M. Fries, archivist of the Moravian Church in 
America. 

In Wachovia the people, less than three hundred, lived 
divided by groups in well-built houses, one for the mar- 
ried couples, one each for the Single Brothers and the 
Single Sisters, and another for the little children, who 
were strictly but tenderly guarded, guided, and schooled 
by certain Single Sisters assigned to the task while the 
parents were engaged in other work. Their life, however, 
was by no means lacking in joyousness. All sorts of 
occasions, from birthdays and Christmas to the resolution 
of community problems, were celebrated by love-feasts 
in the church: coffee and a bun, sometimes an apple for 
each child, a candle, or a little pictured religious card, 
and kisses all around. And music played a central part 
in their life. The hymns, though they sprang from the 
blood and wounds of Christ, were lively and well-learned, 
and all important happenings were acclaimed by the 
music of horns. As soon as the ridge-pole was raised on 
a new building the band with their trumpets, French 
horns, and trombones mounted aloft to shout the achieve- 
ment froin the housetop. Even burial services were not 
dismal; every Moravian aspired to "make a good death," 
and as he felt it approaching, prepared himself composed- 
ly and wrote or dictated his memoirs; and finally Iris 



procession to the Gottcs Akcr was led by the band playing 
triumphantly. 

Nevertheless, this order was accomplished only by the 
strictest economy and a willingness of every member to 
work, to share, and to maintain an accord on all matters, 
great and small. Marriages were undertaken only upon 
the consent of the Elders, and even the meeting of the 
young men and women took place only under their 
watchful eye. For exercise the paths of their "pleasure 
walks" were laid out in the woods, the men going in one 
direction, the girls in another. 

All these regulations the young men found extremely 
irksome. Their careers were being thwarted, their pockets 
were empty (the new wage rule leaving each one a yearly 
balance of only four pounds, seventeen shillings, six 
pence — about $13.50 in today's money), the changing 
value of currency was sending up the price of clothing 
and everything else, and — worst of all — the governors of 
the new republic were now calling them to join up and 
fight, these young men who had been reared to peace and 
brotherly love. Moller had been called up. Yarrell had 
been commanded to show tip at muster with "The Ger- 
man Company" of Captain Henry Smith in Bethania. 
Schober also. Who next? What were they to do? Go 
to jail instead? 

This non-combativeness, this sharing, this subordina- 
tion of self to the welfare of the community did not 
invariably breed docility. Among the Brethren there 
were plenty of strong, stubborn, salty characters. And 
now the strike of the twelve rebellious journeymen re- 
vealed the propensity of the older Moravians to wait out 
their crises until their idea of right prevailed. "The offi- 
cials," wrote Bishop Graff in the daily record, "were con- 
tent to leave it to the Saviour to maintain their position 
against the audacious combination." 

"Hsst! The pleasure-walkers are returning!" 

At dusk, as a heavy frost began to settle down, a 
whisper ran through the town, with here and there a 
suppressed giggle or chuckle. 

"Stolz mid Schober sind ziiriickgckommen! They've 
come back!" 

"Osterlein too!" 

"Schober 's gone to ask par- 
don of his Master." 

"Armcr Kcrl! Poor fellow, 
you should see how red his 
ears are." 

"Shame or frostbite?" 

■ On April third, the day 
after the walkout. Brother 
Graff wrote into the daily rec- 
ord, with a glint of humor 
and a nice recognition of first 
things first: "It is evident 

that many of the blossoms on the fruit trees have been 
killed, but we hope not all. In the Single Brothers House 
it was fairly quiet, those who went pleasure-walking yes- 
terday returned to work and came to dinner at noon. . . . 
All the Brethren and Sisters were waiting to see what 
would be done with them." 

On April fourth he wrote: "Last night there was a 

Continued on Page 33 




Vo,t;/('r House 
Tile Stoic 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



13 




District Board Member Cooper Retires; 
Testimonial Honors Veteran Carpenter 




Two nations recently joined to- 
gether to toast a brother member 
who has done as much as any man 
in this century to advance the cause 
of trade unionism in the Dominion 
of Canada. 

Friends from across the border 
in the U.S., including General Sec- 
retary R. E. Livingston, journeyed 
to Toronto, Canada, to salute Andy 
Cooper, board member from the 
Ninth District, who is retiring after 
43 years of service to his fellow 
man. 



If Brother Cooper had a creed 
it would read like this: "No true 
and permanent fame can be founded 
except in labours which promote the 
happiness of mankind." This credo 
Cooper lived to the fullest possible 
measure during his four decades in 
the Canadian labor movement. 

A highlight of the testimonial was 
a reading of the important events in 
Brother Coopers life in the style of 
the "This is Your Life" television 
program of several years ago. Wil- 
_fred Hague was the very capable 
narrator. After the reading Toronto 
Local 27 presented a handsomely 
framed oil painting of a seascape 
depicting a three-masted schooner 
in the middleground. 

Brother Cooper was born in Twil- 
lingate, a small island connected by 
a bridge, off the northeast coast of 
Newfoundland in 1888. He was the 
son of Captain Andrew Cooper, a 
fisherman by trade. Captain Cooper 
sailed the schooner "Stanley Smith" 
off the coast of Labrador with the 
help of his two sons, Andrew and 
Henry. 

In 1913 Andrew began his car- 
pentry apprenticeship training at $3 
a week for a 9-hour day. In 1923 
he joined Toronto Local 27 and 
served it as a business agent. When 
a vacancy occurred in the post of 
General Representative, President 
William Hutcheson handpicked 
Cooper to fill the vacancy. In 1950 
Brother Cooper was elected to the 
General Executive Board, represent- 

Continued on Page 26 



TOP PHOTO: Retiring Board Member 
A. V. Cooper receives painting from 
Steve Brodacli, O.P.C. V.-P., presented 
on belialf of O.P.C, Canada Conference 
and Toronto Local 27. The oil painting 
is held high by Phil Rohichaud, president 
of Local 27j and Marcel Raymond, presi- 
dent of Canada Conference, while Gen- 
eral Secretary R. E. Livingston and 
President Campbell give smiling ap- 
proval. 

ABOVE: Phil Rohichaud, president of 
Local 27 (Andy's home local), presents 
a framed, enlarged photograph of the 
testimonial invitation to Brother Cooper. 
RIGHT: Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Cooper. 
FAR RIGHT: General Secretary Liv- 
ingston extends best wishes to the Coop- 
ers on behalf of General President 
Hutcheson and the General Executive 
Board. 




14 



THE CARPENTER 




IFa^MTIl 



SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONST. AVE, N> , JW. ^ASHt-t-, 0. C- 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT.) , >„),«» 




Hot His Wind Up 

Politician's wife: "Before we were 
married you made me beautiful prom- 
ises!" 

Politician: "Yeah, honey, but you 
should have known those were only 
campaign promises!" 

BE UNION BUY LABEL 




BUY SAVINGS BONDS 

Red-Hot Story 

An excited woman called the fire 
department. "My house is on fire . . . 
come quick!" she shouted, and hung 
up. A little while later the 'phone at 
the station rang again. It was the 
woman. "I don't hear the sirens . . . 
why aren't you coming?" 'Lady," re- 
plied the fire fighter on duty, "You 
didn't give the address. Where is the 
fire?" "In my kitchen!" she shouted. 
"Hurry!" and she hung up again. 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 

Dropping Lessons 

"Are you going to study singing, 
as you intended?" 

"No. I gave up the idea when the 
teacher convinced me it would take 
three years of hard work to enable 
me to sing as well as I thought I sang 
already." 



Company Time 

A girl applying for a job was asked 
if she had any particular qualifications 
or unusual talents. She said she had 
won several prizes in crossword puz- 
zles and slogan-writing contests. 

"Sounds good," the manager told 
her, "but we want somebody who will 
be smart during office hours." 

"Oh," said the girl, "this was dur- 
ing office hours." 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

She Barely Won! 

The stripteaser won the prize for 
the most original costume at the an- 
nual costume ball of the Eppi Dermis 
Nudist Colony. She put a raisin in 
her navel and went as a cookie. 

U R THE "U" IN UNION 

Needs Help 

"Excuse me," said the meek little 
man to the policeman, "but I've been 
waiting on this corner for my wife 
for over half an hour. Would you be 
good enough to order me to move 
on?" 

WORK SAFELY 

Beautiful Melody! 

It happened in one of the a-go-go 
dens popular with the younger set: a 
waitress dropped a tray of dishes and 
everybody jumped up and started 



Jancing 



This Month's Limerick 

There was a young man of Oporta, 
Who daily got shorter and shorter. 
The reason, he said, 
Was the hod on his head, 
Which was filled with the heaviest 
mortar. 

— Lewis Carroll 



Hair-Rising Stunt 

Once there was a French-horn 
player whose toupee fell into his in- 
strument. He spent the rest of the 
concert blowing his top. 

BUY ONLY UNION TOOLS 

Complete Strikeout 

Sally: "So then Gert said to me: 
'I could have married anyone I 
pleased'!" 

Tally: "You know what that means, 
don't cha? She never pleased any- 
body!" 




BE AN ACTIVE UNIONIST 

Real Healthy Type! 

Joe, beset by problems, jumped 
from the 19th floor. As he passed the 
fourth floor, two associates noted him 
flashing by. "Good heavens! " cried 
one, "That was Joe ... he just got 
back from his Florida vacation this 
morning!" "Yes," replied the other, 
"and it sure must have agreed with 
him. Did you notice that wonderful 
tan?" 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



15 



HOME STUDY COURSE 



!^:=> 




Questions tor Blueprint Reading Unit fX 



The work required for this lesson will be quite detailed. 
The estimation of materials to be used in the building will 
be a "guestimation" at best. Experience in estimating will 
help reduce shortages and overstocking at the job site. 

The answer you derive from your estimation should be a 
close approximation of the correct answer, although a rea- 
sonable amount of variation is acceptable. 

Make a complete list of the rough lumber required for 
the framing, sheathing and insulation of this building. 
Estimate the cost of the material using the quoted prices. 
Realizing that material costs vary throughout the country, 
we have assembled the following price list for use in your 
estimate. 



1" X 2" S4S — $110.00 M 



(M indicates per thousand 

board ft.) 

(S4S indicates surfaced 

four sides) 
l"x 3" S4S — $110.00 M 
l"x 4" S4S — $110.00 M 
1" X 6" T&G — $120.00 M 
2"x4"S4S — $125.00M 
2"x 6" S4S— $125.00 M 
2"x8"S4S— $135.00M 
2"x 10" S4S— $135.00 M 
2"x 12" S4S— $135.00 M 
Timbers S4S — $ 1 85.00 M 
Insulation-average AVi ^ per square foot 
Joist hangers-average cost of 45^ each 
The following explanations are necessary for simplifica- 
tion in "taking off" rough or framing material. 

ROOF SHEATHING 

This sheathing is 1" x 4" boards laid with 1" spacing 
between them. 

By laying the roof sheathing this way, and calculating 
the actual square feet of roof to be sheathed, you will 
have sufficient material and it will not be necessary to add 
a percentage for waste. 

STUDS 

There are several different ways to estimate the num- 
ber of studs required. 

l.You may take the lineal footage of partitions and 
estimate one stud per running foot. This is perhaps 
the most common method. 
2. You may lay out each stud very carefully on the floor 
plans. This is the most accurate way, but is time 
consuming. It is not used very often. 
We might note here that all partitions on the first floor 
are 2" x 6" studs, with the exception of the soundproof 
partition. All exterior partitions on the second floor are 
2" X 6" studs. All interior partitions on the second floor 
are 2" x 4" studs with the exception of the East and West 
walls of the Main Stair Hall. 



FLOOR AND CEILING JOISTS 

Add extra joists .wherever necessary. It is not proper to 
use backing blocks on top of partitions; the material saved 
using scrap lumber for this purpose is lost in labor costs. 

SUB-SIDING 

You should estimate the materials needed for the walls 
as though the walls were solid, ignoring any openings such 
as windows, door openings, etc, in the plans. This will give 
you sufficient material to cover the required surface. 

In other instances, if the sheathing were to be laid on a 
diagonal, an allowance would have to be made for more 
waste. 




ROOF RAFTERS 

First of all they should be framed properly. Do not 
take short cuts! Do not spread the rafters, but put them 
where specified by the Roof Plan. Also add extra ones if 
they are needed. Estimate 2" x 8" stock for valleys, hips, 
and ridges. 

SUB-FLOORING 

After estimating the amount of actual square feet need- 
ed you must add 25% for waste. The reason for doing 
this is that 1" x 6" T&G when laid, actually covers only 
5V4". There is also some waste in cutting and fitting. 

ANSWERS WILL BE FOUND ON PAGE 29 



STUDY MATERIAL AVAILABLE 

The Mathematics Home Study Course has been com- 
piled into a pamphlet and is now available at a cost 
of 50(i per copy. Requests for the pamphlet. The Car- 
pentry Supplemental Mathematics Workbook, should 
be sent to: General Secretary R. E. Livingston, United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 101 
Constitution Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20001. 

The Blueprints and Specifications for the Home Study 
Course in Blueprint Reading and Estimating are also 
available. The price for these is $2, and they also may 
be ordered from the General Secretary's office. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



1967 Apprenticeship £ 
Contest 'Shaping Up' 
As Record Breaker 



Thirty-six leaders in the carpentry 
craft's labor-management apprentice- 
ship training program assembled in 
Vancouver, B.C., recently to lay plans 
for the 1967 apprenticeship contest. 
They composed the Western Region 
Carpenter-Cabinetmaker Apprentice- 
ship Contest Committee. 

Judging from actions taken in the 
one-day gathering, it appears that the 
1967 apprenticeship competition will 
be bigger and more exciting than ever. 
These are highlights of the meeting: 

NAME CHANGE— It was voted to 
change the name of the contest from 
"Western Regional" to "International 
Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest," 
thus calling attention to the enlarged 
scope of the competition. (The 1966 
contest drew contestants from Alaska, 
Arizona. California. Nevada, New 
Mexico. Michigan. Idaho, Utah. Wyo- 
ming, Oregon. Washington. British 
Columbia, and Alberta. Canada.) 

The designation "Cabinet Maker" 
was deleted from the title of the con- 
test because, as Paul Rudd. secretary 
of the committee, explained, the word 
"Carpenter" as used in the trade in- 
cludes all branches of the jurisdiction. 

CONTEST LOCATION— In his re- 
port on 1967 contest arrangements, 
William Cameron, apprentice coordi- 
nator for British Columbia, stated that 
the arrangements committee had inves- 
tigated possible contest sites and rec- 
ommended that the competition be 
held at the Vocational School in Van- 
couver. Tools and equipment are avail- 
able there, and school management 
was receptive to the arrangements. 

The group voted to accept the Voca- 
tional School as contest site and to 
present its decision to the National 
Joint Apprenticeship Committee, 
which meets in New Orleans this 
month. 

DATE FOR CONTEST — The 

group recommended that the competi- 
tion be held in the middle of August. 




1966 APPRENTICE CONTESTANT WORKS AT HIS ASSIGNED PROJECT 



The local committee later set August 
17, 18, and 19 as the dates. 

USE OF POWER TOOLS— In a 

letter presented to the meeting, the 
King County Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee, Seattle, Washington, rec- 
ommended the use of power tools by 
contestants in future contests. It was 
the concensus of the gathering that 
prohibition on the use of power tools 
by contestants be lifted on a limited 
basis. The use of power tools would 
be permissible but not mandatory, and 
it would be up to the committee where 
the contest is held. It was decided that 
the International Contest Committee 
would assist the local committee in 
acquiring necessary power tools. 

EXPECTED PARTICIPANTS— In 

addition to the states and provinces 
represented in the 1966 contest, the 
group was told that contestants are 



also expected from Colorado, Florida, 
Wisconsin, Tennessee, Texas, Illinois, 
and Saskatchewan in 1967. 

IDENTIFICATIONS— C. M. San- 
ford, director of the Carpenter JAC 
Fund, Los Angeles, made the recom- 
mendation that signs be set up at 
future contests indicating the names 
of contestants and their home states 
or provinces. This recommendation 
was adopted. 

DIRECTORY— Leo Gable, techni- 
cal director of the Brotherhood's Train- 
ing Department, reported that the 
United Brotherhood has just published 
a directory of JAC coordinators, chair- 
men, and secretaries, and that these 
booklets were being made available to 
apprenticeship training leaders to assist 
inner-communications in the program. 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



17 



r 

I ^ KBanadian Report 



Construction Has 
Second Best Year 

Construction in Canada in 1966 
experienced its second best year on 
record despite a slump in residential 
building. The estimated total of al- 
most five billion dollars is about five 
percent below the 1964 record. 

The slowdowns in engineering and 
housing accounted for the drop. Both 
are dependent to some extent on gov- 
ernment funds which were reined in 
tight toward the end of the year to 
avoid "overheating the economy." 

Trade union economists don't think 
the economy was in too much danger 
of overheating. They think that some 
of the rein-tightening was ill-advised. 
Their opinion is supported by the sec- 
ond report of the Economic Council 
of Canada which emphasized that a 
serious shortage of housing exists 
across the country. 

The federal government hasn't yet 
taken action to remedy the situation, 
but should do so before too long. Al- 
lowing a shortage of mortgage money 
at moderate interest rates to continue 
has been having the opposite effect to 
the one intended. 

The government cut down on spend- 
ing to avoid inflation. But the house 
shortage is creating inflation for many 
families by pushing up housing costs 
and rents. 

In some urban areas like Metro 
Toronto, the home that sold for $15,- 
000 a few years ago is $25,000 today. 
A serviced lot alone sells for $8,000 
up, 15 miles from downtown. How 
do you build homes for working peo- 
ple starting with this base cost? 

Labor Leader Protests 
Pirating of Worlcmen 

One of Canada's labor leaders says 
that only ill-advised measures by gov- 
ernments can stop Canada's economy 
from showing further growth. He told 
the press that Canada's construction 
potential is enormous, limited only by 
the availability of capital, restraints by 
government and "our own ability, 
shared with employers and govern- 
ment, to train sufficient new journey- 
men." 

The Economic Council says that 
one and a half million new jobs must 
be created by 1970, jobs for skilled 
workers. But training of workers has 



not been keeping up with demand. 

This labor leader whose union is 
heavily engaged in construction says 
that contractors should stop "pirating 
each other's help and sponsor joint 
training schemes instead." 

Ontario Carpenters 
Among Most MiUtant 

Carpenters' local unions were among 
the most militant in Ontario during re- 
cent years. A report just out shows 
that they, along with two other union 
groups, participated in 100 or more 
strikes between 1958 and 1965. 

The report on strikes was only inci- 
dental to a great deal of information 
about the Ontario economy published 
by the Ontario Department of Labor 
as part of a larger report on the use of 
court injunctions in labor disputes. 

The Carpenters' union in this prov- 
ince engaged in 142 strikes, more than 
any other union, but the strikes must 
have been small and of short duration. 
Carpenters' strikes in the period stud- 
ied accounted for only 4.7 percent of 
the workers on strike and only 5.1 
percent of the mandays lost. 




EXPO 67, to be held in Montreal this 
year, will be union-made from the en- 
trance gates to the exits and will in- 
clude the pyramid cluster of 158 dwell- 
ing units known at Habitat 67. Made of 
pre-cast concrete in 15 different types of 
homes, it presents a new approach to 
family living in a high density urban 
development. 



The UAW locals headed the list with 
36 percent of the employees on strike 
and 21.4 percent of mandays lost in a 
total of 115 strikes. 

The Carpenters were the third larg- 
est union by membership in the prov- 
ince in 1965 with over 26,000 on 
record. Largest were UAW with al- 
most 80,000 and Steel with over 74,- 
000 but then most of the auto and 
steel production in Canada is concen- 
trated in this province. 

Pulp Chipper 
Now Operating 

Pulp and paper companies are al- 
ways looking for new and faster meth- 
ods of production. DOMTAR, a major 
Canadian company, has put into use 
a new portable chipper. 

The novel chipper is being operated 
on an experimental basis in the north- 
ern woods to see if tree-length pulp 
can be turned into wood chips virtually 
where the trees are felled. 

Being tested near East Angus in 
Quebec's eastern townships, the chip- 
per can be moved from place to place 
by truck. It operates somewhat like a 
production line in a plant with the 
entire machinery mounted in five truck 
pallets for easy handling. 

The pallets hold the chipper, a 
barker, a conveyor, a live deck and a 
stop and unloader which feeds the con- 
veyor with one tree length at a time 
from the deck. 

The power plant is a modified gas 
turbine aircraft engine, weighing only 
250 pounds but producing 490 horse- 
power. 

This process, if it is proved prac- 
ticable, will be another step in woods 
efficiency, eliminating repetitious han- 
dling, loading, unloading and storing. 

Ney/v Minimum Wage 
Is Now in Effect 

On January 1st, the $1.25 minimum 
wage law went into effect across Can- 
ada. This affects only companies under 
federal jurisdiction like transportation, 
and covers fewer than 10 percent of 
the working force. 

The rest of the working force comes 
under provincial labor legislation, and 
each province sets its own minimum 
wage standards. 

In the provinces minimum wages 
vary but a dollar an hour is about 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



average. This is a long way from the 
$1.75 minimum which is the trade 
union movement's objective. 

U.S.-Canadian Wage 
Gap Mote Obvious 

The wide discrepancy between mini- 
mum wages in Canada and the United 
States will be made even more obvious 
when the auto workers enter negotia- 
tions this year. The union is out to get 
parity of wages in the industry between 
the two countries. 

The wage gap between U.S. and 
Canadian auto workers is now from 
40 cents to one dollar an hour. The 
union claims that one wage scale across 
the border would cost General Motors 
only four cents an hour per employee 
in the two countries. 

This will be an interesting fight. 

In the meantime the union went 
through a long strike to win wage 
parity between Quebec and Ontario. 
GM opened a new plant at Ste. The- 
rese, Quebec, with wage levels well 
below those in effect at its plant at 
Oshawa, Ontario. 

The union won. 

Canada's Centennial 
Observance Begins 

Canada's Centennial observance has 
begun. In over 2,000 communities — 
thriving big cities and isolated small 
towns — Canada's 20 million people 
are marking their national anniversary 
with mounting pride. They're looking 
back to 1867 when four British col- 
onies — Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, 
Ontario and Quebec — banded together 
in a Confederation of the Dominion 
of Canada. That Dominion formed 
the foundation of one independent 
country which now controls its own 
affairs, though Canada remains a mem- 
ber of the British Commonwealth. 

Through multiple galas, Canadians 
are taking a hard look at the present 
state of the nation and envision their 
social and economic future. 

Early on the event-packed Centen- 
nial calendar, Canada will stage its 
first Winter Games at Quebec City, 
February 11-19. Following this, an 
exciting international ski-jumping com- 
petition will be held in Ottawa, Feb- 
ruary 25 and 26. 

Even this early in the Cennential 
year, visitors traveling in Canada may 
catch up with the Confederation Train, 
16 specially decorated history-of-Can- 
ada show-coaches, which began a west 
to east cross-country journey January 
9. The red-coated Mounted Police will 
guard the exhibits. 




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FEBRUARY, 1967 



19 



Claim «Jo Jxave 
(Solved the 
Hxcaale of the 

cJVikaculous 
^tahway 




The strange stairway of saktafe 

Neu) Mexico 

The spiral staircase 

imThe CHAPELOFOURLADYoFLIGHT 

-30 inches wide amd consisting of 33 steps- 
was built entirelv of wood wrrhout the 
use of a single nail -5>'/)cw>?/'sv7e-/? 
who asked for no pay and nevek 

REVEALED HIS NftmE 



Famous staircase (above) was subject of 
a Believe It or Not item back in 1920. 



.^iai 







In the July, 1965 issue of the CAR- 
PENTER there was an article entitled 
"The Legend of the Carpenter of 
Loretto." It dealt with a spiral stair- 
way that was installed by a mysterious 
carpenter in the Chapel of Our Lady 
of Light in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
This was over 80 years ago. 

The story went on to tell how the 
chapel was completed with a choir 
loft but the builder didn't leave room 
for a staircase to the loft. Then a 
mysterious carpenter appears one day 
and builds an impossible stairway with 
two 360-degree turns. As soon as the 
stairway was finished the carpenter 
disappeared without being paid and 
no one has seen him since. 

The stairway, which was featured in 
Ripley's "Believe It Or Not" column 
in 1920, has been examined by engi- 
neers, architects, and carpenters from 
all over the world and they all ac- 
knowledged that they don't understand 
how it stands at all. 

Now two members of our organiza- 
tion claim not only to have solved the 
riddle of the miraculous stairway but 
have actually built models of the 
staircase. Oscar Hadwiger, a 77-year- 
old retired member of Local 362, 
Pueblo, Colo., journeyed to Santa Fe 
to see the stairway first hand before 
beginning work on his model. The 
other member who claims to have 
solved the riddle of the impossible 
stairway is C. W. Ehlert of Warrens- 
burg, Mo., Local 1953. 

Both Hadwiger and Ehlert admitted 
the project was most challenging and 
difficult. Hadwiger, who has a string 
of patents to his credit including the 
first successful floor sander, worked 
ten hours a day on his stairway over 
a period of three months before he 
had the stairway completed to his 
satisfaction. Ehlert's stairway, which 
is 31 inches high and 10 inches in 
diameter, is completed except for the 
railing. 

Hadwiger who says he has "never 
seen anything I couldn't do if I put 
my mind to it" was a cabinet maker 
and stair builder during his days as a 
member of Local 362 — so he had 
some idea of how to start the project. 
As in the original stairway, Hadwiger's 
is pieced together with glue and 
dowels. 

We would like to issue a final chal- 
lenge to our two enterpising carpen- 
ters — build a full-size working replica 
of the "Strange Stairway of Santa Fe." 
As the man says, you can build a 
model of the Wright brothers plane 
but that doesn't mean it's going to fly. 

Gentlemen, the gauntlet has been 
thrown! 

20 



Model of staircase (at bottom of page, 
lower left) was built by C. W. Ehlert 
of Local 1953, Warrensberg, Mo. Origi- 
nal staircase (below), 25 feet high, rises 
to choir loft in the Chapel of Our Lady 
of Light at Loretto Academy in Santa 
Fe, New Mexico. 








.1 









,;*i,., M^.* . 




Oscar Hadwiger, retired member of 
Local 362, examines model of stairway 
he built from pieces of scrap. He said 
model was product of 10% skill and 
90% patience. 



THE CARPENTER 




/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Contractors, 
Unions Praise 
Late Mediator 
C M. LaMotte 

Labor and management in south- 
western New York State joined hands 
in a recent posthumous testimonial to 
Clarence M. LaMotte, a federal media- 
tor in an eight-county area in the state. 

A special guest of honor at the testi- 
monial, held to raise money for the 
Clarence M. LaMotte Memorial Schol- 
arship Fund, was General Secretary 
Richard E. Livingston. 

A kind, patient, tolerant man, Clar- 
ence LaMotte was a great believer in 
getting to the bargaining table and 
resolving differences before they got 
out of hand. This idea, now known 
as "preventive mediation" was prac- 
ticed by LaMotte long before it be- 
came a well-known term in collective 
bargaining and mediation parlance. 

It was LaMotte's early conviction 
of the "rightness" of such an approach 
that brought labor peace and tran- 
quility to the building trades unions 
and contractors in the area known as 
the Southern Tier. 

Under this program, representatives 
of the construction unions and contrac- 
tors meet regularly — as a sort of hu- 
man relations committee — to discuss 
and solve problems and issues as they 
arise in day-to-day relations. This not 
only prevents issues from accumulating 
until the period when the parties must 
negotiate a new agreement, but also 
removes discussion of issues from any 
"crisis" atmosphere. 

This formula soon attracted wide 
recognition among mediation officials, 
and two years ago top officials of the 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation 
Service came to Dunkirk from Wash- 
ington and New York City to person- 
ally salute the "Southern Tier For- 
mula" and the mediator, contractors 
and unionists who made it work. 

Evolution of that plan was an indus- 
trial relations achievement which won 




AT LAMOTTE DINNER — R. E. Livingston, General Secretary; The Reverend 
Luke Power; Mrs. Clarence M. LaMotte; Earl W. Ek, the founding president 
of the Southern Tier Building Association, Inc. 



Mr. LaMotte deserved recognition and 
it was copied widely. 

The Buffalo mediator took special 
pride in the plan because it diminished 
— almost eliminated in fact — discord 
and strikes. 



Mr. LaMotte lamented strikes. He 
knew they were contests of economic 
strength. But he always saw beyond 
that — to the workers affected, to their 
families, and to the welfare of the 
community. 




Service awards were presented at the annual dinner-dance of Local 278, at the Hotel 
Woodruff. From left: James LeFex, president; Milton T. Frey, financial secretary 
and business manager; William H. Gilbert, 50-year member; Robert A. Hutchinson, 
40-year member, and General Secretary Richard E. Livingston. 

Watertown Local Honors Old Timers 



WATERTOWN, N.Y.— More than 
300 persons attended the recent an- 
nual dinner-dance of Local 278. 

Seventy-four members were awarded 
pins for long continuous service. Sev- 
enty received 25-year pins. William 
H. Gilbert was awarded a 50-year pin, 
while Robert A. Hutchinson received 
a 40-year pin. Hobart G. Webber re- 
ceived a 35-year pin and Lynn A. 
Wells was given a 30-year pin. 

Among those receiving 25-year pins 
were: James LaFex, president of the 
iQcal union; Milton T. Frey, financial 



secretary and business manager; Wil- 
liam L. Lawyer, general representative 
of the brotherhood; Augustus Potter, 
treasurer, and Ernest Simonds, warden. 

Richard E. Livingston, general sec- 
retary, was guest speaker and pre- 
sented service awards. 

Master of ceremonies was Nicholas 
S. Valentine, deputy industrial com- 
missioner for state labor affairs. 

The local union was chartered in 
Watertown April 5, 1899, and is affili- 
ated with the Adirondack and Vicinity 
District Council of Carpenters. 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



21 



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Notre Dame Football Star Worked 
As Carpenter Apprentice Last Year 



LIMA, O. — Jimmy Lynch, All-Ameri- 
can captain of Notre Dame University's 
champion football team, worked as a 
first-year carpenter apprentice last sum- 
mer. 

Local 372 of Lima helped to keep the 
collegiate star in training during IVi sum- 
mer months by hiring him out to a large 
local contractor. Green & Sawyer Gen- 
eral Contractors, Inc. 

Proud of the fact that this outstanding 
young man was able to earn money for 
his schooling by working in the craft. 
Local 377 held a special assembly in his 
honor January 7 at the UAW Union Hall, 
with nearly 3,000 persons in attendance. 
The day was declared "Jimmy Lynch 
Day in Lima." A testimonial dinner was 
held that evening. 

Jim Lynch crowned his college foot- 
ball career with a dazzling season in 1966, 
He was picked All-American by United 
Press, Associated Press, American Foot- 
ball Coaches, Football Writers Assn,, 
Time Magazine, New York Daily News, 
Football News, Sporting News and others. 
He also was named as a National Foot- 
ball Foundation and Hall of Fame 
Scholar-Athlete. He was the winner of 
the Ma.xwell Memorial Trophy. This year 
he will undoubtedly be a top draft choice 
for the professional football teams. 

Among the distinguished guests dur- 
ing Jim Lynch Day were Lynch's coach, 
Ara Parseghian, and members of his 




coaching staff; his parents and members 
of his immediate family; Rev. Theodore 
Hesburgh, president of Notre Dame; fel- 
low players. Nick Eddy, Pete Duranko, 
John Lattner, John Homey; and local 
and state officials. 

January 7 marked a day-long testimo- 
nial to a hometown boy who made good. 




HOSTS AND GUESTS— From left, Edward Rettig, president of Local 372; 
Ray Buffenbarger, trustee; Jim Lynch; Robert Wallace, business representa- 
tive; and Rodney Lynch, father of the honoree. 



BUILDING TOGETHER — Carpenters Local 
964, Suffem, N. Y., presents a gift of 
SLOOO for the Good Samaritan Hospital 
Building Fund to Mrs. Joseph T. St. 
Lawrence, Director, Development and 
Public Relations. Presenting the gift 
(right) Louis Servo, Chairman, Donation 
and Awards Committee, said. "Every 
member of our Union is happy to help 
our community hospital build additional 
needed facilities." Also presenting the 
gift are (left) Frank X. Kearsey and Wil- 
liam Sopko, Business Representatives. 




22 



THE CARPENTER 



Auxiliary Marks 20th Anniversary 




Eight charter members were recognized at the anniversary meeting of Ladies' 
Auxiliary 462. They are, from left to right in front row: Mrs. Enos Houmard, Mrs. 
Pearl Nickels, Mrs. Doris Lindberg, and Mrs. Marie DeWitt. In the back row are: 
Mrs. Frank Johnson, Mrs. Phillip Eylans, Mrs. Harry Ford, and Mrs. Louise Allyn. 



LAFAYETTE, INDIANA— At a ban- 
quet in October, Ladies' Auxiliary 462 of 
Carpenters' Local 215 celebrated its 20th 
year of service to the local union. Mrs. 
Kenneth Runkle, president, introduced 
her officers for the year. They include: 
Mrs. Joe Rice, vice-president, Mrs. Rob- 
ert Roswarski, secretary, and Mrs. Frank 
Johnson, treasurer. The auxiliary espe- 
cially honored the charter members of 



the organization who are still active in 
the auxiliary program. 

After the eight charter members were 
recognized, Mrs. Loretta Acker presented 
a small gift from the auxiliary to each 
of the 10 past presidents. The Rev. Earl 
Heimburger then showed slides of his 
trips to Russia and Hawaii. The members 
were also entertained by the "Wooden 
Shoe Four." 



More Than 500 Years of Membership 




TRENTON, N. J. — The members of Local 31 of Trenton in the above photograph 
represent a collective 527 years of membership in the brotherhood. In the front row, 
from left, are: Carl Weidman, 54 years of membership; William Froelich, 47; and 
Mitchell Longevin, 60. In the second row, from left, are: Nickolas Bacskay, 44; 
Joseph Gorman, 41; John Lambert, 51; Business Agent James Goslin, 41; John 
Watkins, 64; Joseph Foley, 49; Arthur Hamer, 52; and Aaron Wame, 22. 



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FEBRUARY, 1967 



23 



Winnipeg Local Has 'Round Robin' of 1966 Activities 




WINNIPEG, MANITOBA — Local 
343 of Winnipeg has been busy during 
the last few months with union activities. 
The brothers provided a float for the 
Labor Day Parade, which was sponsored 
by the Central Body. 

On October 7, Local 343 held a ban- 

The two oldest members of Local 343, 
William Prophet, 92 (left), a member for 
72 years and Robert Reid, 100, a mem- 
ber for 59 years. 



quet on the 79th anniversary of its char- 
ter. At the dinner, 27 members were 
presented with 25-year buttons. Repre- 
sentative Ron Dancer made the presenta- 
tions to the 20 long-time members who 
were present. 

One of the members of Local 343, 
Robert Reid, reached his 100th birthday 
on December 7 and he received congrat- 
ulations from many top officials. Brother 
Reid has been a member of Local 343 
for 59 years. 





f 



UM' " ' '' 







Brother Bachman, dressed as a clown, poses with Local 343's 
float in the Labor Day Parade. 



The float of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America in the Labor Day Parade in Winnipeg, Manitoba. 




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24 



THE CARPENTER 



Local 260 Honors 25 and 50- Year Members 




WATERBURY, CONN. — The members of Local 260 of Waterbury recently held a testimonial dinner honoring their 25 and 
50 year members. Kneeling, from left to right, are: Arthur Hassinger, Albert Kimball, James leronimo, John leronimo, and 
William Fleming. Seated are: Jack Lucas, James Henderson, Oscar Bernier, Jack Betts, Joseph Cipriano, and Tim Ryan. Stand- 
ing are: President Francis Rinaldi, William Smith, Joseph Casta gana, Leandor Bernier, Louis Anderson, Carmine Cocchiola, 
Jerry Scully, Theadore Grieder, William Begley, Gustave Gobs, Arthur Zorn, Ruben Berglund, Anthony Muraska, William 
Abbott, and Business Representative Edward Yezierski. 



Maritime Trades Department Launches 
New Drive for Better Merchant Marine 



WASHINGTON (PAD— With the 
warning that the United States faces 
a "fateful choice" in 1967 on the 
nation's future as a maritime power, 
the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades De- 
partment is opening a new campaign 
to make the public aware of the mer- 
chant shipping crisis that now exists. 

The Department has launched a new 
publication "Maritime" given over to 
basic assessments of the maritime in- 
dustry for the years ahead as seen in 
Washington both by labor and man- 
agement. In an editorial in the opening 
number of the new publication, Paul 
Hall, president of the Department and 
of the Seafarers' International Union, 
said that what is needed is: 

• Passage by the 90th Congress of 
legislation reconstituting the Maritime 
Administration as an independent 
agency. 

• Approval of a "realistic national 
budget" to permit a significant increase 
in that amount of U.S. waterborne for- 
eign commerce carried by U.S.-flag 
ships and to support construction in 
U.S. shipyards of "an adequate num- 
ber of vessels to achieve this purpose." 

Hall noted that in 1966, maritime 
labor, joined by some segments of 



management, succeeded in blocking 
efforts to incorporate maritime in the 
new Department of Transportation. 
"Had we not been successful in keep- 
ing maritime out of this catch-all de- 
partment," he said, "our industry most 
surely would have been over-shad- 
owed, both in budget and in emphasis, 
by other modes of transportation." 

Hall described the 1966 battle as a 
"defensive fight," adding that "in 1967 
we intend to move on to the offensive." 

The new magazine will go to some 
60,000 government, labor, industry 
and civic leaders across the country. 
Publication of "Maritime" also is part 
of an expanded program of activities 
by the Maritime Trades Department, 
according to its Executive Secretary- 
Treasurer Peter M. McGavin. 

This expansion program includes 
regular weekly legislative meetings to 
coordinate activity on bills of interest 
to the Department and its affiliates; 
weekly luncheons to provide a forum 
for the exchange of ideas between 
maritime labor, management and gov- 
ernment representatives; and monthly 
seminars to permit in-depth discussion 
of topics of vital concern to the indus- 
try. 



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FEBRUARY, 1967 



25 




ABOVE: A view of the large gathering 
in tribute to General Representative 
Barry. BELOW: The honoree receives 
his gold lifetime membership card from 
his son, as Abe Saul and GEB Member 
Johnson congratulate him. 




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Testimonial Honors General Representative Barry 



General Representative Francis 
Barry, a transplanted Irishman by way 
of Great Britain and then to America, 
was recently honored at a testimonial 
dinner in Hartford, Conn., attended 
by over 400 friends of the genial Irish- 
man from Belfast. 

A member of the United Brother- 
hood since 1921, the year he landed 
on these shores, Francis was toasted 
at the testimonial by his many friends 
from nearly every local union in the 
state, by the representatives of state 
and district councils throughout New 
England and New York, and by many 
representatives of management. 

Brother Barry served in various of- 
ficial capacities in Stamford. Conn., 
Local 210 until his appointment as 
Special Representative in 1954 and 
then General Representative in 1962. 

In addition to his half century of 
dedication to the cause of trade union- 
ism. Frank has always taken an active 
interest in community projects and has 
lent his time and talents unselfishly to 
any worthy cause. 

Brother Abe Saul, director of East 
Coast Organizing, served as Master of 
Ceremony with First District Board 



Member Charles Johnson, Jr. and 
Renato Ricciuti, Labor Commissioner, 
State of Connecticut being the princi- 
pal speakers. Brother Johnson also 
extended the best wishes on behalf of 
the General Officers and Executive 
Board. General Secretary Richard 
Livingston attempted to attend the tes- 
timonial, but was unable to do so due 
to his flight being held up for mechani- 
cal troubles. 

Presentations were made to Brother 
Barry by Max Savitt, representing the 
Connecticut Road Builders Associa- 
tion, The Connecticut State Council 
of Carpenters. The Providence, Paw- 
tucket and Central Falls District Coun- 
cil of Providence; Arthur Lengel, rep- 
resenting the A.W.I.; Robert Bald, 
representing Frank's home Local 210; 
and the State Council on behalf of all 
who participated in the affair. Gen- 
eral Representative Richard Griffin 
presented gold watches to Mr. and 
Mrs. Francis Barry. 

An outstanding feature of the pro- 
gram was the presentation of a solid 
gold lifetime membership card by 
Frank's son, Eugene Barry, President 
of Local 210. 



Board Member Cooper Honored At Testimonial 



Continued from page 14 

ing the 9th District, the post he held 
at his retirement. 

One paragraph from the "This 
Is Your Life" script read at the 
testimonial just about sums up the 
devotion Cooper had for his fellow 
man: 

"One experience stands out in 
your memories of the logging indus- 
try. You went into a small town in 
the Espanola area during the hard 
years. You went into the homes of 
some of the workers and found pov- 
erty and suffering such as you had 



never seen before. In the one home 
there were a number of children, 
glass was out of the windows and 
children were bathing in a big wash 
tub positioned next to a red hot 
stove. In the first Agreement the 
employes' wages were increased by 
250 per hour, working conditions 
were improved and you knew that 
a course had been set to give the 
workers and their families some dig- 
nity and a chance to keep their fam- 
ilies in good health and decency — 
these are the fruits of your good 
work." 



26 



THE CARPENTER 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at Box 508, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



Wisconsin Deer 




Glenn Slocuni and Whifefail 

Glenn Solum of Giirnee, Illinois, a 
member of Local 448, Waukegan, has 
some vivid memories of his favorite 
deer hunting country out of Hayward, 
Wisconsin, but this past season he really 
hit the nimrod's jacket. Here's a pic of 
Glenn with a beautiful. 8-point white- 
tail he downed which netted him around 
200 lbs. of field-dressed venison. 

■ Indian Style 

A note from Jerry Hunter of Denver, 
Colorado, credits dad, Al Hunter, with 
a 12-point buck, downed on the Ram- 
part Range in Colorado. Al got it the 
hard way, via the bow and arrow 
technique. He used a Redwing bow with 
a 42-lb. pull. It dressed out at 150 
pounds. 

■ Coon Encounters 

According to Rayford Shelton of 
Detroit, Michigan, the coons have been 
plentiful this winter, north of Pontiac. 
Employing their hounds on a recent 
night hunt, Shelton and friend, Hazen 
Doe, accounted for seven of the 
masked marvels which tipped the scales 
at from 15 to 25 pounds. 



■ Young Man's Sport 

Donald A. Townsend of Sacramento, 
California, a member of Local 2170. has 
built a fire for son Jim that the lad'll 
spend a lifetime kindling. On Jim's first 
fishing trip, he out-angled the grownups 
fishing the Sacramento, just below the 
Rio Vista area, using sardine fillets for 
bait. Two stripers were credited to Jim's 
account — a 6 and 15 pounder. 

The hunting counterpart of the afore- 
going can be credited to Ken Hatfield, 
son of Albert Hatfield, a member of 
Local 266. Stockton. California. On a 
big-game junket to Alberta, Ken topped 
dad with his first moose, a monster that 
netted 800 pounds of locker meat and 
featured a rack that sported a 51'/2-inch 
spread and weighed 36 pounds. 



On Light Gear 



W 



^ 




Zimnier 



John Zimmer of 
West Linn. Ore- 
gon, a member of 
Local 1388. al- 
most got more 
than he bargained 
for on a Novem- 
ber "go" for sal- 
mon in Alsea Bay 
on Oregon's cen- 
tral coast. Using 
light spinning 
tackle, he hooked 
a tackle-busting, 
water-spraying fin- 
ster that headed 
for the Pacific 



Ocean and peeled off gobs and gobs of 
precious line. John managed to turn his 
head just as the bare reel spool was show- 
ing. Here's a pic of his finny prize, eased 
to bank on ultra-light gear — a 14-lb. sil- 
ver salmon. 



■ A Rare Animal 

One of America's rarest and least- 
known animals is the black-footed 
ferret. A shy and solitary creature, it 



seldom emerges from its den in the 
daytime. That is one reason why so 
little of its habits is known. It slinks 
along like the otter or mink, its long 
body (about 23 inches) and short legs 
giving it a "low slung" appearance. 

The ferret once made its home on the 
Great Plains where its favorite food 
was the fat little prairie dog which, in 
turn, was dependent upon the great 
herds of buffalo which grazed and 
trampled the tall grass thereby pro- 
viding "the dogs" with food — succulent 
stubby weeds and short grass. 

When the great herds of bison dis- 
appeared, the open burrows, otherwise 
known as "dog towns," dwindled. Even 
so, those that prevailed posed serious 
threats to livestock and horses, and as 
a result the prairie dogs were further 
decimated by large scale poisoning by 
the cattle ranchers. 

Consequently the ferret's numbers 
shrank with that of the prairie dogs, 
until nearly all remaining ferrets are 
reported in South Dakota, with only an 
occasional sighting in neighboring states. 

.\ study of the ferret's life history 
and environment is being conducted in 
South Dakota by State and Federal 
wildlife biologists in an effort to save 




the animal from extinction. Steps pro- 
posed include preserving prairie dog 
towns where ferrets are present, setting 
up sanctuaries and attempting to in- 
crease the numbers through captive 
propagation. Such measures, it is hoped, 
will insure the continued existence of 
this rare animal. 



Anglerette 




Mrs. Tauffest 



Can't wrap up 
this column before 
recording another 
light-line achieve- 
ment, this time for 
an anglerette: Rose 
Tautfest. wife of 
Robert Tautfest, a 
member of Local 
1040. Eureka. Cal- 
ifornia. Here's a 
pic of Mrs. Taut- 
fest with a 36-lb. 
Chinook she eased 
to bank on the 
Eel River near 
Fortuna. She too 
employed a light 
spin rig. topped off 
with 15-lb. test 
line — a 30-minute 
effort without an 
assist. 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



27 



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FORD'S THEATRE 

Continued from Page 4 

Another unusual aspect of the job is 
the fact that all interior trim is ilush with 
the plaster. Carpenters install grounds, to 
which plaster stop is installed, and the 
grounds are removed when plastering is 
completed for an exact fit with the wood- 
work. 

Plans Disappeared 

It has been impossible to recreate the 
theatre precisely as it was in April, 1865. 
The original plan disappeared in the con- 
fusion following the Lincoln assassina- 
tion. Historians have had to rely on frag- 
mentary information and some modern- 
day architectural sleuthing. 

Dr. George J. Olszewski, of the Na- 
tional Capital Region's historical and 
architectural staff, spent years tracking 
down elusive details in such sources as 
old Matthew Brady photographs, some 
of which had never been known to exist 
before; in old newspapers; in the tran- 
script of the trial of Lincoln's assassins, 
and in numerous interviews with descen- 
dents of people directly involved. Com- 
parable theatres of the period were also 
examined for clues to design and con- 
struction techniques. Only two of these 
are known to be in existence: One in 
Baltimore and one in Wilmington, North 
Carolina. 

Olszewski has also watched carefully 
while the guts were torn out of the the- 
atre looking with a knowledgeable eye 
tor signs of original construction, discard- 
ing those which are from the remodelling 
work which took place after the assassina- 
tion. 

Final Shape True 

He is reasonably sure that the final 
shape of the reconstructed Ford's The- 
atre hews so closely to the original ap- 
pearance that few Washington residents 
of the Middle 1800's would know the 
difference. Underneath the surface of 
the walls, of course, there are a lot of 
changes. Building codes of 1863 were 
rudimentary compared with today, and 
the safety of visitors could not be com- 
promised for historical accuracy. Fur- 
thermore, the new Ford's Theatre will 
be fully air conditioned, a concession less 
to safety than to the creature comforts 
of the Twentieth Century, but it's doubt- 
ful that many tourists will complain in 
Washington's wilting summers. 

What's to be done with this historical 
shrine, once the construction is over? 
Most of those who have worked on the 
project hope to see it as a living memorial 
rather than a static display. Already, 
dramatists are thinking about the possi- 
bilities of this period stage for period 
plays, and for dramatizations of events 
from the life of the great man whose 
death ensured the beams and bricks an 
immortal place in history. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



New Officers of Illinois State Council 




CHICAGO, ILL. — Officers elected to the Illinois State Council of Carpenters on 
Nov. 18, 1966, in convention at Springfield are, from left to right: Secretary-Treasurer 
Jack Zeilenga, Local 416, Chicago; President W. E. (Duff) Corbin, Local 916, Aurora; 
Vice-President John Pruitt, Local 16, Springfield; First District Board Member Fred 
A. Mock, Local 242, Chicago; Sixth District Board Member Melvin Tribble. Local 
904, Jacksonville; and Seventh District Board Member Herb Rainbolt, Local 169, 
East St. Louis. 

Florida Local Holds Labor Day Picnic 




JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA— Local 627 of Jacksonville held a Labor Daj 
Picnic last year on beautiful Lake Hampton, six miles south of Starke. The location 
was offered by Charles Howell, Business Representative, and Jesse Kight, Treasurer. 
Fully 500 families attended the outing and dined on fried chicken and fresh fish. 

Fishing and boating enthusiasts had a very enjoyable time as did the teenagers who 
swam and water skied. The picture above shows some of the members and families 
enjoying the food and the warm Florida sunshine. 



Answers for Blueprint Reading Unit IX 

See page 16 

54 joist hangers $ 24.30 

6,824.83 square feet of insulation 307.12 

1,273 board feet of 1" x 2" S4S 140.03 

87 board feet of 1" x 3" S4S 9.57 

3,662 board feet of 1" x 4" S4S 402.82 

4,096 board feet of 1" x 6" T&G 491.52 

2,381 board feet of 2" x 4" S4S 297.63 

2,697 board feet of 2" x 6" S4S 337.13 

4,661 board feet of 2" x 8" S4S 629.24 

2,723 board feet of 2" x 10" S4S 367.61 

3,512 board feet of 2" x 12" S4S 474.12 

238.67 board feet of Timbers 44.15 

TOTAL $3,525.24 



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FEBRUARY, 1967 



29 




MORI AM 



L.U. NO. 1, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Arnold, Kenneth E. 
Buchert, Albert 
Casper, Edward A. 
Cortnumme, Herman 
DeSmet, August 
Folk, Frank 
Harris, Bertram E. 
Landwer, George R. 
Ostland, Richard 

L.U. NO. 11. 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Campbell, James E. 
Lunter, John 

L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Amato, Joseph 
Balone, Oscar 
Eysaman, Irving 
Fuchs, Otto 
Gallivan, James 
Levine, Max 
Meyers. Hugh 
Reid, Robert 
White, Walter 

L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Rank, Wolli 

L.U. NO. 20, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Bove, Anthony 
Larson, Lars J. 
Soderlund, Fred 
Zumach, Louis 

L.U. NO. 46, 
SAULT STE. MARIE, 
MICH. 

Pesola, John 
Viilo, Frank 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Forsythe, William 
Gelormini, Louis 

L.U. NO. 54, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Dlouhy, Joseph 
Pelletiere, Paul 
Partipilo, Joseph 
Pitra, Emanuel 
Sefranek. Joseph 
Sojka, John 
Spurney. Edward 
Zelibor, Rudolph 

L.U. NO. 55, 
DENVER, COLO. 

Conner, S. B. 

L.U. NO. 56, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Hunt, William C. 
Jaynes, Moses 
Lawrence, Joseph 
McCormack, Leo 
McDougall, Phillip 
Manuel, Robert 
Moore, Allen 
Skiffington, Edmund 
Smith, Hugh 



L.U. NO. 59, 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Horner, Abram Z. 
Swan, William J. 

L.U. NO. 60. 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Moran, Leo W. 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Oscar T. 
Carlson, Erland 
Holmgren, Henry W. 
Gustafson, Elof 
Rosen, Gustav 
Zwiers. Henry 

I,.U. NO. 80, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson. Arnold 
Benson, John 
Englund, Alfred 
Johnson, Carl 
Lewis. Major 
Lussow, George 
McConachie, Alex 
Oestreicher, LeRoy 
Ruthven. Robert 
Schothorst, William 
Sorenson, John E. 
Swanson, Carl J. 
Will, William D. 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Harris, Forrest F. 
Maisel, Walter H. 

L.U. NO. 103. 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Garrison, Ernest 
Love, Boyce W., Jr. 
Poindexter, Luther S. 

L.U. NO. 117, 
ALBANY, N. Y. 

Piatt, Ernest 
Stackhouse, James 

L.U. NO. 129, 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Bringenberg, John 

L.U. NO. 166, 
ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Bleuer, Harold L. 
Larson, Conrad A. 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Brewer, Charles C. 
Brown, Kenneth C. 
Dennington, George A. 
Presley, Lawrence 

L.U. NO. 261, 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Sticht, William 
Tehensky, George 

L.U. NO. 298, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Masaitis, John 



L.U. NO. 331, 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Kincaid, Clarence W. 
Lipe, R. A. 

L.U. NO. 343, 
WINNIPEG, MAN., CAN, 
McKerlie, Harold 
Sandberg, Pedar J. 
Simcoe, Samuel 
Tonogai, Seiichiro 
Ziervogel, Henry 

L.U. NO. 361, 
DULUTH, MINN. 

Appleby, Wilfred 
Bergholm, Hugo 
Carlson, Albert 
Erlander, Erland 
Jackson, John T. 
Johnson, Adolph G. 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Berardi, Nicholas 
Brownley, Percy 

L.U. NO. 406, 
BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Kurtz, Frank 

L.U. NO. 422, 

NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

Cartwright, Lawrence 

L.U. NO. 494, 
WINDSOR, ONT., CAN. 

Benotto, Anthonio 
Goldspink, John 

L.U. NO. 501, 
STROUDSBURG, PA. 

Williams, Peter 
Zimmerman, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 606, 

VIRGINIA-EVELETH, 

MINN. 

Davin, Douglas 
Koskela, Mike 
Polley, Leon 
Strom, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 642, 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Brough, Clarence 
Burnett, Marvin S. 
Charnock, Ray 
Deadrich, T. A. 
Finnegan, James J. 
Furseth, Hans 
George, John W. 
Green, Roscoe G. 
Graves, Johnny 
Hopton, George H. 
Jeffries, F. C. 
Josephs, Leonard M. 
Kemper, Joseph 
Kluss, Glenn G. 
Koenig, Dave 
Martin, Wilburn D. 
McMickle, John C. 
Payne, Roy L. 
Phillips, Thomas A. 
Sanchez, Rumaldo 
Subberra, Norman E. 
Talberg, Albert 
Toms, J. E. 



White, Glick D. 
Wright, James G. 
Young, Herbert L. 

L.U. NO. 787, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Yavertsen, Arnold 

L.U. NO. 910. 
GLOUCESTER, MASS. 

Musgrave, Austin 

L.U. NO. 943, 
TULSA,' OKLAHOMA 

Anthony, Ray F. 
Barber, Jean 
Bauchmoyer, H. B. 
Campbell, Ronald R. 
Hughes, C. L. 
Painter, Howard A. 
Petty, H. G. 
Robinson, Dan S. 
Simpson, Ray E. 
Stuart, E. D. 

L.U. NO. 950, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Touvinen, Charles 

L.U. NO. 964, 
ROCKLAND CO. & VIC, 

N. Y. 

Bennett, George 
Miotk, John T. 
Wright, George 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Hartley, Harold 
Kalis, William 
Pierce, James R. 

L.U. NO. 998, 
ROYAL OAK, MICH. 

Burwell, Charles 
Haglund, Walter 
Keogh, Frank 
Navarre, Edward 
Pearce, Harry 
Rowe, James 

L.U. NO. 1016, 
ROME, N. Y. 

Hughes, Richard 
Miller, Charles P. 

L.U. NO. 1063, 
COLEMAN, Wise. 

Houston, Richard 

L. U. NO. 1065. 
SALEM, OREGON 

Berg, Anton 
Cooler, E. C. 
Germond, Archie 
Kuper, Henry G. 
Ohlsen, Clem W. 

L.U. NO. 1089, 
PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

Peak, Jerome R. 

L.U. NO. 1162, 
COLLEGE POINT, N. Y. 

Abbate, Albert 
Lucassen, Eriing 
Schaefer, George 



L.U. NO. 1240, 
OROVILLE, CALIF. 

Moore, Kenneth G. 

L.U. NO. 1289, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Jensen, John M. 
Kern, Theodore 
Lins, Lewis F. 
Ream, Joel S. 
Sharp, Eugene 

L.U. NO. 1323, 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Justice, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1345, 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Ehlers, Melvin 
Jamison, Edgar S. 
McDonald, Martin A. 
Rossiter, Thomas 
Spooner, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1407, 

SAN PEDRO, CALIF. 

Estep, Boyd 

L.U. NO. 1478, 
REDONDO BEACH, 
CALIF. 

Clark, Theodore C. 
Green, Harvey N. 
McGinnis, William E. 

L.U. NO. 1507, 

EL MONTE, CALIF. 

Christler, John M. 
Scobie, Percy A. 

L.U. NO. 1590, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Allen, Aubrey 
Bell, William H., Sr. 
Benden, Thomas P. 
Bishop, Kenneth E. 
Bryant, Stuart 
Buehler, James 
Byrd, William E. 
Holmes, John W. 
Karaitis, John 
Lechlider, Thomas L., Sr. 
McConkey, Elmer M. 
Pearson, Richard H. 
Schicht, Erhart K. 
Williams, Thurman 

L.U. NO. 1707, 

KELSO-LONGVIEW, 

WASH. 

Johnson, Sidney E, 
Keizur, Walter A. 
Lowe, Roland A. 
Meador, Earl H. 
Oxford, Roscoe Clinton 
Wagoner, Roy C. 

L.U. NO. 1752, 
POMONA, CALIF. 

Brue, Charles N. 
Evans, James Lee 
Holmes, Clarence H, 
Kimrey, Fred O. 
Sershen, Allen 

Continued on page 3 1 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



COUGH...GASP 

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Plan- 



IN MEMORIAM 

Cont. from Preceding page 
L.U. NO. 1777, 
SHEBOYGAN, MICH. 

Kiefer, Jake 

L.U. NO. 1797, 
RENTON, WASH. 

Brendgard, Peter 
Burgaas, Phillip D. 
Confer, Kenneth H. 
Ellison, Henry 
Erickson, Martin L. 
Fairbuin, George W. 
Fox, Charles F. 
McMillan, Donald F. 
Paddock, Robert C. 
Schiltz, Leonard N. 
Weatherly, John R. 

L.U. NO. 1811, 
MONROE, LA. 

Thornton, Ray 

L.U. NO. 1822, 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

Carrol, Earl 

L.U. NO. 1846, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Breaiid, Denis 
Cook, William K. 
Hegeman, William, III 
Priez, Benny 
Schultz, Gilbert 

L.U. NO. 1867, 
REGINA, SASK., CAN. 

Lucas, John S. 
Wagner, Phillip 

L.U. NO. 2020, 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Fisher, Lee J. 
Uthke, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 2274, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Hunter. Carl E. 

L.U. NO. 2288, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Conant, Forest 
Weinman, J. L. 

L.U. NO. 2466, 
PEMBROKE, ONT., CAN. 

Maclennan, Fred 



INVENTORS' GROUP 

Carpenters who find a better way. or 
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their ideas through the patenting and 
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about developments in the field. 

Now there's a national organiza- 
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ly-organized American Inventor's As- 
sociation, at Suite 607C, 4201 Connecti- 
cut Avenue. N. W., in Washington, says 
it will keep track of the inventor's in- 
terests and speak for him in the Wash- 
ington bureaucracy. 

In addition, the Association provides 
members with a monthly publication cov- 
ering development and marketing of new 
ideas, and offers free publicity to any 
patented inventions, whether the owner 
is a member or not. 



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FEBRUARY, 1967 



31 



You Can Be 
a Highly Paid 

CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



If you have the ambition to become the top 
man on the payroll — or if you are planning 
to start a successful contracting business of 
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tion cost estimator. A journeyman carpenter 
with the eQuivalent of a high school education 
is well qualified to study our easy-to-understand 
home study course. Construction Cost Esti- 
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WHAT WE TEACH 

We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
take off materials, and figure the costs of ma- 
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lesson you correct your own work by compar- 
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You don't need to send lessons back and forth ; 
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The labor cost data which we supply is not 
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SIDING CORNERS 

Prime painted aluminum siding espe- 
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dimensions, and textures of X-ninety 
lap sidings have been introduced by 
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The company will market 12" corners 
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A pamphlet on the new corners, first 
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free by writing Masonite Corporation, 
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questing Form 6643. 




HEAVY DUTY BOOSTER 

A new accessory for electric hand tools, 
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A.C.-D.C. Universal type motors only. 
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UNDERLAYMENT GUIDE 

A Uniform Installation Guide con- 
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stalling floor underlayment has been 
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key elements in a sound floor system 
and gives recommended procedures for 
handling and installing underlayment 
which have been adopted by the 16 mem- 
bers of the NPA. Single copies are avail- 
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Association, 711 14th Street, N.W., 
Washington 20005. 

GARAGE BOOKLET 

A new edition of the popular booklet, 
HOW TO PLAN YOUR GARAGE, has 
been produced by Crawford Door Com- 
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The new edition is lavishly illustrated 
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basics of garage planning; how to decide 
whether a single-car or two-car garage 
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how to choose a garage door and how 
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This pocket-size booklet provides 20 
pages of helpful suggestions and can be 
obtained by sending 35c to Crawford 
Door Company, 4270 High Street, Ecorse, 
Michigan, or, your local Crawford Dis- 
tributor can furnish a copy. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




Alton Local Union Pays Tribute to Outstanding Members 



ALTON, ILL.— Local Union 377 paid 
tribute, last year, to 52 members having 
some 1,665 years of continuous member- 
ship and gave special recognition to 
two members who have served both the 
International Union and the local union 
for more than 45 years. ABOVE: At 
the long table are 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 
50-year members. Seated at far right 
are Harold Miller, recording secretary; 
Second Gen'l. Vice President William 
Sidell, guest speaker; and Fred Glass- 
brenner, president. Standing are Robert 
Mitchell, conductor; Sam Nickell, war- 
den; Charles Muenstermann, treasurer; 
and Carroll Wells, financial secretary. 
AT RIGHT: Harold E. Miller, record- 
ing secretary; W. O. Hays, retired busi- 
ness agent and secretary; Second Gen'l. 
Vice President Sidell; Harold Cheesman, 
retired International Representative; and 
Fred Glassbrenner, president. 




3 easy ^fays to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any ongle. Sizes J^" 
to Xfi", $.80 eoch. H" to 1", $-90 eocti. 1J4" 
to IH", $1.40 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bif. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, ^" to 
3". Only $4.40. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, %" to 1^". Only $4.00. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
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EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
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Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
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New ond improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
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Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 

IRWIN ^s:r 

every bit as good as the name 





PLEASURE WALKERS 

Continued from Page 13 

frost again, but not so heavy. At one 
o'clock eight Single Brothers were 
called before a Committee from the 
Aeltesten Conferenz and Aufseher Col- 
legium, their misdeeds were pointed 
out to them and ascribed to the influ- 
ence of Satan, and they were earnestly 
shown what the results must be ac- 
cording to the rules of the Congrega- 
tion; yet they were told as they had 
been misled partly by ignorance and 
stupidity they would be treated with 
mercy." 

April 5 : "Today letters of apology were 
received from several of the Single Brothers, 
who are ashamed of their childish behavior." 

April 7: "In the Aeltesten Conferenz the 
letters of apology of five of the Single Brothers 
were considered, and it was decided to wait 
and see whether others would come before 
action was taken." 

April 1 : "The Aeltesten Conferenz met 
and decided that those Single Brothers who 
had acknowledged their wrongdoing would be 
forgiven, but from those who had not ad- 
mitted themselves to be wrong pardon should 
be withheld" — and here brotherly love breaks 
through — "pardon should be withheld for a 
time. The weather has moderated and a gentle 
rain has begun to fall." 

On the eleventh of April, 1778, just nine 
days after the twelve journeymen had walked 
out, and were assembled after the noonday 
meal, they were "notified that their trans- 
gression had been pardoned and the kiss of 
peace was given them. A tender feeling was 
evident." 



Thus ended, along with the frost, what 
was perhaps the first walkout of workers in 
America. Union representation, which might 
have achieved redress of grievances, did not 
come until a century later. 



Guaranteed, 

the 

hardest 

working- 

CARPENTERS 

OVERALLS 




If you don't 

think they're 

the best 

you've ever 

worn, we'll 

take 'em back. 

No questions 

asked. 



H. D. LEE COMPANV, INC., SHAWNEE MISSION, KtNS. 
"World's largest manufacturer of union-made workwear." 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



33 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




(1) THE DALLES, ORE.— At a regu- 
lar meeting of Local 2785 twenty-five- 
year membership pins were presented to 
the following members by S. D. Nelson, 
Brotherhood representative. Front row, 
left to right: Conrad A. Rust, John Hen- 
drickson, and Oral W. Browning. Sec- 
ond row, left to right: Michael V. Ignow- 
ski, William C. Mayfield, Herman L. Pat- 
ton, Edward Mauriis, S. D. Nelson, and 
Major B. Shelton. Not present at the 
meeting but eligible for a pin was Gene 
Senecal and Clifford P. Whalen. 

(2) MILFORD, CONN. — In the top 
photo are members of Local 1580 who 
were recently presented with 25-year and 
50-year service pins. First row, seated 
(1. to r.): James Roach (25-years), Joseph 
La Rocco (26), Robert Logan (50), and 
Roger Herbert (27). Standing: Thomas 
Ghacci, vice president of the Bridgeport 
(Conn.) District Council, who made the 
presentations, Donald LaFrance (25), 
Thomas Brennan (30), Charles Kelly (28), 
and Paul Wyser (29). In the other photo 
are the officers of Local 1580 (1. to r.): 
William Brennan, treasurer; Robert Mc- 
Levy, bus. rep.; Robert Hardy, rec. sec; 
William Stone, fin. sec; Joseph Mayer, 
president; and Henry Reidenbach, vice 
president. Eligible for pins but unable to 
attend the ceremony were William New- 
hall (27) and Michael Tomasko (25). 

(3) REDWOOD CITY, CALIF.— Fifty- 
two veteran members of Local 1408 were 
honored at a recent dinner dance attended 
by nearly 400 members of the local, their 
wives and guests. Charles Nichols, gen- 
eral executive board member, and Clar- 
ence Briggs, general representative, 
brought greetings and congratulations 
from General President Hutcheson who 
was unable to attend. In the photo on 
this page are the two guests of honor 
(Briggs fourth from right) and Nichols 
(fifth from right) and the officers of the 
local. In the photo on p. 35 are the 25- 
year members. First row: Paul Snipes, 
Marvin Tupper, Harold Smiley, James 
Clanton and Gus Villalto. Second row: 
Emmett O'Neill, Walter Stewart, Eugene 
Sweatt, Herman Horst, Frank Small, and 
Tom Oliver. Third row: Wilbur Witzel, 
Harry McMillan, Modesto Garcia, Wil- 
lard Ambrose, V. V. Wyant, Ray Testa, 
Howard Hall, James Camm, and Lee 
Colby. 




r^iidrtAKineint^fs 



^v* v«: -fg^^ I 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



Fourth row: Madeo Peregrina, Levi Gal- 
legos, Thomas Clark, Mann Lane, and 
Claude Smith. Fifth row: John Lowery, 
Cecil Silberberger, and Frank Fisk. 

(4) BIRMINGHAM, ALA.— The follow- 
ing brothers under photo No. 4 were pre- 
sented 25-year pins by Millwrights Local 
1192 at a recent ceremony held in their 
honor. The wives of most of the mem- 
bers were present, along with officers of 
the local union and District Council. 
Back row from left to right: R. J. Mc- 
Nichols, John S. Terry, Willis Fortner, 
and Orie Folsom. Front row from left 
to right: D. M. Whetstone, W. D. Wilson, 
O. D. Adams, and R. F. Carmichael. 



(5) EL CENTRO, CALIF.— Three gen- 
erations of Brotherhood members are 
represented at this pin presentation cere- 
mony. W. A. Jolly, Jr., fin. sec. of Local 
1070, pins a 25-year service pin on the 
lapel of J. P. Henderson, Jr. At the left 
is his father, J. P. Sr. and at the right, his 
son, David. 

(6) JACKSONVILLE, ILL. — Melvin 
Tribble, left, bus. rep. of Local 904 and 
Wayne Blackburn, rec. sec, right, con- 
gratulate 25-year members of the local 
at a recent pin presentation ceremony. 
Left to right: Kermit Reside, Harvey L. 
Holmes, John Colvin, Robert Kemp, Jesse 
Yeager and Wesley Slaid. Unable to at- 
tend but eligible for a 50-year pin is 
Herman Dobev. 



(7) ELLENVILLE, N.Y. — Local 1038 
gave a dinner recently honoring its mem- 
bers with 25 or more years in the local. 
The local, which is affiliated with the 
Hudson Valley District Council of Car- 
penters, was chartered in 1913. Pictured 
from left to right, standing: Jules Lamo- 
nac, sec.-treas. and bus. agt. of Hudson 
Valley District Council of Carpenters; 
Hilton Woodruff, bus. agt.; LaFrance 
Bell, bus. agt.; Hyman Zamansky, Coun- 
cil President and gen. bus. agt.; Robert 
McConnell, president. Seated are: Ben 
Pollack (25), Louis Greenstein, past presi- 

Continued on Page 36 







8 '^ 












o 


^ 




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J^ 


Oi., 




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^^HH|l^ 




I 


1 


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I. 

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3. Continued. 





FEBRUARY, 1967 



35 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




(Continued from page 35) 



dent and executive board member of 
Council (25). and Russell Bliss (25). Not 
sbown in picture: Bernard Murry, second 
vice president of Council; Carl Atkinson, 
first vice president of Council, and Rob- 
ert Goldsmith (35). 



(8) MT. MORRIS, N.Y.— Local 662 re- 
cently celebrated its 50th aniversary with 
a dinner dance at which five of its mem- 
bers with 25 or more years of service 
were honored. In the photo at right 
Charles Kemp (left) presents pin to Ken- 
neth Humphrey for 33 years membership, 
and Donald Frantillo (right) presents pin 
to Don Chiappone for 33 years member- 
ship. Three other members not present, 
with 32 years or more membership are 
John Campbell, Burdette Snyder, and 
Floyd Parker. 



(9) BURLINGTON, IOWA— Long-time 
members of Local 534 were honored re- 
cently at an informal party held at the 
Labor Temple. In the top photo over 
No. 9. those receiving service pins in- 
cluded, from left seated, Milton Diercks 
(34 years), Arthur Nickels (29), Carl 
Folker (26), Ralph Alter (34), and C. 
Merle Hornbaker (34). From left, stand- 
ing: Edward Alter (27), B. H. Hethering- 
ton (25), Ralph Carlson (25), Edwin T. 
Davis (27), and Henry C. Miller (34). 
Hetherington is from Morning Sun, the 
others from Burlington. Local 534 pins 
also went to, from left seated, Alvin 
Wiley (28 years), C. B. Smith (25), E. W. 
Olson (25), Delbert Morris (37), and 
Roy Kienlen (30), Otis Johnson (41). 
From left, standing: Louis Luetger (33), 
and Perry Cochrane (25), Otto C. Kohl 
(25), Jewell Worden (25), Ray E. Pelate 
(30), and Robert Summers (28). Pins 
went to 23 others not present. 



(10) SAGINAW, MICH.— Photo No. 10 
shows the members of Local 334 who 
received 25-ycar service pins at a ban- 
quet held in their honor. Left to right, 
first row: Otto Schmidt, Carl Schroedor, 
Clyde Shaw, L. V. S. Winiecke, James 
Jevicks, kneeling our Photographer, Wil- 
liam Beyer, Frank Brooks, William Soper, 
Earnest Goodeman, Frank O'Leary, and 




36 



THE CARPENTER 




Sam Baird. Left to right, second row: 
Edward Bebertz, Stanley Stinipson, Wal- 
ter Brechtelsbauer, Carl Beyer, Car) Wei- 
land, Louis Somnierfield, Edward Nelson, 
Donald Wardin, Arthur Shepard, John 
Trombley, James Larson, and Ralph 
Steele. Left to right, back row: Ray Zook, 
Int'l Representative; Frank Mueller, Alex 
Roth, Joseph Peruchette, Henry Ewald, 
Robert Schwartz, AI. J. Maier, Jacob 
Michel, John Gudritz, Norris Smith, and 
Leonard Zimmerman, Sec'y of Mich. 
State Carpenters Council. 

(11) PORTLAND, ORE.— The presen- 
tation of service pins to a group of Local 
226 members was turned into a festive 
occasion highlighted by a gourmet buffet 
dinner. In the three pictures at the right 
shown over No. 11 the top one shows 
the senior men of the local, all with 50 
or more years service. Front row (1. to 
r): David Beckman, Kenny Davis, West 
Coast Coordinator for the Brotherhood 
who presented the pins; Roy Van Buskirk, 
Fred Vishnevsky. Rear: J. T. Olsson, O. 
M. Strand and President A. T. Williams 
who chaired the meeting. In the near 
photo over No. 11 President Williams 
(right) presents a journeyman certificate 
to Don Juhr. Looking on at the left is 
Juhr's proud father, a 25-year member 
of the local. Another happy occasion at 
the dinner was the announcement that 
50-year member O. M. Strand and his 
wife were celebrating their 40th wedding 
anniversary. They are shown being con- 
gratulated by Kenny Davis in the far 
photo. 

(12) SPOKANE, WASH.— A group of 
170 members of Local 98, with length of 
service ranging from 25 to 60 years were 
honored at a pin presentation ceremony 
held by the local. The photo shows the 
assembled group. of those receiving serv- 
ice pins. 

Continued on Page 38 




12. 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



37 




Service to 

The Brotherhood 

Continued from Page 37 

(13) WINNIPEG, CANADA— Members 
who received 25- and 50-year member- 
ship pins from Local 343 recently are, 
from left (front row): N. Babynchiik, K. 
G. Jannson, K. Nordal, A. K. Goertzen, 
J. M. Reid, D. Hilderman, and F. H. 
Peterson. In the second row are: C. 
Champagne, T. N. Roisum, E. Nordin, F. 



Turek, E. Mcintosh, J. M. Richerf, and 
A. Robert. In the third row are: I. Sor- 
flaten, J. P. Friesen, E. Desrochers, C. 
Hrymack, G. Landin, and K. Burdzy. 



A man is a worker. If he is not that, he 
is nothing. 

Joseph Conrad 



I never did cinytliing worth doing t>y 
accident, nor did any of my inventions 
come by accident. 

Tliomas Alva Edison 




ltsNEW...Us"GOLD 

IT HAS STUD MARKINGS . . . 

AND IT'S (aT-.^^. 

FROM xooldblatt 



Vi' notches in the iH'x 
54'x22V2' head let you cut 
the full width of a wall- 
board panel in one swipe f 
No more torn or ragged 
corners on the panels — 
you get a clean cut right 
lap to the very edge of the 
pane] every time. 

Use the marking holes at 
16', 24' and 32' to mark 
stud centers without lift- 
ing T-Square — saves 
time, makes it almost 
impossible to miss a stud 
when nailing up panels. 

The blade is same width 
as a standard outlet 
box. You cut both sides 
of the hole with perfect 
accuracy without mov- 
ing the T-Square. 




IT WILL HELP YOU HANG DRYWALL 
BETTER— EASIER— FASTER! 

New "Gold" T-Square will make those walls and ceilirgs po up faster— and 
easier, 'I'xH'xilS^s' blade of heat-treated flexible aluminum alloy lies flat 
against board for fast, clean cuts. And the new anodized gold color finish 
makes numbers and markings show up with greater contrast for easy at-a- 
glance reading:. Large numbers read from either end of the blade to make 
time - wasting mental arithmetic a thing of the past. The handsome gold 
finish also makes a T-Square that's weather- and stain -resistant — a T- 
Square that's lightweight, yet rugged, and built to last. 

No. 05 120 M7 Only $9.00 

NEW IMPROVED 16'' CHECKER-HEAD 
ADZE-EYE WALLBOARD HAMMER 

Properly rounded and checkered head dimples wallboard perfectly 

\ for best possible nailing and easier spotting — without bruising 

paper. Fits-your-hand. offset hickory handle eliminates rapped 

.y. \ knuckles. Full Iti' length gives better balance, makes easy 

l\v. \ rough gauge for 16' centers too. Plus a handy nail puller in 

\^ the wedge-shaped blade. Usethis thin, strong blade to shift or 

pry boards into place. Adze-eye head holds handle securely. 

No. 05 164 M7 Only $6.50 

See Your Favorite Coldblatt Dealer or 

Use the Coupon Below to Order Direct. 

^ ^ 

Goldblatt Tool Company, 521 a Osage St., Kansas City,Kans.66110 * 
Please send me the following tools postpaid: | 

CATAi A^f I I enclose check or money prder for $ Save Shipping Charges-- i 
ATA LOGS ' ,-,„ , r^r,T.^ ^ , „ ■ . BUY BOTH T-SyUAHE AND I 

You'll find all the Iiteil ' USend FREE Goldblatt Tool Catalog. HAMM ER For $15.50 Postoaid 

newest, best drywall tools 

in the bi|, all-new Gold- 

blalt Tool Catalog. Just 

check and mail coupon for 

your copy— it'5>ourjFreB! 



free 




Quantify 
Wanted 



Stock Number, 
As Stiown Ab3ve 



Price 
Eacli 



qS 120 M7_| $9.qo_ 

05 164 M7 I $6.50 




Local 857 Honors 
50-Year Veteran 

TUCSON, ARIZ.— At a regu- 
lar meeting of Local 857, Presi- 
dent John W. Wagman presented 
a 50-year pin on behalf of the 
local, to brother Frank Hoehn, 
who was born at Rochester, 
New York, on September 29th, 
1888 and became a member of 
The United Brotherhood on 
November 8, 1915. 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack raftei-s completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch rise to 12 inch run . Pitches in- 
crease Yn inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is % inch and they increase 
%" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip. Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9>4" wide. Pitch 
i"? IV.," rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
1/et us prove it. or return your money. 



Getting ttle lengths of raftefs by the spah and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 & IW4 Copyrights 



Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C.O.D. fee extra. 

Canada send S^2.75 Foreign Postal M. O. or 

Bank Money Order payable in U. S. dollars. 

Canada can not take C.O.D. orders. 

California add 4% tax, 10(# each. 



A. 

P. O. Box 40.T 



RIECHERS 

Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



— LAKELAXD NEWS" 

John N. Grosse of Local Union 696 Tampa, Florida, arrived at the Home Dec. 26, 
1966. 

Oscar J. Fast of Local Union 1456, New York, N. Y., passed away Dec. 1, 1966 
and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

E. L. Wetzel of Local Union 430, Wilkinsburg, Pa., passed away Dec. 19, 1966. 
Body was sent to Blairsville, Pa. for burial. 

Henry C. Bush of Local Union 25, Los Angeles, Calif., passed away December 20, 
1966. Brother Bush was buried in Arlington Memorial Cemetery, Arlington, Va. 

Chfford C. Cunningham of Local Union 165, Pittsburgh, Pa., passed away Dec. 29, 
1966 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

John Edward Carlson of Local Union 181, Chicago, 111., withdrew from the Home 
Dec. 6, 1966. 

Emil C. Schallau of Local Union 80, Chicago, 111., withdrew from the Home Dec. 
17, 1966. 

Members who visited the Home during December 

Albert B. Reager, L.U. 37, Shamokin, Pa. 

Myron Skihon, L.U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 

Philip G. Conover, L.U. 1489, Burlington, N. J., now living in Kissimmee, Fla. 

Eugene Phillips, L.U. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Ralph Fleener, L.U. 599, Creston, Ind. 

Labe Sexton, L.U. 472, Ashland, Kentucky 

Herbert Weber, L.U. 836, Janesville, Wis. 

Victor Weber, L.U. 1055, Lincoln, Neb. 

Larry Robbins, L.U. 290, Delavan, Wis. 

G. B. Gentry, L.U. 101, Bahimore, Md. 

H. C. Tootle, L.U. 1667, Biloxi, Miss. 

Charles Domanick, L.U. 10, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Pekny, L.U. 1539, N. Riverside, 111. 

Reino Laine, L.U. 2464, Ishpeming, Mich. 

Donald Burley, L.U. 721, Norwalk, California 

Fred Bushman, L.U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 

Edward I. Perko, L.U. 1991, Bedford, Ohio 

Earl Engel, L.U. 1741, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Henry Burkie, L.U. 264, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Peter Barone, L.U. 1209, Newark, N. J. 

Donald Horcester, L.U. 639, Akron, Ohio 

Edward Ellison, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111., now living in Palm Harbor, Fla. 

Martin Olsen, L.U. 488, Bronx, New York, City 

Harry Coten, L.U. 146, Schenactady, N. Y. 

H. D. Cross, L.U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 

Harry Johnson, L.U. 406, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Emil C. Welsch, Jr, L.U. 740, New York, N. Y. 

Wm. L. G. Hauck, L.U. 433, Belleville. III. 

George Thors, L.U. 1590, Washington, D. C, now living in Bradenton, Fla. 

Gilbert Theriault, L.U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 

Felix Colavecchio, L.U. 94, Providence, R. I. 

Otto Bender, L.U. 272, Chicago, 111. 

Joseph Scheeberger, L.U. 503, Lancaster, N. Y. 

John Schieder, L.U. 1401, Buffalo, N. Y. 

W. Earl Althouse, L.U. 492, Reading, Pa. 

Harold Clemensen, L.LI. 1, Chicago, III. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Audel, Theodore 39 

Belsaw (Multi-Duty) 31 

Belsaw (Sharp-All) 23 

Carpenter Tax Kit 29 

Chicago Technical College ... 19 

Construction Cost Institute ... 32 

Eliason Stair Gauge 39 

Estwing Manufacturing 22 

Foley Manufacturing 28 

Foley Manufacturing 31 

Goldblatt Tool- 38 

Harrah Manufacturing 31 



Hydrolevel 23 

Irwin Auger Bit 33 

Lee, H. D 33 

Locksmithing Institute 25 

Lufkin Rule 9 

Miller Sewer Rod 26 

Miller Falls . . Inside Back Cover 
Milwaukee Electric Tool .... 8 

Riechers, A. J 38 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

Vaughan & Bushnell 24 



CARPENTERS 

& BUILDERS GUIDES 




PER 
MONTH 



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used by thousands of carpenters. Shows you — 

HOW TO USE: Milre Boi, Chalk Line. Rules & Scales 
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Stairs, Hoists. Scaffolds, HOW TO: File & Set Saws. Do YA 
Carpenlers Arithmelic. Solve Mensuration Problems. Esti- 
mate Strenptli of Timbers, Set Girders & Sills, Frame Houses 

6 Roots. Estimate Costs. Read & Draw Plans, Draw Ud 
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On Interior Trim. Insulate, Pamt. 

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MAIL COUPON TODAY 

THEO. AUDEL & CO.. 4300 W. 62nd St. C 27 
Indianapolis 6, Ind. 

Mail Audel Carpenters & Builders Guides, 4 
vols., on 7 day free trial. If O.K.. I'll mail $3 
in 7 days and $3 monthly until $16.95 plus ship- 
ping charge is paid. If I'm^ not completely 
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Name 



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MAKE $20 to $30 EXTRA 
on each ^ 

STAIRCASE 




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Saves its cost in ONE day — does a 
better job in half time. Each end of 
Eliason Stair Gauge slides, pivots and 
locks at exact length and angle for per- 
fect fit on stair treads, risers, closet 
shelves, etc. Lasts a lifetime. 

Postpaid (cash with order) or C.O.D. d»^ c QC 

plus postage Only ^ ' D,yD 




ELIASON 
GAUGE 



STAIR 
CO. 



600S Arbour Lane 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55436 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Labor Must Fight Doubly Hard for Legislation This Year 



THE 90th Congress began its work only a few 
weeks ago. There haven't been enough key 
votes to indicate, at this stage of the proceedings, 
which Congressmen are really the friends of the 
working population and which are not. 

The campaign promises of last November gave 
us an indication of where many of the legislators 
stand, but there are some whose position on labor 
affairs is not clear. 

All indications are, however, that organized 
labor has fewer friends than it had in the 89th 
Congress. The authoritative Congressional Quar- 
terly made a study of the political viewpoints of 
the members of the House of Representatives and 
came up with the statement that 188 Congress- 
men favor organized labor while 227 Congress- 
men oppose, and an additional 20 seem to sit on 
the fence. Indications are that the House will be 
far more inclined to defeat progressive labor pro- 
posals than it was in the last session. 

There seems little chance for repeal of Taft- 
Hartley's Section 14(b) this year, and chances for 
situs picketing action seem remote. 

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Na- 
tional Right-to- Work Committee — both perennial 
foes of labor unions — are hoping to turn back the 
clock this year. They hope to restrict collective 
bargaining all along the line. 

Some of the bills placed in the legislative hopper 
in the first days of the current Congress indicate 



that some groups are seeking to restrict picketing. 
Some want to throw roadblocks in the way of legiti- 
mate organizing by abolishing authorization cards 
and limiting the scope of organizing campaigns. 

Spokesmen for the National Right-to-Work 
Committee claim that the November elections 
created a climate for serious consideration of Fed- 
eral restrictions on compulsory unionism. 

All factors considered, union members will find 
their organizations and their goals under strong 
legislative attack in 1967. 

In addition, we can expect that the propaganda 
machines of the anti-labor groups will be grinding 
out material for the press, the broadcasters, and 
the general public which will all be intended to 
create a smoke screen under the cover of which 
the anti-labor legislation can be passed. 

We must work doubly hard to stem the on- 
slaught of the well-equipped, well-heeled lobbyists 
for big business and the reactionaries. We must 
be ready to meet every attack with men and meas- 
ures of our own. The Carpenters Legislative Im- 
provement Committee will be on the job. We call 
for the support of every local union in the struggle 
yet to come. We urge you to write your Senators 
and Congressmen and let them know that you and 
your co-workers believe in the right to bargain 
collectively and to obtain union representation 
against employer injustices. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



If you alwa ys work under ideal 
conditions, Sliock-Proof builders 
saws won't interest you very 
much. 



Let's face it. Who needs Shock-Proof double-insulated 
safety, that protects you even if normal insulation 
fails? All you have to do is make sure the tool is in 
perfect condition and carefully connected to a three- 
wire outlet, that you have a safety program that every- 
one (including you) always follows. All this is if 
you're indoors. If you're working outdoors . . . 
You still might be interested in Millers Falls 6V^", 
7V4" and 8I/4" saws, though. To make them safe, we 
had to make them better. 
So we did. 
With a Stall-Proof Drive so if you hit a knot or bind 



the blade the motor won't stall and cause serious over- 
load. And you won't get a violent kick-back. 
With a Free-Swing Safety Guard for smooth blade 
entry on angle cuts and easy, instant retraction. 
With a See-Through Guard so the blade is never 
exposed beyond the point of safety. And you get a 
clear view of the blade and cutting line. 
With a High Temperature Protected Motor to prevent 
burnout under overload conditions. 
With a Lexan® Sawdust Chute to keep cutting line 
clear, throw sawdust away from you and your work. 
And . . . the Millers Falls Lifetime Guarantee. It's a 
100% repair guarantee extended to the original user. 
Millers Falls will repair, free of charge, any tool that 
fails for any reason other than abuse or normal wear, 
provided the tool is returned to Millers Falls, Green- 
field, Massachusetts. 



Millers Falls 

The safest name in tools 




I 



"•y^.-^ASiS-*" ^ ■' -^ .^.tt^' 



Stanley makes a new 

steel tape rugged enough to 

stand up to a 50-ton tank 




This rugged tape comes 
working as good as ever. 




November 16, 1956: a huge M48A1 50-Ton Tank of the 
9th Battalion 34 Armor rolls over a Stanley "Steelmaster" 
No. MYIOOA Long Tape. 

Who says they don't make tools 
like they used to anymore? 
Stanley makes tools like they 
used to anymore. Just look at 
this new "Steelmaster"^" Long 
Tape — run over by a 50-ton 
tank and it didn't break! 

That chrome-finished, die-cast 
case is tough — 






shaped to fit 
comfortably in 
your hand. And 
the blade is de- 
signed for long 
life, too — pro- 
tected with My- 
lar* to last 10 
times longer than other blades. 

Take your choice of 50 or 100 
foot lengths. Both sizes are 
graduated in feet and inches to 
eighths, with red stud markings 
and foot markings and 
easy to replace ,--^''^'''' 
too. v-:;v^'' 

.. — v\vt^'^ Stanley steelmaster 

::\j^- 100 ft '"" 



Get the tapes that measure up 
to all kinds of work : new "Steel- 
master" Long Tapes. Stanley 
Tools, Division of The Stanley 
Works, New Britain, Conn. 



