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Full text of "Carpenter"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/carpenter90unit 





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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



First District, Patrick Campbell 

190 Main Street 

New City, New York 10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3. Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Marietta Street, Suite 913 
Atlanta, Georgia 30303 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



mm 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should he mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local No. 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(3£\DQK!KatfBD3 




VOLUME XC 



No. I 



JANUARY, 1970 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

The Myth of Housing Costs Nathaniel Goldfinger 2 

Joiner Apprentice of 1805 Had to 'Behave Himself 5 

First General Vice President Finlay Allan Dies 6 

The 1970 Census Measures our Problems and Progress 8 

New Softwood Lumber Standards 12 

Shorter Work Week Was Urged by Famed Scientist Einstein 

Harry Conn 35 

Safeguards Urged on Pension Funds 36 

Seasonal Construction Layoffs, Custom as Much as Weather 38 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 11 

We Congratulate 17 

Service to the Brotherhood 19 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Soetz 23 

Plane Gossip 25 

CLIC Report 26 

Canadian Report 28 

Local Union News 31 

In Memoriam 34 

What's New? 37 

Lakeland News Joseph Plymate 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Chanqe of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave.. N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20£ in advance. 



THE COVER 

Nature's quick-change artist — snow 
— dazzles the eye, delights farmers, 
inspires poets, and unnerves sub- 
urbanites. 

On a clear, crisp day, the jumbled 
ice crystals in new-fallen snow pro- 
duce a dazzling light. Acting as 
prisms, the crystals bend light to 
produce all the colors of the 
spectrum. Since the crystals are 
mixed, the colored rays emerge from 
many sides and directions. 

Every state, including Hawaii, gets 
some snow. In the agricultural West, 
a deep snowfall is like white gold. 
Snow provides water for irrigation, 
drinking, and power. 

From January to May. snow sur- 
veyors trudge through white drifts 
piled high on high western mountains. 
They measure the snow's depth and 
moisture content to estimate the 
amount of water that will flow into 
valleys in spring and summer. 

Snow measurements are regarded 
as an essential part of agricultural 
planning. For instance, farmers on a 
70,000-acre tract in central Idaho 
saved an estimated $300,000 in two 
years by matching crop acreage to 
the expected water supply. 

In the metropolitan East, however, 
a snowfall can be unbelievably ex- 
pensive. Snow paralyzes traffic, dis- 
rupts communications, isolates sub- 
urbs, and closes schools. The great 
storms in January, 1966, cost one 
city — the Nation's Capital — almost 
a million dollars. 



Printed in U. S. A. 





The Myth Of Housing Costs 



■ In the next 30 years America's 
population is expected to grow by at 
least 80 million — equal to adding the 
present populations of England and 
France to the United States. And the 
overwhelming majority of these peo- 
ple will live in urban areas. Yet mil- 
lions of Americans today are ill- 
housed and major portions of central 
cities are dilapidated or decaying 
areas. 

The Housing Act of 1949 estab- 
lished a national housing goal of "a 
decent home and a suitable environ- 
ment for every American family." But 
the government did not place major 
emphasis on meeting the nation's 
housing needs and for many low- and 
moderate-income families that goal 
was not fulfilled. 

Nineteen years later. Congress 
adopted the Housing and Urban De- 
velopment Act of 1968, to speed up 
the building and rehabilitation of hous- 
ing through federal assistance and a 
variety of incentives to business. The 



BY NATHANIEL GOLDFINGER 

Director of the AFL-CIO Department of Research 
Reprinted from the AFL-CIO Federationist 

Act's 10-year goal of 26 million addi- 
tional dwelling units, including at least 
6 million subsidized units for low- and 
moderate-income families, can be met 
only if there is a national commitment 
backed by effective government poli- 
cies to achieve it. 

But today, more than a year after 
the 1968 Act was adopted, there is 
little evidence of such government pol- 
icies and measures. The clear-cut evi- 
dence, in terms of actual construction, 
is to the contrary. 

To achieve 26 million additional 
dwelling units in 10 years — an average 
yearly rate of 2.6 million — the number 
of housing starts in 1969 should be 
moving up sharply from the 1.5 mil- 
lion units in 1968 toward 2 million. 
But the government's restrictive mone- 
tary and fiscal policies and the highest 
interest rates in 100 years are causing 
a sharp decline of residential construc- 
tion rather than a sharp increase. 

Between the winter months of 1968- 
69 and the past few months, the yearly 



rate of housing starts has dropped 
from 1.7 million dwelling units to 1.4 
million. Housing starts are headed 
down, not up. Unemployment among 
construction workers is increasing. 

The soaring trend of interest rates is 
pricing an increasing percentage of 
families out of the market for single 
family homes and new apartments. 
Skyrocketing interest rates have in- 
creased costs to home builders, prices 
and monthly payments to home buyers 
and rents to those who seek new 
apartments. 

The economics department of the 
National Association of Home Build- 
ers reports that monthly payments on 
principal and interest on a 25-year 
mortgage with 20 percent down pay- 
ment rose from $139.80 for a $25,- 
000 house purchased in June 1968 to 
$156.96 for a similar home bought in 
mid-August 1969, as the result of soar- 
ing money costs. This is a rise of 
$17.16, or over 12 percent to be paid 
every month for 25 years. 



THE CARPENTER 



While the Secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment speaks in general terms of the 
need to increase home building, the 
Federal Reserve, the Treasury De- 
partment and the White House are 
embarked on a severely restrictive eco- 
nomic policy that tightens the money 
supply, shoots interest rates upward 
and hits residential construction. The 
Administration's talk and actions have 
been in opposite directions. 

America is actually moving back- 
ward in home building, while there is 
considerable talk of moving forward. 

Some of this talk about moving 
ahead, towards meeting the nation's 
urgently needed housing goal, centers 
around the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development's "Operation 
Breakthrough." If we are to believe 
at least part of the sales pitch that sur- 
rounds it, "Operation Breakthrough" 
is soon going to result in a reduction, 
or considerably slower rise, in the 
price of residences, monthly payments 
on homes and rents on apartments. 
Such an objective is certainly a worthy 
one. 

National attention has been focused 
on an effort to cut the costs of con- 
struction — material and labor costs — 
through radical changes in the tech- 
nology and management of residential 
construction as a key to solving the 
housing problem. However, even if 
one or more radical technological 
breakthroughs are achieved in experi- 
mental stages in the next year or two, 
it would probably take another 5 to 
10 years before these breakthroughs 
could be tested sufficiently through ex- 
perience and consumer response. 

There is an obvious time lag be- 
tween radical technological changes in 
experimentation and significantly wide- 
spread application. If any radical tech- 
nological breakthroughs are achieved, 
they will have little impact on Ameri- 
ca's ability to meet the 10-year hous- 
ing goal established by congressional 
legislation in 1968. 

What the present effort may actu- 
ally achieve, after stripping it of the 
sales pitch, is much more mundane 
than the "breakthrough" title implies. 
If reasonably successful, it should be 
able to accelerate the continuing trend 
of the past 25 years towards pre-fab 
components, pre-fab units and mod- 
ules — all of which would step up the 
trend toward reducing the on-site labor 
component of the price. It should be 
able to increase the use of new mate- 
rials, such as plastics. It should help 
to attract some large firms into the 
business and improve the managerial 
efficiency of residential construction. 



Wages Are Only 16% 
Of New Home Costs 

Construction labor costs on a $21,200 three-bedroom house in 
this area run about $3,444 — or 16 percent of the total a study by 
the Milwaukee Building & Construction Trades Council revealed. 

The study was conducted in cooperation with a Milwaukee building 
contractor in an effort to establish the facts on construction costs and 
refute charges that labor costs are responsible for the high price of 
housing, the council said. 

Pres. John Zancanaro of the trades council said "the rising cost 
of materials, the soaring cost of land and particularly exorbitant 
interest rates have become the principal factors in the inflated prices 
of real estate today." 

The $21,200 cost of the test home included the $5,000 price tag of 
a typical lot for such a house in the Milwaukee area. 

Zancanaro said the number of manhours needed to complete the 
home by skilled union craftsmen totaled 506 Vi hours. 

The findings shattered the widespread myth that labor is the major 
factor in the cost of home construction, Zancanaro observed. He said 
there appears to be a general misconception that labor costs account 
for more than 50 percent of the price of a new home. 

Here is a breakdown of the construction labor costs: 



Type of Work 

Excavating 

Footings, base floor 

Basement 

Carpentry 

Gutters and heating 

Roofing 

Electrical 

Plumbing 

Outside sewer 

Painting 

Tile 

Driveway, landscaping 

(Social Security) 

Total 



Manhours 

4 hours 

17 

36 

217 

20 

7 
32 
42 

51/2 
72 

6 
48 



506V2 



Cost 


$ 25.00 


101.69 


239.52 


1,422.40 


138.20 


44.24 


213.12 


301.14 


32.72 


454.07 


37.80 


277.20 


257.77 



$3,444.37 



All of these would result in some 
cost reductions, if — and it is a big if 
in the light of actual experience — if 
there is a large and expanding volume 
of construction. In fact, a large vol- 
ume of home building would by itself 
provide some cost savings and unless 
a steady expansion of volume opera- 
tions can be achieved, even the feas- 
ible aspects of this effort will remain 
largely unrealized. 

However, we are told by the news 
media that labor costs are the chief 
problem in residential construction. 
Many people believe this myth and 
they also believe that trade unions are 
the major impediment to reduced hous- 



ing costs, although only about 20 per- 
cent or less of residences are union 
built. 

Following through on these views, 
public attention has been focused on 
a need to reduce on-site construction 
activities, particularly the on-site labor 
cost, by moving many of these build- 
ing activities from the construction 
site to the factory. And the aim is to 
prevent such savings on on-site labor 
from being offset by increased costs of 
producing and transporting materials 
from the factories through the stepped- 
up use of new and less expensive ma- 
terials. 



JANUARY, 1970 



But Dr. Michael Sumichrast, chief 
economist of the National Association 
of Home Builders, recently supplied 
the Joint Economic Committee of 
Congress with details on the costs of a 
single-family residence and the figures 
tell a vastly different story. 

Dr. Sumichrast's figures show that 
between 1949 and 1969, on-site labor 
costs fell sharply from 33 percent of 
the price of a home to 18 percent — in- 
dicating a considerable shift to pre-fab 
factory operations and a rise in on- 
site productivity, as well as sharp in- 
creases in other costs. 

While this shift from on-site labor 
to factory and materials activities was 
taking place, the cost of materials in- 
creased only slightly, from 36 percent 
of the price of a home to 38 percent. 
In those 20 years, the cost of the 
structure — everything excluding land, 
financing and profit — fell from 70 per- 
cent of the price in 1949 to 56 percent 
of the price in 1969: 

Home Building Cost, 1949 and 1969 

1949 1969 



Structure 70% 56% 

On-site labor ... 33% 18% 

Materials 36% 38% 

Land 11% 21% 

Overhead and profit 15% 13% 

Financing 5% 10% 

Average price $9,780 $20,534 

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics and National 
Association of Home Builders Economic Depart- 
ment Congressional Record, October 29, 1969, 
pg. E9II3. 



The focus of attention therefore is 
on only 56 percent of the price of a 
single-family home — and on those 
costs, which have been either sharply 
declining or relatively stable compo- 
nents of the price. But there is little 
if any attention given to the sharply 
rising components of the price — land 
costs and financing costs which, in 
combination, rose from 16 percent of 
the price of a home in 1949 to 31 
percent in 1969. 

As an example, based on these fig- 
ures, the on-site labor cost of a $20,- 
000 house is $3,600. Let us assume 
that this cost is reduced 20 percent 
through the increased use of pre-fab, 
which brings the on-site labor cost 
down to $2,880. If the cost of mate- 
rials can be held the same, despite the 
shift to pre-fab, and if land and inter- 
est rate costs and profits were all 
stable, the 20 percent cost-saving would 
reduce the price of the $20,000 house 
to $19,280. That is a saving, but 
hardly a "breakthrough." 

Moreover, to the home buyer or 
renter, the actual saving in monthly 
payments or rent is much smaller than 
even that small amount. On this as- 
pect of the issue, the report of the 
Kaiser Committee on Urban Housing, 
issued in December 1968, sheds some 
light. And the Kaiser Committee's 
cost breakdowns are reasonably close 
to those of the National Association 
of Home Builders. According to the 
Kaiser Committee's report, the on-site 
labor cost is 19 percent of the price 
of a single-family home and 22 per- 
cent of the price of an elevator apart- 
ment unit, while the materials cost is 
36 percent of the price of a private 
home and 38 percent of an apartment 
unit. 

According to the Kaiser Commit- 



tee's report, debt retirement — on prin- 
cipal and interest — is only 53 percent 
of the monthly occupancy cost of a 
single-family home and merely 42 
percent of the monthly rent of an 
elevator apartment unit. Other costs 
include such factors as taxes, utilities 
and maintenance. 

According to these Kaiser Com- 
mittee estimates, the price of the mort- 
gage, and the interest payments on 
that price, amount to only about one- 
half of the monthly occupancy cost of 
a home or rent on an apartment. The 
on-site labor cost is approximately 
one-fifth of that amount, or only about 
9 percent to 1 1 percent of these 
monthly occupancy costs to the home 
owner or renter, including the interest 
payments on the labor cost: 

MONTHLY OCCUPANCY COSTS 

Rough Breakdown in Percent 

To 
Home To 
Owner Renter 

(Single (Elevator 
Family Apartment 
Unit) Unit) 

Debt retirement . 53% 42% 

Taxes 26% 14% 

Utilities 16% 9% 

Maintenance 

and repair .... 
Administrative and 

similar costs . . 
Vacancies, bad 

debts, and profits 



5% 



6% 



13% 



16% 



Total 100% 100% 

Source: McGraw-Hill Information Systems Tech- 
nical Report. President's Committee on Urban 
Housing, December 1968. 

Continued on Page 12 



THE CHANGE IN HOUSING COS" 



1949 



ON-SITE 
LABOR 



OVERHEAD 

AND 

PROFIT 




MATERIALS 



LAND 

AND 

FINANCING 



Average 1949 House: $9,780 



1969 



ON-SITE 
LABOR 



OVERHEAD 

AND 

PROFIT 




MATERIALS 



LAND 
AND 
FINANCING 
Average 1969 House: $20,534 



THE CARPENTER 



Joiner apprentice 
of 1805 had to 
( behave himself 

The joiner apprentice of 1 805 
was truly "in his master's service," 
judging by an early-day indenture 
agreement recently acquired by 
Louis Israel Martel, secretary- 
treasurer of the New Hampshire 
State Council of Carpenters. 

Martel purchased the document 
recently at an antique show near 
his home town of Manchester. He 
made a copy of it for the director 
of the apprentice training program 
in his district and sent a second 
copy to the editor of The Car- 
penter. 

Far different from the printed 
apprenticeship agreements of to- 
day, the indenture reproduced at 
right was, nevertheless, a binding 
and legal document and typical of 
craft-training arrangements in the 
nation's infancy. This is the text 
of the agreement: 

This indenture witnesseth, that Na- 
thaniel Graves, son of Joseph Graves 
late of Deerfield in the County of 
Rockingham and of New Hampshire 
deceased by and with this consent 
of his guardian. William Graves of 
Brintwood, in the County of Rock- 
ingham aforesaid, hath put and bound 
himself: and, by these presents, doth 
voluntarily put and bind himself ap- 
prentice to Edward Page of Deerfield 
aforesaid joiner to learn his art trade 
or mystery, and with his the said 
Edward Page after the manner of an 
apprentice to serve, from the day of 
the date hereof for and during the 
full term of three years and seven 
months and until the said Nathaniel 
arrives to twenty-one years of age. 
During all which term of time the 
said apprentice his said master faith- 
fully shall serve, his servants keep, 
and lawful commands everywhere 
obey. He shall do no damage to his 
said master, he shall not waste his 
said master's goods, nor lend them 
unlawfully to any. He shall not com- 
mit fornication, nor contract matri- 
mony within said term; at cards and 
dice or any other unlawful game, he 
shall not play; he shall not absent 
himself by day or by night from his 
master's service without his leave nor 
haunt ale houses, taverns or play 
houses; but in all thing behave him- 
self as a faithful apprentice ought to 

Continued on Page 30 



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JANUARY, 1970 




First General Vice President Finlay C. Allan Dies 



■ Finlay C. Allan, the hon- 
ored and highly-respected First 
General Vice President of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners of America, 
passed away December 12, after 
a lingering illness brought on by 
a heart ailment. 

He was 61 when he died, and 
his record of devoted service to 
the union spanned more than four 



decades. He served the labor 
movement and his community in 
a wide range of capacities. He will 
be sorely missed in the ranks of 
the Brotherhood. 

A native of Scotland, First Gen- 
eral Vice President Allan brought 
to his craft and his career the 
purposeful and forceful demeanor 
of his Scottish forebears. 

An editorial in The Building 



Tradesman, of Detroit, Mich., a 
newspaper he helped to found 
many years ago, said of him: "He 
brought to the House of Labor 
a brand of personal integrity that 
may have been matched by some 
past leader, but it has never been 
excelled." As the newspaper 
added, he was a man of honor 
in all of his dealings both inside 
and outside the labor movement. 



THE CARPENTER 



Hundreds of his fellow trade 
unionists and friends braved win- 
ter winds to join Mrs. Allan and 
her immediate family in a me- 
morial service to him at Coles- 
ville Methodist Church in Silver 
Spring, Md., Monday, December 
15. Expressions of sympathy, in 
lieu of flowers, were sent to the 
Montgomery County, Maryland, 
Heart Fund Memorial and to the 
Finlay C. Allan Memorial at the 
Colesville Church. 

Brother Allan joined Carpen- 
ters Local 337 in Detroit in 1929 
and was elected its financial sec- 
retary in 1938. Two years later 
the local union elected him busi- 
ness representative. 

In 1941 he became secretary- 
treasurer of the Detroit Carpen- 
ters District Council and six years 
later was elected secretary-man- 
ager of the Detroit Building 
Trades Council, covering Michi- 
gan's Wayne, Oakland, and Ma- 
comb counties. During nine years 
in that position, he served on the 
Detroit Housing Commission, the 
Wayne County Board of Super- 
visors, the governor's St. Law- 
rence Seaway Commission, and 
the governor's Committee on La- 
bor Legislation. During his ten- 
ure as secretary-treasurer of the 
Detroit Carpenters District Coun- 
cil, membership more than tri- 
pled—from 3,000 in 1941 to 
10,000 in 1947. 

He was instrumental in the es- 
tablishment of the United Fund, 
a civic health and welfare en- 
deavor in his home city, and inter- 
ested the building trades in playing 
a vital role in its functions. 

Two of his official labor as- 
signments took him abroad. In 
1949 he represented the AFL- 
CIO Building and Construction 
Trades Department as a delegate 




First General Vice President Allan as he 
addressed a gathering in Washington, 
a year ago, sponsored by the Associated 
General Contractors. He told labor and 
management officials at that time that 
many so-called labor shortages could be 
overcome if answers to the problems of 
seasonality could be found. 




The late First General Vice President 
as he received a proclamation from a 
Chicago official, last August, designating 
the week of the 1969 International Ap- 
prenticeship Contest as Carpenter Appren- 
ticeship Week in the Windy City. 




Brother Allan, center, as he presented 
trophies to the carpenter winner in the 
1969 Apprenticeship Contest. 

to the International Labor Orga- 
nization in Rome, and in 1953 
he was a labor consultant to the 
Industrial Exhibition in Berlin. 



A staunch and dedicated un- 
ionist all of his life, Brother Allan 
went to Indianapolis, Ind., as a 
special assistant to General Pres- 
ident Maurice Hutcheson in 1956. 
He became second general vice 
president in 1 962 and was moved 
up to first general vice president 
in 1 964 following the retirement 
of lohn R. Stevenson. 

One of his constitutional duties 
as first general vice president was 
to head up the growing apprentice- 
ship and training program of the 
International Union. He was truly 
a guiding force in this area, at- 
tending countless apprenticeship 
graduation ceremonies, partici- 
pating in Federal, state and local 
gatherings designed to implement 
the manpower needs of the nation. 

Since he became head of this 
program, the annual International 
Apprenticeship Contest has grown 
from a small annual contest on 
the West Coast to a truly Inter- 
national competition attracting 
state and provincial winners from 
throughout the United States and 
Canada. 

Under his guidance, training 
courses for teaching journeymen 
additional skills were inaugurated. 
Job Corps Centers were made 
dynamic training grounds for dis- 
advantaged youngsters interested 
in entering carpentry as a career. 

In addition, he has directed 
the preparation of training mate- 
rials, home study courses, and in 
other ways made the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America one of the 
most respected, forward looking 
unions in America today in the 
field of apprentice training. 

Brother Allan is survived by 
his wife, Mary, and two sons, 
David A. of Burlington, N.C., 
and Bruce A. of Seabrook, Md. 



JANUARY, 1970 




The 1970 Censt 



A family assists a U.S. census enumerator in completing a 
detailed questionnaire of the 1970 survey. 



Much more 

is involved 

than counting 

noses 



Curiosity and concentration are in evidence as census forms 
are completed. All information is kept confidential; there have 
been no known exceptions to this principle. 




H How do the citizens of Maine, "Missouri or Mis- 
sissippi — or any state — know how many Represent- 
atives they can send to the Congress of the United 
States? How does the school board of Elmwood, 
Pennsylvania, know where it must build new elemen- 
tary schools? Junior high schools? Senior high schools? 
How does the Taeuber Company of Kalamazoo, Mich- 
igan, know where to locate its next supermarket? The 
Goldfield Construction Company of Atlanta, Georgia, 
its high-rise apartments? 

The answers to such questions and to scores of 
other community queries are based on various facts 
about people — how many there are, how many are 
men, women, boys, girls, how old they are, in what 
geographical area they live, how many are home- 
owners, renters, how many live in houses, in apart- 
ments, what they do to earn their living, and many 
other people facts. 

These people facts provide a reservoir of basic eco- 
nomic and social figures needed for the nation's use. 
They are made possible because American house- 
holds reply to questions asked of them every ten years 
by the Bureau of the Census, a part of the U. S. 
Department of Commerce. 

The Nineteenth Decennial Census, to be taken on 
April 1. 1970, will ask population and housing ques- 
tions of every American household. Most of these 
questions were asked in 1960, and many have been 
asked at each decennial census over the years. Such 
continuity, of course, provides long-term comparative 
information needed for the country, its states, coun- 
ties, cities, and other divisions. It is this information 
which tells us where we've been, where we are, and 
where we're going in matters of population and 
housing. 

"Every question asked in the 1970 census has a 
national purpose," says Secretary of Commerce Mau- 
rice H. Stans. "Government programs for welfare, 
education, housing, veterans, senior citizens, minor- 
ities — and many others — depend on accurate counts 
of our people and how they live. Schools, businesses, 
our states, cities, and citizen groups all use census 
figures to plan their work and to measure our coun- 
try's problems and progress." 

Each household will receive a census form on 
March 28 and will be asked to answer all questions 
about members of the household and their housing. 
The number of questions to be answered, as an aver- 
age, will be the smallest of any census in the past 
100 years. Four out of five households will answer 
23 questions, requiring about 15 minutes for a family 
of average size. One household in five will answer 

THE CARPENTER 



Will Measure Our Problems and Progress 



additional questions, requiring another 30 minutes. 

In most large metropolitan areas, with about 60 
percent of the total U.S. population, each census form 
will be accompanied by a brown envelope addressed 
to a Census Bureau office. This envelope, containing 
the form with all questions answered, should be mailed 
by April 1. In other parts of the U.S., families will 
be asked to fill out the form on April 1 but hold it 
until it is picked up by a census enumerator. 

The census of population every 10 years is required 
by the Constitution to determine each State's repre- 
sentation in the House of Representatives. It also is 
used to apportion most State legislatures, city councils, 
and other governing bodies. 

Census figures also are used to apportion several 
billion dollars annually in federal funds to state and 
local governments for support of education, health, 
welfare, employment, and other services. They are 
also used to guide many business decisions. 

In filling out its census form, each family is asked 
to answer each question to the best of its ability. 
Estimates will be accepted if the precise answers are 



not known. Each question is to be answered by filling 
a small circle to create a black dot alongside the right 
answer. 

Each family's answers will be held in strict confi- 
dence by the Census Bureau. They may not be shown 
to tax offices, police, regulatory agencies, or to any 
person outside the Census Bureau. Every census 
worker takes an oath of confidentiality and would be 
subject by law to a heavy fine and imprisonment if 
he violated the oath by disclosing information about 
any person or family. There have been no known 
cases of such violation. 

In February, the Census Bureau will open about 
400 temporary offices, each responsible for taking the 
census of 300,000 to 800.000 persons. About 185,- 
000 temporary workers will be hired during the spring 
months to assemble questionnaires and to make sure 
that every household is included in the census. Most 
workers will earn about $2 an hour. 

Preliminary counts of population in each town, 
city, and county will be reported in late spring as 
each of the 400 district offices completes its enumera- 



From household head to 
telephone clerk to computer, 
a picture of our nation takes 
shape. 



JANUARY, 1970 




Focal point for census information is the U.S. 

Bureau of the Census in Suitland, Maryland, 

where census data is received, stored and 

correlated. 



tion. Final results will be reported by the Census 
Bureau during the period August through October. 
Official population figures for all. states, by law, must 
be reported to the President by December 1, 1970. 
Detailed statistics about characteristics of population 



and housing will be published during 1971 and 1972. 
Statistics will be reported for each state, county, city, 
town, metropolitan area, Congressional district, and, 
in the larger cities and their suburbs, for each census 
tract and city bloc. H 



Census Takers 
Often Encounter 
The Unexpected 

Census takers walk in on births and 
deaths, family quarrels, and household 
emergencies. They find themselves help- 
ing housewives hang out the wash, chang- 
ing babies' diapers, and joining bucket 
brigades to fight house fires. They are 
chased by dogs, goats, roosters, enraged 
bulls, and irate householders. They are 
invited to stay for dinner, to view the 
family album, and admire Sonny's col- 
lection of Indian arrowheads. They find 
themselves dealing with proposals of 
marriage and being kissed goodnight, 
along with the parents, by the children. 

They make their rounds on foot, by 
car, horseback, outrigger canoe, airplane, 
helicopter, snowshoes, skis, snowcats, 
motorboat. rowboat, or whatever means 
of travel is available and necessary to 
reach every household. 

They find people living in converted 
chicken houses, tin huts, old boxcars, 
caverns, packing crates, mine tunnels, 
barn lofts, and old street cars. 

Most census takers enjoy the work 
and many have said they would not take 
anything for the experience. One said 
she would not take a million dollars for 
it, "I met all kinds of people. 99 percent 
very cooperative and helpful in every 
way possible." 

e 

Many a census taker has found that 
census taking is not all census taking. 
One found herself acting as midwife at 
an isolated farmhouse. There was no 
time to take the mother to the hospital; 
the baby was about to be born, so she 
took charge and delivered the infant. 
When asked what he would be named, 
the mother sighed. "He's the eight and 
the last. We'll name him Quitten." 
• 

An elderly gentleman told the census 
taker that he had an invention that 
would cure any possible disease in a 
few days and he would sell it to her for 
a million dollars. 

• 

When asked how many children he 
had. the father of the neighborhood's 
largest family replied. "How many do 
you need to meet your quota?" 
e 

When asked if there was running 
water in the house, the woman replied. 
"No, but I'll be glad to turn it on and 
let it run for you if you want me to." 



DI5TICTS 


-Si «*, 5° • 

£ a is S 


Free nvhiteMales 
under fxteen 
years. 


Free white Fe- 
males, including 
heads cf families. 


All other free per- 
Jons. 


Slaves. 


Total. 


Vermont 


22435 


22328 


40505 


251 


16 


85539 


N. Hamfjhire 


36086 


3485-1 


70160 


630 


158 


14188$ 


Maine 


24384 


24748 


46870 


538 


NONE 


96540 


Maffachufclts 


9S453 


87289 


I90582 


5463 


NONE 


378787 


Rhode Ijland 


16019 


•5799 


32652 


3407 


948 


-68825 


ConneQicut 


60523 


544°3 


117448 


2808 


2764 


"3794° 


New Tori 


83700 


78122 


152320 


46?4 


21324 


340120 


New Jtrfey 


45251 


4141° 


83287 


2762 


» "423 


184139 


Pennjylvania 


I 10788 


106948 


206363 


°537 


3737 


434373 


Delaware 


11783 


12 >43 


22384 


3899 


8887 


59°94 


Maryland 


559'S 


5'339 


IOI395 


8043 


103036 


319718 


Virginia 


1 10936 


116135 


215046 


12866 


292627 


747610 


'Kentueiy 


•5'54 


17057 


28922 


»>4 


12430 


73677 


N. Carolina 


69988 


7 75 c6 


140710 


4975 


100572 


39375* 


S, Carolina 


35576" 


377 22 


66880 


1801 


107094 


249*73 


Georgia 

Total number of 


13103 


14044 


25739 


398 


29264 


8=548 


807094 


791850 


1541263 


^9150 


694280 


3893635 


v _ , 


-=r-e; — 


— c 


k. 






Ir.habitar.ti of 


-*a St 


* <s 


-* 








theUnited States 


3V* 

1> £ 


<; =*> 


S 






exclulhre of S. 


« « > 


!" «N 


-5J 4 


Slaves. 


Totml 


Weftern and N. 


£ r» *S 


•v v. i 


V. <3 


O * 






Tcnitory; 














S. W. territory 


6271 


10277 


153 6 5 


361 


34*7 


35691 


N. Ditto 


— 


— 





— 


— 


, m . _ 



Census Bureau 

The original U.S. Census showed a population of almost 4 million; 179 years later 
this figure has passed the 200 million mark. 



One family insisted that the census 
taker attach a family portrait to their 
census form. 

• 

The family raised pigeons which were 
allowed the run of the house. One mem- 
ber of the household was an evangelist 
who knelt in prayer while the pigeons 
flew around as the census taker inter- 
viewed the head of the house. 
© 

After repeated calls with no response 
at homes of elderly persons living alone, 
census takers usually make special efforts 



to find someone who can enter the house 
to investigate. Experiences in past cen- 
suses have often proven their concern 
was justified. 

• 
The persistence of a census taker led 
to the discovery of an elderly recluse 
who had been dead for over two weeks. 
After several unproductive trips to the 
shack, the census taker had called the 
police. 

• 
The man's feeble voice asked the 
Continued on Page 30 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




HUNG! 





ROUNDUP 



CHILD LABOR ABUSES— Federal wage-hour investigators found 11,273 children illegally- 
employed during the 1969 fiscal year, some of them in hazardous occupations with 
high accident rates. The investigations, which reached only a small portion of 
establishments covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act, turned up 10,024 under-age 
youngsters employed in non-farm establishments and 1,249 children illegally 
employed on farms. Of the non-farm group, 5,234 were 16- or 17-year-olds working 
at hazardous jobs where the minimum employment age is 18. 



CREDIT CARD HEADACHES— Credit cards shouldn't be sent to people who haven't 
requested them, the AFL-CIO wrote a Senate Banking subcommittee. Legislative 
Dir. Andrew J. Biemiller expressed labor's support for a credit card regulation 
bill sponsored by Sen. William Proxmire (D-Wis.), chairman of the Subcommittee 
on Financial Institutions. It would restrict the conditions under which credit 
cards could be sent without having been requested. Biemiller also expressed the 
AFL-CIO' s strong support for a provision of the Proxmire bill which would limit 
a credit card holder's liability for unauthorized use of his card to $50 and 
provide other safeguards. 



CONSUMER MEETING-The Annual Consumer Assembly to be held in Washington, Jan. 
14-16, will feature consumer spokesman Mrs. Bess Myerson Grant. Mrs. Grant, a 
former Miss America, is New York City's outspoken Commissioner of Consumer 
Affairs. Ealph Nader will be keynote speaker at the Assembly. 



MORE JOB BANKS— Ihe Department of Labor's national computerized job bank program 
will be expanded to 55 major cities in the current fiscal year instead of the 
36 originally planned. Seven job banks are already in service in Baltimore, 
Chicago, St. Louis, Portland, Ore., Seattle, Hartford, Conn., and Washington, 
D.C. Another seven will soon be operational in Minneapolis, Atlanta, San Diego, 
Phoenix, Denver, Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio. Twenty-two more are in the 
planning stage and 16 additional cities have been designated for job bank opera- 
tions. The job bank system uses a daily up-to-date computerized list of available 
jobs in a major metropolitan area in an effort to quickly place the disadvantaged 
or unemployed worker in the job opening. Job bank cities now in the planning stage 
are Anaheim, Calif., Boston, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, Detroit, 
Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Miami, Milwaukee, New Orleans, 
New York, Newark, Paterson, Philadelphia, San Bernardino, Oakland, San Jose and 
Tampa. The newly designated cities are Providence, Wilmington, Charleston, W.Va. , 
Birmingham, Louisville, Memphis, Little Rock, Albuquerque, Oklahoma City, Des 
Moines, Wichita, Omaha, Honolulu, San Antonio, Tacoma and San Juan, P.R. Three 
more cities will be named soon in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. 
Eventually, the city Job Banks will become a part of a fully automated statewide 
job matching system such as those operating on an experimental level in Wisconsin, 
California, Utah and New York. Florida and Michigan have systems in the planning 
stage. 



JANUARY, 1970 



11 



MYTH OF COSTS 

Continued from Page 4 

On the basis of these cost figures, a 
20 percent cut in construction work- 
ers' wages — or a 20 percent increase 
in productivity — would reduce the 
monthly occupancy cost to the home- 
owner or renter by only about 2 per- 
cent. The Kaiser Committee says, 
"All on-site labor costs represent such 
a small percentage of monthly rents 
that a general reduction of 20 percent 
for all workmen would mean only a 
reduction in rent from $100 a month 
to $98 in a typical unit." And that in- 
cludes the cost of the interest pay- 
ments on the on-site labor cost. 

While debt retirement of principal 
and interest is approximately only half 
of the monthly costs of a house or 
rent on an apartment, over one-half of 
the debt-retirement portion of those 
monthly payments is for interest 
charges, at recent interest rates. The 
price of the property, therefore, ac- 
counts for only about 20 to 25 per- 
cent of the monthly occupancy costs 
to the home owner or renter and, in 
turn, the on-site labor cost accounts 
for only about one-fifth of that 
amount. 

Therefore, the actual on-site labor 
cost component of monthly occupancy 
costs — excluding interest payments on 
the labor cost — comes to only approx- 
imately 4 to 5 percent of those month- 
ly costs of a homeowner or renter. A 
20 percent increase in the wages of all 
on-site workers — or a 20 percent re- 
duction of on-site labor through in- 
creased use of pre-fab — therefore di- 
rect'y involves only about $1 of each 
$100 of monthly rent or occupancy 
costs of a single-family home, when 
interest charges are excluded. 

All of this adds up to some very 
clear facts: The major part of housing 
costs to the renter or homeowner is 
interest charges — the price of bor- 
rowed money to the developer, build- 
er, landlord and homeowner. The on- 
site labor cost accounts for only a 
small part of the price of the property 
and a much smaller portion of month- 
ly occupancy costs to the owner. 

The on-site labor cost component 
of housing has been the victim of 
gross distortion, ignorance and anti- 
labor myths. The sole focus of pub- 
lic attention on on-site labor costs and 
labor-saving technology is largely based 
on a hoax. If the costs of housing are 
to be reduced — or if such rising costs 
to the consumer are to be slowed down 
— interest rates and land prices, as 
well as labor and material costs, have 



to be reduced or curbed and mana- 
gerial efficiency has to be improved. 

Anyone who focuses sole or major 
attention in the labor-cost component 
of housing costs — whether it be an 
Administration spokesman or college 
professor — is dodging the key issues 
of financing costs and land prices. Un- 
less those costs are cut or curbed, it 
will be impossible to bring the con- 
sumers housing costs under some man- 
ageable control — regardless of the 
progress in pre-fab. 

The building trade unions are co- 
operating with employers in the in- 
creased use of pre-fab and modules 
in residential construction. But sub- 
stantial advances along those lines can 
do only little to curb the consumer's 
housing costs if soaring land prices 
and financing charges are not cur- 
tailed. And unless land and financ- 
ing costs are curbed or reduced, it is 
unlikely that America can soon 
achieve the expanding volume of resi- 
dential construction the country needs 
and which, in itself, would produce 
some cost saving. 

Some people ask whether America 
has the material resources and man- 
power to attain the 10-year housing 
goal of 26 million dwelling units. The 
answer is decidedly yes. However, the 
needed national commitment, backed 
by effective government policies, has 
not been made. 

In 1955, private and public new 
housing activities accounted for about 
4.5 percent of the total national pro- 
duction. But in recent years, the dol- 
lar outlays for new residential con- 
struction have been not much greater 
than in 1955 — despite increased prices 
— and such activities have declined to 
about 2.5 percent of the much greater 
gross national product. 

In the coming years, total national 
production should rise by 4 to 4.5 
percent per year, excluding price 
changes, if high levels of production 
and emp'oyment are to be maintained 
— and probably about 5.5 to 7 percent 
per year in current dollars. If home 
building activities rise as fast in the 
1970s as total national production — 
in contrast to the sharp cyclical swings 
and relative stagnation since the mid- 
1950s — the volume of residential con- 
struction will increase, but not enough 
to attain 26 million additional dwell- 
ing units in 10 years. 

To attain the 10-year housing goal, 
private and public outlays for resi- 
dential construction will have to in- 
crease at a somewhat faster pace than 
the gross national product — to rise 
from about 2.5 percent of the GNP 



in recent years toward about 4.5 per- 
cent of a growing GNP in the seventh 
or eighth year. 

This is not an unreasonable goal in 
terms of feasibility. Such proportion 
of national economic activities for res- 
idential construction was attained in 
the past, as in 1955, and it can be at- 
tained during the course of the 1970s. 
But its achievement requires changes 
in government policy. 

One major needed change is for the 
federal government to shift from pro- 
viding inducements and subsidies for 
business investment in plant and 
equipment to an emphasis on housing. 
Federal policy will have to substan- 
tially curb its variety of devices to en- 
courage an increased share of total 
national production for business in- 
vestment in plant and equipment, 
which has cut into the flow of avail- 
able private savings for investment in 
home building — and which has also 
tended to increase the cost of bor- 
rowed money. 

Rates of increase and levels of busi- 
ness outlays for plant and equipment 
have been unsustainable in recent 
years. If such rates of increase and 
levels of business investment are 
brought down to more moderate and 
sustainable levels, more private sav- 
ings would be available for investment 
in new residential construction, which 
is the tailend of the money market. 

It would ease the residential con- 
struction industry's losing competition 
for available funds with business-in- 
vestment loans, which are considered 
the top choice in the money market. 
It would also eliminate or consider- 
ably reduce the sharp cyclical swings 
in home building, since it would pro- 
vide a steadier flow of private savings 
into residential construction. 

In addition, positive government en- 
couragement of home building is 
needed. Pooled mortgage bonds, au- 
thorized by the 1968 Act, would be 
of assistance in attracting funds into 
housing. Additional encouragement is 
probably necessary — such as a federal 
requirement that a modest portion of 
pension and similar trust funds be in- 
vested in government-guaranteed resi- 
dential mortgages for Internal Reve- 
nue Service approval. 

Such measures should be accompa- 
nied by a general reduction of interest 
rates, an ample growth of the money 
supply and, if monetary restraint is 
necessary, a sheltering of residential 
construction from the ravages of tight 
money. The combination of such gov- 
ernment policies is needed to provide 

Continued on Page 30 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



New Softwood Lumber Standard 
Ends Controversy, Aids Consumers 

Green lumber defined as lumber having 
moisture content in excess of 79 percent 



■ As any journeyman carpenter 
knows, no two pieces of lumber are 
alike — in structure, grain, cut, or mois- 
ture content. Standards and grading 
systems are needed to bring uniform- 
ity to any lumber yard. 

Almost 50 years ago, the American 
softwood lumber industry asked the 
U. S. Department of Commerce to 
help in establishing such standards, 
and, after some disagreement within 
the industry, the Department, in 1924, 
produced a voluntary standards pro- 
gram and labeled it Simplified Prac- 
tice Recommendation (SPR)R-16. 

It was a good start, but SPR 16 
didn't entirely do the job, even after 
its last previous revision in 1953. It 
failed to relate lumber size to moisture 
content. Also, none of the Department 
of Commerce revisions ever came up 
with adequate provisions for enforc- 
ing the standards. 

Down through the years, several 
U. S. Secretaries of Commerce have 
struggled with industry groups to es- 
tablish standards, have watched as pro- 
posed standards either went down in 
defeat for lack of a supporting major- 
ity or wound up in court litigation 
which achieved the same result. 

In 1953 the American Lumber 
Standards Committee, an impartial 
group, was established to seek a better 
and more-binding standard. 

FTC Takes Action 

Fifteen years later, in 1968, the 
Federal Trade Commission, an inde- 
pendent Federal agency, became con- 
cerned with "large areas of consumer 
deception" in lumber grading and 
called for the establishmment of trade 
trade regulations. The Secretary of 
Commerce at that time, C. R. Smith, 
praised FTC efforts. The American 
Lumber Standards Committee, too, 
took notice of the FTC action and 
adopted a resolution calling for man- 
datory grade marking of all common 
lumber produced under its supervision 
and authorized its leeal counsel to co- 
operate with the FTC in developing 
an appropriate trade regulation. 



The Department of Commerce at 
the time, however, was so discouraged 
by the failure of the industry to come 
up with satisfactory voluntary stand- 
ards in more than 40 years that Sec- 
retary Smith announced in luly, 1968, 
that the Department did not intend to 
recommend a revised standard. He 
said, in fact: 

"The increased fragmentation and 
diversity of opinion within the soft- 
wood lumber industry demonstrates 
that progress toward a sound national 
standard and effective enforcement and 
inspection procedures through the ex- 
ecutive solution proposed by the Com- 
merce Department on August 21, 
1967, is no longer practicable." 

But all hope was not lost. In the en- 
suing months the terms of office of the 
members and alternates of the Ameri- 
can Lumber Standards Committee 
were extended in the hope that some- 
thing still might be accomplished. 

Brotherhood Speaks 

As the discussions on standards pro- 
ceeded through the years, several rep- 
resentatives of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and loiners of American 
emphasized the need for intelligent 
lumber standards. General Treasurer 
Peter Terzick has been a member of 
the American Lumber Standards Com- 
mittee for a number of years and has 
tried to bring order out of the long- 
standing chaotic condition. We have 
represented the lumber and sawmill 
workers' interests — the men and wom- 
en concerned with the prosperity and 
good name of the industry itself. 

Somehow, in recent months, the 
momentum has built up and, as 1969 
drew to a close, the American Lum- 
ber Standards Committee finally pro- 
duced a standard which could be sup- 
ported by 21 of its 22 voting members 
and which was approved by 87% of 
the producers, distributors and con- 
sumers of lumber. 

On December 5, the Federal Reg- 
ister in Washington, D. C, published 
the first revised softwood lumber stand- 
ard in 16 years — and the first really 



good standard in a half century. It 
goes into effect on March 1 and is, as 
Secretary of Commerce Maurice Stans, 
states, "an important step for the con- 
sumer of lumber." 

The Secretary added: "The public 
interest required this truly national 
standard. Such a standard enhances 
the consumer's security in selecting the 
type of lumber to satisfy his needs." 

The Secretary pointed out that the 
new standard does permit slight reduc- 
tions in several sizes of lumber. How- 
ever, it avoids the present situation 
where seasoned and unseasoned lum- 
ber start off with the same dimen- 
sions but wind up having different di- 
mensions because of different shrink- 
age rates. The new standard takes ac- 
count of the fact that lumber shrinks 
as it dries by requiring green lumber 
to be finished to a size sufficiently 
larger than dry lumber so that both 
will have the same dimensions after 
seasoning. The Secretary expressed 
the hope that the reduced sizes being 
permitted under the standard would 
increase the supply of lumber to meet 
consumer and other national needs. 

"I am also hopeful that we will have 
widespread acceptance of an optional 
provision in the new standard which 
authorizes the machine grading of lum- 
ber," the Secretary said. Machine 
grading will enable consumers to know 
the precise characteristics of each piece 
of lumber being purchased. 

Nomenclature Problem 

Still to be worked out, the Secretary 
noted, is the continued use of nominal 
designations, such as 2x4, rather than 
actual lumber sizes. "I am concerned 
about this practice which has come 
about through common usage and I 
am pleased that the American Lumber 
Standards Committee, which has done 
a fine job in the revisions announced 
today, has agreed to focus its atten- 
tion on the nomenclature problem." 

The Committee has plans for a 

broad educational campaign designed 

to acquaint all consumers, including 

the do-it-yourself occasional purchaser. 

Continued on page 14 



JANU ARY, 1970 



13 



LUMBER STANDARDS 

Continued from Page 13 

of the actual dimensions of "standard" 
lumber. 

Secretary Stans offered the full co- 
operation of the Commerce Depart- 
ment to the Federal Trade Commis- 
sion in the development of appropriate 
trade regulations which might be nec- 
essary to protect consumers from the 
misgrading of lumber. 

About five months ago the National 
Bureau of Standards, responsible for 
implementing the Department's Vol- 
untary Product Standards progam, re- 
quested the Bureau of the Census to 
conduct a statistical survey to deter- 
mine the acceptability of the revision. 

The Census Bureau report indicates 
that the revision is acceptable to 87 
percent of the producers, distributors, 
and users-consumers of softwood lum- 
ber. Under the Department's proce- 
dures, an average acceptace of not less 
than 75 percent is required before a 
standard may be published. 

The new softwood lumber standard 
will be identified as Voluntary Product 
Standard 20-70, "American Softwood 
Lumber Standard." It will become 
fully effective on March 1, 1970. No 
lumber will be graded under the exist- 
ing Standard (SPR 16-53) after that 
date. 



r SCC£?>'i/5m 




JUST A REMINDER.. 



Do-It- Yourself Tax Packet Helps Claims To Benefits 



The Internal Revenue Service is de- 
termined to make paying taxes for all 
union members as pleasant as possi- 
ble. Here is a news release that in- 
forms, instructs and makes sure that 
you claim all the benefits that are 
coming to you. 

IRS has some good news and some 
bad news for union members this 
year. 

First the bad news: You still must 
pay your income tax. 

Now for the good news: Internal 
Revenue has developed a new income 
tax form to help make filling out your 
return a little easier. 

New Form 1040 

The new Form 1040, the product 
of long and thorough study, replaces 
both the old Form 1040 and the old 
card Form 1040A. 

The new 1040 combines the best 
features of both forms it replaces. It 
is a one-page basic form that every 
taxpayer will file, but separate pages 
may be added to let every taxpayer 
take advantage of all allowable deduc- 



tions, credits, and exclusions. 

The IRS estimates that 31 million 
taxpayers will need only the one-page 
basic form, while another 22 million 
will need to attach only one additional 
page. Thus, over two-thirds of the 77 
million returns due to be filed for 
1 969 will require only one or two 
pages. 

The new 1040 package, which all 
wage earners will receive this year, 
looks quite a bit different from the 
little card that many taxpayers have 
been receiving for years. For the tax- 
payer's convenience and ease in filing, 
the package includes the proper pages 
to attach if he wishes to itemize de- 
ductions as well as those he may need 
to report dividends or interest, pen- 
sions or annuities and other income. 

The back of the new 1040 carries 
detailed instructions and offers extra 
space for the taxpayer to list addi- 
tional dependents or to explain a miss- 
ing W-2. 

The redesigned format also makes 
it possible for the taxpayer to deal 



only with applicable items. For ex- 
ample, itemized deductions no longer 
appear on the same page as dividend 
and interest income but on a separate 
sheet with twice as much space as 
before. 

The new 1040 package also includes 
a worksheet that most taxpayers will 
not need to file, tax rates and tables, 
and optional state sales tax deduction 
tables. 

Broad Advantages 

For union members, the new Form 
1 040 offers the broad advantages of 
eliminating the troublesome choice of 
forms and responding to the individ- 
ual needs of both large and small 
taxpayers. 

In short, the Internal Revenue Serv- 
ice has designed the new 1040 pack- 
age for more convenient use. Having 
to pay income tax may still be bad 
news, but filling out a return that can 
be tailored to help you take advan- 
tage of every allowable tax benefit 
should be good news to every union 
member. (PAI) 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Indiana Local 
Recalls Member's 
Craft and Devotion 

A display in the hall of Carpenters 
Local 274, Vincennes, Ind., and a care- 
fully-tended headstone in a nearby ceme- 
tary bear witness to the affection and 
respect with which A. C. Pennington is 
remembered by his local, many of whose 
members never knew him personally. 

The display includes a beautifully 
hand-tooled suitcase, evidence of his im- 
agination and patience as a craftsman, 
and his framed last will and testament, 
written in 1919, leaving all his posses- 
sions, aside from funeral costs and a 
few small personal legacies (nine dollars 
and a watch among four friends), to the 
"Carpenters Union No. 274," which he 
also named as executor of his estate. 
W. F. Christian, recording secretary of 
the local, points out that a reading of 
the will "makes you see what a dedi- 
cated man he was." It also shows some 
interesting aspects of the social changes 
of the past half century; Pennington asks 
that his funeral be held on a Sunday, 
if possible, "so that Brothers could at- 
tend without loss of time or putting 
their employers to any inconveniance." 
Christian goes on to say that Local 274 
"is very proud to have had him for a 
member." 



" -™ 



Wisconsin Local Celebrates 70th Year 




Carpenter's Local 274, Vincennes, Ind., 
is proud of the handiwork of one of 
its departed members. It displays this 
leather case in its headquarters. 



Carpenfgf-i- . 



«ff W T ® f Hi 




r- 







Finlay Allan, the late First General Vice President of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, as he addressed members and guests of Local 
314, Madison, Wise, and of the state council. 

Carpenters Local 314, Madison. Wis- John Faust, president of Local 314, and 



consin, celebrated its 70th anniversary, 
last year, in conjunction with a celebra- 
tion of the 50th anniversary of the 
Wisconsin State Council. A total of 1725 
delegates and guests were welcomed by 



Ronald Stadler, president of the Wiscon- 
sin State Council of Carpenters. 

The main speaker at the banquet was 
the late First General Vice President 
Finlay C. Allan. 



Building Dedication 
Unfinished Business 

At a recent dedication ceremony for 
their new meeting hall, members of 
Carpenters Local 981, Petaluma, Calif., 
were reminded that the completion of 
a new building marked only one step in 
the continuing "unfinished business" of 
the local's aspirations and fellowship. 
The beginnings of the local were affec- 
tionately recalled: ". . . They were a 
hardy breed of men to whom the union 
cause was a sacred crusade, a labor of 
love the pay for which was more often 
than not a lump on the head. . . ." Pres- 
ident Gene Girard led the dedication 
ceremony meeting. 



SURFING CHAMP 




DON'T BUY GE 



SUPPORT THE 150,000 WORKERS ON STRIKE 



Geri Algaw, a comely member of Lo- 
cal 530, Los Angeles, Calif., shown last 
month in our Journal article on Revell 
model-kit workers, is shown above, ex- 
hibiting the poise which has won her 
many surfing trophies in West Coast 
competition. Miss Algaw works along 
Revell packaging lines. 



JANUARY, 1970 



15 



Brotherhood Members and Their Families Are 
Urged to Support GE Strike and Boycott 




GE strikers are "completely fed up with the General Electric Company and its 
style" of arrogant bargaining, AFL-CIO Vice President James A. Suffridge told a 
recent Atlanta, Ga., labor rally which pledged to back the 150.000 strikers to vic- 
tory. Brotherhood Local Bus'ness Representative Billy Henderson, seated at right 
on the platform, and AFL-CIO Regional Director Oliver W. Singleton, left, repre- 
sented the AFL-CIO Coordinated Bargaining Committee at the gagthering. 

Economists Give Warnings of 
Sharp Recessions Next Year 

Are we or are we not in for a sharp 
recession this year? 

Opinions vary, but there are at least 
two economists who are now giving 
support to what the AFL-CIO Execu- 
tive Council said last August when it 
said that "the risk of recession grows 
daily" as a result of soaring interest 
rates and tight money. 

Economists at the Survey Research 
Center of the University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor have just come out with 
a report saying that consumer attitudes 
are continuing to "deteriorate" for the 
third successive quarter and are now 
close to the low point that was reached 
before the 1957-58 recession. 

Unless there is good news on a num- 
ber of fronts in such areas as inflation, 
the war in Vietnam or tax relief, the 
economists predict "a decline in con- 
sumer demand for cars and other 
durables, leisure-time pursuits and 
other optional goods and services". 

As compared with a Consumer 
Sentiment Index of 100, the index fell 
to 79.7 in the fourth quarter of 1969. 
a sharp drop from the 95.1 recorded 
at the beginning of the year. Some 52 
percent of the 1.500 families inter- 
viewed expect higher unemployment 
against 20 percent a year ago while 40 
percent expect a recession as compared 
with 26 percent a year ago. 



From New York has come a warn- 
ing that there will be a sharp recession 
next year unless the Federal Reserve 
Board eases its tight money policy. 
Dr. Milton Friedman, economist of 
the University of Chicago, however, 
told a conference in Chicago that there 
was a good chance that the Federal 
Reserve might change its policies and 
relax its credit restrictions before long. 

'"The logic of the situation calls for 
immediate relaxation of monetary re- 
straints," he said. (PAI) 



Construction Trades 
Ease Housing Crisis 

Building trades unions are commit- 
ted to helping low-income families 
obtain adequate housing and also to 
advancing modern home building 
techniques, an article in the 1969 
Housing Yearbook points out. 

The writer. Boris Shishkin, is secre- 
tary of the AFL-CIO housing com- 
mittee and a director of the National 
Housing Conference, publisher of the 
yearbook. 

The record, Shishkin declares, 
shows that the building trades were 
a "prime mover" in helping secure 
low-rent public housing 35 years ago 
and have since backed "every policy 
and plan to enhance the housing op- 
portunities for the less fortunate." 

Noting that AFL-CIO affiliates were 
sponsoring some 230 housing projects 
for low-income families by mid-1969, 
Shishkin adds. "National and interna- 
tional unions in the building trades and 
local building trades councils have 
played a prominent part in sponsoring 
such projects." 

Regarding new construction tech- 
niques. Shishkin cites numerous 
examples of building trades unions 
and councils entering into agreements 
covering prefabricated housing. 

He also cites a 1967 survey of pre- 
fabrication made by Battelle Memorial 
Institute of Columbus, O., which was 
financed by the AFL-CIO Building & 
Construction Trades Dept. to help 
unions develop "informed and reason- 
able approaches to problems raised 
by this new technology." 
• 

Always look for the union label 
and union shop card where you're 
shopping. 



Building Trades Panel 

putes Plan 



rnes obs 



The National Joint Board of the 
AFL-CIO Building & Construction 
Trades Dept. and the National Par- 
ticipating Contractors Employers' As- 
sociations announced it will resume 
processing jurisdictional disputes. 

In a joint statement by the labor 
and employer organizations, it was 
noted that negotiations will begin soon 
on improvements in the procedural 
rules under which the board operates. 
Deadline for the talks was set for Feb. 
28 under an interim agreement. 

William J. Cour will continue as 
chairman of the National Joint Board 



and Richard J. Mitchell as chairman 
of the appeals board. 

Labor representatives on the joint 
board are Frank X. Hanley of the Op- 
erating Engineers. Maurice Francher 
of the Laborers. James J. O'Toole of 
the Sheet Metal Workers and Robert 
A. Georgine of the Lathers. 

The appeals board representatives 
from labor are William Sidell of the 
Carpenters. John L. McCarthy of the 
Iron Workers, Andrew B. Haas of the 
Asbestos Workers and William T. 
Dodd of the Plumbers & Pipe Fitters. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 





MMftOM 



?000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



%^| 



©f§#- #f^ #© 0© f| fl f 8 ^© 

i- 




HELLO, DOLLYI-Dorothy Lundblad, above, wife of Edward N. Lundblad, Local 19, 
Detroit, Mich., prepared and dressed 100 dolls for the underprivileged children of 
her city, last Christmas. They were distributed by the Goodfellows organization of 
Dearborn Heights. Though she holds down a union job herself, as a member of 
Laundry and Linen Drivers Local 285, she managed to complete the doll-outfitting 
task over several months of shopping for cloth remnants and accessories. This 
was not her first time at the doll-dressing chore. She estimates that she has dressed 
more than 200 to date. 



ARMY TWIST — Continuing excellence 
makes for continuing recognition — or 
such is the experience of Specialist Five 
Robert W. Twist of 52d Engineer Battal- 
ion, Fort Carson, Colo., and a member 
of Local 122, Philadelphia, Pa. 



b 



^Mnrnmn 



Specialist Five Robert W. Twist, 52d En- 
gineer Battalion, is promoted by Maj. 
Gen. Roland M. Gleszer, left, command- 
er of 5th Infantry Division and Fort Car- 
son, and Capt. Richard Whelan, the gen- 
eral's senior aide. 



Twist has been selected three times 
as honorary enlisted aide for the day 
to Maj. Gen. Roland M. Gleszer. 

Reaching enlisted aide status is not 
easy. Soldiers are first selected colonels' 
aides, generally on the basis of appear- 
ance and attitude. 

Then one of the colonels' aides goes on 
to be the general's aide, following a per- 
sonal interview to determine each con- 
testant's knowledge of current events and 
military matters, attitudes and interests. 

A heavy construction carpenter in the 
Army, Twist was a union carpenter in 
civilian life. The 23-year-old Philadelphia 
native hopes to attend a trade college — 
he mentioned such a school in El Paso, 
Tex. — to study carpentry when he leaves 
the service. 

Continued on Page 18 



$ SCORED 

7 FACE 

ELIMINATES 

GLANCING 

BLOWS 

wwa 

999 

"It always pays 
to buy a good tool" — 
and there is none finer 
than the power packed 
Vaughan 999! 
The deep throat, 1V4 inch 
diameter striking head 
drives nails into the I 
most difficult areas with 
a minimum number of 
blows. The 16-inch 
long-reach white hickory 
handle is triple wedged 
into a specially tapered 
inner eye for 
permanently tight 
"sure-lock" fit. 
Plus many other 
outstanding features. 
For genuine satisfaction, 
select Vaughan 
tools first! 



^H^ - 



VAUGHAN & BUSHNELL MFG. CO. 
11414 Maple Ave., Hebron, III. 60034 



JANUARY, 1970 



17 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is y 2 
inch rise to 12 inch run . Pitches in- 
crease % inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is % inch and they increase 
Vi" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9V wide. Pitch 
is IV?" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 &. 1944 Copyrights. 



In U.S.A. send $3.00. We pay Postage 
and insurance 32c*. Calif ornians 15c 
tax, $3.15. No C.O.D. orders costing 
80c. We send to a Canadian Store. 
We will give you an address. 



A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



BE A PANELING EXPERT 

Scribe beautiful inside and outside 
corners with a kit of aluminum off- 
set jigs and marking gauges. De- 
signed to speed the installation of 
V 4 " (or less) panels. A step-by-step, 
panel-by-panel set of instructions is 
included. No previous experience 

necessary. 
Patent pending 




Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
refunded. Postpaid (check or M.O.) 
or C.O.D. plus postage, only S9.95. 
Calif, add 50C sales tax. 

PANELING SPECIALTIES CO. 

Box 11764 • Palo Alto, Calif. 94306 



We Congratulate 

Continued from Page 17 

SCHOLARSHIP— Irving R. Hennings, Jr., 
22, of 3606 N. 36th Street, Milwaukee, 
Wise, a member of Local 264, Milwau- 
kee, and a freshman at Stout State Uni- 
versity, has received a $1,200 scholar- 
ship from the Wisconsin State Council, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America and its affiliated local 
unions and district councils. At the pres- 
entation were William J. Micheels, uni- 
versity president, seated, and union offi- 
cials, Chester C. Hansen, secretary-treas- 
urer, and Ronald Stadler, president. Hen- 
nings' selection by the union for the schol- 
arship was based on his work, union and 
school record as an apprentice carpenter 
and on an oral and written examination, 
conducted at the Madison Area Technical 
College under the supervision of the state 
council officers and representatives of the 
Wisconsin State Board of Vocational 
Technical and Adult Education. This 
state council scholarship award has been 
in existence for twenty-three years. 




Micheels, Hansen, Stodler, and Hennings 

MODERN ROBIN HOOD-Emil Lehan of 
Monroeville, Pa., left, below, a union 
carpenter in the Pittsburgh area, is also 
a champion archer. He has won state 
and national championships in field 
archery during the past two years. Lehan 
is a compact 200-pounder who stands 
5 ' 1 1 " and pulls a strong bow. He says 
his avocation takes much patience. 

"The guy with the best nerves wins," 
he says, "and I'm nervous, so you can 
imagine how the others feel." 

Nevertheless, he has two mantels 
loaded with trophies. 








This point 
lets you bore 
holes up to IV2 

with small electric drill 



IT'S HOLLOW GROUNDto bore 
cleaner, faster at any angle 

Now step-up the boring range of 
your small electric drill or drill 
press to IVz" with Irwin Speed- 
bor "88" wood bits. Vt" shank 
chucks perfectly. No wobble. No 
run-out. Sharp cutting edges on 
exclusive hollow ground point 
start holes faster, let spade type 
cutters bore up to 5 times faster. 
You get clean, accurate holes in 
any wood at any cutting angle. 
Each Irwin Speedbor "88" 
forged from single bar of finest 
tool steel. Each machine-sharp- 
ened and heat tempered full 
length for long life. 17 sizes, Va." 
to 1Vi", and sets. See your Irwin 
hardware or building supply 
dealer soon. 




IRWIN 



SPEEDBOR "88" 
WOOD BITS 



at Wilmington, Ohio, Since 1885 



LABORand MATERIAL 
COSTS 



NATIONAL 

CONSTRUCTION 

ESTIMATOR 




1970 UNIT COSTS 

COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF 

HUNDREDS OF 

CONTRACTORS 

AND MATERIAL 

SUPPLIERS 



208 Pages ONLY $^75 

8'/ 2 I 11 

NO ADVERTISING In California add 24c tax 



ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS 
IN DOLLARS AND CENTS 
AVERAGE LABOR COSTS FOR 
THOUSANDS OF ITEMS 
TYPICAL SUB CONTRACT 
PRICES INCLUDED 
NEW ESTIMATING RULES 
OF THUMB 



Send for FREE Building Books Catalog 



CRAFTSMAN BOOK COMPANY OF AMERICA -Dept. C 
12* SO. LA BREA AVE.. LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 90036 
r~. Please send me the eighteenth edition of the 
"— ■ NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR . .*4.75 
_ In California add .24c Sales Tax 

1_J Please send me FREE Building Books Catalog. 



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10 DAY FULL MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of picfures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 




(1) SAINT PAUL, MINN. — Twelve 
members of Millwright Local No. 548 
received their 25-year membership pins 
recently. From left to right, in the first 
row: Reuben Salmon, Peter Baatz, Hart- 
ley Alexander, John Jones, and Al Ry- 
man. Second row, left to right: Orville 
Hecht, Earl Stone, Harold Kuchenbacker, 
Pearley Egge, Carl Hemicke, Carl Borton 
and Henry Hein. 

(2) BREMERTON, WASH.— On Thurs- 
day, October 16, Hal Morton, General 
Office Representative, presented Oscar E. 
Peterson, Carpenters Local No. 1597, 
Bremerton, Wash., with his 50 year 
membership pin. 

The following members were presented 
25 year membership pins by Morton: 
Marion V. Allison, Royal J. Hayes, 
William T. Fowler, William T. Klaus, 
Wilfred L. Kluver, Thomas Kralicek. 
Alfred A. Noffsinger, Harold C. Sunder- 
lin and Robert L. Workman. Shown in 
the picture, from left to right: William 
T. Fowler, William T. Klaus, Oscar E. 
Peterson, Hal Morton, Harold C. Sun- 
derlin and Marion V. Allison. 

(3) KANKAKEE, ILL.— 25-year pins 
have been presented to: Al Leverenz, 
Joe Gulczynski, Robert Heyduck, Al 
Hyrup, Waldo Grisby, Elmer Johnson, 
and Harold Jensen. 

(4) LUBBOCK, TEX.— Local 1884 re- 
cently presented pins to its senior mem- 
bers. Membership pins were presented 
to the following: Front row, seated: 
D. C. Cannon, 30 yrs.; George Best, 30 
yrs.; Joe Davidson, 35 yrs.; Gordon Hig- 
gins, 35 yrs.; Herman Bruckner, 50 yrs., 
and J. C. McClellan, 30 yrs. Back row, 
standing: General Represenative Ben Col- 
lins; J. H. Parnell, 30 yrs.; Oris Cecil, 25 
yrs.; George Austin, 25 yrs.; Jim Fulker- 
son, 25 yrs.; G. T. McMahon, 25 yrs.; 
Fred Mize, 25 yrs.; Paul Ward, 25 yrs., 
and J. R. Winfield, 25 yrs. 

Those receiving pins but not in attend- 
ance were: A. W. Bishop, 25 yrs.; L. L. 
Dale, 25 yrs.; L. M. Ferrell, 25 yrs.; J. B. 
Flournoy, 25 yrs.; R. A. Glisson, Sr., 25 
yrs.; Hugh W. Griffin, 25 yrs.; O. A. 




Hardin, 25 yrs.; R. I. Roberts, 25 yrs.; 
J. D. Steele, 25 yrs.; W. W. Taylor, 25 
yrs.; E. D. Brooks, 30 yrs.; Norval But- 
cher, 30 yrs.; Ed Denike, 30 yrs., Claude 
Martin, 35 yrs.; J. A. Martin, 35 yrs.; 
Walter Davies, 45 yrs., and R. B. Smith, 
45 yrs. 



(5) LINCOLN, NEB.— Local 1055 re- 
cently honored its old rimers with 25- 
years or more of service. They included. 
Front row, left to right: Lorenz Elms- 
houser, 28 years; Lloyd Whitney, 27 
years; Gustav Erickson, 27 years; Albert 
Swartz, 26 years; Frank Cookus, 30 years; 



JANUARY, 1970 



19 



Arnold Johnson, 27 years; Joseph P. 

Schneider, 30 years; A. A. Worster, 27 

years. 

Second row: George R. Patterson, 27 

years; L. E. Frey, 28 years; Elmo Elder, 

27 years; Arnold Boettcher, 28 years; R. 
H. Heusser, 46 years; Arthur Schwab, 27 
years; Roy R. Hodgkinson, 27 years; 
John Schlaphoff, 26 years; John Sloup, 

28 years; Ed F. Baney, 27 years. 
Third Row: Peter Terzick, General 
Treasurer; DeLos O. Morey, 25 years; 
John C. Snyder, 27 years; A. J. Hoelk, 
27 years; Jacob Jacobs, 26 years. 

Fourth row: Lee Mullinix, 27 years; W. 
H. Aylwin, 28 years; John Williams, 27 
years; Charles Carroll, 28 years; Glen 
Ferry, 28 years. 

Fifth row: Harold Berkheim, 27 years; 
Edward Regelean, 26 years; Marc E. But- 
terfield, 28 years; Wesley Lampshire, 26 
years; Forest Sanders, 25 years; Ira H. 
Barclay, 27 years. Present but not pic- 
tured was James Krajicek, now deceased. 

(6) CHICAGO, ILL.— Members and of- 
ficers of Millmen's Local 1367, recently 
presented two of their number with gold 
pins, in commemoration of their having 
fulfilled 50 years membership in the 
United Brotherhood. Shown in the pic- 
ture are from left, Vice President Helge 
Nelson, Honorees Edward Hansen and 
Berger Winquist, President Lars Hom- 
meland, who officiated in the presenta- 
tion ,and Recording Secretary Ray Han- 
sen. Treasurer Wilbur Anderson is at 
rear. 

Following the ceremony attended by a 
sizeable part of the membership, refresh- 
ments were served. 

(7) TRENTON, N.J.— At a recent meet- 
ing of Local 31 President Richard Moore, 
left, presented a 60-year pin to William 
Froehlick. 

(8) SAN MATEO, Calif.— On the oc- 
casion of the 70th anniversary of Local 
162 a dinner honoring old timers was 
held at the San Mateo Elks Club. More 
than 300 members and guests assembled 
to see old timers presented the member- 
ship service pins. Gold Life member- 
ship cards were presented by GEB 
Member Charles Nichols. 

Participants in San Mateo festivities 
shown in the picture, included, from left, 
Nels Krieberg, 40-year member; James 
Stevenson, 60-year member; E. Hansen, 
55-year member; Earl Honerlah, busi- 
ness representative; Sam Gray, 55-year 
member; Charles Nichols, 8th District 
Representative; Joe Cambiano, 66-year 
member; Tony Varady, 60-year mem- 
ber; James Curry, 45-year member; and 
Sam Shannon, financial secretary. 

Other veteran members honored and 
the dates of their initiation include: 

Axel Larson, 1916; Hans Lindberg, 
1917; Adolph Carlson, 1923; James G. 
Curry, 1923; S. H. Kriess, 1922; Robert 
Patterson, 1922; James D. Warren, 1921; 
E. R. Chenier, 1927; Peter Christiansen, 




1925; W. O. Christianson, 1927; Allan 
C. Cole, 1927; Ralph Di Renzo, 1926; 
Vic Enberg, 1925; Win. O. Johnson, 
1926; Nels Krieberg, 1925; Algot Nelson, 
1927; Fred J. Ramsey, 1927; Olaf Skre- 
den, 1929; Robert J. Young, 1927; 
A. V. Anderson, 1934; Nick Borota, 
1933; Ray Boulton, 1934; Andrew Cat- 
tich, 1934; J. V. Cattich, 1934; E. A. 
Erickson, 1934; A. J. Espiasse, 1934; 
Joe Gonslaves, 1934; Art Harms, 1930; 
Villy Hermanson, 1933; K. Henry John- 
son, 1933; Chas. Kase, 1934; N. F. 
Kriess, 1934; Walt Maxon, 1934; James 
McBride, 1934; Robert Mullin, Sr., 1931; 
Odus Odell, 1934; U. S. Simonds, 1934; 




John Slomp, 1933; Fred B. Smith, 1934; 
Geo. F. Ward, 1934; Peter Weibe, 1933; 

M. E. Abbott, 1936; C. O. Almgren, 
1936; Oscar Anderson, 1936; C. W. 
Arseneaux, 1936; Henry Baer, 1936; Leo- 
Baker, 1938; H. Barrusch, 1937; Gino 
Basadella, 1938; Fred Berkan, 1936; 
Ralph Beutler, 1936; Ervin Borchers, 
1937; John Botman, 1935; Ed Bou, 1936; 
Sam Branzburg, 1939; Andy Broderick, 
1936; W. F. Broeder, 1936; R. P. Burson, 
1935; Angus Burton, 1939; R. B. Cald- 
well, 1936; P. S. Carlsen, 1937; Frank 
Cary, 1936; James Chestnut, 1935; Vito 
Continolo, 1936; L. G. Cook, 1936; 
Allen Cooper, 1936; Frank Coruccini, 
1938; B. F. Crow, 1938; Alvin Cunha, 
1937; R. Delucchi, 1936; Frank De 
Negri, 1935; Ed Doherty, 1936; 

Keith Douglas, 1936; Carmelo, Draga, 
1936; H. Eastman, 1938; A. H. Eikeren- 
kotter, 1936; Ted Ericksen, 1935; Ivar 
Fallstrom, 1937; A. Favalessa, 1937; 
A. Fernandez, 1936; Milton Finlof, 1939; 
Henry Freeman, 1938; Carl Frey, 1938; 
Peter Garelli, 1936; Al Gonsalves, 1936; 
Chester Grove, 1938; J. L. Gunn, 1939; 
George Gustafson, 1935; Ray Hall, 1937; 
Nels Hansen, 1937; Larry Harger, 1936; 
Silas Hays, 1937; Phil Heglin, 1939; 
Ed Holsher, 1936; E. W. Honerlah, 1937; 
J. K. Hopkirk, 1937; Joe Huber, 1936; 
Viggo Jensen, 1935; Wm. B. Johnson, 
1935; Rene Johnston, 1937; Richard 
Jordan, 1936; Fred Klarenback, 1938; 
Carl Klingborg, 1936; 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




M. E. Koch, 1936; Joe Kohler, 1936; 
J. W. Kristjansen, 1938; E. La Rosa, 
1937; Henning Larson, 1936; Elvin Lar- 
vick, 1937; Hans Larvick, 1936; Douglass 
Leadley, 1937; Jerry Leontie, 1936; Emil 
Lohmae, 1936; W. F. MacKenzie, 1938; 
Harold Magnuson, 1937; L. C. Mangini, 
1937; Louie Mantoani, 1936; Gustav 
Marki, 1936; G. R. Martin, 1936; M. 
Matulich, 1935; A. D. Mclntyre, 1936; 
P. J. McLeod, 1936; Otto Naehle, 1937; 
Albert Nelson, 1938; Olaf Nelson, 1936; 
A. J. Niederberger, 1937; Walter Norbut, 
1937; Stan Norby, 1937; Ivar Nordstrom, 
1936; James Norman, 1937; Al Oates, 
Sr., 1937; Jack Ohlson. 1937; August 
Pacheco, 1937; Henry Paulson, 1935; 

Emil Peruch, 1937; C. H. Peterson, 
1936; W. J. Pezzola, 1935; Mike Phillips, 
1938; James Ragni, 1939; Ed Rowley, 
1936; Pete Rudometkin, 1936; Clayton 
Ruhl, Sr. s 1935; Eugene Russell, 1937; 
Carl Sandberg, 1938; Paul Schaeffer, 
1937; C. R. Schreckengast, 1938; C. F. 
Schuetz, 1936; Felix Schwenderlauf, 
1937; C. J. Sjostrom, 1935; L. W. Steven- 
son, 1936; Karl Storheim, 1937; Edwin 
Sundquist, 1937; Oscar Thelander, 1936; 
E. A. Townsend, 1936; R. C. Turner, 
1938; Richard Upschulte, 1935; D. J. 
Urrerre, 1939; Heteo Utne, 1936; Glen 
Vallance, 1937; Wm. A. Wacker, 1938; 
Peter Wade, 1937; B. Wiklander, 1935; 
Carl Wischhusen, 1935; John Wright, 
1936; Art Zeck, 1935; 

Lowell Abbott, 1944; George Alt, 
1942; James Alterie, 1943; Ivan Ander- 
son, 1941; Wally Anderson, 1941; Had- 
ley Argo, 1943; Al Barsuglia, 1942; 
Karl Bauman, 1943; Emil Bazzini, 1941; 
Ed Beyers, 1942; H. J. Bienert, 1941; 
Tom Black, 1940; C. P. Blankenship, 



8 



1940; Al Boitano, 1942; H. Bradford, 
1943; George Brown, 1941; Angelo Car- 
delli, 1940; Bob Chamberlain, 1941; Ed- 
win A. Clark, 1943; John H. Clifford, 
1942; R. D. Cooper, 1940; Darl David- 
son, 1942; Jesse Davis, 1942; Wm. T. 
Davis, 1941; I. S. Diougo, 1943; Al 
Draga, 1940; H. C. Dun!ap, 1942; Joe 
Emory, 1944; Harry Finlof, 1942; E. W. 
Flory, 1941; F. F. Fregon, 1942; Dan 
Gagliani, 1943; Gino Gandolfi, 1941 
Joe Gervasi, 1942; L. A. Graham, 1940 
Fred Hagen, 1942; Ragnar Hallquist 
1941; Clyde Hammer, 1940; L. Ham 
■iiond, 1943; John L. Hardiman, 1941 
Chas. C. Harvey, 1942; Emil Hesselein 
1940; Maynard Hillberg, 1941; C. R 
Hodgson, 1942; Roy Honerlah, 1941 
Ira Hoover, 1940; Bob Irwin, 1941 
August Jamello, 1943; W. A. Keplinger 
1940; Charles Klink, 1942; R. H. Krist 
jansen, 1940; Wayne La Foy, 1940; Joe 
La Salle, 1944; Woodrow Leonard, 1944; 
George Lieb, 1940; Ben Lillethorup, 
1942; Ray Lind, 1942; Al Lyngso, 1943; 

John Malinverno, 1940; J. E. Martin- 
son, 1942; George McBride, 1943; Ken 
McCallum, 1944; L. T. McMasters, 1942; 
Don H. McNany., 1942; Fred Menta; 
1941; E. H. Morrill, 1943; James Neal, 
1941; Pete Nichols., 1941; John Nielsen, 
1942; Larry Odell, 1942; Floyd C. 
Owenby, 1944; Vic Paganini, 1943; Mel 
Passolt, 1943; Peter Pecar, 1940; Hurley 
Peecher, 1941; Fred Perego, 1941; C. W. 
Phillips, 1941; James Pieratt, 1944; Verne 
Pierce, 1940; Gordon Pitsker, 1943; F. J. 
Preisinger, 1943; James Prentice, 1944; 
Hayden Price, 1942; Wm. B. Priddy, 
1941; 

Joe Ramorino, 1943; Odneal Rice, 
1941; James C. Richards, 1941; James 
Riechter, 1940; U. C. Robbins, 1942; 
Wm. E. Robins, 1942; R. C. Rogers, 
1943; Al Roveta, 1943; Ralph Shaw, 
1940; Frank Silveira, 1942; E. J. Smith, 
1942; Harold Smith, 1942; Harold 
Squires, 1941; Karl Steigleder, 1942; 
P. J. Taylor, 1942; Temple Taylor, 1941; 
Wm. A. Taylor, 1942; Ray Thompson, 
1944; C. F. Tingle, 1940; H. M. Trimble, 
1942; Virgil Turnbough, 1940; Frank 
Van Der Plas, 1942; George N. Warren, 
1940; William Welsh, 1943; James Whit- 
ney, 1941; Louis Wilson, 1941 and 
Frank Zagar, 1942. 




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By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 



■ Pollution 'Kills' 

Each year the Department of Interior's 
Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife 
issues a statement which lists the num- 
ber of fish killed as a result of water 
pollution. When the report comes out, it's 
almost a year old, which is understand- 
able, as it takes that long to tabulate the 
casualties. 

Each year conservationists are awe- 
struck and staggered at the number of 
fish killed. Sometimes the guilty party or 
parties are meted trivial fines, sometimes 
they go scot-free and each year the total 
kill mounts higher and higher. An es- 
timated 15 million fish were killed during 
1968, (that's all we know about), an in- 
crease of 31 percent over the previous 
year's figure. 

Muncipal and industrial pollution ac- 
counted for 88 percent of the fatalities 
this past year — over 13 million fish in 
300 incidents which involved discharge 
of wastes and industrial contaminants. 

We are concerned about the ever-in- 
creasing number of fish that are killed 
each year and we are also worried over 
the macabre prospect of the percentage 
of fish which may become contaminated 
and sick but do not die — perhaps because 
they are on the borderline of the pollu- 
tion area — and may wind up in the an- 
gler's creel or reach the marketplace for 
it is a matter of record that two-thirds 
of the fish which perish were classified 
as having commercial value. 

This frightening prospect will continue 
to exist as long as our rivers, lakes, creeks, 
and coastal ocean waters are being 
poisoned by highly toxic and dangerous 
substances. 

n Timely Switch 

Roy L. Patterson of Las Vegas, Nevada, 
a member of Local 1780 since 1962, 
says his Missus has a good philosophy, 
namely: "If you can't catch a fish; go 
for a deer." 

Roy and his wife fished the Colorado 
River one fine Saturday morning during 
the hunt season and when the fish re- 
fused to bite, Mrs. Patterson suggested 



> 



Patterson 



. 



they leave the area and switch to hunt- 
ing gear. They arrived back in Las Vegas 
the same day, loaded up camp and hunt 
gear and arrived at their favorite hunting 
grounds late that same evening. 

The next morning, about an hour after 
daylight, Roy arrived at a familiar stand. 
He rested a bit, 
pulled out his ther- 
*^ ,, ( • , mos and before he 

J could swallow that 
, . _ first swig i>r codec 

he heard some 
rumbling in the 
■j nearby brush. A 
big doe sauntered 
out, followed im- 
mediately by a tro- 
phy-racked buck 
which was prompt- 
ly downed; ran off, 
and was downed 
again, this time for keeps. 

Here's a picture of Brother Patterson 
with his prize buck, downed where he 
had nailed a similar specimen for the last 
five seasons in eastern Nevada. It sported 
a nice rack with 4 points on one side, 
three on the other and weighed out at 
195 pounds. The previous year he nailed 
a buck that tipped the scales at 310 
pounds. 

B The Record Book 

The following informative letter from 
lim Kirk of Denver, Colorado, a member 
of Local 55: 

"Dear Fred: 

"Anyone desiring information on "Big 
Game Racks" can get it from a publica- 
tion issued by the Boone and Crockett 
Club, specifically: "North American Big 
Game Record Book." It lists all the 
record big game taken and the last one 
was published in 1964. (I believe they are 
issued every six years.) 

Colorado produced the elk that ranks 
No. 1 and it was killed in 1915. 

"As long as you're passing out figures, 
you and your readers might be interested 
to know that a total of 1,660,514 deer 



were killed in Colorado in 17 years — 
from 1949 to 1965— and 852,604 of them 
were bucks. It's also a fact that the non- 
resident hunters have a higher success 
ratio than our local boys on the deer and 
elk kill." 




■ The Mighty Elk 

Many of the nation's hunters stalk the 
far-flung acres of western North America 
for the elk, considered the ultimate in 
antlered trophies, passing the moose in 
this respect. 

Except for the antelope, bighorn sheep 
and Rocky Mountain goat, the average 
distances at which elk are killed exceeds 
that of any North American big-game an- 
imal. Ranges of 150 to 300 yards are 
the rule rather than the exception and 
shots at 500 yards are not unusual. 

The elk is a hardy animal, difficult to 
kill. Too many are shot and crippled — 
eluding the hunter with no return to 
anyone. (There are some actual records 
of bull elk recovering from a bullet en- 
tirely through the lungs.) 

If one cannot be sure of breaking an 
elk's neck, the next best place to aim, 
if the elk is standing or running broad- 
side, is at the shoulder. If both shoulders 
are broken an elk will not travel far. 

Elk take to heavy forest cover during 
the daylight hours, especially during the 
hunting season. They seem to have a 
keener awareness than deer. When 
spooked they leave the country, not for 
hundreds of yards but miles. 




B Colorado Report 

Speaking of big-game hunters who en- 
joy hunting in Colorado, we're reminded 
of a letter from Joe H. Estes of Des 
Plaines. Illinois, a member of Local 1307. 
Joe's interested in hearing from fellow 
members of the Brotherhood in the Chi- 
cago area who plan on hunting in Colo- 
rado next season. His address is 1308 
Campbell Avenue. Des Plaines. HI., 
60016. Interested parties might do well 
to contact Joe who has hunted there and 
came back from a recent junket with his 
deer and elk. Here's a photograph of 



JANUARY, 1970 



23 



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Estes, Buddy, and Elk 

Brother Estes and one of his hunt buddies 
with one of the elk they downed in the 
mountains out of Gunnison. 

■ Archery Records 

Whereas the Boone and Crockett Club 
is the keeper of big-game records for 
riflemen, the Pope and Young Club is 
the keeper of game records for the 
archers. Here's a pic of Brother Paul 
Weisser Jr. of Schuylkill Haven. Pa., a 
member of Local 845. Paul nailed this 
buck, a 10 pointer, which dressed out at 
175 pounds. It made the record list for 
Pope and Young standings in Pennsyl- 
vania. Paul's missus is also a bow-and- 
arrow enthusiast but she temporarily 
deserted the archer's ranks and nailed her 
deer in the rifle season. She's pictured 
here with her first buck which, she avows, 
won't be her last. 




Mr. Weisser and Record Buck 




Mrs. Weisser and First Buck 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONST. AVE. N.W., WASH., D.C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT) 



High Prize to Pay 

Proud father: The man who mar- 
ries my Betty will get a prize. 

Boyfriend: Really? And what is the 
prize? 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 




Having a Doggy Time 

The only vet in the small town was 
also the sheriff. A late night phone 
call caused him to say: "Do you want 
me as a vet or as the sheriff?" 

"Both! We can't get our bulldog's 
mouth open . . . and there's a burglar 
in it!" 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 



Executive Feedback 

As soon as he graduated from col- 
lege, the son of a large corporation 
owner took up his position as execu- 
tive director of his father's firm. One 
of his first official duties was to write 
a memo to one of his underlings re- 
garding his expense accounts. The 
memo read: "My dad says for you to 
watch your expense accounts." 

The answer came from the next 
round of interoffice mail, "And what 
does your mommy say?" 

BE UNION— BUY LABEL 



New Sports Model 

"See what I got for my wife!" 
proudly said Jones, pointing to a 
snappy new convertible. 

"That's terrific!" replied his friend. 
"Where in the world were you able 
to make a trade like that?" 

B SURE 2 VOTE 

A Crazy Notion 

An inmate of an insane asylum 
watched a farmer drive by with a 
wagonload of fertilizer. "Hey, mis- 
ter," he called, "whatcha gonna do 
with that?" 

"I'm gonna put it on my straw- 
berries," replied the farmer. 

"Golly, I must be nuts," sadly de- 
clared the inmate. "1 put cream and 
sugar on mine 



I" 



REGISTER AND VOTE 

Fruity Story 

The Floridian picked up a water- 
melon in a San Francisco market and 
said: "Is this the largest lime you can 
grow heah?" 

"Stop!" cried the Californian own- 
er. "You're crushing that raisin!" 

DON'T BUY GE PRODUCTS 

The Wrong Boatman! 



'You h. 



th 



ou have the wrong number, saic 



This Month's Limerick 

There was an old man from Lister 
Who spoke to a deaf woman but msd 
hr. 
He then bent to her ear 
So that she could hear, 
But those standing by thought he ksd 
hr. 

— H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kan. 



the old gent to the telephone caller. 
"You have to call the Coast Guard 
for that information." 

"Who was that?" asked his young 
wife. 

"Oh, just someone who wanted to 
know if the coast was clear." 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 




Matter of Opinion 

An angry former office-holder 
rushed into the newspaper office and 
asked, "What do you mean by pub- 
lishing my resignation like this?" 

"We published it just like you gave 
it to us," retorted the editor. 

"I know," said the politician, "But 
did you have to list it under 'Public 
Improvements'?" 

BUY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Won't Be Lung Now! 

The husband was terribly depressed. 
He had been to the doctor for a 
checkup, and blurted out to his wife 
as he sank in a chair: "The doctor says 
I have to give up smoking. One of my 
lungs is almost gone!" 

"That's terrible!" she replied. "But 
try to hang on a little longer, dear. I 
have almost enough coupons for a 
new rug!" 



JANUARY, 1970 



25 



L.IC REPORT 



Monthly Membership Contributions To The 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 



This month's report consists only of contributions made to the CLIC 
Campaign since our last issue. Amounts followed by (a) denote local 
unions that have contributed in the past; this amount is additional 
monies from such locals. 



L.U. City and State 



Total Amt. 






CLIC CONTRIBUTIONS 

(as of December 16, 1969) 

L.U. City and State Total Amt. 

ALABAMA 

103 Birmingham $ 36.00(a) 

2429 Fort Payne 8.00 

ALASKA 

1281 Anchorage 44.00(a) 

ARKANSAS 

2321 Benton 5.00 

CALIFORNIA 

162 San Mateo 33.00 

235 Riverside 10.00 

478 Oakland 2.00 

642 Richmond 10.00 

668 Palo Alto 5.00 

751 Santa Rosa 3.00 

829 Santa Cruz 16.00 

848 San Bruno 8.00 

929 Los Angeles 15.00 

1052 Hollywood 50.00 

1147 Roseville 5.00 

1235 Modesto 10.00 

1408 Redwood City 12.00 

1607 Los Angeles 20.00 

1632 S. Luis Obispo 30.00 

1976 Los Angeles 25.00 

2046 Martinez 10.00(a) 

2048 Corona 10.00 

2203 Anaheim 18.00 

3116 San Francisco 5.00 

CONNECTICUT 

43 Hartford 14.00(a) 

216 Torrington 16.00(a) 

260 Waterbury 15.00(a) 

746 Norwalk 11 -00(a) 

825 Willimantic 10.00(a) 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

1 32 Washington 7.00(a) 

1590 Washington 3.00(a) 

FLORIDA 

696 Tampa 1.00(a) 

819 West Palm Beach 81.00(a) 

993 Miami 122.00(a) 

1685 Pineda 45.00(a) 

1766 Boca Raton 5.00(a) 

1927 Delray Beach 40.00(a) 

2024 Miami 36.00(a) 

2411 Jacksonville 5.50(a) 

GEORGIA 

1263 Atlanta 20.00 

1723 Columbus 19.00 



L.U. City and State Total Amt. 

IDAHO 

1258 Pocatello $ 14.00 

ILLINOIS 

44 Champaign & Urbana . . 32.00(a) 

58 Chicago 50.00(a) 

181 Chicago 6.00 

189 Quincy 40.00(a) 

347 Mattoon 33.00(a) 

419 Chicago 36.00(a) 

434 Chicago ll:00(a) 

643 Chicago 14.00 

839 D;s Piaines 81.00(a) 

1185 Chicago 18.00(a) 

1196 Arlington Heights 23.00 

1367 Chicago 100.00(a) 

1539 Chicago 22.00 

1889 Downers Grove 5.00(a) 

1996 Libertyville 38.80 

2063 Lacon 40.00 

2094 Chicago 50.00(a) 

IOWA 

4 Davenport 16.00 

106 Des Moines 42.00 

364 Council Bluffs 14.00 

1260 Iowa City 5.00 

INDIANA 

215 Lafayette 30.00(a) 

232 Fort Wayne 20.00(a) 

352 Anderson 8.00(a) 

912 Richmond 6.00 

1355 Crawfordsville 7.00 

1664 Bloomington 1.00(a) 

2548 Peru 1.00 

3080 Camp Atterbury 3.00 

KANSAS 

201 Wichita 3.00 

1224 Emporia 5.00 

1445 ToDeka 28.00 

1724 Liberal 6.00 

KENTUCKY 

559 Paducah 2.00(a) 

698 Newport 1 3.00(a) 

7 1 2 Covington 250.00(a) 

785 Covington 20.00(a) 

2049 Gilbertsville 9.00(a) 

2058 Frankfort 54.00 

MICHIGAN 

297 Kalamazoo 19.00(a) 

335 Grand Rapids 40.00(a) 

512 ■ Ann Arbor 84.00(a) 

877 Detroit 20.00 



1033 
1461 
2026 



7 
596 

851 

957 

1429 



185 
1987 
2030 



286 



Detroit $20.00(a) 

Muskegon 33.00 

Traverse City 13.00(a) 

Coldwater 1.00(a) 



15 

65 

139 

455 

1006 

1613 

2018 

2250 



146 

240 

203 

322 

357 

493 

502 

503 

516 

532 

689 

950 

1162 

1204 

1292 

1345 

1377 

1420 

1921 

1978 

2287 

2372 

2710 



1492 



182 
854 
1180 
1413 
1426 
1454 
1514 
1602 
1720 
1750 
2159 
2180 



MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 
St. Paul . . 
Anoka . . . 
Stillwater . 
Little Falls 



MISSOURI 

Louis 

Charles 

Genevieve 



MONTANA 

Great Falls 



NEBRASKA 

253 Omaha 

1187 Grand Island 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

625 Manchester 

1031 Dover 

1616 Nashua 

2276 Berlin 



NEW JERSEY 

Hackensack 

Perth Amboy 

Jersey City 

Somerville 

New Brunswick 

Newark 

Lakewood 

Red Bank 



NEW MEXICO 

1319 Albuquerque 

1962 Las duces 



NEW YORK 

Schenectady 

East Rochester 

Poughkeepsie 

Niagara Falls 

Islip 

Mount Vernon 

Canandaigua 

Lancaster 

Lindenhurst 

Elmira 

Dunkirk 

New York 

College Point, L. I. ... 

New York 

Huntington 

Buffalo 

Buffalo 

Hastings 

Hempstead 

Buffalo 

New York 

Monticello 

New York 



11.00 

9.00 

10.00 

34.00 

2.00 



7.00 
16.00 
12.00 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Hendersonville 



OHIO 



Cleveland . . 
Madisonville 
Cleveland 
Ottawa .... 

Elyria 

Cincinnati 

Niles 

Cincinnati . . 
Athens 

Cleveland . . . 
Cleveland . . 
Defiance 



10.00(a) 



38.50 
9.00 



18.00 
10.00 
24.00(a) 
10.00(a) 



27.00(a) 
6.00(a) 
15.00 
28.00(a) 
43.00(a) 
40.00(a) 
38.00(a) 
90.00(a) 



19.00(a) 
40.00(a) 



41.00(a) 

7.00 
11.00(a) 
26.00(a) 

5.00(a) 
11.00 

1.00(a) 
29.00 
20.00 
15.00(a) 
12.00(a) 
70.00(a) 

2.00(a) 
30.00(a) 

5.00(a) 
40.00(a) 
10.00 
20.00(a) 
180.00(a) 
13.00(a) 
20.00(a) 
11:00 
14.00 



20.00 



60.00(a) 
40.00(a) 
24.00 

4.00(a) 
13.00(a) 
20.00(a) 

5.00(a) 
31.00(a) 
14.00 
25.00(a) 
23.00 

3.50(a) 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. City and State Total Amt. 

OKLAHOMA 

653 Chickasha $ 8.00 

OREGON 

583 Portland 4.00(a) 

1277 Bend 5.00 

2066 St. Helens Vic 6.00 

2133 Albany 3.00(a) 

2701 Lakeview 2.00(a) 

PENNSYLVANIA 

122 Philadelphia 42.00(a) 

124 Bradford 20.00 

207 Chester 2.00 

228 Pottsville 10.00 

287 Harrisburg 134.00(a) 

401 Pittston 20.00 

465 Ardmore 40.00(a) 

514 Wilkes Barre 60.40(a) 

773 Braddock 7.00(a) 

838 Sunbury 360.00(a) 

843 Jenkintown 9.00(a) 

845 Clifton Heights 31.15(a) 

900 Altoona 20.00(a) 

972 Philadelphia 20.00(a) 

1 160 Pittsburgh 10.03(a) 

1595 Conshohocken 15.00(a) 

1759 Pittsburgh 37.00(a) 

1856 Philadelphia 50.00(a) 

RHODE ISLAND 

94 Providence 232.00 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

1798 Greenville 13.00 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

783 Sioux Falls 8.00(a) 

TENNESSEE 

50 Knoxville 10.03(a) 

507 Nashville 2.00(a) 

2473 Bristol 40.00 

2738 Oak Ridge 1.00 

TEXAS 

213 Houston . 40.00(a) 

753 Beaumont 26.00(a) 

1884 Lubbock 3.00(a) 

VIRGINIA 

319 Roanoke 20.00 

1665 Alexandria 2.00(a) 

WASHINGTON 

756 Bellingham 14.00(a) 

770 Yakima 53.00(a) 

1289 Seattle 9.75(a) 

1532 Anacortes 7.00 

1715 Vancouver 15.00(a) 

2127 Centralia 7.00(a) 

2755 Kalama 10.00 

WEST VIRGINIA 

128 St. Albans 7.00 

1159 Point Pleasant 13.00 

1228 Bluefield 12.00 

1574 Weirton 13.00 

2427 White Sulphur Springs . . 6.00 

WISCONSIN 

252 Oshkosh 4.00(a) 

290 Lake Geneva 10.00(a) 

314 Madison 1.00(a) 

820 Wisconsin Rapids 10.00 

1074 Eau Claire 1.00(a) 

1709 Ashland 17.00 

1919 Stevens Point 20.00(a) 

2073 Milwaukee 51.00 

WYOMING 

659 Rawlins 11.00 

1384 Sheridan 11.00 

1564 Casper 11.00(a) 




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27 




ANADIAN 



I REPORT 



Ontario Labor Pushes Medicare Changes 
With 6-Point Policy and Demonstration 



The 1969 convention of the On- 
tario Federation of Labor adopted a 
six-point policy on medicare and in- 
structed its officers to plan a demon- 
stration to bring the issues to public 
attention. 

The paradox of the situation is that 
when Ontario did not have a public 
medicare program but relied on pri- 
vate insurance companies to provide 
medical services, there was only mild 
interest in the subject, or so it seemed. 

Maybe the interest was deep but 
restrained. In any case as soon as 
the Ontario government decided to 
bring the province within the federal 
medicare plans by introducing public 
medicare, a great uproar arose over 
the issues involved. 

The basic problem is that the Con- 
servative government adopted public 
medicare very reluctantly. When it 
did, it put the premiums at high levels 
and allowed the private companies to 
continue as collection agencies for 
medicare premiums. 

Both of these items are serious 
faults and should be corrected. The 
Ontario government is collecting 
about $175 million a year from the 
Federal government for medicare. 
All it has to do is to apply the whole 
amount to reduce the direct cost to 
the public. 

As for using private collection 
agencies, this is surely unnecessary 
and costly. The government's cost of 
administering the plan is only six per- 
cent of collections. The private car- 
riers' costs are triple this figure at 
least. 

But the biggest uproar is over the 
decision of the government to pay 
doctors only 90 percent of the fee 
scale set by their own association. 
Doctors have been billing patients for 
the other 10 percent and this has 
proved annoying, especially to those 
who had private plans with 100 per- 
cent payment before. 



Anyway, the OFL demonstration 
December 6th in front of the Parlia- 
ment Buildings at Queen's Park, 
Toronto, was held on a cold, bright 
winter day. The Citizens' Rally for 
Medicare, as it was called, drew the 
largest turnout in many years, around 
10,000 people. 

Actually the event was a joint proj- 
ect of the National Farmers' Union 



February is . . . 
CITIZENSHIP MONTH 

To bolster the campaign being 
waged by the Canadian Welfare 
Council for an improved social 
security program in Canada, the 
executive council of the Canadian 
Labor Congress has called upon 
all unions to make "A Social 
Policy for Canada" the theme of 
all Citizenship Month observances 
in February. 

Such a commemoration would 
give the labor movement an op- 
portunity to present a refresher 
and educational program on the 
role which the trade unions have 
played in bringing about some of 
the social legislation now in exist- 
ence in Canada, George Home. 
CLC director of political educa- 
tion, points out. 

"It would also provide an op- 
portunity to point out not only to 
our own members, but to all 
Canadians, that the majority of 
the funds of the present social 
legislation has been paid for by 
workers, particularly those in the 
middle and low-income groups." 

He called upon all local unions 
to appoint Citizenship Month com- 
mittees "to be ready to swing into 
action" next month. The program 
would be coordinated with labor 
councils and provincial federations. 



and the Federation, the first time in 
several decades that farmer and labor 
have co-operated in such a large public 
effort. 

The United Church of Canada also 
endorsed the rally and sent an official 
representative. So did other organi- 
zations including the 100,000-mem- 
ber Public Service Alliance of Canada 
(CLC). 

The rally got the point across, espe- 
cially since the government is also 
being pressed from its own ranks for 
changes along the lines of OFL policy. 
It would be very surprising if changes 
were not made within the next 12 
months. 

Spokesmen for the OFL at the rally 
were President David Archer and Sec- 
retary-Treasurer Doug Hamilton (a 
Brotherhood member). Others were 
NFU Vice-President Walter Miller, 
PSAC President Claude Edwards, 
Ontario Health Minister Tom Wells, 
Ontario Liberal Leader Robert Nix- 
on, New Democratic Leader Donald 
MacDonald. 

Of the political spokesmen, only 
MacDonald got the hearing he de- 
served from the huge gathering. But 
the OFL officers and farmers visited 
the offices of all three parties after 
the rally to make sure that the mes- 
sage got across. 

Skullduggery in 
Concrete Forming 

An "independent" union arose to 
harass the building trades unions in 
Metro Toronto. Just when it looked 
as though this breakaway group might 
succeed, the Council of Concrete 
Forming Unions appealed to the 
Ontario Labor Relations Board with 
enough evidence to sink the independ- 
ent ship completely and almost suc- 
ceeded in doing it. 

By a clever maneuver of company 
lawyers, the Council did not get a 
chance to present its evidence. The 
contractors involved and the independ- 
ent represented by maverick Bruno 
Zanini confessed their complicity be- 
fore the evidence was produced. As 
a result the Board ruled the Zanini 
contract invalid. The Council won a 
victory with evidence of collusion and 
more still in its pocket. 

The Council of Concrete Forming 
Unions includes the Carpenters, La- 
borers, Iron Makers, Cement Masons 
and Hoisting Engineers. 

Zanini was able to gain control 
over and operate an independent union 
as he is extremely effective in the 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



language which most of the laborers 
know — Italian, but even more impor- 
tant, he was the organizer adopted by 
the contractors to keep out the inter- 
national unions. Without their collu- 
sion, he would never have got as far 
as he did. 

The OLRB ruling has given the 
building trades the opening they 
needed to renew their efforts to bring 
the concrete forming workers into 
legitimate union ranks. 

The whole story is involved and 
has yet to be told. The book is not 
yet closed. 

White Paper on Taxes 
Stits Wide Interest 

The Federal government has an- 
nounced its recommendations for 
changes in Canada's taxation system. 
They were tabled in the House of 
Commons by Finance Minister Ben- 
son. 

Known as the White Paper on Tax- 
ation, the proposals would reduce 
taxes for half of present taxpayers. 

About 750,000 Canadians would 
be relieved of paying taxes, about 
three million would find their tax bills 
reduced and about 820,000 would pay 
the same amount. Around three mil- 
lion would pay higher taxes. 

The proposals are basically sound 
and move tax reform in the right 
direction. However, the income group 
between $10,000 a year and $20,000 
a year gets hardest hit, those earning 
over $50,000 a year not so hard; in 
fact, they seem to get tax reductions. 

The White Paper is intended as a 
basis for discussion. The government 
is inviting criticism, and presumably 
will act on changes if convinced that 
a case has been made. 

Carpenter Heads 
BC Federation 

Al Staley of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America was re-elected president of 
the British Columbia Federation of 
Labor at its 1969 convention late last 
year. 

Ray Haynes was re-elected secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

Two Veteran Trade 
Unionists Pass Away 

Two veterans of trade union action 
in Ontario passed away late last year: 
Sam Sasso, third international vice- 
president of the Bricklayers whose 
home was in Windsor, and Gilly 



Kearns, secretary of the Labor Coun- 
cil of Metro Toronto. Gilly was a 
member of the Beverage Dispensers 
Union but in recent years worked 
full time as labor representative on 
the United Community Chest. 

Food Not Culprit 
In Rising Costs 

Food is not a culprit in rising cost 
of living, according to a senior econo- 
mist with the federal department of 
agriculture. 

There are very few items which 
are relatively cheaper today than they 
were 1 and 20 years ago. Food is 
one of them, he says. 

The economist, I. F. Furniss, 
showed that an hour's wages in 1948 
would buy 5.3 quarts of milk at 17.3 
cents a quart. In 1968 an hour's 
wages (in manufacturing) would buy 
8.4 quarts at 30.7 cents. 

The same with meat. An hour's 
1 948 wages would buy a pound and 
a half of steak at 62.4 cents a pound, 
but two pounds in 1968 at $1.26Vi 
a pound. 

But statistics don't buy food for low 
income families. 

Guaranteed Pay 

Gets Wider Acceptance 

The principle of a guaranteed an- 
nual income has been virtually ac- 
cepted by all three political parties in 
Canada. 

The Canadian Labour Congress is 
having Social Security as its theme 
for Citizenship Month (February) 
1970. with emphasis on this guaran- 
teed income issue. 

So far only the New Democratic 
Party has subscribed to the kind of 
guaranteed income program which 
the CLC envisages. But much more 
discussion has to take place before 
there is general agreement what kind 
of plan will be most successful in 
eliminating poverty. 

Some take the view that the com- 
bination of a higher minimum wage 
plus a floor under all incomes would 
do the job. Welfare measures could 
be eliminated. The CLC agrees that 
minimum wages and incomes would 
go a long way toward solving the pov- 
erty problem but it is strongly opposed 
to the elimination of all welfare pay- 
ments until there is clear evidence 
that they are not needed. 

So far the CLC position is that 
social security measures should be 
based on a guaranteed income pro- 
gram but some will have to be con- 
tinued. 



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JANUARY, 1970 



29 



1805 JOINER APPRENTICE 

Continued from Page 5 

do toward his said master and mis- 
tress during said term. 

And the said Edward Page for 
himself, and his heirs doth here by 
covenant and promise to teach and 
instruct or cause to be taught and 
instructed, the said apprentice in the 
art. trade, or mystery and calling of 
a joiner by the best ways and means 
that he or they may or can, and find 
and provide unto the said apprentice 
good and wholesome meats, drinks, 
washing, lodging, and apparel fitting 
for an apprentice during said term; 
also to find the said apprentice doc- 
toring and nursing if needed and 
every necessary supply in sickness and 
in health during said term, and within 
said term, to give and allow said ap- 
prentice four months time to get 
learning by going to school and at 
the expiration of said term of time 
to give unto the said apprentice one 
good new suit of apparel for all parts 
of his body, in addition to all his 
wearing apparel that he now has, 
which is to be made good to him at 
the expiration of said term. 

And testimony whereof the parties 
to these presents, have hereunto in- 
terchangably set their hand and seal, 
this 27th day of May in the Year of 
our Lord, one thousand eight hundred 
and five 

Signed and sealed in presence Ed- 
ward Page 

Nathaniel Graves 
William Graves 
c/o Joseph Godfrey 
Erick L. Godfrey 

The 1970 CENSUS 

Continued from Page 10 

census taker to climb in the window. 
She did and found an 85-year-old man 
lying helpless on the floor. He motioned 
to the next room and said, "My census 
form is in there. It's all filled out." The 
census taker got him into bed and called 
a doctor. 



Smelling gas and receiving no answer 
to her knock, a census taker climbed 
through a window to find a woman un- 
conscious on a settee. Her coffee pot had 
boiled over, extinguishing the flame of 
the gas burner. The census taker turned 
off the gas, opened the doors and 
windows, and revived the woman by 
wafting ammonia under her nose. 



A census taker making her rounds saw 
a driverless delivery truck rolling down 
a hill, its only occupant a small fright- 
ened boy. Dropping her census port- 
folio, she dashed into the street, man- 
aged to open the door of the rolling 
vehicle, climbed aboard, and brought 
the truck to a safe stop. 



Snows did not daunt the dedicated 
census taker in the far Northwest who 
donned snowshoes and trudged four 
miles through the mountains in a snow- 
storm to enumerate four people. 
• 

It is a common experience for a 
census taker to be invited to stay for a 
meal. One said she had been invited to 
dinner nine times and asked by several 
families to come back for a visit after 
the census. "One lady was especially 
glad to see me. I was her first visitor in 
more than two years," she said. 
• 

Another census taker successfully 
hurdled a fence to elude two enraged 
bulls only to have a goose on the other 
side bite her. 



There have been unusual occupations 
listed, including mouse farmer, snake 
doctor, subterranean architect, artificial 
limb breaker-inner, plumber's helper's 
helper. professional mourner. gum 
taster, rug cutter, golf ball winder, and 
the woman who said she was a pick- 
pocket. "A legal pickpocket," she was 
quick to add, "I work in a dry cleaning 
plant and search pockets of clothing 
left for cleaning." Anyone who savvies 
lumbering jargon will know what these 
men in the lumber camp were doing 
when they told the census taker they 
were camp jacks, timber beasts, rough 
necks, or swampers. 

MYTH OF COSTS 

Continued from Page 12 

a greater supply of private funds for 
home building and to reduce the costs 
of borrowed money. 

However, sole reliance on the pri- 
vate market, even with government 
encouragement, will not increase resi- 
dential construction sufficiently — par- 
ticularly dwelling units for low- and 
moderate-income families. The direct 
role of government will have to be 
increased. 

Direct public outlays for new resi- 
dential construction, in recent years, 
have amounted to only about $700 
million — about one-tenth of one per- 
cent of total national production. 
These sums will have to be increased 
to meet the 10-year housing goal. 

Such increase in direct government 
outlays would require some small 
changes in the composition of federal 
expenditures during the course of the 
next 10 years, with greater emphasis 
on housing. The expected $15 billion 
annual increase in federal revenues — 
as well as the leveling off of defense 
expenditures since mid- 1968 and the 
hoped-for end of the Viet Nam war — 
will make it feasible to increase sub- 
stantially the flow of direct govern- 



ment outlays for residential construc- 
tion, particularly for lower-income 
housing. In combination with govern- 
ment efforts to strengthen the position 
of the private housing market, such 
increases in direct public expenditures 
should enable America to meet the 
goal of 26 million dwelling units in 
a decade. 

As for the availability of land, any- 
one who has traveled across this coun- 
try knows that the potential land sup- 
ply is tremendous. Even in and near 
the cities and towns, a potential sup- 
ply of land is available that could be 
used for residential neighborhoods — 
if transportation and public facilities 
are provided. 

The immediate problem is not the 
supply of land, but soaring land prices. 
The price of land for housing has been 
rising about 10 to 20 percent per year. 
Land costs are now about 21 percent 
of the price of a single-family house 
and approximately 1 3 percent of the 
price of an elevator apartment unit. 
The Kaiser Committee reported the 
average site of a new, FHA-insured, 
one-family house rose from $1,035 in 
1950 to $3,766 in 1967, a rise of 264 
percent in 17 years. The committee 
also reported that in the vicinity of 
Washington, D. C, the price per acre 
paid by builders "increased from 
$3,400 in 1960 to $5,800 in 1964, 
a jump of over 70 percent in a four- 
year period." 

A government land policy is need- 
ed. The taxing and zoning of land 
require review and revision by the 
federal, state and local governments — 
to curb the skyrocketing rise of land 
prices and excessive land speculation. 
We also need something like land 
banks — with government advanced — 
acquisition of rights or ownership to 
large blocks of land for future de- 
velopment, specifically including low- 
and moderate-income housing. Effec- 
tive government policies are needed to 
curtail the sharp rise of land prices if 
the nations housing goal is to be met. 

In addition, the use of land in out- 
lying metropolitan areas for residen- 
tial construction requires the availa- 
bility of mass transportation as well 
as educational and other public facili- 
ties for the creation of decent neigh- 
borhoods. 

The potential manpower supply for 
construction generally must be con- 
sidered since it is impossible to isolate 
residential from non-housing construc- 
tion employment. Several experts have 
examined this complex issue. The Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics estimates that 
total employment in contract construc- 
Continued on Next Page 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Another In-Service Training Session Held 




On December 15 through 19 a large group of instructors and training coordinators in the Brotherhood Manpower Training 
Program assembled at General Headquarters in Washington, D.C., for indoctrination. Above, the group listens to a speaker. 



MYTH OF COSTS 

Continued from Page 30 

ion of all types — residential and non- 
housing — will rise from nearly 3.3 
million in 1966 to 4.2 million in 1975, 
a rise of about 90,000 a year. 

In their work as consultants to the 
Kaiser Committee, John Dunlop and 
Quinn Mills estimated that about one 
million additional man-years of em- 
ployment in residential and non-hous- 
ing construction will be in demand by 
1975. Since few construction workers 
are employed year-round, the Dunlop- 
Mills estimate comes to somewhat over 
100,000 additional employes per year. 

In addition, the number of con- 
struction workers is a slowly declining 
percentage of total employment in 
contract construction, with a rising 
percentage of architects, draftsmen, 
engineers, technicians and clerical em- 
ployees. Therefore, on the basis of 
these estimates, the net increase in the 
number of construction workers that 
will be needed if the 10-year housing 
goal is to be achieved — while non- 
housing construction continues to in- 
crease — will be in the neighborhood 
of 90,000 to 100,000 per year above 
the 2.7 to 2.8 million construction 
workers employed on the average in 
the past four years. 

The number of deaths and retire- 
ments of construction workers, in the 
period ahead, probably will also be 
close to that order of magnitude. So 
we are talking about replacements 
within a range of 90,000 to 100,000 
per year and net increases in employ- 
ment of approximately a similar num- 
ber. 

If the 10-year housing goal is to be 



met, increasing employment of con- 
struction workers will be required — 
with the increases gradually accelerat- 
ing during the course of the decade. 
However, the actual number of work- 
ers needed by the industry will de- 
pend on the actual volume of con- 
struction, rather than long-run fore- 
casts and government promises. 

The major sources of potential man- 
power supply can be roughly identified 
and there may be others as well. 

One major source is the present 
supply of workers with some construc- 
tion experience and skills. As a re- 
sult of the sharp cyclical and seasonal 
swings in construction employment — 
and the casual nature of the labor mar- 
ket — Dunlop and Mills estimated that 
it takes 1.8 workers to fill one average 
year of construction employment, a 
higher ration than in any other in- 
dustry. 

Much work-time is lost in unem- 
ployment, in time between projects 
and in seasonal fluctuations. For ex- 
ample, unemployment in the industry 
is usually about twice the national un- 
employment rate. In addition, many 
"full-time" construction workers are 
employed 1,400 hours or less per year 
in the industry. 

We now have detailed information 
on employment from the Social Secu- 
rity records of 1964. In that year, 
average total employment in contract 
construction was 3.1 million, accord- 
ing to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
But the Social Security records reveal 
that 6.7 million people had some earn- 
ings in contract construction in 1964 
and 4.1 million earned the major pro- 
portion of their earnings in that indus- 
try. A large number of workers were 



in and out of the industry during the 
course of the year. 

These figures also indicate why the 
annual earnings in this industry are 
relatively low, by comparison with 
high hourly wages. In 1964, accord- 
ing to the Social Security records, the 
median annual earnings of workers 
with four quarters of employment in 
the industry were only about $6,200, 
despite high wage rates. Sharp cycli- 
cal and seasonal swings in construc- 
tion employment generally — with im- 
pacts on annual earnings are partic- 
ularly pronounced in home building. 

A steadily expanding volume of 
construction and concerted efforts to 
reduce sharp seasonal changes could 
cut the excessive fluctuation of em- 
ployment in the industry. It would re- 
duce the insecurity of employment, 
increase annual earnings and enable 
the industry to achieve a labor force 
of a more stable size. In addition, the 
extension of union organization in res- 
idential construction — which is now 
only about 20 percent union-organized 
or less — would provide greater cohe- 
sion and rationality to the particularly 
volatile employment pattern in home 
building. 

Another potential source of man- 
power is apprenticeship, particularly 
for the skilled trades. Apprenticeship 
is crucial to the training of the highly- 
skilled key cadre of the industry — the 
full-fledged journeymen with the best 
employment prospects in a casual la- 
bor market, the foremen, supervisors 
and contractors. 

The number of government-regis- 
tered apprentices has been increasing 
during most of the 1960s. Although 
Continued on Page 32 



JANUARY, 1970 



31 



Massive U.S. Voter Drive Urged By Democratic Panel 



A 22-member Democratic task 
force in Washington has called for 
massive Federal action to build up 
voting rolls. 

The task force, under former At- 
torney General Ramsey Clark, also 
has recommended that state resi- 
dency requirements be eliminated in 
voting in Presidential elections and 
that Presidential election days be 
declared national holidays. 

Some 47 million possible voters 
did not go to the polls in 1968, the 
task force reported, and added that 



if the current trend continues there 
will be 70 million to 90 million 
people not participating in Presi- 
dential elections 20 years from now. 

"Such a pitiful record of voter 
participation signifies a profound 
failing of the democratic process," 
the task force said. 

The panel recommended enact- 
ment of legislation which would pro- 
vide for a "universal voter enroll- 
ment" program under which the 
Federal government would actively 
enlist people to vote. 



The proposal, which will be sub- 
mitted to Congress next year, would 
establish an enrollment system in 
each of the nation's 435 Congress- 
ional districts. Each district would 
be headed by a director. 

Clark said that the objective of 
the recommendation would be "to 
assure full opportunity for voter 
participation and to solemnize this 
as the most important occasion for 
the exercise of a citizen's obligation 
in a free society." (PAI) 



MYTH OF COSTS 

Continued from Page 31 

most apprentices are in construction, 
some of them are in other industries, 
such as the metal trades and printing. 
In addition, some apprenticeship pro- 
grams are not registered with the gov- 
ernment. From 172,000 in 1960, the 
total number registered apprentices 
has risen to about 250,000 at present. 
The yearly rate of completions of con- 
struction apprentices at present, is 
probably about 20,000 to 30,000. 
Based on present registrations, the 
number will rise in the next few years, 
probably to about 30,000 to 40,000. 

An aspect of the expanding appren- 
tice ship programs of recent years is 
Outreach. Started in New York City 
by the Workers Defense League and 
A. Philip Randolph Institute, in coop- 
eration with the building trades unions. 
Outreach provides remedial education, 
counseling and encouragement to 
young people, particularly Negro and 
other minority youth, to help them 
pass the tests for entry into appren- 
ticeship. Similar programs — involving 
the U. S. Department of Labor and the 
Urban League, as well as the Workers 
Defense League-Randolph Institute — 
are in existence in over 50 major cities. 

Spurred by these developments, the 
number of apprentices from minority 
groups has been increasing — from 
about 2.5 percent in 1960 to approxi- 
mately 7 percent at present. Even 
more important is the rise in the num- 
ber of minority-group youth among 
newly-enrolled apprentices, which is 
now about 9 percent. 

Apprentice-training programs should 
be expanded and Outreach-type pro- 
grams should be expanded consider- 
ably. But such expansion of appren- 
ticeship can be expected to occur only 
if the volume of construction activities 
increases to justify the training of large 



numbers of new, full-fledged journey- 
men. 

Still another potential manpower 
source is to be found in training and 
upgrading programs. Training pro- 
grams are to be found in several of 
the crafts. For example, nationwide 
networks of training programs, with 
emphasis on Negro and other mi- 
nority-group youth, are run by the 
Operating Engineers, Laborers and 
Carpenter unions. 

Skili upgrading programs to assist 
non-journeymen to achieve journey- 
man status now exist, in cooperation 
with building trades councils and com- 
munity-based organizations, in several 
cities. Such efforts, too, can and 
should be expanded, if an accelerating 
volume of construction actually oc- 
curs. 

The major source of potential man- 
power is the net growth of the nation's 
civilian labor force. In the period 
ahead, the anticipated net expansion 
of the civilian labor force is 1 .5 mil- 
lion per year — surely enough to pro- 
vide an annual net increase of about 
90.000 to 100,000 construction work- 
ers. Equal employment opportunities, 
regardless of race or color, would en- 
able the industry to fully utilize this 
anticipated net growth of the labor 
force. 

This expected sharp expansion of 
the civilian labor force would provide 
an ample supply of potential man- 
power for the construction industry, 
if the rising demand for building 
trades manpower materializes and if 
this potential manpower supply is ade- 
quately trained in the necessary skills. 

However, on the basis of present 
experience and past history, there is 
reason for some skepticism about the 
timing and actual size of federal hous- 
ing programs. Yet the timing and size 
of these programs are key deter- 
minants of the required manpower. 



Moreover, construction is a local 
market industry and construction em- 
ployment on any building site is com- 
posed of different workers, with dif- 
ferent skills, at the varying stages of 
the building process. Decisions about 
construction manpower are made in 
terms of each craft and these deci- 
sions are made in each separate com- 
munity. 

The nature and extent of such de- 
cisions have to be worked out in each 
local area — not on the basis of talk 
and promises, but on the sound foun- 
dation of actual construction plans 
and estimated timetables, backed by 
commitments and ready to go. Under 
such conditions, differences of view- 
points can be worked out and an ade- 
quate supply of manpower in each of 
the crafts can be made available for 
an increasing volume of construction. 

The urgent need for a vast increase 
in residential construction is clear. 
Potential resources are available. The 
major question is whether the federal 
government will change its policies 
sufficiently to assure the expanding 
volume of residential construction to 
meet America's housing needs. ■ 



Don't 

Buy 

G. E. 

Products 

• 

Support 

The 
Boycott 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



Chicago Millmen 
Complete Course 

Twenty-two officers and stewards of 
Chicago area millmen locals were award- 
ed certificates of completion after partici- 
pating in an eight-session class on the 
"Dynamics of Union Leadership." 

The class was sponsored by Locals 
1784. 1367. 1387. 1786, 1922. and 341, 
in cooperation with the Chicago Labor 
Education Program, Institute of Labor 
and Industrial Relations, Division of Uni- 
versity Extension, University of Illinois. 
The class was planned and arranged in 
consultation with Business Representatives 
Stanley Jaworowski, Charles Svec, and 
Joseph Klosterman. The instructor for the 
class was Professor Stanley Rosen of the 
Chicago Labor Education Program. 

Guest speakers for the class included 
Cy Murphy, community services repre- 
sentative for the Chicago Federation of 
Labor Industrial Union Council, and 
Stanley Johnson, executive vice presi- 
dent of the Illinois AFL-CIO and a 
Brotherhood official. 

1970 CONTESTS 

Listed below are the States who have 
indicated an interest in participating in the 
1970 International Carpenters Apprentice- 
ship Contest to be held in Denver, Col- 
orado, the week of October 5, 1970. This 
Calender will appear each month in the 
Carpenter for your information. 

Mil 



State Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Millwright 


Alaska 


X 






Arizona 


X 




X 


California 


X 


X 


X 


Colorado 


X 


X 




Delaware 


X 






District of 








Columbia 








and Vic. 


X 


X 


X 


Florida 


X 






Illinois 


X 


X 


X 


Indiana 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 


X 






Kansas 


X 






Kentucky 


X 






Louisiana 


X 




X 


Maryland 


X 


X 


X 


Massachusetts 


X 


X 


X 


Michigan 


X 






Missouri 


X 




X 


Nebraska 


X 






Nevada 


X 


X 


X 


N«w Mexico 


X 






New York 


X 


X 


X 


Ohio 


X 


X 


X 


Oklahoma 


X 


X 


X 


Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


Tennessee 


X 




X 


Texas 


X 






Utah 


X 






Washington 


X 


X 




Wisconsin 


X 






Ontario, Can. 


X 




X 


Brit:sh Col., 








Canada 


X 


X 






32 


15 


17 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



:^ m ^, i 



|*| f^ ^-i ' Qplf -i 





Class members of "Dynamics of Union Leadership" include, left to right, BACK ROW, 
Joseph Klosterman, B. A.; Joseph Widlarz, Local 1784; Robert Sabo, Local 1784; 
Alfred Wuttke; Stefan Pressling, Local 1784; John Dittrich, Local 1784; Kasmer 
Jakubowski, Local 1367; Ladimer Buresch, Local 1784; Josef Schmidt, Local 1784; 
Edward Buricz, Local 1786; Joe Kadlec, Local 1786; Thomas J. Zuwala, Local 341; 
Stanley Sebonia, Local 1922. FRONT ROW, left to right, Robert Hansen, Local 1784; 
Richard Smicklas, Local 1922; Oskar Sturm, Local 1784; Stanley Jaworowski, busi- 
ness agent; Adam J. Blum, Local 1784; Sam Trombino, Local 1922; and Charles Svec, 
business agent. Other participants not shown include: Wilbur Anderson, Local 1367; 
and Dennis Buric, Local 1786. 

Graduation For Apprentices, Local 1055 




Participants in recent graduating ceremonies of Local 1055, L : ncoln, Neb., included, 
front row: Eugene Essink; Kenneth Jolliffe; Mrs. Dennis Wilson, receiving diploma 
for husband, serving in Viet Nam; Lester Swanson; and Larry Elfring. Back row: 
Robert Maxwell, instructor; Neill Bourne, president. Local 1055; John Connelly, 
state supervisor; Mark Firestone; David Pelan; R. M. Moore, MDTA Coordinator; 
R. D. Dittenber, bus'ness representative, Local 1055; and John C. Snyder, instructor. 
Not pictured: Otto Manulak. 



JANUARY, 1970 



33 



L.U. NO. 7, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN 

Anderson, Adolph 
Bates, Kenneth 
Berg, J. R. 
Boe, Arnold 
Bona, Paul P., Sr. 
Brekke, Nels 
Brovold, Iver 
Carlson, Helmer 
Christenson, Ragnar 
Chuba, Alexander 
Eastman, Adolph 
Ellingson, Harold 
Erickson, W. A. 
Faanes, Hawkon H. 
Forshier, Harry P. 
Hagman, Victor 
Haltli, Carl M. 
Hanson, Peter 
Hemmingson, George 
Hermann, William J. 
Hove, John J. 
Jenson, Peter 
Johnson, Carl Oscar 
Johnson, Gust 
Johnson, Harlan S. 
Johnson, Knute 
Kupcho, Matt 
Kruger, Sidney 
Lanz, Lloyd 
Lee, Lester 
Leier, S. B. 
Leser, Alouis J. 
Lower, Frank 
McDonald, A. H. 
McDonald, Stanley 
McNearney, Robert 
Marcel. Gust 
Mikkelson, Martin 
Miller, Arthur G. 
Morgan, Walter 
Mueller, Joseph G. 
Odden, Clifford 
Olson, Millard C. 
Olson, William 
Ostenso, Lars 
Norin, Emil 
Petersen, L. A. 
Peterson, Christian 
Peterson, Frank 
Peterson, Hilding 
Prestegard, Peter 
Richardson, R. G. 
Rood. C. C. 
Sames, James. J. 
Sova, William C. 
Staebler, James 
Sturzrehm, Henry 
Thorn, Edwin 
Thune, Anton 
Tourtillotte, H. E. 
Vanderbilt, William 
Wiest, Arnold 
Wallentine, A. E. 

L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

Coyle, James A. 
Grome, Harold E. 
Rood, Vernon J. 
Sullivan, John A. 

L.U. NO. 16, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Filbrun, Howard 
Lynard, Claude 
Thornton, E. A. 



L.U. NO. 19, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Briand, Frank 
Brusseau, Luke J. 
Flattley, Raymond 
Gratton, Amnion 
Kuusisto, Armas 
Lancaster, Homer 
Ligon, Robert L. 
Ludwig, Elmer A. 
Mankvitz, Charles 
Smith, Ambrose W. 

L.U. NO. 31, 
TRENTON, N.J. 

Simpers, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 33, 
BOSTON, MASS. 
Bombara, John N. 
Daniels, Harry 
Kaska, John 
Heath, Leo 
Martin, Joseph 
Williams, Henry 

L.U. NO. 40, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Bolivar, Herbert 
DeYoung, Clarence 
Olson, Carl 
Queenan, William 
Stewart, James A. 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Hume, John A. 
Lauro, Lorenzo 

L.U. NO. 53, 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 

Aiello, Joseph 
Cacciola, Frank 
Champagne, Arthur 
Regillo, Saverio 
Stephens, Edward 

L.U. NO. 54, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kazimierski, Michael 
Masa, Emanuel 
Suchomel, Ervin 

L.U. NO. 56, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Bartlett, Lee A. 
Griffin, James F. 
Legrow, John T. 
Skiffington, William 
Tilley, Simeon J. 
Woodman, Milton 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Williford, John I. 

L.U. NO. 88, 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Brebrick, Robert 
Thompson, Russell L. 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Fannin, John C. 
Lieberman, Louis 
Loane, William G. 
Peterson, Samuel B. 



L.U. NO. 103, 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Aldridge, Raymond 
Bolack, Lawrence 
England, Loyal 
Goode, Frank 
Ingle, Paul 
Morgan, Earl 
Payne, Charlie W. 
Rogers, Tully L. 
Sizemore, H. C. 
Turrintine, J. A. 

L.U. NO. 117, 
ALBANY, N.Y. 

Becker, Elmer J. 
Cyr, Fred 
Di Leila, Andrew 
Gosstola, Stanley 
Heatley, Harvey 
Hoyt, Carl 
Lill, Philip 
Murphy, John 
Nestler, Jacob, Sr. 
Stammel, Roland A. 
Sutter, Irvin O. 

L.U. NO. 121, 
VINELAND, NJ. 

Saffiotti, Dominick 

L.U. NO. 131, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Amberg, Henry G. 
Blair, David A. 
Cole, Melvin E. 
Connolly, Roger 
Frederickson, Axel H. 
Helseth, Omar H. 
Lewis, L. G. 
McClellan, Sinclair 
Seman, Carl 
Wales, Rollin C. 
Zeiler, Carl 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Gough, Berkeley B. 
Latham, Harry George 
Letson, John E. 
Reid, Robert P. 
Tyers, William C. 

L.U. NO. 142, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Bell, William F. 

L.U. NO. 176, 
NEWPORT, R.I. 

Harvey, Everett A. 
Kesson, James 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Remmen, Jonas O. 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Beesley, H. P. 
Calder, G. J. 
Cole, J. A. 
Jay, Ira E. 
Schwarz, R. J., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Constans, John P. 
Hefner, Leroy E. 
Waggoner, Gene 



L.U. NO. 213, 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Wheeler, Mack T. 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Kline, Russell 
Misiner, Floyd 
Portuaue, Ira 
Rei, PL. 
Warneke, August 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Holldin, Bert 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Mordente, Germano 
Nylund, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 264. 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Baumann, Joseph 
Beckman, Harvey 
Carlson, Haward 
Ducke, Carl J. 
Krauss, Benjamin J. 
Kressin, Charles F. 
Lutz, Lewis J. 
Poblitz, Roy E. 
Sieren, Edwin A. 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HGTS., ILL. 

Johnson, Paul 
Wimberly, Harry 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Benson, Roy E. 
Dennis, Alan P. 

L.U. NO. 287, 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Chyr, Marian 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Nardiello, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 490, 
PASSAIC, N.J. 

DeVito, Charles 

L.U. NO. 494, 
WINDSOR, ONT. 

Masuret, Frank 
Ristaniemi, Emile 
Sladek, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 546, 
OLEAN, N.Y. 

Johnson, Andy 
Shively, George 
Wilfred, Otto 
Wright, Lyman 

L.U. NO. 584, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Bosch, Julius J. 

L.U. NO. 606, 
VIRGINIA, MINN. 

Long, John 
Park, Walter 
Simonson, Henry 



L.U. NO. 621, 
BANGOR, ME. 

Benner, Ernest L. 
Watts, William C. 

L.U. NO. 625, 
MANCHESTER, N.H. 

Arel, Bernardin 
Davison, David W. 
Demers, Alcide 
Deraps, Joseph E. A. 
Michelsen, Walter 
Roy, Leo Albert 

L.U. NO. 627, 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Hale, Arthur W. 
Jones, Cleon B. 

L.U. NO. 696, 
TAMPA, FLA. 

Ballard, J. O. 
Brush. D. W. 
Corbitt, J. M. 
Coxx, R. F. 
Genske, Herman 
Riggin, R. R. 
Silas, Nathan, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 710. 

LONG BEACH, CALIF. 

Beeney, Samuel L. 
Crawford. Carl G. 
Fambrough. C. H. 
Fulton. Herbert 
Jacobson, Roy O. 
Johansen, Carl 
Logsdon, B. W. 
Long, Stewart 
Philley, Robert C, Jr. 
Stone, Robert A. 

L.U. NO. 791, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Hoddevick, Peder 
Salvesen, Theodore 

L.U. NO. 899, 
PARKERSBURG, W. VA. 

Ewing, Joel B. 
Gabbut, Floyd 
Hardman, Charles C. 
Pryor, John 
Schneider, John W. 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Kargel, Charles 
Severson, Lloyd 
Thurston, John 

L.U. NO. 1065, 
SALEM, ORE. 

Myers, Dudley 
Nuttleman, Carl 

L.U. NO. 1128, 
LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Degener, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 1138, 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Hall, Joseph 
Knapp, Raymond 
Mull, Lawrence 
Munk, Paul 

Continued on Page 36 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



FOR INDIVIDUAL AND ECONOMY 



EINSTEIN 




Shorter Work Week Was Urged 
By Famed Scientist Einstein 



D A scientist, who many believed 
had the most brilliant mind of the 
century, was a staunch supporter of 
a shorter workweek as an important 
step toward meeting the problem of 
high unemployment. 

Albert Einstein, whose genius 
made possible the splitting of the 
atom, wrote often of the need of a 
shorter workweek. This is revealed 
in a collection of the famed scien- 
tist's articles, addresses and pro- 
nouncements, published by The 
Philosophical Library, Inc. of New 
York. 

His views are significant because 
he became an American citizen and 
closely studied the U.S. economy. 

Einstein felt "that the develop- 
ment of industry and machinery has 
made the struggle for existence very 
much more severe, greatly to the 
detriment of free development of 
the individual. 

"But the development of ma- 
chinery means that less and less 
work is needed from the individual 
for the satisfaction of the commu- 
nity needs. A planned division of 
labor is becoming more and more 
of a crying necessity, and this divi- 
sion will lead to the material secur- 
ity of the individual. 

"This security and the spare 
time and energy which the individ- 
ual will have at his command can be 
made to further his development. 
In this way the community may 
regain its health and we will hope 
that future historians will explain 
the morbid symptoms of present- 
day society as the childhood ail- 
ments of an aspiring humanity, due 



By HARRY CONN 

entirely to the excessive speed at 
which civilization was advancing." 

Einstein, who left his native 
Germany in 1933 when Hitler came 
to power, saw the shorter workweek 
not only in relation to the freedom 
of the individual but as a healthy 
and progressive step for the econo- 
my. 

He concerned himself with the 
price-wage problem in the middle 
1930's at the time technological 
change was beginning to make its 
first inroads into employment and 
came forward with these three 
specific recommendations: 

"1. A statutory reduction of 
working hours, graduated for each 
department of industry, in order to 
get rid of unemployment, combined 
with the fixing of minimum wages 
for the purpose of adjusting the 
purchasing-power of the masses to 
the amount of goods available. 

"2. Control of the amount of 
money in circulation and of the 
volume of credit in such a way as 
to keep the price-level steady, all 
protection being abolished. 

"3. Statutory limitation on prices 
for such articles as have been prac- 
tically withdrawn from free competi- 
tion by monopolies or the formation 
of cartels." 

Although Einstein wrote these 
views during the world-wide depres- 
sion, many of his concerns reflected 
today's problems and many of his 
recommendations have been in- 
corporated into the scientist's 
adopted land. 

For example, he believed that 
our fundamental trouble is that "to 



satisfy the needs of the world today 
nothing like all the available labor 
is wanted. The result is unemploy- 
ment and excessive competition 
among the workers, both of which 
reduce purchasing power and put 
the whole economic system in- 
tolerably out of gear." 

Einstein devoted much thought to 
two problems that we are concerned 
with today: jobs for our younger 
people and protections for our 
elderly. 

Writing to a colleague, he de- 
clared: 

"I also share your conviction that 
steps absolutely must be taken to 
make it possible and necessary for 
the younger people to take part in 
the productive process. Further, 
that the older people ought to be 
excluded from certain sorts of work 
(which I call 'unqualified' work), 
receiving instead a certain income, 
as having by that time done enough 
work of a kind accepted by society 
as productive." 

This country owes much to 
Einstein. He came here in 1933 
after leaving Nazi Germany to work 
at Princeton University. 

In leaving his homeland he made 
his famous declaration: "As long as 
I have any choice, I will stay only 
in a country where political liberty, 
toleration and equality for all citi- 
zens before the law are the rule." 

Manv countries invited him but 
he decided the United States offered 
him the best haven for his work. He 
became a citizen and lived here un- 
til his death, and we are now en- 
joying the rewards of his rich 
mind. ■ 



JANUARY, 1970 



35 



To Protect Workers' Rights: 



Safeguards Urged On Pension Funds 



■ Federal legislation is needed to pro- 
tect the pension rights of workers and 
improve safeguards for health and wel- 
fare funds, the AFL-CIO testified. 

Legislative Director Andrew J. Biemil- 
ler. joined by Social Security Director 
Bert Seidman, expressed labor's support 
for the goals of two bills introduced by 
Rep. John H. Dent (D-Pa.). Dent is chair- 
man of the House Labor subcommittee 
dealing with the legislation. 

One of the bills would set up a govern- 
ment insurance program for pension funds 
and establish standards for funding and 
vesting; the other would amend the Wel- 
fare & Pension Plan Disclosure Act to 
spell out the obligations of trustees to 
guard against misuse of funds. 

Both bills are needed, Biemiller said. 
But he urged amendments to strengthen 
portions of the legislation and in other 
sections eliminate several unnecessary and 
burdensome restrictions. 

Corporation Backed 

On the pension fund bill, the AFL-CIO 
strongly endorsed creation of a Pension 
Benefit Insurance Corp., which would be 
financed by an annual premium of two- 
tenths of 1 percent of the amount insured. 

The insurance would be compulsory 
and would guarantee that workers receive 
the benefits due them. The AFL-CIO 
urged that the insurance be required to 
cover all unfunded liabilities of a pension 
plan, not just the vested liabilities. 

Under the bill, three directors of the 
corporation would be appointed by the 
President. The AFL-CIO proposed that 
one of the directors be a representative 
of labor and another be chosen to repre- 
sent management. 



On pension funding and vesting re- 
quirements, the federation strongly urged 
that a sharp distinction be made between 
pension funds covering a single employer 
and multi-employer funds in which a 
worker carries his pension credits with 
him when he changes jobs within the in- 
dustry. For this reason, Biemiller said, 
there is no need to require vesting in 
multi-employer funds. 

Single-employer funds, because of the 
danger of an employer going out of busi- 
ness, should meet the highest actuarial 
standards of funding with a requirement 
for vesting after 10 years of service, the 
federation said. 

But the AFL-CIO stressed that the 
present Internal Revenue Service regula- 
tions, which all pension plans must meet 
on funding, is fully adequate for multi- 
employer plans which are not endangered 
if one of the employers goes out of 
business. 

Biemiller also urged other changes in 
the proposed legislation. He said the 
Secretary of Labor should have the power 
to investigate a fund only when he has 
"reasonable cause" to believe the law is 
being violated and not as an unsubstan- 
tiated "fishing expedition." And he urged, 
as an additional safeguard for workers, 
that the federal bankruptcy law be amend- 
ed "to provide that a health, welfare or 
pension plan should have a priority claim 
against the assets of the employer, imme- 
diately following wages." 

On the separate welfare and pension 
plan legislation, the AFL-CIO urged that 
new federal legislation specifically pre- 
empt state laws in the same field. 

A number of such plans cover workers 
in more than one state and some union 



welfare plans are national in scope, he 
noted. 

The same standards applicable to trus- 
tees of union-management welfare and 
pension plans should be required of "third 
parties" that administer programs, the 
AFL-CIO said, including insurance com- 
panies and banks. 

The federation endorsed the "prudent 
man" doctrine spelled out in the proposed 
legislation. It would require persons with 
control over funds to carry out their re- 
sponsibilities "with the same degree of 
care and skill as a man of ordinary pru- 
dence would exercise in dealing with his 
own property." 

Amendments Needed 

The testimony spelled out a number of 
sections where the AFL-CIO believes 
amendments are necessary, including pro- 
visions dealing with the investigative au- 
thority of the Secretary of Labor. And 
the bills' bar of persons convicted of 
crimes from serving as trustees should be 
clarified to apply to crimes involving 
"a fiduciary relationship," the federation 
suggested. 

While urging specific changes in the 
bill, Biemiller stressed the AFL-CIO's 
strong support for the fullest protection 
of health, welfare and pension funds. 

"Welfare and pension benefits are a 
part of the collective bargaining pack- 
age." Biemiller observed. The funds set 
aside for them, he emphasized, "are in 
fact part of the employes' remuneration, 
accepted in lieu of wages. The funds set 
aside for these plans belong to the work- 
ers covered by them" and must be safe- 
guarded to assure that the workers and 
their families "receive the benefits to 
which they are entitled." ■ 



IN MEMORIAM, (Continued from Page 34) 



L.U. NO. 1162, 
COLLEGE PT„ N.Y. 

Carlson, Alvan 
Massaro, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1292, 
HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

Franz, Gustav 

L.U. NO. 1323, 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Dorn, Frank 
Sullivan, H. H. 



L.U. NO. 1335, 
WILMINGTON, 



CALIF. 



Hayes, Walter B. 
Mattson, Frank 
Naapila, Lauri 
Sturm, Ami G. 
Widman, James O. 



L.U. NO. 1353, 
SANTA FE, N. MEX. 

Tena, Esequiel 
Thompson, Frank N. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bauer, John L. 

L.U. NO. 1382, 
ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Johnson, Otto H. 
Story, Lowell A. 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Alvarado, Manuel 
Grover, C. E. 

L.U. NO. 1449, 
LANSING, MICH. 

Battin, Darrell G. 



L.U. NO. 1485, 
LA PORTE, IND. 

Jonushaitius, Mike 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Paul, H. R. 

L.U. NO. 1609, 

HIBBING, MINN. 

Lidholm, Henry 

L.U. NO. 1665, 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 

Middleton, Percy E. 

L.U. NO. 1707, 
LONGVIEW, WASH. 

Basso, Viljo W. 
Coast, Alonzo L. 



Eckstrom, Rudolph 
Foster, Robert H. 
Frost, William C. 
Schlecht, Theodore F. 
Van Cleave, Charles R. 
Withee, Birtrand B. 

L.U. NO. 1752, 
POMONA, CALIF. 

Anderson, Glenn H. 
Collins, Victor P. 
Kullman, O. W. 
La Clair, Roy O. 
Lambert, Alvin L. 
Miller, Leonard F. 
Paulson, Melvin M. 
Prock, John L. 

L.U. NO. 1922, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Berman, Mendel 



Lipske, William 
Naverauskas, Joseph P. 

L.U. NO. 1971, 
TEMPLE, TEXAS 

Malkowski, Henry A. 

L.U. NO. 2012, 
SEAFORD, DEL. 

Markle, John 

L.U. NO. 2073, 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Bednarz, John 
Schneider, Arthur 
Soike, Joseph 
Wise, Earl 

L.U. NO. 2274, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Nelson, Axel T. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




STUD DRIVER 
FASTENING SYSTEM 

New literature illustrating Remington's 
Hammer-Drive Stud Driver Fastening 
Systems is available from Remington 
Arms Co., Inc., Construction & Industrial 
Division. 

The "Pin-Boy" 66 Stud Driver is de- 
signed for the handyman to do home 
repair and remodeling jobs. The "Pin- 
Boy" 67 is a heavy-duty hammer-drive 
tool. The "Pin-Boy" 367 has an extended 
handle for better visibility and safety. 

Remington's !4" Hammer-Drive Fast- 
eners for use with Remington "Pin-Boy" 
Fastening Tools are illustrated and show 
all the pertinent dimensions for proper 
selection. 

For a free copy of the new Remington 
Hammer-Drive Stud Driver Fastening 
Systems literature, write: Remington Arms 
Co., Inc., Construction & Industrial Divi- 
sion, 25000 South Western Ave., Park 
Forest, 111. 60466. 

WALK3NG JACK 




Pre-assembled walls, partitions and 
many other heavy loads such as girders 
and ridges can now be raised quickly and 
easily with the Hoitsma Walking lack, 
a product of Hoitsma Adjustable Scaf- 
fold Bracket Co., Box 452, River Street 
Station, Paterson. N. J. 

Hoitsma Walking lack, plus a length of 
2x4 for an upright, eliminates physical 
strain and saves time and labor. A 30-foot 
wall, for example, can be raised in sev- 
eral minutes by three men using three 
Hoitsma Walking lacks. Steel or wooden 
girders as well as ridges can be hoisted 
similarly. 

Additionally, complete control of the 
operation is maintained at all times. 



Hazardous winds, for example, never up- 
set the safety factor, even when the wall 
is in the final upright position ready for 
joining. 

WOOD LIGHTING 
STANDARD 




A new, laminated wood lighting stand- 
ard, guaranteed for 20 years, is being 
manufactured by Weyerhaeuser Co. in 
a variety of styles, sizes, colors and wood 
finishes for both residential and com- 
mercial use. 

Weyerhaeuser guarantees the standards 
for 20 years after installation against 
structural failure due to termite attack, 
decay, glueline failure or any other defect 
in workmanship or materials. 

The attractive laminated standards are 
totally engineered products which exceed 
NEMA specifications and are designed 
for maximum deflection of 2% of their 
length when subjected to 60 MPH winds. 
They can be imbedded directly in soil 
without concrete footings or foundations. 

The natural characteristics of wood 
reduce maintenance costs, harmonize with 
residential architecture and landscaping, 
and cannot rust, oxidize or tarnish. An 
important safety factor is also provided 
since wood is a non-conductor of elec- 
tricity. 

They are available from Weyerhaeuser 
in a variety of stained colors, with either 
a smooth or wire brushed surface. 

Pedestal-type standards are available 
in four sizes ranging in mounting height 
from 10 to 20 feet; bracket-type stand- 
ards, fabricated for use with a single- or 
double-arm bracket, range in mounting 
height from 20 to 50 feet. 

Standards are of square dimension uni- 
formly tapered throughout the length of 
the unit for balanced design. 

All standards are equipped with in- 
ternal wire raceways with appropriate ac- 
cess. Pedestal-type ones are furnished 
with 3-inch O.D. slip fitters. 

All models conform to the materials, 
manufacture and quality control require- 
ments of United States Commercial 
Standard 253-63 and are pressure-treated 
with a 0.6-pound per cubic foot retention 
of 5 per cent penta to conform to Amer- 
ican Wood Preservers Association stand- 
ards. 



A report on new products and 
processes on this page in no nay 
constitutes an endorsement or rec- 
ommendation. All performance 
claims are based on statements by 
the manufacturer. 





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STAIRCASE 



ELIASON 





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Saves its cost in ONE day — does a 
better job in half time. Each end of 
Eliason Stair Gauge slides, pivots and 
locks at exact length and angle for per- 
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GAUGE CO. 

6005 Arbour Lane 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55436 



JANUARY, 1970 



37 



Seasonal Construction Layoffs Laid 
To Customs as Much as Weather 



■ Every winter the construction 
industry goes into semi-hibernation, 
putting thousands of men out of 
work. 

Despite major advances in recent 
years that allow construction oper- 
ations to continue through sub- 
freezing weather conditions, the sea- 
sonality of the industry still persists. 

An article in the December issue 
of the Labor Department magazine, 
Monthly Labor Review, says the 
problem must be blamed on tradi- 
tional management practices and 
customs as much as on the ther- 
mometer. 

The article is based on the find- 
ings of a Bureau of Labor Statistics 
study of construction industry sea- 
sonality and manpower problems 
that will be published early next 
year. 

It notes that the construction 
labor force suffers much more un- 
employment than workers in other 
industries. 

"From 1960 to 1968," the article 
points out, "the unemployment rate 
for private wage and salary workers 
in construction averaged 11.1 per- 
cent, in comparison with a rate of 
5.2 percent for all private wage and 
salary workers." 



"Paradoxically, each summer 
complaints arise of labor shortages 
from contractors," MLR says. 

The authors of the article, Joe 
L. Russell and Michael J. Pilot, 
report that geography is often a fac- 
tor in the manpower problems of 
the industry. A surplus of construc- 
tion manpower may exist in one lo- 
cality while a shortage is apparent 
in another. 

"Unlike a manufacturing concern 
that can locate in an area with avail- 
able manpower, a contractor must 
either bring his workers to the build- 
ing site, or find new workers in the 
area. 

"Shortages of construction labor 
are often found in geographic areas 
where there have been relatively 
few opportunities for these workers 
in the recent past." 

The unemployment rate for con- 
struction workers is usually the 
highest of any major industry divi- 
sion, and this is a reason for the 
higher hourly wages for the trades, 
the authors note. 

Even when the industry is oper- 
ating at peak capacity, the unem- 
ployment rate in construction is 
significantly higher than in other 
industries. 




"In 1968, the unemployment rate 
in construction averaged 6.9 per- 
cent, nearly double the 3.6 percent 
rate for nonagricultural industries 
as a whole," Russell and Pilot 
reported. 

They note, too, that even during 
the tight labor market of 1953, 
when the average jobless rate for 
all industries was 2.8 percent, the 
unemployment level in construction 
was 6.2 percent. 

Employment in construction 
peaks generally in August and 
drops lowest in February. The em- 
ployment rates between these two 
months have fluctuated as much as 
30 percent within the last six years, 
the article reports. 

The article says there has been 
no great change in seasonality since 
1947. 

"Seasonal employment move- 
ments in construction are the result 
of inclement weather and the tradi- 
tional management practices and 
customs," Russell and Pilot observe. 

"The exact amount of work that 
could be performed in winter with 
precautions against bad weather is 
unknown, but indications are that 
it is more than is currently per- 
formed." 

As far back as 1924, a govern- 
ment study found that "for most 
types of construction it is now pos- 
sible to build year-round in all 
parts of the United States." The 
Secretary of Commerce at that time, 
Herbert Hoover, wrote, "Bad weath- 
er is not the principal cause of sea- 
sonal idleness. Customs which be- 
came fixed when builders had not 
yet learned how to cope with ad- 
verse weather conditions have not 
yet been changed." 

Americans and Canadians have 
poured concrete at 40 degrees be- 
low zero, the article notes. 

Careful scheduling and protec- 
tion of materials and workers can 
permit work to proceed in periods 
of bad weather," the authors sug- 
gest. ■ 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




MM 



Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida. 



Wm. P. Friedrich, of Local 1947, Holly- 
wood, Florida, arrived at the Home Nov. 
10, 1969. 



Benjamin Huizinga, of Local 80, Chicago, 
111., arrived at the Home Nov. 10, 1969. 



A. Reynold Nelson, of Local 198. Dallas, 
Texas, arrived at the Home Nov. 13, 1969. 



Benjamin Dennis, of Local 65, Perth 
Amboy, N. J. died Nov. 8, 1969. Burial was 
at Matawan, N.J. 



Albin Anderson, of Local 58, Chicago, 
111., died Nov. 21, 1969. He was buried in 



the Home Cemetery. 



Walter L. Smith, of Local 90, Evansville, 
Ind., died Nov. 22, 1969. He was buried in 
the Home Cemetery. 

• 

Savo Gojkovic, of Local 2155, New York, 
N.Y., died Nov. 22, 1969 while on leave. 



Thomas O. Walker, of Local 819, West 
Palm Beach, Fla., died Nov. 28, 1969. 
Burial was at Vidalia, Ga. 



Carl Oscar Peterson, of Local 15, Hacken- 
sack, N.J., died Nov. 29, 1969. Burial was 
at Bergenfield, N.J. 



Report Calls Enforced Early 
Retirement Harmful to Workers 



Early retirement of many workers, 
especially in cases where they are forced 
out, is having a bad effect both on work- 
ers themselves and on the welfare of 
society itself, according to a report made 
to the Senate Special Committee on 
Aging. 

Older workers are dropping out of 
the labor force in "alarming" number, 
too often unwillingly, with the result that 
they are endangering their own retire- 
ment security, helping to worsen an 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Audel, Theodore 


21 


Belsaw Power Tools 


29 


Belsaw Sharp-All Co 


39 


Chicago Technical College . 


27 


Cline-Siqmon, Publishers . 


29 


Craftsman Book Co 


18 


Eliason Stair Gauge Co. . 


37 


Estwing Manufacturing .... 


22 


Foley Manufacturing .... 


24 


Hydrolevel 


21 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


18 
37 
39 


Kant-Slam 


Locksmithing Institute 


Paneling Specialties 


18 


Riechers, A. . . 


18 
aver 


Stanley Works Back C 


Vaughan & Bushnell 


17 



unfavorable "dependency ratio" between 
workers and non workers and are in- 
tensifying inflationary pressure on the 
economy. 

The report was in the form of a work- 
ing paper prepared by the National In- 
stitute of Industrial Gerontology as the 
Committee opened a new round of 
hearings on the "Economics of Aging: 
Toward a Full Share in Abundance." 

As its major point, the report said that 
unemployment in later years and un- 
resolved social policy questions are con- 
tributing to the general problem of in- 
adequate retirement income. 

The report emphasized that the "un- 
evaluated trend toward involuntary and 
early retirement" should be countered 
by development of new employment op- 
portunities for workers before retirement 
begins. 

The report makes a number of rec- 
ommendations including retraining of 
mature individuals: effective information 
on job opportunities for middle-age 
workers: increase in enforcement of 
legislation barring discrimination based 
on age; action toward the vesting of 
pension rights: extended unemployment 
benefits to encourage elderly workers to 
seek new jobs rather than dropping out 
of the employment market, and further 
studies into the problem of involuntary 
retirement. (PAI) 



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time business. 

Robert N. Miller 
Oakland. N.J. 



.306^ 

\V Pi aca I of / 

*\\ LOCKS, HCKS^.i 
U} and TOOLS 



SUpptitd 
(at ww 



JANUARY, 1970 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 1118-010 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Book— "Your Big Op- 
portunities in Locksmithing." complete equipment 
folder and sample lesson pages — Free of all obliga- 
tion — (no salesman will call). 

Same 

(Please Print) 

Address 

City State Zip 

□ Check here if eligible for Vet. benefits 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Are We A Sick Society? 



■ As the decade of the 1 960's drew to a close, 
the great self-appointed oracles of press and TV 
had a field day passing judgment on the past 10 
years and making predictions about the next 1 0. 
Most came to the conclusion we are a sick society; 
that we have lost our way and our sense of values 
as well; that the future looks ominous indeed. 

For my part, I am tired of all such calamity- 
howling. We are not a sick society. We only have 
a few sick people in it — unfortunately, people who 
have loud voices and strong lungs. 

So there is trouble on the college campuses. 
Looking at this fact alone, there might be cause 
for discouragement. But. when one realizes that 
college enrollment has more than quadrupled since 
World War II, the picture takes on a different hue. 

The sons and daughters of working people, 
black and white, are flocking to colleges in un- 
precedented numbers. College is no longer a priv- 
ilege enjoyed only by the offspring of the wealthy. 
I think this represents one of the great advance- 
ments of the past 20 years. The fact that a few 
kooks and loud-mouths may be causing difficulties 
should not be allowed to obscure the great central 
issue — that tremendous strides have been made 
toward the day when college education will be 
within the reach of all who have both the capacity 
and the desire to pursue it. 

So there has been trouble in our cities. In many 
cities there have been ugly confrontations between 
blacks and whites. While incidents of this nature 
are both frightening and sickening, they should 
not be allowed to obscure the fact that great strides 
have been made in achieving equal opportunity 
for all peoples, regardless of race, creed or color. 

Our cities have known riots throughout their 



history. The Irish, the Germans, and even the 
Jews, have at one time or another fomented strife 
in some of our major cities as far back as the 
Eighteenth Century. 

Our present troubles have spurred the nation 
to a new awareness of the need for improving the 
lot of the residents who live in the inner cores of 
our cities. Progress may be slow, but the main 
thing is that the problem has been exposed to the 
light of day. And there is a universal determination 
that the proper corrections will be made. 

There are still hunger and poverty and igno- 
rance, but all of these problems are being attacked 
with a vigor and a determination that will lead 
to ultimate success. That some of the dispossessed 
may become discouraged and restive is only nat- 
ural. Vast social changes cannot be made over- 
night. 

For my part. I see the 1 970's as a time of con- 
tinued challenge. Turmoil and strife may continue 
to stem from the inability of the nation to move 
forward as rapidly as many people would desire, 
but I believe the central focus will remain on the 
determination of the people to wipe out ignorance, 
hunger, poverty, and unnecessary disease. 

I believe the 1970"s will go a long way toward 
reaching this goal. 

A society that in the last 25 years lifted a war- 
shattered world to new heights of prosperity and 
security can hardly be classified as sick. A society 
as heavily committed to eradicating the evils that 
grow out of poverty and injustices can hardly be 
pegged as decadent. 

It is not the society that is sick. It is the assorted 
loud-mouths who give it that appearance. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




*Zot GUttC - ONE TWIN WAS BORN WITH BIRTH DEFECTS 

Joanne and Carol Anne came into this world only 
minutes apart but the difference between them is 
immeasurable. Joanne was born healthy. Her sister 
has hearing and heart defects caused when their 
mother had German measles early in pregnancy. 

Why Carol Anne? Why not Joanne? Someday sci- 
ence may learn the reason. There are still so many 
questions to be answered ... so many birth defects 
to be conquered. 

The National Foundation-March of Dimes is leading 
the battle through research, treatment and educa- 
tion. Please help. 

fight birth defects (feat MARCH OF DIMES 



The folding 





The X226 offers you maximum utility in an ex- 
tension folding rule. With it, your inside mea- 
surement is at one focal point. 

The X226 provides end-to-end or hook mea- 
surements in multiples of exactly 6" (6", 12", 
18", 24", etc.). Can also be used as a marking 
gauge in multiples of 2" (2", 4", 6", 8", 10" 
and 12"). Ideal for door installations, too, be- 
cause it can be opened to give you exact end-to- 
end measurements for three standard doors : 30", 
32" and 36". Stud markings every 16". Exten- 



sion slide extends — and reads — in both direc- 
tions. 

Joints of the X226 snap tight . . . stay rigid! 
Its StanGuard™ yellow finish protects numbers 
and graduations for extra-long life in day-to-day 
use. And brass tips and protector plates for added 
wear life. Stanley Tools, 
Division of The Stanley 
Works, New Britain, 
Connecticut 06050. helps you do things right 



STANLEY 



P. S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest power tools. 



The 



FEBRUARY 1970 



©Z^ KtPdPaTTC^K 



Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 



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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick Campbell 

190 Main Street 

New City, New York 10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Marietta Street, Suite 913 
Atlanta, Georgia 30303 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minii. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing- list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME, 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



@£uaip 




■S1LA80R PRESS?/, 



VOLUME XC 



No. 2 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Construction in the Sixties: A Review George Christie 2 

Canadian Members Help to Tame the Nelson River 6 

There's Some Tax Relief, But 8 

Tax Reform At a Glance 9 

Philadelphia Plan Assailed As Masking Rights Retreat 11 

Safety Director Connelley Named to Advisory Body 16 

A Nail Is More Than a Nail to Illinois Carpenter 17 

Retired Members Enjoy a Variety of Hobbies 35 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 10 

We Congratulate 18 

Editorials 19 

Canadian Report Mordan Lazarus 20 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 22 

What's New? 25 

Local Union News 26 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 30 

Service to the Brotherhood 32 

CLIC Report 36 

Plane Gossip 37 

In Memoriam 38 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

A replica of a French Canadian 
mission-fort destroyed over three cen- 
turies ago has been constructed near 
Midland in Ontario. Carpenters from 
the Central Ontario District Council 
worked on the project, which was 
sponsored jointly by the Ontario gov- 
ernment and the University of Western 
Ontario. 

When the Iroquois Indians swept 
into Huron territory, where French 
Jesuits had converted many Indians, 
in the middle of the 17th century, 
hundreds of converts and priests were 
brutally murdered, missions were 
burned, and even the places where 
they had been were lost to human 
memory. Before that, however. Fort 
Ste. Marie had been a busy center of 
the missionary effort. 

It was at Fort Ste. Marie that the 
first hospital, the first school, and the 
first farm in Ontario were established, 
as well as what was probably the first 
artificial waterway with locks to be 
built in the New World. Priests, lay 
brothers, volunteer skilled craftsmen. 
French soldiers and Indians labored 
together to erect wooden palisades, 
stone bastions and sturdy timber 
buildings. 

The mission included a chapel, a 
carpenter shop, a smithy, dwellings, 
aqueducts and an escape tunnel. Here 
the Jesuits lived and worked for ten 
years, until the tragic massacre in 
1648. A Martyrs' Shrine stands nearby. 




"The long, unbroken period 

of economic expansion of 

the Sixties turned out to be 

as much a problem for some 

parts of the construction 

industry as it was a boom 

for others. One undisputed 

effect was to alter the 

composition of the nation's 

construction output between 

1950 and 1960 away from 

residential building and 

toward business related 

construction. The decade of 

the Seventies is almost certain 

to produce a swing back in 

the direction of greater 

emphasis on housing." 




CONSTRUCTION IN THE SIXTIES 



A REVIEW 



BY GEORGE A. CHRISTIE, 

Chief Economist, 

F. W. Dodge Division 

McGraw-Hill Information 

Systems Company 

■ The Sixties began in a mood 
of great expectations and ended on 
a note of "Wait 'til next decade". 
Waiting and priorities were what 
the 1960s were mostly about, espe- 
cially in matters concerning the 
nation's construction needs. 

Just the same, the statistics of 
the accomplishments of the past 



decade are quite impressive. For 
the first half of the period, that 
highly overworked term, "The Soar- 
ing Sixties," looked almost appro- 
priate. It was only around mid- 
decade that soaring turned to sour- 
ing. As a nation we spent, all in 
all, some $700 billion on the con- 
struction of new housing, industrial 
and commercial buildings, schools 
and hospitals, highways, and other 
facilities. That works out to just 
about one-tenth of the entire Gross 
National Product for the ten-year 



period. But big as that total sounds, 
it fell short of its potential in two 
ways: 

First, we just didn't spend enough. 
Not enough dollars were channeled 
into construction during the Sixties 
to come even close to meeting the 
nation's needs for housing and other 
facilities. In the face of growing 
needs and accelerating deterioration 
of the existing stock of buildings — 
especially in urban areas — we actu- 
ally invested a smaller share of GNP 
in construction than we did in the 



THE CARPENTER 



Fifties. Had we spent the same 
share of our national income on 
construction in the Sixties as in the 
previous decade (and even that 
would have been too little in rela- 
tion to larger needs) we'd have had 
the equivalent of an entire addi- 
tional year's building output. 

Second, we didn't get all we paid 
for. Inflation reduced the effective- 
ness of the $700 billion that was 
spent by some S85 billion — the 
equivalent of another year's output 
that was paid for but never received. 

To understand why the Sixties 
turned out as they did, and perhaps 
gain insight into the Seventies at the 
same time, it's necessary to examine 
how some of the key developments 
of the past decade worked to shape 
construction markets. The four 
critical ones were: economic con- 
ditions; demographic change; the 
urban crisis; the Vietnam war. 

ECONOMIC CONDITIONS 

The economy of the Sixties was 
born in one recession and ended on 
the brink of another. Between those 
two brief setbacks was a period of 
uninterrupted business expansion 
which covered almost the entire 
decade. The durability of this long, 
recessionless span was certainly the 
outstanding economic feature of the 
Sixties. It had both a positive and 
a negative impact on construction 
activity. 

One large block of construction 
is directly related to business activ- 
ity. The factories, offices, stores, 
and other industrial and commercial 
building that represents capital 
spending for business corporations 
makes up about one-fifth of total 
construction activity. During the 
Sixties, this was construction's best 
growth market. 

What made it so was a departure 
from the boom-bust cycle that is 
normally associated with capital 
spending. It boomed all right in the 
Sixties, especially during the first 
half of the decade as the economy 
moved out of recession and into full 
employment, but it never busted. 
Instead of dropping off sharply as 
the rate of business growth slack- 
ened around mid-decade, the high 
level of capital spending was sus- 
tained throughout the balance of the 
Sixties. 



The long, uninterrupted stretch 
of prosperity was an important sup- 
port of this high volume of business 
investment, but it took more than 
that. Two additional forces came 
into play: inflation, or more prop- 
erly, the expectation of higher prices 
and profits; and a gradual but signi- 
ficant change in business investment 
planning. During the Sixties corpo- 
rate investment policy matured, be- 
coming more farsighted and less 
cyclical — even to the extent of plan- 
ning for a strong volume of capital 
outlays through the period of eco- 
nomic slowdown that is now antici- 
pated for 1970. 

While the economic conditions 
of the Sixties led to a strong growth 
of industrial and commercial con- 
struction, they had quite a different 
effect on housing and some other 
types of building. Once the expan- 
sion of the early years of the decade 
turned into the severe inflation that 
blighted the final years, one of pros- 
perity's unpleasant side effects came 
into play. Recurring periods of 
credit scarcity greatly restricted the 
financing of housing and other types 
of construction which rely on an 
ample supply of loanable funds. 

With conventional housing output 
seriously curtailed by tight money, 
some of the demand for housing 
(especially at the lower-cost end of 
the scale) was met by a large in- 
crease in the sale of mobile homes. 
While conventional homebuilding 
was actually declining from the mid- 
dle to the end of the decade, mobile 
home output doubled. 

On balance, the long, unbroken 
period of economic expansion of the 
Sixties turned out to be as much a 
problem for some parts of the con- 
struction industry as it was a boom 
for others. One undisputed effect 
was to alter the composition of the 
nation's construction output between 
1950 and 1960 away from residen- 
tial building and toward business- 
related construction. The decade of 
the Seventies is almost certain to 
produce a swing back in the direc- 
tion of greater emphasis on housing. 

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS 

The structure of the nation's pop- 
ulation underwent an important 
change during the past ten years. 
It was the decade in which the post- 



war babies finally came of age. And 
as the kids of the Forties and Fifties 
became the young adults of the Six- 
ties, they left their mark on con- 
struction as well as on most other 
social and economic institutions. 

Between 1960 and 1970 almost 
half of the entire population growth 
of 26 million took place within the 
15- to 24-year age group. Mean- 
while, the group between ages 20 
and 39 actually shrank by about 
two million over the decade. Looked 
at another way, when the Sixties 
began, the 15-24's just about 
equalled the 30-39's in number; by 
the time it ended, there were three 
young adults for every two people 
in their thirties. 

This turn of events led to some 
quite natural and highly predictable 
consequences. College enrollments, 
for example, shot up from 3Vz mil- 
lion in 1960 to 7 million in 1970; 
elementary school enrollment 
growth slowed noticeably. The mar- 
riage rate, which had been declining 
during the Fifties, began to rise 
again in the Sixties. The rate of 
family formation — a critical gauge 
of the demand for housing — started 
increasing around mid-decade after 
a period of stability. 

Each of these changes drew a 
response from the construction in- 
dustry. The impact on the school 
building market was a big one. 
After an almost insatiable demand 
for elementary and secondary school 
facilities during the Fifties and early 
Sixties, growth of this market 
ceased. A rapid expansion of higher 
educational facilities filled the gap, 
but it was a different kind of con- 
struction — a lot more varied, and 
more costly, too. Out of nowhere 
came a surge of demand for dormi- 
tories, something that doesn't go 
along with K-12 building. 

The rising marriage rate and an 
increase in the number of young 
adults living alone brought two key 
changes in the housing market of 
the Sixties. The first had to do with 
the kind of housing that was re- 
quired to meet the needs of the new 
generation. In the Fifties, when 
most housing was being purchased 
by thirties-aged households that 
were the mainstay of the great sub- 
urban exodus of that decade, de- 
mand ran heavily to the single- 



FEBRUARY, 1970 




MODULAR HOUSING came to the fore in the Sixties, as technological advances 
in the industry made prefabrication of components possible. The Brotherhood and 
other unions entered into agreements with module manufacturers for the first rime. 



family unit with an expansion attic 
and a VA mortgage. In the mid- 
Fifties, four out of five newly-built 
dwelling units were one-family 
houses. In the Sixties, a much 
higher proportion of home seekers 
wanted something different — a gar- 
den-type apartment for the newly- 
wed, perhaps, or a unit in the city 
for those off on their own. That 
shrinking group in their thirties had 
become less of a force in the hous- 
ing market. 

Add the fact that financial con- 
ditions of the late Sixties gave apart- 
ment construction a strong edge 
over one-family building and you get 
the result: a shift in the composi- 
tion of the housing market to the 
extent that by the end of the decade 
apartment units accounted for more 
than 40 per cent of all convention- 
ally-built housing. By this time, the 
mobile home had also captured a 
sizeable share of the shelter market, 
too, and it was quite a different 
business than it was when the Sixties 
began. 

The second major change in the 
housing market of the Sixties was 
the direct result of the increase in 
the total number of homeseekers. 



At the start of the decade a moder- 
ate surplus of housing existed as the 
formation of new families lagged. 
By 1970, this surplus had become 
a severe shortage in most parts of 
the nation. Vacancy rates for both 
single-family units and apartments 
were reduced below accepted mini- 
mum levels as the rapid growth in 
young households and a high rate 
of demolition of substandard dwell- 
ings outstripped production of new 
housing. 

Housing is expected to be the 
fastest-growing major construction 
market of the Seventies as we tackle 
the goal of providing some 26 mil- 
lion dwellings to meet the needs of 
a growing population and replace 
more than ten million existing units 
that are, or will become, substand- 
ard. As in the Sixties, the form that 
this housing will take will continue 
to change along with the require- 
ments of its buyers and renters. 
Equally important, there will have 
to be a great deal more innovation 
in the way this housing is produced 
so that future demand can be met 
at a realistic cost. 



THE URBAN CRISIS 

A far-reaching episode of the 
Fifties was the vast movement of 
population to the suburbs. For most 
of those who made the move, it was 
a happy experience. In the Sixties, 
the urban problems that had been 
left behind were thrust into the na- 
tional limelight. There was nothing 
pleasant about it. Urban decay, 
poverty, and violence were the harsh 
domestic issues of the past ten years. 
One indication of the kinds of 
problems that were demanding at- 
tention during this period is found 
in a cross section of the many special 
commissions that were formed to 
examine urgent matters and recom- 
mend courses of action. A partial 
list includes national committees on: 
civil rights; equal employment op- 
portunities; violence; consumer in- 
terests; voting rights; civil disorders; 
law enforcement; urban problems; 
hunger. These were measures of a 
troubled decade. 

Not all of these problem areas 
required solutions involving con- 
struction, but a surprisingly large 
number of them did. In response, 
Congress passed a prodigious vol- 
ume of legislation aimed at upgrad- 
ing the status of the nation's poor 
and making the city a better place 
in which to work and live. Out of 
this came some major new programs 
for construction. 

Housing, where the need is most 
urgent, drew Congress' greatest at- 
tention. Two major laws, the 1965 
and 1968 Housing Acts, shifted the 
focus of our long sequence of hous- 
ing legislation to bear on the prob- 
lem of providing more urban hous- 
ing at lower cost. The creation of 
the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD) and 
the formulation — for the first time 
— of a national housing plan for 
eliminating substandard housing 
over the next decade while provid- 
ing some 26 million dwelling units 
indicated the thrust of this legisla- 
tion. Related programs, such as 
Model Cities, rent and interest sup- 
plements, rehabilitation of sound 
existing structures, and Operation 
Breakthrough (the scheme to mass 
produce low-cost housing using 
"factory methods") all fit into the 
overall plan. 



THE CARPENTER 



Transportation, which until re- 
cently has been synonymous with 
the Federal highway program, now 
has more of an urban character as 
the result of legislation passed in 
the Sixties to provide for the de- 
velopment of mass transit systems 
in the nation's cities. 

Environmental pollution, a long- 
neglected problem, became a hot 
issue in the last decade. Two new 
laws, the Water Quality Act ('65) 
and the Clean Water Restoration 
Act ('66) authorized Federal funds 
to deal with pollution. 

The decade of the Sixties might 
be considered a period of awaken- 
ing to the urgency of these great 
urban problems — housing, mass 
transportation, environmental pollu- 
tion. Their solution involves con- 
struction in massive doses. An im- 
portant first step in coping with 
these problems was to provide the 
legislative programs that will direct 
more resources into these areas, and 
to that extent some real progress 
was made during the Sixties. What 
was lacking was the money to make 
these programs work. Since 1966, 
the war in Vietnam has had first 
claim on the nation's resources, and 
most domestic programs — new ones 
and old ones alike — have been se- 
verely curtailed as a result. 

THE VIETNAM WAR 

Last of the four major forces 
which helped to shape construction 
markets in the Sixties was the war 
in Vietnam. The "guns-and-butter" 
economy of the second half of the 
Sixties had two effects on construc- 
tion — one direct, and one indirect 
— both of them negative. 

The direct impact of the war was 
the competition for available Fed- 
eral appropriations between the De- 
partment of Defense and the other 
Government agencies which admin- 
ister the many ongoing programs 
for housing, education, health and 
welfare, transportation, and other 
domestic needs. As the annual 
amount committed to military use 
jumped from $50 billion in 1965 
to $80 billion by 1969, these agen- 
cies had to settle for what was left. 
It was considerably short of the 
amount needed to cope with the 
social problems that were mounting 
at home. In particular, it was the 



newer programs — the product of the 
wave of urban-oriented legislation 
passed during the mid-Sixties — that 
were hardest hit by this conflict of 
priorities. For lack of adequate 
financing, few of them are yet be- 
yond the planning stage. 

The indirect effect of the war on 
construction has been felt through 
inflation and its remedies. The seeds 
of the severe inflation in the final 
years of the Sixties were sown when 
the rapid increase in military spend- 
ing was financed by huge govern- 
ment deficits. Efforts to offset these 
inflationary pressures by restraining 
the economy — first by tight money 
and later by deep cuts in Federal 
non-military spending — had a dis- 
proportionately heavy impact on 
construction. Almost all construc- 
tion work needs either private lend- 
ing or public spending to move it 
along. 

Housing was hardest-hit. The 
1966 "credit crunch" brought on a 
severe contraction of home build- 
ing, and after only a brief period 
of recovery a second round of tight 
money in 1969 led to another hous- 
ing "recession". Publicly sponsored 
construction was curtailed by budget 
cuts and very high municipal bor- 
rowing costs, and only industrial and 
commercial building was expanding 
vigorously in the late Sixties. 

Even in the industrial and com- 
mercial building market, large ap- 
parent gains were illusory. In the 
generally inflationary conditions that 
prevailed, construction costs were 
rising by as much as seven per cent 
a year compared with the AVi per 
cent composite of all prices through- 
out the economy at the end of the 
decade. It meant that growth of 
construction in real terms, which 
had been averaging close to five per 
cent per year during the first half 
of the decade, had leveled off to less 
than one per cent annually during 
the final years. The amount spent 
on construction went up 27 per cent 
between 1965 and 1969; all but 
three or four per cent of that rise 
was due to inflated costs. 

THE TASK AHEAD 

An economic climate of uninter- 
rupted prosperity and a shift in the 
composition of the population which 
put more people in the young adult 



age group, were sources of a strong 
rate of construction growth during 
the first half of the Sixties. 

The real challenge of the Sixties, 
however, was the urban problem, 
and it has gone largely unsolved. 
Progress in this area was limited 
largely to recognizing the problem 
— often brought to light in a violent 
way — and to developing the pro- 
grams and technologies to deal with 
it. This challenge established the 
potential for even greater growth of 
construction during the second half 
of the decade than was realized in 
the opening half. It didn't happen, 
mostly because war and inflation 
took precedence. 

BACKLOG OF WORK 

This left an enormous backlog of 
construction work — the task of re- 
building the nation's cities — to be 
done in the Seventies. It will take 
more than a decade to do the job, 
but it's essential that we get started. 

There are signs of change in the 
making. The war has not ended, 
but it is at least being de-escalated. 
Military spending is still a burden, 
but it has been reduced in the latest 
Federal budget. Inflation is still 
rampant, but there is hope that we 
will soon see some fruits of a year's 
restraint on the economy. 

The elimination of these impedi- 
ments are only the first steps to 
reaching the goals of urban recon- 
struction. They are not the only 
barriers. Congress must be willing 
to back its new programs with 
enough Federal money to do the 
job. Local governments must re- 
move the barriers that exist in the 
form of outdated building codes and 
restrictive zoning regulations. The 
financial community must develop 
new avenues for channeling more 
private capital into the undernour- 
ished mortgage market. 

The construction industry faces 
a difficult task: to develop the ca- 
pacity — in manpower, materials, 
technology, and managerial skill — 
to expand its output by nearly two- 
thirds the current volume in only 
the next ten years. 

Some big changes are needed. 
This nation cannot afford another 
decade like the Sixties. ■ 



FEBRUARY, 1970 




CANADIAN 
MEMBERS 

WORK TO 

TAME THE 

NELSON 

RIVER 



(1) An artist's drawing shows how 
the completed Nelson River 
Dam will look. 





(4) Scroll case forms were laid out and built by car- 
penters. 

(5) All these scroll case forms were built completely 
on the construction site and protected from the 
weather till ready for installation. 

(6) and (7) The powerhouse begins to take shape. 



" 






(2) Carpenters of Local 343, Manitoba, set draught tube 
forms in the bottom of the powerhouse. 

(3) Intake soffit forms are prefabricated in the yard 
during the winter months by H. Brown and other 
members of Local 343. 



THE CARPENTER 






■■-■■ ■:■■■ : - ■■;■:::■ ■ : %.. / ■ "*■* -■-; ^r..:M!^. 

-■■ 

■■■■ 



■ In the wilderness of Northern 
Manitoba, 500 miles by air from 
Winnipeg, members of Carpenters 
Local 343, Manitoba, Canada have 
been part of a project to construct a 
120-foot high dam across the Nelson 
River. 

Member employment on the proj- 
ect reached a peak of 550 carpenters 
during the summer months, when 
the most active construction was un- 
derway. Concrete work continues 
through the long-five-month winter 
in enclosed, heated areas. Tempera- 
tures at the site, which is above the 
56° parallel, drop to minus 60 de- 
grees. 

The Nelson River runs from Lake 
Winnipeg 410 miles into the Hudson 
Bay. When the Kettle Rapids Proj- 
ect is completed in 1971, the con- 
crete dam will harness a 98-foot 
head of water and will have the po- 
tential for 12 turbines, each with a 
capacity of 102,000 kilowatts. The 
dam and the powerhouse will con- 
tain 820,000 cubic yards and will 
stretch 4,500 feet, including earth- 
fill. 

Work on the project is covered by 
a council agreement on basic condi- 
tions. R. J. Dancer of the Brother- 
hood is also president of the Allied 
Hydro Council of Manitoba. ■ 




SB 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



There 9 s Some Tax Relief 



BUT MANY WEALTHY AMERICANS STILL ESCAPE TAXATION 



B A far-reaching tax relief and reform 
bill, with increased social security ben- 
efits, was signed into law a few weeks 
ago by President Nixon after winning 
the overwhelming approval of Con- 
gress. 

The bill capped a year-long effort 
by Congress on tax legislation. The 
vote in the House was 381-2, and in 
the Senate, 71-6. All opposing votes 
were cast by Republicans. 

In signing the legislation, which he 
had once indicated he might veto, 
Nixon described the tax cuts as in- 
flationary but said that the reforms 
outweighed this factor. 

"I sign it," he said, "because I be- 
lieve that, on balance, it is a necessary 
beginning in the process of making our 
tax system fair to the taxpayer." 

Major reforms in the. law include 
cuts in oil and other mineral depletion 
allowances; the closing or narrowing 
of some loopholes that have permitted 
a tax-escape on real estate, capital 
gains and banking procedures; a new 
tax on foundations; limits on "hobby 
farming" as a tax dodge; and a mini- 
mum income tax to get at least some 
revenue from presently sheltered in- 
come. 

Included in the tax relief sections, 
are a three-step increase in the per- 
sonal exemption from $600 to $750. a 
three-step raise in the standard deduc- 
tion, tax relief for single persons, and 
a low-income allowance to relieve mil- 



lions of poor families from having to 
shoulder any tax burden. 

The 10 percent income surtax on 
individuals and corporations is re- 
duced to 5 percent, effective Jan. 1, 
and expires completely on June 30. 
The 7 percent investment tax credit for 
businesses has been repealed. 

While the new law closes or narrows 
scores of loopholes in the tax law, bil- 
lions of dollars will continue to escape 
full taxation and unearned income will 
continue to enjoy a privileged position 
in the internal revenue code. 

As a tax reform measure — and that 
was the initial thrust of the Treasury 
Dept. studies released early in 1969 — 
the law's effect will be gradual as 
special provisions and phase-outs ex- 
pire and as new requirements gradu- 
ally take hold and begin to produce 
revenue. 

Some $6.6 billion in long-term 
federal revenue will eventually result 
from the law, almost totally from cor- 
porations and wealthy individuals. 
However, it will still be possible for 
very wealthy Americans to escape pay- 
ing taxes. 

The most massive overhaul of the 
tax structure began last Feb. 18. In 
subsequent hearings before the House 
and Senate, more than 300 separate 
witnesses were heard, providing 14 
volumes of testimony. Among these 
were lobbyists for every conceivable 
industry, mineral, enterprise, founda- 



tion and special interest — all seeking 
to protect or enlarge their favored 
position in the tax code. It was in 
these hearings that the AFL-CIO pro- 
posed its program to close $16 billion 
in tax loopholes. 

As a result of the hearings, the pub- 
lic soon learned that high-income 
Americans were paying little or no 
taxes because of special provisions in 
the law that enabled them to "shelter" 
their income against the maximum 70 
percent tax. In fact, it was disclosed 
that the average income tax paid by 
those in high-income brackets was 
closer to 35 percent than to 70 percent. 

With the Treasury studies before 
them and the testimony of reform- 
minded organizations such as the 
AFL-CIO, Congress concentrated its 
loophole closing among tax provisions 
affecting real estate, minerals, financial 
institutions and capital gains. 

In the final measure, closing of real 
estate tax loopholes will provide $930 
million in new revenue, the lowering 
of percentage depletion and the end to 
"carve outs" in oil and other minerals 
will produce $420 million; capital gains 
$435 million; financial institutions, 
$275 million and the minimum tax 
$635 million. 

These new sources, plus a variety 
of other areas that are touched for 
lesser amounts, and the $3.3 billion 
that will accrue from repeal of the 7 
percent investment tax credit, make 
up the revenue in the new act. ■ 





Tax Comparison 






FOR MARRIED COUPLE WITH 2 DEPENDENTS IN 

1973 
Adjusted 

Gross Tax Under Tax Under Tax Decrease 
Income Present Law* New Law Amount % 


$ 3.000 













— 


3,500 


$ 66 





$ 66 




100.0 


4,000 


123 





123 




100.0 


4,200 


147 


$ 28 


119 




80.9 


5,000 


245 


140 


105 




42.9 


7,500 


578 


476 


102 




17.7 


10.000 


962 


848 


114 




11.9 


12.500 


1,352 


1,238 


114 




8.4 


15.000 


1.798 


1,666 


132 




7.3 


17,500 


2,249 


2.117 


132 




5.9 


20,000 


2.760 


2,610 


150 




5.4 


25,000 


3,848 3,680 

ve of tax surcharge. 


168 




4.4 


* Exclus 



Tax Relief Schedule 



Minimum 
Standard 
Standard 
Deduction 

Personal 
exemption 



1970 



$1,100'- 



1971 



$ 1,050 :: 



1972 



$1,000 



1973 



$1,000 



13%upto 14%upto 15%upto 
$1,500 $2,000 $2,000 



$650 



$700 



$750 



$650 
(Beginning 
July 1) 
Single persons — No more than 20% in excess of 
that paid on joint return for same 
income 
Annual Cost 
to Treasury 

Revenues -$1,441 -$4,927 -$7,269 $9,134 
(In millions) 



* In 1970 and 1971 these amounts are actually low income 
allowances inasmuch as in 1970 the amount phases out at $1 
reduction for each $2 of income above this figure and in 1972 
the phaseout is a §1 reduction for each §15 of income above this 
figure. Thereafter, there is no phaseout. 



THE CARPENTER 



TAX REFORM AT A GLANCE 



Major provisions of the 1969 Tax Reform Bill 
include: 

• PERSONAL EXEMPTION: The $600 exemp- 
tion for each taxpayer and each of his dependents rises 
to $650 on July 1, 1970, to $700 on Jan. 1, 1972 and 
to $750 on Jan. 1, 1973. 

• STANDARD DEDUCTIONS: Allowed deduc- 
tion for a taxpayer who does not itemize expenses is 
now ten per cent, with a ceiling of $1,000. It rises to 
13 per cent with a $1,400 ceiling in 1970, then to 14 
per cent with a $1,500 ceiling in 1971, to 14 per cent 
with $2,000 ceiling in 1972 and to 15 per cent with 
a $2,000 in 1973 and thereafter. 

• LOW-INCOME ALLOWANCE: Designed to 
remove five million poor people from tax obligations 
and to drastically cut taxes for seven million near- 
poor, it is equal to a minimum $1,100 personal ex- 
emption effective Jan. 1, 1970. This drops to $1,050 
on Jan. 1, 1971 and to $1,000 on Jan. 1, 1972 and 
thereafter. 

• SOCIAL SECURITY: A 1 5 per cent increase in 
benefits goes into effect Jan. 1, 1970, to be reflected in 
checks mailed out in March. The minimum benefit 
for a single person rises from its present $55 to $64 
a month. 

• SURTAX: The 10 per cent surcharge on per- 
sonal and corporate income falls to 5 per cent Jan. 1, 
1970, and expires June 30, 1970. 

• EXCISE TAXES: The 7 per cent excise tax on 
new cars and the 1 per cent tax on telephone service 
are continued for another year at their present rates. 

• SINGLE PERSONS: Special tax relief is granted 
unmarried people so that in no case would a single 
taxpayer pay over 20 per cent more in taxes than 
a married couple with the same income. The gap now 
is as much as 40 per cent. 

• INVESTMENT CREDIT: This subsidy to busi- 
nesses and farmers, amounting to a 7 per cent subsidy 
on their expenses for new equipment, expansion or 
modernization, is eliminated, effective last April 1 8. 

• MOVING EXPENSES: Deductible expenses for 
moving are liberalized for moves of 50 miles or more 
to include traveling, meals and lodging for premove 
house-hunting trips and expenses arising from the sale 
of a house. The self-employed are permitted to claim 
moving expenses. 

• INCOME AVERAGING: Persons whose in- 
comes grow by more than 20 per cent in one year may 
average out the additional income over several years, 
subjecting it to a lower tax rate than would otherwise 
be possible. This provision includes income from 
capital gains, wagering or gifts. 



• MAXIMUM TAX: High-income taxpayers who 
receive their income from salary, wages or fees — 
chiefly executives, lawyers, doctors, and other profes- 
sionals — will pay no more than 60 per cent of their 
earned income in 1971 and no more than 50 per cent 
thereafter if they also had no more than $30,000 in 
"unearned income." At present, the tax rate goes be- 
yond 50 per cent for income above $52,000 a year. 
"Unearned income" — from dividends, interest, rents 
and the like — remains taxable at the old rates. 

• MINIMUM TAX: A special 10 per cent tax is 
imposed on "tax sheltered" income, such as income 
benefiting from the oil depletion allowance, capital 
gains taxes or tax preferences which are granted earn- 
ings from real estate investments. 

• DEPLETION ALLOWANCES: The 27.5 per 
cent oil depletion allowance is cut to 22 per cent and 
depletion allowances allowed more than 100 other 
minerals are generally cut by 1 percentage point. This 
will allow an oil firm to withhold from taxation 22 per 
cent of its gross income or 50 per cent of its net profits, 
whichever is smaller. 

• CAPITAL GAINS: The first $50,000 of capi- 
tal gains — profits from the sale of stocks and other 
property held six months or more — is to be subject 
to the existing 25 per cent maximum rate. On gains 
above $25,000, a taxpayer will have to pay half his 
ordinary tax rate on the gains. Thus, for a taxpayer 
in the 65 per cent bracket, the tax is 32.5 per cent on 
gains above $25,000. 

• TAX REFORMS: The bill tightens tax loop- 
holes which permit excessive income from real estate 
investments and banks. Also narrowed are provisions 
under which persons with large amounts of nonfarm 
income may escape taxes by buying a farm and taking 
advantage of liberal writeoffs of farm loss income in- 
tended to benefit bona fide farmers. 

• FOUNDATIONS: They become subject to a tax 
of 7.5 per cent of their income from investments and 
are required to give to charity each year a sum equal 
to 6 per cent of their net worth. 

• CHURCH-OPERATED BUSINESSES: Busi- 
nesses operated by churches and other tax-exempt 
organizations are subject to the 48 per cent corporate 
tax rate on their profits. 

• TREBLE-DAMAGES: Two-thirds of treble 
damage awards for antitrust violations can no longer 
be deducted by businesses as normal business ex- 
penses. Nor can bribes or kickbacks be deducted as 
business expenses. 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



ROUNDUP 



MORTGAGE RATE HIKE— Interest rate ceilings on FRA and VA home mortgages have been 
raised from 1\ to 8-J- percent, further tightening the money squeeze on home 
■building. A "blow to "both home-buyers and to the construction industry, the action 
means that monthly payments on principal and interest on a 30-year $20,000 
mortgage will increase 10%, an added cost of $5,000 for the life of the mortgage. 
The 27% decline in homehuilding since January of 1969 will accelerate in spite 
of the national goal of 26 million dwelling units in 10 years estahlished "by 
Congress two years ago. 

SOCIAL SECURITY-The one in eight Americans who receives "benefits from the Social 
Security system can look forward to a 15% increase in payments this year. The 
new "benefits will "begin automatically with the April 3 payment check for each of 
the 25 million recipients now enrolled. A separate check in the amount of the 
"benefit increase for January and February will arrive in April. 

BUILDING EQUALITY— Negro apprentices in the building trades increased 120 per cent 
in the period between January, 1967, and January, 1969, according to Painters 
President S. Prank Raftery. In a speech before the 46th Commencement of the 
Harvard Trade Union Program held recently in Cambridge, Mass., Raftery called 
American unions "... the most integrated of all mass institutions in our 
society. Over two million Negroes are organized and moving into leadership posi- 
tions in increasing numbers." "By compar ision, " he went on to say, "there is not 
a single black face to be seen on the Board of Directors of 500 of the largest 
corporations in this country." 

UNEMPLOYMENT RISE— Job pressure is beginning to show in a rise in both new and 
insured unemployment claims of 15.8% over the comparable period in 1968. Ac- 
cording to the Labor Department, much but not all of the increase is due to 
seasonal curtailments in construction and other outdoor operations. 

OPEN HOUSING— The final stage of the 1968 Open Housing Law is now in effect, more 
than doubling the number of housing units covered by the ban on discrimination in 
rentals and sales. The Dept. of Housing and Urban Development plans to use its 
administrative powers under this law to the fullest extent, drawing also on the 
even broader anti-discrimination provisions of an 1866 civil rights law, which 
the Supreme Court upheld two years ago. AFL-CIO President George Meany, who 
called the legislation "absolutely essential" when it was put before Congress, 
commented that "to have meaning . . . open housing must go hand in hand with 
enough housing and housing available at a price level workers can afford." HUD 
will treat each separate complaint through a policy of investigation and 
attempted conciliation first, then legal action. 

NIXON ASKS HIGHER EXCISE- The President reportedly wants to ask for a $2.5 billion 
increase over the present $16 billion excise tax revenue, collected on auto- 
mobiles, gasoline, cigarettes, liquor and telephone services. This kind of tax 
increase, like the "value-added" tax Nixon has been considering, would hit lower 
incomes much harder than high ones and is generally opposed by organized labor. 

10 THE CARPENTER 




Meany Calls Quotas Unworkable: 

Philadelphia Plan 

Assailed As 

Masking Rights Retreat 



■ The Philadelphia plan won't 
help a bit to increase the number of 
minority-group jobs in the construc- 
tion industry and is simply a "con- 
coction and contrivance" designed 
to mask the Administration's overall 
retreat on civil rights, AFL-CIO 
Pres. George Meany declared. 

Meany, in a speech at the Na- 
tional Press Club in Washington, 
said "I have seen more misinforma- 
tion and confusion about the Phila- 
delphia plan from columnists, edi- 
torial writers and public officials 
than anything I have seen or heard 
in a long time." 

The plan, which sets up govern- 
ment-determined "goals" for minor- 
ity-group hiring on major federal 
construction jobs, would have been 
killed in the Senate by a rider to an 
appropriations bill on the grounds 
that racial quotas in hiring are a 
violation of the 1964 Civil Rights 
Act. 

However, the rider was removed 
in subsequent votes of the House 
and Senate after a vigorous push 
from the Administration which in- 
cluded a White House press confer- 
ence by Sec. of Labor George P. 
Shultz and Assistant Sec. Arthur 
Fletcher. 

Meany described as "just plain, 
ordinary bunk" many of the press 
accounts of the plan, including one 
columnist's description of the con- 
gressional action as "the most im- 
portant civil rights vote in the his- 
tory of the country." 

On the contrary, Meany said, the 
plan "served its purpose when it 
got the Madison Avenue publicity 
job that was done on it." In actual 
practice, he said, the plan "will fall 
of its own dead weight." 

"Perhaps the greatest drawback 
to the plan," he said, "is that it di- 



verts attention from the real solid 
task of training and qualifying 
minority workers for a permanent 
place in the ranks of skilled work- 
ers, available and qualified for em- 
ployment on all of the construction 
work in an area, not just the fed- 
erally-financed work." 

Such a solution is offered, Meany 
said, by the Apprenticeship Out- 
reach program inaugurated by the 
AFL-CIO and its affiliates two and 
one-half years ago. In contrast to 
Outreach, he said, the Philadelphia 
plan has these shortcomings: 

• The plan applies only to con- 
struction work and then on a job 
basis, which could mean employ- 
ment for only a few months, while 
making no provision for getting 
minority-group members into per- 
manent places in the area work 
force. 

• A contractor could comply 
with the Philadelphia plan by trans- 
ferring workers from private jobs 
to government jobs, without bring- 
ing any new workers into the work 
force at all. 

• A "good-faith" effort is all that 
is needed for compliance, and a 
contractor could dismiss the respon- 
sibility with "one phone call to some 
source." 

"The only sound method to bring 
minority representatives into the 
skilled construction trades is the 
comprehensive program outlined by 
the Building Trades and backed up 
in every way by the AFL-CIO," 
Meany said. "Even Sec. Shultz, after 
singing the praises of this [Phila- 
delphia] plan, recognized its limi- 
tations just a few days ago when he 
strongly endorsed what he called an 
area-wide, multi-employer program. 

"This is what we have. This is 
what Outreach is. But it was started 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



11 



under a previous Administration. It 
started under a different Secretary 
of Labor, and of course, it doesn't 
have the attraction of being some- 
thing that can be attributed to this 
Administration," Meany observed 
caustically. 

Brownie Points 

"And when we contemplate the 
record of this Administration in the 
civil rights field — the softening on 
voters' rights, delayed desegrega- 
tion of the schools in the South, 
the attempt to put Strom Thur- 
mond's baby on the Supreme Court, 
the cutting back of programs that 
could be helpful in the black com- 
munity — it would seem that this at- 
tempt to use the Building Trades as 
a whipping boy could be designed to 
give the Nixon Administration a few 
Brownie points to offset their short- 
comings in the civil rights area as a 
whole." 

Meany also contrasted the Ad- 
ministration's attitude toward the 
Building Trades with its approach 
to three big textile firms in the 
Carolinas — J. P. Stevens, Burling- 
ton and Dan River Mills. He said 
Shultz had pointed with pride to a 
six-month report that minority em- 
ployment in those mills had risen 
nine-tenths of 1 percent, reaching 
an overall ratio as of Sept. 30 of 
18.3 percent under the pressure of 
the Labor Dept. "Big Deal. They 
came up to 18.3 percent in their 
employment of minority groups. 
This could be compared to the em- 
ployment in Philadelphia of the 
Building Trades of over 30 percent 
minority-group members." 

But the 30 percent minority- 
group involvement in the trades in 
Philadelphia is called meaningless, 
Meany noted, because it includes 
the membership in the "trowel 
trades," while the Philadelphia plan 
is "directed especially to iron work- 
ers, plumbers, carpenters, steam fit- 
ters, sheet metal workers and elec- 
tricians." 

Meany said the charge is often 
made that blacks are not admitted 
to the highly-skilled trades but only 
to the low-wage, dirty jobs. "First 
of all," he went on, "there are no 
low-wage jobs in the building trades. 
Lower paid at $7 an hour is not too 
much lower paid. And as far as 



dirty jobs are concerned, there are 
no clean jobs. They are all dirty." 

Meany called for a similar break- 
down by skills on employees of the 
southern textile mills. "Well, this 
isn't done," he said. "They don't 
break down the figures. They take 
the whole thing en masse, and if 
you took the whole thing en masse, 
the Building Trades would be No. 1 
in this area in the country. 

"Nobody would be ahead of 
them — no manufacturers, no indus- 
trial set-up, not the auto workers or 
anyone else. 

"Still, they try to make a whip- 
ping boy out of them because the 
percentage of the skilled trades is 
not as high as they would like to 
see," Meany said. "We would like 
to see it higher and the unions in 
skilled trades are doing what they 
can to make it higher." 



Data supplied to Congress 
by Nixon Administration 
contradicted. Meany 
restates organized labor's 
commitment to a valid 
assistance program for 
minority groups. 



And if breakdowns according to 
skills are going to be made, Meany 
said he'd like to see the same done 
for the textile mills, but "this would 
not fit in with the Southern strategy" 
of the Administration. 

Figures Refuted 

Meany also refuted the figures of 
minority-group membership in the 
Philadelphia Building Trades on 
which the Philadelphia plan was 
based. The Labor Dept. set the fig- 
ures for the Iron Workers at 12 
minority-group members out of 850, 
or 1.4 percent. 

"Our official union records show 
a different picture," Meany said. 
"We show that there is not one 
Iron Worker local union in Phila- 
delphia, there are five. The total 



membership is not 850, it is 3,575, 
of whom 690, or 19 percent, are 
from minority groups." 

He also challenged the statement 
that 302 Iron Workers from minor- 
ity groups were available for union 
membership in Philadelphia. Meany 
said the union president John H. 
Lyons, wrote to Shultz asking for 
names and addresses and pledging 
that these persons would be given 
every assistance in securing employ- 
ment. 

Facts Questioned 

Shultz responded that it would be 
impractical to provide the names, 
Meany said, "because of the nature 
of the information-gathering tech- 
niques used by the Dept. of Labor." 
Meany said it therefore "seems rea- 
sonable to suggest that the Secre- 
tary of Labor might look over the 
fact-finding process that prevails in 
his department." 

He said the labor movement had 
no apology to make for its commit- 
ment to civil rights and the stories 
which said the Philadelphia plan 
was splitting labor away from civil 
rights groups were not true. Meany 
traced labor's close ties with civil 
rights groups in various legislative 
programs, including its 1963 insist- 
ence on getting a fair employment 
practices clause into civil rights leg- 
islation at a time when the Kennedy 
Administrative gave up on being 
able to get it passed. 

The clause was included in the 
1964 Civil Rights Act, Meany said, 
but the power to issue cease-and- 
desist orders to enforce it was 
stricken from the bill. That fight is 
still going on, he said. 

"At the present time, the AFL- 
CIO and all of the civil rights groups 
are fighting side by side to re-estab- 
lish these powers under the bill and 
the Nixon Administration, including 
the Secretary of Labor and the As- 
sistant Secretary of Labor, are op- 
posing these powers." 

In contrast to the publicity sur- 
rounding the Philadelphia plan, 
Meany said the Outreach Program 
is progressing steadily, with minor- 
ity-group participation in appren- 
ticeship up to 9.4 percent from the 
2.5 percent of 1960. ■ 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



YOU MA Y HA VE ALREADY WON! 



"Next week, Mr. Smith, you and two other 
Podunk residents, Mrs. Morgan and Mr. & Mrs. 
Fox, ivill be among those whose names have 
been selected from a list of U.S. residents to re- 
ceive seven lucky numbers . . 



?5 



"Simply mail back these $5,000 coupon- 
checks in the YES envelope enclosed to be eli- 
gible for $2 / 000-a-month for life " 

"HERE'S EXCITING NEWS FOR YOU! 
Your signature on this certificate will bring the 
Schmaltz family an opportunity to share in a 
Hawaiian vacation for 10. . . ." 



By Susan Leigh Smith 

■ Dear Mr. Jones: Congratula- 
tions! . . . You may have already 
won any one of several attractive 
prizes — a new car, cash, or an ex- 
pensive vacation." The letter is 
typed out, looks impressive and con- 
vincing, and seems to have been 
written just for you. 

Computer-produced letters are a 
new twist in the business of "direct- 
mail advertising" — or junk mail, as 
most of us know it. The average 
person has been receiving, and 
throwing away, junk mail for years, 
and the advertiser knows this. But 
what about a letter that comes with 
your name on it rather than "oc- 
cupant," mentions your name again 
and again in the body of the letter, 
and refers to your community and 
to the names of a few neighbors as 
well? When you open this kind of 
letter, do you know right away 
that it's the same old unsolicited 
junk mail? 

The answer to this question ought 
to be "yes." Take a closer look at 
the type on the letter. It is even and 



perfectly spaced out, as if the letter 
was typed straight through, to be 
sent to you alone. It wasn't. It is a 
mass-produced letter, completed by 
a computer from a list of addresses 
and information and made to look 
like an individual letter. Sometimes 
you can see that the type used for 
your name is just a little different 
from the rest of the letter. Some- 
times you can't. But it is still a form 
letter. 

Where Did You Get My Name? 

Where do the lists of addresses 
come from that are used to grind 
out these deceptive letters? How 
do you get on someone's list? And 
if you want to, is there any way to 
get your name taken off? 

There are now more than 500 
million names on solicitation lists 
which are rented among the nation's 
businesses for as little as $2.50 per 
thousand names. (NOTE: there are 
only 220 million U.S. citizens.) If 
you are a homeowner, belong to an 
organization, support a charity, have 
a telephone, open a charge account 



or send away for something with a 
coupon from a magazine, your name 
is probably available to advertisers 
and solicitors — for a price. "Only 
hermits could avoid getting on lists," 
says John J. Daly of the Direct 
Mail Advertising Assn., "but then 
they'd probably get on somebody's 
list of hermits." 

Many state motor vehicle depart- 
ments sell lists of car owners, com- 
plete with make and model, to com- 
panies which compile lists. This 
is obviously of value in indicating 
which familes are two-car families 
or own an expensive car and would 
thus be good targets for, say, an 
encyclopedia salesman. While it is 
not illegal to sell customers' names, 
most utility and service companies 
have dropped the practice because 
of complaints from their patrons. 
Apartment house managers and real 
estate dealers can provide valuable 
lists of families who are either com- 
ing or going for use by moving van 
companies or by businesses who like 
to get in touch with newcomers to 
sell newspaper subscriptions or a 
milk delivery service. And commer- 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



13 



daily organized welcoming services 
which greet new families in a com- 
munity with small presents will often 
report to local merchants how many 
children are in the family and what 
sort of goods or services the family 
might be interested in buying. 

Once your name has been listed, 
computerized, itemized and Zip 
Coded, there is little you can do. 
Writing to solicitors and asking that 
your name be removed from their 
list may help, or it may not. Most 
recipients simply swallow their ir- 
ritation and throw the unsolicited 
advertising into the nearest waste- 
basket. Direct Mail Advertising 
Assn. spokesman John J. Daly says 
cheerfully, "People's names get on 
lists because people exist. The only 
way to get off the lists is to cease to 
exist." 

The American streak of individ- 
ualism, however, is as imaginative 
as it is stubborn. One irritated junk 
mail receiver took a bundle of un- 
wanted mail down to the Post Office 
and, claiming it was obscene, de- 
manded that the Post Office stop 
delivery of junk mail to his house. 
Wilber F. Lawrence, assistant gen- 
eral counsel for the Post Office, 
ruled that obscenity was up to the 
individual and that if a recipient 
stated that junk mail looked ob- 
scene to him, he could have delivery 



of unwanted advertising stopped. 
Lawrence said in his decision that 
"Most people gripe about junk mail 
but don't do anything about it. But 
under the law, they can declare that 
an ad for a sack of potatoes looks 
sexy to them. And, if they do, we're 
obliged to act." 

Keeping One Step Ahead 

Two large corporations which use 
direct-mail advertising extensively 
have already moved to challenge the 
Post Office's decision and close the 
"obscenity" loophole. Meanwhile 
junk mail is getting more and more 
sophisticated as businesses think up 
new ways to get the consumer's at- 
tention before he automatically 
tosses their carefully prepared sales 
pitch in the wastebasket. Computer- 
produced letters, with the appear- 
ance of an individual communica- 
tion, are one new angle. There are 
others. Perhaps the letter will arrive 
with a dramatic message printed in 
red on the envelope (on the assump- 
tion that you'll throw it away with- 
out even opening it) — "You can't 
afford to miss this offer!," or some- 
thing like that. Or perhaps there will 
be no return address to identify the 
sender, only the name of the town. 
Some companies have even resorted 
to the ultimate sacrifice: mailing 
their junk letters at first-class post- 



age rather than bulk mail rates. All 
of this just to get you to read some- 
thing you didn't want in the first 
place! 

Some irate recipients, on the 
other hand, are fighting back with 
more sophisticated methods, too. If 
a junk letter contains a postage- 
guaranteed envelope, this envelope 
may be filled with pebbles or even 
with the unwanted junk letter itself 
and returned to the company, which 
will have to pay the postage. 