-^ff>^' 




"DuPont Polyester film 



long tape No. MYIOOA 



STANLEY 



Stanley makes tools like they used to anymore 



Officiat Pubfication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

CARPENTER 



FOUNDED 1881 



MARCH, 1 967 




u 



There is a rare characteristic inherent 
in men whose guild or craft is that of 
carpenter. I have occasionally known 
and remonstrated with surly, unrelia- 
ble and careless workmen of just 
about all other crafts and trades. I 
never have known a genuine carpenter 
who was not prideful in his work; 
gentle, forthright and humane in his 
nature. Carpenters are mysteriously 
likely to be men of intelligence and 
integrity; they are at once visionary 
and realistic. Perhaps the working 
with wood has something to do with 
all this. Sawing, cutting, hammering, 
nailing, the scent of clean wood is 
always in his nostrils. Perhaps still 
lurking in the wood is something of 
the quiet fragrant forest whence it 
came. It just could be that the still 
living tonic of the long-felled trees 
clears the workman's brain and 
steadies his nerves and makes his 
hand sure and deft. Carpenters talk 
little above the tap of the hammer, 
the buzz of the saw, but when they do 
speak they are likely to be unloqua- 
cious and dryly humorous. All this 
fancied explanation could be false 
and probably is. Doubtless the funda- 
mental explanation for the character- 
istics of the genuine carpenter is that 
he is descended from the carpenter 
who possessed all these qualities — the 
carpenter craftsman, Jesus Christ. A A 

— ED\A FERBER * 



'From A KIND OF MAGIC, Page 202 






GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

FiNLAY C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 
10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 
55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 
64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
American Bank Building 
621 S.W. Morrison St., Room 937 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 7, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be sriven. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



aty 



State 



Zip Code Number 



THE 



(§/A\[S[P 





VOLUME LXXXVI No. 3 MARCH, 1967 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

A New Industry for the Building Trades Robert Weaver 1 

Workers' Rights in Bargaining Elections Spelled out 4 

National Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee 6 

Apprenticeship Contest Rules 7 

How the Word 'Boycott' First Came Into Being PAI 

Largest Wood Fire Door Passes Tests 11 

Congress Near Auto Insurance Probe Harry Conn 14 

When Skyscrapers Were 'A Menace to Life and Property' 17 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 5 

Editorials 10 

Canadian Report 12 

Home Study Course, Blueprint Reading, Unit X 19 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 20 

What's New? 22 

Plane Gossip 24 

We Congratulate 25 

Local Union News 26 

Service to the Brotherhood 32 

In -Memoriam 37 

Lakeland News 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent *o 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20013, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price; United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20$ in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

A writer who grasps the vigor and 
the excitement of the American caval- 
cade and translates them into best- 
selling novels is Edna Ferber. In 
1952 she described the life of Texas 
oil and ranch tycoons in Giant. In 
1958 she conjured up the panorama 
of Alaska and the Far North in The 
Ice Palace. In 1941 Saratoga Trunk 
recreated the colorful era of the Gay 
Nineties spas. She won a Pulitzer 
Prize for So Big, which was first pub- 
lished in 1924. 

In 1963 A Kind of Magic came out 
— the latest of a long line of books 
by Miss Ferber, which began with 
Dan-n O'Hara in 1911! 

On our cover this month we present 
an excerpt from A Kind of Magic — 
words which pay tribute to the mem- 
bers of our craft. The words and 
phrases are carefully trimmed and pol- 
ished, as only an experienced journey; 
man writer could produce them. We 
thought them worthy of our front 
cover and hope that our presentation 
of them beside a color photograph of 
a sturdy western tree will inspire many 
members to frame them for the union 
hall or study. 

We are indebted to Al Silverman, 
the Brotherhood's public relations 
counsel, for calling the excerpt to our 
attention, and we are equally indebted 
to an unknown photographer for the 
ground level view of the sturdy tree 
we display beside it. 





Workers' Rights In 

Spelled Out 



ining 



■ The National Labor Relations 
Board, in an effort to make clear the 
rights of workers in representation 
elections and to make sure that these 
rights are enforced, has launched 
an information program which will 
make itself felt in every plant and 
shop where elections are to be held 
in the future. 

Under the programs, the NLRB is 
using a leaflet and two posters which 
spell out in detail the rights of work- 
ers in elections, what constitutes un- 
fair influences in the holding of 
elections and what recourse workers 
have in the event of unfair tactics. 

While the posters are directed 
equally to any unfair practice com- 
mitted either by management or by 
a union, most of the examples of 
unfair conduct in election battles 
are directed against practices which 
have been the cause of innumerable 
complaints against employers. This 
is not surprising since complaints 
of unfair labor practices against em- 
ployers usually run about two to 
one as compared with complaints 
against unions. 

Idea for the use of the poster 
campaign was credited to Board 
Member Sam Zagoria, himself a 



former newspaperman and official of 
the Washington Newspaper Guild. 

In the past, the Board has simply 
sent out a notice of an election plus 
a sample ballot. It will now include 
a reminder of the right of workers 
to vote free of improper pressure. In 
addition to a leaflet explaining the 
basic mechanics of a representation 
election and voter rights, there are 
two bulletin board notices available. 

The first will be issued when a 
petition is filed with the Board 
seeking a representation election. 
If an election is ordered or agreed 
to, the second bulletin board notice 
of election will be issued. 

There is no compulsion for em- 
ployers to hang the notices on their 
bulletin boards, but the posters 
will be made available both to em- 
ployers and unions. The latter 
will then be in a position to make 
clear to prospective members their 
election rights as laid down by the 
NLRB itself either on plant bulletin 
boards to which they have access or 
their own bulletin boards. 

Here are examples of forbidden 
practices as laid down by the Board 
in its leaflet and posters: 

• Making threats of loss of jobs 



or benefits by a party capable of 
carrying out such a threat. 

• Firing employees or causing 
them to be fired to encourage or 
discourage union activity. 

• Making promises of promo- 
tion, pay raises, or other benefits to 
influence an employee vote, by a 
party capable of carrying out any 
such promise. 

• Making threats of physical 
force or violence to employees to 
influence their vote. 

• Making misstatements of im- 
portant facts where another party 
does not have a fair chance to reply. 

• Making campaign speeches to 
assembled groups of employees on 
company time within the 24-hour 
period before the election. 

• Inciting racial or religious pre- 
judice by inflammatory appeals. 

• Exerting repeated pressures by 
persons or groups not themselves 
involved in the election which tend 
to create fear or job loss, violence 
or other trouble. 

Final word of the NLRB to 
workers is: 

"The National Labor Relations 
Board protects your right to a fair 
election and a free choice." ■ 



THE CARPENTER 




Washington ROUNDUP 



OH-COME-NOW DEPARTMENT— A horrifying fate faces American carpenters of the future 
because of too much leisure, according to the head of the world-famous Smithsonian 
Institution, S. Dillon Ripley. Addressing the Washington Chapter of the National 
Society of Arts and Letters, Ripley gazed into his crystal hall and predicted, 
"The carpenter of the future, working 20 hours a week, will step out of his 
limousine, don his white overalls, tap a nail into a wall, drive "back home, and 
probably bite his nails in frustration." 

CONSUMER CHAMPION— Senator Warren G. Magnuson (D.-Wash.) will chair the Consumer 
subcommittee of the Commerce Commitee, the first new standing subcommittee created 
in the Senate in more than a decade. He says he will introduce bills to protect 
the consumer from almost every hazard of the market place — cigarette advertising 
to door-to-door salesmen. 

MORE MANPOWER TRAINEES— Some 1,050 unemployed men and women will be trained in 
food service occupations in the Northeast as part of an on-the-job training 
program announced by the Department of Labor. As we reported in our January 
issue, another group of 1,000 will begin working in a program in 17 states as 
carpenter trainees. 

UNCLE SAM'S HELP— The United States Employment Service and its state affiliates 
obtained over ten million jobs for workers in 1966. Some 6,535,000 of these were 
nonfarm placements. It was the highest total in the past three years and exceeded 
every year except 1962 and 1963 in the past 15 years. 

AUTOMATION -PROOF— We have it on high authority that two jobs won't be wiped out 
by automation — those held by mailmen and newspaper boys. Deputy Postmaster 
General Frederick C. Belen says that despite the new wonders, these jobs will be 
around in the year 2000. He says that letters are far less susceptible to snooping 
than electronic communications. 

SPRING PLANTINGS— A package of five bills, headed by one which would give 
collective bargaining rights to migratory farm workers, has been introduced in 
the Senate by Senator Harrison A. Williams (D.-N.J.). Other measures in the 
package would bar children under 12 from working on farms other than family farms 
and protect workers in such areas as housing and the right to vote. 

IN A SURVEY of 246 drug manufacturers to determine the potency of their products, 
more than half of the firms had one or more product samples that did not meet 
acceptable standards. The results of the survey were released by Food and Drug 
Administration Commissioner James L. Goddard who said his agency would investigate 
other drug qualities in a broader survey. 

EQUAL WORK, EQUAL PAY— An employer who replaces a man with a woman employee in 
the same job cannot lawfully pay the woman a lower wage. The same is true in the 
reverse situation according to a Labor Department bulletin issued under the Fair 
Labor Standards Act. 

CHISELING CHECK— Employers who chisel workers entitled to protection under the 
minimum wage law are the target of a new, nationwide drive by the AFL-CIO. 
Announcement of the drive was made as the wage floor goes up to $1.40 an hour and 
coverage is extended to 9.1 million additional workers. AFL-CIO President George 
Meany sent letters to President Johnson and to AFL-CIO state and local central 
bodies spelling out labor's enforcement program. Meany asked that each central 
body set up enforcement machinery to receive and help process complaints of wage 
law violations from all workers in its area — including employees of unorganized 
shops and businesses. 

MARCH, 1967 5 



National Committee Report 



Rules and Regulations Governing 
Apprenticeship Contests Adopted 



• Age limit for entry into ap- 
prenticeship training raised. 

• Use of rating forms shown in 
new JAC manual now permis- 
sible. 

• New training aids "well 
along in their development." 



The National Joint Carpentry Ap- 
prenticeship and Training Commit- 
tee met February 2 and 3 in New 
Orleans to survey the work of 1967. 
It heard reports and moved ahead 
on several fronts. 

A motion was made to change 
Section 8 of the Qualifications for 
Apprenticeship in the National 
Standards so that the age limits for 
entry into carpentry apprenticeship 
training could be raised from 17 
through 25 years to 17 through 27 
years. The proposal would also per- 
mit the acceptance of military serv- 
ice personnel through 32 years of 
age. The motion was seconded and 
adopted. 

The United Brotherhood reported 
that it was in the process of revising 
all training manuals for carpenters. 
It is also well along on its way in the 
development of slides, overlays, tape 
recordings, and manuals designed to 
augment training programs. In ad- 
dition, the Brotherhood is currently 
developing a training manual for 
millwrights. 

The New Orleans meeting was 
well attended by the official repre- 
sentatives of the Brotherhood, the 
Associated General Contractors, and 
the National Association of Home 



Builders. The United Brotherhood's 
First General Vice President Finlay 
C. Allan officiated in his capacity as 
committee chairman. 

Robert iVIcConnan represented the 
Federal Bureau of Apprenticeship 
and Training. During the opening 
session there were 15 guests repre- 
senting both labor and management. 

A highlight of the meeting was the 
prensentation and adoption of 
"Rules and Regulations for Govern- 
ing the Annual Apprenticeship Con- 
test, Local, State, Provincial, and In- 
ternational." (The full text of these 
rules and regulations begin on the 
facing page.) 

During a general discussion peri- 
od, the committee members took up 
the matter of contest funding and 
the "Estimated Cost Analysis Sheet" 
as submitted by a special subcommit- 
tee. The estimated cost of financing 
the International Contest was de- 
termined to be approximately $30,- 
000. After considerable discus- 
sion, it was generally agreed that 
certain expenses — specifically those 
expenses pertaining to travel, per 
diem, and wages, totaling approxi- 
mately $15,000 — should be the re- 
sponsibility of the appropriate state 
or provincial contest committee. The 
remaining cost of $15,000 would be 
shared equally by the United Broth- 
erhood, AGC, and the NAHB. 

There was a subcommittee report 
on selection procedures and record- 
keeping forms. A manual covering 
these topics was presented to the 
committee for consideration, and it 
was subsequently adopted as an of- 
ficial manual. 

There was a general discussion of 
a proposal made by the St. Louis, 
Mo., JAC, calling for the reducation 



of the apprenticeship term from four 
to three years, predicated upon the 
use of new training techniques and 
facilities. The decision of the Com- 
mittee was to take no action on this 
matter. 

A motion was made to change 
Section 9 of the National Standards 
for Carpentry Apprenticeship to al- 
low for the suggested use of the 
rating forms contained in the new 
Manual of Suggestions and Informa- 
tion for Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committees. The motion 
was seconded and carried. 

Prior to adjournment, the com- 
mittee agreed to hold its August 
meeting in Vancouver, British Co- 
lumbia, at the time of the Interna- 
tional Contest. 

See Page 27 for a calendar 
of Apprenticeship contests. 



Advanced Series 

We have had many requests 
from members of the Brotherhood 
to provide a more advanced Blue 
Print Reading and Estimating 
series, when the current Blue Print 
Reading Home Study Course con- 
cludes. 

The Current Home Study Course 
concludes in the April Issue of 
The Carpenter and, in keeping 
with the desires of the many mem- 
bers, we will begin the advanced 
series in the May issue. The Blue 
Prints and Specifications are now 
ready for distribution and will sell 
for $5 per set. All orders for this 
advanced Home Study Course 
should be forwarded to our Gen- 
eral Secretary, R. E. Livingston, 
accompanied by your check or 
money order. 

It is our desire to prepare ma- 
terial for future Home Study 
Courses that will meet with the 
needs of our membership. We 
would, therefore, appreciate your 
suggestions as to areas of the trade 
that should be covered. 



THE CARPENTER 



APPRENTICESHIP CONTEST RULES 



"CARPENTER CONTESTANTS" 
means contestants from all sub-divisions 
of the Craft. 

Contestants shall be in their last year 
of Apprenticeship as of January 1, of the 
Contest year. 

LOCAL APPRENTICE CONTESTS 

A. Contest Coniitiittees 

1. If there is no Local Joint Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee, a 
Committee should be formed from rep- 
resentatives of the Local Union and the 
Employer Associations or Employers in 
the area. 

2. The Contest Committee shall select 
a secretary who shall be responsible for 
certifying the applications of the local 
winners, who will participate in the State 
or Provincial Contest. 

3. Contests shall be conducted by the 
Local Contest Committee in all sub- 
divisions of the Craft in which a State 
or Provincial contest has been established. 

B. Participants 

L Apprentice participants shall be 
members of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

2. Participants shall be in the last year 
of their apprenticeship as of January 1. 
of the contest year, according to the 
records on file in the General Office of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. The secretary of 
the Local Union shall obtain a verifica- 
tion of the apprentice's record from the 
Technical Director, Apprenticeship and 
Training Department of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, before the apprentice may 
be permitted to participate in the Local 
contest. 

C. Contest Site 

The Local contest committee should 
select a site that will afford a maximum 
of exposure to the general public, thus, 
acquainting the public with the objectives 
of the Apprenticeship Programs. 

D. Date for Contest 

The Local contest shall be held at a 
time determined by the State or Provin- 
cial contest committee. It is suggested 
that the Local contest be held at least 
thirty (30) days prior to the scheduled 
State or Provincial Contest. 

E. Contest Procedures and Materials 

All contest procedures, materials, writ- 
ten examinations and manipulative project 
plans shall be furnished by the Local 
Contest Committee. The written test 
should be taken from or based upon the 
Apprenticeship Manuals prepared by the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



F. Financing of Local Contests and 

Awards 

1. The Local contest committee shall 
be responsible for the financing of local 
contests. 

2. The Local committee shall deter- 
mine whether or not any awards are to 
be given to contest winners. 

G. Selection of Winners 

The method of selecting winners shall 
be determined by the Local contest com- 
mittee. Application forms for the winners 
of Local contests to enter State or Prov- 
incial contests will be furnished by the 
National Joint Carpenters Apprenticeship 
and Training Committee. 

STATE OR PROVINCIAL CONTESTS 

A. Contest Committee 

1. State or Provincial contests shall be 
conducted by the State or Provincial 
Joint Apprenticeship and Training Com- 
mittee. If no State or Provincial Joint 
Apprenticeship and Training Committee 
exists, a contest committee may be se- 
lected by the State or Provincial Council 
and the Employer Associations. Contest 
Committees should be composed of rep- 
resentatives from both Unions and Em- 
ployers. 

2. Each State or Provincial Contest 
Committee shall appoint a secretary who 
shall be responsible for receiving, han- 
dling and returning all used and unused 
written tests, instructions, project plans, 
score cards, etc., supplied by the National 
Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. 

3. If assistance is needed in organizing 
a State or Provincial contest, it may be 
had by writing the Chairman or Secretary 
of the National Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. 

4. The National Joint Apprenticeship 
and Training Committee should be noti- 
fied immediately of the Name and Ad- 
dress of the Contest Secretary and the 
time and place the contest is to be held. 

B. Participants 

1. A participant in a State or Provin- 
cial Contest shall be a member of a Local 
Union of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America and 
shall be a winner of a Local Apprentice- 
ship Contest. 

2. Second and Third place winners of 
a Local contest may be the First and 
Second Alternates, respectively, and may 
enter a State or Provincial Contest only 
if the First place winner is unable or does 
not wish to participate. 

3. A State or Provincial contestant 
shall be in his last year of Apprenticeship 
as of January 1, of the contest year, ac- 
cording to the record on file in the Gen- 
eral Office of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. The 



secretary of the Local Union shall obtain 
a verification of the Apprentice's record 
from the Technical Director, Apprentice- 
ship and Training Department of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, before the apprentice 
may be permitted to participate in State 
or Provincial Contests. 

4. Only one contestant from a sub- 
division of the Craft may enter the State 
or Provincial Contest. Any deviation 
from this rule must have prior approval 
of the International Carpenters Contest 
Committee. 

C. Time and Place of Contest 

1. State or Provincial Contests should 
be held a minimum of 60 days prior to 
the International Contest: the exact date 
to be selected by the State or Provincial 
Contest Committee 

2. The location to be selected by the 
State or Provincial Contest Committee. 

3. Two (2) days shall be allowed for 
the contest which will be in two (2) parts: 

a. A written test based on the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America Apprenticeship materials. A 
maximum of four (4) hours to be allowed. 

b. A manipulative project, a maximum 
of eight (8) hours to be allowed. 

D. Financing of Contest 

The State or Provincial Contest Com- 
mittee shall determine ways and means 
of financing the State or Provincial con- 
test. 

E. Contest Materials 

The contest committee shall be respon- 
sible for all materials needed for the 
Manipulative project. 

F. Materials to be furnished by the 

National Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. 

1. Contest Rules. 

2. Written Tests for contestants in each 
sub-division of the Craft participating in 
the State or Provincial contest. 

3. Answers and grading procedures 
guide for written tests. 

4. Specifications for manipulative proj- 
ect. 

5. Plans for manipulative project. 
These shall be used in all State and 
Provincial contests. 

6. Judging score cards. 

7. List of materials needed for the 
manipulative project. 

8. Reporting forms for contestants. 

9. Application forms for participation 
in the International Carpenter Appren- 
ticeship Contest. 

NOTE: All used and unused materials 
furnished by the National Joint Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee are the 
property of the National Joint Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee and 
shall be returned immediately upon com- 



MARCH, 1967 



pletion of the State or Provincial Con- 
test. Winners of State or Provincial Con- 
tests will be declared ineligible for the 
International Contest, if the material is 
not returned. 

G. Selection of Winners 

1. Contest Judges — The State or Pro- 
vincial Contest Committee shall select 
three (3) outstanding persons, for each 
of the sub-divisions participating, who 
have a knowledge of our industry and the 
subjects covered in the contest who are 
not related to or directly associated with 
any of the contestants, to judge the con- 
test. 

2. Grading Procedure — Grading of 
written and manipulative tests shall be 
done by using the answer sheets and 
grading procedures furnished by the Na- 
tional Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee. 

3. First, Second and Third Place win- 
ners shall be selected by the Judges. This 
will apply to contestants in each sub- 
division participating in the contest. 

4. The decision of the Judges shall be 
final. 

5. The Names of participants and win- 
ners shall be mailed to the Secretary of 
the International Contest Committee 
within five (5) days after the close of the 
contest. 

6. Questions used in the written test 
shall be accessible only to contestants, 
while answering the questions during the 
contest, and the Judges selected to score 
the written test. No discussion or obser- 
vation of the test questions before or after 
the written test is completed shall be per- 
mitted. The persons selected to score the 
written test shall return all used and un- 
used test booklets, guides and answer 
keys to the contest Secretary who shall 
be responsible for returning all used and 
unused written test materials to the Sec- 
retary of the National Joint Apprentice- 
ship and Training Committee. 

H. Awards 

Whether or not awards and certificates 
shall be given to the winners of State or 
Provincial contests shall be determined by 
the State or Provincial contest committee 
except that the winners who are to par- 
ticipate in the International contest shall 
receive an all expense paid trip to par- 
ticipate in the International Contest. This 
shall be paid by the respective State or 
Province and shall include: 

1. Lost Wages 

2. Per Diem 

3. Transportation 

INTERNATIONAL CARPENTER 
APPRENTICE CONTEST 

A. Contest Committee 

There shall be an International Joint 
Apprentice Contest Committee, appointed 
by the Chairman of the National Joint 
Apprenticeship and Training Committee, 
composed of Management Representa- 
tives from each participating Employer 
Association and the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

A contest shall be conducted by the In- 



ternational Carpenter- Joint Apprentice- 
ship and Training Committee in all sub- 
divisions of the Craft that have partici- 
pated in State or Provincial Contests. 

B. Duties and Responsibilities of tlie 
Contest Committee 

1. Prepare and adopt all procedures 
affecting the contest. 

2. Determine the time and place of 
succeeding contests. 

3. Prepare or have prepared suitable 
plans and specifications for the manipula- 
tive phase of the contest for each sub- 
division participating in State or Provin- 
cial contests. 

4. Prepare or have prepared written 
tests for each sub-division of the Craft- 
participating in State or Provincial con- 
tests. 

5. Prepare or have prepared all forms, 
such as applications, judges scorecards, 
etc. 

6. Prepare or have prepared all written 
tests, grading keys, plans, specifications 
and any other materials needed for the 
International Contest. 

C. Participants 

1. All participants in the International 
Contest shall be members of Local Un- 
ions of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America and shall 
be a winner of a State or Provincial con- 
test. 

2. All participants in the International 
Contest shall be in their last year of ap- 
prenticeship as of January 1. of the con- 
test year. Before a contestant participates 
in the International Contest, his eligibility 
shall have been verified in accordance 
with the rules governing participation in 
a Local. State, or Provincial Contest. 

3. Only one participant of any sub- 
division from any State or Province may 
enter the International Contest. 

4. Alternates: 

a. The Second Place winner in any 
sub-division, of a State or Provincial Con- 
test shall be the alternate for the First 
place winner and may enter the Interna- 
tional contest if the First place winner is 
unable or does not wish to participate. 

b. The Third place winner, in any sub- 
division, shall be the second alternate. 

D. Time and Place of Contest 

1. The International Contest Commit- 
tee shall set the time and place for the 
contest. 

2. Registration of contestants shall be 
conducted at a time established by the 
International contest committee. 

E. Materials and Special Tools 

1. All materials needed for the manip- 
ulative contest will be furnished by the 
International Contest Committee. 

2. All Power tools needed for the con- 
test will be provided by the International 
Contest Committee. 

3. All hand tools needed for the con- 
test shall be furnished by the contestants 
as per lists of tools needed prepared by 
the International Contest Committee for 
the specific project to be constructed. 



F. Selection of Winners 

1. Contest Judges — The participating 
groups on the International contest com- 
mittee shall each select an outstanding 
person, for each sub-division of the con- 
test, who has a thorough knowledge of 
the Craft and subjects covered in the 
contest, to act as Judges. 

2. Grading: 

a. Grading of written and performance 
tests shall be done by using the grading 
sheets and judging score cards prepared 
by the International Contest Committee. 

b. The written test shall account for 
40% of the total score and the manipula- 
tive for 60%. 

c. First. Second and Third place win- 
ner shall be selected by the Judges in each 
sub-division of the contest. 

d. The decision of the Judges shall be 
final. 

e. The names of the winners shall be 
announced at an awards banquet follow- 
ing the contest. 

G. Awards 

1. Every contestant shall receive a cer- 
tificate of participation properly inscribed 
and framed. 

2. First. Second and Third place win- 
ner in each sub-division shall receive cash 
awards as follows: 

The First, Second and Third place win- 
ner, in each sub-division shall receive cash 
awards; the amount to be determined by 
the National Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. 

H. Expenses of Contest 

Expenses of conducting the Interna- 
tional Carpenter Apprenticeship contest 
shall be paid by the International Contest 
Committee from funds budgeted by the 
member associations and organizations of 
the National Carpenters Joint Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee. 

Representatives of any two (2) of the 
three (3) organizations participating shall 
be responsible for signing checks on the 
International Contest Funds. 

I. Additional Rules 

Any additional rules or procedures 
deemed necessary to make the contest a 
success may be adopted by the Interna- 
tional Contest Committee at any time be- 
fore the contest starts. 

J. Safety Precautions and Insurances 

1. The International Contest Commit- 
tee shall take out sufficient insurance to 
protect each contestant during the period 
he is in transit to and from home and the 
contest area and during his participation 
in the contest. 

2. Public Liability Insurance shall be 
purchased to cover the contest commit- 
tee's liability and to protect the public 
while at the contest area. 

3. A first Aid Kit shall be provided 
and kept at the contest site. 

4. Arrangements shall be made for 
emergency care in event of an accident. 
Names of Doctors, Hospital and Ambu- 
lance Service shall be posted in the con- 
test area for the Judges' Information. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 




^5^' 




HOW THE WORD BOYCOTT' 
FIRST CAME INTO BEING 



An Irish patriot Charles Stewart Parnell, in the romanticized 
poster above, was the man credited with the original idea. 



FROM PRESS ASSOCIATES, INC. 



For organized labor the word "boycott" has a 
deeply personal meaning — a call to stand by other 
workers in their times of trouble by refusing to give 
economic support to enemies of the labor movement. 

Yet, relatively few know the meaning of the word 
and almost each generation of working men and 
women must rediscover for itself how it got its start. 

"Captain Boycott," written by Philip Rooney, an 
Irish author, takes the reader back to the 19th century. 
It was a time when absentee English landlords de- 
manded fantastic rents from their impoverished farmer 
tenants in Ireland and turned them out of their homes 
when the rents were not paid. The book is sold at the 
Irish Book Center here. 

Specifically, the story involves Captain Charles 
Boycott, a rack-rent agent for the Earl of Erne who, 
more out of stupidity than viciousness, refused to ac- 
cept the reasonable rents that were offered him and 
evicted his tenants. 

In reply, the embattled Irish farm workers iso- 
lated Captain Boycott in a way not only to hurt him 
economically, but to show their utmost contempt for 
him. 

"No man would save the Captain's crops," wrote 
Rooney. 'No one would drive his cart, the smith 
would not shoe his horses, the laundress would not 
wash for him, the grocer would not supply him with 
goods, the postman would not deliver his letters." 

The device that the farmers used grew out of the 
advice of Charles Stewart Parnell, the great Irish 
patriot, who had denounced men who took over farms 
from which others had been evicted. Such a man, he 
said, in words that still burn, should be left severely 
alone "by putting him into a moral Coventry, by iso- 
lating him from his kind as if he were a leper of old." 

"You must show him your detestation of the crime 
he has committed," Parnell concluded, "and you can 
be sure that there will be no man so full of avarice, 
so lost to shame, as to dare the public opinion of all 
right-thinking men and to transgress your unwritten 
code of law . . ." 

Captain Boycott did dare to face the isolation that 
had been placed upon him. But he failed. He im- 
ported laborers. He guarded them with British cavalry 
and infantry and constabulary. But he could not face 
forever the "detestation" of the Irish farm workers. 

In the end he was forced to return to England, 
defeated and ruined. Behind him he left only the 
memory of his name "a dreaded word" in the English 
language. 



MARCH, 1967 





EDITORIALS 



>:^ Time For Ji Tax Break 

Once again income tax time is nearing. This pre- 
sents a good opportunity for all wage earners in the 
country to petition their Congressmen for a better tax 
break for their famihes. Specifically, we would like 
to see an increase in the personal tax exemption from 
the current $600 to $1,000. This would provide a 
tax-free base of $4,000 for a family of four. 

Now is the time to shift the burden of taxation from 
the middle and lower income families to the rich. For 
the past 30 years it has been going in the opposite 
direction with the rich being favored with an increas- 
ing number of tax loopholes. 

An example of this shifting of the tax burden from 
the rich to the middle and lower income families can 
be seen by studying the 1939 tax picture. Then a 
man and wife had a $2,500 personal exemption plus 
$400 for each child. To equal that level at today's 
cost of living, the exemption would have to be raised 
to $2,000 per person or a total of $8,000 in 1967 
dollars. 

Since President Johnson has proposed the adding of 
a 6% surtax to the wage earners tax burden, we would 
like to urge Congress to raise the personal exemption 
to $1000 before they pass any surtax legislation. 

>!^ Fairer Elections JUtead 

The National Labor Relations Board took a much- 
needed step in the right direction with the recent 
release of its 3-point program designed to stimulate 
fair play in union representation elections. 

Every year scores of NLRB elections are contested 
by foot-dragging employers, resulting in costly and 
time-consuming rescheduling of elections. 

The NLRB program includes the distribution of 
leaflets prior to an election explaining the election 
process; the use of in-plant bulletin boards to point 
out the mutual rights and responsibilities of employees, 
unions and employer; and the posting of election 
notices that cite the right of workers to vote free of 
improper pressures, in addition to the traditional sam- 
ple ballot and time and place of an election. 

Posting of these notices will be a significant stride 
along the road to free expression of the untrammeled 
choice of employees through the medium of the 
secret-ballot election. 

This in turn is the principle method Congress set 



up to resolve representation disputes and is the 
threshold to the collective bargaining process which 
has contributed so much to our industrial democracy 
and vigor. 

^ War on Critne Beffinninff 

The facts uncovered in the recently-released report 
of the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement 
& Administration of Criminal Justice should be dis- 
turbing to all Americans. 

The exhaustive 18-month-long study of crime in the 
U.S. was conducted by Nicholas DeB. Katzenbach 
while he was still Attorney General. The conclusions 
to be drawn from the report are starkly evident. For 
example, the Crime Commission found: 

• Crime costs this nation $3 billion annually in property 
losses alone. White-collar crime leads by far all other crimes 
of violence in total economic cost. Many large department 
stores have found that losses from shoplifting and employee 
pilfering equal or exceed their profit margins. 

• The nation's courts are being clogged by inebriates. 
Drunkenness accounts for nearly one third of all arrests. 

• Our youth in the 15 to 21 age bracket are responsible 
for the highest crime incidence rate. More than 50 percent 
of persons arrested for burglary are under 18 years of age. 

The recommendations made by the Crime Com- 
mission are going to shake the hallowed ground of 
many a lobbyist and legislator in Washington. Katzen- 
bach proposed a tough law banning mail-order sales 
of firearms. He also urged the outlawing of wire- 
tapping and electronic eavesdropping not related to 
national security. He proposed the banning of adver- 
tisement, manufacture, and distribution of wiretapping 
and eavesdropping equipment in interstate commerce. 

Acting on the suggestions of the Crime Commission 
report, President Johnson early in February proposed 
spending $350 million over the next two years to 
streamline police, courts, and correction agencies. He 
recommended to Congress a "Safe Streets and Crime 
Control Act of 1967," which would attack the basic 
causes of crime in this country. 

Reaction from Congress to the President's war on 
crime has been only lukewarm. Conservatives in both 
the House and the Senate are not overly enthusiastic. 
We agree the President's proposals indeed may only 
be a partial solution to the national crime problem. 
However, this can be the start in an effort to sub- 
stantially strengthen present law enforcement agen- 
cies, and this alone merits the full support of Congress. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




I HE LUMBER and millwork in- 
dustry is putting the heat on com- 
petitive products with new fire doors 
that successfully withstand up to 
1700 degree fires for an hour or 
more. The same heat would cause 
most metals to sag and lose their 
strength. 

One of the new fire doors, manu- 
factured by the Weyerhaeuser Com- 
pany, comes in sizes as large as 
4x10 feet to meet the demand for 
the new large-size doorways popu- 
lar with architects. Most installa- 
tions are in schools, hospitals, and 
business establishments. The door 
is made with wood veneer surfaces, 
extra-thick hardwood side edges, 
which are treated with a fire-retard- 
ant chemical, and a mineral core. 
Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. has 
given the door a one-hour rating. 

Another new fire door, which is 
available in sizes up to 4x8 feet, 
has a fire rating of one and a half 
hours, provided by an extra thick- 
ness of mineral core. 

Another kind of fire-resistant door 
is made with a core of wood par- 
ticles bonded with phenolic adhesive, 
and treated with a fire retardant ma- 
terial, instead of the mineral core. 
Heavier than the mineral core type, 
the door also has a one-hour fire 
rating, and provides excellent screw- 
holding power. A bonus is good 
noise control. 

Before thy turn new fire door de- 

MARCH, 1967 



LARGEST WOOD FIRE DOOR 
PASSES TESTS 
With naming Colors 



Flames dance brightly and 
ominously about the big fire door, 
as technicians put it through 
the furnace test. The door 
surface is exposed to flame 
for the duration 
of the fire rating. 



signs over to the construction in- 
dustry, the manufacturers put them 
on the torture rack in their labora- 
tories to make sure they can not only 
stop fire, but withstand the punish- 
ment of normal daily use as well. 

Machines slam proposed market 
designs a million times, and the 
doors are then overloaded until they 
come apart. Even then, in one series 
of tests, the edge-banding pulled 
away from the doors before the 
screws could be pulled loose. 

To test fire resistance, a door is 
placed in a gas-fired brick furnace 
under rigidly controlled conditions. 
The door surface is exposed to 
flames for the duration of the fire 
rating. The heat is intense enough 
to melt most door handles. Imme- 
diately after the specified period of 
fire resistance is over, the door is 
withdrawn from the furnace and ex- 
posed to the blast from a fire hose. 
If it stays in one piece, it's won its 
rating with flaming colors. 

All Weyerhaeuser fire doors — and 
those of most manufacturers — are 
first tested in each company's own 
laboratories and later by engineers 
at Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 
Manufacturers then seek approval 
of Factory Mutual and the New 
York City Board of Standards and 
Appeals, as well as other state and 
local agencies concerned with fire 
hazards, before placing their doors 
on the market. 



11 




TECHNICIANS place door on gas-fired 
furnace to test its quality as fire barrier. 
Door surface is exposed to heat and 
flames for period ranging from % hour 
to IV2 hours. 

FIRE DOOR, immediately after furnace 
test, is withdrawn from the furnace and 
subjected to the pounding and cooling 
effects of fire hose. If, after prolonged 
exposure to heat and flame, door can 
withstand shock of high-pressure hosing, 
it has passed test. 




(."ai»«iSSIi«S»tM»». <.*«. 




I # KBanadian Report 



Facts in Toronto Resilient Floor Workers' 
Controversy Are Shown in Ne^v Pamphlet 



A newspaper headline Feb. 8th said, 
"Labor upstart sets up shop in To- 
ronto." 

The story below it was that the 
Confederation of National Trade Un- 
ions, with about 99 percent of its mem- 
bership in the province of Quebec, has 
opened an office in Toronto, with a 
view to making inroads into the orga- 
nized labor movement in Ontario. 

Before this the CNTU had made 
two moves, one, getting a dissident 
group of members of a Brotherhood 
local in Toronto to agree to move into 
the CNTU; two, to get a similar group 
of Steelworkers in the Collingwood 
shipyards to consider such a move. 

The move of the members of the 
resilient floor workers' (Carpenters) 
Local 2965 is being disputed before 
the Ontario Labor Relations Board. 
The decision of the Board will not 
likely be known for many months. 
The agreement which the Local has 
signed with the building industry is 
good until 1970. Members of the 
Local in good standing are still work- 
ing under that agreement and will con- 
tinue to do so. The Board won't upset 
that contract. The CNTU will have to 
look elsewhere if it wants an "in" in 
Ontario. 

The Toronto Building Trades Coun- 
cil with the support of the Canadian 
Labor Congress and the Ontario Fed- 
eration of Labor has issued a pam- 
phlet called "The Facts of the Contro- 
versy about the Resilient Floor Work- 
ers' Union in Toronto." 

It is required reading for anyone 
who wants to know the background to 
the case. It is being mailed to every 
staff representative of every union in 
Ontario. 

Raiding Is CNTU's 
Major Ob/ectiVe 

One fact that everyone should know 
is that the CNTU is bent on raiding 
international unions which, they say, 
is cheaper than organizing the unor- 
ganized. 

But in Quebec, where the CNTU 
has most of its membership, the big 
majority of building trades union 



membership in Montreal, for example 
is in international unions. 

The Brotherhood alone has six times 
as many members in Quebec as the 
CNTU-organized carpenters. 

Little Difference in 
Brand, Non-Brand Drugs 

Canada is now getting the facts 
about drug prices exposed by the Ke- 
fauver Committee in the United States 
a few years ago. 

The director of investigations under 
the Combines Act (Anti-trust in the 
U.S.) told an enquiry into drug prices 
that there is no competition in the 
manufacture of drugs, that drug prices 
are too high, that non-brand name 
drugs are as good as brand name 
drugs. 

The drug manufacturers had claimed 
that brand name drugs are necessarily 
higher in price because they are higher 
in quality than non-brand names (often 
imported) drugs. 

The food and drug directorate of 
the federal government tested both and 
reported that there was no significant 
difference in quality between them. 

Mr. Henry urged that physicians 
should be encouraged to use competing 
drug products, that is, use non-brands 
where possible. 

CLC Presents Annual 
Brief to the Cabinet 

The Canadian Labor Congress made 
its annual submission to the federal 
cabinet February 8th. The brief pre- 
sented by CLC President Claude Jo- 
doin dealt with all the subjects about 
which policy decisions had been made 
at the last CLC convention plus a num- 
ber of vital current issues. 

Half a dozen leading members of 
the cabinet were present headed by 
Prime Minister Pearson. About 250 
union leaders sat in on the hearing. 

President Jodoin cautioned the gov- 
ernment against any actions which up- 
set the collective bargaining relation- 
ship between management and labor. 

The government must face up to the 
fact that trade unions will continue to 



press for wage increases and engage in 
strike action if necessary. 

Restrictive legislation which inter- 
feres with free collective bargaining 
allies the government to all intents and 
purposes with the employer, said the 
Congress. 

Many Incomes Too Low 
To Purchase Housing 

Canadians are supersensitive about 
the cost of living. For the past six 
months a loint Committee of the Sen- 
ate and the House of Commons has 
been hearing submissions from con- 
sumer and other groups. Most of the 
protest about rising prices has been 
about food, but surprisingly enough, 
food has not been the only or major 
culprit. 

The consumer price index which 
measures price rises shows that housing 
costs, transportation and health care 



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Pi.M. of 



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I 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. I-1 18-037 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustialed Book — "Your Bii; Op- 
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12 



THE CARPENTER 



have all gone up in price more than 
food since the index was started in 
1949. 

Recently the spotlight of rising costs 
has been focused on housing. The 
price index of housing jumped from 
142.9 in January 1966 to 147.6 in Jan- 
uary 1967. A five-point boost is big 
in one year. 

At the same time the food index 
rose 4.1 percent to 144.7 in January 
1967 from 140.6 in 1966. But with 
wages rising too, one hour of wages 
will buy more food today than it 
would 20 years ago. 

In housing, the situation is different. 
There is a critical shortage of housing. 
and costs have gone up so much in re- 
cent years that the average family can- 
not really afford to buy a home. 

In Metro Toronto, a major indus- 
trial area with a population greater 
than eight of the 10 provinces, the av- 
erage selling price of a home in 1966 
was $29,666, up $5,866 from the year 
before. 

Authorities say that 90 percent of 
the families in the area have incomes 
too low to buy at such prices. If they 
have to buy, they are paying out so 
much of their income for shelter that 
they have not enough left over for 
food, clothing and other essentials. 

But the cost of construction is not 
the reason for the high cost of housing. 
The National Home Builders Associa- 
tion told the Joint Senate-Commons 
Committee on Consumer Prices that a 
service 50-foot lot went up in price 
by 38.7 percent in the last three years, 
from $7,200 to $9,990. 

No one can build a standard low 
cost home for the average family on a 
$10,000 lot. 

On top of this, there is the high cost 
of money. As the Ontario Federation 
of Labor said in a policy statement 
adopted by its Executive Council, 
"Low cost housing cannot be built on 
expensive land with expensive money." 

The Federation called for a public 
enquiry into land costs, money costs 
and construction costs, property taxes 
and exemptions and related matters to 
throw more light on the problem and 
to suggest effective solutions. 

In the meantime the federal minister 
responsible for housing John Nichol- 
son travelled across Canada meeting 
with provincial housing officials and 
others to find out what should be done, 
while the Prices Committee is doing 
the same thing. 

However there have been dozens of 
enquiries over the years. If words 
could build homes, there would be no 
shortage in Canada. 




Sheffield Scotch Nails practically eliminate wood splitting. 
Because of their square design, Scotch Nails tend to cut into 
wood rather than wedge and split the grain. The result is 
a neater, cleaner looking job that measures up to the highest 
standards of the builder and the customer. 

Another important plus for the Sheffield Scotch Nail is that it 
withdraws much easier from new wood shortly after driving 
than the ordinary nail. This can save trouble during construction. 
Yet after wood has dried — withdrawal resistance of Sheffield 
Scotch Nails is more than 100% greater than that of the 
round nail. The deep serrations on the sides of the nail grip 
the wood fibers, assuring you of a better anchored job. 

See your dealer about stocking Sheffield Scotch Nails. Write 
Armco Steel Corporation, Department W-527AA, 7000 Roberts 
Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64125. 



.«.-«»«« .»^._. ARMCO 

ARMCO STEEL V 



MARCH, 1967 



13 



'Blackout' on Workers 




Congress Near Auto Insurance Probe; 
Pressure On For Federal Protection 

By HARRY CONN 

Do you have a complaint about auto insurance? 

If so, Congress wants to hear about it. 

The Senate Anti-Trust and Monopoly Subcommittee has been 
compiling evidence which it expects to use in a probe of the in- 
dustry. 



Rep. John E. Moss (D., Calif.), 
a ranking member of the House In- 
terstate and Foreign Commerce 
Committee, has announced that he 
"will press for early action for a 
full scale investigation of the auto- 
mobile insurance industry." 

Organized labor has been de- 
manding action, too. In Ohio, Wis- 
consin and Pennsylvania and other 
states trade unionists are engaged in 
bitter fights for more protection for 
the policyholders. 

Auto insurance is a budget item 
that hits most Americans along with 
food, housing and medical care. 
Major hikes in insurance rates can 



eat into a worker's pocketbook just 
as surely as higher prices. 

Members of Congress must be 
hearing about it since a growing 
number are co-sponsoring a bill to 
establish Federal standards of pro- 
tection to drivers against high-risk 
insurance firms through a Federal 
Motor Insurance Guaranty Corpo- 
ration. 

One of many members of the 
House co-sponsoring legislation. 
Rep. Leonard Farbstein (D., N.Y.), 
recently declared: 

"To most American families the 
automobile is no longer a luxury 
item, but a virtual necessity." 



He points to the fact that 70 per- 
cent of all U.S. families own one or 
more cars and 25 percent own two 
or more. Automobile liability in- 
surance is likewise a necessity. All 
states either require or encourage 
auto insurance. 

"The regulation of this great inter- 
state business of insurance has been 
under the domain of the several 
states and it's about time Congress 
took a good hard look at how effec- 
tively the public interest is being 
served," Farbstein said. 

His reference was to a 1944 rul- 
ing by the U.S. Supreme Court 
which held that the insurance busi- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



ness was subject to full Federal reg- 
ulation and taxation under the inter- 
state commerce clause of the Con- 
stitution. 

In 1945 the McCarren-Ferguson 
Act returned to the individual states 
the power to regulate and tax the in- 
surance industry. There appears to 
be growing support in Congress to 
return to Federal regulation and 
many members of the House and 
Senate say that the legislative his- 
tory of the McCarren-Ferguson Act 
makes it clear that the surrender of 
insurance power to the states was a 
conditional delegation of power. 

In 1966 nearly $9 billion in pre- 
miums were paid by approximately 
100 million drivers of over 80 mil- 
lion motor vehicles. The Interstate 
Highway System allows our citizens 
the opportunity to drive from state 
to state. The feeling developing in 
Congress is that they should be able 
to operate their cars with protection 
against financial loss. 

Senator Thomas Dodd (D., 
Conn.), who is sponsoring legisla- 
tion, recently placed in the Congres- 
sional Record a table showing "the 
estimated average amount of cents 
on the dollar claimants will receive 
in certain states from insolvent in- 
surance companies." The table 
shows, for example, that: 

• In Pennsylvania 4000 claim- 
ants will receive 1 cent on the dollar. 

• In Illinois, 50,000 claimants 
will be paid 25 cents on the dollar. 

• In Michigan, 25,000 claimants 
will be compensated 25 cents on the 
dollar. 

• In Missouri 20,000 claimants 
will receive 10 cents on the dollar. 

The problem of high-risk insur- 
ance companies, as bad as it is, is 
only a small part of the auto insur- 
ance practices which is leading to 
what may be one of the more sensa- 
tional Senate probes in some years. 

State insurance regulatory bodies, 
with the exception of a very few 
states such as Maryland, have usu- 
ally been under the domination of 
the auto insurance industry. 

Here are some examples: 

"Blackouts" — Motorists in low 
income sections of many urban 
conmiunities are "blacked out" 
from receiving adequate insurance 



protection. Thousands of motorists 
with good driving records are suffer- 
ing through no fault of their own 
other than that the insurance firms 
consider that they live in "high-risk" 
areas. 

The Senate Anti-Trust Subcom- 
mittee has maps of many urban 
areas revealing, for the first time, 
"blacked out" sections. 

Last April, Orman Vertrees, a 
reporter for the Seattle Post-Intelli- 
gencer, got hold of an agent guide, 
then in its 15th printing. It warned 
agents not to sell auto insurance to 
people in the "lower laboring 
classes." Included in this group 
were aircraft workers and longshore- 
men. 

At a rate hearing in Kentucky it 
was discovered that 35 percent of 



Auto insurance 
is a budget item 




that hits 
most Americans 



the state registered cars are unin- 
sured. "Blackout" maps were found 
on the walls of some companies 
marking poorer areas of Louisville 
where insurance is not to be sold. 

Moreover, state officials claim 
that there is effective "blackout" for 
all kinds of casualty insurance in the 
depressed Appalachian region. 

Insurance Rates — State regulatory 
agencies have usually been pawns 
for the industry, permitting excessive 
increases in rates. 

The Cleveland Press recently car- 
ried an article showing that in Ohio 
rates on automobile liability were 
increased three times since July 



1964. A 1964 hike averaged 10 
percent. A similar increase came in 

1965. Last November there was a 
25 percent boost. 

In pointing this out to the Senate, 
Senator Stephen Young (D., Ohio) 
declared: "The Federal Government 
must assume authority and responsi- 
bility for the regulation of the insur- 
ance industry because the states have 
defaulted in their obligation to the 
general public." 

Cancellations — Insurance firms 
can arbitrarily cancel insurance pol- 
icies and the motorist, whatever his 
driving record, is helpless. 

Many companies flatly deny in- 
surance to drivers over 65. With a 
cancellation on his record, it makes 
anything short of high-risk insur- 
ance difficult. This is true of young 
people, 16 to 25, who are also driven 
to the high-risk field. 

In Washington State, a special in- 
surance committee of the legislature 
issued a report in December, 1966, 
finding that "cancellation, rejection 
and failure to renew automobile lia- 
bihty insurance present the number 
one problem facing the insurance- 
consuming public today." 

The ipost bizarre cancellation, the 
Senate Subcommittee reports, was 
suffered by a South Carolina man. 
The insurance firm wrote him: "In- 
vestigation reveals that your automo- 
bile coverage was terminated due 
to the circumstances surrounding a 
parking ticket which your wife re- 
ceived recently." 

She had protested the ticket to 
police, saying the meter was broken. 
But she did pay the fine. 

Members of Congress are reacting 
to such arbitrary treatment of motor- 
ists. 

They seem unmoved that the giant 
stock casualty companies are cry- 
ing poverty, claiming that they lost 
$275 million from their auto writ- 
ings in 1965. Actually, they earned 
$850 miUion from their investment 
income. 

Last year was even a more profit- 
able year. Firms made $130 mil- 
lion on auto writing and $900 mil- 
lion on investment. 

Needing help is the policyholder 
and Congress seems determined to 
move in that direction. 



MARCH, 1967 



15 




|ood carpenters 



choose and use the best. In measuring, that's Lufkin. In Lufkin, that's 
LOKmatic®, the only tape rule with both positive locking and controlled 
push-button return. For pride in workmanship and pride in ownership, 
only LOKmatic tape rules offer all of these advantages: 

Lufkin's exclusive flowed-on epoxy coating is the most durable ever 
developed for a tape rule blade. 

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Handsome nameplate doubles as convenient control for automatic 
blade return without whiplash. 

Large modern numbers against a snow-white background give easy 
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On the W7312 illustrated, 10 useful reference tables are printed on 
the back of the blade. 

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HELP WANTED AD 

You Can Save $10,000, 
But It's a fAighty Big But 

WASHINGTON, (PAI)— "Men, 
how would you like to put aside 
a nest egg of upwards of $10,000 
in a single year?" 

That's the kind of a "Help 
Wanted" come-on that no one 
less than Uncle Sam is using in 
an effort to recruit workers with 
all sorts of glowing inducements 
that include "automatic washers 
and driers, high fidelity record 
players, billiard tables and num- 
erous hobby facilities." 

If you think there's a catch in 
it, you're right. The jobs are on 
the fringes of the Arctic Ocean 
where, the Government admits, 
"life can be lonely . . . the weather 
is cold, from 65 to 80 degrees be- 
low zero . . . the winter nights 
are long . . . and, there are no 
women." 

Here's the story: 

The U. S. Weather Bureau has 
28 openings in five Canadian-U. S. 
weather stations in the Arctic. The 
tour of duty at each station is 12 
months except for airstrip con- 
struction mechanics where the 
tour is only six months. The jobs 
pay from $7,068 to $10,927 for 
the year. In addition, there is a 
$200 a month Arctic bonus plus 
an extra $100 a month bonus dur- 
ing the winter months. November 
through February. 

"Expenses?" says the Weather 
Bureau, adding, "What can you 
spend on a frozen tundra?" 

Of course, the Weather Bureau 
puts its best foot forward, too. 

"Accommodations," it says, "are 
made as comfortable as possible. 
The bachelor quarters in special- 
ly-constructed polar buildings in- 
clude a bed, desk, wardrobe and 
chair in individual carpeted 
rooms. First quality prepared food 
is supplemented during the year 
with fresh meat and vegetable." 

The kind of help the Weather 
Bureau wants includes executive 
officers, meteorological techni- 
cians, electronic technicians, ma- 
chinery maintenance mechanics, 
airstrip construction mechanics 
and cooks. 

All qualified men who don't 
mind the cold and want to save 
that $10,000 in a year are told to 
apply to the Personnel Depart- 
ment of the Environmental 
Science Services Department of 
the Washington Science Center, 
Rockville, Maryland, 20852. 

The next group will leave for 
the Arctic in April. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




It Was 'Twenty-three Skidoo' When Gilbert 
Dropped His Plumb Line Over the Side 



When 

skyscrapers 

were 'a menace 

to life 
and property' 





The 

'TSMAN'S 
-EGACY 



■ In 1913, a farm boy who made 
a fortune amassing nickels and dimes 
converted $13,500,000 of his small 
change into the world's tallest 
building. 

The 60-story Gothic tower that 
F. W. Woolworth built on lower 
Broadway in New York was hailed 
as a "Cathedral of Commerce." 
Woolworth himself thought of it 
more practically — a "sky sign" to 
advertising his five -and -ten -cent 
stores. 

The ornate building — with Gothic 
details such as gargoyles and pin- 
nacles — set an architectural pattern 
that was, one critic said, to convert 
Manhattan into "Nineveh and Baby- 
lon piled on Imperial Rome." 

Though other skyscrapers have 
surpassed the Woolworth Building 
in height, it remains an impressive 
sight, the National Geographic So- 
ciety says. The National Park Serv- 
ice recently made the structure a 
National Historic Landmark. 

Woolworth decided to put up his 
building after the Metropolitan In- 
surance Company refused him a 
loan. At that time, the 700-foot 
Metropolitan Tower was the tallest 
building in the world. The dime- 
store tycoon was determined to put 
it in the shade, according to archi- 
tect Cass Gilbert, who designed the 
Woolworth Building. 



Woolworth paid for a survey to 
determine the exact height of the 
Metropolitan Tower, then ordered 
Gilbert to exceed it. He did — by 
92 feet. 

The Woolworth Building was 
erected only 24 years after New 
York's first real skyscraper, the 13- 
story Tower Building. The public 
had confidently expected the Tower 
to blow over in the first strong gale. 

On a Sunday morning when the 
Tower Building was almost com- 
plete, a fierce wind rose. Bradford 
Lee Gilbert, the architect, rushed to 
his project and climbed workmen's 
ladders to the top. 

A large crowd watched as Gilbert 
crawled along the scafliolding on the 
13th floor. He dropped a plumb 
line; there was not the slightest vi- 
bration. The jubilant architect stood 
up and waved his hat. The wind 
caught him and nearly blew him off 
the scaffold, but he managed to 
clutch a rope. 

Meanwhile, other skyscrapers 
were rising in New York. The Flat- 
iron Building, 21 stories tall and 
looking like "an ocean steamer with 
all Broadway in tow," was pictured 
on countless postcards and souvenirs 
after in was completed in 1902. The 
expression "twenty-three skiddoo" 
supposedly originated from police- 
Continued on page 28 




Materials We Work With 



Three elder sfafesnieii of the skyscraper fraternity are, from the left, the Woolworth 
Building, the Flatiron Building, and the Empire State Building, all located in the land 
of skyscrapers. New York City. Empire State is still world's tallest building. 



MARCH, 1967 



17 



#FG16 HAMMER 

$C89 




New True Temper 
Extra-Strength 
Fiberglass Hammers 

They put more power in your swing, 
are easier on the muscles. True Temper 
full-length fiberglass handles are extra 
strong, extra solid. Why? 1,070,592 
continuous strands of fiberglass are 
bonded together with high-strength 
epoxy resin. Become even stronger in 
colder temperatures.They're noncorrosive, 
nonconductive. And each with famous 
True Temper cushion grip. Heat-treated 
forged-steel heads permanently bonded 
to the handles. Striking? You bet. Pick up 
your favorite model wherever you buy tools. 

'Manufacturer's suggested retail price 

You'll be glad you bought the best ' 



I RUE I EM PER 

LEADING MAKER OF ACTION PRODUCTS 



©■ 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



HOME STUDY COURSE 




BLUEPRINT READING, UNIT X 



This unit is a confinuafion of the previous lesson. It will 
require the same close scrutiny of the plans and speci- 
fications. The detailing of a complete list of materials 
required for the building to be constructed is a task that 
can best be performed by a craftsman who has a work- 
ing knowledge of the work processes. 

The answer you derive from your estimation should be 
a close approximation of the correct answer, although a 
reasonable amount of variation is acceptable. 

Make a complete list of the interior and exterior trim 
required for this home; omit all stairways and all cabinets. 
Estimate the cost of the material using the quoted prices. 
Realizing that material costs vary throughout the country, 
we have assembled the following price list for use in your 
estimate: 

2'/4"T&G Select white oak 

floor $ 485.00 per M- 

Red cedar heart wood 

shingles 20.00 per square 

(See Note 1.) 

Wood overhead garage door 105.00 

l"x4" T&G white pine 525.00 per M 

l"xlO" ship lap white pine 220.00 per M 
l"xlO" bevel siding white 

pine 425.00 per M 

l"xlO" S4S white pine 190.00 per M 

2"x8" S4S white pine 150.00 per M 

Shutters white pine 10.00 per pair 

Moulding white pine .OTVi per lin. foot 

(See Note 2.) 

Moulding birch .20 per lin. foot 

Solid birch 750.00 per M 

Moulding walnut .40 per lin. foot 

Solid walnut 1350.00 per M 

Vz " walnut plywood 1 .00 per square foot 

Door openings, including 

door, jamb and casing . . 27.50 each 
=' M indicates per 1,000 board ft. 

NOTE 1. A square is a term used for roof area. It is a 
surface area of 10' x 10' or 100 square feet of area. Sur- 
face area of roofs is designated by squares. Materials 
used for roof application are normally computed in terms 
of the number, or fraction, of a square it will cover when 
applied as directed. 

NOTE 2. The price of moulding is listed as a per foot 
cost, or in terms of cost, for 100 lineal feet, i.e.. l^'z^ 
(1 .5() per lineal foot could also be identified as $7.50 C 
($7.50 for 100 lineal feet). 

The following explanations will be helpful to you in 
"taking off" the interior and exterior trim materials: 

Finish Wood Floor— After computing the amount of 
actual square footage needed you must add 25% as a 
waste allowance. 



Base and Mouldings— When estimating base, use the 
perimeter of the room as if there were no doors or other 
openings; this should provide sufficient material. This 
system allows for cutting, fitting and "end of stock" waste. 
One price for moulding is listed on the price list, by 
using this figure, which is an average price for all the 
different types of moulding, your cost will average out. 
The price of moulding varies with the design, height and 
material that is used. 

Siding— You should estimate the material needed for the 
walls as though the walls were solid, ignoring any open- 
ings such as windows, etc., on the plans. 

This house has 1" x 10" bevel siding with an eight inch 
exposure so you must add 20% for the 2" lap, i.e., con- 
sider that only 8" will be used for actual surface coverage. 

For ship lap siding, add 15%. 

Wood Ceilings— Add 15% to the actual amount of area 
to be covered. 

Window Trim— You should use even feet when estimat- 
ing window trim. This wilf permit sufficient allowance 
for cutting and fitting. 

Doors and Door Trim— Estimate the cost at a given 
amount per opening, as indicated on the price list, regard- 
less of whether it has a door or not. Some openings will 
have two doors and others have none at all, so this system 
will tend to balance out the cost and give a reasonable 
average. 

Roofing— By taking the actual roof to be covered and 
dividing it by squares you know how much roofing will 
be needed. (1 sq. = 100 sq. ft.) 

Answers to Problems are on page 21. 




MARCH, 1967 



19 



£^ 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at Box 508, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



■ Successful Surfer 

Joseph G. Fow of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut, longtime member of Local 260, 
can look back on 50 years of surf 
fishing, prime target being the striper, 
probably the most sought after su-rf and 
sea-run gamester that is common to both 
the Atlantic and Pacific coast. 




Here's a pic of Joseph G. Fow with 
a 46'/^ -pound striped bass taken from 
the surf off Highland Light, Cape Cod 
area. Says Brother Fow: 

"Dear Fred: 

"I've never seen anything about Local 
260 members, so I thought I'd send in 
a pic of one of the many stripers I've 
taken from the surf out of Cape Cod 
near Highland Light. The beaches here 
are wide and the heavy ground swells 
make it an ideal place to surf cast. If 
you do happen to tie into one of these 
lunkers, there's plenty of room for foot- 
work. 

"The bull bass show up in late May 
and early June and after a slow summer 
are back again, strong, during September 
and the first half of October. 

"I enjoy reading about the exploits 
of fellow members of the Carpenters' 
Union over the U. S. and Canada." 



■ White Woodchuck 

Recent addition 
to pic and notes on 
shooting of al- 
bino animals 
comes from 
Vaughn Dexter of 
Van Castle, Pa. 
Vaughn downed a 
snow-white, pink- 
eyed, bushy-tailed, 
albino woodchuck 
with his .22 caliber 
rifle near Pulaski, 
Penns y I v a n i a . 
Here's a pic of 
Dexter with his 
furry prize. 

■ Halibut Hullabaloo 

T. E. Gooden of Fresno, California, 




701, recalls that a 
finster, a halibut 



a member of Local 
recent deep-sea 
he caught, fought 
harder in the boat 
than in the salt- 
chuck. He .said: 
"When we got him 
in the boat, he 
fought like a wild 
pig. I thought he 
was going over the 
side and me with 
him for a while 
there." 

In answer to 
Gooden's question, 
and others we've 
had on the subject, 
be it known that 
the largest halibut 
are taken from the 
east coast briny. 
Granted some halibut up to and over 
a hundred pounds have been nipped 
from the Pacific depths but the largest 
halibut we've heard tell about was 
taken in the Atlantic by Herbie Dubois 
of Southington, Massachusetts in April. 
Fishing from a party boat off Rockport, 
Massachusetts, off the tip of Cape Ann, 
he tied into, and successfully boated, a 
240 pounder. Although there are no 




official sport-caught records kept on 
halibut, we're fairly sure that Dubois 
can lay claim to catching the "lunker of 
lunkers" for this species. Anybody care 
to challenge it? Just for the record, 
Herbie used sea clam for bait, was rigged 
with 40-lb. test line and fishing in 
water approximately 180 ft. deep. It 
took him 35 minutes to bring the 
whopper close enough to gaff. 




■ Reaping the Rye 

A tip of the column topper to Charles 
Johnson of Springfield, Vermont. Con- 
cerned about the meager winter food 
supply predicted for the state's deer herd, 
he carried out a one-man conservation 
drive to remedy the situation. Johnson, 
a grocerman, passed out many a pocket- 
full of rye seed to his customers who 
agreed to sow it on their next junket to 
the woods. He said the rye springs up in 
about a week and stays green all winter. 
Venison on rye! 

■ Pot Shots, Short Casts 

• Bill Petrilas of New Haven, Con- 
necticut, a member of Local 79, bucks 
the wild winter seas out of Block Island 
off Rhode Island on the good craft "Mi- 
Joy." Recent junket netted a 45-lb. cod, 
taken in 100 feet of water. 

• Frank Miller of St. Louis, Missouri, 
a member of Local 5, was getting a little 
nervous this past year but he finally 
scored on the last day of the season with 
a 10-pointer, one hour before the shoot- 
ing curtain fell. The moose-like buck 
dressed out at 190 pounds. 

• Burl Carter and Raymond Peak of 
Lineville, Alabama, downed bucks, 
largest being an eight pointer, not too 
far from their cabin doors. Both are 
members of Local 225, Atlanta, Georgia. 

• Emil Pikel of Reedsburg, Wiscon- 
sin, a member of Local 2334, tempts 
fate each time he goes angling with light 
tackle. Recent catch on fly tackle was 
a 10-lb. northern pike. 

• Chalk up an outstanding catch for 
Larry Ritter of Apopka, Florida — a 7- 
ft., 7-in. sailfish, off Riviera Beach. 
Larry's a member of Local 1765. 

• P. V. Kuhn of Tacoma, Washing- 
ton, a member of Local 470, eased a 
50-lb. halibut from the bay just out of 
Tacoma. 

• A. D. Scott of Houston, Pa., a 
member of Local 1441 at Canonsburg, 
recommends a powerful, fast, small- 
caliber riflfe for chucks. He uses a 222 
Remington which he converted from a 
.22 Hornet. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



• Albert L. Lunbeck of Grants Pass, 
Oregon, a member of Local 3009. now 
retired, recalls a lifetime of fishing thrills, 
top thrill being the day he nipped a 25- 
Ib. Chinook from the Rogue River near 
his home. 



■ Beaver Trapper 

Tom Shamberger of Brackney, Pa., 
is an avid cat-and-coon hunter and 
proud of his well-kept hounds which 
accompany him on all his sortees. 
He's also trapped his share of "paddle- 
tails," and his success in this pursuit, ac- 
cording to wife Kay, has earned him 
the appropriate nickname of "Beaver." 
"Beaver of beavers" for Tom, thus far, 
is a monster that tipped the scales at 61 
pounds. 



■ Patient Stalker 

Tom Collins of Oceanside, California, 
is a patient stalker: has to be because of 
the close-shot equipment he uses — bow 
and arrow. He hunts the wild pigs and 
Spanish goats, progeny race of former 
domestic animals, long since abandoned 
by the former inhabitants of Catalina 
Island off the California coast. Largest 
goat downed, sported a horn spread of 
18 inches, and top pig was a brute that 
dressed out at 65 pounds. He nailed 'em 
with a 55-lb. bow. 



Answers for 




Blueprint Reading, Unit X 


See Page 19 




367 lin. ft. of walnut 




moulding $ 


146.80 


470 sq. ft. of walnut 




plywood 


470.00 


3167 1in. ft. of birch 




moulding 


633.40 


58 bd. ft. solid birch . . . 


43.50 


1000 lin. ft. white pine 




moulding 


75.00 


577 bd. ft. I"xl0" ship lap 




white pine 


126.94 


2302.92 bd. ft. I"xl0" bevel | 


white pine 


978.74 


153bd. ft. l"xl0"S4S 




white pine 


29.07 


364 bd. ft. 2"x8" S4S white 




pine 


54.60 


1063 bd. ft. I"x4" T&G 




white pine 


558.08 


13Vi pairs of white pine 




shutters 


135.00 


38 door openings 1,045.00 | 


1 wood garage door .... 


105.00 


l,790bd. ft. white oak 




floor 


868.15 


24 lin. ft. oak clothes pole 


at 25^ per foot 


6.00 


3214 squares of red cedar 




shingles , 


645.00 




TOTAL $5,920.36 




These 



FREE BLUE PRINTS 

have started thousands toward 

BETTER PAY AND PROMOTION 



That's right! In all fifty states, men who 
sent for these free blue prints are today 
enjoying big success as foremen,, superin- 
tendents and building contractors. They've 
landed these higher-paying jobs because they 
learned to read blue prints and mastered 
the practical details of construction. Now 
CTC home-study training in building offers 
you the same money-making opportunity. 

LEARN IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

As you know, the ability to read blue prints 
completely and accurately determines to a 
great extent how far you can go in building. 
What's more, you can learn plan reading 
simply and easily with the Chicago Tech 
system of spare-time training in your own 
home. You also learn all phases of building, 
prepare yourself to run the job from start 
to finish. 



CASH IN ON YOUR EXPERIENCE 

For over 57 years, building tradesmen and 
beginners alike have won higher pay with 
the knowledge gained from Chicago Tech's 
program in blue print reading, estimating, 
foremanship and contracting. Through step- 
by-step instruction, using actual blue prints 
and real specifications of modern, up-to-date 
buildings, you get a practical working 
knowledge of every building detail — a 
thorough understanding of every craft. And 
as a carpenter or apprentice, you already 
have valuable experience that may let you 
move up to foreman even before you com- 
plete your training. 

Don't waste a single day. Start preparing 
right now to take over a better job, increase 
your paycheck and command greater respect 
as the "boss" on the job. Find out about 
Chicago Tech's get-ahead training in build- 
ing. Send for your free blue prints and trial 
lesson — today! Approved for Veterans. 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

C-139 TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



FREE 

BLUE PRINTS 

AND 
TRIAL LESSON 

Send for your free trial lesson 
now. You'll agree that this 
training is simple yet practical — 
your surest way to promotion 
and increased income in build- 
ing. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



r- 



Chicago Technical College 

C-139 Tech Bidg., 2000 S. Michigan 

Chicago, Illinois 60616 



New G.I. Bill! 
Vets check here 



are I 1 1 



Please mail me Free Trial Lesson, Blueprints and Catalog-. 
Nam e Age 



Address^ 
City 



_State_ 



_2ip_ 



Occupation^. 



Accredited Member National Home Study Council 



MARCH, 1967 



21 



STAIRWAY 

CONSTRUCTION 
MADE EASY 




With the aid of the 

STArRWAY CONSTRUCTION 
HANDBOOK 

It gives you complete, detailed, easy-to- 
follow instructions on how to lay out, meas- 
ure and cut for a more perfect stairway. 

With illustrations, photos and plain lan- 
guage, you are shown the method that years 
of experience has proven the -fastest, most 
practical and efficient. 

Even with no previous experience, this 
step-by-step method will enable anyone to 
build a good stairway the first time and 
every time. Increase your skill and self-con- 
fidence now. 

Convenient pocket size, plastic bound 
— lays flat open, 16 pages of pictures. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 
$2.50 postpaid Washingtonians add 4% 

DOUGLAS FUGITT 

I 1347 N.E. 124th St., Kirkland, Wash. 98033 



Send Sta 
Enclosed 


ORDER TODAY 

rway Construction Handboolc. 

is $2.50 n Check n M.O. 




City 






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LAY OUT PERFECT RARERS EASILY 

with the RAFT-EZ TEMPLATE 

• Save Money & Material — Time saved on one 
job pays for Itself. 

• Accurate — Eliminate errors of older methods. 

• Simple — One setting of RAFT-EZ and two 
measurements marks out complete rafter. 

• Ends Guesswork — Rafter chart gives e>:act 
lenglhs. 

• Sets Correct Depth of Seat Cuts Automati- 
cally. 

• Marks All Cuts for 2x4 & 2x6 Rafters. 

• Adjusts to 13 Roof Pitches— 3-12 thru 9-12. 

• Rustproof — Tempered aluminum. 

• Simple Instructions Included. 

Priced at only $4.95 

Send check or money order for postpaid ship- 
ment. (Canada price is $5.45 U.S. Funds.) 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

NELSON INDUSTRIES 

1050 Magnolia Lane N. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55427 



Wm 



FLOOR LEVELING ITEM 




Timber Engineering Company (TECO) 
has developed a prototype floor leveling 
device as a result of the firm's participa- 
tion in a New York City urban rehabili- 
tation project involving apartment build- 
ings over 60 years old. TECO engineers 
were requested by the U. S. Forest Serv- 
ice and Federal Housing Administration 
to study installation of new floors on top 
of existing floors. Since in some instances 
floors had sagged as much as eight inches, 
there was a need for some method of 
leveling. 

Methods previously used to level floors 
have involved cutting and placing indi- 
vidual shims under strip flooring. This 
has proved to be not only time consum- 
ing but somewhat unsatisfactory from a 
long term performance standpoint since 
there can never be complete assurance 
that shims will be properly made and 
placed. TECO's answer to the problem 
has come in the form of a special V- 
formed device manufactured from 22 
gauge steel. Ribbing is incorporated in 
the part for extra strength. Application 
procedures call for the device to be nailed 
to 2x3 wood sleepers (or screeds) every 
36". These sleepers are then placed 24" 
apart over the existing floor. The angle of 
the "V" is adjusted to accommodate the 
degree of sag in the floor. Two "tabs" or 
"feet" extend from the bottom of the "V" 
and are nailed to the existing floor. After 
the leveling device has been fully nailed 
to the sleepers and the floor, plywood 
subfloooring is laid on top. 

Tests conducted by TECO and certified 
by the National Association of Home 
Builders Research Institute Laboratory 
show that the Floor/Level/Support will 



carry a live load of 40# /square foot. 
Recent New York studies confirm that the 
system can be installed more economic- 
ally than other leveling systems under 
study. 

The TECO leveling device has been 
used in a pilot room in the New York 
City rehabilitation project and is still 
under study for possible use in other 
projects. Since its development, TECO 
engineers have uncovered other applica- 
tions where the product can be used 
either as a leveling device or as a plenum 
support. 

Those desiring more information on 
TECO's leveling device should write 
Timber Engineering Company, 1619 
Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, 
D. C. 20036. 

SLAB SLEEPERS 

Home-buyers often desire the economy 
of concrete slab construction, but wish 
for the warmth and elegance of wood 
floors. For the builder with such a client, 
Potlatch Forests has created Potlatch 
Cushion-Sole Sleepers. 

Cushion - Sole Sleepers are screeds 
which serve as nailers for sub- and finish 
flooring over concrete slab. When prop- 
erly installed 12" on centers above a 
moisture barrier, they substitute for the 
floor-joists used in the more costly 'crawl- 
space' construction. 

Potlatch Cushion-Sole Sleepers are 
available in widths of 2V2" to 2%"; and 
in 3', 4', 5' and 6' lengths. Thickness is 
1%", synthetic rubber cushions, which 
are 12" apart and impervious to changes 
in temperature and humidity, add %" to 
make the total thickness 2" overall. 

Cushion-Sole Sleepers provide a pleas- 
ant floor resihence and are particularly 
effective in the reduction of noise. They 
are made of kiln-dried Southern Pine and 
penta-treated for extreme durability. 

For information on Potlatch Cushion- 
Sole Sleepers, write to: Potlatch Forests, 
Inc., Bradley-Southern Division, Warren, 
Arkansas. 




22 



THE CARPENTER 



NEW TYPE ANCHOR CLIPS 

A totally new approach to anchoring 
wood to masonry has been developed by 
Anchor Clips. Designed to eliminate trou- 
blesome anchor bolts, clips come in two 
sizes, IV2" for one block and MVi" for 
two block imbedment. Clips can also be 
used to Anchor roof trusses to concrete, 
masonry or wood stud walls. Labor Sav- 
ing Anchor Clips are made of heavy 16 
gauge zinc coated steel. 

Carpenters save time spent locating, 
drilling holes and they can bend nailing 
arms out of the way so wall sections will 
slide freely. Upper arms wrap around 
plates up to 2x8 in size. Lower arms 
engage masonry. Wood plates are secure- 
ly held even after normal shrinkage loos- 
ens bolts. For information, write: 

The Panel-Clip Company, Box 323, 
Farmington, Michigan. 



DRYWALL RADIANT-HEAT 




Two Views of the New Clips 




SHORELINE PILINGS 

Tested protective construction ideas, 
utilizing creosoted wood piling for foun- 
dations of homes and other structures on 
waterways and beaches, are contained in 
a brochure issued by the Tar & Chemical 
Division, Koppers Company, Inc., Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. 15219. 

The booklet is illustrated with photos 
of shore construction where loss of land 
from banks of waterways and around 
foundations has been successfully com- 
batted. Detail drawings for proper instal- 
lation of creosoted wood piling for homes, 
seawalls, groins and bulkheads are in- 
cluded. 




Eacli Rayboard is a self-contained unit. 
The electrical heating cable is embedded 
in the board. The connecting pigtail, 
shown in the illustration, is taped to the 
back of the board for shipping to the job. 

The first single layer radiant-heat dry- 
wall ceiling system, consisting of %" 
gypsum wallboard with electric cables 
embedded in the fireproof gypsum cores, 
has been announced by the Building 
Products Division of National Gypsum 
Company. 

To be marketed under the name "Gold 
Bond Rayboard." the new radiant system 
is installed with simple conventional 
wallboard hanging techniques. No special 
parts or insulated nails are required — 
panels are applied directly to ceiling 
joists and all joints and nail heads are 
finished in the conventional manner, 
ready to receive paint, texture, or wall- 
paper. 

The new system is listed by Under- 
writers Laboratories, Inc. 

Each Rayboard panel is a self-enclosed, 
separate heating unit, yet all panels in a 
room are controlled by a single thermo 
Stat. Each panel is provided at the fac- 
tory with an individual 12-ft. non-heating 
lead and these are connected in parallel 
to a 240-volt circuit during installation. 
This method of connection makes it pos- 
sible to use regular ys-in. gypsum wall- 
board along with the Ys-in. Rayboard 
panels. Thus only the minimum amount 
of heating surface required for any instal- 
lation need be used, and individual sec- 
tions of the heating surface can be placed 
in their most efficient locations. 

With the Rayboard system, immediate 
heat for a room can be provided during 
winter building — even before the wall- 
board joints are finished. The surface 
temperature when in operation is just 
above normal body temperature — approx- 
imately 100°F. 

For further information on Rayboard, 
write National Gypsum Company, Dept. 
RM-1, Gold Bond Building, Buffalo, 
New York. 



UNION CARPENTERS! 

YOU HAVE BEEN 
OVERPAYING YOUR 

INCOME TAX 

YE AR AFTER YEA R! 

NOW YOU CAN SAVE 

HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS 

WITH THE 

ALL NEW 
TAX RETURN KIT 

prepared by expert tax 

attorney and accountant 

for UNION CARPENTERS only! 



WE GUARANTEE j 



WITHOUT this kit your tax bill 
w/ill be hundreds of dollars 
higher than it should be. 

WITH this kit you can keep 
your taxes DOWN! All you have 
to" do is follow the instructions. 



KIT INCLUDES: 

• Clear explanation of your 
SPECIAL TAX BENEFITS 

• Detailed instructions 

• Simplified work sheets 
accepted by internal revenue 

• Sample completed return for 
your guidance 

And all for only $20.00! Which is 
TAX-DEDUCTIBLE! 

IF YOU CAN USE MORE MONEY 

YOU NEED THIS SPECIAL KIT! 

Act now to obtain your kit! 
Mail the coupon below, along 
with your check or money order 

To: Carpenter Tax Kit 
P.O. Box 1040 
Rockville Centre, N.Y. 11571 

Please rush my tax return kit. 
Enclosed is $20.00 D Check U M-0. 
If not completely satisfied, 1 may return 
the kit. 



Name_ 



Address. 

City 

State 



-Zip- 



MARCH, 1967 



23 





SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE SOSSIP, 101 CONST. AVE, N. W. WASH., D. C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT.) 



Teeth in An Old Saw 

It is possible to find a needle in a 
haystack . . . but only it that is where 
the farmer's daughter does her fancy 
work. 

BE A UNION BOOSTER! 

The Answer is "No!" 

Well, doctor, was my operation a 
success? 

Who's a doctor? I'm St. Peter. 

BUY UNION-MADE TOOLS 




Crowding His Luck! 

She: Mother said there are some 
things I shouldn't do before 21! 

He: That's right! I don't like an au- 
dience, either! 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Mammoth Task 

The Peace Corpsman in India woke 
up feeling good. "I feel like doing 
something big and clean today!" he 
said. "Fine," replied his partner. "You 
can wash the elephant!" 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 

Needs A Change? 

A Martian emerged from his UFO 
near Reno, stalked Into one of the 
casinos and started examining the 



slot machines. Just then someone hit 
a jackpot, the machine whirred and 
the coins flooded out. The Martian 
walked over to the one-armed bandit 
and said: "You shouldn't be out with 
a cold like that" 



TODAY'S DUES — 
TOMORROW'S SECURITY 



Room To Improve 

A resort hotel is one where you go 
for a change and a rest but the 
bellboys get the change and the 
hotel gets the rest. 

ALWAYS WORK SAFELY 



Wall-eyed Carps? 

A fisherman dropped his wallet out 
of his boat. A large carp grabbed it 
and tossed it to another carp, who In 
turn tossed it to another and on down 
the line. The fisherman was astounded; 
never before had he seen carp-to-carp 
walleting. 



ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 

Bull's Eye! 

Judge: The witnesses all agree that 
you neither slowed down or tried to 
avoid hitting the pedestrian. 

Driver: I did everything any driver 
could be expected to do; I blew my 
horn and cussed at him! 



This Month's Limerick 

Mr. Fix, quite adept with tools, 

In their care followed all of the rules. 

He'd neither ill-use nor lend 

And his last dime he'd spend . . . 

Tools to him were like valuable jewels! 

— Vernice F. Scott, Rowena, S. Dak. 



Production Line 

Steno: Was it a big wedding? 

Clerk: I'll say It was! I went through 
the line to kiss the bride three times 
and nobody noticed! 

BE UNION — BUY LABEL 



Fine-Feathered Friend 

Papa robin: "How did that speckled 
egg get in our nest?" 

Mama robin: "I did It for a lark." 

U R THE "U" IN UNION 




Crazy About Her? 

There was a fellow In our town who 
hadn't kissed his wife in three years. 
Then he killed a guy who did! 

REGISTER TO VOTE 

Just Kiddin', Dear! 

A good wife is one who sticks with 
her husband through all the trouble 
he wouldn't have if he hadn't married 
her in the first place. 

UNITED WE STAND 

He Made His Pint! 

A note left for a milk man: "Please 
leave an extra quart of milk today. 
If it rains and spoils this note, please 
don't wake me to see what It said." 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



INVEST 
IN YOURSELF 

FOR PERMANENT 
DIVIDENDS 



HOUSE CARPENTRY 
SIMPLIFIED 

By Nelson L. Burbank. 
Revised by Charles A. Phelps. 

Explains and illustrates— with over 
1100 large -page illustrations — every 
step of house construction. An ideal 
guide for remodelers, it provides full 
information on the most up-to-date 
carpentry materials, equipment, tech- 
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lining the principles and procedures 
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methods, thermal installation, and 
scores of other topics. Includes the 
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leading architects. 8/2x11. 

256 Pages $7.95. 

SIMPLIFIED CARPENTRY 
ESTIMATING 

By J. Douglas Wilson and 
Clell M. Rogers 

How to "take-off" from a set of blue- 
prints and specifications a bill of mate- 
rials for the construction of a frame 
house is clearly explained in this book. 
Rules and shortcut methods for mak- 
ing accurate lists of building materials 
required for a house are described and 
completely illustrated. Simple arith- 
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mating all costs are given step-by- 
step. Methods of cross-checking to 
eliminate mistakes are emphasized. 
Many useful tables are included. 1960. 
304 pp. lUus. 5x7?i. Cloth. $4.25. 

MAIL THIS COUPON 

Simmons-Board man Books, Dept. C7 

30 Church Street, New York, N. Y. 10007 

Send me the book(s) checked below with the under- 
standing that if I am not completely satisfied I can 
return them in 10 days for FULL REFUND. 



D SIMPLIFI 
EST 1 MAT 


ED 

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CARPENTRY 


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Name 










City 




.'..Z!p Code.. 


State 


MARCH 


» 


1967 






fefflfflD^aflooDa^ 



?ooo 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 





Chester Hansen, second from left, secretary of the Wis. State Council of Carpenters, 
presents a $1,000 scholarship on behalf of the council to Tom Stanitis, Stout State 
university freshman from Racine. Others at the presentation were, left, Dr. John Jar- 
vis, Stout's vice-president for academic affairs, and Ronald Stadler, council president. 



WINS SCHOLARSHIP — Tom Stanitis, has 
been selected 1966 winner of the $1,000 
scholarship to Stout State university 
awarded annually by the Wisconsin 
State Council of Carpenters. 

Stanitis, who plans to major in in- 
dustrial technology, is enrolled as a 
freshman at Stout State. 

His selection was based upon a written 
proficiency test, oral interviews and 
ratings, by his school, union and em- 
ployer. 

A graduate of the Washington Park 
high school, Racine, he is a member of 
Racine local 91 and is scheduled to 
complete his apprenticeship in about six 
months. 



CHRISTMAS CHEER— Patients of St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital, large Federal insti- 
tution for the mentally ill in Washington, 
D. C, received gifts and a holiday party 
from the members of Ladies Auxiliary 
No. 467. Ruth Sanford, wife of D. C. 
District Council Business Agent Ben San- 
ford, played Santa Claus, and patients 
joined the auxiliary members in trim- 
ming a Christmas tree. There was home- 
made fudge, cookies, cakes, and much 
more. Each patient received a box filled 
with gifts and useful items. As a patient 
played piano, all joined in singing Christ- 
mas carols. 



CENTENARIAN— The drums and can- 
non of the Civil War had hardly stilled 
when Martin Middlefon was born No- 
vember 15, 1865. Seven years later, Madi- 
son Johnson was born, November 3, 1872. 
Both men, veteran Negro members of the 
Brotherhood, were recently presented with 
their 50-year pins by their home local, 
No. 159, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Brother Middleton, who joined the 
Brotherhood on May 27, 1912, is shown 
in accompanying picture as he was pre- 
sented his pin by Southern States Director 
James A. Parker and Local 159 Business 
Agent R. O. Fine. 

Brother Johnson, who was not present 
when the picture was taken, joined the 
Brotherhood on February 23, 1900. John- 
son, still a spry man of 95, was visiting 
in New York at the time. 

25 




The honorees and guests filled the big union hall in Salt Lake Cit>. 



Salt Lake City, Local 184 Honors Longtime Members at Awards Luncheon 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH— On Oc- 
tober 1, 1966, an awards luncheon was 
given by Local 184 of Salt Lake City, 
honoring those with 25 years and longer 
membership in the Brotherhood. The 
luncheon was attended by about 250 
members and their families at the Car- 
penters Hall. 

Brother Charles Nichols, Executive 
Board Member, presented 50-year pins to: 
Melvin Sperry, Joe James, H. O. French. 
F. T. Baysinger, R. H. Hunt and Alex 
Brown. Due to illness the last two men- 
tioned could not be present. Brother 
Nichols was assisted by Howard Pace, 
secretary of Carpenters District Council 
of Utah, and officers of Local 184, name- 
ly Pres. S. L. DiBella, Vice Pres. Arthur 
H. Gordon, Fin. Sec. LeRoy A. Gehring, 
Rec. Sec. Wallis Rosenlof, Treasurer John 
E. Bonner, and Warden Francis Rudd. 

In all, 137 pins and certificates were 
awarded to: J. W. Askee, J. V. Day, A. E. 
Gunderson, H. E. Mabey, Oscar Osmund- 
sen, Erick Pearson, John Polencheck, 
Sam James, Charles Odor and Henry 
Peterson, all over-40-year members. 

William Behr, Martin Boogaard, Lester 
Brough, Rudy Christensen, George Eard- 
ley, William H. Bennett, Arthur Allen, 
A. B. Emmertson, H. S. Hansen, George 
Hartman, Mark Hepner, Edwin C. Ink- 
ley, R. W. Jack, Stanley Jensen, Barney 
Johnson, William Keil, Carl Lange, 
Henry V. Larsen, Morris C. Larsen, 



Lamar Little, Lawrence Loder, Severn 
Loder, Maurice Lyman, George Mabey, 
Bert L. Martin, Parley McKenzie, Alfred 
McPhie, J. G. Mjaseth, W. E. Newcomer, 
George Nichols, Erik A. Persson, T. C. 
Punshon, Willard Ranch, Carl O. Swan- 
son, Roy E. Yaylor, J. H. Tucker. Fred- 
erick O. Uhlig. Joseph Vaughn, Leroy 
Welling, Leonard F. Wendel, Leonard 
M. Wendel. George Wharton, and Ernest 
O. Will, all over 30 year members. 

Edwin H. Aamodt, Lester Allen, J. Lee 
Anderson, H. L. Ashby, Royal Atwood, 
Henry Bell, A. E. Blanka, H. J. Boettcher, 
H. K. Bohn, A. R. Burke, Owen Busen- 
bark, Adolph Case, W. E. Conger, Ervin 
W. Cox, Leroy Curtis, Delos Dahle, A. J. 
Dittman, Owen Ellis, Gilman Fikstad, 
Allen Frost, Lee Gibson, Delwyn E. Goff, 
Glenn E. Goff, Lawrence Goff, Harry 
Greaves, Dale Grow, Pratt Hawkes, J. M. 
Hess, Irvin Hirsch, Richard Hoffman, 
Alton Huff, Otto Janke, Archie Jeffries, 
Herman Jensen, Leo D. Jensen, Orson 
Jensen, Farrel Johnson, J. F. Johnson, 
Lionel Lecheminant, Merrill Leetham, 
Thomas Liddard, James Linde, John Mc- 
Allister, Frank McDowell, Douglas Mac- 
Calmon, William J. Mann, Cornelius 
Meyer, Emil Neilson, E. Nelson, Orris 
Petersen, Andrew Peterson, Alfred Ray, 
Robert Reinertsen, Frank Rigler, Joe Rig- 
ler, Sidney Roberg, Howard L. Rushton, 
Harold Sanders, James Sarria, Wilford B. 
Schulze, Durward V. Scott, Lawrence 



Shepherd, Mack A. Slye, John Smit, 
Richard M. Sperry, Herman Spilker, Wil- 
helm B. Stoll, F. L. Stuart, Sverre Swen- 
son, Leo T. Tew, Arthur Thompson, 
Peter Tonneson, W. A. Vanderlinden, 
Fred N. Wells, Francis Wilcox, Earl J. 
WiUiams, George Williams, and Joseph 
H. Wilson, all over 25 year members. 

The Awards Committee for this affair 
was composed of the following members: 
Kendall B. Fisher, Chairman: Calvert 
Wagner, Lavor LeCheminant, LeRoy H. 
Gehring, and Arthur Gordon, and they 
performed an outstanding job. 

Carpenters Auxiliary 218 prepared and 
served luncheon and decorated the hall. 

Brother Nichols gave a short address 
extolling the faithfulness and pride these 
honored members had displayed and con- 
tributed to the success of Local 184 in 
its long and faithful career. 



Attend your local union 
meetings regularly. Be an 
active member of the Broth- 
erhood. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



San Diego Ladies' 40th Decade 




SAN DIEGO, CALIF. — Ladies Auxiliary No. 170, sponsored by Carpenters Local 
1571, San Diego, celebrated its 40th anniversary on November 12, 1966. The Auxiliary 
was the first to receive a charter in San Diego and still remains largest and most active. 
Cutting the cake for the happy aifair was Mrs. Sam Pitts, president, assisted by Mrs. 
Louis Lindeman, vice president. Other officers are Mrs. Floyd Cain, secretary; Mrs. 
Wm. Booker, Treasurer; and Mrs. Clarence Montgomerj', a charter member. 



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MARCH, 1967 



27 



Veteran Members Get Yuletide Pins 




NORFOLK, VA. — 1690 Years of Membership in Carpenters Local 331 is represented 
in this picture as veteran members receive awards at the Union's annual Christmas 
party held at the Golden Triangle in Norfolli. They are: Lee Chambers (27 years), 
Adelard LeBIanc (26 years), Business Agent Kenenth E. Browne (26 years), Ira W._ 
Wear (25 years). International Representative James Bailey, L. C. McClannan (25 
years). International Executive Board member Raleigh Rajoppi (who presented the 
pins), O. C. Moore (46 years), 331 President J. S. Foster, Wilbur Prescott (26 years). 
Burns P. Smith (28 years). Fred E. Wright (47 years), C. W. Swope (26 years), Roy 
S. Denton (25 years), C. L. Davis (31 years), W. R. Daughtry (44 years), and A. 3. 
Filyaw (41 years). 

Unable to attend were: P. A. Brooks (39 years), D. E. Cameron (33 years), Robt. 
L. Craun (26 years), Roy Daughtry (31 years), Guy Derreubacker (46 years), G. L. 
Ellis (33 years), Oscar Erickson (31 years), C. C. Foreman, Sr. (32 years), N. T. Gilbert 
(57 years), Thos. A. Harris (26 years), O. D. Hartman (47 years), June J. Hayden (25 
years), T. B. Holland (29 years), Garbiel L. Hylton (25 years), J. B. Inabinet (32 years), 
H. L. Jennings (25 years). Enhrd Johnson (25 years), Orval A. Keith (25 years), C. R. 
Kelley (31 years), J. C. Lette (25 years), W. C. Lipscomb (25 years), Walter I. Lore 
(26 years), Robt. Marquis (32 years), M. A. Matson (46 years), Edward Outten (44 
years), C. F. Owens (30 years), A. L. Perkins (43 years), Herbert G. Ramsey (25 years), 
Fred M. Rogers (25 years), J. P. Schragle (25 years), C. W. Smith, Jr. (26 years), F. B. 
Stargardt (31 years), E. A. Thornton (47 years), M. L. Wert (25 years), C. R. White- 
hurst (26 years), H. W. Williamson (26 years), and R. C. Wilson (28 years). 



SKYSCRAPERS 

Continued from page 17 

men shooing loungers away from the 
23rd Street corner of the building. 
One civic leader complained that 
skyscrapers were "a menace to life 
and property" because their weight 
might cause Manhattan Island to 
sink. 

In 1928-29, builders of the Chrys- 
ler Building and 40 Wall Street raced 
to erect the first structure to top the 
Woolworth Building. Construction 
of 40 Wall Street was stopped at 
927 feet when it seemed that the 
Chrysler Building would not exceed 
925 feet. 

But steel workers had been se- 
cretly assembling a spire in the ele- 
vator shaft of the Chrysler Building. 
The hidden pinnacle was hoisted 
through the open top of the building 
to 1,046 feet. 

The Chrysler Building's domi- 
nance lasted only until the Empire 
State Building was completed in 
1931. 



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28 



THE CARPENTER 



Children's Christmas Party in Las Vegas 





,o. 






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LAS VEGAS, NEV. — Children gather around the Christmas tree at Christmas party 
sponsored by Carpenters Auxiliary 597. At extreme left, bending over the youngsters, 
is Joe M. Cordova, Business Representative of Carpenters Local 1780. Each of the 
nearly 500 youngsters attending received a handsome gift chosen from a large selec- 
tion, and a bag of candy and fruit. 




WESTERN BAND played for dancing following the Carpenters Auxiliary Children's 
Christmas party held on Saturday evening, December 17th. Youngster on left is 
grandson of Member Orene Johnson and in striped coat is Red Wellman's son. Car- 
penters playing in band were George Moore, Red Johnson, Red Roybol, and Jake 
Romo. Auxiliary Member Judy Truax sang some numbers with the group. 




COMMITTEE FOR CHILDREN'S PARTY, left to right, standing: Al Benedetti, 
Chairman for Carpenters Local 1780; Tom Truax, Al Thompson, Mac Morris, Roy 
Liston, and Nadine Gemmer. Seated are: Dolly Powers; Bonnie Thompson, Chairman 
for Auxiliary 597; Opal Liston; and Loretta Benson. Entertainment to begin the 
evening's festivities was Mr. and Mrs. Marty Morfenson, a piano and trumpet duo, 
and Pat's School of Music whose thirty accordionists, ranging in age from seven to 
sixteen, played and sang to the delight of both old and young guests. They sparked 
the program by gaining audience participation in several favorite vocal numbers. 



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Service To Arizona J AC 




Left to right, are 
Earl Kropp, coor- 
dinator, Flagstaff 
Carpenters' JAC; 
C. P. Hanna; and 
E. J. Wasielewski, 
contractor and 
chairman of the 
Arizona Carpen- 
ters Apprenticeship 
Committee. 



PHOENIX, ARIZ. — At a recent meeting of the Arizona 
Carpenters Apprenticeship Committee, a presentation was 
made by Earl Kropp to C. P. Hanna of a Merit Certificate 
issued by the Arizona Apprenticeship Council. 

Mr. Hanna, who has lived in the Flagstaff Area for more 
than 60 years, was, until recently, the financial secretary for 
Local No. 1100, Flagstaff, and served in that capacity for 45 
years. 

The presentation was made in recognition of his service as 
an employee member of the Flagstaff Carpenters' JAC for 
the past ten years. 



Tucson Supports Typos 



William M. Sheehy, 
Sr., financial sec- 
retary of Local 
857, presents two 
$100 bills to the 
Tucson Typograph- 
ical Union's presi- 
dent. Jack Gridley, 
as free-will dona- 
tions in support of 
their strike. Abe 
Terrance of the 
strikers looks on. 



TUCSON, ARIZ.— Tucson Typographical Union No. 465 
has been on strike against the local Star-Citizen newspaper 
since last October, because of the employer's refusal to con- 
tinue negotiations. On Saturday, February 4, a mass rally 
was held at the struck plant. More than 400 individuals 
walked as pickets, not as members of any local union but as 
private citizens. It was a wonderful display of unionism, 
according to Carpenters' Local 857 Financial Secretary Wil- 
liam Sheehy, Sr. As the picture above shows. Local 857 also 
aided the strikers financially. 



Honest Iowa Carpenters 

DAVENPORT, la. — Robert McClimon and George Rafferty, 
members of Carpenters' Local 4, Davenport, were doing 
remodeling work in the operating room of Mercy Hospital. 
As they walked across the hospital parking lot to the job, 
they saw an envelope deep in a snow bank, pulled it out, 
and discovered $1,600 in cash and checks. They turned the 
envelope over to the hospital's chief engineer and the money 
was soon returned to its owner . . . who, needless to say, 
was high in his praise of the members' honesty. 




30 



THE CARPENTER 



San Francisco Piledrivers Annual Get-Together 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. — On Januarj 11th Piledrivers Local No. 34 held its annual Old 1 inters Luncheon, which brought 
together well over 100 retired members of the local. Local 34 has seven members with over 50 years membership, one with 
63 years membership, and one with 66 years membership. Clarence Briggs, International Representative, was guest speaker. The 
annual affair has become a tradition of the local and is looked forward to and immensely enjoyed by those who attend. 





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MARCH, 1967 



31 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




(1) AUGUSTA, GEORGIA— Local 283, 
recently presented membership buttons to 
men with 25 or more years service. Sit- 
ting, from left to right: H. M. Mont- 
gomery, J. R. Smith, D. R. Reeves, W. 
A. McAIhaney. Standing, from left to 
right: W. H. Arnold, John M. Craft, W. 
W. Toole, W. L. Templeton, E. B. Ivey, 
and B. J. Toole. Those unable to attend 
were later presented their 25 year mem- 
bership buttons. They were: H. C. Ayers, 
E. F. Benson, Edward Bniggeman, Fred 
W. Holley, John B. Holman, W. R. 
Newman, and A. K. Neal. 



(2) TEXARKANA, TEXAS— Local 379 
recently held a banquet to honor its mem- 
bers with 25 or more years' membership. 
Each of these members represent over a 
quarter century of experience and to- 
gether the total amounts to eight hundred 
and thirteen years. Guest speaker was 
J. O. Mack, member of the General Ex- 
ecutive Board. Listed from left to right, 
standing: L. J. Turner, W. H. Camp, 
Frank Lumpkin, H. G. Higgins, Charles 
Boyette, H. P. Thrapp, Ralph Kidd, Tom 
Henson, Bill Prather, Gene Holmes, Har- 
rell Thompson, Jack Eakins, and Jack 
Butler, Sr. Seated: M. H. Burnham, Jim 
Wilcox, D. A. Owens, S. A. Prince, F. S. 
Young, M. G. Thompson, Earnest Poag, 
S. A. Jones, Merlin Stockton, and John 
Thrapp, Business Representative, Local 
No. 379. Kneeling: G. L. Smith, Carl 
Johnson, C. A. Stanley, Jesse Bentley, F. 
L. Earhart, J. J. Powell, Recording Sec- 
retary; J. O. Mack, 6th District Represen- 
tative; G. H. Simmons, District Organizer 
of Texas; and C. E. Murdock, President 
of Local No. 379. 



(3) SOUTH NORWALK, CONN.— Vet- 
eran members of Local 746 were honored 
at the local's 75th anniversary celebra- 
tion when they were presented 25- and 
50-year pins. In photo at the botton of the 
page are the 50 year members. Left to 
right: Raymond J. DeRosa, Business 
Rep., who assisted in the presentation; 
Henry Woods; Fred Gandrup; Archie 
Johnson; Halbert Amundsen; William 
Byxbee, president of Local 746, who 
made the presentations. In the other 
photo are the 25 year members. Left to 
right: Herbert Holtz, Charles Busek, 
Stephen Ungvary, Jr., and Frank Lusardo. 





32 



THE CARPENTER 




(4) PARKERSBURG W, VA.— Local 
899 had a Dinner and Dance honoring 
their 60th Anniversary. There were 
twenty-six members present eligible for 
twenty-five year pins, and five with 47 
years continuous membership. Pictured, 
seated from left, are H. D. Hunter, 
Chester Gates, Joe Ewing, E. J. Faus and 
Henry Siers; standing, Joseph Porreca, 
Denzil Rhodes, Earl Smith, Merle Welch, 
Dale Sims, William Moore, Lester Fury 
and George Blankenship. 



(5) BRISTOL, CONN.— Thirteen mem- 
bers of Local 952 were honored at a 
65th Anniversary party which included 
a presentation ceremony for 25 and 50 
year members. Alexander Porrini pre- 
sented pins to, from left (with years of 
membership in parenthesis): Jalmer 
Chellberg (27), Edwin Ed man (28), 
Romeo Perrault (29), Hugo Peters (44), 
Alexander Porrini, Master of Ceremonies, 
Michael J. O'Sullivan (54), Arthur Cabrel 
(30), Carl Larson (28), Henry O'Sullivan 
(28), Rocco Straniari (25). Not present 
to receive their pins were Martin Andrews 
(51), George Keltonic (25), Charles Fries 
(25), and Gunnar Anderson, deceased (29). 



(6) GREENVILLE, PA.— An anniversary 
dinner honoring pension and retired mem- 
bers of Local 1000 was held recently. 
Members receiving pins are, front row, 
left to right: Troy Stuver (40), Byron 
McQueen (50), Fred Boise (50), John 
Rimer (50), and William Wales (40). Back 
row: James L. Oakes, Bus. Rep. of Local 
1000, Neil Hall, President of the Local, 
Milan March, Exec. Sec, Ohio State 
Council of Carpenters. Michael Beckes, 
Exec. Sec. of Mahoning, Trumbull and 
Mercer Co's District Council, and Austin 
Polley, Rec. Sec. of Local 1000. 



(7) ALLENTOWN, PA.— Two longtime 
members of Local 1285 are shown as 
they received their 50-year service pins. 
The two members are Charles Oaler, sec- 
ond from left, and Martin Zanders, sec- 
ond from right. Making the presentations 
are Bus. Rep. Schweyer, left, and Bus. 
Rep. Kuzniak, right. 




MARCH, 1967 



33 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




(8) METROPOLIS, ILLINOIS— Forty-six 
members of Local 803 and their guests 
attended tiie recent 65tli anniversary 
observance of the local union. Forrest 
Moreland, Sr., business agent and finan- 
cial secretary, briefly reviewed the 65-year 
history and growth of the Union, and 
members who have been associated with 
the union for 25 years or longer were 
given special recognition. Shown in the 
photo are, left to right, seated: John 
Sleeter, Arthur Bivins, Robert C. Mc- 
Arter, Ulys Blanchard, Otis Wallace, John 
Pryor and Carl Foss; standing: Lynn 
Schneeman, Alvin Oakes, William Sleeter, 
Luther Anderson, Scott Wallace, William 
I. Anderson, Edgar Huston, B. W. Korte, 
J. H. Bigley, Virgil Schneeman, Quinton 
Powell, O. M. Lindsey, District Business 
Manager William Simms, Earl Schmidt, 
District Business Representative Jack 
Berry and Bus. Agt. Forrest H. More- 
land, Sr. 

(9) MILLTOWN, N.J.— Charles Dunn, a 
60-year member of Local 1006 receives 
his pin at a recent dinner-dance honoring 
members of the local with 25 or more 
years service in the Brotherhood. The 
names of the 105 men who received serv- 
ice pins were read by Bus. Rep. Sewell 
Peckham. 

(10) FORT COLLINS, COLO.— At a 
recent meeting of Local 1340 25-year 
pins were presented to the following 
Brothers: Arthur Peterson, Joseph Cook, 
and Wm. L. Guisinger in the front row 
and in the back row, Willard Gates, Wm. 
Moser, Wm. Wyatt, W. C. Williams. 
Brother Wm. E. Fulks was unable to 
be present. 

(11) MIDLAND, TEXAS— Some of the 
twenty-one members of Local 1428 who 
received 25-year pins at a recent presen- 
tation ceremony are shown with their 
wives. From the left are the M. S. Wares, 
the W. N. Hamiltons, the Eari Bulls', the 
Ulys Barbers, the W. H. Brays, the J. W. 
Paces and Lance Miller. 

(12) PATCHOGUE, LONG ISLAND— 
Local Union 1483 celebrated its 60th 
year as a local union and presented 25 
year pins to the following members: 
Seated, left to right: Charles Froelick, 
Emil Pokomy, Michael Lang, Andrew 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



Pearson, Fred Wahlburg (50 year pin), 
Anthony Scesny, Edward Steinecke, Emil 
Jost. Back row, left to right: President 
Joseph Tracz, Warren Griffin, John E. 
Kiwisile, Leo M. Jendral, Secretary- 
Treasurer of Suffolk County District 
Council, George Babcock, Samuel Sam- 
uelsen, Ralph Kassner, Business Repre- 
sentative, Barney Keefer, General Repre- 
sentative George Welsch, Chairman of 
Dinner Committee, Fred Schorsh, Finan- 
cial Secretary, Edwin L. King, Business 
Representative, George Steenland. Unable 
to attend: Frank McDonald (50 year pin), 
Peter Abrahasen, James Carr, David 
Carter, Helsey Case, Owen Chaytor, An- 
gelo Kelly, Anthony Maschek, John Mc- 
Grevey, Thomas Palladino, Felix Pike, 
Henry Withkamp, Joseph Lotko, Chester 
Rhodes, and Otto Hillenbrand. All re- 
ceived 25-year pins. 

(13) HIBBING, MINN.— The two photos 
over No. 13 were taken last Fall at a 
picnic honoring these members of Local 
1609 with 25-years or more service. The 
photo with the three men are 50-year 
members, from the left, John Oist, Henry 
Lidholm and Alex Carlson. Eligible for 
a pin but not shown is Garfield Larson. 
The 25-year members shown in the other 
photo, from the left, are Anton Rantala, 
32 years; William Lindvall (31), Edward 
Dreis (36), Jacob Edwardson (31), Victor 
Johnson (29), Albert Johnson (31), Harry 
Ricci (26), Gerhart Maki (27), and Arthur 
Koski (31). Not shown but receiving pins 
were Henry Jarvi (27), Eric Rian (31), 
A. W. Hedlund (29), Audley Patterson 
(27), John Hanson (25), Sigvold Kickeby 
(26), Olaf Kirkeby (32). Eino Laino (26), 
Howard Pearson (26) and Rudolph Salmi 
(25). 

(14) BIG SPRING, TEXAS— Brief cere- 
monies were recently held by Local 1634 
to honor a fifty-year member, C. E. 
Shive, and several 25-year members of 
the local union. Shown, left to right 
(seated) are Jess Slipley, Earl Parrish, 
Clarence Shive, M. D. Lightfoot, D. P. 
Day; standing, L. C. Lawdermilk, W. T. 
Boadle, J. E. Parker, Richard Reagan, 
Roy Beck and Johnnie A. Green. 

(15) ONEONTA, N.Y.— Local 1656 re- 
cently held a presentation of 50-year pins 
ceremony and dinner for three 50-year 
members. Brother William Burdick, 
Brother Ernest Schidzsik, and Brother 
Thomas Watson. From left to right in 
the picture are Treasurer Melvin Hasen- 
kamp, Trustee George Bell, Recording 
Secretary Robert Elwood, Brother 
Ernest Schidzsik, Trustee Arthur Bless- 
ing, President Fred Jacobson, Vice Pres- 
ident John Schrull, Brother William 
Burdick, Business Agent Carlton Atkin- 
son, Conductor Rudy Schrull, Brother 
Thomas Watson, Financial Secretary 
Aage Richardson, Warden Stuart Bennett. 

(16) RUSSELLVILLE, ARK. — Shovra 
are some of the 16 or more members 
and their guests who attended a recent 




MARCH, 1967 



35 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




pin presentation of Local 1836. Front 
row: Lear Parker, Jim Hemmer, F. H. 
Powell, John P. Hanson (SO-year pin), 
G. E. Harkey. Standing, left to right: 
Fred Bull, Okla. Rep., M. A. Glenn, 
Allen B. Coleman, Bus. Rep. R. B. Hays, 
Herman Steuber, J. O. Mack, Intl. Rep. 
Cecil Fridell, President J. O. Bates, 
Henry Blalock, C. W. Berry, and S. R. 
Roach. All received 25-year pins except 
John P. Hanson. 

(17) UTICA, N.Y. — At a testimonial 
dinner of Local 125 the following mem- 
bers were presented pins by our General 
Representative Sam Ruggiana, assisted 
by Harold A. Coleman, president of 
Mohawk Valley District Council (seated 
at left) and William Brennan, Business 
Representative, of Local 125 (seated at 
right). William Lubey (seated next to 
Brother Coleman) received a 60-year pin. 
Earl Simpson (seated next to Brother 
Brennan), received a 60-year pin. The 
following 13 members received 25-year 
pins. Second row from left: Lawrence 
Scianni, Nathan Margolin, Sebastain Pen- 
zimer, Ernest Hamilton, Robert Man- 
cuso, Alfred Monopoli, and Tom Ricci. 
Rear row from left: Marion Labritz, 
Frank Paratone, Bernard Ryan, Harry 
Hardy, Fred Darvoc, and Nathan Perl- 
man. Members unable to attend receiving 
pins included George Stein, our oldest 
member, who received a 65-year pin at 
his home. Rocco Laraia, Salvatore Maz- 
zara Sr., Herbert J. Schrader, and Sam 
S'Doia received 25-year pins. 





IN All WAUS OF tlF€,-XOOK FOR THG UNION Lf\UL, 
SHOP CARD, STORE CARD AND SERVIC6 BUTTON 

UNION LABEL AND SERVICE TRADES DEPT.,AFL-CIO 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




IN 



I AM 



L.U. NO. 11, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Ailor, Frank 

L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

DeSantis, Nicholas 
Meeker, Paul 
Schumacher, Edward J. 
Wright, Henry D. 

L.U. NO. 22, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Banford, Ellis 
Caridis, William 
Connelly, William P. 
Cullen, Thomas 
DeSordi, Tony 
Equinoa, Pedro 
Friedman, Harold V. 
Goodrich, Rae J. 
Hansen, Hans 
Herman, A. D. 
Hickey, James E. 
McCool, W. D. 
Maldonado, John R. 
Waldorff, H. E. 
Wall, Frank 
Sandstrom, Carl 
Soules, Charles E. 

L.U. NO. 25, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Anderson, Theodore 
DuOay, George J. 
Gehnert, Mike 
Jackson, Ambrose 
Knapp, Gilbert 
Loquet, Felix 
Newton, E. J. 
Peters, George E. 
Ruddy, Earl J. 
Tipoh, Josep 
Vanderlee, Louis G. 
Young, Daniel C. 

L.U. No. 28, 
MISSOULA, MONT, 

Barney, A. J. 

L.U. NO. 34, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Burton, Joseph 
Clements, William 
Davis, Sam E. 
Dollar, Hugh 
George, Creighan 
Kemp, John 
King, Edward 
Long, J. E. 
Metz, Dave 
Montgomery, Louis 
Morris, Louis 
Oshier, Morris 
Perila, George 
Pettit, Robert 
Rhodes, Glenn G. 
Schwartz, William 
Willis, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 35, 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Joos, Josia 
Sproete, Paul 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Blanton, G. M. 



L.U. NO. 55, 
DENVER, COLO. 

Thomas, George L. 

L.U. NO. 60, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Brown, Ora 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bubik, Anton 

L.U. NO. 67, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Backlund, Carl 
Belyea, Frank 
Campbell, Neil G. 
Crispi, Andrew 
De Leo, Joseph 
Gillis, Stephen 
Langeon, Edmond A. 
McKenna, Leo P. 
McLeod, Kenneth 
Scanlon, C. Joseph 
Sundberge, Mattias A. 
Werner, Carl 
Woodford, Donald 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Clemmer, G. Merrill 
Fisher, Harry E. 

L.U. NO. 107, 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

Blanchard, Emile 
Lamoureux, Russell 
Rosek, Peter 

L.U. NO. Ill, 
LAWRENCE, MASS. 

Matteo, Louis 

L.U. NO. 154, 
KEWANEE, ILL. 

Manthe, Fred H. 

L.U. NO. 183, 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Camp, Z. H. 
McCarron, Edward O. 
Olson, Ragnar 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Bellamy, Wylie 
Smith, M. B. 
Wright, E. F. 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Booth, Walter 
Borne, Edmund 
Ogg, Walter 

L.U. NO. 213, 
HOUSTON, TEX. 

Barrett, Don 
Clem, Vance E. 
Courtney, W. L. 
Elliott, J. M. 
Frisk, Carl 
Helmer, Sam 
Hill, Richard B. 
Hunley, J. H. 
Jackson, Jack 
Knapp, John 
Lem, J. D. 
Martin, H. R. 
Meade, Vernon F. 
Mealy, George A. 
Ogg, T. A. 



Palmer, A. M. 
Shiftman, Max 
Thomas, Walter L. 
Whatley, Glenden E. 
Wood, R. E. 

L.U. NO. 216, 
TORRINGTON, CONN. 

Prince, Paul 
L.U. NO. 241, 
MOLINE, ILL. 

Bjorklund, Peter 
Covemaker, Maurice 
Romme, John P. 

L.U. NO. 252, 
OSHKOSH, WIS. 

Kubiayk, John 
Marmes, Ray 

L.U. NO. 259, 
JACKSON, TENN. 

Barnes, J. L. 
Butler, Robert L. 
Murchison, E. F. 
Overton, T. 1. 
Thomas, Guy 
West, Robert 

L.U. NO. 264, 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Anderson, Christ 
Baumann, Robert 
Beletsky, Walter 
Bieman, Conrad 
Block, Joseph, Jr. 
Caldwell. Malven G. 
Christoph, Nichel 
Hafer, Gustave 
Hansen, John M. 
Horster, John 
Jacobsen, Clarence Jacob 
Jahnke, Lawrence 
Jeske, Frank J. 
Koehler, Henry E. 
Koshnick, Herman 
Krahn. John 
Kraus, John 
Kreutzfeldt, Henry 
Lenz, Fred 
Liedtke, Edwin 
Pearson, Edward 
Popp, Walter 
Ranscht, Roland 
Ritter, John 
Roge, Carl 
Rohde, John 
Rohlfing, William 
Slagowski, Peter 
Smith, Burton 
Solfanelli, Americe 
Tarmann, Jack F. 
Tschury, Frank 
Vorpahl, Ernest G. 

L.U. NO. 274, 
VINCENNES, IND. 
Deluryea, Ed 
Mehyne, William 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N. Y. 
McCaffrey, Henry W. 

L.U. NO. 283, 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Clark, Hugh 
Hobbie, T. F. 
Leverett, Jesse W. 



L.U. NO. 301 
NEWBURGH, N. Y. 
Conklin, Josiah B. 

L.U. NO. 331, 
NORFOLK, VA 

Slater, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 344, 
WAUKESHA, WIS. 

Boyd, Myron 
Endes, Stephen 
Nohelty, William 

L.U. NO. 345, 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Dodson, L. C. 
Gordon, H. B. 
Holt, Sam J. 
Hosey, J. I. 
Jameson, C. S. 
Leslie, William A. 
Reid, C. C. 
Varner, M. B. 

L.U. NO. 349, 
ORANGE, N.J. 

Dunford, William D. 

L.U. NO. 353 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Arbuthnot, John 
Brown, Sam 
Burke, George 

L.U. NO. 355, 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Erb, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Rutherford, James 

L.U. NO. 379, 
TEXARKANA, TEX. 

Henson, Tom 
McDuffie, Bill 

L.U. NO. 470, 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Arneson, Ward 
Bush, W. V. 
Connely, L. J. 
Frost, Everett 
Fuson, Charles W. 
Herren, A. J. 
Meyers, Marvin J. 
Sorenson. James 
Tanner, Henry 

L.U. NO. 490 
PASSAIC, N.J. 

Tomasini, Herman 

L.U. NO. 579, 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Flynn. Alphonsus 

L.U. NO. 610, 

PORT ARTHUR, TEX. 

Dowden, C. B., Jr. 
Hardin, William F. 
LeBlanc, Albert 
Snodgrass, W. W. 

L.U. NO. 746, 
NORWALK, CONN. 

Giroux, Arthur 
Olsen, Henry 

L.U. NO. 762, 
QUINCY, MASS. 

Jacobson, John A. 



Johnston, James N. 
Kilpatrick, George W. 
Oster, Gus 
Vera, Frank 

L.U. NO. 803, 
METROPOLIS, ILL. 

O'Brien, Peter Carl 
O'Brien, William Wallace 

L.U. NO. 946, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Bennett, T. L. 
Brombacker, F. 
Carlson, W. C. 
Crance, Louis 
Evenson, Bert 
Forsyth, C. D. 
Funk, M. J. 
Gibson, John M. 
Karlin, H. 
Keiserman, Joe 
Ketcham, R. C. 
Kimball, Marion R. 
Markwith, A. E. 
Nordin, Fred 
Nordquist, O. P. 
Phillips, Earl 
Spann, J. F. 
Sutherland, George 
Tone, J. A. 

L.U. NO. 1010, 

UNIONTOWN, PA. 
Traft, Clayton B. 

L.U. NO 1042, 
PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. 

Broughton, Royal 
Esposito, John 
Moody, Leon 
Sawyer, Gordon 

L.U. NO. 1055, 
LINCOLN, NEBR. 

Buhrdorf, Verner 
Campbell, James 
Kenny, Thomas F. 
Zacher, Merlin E. 

L.U. NO. 1060. 
NORMAN, OKLA. 

Brenton, Robert 
Clark, Paul 
Pence, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 1065, 
SALEM, OREG. 

Stryker, Hugh M. 
Whetstone, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1089, 
PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

Ellison, Vernon E. 

L.U. NO. 1164, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Barbera, Anthony 
Feinstein, Abraham 
FoUmer, Henry 
Kolln, Karl 
Korb, William 
Moser, Frank 
Plucinski, Stanley 
Rubin, Abraham 
Schaefer, Richard 
Smilowitz, Sam 
Spector, Harry 
Szabo, Andre 
Zack, Joseph 

Continued on page 38 



MARCH, 1967 



37 




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IN MEMORIAM, cont'd 



L.U. NO. 1323, 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Baker, Lawrence 
Burns, Lee A. 

L.U. NO. 1353, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 

Ortiz, Jose H. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Janis, Edward 
Molin, Peter 

L.U. NO. 1394, 
FORT LAUDERDALE, 
FLA. 

Beighton, Arthur V. 
Schwenker, Howard 
Smith, C. B. 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 
N.Y. 

Nelson, Herbert 



L.U. NO. 1419, 
JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Grata, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1423, 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Dyess, William E. 
Kincaid, J. V. 

L.U. NO. 1449, 
LANSING, MICH. 

Fox, Charles, E. 

L.U. NO. 1483, 
PATCHOGUE, N.Y. 

Woodhull, Herbert C. 

L.U. NO. 1507, 

EL MONTE, CALIF. 

Cardy, William 
Hoover, Carl J. 
Olsen, K. J. 

L.U. NO. 1513, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Epstein, Joseph 
Goldman, Joseph 



L.U. NO. 1683, 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

Hudson, Russell 
Linthicum, Max O. 
Warren, Jimmy L. 

L.U. NO. 1777, 
CHEBOYGAN, MICH. 

Fenlon, James 
Hayes, Laurence 
Kiefer, Jacob 

L.U. NO. 1822, 

FORT WORTH, TEX. 

Guest, M. A. 
Wickes, Daniel Noel 

L.U. NO. 1835, 
WATERLOO, IOWA 

Donley, Harley 

L.U. NO. 2117, 
FLUSHING, N.Y. 

Cragwell, Leon 
Konchan, Cyril 
Kuczynski, Stephan 



LAKELAND NEWS 



Joseph Burcal of Local Union 1786, Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home January 
19, 1967. 

Algol E. Johnson of Local Union 94, Providence, R. I., arrived at the Home Janu- 
ary 23, 1967. 

Eldon A. Harritt of Local Union 2633, Tacoma, Wash., arrived at the Home Janu- 
ary 30, 1967. 

John E. Grosse of Local Union 696, Tampa, Fla., passed away Jan. 2, 1967 and 
burial was at Safety Harbor, Fla. 

Eric A. Erickson of Local Union 107, Worcester, Mass., passed away January 7, 
1967. Burial was in Massachusetts. 

Gus Louis Spaht of Local Union 718, Havre, Mont., passed away January 6, 1967 
and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Ludvig Johnson, No. 1, of Local Union 58, Chicago, 111., passed away January 9, 
1967 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Alexander J. Farrant of Local Union 1027, Hudson Falls, N. Y., passed away 
January 8, 1967 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Theodore Nelson of Local Union 993, Miami, Fla., passed away January 21, 1967 
and was buried in Chicago, 111. 

Fred Newstedt of Local Union 58, Chicago, 111., passed away January 25, 1967. 
Burial was in Chicago, 111. 

John E. Hendrickson of Local Union 993, Miami, Fla., passed away January 29, 
1967 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Paul J. Dorchack of Local Union 13, Chicago, 111., passed away January 30, 1967 
and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Joseph Wabrauschek of Local Union 1786, Chicago, 111., withdrew from the Home 
January 5, 1967. 

Chester A. Berry of Local Union 428, Fairmont, West Virginia, withdrew from 
the Home on January 11, 1967. 

Members who visited the Home During January 1967 

Douglas H. Geister. L.U. 116, Plymouth, Mich. 

Louis P. Wasowick, L.U. 39, Dedford Heights, Ohio 

Patrick E. Wisniewski, L.U. 181, Hoffman Est., lU. 

Fred L. Dyson, L.U. 1508, Newark, N. Y. 

E. C. Howe. L.U. 819, Plant City, Florida 

Paul E. Fredrick, L.U. 264, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Ronald W. Reeves, L.U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

William A. Chaplin, L.U. 2159, Cleveland, Ohio 

John Newman, L.U. 287, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Ralph Streby, L.U. 532, Elmira, N. Y., now living Lakeland, Fla. 

Larry Epler. L.U. 145, Pa. 

David Charmers. L.U. 132, Washington, D. C. 

B. Comstock, L.U. 942, Ft. Scott, Kansas 



Continued on Page 39 , 



38 



THE CARPENTER, 



LAKELAND 3^EWS, cont'd- 



L. Jaliano, L.U. 440, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Kenneth Kempley, L.U. 599, Hammond, Ind. 

Olaf Swertson, L.U. 579, Chicago, 111. 

George Gray, L.U. 60, Indianapolis. Ind. 

John Verdet, L.U. 1033, Muskegon, Mich. 

John Shoefstall, L.U. 943, Tulsa, Okla. 

Jess Singley, L.U. 711, Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

Roy E. Lee, L.U. 1590, Edgewater, Md. 

Percy C. Stevens, L.U. 171, Youngstown, Ohio 

Edgar Wise, L.U. 683, Burlington, Vt. 

Robert Martininsen, L.U. 620, Madison, N. J. 

Clarence Holm, L.U. 113, Chesterton, Ind. 

Vincent Fildes, L.U. 1401, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Claude Rice, L.U. 104. Dayton, Ohio 

Elmer Mayers, L.U. 2098, Camden, N. J. 

Dwayne Brown, L.U. 106. Des Moine, Iowa 

Lewis Hesgard, L.U. 599, Hammond, Ind. 

James Ritchie, L.U. 1115. Kent, Conn. 

Steve Breczek, L.U. 10, Chicago, 111. 

Fred Hinze, L.U. 264, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Jack Zeilinga, L.U. 416. Chicago, 111. 

Joseph Fredette, L.U. 40, Winchester, Mass. 

Charles Crickton, L.U. 7, St. Paul, Minn. 

Arthur Ekblorn, L.U. 1456, Morganville, N. J. 

Leonard Zimmerman, L.U. 335, Lansing. Mich. 

Michall Michalina. L.U. 281. Binghamton, N. Y. 

Elmer E. Gallagher, L.U. 377. Alton, 111. 

S. W. Smith, L.U. 2376. Sanford. Fla. 

Robert S. Smith. L.U. 165, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John Brumenschenkel, L.U. 735, Mansfield, Ohio 

Aladar Szabo, L.U. 867. Cleveland. Ohio 

Walter Sudik, L.U. 531. St. Petersburg. Fla. 

Sam Spitale, L.U. 599. Hammond. Ind. 

L. E. Tucker, L.U. 2310, Madisonville, Ky. 

G. E. DeBord. L.U. 1078, Washington 1, D. C. 

Jack Hill, L.U. 183, Peoria, 111. 

Frank Landry, L.U. 1379, Miami, Fla. 

AtweU Posey, L.U. 101 Baltimore, Md. 

Ben Bjarnson, L.U. 101. Baltimore. Md. 

John Phiffer. L.U. 141. Chicago. 111. 

Alex W. Robertson, L.U. 80. Glen Ellyn, 111. 

Raymond Levesque, L.U. 1305. Fall River, Mass. 

Louis Levesque, L.U. 1305, Fall River, Mass. 

Charles Campbell, L.U. 368, Allentown, Pa. 

T. E. Meeks, L.U. 21, Chicago, 111. 

John Mayo, L.U. 15, Hackensack, N. J. 

Vaughn Stains, L.U. 2274, Three Springs, Pa. 

Warren Grimm, L.U. 422, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Nelson Miller, L.U. 377, Alton, 111., now living Sarasota, Fla. 

Frank Ingham, L.U. 200, Columbus, Ohio 

Kenneth Moye, L.U. 1308, Lake Worth, Fla. 

H. E. Morris. L.U. 2024, Miami, Florida 

J. E. Sheppard, L.U. 1509. Miami. Fla. 

D. W. Mercer, L.U. 639. Akron. Ohio 
B. F. Mead, L.U. 1323. California 

E. Rowe, L.U. 200, Columbus. Ohio 
Charles Griffin, L.U. 53, White Plains. N. Y. 
Earl Coughlin, L.U. 608, New York. N. Y. 
John Aigelinger, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Jacob Sherman, L.U. 524, Middletown, N. Y. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Armco Steel 13 

Audel, Theodore 27 

Belsaw (Multi-Duty) 29 

Belsaw (Sharp-All) 39 

Carpenter Tax Kit 23 

Chicago Technical College ... 21 

Eliason Stair Gauge 38 

Estwing Manufacturing 31 

Foley Manufacturing 28 

Fugitt, Douglas 22 

Garlinghouse, L. F 39 

Hydrolevel 38 



Irwin Augur Bit 27 

Lee, H. D 29 

Locksmithing Institute 12 

Lufkin Rule 16 

Nelson Industries 22 

Simmons-Boardman 25 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

True Temper IS 

Union Label and Service 

Trades 36 

Vaughan & Bushnell 31 

Zapart Saw Filer 27 




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MARCH, 1967 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Why Those on Social Security Need o Raise 



President Johnson has proposed that the 90th Con- 
gress increase Social Security benefits for the aged 
by at least 20%. 

This is far short of the 50% hike asked by the 
AFL-CIO at its 1965 convention in San Francisco, 
but it is, as AFL-CIO President George Meany has 
stated, "a substantial down payment." 

For 19 million elderly Americans the monthly So- 
cial Security checks mean the difference between per- 
sonal economic security and the poor house. There 
are few millionaires in the Social Security Club. The 
average single member has a Social Security income of 
less than $1,000 a year; the average couple about 
$1,700. 

Only 15% of those presently retired have any sort 
of private pension income. The other 85 % depend on 
Social Security alone. 

It's true that the figures will change for the better, 
as the years pass. About 30% of the present labor 
force is covered by some sort of private pension ar- 
rangement. In another 15 or 20 years, this will show 
up in the pension statistics. But that will still leave 
70% with nothing but Social Security. 

The plain fact is that the great majority of retirees 
have no income except Social Security and, because 
Social Security benefits are too low, many of them 
are desparately poor. 

Social Security benefits have been raised only twice 
since 1954. The 1958 increase did not even restore 
the buying power lost since 1954. The 1965 increase 
did not restore the buying power lost since 1958. The 
two raises left retirees worse off than they were a 
decade earlier. 

We all realize — or we should stop to realize — 
that no raise in Social Security benefits comes with- 
out an accompanying rise in Social Security taxes. You 
are now paying 4.4% in Social Security taxes on every- 
thing you earn up to $6,600 a year. Under the present 
law, the rate will go up to 4.9% in 1969. The new 
proposals made by President Johnson in January 



would raise your tax rate to 5% (instead of 4.9%) in 
1969. But before that — next year — it would increase 
the earnings base to $7,800. In 1970 the earnings base 
would go to $9,000. 

Regardless of all this, every United States worker 
covered by Social Security is getting his money's worth 
■ — in future security, in Medicare, and in additional 
protection from problems of total disability. 

Any young worker planning his future, for the se- 
curity of his family and, possibly, even his parents, will 
find that insurance agents will say to him "Social Se- 
curity will provide so much and so much . . . let's see 
where we go from there . . ." 

The Social Security system adopted by the United 
States 32 years ago is the foundation on which every 
pension plan is built. Today that system must be 
strengthened and improved to provide even greater 
protection and security for a new generation of work- 
ers as well as those who have already put in their time. 

President Johnson said this in his Message on Older 
Americans, sent to Congress, January 23: 

"America is a young nation. But each year a larger 
proportion of our population joins the ranks of the 
senior citizens. Today, over 19 million Americans are 
65 or older — a number equal to the combined popula- 
tions of 20 states. One out of every 10 citizens is in 
this age group — more than twice as many as a half- 
century ago. 

"These figures represent a national triumph. The 
American born in 1900 could expect to reach his 47th 
birthday. The American born today has a life ex- 
pectancy of 70 years. Tomorrow, the miracles of man's 
knowledge will stretch the life span ever farther. 

"These figures also represent a national challenge. 
One of the tests of a great civilization is the compassion 
and respect shown to its elders. Too many of our 
senior citizens have been left behind by the progress 
they worked most of their lives to create. . . ." 

His words underscore the urgency of the current 
proposals before Congress. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




Your Breathing Troubles: 

Understand Them, Face Them, Treat Them 



You have trouble with your 
breathing: unusual shortness of 
breath, persistent coughing, too 
much phlegm — or a combina- 
tion. Is it serious? It might be. 

You know it's not "just a cold." Your 
trouble has been going on for a long 
time, or coming and going over months, 
perhaps years. You are only noticing 
it now — and wondering. Or perhaps 
you've been aware of it for a while. 
But you put it down to "too much 
smoking" or "just run down" or "get- 
ting out of condition." Now you think 
there might be more to it than that. 
Yes, there might. 

What Happens? 

Your lungs are a complicated system 
of air sacs with connecting tubes, large 
and small. Their job is taking in fresh 
air and forcing out stale air. Trouble 
comes when the flow of air in and out 
of the lungs is impaired. Then trouble 
shows itself in breathlessness, coughing 
or other such symptoms. 

Your air flow may be impeded by 
one or more of several possibilities. A 
doctor can usually tell which factors 
are involved in a particular case. When 
they consider the overall picture, the 
general name given to this trouble by 
medical experts is "chronic airway dis- 
ease." By this they mean breathing 
trouble that involves impaired air flow, 
the cause for which must be found 
for each patient. It may not be easy. 

Having looked into the situation of 
the patient before him, the doctor may 
give his trouble a specific name, too, 
depending on the cause and other fea- 
tures. Asthma, chronic bronchitis, em- 



physema—these are the three most im- 
portant of several ailments that come 
under "chronic airway disease." 

Three Ailments 
. . . Asthma is the collection of breath- 
ing troubles that result from an allergy 
to some normally harmless substance. 
. . . Chronic bronchitis means long-last- 
ing trouble in the lung tubes that shows 
itself in coughing, too much phlegm, 
and breathlessness. 

. . . Emphysema may show itself in the 
same way — especially by breathlessness 
— but it has the added feature that some 
of the small sacs (air spaces) deep in 
the lungs are damaged. 

These three (and certain other ail- 
ments) are -lumped together under one 
heading because they so often overlap. 
Also, they look and feel much alike. 

What Causes? 

. . . Asthma can be explained, in a gen- 
eral way: You're allergic to some sub- 
stance, like ragweed pollen or horse 
dander. But finding the substance (or 
substances) that are guilty in your par- 
ticular case may be difficult. 
. . . Chronic bronchitis? Maybe it's 
caused by repeated colds, too much 
smoking, air pollution, or other things 
that do damage in the lungs — or by a 
combination of several or all such ihings. 
... In emphysema, with the over- 
stretched air sacs and destroyed air sac 
walls that are its outstanding feature, 
the cause is less clear. But the doctors 
have strong suspicions about infections, 
cigarette smoking and air pollution. 

Most important for you, the doctors 
have ways of meeting the challenges 



of the various causes of chronic breath- 
ing trouble and of the very real and 
known troubles they cause. 

If you (or someone in your family) 
has chronic airway disease, you can 
be helped. Your doctor has available 
both advice and medical procedures of 
severfil kinds. He has ways to help you 
breathe better, to combat infection if 
it is present, and to avoid those things 
that aggravate your symptoms. 

What Should You Do? 

If you have breathing troubles, you 
cannot decide for yourself what is caus- 
ing them. Let your doctor decide. If 
you turn out to have chronic airway 
disease, particularly emphysema, you 
want to know how you can be helped. 
Your doctor can tell you. 

Write for the free booklet, "Your 
Breathing Troubles: Understand Them, 
Face Them, Treat Them," paid for by 
Christmas Seals. Use the coupon. Paste 
it to a postcard. 

NTA 

GPO, Box 2400 

New York, N.Y. 10001 

Send me the free booklet, "Your 
Breathing Troubles: Understand 
Them, Face Them, Treat Them" 



Name 



Address 



City 



State 



Zip Code 



Emphysema-Bronchitis dj 
National TB Association »|l- 



Stanley makes a 

folding wood rule strong 

enough to land a 

17-inch Bass. 



F 




Mr. Paul Kukonen, member of the "All-American Casting Team", landed a 
17-inch bass at Flagg Pond in Shrewsbury, Mass. last October using a Stanley 
6' No. X226 folding wood rule. 



Stanley designed the first 
spring joint rule in America 
in 1899. And we've been 
improving it ever since. 

Take the "100 PIust^ 
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Those bold, "High Visi- 
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No. X226 ^%;4!^%, 
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StanGuard resists abra- 
sion, oils, acids, and most 
alkalies 400% longer than 
ordinary finishes. 

Stanley also uses the finest 
hardwood sticks to give you 
a folding wood rule strong 
enough (yet flexible enough) 
to land a 17-inch bass. 

Free Sports or Hobby Books 

Buy any Stanley folding 
wood rule and pick any one 
of these four free pocket- 
books: "The Compact Book 
of Hunting", "The Compact 
Book of Fishing", "Golfers' 
Gold", and "How To Work 
With Tools and Wood". Ask 
the dealer for the free cou- 
pon, and mail it to Stanley 
Tools, Division of The 
Stanley Works, New Britain, 
Conn. This offer expires 
April 30, 1967. 



STANLEY 



.^l^_^j^W^^f^-'iH'i^^ helps you do things right 






Official Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOrNERS~irF~AMlRICA 




FOUNDED 1881 



APRIL, 1967 







^•i 






EXPO 



GtANAD 



Commemorates 100 Years 
of Confederation 



JSOBTA 



W 

m 



867 1967. 





GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 2000) 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W., 

Washington. D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

FiNLAY C. AlL.\N 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 
William Sidell 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Tep.zick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S^ W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City, Mo. 64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
American Bank Building 
621 S.W. Morrison St.. Room 937 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailius list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the cominiter, It is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are .suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 
The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one L/ocal Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPEISTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(§/A\[S[p 




VOLUME LXXXVI No, 4 APRIL, 1967 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Expo 67, Canada's Birthday Exposition 2 

Donaldson's Dandies James B. Glynn 6 

Social Security, The Price and the Product 10 

Brotherhood Leaders at Public Issues Conference 11 

First MTDA Graduates 12 

The Utility of Wood Special Color Section 21 

DEPARTMENTS 

Editorials 14 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 15 

Home Study Course, Blueprint Reading, Unit XI 17 

Plane Gossip 20 

Washington Roundup 25 

Canadian Report 26 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 28 

Service to the Brotherhood 30 

Local Union News 32 

In Memoriam 39 

What's New? 41 

Lakeland News 42 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 44 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20013, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscriptiori price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20$ in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Like a sleek, modern extravaganza 
of the 21st Century. Expo 67 flashes 
across the news and feature pages of 
our newspapers and magazines this 
year, as Canada prepares to celebrate 
its first century as a confederation in 
the British family of nations. To com- 
memorate its first 100 years, Canada 
and its historic city of Montreal have 
teamed up to produce what may well 
be the most exciting world's fair ever. 

Though Expo 67 is not an official 
world's fair, like the one in Brussels. 
Belgium, a few years ago, it has all 
the trappings and more. 

Its theme is "Man and His World," 
which is symbolically expressed in the 
insignia of the exposition shown at 
the lower right on our front cover. 
The paired "Y" emblems which radiate 
from the title "Expo 67" represent 
man's upraised arms to a greater to- 
morrow. 

Xo our cover artist, they also ap- 
peared to be beams and braces on a 
construction job . . . which is fitting, 
too. For Expo is one of the most 
exciting construction jobs of the dec- 
ade. As the pictures on our cover and 
on the pages which follow show, the 
fair has been an architect's playground. 
Through the red beams on the cover, 
you can see portions of the Theme 
Building (upper left), the British Pa- 
vilion (lower left), the U.S. Pavilion 
(upper right), and German Pavilion 
(lower right). 

The geometric maple leaf at the 
bottom of the cover is the emblem ot 
the centennial observance. 










Canada's super, colossal 
birthday exposition commemorates 
a century of change from a frontier economy 

to a modern, Industrial giant 



BY now anybody who reads the 
papers knows what Expo 67 is 
all about. But just in case you have 
been out of touch, Expo 67 is the 
half-billion-dollar "first category" 
exhibition which will open its doors 
to the public on the 28th of this 
month. The exhibition, which will 
run for six months, will be the high- 
light of Canada's 100th birthday 
celebration. 

The Dominion of Canada, whose 
total population of 19.5 million is 
only three million larger than the 
State of New York, has come a long 
way since that day in 1867 when the 
British North America Act was 
signed, providing for a federal union 
and setting up a parliamentary sys- 
tem of government. 



During the past three years, for 
instance, Canada has had the fast- 
est economic growth rate in the 
world. The main factor behind this 
increase has been industrial invest- 
ment in new plants, machinery and 
equipment, augmented by an excep- 
tionally robust consumer demand. 

The Canadian government hopes 
that this consumer demand will 
carry over to Expo 67 when it opens, 
since they are footing about 50% 
of the tab. But if the fair runs into 
the red nobody will be mad, because 
they figure it will be worth it in in- 
ternational publicity and goodwill, 
tourist promotion and the value of 
permanent buildings, roads and other 
structures Expo 67 will bequeath. 

Work on the fair began over three 



years ago with the placement of mil- 
lions of cubic yards of fill on two 
islands — Ste. Helene and Notre 
Dame — located within the shadow of 
Montreal's skyline. 

Since that time upwards of 8,000 
building trades workers, including 
many hundreds of members of 
Brotherhood local unions affiliated 
with the Greater Montreal District 
Council, have been employed on the 
project. 

Expo 67 has the hearty endorse- 
ment of the Canadian Labor Con- 
gress, which voiced its approval at 
its last convention. CLC President 
Claude Jodoin is a member of the 
exhibition corporation's board of di- 
rectors, and many unions purchased 
blocks of tickets at reduced prices 



THE CARPENTER 



Summer-long entertainment will be pro- 
vided in the $3.3 million Expo Stadium, 
a 25,000-seat permanent structure, at 
right. Sample events are the Canadian 
Searchlight Tattoo, staged by 1.700 men 
of Canada's armed forces; a "wild west" 
rodeo, and an international track meet. 




Honors for the tallest building in the show will go to the 
United States — a 20-story-high steel and plastic bubble, 
225 feet in diameter, which will be filled with all sorts of 
sideshows based on a "Creative America" theme. 



A big plus at Expo 67 will be the availability of 
transportation around the fair grounds. Expo 
Express, a surface transport system will carry 
visitors free while a nominal 25-cent charge 
will be made for the Minirail, shown below. 



The Canada Pavilion keynotes the centennial observance. Located on 
the west tip of the He Notre Dame, it is dominated by an inverted 
pyramid named "Katimavik," the Eskimo word for meeting place. 



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An early construction view shows exhibits taking shape. Curtain will 
rise on Expo 67 on April 28. Expo has a modest attendance projection 
of 10 million (compared to the New York fair's 70 million) with about 
60% expected to come from the U.S. 







for re-sale to their members. 

The bulk of the construction work 
was done by members of unions 
affiliated, in most cases, with both 
the CLC and the AFL-CIO. One 
industry observer called Expo one 
of the greatest construction projects 
in the history of the world. Said he: 
"In dollar value Expo 67 does not 
compare with the Aswan Dam or the 
Dew Line; but they have had more 
time to build those two projects. 
Expo 67 is a tremendously com- 
pressed construction project." 

More than 100 buildings on the 
Expo 67 site will house exhibits for 
more than 50 nations, from Sweden 
to Senegal. 

Since all world's fairs must have 
themes. Expo 67's is "Man and His 
World," taken from the works of 
French author Antoine de Saint-Exu- 



Form for Habitat 67 is lowered into place. Exhibit 
is described as "a complex of individual homes floating 
free in a modern adaptation of the Hanging Gardens 
of Babylon." Model units will be on display. 




Access to the fair will be via this bridge (now completed) 
that connects with the mainland. Expo 67 has already 
presented to Montreal's economy a cornucopia of fair- 
related new construction projects. 





Monster above awaits unsuspecting visitors at the end of a 
"space voyage" in the 215-foot high Gyroton, the newest 
concept in amusement park rides (shown below). Gyroton 
trip ends in a pool of bubbling lava in the adjacent "live 
volcano," habitat of the mechanical monster. 





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THE CARPENTER 



pery, who wrote: "To be a man is to 
feel that through one's own contri- 
bution, one helps to build the world." 
Taking off from there, Expo 67 
develops five subthemes: Man the 
Explorer, Man the Provider, Man 
the Producer, Man the Creator and 



Man in the Community. Within this 
framework all manner of exhibits are 
to be created, from the wilderness 
period of Montreal's beginning to 
the glass-and-chrome of today — 
and beyond. 

Perhaps the best of all surprises 



offered by Expo 67 officials, and a 
birthday present of its own to fair 
visitors, is a promise that there will 
be no price gouging. After all, the 
hosts have something going for them 
— it's their birthday party and they 
wouldn't want you to go home mad. 



THE WELCOME MAT IS OUT 




Motorized caravan is bringing a sneak preview of Expo 67 to 
many U.S. cities in hopes of luring Yankee dollars across the 
border. Part of Canada's 1967 Centennial celebration was the 
Montreal to New York canoe race. The team race was a warm- 
up for the 100-day cross-Canada canoe marathon. Lances 
raised, the scarlet-coated Royal Canadian Mounted Police per- 
form the "Dome," a maneuver in their famed musical ride. 
This colorful group will perform for Expo 67 visitors. 





APRIL, 1967 






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Donaldson's Dandies 

By improving the breed of Northwest fish, a noted 
educator directs a lesson to a protein-hungry world. 



BY JAMES B. GLYNN 



Reprinted with permission from PANEL, 
Piihlished bv the American PIvwood Association 



■ The consummate skill of the Chi- 
nook salmon in finding its way back 
home after ranging over thousands 
of miles of ocean in the North Pa- 
cific is the basis of a noble experi- 
ment by a fish-lovin' professor at 
the University of Washington. 

Dr. Lauren Donaldson, who likes 
to work with fish because, as he 
says, "Fish are just plain smart," 
had two purposes in mind when he 
began his work back in 1948. 

He wanted, as do horse lovers, to 
improve the breed. And he wanted 
to develop a new strain of Chinooks 
that would mature early; that would 
be healthy and free of disease and 
that would return to an artificial 
birthplace earlier than the customary 
four years. 

When a confirmed fisherman sees 
the laboratory of Dr. Donaldson on 
the Seattle campus today, he comes 
away convinced that he had best not 
retell his experience, for anything he 
might say would sound like a fish 
story of the greatest magnitude. 

NOSE FOR DIRECTION 

The clinical explanation of how a 
salmon gets home after a long jour- 
ney in the ocean has never been set 
down in indisputable form. Donald- 
son says the fish relies on a unique 
memory system and keen sense of 
smell. 

He has already demonstrated in 
his experiments that when the nos- 
trils of a salmon are plugged with 
cotton, the fish will become hope- 



lessly lost in a relatively small area. 
But, given free use of all its amaz- 
ing faculties, the salmon usually 
can get back home, and it was with 
this fact in mind that Donaldson be- 
gan his work. 

In the autumn of 1948, he culled 
from the water of Soos Creek, near 
Tacoma, the best female Chinooks 
he could find. He removed their 
eggs, fertilized them with sperm 
taken from choice males and let 
them mature in water-filled trays 
in his laboratory. After hatching, 
the fish were placed in ponds outside 
the lab and put on a nutritive diet 
prepared by Donaldson. 

HAZARDS ABOUND 

Then, after marking each one by 
snipping off a small fin, the finger- 
lings were dumped into nearby Lake 
Union. To begin their migration 
northward through Puget Sound to 
Alaska, the salmon first had to sur- 
vive the caustic industrial waters of 
Lake Union, a feat that to some 
seemed highly unlikely. 

In fact, the chances seemed slim 
that any of these tiny fish would ever 
reach the ocean, let alone return to 
Donaldson four years later. 

Indeed, since they had been reared 
in an enclosed pond on the campus, 
there was no through route for them 
to travel on the return trip. Donald- 
son and his staff solved that by 
digging a ditch from the pond to the 
edge of Lake Union. Campus non- 
believers promptly named the ditch 




APRIL, 1967 





L-a.. V «- ^- 



'j'aJL- 







''They came in numbers far exceeding Donaldson s dreams' 



"Donaldson's Folly." They came in 
droves to disparage the crude ditch 
and taunt the students from the 
Fisheries Center who helped the 
professor dig it. 

But four years later the Chinooks 
did come back, wriggling eagerly up 
the shallow ditch and into the pond 
outside the professor's office. They 
came in numbers far exceeding Don- 
aldson's dreams and they were big, 
full-bodied and healthy as the pro- 
verbial pup. 

Now there was a new nickname — 
"Donaldson's Dandies" — and in 
deed they were a new breed that 
held out great hopes for the im- 
provement of the species in the 
Pacific Northwest. 



The cycle has been repeated each 
year and in 1955 came a significant 
development. In the autumn of that 
year, some Chinooks returned that 
had been released in 1952. They 
were a year ahead of schedule, but 
they were as big as four-year-olds. 

Six years ago, the old ditch that 
had been dug by Donaldson and his 
students was replaced with a con- 
crete flume, or fish ladder, for the 
use of the returning salmon. 

Plywood gates are a part of the 
flume and they have given Donald- 
son and his staff some insight into 
recent improvements in the plywood 
industry. Partially immersed in wa- 
ter, the gates have been there for 



six years and there is no sign of 
wear or delamination. 

It has been 30 years since Dr. 
Donaldson began experimenting 
with rainbow trout, hoping to de- 
velop a select breed. His latest 
specimens can be found in one of 
the rearing tanks outside his office. 
They are, by the standards of any 
ardent fisherman, eye poppers. 

OPENING-DAY FUN 

He has rainbows only a year old 
that weigh three pounds. His three- 
year-olds range up to 18 pounds — ■ 
and that's no fish story. The pro- 
fessor has been known to sneak a 
few into a nearby trout lake before 



8 



THE CARPENTER 




opening day of fishing season, then 
stay to watch the excitement. 

"When I hear some guy out there 
yelling like hell, it all seems worth 
while," says the professor. 

Now he is crossing these rainbows 
with steelhead, which by his defini- 
tion, is "like crossing a Holstein 
with a Black Angus," since the rain- 
bow and the steelhead are of the 
same racial stock. 

He hopes to combine the migra- 
tory habits of the steelhead with the 
non-migratory qualities of the rain- 
bow. And by merging the fighting 
spirit of the steelhead with the 
beauty of a rainbow, he is produc- 
ing a fish that will have great ap- 
peal to the fisherman. His speci- 



mens, though still not a year old, 
look like full grown rainbows. 

LESSON FOR WORLD 

In a Seattle speech recently, Vice- 
President Hubert H. Humphrey 
urged that the waters of the North- 
west should be exploited to acquire 
more protein for the undernourish- 
ed people of the world. 

Dr. Donaldson does not think that 
salmon, which he calls "a luxury 
fish," will contribute significantly to 
that goal, mainly because the meat 
of the salmon is so high-priced. 

But he thinks that the mass pro- 
duction of other types of fish 
through artificial breeding and con- 



trolled feeding could help supply 
food for the hungry. 

Indirectly, then, his work of the 
past 30 years has its humanitarian 
aspects which the experts will hardly 
be able to overlook. 

Meanwhile, his fish are returning 
in ever-increasing numbers and by 
his own estimate the tide will in- 
crease and the fish will grow even 
larger. 

It is said, in fact, that scores of the 
Chinooks caught this year along the 
Washington coastline were not den- 
izens of natural breeding areas in 
the Columbia River and Soos 
Creek, but some of Donaldson's 
Dandies. ■ 



APRIL, 1967 




SOCIAL SECURITY 

u^ The Price 

i^ and the Product 



President Johnson's Social Security proposals are 
going to cost you money. 

The younger you are, the more they will cost you. 

The more you earn, the more you will pay. 

That's the worst of it, and that's what you'll be 
hearing as the proposals come before Congress. 

You may not hear this: 

The younger you are, the more insurance protection 
you get. 

The more you earn, the more you can collect. 

All these statements are true. Let's try to strike 
a balance. 

If you are a young worker and you live to be 65 
you will pay a very long time for a pension which 
(no matter how much it is improved) won't allow you 
to live in luxury. 

On the other hand, you could not buy as big a 
pension for the same money anywhere else. 

As your earnings go from $6,600 to $7,800 to 
$9,000 and beyond, you will have that pesky Social 
Security tax deducted all year long, instead of just 
part of the year. And the rate will go up, too. 

But when you retire — or if you die or get disabled 



— your income, or your family's will be a lot closer 
to your present earnings. Not close enough — just 
closer. 

Whether you're young or old, whether you make 
less than $6,600 or more than $9,000, you'll be far 
better protected if you die or are too crippled to work. 

You can't buy that kind of insurance at any price, 
anywhere else. 

This is the point of it. You want a reasonably ade- 
quate pension, in relation to your earnings, if you 
live to be 65, and reasonably adequate protection 
for your family if you don't. 

The Social Security system can approach this goal 
only if taxes are modestly increased — a maximum of 
$159.60 by 1970, if you earn more than $9,000 a 
year. 

If you yourself had the money you now pay in 
Social Security taxes you could not possibly buy a 
fraction of the protection offered by the federal system. 

It is as simple as that. 

Here are the two basic questions about "the price 
and the product": 

Q: The papers say the President is asking for an 
"average" 20 percent increase in Social Security pen- 
sions. Who would actually get how much? 

A: Every retirement benefit would be raised at least 
15 percent. The biggest proportionate increases would 
go to the 2.5 million retirees who now get only the 
minimum of $44 a month C$66 for a couple). These 
minimums would become $70 and $105. Also, the mini- 
mums for retirees who were covered for 25 years or 
more of their working lives would rise to $100 for an 
individual and $150 for a couple. 

The special benefits for persons 72 or older who never 
qualified for Social Security pensions — a provision 
adopted along with medicare in 1965 — would be $50 
rather than $35 a month ($75 instead of $52.50 for a 
couple). And another 200,000 persons would be added 
to the 900,000 eligible for such benefits. 

For other pensioners — the vast majority — the basic 
increase would be 15 percent. Unless you're in one of 
the categories listed above, that's what you'd get. 

Q: Can you tell me in simple terms — not in a lot of 
tables — how much we're going to pay for this? 

A: Let's just look at the next three years. You are 
now paying 4.4 percent in Social Security taxes on every- 
thing you earn, up to $6,600 a year. Under the present 
law, the rate will go up to 4.9 percent in 1969. 

The new proposals would raise your tax rate to 5 
percent (instead of 4.9 percent) in 1969. But before 
that — next year, in 1968 — it would increase the earnings 
base to $7,800. This would only affect those who earn 
more than $6,600 a year. It would mean that they 
would have Social Security taxes deducted for more pay 
periods, until their earnings exceed $7,800. In 1970, the 
earnings base would be raised again, to $9,000. In the 
same way. this would affect only those earning more 
than $7,800. 



ACTION NEEDED NOW! To get early Congressional 
study and successful enactment of President Johnson's Social 
Security proposals, you must join millions of other wage 
earners in a letter-writing campaign, this month. Write to 
your Congressmen and Senators, Washington, D.C., tonight, 
urging support of this vital legislation. A flood of letters 
from you and your fellow members can make a big difference! 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




■ The Brookings Institution of 
Washington, D.C., through its Ad- 
vanced Study Program, brings to- 
gether leaders in many fields for dis- 
cussions of public issues. It attempts 
"to provide serious study to persons 
holding key roles in the development 
of public policy." 

It has a special advanced study 
program for labor leaders and a 
periodic "Public Issues Conference 
for Elected Union Officials." To such 
a gathering, March 5 to 8, at Wil- 
liamsburg, Va., went First General 
Vice President Finlay C. Allan and 
General Treasurer Peter Terzik. 

With other trade union leaders, 
they discussed the social effects of 
urbanization with Professor James 
B. McKee of Michigan State Uni- 
versity, the problems of education 
in the city with Professor Patricia 
Sexton of New York University, the 
politics of the city with Professor Ed- 
ward Banfield of Harvard University, 
and law enforcement with The Hon. 
George Edwards, circuit judge of the 
Sixth Circuit, U.S. Court of Appeals. 



BrotlierlioocI Officers 
Parficipate in Public 




WITH BROOKINGS LEADERS— First General Vice President Finlay C. Allan, 
second from left, and General Treasurer Peter Terzick, right, with Fred K. Hoehler, 
.Ir., consultant to the Brookings Advanced Study Program, and Robert D. Calkins, 
president of the Brookings Institution. 



It was a unique opportunity to ex- 
plore weighty issues and to learn 
from each participant's experiences 
and thoughts. In the relaxed atmos- 



phere of Colonial Williamsburg, 
Brookings hopes that its guests find 
something of value for the challenges 
of tomorrow. ■ 




PARTICIPANTS — First row, from left: George E. Gill, Communications Workers' vice president; Guy Leber, Painters' 
administrative assistant; Charles F. West, Machinists' vice president; Marion Anderson, Brookings Institution; Patricia Sexton, 
sociology professor, NYU; Leo Kriegbaum, Building Service Employees' international representative; and Fred Hoehler, Jr., 
Brookings consultant. Second row: J. W. Hardesty, Structural Iron Workers' director of apprenticeship; Gilbert Brunner, 
Machinists' vice president; George Knaly, Electrical Workers' director of government operations; First General Vice President 
Allan; General Treasurer Terzick: Paul Askew, assistant to the president. Operating Engineers; Frank Hanley, assistant to the 
president. Operating Engineers; John Hauck, Plasterers' secretary-treasurer; and Joseph Maloney, Structural Iron Workers' gen- 
eral organizer. Matthew McGrath, Jr., Building Service Employees' international representative, was not present for the picture. 



APRIL, 1967 



11 



FIRST 



M 
T 
D 

A 



GRADUATES 

23 membets of Local 
2274 brave winter 
weather to attend ad- 
vanced training course 
contracted under the 
Manpower Develop- 
ment and Training Act 





Graduates of Local 2274 training program contracted under the Manpower Develop- 
ment and Training Act are shown with officers of the local, members of the local 
union's training committee, and Instructor Glenn Griffin (rear row, second from left). 



LIKE the proverbial mailman who 
makes his appointed rounds no 
matter what the weather, 23 members 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., Local 2274 com- 
pleted an advanced training program 
for journeymen in the face of some 
wild winter days, last January and 
February. 

The training program, contracted 
under the Federal government's Man- 
power Development and Training Act, 
began on January 30 and lasted for 
120 hours of study. The curriculum 
consisted of one week each of mathe- 
matics, blueprint reading and estimat- 
ing and finished the third week with a 
course in the level and transit. 

The remarkable thing about the pro- 
gram was that many of the members 
who took the course lived long dis- 
tances from the training site and had 
to travel, in some instances, up to 70 
miles per day to attend classes. Two 
who took the course lived 170 miles 



away and rented a room so as not to 
chance missing any classes. 

In a letter to Frank Miller, business 
agent of Local 2274, Brotherhood 
Treasurer Peter Terzick extended his 
congratulations to those who completed 
the course. 

"It really is a tribute to the deter- 
mination of the 23 participants that 
they allowed neither icy roads nor bad 
weather to deter them from completing 
their training. Please extend my con- 
gratulations to all of them," Terzick 
wrote. 

Credit for much of the success of 
the program must go to Brother Miller, 
Bus. Rep. Herschel Marshall, Milford 
Ward, Regis Murphy, Joseph Caputo, 
and Instructor Glenn Griffin. 

Charles Atkinson, M.D.T.A. Coordi- 
nator, was high in his praise of the 
local union and the spirit of coopera- 
tion that helped to make the program 
a success. 




AH textbooks and equipment necessary for completion of the 120-hour course was 
furnished the local union by the Brotherhood under an M.T.D.A. grant. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 





FIRST 

M T D A 

GRADUATES 



Instructor Glenn Griffin has his hands full as he moves from table to table 
instructing journeymen during Local 2274's advanced training program. 
The course was held in Franklin, Pa., and the training expenses were borne 
by a grant received under the Manpower Development and Training Act. 
Despite icy roads and inclement weather, the men enrolled in the program 
had a remarkable 96% attendance record. 




APRIL, 1967 



13 





EDITORIALS 



^ 



JtMnonff the Jtnnointed 



Your editor receives scores of letters each month 
from readers on many topics other than news of the 
Brotherhood. When we get one like the recent message 
from Mrs. John J. Sullivan of Boston, whose husband 
is a member of Local 40, we're inclined to share parts 
of it with our readers. She admired our March cover 
and its comments about the craft from Novelist Edna 
Ferber. She adds her own thoughts: 

"Your March issue arrived in the mail this morning, 
and as my carpenter husband is off somewhere carpen- 
tering, I got first crack at it — / usually do. I want to 
thank you ever so much for your beautiful cover. . . . 

"In a world of poor values and so much .silliness, 
my husband and I feel that his trade is like a beacon 
of what is true and substantial. I guess we feel a little 
like Edna Ferber and probably a little like you do 
about it. Thank you for giving honest, 'dirty' work 
DIGNITY in this white-collar world. I've always 
been proud to be the wife of a craftsman, and you 
have only strengthened my ideals. I was in love with 
him long before he became a carpenter, and he was 
not a happy person. His entrance into this trade is 
the single best blessing of our lives. He is among the 
annointed — a man who loves his work! 

"Over a year ago you put out an issue which had, 
on the cover, a huge, burly hand holding a hammer 
in its fist. I cut this out, pasted it on a knotty pine 
paper and wrote on the paper these words — taken 
from John Updike's novel, THE POORHOUSE FAIR 
— 'As to being a carpenter . . . there is no profession 
so native to holy and constructive emotions, or so 
appropriate for God-made flesh to assume.' It is 
framed and hung in a place of honor. Thank you for 
making this apparent every single month." 

^ Let's Cut Tax Paper Work 

The annual struggle with tax forms is about over 
for most of us. While the ordeal is still fresh in our 
minds, it seems appropriate to think about relieving 
the taxpayer of some of the paperwork which the 
present system demands. Few of us are inclined to 
be accountants, yet each year it seems that the rules 
and regulations become more and more complex, 



especially for people who must fill out the detailed 
long form in order to avoid being overtaxed. Even 
with the assistance of a professional tax advisor, a 
taxpayer must do a lot of tedious homework before 
his return can be filled out. It seems unbelievable 
that there isn't some way to simplify the process. 
Perhaps a number of taxpayer categories could be 
set up, based on income, the size of the family, the 
value of the home or monthly payments, etc., with 
tables showing fair tax due for each combination. It 
would be necessary to leave open the option of filing 
detailed information for those taxpayers who have 
exceptional situations, such as crippling medical ex- 
penses or casualty losses, but for the average home- 
owning family, such tax categories could work well. 
We suspect that the Federal Government, as well as 
the taxpayer, would benefit. Money due the Treasury 
would likely come in sooner, and the Internal Revenue 
Service might avoid that last-minute logjam of tax 
returns that gives tJiem headaches just about now. 

^ Join the Cancer Crusade 

It's a well established fact that cancer can be cured 
by surgery, x-ray or radium, if caught in time. The 
American Cancer Society describes cancer's "seven 
danger signals" in its annual Crusade, each April, and 
supports a year-round program of research. Join the 
drive for funds today. 

The best way to protect yourself against cancer is 
still this: Have a checkup every year, and, between 
checkups, be alert to Cancer's Seven Danger Signals, 
which are. . . 

1. Unusual bleeding or discharge. 

2. A lump or thickening in the breast or elsewhere. 

3. A sore that does not heal. 

4. Change in bowel or bladder habits. 

5. Hoarseness or cough. 

6. Indigestion or difficulty in swallowing. 

7. Change in a wart or mole. 

See your doctor immediately if any danger signal 
lasts longer than two weeks. 

Organized labor has played a leading role in the 
work of the voluntary health agencies across North 
America. It will continue to do so, so long as health 
menaces like cancer threaten. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



The apprenticeship and training pro- 
gram of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America 
is an expanded and varied activity. 
To bring together the many news 
items in this field, Tlie CARPEN- 
TER begins, with this issue, a regu- 
lar feature: "What's New in Ap- 
prenticeship and Training." 




Whaf s New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



Advanced Training Classes Underway Under U.S. Contract 



ERIE, PA. — Advanced training for 
journeymen of Local 81, Erie, began as 
scheduled last January 23. There were 
20 Brotherhood members in attendance. 
The classes cover such subjects as mathe- 
matics, blue print reading and the level 
and transit. C. (Ted) Dombrowski, busi- 
ness agent of Local 81, reports that it 
would not have been possible to launch 
the training program at this time without 
the fine cooperation and sincere interest 
of Frank E. Anthony, director of voca- 
tional adult education for area public 
schools, who made available the facilities 
and instructional staff. 

The Erie school is one of the programs 
available under the United Brotherhood's 
prime contract with the U. S. Department 
of Labor. 





Calendar of State 




and Provincial 


Apprenticeship Contests 




Scheduled to Date 


March 




17-18 


Alaska — Anchorage 


30-31 


Colorado — Denver 


April 




1 


Alberta — Calgary 




(Canada) 


1 


Idaho — Boise 


7-8 


Alberta — Calgary 




(Canada) 


22-23 


Wyoming — Casper 


28-29 


Tennessee — Nashville 


May 




12-13 


New Mexico — 




Albuquerque 


12-13 


Nevada — Las Vegas 


18-19 


Saskatchewan — 




Saskatoon (Canada) 


20 


Arizona — Phoenix 


26-27 


Washington — Tacoma 


27 


Utah— Ogden 


June 




7-8 


Michigan — 




Grand Rapids 


23-24 


California — San Diego 


July 






None Scheduled 


August 




17-18- 


International Carpentry 


19 


Contest, Vancouver, 




B.C. (Canada) 




In their first class session Brotherhood members reviewed instructional materials 
made available through the United Brotherhood's prime contract with the U.S. 
Department of Labor. The first class was held in a temporary classroom made 
available by the local trade school. 




Instructor Charles Johnson explains basic math functions to the Erie class in 
its new classroom, which will be used until the course is completed. 



HISTORY AVAILABLE — Every new 
member of the Brotherhood should 
know the history and purposes of 
our great organization. To provide 
this background information, the 
Brotherhood introduced at its 1966 



Convention a brief but concise 40- 
page booklet entitled, "They Kept 
Ahead of the Future." Copies are 
available to joint apprenticeship 
committees for use in instruction 
programs. 



APRIL, 1967 



15 




TWO VIEWS of the new training facilities in tlie busy Deep South city of New Orleans. At 
left: An inside view of one of the 10 welding booths set up for arc and heli-arc welding. 
At right: A full-length view of the acetylene work area and classroom area of the school. 



New Welding School Opens in New Orleans 



THROUGH the combined effort 
and cooperation of the Car- 
penters District Council of the New 
Orleans Area (of which Carpenters 
Local 1846; Carpenters Local 2258, 
Houma, La.; Millwrights Local 
1931; and Piledrivers Local 2436, 
New Orleans, La., are affiliates) and 
the New Orleans Associated Gen- 
eral Contractors of America, Inc., a 
much-needed welding school was 
established for use by both journey- 
men and apprentices of the four 
above-mentioned local unions. The 
dedication and opening ceremony 
for the new school were held on Jan- 
uary 16, 1967. 

The welding school furnishes free 
training to the journeymen and ap- 
prentices, thereby enabling them to 
fulfill the needs of the employing 
contractors in the New Orleans area 
in the years ahead. 

The school is located at 1313 
South Rendon Street, New Orleans, 
and has facilities for the enrollment 
of 40 welding students for a period 
of 60 class-hours or 15 weeks each 
on a continuing basis. It is equipped 
with a selection of the latest and best 
equipment available, affording the 
students an opportunity to learn 
basic techniques in acetylene weld- 
ing, brazing and cutting, through 
electric arc welding and on to heli- 
arc and "Tig" welding of all weld- 
able common metals and alloys or 
composition metals. 

A full-time welding instructor is 
in charge and is assisted by two part- 
time instructors during class hours, 
which run Monday through Thurs- 
day nights, from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 
p.m. 



One class of 20 students attends 
on Monday and Wednesday nights; 
the other on Tuesday and Thursday 
nights. The four locals are making 
full use of the facilities. 



The school represents another 
example of how management and 
labor together can produce the facil- 
ities necessary to meet the never 
ending demands of tomorrow. 




1. John A. Stewart, Ass't. Managing Director, New Orleans Chapter, Asso- 
ciated General Contractors of America, Inc., New Orleans, La. 2. Leo Broders, 
Member, Board of Trustees, AGC-CDC- Joint Apprenticeship & Training 
Comm., New Orleans, La. 3. Herman Sonnier, Business Agent, Carpenters 
Local 2258, Houma, La. 4. W. H. Lowe, Business Agent, Millwrights Local 
1931, New Orleans, La. 5. Claude Andry Managing Director, New Orleans 
Chapter, Associated General Contractors of America, Inc., New Orleans, La. 
6. Edwin I. Soule, Coordinator, Carpenters, Millwrights & Piledrivers Appren- 
ticeship & Training Program, New Orleans, La. 7. Davy P. Laborde, Sr., Exec. 
Secty., Carpenters District Council — New Orleans Area, New Orleans, La. 

8. Robert I. Conran, Dir. of Apprenticeship, State of La., Baton Rouge, La. 

9. Jack McGuire, Aide to Mayor of New Orleans. 10. Norwood Jatho, Ass't. 
Director, Bureau of Apprenticeship & Training, New Orleans, La. 11. Thomas 
J. Laborde, Ass't. Coordinator, Carpenters, Millwrights & Piledrivers Appren- 
ticeship & Training Program, New Orleans, La. 12. Ed. Boettner, Bureau of 
Apprenticeship & Training, New Orleans Area, New Orleans, La. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



V 



TUDY COURSE 



'la 



BLUEPRINT READING, UNIT XI 



Tfi/'s unit \s really one in reading compreliension. You 
might even question the need for it. However, the ability 
to read ^nd thoroughly understand the General Conditions 
of the Specifications for Plan "C" is one more facet of 
upgrading your carpentry skills. It is essential that the 
carpenter who is supervising the construction project under- 
stands exactly who is responsible for what, and to whom, 
in the contract and this is specified in the General Conditions 
of the Specifications for Plan "C". 

Read the entire section under the heading "General Con- 
ditions" carefully, and then answer the questions by filling 
in the blanks^ indicating whether the statement is true or 
false or by a statement which answers the question cor- 
rectly. 

This is the final assignment of the elementary blueprint 
reading course. 

CONTRACT CONDITIONS 

1. The contract documents shall consist of the (a) 

, (b) , (c) , 

and (d) 

2. The contract shall be signed in (a) by the 

(b) -^ ^^ and the (c) 

CORRELATION AND INTENT OF CONTRACT 
DOCUMENTS 

3. The contractor shall examine the specifications care- 
fully as all work will remain in force unless erased by the 
(a) or (b) 

4. The contractor shall not make any changes in (a) 
or (b) 

DEFINITIONS 

5. refers to and indicates the designer. 

6. refers to and indicates the owner of the 

building or his duly authorized representative. 

7. and refer to and indicate the 

party or parties contracting to perform work to be done. 

8. and refer to and indicate the 

party or parties to whom parts of the work are sublet 
by the contractor, or by the owner, but does not include 
one who merely furnishes material. 

9. shall be interpreted to mean the work, 

including material, labor and use of tools, necessary to 
complete the construction in full compliance with the 
terms of these specifications and as shown by the drawings. 

CONTRACTOR'S UNDERSTANDING 

10. After having entered into a contract, it shall be 
understood and agreed that the contractor shall make 
claims against the owner, either for extra compensation 
or otherwise, should conditions actually encountered by 
him in the performance of the work be at variance with 
those he anticipated as the result of his own preliminary 
investigation. Is this statement true or false? 

APRIL, 1967 



DESIGNATION OF MATERIALS 

11. Is the following statement true or false? All mate- 
rial to be used in the construction of this house is properly 
indicated through conventional methods. 

DETAIL DRAWINGS AND INSTRUCTIONS 

12. Who supplies additional drawing and instructions 
with reasonable promptness to the contractor? 

13. How many copies of the drawings and specifica- 
tions must be on the job at all times? 

SHOP DRAWINGS 

14. How many corrected copies of the shop drawings 
must be filed with the architects? 

SAMPLES 

15. The architects must furnish samples to the con- 
tractor, so that the contractor knows what to buy. Is this 
statement true or false? 

OWNERSHIP OF DRAWINGS AND MODELS 

16. Who owns the drawings, specification, and models? 

17. What disposition is made of them at the completion 
of the work? 

MATERIALS AND APPLIANCES 

18. All materials shall be new and both workmanship 
and materials shall be of good quality. Is this statement 
true or false? 

WORKMEN 

19. The contractor must hire all union craftsmen. Is 
this statement true or false? 

SURVEYS, PER,MITS AND REGULATIONS 

20. All surveys will be furnished by the 

PROTECTION OF WORK AND PROPERTY 

21. Who can act at his own discretion, in an emer- 
gency affecting life or work or the adjoining property? 

USE OF PREMISES 

22. Is this statement true or false? The contractor shall 
not load or permit any part of the structure to be loaded 
with a weight that will endanger its safety. 

CONTRACTOR'S SUPERVISION 

23. What are the duties of the superintendent? 

LINES AND LEVELS 

24. Who is responsible for all grades, base lines, and 
bench marks? 

Continued on Page 18 



17 



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HOME STUDY COURSE 

Continued from Page 17 

VERIFYING MEASUREMENTS, LOCATIONS, ETC. 

25. Who makes the final decision in case of a conflict 
between the various trades in installation of materials or 
equipment? 

SEPARATE CONTRACTS 

26. Is this statement true or false? The architects re- 
serve the right to l.t other contracts in connection with 
this work. 

SUBCONTRACTS 

27. Is this statement true or false? The contractor 
agrees that he is fully responsible to the owner for the 
acts and omissions of his subcontractors. 

LIABILITY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE INSURANCE 

28. What type of insurance must the contractor carry 
for this work? 

FIRE INSURANCE 

29. How much fire insurance must be carried, and 
who will pay for it? 

TAXES 

30. What types of taxes must the contractor pay? 

ROYALTIES AND PATENTS 

31. Who pays for royalties and license fees? 

INSPECTION OF WORK 

32. If any work should be "covered up" without 
approval of the architects, it must, if required by the 
architects, be (a) for examination at the con- 
tractor's (b) 

CHANGES IN THE WORK 

33. What manner of payment is specified for extra 
work or changes in the work? 

CORRECTION OF WORK BEFORE FINAL PAYMENT 

34. Is the following statement true or false? The con- 
tractor shall promptly remove from the premises all mate- 
rials condemned by the architects as failing to conform 
to the contract, whether incorporated in the work or not, 
and the contractor shall promptly replace and re-execute 
his own work in accordance wtih the contract and without 
expense to the owner and shall bear the expense of making 
good all work of other contractors destroyed or damaged 
by such removal or replacement. 

DEDUCTIONS FOR UNCORRECTED WORK 

35. If the architects and owner deem it inexpedient to 
correct work injured or done not in accordance with 
contract, equitable deduction from the contract price 
shall be made therefor. Is this statement true or false? 

OWNER'S RIGHT TO TERMINATE CONTRACT 

36. Give five reasons, any of which would justify the 
owner's terminating the employment of the contractor. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



CONTRACTOR'S RIGHT TO STOP WORK OR 
TERMINATE CONTRACT 

37. Give three reasons, any of which the contractor 
could justify the termination of the contract. 

PAYMENTS 

38. What must the contractor provide the owner or 
architects whenever he receives a payment? 

ASSIGNMENT 

39. Is the following statement true or false? Neither 
party to the contract shall assign the contract or sublet it 
as a whole without the written consent of the other, nor 
shall the contractor assign any moneys due, or to become 
due, to him hereunder, without the previous written con- 
sent of the owner. 



CASH ALLOWANCES 

40. No demand for expenses or profit other than those 
included in the contract sum shall be allowed. Is this 
statement true or false? 



STUDY MATERIAL AVAILABLE 

The Mathematics Home Study Course has been com- 
piled into a pamphlet and is now available at a cost 
of 500 per copy. Requests for the pamphlet. The Car- 
pentry Supplemental Mathematics Workbook, should 
be sent to: General Secretary R. E. Livingston, United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 101 
Constitution Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20001. 

The Blueprints and Specifications for the Home Study 
Course in Blueprint Reading and Estimating are also 
available. The price for these is $2, and they also may 
be ordered from the General Secretary's office. 



ANSWERS TO HOME STUDY COURSE PROBLEMS WILL BE FOUND ON PAGE 35 



Leaders of Missouri Local Unions Visit Job Corps Center 



POPLAR BLUFF, MO.— Representa- 
tives of Carpenters' local unions from 
various parts of Missouri visited Poplar 
Bluff Job Corps Center January 11 in 
connection with a new nationwide Job 
Corps policy which will enlist labor un- 
ions in the recruitment of Job Corps 
enrollees. 

Touring the Job Corps center, which 
is nine miles north of here on U.S. 67, 
were Mel Shasserre of Jefferson City, 
international representative of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America; Henry L. Brown, president. 
Carpenters District Council of Kansas 
City; Ralph A. Hager and Jim Harding, 
business representatives of the Carpenters 
District Council of Kansas City; Chet 
Sliger, business representative of Carpen- 
ters Local 1049 at Poplar Bluff; Joe R. 
Boly, president. Carpenters Local 1049; 
Donald R. Bacon of Bloomfield, secre- 
tary-treasurer of Carpenters Local 618 
at Sikeston, and J. H. GriflSn of Bloom- 
field, business representative of Carpen- 
ters Local 618. 

The group was accompanied by Joe 
Joy, labor liaison officer. Job Corps head- 
quarters, Washington, D. C; Charles E. 
Gates, labor liaison officer, Regional Of- 
fice of Economic Opportunity, Kansas 
City, and former labor member of the 
Missouri Industrial Commission; James 
Tice, community affairs officer, Regional 
Office of Economic Opportunity, Kansas 
City; Jack Goss, recruitment specialist. 
Job Corps, Kansas City; Olin Matter, 
program specialist. Job Corps, Kansas 
City; Hansel "Red" Arnac, member of 
the board of the Poplar Bluff Chamber 
of Commerce; and Jim Ruble, mayor of 
Poplar Bluff. 

James Berlin, Job Corps center direc- 
tor, conducted the tour of the conserva- 
tion-type center, at which 224 men be- 



Charles E. Gates, Labor Li- 
aison, Kansas City OEO; 
Corpsman Raymond Smith; 
Corpsman Walt Ham den; 
Henry Brown, president, 
Carpenters District Council, 
Kansas City and Vicinity; 
and Mel Shasserre, Carpen- 
ters international representa- 
tive and secretary, Missouri 
State Council of Carpenters. 



tween the ages 16 and 22 are being 
trained. Berlin and other center staff 
members explained the curriculum of the 
vocational carpentry course taught at the 
center, which is one of several vocational 
courses taught at the Poplar Bluff Job 
Corps Center. 

The visitors met many Job Corpsmen 
and talked with them about their views 
of Job Corps and the Poplar Bluff center. 

Joe Joy of Washington, D. C., an- 
nounced that the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners had just been 
awarded a $2,900,357 MDTA contract 




to train 3,000 men as carpenters. He said 
that 580 of the trainees would be from 
the 11 -state North-Central Region of 
OEO, which includes Missouri, Kansas, 
Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, South 
Dakota, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, 
Utah and Idaho. 

Tice explained that another new Job 
Corps policy would have significant bear- 
ing on recruitment of Job Corps en- 
rollees. He said that enrollees may now 
be assigned in the same general region 
in which they are recruited. 



New, Full-Fledged Carpenters Presented Certificates 



GILBERTSVILLE, 

KY. — Three apprentices 
who have completed their 
four-year training with 
Local 2049 were given 
certificates recently. From 
left: Kenneth Osborn, 
Joe Dunn, Hoy Hiett, 
vice president, who pre- 
sented the certificates, and 
Billy D. Walker. 




APRIL, 1967 



19 



iwRiLMBawr 




SEND IN YOUR FANORfrES' MAti,TO fyyg^ ®Qf|iJj^'<'' ?5'iiiJ ^"^^-^ ^ "^^Ir^- ^^J^^^^'^' 



ORRY ^13 c- 1 ><; ,T , 



What y\ Mess? 

Woody: "What's a 'self-made 
man'?" 

Chopper: "Most of 'em I've seen 
are examples of unskilled labor!" 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

Jack from Jill 

The truckdriver was preparing to 
fix a flat for the good-looking gal. 
"What kind of jack do you have?" 
he asked. "Well," she replied, "would 
$5 be enough?" 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Rattle-Brained 

Teacher: Why didn't you answer 
the question? 

Student: i did, teach; I shook my 
head. 

Teacher: You didn't expect me to 
hear it rattle from here, did you? 



BUY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Willing 

Admiral Bilgebottom was standing 
outside a London club. One of the 
members, a snooty British nobleman, 
mistook him for the doorman and 
barked at him,, "Call me a cab." "All 
right," said the admiral, "You're a 
cab!" 

BE AN ACTIVE UNIONIST 

On The Level 

Apprentice: "I got up this morning 
at dawn to see the sunrise!" 

Carpenter: "Well, you managed to 
pick the right time!" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

The Rat Answer 

Teacher: Who wrote "To A Field 
Mouse?" 

Student: Robert Burns. 

Teacher: Correct. What else can 
you tell us about it? 

Student: He didn't get an answer. 



Safe at Home? 

The soap-box orator was exhorting 
his followers. "Comrades," he shouted, 
"make me your leader and I'll be be- 
hind you in everything you under- 
take!" 



BE UNION — BUY LABEL 




Project on the Shelf 

The apprentice was building a 
bookshelf for himself when the boss 
walked in. hie told the boy that 
personal projects were not allowed 
and that, from now on, he was on 
probation. Sometime later the ap- 
prentice asked the boss: "Am I still 
on probation?" "Why do you ask?" 
countered the boss. "Well," replied 
the apprentice, "I'd like to finish that 
bookshelf I started!" 

—Louis Delln, L.U. 608, New York. 



1 4 ALL — ALL 4 1 



Listen Before You Leap! 

If you wanna know how your girl 
will talk to you after you're married 



This Month's Limerick 

A brash young punk once thought 

himself able 
To burgle a furrier and steal a sable. 

Guards came on the run, 

"Boom boom" went a gun 
And thus ends this very sad fable. 
— hfelen & Dick Williams, Los Angeles. 



to her, listen to how she talks to her 
little brother. 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Good Question 

Mother: "Which apple do you 
want. Junior?" 

Junior: "The biggest one. " 

Mother: "Why, Junior, you should 
be polite and say the little one." 

Junior: "Well, mother, should I 
lie to be polite?" 

LOOK FOR THE UNION LABEL 

Smart Father 

"hlas your husband cured his deaf- 
ness?" 

"No, he's waiting until the children 
have finished having music lessons." 

UNITED WE STAND 

No Big Spender 

The high school girl was "going 
steady" with the boy down the block 
— which simply meant walking to the 
drugstore and sharing a soda. One 
evening after this routine, the young 
lady came home and sighed to her 
father: "Dating George sure makes 
It hard to realize that the American 
teen-ager spends $14 billion a year." 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Got A Problem 

Q: "What's a man who has gone to 
Europe and back without taking a 
bath?" 

A: "A dirty double crosser." 

B SHARP — WORK SAFELY 

A Triple Reward 

At church, the pastor announced 
that the church's Old Maid had 
dropped an unusually large contribu- 
tion in the collection and, therefore, 
would be allowed to select three 
hymns. Told of this, (she was hard 
of hearing), she stood up, pointed, 
and shouted: "I'll take him, and him 
and him!" 

— Susan Keefe, Springvale, Me. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



1 1 




The 
Utility 

WOOD 




WHETHER you carve it, build with it, burn it 
or knocl< on it, you're using man's oldest 
tool— wood! Ever stop to think that the 
only tool older than fire was the wood that 
fueled that first blaze? 