Advocates of the direct-mail ad- 
vertising system like to defend their 
practices on the grounds that people 
like to get mail, after all. Certainly 
the unsolicited junk letter is not 
nearly so annoying as the unsolicited 
phone call that you got out of the 
bathtub to answer. One compiler 
of a mailing list points out that the 
recall of unsafe motor vehicles by 
Detroit auto manufacturers has been 
simplified by its extensive list of car 
owners. 

As direct-mail advertisers and 
reluctant recipients think up more 
and more sophisticated ways to out- 
smart each other, the problem may 
eliminate itself, with junk mail of 
the future written to look just like 
a letter from your childhood sweet- 
heart! ■ 



Labor Asks All-Out Effort to Curb Hunger 



■ Both legislation and White House 
action under laws already on the 
books are needed to mount an ef- 
fective attack on the nation's "num- 
ber one social problem" — hunger, 
an AFL-CIO spokesman declared. 

As many as 10 million Americans 
who need Federal food stamps aren't 
getting them now. and the program 
itself isn't even available in many 
parts of the country, said Clinton 
Fair, a legislative representative of 
the AFL-CIO. 

Fair said the President doesn't 
have to wait for new legislation to 
put the Federal food stamp pro- 
gram "into the more than 300 coun- 
ties" that don't have it now. He can 
use the power he has under the law 
as it now stands, Fair contended. 



He made the statements on the 
AFL-CIO produced public affairs 
interview, Labor News Conference, 
broadcast Tuesdays at 7:35 p.m., 
EST. on the Mutual Broadcasting 
System. 

Turning to new legislation, Fair 
pointed out that the Senate last year 
approved a bill that would "expand 
the food stamp program tremen- 
dously," by the "substantial vote of 
78 to 14." He said the measure is 
now before the House Agriculture 
Committee, and that the outlook for 
its passage in the House this year is 
"good." 

"I don't know that we will get the 
bill out of committee in a form that 
is acceptable." he said. But, "I am 
sure that there will be the votes on 



the floor of the House" to assure 
enactment of the type of program 
already approved by the Senate, he 
added. 

Fair said the White House Con- 
ference on Food, Nutrition and 
Health last December indicated that 
the President is "striving to go in 
the right direction" in combatting 
hunger. He said the conference also 
added to public recognition of the 
need for a serious and concentrated 
attack on American hunger prob- 
lem. 

But, he asserted, the direction 
and effectiveness of that attack "de- 
pends a great deal" on what the 
President proposes to Congress, and 
how hard he pushes for passage of 
his proposals. ■ 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



George Meany Hails 
Chicago Job Pact 
In Construction 

AFL-CIO President George 
Meany has hailed the program 
launched by Chicago area construc- 
tion unions, employers and civil 
rights groups to recruit, train and 
place more minority group workers 
in construction jobs as a "significant 
forward step." 

Meany said the area-wide, multi- 
employer Chicago agreement is 
"substantially in line" with both 
the established policy of the AFL- 
CIO Building and Construction 
Trades Department and the "con- 
tinuing policy of the AFL-CIO." 

In a letter to Building Trades 
Department President Cornelius J. 
Haggerty, Meany said: 

"Its most important attribute, it 
seems to me, is that this multi-em- 
ployer, area-wide agreement is 
truly a hometown product, devel- 
oped by men aware of the prob- 
lems, needs and practicalities of 
this area. It is an achievable pro- 
gram, that rests four-square on 
mutual trust. As such, it is vastly 
superior to any government-im- 
posed quota system — which is, of 
course, artificial and discrimina- 
tory." 

Meany pledged continuing co- 
operation and assistance of the 
AFL-CIO Civil Rights Department 
in assuring the program's success. 

Meany added: "The Chicago 
agreement may well serve as a 
guide to Building Trades Councils 
with the full text of the agreement 
in other areas as they implement 
your convention policy. Therefore, 
I suggest you provide each of them 
for their study and consideration, 
for it is a worthy extension of 
Operation Outreach, which has al- 
ready proven itself." (PAI) 

Less Building In 70? 

Nixon's anti-inflationary measures will 
lead to a sharp cutback in construction 
spending in 1970, according to Johns- 
Manville Corp. in New York. 

In its annual industry forecast, Johns- 
Manville estimates that, even with cost 
increases, construction spending this year 
will be about $88.4 billion for 1.3 million 
housing starts, well below 1969's figures 
of $90.8 billion for 1.5 million starts. 




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FEBRUARY, 1970 



15 




PARTICIPANTS in a January seminar of instructors and training leaders, held at the General Headquarters in Washington. 
This group is one of several which have gathered in the nation's capital for "post graduate" training under the Federal Man- 
power training program. 



Safety Director Connelley Named 
To Construction Safety Advisory Body 



■ Secretary of Labor George P. 
Shultz, last month, announced the 
establishment of a nine-member 
committee to advise him on safety 
and health matters in Federally- 
funded construction work. 

He appointed Herman J. Spoerer, 
of Canfield, Ohio, retired vice presi- 
dent for industrial relations of the 
Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co., 
as chairman of the body, whose 
members represent labor, manage- 
ment and the public. 

The committee, created under 
provisions of construction safety 
legislation enacted earlier this year, 
will advise the Secretary on formu- 
lating construction safety and health 
standards and other regulations. 

In addition to Chairman Spoerer, 
Mr. Shultz named seven other mem- 
bers to the committee. They are: 

• David V. MacCollum, Safety 
Director, U.S. Army Strategic Com- 
munications Command, Fort Hua- 
chuca, Arizona, and Barry C. 



G.E. RUNS OUT 

General Electric is running out 
of products. 

G.E. Vice President for Con- 
sumer Electronics Donald E. Perry 
told Business Week magazine, last 
month, that "from this point for- 
ward every week that the strike 
goes on is going to hand business 
to our competitor on a silver 
platter." 



Brown, Director, Michigan Depart- 
ment of Labor, Lansing, Michigan. 

• George E. Aro, Safety Man- 
ager, United Engineers and Con- 
structors, Inc., Philadelphia. Penn- 
sylvania, and George A. Moore, 
President, George Moore Associ- 
ates, Inc., Portland, Oregon (the 
third employer representative will 
be named later). 

• Alan F. Burch, Safety Director, 
International Union of Operating 
Engineers, Washington, DC.; Paul 
H. Connelley, Safety Director, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and loiners, Washington, D.C., and 
Victor E. Whitehouse, Safety Direc- 
tor, International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers, Washington, 
DC. 

The new law under which the 
committee was created will cover 
between IVi million to 2 million 
construction workers — 40 to 50 per 
cent of all workers in this field. The 
legislation: 

® provides that construction 
workers on covered contracts be af- 
forded safe and healthful working 
conditions. 

» directs the Secretary of Labor 
to promulgate safety and health 
standards for workers covered. 

• directs the Secretary of Labor 
to seek compliance with safety and 
health standards on Federal or Fed- 
erally-assisted contracts or subcon- 
tracts for construction work. 

• provides avenues for judicial 



review for contractors aggrieved by 
the Secretary's actions. 

• directs the Secretary of Labor 
to provide for establishment and 
supervision of programs for educat- 
ing and training both employers and 
workers in accident-prevention tech- 
niques. 

TOY CHEST DONATIONS 




EXCITEMENT-Robert Buckingham, center, 
executive coordinator of the King County, 
Wash., Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship 
and Training Committee, and Dr. Ralph 
N. Hayden, clinical director of Fircrest 
School, enjoy the excitement of resident 
Joleen Lindholm as she explores the con- 
tents of a toy chest built by an apprentice 
cabinetmaker during the annual state ap- 
prenticeship contest. Several toy chests 
were completed, painted and given to 
Fircrest and Buckley Schools, two schools 
for the mentally retarded, by the Wash- 
ington State Carpenters and Cabinet 
Makers Contest Committee, and filled 
with toys by the District Council of Car- 
penters. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



A Nail Is More Than a Nail 
To Illinois Carpenter 




Frank S. Horwath, a member of Carpenters Local 174, Joliet, 111. 
points out ornamental nails from Germany to a group of school children. 



■ The odd nail in the bottom of 
your tool chest might interest Frank 
C. Horwath, a member of Carpen- 
ters Local 174, Joliet, 111., who used 
to sort the mixed nails in his father's 
apron. Fascinated by the varieties 
and sizes he found, he began to save 
one of each kind. Over the years 
Horwath has built up a collection of 
nails of all sizes, uses and ages, 
which tells a uniquely interesting 
story of one aspect of the carpenter's 
craft. 

His collection includes nails from 
several countries and centuries, as 
well as some recovered from histori- 
cally famous buildings. There is one 
from the oldest house in the United 
States, located in St. Augustine, Fla., 
and a handmade nail from Besley 
Tavern in Westchester County, N.Y., 
where George Washington slept. Ac- 
cording to Swedish history, this last 
nail may be seven centuries old. 

Nail-making passed through sev- 
eral stages. Horwath has a fine col- 
lection of handmade nails from Eng- 



land, where country families would 
take advantage of long winter eve- 
nings to forge quantities of nails, 
hammering and cutting "nailrods" 
separately and afterwards molding 
and casting the head. 

The first real machine nails were 
manufactured by Jeremiah Wilkin- 
son in Rhode Island in 1777, but it 
was not until 1835 that a really prac- 
tical nail-making machine was in- 
vented, this time in France. This 
machine made nails from wire and, 
while decreasing the use of the 
old handmade cut nails, made nails 
cheaper and more widely used than 
before. By 1880 machines much 
like those used today were producing 
100 to 1,000 nails per minute. 

Horwath's fund of information 
matches his unique and varied col- 
lection, and both continue to grow. 
He has turned his craftsman's curi- 
osity about the sizes and kinds of 
nails into an exhibit which illustrates 
a little-known sidelight of the tools 
and history of carpentry. ■ 



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FEBRUARY, 1970 



17 




(DODGIRM 




000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 




WINNERS of $500 Ted Kenny Memorial Scholarship awards, David M. Dahlbacka, 
son of Tovia M. Dahlbacka of Carpenters Local 448, Waukegan, 111., and Carol Ann 
Plagge, daughter of Edward C. Plagge of Carpenters Local 558, Elmhurst. III., admire 
award plaques held by George Vest, Jr., and Charles A. Thompson, president and 
secretary-treasurer, respectively, of the Chicago District Council. Looking on, left 
to right, are: Louis Ugolini, business representative. Carpenters Local 448; Mr. and 
Mrs. Dahlbacka; Mr. and Mrs. Plagge; and Warren Hargreaves, business representa- 
tive. Carpenters Local 558. 



ANNIVERSARY— Benjamin Bush, a mem- 
ber of Carpenters Local 2250. Red Bank. 
N.J.. recently celebrated his 60th wed- 
ding anniversary. He is the only living 
member of Local 1374 and was its presi- 
dent for 20 years. Local 1374 merged 
in 1937 with Local 2250. Bush installed 
the first electric lights in Keyport. N.J., 
in 1898 and in 1901 helped lay down the 
town's first trolley tracks. 

CRAFTSMAN HONORED-Carpenters Local 
343, Winnipeg, Manitoba, gave special 
recognition at its recent annual banquet 
to William Prophet, age 95 and a 75- 
year member who is especially noted for 
his wood inlaid tables of as many as 
13.500 pieces, depicting well-known 
buildings in natural wood colors. 

FEATURED— Robert F. Miller, a carpenter 
from Patton, Pa., was featured in a front- 
page article in the Union Press-Courier, 
published in Patton. "Bob" Miller, a 
Purple Heart Veteran of World War II, 
has been in the carpentry trade for 20 
years and is a member of Local 1419 
in Johnston, Pa. 




De War surrounded by well wishers. 

MILESTONES— John De War of Carpenters 
Local 2073, Milwaukee, Wise, recently 
celebrated three big events: his 93rd birth- 
day, his 60th wedding anniversary, and 
his 50th year as a member of the local. 
Presenting a 50-year pin to member De 
War, center, are several of the officers of 
the local. They are. left to right: Ben 
Bergman, trustee: Walter Stollenwerk, 
financial secretary; Arthur Schmitz. 
treasurer; and Richard Hohl. president. 




FIRST PRIZE in the domestic arts category 
at the recent New Jersey State Fair went 
to Eric Beck, son of Albert Beck, Jr., for 
his model of the U. S. S. Constitution. 
The model ship is shown under full sail 
and took two years to complete. Albert 
Beck, Jr. is the business representative 
of the Hudson County District Council 
of Carpenters, Jersey City, N. J. 

CAN DO!— The Vietnamese Technical 
Medal, First Class, has been awarded to 
Builder First Class Rubin C. Rawson of 
Naval Battalion Three. Rawson. a mem- 
ber of Carpenters Local 169, East St. 
Louis, 111., was in charge of construction 
and supervision of 120 Vietnamese work- 
ers repairing the highway over the Hai 
Van Pass from Danang to Hue. High 
praise accompanied the medal for Raw- 
son's "unparalleled professionalism and 
devotion to duty" while "working day 
and night with little regard to the danger 
from the enemy." 




Member Rubin C. Rawson, now serving 
as a "Seabee," receives the Vietnamese 
Medal First Class for his work on an 
essential troop supply highway. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 





* 



How Free the Press 



At a time when several newspapers have refused 
to print advertisements submitted by striking General 
Electric workers, a U.S. District Court has ruled 
in Chicago that newspapers cannot be forced to al- 
low a labor union "equal time" in advertising its 
complaints against a large department store chain. 

Last August, members of the Chicago joint board 
of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, 
AFL-CIO, picketed Marshall Field & Co. department 
stores to protest the selling of imported clothing. The 
union tried to print advertising in the four city dailies 
to explain its position that selling the imported 
clothing was unfair to American workers. All four 
newspapers refused the paid advertisement. 

The frustrated union filed suit asking that the 
federal court permanently enjoin the papers from 
refusing its advertising or, alternatively, enjoin them 
to refuse advertising for the imported clothing. The 
court ruled that newspapers do not constitute, as the 
union had claimed, a "quasi-public entity" obliged 
to guarantee equal consideration to any lawful ad- 
vertisement. The press, it stated, remains a free 
enterprise and has the right to print or reject any 
advertisement according to its own discretion. 

Don H. Reuben, representing the Chicago Tribune 
in the case, said the ad was refused because it criti- 
cized one enterprise for selling imported clothing 
while "there are so many commercial firms that do 
so." Edward D. Corby, director of advertising for the 
paper, added that the union advertising copy did not 
meet the newspaper's standards. 

The question of the union's right to express itself 
in a public newspaper has thus been removed from 
the courts for the time being. But some less legalistic 
questions of human values remain to be answered: 
why, for instance, if the copy submitted was not ac- 
ceptable, couldn't the papers have met with the unions 
to work out an advertisement which could have con- 
formed to their standards for printing — perhaps one 
denouncing the selling of imported clothing in general 
rather than only at the store being picketed? Isn't 
some sort of reasonable compromise, leaving room for 
all opinions to be read by the public, consistent with 
the newspapers' idea of "free enterprise?" 

The inescapable conclusion is that department 
stores account for a heavy portion of advertising 



EDITORIALS 



revenue for any newspaper, and therefore a paid ad- 
vertisement expressing criticism from union workers 
— who, after all, buy the paper — cannot be printed. 



* 



1969s Striking Pattern 



While 1969's largest strike, that of 150.000 Gen- 
eral Electric workers against a stubborn, reactionary 
management, drags on into 1970, the pattern that 
emerges from the past year is actually one of fewer 
man-days lost by fewer strikers. 

Time lost on the job in 1969 "declined substan- 
tially," according to preliminary estimates of the La- 
bor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics. Strikes 
accounted for the loss of 45 million man-days in 1969, 
well below 1968's 49 million, which was a record for 
the decade. 2.5 million workers participated in strikes, 
about 100.000 less than in the previous year. Time 
lost because of work stoppages amounted to .023 
percent of total working time, compared to .028 per- 
cent in 1968. 

This pattern could point to several heartening de- 
velopments. Perhaps management and labor, in gen- 
eral, are beginning to be able to communicate with 
each other sooner, better, and less bitterly in many 
trades and professions. Certainly the worker as well 
as the company is happy when more time is spent on 
the job and less on the picket line. 

Have you read any advertisements by General Elec- 
tric lately? Having rejected arbitration in favor of an 
inflexible wage offer, the company is now engaged in 
a contemptible effort to give the impression that unions 
like to strike. Chairman James Compton of the AFL- 
CIO Bargaining Committee has said flatly, "GE 
strikers . . . want a sound settlement so that we can 
all get back to work soon." 

Can General Electric really continue to think, and 
ask the nation to think, that union men want to be off 
their jobs? 



# 



Economic Progress 



AFL-CIO President George Meany recently told a 
luncheon of the National Press Club, "I think we're 
getting to the point where, within a short time, we 
may see a very strange phenomenon — a recession and 
inflation at the same time. It's going to take a lot of 
doing but it looks like Nixon may be able to do it!" 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



19 




CANADIAN 



r 



Construction Is 
Political Football 

Canada is engaged in a do-or-die 
battle against inflation, and from 
Prime Minister Trudeau's own lips it 
became known that he intends the 
battle to be won, even if a few hun- 
dred thousand more people join the 
ranks of the unemployed. He said 
this much and more in a telecast be- 
fore Christmas Day. What a holiday 
gift! 

He also accused the better-off prov- 
inces — Ontario, Alberta and British 
Columbia — of not doing their share 
to fight inflation, of letting boom con- 
ditions go unchecked. 

Prime Minister Trudeau's idea of 
checking the boom is to allow interest 
rates to go up to the highest rate in 
history. This has allowed the banks 
— all of them — to make the biggest 
profits in their very profitable history. 

He also ordered the layoff or firing 
of 25.000 civil servants, and econ- 
omies in government construction. 

He got sharp answers from the 
provinces, especially those where un- 
employment is very high already. 

Ontario cracked back at him that 
he is allowing three large office build- 
ings to be started in Ottawa while 
expecting the provinces to cut back. 
One of the government office build- 
ings was a $28 million structure for 
the defense department. Since the 
Federal government has cut down 
sharply on defense spending, why a 
new office building? For armchair 
generals? 

That's what it must have been for 
the Federal government soon an- 
nounced that the plans for that build- 
ing were being postponed. 

But the Ontario government is 
going ahead with its construction 
plans. It is now spending millions 
of dollars renting office space from 
private developers. It would be penny 
wise and pound foolish to delay con- 
struction of its own premises. So the 
government thinks. 

But private home builders are find- 



ing the going very rough in today's 
tight money market. The only way 
that homes will be built in sufficient 
numbers in 1970 is if the government 
gives residential construction top pri- 
ority. Halfway measures just won't 
do. But with government anti-inflation 
policy being what it is, more money 
but not enough money may be chan- 
nelled into housing, while the com- 
mercial construction market will be 
lucky if it meets last year's produc- 
tion figures. 

If construction is down or does not 
increase, more unemployment will 
show up in the building trades. 

Last year, builders had a hard time 
finding enough money to build 200.- 
000 homes. This was at least 50,000 
short of the demand. Shortage of sup- 
ply pushes up prices, and this is what 
has happened. 

You can't fight inflation by cutting 
back supply. Cutting back pushes up 
prices and that's inflationary. 

CLC Condemns 
Jobless Attitude 

Not everyone will agree with the 
Federal government that inflation is 
our gravest danger and requires the 
most serious action, even controls. 

The Canadian Labor Congress cer- 
tainly does not. nor do some of 
Canada's most reputable economists. 

The CLC charged the Prime Minis- 
ter with a "callous attitude toward 
unemployment." CLC President Mac- 
Donald said that Trudeau is trying to 
pin the blame on the workers of 
Canada while "the conditions being 
experienced in Canada have come to 
a considerable degree from the United 
States. Actually current inflation is a 
problem facing many countries." 

Some economists say that Trudeau's 
policies are bound to fail. Even if 
unemployment does go up, inflation 
may go unchecked. Then what? 

It is far better, they argue, to have 
some inflation with a little unemploy- 
ment than to chase a will-o-the-wisp 
like stable prices in today's troubled 



world and at the same time cause 
untold misery in people's lives. 

Toronto Metro Is 
Building Boom Hub 

Ontario is one of the construction 
boom areas on the North American 
continent. In residential construction 
it probably leads on a per capita basis. 
Prices have boomed too. 

In Metro Toronto the home which 
sold for an average of $18,883 in 1965 
went up to $30,560 in 1969. 

But the biggest boom is in office 
buildings. 

The Toronto-Dominion Centre, the 
$160 million complex, is now com- 
pleted with the tallest tower in the 
Commonwealth, 56 storeys and 740 
feet in height. 

But it won't hold the "tallest" honor 
for very long. 

Ground has already been broken for 
a new Canadian Imperial Bank of 
Commerce complex. The highest struc- 
ture will go up 784 feet. Called Com- 
merce Court, the whole project will be 
a $100 million development to be com- 
pleted by 1972. 

There are several $50 million proj- 
ects under way but these are dwarfed 
by a $250 million job at the water- 
front which is having some trouble 
getting financing, and a one billion 
dollar Metro Centre to be built jointly 
by Canada's two major railways, the 



POSTER REMINDER 

A SOCIAL POLICY FOR CANADA 



Workmen's Compensation Act 1914 
Old Age Security Act 1926 
Unemployment insurance Act 1940 
Hospital Insurance Acts 1947-1957 
Canada Pension Plan 1966 
Medical Care Plans 1962-1969 




Guaranteed Annual Income 1970 



Citizenship Month 1970 

This poster published by the Political 
Education Department of CLC, urges 
total commitment to social security in 
Canada. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



Canadian National and the Canadian 
Pacific in downtown Toronto. 

This Metro Centre complex will 
cover 190 acres of railway property 
and is expected to take 1 5 years to 
complete. 

Sad Notes On 
Inflation Front 

Anti-inflation Blues: interest rates on 
first mortgages have reached 1 OVi per- 
cent, on second mortgages 14Vf> per- 
cent and UP. 

OHC Is Now 
Biggest Landlord 

The Ontario Housing Corporation, 
the provincial government's housing 
authority, is in the housing business 
in a big way. 

OHC finances its developments by 
borrowing 90 percent of its funds from 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corpo- 
ration, the Federal government agency. 
and 10 percent from the provincial 
treasury. 

It leases its family and senior citizen 
housing on a rent geared-to-income 
basis. Rents start at S32 a month for 
persons whose monthly income does 
not exceed $192.00. 

At the end of last year, OHC had 
23,933 family and 2,786 senior citizen 
dwellings under administration. 

Another 12.434 family and 7.802 
senior citizen dwellings were under 
various stages of development for a 
total program of 46,955 rental dwell- 
ings. 

In a few years OHC has become 
the biggest landlord in Canada. It's 
going to get bigger. 

Quebec Seeks 
Fund Recovery 

The Quebec Federation of Labor is 
taking court action to recover control 
over a $50 million pension fund for 
construction workers. 

QFL leaders said that the legislation 
adopted by the provincial government 
violates the property rights of the 
workers and should be declared invalid. 

The legislation placed the construc- 
tion pension fund under control of a 
provincial agency that invests funds 
accumulating under the Quebec Pen- 
sion Plan. 

Unlike the other nine provinces 
which come under the federal Cana- 
dian Pension Plan, Quebec started its 
own plan when it opted out of the 
federal pension program. 

Steelworkers Call 
Wage Hikes Justified 

The Steelworkers' Union told the 
Federal prices and incomes commis- 



sion that increased productivity justi- 
fied the wage increases steelworkers 
got last year. 

Wage restraints, said William Ma- 
honey, Canadian Director, "would 
only have insured increased profitabil- 
ity for the investors and increased dis- 
satisfaction among the workers." 

The union pointed out that steel 
output per man-hour increased 76.4 
percent from 1957 to 1968 while aver- 
age earnings of production workers 
increased only 52.6 percent. 

During the first half of last year, 
output per man-hour rose by 88.5 
percent. Average hourly earnings went 
up only 52.6 percent. 

The steelworkers were due for the 
increase they got. 

Zanini-Worker Split 
Still Simmers in Ontario 

The second round of the fight of the 
international building trades unions 
composing the Council Forming Un- 
ions in Metro Toronto ended before 
the Ontario Labor Relations Board 
with no further decision in the case 
against Bruno Zanini. 

Zanini headed an independent union 
which split off almost two thousand 
workers from the building trades ju- 
risdiction. The Council of Concrete 
Forming Unions charged Zanini with 
collusion with the employers. The first 
round ended in victory for the Council 
when Zanini was shorn of most of his 
support by the Labor Board. 

He then appealed the case to the 
Board early in January. The Council 
then charged that he accepted a cheque 
for $1,500 from Metro Toronto's larg- 
est group of concrete-forming compa- 
nies. 

The case adjourned for a month 
when the Council is expected to bring 
forward its witnesses to prove its case. 

At least two of the key witnesses are 
former employees of the contractors. 

Ontario Fed. Pushes 
Guaranteed Income 

The Ontario Federation of Labor is 
taking to the air to reach the public in 
support of the Guaranteed Annual 
Income. 

This month the trade union move- 
ment in Canada is engaged in a post- 
card campaign to persuade the Federal 
government that Canada's social se- 
curity legislation needs a good over- 
haul including an underpinning by a 
guaranteed income program. 

The OFL has booked time on some 
of the best radio stations in the prov- 
ince to promote the idea. The stations 
are in Toronto, Hamilton and London 
covering the industrial heartland of 



RESOLUTION 

The CLC has asked all local unions 
to adopt the following resolution, this 
month: 

A SOCIAL POLICY FOR 
CANADA 

WHEREAS the Federal Government 
of Canada has endorsed the 1948 United 
Nations Universal Declaration of Human 
Rights, article 25 states: 

Everyone has the right to a stand- 
ard of living adequate for the health 
and well-being of himself and of his 
family, including food, clothing, hous- 
ing and medical care and necessary 
social services, and the right to se- 
curity in the event of unemployment, 
sickness, disability, widowhood, old 
age. or other lack of livelihood in 
circumstances beyond his control and 
WHEREAS it is reported that 20 per 
cent of the Canadian population live in 
poverty, and an additional 20 per cent 
live in what socialogists call "a state of 
deprivation." In other words, two out of 
every five Canadians live in poverty or 
on the verge of poverty, and 

WHEREAS a decided policy of the 
present government and past govern- 
ments has tended to place the onus of 
providing relief for the poor on the 
lower and middle income groups, allow- 
ing the upper income bracket to escape 
their fair share. 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED 

that Local Union calls upon 

the governments responsible to institute a 
review of the entire system of Social 
Security to determine its adequacy as 
to coverage, benefits and allocation of 
costs, plus the need for effective inte- 
gration, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that 
we strongly urge immediate action to 
provide the necessary legislation for an 
adequate guaranteed annual minimum in- 
come for all Canadians as one step in 
assisting the raising of living standards of 
the Canadians in need. 



Ontario and in Sudbury. Sault Ste. 
Marie and Thunder Bay, covering a 
good part of Northern Ontario. 

Canada has a fairly substantial social 
security system including family allow- 
ances, unemployment insurance, old 
age pensions, workmen's compensa- 
tion, mothers' allowances and rents 
geared-to-income. But together the 
program falls short of today's needs. 
Too much overlapping in some cases, 
too many gaps in others, too little 
money in most. 

The guaranteed income would make 
up the deficiencies. If introduced it 
would be about the first in the non- 
communist world. Great advocate of 
guaranteed annual income is Canadian- 
born U.S. economist John Kenneth 
Galbraith. 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



21 



Dinner Honors 
Lake Erie 
Apprentices 

Eleven members of the Lake Erie 
Council of Carpenters, representing nine 
north-central Ohio counties, were hon- 
ored at the Elks Country Club. Septem- 
ber 20, upon completion of apprentice- 
ship training. 

Daniel McCarthy, Bureau of Appren- 
ticeship and Training, U. S. Department 
of Labor, was guest speaker and made 
the presentations to the new district jour- 
neymen attending schools in Elyria, 
Mansfield and Sandusky. This apprentice 
school supplements the on-the-job train- 
ing for the outstanding apprentices se- 
lected from nine north-central Ohio coun- 
ties, including: Ottawa, Erie. Lorain, San- 
dusky, Seneca, Huron, Crawford, Rich- 
land and Ashland. 

The school instruction was conducted 
by Harry Petee, Lake Erie District sec- 
retary and coordinator for the Joint Ap- 
prenticeship and Training. 

Committee members include: Robert 
Woodward, chairman. Woodward Con- 
struction; Royce Jennings. Jennings & 
Churella: A. C. Peterson, Peterson Lum- 
ber; Kenneth Focht, Focht Bros.; Lee 
Johnston, Midwest Constructors; Joseph 
Lach, Lach Construction; Ez Otermat, 
Mosser Construction; and Al Morley, 
committee advisor. 

Lake Erie District Council members 
serving on the committee: Paul Loper, 
JATC treasurer and Lake Erie District 
president and business manager; Ernest 
Denecia. business representative, Elyria; 
Dave Treadway, business representative, 
Lorain; Stan Bennett, business represen- 
tative, Sandusky; Herm Bogantz, business 
representative, Mansfield; Chet Jadwisiak, 




Among those present at the Lake Erie Council of Carpenters Apprenticeship Gradu- 
ation ceremony were, seated, left to right: Ray Flory, chairman, Ohio State Appren- 
ticeship Council; Larry Burton, Alfred Thomas, and Dennis Schwerer, graduating 
apprentices; standing: Dan McCarthy, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. 
Department of Labor; Larry Grimes, George Ross, Jr., Raymond Hines, and Donald 
Cassidy, graduating apprentices; Harry Petee, Lake Erie Council Secretary and Co- 
ordinator, JACT; and AI Morley, JACT Advisor. 



business representative, Port Clinton; 
John Sharick. committee advisor and Mrs. 
Rita Woodside, committee secretary. 



Also attending the recognition dinner 
was Ray Flory. chairman, Ohio State 
Apprenticeship Council. 



Louisiana 
Pre-Apprentices 
In Class 

Instructor-Coordinator Walter Bucklew 
helps a student in a Shreveport, La., pre- 
apprentice class while Business Agents 
M. H. Tipton and C. R. Gilbert of Local 
764 look on. Students in the class in- 
clude, front row, left to right; James 
Cloud, Billy Lyons, and Gary Kinsey; 
second row: Mike Ponthier, Calvin 
Anderson, Jr., and Mike Brasington; 
third row: Wayne Lowrey, Karl W. 
Columbus, and Howard Sepuluado; and 
fourth row: Roland Williams, Rickey 
Williams, Claude Mathis and David 
Lewis, Jr. 




22 



THE CARPENTER 



Texas Local Helps Job Corpsmen 




Trainees and leaders involved in the apprenticeship and training program in 
Dallas are, front row, left to right: Sammy Joe Smith, Local 1276; Corpsmen Floyd 
Louis Jameson, Jr., William McKenzie, Eddie C. Eiland, Willie J. Johnson, Lee 
Brumadge, Charles Hill, Louis C. Johnson, Lorenza Bradley Jr., Joseph Freeman, 
and Thomas W. Bessellieu; second row, left to right: Corpsmen Jack J. Kelly, Jr., 
Raymond L. Brown, John E. Bacon. Robert Taylor, Webster Terrell, Wallace Nor- 
wood, and Moses Crocker; Arthur Robinson and Eddie White, Local 1276; and 
Gilbert Demieville, Webster Basin Job Corps Center; third row, left to right: G. H. 
Simmons, Jr., director, Texas Organizing Office of the Brotherhood; W. C. Cleveland, 
representative, Texas Office; Thomas Neal Goates, instructor; Jack Shaddock, rep- 
resentative, Bureau of Apprenticeship & Training, U.S. Department of Labor; and 
Howard J. Webb and Arthur Sudds, instructors. ' 



Enrollment in an apprenticeship and 
training program was only the beginning 
for 30 young Job Corpsmen transferred 
to Dallas. Texas, from training centers 
in four other states. The Joint Appren- 



ticeship and Training Committee of Car- 
penters Residential Local Union 1276 
went a step further and helped the 
students obtain tools, find a place to live, 
and work out transportation problems. 



Welders Complete Training Course 




Members of the Suffolk County District Council of Carpenters, N.Y., recently 
completed a successful training program in welding. The classes were conducted 
under the M.D.T.A. program. Members who completed the course included, front 
row, left to right: Edward Wider, Local 1167; George Lessard, Local 2197; Thomas 
Usman, Local 1483; Robert Joyce, Local 1135; and George Kling, Local 1837; 
second row, left to right: August Strods, Local 1837; Harry Kijowski, Local 1511; 
Carl Nuehoff, Local 1511; George Babcock, general agent; Michael Denicolo, Local 
1973; George Pugh, Local 1483; Thomas Blake, instructor; James Everett, business 
representative; and Burton Redlein, Local 412. 



START A MONEY-MAKING BUSINESS 

FOR LESS THAN $50! 




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FREE PLAN gives you all the facts: How 
to start, how to grow. You don't need pre- 
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I'll even finance you. People bring you the 
work and pay cash. Over 90(* of every dol- 
lar you collect is clear cash profit. And you 
work when you want to. Let me prove you 
can't find a more certain, lower cost, higher 
paying business of your own. 




BELSAW SHARP-ALL CO. 

Stan Field, President 
730F Field Bldo,., Kansas City, Mo. 641 1 1 



Name_ 



Address_ 
City 



_State_ 



-Zip- 



STAIRWAY 

CONSTRUCTION 
MADE EASY 




WITH THIS NEWEST BOOK 

In plain language and with over 50 illus- 
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methods that years of experience have 
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Even with no previous experience you will 
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It gives complete, detailed, easy-to-follow 
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a more perfect stair. It shows the basic 
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This is the most complete book on stair 
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DOUGLAS FUGITT 

11347 N.E. I24*h St., Kirkland, Wash. 98033 



ORDER TODAY 

Name 

Address 

City 

State Zip Code 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



23 




LAYOUT LEVEL 



• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate *|fc| f .^ ,, ' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1950 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only $7.95 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
age. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

Ask your tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow the usual dealer discount on }, t Doz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSofo, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 




You'll Like Being a 
SKILLED 

LOCKSMITH 



EARN MORE, LIVE BETTER 
than Ever Before in Your Life 
You'll enjoy your work as a Lock- 
smith. It's more fascinating than a 
hobbv — and highly paid besides! 
As a Locksmith year after year, in 
good times or bad you'll be the 
man in demand in an evergrowing 
field offering big pay jobs, big 
profits as your own boss. What more 
could you ask! 

Train at Home- 
Earn Extra $$$$ Right Away! 
All tliis can he yours FAST regard- 
less of age. education, minor phys- 
ical handicaps. Job enjoyment and 
earnings can begin AT ONCE. You 
learn quickly, easily. CASH IN on 
all kinds of locksmitliing jobs. All 
keys, locks, parts, picks, special 
tools and equipment supplied. Li- 
censed experts guide yon to suc- 
cess. 

CDCC Illustrated Book 
TKEC sample Lesson Pages 
Locksmithing Institute graduates now 
earning, enjoying life more every- 
where. Coupon brings exciting facts 
from only school of its kind: Lie. by 
N. J. State Dept. of Ed.. Accredited 
Member. Nat'l. Home Study Coun- 
cil. VA Approved. LOCKSM ITH1NG 
INSTITUTE, Div. of Technical 
Home Study Schools, Dept. 1118- 
020. Little Falls, N.J. 07424. 




"I became a lock- 
smith when a back 
injury forced me to 
give up my job. Now 
I own a mobile lock- 
smith shop and en- 
joy a successful full 
time business. 

Rnhert N. Miller 
Oakland. N.J. 




LOCKSMITH1NG INSTITUTE, Dept. 1118-020 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Tlease send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Op- 
portunities in Locksmithing." complete equipment 
folder and sample lesson pages — Free of all obliga- 
tion — (no salesman will eall). 



Same 



(Please Print) 



City State Zip. 

□ Check here if eligible for Vet. benefits 



Arizona Exhibit Lands Training Program 




HEBER 



Job Corps P 

ENTERS/ PAINTER'S 
-APPRENTICESHIP 
1NIN6 PROGRAMS 

Jt erWeuimt row" «««* 



»T, or tAftOK 



n?AT THEJ 



SITGREAV. 

NATIONAL FOR 
OAMPGROUi 



CANYON 
. . POINT 




A display at the recent State Fair in Phoenix, Arizona, gave the public a chance 
to see the progress being made by Job Corpsmen enrolled in the Carpenters and 
Painters Union Training Programs at the Heber Job Corps Center. This picnic table 
was built and finished by the Corpsmen. Mr. Harper C. Stewart, state supervisor 
for the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, handed out brochures and answered 
questions about the program. 




Corpsman Eddie Strickland routes a 
sign for display at the fair. After com- 
pleting the carpentry program, he plans 
to enter the Carpenter Apprentice Train- 
ing Program when he returns home to 
Menifee, Arkansas. 



Corpsman Robert Gonzales of Los An- 
geles, Calif., letters a sign for the display. 
He chose painting as a career seven 
months after entering the program and 
hopes to use his training in the Los An- 
geles area. 



Nebraska's Successful Pre-Apprentice Program 




Recent graduates of the Lincoln, Neb., pre-apprentice program are, first row, left 
to right: Dennis Rieschick, Gary Parde, Dean Madsen, Bill Beck, Jim Pardee, and 
Ben Bowman; second row, left to right: Lester Swanson, Instructor; Larry Hugeman, 
Robert Martin, Ron Howdsen, James Gamblain, and Robert Ferrel. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




SHOCK ABSORBER 



f 'Iiiii 



MEMBER DESIGNS CHEST 



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BEAMS DELIVERY 

Glue laminated timber beams will 
soon be available immediately from local 
building outlets in lengths of up to 60 
feet, avoiding the usual delay of several 
weeks for delivery. Timber Structures, 
Inc., Portland, Ore., announced recently 
that the beams, marketed under the 
name "Stock-Lam," eventually will be 
stocked by 40 or more distributors. 

DRILL CARRYING CASE 



Carl J. Hagerup, a member of Local 
2247, is preparing a booklet with plans 
and specifications for his carpenter's roll- 
away toolchest. As portable as a two- 
wheel hand truck, this attractive chest 
keeps a complete set of tools handy and, 
when closed, requires so little floor 
space that it can be considered a piece 
of furniture. For further information, 
write Mr. Hagerup at R. R. 1, Box 2120, 
Juneau, Alaska 99801. 



Workmen on temporary platforms such 
as scaffolds, swinging stages, or bo's'n's 
chairs have no permanent tie-off point. 
If the platform fails or the man falls 
from the platform almost certain injury 
or death is the result. The Rose Manu- 
facturing Co. of Denver recommends an 
independent life line and a Safe-Hi Rope 
Grab Shock Absorber. Then if the work- 
man falls, he will be stopped from strik- 
ing the ground or floor. 

It is also very important says Rose 
to cushion the fall when he is "caught" 
at the end of the lanyard. Safe-Hi Rope 
Grab absorbs the shock and slows down 
the stop. The Rope Grab slides down 
the rope as the plates close. 

The Safe-Hi Rope Grab is easily in- 
stalled and easily moved up and down 
the rope. Two models are available, No. 
2550 with nylon lanyard and snap, and 
No. 2575 with steel cable and snap. 

RADIAL SAW 




A sturdy, lightweight carrying and 
storage case for electric drills, now on 
the market, combines protection for the 
machine and cord with a handy tray 
for drills, bits and small wrenches. The 
wire case can be hung on a shop peg- 
board for safe, out-of-the-way storage. 
Write the American Wirecase Corp., 2208 
W. Superior Street, Chicago, 111. 60612. 



ON THE LEVEL 




PRODUCT DISSOLVES RUST 



Rust-Removo, a jell which brushes on 
any surface, even walls and ceilings, 
and rinses away rust, corrosion and 
tarnish, is now being marketed by the 
Ace Chemical Co., Chicago, 111. Rust- 
Removo contains no muriatic acid and 
is non-fuming and non-flammable. For 
a sample gallon at $14.95 or for more 
information about Rust-Removo, see 
your supply jobber or write Ace Chem- 
ical Co., 4401 Ravenswood Ave., Chica- 
go, 111. 60640. 



A new, lower-priced, versatile radial 
arm saw has been introduced by The 
Black and Decker Mfg. Co. Its light- 
weight 58 pounds makes it a portable 
tool for on-site construction work. It 
combines features of a shop saw, a 
table saw and a miter box with those of 
a radial arm saw. The No. 7700 Radial 
Arm Saw is available from hardware 
and department stores for $99.95. Write 
The Black and Decker Mfg., Co., Tow- 
son, Md. 21204. 



A level attachment which leaves the 
hands of the carpenter free to work is now 
available. The attachment, when installed 
on a level, can be hooked onto wood sid- 
ing, insulated siding, or window sashes. 
For a wooden level, mount attachment 
as shown above. Predrill with \\$" di- 
ameter drill about !4" deep and use 
screws furnished. If your level is alumi- 
num, use a No. 51 drill. For a two-foot 
level, use as is: can be cut for shorter 
level. It sells for $2.00. postage paid. 
Write Chester Cerklaski, A & D Mfg. 
Co., 4325 North Ottawa Ave. Norridae. 
Illinois 60634. 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



25 



Local Dedicates Building 
In True Texas Style 

More than 1,100 persons were served 
at the Annual Family Bar-B-Que when 
Carpenter's Local 1266 in Austin, Texas, 
celebrated its "dream come true," the 
dedication of its new Apprentice and 
Journeyman Training Building. Catered 
by their own members, the Bar-B-Que and 
dedication ceremony drew an overwhelm- 
ing turnout from local public officials as 
well as from the local's own membership. 

In an unusual ribbon-cutting cere- 
mony, Mayor Travis LaRue and Austin 
Independent School District Superin- 
tendent Dr. Irby Carruth jointly sawed 
the ribbon with a twelve-point saw. 

The new training building seats 50 
students, and includes related math, re- 
lated blueprint reading, related estimat- 
ing, shopcraft, plastic welding and sup- 
plementary visual education among the 
journeyman subjects in the curriculum. 

Handicap Overcome 




James Chapman, a 48-year-old member 
of Local 821, Springfield, N. J., is back 
on the job in the Engineering Department 
of the New Jersey State Hospital at 
Greystone Park, near Dover, N. J., SVz 
months after losing both legs below the 
knee in a freak accident. Chapman 
hasn't lost a day since returning to the 
job and can walk without crutches, climb 
stairs, and drive a car wit. hand controls. 
"Prayer," says Chapman, "gave me the 
confidence to overcome my handicap." 




Among the Brotherhood representatives present at Austin, Texas, Local 1266's dedi- 
cation and Bar-B-Que were, left to right: A. W. Fox, president; G. A. McNeil, busi- 
ness representative for Local 1266; Chester V. Smith, general representative; A. C. 
Shirley, joint representative; Fred Bull, General Executive Board Member from 
Sixth District; Anthony Ochocki, Director of Organization for the Brotherhood, 
and Ed Thele, field coordinator for MDTA Programs. 

Auxiliary Presents Check to Hospital 




Ed Robinson, director of the Community Hospital in Hammond, Ind., accepts a 
donation from Carpenters Auxiliary 619 representatives. The ladies are, left to right: 
Mrs. George Malcolm, publicity chairman, Mrs. Guy Slosser, president, and Mrs. 
Harold Taylor, recording secretary, who is also vice president of the Indiana State 
Council of Carpenters Auxiliaries. 




MacLean 



LOCAL LOSES OLDEST MEMBER 

Carpenters Local 275, Newton, Mass., lost its oldest member 
recently in Angus MacLean, a 93-year-old member of 70 years 
standing. MacLean had been active in the union since joining 
in 1899. He held the office of president of the Carpenters District 
Council of Newton and Vicinity and served as the council's busi- 
ness representative for 23 years. In his own local he held almost 
every office at one time or another. MacLean also served as 
vice president of the Massachusetts State Building and Con- 
struction Trades Council and as executive board member of 
the Massachusetts State Council of Carpenters, and was active 
in the State Labor Council and community affairs. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Houston Pension Plan 'Kicked Off 




Jack O. Fountain, business manager of the Carpenters District Council of Houston 
and Vicinity, Tex., addresses members present at a recent dinner which marked the 
distribution of the first pension checks under the district's new pension program. 
Other members present are, left to right: A. D. Pyle, business representative, Local 
2079; C. O. Ball, business representative, Local 213; Frederick N. Bull, Executive 
Board member, 6th District, U. B. of C. & J. of A.; J. L. Greer, business representa- 
tive, Local 213; M. A. Graham, Executive Secretary of the Houston Building Trades 
Council; and O. W. Bland, retired carpenter. 



Almost 400 retired union carpenters 
received checks totaling $135,000.00 as 
the Houston area's first Pension program 
for union carpenters was kicked off at a 
luncheon at S.P.J.S.T. Lodge at 1500 
Bene Street. 

Calling this the largest group of re- 
tiring carpenters in the state by a build- 
ing trades union. Jack Fountain, execu- 
tive secretary of the Houston District 
Council of Carpenters, praised the 
pioneering efforts of the group of Car- 
penters who literally changed the skyline 
of Houston. 

The pension checks, retroactive to July 
1, 1969, averaged approximately $330.00 
each and were given out individually by 
the various union business agents. 

Fountain went on to pay tribute to 
these men and their wives who over the 
years have contributed toward making 
the Houston Carpenters Pension Plan a 
living reality. Houston's Mayor Louie 
Welch told the gathering it was the finest 
day in the history of the greater Houston 
and Vicinity brotherhood of carpenters 
and called upon the younger generation 
of carpenters to follow the example set 
by the old-timers. 

The pension program was negotiated 
and provided for in a three-year contract 




The oldest carpenter present at the 
dinner, A. J. Oliver, cashes his first pen- 
sion check right away, while W. M. Null, 
business representative, Local 213, B. A. 
Gresham, assistant business manager of 
the Carpenters District Council, and 
Maurice Butler, vice president of the 
Texas National Bank of Commerce, con- 
gratulate him. 



settlement of July 1, 1968, between the 
Carpenters Union and the Houston 
Chapter of Associated General Con- 
tractors of America, Inc. and the Con- 
struction Employers Association of Texas. 
The program has John Haag with A. S. 
Hansen Consulting Actuaries as its con- 
sultant and Ralph Jackson with South- 
west Administrators, Inc. as administra- 
tor. The legal firm of Mitchell & Doran 
act as attorneys for the fund with the 
Texas National Bank of Commerce 
serving as depository. 

Fountain explained that the contractors 
now contribute \2t for each man hour 
put in by a union carpenter on a job in 
a 23-county area. This contribution will 
increase to 270 per hour when the cur- 
rent contract expires July 1, 1971. 

Fountain went on to say that the pro- 
gram also provides for a full pension for 
disabled carpenters and a reduced pension 
for widows of carpenters who died after 
July 1, 1968. In addition the plan pro- 
vides for a death benefit up to $5,000.00 

To qualify for a pension under the 
plan, a carpenter, millwright or piledriver 
must have at least 10 years of service in 
the 23-county jurisdiction of the Carpen- 
ters district council and must have been 
dependent upon his trade for his liveli- 
hood. 

Honoring the oldest carpenter present 
at the luncheon, Bert Greshairu assistant 
secretary in the district council, and W. 
M. Null, business agent of Local 213, 
presented to A. J. Oliver his initial pen- 
sion check, and to Mrs. Oliver a flower 
spray. Oliver was born on May 19, 1883. 
He retired in 1953 after working at the 
trade for over 41 years. 

Among the honored guests and speak- 
ers were Mayor Louie Welch; Fred Bull, 
General Executive Board Member; M. A. 
Graham, executive secretary of the Build- 
ing Trades; Wylie Doran, attorney; Ralph 
Jackson and Bob Graham, administrators 
for the plan; John Haag, consultant; 
Maurice Butler and Murphy Biehle, Texas 
National Bank of Commerce, and Rich- 
ard Hopkins and Grant Mathews, audi- 
tors and the business agents of the various 
locals in the district council jurisdiction. 



\ 




3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes V4" 
to 9 /, & ", $-85 each. 5 / 8 " to 1", $.95 each. 1 Vb" 
to 1 y 2 ", $1.50 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit, Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, 7 /s" to 
3". Only $5.00. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, 5 / 8 " to 1 3 A". Only $4.50. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes Vd" to 
1 V 2 ". As low as $1 .45 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.35 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
5trait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 



IRWIN 



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FEBRUARY, 1970 



27 



CyWffr Improved 



Estwing 

Hammers 

Last Longer 
Than All Others! 



"Mark of 

the 
Skilled" 



New Safe-T-Shape Grip 

* Unsurpassed, Estwing 
Temper, Balance 
and Finish 

* Forged One-Piece 
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plus 

* Exclusive Nylon-Vinyl 
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(net rubber) 

* Molded Permanently 
to Steel Shank 

* Won't Loosen, Come 
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Estwmg^^MFG. CO. 

Dept. C-2 Rockford, III. 



New York Local Dedicates New Building 



iMED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPEMMSANOJOINERS 

OF AMERICA 





AFL-CIQ 

local nnm, S3 
white rains, hx 



Sal Million of the building committee cuts the ribbon at the dedication ceremony 
for Local 53's new meeting hall while Tom Strati, general contractor, Joseph Grady, 
president of the local, James Nicholson, business representative, and Abe Saul, East 
Coast District Organizer, look on. 



When an urban renewal project threat- 
ened their 30-year old meeting hall three 
years ago, members of Carpenters Local 
53, White Plains, N.Y., thought for a 
while that they might have to "move to 



the parking lot" to hold meetings. But 
energy replaced doubt and a new building 
was constructed. Three hundred members 
and friends attended the recent dedication 
ceremony. 



Reneival Project in Pennsylvania 





Members of Carpenters Local 129, Hazleton, Pa., recently worked on a renewal 
project which included 100 dwelling units in 50 buildings and one community building 
for offices and a neighborhood center. Work on the Vine Street West Project was 
financed through HUD in Philadelphia. More such housing projects are needed 
across the nation, but "tight'' financing and high land costs are halting progress. 




af 



Pausing during work at the Vine Street 
West renewal site are, left to right: Clyde 
Drasher, Charles R. Marshall, and "Big 
John, the labor boss." Scores of mem- 
bers worked on the project last year. 



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Involved in the Vine Street West Project 
are, left to right: Teddy Fresco, super- 
intendent; Joseph Zenonani, foreman; 
Joseph Vadus, business representative; 
and Charles R. Marshall, steward. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



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Charles Marx and his crew raise the frame for a house in 
the hurricane-damaged area. These men are members of Local 
1846, New Orleans, who donated their services in off-hours 
and weekends. 



H. Jay Laborde, John Wright, C. W. Desmar, Andrew Heisser, 
State Senator Mike O'Keefe, William Wright and Tom Laborde 
are ready to come home after a day of volunteer carpentry in 
Plaquemine Parish. 



Louisiana Members Continue to Aid Camille Victims 



Volunteers from Carpenters Local 
1846 in New Orleans, La., are donating 
their time and skill to rebuild homes 
destroyed in Plaquemine Parish, La., 
by Hurricane Camille. With free labor 
from the Louisiana AFL-CIO and ma- 
terials furnished by the American Red 
Cross, journeymen from all crafts in 
the Building and Construction Trades 



Council of Southeast Louisiana are co- 
operating to complete one house each 
weekend for the needy families of the 
area. Local 1846 is attempting to 
furnish 20 crews of carpenters each 
weekend for this project. 

Financial help is needed by the local 
to buy equipment for the construction 



program — power generators, skill saws, 
electric cords, chain saws and anything 
else — which will be kept in reserve by 
the Louisiana AFL-CIO for use in fu- 
ture disasters. (Pages 18 and 19 of the 
November, 1969, CARPENTER con- 
tain a comprehensive report of Camille 
relief work performance by Brotlierliood 
members.) 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



29 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 



Pinto Deer 




Carpenter Roland Dennis of Auburn, 
New York, a member of Local 453, 
thought his vision was going bad when 
he distinctly saw spots before his eyes on 
a recent hunt junket to Tioga County in 
his home state. He saw spots all right 
but his eyesight proved as good as ever 
after he pulled the trigger. He downed 
a buck that sported a four-point antler, 
dressed out at 135 pounds and was 
heavily marked — in pinto fashion — with 
brown and white spots. 

■ Racked Deer 

Robert Dunn of Hathaway Pines, Cal- 
ifornia, retired out of Local 721, Los 
Angeles, for over five years now, recalls 
some outstanding deer junkets in Utah 




Here are 18 points . . . count em! 



when he hunted out of Beaver near Pole 
Canyon and near Bearshin and Oak 
Cove. Although Brother Dunn has 
rounded 70 years of age he still hunts 
and recently nailed a chunky buck in 
his home county of Calaveras, a black- 
tail which dressed out at 180 pounds. 

Bob says he doesn't plan on hunting in 
Utah any more as the prospects are good 
in his own area but says he's willing to 
counsel fellow Carpenters who want to 
hunt in that state. Just drop him a line 
at P.O. Box 87, Hathaway Pines, Cali- 
fornia 95233. 

Brother Dunn contends that the num- 
ber of points on a deer's antlers are not 
necessarily an indication of what the 
weight may be. He recalls two previous 
bucks downed, a four-pointer and three- 
pointer, which weighed less than the 
aforementioned 180 pounder, a forked 
horn. He totes a 348 Winchester rifle 
and shoots a 150 grain bullet. Below 
is a photograph of one of those 
monstrous Utah bucks he downed, this 
one featured a rack with a total of 18 
points. 

■ High-Speed Honkers 

No doubt many of you have been stalk- 
ing Canadian honkers this season. If 
you've missed more than your share, 
console yourself with the fact they can — 
aided by good strong tail wind — pour 
on the coals to attain a speed of 60 miles 
per hour. (The maximum altitude of a 
honker has been recorded at a mere 
29.000 feet, nearly 5Vi miles.) 

The broad term "Canadian honker" 
has been, at one time or another, pinned 
to any one of the five species of this 
great goose family, namely the Common 
Canada, otherwise known as the Great 
Basin Canada and the most widespread 
and widely distributed of all Canadas; the 
Richardson's Goose which breeds way 
north, close to the Arctic Circle, and the 
Cackling, Lesser Canada and Western 
Canada Goose which are, primarily, 
western birds. 

This is one fowl which has certain 
traits which humans might well take a 



lesson from, particularly in the family 
relations department; Canadas mate for 
life. During the incubation period, the 
gander stands guard near the eggs. 

They are keen of sight and hearing, 
very difficult to sneak up on. While some 
predation is suffered from crows and 
ravens, and coyotes and bobcats prey on 
their young, the parents watch over them 
closely, alternating or together guarding 
the fledglings. 

The well-kept Journals of James Audu- 
bon (1840) tell of his discovery of a nest 
and on approaching it being attacked by 
a defiant gander. He wrote: ". . . as I 
approached within a few yards of the 
nest, it suddenly lowered its head, shak- 
ing it as if it were dislocated from the 
neck. It opened its wings to full spread; 
launched into the air and flew directly 
at me. So daring was this fine fellow 
that in two instances it struck me a 
blow on my right arm with one of its 
wings, and I thought, for a moment, that 
my arm was broken." 




■ Year's Recap 

According to recent flow of letters and 
pics from hunt-loving members of the 
Brotherhood, it's been a great year. 
Here's a recap on some of the action: 

Merlin Hoiseth of Ft. Worth, Texas, 
a member of Local 1822, reports a fine 
crop of whitetail and nailed an eight- 
pointer past opening day (November 8th, 
'69). "It was as fat as butter and the hair 
as fine and silky as fur," says Brother 
Hoiseth. 

One of the nicest 
head mounts we've 
seen in many a 
moon can be 
chalked up for Ma- 
son A. Lee of Bal- 
timore, Maryland, 
a member of Local 
101. Here's a look- 
see at head of buck 
he downed in Wi- 
comico County on 
the Maryland east- 
ern shore. It featured a spread of 25% 
inches at widest point; had a total of 9 
points and field dressed at 162 pounds. 

Top big-game trophy for T. Thompson 
of Vista, California, a member of Local 
2078, is a moose he downed in Canada, 




Lee's Mount 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



a four-year-old near Lone Butte in Brit- 
ish Columbia which dressed out at over 
400 pounds. 

A man with a hunt urge, living in Car- 
mel, California, has one advantage that 
few hunters have, namely the oppor- 
tunity to stalk wild boar. Here's a photo- 
graph of Carpenter Ralph Monroe of 
Carmel who nailed one, his first, in the 
Carmel Valley this past season. It was 
downed with one shot at 150 yards; with 
a 264 Magnum, a 140 grain Sierra bullet. 
In a previous column we recorded a wild 
boar kill for Ralph's son Todd who, last 
we heard, was stationed on an aircraft 
carrier out of Vietnam. Todd's boar 
tipped the scales at 267 pounds while 
Ralph's boar weighed in at 243 pounds. 

Donald Davis of Pevely, Mo., a mem- 
ber of Local 73, downed a buck in Wash- 
ington County in his home state that 
sported a perfect rack — four points on 
one side, four on the other, and dressed 
out at 200 pounds. 



*&- w^T 




Monroe and Boar. 

■ 1968 Fish Kills 

The annual census of fish kills began 
in June 1960, and since that time a total 
of 103,380,000 fish have been reported 
Mlfed in 2,830 incidents. 

In 1968 alone, an estimated 15,236,000 
fish were reported killed in 42 States by 
identifiable pollution sources. This was 
an increase of 3,645,000, or 31 percent, 
over 1967, when 11,591,000 fish were 
killed in 40 States. 

Of the 438 reports of definite fish kills 
by pollution, only 379 specified the num- 
ber of fish killed. Another 107 fish kills 
were reported, but the causes of these 
deaths could not be determined, although 
pollution was suspected in a number of 
the cases. 

Improved reporting practices, varia- 
tions in weather, or other factors could 
be partially responsible for the increased 
number of fish kills reported. 

The largest fish kill in 1968 occurred 
on the Allegheny River at Bruin, Pa., 
where 4,029.000 fish died. A petroleum 
refinery company's lagoon overflowed 
into another pond whose walls broke, re- 
leasing chemicals into a stream. Suds 6 
feet high were created as the mixture 
flowed along the stream. 



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FEBRUARY, 1970 



31 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(1) PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA — 
Members of Local 981 with 25 or more 
years of service were honored recently at 
a pin ceremony following the dedication 
of their new Carpenter's Hall. Those pic- 
tured here include, front row, left to 
right: Joe Fenk and Elmer Rivers, 30 
years; Linn Bryan, 47 years; Anton Mat- 
son, 30 years; Earl Armstrong, 56 years; 
Roy Johnson, 32 years; Antonio Mateuc- 
ci, 35 years; and Ed Mathiesen, 30 years; 
second row: Emit Volker, Bill Budinsky, 
E. A. Brown, and Harold Carlson, 25 
years; Arnold Ahlstrom, 30 years; Ralph 
McCoy and Elmer O'Haver, 25 years; 
Floyd Dodson, 30 years; Homer Rob- 
bins, Francis Lutz, John Niukkanen and 
Clarence Hansen, 25 years. 

Those who received a pin, but who are 
not pictured included: Homer Calmer, 
Tom Limbaugh, Arvo Mattson and Hen- 
ry Volker, 30 years; Hugo Ivarson, 32 
years, and John Mindham, 35 years. 

(2) FREMONT, OHIO — Members of 
Local 1166 recently held a 25-year pin 
presentation party and member-and-wife 
get-together. Among those honored were, 
front, left to right: John Durbin, John 
McCoy, C. J. Renglein, Clarence Chand- 
ler and William Hoffman; second row: 
Robert Hotz, Rom Rusch, Joseph Rusch, 
Ken Sale and Jack Durbin. 

(2a) Business Manager Paul Loper of the 
Lake Erie District Council of Carpenters 
presents a 25-year pin to John McCoy, 
a member of 34 years standing. 

(3) VANCOUVER, CANADA — Local 
452 recently awarded a 70-year pin to 
member Frank Piatt. The pin was pre- 
sented by General Executive Board 
member George Bengough. 

(4) SANTA ANA, CALIF.— Local 1815 
recently honored 25-year members. Pic- 
tured here, front row, left to right, are: 
Calvin Elliott, A. P. Ramirez, J. Wallace 
Nelson, R. E. Brattain, L. S. Allcock, E. 
E. Gardner, Boyd Linkhart, and Ellis 
Burrows; second row left to right: Oliver 
Storeim, Silvert Thompson, Walter Dono- 
van, Thomas Hardcastle, Vernie Alex- 




32 



THE CARPENTER 



ander, Win. E. King, Audra U. Friend, 
and Harry Harkleroad, who presented the 
pins. 

(5) MIAMI, FLA. — At a recent special 
meeting of Local 2024, 25-year service 
pins were awarded to members Oscar J. 
Rees and H. E. Morris. 

(6) MARSHALLTOWN, IA.— Member 
O. F. Sellers of Local 1112 received his 
50-year service pin at the local's recent 
Christmas party. The pin was presented 
by S. P. McKenzy, a member with 53 
years of service. 

(7) STERLING, ILL. — Carpenters Lo- 
cal 695 recently awarded two 50-year 
and 20 25-year pins to members at a 
Recognition Banquet. Honored members 
were seated, left to right: Henry Duuck, 
Merle Wolf, Fred Sangrey, and Oscar 
Eversole; standing, left to right: Robert 
Sangrey, Eldo Hagen, business represent- 
ative; John Pruitt, general representative; 
Donald Dietz, Orin Sheley and Nathaniel 
Cooke. 

(8) GREENWICH, CONN. — A 70th 
Anniversary Dinner Dance was the oc- 
casion for Local 196's presentation of 50- 
year pins to members. In this picture, 
General Executive Board Member Patrick 




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FEBRUARY, 1970 



33 




J. Campbell presents a 50-year pin to 
Albert E. Green, while other pin recip- 
ients look on. They are, left to right: 
Joseph Pandowski, past president; John 
Bella; Peter Knudsen, Jr., past president; 
and John Brown, president of the local. 
Not shown is Harry H. Waterbury, who 
also received a pin. 

(9) ROSEBURG, ORE.— Local 2949 
awarded 20-, 25- and 30-year service pins 
to members at a recent "Spouse Night" 
meeting. Those are, front row, left to 
right: Mr. and Mrs. Chester Hammond, 
Edward McDermott, Mr. and Mrs. Ha- 
rold Rand, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Pollard, 
and Jim Nichols; second row, left to 
right: Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Long, Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter Moe, Mr. and Mrs. Mil- 
burn Joiner, and Roy Downing; third 
row, left to right: Lawrence Long, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ardellinville, Ernest Buetner, 
Charles M. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Marshall, Mrs. Roy Donwing, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack McChesney. 

(10) KANSAS CITY, MO.— Local 1904 
recently awarded 25-year pins to several 
of its members. In this picture. Special 
Representative Sam Curd presents a pin 
to President Charles Munkers, watched 
by Henry Brown, president, K. C. Car- 
penters District Council, J. O. Mack, re- 
tired General Executive Board Member, 
and Jim Tomlin, recording secretary of 
the local. 

(10a) Other members of Local 1904 who 
received pins are, left to right: Garland 
McCoy, John Munkers, Gerald Dietz, 
Clarence Fortune, Kenneth Pursell, Joe 
T. Cherry, J. M. Shippee, Bernard Eckart, 
John Sututovich, and Charles Munkers. 
Not present to receive their pins were 
Sammie Bray, Donald Chappie, John J. 
Guth, William Guth, and Charles Herz. 

(10b) Local 1904 members Garland Mc- 
Coy, Charles Munkers, and Gerald Dietz 
all have 34 years of service. 

(11) PATCHOGUE, N.Y.— Local 1483 
honored member Edwin L. King at their 
recent annual dinner for his "50 years 
of devoted service as financial secretary." 




10a 




10b 

In this picture, Secretary-Treasurer 
George Babcock, left, presents a plaque 
to member King, left, as General Rep- 
resentative John Rodgers looks on. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 




Retired Members Enjoy 
A Variety of Hobbies 



■ Public service, gardening, and 
— of course — woodworking, are 
some of the interests with which re- 
tired members fill their long-awaited 
leisure years. Retirees make use of 
their time and skills in projects 
which are useful, absorbing, or just 
plain decorative, demonstrating that 
retirement is hardly a time of 
"nothing to do." 

Jack McGlashan, Local 192, 
Vancouver, Canada, has been a 
chrysanthemum grower and fancier 
since 1935. A chrysanthemum club 
he started years ago has now spread 
down into Washington State. He re- 
fuses to accept payment for plants, 
insisting that instead those who re- 
ceive them put something extra to- 
wards their favorite charity. "If I 
started to sell plants," he says, "I 
would begin to get up early in the 
morning to make more money, and 
then this would no longer be a 
hobby, but a business." 

Another member of Local 192, 
Morton Rook, turns his carpentry 

FEBRUARY, 1970 



2 



4 



Peter Meindl adds some final touches 
to his hand-carved figure of a medie- 
val knight. Meindl also designed the 
figure. 

Morton Rook shows some of the 
self-help devices he makes for 
crippled patients of a nearby hospi- 
tal. 

Earl and Josephine Hallock and Wil- 
liam Mclvor are proud of their Un- 
ion Label Booth at a recent exhibition. 

Jack McGlashan, 84, enjoys his 
flourishing collection of chrysanthe- 
mum plants. 



skill to good use in making self-aid 
devices for crippled patients to ex- 
ercise with at the Victorian Order of 
Nurses. His work helps many 
patients to be less reliant on nurses 
and able to do more things for 
themselves. 

Three pensioners from Piledrivers 
Local 2404, Vancouver, Canada, 
have made the promotion of the 
Union label their enthusiastic proj- 
ect since 1957. Mr. and Mrs. Earl 



Hallock and William Mclvor put 
together a Union Label Booth at the 
recent Pacific National Exhibition. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hallock also find time 
for the United Nations Organization, 
the Children's Jubilee Summer 
Camp and the Human Rights As- 
sociation. 

A career in woodcarving begun 
in Bavaria at the age of 14 has ex- 
tended into retirement for Peter 
Meindl, Carpenters Local 1688, 
Manchester, N.H. His home is filled 
with carved and tooled panels, 
shelves, and figures, and he still 
accepts some commissions, such as 
a recent one from musician Skitch 
Henderson. More than 300 hours 
went into completing a figure of a 
medieval knight, authentic even to 
his height of five feet, two inches, 
an average height in those days. 

These sample retirement hobbies 
demonstrate that leisure time can be 
full of variety and satisfaction, with 
imagination as the only limit to 
how busy the retiree can find him- 
self. ■ 



35 



CLIC REPORT 

Monthly Membership Contributions To The 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 

The 1969 CLIC Campaign has been completed. During the past year 
contributions were made at state council and district council conventions 
totaling $15,938.20. Contributions from the membership of local unions, 
exclusive of conventions, amounted to $38,375.80. CLIC material was 
sent to 1710 locals; however, only 592 were interested enough in their 
legislative welfare to participate. This seems far short of what could 
reasonably be expected from our membership. 

We do wish to express our sincere thanks to those local unions which 
did participate in this worthwhile program. We hope that in our 1970 
campaign, more locals will show an interest in participating. 

As our final report for the 1969 campaign, we are listing below the con- 
tributions received since December 16; those locals carrying an asterisk 
indicates that the local has made contributions before. 



L.U. 



1243 
2520 



CLIC CONTRIBUTIONS 

(as of January 16, 1970) 

Cirv and State 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 
Anchorage 



ARIZONA 



1153 Yuma 

CALIFORNIA 

162 San Mateo 

1046 Palm Springs 

1158 Berkeley 

1400 Santa Monica 

1570 Marysville 

1992 Placerville 

2006 Los Gatos 

2463 Ventura 

COLORADO 

55 Denver 
1583 Englewood 

DELAWARE 

626 Wilmington 
2012 Seaford 

FLORIDA 

1308 Lake Worth 

1764 Orlando 

3206 Pompano Beach 

IDAHO 

635 Boise 
2816 Emmett 

ILLINOIS 

21 Chicago 

80 Chicago 

504 Chicago 

558 Elmhurst 

578 Chicago 

633 Madison 

798 Salem 

812 Cairo 

1128 La Grange 

1922 Chicago 

INDIANA 

232 Fort Wayne 
599 Hammond 

IOWA 

373 Fort Madison 



Amount 

$ 50.00 
80.00 

5.00 



9.00* 

5.00 
11.00 

8.00 
40.00 
14.00 
13.00 

4.00 



10.00 
29.00 



2.00 
18.00 



4.00 
23.00 
26.00 

20.00 
40.00 

5.00 

25.00 

15.00 

22.00 

125.00 

18.00 

2.00 

6.00 

10.00 

17.00 

10.00* 
10.00 

5.00 



L.U. City and State 

KANSAS 
499 Leavenworth 
714 Olathe 
2279 Lawrence 

KENTUCKY 
442 Hopkinsville 
2310 Madisonville 

LOUISIANA 
3101 Oakdale 

MARYLAND 
101 Baltimore 
1024 Cumberland 
1126 Annapolis 

MASSACHUSETTS 

107 Worcester 

157 Boston 

275 Newton 

444 Pittsfield 

624 Brockton 

762 Quincy 

885 Woburn 

1416 New Bedford 

MICHIGAN 

116 Bay City 
1433 Detroit 
1615 Grand Rapids 
2265 Detroit 

MISSISSIPPI 
1518 Gulfport 

MISSOURI 
618 Sikeston 
1635 Kansas City 
1839 Washington 
1925 Columbia 

MONTANA 
153 Helena 
1172 Billings 

NEBRASKA 
1606 Omaha 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
921 Portsmouth 

NEW JERSEY 
299 Union City 
349 Orange 
383 Bayonne 
842 Pleasantville 
1489 Burlington 
1743 Wildwood 



Amount 

> 1.00 
13.00* 
19.00 

4.00 
6.00 

15.00 

6.00 

15.00 
20.00 

22.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
17.00 
17.00 
20.00 
10.00 

2.00 

4.00 

33.50 

80.00 

10.00 

10.50 
5.00 

24.00 
21.00 

5.50 
1.00 

24.00 

25.00* 

40.00 
20.00 
17.00 
12.00 
140.00* 
20.00 



L.U. 


City and State 

NEW YORK 


Amount 


125 


Utica 


$ 20.00* 


187 


Geneva 


20.00 


298 


New York 


112.00 


453 


Auburn 


32.00* 


791 


New York 


16.00 


1042 


Plattsburgh 


94.00* 


1164 


New York 


200.00 


1175 


Kingston 


37.00 


1401 


Buffalo 


10.00 


1456 


New York 


11.00 


1575 


Endicott 


4.00 


1681 


Hornell 


8.00 


1704 


Carmel Kent 


5.00 


1772 


Hicks ville 


46.50 


2765 


Nassau Co. 


60.00 



2230 

200 

372 

525 

650 

881 

976 

1108 

1393 

1629 

2092 

2248 

2906 

986 
1060 

1388 
1857 
2851 
3064 



321 

368 

406 

677 

691 

833 

838 

1010 

1285 

1419 

1562 

1906 



590 
683 

331 

388 

1402 

2070 

98 
131 
954 
1036 
1054 
1708 
2205 
2628 

428 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Greensboro 

OHIO 

Columbus 

Lima 

Coshocton 

Pomeroy 

Massillon 

Marion 

Cleveland 

Toledo 

Ashtabula 

Canton 

Piqua 

Jeffersonville 

OKLAHOMA 

McAIester 
Norman 

OREGON 

Oregon City 
Portland 
LaGrande 
Toledo 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Connellsville 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Lebanon 

Williamsport 

Berwyn 

Sunbury 

Uniontown 

Allentown 

Johnstown 

North Wales 

Philadelphia 



TEXAS 



1822 Fort Worth 



VERMONT 

Rutland 
Burlington 

VIRGINIA 



264 
657 
1143 
1733 
1801 
2898 



Norfolk 
Richmond 
Richmond 
Roanoke 

WASHINGTON 

Spokane 

Seattle 

Mt. Vernon 

Longview 

Everett 

White River Valley 

Wenatchee 

Centralia 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Fairmont 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 

Sheboygan 

LaCrosse 

Marshfield 

Hawkins 

Glidden 



40.00 

26.00* 
20.00 
13.00 
13.00 

2.00 
20.00 
20.00 

5.00 
12.00 
20.00 
10.00 

3.60 

3.00* 
4.00* 

21.00 
40.00 
60.00 
24.00 

14.00 

10.00 
5.00 
1.00* 
2.00* 

11.00 
100.00* 

20.00 
3.00 
9.00* 
7.00 

67.00 

21.00 

4.50 
10.00 

16.00 

36.00 

11.00 

7.00 

12.00 
11.50* 
14.00 
20.00 

5.00 
20.00 
20.00 

8.00 

6.00 



52.00* 
1.00 
1.00 
4.00 

15.00 
6.00 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONST. AVE. N.W., WASH., D.C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT) 



Unexpected Answer 

Stormed the irate parent: "What's 
the idea of bringing my daughter 
home at 2 a.m.?" 

To which the boyfriend replied: 
"I'm sorry sir, but it started to rain!" 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 




Yankee Ingenuity! 

General Washington invited one of 
his young Continental Army captains 
to a dance at Mount Vernon, where 
a southern belle pounced upon him. 
"Mah goodness," she cooed, "ah think 
it's so wonderful for you-all to be will- 
ing to die fo' youah country!" 

"Not really," replied the captain. 
"What I want to do instead is to 
influence some Britishers to die for 
theirs! — Levi Jacobson, South Gate, 
Calif. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

Hobson's Choice 

Replied the banker to the man ask- 
ing for a loan: "Your finances are in 
terrible shape. Why do you allow 
your wife to spend more than you 
make?" 

"Because," replied the mfld-man- 
nered man, "I find it less painful to 
argue with you than with her!" 



From Bath to Worse 

"Certainly we have a room," said 
the hotel clerk. "Would you like one 
with a tub or a shower?" 

"What's the difference?" asked 
the traveler. 

"Not much," said the clerk, 
"they're both wet, but with a tub you 
sit down." 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Poetical Version 

The item above is a reminder of the 
energetic poet who, when he woke up 
every day, went from bed to verse. 

BE UNION — BUY LABEL 

Logical Steps 

"The murder took place in the up- 
stairs bedroom," said the prosecutor 
to the witness. "Now tell me . . . how 
do the steps go?" 

It was a while before the witness 
replied: "On the first floor, the steps 
go up. On the second floor, the steps 
go down." 

BUY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

No Generation Gap 

A mother was complaining to a 
neighbor: "Children grow up too 
soon! You look in your closet one 
day and discover your daughter is 
wearing your favorite dress!" 

"You're lucky," said the neighbor. 
"My daughter also borrows my 
purse!" 



This Month's Limerick 

A prudish young girl named Anheuser 
Once said that no lad could arouse 
her. 

But Old Overholt 

Gave her virtue a jolt, 
And now she is sadder Budweiser. 



A Shaggy Dog? 

Librarian: "What did you do when 
the dog started chewing on the dic- 
tionary?" 

Assistant: "I took the words right 
out of his mouth!" 

B SURE 2 VOTE 

This Month's One-Liner 

Old carpenters never die; they 
just pound away. — Mrs. Jean Tusler, 
Hammond, N. Y. 




Holding His Own 

Jake was courting Daisy May when 
her pappy said: "Jake, I want to 
know: are your intentions honorable 
... or dishonorable?" 

"Gosh," said Jake, "you mean I 
qot a choice?" — Shane Wyman, 
Columbia Falls, Mont. 

LIKE TOOLS. BE SHARP & SAFE 

He Finally Arrived 

Husband, looking up from a pile 
of bills: "It looks like we are at that 
bridge we were going to cross when 
we came to it!" 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



37 




EM OR 1AM 



~z 



L.U. NO. 7, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Anderson, Ernest 
Anderson. Lawrence 
Bach. Walter 
Baker, Alfred E. 
Benson, Arvid 
Brown, Lawrence M. 
Butler, Neil W. 
Byman, Hans 
Carlson, C. 
Carlson, Morris 
Dean, Orin J. 
Dole, Albert 
Ekdahl, Oscar H. 
Erhorn, William A. 
Fisk, David 
Glasrud, Carl J. 
Goodoien, James H. 
Halverson, Albert 
Jacobson, Eric 
Jalo, August 
Jenniges, Edmund 
Johnson, Gust 
Johnson, Johan W. 
Kriesel, Theodore 
Krost, Paul M. 
Landvik, Ole G. 
Leander. Oswald 
Maki, Eino I. 
Martenson, Harry 
Melsom, John 
Meyers, Ernest E. 
Miller, Orville 
Moline, Valdez V. 
Nelsestuen, John P. 
Nelson, George E. 
Neumann, Elmer W. 
Nicholson, Swen O. 
Nordstrom. Roy J. 
Northfeldt, Frank 
Olson, Algot 
Olson, John 
Peterson. Lester E. 
Severson. Andrew 
Severson, Julian 
Sjolund, William 
Slotem, Noranius 
Soderberg, Leonard 
Strand, Alfred B. 
Tullgren, Arvid W. 
Walstrom, Walter 
Westerman, Sam H. 

L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Alsheimer, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 14, 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Arnold, Frank 
Bel, W. P. 
Bohlman, O. J. 
Call, Leslie F. 
Crane, W. C. 
Fluitt. Maurice 
Gembler, E. C. 
Gill, John L. 
Haas, Julius K. 
Haveman, Henry 
Kehn, George R. 
Kurtzman, Daniel F. 
Lacewell, Frank B. 
Lapham, S. G. 
Moreau, E. L. 
Parks, Floyd E. 
Schmidt, Hilmer S. 
Shepherd, D. T. 



Taylor, Dee 
Thompson, A. C. 
Wagner, C. J. 
Webb, Charles L. 
Wharton, E. R. 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Beasley, Fred M. 
Bryson, Benjamin Jude 
Mayberry, W. C. 
Smith, Lurton E. 

L.U. NO. 54, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Miksovsky, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Bear, C. H. 
Chinn, A. W. 
Giese, Gus 
Goodhue, W. E. 
Hosman, G. B. 
Nilson, Carl T. 
Rutledge, Harry L. 
Willison, Harold E. 

L.U. NO. 89, 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Cannon, D. H. 
Richburg, Morgan 

L.U. NO. 100, 
MUSKEGON. MICH. 

Dorn, Frank 
Springer, Lewis 
Trapp. Jelte 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Dettmer, Charles A. 

L.U. NO. 102, 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Newell, Robert L. 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Brown, E. R. 
Cator, Benjamin W. 
Jackson, Ralph 
Kitts, Hallie B. 
McKnight, J. Blanton 
Mogavero, Frank 
Thompson, George 

L.U. NO. 141, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carlson, Carl O. 
Leisen. Charles 
Lundgren, Salem 
Nelson, David V. 

L.U. NO. 144, 
MACON, GA. 

Richardson, William F. 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Betke, Charles 
Hockstad, Christ 
Rasmussen, Max 

L.U. NO. 188, 
YONKERS, N.Y. 

Beighley, Earl G. 



L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Frasure, Eddie B. 

L.U. NO. 201, 
WICHITA, KANS. 

Goodwin, Ted 
Preston, Charles 

L.U. NO. 219, 

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

Anderson, Gudmunder, J. 
Gannon, William C. 
Werschin, Max A. 

L.U. NO. 230, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Entinger, Fred 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Pierce, Charles 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Caldrone, Carmelo 
Sarcia, Salvatore 
Stykke, Anton 

L.U. NO. 266, 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 

Agnew, John 
Caffall, Clinton 
Evans, Don 
Harper, R. H. 
Renner, Emil 
Snelling, Preston 
Wasson, A. H. 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, 
ILL. 

Devine, August 
Littell, Fay Elmer 
Pezzute, Anthony 
Radtke, Karl 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Lanthier, Gerard 

L.U. NO. 345, 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Fisher. H. H. 
Hunt, I. D. 
Lamb. Walter 
O'Neal, Henry 
Record. W. T. 
Todd, Donald R. 

L.U. NO. 355, 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Steward, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 403, 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Welch, Cammie C. 

L.U. NO. 411. 

SAN ANGELO, TEXAS 

Burks, W. C. 

L.U. NO. 514, 
WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

French, Wilbur 
Nagorski, Victor 
Stroshal, Richard 



L.U. NO. 569, 
PASCAGOULA, MISS. 

Lassiter, William K. 
Reid, Robert C. 
Williams, John H. 

L.U. NO. 661, 
OTTAWA, ILL. 

Cooter, David A. 
Parks, Thomas D. 

L.U. NO. 669. 
HARRISBURG, ILL. 

Martin, John 

L.U. NO. 727, 
H1ALEAH, FLA. 

Adkison, William R. 
Bailey, Clifford H. 
Jackson, John B. 
McAllister, James A. 
Purcell, Joseph M., Jr. 

L.U. NO. 746, 

S. NORWALK, CONN. 

Kocian, Frank 

L.U. NO. 751, 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

Gaudet, Louis 
Schiefelbein, Frank 

L.U. NO. 753, 
BEAUMONT, TEXAS 

McCarter, J. P. 
Stewart, Vernon V. 

L.U. NO. 756, 
BELLINGHAM, WASH. 

Neufeld, William 

L.U. NO. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

Trevigna, Robert 

L.U. NO. 833, 
BERWYN, PA. 

Baumgard, Edward 

L.U. NO. 899. 
PARKERSBURG, W.VA. 

Matics, Roy E. 

L.U. NO. 982. 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Barnum, Elmer L. 
McClellan, George T. 
Shultz, Paul 

L.U. NO. 1040, 
EUREKA, CALIF. 

Roberson, W. A. 

L.U. NO. 1098. 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Nichols, Fred 
Stiles, Jessie 

L.U. NO. 1138, 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Craft, Felix 
Ostrander, Fred 
Wight, William L. 

L.U. NO. 1140, 

SAN PEDRO, CALIF. 

Ahrens, E. C. 
Bruner, Loren E. 



Rygh, Alvie J. 
Stough, J. Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Stauffer, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1273, 
EUGENE, ORE. 

Anderson, Sven W. 
Broderick, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1331, 
BARNSTABLE, MASS. 

Talamini, Jack 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Wilson, Arvid 

L.U. NO. 1373, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Appleton, Virgil L. 
Minkler, Walton E. 
Smeltzer, Owen 
Thompson, Thomas A. 

L.U. NO. 1511, 
SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. 

Brown, George 

L.U. NO. 1513, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Chyz, Jack 
Daniels, Ernest 
Steel, Louis 

L.U. NO. 1590, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Anderson, Ebbe 
Baker, Otis 
Bjorkrot, Elmer A. 
Brooks, Rufus 
Clayton, J. E. 
Ferguson, Thomas, Sr. 
Foster, Willie 
Johanson, John A. 
Johnson, Aubrey 
Larrick, Winfred H. 
Larson, Enok A. 
Lyon, John B. 
Nelson, Joseph 
Oberg, Bror 
Opszentkoski, Peter 
Parish, Leo 
Patterson, Lorence 
Sheets, Donald 
Slayton. Lloyd E. 
Wikander, Aaron E. 
Wilmoth, Harry 

L.U. NO. 1683, 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

Harbour, Hugh H. 

L.U. NO. 1822, 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

Albright, Samuel E. 
Barrow, Irvin C. 
Wilson, E. B. 
Worthington, Percy W. 

L.U. NO. 1846, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Abraham, Peter 
Cockran, Raymond 
Delarosa. Richard, Sr. 
Continued on page 39 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



l<u*$Um 





Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida. 



Frank Beck, Local 133, Terre Haute, 
Ind., arrived at the Home Dec. 8, 1969. 



Edgar James Lesher, Local 627, Jack- 
sonville, Fla., arrived at the Home Dec. 
10, 1969. 



Harry Sloan, Local 715. Elizabeth, 
N. J., arrived at the Home Dec. 17, 
1969. 



Joseph S. Gergely, Local 1209. Irving- 
ton, N. J., arrived at the Home Dec. 29, 
1969. 



Armania J. Vallee, Local 337, De- 
troit, Mich., died Dec. 15, 1969. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 



Fredolph Carlson, Local 66, James- 
town, N. Y., died Dec. 16, 1969. Burial 
was at Jamestown, N. Y. 



John Cumming. Local 350, New Ro- 
chelle. N. Y., died Dec. 24, 1969. Burial 
was at New Rochelle, N. Y. 



Quint Eddins. Local 132. Washington, 
D. C, died Dec. 30, 1969. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 



In Memoriam, Continued 

Meynier, Henry C. 
Morris, W. W. 

L.U. NO. 1922, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kaiser, Curt 
Smicklas, Richard A. 

L.U. NO. 1976, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Finkelstein, Abe 
Ramirez, Louie 
Sher, Sam 
Trester, Abe 



L.U. NO. 2114, 
NAPA, CALIF. 

Strand, Axel 

L.U. NO. 2203, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Evans, William G. 
Krein, G. 

L.U. NO. 2340, 
BRADENTON, FLA. 

Eddy, Hubert H. 
Korner, Otto 



L.U. NO. 2422, 
SONOMA, CALIF. 

Balta, Alex 

L.U. NO. 2582, 
MUSKEGON, MICH. 

Vander Leest, Henry 
Saunders, Louis 

L.U. NO. 3127, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Fix, Ludwig 
Neuhaus, Moritz 
Teitler, Jacob 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel, Theodore 17 

Belsaw Power Tools 39 

Belsaw Sharp-All Co 23 

Chicago Technical College ... 15 

Estwing Manufacturing 28 

Foley Manufacturing 31 

Fugitt. Douglas 23 

Hydrolevel 25 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 27 

Lee, H. D 17 

Locksmithing Institute 25 

N. American School of Drafting 29 

Paneling Specialties 39 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

True Temper 33 

Zapart Saw Filer 27 



Chain Saw Vibrations 
May Cause Bone Damage 

Lumberjacks in Helsinki, Finland, 
complaining of night pain and numb- 
ness or prickling in their arms, may 
have developed bone changes due to 
using a motor-driven chain saw for one 
to three years. This is the conclusion of 
the Helsinki Institute of Occupational 
Health, in collaboration with the World 
Health Organization, after studying the 
mineral content and cortical thickness 
of the forearm bones of 22 lumberjacks, 
using special radiographic techniques. 
Eight patients had cysts in the wrist or 
hand bones; those who had been longest 
on the job showed marked demineraliza- 
tion of the forearm bones. The chain 
saw, which turns at 2,000 to 3.000 revolu- 
tions per minute, potentially triples the 
lumberjacks' output. 



Planer- Molder- Saw! 




Now you can use this ONE power feed shop 
to turn rough lumber into high-value mold- 
ings, trim, flooring, furniture . . . ALL pop- 
ular patterns. 

RIP... PLANE... MOLD... separately or all 
at once by power feed . . . with a one horse- 
power motor. Use 3 to 5 HP for high speed 
commercial output. 

LOW COST. . .You can own this money mak- 

inc power tool for only . . . $30.00 down. 

Send coupon today ... No salesman will call 



BELSAW POWER TOOLS 
910F Field Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 64111 
Send me complete facts on the MULTI- 
DUTY Power Tool. No obligation. 



Name 

Address- 
City 



_State_ 



-Zip- 



BE A PANELING EXPERT 

Scribe beautiful inside and outside 
corners with a kit of aluminum off- 
set jigs and marking gauges. De- 
signed to speed the installation of 
V 4 " (or less) panels. A step-by-step, 
panel-by-panel set of instructions is 
included. No previous experience 

necessary. 
Patent pending 




Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
refunded. Postpaid (check or M.O.) 
or C.O.D. plus postage, only S9.95. 
Calif, add 50C sales tax. 

PANELING SPECIALTIES CO. 

Box 11764 • Palo Alto, Calif. 94306 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Seasonality Is an Expensive Luxury 



■ Late last month, the Secretary of Labor and 
the Secretary of Commerce submitted to the Presi- 
dent a report on seasonality in the construction 
industry. 

Unfortunately, the study did not come up with 
any profund solutions. It concluded that much of 
the seasonality in construction stems from custom 
and tradition rather than from any physical, cli- 
matic, or mechanical difficulties. 

This, of course, is no secret to anyone who has 
been connected with the construction industry for 
any length of time. Some of the figures contained 
in the report pinpoint the wide discrepancy be- 
tween construction employment in the summer 
months and employment in the winter months. 

For example, in August of 1968, there were 
only 6,300 construction workers in the State of 
New York collecting unemployment compensa- 
tion. Yet in February of that year, there were 
47,000 collecting benefits. In other words, there 
were 8 times as many construction workers col- 
lecting unemployment compensation in February 
as there were in August. 

Even in California, where 90% of the construc- 
tion is unaffected by climatic extremes, the number 
of unemployed construction workers in February 
was 2Vi times as high as the figure for August. 

Certainly this is an indication that custom rather 
than necessity is responsible for much of the dol- 
drums which catch up with the industry about the 
middle of December. 

Seasonality, of course, is an expensive luxury 
which the industry can no longer afford ... if 
it ever could. 

Seasonality costs construction workers a good 
deal of lost time. There is a substantial cost factor 
to the employer as well — particularly in this day 



and age of short supply of skilled craftsmen in 
many areas. 

As a means of reducing seasonality in the con- 
struction industry, the report recommends revised 
government scheduling of work to provide opti- 
mum employment during winter months. It further 
recommends expanded manpower programs and 
new technological approaches to cope with bad 
weather. 

To relate national manpower policies to sta- 
bilization of employment in construction, the re- 
port recommends three major actions: 

1 . expansion of apprenticeship training, skill 
enrichment, and minority employment programs 
to provide the range of skills needed by a more 
stable construction work force. 

2. development of new financial incentives to 
encourage winter employment, and, 

3. development of a local construction labor 
market information system by cooperative action 
of contractors, building trade unions, and the De- 
partment of Labor in conjunction with computer 
job-matching programs. 

While none of these recommendations is earth- 
shaking, added together they probably can con- 
tribute something toward the elimination of unem- 
ployment among construction workers in the 
winter months. 

The report also recommends the establishment 
of an all-weather construction council to conduct 
continuing studies aimed at eliminating the factors 
which slow down construction work in winter. 

As far as the report is concerned, it does a better 
job of focusing attention on the problem rather 
than suggesting solutions. Perhaps in the long run, 
this is a tremendous contribution, because under- 
standing a problem thoroughly is the first step 
toward achieving a workable solution. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




He's back 
on the j 



§ • 



He survived heart attack He's back on 
the job because coronary care units, 
new drugs, and advanced methods of 
rehabilitation are helping doctors restore 
more cardiacs to productive lives. 
Most victims survive first heart attacks 
and, of those who do, four out of five 
now go back to work 

Heart scientists predict even greater 
heart-saving advances in the foreseeable 
future, provided funds are increased for 
research, education and community 
services. Help make these predictions 
come true: 




Contributed by the Publisher 



Stanley gives 

today's best routers 
even more power 




Two of today's most popular ball bearing routers 
have been given even greater power and capacity. 

Model 91264 at $72.50 now produces a full 1 
h.p.; Model 91267 at $84.00 has a full Wi h.p. 
Each router will now accept %" shank diameter bits, 
as well as Va" , using either of two collets furnished. 
Use of heavier 3 /s" shank bits, however, assures less 
breakage under heavier torques and feeds. 

Motors have welded (not soldered) leads. Microm- 
eter depth settings are in .004" increments. Three 
position handles provide fatigue-free operation, bet- 



ter control, with convenient thumb switching with- 
out removing either hand. A switch-operated shaft 
lock permits one-wrench bit changes. And only 
Stanley routers have a built-in light for better visi- 
bility for the operator. 

Stanley's complete line of routers range from 
Va h.p. to 8 h.p. in electric, air and high-frequency 
power sources. See them at your distributor. Stan- 
ley Power Tools, Division of 
The Stanley Works, New 

Bern, No. Carolina 28560. 

helps you do things right 



STANLEY 



P.S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest hand tools. 



MARCH 1970 




smr 



Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 



mJr> : -*~ 







■'#*#-*? 



'*^*— ■»* .'..■' $*"- 



CLEAN AIR 

America Tackles 
Its Air Pollution 
Problem at Last 






GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Marietta Street, Suite 913 
Atlanta, Georgia 30303 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change Of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



<3/A\D3[p 




VOLUME XC 



No. 3 



MARCH, 1970 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



i flUBOBPRESSfe 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

The Building Trades Plan Aid to Union Contractors 2 

How Long Can You Hold Your Breath? 5 

The 1970 Convention Call 8 

2500 Honor 55- Year Veteran Charles Johnson 10 

What's a Good Union? 12 

Andrew Jackson Paid The Hermitage Construction Bill 17 

Coordinated Bargaining With Westinghouse 34 

Pensions for Workers Increasing Sharply 34 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 4 

Editorials 14 

Service to the Brotherhood 18, 21, 24 

Canadian Report 19 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 22 

Plane Gossip 25 

Local Union News 26 

CLIC Report 30 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 31 

What's New? 35 

In Memoriam 36 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20c in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

As "America the Beautiful" con- 
tinues its headlong search for a bet- 
ter and better standard of living, the 
phrase "for spacious skies" may soon 
have to be deleted from one of our 
favorite patriotic songs. Industrial 
growth and the rise of the two- or 
three-car family have put our atmos- 
phere in deadly peril. In the centu- 
ries since pioneer families first pushed 
their way across this continent of 
seemingly endless bounty, the sky 
has been literally the limit for Ameri- 
ca's fantastic boom of productivity. 
Now we are just beginning to wake 
up to the fact that the sky is the limit. 

The popularity of the phrase "the 
quality of life" reflects this growing 
realization that perhaps what we 
really want is not more and more 
gadgets, but more beautiful, tranquil 
places like the one shown on this 
cover, where children may explore and 
dream and grownups may simply 
"get away from it all." Such spots of 
natural beauty are rapidly disappear- 
ing. On the other hand, air pollution 
has grown to be such a hazard in 
many urban and semi-urban areas 
that schoolchildren are warned during 
play period not to run too hard or 
breathe too deeply. 

Even big industry is beginning to 
appreciate the problem that pollution 
of the air represents. This photo- 
graph was furnished to the National 
Air Pollution Control Administration 
by the Standard Oil Co. of California. 





Members of the AFL-CIO Building and Construction Trades Department discuss future programs at a Bal Harbour, Florida, 
meeting. They are, clockwise from bottom left: John H. Lyons of the Ironworkers, Russell K. Berg of the Boilermakers, 
Charles H. Pillard of the Electrical Workers, Peter T. Schoemann of the Plumbers and Pipe Fitters, Edward J. Leonard of the 
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Secretary-Treasurer Frank Bonadio, President C. J. Haggerty, Mrs. Alice Sheriff of President 
Haggerty's office, General Counsel Louis Sherman, Hunter P. Wharton of the Operating Engineers, Peter Fosco of the Labor- 
ers, S. Frank Raftery of the Painters and Allied Trades, and Thomas F. Murphy of the Bricklayers. 



AFL-CIO Building Trades Department 
Maps Action Programs for Jobs, Safety 



Positive action programs in the 
areas of manpower, legislation, safe- 
ty, and construction financing were 
approved at recent winter sessions 
of the AFL-CIO Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department, meet- 
ing in Bal Harbour. Florida. 

Top leaders of the building crafts 
unions approved important new pro- 
grams and listened to reports on the 
status of the industry and its pros- 
pects for the new decade. 

In a move to strengthen the com- 
petitive position of skilled union 
craftsmen and union contractors, a 
nine-member "summit committee" 



was appointed by BCTD President 
C. J. Haggerty. United Brotherhood 
President M. A. Hutcheson will 
serve on this special committee, 
established on a unanimously-ap- 
proved motion of the 17 general 
presidents of the unions affiliated 
with the Building and Construction 
Trades Department. The group will 
be chaired by President Haggerty. 
Other members include these craft 
union presidents: Russell K. Berg, 
Boilermakers; Charles H. Pillard, 
IBEW; S. Frank Raftery, Painters; 
Edward F. Carlough, Sheet Metal 
Workers; Peter T. Schoemann, 



United Association of Plumbers; 
Peter Fosco, Laborers; R. Wayne 
Williams, Elevator Constructors; 
and John H. Lyons, Iron Workers. 
The committee was set up after 
the general presidents had met 
with representatives of the National 
Constructors Association, who re- 
quested joint action by the unions 
and union contractors in tackling 
situations affecting the construction 
industry, such as seasonality, sched- 
uling of work by contractors, ade- 
quate supply of skilled manpower, 
work stoppages and productivity. 
The Department accepted the in- 



THE CARPENTER 



vitation of the NCA to meet again 
within 60 days. 

The BCTD also approved a 
proposal to set up a three-day na- 
tional conference on occupational 
health and safety, with specific ap- 
plication to the construction indus- 
try. The conference will deal with 
job-site safety inspection, pre -job 
safety conferences, and occupational 
health and job environment. 

BCTD members attending the 
Bal Harbour meeting also heard a 
legislative report by Legislative Di- 
rector Walter J. Mason, who de- 
scribed the first session of the 91st 
Congress as "not very productive." 
Mason's report noted the lack of 
action on "many long overdue and 
badly needed measures" and the 
lack of adequate funds for previ- 
ously-approved programs. 

The Department's Executive 
Council also heard a report on the 
AFL-CIO Mortgage Investment 
Trust Fund, which urged that con- 
struction unions invest their pension 
funds in the program and thus pro- 
vide badly needed funds for private 
housing. Speaking for the fund was 
John Evans, director of the federa- 
tion's Department of Urban Affairs. 

Evans said that union pension 
trustees had thus far invested $10 
million in the trust fund, and ex- 
pected this sum to rise substantially. 



On House-Passed Bill 

Hearings Open on Jobless Pay, 
As Labor Seeks US Standards 

With unemployment starting to rise, the Senate Finance Committee has 
picked a timely moment to open hearings on the House passed measure 
to improve unemployment compensation. 

The major issue in the hearings, as far as organized labor is concerned, 
is the need of federal standards for benefits. 

The House bill, H.R. 14705, sponsored by Representatives Wilbur Mills 
(D. Ark.) and John Byrnes (R. Wise), which the Senate Finance Committee 
is now considering, falls far short of calling for such federal standards. 

Secretary of Labor George P. Shultz, testifying before the Senate Com- 
mittee on behalf of the Administration, has called for three major modifi- 
cations of present law but does not ask for Federal standards. 



Modifications Needed 

Three modifications which Shultz 
stresses the most generally, have the 
support of organized labor. They are: 

• The extension of unemployment 
insurance protections to hired workers 
on large farms. The bill currently does 
not include coverage for any farm 
workers. He called this a "serious de- 
fect." 

• The extension of unemployment 
insurance protection to college profes- 
sors and other "instructional, research 
and principal administrative personnel 
of institutions of higher education." 

• A higher wage base for financing 
unemployment insurance benefits and 
no permanent tax rate increase to make 
financing "more equitable." The House 



Maritime Trades Discuss Ship Construction 




Secretary Richard Livingstone, addressing a Maritime Trades Department meeting in 
Bal Harbour, Florida, recently, discussed a proposal which would provide federal 
aid in the construction of ships for non-contiguous trade between the United States 
and Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. This aid. coupled with an extension of the right 
to establish tax-deferred construction reserve funds (now enjoyed by some operators 
in foreign trade) could lead to significant reductions in cargo rates for these areas. 



bill raises the taxable wage base from 
S3, 000 to S4,200 and would raise the 
Federal unemployment tax rate from 
3.1 percent to 3.2 percent. 

Members of the Senate Finance 
Committee asked Shultz what he pro- 
posed to do about some states which 
have such inadequate benefit floors for 
such shorter durations. 

His reply was little different than a 
year ago when he declared that if the 
states did not act Federal action might 
be necessary. However, in the year few 
states have actually taken action to 
meet the higher Federal standards. 

Federal "Trigger" Plan 

Shultz did propose that when the 
national insured unemployment rate 
reached 4.5 percent for three consecu- 
tive months the Federal government 
should finance a program for extended 
benefits. Actually, the trigger point 
4.5 percent of insured unemployed 
would mean at least 5.5 percent nation- 
al unemployment rate. 

Under this plan, a comparable trig- 
ger would be set for state action, too. 

However, as trade union experts 
point out, this does nothing for a work- 
er involved in an individual plant shut- 
down or even a regional job crisis. 

"Even' man has his own depres- 
sion," said AFL-CIO's James O'Brien. 

Also, unionists say, it would be un- 
fair for the Federal government to 
step in at the end of the duration peri- 
od which varies from nine to 26 weeks. 

Clinton Fair of the AFL-CIO Leg- 
islative Department is scheduled to 
testify and he will tell the Senate Fi- 
nance Committee that the only fair, 
equitable approach is Federal stand- 
ards which will not penalize or reward 
a worker because he lives in one state 
or another (PAI). 



MARCH, 1970 





™^^ ROUNDUP 



REAPPOINTED— General Vice President Maurice Hutcheson of the Carpenters has been 
reappointed to the Economic Policy Standing Committee of the AFL-CIO. He will 
also serve on the standing committees on Veterans Affairs and Housing. 

POOR HIT HARDEST— Low income families have "been hardest hit by the "money squeeze" 
that grips the housing industry, according to John J. Cummings, Jr., the chairman 
of the non-profit company which aids construction and rehabilitation of housing in 
Rhode Island's blighted urban neighborhoods. Cummings told the Housing Banking 
and Currency Committee, which is considering alternative sources of home mortgage 
financing, that his Urban Housing Corp. utilizes Federal government programs as 
fully as is now possible in an effort to allow all low-income persons "to enjoy 
the pride of home ownership." 

HOUSING PLEA— Mayor John Lindsay of New York City told Congress recently that 
Administration "tight money" policies have not helped curb inflation, but rather 
have hurt housing, raised interest rates, and jacked up consumer prices. Testi- 
fying in favor of a Federally-funded National Development Bank to make direct 
loans for home mortgages, Lindsay called the national goal of 2.6 million new 
homes by 1978 "simple a joke" and said that it will not be met without additional 
funds. Lindsay declared that Administration policies "threaten to dry up money 
for housing" and "ignore a vital human need." Lindsay said that it is important 
to fight inflation, but that it should be accomplished by "cutting military waste, 
slowing down our space program, reducing environmentally dangerous highway 
building, and— if necessary-by careful controls in the wage and price area," rather 
than at the expense of people who need homes. 

BUILDING TOTAL— New construction totaling $91.1 billion was put in place last 
year, according to a recent Commerce Department report. This represents an increase 
of 8 percent over 1968. The Department report added, however, that when adjustment 
is made for price increases, the value of new construction changed very little 
from year to year. 

LABOR RELATIONS RULES— Provisions of Executive Order 11491 which deal with Federal 
labor-management relations are now in effect. Assistant Secretary of Labor 
W. J. Usery, Jr., is now responsible for the handling of these rules, which 
regulate representative questions such as unit determinations and elections and 
unfair labor complaints. Proposed regulations concerning labor organization 
standards of conduct, prescribed in Section 18 of the Executive Order, will be 
offered for comment at a later date Section 18 aims at applying to labor organ- 
izations of Federal employees approximately the same reporting and bonding 
requirements, standards for election of officers and safeguards for the rights of 
union members as those prescribed in the private sector by the Labor-Management 
Reporting and Disclosure Act. 

TRAINING EXCEEDS GOALS-The C.S. Department of Labor announced recently that 
the Building and Construction Trades Councils in San Antonio and Oklahoma City 
have exceeded their goals for the training of minority apprentices. Together the two 
Councils have placed 153 youths in various construction trades jobs. New one-year 
contracts were awarded to both councils, and a new Labor Department contract has 
been given to the Southern California Area Construction Program. 

A 1968 CURB on the use of tax-free state and local bonds as a means of luring 
industries from one area to another apparently has produced some results. 

Figures released by the Investment Bankers Association show the issuance of 
industrial bonds fell from a peak of SI. 6 billion in 1968 to about $48 million in 
1969, the lowest yearly total since 1960. The number of issues dropped from 
165 to 68. 

4 THE CARPENTER 



**ifff\ 




YOUR 
BREATH ? 

"Just a Breath of Fresh Air," 
Once So Much Taken for Granted, 
Is Fast Becoming a Luxury 
Even the Wealthiest Can't Afford 



• 




■ Take a good look at our cover 
this month. Beautiful, isn't it? Per- 
haps it would be well for you to clip 
and save such pictures — clear views 
of the heavens are becoming in- 
creasingly rare. 

There is a vast ocean of clean air 
around our earth, enough for 2.5 
million tons for each human being. 
Yet people are becoming uncom- 
fortable and even sick for the lack 
of each man's requirement of 30 
pounds of clean air a day. It doesn't 
do us much good "up there" if we 
are "down here" under a blanket 
of gritty, greasy, malodorous, and 
poisonous smog. 

Today, polluted air threatens the 
health of most Americans, corrodes 



their property, obscures or obliter- 
ates their scenery and rubs raw their 
peace of mind. Once the plague of 
large, industrial cities, filthy air now 
hovers over most of the places where 
we live. Missoula, Mont., "Garden 
Spot of the West," is the nation's 
second worst smog area. Denver, 
Colo., long a haven of those needing 
clear, pure air for lung disorders, 
seldom enjoys the breathtaking view 
of its surrounding snow-capped 
mountains now. Donald McLean of 
Polk County, Fla., told a Senate 
committee that, since phosphate 
plants began putting seven tons of 
fluorides a day into the air, he has 
had to sell his cattle and his citrus 
groves because his cattle sickened 



MARCH, 1970 




and died, crops that used to mature 
in 80 days now take 200, barbed 
wire that used to last 20 years rots 
in four, and he doesn't dare grow 
vegetables for his family for fear 
they will pick up the same chemi- 
cals that fall on his groves and 
pastures. 

Every American city of more than 
50,000 population has air pollution 
serious enough to worry about, 
whether or not its citizens ever see 
or smell it. Smoky industry and dark 
motor exhaust provide extra doses, 
but masses of atmospheric poisons 
come from smokeless chimneys and 
from perfectly tuned engines. Four- 
fifths of all pollution is invisible, 
most of it odorless. 

As this deadly fact of modern life 
becomes more impressed on our 
already over-burdened anxiety cen- 
ters, we become more keenly aware 
of this most urgent demand of man 



on his environment — clean air. We 
can exist without water for days 
and without food for weeks, but we 
can't hold our breath for more than 
a minute or two. Then we must 
breathe, even if it kills us — and it 
sometimes does. 

In four days in 1948 polluted air 
sickened 43 percent of the popula- 
tion of Donora, Pa., and killed 20: 
in four days in 1952 it killed 4,000 
people in London: in 15 days in 
1963 it killed 400 people in New 
York City. Polluted air undoubtedly 



"In biological history no orga- 
nism has survived long if its environ- 
ment became in some way unfit for 
it, but no organism before man has 
deliberately polluted its own en- 
vironment." 

— Rachel Carson 



kills many other people in many 
other places but they are not counted 
because the death certificates never 
read "air pollution" but respiratory 
disease (from allergies to lung can- 
cer) doubles every five years in the 
United States. Emphysema is almost 
surely the result of air pollution. 
It creeps up in the form of increas- 
ingly-frequent colds, chest conges- 
tion, breathlessness; and then, usu- 
ally after age 50, there is a definite 
diagnosis and ultimately death. There 
is no cure. California has recorded 
an astonishing 300 percent increase 
in cases since 1955. About nine per- 
cent of all Social Security payments, 
more than $100 million a year, is 
paid for emphysema victims — sec- 
ond in number only to those with 
arteriosclerotic heart disease. 

Add to these obvious and growing 
health hazards the 12 billion dollar 
annual loss to property caused by 



THE CARPENTER 






MAJOR GROWTH TRENDS 
AFFECTING AIR POLLUTION 



air pollution and you have a critical 
national problem affecting every one 
of our citizens. 

Air pollution is mainly the result 
of things burning — gasoline in cars, 
coal and oil in factories and homes, 
trash and garbage in incinerators 
and dumps. The curve of dirty air 
follows pretty closely the curve of 
national wealth — more cars to put 
out exhaust, more power plants to 
put out power so more factories can 
put out goods so there will be more 
trash to burn. The optimistic econ- 
omist of the 19th century who saw 
the smoke-filled sky above humming 
factories as the surest mark of pros- 
perity was right — he just hadn't 
thought the situation through to its 
logical conclusion. And after two 
decades of uninterrupted boom, the 
practice of breathing dirt and poison 
has begun to fester. 

(Continued on page 26) 




GROSS 

NATIONAL 

PRODUCT 


.>^5 HHH 


■HHH^c' 


BILLIONS OF DOLLAPS 


moOHHHI 




HH'OIO 









MOTOR 
VEHICLES 


1965 BBHH 


■■■■& 


MILLIONS OF VEHICLES 


1980HHB 




IHizo 











REFUSE 
PRODUCTIOH 


»&■■■■ 


MILLIONS OF TONS PER YEAR 

^HH|i70 


19gOHHBHI 


■HHHMH^H 250 







CONVENTION CALL 

OF AMERICA 
INSTITUTED AUGUST 127? 1881 

*. I. LIVINGSTON , 0| <-„„„,,„,,„„ Av . NW . 

O.narc.1 Secretary W „j,| ng ,on, 0. C. 20001 



February 28, 1970 

TO THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF LOCAL UNIONS, DISTRICT, STATE, 

AND PROVINCIAL COUNCILS OF THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Greetings : 

You are officially notified that, in accordance with the action of the General Executive 
Board, the Thirty-First General Convention of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America will be held in the Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California, begin- 
ning Monday, August 24, 1970, at 10:00 a.m. and continue in session from day to day until 
the business coming before the Convention has been completed. 

The basis of representation in the Convention, in accordance with Section 18-C, is One 
hundred (100) members or less shall be entitled to one delegate; more than one hundred 
(100) members and less than five hundred (500), two delegates; more than five hundred 
(500) members and less than one thousand (1,000), three delegates; one thousand (1,000) 
or any greater number of members, four delegates. Upon payment of a special per capita 
tax of $50 per year, which shall be payable not later than July 1 of each year, State, Provin- 
cial and District Councils shall be entitled to representation by election of one delegate. 

A Local Union owing two months' tax to the General Office is not entitled to repre- 
sentation in the Convention. 

In accordance with Section 18-F, upon receipt of the Convention Call, all Local Unions 
and Councils are directed to issue notice of a special called meeting for the purpose of select- 
ing delegates to the 31st General Convention by secret ballot. Section 18-F further provides: 
"All members shall be notified by mail to attend the meeting at which the delegates are to 
be elected. No member shall be eligible as a delegate unless the member is a Journeyman, 
working at or depending on the trade for a livelihood, or employed by the organization, 
retired members excepted, and has been twelve consecutive months a member in good 
standing of the Local Union and a member of the United Brotherhood for three years im- 
mediately prior to election, except where the Local Union has not been in existence the time 
herein required." Council delegates to the General Convention will be elected by the dele- 
gates to the Council who represent its affiliated subordinate bodies. Required notices will 
be sent only to such delegates. 

Section 31-E provides: "A member cannot hold office or be nominated for office, Bus- 
iness Representative, Delegate, or Committee unless present at the time of nomination, 
except that the member is in the anteroom on authorized business or out on official business, 
or prevented by accident or sickness from being present; nor shall the member be eligible 
unless a Journeyman working at or depending on the trade for a livelihood or employed by 
the organization and has been twelve consecutive months a member in good standing im- 
mediately prior to nomination in the Local Union and a member of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America for three years immediately prior to nomination, un- 



less the Local Union has not been in existence the time herein required. A member must 
be a citizen of the country in which the Local Union is located for a period of three years 
immediately prior to nomination. Non-beneficial members are not eligible to hold office; 
nor shall a contracting member be eligible, nor shall a member who has been a contracting 
member until twelve months have lapsed following notification by him to his Local Union 
in writing that he has ceased contracting." 

All members in good standing must receive notice of the number of delegates to be 
elected and the time, place, and proper form f o r submitting nominations. This notice should 
be sent at least 15 days prior to the date set for the nominations of delegates. Notice of 
the election must be mailed to each member in good standing at his last known home ad- 
dress not less than 15 days prior to the election. No other form of notice is permitted. In 
the case of Councils, notices will be sent only to the delegates. 

The notice must include a specification of the time and place of the election and the 
number of delegates to be elected. A Local Union or Council, however, may use a combined 
notice if it contains all necessary information, is sent by mail to each member in good stand- 
ing at his last known home address and sent at least 15 days prior to nominations. If a 
Local Union or Council sends a combined 30-day notice, nominations and elections of dele- 
gates may be held at the same special called meeting. All members of a Local Union, in 
good standing, except contracting members, shall be eligible to vote for Local Union dele- 
gates; all duly elected delegates to Councils will be eligible to vote for delegates from the 
Councils to the General Convention. 

Names of the elected delegates are to be in the General Office by June 1, 1970. 

Each delegate will be entitled to one vote. (A delegate representing more than one 
chartered body will be entitled to only one vote.) Proxy representation is not allowed. 
Each delegate establishes claim to a seat in the Convention through official credentials sup- 
plied by the General Office which must be properly filled out and signed by the President 
and Recording Secretary of the Local Union or Council which he represents, with the Seal 
of the Local Union or Council affixed thereto. 

A delegate must have his due book with him to show that he has been a member in good 
standing twelve months prior to his election and the expense of each delegate attending 
the Convention is to be paid by the Local Union or Council he represents. 

The Recording Secretary must report at once to the General Secretary the name and 
Post Office address of the delegate and alternate, under penalty of fine as provided in Sec- 
tion 18-G of our Constitution and Laws. When the name and address of the delegate is 
reported to the General Office and the elected delegate's membership is found to be in com- 
pliance with our Constitution and Laws, blank credentials and further information will be 
sent to the delegate and not to the Local Union or Council. 

All proposed amendments to the Constitution and Laws must be submitted by June 19, 
1970, in accordance with Section 63-E and F. 

Fraternally yours, 
General President. General Secretary. 





2500 Honor 55-Year Veteran Charles Johnson 

Gov. Rockefeller, of New York 
Joins Well-Wishers at Banquet 



■ On January 17, 2500 people 
from all walks of life paid public 
tribute to Charles Johnson, Jr., 
veteran leader of the Brotherhood 
in New York State. At an elaborate 
formal dinner in the Americana 
Hotel in New York City, Johnson 
received the tributes of his union 
brothers, leaders of government, in- 
dustry, religion, and the armed 
services. 

Charles Johnson retired as presi- 
dent of the Dockbuilders Local 
1456 and as president of the New 
York City District Council on De- 
cember 21. He had resigned earlier 
last year as president of the New 
York State District Council of Car- 
penters and also from his post on 
the General Executive Board, First 
District of the Brotherhood. The 
testimonial dinner called attention 
to the long, innovative leadership he 
has given to those and other posi- 
tions in the labor movement and in 
the community. 

Top Leaders Present 

Attending the banquet were liter- 
ally hundreds of the top leaders of 
organized labor in New York and 
in the nation, as well as friends in 
high offices in many other profes- 
sions. International President M. A. 
Hutcheson served as Master of 
Ceremonies, and New York State 
Governor Nelson Rockefeller, Lt. 
General James H. Doolittle, and 
AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Lane 
Kirkland were among the principal 
speakers. Many banquet guests, 
who had long been associated with 
Johnson in his 55 years of Brother- 
hood and civic activities, were pres- 
ent to wish him well in retirement. 

Charles Johnson. Jr. began his 
career with the Dockbuilders Local 
1456 on January 14, 1914, the 
union which his father had helped 
found before the turn of the century. 




Charles Johnson, Jr., left, receives a gold honorary membership card from Inter- 
national President M. A. Hutcheson, as New York State Governor Nelson Rocke- 
feller, center, looks on approvingly. International President Hutcheson served as 
master of ceremonies at the testimonial dinner honoring Johnson. Governor Rocke- 
feller was a principal speaker. 



" ; 



i - 




"It takes a lot of thought to cram a quarter-century of devoted service onto one 
plaque,'' states General Secretary Richard Livingston, as he presents framed mes- 
sage to Charles Johnson, on behalf of the General Executive Board of the United 
Brotherhood. Also shown are International President \I. A. Hutcheson and Vice 
President William Sidell. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Johnson was elected president of 
the local in 1922 and continued as 
president and business representa- 
tive until December 31, 1969. He 
was appointed to the General Ex- 
ecutive Board, First District, of the 
United Brotherhood in 1945. He 
was elected president of the New 
York State District Council of Car- 
penters and also president of the 
New York City District Council of 
Carpenters in 1957. 

Besides these four major elected 
positions, from which he has re- 
tired, he has been a vice president 
of the New York State AFL-CIO 
since 1962, and also a vice presi- 
dent of the New York City Building 
Trades Council. 

Truman Appointee 

His acceptance of public respon- 
sibility brought him an appointment 
by President Truman in 1947 as 
one of the six U. S. representatives 
to the first post-war conference of 
the International Labor Organiza- 
tion in Brussels. Governor Dewey 
appointed him to his Labor Ad- 
visory Committee, and only recently 
Governor Rockefeller appointed 
him to a tripartite commission of 
government, labor and management 
personnel to assist him in allocating 
priorities in construction. The late 
Cardinal Spellman had appointed 
him to serve on the Committee of 
the Laity in New York City. 

In 1968, he was made the first 
recipient of the Patriots Award of 
the Congressional Medal of Honor 
Society of the U. S. 

During his leadership of the New 
York City District Council, car- 
penters have tripled their hourly 
wages and fringe benefits, due in 
part to his astute negotiating abil- 
ities. He was also instrumental in 
creating an annuity fund for mem- 
bers, a vacation fund, and an ap- 
prentice-journeyman retraining edu- 
cational fund. 

Although retiring, Johnson will 
continue to be available for con- 
sultation by both the District Coun- 
cil and Local 1456. In addition, he 
will be active on the Board of Urban 
Affairs of the New York Building 
Trades Council, and will continue 
to serve on the Governor's panel for 
the construction program in New 
York State. ■ 




A token of the esteem of members of the New York City District Council of 
Carpenters is presented to Charles Johnson, center, by newly-elected Council Pres- 
ident Conrad F. Olsen. At left is District Council Secretary-Treasurer Edward A. 
Bjork. Johnson served in the post now held by Olsen since 1957. Olsen states, "I 
have inherited a going concern, and I intend to keep it that way," placing credit 
for the Council's success squarely on his predecessor. 



Labor Presses Drive for Federal 
Standards on Jobless Benefits 



Steady deterioration of the na- 
tion's federal-state unemployment 
system can only be halted by the 
adoption of strong federal standards, 
the AFL-CIO told Congress. 

The "federal partner," the feder- 
ation added, must also assume a 
greater role in the system by extend- 
ing it to cover workers who now 
have no income protection for lost 
jobs. 

The testimony was given to the 
Senate Finance Committee by Clin- 
ton M. Fair, an AFL-CIO legislative 
representative, on behalf of Legis- 
lative Dir. Andrew J. Biemiller. 
Fair was accompanied by James 
O'Brien, an assistant director of the 
federation's Dept. of Social Security. 

The Senate committee is holding 
hearings on a bill passed by the 
House in November that would ex- 
tend unemployment insurance cov- 
erage to 4.5 million additional 
workers. 

The measure also provides for an 
extended period of jobless benefits 
during periods of high unemploy- 
ment by raising the payroll tax 
slightly and increasing the taxable 
wage base. 



Fair described the House bill as 
a "meritorious effort to improve the 
system, but still lacking the most 
essential ingredient — minimum fed- 
eral standards." 

He reiterated the AFL-CIO's call 
for the establishment of a minimum 
federal benefit standard that would 
benefit equal to at least two-thirds 
of their lost pay during periods of 
unemployment. 

The federation further urged 
amendments to the House bill to in- 
clude a standard on duration of job- 
less benefits, a $6,000 taxable wage 
base and a "completely federal" 
program of benefits for long-term 
unemployed. 

The AFL-CIO said the House 
bill's extension of unemployment in- 
surance benefits to cover additional 
workers should be strengthened to 
include all farm workers, domestic 
workers and public employees. 

The additional coverage under the 
House bill would apply mainly to 
some employees of non-profit insti- 
tutions, workers in small establish- 
ments and those in agricultural 
processing plants. 



MARCH, 1970 



11 



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What's a 'Good Union'? 



■ What is the definition of a "good union"? What 
are the basic qualities involved? There are a number 
of answers, depending on where the question is asked. 
Some management quarters still hold to the concept of 
the western pioneers, "the only good Indian is a dead 
Indian." To them the only good union is a dead union, 
but there are sounder standards. 

Is it simply a matter of longevity? Can it be assumed 
that a union is good because it has lasted for genera- 
tions? 

Obviously, age is one indication that a union is 
serving a useful purpose, but it is not decisive. All es- 
tablished institutions — including unions — tend to be 
self-perpetuating. So age is not an adequate test. 

Then there is the matter of size. Size is clearly not 
a way to measure quality. There are good small unions 
and good large unions in the AFL-CIO. And there is 
one very large union outside the AFL-CIO which can- 
not be described without great controversy. 

Then there is the question of power, the power to 
win economic battles; the power to sustain strikes 
until they are won. There is no doubt that a good union 
needs to be a strong union. But here again, power 
alone is not enough. There are strong unions which 
are not good unions. Union power must be viewed 
in the context of "power for what?" And this makes 
it clear that strength, though necessary, does not nec- 
essarily result in a good union. 

What about the exercise of power? What about the 
strikes or the lack of strikes? 

The newspaper editorial writers would have the 
public believe that a good union never gets involved 
in a strike. It is true that some good unions have long 
records of industrial peace. This is commendable — as 
long as the interests of the members have been pro- 
tected and advanced during the periods of peace. But 
that is possible only when employers, too, sincerely 
want a fair agreement, one that will give workers 
what they properly should receive. 

Some good unions have a great many strikes. They 
are found in those industries where management as a 
whole has never become reconciled to collective bar- 
gaining; where its aim is not only to force the hardest 
economic bargain, but to hamper in every possible 
way effective functioning of the union itself. 

The strike record of a union is not a good measuring 
rod. And neither is the opinion of the newspapers. 

Reprinted from "The Hands That Build America," a 
special AFL-CIO Supplement in The New York Times. 



Having ruled out these factors, what about the posi- 
tive side? What qualities need to be present in a good 
union? 

First and foremost, a good union must be able to 
protect its members and win a reasonable measure of 
economic justice for them. 

Since power was ruled out as the ultimate test of a 
good union, this may seem contradictory. Actually, it 
is not. Unions need to be strong. But they need to be 
strong in terms of how well they can meet the needs 
and fulfill the proper aspirations of their members. A 
good union looks upon power as a means, not an end. 

Second, a good union must be run by the members 
and for the members. It must be a representative de- 
mocracy of the highest type. There must be leaders — 
strong leaders, able and willing to stand firm for what 
they believe is right, and to fight for it against what 
might appear at times to be a popular position. But 
they must always be subject to the support or the 
rejection of the general membership of the union. 

Third, a good union must be an honest union. This 
goes beyond finances; just being "money honest" is 
not enough. The integrity of a good union is all-inclu- 
sive. It extends to its relationships with employers; 
to what it says to its own members; to the formulation 
of its policies and the evaluation of its own perform- 
ances. 

Fourth and last, but by no means the least, a union 
must look beyond its own horizons. It must recognize 
and fulfill its proper role in the life of the nation and 
the community in which it lives. 

A good union is concerned with politics and with 
legislation at every level. It lends its support to com- 
munity projects and services, such as the United Fund 
and the American Red Cross. It is dedicated to the 
proposition that the ultimate objective of a union in 
improving the lot of its members, is to improve and 
strengthen the nation as a whole. 

For example, a union can very easily avoid a strike 
by agreeing to its own destruction at the hands of an 
intransigent employer. But avoiding a strike on these 
terms does not serve the national interest; it weakens 
it. Under those circumstances, the interests of the 
members are identical with the national interest, and 
a good union is aware of that fact. 

The protection and betterment of the membership; 
unflagging adherence to democratic practices; total 
integrity; broad civic spirit. These are what make a 
good union. — George Meany ■ 



MARCH, 1970 



13 





EDITORIALS 



* 



For the Life of Us 



Concerned about the high price of being sick? 
Worried about the quality of health care available 
to your family? The solution to these problems may 
best be found in a proposed new National Health 
Insurance program. A bill has now been introduced 
in Congress by Representative Martha W. Griffiths, 
Democrat of Michigan, which would provide complete 
health services for all Americans, regardless of age 
or income. The bill has the full backing of organized 
labor, and closely parallels the program advocated 
by the AFL-CIO for more than two decades. 

The Griffiths bill would cover all needed physician 
services, from periodic physical examinations and 
other preventive health care through surgical opera- 
tions. It would provide unlimited hospital and nurs- 
ing home care, as long as it is medically required. 
It would cover the cost of prescription drugs, eye 
care (including glasses), and routine dental care for 
children. 

This sweeping National Health Insurance plan 
seems to be the only escape from high medical costs 
and decreasing health care quality. 

Medical costs have been going up faster than any 
other item in the Consumer Price Index, yet Ameri- 
cans seem to be getting worse rather than better health 
care. In comparison to other nations of the world, 
the United States can no longer be considered to be 
among the healthiest. Since 1950, for example, the 
U. S. dropped from sixth place in infant survival to 
eighteenth. In the last six years of accumulated sta- 
tistics, we have fallen from thirteenth to twenty-second 
place in the life expectancy at birth for males. 

From the viewpoint of the American worker, ade- 
quate health care seems forever out of reach. Little 
matter how successfully we bargain at the negotiating 
table for better health and welfare coverage, the in- 
creasing doctor and medical costs and the over- 
crowded hospitals never quite seem to meet our 
families' needs. 

The solution must be found, and it must be found 
soon. We believe that an effective National Health 
Insurance, such as that proposed by Rep. Griffiths, 
can provide the answer. 

Introduction of a bill in Congress, however, does 



not insure that NHI is just around the corner. The 
road to passage will be long, and opposition is build- 
ing. Certainly there will be many attempts to alter 
its purpose or dilute its effectiveness. Although the 
President of the United States has voiced his support 
for a National Health Insurance plan, and a national 
poll indicates that a majority of the public wants it, 
and strong support has been given by leading health 
officials, much work must still be done. 

Organized labor is being asked to join in a nation- 
wide campaign to see that NHI is promptly enacted 
by the 91st Congress now in session. The National 
Health Insurance plan will have our support. It will 
need your support. For the very life of us, we cannot 
do less. 



* 



Men Women Really Want 



The heroes of fiction, movies and TV shows are 
usually dashing fellows — virile, brave and strong on 
sex appeal. 

But are they really the ideal men of most women? 

Well, take heart. They're not. A recent survey 
sponsored by the Institute of Life Insurance indicates 
that most women tend to discount the importance of 
the glamorous characteristics associated with movie 
and TV stars. 

What women do prefer a man to have is traits more 
attuned to daily living; Is he a good provider? Is he 
a good money manager? Is he a good planner? Is he a 
good family man? 

Only 23 per cent of the women in the survey said 
"sexual attractiveness" was very important in a man. 
However, between 75 and 85 per cent rated the quali- 
ties of the steady reliable family man as very impor- 
tant. 



* 



Labor and Greatness 



Whatever there is of greatness in the United States, 
or indeed in any other country, is due to labor. The 
laborer is the author of all greatness and wealth. With- 
out labor there would be no government , no leading 
class, and nothing to preserve. — ULYSSES S. GRANT 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




President Hutcheson Honored As 
Man Who Made Mark in 1969' 



■ United Brotherhood President 
M. A. Hutcheson has been honored 
for his role in "pioneering agree- 
ments that will facilitate factory 
construction and on-site installation 
of modular homes." The presenta- 
tion was made at the recent Con- 
struction's Man of the Year Award 
banquet, sponsored by Engineering 
News-Record magazine. 

The award, made to President 
Hutcheson in absentia, was an- 



nounced at a formal banquet in New 
York City, February 11. A gold 
plaque commemorating the event, is 
inscribed: "M. A. Hutcheson is 
cited by the publishers and editors 
of Engineering News-Record from 
among the many men who serve 
the best interests of the construction 
industry." 

Named at the awards banquet 
as "Construction's Man of the Year" 



was John A. Volpe, Secretary of 
Transportation. 

Two other presidents of interna- 
tional unions also received awards, 
Peter T. Schoemann, United Asso- 
ciation of Plumbers and Pipefitters, 
and Charles H. Pillard. International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. 
These two awards were also given 
for their work in establishing modu- 
lar home construction agreements. 



MARCH, 1970 



15 



One building materials 

manufacturer foresees 

the construction industry as 



A WHOLE NEW BALLGAME IN THE 70s 
... TO BE PLAYED WITH NEW RULES 



■ Housing construction, already in 
a recession, will start to pick up 
before the general economy reaches 
its slowest momentum in the first 
half of 1970, according to Harold 
E. Sand, vice president of the 
Georgia-Pacific Corp. Speaking be- 
fore a recent meeting of the Lumber 
Trade Association of Greater Chi- 
cago, Sand made several predictions 
for the construction industry, which 
he likened to "a new ballgame in 
the 70s," one in which "the player 
on the bench is the one who will 
be hurt." 

The building materials manufac- 
turer suggested that those in the 
construction industry "not make the 
mistake of thinking that the great 
social changes now taking shape" 
will not have an effect on the people 
involved in our business. "Let us 
not make the mistake of thinking 
that only the barefoot hippies are 
the proponents of clean air, clean 
water, conservation of resources, 
good housing, an end of shoddy 
merchandise, and insistence upon 
product guarantees that mean what 
the consumer thinks they mean." 

Sand was more specific. "One 
of these basic problems in our en- 
vironment is a lack of adequate 
shelter for millions of people," he 
said. "Slums and crime in the 
streets, and general civil unrest, go 
hand in hand with inadequate shel- 
ter. In the 60's.we saw some two 
million young people added to the 
ranks of those between the ages of 
20 and 29, the family formation and 
house-buying or apartment-renting 
age. In the 70's it will be 15 million 
new people added to that age group. 
Filling the housing void may well 



have the impact on our national 
economy in the latter part of this 
century that the railroads gave us 
in the last century when geographic 
frontiers were being opened. 

"You and I will be in the middle 
of all this — as leaders and not side- 
liners, if we choose to play in this 
new ballgame." 

The manufacturer cited Congres- 
sional figures on the number of new 
housing starts that would be re- 
quired to meet the rising need and 
pointed to trends calling for larger 
single-family homes, as well as for 
new schools, clinics, shopping cen- 
ters, and recreational facilities that 
will be needed for a population that 
will be 100 million larger in another 
generation. 

What did Sand have to say about 
all the housing and related demand, 
and the talk of recession? 

"We already have had our private 
recession, progressing since early 
1969," he said. "I believe our in- 
dustry is now looking up at the other 
side of the valley. ... As has hap- 
pened so many times in the past, 
when housing led the downtrend, it 
also led the uptrend. . . . Housing 
can be expected to lead an upturn 
in 1970 for several reasons: 

"Consumer spending has already 
slackened. Retail sales have been 
on a plateau since almost mid-year 
1969. Durables, such as autos, have 
had some tougher-than-anticipated 
sledding in recent months. As 
things tighten further, we can ex- 
pect some increase in savings. We 
also can expect some easing in inter- 
est rates, largely short-term. We 
will see another $12 to $13 billion 
enter the market in mid-year 



through tax savings and increased 
social security benefits. We should 
see Viet Nam spending drop from 
its back-breaking $30 billion level. 
There will be deferred wage in- 
creases in several major industries 
affecting five million workers, and 
there will be new contracts for an- 
other five million workers. A pick- 
up in savings will bring some loosen- 
ing of mortgage funds. 

"This does not mean a return of 
the old easy money for mortgage 
loans, however, since a major in- 
crease in housing means a larger 
percentage of the total gross national 
product, and a need for new sources 
of housing funds. We must have 
new financial instruments that will 
do what FHA and the monthly 
mortgage payment did for home 
ownership in the first half of the 
century. 

"We will see housing and related 
construction start picking up fairly 
soon, and reach an annual rate of 
at least 1.6 million and perhaps 1.8 
million conventional starts by the 
end of the year. This should give 
us a total year of around 1.5-plus 
million conventional starts. The 
pattern will be almost the reverse 
of what we saw in 1969." 

Sand confesses that, "A month 
ago I would have found it more 
difficult to be enthusiastic about the 
near-term future, although the long- 
term was never in doubt. Today 
we can be enthusiastic about both. 
We know the new rules. The warm- 
up period for this new ballgame is 
already here for the housing indus- 
try. I am sure we will all be ready 
when the starting whistle blows." ■ 



16 



THE CARPENTER 





Andrew Jackson Paid . . . 

THE HERMITAGES CONSTRUCTION BILL 



■ When President Andrew Jack- 
son's home, The Hermitage, burned 
to the ground in 1834, he immedi- 
ately contacted his son and told him 
to contract with the best carpenters 
in Tennessee to have the house re- 
built. 

The son wrote his father soon 
after and told him that he had 
signed a contract with Joseph Reiff 
and William C. Hume for the job. 
A copy of that contract is included 
in the Correspondence of Andrew- 
Jackson, edited by John S. Bassett, 
and we thought our members might 
be interested in the details of the 
arrangement. 

Reiff and Hume agreed to re- 
build the Hermitage House and the 
east wing, "to do all Carpenters 
work, of said House, and to find and 
furnish all Lumber Plant scantling 
and Nails, Brads, Spriggs, Hinges, 
Bolts and in fact every thing re- 
quired to Rebuild the same. . . . 
The lumber, flooring, etc., etc. to 
be of the best quality and all well 
seasoned." 

The two carpenters agreed that 
the job would be done "in the Best 
and most approved Workmanlike 
manner." 

The contract was signed on Jan. 
1, 1835, and it called for all car- 
penter work to be finished by mid- 
September of the same year, so that 
the house would be ready to be 
moved into again by the end of 
December. 

Reiff and Hume bound them- 
selves "to make a complete finish 
of the Carpenters work of the said 
Building, pay all expences of Turn- 
ing, using ceder timber where it is 
necessary, the contract to be ful- 
filled agreeable to the plan given, 
and to the express understanding 
made and agreed upon. . . ." 

Total price for the whole project 
work: $3,950. 



From all available evidence, "Old 
Hickory" was very pleased with the 
completed job. 



Following is a detailed bill of the 
cost of the carpenter work in re- 
building "The Hermitage" in 1835: 



2 cellar doors and fraims at $3.00 each $ 6.00 

40 Lintles for doors and windows at 25 cts 10.00 

Framing 76 sqr Joice at 75 cts per square 57.00 

830 feet of washboards at 1 1 ct per foot 85.00 

53 ! /2 sqr. of poplar flooring at $2.50ct pr sqr 133.75 

8 Chimney pieces at $10.00 each 80.00 

1 3 Doors cased with Pilasters at $12 156.00 

2 Large Folding Doors 10 or 12 feet at $30 60.00 

2 Front doors at $30 60.00 

8 Windows, Recessed Pilasters to casing at $10 80.00 

9 ditto not recessed at $6 54.00 

1 7 Double Boxed window frames at $4.50 76.50 

1 7 pair of Venitian shutters at $6.00 102.00 

408 lights of sash 10 by 14 Glass at 10c 40.80 

4 Garret windows complete at 8.00 32.00 

32 square of framing, sheeting and shinglina, 2.50 80.00 

128 feet of cornice 1 .00 1 28.00 

50 feet of Verge Boards 1 2Vi 4 6.25 

Framing and Laying open floor and ceiling and Hand-| 140 00 

rail and balastrading walk on house 60 by 12 or 14 ft f 14U.UL 

Trap door, steps in garret and sky light 15.00 

1 Circular stair case 2 storys high 260.00 

1 Private stair case 30.00 

4 Presses at $12.00 48.00 

First story of front poarch with 6 collums etc 256.00 

second story of d^tto 75.00 

one back Portico 40.00 

Work on Win' 1 

Fraiming 22 square of joist at 75c 16.50 

ditto 15 do of shingling 2.50 37.50 

Laying 10 dito of poplar flooring 2.50 25.00 

1 80 feet of washboard 1 0c 1 8.00 

2 chimney pieces $ 1 20.00 

3 doors caised with Pilasters $12 36.00 

4 18-light windows and shutters 16.50 66.00 

1 Venitian window 1 6.00 

100 Feet of cornice 50c 50.00 



$2396.30 
Add one fourth for Boarding 599.07 



$2995.37 
see estimate of Lumber 804.63 



$3800.00 
add for pulleys weiahts cord hinges a n d screws 150.00 



$3950.00 



MARCH, 1970 



17 





Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(la) PORTSMOUTH. N.H.— Local 921 
recently held an Awards Night reception 
honoring members with 25, 30. 40 and 
50 years of service. The pins were pre- 
sented by Carl T. Soderquist. general 
representative of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
Those present were, seated, left to right: 
Alonzo N. Crowell, Charles H. Oulton, 
William D. Peterson, Lewis E. Morse, 
Shirley S. Thompson, and Norman West; 
Standing: S. M. Giambalvo, business rep- 
resentative; Everett A. Street; John 
Schoch, accepting a pin for his father; 
Lenox C. Stevens; Eugene Leland; Harry 
N. Hartford; Charles B. Nelson, record- 
ing secretary of the Local; Paul N. Ilsley; 
Milton Garland; Vincent McKenzie; and 
Carl T. Soderquist, who made the presen- 
tations. 

(lb) Vincent McKenzie, president of Lo- 
cal 921, looks on while Carl T. Soder- 
quist presents a 50-year pin to Shirley S. 
Thompson and a 40-year pin to Lewis E. 
Morse. 

(2) FORT MYERS, FLA.— Members of 
Local 2261 who recently received 25-year 
pins are, left to right: Rudolph Gettle, 
Fred Glarun, D. F. Lamons, and James 
Goodman. 

(3) KLAMATH FALLS, ORE. — Car- 
penters Local 190 recently awarded a 
50-year pin to member Hjalmar Rathe. 



Local officials congratulating member 
Rathe are, left to right: Don Schortgen, 
business representative; James Hall, 
trustee; Charles Rogers, recording sec- 
retary; Arthur Rodgers, trustee; and 
Milbert Haugen, president. 



(4) CLINTON, IOWA — Carpenters 
Local 772 recently awarded a plaque to 
member William A. Lawrenz. commem- 
orating his 41 years of service. Member 
George Outzen, left, made the presenta- 
tion. 



(5) SAGINAW, MICH. — Local 334 
honored Louis C. Sommerfield with a 
50-year pin at a recent banquet held for 
members and their wives. Financial sec- 
retary Jacob Michel, himself a 50-year 
member, made the presentation. 





4. 




18 



THE CARPENTER 




CANADIA 



Lower Land Costs, Lower Interest Rates Needed 
For Low Cost Housing, Not Just New Ideas 

The federal government has offered 
$200 million to private builders and 
developers to encourage them to pro- 
duce new ideas for housing lower 
income families. 

Just what this will accomplish it is 
hard to imagine. The problem with 
providing low cost housing is that 
high interest rates and high land costs 
make it virtually impossible. 

So what good is it to offer such a 
big chunk of money to urge the con- 
struction industry to apply "the tech- 
nology which they are so proud of" 
to create new forms of low income 
housing? 

The technology has been advancing, 
but, regardless of how good it is. how 
can you build homes for working 
people on lots costing from $8,000 
to $16,000? 

One big homebuilder reported that 
last year he built 400 homes in the 
$50,000 class — hardly for working 
people. Why not build 800 homes at 
$25,000? Probably because he paid 
around $15,000 for each lot and how 
can you put a $10,0000 structure on 
a lot of that price? 

The government would be far better, 
according to knowledgeable people, if 



it put up the money for buying up 
land around cities on a large scale and 
help bring land costs down. 

Then there would remain the prob- 
lem of interest rates which are now 
over 10 per cent for first class mort- 
gages and still edging higher. 

The Federal government is, how- 
ever, going to channel more of its 
housing money into low-income hous- 
ing this year. This is intended to pro- 
vide about 35,000 homes for low 
income families. 

Last year 210.000 new dwellings 
were built across the country. Prob- 
ably not more than ten per cent were 
in the low income category. 

Housing starts this year will likely 
be down, maybe to the 185.000 mark. 
This will be about 50.000 to 65,000 
short of what are really needed. 

The shortfall will be due to the 
lack of funds available to the private 
sector. There are two reasons for this 
impending money shortage for private 
housing; one, tight money due to gov- 
ernment policy, and two, fear of some 
of the big lenders that housing prices 
and rents have gone too high for safe 
investment. 



Supreme Court Ruling on Nature of Union 
Membership Shocks Canadian Movement 



The Supreme Court of Canada has 
handed down a ruling which has 
shocked the trade union movement 
in Ontario, the Ontario Labour Rela- 
tions Board and even the department 
of labour of the Ontario government. 

It ruled that the exact wording 
of a union's constitution is the decid- 
ing factor regarding members who may 
be signed up by the union. Heretofore 
the final decision was up to the Ontario 
Labor Relations Board which functions 
under provincial legislation. 

Section three of the labor legisla- 
tion says, "every person is free to 
join a union of his own choice." The 



Board used its own system of deter- 
mining who were and who were rot 
eligible to join, includine signing of 
an application card and payment of a 
one dollar fee, or an initiation fee. 

This system of certification has been 
in effect since 1951. 

What the Court's decision has done, 
although some doubt remains on this 
score, is to require the Board to refer 
to a union's constitution before de- 
ciding the question of eligibility. 

The case before the Court arose 
from an appeal by the Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Company in Ottawa 
against a decision of the Board which 



ruled that its building maintenance 
and cleaning staff were eligible to join 
the union of operating engineers. 

The union won its case before both 
the Supreme Court of Ontario and the 
Ontario Court of Appeal. They ruled 
that the courts are barred by law from 
reviewing a Labour Board's decision 
on the grounds of error in fact or law. 

The Supreme Court had no such res- 
ervations. It delivered a decision that 
the Boird did in fact err by not acting 
with reference to the union's constitu- 
tion. 

Union constitutions, of course, vary 
greatly. The method which the Ontario 
Board used avoided complications, or 
at least, avoided adding complications 
to an already difficult process. 

Some union constitutions are either 
outdated or do not effectively cover 
the range of employees they want to 
admit to membership. Canada is such 
a widespread country that many areas 
have working populations spread too 
thin to enable unions to function in 
all jurisdictions. H nee unions who are 
working in an a^ea will organize em- 
ployees in that area whom th:y would 
not normally sign up. This has enabled 
workers in these areas to become 
unionized when they would otherwise 
have been excluded from membershin. 

This is just one of the situations 
which the Court decision will compli- 
cate. 

David Archer. President of the On- 
tario Federation of Labour, and a 
veteran member of the Labour Board 
himself, dubbed the Court reactionary 
and anti-labor. 

The legislation in Ontario will prob- 
ably have to be changed to overcome 
the Supreme Court's ruling. In the 
meantime the Board will continue to 
carry on as formerly, hoping that its 
jurisdiction will not soon be chal- 
lenged by the Courts again. 

It could be a few months before 
new legislation is introduced. 




MARCH, 1970 



19 



Housing Minister 
Backs Low-Cost Housing 

The Federal government is also 
taking more direct action to stimulate 
homebuilding for lower income fam- 
ilies. 

First it announced that it would 
channel more of its housing money 
into the low-income field, a step long, 
long overdue. 

Second, the minister in charge of 
housing, Robert Andres, announced 
early in February that he was going 
to put up $200 million to encourage 
the building industry to come up with 
new ideas for low-cost homebuilding. 

This was taken as a strong hint 
from the top level that the builders 
should put the brakes on expensive 
homes and start thinking in terms of 
the mass of the people who earn under 
$8,000 a year. 

His remarks were on the whole, 
well received by the industry. 

"Surely it is not beyond our capa- 
bility," he told a convention of home- 
builders, "to direct our collective re- 
sources away from the provision of 
unimaginative, massive, stifling com- 
plexes and toward an attempt to fill 
the requirements of disadvantaged 
groups." 

Of $854 million in the 1970 budget 
of Central Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation, $570 million will be for 
housing for low-income families. 

Polymer Corporation 
Into Building Industry 

The building industry could not 
have missed a third announcement 
affecting home construction and meth- 
ods, this time not directly from the 
Federal government itself but from 
a government corporation, Polymer 
Corporation with headquarters in 
Sarnia. 

Polymer has reached an agreement 
with Stressed Structures Inc. of Den- 
ver, Colorado, covering rights in Can- 
ada for a patented building system for 
volume production of complete build- 
ing units. 

Polymer was established by the Fed- 
eral government during the Second 
World War to produce synthetic rub- 
ber for the allied cause. It did so very 
successfully. It is one of the few gov- 
ernment agencies - set up during the 
war which survived in its original 
capacity long after the war. It has 
not only survived but has expanded 
substantially so that it is today one of 
the most efficient companies of its 
kind in the world. 

The crown company has been look- 
ing for other fields to get into in 



order to make more use of its highly 
rated technical staff. 

It picked the Stressed Structure sys- 
tem after testing 37 different kinds 
approved by the U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development. 

Polymer President E. R. Rowzee 
said that where land costs and popu- 
lation density are high, the system 
allows new architectural approaches 
that can allow a high degree of pri- 
vacy, space and comfort on a severely 
restricted area. 

Polymer may of course be a prime 
bidder for some of the S200 million 
pledged by housing minister Andres 
for new ideas in homebuilding. 

It is highly questionable whether 
systems building will bring down hous- 
ing costs appreciably. It will bring 
them down, but if interest rates and 
land costs go up, up and up. is this 
where the emphasis is needed? 

Save a dollar on construction and 
lose two dollars to land speculators 
and moneylenders? 

Housing in Ontario 
Faces Tight Money Issue 

In 1969 the Ontario Housing Cor- 
poration, agency of the provincial 
government, accounted for 1 3 percent 
of all single and semi-detached hous- 
ing starts in the province. This made 
it the. biggest producer of dwellings 
on the continent. 

OHC hopes to continue this pace 
or, if at all possible, to step it up. But 
again tight money may prevent it. 

The big developers are. of course, 
concerned about a government getting 
so deep into housing, but the building 
industry as such need have no fears. 
The present government is buying 
land, initiating and planning housing 
projects, but it is using private firms 
of architects, engineers and contrac- 
tors to do the actual construction. 

At a time of tight money the fact 
that a government is anxious to see 
that homes are produced should be 
of some help to the industry. 



Union Membership Up 
42% During 7960's 

Membership in the Canadian labor 
movement increased 42 percent during 
the 1960s, according to figures re- 
cently available. 

In 1960 union membership was 
shown as 1.459.000 with 4.522.000 
in the non-agricultural working force. 

In 1969 it reached 2,074.000. The 
non-agricultural working force in- 
creased to almost 6.200,000 (est.). 

However the percentage increase 
in the working force was not very 
high over the 10 year period. It was 
around 33 percent in 1960, around 34 
percent in 1969. 

But the encouraging fact is that, 
while this percentage dipped below 30 
percent around 1964-5, it has since 
shown a strong uptrend. 

In 1967 the federal government ex- 
tended bargaining rights to its employ- 
ees and this added a substantial num- 
ber to union ranks — 140.000 in the 
Public Service Alliance of Canada 
now affiliated with the Canadian La- 
bor Congress. 

Wage gains improved with member- 
ship increases. The construction trades 
fared best among all workers. 

In the 10 years between 1959 and 
1969, wages in construction went up 
89 percent in the Atlantic region com- 
pared with increases of 61.6 percent 
in mining and 48.3 percent in manu- 
facturing. 

In Quebec, construction pay went 
up 1 05 percent compared with 64.2 
percent in manufacturing and 59.6 
in mining. 

In Ontario the relative increases 
were 94 percent, 62.6 percent and 45.3 
percent. 

In the Prairie region, relative in- 
creases were 82.4 percent, 61 percent 
and 59.1 percent. 

In British Columbia the increases 
were 107.7 percent in construction. 
69.5 in manufacturing and 91 in min- 



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20 



THE CARPENTER 




SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD iCA 



(1) HAMILTON, CANADA— Local 18 
recently presented service pins to its 
members of 50 and 25 years standing. 
They are, front row, left to right: Stanley 
Daca and William Stefanovitch, the lat- 
ter an International Representative, 25 
years; Charles Widdup. Donald McFar- 
lane, Norman Powell, and R. C. 
Edwards, 50 years; S. Smith, George 
West, Benjamin Petrie. and Donald 
Clement, 25 years; second row, left to 
right: George Roy, Palma Arcand, Wil- 
fred Axford, John Sanchuk, Mike Za- 
paticky, George Mayhew, Edmond Au- 
det, George Herod, and Walter Chmiel, 
25 years; third row, left to right: Jack 
Urockhill, Jack Valquette, Fred Duf- 
field, John Nesdack, Andy Molnar, 
Harry Fieldhouse, and William Allen, 
25 years; fourth row, left to right: 
Stephen Rheindt, Edward Thompson. 
Jack McLeod, Joseph Neskar, A. Delisle, 
John Vogt, and Michael Balemba, 25 
years. 

(2) VANCOUVER, CANADA— Local 
452 recently awarded a 70-year pin to 
member Frank Piatt. The pin was pre- 



sented by General Executive Board Mem- 
ber George Bengough. 

(3) MEMPHIS, TENN.— Local 345 re- 
cently awarded 50-year pins to members 
who have participated continuously in the 
local since 1919. In this picture. General 
Executive Board Member Herbert Skinner 
presents the pins to E. R. Tyson and G. 
H. Boone. 

(4) CHICAGO, ILL.— Carpenters Lo- 
cal 1 recently held a dinner at which 
25- and 50-year members were honored 
with service pins, as well as a small gift. 
Those with 50 years service include, 
seated, left to right: Frank E. Shimon. 
Henry Meuller. Harry Hartman, Roy A. 
Johnson. Peter Berg and Rheul Burlin- 
game. Members who received 25-year 
pins include, standing, left to right: 
Richard Garnett, financial secretary-treas- 
urer of the local; Coleman Tallant; 
Frank Wohlgenant; Earl W. McLennan, 
president and business representative of 
the local; John J. Ryan; Alfred Tessey- 
man; Denneth J. Kinny, recording sec- 
retary of the local; and August Tollman, 
vice president of the local. 





MARCH, 1970 



21 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 

■ Tuna on the Tomcat 

Attilio Bitondo, Business Representa- 
tive for Local 257, New York City, had 
a day on the Atlantic briny that he will 
ne'er forget, fishing off the sport craft 
"Tomcat," in the fish-lush waters about 
30 miles out of famous Montauk Point 
this past August. 

Bitondo received a powerful strike 
while trolling a large bait eel, plumb 

through the midst 

of the Russian 

Trolling Fleet 

which was busily 

engaged in the 

process of netting 

tons of herring. It 

seemed the natural 

thing for the Tom- 
cat skipper Bob 

Ferno to do as the 

netting activity had 

created a "hot 

spot" for giant 

tuna, swordfish, 

marlin, school 

tuna and sharks. 





Bitondo 



As the accompanying photograph will 
attest. Brother Bitondo made his strike 
pay off and he is depicted here with his 
catch: A giant tuna which tipped the 
scales at 553 pounds. His gear: Eight 
pound dacron and 130 lb. monofilament 
leader: a Fin-Nor 80-lb. rod with offset 
butt section and size 10/0 Fin-Nor reel. 
It took him three hours and twenty 
minutes to bring the monster to boat. 

It proved a pretty good year for 
Attilio as he assisted in boating three 
other giant tuna, one weighing 626 
pounds. 

■ Game Near San Jose 

One of the favorite outdoor pastimes 
for Donald Raley, a member of Local 
316, San lose, is pheasant hunting, and 
his enthusiasm is shared by his wife, 
ludy. They both enjoy stalking the flats 
of the Green Valley Hunting Preserve 
of which both have been a member for 
quite a while. Here's a look-see at ludy 
and their hunt partner "Rip," shortly 



MRS. RALEY and RIP 

after Rip kicked a cock out of a brush 
pile and she brought it down — her first 
but not her last pheasant. 

■ Antelope Comeback 

One of the main 
reasons for sharp 
declines — and in 
some situations 
complete annihila- 
tion — of certain 
species of our wild- 
life is the dwindling 
of their environ- 
ment. But I dare- 
say we have prof- 
ited by our mis- 
takes to some de- 
gree in the last 50 
years and have 
managed to make 
a comeback in 
some game depart- 
ments, restoration 
of deer and ante- 
lope stocks being a 
prime example. 

It's a matter of 
record that in 1924 
there were only 
about 26,000 ante- 




lope counted throughout their natural 
habitat in the west. A "crash program of 
restoration'' was begun from this "low," 
and we note with encouragement from a 
past western-states survey that over 350,- 
000 of these splendid game animals were 
counted over the west's far flung acres. 
According to the latest figures we have, 
Wyoming has the largest number of an- 
telope, close to 150,000. The Montana 
herds are second, close to 95,000 ani- 
mals. Not bad when we note that 35 
years ago there were only 3.000 antelope 
counted in Montana; 7,000 in Wyoming. 




THE MACKESEY SONS 



We definitely know of three bucks that 
were culled from the Montana herd this 
past hunting season and we've got a 
photograph as conclusive evidence. Here 
'tis: The three sons of Richard Mackesey 
of Cottage Grove, Wisconsin, a member 
of Local 314. Brother Mackesey writes: 
"Each of the lads came up with a nice 
buck the first time out. I planned the 
trip so well that the hunting I hoped to 
do didn't open until three days after we 
left for home. Next year, maybe the 
boys will let me go again." 

Readers may be interested to learn that 
both the male and female have horns but 
the horns of the doe are much slimmer 
and shorter and do not have the bottom 
extension or prong which is characteristic 
of the buck. 

Left to its own devices on "scab land" 
which does not lend itself to farming, 
grazing or urban development, the prong- 
horn antelope is making a comeback. 



Back Castings 

Biggest bluefish 
catch to ever grace 
this column can be 
credited to Vin- 
cent Pino of South 
Boston, Massachu- 
setts, a member of 
Local 33. Here's a 
photograph with 
his outstanding 
"blue" which he 
nipped from the 
Atlantic briny off 
Cape Cod. It 
weighed 21 pounds; 
measured 36 inch- 
es from nose to tail 
and earned him the "Governor's Trophy" 




Pino 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



for the year and a national Sports Afield 
Award. 

"There's some excellent bass fishing 
around Hope, Arkansas," says James H. 
Black, now living in that city after retir- 
ing out of Local 211 in Houston. Tex. 
A photograph, too faint to reproduce, 
nevertheless depicted Brother Black with 
a heavy stringer of largemouth, some 
near five pounds. He says there are five 
;xcellent bass lakes within 50 miles of his 
back door. (Sounds good: next time I"m 
in that neck of the woods, I'll give it 
a try.) 

Chip off the old hunter's block is Jim 
Gebolys, 15-yr. old son of John Gebolys, 
a member of Local 824, Muskegon, 
Mich., for over 18 years and one of the 
local's past presidents. Some years ago 
John made headlines in the sport pages 
with a 14-point buck he downed out of 
Iron River, Michigan, which dressed out 
at 280 pounds. This past year Jim nailed 
one almost as large in the same area — a 
buck which dressed out at 220 pounds 
and featured a 10-point rack. We under- 
stand there's another Gebolys coming up 
the hunter's trail, namely 10-year-old 
son David. (Thanks to Mrs. Gebolys for 
the information.) Here's a photograph 
of the happy hunters with Jim's recent 
ten pointer. 




THE GEBOLYS 
■ Notes from Nature 

• The weatherman isn't hedging when 
he predicts "partly cloudy" or "partly 
sunny" skies. The forecast means that 
three-tenths to seven-tenths of the sky 
will be covered by clouds. A prediction 
of "slowly rising temperatures'' indicates 
an increase of 5 to 10 degrees in the 
foliowing 12 hour period. 

• The Canada goose can submerge 
for three minutes and swim one hundred 
yards under water, the National Geo- 
graphic says. 

• Glaciers in Washington contain 
enough ice to melt into 40 million acre- 
feet of water, as much as in all the 
reservoirs, lakes and rivers in the State. 

• Although most starfish have five 
rays, some have six or more, and 12- 
armed species have been taken in the 
Gulf of Mexico. 

• Many snow crystals appear similar 
but, like human fingerprints, no two are 
identical, National Geographic says. 
Among all the countless snowflakes that 
fall, no two have ever been found with 
exactly the same size, pattern, and num- 
ber of water molecules. 



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SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 



(1) HICKSVILLE, N.Y. — Local 1772 
paid special tribute to member Harry 
Hicks for 55 years of active service at 
its annual dinner and dance. Eight mem- 
bers also received 25-year pins. In this 
picture. Business Representative Glenn 
Kerbs presents a gold card to member 
Hicks while Kaarlo Suminem and Carl 
Harre, left, 25-year members, President 
Walter Gebhardt, and 25-year members 
Ladislaus Koch and Vincent Franco, 
right, look on. Not shown are members 
Alexander Woronstoff, Sr„ Angelo Ga- 
lante, Al Milone and Karl Erickson, who 
were also awarded pins for 25-year mem- 
berships. Refreshments were served after 
the ceremonies. 



(2) UTICA, N.Y.— Local 125 recently 
held a presentation dinner honoring 
several of its members. Those receiving 
pins were, front row, left to right: 
Anthony Janus and Matthew Monaco, 
25 years; William Walters, 35 years; and 
Clarence Horn, 25 years; second row, 
left to right: general representative Sam 
Ruggiano; Harold Coleman, 35 years; 
John H. Wilcox and John E. Gwilt, Sr., 
25 years; and William Brennan, 35 years. 
Also present but not pictured were Vic- 
tor Bruni, Francis Shifter, Anthony 
Tomaselli, and Alex Williamson, 25 
years; Louis Cragnolin, Roscoe Roberts, 
and Bernard Pannone, 35 years; and 
Charles Wolfert, 65 years. 




24 



THE CARPENTER 




SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONST. AVE. N.W., WASH., D.C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT) 



This /Month's One-Liners 

Men fall into three classes: the 
handsome, the clever and the major- 
ity. 

The trouble with falling into a 
woman's arms is that you also fall into 
her hands. 

Remember the good old days when 
girls were round and boys were square 
. . . and everybody liked it that way? 

A hippy whose head looks like a 
second-hand Brillo pad can't expect to 
make much scratch. 

MAKE YOUR $$$ CLICK — GIVE TO CLIC 




If Certainly Figures! 

A wise husband always remembers 
his wife's birthday but can never re- 
member which one it is. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

I'll Be Doggone.' 

Two dogs met on the street. "My 
name's Fifi" said the poodle. "What's 
yours?" 

"I'm not sure," replied the spaniel, 
"but I think it's Down Boy." — Peter J. 
Slaten, Los Angeles, Calif. 



No Pulling Power 

A carpenter having trouble with his 
income tax sought help from the In- 
ternal Revenue Service. The clerk said: 
"How much of your salary was with- 
held?" 

"You gotta bs kidding," retorted 
the carpenter. "I don't withhold any- 
thing; my wife takes it all!" 

BUY ONLY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Don't Get Horsey! 

A guy who is always on his high 
horse is riding for a fall. 

1 -4 ALL — ALL 4 I 

Kinda Stinky Joke 

The skunk family 
"Let us spray 
they all knelt down in their phew 



were in church. 
said Papa Skunk, so 



UNION DUES BUY RAISES 

On His Second Round 

Two army buddies celebrating the 
end of World War II in a bar decided 
they would meet there exactly ten 
years later to the hour and compare 
notes. At the appointed time a dec- 
ade later, one walked in and, sure 
enough, there was the second. 
"Golly," he exclaimed, "I'm glad you 
could make it. I was afraid when we 
parted you wouldn't make it back to 
keep our date!" 

"Never left!" hiccupped his pal. 

R U A UNION BOOSTER? 



This Month's Limerick 

There once was a lady named Harris 
Who nothing could seem to embarrass 

'Til the bath salts one day 

In the tub where she lay 
Turned out to be plaster of Paris. 
— Diane Wydro, Long Island, N.Y. 



Shutting Out the Pain 

A man seated on a crowded bus 
saw that the man next to him was 
sitting there with his eyes shut. 
"What's the matter, are you sick?" 

"No," replied the second, eyes still 
shut. "It's only that I hate to see 
women standing!" 

WORK SAFELY — ACCIDENTS HURT 




Quick! Laugh at This! 

He who laughs last may laugh best, 
but he soons earns a reputation as a 
dumbbell. — Lynn Turner, Fort Pierce, 
Fla. 

ALWAYS C D UNION LABEL 

Old 

The coach at State U is strict with 
his football players attending on ath- 
letic scholarships. He won't let any 
player have his letter unless he can tell 
which one it is. — Leo M. Smith, L.U. 
228, Pottsville, Pa. 

R U GOIN 2 D UNION MEETING? 

Gone and Almost Forgotten 

For centuries, historians have been 
suppressing the fact that Columbus 
sailed with four ships: Nina, Pinta, 
Santa Maria and Santa Lucia. Unfor- 
tunately the Santa Lucia fell off the 
edge! 



MARCH, 1 970 



25 



HOLD YOUR BREATH 

Continued from Page 7 

Of the total of 166 million tons 
of junk Americans put into their 
air every year, it is estimated that 
60 percent is the colorless and in- 
visible gas called carbon monoxide. 
One thousand parts of carbon mo- 
noxide to a million parts of air kills 
quickly; 50 parts is considered the 
danger point; 30 parts for eight 
hours seriously affects the circula- 
tion of the blood. U.S. Public Health 
Service samples of air in six cities — 
Cincinnati, St. Louis, Philadelphia, 
Denver, Chicago and Washington, 
D.C. — found carbon monoxide at 30 
parts per million in 10 percent of 
the samples, the average level inside 
passenger cars during rush hours 
ranging from 21 to 29 parts and 
concentrations higher than 100 parts 
inside tunnels and garages. 

The next heaviest helping of 
poison in America's air is the sulfur 
oxides which come mostly from 
burning coal and oil in power plants, 
factories and homes. They have been 
the chief villain in every recent pol- 
lution disaster. They paralyze the 
tiny hair-like tissues that ordinarily 
protect sensitive lung tissues from 
dangerous invaders. 

Next in line as a deadly pollutant 
are the hydrocarbons, a large group 
of compounds coming mainly from 
escaped, unburned fuel, mostly in- 
visible and mostly from cars. They 
are known to cause cancer, though 
it takes higher concentrations than 
usually found in the air. Worse yet, 
sunlight causes hydrocarbons to 
combine insidiously with still an- 
other pollutant — the oxides of ni- 
trogen — to produce photochemical 
smog, the bourbon-colored haze 
that regularly blurs most modern 
cities. 

Beside these major pollutants, 
another factor aggravating the situ- 
ation is that the nature of aerial 
waste is changing. For example, 
when plastics now common in house- 
holds are burned, some of them 
yield phosgene, a poison gas used 
in World War I. A report of the 
National Academy of Sciences — 
National Research Council says: 
"Chemical poisons are being repro- 
duced in new forms so fast that the 
toxicologists cannot keep up with 
them." 



The Quarrel of the Tools 

A FABLE 



■ The Carpenter's tools had a 
conference. Brother Hammer was 
in the chair. The meeting had in- 
formed him that he must leave 
because he was too noisy. 

"All right, I will leave. But if 
I leave Brother Screw must go 
also. You have to turn him around 
again and again to get him to go 
anywhere." 

Brother Screw replied, "If you 
like I will go, but Brother Plane 
must leave as well. All of his work 
is on the surface. There is never 
any depth to it!" 

To this Brother Plane answered, 
"Well, Brother Rule will also have 
to withdraw if I do — he's always 
measuring people as though he 
were the only one who is ever 
right." 

Brother Rule then complained 



against Brother Sandpaper, saying, 
"I just don't think he should be 
allowed to remain; he's too rough 
and always rubs people the wrong 
way." 

In the midst of this discussion 
the Master Carpenter came in and 
began to work on a pulpit from 
which to preach his Gospel. As he 
worked, he used the screw, the 
sandpaper, the hammer, the plane, 
the rule, the saw, and all the other 
tools. 

When the day's work was com- 
pleted, Brother Saw arose and said 
to the other tools, "How wrong we 
were to criticize each other when 
the Craftsman used each of us 
equally for the task that each one 
is designed to do. We must remem- 
ber to be more careful in finding 
fault with one of His tools." ■ 



What has been done in recent 
years to clean up America's polluted 
air? The federal government did not 
move into the picture until 1955, 
when legislation was enacted creat- 
ing a federal program. The Public 
Health Service of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and 
Welfare was authorized to conduct 
research on the problem and pro- 
vide technical assistance to state and 
local governments. 

The 1960 amendments to the 
basic federal act provided for a spe- 
cial study of motor vehicle pollution, 
bringing more scientific knowledge 
to bear on causes and effects. Grad- 
ually, the public was becoming aware 
that polluted air was a national 
problem, was damaging to the pub- 
lic health and that control of many 
of the worst sources of poison was 
feasible — an important turn of 
events. 

Although knowledge about the 
causes, effects, scope and control 
techniques was steadily advancing, 
there was little done by local, state 
or federal levels of government to 
clean up the air. The federal pro- 
gram was research-oriented. Out- 
side of Los Angeles and the state 
of California, there were few local 
or state programs — and these were 
largely ineffective. 



The Clean Air Act of 1963, how- 
ever, broadened the scope of the 
federal program. It authorized fed- 
eral grants-in-aid directly to state 
and local air pollution control agen- 
cies to establish or improve their 
programs and empowered the federal 
government to take action to abate 
interstate air pollution situations. 

The 1965 amendments to the 
Clean Air Act authorized the Secre- 
tary of HEW to establish standards 
to control emissions into the air from 
new motor vehicles and to investi- 
gate and develop methods of con- 
trolling new air pollution problems. 

In 1966, further amendments in- 
creased the grants-in-aid to states 
and localities and established a three- 
year authorization of $46 million 
for fiscal 1967, $66 million for 1968 
and $74 million for 1969 (in con- 
trast to the $2 million to $1 1 million 
allottments made between 1955 and 
1963). 

The Air Quality Act of 1967 
moved the nation another step to- 
ward cleaning up its air. It provided 
for federal criteria under which the 
states are expected to develop and 
place into effect air quality stand- 
ards subject to review of the Secre- 
tary of HEW. If the state fails to 
do an adequate job, the Secretary 
of HEW can institute abatement 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



action. In addition, the 1967 Act 
expands federal programs regulating 
motor vehicle pollution by provid- 
ing federal grants to states to de- 
velop inspection programs, and pro- 
vides for registration of fuel additives 
and intensified efforts to control air 
pollution from federal facilities. 

One of the large national prob- 
lems posed by emissions from motor 
vehicles, far and away pollutant No. 
1, is that while it is possible to re- 
duce their rate of pollution, the con- 
tinually increasing number of cars 
will result in total pollutants increas- 
ing in direct ratio. 

Unfortunately, Congress did not 
see fit to retain the provision in the 
1967 Act calling for a research pro- 
gram in alternative low-pollution 
vehicle systems, such as the electric- 
powered car or an improved steam 
driven vehicle or a gas turbine en- 
gine. 

The problem with respect to elec- 
tric cars is to find an energy source, 
either a battery or fuel cell which 
operates on chemicals, which will 
enable faster pick-up, higher speeds 
and longer periods between refuel- 
ing. 

The disadvantages of steam- 
driven vehicles — slow warm-up 
time, high water consumption and 
and explosion hazards — can be 
solved but will require additional en- 
gineering refinement and cost reduc- 
tions. 

The use of gas turbines must first 
overcome high manufacturing costs 
and high fuel consumption. 

Air pollution is a complex and 
elusive problem and one that admits 
of no easy, simple solutions. Public 
officials can only apply remedies as 
drastic as public support will per- 
mit. We will have to be prepared 
to sacrifice money, time, conveni- 
ence and, yes, perhaps even some 
precious horsepower to permit our 
atmosphere to continue to sustain 
our lives. 

There are many ways that you as 
a citizen (and fellow air-breathing 
organism) can help restore clean 
air to our nation. Write for infor- 
mation to Department RB. Clean 
Air, Washington. D.C. 20201. You 
have nothing to lose except slow 
asphyxiation. ■ 




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27 




/ 
/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Vancouver Pensioners Attend Christmas Gala 



■ ■ 



::--r5J'; 



a CARPENTERS & JOINERS 

~ ..- of,. m r >ica . . ^ 



f»\ 




A total of 1,391 years of union membership was represented 
mas party for retired pensioners. Herb Cunliffe, a 54-year mem 
left to right: Len MacDougall, Alex Skalbania, Olaf Myrhaug, 
Garrett, Edward Utterstrom, Fred Gathercole, Albert Powers; 
Eyber, Chris Kyme, Rangvald Dysthe, Herb Kirkman, Robert 
Fred Rockman, Eli Sychlocha, Al Johnson Nils Erickson, Tom 
Hamilton, Jack McGlashan, M. McKinnon, John Livingstone; 
Rook, H. Janzen, C. Gowanlock, N. Suvanto, Joe Alterio, Nick 
Gillespie. 



at a Carpenters Local 452, Vancouver, Canada's recent Christ- 

ber, was particularly honored. Members pictured are, front row, 

Peter Sorensen, William Herron, Frank Piatt, John Longul, Stan 

second row, left to right: Andy Anderson, Fred Olson, Jack 

Stewart, Clarence Hornick, Albert Robinson, Albert Skistad, 

Scott, Ernie Tyvand, Harry Hamilton, Andy Torgerson, Hugh 

third row, left to right: Jack Wright, A. Magnusson, Morton 

Melanson, Nils Kudsk, William Harvey, Tom Jones, and C. 



Future Builders Visit Construction Site 



Shop students in Philadelphia, Pa., 
got a chance to see what the real thing 
is like when their instructor, Local 1856 
Member Alphonse S. Zimba, took them 
on a tour of various city construction 
sites. A total of 150 boys from the 6th, 
7th and 8th grades, in groups of 50 each, 
visited the mile-long Penn Landing 
riverfront project, the site of the city's 
new sports stadium, and other city 
building projects. Member Zimba. a 
journeyman carpenter with 18 years ex- 
perience, teaches industrial arts at the 
Creighton School in Philadelphia. 



1. 





1. At the Penn Landing Site in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., Member Zimba explains 
construction techniques to his interested 
students. Zimba commented, "Even the 
bus driver seemed interested." 



2. On the way home, three 6th grade 
classes demonstrate that they find field 
trips fun as well as educational. 



Chicago Member's 
Torch is Passed 

Henry J. Mock, business representa- 
tive of Carpenter's Local 242, Chicago, 
111., for 37 years, died recently at the age 
of 79. A member since 1910, Mock was 
a longtime delegate to. and past president 
of, the Carpenters District Council. He 
was also a member of the original South 
Side Business Representatives' Committee 
of the Chicago Building Trades Council. 

Mock was also active on several com- 
mittees, including the Home and Pension 
Committee. 

His son, Fred A. Mock, carries on the 
tradition of service: he is currently ex- 
ecutive vice president of the Chicago 
District Council of Carpenters. 



ATTEND YOUR 

LOCAL UNION 

MEETINGS REGULARLY 

• 
BE AN ACTIVE MEMBER 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Schools teach your kids 
how to read and write. 

We teach them how to save lives. 




The American Red Cross. 
We don't know where 
well be needed next 

\bu don't either 



advertising contributed "Q\ \k 
for the public good ^■j}g£ 



This SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER 

Discover cancer. 

Early enough 

to do something 

about it. 

The seven warning signals 
are: 

1. Unusual bleeding or 
discharge. 

2. A lump or thickening in 
the breast or elsewhere. 

3. A sore that does not 
heal. 

4. Change in bowel or 
bladder habits. 

5. Hoarseness or cough. 

6. Indigestion or difficulty 
in swallowing. 

7. Change in size or color 
of a wart or mole. 

If you have a warning 
signal, it doesn't necessar- 
ily mean you have cancer. 
You probably don't. But 
if your symptoms last 
longer than two weeks it 
pays to do the smart thing 
and see your doctor. 

American Cancer Society^? 

Fight cancer with a checkup and a check, vi 



Though he's king of ihe beasts, he 
doesn't know where his next meal is 
coming from . . . 




You're better off, thanks to your 
union and your active participation 
in it. 



CLIC REPORT 

Monthly Membership Contributions To The 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 






This is our first magazine report on the 1970 CARPENTERS 
LEGISLATIVE IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE (CLIC) Cam- 
paign. So far, approximately 20 local unions have sent in contribu- 
tions. We had hoped for a greater response, due to the importance of 
the upcoming elections to be held this year. 

It is very important that we be able to help re-elect those Congress- 
men who have shown by their record that they are interested in legisla- 
tion which will benefit the working man. Listed below are the monies 
received from the local unions who have responded: 



180 
483 
2078 
2114 
2308 
2435 



1545 
1250 



144 

225 

3265 



CLIC CONTRIBUTIONS 
(as of February 16) 



L.U. City and State 



CALIFORNIA 

Vallejo 

San Francisco 

Vista 

Napa 

Fullerton 

Inglewood 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

FLORIDA 

Homestead 



Macon 
Atlanta 
Albany 



GEORGIA 



IDAHO 



1258 Pocatello 

ILLINOIS 

10 Chicago 

448 Waukegan 

839 Des Plaines 
2014 Barrintgon 
2087 Crystal Lake 

INDIANA 

985 Gary 
1003 Indianapolis 

IOWA 

308 Cedar Rapids 
534 Burlington 

LOUISIANA 

2192 Ruston 

MASSACHUSETTS 

82 Haverhill 

193 North Adams 

708 West Newton 

988 Marlboro 

MICHIGAN 

1161 Bay City 
1191 Lansing 

MINNESOTA 

649 Crookston 

MISSOURI 

618 Sikeston 

MONTANA 

1172 Billings 



Amount 

$ 36.00 

285.00 

1.00 

20.00 

6.50 

10.00 

44.00 

21.00 



12.00 
10.00 
20.00 

53.00 

19.00 

50.00 

118.00 

34.00 

9.50 

100.00 
1.00 



50.00 
10.00 

10.00 



18.00 
22.00 
10.00 
20.00 



29.00 
20.00 



12.00 
10.50 
10.00 



NEBRASKA 

1055 Lincoln 50.00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1616 Nashua 44.00 

NEW JERSEY 

612 Union Hill 1.00 

NEW YORK 

9 Buffalo 16.00 

99 Cohoes 11.00 

355 Buffalo 32.00 

964 Rockland Co. 63.00 

NORTH CAROLINA 

522 Durham 10.00 
NORTH DAKOTA 

1176 Fargo 25.00 
OHIO 

186 Steubenville 12.00 

245 Cambridge 20.00 

404 Lake Co. 40.00 

650 Pomeroy 10.00 

976 Marion 20.00 

1438 Warren 109.00 

2280 Mt. Vernon 10.00 

OKLAHOMA 

329 Oklahoma City 3.00 

OREGON 

1020 Portland 1.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

8 Philadelphia 50.00 

263 Bloomsburg 9.00 

422 New Brighton 26.00 

TENNESSEE 
50 Knoxville 54.00 

345 Memphis 30.00 

VERMONT 

679 Montpelier 11.00 

VIRGINIA 

2514 South Norfolk 11.00 

WASHINGTON 

770 Yakima 40.00 

1289 Seattle 20.00 

1707 Kelso-Longview 6.00 

WISCONSIN 

1582 Wilwaukee 
3049 Merrill 

Total $1,808.50 



1.00 
2.00 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



Texas School Gets Pickup Truck 

I "A I A" 




Jim Leebens, a representative of Fordtown, Austin, Texas, hands over the keys of 
a donated pickup truck to Ronald Hannem, instructor for the Austin Area Voca- 
tional-Technical School, while Rohert Knutson, instructor, and Don Ingram, assistant 
director of the school, look on. 



Carpentry classes at the Austin Texas, 
Area Vocational-Technical School have 
been given the use of a pickup truck to 
transport tools and equipment to job 
sites by the Ford Motor Company. 

The Austin Advisory Committee on 
Carpentry has approved work outside 
the school for the vocational classes. 
Outside jobs are selected from requests 
submitted on the basis of what type of 
training the students are ready for and 
need. 



The Advisory Committee, which is 
made up of members of the union and 
of the contractor's association, includes 
chairman Willard Moen, Willie Bailey, 
Stanley Nelson, Robert Olson, Tony 
Saman and secretary Donald Schieck. 

Morton Carney, vocational school di- 
rector, said that the Ford Motor Com- 
pany, through a local dealership has 
made other equipment and training aids 
available to the school in the past. 



State and Provincial Contests, 1970 



Apprenticeship Contest 


Calends 


u for 1970 


Michigan 


X 




X 


(as of February lf>. 


1970). 




Minnesota 


X 
















Missouri 


X 




X 








Mill 




Nebraska 


X 






State C 


arpenter 


Cabinet 


Millwright 


Nevada 


X 


X 


X 


Alaska 


X 








New Jersey 


X 


X 


X 


Arizona 


X 






X 


New Mexico 


X 






California 


X 




X 


X 


New York 


X 


X 


X 


Colorado 


X 




X 




Ohio 


X 


X 


X 


Delaware 


X 








Oklahoma 


X 


X 


X 


District of 










Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


Columbia 










Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


and Vic. 


X 




X 


X 


Tennessee 


X 




X 


Florida 


X 








Texas 


X 






Illinois 


X 




X 


X 


Utah 


X 






Indiana 


X 




X 


X 


Washington 


X 


X 




Iowa 


X 








Wisconsin 


X 






Kansas 


X 






X 


Ontario. Can. 


X 




X 


Kentucky 


X 








Brit'sh Col., 








Louisiana 


X 






X 


Canada 


X 


X 




Maryland 


X 




X 


X 




— 


— 





Massachusetts 


X 




X 


X 




34 


16 


19 


MARCH, 


1 970 















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31 




More In-Service Training Sessions in Washington 

Above and below are pictures of instructors and training coordinators in the Brotherhood Manpower Training Program who 
were recently in Washington, D.C. for indoctrinaton on training methods and policies. The group above held sessions during the 
last week of January. The group below gathered for instruction last month. 




Chicago Minority Job Program Is Practical, Not Rhetorical 



If minority workers are to find more 
jobs in the construction industry, the 
path is that of the union-sponsored 
Chicago Plan rather than the Nixon 
Administration^ so-called Philadelphia 
Plan. 

In a discussion of the two techniques, 
AFL-CIO Civil Rights representative 
Robert McGlotton pointed out that the 
area-wide Chicago agreement directly 
involves the community in its operations, 



opening an effective course to "meaning- 
ful jobs . . . with real opportunities." 

Questioned by reporters on Labor 
News Conference over the Mutual Broad- 
casting System, McGlotton said that the 
Chicago Plan is keyed to four categories 
of work and workers that will mean 
wider job opportunities for greater num- 
bers of minority group workers. He point- 
ed out that the plan will open new op- 



portunities for workers who already have 
journeyman experience, as well as those 
with limited experience, apprentices and 
workers who need on-the-job training. 

McGlotton said that "if we are really 
serious about job opportunities, and we 
are going to get about the business of 
training people for meaningful employ- 
ment," the way to do it is to expand, not 
contract, the "job market." (PAI). 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



New and Veteran Carpenters Honored 




Journeyman certificates and service pins were awarded together at a recent awards 
night reception held by Carpenters Local 921, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. While 
experienced carpenters received pins commemorating as much as 50 years of service 
to their craft, six apprentices received certificates that marked the beginning of their 
careers. Shown in this picture are, seated, left to right: Journeymen David Muche- 
more, John Rodgers, Nelson L. Emerton. Gary C. Varrell, Donald J. Shilko. and 
Charles E. Chapman. Standing, left to right: Carl T. Soderquist, General Representa- 
tive, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America; Vincent McKenzie, 
president of the Local; Charles B. Nelson, recording secretary of the local; and S. M. 
Giambalvo, business representative of the local. 

'Sunshine State' Training Program 




Gainesville, Fla. is the location for a pre-apprenticeship class conducted under 
Subcontract 101 and sponsored by the North Florida Carpenters Joint Apprentice- 
ship Committee Trust Fund. Pictured here are, front row, left to right: Jerrold Sim- 
mons, Stanley Goodal), and Moses Clark; second row: Dennis Powell. Terry Lind- 
sey, Frank Helton, Darnett Lee, and MDTA instructor-coordinator Charles Blanken- 
ship; third row: James Lee, Vernon Lee, Burnie Box, Lane T. Kelly, and J. D. 
Walker. 



THE 1970 INTERNATIONAL CARPENTERS APPRENTICESHIP CONTEST 

The 1970 International Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest, an annual competition 
sponsored by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, the 
Associated General Contractors, and the National Assn. of Home Builders will be 
held this year in Denver, Colorado. The dates: October 7, 8, and 9. 1970. 




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33 



Coordinated Bargaining With Westinghouse 



■ By the time this appears in print, 
the members of the Brotherhood 
employed by Westinghouse Electric 
Corp. may have attained a new con- 
tract based on parity with the Gen- 
eral Electric compact signed on 
February 3 by the majority of un- 
ions which were participants in the 
AFL-CIO Coordinated Bargaining 
Committee. 

Approximately 10,000 members 
of the Brotherhood are employed by 
Westinghouse, principally in pro- 
ducing cabinets for various elec- 
tronic components such as television 
and high fidelity music reproducers. 

Although there has been a "news 
blackout" observed by both parties 
to the negotiations, usually reliable 
sources reported recently that there 
had been "a new technique em- 
ployed" in approaching the knotty 
problem of negotiating a contract. 
The source also said there "was 
every possibility that agreement was 
in the offing." 

Representatives of the nine Unions 



involved met in continuing bargain- 
ing sessions in Pittsburgh. In ad- 
dition to the Brotherhood, the other 
eight unions included the Interna- 
tional Union of Electrical, Radio 
and Machine Workers; International 
Association of Machinists; Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers; Allied Industrial Work- 
ers; United Steelworkers, and the 
Flint Glass Workers. Working 
closely with the CBC, although not 
formally a part of it, were two un- 
affiliated unions, the Federation of 
Westinghouse Salaried Employees 
and the United Electrical Workers. 
The two major unions involved 
in the Westinghouse talks, the IUE 
and the IBEW, have been holding 
separate meetings with Westinghouse 
bargaining teams. The Brotherhood 
and all other unions involved have 
been represented continuously in 
both sets of talks and in the dis- 
cussions within the Coordinated 
Bargaining Committee's Steering 
Committee, chairmanned by James 



Compton, executive assistant to the 
IUE president. 

The General Electric agreement 
produced a contract with improve- 
ments valued at $1.05 per hour 
over the 40 months covered by the 
pact. The Westinghouse bargain- 
ing teams resolved they would not 
settle with Westinghouse for any- 
thing less. There will be a total of 
104,000 workers covered by what- 
ever contract is produced. West- 
inghouse workers continued to work 
past the anniversary date of their 
contract, last November 7. Any 
agreement reached would, of course, 
be retroactive to that date. 

One of the major objectives at 
Westinghouse is a wage rate differ- 
ential of 1 5 percent for workers who 
do outside work. The union bar- 
gaining committee told management 
that such workers often travel hun- 
dreds of miles from home, spend 
weeks away from their families and 
work in dangerous surroundings. ■ 



Pensions for Workers Increasing Sharply 



■ In the last four years, pay- 
ments under major pension plans 
negotiated through collective bar- 
gaining have shown an average in- 
crease of 40 per cent for workers 
with 30 years of service, according 
to the Institute of Life Insurance. 

Workers who have spent most of 
their time in one company are find- 
ing that pension plus Social Security 
— ■ often approaches the level of 
after-tax earnings prior to retire- 
ment. 

Here's one unusual example of 
the trend toward higher pension 
benefits: one West Coast union re- 
cently negotiated a contract for its 
members which provides for $20 a 
month each year a worker puts in 
on the job. This would mean that 
for a span of 30 years, he would re- 
ceive a monthly pension of $600 at 
retirement. 

These are the factors that have 
tended to improve pensions: 

• Reducing the number of years 
a worker must be on the job to 



qualify for a monthly benefit. 

• An approach that pays higher 
pension to workers with long serv- 
ice. 

• Reducing or eliminating the 
so-called "Social Security offset," 
which would be used to cut back 
payments from private pensions. 

• Raising the minimum monthly 
benefit for each year of service. 

One pension plan formerly had an 
earnings and service formula under 
which pensions were adjusted an- 
nually to reflect changes in the cost 
of living. The plan was revised en- 
tirely on the basis of length of 
service. All but the highest-paid 
workers immediately qualified for 
larger pensions. Real benefits in- 
creased sharply because wages rose 
much more rapidly over the four- 
year period than the cost of living. 

The amended Social Security Act, 
making men eligible for benefits at 
62 (this had been available for 
women for several years) has not 



been overlooked as new contracts 
have been negotiated. The age re- 
quirement for normal and early re- 
tirement has been lowered in many 
cases. 

Other benefits gained by workers: 

• Disability retirement has been 
included in many new plans. 

o Increased vesting provisions, 
guaranteeing that a worker will not 
lose his pension even if he changes 
jobs. ■ 




NEW ORLEANS -MAY 22-27.1970 



UNION LABEL AND SERVICE TRADES DEPT. AFL-CIO 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




NAVAL JELLY ROUTS RUST 



liJilill 



YARD TOOLS SAFETY HOOK 




Keep yard tools in order and safely 
out of the way with this new, easily in- 
stalled Safety Hook. Also useful for 
camping and boat equipment, ladders, 
and hoses, this tool hook is made of 
heavy gauge steel and finished with 
heavy zinc plating. Write the Fearing 
Manufacturing Co., 808 East Geranium 
Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 55106. 

LIGHTWEIGHT BUMP CAP 




Protect your scalp while on the job 
with a newly designed thermo-plastic 
bump cap that weighs under five ounces. 
Available in five colors, the Jackson 
Bump Cap is equipped with a polyethy- 
lene plastic suspension which adjusts to 
thirteen head sizes. Plastic "fingers'' se- 
curely hold the elastic strap of any 
standard safety goggle, while a head-grip- 
ping rear strap holds the cap firmly in 
place. Write Jackson Products, Airco 
Welding Products Division. Air Reduc- 
tion Company, Inc., 5523 Nine Mile 
Road, Warren, Mich. 48091. 

Always look for the union label. 




Naval Jelly, a Woodhill Chemical Co., 
product, removes rust without harming 
metal surfaces and remains effective in 
storage for years. This thixotropic jelly 
clings to verticals and overheads, brushes 
on to combine chemically with rust so 
that it may be washed away with ordi- 
nary water. An introductory half-pound 
size is available at stores locally, or pre- 
paid from The Naval Jelly Co., 310 West 
9th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64105. 

HARD-TO-FIND TOOLS 




A 24-page, fully-illustrated catalog 
offering several new. unusual and ex- 
tremely useful hard-to-find tools is now 
available from the Brookstone Com- 
pany, Peterborough. New Hampshire. 

The new catalog contains precise and 
detailed descriptions and applications of 
each tool in this unique collection. 
Brookstone tools are rarely sold by in- 
dustrial distributors or stores. Among 
the many new items offered are tungsten 
carbide saw blades, miniature riffler files, 
torch lamp, miniature screws, nuts, bolts, 
washers stainless steel pliers and hard 
chromed needle files. Also included are 
wood working tools, electronic tools, 
jewelers' tools, diamond pencil and glass 
cutter, unusual solders, rust remover, 
hard-wire cutters, glass drills. Plus scores 
of other versatile hand tools and small 
power tools. 

All are highly professional quality 
tools. Available only by mail. Write: 
Brookstone Company, 162R Brookstone 
Building, Peterborough. New Hampshire. 
03458. 



Planer- Molder- Saw! 




Now you can use this ONE power feed shop 
to turn rough lumber into high-value mold- 
ings, trim, flooring, furniture . . . ALL pop- 
ular patterns. 

RIP . . . PLANE . . . MOLD . . . separately or all 
at once by power feed . . . with a one horse- 
power motor. Use 3 to 5 HP for high speed 
commercial output. 

LOW COST. . .You can own this money mak- 
ing power tool for only . . . $30.00 down. 
Send coupon today . . . No salesman will call 



BELSAW POWER TOOLS 

940M Field Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 64111 
Send me complete facts on the MULT I 
DUTY Power Tool. No obligation. 









1 


1 


1 
i ni+ y 


State 


7ip 


1 
1 








1 





BE A PANELING EXPERT 

Take all the guesswork out of aligning 
and marking corner panels with our kit 
of rugged aluminum off-set jigs and 
marking gauges. 




Increase your speed 
and accuracy as you 
scribe perfect pan- 
els marked for a 
"pressed-in" fit. 
Panel-by-panel in- 
structions included 
for inside and out- 
side comers and for 
the location of cut- 
outs. Designed for 
plywood panels of 
W or less. 



Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 
Postpaid (check or M.O.| or C.O.D. plus 
postage and charges, only S9.95. Califor- 
nia ns add i in: sales tax. 



COMMERCIAL TRIM & FIXTURE MEN 

A revolutionary new dolly 

for your tools! 

Heavy duty compact design •turns on a 
dime • jumps electric cords with ease 
quickly converts to a door dollyeasily 
maneuvered in crowded areas. 

Detailed Construction Plans — S1.95. 
Check or M.O. Californians add 100 tax. 
Sorry, no C.O.D.s. 

PANELING SPECIALTIES CO. 
Box 11764 • Palo Alto, Calif. 94306 



MARCH, 1970 



35 




IN MEMOR1AM 



L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

Pirwitz, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 13, 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Bensen. Harold 
Bjork, Nels W. 
Cribb. Harlo 
Egan, James J. 
Frank, William E. 
Gedwellas, Stanley 
Johnson, Einar O. 
Knaack, Roland 
Larsen, Paul 
Madden, Michael 
Payne. Thomas E. 
Peterson, Eric 
Rosenberg, Harry 
Schroeder, William 
Staunton, Martin 
Tragas, Paul 
Wojtas, Edward J. 
Wright, Harold R. 

L.U. NO. 23, 
DOVER, N.J. 

Meiele, Rudolph 

L.U. NO. 34, 

SAN FRAN., CALIF. 

Bowe, Robert K. 
Fitzsimmons, C. A. 
Lake, Edward E. 
Poole, Sammie 
Sweeney. Daniel H. 

L.U. NO. 35, 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Griffith. L. L. 

L.U. NO. SO, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Dugger. Bruce 
Everett, Willie 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Carnes, Kenneth 
Hume. Ewen 
Hume, John 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Gibson, Joseph L. 
Klement, George O. 
Myers, Ralph S. 
Thomsen, Thomas S. 
Woods, Sylvester E. 

L.U. NO. 65, 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

Dennis, Benjamin 

L.U. NO. 74, 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

Clarkson, Carroll C. 
Cornelison, E. G. 
Moore, Cortez E. 
Phillips, Edward 
Ripper, Charles F. 
Sullivan, John H. 
Youngblood, R. E. 

L.U. NO. 88, 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Broman, Nels 
Shaver, Albert 



L.U. NO. 89, 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Thompson, John E. 

L.U. NO. 101. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Davis. James L. 
Gent, Julian S. 
Harrin"ton. Robert R. 
McCauley. Joseph L. 
Silverman, Nathan 
Stromer, Henry K. 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Andrukite, John 
Boatwright, Samuel J. 
Bowman, Paul A. 
Carroll, Earl 
Dellinger, Benjamin F. 
Taylor, Earnest Edward 

L.U. NO. 133, 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

Beltz, Claude 
Dawson, Asa 
Duby, Cletus 
Foreman. Haskell 
Fugate, Ben 
Schlegel. Otis 

L.U. NO. 162, 

SAN MATEO, CALIF. 

Barney, George 
Blankenship. C. P. 
Frey, Carl 
Lillethorup, Ben 
Lindberg, Hans 
Wetzel. Donald 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Olsen, Carl M. 

L.U. NO. 183, 
PEORIA. ILL. 

Barnewalt, Adolph 
Brown, Charles F. 
Cramer, Allen 
Falk, Edwin E. 
Hoff, Jacob 
Janssen, Harry 
Johnson, Melvin 
Kehl, Edward 
Loscher, Raymond 
Lynn, Homer 
Schultz. Rudolph 
Short, Albert 
Stermer. Raymond 
Stickle. William E. 

L.U. NO. 188. 
YONKERS, N. Y. 

Fitzgerald, Daniel 

L.U. NO. 199, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Erik 
Bradley, Norman 
Brass, John 
Carlson, Nels S. 
Daun, Albin 
Erickson, Lars A. 
Falkenthal, Carl 
Grzebyta, Stanley 
Koscielski, Kasimer 
Koscielski, Stanley 
Kovacich, George 



Leander, Leroy 
Macke, John 
Peterson, David 

L.U. NO. 219, 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Seybert, Leroy 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Berkey. William H. 
Christensen, Earl S. 
Krause. Rudolph 
Lowery, Lynman 
Sutherland, John 
View, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 229, 
GLEN FALLS, N. Y. 

French, Evert 
West, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Adorno, Louis 
Di Nunzio, Gaetano 
Marino. Peter 
Maytan, Steve 
Ricci, George 
Schulthes, Karl 
Simko, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Bereghazy, Joseph 
Johnson, Emil 
Olsen, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 262, 
SAN JOSE, CALIF. 

Friene, Joseph 
Harris, John 
Hughes, Freeman 
Lopez, Arthur 
Manha, Frank 
Maral, Frank 
Morales, Alfred 
Rondone, Sam 
Stimmel, L. E. 
Vallez, Paul 

L.U. NO. 264. 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Bull, Emil 

Feyerherd, Frank C. 
Kessler, Roy C. 
Radtke, Paul 
Reinhardt, Fred 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N. Y. 

Kostyk, Theodore 
Larue, Leroy 

L.U. NO. 297, 
KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

Macek, Rudy 
Panse. J. J. 
Sherman. William 
Vander Meer, Henry 

L.U. NO. 353, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Arledge, Arnold 
Ayres, Arthur 
Eskala. A. 
Farrel, Charles 
Lensky, Nathan 



Magill, J. 
Noddeland. John 
Smith, Steave 
Wiberg, W. 

L.U. NO. 355, 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Kramer, Peter 

L.U. NO. 403, 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Gagnard, Dallas 
Roy. Roy Joseph 

L.U. NO. 436, 

NEW ALBANY, IND. 

Swift, James 

L.U. NO. 545, 
KANE, PA. 

Bloomquist. P. F. 

L.U. NO. 606, 
VIRGINIA, MINN. 

Heiska. Roy 

L.U. NO. 608, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Caprioglio, Albino 
Durning, Patrick 
Ford, Alfred, Sr. 
Keeley, John 
Neary, James 
O'Reilly, Stephen 
Seele. Joseph 

L.U. NO. 625, 
MANCHESTER, N. H. 

Croteau, Wilfrid J. 
Lessard, Donat J. 

L.U. NO. 674, 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Baldwin, Richard B. 

L.U. NO. 746, 
NORWALK, CONN. 

Gandrup, John 

L.U. NO. 753, 
BEAUMONT, TEXAS 

CafTey, Robert H. 

L.U. NO. 776, 
MARSHALL, TEXAS 

Woods, Elton D. 

L.U. NO. 792, 
ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Henson, Bill 
Holmes, Radford 
Kleslie, Vincent 
McCartie, Tom 

L.U. NO. 819, 

W. PALM BEACH, FLA. 

Anderson, Ira 
Becker, A. M. 
Booye, William 
Bush, Lester 
Cadenhead, J. Ben 
Carroll. Sinclair 
Cheek, William E. 
Claunch, Thomas 
Devlin, Walter J. 
Farry, Frank E. 
Herman, Peter 
Hunt, William K. 



Johnson, Grant 
Lanier, Frank 
Owens, Buel E. 
Primicerio, Louis 
Smith. Berry H. 
Wehage, A. J., Jr. 
Williams, C. E. 
Williams, C. S. 
Vanstrum. Carl 

L.U. NO. 829, 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 

Cerps, William 
Lucas, Ora 
McKinney, Walter 
Pryor, Ben B. 
Staron, Joseph, Jr. 
Wilson, Glen 

L.U. NO. 930, 

ST. CLOUD, MINN. 

Johnson, Elmer D. 
Jost, Peter 
Maciej, Joseph L. 
McGuire, Michael 

L.U. NO. 950, 
LYNBROOK, N. Y. 

Schneider, Fred H. 

L.U. NO. 982. 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Conners, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 1065, 
SALEM, ORE. 

Bothern, Robert 

L.U. NO. 1074. 

EAU CLAIRE, WISC. 

Benson, Gunnar 

L.U. NO. 1093, 
GLEN COVE, N. Y. 

Germaine, George 

L.U. NO. 1098, 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Gauthier, John 
Ricard, Stafford 

L.U. NO. 1138, 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Evans, William 
Seeger, Lyle 
Stewart, Harry 

L.U. NO. 1149, 
SAN FRAN., CALIF. 

Argyle, Frank 
Mclnturfl, Martin 
McNeely, Giles 
Johannesen, John 
Paladini, Eugene 
Stella, George 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Stoppel, George 

L.U. NO. 1185, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Czech, Frank J. 
Rhineberger, Raymond C. 

L.U. NO. 1214, 

WALLA WALLA, WASH. 

Haasch, George 
Stedman, Bruce 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 1236, 
MICHIGAN CITY, 1ND. 

Anderson, Walter L. 
Austin. Willard 
Roth, Herman 

L.U. NO. 1274, 
DECATUR, ALA. 

Cady, James 
Singleton, Rindohl 

L.U. NO. 1292, 
HUNTINGTON, N. Y. 

Behn, Rudolph 

L.U. NO. 1319, 
ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. 

Waldron. Nick 
Wilson, Ernest P. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Nergaard, Olof 

L.U. NO. 1382, 
ROCHESTER. MINN. 

Nordine, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1400. 

SANTA MONICA, CALIF. 

Backlund, Hjalmer 
Bailey, Charles M. 
Berkihiser, Walter 
Dollahite, Robert E. 
Fullerton, Archie J. 
Jansen, Charles B. 
Masny, Nick 
Mazurek, S. A. 
Price, Ned 
Santana, Freddie M. 
Self, Jimmie C. 
Sharon, Robert L. 
Shick, Ray E. 
Swanson, Vidor C. 
Tish, Tracey M. 
Wood, Walter S. 

L.U. NO. 1433, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Janik, Anthony 
Laiho, John 
Mell, Edgar E. 
Mitchell, James 
Smith, George 
Wilson, James H. 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Christianson, Nils 
Foley, Frank 
Ford, Samuel 
Forstrom, Erick 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Isaacson, Sigurd 
Lapertosa, Pasquale 
Logan, James 
Manning, James 



Mulvihill, Thomas 
Olsen, Irving 
Petersen, Bernard 
Seablom, Svante 
Sullivan, Augustine 
Tellefsen, Christian 
Tierney, John 
Westerholm. Karl 

L.U. NO. 1533, 

TWO RIVERS, WISC. 

Emond, David A., Sr. 
Hewitt, Courtland 

L.U. NO. 1595, 
CONSHOHOCKEN, PA. 

Hower, Herley D. 
Meyers. Russell 

L.U. NO. 1644, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Anakkala, Roy 
Griggs. James 
Heikke, Axel W. 
Heikke. Hans C. 
Henrickson, Harris R. 
Mielke, Arthur 
Parmeter, Major E. 
Salzman, Fred 
Tabaka, Gregory C. 

L.U. NO. 1683, 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

Boyce, Jesse A. 

L.U. NO. 1715, 
VANCOUVER, WASH. 

Alvis. George 
Dyer, Lyman E. 
Gilbert, J. J. 
Grover, William 
Hout. Lewis W. 
Huettl, Clifford 
King, Verne P. 
Lang, John 
Mesedahl, Peter C. 
Sheehan, Charles 
Syvancn. Carl 
Thomas, Eugene 
Thompson. Walter G. 
Thorton, Lawrence 
Thorson, Arne E. 
Veach, Austin 
Weddle, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1723, 
COLUMBUS, GA. 

Adams, R. C. 
Burkes, T. B. 
Duncan, J. W. 
Hay, J. T. 
McCormick, J. A. 
Slayton, W. L. 
Trawick, L. D. 
Watts, J. H. 
Weed. William A. 
Wilson, Joseph W. 



L.U. NO. 1815, 
SANTA ANA, CALIF. 
Blankenbeckler, W. S. 
Campbell, Le Roy 
Fishpaugh, Harry 
Gonzales, Ray H. 
Holm, Arthur 
Jayne, Oscar 
Lang, Michael 
Leatherwood, G. E. 
Palmquist, Malvin A. 
Reed, John Tyler 
Van Fleet. P. D. 

L.U. NO. 1849. 
PASCO, WASH. 

Swartz, Glen H. 

L.U. NO. 2012, 
SEAFORD, DEL. 

Evans, John M. 

L.U. NO. 2084, 
ASTORIA, ORE. 

Brown, Elmer U. 
Lindstrom, Adolph 

L.U. NO. 2203, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Lansdown, L. M. 
McEvers, Douglas E. 
Peck, Rudolph 
Wilkerson, John P. 

L.U. NO. 2205, 
WENATCHIE, WASH. 

Hill, Ben 
Leaver, Paul 

L.U. NO. 2375. 
WILMINGTON, CALIF. 

Adams, John C, Sr. 
Arave, D. W. 
Belcher, Major L. 
Johansen, Nels 
McPherson, James Monroe 
Patterson, R. B. 

L.U. NO. 2463, 
VENTURA, CALIF. 

Bradshaw, Sarnie 
Brunelle, Joe R. 
Carter, Raymond H. 
Hall, E. E. 
Heckenlively, C. E. 
Hicks, Charles L. 
Hoobler, A. I. 
Hooper, C. J. 
McCormick, Frank N. 
Pearson, Albin W. 
Petitt, Hiram K. 
Pickering, William A. 
Potter, Glen R. 
Price, Carl C. 
Ramirez, Joe M. 
Sparks, Chester 
Sudbury, Jack D. 
Wayman. Dewey 
Williams. Harold H. 



LEGACIES OF LONG SERVICE 



Several locals will especially miss 
members of long standing who passed 
away recently. Among those who left a 
legacy of decades of service are A. H. 
Jasper, oldest member of Local 1273, 
Eugene, Ore., a 48-year member; Lewis 
D. Pollard, Local 1325. Edmonton. Al- 
berta, Canada, a member for 46 years; 



James L. Woodrow of Local 422. New 
Brighton. Pa., who had almost 50 years 
service; Local 925, Salinas, Calif. 's oldest 
member, Julius Schirle. who had served 
for 57 years; James Hibbert of Local 111. 
Lawrence, Mass., with 66 years service; 
and Duncan McCorkindale of Local 15, 
Hackensack. N. J., whose record of serv- 
ice spanned nearly 71 years. 



LABORari MATERIAL 
1 COSTS 



ESTIMATOR 




1970 UNIT COSTS 

I COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF 

HUNDREDS OF 

CONTRACTORS 

AND MATERIAL 

SUPPLIERS 



208 Pages only$^|/3 

8>/ 2 » 11 
NO ADVERTISING In California add 24c ta: 



ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS 
IN DOLLARS AND CENTS 
AVERAGE LABOR COSTS FOR 
THOUSANDS OF ITEMS 
TYPICAL SUB CONTRACT 
PRICES INCLUDED 
NEW ESTIMATING RULES 
OF THUMB 



Send for FREE Building Books Catalog 



CRAFTSMAN BOOK COMPANY OF AMERICA De Pt- C-l 

124 SO. LA BREA AVE., LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 90036 

p j Please send me the EIGHTEENTH EDITION of the 

■— ' NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR . . S4.75 

In California add .24c Sales Tax 

□ Please send me FREE Building Books Catalog. 



Firm Name . 
Your Name . 
Address 



City. 



10 DAY FULL MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 






Lee 

GETS T|fe JOB 
DONE. ^PRECISELY 

Carpenter's Overalls by Lee give 
you tailor-made comfort, 
unequaled utility features, and 
money-saving durability. From 
the uncut material to the finished 
garment highly skilled union 
craftsmen pay close attention to 
every detail. Buy a pair and 
you'll see why Lee guarantees 
them to please you more than 
any other brand. 