Since then, wood has "logged up" some ingenious uses. 
The original wheel was probably a simple section cut 
from a log; the Sumerians had wheels of this type as 
early as 4000 B.C. 

Plywood, amazingly, dates back 1500 years before 
Christ! According to information from researchers at the 
Canadian Hardwood Plywood Association, ancient "piles" 
or sheets were cut from the flat surface of a split log, 
and could never be wider than the log itself. 

Wood has been used for toothbrushes (in India, around 
600 B.C.)— and for false teeth (George Washington wore 
wooden dentures, and hated them). Eyeglass frames were 
made of wood in the 13th century— and in Shakespeare's 
day, women saw their way clear to wearing corsets with 
wooden stays. The legendary wooden horse built by the 
Greeks helped them get inside the wails of Troy. Eng- 
land's defensive "wooden walls" weren't walls at all; 
they were wooden warships before the advent of iron- 
clads. 

To solve an even "knottier" problem, money made from 
plywood was used in Tenino, Washington, when that 
town's banks failed in 1932. Scrip was printed up on 
plywood "coins" in denominations of 25^, 50i^ and $1.00. 
Plywood money notwithstanding, people have banked 
on wood primarily to build shelters. Prehistoric man made 
crude lean-tos of wood. The first real houses, built in the 
New Stone Age and unearthed near Aichach, Germany, 
had wooden floors and walls of split logs. 

Later, the log cabin became part of American folklore; 
even today, the wood frame house maintains its popularity 
despite a host of competing materials. Indoors, wood is 
prized for paneling that lends warmth to any decor. Ply- 
wood brings this beauty within reach of those who could 
not afford solid wood paneling; Canadian Birch plywood 
is a particular favorite because it is easy to install and 
lends itself to brilliant finishes. One of the hardest of 
hardwoods, Canadian Birch is unexcelled for durability; 
its surface stays satin-smooth for years with almost no 
maintenance. 

Birch may mean carefree elegance to moderns— but 
to ancient Norsemen it meant the eternal return of spring 
and renewal of the earth. The pine is the symbol of lon- 
gevity to the Chinese and Japanese. The people of Brit- 
tany believe the aspen trembles because it was used for 
Christ's cross and was the only tree that did not shake 
during the Crucifixion. 

Know why we "knock on wood"? It all started back 
when primitive man thought that trees were inhabited by 
spirits of gods. When making a wish, a man would knock 
on the tree to ask permission of the resident spirit. 

Next time you knock on wood, give thought of this: 
there are at least 4500 different uses of wood and its by- 
products—not counting plastics. Chances are if the an- 
cients who carved their tools and idols out of this amazing 
"discovery" could see it today, they "wooden" believe it! 



This tree is 62 years old. It's 
been through fire and drought, 
plague and plenty. And all of 
this is recorded in its rings. 



Each spring and summer a tree adds new lay- 
ers of wood to its trunk. The wood formed in 
spring grows fast, and is lighter because it con- 
sists of large cells. In summer, growth is slower; 
the wood has smaller cells and is darker. So 
when the tree is cut, the layers appear as alter- 
nating rings of light and dark wood. 

Count the dark rings, and you know the tree's 
age. Study the rings, and you can learn much 
more. Many things affect the way the tree grows, 
and thus alter the shape, thickness, color and 
evenness of the rings. 

The small illustrations surrounding the cross 
section of a log on these pages indicate the 
trials and tribulations of a single source of lum- 
ber before it reaches the skilled hands of a jour- 
neyman carpenter. 

Our thanks to the St. Regis Paper Company for permission to 
reprint the accompanying illustration from a recent advertisement 




1904 

The Tree— a lobloMy pine— is born 




1909 

The tree grows rapidly, with no dis- 
turbance. There is abundant rainfall 
and sunshine in spring and summer. 
The rings are relatively broad, and 
are evenly spaced. 






1914 

When the tree was 6 years old, 
something pushed against it. mak- 
ing it lean. The rmgs are now wider 
on the lower side, as the tree builds 
"reaction wood" to help support it. 




1924 

The tree is growing straight again. 
But Its neighbors are growing too, 
and their crowns and root systems 
take much of the water and sunshine 
the tree needs. 




1927 ^Wf-tWSfiSCT^T.Wfcwi., 

The surrounding trees are harvested. 
The larger trees are removed and 
there is once again ample nourish- 
ment and sunlight. The tree can now 
grow rapidly again. 




1930 >isa»w*:aKrs^s^i- 

A fire sweeps through the forest. 
Fortunately, the tree is only scarred, 
and year by year more and more of 
the scar is covered over by newly 

formed wood. 




1942 

These narrow rings may have been 
caused by a prolonged dry spell. 
One or two dry summers would not 
have dried the ground enough to 
slow the tree's growth this much. 




1957 

Another series of narrow rings may 
have been caused by an insect like 
the larva of the sawfly. It eats the 
leaves and leafbuds of many kinds 
of coniferous trees. 



COPYRIGHT, 19fi6, ST. REGrS PAPER COMPANY, 
150 EAST 4aND STREET, N. Y., N. Y. 10017. 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 




WHITE OAK PATRiARCH-The 597- 

year-old white oak, shown above, was 
growing in Western Pennsylvania until 
it was logged recently. In the photo, 
Alex Badenoch, Pennsylvania histori- 
an, measures one of the logs and 
checks the ring grov/th. He estimates 
that the tree emerged from a seed in 
the Year 1397, when Europe was 
emerging from the Dark Ages. By the 
time Columbus reached America it 
was a sturdy oak of 95 years. When 
it was cut down, the 100-foot-high tree 
was divided Into nine highly-market- 
able logs. Photo by Larry Hammond. 

WOOD FROM THE ICE AGE-A 

bald cypress log from a prehistoric 
swamp that lies under many midtown 
Washington, D. C, buildings, dwarfs 
Martha Block, an employee of the Na- 
tional Geographic Society. Excavators 
struck the remains of an ancient cy- 
press forest while digging the site for 
the Society's modern headquarters 
building. The forest grew during the 
Ice Age, 100,000 to 500,000 years 
ago. National Geographic Society 
Photograph 





TOM 




ROUNDUP 



STRIKE TIME DROPS— American workers lost only 16 one -hundredths of 1 percent of 

total working time because of strikes in the 1960-66 period compared with 

32 one-hundredths of 1 percent during the 1950s, according to estimates hy the 

Lahor Dept.'s Bureau of Lahor Statistics. Ahout 4,200 stoppages involving 

1.8 million workers started in 1966 with a loss of 19 one-hundredths of 1 percent 

of total working time. The 1965 worktime loss was 18 one-hundredths of 1 percent, 

with 1.5 million workers participating in 3,963 stoppages, the report showed. 

HOW NOW, MR. NOW— Memhers of the Teachers Union in Washington are laughing 
about the supervisor who confronted a union representative wearing an AFT button. 
The button, in support of collective bargaining for teachers, read: "C.B. NOW." 
The supervisor glanced at the button and then engaged the representative in a 
discussion which began, "Mr. Now....". 



GOMPERS PAPERS-The AFL-CIO has given to 
Samuel Gompers, founder of the former AFL 
in 1924, except for one year. The gift, 
than 300 volumes of letter books covering 
that led to formation of the AFL got unde 
reflects every phase of the rise and grow 
period. The library announcement said th 
primary source for the study of trade uni 
qualified researchers in the library's Ma 



the Library of Congress the papers of 

and its president from 1886 to his death 
announced by the library, includes more 

the period from 1883, when the movement 
r way, to 1924. The correspondence 
th of the labor movement over the 41-year 
e collection "will be an indispensable 
onism in this country." It is open to 
nuscript Division. 



MEDICARE SABOTAGE— Far from supporting Medicare now that it is law, organized 
medicine is "trying to wreck" the program, according to Leo Perils, Director of 
the AFL-CIO 's Department of Community Service Activities. His charges were made 
in an interview on "Labor News Conference" on Mutual Radio Network. Perils 
declared that fast-rising medical fees and physicians' insistence on billing 
insured elderly patients instead of the designated Medicare agencies are creating 
hardships for the very people that the law is designed to protect. Perils said 
that direct patient billing forces people with already inadequate incomes to 
undergo the additional hardships of filing claims and enduring long delays in 
reimbursement of medical costs. And because of illness or other reasons, "there 
are many people in that age group who are simply incapable of filling out these 
forms," he said. 

MORE ON MEDICARE- The Social Security Administration has approved 1,644 extended 
care facilities for use by participants in the Medicare program. Another 856 
institutions still have one or two final steps to take before formally entering 
into an agreement to participate in the program. It is estimated that about 
50,000 to 60,000 Medicare patients will need these facilities at any one time in 
the near future. 

BUSY TAX MEN— More than $130 billion in Federal income taxes will be processed by 
electronic computers this year, when, for the first time, the machines will be 
checking all returns. More than 100 million returns must be processed, according 
to the Internal Revenue Service, compared to 1930, when only 6 million returns 
were filed, representing $3 billion. 

TV SATELLITES— President Johnson has recommended to Congress the expenditure of $9 
million for the establishment of a "Corporation for Public Television." The 
agency's first job would be to study the possibility of an educational satellite 
system. 



APRIL, 1967 



25 



I'^'rBanadiaii Report 



Taxation Study 
Brings Sleepless Nights 

Four and a half years ago the fed- 
eral government, at that time Conserv- 
ative, appointed a Royal Commission 
to investigate Canada's system of tax- 
ation. It named an accountant, Ken- 
neth Carter, as chairman. 

This commission of investigation 
was welcomed by the business world, 
who were wont to shed tears over the 
high taxes levelled against corpora- 
tions, the rich and so on. 

Now that the commission has re- 
ported, there are few in the business 
world who don't wish that the Carter 
Commission had never lived. Carter 
says and proves that their tears were 
crocodile, that it is not big business 
and the well-to-do that have been un- 
justly dealt with by our taxation sys- 
tem but the lower income groups. 

The Carter Report picks out the big 
mining, oil and insurance companies 
for special attention. It points out that 
up to 1964 the uranium industry made 
a gross return of over one billion dol- 
lars on a $250 million investment, 
made a net profit of over $250 million 
(or 100 per cent on investment), but 
paid only $30 million in taxes, just 
over 10 percent. 

The big Canadian insurance com- 
panies in 1964 made a net profit of 
over $90 million, but paid income 
taxes of only $2,000,000. 

Carter recommends sweeping 
changes in Canada's system of tax- 
ation. The trade union movement will 
generally support the recommenda- 
tions which include a capital gains tax, 
restraint on company expense accounts 
and the removal of tax concessions to 
the big corporations. 

The whole report covers six volumes 
and sells for $27.50. Not bedtime 
reading, but there are a lot of people 
in government and business who are 
beginning to lose sleep over it. 

Housing Is Timely 
Citizenship Theme 

This year the theme of Citizenship 
Month, sponsored by the Canadian 
Labor Congress in co-operation with 
the provincial federations, was housing. 
It was extremely timely. 

Canada, especially the urban areas, 
is in the crux of a housing crisis. For 



example, in Metro Toronto, an aver- 
age home sold in 1966 for almost 
$30,000. An average vacant, serviced 
lot sold for almost $10,000. Interest 
rates on mortgage money are at an 
all-time high. 

The public concern is just beginning 
to mount. The issue will be a live one 
for a long time to come. 

Few knowledgable people are blam- 
ing labor for the high cost of housing. 
One major contractor in the Metro 
Toronto area told the federal probe 
on consumer prices that since 1945 
materials costs have gone up 51 per- 
cent and labor costs 136 percent. But 
he had to admit that the total cost of 
building a house had gone up only 40 
percent. 

Another big residential contractor 
conceded that, since 1960, the cost of 
building a house had gone up only 15 
percent and of building an apartment 
only 20 percent. 

The construction industry has be- 
come more efficient; that is, the best 
contractors have. 

Even so. more planning by all levels 
of government concerned and more 
cohesion by government departments 
would help. 

But, said the Ontario Federation of 
Labor in its brief to the federal prices 
probe a month ago, you cannot build 
low cost housing on high cost land and 
pay high interest rates. 

The Federation urged a major in- 
vestigation into all aspects of Canada's 
serious housing problem with the view 
to coming up with some imaginative, 
forward-looking solutions. 

More Time Lost 
Through Accidents 

The trade union movement made 
big wage gains in 1966, but in most 
cases had a hard time getting them. 

This is shown by the time lost 
through strikes and lockouts last year, 
the second highest on record since 
1945. Time lost amounted to 0.33 
percent of time worked by the non- 
agricultural working force, about dou- 
ble the time lost in 1965. But still 33 
days of lost time for every 1,000 days 
worked is not critical. There is much 
time lost through industrial accidents 
and sickness, and through unemploy- 
ment. 



The Outlook for 
Major Construction 

Some people in the construction in- 
dustry are already worrying about 
1968 and beyond. Some big projects 
like EXPO end this year, it is true, 
but more are in the offing. 

The Manicouagan power develop- 
ment in Quebec, the Mactaquac power 
development in New Brunswick, the 
Churchill Falls power project in Lab- 
rador, the twinning of the Welland 
Canal locks in Ontario, the develop- 
ment of Manitoba's Nelson River, and 
British Columbia's Peace and Colum- 
bia Rivers, and the causeway to Prince 
Edward Island are some of the biggest 
ones. 

And if homebuilding is stepped up 
as it should be, the construction and 
allied industries will be busy for the 
foreseeable future. 

Status-of-Women Group 
Is Commissioned 

The Liberal Government in Ottawa 
has established a Royal Commission 
on the Status of Women to insure the 
equality of women with men "in all 
aspects of Canadian society." 

Consumer Credit 
Gets Federal Study 

The federal joint Senate-House of 
Commons committee on consumer 
credit (Consumer Prices Probe) asked 
the government to stop unethical 
lending and credit-buying practices, 
and to guarantee low-interest long- 
term loans for families with yearly in- 
comes of $4,000 or less, to allow them 
to purchase essentials for home and 
family. Maximum loan would be 
$1,500. 

The committee revealed that three- 
quarters of the loan business is with 
people who are already in debt. Only 
about 36 per cent of the money loaned 
is actually advanced in cash. 

The idea of the guaranteed annual 
income, or "negative income tax," was 
also among the proposals in the On- 
tario Federation of Labor's brief to the 
special House of Commons-Senate 
Committee on consumer credit (prices). 

The OFL also emphasized equitable 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



distribution of income, housing, edu- 
cation, health care, and auto compen- 
sation. 

CLC Recruiting 
Double That of CNTU 

The Canadian Labor Congress is re- 
cruiting workers in Quebec at more 
than double the rate of the Quebec- 
based Confederation of National Trade 
Unions. Last year the Quebec Labor 
Board issued 457 certification de- 
cisions to Congress affiliates bargaining 
for almost 27 thousand workers; the 
CNTU got 290 certificates and 12,800 
workers. 

Civil Servants 

Gain Right to Strike 

About 200 thousand Canadian civil 
servants gained the right to strike as 
part of federal collective bargaining 
legislation covering the government's 
own workers. 

Three bills passed by the House of 
Commons establish a bargaining sys- 
tem, modernize the Civil Service Act 
to allow civil servants greater political 
freedom, and establishes the Treasury 
Board as management's bargaining 
agent. 

Empire Club Lauds 
Auto Pact Report 

The Empire Club, starchy Toronto 
big-business outfit, applauded UAW 
Canadian Director George Burt after 
his hard-hitting speech on the Canada- 
U.S. auto pact. 

So-called "inefficient" Canadian 
plants competed successfully in price 
with American counterparts, because 
otherwise the Americans wouldn't buy 
the Canadian product. 

And buy they did: in the first 11 
months of 1966, Canada exported 185 
thousand cars to the U.S., compared 
with only 45 thousand the year before. 

Yet these new cars — with identical 
equipment — cost from $600 to $1,000 
more in Canada. The imported y4»!ej-- 
ican car also costs more here despite 
elimination of the tariff, Burt said. 

Textile Workers 
Hit By Injunction 

The Textile Workers Union of 
America, still engaged in a year-old 
battle against injunctions against dem- 
onstrations at the struck TILCO plas- 
tics plant, has been hit again. 

This time the injunction limits pick- 
eting at the 300-employee Spinrite 
Yarns and Dyers Ltd. in Listowel, Ont. 
The strike started last November 21. 







carpenters... good v\/ork 



and Lufkin Red End® rules are a natural combination. Careful crafts- 
men who set high standards for themselves demand the best in the 
tools they use. One tool that has been a favorite of carpenters for many 
years is the Lufkin X46 extension rule. The features listed below are 
some of the reasons why. 

Durable epoxy coating, proved superior to any other, gives extra pro- 
tection for long wear. 

Brass slide, with black-filled graduations and figures, makes it possible 
to take inside measurements. 

Spring joints have mating slots and projections for triple locking that 
helps to prevent end play. 

Bold figures, embedded in the wood, are easy to read; 16" (stud) centers 
are marked in red figures. 

Solid brass strike plates on each section take all of the sliding friction, 
save abrasion of figures. 
Look for Lufkin at your favorite hardware store or lumber yard. 



THE LUFKIN RULE COMPANY/ SAGINAW. MICHIGAN 

MASTER RULE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. INC,,.Middletown, New York • THE LUFK!N RULE COMPANY o1 Canada 
Limited, Barrie. Ontario • ANSON STICK CO., Wadison, Maine • LUFMEX, S. A,, Mexico City, Mexico • LUFKIN CARIBE 
INC.. Ponce, Puerto. Rico • LUFKIN SPECIALTIES, INC., -Jackson, Tennessee • LUFKIN INSTRUMENTS, Cleveland, Ohio 




APRIL, 1967 



27 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at Box 508, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



Coon Callers 




Ernest L. Smith of Mill Valley, Cali- 
fornia, a longtime member of Local 35, 
San Rafael, says he is now "retired" and 
"reformed," retired from Local 35 and 
a reformed coon hunter. He writes: 
"Dear Fred: 

"We are reformed coon hunters who 
feed eight to nine raccoons on our patio 
every evening. A buzzer connected to a 
feeding platform announces their arrival. 

"Hand feeding with marshmallows 
(next to chicken, it's their favorite food) 
has tamed some of them, so much that 
they come into the house and eat more 
of the same off the fireplace hearth. Much 
more gratifying than hunting. 

"I'm enclosing a copy of our Christ- 
mas card this past year which received 
more comment than any we have ever 
sent. The raccoon in the foreground is 
one of our frequent house guests." 

■ Kitchen-Door Angler 

Ten-pound sea-run rainbow trout, less 
than ten miles from the kitchen door. 
That is not an unusual occurrence for 
fortunate angler, John Pesdirz. a member 
of the Carpenters' Union and a resident 
of Port Coquitlam. British Columbia. 
John fishes the AUouet River near home, 
in company with his daughter, and has 



taken many a chunky sea 'bow, other- 
wise known as steelhead, from there this 
past fall and winter. 

■ Fishing Family 

AI Farrell of Sherman Oaks, California, 
a member of Local 2288, paid-up and in 
good standing since 1943, is a grand- 
father with nine grandchildren, five of 
which are boys — and all fishermen. He 
credits wife Lois, top angler in the fam- 
ily; says she always catches the first, 
largest and most bass on their junkets to 
Lake Shasta. Who said fishermen weren't 
honest? The Farrells use waterdogs for 
bait. 

■ Better-Late Item 

Mario Bove, Jr. of Cape May, New 
Jersey, a member of Local 1743, Wild- 
wood, travelled "far, wide and hand- 
some" in search of a buck this past 
season: finally nailed a 12-pointer, with 
a 32" antler spread in the Grand Mesa 
country of Colorado this past October. 

■ Loebe Triumphs 

Elmer Loebe of 
Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, a member 
of Local 1741, will 
long remember the 
day he caught a 
lunker northern 
pike. Up 'til then 
it was the largest, 
and he's never 
caught a larger 
one since. Here's 
a photographic rec- 
ord of the catch — 
Brother Loebe with 
his 12 pound north- 
em that measured 
-•■'' -^^ 36 inches from 

nose to tail. Scene of the catch was Lake 
Foygan, Wisconsin and the toughest 
chore was getting the scrapper into the 
boat — without a gaff or landing net! 




■ Gone Are The Days! 

Occasionally I page through a stack 
of old outdoor magazines, some dated 
1884-5, I fell heir to, and what con- 
tinues to catch my eye are the gun and 
rifle ads. For instance: 

The plinker or varmint hunter could 
buy a .22 caliber Stevens rifle for $4.25, 
while a Remington Rifle, Model 2 in a 
.32 caliber, sold for $7.50. Winchester 
Arms was asking the huge sum of $20 
for their excellent Model 73, a lever- 
action big-game rifle and Marlin Arms 
was featuring a similar lever action for 
$13. 

A double-barreled shotgun, called the 
Sam Holt, with fancy engraved butt 
plate, could be had for $8.90 while a 
mail-order concern was featuring a shot- 
gun called the "Long Range Winner" 
for $3.98. 

But the red hot bargain of the day 
was offered by another mail-order con- 
cern — a .22 caliber Hamilton for $1.61 — 
with 100 bullets thrown in to seal the 
bargain 1 

■ Big-Game Hunters 



* ^ 




Allan Hosier of Louisburg, Missouri, 
a member of Local 978, Springfield, Mis- 
souri, is an avid big-game hunter and has 
passed on the love and appreciation of 
same to his 14-year old daughter. Here's 
a pic of the fair nimrod with an Alaskan 
caribou she brought down at 225 yards 
with her 30-06 rifle. Brother Hosier nailed 
a large moose that weighed over 1,500 
lbs., and a caribou. Last season's trek 
to Alaska also included some excellent 
salmon fishing. 

■ Family Record 

Daryl Sullivan of Rochester, Minne- 
sota, whose dad is a member of Local 
1382, credits big brother Dan for top 
northern in the family — a 14% pound 
lunker in 1963. 

■ Buck, Not Doe 

All is not honey and cream in the deer- 
hunting scene. Some hunt long and hard, 
but such effort is of no avail when the 
game is out of range. One hunter who 
knows that well is Anthony Hoffman of 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Secretary's Report 




General Secretary R. E. Living- 
ston, a fisherman at heart, but ordi- 
narily a man who is unable to 
leave his busy desk at the General 
Office in Washington, took advan- 
tage of an invitation to join a 
fishing party in Miami, Florida, 
last February and returned from 
the outing with the sizable amber- 
jack which he displays above. The 
Secretary's Report is accepted as 
read. 



Romulus, Michigan, a member of Local 
982. After 20 years, he nailed his first 
deer. "Thought it was a doe at first," said 
Tony, "but after I downed it, I dis- 
covered, by virtue of its spiked horns, 
that it was a buck." 

■ The Snappers 

John Ray Dishong of Nelsonville, Ohio, 
a member of Local 1720, Athens, says 
those snapping turtles taste a lot better 
than most people think. "Don't let the 
looks fool you," says Brother Dishong. 
In company with his two boys he eased 
many a ten and fifteen-pounder from 
Margaret's Creek near Athens, then 
topped off the season with a giant speci- 
men that tipped the scales at 36 pounds. 
Can any of you snapper hunters top that? 

■ Outdoors Tip 

If you happen to be traveling through 
Arizona in May. plan to take in the 
big 1967 AFL-CIO Union Industries 
Show at Phoenix, Arizona, May 19-24. 
It runs from 1 to 10:30 p.m. daily, and 
it's well worth your time. Look for the 
big display of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
too! Admission is free, and there are 
thousands of giveaways and prizes at the 
hundreds of exhibits. 




makes 
products 
better 
for you 

Want to stop splitting? 

Even when toe-nailing 2 x 10 floor joists? 

Square Sheffield Scotch Nails reduce wood splitting drastically. 
Because they have a square design, they tend to cut their way into 
wood rather than wedging and splitting the grain. This means a 
better-looking job, that measures up to the highest standards of 
the builder and the customer. 

Just as important, official testing has shown that the Sheffield 
Scotch Nail withdraws much easier from new wood shortly after 
driving than the ordinary nail. (Such easy withdrawal can save 
trouble during construction.) Yet just 30 days later — after wood 
has dried — withdrawal resistance of Sheffield Scotch Nails is 
well over lOC/o greater than that of the common nail. By this time, 
deep serrations down the nail's full length have gripped the wood 
fibers, anchoring nails tightly. 

So spread the word about these Sheffield Scotch Nails. Make 
sure your dealer stocks them. For further information or a sample 
packet, write Armco Steel Corporation, Department W-1087AA, 
7000 Roberts Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64125. 



M 



ARMCO 



APRIL, 1967 



29 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




(1) POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.— Local 203 
recently celebrated its 80th Anniversary 
with a dinner-dance and a pin presenta- 
tion ceremony. Pins were presented to 
twenty-five 40-year members, fifteen 45- 
year members and four 50-year members. 
Two of the 50-year members were not 
able to attend. There were 250 people 
present at the affair. The pins were pre- 
sented by James Rhynders, president of 
Local 203, and William Sorenson, Busi- 
ness Representative of the Poughkeepsie 
Electrical Workers Union. William Sor- 
enson also acted as Master of Ceremonies. 
William Sorenson is on the left, present- 
ing a pin to Antonio DeCarlo a 50-year 
member, and James Rhynders, 3rd from 
left, is presenting a 50-year pin to Joseph 
Eisenhardt. 



(2) PITTSTON, PA.— Twenty-five and 
50-year pins were presented to the fol- 
lowing members of Local 401 at a recent 
presentation ceremony: Left to right, 
first row, are F. Palmieri (48 years), W. 
Schooley (54), President J. Delicati, W. 
Smiles (50), H. Craig (43), Fin. Sec. V. 
Lanunziata (25), Rec. Sec. L. Brown (31), 
Treas. J. Barbush (25), Bus. Rep. E. Con- 
sidine, and Vice Pres. N. Solano. Second 
row: R. Bonita (29), A. Arfanello (25), 
B. A. Manganieelo (26), I. Maurizzi (25), 
P. Maurizzi (25), A. Ninotti (26), A. 
Hreha (30), D. Recine (25), P. Colanisso 
(25), and W. DeHaba (28). Absent be- 
cause of illness was P. Latzko (30). 



(3) DENVER, COLO.— Twenty-five-year 
pins were presented to two veteran mem- 
bers of Local 2249 by President Bill 
Martin (center) at a recent presentation 
ceremony. Receiving pins are Ray Bergh, 
(left) a Joint Rep. of the Brotherhood 
and a member of Local 2249 and Perry 
Collicott. 



(4) LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS— Pic- 
tured are members of Local 690 that 
recently received 25 and 50-year pins. 
Left to right, front row: Cecil Hunter, 
Ernest Schlerith, Frank Lindsay, Lester 
P. Williford, Fred W. Westfali, L. W. 
Roachell and Joe Weber. Standing, left 
to right: Frank Keller, A. L. Stevens, R. 
D. Huffman, C. E. Blacklock, Charles 
Southern, B. A. Mills and Odis J. Carter. 
Not present — R. D. Bosshart, James H. 






30 



THE CARPENTER 



Boyles, Lee Brun, William R. Camp, 
Clinton C. Culver, V. A. Davenport, L. 
A. Devore, Albert E. Goodwin, Carl 
Green, C. L. Harper, A. H. Hunt, E. F. 
McCoy, B. W. Nininger, Neils C. Peter- 
son, M. G. Rogers, Chester E. Smith, 
G. F. Vaughn, A. P. Wolfe, Sr. 



(5) RICHMOND, CALIF. — Presenta- 
tion of 25-year service pins was recently 
made by Brother Anthony Ramos, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the California State 
Council of Carpenters, to eligible mem- 
bers of Local 642. Besides Brother Ramos 
and Brother Rolland I. Sprague, Acting 
President of Local 642, pictured are the 
following: Neal Anderson, T. E. Baldwin, 
Clarence Betz, Orron P. Brown, Earl J. 
Bryant, Earl Carlisle, Jos Cilione, Albert 
Connerley, E. H. Connerley, L. E. Con- 
nehley, Vernon Davidson, Willis J. Gould, 
Oscar Hoff, Albert C. Hubbard, Clifton 
E. Hurst, Ralph Johnson, O. W. Kaun- 
dart, Delbert Kimbrough, Leo Knight, 
John S. Lowrance, Paul Madison, An- 
thony Martin, Walter Mason, Louis 
Merlo, Eugene Pagni, Leonard E. Rob- 
ertson, E. A. Ryosa, Harry V. Spiher, 
G. W. Sutton, John Tkach, Alvin Van 
Winkle, Clifford Walker, Mark Wharton, 
John Woltkamp. Unable to attend the 
meeting due to 
town, however, 
following: Thomas 
Morris, Albert 
Max Owen, Ernest 
Schmit. Leroy 
B. Stewart, Eino 
E. Wright. 



(6) CHARLESTON, SOUTH CARO- 
LINA — The following Local 159 mem- 
bers received twenty-five year pins at a 
recent meeting: Front row, seated, left 
to right: Thomas E. Fulton (26 years), 
Robert R. Owen (26), J. D. Herndon 
(26), Thomas A. Mitchum (26), James 
L. Copeland (25), Charles Ogilbee (26), 
R. L. Blocker (27), R. C. Scott (25), P. D. 
Fogle (44), P. Y. Eadie (28), and J. G. 
Easterling, Jr. (25). Back row, standing, 
left to right: Aaron Washington (41 
years), Eliga Gibbs (25), Ernest Mazyck 
(44), Otto C. Gregory (26), Carter C. 
Deas, Jr. (27), J. T. Herndon (25), Ron- 
ald O. Fine (28), David J. Goude (26), 
James R. Bach (26), John E. Williams 
(27), George L. Beach, Sr. (28), Hubert 
Broadway (27), Everette Whitmore (27), 
and J. F. Livingston (25). Members elig- 
ible for twenty-five year pins not present: 
George M. Campbell (26 years), T. L. 
Gantt (27), J. B. L. Gibson (26), W. P. 
Kizer (26), Joseph LaPrince (28), B. H. 
Lessene (27), T. P. Orvig (26), Haskell 
E. Owen (28), Joseph L. Parker (25), 
R. H. Robertson (48), Thomas A Rozier 
(26), Howell W. Stone (25), William J. 
Warren (27), George G. Wethers (25), 
Joseph C. Williams (39), Milton E. Wil- 
liams (25), N. R. Bishop (26), George A. 
Campbell (27), and A. H. Lemacks (28). 












APRIL, 1967 



31 




/ 
/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Member to Africa 
On Church Mission 

SYRACUSE, N.Y.— In the shadow of 
Africa's towering Mt. Kilimanjaro a 
member of Local 12 of Syracuse is now 
teaching natives of the young state of 
Tanzania the age-old art of carpentry. 

He is also helping Catholic mission- 
aries of the Holy Ghost Order to con- 
struct a new mission site. 

Leonard Biscotti, aged 50. left Ken- 
nedy Airport in New York last December, 
bound for Tanzania. He is now in the 
village of Usa working beside Father 
Gerry Feeley, formerly of Syracuse, who 
has been serving his church in Africa for 
12 years. Housed and fed by the mis- 
sionaries. Brother Biscotti will receive 
no pay during his six-month stay on the 
continent. 

Asked why he undertook the work, 
Biscotti said, "Every once in a while 1 
get this feeling to help people, and then 
I've got to do missionary work." 

The Local 12 member already has a 
strong background of service to under- 
developed nations. He has been teaching 
carpentry to Peace Corps volunteers at 
Syracuse University. He demonstrated 
how the craft can help to better the 
living conditions of African natives by 
actually directing the erection of a model 
village on Syracuse University property. 

More than 300 Peace Corpsmen trained 
by Biscotti are now serving in Africa. 

Biscotti has applied for a Peace Corps 
post himself. He hopes to eventually be 
assigned to work in Africa by that Fed- 
eral agency. 

The Local 12 member says that his 
wife, Mary, to whom he has been mar- 
ried for 26 years, at first had some fleet- 
ing misgivings about his ventures. 

"But she knows that this is what I want 
to do," he adds. 

The Biscottis are parents of two daugh- 
ters — one a novice in Mt. Carmelite 
order of nuns and the other a housewife 
in El Paso, Texas. A son, Leonard. Jr., 
is employed by the Syracuse Traffic Viola- 
tions Bureau. 

TIMELY REMINDER 

Attend your local vmion meetings 
regularly. Be an active member of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. Your voice is needed 
in its deliberations. Your vote is needed 
on many vital issues affecting your 
livelihood. 



TREE HOUSE TIME 




ASHLAND, KY. — The return of 
spring inspired four members of Local 
472, Astiland, and 1111, Ironton, Oliio, 
to build a tree house for some lucky kids 
at the residence of Terry Mussetter in 
Ashland. Arnold Blankenship of Local 
1111 works atop the ladder, above. Other 
participants included: George Ward of 
Local 472; John Groves, "general fore- 
man"; and Ike Stephens, "general con- 
tractor." Specifications: The house is 6' x 
8'; 10' from the ground; built of 2" x 8" 
joists; 1" X 12" boxed construction walls 
5'6" high; roof pitch — 8 and 12 front and 
4 and 12 back. Has carpeted floor, elec- 
tric heating, trap door entrance. This is 
all built around a sturdy 16" beech tree. 



CODED NUMBERS 

Here's a brain teaser sent to us 
by Representative Joseph Lia of 
the New York State Council. It's 
a multiplication problem in which 
you are to transpose the letters into 
digits. As a clue, we must tell you 
that the "O" is not a zero but an 
"8". Now take it from there and 
figure out what all the other digits 
are: 

CARPENTER 
UNION 



CARPENTER 
UI TEUAPOAE 
U NUUURACTU 
C ARPENTER 
RTF ORUCUUO 

RUITEARCIECIRR 

For an answer to this puzzle, 
turn to Page 36. 



Local 1006 Honors 
Vets at Testimonial 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J.— Veteran 
members of Local 1006. with years of 
service ranging from 25 to 60 years, were 
recently honored by the membership at a 
dinner-dance, where an over capacity of 
nearly 500 tickets were sold. A total of 
105 members of the Brotherhood were 
eligible to receive service pins. Almost 
all of this number were able to attend the 
affair and accept their awards in person. 

Continuous membership pins included 
one member with 60 years of service, 
three members with 59 years, one mem- 
ber with 58 years, two with 50 years, 
seven members with 45 years, five mem- 
bers with 40 years, one member with 35 
years, 28 member with 30 years, and 57 
members with 25 years of service. This is 
a total of 3210 years of service. Many 
of the brothers receiving pins have served 
or are now serving as officers of Local 
1006, and district or state councils. 

Affair Chairman Thomas Roster turned 
the microphone over to the master of 
ceremonies, the Honorable Chester W. 
Paulus, mayor of the city of New Bruns- 
wick. The mayor then introduced Mon- 
signor William Fitzgerald who delivered 
the invocation. Andrew Daddio, presi- 
dent of Local 1006, welcomed the hon- 
ored guests, the attending members, and 
friends of the Brotherhood. 

There were speeches by Robert F. Ohl- 
weiler, General Representative; George 
Walish, president of the Penn. State 
Council of Carpenters; and John Wade, 
president of The Middlesex County 
Building and Construction Trades 
Council. Mayor Paulus emphasized the 
key role all carpenters are playing in 
Middlesex County and in the rapid de- 
velopment extending throughout the 
entire world. 

Business Representative Sewell A. Peck- 
ham read off the names of the following 
members who received service pins: 

60 Year Member: Charles Dunn. 

59 Year Members: Alvin Bean, Ernest 
Lucas, William Randolph. 

58 Year Member: William Mulligan. 

50 Year Members: Axel Karlson, Eu- 
gene Keegan, Sr. 

45 Year Members: Dominick Bemad, 
Adam Frank, Charles Harris, Frank J. 
Hart, Stephen Kaplar, Jacob Stemmer, 
Stanley Wondowski. 

40 Year Members: Peter Belli, Bias 
Bucolo, Edwin Grover, Sr., August Jan- 
icker, Everard Vander Wee. 

35 Year Member: Herman Newlin. 

30 Year Members: Steve Arman, Percy 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



Bartlett. Edwin Hardy, Frank Holzworth, 
J. Howard Kern, Stephen Kokai, John 
Lear, Sr., Max Lemerick, Sr., Jack Losso, 
Joseph Mazellan, Joseph Molnar, Fred 
Mundy, Bent Olsen, Eric Osterblom, 
Primo Pormilli, Anthony Rossetto, John 
Rossetto, Michael Rusciano, John Salon- 
tay, WilHam Sicknick, Louis Spiesz, 
Joseph Staat, Frank Teneralli, James 
Tonelli, Isaac Van Arsdalen, Victor Wil- 
son, Frank Zandomengo. 

25 Year Members: Louis Anzolut, Ig- 
natius Battaglia, William Belloflf, Cliflford 
Bennett, Damien Bennett, Cornelius 
Beaukenkamp, Andrew Black, Louis Bru- 
stowicz, Rosario Calamoneri, Leonard 
Cicchi, Louis CoUari, Andrew Connolly, 
B. Earl Corliss, P. Lester Dayton, Ed- 
ward Deuchar, John Domino, Frank 
Donato, Arthur Eastland, Julius Fekete, 
Patsy Genito, Conrad Heflfron, Robert 
Hood, Llewellyn Jenkins, Eugene Kee- 
gan, Jr., Louis Kosztyo, Walter Koziatek, 
Sr., Joseph Kubis, Afonase Kurlonak, 
Ola Larson, William Lease, Isadore 
Levine, John Lukasonek, Marilio Maran- 
sana, Alex Matusz, Vincent MoUica, 
Fred Murray, John Muscle, John O'Neill, 
Peter Pellowski, Joseph Rappan, David 
Rizzo, Sr., Joseph Roberts, Cono Rutolo, 
Peter Sackett, Aloysius Schmid, Victor 
Skomba, Frank Small, Alf Sorenson. 
William Stenner, John Suchon, Elwood 
Suydam, Stephen Talan, Peter Trus- 
kiewicz, Thomas Tufaro, Louis Venute, 
Michael Wilchuk, Elio Zardus. 



Mammoth Tree 











s.v. •/ 




MEDFORD, ORE.— Trees grow big in 
Oregon, as this giant Douglas fir attests. 
Harvested in the Lost Creek area by 
members of Local 2715, employed by 
MEDCO, Medford, the 230-foot tree 
measured nearly nine feet in diameter. 
The 32-foot long section shown will make 
some 9,360 feet of lumber, almost the 
amount used in today's average house. 




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APRIL, 1967 



33 




James Rowden, business agent of Local 16, holds diplomas, as First Gen'l. Vice 
President Finlay Allan, right, presents one to Donald Aldrich. Chalmer Fllbrun, 
secretary to the Joint Apprenticeship Committee, assists in the presentation. 



Anniversary Honors 
In the Land of Lincoln 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL.— At a special din- 
ner, last November 10, Local 16 of Spring- 
field commemorated its 78th anniversary as a 
local union and conducted an apprentice 
completion ceremony. More than 250 mem- 
bers, wives, and guests participated in the 
event. Members of Ladies Auxiliary Local 
230 assisted Anniversary Chairman J. Earl 
Welch in making the occasion memorable. 
The Land of Lincoln Chorus presented mu- 
sical selections, and guests included many 
state and national union and apprenticeship 
training leaders. 




Entertainment Committee Chairman J. Earl Welch, right, with 
Local 16 guests. From left: George Johnson of the National 
Apprenticeship Program, Associated General Contractors; 
Springfield Mayor Nelson Haworth; First General Vice Presi- 
dent Allan; and General Representative W. E. Corbin. 



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Three 50-year members with international and local leaders. 
From left: First Gen'l. Vice Pres. Allan; F. A. Goby (50-year 
member); Gen'l. Rep. W. E. Corbin; Charles Sakris (50-year 
member); Local 16 Pres. A. V. Gent and W. Boardman (50-yr. 
member). One 50-yr. member, M. Carrigan, was not present. 



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Name 

Address_ 
City 



_State_ 



-Zip- 




Twelve of Local 16's 51 apprentices with leaders and guests. At extreme left: Chalmer 
Filbrun, secretary of the JAC. In front row are First Gen'l. Vice Pres. Allan; George 
Johnson of Nat'l. AGC; Raymond Davis, Area Rep., US Bureau of Apprenticeship 
and Training; JAC Chairman Leonard Carter; Joseph Sullivan, state apprenticeship 
supervisor, USDL; and Anniversary Committee Chairman Welch. 




Local 16 honored 36 25-year men at the anniversary ceremonies, 
six absentees with some of (he guests and local officers. 



Here are all but 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



HOME 


CTiiPkV rrkiiDCc I 


1. a. contract 


«f I T 


30. 


federal, state and local taxes 


b. the general conditions 




31. 


contractor 


c. specifications 




32. 


a. 


uncovered 


d. drawings 






b. 


expense 


2. a. duplicate 




33. 


a. 


by estimate and acceptance 


b. owner 








in a lump sum. 


c. contractor 






b. 


by unit prices named in the 


3. a. architects 








contract or subsequently 


b. owner 








agreed upon. 


4. a. drawings 






c. 


by cost and percentage or 


b. specifications 








by cost and a fixed fee. 


5. architects 




34. 


true 


6. owner 




35. 


true 


7. contractor and contractors 




36. 


a. 


if the contractor should be 


8. subcontractor and subcontrac- 






adjudged a bankrupt. 


tors 






b. 


if the contractor should 


9. work 








make a general assignment 


10. false 








for the benefit of his credi- 


11. false 








tors. 


12. the architects 






c. 


if the contractor should fail 


13. at least one copy 








to make prompt payment to 


14. two 








any subcontractor. 


15. false 






d. 


if the contractor should fail 


16. the architects 








to make prompt payment 


17. Upon the architects' request. 






for material. 


they are returned to him 






e. 


if the contractor should fail 


18. false 








to make prompt payment 


19. false. However, the type 


of 






for labor. 


workmen specified can best be 


37. 


a. 


if the work should be 


found in the ranks of org 


an- 






stopped under an order of 


ized labor. 








any court, or other public 


20. owner 








authority, for a period of 


21. the contractor 








three months, through no 


22. true 








act or fault of the contrac- 


23. He acts as the contractor 


in 






tor or of anyone employed 


the contractor's absence. 








by him. 


24. the contractor 






b. 


if the architects should fail 


25. architect 








to issue any certificate for 


26. false 








payment covering approved 


27. true 








and accepted work within 


28. a. public liability 








fourteen days after it is due. 


b. workmen's compensation 




c. 


if the owner, for any reason 


c. property damage 








whatsoever, should decide 


29. The owner shall effect and 






to terminate this contract. 


maintain fire insurance for 


at 


38. 


waivers of lien 


least 80% of the insurance 


39. 


true 


value thereof. 




40. 


true 


New Contract Signed 


at 


YA Hospital in New York 


^:% n 




1 




P.Prt^- 1 


^dki^^x^i^m 


^ ^4 


1 


li 


AM.k.^^ ' 



f 



% i 



MONTROSE, N.Y. — Local 2440, first Brotherhood local organized in the Veterans 
Administration under E.vecutive Order 10988, has just negotiated a new contract with 
F. D. R. VA Hospital at Montrose, covering 355 employees. At the signing, seated, 
from left, were: Local President Louis Cohen and Dr. Leon L. Rackow, hospital 
director. Standing are: Edward Morabito, assistant chief, personnel; Stephen Loechner, 
Local 2440 vice president; Raymond ttoylan, chief shop steward; Miss Marion Irvine, 
chief, dietetic service; Edward Turner, assistant chief, housekeeping; .Tames Riner, 
chief, engineering; and Robert Mcllvain, shop steward, dietetic service. 



J\UDEL 

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worhet. Mail COUPON TODAY to get these helpful guides 
used by thousands of carpenters. Shows you — 
HOW TO USE: Miire Boi, Clialk Line Rules fi Scales 
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Slairs, Hoisis, Scaffolds HOW TO: Kile & Set Saws Do 
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maie SirenBili ol Timbers, Set Girders S Sills, Frame Houses 

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APRIL, 1967 



35 




UNION-MADE 

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A literal goiri mine of 
practical, authentic infor- 
mation for carpenters, 
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in easy concise forms you 
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daily. Dozens of tables 
on measures, weiglits. mor- 
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steel beams, tile, interest rates and many others. 

Instructions on use of steel square, square root tables. 

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and Jack rafters completely worlced 
out for you. The fl-ittest pitch is % 
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the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
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width is Vi inch and they increase 
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foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
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pitch. 230.400 rafter lengths for 48 
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A hip roof is 48'-9U" wide. Pitch 
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Canada can not take C.O.D. orders. 

California add 4% tax. 10(i each. 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 40.T Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



San Diego Local Marks 50th Anniversary 




Officers of Local 1296, from left to right: John Ford, trustee; Henry Kuehn, warden; 
Leone Palmer, trustee; George Benton, vice president; Andrew Andersen, president; 
Luis Adams, recording secretary; C. F. Lindebrekke, financial secretary; Roy Lundeen, 
trustee and George Murrell, conductor. 








-10- 



liSsJ' 




At the upper table: Civic leaders, labor leaders and their wives. At the lower table: 
Local 1296's officers and wives. Mrs. Frances Mueller, secretary of Local 1296, is 
seated in the middle in front of speakers' platform. She has been with this union 
more than 21 years. 



SAN DIEGO, CALIF.— On September 
10, 1966, Carpenters' Local 1296 cele- 
brated it's 50th anniversary with a dinner- 
dance held in the new Community Con- 
course of San Diego. The occasion also 

AFL-CIO Calls For 
Situs Picketing Law 

"Full and complete support" of the 
AFL-CIO for situs picketing legislation 
in the 90th Congress has been pledged 
by the AFL-CIO Executive Council. 

A statement adopted at the Council's 
mid-winter meeting declared: "We call 
upon the 90th Congress to rectify this 
unfortunate failure of the 89th Congress 
to act on this much needed meritorious 
legislation. We urge the House Commit- 
tee on Education and Labor to hold hear- 
ings and report the Bill promptly." 

The present Bill is HR 100, introduced 
by Rep. Frank Thompson (D.-N.J.). It 
implements recommendations by four 
Presidents: Truman, Eisenhower, Ken- 
nedy and Johnson. 



was used to honor the 50-year members 
and the 25-year members of the local 
union. The union was able to honor three 
50-year members and one hundred-thirty 
seven 25-year members. 

Wrong Age for the Ladies 

In our March issue we reported that 
the Ladies Auxiliary No. 170 of San 
Diego, Calif., had celebrated its 40th 
decade! It should have been 4th decade 
(40 years) and the 40th anniversary. Our 
apologies to the members of Auxiliary 
No. 170. 



Answers to Brain Teaser 




See Page 32 


N = l 


E = 6 


R = 2 


1 = 7 


T = 3 


= 8 


U = 4 


A = 9 


C = 5 


P=0 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



Labor Leader Becomes Ambassador 




John F. Henning, former U. S. Undersecretary of Labor and a leader In the 
American labor movement for many years, shown at right above, is sworn 
in as U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand. Among the onlookers at State De- 
partment ceremonies were General Treasurer Peter Terzick and AFL-CIO 
President George Meany at left. 



The recent appointment of Under- 
secretary of Labor John F. Henning 
as U. S. Ambassador to New Zealand 
was a noteworthy event for American 
labor. It marked the second time in 
history that a U. S. labor leader has 
been named to a high diplomatic post. 

Ambassador Henning was a guest 
speaker at the Brotherhood's 30th 
General Convention in Kansas City, 



last year. Delegates will remember 
his strong statements on behalf of 
progressive labor legislation. 

Henning is succeeded in the Labor 
Department by James J. Reynolds, 
who moved up from Assistant Secre- 
tary. The post left vacant by that 
move has since been filled with the 
appointment of Thomas R. Donahue 
of the Building Service Employees. 



Brotherhood Lauded In Maritime 




85 YEARS OF BUILDING 






11 



THE BROTHERHOOD was featured in an article entitled. *'85 Years of Building." 
in the February issue of MARITIME, official publication of the AFL-CIO Maritime 
Trades Department. The article was first in a series about MTD affiliates. 

APRIL, 1967 




EARN MORE, LIVE BEHER 
than Ever Before in Your Life 
You'll cn|oy yoiir work as a Lock- 
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INSTITUTE, Div. of Tedinical 
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"MADE 
S2000 
While 
WHILE 
TRAIN- 
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smith shop and en- 
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time business. 

Robert X. Jliller 
Oakland, X.J. 




*T\ LOCKS, MCKl" 
"Uj on<J1QOLS : 




I ^ 

I LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 1118-047 
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2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
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3". Only S4.40. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, ^s" to \%". Only S4.00. 

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Mario P. Russo, president of the Arverne, 
N.Y., Civic Council, an officer of Local 
353, and delegate to the New York Dis- 
trict Council, and Mrs. Russo. secretary 
of the Council, attended the National 
Cleanest Town Conference, February 20 
and 21, in Washington, D.C., at which 
time their town was presented with a 
citation for its Clean-up Campaign for 
1966. Brother Russo accepts the citation 
at left in the picture above. 

Part of the campaign called for tearing 
down old unoccupied buildings that 
presented safety and fire threats to the 
community. It also called for the clean- 
ing up of lots, stores, and the restoration 
of sidewalks and curbs. 

Hundreds of cities and towns through- 
out the country participated in the 1966 
National Cleanest Town Achievement 
Award contest sponsored annually by 
the conference. Winners are chosen for 
their achievement in home and com- 
munity beautification, prevention of 
slums, improving health, etc. 

FrankUn F. Regan, Chairman of the 
Citizens Committee to Keep New York 
Clean: Sylvester Camarro of the Arverne 
Area Services Project, a unit of the 
Housing and Redevelopment Board's 
Bureau of Neighborhood Conservation; 
and Walter Munday, Sanitation Dept. 
Supt., all cooperated with the group. The 
Hon. Stewart L. Udall, Secretary of the 
Interior made the presentation. 

CRAFTSMAN OF YEAR — Glenn Engen, a 
member of Local 2027, Rapid City, 
South Dakota, has been chosen "Crafts- 
man of the Year" by the South Dakota 
Chapter of the American Institute of 
Architects. Engen. 38. an employee of 
the Dilly Construction Company, was 
cited specifically for his carpentry work 
in Surbeck Center on the campus of the 
School of Mines and Technology, for his 
work in remodeling Seeley's Men Store, 
and his work in the Rushmore Building 
in Rapid City. Engen began his trade in 
1942 under the direction of his father, 
who was a skilled carpenter and cabinet- 
maker at Watertown, South Dakota. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




irrsrTvTEM 



^-5C-«-^.-— 5 



VT^m 



,:> 



L.U. NO. 13, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Haluska, Sam 
Holmdahl, Joseph 
Johnson, John 
Monaco, Tony 
Susman, EH 
Vrbica, Adolph 

L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

DeMarzo, Vincent 
MacDonald, Thomas 
Roetman, John 
Truhlar, George 

L.U. NO. 16, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Baker, Glenn 
Bell, John E. 
Butkis, Anton 
Feger, Joseph C. 
Jones, Zeb 
Ross, George 
Snow, Phillip 
Watkins, Horace 
Wheeling, Edward 

L.U. NO. 35, 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Olson, John 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Arnold, Lawrence 
McClelland, J. D. 
O'Sail, F. L. 

L.U. NO. 55, 
DENVER, COLO. 

Conter, H. J. 
Gorton, R. E., Jr. 
McKindra, Mack 
Ruehmann, C. K. 
Worley, Charles E. 

L.U. NO. 64, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Hollkamp, H. J. 
Humphrey, Ruel 
Jones, Webb 
Ferryman, William D. 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Broaders, Frank 

L.U. NO. 109, 
SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Peters, Joe G. 

L.U. NO. Ill 
LAWRENCE, MASS. 
Leuphold, John N. 

L.U. LO. 116, 
BAY CITY, MICH. 

Binkley, Roy 
Derosier, Ameda 
Garwick, Joseph 
Geirsbach, Louis 
Johnson, Henry 
Jokenon, Walter 
Matuszewski, Anthony, 
McKay, William 
Studley, Frank 

L.U. NO. 117 
ALBANY, N.Y. 

Ludlum, Frederick 



L.U. NO. 121, 
VINELAND, N.J. 

Lamenteer, John 

L.U. NO. 129, 
HAZELTON, PA. 

Youngcourt, Albert H. 

L.U. NO. 131, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Durkee, A. L. 
Dygert, Edward B. 
Emerson, Raymond N. 
Gerry, Warren C. 
Gronvold, John 

L.U. NO. 146. 
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. 

Tyrrell, Orlin 

L.U. NO. 157, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Adelman, Jacob 
Silverman, Myer 
Wolfson, Max 
Woolf, Max 

L.U. NO. 162 

SAN MATEO, CALIF. 

Hornquist, Einar William 
Soderlund, Hugo 
Swanson, Dewey 

L.U. NO. 169, 

E. ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Fulford, Guy 
Lemansky, Joseph 
Quails, Howard 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Berg, Paul 
Carlson. Edward 
Skoog, Ragnar 

L.U. NO. 184 
SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 

Hunt, Richard H. 
Lamano, Charles 
Middlemiss, Earl H. 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Clark, R. M. 
Davis, Thurman E. 

L.U. NO. 211. 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Fueller, Henry C. 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Arthur, Maurice 
Borsting, S. S. 
Fishburn, L. H. 
Gibson, Ray 
Ingle, O. W. 
Long, Oscar 
Madison, Ray 
Marx, Michael 
McLean, Harry 
Walker, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 240, 
Sr. E. ROCHESTER, N.Y. 
Bartle, Robert 

L.U. NO. 250, 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Anderson, Gus 
Niemeyer, Frank 



L.U. NO. 252. 
OSHKOSH, Wise. 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Anderson, Evald 
Gulik, Julius 
Soderholm, William E. 
StefFensen, Holger 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, 
ILL. 

Conley, Peter 
Jung, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 331, 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Holland. T. B. 
Williams, Aubrey 

L.U. NO. 359, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Culbertson. Edward J. 
Smith. Ralph 
Stadniczuk. Paul 
Steinfield, Fred 

L.U. NO. 362, 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Ivey, Ray 
Matson, Carl 
Routh, James V. 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Jannotte, Louis 
Orosz, Julius 
Pickman, Louis 
Seidel, Karl 

L.U. NO. 372, 
LIMA, OHIO 

Pennell, Halford 

L.U. NO. 403, 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Scroggs, R. V. 

L.U. NO. 440, 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Fehr, Clarence 
Goldbach, Henry 
Wild, Albert 

L.U. NO. 490, 
PASSAIC, N.J. 

Widovic, William 

L.U. NO. 501, 
STROUDSBURG, PA. 

Strunk, Eugene B. 

L.U. NO. 507, 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Curd, E. E. 
Grissom, A. V. 
Howard, David H. 
Ladd, G. B. 
Lee, Albert 
Mathis, E. A. 
Reynolds, Max L. 
Simpson, James Roy 

L.U. NO. 532. 
ELMIRA, N.Y. 

Decker, Cortland Sr. 
Mowers, Alfonso 
Thornton, F. Kenneth 



L.U. NO. 569, 
PASCAGOULA, MISS. 

Seal, Percy 
Stuart, W. A. 

L.U. NO. 586, 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Aronson, Victor 
Baker, Hiram E. 
Biffel, Virgil W. 
Black, Ben 
Carstairs, Robert 
Crane, Walter 
Dawson, James R., Sr. 
Dayton, Bert P. 
Deiphia, N. A. 
Edwards, Ralph 
Fiedler, Charles A. 
Gaunt, G. A. 
Granfield. Simon 
Harris, Ollie 
Heiller, J. W. 
Hellen. Charles T. 
Hopper, Harlen M. 
Jorgensen, James P. 
Kruse, Jack 
Latal, Frank 
Lee, Charles E. 
Linn, S. G. 
Lippert, Jess 
Mclnnis, Stanley D. 
Meade, Clinton C. 
Montez, Matias O. 
Norman, V. Y. 
Peitsch, H. A.' 
Pollock, Kenneth M. 
Popper, Louis 
Roberts, Benjamin M. 
Rosenberger, Alvin F. 
Snow, John F. 
Thaagard, Harold 
Vande Sande, Jacob J. 
Waltz, Herbert F. 
Watson, Jesse A. 
West, Archie R. 

L.U. NO. 661, 
OTTAWA, ILL. 

Bohler, John A. 

L.U. NO. 674, 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Hosford, Millard 
Tremlett, Albert 

L.U. NO. 710, 

LONG BEACH, CALIF. 

Foote, Addison J. 
Kalata, Jack 
Little, William 
Wagle, Alex 

L.U. NO. 721, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Bussing, Wilhelmus 
Chirby, M. L. 
Filipone, Angel 
Games, Marsh 
Hammerii, Emil 
Hampton, Sanders S. 
Lloyd, Clarence F. 
Mercurio, M. 
Ormanson, Juel S. 
Wiens, Lawrence A. 

L.U. NO. 746. 

SO. NORWALK, CONN. 

HoUman, Charles 



L.U. NO. 751, 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

Black, Ted 
Richert, Bob 
Younger, Cleveland 

L.U. NO. 766, 
ALBERT LEA, MINN. 

Rietveld, Peter 

L.U. NO. 769, 
PASADENA, CALIF. 

Birkhimer, Robert 
Erickson, Leonard 
Forneris, J. M. 
Hamill, Thomas B. 
Hunter, George 
Hunter, R. J. 
Meador, William O. 
Melovidoff. Frank 
O'Neill. Jack 
Parry, Thomas W. 
Sparkes, John C. 
Swenson, August 
Van de Wettering, Garry 
Valensi. Louis 
Winn, Richard J. 
Yaeger, Carl 
Ziegler, Lowell 

L.U. NO. 776, 
MARSHALL, TEXAS 

York, Claud 

L.U. NO. 787, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Helberg, Teddy 
Mattsen, Gus 
Sodestrom, Lorence 

L.U. NO. 810, 
WAKEFIELD, R.I. 

DeJordy, Robert 

L.U. NO. 824, 
MUSKEGON, MICH. 

Cone, Lyle 
Matesiewiez, Julian 

L. U. NO. 839, 
DES PLAINES. ILL. 

Bramlett, Richard 
Camp, Luther 
Jewell, Leo H. 
Sanders, T. A. 

L.U. NO. 981, 
PETALUMA, CALIF. 

Burchell, Roy 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Cyr, Edgar J. 

L.U. NO. 998, 
BERKLEY, MICH. 

Burwell, Charles 
Dobson, Clarence 
Karn, William 
Nichols, Howard 
Raymond, James C. 
Smith, John 
Winchell, Robert 
Yaeger, Henry 

L.U. NO. 1040, 
EUREKA, CALIF. 

Tank, John 

Continued on Page 40 



APRIL, 1967 



39 



IN MEMORIAM 



Continued 

L.U. NO. 1089, 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 

Sullivan, William D. 

L.U. NO. 1132. 
ALPENA, MICH. 

Brousseau, Henry 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Cooley, James 
Klipstein, Edward 
Poole, Max 

L.U. NO. 1292, 
HUNTINGTON, N. Y. 

Dammann, Henry 
Rasweiler, Frank, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1296, 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Battle, H. C. .. 
Craven, Sam, Jr. 
Degler, Lloyd 
Enell, Eric J. 
Freeman, Harrison 
Garnelt, Ray 
Gove, Daniel I. 
Hamilton, Eugene 
Jones, Curtis L. 
Jones, Robert H. II 
Josephson, Elmer 
Kerr, Lyle E. 
Kirk, Allie L. 
Kirk, Welton L. 
McElhinny, Vern 
Miller, Warren R. 
Morgan, Charlie D. 
Muschler, John 



from Page 39 

Oberg, John 
Roman, Paul 
Scheld, Howard 
Wheaton, Oclee 
Whigham, A, N. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Isakson, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 1394. 
FT. LAUDERDALE, 
FLA. 

Reeves, Heardiss 

L.U. NO. 1397, 

N. HEMPSTEAD, N. Y. 

Banks, Albert B. 

L.U. NO. 1407, 

SAN PEDRO, CALIF. 

Barker, Marion W. 
Brooks, J. E. 
Howell, Earl D. 
Lind, Kenneth A. 

L.U. NO. 1419, 
JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Smith, Everett 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, 
TEXAS 

Robles, M. A. 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Alibrando, Joseph 
Graff, Francis 
Grewe, Henrick 



Jacobsen, John 
Johnson, Andrew 
McKinley, George 

L.U. NO. 1495, 
CHICO, CALIF. 

Burnight, E. H. (Red) 

L.U. NO. 1507, 

EL MONTE, CALIF. 

Carpenter, M. H. 
Gilliam, William H. 
Nelson, Swan 

L.U. NO. 1513, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Freeman, Louis 
Smith, Jimmie 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B.C., 
CANADA 

Luney, Robert J. 

L.U. NO. 1599, 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Eldridge, LeRoy 
Oleson, Dallas 

L.U. NO. 1644, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Bruesharber, Wallace E. 
Campbell, Frank A. 
Gleason, Donald W. 
Grahn, Elvin H. 
Hansen, Peder S. 
Hoeppner, Leroy A. 
Hokkanen, E. WiUiam 
Holm, Elmer N. 
Johnson, Alfred F. 
Kenneally, John E. 
Larson, Wallace V. 
Markkanen, Henry R. 



Peterson, Elmer A. 
Struck. Jack J. 
Winick, William E. 
Zentgraf, Thomas J. 

L.U. NO. 1768, 
JACKSONVILLE, 
TEXAS 

Benthall, W. T. 

L.U. NO. 1846, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Bergeron, Wilton 
Bracomontes, Bobbie 
Delery, Walter 
Meyers, Joseph S. 
Miller, Louis 
Murphy, Oscar 
Walker, Gerald 

L.U. NO. 1867, 
REGINA, SASK., 
CANADA 

Kissinger, Ludwig 

L.U. NO. 1913. 
VAN NUYS, CALIF. 
Brondell, Theodore 
Caldwell, John W. 
Ferguson, Cash W. 
Hoffner, Lester 
Lindland, John 
Mathis, Roy E. 
Rodgers, John J. 
Zollinger, W. H. 

L.U. NO. 1921, 
SOUTH HEMPSTEAD, 
N.Y. 

Lemke, John E. 
Mulvey, Harry 
Petrick, Andrew 



Schmadtke, Albert 
Stell, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1939, 
CLIFTON, N.J. 

DeSandre, Bartolo 

L.U. NO. 2020, 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Schoonover, R. G. 
Smith, Vern 

L.U. NO. 2114, 
NAPA, CALIF. 

Backstadder, H. H. 
LaRoque, Art 
Stoltz, Ed 

L.U. NO. 2133, 
ALBANY, ORE. 

Cutts, Arthur K. 

L.U. NO. 2143, 
UKIAH, CALIF. 

Hill, Chester A. 

L.U. NO. 2151, 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 

Browder, C. W., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 2288, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Hulstrom, Albert H . 
Shubin, William 
Wilson, W. O. 

L.U. NO. 3066, 
WEST NEWTON, PA. 

Adams, Donald 
Booley, Paul 
Kopko, Elmer J. 
Lash, William C. 
Leasure, Clarence 
Reed James 




Wrap your fingers around the genuine leather of a Vaughan Pro-Grip^ and you'll 

know at once that it's the finest hammer you've ever hefted. You'll lil<e the way the leather 

soaks up sweat and absorbs vibration. Prevents blisters and looks good, too. The Pro-Grip 

has that perfect balance — cuts down arm and hand fatigue, helps you drive nails accurately 

and rapidly without tiring. The brightly polished Vaughan Vanadium head is forged and 

triple-tempered to exactly the right hardness. It's carefully precision-ground for a 

true-crowned striking face and polished like a jewel. The uniform face bevel 

^JsT^:"^ . minimizes dangerous chipping and the inner-beveled claw grips nails 



firmly without cutting. Only the finest white hickory goes into Pro- 
Grip handles and they're compression-fitted, steel-wedged 
and plastic-sealed to prevent loosening. The Vaughan 
Pro-Grip is made for the professional car- 
penter. Available in 13 and 16 oz. nail 
and 16 oz. rip. If you really want 
the best, you'll find it at 
your hardware outlet. 
Or he'll find it for 
you. If all else fails, 
you can always 
,,^^ write to us. 

Vaughan & BUShnell Mfg. Co. 135 S. LaSalle street, CWcago, HUnois 60603 






40 



THE CARPENTER 




!/iun;h;ifft^Ai]lll/IS 



QUICK-SET CLAMP 




Anyone who uses clamps knows that 
resetting the shaft usually takes consid- 
erable time. The shaft has to be turned 
again and again until it reaches the 
desired position. 

This is no longer necessary. For the 
new Quick-Set Clamp, made by Wing 
Products Company of Tempe, Arizona, 
has a grip on the shaft that can be re- 
leased by pressing a trigger. The shaft 
then can be instantly moved, without 
turning, to the new position and locked 
into place. The whole operation takes 
about one tenth of the time required 
for conventional clamps. 

Wing Quick-Set Clamps are made by 
Wing Products Company, 805 Farmer 
Avenue, Tempe, Arizona, the manufac- 
turer of Wing Router Templates and 
Wing Molding Jigs. 

TEFLON-COATED SAWS 

Pittsburgh — The world's first line of 
Teflon-coated, steel-blue colored hand and 
pruning saws has been unveiled by the 
Hardware and Industrial Products Divi- 
sion, H. K. Porter Company, Inc. 

The Division has had the products 
under development since early 1966 and 
was finally able to move into full produc- 
tion when DuPont, late in the year, per- 
fected a new and harder Teflon. The new 




"Teflon S" was especially developed for 
saws and other industrial uses, is extreme- 
ly abrasion resistant, and considerably 
harder that the Teflon used for cookware. 
At present, the line consists of a pro- 
fessional handsaw, all-purpose handsaw, 
professional single edge pruning saw, 
homeowner's double edge pruning saw, 
folding saw, orchard pruning saw, and a 
combination kit consisting of a handle 
and two separate blades for radius type 
cutting. 



DECORATING BOOK 

A handbook of professional decorating 
ideas, featuring room designs by Ving 
Smith, A.I.D., has been introduced by a 
manufacturer of plastic-finished hard- 
board paneling. There are 46 colorful 
illustrations in the book that gives prac- 
tical ideas on home improvements. To 
obtain a copy of the booklet, send a post 
card to Idea Handbook, Marlite Paneling, 
P. O. Box 250, Dover, Ohio 44622. 



MOVING ESTIMATES 

Here's a handy packet that helps do-it- 
yourself movers determine how much 
they have to move and the most econom- 
ical way of moving it by rental truck 
or trailer. The packet, complete with 
valuable tips and suggestions to make 
moving easier, also lists the cubic footage 
of the items most likely to be moved. 
A 60" cloth tape measure comes with the 
packet for household use. Write U-Haul, 
Box 14000, Portland, Oregon. 





LAYOUT LEVEL 



• ACCURATE TO 1/32'^ 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accm'ately set batters 
foi slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
foi lemodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32 accuracy and fast one- 
nian operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate *■#■*'' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1950 
thousands of carpenters, buildei'S, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro - 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only $7.95 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
age. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

Ask your tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow the usual dealer discount on 3^ Doz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSoto, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 





an hour 

FILING 

SAWS 

with a Zapart Saw Filer 
write for details 



FILERS AND SETTERS 
AVAILABLE ON TRIAL 

literature free 

Your address please 



mail to 

ZAPART SAW FILER 

586 Manhattan Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 11222 



APRIL, 1967 



41 



MAKE $20 to $30 EXTRA 

on each ^ 

STAIRCASE jl^ 


, -..V- — ,-^!- 




STAIR GAUGE 



Saves its cost in ONE day — does a 
better job in half time. Each end of 
Eliason Stair Gauge slides, pivots and 
locks at exact length and angle for per- 
fect fit on stair treads, risers, closet 
shelves, etc. Lasts a lifetime. 

Postpaid (cash with order) or C-O.D. d>^ c QC 

plus postage Only *P ' J«^3 




ELIASON 


STAIR 


GAUGE 


CO. 


6005 Arbour 


Lane 


Minneapolis, Minn. 55436 



POWER GUN 
Opens Sewer 

Instantly 

THINK OF IT! 




CLEANS PIPE 
W TO 6" DIAM. 



HELPFUL FREE BOOK 

HOW TO CLEAN ALL DRAINS 

(Useful Advice) 



Piesto — one shot of this New Pressure Gun trig- 
srers a powerful impact on difficult stoppages in 
pipe i4"to6" ; Rags, Grease. andRootsmeltaway 
when struck bv hammer-blow in TOILETS, 
SINKS. URINALS, BATHTUBS & SEWERS 
200 ft. Amazingly effective when air hits run- 
ning water. Save Costly Plumbing Bills or start 
your own Business. Tear out Ad now & urite 
address beside it for FREE BOOK or phone 
Kildare 5-1702. Miller Sewer Rod. Dept. HD, 
4642 N. Central Ave- Chicago. III. 60630. 



— LAKELAXD NEWS — 

Jakob J. Kleinert of Local Union 997, Pottstown, Pa. arrived at the Home Feb. 
L 1967. 

Leo Retzel of Local Union 62, Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home Feb. 6, 1967. 

Ralph W. Thompson of Local Union 1765, Orlando, Fla., arrived at the Home 
Feb. 8, 1967. 

H. H. Masterson of Local Union 103, Birmingham, Ala., arrived at the Home Feb. 
16, 1967. 

R. L. Cook of Local Union 144, Macon, Ga., arrived at the Home Feb. 17, 1967. 

Simeon H. Gibson of Local Union 132, Washington, D. C, arrived at the Home 
Feb. 20, 1967. 

John Watt of Local Union 72, Rochester, N. Y., passed avifay Feb. 2, 1967 and 
burial was at Rochester, N. Y. 

John C. Johnson of Local Union 1367, Chicago, 111., passed away Feb. 15, 1967 
and was buried in Chicago. 

Hjalmar Gabrielson of Local Union 1, Chicago, 111., passed away Feb. 26, 1967 
and burial was in Decatur, Ga. 

Cecil E. Parker of Local Union 1296, San Diego, Calif., withdrew from the Home 
Feb. 7, 1967. 

Members Who Visited the Home during February 1967 

Fred Langhein, L.U. 155, So. Plainfield, N. J. 

H. R. Connor, L.U. 4, Davenport, Iowa 

John llorg, L.U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Joseph Prestienne. L.U. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 

E. R. Collier, L.U. 1438, Warren, Ohio 

Archie Baker, L.U. 268, Sharon, Pa. 

Harold Benson, L.U. 1128, LaGrange. 111. 

Gunnar Benson, L.U. 1128, Seminole, Fla. 

Chfford Gulbransen, L.U. 58, Chicago, III. 

John Jacobson, L.U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

Paul Engstrom, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111. 

Eskel J. Lindblade, L.U. 72, Chicago, III. 

Joseph Noble, L.U. 950, Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Martin DeGraaf, L.U. 325, Paterson. N. J. Now living Sarasota, Fla. 

W. H. Landrey, L.U. 1527, Winfield. III. 

Albert K. Frantz, L.U 122, Flourtown, Pa. 

George Brunte. L.U. 1584, Quebec 

Walter Januzilg, L.U. 181, Chicago, III. 

Gordon Cousino, L.U. 2037, Adrian, Mich, 

C. M. LaBreaque, L.U. 96, Springfield, Mass. 

Robert Hackenberger, L.U. 287, Harrisburg, Pa. 

C. L. Richardson, L.U. 133. Terre Haute, Ind. 

John Merritt, L.U. 200. Columbus. Ohio 

Carl Stocklose. L.U. 141, Chicago, III. 

August Gilgash, L.U. 101. Baltimore, Md. 

Alva Fox, L.U. 993, Miami, Fla. 

W. H. Purll, L.U. 132, Washington, D. C. 

Rufus Stermon, L.U. 378, Edwardsville, III. 

Joseph Mador, L.U. 950. Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Karl Kischeid, L.U. 1402, Redwood, Calif. 

Mrs. Frank Schultz, L.U. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mrs. O. C. Spicer, L.U. 627. Jacksonville. Fla. 

Mrs. P. J. Martinez, L.U. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mr. L. D. Underwood, Jr., L.U. 2292, Ocala, Fla. 

Charles Hunter, L.U. 3204. Live Oak, Fla. 

H. E, Morris, L.U. 2024, Miami, Fla. 

N. A. Johanson, L.U. 80, Chicago, 111. 

A. Errikson, L.U. 80. Chicago, III. Now living Clearwater, Fla. 

Willard VanHoose, L.U. 1685, Cocoa, Fla. 

Roland VanHoose, L.U. 1685, Cocoa, Fla. 

Harold Williams, L.U. 3843, Rushland, Pa. 

Arthur Heal, L.U. 183, Peoria, 111. Now living Lake Worth. Fla. 

Charles Tonkovich, L.U. 2212, Pt. Pleasant N. J. 

John Preston. L.U. 98, Washington 

Quinn Matson. L.U. 1456, L. I.. N. Y. 

Peter Sepp, L.U. 1456. New Hyde Park, N. Y. 

Ivar Johnson, L.U. 246, New York 

Frank Peterson, L.U. 791, New York 

Henry Magnon, L.U. 19, Detroit, Mich. 

Emil Schneeberger, L.U. 1499, Kent, Ohio 

Harold Shell, L.U. 242, Summit, III. 

G. T. Sutton, L.U. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Carl Stanley, L.U. 637, Hamilton, Ohio 

Charlie Byers L.U. 637, Hamilton. Ohio 

Stanley Chalk, L.U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 

Walter Holmer. L.U. 985, Gary, Ind. 

Jack Wilson L.U. 599. Hammond, Ind. 

Leslie Kellogg, L.U. 1765, Orlando. Fla. 

Vern DeBolt, L.U. 1654, Midland, Mich. 



Continued on Page 43 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



— LAKELAND I^^EWS, cont'd- 

Carl Swanson, L.U. 199, Chicago, 111. 

Otto Busch, L.U. 105, Cleveland, Ohio 

Marshall Bisehoff, L.U. 1922, Midlothian, 111. 

Gumar Larson, L.U. 1590, Washington, D. C. 

Oscar Graybill, L.U. 287, Pa. 

Edwin Mellin, L.U. 106, Des Moines, Iowa 

Eskel Nelson, L.U. 58, Chicago, III. 

Gus Binckie, L.U. 77, Rye, N. Y. 

Leo Korda, L.U. 13, Chicago, 111. 

Dave Chez, L.U. 504, Chicago, 111. 

Otto Boesel, L.U. 1938, Crown Point, Ind. 

Wm. H. Byers, L.U. 268, Sharon, Pa. 

Christian Andersen, L.U. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 

G. R. Hopkins, L.U. 60, Melbourne, Fla. 

Ed Gordon, L.U. 225, Lafayette, Ind. 

Leonard Jackson, L.U. 2010, Anna, 111. 

Carl Jacobsen, L.U. 1973, Hampton Bays, N. Y. 

Jack Clouse, L.U. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 

Karl Josephson, L.U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 

Allen Folk, L.U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio 

Elias Lampi, L.U. 1204, New York 

Everett Wagner, L. U. 540, Waltham, Mass. 

Robert O'Hearn, L.U. 335, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Thomas Hammer, L.U. 787, Brooklyn, N. Y. Now living Port Richey, Fla. 

M. Murphy, L.U. 791, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

W. Stuart Moore, L.U. 706, Sullivan, Ind. 

N. J. Pomanico L.U. 1550, Braintree, Mass. 

Carl E. Bergquist, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111. 

A. V. Elliott, L.U. 1665, Silver Spring, Md. 

L. A. Saudy, L.U. 5, St. Louis, Mo. 

Vincent McCann, L.U. 49, Lowell, Mass. 

W. A. Johnson, L.U. 2164, San Francisco, Calif. 

Edward Birtell, L.U. 813, Pa. 

L. Ebner, Sr., L.U. 211, Glenfield, Pa. 

Lawrence Szobo, L.U. 325, Lodi. N. J. 

Michael Cafferkey, L.U. 1929, Cleveland, Ohio 

Lynn Ellis, L.U. 81, Springfield, Pa. 

Thomas Reinestad, L.U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 

Arthur Sons, L.U. 272, Chicago Heights. 111. 

Christian Lund, L.U. 1397, Roslyn, N. Y. 

Sigurd Terjesen, L.U. 1397, Port Washington L. I., N Y. 

M. D. Poole, L.U. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 

Earl Davis, L.U. 615, Brownsville, Pa. 

F. E. Grigsby, L.U. 1320, Berlin, Pa. 

Iver Swanson, L.U. 1456, Dundee, Fla. 

Elton GifEord, L.U. 985, Gary, Ind. 

George Herrgott, L.U. 972, Newportville, Pa. 

Arthur Prokaski, L.U. 1889, Douners Grove, 111. 

Howard Brackenbury, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 

George Gaskill, L.U. 432, Northfield, N. J. 

John Murphy, L.U. 117, Alvany, N. Y. 

Harry Western, L.U. 1067, Port Huron, Mich. 

Alexander C. Scott. L.U. 414, Bay City, Mich. 

Wilson Middleton, L.U. 404, Mentor, Ohio 

George Lockwood L.U. 210, Stamford, Conn. 

Cecil Crothers, L.U. 171, Youngstown, Ohio 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Armco Steel 29 

Audel, Theodore 35 

Belsaw Machinery 34 

Chicago Technical College 33 

Cline-Sigmon 36 

Construction Cost Institute 43 

Eliason Stair Gauge 42 

Est wing Manufacturing 18 

Foley Manufacturing 38 

Hydrolevel 41 

Irwin Auger Bit 37 



Lee, H. D 3.5 

Locksmithing Institute 37 

Lufkin Rule 27 

Miller Sewer Rod 42 

Millers Falls Back Cover 

Milwaukee Electric 

Tool Inside Back Cover 

Riechers, A 36 

Vaughan & Bushnell 40 

Zapart Saw Filer 41 



You Can Be 
a Highly Paid 

CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



If you have the ambition to become the top 
man on the payroll — or if you are planning 
to start a successful contracting business of 
your own — we can teach you everything you 
need to know to become an expert construc- 
tion cost estimator. A journeyman carpenter 
with the equivalent of a high schooJ education 
is well qualified to study our easy-to-understand 
home study course. Construction Cost Esti- 
mating. 

WHAT WE TEACH 

We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
take off materials, and figure the costs of ma- 
terials and labor. You prepare complete esti- 
mates from actual working drawings just like 
those you will find on every construction proj- 
ect. You learn how to arrive at the bid price 
that is correct for work in your locality based 
on your material prices and wage rates. Our 
course is seJf-teaching. After you study each 
lesson you correct your own work by compar- 
ing it to sample estimates which we supply. 
You don't need to send lessons back and forth ; 
therefore you can proceed at your own pace. 
When you complete this course you will know 
how to estimate the cost of all types of con- 
struction : residences, schools, churches, and in- 
dustrial, commercial, and institutional build- 
ings. Our instructions are practical and com- 
plete. We show you exactly how to proceed, 
step by step, from the time you unroil the 
plans until you actually submit your proposal. 

ACCURATE LABOR COST DATA 

The labor cost data which we supply is not 
vague and theoretical — it is correct for work 
in your locality — we leave nothing to guess- 
work. Instead of giving you a thousand rea- 
sons why it is difficult to estimate construction 
costs accurately, we teach you how to arrive 
at a competitive bid price — low enough to get 
the job — high enough to realize a profit. 

STUDY WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

You don't need to pay us one cent until you 
first satisfy yourself that our course is what 
you need and want. We will send you plans, 
specifications, estimate sheets, material and 
labor cost data, and complete instructions for 
ten days study ; then if you are not convinced 
that our course will advance you in the build- 
'ng business, just return what we have sent 
you and there is no obligation whatever. If 
you decide to study our course, pay us $13.25 
monthly for three months, a total of only 
$39.75. 

Send your name and address today — we will 
do the rest. 



CONSTRUCTION COST INSTITUTE 

Dept. C-467— University Station 
Denver, Colorado 80210 



APRIL, 1967 



43 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Labor's Rocky Road for Social Benefits 



THE march of progressive social legislation in 
America has traveled a rocky road over a 
great many years. Every suggestion for a legis- 
lative remedy to solve the problems of poverty 
among the elderly, unemployment among the fit, 
or inadequate education among the young con- 
sistently engendered opposition from those who 
speak for the business community. 

The tradition has been for labor to work val- 
iantly on behalf of all social legislation and for 
business leaders to oppose it with all the vigor 
and resources at their command. 

Every piece of social legislation that eventually 
wound up as law of the land got there over vigor- 
ous opposition from business leaders. Social Se- 
curity was going to lead to every citizen losing 
his identity and being identified by a number rather 
than a name. Unemployment insurance was going 
to undermine the morale of the nation, because 
nobody was going to be interested in working 
while he could draw unemployment compensation. 
National bankruptcy was going to follow the es- 
tablishment of group insurance, company pen- 
sions, etc. 

All the while, organized labor was insisting that 
these measures were good not only for union mem- 
bers but for the nation as a whole. There is at least 
one prominent industrialist who admits that much 
of the opposition of the business community to 
social legislation was ill advised. 

Clarence Randall, the 76-year-old former chair- 
man of the board of Inland Steel Company, ad- 
mits in his book. The Folklore of Management, 
that he was wrong about social progress many 
times. 

In his book, Mr. Randall admits that he was 
firmly in management's camp, that he "almost 



without exception" resisted every program of or- 
ganized labor that would have benefited the in- 
dividual worker. "Almost invariably," Randall 
admits, "I was wrong." 

"All of this revolutionary social change has come 
about in my day — workmen's compensation, un- 
employment compensation, social security, old age 
benefits, company pensions, group insurance, 
health insurance, supplementary unemployment 
benefits, insured education plans, and all the rest 
of our complex of social protection for the indi- 
vidual," Randall wrote. 

"During the last three decades," Mr. Randall 
notes today, "the broadening of social benefits has 
coincided with the greatest surge of industrial ex- 
pansion that our country has ever known, and 
with the period of our economy's most imaginative 
and creative resiliency. If these new measures 
were all evil, we ought to be in a complete tail- 
spin right now." 

A registered Republican and a onetime special 
assistant to President Eisenhower on foreign eco- 
nomic policy, Mr. Randall dates our greatest so- 
cial and economic progress from the days of the 
Roosevelt Administration and the passage of the 
National Industrial Recovery Act that was de- 
signed to meet the problems of serious and wide- 
spread unemployment. (The NIRA was declared 
unconstitutional in 1935 by the Supreme Court, 
but the Wagner Act, sometimes referred to as 
labor's Magna Carta, filled the breech when it 
became law in July 1935.) 

It takes a big man to say "I was wrong." We 
would like to think that Mr. Randall is typical of 
a growing number of business leaders who resist 
the conformity of their fellows. 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



MILWAUKEE POWER MITER TABLE 




Brings Shop Speed and Versatility to Job Site 



Does for finishing what circular saws did for roughing 

The Milwaukee Power Miter Table combines the efficiency of a stationary saw 
and portability of a hand miter box. Fast chop-cutting action provides accurate, 
smooth, splinter-free miter cuts. You can angle, square, rip, shave and under- 
cut all wood trim in seconds. 3 simple adjustment knobs control all sawing 

operations. Obsoletes the hand miter box. 

Ruggedly built, weighs only 45 lbs can be 

easily carried from room to room without dis- 
assembly. Its Milwaukee heavy-duty 7" saw can 
be quickly detached from table for hand use. 
Only $198.50, including saw. Contact your Mil- 
waukee Distributor or write for Bulletin SW-60. 

MILWAUKEE ELECTRIC TOOL CORPORATION 

13189 W. LISBON ROAD • BROOKFIELD, WISCONSIN 53005 



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Light, easy to carry. 



If you alway s work under ideal 
conditions, Shock-Proof builders 
saws won't interest you very 
much. 



Let's face it. Who needs Shock-Proof double-Insulated 
safety, that protects you even if normal insulation 
fails? All you have to do is make sure the tool is in 
perfect condition and carefully connected to a three- 
wire outlet, that you have a safety program that every- 
one (including you) always follows. All this Is if 
you're indoors. If you're working outdoors . . . 
You still might be interested in Millers Falls (>yi" , 
IVi" and 8V4" saws, though. To make them safe, we 
had to make them better. 
So we did. 
With a Stall-Proof Drive so if you hit a knot or bind 



the blade the motor won't stall and cause serious over- 
load. And you won't get a violent kick-back. 
With a Free-Swing Safety Guard for smooth blade 
entry on angle cuts and easy, instant retraction. 
With a See-Through Guard so the blade is never 
exposed beyond the point of safety. And you get a 
clear view of the blade and cutting line. 
With a High Temperature Protected Motor to prevent 
burnout under overload conditions. 
With a Lexan® Sawdust Chute to keep cutting line 
clear, throw sawdust away from you and your work. 
And . . . the Millers Falls Lifetime Guarantee. It's a 
100% repair guarantee extended to the original user. 
Millers Falls will repair, free of charge, any tool that 
fails for any reason other than abuse or normal wear, 
provided the tool is retiuned to Millers Falls, Green- 
field, Massachusetts. 



Millers Falls 




( Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



^HIS 



FOUNDED 1881 




MAY, 1967 





rotherhood 
skills restore an 
• historic covered bridge 




fBiBlfl 



oImation 




GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

FiNLAY C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Tep.zick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City, Mo. 64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

American Bank Building 

621 S.W. Morrison St., Room 937 

Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. HuTCHEsoN, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THe 




(§ZA\KP[ira^ 



VOLUME LXXXVI No. 5 MAY, 1967 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peler Terzick. Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

New Covered Bridge Recalls America's Past . . . 

. . . Ralph and Anrve Hinds 2 

Today I Became An Apprentice Peter Terzick 7 

Navy' Seabees Celebrate 25 Years of 'Can Do' Service .... 8 

Building Trades Testify on City Problems 10 

General Officers Sworn Into Office 12 

The Referee Is a Buzz Saw 14 

Brotherhood to Exhibit at Union Industries Show 15 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Editorials 13 

Plane Gossip 17 

Canadian Report 18 

Home Study Course, Advanced Blueprint Reading, Unit I ... 20 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred O. Goetz 22 

We Congratulate 25 

Local Union News 27 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 30 

Service to the Brotherhood 32 

In Memoriam 36 

Lakeland News 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building. 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave.. N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Carpenters, using the old-time slick 
and adze, and some nearly forgotten 
skills, have restored the historic Shim- 
anek Covered Bridge across Thomas 
Creek, near Scoi, Oregon. For mem- 
bers of several Oregon locals, the 
restoration was a work of keen ex- 
citement as evidenced by the pictures 
on our cover and on the pages which 
follow. In the past they had torn 
down many old covered wooden 
bridges, replacing them with concrete 
and steel spans considered more fitting 
in today's hurried, efficiency-conscious 
world, but the Shimanek Bridge was 
their first opportunity to build a new 
wooden structure similar to the one 
torn down. 

The faded red bridge, built in 1921, 
was the third or fourth on that spot. 
A windstorm on Columbus Day, 1962, 
lapped off most of the roof shingles 
and the siding, leaving the bridge un- 
safe for the rural traffic it had served 
well over the years. The Linn County 
Court, the governing body of the area, 
after consideration of the alternatives, 
decided last year that a new covered 
bridge was the most appropriate to 
the site. The increased interest by 
Americans in covered bridges draws 
many visitors to the Willamette Valley 
of Oregon each year. 

The entire project took only two 
and a half months from the start of 
demolition imtil the new bridge shown 
at the lower right on our front cover 
was ready for traffic. 





A worker's view down the center of the new bridge, show- 
ing the size of the timbers used in the restoration project 
at Shinianek. 



A skilled, gloved hand applies a 
nut to a big tie rod. 





local did the on-site work. They as- 
sembled the stringers on which the 
decking would rest, assembled and 
erected the huge trusses, and tied the 
top together with the lateral bracing 
to complete the bridge's skeleton. 

Board and batten siding and a roof 
of red cedar shingles covered the 
framework, and weatherboarding was 
added to each end to protect the 
trusses. Six gothic windows on each 
side, louvered to keep out the rain, 
allowed much-needed light to illumi- 
nate the interior of the long bridge. 

Asphalt paving, a modern necessity, 
covered the decking. Although far 
more practical than the loose crossways 
planking so familiar on older bridges, 
the paving eliminated the nostalgic 
thump, thump which set the entire 
structure to vibrating rhythmically 
each time a car rattled through. 

From the start of demolition until 
the new bridge was ready for traffic 
the job took only two and a half 



months. Early in March, the school 
bus was able to shorten its route by 
several miles by crossing the new 
structure. 

Members of the Shimanek family, 
for whom the bridge was named, were 
honored guests at the dedication cere- 
monies in May. A large crowd heard 
Thomas Vaughan, Executive Director 
of the Oregon Historical Society, re- 
count the history of covered bridges 
in his dedicatory address. 

The first covered bridge whose exist- 
ence was recorded in history was built 
across the Euphrates River in Babylon 
nearly 800 years before Christ. The 
oldest still-standing covered bridges in 
Europe — in Austria and Switzerland — 
date from before 1300. The covered 
bridge was not, surprisingly, a part of 
America's earliest history. Timothy 
Palmer, a shipwright's apprentice 
turned bridge-builder, first roofed over 
a triple span across the Schuylkill 
River at Philadelphia in 1804. 



On the West Coast, where once 
more than a thousand of these pic- 
turesque structures dotted the land- 
scape, the present count is fewer than 
90, of which the great majority are 
in Oregon. The first covered bridge 
in that state was built at Oregon City 
in 1851. 

The 1940s saw what seemed to be 
the end of an era in Oregon bridge 
building when the carpenter, con- 
structing wooden barns over rivers, 
was replaced by the steelworker and 
piledriver, who built efficient and un- 
obtrusive concrete and steel spans 
where modern highways crossed 
streams. Of the two covered bridges 
built during the 1950s in Oregon, one 
— the Dodge Slough bridge across the 
Willamette near Monroe — has already 
been replaced by a no-nonsense mod- 
ern span. 