H. D. Lee Co., Inc. 
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201 
"World's Largest Manufacturer 
of Union Made Work Clothes'' 



MARCH, 1970 



37 



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B.C. Representative Joins Grape Protest 




Al Stanley, newly re-elected president of the B. C. Federa- 
tion of Labor and an International Representative of the 
Brotherhood, showed solidarity with striking U.S. grape work- 
ers in a recent Vancouver demonstration. He joined Miss 
Pamela Smith, a grape workers' representative in the area, 
and Ray Haynes, left, secretary-treasurer of the B. C. Federa- 
tion of Labor, in front of a Vancouver grocery store. 

Wisconsin Auxiliary Marks 25th Year 




Members of Carpenters Auxiliary 430, Madison, Wise, 
held a dinner party recently to celebrate their 25th anniver- 
sary. Guest speaker Robert Strenger, an International Repre- 
sentative of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, stressed the importance of women's support of 
union activity and union-made products, as well as the value 
of their efforts in legislative areas. Those who attended were, 
seated, left to right: Amelia Grahn, Frances Younger, Rachel 
Christopherson, Mary Vetter and Barbara Hildebrandt; stand- 
ing, left to right: Inez Petersen, Margaret Faber, Stella Erdahl, 
Myrtle Demro, Emma Strenger, Jo Bauer, Bertha Boeker, 
Lu Taubert, Dorothy Luhrson and Elizabeth Schweppe. 

Retirees Sought For Census Work 

Work on the 1970 U.S. census is now in full swing, and 
older people are being actively sought for jobs as census 
takers. 

The U.S. Commissioner on Aging, John B. Martin, has sent 
letters to state agencies on aging and to national organizations, 
urging them to let older people know that these jobs are now 
available. 

Census takers generally work in their own neighborhoods, 
and are paid for their work as door-to-door interviewers. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



/tfk*4uid 




Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida. 

George Court of Local 1, Chicago, James Holland. Local 490, Passaic, 



111., arrived at the Home January 5. 1970. 

Edward T. Moyer. Local 946, Los 
Angeles, Calif., died January 3, 1970. 
He was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Per Stranberg, Local 58. Chicago. 
111., died January 14, 1970. Burial was in 
Chicago. 



N.J.. died Jan. 19, 1970. 

Mike Hokki. Local 1308, Lake Worth, 
Florida, died January 24. 1970. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Victor Larson. Local 62. Chicago, 
111., died Jan. 15, 1970. Burial was at 
Worth. 111. 



Outright Ban Urged On Use Of Lie Detectors 



The use of lie detectors as one aspect 
of the "invasion of privacy in America" 
should be banned by federal legislation, 
the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Dept. 
declared recently. 

The use of polygraphs or similar lie 
detecting devices "is clearly violative 
of constitutional rights." the department's 
executive board said in a resolution. It 
called the polygraph "an unreliable de- 
vice for the measuring of truth or decep- 
tion." 

The resolution was based on a de- 
tailed 174-page study devoted to the 
use of lie detectors by industry, govern- 
ment and law-enforcement agencies. The 
report. "The 'Lie Detector' — Guilty Until 
'Proven' Innocent." was presented to the 
board by Edward J. Carlough. director 
of organization of the Sheet Metal 
Workers and chairman of a special study 
committee created by the MTD to look 
into all aspects of invasion of privacy in 
America. 

The lie detector report is the first of a 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel. Theodore 31 

Belsaw Power Tools 35 

Belsaw Sharp-All Co 39 

Chicago Technical College 29 

Craftsman Book Co 37 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 31 

Est wing Manufacturing 38 

Foley Manufacturing 23 

Goldblatt Tool Co 20 

Hydrolevel 33 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 33 

Lee. H. D 37 

Locksmithing Institute 39 

Paneling Specialties 35 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

Vaughan & Bushnell 24 



series scheduled to be produced by the 
MTD including studies of electronic 
surveillance, pre-employment tests, coun- 
selling questionnaires in schools and in- 
discriminate gathering and dissemination 
of personal information by credit bu- 
reaus. Carlough said. 

In addition to its call for a flat pro- 
hibition against the use of lie detectors, 
the MTD "board called for: 

• Inclusion in all collective bargain- 
ing agreements of a clause prohibiting 
management from compelling, or even 
requesting workers to submit to such 
tests either during pre-employment 
screening or after they are on the job. 

• Use of grievance and arbitration 
machinery to protect workers against 
being compelled to submit to lie detector 
tests. 

• Action at the state level to win 
passage of laws banning the use of "lie 
detectors" in employer-employe relations 
until federal legislation can be enacted 
in the field. Carlough said there are 
now a dozen states that have these laws 
on the books, and that's a good beginning. 
The report contains a lengthy analysis 
of the development of the polygraph 
from devices originally used only for 
medical purposes, and cites numerous 
court cases and the testimony of educa- 
tors challenging the validity of the as- 
sumptions on which the "lie-detecting" 
process is based. 

Il contains also case histories of 
workers who have lost their jobs either 
for refusing to submit to such tests or 
on the basis of the "conclusions" of the 
polygraph operators that they were not 
telling the truth. 

All of these factors, the study con- 
cluded, are "cause for alarm." It urged 
a total ban on the devices, even in "so- 
called national security cases." 



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MARCH, 1970 



39 



M. A. HUTCH ESON, General President 




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POLLUTION CONTROL-an uphill fight 



■ At long last, the problem of pollution seems 
to be getting some significant attention in the White 
House and on Capitol Hill. 

For a long, long time the labor movement and 
various conservation societies have been warning 
that time is running out for human life in our 
cities, unless something is done to reverse the cy- 
cle of pollution which is making city air all but 
unbreatheable and water undrinkable. 

A modest program of pollution control has been 
advocated by President Nixon. Democratic sena- 
tors and congressmen are criticizing the Nixon 
program as being totally inadequate. I am not 
knowledgeable enough in the field to know what 
the right figure should be. However, it is gratify- 
ing to know that the pollution problem is getting 
some serious attention at last. 

As far as the survival of our cities is concerned, 
pollution control is only one of the challenges. Ob- 
solete transportation, inadequate housing at rea- 
sonable cost, rampant crime, and dreary surround- 
ings, all are making life in our larger cities some- 
thing less than beautiful. 

I recently had this point driven home when 
a young man I know, fresh out of college, received 
a fine job offer from a large corporation in one of 
the major metropolitan centers on the East Coast. 
He was jubilant at being hired, but after he spent 
four or five days driving around the city looking 
for suitable living quarters he could afford, he 
threw in the sponge and took a much less promis- 
ing job in a smaller town. 

He found that the only apartment he really felt 
was adequate would take 25% of his monthly pay. 
In addition, three hours of total commuting time 
to and from work each day would have been in- 



volved. On top of that, his wife would have been 
afraid to stay alone on the occasions business 
would take him out of town. 

All these shortcomings were in addition to the 
smog, soot, and over-crowding that increasingly 
plague city residents today. 

Adding all these shortcomings together, my 
friend decided that the potential rewards of a good 
job could not compensate for big city living. 

I wonder how many thousands of times this 
kind of thing is repeated every day or every week. 

Our cities make up the backbone of our indus- 
trial might. Without them, I doubt if our eco- 
nomic system could survive for very long. 

Therefore, I believe it is imperative that the 
quality of life in our cities be upgraded rapidly. 
To control pollution, to eradicate crime, to provide 
enough decent housing at reasonable prices, to 
make it possible to get from home to work and 
back again within a reasonable time, add up to a 
mighty expensive package. Tens, if not hundreds, 
of billions of dollars will be needed to get the job 
done. 

Are the American people prepared to pay the 
price in increased taxes? I believe they are. In 
every true crisis — in World War II and in the 
Korean War, and even in Vietnam, we have been 
willing to commit billions upon billions to defend 
our way of life. 

As soon as the people in both the United States 
and Canada realize that the crisis of pollution and 
urban decay constitute a crisis as great, or greater, 
than those we faced in 1941 or 1952, 1 believe they 
will accept whatever burdens of taxation are re- 
quired to get the job done. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



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The 



APRIL 19 70 



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Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 




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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington. D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, 



Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER. 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS - 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(S/ansEpaKra 1 




VOLUME XC 



No. 4 



APRIL, 1970 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 



jfuBOR PRESSJK 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Executive Board Policy Statement on Prefabricated Housing .... 2 

What Do We Do With All the Garbage? 5 

Letter Describes Papermaking from Waste 9 

Changes on Executive Board — Sidell and Skinner 10 

The Molly Maguires 11 

Forest Service Shows How to Cut Housing Costs 12 

Westinghouse Workers Win 'Best Ever' Contract 21 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 4 

Canadian Report tvlorden Lazarus 1 8 

Plane Gossip 20 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 22 

Local Union News 25 

We Congratulate 29 

Service to the Brotherhood 30, 33 

CLIC Report 34 

What's New? 35 

In Memoriam 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20£ in advance. 

Printed in TJ. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Spring hangs her infant blossoms 
on the trees, 

Rock'd in the cradle of the . . . 
breeze. 

With the arrival of cherry blossom 
time, Washington. D. C, again bids 
welcome to spring. 

The Washington Monument (shown 
framed in cherry blossoms on this 
month's cover) is a tapering obelisk 
of white marble which dominates the 
skyline of the Nation's Capital with 
its simplicity of design and innate 
dignity. Since it was opened to the 
public in the late nineteenth century, 
the Monument has been a fitting 
memorial to America's first President 
as well as a popular tourist attraction. 

One of the tallest masonry struc- 
tures in the world, this towering shaft 
measures 555 feet. Over 200 carved 
memorial stones from states, foreign 
countries, and organizations are set 
into the interior wall. The iron stair- 
way has 50 landings and 898 steps. 
A modern elevator zooms sightseers to 
the 500-foot level in just one minute, 
compared with the 12 "precarious min- 
utes" it took in 1888. 

The famous cherry trees, which en- 
circle the Tidal Basin on the south side 
of the Monument, were established in 
1912 by a gift from the Mayor of 
Tokyo to the city of Washington. 
D.C. The trees usually are in full 
bloom the first week in April but no 
precise date can be given earlier than 
10 days prior to full bloom. 




KB? BSq IF!- • 

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General Executive Board Policy Statement on 

PREFABRICATED HOUSING 



■ In spite of all the Federal hous- 
ing legislation passed in recent 
years, the housing industry is stead- 
ily losing ground in relation to de- 
mand. High interest rates and sky- 
rocketing lands costs are driving 
prices so high, more and more peo- 
ple are constantly being frozen out 
of the market. This shrinking mar- 
ket reflects itself in fewer housing 
starts. 

The 1968 Housing Act set a goal 
of 26 million houses in a 10-year 
period. This breaks down into a 



schedule of 2,600,000 houses per 
year. The 1968 Housing Act now is 
barely a year old, and already we 
are approximately 1,500,000 hous- 
ing units behind schedule. In 
Canada, the picture is scarcely any 
brighter. There, too, a serious slump 
has created a real depression in the 
house building field. 

Sooner or later, the factors which 
are holding back housing will be 
corrected in both the United States 
and Canada. When that day comes, 
the pressure on the construction in- 




House produced from modular components and prefabrications by Hodgson 
Houses, Inc. (See opposite page) 




A finished Concord Modular Home, as depicted in an artist's drawing. (See 
opposite page) 



dustry to meet the pent-up demand 
will exceed anything heretofore ex- 
perienced. 

The population of the United 
States is expected to increase from 
200 million to 300 million by the 
year 2000. The percentage of the 
population reaching marriageable 
age is near floodtide proportions, 
and family formations are destined 
to reach three million per year be- 
fore the 1970s fade out of the pic- 
ture. 

If the nation is to meet the hous- 
ing needs spelled out in the Housing 
Act of 1968, the industry will be 
required to turn out well over three 
million units per year before 1980. 

In an effort to stimulate housing, 
the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development initiated "Oper- 
ation Breakthrough." The objec- 
tives of "Operation Breakthrough" 
are to encourage and help develop 
new approaches for faster and possi- 
bly cheaper construction. HUD has 
helped to finance many new experi- 
mental operations. Naturally, this 
has given considerable impetus to 
prefabrication. The newest devel- 
opment in the prefabricated home 
industry is the modular unit. In this 
type of construction, modules con- 
sisting of one or more fully com- 
pleted rooms are built in a factory. 
These modules are hauled to the 
job site, where they are lifted onto 
a prepared slab or foundation. The 
units are then tied together to 
create a turn-key house. 

Modular construction is not con- 
fined to single family units; it is en- 
tirely possible to stack modules. 

Whether we like it or not, there 
is no disputing the fact that modular 
construction is here to stay. In fact 
it is destined to grow by leaps and 
bounds, because the end product is 
not a flimsy one. Since the modules 
are transported by truck and lifted 



THE CARPENTER 



by crane, they must be rigid and 
well constructed. 

The growth of prefabricated hous- 
ing poses a challenge which the 
United Brotherhood is in no position 
to ignore. Happily, we are no 
stranger to the field of prefabricated 
housing. We have nearly 200 con- 
tracts, many dating back a quarter 
of a century, with companies pro- 
ducing prefabricated houses or pre- 
fabricated housing components. 

In the next few years, however, 
the number of prefabricating plants 
will show an unprecedented growth, 
particularly plants manufacturing 
modular houses. As an educated 
guess, it is estimated that there will 
be a thousand new plants springing 
up all over the United States and 
Canada in the next five years. 

The area which can be served 
economically by a prefabricating 
plant is rather limited by transporta- 
tion problems. This means that pre- 
fabricating plants will have to be 
located in virtually all major areas 
of the United States and Canada. 

If prefabrication is going to con- 
tribute a substantial number of new 
homes to the housing market, the 
number of employees needed to man 
the plants will be very large. From 
the roughest kind of data, it ap- 
pears that existing prefabricating 
plants turn out about six houses 
per year per worker. This translates 
into 100,000 workers required to 
turn out 600,000 housing units an- 
nually. 

It is the unanimous conclusion 
of the General Executive Board that 
our Brotherhood, with its vast ex- 
perience in the prefabricating field, 
has a responsibility to organize the 
prefabricating industry as complete- 
ly as possible as rapidly as possible. 
This is necessary because the skills 
of our members will be needed in 
the prefabricating plants. Also, the 
jobs lost at the job site to the fac- 
tory will be the jobs of our mem- 
bers. Consequently, the General 
Executive Board, at its meeting of 
January 26, adopted the following 
policy relative to prefabricated 
housing: 

1. The United Brotherhood, in 
conjunction with local unions 
and district councils, will im- 
mediately undertake an orga- 
Continued on page 36 




Signing contracts to launch the first factory -made homes to he built in the Greater 
St. Louis area were, from left to right: James Quinn, business representative. Electri- 
cal Workers Local 1; Leo Flotron, business representative, Plumbers Local 35; Ollie 
Langhorst, executive secretary-treasurer, Carpenters' District Council; John Fischer, 
president, and Lawrence Frichtel, vice president-general manager. Mobile & Modular 
Homes Division of Concord Homes, Inc.; Roy Sachse, business manager. Electrical 
Workers Local 1 and Robert Parr, executive assistant. Concord Homes Inc. 




Signing the Hodgson Houses contract were, seated, from 
left, Santo T. Tulumello, business representative, Local 
867, and Robert Wellman, Hodgson vice president and 
plant manager. Standing, from left: Edward Suhlam, 
shop steward; James Doian, International representative; 
Thomas McGillacuddy, assistant plant manager; and 
Joseph Ceruti, production manager. 

Modular Pacts Signed in Missouri and Massachusetts 



■ One of the first realizations of 
the program of organization in the 
field of modular and mobile construc- 
tion was achieved by the Carpenters 
District Council of Greater St. Louis, 
which signed a contract with the 
Mobile and Modular Homes Division 
of Concord Homes, Inc. Local unions 
of the Plumbers' and Electrical Work- 
ers' unions were also signatories to 
the pact. 

The contract covers production 
workers at a new 80,000 square foot 
"homebuilding factory" which will 
produce one complete three-bedroom 
modular home every eight hours, to 
be marketed in a 300-mile radius. To 
cost from $15,000 to $16,000 de- 
livered on the site by trucks, the three- 
modular homes will include three bed- 
rooms, living, dining or study, utility 
and bathrooms and will include wall- 
to-wall carpets, range with oven, dish- 
washer, garbage disposal and central 
air conditioning with a total of 1 ,080 
square feet. All electrical and plumb- 
ing facilities will be installed at the 
factory. 



Rates of pay in the three-year con- 
tract will be the same as those gen- 
erally in effect in the St. Louis area. 
There will be six carpenters to one 
plumber and one electrician in the 
work force, Ollie W. Langhorst, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of the Carpenters 
District Council and chairman of the 
three-union negotiating committee, de- 
clared. 

Another contract covering members 
of Local Union 867 of Milford, Rhode 
Island, was signed recently with Hodg- 
son Houses. Inc., it has been an- 
nounced by Santo T. Tulumello, Presi- 
dent and Business Representative. 

Hodgson Houses, Inc., with offices 
in Millis, Mass., produces modular 
components and prefabrications for 
construction. About 46 union car- 
penters are currently employed by 
Hodgson but in the summer months 
the production force can increase to 
as many as 60. Tulumello said that 
recognition at the plant came on the 
third attempt and gives much credit 
for success in the NLRB election to 
Brotherhood effort. ■ 



APRIL, 1970 




ASMIJMGTOM 



ROUNDUP 



RESPECT FOR THE UNIFORM— Congressman Edwin Eshelman of Pennsylvania has been 
angered, as have many Americans, by pictures of anti-war protesters wearing parts 
of military uniforms with Nazi swastikas or other defacements. He is sponsoring a 
bill in Congress to make such defilement a Federal crime. The penalty: six months 
in jail, a S200 fine, or both. 

THE CREDIT MAJORITY— More families than ever are using credit and in larger amounts 
and in more forms. An Agriculture Department economist reports that, last year, 
U.S. families paid an average of $806 in debt payments. In a survey conducted by 
the department, four out of five of some 365 families interviewed were making 
payments on consumer debts — other than debts for purchase of a home. 

MILITARY JOBS— Employment generated by military expenditures — including military 
personnel and government employment-rose steadily from 5.8 million in fiscal year 
1965 to 8.2 million in 1968 and leveled off in 1969 at 7.9 million, the Labor 
Department reports. 

PRIVATE PENSION PLANS reporting to the Labor Department covered about 19.5 
million workers in 1969, almost 25 percent more than in 1962 and about 12 
percent more than in 1967. The growth in the number of workers covered by private 
pension plans is primarily attributable to the growing employment in firms with 
pension plans, rather than to the adoption of new plans. 

CAR PERFORMANCE— For the first time consumers will be able to compare performance 
characteristics of new cars. The Department of Transportation has issued a new 
publication entitled, Performance Data for Mew Passenger Cars and Motorcycles, 
which manufacturers will have to include in each owner's manual and make available 
in dealers' showrooms. 

The publication covers three specific areas: stopping ability, acceleration 
and passing and tire reserve loads. It will be expanded as Federal safety 
standards require additional performance information. The information was pro- 
vided by foreign and domestic manufacturers under regulations issued by the 
National Highway Safety Bureau. 

OIL POLLUTION— In a recent address before the National Petroleum Council, Secretary 
of the Interior Walter J. Hickel urged the oil industry to solve the problem of 
oil tankers breaking up and polluting the world's oceans and beaches. 

He urged oil industrialists to consider the prospects, if a 500,000 ton 
ship, similar to one that Japan is capable of building today, would go down. 

"A tanker this size would carry oil in a single trip equal to a day's traffic 
through the Suez Canal at the time it was closed in 1967. Three and a half 
million barrels . . . compare this with the seven thousand barrels lost from the 
Santa Barbara (Calif.) leak," he said. 

PAY GAINS— Salaries of building trades workers were up 8.3 per cent as of July 
1, 1969, according to the Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics. This 
represents the largest annual increase since 1947, when wages went up 10.6 per 
cent. This increase brings pay rates up to an average of $5.54 an hour. 

ARTS EXTENSION-The AFL-CIO has urged support in both houses of Congress for 
twin bills to continue the programs of the National Foundation on the Arts and 
the Humanities. 

Labor's recommendation was made in a letter from AFL-CIO Legislative Dir. 
Andrew J. Biemiller to Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.), chairman of the Senate 
Labor subcommittee on the arts and humanities and Rep. James Brademas (D-Ind.), 
chairman of the House Select Education subcommittee. 

1970 BARGAINING— At least 5 million workers under contracts covering 1,000 em- 
ployees or more — a greater number than in any year during the 1960 's — will be 
affected by collective bargaining in 1970. Another 5 million will receive deferred 
wage increases, according to estimates of the Labor Department's Bureau of 
Labor Statistics. 

Labor contracts expire in 1970 in the trucking, construction, rubber, auto- 
mobile, farm and construction equipment, apparel, and meat-packing industries 
among others. In addition, - many railroad pacts expire the end of this year and, 
presumably, will add to the 1970 bargaining load. 



WASTE MUST BE "MANAGED" IN TOMORROW'S WORLD 













■ A favorite project of many high 
school science students over the 
years has been the establishment of 
a "balanced aquarium." In this 
"best of all possible worlds," the 
waste of the fish and other marine 
life such as turtles and snails is ex- 
actly enough to provide fertilizer for 
the plant life which, in turn, provides 
food and oxygen for the marine ani- 
mals' maintenance. 

Human beings, too, live in what 
must, by necessity, also be "a bal- 
anced environment." All of us are 
trapped on a small planet which 
must provide us with food, clothing, 
oxygen, suitable water and the com- 
forts with which human ingenuity 
has surrounded us. 

The goldfish in the balanced 
aquarium did not disturb their eco- 
logical balance by continually rid- 
ding themselves of articles which 
had outlived their usefulness. They 
did not generate solid wastes such 
as worn-out automobiles, railroad 
freight cars, paper, cans, bottles, 
food scraps, and countless conve- 
nience items and necessities. 

But people continually generate 
much solid wastes and. as the num- 
bers and concentrations of people 
increase, the problem becomes more 
complex. 

To deal with the problem ... to 
find answers to the solid waste pol- 
lution threatening to overwhelm 
mankind in its own cast-offs . . . 
Congress has established, in the De- 
partment of Health. Education and 
Welfare, a Bureau of Solid Waste 
Management. 

The name of the organization is 
a clue to its functions; waste is to 
be "managed," not simply disposed. 
Mankind is trying to recycle much 
of this waste material. 

Most waste can be burned, but in 
so doing, the solid pollution is often 
turned into air pollution. The town 
dump with its ever-rising pyre of 
smelly smoke is testimony to this 
highly inefficient method of solid 
waste disposal. In addition, the resi- 
due of non-combustible waste must 
be disposed of in some manner. 



■'■■■'' ' - " ' " ■':■■ 





The Kenilworth Dump was a notorious polluter of the atmosphere in the nation's 
capital, until an aroused public and administrators took measures to change the 
situation. From routine burning of garbage, the city switched to land-fill, and now 
the area is being converted to a public golf course and recreation area as shown. 



We are tripping over our own in- 
genuity. Farmers for years used the 
manure of their animals to fertilize 
their crops. But now that commer- 
cial chemical fertilizers are so much 
more efficient, the disposal of agri- 
cultural waste is becoming a prob- 
lem similar to the disposal of mu- 
nicipal wastes. 

Composting of solid wastes has 
been suggested and experimented 
with, but the process is both costly 
and slow. It has also been adjudged 
to be of limited usefulness since 
many waste products are not biode- 



gradable; that is, they will not decay. 

Outright burning of all wastes can 
produce vast amounts of carbon di- 
oxide. Some scientists have con- 
tended that excessive amounts in the 
atmosphere, beyond the limits of 
plant life to absorb, might conceiv- 
ably result in a gaseous "shield" in 
the atmosphere which would ulti- 
mately cut out a significant portion 
of the sun's rays, resulting in a les- 
sening of its warming effect and 
possibly an ultimate return to "the 
ice age." 

A theory held by other scientists 




is "the greenhouse ,'e, 
savants declare that 
excess carbon dio, 
world will allow 




These 

elope of 

und the 

s rays to 



enter, but will trap the. heat ra\s. 
much like a greenhouse warms itself 
in winter. This will r&S fiajb the ice 
caps melting, raising the se"a leve 
300 to 400 feet and "inuf^SBfereat 
areas of land. London, Tok! 
York and many other cefl$ 
population would be flooded. 

Let us hope that these two trej| 
will serve to offset each 'other 
as the warming ability of the 
decreases, the "greenhouse 
will correspondingly _ trap 3 
heat to keep us warttit:. .,. 
too warm! ')''• '■•' . 

Regardless, the answer, to solid 
waste disposal must be forthcoming 
fairly soon. Not only are -there more 
and more people contributing to the 
global litter, but each: is; generating 
more each year. In 1920, each per- 
son in the U. S. pfodaced 2.75 
pounds of solid waste -per day. In 
1970 this has risen ~'£p- ,5.3 pounds 
daily. The prospect is that by 19 SO 
waste generation will "rise, to S 
pounds daily. In the ElgfiJHB?te 
throw away 900,000,000; 




te 



solid waste every day. Getting rid of 
that much waste is a monumental 
problem. In the past 30 years. 20 
billion tons of mineral wastes have 
accumulated as giant slag heaps, 
mounds of mill tailings, and similar 
eyesores. If it continues unabated, 
the nation could become literally one 
big trash pile. 

Disposal would be immensely 
simplified if everyone would "file" 
his waste: food garbage in one con- 
ainer. glass in another, steel- 'M 
nother, aluminum in an-oth,&j.v_ 
ood, paper and cloth in anoi^jJjvp 
But this is patently non-feasible;, 
man nature being wha't.;it."1svV 
separation of the constituent^ 
trash is being experimentally tried 
by blowing large quantities; of |9 
pressure air through the trash, T 
hoped a method of sorting it 
particle size and specific gravity xi 
be achieved. 

Landfill is another way of ,b 
dead artifacts. But transpOftiapni is 
costly and what do you do^ggpln you 
run out of areas suitabjjgror land- 
filling? Near Chicago thjgjFe has been 
experimentation A«|jFh "garbage 
hills." Trash is mpuiped up, cov- 
ered with soil, and iiij|?d for toboggan 



'<-K: 



ruiis and other tftjirp'ational purposes. 
"Super- incinerators" with tempera- 
tures, wfHo32X)0 degrees burn every- 
thing combustible and melt non- 
cnmbustibies into liquid which is 
quickly quenched in water to form 
. piVMt'*' o£iblack granules. Ferrous 
- ; thcftaisj £Sn then be reclaimed from 
Oth^/iherifti'f; which can be cast into 
' Wi\gf^g- blocks like cinder blocks. 
;>^"5w^rp.blem here is that the in- 
tense heat A\hich consumes the waste 
also tends to consume the incinera- 
gff! 

Cleveland, a process of com- 
icting waste is being laboratory- 
tested to determine if there is any 
possibility of pollutant effect before 
it is used to fill underwater areas to 
reclaim land. Shredded solid wastes 
are combined with fly ash trapped 
in chimneys, dried sewage sludge, 
burnout from incinerators and lake 
dredgings to make a dense block. 

At Louisiana State University, 
cellulose waste in the form of 
bagasse, the stalk waste after sugar 
cane is pressed, has been microbio- 
logically converted to high-protein 
food which looks like coarse flour. 
There is a possibility that the 
process could be adapted to other 
cellulose wastes such as grass, hay, 
cornstalks and even wood chips and 
old newspapers. The cost is con- 
sidered to be competitive with pro- 
ducing soybean flour at 14 cents a 
pound. 

Another process with possibilities 
is the drying of municipal waste, 




. v ■ 



Tax on Waste Makers Is Suggested 



A tax to be paid by manufac- 
turers of potential garbage and 
junk was proposed to the Senate 
subcommittee on air and water 
pollution recently by a New York 
consulting engineer. 

Leonard S. Wegman. president 
of a firm bearing his name, sug- 
gested a penny-a-pound Federal 
manufacturer's excise tax on any 
consumer goods expected to be- 
come junk within 10 years after 
purchase. It also would cover con- 
tainers for foods and beverages, 
but not the foods and beverages 
themselves. 

Wegman listed packaging, glass- 
ware, clothing, refrigerators, wash- 



ers, bedding. TV sets, cars, beer 
cans, cigarette cartons, toothpaste 
and cereal containers as examples 
of items to be taxed under his plan. 
Periodically all manufacturers 
would pay the tax to the Federal 
government, based upon the weight 
of the items produced and sold. 
Revenue thus obtained would be 
placed in a special trust fund for 
payments to cities. Cities would 
receive such funds under an in- 
centive plan — those cities with 
maximum programs for the abate- 
ment of air, water, and land pollu- 
tion would receive full appropria- 
tions, based upon population. 



then burning it to develop electric 
power. Municipal waste has an un- 
expectedly high heat value of about 
5000 btus per pound; about a third 
of that in a good grade of coal. 
Another ingenious use of human 
body waste has been achieved for 
many years in Milwaukee, where 
the city's sewage is processed to pro- 
duce an organic fertilizer sold com- 
mercially all over the nation. 

High-density compression of mu- 
nicipal wastes has been achieved 
both here and in Japan. However, 
the Bureau of Solid Waste Manage- 
ment considers the process to be of 
doubtful worth. In the process, waste 
is compacted with high-density 
presses capable of exerting 5,278 
pounds per square inch. This forms 
the waste into a dense block or bale 
which can then be covered with con- 
crete or with a vinyl jacket. Although 
much water is pressed from the 
waste in the process, a large amount 
remains. This water could cause 
trouble if the blocks were to be used 
for building purposes. In addition, 
anerobic materials trapped in the 
block could begin to ferment, pro- 
ducing methane gas. Experimenta- 
tion is continuing. 

If the problems of solid waste dis- 
posal seem to be insoluble, the in- 
genuity of man in attacking the 
problem is also fantastic. Consider 
the problem of getting rid of the 
70,000 railroad freight cars which 
are junked every year. Open burn- 
ing of the wood and reclaiming the 
metal has been adjudged undesirable 



from a standpoint of air pollution. 
Some genius came up with a high- 
pressure water jet which can actual- 
ly cut the wood away from the 
metal. The metal is then recycled in 
smelters, and the wood is ground up 
to make particle board for use in the 
building industry. 

For many years, the refuse from 
race tracks and livery stables was 
highly prized by mushroom pro- 
ducers. But the auto has largely re- 
placed the horse, and mushroom 
farmers have been casting about for 
a substitute material for mushroom 
beds. At the University of Florida, 
experimentation is going on in the 
conversion of municipal wastes into 
composts for mushroom production. 

There are many parallel problems 
involved in waste disposal. DDT and 
other potentially harmful chemicals 
persist even in composted agricul- 
tural wastes. At the National Can- 
ners Association in Berkeley, Calif., 
this problem has been studied. The 
pollution of subsurface water by 
sanitary landfills is under study at 
the Drexel Institute of Technology. 
Philadelphia. At Auburn University 
in Alabama, studies are going for- 
ward on the desirability of process- 
ing municipal garbage and using it 
to fertilize grasses, woody plants and 
cut crops. 

The ocean depths represent a vast 
waste dumping ground. There is the 
ever-present risk, however, that by 
dumping various chemicals and ma- 
terials, the waters may become so 
polluted as to disturb the ecological 



balance in the water portion of our 
world. There is every possibility that, 
in ages to come, much protein for 
the world's burgeoning population 
will come from the sea as people 
occupy more of the land areas. If 
the fish of the ocean are poisoned 
by man's waste, he will have de- 
stroyed a vital source of his own 
food. 

A seagoing incinerator system was 
studied by the Harvard School of 
Public Health. Municipal waste was 
loaded aboard a shipborne incinera- 
tor in Boston and burned en route to 
the open sea. where the burnout 
was dumped. Detailed studies on the 
effects on sea life were made. Toxic- 
ity tests with winter flounder and 
other marine life showed no mortal- 
ity induced over a 96-hour period 
at 15 weight percent waste concen- 
tration, provided aerobic conditions 
were present. 

All over the world, the problem 
of waste disposal is occupying the 
minds of leading scientists and tech- 
nicians. In Sweden, technicians are 
considering containers which are 
supposed to disintegrate rapidly 
after being exposed to sunlight. At 
Clemson University in South Caro- 
lina, a scientist is experimenting with 
bottles which melt away a few days 
after being broken. 

One of the truly "far-out" solu- 
tions is the "fusion torch." This is 
the name applied to the incredibly 
hot exhaust from a controlled hydro- 
gen bomb powering a thermonuclear 
power plant. It would conceivably 
vaporize anything it hit, thus reduc- 
ing all waste to its component ele- 
ments such as iron, copper, alumi- 
num, silicon, etc., if used as a 
nuclear incinerator. 

The problem of all waste disposal; 
solid, liquid and gaseous, is to ac- 
tually get rid of the unwanted ma- 
terial . . . not merely to change its 
shape. Reuse and recycling accom- 
plish this to a limited degree, but 
complete disposal is, thus far, more 
an "impossible dream" than any- 
thing else. Conversion of the un- 
wanted matter into usable energy is 
probably the ideal achievement. 

Truly, the maintenance of an 
ecological balance in this "balanced 
aquarium" we call The World is 
becoming increasingly more difficult 
day by day. ■ 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



United States Department of Agriculture 

forest service 

Washington, D. C. 20250 



1630 
March 9, 1970 



r 
Mr. Peter Terzick, Treasurer 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America 

101 Constitution Avenue, N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



Dear Mr. Terzick: 




This sheet of paper is a matter of particular pride to me and to the 
research staff of the Forest Service. Thirty percent of the fiber in 
this sheet came from the city dump in Madison, Wisconsin. We have re- 
claimed refuse that is an eyesore and pollution problem in most American 



communities 



r\W 



The red- dyed wood fibers that give this sheet its pink color came from 
that dump; the remaining -70 percent from a kraft pulp commonly used in 
papermaking. The transformation from rubbish to paper was made at our 
Forest Products laboratory in Madison. This seeming alchemy is part of 
our research on reclamation and recycling of urban solid wastes. 

The supply of fiber in rubbish is enormous. About half of the rubbish 
collected by cities is wood fiber, none of which is being reclaimed. 
Successful recycling of the wood fibers in waste could mean more paper 
like this, as well as newsprint, building materials, coarser papers, 
and even new products. It would also mean reduced pulpwood demand, 
more raw material for industry, less air pollution from burning rubbish, 
and less cost for waste disposal. 

To get the knowledge we need to utilize fiber in solid wastes, we are 
cooperating with others. The City of Madison, Bureau of Mines, and 
Bureau of Solid Wastes Management are all concerned and participating 
in the exploratory research. 

President Nixon in his message on the environment ordered "greater em- 
phasis on techniques for recycling materials." We proudly present this 
sheet of paper as an example of what the Forest Service is doing. The 
President's budget for 1971 provides for an acceleration of this effort. 
We believe this is a significant step in learning to re-use resources 
and to enhance the quality of the Nation's environment. 

Sincerely, 



£&k*j. (p. 

EDWARD P. CLIFF 
Chief 




APRIL, 1970 



Executive Changes in the Brotherhood 




SIDELL 





SKINNER 



WILLIAM SIDELL 

First General Vice President 



As provided by the International 
Constitution, William Sidell has moved 
up to First General Vice President of 
the Brotherhood, filling the vacancy 
created by the death of Finlay C. 
Allan. 

Sidell has served as Second General 
Vice President of the Brotherhood 
since 1964. He was elected to the 
General Executive Board from the 
Eighth District in 1962 at the 29th 
General Convention of the Brother- 
hood, held in Washington, D.C 

He had a distinguished career in 
the labor movement of California be- 
fore becoming a member of the Gen- 
eral Executive Board. He served as 
secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles 
District Council and held a number 
of important posts in both the state 
federation and in various civic bodies. 

He is a member of Local 721, Los 
Angeles, with over 30 years of mem- 



bership. Within a few months of 
joining the local union he was elected 
an officer, and he held an elective post 
in the union until his election as sec- 
retary-treasurer of the district council 
in 1957. 

He assumed his present office well 
grounded in all phases of Brotherhood 
activities, and as First General Vice 
President is taking on the responsi- 
bility for apprenticeship and training, 
fields in which he has a deep interest. 

A native of California, Sidell is well 
known in the labor movement for his 
work on jurisdictional dispute panels. 
He is a member of the Jurisdictional 
Appeals Board. 

Following the retirement of John 
R. Stevenson as First General Vice 
President in August, 1964, Finlay C. 
Allan was moved up to fill this vacan- 
cy, and Brother Sidell moved to the 
Second General Vice Presidency. 



HERBERT C SKINNER 
Second General Vice President 



Herbert C. Skinner, who has served 
as a member of the General Executive 
Board since the retirement of Henry 
Chandler, early last year, was, last 
month, appointed Second General Vice 
President to fill the vacancy created 
by the elevation of William Sidell to 
First General Vice President. 

As new Second General Vice Presi- 
dent. Skinner brings a wealth of trade 
union experience to this high position 
in the Brotherhood. A native of Au- 
gusta, Ga., and the Brotherhood's rep- 
resentative on the National Joint Board 
for Settlement of Jurisdictional Dis- 
putes from 1964 until last year. Skin- 
ner is son of a carpenter, construction 
superintendent and contractor. He was 
initiated into Local 256. Savannah, 
Ga., on December 26, 1933, where he 
has held continuous membership ex- 
cept for a period of 18 months during 



1934-1935, when he transferred mem- 
bership to Local 283, Augusta, while 
working there. After serving both local 
unions in key posts, he was appointed 
a joint representative of the Brother- 
hood in 1957. 

Skinner has served the labor move- 
ment in the Southeast in several capac- 
ities. He was president of the Savan- 
nah Metal Trades Council, 1942-44, 
president of the Savannah Building and 
Construction Trades Council. 1944-46; 
and president of the Savannah Trades 
and Labor Assembly, 1945-48. At the 
time of his appointment to the Nation- 
al Joint Board for Settlement of Juris- 
dictional Disputes on May 1 8, 1 964, 
he was serving as Southeastern Re- 
gional Director of the Building and 
Construction Trades Department, 
AFL-CIO. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




■ A movie entitled "The Molly 
Maguires" will be opening at your lo- 
cal motion picture theatre soon. 

It offers a rare opportunity to mix 
entertainment — excitement, mystery 
and intrigue — with labor history, 
served up with welcomed even- 
handedness. 

The film is not a documentary. It 
is a story based, however, on actual 
incidents. The end product is an im- 
portant contribution to understanding 
a grim period in labor's past. 

The Molly Maguires was a secret 
Irish organization concentrated in the 



Pennsylvania anthracite coal regions 
which operated for several decades 
after the Civil War. Its members were 
direct actionists who used murder and 
arson against the mine owners and 
bosses. 

The film deals with James Mc- 
Parlan, a labor spy (played by Richard 
Harris), who infiltrated the Mollies, 
participates in their escapades and 
eventually puts his finger on them. 

In the movie the Molly leader, 
James Kehoe (played by Sean Con- 
nery of James Bond fame) ends up on 
the gallows along with two supporters. 



after McParlan led them into a trap. 

Actually, according to labor his- 
tory, some 24 Mollies were arrested 
as a result of McParlan's spying and 
at least 10 were hanged. 

If you like action, you get plenty 
of it in 'The Molly Maguires." There 
is a soccer game, for example, be- 
tween teams from two collieries that 
makes modern football an exercise in 
gentlemanly courtesy. Some 25 pro- 
fessional football players were hired 
as extras for it. 

The vivid recreation of the mine 
Continued on Page 27 



APRIL, 1970 



11 




Forest Service Shows How to Cut Housing Costs 



More Efficient 

Use of Wood 

And Wood Products 

Is Key Factor 




■ The rising cost of residential 
housing is being rolled back by the 
Forest Service of the Department of 
Agriculture through experimentation 
in producing better and cheaper 
housing through more efficient use 
of wood and wood products. 

The Forest Service has designed 
11 small, spartan frame houses at 
experimental laboratories in Madi- 
son, Wise, and Athens, Georgia. 
The designs are simplified (in some 
cases unorthodox) and all "frills" 



such as dishwashers, disposers, 
kitchen cabinetry and much trim, 
both interior and exterior, have 
been omitted. 

The Forest Service points out 
that the 1960 census revealed 27 
percent of all rural housing units 
were dilapidated or deteriorating. 
Land costs preclude building real- 
ly low-cost homes in the cities. If 
acceptable low-cost housing can be 
made available in rural areas ad- 
jacent to metropolitan centers, the 



trend of families moving out of the 
country into the cities may be re- 
versed. The result would be effec- 
tive in reducing population con- 
centration, pollution and a host of 
other social and ecological ills 
which now beset the cities. Only a 
few of the rural poor live on farms; 
most live in small rural commu- 
nities. By expanding these commu- 
nities (while still maintaining their 
rural nature), the best interests of 
a large segment of the population 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



may be served. 

The houses are certainly not 
palatial, but are structurally solid. 
At least two are extremely uncon- 
ventional; a circular house with cen- 
ter atrium where rooms come to- 
gether, and an "egg house" built 
on the post-and-girder principle. 
The smallest house measures 576 
square feet and includes only two 
bedrooms, living room, kitchen and 
bath. Largest has three bedrooms, 
living, dining, kitchen and bath on 
the first floor with two large "dor- 
mitory style" bedrooms on the sec- 
ond floor. In almost all the designs, 
the living and dining areas have 
been left open to create more of an 
atmosphere of spaciousness in a 
small house. 

Interior doors have been omitted 
in instances where such doors are 
not essential. Open shelves substi- 
tute for cabinets, and closets are 
not equipped with doors, jambs or 
trim. In at least one design, a type 
of prefabrication of exterior wall 
panels can be effected, using stand- 
ard exterior plywood, glued and 
nailed together with 2x4s flat be- 
tween them. The panels are then 
nailed in place to form a self-stud- 
ding wall. 

Panel siding with perimeter nail- 
ing eliminates the need for corner 
bracing and sheathing. The rough- 
textured exterior grade plywood can 
be finished with pigmented stain. 
Where trimwork, both exterior and 
interior, has been eliminated in an 
effort to cut costs to the bone, the 
householder who so desired, could 
add it later to the basic house. In 
some of the designs, single thick- 
nesses of particle board are used 
for partitions between some rooms. 

The booklet which describes the 
houses warns the prospective build- 
er that some features may not meet 
local building codes. Consultation 
on the local level is advised before 
construction is understaken. 

The goal has been to make hous- 
ing available at a price of $7 to $8 
per square foot, not including ex- 
terior connections, land cost, legal 
fees, etc. Because of increases since 
the program was begun in early 
1968, the attainable figure may be 
something higher at the present 
time. 

The Housing Act of 1968 pro- 



vides for subsidies for both month- 
ly payments and interest for fam- 
ilies which qualify for benefits 
under the law. Interest can run as 
low as one percent and monthly 
payments do not exceed 20 percent 
of the family income, adjusted for 
family size. The designs meet all 
FHA requirements for strength and 
serviceability. 

The houses are designed to be 
built on treated wooden foundation 
posts rather than on masonry 
foundations. The walls, floors and 
ceilings are all adequately insulated 
for comfort and ease of heating. 
The plumbing, heating and electri- 
cal work have been kept to a mini- 
mum. Any forced-air heating sys- 
tems have duct runs as short as 
possible. 

Some of the houses are built on 



Mechanics Training Urged 



sleepers of 2x4s laid flat on a 
levelled bed of sand. The ground is 
poisoned against termites, treated 
sleepers are used, a vapor barrier 
and insulating board goes atop the 
sleepers and the space between sand 
and flooring is used as a shallow 
return duct for the hot air furnace. 
Most of the houses could be placed 
over basements if it were so desired, 
although that would significantly 
increase the cost. 

Floor plans and descriptions of 
the houses are contained in a 28- 
page booklet "Designs for Low- 
Cost Wood Homes" available by 
sending 250 to: Superintendent of 
Documents, U.S. Government Print- 
ing Office, Washintgon, D.C. 20402. 
Detailed working plans for each of 
the houses are also available for 
from $1 to $1.75 each. ■ 



Plan To Stop Gougings On Auto Repairs Is Outlined 



■ A five-part plan to overcome con- 
sumer complaints over auto repairs 
was outlined in Detroit recently by 
Senator Philip A. Hart (D. Mich.) in 
a speech before the Society of Plastic 
Engineers. 

Hart is chairman of the Senate 
Anti-Trust and Monopoly Subcom- 
mittee which has been studying the 
auto repair problem the last 1 8 
months. 

"Consumers," Hart declared, "have 
put their overall complaint concisely: 
When the darn thing doesn't work 
right why can't someone simply tell 
me what is wrong and fix it — the first 
time." 

Hart said that this complaint was 
well founded, that "figures for un- 
satisfactory repair jobs ranged from 
36 to 99 percent." 

Consumers have been agitated, too, 
by the total cost they have encoun- 
tered in keeping their cars operating. 

The Michigan Senator said that cars 
can be better designed so that they 
need less repairs, it will be easier to 
make more accurate diagnosis of the 
car's ills, and reaching and changing 
parts will be simplified. 

Specifically, Hart is making these 
recommendations: 

Standards — Minimum performance 
standards for both new and used cars 
should be established by the Depart- 
ment of Transportation under the 



Motor Vehicle Safety Act. 

"Obviously," Hart said, "if we are 
to cut consumer costs by keeping cars 
out of accidents, not to mention saving 
lives, the method of checking safety 
must be simple or inexpensive enough 
to assure cars on the road are suffi- 
ciently safe." 

Inspection — A national network of 
inspection stations with diagnostic 
equipment to be used to check the 
safety of cars and for a consumer to 
get the best evaluation of his car's 
ailments before being taken in for 
repairs. 

Licensing — Such stations would be 
licensed with at least one master 
mechanic. He would oversee the work 
and sign it out as done completely. 

Training — "Today we are at least 
70,000 mechanics short," Hart de- 
clared. "And while the vehicle popu- 
lation continues to explode, the rate 
of increase in skilled mechanics is 
not keeping pace." 

He called for a "massive training 
program" which, Hart added, "might 
have social benefits far beyond getting 
consumers' cars repaired more quickly 
— and better. For it could help cut 
into the unemployment rate for many 
of our high school dropouts." 

Design Changes — Hart said that 

the design of the car often affects the 

frequency of repairs and their costs. 

Continued on Page 27 



APRIL, 1 970 



13 



Those numbers on your checks . . . 




©hv; 



. . . what do they mean? 



NEARLY 16 BILLION CHECKS COVER NEARLY SIX TRILLION DOLLARS 



■ Today's checks have been called 
"instant money" — not a bad defini- 
tion considering the speed with 
which modern-day checks have ac- 
celerated the flow of money in the 
United States. 

The prompt and widespread ac- 
ceptance of checks which we often 
take for granted bears testimony to 
the fact that this method of trans- 
ferring monetary funds from one in- 
dividual or company to another far 
overshadows all other forms of pay- 
ment. Some economists estimate 
that checks pay for about 90 per- 
cent of the total dollar volume of 
transactions in this country, while 
coin and currency are used for less 
than 10 percent. 

65 Million Accounts 

There are now more than 65 
million checking accounts in the 
U. S. on which about 16 billion 
checks covering almost six trillion 
dollars ($6,000,000,000,000) are 
written each year. 

Because of their convenience, the 
way they can serve as receipts, and 
a risk of loss much smaller than 
with cash, checks do most of the 
monetary exchange work in our 
economy. 

The public's blanket endorse- 
ment of a fiscal economy so depend- 
ent on checks could have choked 
itself to death on success in the past 



decade . . . except for the introduc- 
tion of electronic check processing. 
By utilizing high-speed electronic 
machines which read symbols im- 
printed with magnetic ink on individ- 
ual checks, our "instant money"' can 
be processed at an average rate of 
nearly 70,000 per hour. 

Machine Readers 

The machine feeds on the spe- 
cially-marked checks which read, 
itemize, record on microfilm, and 
endorse them, then sorts the checks 
into compartments which represent 
either single banks or groups of 
banks, and even rejects those which 
are incorrectly coded, mutilated or 
which otherwise fail to fit the ma- 
chine pattern. When the whole 
process is completed the machine's 
tabulation is reconciled to a "cash 
letter"' total sent by the depositing 
bank. After verification, the sorted 




checks are packaged and sent on 
their way by road, rail or air de- 
livery. 

The speed with which the checks 
move through processing channels is 
such that a check drawn on a bank 
in San Francisco but deposited in 
another bank in New York now is 
paid in two days, compared with 
the two weeks it might have taken 
not too many years ago. 

The magnetically-encoded check 
now required by most banks is al- 
most a miracle in itself. Those 
strange looking numbers at the bot- 
tom of your special check tell a 
complete story about your transac- 
tion which, very uniquely, can be 
read by man or machine. 

What Check Reveals 

A glance at your check reveals 
several things. Across the bottom 
are a complete row of numbers. 
The numerals on the left tell you, 
your banker, or the processing ma- 
chine these things: first, which Fed- 
eral Reserve district the check must 
be cleared through; the second num- 
ber indicates which Federal Reserve 
branch bank that the check will go; 
and the last of the three numbers 
in the first group tells the bank how 
many days it should wait before 
crediting its account with the 
amount of the check. 

The next group of three numbers 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



is the bank's designation number. 

Next, the center group of seven 
numbers is your account number 
at your bank. 

The area at the lower right side 
of the check (below your signature) 
will be blank at the time you write 
the check. Perhaps you have noted 
that this space has been filled with 
numbers when the processed check 
is returned with your bank state- 
ment. Compare the numbers which 
have been added to the amount of 
the check; they should be the same. 

The whole process of banking has 
then been accomplished, probably, 
with no one actually paying out or 
receiving "cash." "It has become a 
highly automated process involving 
the debiting and crediting of ac- 
counts in different accounts, perhaps 
different banks, different Federal 
Reserve branch banks and Federal 
Reserve districts. 

Bank Restrictions 

The newer, mechanized way of 
check writing and check payment 
has no doubt impersonalized an- 
other aspect of our society. Your 
bank will no longer accept your 
check written on just any scrap of 
paper, and may seriously frown at 
"counter checks" or even printed 
checks which have been crossed 
through or altered by the writer. 
Completely gone are the days when 
the local Kiwanis Club could present 
a "big" posterboard check to the 
March of Dimes except for publicity 
purposes; such a check would never 
make it through the bank. 

Man has again given way to the 
machine, and in this case, man can 
consider himself better off for it. 

Just how far man can push the 
electronic check processors is not 
known, however. The number of 
checks written has increased over 5 
percent each year for more than a 
decade. At this pace we can an- 
ticipate nearly 30 billion checks an- 
nually by 1975 . . . and bankers say 
that such a large volume may be im- 
practical to handle. 

The money men are already look- 
ing for new techniques — perhaps a 
method that will completely elim- 
inate the check entirely — which will 
satisfy our demands for monetary 
exchange. 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



Job Corps Trainees in Hawaii 
Rebuild Hurricane-Downed Pavilion 



A hurricane blew through the islands 
of Hawaii last January, damaging many 
structures and nearly demolishing the 
Polihole Beach Park Pavilion. 

A group of Job Corps trainees par- 
ticipating in the Kokee Camp Carpen- 
ters Training Program has made the re- 
building of the pavilion its first construc- 



tion project. They are doing the complete 
job, from staking and laying out the new 
building, to placing the batter boards, 
to building and placing the forms, and 
on through to the finished roof and trim. 
The concrete slab is being poured and 
finished by the Job Corps Masonry 
Training Branch. 




The Job Corps work crew and leaders include, standing from left: Carpentry Co- 
ordinator Alan R. Pearson, Carpentry Instructor Kazuya Kuboyama, Corpsmen Rob- 
ert Iwasaki, Glynn Mizumoto, John Jomwe, Matthew Motas, David Flores, Kokee 
Camp Director Art Harrington and Carpenters' Business Agent "Yasu" Yasutake. 
Kneeling: Gregory Oshiro and Raymond Benevente. 




Going over plans for the pavilion are Carpenters' Business Agent "Yasu" Yasutake, 
Kokee Camp Director Art Harrington, Carpentry Instructor Kazuya Kuboyama, 
Instructor Dino Altermare, and Carpentry Coordinator Alan R. Pearson. 



APRIL, 1970 



15 






EDITORIALS 



* 



Elections and The Census 



This is an election year. This is also a census year. 
The state legislators who are elected next November 
will be given the opportunity to re-district their states 
for congressional representation purposes based on the 
population figures contained in census returns. 

If reactionary politicians in the states succeed in 
gaining majorities, they will re-apportion their states' 
voting districts in a manner which will benefit the re- 
actionaries and make it easier for them to gain elective 
majorities. 

This process, known as "gerrymandering," is 
achieved by drawing the lines of voting precincts so 
that voting majorities are achieved in areas which 
might otherwise be lost to the opposition. 

It is vital that liberal state legislators, congressmen 
and senators be elected next November. The Carpen- 
ters Legislative Improvement Committee (CLIC) needs 
your help; financial and physical. Contact your local 
union and see what you, as an individual, can do to 
help insure the election of honest and liberal legisla- 
tors. Remember that one of the most effective means 
of protest against reactionary politicians is to contrib- 
ute to CLIC. You can be sure your money will be used 
against them by aiding the election campaigns of 
liberals. Don't delay . . . start to CLIC today! 

: ' : H High-Profit Recession 

There is a curious situation in this nation today. 
There are more and more people out of work, there 
is a gradual slow-down of business activity. People 
are finding less and less money in their pockets . . . and 
consequently in the cash registers of businesses. And 
yet prices are going higher and higher. 

How can a business recession and inflation exist 
simultaneously? It is a hard nut for even the most 
theoretical economists to crack. 

Ordinary working people don't try to understand 
it; they are busy enough just trying to live with it. But 
it would be interesting to know where the money 
represented by the spread between low prices to the 
producer and high prices to the consumer is going. 
This spread was dramatized last month in a television 
report on potato growers who were burning their crops 
rather than selling them for 30 a pound. The proc- 
essors and distributors took profits from their work 



until the potatoes were sold to the retailer for 90 a 
pound. Here is where, according to the television 
report, a considerable jump occurred: the retailer sold 
the potatoes for 160 a pound . . . almost a 100 per- 
cent markup. 

From time immemorial there have been poor people, 
rich people, and people-in-between. Chances are it 
will always be that way, no matter what type of gov- 
ernmental or economic system is in effect. But there 
is something essentially wrong about a distribution 
system which permits the workman to be deprived of 
the fruits of his labor by being priced out of the market 
for the same items that he produces. 

''•*' Earth . . Future Trashpiie? 

Pollution is much in the news these days, as the 
story beginning on page 5 attests. Pollution has been 
an increasing problem but, like an aspiring Hollywood 
actress, pollution now has a crackerjack press agent 
which keeps it in the public awareness: the U.S. gov- 
ernment. 

Consider the lowly milk carton. It starts out as a 
tree somewhere, contributing its mite to combatting 
pollution by soaking up carbon dioxide and emitting 
oxygen. Someone cuts it down, processes it and it be- 
comes a milk carton. Ultimately it is filled with milk, 
put on sale, the milk consumed, the carton thrown 
into a residential garbage can. Only now does the 
milk carton become a problem. 

If it is burned, it adds to air pollution. If it is 
thrown into the water, it pollutes the water. If it is 
buried in the earth, it pollutes the ground. What to do 
with the discarded milk carton? It can't possibly be 
returned to its original shape ... a tree. 

Multiply that single milk carton by billions. Multi- 
ply the types of discarded items by millions in all 
shapes, sizes and materials. Further complicate the 
problem with excesses of gases, smoke, and liquid 
wastes, and the enormity of the problem only begins 
to make itself manifest. 

What is the answer? Even experts frankly admit 
they don't know the answer. As years go by and man 
continues to dump his discarded artifacts, it is only a 
matter of time until he finds himself living on top of 
a trash heap unless some solution is found. 

Scientists tell us that matter is indestructible. What 
matters more is: is man? 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




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the snow-white blade leave fewer chances for reading errors. In addition, 
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Other Mezurlok features, built-in especially for carpenters, include the 
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ANADIAN 



Federations Fight 
Inflation Layoffs 

The federations of labor across 
Canada are in process of presenting 
their annual briefs to their provincial 
governments, and two issues among 
many stand out. 

They all condemn policies which 
are geared to creating more unem- 
ployment in the fight against inflation. 

The major policy action has been 
taken by the federal government. The 
federations used their provincial 
briefs as an opportunity to protest 
against federal and all policy decisions 
which hit hardest at the workingman 
and the low income groups. 

David Archer, president of the On- 
tario Federation of Labor, was speak- 
ing for all of labor when he told the 
Ontario government that policies of 
economic restraint which create more 
joblessness are as bad if not worse 
than the inflation they are designed to 
correct. 

Don't get carried away by the in- 
flation problem to such an extent that 
you ignore all the other important 
issues, said the OFL president, citing 
problems of housing, pollution, edu- 
cation, poverty and care of the aged. 

Federation 

Notes Housing Crisis 

The OFL itself did not ignore other 
issues in its brief. 

One of the really serious problems 
it dealt with was housing. The public 
is really up in arms about the hous- 
ing crisis in urban centers, yet federal 
policies are restricting house con- 
struction. 

Money is very tight, and interest 
rates are the highest ever — now IOV2 
to 11 percent on top-rate first mort- 
gages. 

The OFL suggested to the govern- 
ment how money might be raised for 
housing and at the same time help 
reduce interest rates. 

"There is just no way that housing 
price increases are going to be halted," 



said the OFL submission to Premier 
Robarts and his cabinet, "if money 
costs continue to go up. 

"We suggest that the provincial 
government start an Ontario Savings 
Bond campaign along the lines of the 
federal Canada Savings Bond cam- 
paign. This would enable it to borrow 
substantial sums from the public at 
around 8 per cent and channel it into 
housing with mortgage money at not 
more than half of one per cent above 
the borrowing cost. 

"This would be about two per cent 
below the rate of conventional mort- 
gages and so make a contribution to- 
ward lowering housing costs. 

"Increasing interest rates have had 
a greater influence on costs in the 
housing industry from 1 965 to 1 969 
than all increases in the costs of labor 
and materials for construction, prop- 
erty taxes and federal and provincial 
taxes." 

Another suggestion for raising 
money was also made. Get deeper into 
the banking business, said the Federa- 
tion. 

The Ontario government has for 
years operated Ontario savings banks. 
But it has not expanded the operation. 
There are only about 17 branches in 
all of Ontario. 

Expand this government savings 




Emblem of the Canadian Labor Congress 
as displayed on a plaque in Ottawa. 



system and get more money directly 
from the public, was the proposal. 

The government indicated interest 
in both ideas. The Federation was 
told that a study was being made of 
the savings bank system. So far results 
indicate that an extension of the sys- 
tem would meet with public acclaim. 

Record Set Straight 
On BC Hydro Claim 

The British Columbia Federation of 
Labor proved to the satisfaction of the 
public, if not of the company, that the 
B.C. Hydro Commission was raising 
its rates, not on account of higher 
labor costs, but simply because of 
record high interest rates on its bor- 
rowings. 

The company, owned by the B.C. 
government, raised its rates about 15 
per cent. 

The B.C. labor body proved that in 
a two-year period ending March 31, 
1971, B.C. wage costs will go up 
around $12 million. But the cost of 
borrowing money for its various proj- 
ects will go up over $42 million. 

If labor costs were the only factor 
in the total costs, the B.C. consumer 
would have enjoyed a cut in rates. 

This is further evidence of the 
kind of research which the trade union 
movement is capable of doing today. 
Management can't get away with as 
much as it used to. 

Home Prices Almost 
Double in 5 Years 

A home which sold in Metro 
Toronto for around $22,000 in 1965 
was almost $43,000 in 1 970. 

A plot of land which then sold for 
$8,000 now sells for $16,000 to 
$18,000 for a single family home. 

If this same plot of land is sold for 
a semi-detached dwelling, the selling 
price is $28,000. 

Just to round out the picture, a 
$22,000 mortgage at 10 per cent over 
40 years will cost the homebuyer a 
total of $88,000 or so by the time it's 
paid off. 

Tax Reform Action 
Still Necessary 

The most contentious issue in 
Canada today is the federal govern- 
ment's proposals for tax reform. 

These proposals have brought forth 
concerted, even violent, attacks from 
business interests — big business, small 
business, banks, trust companies, in- 
dustry, all the conservative elements. 

There are so many angles in the 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



tax reform proposals that the public 
could easily get confused. 

To simplify the basic proposals: 
about 90 per cent of hourly wage- 
earners would pay less taxes under 
the new proposals; about 90 per cent 
of executives and union staff would 
pay more. 

The estimate of the government is 
that 750,000 taxpayers in the low in- 
come brackets would be taken off the 
tax rolls. 

Another three million would pay 
less taxes. 

This means that about half the 
present taxpayers would pay less, the 
other half would pay more. 

The lowest income groups would 
benefit most. 

Now this seems fair enough. 

One proposed change in the tax 
laws has become an issue involving 
big and small business alike. 

The government proposes to do 
away with the present tax concession 
to corporations with profits under 
$35,000 a year. They pay only 23 per- 
cent in taxes against the regular 
corporate rate of about 50 percent. 

But of over 400,000 small busi- 



nesses in Canada, only about 40,000 
are incorporated. So only 10 per cent 
get the special advantage. Yet this has 
cost the government $400 million a 
year. 

So business really has no reason to 
ask that this concession be continued. 
Why, asks Finance Minister Benson, 
should a businessman making $35,000 
a year pay less in taxes than his em- 
ployee making the same amount? 

The tax reform proposals, outlined 
in a White Paper, would also do away 
with other special concessions to peo- 
ple with big money. It will cut down 
on expense account living, reduce 
capital cost allowances whereby real 
estate owners get away with little or 
no taxes, and introduce a capital gains 
tax for the first time in Canada. 

The White Paper is far from per- 
fect, of course. 

It goes easier than it should on peo- 
ple earning over $40,000 to $50,000 
a year. 

It does nothing about indirect taxes 
which lean heavily on low income 
families. 

But it is a step in the right direction. 
It would be a pity if the terrific at- 



tack on the proposals by big business 
should force the federal government 
to make substantial changes for the 
worse. 

It is in the best interests of working 
people to see that the proposals are 
instituted and improved on from year 
to year. 

18 Unions Hold More 
Than Half of Unionists 

The Canada Department of Labor 
publishes a handy directory of "Labor 
Organizations in Canada." The latest 
edition lists 18 unions in Canada with 
membership over 30,000. These un- 
ions account for more than half of the 
two million trade union members at 
the end of 1969. 

Trade union membership in 1969 
increased by 3.2 per cent over the 
previous year. Of the 101 internation- 
al unions listed in the directory, 85 
were affiliated with the CLC and the 
AFL-CIO, five with the AFL-CIO and 
seven were independent. 

Membership in international unions 
is 65 per cent of the 1969 total. The 
total represents 32.5 per cent of the 
non-agricultural labor force. 



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APRIL, 1970 



19 



miiiiaiLiliUjiUiiiilili ■^>aV'_ 



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Doggone Good Story 

A vet in our town started cross- 
breeding animals. He crossed a poo- 
dle with a chicken and now he has a 
bird dog that lays pooched eggs. 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 



HAM 

AND 

*B3GS 




Putting it Eggzactly 

The chicken and the pig were walk- 
ing together when the chicken saw a 
sign: "All the ham and eggs you can 
eat for $1." She suggested they try 
it. 

"No," replied the pig. "For you it's 
only an involvement. But for me it's 
a total commi+ment!" 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Of Courts He Did! 

A man, late for a funeral, slipped 
inside the church and sat down beside 
a lawyer friend. "How far has the 
service gone?" he whispered. 

The lawyer nodded toward the min- 
ister in the pulpit and whispered back: 
"He just opened for the defense!" — 
Jerry Jasa L.U. 308, retired, Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 

UNION DUES— TOMORROWS SECURITY 

Keeping it Quiet 

The office manager told the force: 
"When I enter, I want to see every- 



one cheerfully performing their 
duties. We have a suggestion box, 
and if anyone has ideas on how this 
may best be achieved, please put in 
your suggestion." 

When the box was opened it had a 
slip of paper on which was written: 
"Don't wear rubber-soled shoes." 

B SURE 2 VOTE! 

This Month's One-Liner 

The unluckiest guy in the world was 
the artist who choked to death be- 
cause he couldn't draw his breath. — 
John Freeman, L.U. 22, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

GIVE A DOLLAR TO CLIC 

As I Was Saying . . . 

The girl was provoked. "Don't be 
so impolite! You've yawned five 
times in the past thirty minutes while 
I was talking!" 

"I wasn't yawning," he shot back. 
"I was trying to say something!" 

REGISTER AND VOTE 

Not So Orderly 

Children really haven't changed 
much over the years since we v/ere 
young. They still grow up, go off to 
school, get a job, get married and 
have children. The difference is: they 
don't necessarily do it in that order. 



This Month's Limerick 

A lively young glutton named Ned 
Had a snack before going to bed. 
He ate lobster and ham, 
Ice cream, pickles and jam 
And when he awoke he was dead. 
— John Freeman, L.U. 22, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



A Close Squeak! 

Hanging a door, a carpenter cut 
a bit too deep and was putting a 
cardboard behind the hinge when the 
owner saw him. "What are you 
doing?" he asked. 

"Putting some cardboard behind 
this hinge so it won't squeak," fast- 
talked the carpenter. 

"Good," said the owner. "Put it 
back of all of 'em. I don't want any 
squeaky doors!"- — Morrison Lowry, 
L.U. 1046, Yucaipa, Calif. 

LIKE TOOLS. BE SHARP & SAFE 




That's For the Birds! 

A young carpenter went booming. 
Soon his wife received a telegram: 
"Made foreman; feather in my cap." 
Soon another wire said: "Made super- 
intendent; another feather in my 
cap." Later still came a third: "Was 
fired, send train fare." She wired 
back: "Use your feathers and fly 
back!"— Jerry Jasa, L.U. 308, Retired, 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

TELL M U R UNION! 

Smart fella 

A bachelor is a man who likes 
women, but doesn't let the feeling 
get nuptial. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




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Westinghouse Unions Win 'Best Ever' Contract 



Nine unions with 1 04.000 members 
stayed at the negotiating table in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., for 48 hours to win 
a "best ever" contract from Westing- 
house Electric Corp. just ahead of a 
scheduled walkout. 

The contract, approved by members 
of all the unions that coordinated their 
bargaining at Westinghouse, provides 
wage increases of 53 cents an hour 
over 41 months, cost-of-living bonuses 
to a top of 21 cents an hour and 
skilled labor adjustments adding 5-25 
cents an hour to pay. Gains also were 
achieved in pensions, insurance, sick 
leave plus personal leave time, vaca- 
tions, tuition payments and grievance 
procedure and other areas. 

The cooperating unions are the 
Electrical, Radio & Machine Workers, 
the Internationa] Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers, the Machinists, 
the Carpenters, Flint Glass Workers, 
Allied Industrial Workers, Steelwork- 
ers, and the unaffiliated Federation of 
Westinghouse Salaried Workers and 
United Electrical Workers (UE). 



AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany ex- 
pressed "warmest congratulations on 
the new contract settlement." He 
noted that while it does not meet every 
need of Westinghouse workers, it 
does "bring vast improvements, long 
overdue, in wages and working con- 
ditions." 

Meany said the "firmness, deter- 
mination and patience of Westing- 
house workers gave their negotiators 
what they needed to reach a just and 
peaceful settlement." He called the 
outcome of six months of effort "a 
victory for collective bargaining" 
which "sets an example for the en- 
tire industry of how labor-management 
agreements can and ought to be 
reached." 

Westinghouse workers. Meany 
noted, "had the support of every 
AFL-CIO member, precisely as those 
at General Electric Co. did throughout 
their long ordeal" of 100 days on 
strike. Both struggles. Meany said, 
"set a standard of solidarity and unity 
rarely matched in labor history." 



He added: "The entire labor move- 
ment is stronger because of it." 

Meany is chairman of the AFL- 
CIO Coordinated Bargaining Com- 
mittee which set uniform contract 
goals last year and kept all affiliates 
informed of contract developments in 
negotiations with GE and Westing- 
house. 

New contract benefits were valued 
by the unions at 98 cents per hour, 
plus the "rollup" value of accompany- 
ing gains. 

They include an initial increase, re- 
troactive to Jan. 5, of 23 cents an 
hour, skilled trades adjustments of 5 
to 25 cents an hour additional, hikes 
of $8 to $15 a week for salaried em- 
ployees, and new wage brackets for 
higher pension and insurance benefits 
in the future. 

This will be followed by a cost-of- 
living increase on Nov. 9 and annually 
for the life of the contract, and wage 
increases of 15 cents or 4 percent on 
March 15, 1971 and May 15, 1972. 



APRIL, 1970 



21 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Coetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 



■ Some Late Hunt Reports 

Inasmuch as the warm-weather angling 
season is fast approaching, subsequent 
issues of Outdoor Meandering will be 
greater of content in that outdoor de- 
partment. Meanwhile this column will 
review highlights of the past season's 
hunt achievements: 

Two longtime members of Local 171. 
Youngstown, Ohio (about 22 years 
apiece) — Robert Callen and Howard 
Grubb — decided they wanted a little 
change from the deer-hunting routine 
in Pennsylvania, so they tripped far 
north to Quebec this past September in 
company with veteran hunt partner 
Corley Fox. Below is a photograph of 
Brother Callen (kneeling), Grubb (mid- 
dle) and their French-Canadian guide 
with the first moose they downed on 
junket. They roamed far afield, but this 
one, which was estimated to weigh over 
1.200 pounds, was downed less than 200 
yards from camp. 



m 




. V 

Callen, Grubb, and French guide. 
■ More Big Raccoons 

Regarding a past item on raccoons. 
Donald R. Lescarbeau of North Adams. 
Massachusetts, a member of Local 193. 
says the largest he ever brought home — ■ 
nailed on the Deerfield River banks — 
tipped the scales at 29 pounds. That's 
a large 'coon. Don. well above average, 
but naturalist Victor H. Calahane. in 
his excellent text "Mammals of North 



America," says he has had reports of 
'em weighing as high as 49 pounds. 
Nevertheless, that 29 pounder is the 
largest we've heard tell about from Car- 
penter readers, anybody top it? 

Brother Lescarbeau, who lives at 318 
Ashland St., would like to hear from 
fellow "coon hunters," and is in the 
market for a good coon hound. 

■ Nebraska Turkeys 




Joseph Coufal and John Brown. 

Brother Carpenter Joseph P. Coufal of 
Omaha. Nebraska, said the two turkey 
hunts in his home state — limited to 2.000 
permits — proved successful for him, 
brother Chuck, and rancher friend John 
Brown. 

The trio hunted in the Round Top 
area in western Nebraska. Joe (glasses) 
sent in the accompanying photograph of 
himself and John Brown with the four 
birds they nailed, and he made the 
following comments: 

"We spotted the turkeys at Canyon 
Ridge, about a half mile away, feeding 
in a stubble field. We had to quietly 
sneak in back of them, cutting them off 
from the canyon where they could 
escape. I have found it a good idea to 
aim for the head and neck; these birds 
can take a good load of shot in the 
body." 



■ Empire State Buck 

Sal De Siena, vice president of Local 
350, New Rochelle, N.Y., looks back on 
a successful hunt season last year, and 
didn't have to leave the Empire State. 
He nailed a six-point buck whitetail on 
the opening day of the season in the 
Catskills and countershot a week later 
on a doe hunt out of Davenport. 

■ 30-Point Deer 

Mariano Montileone of St. Louis, 
Missouri, a member of Local 1596, can 
lay claim to a many-pointed moose rack 
as a momento of last year's hunt in 
Ontario, Canada. He nailed a bull in 
the Sioux Lookout area which featured 
30 points on the rack. 

■ Colorado Elk 

Another group of Carpenters who 
tripped over far-flung acres in quest of 
big game this past season was: Cyril 
Fritz, James Baker. Harold Borden and 
Herman Baker, all members of Local 
1453 at Huntington Beach, California. 
In company with hunt buddies — Herb 
Weir and Kenny Werner — they brought 
home a wagon load of elk, downed in 
the high snow country of Colorado. 
(Sorry, men. the photographs were a 
bit too faint for reproduction). 

■ More From Colorado 

Another California hunter who tripped 
to high snow country of Colorado to 
nail buck deer and bull elk was Willis 
D. Kinney, a member of Local 2288 in 
Los Angeles for over 15 years. Here's a 
look-see at Brother Kinney with one of 
his mule deer bucks which sported a 
4-point spread measuring 36% inches 
from tip to tip. Brother Kinney and 
party, assisted by logger-guide — Brice 
Cole of Delta, Colorado — came out with 
two elk and a trio of mulies. 




^ - VST M^SZiMMmM&M-^ 

Kinney and buck. 

■ Fishing Gear Check 

The angler's sun is coming up over 
the horizon, time to think about the 
condition of your fishing gear. Here are 
a few guidelines: 

REELS: Give 'em a thorough oil con- 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



ditioning; last year's oil may have 
evaporated. Reels, pocked from saltwater 
corrosion, should be thoroughly checked, 
taken apart, soaked and scrubbed with 
a hot, soapy-water solution, wiped clean 
and dry and wiped again with a lightly- 
oiled rag. If you have a spin reel with 
a line roller, check it; even a slightly 
nicked roller bearing could ruin a new 
line in minutes. Do likewise with line 
guide mechanism of casting reel. 

RODS: Check for shaky ferrules, a 
loose one can cause the rod to snap 
during a particularly sharp overhead 
snap cast or with a heavy fish. Replace 
and revarnish frayed wraps. Make sure 
tiptop and guides are free of abrasions. 
(Pull a piece of nylon stocking through 
them; if they are nicked the fabric will 
catch). 

LINES: A used line should be gone 
over, fingering every inch of it for frayed 
sections. Don't lose the lunker of the 
day because of a defective line. If it's 
a fly line, remove last summers dirt and 
grease with solution of warm water and 
mild, alkaline-free soap. 

BOOTS or WADERS: Check for 
leaks. It's no fun fishing on a chilly 
opening with a boot full of icy water. 

SPINNERS and PLUGS: Shine up 
spinners; touch up chipped plugs. Check 
lure's rings, swivels, hooks for defects. 

HOOKS: Set aside a goodly supply 
for a few day's fishing and hone them 
to needle-point sharpness. It might make 
the difference between being skunked or 
coming home with a full creel. 




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APRIL, 1970 



23 




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11% of New 1969 Apprentices 
Recruited From Minority Groups 



Rockford, 



■ Impressive increases in the per- 
centage of minority group participa- 
tion in apprenticeship training pro- 
grams have been reported by the 
Department of Labor. 

Secretary of Labor George P. 
Shultz has announced that more 
than 8,000 apprentices from minor- 
ity groups represented a record of 
1 1 percent of the 73,000 new ap- 
prentices admitted to registered pro- 
grams throughout the nation in 
1969. 

The influx of new apprentices, 
minus graduates and dropouts, 
brought to more than 20,000 the 
total of new and previously admitted 
minority participants working and 
learning in registered programs dur- 
ing 1969. 

With an estimated 255,000 ap- 
prentices in all programs registered 
in 1969 directly with the Bureau of 
Apprenticeship and Training, mi- 
nority participation was 7.8 percent, 
compared with 6.5 percent at the 
beginning of the year and 4.4 per- 
cent in 1966. 

OPERATION OUTREACH 

Since July 1967, 5,633 appren- 
tices have been recruited through 
Operation Outreach, with 3,308 
picked up in the last year. This is 
an AFL - CIO program funded 
through the Dept. of Labor with the 
cooperation of such groups as the 
National Urban League and the 
Workers Defense League. 

Of the apprentices recruited 
through Operation Outreach in the 
last year, 56 percent went into five 
crafts: Carpenters (1,132), Elec- 
tricians (599), Plumbers & Pipe- 
fitters (527), Painters (513) and 
Sheet Metal Workers (424). 

About one-half the minorities 
registered were Negro; the balance 
was made up mostly from Spanish- 
speaking Americans and about one 
percent of the total number of mi- 
norities were Indian and Oriental. 

Using the tutor-and-cram tech- 
nique, the exclusively minority- 
oriented Apprenticeship Outreach 
program prepared youths to pass 



written examinations and oral in- 
terviews and become apprentices in 
the building and construction trades. 
There are now 63 such programs 
operating in urban industrial areas 
throughout the country. 

Another key program is the Ap- 
prenticeship Information Centers 
which assist those who wish to be- 
come apprentices in the recognized 
skilled trades by providing an ap- 
prentice information bank and 
counseling, testing and referral serv- 
ices. The centers are now estab- 
lished in the District of Columbia 
and 34 major industrial areas in 21 
states. 

During 1969, 12,727 became ap- 
prentices through the Outreach and 
information programs and 40 per- 
cent or 5,145 of them were minority 
members. — PAI 



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24 



THE CARPENTER 



New York Local Marks 85th Year 



I I f f f 





Any occasion for a gala dinner-dance is always welcome, 
and Local 6, Amsterdam. New York, had a better-than-aver- 
age event to celebrate recently: its 85th year as a part of the 
Brotherhood. Longtime members were especially honored. 
Among those in attendance were, seated, left to right: Emil 
Yoos, a 43-year member: Samuel Douglass, a member for 53 
years; John Dulczewski. with 61 years of service: Charles 
Maves, a 63-year member; Frank Leffert, the oldest living 
member of the local, with 65 years of service; Robert Bates, 
a member for 45 years; and William Frenz, with 53 years of 
service. Standing, left to right: Robert Erni and Joseph Roth- 
mund, 44-year members; William Lawyer, general represent- 



ative; Edward Gardner, secretary-treasurer of the District 
Council; Charles Beers, business agent of Local 146, Schenec- 
tady, N.Y.; Pasquale Zappone. president of the local; Henry 
Kartner, business agent for the local; Thomas Hammill, presi- 
dent of the District Council; Francis Gilmaier, a 30-year mem- 
ber; Edwin Leavenworth, with 46 years service; Walter Voss, 
financial secretary of the local; Seren Hansen, a 46-year mem- 
ber; and Joseph Ciskanow, with 30 years of service. Also 
present, but not pictured, were Charles Schwartz, 61 years; 
Leonard E. Krutz, 46 years; and John Zehrs, 30 years. Mem- 
bers who died during the year include Carter Douglas, a 62- 
year member; Fred Kriesel, a 50-year member, and Harry 
Ropa, a member for 31 years. 



Tacoma, Washington, Local Honors Retirees 



Members of Local 470. Tacoma, 
Washington, honored two retiring of- 
ficers and their wives with a cocktail 
party and buffet dinner. The guests of 
honor were Harold L. Cosgrove and 
Jack Mitchell. 

Brother Cosgrove has been in the 



Brotherhood since January 30, 1941. He 
held many offices in his Local Union in- 
cluding warden and vice president. He 
also served on the Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee and for the past 19 years he has 
served the Local as business representa- 
tive. 



Brother Mitchell joined the Brother- 
hood on January 2, 1936, and since that 
time has held every office in the Local 
Union with the exception of business 
representative and financial secretary. 
Brother Mitchell has served as trustee 
lor the past 18 years. 




) 



Retiring officers of Local 470 honored 
recently were Harold L. Cosgrove (left) 
and Jack Mitchell. 



1 



Honored guests. Local 470 President, and wives enjoy the Retirement 
right: Harold L. Cosgrove, Mrs. Cosgrove, Mrs. Whitelick, Elvet W 
Mitchell, and Mrs. Mitchell. 



Party, left to 
hitelick, Jack 



APRIL, 1970 



25 



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A representative sampling of the glass fiber concrete forms produced by members 
of Local 367, Centralia, 111., employed by Bergan Built, Inc. 



Centralia Manufacturer Employs 
Local 367 Members 



A firm begun as a partnership with a 
Brotherhood member on a withdrawal 
card has achieved outstanding success 
and has established excellent contractual 
relations with Local 367, Centralia, Illi- 
nois. 

Less than five years ago, Irvin Colbert, 
a member of Local 367 at the time, 
entered into a business venture with 
Phillip Bergan to build reinforced glass 
fiber products. From the beginning they 
were moderately successful, but it was 
not until they began to produce glass 
fiber concrete forms that they really 
experienced an unusual degree of success. 

Cards are Signed 

In mid-1967, G. D. Meyer, business 
representative of Local 367. had authori- 
zation cards in the Brotherhood signed 
by 27 of the 29 employees of the firm. 
Bergen Built. Inc. With the assistance 
from Intl. Rep. loe Gilliam, a two-year 
contract was signed. Since that time the 
company has continued to grow. Local 
367 members have also built five new 
and modern buildings connected with 
covered walkways for a total of over 
33,000 square feet of covered production 
area. In the near future this will be 
expanded to 42.000 feet. More than 60 
Brotherhood members are now regularly 
employed by the firm. 

According to Business Representative 
Meyer, the firm has proven itself to be 
unusually fair in its dealings with the 
local union. It voluntarily agreed to re- 
open the two-year contract in August, 
1969, and an agreement was promptly 
reached. While not in the contract, the 
company gave the operators a 100 per 
hour raise immediately and a 5<£ per 
hour raise every two months thereafter 
for the duration of the contract. The 
present scale is $2.75 per hour and other 
classifications are pro-rated the same 
way. 



In addition to the production of glass 
fiber concrete molds, Bergan Built, Inc. 
also does custom building, utilizing union 
carpenters in every instance. 





Attractive design produced by use of 
Bergan Built glass fiber concrete forms 
at the University of Massachusetts. 



Attend Your Local Union 
Meetings Regularly. 



Be an active member of 
the Brotherhood. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Cabinet Maker 
Creates Own Tower 




Veteran cabinet maker Thomas DiNardi 
displays the Leaning Tower of Pisa he 
constructed following his visit to Italy. 
He is assisted by one of his six grand- 
children. 

It took Italy more than 200 years to 
erect the Leaning Tower of Pisa . . . but 
a retired member of Local 246, New 
York. N.Y., needed just five months to 
duplicate it. There is, however, a slight 
difference in the two Towers. The one 
built by veteran cabinet maker Thomas 
LiNardi is only six feet high — 173 feet 
shorter than the original Tower in Pisa, 
Italy. 

"I spent the summer in Italy," ex- 
plains DiNardi. "and was so amazed at 
the beauty of the tower, I figured I had 
to have one in my house. I studied the 
tower and read all about it." 

"I loved it so much, seeing the Tower 
of Pisa." he added. "I couldn't believe it 
was that beautiful." 

DiNardi's Tower is only 18 inches in 
diameter and stands in the living room 
of his home in Queens Village. 

The Molly Mag u ires 

Continued from Page 11 

village, the colliery and the mine it- 
self, with its tunnels, shafts and slopes, 
provides a thoroughly realistic back- 
drop. 

Fortunately, today's workers do not 
have to choose between murder and 
spying to secure a better life. They 
have their unions. And the tragedy of 
the Molly Maguires makes unionism 
seem even more vital. ■ 



Weather Bureau-Type Reporting 
of Pollution Levels Sought 



Senator John Sparkman of Ala- 
bama has introduced a bill in the 
U. S. Senate which calls for weath- 
er bureau-type reporting of air and 
water pollution news. 

Sparkman said his bill is de- 
signed "to create the kind of pub- 
lic awareness of the pollution prob- 
lem that will help to build wide- 
spread public support of a crash 
program to stop pollution. This 
bill calls for levels of pollution in 
both the air and water to be sur- 
veyed and made available to the 
public just like weather reports. 

"The weather is the most sought 
after news in just about every part 
of the world. Nearly everyone sees, 
hears, or has access to the latest 
report on the weather." Sparkman 
said. "If we can throw the pollu- 
tion report into normal weather 
reporting, then we shall have 



reached a most effective way to 
bring home to millions of people 
three or four times per day the 
seriousness of the pollution prob- 
lem. 

"This bill would authorize the 
Secretary of Commerce, through 
the Environmental Science Serv- 
ices Administration, to (1) make 
daily determinations of the extent 
of pollutants dangerous to the pub- 
lic health and welfare which are 
present in the air and (2) make ap- 
propriately frequent surveys of the 
pollution of the navigable waters 
of the United States," he said. 

Sparkman expressed optimism 
for the bill's chances of becoming 
law. He said he believed the Con- 
gress and the people are of a mood 
to take every possible and practical 
step in the fight on pollution. 



Auto Repair Plan 

Continued from Page 13 

"This," he added, "is one where the 
industry, itself, can take the necessary 
steps and avoid the possibility of the 
government regulating design with 
'repair standards.' " 

"There is no doubt in my mind," 
Hart continued, "that the consumer 
today is deeply concerned over the 
fragility of his car. Having laid out 
anywhere from $2,000 to $9,000 for 
a beautiful machine he is a little sick 
to see it a few weeks later looking 
as if it has been in a barroom brawl 



with all the parking lot nicks and 
creases. 

"Worse, of course, is the discovery 
that the cosmetic touches on the front 
or rear will cost him $300 or $400 
to replace when he nudges the car 
ahead in the traffic jam." 

Autos these days have long since 
ceased to be a luxury for most Ameri- 
cans but a virtual necessity, Hart said, 
adding: 

"He must rely on it in order to 
conduct his life. Let's build escape 
machines — but let's remember that 
the one thing the consumer wants most 
to escape from are the frustrations of 
maintenance." ■ 



Sean Connery 

leads a group of 

miners toward 

a confrontation 

with the mine 

bosses. 




. - -^. r: ' .. ., 



APRIL, 1970 



27 



Texas Member Gets 
His Own 'WeeU 

Carpenters Local 198, Dallas, Tex., 
waited over 67 years before honoring 
one of its members but made up for the 
oversight when they proclaimed a "For- 
rest C. Hughes Week" to celebrate the 
97th birthday of their treasurer, Forrest 
C. Hughes. He joined the local in 1902 
and, prior to becoming its treasurer some 
30 years ago, served many years as a 
trustee. Always active in the local, he 
taught in its first apprenticeship school, 
and has been elected delegate to many 
of the state and national conventions of 
the Brotherhood. 

To kick off the week's celebration the 
members presented him with a Neiman- 
Marcus beaver hat. The ladies of Auxil- 
iary No. 3 baked a large decorated 
birthday cake, which was served by their 
members. The ladies also did an artistic 
job on a birthday greeting placard with 
cut-out pictures of the tools of a journey- 
man carpenters. This now hangs in the 
local's office. 

Mr. Hughes responded to the presenta- 
tion with an interesting talk, recalling 
many of his experiences in the now 83- 
year-old local that he joined in its 15th 
year. He ended his talk by advising those 
present that while it is well to look back 




Local 198 gave a week-long birthday 
parry for 67-year member Forrest C. 
Hughes. 



to the wisdom of experience, it is the 
future that they should be concerned 
with. It is easy to understand that this 
advice, coming from one who has seen 
so many changes in his lifetime during 



which the mode of transportation came 
all the way from the covered wagon to 
the present space age, was well received. 

Oregon Governor 
Spurns R-T-W Bid 

Oregon Governor Tom McCall has de- 
clined to meet supporters of a "right-to- 
work" law in Oregon, he told an audi- 
ence of 500 at a farewell luncheon for 
George Brown, retired political education 
director for the state AFL-CIO. 

McCall said he could not in good con- 
science do anything else as a 22-year 
union member and former president of 
the Portland local of the Television & 
Radio Artists. 

Besides, he said, "at 56 I am a little 
too old to become a prostitute." 

Woman Member 
First Since WW 2 

For the first time since World War II, 
Carpenters Local 1020, Portland, Ore., 
has a woman member. 

She's Mrs. Anton Luhaorg. who does 
finish carpentry on construction projects 
for a local subcontractor. Her husband 
has been a carpenter for 25 years. 



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28 



THE CARPENTER 




000 



. . . those members of our Broiherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 




CENTER GRADUATE-Labor's first full-time 
education institution graduated a Virginia 
man from its second class, a seminar on 
Collective Bargaining for East Coast Met- 
al Trades Councils. 
Enos R. Dough- 
erty, Jr., Interna- 
tional Representa- 
tive, United Broth- 
erhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners of 
America of Rich- 
mond, received his 
diploma from the 

AFL-CIO Labor 
Dougherty Studies Cente] . in 

Washington. D. C. 

The Center, which opened its doors to 
unionist-students in December, will offer 
several courses including seminars on 
civil rights, health care and labor law. 

PIONEER— In the days when the bread 
lines were beginning to form and a union 
newspaper for Ohio was still only a 
dream. John Coo- 
per of Carpenters 
Local 104, Dayton, 
Ohio, was one of 
the first to support 
the venture and to 
offer a loan from 
his local to help 
make the dream 
come true. Ohio 
members now have 
a statewide voice 
in their Labor Union Newspaper, which 
recently honored member John Cooper 
for having helped make the paper pos- 



sible. A member since 1919, Cooper has 
served as business agent and financial 
secretary of his local and has held the 
position of secretary to the Carpenters 
District Council. 





Cooper 



Queens District Attorney Thomas J. 
Mackell (right) administers oath of office 
to Brother McCabe. 

CONSULTANT— Joseph McCabe. financial 
■>ecretary and business representative of 
Local 1162, College Point, N.Y., has been 
appointed as a labor relations consultant 
on the Queens County Crime Prevention 
Board. The appointment was made by 
Queens District Attorney Thomas J. 
Mackell. 

McCabe is a delegate to the Brother- 
hood's 40.000-member New York City 
District Council and also represents 
Queens on the Council's Political Action 
Committee. He served on the negotiating 
committee which recently resolved the 
controversy over construction union con- 
tracts in the boroughs of New York City. 



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unequaled utility features, and 
money-saving durability. From 
the uncut material to the finished 
garment highly skilled union 
craftsmen pay close attention to 
every detail. Buy a pair and 
you'll see why Lee guarantees 
them to please you more than 
any other brand. 

H. D. Lee Co., Inc. 
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201 
"World's Largest Manufacturer 
of Union Made Work Clothes'' 




There is no doubt 

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We can help make it sooner. 

If you help us. 

Give all you can to I 

the American Cancer Society. I 

Fight cancer with a checkup and a check.?® 

THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER 



APRIL, I 970 



29 





Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 

(1) DENVER, COLO.— Local 55 pre- 
sented service pins to several of its mem- 
bers at a recent banquet. Participating in 
the ceremony were, front row, left to 
right: William Hunter, 50 years; Walter 
Jouno, 65 years; Mikal Villa. 60 years; 
James McFarland, president of the local; 
Axal Hansen, 60 years; Robert Ldeson, 
50 years; and Jesse Frame, 25 years. Sec- 
ond row, left to right: Ben Landenberger, 
Anthony Kowalski, W. C. Woodard, N. 
F. Peterson, Raymond Vaugn, Charles 
Center, Edwin Carlson, Charles Berry, 
and Willis Ray, 25 years; Roy Bergh, in- 
ternational representative; and Raymond 
Olson, financial secretary of the local. 



(2) MORTON, WASHFNGTON— In re- 
cent ceremonies, Lumber & Sawmill 
Workers Local 2767 presented 25-year 
pins to its veteran members. Kenneth 
Davis, West Coast Coordinator, made 
the presentations. Pictured, left to right, 
seated: Herman Wassenaar, Walt Arthur, 
and Howard Thompson. Standing, left 
to right: Kenneth Davis, Anton Kauer, 
Frank Brodin, and Nelson Stamper. 

Eligible to receive pins but not present 
for the ceremonies were these seven 
members: Lionel Choiniere, Gordon 



Dunlap, Axel Frederickson, Herman 
Johnson, Basil Messling, Benjamin 
Nieme, and Bill Redick. 

In other ceremonies, Frank Suter, 
Brotherhood Representative, presented 
Brother Davis with his 35-year pin. 

(3) CATSKILL, N.Y Awards for long 

service were made recently to members 



of Carpenter's Local 2161, at their an- 
nual organizational dinner. Among those 
honored were, left to right: Max Weinert, 
recording secretary; Charles Dyce; Julius 
Lamanec, business agent and past presi- 
dent of the local; Glenn Ryan, president 
of the local; and Ralph Herron, Joseph 
Birk, Donald Stein, and Francis Bondy, 
past presidents of the local. 




30 



THE CARPENTER 



(4) LIVONIA, MICHIGAN— Local 982 
entertained its 242 members with 25 
years or more of service to the Brother- 
hood at a lavish dinner dance on March 
7, 1970. Guest speakers included: Peter 
Terzick, Brotherhood General Treasurer; 
John Harrington, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Detroit District Council; and Leonard 
Zimmerman, Secretary-Treasurer, Michi- 
gan State Carpenters Council. 

Other honored guests include: C. 
A. Shuey, General Executive Board 
Member from the Third District; Ray- 
mond Fair, President of Detroit District 
Council; Jack Wood, Secretary-Treas- 
urer, Detroit Building Trades Council; 
Stanley Arnold, Secretary, Michigan 
State Building Trades Council; Robert 
Laing, International Representative; 
Raymond Zook, International Repre- 
sentative; Raymond Dzendzel, State 
Senator; and James A. Garrison, Editor, 
Detroit Building Tradesmen. 

Local 982 President Frank Greenhalgh 
was Program Chairman for the occasion. 
Toastmaster for the gala affair was 
Vernon Ellsworth, Financial Secretary 
and Business Representative of Local 
982. 

Dancing to the music of Frank Venice 
and his Orchestra was enjoyed through- 
out the evening. 

Arrangements for the festivities were 
handled by the Banquet Committee: 
Vernon Ellsworth, Chairman; Ralph 
Wood, and Julius Nagy. 

Pins were presented to these members: 

Raymond Ackerson, Albert Ahonen, 
Milton Albee, Albin Alfvegren, Claude 
Allen, David Anderson, Louis Arquette, 
Ralph Baird, C. B. Baker, Elmer Barnett, 
Farris Barnett, Andrew Bartkowiak, 
Russell Beardsley, Donald Bennett 

George Berckley, Woodrow Berger, 
Leon Betcher, Howard Biegert, Albert 
Billard, Norman Bockclman, Lawrence 
Boese, Charles Borso, Albert Boss, Frank 
Bowles, Joseph Bracken, Abramo Brama, 
Wesley Brett, Henry Brewbaker, Arthur 
Briggs 

Ernest Brisson, August Brosch, George 
Bueche, Leonard Bumstead, Frank Burte, 
John Caba, Gunnar Carlson, Mahlon 
Carter, Joseph Cherney, Robert Christen- 
son, Obeodiek Churchill, Arthur Clinan- 
smith, Donald Clink, Albert Comiski, 
Aaron Cosont 

Roy Cumming, Lawrence DeGrand- 
champ, Frank Disinger, Arthur Dittmer, 
John Donica, William Dowsett, Linus 
Drogs, Walter Duprey, Clilford Duston, 
John Dzendzel, Raymond Dzendzel, John 
Eberly, Howard Edwards, John Edwards, 
Charles Ellis 

William Ellis, Louis Faulkcr, Claud 
Fink, W. W. Foster, Everette Fox, Wil- 
liam Frederick, Reginald Fryer, Lloyd 
Fuller, Harold Gallarno, Robert Gard- 
ner, Andrew Gebus, Harry Geistler, 
Lawrence Germain, Burnett Gibson. Emil 
Git/el 

Norman Graham, Leo Grandbois, 



Chesley Green, William Green, Hugo 
Gustafson, Herschel Hager, Stanley 
Haincr, Robert Hakala, Zemery Harden, 
Levi Harris, John Hayes, Louis Helwig, 
Elmer Henning, Elmer Heumann, Gerald 
Hewitt 

Jack Hewitt, Lenford Hines, Edward 
Hoeppner, Anthony Hoffman, Christian 
Holm, Dallas Holmes, Harley Holycross, 
Henry Hoppe, Olaf Hotvedt, Clarence 
Houchins, Arthur Hutt'master, George 
Huffmaster, Clarence Inman, Jacob 
Jacobson, Edward Janke 

Clarence Jarrett, George Jennings, 
Herman Jennings, John Jerore, Ewald 
Johnson, Glen Johnson, Sid Johnson, 
Walter Johnson, Ira Jones, Eli Karvonen, 
Alvie Kaser, Charles Kavan, Hollie Keer- 
an. Ivory Kelm. Arthur Kirkey 

Walter Kline, William Kniffel, Bruce 
Kolak, Reinhardt Kramer, Kurt Lange- 
matz, Norton Lawson, Robert Lawson, 
William Lcckner, Guy Ledbetter, Robert 
Lefevre, John Liberski, Ervin Lincoln, 
Henry Lowe, Dewey Lyke, Thaddeus 
Maciusezek 

Troy Martin, Ted Masters, James 
Matatall, Joseph Maurin, Thomas Mc- 
Arthur, Charles McClellan, Joe McCIel- 
lan, Elmer McCombs, Andrew G. Mc- 
Guinn, Bennie McLaren, Sam McMillan. 
Carl Mews, George Mihelsic, Eric Miller, 
Robert Millspaugh 

Joe Minnick, Thomas Mitchell, Joe 
Montour, Dale Morrison, R. A. Mou- 
land, Patrick Nadon, Eugene Nelson, 
Wilbert Nicola, Edward Nightengale, Ed- 
ward Nordin, Foster Oatley, Charles Old- 
ford, John Olejaszceski, Ole Olson, 
Walter Olszewski 

Ray Osborn, George Osborne, Gerald 
Osburn, Ralph Otto, James Peacock, A. 
O. Pearsall, Algot Pearson, Herbert 
Peebles, James Perry, Martin Pietk. Ed- 
ward Pcdgorski, Howard Powers. Merle 
Procter, Forest Quick, Russell Rattle 

Raymond Reiten, Lloyd Rideout. Jack 
Robertson, Az Root, Peter Roulo. Mike 
Rymar, Irwin Sageman, Charles Schraed- 
er. Fred Schultz, Harold Schultz, Herman 
Schultz, Joseph Sella, Albert Semke, Wil- 
liam Septrion, Thomas Sheppard 

Frank Shively, Harry Sholtz, Hugh 
Siglcr, John Sikkala, Edward Skinger. 
Jack Skinner, Charles Smith, Harry 
Smith, Robert Smith, Hugh Sprott, Nick 
Star, Oiaf Stenback, Graham Sterling, 
Ole Stretlien, Leonard Suikowski 

Charles Surdey, Ernest Swanson, Alex 
Swantek, Raymond Swantek, William 
Taylor, Harold Telling, Howard Telling, 
Russell Tewksbury, Leon Thorley. 
George Thornton, Arthur Thrushman, 
Emil Tober, Erwin Totton, Fred Troke, 
John Troke 

Elmer Trost, Elmo Trueblood. Fred- 
erick Turner, James Turner, George 
Wakefield, Robah Walker, Otto Walter, 
Henry Walthers, Neil Walton, Grover 
Wedding, Elmer Whaley, Robert Whel- 
an, George Wickersham, E. A. Wigle, 
Wilton Witt, Grover Woodruff, Byers 
Young, William Young. 



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LAYOUT LEVEL 

•ACCURATE TO 1/32' 

•REACHES 100 FT. 

•ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
elear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate *wf*' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
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thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
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and give return-mail service. 

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FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 




APRIL, 1970 



31 



AVAILABLE AT LAST! 

The world's first completely self contained mortising tool- 

THE ALL NEW 

0*) MORTISE 
MASTER 




Only $ 29 95 



At last! The perfect, completely 
self contained mortising tool! 
Now you can cut a clean precise 
mortise in seconds with the all NEW 
LP MORTISE MASTER. Automatic 
internal stop gives positive mortise 
depth ... no chance of error ,.--, . no 
chance of marring visible surface. No 
more time consuming measuring or ad- 
justing gauges — positioning arm places LP 
MORTISE MASTER exactly! Automatically 
compensates for door clearance. 
The first size LP MORTISE MASTER offered 
makes automatic 3 1 / 2 "x1 1 /8"x.125" mortises 
for 3Y 2 " x 3Y 2 " butt hinges for use on 1 3 / 8 " in- 
terior doors. To make longer mortises, merely 
overlap the first cut with a second cut. 
The LP MORTISE MASTER is manufactured of the 
finest steel to exact specifications with precision 
ground cutting blades that guarantee clear, no splinter 
cuts. Blades easily removed for sharpening or replacing. 



1. COMPLETELY SELF CONTAINED— No 

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2. AUTOMATIC INTERNAL STOP— Posi- 
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error, no dents or mars. 

3. AUTOMATIC MEASURING— Position- 
ing arm places mortise exactly, au- 
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clearance. 

4. RIGHT OR LEFT HAND OPERATION 

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plus $1.05 shipping 
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Enclosed is my check or money order for $29.95* (plus $1.05 shipping and handling). 
Please ship complete NEW LP MORTISE MASTER 

NAME . 



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ADDRESS- 
CITY 



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_STATE_ 



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ZIP CODEL 



'Residents of Illinois add 5% Sales Tax—Canadian residents add $5.00 to cover duty and handling. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 



(1) TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA 
— Carpenters Local 27 recently honored 
its 25- and 50-year members at a Presen- 
tation Dinner. Those receiving pins were, 
front row, left to right: 50-year members 
F. Ward, F. Thorogood, F. Knight and 
V. Smith; second row, left to right: James 
Tanchuk, George Bartlett, Narare Lan- 
dry, Joseph J. P. Landry, James Mathe- 
son, William Dragan, Tor Jokobson, Eric 
Filppula, Dan Galecki, Raymond Bruce, 
and Fred Nauss. 

(2) TEMPLE TEXAS— Local 1971 re- 
cently awarded its first 50-year pin ever 
to member Oscar G. Wynne. Business 
representative Floyd Boyd, right, made 
the presentation. 

(3) MANCHESTER, N. H.— Members 
of Local 1688 who recently received 25- 
year service pins are, left to right: Paul 
Toll, Walter Schoepf and Gerard Hecker. 
Local president Arthur Gimas, right, 
made the presentation. 