The other, a private bridge leading 
to Milo Academy across the South 
Umpqua River, replaced an aged cov- 



THE CARPENTER 




■II w .^_ 




Below: A stack of the big chords at the bridge site. 



Partly-assembled diagonal bracing. 





Below: A closeup view of lower chord splice. 




At Left: Merle Nelson of Local 2133, 
Albany, Oregon, drills bolt holes. 



Below: Yard Superintendent Jack Brindle 
instructs Bruce Kaasa on moving timbers 
for lower chords. 




ered structure. The new bridge was 
built as an open, steel-beamed span, 
but protests from the community, 
which felt that only a covered bridge 
looked right there, led to covering it 
with board and batten siding, making 
it perhaps the only wooden-housed 
steel span in the country. 

As the number of covered bridges 
declines, interest increases across the 
country in those which remain. The 
National Society for the Preservation 
of Covered Bridges. Inc., headquar- 
tered in Boston, Mass., and other 
covered bridge groups and historical 
societies are becoming increasingly 
concerned with the preservation and 
rehabilitation of these picture-postcard 
remnants of a more leisurely era. Many 
of the no longer used spans have been 
bypassed and preserved; some have 
been beautified by the development of 
parks and picnic areas nearby. 

In this climate of awareness of the 
significance of the covered bridge in 

MAY, 1967 



our historical heritage, it is not sur- 
prising that the building of the new 
Shimanek bridge generated interest in 
far-flung parts of the land, and that 
local people who had formerly paid 
little heed to the gradual disappear- 
ance of the familiar structures became 
interested in their history and their 
preservation. 

The earliest covered bridges in the 
United States were complicated, pon- 
derous structures, difficult to assemble 
and so heavy they could scarcely hold 
up their own weight. Ithiel Town, a 
New Haven architect, designed the 
Town lattice truss in 1820 to simplify 
bridge construction. In 1840 William 
Howe, brother of Elias Howe of sew- 
ing machine fame, invented the Howe 
truss. 

Use of the tie rod and turnbuckle 

have made the Howe truss a standard 

of covered bridge design ever since. 

In addition to its simplicity and 

Continued on Page 15 





Washington ROUNDUP 



MORE HEAD COUNTS?— Senators from fast-growing California and Florida joined 
today in calling for a national census every five years instead of 10 years. The 
effort was renewed when Senators George A. Sraathers of Florida and Thomas H. 
Kuchel, California, joined in sponsoring a bill to authorize the census at more 
frequent intervals. In a joint statement, the two Senators said it was estimated 
that the United States had gained more than 16 million people since the last 
census was taken in 1960. During the same period, they said, there had been vast 
shifts of population from one part of the country to another. 



CALL FOR NURSES— The American Nurses Association will get a $50,000 grant from the 
Manpower Administration to recruit inactive nurses back to their profession. 
A target of 10,000 trainees in refresher courses for nurses has been set for 
the next 12 months. 

INDEBTEDNESS DROP— Consumers added only $216 million to their installment debt in 
February — the smallest increase in five years— the Federal Reserve Board reported 
last month. The slim gain reflected a continuing slump in car sales, the Board 
said. But installment loans for other durable goods and personal loans were 
strong, the Board added. 

OLDER WORKERS CUT OUT-The AFL-CIO has charged, before a Senate labor subcom- 
mittee, that discrimination by employers against older Americans has closed one- 
fourth of all job openings to workers over 45 and one-half of all job openings 
to those past 55 years. AFL-CIO Legislative Director Andrew J. Biemiller 
supported legislation that would prohibit discrimination because of age in 
employment. The bill now before the subcommittee would add to legislation which 
already makes it illegal for employers to discriminate because of color and sex. 

THE CRACKPOTS of the right wither away without the spotlight of publicity. 
This was proved some years back when the pro-fascist Gerald L. K. Smith announced 
he would invade St. Louis and hold a huge mass rally to spread his hate- 
propaganda. But the newspapers refused to cooperate; in fact, they completely 
ignored the rabble-rouser. Result: eight people turned up at the "mass rally." 
Recently George Lincoln Rockwell's American Nazi Party sought a Congressional 
investigation of his brown-shirted outfit in order to use it as a sounding board 
and publicity forum for his Hitlerian rantings and anti-Semitism. But Congres- 
sional committee after committee refused to be suckered into Rockwell's game. 
Disgusted, Fuehrer Rockwell announced he was quitting the Washington, D.C. area, 
packed up his stormtroopers (who reportedly never numbered more than 100) 
and goosestepped off to set up new headquarters in Texas. 

CONSTRUCTION spending rose in March for the fifth month in a row, despite a 
slight decline in homebuilding outlays, the Commerce Department reported 
last month. 




THE CARPENTER 




Today I Became an Apprentice 



Today I became an apprentice. 

Today I set my feet on a road that begins at the pyramids and 
stretches beyond the stars to the outer reaches of man's imagination. 

Today I walked with men whose credentials are craftsmanship and 
whose identity is rooted in know-how. 

The span of my day was endless, and the tools in my hand were awkward. 

The tool that was meant to glide chattered and balked. 

The part that was made to fit refused to conform. 

The gauge I relied on played me false. 

My fingers were thumbs, and my thumbs were stumps. 

My day was filled with frustration, but my eyes were fixed on tomorrow. 

Then the calluses from today's balky tool will become a caress. 

Then the gauge will no longer speak with a forked tongue. 

Then hand, eye, and brain will work together with the precision 
God endowed his humblest servant Avith. 

Then I will be a craftsman. 

Then I will take my place in a challenging world, ready and willing 
to build, to grow, and to create a better tomorrow. 

Today I became an apprentice, and I am content. 

By PETER TERZICK, General Treasurer, United BrotherJiood of Carpenters 




During World War 11, the six-montlis-old Seabees followed the Marines ashore after 
their landing at Guadalcanal in August 1942 — to begin conversion of a muddy 
Japanese landing strip into an all-weather airfield capable of supporting anything 
from fighter aircraft to B-17s, in spite of constant shelling by the enemy. 




Navy's Seabees Celebra 



Established in the spring 

of 1942, the famed 

Mobile Construction 

Battalions are today 

knee-deep in the action 

in South Vietnam 



■ Now a highly respectable 25 years 
of age, Uncle Sam's indomitable 
Navy Seabees — like the Minute Men 
of Concord 1 67 years before them — 
organized themselves during a time 
of great peril to accomplish what 
may have seemed to some people at 
the time like an almost complete 
impossibility. 

Formed at the beginning of World 
War II to meet the sudden emer- 
gency, the Seabees were composed 
mostly of patriotic construction men 
(including thousands of carpenters) 
• — many of whom were over draft 
age. They spurned high wartime 
wages to volunteer themselves and 
their skills to build anything, any- 
where, at any time. 

Today's Seabees, conducting 
themselves in the same World War 
II "Can Do" tradition, are again 
earning an honored place in the 
fighting men's Hall of Fame. In 
Vietnam, they are building by day 
and are guarding camp perimeters 
at night. Their accomplishments in- 
clude "instant" airfields, hospitals, 



bridges, roads, port facilities, and 
troop housing. 

Today there are seven Mobile 
Construction Battalions and part of 
an Amphibious Construction Bat- 
talion in Vietnam. They and units 
they have relieved have already 
proved their mettle as combination 
builders-fighters. MCB-9, for ex- 
ample, wall be remembered in history 
for having withstood two heavy mor- 
tar shellings and a ground assault 
at DaNang, yet it still completed a 
nearly-destroyed hospital project 
ahead of schedule. 

At another South Vietnam base — • 
at remote Dong Xoai — nine mem- 
bers of a Seabee team helped a small 
U. S. Special Forces unit as waves 
of screaming Viet Cong infantrymen 
tried to overrun the small outpost. 
Two Seabees died and the seven 
survivors were all wounded, but the 
outpost held. 

Thanks to 25 years of cumulative 
experience, it goes without saying 
that today's Seabee is younger and 
more militarily knowledgeable than 



THE CARPENTER 




An often unsung aspect of the Seabees' service in today's war is training South Vietnamese construction workers in modern-day 
building procedures and techniques. At the left above, a Vietnamese trainee is operating a TD-9 bulldozer preparing the site for 
a new market place for the village of Cam Giang. At the right, newly-enlisted Seabee carpenters go through a thorough orientation 
program which includes overseas-type building and maintenance work under conditions far less favorable than these. 



5 Years of 'Can Do' Service 



Rehabilitation of citizens' every-day living facilities — such as 
this village well — is also an important part of the MCB's 
war-zone assignment. 



his World War II counterpart. He 
is trained in latest construction skills 
and military techniques at Seabee 
training centers. 

Through their relatively short but 
proud history, the Seabees have done 
such things as become "airborne," 
have met crises in Korea, Cuba, and 
the Dominican Republic, have 
helped underdeveloped nations 
through people-to-people Seabee 
Team visits, and have added lustre 
to their exploits by building scien- 
tific outposts in the Antarctic. 

At the bottom of the world — at 
McMurdo Sound, 830 miles from 
the South Pole — the Seabees are 
operating a nuclear power/desalina- 
tion plant which produces electricity 
and converts salt water to fresh water 
for use by the men and the equip- 
ment at the base. 

An average Naval Mobile Con- 
struction Battalion is composed of 
many men with many talents and 
many years of experience, including 
the following: 

Continued on Page 16 




MAY, 1967 



Building and Construction 
Trades leaders testify, from 
left: Frank Bonadio, Secretary- 
Treasurer of BCTD; Laborers 
Secretary-Treasurer Peter 
Fosco; Electrical Workers 
President Gordon Freeman; 
BCID President C. J. Hag- 
gerty; Plumbers and Pipefitters 
President Peter Scboemann; 
and Carpenters and Joiners 
President Maurice Hutcheson. 




BEFORE SENATE COMMITTEE 



Role Of Building Trades Unions 
In Rebuilding Our Cities Aired 



THE ROLE of the building trades 
unions in rehabilitating the slums 
of America was analyzed in depth 
before the U.S. Senate subcommit- 
tee probing the problems of our 
cities, last month. 

Chief spokesman for the unions 
was C. J. Haggerty, president of the 
AFL-CIO Building and Construction 
Trades Department. 

He was accompanied by six mem- 
bers of the BCTD executive council 
— Brotherhood President Maurice 
Hutcheson, IBEW President Gordon 
Freeman, Plumbers and Pipefitters 
President Peter Schoemann, Operat- 
ing Engineers President Hunter P. 
Wharton, Laborers Secretary-Treas- 
urer Peter Fosco, and Frank Bona- 
dio, secretary-treasurer of BCTD. 

Senator Abraham Ribicoff (D., 
Conn.), chairman of the subcommit- 
tee, opened the hearings with the 
statement that "we have invited some 
builders and some philosophers of 





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FROM PRESS ASSOCIATES 

the American city to discuss specifics 
with us — to discuss the kinds of hard 
problems we ought to be thinking 
about and to discuss the manner in 
which we ought to approach .them. 

"We are here as construction men, 
not as social engineers," Haggerty 
told the subcommittee. "We recog- 
nize the tremendous problem facing 
us if we are to rebuild, rehabilitate 
and rejuvenate our urban areas — our 
great metropolitan centers." 

First he said he wanted to set the 
record straight on several points. 
One was on the contention that the 
building trades have resisted material 
changes in construction. 

"We have readily accepted and 
adapted to hundreds of changes 
made by material manufacturers, in- 
novators, architects, engineers and 
have never hesitated to put these in 
place," he declared. 

"Your best and cheapest rehabili- 
tation work now going on contains 



General President 
Hutcheson and 
First General Vice 
President Finlay 
Allan with Senator 
Ribicoff during 
a lull in the sub- 
committee hearing. 



many of these new materials. Al- 
most every new building — residen- 
tial or commercial — now going up, 
has new materials and new applica- 
tions in the specifications. We know 
these must be used in the job we 
have ahead of us — in rehabilitation, 
new housing and commercial — to 
rebuild our cities." 

Haggerty also took issue with 
those who claimed that the building 
trades have not gone along with or 
conducted research. 

He called the charge "fantastic" 
and cited the costly study being con- 
ducted by the Battelle Memorial In- 
stitute "to determine where and 
what is the present and future of 
prefabrication, the use of new mate- 
rials, new methods and new tech- 
niques and tools" in the industry. 
Other work in the research field was 
discussed, too. 

"On the matter of (building) 
codes," Haggerty said, "we have not 
and will not resist code changes 
where it will expedite construction, 
except where it will reduce safety 
or where it will lower values or de- 
stroy specifications designed for the 
protection of the owner and the 
members of the community." 

The union leader stressed positive 
suggestions for rehabilitating our 
slums. 

One was a public policy of in- 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



creasing compensation for those who 
live in slums. "Put more income 
into the hands of slum families," 
he said, "and they will be in a posi- 
tion to afford improved housing." 

Also, Haggerty said, "dreams of 
new technology will not produce 
rehabilitation and renewal as effec- 
tively as providing clear incentives 
to builders and contractors. They 
will, in turn, develop practical tech- 
nology and highly efficient proce- 
dures to do the work." 

"Are there," Senator Ribicoff 
asked Haggerty, "enough skilled 
people to do the job?" 

"If the program is planned as to 
time and place and the new tech- 
niques we know added, we could 
supply the skilled personnel," was 
the reply. 

Stefanovitch, New 9th 
District Board Member 




William Stefanovitch 

Newest and one of the youngest mem- 
bers of the General Executive Board is 
Ninth District Board Member Wilham 
Stefanovitch of Windsor, Ontario, who re- 
placed Andrew V. Cooper upon his re- 
tirement last month. 

Brother Stefanovitch brings to his new 
International post two decades of service 
in the Brotherhood. He became an ap- 
prentice to Local 494 in February, 1947, 
and shortly thereafter began taking an 
active role in local union and Canadian 
labor affairs. 

In 1957 the General President appoint- 
ed him to the regional organizing office 
in Toronto. He traveled in Quebec, Lab- 
rador, and Ontario on behalf of the 
Brotherhood. In 1953 he had been elected 
a vice president of the Ontario Provincial 
Council of Carpenters. He was appointed 
to the Canadian Labour Congress Man- 
power Committee several years ago and 
is still a member of that body. 

Early in 1966 he was elected secretary 
of the General President's Committee in 
Canada for Plant Contract Maintenance. 
Last year, the 30th General Convention 
also elected him as Ninth District Board 
Member. 

He is married and the father of two 
boys, 13 and 16. 

MAY, 1967 




Amazing Facts About Cities 



IF you're a city slicker, you have 
more company than you may 
realize; 63 percent of the entire popu- 
lation of the U.S. lives in the 212 
metropolitan areas with populations 
of 50.000 or more. 

New York City has the largest 
population — 7,891,957 in 1960— and 
combined with Jersey City and New- 
ark, N.J., it makes up the world's 
largest metropolitan census area with 
a population of 14,750,429 according 
to the 1960 census. 

While New York has the largest 
population. Los Angeles is the most 
spread out with a land area of over 
450 square miles. 

The highest state capital is Denver, 
Colorado, "The Mile High City," 
where the altitude on the steps of the 
capital building is exactly 5,280 feet! 

Juneau, Alaska, has the distinction 
of being the northern-most capital 
and the coldest city in the U.S., with 
an average annual temperature of 
40.1 °F. 

The city with the biggest building 
boom is Los Angeles, which put up a 
record 141,526 housing units alone 
in 1963. 

The growth rates of large cities 
such as New York and Los Angeles 
over the past decade can't compare, 
however, to a much smaller city which 
takes the honors for being the fastest 
growing. Warren, Michigan, jumped 
from 727 people in 1950 to 89,246 a 
decade later — an increase of 12,175.9 
per cent! 

While New York has the largest 
population in the United States, it's 
dwarfed by Tokyo, which was the first 
city to officially pass the 10 million 
mark in 1962. In 1964, an off-the- 
record estimate put the population of 
Shanghai at 10,700.000. 

While some cities are famous for 
their size, others are equally famous 
for other superlatives. The highest cap- 
ital in the world, before the conquest 
by China, was Lhasa in Tibet with an 
elevation of 12.087 feet above sea 
level. Jericho, now called Ariha, in 
Jordan, is the oldest known walled 
town: it may have been inhabited as 
early as 7800 B.C. The world's oldest 
capital city, Damascus. Syria, has 
been continuously inhabited since 
2000 B.C. 



Many cities around the world at- 
tract visitors to see their architectural 
marvels of bygone days. Such struc- 
tures as the Taj Mahal, Chartres Ca- 
thedral and the Egyptian pyramids 
have withstood the test of time and 
continue to inspire modern architects. 

Unfortunately, most cities, here and 
abroad, sprang up willy-nilly. But 
such American cities as Buffalo, De- 
troit and Washington, D.C. benefitted 
from early planning. 

Also known as "The City of Mag- 
nificent Distances," Washington is fa- 
mous for its wide avenues and scenic 
vistas. Constructed on the site ap- 
proved for the new capital by Presi- 
dent Washington, the city was de- 
signed by a French engineer who had 
fought in the American Revolution, 
Pierre Charles L'Enfant. 

Many other cities have become 
equally well-known by their nick- 
names. While you may know Paris 
as "The City of Light," can you guess 
which is the "City of Saints" . . . the 
"City of Bells" . . . "The City of the 
Three Kings?" 

Montreal, the capital of the Cana- 
dian province of Quebec, is often 
called the "City of Saints," because 
so many of the streets there are 
named after saints. Strasbourg, in 
northern France, is sometimes refer- 
red to as the "City of Bells." "The 
City of the Three Kings" is Cologne, 
Germany, which is reputed to be the 
burial place of the Magi. 

Rome is known as "The City of 
the Seven Hills." and "The Eternal 
City." It was said that Agrippa, dur- 
ing the reign of Augustus, converted 
it "from a city of brick huts to one 
of marble palaces." Agrippa would 
probably be amazed at how much 
more rapidly his marble palaces would 
go up today if they were being built 
with the modern conveniences of thin 
marble slabs. 

Today, the modern Stone Age is 
reaching into every city regardless 
of its size. Sights to delight even the 
most blase Sidewalk Superintendent 
are all around you, and no matter 
what city you call home, you can be 
pretty sure that the big build-up will 
reach greater heights. 




General Officers and District Board Members line platform as Farmer First General Vice President Stevenson administers oath. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

and 

DISTRICT 

BOARD MEMBERS 

SWORN INTO 

OFFICE 

in 

SOLEMN 

CEREMONY 



TN A TRADITIONAL and solemn ceremony, Sat- 
-■- urday, April 1, in the auditorium of the General 
Headquarters Building in Washington, D.C., the 
General Officers and District Board Members of the 
Brotherhood were sworn in for an ensuing four-year 
term. 

A quiet gathering of families and friends watched 
with members of the official staff as Former First 
General Vice President John R. Stevenson installed 
the new slate of Brotherhood leaders. Before leading 
the men in the oath of office, Brother Stevenson spoke 
briefly to the audience, recalling some of the difficult 
periods in the Brotherhood's history. He emphasized 
the strong obligation borne by each General Officer 
and District Board Member about to take on renewed 
duties in the organization. 

There were other words and thoughts of the past, 
as Andrew V. Cooper of the Ninth District officially 
retired from the Board, to be succeeded by William 
Stefanovitch of Windsor, Ontario. Brother Cooper 
was presented with a lifetime gold membership card 
in a brief ceremony. 

As the ceremonies drew to a close. General Presi- 
dent Maurice Hutcheson spoke briefly on behalf of 
the entire board, thanking those in attendance and 
expressing the hope that the Brotherhood will continue 
to maintain the fine spirit and progressive actions of 
the 30th General Convention, which elected the offi- 
cers just installed. 

The installation ceremonies came at the conclusion 
of a week of work by the Brotherhood's General 
Executive Board. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 





EDITORIALS 



^Long-Standing Injustice 

American labor and the Administration have called 
upon Congress once more to restore the right of peace- 
ful picketing at job sites to building trades unions. 

For 16 years members of building and construction 
trades unions have suffered the long-standing injustice 
of being denied the right to picket certain contractors, 
subcontractors and employers at the job site because 
it is claimed that such action violates the Taft-Hartley 
ban on "secondary boycotts." 

A bill introduced by Congressman Frank Thompson 
of New Jersey would rectify the situation. It failed 
passage in the last Congress because of time lags and 
political maneuverings. 

This time, it comes back with much stronger sup- 
port. The metal trades, the railroad brotherhoods, 
and many other groups have called for passage of Rep. 
Thompson's bill. 

Let's get behind the drive for enactment this time 
with letters to Congressmen urging passage in this 
session. 

^R ContractOBf's Bequest 

Edmund Prentis was one of the most sucessful con- 
tractors in the New York City area. The General Con- 
tractors Association Bulletin stated that his firm — • 
Spencer, White & Prentis — was "known throughout 
the world for its particular skills in the realm of 
heavy construction engineering." 

He was active in subway construction and mining 
operations. He was co-inventor of the pretest system 
of underpinning and piledriving and was instrumental 
in developing the theory of streamhning coffer dams. 

In spite of his lofty professional position, Edmund 
Prentis never forgot that it was skilled craftsmen fur- 
ther down the ladder who made his firm's achievements 
possible. 

When he died last March 12 at the age of 83, the 
last surviving member of his firm, it was learned that 
he had bequeathed $2500 to Local Union 1456 of 
New York City with the request that this sum be used 
to aid the sick and disabled members of the local 
union. He was himself a card-carrying member of the 
union and proud of his labor background. 

Mr. Prentis's will stated that he left the funds to 
Local 1456 "in view of the pleasant relations which 



my associates and I have had over many years with 
this trade union local." 

This may be the first such bequest ever received by 
a local union of the Brotherhood from an employer- 
contractor. 

We join with the Piledrivers, Bridge and Dock Car- 
penters, the Shorers and Underpinners of New York 
City in acknowledging with thanks this unusual be- 
quest. May there be more Edmund Prentises in the 
world of heavy construction, with their ideals high 
and their sentiments firmly on the ground. 

^Take tlte BriveFS Test 

On the inside back cover of this issue of The Car- 
penter you'll find a form for recorduig your answers 
to the 1967 National Drivers Test to be televised this 
month. We hope you'll keep it handy and take the 
test. 

Street and highway safety is of growing concern to 
Americans, as they race down turnpikes and thorough- 
fares to and from work each day. The chart below 
will indicate why. Motor vehicle deaths form the 
largest percentage of overall accidental deaths. You 
can make Memorial Day and every other holiday a 
safe time for driving by learning the rules of safety and 
making them a part of your driving habit. 



nKidental Deaths in the 
United States in 19BB 



Total Accidents ^^^HH 

DEHTHS (nil [auses] 

Motor Vehicle 
Deaths 



1100% (112^000) 



1 47% (52,500) 




I Source: National Safety Cotfncif 



MAY, 1967 



13 



THE REFEREE 

is 3 

BUZZ SAW 

'I wouldn't have your job for a 

million bucks/ people assure this 
Philadelphia carpenter, vfho tells 
Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell 
ivfien to jump. 

TN A RECENT syndicated story. United Press Tn- 
■*■ ternational said that Joe Gushue tames Giants with 
a whistle. 

This is indeed true. Acting in his capacity as a 
bigtime professional basketball referee, Joe Gushue 
keeps peace among tall warriors of the cage like 7- 
foot, one-inch Wilt Chamberlain and 6-foot, eleven 
Bill Russell . . . simply by blowing a shrill blast on 
his regulation whistle. 

Part of the year Gushue is a union carpenter, ply- 
ing his trade like any other member of the Brother- 
hood. But from September to April he becomes one 
of 11 vagabonds who travel the coast-to-coast circuit, 
making the decisions in the big games. The wife and 
three children have to stay behind as Referee Gushue 
takes on his winter job (which pays, incidentally, from 
$50 to $120 a game, according to seniority). 

"A lot of times in my travels," the 32-year-old Phila- 
delphian said, "I'll get on the plane and happen to 
start a conversation. They ask what I do and I have 
to say, 'Well, I'm a National Basketball Association 
referee.' " 

"Then," he laughed, "they say, 'I wouldn't have 
your job for a million bucks.' " 

Gushue, in his fifth year in the NBA, said "traveling 
is the hardest part of the job." 

"We travel so much and work in so many cities on 
consecutive nights," he said. "Every game you have 
to get yourself up. You can't let it become dull. Every 
night you have to give 100 per cent. 

"We run an average of about seven and a half miles 
a night, believe it or not — four or five nights a week," 
he said. "We have to be in just about as good shape 
or better than the players. We don't have any subs." 

Gushue, who played independent and service bas- 
ketball, said a referee cannot afford to have "rabbit 
ears." 

"There's so much judgment, so many judgment 
plays," he said. "You've got to make up your mind 
as soon as the whistle blows what way you're going." 

His philosophy is to "let the booing go in one ear 
and out the other." 

"You can't let it bother you," he said. "Most of 




That's .loe Gushue watching the action in his striped shirt. 



the cities are rooting for the home team and every- 
where you go it's the same. As long as you have judg- 
ment calls — and 85 or 90 percent are — the ref will 
always be what he is now — on the spot." 

But Gushue, one of the popular NBA referees, 
quickly added, "these guys (fans) are paying to see 
the game and they have a right to boo or jeer." 

A dwarf in a rugged world of Goliath-like athletes, 
Gushue has broken up his share of fights in the NBA. 

"Most of the time our players don't want to fight, 
but it's just a matter of saving face," he said. "When 
two players get into a scuffle, it's not a matter of want- 
ing to hurt each other. But one player can't back down 
or he will get the tag in the league of being easy." 

Gushue said the man with the whistle is boss, "but 
his word is often disputed." 

"You have to have a certain personality to work 
in this league," he said. "Some nights the players 
won't say anything, other nights they gripe. Traveling 
makes the difference." 

Gushue said a player protests mainly "because he 
is embarrassed he did wrong and wants to put the onus 
on the referee — or what we say, tries to put the 
monkey on your back." 

"If these guys know you're not sure on the call," 
he said, "the bigger the beef you're going to get. 
You've got to say right away whether it's a block or 
a charge, goal tending or not goal tending — the two 
hardest calls." 

There's no doubt about Gushue's love for the game. 
He refereed playground games before entering the 
NBA, and returns to the playgrounds in the summer. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Covered Bridge 

Continued from Page 5 

strength, it has the added advantage 
that it can be tightened up, or tuned 
to take up the slack caused by aging. 

The search for those nostalgic relics 
of a more leisurely past — most of them 
hidden away on winding back roads 
— leads through magnificent country 
of ever-changing aspect: along the 
rugged shores of the Pacific, over the 
heavily-timbered Coast Range, through 
the rural reaches of the lush Willamette 
Valley and up into the wilderness of 
the high Cascades, famed as fishing, 
hunting and skiing country. 

Covered bridge country has a rural 
charm missed by the hurrying freeway 
traveler. For only on the back roads 
have these wooden spans survived. The 
traveler who stops at a crossroads store 
to ask directions (most covered bridges 
aren't easy to find) may find himself 
back at the turn of the century, amid 
a stock of kerosene lamps, wood-burn- 
ing stoves, and cast-iron kettles. There 
may still be an old gas pump in front 
of the store. 

Everyone has his own idea of how 
a covered bridge should look. Styles 
have changed over the years, so it is 
possible to date the bridges with some 
accuracy from the appearance of the 
portals, the style of windows, and 
possibly from the decking. A bridge 
may be a long, dark, dusty tunnel 
which rattles and thumps to the rhythm 
of passing cars or it may be an open- 
sided structure which gives a view of 
the stream it crosses. Colors, too, 
vary from the silvery sheen of long- 
unpainted boards to traditional barn 
red or crisp gleaming white. 

Although the severe floods of De- 
cember 1964 damaged or destroyed 
several covered bridges, their sturdi- 
ness compared to modern spans proved 
itself. Many covered bridges sustained 
no damage in the devastating floods 
and were put back into service as soon 
as the flood waters receded, if, indeed, 
they were closed to traffic at all. 

One covered bridge which was 
washed out was the state's most east- 
erly one, the Belknap, high in the 
Cascades near the tiny town of Rain- 
bow. First plans called for replace- 
ment by a modern span, but successful 
completion of the Shimanek bridge 
and growing interest in covered bridges 
changed the plans. W. A. Palmateer, 
who designed the Shimanek bridge, 
drew up plans for a new, bigger and 
sturdier bridge to be built a few hun- 
dred yards downstream from the old 
Belknap site. This bridge was com- 
pleted in the fall of 1966, shortening 
the school bus route by about 12 miles 



and enabling residents of the south side 
of the McKenzie River to reach their 
homes without a long detour. 

A further note of encouragement 
to covered bridge buffs is the projected 
construction of still another covered 
bridge, the Barton Park bridge near 
Glendale in southern Douglas County, 
Oregon, for which plans are now on 
the drawing board. It, too, will re- 
place an aged covered span. 



Construction of these new covered 
bridges makes it seem likely that an- 
other generation or two will be able 
to know the feeling of delight of sud- 
denly coming upon a wooden span 
around a curve in the road, of walking 
through its hushed interior, of savor- 
ing a bit of the past; maybe even swim- 
ming or fishing in its shadow before 
that shadow, along with the last cov- 
ered bridge, disappears. 



Brotherhood to Exhibit at 1967 
Union Industries Show, Phoenix 



The big, annual AFL-CIO Union indus- 
tries Siiow opens witii gola ceremonies 
at the Arizona Veterans Memorial Coli- 
seum in Phoenix, Arizona, May 19, and 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America will, once again, 
be a primary exhibitor. 

There will be displays of craft skill 
and demonstrations of shop work. Near 
the Brotherhood booth will be other ex- 
hibitors with all manner of displays and 
prizes. It's all free, and the public is 
cordially invited to attend for the six- 



day duration of the exhibition. 

Union members, particularly, will find 
a visit to the show gratifying, for they 
will see how skilled workers of other 
unions carry on their daily work. It is 
hoped, too, that "the man on the street" 
in Arizona— a "right to work" state- 
will see the advantages of labor-man- 
agement cooperation and collective bar- 
gaining in our American society. 

We urge all members of the Brother- 
hood to bring their families and friends 
to the big and exciting show! 



It's Branding Time in tine Great 
Soutliwest. Plan Now to Attend 



the big AFL-CIO 

UNION 



SHOVW' 

ARIZONA VETERANS MEMORIAL COLISEUM 

STATE FAIR GROUNDS • PHOENIX, ARIZONA 

May 19-24, 1967 * 7 PM.-10:30 PM. 

FREE Ai^^'^^'ON * PRIZES 

UNION LABEL AND SERVICE TRADES DEPARTMENT AFL-CIO 





MAY, 1967 



IS 



MAKE $20 to $30 EXTRA 
on each *^ 

STAIRCASE 



ELIASON 




Saves its cost in ONE day — does a 
better job in half time. Each end of 
Eliason Stair Gauge slides, pivots and 
locks at exact length and angle for per- 
fect fit on stair treads, risers, closet 
shelves, etc. Lasts a lifetime. 

Postpaid (cash with order) or C.O.D. 
plus postage 



Only 



$15.95 




ELIASON STAIR 
GAUGE CO. 

6005 Arbour Lane 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55436 




LAYOUT LEVEL 

• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

REACHES 100 FT. 

ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Wnter Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set battere 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, fonns, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate '4/^' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- >« 

curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1950 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only .$7.95 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
age. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

Ask yom- tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow the usual dealer discount on }i Doz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

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925 DeSoto, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 





DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20350 



Dear Mr. Hutcheson: 

You will recall that we came to the Building and Construction 
Trades Council last March to solicit your assistance and co- 
operation in support of our Navy's Seabee petty officer recruit- 
ment program. 

The response of the Co\incil and the membership of the Carpenters 
and Joiners' Brotherhood to our appeal for assistance in 'obtaining 
carpenters and joiners for duty as petty officers in our Seabee 
Battalions was magnificent. Without this help, we would never 
have met the heavy demands for Seabees in Southeast Asia, 

The men recruited from your organization are doing a fine job, 
as we knew they would, and have made a significant contribution 
as we strive to meet increasing requirements imposed on the 
Navy by our responsibilities in Southeast Asia. 

On behalf of the Navy, please accept my personal thanks and 
appreciation for the timely and outstanding response of the Council 
and the membership of the Carpenters and Joiners' Brotherhood. 



\)-Mf^V- 



-X" 



RICHARD A. BEAUMONT 
Deputy Under Secretary For Manpower 



Mr. M, A. Hutcheson, General President 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 

Joiners of America 
101 Constitution Avenue, N,"W", 
Washington,. D. C. 20005 

The Navy seeks Seabee petty officers from Brotherhood ranks 



NAVY'S SEABEES 

Continued from Page 9 

1. Officers with a minimum total 
of 96 years of college education in 
civil engineering, logistic support, 
medical and dental training, plus 
many years of practical experience 
in engineering problems during pre- 
vious military assignments. 

2. Chiefs with 750 to 800 years 
of practical experience in the fol- 
lowing construction fields: (a) roads, 
runways, earthmoving projects, and 
heavy-equipment and automotive 
operation and repair (b) wood, steel, 
and construction in the building 
trades; (c) water, sewage, and boiler- 
system installation and maintenance, 
(d) electrical construction, genera- 
tors, high lines, and all other types 
of electrical installation and mainte- 
nance; (e) steel construction, fabri- 
cation, and welding (gas and arc); 
and (f) support experience, logistics, 
administration, and medical train- 
ing. 



3. First Class Petty Officers with 
an average of more than eight years 
in their respective rate; Second Class 
Petty Officers with an average of 
more than three years' experience in 
their respective rate; and Third Class 
Petty Officers with a minimum of 
two years' experience in their respec- 
tive rate. 

All this is without counting the 
rest of the battalion — the younger 
members who may have had experi- 
ence in vocational schools or prac- 
tical experience from hobbies or 
summer jobs. The average Seabee 
unit, in short, has over 2,000 years 
of construction knowledge and ex- 
perience behind every "Can Do" or 
"Ingenuity" accomplishment it has 
completed. 

We need have no fears about get- 
ting the job done — wherever destiny 
takes our builders-fighters like the 
Seabees. ■ 



1« 



THE CARPENTER 



A^ 








SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONST. AVE., N. W. WASH.. D. C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT.) 



He Was Dead Wrong 

Talking to a faith healer, he hap- 
pened to mention that his brother was 
very sick. "hHe's not sick ... he only 
thinks he's sick," contradicted the 
faith healer. Some time later they 
met again and the "healer" said: 
"Hov/'s your brother now?" 

"Much worse," came the reply. 
"Now he thinks he's dead!" 

— S. S. Sorter, Klamath Falls, Ore. 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

A Phoney Story 

The boss was having trouble with 
the new secretary. "You've gotta learn 
how to answer the 'phone!" he ex- 
ploded. "Well, it seems silly," she re- 
plied. "Nine times out of ten it's for 
you!" 




Handy Partner 

Two beatniks were walking through 
the swamp when one stepped off into 
a quicksand bed. "Quick, man, give 
me a hand!" he cried. And the other, 
as his partner went under, applauded 
vigorously. 

— David Greene, Petaluma, Calif. 

BE UNION — BUY LABEL 

Dub-a-dub Flub 

Electricity had reached the back- 
woods and a salesman was trying to 



sell a hillbilly wife a washing machine. 
"What's that hole in the bottom 
for?" she asked. "Why, that's to let 
the water out,'" he replied. "Ah-ha!" 
she cried. "I knew this thing was a 
fake. It don't wash with 'lectricity 
. . . you still gotta use water!" 

UNION MEN WORK SAFELY 

Make-Believe Barroom 

The wife was bored as she sat at 
home with her hubby. She turned off 
his tv and demanded: "Pretend I'm 
a bartender . . . talk to me!" 



BUY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Diplomat 

She was one of the prettiest — and 
wealthiest — young women in town. 
Any number of eligible young men 
had courted her unsuccessfully, yet 
one day her family announced her 
engagement to a very unlikely pros- 
pect from the other side of the tracks. 
"hHow did you convince her to marry 



you.' 



a friend asked the future 



groom. 

"I sent her 25 roses on her 30th 
birthday," he replied. 

1 4 ALL — ALL 4 1 

No Excuse Left 

Nagged the wife to the hubby: 
"You certainly made a fool of your- 
self at that party! I just hope nobody 
realized you were sober!" 



This Month's Limerick 

"This suit," said the shapely Miss 

Moore, 
"Should make a big hit at the shore." 
It did, 'til a cop 
Ran up yelling "Stop! . . . 
When you zipped it, you ripped It 
... it tore!" 

— Jim Ware, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 



Mr. Pert Sez: 

Bein' th' flower o' th' fambly may 
be great, but there's alius th' chanct 
o' bein' th' bloomin' idiot insteada 
th' buddin' genius! 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 

Singleminded Fellow 

"There's one thing wrong with my 
boyfriend," said hHopeful hiannah. 
"hie likes me as I am . . . single!" 




Sure No Cure 

Teacher was explaining to the class, 
on the first day of school, the ground 
rules. "If you must go to the bath- 
room, hold up two fingers," she an- 
nounced. In back of the room a wor- 
ried beginner asked: "hlow will that 
help?" 

TAKE PART IN UNION AFFAIRS 

The Critical Time 

Wanna know when your child is 
grown up? Look for the time when he 
quits asking where he came from and 
refuses to tell where he's going. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

Prance and Dance 

Joe: "Whatcha call a guy who's 
crazy about go-go girls?" 
hlowie: "A chest-nut!" 

— M. Choma, Local 1452. 



MAY, 1967 



17 



I # tBanadian Report 



CNTU Fails in Move to Take Over 
Resilient Floor Workers of Toronto 



As predicted in this column in 
March, the Quebec-based Confedera- 
tion of National Trade Unions failed 
in its bid to take over the Resilient 
Floor Workers Local 2965 in Toronto 
from the Carpenters' Union. 

The CNTU asked the Ontario 
Labor Relations Board to declare that 
they had a majority of Local 2965 
signed up. They presented cards to 
prove it. But on examination by the 
Board, at least three of the cards 
were found to have phony signatures. 

The lawyer for the CNTU admitted 
that the signatures on those cards 
were "unauthorized". The Carpenters' 
lawyer called them "forgeries". 

For the time being the building 
trades' unions in the Toronto area, 
maybe in all Ontario, will have little 
to worry about the CNTU. But this 
Quebec union is still claiming a 
majority of the members of a Steel- 
workers' local in the Collingwood 
shipyards. 

Economist Asks Upgrading 
Of Lumberjacks' Life 

A leading economist with the 
Economic Council of Canada has told 
the forest industry that lumberjacks 
will have to be provided with more 
of the amenities of life if the industry 
is to attract and maintain its em- 
ployees in woods operations. 

"There will need to be upgrading 
programs for the workers at present 
engaged in forestry, as well as train- 
ing programs for new entrants. Liai- 
son and consultation between in- 
dustry, the unions and government will 
be required as the transition to a new 
type of work force takes place." 

The lumber industry in Northern 
Ontario was very backward in pro- 
viding accommodation of even ele- 
mentary decency to its woods workers 
until the Lumber and Sawmill 
Workers, a Brotherhood aflfiliate, 
forced them to change their ways. No 
doubt the same has been true right 
across Canada, backward company 
attitudes, militant unions demanding 
change. 

But the new changes Mr. Dawson 
predicts will mean more than mod- 



ernization in the lumber camps. What 
he is talking about is increasing 
mechanization. 

As this takes place, a change will 
also take place in the work force, he 
said, from a relatively unskilled, 
largely seasonal work force with little 
formal education to a more highly- 
skilled year-round work force. 

This new kind of work force will 
work on expensive machines. The men 
will want to live with their families in 
permanent communities with adequate 
schools and other social facilities. 

He went on to suggest that the 
necessary facilities will be relatively 
costly, too costly for small com- 
munities. 



Canada on Parade 




THE DRUMS WILL ROLL and senses 
will be engulfed by the spectacle and 
sound of martial pageantry when Can- 
nada's Centennial Tattoo is peri'ormed in 
some 40 cities across the country in 1967. 
Derived from the traditions of both Eng- 
lish and French military origins, the 
Tattoo will be seen in several spectacular 
outdoor presentations with a cast of 1.700 
military personnel, including these mem- 
bers of the Canadian Guard, at Victoria, 
Vancouver, Ottawa, Hamilton, the Cana- 
dian National Exhibition at Toronto and 
at EXPO 67 in Montreal. Smaller 250- 
member groups will present scaled down 
performances in other centers. (Canadian 
Government Travel Bureau Photo.) 



This will make it necessary to co- 
ordinate the location of woods 
operations among different companies 
so that permanent communities of 
adequate size can be established. 

Economic Council 
Holds Conference 

Co-operation of labor, management 
and government was the subject of a 
conference sponsored by the Economic 
Council of Canada late in March. 

Chairman of the Council, Dr. J. J. 
Deutsch, called for labor-management 
co-operation to ensure that techno- 
logical changes are brought about in 
an orderly manner involving equal 
sharing of the sacrifices and benefits. 

This sounds very good but is no 
different from dozens of other state- 
ments on the subject made from time 
to time, usually by top-level Depart- 
ment of Labor officials. The Canadian 
Labor Congress has asked for labor- 
management-government consultation, 
but so far it has been management 
that has balked. 

"How ready," asked Dr. Deutsch, 
"are both management and labor to 
take up the challenge of trying to cope 
with the requirements of change 
through a system of free discussion 
and bargaining?" 

The ECC chairman thought there 
was a lack of communication between 
management and labor which has led 
to various complications in the field 
of industrial relations. 

The best contribution to the dis- 
cussions was made by Manpower Min- 
ister Jean Marchand. He said that 
management and labor would have to 
get together to work out ways and 
means of adjusting to changes. The 
alternative was legislation. 

He was in favor of employees get- 
ting at least three months' notice from 
management of technological innova- 
tions and major changes in production 
methods. 

Federal Grants 

For Moving Expense 

Manpower Minister Marchand has 
announced a number of improvements 
in Canada's labor mobility policies, 
effective April 1st. 

Until now workers having to move 
to new jobs could obtain federal loans 
to do so. repayable in a year or two. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Now these workers can get outright 
grants for moving themselves and their 
families. 

Another change is that now every 
worker will be eligible for such grants. 
Formerly it was only those who were 
unemployed for four months or more. 

The federal government will also 
grant $500 toward the cost of selling 
a home and buying a new one. 

These improvements are all in line 
with what the Canadian Labor Con- 
gress has been demanding. But what 
has helped move the government too, 
is the tight employment situation in 
many parts of the country and in many 
industries. 

Fedetal, CLC Study 
Of Swedish Methods 

The changes suggested to the ECC 
labor-management conference by Man- 
power Minister Marchand were not 
very far from what has been in effect 
for over 20 years in Sweden. 

A central labor organization bar- 
gains with a central management or- 
ganization about nationwide wage 
increases for all industries and all em- 
ployees. But Sweden hasn't 10 prov- 
inces with 10 labor laws in addition 
to the federal law, as well as wide 
disparities in income between east and 
west and central regions as in Can- 
ada. 

Nevertheless the Swedish system 
provides some guidelines for improve- 
ments in collective bargaining methods 
and manpower policies which the CLC 
has studied and the federal government 
is now taking into account. 

The results of the Swedish system 
are apparent. That country has the 
best strike record of any nation in the 
industrialized, democratic world. Ac- 
cording to the International Labor 
Office, Sweden lost an average of only 
seven days per 1000 workers employed 
between 1955 and 1965. 

The ILO figures show that the 
United States was highest with 1 ,020 
days lost per 1,000 employed. Italy 
was second with 885 days lost and 
Canada third with 581 days lost for 
1000 employed. 

Housing Shortage 
Expected to Worsen 

Canada's housing shortage will get 
worse this year despite belated gov- 
ernment efforts to stem the downward 
tide. 

Federal figures show that both land 

and construction costs have gone up, 

but when the figures show an average 

land cost of $3,480 for a home built 

Continued on Page 24 




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MAY, 1967 



19 



HOME STUDY COURSE 



m^ 




ADVANCED BLUEPRINT READING-UNIT I 



INTRODUCTION— This unit and succeeding units will ex- 
tend your knowledge of Blueprint Reading and Estimating; 
the elementary course was concluded with the April, 1967, 
issue. You will also apply the principles of basic mathe- 
matics which have been previously presented and will be 
reviewed in this course. Additional information is provided 
which will enable you to learn the basic principles of ad- 
vanced blueprint reading using the plans and specifications 
for Plan "D". 

BLUEPRINT 

A photographic print, referred to as PLANS, used to 
copy maps, architectural plans, etc. The Plan "D" series 
are a "Black Line" on white background. Generally con- 
struction plans are "Blue Line" or "Black Line" but are 
still referred to as Blueprints. The Blueprints which are 
white on a bright-blue background are used in this indus- 
try to some extent. 

PURPOSE 

The purposes of a set of plans and specifications are to: 

(1) Furnish necessary information to craftsman, sup- 
pliers, contractor and subcontractors for building 
the project. 

(2) Show necessary marks and reference points. 

(3) Illustrate special details of construction for work- 
men in performing their particular tasks. 

(4) Convey the owner's wishes through the architect, 
in a clear, concise and detailed manner. 

PLANS 

The plans which include: 

(1) Foundation plans — shape, size and location of walls 
and footings. 

(2) Floor plans — Layout of all floors and space desig- 
nations, i.e., office space, stairs, duct spaces, rest- 
rooms, etc., shows location of doors, windows, serv- 
ice outlets, cabinets and other necessary informa- 
tion needed for planning and scheduling work 
processes of the various trades. 

(3) Plot plan — Shows the e.xact location of the building 
in relation to fixed and identifiable reference points. 

(4) Roof plans — Shows roof construction and details 
regarding slope (pitch) of roof and its relation to 
adjoining walls. 

LOCATIONS 

The elevations are a pictorial view of the building from 
all directions; i.e.. North, South, East and West. Materials 
to be used are shown by appropriate architectural symbols 
or words. Typical elevation cutaways (see Section A-A or 
B-B) are used to clarify dimensions and details from the 
floor plans. 

DETAILS 

A detail is used to clarify a particular phase of the con- 
struction process such as a staircase, rail construction. 



elevator shaft or framed wall. They are usually drawn to 
a much larger scale for clarity. They generally indicate 
precisely the manner in which the particular unit is to be 
placed or built. 

SECTIONS 

A section is a cutaway view of some portion of the 
building. It shows dimensions, shapes and materials to be 
used; it clarifies a detail of construction. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

The specifications contain a minute description of ma- 
terials used in construction, contractual terms and respon- 
sibilities of all parties, architectural descriptions and de- 
tails not otherwise enumerated. Specifications should be 
read carefully and niiist be thoroughly understood by all 
interested parties. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Interior Finish Schedule indicates materials used for 
floors, base, wainscot, (if any) walls and ceiling. (See 
Sheet 2.) 

Door Schedule — Detailed description of size, type and 
characteristics of each door used in the building. (See 
Sheet 2.) 

Window Schedule — Description of size and character- 
istics of each window used in the building (See Sheet 2.) 

Rib Table — Shows dimensions and materials required 
for forming the concrete ribs that reinforce the concrete 
floors. (See Sheet 9.) 

Beam Table — Shows dimensions and material place- 
ment of beams which support the interconnecting ribs of 
the concrete floor. (See Sheet 9.) 

Numbered Sections — In addition to the usual sections 
that appeared in the Elementary Blueprint Course (Section 
A-A, B-B. etc.), this plan contains numbered sections, i.e., 
Section 1101, 1108a, 1202 and others which serve to 
clarify types, shapes and placement of materials. (See 
Sheets 9, 10, 11, 13.) 

MATHEMATICS REVIEW 

The carpenter must be familiar with the three basic 



STUDY MATERIAL AVAILABLE 

The Mathematics Home Study Course has been com- 
piled into a pamphlet and is now available at a cost 
of 500 per copy. Requests for the pamphlet, The Car- 
pentry Supplemental Mathematics Workbook, should 
be sent to: General Secretary R. E. Livingston. United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 101 
Constitution Avenue, N. W.. Washington, D. C. 20001. 

The Blueprints and Specifications for the Home Study 
Course in Blueprint Reading and Estimating are also 
available. The price for these is $2, and they also may 
be ordered from the General Secretary's offlce. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



types of measurements and be able to solve problems 
which involve each type. 

THREE TYPES OF MEASUREMENTS 

(1) Linear Measure — A measured distance along a 
straight or curved line. 

(2) Surface Measure — A measure of surfaces; meas- 
urement is expressed as square units. 

(3) Volume Measure — A measure of capacity (con- 
tents); measurement is expressed in cubic units. 



18' 



70 YDS. 



55 6 



X 




in 


b 




la 


Y 


Q 






30'6" 


o 




O 

CM 


•^ 




s 







30 YDS. N 

A B C 

Figures A, B and C are formed with right angles. The 
figures are not drawn to scale. 

(1) Find the perimeter of Figure A. 

(2) Find the perimeter of Figure B. 

(3) Find the perimeter of Figure C. 

(4) Find the area of Figure A. 

(5) Determine the length of dimension X and Y. Find 
the area of Figure B. 

(6) Determine the length of dimension M and N. 
Find the area of Figure C. 

ASSUME THAT FIGURES A, B and C HAVE A 
THICKNESS of 4" for PROBLEMS 7-9. 
. (7) Find the volume of Figure A. 

(8) Find the volume of Figure B. 

(9) Find the volume of Figure C. 



BLUEPRINT READING 

(10) Make a list of the pages and main items which 
are included in Plan "D." 

(11) What direction does the front of the building face? 

(12) What is the street address of the building? 

(13) How far is the front property line from the curb 
line? 

(14) What are the exact dimensions of the lot? 

(15) What are the exact dimensions of the building? 

(16) What is the height from the lower garage to the 
finished first floor? 

(17) What is the width of the alley? 

(18) How far is the building from the front property 
line? 

(19) What is the difference in the elevation of the nat- 
ural grade between: 

a. NE corner and the SB corner of the building 
site. 

b. SW corner and NW corner. 

(20) Assuming that the curb height is set at the bench 
mark, how high must water flow above the curb 
to begin flowing into the first floor? 

(21) What lot numbers make up this parcel of prop- 
erty? 

(22) There are two elongated indentations shown to 
the West of the main entrance. What are they and 
what is their purpose? 

(23) What is the width of the existing sidewalk? 

(24) What is the distance between the existing sidewalk 
and the property line? 

(25) What must be removed along property line from 
SW corner to NW corner prior to beginning pre- 
liminary excavation? 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ARE ON PAGE 24 




■f 






■A' 



•»■•«.":. 



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and 16 oz. rip. If you really want 
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Or he'll find it for 
you. If all else fails, 
you can always 
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MAY, 1967 



21 





By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at Box 508, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



B Hefty Halibut 

D. E. Hammer of Tacoma, Washing- 
ton, a member of Local 470. keeps the 
piscatorial pot boiling. He writes: 

"Dear Fred: 

"In a recent column you credited 
Herbie Dubois of Southington. Massa- 
chusetts with catching the largest halibut, 
a 240-pounder, I believe (right. Brother 
Hammer?) taken from the Atlantic salt- 
chuck, off the tip of Cape Ann. I re- 
spectfully call to your attention three 
catches recorded in The Alaska Sports- 
man Magazine — August, 1966: A 373- 
pounder (details unknown); a 352- 
pounder. taken by Paul Jones of Homer. 
Alaska in the Kachemak Bay area, and 
a 413 pounder by Karl Tagg of Haines, 
Alaska, deceased." 

You are right. Brother Hammer, all 
three catches mentioned in Alaska Sports- 
man exceeded — weight-wise — the catch 
by Dubois, but I fail to note any of 
these catches made via the sport-fishing 
method, that is. by rod and reel, and 
landed, unaided, by the angler who 
hooked the fish. As I previously men- 
tioned, there are no official sport-caught 
records kept for halibut. As far as our 
records go. Dubois must be credited, 
unofficially, with the largest. Perhaps a 
larger one has been caught, if so I would 
be grateful for the details and I'll pass 
them along in a subsequent column. 

■ Deer Spotter 

"Seek out a good natural deer run and 
perch yourself in a tree where you can 
get a good look all around; then wait for 
them to come sauntering by." That is the 
nimrod philosophy of Clay Porter of 
Aberdeen, Kentucky, a member of Local 
2310, Madisonville. Judging from the 
following pic of Brother Porter and his 
buck, I'd say it's a pretty good trick, 
leastwise it worked for him last season. 
Clay picked his buck from a group of 
deer that trailed below him and was led 
by a large doe. He waited 'til they passed, 
trailed 'em for about 100 yards, then 



22 



Porter and bis buck. 

settled for the buck which field-dressed 
at 180 pounds. Nice looking rack, 
don'tcha think? 



■ Recessed Filters 

Andy Craven of Spokane. Washington, 
says he received the biggest surprise of 
his life recently when he cleaned a catch 
of cutthroat trout that he eased from 
Mineral Lake near Elbe. One of the 
cutts had three cigarette filters in its 
stomach. 

■ Monster Muskie 

The muskellunge experts sat up and 
took notice of a fair anglerette from Jo- 
liet. 111., namely Mrs. Mavis Haines, wife 
of carpenter H. D. Haines, a member 
of Local 174. now retired. A letter and 
pic from Brother Haines records his 
wife's catch — a 46-pounder from the 
Flambeau Flowage near Mercer, northern 
Wisconsin. At that time it was thought 
to be the largest taken in the nation — 
and it was, almost. The 1966 Field and 
Stream records, recently released, showed 
one slightly larger, a 49-lb., 12 oz. speci- 
men taken by Larry Anderson from the 
Lake of the Woods in Ontario. Mrs. 
Haines' catch was made on August 11th; 
Anderson's on August 4th. She hooked 



Mr. and Mrs. Haines and Muskie. 

the finny moose on the third cast. When 
it was eventually eased into the boat, one 
prong of the hook, all that was holding 
the monster, fell out. The giant musky 
now rests, mounted on a plaque, on the 
Haines' wall. Hear tell Mr. and Mrs. 
Haines, between them, have accounted 
for 49 muskies in seven years of fishing 
in the northwoods. 

(I note, however, in checking 1966 
records on muskies for the state of Wis- 
consin, as listed in Sports Afield Maga- 
zine (March, '67), that a catch by an- 
other anglerette, Elsie Seeley, was listed 
as tops, a lunker that tipped the scales 
at 43 -lbs., 14-ozs. It therefore appears 
from this that Mrs. Haines can lay 
claim to catching the largest musky in 
the state of Wisconsin last year. It is 
unfortunate that her fish was not regis- 
tered in Sports Afield records as well as 
the Field and Stream contest). 

■ Portable Camper 

Here's a pic of V. C. Holmes of Box 
165. Foxwell Road, Millersville, Mary- 
land, a member of Local 101. He is 
standing in front of his %-ton GMC 
truck equipped with a camper he built 
himself. The interior is complete with 
dinette, kitchen, wash room, toilet, and 
ample closet space. It converts at night 
to sleep five adults; is wired for both 
110- and 12-volt electric current and 
featLires an intercom system from cab to 
Continued on Page 24 




Holmes and his camper. 

THE CARPENTER 



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SEE PAGES 20 AND 21 



MATH REVIEW 



1. 


60 Ft. 


2. 


260 Ft. 


3. 


116 Ft. 


4. 


216 Sq. Ft. 


5. 


X = 40 Yds. 




Y = 40 Yds. 




AREA - 3400 Sq. Yds. 



NOTE: To determine the area of a • 
figure for which a formula is not 
given, divide the figure into known 
figures by adding working lines. The 
inside corner line on figure B and C 
could be extended in a horizontal or 
vertical direction so that the figures 
become rectangles. 

6. M = 20' 6" 
N = 25' 

AREA = 2732.50 Sq. Ft. 

NOTE: All measurements used to de- 
termine area or volume must be in 
the same units, i.e. 55'-6" ^ 55.5' 

7. 72 Cu. Ft. 

NOTE: 4" = .33 Ft. or Vj Ft. 

8. 11331/3 Cu. Ft. 

9. 910.83Vi Cu. Ft. 

BLUEPRINT READING 

10. Plan "D" is made up of a pamphlet 
of specifications for Plan "D'' and 14 
pages of plans. 

Page 

1. Basement, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Floor 
Plan. 

2. 4th Floor. Roof and Plot Plans. 
Interior Finish, Door and Win- 
dow Schedules. 

3. Elevations and Sections. 

4. Details of North Wall. Miscel- 
laneous Details. 

5. Stair and Ramp Details and 
Building Sections. 

6. Elevator and Toilet Details. 

7. Miscellaneous Details 

8. Lobby and 1st Floor Office De- 
tails. 



9. 4th Floor and Roof Plan of Typi- 
cal Beams and Ribs. 

10. Section through Garages and 
Rear Stairs. 

11. Basement and Foundations; Foot- 
ing Plans and Typical Sections. 

12. Structural Front. 

13. Typical Floor Plans for Ribs and 
Beams — Sections and Columns. 

14. Structural — West Elevation. 

11. The Building faces North. (Plot Plan, 
Pags 2.) 

12. 7607 Santa Lorica Blvd. The contrac- 
tor is to verify the address numerals 
with the owner. (Plot Plan, Page 2 
and Elevation E. Page 8.) 
NOTE: symbol E identifies an eleva- 
tion winch is clarified elsewhere. 

13. 15'-0" (Plot Plan Sheet 2.) 

14. 70'-0" X 90'-i/4 " (Plot Plan Sheet 2.) 

15. 69'-10" X 89'-l 1" (Plot Plan Sheet 2.) 

16. 6-6" (East Elevation, Sheet 3.) 

17. 20'-0" (Plot Plan, Sheet 2.) 

18. Vi" 

19. (a) 0'-9y8" 
(b) l'-4%" 

20. The bench mark (B.M.) is an arbi- 
trary reference point which is desig- 
nated at an elevation of lOO'-O" to 
avoid the use of minus numbers in 
calculations. The water level must 
reach 3" above the curb to flow into 
building. 

21. Lot 23 and 24. Note that measure- 
ments which are listed on the plans 
relating to surveys are noted in deci- 
mal parts of a foot, i.e., 197.01', 
40.01', etc. 

22. The two indentations show the loca- 
tion of planter boxes (Plot Plan, Page 
2 and details, page 4) 

23. 5'-0" 

24. 6'-0" (First Floor Plan, Sheet 1 and 
Plot Plan, Sheet 2) 

25. The power pole and an existing wood 
curb along the property line must be 
removed. (Plot Plan, Sheet 2) 



CANADIAN REPORT 

Continued from Page 19 

in 1 966 under the National Housing 
Act, there is something wrong some- 
where. In the Metro Toronto area, 
land costs have soared to around $10,- 
000 for a serviced lot, and most in- 
dustrial areas show the cost of land 
as a major culprit in home costs. 

Building wages went up only 8 per- 
cent, homebuilding materials less than 
2 percent, and overall building costs 
about 5 percent. 

But mortgage costs went up from 
around 6 percent to over 8 percent 
on non-NHA mortagages which is a 
really big boost. 



OUTDOOR MEANDERINGS 

Continued from Page 22 

camper. Utilizing his spare time, it toolc 
Brother Holmes 1 1 months to build. 
Holmes says nothing smaller than a %- 
ton truck should be used to carry the 
camper which weighs 1,600 pounds with 
full water tanks. 

■ Eagle Lore 

In regard to a recent question. I must 
say that the stories of an eagle carrying 
off infants belongs in the category of 
fairy tales. I doubt, very seriously, if 
the eagle can lift its own weight. For 
instance, an eagle that weighs ten pounds 
would have a hard time flying off with 
a rabbit that weighs seven. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 









000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 




Augusta volunteers who worked on the USO Building (See story below.) included: 
front row, from left, E. L. Wilkerson, W. T. Brantley, J. Harold Dye, Hammond 
W. Boyd, E. B. Ivey, Ronald Bracewell. Back row, from left, R. H. Partridge, Jr., 
W. B. Hodges, Edward Bracewell, L. E. Otts, Henry T. O'Neal and Ralph E. Stanley. 



U.S.O. VOLUNTEERS— Monday, March 6, 
was volunteer day for members of Car- 
penters Local Union No. 283, Augusta, 
Georgia. 

Twelve carpenters assembled at the 
U.S.O. on Broad Street at 6:30 P.M. with 
tools in hand. By 11:00 o'clock that 
night they had constructed a sizable stage 
in the recreation area on the first floor 
of the U.S.O. building — a community 
facility where servicemen from nearby 
military installations gather. 

Because of the many entertainment 
programs produced each week and ex- 
tremely heavy attendance at these pro- 
grams it has become a must that ad- 
equate stage facilities be provided. This 
need was conveyed to Carpenters Local 
Union No. 283 by Harold Dunlavy, the 
Augusta U.S.O. Director. J. Harold Dye, 
business representative of Carpenters 
Local No. 283. made a call for volunteers 
and immediately had the task force pro- 
vided. It developed that a number of the 
carpenters had seen active service in the 
military as well as having sons now in 
the military service of their country. 



GRAND JURY SERVICE— Tiro local union 
members of tlie Bay Counties District 
Council of Carpenters have achieved dis- 
tinction in their local county by being 
named to the County Grand Jury. Bus. 
Rep. Earl Honerlah of San Mateo, Calif., 
Carpenters Local 162 has been named 
foreman of the 1967 San Mateo County 
Grand Jury. Bus. Rep. Charles Young of 
San Bruno Carpenters Local 848 served 
on the 1966 San Mateo County Grand 
Jury. San Mateo County is immediately 
south of San Francisco city and county. 





HONERLAH 



YOUNG 



Armon L. Henderson, Executive Secre- 
tary of the San Diego County District 
Council of Carpenters, receiving the Bent 
Nail Award from William A. Bennett, 
business Representative, Carpenters Local 
1507, El Monte, California. 

BENT NAIL AWARD- It has been the pride 
and pleasure of El Monte Carpenters' 
Local 1507 for the past five years to 
present to a carpenter in California its 
"Bent Nail Award." This award is its 
way of paying tribute to those in the 
Brotherhood who have, over the years, 
made sizable contributions, not only 
to the Union, but to their fellow man. 

On February 17th, 1967. at a meeting 
of the District Council of Carpenters in 
San Diego, Business Representative Bill 
Bennett, on behalf of Local 1507, pre- 
sented the 1966 Bent Nail Award to 
-Armon "Slim" Henderson, member of 
Local 1296. The gala affair, hosted by 
the District Council and well attended, 
was planned to honor San Diego's "old 
timers," who have given outstanding serv- 
ice to their union, as well as to honor 
"Slim." 

In making the presentation, Bennett 
pointed out the many accomplishments 
highlighting "Slim's" career — from the 
time he first joined a local, when he 
helped to organize in Mesa, Arizona, in 
1936, to his current position as executive 
secretary of the San Diego County Dis- 
trict Council of Carpenters. He touched 
on some of the too-numerous-to-list com- 
mittees "Slim" has served on as well as 
headed (the Trusts, legislative and ne- 
gotiating committees), the occasions when 
he was called upon to host conventions, 
his willingness to serve when called to 
head the Eighth District Organizing and 
Education Program, (serving in this latter 
capacity for the past 16 months). The 
word "service" on a guidepost has been 
the direction "Slim" has followed all 
these years. 

Joining the officers and members of 
San Diego in the celebration were Dean 
Weddle. business representative of Local 
1507; Charles Nichols, Eighth District 
Board Member; Anthony Ramos and 
Paul Urgel, State Council of Carpenters; 
Terry Slawson and Pat MacDonald, Los 
Angeles County District Council of Car- 
penters. 



MAY, 1967 



25 



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26 



THE CARPENTER 




Retired members of the Central and Western Indiana District Council proudly display tlieir pen- 
sion fund checks, which were presented to them at the pension banquet sponsored by the Council. 



Indiana Council's Pension Plan Holds Memorable 'Kick-Off 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. — The Carpen- 
ters Central and Western Indiana District 
Council kicked off its pension program 
recently with a banquet in honor of re- 
tired members eligible for benefits. 
Checks were presented to 141 members 
with 10 years or more of continuous 
membership. 

Special guest of honor, John V. Harris, 
91, the "oldest living member in the 
fund area" was presented a plaque as a 
tribute for dedicated service to the 
brotherhood. Brother Harris has 64 years 
of continuous membership. 

Ed Wyler, International Representa- 
tive, was the main speaker for the oc- 
casion. Mr. Wyler recounted the strug- 
gles of the Brotherhood in its efforts to 
keep the carpenter out in front in the 
building trades. 

The Trustees of the Pension Fund, 
headed by Chairman Ernest Walker and 
including Norman Bland, Ralph Smith, 
and Wendell D. Vandivier, assumed over 
a million dollars in liabilities to provide 
for the welfare of the already retired 
members who contributed so much to 
the present success of the brotherhood. 




SPECIAL GUEST of honor at the Cen- 
tral and Western Indiana District Coun- 
cil's recent pension banquet, John V. 
Harris, 91, is shown receiving a plaque 
from Chairman Ernest Walker as a trib- 
ute for his 64 years of continuous mem- 
bership in the Brotherhood. International 
Representative Ed Wyler looks on. 



Carpenters Work 
On New Poe Lock 

SAULT STE. MARIE, MICH.— Many 
carpenters in the Sault Ste. Marie area 
are finding employment on the new Poe 
Lock construction at the Sault Locks. 
The 1200-foot-long lock is 61 feet deep 
and 110 feet wide and is described as 
the largest man-made lock in the world. 

To allow enough room to build the 
new lock, it was necessary for contrac- 
tors to construct a huge hole between 
the first and third of the Sault's famous 
locks. This hole, 2400 feet long and 300 
feet wide, was coffer-dammed at either 
end to keep the waters of Lake Superior 
and the lower St. Marys River out of the 
excavation. 

For those with mathematical minds, 
it required the removal of 400,000 cubic 
yards of material to create the excava- 
tion; the lock itself will contain 367,000 
cubic yards of concrete work; and 240,- 
000 yards of backfill against the back 
walls of the lock. The concrete work is 
now about 60 percent completed. 



NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS: When sending material for publication in the CARPENTER, please write as legibly as 
possible, check spelling of names, and be certain all persons are identified in group pictures. Please sho^ official 
titles of persons photographed as completely as possible. We will use your local union news as space permits. 



MAY, 1967 



27 



Old Timers of Louisiana Local Presented Gold Rings 



SPRINGHILL, LOUISIANA — At a 

recent meeting of Local 886, it was 
decided to present all 25-jear members 
a gold ring with our Carpenter emblem. 
About 60 members and their families 
were treated to an old-fashioned fish 
fry at the International Paper Co. Bar- 
becue Building in Springhill. Members 
receiving rings were from left to right: 
President John E. Bryan, Olie C. Mc- 
Donald, W. D. Beavers, G. F. McCoy, 
and J. P. Stevens. Presenting the rings 
is Financial Secretary Ray Wallace. 
Two members receiving rings who 
were unable to attend the fish fry were 
E. M. O'Neal and H. C. Corbell. 




Princeton Members Honor Their 25-Year Veterans 




Large Group Honored in Pittsburgh 




PITTSBURGH, PENNA.— Local 221 
recently held a Membership Awards 
Presentation and presented 23 Fifty- 
Year pins and 132 Twenty-Five Year 
pins. The following were among the 
brothers honored: Richard Lensner 
(64), Nathanial Nesbit (63), Aloysins 
Glaser (62), James B. Lyons (62), 
James F. Heckert (60), Emil E. Blosat 
(59), Eric Johnson (58), Paul F. Eshel- 
man (57), John E. Williams (55), John 
McAllister (53), James R. Salter (53), 
Clement A. Wilson (53), John J. Calla- 



han (52), Valentine Hohman (52), R. 
L. Mcllvaine (52), James J. Reiter (52), 
Alan R. Rudolph (52), Andrew C. 
Geisler (51), Howard C. Beckert (51), 
Alex C. McNeal (51), Harry C. Bradel 
(50), John Mikut (50), and M. Dale 
Cashdollar (50). Brothers in the photo, 
from left to right, are: Andrew S. 
Zovko, president of Local 211; Valen- 
tine Hohman and R. L. Mcllvaine, 52 
years each; and Joseph A. Senge, secy.- 
treas. of the Carpenters' District Coun- 
cil of Western Pennsylvania. 



PRINCETON, N. J.— Local 781 re- 
cently honored its 25-year members. 
They are, seated left to right, Walter 
Tuomisto, George W. Rodefeld, con- 
ductor, Leo Goeke, John Orlofl", David 
Donald, and George E. Hullfish. 
Standing observing are Walter N. Ells- 
worth, vice president, Russ W. Smith, 
recording secretary, John A. Brabson, 
president, Joseph A. Rigby, treasurer, 
William A. Pinelli, trustee, John A. 
Butrym, financial secretary, and Wil- 
liam H. Fry, business representative. 
Absent when the picture was taken 
was N. W. Van Setfen, a 50-year mem- 
ber. 



Wagon Museum 
Opens in Ohio 

COLUMBUS, OHIO— William E. Way 

of Local 200, Columbus, encourages 
members and their families to visit the 
recently-opened Pioneer Wagon Museum 
in Canton, Ohio. 

"Even the Amlsh come to see my 
wagons," says Nick Cucerzan, creator 
of the Museum. In his museum are 44 
wagons, each one authentic and each 
one handcarved by Nick — a painstaking 
labor which has taken him many years 
to complete. Most of the wagons are 
scale models, two to three feet long, 
and several are full size. 

Wagons taken out of the pages of 
American history include: a covered 
wagon train, 15 wagons long; a Prairie 
Schooner; a Conestoga wagon; and a 
full-size covered wagon complete with 
frying pan, wash tub, scrubbing board, 
and brown jug. 

Nick Cucerzan's Pioneer Wagon Mu- 
seum, 2900 Navarre Road SW, Canton, 
is open to the public seven days a week 
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Hudson County Council Members Assist Scouts 




JERSEY CITY, N.J. — Several members of the Hudson Couiitj Dislricf Coiiiitil of 
Carpenters of New Jersey donated their time and skills to help erect booths for 
the annual Scout 'O Rama sponsored by the Hudson Council, Boy Scouts of America. 
The event was staged in the Jersey City National Guard Armory. In the front row, 
from left, are: Stewart Kopp, Local 139; John Wilson. Local 2315; Ken Ross, Local 
482; Al Beck, Sr., Business Agent; George Walrod, Local 282; Frank Aiello, Local 
139; Thomas Bifano, Business Agent; Tom Colagiero, Local 612. In front, Al Beck, 
Jr., Business Agent. In the second row, from left, are: Walter Iskra, Local 383; Andy 
Suchovich, Local 486; R. Eberling, Local 612; Ted Gnida, Local 486; Tom Kelly, 
Local 2315; and Walter Hoff, Local 486. In the third row, from left, are: Ted 
Yiengst, Local 564; Ed Hoff, Local 486; Martin Martinsen, Local 282; Tom No- 
vembre, Local 299; Sal DeAnni, Local 299; and V. Abattiello, Local 612. Standing, 
left, Joe DeAnni, Local 299; and John Hanson, Local 482. 



ices Exhibit at Exposition 




FORT WORTH, TEXAS— Apprentice carpenters of Local 1822 of Fort Worth are 
shown at work on scale models which they exhibited at the Southwestern Exposition 
and Fat Stock Show in Fort Worth recently. Spokesmen for Local 1822 report its 
Joint Apprenticeship Program is now in "full swing" with approximately 60 apprentice 
carpenters enrolled in the program. 

MAY, 1967 



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29 



Skills Displayed During 3-Day Seattle Celebration 




SEATTLE, WASH. — King County Carpenters recently partic- 
ipated in a 3-day event called "Careers Through Apprentice- 
ship and Training Days." At the Seattle Civic Center they 
exhibited some of their craft skills and supplied literature to 



visitors. In the picture at right, above, they displayed a boat 
built by boat-building students trained at Seattle Community 
College with a strong assist from the King County Carpenters 
Joint Apprenticeship Committee. 



What's New in 
Apprenticeship & Training 




First Contest Held in Colorado 



DENVER, COLO. — The Carpenters 
Apprentice Training Program in Colo- 
rado has at last accomplished one of its 
greatest goals — a Carpenters Appentice 
Contest, which was held on March 29 
and 30, 1967. First place winner in the 
mill cabinet contest was Joseph Anderson 
of Colorado Springs, and second place 
winner was Lester Pierce of Denver. 
First Place winner of the construction 
carpenter contest was William P. Davis 
of Grand Junction, and second place win- 
ner was Wayne Masin of the Denver 



Colorado Winners Presented Certificates 



Denver, Colo.^ 
George Prince of 
the Brotherhood's 
Training Depart- 
ment, left, with 
William Davis, 
construction car- 
penter winner; Jo- 
seph Anderson, 
mill cabinet win- 
n e r; and Guss 
Wells, coordinator 
of . the . statew ide 
program. 




Apprentice Carpenters Receive Diplomas 



Daytona Beach, 
Fla. — Apprentice 
carpenters of Lo- 
cal 1725 of Day- 
tona Beach display 
diplomas presented 
to them in recent 
ceremonies. They 
are, from left: John 
Bennett, John Rus- 
s e 1 1, Jr., Fred 
Grossbauser, and 
Steven Bacom. 



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participating in the International Appren- 
tice Contest. 

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sure of themselves, and did not want to 
compete in the contest because they did 
not believe they were good enough. 



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THE CARPENTER 



Successful Trainees 




SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. — Pile 
Drivers, Bridge, Wharf and Docl< Build- 
ers Local 34 recently launched a train- 
ing program in its area. On March 17 
the first two men to complete training 
under the program were initiated into the 
union. Shown above with Local 34 Pres- 
ident Charles Clancy, center, are Richard 
Cardova and Richard Abbott. 

Hospital Support 




ELLENVILLE, N. Y.— Members of 
Carpenters' Local 1038 Ellenville, re- 
cently presented a piece of hospital equip- 
ment to Evald Bors-Koefoed, administra- 
tor of the Ellenville Community Hospi- 
tal, in memory of the late Carl Geisel- 
hart. At the presentation, left to right, are 
Mr. Bors-Koefoed, Robert Ballantine, 
Morris Chartakoff, Louis Greenstein, and 
President Robert McConnell. 

Union-Type Clown 




MARTINEZ, CALIF. — Members of 

Local 2046 have sponsored a Christmas 
party for their families for the past five 
years. There was a tremendous assembly 
of kids and parents last December to 
commemorate the holidays. Entertain- 
ment Committee Member Ray Williams, 
above, proved to be a top entertainer 
himself. Following the party, the local 
union distributed 26 baskets to needy 
families. 




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MAY, 1967 



31 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




(1) ANCHORAGE, ALASKA— Local 
1281 recently paid tribute to members 
who have completed 25 years of serv- 
ice. General Representative Paul Rudd 
was in Anchorage at the time and con- 
ducted the presentation. Seated left 
to right, all 25 year members, are: H. 
A. Poore, John Parks, George Moen, 
Ray Martsolf, William Markley, Clyde 
McCurdy, Kristlan Larson, Peter Lan- 
nen, Elmer Knutson, Doyle William- 
son, E. J. Augustin, Robert Baird, 
Starling Cornelius, Delbert Dishaw, 
Lee Toohey, Joe Rose, Ellis Summers, 
and Floyd Thompson. 

Standing, left to right, are: Larry 
Smith, trustee, Ed Salas, executive 
committee member-at-large; Bob Pow- 
ell, business agent; Bill Ross, recording 
secretary; Marvin Mitchell, president; 
Paul Rudd, general representative; Ben 
Perkins, financial secretary; Clarence 
Davis, 25-year member; Willis G. 
Turner, trustee; John Thomas, con- 
ductor; Bruno Johnson, executive com- 
mittee member-at-large; Einer Huseby, 
27-year member and assistant business 
agent; Nile Van de Mark, 25-year 
member; Peter Cassidy, 25-year mem- 
ber and trustee; Floyd Ward, treasurer; 
and Ned Turnage, warden. Unable 
to be present were the following 25- 
year members: James Bergsrud, Albert 
Lausterer, Flomey Carlin, John Sned- 
don, Clarence Johnson, D. C. Ray, 
Ed Crean, A. E. Hicks, William Mul- 
ford. Cliff Spellman, Chester Jacobs, 
Robert Manson, Robert Cobern, Clar- 
enc Davis, Earl Jones, R. M. Reed, 
Art Sandland, and John Thallhimer. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



(2) ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN— At 
a recent meeting at Local 512's Union 
Hall, the following brothers received 
their 25-year pins. Seated, left to right, 
are August Feldhauser, Harold Green- 
wood, Carl Weber (Local 512 presi- 
dent), Len Zimmerman (secretary- 
treasurer of the Michigan State Car- 
penters Council), and George Wandell. 
Second row: Cleo Hanrath, James 
Beal, Cecil Cady, William Shipley, and 
Charles Masztios. Top row: Curtis 
Farley, Helmut Heilmann, George 
Johnson, Blair Oney, and Starr 
Lolmaugh. Others awarded 25-year 
pins but not present for the photo were 
Donald Behnke, William Bowling, Mil- 
ton Carver, Ernest Jennings, Rufus 
Nutter, Clemence Okey, Paul Seitz, 
Paul Stone, and George Wisner. Our 
congratulations to them all. 

(3) BATTLE CREEK, MICHIGAN— 
An Oldtimers Banquet was held recent- 
ly by Local 871 at the Countryside Inn. 
At this banquet 23 twenty-five year 
membership pins and one fifty year 
pin were presented. 

Honoring the new 50-year member, 
Charles Aurand (third from left in the 
front row) were many of our members, 
including (in the front row) Austin 
Gibson, trustee; James Engle, treas- 
urer; John Steele, president, S. W. 
Michigan Carpenters District Council; 
Lewis Scarbrough, b.r.-f.s.; and Keith 
Clinton, secy.-treas., S. W. District 
Council. 

Gathered for the official banquet 
photo were the following "oldtimers": 

First row, I. to r.: Trevor Holcomb 
(26), Ralph Haines (30), Edw. E. 
Evans (31), Milton McClintock (26), 
Ed WilUs (49), Hershel Rosine (29), 
Glen Toppan (39), Fred Scott (26, 
Second row, 1. to. r.: Chas. Aurand 
(50), Alfred Pierce (26), Ed Eisinger 
(48), Roy Lyttle (26) Carl Peters (30), 
Raymond Fullerton (26), Peter Rhy- 
nard (26). Third row, I. to r.: Maynard 
Pickels (28), Chas. E. Moore (26), 
Chas. S. Johnson (29), Harry Leins 
(26), Harold Gino (26) Archie Don 
(31), S. John Flo (25), Jos. Karlovsky 
(48), and Ezel Johnson (26). 

(4) BIRMINGHAM, ALA.— -At a re- 
cent banquet honoring 25-year mem- 
bers of Local 1105, the following 
brothers were present to receive their 
25-year pins (from left to right): Harry 
V. Gilmer, T. M. Ellard, Sr., C. E. 
lowers, J. T. Evans, G. B. Ellard, and 
Lawrence Brakefield. Members who re- 
ceived 25-year pins but who were not 
present at the banquet: J. E. Brown, 
B. V. Coleman, J. D. Conway, L. J. 
Miller, and J. L, West, 




«r> 




(5) BOONE, IOWA— Local 315 re- 
cently presented membership buttons 
to men with 25 or more years of serv- 
ice. Standing, left to right: Wm. F. 
Dohms (26), Milton Schoonover (25), 
Franklin Hutson (33), Lawrence Lar- 
sen (29), August Stemmerman (30), 
Wm. McBimie, Sr. (28), Joe Poshusta 
(25), Sigard Peterson (29). Seated, 
left to right: Wm. M. Dohms (25), Joe 
Loehrer (50), Walter Perrson (43), 
August Dunnerman (26), and Verne 
Schwein (30). 

(6) GILBERTSVILLE, KENTUCKY 
— At a dinner at the Ken Bar 



^M 



Inn recently, 58 members of Local 
2049 received their 25-year pins, or 
were cited as eligible for them this year. 
Presentations of pins to 34 of these 
brothers were made by Mitchell Mc- 
Candless, secretary of the Kentucky 
State Council of Carpenters as well as 
Brotherhood International Representa- 
tive. Honored members at the picture 
taking time were (seated): N. L. 
Thompson, Robert Mimms, Elmer 
Brien, Don Nelson, Gordon Bridges, 
Paul Grace, Mitchell Andres, W. W. 
Joyce, Orbie Culver, and Victor Jar- 
vis. Standing in the first row are: 
Charlie Shaw, Dan Clayton, Hoy 



MAY, 1967 



33 



Greenfield, J. W. Skaggs, Edgar Karns, 
Walter House, G. C. Shelfon, Cecil 
Lovett, Lloyd Thorp, Clifton Travis, 
James Messamore, Otis Curtis, Burlis 
Ward, Everett Waterfleld, Solon Wvalt, 
Edgar Wallace, and Mitchell McCand- 
less. Standing in the back row are: 
Charles Travis, Malcolm Gream, How- 
ard Williams, Leo Helm, Elgie Arant, 
Bob Orr, and Charlie Yahr. 

(7) LAKEWOOD. N. J.— Local 2018 
honored its 25-year members with a 
recent dinner-dance held at the New 
Irvington Hotel. Service pins were 
presented by General Executive Board 
member Raleigh Rajoppi, who topped 
the list of honored guests. The party 
was attended by 400 persons. Mem- 
bers who received awards were Broth- 
ers Andrew Alonzo, Rodney Barfoot 
Willever Bennett, Charles L. Brice, 
Calvin Brown, Ludwig Burkard, Ray- 
mond Camburn, Ralph Clayton, Sr., 
Vincent Clayton, Charles S. Coryell, 
Charles Fisher, George Gant, Robert 
Gant, James Glasgow, William J. 
Gruning, George Gunfher, Oliver 
Havens, Albert Heinrich, Sam Heulitt, 
Adam B. Huff, Perry Inman, Harry J. 
Layton, Sr., William P. Layton, Karl 
R. Litzenberger, Armand Mathieu, 
Edward Miller, Guy T. Molinaro, 
James E. MuUin, Sr., Donald M. Mur- 
ray, Gustaf Ottosin, Albert J. Reid, Sr., 
William Reynolds, Armando Romano, 
Thomas Sculthrope, Douglas Smith, 
Carl N. Spangler, Grandin C. Thomp- 
son, Elmer B. White, and James Mar- 
tin. The photo shows Brother Rajoppi 
presenting 30-year member James 
Martin O^ft), with his service pin, 
while standing with Brother Martin 
are Local President Nicholas Sme- 
recky (second from left). Business 
Representative Frank S. Krajacich, and 
Local 2018's youngest member, Mi- 
chael Synaovitz. 

(8) MADISON, WISCONSIN— A 50- 
year pin was presented to Al Diebold 
at the meeting of February 22. Shown 
are G. F. Faber, Recording Secretary; 
center, Al Diebold; and right. Presi- 
dent of Local 314, John Faust. 

(9) MARTIN'S FERRY. OHIO— Lo- 
cal 3262 recenly held a banquet hon- 
oring its 25-year members. At the fes- 
tivities held in the Pine Room of the 
VFW Building in Martin's Ferry, 
Representative Jim Bailey of the U. B. 
of C. and J. of America presented 
service pins to (front row. left to right): 
Donald Baldwin, William Koher, Mar- 
ion Spragg, and Cecil Moreland; and 
in the back row, to Paul Miller; 
Charles Swingle, Louis Miller, Arnold 
Makara, and George Talbert. 




(10) MAYWOOD, CALIF. — Local 
3161 presented 25-year membership 
pins recently to the following members, 
standing left to right: Herman Kuehen, 
Hugh Magill, William Goss, Samuel 
Loober, Mike (Ike) Medrano, Pedro 
Barron, John Abaroa, Walter Hennig, 
Waymon Bagwell, Robert Espinosa, 
Albert Varela, Alvalo Leiva, Joe Ce- 
raolo, William Hall, Earl Rossman, 
and Lawrence Struickman. Francisco 
Sanchez, president of Local 3161, who 
did not receive a pin, is on the extreme 
right. Seated left to right are: Arthur 
Mora, Emanuel Oropeza, Albert Sailor, 
Louis Castro, John Gustafson, Lonnie 
Sals, and Esteban Lopez. 

(11) NILES, OHIO — At a recent 
party held in their honor, long-time 



members of Local 1514 were presented 
membership pins commensurate to 
their long service in the Brotherhood. 
Presentations were made in the Niles 
Carpenters Hall by President J. W. 
Gilbert fleft). Recipients of pins were 
(left to right) Edward Strohmeyer (65 
years of service), Charles Swager (42), 
Al Storm (32), Joe Gilbert (30), Guy 
Nori (25), Elbert Turner (29), C. E. 
Remalion (25), and Harold Gilbert 
(25). James Brickerstaff and Charles 
Williams, each with 25 years' service, 
were not present at the party. 

(12) OMAHA, NEBRASKA— Three 
50-year members and twenty-eight 25- 
year members received their service 
pins at a recent dinner-dance held by 
Local 253 in the Livestock Exchange 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



BuUding in Omaha. Introduced by 
Local 253 President George Chadwell, 
the banquet guest was George Arnold, 
president of the Nebraska State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters. Gathered for the 
official banquet photo are (front row, 
left to right) Leon Green, 8th District 
Board member, Fred Gordon, Don 
Bastermler, and Earl Stiner. In the 
second row (1. to r.) are Sam Short 
(warden), Harry Serviss (50), Charles 
Lewis (50), Carl Auguston (50), spe- 
cial guest C. F. Custer (60), trustee 
John Petersen, Local 253 President 
George Chadwell, and Anders Larsen 
(25). In the back row (1. to r.) are 
Daniel Muck (25), Fred Brodersen 
(25), John Ehrlich (25), Ole Clausen 
(25), Yale Linn (25), Emanuel Ward 
(25), Henry Huglin (25), Niles Jorgen- 
sen, Joe Prenosil (25), S. J. Nodgaard 
(25), and Frank Blankman. 

(13) OROVILLE, CALIF.— The fol- 
lowing members of Local 1240 were 
recently honored at a special presenta- 
tion of their 25-year service pins. Bot- 
tom row, left to right: Cecil Bledsoe, 
Cloyd Boswell, T. M. Crawford, Mar- 
tin Johnson, and H. A. Stevens. Mid- 
dle row (1. to r.): Donald Mundorff, 
Jess Dawson, William O. Dodd, Ken- 
neth Malcolm, and Clarence Eberle. 
Top row (1. to r.): Clifford Simmons, 
Cecil White, Leon Roziere, Fred 
Morse, Don R. Warison, and Jack W. 
Williams. Twenty-five-year members 
unable to be present included Harry 
Crandall, J. C. Hearn, Perry Mosely, 
Floyd Price, Ray Wallace, Sherman 
Ingles, and Sam Shuker. 




(14) OSSINING, N. Y.— At a testi- 
monial dinner at Pastor's Restaurant in 
Ossining, Local 447 honored its 25-year 
members. Pictured, left to right, are 
David Anderson, Krist Breimoen, By- 
ron Wager, Peter U. Fowler, Franz 
D. Kirstein, Sr., William A. Kerr, busi- 
ness representative, and Gabriel R. 
Galletto, president. 

Not pictured but also eligible for 
25-year pins were Karl Smalley, Fred 
Weise, Charles Queen, Otto Krampetz, 
Jr., Charles Kornet, Robert Kohl, and 
Adam Gallicani. 

Peter U. Fowler was presented with 
a plaque denoting his 56 years of con- 
tinuous membership, just retiring as 
treasurer, after being an officer of 
Local 447 for almost every year. 

Vincent D'Addona was presented 
with his journeyman's certificate upon 
his completion of his apprenticeship 
training. 

(15) OTTAWA, ILLINOIS — One 
hundred sixty carpenters and wives 
paid tribute to the senior members of 



14 






Local 661 at a banquet held at the 
Ramada Inn recently. Gold and silver 
membership pins went to 36 members. 
Recipients of gold-award pins were 
William Kammerer (60), Herman 
Sackse (52), and Thomas Gray, Jake 
Jugenitz, and Russell Prentice (50). 
Photographed after the presentation 
ceremonies were, front row, left to 
right: Abe Halterman (28), Walter 
Zimmerman (43), Frank Thum (49), 
Tom Gray (50), Russell Prentice 
(50), Jake Jugenitz (50), Simon John- 



son (43), Mark Eells (46), and George 
Smith (40). Back row, left to right: 
Wilbur F. Corbin, International Repre- 
sentative, who presented the awards; 
Walter Williams, Business Representa- 
tive of Local 661, and master of cere- 
monies (41); Richard Streul (33), Ed- 
mund Halm (26), William Barnes (25), 
Fred Holm (29), Carl Wagner (41), Joe 
Prograce (30), William Streul (37), 
John Doig (45), Charles Jugenitz (43), 
and Charles Streul (39). 



MAY, 1967 



35 




IN MEMORIA 






L.U. NO. 11, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Obester, Joseph 
Peterson, Valentine 
Vrbecky, Henry 

L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

Six, August 

L.U. NO. 14. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Brittain, L. E. 
Chapoy, F. M. 
CuUen, O. T. 
Fryar, N. L. 
Meyer, Albert 
Morris, Carl 
Miinoz. Rafael 
Narvaez, Anselmo 
Perrin, Harvey 
Schulz, R. H. 
Smajstrla. Emil A. 
Street, James W. 
Tanna, W. J. 
Ward, Cordas E. 
Waskow, Herman W. 

L.U. NO. 16, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Yard, John J. 

L.U. NO. 42, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Allen, Olid T. 
Bogdanoff, Peter 
Hansen, Carl S. J. 
Janigian, Michael 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Ogle, Robert 
Williams, W. H. 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Saiilnier, Julius P. 

L.U. NO. 55, 
DENVER, COLO. 

Estes, F. K. 
Keller, Harry L. 
Romero, John A. 

L.U. NO. 59, 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Doman, Frank 
Eberly, Charles, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 60, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Castor, Bert E. 
Chiodine, Steve 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Liljestrom, Harvey 
Ratcliff, Thomas E. 
Russell, Gustaf 
Wardman, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 94. 
PROVIDENCE, R.L 

Beatty, Charles 
Blackwood, Richard 
Brodeur, Amedee 
Ciullo, Albert 
Covin, Donald 



Fine, Israel 
Flad, Frederick 
Lemieux, Philip 
McDonnell, Walter S. 
Phaneuf. Remi 
Ring. Arthur 
Russell, Isaiah H. 
Senese, James 
Shaw, George E. 
Williams, George 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Bersterman, John W. 
Brown, William T. 

L.U. NO. 104. 
DAYTON. OHIO 

Broome, Louis J. 
Wright, Joe Smith 

L.U. NO. 107, 
WORCESTER. MASS. 

Gendron, Oscar 
Jordan, Earl 

L.U. NO. 109. 
SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Grant, Jesse L. 
Marks, Emmett 
Sockwell, Homer E. 

L.U. NO. 113, 
CHESTERTON, IND. 

Luke, Edward 

L.U. NO. 115, 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Cisero. Nicholas 
Clarke, James 
Lagasse, Henry 
Patrignelli, Augustino 
Poneleit. William 
Zitney, Stephen 

L.U. NO. 121, 
VINELAND, N.J. 

Langley, Harry 

L.U. NO. 144, 
MACON, GA. 

Merritt, W. W. 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Clausen, John C. 
Erie, Andrew 
Eulberg, August 
Hansen, Louis 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Smith, Cornell B. 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Hayes, Donald R. 
Retry, Glenn 
Wildermuth, C. K. 

L.U. NO. 218, 
BOSTON, MASS. 
Leard, Leith L. 
MacLaughlin, Laughlin 
Mancini, Alfred A. 

L.U. NO. 220, 
WALLACE, IDAHO 

Huffman, J. D. 



L.U. NO. 225, 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Adamson, H. C. 
Binford, L. L. 
Bradberry, J. O. 
Brown, W. R. 
Bryan, John T. 
Cochran, R. R. 
Cole, Fred 
Craven, W. B. 
Davis, David H. 
Griffith, Claude E. 
Harrison, Curtis M. 
Haynie, J. Fred 
Johns, W. B. 
Logan, G. P. 
Morison, Harvey 
Posey, W. L. 
Poss, H. T. 
Rakestraw, A. R. 
Rich, Benjamin F. E. 
Rickerson. S. P. 
Roach, John D. 
Smith, Charles A. 
Sorrells, W. Lee 
Stearns, Clyde L., Sr. 
Tarleton, W. B. 
Taylor. Homer C. 
Thomas, William L. 
Wallace, Herbert L. 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Johnson. T. E. 
Rood, Roy P. 

L.U. NO. 235, 
RIVERSIDE, CALIF. 

Downs, Paul J. 
Koerner, Phillip P. 
Pennington, Albert J. 
Roberts, Harley J. 
Van Rooyen, Jacob 
Van Wagenen, Keith R. 
Yeager, John W. 

L.U. NO. 242, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Engelke, Harry 
Jutzi, Alfred 
Reinhardt, Carl 
Ringkevicius, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 252, 
OSHKOSH, Wise. 

Domer, Edwin H. 
Freiberg, John 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Connolly, Bernard 
Viola, Angelo 

L.U. NO. 275, 
NEWTON, MASS. 

Sweeney, Charles H. 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Spencer, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 287, 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Goodall, Leon S. 
McLane, Harry 



L.U. NO. 301, 
NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

DeLong, George E. 

L.U. NO. 325, 
PATERSON, N.J. 

Van der Gaag, James 

L.U. NO; 340, 
HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

Ralston. John J. 
Roe, John M. 
Smith, Charles W. 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Alfonso, Anthony 
Spinelli, Angelo D. 
Wallack, Max 

L.U. NO. 385, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Aiello, Philip 
Arcoleo, Eugene 
Bottillo, Ernest 
Carcich, Marco, Sr. 
Collins, Elmer 
Cotroneo, Luigi 
D'Alterio, John 
Finocchio, Pietro 
Funicello, Joseph 
Hartman, Peter 
Hurray, Charles 
Kestin, Jacob 
Klass, Louis 
Koch, Fred 
Lapi, Paolo 
Magnan, Egidio 
Marashinsky, Max 
Merlin, Abraham 
Nutch, Frank 
Prisco, Amadeo 
Roberts, George 
Romano, Jack 
Romeo, Giuseppe 
Rossilli, Dino 
Stacey, Robert 
Vizzini, Frank 

L.U. NO. 388, 
RICHMOND. VA. 

Dillion, George C. 
Fussell, Robert S., Jr. 

L.U. NO. 429, 
MONTCLAIR, N.J. 

Goldie, Robert 
Jansen, Gustav 
Nelson, Walter C. 
Olin, John E. 
Schafer, Henry, Sr. 
Scola, Anthony 
Stinstrom, Carl J. W. 

L.U. NO. 488, 
BRONX, N.Y. 

Johnson, Fred E. 

L.U. NO. 490, 
PASSAIC, N.J. 

Stivale, Sylvester 

L.U. NO. 494, 
WINDSOR. ONT. 

Quigley, Clayton 
Rintaniemi, Toivo 



L.U. NO. 532, 
ELMIRA, N.Y. 

Martin, William S. 
Neiley, Harry 

L.U. NO. 579. 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Batten, Samuel R. 
Legge, Roy 
Melendy, John 
Rodgers, Simon 

L.U. NO. 610, 

PORT ARTHUR, TEXAS 

Arnsberg, Carl 

L.U. NO. 627, 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Biven, W. H. 
Burdeshaw, Norman 
Griffith, Albert 
McGlothlin, George 
Mayse, Emmett C. 
Morgan, Paris E. 
Parramore, Phil 
Perkins, James D. 
Waters, Edward E. 
Williams, R. B. 

L.U. NO. 721, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Flushman, Max 
Hilgart, Fred J. 
Hoffman, Robert S. 
Hutchins, Orville L. 
Olson, Edwin 
Peterson, G. R. 
Tchoma, Alex 

L.U. NO. 770, 
YAKIMA, WASH. 

Bowman, Jack 
Burris, Emmett L. 
Dressier, Paul S. 
Hoggarth, Ernest L. 
Schroeder, Rubin 

L.U. NO. 878, 
BEVERLY, MASS. 

Weed, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 950, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Benson, Harry 

L. U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Babula, Faustyn 
Buckingham, Thomas 
Cottenham, Charles A. 
Hamill, Thomas J. 
Osterberg, John O. 
Sutherland, James F. 

L.U. NO. 1013, 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Carlson, Victor 

L.U. NO. 1075, 
HUDSON, N.Y. 
Groat, George 

L.U. NO. 1098, 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Weems, Joe L. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 1140, 

SAN PEDRO. CALIF. 

Christensen, Chris 
Johnston, Clarence 
Lofton, Robert 
Purdy, Edward 
Reno, Torrey 

L.U. NO. 1162, 
COLLEGE PT., N.Y. 

Sassano, Matthew 

L.U. NO. 1166. 
FREMONT, OHIO 

Miller, Herman B. 

L.U. NO. 1185, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bergstrom, Sanfrid P. 

L.U. NO. 1207, 
CHARLESTON, VV. VA. 

Hager, A. F. (Dutch) 
Heffner, Ray 
Morris, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 1319, 
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. 

Clark, Gordon D. 

L.U. NO. 1394, 

FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 

Moon, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1423, 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Martin, James W. 

L.U. NO. 1437, 
COMPTON, CALIF. 

Eales, Percy E. 



L.U. NO. 1478, 
REDONDO BEACH, 
CALIF. 

Connors, George J. 
Delancey, Thomas A. 
Forster, Frank J. 
Mooney, Robert H. 
Peel, Ross W. 
Reynolds, Wilson L. 

L.U. NO. 1497, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Barrow. Charles A. 
Cook, Herbert A. 
Hunnell, Peter D. 
Leon. Maurice 
Pepper, W. T. 
Weaver, Charles E. 

L.U. NO. 1518, 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Bufkin, E. L. 

L.U. NO. 1565, 
ABILENE, TEXAS 

Jones, Robert Roy 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Packford, Percy 

L.U. NO. 1599, 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Smith, Earl R. 

L.U. NO. 1629, 
ASHTABULA, OHIO 

Purola, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1654, 
MIDLAND, MICH. 

Bates, Harold 
Williams, Thomas J. 



L.U. NO. 1683, 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

Woodhef, Louis 

L.U. NO. 1922, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Henry 
Drysch. Frank 
Falk, John 
Garity, Thomas H. 
Hansen, Lars 
Kenney, Ted 
Korper, Frank 
Kozmenski, Joe 
Lukes, John T. 
Tuveson, Walfred 

L.U. NO. 2094, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Swansen, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 2236. 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Anderson, Seth 
Bartolomeo, Charles 
Christiansen, Thorn 
Haapanen, David 
Malkiewicz, John 
Marini, Nick 
Markus, Werner 
Meleshkevitch, Elia 
Nilsen, Nils 
Screan, Emanuel 
Severinsen, Lars 
Wehanen, Nick 

L.U. NO. 2261, 
FORT MYERS, FLA. 

Petersen, Hans 

L.U. NO. 2498, 
LONGVIEW, WASH. 

Jakubik, Walter E. 



Sporting Goods for Convent Children 




BARDONIA, N.Y. — Carpenters Local 964 of Rockland and Orange Counries recently 
presented sporting goods to St. Agatha Convent, Nanuet, N.Y. Shown in the picture 
at extreme right is president of Local Union 964 and International Representative 
Patrick J. Campbell; at extreme left, Louis Servo, chairman of the donations and 
awards committee; center, one of the Sisters of St. Agaflia and four of the many 
children, who will enjoy the use of the sports equipment in their convent and school 
program. 



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MAY, 1 967 



37 



LABORiri MATERIAL 
COSTS 



1967 UNIT COSTS 

COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF 

HUNDREDS OF 

: CONTRACTORS 

AND MATERIAL 

' SUPPLIERS 



ONLY 



$4 



75 



208 Pages 

NO ADVERTISING In California add 19c Sales Ta« 

• ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS 
IN DOLLARS AND CENTS 

• AVERAGE LABOR COSTS FOR 
THOUSANDS OF ITEMS 

• TYPICAL SUB CONTRACT 
PRICES INCLUDED 

• NEW ESTIMATING RULES 
OF THUMB 



CRAFTSMAN BOOK COMPANV OF AMERICA -Dept. CI 
124 SO. LA BREA AVE , LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 90036 
GENTLEMEN; 

Please send me the FIFTEENTH EDITION of the 
NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR $4.75 
In California add 19c Sales Ta. 



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your own Business. Tear out Ad now & write 
address beside it for FREE BOOK or phone 
Kildare 5-1702. Miller Sewer Rod. Dept. HD, 
4642 N. Central Ave., Chicago, HI. 60630. 



—LAKELAND NEWS — 

Daniel V. Gillis of Local Union 993, Miami, Fla., arrived at the Home March 8, 
1967. 

William M. Blakeley of Local Union 25, Los Aneeles, Calif, arrived at the Home 
March 9 1967. 

H. E, Lake of Local Union 659, Rawlins, Wyo., arrived at the Home March 
10, 1967. 

Alexander F. Jacksto of Local Union 808, New York, N. Y., arrived at the 
Home March 10, 1967. 

Walter Januzik of Local Union 181, Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home March 
14, 1967. 

Guy Butler, of Local Union 253, Omaha, Nebr., arrived at the Home March 
28, 1967. 

Victor Larson (No. 2) of Local Union 1423, Corpus Christi, Tex., passed away 
March 7, 1967 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Thomas Thompson of Local Union 1456, New York, N. Y., passed away March 
10, 1967 and was buried in the Home 'Cemetery. 

Joseph Cerami of Local Union 490, Passaic, N. J., passed away March 10, 1967 
and burial was at Hawthorne, N. J. 

Harry W. Marsh of Local Union 61, Kansas City, Mo., passed away March 15, 
1967, and burial was at Kansas City, Kans. 

Charles Dreher of Local Union 1367, Chicago, 111., passed away March 21, 1967, 
and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Guv Butler of Local Union 253, Omaha, Nebr., passed away March 30, 1967. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

William O. Culbertson of Local Union 985, Gary, Ind., passed away March 31, 



Members Who Visited the 

Herbert Harwick, L.U. 406, Bethlehem, 

Pa. 
Frank Hartoff, L.U. 240, E. Rochester, 

N. Y. 
Vincent Kolom, L.U. 385, L. I., N. Y. 
L. D. Harris, L.U. 661, Ottawa, 111. 
Harry Sertz, L.U. 1765, Orlando, Fla. 
Lear Burnham, L.U. 822, Findlay, Ohio 
Ray Hichsmith. L.U. 822, Findlay, Ohio 
Edward E. King, L.U. 11 38, Toledo, Ohio 
Mack Jorgenson L.U. 252, Oshkosh, Wis. 
Vasco Childers, L.U. 302, Huntington, 

W.Va. 

E. Lindberg. L.U. 958, Marquette, Michi- 
gan 

Percy Boren, L.U. 422, Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Bernard L. Brockwell, L.U. 950, L. I., 

N. Y. 
J. O. Danielson, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111. 
Wm. Redpath, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111. 
Edwin Flermoen, L.U. 100, Muskegon, 

Mich. 
Kenneth Wilcon L.U. 1729, Waynesboro, 

Va. 
George Smith, L.U. 1856, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Marion C. Douglas, L.U. 2334, Baraboo, 

Wis. 
Edward Bork, L.U. 314, Madison, Wis. 
Corbett Ritzman, L.U. 1138, Toledo, 

Ohio 
George Goodspeed L.U. 281, Bingham- 

ton. New York 
Michal Soviok, L.U. 199, Chicago, 

Illinois 
David Kraft, L.U. 1248, Geneva. Illinois 
John Jones, L.U. 1922, Harvey, III. 
James Jones, L.U. 1922, Chicago, 111. now 

living St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Charles Spoon, L.U. 48, Fitchburg. Mas- 
sachusetts 
Al Remer, L.U. 1, Sarasota, Fla. 
C. N. Dennis, L.U. 2208, Ft. Pierce, Fla. 

F. S. May, L.U 1024, Cumberland, Md. 
H. E. May, L.U. 1024, Cumberland, Md. 
Carl Anderson, L.U. 257, New York, now 

living St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Chester Wesseldine, L.U. 125, Clinton, 

N. Y. 
Gus Trenter, L.U. 100, Muskegon, Mich. 
Grady Pinner, L.U. 998, Pontiac, Mich. 
W. S. Conrad L.U. 2092, Canton, Ohio 
Peter vanGemert, L.U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
Gerald Bordiane, L.U. 2452, Montreal, 

Ont., Canada 



Home During March 1967 

Clarence Pierce, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111. 
Clifford Jones, L.U. 183, Peoria, 111. 
Leo Connolly L.U. 281, Binghamton, 
N. Y. 

F. H. Pitts, L.U. 67, Boston Massa- 
chusetts 

G. N. Prudent, L.U. 29, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
now living Largo, Fla. 

Wm. Surette, L.U. 94, Providence, R. I. 
E. G. Warner, L.U 1489, Burhngton, 

N. J. 
Chris Specher, L.U. 135, Carmel, N. Y. 
Kenneth Davis, L.U. 141, Chicago, 111. 
Septimus Wood L.U. 1481, Royersford, 

Pa. 
Roger Gilligan, L.U. 222, Springfield, 

Mass. 
William Kelley, L.U. 206, New Castle, 

Pa. 
Werner Persson, L.U. 416, Chicago, 111. 
L. L. Nelson, L.U. 181, Chicago, HI. 
Josephat Lovalhe, L.U. 625, Manchester, 

N. H. 
Ralph Beiting, L.U. 698, Newport, Ky. 
James Martin, L.U. 2018, Toms River, 

N. J. 
Carl Carlson, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111. 
O. E. Keller, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N.Y. 
Gerald Spicer, L.U. 335, Cedar Springs, 

Mich. 
Charies Hurst, L.U. 998, Pontiac, Mich. 
Harvey Thaemert, L.U. 87, St. Paul, 

Minn. 
E. L. VanRyn, L.U. 2235, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Gregory J. Paul, L.U. 59, Lancaster, Pa. 
Rudolph Perz, L.U. 1, Chicago, 111. 
,Tohn E. Yonhas L.U. 15, Garfield, N. J. 
Ulysses J. Comeau, L.U. 40, Boston, 

Mass. 
Herbert A. Mills, L.U. 1089, Phoenix, 

Ariz. 
Walter Imhoff, L.U. 881, Massillon, Ohio 
Eari Washer, L.U. 1406, Louisville, Ky. 
Al Christensen, L.U. 448, Tampa, Fla. 
George H. Wise L.U. 687, Harrisburg, Pa. 
George Hummer, L.U. 355, Elma, N. Y. 
Harry P. Coten, L.U. 446, Schenectady, 

N.Y. 
Lloyd F. Conde, L.U. 446, Schenectady, 

N. Y. 
Roney McGee, L.U. 1003, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Alex Vollman, L.U. 65, Perth Amboy, 

New Jersey 



Continued on Page 39 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



LAKELAND NEWS, cont'd' 



J. W. Gross, L.U. 2310, Madisonville, Ky. 

Elmer Swanson, L.U. 1128, La Grange, 
111. 

Emory Peterson L.U. 10, Chicago, 111. 

John Ech, L.U. 199, Glenview, 111. 

Richard Nash, L.U. 453, Auburn, N. Y. 

S. Mortensen L.U. 643, Bensenville, 111. 

Harold Pearsen, L.U. 1, Chicago, 111., 
now living St. Petersburg Fla. 

Carl Granat, L.U. 13, Chicago, III. 

Carl L Agren, L.U. 393. Camden, N. J. 

Frank Barry, L.U. 210, Stamford, Conn. 

E. M. Howe, L.U. 819, Lalce Worth, Fla. 

E. C. Howe, L.U. 819, Plant City, Fla 

Frank G. Lindhir, L.U. 406, Bethlehem, 
Pa. 

EH Mahkonen, L.U. 1108, Cleveland, 
Ohio 

Alex Jones, L.U. 2163, New York, N.Y. 

Lawrence Klein, L.U. 155, South Plain- 
field, N. J. 

Barnett Hancock, L.U. 27, Toronto, Can- 
ada 

James Capirhorn, L.U. 860, Framingham, 
Mass. 

William LeBlanc, L.U. 860, Framingham, 
Mass. 

John H. Lindstrom, L.U. 1865, Minneap- 
olis, Minn. 

Fred Rodenberg, L.U. 141, Chicago, 111. 

Steve Mathak, L.U. 811, Erie, Pa. 

Howard Joseph, L.U. 289, Lockport, N.Y. 

James H. Gardenier, L.U. 325, Haw- 
thorne, N. J. 

Chris Breidenstein, L.U. 1345, Hamburg, 
N.Y. 

John Netfrey, L.U. 1664, Bloomington, 
Ind. 



Claud W. ElUott, L.U. 334, Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Steve Galco, L.U. 422, Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Henry Clausen, L.U. 1922, Chicago, lU. 

Nils Johnson L.U. 1164, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Anthon Anderson, L.U. 7, Minneapolis, 
Minnesota 

W. C. Ahl, L.U. 548, St. Paul, Minn. 

C. T. Covert, 1871 S. Euclid, Ohio 

John Sexton, L.U. 804, Naugatuch, Con- 
necticut 

James Tocchio, L.U. 260, Waterbury 
Connecticut 

Norman Dick, L.U. 1397, Whitestone, 
L. L, N. Y. 

Ernest Newcomb, L.U. 769, Pasadena, 
Calif. 

Robert Donaldson, L.U. 1093, Glen Cove, 
N.Y. 

Warren Crabtree, L.U. 1665, Alexandria, 

Va. 
Lester Baker, L.U. 131, Seattle, Wash. 
Roy Liby, L.U. 1438, Warren, Ohio 
Simo Koski, L.U. 20, Staten Island, N. Y., 

now hving Lake Worth, Fla. 
Arthur Bilder, L.U. 1741, Brown Deer, 

Wis. 
Eddie Anderson, L.U. 993, Miami, Fla. 
Henry Reichel, L.U. 1211, Syracuse, N.Y. 
George Reichel, L.U. 192, Syracuse, N.Y. 
Albert Silva, L.U. 860, Framingham, 
Mass. 

Joseph Weiser L.U. 9, Buffalo, N. Y. 
John Koehler, L.U. 335, Buifalo, N. Y., 
now living Daytona Beach Fla. 
Edward Alarie, L.U. 94, Providence, R.I. 




3 



easy ways 
to get the 
Zip Codes 
of 
people 
you 
write to: 



J When you receive a letter, 
note the Zip in the return 
address and add it to your 
address book. 

2 Call your local Post Office 
or see their National Zip 
Directory. 

3 Local Zips can be found 
on the Zip Map in the 
business pages of your 
phone book. 

Published as a public service in coop- 
eration with The Advertising Council. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Arco Publishing 


. 37 


Audel, Theodore 


. 29 


Belsaw Manufacturing 


. 39 


Chicago Technical College . 


. 31 


Craftsman Books 


. 38 
. 16 


Eliason Stair Gauge 


Estwing Manufacturing . . . 


. 26 


Foley Manufacturing 


. 26 


Hydrolevel 


. 16 


Irwin Auger Bit 


. 29 


Lee, H. D 


. 39 

. 30 


Locksmithing Institute 


Lufkin Rule 


. 19 


Miller Sewer Rod 


. 38 

. 24 


Nelson Industries 


Stairway Construction 


. 24 


Stanley Works Back 


cover 


True Temper 


. 23 


Vaughan & Bushnell 


. 21 



STARTAMONEY-MAKING BUSINESS 
FOR LESS THAN $50! 




You can have your own lifetime business 
right at home... work in spare time... 
and make up to $200 a month CASH ! My 
FREE PLAN gives you all the facts: How 
to start, how to grow. You don't need pre- 
vious experience. You don't have to sell. 
I'll even finance you. People bring you the 
work and pay cash. Over 90(! of every dol- 
lar you collect is clear cash profit. And you 
work when you want to. Let me prove you 
can't find a more certain, lower cost, higher 
paying business of your own. 




BELSAW SHARP-ALL CO. 

Stan Field, President 

7373 Field BIdg., Kansas City, Mo. 641 1 1 



Name_ 



Address- 
. City 



_State_ 



-Zip_ 




UNION-MADE 

CARPENTERS' 
\OVERALLS 



>piu)vii:i) 

CARPENTERS 

Great for comfort 
and convenience. 
\ Guaranteed to be 
the best you've 
ever worn or 
we'll take 'em 
back. No ques- 
tions asked. 

® 



H. D. LEE COMPANY, INC., SHAWNEE MISSION, KANSAS 
"World's largest manufacturer of union-made worKwear." 



MAY, 1967 



39 



rpPTTT 

,1 

ilihlili 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




2 



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3 



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8 



A Man of Many Roles: Your Local Union Officer 



We have just begun a new four-year 
period of Brotherhood leadership. As you 
will note elsewhere in this issue of the 
magazine, the General Officers and Dis- 
trict Board Members were sworn into of- 
fice on April 1, and they have already 
served for more than a month in their new 
roles of International leadership. 

All over North America this year there 
will be other installation ceremonies, when 
rank and file members will step forward 
and take positions of responsibility in their 
local unions, district councils, and state 
organizations. Such ceremonies are always 
an inspiration to me, when I am able to 
observe them, for I know the fraternal 
pride that fills the man elected to office who 
carries the support of his brethren in the 
craft. 

Union office is a solemn and sometimes 
thankless responsibility. When a man is 
elected to an office in his local union he does 
not become eligible for stock dividends, 
keys to executive washrooms, and year-end 
bonuses, as is often the case when a busi- 
nessman is elevated to a high post. 



Instead, he either collects membership 
rolls, the bookkeeping ledger, the orga- 
nizing literature, or simply "the books" and 
the other simple vestures of union office. 

In addition, he collects the abuse of a 
few impatient members who think they 
can do a better job of arbitrating, or or- 
ganizing, or distributing the available jobs. 
Sometimes he receives a battered and 
scarred gavel and the disheartening job 
of getting the members out to meetings. 

Unless he is a full-time administrative 
officer or business agent, he'll burn some 
late-night electricity looking after the 
affairs of his office. 

The local union officer is a combination 
of negotiator, psychologist, teacher, presid- 
ing officer, and friend in need. He often 
bears a heavy load. 

He deserves more than lip service. He 
deserves your year-round support so that 
the local union and the Brotherhood can 
become the vital force for economic better- 
ment that they should be. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




THE NEW 1967 
NATIONAL DRIVERS TEST 

TUESDAY, MAY 23RD, 10-11 P.M., EDI 
ON THE CBS TELEVISION NETWORK 



Nearly 80 million viewers have watched the National 
Drivers Test the past two years — making it the most 
popular public service program ever carried on a single 
TV network. 

It won the Peabody Award; the Alfred P. Sloan Radio 
& TV Award; and the National Safety Council Public Serv- 
ice Award. 

Now an all-new National Drivers Test for 1967, timed 
for the week before Memorial Day, will provide one more 
hour in your life to check your ability at the defensive 
driving we face today. 

Compare your answers with those of a studio audience 
of motorists, with friends' and family scores, and with 
correct answers provided by expert drivers. 

Note the date on your calendar now; check the local 
time and channel number in your newspaper or weekly 
TV guide. 

Fill in blanks with T or F (True or False), Y or N (Yes 
or No), A, B, C or D (multiple choice), or appropriate 
word. Opinion questions are not scored. 



D A 



.D 



D 



3. 



D A. 



D 



8^ 
9. 



10. 



11. 



12. 



13. 



14. 



15. 



16. 



17. 



18. 



19. 



20. 



D 2L 

n A 

□ 24^ 

n 25. 



D 26. 



□ 27. 



□ 29. 
D 3°: 



_□ 31. 






n A 





35. 




1. 


OPINION (NO SCORE) 


2. 


3. 



TOTAL SCORE 



D 



.D 



D 



D 



n 



D 



D 



D 



D 



D 



D 



n 



The new 1967 National Drivers Test is produced by 
CBS News, with the cooperation of the National Safety 
Council, under sponsorship of Shell Oil Company. 




"'^i:!^'-'' 



This Official Test Form is printed for your 
convenience in marl<ing down your answers, 
totaling your score and comparing it with that 
of your family and friends. 

Be sure to save it for the new 1967 National 
Drivers Test on Tuesday, May 23rd, on the CBS 
Television Network. Check your local newspa- 
per for exact time and station. 



If you're interested in taking an 8-hour course 

in better driving, mail this coupon to your local 

Safety Council or to— 

Mr. Chris Imhoff 

The National Safety Council 

425 North Michigan Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 60611 

Name 



Street - 
City 



State- 



-Zip. 



Stanley makes a 

screwdriver so tough, 

you can stake your 

life on it. 





January 19, 1967: Edv/m Bernbaum, a member of the 
expedition that first conquered the formidable North- 
west Ridge of Alaslta's Mt. St. Elias, hangs from the 
side of a sheer cliff. Instead of using a rock climber's 
piton, Bernbaum is staking his life on a Stanley Job- 
master No. 66-668 screwdriver driven into the rock. 



Where shaft meets handle, 
an extra heavy-duty bolster. 



Edwin Bernbaum was safe 
This screwdriver is tough. 

A good pounding won't 

even hurt it. 

The extra heavy-duty 

bolster is tough. That's 

where the shaft widens 

at the handle, and it 

keeps the shaft from 

slipping up through 

the handle. 

And the tip is 

tough, too. We 

forge it from 

special-formula 




l^' 



alloy steel that's been heat- 
treated to really stand up. Then 
we plate it with chrome to pre- 
vent rusting. 

Pick our screwdriver up. The 
full-size rubber grip handle will 
feel just right in your hand. 

Who says they don't make 
tools like they used to anymore? 
Stanley makes tools like they 
used to anymore. 

Stanley Tools, Division of 
The Stanley Works, New 
Britain, Connecticut. 



STANLEY 



Oiiiciol Publication or the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPEN 



ERS OF AMERICA 



(§/A\E[?@[Z]Tr[lE 



JUNE, 1 967 



FLAG DAY 

June 14 

X HE THINGS THAT the flag stands for 
were created by the experiences of a 
great people. Everything that it stands 
for was written by their Hves. The flag 
is the embodiment, not of sentiment, 
but of history. It represents the experi- 
ences made by men and women, the 
experiences of those who do and Uve 
under that flag." 

WOODROW WILSON 




/ 



^ 






i 


^ 

^ 








y 


K 
^ 




m 


f 

E 


y 


■«■» 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

FiNLAY C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. lOOIO 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City, Mo. 64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

American Bank Building 

621 S.W. Morrison St., Room 937 

Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, William STfeFANOviTCH 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail Ust. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(§/A\[S[? 




VOLUME LXXXVI No. 6 JUNE, 1967 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Central Regional Industrial Conference 2 

Situs Picketing Louis Sherman 5 

Leisure-Living Homes, The Union Way ... Margaret Marshall 8 

What's Wrong Here? National Safety Council 15 

DEPARTMENTS 

Editorials 7 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 11 

Washington Roundup 17 

Outdoor Meandering Fred Goetz 1 8 

Home Study Course, Advanced Blueprint Reading, II 21 

Plane Gossip 23 

We Congratulate 25 

Canadian Report 26 

Local Union Nev^s 28 

Service to the Brotherhood 31 

What's New? 36 

In Memoriam 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., V/ashington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
0. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20f in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

On June 14, Americans will observe 
Flag Day. Old Glory originated as 
the result of a resolution offered by 
the Marine Committee of the Second 
Continental Congress at Philadelphia 
and adopted June 14, 1777. It read: 

"Resolved, that the flag of United 
States be 13 stripes alternate red and 
wliite, that tiie union be 13 stars white 
in a blue field representing a new con- 
stellation." 

No one knows for a certainty who 
designed the first flag. The widely 
publicized legend that Mrs. Betsy Ross 
made the first Stars and Stripes in 
June. 1777, has never been established 
by historians. 

The Stars and Stripes was soon to 
be altered from the original design of 
1777. As new states were admitted to 
' the Union, the design of the flag had 
to be changed. In 1795, a Congres- 
sional act added two more stars to the 
flag. This flag became popularly 
known as the flag of "Fifteen Stars 
and Stripes." 

It was this flag that history says 
inspired Francis Scott Key to write 
"The Star-Spangled Banner" during 
the British attack on Fort McHenry. 
Baltimore (depicted on our cover this 
month) in 1814. The original flag 
which flew over Ft. McHenry has 
been preserved and hangs in the 
Museum of History and Technology 
of the Smithsonian Institution in 
Washington, D. C. 






, "5CTr +Jte «?■&■ ^-oci/e. 



"They're simple, happy folk. Knowledge would just confuse them." 

Labor Fights Move to Weaken 
Truth-In-Lending Measure 

By RUTH STACK 

Press Associates, Inc. 



■ While the truth-in-lending band- 
wagon is rolling on, with the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board the latest to 
jump on board, there is a behind- 
the-scenes move going on to com- 
promise the bill in a way that would 
hurt low income families the most. 
In committee sessions, leading 
senators have indicated that they 
will propose exemption of revolv- 
ing credit charges from the bill's 
coverage. Revolving credit ac- 
counts, offered by department 
stores, in the main, charge true 
annual interest rates of 18 percent 
or higher. 



Opposition to inclusion of revolv- 
ing accounts has been spearheaded 
by the American Retail Federation 
whose members say it would be im- 
possible to show the true interest 
in advance of the purchase because 
of technicalities in the way the pur- 
chaser pays his bill. 

They point out that there is a 
"free" period of thirty to sixty days 
that a credit customer has to pay 
the bill without charge and that re- 
payment occurs at different amounts 
and in different periods of time. 

While some senators have bought 
this argument, Subcommittee Chair- 



man William Proxmire (D. Wise.) 
insists that this is only a matter of 
language. A compromise offered by 
the Federal Reserve Board would 
simply require retail stores to de- 
scribe the various options that are 
open to them under the plan still 
showing the true annual interest 
rate. Many stores now say you pay 
"only 11^ percent" which is equal 
to a rate of 18 percent a year. 

Federal Reserve Board vice chair- 
man J. L. Robertson told the sub- 
committee that the Board's members 
had unanimously recommended en- 
actment of a truth-in-lending bill 
with certain weakening amendments. 

An AFL-CIO spokesman said the 
Federation is "concerned about this 
move to weaken the legislation and 
will fight against any exemption of 
revolving credit charges." 

The Federation is also opposed 
to another Reserve Board compro- 
mise which would exempt loans of 
under $100 from the full disclosure 
requirement. 

These exemptions would hurt low 
income borrowers, the most, said 
the spokesman. Some of these low 
income loans carry annual interest 
charges of 50 percent or higher. 

Another proposal offered by the 
Federal Reserve Board would ex- 
empt first-mortgage loans from dis- 
closure requirements. 

Consumer credit now stands at 
$100 billion a year. Another $220 
billion is mortgage credit, most of 
this first trust loans. 

According to the Senate Banking 
and Commerce Committee staff, 
Proxmire is fighting hard to retain 
the revolving credit coverage. It 
now accounts for only $3.5 billion 
of consumer credit but it is a rapidly 
growing area and an exemption 
could provide retailers with a great- 
er incentive to use this form of 
lending. 

Low income loans, under $100, 
account for about $2.5 billion of 
the total consumer debt. 

The Administration continues to 
give its support to the full disclosure 
measure and is apparently not yet 
willing to accept a compromise on 
the bill. The committee will meet 
in executive session June 8 and 9 
to hammer out language on a final 
bill. ■ 



THE CARPENTER 



Denver Building and Construction Trades Council v. National Labor Relations Board 





m(m^'i^m(B 



Perspective on a Famous Case 

By LOUIS SHERMAN 
Counsel, Building & Consfrucfion Trades Depf., AFL-CIO 

Reprinted from tlie Construction Craftsman 



THERE are many systems of gov- 
ernment in the world which do 
not recognize the right to strike or to 
picket. Indeed, severe governmental 
sanctions are applied against employes 
when they engage in such activity. 
The free enterprise system of the 
United States, however, recognizes the 
freedom of labor to strike and to picket 
as well as the rights of management. 
The recognition of these rights is not 
only consistent with our political 
ideals, it is also part of the structure of 
the strongest economy in the world. 
The following statistical facts are 
relevant: 

( 1 ) The ratio of man days lost by 
reason of work stoppages to total 
estimated working time in the year 
1965 was 0.18%— less than 2/10 of 
1%. 

(2) Strikes in the year 1965 affected 
only 2% of the approximately 150,000 
collective bargaining agreements in 
effect in the United States. 



(3) The gross national product 
computed on the basis of 1958 prices 
rose from $446,000,000,000.00 in 
1956 to an estimated $647,000,000,- 
000.00 in 1966. 

The legal right to picket is not ab- 
solute. In 1947 the Congress enacted 
the Taft-Hartley law which, among 
other things, sought to define the per- 
missible area of economic contest be- 
tween labor and management. The 
principal line of distinction drawn by 
Congress is between primary picket- 
ing, which is allowable, and secondary 
boycotts, which are prohibited. 

The situs picketing issue arose in the 
case of Denver Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Council v. National Labor 
Relations Board. In that case the 
general contractor brought a nonun- 
ion electrical contractor on the job 
who was paying his employes 42''2«' 
an hour less than the union scale. 
The Building and Construction Trades 
Council engaged in peaceful picketing 



to protect the conditions which they 
had laboriously built up in the area 
during a period of many years. 

The National Labor Relations 
Board, which had no previous experi- 
ence with the building and construction 
industry because the Wagner Act had 
not been applied to it, ruled that the 
literal language of the Taft-Hartley 
Act made the picketing unlawful. The 
United States Court of Appeals for 
the District of Columbia Circuit re- 
versed unanimously in an opinion 
written by Judge Fahey, a former gen- 
eral counsel of the National Labor 
Relations Board and a former Solicitor 
General of the United States. Judge 
Fahey wrote an opinion holding that 
the picketing was lawful primary 
activity because "the pressure was 
limited to the one job. which was 
picketed as a whole to make it wholly 
union and in protest against the em- 
ployment there of the nonunion elec- 
tricians." 

The Supreme Court of the United 



JUNE, 1967 



States in June, 1951, decided by a 
vote of 6 to 3 to affirm the decision 
of the National Labor Relations Board. 
The opinion of the majority rendered 
by Mr. Justice Burton relied heavily 
on the administration expertise of the 
National Labor Relations Board. 

The building and construction trades 
unions began their long legislative fight 
against this inequitable restriction of 
their right to engage in primary picket- 
ing. The justification for their posi- 
tion is to be found in the unique facts 
of the building and construction in- 
dustry. The typical job in this in- 
dustry is not carried forward by a 
single employer with different depart- 
ments for different types of work as is 
the typical factory operation. Unlike 
the single employer factory operation, 
there are numerous contractors on a 
single construction job site [or situs] 
performing the different types of work 
required to complete the building or 
project. In a single employer factory 
operation, if a labor organization is 
engaged in a labor dispute with the 
factory operator in respect to a matter 
involving one of the departments of 
the factory, it can strike and picket 
the entire factory operation without 
becoming subject to the legal re- 
strictions against secondary boycott 
activity. Equity requires that the same 
rule be applied in the building and 
construction industry. 

In 1954 President Eisenhower rec- 



ognized the justice of this trade union 
position and sent a message to the 
Congress in which he recommended 
situs picketing legislation. The Presi- 
dent urged: 

"That the Act be clarified by mak- 
ing it explicit that concerted action 
against ... an employer on a construc- 
tion project who, together with other 
employers, is engaged in work on the 
site of the project will not be treated as 
a secondary boycott." 

Presidents Truman, Kennedy and 
Johnson have taken a similar positio'n 
in support of the building and con- 
struction trades unions. 

There is wide-spread bipartisan sup- 
port of the situs picketing bill. As 
long ago as 1954, when the Republi- 
cans controlled the administration of 
the Senate, a favorable report was 
rendered on situs picketing legislation 
by the Senate Committee on Labor 
and Public Welfare. There have been 
a number of favorable reports by the 
House Committee on Education and 
Labor. 

The enactment of the bill has been 
frustrated by a series of parliamentary 
maneuvers. In 1959 the situs picketing 
provision was not included in the 
Conference Report on the Landrum- 
Griffin Bill because of advance notice 
that a point of order would be raised 
against the provision in the House. 
In 1960 the situs picketing bill was 
filibustered in the Senate Committee 



on Education and Labor. In 1965 the 
bill was given a rule by the House 
Rules Committee, but in an unusual 
parliamentary maneuver the then 
Chairman of the House Committee on 
Education and Labor had the bill re- 
moved from the calendar of the House. 

In a sense, the fact that the op- 
ponents of the bill have had to rely 
on such parliamentary devices to pre- 
vent its enactment is a genuine tribute 
to its solid merit. 

The situs picketing bill in this ses- 
sion of the Congress is H.R. 100. It 
has been introduced in the House by 
Congressman Frank Thompson, Jr., 
Chairman of the Special Subcommittee 
on Labor, a long-time supporter of 
the bill to reverse the Denver Building 
Trades rule. The House Committee 
on Education and Labor voted to re- 
port the bill favorably on April 25, 
1967. In the Senate the situs picketing 
bill is S. 1487 introduced by Senator 
Wayne Morse of Oregon and co- 
sponsored by Senators Clark, Case, 
Javits, Kuchel, Hart, Mondell, Mc- 
Carthy, and Williams. 

The situs picketing bill in this ses- 
sion will present a test of the legislative 
process. It remains to be seen whether 
the merits of this bill, as declared by 
four Presidents of the United States 
and responsible Committees of both 
the House and the Senate will prevail 
over the exaggerated charges and par- 
liamentary devices of its opponents. 




sotu congress 

1st Session- 



H. R. 100 



W THE HOUSE OFMPMSEWATiyBs 

I Mr T^ Jandart 10, 1967 

I •'"'^- Thompson of Won, T . "! ii'oi 



A BILL 

'') (*) III the Nali 



To amend seclion 8(1,1 14] „, ,. „ . 

AC, as amended, .ilL "" ""'"•"" ^"^ «el«'»ns 




con- 



THE CARPENTER 





EDITORIALS 



^Tb Encourage adoptions 

To anyone who has paced the depressing rows of 
crib-bound babies in many of the orphanages today, 
aware of the bleak promise Hfe holds for these un- 
fortunates, the tiniest hope that more of them will find 
their ways into normal homes is heartwarming news. 

Despite the fact that the number of stable, young 
and loving homesteads is rising, as well as the number 
of children available for adoption, agencies have had 
to actively solicit the placement of babies. One of 
the biggest single obstacles to getting these homes and 
babies together may simply be money. In the most 
desirable homes, where the prospective parents are 
young, the burden falls hardest. Adoption expenses 
of 10% of annual income are routine, and they can 
go much higher than that. 

Adoptive parents, unlike so-called "natural" par- 
ents (what could be more "natural" than the warm, 
normal relationship that develops between an adoptive 
child and parents?), must think long and hard about 
a decision to start a family. With clear choice, they 
must thoroughly explore all of the factors and undergo 
an extensive period of self-examination with the help 
of their agency. A significant factor in their planning 
has to be money. Non-adoptive parents often accept 
the inevitable and rejoice that the cost of having a 
baby is somewhat alleviated by the tax deduction. 

Adoptive parents now have no comparable tax 
deduction, but Rep. Qement J. Zablocki (D-Wis.) 
has introduced a bill in the House (H. 19) which 
would give equal tax treatment to adoptive parents. 
He sees broad social benefit in this, both from the 
standpoint of the children, and the state agencies 
which must now support unadopted children. His 
Adoption Opportunity Act would allow adoptive par- 
ents to deduct up to $1,250 of the costs. 

It is logical to allow an adoptive parent the same 
standing before the tax structure as non-adoptive par- 
ents. The philosophy behind the allowance for non- 
adoptive parents is to give tax relief so they may have 
more to spend . on the care of their baby. Adopted 
babies need care, too! 

We think Rep. Zablocki's bill makes hard sense. 
If you do too, why not let your own Congressman and 
Senator know? 



"^Closed Shop, Leyal Style 

Byron L. Dusky, an Oakland attorney, served a 
three-day jail sentence because he practiced law while 
he was under suspension by the California Bar Associ- 
ation. His crime: failure to pay his bar association 
dues. 

Imagine what would have happened if any union, 
except the lawyer's union or doctor's union, had tried 
to send people to jail for non-payment of dues! 



"^Ratly 'Round the Fluff 

In this period of public protests it seems fashion- 
able for the immature and the rebels in our midst 
to bum draft cards and deface flags in public defiance 
of law and order, the "masses", "the Establishment", 
or whatever else the wild-haired far-leftists care to 
call those of us who don't grow beards, dream in LSD, 
or flake out in marijuana smoke. 

So-called artists drape models in the nation's ban- 
ner or tie the Stars and Stripes in knots to hang in 
display in art galleries, protesting American interven- 
tion in 'Viet Nam. 

Those who oppose our participation in the fight to 
keep the people of South Viet Nam free of commu- 
nist domination have a right to freely express their 
opinions. But they do not have the right to commit 
mayhem on our national emblem. The Flag is the 
visual representation of the nation as a whole, and 
no one should be allowed to desecrate that emblem. 

These bantlings should be invited to try their hands 
at desecrating a communist flag inside China and see 
how long they would keep their heads . . . literally! 

It's time a halt was called to these ill-considered 
actions, and we are happy to see that Congress is 
studying a Federal bill to bolster the many state laws 
which protect the national standard. We are happy, 
also, to see that a New York court has convicted a 
New York gallery owner for displaying a defiled flag 
as stuffed art. In this 190th anniversary of Flag Day. 
we urge all to rally 'round the flag in its time of 
distress. 



JUNE, 1967 



Pan-Abode's "Beachaven" is assembled 
by Seattle members in the big Coliseum. 
The cedar vacation home has tno bed- 
rooms plus a smaller child's room. It's 
of imion manufacture. 





Leisure-Living Homes- 



Seattle members prepare 
prefabricated 'second 

homes' for presentation 
at big, annual home show. 

By MARGARET MARSHALL 

■ When the 1967 Seattle Home 
Show began its nine-day run in the 
city's huge Coliseum, 1,000 persons 
were hned up at the entrance. They 
had come early to avoid the rush 
they knew would greet another 
colorful display of the housing in- 
dustry's latest achievements. 

Sponsored by The Seattle Post- 
Intelligencer newspaper and the 
Seattle Master Builders, this was the 
23rd year for the annual event, and 
each show manages to break the 
previous year's record in attendance. 
127,356 persons paid admission this 
year to marvel at the display which 
had been prepared with the help of 
skilled union building tradesmen. 

"A Panorama of Leisure Living" 
was the official description of this 
year's show, and the center of at- 
traction was found in three fully- 




furnished and decorated vacation 
homes. Seattle's Coliseum was built 
for the city's World's Fair in 1962, 
and since then has served the com- 
munity well in providing a spacious 
showcase for large exhibitions and 
sporting events. During the week 
before the Home Show opened, the 
Coliseum walls reverberated with 
the sound of hammer and saw as 
display booths were erected and the 
three vacation homes were assem- 
bled. Although the homes were pre- 



fabricated, a variety of building 
crafts were represented, as waUs 
were assembled, glass installed, 
roofs shingled and trim and interiors 
painted. Decorators from leading 
furniture stores then stepped in to 
provide the three homes with furni- 
ture which blended with the theme 
of leisure living. By the time land- 
scapers had surrounded the homes 
with alpine firs, woodland ground 
covers, moss and rocks, spring bulbs 
Continued on Page 19 




The Union Way 




An A-frame "Alpen Hut", manufactured by Cedars of Lebanon. 




Carpenters move a spiral stairway into 
a one-room Olympic "Shal-A". 




Above: Another view of the "Shal-A", 
showing the laminated arches. 

Below: Members at work on a special 
show exhibit. 



Below: An exterior view 
of Seattle's big Coliseum. 




Vacationers Find Eden In Western Wastelands 



■ A new breed of American pio- 
neer — the vacationer — is staking his 
claim in desert wastelands of the West. 

Hardy people, anxious to get away 
from it all, are seeking out empty 
deserts and rocky hills far from civili- 
zation. Regions too dry or rough for 
farming have become increasingly 
popular as fishing, hunting, and camp- 
ing retreats, the National Geographic 
Society reports. 

Throughout the year, the United 
States Department of Interior's Bureau 
of Land Management auctions off 
thousands of small tracts unsuited for 
public development. These scattered 
parcels are within the Federal Govern- 
ment's 460 million acres of public- 
domain land mostly in 11 Western 
States and Alaska. 

The tracts vary from one to 1,200 
acres. Bidding, which must begin at 
the appraised fair market value of the 
land, starts anywhere from $100 to 
$900 per tract. The usual site is with- 
out water and utilities; it may be a 



day's ride by burro from the nearest 
road. 

Nevertheless, city folk find that a 
tract in the California desert is a 
Shangri-la during the winter. Places of 
seclusion in the mountains do double 
duty as summer homes and ski 
lodges. 

A few owners build elaborate homes, 
bring in utilities, and build access 
roads. Most people are satisfied with ■ 
lean-tos, tents, and A-frame cabins. 

Several small-tract owners near 
Phoenix have so much faith in Arizona 
sunshine that they built huts out of 
cardboard. 

One enterprising couple used an am- 
phibious trailer as their vacation retreat 
in Alaska. They propelled the vehicle 
across Cook Inlet, then towed it five 
miles up a mountain trail to their site. 

Some people who purchased govern- 
ment tracts as holiday refuges have 
settled down on a year-round basis. 
The champion commuter may be the 
Michigan businessman who built a 
home for his family in the California 



desert, and commutes every week by 
private plane to Detroit. 

Not all small-tract buyers are 
vacation-minded. A Californian, who 
lived a quarter of a mile from an 
offered tract, bid $10,000 for it just to 
preserve his unobstructed view of the 
countryside. 

Because city ordinances prohibit the 
keeping of horses, residents in Ajo, 
Arizona, use their property mostly as 
stables. 

It's not unusual to see a boat moored 
high and dry in the California desert. 
Boat owners use the sites as convenient 
dry docks, saving miles of hauling 
back and forth from Los Angeles to 
the Salton Sea. 

The Government's policy of mak- 
ing barren tracts available for pur- 
chase seemed justified when a Bureau 
of Land Management employee came 
across a recumbent man sobbing face 
down on his Arizona property. He 
explained that he "just had to have 
some place away from people and 
troubles to think things out." ■ 



Earliest New World Houses Are Discovered 



■ An expedition sponsored by the 
National Geographic Society and 
Harvard University's Peabody Muse- 
um has discovered the oldest houses 
known anywhere in the Americas. 

The remains of two circular huts 
built by paleo-Indian people some 
10,000 years ago were uncovered at 
Hell Gap near Guernsey, Wyoming. 
The site has been under excavation for 
the past five years. 

"The houses at Hell Gap are the 
earliest known in the Western Hemi- 
sphere," said Professor J. O. Brew, 
director of the museum and leader of 
the expedition. "The two structures 
consist of overlapping circles of post- 
holes that were formed by the butts of 
upright branches used to make the 
shelter. These postholes were evenly 
distributed about every two feet in a 
symmetrical ring about six and one- 
half feet in diameter. 

"The branches were probably bent 
and tied in the middle and then cov- 
ered with hides or skins, much like a 
modern Apache wikiiip, a type of 
Indian hut used in the West. The 
floors of the structures contained bones 
of bison and other animals that the 
people had killed and a number of 
fine examples of flint tools." 

The huts were erected about 8000 
B.C. — some 5,000 years e5rlier than 



any previously dated houses in the 
Western Hemisphere. Until now, it 
was not know that early paleo-Indian 
people erected houses. Most authorities 
presumed that they led a simpler 
nomadic existence. 

There has been continuous habita- 
tion of the Hell Gap area since late 
glacial times, according to age deter- 
minations made by the radiocarbon 
method. The prehistoric houses were 
discovered in the dig's third lowest 
culture level, one known as "Agate 
Basin" from the type of spear point 
found there. 

The Agate Basin people produced 
some of the finest specimens of flint 
artifacts in North America, archeolo- 
gists say. The ancients also made bone 
beads, one of which was recovered 
by the expedition. 

Hell Gap is a secluded Wyoming 
valley with protecting cliffs that keep 
it warmer in winter and cooler in 
summer than surrounding lands. In 
ancient times a stream flowed through 
the valley, and it was along this stream 
that one tribe after another set up 
camp. 

Besides offering water and protec- 
tion from the weather, the site was 
convenient to both prairie and moun- 
tain game. Nearby was a quarry where 
stone tools could be chipped. 



Because of the washing down of 
earth in the valley, each of the oc- 
cupation sites became covered with a 
thin layer of dirt. Modern excavators 
peel off these levels of dirt and debris 
one by one to record the changes in 
the way of life that tools, camp debris, 
and settlement pattern can tell. 

The archeologists have found evi- 
dence of occupation "considerably" 
before 9000 B.C., but finds for this 
most ancient period are limited to a 
few flakes and some charcoal. From 
a later period, the scholars recovered 
an unfinished spear point 11 inches 
long. The weapon was spoiled by a 
flaw in the stone; the person who 
worked it thousands of years ago 
probably threw it aside in disgust. The 
expedition found the flakes that the 
ancient craftsman had chipped away, 
and succeeded in fitting some back in 
place on the original stone. 

The site, discovered in 1 959, is on 
land owned by Miss Ruth Frederick of 
Guernsey, Wyoming. The field party 
was jointly directed by Henry T. 
Irwin of Harvard and Cynthia Irwin- 
Williams and George A. Agogino of 
Eastern New Mexico University. 
Scores of college students and other 
young people participated in the 
project. ■ 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 




International Contest Rules And 
Regulations Are Now Under Review 



The rules and regulations governing 
Local State and Provincial and the Inter- 
national Contests, as published in the 
March, 1967 issue of the Carpenter are 
now being revised and refined. 

Committees who have constructive sug- 
gestions that they feel would improve the 
rules and regulations are invited to sub- 
mit them in writing prior to June 15. to 
the Apprenticeship and Training Depart- 
ment of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America. 

We expect to have entries in Carpen- 
try, Cabinet-Making and Millwrighting 
however, there must be a minimum of 8 
contestants in any of the divisions before 
a contest for the division will be spon- 
sored. 

To be eligible for entry into the Inter- 
national Contest, the contestant must 

1. Have won an approved local and 
state or provincial contest; 

2. Have prior approval from the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America Apprenticeship and 
Training Office as stipulated in the 
Contest rules and regulations; 

3. Be a member of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America. 

4. Be in the last year of his apprentice- 
ship as of January 1 of the contest 
year. 

In addition to certificates of participa- 
tion and awards, cash prizes will be 
awarded to the first, second and third 
place winners in each division of the con- 
test as follows: 

1st place winner — SI. 500 

2nd place winner — SI. 000 

3rd place winner — $500 

In order to promote the International 
Contest of 1968, all Joint Apprenticeship 
and Training Committees, Local Unions, 
State and Provincial Councils are urged 
to qualify contestants in all divisions. 
Apprentices who meet the basic qualifica- 
tions are urged to petition their Local 
Joint Apprenticeship and Training Com- 
mittee to participate in the State or 
Provincial Contest in order that they may 
have the opportunity to qualify for the 
International contest. 

The date and place where the Inter- 



national Contest is to be held in 1968 
will be announced at a later date. 

As soon as the Rules and Regulations 
are completed and printed we will make 
them available for distribution and will 
announce their availability in the "Car- 
penter." 

West Virginia 
Sets State Standards 

Under the guidance of Franklin Allen, 
secretary. West Virginia State Council of 
Carpenters, and G. T. Leonard, labor 
relations manager. Constructors Labor 
Council of West Virginia Inc.. represent- 
ing the employers performing heavy and 
highway construction in the state, state- 
wide apprenticeship standards have been 
established. 

Realizing that, to assure the success of 
their apprenticeship training, adequate 
financing must be provided, an addendum 
to their collective bargaining agreement 
was authorized, which provides that all 
contractors performing work under the 
Continued on Page 12 



Holding the completed West Virginia 
Agreement and Declaration of Trust are, 
left, Franklin Allen, union trustee and 
secretary of the training and trust com- 
mittee, and, right, Stanley E. Deutsch, 
attorney at law, authorized to sign the 
agreement and declaration of trust for 
the employers in the absence of Elmer 
H. Dodson, executive secretary for the 
Constructors Labor Council of West 
Virginia, Inc. 



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Signing the West Virginia State Council 
of Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Fund Agreement and Declara- 
tion of Trust (clockwise around the 
table): G. E. Ray, employer trustee and 
chairman of the trust and training com- 
mittee; C. Dale Sims, union trustee; 
Franklin Allen, union trustee and secre- 
tary of training and trust committee; 
G. T. Leonard, employer trustee; and 
Benjamin W. Skeen, Bureau of Ap- 
prenticeship and Training, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Labor. 



Work On Millwright Training Materials 




Members of the Brotherhood working on revisions of instructional material for 
Millwrights. From left to right are: C. A. Shuey, General Executive Board Member; 
Wilham Oviedo, Coordinator, Apprenticeship and Training Department; Robert 
Laing, General Representative; George E. Prince, Coordinator, Apprenticeship and 
Training Department; George Welsch, General Representative; and William Nipper, 
Millwright Representative, Local 1510. 



JUNE, 1967 



H 



Alaska Winners 
Are Announced 

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA— The sec- 
ond annual Alaska State Carpenter Ap- 
prenticeship Contest was held in the 
Apprentice Training Center, Anchorage, 
on March 17, 18. 

There were six young men from differ- 
ent sections of Alaska participating. The 
written examinations and the manipula- 
tive project plans were prepared by the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, Apprenticeship and 
Training Department. In keeping with 
the action taken by the Western Region 
Contest Committee, contestants were per- 
mitted to use power tools. 

Charles E. Handy, training coordinator, 
and the joint apprenticeship and training 
committee made all arrangements for the 
contest, which was judged by Wray Lewis, 
general contractor; Clarence Pilon, 
journeyman carpenter; and Bob McCoy, 
architect. General Representative Paul 
Rudd acted as the coordinating judge. 

David West of Anchorage was the first 
place winner. Mike Webb of Valdez was 
second place winner and will be the 
alternate for David. 




The three judges for Alaska Contest 
were, left to right, Anchorage Contractor 
Wray Lewis, Carpenter Clarence Pilon 
and Architect Bob McCoy. 

WEST VIRGINIA SETS 

Continued from Page 11 

heavy and highway agreement shall pay 
into the statewide apprenticeship training 
trust fund two cents (20) per hour for 
each hour worked by the journeyman 
carpenter covered by the heavy and 
highway agreement. 

The trustees for the training trust fund 
are: Employers: Jerry Ray, chairman, 
G. T. Leonard, and Jim Burati; em- 
ployees, Franklin Allen, secretary, Robert 
Jones, Jr., and Dale Sims. 

The trustees are to establish apprentice- 
ship policies and administer the program 
in such a manner that sound training 
plans will be developed to promote the 
apprenticeship program and provide an 
adequate number of well-trained crafts- 
men to meet the needs of the industry. 

Apprenticeship Coordinator George E. 
Prince was assigned to assist the Trust 
committee in finalizing their standards 
and trust agreement. 




After the Alaskan Contest, a picture. Left to right: Charles Handy, State Training 
Coordinator; Mike Webb, Second Place Contestant; David West, First Place Contest- 
ant; Bob Powell, Business Representative of Local 1281, Anchorage; Paul Rudd, Gen- 
eral Representative, Seventh District; and Joe Fialla, State Supervisor, Bureau of 
Apprenticeship and Training. 



Melbourne, Florida 
Pre-Apprentices 

MELBOURNE, FLA. — Willard Van 
Hoose, business representative. Local 
1685, Melbourne, announces the com- 
pletion of the eight-week institutional 
phase of their pre-apprenticeship pro- 
gram. The young men completing the 
program have now been assigned to co- 
operating employees in the area. 

The Melbourne Joint Apprenticeship 
and Training Committee were well 
pleased with the subcontract they had 
entered into with the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of Amer- 
ica, which made the program possible. 
They feel that all local unions of the 
Brotherhood should take advantage of 
the assistance offered through the Ap- 
prenticeship and Training Department 
of the United Brotherhood to promote 
and improve their apprenticeship pro- 
grams. 

M.D.T.A. Coordinator H. E. Morris 
assisted the committee to develop the 
program. 



Middle Atlantic 

Conference 

A "down to earth" workshop on 
apprenticeship training, manpower 
development, equal employment 
opportunities, etc. will be held July 
10 through 13 at the Golden Tri- 
angle Motel, Norfolk, Va. It'll he 
the 7th Annual Middle Atlantic 
States Apprenticeship and Training 
Conference. Delegates are invited 
from Delaware, D.C., Maryland. 
North Carolina. Pennsylvania, 
West Virginia, and Virginia. Write 
P.O. Bo.x Will, Richmond, Va. 
23240 for details. 



fm^ ^ ^ 




Safety Program Certificates at Melbourne 
went to (front row) Melvin Clark, John 
J. Miller, J. Allen Collins, and George 
Carter; (back row) James Close, Charles 
Pear, Vaughn J. Jones, and W. W. Kees- 
ler, the instnictor. 




Phillip Daughty works on a project. 




Phillip Daughty and 
square up their work. 



George Carter 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Pre-Apprenticeship 
In Washington State 

PASCO, WASHINGTON— The United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America and Local 1849, Pasco, joined 
together to initiate a pre-apprentice class 
of 15 trainees under the Brotherhood's 
Prime Manpower Development and 
Training Contract with the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Labor. 

Spearheading the program is Guy 
Adams, business representative, and the 
local joint apprenticeship and training 
committee. 

Brother Adams states that the progress 
of each trainee in the institutional phase 
is far above expectation and that the 
JAC Committee is looking forward to 
placing these young men in the appren- 
ticeship program. 

Management representatives in the 
area feel that young men entering the 
apprenticeship program after the eight- 
week training will make a more valuable 
employee than those who enter with no 
experience or previous direction. 

Brother Ed Voycheske, instructor- 
coordinator, is well pleased with the 
initiative shown by all trainees. 

First State Winners 
In Tennesee Test 




NASHVILLE, TENN.— The first state- 
wide carpenters' apprentice contest was 
held April 28 and 29, 1967, at the Ten- 
nessee State Fairgrounds, Nashville. Wit- 
nessing this contest, which was coordi- 
nated by George Prince, were representa- 
tives of joint apprenticeship committees 
from all sections of Tennessee. 

This first annual state competition was 
won by Willie R. Barksdale of Carpen- 
ter's Local 74, Chattanooga. Runner-up 
Oscar Wayne Jackson of Carpenter's 
Local 345, Memphis. The winner will 
represent Tennessee in the International 
Competition in Vancouver, British Co- 
lumbia, Canada, later this year. 

In the picture above are: Willie R. 
Barksdale, Earl D. Harris, and Oscar 
Wayne Jackson. 





Edward Voycheske, Instructor in (lie i'asio school, v^itli James Clark, Jerry Bosh, Bob 
Doty, Don Wilkinson, Randy Armes, Ed Harris Larry Forbes, Wallace Schlegel, Jim 
Macki, Dennis Warner, Jim Montgomery Lynn Ralston and Gary Lane. 



Five Hopeful Facts You Should 
Know About the Heart Diseases 



Today, hearts are being saved 
because heart research is making 
vital, new discoveries- 
because people are beginning 
to know these 5 hopeful facts. 



W All heart cases 
can be cared for best 
if diagnosed early. 



s 







T" Most heart 
patients can keep on 
working-very often 
•It the same job. 




1 



Some forms of 
heart disease can 
be prevented ... a 
few can be cured. 



\J Almost every 
heart condition 
can be helped by 
proper treatment. 




kJ Your "symptoms'" may 
or may not mean heart 
disease. Don't guess- 
don't worry. See your 
doctor and be sure. 




. . . fight fears with jacts . 



gj helpyour heart fund... 

help your heart 



JUNE, 1967 



13 




Saskatchewan Council 

Members present at a recent meeting of 
the Saskatchewan Joint Apprenticeship 
Contest Committee were, back row, left 
to right: John Clark, L.U. 2469; Jack 
Klein, 1867; Leo Fritz, chairman, L.U. 
1805; Mike Wytosky, 1990; Ed Lozin- 
sky, 1990; J. Kirk, 2374; Fred Nau, 1876; 
E. 1. Bender, 1805; W. G. Stanton, Gen- 
eral Representative; Bill Golly, Secretary- 
Treasurer local contractors; Keith Pe- 
berdy, contractors; Paul Rudd, General 
Representative and John Gebert, 1867. 




Contestants in the 1967 Alberta Provincial Carpenter Apprentice Contest. Seated, 
left to right: L. Goericke, Local 2103, Calgary; E. Zapisocki, Local 1325, Edmonton, 
and W. Milaney, Local 1779, Calgary. Standing: B. Bedry, Local 1325, Edmonton; 
W. Neufeld, Local 1779, Calgary; F. Deuschle, Local 846, Lethbridge; H. V. Stepa- 
nick, Local 1325, Edmonton. (This contestant had his right hand badly injured at 
work two days before the contest and could not compete but was so interested that 
he attended the contest at his own expense); U. Rondeau, Local 1325, Edmonton, 
and G. Whaley, Local 1325, Edmonton. 




In the Carpentry shop, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Calgary. Alberta, 
left to right: Brian Smith, chief supervisor, apprenticeship board, member of joint 
committee; W. G. Stanton, general representative, member joint contest committee; 
Trev. Walters, contest judge, Foundation Co. of Canada; Collin Roulson, contest 
judge. Local 1779, Calgary; F. Whittle, contest judge and director of apprenticeship. 
Province of Alberta; K. Vine, chairman of joint contest committee, Hurst Construc- 
tion Co., Calgary; P. Rudd, contest co-ordinator, general representative; and P. Chris- 
tensen, business representative. Local 1325, Edmonton, member of joint committee. 



Alberta Provincial 
Contest Completed 

CALGARY, ALTA. — The Second 
Annual Alberta Provincial Carpenter 
Apprenticeship Contest was held in facili- 
ties of the Southern Alberta Institute of 
Technology, Calgary. 

Eight contestants participated, repre- 
senting the Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committees of Edmonton, Cal- 
gary, and Lethbridge. The ninth sched- 
uled contestant, H. V. Stepanick from 
Local Union 1325, Edmonton, suffered 
a severe hand injury just prior to the 
contest and was unable to compete. 

The contest was in two parts — a writ- 
ten examination and a manipulative proj- 
ect (which was an open stairs with a 
handrail). 

The contest committee composed of 
labor and management representatives 
from the province made all arrangements 
for the contest, which was judged by 
Collins Roulson, journeyman carpenter 
from Local Union 1779; Calgary F. Whit- 
tle, provincial director of apprenticeship; 
and Fred Walters representing the Foun- 
dation Company of Canada. General 
Representative Paul Rudd of the United 
Brotherhood acted as coordinating judge. 

The first place winner was Eugene 
Zapisocki from Local Union 1325. Ed- 
monton, and the second place winner was 
Fred Deuschele from Local Union 846 
Lethbridge. Ei>gene will represent the 
Provinces at the International Contest. 



WE GOOFED 

Help! Since the April issue of 
THE CARPENTER was distrib- 
uted, we have been swamped with 
letters from readers who worked 
the "Brain Teaser." They point out 
that an error appeared in the last 
line. It should have read: 

RUITEANCIECIRR 
Our thanks to all those readers 
who took the time to write. It's 
great to know so many people read 
the brain teasers. 

THE EDITOR 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



HOME safety/workshop 

WHAT'S WRONG HERE? 



Jusf for f/ie camera, Mike Flaheriy of ihe Nafional Safety Council shows 
who/ nof fo do in your home workshop or on the job either, for that 
matter. For the answers to what Mike is doing wrong, turn to Page 24. 







^ \ in MP ^ m 



# 



^ 



^ >4: 



Detroit locals recently graduated 97 new journeymen. Most of them were able to attend graduation ceremonies and lined up 
for the official picture above. 

Apprentices Busy in Detroit Area 

DETROIT, MICH.— Two events in the 
Motor City recently reflected the im- 
petus being given to craft training pro- 
grams there. The Detroit Carpentry Joint 
Apprenticeship Committee graduated 97 
new journeymen, and it also held its 
second annual apprentice elimination 
contest and prepared to send winners to 
a state competition. 

Twenty-four apprentices competed in 
a manipulative contest, building picnic 
table-seats at Detroit's Cobo Hall. Win- 
ners next go to a state "playoff" at Grand 
Rapids, this month. William Hoover of 
Local 982 finished first in the Detroit 
contest. 

Another 982 trainee, James Costigan 
finished second. Harold Quennville of 
East Detroit, Local 26, was third, while 
Dayton Calahan of Local 19 placed 
fourth. All four young men will partici- 
pate in the state tourney at Grand Rapids, 
scheduled for June 7-8. 




The Second Annual Apprentice Elimination Contest in Detroit found these leaders 
and winners before the camera: From left, Carl Mews, chairman of the Detroit Area 
Contest Committee; Bradley Foster, contestant. Local 1433; Ray Fair, president, 
Carpenters District Council and chairman of area JAC; Amos Stewart, Local 19 
business manager; William Hoover, Local 998, first place winner; Ralph Wood, 
Local 982 business agent; Harold Quennville, Local 26, third place winner; Joe 
Miller, member, JAC; John R. Ferrier, Local 998, apprentice contestant; Ernier 
Landry, secretary, JAC committee; Dayton Calahan, contestant; James Costigan, 
who placed second, was not present for the picture. 




Detroit Area contestants and members of the Joint Apprenticeship Committee. 
All the contestants were presented band saws and trophies as mementos of the day. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




ASHEJM 





ROUNDUP 



WHAT PRICE GUIDEPOSTS?— When the corporate employer pleads "inahility to pay" this 
year he'll have a tough time proving it, in most cases. The Commerce Department 
reported last month that profits after taxes have jumped 9 percent in recent 
months . . . while hosses were demanding that workers' pay hikes be limited to 
less than 4 percent! 

MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE RANCH, Gardner Ackley, chairman of President Johnson's 
Council of Economic Advisors, says his 3.2 percent wage "guideposts" are not dead. 
He conceded that the public had never given the guideposts the support the Council 
had hoped for. 

150,000 NAMES were on petitions calling for improvement in Social Security, 
which the AFL-CIO turned over to Congress in May. The petitions— representing the 
first hatch gathered in an AFL-CIO nationwide drive — were turned over by AFL-CIO 
President George Meany and a delegation of city central body leaders. 

U. S. SHIPS IN U. S. YARDS- The AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Department has stated 
emphatically that it is opposed to Secretary of Transportation Alan Boyd's plan to 
build U.S. -flag ships in foreign yards. Department President Paul Hall told 
Alaskan Senator E. L. Bartlett, chairman of the Senate Merchant Marine Sub- 
committee, that nothing could be further from the truth than Boyd's assertion that 
"virtually all of industry — labor and management alike — was behind the program." 

STRIKES STILL LOW— Preliminary estimates of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show 
that strike idleness the first three months of 1967 was less than in 1965 and only 
slightly higher than in 1966. Strike idleness accounted for only 0.12 percent of 
estimated working time. 

FLIGHT TO SUBURBS— Not only are people running away from the cities to the suburbs, 
but their jobs are, too. This is the conclusion of employment specialists in the 
U.S. Department of Labor, who report that job opportunities are multiplying in the 
suburbs but that they are out of reach of the poor in the central city areas. 
Many of the jobs available in the suburbs are for subprofessional, clerical, sales 
or semi-skilled employes in plants, stores, warehouses and hospitals. 

APPRENTICE RANKS UP— The number of apprentices training in government registered 
programs hit an 18-year high in 1966 with more than 207,000 apprentices receiving 
skilled training. There were 85,000 new apprentices enrolled in programs in 1966 
also, a 19-year high. Some 26,400 trainees completed apprenticeship also, the 
largest number in the past five years. 

HST HAILED ON 83rd BIRTHDAY-The AFL-CIO Executive Council sent birthday greetings 
to former President Harry S. Truman on his 83rd birthday, saying that labor 
"never had a better friend in the White House..." 

WHITE COLLAR JOBS EXPAND— Employment went up during April and unemployment went 
down moderately, but there was not much overall lift in the job situation for the 
month. There were gains in retail trade, services and government employment, but 
manufacturing and construction continued to show the slackness that had been 
characteristic of the past few months. The Labor Department reported jobs in 
general went up about 100,000 on a seasonal basis and that unemployment 
remained at 3.7 percent. 

JUNE, 1967 17 




Shortly thereafter Cliff's partner nailed 
a small buck deer, and Cliff countered 
with a monstrous bull elk that dressed 
out at 815 pounds. 

• Avid hunting trio is Mile "Mike" 
Wade and sons of Apple Valley, Califor- 
nia, a member of Local 944. Here's a pic 
of "three of a kind," Carpenter Mike in 
the center, flanked by son Danny on left 
and Tim on the right. All scored on 
buck deer, as the photo illustrates. 

• Another elk hunter who scored on 
a big bull last year was Paul L. Johnson 
of Forest Grove, Oregon. He nailed his 
bull, with a rack almost large enough 
to drive his jeep through, with his own 
home-loaded bullets, near the job site 



By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at Box 508, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



■ Say Cheese! 

It appears that grocery stores will soon 
be running competition with the bait 
shops, such a conclusion prompted by 
increased reports of fish taken on cheese. 
Can't you see it now, on a television 
commercial: 

"Folks, buy delicious 'Brand X' cheese. 
It spreads evenly on bread — and hooks. 
You and the youngsters will love its 
tangy flavor — and your favorite finster 
will be lured to death by it. Always 
keep a package handy in your refrigerator 
— and your tackle box." 

■ Salmon Derby Champ 

Peter Lind of Bellingham, Washington, 
a member of Local 2017, has enjoyed a 
lifetime of salmon fishing — and he's 
caught his share of the lunkers. many of 
them over 30 pounds. On a recent junket 
to the Skagit River, in a deep stretch 
about a mile above the town of Mt. 
Vernon, he nipped the moose of 'em all, 
by far the largest he's ever taken, a 44-lb. 
buck. King Chinook — and on 20-lb. test 
line. The fish was acknowledged by local 
veteran salmon anglers as one of the 
largest ever taken from this area of the 




'■*'«» t^ 




Skagit. It won, hands down, the local 
salmon derby. 

■ Near the Record 

Credit Austin Bonds of Bham, Ala- 
bama, with a near-record catch for 
smallmouth bass. He nipped a 10-lb. 
specimen from Smith Lake at Bremen, 
Alabama, on a "bushwacker" lure. 
According to the records of Field and 
Stream Magazine, Austin has two more 
pounds to go before he can lay claim to 
a new world record, which is currently 
held by David L. Hayes, who eased an 
11 -lb., 15-oz. specimen from Dale Hol- 
low Lake, Kentucky, on July 9th, 1965. 




Derby Champ Lnid 



Smallmouth Bass 

■ Hunting Roundup 

Shades of last year's hunt season: 

• Charles Reeves of Elsberry. Mis- 
souri, a member of Local 1875. at 
Winfield, finally scored on a big buck 
deer after several barren, yearly attempts. 
He nailed a moose of a whitetail with 
a rack like grandma's rocking chair, 
featuring five points on each antler. 
It locker-dressed at close to 150 pounds. 
Mrs. Reeves says Charles downed it 
almost within shouting call of their back 
door. 

• C. C. Reade, rounding a 30-year 
membership in the Carpenter's Union, 
a former resident of Seattle, residing in 
Missoula, Montana for the last ten years, 
is a hunter not easily discouraged. He 
and partner rolled their jeep over on a 
late-season hunt and both were pinned 
beneath the car. They managed to crawl 
out uninjured, and in less than two hours 
after the incident were back on the road 
— heading for the hunting grounds. 




Reeves and Whitetail 

on timber holdings of the Stimson Lum- 
ber near his home. 

• Fourteen-year old Jim Antel. Jr, 
whose dad is a member of Local 851, 
Anoka, Minnesota, had a most satisfac- 
tory hunt the season before last, downing 
a doe that dressed out at 150 pounds and 
a buck at 160 pounds. 



■ Hound Dog Man 

They say that nothing can compare 
to the eerie cry of the hound dog as it 
scurries along the deep-night trail in the 
forest. I remember a story my father 
told me, long ago, about a hound dog 
man that refused to enter the gates of 




18 



Wade and Sons 
THE CARPENTER 



heaven until he had some assurance from 
the angelic gate tender that he — and his 
favorite hounds — would find their share 
of coon, cougar and bear. Only after 
they were assured they had gained a 
hunter's paradise did they accept their 
reward. 

The lure of coon hunting was brought 
out in a recent letter and pic from Walter 
E. Blackburn of Columbus. Ohio, a 
member of Local 200 for a shade under 
50 years and a hound dog man for even 
more. 

He writes: 

"Enclosed find photo depicting results 
of 12 nights of hunting. 30 coon. 
Largely responsible is my four footed 
friend in the foreground — 'Lonesome 
Red,' the greatest coon dog it's ever been 
my pleasure to own. When 'Lonesome' 
gives out with that soul-searing bawl, it 
is the voice of doom for Mr. Coon, and 
he must quickly take to the tree. 

"Fm rounding 75 years of age, Fred, 
and I've walked hundreds of miles, fol- 
lowing the hoimds. Dogs like 'Lonesome' 
keep my spirits high for the hunt." 

■ Deep Down Pleasure 

The mass movement of schools of 
deep-sea fish are quite unpredictable. 
Some time ago trawl fishermen hauled 
aboard l'/6 tons of scabbard fish in their 
nets in 140 fathoms of water off Newport 




Blackburn, Hound, and Coons 

Beach, California. Prior to this, only 30 
specimens of this rare fish were reported 
taken from anywhere. 



Always practice the rules of safety 
when you hunt or fish. One false 
move can cost you your life . . . And 
take special care when the wife and 
kids are along. 



HOME STUDY 
CORRECTIONS 

In spile of efforts to be completely 
accurate, there were errors in Unit 
I of the Home Study Course in the 
May issue. The correct answers for 
three of the questions should have 
been: 2. 260 yds.; 3. 232 ft.; 
8. 337 7/9 cu./yds. 



LEISURE-LIVING HOMES 

Continued from Page 9 

and flowering trees, the illusion was com- 
plete that one had stumbled upon a col- 
ony of delightful vacation retreats. 

Vacation homes are now being built in 
this country at the rate of approximately 
125,000 a year. It has been estimated 
that 15% of all families in the $15,000 
and up bracket now own a second home, 
but many families in a much lower finan- 
cial bracket also are able to enjoy the 
pleasures of a vacation retreat. 

Concepts of vacation housing have 
changed considerably in recent years. The 
doll house dimensions and flimsy con- 
struction that formerly characterized the 
small beach cottage or skiing cabin have 
now given way to more spacious houses 
which are designed for durability. Ap- 
proximately 70% of today's vacation 
home owners rent their homes on occa- 
sion, and in many cases, today's holiday 
home becomes tomorrow's retirement 
home. 




-"•^ Wrap your fingers around the genuine leather of a Vaughan Pro-Grip^ and you'll 
know at once that it's the finest hammer you've ever hefted. You'll Mice the way the leather 
soaks up sweat and absorbs vibration. Prevents blisters and looks good, too. The Pro-Grip 
has that perfect balance — cuts down arm and hand fatigue, helps you drive nails accurately 
and rapidly without tiring. The brightly polished Vaughan Vanadium head is forged and 
" ^ triple-tempered to exactly the right hardness. It's carefully precision-ground for a 
m^^y^, true-crowned striking face and polished like a jewel. The uniform face bevel 
iT^t^f?.'. minimizes dangerous chipping and the inner-beveled claw grips nails 

^**^^'*4^'^r**«>.,_^ 'irnily without cutting. Only the finest white hickory goes into Pro- 
Grip handles and they're compression-fitted, steel-wedged 
and plastic-sealed to prevent loosening. The Vaughan 
Pro-Grip is made for the professional car- 
penter. Available in 13 and 16 oz. nail 
and 16 oz. rip. If you really want 
the best, you'll find it at 
your hardware outlet. 
Or he'll find it for 
you. If all else fails, 
you can always 
^^^ write to us. 

Vaughan & BUShnell Mfg. Co. 135 S. LaSalle street, Chicago, Illinois 60603 





JUNE, 1967 



19 





Tools that combine power with balance, high productivity with low maintenance. 
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ME STUDY COURSE 



ADVANCED BLUEPRINT READING-UNIT II 



This Unit will deal with materials and conditions found in 
the Foundation Section of Plan "D." Some reference will be 
made to other Sections of the Plans. You should review the 
answers for Unit I so that all information required for Unit I 
has been conveyed to you. Some of the answers will re- 
quire you to refer to more than one sheet of the Plans and 
the Specifications for a complete answer. 

QUESTIONS 

1. What sheet shows the details of the foundation and 
the foundation footing? 

2. What kind of earth is to be reached at the bottom of 
the "Footing Trenches"? 

3. What average depth are the "Footing Trenches" to 
be excavated? 

4. What do the dotted lines along the front of the build- 
ing indicate? 

5. What is the depth below grade for the foundation 
footing along the front of the building? 

6. What does the 1" dimension along the left side (North 
to Northeast) of the basement and footing plan indi- 
cate? 

7. What provision is made for footings that have been 
excavated to a greater depth than required? 

8. What widths are indicated for the foundation footing 
along the left side (North to Northeast) of the base- 
ment and footing plan? 

9. What length of the North to Northeast wall has the 
width indicated by detail 1 109, sheet 11? 

10. What distance is the reinforcing steel set back from 
the outside of the foundation footing and wall along 
the North to Northeast basement wall? 

11. Who is responsible for ordering extra cribbing? 

12. What is the minimum clear distance between the 
forms and the reinforcing steel? 

13. Determine the area of the cross sectional face of Sec- 
tion 1109, Sheet 11. 

14. How many cubic yards of concrete will be required 
to pour the footing for Section 1109 (See Answer 
No. 9)? 

15. What is the size of the foundation footing in the non- 
load bearing wall shown in Section 1107, Sheet 11? 

16. How many V4 " ties will be required to properly secure 
the reinforcing steel rods in the ground beams? 

17. Excluding excavation for foundation footings and 
piers, what is the approximate depth of the lower 
garage floor below natural grade (For excavation)? 

18. What is the greatest East to West dimension for ex- 
cavation of the lower garage floor (Exclude the foun- 
dation walls)? 

19. What is the greatest North to South dimension for 
excavation of the lower garage floor (Exclude the 
foundation walls) ? 



20. How many cubic yards of earth must be excavated 
for the lower garage and ramps (Exclude the stairs 
in Equipment Room 1)? 

21. What kind of steel is used in the concrete slab? 

22. Describe the typical footing foundations under col- 
umns D-2 and E-2. 

23. What provision must be made prior to pouring the 
pedestals for the column foundations? 

24. What special provisions must be made for the fill 
under the lower garage ramps? 

25. What kind of material is to be used for backfilling? 

26. What is the thickness of the gravel fill under the floor 
slabs and what size rock is specified? 

27. What is the size and spacing of the reinforcing steel 
in the typical foundation wall section? 

28. Where would you find the "existing" grade points? 

29. When will it be permissible to omit forms when pour- 
ing foundations? 

30. Who is to decide the correct footing widths when 
excavations are made to a greater width than re- 
quired? 

31. What elevations or depths are to be used in computing 
the quantities of excavations? 

32. Who is authorized to order extra excavation? 

33. What provision is made for payment of extra ex- 
cavation? 

34. What precaution is to be taken to prevent earth banks 
from falling after the excavation and prior to pouring 
the concrete? Who is to pay for the cost incurred in 
this operation? 

35. When is backfilling to be accomplished? 

36. What special provision is made for the dirt under 
slabs, pavement or steps? 

37. List the widths of the concrete foundation footing in 
the perimeter of the exterior walls. 

38. List the depths of the concrete foundation footing in 
the perimeter wall of the exterior walls. 

39. Are there any concrete footings in the interior walls 
of the building that are poured to a greater depth than 
the exterior walls? 

40. Determine the depth of the concrete that is poured 
below the floor level for Columns D-3 and E-2. 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ARE ON PAGE 23 



PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS for the Advanced 
Blueprint Reading Home Study Course is available 
through the office of General Secretary R. E. Living- 
ston. Forward a check or money order for five dollars 
($5) with your order. 



JUNE, 1967 



21 




M.mW, 




Send in your favorites (no poetry). 
Mail to: Plane Gossip, 101 Const. Ave., 
NW, Wash.. D.C. 20001. Sorry, no pay! 




Really On The Ball 

They rushed her to the hospital a 
few minutes too late; she had her 
baby on the hospital's lawn. The 
father received a bill for "Delivery 
room and maternity care, $170." hHe 
wrote back, saying that he thought 
the bill too high, since the baby did 
not have delivery room care, having 
been born on the grass. Later he re- 
ceived a revised bill from the hospi- 
tal: "Greens fee and maternity care 
. . . $170." 

— F. S. Millham, Fullerton, Pa. 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 




No Big Shot 

The robber told the banker: "Gim- 
me your head or I'll blow your money 
off!" Said the banker: "Look, fellow, 
haven't you got that backward?" 
"Don't confuse me," replied the gun- 
man, "this is my first job!" 

— Charles Moenning, 
hiarrisburg, Mo. 

1 4 .ALL — .\LL 4 1 

Malice for Alice 

The wealthy woman was crying and 
said to her maid: "Oh, Alice, I think 
my husband is running around with his 
secretary!" 

"I don't believe it," snapped Alice. 
"You're just trying to make me 
jealous!" 



Mr. Pert Sez: 

"It's a good idee to love yer neigh- 
bor and be religious, but don't fergit 
to lock yer car whilst yer in church!" 

WORK SAFELY — ACCIDENTS HURT 

The Price Was Right! 

A tourist was complaining to the 
Indian on the western reservation 
about his crowded, cramped exist- 
ence in New York City, compared to 
the sunlight and air enjoyed by the 
Indian. "It's terrible!" he said. "The 
air's polluted, there's so much crime 
no one is safe, the streets are dirty, 
the traffic hardly moves, the . . ." 
"Ugh!" interrupted the Indian. "What 
you expect for twenty-four bucks?" 
—Rudy Wade, L.U. 3107 

PATRONIZE UNION STORES 

Aims to Pease! 

Two monks had broken the abbey 
rules. The abbott ordered them to 
wear peas in their shoes all one day. 
One monk hobbled painfully about, 
while the other went about his work 
with joy and ease. That night the one 
groaned: "I cannot see how you en- 
dured such agony so blithefully, 
brother!" "That's easy," grinned the 
other. "I boiled my peas! " 

UNION-MADE IS WELL MADE 

Good Advice 

"Men, don't worry because your 
hair starts falling out. Suppose it 
ached and you had to have it pulled 
. . . like your teeth!" 

■ ■BBBBBBHEBKEBBBaBHHBBBIIBB 

This Month's Limerick 

A carpenter who had but one leg 
Was too proud and ambitious to beg. 
He never did shirk 
But did all his work 
By pounding in nails with his peg. 
— Frances May, 

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 



Right Answer 

The teacher had just given her sec- 
ond-grade class a lesson on magnets. 
Now came the question session, and 
she asked a little boy: "My name 
starts with an 'M,' and I pick up 
things. What am I?" 

The boy replied instantly, "A 
mother." 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Daze and Nights 

Two Miami Beach beauties were 
sunning themselves when one said: 
"Did you know there's going to be a 
beauty contest tomorrow afternoon?" 
"Sure," yawned the other. "I won it 
last night!" 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 




One-Way Correspondence 

Teacher: "Robert Burns wrote 'To 
A Field Mouse'." 

Pupil: "I bet he didn't get an an- 
swer!" 

— Jenetta h^urd, 
Compton, Calif. 

LIKE TOOLS, BE SHARP Sc SAFE 

Patient Patient 

Voice on the 'phone: "Doc, my wife 
has dislocated her jaw. Can't say a 
word. If you're out this way in the 
next week or two, how about drop- 
ping in to see her?" 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Home Study Course 

Answers to Questions on Page 21 

1. Sheet 11. 

2. The trenches should be carried down 
to depth where stiff brown clay has 
been reached subject to the architect's 
or engineer's approval. (Specifica- 
tions; Excavations, Grading and Fill- 
ing and Section 1101-3, Sheet 11) 

3. Carry down to a depth of 7'-0". 
(Specifications; Excavation, Grading 
and FilHng) 

4. They indicate the foundation wall and 
footing under the 1st floor. (Base- 
ment and Footing Plan and Section 
1115, Sheet 11) 

5. 6'-6" minimum. (Section 1115, Sheet 
11) 

6. It indicates the projection of the foot- 
ing outside the basement wall (1st 
floor Plan, Sheet 1 and Basement and 
Footing Plan, Sheet 11) 

7. Tlie additional depth is to be filled 
with concrete to same specifica- 
tion as the required footing at the 
contractor's expense. (Specifications; 
Excavating, Grading and Backfilling) 

8. 2'-7" at Section 1109 and 2'-2" at 
Section 1101. (Basement and Foot- 
ing Plan, Sheet 11) 

9. 53'-7"; 20'-0" + 16'-6" -I- 16'-6" + 1'- 
5" - O'-IO" (Basement Plan, Sheet 1 
and Basement and Footing Plan, 
Sheet 11) 

10. 3" at the foundation footing and 2" 
at the foundation wall. The steel is 
to be bent to the centerline of the 
wall at the next floor level (Section 
1101 and 1109, Sheet 11) 

11. The architect, engineer or their rep- 
resentatives. (Specifications; Excavat- 
ing. Grading and Backfilling) 

12. The clear distance for round bars 
shall be the diameter of the bar and 
V/i times the side dimension of 
square bars unless otherwise indicated 
on the Plans. (Specifications: Exca- 
vating, Grading and Backfilling) 

13. 2.8 sq. ft. d'-l" X 2'7"; 13" X 31" 
-=- 144 ^ Answer Rounded to 1 Place 
Decimal) 

14. 5.76CU. yd.;(l'-l" x 2'-7" x 55'-7") 



27 X 1728 
or 1%, X 31/12 X ««"/i2 X Vi- 
Determine answer by changing all 
measurements to same units; i.e., 
inches or feet. Division by 27 con- 
verts answer to cubic yards. 

15. 12" X 18" ground beam (Section 
1107, Sheet 11) 

16. Approximately 87 feet of ground 
beam in two separate sections would 
require 89'/4" ties when spaced at 
12" OC. (Section 1107 and Base- 
ment and Footing Plan. Sheet 11) 

17. 5'-7%" (Section 1101, Sheet 11) 

18. 67'-10" (Basement and Footing Plan, 
Sheet 11) 



19. 37'-0" (Section 1101, 1103 and Base- 
ment and Footing Plan, Sheet 11) 

20. 553 cubic yards (Section 1101 and 
Basement and Footing Plan, Sheet 11) 

21. 6" X 6" - #10 X #10 W. W. mesh 
at garage level and 4" x 8" — #12 
X #12 W. W. mesh at 1st. 2nd and 
3rd floor level. (Basement and Foot- 
ing Plan, Sheet 11 and Structural 
Plan, Sheet 13) 

22. Pyramiding square pedestal made in 
three separate pours. (Basement Plan, 
Sheet 1 and Section 1112, Sheet 11) 

23. The column stubs are to extend into 
the pedestal a minimum of 5'-0". 
The stubs must be placed prior to 
pouring the pedestal. 