(4) MUSCATINE, IOWA— Carpenters 
Local 1559 recently awarded 25-year pins 
to several of its members. They are, first 
row, left to right: Ralph Smull, John 
Barko, Ann Wollett, Ray Diercks, Don- 
ald Brewer, and Walter Paetz; second 
row: Ed Kreuger, Lyle Hildebrandt, John 
Blaesing, Hugo Braasch, Harold Martin, 
George Cozad, and Ray Brown; third 
row: Orval G. Hubbard, Harvey Lamb, 




Howard Carl, financial secretary Chester 
Hank, president Rusty Reichstein, Mid- 
western Millmen District Council busi- 
ness representative Robert Warosh, who 
made the presentation, and Herbert 
Howard. 





3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes W 
to 9 /, 6 ", $.85 each. 5 / B " to 1", $.95 each. 1 Vb" 
to \Vi", $1.50 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard hales, 7 /b" to 
3". Only $5.00. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, 5 / 8 " to l 3 / 4 ". Only $4.50. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes VV to 
1 VV'. As low as $1 .45 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.35 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 

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every bit as good as Ihe name 



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STAIRCASE 




ELIASON 




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Saves its cost in ONE day — does a 
better job in half time. Each end of 
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locks at exact length and angle for per- 
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Postpaid if payment sent with order, or *iq at 
C.O.D. plus postage Only f I »''J 




ELIASON STAIR 
GAUGE CO. 

6005 Arbour Lane 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55436 



APRIL, 1970 



33 



CLIC REPORT 

Monthly Membership Contributions To The 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 



■ The 1970 CLIC program received a healthy boost in February when 
the Convention of the California State Council of Carpenters raised $2,430 
for the political arm of our Brotherhood. At its meeting of February 22, 
the Los Angeles District Council added some frosting to the cake by col- 
lecting some $233 for the CLIC Fund. 

The Missouri-Kansas Sixth District Business Representatives Training 
Seminar held in March collected $60 which it submitted to the campaign. 

A number of local unions seem to be getting their 1970 campaigns 
started early. Listed below are the local unions which have sent in con- 
tributions since the last tabulation was carried in the magazine. Several 
of the locals listed have sent in monies they collected from their members 
earlier this year and the sum credited to them in this tabulation represents 
a second contribution. ■ 



Amount 

20.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
20.00* 
30.00* 
30.00* 
20.00* 
20.00* 
20.00* 
40.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
10.03* 
50.00* 
40.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
40.00* 
10.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
40.00* 
45.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
20.00* 
30.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
40.00* 
10.00* 
20.00* 





CLIC CONTRIBUTIONS 




L.U. 


City and State 




(as of March 13, 1970) 




1149 


San Francisco 


L.U. 


City and State 


Amount 


1158 
1205 


Berkeley 
Indio 


221 


ARIZONA 

Morenci 


$ 18.00 


1235 
1280 


Modesto 
Mountain View 




CALIFORNIA 




1296 


San Diego 


22 


San Francisco 


30.00* 


1300 


San Diego 


25 


Los Angeles 


40.00* 


1323 


Monterey 


34 


San Francisco 


40.00* 


1358 


La Jolla 


35 


San Rafael 


20.00* 


1400 


Santa Monica 


36 


Oakland 


40.00* 


1407 


San Pedro 


42 


San Francisco 


10.00* 


1408 


Redwood City 


162 


San Mateo 


10.00* 


1418 


Lodi 


180 


Vallejo 


10.00* 


1437 


Compton 


235 


Riverside 


15.00* 


1453 


Costa Mesa 


262 


San Jose 


40.00* 


1473 


Oakland-Fruitvale 


266 


Stockton 


10.00* 


1478 


Redondo 


316 


San Jose 


40.00* 


1486 


Auburn 


365 


Marion 


10.00* 


1490t 


San Diego 


386 


San Andreas 


10.00* 


1496 


Fresno 


483t 


San Francisco 


334.00* 


1497 


E. Los Angeles 


530 


Los Angeles 


20.00* 


1506 


Los Angeles 


550 


Oakland 


40.00* 


1507 


El Monte 


553 


San Diego 


10.00* 


1571 


E. San Diego 


563 


Glendale 


30.00 


1599 


Redding 


642 


Richmond 


30.00* 


1607 


Los Angeles 


668 


Palo Alto 


10.00* 


1622 


Hayward 


701 


Fresno 


50.00* 


1632 


San Luis Obispo 


710 


Long Beach 


40.00* 


1648 


Laguna Beach 


721 


Los Angeles 


30.00* 


1662 


Van Nuys 


743 


Bakersfield 


20.00* 


1752 


Pomona 


751 


Santa Rosa 


20.00* 


1815 


Santa Ana 


769 


Pasadena 


10.00* 


1849 


Pasco 


771 


Watsonville 


20.00* 


1861 


Milpitas 


829 


Santa Cruz 


10.00* 


1869 


Manteca 


844 


Reseda 


30.00* 


1913 


San Fernando 


848 


San Bruno 


20.00* 


1930 


Santa Susana 


907 


Bishop 


10.00* 


1976 


Los Angeles 


925 


Salinas 


20.00* 


2006 


Los Gatos 


929 


Los Angeles 


40.00* 


2015 


Santa Paula 


944 


San Bernardino 


40.00* 


2042 


Oxnard 


946 


Los Angeles 


10.00* 


2046 


Martinez 


981 


Petaluma 


20.00* 


2070 


Roanoke 


1046 


Palm Springs 


30.00* 


2074 


San Diego 


1051 


Sacramento 


10.00* 


2078 


Vista 


1052 


Hollywood 


20.00* 


2164 


San Francisco 


1062 


Santa Barbara 


40.00* 


2170 


Sacramento 


1109 


Visalia 


10.00* 


2172 


Santa Ana 


1113 


San Bernardino 


20.00* 


2203 


Anaheim 


1125 


Los Angeles 


20.00* 


2231 


Los Angeles 


1140 


San Pedro 


20.00* 


2308 


Fullerton 



L.U. City and State Amount 

2375 Los Angeles 40.00* 

2398 El Cajon 30.00* 

2435 Los Angeles 40.00* 

2463 Ventura 40.00* 

2559 San Francisco 20.00* 

2565 San Francisco 20.00* 

2665 Santa Ana 30.00* 

2715 Medford 10.00* 

2767 Morton 10.00* 
Ladies Auxiliary #216-Torrington 10.00* 
Ladies Auxiliary #748-Marysville 10.00* 

COLORADO 

1397 Golden 100.00 

CONNECTICUT 

825 Willamantic 20.00 
FLORIDA 

819 West Palm Beach 120.00 

IDAHO 

2816 Emmett 20.00 
ILLINOIS 

242 Chicago 90.00 

1361 Chester 40.00 

2158 Rock Island 200.00 

INDIANA 

3228 Winchester 70.00 
IOWA 



641 
937 


Fort Dodge 
Dubuque 

MASSACHUSETTS 


40.00 
20.00 


32 

33 

275 

866 

1479 


Springfield 

Boston 

Newton 

Norwood 

Walpole 

MINNESOTA 


40.00 
300.00 
10.00 ; 
25.00 
20.00 


548 
2465 


Minneapolis 
Willmar 


58.00 

20.00 



MISSISSIPPI 

2315 Grenada 

MISSOURI 

61 Kansas City 
2214 Festus 



MONTANA 



Anaconda 



15 

306 

490 

542 

1743 

2018 



1319 



53 

284 

835 

1135 

1456 



971 
1780 

105 

226 



191 
500 
541 



NEW JERSEY 

Hackensack 

Newark 

Passaic 

Salem 

Wildwood 

Lakewood 

NEW MEXICO 

Albuquerque 

NEW YORK 

White Plains 
New York 
Seneca Falls 
Port Jefferson 
New York 



NEVADA 



Reno 

Las Vegas 

Cleveland 



OIUO 



OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia 
York 
Butler 
Washington 



20.00 



40.00 
21.00 



6.00 

171.00 
10.00 
50.00 
40.00 
20.00 

100.00 

39.00 



48.00 
50.00 
20.00 
30.00 
10.00 



10.00* 
20.00* 

113.00 

141.00 



23.00 
80.00 
30.00 
22.00 



Continued on Page 36 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




MEMBER INVENTS SAW UNIT 




E. A. Carroll, member of Local 586, 
Sacramento, Calif., has patented a new 
combination tilting arbor saw which rips 
to four feet, cuts off, miters, is light- 
weight so one man can load or unload 
from a truck. It comes with either a 10- 
or 12-inch blade and its one-horsepower 
motor can operate on either 110 or 22 
volt current. For information, address 
the inventor at 1530 Mission Avenue, 
Carmichael, Calif. 95608. 

PORTABLE WORK TABLE 




A light weight aluminum table that 
will take up to a full size 2" x 12" beam 
is now on the market. Called Porta- 
Table. it sells for $169.50, has a perma- 
nent recessed measuring tape, and per- 
mits accurate miter joints and siding 
cuts. Any portable circular electric saw 
with a full shoe can be used with it. 



Write Ed Raugstad and George Carlberg, 
Porta-Table Corp., 4026 N. Pulaski 
Road, Chicago, 111. 60641. 

TILT-IN WINDOWS 




Double-hung wood windows are now 
available which can be easily tilted in- 
ward for routine cleaning and can also 
be removed, without tools, for mainte- 
nance and cleaning. Available in both 
colonial and contemporary styles, these 
windows can be cleaned from the in- 
side even with an air conditioning unit 
installed. Write the Caldwell Manu- 
facturing Co., P.O. Box 444, Rochester, 
N.Y. 14602. 

REUSE WASTE LUMBER 




A new hydraulic press which converts 
short lengths of waste lumber into usable 
lengths is called the "Lumber Mizer." 
Powered by an electric motor-driven 
"Vanguard Jr." hydraulic pumping unit, 
the compact press produces an accurate 
load-bearing joint with a single stroke. 
An optional 14-inch cut-off saw can be 
attached to the press. Write the Con- 
struction Automation Division of Clary 
Corporation, P.O. Box 1627, Arlington, 
Texas 76010. 



LABORand MATERIAL 
1 COSTS 




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PRICES INCLUDED 
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OF THUMB 



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35 



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Prefab Policy 

Continued from Page 3 

nizing campaign to organize all 
in-plant and erection employ- 
ees of all companies manu- 
facturing prefabricated houses 
or components or modules 
thereof. 

2. Brotherhood members will 
erect all prefabricated housing 
units, components, or modules, 
regardless of the materials. 

3. The United Brotherhood will, 
where appropriate, negotiate 
national agreements for the 
manufacture and erection of 
prefabricated housing with 
firms operating in more than 
one area. These agreements 
will set forth broad, minimum, 
uniform guidelines relative to 
wages and working conditions; 
such guidelines to provide a 
bargaining base which can be 
adapted to meet economic 
standards in any given area. 

4. Local agreements negotiated 
by district councils and/or 
local unions shall comply with 
the uniform guidelines. Agree- 
ments covering in-plant em- 
ployees shall include a pro- 
vision for automatic United 
Brotherhood representation 
whenever such employers ex- 
pand their operations. 

5. The General Office will co- 
ordinate efforts to organize 
companies engaged in the man- 
ufacture and/or erection of all 
types of prefabricated housing. 

While organizing the prefabricat- 
ing industry presents a tremendous 
challenge which our Brotherhood 
must meet promptly and adequately, 
we must not lose sight of the fact 
that conventional construction will 
continue to constitute the backbone 
of the housing field. Regardless of 
how many prefab plants are built, 
many conventional builders will be 
able to hold their own. 

In view of today's skyhigh interest 
rates and the outrageous land costs, 
the percentage of cost of owning a 
house attributable to on-site labor is 
very small. Yet all of the efforts by 
the government and most housing 
agencies is directed toward reducing 
the cost of on-site labor. 



Therefore the prefabricating in- 
dustry has very little advantage 
over conventional construction, since 
the only possible saving lies in 
lower on-site construction costs — 
costs that can be more than eaten 
up by high transportation costs. 

Therefore there should be no let- 
up in our efforts to organize con- 
ventional home builders. Far too 
much of the industry is now un- 
organized and this constitutes a 
road-block to the kind of progress 
we are capable of making. 

A further challenge is posed by 
the phenomenal growth of the 
mobile home industry. As land costs 
and interest rates have driven up 
the price tag on stationary homes, 
people of moderate income have 
turned increasingly to mobile homes. 
Some 400,000 mobile units were 
built in the United States last year. 
The industry accounts for a very 
substantial percent of all the hous- 
ing units sold last year for less than 
$15,000. It seems logical that there 
will be continued growth in the 
mobile home industry and our or- 
ganizing efforts need to be increased 
greatly in this field too. ■ 

CLIC Report 



Continued from Page 34 

L.U. City and State 

TENNESSEE 
50t Knoxville 
345 Memphis 

TEXAS 

San Antonio 



14 



722 



396 
1534 

317 

770 

1289 

1862 



1582 
2073 



UTAH 

Salt Lake City 

VIRGINIA 

Newport News 
Petersburg 

WASHINGTON 

Aberdeen 
Yakima 
Seattle 
Spokane 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Wheeling 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 
Milwaukee 

TOTAL 



Amount 

150.00 
10.00 

20.00 

30.00 

100.00 
20.00 

28.00 
20.00 
30.00* 
14.00 

22.00 



15.00 
10.00 

$5,518.00 



' In addition to previous monies submitted 
to the 1970 Program. 

: Includes contributions from delegates rep- 
resenting their local unions at the state 
council conventions. In some instances, 
these convention contributions were the 
only monies received from the local unions. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




MOR1AM 



L.U. NO. 1 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Aune, Frederick 
Eigenrauch, George Walter 
Elly, Albert 
Guyes, John 
Halcrow, G. J. 
Kerr, Harry 
Knapp, Bert C. 
Limbert, C. O. 
Reetz, Leo 
Rende, Robert J. 
Spee, Ferdinand 
Strofel, August 
Whowell, Bernard F. 

L.U. NO. 7 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Baker, Cecil 
Bjorkland, J. R. 
Bridgeman, Roy 
Brown, Walter J. 
Carlson, Curt H. 
Carlson, Reuben C. 
Edmondson, John 
Hackler, Bradley 
Halverson, Ole 
Hanson, Hans 
Heuer, Wyman 
Huebner, Clarence 
Johnson, John L. 
Johnson, Luther 
Lapham, Lester 
Miller, Peter 
Ness, Peder A. 
Person, Peter 
Satterlund. G. N. 
Swanson, C. A. 
Swanson, Herbert 
Thompson, Andrew G. 
Vallin. Gust 
Whaley, Clinton 

L.U. NO. 12 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Caruso, Antonio 
Showers, Nelson 

L.U.NO. 15 
HACKENSACK. N. J. 

Larsen, Conrad H., Jr. 

L.U.NO. 21 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Neugebauer, Max 

L.U. NO. 25 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Akerson, E. 
Boston, Curlin 
Bradford, George S. 
Jacobs, Alfred 
Larson, William 
Maupin, H, Q. 
Nielsen, Ottis A. 
O'Gora. James B. 
Olsen, Mike 
Phillips, Henry M. 
Paiz, Wilfred O. 
Querner, Dee H. 
Setbacken, Ambrose 
Simmons, H. B. 
Sparks, William B. 
Stewart, Ernest L. 
Taylor, Johnny 
Wilson, Lee 
Writer, James E. 



L.U. NO. 27 
TORONTO., ONT., CAN. 

Aukstakaunis, A. 
Burgess, Charles 
Cole, Reuben 
Javainen, Andy 
Jonsson, Axel H. 
Kraut. Raymond 
McGarr, Fred 
Milne, James F. 
Rodgers. Samuel 
Ross, H. K. (Pensioner) 
Sinclair, Wm. G. 

L.U. NO. 31 
TRENTON, N. J. 

Bready, Charles 
Crawford. Eugene 
Duboaky, Nick 
McCrohan, Maurice 
Slack, Carl 

L.U. NO. 32 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Mason, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 35 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Flores, Julian 
Upton, Robert 

L.U. NO. 38 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 

Burk. C. 

Mallette. N. 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Brussard. William 
Hermistone, John 
Robey. Edwin 
Smallman, William 
Temple. Clifton 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOVILLE. TENN. 

Thompson, W. C. 
Whitaker, W. J. 

L.U. NO. 51 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Carnes. Kenneth 
Tanch. Emery P. 
Walker, David K. 

L.U. NO. 54 
CICERO. ILL. 

Binkowski, Chester 
Lodl, James 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY. MO. 

Franzen, Oscar F. 
Mitchell, Thomas C. 

L.U. NO. 62 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Anderson, John S. 
Benson, Oscar 
Kershasky, Floyd 
Mattes, Arthur 
Nylen. Herman 
Thorne, John W. 
Van Dam, Martin 

L.U. NO. 82 
HAVERHILL, MASS. 

Bartlett, Mike 



L.U. NO. 87 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Anderson, Edward A. 
Bauler, Donald 
Eng, Dennis 
Hellie, Ed 
Jacobsen, Albert 
Lenzmeier, Larry 
Meier, Charles 
Pederson, Arne 
Seed, Kenneth 

L.U. NO. 98 
SPOKANE. WASH. 

Benson, John E. 
Barberow, Henry B. 
Carter, Robert W. 
Causey, John F, 
Drews, Raymond J. 
Falk, Clifford E. 
Fredrickson. Karl A. 
Fulwiler, Charles J. 
Hogue, LeRoy 
Maass, John 
Maxted, Harry I, 
McConnell, Del C. 
McLeave, A. L. 
Meine, Paul I.. 
Nevdahl, H. O. 
Porterfield, John C. 
Reel, Paul I. 
Saucier, Louis 
Smith, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE. MD. 

Dove, Howard E. 
Schluter, Milton E. 
Smith, Wilbur 
Taylor, Willard W. Jr. 
Weyrich, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 103 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Chavers, Cecil Harold 
Edge, Henry J. 
Henry, David A. 
Hughes, Cecil T. 
Jordan, William Ellis 
Karnegy, A. W. 
Moore, R. T. 
Stevens, H, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 104 
DAYTON. OHIO 

Browning, Herman 
Eldridge, Ellis D. 
Few, Donald O. 
Gilbert, George 
Long, Oscar Ernest 
Sims. Jessie 
Stebbins, Lester 
Williams, James B. 
Zwirner, John 

L.U.NO. Ill 
LAWRENCE. MASS. 

Chirks, John 
Hibbert, James 

L.U.NO. 121 
VINELAND. N. J. 

Anderson, Einar 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Davis, R. T. 
Dreyer, George J. 



Dunlap, Madison B. 
Evans. Richard E. 
Keller John M. 
Park. Fred A. 

L.U. NO. 135 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Becker, Sam 
Gorelick, Rubin 
Hipper, Sam 
Hyman, Joe 
Kantrowitz, Benjamin 
Kohl. Hyman 
Osman, Albert 
Rintel. Hyman 
Rothstein, Sam 
Shapiro. Abraham 
Zajfman. Nathan 
Zaniewski, Edward 

L.U. NO. 155 

PLA INFIELD, N.J. 

Thomas, George A, 

L.U. NO. 166 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Brussel. Edward 
Devenyns, Clement 

L.U.NO. 180 
VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Oliver, Harry 
Yates. Franklin 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Berg. Emil 
Karum, John 

L.U. NO. 188 
YONKERS, N. Y. 

Tesoro. Albert A. 
Weist. Gerald C. 

L.U. NO.211 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Blosat. Emil 
Gerwig, Charles S. 
Humbert, Earl M. 
McNeal, Alexander 
Mikut. John 
Stadnick, Gustav 
Sutherland, Charles 

L.U. NO. 218 
ALLSTON, MASS. 

Almeida. Anthony 
Inman. George 
LeGrow, Reuben 
LeGrow, William 
Sherritt. Stanley 
Summers, George E. 

L.U. NO. 219 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

DeMartini, William 
Loewy, Joe 
Opitz, Gus 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Carr. Ben H. 
Timmons, John E. 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Ramelow, Ernest 



L.U. NO. 248 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Schwartz, William H. 

L.U. NO. 257 

NEW YORK. N. Y. 

Cizek, Frank 
Hendrickson. August 
Leitgeb, Frank 
Novick, Nathan 
Panzarino, Pasquale 

L.U. NO. 343 
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 

Brava, Manuel 
Crowe, Neil 
Denesovitch, Peter 
Dickson, Melville 
Epp, John 
Frank, H. G. 
Holmes, George 
Krill, Nick 
Slobodian, Michael 
Tweedley, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 359 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Ellmer, Frank 
Feracco, George 
Moser, John 
Nelson, Edward D. 

L.U. NO. 366 
BRONX, N. Y. 

Smario, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 422 

NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

Woodrow, James L. 

L.U. NO. 488 
BRONX, N. Y. 

Aalto, Uno 
Johnson, Charles 
Johnson, George 
Johnson, Henry 
Levish, Sam 
Mardirosian, Paul 
Moskowitz, Hyman 
Olsen, Tom 
Silverstein, Eddie 
Wohlfahrt, Herman 
Yates, Pasquale 

L.U. NO. 494 
WINDSOR, ONT. 

French, T. 
Pigeon, H. 
Vidmar, V. 

L.U. NO. 579 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Buckle, John L. 
Harnum, Jonas 
Thorne, Richard 

L.U. NO. 586 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Barkman. George 
Carlile, Nathan E. 
Cowan, Noah W. 
Gau, Mike C. 
Hume, Alfred 
Ricard. Raymond 
Sloan, Robert L. 

L.U. NO. 606 
VIRGINIA, MINN. 

Woods, Everett 

Continued on next page 



APRIL, 1970 



37 



IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from Preceding page 



L.U. NO. 608 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Caprioglio, Albino 
Horan, Michael 
Jenkinson, Chris 
Liebler. William 
Piersley, Charles 
Wixted, Mathew 

L.U. NO. 620 
MADISON, N. J. 

Brenner, Howard 
Miller. Stephen 
Zahn, Edwin 

L.U. NO. 639 
AKRON, OHIO 

Benedum. Glen 
Huft, John 
Puster, John 
Reitz, Emery E. 
Schwendaman, A. J. 
Sigier, Adolph 

L.U. NO. 661 
OTTAWA, ILL. 

Halterman, Abe 

L.U. NO. 668 

PALO ALTO, CALIF. 

Spires, Loyd O. 

L.U. NO. 690 
LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 

Bosshart, Rudolph 
King. Hubert U. 
Madden, Eddley 
Mann, John W. 
Morehead, William T. 
Stringfellow, Ted B. 

L.U.NO.715 
ELIZABETH, N. J. 

Jacobs, Jack 
Leonard, John 
Nycz, Joseph 
Wood, Edward E. 

L.U. NO. 721 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Brooker, Walter 
Carlson, Oscar 
Danziger, Harry 
Getz, George A. 
Henry, William J. 
Hynek. Marion 
Jacobs, Morry 
Kerekes, George 
Mendler, Adam 
Taylor, Charles J. 

L.U. NO. 770 
YAKIMA, WASH. 

Bell, William 
Naasz. R. H. 

L.U.NO. 791 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Clippard, John 
Nystrom, Frank 
Wade, Frank 
Zacher, Ehard 

L.U. NO. 925 
SALINAS, CALIF. 

Kelly, Elbert S. 



L.U. NO. 929 

SOUTH GATE, CALIF. 

Anderson, John A. 
Baugh, Thomas L. 
Brown, George W. 
Carter, Jim 
Chapman, George 
Clements, T. L. 
Foote, B. W. Sr. 
Fuller, C. Earl 
Gibson, P. H. 
Grabowski, Steve 
MacLean, Matthew D. 
Paradis, A. M. 
Peters, Norman L. 
Poland. L. N. 
Sanford, James L. 

L.U. NO. 950 
LYNBROOK, N. Y. 

Scott, James A. 
White, John 

L.U. NO. 977 
WICHITA FALLS, TEX. 

Joyner. Harry N. 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

McMullin, Austin 

L.U. NO. 1006 
MILLTOWN, N. J. 

Franks, Adam 

L.U. NO. 1072 
MUSKOGEE, OKLA. 

Damet, William Fred 
Westbrook, H. C. 

L.U.NO. 1128 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Hoffman, Robert W. 

L.U.NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Eldridge, J. F. 

L.U.NO. 1143 
LA CROSSE, WIS. 

Frectchl. Al 
Neprud, Levi 
Thies, Steve 
Yeoman, Stan 

L.U.NO. 1164 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Arzt, Abe 
Baier, Charles 
Brauns, Charles 
Fasullo, Joseph 
Greenberg, Archie 
Lewandowski, Alex 
Lindermeyer, Otto 
Neustadter, John 

L.U.NO. 1172 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Blackburn, Richard 

L.U.NO. 1175 
KINGSTON. N. Y. 

Kerr, Victor E. 

L.U. NO. 1185 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Wallace, Paul C. 



L.U. NO. 1236 
MICHIGAN CITY, IND. 

Busscher. Joel 

L.U. NO. 1266 
AUSTIN, TEX. 

Meredith, Marvin E. 
Neitsche, Carlie A. 
Ottinger, J. M. 
Raven, Edward M. 
Rogertson, Lee A. 

L.U. NO. 1289 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Anderson, Arvid 
Christian, Olaf 
Erickson, Edward B. 
Fairchild, Freeman L. 
Fullam, Henry P. 
Griffin, A. B. 
Mackey, Earl H. 
Morse, Jack Sr. 
Olinger, Cecil L. 
Seanor, H. G. 

L.U. NO. 1292 
HUNTINGTON, N. Y. 

Peterson, John O. 

L.U. NO. 1296 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Barnes, Carl M. 
Benson, Elbert H. 
Bollman, Andrew P. 
Booker, Edwin L. 
Butcher, J. N. 
Caughey, Floyd 
Dinkins, William H. 
Elliott, Celand F. 
Foster, Lenzy L. 
Grim, Frank 
Hill. BO. 

Kostenbauder, Albert 
Mansur, Alan J. 
Moody, A. G. 
McClanahan. Thomas 
Ransom, C. K. 
Roberts, M. L. 
Serrato, Jack 
Smith, John O. 
Thomas, Adlowe 
Tomlinson, John E. 
Torgeson. Ole 
Washington, Robert L. 

L.U. NO. 1325 
EDMONTON, ALBERTA 

Pollard, Lewis D. 

L.U. NO. 1335 
WILMINGTON, CALIF. 

Lewis, O. W. 
Slayton, Leroy C. 
Usrey, Walter S. 

L.U. NO. 1353 
SANTA FE, N. MEX. 

Fernandez, Felix 
Lisson, Harry 
Ortega. Felix R. 

L.U. NO. 1373 
FLINT, MICH. 

Griffith, Fred 
Sutton, William J. 

L.U.NO. 1471 
JACKSON, MISS. 

Bullard, Chester 
Clark, E. D. 
Cosby, J. B. 
Garber, S. D. 
Garrett, James W. 
Morris, Willie 
Ovesby, A. A. 



Patterson, J. H. 
Rhodes, A. J. 
Robinson, H. L. 
Smith, William R. 
Tolbert, James A. 
Yarbrough, Charles Earl 

L.U. NO. 1478 
REDONDO BEACH, 
CALIF. 

Callahan, William H. Sr. 
Hampton, Jesse J. 
Noriega, Richard A. 
Schnoor, William F. 

L.U. NO. 1513 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Pierce, Lambert 
Tomassini, Geno 

L.U. NO. 1587 
HUTCHINSON, KANS. 

Brown, George 
Hostettler, Mike A. 

L.U. NO. 1590 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Barrett, Alonza W. 
Dove, Carlyse M. 
Harding, Leon H. 
Horowitz, Sol 
Langston, Jonas D. 
Latham, John I. 
Nelson, Arthur W. 
Reynolds, Laurist E. 
Williams, Homer 

L.U. NO. 1599 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Gatchett, William 

L.U. NO. 1615 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Hoogewind, Chris 
Johnson, Peter 
Slachter, Gerrit 

L.U. NO. 1699 
PASCO, WASH. 

Gunter, Willard 
Hatcher, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1741 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Clausing, Carl 
Demi, Herman 
Etzel, Elmer M. 



Ewald, Harold 
Fischer, Clarence J. 
Fleischmann, George 
Heger, Edmund 
Pokel, Carl E. 
Ponschock, Joseph J. 
Schemenauer, Edward M. 
Schmidt. Emil C. 
Schuler. Milton P. 
Schwartz, Alex R. 
Wenninger, Joseph C. Sr. 
White, Joseph D. 
Wolf, Randall J. 
Yenter, Harry J. 
Zingen, Arnold 

L.U. NO. 1784 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kiechler, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1837 
BABYLON, L. I., N. Y. 

Aberg, Alfred 
Fellman, Eric 

L.U. NO. 1846 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Cole, Morris 
Edwards, A. R. 
Sims, W. T. 
Trascher, Conrad C. 
Tureaud, Louis 
Waterman, O. M. 

L.U. NO. 1971 
TEMPLE, TEX. 

Pate, H. L. 

L.U. NO. 2012 
SEAFORD, DEL. 

Davis, James 
Wright, Glenn 

L.U. NO. 2073 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Timper, Fred 

L.U. NO. 2161 
CATSKILL, N. Y. 

Kabatar, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 2205 
WENATCHEE, WASH. 

Brown, Elmer 
Johannsen, Hans P. 
Wilt, Perry 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Arco Publishing Co 


23 


Audel, Theodore 


39 




31 


Chicago Technical College . . 


21 


Cline-Sigmon. Publishers .... 


36 


Craftsman Book Co 


35 


Eliason Stair Guage Co 


33 


Estwing Manufacturing 


24 




19 




36 


Garlinghouse 


35 


Goldblatt Tool Co 


29 




31 




33 


Lee, H. D 


29 


Locksmithing Institute 


24 


LP Manufacturing 


32 


Lufkin Rule Co 


17 


Nelson Industries 


23 




39 


Stanley Works Back Cover 


True Temper 


28 


Vaughan and Bushnell 


26 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



£a£p&wd 





Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida. 



Albert Johnson, of Local 655, Key 
West, Florida, arrived at the Home 
February 2, 1970. 

9 
John M. Oldham, of Local 1419, 
Johnstown. Pa., arrived at the Home 
February 9, 1970. 

• 
William A. Dent, of Local 993, Miami, 
Fla., arrived at the Home February 13, 
1970. 

• 
Carl G. L. Jacobson, of Local 62, 
Chicago, 111., died February 1, 1970. 
Burial was in Chicago. 
• 
Algot Johnson, of Local 94, Provi- 



dence. Rhode Island, died February 3, 
1970. Burial was in Providence. 
9 
Edgar James Lesher. of Local 627, 
Jacksonville, Fla.. died February 7. 1970. 
He was buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
George G. Dunlop, of Local 1 856. 
Philadelphia, Pa., died February 11. 
1970. Burial was in Philadelphia. 
• 
Arthur Neff. of Local 213. Houston. 
Texas, died February 14, 1970. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
Moses Warner, of Local 842. Pleasant- 
ville. N. L, died February 25. 1970. 
Burial was near Philadelphia. 



Strong Job Safety-Health Bill Urged 



■ Passage of a strong occupa- 
tional safety and health bill is a must 
item on the agenda of this session of 
Congress, the AFL-CIO Executive 
Council declared recently. 

It reiterated "in strongest terms" 
the endorsement by the 1969 AFL- 
CIO convention of legislation intro- 
duced by Rep. James G. O'Hara CD- 
Mich.) and Sen. Harrison A. Wil- 
liams, Jr. (D-N.J.) to provide on- 
the-job safety and health standards. 

The measure would direct the 
Secretary of Labor to set the stand- 
ards and enforce them with the pow- 
er to shut down an unsafe operation 
in an emergency. Health standards 
would be based on recommenda- 
tions from the Dept. of Health, Edu- 
cation & Welfare. 

Adoption of the legislation, ade- 
quately funded and staffed, "will be 
the first decisive step toward the 
ultimate achievement of a safe and 
healthy place of employment for all 
American workers," the council 
said. 



The council's statement on the 
subject urged all AFL-CIO affiliates 
"to immediately use every means 
within their power" to appeal to 
their congressional delegations for 
passage. 

"As every working man and 
woman knows," the council pointed 
out, "the danger of death or crip- 
pling illness or accident on the job 
is a constant and growing hazard." 

Yet, it continued, there is no state 
with a completely adequate safety 
and health law and in many states 
such laws "are absolutely inade- 
quate." 

Noting that both the previous and 
present Administrations have urged 
enactment of federal legislation, the 
council added, "The issue is no 
longer whether or not any legisla- 
tion should be adopted, but what 
kind of legislation." 

With that made clear, the AFL- 
CIO leaders urged Congress to stop 
the mounting death and injury toll 
by enacting the O'Hara-Williams bill 
"at the earliest possible date." ■ 



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39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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What Shortage of Skilled Construction Labor? 



■ While skyscrapers continue to rise in the 
downtown areas of most of America's major cities, 
round about these giant edifices ordinary John-Doe 
citizens cry out for adequate housing. The modern 
marvels of steel and concrete look down on ghettos 
built before the turn of the 20th Century, where 
trapped people — men, women, and children — 
seek their livelihoods in polluted air, amid grimy 
surroundings. 

Two things are required to improve this picture 
... to create beautiful residential communities in 
cities and suburbs: money and manpower. 

Both can become available, if Congress and the 
Administration will take the proper steps. 

The money is tied down by forbidding high- 
interest rates in bank vaults, as bankers turn away 
from residential housing toward short-term, specu- 
lative investments. 

Other money is tied up by a Congress which 
will not give proper funding to the Housing Act 
of 1968. 

We spend millions on questionable military pro- 
curements, while many citizens are forced to share 
living quarters with strangers in order to pay the 
rent. 

The Nixon Administration and various reaction- 
ary elements have blamed organized labor for the 
housing shortage, claiming that skilled building 
and construction trades have kept their member- 
ship rolls closed and tightened apprenticeship 
training programs in order to bring high pay to 
their journeymen. 

The facts do not bear this out: The Federal 
government's own figures for February, 1970. 



show a 7.9 percent unemployment rate among 
construction workers. During that month nearly a 
half-million skilled construction workers were idle. 

Certainly this does not indicate that there is any 
shortage of construction labor. The nearly half- 
million unemployed construction workers could 
have turned out. during that idle month, thousands 
of new housing units to ease the crisis. 

As we have said many times before, the cost of 
labor is not responsible for the high cost of 
housing. Between 1949 and 1969 on-site labor 
decreased from 33 to 18 percent of the cost of 
building a home, while in the same period, the 
cost of land rose from 11 to 21 percent, financing 
for a home went from 5 to 10 percent and mate- 
rials increased from 36 to 38 percent. 

President Nixon, late last year, put a freeze on 
many types of Federal construction as a measure 
to curb inflation. He recently announced that he 
was freeing $1.5 billion in state and federal funds 
for public construction and withdrawing a request 
he made to governors to postpone state-financed 
construction voluntarily. 

He called for the doubling of the production of 
subsidized housing from 223,600 units in 1969 
to 450,000 units in 1 970, and he proposed author- 
ity for the Federal National Mortgage Association 
to deal in conventional as well as FHA and VA 
mortgages. 

These and other steps should give some impetus 
to residential construction this spring. 

The manpower is ready to tackle the big task. 
Union construction labor has the skills, if govern- 
ment and management will only unravel the finan- 
cial morass. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



"DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT . . . 

ITS ONLY AN OFF-YEAR ELECTION!" 




The conservative forces would have you believe that the election next 
November 3 is a "mere nothing . . . you might as well not even vote in it." 

Oh yeah? True, there's no President and Vice President being elected, 
but just about everybody else is getting into the act. The entire House of 
Representatives is up for election. A third of the Senate is to be elected or 
re-elected. There are 35 governorships to be decided. In the states there are 
1,460 seats in upper and lower houses at stake. 

And this election isn't important? You bet it is! 

The big business interests who make money when wages are down and 
profits are high would just love it for you to "sit this one out." They could 
hand-pick their stooges and get them into key positions where they could 
roll back the liberal gains that have been made in the past generation. In 
order to get yes-men into Congress and the state legislatures, they contribute 
heavily to political campaigns. 

But who is going to finance YOUR candidates? Who is going to help 
pay for the campaigns of the liberals who, if elected, will vote FOR the 




people's interest and AGAINST the special interests? It's up to YOU, 
Brother! . . . and millions of others like you! 

Sit down and write a generous check or money order right now . . . 
make it double or triple what you originally planned, and send it to 



CARPENTERS' LEGISLATIVE IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 



Your contribution, added to the contributions of thousands of others, 
will help to insure that liberals sit in the legislative halls. There won't be 
reactionaries there, passing anti-labor legislation, cutting down on social 
services, hand-tailoring legislation for the super-rich and the special interests. 



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MAY 1970 




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Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 



flf 



H'd 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington. D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 

Members who die or are suspended are 
automatically dropped from the mailing 
list of The Carpenter. 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, 



Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local No - 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



e&EypHErEr 




VOLUME XC 



No. 5 



MAY, 1970 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Legislative Conference Urges Solutions to Housing Dilemma 2 

Training Seminar for Organizers 6 

Member's House Copied; Original To Be Demolished 7 

Union-Made Buildings 'On the Move' 8 

Revamped Board Back In Business 9 

Issues of the 70s: Tight Money 12 

Two Views On Rising Hospital Costs 14 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 5 

Editorials 11 

Plane Gossip 17 

Canadian Report 20 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 23 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 25 

Service to the Brotherhood 30 

Local Union News 32 

We Congratulate 36 

What's New? 37 

In Memoriam 38 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS. ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20f in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

There are few joys equal to that 
of fishing a swift stream fed by the 
melting snows on nearby majestically 
mantled mountains. The angler on 
our cover this month is in the process 
of netting another finny denizen of a 
remarkably pollution-free environ- 
ment; the high ground where indus- 
tries are unknown and litterbugs do 
not penetrate. 

The angler might be in any number 
of attractive National Parks in the 
western region of the nation. Glacier 
Park in northwestern Montana has 
more than a million acres of rugged 
mountain beauty, 60 small glaciers 
and more than 200 lakes fed by them. 
In northwest Wyoming is Grand 
Teton Park. 303.000 acres of moun- 
tain grandeur. 

Kings Canyon Park in middle east- 
ern California has almost 460.000 
acres of Sierra wilderness, many peaks 
up to 15.000 feet and groves of giant 
Sequoia trees. Mount Rainier Park in 
west central Washington with almost 
242.000 acres boasts the greatest 
single-peak glacial system in the U.S. 
and dense forests. 

There are many other National 
Parks of great attractiveness, from 
Acadia in Maine to the Everglades in 
Florida and Big Bend in Texas. All 
lend themselves to fascinating vaca- 
tions featuring outdoors beauty and 
attractions such as camping, explor- 
ing and fishing. 




Legislative Conference Urges Solutions t 



B The subject of housing, in all 
its forms, prevailed in virtually 
every address by prominent speak- 
ers appearing before the Building 
and Construction Trades Depart- 
ment Legislative Conference, held in 
Washington, D. C, March 23-26. 
Concerned Congressmen, various 
AFL-CIO leaders, and top Admin- 
istration officials discussed the high 
cost of housing, the lack of housing, 
the quality of today's housing, and 
the myth of "insufficcient housing 
manpower." Inflation, unemploy- 
ment and current Administration 
policies, and environmental prob- 
lems were also under scrutiny. 

Upon hearing of the current status 
of housing and associated labor, so- 
cial and economic conditions, dele- 
gates to the 15th Annual Confer- 
ence began action on the widest- 
range legislative program ever 
evolved by the Department. Follow- 
ing a long day of listening, the 3000- 
plus delegates devoted the next two 
days, as in previous years, visiting 
their own Senators and Represent- 
atives to urge prompt and favorable 



action on bills to carry out the pro- 
gram. 

The delegates, after taking their 
problems and programs to Capitol 
Hill, reported back to the Depart- 
ment about their reception with their 
various Congressmen. Urged on by 
the impending crisis in construction, 
conferees then returned to their 
homes, in 600 cities and all 50 
states, to build grass-roots support 
for the strong legislative program 
outlined at the Washington meeting. 

The pressing nature of this year's 
legislative effort was stressed in the 
keynote address of BCTD President 
C. J. Haggerty. "Never before has 
our legislative conference been of 
more importance. The very fabric 
of our domestic society is being test- 
ed and even our personal health is 
continuously being threatened by 
uncontrolled pollution of our air and 
our waters . . . 

"We are confronted," President 
Haggerty continued, "with one of 
the worst inflationary spirals in our 
history, triggered first by the rais- 



ing of interest rates and then fueled 
by business administering prices on 
a 'what the market will bear' basis. 
In the midst of this runaway infla- 
tion we are going into a most wide- 
spread recession with the accompa- 
nying tragedy of severe unemploy- 
ment." 

More than 500,000 building 
tradesmen were jobless as of March 




THE CARPENTER 



Dusing Dilemma 



1, an unemployment rate of nearly 
nine percent, Haggerty pointed out, 
and the impact is sure to be felt by 
producers and suppliers of building 
materials. "The production last year 
was not even half of that and this 
year, at the present rate, it will be 
even less . . ." 

Following the delegates' full day 
in general assembly, the presidents 



of international unions affiliated 
with the Building and Construction 
Trades Department met with Presi- 
dent Nixon in the White House. The 
90-minute session was featured by a 
candid exchange of views on vir- 
tually every current issue from ap- 
prenticeship to Viet Nam. The Pres- 
ident indicated that there would be 
Continued on next page 





M. A. Hutcheson, General President of 
the International Brotherhood, right 
(photo at ahove left), chats with Henry 
Saracusa, business representative of Lo- 
cal 111, Lawrence, Mass., left. James 
Bailey, Carpenters Legislative Represent- 
ative, center, looks on. 



United Association President Peter T. 
Schoeniann, standing (photo above), dis- 
cusses the legislative program at the 
speakers' platform with Bricklayers Pres- 
ident Thomas F. Murphy and Interna- 
tional Brotherhood President M. A. 
Hutcheson. 



At left, Building and Construction Trades 
Department President C. .1. Haggerty 
calls into general session the fifteenth 
annual Legislative Conference. Presidents 
of various international unions affiliated 
with the department are seated on the 
Front row of the platform. 



LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM 

1970 

Building and Construction 

Trades Department, AFL-CIO 

Although the first session of the 91st 
Congress was one of the longest on 
record, it had the lowest legislative output 
of bills since 1933. Numerous bills of 
interest to labor, which should now be 
public law, are still pending. Congress 
enacts what the people want and demand, 
but the people must first make their views 
heard. The goal of the Legislative Con- 
ference is to make the voice of labor 
heard again. Below are just a few of the 
vital issues where Congressional action 
is being urged. 

On-Site Picketing Amendment. Hear- 
ings have been held in House, and a re- 
port from Secretary of Labor is awaited. 

Repeal of Section 14(b). Labor is sup- 
porting the first of several bills introduced 
in the House that would nullify state 
right-to-work laws by repealing section 
14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act. 

Joint Labor-Management Industry Pro- 
motion Funds. House has passed legisla- 
tion in 1965 and 1968. and Senate has 
considered bill. After heated debate this 
measure has been sent back to the Senate. 

Lease-Option. Two bills in the House 
and one in the Senate have been intro- 
duced, with labor support, which would 
require extended compliance with the 
Davis-Bacon Act in the construction, 
modification, repair, painting, etc.. of 
buildings leased by Post Offices or other 
government agencies. 

Implementation of Construction Safety 
Act of 1969. News standards are needed 
to properly implement and enforce law. 

Occupational Health and Safety. 
Senate Labor Subcommittee is near com- 
pletion of hearings on this legislation, 
and House group is expected to soon re- 
port a bill to full committee for consid- 
eration. Several bills have been intro- 
duced, some which would assure safe 
working conditions, provide safety re- 
search, education, and information; others 
would just further confuse real problems. 
Close scrutiny is needed to insure that 
meaningful bills be passed. 

Workmen's Compensation — Federal 
Standards to Insure Uniform State Bene- 
fits. Congress should act to make certain 
that no victim of a job-related accident 
lacks the funds he needs to pay his medi- 
cal bills and support his family. There 
is now no state-to-state uniformity. 

Unemployment Compensation — Fed- 
eral Minimum Benefits Standards. Only 
a beginning has been made in proposed 
legislation. 

Many other bills need action. To name 
a few: Fair Labor Standards Act Amend- 
ments, amendments to Landrum-Griffin 
Act, Farm Labor bills, inclusion of sub- 
sistence allowance in Davis-Bacon Act. 
railroad retirement. Organized labor is 
just as interested in other important leg- 
islation including those affecting our en- 
vironment, national health insurance, tax 
justice, and the problem of inflation. 




C. J. Haggerty, BCTD President, left, asks a question being pondered by General 
President M. A. Hutcheson, right, and Al Silverman, labor public relations consultant. 





All Brotherhood delegates assem- 
bled with General Officers on the 
second day of the Conference for 
a special luncheon. Here are views 
of some of the participants. 



Candid Views of the Brotherhood Luncheon 




"a lot of work" in the construction 
industry in the near future. But be- 
yond this forecast, the union lead- 
ers came away with the feeling that 
there had been little genuine com- 
munication between them and the 
President. 

Overall, however, the Adminis- 
tration and its policies took a beat- 
ing under the verbal barrage of sev- 
eral Legislative Conference speakers. 

House Speaker John W. McCor- 
mack warned delegates that "We 
are witnessing an unfortunate replay 
of what happened during the 1950's. 
In 1957 the Republican Adminis- 
tration . . . pursued economic poli- 
ices which crippled the housing in- 
dustry. The sickness in housing 
then spread like a virus through the 
entire economy . . . Unless action is 
taken and taken immediately ... I 
fear a similar economic catastrophe 
awaits the country." 

AFL-CIO Legislative Director 
Andrew J. Biemiller, who briefed 
delegates on the problems to be 
faced in coming months, stressed 
that these problems exist because of 
"an Administration that talks one 
way and acts another." 

Biemiller termed the Administra- 
tion's proposed transportation labor 
disputes law "Rube Goldberg gim- 
mickry" that would make a mock- 
ery of collective bargaining and "has 
got to be defeated.'" 

Senator Harrison Williams, Dem- 
ocrat of New Jersey, charged in his 
address to Conference delegates that 
the Administration is misleading the 
nation by seeking to put the blame 
for high housing costs on labor. 

Senator Alan Cranston, Demo- 
crat of California, in his turn at the 
Conference rostrum, declared "that 
it is unwise, improper and unjust if 
our government, acting to protect 
the dollars that some people have, 
takes steps that mean other people 
won't have any dollars at all." 

Continuing the criticism of Ad- 
ministration-assisted inflation and 
unemployment and apparent lack of 
concern in the area of construction 
safety, Senator Ralph Yarborough, 
Democrat of Texas, exclaimed that 
"Everybody who ever worked knows 
the thing a working man dreads is 
getting hurt and being off the job 
and getting those old measly pay- 
Continued on Page 35 

4 THECARPENTER 




ROUNDUP 



AID FOR "THE MIDDLE-MAN"— Howard Bahem, former printing company controller of 
Adelphi, Maryland, is registered in Washington as a professional lobbyist. He has 
founded the Average Citizens, Voters and Taxpayers Association of America. Its 
aim: to obtain- a better break on Federal, state and local taxes for that forgotten 
man, the middle-income taxpayer. Two of his group's primary goals are to cut gov- 
ernment spending and curtail tax deductions now allowed wealthy individuals and 
corporations. According to the Wall Street Journal, "Mr. Bahem is finding more 
doors open at the offices of Congressmen willing to listen to his views. Senators 
ranging the political spectrum from conservative Republican Barry G-oldwater of 
Arizona to liberal Democrat Vance Hartke of Indiana have written letters endorsing 
his association's aims." The annual dues are $5, but one "average" Texan donated 
$1,000 for a lifetime membership. 

THE CAPITOL TRASHBIN— Washington, D.C., is experiencing difficulty in ridding itself 
of its trash. It formerly burned most of it, but anti-pollution forces said the 
smoke was poisoning the air. The District considered filling marsh areas, but 
conservationists said that would ruin spawning grounds for water life. A move to 
use a land fill in nearby Prince Georges County was thwarted in the courts by 
Maryland forces. 

low Southern Railways has offered the city government a proposal to build a 
special processing plant. It would compress the trash into bales which would then 
be shipped on special flatcars to a land-fill site 100 miles south in rural 
Virginia. 

NO LAUGHING MATTER— A recent ruling by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 
makes it illegal for a supervisor to tell "Polish jokes" where a worker of Polish 
extraction is employed. The ruling has been attacked by a Washington comedy 
writer on the ground that it violates the supervisor's right of free speech as 
provided for in the First Amendment. 

4,000 CONGRESSMEN?— When the founding fathers structured the present form of gov- 
ernment, there was one representative provided for every 30,000 citizens. Consid- 
erable debate took place at the time on the question: is this enough represen- 
tation? Today the average number of people represented by each of the 435 
Congressmen is nearly 500,000. If the original rate of representation had been 
continued, the House of Representatives today would contain more than 4,000 
Congressmen. 

Few legislatures in the world approach the U.S. House of Representatives in 
the numbers of people represented. Russia has one representative for each 300,000 
citizens, Great Britain one for each 60,000 inhabitants, France one for every 
93,000 and Brazil one for every 150,000. 

IN SUPPORT OF HOUSING— The National Urban Coalition's housing task force is at work 
on a set of proposals designed to help break Federal housing program bottlenecks 
and stimulate more low- and moderate-income housing. 

The program will call for restructuring the present housing subsidies program 
which allegedly makes it possible for communities to ignore housing needs of 
lower-income families. It will call for reorganization of lower-income housing 
programs so they can operate regionally or statewide in order to improve produc- 
tion and process. Federal authority to cut through restrictive codes on fed- 
erally-assisted housing will be called for, as will authority to meet housing 
needs directly whenever other levels of government fail to act. Finally, the 
group will call for adoption of a "land bank" whereby land will be acquired in ad- 
vance of need for public purposes, including subsidized housing. 

MAY, 1970 S 




First General Vice President William Sidell speaks to the organizers, above. General Secretary R. E. Livingston addresses them 
below. 

Organizers work to improve their 'win average . . . 

Seminars Brief Organizers on Modular and Pre-Fab Problems 



■ The changing nature of the con- 
struction industry and the vast 
growth in pre-fabrication is posing 
a great organizing challenge to the 
United Brotherhood, as it is to other 
building and construction trades. 
These changes have been matched 
by the changing needs and desires of 
the workers. 

To better equip our organizers 
with the necessary tools and data 
to cope with this new climate of ac- 
tivity, the Brotherhood sponsored 



two 3'/2-day seminars at the Gen- 
eral Offices last month. 

The first 2Vi days of the seminar 
were concerned with new organiz- 
ing methods and the activities of the 
National Labor Relations Board. 
Staff representatives of the AFL- 
CIO Department of Organization 
conducted these sessions. These 
seminar leaders included Assistant 
Directors of Organization Ed Haines 
and Alan Kistler. They were assist- 
ed by Dick Healy and Gerald Som- 
mers. 



The last day was devoted to col- 
lective bargaining and modular and 
pre-fab industry agreements. These 
sessions were conducted by Don 
Danielson. with a final summation 
of the entire seminar by the Brother- 
hood's Director of Organization, 
Anthony Ochocki. 

As one participant in the seminar 
commented later, "This material 
should greatly enhance our effective- 
ness in our day-to-day organizing 
activity and improve greatly our win 
average." 




THE CARPENTER 



Victim of Highway Widening: 



Member's Unique Home Is Copied, 
But the Original Must Be Demolished 



To have designed and built his 
own home, which up until a few 
years ago was the only one of its 
kind in the world, is the unique ex- 
perience of Brother Henry Switzer, 
a member of Local 452 in Vancou- 
ver, British Columbia. 

People from far and wide have 
come to gape and take pictures of 
his unusual house beside the Upper 
Levels Highway in West Vancouver, 
which unfortunately will have to be 
demolished when the highway is 
widened to cope with the ever in- 
creasing traffic. 

When Brother Switzer worked on 
a house in rocky West Vancouver, 
and found that it cost over $5,000.- 
00 to blast out the basement, he 
thought there must be an easier way. 
That is how he came upon the idea 
of building his own home in the 
same rough terrain on a 16- by 16- 
foot concrete base, containing a fur- 
nace room, a small workshop, a hall, 
and a curved stairway leading up to 
the living quarters above, suspended 
in four 22-foot reinforced concrete 
wings with 1800 square feet of liv- 
ing space. 

These living quarters have an ex- 
ceptional freedom of access, with 
only three doors in the entire up- 
stairs — on the two bedrooms and 
the bathroom. The kitchen area, 





Here Brother Henry Switzer (right) discusses his unusual home in the background 
with Brother Carl Erickson, Financial Secretary of Local 452 in Vancouver. The 
22-foot reinforced concrete wings extending from the central concrete core of the 
house support the frame structure. Sun decks give the Switzers a very pleasant place 
to relax on sunny days. 



Plan shows the layout of the upper living 
quarters with its ease of access from one 
part of the house to the other. 



with an electric stove, modern cup- 
boards and sink facilities is sepa- 
rated from the dining room by a 
low, semi-circular wall, making 
serving convenient from both ends. 

An ornate fireplace separates the 
kitchen from the living room, where 
the walls and ceiling are of acoustic 
plaster. 

When you enter the home, you 
see a small medallion stating "Copy- 
righted Switzer Home of Tomor- 
row" imbedded in the concrete, and 
if anyone is interested he will pro- 
vide the plans and permission to 
build for a specified fee. Up until 
now the only other one built is in 
Puyallup in nearby Washington 
State, but Brother Switzer has also 
designed a motel unit with a similar 
plan, and no doubt the idea can be 
very feasible and practical to those 
who have to contend with rocky ter- 
rain. 

Up until now the Switzers have 
not decided what they will do when 



they are finally forced to vacate their 
premises. But whatever happens, 
West Vancouver will never be the 
same without this unusual house 
that has been such an attraction for 
thousands of tourists and Sunday 
drivers since it was built in 1960. 



Sorry, Pardner, This 
Austin Not in Texas 

The March. 1970 issue of the Carpen- 
ter carried an article (page 31), giving 
one of Minnesota's 26 vocational-techni- 
cal schools to Austin, Texas. 

We are notified that Minnesota is 
justly proud of its modern post-secondary 
Vo-Tech schools, of which the one at 
Austin (Minnesota, that is) is among its 
pioneers. The 26 Minnesota schools give 
the state an educational network, offering 
vocational-technical course work, tuition 
free to residents under 21 years of age. 
Austin is one of 14 schools offering 18- 
month instructional programs in carpen- 
try or cabinet making. 

Our apologies, please. 



MAY, 1970 



Union-Made Buildings 'On the Move' 



■ A growing number of Houston, 
Texas, union carpenters are work- 
ing for the Robert R. Sloan Com- 
pany, a contractor whose product 
is — quite literally — on the move. 
Considered one of the most efficient- 
ly run union shops in the Southwest, 
Sloan makes and moves custom- 
designed building modules which, 
when delivered and coupled together 
at the site, comprise a complete, 
ready-for-occupancy structure. 

Sloan units are built in Houston 
with floors, ceilings, plumbing fix- 
tures, lighting, air conditioning, and 
any other fixtures necessary for im- 
mediate "open for business' opera- 
tion, needing only utility connec- 
tions to be operational. 

The firm's president, Robert R. 
Sloan, attributes much of his com- 
pany's growth to the splendid co- 
operation offered by the Carpenters 
District Council and its capable 
members. All work involved in the 
manufacturing and assembling of 
the buildings is performed by car- 
penter members. 

The company was organized in 
1965, primarily to market pre-fab 
buildings. Sloan soon became a 
general contractor, however, and 
now has his own architectural, engi- 
neering, electrical, plumbing and air 
conditioning departments. In the 
past year many exciting changes 
have been made in developing a 
unique method of "manufactured 
modular construction." 

A striking example of this new 
construction technique is shown in 
the recently-completed modular 




These six truckloads of modular buildings will, when delivered to location, be linked 
together, then connected to utilities, and "open for business" in five hours. Success 
of this type of construction is attributed by the builder to be largely due to efforts 
of union carpenters who make and assemble them. 



buildings built for Passpoint Car 
Wash. The Houston plant designed, 
built and transported these units to 
St. Louis where, upon delivery, they 
required only five hours of installa- 
tion time. 

Each unit of the car wash is 
approximately 12 ft. by 25 ft. by 
12 ft, making the overall size of the 
six-unit structure 72 ft. by 35 ft. by 
12 ft. Construction is of pre -cast 
lightweight reinforced concrete, 
using a structural floor system with 
tilt-up walls welded into place. The 
roof system consists of 18 gauge 
interlocking roof panels, and when 
all six modules are bolted together, 
they form a continuous roofing sys- 
tem. The underside of the roof is 
insulated with spray-on poly- 
urethane. The interior of the car 
wash is finished with a nylon base 
paint that completely seals the walls 
and floors from water, grease and 
detergent. The conveyor system is 
cast into each floor module with 



final alignment and connections 
made in the field when the units are 
bolted together. All of the car wash 
equipment is set into place in each 
module and completely piped and 
wired, requiring only utility connec- 
tions to be completely operational. 

The company also makes other, 
and uniquely different modular 
buildings for such customers as 
Leslie's Chicken Shacks, Young- 
blood's Restaurants, U-Tote'M, and 
Parky's. 

The buildings are being delivered 
to sites across the country, requiring 
specially-built telescoping semi- 
trailers. Each trailer must be able 
to carry a 25-ton module in lengths 
up to 52 feet. 

Sloan credits his success to the 
outstanding job done by labor op- 
erating in an atmosphere of free 
enterprise. He is justly proud of his 
company, his union employees, his 
country, and the American way of 
doing business. 



Pre-cast concrete module, completed by Houston carpenters, begins cross-country journey aboard specially-built trailer. 




WIDE LOAD 



Revamped Board Back In Business 

Executive Council of Building Trades Department approves 

amended plan for settling jurisdictional disputes 

within National Joint Board framework 



The Building and Construction 
Trades Department, AFL-CIO, and 
the national Participating Contrac- 
tors Employers' Associations last 
month successfully completed nego- 
tiations for amendment of the "Plan 
for Settling Jurisdictional Disputes 
Nationally and Locally in the Build- 
ing and Construction Industry" un- 
der which the 22-year-old National 
Joint Board settles jurisdictional 
disputes in this industry. 

The amended Plan, which became 
effective April 3, 1970, and contin- 
ues in effect until March 31, 1971, 
has been approved by the Executive 
Council of the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department as the 
method of procedure for the settle- 
ment of jurisdictional disputes under 
Article X of the Constitution. That 
Article provides that plans and 
methods of procedure approved by 
the Executive Council "shall be 
recognized as final and binding upon 
the Department and upon all affili- 
ated national and international un- 
ions and their affiliated local un- 
ions." 

The National Joint Board is pro- 
viding a private means for settling 
jurisdictional disputes amicably in 
the building and construction indus- 
try. It is a home-grown solution to 
labor problems which would other- 
wise load up the already overtaxed 
facilities of the National Labor Re- 
lations Board and the Federal 
courts. Although it is privately fi- 
nanced by the parties to the agree- 
ment, the facilities of the National 
Joint Board are available to all 
contractors dealing with organized 
labor in the building and construc- 
tion industry. No charge is made 
for use of these facilities. 

The Building and Construction 
Trades Department is composed of 
the 17 national and international 
union affiliates of the AFL-CIO 
which represent employees in the 
building and construction industry. 
The Participating Contractors Em- 




SIGNING CEREMONY— Labor Secre- 
tary George P. Shultz (center) presents 
C. .1. Haggerty, President of the AFL- 
CIO Building and Construction Trades 
Department, with the pen he used to sign 
the amended plan for settling jurisdic- 
tional disputes in the construction indus- 
try. At left is .lames E. Swan, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the National Electrical Con- 
tractors Association, who represented the 
Participating Contractors Employers' As- 
sociation in signing the agreement. Mr. 
Swan also received the pen he used for 
the signing. 

ployers' Associations include the fol- 
lowing organizations: 

National Constructors Associa- 
tion 

National Electrical Contractors 
Association 

Mechanical Contractors Associa- 
tion of America, Inc. 

National Association of Reinforc- 
ing Steel Contractors 

National Association of Miscel- 
laneous, Ornamental and Ar- 
chitectural Products Contrac- 
tors 

National Erector Association 

Crane and Rigging Division of 
Heavy Specialized Carriers 
Conference 

Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Con- 
tractors Association 

Painting and Decorating Contrac- 
tors of America 

Sheet Metal and Air Condition- 
ing Contractors National Asso- 
tiation 

Insulation Distributor-Contractors 
National Association 



Gypsum Drywall Contractors In- 
ternational 

Glazing Contractors Labor Juris- 
diction Committee 

The above-listed associations 
comprise more than 25,000 em- 
ployers in the building and construc- 
tion industry and employ the bulk 
of organized employees in the in- 
dustry. 

The National Joint Board repre- 
sents the long-term effort of the 
building and construction industry 
to provide the kind of private meth- 
od for the voluntary adjustment of 
jurisdictional disputes which Con- 
gress intended to encourage as stated 
in Section 10(k) of the Taft-Hartley 
Act. 

The extensive revisions of the 
Plan accomplished over many 
months of negotiations include ten 
amendments listed below. The Joint 
Negotiating Committee representing 
management and labor signatories 
will meet every three months to con- 
sider the adoption of further amend- 
ments which are mutually desirable. 

1. The National Joint Board is 
increased in size from four to eight 
regular members plus an impartial 
chairman. 

2. Members are to be selected 
from among individuals representing 
primary experience and knowledge 
in each of the following general cat- 
egories in the industry: (1) industrial. 
(2) commercial, (3) heavy and high- 
way, and (4) residential. 

3. The eligibility requirements for 
participation on the Appeals Board 
are conformed to the eligibility re- 
quirements of the Joint Board in that 
qualified association staff members 
who have had experience and are 
actively engaged in the building and 
construction industry may be select- 
ed as members. 

4. When a dispute is filed, the 
Joint Board is required to first in- 
vestigate the claims to determine 

Continued on page 10 



MAY, 1970 



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REVAMPED BOARD 

Continued on page 9 

whether or not a disposition thereof 
has been made by a previous deci- 
sion of record or by recorded agree- 
ment between the parties to the dis- 
pute, and then, if there is no such 
coverage, the job decision is to be 
rendered on the basis of established 
trade practice and prevailing practice 
in the locality. 

5. The parties have specifically 
agreed to take into account the con- 
sumer interest in the matter of ju- 
risdictional disputes by specifically 
providing that: 

"Because efficiency, cost and good 
management are essential to the 
well-being of the industry, the 
Joint Board should not ignore the 
interest of the consumer in settling 
jurisdictional disputes." 

6. The Chairman of the National 
Joint Board is authorized to request 
the establishment of joint committees 
of those national and international 
unions most affected to begin reso- 
lution of the most serious and/or 
repetitive disputes in the industry. 
In addition, the hearings panel pro- 
cedure has been revised to permit 
the hearings panel, after reference 
by the National Joint Board, to as- 
certain "whether and to what extent 
the disputed work operations are 
governed by a decision or agreement 
of record." The hearings panel is 
further authorized to "make national 
jurisdictional determinations of work 
operations not governed by decisions 
or agreements of record which shall 
be binding on all parties." 

7. The Joint Board is authorized 
to receive and act upon protests with 
respect to "any agreement, resolu- 
tion or stipulation" that attempts to 
establish jurisdiction deviating from 
the spirit and intent of the agree- 
ment. 

8. The employer associations and 
the national and international unions 
which are affiliated with the Building 
and Construction Trades Depart- 
ment agree to take all action which is 
legally within their power to secure 
stipulations by employers to the pro- 
cedures of the National Joint Board. 

9. It is provided that if a work 
stoppage persists for more than 48 



Commuted Sentences 

In 1848, nine men were captured 
in Ireland, tried, convicted of trea- 
son against Her Majesty, the Queen 
of England, and sentenced to death 
— John Mitchel, Morris Lyene. 
Patrick Donahue. Thomas McGee. 
Charles Duffy. Thomas Meagher. 
Richard O'Gorman, Terence Mc- 
Manus and Michael Ireland. 

World-wide protest led Victoria 
to commute the sentence to exile 
for life in Australia. 

In 1874, word reached the 
astounded Queen that the Sir 
Charles Duffy newly-elected as 
Prime Minister of Australia was 
the same Charles Duffy trans- 
ported 25 years before. On the 
Queen's demand, the records of 
the rest were revealed, and this is 
what was uncovered. 

Thomas Francis Meagher 
Governor of Montana 

Terence McManus 
Brigadier General. U.S. Army 

Patrick Donahue 

Brigadier General, U.S. Army 

Richard O'Gorman 
Governor General, Newfound- 
land 

Morris Lyene 

Attorney General, Australia 

Michael Ireland 
Attorney General, Australia 
(after Lyene) 

Thomas D'Arcy McGee 
President of the Council, Domin- 
ion of Canada — Member of 
Parliament — Minister of Agri- 
culture 

John Mitchel 

Prominent New York Politician, 
father of John Purroy Mitchel, 
Mayor of the City of New 
York, 1913-1917 

— St. Peters Institute 
of Labor Relations 



hours following notification by the 
National Joint Board (Saturday, 
Sunday and legal holidays excluded) 
the contractor is free to pursue meth- 
ods of settlement other than the 
Joint Board. 

10. In the event the Joint Board 
declares any international union or 
a contractor to be in noncompliance, 
such union or contractor cannot be 
represented on either the Joint 
Board, the Appeals Board or a hear- 
ings panel, if any, during the period 
of noncompliance. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




* 



Editorials 



* Rising Arson Threat 

Fires are becoming an ever-increasing threat to life 
in the United States. Despite the best efforts of fire 
prevention forces and fire fighters, big-city fires are 
becoming primarily responsible for a horrifying annual 
toll of approximately 12,000 lives, to say nothing of 
the fantastic property loss involved. 

Authorities declare that although arson is a propor- 
tionately small cause of this tragic loss ... it is 
estimated that about 15 percent of all fires in heavily- 
populated areas are deliberately set . . . it is by far 
the most serious aspect of the fire loss problem. The 
first reason is that the arsonist can strike anywhere and 
at any time despite the precautions of those who live 
in the property or its owners. Usually the arsonist 
picks the cover of night for his despicable act, when 
his innocent victims are asleep. The second main rea- 
son why arson is such a major factor in fire deaths 
and property losses is that the arson fire almost in- 
variably involves what authorities term "an accelera- 
tor." This can be anything from gasoline through 
kerosene, paint thinner or crumpled paper. The fire 
spreads . . . and kills . . . too rapidly to be controlled. 

Seldom, if ever, does a building go up in smoke 
because of its basic construction. The wooden struc- 
ture is little if any more prone to normal fire damage 
than the so-called "fireproof structure." It has often 
been truly stated that "there is no 'fireproof structure" 
because its inhabitants, furnishings, furniture and 
other contents are all combustible and can be fired 
by the arsonist. 

The heinous crime of arson, which allows death- 
dealing fire to kill at random, is increasing. Spokesmen 
for fire departments in New York, Washington and 
Los Angeles declare that cases of suspected arson last 
year were four times what they were in 1960 despite 
the fact that fires in general have increased no more 
than 2 percent annually since 1960. 

In other times, arson was generally a crime of 
revenge. The arsonist sought to destroy the property 
of an enemy who had, at least in his mind harmed 
him. While that motivation is still in the arson pic- 
ture today, fire officials say that now frustrations often 
bring on arson; a school is burned because a student 
views it as an enemy, a slum tenement burns because 
a slum dweller can find no other way to escape it. 



Everyone in a position to speak with authority states 
that more and better housing will unquestionably re- 
duce the fire death rate and the property loss. The 
question seems to be: will our construction rate man- 
age to outstrip our destruction rate? 

Unfair Competition 

Members of very few labor unions in the United 
States have not been injured during the past several 
years by the flood of imports into the nation. 

After World War II, when it seemed desirable to 
build up the economies of the free world, the pro- 
grams of the United States were tailored to aid the 
foreign producers. Billions of dollars were spent in 
foreign aid. There was not a day that several foreign 
"production teams" were not being escorted through 
the firms and factories of the nation . . . soaking up 
"Yankee know-how." 

The free world profited greatly. Foreign firms bor- 
rowed U.S. dollars to buy U.S. equipment and put 
it to work in foreign nations. Soon the foreign nations 
were knocking at our doors with their arms full of 
products they wanted to sell. "If you don't buy our 
products, we are lost!" they cried. 

As a result, the U.S. began to roll back the tariff 
barriers which had been erected to protect our high 
standard of living. Before long the Kennedy Round 
of tariff reductions was in progress. Tariffs now are 
at the lowest levels in history. The old posters of the 
depression days, "Buy American!" are beginning to 
be seen again. Now it is not our friends abroad who 
are hurting ... it is us! 

Now it seems that unemployment, caused in some 
part by competition or imports from low-wage nations 
admitted to this nation without equalizing import 
duties, is causing the AFL-CIO to take a second 
longer, harder look at the problem. American funds 
and American know-how snipped abroad have made 
themselves a Frankenstein monster that has come to 
haunt them. 

Other nations manage to protect their home indus- 
tries with tariffs . . . even Japan. It is time that Con- 
gress consider the problems posed by unfair foreign 
competition with domestic industries. 



MAY, 197 



11 





i! I 





First in a series of articles discussing the major problems of this decade 



Tight Money 

A poor remedy for the ills of inflation 



■ Interest rates at the highest level 
in 100 years! 

National economic growth rate 
declines! 

Unemployment rising! 

And with all this, the cost of liv- 
ing still rises. 

These are some of the strange 
and frightening trends we are ex- 
periencing in our economic picture 
and many economists are openly ex- 
pressing serious doubts about the 
way we are handling them. 

Inflation, without a question, is 
a subject of serious concern. The 
dollar just doesn't go as far as it 
did; it takes more dollars to buy 
the necessities of life. 

The Nixon Administration says 
that one of its primary tools in fight- 
ing inflation is making the cost of 
borrowing money so high that peo- 
ple will be discouraged from mak- 
ing major purchases. They say it 
will help to "cool off" the economy 
and bring inflation under control. 

This policy is known as "tight 
money" or "hard money." It is a 
very old economic theory largely 
identified with Republican adminis- 
trations of the past. 

What concerns many economists 
and many members of Congress to- 
day is that this economic approach 
in the past has led to either depres- 
sions or to moderate-to-severe re- 
cessions with the resulting high un- 
employment. 

In 1920, when the Harding Ad- 
ministration assumed power, inter- 
est rates were increased to dramatic 
peaks, leading to the 1921 depres- 
sion. Again, in 1928, in the Hoover 
Administration, tight money was 
pressed and the catastropic 1929 
depression got under way. 

From 1930 to 1940 the average 
rate of interest on the Federal debt 
— one of the measuring rods for 



hard money — fell from 3.8 percent 
to 2.6 percent. 

During World War II, despite the 
fact that the national debt rose by 
more than $208 billion, the average 
interest rate on the public debt de- 
clined from 2.5 percent to 1.9 per- 
cent. 

From 1946 to 1950 there was a 
gradual rise in interest rates. There 
was a mild recession in 1949. 

Beginning in 1953, however, with 
the Eisenhower Administration, we 
witnessed "hard money" flower. 
The net result was three major re- 
cessions. This contrasts with the 
eight Kennedy-Johnson years in 
which there were no major reces- 
sions. 



ipooo < 

,$1100 

~ $11000 

$11 Ol f 

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However, interest rates did start 
to climb in the latter Johnson years. 
This was largely through the actions 
of the Federal Reserve Board and it 
is important to understand the role 
of the "Fed" if we are to under- 
stand economic policy. 

The Federal Reserve System was 
set up in 1913 by the Congress to 
supervise banking. It was given 
great power to influence credit con- 
ditions. An important way this is 
done is through setting the redis- 
count rate member banks are 
charged when they borrow from the 



Federal Reserve banks. It is used 
to signal the desired direction of all 
interest rates. 

By increasing rediscount rates the 
"Fed" can effectively raise all inter- 
est rates and consequently restrict 
the supply of credit. This is a 'tight 
money' move. 

The charge is frequently made 
that the "Fed" is dominated by the 
bankers. Most of its seven-member 
board of governors have banking 
backgrounds and they are appointed 
by the President. 

Only recently. President Nixon 
appointed one of his closest eco- 
nomic advisors, Arthur Burns, as 
"Fed" chairman, replacing William 
McC. Martin, Jr. And though the 
"Fed" is theoretically independent 
it is now expected to closely follow 
the lead of the Administration. 

Past history has shown that "hard 
money," has been used to fight infla- 
tion in the past but it has almost 
always had these results: 

1. Reduces the level of demand 
and brings on a recession. 

2. Increases unemployment. 

3. Hits home building particular- 
ly hard since it relies on long-term 
credit. The auto industry also feels 
the impact as do other industries. 

4. Government program using 
credit for essential social programs 
are curbed, and 

5. It increases the profits of fi- 
nancial institutions. 

Opponents of hard money say 
that in small doses it is not an effec- 
tive answer to inflation and in large 
doses it often leads to major re- 
cessions or depressions. 

Other anti-inflation proposals are 
being made but certainly in the 
months ahead the use of hard or 
tight money will be an increasingly 
hot issue. 

— by Press Associates, Inc. 



Two Views on Rising Hospita 



TODA r IT TAKES ALMOST 300 HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES TO TAK 



m The seemingly uncontrolled increase in hospital 
charges has been the subject of hundreds of studies. 
All come up with versions of the same set of reasons. 
The very necessary and long-delayed increase in hos- 
pital wages; introduction of new and costly drugs, of 
new and high cost machines (heart-lung, kidney, 
cobalt bombs, etc.); a sharp increase in the ratio of 
employees to patients — in 1964 voluntary short-term 
hospitals in the United States employed 247 persons 
per 100 patients, by 1968 it took 278 employees to 
take care of 100 patients. 

Medicare did not help this situation. The original 
reimbursement formula for hospitals was a cost-plus 
formula. "That policy encouraged duplication, over- 
lapping, and unnecessary expansion of facilities and 
services and created an unhealthy economic incentive 
to maximize operating costs," said a U.S. Senate re- 
port. The formula was revised July 1, 1969, to elimi- 
nate the cost-plus feature. 

Another factor within the formula was a 2 percent 
item which, in theory, was to cover hidden costs, 
actually put there to finance hospital growth. Two per- 
cent of even a $1,000 hospital bill is a relatively small 
amount, but 2 percent of a total annual hospital bene- 
fit of $4 billion comes to $80 million — a worrisome 
figure. The argument was made that if the federal 
government is to help hospitals with their capital 
needs, it ought to be done directly rather than as a 
hidden cost in hospital insurance for the elderly. The 
2 percent growth factor was also removed in 1969. 

Medicare payments to physicians make headlines 
when they are so large as to suggest overcharging, or 
so improbable they suggest unethical practices. In 
1968 more than 4,200 physicians received over 
$25,000 each in Medicare reimbursements. Twenty- 
five thousand dollars is not a larae income for a 



physician, however, physicians with $25,000 Medicare 
billings often had large Medicaid payment incomes 
also — and in few cases did the doctor limit his prac- 
tice to Medicare and Medicaid. He had non-Medicare 
and Medicaid patients. For example, one California 
doctor received $37,269 from Medicare and $29,452 
from Medicaid in 1968; a Georgia physician was 
reimbursed $36,444 and $32,237; a Michigan doctor 
received $108,526 from Medicare and $29,811 from 
Medicaid. 

In some cases these fees were collected under cir- 
cumstances that raise very real doubts. Gang visits 
are particularly suspect. In these, a physician charges 
for services to 25 of 30 or 50 residents of a nursing 
home, seen in a one-hour visit, or he charges for 
treating seven patients when he visits the home of a 
mother and six children. 

Another doubtful practice is for the physician to 
charge separately for services that formerly were 
part of his overall fee. For example, a physician who 
formerly charged $10 for a visit including routine 
laboratory tests now charges Medicare patients $10 
for the visit, plus an additional fee for the tests. 
Similarly, some surgeons now charge extra fees for 
preoperative and postoperative visits. 

These are the headline-making cases, but they are 
not the most important factor in the unanticipated rise 
in the cost of Medicare medical insurance. 

The Medicare law says that "in determining the 
reasonable charge (to a physician) . . . there shall be 
taken into consideration the customary charges for 
similar services ... as well as the prevailing charges 
in the locality for similar services." Moreover, the 
fiscal agent of the government in handling Medicare 
(generally Blue Shield or an insurance company) is re- 
quired by the statute to assure that charges "will be 



DOCTORS ARE PRIVATE BUSINESSMEN; HOSPITALS HAVE VEIL i 



■ One of the more vexing problems 
in our deteriorating medical care 
system is the skyrocketing cost of 
hospitalization. 

The Senate Anti-Trust and Mo- 
nopoly Subcommittee, under the 
chairmanship of Senator Philip 
Hart (Dem., Mich.) has just com- 
pleted two days of hearings de- 
voted to these costs. It produced 
some insights which at least point 
the way to some solutions. 



One witness was Leon J. Davis, 
president of the National Union of 
Hospital and Nursing Home Em- 
ployees. RWDSU. He sought to 
place the hospital costs into a proper 
perspective. 

First, Davis said, "it is absurd to 
think we can control hospital costs 
alone without considering the in- 
terrelated problems of drug costs, 
costs of doctors' services, etc." 

And, he added, "if we want to 



talk about costs, we must start out 
with a clear and pressing commit- 
ment our first priority is to provide 
excellent medical care for all." 

Davis said that the entire picture 
of health financing has changed. 
For example, prior to World War 
II, 30 percent of the support for 
voluntary or private, non-profit 
hospitals came from philanthropy. 
These hospitals were operated for 
the poor by religious groups. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



losts 



RE OF 100 PATIENTS 



Excerpted from the Martin E. Segal Co. Newsletter 



reasonable and not higher than the charge applicable 
... to the policyholders and subscribers of the carrier." 

Under the spur of Medicare and Medicaid, physi- 
cians' charges skyrocketted and reimbursements to 
physicians by the fiscal agents of the government had 
little relationship to the amount they paid for the 
same services to their own policyholders and sub- 
scribers. 

Comparing the average reasonable charge on which 
Medicare reimbursement was based, with the maxi- 
mum Blue Shield payment for the same procedure, 
wide differences are apparent. 

For gall bladder removal, for example: In Alabama 
the Blue Shield maximum was $100, the Medicare 
average was $303; in Illinois areas in which Contin- 
ental Casualty is the fiscal agent the maximum and 
average were $165 and $294; in New Hampshire 
(Blue Shield) they were $160 and $300; in Texas 
(Blue Shield) the figures were $95 and $303. (Figures 
are for January-July, 1968.) 

For a prostatectomy: Colorado (Blue Shield), Blue 
Shield mamimum is $250, Medicare average is $333; 
Iowa (Blue Shield), $190 and $325; New Jersey 
(Prudential), $300 and $501; Rhode Island (Blue 
Shield), $267 and $335. 

Although Congress had clearly intended that Medi- 
care reimbursements be reasonably close to carriers' 
payments for the same service, neither the Social 
Security Administration nor the carriers made any 
pretence of requiring this standard. The result, as a 
Congressman put it, was that the ceiling on fees be- 
came a floor. 

Both before the Medicare law was passed and after, 
there was much discussion about new forms of health 
care delivery, of new ways of organizing services that 



would hold down costs. The big hope was in group 
practice — which has been steadily promoted by sec- 
ondary levels of government officials since Medicare 
became a reality. Group practice has been growing, 
but not at the rate, and without the price-restraining 
results, hoped for. 

A few weeks ago the Administration proposed an 
expansion of Medicare coverage that would have the 
effect of improving services to Medicare and Medicaid 
beneficiaries while stimulating group practice organiza- 
tion. The proposal was for an optional full service 
program, including preventive care— to be provided by 
group health programs such as Group Health Insur- 
ance and Health Insurance Plan in New York and the 
Kaiser-Permanente programs on the West Coast. 

Present Medicare coverage does not include periodic 
health checks or routine injections (flu shots, for 
example). The propoosed optional program would 
encompass these preventive measures and, it is hoped, 
reduce the acute illnesses that are now covered. 

Both opponents and proponents of national health 
insurance point to Medicare to prove their case. Op- 
ponents point to the steadily mounting tax and premium 
rates that seem to confound projections and assump- 
tions. These, say those opposed to health insurance, 
are a poor augury for a national system. Proponents 
of national health insurance, on the other hand, point 
to the quality and quantity of health services provided 
20 million older Americans pre- and post-Medicare, 
to the improved economic, psychological, and 
physical health of the older population. This view is 
generally coupled with a caveat: that a national health 
insurance program will work only if procedures can 
be developed to improve the delivery mechanisms and 
quality of such care and control their costs. 



CRECY,' SAYS WITNESS 



Excerpted from an Article by Press Associates, Inc. 



Today, less than two percent of 
these costs are paid by philanthropic 
contributions. Most of the income 
now comes from patients' care 
through Blue Cross, commercial in- 
surance, Medicaid and Medicare. 

At the same time that the old 
form of financing was fading, costs 
were rising. 

"The new forms of financing have 
not yet been rationalized," Davis 
said, "to the point where they ade- 



quately cover hospital costs, either 
from the point of view of the con- 
sumer or from the point of view of 
the hospital." 

Davis emphasized that "hospitals 
are not entirely self-controlled in- 
stitutions." He noted that individ- 
ual doctors play a determining role 
in hospital costs — whether a patient 
is admitted, how long he stays, what 
procedures are used and what equip- 
ment is needed. And doctors, he 



stressed, are "private businessmen." 
The union leader also expressed 
concern over what he called the 
"veil of secrecy" behind which 
hospitals operate. "It is impossible 
to find out," he said, "accurate in- 
formation about personnel and wage 
structure, breakdowns of sources 
and expenditures of money, alleged 
inefficiency of operations, alleged 
misuse of money for such purposes 

Continued on Page 37 



MAY, 1970 



15 



Instructors and Training Leaders Meet 
In Washington for 'Post- Graduate' Study 




Instructors and training leaders involved in Federal Manpower Training Administration programs gathered in Washington, 
D. C, General Headquarters of the International Brotherhood, to continue their "post-graduate" study. The seminars are part 
of a continuing program for upgrading and informational study. Shown in pictures here are those attending the February 
and March seminars. 




16 



THE CARPENTER 





SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE GOSSIP. 101 CONST. AVE. N.W., WASH., D.C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT) 



Not Exact// What She Meant 

The hillbilly had gotten married 
and, after the honeymoon, the new 
bride complained: "Yew tor me be- 
fore we-uns wuz married that yew 
wuz well-off!" 

"I wuz well-off" replied the new 
groom, "but it's too late now to cor- 
reck mah mistake!" — F. S. Millham, 
Fullerton, Pa. 

FOR BETTER LAWS GIVE TO CLIC 




Against The Law of Physics 

Just when you've managed to con- 
vince your kids that it's impossible to 
put ten pounds in a five-pound bag, 
your mother-in-law starts wearing 
slacks! 

REGISTER AND VOTE 

Double Mistaken Identity 

The Irishman, walking along the 
road, sees an old friend walking the 
opposite direction on the other side. 
They wave to each other and start 
for the center with arms out-stretched 
only to realize as they drew closer 
that the first didn't know the second 
nor the second the first. 

Said Pat: "Sorry, I thought you 
were . . ." 

"That's all right," interrupted Mike. 
"I thought it was you, and you 
thought it was me . . . and it was 
neither of us!" — Mary Gillen, Flush- 
ing, N.Y. 



This Month's One-Liners 

By the time you scratch up enough 
for a nest-egg, inflation has turned it 
into chicken feed. 

Fashion is what a him tells a her to 
do to her hem to get her a him. 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

He Mint No Harm 

A minister had a wonderful repu- 
tation for delivering 20-minute ser- 
mons. One Sunday, however, he was 
2 hours late for dinner following his 
services. It was his custom to put a 
candy mint under his tongue as he 
began his sermon, and bring it to a 
close as he felt the mint dissolve. 
This Sunday, however, he mistakenly 
had put a shirt button in his mouth. 
— Leo Spies, L.U. 47, St. Louis. 

TAKE PART IN UNION AFFAIRS 

Just In Case 

Leaving her psychiatrist's office, 
she said: "Doctor, I don't know how 
I can thank you enough for curing 
my kleptomania!" 

"My fee is quite enough," replied 
the headshrinker, "but if you should 



up 



have a relapse, you might pick 
a transistor radio for my son." 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 

Really Teed Off! 

At the dinner table, the wife of 
the inveterate golfer said: "Junior 
tells me he caddied for you today." 

"That's it!" exclaimed the golf bug. 
"I knew I'd seen that kid somewhere 
before!" — Maurice Howes, L.U. 444, 
Ret., Sunmmerfield, Fla. 



This /Month's Limerick 

An epicure dining at Crewe 

Found quite a large mouse in his stew. 

Said the waiter: "Don't shout 

And wave it about, 
Or the rest will be wanting some, too!" 



Long-Distance Lothario 

Doctor: You must avoid all forms 
of excitement. 

Patient: Can I look at 'em from 
across the street? 

B SURE 2 VOTE! 

His Return Was Returned 

When the B.A. made out his 1040 
this year, he tried to claim three bar- 
tenders as exemptions. He said they 
mostly depend on him for a living! 
UNION MEN WORK SAFELY 




Ain't It The Truth! 

When you decide to spend your 
vacation in your back yard, your 
neighbors will realize that you're sen- 
sible, imaginative, level-headed, home- 
loving, dead broke. — Wilfred Beaver, 
Chicago, III. 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Light Comedy 

The stage electrician was fired. It 
seems the star of the broadway show, 
in one of the quick-change blackouts, 
called for her tights. He thought she 
said "lights." 



MAY, 1970 



17 





CLIC RE 


PORT 




L.U. 

1445 


City and State 

KANSAS 

Topeka 


Amount 

38.00 














2279 


Lawrence 


13.00 




Monthly Membership 


Contributions To The 






LOUISIANA 






Carpenters Leg 


islative 


Improvement Committee 


1811 

2258 


Monroe 
Houma 


40.00 
100.00 














3172 


Dodson 


10.00 














3177 


Holden 

MARYLAND 


10.00 














■ 


At the Massachusetts State Convention, held early in April. 


the dele- 


1126 


Annapolis 


10.00 


gates present contributed a 


total of $1,800.00 to the 1970 Carpenters Leg- 




MASSACHUSETTS 




islative Improvement Committee campaign 


fund. 




32 


Springfield 


120.00*(a) 


At a 4th District seminar, also held in April, in Jacksonville, 


Fla., the 


33 
40 


Boston 
Boston 


100.00* 
100.00* 


business agents present contributed $520 to CLIC 




48 


Fitchburg 


80.00* 


CORRECTION: In the last "CLIC" report, Carpenters Local 306 of 


49 
51 


Lowell 
Boston 


81.00* 
80.00* 


Newark, New Jersey, was 


credited with a 


contribution from Ladies Aux- 


56 


Boston 


70.00* 


iliary Number 306 of Santa Barbara, 
ed to these two organizations. The 


California. Our apologies are extend- 
correct amounts and locals are listed 


67 

82 

107 


Boston 

Haverhill 

Worchester 


100.00* 
20.00* 
60.00* 


in this report. 










111 


Lawrence 


40.00* 














193 


North Adams 


20.00* 


Inadvertently, Local Union 2544 


of Shawano, Wise, was not listed 


218 


Boston 


90.00* 


in the final report of contributions to the 1969 CLIC program. This local 
did contribute S14 to the political fund during that campaign year. We 


275 

327 
351 


Newton 

Attleboro 

Northampton 


50.00* 
20.00* 
30.00* 


regret this error. 










400 


Hudson 


10.00* 














424 


Hingham 


20.00* 














444 


Pittsfield 


40.00* 




" 










540 


Waltham 


30.00*(a) 


E 












549 


Greenfield 


20.00* 




CLIC CONTRIBUTIONS 
(as of April 13. 1970) 


L.U. 

1509 


City and State 

Miami 


Amount 

60.00*(a) 


595 
624 
656 


Lynn 

Brockton 

Holyoke 


20.00* 
40.00* 
20.00* 


L.U. 


City and State 


Amount 


1510 


Tampa 


49.00* 


680 


Newton 


10.00* 








1554 


Miami 


10.00* 


693 


Needham 


10.00* 




ALABAMA 




1641 


Naples 


10.00* 


708 


West Newton 


20.00* 


103 


Birmingham 


$20.00 


1685 


Pineda 


10.00* 


762 


Quincy 


20.00* 








1765 


Orlando 


10.00* 


847 


Natick 


20.00* 




ARIZONA 




1927 


Delray Beach 


10.00* 


858 


Clinton 


10.00* 


1089 


Phoenix 


10.00 


1947 


Hollywood 


10.00* 


860 


Framingham 


40.00* 








1966 


Miami 


20.00* 


866 


Norwood 


20.00* 




CALIFORNIA 




2024 


Miami 


190.00(a) 


867 


Milford 


20.00* 


34 


San Francisco 


30.00(a) 


2139 


Tallahassee 


10.00* 


878 


Beverly 


50.00* 


35 


San Rafael 


5.00(a) 


2217 


Lakeland 


10.00* 


885 


Woburn 


50.00* 


180 


Vallejo 


62.00(a) 


2340 


Bradenton 


10.00* 


888 


Salem 


20.00* 


483 


San Francisco 


131.00(a) 


2376 


Sanford 


10.00* 


910 


Gloucester 


20.00* 


710 


Long Beach 


400.00(a) 


2411 


Jacksonville 


10.00* 


988 


Marlboro 


20.00* 


929 


Los Angeles 


10.00(a) 


2795 


Fort Lauderdale 


100.00 


1035 


Taunton 


20.00* 


1280 


Mountain View 


10.00(a) 


3206 


Pompano Beach 


10.00* 


1121 


Boston & Vicinity 


20.00* 


1323 


Monterey 


16.00(a) 




GEORGIA 




1144 


Danvers 


10.00* 


2006 


Los Gatos 


20.00(a) 






1210 


Salem 


20.00* 


2046 . 


Martinez 


21.00 


144 


Macon 


10.00* 








Ladies Auxiliary — 306-Santa 




225 


Atlanta 


40.00* 


1305 


Fall River 


40.00* 


Barbara 


10.00 


256 


Savannah 


20.00* 


1459 


Westboro 


20.00* 








283 


Augusta 


10.00* 


1479 


Walpole 


30.00* 




COLORADO 




547 


Athens 


10.00* 


1503 


Amherst 


20.00* 


2834 


Denver 


20.00 


865 


Brunswick 


10.00* 


1531 


Rockland 


20.00* 








1263 


Atlanta 


10.00* 


1550 


Braintree 


30.00* 




CONNECTICUT 




1723 


Columbus 


20.00* 


1593 


Concord 


10.00* 


43 
825 


Hartford 
Willimantic 


10.00* 
10.00(a) 


1977 
3265 


Rome 

Albany 

IDAHO 


10.00* 
10.00* 


2168 


Boston 

MICHIGAN 


10.00* 




FLORIDA 




1482 


Grangeville 


3.00 


26 


East Detroit 


30.00 


405 


Miami 


10.00* 








297 


Kalamazoo 


20.00 


627 


Jacksonville 


30.00*(a) 




ILLINOIS 




335 


Grand Rapids 


20.00 


696 


Tampa 


30.00* 


62 


Chicago 


30.00 


337 


Detroit 


20.00 


727 


Hialeah 


30.00*(a) 


242 


Chicago 


20.00(a) 


982 


Detroit 


30.00 


993 


Miami 


52.00* 


839 


Des Plaines 


98.00(a) 


1161 


Bay City-Midland-Saginaw 


8.00(a) 


1194 
1250 


Pensacola 
Homestead 


10.00* 
10.00* 


1996 


Libertyville 


40.00 


1373 
1433 


Flint 
Detroit 


10.00 
20.00 


1275 


Clearwater 


10.00* 




INDIANA 




1452 


Detroit 


30.00 


1278 


Gainesville 


10.00* 


215 


Lafayette 


41.00 


1513 


Detroit 


10.00 


1308 


Lake Worth 


10.00* 


2601 


Lafayette 


40.00 


1615 


Grand Rapids 


25.00 


1383 


Sarasota 


10.00* 


3154 


Monticello 


4.00 


2265 


Detroit 


20.00 


1394 


Fort Lauderdale 


20.00* 














1447 


Vero Beach 


10.00* 




IOWA 






MINNESOTA 




1500 


Palatka 


10.00* 


308 


Cedar Rapids 


40.00 


766 


Albert Lea 


23.00 



18 



THE CARPENTER 





MISSOURI 




61 
602 


Kansas City 
St. Louis 

NEBRASKA 


40.00(a) 
20.00 


253 


Omaha 

NEW JERSEY 


54.00 


306 
432 


Newark 
Atlantic City 

NEW YORK 


60.00 
100.00 


20 

246 

301 

357 

447 

754 

787 

1135 

1656 

1772 


New York 

New York 

Newburgh 

Islip 

Ossining 

Fulton 

New York 

Port Jefferson 

Oneonta 

Hicksville 

OHIO 


140.00 
10.00* 

150.00 
50.00 
10.00 
20.00 
50.00 
20.00 
3.00 
40.00 


171 

716 

1454 

1514 

1602 


Youngstown 

Zanesville 

Cincinnati 

Niles 

Cincinnati 

OKLAHOMA 


10.00 
27.00 
20.00 
10.00 
40.00 


329 
986 


Oklahoma City 
McAlester 

OREGON 


30.00 
20.00 


2627 


Cottage Grove 

PENNSYLVANIA 


13.00 


59 
206 

321 

333 

773 

1333 

2264 


Lancaster 

Newcastle 

Connellsville 

New Kensington 

Braddock 

State College 

Pittsburgh 

RHODE ISLAND 


40.00 
13.00 
20.00 
40.00 
10.00 
160.00 
80.00 


176 


Newport 

SOUTH CAROLINA 


100.00 


159 
1798 


Charleston 
Greenville 

TENNESSEE 


10.00* 
10.00 


50 
1357 


Knoxville 
Memphis 

TEXAS 


50.00(a) 
10.00 


213 

425 

1822 


Houston 
El Paso 
Forth Worth 

WASHINGTON 


30.00 
15.00 
50.00 


770 
2382 
2536 


Yakima 
Spokane 
Port Gamble 

WISCONSIN 


40.00(a) 
20.00(a) 
20.00 


657 

849 

2334 


Sheboygan 
Manitowoc 
Baraboo 

WYOMING 


10.00* 

10.00 

23.00 


1564 


Casper 


10.00 




TOTAL $6,048.00 



* Includes contributions from delegates rep- 
resenting their local unions at the state 
council conventions. In some instances, 
these convention contributions were the 
only monies received from the local unions. 

(a) In addition to previous monies submitted 
to the 1970 Program. 




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to finish. 



CASH IN ON YOUR EXPERIENCE 

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1-142 TECH BLDG., 2000 S. MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 60616 

r; 



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Q] 



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Ace 


Address 


Citv 


State 


7.1D 


Occupation 







Accredited Member National Home Study Council 



MAY, 1970 



19 




ANADIAN 



White Paper on Taxes 
Draws Fire from Many 

The Federal government headed by 
Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau got 
itself into trouble with both the right 
and the left as a result of its White 
Paper on Taxation, but this was noth- 
ing compared with the clobbering it 
took for its so-called anti-inflationary 
policies. 

The bitter attack on the govern- 
ment, especially by the right led by 
the entire business community, small 
business as well as big business, was 
not entirely deserved. The govern- 
ment made what it considered to be 
a reasonable attempt to probe public 
opinion on the basis of its proposals 
for tax reform. 

Most of the proposals were good, 
helping lower incomes while taxing 
higher incomes and instituting a cap- 
ital gains tax. They were far from 
perfect, but did not deserve the whip- 
ping they got from the moneyed in- 
terests. 

But the government's policies to halt 
inflation are another matter. In this 
case the big interests are applauding. 
Organized labor supported in parlia- 
ment by the NDP is angry and rightly 
so. 

What the Trudeau administration 
set out to do is to use high interest 
rates, tight money and unemployment 
to halt inflation. 

Accordingly interest rates are at 
record high levels. Money is in such 
short supply that housing construction 
has come almost to a standstill. Un- 
employment is at the highest levels in 
many years. 

It is not only the trade union move- 
ment which is raising its voice against 
these policies. After the Canadian 
Labor Congress presented its brief to 
the government March 23rd, a whole 
chorus of expert opinion has attacked 
the policies from stem to gudgeon. 

The CLC told Prime Minister Tru- 
deau and his cabinet that their cure 
for inflation is worse than the disease. 
They should be making jobs, rather 



than joblessness. Inflation such as 
Canada has had was not as serious a 
problem as unemployment. And if the 
federal policy is to be continued, the 
unemployment will extend at least in- 
to next year. 

"We are concerned," said the CLC 
in its annual brief, "that your govern- 
ment seems to be indifferent to the 
human as well as economic costs of 
rising unemployment. The prospect of 
hundreds of thousands of unemployed 
people in this country, as well as the 
considerable loss of output of goods 
and services, cannot be lightly re- 
garded." 

An economist for the Toronto Star, 
Dian Cohen, took a position which in 
effect supported the CLC case. 

In her column March 30th she said 
that the government's axe is chopping 
jobs but inflation is still marching on. 

The government has backed itself 
into a corner, she said. It made a bad 
value judgment by thinking that in- 
flation such as Canada has had was 
worse than declining production and 
increasing unemployment. 

Canada is paying a high price for 
the Trudeau policies, she contended, 
with "billions of dollars of goods lost 
to production." 

Professor Weldon of McGill also 
agrees to a large extent with the CLC 
criticism. But he usually takes a posi- 
tion with which labor economists 
agree. 

But Professor Grant L. Reuber has 
not been known to side with organized 
labor. Yet in a paper he circulated 
privately, he argues that the govern- 
ment is wasting time and money as 
well as misleading the Canadian peo- 
ple about the desirability and effective- 
ness of voluntary restraints. These 
restraints were supposed to get busi- 
ness to keep down prices and labor 
to hold down wages. 

This so-called voluntary action has 
never worked and never will work. 
The banks don't have to do anything 
but sit tight. They are enjoying the 
highest profits in history. 



But many union contracts are ex- 
piring this year. These have tied hun- 
dreds of thousands of workers to 
agreements signed two and three years 
ago. Should they be expected to use 
restraint in 1970 when business has 
enjoyed the results of several boom 
years? 

The most effective challenge to 
government policies came from within 
its own party ranks. In this country 
with its strong party discipline, this 
is very unusual. 

Liberal Senator Maurice Lamon- 
tagne, a Laval University economist, 
called for easier and cheaper money 
and selective tax cuts. This would 
mean reversing the present situation. 

The Trudeau policies, he said, were 
hitting hardest at those areas and those 
people who could afford it least. 

"It may well be that the poor will 
be hit twice, both by inflation and its 
so-called cures, while the stronger 
sectors of the economy, which are 
mainly responsible for cost-push in- 
flation, will continue to enjoy rising 
incomes. 

"In this way, what we are trying 
to achieve — unconsciously, I am sure 
— is to make the poor so poor and the 
weak so weak that the rich and the 
strong will not be able to exploit them 
any further by pushing prices up." 

To top them all, federal NDP 
Leader T. C. Douglas charged the 
government with deliberately inducing 
a recession in Canada. 

"It is nothing short of criminal for 
any government to create unemploy- 
ment as a deliberate policy and then 
to refuse to do anything about it. 

"The government has a responsi- 
bility either to present to Parliament 
a program that will provide jobs . . . 
or resign." 

Housing Crisis 
In Canada, Too 

It is estimated that Canada still 
needs two and a half million new 
homes by 1979. The housing crisis 
has been bad for a year or two and 
is getting worse. 

Yet housing starts in the first three 
months of this year have been way 
down. 

Spokesmen for the government still 
believe that about 1 80,000 to 200,000 
units will be built this year. Last year 
about 215,000 were built. So even if 
these spokesmen are right, Canada will 
get fewer new homes than last year, 
and far below the minimum of 250,- 
000 a year needed to catch up with 
the backlog of demand. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



Office Construction 
Remains at High Level 

If housing construction is in the 
doldrums, office buildings are still go- 
ing up at a fast rate. 

In major Canadian cities demand 
is high and the vacancy rate low for 
first class office space. 

In metro Toronto, for example, 
1969 was a record year for space oc- 
cupancy. Buildings under construction 
or close to the construction stage will 
produce 12.5 million square feet be- 
tween now and 1974. But the demand 
is expected to be as high as 16.5 mil- 
lion square feet. 

In Edmonton, Alberta, not enough 
office space is being built to meet ex- 
pected demand. Last year office con- 
struction set a local record. 

The situation in Calgary is some- 
what similar. Last year 1.2 million 
square feet became available, so a 
slowdown this year was expected. 

In Vancouver the downtown va- 
cancy rate is low. In 1969 1.2 million 
square feet became available. This 
year only one new office building has 
been started, but several major devel- 
opments are getting going. 

Office rents in Vancouver are 
around $6 to $7 a square foot at this 
time. The rate is expected to rise to 
$7 to $8 a square foot. 

In Toronto there is little or no 
space downtown at less than $8 a 
square foot. The going rate for prime 
space is about $9.50 to $10.50 a 
square foot. 

In downtown Ottawa, prime space 
is going at $6 to $8 a square foot, the 
same as in Winnipeg in the mid-West. 

Call for Low-Rent 
Housing Issued 

The fight against poverty is being 
hampered by poor housing, a gov- 
ernment agency, the Federal Depart- 
ment of Health and Welfare, told the 
Senate Committee on Poverty. 

The department's brief called for a 
large increase in low-rental housing 
projects. 

The Canadian Welfare Council is 
getting ready to do something about 
the housing situation. 

It has just announced that it is 
establishing a national housing com- 
mittee which will be strongly repre- 
sentative of low-income and other 
citizen groups. 

It is being frankly labeled as a 
pressure group. The CWC says that 
there are already special interests 
lobbying governments, but there has 
been none at the national level that 
represents low-income groups and citi- 
zens' housing organizations. 



It is perhaps surprising that no trade 
union names have been put on this 
committee. The trade union move- 
ment through the CLC and through 
its National Labor Co-operative Com- 
mittee has been actively promoting 
housing for low and middle income 
families. 

Anyway, the job needs to be done. 
Now is a good time to do it. Unem- 
ployment has hit hard at the building 
trades in many areas. Stepped up 
housing construction would help make 
jobs. 

Will the federal government start 
reversing its high interest, tight money 
policies and encourage homebuilding? 

Minimums Up 
In Two Provinces 

Two provinces have increased their 
minimum wage rates. Both Alberta 
and Manitoba have stepped their rates 
up to $1.50 an hour. 

Ontario hasn't done so yet, but it 
will likely do so within the next few 
months. 

Ontario Amends Law 
After Recent Decision 

The Ontario government has 
amended its labor legislation to wipe 
out the adverse decision of the Su- 
preme Court of Canada in the Metro- 
politan Life case. (See March issue.) 

The amendment restores the con- 
ditions laid down by the Ontario La- 
bor Relations Board before the court 
decision made it mandatory for the 
Board to refer to union constitutions 
as a guide to certification. 

Union constitutions vary greatly. 
The Board's conditions are generally 
acceptable to labor, but still not as 
good as they should be. 

Nationals Versus 
Internationals 

Canada has always had some "na- 
tional" unions as opposed to "inter- 
national," but they have never had 
more than 10 or 15 per cent of total 
union membership across the country. 
Only in the province of Quebec has 
a national union captured over 25 per 
cent of union members. 

Nevertheless, in the fight for union 
membership, feelings sometimes run 
high and things are said which were 
better unsaid, especially when they 
are spoken from strong prejudices and 
are untrue. 

A recent attack by a highranking 
officer of a national union on inter- 
nationals is a case in point. 

Continued on Page 24 



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22 



THE CARPENTER 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 

M When You Get There 

Having dealt in a recent issue of this 
column with suggestions on getting gear 
ready for the opening of the fishing sea- 
son, here's a few ideas on what to do 
when you get there: 

• I've oft' been asked if the action of 
the outboard motor's prop frightens fish. 
I believe it usually does in the immediate 
area. To offset this, I usually troll as far 
behind the boat as possible, and very 
slowly, just fast enough to activate the 
lure. 

• In stream fishing for trout. I've 
found it a good idea to stand as far back 
from the bank as possible. And I've found 
it pays off — after taking a trout or two 
from one hole — to move down to another 
likely spot. True, there may be more fish 
in a comparatively restricted area but 
doesn't it seem logical that repeated casts 
in a small patch of water, with an occa- 
sional hooking of fish, could spook the 
school. Give the "hot spot" a chance to 
cool off, then come back and hit it again. 

• Getting back to boat fishing, may I 
suggest that you move around as little as 
possible, whether you're trolling or still- 
fishing, to avoid exposing yourself or 
casting moving shadows from the boat, 
especially in comparatively shallow water. 
And I've learned from observation on a 
gin-clear lake that the surest way to dis- 
perse the fish is to scrape the bottom of 
the boat with a heavy object — like an 
anchor, bait bucket, tackle box, or even 
a heavy heel. (That's why many boat 
fishermen wear rubber-soled sneakers.) 
Water, it must be remembered, is an ex- 
cellent medium for transmission of sound 
vibrations. 

• We've had some letters about "pros" 
and "cons" of treble hooks. To those who 
would like to remove trebles, replacing 
them with single hooks. I urge them to do 
so. Single hooks should improve rather 
than impair the lure's action as they offer 
less resistance to movement than treble 
hooks, and what is more important they 
increase the possibility of releasing small 
fish unharmed. 

• If you want to start your youngsters 
out right, make sure they are familiar 




Haddock and Antlers 





Stachowich 



Pressley and Fish 



with their equipment. I've watched some 
mighty enthusiastic young anglers go 
"cold" on the angling pastime after con- 
tinually fouling up their line. Try starting 
them out with dry-land casting lessons, 
knot tying, hook baiting, streamcraft,, 
conservation, fish identification, etc., then 
head for your favorite lake stream or the 
briny. This pre-trip training will sharpen 
their interest, technique, and help put a 
few fish in their creel. 

■ Out of the Ice 

Carl S. Ekholm, 
secretary- treasurer 
of Northern On- 
tario District Coun- 
cil of Lumber and 
Sawmill Workers 
Union at Port Ar- 
thur. Ontario, calls 
attention to a real 
Iunker walleye 
caught by Mike 
Stachowich, shop 
steward. Mike 
eased a 15-pounder 
from a hole in the 
ice on D i n o r w i c 
Lake. It measured 
32 inches from 
nose to tail. 

■ California Duo 

Avid husband-and-wife angling team 
who are "out there," just about every 
weekend, is Mr. and Mrs. Max Martin of 
Bakersfield. California. Max is a member 
of Local 743. At left is a photograph of 
the outdoor-loving pair with a bowed 
stringer of largemouth bass they eased 
from Lake Nacimiento. Largest on this 
stringer was a 5-Ib., 2-oz. specimen, but 
the very largest Max nipped from Naci- 
miento was a Iunker of a largemouth that 
tipped the scales at 8-lb.. 10-ozs. 

■ Hunting Haddocks 

"You gotta' watch these women folks. 
Teach 'em how to hunt and they'll make 
you step to the music to try and keep up 
with them." That is the conclusion of 
Hugh R. Haddock of Grants Pass. Ore- 
gon, a member of Local 3009. In the big- 
game hunt season 'fore last, Hugh nailed 
down a six-point bull elk in the eastern 
highlands of his home state. 

No question about it, Hugh was top 
gun that year but last year it wound up 
differently. Both Mrs. Haddock and the 
Haddock's daughter-in-law nailed a tro- 
phy-antlered elk last year while Hugh 
barely managed to fill his tag with a 
spike. They'll do it every time, Hugh. 

■ Another Prize Catch 

Getting back to the subject of note- 
worthy catches, we're bound to record a 
few "prize catches" by Jesse Ronald 
Pressley of Baltimore. Maryland, a mem- 
ber of Local 101. At left is a look-in on 
Brother Pressley at home on Gough 
Street, displaying his mounted rainbow 

Continued on Page 24 



MAY, 1970 



23 



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Outdoor Meanderings 

Continued from Page 23 

trout which was taken from the Big Gun- 
powder River (falls area); tipped the 
scales at 4-lbs., 2-ozs. and earned him 
""Best in State" award from Sports Afield 
magazine. Another "Best in State" cer- 
tificate from Sports Afield was earned for 
5-lb., 2-oz. shad he nipped from the Sus- 
quehanna Flats. (I was particularly inter- 
ested in Jesse's catches for in recent visits 
to my home town of Baltimore, I've fished 
the aforenamed waters, sauntering out 
from my old home on Robinson Street 
which crosses Gough near Patterson Park, 
but I've never caught one near as big as 
Jesse did.) 

Canadian Report 

Continued from Page 21 

The attack was that international 
unions are deriving revenue from their 
Canadian members in excess of bene- 
fits received. 

The basis of the attack was a gov- 
ernment report of returns under the 
Corporations and Labor Unions Act. 

The Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
gathers data about unions under 
authority of this Act, but the data is 
far from complete and as a result, 
the information gathered is both de- 
ficient and inaccurate. 

The Canadian Labor Congress has 
repeatedly protested this Act to the 
government but nothing has been done 
to correct it. 

Said the CLC in its submission to 
the government in March, "The data 
published are being used to attack 
international trade unions by those 
who have an interest in doing so even 
though an examination of the legisla- 
tion and of the annual reports make 
it clear that the statistics are not re- 
liable. . . . The annual reports should 
not become an avenue for the expres- 
sion of one-sided opinions and unin- 
formed comment as to the place and 
role of trade unions in the economy. 
We find these views out of place in 
an official publication." 

Says CLC Legislative Director Andy 
Andras, "It is worth observing that 
international unions tend to deposit 
their Canadian cash receipts in Cana- 
dian banks or to invest them in Cana- 
dian bonds and stocks. The 1 967 An- 
nual Report shows that in that year 
international unions had over $18,- 
000,000 in cash on hand and on de- 
posit in Canadian currency and an- 
other $60,000,000 in federal, provin- 
cial and municipal bonds, bonds and 
debentures issued by corporations res- 
ident in Canada and stocks issued by 
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24 



THE CARPENTER 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



Charlotte, North Carolina MDTA 
Class 'Beyond Fondest Expectation' 



APPRENTICESHIP CONTESTS 
CALENDAR FOR 1970 



Stale 



Mill 
Carpenter Cabinet Millwright 




These 27 members of the Charlotte, North Carolina, class of carpentry apprentices, 
studying under a MDTA program, are described as "not teenagers, but good, solid 
citizens," by Instructor Coordinator Dowd L. Rape (shown standing at rear). He also 
praised the present group's success as "beyond my fondest expectation." The class 
includes, shown from left: front row — Hugh A. McLain, Jr., David M. Lingerfelt, 
Billy R. Sellers, Ralph \\ . Broome, Roy L. Brown and James H. Livingston; second 
row — David W. Helms, Lawrence A. Peavler, Ronald D. Bates, John M. Clanton, 
James H. Therrell and David E. Lee; third row — John S. McDaniel, William F. 
Heptig, Daniel G. Caudle, James F. Wiles, Richard A. Price, James C. Little and 
Jay Lewis Eddings; back row — Ronald R. Ross. 

South Florida 
JATC Selects 
Top Apprentices 

Seven 4th year apprentices partici- 
pated in the annual "Apprentice of 
the Year" contest. The winner. John 
Johnston (see photo) was presented 
the "Arthur E. Stewart Memorial 
Trophy" and will participate in the 
Florida Statewide Contest. The State- 
wide Contest will select the "Sunshine 
State" representative to the Interna- 
tional Contest to be held in Denver, 
Colorado in October. 

All the participants were selected 
by the JATC on the basis of their 
overall school record and on-the-job 
performance. Selection for participa- 
tion is an honor obtained only through 
hard work and study. 

Wallace S. Bray, Director of the 
South Florida JATC, congratulated 
all the participants for their contribu- 
tion to the promotion of craftsmanship 
through apprenticeship. 



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Wisconsin 


X 






Ontario. Can. 


X 




X 


British Col. 


X 


X 




Calgary, Alberta X 






Totals 


36 


16 


19 




No beards, no long hair, no dope, no anti-establishment. Just seven clean cut young 
men who are 100 per cent for the establishment and proved so by developing them- 
selves into premium wage earners in the construction industry. Left to right are: 
Alexander Smith, Terry Doolittle, John Johnston, winner of the contest, Will Rollins, 
Wayne Sites, alternate, John Copeland, and Spenser Cunningham. 



MAY, 1970 



25 



Most 

young 

car 

thieves 

start 
your car 

the 
same 

wav 
you do. 

(with your keys). 





LOCK YOUR CAR. 
TAKE YOUR KEYS. 



Advertising contributed 
for the public good. 



Los Angeles Starts First of Five 
MDTA Pre-Apprenticeship Classes 







First of five sections of training under the MDTA program is being conducted by 
the Los Angeles JACT. Under the direction of Charles Sanford 100 will receive 
pre-apprenriceship training. The first group of pre-apprenticeship trainees include, 
from left (back row) Tom Benson, coordinator; Jorge Ibudo; Ray Doucette Jr.; 
Billy D. Potts; Donald W. Tresvan; John Sermeno; George A. Cantley Jr.; James 
W. Walker; Jerry Romero; Raymond P. Pablis; Victor Penn, instructor. (Front 
row): Larry G. Brent; John Madril; George A. Johnson; Leroy Wheaton and Robert 
McNeil. 



Nine Detroit Area Locals Graduate 
183 Apprentices at Honors Banquet 




26 



At a recent ceremonial banquet in Detroit, 183 certificates of apprentice completion 
were presented by officers of nine local unions. Shown here, Leo Gable, technical 
director of apprenticeship and training, United Brotherhood, is presenting Donny 
Brown his certificate. From left are: Stan Arnold, secretary-treasurer, Michigan 
State Building and Construction Trades Council; Anthony "Pete" Ochocki, director 
of organization, United Brotherhood; Leonard Zimmerman, secretary-treasurer, 
Michigan State Carpenters Council; Gable; Raymond Fair, president, Detroit Car- 
penters District Council; Brown, and John Harrington, secretary-treasurers, Detroit 
Carpenters District Council. Donny Brown, 1969 state carpentry apprentice contest 
winner, gave the graduates response to the officers' presentation of certificates, in 
which he gave high praise not only for the training program but also for the 
"dedicated instructors." New journeymen were added to the ranks of Locals 19, 
26, 337, 674, 982, 998, 1067, 1433, and 1513. 

THE CARPENTER 



48 Apprentices Learn Carpentry 
At Rochester Institute of Technology 



Forty-eight potential carpenters are 
taking a 144-hour course at the Rochester 
Institute of Technology, Rochester, New 
York. This internationally-known insti- 
tution of higher learning is providing 
space at its downtown center for the car- 
penter's apprenticeship program through 
arrangements with the Builders Exchange 
of Rochester. Robert H. Griffith is as- 
sistant secretary and apprentice training 
coordinator of the Exchange. 



Griffith states that the class is the 
"biggest yet." The project derives its 
funds from the Industry Advancement 
Program administered by the Building 
Trades Employers Association, and in 
cooperation with the Rochester Carpen- 
ters District Council. 

Total current enrollment in the over- 
all program this year is 106, which in- 
cludes advanced apprentices. All com- 
pleted their training April. 







A new phase of the apprenticeship program at the Rochester Institute of Technology 
is an eight-hour "crash program" in first aid. Shown here, from left are apprentices 
Richard J. Hocenic, Robert J. Schoepfel, Jr., Robert San Filippo. David White, and 
Howard I. Briggs. This portion of the class program is taught by John Loomis, 
safety instructor for the local Red Cross. 

Practical Skills Emphasized in King County, 
Washington Pre-Apprentice Training 




Now Hearing completion, the third MDTA program sponsored by the King County 
(Washington) Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship and Training Trust has emphasized 
use of carpenter tools, manipulative skills and practical training. As a consequence 
of this training, the young men are anxious to go to work at the trade. Shown here 
is the class and its leaders, from left, back row: Cecil Jensen, Larry Gilmore, Wendell 
Phillips, Weldon Abrams, Dan Kennedy, Mike Wanwig Fred Anderson, Apprentice 
Coordinator Bob Buckingham, and Secretary-Treasurer Donal Johnson. Kneeling 
are George Urovak, Eddie Ramos, Phil Demmert, and Ben Alexander. 



LABORS MATERIAL 
1 COSTS 




1970 UNIT COSTS 
COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF 

j HUNDREDS OF 
CONTRACTORS 
AND MATERIAL 

I SUPPLIERS 



208 Pages 0N >-Y 



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ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS 
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AVERAGE LABOR COSTS FOR 
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TYPICAL SUB CONTRACT 
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OF THUMB 



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27 



Job Corpsmen Build Student Building 




'First 7 Apprenticeship 

Crad Under CI Bill 

Is Challenged 

In 1947 the Carpenter published a story 
about the graduation of what then ap- 
peared to be the first man trained in a vo- 
cational school as a carpenter under the 
GI Bill of Rights. 

A member of Local 1296, San Diego, 
California, has now come forward with 
supporting documents to lay claim to that 
title. He is Coyle W. Turner, Sr., now a 
general building contractor in El Cajon 
who maintains his membership in the 
United Brotherhood. Turner trained un- 
der the GI Bill at the San Diego Voca- 
tional College. He was issued a diploma 
by the State of California, and promoted 
to journeyman status on November 1, 
1946. The dates of his graduation and 
advancement has been verified by Bob 
Bethel, coordinator of vocational educa- 
tion at SDVC. 



Young Hawaiians in Job Corps, preparing for apprenticeship program of Local 745, 
built the structure shown behind the group, which will be used as student body 
headquarters for Aiea High School in Aiea. On the stairway, from top to bottom, 
are: Ralph Tokuda, Sam Ogitani, Richard Hirokane, Alan Feliciano, Harry Kuihahi, 
Doublas Miyashiro, Russell Kim, Gary Tachera, Saduyuki Hashimoto, William 
Taisipic, Johnston Jonas, Harry Brogden, Vidado Dumlao and John Manuel. 



Attend Your Local Union 
Meetings Regularly. 


Be an 
thi 


active member 
' Brotherhood. 


of 



RETIRED CARPENTERS! 

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28 



THE CARPENTER 



Detroit Area Selects Top Apprentices 




Joel Bergman (center), of Carpenters Local 1433, is shown receiving his champion- 
ship award from John Harrington, secretary-treasurer of the Detroit Carpenters 
District Council, after winning the Detroit Area Carpentry Apprentice Contest. 
Pictured from left, are: Harrington; Dennis Campbell, Local 998, who placed third 
in contest; Joseph Miller, business agent of Local 337 and contest committee chair- 
man; Bergman; Raymond Fair, CDC president and chairman of the Joint Appren- 
ticeship Committee; Kenneth Rosemeck, Local 674, contest runner up; and Clay 
Langston, JAC secretary representing management. 




ARnUALp-iP^ IRY APPREnTIC 




Participants in the Detroit Area Carpentry Apprentice Contests, held recently in 
the large Cobo Hall, to choose winners which will, in turn, participate in the state 
contest later this year. Shown, left to right: front row seated — Stuart Proctor, Co- 
ordinating Judge, International Apprenticeship Commissioner; and contestants Robert 
Drinker). Wesley Treece, Edwin LaBut. Dennis Campbell, Joel Bergman. Kenneth 
Rosemeck, Norbert Brohl, Jerome Rospierski, David Gray, and John Casey; second 
row seated — Floyd Lynch, Judge representing Labor; Rex Jenkins, Representing Asso- 
ciated General Contractors and JAC; John Rogers, Business Representative of Local 
1433; Herb Schultz, Assistant Head Instructor of the Apprentice School; Chris 
Magnusson. Coordinating Judge representing MCCA and JAC; Joseph Miller, Busi- 
ness Representative of Local 337, Chairman of the Contest Committee, and member 
of the JAC; Donald Sudau, Business Representative of Local 674, member of JAC: 
Amos Stewart, Business Representative of Local 19, member of JAC; and Clay 
Langston, Secretary of the JAC, representative of the AGC; third row standing — 
Jack Kelley, Judge, Deputy Commissioner. City of Detroit Building and Safety 
Department; Raymond Cooks. Coordinator of the Detroit Carpentry JAC; Daniel 
Kelley, Business Representative of the Carpenters District Council; Nelson Kropik. 
Judge representing Management: John Harrington, Secretary-Treasurer of the CDC. 
member of the JAC; Raymond Fair. Chairman of the CDC. and JAC; Henry Tuck. 
Head Instructor of the Apprentice Training School, and George Eickholdt, Instructor 
at the Apprentice Training School. 



A mouse 

has already 

been saved 

from 

leukemia. 

Help us 
save a man. 



* v 



For years, you've been 
giving people with leukemia 
your sympathy. But sympathy 
can't cure leukemia. Money 
can. Give us enough of that, 
and maybe we'll be able to do 
for a man what has already 
been done for a mouse. 

American Cancer Society * s 



MAY, 1970 



29 



f* I 





Service to the 
Brotherhood 




30 



A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 

(1) LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA— Local 
1308 recently honored its long-time 
members at a special dinner. Kenneth 
Moye, business representative, was toast- 
master. Art Hallgren, vice president of 
the Florida AFL-CIO, and Local 1308 
President Herbert M. Schuette presented 
the awards. Shown here, from left, are: 
front row — Harold Jordan, 25 years; 
John Newman, 60 years; Arlie Dun- 
baugh, 50 years; Mortimer E. Cole, 25 
years; standing — A. C. King, financial 
secretary of the local for 47 years; 
Charles C. Pearson, Jr., 25 years; H. M. 
Schuette, local president; Earl Boles, 25 
years; and Art Hallgren, Florida AFL- 
CIO vice president. Others to receive 
awards were Vaino Lahde, 50 years; 
Walter Ousler, Garland Fore, Frank 
Moore, and Lester Williams, all 25 years. 

(2) GREELEY, COLORADO— For the 

first time in the history of Local 418, 
members and their wives gathered at a 
Recognition Dinner to honor its senior 
members and past presidents. Fifteen 
long-time members were recognized, and 
five past presidents of the local were also 
honored. Shown here, from left, are: 
Carl C. Taylor, past president; Roy Nor- 
dell, charter member, 35-year pin; Her- 
man Diekman, past president, Dennis 
Gustafson, 30-year pin; Floyd Stansbury, 
past president; Lee Clevenger, 30-year 
pin; Paul Willis, 25-year pin; Clarence 
Boyd, 30-year pin; Pete Sundberg, 25- 
year pin; Robert Speer, 45-year pin; and 
Lynn Koenig, current president of Local 
418. 

(3) NORWOOD, PA.— Three hundred 
members and their wives attended the 
Annual Awards Night dinner of Local 
845, to honor 20 men who received their 
25-year service pins. Shown here at the 
presentation, from left, are: Bernard 
Stromberg, 25-year pin; Frank Shriver, 
25-year pin; George Walish, president 
of the Pennsylvania State Federation of 
Carpenters and guest speaker; Douglas 
Quigg, financial secretary of Local 845; 
Robert H. Gray, secretary -treasurer of 
Philadelphia Metropolitan District Coun- 
cil, who is pinning a 25-year pin on Vin- 

THE CARPENTER 



cent Martinieehi.o; Robert Shmucker, 25- 
year pin; Joseph Seefeldt, business rep- 
resentative of Delaware County; and 
Edward Kammerer, president of Local 
845. Not pictured, but receiving their 
25-year pins were: Joseph Barbour, Jo- 
seph Bonghi, Larry Boyle, George Castle, 
Charles Killen, George Killen, Charles 
Kandle, Samuel Mannera, Donald 
Napier, Lawrence Olsen, Russell Sig- 
mund, E. Truckenmiller, Joseph Tumola, 
Earl Wilson, Charles Wilson, and An- 
thony Yakas. 



(7) WHITEHORSE, YUKON TERRI- 
TORY — Emil Dahldren is the recipient 
of a 25-Year service pin, being presented 
by R. M. Ayers, president of Local 2499. 
Whitehorse. Brother Dahldren, a native 
of Sweden, emigrated to Canada in 1928. 
He joined Local 452 in Vancouver, and 
in 1949 transferred his membership to 
Local 2499 in Whitehorse. There he 
worked steady at his trade until retire- 
ment December 31 when he took his 
withdrawal card. Emil and his wife are 
now preparing for a visit back to Sweden. 




(4) NEENAH AND MENASHA, WIS- 
CONSIN — Local 630 recently paid trib- 
ute to three of its members who have 
earned their 50-year service pins. Shown 
at the presentation are, from left: Busi- 
ness Agent Jerry Johnke; 50-year mem- 
bers John Christian, William Neubauer, 
and Emil Blank; Wisconsin State Council 
President Ronald Stadler; Erven Schultz, 
master of ceremonies; and Local 630 
President John Lauer, Jr. 




J 



f% 



■ci If I W 




(5) HELENA, MONTANA— The Local 
153 awards banquet, held recently, hon- 
ored several members. Standing, from 
left, are: Al Sternberg, master of cere- 
monies; Bernhard Merkel, executive sec- 
retary of the Montana State Council of 
Carpenters, who presented the awards; 
Elmer Mills, 25-year pin; Ivan Martin- 
son, 55-year pin; Art Englund, 60-year 
pin; Mrs. Herman Lindstrom (who re- 
ceived 60-year pin on behalf of her de- 
ceased husband, who served as a local 
officer most of his 60 years in Local 153, 
and prior to his recent death, missed 
only five meetings in the past 18 years); 
Kenneth Lindstrom, and Phillip Ogle, 
president of Local 153. Robert Costain, 
not present, also received a 55-year pin. 



(6) CLEVELAND, OHIO— Five mem- 
bers of Local 1929 (Piledrivers) have 
been awarded 50-year service pins. They 
are, from left: first row — Hugo Granfors, 
Patrick Livingston, and Edward Kresin; 
second row — Nick Kosetf, Tom Forsythe 
(53-year member), and Tovio Maki. 
Standing in the third row is Local Presi- 
dent Howard Kail and Business Repre- 
sentative David Quinby. 





Several area labor dignitaries were present at the annual Old Timers Luncheon of Local 34 (Piledrivers), San Francisco. One 
50-year service pin award and several 25-year pin presentations were made, and special recognition was given to past presidents 
of the local. The luncheon group, shown here, included these guests: Joe Sullivan, president of Bay Counties District Council; 
C. Bruce Sutherland, administrator for Carpenters Health & Welfare Trust Fund for California; Gordon Littman and Dave 
Wilcox, of the Bay Counties Carpenters Apprenticeship Training program; Clarence Briggs, 8th District international repre- 
sentative of the United Brotherhood; Al Figone, secretary of Bay Counties District Council, and Anthony L. Ramos, secretary 
of the California State Council of Carpenters. 



MAY, 1970 



31 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Ukiah Local 2143 Honors Long-Time Members 



I 




Long-time members of Local 2143, Ukiah, California, were 
given special recognition at a recent ceremony. Flanked by 
Local 2143 President H. E. Carr (left) and Gus Urban (far 
right), president of the North Coast District Council and mem- 
ber of Local 1040, Eureka, Calif., who made presentations, 
are 30-year pin recipients Vernon Mize, Lloyd Golding, Frank 
Reed and E. J. Schuette. Not present to receive his pin was 
Frank Kallio. 




Local 2143 members receiving 25-year pins are, from left: 
seated — Bill Hein, Louis Page, Pete Gialdini, and George 
Townsend. Standing — Joseph McEntire, Carl Burton, Leslie 
Knighton, Herbert Clem, Harry Cranucci, Harvey Davis, and 
Local 2143 President H. E. Carr, and Cus Urban, president 
of North Coast Council of Carpenters. 



Member Keeps Old Ritual 



Retired carpenter George Flieg is 
shown here holding a ritual used by the 
first carpenters union in Jefferson County, 
Missouri. The charter for the local was 



No. 1352 and was issued March 20. 1918 
at Pevely. Missouri. The charts was in 
force until September 23. 1930. The car- 
penters of Jefferson County are now 
served by Local 2214. Festus. Missouri. 
Brother Flieg. a union carpenter much 
of his life, is now 86. He was born in 
Stabtown, and moved to Herculaneum at 
an early age where he worked at his trade 
for many years. He is now retired in 
Flat River. Missouri. The ritual, among 
Brother Flieg's prized possessions, holds 
many memories of an exciting era in 
Missouri unionism. 



Local 1778 Hosts 
Turkish Visitors 

Carpenters and Millwrights Local 1778, 
Columbia. South Carolina, were recent 
hosts of a five-man delegation of the 
Turkish Confederation of Trade Unions. 
The group is taking a six-week tour of 
the United States under the auspices of 
the Agency for International Develop- 
ment (AID). U. S. Department of State. 

The men. officers of rail, highway and 
defense workers unions in Turkey, met 
with Local 1778 representatives and 
toured one of the carpenters' job sites. 



Union Membership Fulfils 'Active Search' 
Provision of Georgia Unemployment Rules 



George Flieg with ritual. 



Organized labor has taken a great step 
forward in Georgia, because of a major 
rule change in the state's unemployment 
insurance program. The program is ad- 
ministered by the Employment Security 
Agency of the state Department of La- 
bor. The new ruling should prove helpful 
to carpenters and other tradesmen, in 
good standing with their local unions, 
who apply for unemployment benefits. 

Commissioner of Labor Sam Caldwell 
announced that: '"Effective September 22 
(1969), union or professional society 
members will be considered to comply 
with the active search requirement of the 
Georgia Law if they show they are mem- 
bers . . . and are willing to accept any 



job to which they are referred by the 
officials of the organization." 

The rule, as revised, now states: "The 
Law requires that one make an active 
search for work. Because union members 
generally secure their jobs through their 
locals, one shall be considered to com- 
ply with the active search requirement if 
he is in an occupation in which jobs are 
filled through labor union channels, pro- 
fessional societies, etc. He must show he 
is a member in good standing, is cur- 
rently registered with the union or society 
and is willing to accept any job to which 
he is referred by the officials of such 
organization." 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



In Magazin e Article 



St. Louis Member Gives Flooring Tips 



The sound advice of professionals 
was presented in a special Sunday 
magazine supplement to the April 5 
issue of the St. Louis Globe Dem- 
ocrat. The subject was flooring, and 
one of the professionals speaking out 
on that topic was Perry Joseph, 
business manager of the Carpet, 
Linoleum, Hardwood and Resilient 
Tile Layers Local 1310. 

His recommendations, and his 
valid appeal for specification of un- 
ion workmanship, are worthy of re- 
peating here. Mr. Joseph's by-lined 
article was entitled, "Get the Job 
Done Right!" 

"Throughout the years we've 
tried through many different pro- 
grams to be of greater service to the 
public because when all is said and 
done, our existence as a Union de- 
pends on how well we serve you. 

"Our members are hired by floor- 
ing contractors, retail establish- 
ments and installation service com- 
panies. We do the actual physical 
work of installing whatever type of 
new flooring you select. These men 
are well trained and have years of 
experience behind them. 

"We urge you to select a reputa- 
ble dealer because he is responsible 
for advising you on what type of 
material (and there are hundreds) 
is best suited to your installation. 

"He will point out any prelimi- 
nary work that should be done be- 
fore installing the new flooring ma- 
terial and tell you what will wear 
best in high traffic areas or areas 
that get soiled often. He also 
knows about cleanability and main- 
tenance requirements of the mate- 
rial. 

"There are many other elements 
he will consider, too, such as ex- 
posure to sunlight, radiant heat or 
below-grade installation. He'll want 
to know about pets, cooking areas 
and many other factors that the un- 
informed do-it-yourselfer could not 
possibly know. 

"We advise you to follow these 
simple steps — for your own protec- 
tion — when you consider buying 
any type flooring material: 

"1. Select a reputable dealer — 



this is most important. 

"2. Explain in detail the installa- 
tion you are considering. 

"3. Let the dealer come to your 
home or business and actually ex- 
amine the installation site carefully 
if he feels it necessary. 

"4. Insist on Union Floor Layers 
— they are well trained. 

"5. Don't be fooled and try to 
install a do-it-yourself floor. 

"Follow these simple guidelines 
and get the job done right — that's 
the only way all the pieces will fit 
together and give you a beautiful 
serviceable floor for years to come." 

Local 412 Marks 
70th Anniversary 

A gala banquet was held recently 
to celebrate the 70th anniversary of 
Local 412, Sayville, New York. The 
event was also a testimonial to re- 
tiring Business Agent George Steen- 
land for his many years of devoted 
service to the local union and the 
district council. 

At right: Assistant to the President 
John Rogers makes presentation to 
George Steenland, with Mrs. Steenland 
in the foreground. 

Below: Turnout was big for the Local 
412 banquet. Seated at the head table 
are officers and special guests, which in- 
cluded General Agent George Babcock 
of the Suffolk County District Council, 
and General Representative George 
Welsch. 



New One-Family Honies 
Down 26% In Year 

The grim state of housing in this 
country is reflected in preliminary 
statistics just released by both the 
Department of Commerce and the 
Department of Housing and Urban 
Development. 

They show that during February 
1970, the number of new one- 
family homes sold in the United 
States was at a seasonally adjusted 
annual rate of 377,000 units, 16 
percent below last month's rate and 
29 percent below the February 1969 
rate. 

The number of new one-family 
homes sold during February was 
estimated at 29,000 units without 
seasonal adjustments, 9 percent be- 
low last month and 28 percent be- 
low February 1969. 





MAY, 1970 



33 



Inverted by Local 226 Member-. 



Concrete Form Ties 
Completely Removable 



Latest innovation in concrete form 
work is the Taper Tie, which can 
be used again and again, can be easily 
removed, leaving no metal in the wall 
to rust or corrode. The device was 
invented by William B. Huber, a mem- 
ber of Local 226, Portland, Oregon. 
The product — offered in several sizes 
to accommodate different wall thick- 
nesses — is being made and marketed 
by Concrete Taper Tie Corp. (For 
further information write Concrete 
Taper Tie Corp., 2323 Northeast 1 81st 



St., Portland, Oregon.) 

"I got sick and tired of busting my 
knuckles on ties and figured there had 
to be a better way," said Huber in 
explaining the motivation for his in- 
vention. 

The Taper Tie consists of a steel 
rod sheathed with a high-grade plastic 
to which concrete does not adhere. 
Cork cones are supplied which can be 
inserted in either end to facilitate 
grouting. 

The new forming aid has a time sav- 




®WW 




®12\6/ 



©ity*M 



CORK 




A. Concrete Taper Tie being used in forming. 

B. Tie being tapped out. 

C. Patching hole after tie is completely removed. 

D. Three-dimensional view of Taper Tie. 



Inventor Bill Huber illustrates the ease 
of removal of his Taper Tie. 

ing advantage. A strike on the end of 
the tie removes the complete tie from 
any thickness of the wall, with up 
to 1 00 percent recoverability. The 
customer or builder can specify his 
own depth of breakback, that is, how 
deep the hole is to be plugged with 
grout by inserting proper size corks in 
either end. (See diagram.) 

Because the taper extends the entire 
thickness of the wall on the taper tie, 
the hole left for grouting provides al- 
most parallel walls, and provides ex- 
cellent grip surface for grout. The 
ties are constructed with 3000 lb. test 
load wire for 7, 8, 10 and 12-inch wall 
dimensions. 



First Age Discrimination Suit Against Employment Agency Filed by Government 



The U.S. Labor Department has 
filed the first lawsuit in the country 
against an employment agency under 
the Age Discrimination in Employ- 
ment Act of 1967. 

Federal Wage-Hour Administrator 
Robert D. Moran said the Depart- 
ment has asked the U.S. District Court 
in Cleveland to permanently restrain 
the Mansfield (Ohio) Employment 
Service, a private agency, from taking 
illegal job orders from clients which 
specified age ranges and from other- 
wise violating the Age Discrimination 
in Employment Act. The injunction 
named Thomas Shimer as defendant 
in the case. 

The age discrimination law, which 
became effective in June 1968 and 
is enforced by the Labor Department's 
Wage and Hour Division, prohibits 
discrimination in employment of per- 



sons between 40 and 65 years of age. 

The law applies to employers of 25 
or more employees, labor unions, and 
employment agencies. 

The suit against Shimer alleges that 
he refused to refer a 55-year-old ap- 
plicant to a job advertised by his 
agency because of the applicant's age. 
The applicant is a widow supporting a 
handicapped child. 

Shimer had previously been inves- 
tigated by the Department for refus- 
ing to refer the same applicant to a 
job and for having on file more than 
100 job orders from clients on which 
age ranges were specified in violation 
of the Act. He agreed at that time 
to refrain from such discrimination 
but a subsequent investigation re- 
vealed that his agency was continuing 
the improper practices. 

Moran said he is determined to 



move forcibly against age discrimina- 
tion wherever it occurs in an effort 
to assure equal employment oppor- 
tunity for all persons protected by the 
Act, regardless of age. 

"I am convinced," he said "that 
the problem of age discrimination in 
employment is fully as perverse and 
as damaging to the economy as dis- 
crimination based on race or sex or 
any other arbitrary criteria. If we 
cannot erase age discrimination 
through voluntary cooperation, I shall 
not hesitate to utilize fully the legal 
sanctions contained in this law to solve 
this problem." 

The Ohio complaint was filed by 
Aaron A. Caghan, the Labor Depart- 
ment's Regional Attorney in Cleve- 
land, on behalf of Secretary of Labor 
George P. Shultz. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



Don't pity those on production lines! 

Workers on Automated Equipment 
Enjoy It, New Study Maintains 



Workers who work on automated 
jobs and assembly lines and think 
they are bored can forget it. At 
least, University of Michigan re- 
searchers say it isn't so. 

The University's Institute for So- 
cial Research has just published a 
report, "Technological Advances in 
an Expanding Economy," which re- 
jects the warning given by Adam 
Smith 200 years ago about the evil 
effects of machine technology on 
man. 

U. of M. economist Eva Miller 
drew her conclusions from a nation- 
wide study of more than 2,600 blue- 
collar and white-collar workers. The 
report states that "those who work 
with highly automated or mecha- 
nized equipment are more likely 
than others to say that they enjoy 
their work." 

Workers in all major socio-eco- 
nomic groups who have experienced 
changes in machine technology view 
their jobs as having become more 
demanding and requiring more at- 
tention, new skills, and a greater 
need for planning and judgment, the 
U-M survey revealed. 

Over the five-year period (1962- 
67) about which the workers were 
questioned, those experiencing a 
change in machine technology were 
more likely to have received income 
gains than those who continued to 
work with the same equipment. 

Prof. Miller attributes much of 
the income differential to the above- 
average educational levels of those 
who work with automated equip- 
ment. 

Among the popular myths chal- 
lenged by the study findings is the 
belief that technological change de- 
termines the incidence of unemploy- 
ment. 

Prof. Miller comments: "The 
survey leads us to infer that the im- 
pact of advances in machine tech- 
nology on employment is largely in- 
direct. The firm which introduces 
new labor-saving machinery often 
is faced with labor shortages and a 
growing market for its products. 
Normal retirements and resignations 



further help to bring its labor supply 
in balance with needs. Skilled and 
experienced people who have to be 
laid off tend to be re-employed 
quickly. 

"Much of the unemployment re- 
sulting from labor-saving machinery 
'trickles down' to the most marginal 
groups in the labor force. Workers 
who might have been hired in the 
absence of technological change are 
not needed. The last to be hired 
have to wait longer for a job; they 
suffer more unemployment. These 
are the people with the weakest la- 
bor market qualifications for rea- 
sons of age, experience, education, 
health, location, race, previous em- 
ployment record, and other possible 
handicaps." 

Also vulnerable, the report notes, 
are workers employed by firms that 
fall behind technologically. Un- 
steady work and short hours are rel- 
atively frequent in such situations. 

The report concludes that re- 
training and other special programs 
to ease the impact of technological 
unemployment "on the marginal 
segments of the labor force" should 
receive special attention. 



Legislative Conference 

Continued from page 4 

ments he can't live on." Yarborough 
said that construction safety legis- 
lation passed last year must be fund- 
ed this year to provide enforcement 
of its provisions. 

Other speakers at the day-long 
session were Representative Carl 
Albert, Democrat of Oklahoma and 
House Majority Leader; Represent- 
ative Carl Perkins, Democrat of 
Kentucky and Chairman of the 
House Education and Labor Com- 
mittee; Senator William Saxbe, Re- 
publican of Ohio; Senator Gaylord 
Nelson, Democrat of Wisconsin; 
Representative Martha Griffiths, 
Democrat of Michigan; Represent- 
ative William H. Ayres, Republican 
of Ohio; and Representative Wright 
Patman, Democrat of Texas. Louis 
Sherman, General Counsel of the 
Building and Construction Trades 
Department, also appeared on the 
program. 

Conspicuous by his absence was 
AFL-CIO President George Meany, 
who because of illness was unable 
to attend his first Building Trades 
Conference in more than a decade. 
Also scheduled to address the dele- 
gates was Secretary of Labor George 
Shultz, who could not appear be- 
cause of postal strike negotiations 
then underway in Washington. 



Tri-Trades Label Expands 
Pre-Fab To Alaska, Hawaii 



Three major craft unions — Car- 
penters, Plumbers and Pipe Fitters, 
and Electrical Workers — have ex- 
tended their landmark agreement 
for the factory production of modu- 
lar and pre-fabricated housing into 
Hawaii and Alaska. 

The Neidermeyer and Martin 
Company of Portland. Oregon, 
hopes to build over 1 ,000 units in 
the Outer Islands of Hawaii and 
more than 300 units in Alaska bear- 
ing the Tri-Trades Union Label 
established by the three crafts. 

When the agreement that seeks 
to achieve dispute-free production 
of modular homes was signed with 
the first company, Prestige Struc- 
tures, Inc. of Charlotte, Mich., late 



last year, President Nixon and Sec- 
retary of Housing and Urban De- 
velopment George Romney hailed it 
as a significant step forward to meet 
the increasingly desperate housing 
needs of the United States. 

Because of the climate differ- 
ences, the Alaska housing will run 
about 25 percent higher than that 
in Hawaii. The cost range of the 
homes will be between $12,000 and 
$70,000, Edward Neidermeyer. 
president of the company, said. 

Another important provision calls 
for the active employment and 
training of unskilled minority group 
members and unskilled workers in 
the production plant. 



MAY, 1970 



35 





fcOD«ftQOfeft( 



7000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 







^1 



UNION MAN SEABEE— Honored as "outstanding Battalion chief" and winner of Bat- 
talion "Chief's Trophy" at a recent Seabees training stint at Camp Pendleton was 
Chief Petty Officer, H. R. "Hal" Halvorsen, longtime member of Piledrivers and 
Bridge Builders Local 34, San Francisco, shown here, center, with his trophy, in- 
scribed "Construimus (we build) Batuimus (we fight)." Builder Chief Petty Officer 
Gunnar Benonys, creator of the trophy, is at right, and at left is Commander W. J. 
Mellish, Seabee Program Officer, Treasure Island. 



BRIDGE MASTERS— Two members of the 
United Brotherhood in the Thunder Bay- 
Port Arthur, Ontario, area, have won the 
right to represent Canada in the World 
Olympiad to be held in Stockholm. 
Sweden, in June. They are Eric Hautala, 
financial secretary and business agent of 
Local 2693 (Bushworkers), and John E. 
Dagsvik. a construction engineer and 10- 
year member of Local 1669 (Carpenters. 
Fort William). 

The bridge experts placed second in lo- 
cal competition in January, then placed 
first in Western Canada trials in Manitoba 
recently. Hautala and Dagsvik will be one 
of six pairs representing Canada in In- 
ternational competition. 



INFLATION 

It seems that a group of Illinois 
housewives rallied on Nov. 3, 
1837 against climbing food 
prices. 

Butter had skyrocketed to 8 
cents a pound; eggs were un- 
reachable at 6 cents a dozen. Cof- 
fee and sugar had zoomed to 20 
and 10 cents a pound. And, they 
complained, even the wages of a 
good hired house maid had gone 
to $2 a week. 




Wallace S. Bray 



APPRENTICE BOOSTER-Wallace S. Bray, 
Director is completing five years of serv- 
ice to the South Florida Carpenters 
♦ .-!.:.. ■ JATC - He started 

^j(jSbfc. n ' s program on a 

JPP* -Wl shoestring with 

two instructors and 
97 apprentices in 
1965. Handicap- 
ped by lack of 
funds and a major 
strike, he bor- 
rowed $500 from 
Local 993 to host 
the annual comple- 
tion awards and 
banquet that year. 
Today, Mr. Bray has 750 apprentices 
and 16 instructors to serve their instruc- 
tional needs. Mr. Bray anticipates over 
800 apprentices to be enrolled for the 
September 1970 term. An eight-fold in- 
crease in 5 years is certainly a com- 
mendable achievement. 



OUTREACH RECRUITER-Crockett Garrett, 
of Local 345 in Memphis, Tennessee, has 
has been named a recruiter for a new 
$66,000 Apprenticeship Outreach pro- 
gram. 

The program, funded by the U. S. De- 
partment of Labor, is sponsored by the 
AFL-CIO's Human Resources Develop- 
ment Institute in Cooperation with the 
Memphis Building Trades Council. It 
will prepare 50 minority youths for ap- 
prenticeship in the building and construc- 
tion trades. The Memphis program is 
one of the first to be sponsored by the 
HRDI. The Institute was set up by the 
AFL-CIO to involve more unions in man- 
power programs for the hard-to-employ. 
It has offices in 50 cities. 




Local 345 member Crockett Garrett, 
center, is congratulated on his appoint- 
ment as recruiter for the new Memphis 
Apprenticeship Outreach program by 
Sam Starks, BAT representative for 
Tennessee and Local 1667 member 
(left), and Don L. Arant, director of 
the program. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




SCREW CHECKER 

1 




The Screw Chek'r tells the size and 
thread of any standard American or 
Unified screw from No. 1 thru 5/16" 
quickly and accurately. It tells the size 
and number of wood screws, self tapping 
screws and shank diameters of rivets and 
cotter pins. The tool is 2 15/16" wide 
by 5!/s" high and 3/32" thick, made of 
hardened steel and chrome plated for 
long, rust-resistant life. The Screw 
Chek'r also measures threads per inch 
and tap drill and clearance drill sizes. 
Identifies tap series fN.C, N.F.. or N.S.) 
plus basic diameter table and 2%" scale 
for length measurements. In addition, 
it serves as a handy holder for screws 
that need filing on head, slot or end and 
for straightening bent screws and comes 
with a hardened cutter used for cutting 
size 10 and smaller screws to length. 
$5.65 ppd. Sold only by mail from 
Brookstone Co., 714R Brookstone Bldg., 
Peterborough, N.H. 03458. 

PLEASE NOTE 
A report on new products and processes 
on this page in no way constitutes an 
endorsement or recommendation. All 
performance claims are based on state- 
ments by the manufacturer. 



Hospital Costs 

Continued from Page 15 

as union busting, public relations 
and plush private offices, etc." 

On the question of labor cost. 
Davis noted that these costs make 
up two-thirds of total hospital costs 
but the breakdown beween profes- 
sionals and non-professionals is un- 
known. 

"Since the unionized employees 
are by and large the lower paid 
workers," he said, "wage hikes for 
the professionals and administrators 
probably account for a dispropor- 
tionate part of rising labor costs." 

Davis declared that "this is a 
matter which could stand further 
investigation in light of the continual 
charges we hear in New York from 
hospital officials that unionization 
of low-paid employees bears pri- 
mary responsibility for rising hos- 
pital costs." 

He felt it was important to point 
out several things, though: one that 
unionized hospital workers' wages 
"have risen from a scandalously 
low base" and, two, that "non-labor 
costs of hospitals have gone up at 
just as fast a pace as labor costs." 

Among other factors in hospital 
costs, Davis said, were plant ob- 
solescence and the high cost of train- 
ing medical personnel, especially 
doctors. 

"We must take health care out 
of the market place," Davis con- 
tinued, "and replace the chaos of 
the market place with rational 
planning. We need a national health 
care delivery system. ... It must be 
responsive to local desires and in- 
volve the participation of both the 
providers of health services and 
consumers of the community." 

Another witness before the Sub- 
committee was Mrs. Max Ascoli, 
who is chairman of the Health 
Section Citizens' Committee for 
children of New York. 

She made a point similar to that 
made by Davis, declaring that "it is 
unfortunate that in these United 
States — the most highly industrial- 
ized country in the world — we do 
not today have a plan for an ef- 
ficient health delivery system. We 
do not really, at this point, know 
how to deliver medical care effec- 
tively, efficiently and economically." 







-& 



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6V 



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Oakland, N.J. 



f 



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ond TOOLS 

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■■■■■"■■ Cfiw U 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 1118-050 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

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folder and sample lesson pages — Free of all obliga- 
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□ Check here if eligible for Vet. benefits 



MAY, 1970 



37 



L.U.NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

McCorkindale, Duncan 

L.U. NO. 18 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Personick, Harry 

L.U. 35 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Dunn. Robert F. 

L.U. 38 

ST. CATHARINES, 

ONT. 

Jeaurond. A. 
Southall, A. 

L.U. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Burt, Stanley B. 
Diehard. James 
Landry. Alex 

L.U. NO. 50 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Johnson, John H. 

L.U. NO. 54 
CHICAGO, ILL, 

Splavec, James 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Callaway, B. E. 
Harris, Orie M. 
Koontz, Roy 
Love, Charles 
Manes, William R. 
Rogers. M. S. 
Wilcox, Andrew B. 

L.U. NO. 67 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Brown. Nelson W. 
Gallant, Raymond M. 
Innis. Charles J. 
McLellan. Alexander J. 
Occhiolini. Augustine 
O'Reilly, Stanley J. 

L.U. NO. 79 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Barber. Howard 
Casey, Christopher 
Ceccarelli, Dante 
Donovan, Michael 
Florian, Charles 
Girling, Edwin, Sr. 
Greenvall, Elton 
Heywood. Lee 
Jenschke, Werner 
Peel, Christian 
Peters, Fred 
Rial, Joaquin 
Rubertone, Michael 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Murphy, Henry H, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 115 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

DeNapoli, Fred 
Flanagan, Richard 
Flanagan, Stephen 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Ballowe, C. A. 



Harvey, Charles E. 
Herzing, John 

L.U. NO. 144 
MACON, GA. 

Christmas, J. R. 
Lowe, Lawrence W. 

L.U. NO. 188 
YONKERS, N.Y. 

Torhan, Edward J. 
Weis. Thomas H. 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Colegrove, Van Earl 
Nash. Roy 
Willis. Harold, Sr. 
Vaughn, Clyde 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Clark, W. B. 
Clement. John R. 
Johanneson. Sam G. 
Lakin. Ralph C. 
Marnach, Henry 
Schierholz, J. H. 
Trautman, Fred 

L.U. NO. 242 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mock, Henry 

L.U. NO. 257 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Nachtrieb. William 

L.U. NO. 272 
CHICAGO HTS., ILL. 

Herz, Emil C. 
Johnston, George 

L.U. NO. 284 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Andersen. Albert 
Dannheim, Fred 
Imhoff, Joseph 
Jahre. Juul 
Matland, Neils 
Raunio. Toivo 
Somas. Anthony 

L.U. NO. 287 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Koppenhaver, M. M. 

L.U. NO. 289 
LOCKPORT, N. Y. 

Pratt, Stanley L. 
Taylor, Elwood H. 

L.U. NO. 298 

LONG ISLAND CITY, 

N.Y. 

Buhler, Erwin 
Catalfamo. Frank 
Fennessy, William J. 
Hanson, Arthur 
Soehnel, Raymond 
Stein, Charles J. 

L.U. NO. 302 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

Raines, Grant C. 

L.U. NO. 314 
MADISON, WISC. 

Albers, William, Jr. 
Bolen, Hobart 



Perry. Mark 
Roberts, Clarence 
Uselman. David F. 

L.U. NO. 322 
NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y. 

Tower, Ronald 
Webster. Ralph 

L.U. NO. 331 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Asbel. James W. 
Beckner. A. L. 
Hamm, Jonce L. 
Keel, W. H. 
Sessions. John C. 
Skinner. Willie 
Stout. Fred W. 

L.U. NO. 335 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Burdick, James 
Faber, Arthur 
Mattie, Maurice 

L.U. NO. 368 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Mantz. Fred 
Rex. James 

L.U. NO. 403 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Lewis. Harvey 

L.U. NO. 406 
BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Eder. Joseph A. 

L.U. NO. 413 
SOUTH BEND, IND. 

Lanning. William 

L.U. NO. 490 
PASSAIC, N. J. 

Dytchel. Meyer 
Hollander, James 
Nilsen. Peter 

L.U. NO. 583 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Goodnight, Harry C. 
McPherson. E. A. 

L.U. NO. 621 
BANGOR, MAINE 

Getchell. Fred B. 

L.U. NO. 674 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Smith. Fillimore R. 

L.U. NO. 727 
HIALEAH, FLA. 

Carter. Albert 
Hazan, Charles A. 

L.U. NO. 751 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

Feigi, Earl 
Uhr, Jessie 

L.U. NO. 787 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Spence, Lionel 

L.U. NO. 845 

CLIFTON HEIGHTS, PA 

Bullock, James 
Harkins, Roy J. 



Killen, Harry A. 
Maule. John 
Olsen. Lawrence 
Pierce, George 
Redford, Rex 

L.U. NO. 849 
MANITOWOC, WISC. 

Hanson, Ben C. 

L.U. NO. 925 
SALINAS, CALIF. 

Schirle. Julius 

L.U. NO. 937 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Bidiaux, Carlton H. 
Winge. Hiram 

L.U. NO. 943 
TULSA, OKLA. 

Adams, Buster F. 
Clifton. C. C. 
Dow, Spencer E. 
Gambrell. Ralph 
Nash, Charles 
Scott. W. D. 
Wildey. Carl C. 

L.U. NO. 950 
LYNBROOK, N. Y. 

Hittle, Harold 

L.U. NO. 977 
WICHITA FALLS, TEX. 

Henry, G. T. 

L.U. NO. 978 
SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

Crawley, Fred 

Cox. John M. 

Grammer, Thomas Monroe 

Highfill. Fred G. 

Ligon. George 

Rushing, Eli B. 

Thompson. Robert M. 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT. MICH. 

Woodruff, Grover 

L.U. NO. 1040 
EUREKA, CALIF. 

Wertz, Eldon 

L.U. NO. 1072 
MUSKOGEE, OKLA. 

Taylor. G. H. 

L.U. NO. 1093 
GLEN COVE, N. Y. 

Carter, John J. 
Isaac, Samuel 

L.U. NO. 1128 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Hearron, Elmer D. 
Peterson. Carl B. 

L.U. NO. 1162 
COLLEGE POINT, N. Y. 

Manning, Percy 

L.U.NO. 1185 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Alich, Kurt W. 

L.U. NO. 1273 
EUGENE, ORE. 

Jasper, A. H. 



L.U. NO. 1353 
SANTA FE, N. M. 

Martinez, Antonio J. 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Nielsen, Edward 
Williams. Axel 

L.U. NO. 1386 
SAINT JOHN, N.B. 

Cady, John 

Marr, George Oliver 

L.U. NO. 1421 
ARLINGTON, TEX. 

Blain, Luther D. 
Livingston, Ralph J. 

L.U. NO. 1423 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Coward, A. T. '"Blackie" 
Luzader. E. R. 
Tillery, Charles N. 

L.U.NO. 1511 
SOUTHAMPTON, N. Y. 

Halsey, Eugene 

L.U. NO. 1533 

TWO RIVERS. WISC. 

Taylor. Robert H. 

L.U. NO. 1580 
MILFORD, CONN. 

Hardy. Robert 

L.U. NO. 1598 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Brawner, V. H. 

L.U. NO. 1616 
NASHUA, N. H. 

Dubois. Honore 
Morton. Carlton 

L.U. NO. 1725 
DAYTONA BCH, FLA. 

Brown, Thomas J. 
Cowen, William 
Riedel, Morris 
Thompson, Leon 
Williams, C. B. 
Yeatman, Paul 

L.U. NO. 1846 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Hebert, Wilbert 
LaBorde, Herbert 
Migliore, Frank 
Mittlestaedt, John 
Poulsen, Anton 

L.U. NO. 1922 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Fritsch. George 
Nafshun, Sam 
Para, Stanley 
Schuch. Paul 

L.U. NO. 1971 
TEMPLE, TEX. 

Duncan. Doyle A. 
Pate, Henry Lee 

L.U. NO. 2006 

LOS GATOS, CALIF. 

Majewski, Charles J. 

Continued on page 39 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




easy ways 
to get the 
Zip Codes 
of 
people 
you 
write to: 

1_ When you receive a letter, 
note the Zip in the return 
address and add it to your 
address book. 

2 Call your local Post Office 
or see their National Zip 
Directory. 

3 Local Zips can be found 
on the Zip Map in the 
business pages of your 
phone book. 

Published as a public service in coop- 
eration with The Advertising Council. 



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It gives complete, detailed, easy-to-follow 
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a more perfect stair. It shows the basic 
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Name - 

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State Zip Code 



LAKELAND NEWS 

Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida. 

James A. Beaver, of Local 122, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., arrived at the Home March 
26, 1970. 



Victor Carlson, Local 58, Chicago, 111., 
died March 25, 1970. Burial was in Chi- 
cago. 

• 

Peter Savern. Local 20, Staten Island. 
N. Y., died March 31, 1970. Burial was 
at Staten Island. 



IK MEMORIUM 

Continued from page 38 



Olson, Olaf J. 
Perrin, Edwin 
Seibel, Eli 

L.U. NO. 2114 
NAPA, CALIF. 

Bregg, James W. 

L.U. NO. 2192 
HUSTON, LA. 

Henry, Milton D. 

L.U. NO. 2203 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Wallette, W. W. 

L.U. NO. 2250 
RED BANK, N. J. 

Applegate, Russell 
Frisk, Frank 



Gargena, John 
Gant, Alfred 
Gant, Joseph Y. 
Hauser, Percy 
Hoever, Robert 
Koolmeister, August 
Michaels, Theodore 
Morecraft, Isaac 
Morin, Roy 
Morton, Daniel 
Mount, John 
Nordin, Ivar 
Peterson, Nels 
Spratt. William 
Walling, Carlton 

L.N. NO. 3127 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Hamm, Charles 
Macari, Joseph A. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Aluminum Box Company . 


22 


Arco Publishing Company . 


. . 10 


Audel, Theodore 


.. 21 


Belsaw Sharp-All Co 


.. 39 


Chicago Technical College 


.. 19 


Craftsman Book Company 


. . 27 


Eliason Stair Guage Co. . . 


.. 24 


Estwing Manufacturing . . . 


ti 


Foley Manufacturing 


.. 28 


Fugitt, Douglas 


.. 39 


Hydrolevel 


39 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


.. 37 


Lee, H. D 


.. 21 


Locksmithing Institute .... 


.. 37 


North American School of 




Drafting 


27 


Paneling Specialties 


.. 24 


Stanley Works Back 


Cover 


Vaughan & Bushnell 


, 24 



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: ^ 

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Kansas City, Mo. 64111 

Send Free Book, "LIFETIME SECURITY." No 
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Name 

Address_ 
City 



.State. 



-Zip_ 




LAYOUT LEVEL 

* ACCURATE TO 1/32" 
•REACHES 100 FT. 



e ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate •I/' 1 ' ' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1950 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only $7.95 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
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allow the usual dealer discount on }£ Doz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSoto, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
v FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 







JUNE, 1970 



39 




in conclusion 



M. A. Hutcheson, Genera/ President 




9£L 

JimsL to 
QowiL Owl. 



■ The piece at right was written by Brother 
Ervin Gehl, a member of Local 264. Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, shortly before he died on January 1, 
1968. 

It came to the attention of THE CARPENTER 
only a few weeks ago. On the same day it arrived, 
newspaper stories were telling of three Hippies — ■ 
all from well-to-do families — blowing themselves 
to bits making bombs with which they presumedly 
intended to battle "The Establishment." 

It seems to me that both the sickness and sound- 
ness of our society are laid out here. 

A long-time carpenter, who invested several 
years of his life defending his country in a war on 
foreign soil, who fought malnutrition through the 
Depression years at home, counts his blessings by 
the dozen. 

On the other hand, youngsters who had no ex- 
posure to hunger or joblessness or Army service. 
find the American system intolerable. A large part 
of "The Establishment" which they fight against is 
made up of millions of Ervin Gehls. 

To say it is confusing is an understatement, 
although there is little confusion in the following 
lines written by Brother Gehl: 



MY BLESSINGS 

That I was born in the United States of America, 
To God-fearing parents, who tried to bring me up 

in God's ways. 
That I was baptized a Christian, 
That I received a normal education, 

That after miscellaneous jobs I graduated to the 
carpenter trade. 

That I served my country in World War I. 

That I went back to being a carpenter after the 
war. 

That I joined the A.F.L. Carpenters' Union. 

That I married a very pretty and good girl, 

That we had many exploits in building new homes 
and landscaping and beautifying the grounds 
around them. 

That when I became ill. the United States Govern- 
ment took care of doctor, medical and hospi- 
tal expenses to compensate me for my services 
in World War I. 

That I and my wife were destined to live our 
remaining years after 1959 in the north por- 
tion of the Great State of Wisconsin, the 
beautiful, in a small hamlet called Pine River. 

That I still have many friends and old acquaint- 
ances, also brothers and sisters-in-law, nieces 
and nephews. 

That again in 1967 when I was confined to a 
hospital Uncle Sam took care of me; 

That I receive Social Security, Veterans' and Car- 
penters' pensions, 

That I remain in fairly good health at age seventy- 
one years, 

And, above all. that I have found my Maker and 
Redeemer. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




NEW ORLEANS 

In Tune With The Times 

Welcomes 

1970 
UNION 

INDUSTRIES 
SHOW 



MAY 22-27, 1970 

SPONSOR: AFL-CIO Union Label and 
Service Trades Department 

EXHIBITS: Approximately 300 exhibits 
displaying union-made products 
and demonstrating union services 

PRIZES: $100,000 in free prizes to those 
attending the show 

FREE ADMISSION: Admission to the 
show is free to the public 

THE WORLD'S LARGEST LABOR-MAN- 
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Here's why: In assembling conventional hammers, the 
handle is driven up through the bottom of the head. But, 
with the Stanley Taper-Lock, the fiberglass handle is 
driven down through the top, resulting in the 
inseparable bond shown. 

This is, in fact, the ultimate in hammers. 
Includes other great time-tested Stanley features. 
Rim-tempered face — minimizes chipping. Super heat-treated 
head. Extra tough from head to claw. Double beveled 
nail slot — really bites and pulls. Perforated neoprene 
rubber grip. Perfectly balanced and contoured for comfort. 

Stanley Tools, Division of The Stanley Works, 
New Britain, Connecticut 06050. 

Thehamm 




STANLEY 



helps you do things right 

P.S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest power tools. 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 




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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington. D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, 



Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be dh-ected to the 
editor. 



In processing- complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 

Members who die or are suspended are 
automatically dropped from the mailing 
list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should he mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No - 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



e&taiPHDamia 



VOLUME XC 



No. 6 



JUNE, 1970 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 



M LABOR PRESS w L 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

A Lesson from the Past, If Our Wafers Die, So Do We 2 

The Moral Difference Between Interest and Usury . . . 

Issues of the 70's 8 

Foreign Import Threat Growing 10 

National Health Insurance Is Needed Now 11 

Harold Lewis Named to General Executive Board 13 

'Repossession' Gimmicks Open Way to Fleecing Car Defaulters 16 

Ontario Carpenters Upgrade Their Skills 20 

Depreciation, Maintenance Are Top Auto Operating Costs PAI 21 

Social Security Benefits to Students Exceed Scholarships 27 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Editorials 17 

Canadian Report 18 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 23 

Local Union News 28 

CLIC Report 32 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 34 

What's New? 37 

In Memoriam 38 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20c in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

A disaster not tinlike the Dust Bowl 
of the Depression probably drove the 
tenants from the mesa and cliff homes 
in the American Southwest pictured 
on our cover. 

Although Indians are known to have 
lived in the Southwest for several 
thousand years, there is little evidence 
of the earliest inhabitants of the Verde 
Valley where Montezuma Castle 
National Monument in central Ari- 
zona stands. About 1100 A.D.. how- 
ever, a group of dry-farming Indians 
entered the valley from the north. 

There is evidence the Indians abused 
the land. When drought came, the top 
soil blew away and what once was 
fertile land became desert. Man's in- 
sensitivity to his environment dates 
back many centuries. 

One can easily imagine the enthu- 
siasm felt by a group of farmers on 
first seeing the sheltering, cavern- 
studded limestone cliffs along the 
north bank of Beaver Creek, only four 
miles from the Verde River. This 
was an ideal place to live, with good 
cropland on the creek terrace nearby. 

These dwellings were occupied for 
about two centuries by as many as 
200 people at a time. 

In the 1200's, a series of droughts 
led to disaster. Soon. Montezuma's 
Castle (named by early white settlers 
who mistakenly believed it had been 
built by the Aztec Indians) and the 
settlement it commanded were de- 
serted. Photo by Francis Lightner, 
Phoenix, Arizona. 





W A I til -Cradle and Source of Life 
. . . If Our Waters Die, So Do We 



■ Do you live in a community 
with polluted water ... or a com- 
munity with inadequate water sup- 
plies? If so, it probably has been 
so long since you even thought of 
swimming, fishing or boating in 
nearby waters you"ve forgotten it 
was once possible. 

You've become accustomed to the 
strange taste of the water you drink 
(or perhaps you've unconsciously 
come to drink less and less). You 
don't worry about it because it 
doesn't make you sick, and you try 



to act unconcerned when your visi- 
tors complain. 

Occasionally you fret when you 
can't use water freely during the 
summer drought season, but after a 
while the limitations are raised and 
you go back to watering the lawn 
and washing the car and think no 
more about it. 

And if you do read an article 
or see a TV documentary that says 
our increasing population may not 
have enough good quality water 
for drinking, agriculture, industry, 



recreation or other useful purposes 
by 1980 — well, that's a long way 
away, and by that time "they" will 
have taken care of it. 

"They" probably will but not 
without our involvement because 
the simple and inexpensive solutions 
have all been exhausted and what 
must be done now is going to cost 
large numbers of tax dollars and 
a major revision in the approach 
of our urban and suburban popu- 
lations. In this sweeping and occa- 
sionally painful area, our public of- 

THE CARPENTER 



ficials will not be able to move with- 
out the steady and informed sup- 
port of all of us. 

How much harm does water pol- 
lution really do? Should we be con- 
cerned about it? Should we do some- 
thing about it? 

A river flows down from a moun- 
tain to the sea. A town located 
along its banks removes thousands 
of gallons of water each day. First, 
this water is treated to make it 
safe for use. Then it is piped through 
the town's water mains. Each home 
withdraws a certain amount; the 
family uses it for drinking, cooking, 
bathing and many other purposes. 
Hotels, restaurants, laundries and 
industry also take water from the 
town's supply. The used water is 
collected in another set of pipes, 
the town's sewer system. This water 
carries the human wastes, dirt and 
other unwanted materials from all 
these homes and businesses. In some 
towns, this mass of pollution flows 
into a treatment plant where it is 
made harmless before it is returned 
to the stream. In others, it goes 
directly into the stream. (It is an 
astonishing fact that, of the approx- 
imately 12,000 communities with 
sewers in this country, some 2,300 
still dump their sewage raw into the 
local stream or watershed.) 

Process Repealed 

The next town downstream then 
removes its thousands of gallons 
and the process is repeated. This is 
the man-made water "cycle". If the 
wastes are treated by each com- 
munity, the cycle can go on indefi- 
nitely without serious harm to the 
stream. But if the amount of in- 
dustrial and urban wastes poured 
into the water overwhelms the sup- 
ply of oxygen, the bacteria that live 
on this oxygen and destroy the 
wastes die. With its oxygen gone, 
all life in the water must leave or 
die also. The tiny animals and 
plants which the fish need for food 
die first. Then the fish themselves 
leave or their bodies float to the 
surface. That water takes on a 
greasy look and a foul odor. The liv- 
ing waters, cradle and source of 
all life, have died. 

Too many of our citizens in too 
many sections of our nation have 
been eye witnesses to this tragic 



drama to have to be told that a 
water crisis is "near, even at the 
door". 

Water is the No. 1 raw material 
of industry. It is a power source, 
a coolant, a transporting device, 
an ingredient, a cleansing agent. 
Factories use water in astonishing 
amounts — 1,400 gallons to produce 
a dollar's worth of steel, nearly 200 
gallons for a dollar's worth of paper. 
But almost every use of water de- 
grades its quality, makes it less 
useful for the same or other pur- 
poses. And, as everyone knows, 
our industries are growing at a 
tremendous rate. 

Municipal use is increasing, too. 
As our population grows — from 76 
million in 1900 to 205 million now, 
and 260 million expected by 1980 — 
so does the drain upon our water 
supply. High standards of living 
and sanitation — multiple bathrooms, 
home laundries, garbage grinders — 
mean greater consumption of water 
per capita. That is one reason why 
many cities are drawing water from 
greater and greater distances. 

Agriculture uses almost seven 
times as much water for irrigation 
now as it did in 1900. Considering 
irrigation only and not including the 
natural moisture drawn from the 
soil, agriculture uses less water than 
industry, but it "consumes" more 
because almost all the water used 
by industry is recoverable whereas 
about 60 percent of the water used 
in irrigation is "lost". And much of 



the irrigation water returned to 
various watercourses is laden with 
salts, other minerals, and agricul- 
tural chemicals (DDT for example) 
which are difficult to remove by 
conventional water treatment meth- 
ods. 

Recreation is a water "use" which 
cannot be measured in gallons but 
is increasingly important neverthe- 
less. Demand for water-oriented 
recreation is surging ahead even of 
population growth. People have a 
natural desire to swim, fish, go boat- 
ing, picnic and camp beside water, 
or just look at it. They can fulfill 
these desires only if water is of 
high quality aesthetically and is 
free from health hazards. 

Blight's Many Forms 

Until recently, the growing blight 
of water pollution has been ignored 
largely because, though it is a na- 
tional problem, it takes different 
forms in different areas. In most of 
the West, and particularly in the 
Southwest, water — any kind of water 
is scarce — and what there is is 
often polluted with salts and silt. 
In many places the consequent drain 
upon underground sources is lower- 
ing the water table at a frightening 
rate. Salt water is sometimes seeping 
in to replace it. Along the Atlantic 
Coast and the Great Lakes, muni- 
cipal and industrial wastes have 
caused public health authorities to 
close beaches to swimmers and fish- 




Regions of future large around-water development. 



JUNE, 1970 



ermen. Acid mine drainage has pol- 
luted many miles of streams in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia 
and other states. Concentrated pop- 
ulation and industry in the Midwest 
and New England have poured 
great quantities of acids, chemicals, 
oils, greases, salts, animal and vege- 
table matter into their rivers and 
made some of them unusable for 
other purposes. In rural areas, water 
is sometimes polluted with insecti- 
cides and pesticides. Cities with 
poor water supplies are being by- 
passed when industries seek sites 
for new plants. The list of local and 
regional water headaches is almost 
endless. 

We Have Much To Do 

If these conditions are to be 
curbed, as they must ... if we are, 
in the words of the late President 
Kennedy, "to have sufficient water, 
sufficiently clean, in the right place 
at the right time to serve the range 
of human and industrial needs", 
then we as a nation and as indi- 
viduals have much to do. 

When we consider that, of the 
197 million square miles of the 
earth's surface, some 140 million 
is water, it is necessary to look more 
deeply at the nature of that water 
to understand our water crisis. 
About 97 percent of the world's 
water supply is in the oceans. The 
conversion of salt water to fresh is 
a great and intriguing challenge. 
Even though conversion processes 
become economically feasible, how- 
ever, the cost of transportation may 
prohibit the use of converted sea 
water by inland areas for a long 
time. Conversion of locally avail- 
able salt water may become feasible 
in some inland areas, and may re- 
solve problems that are locally seri- 
ous. On the whole, however, the 
available amount of such water is 
not sufficient to add materially to 
regional or national water supplies. 
Therefore, for an indefinitely long 
future period, inland areas will re- 
ceive water from the sea only in- 
directly and in the same manner that 
they always have — as vapor carried 
inland in the air and dropped as 
rain or snow. 

Of the total amount of water on 
the land areas of the earth or under 
its surface (less than three percent 



RAW SEWAGE FROM SEWERS 




SLUDGE 
DIGESTER 



Sewage treatment plants usually function in the manner shown in the diagram on 
these two pages. Some cities need only primary treatment, shown above, depending 
on the ability of the natural waterway to purify itself, and the uses to which the 
water will be put after it enters the waterway. 



of all water) 78 percent is locked 
up in the icecaps and glaciers and 
about 0.27 percent is in inland 
saline lakes and seas. Much of the 
ground water at depths greater than 
half a mile (half of all ground water) 
is economically inaccessible at pres- 
ent or is saline. Thus, less than 3 
percent of the world's water supply 
is available on the continents, and 
only about 1 1 percent of this water 
on the continents is actually usable 
or accessible ( 1 1 percent of 3 per- 
cent is .0033 percent). Furthermore, 
the yearly renewal and continued 
availability of this relatively minute 
supply of water depend wholly on 
precipitation from a tenuous bit of 
water vapor in the atmosphere. 

The yearly disposition of rainfall 
in the United States probably goes 
to somewhat more than one-third 
each to runoff and soil moisture 
and about one-fourth to ground 
water recharge. This latter factor, 
our underground water bank, is per- 
haps the least understood and most 
hopeful of our sources of moisture. 

Ground water is far more widely 
and easily available than surface 
water, for it is present between 
streams and in some large areas 
where there are hardly any streams 
at all, such as large parts of the 
High Plains between Texas and 
South Dakota and in much of the 
Basin and Range province of the 



Southwest. In spite of the impres- 
sion created by scattered cases of 
pollution, including a few really 
serious ones, most ground water is 
unpolluted and is relatively safe 
from pollution. For both these rea- 
sons, immediate availability and 
acceptable quality untreated or with 
minimum treatment, ground water 
is more economical to obtain. Some- 
thing like a third of the area of the 
continental States is capable of 
yielding at least 50 gallons per min- 
ute of fresh water per well. And 
there are areas totaling a good many 
thousands of square miles where 
hundreds and even thousands of 
gallons per minute can be obtained 
from wells, such as large parts of 
the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain 
and the Snake River Plain of Idaho. 

Ground Water In Emergency 

Ground water generally averages 
a little harder and more mineralized 
than surface water in the same lo- 
cality, but the quality is more uni- 
form during the year and thus sim- 
plifies any treatment that may be 
necessary for particular uses. It is 
rarely if ever necessary to consider 
removal of sediment from ground 
water, whereas nearly all surface 
water has some. Where ground 
water is polluted, treatment to make 
it safe is simple and relatively in- 
expensive where municipal and 



THE CARPENTER 



TRICKLING FILTER 




SECONDARY 
TREATMENT 



SLUDGE DRYING BED 



mm 



Secondary treatment (shown on this page), though more expensive, is often necessary 
in many cities to reduce pollutants which a primary system is unable to remove. A 
primary treatment plant removes about 35 percent of the pollution load of sewage 
water; a secondary treatment system removes 85 percent or more. 



other large supplies are involved, 
and treatment even of individual 
domestic supplies is becoming more 
practical. Ground water is the prac- 
tical source of emergency supplies 
in the event of national nuclear dis- 
aster. 

The temperature of ground water, 
like its chemical quality, is relatively 
uniform throughout the year. This 
makes it preferable for cooling pur- 
poses in the summer when surface 
water is warmer, and large quanti- 
ties of ground water are used for 
this purpose. 

To put it in other words, ground 
water is an exceedingly valuable 
resource. Without it, our economy 
would not be nearly so advanced 
as it is. Why? Because it was ground 
water that enabled the settlement 
and continued occupation of our 
agricultural areas, which have made 
the cost of feeding ourselves a much 
smaller part of the national budget 
than it is in most other countries. 
Because it was ground water that 
furnished public and industrial water 
for most of the towns and cities 
that grew up around the country, 
and did it at a fraction of the cost 
of surface water so that water was 
rarely a problem holding up growth 
of cities in their early stages. Be- 
cause ground water stepped in to 
supplement fully developed surface 



water in the irrigated areas of the 
West, adding to that region's agricul- 
tural potential and wealth. Because 
ground water is still an undeveloped 
resource in large areas and is con- 
tributing substantially to our in- 
dustrial growth, dramatically so in 
such areas as the rapidly industri- 
alizing southeastern states. For all 
these reasons, ground water will 
continue to meet new and increas- 
ing demands in nearly all parts of 
the country. 

Undoing the Damage 

Your community is the place 
where the most vital battle against 
water pollution is fought through 
the aroused interest of you and your 
neighbors. When we talk about our 
use of natural resources, we tend 
always to "view with alarm". True, 
there is much to be alarmed about. 
For the most part, we have not 
been wise in our dealings with na- 
ture. We have found quick riches, 
but in doing so we have used up 
resources that might have been saved 
for our children and our children's 
children. Nature's wealth is not un- 
limited. Some of our damage may 
never be undone. 

But we also have accomplished 
much to which we can "point with 
pride." As soon as we began to 
see a possible end to the wealth of 



Nature, we began to find ways of 
using our resources wisely. When 
people feel a need, they find a way. 

Where can we see evidences of 
these accomplishments? We find ter- 
raced hillsides in New England; ro- 
tation and strip-cropping in Ala- 
bama; selected cutting of timber in 
Wisconsin and Washington; acres 
of seedlings on the slopes of the 
Rockies and the Appalachians; 
wildlife sanctuaries in Louisiana 
and Colorado, and a few streams 
running clear again, unpolluted by 
either the soil of the earth or the 
soil of man's cities. 

The Indians of our Great South- 
west, without the technology and 
broad land mass to escape the rav- 
ages of the endless drying wind and 
cracked earth, disappeared as a rec- 
ognizable civilization. We have the 
knowledge, the skills, the money — 
and a continent containing about 
one-fourth of all the fresh water 
on the globe. 

We have made a beginning but 
we still have not decided definitely 
and finally that we will take the road 
of the conserver and wise user. 

The choice is still ours. We must 
choose wisely and soon. Time and 
our rivers will not wait. B 

is? - " • ■<. 7* ifc "~~i 




The silt deposit in this completely de- 
stroyed corn field was tremendous. The 
sun was drying out the silt and it was 
cracking as it dried. One of the pieces 
was removed from its position and found 
to be 4>/2 inches in thickness. 
— USDA Soil Conservation Service photo 



JUNE, 1970 




ROUNDUP 



"AND THAT AIN'T BALONEY!"— Bologna and frankfurters cease to be classed as such 
when their fat content rises too high. According to the U.S. Department of Agri- 
culture, the average fat content of those and other similar sausages now is 28.5 
percent. Which explains why your breakfast sausage shrivels so much in the frying 
pan. The legal limit is 30 percent fat, so producers are close to failing to make 
both ends meat. 

JOB OPPORTUNITIES— Despite rising unemployment, some types of jobs still are short 
of takers. Classifications include: practical nurses, chefs, top computer pro- 
grammers, certain machine operators, lithographers. On the other hand, the rising 
tide of unemployment has made it easier to hire people for such unattractive jobs 
as dishwashers and bus-boys, a hotel chain reports. 

A SEA OF AIR?— Air traffic controllers, many of whom have been on an extended 
"sick-out" in protest to what they term unsafe and objectionable conditions at 
many of the nation's leading airports, may be joining the AFL-CIO instead of their 
non-affiliated PATCO organization. The word is out they are considering joining 
the APL-CIO Marine Engineers Beneficial Association. Last month 200 Shell Oil 
research scientists affiliated with MEBA. 

MORE CASH FOR HOMES?— The House Banking Committee will shortly propose legislation 
which could funnel as much as $4 billion annually into badly-needed home construc- 
tion, lagging now for lack of reasonable financing rates. The mortgage money 
would come from foundations, pension funds and commercial banks. To keep their 
tax -preferential positions, foundations and pension systems would be required to 
invest up to 2.5 percent of their assets in low-interest-rate housing loans. 
Banks would be given authority to invest part of their required cash reserves in 
such manner, but at rates not over 6 percent. If such funds were available, the 
pressure generated to reduce all mortgage rates would be considerable. 

WARRANTY MAY MEAN MORE— The Senate Commerce Commission has reported out favor- 
ably a bill which would make it incumbent on manufacturers who state a warranty on 
their products to qualify whether it is "full" or "limited" and, if limited, to 
state in what respect. The fine print in many "limited warranties" actually 
protects producers more than consumers. The legislation, almost certain of enact- 
ment, will allow a consumer who believes the law has been violated to take the 
supplier to court and be awarded reasonable attorney's fees if he wins. 

REWARDING THE INEPT— The head of the Washington, D.C., bus company is repeatedly 
asking for fare increases on the grounds that his company, D.C. Transit, Inc., is 
losing money on the operations he directs. He furnishes financial figures to 
prove it. Last month it was revealed that he had rewarded his poor managerial 
ability by granting himself a S10,000-a-year raise to $65,000 (which should 
increase the deficit enough to warrant another fare increase.) 

TAX RELIEF? WELLLL . . .—Word is around that some of President Nixon's advisors would 
even risk a major battle with Congress to avoid a budget deficit. The Cambodian 
campaign (and other mounting costs) might be reason to delay such tax advantages 
as the already-enacted increase in the personal income tax exemption and next 
year's scheduled 50 percent boost in the standard deduction allowed. The bogey- 
man alternative waved, in the face of the public is the "tax on value added." This 
is a sales tax which would be applicable all along the production route from raw 
material to finished product (never before enacted in the U.S.). The tax adds 
considerably to the sales prices of all consumer items but is, itself, invisible. 

WORK STOPPAGES INCREASE— According to the Labor Department release, strikes during 
the first quarter totalled 1,450 and involved 893,000 workers. This is up from 
1,230 strikes by 504,000 workers a year earlier. Nevertheless, the time lost to 
work stoppages at .17 percent was down slightly from the .18 percent in 1969. 

6 THE CARPENTER 



Walter Reuther Is Dead-But His Work Lives On 



■ Walter Reuther is dead. A 
voice which for two decades spoke 
out vigorously against exploitation, 
injustice, and discrimination has 
been silenced forever. 

Like all public figures who achieve 
prominence in their chosen field, he 
was a controversial man. There 
were those who considered him a 
Twentieth Century Messiah, always 
to be found where a battle was going 
on for social or economic justice — 
from the grape fields of California 
to the poverty marches in Washing- 
ton. 

If there are some who held that 



Walter's appearance was predictable 
at any such confrontation in direct 
proportion to the number of televi- 
sion cameras which would be there, 
such remarks can be attributed to 
scars from long-fought battles. 

Neither friend nor foe can dis- 
count the fact that Walter Reuther 
was one of the most dynamic men in 
or out of the labor movement since 
1935. His impact on the social con- 
science of America, upon the Amer- 
ican labor movement, and upon the 
whole liberal cause cannot be dis- 
counted nor downgraded. 

Death came to Brother Reuther 



in an almost predictable manner. 
Rushing from one conference to an- 
other, the private plane in which he 
was riding crashed into some Michi- 
gan woods. Both he and his wife 
were killed, together with the pilot 
and another passenger. 

Ironically, Brother Reuther was 
flying to a new educational center 
which he persuaded his union to es- 
tablish. Education was his major 
love. 

Walter Reuther is gone, but the 
work he did lives on. Years will 
pass before another leader of his 
peculiar talents emerges again. ■ 



COLD WEATHER CONSTRUCTION VNDEBATABLE' 



■ Year-around construction has 
been proven according to an article 
in the May issue of Manpower mag- 
azine, published by the Department 
of Labor. 

"One of the least debatable as- 
pects of winter work is its technical 
feasibility," writes William Delaney, 
a Labor Department member of the 
Joint Labor Department-Commerce 
Department Study of Construction 
Seasonality. 

Seasonality has been strongly 
fought by the AFL-CIO Building 
and Construction Trades Depart- 
ment and the construction unions. 

"Cold weather construction can 
take place anywhere it is needed and 
there are only a few exceptional 
conditions," writes Delaney. "Eu- 
ropean and Canadian experience has 
proven this. As far as human beings 
are concerned, work can be per- 
formed at extreme temperatures. 

"Warm, dry, and light clothing is 
available at reasonable cost and, 
while some fall-off in human effi- 
ciency at below zero temperatures 
is likely, the machine and not the 
man is likely to cause problems 
in extreme cold." 

Nevertheless, says Delaney, the 
construction industry still keeps 
"pretty much in step with the 
weather." 

The author declared that "neither 
our great technological rush nor the 
economics of full employment have 
brought us close to using our con- 



struction labor force the whole year 
round." He added: 

"The United States is in the proc- 
ess of building and rebuilding itself; 
its housing replacement needs alone 
are estimated at nearly 30 million 
units, and many of the envisaged 
public works in environmental im- 
provement and urban development 



are so huge that cost estimates are 
frequently stated as significant por- 
tions of the Gross National Product. 
"Success in meeting construction 
goals depends on the full use of 
manpower throughout the year. We 
no longer can tolerate a 'fair weath- 
er' industry that shrinks from the 
cold and wet." ■ 



100 Million Seen In 
Nation's Workforce of 1980 

■ A team of Labor Department economists peered into a statistical 
crystal ball and came up with a picture of the American economy 10 years 
from now. 

If the projections of the Bureau of Labor Statistics experts prove valid, 
by the year 1980: 

• The nation's labor force will have grown by one-fifth, to 100 million 
workers. Of these, 26 million will be in the 25-34 age group. 

• The gross national product — the total value of goods and services 
produced — will have increased an average of 4.3 percent since 1968, to 
reach a total value of $1.4 trillion in 1980 — measured by the 1968 value 
of the dollar. 

• Productivity will have increased 3 percent a year, a slightly slower 
pace than the decade of the 1960s. 

• Hours of work will show little change — declining only one-tenth of 
1 percent a. year to 38 hours a week. 

• Employment will continue to shift to industries that produce services 
rather than goods. 

Construction will be one of the few non-service industries to expand 
its share of the economy during the 1970s. A growth rate of 2.5 percent 
a year is predicted, nearly twice that of the 1960s, with employment 
rising from 4 million in 1968 to nearly 5.5 million by 1980. 

• The long-term trend will continue to white-collar occupations and 
those requiring the most education and training. 



JUNE, 1970 



ma 

■ Of all the words in the English 
language the word "usury" is one of 
the ugliest. 

It is ugly in its connotation — the 
mean exploitation of those in need 
by money-lenders through exorbi- 
tant interest charges. 

Today's debate on high interest 
rates has almost entirely been based 
on economic considerations — what 
effect excessive rates will have on 
business and industry; on jobs and 
general welfare; on the lives of all 
Americans. 

Almost no debate has taken place 
over the moral considerations in- 
volved. 

All through recorded history, from 
Babylonian times into the modern 



era, mankind has been deeply 
troubled by the moral aspects in- 
volved in the lending of money and 
the rate of return that could be 
considered fair and just. 

Indeed, in the early days of the 
Christian era, the taking of interest 
on loans was forbidden as an im- 
moral practice. Even before that 
the Greek philosphers Plato and 
Aristotle condemned interest in it- 
self as a particularly obnoxious kind 
of money-making. 

Originally the word usury was 
applied to all interest; it was only 
later in history that it was applied 
to demanding and taking interest 
higher than that permitted by law. 
Thus, usury early became a crime. 

Although the Church fathers for 
many centuries condemned interest 
as an evil institution, the develop- 
ment of commerce and industry 
broke down this moral concept. In- 
terest became recognized as a neces- 
sity in a mercantile society and be- 
came more or less respectable. 



But usury, never. 

Even medieval society found 
usury as obnoxious as the ancient 
Greeks and governments sought to 
protect its victims as best they could. 
As early as 1545, the English Parlia- 
ment set 10 percent as a maximum 
rate of interest but only in special 
cases such as failure of the borrower 
to repay on time. Even this limited 
10 percent rate was strongly opposed 
and was set as 8 percent in 1624. 

Later the legal rate was brought 
down even lower; to 6 percent in 
1652 and to 5 percent in 1713 and 
over a period of many years the 
going rate was lower than that. But, 
as the industrial revolution set in the 
old usury code was all but swept 
away. Rates once more became 
exorbitant and by 1900, the Courts 
were opened to give relief for exces- 
sive rates and by 1927 Parliament 
adopted legislation regulating and 
licensing money lenders. 

Despite all efforts to control 
usury, money lenders have always 





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SHsJcLL 





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^ 




THE CARPENTER 



found ways to get around the law: 
deduction of interest in advance; 
compound interest; discounts, 
bonuses, commissions and fees, side 
agreements — all these and more 
have blunted efforts to protect bor- 
rowers from all too rapacious money 
lenders. 

There is no uniform Federal leg- 
islation in the United States to pro- 
tect borrowers against usury. 

Instead, the states have evolved 
their own widely varying ways of 
meeting the problem, some of them 
pitiably inadequate. In 1967, 11 
states fixed 6 percent as a maximum; 
5 fixed 7 percent; 12 fixed 8 percent 
and the rest have fixed rates up to 
12 percent. 

But, by and large, it can be said 
that most Americans — state laws or 
not — have always thought 6 percent 
as a decent and acceptable maxi- 
mum interest level. 

Now all that has been shot to 
pieces. We have a prime interest 
rate of %Vi percent with much high- 



er levels of interest as credit filters 
down, compounded by gimmicks 
such as points and commissions. We 
now have a "national" level of in- 
terest rates. It was not set by Gov- 
ernment; but by a handful of private 
bankers acting as an agency of Gov- 
ernment, but independent of it. 

Today's 8V2 percent prime rate, 
set by bankers' fiat which has sent 
their profits soaring in the name of 
fighting inflation, is higher than in 
the Nineteenth Century. We have 
to go back to the Middle Ages to 
find similar rates. 

A state such as Maryland which 
had set 6 percent as the top interest 
rate that could be paid on its bonds 
has been forced to repeal that law 
and to permit a higher rate because 
the money market wouldn't settle 
for 6 percent. 

American families, desperately in 
need of homes, are being forced to 
accept mortgage interest rates that 
will take a bitter toll for the rest of 
their lives. The very law that de- 



mands the honest statement of true 
interest rates, has become a mean- 
ingless mockery when "shopping" 
for fair rates becomes impossible in 
a credit market dominated by a 
handful of banks. 

Yet, debate over this situation 
still remains purely economic with- 
out the slightest attention to the 
moral aspects of what is going on. 

Have the American people, have 
their legislators forgotten the mean- 
ing of usury? Have they forgotten 
centuries of troubled national con- 
sciences that sought to protect bor- 
rowers from rapacious lenders? 

We now have interest rates that 
were regarded as usurious a century 
ago; we now have national rates 
fixed by private bankers instead of 
by government; we now have a com- 
plete absence of moral considera- 
tions of "tight money". 

It is time for Congress to turn 
back the clock a bit and rediscover 
the moral difference between interest 
and usury. ■ 




JUNE, 1970 



Foreign Import Threat Grows 



■ After nearly 18 months in of- 
fice, all the brave promises made by 
President Nixon during his 1968 
campaign have vanished into thin 
air. 

His promise to end the war in 
Vietnam is taking some mighty 
strange detours into Cambodia and 
Laos. 

His pledge to end inflation has 
long since fallen by the wayside. 
April saw another tremendous in- 
crease in the cost of living. The anti- 
inflation measures adopted by the 
Administration have had only one 
result. They have drastically in- 
creased the rolls of the unemployed. 

Interest rates are showing no signs 
of declining; and. as a result, the 
home building industry is slowed to 
a walk. 

To cap the climax, the promise 
of a balanced budget, by which the 
conservatives set such great store, 
has dissipated in a flood of fancy 
rhetoric. Instead of a surplus, the 
current fiscal year is going to end 
with a deficit. Worst of all, perhaps, 
his promise to bring us all together 
has fallen widest of the mark. 

Not the least of the unsolved eco- 
nomic problems is the continued de- 
terioration in the foreign trade bal- 
ance sheet. 

Ten years ago, the foreign trade 
picture began to become cloudy as 
many European and Asian nations 
began recovering from the effects of 
the war. As a result, from 1960 to 
1969, our exports of manufactured 
goods roughly doubled: but, during 
that same period, our imports of 
such goods more than tripled. 

Particularly significant has been 
the increase in imports of highly 
sophisticated goods; i.e., goods that 
involve a good deal of manufactur- 
ing labor. In 1960, such goods only 
comprised about 35% of all im- 
ports. By 1969, they made up over 
half of our imports. 

It is significant, too. that this trend 
has accelerated year by year. In the 
last several years, while imports were 
rising generally by about 9%, the 
imports of finished manufactured 
goods soared by 18%. 

The sad truth of the matter is that 



the United States is more and more 
becoming an exporter of raw ma- 
terial and agricultural products while 
importing increasingly larger 
amounts of manufactured goods. 

Japan is a case in point. In the 
last decade, the value of our exports 
to Japan probably exceeded the 
value of our imports, but when you 
take a look at the goods making up 
our trade with Japan, you find a dis- 
heartening picture. 

While we export vast quantities of 
cotton, tobacco, wheat, coal, hides, 
etc., we import automobiles, motor- 
cycles, cameras, tape recorders, and 
optical goods — all of which involve 
plenty of manufacturing work. On 
the other hand, by some clever gim- 
micks involving quasi-government 
trading companies, many American 
manufactured goods have little or no 
chance to even enter, let alone com- 
pete, in the Japanese market. 

What is true of Japan is true of 
many parts of the globe where tech- 
nology is comparatively advanced. 

The manufactured goods we do 
export consist very largely of ultra- 
sophisticated items, such as comput- 
ers and various control devices in 
which our technology is far ahead of 
other nations. 

This is strictly a temporary ad- 
vantage, since most industrial na- 
tions have the capacity to copy our 



Shingle Weavers' Strike 
Enters 10th Month 

The strike of Brotherhood Shingle 
Weavers against the Huntington 
Shingle Company of Springfield, 
Oregon, and the Lester Shingle 
Company of Sweet Home. Oregon, 
is now going into its 10th month. 
These two mills are operating with 
strike breakers on a limited basis. 

All other shingle mills in Oregon 
and Washington have signed a 
standard contract, so Brotherhood 
members should know that the 
Huntington Shingle Company and 
the Lester Shingle Company seem 
determined to set labor relations 
back 40 years. 



technological advances once they be- 
come familiar with them. The day 
when American know-how and pro- 
ductivity could more than compete 
with less sophisticated foreign pro- 
duction is rapidly disappearing. The 
day when our mass-production in- 
dustries, paying $3 a hour, could 
economically outproduce foreign 
factories, paying 75 or 80 per cent 
less in wages, is practically gone. 

The overall problem is further 
compounded by the fact that Amer- 
ican capital has gone global. 

In the years since the close of 
World War II virtually all major 
American companies have built or 
bought factories abroad. If they did 
not build or buy factories, they ob- 
tained ironclad franchises for mar- 
keting goods in the United States. 

This means that the companies 
are a lot less concerned about pro- 
tecting American industries than 
they used to be. After all, if they 
have foreign factories or franchises, 
it does not make too much difference 
to them whether they sell goods 
made in America, or made in Tai- 
wan, or Hong Kong. They make a 
profit either way. 

Consequently, such industries are 
far less concerned about the foreign 
trade situation than are the unions. 
The workers really are the only ones 
to lose when foreign imports begin 
usurping ever bigger portions of the 
American market in a given indus- 
try. 

This is a complete reversal of the 
situation which existed 40 or 50 
years ago. It was not unusual for 
an employer in the 1920s to put a 
note in a worker's pay envelope say- 
ing that unless Warren Harding or 
Calvin Coolidge was elected Presi- 
dent, the factory would be forced to 
close because the Democrats were 
free traders and a victory for them 
would open the door for ruinous 
foreign competition. 

Today, the companies that have 
branches in the Far East, or in the 
Near East, or other low-wage parts 
of the world couldn't care less about 
whether their profits come from 
American-made goods or foreign- 
made goods. 

Continued on page 14 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Health Care for ALL Americans 




■ The cost of a major illness is such that 9 out of 10 
Americans are medically indigent right now — unable 
to pay the high costs of care without severe economic 
scrifice. 

I recently saw an estimate that puts the cost of single 
coronary, within the next three years, at $16,000. This, 
in itself, is a heart stopper! Average health expenditures 
now amount to $294 per year for every man, woman 
and child in the nation. For some middle Americans, 
this means spending from 10 to 25 percent of their 
income on health and medical services. 

The inflationary facts of health services are astonish- 
ing. The nation's spending for health reached $60.3 
billion in fiscal 1969. Per capita health expenditures 
rose 11 percent over the previous year, fiscal 1968. 
Public outlays for health rose nearly 15 percent in one 
year. Payments for hospital care increased 17 percent 
in one year and reached a total of $22.5 billion in fiscal 
1969. 

American Hospital Association representatives re- 
cently testified before the House Ways and Means Com- 
mittee that the average daily room rate would rise to 
nearly $100 a day by 1973. Daily room charges al- 
ready exceed $100 a day in some of our teaching hos- 
pitals. In fiscal 1969, expenditures for physicians' 



Martha W. Griffiths, who has represented the 17th district of 
Michigan in Congress since 1955. recently introduced a bill 
which would set up a comprehensive National Health Insurance 
Program. This personal explanation of Rep. Griffith's health 
plan is taken, in part, from an article appearing in the April 
1970 issue of the AFL-CIO American Federationist. 



by Rep. Martha W . Griffiths 

Congress ponders a solution 
to increasing medical costs, 
inadequate results and 
inferior services 



services also rose 9 percent over the previous year. The 
Dec. 8, 1969, issue of Medical Economics predicts gross 
receipts of private physicians will average "at least 10 
percent higher" for calendar year 1969 than in 1968. 

Small wonder, then, that health care has absorbed an 
increasing proportion of the Gross National Product. 
In 1950, U.S. health expenditures accounted for 4.6 
percent of the GNP. In 1960, it had risen to 5.3 percent 
and in 1968. 6.7 percent. In fact, if health expenditures 
continue to absorb an increasing proportion of the Gross 
National Product at the same rate as has occurred in 
recent years, just 107 years from now, in 2077, health 
expenditures will consume the entire Gross National 
Product, leaving nothing for food, clothing or shelter. 

The worst aspect is that in relation to huge health 
expenditures, the United States is faring rather poorly 
in comparison with other countries in the Western 
world. Despite the high costs and expenditures, we are 
getting inadequate results and inferior services. Ob- 
jective statistical measurements of infant mortality, ma- 
ternal mortality and life expectancy not only show we 
rank below most other Western countries, but that our 
relative position has been declining. 

Thus we must ask these questions: Why has Ameri- 
can medicine failed to live up to its potential? Why 
is it not the best in the world? 

In reality, what we have is a 19th century cottage 
industry shackling sophisticated, 20th century technol- 
ogy. Doctors behave like independent, small business- 
men and hospitals are run like independent businesses. 
The advantages of cost reductions and expansion of 
services in modern business administration procedures 
and synergistic business organization are totally lacking. 

The bill I have introduced is designed to accomplish 
far more than simply pay for health services, and it 
would not only contain the rising cost of health care, 
but it also has the potential of actually reducing cost 
over the years. 

This cost control is achieved by having the federal 
government contract for health, hospital and dental 
services with organized groups of physicians, with hos- 
pitals and with groups of dentists. Contractual relations 
between free parties is a cornerstone of our private en- 
terprise business and industrial system. It is a time- 
tested system in the health field as well. 

Continued on next page. 



JUNE, 1970 



11 



INCREASE IN MEDICAL CARE PRICES 
COMPARED TO OTHER 
CONSUMER ITEMS 



ANNUAL RATE OF INCREASE 

H Consumer Prices 
■ Medical Care Prices 

4.2% 



3.0% 



5.8% 



3.3% 



2.5% 



1.3% 



1946-60 



1960-65 



1965-68 



Source: Social Security Administration, U.S. Department ol 
Health, Education and Welfare. Chart Book, 1969. 



HOSPITAL DAILY SERVICE CHARGES, 


1959-1969 


INDEX: 1957-59 = 100 


250 


1 

All Medical Care Prices 




200 


,■■ Hospital Daily Service Charges 












150 








., , 




100 


' "*" 







1959 1966 1969 


Source: Social Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. Chart Book, 1969. 





For over two decades there have existed pre-paid 
group practice plans — which might be regarded as mini- 
national plans. These plans, such as the Kaiser Founda- 
tion Health Plan, have contracted with medical groups 
for comprehensive health services. These contracts place 
the medical group under a budget. The budget controls 
the costs. If the cost of providing services is actually 
less than the amount stipulated in the contract — the 
budget — the physicians receive a bonus at the end of 
the year. Thus, the more efficient the services, the more 
money they make. 

The cost savings achievable under the contract sys- 
tem are nothing short of spectacular. For example, the 
President's Commission on Health Manpower studied 
the Kaiser plan in depth. The commission's conclusion 
was that the Kaiser plan provided as good or better care 
than was available in the general community — and the 
Kaiser plan cost from 20 to 30 percent less. 

In addition to Kaiser, all other pre-paid group prac- 
tice plans have demonstrated the capability of reducing 
hospitalization and the number of surgical procedures. 
A recent study of the Federal Employes Health Benefits 
Program showed that the group practice, pre-payment 
plans had but one-half the number of non-maternity 
hospital days per 1000 subscribers as the alternate 
coverage. 

My bill would not only provide free choice of primary 
physician, but also allow beneficiaries a free choice of 
health delivery systems — solo or group practice. More- 
over, beneficiaries would choose their personal physician 
when they were well and not under the stress of illness. 

Here are the benefits my bill will provide and which 
any plan should provide: 

One: Coverage for every man. woman and child who 



has resided in the United States for one year or more. 

Two: Comprehensive health benefits, including un- 
limited hospitalization, physician services, including 
surgery, subject to a small $2 cost-sharing charge per 
visit after the first visit; preventive care and physical 
examinations, nursing home care as required and with- 
out limits, home health services subject to a $2 charge 
per visit and rehabilitation services. 

Three: Comprehensive dental services for all children 
under age 16 subject to a $2 cost-sharing charge per 
visit after the first visit. Dental examinations and pro- 
phylaxis provided at no cost to the patient. 

Four: Eye care including an allowance for eyeglasses 
and frames. 

Five: Prescription drugs. 

These benefits would be financed under the Social 
Security program. Employers would pay 3 percent of 
payroll, employes 1 percent of payroll and the govern- 
ment would match the employer contribution from gen- 
eral revenues. 

In summary, the bill I have introduced would estab- 
lish a National Health Insurance program under the 
Social Security system and would give to middle Ameri- 
cans those health and medical benefits which the wealthy 
now have — because they can afford to pay for them. 

The time is long overdue to make comprehensive 
health care a matter of right for all Americans, in all 
income levels, rather than a matter of privilege, pity or 
proximity. 

The United States should rank first among all na- 
tions in providing high quality health care at reasonable 
cost for all people. In my opinion, the national medical 
and health crisis can only be resolved through a com- 
prehensive National Health Insurance program, with 
comprehensive financing. ■ 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



A Call to Arms 



The Consumer, the Silent Majority, 
Urged to Move Against Deceptions 



By BESS MYERSON GRANT 

Editor's Note: The following are ex- 
cerpts from an address by Mrs. Grant 
to the Consumer Assembly 1970. A for- 
mer Miss America, she is now the Com- 
missioner of Consumer Affairs for New 
York City. 

■ If there is a silent majority in 
America, its silence is not the silence 
of smugness, suspicion and self-sat- 
isfaction. It is a majority which in- 
cludes the working man who wins a 
larger paycheck, only to find his 
wages devoured by taxes and infla- 
tion — taxes and inflation caused by 
an old war that will not end and new 
arms to fight the wars yet to start. 

This majority is the families who 
are fed the processed foods whose 
nutrition is constantly reduced as 
prices are increased — which means 
that along with the financial burden, 
we do not get the balanced meals we 
need. The recent reports on under- 
nutrition, even among middle- and 
higher-income groups, are frighten- 
ing — and there is no statistical scale 
to measure the ultimate diminution 
in bodies and minds in the genera- 
tion still trying to grow up to its full 
potential. 