24. The fill is to be stabilized with IV2 
sacks of cement per cubic yard of 
dirt fill and tamped in place. (Spec- 
fications; Excavating, Grading and 
Backfilling and Section 1004, Sheet 
10) 

25. Good clean earth, which shall be set 
with water and tamped until it is 
compact and solid. In cases where 
backfilling and grading are necessary 
in preparation for laying concrete, it 
shall be solidly compacted in 6" lay- 
ers' by vibrating, tamping or rolling. 
(Specifications: Excavating, Grading 
and Backfilling) 

26. Gravel fill under floor slab shall be 
4" thick, river rock uncrushed and 
sized from ¥a" minimum to IV-t" 
maximum. (Sections, Sheet 11 and 
Specifications; Concrete Work) 

27. V2" round reinforcing steel spaced 
12" O.C. horizontally and vertically 
with stubs lapped 2'-0". The steel 
shall be unpainted, uncoated. free 
from rust and scale and straightened 
prior to placement. (Section 1109, 
Sheet 1 1 and Specifications: Concrete 
Work) 

28. The grade points are found on the 
Plot Plan. (Sheet 2) 

29. Forms may be omitted when the net 
footing sizes are dug to the correct 
width and the earth banks are firm. 
(Specifications; Concrete Work) 

30. The engineer will direct the contrac- 
tor in the placing of forms so as to 
provide for a balanced footing. (Spe- 
cifications: Excavating Grading and 
Backfilling) 

31. Use the elevations shown on the 
Plans. (Specifications; Excavating, 
Grading and Backfilling) 

32. The engineer or the architect is au- 
thorized to order extra excavation. 
(Specifications; Excavating, Grading 
and Backfilling) 

33. Extra excavation authorized by the 
architect or engineer or their rep- 
resentatives shall be paid for by the 
owner according to the provisions of 
the contract, or as per additional 
agreements. (Specifications; Excavat- 
ing, Grading and Backfilling) 

34. Cribbing shall be installed by the 
contractor at his expense to retain 
the earth banks. Cribbing required 



for extra excavation authorized by 
the architect or engineer shall be 
paid for by the owner. (Specifica- 
tions; Excavation, Grading and Back- 
filling) 

35. The backfilling is to be accomplished 
after the piers, foundation and con- 
crete walls are stripped of forms and 
approved by the architect or engi- 
neer. Backfill shall be clean earth, 
set with water until it is compact and 
solid. (Specifications, Excavating, 
Grading and Back-filling) 

36. Where possible, the concrete work is 
to be laid over undisturbed earth; 
except slabs laid over gravel. (Spe- 
cifications: Excavating, Grading and 
Backfilling) 

37. 2'-7" at Section 1109, 2'-2" at Sec- 
tion 1101, 2'-4" at Section 1106, 
2'-0" at Section 1113 and 2'-0" Sec- 
tion 1115. (Basement and Footing 
Plan, Sheet 11) 

38. I'-l" at Section 1109, l'-2" at Sec- 
tion 1101. I'-O" at Section 1106, 
O'-IO" at Section 1113 and I'-O" at 
Section 1115. (Sheet 11) 

39. Yes. Section 1107— r-6" below the 
concrete floor. (Sheet 11) 

40. 6'- 10" plus the allowance for varia- 
tion in existing grade. (Section 1101, 
1107 and 1112, Sheet 11) 



. You'll Like Being a 
SKILLED 

LOCKSMITH 



EARN MORE. LIVE BEHER 
than Ever Before in Your Life 
You'll enjoy your work as a Lock- 
smith. It's more fascinating than a 
hobby — and highly paid besides ! 
As a Locksmith year after year, in 
good times or bad you'll be the 
man in demand in an evergrowing 
field offering big pay jobs, big 
profits as your own boss. What more 
could you askl 

Train at Home- 
Earn Extra $$$$ Right Away! 
All this can be yours FAST regard- 
less of age. education, minor phys- 
ical handicaps. Job enjoyment and 
earnings can begin AT ONCE. You 
learn quickly, easily. CASH IN on 
all kinds of locksmitliing jobs. .\1I 
keys, locks, parts, picks, special 
tools and equipment supplied. Li- 
censed experts guide you to suc- 
cess. 

rpEE Illustrated Book 
rn.EC Sample Lesson Pages 
Loclcsmithiiig Institute graduates now 
earning, enjoying life more every- 
where. Coupon brings exciting facts 
from only school of its kind: Lie. by 
N. J. State Dept. of Ed.. Accredited 
Member. Nat'l. Home Study Coun- 
HI. VA Approved. LOCKSMITH ING 
INSTITUTE, Div. of Technical 
Home Study Schools. Dept. 1118- 
057. Little Falls. \.J. 07424. 



..-*<5^ 




smith when a back 
injury forced me to 
give up my joh. Now 
I own a iiiol)ile lock- 
smith shop and en- 
joy a successful full 
time business. 

Robert N. Miller 
Oakland. N.J. 



f" 



306 



at 



LOCKS. Mews'* 

orxJ TOOLS , 

\^ tupptisd / 

fat uf h 



I LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE. Dept. 1118-057 | 

I Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

I riease send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Op- [ 

I portunities in Locksmithing," complete equipment | 

I folder and sample lesson pages — Free of all obliga- i 

I tion — fno salesman will call). I 

I Name ' 

I (Please Print) | 



City. 



. State . 



.Zip. 



□ Ciieck here if eligible for Vet. benefits 



JUNE, 1967 



23 





3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at ony angle. Sizes ^4" 
to Ju", $.80 each. %" *o 1", $.90 each, 1>^" 
to 114". $1 •'*0 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, Vq" to 
3". Only $4.40. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, %" to 1?4". Only $4.00. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes J4" to 
1)4"- As low as $1.30 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.25 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
domoge-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
G perfect chalk line every time. 

IRWIN ^"sl-r- 

every bH as good as the name 



LAYOUT LEVEL 

• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

•30NE-MAN OPERATION 

Sove Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set battera 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate %fi^' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? 
thousands of carpentei-s, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only $7.95 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
age. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

Ask your tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow tlie usual dealer discount on ^.^ Doz. lots 
and ^ive return-mail service. 





HYDROLEVE 

925 DeSoto, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 



,sj 



Home Safety Workshop 
What's Wrong Here? 



Answers fo Picture Problems on Page 15 

PHOTO 1 — Walloping a wrench with a 
hammer can fracture a thumb or wrist 
if the hammer slips or the wrench conies 
down on the exposed thumb. (Always 
use a wood chock over the wheel before 
applying a wrench.) The wrench should 
be the proper size. Even then, says Mike, 
you should be alert to the possibility of 
its slipping. 

PHOTO 2 — You're asking to lose fingers 
if you use a band saw this way with 
guard up and hands in front of and close 
to the blade. Guard should be as close 
to the work as possible and never more 
than one-quarter inch away. Anything 
else? Mike not only is not wearing any 
eye protection, but the smoke from that 
cigarette could obstruct his vision. 

PHOTO 3 — The calipers Mike is putting 
on that rotating piece could be wrenched 
from his hand and hurled at him. (Stop 
work before measuring, and never reach 
across a moving piece of work; you risk 
being caught in the machine.) Anything 
else? Yes. Mike should have the protec- 
tive shield over his face. 

PHOTO 4— The force of the turning 
drill could wrench the work from Mike's 
hand. He should be using a device de- 
signed for holding down materials. Any- 
thing else? Yes. Mike isn't wearing pro- 
tective glasses. 

PHOTO 5 — You don't need power tools 
to get into trouble in your home work- 
shop. Mike is asking for trouble by hold- 
ing the work in his hand while using a 
screwdriver. The tool, under pressure, 
could slip, piercing his hand. (The work 
should be on a flat surface and firmly 
secured.) Anything else? Yes. The 
screwdriver Mike is using is too small 
for the screw being used and is not cen- 
tered in the screw slot. 

PHOTO 6— What's wrong here? Plenty: 
1) Mike has not attached the anti-kick- 
back pawl — meaning that the saw blade 
could kick back a piece of wood at a 
speed of up to 90 miles per hour. 2) He 
is standing directly behind the work 
instead of to the side. 3) He is not using 
a push-stick to guide the piece through 
and has raised the blade guard — inviting 
the loss of some fingers. 4) He has not 
dropped the blade guard sufficiently in 
back to prevent sawdust from being 
thrown into his face. 5) He is not wear- 
ing protective glasses. 6) He has not 
connected the vacuum attachment. 7) 
Last, but not least, Mike has not raised 
the table leaf to provide adequate support 
for the piece being worked on. 



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• NEW ESTIMATING RULES 
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24 



THE CARPENTER 





i^(DDD(^[rg]ftfflUg]li 



?000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to pubhc offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the foilowino; 




Another significant occasion for Carpenters Local 25: Choosing the proud recipients 
of Local 25's Scholarship awards at Los Angeles Trade Technical College. Seated 
from left to right are: Raymond Tomalas, Steve Jones, Vince Castiglione and Arthur 
Placencia. Standing, and presenting these young men with their awards for 1966, 
are (from left): E. G. "Blackie" Daley, Business Representative; Ben Fenwick, Busi- 
ness Representative; Douglas "Doug" Coffin, Trustee; Joe "Wilkie" Wilk, Business 
Resresentative: and James L. Keen. Financial Secretary-Treasurer. 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND ESTABLISHED— To en- 
courage potential young men to advance 
their professional interests through con- 
tinuation in the carpenter's trade, a 
$1,500 Scholarship Fund has been estab- 
lished by Los Angeles Local 25. 

The fund to be distributed each 
semester was recently presented to Los 




Angeles Technical College by Local 25, 
one of the oldest combined affiliates of 
Ihe Carpenters' Brotherhood. 

Scholarships will be named on the 
basis of need, ability, and scholastic 
achievement as determined by Local 25's 
Executive Committee, with Los Angeles 
Trade Tech Building Trades faculty 
recommending carpenter craft scholars 
whom they consider worthy of Local 25 
scholarship eligibility. 

Awards for scholarship will comprise 
four $300 scholarships and two $150 
grants, to be distributed annually. 

The drive for the Scholarship Fund 
was conducted by Business Representa- 
tive E. G. Daley and was assisted by 
James Keen, Financial Secretary-Treas- 
urer; Doug Coffin, Trustee; and Joe Wilk, 
also a Business Representative. 

UNDERSTANDING—// unions in Lexena, 
Kan., have any disputes they can expect 
fair treatment from the new chief of 
police. He is Jim Ainswortli, a long- 
time member of Carpenters Local 61, 
who understands the vital role that or- 
ganized labor plays in the comnuiiiity. 

FIGHTER NOW CARPENTER-Paul Labbe, 
Jr., a member of Local 407. Lewiston, 
Maine, was a professional boxer in the 
1940s. Brother Labbe, left, fought under 
the name Paul Junior. He is shown with 
Henry Armstrong, former World Welter- 
weight Champion, whom he fought twice 
for the title. 




Labbe and Armstrong shake. 



Three final scholarship winners in the 
Carpentry Trade Class at Los Angeles 
Trade Technical College: Seated (from 
left) Douglas S. Coffin, Trustee, and Jim 
Keen, Financial Secretary-Treasurer, 
representing Carpenters Local 25, pre- 
sented the three scholarship awards of 
$100 each. Standing (from left) are 
award recipients Leo Rizuto, Henry 
Porter, and Michael Kochan. 




JOB FOR THE LION-HEARTED- When officials of the Utica Zoological Society, Utica, New 
York, bemoaned the fact that the "cats" could not get proper exercise during the 
winter, George Weber, president of Carpenters Local 125, volunteered his services. 
He built exercise shelves on which the lions, leopards and jaguars can prowl back 
and forth. The hungry-looking jaguars, pictured above, enjoy the finished product. 



JUNE, 1967 



25 



I^Qanadian Report 



Stefanovitch Serves 
On Discussion Panel 

A trade union conference on organ- 
ization was jointly sponsored by the 
Canadian Labor Congress and the On- 
tario Federation of Labor in Toronto 
in mid-May. 

This was the second in a series of 
organizational conferences to be held 
across Canada. The first was held in 
New Brunswick. 

One of the purposes of these con- 
ferences is to develop better methods 
of co-ordinating the efforts involved 
in increasing activities in organizing 
new members. 

One of four discussion groups dealt 
with the building trades unions exclu- 
sively. Chaired by James Black, of the 
AFL-CIO Building Trades Department 
in Ontario, members of the panel were 
William Stefanovitch, the Brother- 
hood's executive board member for 
District 9; Alex Main, manager, 
Toronto Building Trades Council; and 
Douglas Forgie. general representative, 
International Hod Carriers and La- 
borers. 

A report on the conference is being 
drafted by Harry Simon, Ontario Di- 
rector of Organization for the CLC. 



CLC Warns Rand 
Commission on Strikes 

The Canadian Labor Congress has 
told the Rand Commission enquiry 
into labor disputes that outlawing 
strikes was no solution to problems 
arising from collective bargaining. 

The commission headed by retired 
Justice Mr. Ivan Rand was set up by 
the Ontario government in face of 
strong protests by Ontario labor 
against the abuse of injunctions in 
labor disputes. 

Pointing to the bias in the "socio- 
economic system ... in favor of the 
employer," the CLC brief suggested 
that there was also a bias in the opera- 
tions of the various labor acts under 
provincial jurisdiction. 

"The state, far from being merely 
an umpire, has become increasingly 
an intervenor which, if not plainly on 
the side of the employer, has to say 
the least set out to make the role of 
the union increasingly difficult to ex- 
ercise." 

Defending the right to strike, the 
CLC said that employers still look 



upon unions as "a necessary evil" and 
that the way to better labor-manage- 
ment relations was through "better col- 
lective bargaining and dispute settle- 
ment procedures . . .; more skilled 
conciliation services on the part of gov- 
ernment; and a greater obligation on 
the part of the so-called essential in- 
dustries to deal in good faith with thfe 
unions of their employees." 

Attacking the abuse of injunctions 
in industrial disputes, the Congress 
said that governments in Canada have 
"demonstrated a greater willingness to 
intervene to stop strikes than to pre- 
vent them from happening." 



Canadian Mineworkers 
Now in One Union 

There's an old saying that politics 
makes strange bedfellows. Sometimes 
union mergers do too. 

The Canadian section of the Steel- 
workers has just absorbed the remnants 
of the Mine, Mill and Smelter Work- 
ers, a union which it fought bitterly 
for 18 years. 

Having beaten Mine, Mill in almost 
every mine across the country except 
Falconbridge in Ontario and Cominco 
at Trail, B.C., the handwriting was 
probably on the wall. 

However the result of the merger, 
to be ratified by Mine, Mill before the 




Manitoba's Legislative Building is said 
to be one of the most beautiful parlia- 
ment buildings in North America. Seen 
from the air, its magnificent architec- 
tural design and its almost sylvan setting 
in the heart of Winnipeg, can be ap- 
preciated. 



end of June, is to bring Canadian 
mineworkers under one union roof. 



Submission to CLC 
Calls for Fewer Unions 

The Commission on Constitution 
and Structure set up by the Canadian 
Labor Congress after its 1966 con- 
vention has been holding hearings in 
private. 

However, one union took the liberty 
of making its submission public, and 
advocating the drastic reduction in the 
number of unions operating in Canada. 

It is true that many unions have a 
rather sparse membership compared 
with the size of the country. But it 
is likely that natural attrition will 
change the situation where necessary 
and that directives are unlikely to 
work. 



Housing Crisis 
Is Steadily Worse 

The housing crisis predicted by the 
Economic Council of Canada has 
grown steadily worse. In the Toronto 
area, about 12,000 families were re- 
ported to be in need of accommodation 
or better quarters by the Toronto 
Housing Authority with literally noth- 
ing available. 

Some families are being housed tem- 
porarily in old, reconditioned army 
barracks until some kind of housing 
can be found for them. 

Statements continue to come from 
official sources saying that more hous- 
ing permits have been issued and more 
money is being made available. But 
no one yet has said with any convic- 
tion that the backlog of housing needs 
will be met in the foreseeable future. 

The Canadian banks, due to an 
amendment to the Bank Act, are now 
permitted to lend money on mort- 
gages, and will undoubtedly do some- 
thing to ease the mortgage money 
shortage. 

But the president of the govern- 
ment's housing agency. Central Mort- 
gage and Housing, H. W. Hignett, 
expects that only 170,000 homes will 
be built in the year starting June 1st. 

This will take care of new demand 
in that 12-month period, but will do 
nothing to overcome the shortage. 
Anything below 200,000 housing units 
a year for the next 1 years falls short 
of adequate performance. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Federal Housing 
Czar Is Rumored 

Evidence that public opinion in 
Canada is more aroused than ever be- 
fore to the gravity of the housing 
problem is the rumor that the federal 
government may make a cabinet min- 
ister as "housing czar." 

The establishment of a housing port- 
folio in the cabinet is certainly a step 
in the right direction. It is expected 
that former finance minister Walter 
Gordon will get the appointment. 

Mr. Gordon is now engaged in head- 
ing a governmental enquiry into for- 
eign investment in Canada. He has 
strong views on the subject, many of 
them not shared by his colleagues in 
the cabinet nor by economists. 

Most Canadians like the idea of the 
nation building and maintaining a 
greater stake in the country's economy, 
but few like Gordon's way of going 
about it. 

The idea of using Canadian funds 
to buy back 25 percent of a foreign 
controlled corporation does not appeal 
to either corporations or labour as the 
best way to use our financial resources. 
Better use the money to build new 
industries and develop new resources. 

And legislating that a few Canadians 
must be on every board of directors 
of a foreign-controlled company may 
appeal to our ego, but does nothing 
to make that industry more productive 
and more capable of serving the na- 
tional interest. 

Besides, experience has been that, 
in collective bargaining, there is not 
much to choose between U.S. manage- 
ment and Canadian management. 

There are better ways of pursuing 
and promoting our national interests 
and goals. 



Eyeball-to-Eyeball 
Industrial Relations 

The Ontario government has set up 
a union-management council to ex- 
plore problems of labor-management 
relations. The 10-man council will 
have equal representation from labour 
and management. Chairman of the 
council will be Dr. John Crispo, direc- 
tor of the University of Toronto's 
Centre of Industrial Relations. 

There is already a similar body un- 
der federal jurisdiction headed by 
Dean W. D. Woods, head of the In- 
dustrial Relations Centre, Queen's Uni- 
versity, Kingston. 

Crispo is a member of Woods' 
committee. 

Will Woods and Crispo take in 
each other's washing? 




Sheffield Scotch Nails practically eliminate wood splitting. 
Because of their square design, Scotch Nails tend to cut into 
wood rather than wedge and split the grain. The result is 
a neater, cleaner looking job that measures up to the highest 
standards of the builder and the customer. 

Another important plus for the Sheffield Scotch Nail is that it 
withdraws much easier from new wood shortly after driving 
than the ordinary nail. This can save trouble during construction. 
Yet after wood has dried — withdrawal resistance of Sheffield 
Scotch Nails is more than 100% greater than that of the 
round nail. The deep serrations on the sides of the nail grip 
the wood fibers, assuring you of a better anchored job. 

See your dealer about stocking Sheffield Scotch Nails. Write 
Armco Steel Corporation, Department W-527A 7000 Roberts 
Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64125. 



M 



. ARMCO 

L V 



JUNE, 1967 



27 



25,000 Years Noted 
By D. a Local 132 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Members of 
District of Columbia Local 132 held 
a dinner-dance April 15 to honor its 25 
and 50-year members. Fourteen hon- 
orees had between 55 and 60 years of 
service each; nine had between 60 and 
65 years listed: these, with 25, 30, 35, 
and 40 year members, made up a total 
of more than 25.000 years of service to 
the Brotherhood. 

More than 1600 members and guests 
attended the big gathering at the Shera- 
ton Park Hotel in the nation's capital. 
Among the visitors were First General 
Vice President Finlay C. Allan and Gen- 
eral Treasurer Peter Terzick. 

Master of ceremonies was local union 




Congrahilations from Pres. Joe Groonies, 
left, and General Treasurer Terzick, 
right, to Past Fin. Secretary E. J. Appell, 
60-year veteran, and Ed Campbell, past 
recording sec. and trustee, also 60 years. 



WERE YOU THERE? 

ATTENTION: Carpenters who 
have worked within the jurisdic- 
tion of the Fox River Valley Dis- 
trict Council of Carpenters, in the 
State of Wisconsin, during the pe- 
riod of April 1, 1962, through 
June 1, 1966. You may have un- 
claimed vacation contributions in 
the Kellogg Citizens National Bank, 
P. O. Box 670, Green Bay, Wis- 
consin. 

Any carpenter who worked in 
this area during this period and 
has not received his vacation 
money, should send his name and 
address along with his Social Se- 
curity number to the Kellogg 
Bank at the address shown above. 




-ij«.»#ii.Wl.«1iWfriifirf, 

ABOVE: Fin. Sec. Martin Cressman, 
Gen. Treas. Terzick, Trustee Everett 
Johnson, Trustee Fred Johnson, First 
Gen'l. VP Allan, Trustee Jim Merkle, 
and Pres. Joe Grooraes. 



President Joseph Groomes. Invocation 
was delivered by Harry R. Bryant, Jr. 
of the local union. 

Pins were presented by General Treas- 
urer Terzick. 

In a brief "sidelight"" ceremony. Inter- 
national Legislative Rep. James Bailey 
presented a 40-year pin to First Gen'l. 
VP Finlay Allan. 

Committee on Arrangements included 
Fred Johnson, chairman, Joseph 
Groomes, Martin Cressman, Everett 
Johnson, and James Merkle. 




Int'l. Legislative Rep. Jim Bailey presents 
40-year pin to First Gen'l. VP Allan. 



Freeburg, Illinois, Local Has New Hall 




FREEBURG, ILL. — Local 480 of Freeburg dedicated its new union hall on February 
11. Following the dedication, the officers lined up for a picture. From left, they are: 
Vance Kosarek, financial secretary; Louis Darmstatter, conductor; Jim McGuire, 
business representative; Sidney Hill, recording secretary; Clyde Pruett, president; John 
Schwalb, trustee; Emil Ross, trustee; Sylvester Neff, trustee; and George Roth, treas- 
urer. Not present for the picture were Charles Strautz, warden; and Emil Steinheimer, 
vice president. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Saskatchewan Plans 
For the Year Ahead 

SASKATOON, SASK.— The 22nd An- 
nual Convention of the Saskatchewan 
Provincial Council of Carpenters con- 
vened for three days at the Holiday 
House Motor Hotel, last February, to 
chart work for the coming months. 

There were 18 delegates present, plus 
General Reps. W. G. Stanton and Paul 
Rudd. Chairman was President J. Gebert. 

The gathering heard a report on prog- 
ress in the provincial apprenticeship 
program and noted that the province 
will be represented in the International 
Contest at Vancouver. 

There was a report from the Organi- 
zation and Work Rules Committee which 
defined in more exact terms some of 
the standards of work to be carried out 
by all local unions in the area. Duties 
of shop stewards were also defined in a 
six-part statement. General Rep. Rudd 
recommended that one standard job 
steward card be used by all locals. 

It was moved that 2,000 copies of the 
Trade Rules as revised be printed and 
sold to the local unions at cost. 

There was some discussion of welfare 
plans, and a committee was appointed 
to make a study. 

The Resolution and Constitution Com- 




Delegates to the Saskatchewan Convention were: back row, left to right: Jack Klein, 
L.U. 1867; Adam Deutscher, 1867; Mike Wytosky, vice president; Frank Mazur, 
1804; Tom Aitkin, 2849; John Clark, 2469; and J. Kirik, 2374. Middle row: Fred 
Nau, president; Oliver Anderson, 1805; Fred Smith, 1805; Leo Fritz, secretary- 
treasurer; Frank Wells, 1804; Ed Lozinsky, 1990; Leo Klaudt, 2469; and W. R. 
Garnett, 1805. Front row: George Cole, fraternal delegate; E. I. Bender, past secre- 
tary-treasurer; John Gebert, past president; Mrs. I. McDonald, office stenographer; 
George Bengough, 10th District Executive Board Member; Paul Rudd, general repre- 
sentative; and W. G. Stanton, General Representative. 



mittee presented a resolution urging all 
locals of the three prairie provinces to 
appeal to the Unemployment Insurance 
Commissions requesting a rewriting of 
their regulations to exclude the construc- 
tion industry. 

Article 172, Section G of the Regu- 
lations states that annual holiday pay 
must be considered earnings when an 
employee is laid off, if a plant or place 



of business is to be shut down for a 
continuous or extended holiday within 
six weeks of the layoff. The Commission 
has interpreted this article to include a 
construction project when the project 
closed down for 10 days at Christmas 
time. Many members are thus penalized 
and deprived of as much as two weeks' 
benefits as early as a mid-November 
layoff. 



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SEATTLE, WASH. — One of the major challengers for unlimited hydroplane speed 
records this year will be a new Miss Bardahl. She has new lines and weighs in at 
a mere three tons, some 1200 pounds lighter than her predecessor of the same name. 

The 1967 boat, which carried the famous "U-40'' Miss Bardahl number at her 
first trials in April, will have a hull fabricated of 5-pIy Douglas fir plywood only 
V4-inch thick, but designed to withstand the terrific pounding of 180 m.p.h. speeds. 

It replaces 7/16-inch, much heavier and more brittle hardwood previously used. 
Instead of 8-foot pieces, this year's plywood is made the full length of the 30-foof 
4-inch hull by Georgia-Pacific's marine plywood division to eliminate cross-the-beam 
joints. This one-piece hull material is supported by marine fir plywood frames V»- 
inch thick. 

Plywood officials said tests show the Vi-inch 5-ply plywood will carry 20 times 
the bending load of sheet steel and 5 times that of aluminum for the same weight 
per square foot. The test report also indicates the plywood, made of vertical grain 
veneers, is 149 times stiifer in bending than sheet steel, 18 times aluminum and 8 
times magnesium for the same weight per square foot. 



CERTIFICATES PRESENTED 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. — Construction 
was temporarily halted recently on the 
L. S. Ayres & Co. warehouse project for 
the presentation of the Journeyman's 
Certificate of Completion to Wayne 
Blackford (left center), a member of 
Local Union 60. Making the presenta- 
tion were Richard DeMars (left), Presi- 
dent of Geupel Construction Co., which 
employs Blackford, and Wendell D. 
Vandivier (right-center). Coordinator for 
the Central and Western Indiana Joint 
Apprenticeship Committee, and William 
P. Jungelaus (right), JAC member. 

Brother Blackford also received the 
Certificate of Completion of the United 
States Bureau of Apprenticeship and 
Training, as well as the Certificate of 
Craft Achievement of the Associated 
General Contractors of America. 




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to these better paying positions? ... If not, 
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30 



THE CARPENTER 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(1) WILLIAMSPORT, PA. — Recently 
members with long service were recog- 
nized at a ceremony held by Local 691. 
Pictured are those who were presented 
with pins for 25 years or more in the 
Brotherhood. From left to right they 
are: Melvan Dewan (25), Sam Bartolett 
(60), Herman Confer (Pres.), George 
Meytrott (50), Charles Barnes (47), John 
Ort (35), George Brass (25), James 
Moore (29), George Moore, Sr. (29), An- 
son Gamble (26), Carlyle Engel (29), 
Arthur Hamm (26), Charles Starr (26), 
Charles Bingaman (25), George Bixler 
(25), Alton Neal (25), and Harold Weav- 
er (26). Absent when the picture was 
taken were Sidney Diehl (31) (since de- 
ceased), Clayton England (29), William 
Goodall (29), William King (32), Guy 
Neal (30), and Frank Hanson (29). 

(2) WILKINSBURG, PA. — At its 
third annual banquet, Local 430 paid 
tribute to members who have com- 
pleted 50 years of service. From left to 
right they are, in the photo below, Bruno 
Hanson and Ivan W. Larimer. Also hon- 
ored were five brothers who received 
their 25-year pins. Pictured with the 
new 50-year members, they are, in the 
second photo: Front row, left to right, 
Peter Penna (25), Bruno Hanson (50), 
President of Local 430 Ralph Mauro, 
D. A. Maxwell (25) and Ivan W. Larimer 





(50). In the rear row are Ralph Ritter 
(25). F. K. Stiver (25), and Joseph 
Gierl (25). 

(3) TACOMA, WASH. — Local 470 
held its third annual 25-year pin presen- 
tation on February 25, 1967. honoring 
members with a smorgasbord and dance. 
Mr. Paul Rudd, area representative, pre- 
sented 58 men with service pins, out of 
the 108 members eligible. It was a gala 
event for the members and their wives, 
along with the officers of the local union 
and district council. 

(4) SEATTLE, WASH. — Three mem- 



bers of Local 1982 were presented 25- 
year service pins at a recent meeting. 
Shown in the picture (from left to 
right) are: D. N. Mclnroy, Robert Allen, 
George Gilbert, and Harry L. Carr, 
Business Representative of the District 
Council of Carpenters, who made the 
presentation. 

(5) SANDUSKY, OHIO — At a recent 
dinner meeting of Local 940. Maurice 
VanBarg was presented a pin for his 
50 years of meritorious service. Paul H. 
Loper, President of the Lake Erie Dis- 
trict Council of Carpenters, presented 
the pin to a very surprised brother. 



31 



(6) PAWTUCKET and CENTRAL 
FALLS, R.L — At a recent banquet 
and testimonial, Local 342 gathered to 
honor Henry E. Detreault, treasurer of 
the Local for 28 consecutive years, who 
was also decorated with a 50-year mem- 
bership pin. Shown in the photo (from 
left to right) are: Patricia M. Landry, 
President of the Committee presenting 
an Accutron watch to Henry E. Detreault 
while Philip Hebert, President of the 
Local, is pinning on his lapel a 50-year 
membership pin. He joined the club of 
50-year members, which includes Phil 
Sousegnant (60), Charles Lambert (64), 
David Gregoire (55), Philip Grise (58), 
Arthur Goyette (53), and Herbert Jull- 
son (54). Other "old timers" with 40 or 
more years that were present at the 
testimonial included: Wilfred Gendron 
(46), Romeo Bonin (48), John Dumont 
(47), Clovis Lemieux (44), Emile Racine 
(44). Joseph Jolicoeur (44), Rudolph 
Vacher (41), William Crepeau (45) and 
Felix Goulet (43). 

(7) LIIVtA, OHIO — Local 372 en- 
joyed the presentation of 25-year pins 
at a crowded meeting, and a line buffet 
lunch was served. The pins were awarded 
to the following members, from left to 
right: Cliff Corson, Lester Taylor, Don 
Murphy, Paul Kistner, Chris King, Edgar 
Altstetter. Included in the picture on the 
extreme right is Local President Ed- 
ward Rettig. 

(8) OAKLAND, CALIF.— At a recent 
dinner given by Local 1473, brothers 
who have been continuous members for 
25 years or more were honored and pre- 
sented with pins. Members receiving 45- 
year pins were: Porter Fawcett, Ralph G. 
Norman and C. E. Chasmire (47). Mem- 
bers receiving 30-year pins were: Clyde 
Barker, Angus Craig, A. A. Schneider, 
W. B. Widerstrand and H. K. Dughman. 
Also eligible but not present was Fred 
O'Toole. Members receiving 25-year pins 
include: R. G. Baker, Chris H. Bossen, 
Toge Clausen, Arthur Fain, Walter 
Fuller, Willard Haldeman, Manuel In- 
gracia, Oscar Kennedy, Jack Kirkman, 
Timan Lund, William F. Marshall, John 
Miller, Hodge Mosely, Carl Nelson, John 
Nilson, Paul Nuss, Joe Paul, Vincent 
Peck, Walter Roberts, Sam Rubino, Wil- 
liam A. Sprague, Leslie Thomas, Howard 
Trippy, Ira Williams, William O'Connor, 
A, L. Andresen, John D. Duncan, John 
Grismore, Harold Hunter, Emory John- 
son, Robert Lafferty, C. H. McCulley, 
Carl Meydam, P. H. Petersen, John Paul, 
Gunther Reineche, Harry Strand, Hiram 
Waters, Royal Benge, Charles Duncan, 
C. E. Empie, John Fisher, John Haak, 
Emil Habich, R. H. Hutchinson, Roy 
Hutt, James MacLeod, Donald Marshall, 
Elmer Olson, John Walline, E. E. 
Weaver, Bengt Benson, Ralph Blair, 
Kenneth Irvine, R. F. Meissner, Henry 
Pedersen, Walter Smith, L. W. Wheeler, 
Walter Wells, Fred Bell, M. R. Ben- 
ninger, James Bishop, Louis Peterson 
and C. A. Mcintosh. Members and offi- 
cers included in the picture, left to right, 




are Harry Strand, Trustee; C. A. Mcin- 
tosh, Trustee; H. K. Dughman, R. H. 
Hutchinson, John Fisher, Boll Halde- 
man, Mike Benninger, Warden; Royal 
Benge, former Dispatcher and William 
F. Marshall, Business Representative. 

(9) DETROIT, MICH.— At the recent 
25th Anniversary Party of Local 1433, 
the following brothers received their 25- 
year pins. They are: Solomon Alden, 
Edward J. Anderson, William S. Beattie, 
Reynold Blomquist, Arthur Bluhm, Gust 
Goettcher, Omor Bullock, Jack L, Burch, 
George Cathey, John B. Cornutt, Floyd 



Coulter, John R. Forsythe, Fred Gen- 
nara, James Hamilton, Edward Hawley, 
James Hurd, Lester Huyck, Elmer John- 
son, William H. Jones, Joseph Kanikow- 
ski, John Kardos, Mike Kartje, Albert 
Knopp, William Lake, Norman C. Leh- 
man, William G. McDonald, Thomas 
McNeil, Chester Mead, Santo Molinaro, 
Philip Morin, Theodore Nilson, Carlton 
Oldford, John Oldford, Robert Olhsson, 
Ellies C. Papp, Richard Parks, Florian 
Particka, Edward Priestaf, Lawrence 
Racette, John Rimer, John Rogers, Fred 
Roux, William J. Roy, William A. Small, 
Donald Speck, Hartley J. Speck, Theo- 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



dore Schmaltz, Harold A. Sivertson, Roy 
F. Swisher, Oscar T. Tressler, Charles 
M. Waite, Everett E. Wilson, Frank 
Wood, and Elmer Yunnlla. Also in- 
cluded in the picture, in the front row, 
are Thomas Saunders, President; Robert 
Laing, International Representative; Mar- 
vin Grisham, Business Representative; 
and Jack Wood, member Local 674 and 
Secretary of the Detroit Building Trades 
Council. 



(10) COLUMBUS, G A.— Members of 
Local 1723 who have completed 25 years 
of service were honored at a recent meet- 
ing. Shown receiving their pins from 
James G. Brown, Representative of 
Georgia State Council of Carpenters, are 
(from left to right): A. J. Hinton, James 
H. Renfroe, Roscoe E. Tarvin, B. M. 
Huey, and W. K. Powers. Other mem- 
bers eligible but who are not shown in- 
clude: T. B. Burkes, T. R. Byard, Roy 
Campbell, W. R. Conaway A. E. Curry, 
O. R. Griffin, G. L. Hood, A. D. Home, 
J. O. Hutchinson, W. J. Lightsey, Henry 
A. McLeod, W. E. Marchbanks, J. H. 
Milner, M. D. Poole, Jr., H. D. Redding, 
Sr., W. L. Slayton, H. K. Strickland, 
R. L. Waldrop, Edward Wilkes. 

(11) JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA— Lo- 
cal 627 recently honored its 25-year mem- 
bers at a banquet where Henry W. Chand- 
ler, Executive Board Member of the 
Fourth District and J. L. Rhodes, Director 
of Organization, were present to distribute 
the pins. Members who were present to 
receive their pins included Edward Bar- 
rett, C. C. Coley, Walter Sapp, Daniel 
Leiterman, J. D. Hagin, T. T. Drum- 
heller, J. F. Mathis, J. H. Harry, W. H. 
Biven, Edmund E. Scydick, James H. 
Hinton, L. D. Thompson, E. W. Ander- 
son, Albert Carver, S. S. Owens, W. O. 
Ingram, H. H. Peacock, James E. Brooks, 
H. E. Adams, Homes DeLaney, John H. 
Sea, S. P. Waldo, T. H. Norton, Emmett 
C. Spicer, H. Davis, Ysidoro Mallo, B. B. 
Sauls, Theo Morris, R. Phillips, Leroy 
Roberts, W. L. Durrance, J. H. Robin- 
son, L. W. Goodin, E. D. Bowen, A. V. 
Helbert, James D. Foster, C. M. Hardin, 
Leroy I. Brown, F. W. Emanuel, F. T. 
Lowe, J. MacBrown, Maurice Hull, A. F. 
Lightbody, Jimmie Altman and W. E. 
Flanagan. Those entitled to pins but 





not present were Julian E. Wilson, B. F. 
Scott, Sr., G. M. Thacker, J. L. Yeo- 
mans, John L. Mason, Frank A. Sim- 
mons, R. O. Bellwood, B. A. Crum, 
John P. Lucas, D. J. Parker, Howard S. 
Rogers, H. N. Ray, H. B. Rodgers, John 
S. Shedd, Royce GrifHn, Irving Goolsby, 
J. E. Holloway, John J. Scholl, G. F. 
Clifford and Claude J. Tillman. 

(12) HAZLETON, PA. — Members of 
Local 129 who have been affiliated with 
the union for 25 years or more are 
shown with officers of the Local at a 
recent get-together noting the 60th anni- 
versary of the Brotherhood. Left to 
right, front row: Gerard Marino, Al 
Ganss, Paul Jacko, John Sambroski and 
John Buyarski. Second row: Thomas 
Buglio, vice president; George Mehalick, 
Peter Cuozzo, John Marcinkevich, Walt- 
er Bahrt and Paul Ziegler. Back row: 
Stephen M. Sabol, treasurer; Arthur A. 
Balliet, recording secretary; Eugene Coa- 
sidine, business agent for Areas 1-3; 
George Sabo, conductor; Paul Sell, 
Howard Schell and Michael Mikula, 
trustees; and George Dusheck, financial 
secretary. In the photo below (12A), Paul 
Jacko (left), a member for 50 years, was 
honored when he received a pin from 
Eugene Considine, business agent. 

(13) WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN— Local 
344 recently honored its members who 
had 25 years or more of continuous 
membership. Each honored member re- 
ceived a gold pin. In a special ceremony. 
Brother N. C. Spillman also received a 




12 A 



plaque designating his 63 years of 
membership. After the presentations all 
the members enjoyed refreshments. 

The brothers, with membership years, 
are: first row, left to right, Conrad Stark 
(30), Elmer Abel (30), L. V. Coles (35), 
Mason Christianson (36), N. C. Spillman 
(63), William Biegemann (39), Edward 
Kuehl (32), John D. Schmidt (32), and 
Vincent Rapp (31). Second row, left to 
right, are: Harold Kelsey (26), Norbert 
Kirby (26), Louis Masek (28), Oscar 
Priefer (29), John Zimmerman (30), 
Joseph Prebelski (29), William Sussex 
(29), Adam Schultz (29), Henry F. 
Schneider (30), Edward Lederer (28), 
Harry Meidenbauer (26), and Harry 
Peterson (25). The following brothers 
were also honored, though they were 
not present: Henry Schneider (30), Peter 
Poos (29), Myron Boyd (30), Edward 



JUNE, 1967 



33 



Smith (31). Charles Howard (29), Le- 
Roy Kussrow (26), Herbert Nettesheim 
(26), and Clarence Schuize (26). 

(14) TAYLORVILLE, ILLINOIS— Local 

748 entertained members and their fam- 
ilies recently at a smorgasbord in the 
American Legion home. Especially hon- 
ored were four brothers who have com- 
pleted 25 years of membership. Local 748 
President Frank Hodges (left) presented 
service pins to Merle Ward, William 
Widmar, Ray Runyon, and Al Dullenty 
(right). Members scheduled to receive 
pins the same evening, but unable to 
attend the dinner, were Earl Hudson, 
Glen Cole, and Berney Shaw. 

(15) PORTAGE, WISCONSIN— Recently 
Local 1344 held a dinner banquet cele- 
brating its 57th year. Highlight of the 
evening was the presentation of a 25- 
year pin to Brother Fred Kittmann, 
center. Presenting him with his pin were 
Brothers Jerome Winkler, business repre- 
sentative (left) and Vernon Sines, presi- 
dent (right). 

(16) ROSEBURG, ORE. — Local 1961 
recently presented 25-year pins to seven 
members, with one eligible member be- 
ing absent from the ceremony. The 
eight members make a total of 200 years 
of union membership. Quite a large 
crowd attended the meeting, as it was 
open for Local 1961 members, their 
wives, and delegates of the Douglas 
County Labor Council. Pins were pre- 
sented by General Officer Brother Lyie 
Hiller, Seventh District board member. 
Brother Robert J. Caley, a member of 
Local 1961 and present executive secre- 
tary of the Oregon State Council of 
Carpenters, acted as master of cere- 
monies. At the conclusion of the presen- 
tations, members and guests enjoyed a 
social. Arrangements for the occasion 
were made by Financial Secretary and 
Business Representative Charles A. Mc- 
Cord. In the photo, shown standing be- 
hind their wives, are pin recipients John 
Quibell, Walter Nicholls, Clark Smith, 
Ed Lewis, Sturgeon Hawkins, Local 
President Murl Young, and W. O. Hall. 
The absent eighth member was R. G. 
Phillips, Sr. 

(17) SCRANTON, PENNA.— Local 261 
held a dinner dance recently at the 
Jermyn Motor Inn to honor its pen- 
sioned members, and to pay special 
tribute to 50-year members. Seven broth- 
ers received their 50-year pins at the 
dinner. Three of them are seated in the 
front row: Harry Hinkley, Fred Schirg, 
and George Schroeder. Standing directly 
behind them are 50-year-pin recipients 
Louis Mastro, Earl H. Walter, and John 
Sullivan (shown being "re-pinned" by his 
son-in-law Federal Judge William L. 
Nealon of the Pennsylvania Middle Dis- 
trict). To the right of Judge Nealon, who 
was the principal speaker at the banquet, 
is James Vaughn, president of Local 




34 



THE CARPENTER 





261. The two brothers standing at the 
left are International Representative 
Charles Slinker, who presented the pins, 
and Local 261 Business Representative 
Joseph Bartell. Brother Joseph Preitz, 
who attended the banquet and received 
his 50-year pin, was not available for 
the picture. Brother Charles Zeller, who 
was entitled to his 50-year pin, was un- 
able to attend the banquet. Thirty-six 
pensioned members of Local 261 at- 
tended the gala occasion. 

(18) TRENTON, N. J.— Three members 
of Local 31 received certificates of 60- 
years membership in the Bortherhood at a 
recent meeting presided over by Presi- 
dent Richard Moore. 

The three 60-year members will be 
honored guests at our 85th Anniversary 
Party, which will be held at Cedar 
Garden Inn in Trenton on May 12. Left 
to right: Harold Lee (initiated 2/20/07), 



Richard Moore (President, Local 31), 
Michael Longevin (initiated 7/25/06), 
and Richard Smith (initiated 10/1/06). 

(19) VIRGINIA, MINNESOTA— Presen- 
tation of 25-year pins was made recently 
to the following members of Local 606. 
From left to right, Prof. John Boyer, 
making the presentations; Lino Bardelli, 
John Crowley, Einar Johnson, Toivo 
Enberg, Harry Johnson, John Shutte, 
and Sulho Norri; and Leonard Suell, 
business agent. 

WHEATON, ILLINOIS — Local 1527, 
which is observing its 65th anniversary 
this year, recently paid tribute to mem- 
bers who have completed 25 years of 
service by honoring them at a dinner 
dance. They are: Gerald A. Arens, 
Olav Hammer, Fred Lenertz, Joseph 
Lenertz, John V. Mann, Wesley Peter- 
son, and John Wilson. 



J^UDEL 

CARPENTERS 

& BUILDERS GUIDES 




« ^ PER 
>S MONTH 



4 VOLS. 

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INSIDE TRADE INFORMATION — 

for Carpenters, Builders. Joiners. Building Mechanics and 
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a practical daily help and Quick Reference for the master 
worker. Mail COUPON TODAY to get these helpful guides 
used by thousands of carpenters. Shows you — 
HOWTO USE: Milre Box. Clialk Line Rules S, Scale! 
Steel Square & Seltings 12. 13 S 17. HOW TO BUILD; .«v 
Furniture. Cabinetwork, Houses, Barns. Garages Skylights \V 
Stairs. Hoists. Scatlolds, HOW TO: Kile 8 Set Saws Do 1*^ 
Carperters Antiimeltc. Solve fvlensuration Problems Esti- 
male Slrenfith o( Timbers, Set Girders & Sills, Frame Houses 

6 Roots. Estimate Costs. Read & Draw Plans. Draw Up 
Speciiicalions. Excavate, Lalh, Lay Floors, Hang Doors Put 
On Interior Trim, Insulate, Paint. 

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MAIL COUPON TODAY 

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Indianapolis 6, Ind. 

fvtail Audel Carpenters & Builders Guides. 4 
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JUNE, 1967 



35 



'j^7 



NEW ? 



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TOOL CHEST FOR TRUCKS 




A unique, new, all-weather tool chest 
for pick-up trucks has been developed 
by Weather Guard Chest, subsidiary of 
Ryan Heating Co., in St. Louis. Rug- 
gedly constructed of 20 gauge iron, pro- 
tected with rust inhibitive paint, the 
Weather Guard Chest includes two large 
removable sliding trays and a large 
storage area. Two sturdy, hinged doors, 
equipped with locking hasps, allow quick 
and easy access from either side. 

The chest is installed by merely slip- 
ping it into place behind the cab where 
it rests on the side panels, leaving use- 
able space between the chest and truck 
bed. 

The Weather Guard Chest comes in 
two sizes, MVi" and 68". 

For further information and prices 
write Weather Guard Chest, 4000 Chip- 
pewa, St. Louis, Missouri 63116. 



NEW CORNER IRONS 




New Corner Irons by L. Newman 
Company are ideal for protecting loads 
such as lumber and building materials 
where ropes, bands or binders are used. 
Made of #12 gauge hardened steel, the 
Corner Iron's special ribbed construc- 
tion gives rugged strength and rigidity to 



corners. This same ribbed design holds 
retaining lines secure and prevents them 
from cutting into a load. 

Corner Irons are rust-proof zinc 
chromate plated and come in three 
sizes; 3"x3"x6", 3"x5"x6" and 
8"x8"x8". For further information 
write L. Newman, 1001 — 24th Street, 
Oakland, California 94607. 



TECHNICAL PAMPHLETS 

The Masonite Corporation now has 
available a pamphlet (Technical Bulletin 
P-112) giving detailed written directions- 
for installing Masonite Concrete Form 
Board for forming walls, columns, decks 
and beams. 

Also, available are application instruc- 
tions for Masonite Williamsburg-X-nine- 
ty Lap Siding (Technical Bulletin P-114). 
These instructions include general con- 
struction, application and finishing pro- 
cedures. 

For copies of these publications, write 
Masonite, Box B, Chicago, 111. 60690. 



FOAM WORK-VEST 

GenTex Corporation has announced 
the addition of the "Comfort King" 
foam work-vest to its line of products 
designed for people who work on and 




near the water. The new vest is covered 
with high-visibility safety-orange vinyl 
and is contour-molded from PVC uni- 
cellular foam to provide wearer mobility 
and to support the wearer's head gently, 
yet firmly above water. 

It is designed with more buoyancy in 
the right side, giving a high degree of 
automatic turning action in the water, 
which quickly positions a fully clothed 
worker in a face-up position, even if he 
is stunned or unconscious. For further 
information, contact GenTex Corp., Car- 
bondale. Pa., or a leading industrial 
safety distributor. 

ATTIC INSULATION 

A new, do-it-yourself, loose type in- 
sulation, designed for installation over 
present attic insulation or in new ceil- 
ings between joists has been introduced. 
This new insulation, Conwed Attic In- 




sulation, is made of treated cellulose 
fibers. 

The cubes are merely spotted around 
the attic, then spread and fluffed with a 
stick. Most attics can be re-insulated in 
about two hours. Literature and addi- 
tional information are available by writ- 
ing Wood Conversion Company, 332 
Minnesota Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 
55101. 



CAMPGROUND GUIDE 

Union families who cut vacation costs 
by camping out, will appreciate a new 
Interior Department directory listing the 
location of 571 campgrounds in 78 areas 
of the National Park Service. Single 
copies of the directory may be obtained 
by writing: Public Inquiries Section, Na- 
tional Park Service, Washington, D. C. 
20240. 



GOLD HAMMER 
TIE TAG 




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with clutch back. 

$1.00— Postage Prepaid 

"MINIATURES" 

2075 Friendly Street 
Eugene, Oregon 97405 

(Quantity prices furnished to Locals 
on request.) 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 7, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Anderson, William 
Aronson, Andy 
Asp, Arthur 
Beito, C. E. 
Bolin, Oscar 
Bolstad, William 
Chovan, Mike 
Dembouski, William 
Eriksson, Erik 
Fredin, Eric 
Fremman, Roger 
Hagman, Andrew 
Hall, Anton 
Haugsness, Ingvald 
Holmes, R. G. 
Jaeger, George 
Jorgenson, Axel 
Jorgenson, O. Roy 
Jungels, Walter 
Kassberg, John 
Kvalness, Nilmer 
Larson, Halvor 
Lindquist, August 
Lindseth, Manford 
Lish, Bert 
Meyers, Rueben 
Morrison, Elmo 
Nelson, Herbert I. 
Olson, Edward 
Olson, Olaf S. 
Peterson, Harry 
Rasmussen, Edward 
Shurgot, Fred 
Skaar, Alfred 
Stone, Hilding 
Styrlund, Dave 
Styrlund, Emil 
Tollefson, Tollef 
Wahl, Herman 
Walstrom, Wesley 
Whitelaw, William 

L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

Paddock, George 

L.U. NO. 16, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Lyons, Robert J. 
Snow, Robert, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 19, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Abel, George 
Anderson, Olof 
Armstrong, Charles W. 
Biggerstaff, Duncan 
Botolfson, Bernt 
Gap, Frank 
Gauthier, Joseph B. 
Gibson, Jack C. 
Gourlay, William 
Grundy, Francis 
Harris, Claude A. 
Hayes, A. S. 
Hobbs, W. R. 
Jacosky, Leonard 
Kennedy, Donald 
Kessel, Bernard 
La Moore, Willard 
Martin, Ephriam J.- 
Mason, Sam 
Morris, Jeffery J. 
Orange, Charles D. 
Orjada, Frank 
Pasquallotto, Aquino 



Tremmel, Frank 
Wallace, Roy 

L.U. NO. 30, 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Montanari, Hugo J. 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Anderson, Albert C. 
Petty, Guy 
Ryno, Walter 
Stanton, WiUiam E. 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Hamilton, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 60, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Osborn, Maynard 
Wilson, Reid W. 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL, 

Carlson, Axel D. 
Tobin, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Gardner, Howard E. 
Guyer, Harry M. 
Hartlove, Henry 
Jung, William C. 
Kusyk, Joseph T. 
Stielper, John L. 

L.U. NO. 109, 
SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Thornton, Thomas H. 

L.U. NO. 131, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Bush, William J. 
Cartwright, J. B. 
Hase, H. J, 
Lovett, James M, 
Pederson, Sidney J. 
Shaffer, John 
Solie, Melvin A. 
Solsness, Louis 

L.U. NO. 137, 
NORWICH, CONN. 

Koivisto, Salmo 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bush, Emil A, 
Ehrlich, George 
Oenes, Rasmus 
Reeger, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 183, 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Busker, William J. 
Smith, S. E. 
Swanson, Emil 

L.U. NO. 188, 
YONKERS, N.Y. 

De Filippo, Fausto 
Kampa, Louis 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Hobgood, Joe W. 



Midkitf, T. D. 
Stekley, Joe, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Gill, Oma 
Plank, Earl 

L.U. NO. 218, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Hudson, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Grohskopf, Harry 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Ehrlich, George 
Yanlowsky, Sam 

L.U. NO. 266, 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 

Breshears, Orval 
Cash, Jim L. 
Robbins, S. W. 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, 
ILL. 

Devine, Albert 
Harrell, Lester 
Rust, Henry H. 
Siddens, J. V. 
Umland, Henry 

L.U. NO. 277, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Andy, Leon 
Blank, Joel 
Cramer, Raymond 
Dillin, F. 
Drews, John 
Finnigan, Joseph 
Hagelin, Fred 
Heileman, William E. 
Hill, C. 
Hill, Isaac N. 
Hinks, John 
Lengemann, Herman 
Rasmussen, Oscar 
Rieben, Edward 
Sands, Joseph 
Shelly, Walter 
Shilling, Henry 
Thorn, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 283, 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Crawford, W. E. 
Jarrett, W. W. 

L.U. NO. 350, 

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. 

Molteni, Jacob 

L.U. NO. 357, 
ISLIP, N.Y. 

Wills, John 

L.U. NO. 361, 
DULUTH, MINN. 

Anderson, C. O. 

Marken, A. N. 
Marttila, Erick 



Sjogren, Fred C. 
Toor, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Schinella, Attilio 

L.U. NO. 374, 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Klose, Otto 

L.U. NO. 406, 
BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Wagner, Lloyd 

L.U. NO. 422. 

NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

Burhenn, George H. 

L.U. NO. 460, 
WAUSAU, Wise. 

Grell, Arnold 
Hintz, Paul 
Schneck, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 469, 
CHEYENNE, WYO. 

Milne, Ray W. 

L.U. NO. 470, 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Abelson, Alfred 
Beeler, Allen 
Berggren, Ered 
Johnson, Harold 
Munsey, Claude V. 
Nordmark, Henry 
Scearce, Edward 
Stenerson, Henry 

L.U. NO. 488, 
BRONX, N.Y. 

Bakke, Johan 
Bernstein, Abraham 
Disabato, Vincent 
Glazer, Theodore 
Johnson, Fred E. 
Kangas, John 
Levine, Israel 
Repaskey, Gustav 
Saarela, John 
Shapiro, Abraham 

L.U. NO. 490, 
PASSAIC, N.J. 

Tobiason, Herman 

L.U. 514, 
WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

Ayres, Frank 
Nagorski, Frank 

L.U. NO. 583, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Opdenweyer, William 
Shumaker, Albert 
Smith, Wilford L. 
Spies, Walter 

L.U. NO. 599, 
HAMMOND, IND. 

Bradley, Charles 
Carnovitz. Mike 
Cole, Evan 
Crouch, Harvey 
Grassel, William 



Hickle, Glenn 
Kelley, Frank 
Kroer, Edward 
Schweiger, William 

L.U. NO. 665, 
AMARILLO, TEX. 

Andrews, Rupert W. 
Baker, W. T. 
Dial, W. B. 
McRae, T. E. 
Moree, S. L. 
Paetzold, J. M. 
Urton, John H. 

L.U. NO. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

Kollenig, Harold 

L.U. NO. 822, 
FINDLAY, OHIO 

Long, Kenneth 

L.U. NO. 839, 

DES PLAINES, ILL, 

Janus, Walter 

L.U. NO. 929, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Alder, Henry S. 
Dahl, Irvin L. 
Freeman, Harold 
Hunt, Earl 
McGlover, Andrew 
Mensch, Floyd L. 
Mitchell Frank W. 
Porche, Dewey 
Secky, Charles 
Williams, R. A. 

L.U. NO. 1022, 
PARSONS, KANS. 

Schneickert, M. O. 

L.U. NO. 1089, 
PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

Reed, John O. 

L.U. NO. 1162, 
COLLEGE POINT, N.Y. 

Taitt, Egbert 

L.U. NO 1175, 
KINGSTON, N.Y. 

Ertelt, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1185, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Harmon, John C. 

L.U. NO. 1289, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Berg, Royal S. 
Cianci, Anthony T. 
Davison, Edward E. 
Howenstine. Ernest R. 
Johns, Luther A. 
Lamoreaux, Frank 
Larsen, Carl Victor 
Shaffer, Alma M. 

L.U. NO. 1308, 
LAKE WORTH, FLA. 

Bamford, Kenneth 
Maki, Sam 
Padget, Otis 



JUNE, 1967 



37 




IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from Page 37 

L.U. NO. 1319, 
ALBUQUERQUE, 
N. MEX. 

Swanson, Charles O. 

L.U. NO. 1323, 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Daniels, L. J. 
Goodale, F. C. 
Westcott, George H. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Macewicz, Michael 



L.U. NO. 1394, 

FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 

Eggers, Andreas 
Hamel, Albert 
Watier, Earl J. 
Weinstein, Max 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N.Y. 
Gimmestad, Soren 
Kern, Arthur, Sr. 
Wickey, Walter A. 

L.U. NO. 1400, 
SANTA MONICA, 
CALIF. 

Chalmers, George W. 



Jensen, Thomas C. 
Jines, Jeff 
Kerr, George D. 
Lemay, Fred 
Sherman, Robert D. 

L.U. NO. 1423, 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Farias, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Arvidson, Martin 
Goodman, Edward 
Lakson, Leonard 
Maguire, John 
McGarry, George 
Nelson, Adolph 
Nye, Gust 
Pearson, John 

L.U. NO. 1507, 

EL MONTE, CALIF. 

Culver, Roswell L. 
Frost, Jess 

Massengill, Wilburn C. 
Prince, John H. 
Wishart, W. C. 

L.U. NO. 1511, 
SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. 

Mojeski, Michael 

L.U. NO. 1513, 
DETROIT, MICH, 

Ditkoff, Joseph 
Levitt, Ben 



L.U. NO. 1518, 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Bond. Manuel P. 

L.U. NO. 1725, 

DAYTONA BEACH, FLA. 

Kendall, George A. 
Vincent, John 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FORT WORTH, TEX. 

Chisholm, O. E. 
Gee, Estelle 

L.U. NO. 1846, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Aleman. Edward- J. 
Cruthirds, John P. 
Landry, Sam 
Richards, J. V. 
Ward, James H. 

L.U. NO. 2046, 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Allison, Billy 
Bacon, Aldo 
Beldin, Sidney 
Gary, Robert 
Chignell, Conway 
Coleman, Claud 
Condeff, Harry 
Dary, Eugena 
DiMaggio, Neno 
Edwards, George 
Estas, Francis 
Graham, Leonard 



Hayward, Donald 
Howells, Ryle 
Leoni, Ray 
Lippy, Ed 
Lucido, Neno 
Mooney, Archie 
Reddington, Charles 
Richardson, Ken 
Ristow, Edward 
Roark, James 
Rorstrand, Albert 
Selba, Louis 
Stanley, Alan 
Turner, Henry 

L.U. NO. 2073, 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Prowatske, Gerhard 

L.U. NO. 2163, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Broderick, Patrick 
Delaney, James P. 
Korotie, Louis 
Stevenson, Joseph 
Stokkeland, Olav 

L.U. NO. 2288, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Jones, Donald S. 

L.U. NO. 2391, 
HOLLAND, MICH. 

Costing, Klass 

L.U. NO. 2415, 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

dander, N. F. 



Contractors, Carpenters, Custom Filers . . . Save Time, Save Money with FAMOUS 

I^OLEY Sharpening Equipment 




Foley automatic sharpening equipment has the skill to do a 
perfect job every time — NO "human error". And no experience 
is necessary to accomplish a professional job. All Foley equip- 
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314 GRINDER— Sharpens all types of 
circular saws — rip, crosscut or com- 
bination toothed — from 5" to 44" in 
diameter. Attachments available for a 
variety of other sharpening jobs. 



RETOOTHER AND POWER SETTER— 

Retoother cuts a full set of teeth, either 
np or crosscut, in less than a minute. 
Operated either by motor or by hand 
crank. Power setter automatically sets 
band saws up to IVa" in width, as well 
as all carpenter's hand saws, either 
np or crosscut. 



FOLEY CARBIDE SAW GRINDER-New 

precision machine grinds face, top, 
sides of carbide blades. Sharpens old 
teeth and replacement tips. Reduces 
saw downtime, high sharpening cost. 




FOLEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

618-7 Foley BIdg, 9 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55418 
Please send me FREE booklets ctiecked below: 

□ "Money Making Facts" C Automatic Saw Filer G Automatic 314 Grinder 
D Carbide Saw Grinder D Automatic Retoother D Automatic Power Setter 



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LITERATURE TODAY! I ^ity state. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



—LAKELAND XEWS — 

George R. White of Local 1207 Charleston, West Virginia, arrived at the Home 
April 21, 1967. 

Tony J. J. Widd of Local Union 1367 Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home April 25, 
1967. 

Michael McCarthy of Local Union 331 Norfolk, Virginia, passed away April 7, 
1967 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Robert W. Hamlett of Local Union 1529 Kansas City, Kansas, passed away April 
7, 1967 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Jack J. Vandenberg of Local Union 824, Muskegon, Mich., passed away April 23, 
1967 and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Paul Wendt of Local Union 169 East St. Louis, 111., passed away April 27, 1967 
and was buried at Caseyville, lU. 

Members who visited the Home during April 1967 



Clinton E. Culber, L.U. 574, Middletown, 

N. Y. 
B. T. Kennedy, L.U. 132, Washington, 

D.C., now living in Miami, Fla. 
R. S. Brown, L.U. 321, Connellsville. Pa. 
B. A. Whited, L.U. 297, Three Rivers. 

Mich. 
Henry L. McCutcheon, L.U. 1729, 

Waynesboro, Va. 
KimbaU R. Nelson, L.U. 62, Chicago, 

111. 
Chris Danielson, L.U. 1456, New York, 

N. Y. 
Paul T. Smith, L.U. 848, San Bruno, 

Calif. 
F. Freund, L.U. 612, Edgewater, N. J. 
Bruce E. Brommeland, L.U. 104, Dayton, 

Ohio 
Russell E. Richer, L.U. 972, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
William T. Harrison, L.U. 1274, Athens, 

Ala. 
John Fagerholm, L.U. 115, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
George C. Boise, L.U. 1019, Cortland, 

N. Y. 
Herbert Neubecker, L.U. 1401, Buffalo, 

N.Y. 
J. S. Spieth, L.U. 142. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
William L. Sims, L.U. 1734, Paducah, 

Ky. 
John J. Barin, Sr., L.U. 1856, Ft. Lauder- 
dale, Fla. 
Selley Carnell, L.U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

now living Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
Raymond Swayze, L.U. 23, Branchville, 

N.J. 
Alton Garanson, L.U. 107, Shrewsburg, 

Mass. 
Fritz H. Dehn, L.U. 2031, Staten Island, 

N. Y. 
Arnold L. Gengerke, L.U. 1132, Alpena, 

Mich. 
Harley G. Mattson, L.U. 361, Duluth, 

Minn. 
William C. Ferry, L.U. 1382, Rochester, 

Minn. 



V. Sherman, L.U. 811, New Bethlehem, 

Pa. 
N. C. Sherman, L.U. 811, New Beth- 
lehem, Pa. 
Mr. Rolsted, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111. 
Orville Tupper, L.U. 824, Muskegon, 

Mich. 
Harry J. Schleicher, Sr., L.U. 1285, Al- 

lentown, Pa. 
Edwin F. Grover, Sr., L.U. 1006, Mill- 
town, N. J. 
Paul J. Finchem, L.U. 26, Detroit, Mich. 
Curtis Fisher, L.U. 2213. Meridian, Miss. 
Paul J. Johns, L.U. 819, West Palm 

Beach, Fla. 
Ludvig Hoglund, L.U. 588, Evergreen 

Park, 111. 
WiUiara McFadden, L.U. 53, White 

Plains, N.Y. 
Maurice W. Howes, L.U. 444, Lenox, 

Mass. 
Henry Overeem, L.U. 325, Paterson, N.J. 
Joseph H. Hewitt, L.U. 79, Palm Harbor, 

Fla. 
Louis Hardvall, L.U. 210, Stamford, 

Conn. 
Hugo Swanson, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111. 
Alvin R. Schulke, L.U. 299, Cliffside 

Park, N. J. 
Raymond Johnson, L.U. 15, Largo, Fla. 
William J. Weller, L.U. 12, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 
John Williamson, L.U. 12, Syracuse, 

N. Y., now living Orlando. Fla. 
William B. Penn, L.U. 1453, Santa Ana, 

Calif. 
R. L. Roy, L.U. 96, Springfield, Mass. 
Edward L. Gaynor, L.U. 62, Chicago, III. 
Frank VanDam, L.U. 15, Hackensack, 

N.J. 
John F. O'Connell, San Francisco, Calif. 
Henry Vander Horn, L.U. 15, Rochelle 

Park, N. J. 
Robert O'Dohl, L.U. 626, Wilmington, 

Del. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Armco Steel 27 

Aiidel, Theodore 35 

Belsaw Manufacturing 35 

Chicago Technical College 30 

Craftsman Book Co 24 

Eliason Stair Gauge 24 

Estwing Manufacturing 29 

Foley Manufacturing 38 



Gold Hammer Tie Tac 36 

Hydrolevel 24 

Irwin Auger Bit 24 

Locksmithing Institute 23 

Miller Sevi/er Rod 39 

Milwaukee Electric Tool 20 

Riechers, A 39 

Vaughan & Bushnell 19 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Comraon-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch ri.se to 12 inch run . Pitches iu- 
erea.se ^2 inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is M inch and they increase 
%" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is iS'-SVi" wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the spah and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 &. 1944 Copyrights. 



Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C.O.D. fee extra. 

Canada send .$2.75 Foreign Postal M. O. or 

Bank Money Order payable in U. S. dollars. 

Canada can not take C.O.D. orders. 

California add 4% tax. 10^ each. 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



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JUNE, 1967 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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NAHB Executive Verifies It: 



Labor Portion of Total Sales Price 

For f^ew Homes Has Actually Dropped! 



nn here are a couple of badly shop-worn myths 
about the construction industry that the in- 
dustry has never been able to shake off completely. 
One is that the industry is hide-bound, lacking 
in progressiveness, and dedicated to retaining 
obsolete methods and techniques. The other is 
that the seemingly high hourly rates of building 
trades workers chiefly contribute to the high cost 
of housing. Both of these myths have been ef- 
fectively disproved once more by the testimony of a 
man who ought to know whereof he speaks. 

Leon Weiner, president of the National Associa- 
tion of Home Builders, declared in testimony on 
Capitol Hill that, from 1944 to 1964, the cost of 
labor entering into the price of a new home 
dropped from 29 to 18 percent of the total sale 
price. 

How can this be, when, thanks to their union 
organization, carpenters have managed to keep 
their wages apace of the progress of inflation? 
Because of increases in productivity, off-site fabri- 
cation, etc. Traditional methods of carpentry, of 
measure-cut-fit-nail have been largely modified in 
an effort to keep pace with the nation's needs. We 
have not fought improved technologies. We have, 
however, insisted that carpenters share in the im- 
proved technology and increased productivity. 

While labor costs were dropping, land costs in 
home prices jumped from 13 to 26 percent in 20 
years, Weiner declared. Other costs, such as sales, 
equipment, financing, profit and services rose from 
1 3 to 1 9 percent of the house's cost. 

The home buyer of today gets a lot more in his 
home, too, even though he pays more for it. Air 



conditioning is fairly standard in all but the lowest- 
priced homes being built today. There is more open 
area, more bedrooms, more baths, more storage 
areas, all in response to demands from today's 
informed homemakers. 

It seems inevitable that housing will continue 
to increase in cost, (as will everything else), as 
inflation continues. The principal deciding factor, 
according to housing economists, will be increased 
land costs. In our nation's capital, the average 
price of a building lot rose 61.6 percent in the 
four-year period of 1960-64, or better than 15 
percent per year. 

The housing professionals are predicting a wel- 
come turnabout in public housing preferences in- 
sofar as carpenters are concerned. In the past five 
years, in most parts of the nation, there has been a 
large surge of enthusiasm for apartments. Now 
there is a discernible return to major interest in 
single-family dwellings. The emergence of new 
small towns and "satellite cities," together with 
development of more and better access roads, may 
have contributed to the return to single-family 
dwelling interests with the greater land demand. 
An increase in the amount of mortgage money 
available for single family dwellings, albeit at a 
higher rate, also will contribute to the increase in 
housing starts. 

When the housing industry is in trouble, the 
country is in trouble. From here and now, it 
appears the housing industry is in an excellent posi- 
tion to bounce back from the 1966 doldrums. 
As public demand rises, the organized building 
and construction trades stand ready to meet the 
need. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 







NGEMEOUT. 



If you don't help your school officials 
open recreation areas nights, weekends 
and during the summer, nobody else will. 



For a free button and information to help you.wnte: Fitness. Washington, D. C. 20203 
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL ON PHYSICAL FITNESS 




OHicial Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 
THE 



FOUNDED 1881 



JULY, 1 967 




nm 



mmm 





GENERAL OFFrCERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 2000) 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

FiNLAY C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



LSS RSt ^.;S WB "i!;? I'E an S ■; tl::i rJ,^- r^i; 

Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City, Mo. 64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
American Bank Building 
621 S.W. Morrison St., Room 937 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



K^ ?sis sas 



ma m 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 




(g/A\s^p[iGa^ 



VOLUME LXXXVI No. 7 JULY, 1967 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

A Nation's Highest Award for Bravery 3 

Big Doings in Phoenix 6 

Surveyor III Bears a Union Label 10 

The California Health Plan C. R. Bartalini 15 

DEPARTMENTS 

Editorials 7 

We Congratulate 13 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 12 

Plane Gossip 14 

Washington Roundup 17 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 18 

Honne Study Course, Advanced Blueprint Reading III 23 

Canadian Report 24 

Local Union News 26 

Service to the Brotherhood 29 

Seasoned Members 35 

In Memoriam 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building. 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Vv'ashington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E,, Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20<t in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

The great bird on our July cover, 
which for nearly 200 years has stood 
for the strength and freedom of 
the United States, now needs the help 
of all Americans if it is to survive. 

What the eagle stands for in our 
national life remains vital, but the 
eagle behind the symbol, the real 
eagle is becoming rare. Once bald 
eagles flourished all over the United 
States. Today less than 500 active 
nests are known in the 50 States, 
although a goodly number may still 
be found in Alaska amid unspoiled 
surroundings. What has happened to 
this king of the skies? 

The bald eagle, like all living 
things, needs its own particular con- 
ditions in which to live, grow, and 
have young. It likes high trees for its 
big nest. It must be near water, for 
its food is mostly fish. It needs space, 
for it is fiercely independent. 

Steps have been taken to save the 
bald eagle, but they are not enough. 

We should do more: Set aside, by 
purchase or other means large tracts 
around nests near waterways. En- 
courage persons and organizations 
who own land to keep inviolate trees 
and space for eagles. Learn — all of 
us — about the eagle's plight and 
remember that it is part of a larger 
problem: The task of protecting for 
the wellbeing and enjoyment of all 
Americans always the resources, 
green spaces, and things of the spirit 
with which our country is blessed. 








There is one Congressional Medal 
of Honor, but there are three dis- 
tinct designs, one each for the 
Army, Navy and Air Force, shown 
in that order, from top to bottom, 
above. The medal was first author- 
ized by Congress, Dec. 21, 1861. 



The Viet Cong Attack fell swiftly on Anny Special Forces De- 
tachment A-726 at Nam Dong. In a pre-dawn darkness, a sheet of 
mortar fire, grenades, and exceptionally heavy small arms fire crashed 
through the compound so swiftly that the fight might quickly have 



been over, and the U.S. position 
annihilated. 

Infantry Captain Roger Donlon 
thought otherwise. With the first 
explosion, he issued orders to or- 
ganize the defense and directed re- 
moval of vital ammunition from a 
building already afire. 

Completely disregarding his own 
safety. Captain Donlon then waded 
through a rippling curtain of small 
arms fire and exploding grenades 
to plug a breach at the main gate, 
and wiped out a three-man enemy 
demolition team on the way. Under 
incessant personal grenade attack, 
Donlon then dashed to one of his 
mortar pits, and sustained a severe 
stomach wound live yards away. He 



kept going, and discovered that the 
gun crew had been injured. He 
directed their removal, covered the 
evacuation, and attempted to drag 
the team sergeant back to safety 
himself. Both were caught in the 
blast of a mortar shell, again wound- 
ing Donlon, but he struggled with 
the heavy mortar to a new defensive 
position, administered first aid to 
three wounded men there, and left 
them with the mortar to continue 
fighting. 

Still under heavy personal fire, 
Donlon moved to another aban- 
doned position and recovered a re- 
coilless rifle and ammunition for 
both the rifle and the mortar. While 
dragging the ammunition he received 
a third wound. 



THE CARPENTER 



A Nation'^s Highest 
Arward for Bravery 



Oblivious to the pain, Donlon 
crawled 175 yards to another mortar 
position to direct the firing into a 
weakened defense sector. Then, 
while moving on to another mortar 
position, he noticed that the enemy 
attack was weakening and returned 
to the first mortar pit to put it back 
into action. 

Captain Donlon moved out of 
cover again, to contact all of his 
perimeter defense positions, inspir- 
ing his men to almost superhuman 
effort, while hurling grenades him- 
self. He soon received a fourth 
wound which failed to stop him. 
With the stomach wound, his left 
shoulder ripped by mortar steel, left 
leg torn by a grenade fragment, and 
his face and body mauled by the 
mortar shell. Captain Donlon reor- 
ganized his defenses and adminis- 
tered first aid to the wounded. 

As dawn broke, the attackers 
faded back into the jungle, broken 
by the incredible resolve of a cap- 
tain leading greatly outnumbered 
forces. The Viet Cong left 54 dead 
behind them. 

For his uncommon gallantry in 
combat. Captain Donlon of Sauger- 
ties, N.Y., was awarded the Con- 
gressional Medal of Honor by Pres- 
ident Johnson in December, 1964. 



His citation — the highest honor of 
his nation for heroism — was one of 
15 that have been presented to com- 
batants in Viet Nam, and one of 
the 3,184 that have been awarded 
since the honor was first established 
in 1861. 

Just a few weeks ago, another 
Medal of Honor was awarded. This 
is the story of gallantry behind this 
most recent award: 

The area where the memorable 
event occurred was riddled with 
caves and VC tunnels, and as Ser- 
geant Peter Connor threaded his 
platoon through the enemy-infested 
area, he spotted a small "spider 
hole," a dozen yards away. With 
a swift, practiced movement, Con- 
nor pulled the pin of a grenade and 
coiled to spring forward on the run, 
dropping the grenade in the hole. 
Almost instantaneously, he knew 
something was wrong. Despite the 
fact that he still firmly held the 
fuzing arm down, it was lit, and 
Sgt. Connor was suddenly holding 
the future of his platoon in his hand. 
There wasn't time left to cover the 
ground to the spider hole. The pla- 
toon too scattered and hidden in 
the tangled jungle to hazard a wild 
throw. One of his own men might 
get it. 



For a fighting man like Sgt. Peter 
S. Connor, there was only one, 
simple answer. He tucked the gren- 
ade close to his own body, and 
waited. 

When the shock of the blast had 
subsided, Connors was mortally 
wounded, but miraculously alive, 
and there wasn't a scratch on his 
men. 

Two weeks later, aboard the hos- 
pital ship Repose, Sergeant Connor 
died of the wounds which had pro- 
tected his men. 

To Connor, a professional fight- 
ing marine, no alternatives may have 
occurred, but to the board of awards, 
Connors action was beyond the call 
of duty. Had he not done it, no 
one could have criticized him. The 
. act clearly distinguished his gallan- 
try beyond the call of duty. For it, 
Connor was posthumously pre- 
sented with the Medal of Honor. 

Most people know the medal 
as the "Congressional Medal of 
Honor," because it is presented in 
the name of the Congress of the 
United States, but the formal title 
is simply Medal of Honor. Sergeant 
Connor, because he was a Marine, 
was awarded the Navy Medal of 
Honor, which was the first designed, 
and was the first medal for bravery 



Ten Congressional Medal of Honor holders, wearing the blue ribbons and medals about their necks, marched in the front ranks 
of the "Support Our Boys in Viet Nam" Parade in New York City, last May 13, as shown below. (See story, next page.) 




m I i 



"Mill- 




The sketch above of Marines carry- 
ing the body of a buddy killed by 
a mine and the title sketch on 
Page 2 were drawn by Marine 
Capt. John Groth, a combat artist. 



ever authorized by the United States 
Government. 

Who is entitled to a Medal of 
Honor? 

Each of the armed services has 
set up regulations for judging which 
permit no margin of doubt or error. 
The deed of the winner must be 
proved by incontestable evidence 
of at least two eye witnesses. It 
must be so outstanding that it clearly 
distinguishes his gallantry beyond 
the call of duty from lesser forms 
of bravery. It must involve the risk 
of his life. It must be the type of 
deed which, if he had not done it, 
would not subject him to any justi- 
fied criticism. 

On a few rare occasions Congress 
has awarded special Medals of 
Honor for individual exploits taking 
place in peacetime. 

Soon after the Medal was estab- 
lished by law under President Lin- 
coln, there were abuses and con- 
fusion as to who earned it. Many 
solicited the medal for private pur- 
poses. In a few cases the medal was 
awarded and later rescinded. A 
Congressional Medal of Honor So- 
ciety was chartered to prevent such 
abuses. 

A Medal was pinned on the flag 
draping the coffin of each unknown 
soldier buried at Arlington. 

The United States has built 
through its military awards a so- 
called "Pyramid of Honor." The 
Medal of Honor stands at the top 
of that pyramid — truly, a nation's 
highest award for bravery. 




The New York City District Council of Carpenters was out in the full force 
for the march down Fifth Avenue, May 13. This is one contingent. 

NY Carpenters Respond to Vietniks 



A giant '"Support Our Boys in 
Vietnam" Parade was held in New 
York City, May 13, with 5,000 
union Carpenters of the New York 
District Council, joining more than 
70,000 other marchers in a demon- 
stration of war support. 

Planned as a rebuttal to the so- 
called "peace marchers" of a few 
days before, this parade brought to- 
gether large contingents from labor, 
civic, and patriotic organizations of 
the nation's largest city. Marchers 
moved down Fifth Avenue for more 
than seven hours, with 10 Congres- 
sional Medal of Honor holders in 
the vanguard of the many units. 

The parade was initiated by a 
Union Fire Fighter, Raymond W. 
Gimmler, Fire Fighters Local 854, 
and it had strong support from or- 
ganized labor. 

Earlier, the New York District 
Council of Carpenters, in an effort 
to show its gratitude to the heroes of 
the nation, asked the Congressional 



Medal of Honor Society in what 
way it could show its appreciation 
for the service of Medal of Honor 
winners to the cause of freedom. 
When the Society suggested that a 
roster of its membership might be 
prepared for distribution, the Dis- 
trict Council prepared a small book- 
let listing all Congressional Medal 
of Honor holders and their ad- 
dresses and included in the booklet 
many little-known facts about the 
famous medal and its winners. 

(Facts from the booklet are con- 
tained in the preceding article.) 

The booklet was sent to many 
high officials, including President 
Lyndon Johnson. In a letter of 
thanks to Congressional Medal of 
Honor Society President Thomas J. 
Kelly, President Johnson said "I will 
treasure it as this nation treasures 
every name within it. In this little 
book we find large encouragement 
to persevere in defense of freedom 
and win the struggle for peace in 
Vietnam." 



Parade leaders and distinguished guests watch the "Support Our Boys in Viet 
Nam" Parade from the reviewing stand in Central Park. From left, they 
include: Charles Johnson Jr., Member of the Brotherhood's General Executive 
Board; Parade Chairman Raymond W. Gimmler of Fire Fighters Local 854; 
Lt. Governor Malcolm Wilson; Speaker of the New York State Assembly 
Anthony Travia, and Minority Leader of the State Senate Joseph Zaratsky. 



r- 
•* 








^ 


i 


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4 




THE CARPENTER 




EDITORIALS 



^' High Cost ot Crime 



When the costs of government are being considered, 
much attention is often directed to the cost of the 
war in Viet Nam, the cost of the space program, the 
cost of foreign aid. But a "hidden cost" today which 
must be borne by every taxpayer is the staggering cost 
of crime. 

On any given day, 400,000 people are in our jails 
and prisons. It costs a billion dollars a year to care 
for and attempt to rehabilitate them. Reported prop- 
erty losses due to crime total $3 billion a year, and 
many are not reported. That figure does not include 
the 10,000 murders or 206,000 aggravated assaults 
annually, with their attendant costs in lost wages and 
medical bills. 

Crime is increasing so fast that the President's Crime 
Commission states that 40 percent of all male children 
in the U.S. today will be arrested some time in their 
lives for a non-traffic ofl'ense! In fact, the Commis- 
sion declares that more crimes are committed today 
by 15-year-olds than any other single age-group and 
that half of the arrests for burglary are of youths 18 
years of age or younger. 

The Commission wants to reduce some of these 
statistics and has called for a five-year action program. 
The plan would cost $350 million in the first two years. 
But if it results in a reduction of these staggering 
statistics, blighted lives and wasted opportunities of 
youth, it would be well worth ten times that. 

^ Imaffe oi 'TIte Dumb Cop' 

The President, in his State of the Union message, 
introduced new programs designed to reduce crime. 
In conjunction with the President's proposals, there 
exists a bill (H.R. 6628) introduced at this session by 
Rep. William R. Anderson (D.-Tenn.) which would 
provide for loans and fellowships to students pursuing 
programs of college level education in police and cor- 
rectional science. 

Today the brisk trend of our society is toward 
higher levels of education. This bill, entitled "Law 
Enforcement Education Act of 1967," is designed 
to prevent the law enforcement professions from 
falling behind in our ever-changing society. The 
policeman of today finds himself confronted with a 



wider range of social problems and increasingly more 
sophisticated equipment than his predecessor. He 
must enforce an ever-more complex system of laws. 
Yet only about 6 percent of the nation's policemen 
had a college degree of any type. 

The image of the 'dumb cop,' whether or not it 
has been justified in the past, must not prevail in 
the future if we are to have that civic trust and respect 
for the law which underlies civil order. 

H.R. 6628 is the result of several months work by 
Rep. Anderson and his staff, assisted by a number of 
leaders in the field of law enforcement. Two similar, 
but less comprehensive, bills have been introduced 
in the Senate (S. 1502 by Sen. Abraham A. Ribicoff, 
D.-Conn.; and S. 1505 by Sen. Hiram L. Fong, R.- 
Hawaii). 

We feel that the need for a program of federal 
assistance to law enforcement education is obvious 
and urge our readers to support this much-needed 
legislation and work for its early passage. 

^ a Mylla Dispelled 

The myth of the "welfare loafers" has been bril- 
liantly exploded by White House Assistant Joseph A. 
Califano, Jr., in a recent speech demonstrating the 
application of systematic analysis and identification 
to major social problems. 

Of the 7.3 million persons receiving federal welfare 
benefits, Califano said, only 50,000, or one out of 
every 145, is able to work or capable of receiving train- 
ing for gainful employment. The rest are either over 
65, children, mothers of small children, blind or other- 
wise disabled. 

The concise and crisp identification of the welfare 
problem will help mightily to shift the discussion from 
the phony issue of "loafers and chiselers" to how to 
put the 50,000 capable of working on payrolls. The 
discussion must turn also to the need of bringing into 
the job market many of the mothers, possibly by pro- 
viding day-care centers for their children. 

Beyond the immediate problem of caring for those 
in need, however, the basic problem is to devise pro- 
grams to prevent the future growth of welfare rolls. 
The identification of the problem and the dispelling of 
ancient myths is a necessary first step. — Reprinted 
from the AFL-CIO News. 



JULY, 1967 







npjngb 



pjSfnix 



1967 Union Industries Show 
proves to be the biggest and 
fastest draw to hit 
Arizona since Wyatt Earp 



■ The thousands of Arizona citizens who visited the 
1967 AFL-CIO Union Industries Show at Phoenix, 
May 19-24, will be talking about it a long time. It 
was probably the biggest event to occur in the Grand 
Canyon State since the fight at the OK Corral. 

They came in droves each day to pick up free shop- 
ping bags at the doors and move down the aisles of 
the exhibits, filling the bags with souvenirs and prizes, 
signing up for other prizes, watching craftsmen at 
work, listening to union-made music, and generally 
have a good time. 

Judging by head counts taken at the entrance to 
the big Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum, al- 
most one out of every three citizens of Phoenix and 
vicinity attended the show. 

Arizona is a state with so-called "right-to-work" 
laws — actually, union-busting laws which permit em- 
ployers to ride roughshod over their workers — and 
one major purpose of the 1967 UI Show was to show 
Southwesterners that labor and management can work 
in harmony, producing top quality goods and services 
under fair working conditions. This year's show — the 
29th annual production — made this point well. A 
total of 49% of the exhibitors were trade unions; 
47% were union employers; and the remaining 4% 




was either government, civic, or charitable organiza- 
tions. 

AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer William Schnitzler, 
in opening the show, said: "It is a demonstration that 
labor and industry do seek — and in many instances 
have achieved — a working industrial democracy in 
their places of employment." 

Schnitzler pointed out that the show is a demon- 
stration of what unions and many of their employers 
have long said. 

"That is," he continued, "unions are people like 
yourselves, and all employers do not dislike unions of 
their employes. In fact, as the show here proves, to- 
gether they have produced a quality of goods and a 
level of craftsmanship in a volume that is the marvel 
of the world." 

Central Arizona Carpenters, MiUmen, and Mill- 
wrights pitched in with fervor to make their part of 
the exhibition a success. Brotherhood locals partici- 
pating in the show included Local 445, Kingman; 
Local 906, Glendale; Local 1089, Phoenix; Local 
1100, Flagstaff; Local 1216, Mesa; Local 1538, 
Miami; Millwrights Local 1914, Phoenix; Mill and 
Cabinetmens Local 2093, Phoenix; and Local 2763, 
McNary. 

THE CARPENTER 




fii..- * 



SAL 931 



tsjttir 



■^ 



■<^i: 





CARPENTER SCULPTORS— Two indi- 
vidual exhibitors at the long booth of 
the United Brotherhood displayed their 
special skills at wood carving and art 
creation. In the top photo, Nels Nelson 
of Local 1089, (shown standing between 
Apprenticeship and Training Coordina- 
tor Leo Gable and First General Vice 
President Finlay C. Allan) describes the 
work which went into his carvings of 
birds, horses, and other creatures. In the 
lower photograph, William Seppamaki, 
also of Local 1089, exhibits some of 
his "Stump Art" — creations produced by 
hand tools, varnishes and other ma- 
terials from ironwood, camphor root, 
mesquite and other woods of the desert. 





^" UNITED FARM WORKERS 
JBG^^ZING COMMITTEE 



STRONG PRESENTATION of the plight of farm workers 
was offered to show visitors at the booth of the United Farm 
Workers Organizing Committee. Migrant workers are now 
being organized in the Southwest. 



[T^'* <^':^.- 




ROUNDUP TIME for union cigarettes was evident as pretty 
members of the Tobacco Workers International Union from 
Louisville, Ky., joined a company representative in distributing 
free samples. BELOW: An Indian dancer who performed at 
opening ceremonies. 




*»fc,-»J;' 



A CROWD WAITS outside the Arizona Veterans 
Memorial Coliseum for the doors to open. 



JULY, 1967 




ACOUSTICAL CEILIN{;S of the type installed by members of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America were displayed at the show. Here, two 
show visitors consider the merits of a union manufacturer's product. 




CROWDS MILL AROUND the Brotherhood exhibit. The Carpenters* union label 
shows prominently at upper right, and the trademarks of union manufacturers and 
supply houses mingle with union displays in this labor-management extravaganza. 






SKILLED UNIONISTS ALL— From 
top, the Butcher, the Sheet Metal 
Worker, the Barber, the Plasterer, 
the Glass Bottle Blower, the Baker, 
the Operating Engineer— only seven 
of many crafts which demonstrated 
their skills at the show. 






APPRENTICESHIP was the subject of this exhibit at the 
Brotherhood booth, viewed by Bill Koons, Central Arizona 
JAC; Jerry Hoffman, iinancial secretary. Local 1089; and 
C. L. Bradbury, assistant business agent. Local 906. 



A PICTURE EXHIBIT has the attention of Larry Richardson, 
business agent. Local 2093; Ralph Ellison, business representa- 
tive. Local 1089; General Representative Bill Nazer, and 
George Duff. 




SHOW DIRECTOR Joseph Lewis, second from left, at the 
booth with Bill Koons of Central Arizona JAC; and other 
Central Arizona Brotherhood leaders. Lewis had high praise 
for the displays. 



GENERAL SECRETARY Richard Livingston, International 
Representative Ben Collins, District Council Secretary-Treas- 
urer Bob Barrett, and First General Vice President Finlay C. 
Allan view the displays. 




ARIZONA GOVERNOR John Williams, center, was a booth 
visitor. He's shown with R. W. Knox, assistant business repre- 
sentative, Local 1098; and Bill Koons. AT RIGHT a manu- 
facturer's representative demonstrates sabre saw. 





UNION TECHNICIANS from Hughes Aircraft Company theck out a model Surveyor 
moon-landing spacecraft at a windswept mountain test site near Los Angeles California. 



SURVEYOR BEARS 
A UNION LABEL 

Space-technician members 

help to produce 'most 

complex spacecraft ever launched' 



■ If members of the Electronic and 
Space Technicians Local 1553 of 
the United Brotherhood have been 
looking extra hard at the moon 
lately, it could be because they 
played a key role in placing a 
strange-looking three-legged "thing" 
on that celestial body. 

The "thing," of course, is the Sur- 
veyor spacecraft, and the "EAST" 
members work at Hughes Aircraft 
Company, Culver City, Calif., where 
, the lunar vehicle was designed and 
built. And its success is a tribute 
to the people whose efforts gave 
it a measure of reliability rarely 
achieved. 

Surveyor has been termed the 
most complex spacecraft ever 
launched. It was built by Hughes 
for the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, under the di- 
rection of Jet Propulsion Labora- 
tory. 

The first Surveyor, launched in 
June, a year ago, achieved one of 
the most spectacular successes of the 
U.S. space program when it was 
soft-landed on the surface of the 
moon on its first attempt. Surveyor 
III, launched last April, was even 
more impressive when it was able to 
perform satisfactorily after bouncing 
twice on 10 degree slopes before 
finally coming to rest. 

In each case, the spacecraft then 
transmitted thousands of pictures 
back to earth, and in the case of 
Surveyor III, actually sampled the 
surface of the lunar soil. The en- 
tire Surveyor program is designed to 
provide valuable information needed 
to guide the Apollo program which 
will put men on the moon. 

Following the successful landing 
of Surveyor III, M. A. Hutcheson, 
general president of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, sent the follow- 
ing telegram to Hughes' vice-presi- 
dent and general manager Lawrence 
A. Hyland: 

"We wish to extend our heartiest 
congratulations to Hughes Aircraft 
Company on the success of Sur- 
veyor III spacecraft as a worthy suc- 
cessor to the history-making feats of 
Surveyor I. We at the headquarters 
of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America 



have commended our members of 
our affiliated Electronics and Space 
Technicians Local 1553 who played 
such an important role with Hughes 
Aircraft Company management in 
the space achievement which has 
touched the pride of all Americans 
and captured the enthusiasm of all 
the world." 

Raul J. Robles, president of 
Local 1553, also indicated that: 
"Members of Local Union 1553 and 
I are proud indeed to have con- 
tributed to the achievement of Sur- 
veyor III. It is something to tell our 
children and for them to tell their 
children about." 

Commenting on Surveyor's dra- 
matic reliability, Hughes' General 
Manager Hyland noted that the 
vehicle, which would fit into a mod- 
est living room with space to spare, 
is composed of more than 90,000 
parts. 

"These parts had to work per- 
fecdy at exactly the right moments 
while responding to hundreds of 
commands from Earth," Hyland 
said. "There are 30,000 electronic 
parts alone that had to respond and 
operate on split-second schedule. 

"The spacecraft had no less than 
43 rockets and explosive devices 
that had to be precisely timed. They 



varied in power from one 1,000th 
horsepower (a gas jet for attitude 
control) to be developed horespower 
of 5,600,000 (main booster rocket). 
These power outputs had to be con- 
trolled delicately over vast distances 
and they were. 

"Modern automobiles, which com- 
pare in complexity to Surveyor as a 
simple adding machine compares to 
a giant computer, are road-tested for 
years before ever tackling the free- 
ways. But the Surveyors, most com- 
plex of all space vehicles to date, 
could never be test-flown. The first 
time they were launched had to be 
for real." 

Surveyor is a "basic bus" capable 
of soft-landing a variety of instru- 
mented payloads, including cameras 
for a televised surveillance of the 
lunar surface. It weighs approxi- 
mately 2,200 pounds including its 
engineering payload and stands 10 
feet high and 14 feet across when 
the legs are extended. 

The basic spacecraft is comprised 
of spaceframe, telecommunications, 
power generation, propulsion and 
flight controls. These will provide 
capability to perform the earth- 
moon journey and make a soft-land- 
ing while maintaining two-way com- 
munications. ■ 





^^^k 


rs 






i.' . 


* \ 


SURVEYOR 
SEPARATION 




LAUNCH FROM 
CAPE KENNEDY 


'X 








\ 

\ 
I 
\ 






COAST ATTITUDE 

SONCANOPUS 

CORRECTION 


^^IP^^^^^I 



MIDCOURSE 
CORRECTION 



RETROENGINE BURNOUT 

AND JETTISON 

VERNIER ENGINE DESCENT 
UNDER RADAR CONTROL 



LUNAR BACK-SCRATCHER — A surface sampling 
"claw," mounted aboard Surveyor III, to scratch and 
dis at moon's crust is tested by Brotherhood member. 



VERNIER CUTOFF 
12 FEET.3=/i MPH 



MAJOR MAM:1\I;KS wlildi 
Surveyor III underwent after liftoff 
from Cape Kennedy for its 240,- 
000-miIe journey to the moon. 





By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at Box 508, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



■ The Full Impact 

Fishing and hunting are rated among 
the nation's most popular co-participat- 
ing outdoor sports — fishing is first; gun- 
ning sports have twice as many adherents 
as golf. In addition to exhilarating and 
healthful pastimes, both are "big busi- 
ness." Hunters and fishermen spent close 
to 140 million dollars this past year for 
licenses, and an estimated four billion 
dollars in pursuit of fin-and-fur targets, 
roughly about an average of $125 per 
year for each fish-and-hunt fan. 

I mention this because the average 
citizen who enjoys these activities oftimes 
overlooks the important part they play 
in the nation's economy. Remind your 
state and federal lawmakers of this when 
— from time to time — wildlife values and 
public lands are threatened. 

■ 80th Marked 

Many oldtimers will remember, I'm 
sure, Joseph Hart of Barnard, Vermont, 
a member of Local 127 in Derby, Con- 
necticut for 61 years, now retired from 



ir ^rm 




Joe Hart and "Chucks" 



the workaday world. Joe recently cele- 
brated his 80th birthday by sauntering 
out on a hunt trip and bagging a pair 
of chunky groundhogs. Here's a pic of 
Brother Hart with his two chucks, 
downed with a .22 Magnum Mossberg 
rifle equipped with a six-power Weaver 
scope. 

■ Double Exposure 

Outdoor photographers who use Polar- 
oid (pic-a-minute) cameras are warned 
against discarding the tear-off negative 
sheet in the woods. Game biologists 
from the Arizona Fish and Game De- 
partment tell us that lab tests have shown 
where poisons in the Polaroid negative 
have caused the death of some members 
of the wildlife fraternity. 

■ Have You Heard About: 

... a new process called "gluteral- 
dehyde tanning" which has been de- 
veloped through the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture? They claim it prolongs 
glove life by making leather very pliable, 
resistant to perspiration and repeated 
laundering. 

. . . marketing of luxury tackle box 
which features two interior lights, set 
into clear plastic trays to diffuse light 
through box? Diffused lighting, piped 
through trays, makes it easier to find 
smallest item of tackle. 

... a new fishing rod which nestles 
tightly in 15-inch plastic case and can 
be carried in tackle box, deep pocket 
of fishing jacket, creel — or brief case? 

. . . revolutionary new electric spin 
reel which eliminates crank? Line can 
be retrieved in three speeds by exerting 
pressure on handy, thumb-control button. 
A boon to one-arm anglers. 

. . . the 16-page booklet which lists 
2,500 Federal Recreation areas where 
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation's annual 
$7 "Golden Eagle" passport is valid? 
They're free! Write to "Operation Golden 
Eagle, P.O. Box 7763, Washington, D.C. 
20044. 



. . . recommendation of Department 
of Interior to legislature which seeks to 
raise "Duck Stamp" fee from $3 to $5? 

■ Mexican Fishing 

Harold A. Busswitz of Austin, Minne- 
sota, will ne'er forget a recent fishing 
vacation to Mexico. One of the events 
that keeps the memory alive is recorded 
here with pic of Brother Busswitz, hold- 
ing a 45-lb. yellowtail he eased from 
the fish-lush waters of the Gulf of Cali- 
fornia off the coast of Topolobampo, 
Mexico this past February. Harold re- 
cently retired in good standing from 
Local 2061 at Austin. 




Busswitz and Yellowtail 

■ Back Casts; Spent Powder: 

. . . Joe Morawski of Bristol, Conn., 
a member of Local 97 at New Britain^ 
recommends a 308 caliber rifle as a good' 
all-around big-game shooting iron. Latest 
notch on stock is for big buck downed 
in New Hampshire back country. Joe 
used a 180 grain bullet. Moose-like buck 
locker dressed at over 210 pounds. 

. . . George Jaeger of Zimmerman, 
Minn., a longtime member of the Broth- 
erhood, says near-home Elk Lake, though 
comparatively small — about 650 acres — 
is, nevertheless, an excellent producer 
of walleye, pike, crappie, bluegill and 
perch. George can account for walleyes 
to 11 pounds; pike to 25 pounds. 

. . . Some anglers are kinda close- 
lipped about their favorite fishing spot. 




Wheeler and Panfish String 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Not so with J. A. Wheeler, a member 
of Local 716, Zanesville, Ohio, now re- 
tired. He says he took the heaviest 
stringer of panfish (spotted perch) in his 
angling career on a recent junket to 
Florida, and sends graphic proof with 
accompanying snapshot. All came from 
waters in vicinity of Route 44 bridge 
crossing over St. Johns River near 
Deland, Florida. 

. . . Oscar B. Carlson of Quincy. Mass., 
can look back over 50 years as a mem- 
ber of the Brotherhood, having joined 
in Boston, Local 1824, when it was 
situated at 30 Hanover St. Now 73 
years old and retired, Carlson, a cabinet 
maker, recalled a past junket to Maine 
waters with son. Both caught bass, some 
over 3'/6 pounds but outstanding incident 
was when a 24-inch pickerel hit surface- 
retrieved Jitterbug, an unusual act for 
pickeral. . . . Herbert Kalson of Geral- 
ston, Ontario, found good hunting this 
past winter at Kenogamisis Lake Resort. 
Here's a pic of Brother Kalson, a mem- 
ber of Local 2693, with one of the big- 
game specimens he downed — a moose 
with a rack as wide as the rungs on 
grandma's rocking chair. 

■ Just for the Halibut 

D. E. Hammer of Tacoma, Washing- 
ton, keeps the piscatorial pot boiling — 
"just for the halibut." 




Kalson With Winter Moose 



Fred, in a recent column you credited 
Herbie Dubois of Southington. Massa- 
chusetts, with catching the largest halibut. 
As I recall it was a 240 pounder (right) 
and was taken off the tip of Cape Ann. 
I respectfully call to your attention two 
catches recorded in the Alaska Sports- 
man Magazine of August. '66. One was 
a 352 pounder, taken by Paul Jones 
of Homer, Alaska, in the Kachemak Bay 
area, the other a 413 pounder by Karl 
Tagg of Haine, Alaska. 

Yon are right. Brother Hammer, these 
two catches exceed Dubois' catch but 



in checking this issue of the Alaska 
Sportsman, I note that neither of these 
catches were made via the sport-fishing 
method — that is, caught by rod and reel, 
and landed; unaided, by the angler who 
hooked the fish. 

As I previously mentioned, there are 
no official sport-caught records kept for 
halibut. As far as our records go, Du- 
bois must be credited with the largest. 

■ Extra Earnings 

Members of the Brotherhood in good 
standing can earn a pair of the illus- 
trated KROCODILE spinning lures. All 
that's necessary is a clear snapshot of 
a fishing or hunting scene — and a few 
words as to what the photo is about. 
Send it to: 

Fred Goetz, Dept. OM 

Box 508 

Portland, Oregon 97207 




All members of the family and, of 

course, retired members are eligible. 

Please indicate local number and zip 
code. 



Summer Schools 

WASHINGTON, D. C— The AFL- 
CIO Department of Education has an- 
nounced the following list of summer 
schools for union members and leaders 
sponsored and arranged by various state 
and regional bodies. Local, district and 
state groups are urged to send "students" 
to the schools in their respective areas, 
taking advantage of an unusual opportu- 
nity to get additional education in trade 
union practices. The summer schedule is 
as follows: 

July 16-21— Kentucky State AFL-CIO, 
University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. 

July 16-29— AFL-CIO Industrial En- 
gineering Institutes, University of Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wisconsin. 

July 23-28— Ohio State AFL-CIO, 
Kenyon College, Gambler, Ohio. 

July 28-30— Nebraska State AFL-CIO, 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Ne- 
braska. 

July 30-August 4 — Florida State AFL- 
CIO, Palm Beach Towers, West Palm 
Beach, Florida. 

July 30-August 4 — Michigan State 
AFL-CIO, (State-Wide School), Camp 
Kett, Michigan. 

Aug. 7-10— New York State AFL-CIO, 
Long Island Union, Long Island, N. Y. 

August 13-18— Gulf Coast Labor 
School (Georgia. Alabama. Mississippi), 
Battle House Hotel, Mobile, Alabama. 

August 20-25 — Michigan State AFL- 
CIO (Northern and Upper Michigan), 





[SSffiSlffgl^fflfe^d 



?ooo 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



VIET NAM COMMENDATION-Senior Chief 
Petty Officer Francis J. Giaimo, former 
secretary of Local 139, Hudson County 
District Council of Carpenters and Mill- 
wrights, Jersey City, N. J., on receiving 
the Secretary of the Navy's Commenda- 
tion IVIedal for his "outstanding per- 
formance of duty" while serving with the 
Seabees in Viet Nam. Rear Admiral 
H. N. Wallin presented the award during 
ceremonies at the Atlantic Fleet Seabees 
Headquarters, Davisville, Rhode Island. 
Brother Giaimo's parents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Anthony Giaimo of Jersey City. 



Northern Michigan University, Mar- 
quette, Michigan. 

August 20-25 — Pennsylvania State 
AFL-CIO, Pennsylvania State University, 
University Park, Pennsylvania. 




JULY, 1967 



13 



'^ 



^ 



, — . 





Send in your favorites (no poetry). Mail to: Plane Gossip, 101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001. Sorry, no pay! 



Don't Eat the Gazintas! 

Junior came home from school and 
announced to his mother that "We're 
studying gazintas." 

"What," inquired Momma, "is a 
'gazlnta'?" "Don'tcha know?" asked 
Junior. "It's like two gazinta four; 
three gazinta six and like that!" 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

Horsing Around 

The Greek was attempting to im- 
press the visiting Bostonian with the 
valor of the defenders of Thermop- 
olae. The New Englander wouldn't be 
impressed, however. "Did you ever 
hear of Paul Revere?" countered the 
Bostonian. "Paul Revere . . . Paul Re- 
vere . . ." mused the Greek. "Wasn't 
he the guy who ran for help?" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 




And Then Crows? 

Our business agent, something of 
a lady's man, says his wife does bird 
imitations . . . she watches him like a 
hawk! 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

He-and-She Business 

You can be sure the honeymoon is 
over when He calls home to tell Her 
that He is going to be late and She 
has already left Him a note that She 
has left His dinner in the oven! 

—Rudy Wade, L.U. 3107 



Mr. Pert Sez; 

"Iff'n you'd like to git yer hands 
on lotsa dough, doing somethin' 
crooked, and never git arrested fer 
it ... git a job in a pretzel factory!" 

1 4 ALL — ALL 4 1 

Easy to Please 

The doctor finished his examination 
and then told the patient: "The best 
thing for you to do is to cut out 
smoking, liquor, excitement of all 
kinds, women and late hours." The 
fellow gulped, then replied: "Doc, 
I'm such a miserable character, I don't 
deserve the best. What's second- 
best?" 

GIVE A DOLLAR TO COPE 

A Real Windfall 

The cannibal came running out of 
the jungle, shouting happily: "I've 
captured a politician! Now we can ail 
have bologna sandwiches!" 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 

A Hare-y Story 

Heard about the gas that puts a 
tiger in your tank? There's a new 
brand out now called Jackrabbit Gas. 
it's for short hops. 

BUY AT UNION RETAIL STORES 

Adam Shame! 

Observing that the minister aiway 
read his Sunday sermon, the mis- 
chievous boy sneaked Into the pulpit 



This Month's Limerick 

There once was an eager young priest 

Who ate practically nothing but yeast. 

"For," he said, "it is plain 

We must all rise again, 

And I want to get started at least!" 



ahead of time and removed the last 
page. The minister, launched on his 
Sunday exhortations, was telling about 
the Garden of Eden. He finished read- 
ing the next-to-last page with ". . . 
and Adam said . . .' before reaching 
for the final page. He searched for it 
frantically for a few moments before 
muttering to himself (and It came out 
clearly over the p. a. system): "There 
seems to be a leaf missing!" 

R U A UNION BOOSTER? 




Fish Story 

"Catching any?" asked the by- 
stander. 

"Caught 30 walleyes outa here yes- 
terday," replied the fisherman. 

"You did? By the way, do you 
know who I am? I'm the county fish 
and game warden." 

The fisherman pondered a moment, 
then said, "Do you know who I am?" 

"No," replied the warden. 

"Well, I'm the biggest liar in this 
county." 

UNION-MADE IS WELL MADE 

Not-so-Small Fraction 

The Internal Revenue Service says 
there are really only two types of peo- 
ple who complain about paying taxes: 
men and women. 

B SHARP — WORK SAFELY 

And Nobody Barred 

Sign over the bar: "We accept 
resignations from Alcoholics Anony- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




The California Heaitli Pia 



C. R. BARTALINI 

President, California State Council of Carpenters 

Reprinted from LABOR TODAY, Detroit, Michigan 




California labor pools its collec+Ive bargaining strength to get the best health 
benefits possible, while pumping $700 million a year into the health care industry 



■ California labor, which is pumping 
some 700 million dollars a year into 
the state's health care industry, is un- 
dertaking a massive and novel program 
to assure that its members will get the 
most and the best for their money 
through their health and welfare plans. 

If the effort succeeds, it is likely to 
profoundly affect the cost, quality, 
type, range and distribution of health 
care services for all Californians and 
to provide a model for similar activity 
throughout the nation. 

The agency through which this 
hoped-for revolution of medical con- 
sumers may come about is the Cali- 
fornia Council for Health Plan Alter- 
natives. After two years of studies and 
planning, it is about to swing into 
operation with its own staff of experts 
and a modest but adequate budget. 

The Council presently is composed 
of 13 trade union officials who com- 
prise a broad cross-section of Cali- 
fornia labor, including the major AFL- 
CIO unions and the independent 
Brotherhood of Teamsters and Intl. 
Longshoremen's & Warehousemen's 
Union, a doctor of medicine, an 
economist and a health plan adminis- 
trator. 

WHEN ESTABLISHED 

It was established at a meeting in 
March, 1965, of some 70 California 
union officials concerned about their 
organizations' health care programs, 
with further planning and organiza- 
tional steps being taken at broad re- 
gional meetings in June, 1966, in Los 
Angeles, San Francisco, Sacramento 
and San Diego. The Council has also 
held a series of quarterly meetings in 



which it has had the advice and analy- 
sis of some of the nation's foremost 
health care authorities. It was at the 
latest of these meetings, March 7 in 
Burlingame, that the staff structure and 
financing decision were made prepara- 
tory to launching full-scale activity. 

The spur for formation of the Cali- 
fornia Council for Health Plan Alter- 
natives was a set of circumstances only 
too well known to anyone concerned 
with union health plans. 

GAINS WERE LOST 

For years the unions have been nego- 
tiating increased employer payments 
for health and welfare plans, only to 
see the increases chewed up by con- 
stantly rising doctor and hospital costs. 

Many California union leaders had 
come to feel that the labor organiza- 
tions had become, simply, collection 
and disbursement agencies for doctors, 
hospitals and insurance companies. It 
seemed that the unions had in a sense 
become victims of their own success. 
By constantly raising the demand for 
more and better services, they had con- 
tributed to pressure on these services, 
which in turn led to inflating their cost. 
As a result, most plans were scram- 
bling to get enough money just to 
maintain the level of benefits, and some 
had to reduce benefits. 

There was concern, also, that union 
programs were not accomplishing what 
needs to be done toward preventing 
illness and maintaining good health of 
members and dependents, that they 
might be overstressing catastrophic and 
acute illnesses in relation to the chronic 
illnesses and disabilities which are be- 
coming more prevalent than ever be- 



fore and that the union programs have ^ 
over-protected hospitalization cases at 
the expense of more generally needed 
outpatient services. 

More recently, the California un- 
ions have become worried about the 
impact of the new federal Medicare 
program and state MediCal program. 
These new programs are creating ad- 
ditional massive demand and purchas- 
ing power for health services. When 
this is added to the demand created 
by the union plans, what will be 
the effect on the cost, on the quality 
and on the availability of qualified 
practitioners and facilities? 

It was apparent that the unions and 
their health plans would have to stop 
trying to go it alone and that organized 
labor should remember its own funda- 
mentals and organize in this field, too — 
to pool its collective bargaining strength 
so it can get the best dollar's worth in 
health and to combine its organiza- 
tional resources to enable it to find out 
what that might be. 

Even in its preliminary, small-scale 
activity the Council has developed 
much significant information. 

PROGRAM SURVEY 

For example, it surveyed Los An- 
geles bakery wagon drivers to learn 
how much of their health care ex- 
penses during a six-month period was 
paid by their negotiated health plan, 
which offers dual choice — an insured 
plan and the Kaiser prepaid plan. 

The insured plan paid, on the aver- 
age, $164, about 43 per cent of the 
total costs; the member paid $196 "out 
of pocket," about 51 per cent, and 



JULY, 1967 



15 




other insurance plans paid the remain- 
ing 6 per cent. Only 1 per cent of those 
under the insured plan reported that it 
paid all their expenses. Ten per cent 
of those in the Kaiser plan said it had 
paid all their expenses, but the average 
member in Kaiser had paid an identical 
$196 "out of pocket." 

This and other researches have con- 
vinced the Council that the union nego- 
tiated health plans, which at their in- 
ception were hopefully designed to 
cover 80 to 90 per cent of family health 
expenditures, are generally covering 
only 50 per cent of the costs. 

The Council's inquires have verified 
the conclusions of a special Blue Rib- 
bon committee which made a study of 
California's health care industry six 
years ago and found that health serv- 
ices were inadequate, uncoordinated, 
poorly organized and badly distributed. 

Regarding the poor distribution of 
facilities, for example, the Council 
noted that at the very moment a Los 
Angeles regional health planning com- 
mittee was complaining that there was 
too much bed capacity in its affiliated 
hospitals, there was not one single ap- 
proved hospital bed in the Watts ghetto. 

The Council finds that there is a 
mixup of federal, state and local gov- 
ernment activities and a variety of 
private groups developing programs to 
meet special needs which result in a 
patchwork that displays serious over- 
lapping of facilities and services in 
some situations and serious gaps in 
others. 

Californians, the Council notes, still 
lack the kinds of community facilities 
people need before going to the hospital 
or after leaving it — such as home care, 
nursing visits, social services, rehabili- 
tation, homemaker services and out- 
patient care. People are often placed 
in hospitals simply because there is no 



other more appropriate and perhaps 
less expensive community facility to 
supply treatment. 

Union members and their families 
obviously have a direct and intimate 
stake in health care planning, and the 
Council for Health Plan Alternatives 
sees this as an area in which organized 
labor must increasingly participate. 

In the Council's view, organized la- 
bor must get to know a lot more than 
it does now about the economics of 
health care so that it can more effec- 
tively deal with the problems of con- 
stantly rising doctor and hospital bills. 

The Council, for instance, is in- 
terested in the case of one Southern 
California hospital which budgeted a 
60 per cent occupancy rate in August. 
It figured this would yield a net profit 
of 99 cents per patient day in July 
and $1.41 in August, since costs fall as 
occupancy rises. Actually, the hospital 
earned $6.03 per patient day in July 
and $6.90 in August. 

Shortly afterward this hospital an- 
nounced an $8 a day increase in rates. 
Is the increase justified? Under present 
circumstances, nobody outside the 
hospital can really say. But the Coun- 
cil feels that many of the most serious 
problems of labor's health plans cannot 
be solved until the mystery that has 
been built up around health service 
cost is dispelled. 

PUBLIC DISCLOSURE 

That's why the chairman of the 
Council testified recently before a fact- 
finding panel in a nurses' pay dispute 
that the Council will insist on full 
public disclosure of the price structure 
in the health care industry "until we 
can achieve some public understand- 
ing of what constitutes 'reasonable' 
costs and charges for health care." 

Other spokesmen for the Council 
told the same disputes panel that if 
costs continue their uninterrupted rise, 
there may be demands for legislation 
permitting the public to scrutinize 
hospital costs and for some form of 
public regulation of hospital rates, per- 
haps by declaring them to be public 
utilities. 

But cost is not the only, and may 
not even be the main, concern of the 
Council; it has at least equal interest 
in the quality aspects of the health care 
union families receive. It is aware of 
a recent study in the East of union 
health care experience which showed 
that many confined in hospitals for 
needlessly long periods and that a 
great deal of unnecessary surgery is 
performed. The Council is convinced 
that there is need for similar research 



in California and is sponsoring such 
research. 

The labor group is also paying care- 
ful attention to the provisions for 
licensing and accreditation of medical 
facilities which have been incorporated 
in the new governmental health pro- 
grams such as Medicare and MediCAL 
and wondering why the health pro- 
grams for which union plans pay 
should continue to use facilities which 
are not licensed and accredited under 
the government programs. 

KEY SUPPORT 

In its activities to date the Council 
has gained the support and cooperation 
of key state governmental and educa- 
tional agencies concerned with health, 
including the State Departments of 
Public Health and Industrial Relations, 
the California Health & Welfare agen- 
cy and such related divisions of the 
University of California as the schools 
of Public Health at Berkeley and Los 
Angeles and the Centers for Labor 
Education and Research at UC Ber- 
keley and UCLA. 

Members of the Council are also 
serving on the state's new Planning 
Committee on Hospitals and Related 
Health Care Facilities and the Health 
Review and Program Council, which 
advises on operation of the MediCAL 
program. 

The Council is conceived, not as a 
massive new apparatus to supplant 
labor's existing health programs, but 
as a center of joint activity to work 
with the existing programs and im- 
prove them. 

Its long-range perspectives include 
helping unions to acquire necessary 
financing for worthwhile new programs 
or medical facilities, possibly through 
loans from the pension reserves; en- 
couraging, where feasible, prepaid 
programs under which unions and 
medical groups would negotiate com- 
prehensive health care for union mem- 
bers and their families; investigation of 
all aspects of self-insurance, the pos- 
sible economies of pooling various 
trust funds, and ways to reduce pres- 
ent administrative, "loading" and 
brokerage costs, and examination of 
ways to extend health care protection 
to unemployed members for longer 
periods. 

With sufficient income for its initial 
activities now assured, the California 
Council for Health Plan Alternatives 
is in the process of hiring an execu- 
tive director and stafl: and beginning 
to implement its program. The ex- 
pectation is that there will be further 
affiliations and broadened activity as 
the program picks up momentum. ■ 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




HHNGT0N 



ROUNDUP 



REEMPLOYMENT ANSWER TO AUTOMATION-There are many ways to meet the unemployment 
problems caused by automation and technological change, but the basic answer is 
"rapid reemployment" in the view of a special meeting of experts at the Inter- 
national Labor Office. The experts said that while it is essential to provide 
income for unemployed workers, "no monetary payments can fully compensate for the 
psychological strain of being out of work." To help displaced workers get jobs, 
the experts called for improvement in employment services, the development of 
adequate re-training programs, advance notice of job changes to manpower author- 
ities and help for workers who must move out of their old communities to new 
ones in order to find employment. 

ON-THE-JOB TRAINING— On-the-job training has proved so successful that it has run 
out of funds for the rest of this fiscal year and is training 15,000 more workers 
than had been expected for a 1966-67 total of 140,000 men and women. Secretary 
of Labor W. Willard Wirtz said that the year's training goals had been exceeded 
by 12 percent and that no new programs can be approved until more money becomes 
available. 

NLRB RULING— The National Labor Relations Board unwittingly was the cause of 
Hubert Humphrey becoming Vice President of the United States. The Veep disclosed 
this at the ceremonies marking the 25,000,000th ballot cast in an NLRB election. 
In the Depression period of the 1930s, Humphrey said, he applied for aposition 
with the HLRB, and was turned down. "It forced me to 'run for office," he 
explained. 

URANIUM STANDARDS— A major breakthrough in protecting the health of uranium 
miners through adequate standards of how much radiation they may be exposed 
to has been made by Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz. Acting under the 
Labor Department authority to administer the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act, 
Wirtz has placed strict limitations on the amount of radon radiation to which the 
miners can be exposed. 

MEDICARE DRUGS— A full-scale investigation into the feasibility of including 
prescription drug costs under the Medicare program has been ordered by John W. 
Gardner, Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare. Gardner has appointed an 
8-man blue ribbon task force on prescription drugs that will investigate and 
make recommendations within six months. 

SUMMER JOBS FOR YOUTH-The Labor Department is making more than 100,000 extra 
IJeighborhood Youth Corps summer jobs available through additional funds voted by 
Congress. There are now some 341,000 summer jobs planned for poor youths through 
the Bureau of Work Programs . 

MAY EMPLOYMENT— "Sluggish" was the word for the economy once again during May as 
reflected in the employment and unemployment statistics. Employment "advanced 
less than usual," said the Department of Labor while the jobless rate, at 3.8 per- 
cent, was similar to what has stubbornly prevailed since the beginning of 1966. 
Reasons for the failure of the economy to pick up include: inventories are still 
out of line with retail sales; and manufacturing employment was off 80,000 on 
a seasonally adjusted basis. 

LABOR LEADERS JOIN FIGHT ON SLUMS— President Johnson has named an eighteen-man 
committee to study how private industry can become a major factor in the rehabili- 
tation of urban slums. Named to the committee were APL-CIO President George 
Meany, UAW President Walter P. Reuther and Secretary Joseph D. Keenan of the 
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Edgar P. Kaiser, President of 
Kaiser Industries, is chairman. 

JULY, 1967 17 



1 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
^ & Training 



Los Angeles County Honors Apprentices 
As Program Sets New National Record 




Recipients of major awards, with Carpenters Brotherhood officials, management. 
Apprenticeship Training personnel and State representation at completion ceremonies 
included (from left): Frank Boyce, Southern California Chapter, Associated General 
Contractors of America; Charles Nichols, Eighth District Executive Board Member, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America; David H. Kirkham, 
Local 1507 recipient. Third Place Award L.A. County; Stanley Krol, Local 1752, 
recipient. First Place Award, L. A. County; Leo Gable, Technical Director, Appren- 
ticeship and Training Dept., United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America; Charles F. Hanna, Chief, California Division of Apprenticeship Standards. 




Apprentices selected by each Joint Apprenticeship Committee for meritorious effort 
devoted to the Carpenters Trade include (from left, seated): David Blackinton, Local 
769; Kenneth Vanden Berge, 710; Edward B. Meehan, 563; John R. Miller, 25; 
David H. Kirkham, 1507; Arthur A. Tonnies, 1478; Adolf Faber, 721; (standing): 
Stanley Krol, 1752; Floyd Wilson, 1607; Percy L. Kirklin, 1976; Terry L. Beeler, 
1913; Bobby Lawrence, 1497; Richard T. Norwillo, 1400; Leonard W. Salke. 929; 
Charles V. Glenn, 1140; (not shown in photo): Terry L. Ayer, 2435; James C. Perry, 
844; Wayne L. Rexwinkle, 1437. 



LOS ANGELES, CALIF. — Comple- 
tion ceremonies were held in Los Angeles 
recently for 244 young men who achieved 
journeyman status during 1966. This is 
the largest number of apprentices in a 
construction craft to complete an area 
labor and management apprenticeship 
program for any one year in the United 
States. This is the second consecutive year 
that the Los Angeles County carpenter 
apprentices have established a national 
record. The graduates included 225 car- 
penters, 18 cabinet makers and one mill- 
wright. 

Richard M. Lane, Chairman of the 
Los Angeles County Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee for Carpentry, extended a 
warm welcome to the completing ap- 
prentices and the large assemblage that 
came to congratulate them. He then 
introduced C. M. "Chuck" Sanford, 
Director Carpenters JAC Fund for 
Southern California, who was master of 
ceremonies for the event, which was at- 
tended by more than 600. After intro- 
ducing the people at the head table. 
Director Sanford introduced his staff and 
all committeemen. He expressed his 
thanks to them for a job well done. 

Tony Whan, expert salesman and mar- 
ket developer, was the featured speaker. 
In his speech entitled "The Priceless 
Ingredient," he outlined in a humorous 
but logical way how motivation has made 
America the greatest nation in the world. 

Charles F. Hanna, Chief State Division 
of Apprenticeship Standards, extended 
greetings from the State of California. 
Approximately three-fourths of the ap- 
prentices in the state are from the con- 
struction trades, and carpentry is the 
largest single group. Hanna noted that 
apprenticeship is not only vital to the 
construction industry but that it is the 
answer to many of California's economic, 
social and employment problems. 

Leo Gable, Technical Director Ap- 
prenticeship and Training Department, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, presented awards to 
the Outstanding Apprentices selected by 
each Joint Apprenticeship Committee. 

Charles Nichols, member of the Gen- 
eral Executive Board Eighth District, 
presented Trade Certificates for the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Frank Boyce, Committeeman, pre- 
sented Special AGC Certificates. 

California Trade Certificates were pre- 
sented to the completing apprentices by 
Charles F. Hanna. 



INTERNATIONAL CONTEST 

The 1967 International Carpen- 
ters Apprenticeship Contest sched- 
uled for August 17, 18, 19 will be 
held at the Vocational School in 
Vancouver, British Columbia. 



J 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




Ben E. .Tones (center), Coordinator of the Reno Joint Apprenticesliip Committee, has 
reason to be mighty proud of his two boys who were winners at the recent Nevada 
State Apprenticeship Contest held at Las Vegas. Edward Lusty, left, placed second, 
and Ronald Baichtal, right, was first place winner. Baichtal will represent Nevada at 
the International Contest to be held at Vancouver, British Columbia, on August 17-19. 

Reno Contestants Win Nevada Contest 



LAS VEGAS, NEV.— The Nevada 
State Carpentry Apprenticeship Contest 
was held at the Convention Center in 
Las Vegas on May 12-13, in conjunction 
with other Building Trades Apprentice 
Contests. 

Carpenter contestants were John 
Barnes and John Chamberlin, represent- 
ing Local 1780, Las Vegas; and Ron 
Baichtal and Ed Lusty, representing 
Local 971, Reno. 

The contestants were vying for the 
honor of representing Nevada in the 
International Contest in Vancouver, 
B. C, August 17-18-19. Winners were 




Ron Baichtal. first place, and Ed Lusty, 
second place. Reno will also have a 
mill-cabinet contestant in the Inter- 
national Contest. 

Coordinators A. D. McKenna, Las 
Vegas, Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee, and Ben Jones, Reno, Joint 
Apprenticeship and Training Committee, 
made the contest arrangements. The con- 
test was coordinated by General Repre- 
sentative Paul Rudd. The manipulative 
plans and written tests were prepared and 
furnished by the Apprenticeship and 
Training Department of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America. 

Awards were made to all contestants 
at an awards banquet following the 
contest. 



A. D. McKenna, Coordinator of the Las 
Vegas Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee, is pictured with John Cham- 
berlain, left, and John Barnes, right, 
who represented Las Vegas Local 1780 
at the Nevada State Carpentry Appren- 
ticeship Contest. 



Conference Reminder 

A "Jo^iii to earth'' workshop on 
apprenticeship training, manpower 
development, equal employment 
opporliinities, etc. will he held July 
10 through 13 at the Golden Tri- 
angle Motel. Norfolk, Va. It'll be 
the 7th Annual Middle Atlantic 
States Apprenticeship and Training 
Conference. Delegates are invited 
from Delaware, D.C., Maryland, 
North Carolina, Pennsylvania, 
West Virginia, and Virginia. Write 
P.O. Bo.x 10111, Richmond, Va. 
23240 for details. 



Bay Area Selects 
Winners for 1967 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIF.— Robert Ru- 
zick of Novate was selected as the 
outstanding Carpenter Apprentice at the 
Bay Counties 8th Annual Carpenter Ap- 
prentice Contest, held May 20 on the 
Northgate Fashion Mall in San Rafael. 

Ruzick. San Rafael Local 35, and sec- 
ond place winner, John Cappelletti, San 
Francisco Local 483, represented the Bay 
Area in the statewide competition in San 
Diego on June 23, 24. 

Third place was won by Greer Trice, 
San Francisco Local 483. Honorable men- 
tion was awarded to David Ritter, an 
apprentice member of San Rafael Local 
35. 

Winners were presented savings bonds 
and tools as prizes at the conclusion of 
the contest. The winners were selected 
by former contest winners who served as 
judges for the competition. 

Apprentices were given a blueprint of 
a bus stop shelter and building materials. 
Using handtools. each apprentice was 
allowed eight hours to complete an indi- 
vidual project. Winners were chosen on 
the basis of craftsmanship and addi- 
tional points earned in a comprehensive 
written examination. 




Norman Campbell, left, and Henry 
Torget, far right, congratulate Robert 
Ruzick, first place winner, and David 
Ritter, second from left, honorable men- 
tion. All are from San Rafael Local 35. 




Contestant Greer Trice, San Francisco 
Local 483, took an early lead in the 
framing of the contest project, a bus 
stop shelter. Trice won third place 
honors. 



JULY, 1967 



19 



Wyoming State 
Winners Named 

CASPER. WYO.— The Wyoming Car- 
penter Apprenticeship Contest was held 
in Casper on April 22 and 23. Plans 
for the contest were initiated early in 
1967 by Apprentice Instructor Roy 
Amick, working with General Represent- 
ative Paul Rudd. 

The Wyoming State Carpenters Joint 
Apprenticeship and Training Committee 
members are: contractor Brice Cook, 
Chairman; carpenter Ralph Davidson, 
Local 1384, Secretary; carpenters Chris 
Pasley, Local 1432, and Roy Amick, Lo- 
cal 1564; contractors C. E. Hawks and 
Richard D. Olson; advisor H. H. Leist, 
Bureau of Apprenticeship & Training, 
U.S. Dept. of Labor. 

Plans and arrangements for the contest 
were coordinated by Secretary Ralph 
Davidson, assisted by the Apprenticeship 
Committee, Business Representative H. P. 
Johnson, and other members of Local 
1564. 

Apprentices eligible to compete were: 
Henry M. Allen. Howard F. Hodgins, 
Larry D. Rein of Local 1564 in Casper, 
and Michael J. Sara, Local 469, Chey- 
enne, who was not able to attend the 
contest. 

Materials for the contest were donated 
by these Casper lumber dealers: Builders 
Mart. Casper Lumber, Oil City Lumber, 
and Walker Lumber Co. Equipment was 
loaned by contractors: Lower & Cool, 
Inc., J. Jones, L. D. Leisinger Construc- 
tion, and Roanstad-OIson Construction 
Co. 

Contest Judges were: Coordinating 
Judge, Paul Rudd, General Representa- 
tive of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters; architect Larry Frank of Krus- 
mark & Krusmark. architects of Casper; 
carpenter John Neifert, Local 1564; con- 
tractor N. A. Nelson of Sheridan: and 
alternate Joe Mathisen of Rognstad-Olson 
Co., Casper. 

Manipulative contest was held April 22 
at Casper Industrial Building; and the 
written contest on April 23 at the Casper 
Carpenters Hall. Plans and written exam 
were furnished by the Education Dept., 
U. B. of C. & J. of A. 

Awards of Certificates plus first, sec- 
ond and third place plaques were made at 
a banquet at Casper Carpenters Hall on 
April 23 by Representative Paul Rudd. 

First place winner Henry M. Allen, 
will receive a time and expense paid trip 
to the International Contest at Vancou- 
ver, B. C. Second place contestant Larry 
D. Rein receives a S50 Savings Bond, and 
third place winner Howard F. Hodgins 
receives a S25 Savings Bond. 

• 
Support the apprenticeship and train- 
ing program in your community. Ex- 
perienced hands are always welcome. 




Union officials and judges at the \\ yoming State Carpenter Apprenticeship Contest are 
pictured, from left to right: Herschel Leist, Bureau of Apprenticeship & Training 
Representative; K. C. LeClere, Secretary of the Wyoming Contractor Association; 
Ralph Davidson, Secretary of the Wyoming Carpenter Apprenticeship Committee; 
Roy Amick, Jr., Apprenticeship Instructor; unidentified member of Local 1564; 
Carpenter Judge John Neifert; General Representative Paul Rudd, Coordinating 
Contest Judge; Contractor Judge Joe Matheson; and Architect Judge Larry Frank. 




\\\()iuiiii;s first place winner. Henry 
Allen, works on his prize-winning project. 




Larry Rein, second place winner, with 
General Representative Paul Rudd and 
onlookers at the Casper competition. 



Washington State 
Pre-Apprentices 

SEATTLE, WASH. — The Seattle, 
King County and Vicinity District Coun- 
cil of Carpenters has completed the 8- 
week institutional phase of its first pre- 
apprentice class under a subcontract 
with the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America. 

The program is under the auspices of 
the Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee. The Committee reports that 
ten young men have embarked on the 
18-week course of supervised on-job 
training under the direction of Appren- 
tice Coordinator Bob Buckingham and 
Coordinator Richard Leaser, who is the 
instructor. 

Brother Feaser commended the men 
for the interest they have shown and 
the diligent manner in which they have 
applied themselves to mastering the 
basic fundamentals of the craft as cov- 
ered in the eight weeks of institutional 
training. He predicts that "each of the 
young men will make a worthwhile con- 
tribution to our craft and will become 
constructive members of our Brother- 
hood if they continue to strive for ex- 
cellency throughout their apprenticeship 
in the same manner as they have in the 
basic training to date." 

The program was spearheaded by 
Donald Johnson, Secretary of the Dis- 
trict Council, who is also Secretary of 
the Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee. Secretary Johnson has stated 
that he feels the program is an excellent 
means of selecting young men for the 
trade. "The pre-training will contribute 
much to the value of the young men on 
their on-job assignments thus making 
them more valuable to the employer," 
he reports. 

(A picture of participants in the King 
County program appears at the top of 
the next page.) 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




Participants in the eight-week institutional training program conducted by the Seattle, 
King County and Vicinity District Council of Carpenters were, left to right: Mike 
Wasell, Jack Ledbetter, Joe Good, Instructor Dick Feaser, John Melendez, Mike 
Joseph, Clinton Crist. Front, left to right: Lew Zeigler, Bob Johnson, Rockne Stephen- 
son. Douglas Hamilton was not present for the picture. (See story, page 20.) 




OPERATION 
GOLDEN EAGLE 

. . . more and better 
recreation facilities 
for you and your family 
in US paries and 
forests 



A real bargain in recreational facilities awaits the tourist and out- 
doorsman who purchases the new $7 Golden Eagle Passport now 
being sold by the US Department of the Interior as a one-year pass 
to any and all Federal recreation areas across the United States dis- 
playing the sign shown above. Instead of paying 500 in this park and 
500 in that park, the new sticker and passport gives you easy access 
to all of them for a full year. The 1967 passport can be purchased 
at most Federal recreation spots and it's good until March 31 of 1968. 



5th Annual Contest 
Held in New Mexico 

ALBUQUERQUE, N. M.— The Fifth 
Annual New Mexico Carpenters Appren- 
ticeship Contest was held May 13 at the 
Hoffmantown Shopping Center in Al- 
buquerque. 

The contestants were Raymon Cope- 
land. Local 671, Clovis, (First Place Win- 
ner); L. Dean Carr, Local 1319, Albu- 
querque. (Second Place Winner); Ralph 
Eggleston. Local 1319, Albuquerque; and 
Robert Ortiz. Local 1319, Albuquerque. 

Contest projects were donated to the 
New Mexico Society for Crippled Chil- 
dren for their use throughout the state. 
The project was a stair and ramp combi- 
nation with hand rails for the children 
to walk up and down in order to 
strengthen their arms and legs. 

The three judges for the contest were 
Al T. Kendrick, Local 1319; T. C. Styron, 
contractor; and Bill Wilson, architect. 

Materials for the projects were do- 
nated by the Lumber Merchandisers 
Association of Albuquerque. 




Al Kendrick, left, Carpenter Judge at the 
5th .\nnual New Mexico Carpenters Ap- 
prenticeship Contest, inspects the work of 
Raymon Copeland, first place winner. 




L. Dean Carr, second place winner, works 
on his contest project while Carpenter 
Judge Al Kendrick observes. 



The largest thing alive on the face 
of the earth is said to be the General 
Sherman sequoia tree in Sequoia Na- 
tional Park, California. It has been esti- 
mated that it could provide the lumber 
to build 35 five-room bungalows. 



JULY, 1967 



21 



Journeymen Train 
In Birmingham 



Apprentice of Year Chosen in Arizona 




Journeymen attend classes as part of the 
Blueprint Reading and Estimating training 
program under way in Birmingham, Ala- 
bama. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA.— H. O. Moore, 
Jr., Apprenticeship Training Director for 
the Birmingham Carpenters and Mill- 
wright Apprenticeship and Training Pro- 
gram, advises that Birmingham has two 
of its three journeyman advance training 
programs under way. 

Director Moore reports that there are 
20 journeymen enrolled in the blue- 
print reading and estimating course 
and 20 taking instructions on the 
use of the framing square. The third 
course, level and transit, is scheduled 
for the near future. 

M.D.T.A. Coordinator Elmer Morris 
worked with the Birmingham Commit- 
tee in establishing these programs under 
a subcontract with the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America. 

Beginner's Luck 




SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. — With sheer de- 
termination, Steve Littman, 9, of Santa 
Venetia slugged away to drive his point 
home in a warmup for the nail-driving 
competition at the 8th Annual Carpenter 
Apprenticeship Contest sponsored by the 
Bay Counties Carpenters Apprenticeship 
& Training Program. The tryout was 
a shade more than chief judge John 
Watts, Local 162, could bear to face, 
but the nail came out right in the end. 
And why not? Steve is a son of Gordon 
A. Littman, Director of the Carpenters 
Apprenticeship Program for the Bay 
Area. Prizes for youngsters in the con- 
test were donated by the Northgate Mer- 
chants Association. 




Contestants, officials, and guests at the Arizona State Apprenticeship Contest 
included, from left to right: Bob Barrett, Secretary, Central Arizona District Council; 
Antonoi Obton, contestant from Local 906, Glendale, Arizona; Paul L. Joseph, 
contestant from Local 1216, Mesa, Arizona; E. J. Wasielewski, Contest Committee 
Chairman; Finlay Allan, First General Vice President; Ricardo Saldate, first place 
winner, Tucson Local 857; Henry Acuna, contestant from Tucson Local 857; Leo 
Gable, Technical Director, General Office; Cal Hackworth, Coordinator, Tucson 
Joint Apprenticeship Committee; and Bob McNeal, Secretary, Southwestern District 
Council. 




Attending the 1967 Arizona Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest in Phoenix were, 
from left to right: E. J. Wasielewski, Chairman, Contest Committee; Leo Gable, 
Technical Director for the Apprenticeship and Training Department of the Inter- 
national Union: Jerry Hofman, Financial Secretary of Phoenix Local 1089; Ben 
Collins, General Representative; and Finlay Allan, First General Vice President 
of the International Union. 



PHOENIX. ARIZ.— The Arizona Car- 
penters Apprenticeship Committee spon- 
sored its Eighth Annual Apprentice 
Carpenters Contest in Phoenix on May 
20. 

Ricardo Saldate of Tucson was first 
place winner and Henry Acuna, also of 
Tucson, was second. Young Saldate will 
represent Arizona in the International 
Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest to be 
held in Vancouver, British Columbia. 
August 17, 18 & 19. He will also be 
honored as an outstanding apprentice at 
an awards ceremony next November in 
his home city. 

At an awards dinner following the 
contest, Ed Wasielewski, Chairman of 
the sponsoring committee, announced 
the winners and presented the cash 
awards. 

Finlay Allan, Vice President of the 
Brotherhood, was the principal speaker 
at the dinner. 

Other out-of-town union officials who 
attended the dinner with Vice President 
Allan were Leo Gable and Ben Collins. 



^p^ 




Ricardu Saldate. center, winner of the 
1967 Arizona Carpenters Apprenticeship 
Contest, is pictured with International 
Vice President Finlay Allan, left, and 
E. J. Wasielewski, Chairman of the Ari- 
zona Carpenters Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee which sponsored the contest. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



MJOME STUDY COURSE 




ADVANCED BLUEPRINT READING-UNIT III 



This Unit complefes fhe Foundafion Section, which was 
discussed in Unit II. It then deals with Basement, First, 
Second and Third Floor Plans. Some references will be 
made to the Lobby and First Floor details. You will note 
that some answers will require you to compile information 
from more than one section of the plans in addition to 
reviewing the specifications for a complete answer. 

QUESTIONS 

1. What is the net depth of the elevator pit? 

2. What special treatment is required for concrete that 
is placed below the lOO'-O" elevation? 

3. May any reinforcing steel be plain bars? 

4. What provision is required prior to re-using forms? 

5. Do the provisions for regular forms also apply to 
forms where the concrete is to be plastered? 

6. Are there any provisions made for the use of steel 
forms? 

7. When walls and footings are to be poured in sections, 
how are the ends of the forms to be fabricated? 

8. What length of time must the forms be left in place 
after the concrete has been poured? 

9. What size brick is specified for the brick veneer? 

10. How much difference, if any, is indicated in the eleva- 
tion of the first floor? 

11. Note the aisles on the floor plan and determine the 
extreme amount of slope of each aisle. 

12. What materials are specified for the partitions in the 
office area? 

13. What type of floor is specified for the office space? 

14. What type floor is specified for the lobby area? 

15. How far is the teleregister set back to the rear of the 
wood valance? 

16. Describe the construction of the wood valance. 

17. What material is specified for the interior surface at 
the exterior wall of the lobby? 

1 8. What type of framing is specified for the wall between 
the lobby and the offices? 

19. What is the ceiling height in the lobby area? 

20. What does the term "Return Valance to Wall" in- 
dicate? 

21. What size is specified for the corner and typical mul- 
lions of the wood and glass partitions? 

22. Will the muUions in the wood and glass partitions be 
solid or hollow? 

23. What are the dimensions of the wood rail in the office 
area? 

24. Describe the construction and material of the wood 
rail. 

25. Is the detail section ^2 noted on sheet 8 a horizontal 
or vertical view? 



PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS for the Advanced 
Blueprint Reading Home Study Course are available 
through the office of General Secretary R. E. Living- 
ston. Forward a check or money order for five dollars 
($5) with your order. 



26. What is the size of the channel used as a header over 
the lobby entrance doors? 

27. Determine the weight of the channel that is used over 
the double door entrance. 

28. What are the dimensions of the concrete trench in 
the lower garage? What provision is made for slope? 

29. How many sections of G.I. grating are used over the 
concrete trench? 

30. Describe the foundation at column D-5 which is in 
the center of the lower garage. 

31. How is access to the bottom of the elevator pit 
gained? 

32. At what floor level is the base of column D-4 placed? 

33. What is the width of the tread on stairs "A"? 

34. What is the rise per step on stairs "A" from the first 
to second floor? 

35. What material is placed on the concrete walls in stair- 
well "A"? 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ARE ON PAGE 36 



IS IT POSSIBLE? 



Dovetails on Four Sides? 




No, fhfs is not a ques- 
tion from "Home Study 
Course"! It's just a brain 
teaser sent in by Stan 
Horridge, Local 18, Ham- 
ilton, Ontario. We 
thought you might like 
to puzzle over it a bit. 

The question: Is it pos- 
sible to join two blocks 
of wood by dovetailing, 
v/ith dovetails showing 
on all four sides? 



For on answer, hold your thoughts and calculations until our 
August issue, when we'll publish Brother Horrldge's solution. 



JULY, 1967 



23 



1 "^ Canadian Report 



'67-'68 Expenditures 
Tie '46 Nat'l Income 

The federal government is estimat- 
ing its expenditures at just under $10 
billion for the fiscal year 1967-8. This 
figure is almost exactly what the na- 
tional income was in 1946. 

This is an indication of the growth 
of Canada's economy — that the fed- 
eral government alone is spending in 
a year what the entire income of the 
nation was 20 years ago. 

Another comparison is expenditures 
in 1950 with those in 1967-8 — two 
and a half billion dollars against al- 
most 10 billion, a fourfold increase in 
28 years. 

The federal finance minister expects 
the gross national product (the total 
production) to reach $20 billion this 
coming year. Of this about one-third 
will be collected in taxes by all three 
levels of government — federal, pro- 
vincial and municipal. 

These increasing governmental ex- 
penditures are beginning to raise the 
taxpayer's hackles. Nobody likes to 
pay taxes. 

But where else in the world can a 
citizen get the value for his tax dollar 
that he gets in Canada? Only the 
United States and Sweden can equal 
or exceed it. 

Ontario Compuhory 
Atliitration Views 

Compulsory arbitration got support 
from two of Canada's leading indus- 
trial relations experts. However, their 
support was restricted to the public 
service field. 

Jacob Finkelman, chairman of the 
new federal Public Service Staff Rela- 
tions Board, told a meeting of the 
Canadian Industrial Relations Re- 
search Institute that experience with 
compulsory arbitration in Ontario has 
not hampered normal collective bar- 
gaining. 

Mr. Finkelman is former chairman 
of the Ontario Labor Relations Board. 
He said that the operation of compul- 
sory arbitration legislation covering 
Ontario hospitals far exceeded expec- 
tations and asked critics of the legis- 
lation to take a closer look at the re- 
sults. 

A similar view was expressed by 
Professor Harry Arthurs, of Osgoode 
Hall law school, Toronto. He told the 
meeting that of 107 hospital disputes 



since the legislation barring hospital 
strikes was put into effect, only 17 
cases required arbitration to settle the 
diff'erences between the parties. 

Two major unions are involved in 
the hospital field in Ontario, one a 
national union strongly opposed to the 
legislation, the other an international 
union strongly in favour of it. 

Organized labor's official opposi- 
tion to compulsory arbitration makes 
it difficult to concede the fact that 
this international union is now domi- 
nating the hospital organizing field in 
the province. 

In assessing the situation, it must be 
admitted that unions seldom struck 
hospitals anyway. Hospitals are now 
financed out of public funds under the 
prepaid hospital program effective in 
every province. There is a case for 
taking a searching look at the legis- 
lation as it affects hospitals without 
accepting compulsory arbitration hook, 
line and sinker, according to some 
leaders in the labor movement. 

Labor Films to Show 
At Montreal Festival 

The fifth International Labor Film 
Festival is being held in Montreal 
August 11th to 15th. 

It is expected that about 75 films 
from 20 countries will be shown. 

The festival is being arranged by 
the International Labor Film Institute 
with the co-operation of the Canadian 
Labor Congress and the National Film 
Board. 

Previous film festivals have been 
held in Hamburg 1954, Vienna 1957, 
Stockholm 1960 and Israel 1963. 

The film show will be followed by 
the first World Conference on Educa- 
tion in the Trade Union Movement, 
also in Montreal from August 16th 
to 26th. 

Both these events come in the midst 
of the amazingly successful EXPO 
international exposition which is re- 
ceiving worldwide acclaim. 

Drug Sales Tax Gone, 
But the Profits Remain 

The federal budget did cut off the 
1 2 per cent sales tax on drugs. As a 
result, drug prices are expected to 
come down around 10 per cent at the 
retail level. 

But what does this one move do 
about breaking up the drug manufac- 



turing cartels and the unconscionable 
profits being reaped by the manufac- 
turers on brand name drugs? 
Nothing. 

Housing Problems 
Remain Unchanged 

The housing problem has never been 
so much in the public eye as it has the 
last year or two. 

Some interested spokesmen,- how- 
ever, are getting tired of repeating 
themselves about the seriousness of the 
problem and what needs to be done 
to solve it. 

Reid Scott, a member of parlia- 
ment from the Toronto area where 
the housing crisis is most serious, told 
the House of Commons last month 
that he read his speech on housing 
of four years ago and was amazed 
that so little had been done about it 
since then that he could repeat exactly 
the same speech now and it would 
still be applicable. 

He pointed out that there is an 
urgent backlog of half a million homes 
needing to be built, that a large num- 
ber of homes are already unfit to live 
in. that the shortage is forcing up 
prices and rents so that most Canadian 
families cannot afford to buy or rent at 
today's economic levels. 

"In my own city of Toronto we 
need a minimum of 40,000 new homes 
a year and we are building 21,000." 

Housing prices have gone up so 
fast that now many middle income 
families have been priced out of the 
market. 

As for lower income families, they 
are in difficulty bordering on the hope- 
less. There are about 12,000 families 
on the waiting list in Toronto alone. 
Families are being housed in tempo- 
rary barracks by the city, hoping that 
something will show up. 

Latest reports show that this year 
Canada will again fall short of its 
minimum needs of 170,000 new homes 
a year just to keep up with demand, 
without cutting into the backlog. What 
is really needed is a planned program 
of 250,000 homes a year for 10 years 
— most of it public housing. 

Experts in touch with the situation 
believe that nothing effective will be 
done until the senior levels of govern- 
ment, federal and provincial, step in 
with more direct action, with the fed- 
eral government putting up as much 
as 100 percent of the funds for land 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



assembly and planning and building, 
plus 75 percent of the funds for rent 
subsidies in public housing. 

Canada is still a backward country 
as far as public housing is concerned. 

This is too bad — since in many areas 
we have some of the most progressive 
social security legislation anywhere. 

Jodoin Illness 
Causes Concern 

The sudden and serious sickness of 
Claude Jodoin. President of the 
Canadian Labour Congress, has come 
as a shock to the labor movement 
in Canada and everywhere. 

Mr. Jodoin is a big, hearty man who 
is the leading spokesman for the trade 
union movement in Canada and a su- 
perb image-maker for labor. 

Taking his work seriously, he has 
always had a keen interest not only 
in Canadian affairs but in the inter- 
national scene. 

More than any other man in the 
labor movement he truly represented 
his native land in the ranks of labor. 
Born in Quebec, he is perfectly bi- 
lingual, but never was bitten by the 
narrow nationalism or the parochial 
approach which has infected others. 

In other words he's a big man in 
size and spirit. 

MacDonald Decries 
Building Supply Tax 

Here is an excerpt from a statement 
issued June 1 by Donald MacDonald, 
secretary-treasurer of the Canadian 
Labour Congress: 

"The government has failed to take 
advantage of the opportunity afforded 
by the budget to give the country's 
economy an obviously much-needed 
stimulus. 

"This is the time for moderate stim- 
ulus to move our rate of economic 
growth back to its potential levels. The 
budget fails to provide this, and the 
omission adds to the seriousness of the 
economic outlook which concerns the 
Minister. Certainly, the removal of the 
six percent tax on production machin- 
ery and apparatus 10 months earlier 
than was planned falls far short of 
what is needed. 

"Action taken with regard to con- 
struction is also inadequate. It is re- 
grettable that the government has once 
again rejected proposals for a removal 
of the 11 percent tax on building 
materials and supplies. The continued 
acute housing shortage, with little like- 
lihood that it is going to be relieved 
in any major degree, points up the 
urgency for the removal of this tax." 




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/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 




Millwright Education Conference at Toronto 

TORONTO, ONT. — Dave Roberts, chairman of the Ontario Millwrights Committee, expresses thanks to Robert Laing, 
International Representative, with a number of Millwright delegates attending the April 29, 30, Education Conference. 
Brother Laing, the feature speaker for the Conference, spoke on trade jurisdiction. 



Labor Leaders View 
Job Corps Training 

CLEARFIELD. Utah— Labor leaders 
of AFL-CIO affiliates, including the 
United Brotherhood, and the Farmers' 
Union accompanied Governor Calvin L. 
Rampton on a tour of the Men's Urban 
Job Corps Training Center in Clearfield 
recently. 

William W. Dodgson, Jr., center di- 
rector. Governor Calvin L. Rampton, 
and C. E. Berger, president of the Utah 



State AFL-CIO. welcomed the 100 ob- 
servers to the Center. 

Governor Rampton told the visitors 
the Utah economy had grown to the 
point where the state can absorb all the 
trained workers the center turns out. 

The tour was co-sponsored by the cen- 
ter and the Utah State AFL-CIO with 
the assistance of the Kansas City OEO 
Office and the Job Corps Labor Liaison 
Office of Washington, D.C. 

A luncheon was prepared and served 
by corpsmen in the food processing 
classes. 



From Father to Son 




Carpenter's who attended the meeting at Clearfield included, left to right: Howard 
Pace, district council secretary; Ellis J. Reese, manager of Carpenter's Local No. 
450; Calvin L. Lindquist, Millwright's Local No. 722; and Harold Lassen, Carpen- 
ter's Local No. 1498. Charles Cates, Local No. 61, Kansas City, regional OEO 
labor liaison officer, coordinated the affair. 




LONG ISLAND, N.Y. — The Suffolk 
County District Council of Carpenters 
held its Apprenticeship Dinner and 
Graduation exercises on Saturday, May 
13, at the Wagon Wheel Restaurant, 
Port Jefferson, Long Island. In the pic- 
ture above, Business Representative 
Chauncey Bartow (second right) presents 
his son Joseph with his diploma, while 
Preston Brady, executive secretary of the 
Building Trades Employers Association 
(first right) and George Babcock, secre- 
tary-treasurer and general agent of the 
Suffolk County District Council of 
Carpenters look on. Diplomas and gifts 
for good attendance were given to all 
of the apprentices who qualified at this 
dinner. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 







Miami Local Moves To New Quarters 

MIAMI, FLA. — Carpenters Local 993 moved into a new headquarters building 
(shown above) at 2671 N.W. 28th Street, last February 1., just nine days before its 
65th anniversary. Dedication of the building was held on April 21, with General 
Representative E. Jimmy Jones as master of ceremonies. 

Officers of Local 993 (shown below) are: First Row: J. W. Sharp, warden; H. G. 
Jordahl, financial secretary; R. G. Dickhaus, treasurer; Peter Stolk, vice-president; 
J. H. Reeves, trustee; W. H. Brown, sick warden. Back Row: James Kilroe, recording 
secretary; E. L. Clarke, conductor; Kenneth Berghuis, Jr., president; Kenneth Pekel, 
trustee; and Wallace Bray, trustee. 




Pompano Beach Pays Off Mortgage 




POMPANO BEACH, FLA. — Local 3206 recently held a "Mortgage Burning" 
ceremony to commemorate the payment in full of all obligations against its building. 
Officers attending the ceremony were, left to right, front: Hawley H. Fairchild, 
Trustee. Back: James Ashby, President; Walter Schulze, past President; Warren 
Conary, State Organizer; Martin Lampman, Treasurer; Charles Strain, Financial 
Secretary and past President; Henry Chakford, Vice Chairman; Mel Voyles, Warden; 
George King, Trustee; Jasper Brown, Jr., Trustee. Joseph Mankowicb, Business 
Representative and Chairman of the Building Committee, is pictured in front of 
Brothers King and Brown. Not pictured is Earl Rollins, Conductor. 




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Walla Walla Salutes Veteran Members 



WALLA WALLA, WASH. — Local 
1214 paid tribute to its senior members 
with a special dinner, July 25, 1966. Cir- 
cumstance prevented us from publishing 



pictures of the event until now. The din- 
ner was held at the Marcus Whitman 
Hotel, with a large group of members 
and friends attending. 




Ray Faulkner, president of Local 1214, was the speaker, above. At the head table, 
from left were: Mark Berney, former 1214 secretary; Mrs. Berney; Mrs. Ray Faulk- 
ner; the speaker; Guy Adams; Mrs. Adams; Mrs. H. H. Brown; H. H. Brown, presi- 
dent of the Washington State Council of Carpenters; and Pete Hager, International 
Representative. 




10 DAY FULL MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 



Those presented with pins at the Local 1214 dinner and the number of their years 
of service (shown in parentheses) included: Seated, front row, left to right, 

Lloyd Gilmore (25), John Cunnington (30), Mark Berney (26), Frank Meachum 
(25), Gunnar Holmquist (25), and Walter Anderson (43). 

Standing, George Haasch (29), Galen Weber (25), John Riehl (31), Ed Arbuckle 
(25), Dempsey Hamilton (28), F. B. Anderson (28), Bernard Humphreus (25), Harold 
Taylor (29), Adolph Knudson (28), George Haasch, Jr. (29). J. J. Dychee (32), Tom 
Durkin (25), and Floyd Shelton (25). 

Members not present, due to illness, but presented pins: Robert Johnson (60), 
Thomas Barrie (47), Glen Blakely (25), Richard Danniels (25), Otto Gross (27), C. C. 
Guinn (26), Jess Swegle, (27) and George Terry (27). 



Veteran Retires 



SANTA MARIA, CALIF. — Harry E. 
Stier, Local 2477, retires this month. 
Brother Stier was initiated into Local 
2477 on September 10, 1936. He has 
served his local as president, trustee, 
assistant business agent, and for the past 
six years, as financial secretary. Brother 
Stier has been active in apprenticeship 
training and has served on the Carpen- 
ters Joint Apprenticeship Committee. 




28 



THE CARPENTER 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(1) OTTAWA. ONTARIO— Twenty-five- 
year pins were presented to thirteen vet- 
eran members of Local 93 at a recent 
presentation ceremony. Receiving pins 
are left to right, sitting: James Carty, 
Robert Thompson. Oscar OueUette, Ern- 
est Corcoran. Frank Dziadura. Standing, 
left to right: Oscar Duguay, Joseph La- 
moureux, Bertram Prudhomme. Rheal 
Lachapelle, Kenneth Vermette, Martin 
L'Abbe, Albert Villeneuve and James 
Simser. Brother Richard Stephens who 
has been a member of Local 93 for fifty 
years was absent when the picture was 
taken. 

(2) MT. OLIVE. ILLINOIS— Fred Boe- 
ker. a charter member of Local 280, was 
presented with a 65-year pin recently. 
Brother Boeker joined the Brotherhood 
on April 17. 1899. 

(3) BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS — Local 
433. honoring 925 years of continuous 
membership, presented three 50-year and 
thirty-one 25-year pins to members at a 
builet dinner-dance in April. Only one 
of the three 50-year members, William 
Wegener, sixth from left, seated, was able 
to attend. Other 50-year honorees were 
Joseph Schlich and Henry Schmidt. 
Seated with Brother Wegener, from left, 
are Local 433 officers. Trustee Gordon 
Bien. Financial Secretary Edward Kalk- 
brenner. Treasurer Harold Rickert, Vice 
President Lester Appel. Business Rep- 
resentative-Recording Secretary Alfred 
Kraft, Brother Wegener, President 
George Kocsterer: guests Eugene Clay- 
ton, Secretary of the Tri-Counties Car- 
penters District Council and Belleville 
Trades & Labor Assembly President 
Stanley Spehn, and a 25-year honoree. 
Trustee Joseph Schaefer, Jr. Other 25- 
year honorees were, second row, from 
left to right: Edward Summers, Sr., Leslie 
Stauder, Leon Cook, Cyrus Holcomb, 
Ben Davinroy. Jack Todd. Melvin We- 
gener, Fred Deul, Bernard Ruser, Ernest 
Ballenger. Elbert Eschman. Ralph Fey 
and Fred Schindler. Third row, from left 





to right: 25-year honorees Mack Furlow, 
Wilbcrt Zellmer. Charles Beller, Leonard 
Schmidt. Harry Hohm. Arthur Wright 
and Harry Gravlin. Sr. Unable to attend 
were 25-year members Eugene Engel. 
Richard Fellmer, Otto Grab, Earl Ham- 



mel. Carl Hottes, Theo. Jacobus. Leonard 
Kunkelman. Leonard Miller. Howard 
Werkmeister and Frank Wenzel. 

(4) ASHLAND, PENNA.— Local 1670 
held its first awards banquet recently. 
Nelson Kehler. President of Local 1670. 
presented service pins to the following 
members, from left to right, seated: Wil- 
liam Seller, 26 years; Charles Heizenroth, 
26 years; James Neary, 37 years; Howard 
Boyer, Financial Secretary with 42 years; 
Charles Rowe, 29 years; and Raymond 
Hollister, 43 years. Standing, left to 
right, are: George Peiflfer, 51 years; John 
O'Hara, 52 years; William Wetzel, 53 
years; Nelson Kehler, President; Mathis 
Huhn, 44 years; and Walter Wagner, 26 
years. Others receiving pins but unable 
to attend the banquet were Anton Mend- 
ler, 63 years; Fred Nagle, 30 years; and 
Charles Peiffer, 63 years. Total service 
to the Brotherhood represented by the 
group amounts to 585 years. 



JULY, 1967 



29 




(5) SOUTH BEND, INDIANA— At its 

recent awards banquet, Local 413 paid 
tribute to members who have completed 
50 years of service. From left to right, 
they are, in the photo at right, Clement 
Cressey, 59-year member; George EIrod, 
Business Representative; Roy C. Klein, 
President; and Archie Roysdon, 55-year 
member. Brothers Cressey and Roysdon 
were presented 50-year pins. Other 50- 
year members unable to attend the ban- 
quet were Charles O. Monroe. Elmer 
Murray, Andrew Nojd, and Ernest Rans. 
Also honored were 115 brothers who 
received their 25-year pins. These broth- 
ers, pictured above with Business Rep- 
resentative George EIrod and President 
Roy C. Klein, were present at the 
awards banquet: Raymond Bengtson, 
Vernon Bowman, C. T. Breyscher, Joe D. 
Brown, Wm. M. Brown, Albert Carlson, 
Henry Carpenter, Carl Davis, Charles 
Everett, Nelson Fink, Robert Gerhold, 
Byron Gilchrist, Frank Gowell, Paul 
Hancock, Emil Hansen, Gordon Harrell, 
Leo Henry, W. E. Hott'man, Archie Holt, 
Eugene Hollycross, Howard Hoose, Wm. 
Knebel, Russell Knowlton, Ernest Koep- 
pens, Robert Koopman, Z. Kosiak, Ira 
Kreiter, Ray Larimer, Carl Larson, Harry 
Leslie, Mathew Liedtky, Joseph Lower, 
Richard Luer, Alex Makinen, Wallace 
Mallery, E. N. Mead, Everett Miller, 
Clyde Morris, Henry Mroezkiewicz, 
Myron Mullett, John A. McCloughan, 
Harry Nelson, Otto Nielson, Arthur 



Odor, Albert Overmeyer, Darle Pfeiffer, 
Vince Piechocke, Howard Porcher, Ros- 
coe Robinson, Paul Rough, John Scher- 
merhorn, Jacob Seeger, Lester Six, Mar- 
cus Steenbergen, C. E. Surbaugh Jr., 
Harry Swanson, A. M. Taylor, Paul 
Tipps, K. J. Tubbs, Louis Vaerwick, 
Lawrence Voll, Glen Voreis, Barton 
Wade, Eric Wagman, Walter Wakeman, 
Ralph Walters, Stanley Wegner, Henry 
Wendels, Maurice Wickizer, Earl Wiles, 




Keith Wingard, Lawson Wingett, Bruce 
Wise, Albert Wright, Elza Wright, and 
Earl Yeagley. 

Others receiving their 25-year pin but 
unable to attend the banquet were: C. E. 
Adams, Dennis Arnold, Shirley Blake, 
Charles Blanch, Clem Burger, Ralph 
Cochran, Sherman Deo, George Geddes, 
James Geddes, William R. Gray, John 
Grenert, John B. Hall, Sidney Harris, 
John Hensell, Joe Hodgson, Byron Jones, 
Marvin Judd, Elmer Kentz, Thurman 
Kreiter, William Lanning, Omar Mow, 
Russell Norton, Emery Papal, Raymond 
Parrish, Henry Pfeiffer, Carl Pruett, Rus- 
sell Reckell, Luke Riggs, Nicholas Scean- 
dra, George Shotkowsky, Chester Six, 
West Stephens, John Stross, Bayard Tay- 
lor, William Trowbridge, Harry Truax, 
Frank Wishman, C. A. Wright, and 
Claude Zook. 

(6) PARSONS, KANSAS— Local 1022 
honored its 25 and 50-year members with 
a dinner. Charles M. Miller, Secretary of 
the Kansas State Council of Carpenters, 
presented the pins to members. Pictured, 
from left to right, seated: Howard Jarboe, 
Max Milks, Earl Johnson, Charles M. 
Miller and Wallace McClure. Standing, 
left to right: Ray Axford, Ray Pollock, 
Lee Richardson, Melvin Lamb, Arthur 
Anderson, Thomas Kelley, and Ray Kel- 
ley. Mr. Earl Johnson received the only 
50-year pin presented. The others were 
awarded 25-year pins. Several members 
eligible for pins were unable to attend the 
dinner. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



(7) ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY — 
Members with long service were recog- 
nized at a ceremony held recently by 
Local 715. Pictured at right are those 
who were presented with pins for 50 
years or more in the Brotherhood. From 
left to right, they are: Financial Secretary 
George S. Ford, a 50-year member who 
has served 25 years as a Trustee and who 
is retiring after 16 years as Financial 
Secretary; Business Representative Mar- 
tin Knudsen; Fred Zingler, 50-year mem- 
ber; Andrew Broberg, 50-year member 
who is retiring as Trustee after 15 years; 
Raleigh Rajoppi, General Executive 
Board member from the second district 
and a member of Local 715; and Presi- 
dent John A. Williams. Also honored 
were brothers who received their 25-year 
pins. Pictured from left to right, they 
are: Joseph Golden, Helmut Garber, 
and Leo Lasher, all 25-year members; 
Business Representative Martin Knudsen; 
Louis Levitt, and George Klug, both 25- 
year members; and President John A. 
Williams. Brothers who received serv- 
ice pins but were unable to attend 
the banquet were 50-year members: 
George Fisher and Vincent Rusinalc; 25- 
year members: Salvatore Autullo, Ernest 
Finizio, Nicholas Florio, Anders John- 
son, Joseph Nycz, and Ernest Vinella. 

(8) PORTLAND, OREGON — Albert 
Endrizzi was presented his 50-year service 
pin at a special called meeting of Local 
3182 in May. Brother Endrizzi was 
initiated into Local 1120 in 1917 when 
he was 22 years old. He served Local 
1120 as Recording Secretary for 15 years 
before transferring to Local 3182 in 
1949. Pictured, left to right, are Lyie 
Hiller, General Representative of the 
7th District, presenting the pin to 
Brother Endrizzi while Fred H. Kling- 
man. Business Representative-Financial 
Secretary of Local 3182, watches. Gen- 
eral Representative Hiller also awarded 
25-year pins to eligible members. They 
are, left to right, seated: Robert W. Volz, 
David Hergett, Emanuel Lutz, Annie 
Lynn, Brother Endrizzi, Frank Destefano, 
Horace Todd, Fred Tartarini. Standing, 
left to right: Frank R. Switzer, John 
Miles, Vincent J. Krieger, Paul Cappoen, 
Angelo Endrizzi, General Representative 
Hiller, Alonzo Gribling, Arthur Whit- 
ford, John Brandt, William Land, Harold 
Blakely, Theodore Heinle. Unable to 
attend the awards presentation were Mary 
Budiselic, Arthur Dahlstrom, Neva Gil- 
lenwater, John Heinrich, Jr., Christion 
Kessler, Erwina Smith, William L. Smith, 
and James L. Wells. 

(9) raONTON, OHIO — In a special 
called meeting on April 29, Local 1519 
honored its 25-year members. Business 
Representative Howard Crabtree pre- 
sented 25-year pins bearing the Brother- 
hood insigna and 25-year certificates to 
the members pictured from left to right, 
seated: James F. Stumbo, Delbert Crum, 
and Webb Roberts. Standing, from left 




fm:ts-£.';k~ 



-fS'JTS'RWa 




JULY, 1967 



31 



to right: Howard Crabtree, Charles Alley, 
Frank Webb, Kile Lake, Letson "Elmo" 
Morrison, and Austin B. Stevens. Absent 
from the presentation was John H. Col- 
lins of Carlsbad, New Mexico. 

(10) WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS— Local 

977 presented 25-year service pins to 24 
brothers at their 61st annual banquet. 
Presentations were made by G. H. Sim- 
mons, Jr., Texas Regional Director of 
Organization, and Chester Smith, Execu- 
tive Secretary, Texas State Council of 
Carpenters. Honored guests at the ban- 
quet were J. B. Osborn, 42-year member 
who served as Financial Secretary and 
Business Agent of Local 1706 for 30 
years before becoming a member of Local 
977; W. R. Wilcke, 42-year member who 
served Local 977 as Financial Secretary 
& Business Agent at the same time; H. 
M. Watson, 32-year member and past 
President of Local 977. Members receiv- 
ing pins and special guests are pictured, 
from left to right, seated: Wayne Phillips, 
President of Local 977; J. B. Osborn, 
G. H. Simmons, Jr., H. M. Watson, Ches- 
ter V. Smith, W. R. Wilcke, J. W. Jack- 
son, Financial Secretary & Business 
Representative of Local 977. Second row, 
left to right: L. W. Blenis, F. I. Boyd, 
Howard Haberman, F. W. Hickman, C. 
W. Woods, Edd H. Castles, H. K. Wilson 
and Earl H. Wood. Third row, left to 
right: W. H. Hull, W. M. Rogers, Glen 
D. Jones, S. D. McReynolds, W. C. 
Stanley, Jr., Guy Taylor, and R. D. 
Heins. Back row, left to right: C. M. 
Morrow, E. B. Lynskey, N. E. Guthrie, 
Sr., Joe Martin, H. T. Cropper, E. E. 
Smith, Marion Bowling, Albert Maeckel, 
and R. A. Foshee. 

(11) MONROE, MICHIGAN — Local 
1301 celebrated its 30th Anniversary with 
a dinner party. Members with 25 years 
service to the Brotherhood were pre- 
sented pins. Pictured, left to right: 
Walter Knerr, President; Carl Miller, 
Martin Albright, Leo Russeau, William 
Christie, Louis Sanglier, David Christie, 
Leo Hayes, Business Representative; Paul 
Zumfelde, and Dody Jacobs. Members 
eligible for pins but not present at the 
dinner included: O. W. Michaelis, John 
Siebert, Vern Wells, Jason King, and 
Claude Wagoner. 

(12) WATERLOO, IOWA— Local 1835 
celebrated its 60th Anniversary with a 
banquet and awards presentation during 
the 53rd Annual Convention of the Iowa 
State Council of Carpenters. Approxi- 
mately 300 members, wives, and conven- 
tion delegates attended the affair. Fifty- 
year pins were awarded to these members, 
from left to right, seated: William 
Kuriger, 53-year member (now deceased); 
Lou Blitsch, 50-year member and former 
Business Representative of Local 1835; 
Hans Anderson, 57-year member. Stand- 
ing, left to right: Fred Pedersen, former 
Business Representative, now an Inter- 
national Representative and Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Iowa State Council of 




32 



THE CARPENTER 



Carpenters; Sid Dudley, 55-year member; 
and Ted Schuler, present Business Repre- 
sentative of Local 1835. 

(12A) Members from Local 1835 with 
25 through 50 years of service to the 
Brotherhood are pictured, from left to 
right, seated: Henry Tegtmeier, Julius 
Bauman, Mike Blitsch, Leo Heim, George 
Johnson, Byron Kime, Lou Blitsch, John 
Joyce, Emil KIuss, Dave Christensen, 
Walter Meyerhoff, Frank Petersen. Stand- 
ing, left to right: Fred Pedersen, Harold 
Lehman, Arthur Salton, Louis Westphal, 
Carl Ahrenstedt, Victor Bruns, Chris 
Christensen, Marshall Crosier, Ed Dyer, 
Luke Galvin, Lester Larson, Robert 
Leistikow, Fred Prueter, Chet Schuler, 
Lyie Christensen, Frank Silver. 

(12B) Many past and present apprentices 
attended the awards banquet. They were, 
from left to right, seated: Robert Patten, 
Connor Galvin, Harry Borwig, Jim Buss, 
Norbert Meyer and Bruce Reinhart. 
Standing, left to right: Gary Losbman, 
past apprentice and instructor, Kenneth 
Garetson, Grant Christensen, Marvin 
Miller, Ronald Fell, Lorraine Johnson, 
Dwayne Robison, Donald Nelson, Walter 
Weber, Ted Schuler, past apprentice and 
instructor and present Business Repre- 
sentative for Local No. 1835, and Fred 
Pedersen, past Business Representative 
and currently on the International staff. 

(13) NAPA, CALIFORNIA— Recently 
members with long service were recog- 
nized at a dinner given by Local 2114. 
Pictured are those who were presented 
with pins for 25 years or more in the 
Brotherhood. From left to right, seated, 
they are: Claud Hallsey, President; Harry 
Bell, Hubert Brown, J. Gaylord Jones, 
former Recording Secretary — now re- 
tired; C. L. Cantrell, W. J. Carey, 52- 
year member; Fred Schoonmaker, former 
Recording Secretary and Business Repre- 
sentative for 15 years — now retired; Her- 
bert Phelps, Margaret LarRocque, who 
received the pin posthumously for her 
husband. Brother Arthur LarRocque; 
and Axel Strand. Standing, left to right: 
N. D. Anderson, George Ewing, Conduc- 
tor; Albert Kristensen, George Ford, 
Francis E. Long, Trustee; Ted Jalo, Rob- 
ert Wallace, Eriin O. Herrick, William 
McCamey, Wilburt D. Norton, William 
Jessiman, James Chadwick, Louis J. 
Limpic, Hans Mundkowski, Jess T. Trot- 
ter, Edwin Momerick, and Frank Mayers, 
Financial Secretary. Al Brown, former 
Executive Secretary of the Northern 
Coast Counties District Council, was 
Master of Ceremonies for the evening 
and presented the pins. (13A) W. J. 
Carey is shown after receiving his 50- 
year pin. Left to right: Mrs. Jordan, 
sister of Mr. Carey; Brother Carey, Presi- 
dent Hallsey, Al Brown, Mrs. Brown, 
Fred Schoonmaker, and Robert Hinkson, 
Executive Secretary of Northern Coast 
Counties District Council. Others receiv- 
ing pins but not pictured are James 





12A 




12B 



JULY, 1967 



33 



Bragg, George Ganger, Lon Jenkiiis, 
Irwin Krenke, John Molinari, Howard 
Moore, Levi Spickelmier, and Leland 
Swift. Tiie dinner was prepared and 
served by members of Ladies Auxiliary 
544. Members of the committee in charge 
of arrangements for the evening were 
three men who served together in the 
local apprentice school: Harold LaBarge, 
Bruce Jinks and Gordon Barstad. 




13A 

(14) ERIE, PA.— Local 81 recently honored 
their 25 and 50-year members with a dinner 
dance held at the Polish Falcons. In charge 
of the banquet was Jack Kowalski with 
Business Agent Ted Dombrowski assisting. 
Shown in the picture at right are the 50-year 
members. Seated, left to right they are: Fred 
Uhlnian, Frank Kauffman, Bert Johnson, 
Conrad Blodine. Those standing are: Charles 
Chitwood, President, Earl Baldwin, Arthur 
Rose. T. J. Cunningham, George Hoornstra, 
and Conrad Blodine. The 25-year members 
pictured seated, left to right, are: Hilliard 
Daindridge, Ted Stoltz, Raymond Peel, 
Frank DiRienzo, Robert Kitts, and Mike 
Waratuka. In the middle row are: Jack 
Kowalski, F. J. Wagner, Ben Davis, King 
Chambers, Willard Fresch, W. H. Brown, 
Walter Jameson, and J. R. Kirsch. In the 
top row are: E. E. Borland, Leonard Paavola, 
Walter Parsons, Ted Davis, Sr., George 
Cook, and William Goranson. 

(15) NEW BETHLEHEM, PA.— At the an- 
nual recognition dinner of Local 811 held 
in the Hawthorn Fireball, H. A. McElhattan 
(second from left, front row) was honored 
for bis long years of service when he re- 
ceived a 50-year service pin. The other men 
pictured received their 25-year service pins. 
They are, left to right, front row: Fred Allen, 
McElhattan, Calvin Shick, and William 
Jackson. Second row: Irwin Miller (presi- 
dent), Vern Hopper, William Allen (record- 
ing secretary), and David Walters. Other 
members who received their 25-year service 
pins but were not able to attend the dinner 
were: Harold Gourley, Merle Sherman, Mal- 
by Davis, Charles Haddan, and E. M. 
Skinner. The pins were presented by Bright 
Remaley, business agent. 




WE'VE BEEN SWAMPED with pictures of 25-year 
and 50-year pin presentations since we began run- 
ning them regularly and systematically in The 
Carpenter. Consequently, we sometimes get as 
much as two or three months behind in pub- 
lishing them in the limited space allotted by each 
40-page issue of the magazine. We ask our mem- 
bers and local unions to bear with us, patiently, 



as we attempt to present them all. Often it's two 
or three months after the presentation ceremony 
before the local union obtains photographic prints 
and identification to send us. With this factor 
added, this means we won"t be able to publish a 
June activity until the following winter! We urge 
that you send in your pin pictures as promptly and 
completely identified as possible. — The EDITOR. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




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SEASONED MEMBERS 

From time to time, local unions proud- 
ly recognize their "seasoned members" 
who have served long and well in the 
local ranks. These are five recently pre- 
sented to us: 




Upper left: 

John Wordstrom 

Upper right: 
Carl Poppe 

Right: Raymond 
Sammons 



P. A. DAY has been a member of Local 
993, Miami, Fla., since 1904 and has 
served the Brotherhood since 1901, 
when he joined Local 819 of West 
Palm Beach, Fla. 

JOHN R. WORDSTROM has been a 
member of Local 113 since March 
20, 1905, and has received his 60-year 
pin. 

CARL POPPE — In January, 1967, mem- 
bers of Local 224, Cincinnati, C, were 
saddened by the death of Carl Poppe. 
His 60 years of membership and serv- 
ice to the Brotherhood as recording 
secretary of Local 224 for 45 years, 
and as recording secretary of Local 
628 set a record. 

RAYMOND SAMMONS has been a 
member of Local 132 for 60 years. 

HENRY VRBECKY, who had been a 
50-year member of Local 11, Cleve- 
land, Ohio, passed away on January 
11, 1967. 



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FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 



JULY, 1967 



3S 



HOME STUDY COURSE 

Answers to Questions on Page 23. 

1. 5'-6" (Section 1110; Sheet 11) 

2. Integral water proofing shall be added 
to concrete wall and floor slabs below 
lOO'-O" elevation. It shall contain 4/5 
quart per bag of concrete of Red 
Label Suconem as manufactured by 
Super Concrete Emulsions, Ltd. and 
placed according to their directions. 
(Specifications; Concrete Work) 

3. Stirrups and tie bars may be plain 
bars. (Specifications; Concrete Work) 

4. Before re-using forms, or when re- 
using second hand lumber for forms, 
they shall be cleaned and all nails 
removed therefrom. The forms shall 
then be oiled with non-staining oil or 
other preparation as approved by the 
engineer, except where concrete is to 
be plastered. (Specifications; Con- 
crete Work) 

5. No. Forms for concrete to be plas- 
tered shall be made with untreated 
lumber. All soffits to be plastered 
shall have rough lumber adjacent to 
the pour. (Specifications; Concrete 
Work) 

6. Yes. Steel forms shall be used to 
form all exposed concrete. (Specifica- 
tions; Forms) 

7. The ends of the forms are to be built 
as a bulkhead with keyways attached. 
(Specifications; Forms) 

8. Forms are not to be disturbed until 
the concrete has achieved adequate 
strength to carry its own weight and 
all other loads that may occur sub- 
sequently; normally seven days. 
(Specifications; Forms) 

9. Brick veneer shall be rose ruffled 
roman face brick, IVi" x 3Vi" x 
llVi" in size. (Specifications; Ma- 
sonry) 

10. The elevations vary from 100'-3" at 
the lobby to 103'-3" at the upper 
garage; a difference of 3'-0". (First 
Floor Plan; Sheet 1 and Elevations; 
Sheet 3) 

11. The elevations at the extreme end of 
the aisles are 100'-3" and 99'-3". 
This indicates a slope of I'-O". (First 
Floor Plan. Sheet 1 and Structural 
First Floor Plan; Sheet 13) 

12. The office area partitions are to be 
mill made and mill finished with 
Honduras mahogany plywood panels 
set to a 3'-6" height and topped with 
Vi" plate polished glass 2'-6" in 
height with appropriate vertical sup- 
ports. (First Floor Plan; Sheet 1. 
First Floor Office Details; Sheet 8 
and Specifications; Finish Carpentry 
and Mill work) 

13. The office space floor is to be covered 
with 9" X 9" X Va" thick asphah tiles. 
The color is to be selected by the 
architect. It shall be finished with 
coved topset type base 4" high to 
match the floor tile. (Interior Finish 
Schedule; Sheet 2, First Floor Office 



Details; Sheet 8 and Specifications; 
Asphalt Tile and Vinyl Plastic Tile) 

14. A terrazzo floor is specified in the 
lobby area. (Interior Finish Schedule; 
Sheet 2 and Lobby Details; Sheet 8) 

15. 3'-2". (First Floor Plan; Sheet 1 and 
First Floor Details; Sheet 8) 

16. The wood valance is attached to the 
acoustical tile ceiling and is fabri- 
cated to follow the profile of the tele- 
register. Its overall vertical height is 
l'-6" from the finished ceiling. The 
framing is set at 24" centers and 
attached to the ceiling through nail- 
ing channels by V-i " hanger rods 
spaced at 30" O.C. (Detail of Val-' 
ance; Sheet 8) 

17. A marble finish is specified on this 
wall. (Interior Finish Schedule; Sheet 

2 and Lobby Details; Sheet 8) 

18. The wall is to be framed with 4" 
steel studs set at 16" O.C. (Lobby 
Details; Sheet 8) 

19. The height of the ceiling in the lobby 
area is lO'-lO". (Sect. A-A; Sheet 5 
and Lobby Details; Sheet 8) 

20. This means that the valance will be 
turned and continued until it meets 
the nearest wall. (First Floor Plan; 
Sheet 1) 

21. The corner mullions are to be 3" 
square and the typical mullions are 
to be lV2"x3"; end mullions are 
considered similar to corner mullions. 
(First Floor Office Details; Sheet 8) 

22. The architectural symbol indicates 
that they are solid, but corner or end 
mullions may be cored if the con- 
tractor desires to fabricate them in 
this manner. (First Floor Details; 
Sheet 8) 

23. The wood rail has an overall length 
of 18'-lli/2" at a height of 2'-6". 
(First Floor Office Details; Sheet 8) 

24. The wood rail is fabricated with 2x3 
studs and plates. The sole plate is 
anchored to the floor with Vs" bolts 
set 3'-0" O.C. The studs are spaced 
16" O.C. The wall is held in place 
by clip "L's" at the ends of the parti- 
tion and at 4'-0" O.C; V4" hard- 
wood plywood is nailed to the frame- 
work and a hardwood cap is set on 
the top plate. (First Floor Office De- 
tails; Sheet 8) 

25. The detail section #2 shows a hori- 
zontal view. It should be noted that 
the circled numbers 1 through 13 
with a horizontal or vertical line ex- 
tended from the circles indicates the 
section which is being described; they 
are sectioned vertically and hor