MAJORITY DEFINED 

This majority consists of those 
heads of families who are doing the 
nerve wracking, physically draining 
task of trying to keep a limited in- 
come within hailing distance of an 
expanding outgo. When bills keep 
piling up and more go unpaid each 
month, tension is a permanent vis- 
itor and peace of mind a stranger in 
the home. 

We are the aging who are tasting 
the bitter medicine of runaway med- 
ical costs, while pensions and ben- 
efits remain the same. 

We are the beneficiaries of a tech- 
nology which has made us its vic- 
tims. We use micro-wave ovens — sit 
before color TV sets which emit 
radiation — which means our families 
may be dying while they laugh at 
someone else's domestic comedy. 

This majority includes the com- 



muter locked for twenty percent of 
his waking hours in the daily, weary- 
ing crawl of autos from the suburb 
to the city. It includes millions of 
metropolitan families fed up with 
poor service and high rates from 
public utilities that are not really 
public, and regulatory agencies that 
do not really regulate — who are fed 
up with air that is unfit to breathe — 
while scientists predict that we may 
poison ourselves out of existence in 
50 years. 

BEYOND OUR MEANS 

We are saddened as we see our 
open land the victim of continuous 
jackhammers, construction cranes, 
and bulldozers. We are frantic as 
we find that even our health and our 
lives are becoming priced beyond 
our means. . . . 

This is the constituency of con- 
sumerism. That is who we are. 

What then do we want? 

We want to restore the precious 
balance of human priorities with the 
precious balance of nature, and never 
again allow them to get out of bal- 
ance. 

We want to break the bonds of a 
society where great producing or- 
ganizations are not only able to 
manage consumers, they even man- 
age the government to help them do 
the job. . . . 

The consumer movement is at a 
critical point in its history, and we 
face a critical danger, the danger 
that we will be fooled by fake re- 
form. Deceptive packaging and mis- 
labeling are as insidious on the con- 
gressional calendar as they are on 
the supermarket shelf. 

Let us therefore make it clear that 
we will not accept new names hung 
on old and tired institutions; we will 
not accept honorific committees and 
superfluous councils served up as 
consumer protection agencies; and 
we will not accept as consumer pro- 
tectors, Panglosses and Pollyannas 
who have little knowledge of the 
disease, and less concern for the 
patient. (PAD ■ 




Harold E. Lewis 

Lewis Named 
GEB Member 

Harold E. Lewis, 51, business 
representative for the Miami, Flori- 
da, District Council of Carpenters, 
has been named a member of the 
General Executive Board from the 
Fourth District by President M. A. 
Hutcheson. He fills the vacancy 
created when Herbert C. Skinner 
was appointed Second General Vice 
President. 

Born in Queens County, New 
York, March 30, 1919, Lewis re- 
ceived his first taste of carpentry 
soon after graduation from Queens 
P.S. 63 as he worked for his con- 
tractor grandfather, building homes 
in the immediate area. After Army 
service during World War II, in- 
cluding action at the Battle of the 
Bulge, he held a succession of con- 
struction jobs before settling in 
Miami in 1947, where he became 
active in Local 1509. His first union 
position was as a steward; his first 
elected office was as recording sec- 
retary in 1949, and he was elected 
local president in 1951. 

In 1957 Lewis was named assist- 
ant business agent for the Miami 
District Council, and in 1963 be- 
came the business representative for 
the Council. He has also served as 
the first vice president of the Florida 
State Council of Carpenters and at 
present is chairman of the state 
Continued on page 14 



JUNE. 1970 



13 



Emergency Housing Aid Bill Passes Senate 



Sen. John Sparkman (D., Ala.) 
recently called up for consideration 
on the U.S. Senate floor, S. 3685, an 
emergency bill designed to shake 
loose around $2 billion to bolster 
the nation's sagging housing indus- 
try. That bill has now passed the 
Senate, and has been sent to the 
House of Representatives for further 
action. 

"It is obvious to the committee 
that economic conditions in this 
Nation are approaching a critical 
level, and that immediate action is 
necessary if we are to avoid a further 
drop in the economy and possibly 
a serious recession by the end of 
the year," said Sparkman, Senate 
Banking and Currency Committee 
Chairman. 

Blaming inflation for the current 
dilemma, Sparkman said the drop- 
off in housing starts comes at a time 

(1) when housing demand is at its 
highest level since World War II, 

(2) vacancy rates are the lowest 
since World War II and (3) interest 
rates, the highest since the Civil 
War. 

Money shortage and high interest 
is on the point of applying a "death 
blow" to the home-owning hopes of 
middle income families, according 
to Sparkman. The emergency bill 
includes the following sections which 
grew out of bills sponsored by 
Sparkman in his role as Senate 
Housing Subcommittee Chairman: 

1. A bill to let the private, fed- 
erally chartered corporation, the 
Federal National Mortgage Assn., 
buy, for the first time, conventional 
mortgages. Now, FNMA buys only 
Federal Housing Administration and 
Veterans Administration home 
mortgages so original mortgage 
holders can use sale proceeds to 
make more home loans. 

2. A bill to let the Federal Home 
Loan Bank buy mortgages from 
savings and loan associations so 
they can use the sale proceeds to 
make more home loans. 

3. A bill to provide a $250 mil- 
lion appropriation to Federal Home 
Loan Banks to help savings and 
loan associations make loans to 
homebuyers at lower interest rates. 



4. A bill to reallocate $2 billion 
in the funds of a federal financial 
agency set up to support FHA and 
VA loans (Government National 
Mortgage Association) for the pur- 
pose of increasing the volume of 
purchases of FHA and VA mort- 
gages from the original holders so 
that sale proceeds may be used to 
make more home loans. 

"Instead of meeting our Nation's 
goal of 2.0 million housing units in 
1969, we produced only 1.5 mil- 
lion and. at our present rate, we 
will be lucky to meet a level of 1.4 
million in 1970," Sparkman said. 
"This situation reflects poorly on 
the money managers of our econ- 
omy. We seem to have plenty of 
money for office buildings, new 
plants and for all kinds of consumer 
frivolities, but not for homes." 

Lewis Named 

Continued from page 13 

council. He has also served as a 
delegate to the Dade County Cen- 
tral Labor Union, a member of the 
Miami Housing Board of Appeals, 
as a member of the Urban League 
and as a member of LEAP (Labor 
Education Advancement Program.) 
He has also served as a board mem- 
ber of the United Givers Fund and 
as a director of the John Elliot 
Blood Bank, sponsored by organized 
labor in the Miami area. 

The new Board Member has at- 
tended the University of Miami at 
nights for two years, pursuing stud- 
ies in business law and business 
administration. 

Married in 1942 while in the 
Army to the former Mary Ross, 
in New York, the couple has two 
children; Richard Alan. 18, due to 
enroll in the University of South 
Florida next semester, and Sandra 
Ann, 16, who is in high school. 
The finny denizens of the Gulf 
Stream are fishing targets for Lewis 
when he has time for it. as is bowl- 
ing and, as spectator sports, foot- 
ball and baseball. 



Promises 

Continued from page 10 

This, then, is the foreign trade 
picture in 1970: (a) Countries that 
offered only hand work competition 
to American production techniques 
before World War II are now prac- 
tically caught up in technological 
know-how. (b) Major American 
companies have bought or built for- 
eign plants all over the world. So 
long as they can bring their low- 
wage imports from their foreign fac- 
tories into the United States, they 
have little interest in protecting 
American factories or workers. 

As an example: It is only neces- 
sary to point out that South Ameri- 
can paper companies can deliver 
quality paper to East Coast envelope 
manufacturers at $30 per ton less 
than it costs to make comparable 
paper in Albany, N.Y. or Pennsylva- 
nia. The South American paper 
mills are subsidiaries of U.S. firms, 
of course. 

Pottery making was once a flour- 
ishing industry in the United tSates. 
Imports have gradually chipped away 
at American production to the point 
where the industry has practically 
disappeared. 

At recent Congressional hearings, 
the Ladies Garment Workers Union 
testified that imports of wearing ap- 
parel increased from 4% to 22% 
in some 14 years. Foreign imports 
now account for as much as 72% 
of such items as sweaters. 

Foreign trade is a tremendously 
complicated field. There is no doubt 
but that expanding foreign trade is 
a healthy development for the entire 
world. However, this is true only if 
there is reciprocity and a proper 
balance, If one nation, even one as 
strong and as affluent as the United 
States, is expected to unilaterally 
carry a disproportionate share of the 
burden, the results eventually must 
become self-defeating for that nation. 

In view of all these considerations, 
it is time for the United States (and 
this applies to Canada, too) to take 
a long hard look at the whole foreign 
trade picture. 

Foreign trade is fine until such 
time as it trades away too many jobs 
of our workers for bigger profits for 
our corporations and financiers. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(1) OAKLAND, CALIF.— A recent 
dinner for members of Local 1473 
honored long-time members of the 
Brotherhood. Shown here are 25-year- 
pin recipients (front row, from left) 
Olaf Hougen and Adolfo Ungaretti. On 
the back row are: Local 1473 President 
Jack Myers and Local 1473 Trustee 
Glenn Frazier. 

(2) Local 1473's 50 year member Ralph 
Norman, right, is congratulated by Finan- 
cial Secretary Jack Kirkman and Presi- 
dent Jack Myers. 

(3) 30-Year members of Local 1473 
recently honored were (front row, from 
left) John Grismore, Carl Meydeam. 
Harry Strand, and Alfred Schneider. 
Back row — John Bennett, Irwin Nelson. 
Harold Hunter, Ralph Norman (50 years). 
and Robert Lafferty. 

(4) HARBOR CITY, CALIF.— Local 
1140 officers and members held their 
annual pin presentation honoring brothers 
who have held membership for 25 years 
or more. Awards were presented by Gor- 
don McCulloch, executive secretary of 
the Los Angeles District Council, and 
Harry Dawson, president of the Los 
Angeles District Council and Business 
Agent of Local 1140. 25 year pins were 
presented to Charley Landers, Herman 
Myers, Thomas O'Gorman, Selmar 
Thomas, Isaac Yarbrough, and Floyd 
Hoffman. A 50 year pin was presented 





to Elston S. Miller. Shown at the present- 
ation are, from left: Front row, kneeling 
—P. O. Stott, Dan Nero, O. C. Grubbs, 
H. W. Dobbins, H. V. Dawson. Back 
row— E. S. Miller. F. Hoffman, H. W. 
Thornton, C. Landers, E. B. Wilson, M. 
R. Hall, S. Thomas, I. W. Yarbrough, A. 
Eisele, H. Myers, T. M. O'Gorman, G. 
T. Yoder, G. A. McCulloch. 



(5) Brother Pete Holland, Local 1140, 
was awarded a plaque in honor of his 
63 years of membership in the Brother- 
hood. Shown congratulating Holland are 
Harry Dawson, president of the Los 
Angeles District Council and Business 
Agent of Local 1140, and Gordon Mc- 
Culloch, executive secretary of the Los 
Angeles District Council. 



JUNE, 1970 



15 



Financial Gyp 



"Repossession" Gimmicks Open 
Way to Fleecing Car Defaulters 



Today's system of "repossessing" 
cars whose owners have defaulted 
on payments opens the way to the 
gross "fleecing" of such owners in 
the view of Professor Philip Shuch- 
man of the University of Connecti- 
cut. 

Writing in the Stanford Law Re- 
view, Prof. Shuchman said that the 
"alarming and most inequitable" re- 
possession system was largely due 
to the major financing institutions, 
especially those owned by auto man- 
ufacturers. 

In a study of nearly 150 repos- 
sessions in Connecticut. Shuchman 
found that if dealers or finance com- 
panies were required to sell repos- 
sessed cars promptly at their retail 
market value, the average price ob- 
tained would more than equal the 
balance owed by the original pur- 
chasers. 

In at least half the cases, he esti- 
mates, this would eliminate the need 
— and the consumer expense — of 
seeking deficiency judgments through 
the courts. These judgments typi- 
cally include the balance owed after 
the initial resale of the car, plus the 
"arbitrary and high" costs and legal 
fees of the dealer or financier repos- 
sessing the automobile. 

Shuchman found that the price on 
the first resale usually to an auto 
dealer — averaged only 51 percent 
of the Redbook retail price of the 
car and 71 percent of the Redbook 
wholesale price. Most cars were in 
normal working order, he adds. 

In one illustrative case the origi- 
nal buyer defaulted after paying a 
total of $1,835 on a car priced at 
$2,605. After repossessing the car, 
the financer resold it to the original 
dealer for $400. 

At that time, the car had a Red- 
book wholesale value of about $700 
and a retail value of $850 to $900— 
more than enough to cover the un- 
paid balance. 

Five weeks later, the dealer resold 
the car for $950 cash — two and a 
half times the price he paid the 
finance company. In the meantime, 
a deficiency judgment seeking to 



recover the unpaid balance due on 
the car collection costs, and attor- 
ney's fees was filed against the origi- 
nal purchaser. 

Present legal practices provide 
"no incentive for the financer and 
little incentive for the dealer to resell 
the repossessed car at the highest 
price obtainable in the open market," 
Prof. Shuchman comments. 



Sharply discounting the proposed 
Uniform Consumer Credit Code, 
Prof. Shuchman argues that "were 
automobile repossessors to use the 
same efficient business practices in 
resale that they do in dealings with 
one another, there would be no need 
for anything except the security (col- 
lateral) of the automobile itself. 

"Were they to resell the repos- 
sessed car for deficiency judgment 
purposes with anything like the zeal 
with which they originally sold the 
car, they would have virtually all the 
profit for which they contracted in 
Continued on page 27 



Pioneer Lumbermen 




TIMBERRRRRRRRRRRRR— A tribute to Michigan's pioneer lumbermen is 
the Lumberman's Memorial on the shore of the Au Sable River northeast of 
Tawas in eastern Michigan. Shown here is an unusual nighttime view, the 
memorial was erected in memory of the men "through whose labors was made 
possible the development of the prairie states." Because of its proximity to 
water transportation, Michigan easily outdistanced other states in harvesting 
lumber in the last half of the 19th century. Production reached a peak in 1888 
when nearly 4.3 trillion board feet were harvested, in addition to millions of 
shingles, staves, pickets, railroad ties and squared timbers. Much of the lumber 
used to rebuild Chicago following the disastrous fire of 1871 came from Mich- 
igan forests. In the industry's heyday, nearly every stream in Michigan was 
used to float logs from forest to mill. The lumbermen depicted in the memorial 
are shown with the tools of their trade — an axe, a saw and a peavey. (Michi- 
gan Tourist Council Photo.) 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




* 



Editorials 



•*♦•' Support the O'Hara Biii 

Despite the widespread opinion that it is "an exer- 
cise in futility," we should like to encourage each of 
you to take pen in hand and write your Congressional 
delegation; your Representative in Congress and your 
two Senators. 

Tell them you would like them to support the 
O'Hara Manpower Bill, H.R. 11620 (Occupational 
Health and Safety). This pending legislation would 
act to make American workplaces safer and healthier 
places for breadwinners. Every year more than 1 4,000 
workers die, and more than two million are injured 
because their workspaces are unsafe or unhealthy. 
The O'Hara bill will do much to correct this situation. 

At the present time the proposed operation of the 
legislation is saddled with a review board, an extra 
layer of bureaucracy, which would hamstring proper 
operation of the law. When you write, tell your Sen- 
ators and Representative that, while you favor the 
O'Hara Bill, you want the "board" provision deleted. 

The companion bill in the Senate, introduced by 
Senator Williams of New Jersey, is S. 2193 and should 
be referred to as such when addressing your Senators. 

It definitely does help to write your Congressional 
delegation. True, only one voter out of the entire 
nation writing to Congress doesn't do much good. But 
just as a single drop of water doesn't make a rainstorm, 
so also a lot of them can cause a flood. Your effort, 
coupled with many others, can cause Congress to act. 
Do it now. 



% 



No Funds tor Education 



Despite the availability of funds to pursue the war 
in Southeast Asia, to explore the moon, to build bigger 
and faster airliners, and to perpetuate a great number 
of government projects which many of us would just as 
soon do without, there seems to be a shortage of funds 
for educational purposes in this nation. 

The AFL-CIO has urged full funding of Federal 
aid to education, pointing out that the present admin- 
istration has asked for only about half of the funds 
already authorized for the purpose. The Teachers' 
Corps appropriations are slated for cuts. Funds for 
vocational and adult education programs have been 
reduced. Full funding of the work-study program for 
needy college students has been denied. 

"We will pay dearly in the future for the money we 
save today," declared the AFL-CIO in testimony 



before the House Appropriations Committee. 

The Congressmen working on today's governmental 
problems will not live forever. Neither will the career 
government administrators, the diplomats abroad, the 
doctors and lawyers and bankers and engineers and 
architects and all the other walks of life which demand 
specialized training. 

What can be the matter with our planners and 
legislators that they can find funds for war, for space, 
for aeronautics, for freeways . . . for everything under 
the sun except the most important item of all: educa- 
tion of our youth who must take over the reins when 
they fall from dead hands? 



% 



Canada 's Problem 



Like the United States, Canada is facing the dis- 
tinct possibility of a recession. The Canadian Labour 
Congress has taken note of the perilous trend in that 
country, pointing out that the policies being pursued 
by the government in combatting inflation are, in fact, 
doing little more than contributing to the unemploy- 
ment situation. 

The CLC has formally advised the government in 
a 15,000-word memorandum: "We are fearful that 
these policies, which were put into effect last year, 
will aggravate and prolong the unemployment prob- 
lem this year and beyond, and at the same time have 
only a negligible effect on the overall price problem 
in Canada." 

It would be presumptuous for us to contend that 
we have the answer to Canada's fiscal problems, any 
more than that of our own nation. But one of the 
first steps toward solving both our nations' problems 
is to recognize that it is a human problem, not a 
fiscal problem. The planners in both nations seem to 
be concerned only with interest rates and treat all 
forms of income alike. They fail to realize that the 
incomes of large corporations, banks and financial 
institutions are different than the incomes of wage 
earners, on whose purchasing power the lifeblood of 
commerce depends, and on whose welfare and hap- 
piness (or lack thereof) governments rise and fall. 

The government of Canada, the government of 
the United States, and representative governments 
around the globe should attack their problems from 
the standpoint of the welfare of the working men and 
women instead of the financiers. 



JUNE, 1970 



17 




ANADIAN 



Employers Lockout 
Carpenters in BC 

Seven contruction trades unions 
have been locked out in British Co- 
lumbia by an employers' organization 
known as the Construction Labor Re- 
lations Association. 

The Vancouver Island Building and 
Construction Trades Council set up 
a Lock-Out Committee which co- 
ordinated the plans of the unions in 
the area and was effective in offsetting 
the lockout to some extent. At the 
end of April, the Council's committee 
reported that the Carpenters, Laborers, 
Operating Engineers and Heat and 
Frost Insulators were dispatching more 
men than were being laid off. 

The lock-out could affect about 
40,000 construction workers and $200 
million of construction. The unions 
were confident that they were going 
to get the settlements they would like. 

BC Minister Defends 
Recent Wage Hikes 

On one occasion recently the Brit- 
ish Columbia Federation of Labor 
was happy to congratulate the pro- 
vincial minister of labor, something 
which they don't often have an op- 
portunity of doing. 

Labor Minister Peterson made a 
speech which got public attention 
in which he said, ". . . there is no 
theoretical evidence to suggest that 
rising wages are a major cause of 
inflation even where wage increases 
precede price increases. 

"A wage increase," he continued, 
"followed by a price increase may 
be partly an excuse on the part of a 
firm affected, as some price increases 
are often greater than the increase in 
labor costs." 

Mr. Peterson also suggested that 
efforts aimed at making better use 
of manpower resources would best 
reduce inflationary pressures. 

"I hope," said Ray Haynes, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer of the B.C. Federation 



of Labor, "that Mr. Peterson will be 
able to make this point to some of 
his colleagues who have wrongly 
been blaming labor for our inflation 
problems. 

"This is not the only recent example 
of increased recognition that wage 
increases are not the primary cause 
of Canada's inflation." 

Inflation in Canada is primarily 
caused by inflation in the United 
States. 

"The federal government's current 
war on inflation is a phony war," he 
continued, "which can produce no 
constructive results but can only dam- 
age the Canadian economy and, 
through greatly increased unemploy- 
ment, can and is causing hardship to 
thousands of Canadian families." 



New Labels To Identify 
Hazardous Materials 

Effective lune 1 of next year, new, 
standardized warning labels will be 
required on poisonous, flammable, ex- 
plosive and corrosive chemical prod- 
ucts in everyday household use in 
Canada. The labels must be affixed to 
all such products, regardless of wheth- 
er the product is made domestically 
or imported. 

The labels are required under new 
regulations in Canada's Hazardous 
Products Acts, passed last year. 

Manufacturers will be required to 
use the uniform symbols that will show 
type and degree of hazard, and to 
publish warning statements — in both 
English and French — along with basic 
first aid information. The measure is 
reportedly the strongest and toughest 
to be introduced in any country in the 
world. Mounting evidence in poison 
control centers and hospital emergency 
wards indicates the need for such 
stringent regulations. 

Products covered under the new 
regulation, the first to be published 
under the Act, include bleaches, 
polishes, sanitizers, glues and cleaners. 
Every type of aerosol will be required 
to carry an "explosive" warning, in- 
cluding such products as shaving 
creams, deodorants and hair sprays. 



HAZARDOUS PRODUCT SYMBOLS 




DANGER;P0IS0N DANGER FLAMMABLE DANGER/EXPLOSIVE DANGER/CORROSIVE 




WARNING/POISON WARNING, FLAMMABLE WARNING/EXPLOSIVE WARNING/CORROSIVE 




CAUTION/POISON CAUTION FLAMMABLE CAUTION/EXPLOSIVE CAUTION/CORROSIVE 



Table of labels for dangerous items that will be required next year in Canada. The 
octagon around skull-and-crossbones would mean, "Danger, poison — it can kill you." 
A diamond would mean, "Warning, poison — it can make you very ill and can injure 
you." The same symbol within a triangle shape would mean, "Caution, poison — it 
can make you very ill." Some products may carry several symbols. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



CLC Convention 
Studies Jobless Aid 

The unemployment crisis will cer- 
tainly be one of the major topics of 
debate at the biennial convention of 
the Canadian Labor Congress being 
held in Edmonton in mid-May. 

One of the proposals which will 
likely be put forward to help people 
will be the guaranteed annual income. 
This idea has already been endorsed 
in principle by the CLC and a cam- 
paign to support it was launched in 
February. 

Unemployment insurance alone is 
not doing the job of easing the pains 
of joblessness. The benefits are too 
low. The maximum anyone can re- 
ceive is $53 a week for a period up 
to one year. 

Lower paid workers receive smaller 
amounts, as little as $17 a week, re- 
gardless of the size of the family. 

Even at the maximum level, a 
worker with a family would receive 
well under $3,000 a year. He'd need 
twice as much for an adequate stand- 
ard of living. Certainly 50 percent 
more than the U.I. maximum. 

A serious flaw in the U.I. scheme is 
that it helps only those employed at 
least 30 out of the past 104 weeks. 

This tends to exclude many young 
people who are just entering the labor 
force, and older people who may be 
laid off for lengthy periods. 

Workers who earn over $7,800 a 
year are excluded from the plan. 
This is certainly not a sensible ceiling 
today although it looked like it a 
few years ago. 

Two things at least must be done, 
one, increase the scale of benefits 
under Unemployment Insurance and 
include every employed person under 
the plan: two, institute a guaranteed 
annual income program which would 
put a floor under the income of every 
person and every family. 

These will be issues at the CLC 
convention. 

Federal Officials Miss 
Real Inflation Villain 

The president of the Ontario Fed- 
eration of Labor made a number of 
press statements in which he also 
condemned the Federal government 
for mistaken policies to combat in- 
flation. 

Said OFL President Archer: "The 
avowed purpose of the government is 
to create unemployment as a classic 
response to inflation. It has succeeded 
in creating unemployment all right, 
but has failed to halt inflation." 

Prime Minister Trudeau was aim- 



ing his guns at working people, he 
said, but the real villain is the moneyed 
interests or the corporations. 

The national average for unem- 
ployment was around the seven per- 
cent mark. But in Quebec province, 
it was nine percent, in the Atlantic 
provinces 11 percent. 

Mr. Archer pointed to specific 
areas and instances which told a grim 
story. 

The shutdown of the Dunlop Rub- 
ber plant in Toronto put 600 men 
out of work. Many of them had long 
terms of seniority, were too old to 
get jobs easily, too young for pen- 
sioning. 

The Erie Flooring and Wood Pro- 
ducers plant in West Lome, near 
St. Thomas, closed down with only 
three days' notice to its 150 employees 
organized by the Carpenters. 

These employees made up about 
40 percent of the total work force in 
the town. There was no prospect of 
jobs in the other three industries in 
the immediate area. Many of them 
had worked in this plant most of 
their lives. 

The OFL president called for more 
action by governments. He urged the 
federal government once again to 
implement the recommendations of 
the Freedman Report which was made 
about four years ago. 

This report if adopted would make 
it mandatory for employers to give 
the union at least six months' notice 
of a major layoff and to negotiate the 
terms of a settlement with the union 
to reimburse the workers, in part at 
least, for the displacement. 

As long as the federal government's 
so-called anti-inflationary policies con- 
tinue, the unemployment situation will 
worsen. 

Pollution is Major 
Issue of Trade Unions 

Pollution is the subject people are 
talking about everywhere, particularly 
young people. 

The trade union movement will be 
taking more and more interest in the 
subject as it begins to affect more and 
more jobs. 

The Ontario Federation of Labor 
is taking pollution as its subject for 
its 11th annual Farmer-Labor-Teacher 
Conference to be held at the Educa- 
tion Centre, Port Elgin, June 20th 
and 21st. 

The new Executive Vice-President 
of the Canadian Labor Congress Jean 
Beaydry will be one of the guest 
speakers. 



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JUNE, 1970 



19 



Ontario Carpenters Upgrade Skills at 
Quetico Centre for Continuing Learning 



n i 



'» 



Canadian Carpenters are learning new 
techniques and discovering how to cope 
with change at an unusual course at 
Quetico Centre 20 miles east of Atikokan, 
Ontario. 

During the last two years the center for 
continuing learning has worked with 
Canada Manpower, the Ontario Depart- 
ment of Education, the Lakehead Build- 
ers' Exchange, and Local 1669 of the 
United Brotherhood at Thunder Bay. in 
providing an upgrading course in the 
trade. 

It is the only known course of its kind 
in Canada, says Norman Ross, a member 
of Local 1669, and a Thunder Bay con- 
struction foreman. Mr. Ross has been on 
loan to Quetico Centre as an instructor 
for the six-week course, and helped set 
up the first one in 1968. This is the fourth 
in the series. 

Employers, the union and carpenters 
all recognize the need for those in the 
trade to obtain instruction on how to use 
the many new tools and materials coming 
on the market. 

Vern Silver, vice president and past 
business agent of Local 1669, said at the 
recent graduation ceremony. "Employers 
and carpenters have paid 10 each per 
work hour since the establishment of the 
Apprenticeship and Carpentry Industry 
Promotion Trust Fund in early 1967. 
We now have better than $18,000, having 
already spent $14,000 on various training 
efforts. Students in apprenticeship pro- 
grams are supported at the rate of $25- 
$35 per week: we have made available 
bursaries, and co-sponsored programs 
like this one at Quetico and night school 
classes in Thunder Bay. We are now 
looking for further projects which will 
develop and promote the Carpentry 
Industry.'' 

Russ Mayotte. a trustee of the Fund 
and a Thunder Bay builder, added, 
"There is a great need for effective lead- 
ership in the Construction Industry; with 
the lack of supervisory skills, builders are 
unable to tender jobs. Programs such as 
this must be continued and further devel- 
oped, in order to increase the quality of 
supervision and therefore the success of 
our industry." 

The carpenter "students" are from 
Northwestern Ontario — Thunder Bay. 
Red Lake, Kenora. Fort Frances, Dryden. 
Atikokan. Kapuskasing, Geraldton and 
Nipigon. Some are in their late 40s. More 
than 10 percent of the 800 membership 
in the Thunder Bay local now has taken 
the course. 

Graduates have found it much easier to 
obtain better employment when they re- 
turn home. One from Thunder Bay now 
has as many as 60 men working under 
him as a foreman on housing projects. 

At Quetico Centre, housed in comfort- 
able quarters and isolated from pressures 
at home, carpenters learn quickly and 
easily. Some have never encountered sub- 



jects taught, such as construction math, 
safety and compensation legislation, 
supply estimating, blueprint and specifica- 
tion reading, level and transit. That is one 
reason the course has been a success 
from the start. The loss of a $10,000 job 
because he couldn't use a transit con- 
vinced one carpenter that it was time to 
catch up. 

Ross is pleased with an innovation 
introduced this winter, the carpenter- 
student assuming the role of instructor 
for a short while in order to pass on his 
particular field of knowledge to others. 

He says, "Most of the men have 
specialized in some aspect of the trade, 
e.g. framing; My task is to make op- 
portunities for them to share their ex- 
perience with the others who know tricks 
and short cuts in some other special field, 
e.g. forming or finishing. In this way, they 
expand their skills and discover the need 
to work more effectively with other 
groups involved in the building process. 
I have met at least six of my former 
students who have had steadier and better 
employment since the course. As well, I 
find that some employers value this train- 
ing so much that they free their men 
to take the course." 

The course participants value highly 
the instruction relating to problems, 
talents and skill of foremanship, job 
teamwork and communication barriers 
(due to language or differences in atti- 
tudes and values). This instruction has 
made possible advancement for some of 
them. Everyone concerned with the pro- 
gram is enthusiastic about the results. 




Upgrading of present skills, leadership 
training and instruction into new areas, 
such as transit reading (shown here), have 
given rise to the success of Quetico Cen- 
ter. When one Ontario carpenter failed 
to get a better job because he couldn't 
read a transit, he decided it was time to 
take advantage of the center's improve- 
ment program. 

Quetico Centre was established more 
than 10 years ago to provide adult educa- 
tion in a wide range of subjects, from 
skill improvement through arts, music 
and crafts, to organization development 
and youth leadership. 

Other skills-upgrading courses include 
one for marine and small engine me- 
chanics and another in which unemployed 
men can obtain a basic training in the 
operation of heavy construction equip- 
ment. 




"Students" and faculty of a recent graduation class of the Quetico Center. Men of all 
ages, comprising more than 10 percent of Thunder Bay Local 1669, have now 
taken the skill upgrading course. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



7 7.9 cents per mile: 



Depreciation, 

Maintenance 

Are 

Top 

Auto 

Operating 

Costs 




The biggest expense in running a 
car is the cost of depreciation and 
maintenance. The average American 
motorist also pays more for his 
garage, parking and tolls than he 
pays to maintain his share of the 
nation's highways through taxes. 

The cost per mile of operating a 
car has just been released by the 
Federal Highway Administration of 
the U.S. Department of Transporta- 
tion. The study shows it costs the 
average motorist 1 1.9 cents per mile 
to own and operate his car. 

Depreciation accounts for 3.2 
cents for the total; maintenance, ac- 
cessories, parts and tires cost an- 
other 1.9 cents. Gas and oil cost 
1.9 cents; insurance 1.7 cents; 1.8 
cents goes for garage, parking and 
toll fees and 1.4 cents goes for state, 
Federal and local taxes. 

The study is based on a $3,185 
car driven 100,000 miles over a 10- 
year life span. Few motorists drive 
a car for ten years, but the Depart- 
ment assumes that the average auto 
is sold or traded three or more times 
and is on the road that long. 

The analysis involved a 1970, 



four-door sedan owned by a Balti- 
more family. Motorists in Boston, 
Washington, San Francisco or New 
York would have a higher per-mile 
cost; while those in Atlanta, Jack- 
sonville or Fort Worth would pay 
less. 

Careful drivers who keep their 
cars in good operating condition pay 
less than those who ignore oil 
changes and lubrication jobs while 
indulging in tire-screeching stops 
and starts. 

The cost per mile is higher in the 
earlier years of ownership because 
of depreciation, but the per-mile 
cost remains fairly constant over the 
10 years because rising maintenance 
costs offset lower depreciation. 

According to Department figures 
it cost $11,890 over the ten years 
to operate the studied car which 
broke down like this: 

$3,185— original cost; $1,733 — 
7,200 gallons of gasoline; $543— 
replacement tires, oil; $1,722 — in- 
surance; $1,521— maintenance and 
repairs; $1,805 — parking and tolls; 
$1,353 — taxes. 



LABORS MATERIAL 
1 COSTS 



NATIONAL 

CONSTRUCTION 

ESTIMATOR 




11970 UNIT COSTS 

, COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF 

HUNDREDS OF 

CONTRACTORS 

AND MATERIAL 

I SUPPLIERS 



In California add 24c tax 



208 Pages 

8Vi»ll 
NO ADVERTISING 



ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS 
IN DOLLARS AND CENTS 
AVERAGE LABOR COSTS FOR 
THOUSANDS OF ITEMS 
TYPICAL SUB CONTRACT 
PRICES INCLUDED 
NEW ESTIMATING RULES 
OF THUMB 



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JUNE, 1970 



21 




pounder, both taken from the waters of 
British Columbia. 



Outdoor 
. Meanderings 



Readers may write to 
Fred Goetz 

2833 S. E. 33rd Place, 
Portland, Oregon 97202 




Rev. Tripp, Muskie 



Hook-shy Lunkers 

One of the most 
unpredictable of 
all gamesters is the 
muskie. Even the 
grizzled vets will 
tell you that it 
takes a thousand 
casts or so, on the 
average, to pro- 
voke a lunker into 
striking. Come to 
think about it, it's 
probably their 
hook-shyness that 
allows them to 
grow to such enor- 
mous size. 

Most of the 
really big muskies 
are taken from good sized lakes on big 
plugs, as long as a cucumber and even 
larger baitfish. But, of course, there's al- 
ways the exception, one in particular being 
pointed out in a recent letter from Dee 
Ingwer of Wellston, Ohio, a member of 
Local 1426, now retired from the work- 
aday world. He sends in the accompany- 
ing photo of his minister. Rev. Alfred 
Tripp of McArthur, Ohio, holding a 
muskie he nipped from Middleford Creek 
in Vinton County. Ohio, and on an aver- 
age-sized bass lure, the "Bass Oreno." 

Brother Ingwer says he thinks there 
are some larger ones finning around and 
stated in his letter that he'll be out to 
get one of 'em this summer. 

■ Salmon in the Midwest 

One of the most exciting fish stories 
in the nation occurred a few years ago 
when midwest fishermen started taking 
Coho salmon from key streams flowing 
into the Great Lakes, the ultimate result 
of a mass airlift of eggs from Pacific 
coast salmon stocks from the Columbia 
River to the Great Lakes area. The first 
notable catches called to my attention 
occurred off the mouth of the Manistee 
River of Michigan where a town of the 
same name is located. 




Deutsch 



Practically overnight the city became 
a boom town now off referred to as 
'The Salmon Capital of the Midwest." 
of "The Town That Coho Built." Along 
with eggs from the Coho — sometimes 
referred to as the "silver salmon" in the 
northwest — some Chinook salmon eggs 
were introduced, 
and it has just been 
a few months since 
we've heard of 
some noteworthy 

nHb returns of mature 
specimens of this 
fish to Great Lakes 
streams. In line 
with this, here's a 
letter from Adolph 
Deutsch of Dyer. 
Indiana, a member 
of Carpenters' Lo- 
cal 599 at Ham- 
mond. 

"It finally happened. I caught one of 
those beautiful Chinook salmon you 
ofter talk about, and not on the Pacific 
Coast but right here in the midwest, no 
doubt the result of the transfer of 
Chinook eggs from the Columbia River 
to here a few years back. The enclosed 
photograph depicts 'yours truly' with a 
22-pounder I caught from the upper 
Manistee this past September 19. '69. It 
measured 37 inches from nose to tail. 
I'll looking forward to the day when we 
in the midwest will be catching them as 
large as the west coast fish, say a 50- 
pounder or more." 

I'll say this. Adolph: "If the size at- 
tained by the Great Lakes Coho is any 
indication of the salmon's growth pat- 
tern, you midwesterners might well, some 
day. come up with a record fish — both 
Coho and Chinook. At this point; com- 
paratively speaking. I think that the Coho 
of the Great Lakes is a larger fish than 
the Pacific Coast species, no doubt due 
to two factors: The preponderence of 
alewife as a food fish and the compara- 
tive lack of predators. Currently, the 
world record, sport-caught Coho is a 31- 
pounder; the largest Chinook a 92- 




Marino, center, grandson, and guide. 

■ Back Casts 

. . . According to a note from Frank 
J. Marino of Seymour, Connecticut, a 
member of Local 127, Derby, there's 
some mighty fine trout fishing up north 
in Maine. A past junket to Fish Lake 
out of Portage, Maine, netted better-than- 
pan-size beauties, largest of which was a 
lake trout which measured 22 inches and 
a brook trout which taped 17 inches 
down the back. Photograph shows Broth- 
er Marino, center, guide at right and 
grandson at left. 



■ }}« . 



"«-- . 



•:« 




Kormos and rainbows 

... A unique sub-specie of rainbow 
trout prevails in the high-country waters 
of California, the colorful Kern River 
rainbows. Here's a look-see at a nice 
catch of 'em, made by Brother Jake 
Kormos of Santa Ana, California. He 
caught them in a stretch of the Kern 
above Johnsondale in the Tule River 
District. 

. . . Chalk up a catch of flathead cat- 
fish for Brother Glen O. Arnold, retired 
member of Local 2435. Inglewood, Cali- 
fornia, and his brother-in-law Sid McFee 
of St. Joseph. Missouri. They trot-lined 
lake waters out of Altamont, Missouri, 
and the largest of the flathead weighed 
13 pounds; measured 31 inches down the 
back. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



. . . Top northern pike for Arnold 
Hoffman of Hamilton, Ontario, a mem- 
ber of Local 18, is a 34-incher he eased 
out of Georgian Bay near Pointe au 
Bleue. Anybody top that one lately? 
Brother Hoffman is pictured with his 
catch and boat. 




Hoffman and pike. 

■ Outdoor Clothing 

Clothes may make the man — a target 
for stinging insects. Some kinds of sar- 
torial splendor seem to infuriate bees, 
wasps, and hornets. 

It pays for the well-dressed gardener, 



hiker, or outdoorsman to choose his 
wardrobe with care if he wants to enjoy 
peaceful coexistence with his formidably 
armed neighbors. 

Nobody knows why these stinging in- 
sects have such pointed views on fash- 
ions, the National Geographic Society 
says. But man has become painfull), 
aware of some of them. 

Some man-made fibers, and black or 
dark clothes seem to enrage them into 
attacking, but not white or light-colored 
clothing. They seldom sting smooth fin- 
ished materials, but leather, suede, wool. 
or coarse weaves invite trouble. Sting- 
ing insects seem to be irritated by sweet- 
smelling people redolent of hair oil, 
tonics, cologne, strong perfume, and 
scented soap. But clothing with unpleas- 
ant odors, particularly from perspiration, 
is just as likely to provoke them. 

Armchair entomolgists have many 
theories on what brings out the worst in 
bees, wasps, hornets, and their flashy 
cousins, the yellow jackets. 

Bad weather comes in for a share of 
the blame: On windy days, for instance, 
they can't fly well enough to forage for 
food, so they take out their ill temper 
by stinging somebody. 

Many victims have learned the hard 
way that getting excited, jumping up and 
down, and flailing the arms around, or 
making swatting motions, are sure ways 
of provoking attack. 



Beekeepers advise the best thing to 
do when stinging insects threaten is to 
freeze, or better yet, relax and ignore 
them. It may take furious bees a while 
to cool off again. A man and wife in 
Memphis were besieged in their house 
for three weeks when he barricaded a 
swarm out of the hive they had made in 
a wall. And it's not easy to outrun bees. 
They have been clocked in flight at 13 
miles an hour. 

Stings, usually only annoying, can be 
deadly. Swarms of bees and wasps have 
stung horses to death. They kill more 
people than any other animal: in the 
United States at least 200 in the last 10 
years. Most human victims have an al- 
lergy to the venom or an acute sensitivity 
brought on by previous stings. Without 
treatment, they may die within hours 
from blood problems or breathing fail- 
ure. 

Yet a bee sting was credited with re- 
storing the hearing of a man deaf for 42 
years. Beekeepers have long touted stings 
as a cure for rheumatism, and doctors 
have investigated the venom for stopping 
chronic bleeding. 

Stinging insects are even used in war. 

In jungle fighting. Viet Cong soldiers rig 

booby traps with wasps' nests. 

• 

Practice the Rules of Safety 

When You're Outdoors. 



Precisely tapered 
claws make 
it easy to 
pull even 
headless 
nails. 



The hammer with the handle 
that packs its own punch 

...thanks to m3 irue iemper engineering. 

Fiberglass handle adds flex action to your swing, more drive 
to each stroke. 

Epoxy-bonded filaments of unidirectional glass 
libers deliver punch all their own. Head is 
permanently bonded to handle. 




True Temper manufactures a great 
variety of weights, shapes and claw 
designs so you can team the right hammer 
with the right job. 

J^Steel-Handled Rocket-' Hammer. 

With all the quality features 
Strong tubular steel handle. S&,' 
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Grip is cushioned for comfort, 
won't slip wet or dry — even 
in a gloved hand! 

J^Vibcrglass-Handled 
Hammer — 16 ounce. 
i IG16) 




Hand Sledge. Perfect for all-purpose use, 
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"You'll be glad you bought the best I 



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JUNE, 1970 



23 




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Reasoned Reason 

The father told his daughter as she 
left on a date, "I want you home no 
later than midnight!" 

"Really, father," protested the girl, 
"I'm no longer a child, you know!" 

"That's right," replied the father, 
"and that's why I want you home by 
midnight!" 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 




A Non-Union Job? 

There's nothing a woman appre- 
ciates more than a good strong man 
for a husband; one who will steady the 
stepladder for her while she paints 
the kitchen ceiling. 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

From Words to Worst 

In our trade, there are words that 
really don't mean what they say. Here 
are some of them. 

Batter board — Not a panel of cake 
mix experts. 

Rabbitt plane — Not transportation 
for Belgian hares nor for short hops. 

Field made jambs — Not job site- 
produced preserves. 

Strike plate — Not a dish for eating 
from during a labor dispute. 

Plumb bob — Not a name for an 
eater of certain fruit. 



Shutter — Not a reaction to possible 
layoff. 

Lintel — Not a building item for 
making soup during a layoff. 

Pile driver — Not a mixture of vodka 
and prune juice. 

Adz — Not a function of math-like 
"2 & 3 adz up to 5." 

Framing sguare — Not an uncom- 
forming conniving person. 

Router — Not a bouncer at a union 
meeting. 

Buck saw — Not a dollar item for 
doing carpentry. 

Nail set — Not a complete collection 
of finger tips. 

Jack plane — Not a tool for a man 
named Jack. 

Board — Not a term to tell what you 
are with your job. 

Rule — Not a golden thing to fold 
for your pocket. 

50' tape — Not a thing to tie a big 
break with. 

Wdw pane — Not a backache that 
one can see thru. 

Bench mark — Not your imprint on 
a seat on a jobsite. — Walter Marty- 
now, L.U. 982, Livonia, Mich. 

B SURE 2 VOTE! 

Not Wefl Matted 

The boyfriend was trying to get her 
to let him come in for awhile, but she 
said no. Pointing to the door mat, he 
said: "Am I supposed to ignore this 
door mat that says 'Welcome'?" 

"Of course, silly," she replied. 
'There's not room for us on that!" 



This Month's Limerick 

An athletic young lady named Bright 
Had a speed much faster than light. 

She went out one day 

In a relative way 
And returned on the previous night. 



Anger Was Escalated 

The absent-minded professor 
stepped into an open elevator shaft 
and fell three stories. He staggered 
to his feet, shook his fist at the ele- 
vator door and shouted: "You scoun- 
drel! I said UP!"— Harold Nieder, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 




Tell the Tooth, Dad! 

Two little brothers, one of whom 
had had a tooth pulled, went to bed 
with hopes the Tooth Fairy would 
leave money under the pillow. After 
he thought them asleep, the father 
went on hands and knees to put the 
money under the pillow. The brother 
who hadn't had the tooth pulled was 
awake and saw him. Sitting up, he 
accused: "Gee, Dad, what are you 
doing, robbing the kid?" — Florence 
Wetter, Algonac, Mich. 

R U GOIN 2 D UNION MEETING? 

Case of Double-Think 

One husband said to the other: 
"What do you mean, that you have 
to think twice before leaving your 
wife alone nights?" 

"First I have to think of a reason 
to go out," replied the second. "Then 
I have to think up a reason why she 
can't go with me!" 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



Labor's Role Urged 
In Low Cost Housing 

The role that organized labor can 
play in helping the development of 
low-income housing was discussed 
by more than 50 union representa- 
tives from Missouri who met recent- 
ly under the joint sponsorship of the 
Missouri State Labor Council, the 
Columbia-Jefferson City Building 
and Construction Trades Council 
and the U.S. Office of Economic Op- 
portunity. 

Miss Sandy McCaw of the OEO 
said that unions could sponsor low- 
income housing for the elderly poor; 
could invest treasury and pension 
funds into a loan investment trust, 
and could endorse and operate job 
training and job opportunity pro- 
grams in connection with subsidized 
housing. 

John Hardy of the Urban League 
said that labor had played an im- 
portant role in making housing 
needs known and that it could help 
further in the rehabilitation of exist- 
ing structures so that the poor could 
afford to buy or rent them. 

Co-chairmen of the conference 
were President Vincent J. Van 
Camp of the State Labor Council 
and President Charles Wilcox of the 
Building Trades Council. 

How to Add 10 
Years to Your Life 

A noted authority on aging told a 
Cleveland, Ohio, audience here that 
people no longer become old until 
they have reached 75 years of age. 
For this reason, D. J. Kreps urges 
that the retirement a»e be moved up 
to 75. 

"Early retirement is a very ex- 
pensive business," said Dr. Kreps, 
pointing out that a man retiring at 
age 65 can expect to live 13 more 
years with very little income. 

"Who has to take care of the 
older retiree?" Dr. Kreps asked. 
"You, the taxpayer, in one way or 
another. Either directly because they 
are your parents, or indirectly 
through your increased taxes." 

Dr. Kreps also suggested increas- 
ing vacation periods, retraining em- 
ployees nearing retirement age, and 
providing part-time jobs for those 
70 or more. 




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JUNE, 1 970 



25 



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Balance & Finish 



flhliu 

Exclusive Nylon 
Vinyl Deep 
Cushion Safe- 
T-Grip Molded 
on Permanently 




E3-22SM 

Milled Face 

16 oz. Handle 



^te-7 



Drywall 
Hammer 




These and Other Quality Estwing Tools 
Are Available At Leading Hardware, 
Lumber And Building Supply Dealers. 



Estwing 



2647-8th 
Mfg. 10. Dept. C-6 

Rockford, III. 61101 




Back Pack Tool Box 

The Back Pack Tool Box is made from .063 gauge, 
50-52 H32 aluminum. The corners are heliarc welded 
for strength. The fillers are made from '/ 8 in. ma- 
sonite with I '/ 2 in. industrial elastic holders, snap 
riveted. It has double latches which can be pad- 
locked, and heavy duty fiberglass handle. Back 
Pack belts are made from waterproof webbing with 
steel buckles. 

This box is Union made and has a Patent Pending. 
It is designed for all carpenters, dam and bridge 
workers and house builders. It holds a complete line 
of any major brand of hand tools for carpenters. 
This tool box can be carried anywhere like a suit- 
case. The back pack feature is for men working in 
high places, enabling them to use both hands for 
climbing ladders, etc. It is very compact and easy 
to use. 

This box will give you years of service. All tools 
can be seen at a glance and easily removed. The 
savings made in lost tools will more than compensate 
for the less than 15 cents per working day cost of 
the tool box. This is based on 250 working days for 
I year. It weighs approximately 44'/j lbs. completely 
stocked. It is 14 in. wide, 34 in. long and 4 in. thick. 
The price of this box is $36.50 ppd. Check or 
money order, no C. O. D. 's. This price does not 
include the tools. Immediate shipment, satisfaction 
guaranteed. Distributors wanted, write for price list. 

List of Tools This Box Will Hold 



2 hand saws 

1 hammer 

1 25, 50 or 100 ft. tape 

1 6 to 16 ft. tape 

1 wood rule 

1 keyhole saw 

1 tri-sauare 

pencils 

nail punches 
1 chalk box 

1 6 or 7 in. block plane 
1 plumb bob 

chisels 
1 24 or 30 in. level 
1 2 ft. framing square 



All spaces for tools are clearly labeled. 



1 sweep brace 

chalk line 
1 10 or 12 in. crescent wrench 
1 hatchet 
1 side cutter 
1 vise grip 
1 18 in. pry bar 
1 nail claw 

1 24 in. extension bit 
1 expansion bit 
13 wood bits, 1 in. to 3 /e in. 
1 bevel square 
1 to 3 screwdrivers 
1 small tin snip 



Aluminum Box Company 

Cusick, Washington 99119 
Phone 445-2541 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Social Security Benefits To Students 
Exceeds Scholarships to All Colleges 



The 1965 Amendments to the 
Social Security Act provide that a 
child can be entitled to child's in- 
surance benefits if he, in addition 
to meeting other requirements, is 
a full-time student. A "full-time 
student" is one who is in full-time 
attendance as a student at an educa- 
tional institution. 

One-half a million students age 
18 to 22 get $36 million a month 
in social security benefits because 
they are in school and are the chil- 
dren of retired, deceased, or dis- 
abled workers. This amounts to 
more than the scholarships at all the 
colleges and universities in the 
country. 

Approximately five months pre- 
ceding the month a child beneficiary 
attains age 18, a notice concerning 
the child will be sent to the payee 
on the child's behalf, or the bene- 
ficiary if he is his own payee. 



The advance notice informs the 
payee that benefits for the named 
beneficiary will terminate at age 18 
unless the child is a full-time student 
or has qualified for childhood dis- 
ability benefits, and instructs the 
payee that if he believes the child's 
benefits should continue because the 
child is a full-time student, a sepa- 
rate form must be completed by the 
child and returned by mail or in 
person to their Social Security Dis- 
trict Office. 

In some instances, verification of 
the student's full-time attendance 
must be obtained from the educa- 
tional institution, and in some cases 
the student's allegation is sufficient. 
In either case, the forms should be 
completed and returned to the near- 
est Social Security District Office 
promptly to assure that the child's 
benefits will not be interrupted un- 
necessarily. 



In addition, a child over age 18 
who is receiving student benefits 
should complete and submit the re- 
quired form as soon as possible in- 
dicating his intent to resume full- 
time attendance the next school 
term. His benefits will continue dur- 
ing the period of non-attendance. 
Verification will be obtained in some 
cases, however, when full-time at- 
tendance resumes the next school 
term. 

Repossession Gimmicks 

Continued from page 16 

most cases. And dealers would do 
so were they to keep any surplus. 

"There should be no debt actions 
and no deficiency claims permitted 
as a result of the retail-installment 
sale of automobiles. At the very 
least, wage garnishment and prop- 
erty execution should be abolished as 
immoral or viewed as activities in 
which the state has an interest such 
as warrants the interposition of coun- 
sel for the public in every case." 




File Saws Easily 

AUTOMATICALLY 



You don't need special training or previous experience to get per- 
fect, sharp blades with the Foley Automatic Saw Filer. Operation 
is simple — you just follow easy step by step instructions. "The 
first saw I sharpened with my Foley Filer came out 100%," writes 
Clarence E. Parsons. This model is the first and only machine that 
precision files hand, band and both "combination" and cross-cut 
circular saws. It's so mechanically accurate it's used by saw- 
manufacturers! Takes minimum space in corner of shop. 

Set up in Basement or Garage 

Foley can show you how to establish your own saw filing service in your 
basement or garage. A small cash payment puts a new Foley Saw Filer in 
your hands. The profits you make easily handle the low monthly payments. 
Operating expense is low — only 70 for files and electricity to turn out a com- 
plete saw filing job. Mail coupon now for money-making facts and business- 
building ideas. No salesman will call. 



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"Money Making Facts" 



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FOLEY MFG. CO. 

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time payment plan. 



618-0 Foley Bldg. • Minneapolis, Minnesota 55418 

"Money Making Facts" and details on easy 



Narne- 



Address- 



City_ 



_State_ 



_Zip_ 



JUNE, 1970 



i 

27 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Hager Helps Draft 
Safety Standard 

Sawmill workers involved in such 
potentially dangerous operations as log 
and lumber handling, sawing, trimming 
and planing will receive improved pro- 
tection of health hazards and injuries 
through application of the recently pub- 
lished American National Standard Safe- 
ty Requirements for Sawmills. 

The new American National Stand- 
ards Institute document was developed in 
12 months to meet urgent needs of that 
industry. Assisting in the formulation 
of the ANSI standard was Peter Hager. 
an active member of the sawmill safety 
committee. Hager is a United Brother- 
hood representative. 

The standard is designed to provide 
sawmill operators and owners with safety 
guidelines and to provide regulatory gov- 
ernment agencies with performance re- 
quirements that can be adopted as safety 
regulations or used in the formulation of 
similar regulation. In addition, the stand- 
ard covers safety requirements for waste 
disposal, operation of dry kilns, finishing, 
shipping, storage, yard and yard equip- 
ment, and for power tools and affiliated 
equipment used in sawmill operations. 

Local 2947 Member's 
Monuments in Wood 



Local 625 Honors Josapliat Lavallee 




Josaphat Lavallee, for several years recording secretary of Local 625, Manchester, 
New Hampshire, has been honored with a special testimonial dinner. Lavallee was 
recently chosen as government inspector on a nine-story high rise building in Man- 
chester. Pictured, from left: Seated — David A. Meserve, Local 625 president; Mrs. 
David A. Meserve; Mrs. Josaphat Lavallee, and honored guest Josaphat Lavallee. Sec- 
ond row — Raymond Chartier, business agent of Local 1616. Nashua, N. H.; Alphee- 
E. Jam-llc, vice president of Local 625; Aime Lemay. trustee of Local 625; Alphee-O. 
Lavallee, recording secretary of Local 625 and son of Josaphat; and Louis-Israel Mar- 
tel, financial secretary-treasurer and business agent of Local 625. 

1000 Attend Philadelphia COPE Banquet 




t^_ : 

Vincent Signoretto, a member of Car- 
penters Local 2947, New York, N. Y., 
is shown with two fine examples of his 
hobby. Signoretto constructs various his- 
torical monuments in wood. These two 
models, intricately carved likenesses of the 
Eiffel Tower and the Leaning Tower of 
Pisa, are among his recent projects. 



Among the 1,000 trade unionists attending Philadelphia COPE's twenty-first annual 
banquet April 11 were, from left: Robert P. Casey, auditor general of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania and gubernatorial candidate in the 1970 Democratic primary; 
Robert Gray, secretary-treasurer of the Carpenters' Metropolitan District Council 
of Philadelphia and Vicinity and vice president of the Philadelphia Council AFL-CIO 
and member of board of Directors of Philadelphia COPE; and Richard S. Schweker, 
United States Senator from Pennsylvania. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



New Millwright 
Local in Tucson 

General Representative Ben Collins in- 
stalled the charter for the new Mill- 
wright and Machinery Erectors Local 
1182 on February 28. 1970. The Tucson, 
Arizona local had its election and in- 
stallation of officers on March 7. 

These officers have been elected: E. 
Lou Heath, business representative and 
financial secretary; Andrew Rendes, 
president; Richard Palmer, vice-president; 
J. Mills Gillespie, recording secretary; 
Edward Arnold, treasurer; George 
Friend, conductor; Donald Thompson, 
warden; Donald Decker. Jess Grover and 
John Sandoval, trustees. 



Senior Members Honored in Middletown 




Gen. Represetative Ben Collins turns the 
meeting over to President-elect Andrew 
Rendes. 




E. Lou Heath, newly elected Business 
Representative of Local 1182. 




Gen. Representative Ben Collins pre- 
sents charter to L. C. Wardlow, acting 
president for Millwright and Machinery 
Erectors Local 1182, Tucson, Arizona. 




Local 1477 Middletown, Ohio, honored its senior members recently at a pin presenta- 
tion party. The honorees, and their tenure of service, are (shown from left): Front 
row — Riley Freeze, Jr., 28 years; .lames Branham, 28 years; Rolla Harrison, 34 years; 
Brack Amyx, the local's first 50 year member; Ervin Watkins, 47 years; Owne Ham- 
mond, 32 years; Harold Wise, 29 years. Back row — Tony Wells, 34 years, Melvin 
Shatto, 29 years; John Miller, 28 years; Norman Knott, 33 years; Guy Kelly, 34 years; 
Hobart Duff, 44 years; Charles Gentry, 27 years; Guy Smothers, 27 years, and Winfred 
Gevedon, 27 years. 

1901 Minute Books Presented to 
Local 927 At 68th Anniversary Celebration 

Earlier this year Local 927, Dan- 
bury, Connecticut, recognized its 
sixty-eighth anniversary with a din- 
ner dance. 

An interesting sidelight to the 
occasion was the presenting of old 
minute books to the Local by Broth- 
er Franz Dufner. Brother Dufner 
had purchased an old house, and in 
looking through the old Structure, Presentation of the old minutes. Shown 
found the books dating back to from left: George Perdrizet 50 yr.mein- 
lnA1 ., , • , ° T , a -t ber; P. Walter Smigala, Pres.; Arthur 

1901, the year in which Local 927 Davis Jr Genera| Represenfa , ive . Franz 

was chartered. Dufner. who gave the books to the Local. 





Officers of Local 927. Seated, left to right: Robert Gore. Sr.. recording secretary; An- 
tone Arnold, vice president; P. Walter Smigala. president; George Perdrizet, 50 yr. 
member; Anthony Sehirmer. conductor. Standing: H. William Condra. warden; Wil- 
liam Christman, trustee; Clifford Cole, trustee and Bus. Rep.; Arthur Davis, Jr., gen- 
eral representative; Robert Mooney, president Conn. State Council of Carpenters; 
Herman Koch, trustee. Not included are Wilbur Maclntyre. treasurer and Fred 
Felisimo, Financial Secretary. 



JUNE, 1970 



29 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 

(1) EAST ORANGE, NJ. — Local 
Union 349 celebrated its 75th anniversary 
recently with a dinner held at the Local's 
Meeting Hall. At that celebration mem- 
bers were presented with 50 and 25 years 
Membership Pins. They are, front left: 
Gunnard Skaad, 25 years; Thore Bensen, 
25 years; Edvin Berg, 25 years; President 
Eugene O'Horo; General Representative 
Robert Ohlweiler, who presented the pins; 
Joseph Poliseno, 25 years, and Joseph 
Milne, 50 years. Three other members 
not in photo also received 50 year pins: 
Frank Farrell, Conrad Anderson, and 
John Lloyd. 

(2) General Representative Robert Ohl- 
weiler presented 50 year Membership Pin 
to Brother Joseph Milne. Brother Joe is 
an active member of Local 349 and 
attends and takes part in most of the 
meetings. 

(3) TAMPA. FLORIDA — Several mem- 
bers of Local 696 were recently presented 
with 25 year service pins. Following pres- 
entation, refreshments were served by 
members of Ladies Auxiliary 187. Those 
shown are, from left: Front row — G. J. 
Heaton, J. R. Reed, A. Rendules, C. 
H. Haskell, Frank Pelaez, Manuel Pelaez, 
Manuel Gonzalez, Wade Thompson, E. 
E. Tucker, and E. E. Ilellin. Back row — 
W. R. Sanders, Joe Lopez, D. Amador, 
P. Ciccarello, Ellis Champion, and Frank 
Castellano. 





(4) GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN— 

A 60 year pin was recently presented to 
Local 335 Member Harry Knoll. Making 
presentation was Keith Clinton, secretary- 
treasurer of the Southwest District Coun- 
cil. Shown in picture surrounding them 
are members of the Local 335 Executive 
Board. They are, from left: Marvin Ver 
Hage, trustee; Don Van Maldegen, 
trustee; Kenneth Benoit, warden; Don 
Morgan, treasurer; Larry Hamelink, 
president; Robert Schober, recording 
secretary; Herald Andrus, trustee; Con- 
rad Hampel, conductor; and David R. 
Cain, business representative and financial 
secretary. 

(5) LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA— Local 

846 recently celebrated its fiftieth an- 



niversary with a party, at which time 
presentations were made to several 
pioneer members of the local. Brother 
George Bengough awarded 25 year pins 
to four members and presented cuff links 
to six other past officers for long service. 
Shown here, from left, standing behind 
their wives are: Wm, Rull. rep. of Local 
1569, Medicine Hat; Gerald Litchfield, 
president of Lethbridge Labor Council; 
Lethbridge Mayor Andy Anderson; Pat 
Matei. Int'l. Rep. representting Alberta; 
Mr. Smith, representing Local 1779, Cal- 
gary; Roy Berlando, recording secretary 
and business agent of Local 846; and Joe 
Leroy, president of Local 846. 

(6) PALO ALTO, CALIF.— Local 668 
recently held a mortgage-burning cere- 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



mony and awarded members with 25 
year pins. After the ceremony, refresh- 
ments and dancing were enjoyed by mem- 
bers and their guests. Pictured front row. 
left to right: G. Anderson; T. Johnson; 
S. Goodman; O. B. Landman; H. Toll- 
ner; T. B. Hagood; A. L. Ramos, secre- 
tary-treasurer California State Council 
of Carpenters; J. Powers, business agent; 
back row, left to right: C. E. Nichols, 
8th District Board Member; J. Hendrix; 
I. L. Brecunier; F. Ross; A. B. Bodi, Edi- 
tor, Palo Alto Times (newspaper); R. 
Gattoni; P. R. Holmes, attorney at law; 
J. Dodson; E. Schultz, president of Local 
668. 

(7) MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN — 
Millmen's and Cabinetmakers Local 1053 
recently celebrated their 65th anniversary, 
at which time 25-year service pins were 
given. In this picture are the officers and 
honored guests, left to right: Sylvester 
Collins, vice president of the local and 
recipient of 25-year pin; Edward Koepke. 
financial secretary of the local; John R. 
Goebel, 25 years, Ray Gazinski. secretary 
of Carpenter's District Council; Charles 
Rosenau, Jr., president of the local; 
Ronald Stadler, president of Wisconsin 
State Council; Chet Hansen, secretary- 
treasurer of Wisconsin State Council; 
Otis Motz, 25 years and Fred Widder. 
25 years. 

(8) CLEVELAND, OHIO— Many mem- 
bers of Local 1108 were recently pre- 
sented service pins for service of 25, 30, 
35, 40, 50, 60, and 65 years. Those 
honored include (not necessarily in the 
order shown.and not all present): 25 year 
pins — Thomas Botosan, Alex Domonkos, 
Louis Emrich, Einar Enroth, John Holick, 
Joseph Kammerer. Joseph 1. under. Louis 
Lunder, Elmer Schowerth, Bernard Tell- 
ing, Matt Tabor, John Kish, Delberl 
Miller, Stanley Lewand, William Lear, 
Roy Eberly, Feodore Inkila, John Isen- 
berg, George Watt, Ola Pate, John Kloos, 
Louis Forsthoffer, Nelson Pepke, Leonard 
Muttick. 30 Year Pins — F. A. Brodess. 
Del Cameron, Alex Haggblom, Marvin 
Hepner, Walton Jamison, Yirl Kizzire, 
Albert Kolanz, Eugene Laiho, Galdwin 
Lewis, Joseph Molnar. Louis Monica, 
Lowell Ness, Henry Rechner. Enoch 
Sandwich, Walter Schatschneider, Bernard 
Schulz, Joseph Smith. Maurice Ward. 
35 Year Pins — Paul Fournier. Halagam. 
George Lippert, Charles Pekarek, A. R. 
Ruppelt, Louis Schmidt, Fred Scholl, 
Jess Smith, Carl J. L'hinck. 40 Year 
Pins — Einar Vige and William Loehr. 
50 Year Pins — Alex Toom, T. B. Chris- 
tensen, and Leroy Mumford. 60 Year 
Pin — Earl Lapp. 65 Year Pin — Axel 
Johnson. 

(9) ALLENTOWN, PENNA. — Local 
368 recently honored its members with 
40 or more years of service to the Broth- 
erhood. Those receiving service pins and 
certificates were: from left: Francis Dreis- 
bach, 56 years; John B. Roberts, 47 years; 
Willis F. Schmoyer, 41 jears; Edison M. 
Brewen, 47 years; Solomon W. Smitli, 




53 years; Harry A. Schweyer, 47 years; 
Oliver I. Shaeffer, 41 years; President 



William Thomas, and Vice President 
Ronald Hoke. 



JUNE, 1970 



31 



Monthly Membership Contributions To The 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 






■ Since the last "CLIC" report in the May issue, three states have held 
their annual conventions and responded handsomely; there has also been 
one political conference, which was held at Rutgers University in New 
Jersey. At this meeting, the delegates contributed a total of $460.00 to 
the program. 

At the New York State Convention held during April, those in attendance 
contributed $750.00 to be deposited in the political fund. Also in April, the 
delegates to the Oregon Convention contributed $520.00 to "CLIC." 

Kansas State held its convention during May, with the delegates contrib- 
uting $650.00 to be added to the campaign fund. 

Daily, we are receiving requests from Congressional campaigns for finan- 
cial assistance. We hope that all local unions will make an effort to get 
their returns in as soon as possible so we may help our friends who need us. 

Remember that the election will cover the entire 435 seats in the House 
and 37 Senate seats. From this it can be readily seen that we do need 
greater participation in "CLIC" at the local union level. 

Each dollar contributed helps to insure the election of Congressmen 



L.U. 


City and State 

MICHIGAN 


Amount 


337 


Detroit 


10.00*(a) 


982 


Detroit 

MISSOURI 


18.00(a) 


61 


Kansas City 


147.00*(a) 


1635 


Kansas City 

MONTANA 


10.00* 


718 


Havre 

NEW JERSEY 


2.00 


15 


Hackensack . 


40.00(a) 


23 


Dover 


20.00* 


65 


Perth Amboy 


21.00 


155 


Plainfield 


10.00* 


325 


Paterson 


20.00* 


349 


Orange 


10.00* 


393 


Camden 


20.00* 


429 


Montclair 


20.00* 


432 


Atlantic City 


10.00* (a) 


455 


Somerville 


30.00* 


490 


Passaic 


20.00* (a) 


620 


Madison 


50.00* 


1006 


New Brunswick 


10.00* 


1209 


Newark 


10.00* 


1489 


Burlington 


150.00* 


1493 


Pompton Lakes 


20.00* 


1613 


Newark 


10.00* 


2018 


Lakewood 


10.00* (a) 


2250 


Red Bank 


180.00* 



NEW MEXICO 

1319 Albuquerque 127.00(a) 



and 


Senators favorable to 


the interests of 


the wage earners of 


America. 




NEW YORK 




Let's 


all do our part. ■ 










6 


Amsterdam 


10.00* 












9 


Buffalo 


50.00* (a) 










~;-- - 


~ ! :i 


12 
66 


Syracuse 
Jamestown 


10.00* 
10.00* 














72 
117 


Rochester 
Albany 


10.00* 
20.00* 




CLIC CONTRIBUTIONS 


L.U. 


City and State 


Amount 


135 


New York 


30.00* (a) 




(as of May 15, 1970) 




916 


Aurora 


10.00* 


146 


Schenectady 


20.00* 


L.U. 


City and State 


Amount 


1185 


Chicago 


61.00 


163 


Peekskill 


10.00* 




ALABAMA 




1883 


Macomb 


79.00 


188 


Yonkers 


10.00* 






1922 


Chicago 


57.00 


229 


Glens Falls 


10.00* 


103 


Birmingham $ 


100.00(a) 


2158 


Rock Island 


100.00(a) 


246 


New York 


40.00* (a) 


1192 


Birmingham 


30.00 




IOWA 




257 
278 


New York 
Watertown 


620.00* 
30.00* 




ALASKA 




1069 


Muscatine 


6.00 


284 


New York 


84.00(a) 


1243 


Fairbanks 


20.00 


1260 


Iowa City 


100.00 


289 


Lockport 


10.00* 








1835 


Waterloo 


100.00 


298 


New York 


10.00* 




CALIFORNIA 










310 


Norwich 


10.00* 


42 


San Francisco 


35.00(a) 




KANSAS 




322 


Niagara Falls 


10.00* 


483 


San Francisco 


158.00(a) 


168 


Kansas City 


60.00* 


323 


Beacon 


10.00* 


1062 


Santa Barbara 


62.00(a) 


201 


Wichita 


60.00* 


350 


New Rochelle 


20.00* 


1147 


Roseville 


28.00 


499 


Leavenworth 


10.00* 


353 


New York 


10.00* 








714 


Olathe 


30.00* 


357 


Islip 


70.00(a) 




CONNECTICUT 




750 


Junction City 


20.00* 


366 


New York 


10.00* 


30 


New London 


40.00 


797 


Kansas City 


10.00* 


385 


New York 


10.00* 


196 


Greenwich 


80.00 


918 


Manhattan 


10.00* 


488 


New York 


30.00* 








1212 


Coffeyville 


10.00* 


574 


Middletown 


10.00* 




COLORADO 




1224 


Emporia 


30.00* 


608 


New York 


20.00* 


2249 


Adams Co. 


10.00* 


1445 


Topeka 


70.00* (a) 


689 


Dunkirk 


10.00* 


— 






1529 


Kansas City 


70.00* 


700 


Corning 


10.00* 




WASHINGTON, D. C 




1542 


Dodge City 


20.00* 


747 


Oswego 
Fulton 


10.00* 


2311 


Washington 


12.00 


1587 
1724 


Hutchison 
Liberal 


21.65* 
30.00* 


754 


10.00* (a) 




FLORIDA 




1926 
2279 


Chanute 
Lawrence 


10.00* 
20.00*(a) 


791 
950 


New York 
New York 


10.00* 
10.00* 


1394 


Fort Lauderdale 


10.00(a) 


2417 


Osawatomie 


20.00* 


1038 


Ellenville 


10.00* 


1685 


Pineda 


52.00(a) 


3234 


Hays 


20.00* 


1042 


Plattsburgh 


20.00* 


1725 


Daytona Beach 


40.00 








1134 


Mt. Kisco 


30.00* 


2024 
2217 


Miami 
Lakeland 


10.00(a) 
41.00(a) 


101 


MARYLAND 

Baltimore 


60.00 


1135 
1151 


Port Jefferson 
Batavia 


10.00*(a) 
10.00* 




GEORGIA 






MASSACHUSETTS 




1162 


College Point 


10.00* 


256 


Savannah 


45.00(a) 


48 


Fitchburg 


10.00*(a) 


1164 

1167 


New York 
Smithtown Branch 


10.00* 
60.00 




ILLINOIS 




111 
390 


Lawrence 
Holyoke 


100.00(a) 
20.00 


1204 


New York 


60.00 


13 


Chicago 


10.00* 


680 


Newton 


16.00(a) 


1292 


Huntington 


10.00* 


341 


Chicago 


30.00 


867 


Milford 


20.00(a) 


1456 


New York 


50.00* (a) 


839 


Des Plaines 


93.00(a) 


.1210 


Salem 


6.00(a) 


1483 


Patchogue 


49.00 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. City and State 



1508 
1511 
1536 
1577 
1649 
1704 
1772 
1837 
1973 
2161 
2163 
2241 
2287 



Lyons 

Southampton 

New York 

Buffalo 

Woodhaven 

Carmel Kent 

Hicksville 

Babylon 

Riverhead 

Catskill 

New York 

Brooklyn 

New York 



OHIO 



105 Cleveland 

248 Toledo 

1359 Toledo 

1426 Elyria 

OKLAHOMA 

329 Oklahoma City 

OREGON 

190 Klamath Falls 

226 Portland 

573 Baker 

583 Portland 

738 Portland 

1020 Portland 

1065 Salem 

1096 Coquille 

1120 Portland 

1273 Eugene 

1277 Bend 



Amount 

27.50 
10.00* 
20.00* 
40.00 
100.00 
10.00* 
10.00*(a) 
10.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
30.00 
10.00* 



65.00(a) 
10.00 
10.00 
21.00 



10.00* (a) 



10.00* 

10.00*(a) 

10.00* 

10.00* 

50.00* 

70.00* 

10.00* 

20.00* 

30.00* 

60.00* 

10.00* 



L.U. 

1388 
1857 
1896 
2067 
2133 
2181 
2416 
2896 
3064 



342 



City and State 

Oregon City 

Portland 

The Dalles 

Medford 

Albany 

Corvallis 

Portland 

Lyons 

Toledo 





PENNSYLVANIA 


122 


Philadelphia 


422 


New Brighton 


501 


Stroudsburg 


541 


Washington 


838 


Sunbury 


843 


Jenkintown 


1823 


Philadelphia 



RHODE ISLAND 

Pawtucket 



TENNESSEE 

50 Knoxville 

74 Chattanooga 
1357 Memphis 
1818 Clarksville 

TEXAS 

3106 San Antonio 

VIRGINIA 

1665 Alexandria 



Amount 

30.00* 
30.00* 
40.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
36.00* 
10.00* 
21.00 



73.00 

30.00 

15.00 

20.00(a) 

19.00 

31.00 

10.00 



23.00 



50.00(a) 
20.00 
20.00(a) 
20.00 



20.00 



42.00 



L.U. 

98 
131 
338 
1289 
2498 
2805 
3185 



1159 



City and State 

WASHINGTON 

Spokane 

Seattle 

Seattle 

Seattle 

Longview 

Klickitat 

Creosote 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Point Pleasant 



Amount 

10.00* 
113.00 
10.00* 
44.00(a) 
30.00 
10.00* 
10.00* 



20.00 



WISCONSIN 

820 Wisconsin Rapids 
2073 Milwaukee 

WYOMING 

469 Cheyenne 

585 Cody 

1261 Jackson 

1384 Sheridan 

1432 Laramie 

1564 Casper 

1620 Rock Springs 

TOTAL $6,329.15 

* Includes contributions from delegates rep- 
resenting their local unions at the state 
council conventions. In some instances 
these convention contributions were the 
only monies received from the local un- 
ions. 

(a) In addition to monies previously con- 
tributed to the 1970 "CLIC" program. 



10.00 
18.00(a) 



15.00 
10.00 
1.00 
10.00 
20.00 
44.00(a) 
10.00 



Canadians Study 
Auto Insurance Moves 

The first New Democratic govern- 
ment in Canada is going ahead with 
a public auto insurance plan which 
is expected to cut auto insurance 
premiums as much as 20 percent while 
providing improved benefits. 

The private insurance agents are 
up in arms against the proposal but 
the trade union movement is solidly 
supporting it. The principle of a pub- 
lic auto compensation plan was ap- 
proved by the Canadian Labor Con- 
gress three years ago. 

At present about $30 million is col- 
lected in premiums by the private auto 
insurance carriers. Of this amount, 
about 67 percent is paid out in claims, 
about 33 percent goes to expenses, 
commissions and profits. 

Under public insurance which is 
already in effect in the neighboring 
province of Saskatchewan, only 17 
percent would go to expenses, the 
balance in payment of claims. 

But the important difference be- 
tween public and private insurance is 
that the former pays claims regardless 
of fault and without court action. The 
savings in legal costs as well as worry 
and heartbreaks is substantial. 





151 



®Gu«ftOOL«oo 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who. in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



SCHOLARSHIP-Robert L. Dugwyler, Jr., 
a student at Lincoln High School, Ta- 
coma, Washington, has been awarded a 
four-year college scholarship by the AFL- 
CIO, President George Meany announced 
today. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert L. Dugwyler, 4060 Tacoma Ave- 
nue South. 



His scholarship is 




Dugwyler 



one of six spon- 
sored by the labor 
federation under 
Ihe National Merit 
Scholarship Pro- 
gram. Their value 
ranges up to $6,000 
over the four years. 
Dugwyler. who 
will major in math- 
ematics at Stanford 
University. Palo 
Alto, California, is 



editor of his school newspaper and a 
prize-winning member of the debating 
club. He also has won awards for his 
original poetry and for his achievements 
in mathematics. 

His father, employed by the MacDon- 
ald Construction Company, is a member 
of Local 470 of the Carpenters Union. 

"We in labor are proud to help spon- 
sor this program," Meany declared. "We 
believe that these youngsters are among 
America's most vital assets, and that our 
whole society benefits when they are given 
a chance to develop their full potential. 

"The impressive record made by pre- 
vious winners of AFL-CIO Merit Schol- 
arships is the evidence that underlies our 
conviction that every student should have 
the same opportunity and our determina- 
tion to help create a society in which that 
goal will be realized." 



JUNE, 1970 



33 



What's New in 

Apprenticeship 

& Training 




Savings Bonds Awarded to Top Three 
Apprentice Contest Winners 




Ml ■ 1* 

The Memphis Carpenters Apprentice Training Program held its annual local contest 
on Saturday, April 11, 1970, with three 4th year carpenter apprentices competing. 
Buford Shaw McCormick was selected as first place winner and represents Memphis 
in the Tennessee State Carpenters Apprentice Contest. Prizes awarded to top three 
winners were U. S. Saving Bonds plus a set of chisels for each contestant. Shown here 
are, from left: William V. Hood, director of apprenticeship and training, Memphis 
Carpenters Apprentice Training Program; Roy Eugene Burrow, second place winner; 
Buford Shaw McCormick, first place winner; H. W. Green, business agent, Carpenters 
Local 345; and Thomas Wayne Henry, third place winner. 

Journeymen Certificates Presented to 
Southeastern Arizona Graduates 




The Southeastern Arizona Carpenters' Joint Apprenticeship Committee presented 
Journeyman Certificates during a banquet at the University of Arizona, on April 26, 
1970 to 24 apprentices who had successfully completed four years of training. Part 
of the class is shown in the picture. Seated, left to right: Guadalupe L. Valencia, 
Oscar A. Jaramillo, Jose Q. Escobar, Alex S. Gutierrez, and Roger D. Hill. Standing: 
Daniel Ramirez, Benny A. Ramos, Robert E. Kline, Jr., Daniel J. Hawkins, Ronald 
A. Harris, Gary D. Elliott, John W. Stum, James A. Carpenter, Richard R. Hollimon. 



Cleveland, Ohio, 
Reports Winners 

The Cleveland Carpenters' Joint Ap- 
prenticeship Committee held its appren- 
ticeship contest April 10. Working for 
five hours each of the four apprentices 
constructed his own wood-frame struc- 
ture. First place winner for quality work- 
manship was William A. Thomas, a grad- 
uate of John Marshall High School, 
member of Local 1108, and an em- 
ployee of Gerald B. Covey, general con- 
tractor. Thomas won the first prize of a 
SI 00 Savings Bond, an opportunity to 
represent Cleveland in the Ohio State 
Contest in Toledo on May 19 and 20, 
and a North American Rockwell power 
saw donated by Palevsky Industries. 
Thomas lives with his wife and child in 
North Olmsted. 

The other winners were: Richard 
Nadolny, Local 39, of Leonard Krill 
Company, second prize of $75 bond; 
Thomas Ardito. Local 1108, of R. A. R. 
Construction, third prize of a $50 bond; 
and LaVern Cookson, Local 1108, of 
United Insulation, fourth prize of a $25 
bond. 

Judges for the event were: Thomas J. 
Welo, business representative of the 
Carpenters' District Council; Eli Mahler, 
architect with the firm of Freemont and 
Mahler; and Art Abram of Zaremba & 
Sons. 

William Friedson, apprentice coordina- 
tor, supervised the contest. Forest City 
Material Company donated the supplies; 
North American Rockwell Company and 
Palevsky Industries, Inc., supplied the 
power equipment. 




Cleveland apprenticeship contest winner 
William A. Thomas, a member of Local 
1108, 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



St. Cloud, Minnesota Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee Holds Awards Banquet 



The St. Cloud, Minn., Carpenters and 
Joiners Joint Apprenticeship Completions 
and Awards Banquet was held at the 
Wagon Wheel in Waite Park on May 2. 

The following young men were pre- 
sented their journeyman carpenter certifi- 
cates: Kenneth Jockum, Allen Lahr, 
Dennis Hanerud, Douglas Yozamp, 
Gerald Shill, John G. Voight, Larry 
Pauly, Victor Lahr, LeRoy Hemminger, 
and Leonard Merdan. To qualify as a 
state certificated journeyman carpenter, 
these young men worked for 7000 hours 
for area contractors under the guidance 
of qualified carpenters and completed the 
evening school related training courses 
that include: mathematics, drafting, lay- 
out procedures, industrial relations, blue- 
print reading, job procedures, and job 
safety. James Wakefield, director of the 
St. Cloud Area Vocational-Technical 
School, presented the certificates. 

Awards were presented to the winners 
and runner-ups in the Carpenter Appren- 
tice Contest that was held on April 25, 
1970, at the Crossroads Shopping Center 
by Gene Kropp, a former member of the 
Apprenticeship Committee. These young 
men had completed a four-hour compre- 
hensive exam on carpentry on April 6, 
and the combined scores of this test and 



.-» 



the manipulative part of the contest 
held April 25 are used to determine the 
winners. The runner-ups are Dale Zika, 
John Welsh, Ron Botzer, and Roger 
Weyer. Second place Allen Walters, and 
First place Al Yamry. The first place 
winner will represent St. Cloud in the 
state contest in July. 

Honored guest were: the related training 
instructors, Jerome Strack, Ted Ferkinhoff, 
Robert Larson, and Robert Madeson. The 
apprenticeship committee, Floyd Cough- 
try, Floyd Stocker, Ted Ferkinhoff, rep- 
resenting Carpenters Local Union 930 
and Arnie Preusser, Leonard Koshoil, 
and Ralph Weiber, representing the St. 
Cloud Building Contractors, Ray Her- 
manson. Gene Kropp, and Jerome Strack 
who were the judges for the manipulative 
contest. James Wakefield, director of the 
vocational school, who presented the 
journeyman certificates. Rollie Carlson, 
manager of Crossroads Merchants Asso- 
ciation, who presented special certificates 
to the contestants. 

Harvey Paulson, President of the Min- 
nesota Building and Construction Trades 
Council AFL-CIO was the guest speaker. 

Robert Madeson, secretary to the ap- 
prenticeship committee was master of 
ceremonies for the banquet. 



o 



0^k 4ffejk 



'.-\ 







Left to right: Douglas Yozamp, Dennis Hanerud, Larry Pauly, Kenneth Jochum, 
LeRoy Hemminger, John G. Voight and Leonard Merdon. Not pictured, Adler Lahr 
Gerald Si hill, and Victor Lahr. These young men were presented their journeymen 
carpenter certificates at St. Cloud ceremonies. 






.; : .*>f 



/ 





Among the honored guests were, left to right. Ralph Weiber, Jerome Strack, Ted Ferk- 
inhoff. Rollie Carlson, Gene Kropp, Robert Madeson, Ray Henmonson, Leonard 
Koshoil, and Robert Larson. 




\ 



r. 




3 easy ways fo 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for oil electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes V4" 
to 3V, $.85 each. s /a" to 1", $.95 each. 1 >/s" 
to 1V 2 ", $1.50 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, 7 /a" to 
3". Only $5.00. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, 5 / e " to l 3 /4". Only $4.50. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes Va" to 
1 V2". As low as $1 .45 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.35 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. fd 

IRWIN Wil sz ,on ' 

every bit as good as the name 

Planer Molder Saw! 





Now you can use this ONE power feed shop 
to turn rough lumber into high-value mold- 
ings, trim, flooring, furniture . . . ALL pop- 
ular patterns. 

RIP... PLANE... MOLD .. .separately or all 
at once by power feed . . . with a one horse- 
power motor. Use 3 to 5 HP for high speed 
commercial output. 

LOW COST. . .You can own this money mak- 
ing power tool for only . . . $30.00 down. 
Send coupon today . . . No salesman will call 



BELSAW POWER TOOLS 

940H Field Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 64111 
Send me complete iacts on the MULTI- 
DUTY Power Tool. No obligation. 



Name 

Address- 
City 



.State- 



-Zip- 



JUNE, 1970 



35 




BE II PANELING EXPERT 

Take all the guesswork out of aligning 
and marking corner panels with our kit 
of rugged aluminum off-set jigs and 
marking gauges. 
Increase your speed 
and accuracy as you 
scribe perfect pan- 
els marked for a 
"pressed-in" fit. 
Panel-by-panel in- 
structions included 
for inside and out- 
side corners and for 
the location of cut- 
outs. Designed for 
plywood panels of 
V 4 " or less. Patented U.S.A. 

NOW . . . OFFSET JIGS FOR ROUTERS 

A Cut-in-Place method of fitting inside corner 
panels. The router takes the place of the 
marking guage or scriber and precisely cuts 
over 90°o of an 8 ft. panel. The remaining 3" 
at the top and bottom are trimmed in sec- 
onds. You can now do three hand operations 
(scribing, sawing and planing) in one fast 
accurate cut-in-place operation. Any router 
can be adapted to these special offset jigs, or 
you can order the complete kit including off- 
set jigs, STANLEY heavy duty, light weight, 
INDUSTRIAL router #91015, STANLEY U" car- 
bide tipped router bit, a non-marring router 
base, and complete instructions. All Cut-in- 
Place kits are designed lor plywood panels of 
V2" or less. 




D Offset jigs and marking guages. 
S9.95 Postpaid. (Calif, tax 500) 

□ Cut-in-Place jigs for your router. 
S6.95 Postpaid. (Calif, tax 35c) 

□ Cut-in-Place kit with offset jigs and 
STANLEY equipment listed. 

S69.95 Postpaid. (Calif, tax S3.50) 
Only Californians add sales tax. 
C.O.D. orders: you pay postage and charges. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 

COMMERCIAL TRIM & FIXTURE MEN 

A revolutionary new dolly 

for your tools! 

Heavy duty compact design -turns on a 
dime • jumps electric cords with ease 
quickly converts to a door dolly 'easily 
maneuvered in crowded areas. 

Detailed Construction Plans — S1.95. 
Check or M.O. Californians add IOC tax. 
Sorry, no C.O.D.s. 

PANELING SPECIALTIES CO. 

Box 11764 • Palo Alto, Calif. 94306 



Roseville, California, Apprentices 
Receive Welding Instructions 




The apprentice class of Roseville, California, Local 1147 is being taught to handle 
any aspect of the craft, and to do it well. This class is presently being taught welding, 
a subject very popular with the young men. Instruction in welding is given by Phil 
Harless, son of H. S. Harless, financial secretary and business agent of Local 1147, 
and is taught on the Sierra College campus in Rocklin. Pictured here, from left, are: 
Standing — H. S. Harless; Ed Bruins, apprentice instructor; Jim Pedersen, Lane Mor- 
gan, and David Horn, apprentice welders, and Phil Harless. Kneeling — apprentices 
Don De Roso, Reggie Cruz, Wayne Wagner, and Stan Troxel. 

Eighteen Earn Pre-Apprenticeship 
Certificates in Hartford MDTA Program 



ma — -" 






Eighteen young men from Hartford, Connecticut, have been presented their certifi- 
cates for successfully completing their eight-week pre-apprenticeship training, and are 
all now on the job with individual employers, commencing their formal training in 
carpentry. The pre-apprenticeship program, developed under the MDTA, was worked 
out jointly by Local 43 of the United Brotherhood, the Urban League of Greater 
Hartford, and the State Education Department, with the assistance of Charles Atkin- 
son, MDTA area coordinator for the United Brotherhood. Shown here are, from left: 
First row — Joseph L. Davis; James Burney; Arthur Brainard; George Wright; Michael 
A. Torruella; Samuel J. Smith, Jr.; James Williams; Raynell Lindsey; Lynwood New- 
ton. Second Row — John Finkler; George Deeds; Arthur Clark, Wesley Schenck; Rob- 
ert Perez; Albert Gomaley; Joseph W. Bumpers. Jr.; Clyde T. Walker; Rozzell N. 
Carney. Third Row — Francis MacDonald, business agent; Edward Haley, instructor 
coordinator; Edward MacDonald business, representative. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



j; 




MilliiiilMMin l/iJs 



I 

IMPROVED PLUMB BOB 




You might think that a plumb bob is 
a plumb bob, and that's the story. But 
a member of Local 1140. Harbor City, 
California, decided he could improve on 
that ancient tool. He did and has the 
patent to prove it. 

Brother Joe Prutch, San Pedro. Cali- 
fornia, has been issued a patent on a 
plumb bob which looks quite like a con- 
ventional bob on the outside. However, 
on the inside, he has made provision for 
a reel which holds the string for the 
plumb bob. Any amount of string can 
be pulled from the reel (up to capacity) 
and then secured so no more will come 
out. The plumb bob is then used in the 
customary fashion. The advantage is that 
there are no snarls, knots or problem 
of coiling up the cord when storing as 
is the case with the ordinary plumb bob. 

Bro. Prutch plans to market his im- 
proved plumb bob himself. For addi- 
tional information write him at 317 W. 
Sepulveda St.. San Pedro, Calif. 



PLEASE NOTE: A report on new products 
and processes on this page in no way con- 
stitutes an endorsement or recommendation. 
All performance claims are based on state- 
ments by the manufacturer. 



AUTOMATIC PROTRACTOR 

The "PRO" #700 Series Inclinometer 
(Automatic Protractor) that converts a 
carpenters square or any straight edge to 
a horizontal or vertical level and/or 
angle finder is announced by Pro Prod- 
ucts Co. Inc. 

The new unit, which operates on the 
principle of gravitational force, has a 
powerful magnetic in its base and can 
thus be quickly attached to any square 
or straight edge of ferrous material. In 
instances where an aluminum or wood 
square or straight edge is used, the auto- 
matic protractor can be affixed with two 
small screws. This multi-purpose Pro- 
tractor can be used individually by 
merely setting its magnetic base or side 
on the surface to be checked. Action of 
the dial indicator is not affected by the 
magnetic field and no oiling is ever 
needed. The instrument attaches mag- 
netically from the back or from the base. 

The instrument is also made available, 
as Model 700-V. which is provided with 
a sensitive spirit level vial as a means 
of providing a "Double Checking" means 
of the absolute starting position of the 
indicator. The Direct Reading Protractor 
provides accurate readings from 0° to 90° 
in any quadrant and is accurate to Vi 
of one degree. The "Double Check" vial 
provides a level "Double Checking" 
means to within 1/10 of one degree. 

Because it is a direct reading instru- 
ment and provides instant measurement 
of angles, the most experienced trades- 
man is relieved of determining angles by 
the conventional method of finding the 
hypotenuse when using a square or 
straight edge. 

An angle and grade chart is perma- 
nently attached to the back side of the 
housing, and shows degrees in angles 
converted to pitch per foot, pitch per 
inch as well as the formula for comput- 
ing rise and pitch of any angle. 

The #700 Pro Inclinometer is made 
of durable ABS high impact plastic to 
withstand the effects of heat and cold, 
and is highly shock-resistant. The unit 
measures 5"x4 3 /s" overall and the dial 



is 4" diameter protected by a clear plas- 
tic face. The base and left edge of the 
housing form a right angle, and these 
two members of the housing have both 
a scale in inches. The left side is provided 
with a V groove for using on pipe or 
round surfaces. 

Each protractor is packed in a color- 
ful peg-board merchandiser illustrating 
the many uses on the front and back. 
They are available in black only. The 
#700 retails for $8.95. The #700-V at 
$9. 95. For further information write: 
The Pro Products Co., Inc., 812 22nd 
Street. Rockford, Illinois 61108. 

JAMB CLIP 






"i|! 



i 




Door hanging is easier and faster with 
a new steel Jamb Clip that may be used 
on job hung or pre-hung door units. 
Sized for four 5 /s" drywall jambs, the 
clips snap in two to adjust for other 
jamb widths and window frames where 
a half-clip is handier. They are stocked 
in one size for all applications and re- 
quire only a hammer for installation. 
Write the Panel Clip Co.. Box 423R, 
Farmington, Michigan 48024. 



SERIES 700 





ON CARPENTER'S SQUARE 



ON STRAIGHT EDGE 



CONSTRUCTION 




FIXTURING 



ROD/WIRE BENDING 



JUNE, 1970 



37 



L.U. NO. 12 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Broasky, Francis, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Giachino, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 18 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Anderson, William H. 
Craven, J. W. 

L.U. NO. 19 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Beasley, Cecil J. 
Caudill, Gehazie 
Clark, William B. 
Dunn, Harold F. 
Fetterman, James 
Fisher, Harry 
Gilbert, Earl H. 
Gumienny, Valentine 
Jones. Claude 
Jung, Elmer H. 
McLean, Arthur 
Nadone, Fred 
Petre, Percy 
Stencel, Carl F. 

L.U. NO. 34 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Harnois, Charles T. 
Jackson, John W. 
Johnson. Swan 
Jones, Leo 
Wood, Wallace T. 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Andersons, Leonhards 
Benoit, Andrew 
Daigle, Philipe 
Isnor. Clyde W. 
Watson, Clifford 

L.U. NO. 48 
FITCHBURG, MASS. 

Conley, Leo 
Salokangas, Olavi 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Burroughs, F. R. 
GUI, Charles W. 
Hagan, Ray J. 
Killion, L. E. 
Locascio, Vincent 
Mackey, W. N. 
Polsinelli, Pete 

L.U. NO. 62 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bizat, Joseph 
Cappetto, Anthony 
Erickson, Victor T. 
Heagberg, Henry 
Jacobson, Carl 
Larson, Victor 
O'Hare, Patrick 
Russell, James 
Swanson, A. J. 
Walcowicz, Peter 

L.U. NO. 89 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Salley, Robert C. 



L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Holland, Michael J. 
Buyarski. John 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Brown, William E. 
Davis, Robert Britton 
Gregory, W. H. 
Kress, Carl F. 
Lico, Joseph 
Messer, Cleo Ray 

L.U. NO. 133 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

Abrams, Thomas Everett 
Dierdorf, Joe 
Hess, William 
Morris, Milford 
Wile, John W. 

L.U. NO. 166 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Ceurcey, Harold 
Mosher, Charles L. 

L.U. NO. 180 
VALLEJO, CAL. 

Brewer, John H. 
Dentel, Russell 
Grote, H. A. 
Lane, C. A. 
Maher. Malcolm T. 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Barnes, Barney 
Carlson. Eric W. 
Hansen. Ralph 
Hoffman, Henry 

L.U. NO. 182 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Dendorfer, Carl 
Febel, Adam 
Goldean, Peter 
Gorjup, Charles 
Habe. John 
Hartman, Michael 
Kauntz, John 
Mantin, Herman 
Moodt, Karl 
Mrosek, William 
Nemeth, Frank 
Reidl. Henry 
Vitak, Frank 
Woidke, Fred 

L.U. NO. 198 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Christianson, E. B. 
Hillhouse, R. E. 
Noah. Ken 
Reagan. John 
Trout, H. C. 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Pfeifer. P. J. 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Hansen. Harry 

L.U. NO. 264 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Brandstrom, John 



Grimm, Wilford 
Kosecki, Stanley 
McKnight, Lloyd 
Meyer, Albert J. 
Paape, Edward G. 
Rahn, Eugene 
Schell. Henry 
Schroeder, Henry 
Smith, Emmet R. 
Waters, Fred 
Wendt, Baldwin 

L.U. NO. 266 
STOCKTON, CAL. 

Applegate, James 
Michell, Eugene 

L.U. NO. 272 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, 
ILL. 

Landau, William 
Thiery, Nicholas 

L.U. NO. 278 
WATERTOWN, N. Y. 

Burke, Levi 
Schwendy, Gerald 
Weidner, Charles 

L.U. NO. 281 
BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

Mihalko, Michael 

L.U. NO. 298 

LONG ISLAND CITY, 

N. Y. 

Seasack, Charles 

L.U. NO. 331 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Stargardt, F. B. 

L.U. NO. 355 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Tenbult, Carl 

L.U. NO. 362 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Jones, Paul F. 
McDonald. John A. 
Moore, William H. 

L.U. NO. 366 
BRONX, N. Y. 

Friedman, Jack 
Rosenberg, David 

L.U. NO. 373 

FORT MADISON, IOWA 

Lancaster, Donald L. 
Nelle. Albert J. 

L.U. NO. 406 
BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Fenner, Roy A. 
Neeb, Edgar L. 

L.U. NO. 432 
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

Adams, Archie 
Cody, Paul 
Gaunt, Stacey 
Keller. George 
Lambert, Christopher 
Lee. Joseph M. 
McCormack, Michael 
Miller, Ernest 
Reed, Louis 
Richardson, Robert E. 



L.U. NO. 470 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Cozine, Sidney, Jr. 
Dayton, R. G. 
Fieber, Carl J. 
Kuran, M. J. 
Laney, Harry M. 
Mercer. John 
Pannek, John 
Reeves, Marcus L. 
Wootan, James 

L.U. NO. 562 
EVERETT, WASH. 

Carroll, Elmer D. 
Dudder, Herbert L. 
Forde, Jesse L. 
Fox, Ervin E. 
Gall, Ed 

Hanson, Carl M. 
Honeycutt, M. E. 
Husby, John 
Johnson, Harold L. 
Lumsden, James D. 
McManus, Albert J. 
Nielsen, Hans 
Peterson, Joseph 
Towers, Donald 
Weldon, Charles J. 
White, Herbert B. 
Williams, Virgil 

L.U. NO. 595 
LYNN, MASS. 

Bailey, Edward 
Crooker, Joseph 
McLeoud, Arthur 
Nason, Everett 
Swanson. August 

L.U. NO. 608 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Henshaw, John 
Horan, Michael 
Kristensen, Peter 
Liebler. William 
Sullivan, John 

L.U. NO. 621 
BANGOR, ME. 

Michaud, Bertram 

L.U. NO. 627 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Adams, Joseph C. 
Anderson, Elzie L. 
Betts. Robert L. 
Delaney, Homer E. 
Hart. Cornelius A. 
McDonald, Claude C. 

L.U. NO. 665 
AMARILLO, TEX. 

Baker, Elmer A. 
Ballard. J. H. 
Cliver, Harvey R. 
Wilson. W. B. 

L.U. NO. 674 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Czeiszperger, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 689 
DUNKIRK, N. Y. 

Hubbard, Clarence F. 

L.U. NO. 791 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Dempsey, Joseph 



Ericcson. John 
Hansen. Louis 

L.U. NO. 937 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Bidaux. Carlton 
Winge, Hiram 

L.U. NO. 964 
NEW CITY, N. Y. 

Kearsey, Frank X. 
Roloson, Robert C. 
Waldron, Carlton 

L.U. NO. 977 
WICHITA FALLS, TEX, 

Woods. C. W. 

L.U. NO. 1025 
MEDFORD, WISC. 

Cysher, William 

L.U. NO. 1093 
GLEN COVE, N. Y. 

Bojenski, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1098 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Cochran, Leslie G. 
Haggard, Charles 
Johnson, L. R. 
LeBlanc, Clement J., Jr. 
O'Conner, Edward A. 

L.U. NO. 1128 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Johnson, Henry 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Drogmiller. Frederick 
Feist, George 
Grosjean, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1149 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Bierman, Herman 
Caudle, G. C. 
Willett, Leonard 

L.U. NO. 1185 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Boelter, Rudolph G. 

L.U. NO. 1292 
HUNTINGTON, N. Y. 

Gildersleeve, Wilson 

L.U. NO. 1303 

PORT ANGELES, WASH. 

Crawford, William 
Hinkley, Ernest A. 
Weber, Adolph W. 

L.U. NO. 1305 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

Cardoza, Dennis 
Caron, William G. 
Casey, Thomas 
Gendreau, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Morenzien. Otto 

Continued on Page 39 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




Lakeland 
News 



Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida 



Six Arrivals At Home During April 



John A. Jacobsen, Local 1456, New 
York, N. Y., arrived at the Home April 
8, 1970. 

• 

Christian Munk. Local 58. Chicago, 
111., arrived at the Home April 16, 1970. 

• 

Herman L. Bailey, Local 345. Mem- 
phis, Tenn., arrived at the Home April 
20, 1970. 

• 

R. Wilson Ranson. Local 993, Miami, 
Fla., arrived at the Home April 20. 1970. 

• 

Gust Olson, Local 58. Chicago, 111., ar- 
rived at the Home April 23, 1970. 



Peter J. Kearney, Local 727, Hialeah. 
Fla., arrived at the Home April 29, 1970. 



James A. Beaver, Local 122. Philadel- 
phia, Pa., died April 7, 1970. Burial was 
in Philadelphia. 

Percy Poynter, Local 1397, Roslyn. 
N. Y.. died April 13, 1970. Burial was in 
Port Washington, N. Y. 



Charles James, Local 12, Syracuse, 
N. Y., died April 21, 1970. 




IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from page 38 



Look for the union label when you shop 
for goods and services. The union label 
of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America, shown above, 
appears on many tools and products of 
the trade. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Aluminum Box Company 


...26 


Audel, Theodore 


...39 


Belsaw Power Tools 


... 35 


Belsaw Sharp-All 


. .. 19 


Chicago Technical College 


... 28 


Craftsman Book Co 


...21 


Eliason Stair Gauge Co. . . 


...21 


Estwing Manufacturing . . . 


... 26 


Foley Manufacturinc 


...27 


Hydrolevel 


...19 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


.. . 35 


Locksmithing Institute .... 


... 39 


Paneling Specialties Co. . . 


...36 


Stanley Works Bac 


c Cover 


True Temper Corp 


... 73 





L.U. NO. 1423 
CORPUS CHRISTI, 
TEX. 

Deal, Robert C. 

L.U. NO. 1433 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Factor, Joseph 
Gillis, Andrew 
Kreucher, Anthony 
Rubecz, Edward 
Stapleton, Albert 
Varner, Edwin L. 
Waite, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1456 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Berg, Oscar 
Dahl, Sigvald 
Fisher, Kenneth 
Johannesen, John 
Keegan, Joseph 
Lund, Fred 
O'Shea, William 
Solberg, Dan 
Tuominen, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1485 
LAPORTE, IND. 

Hagenow, Louis F. 

L.U. NO. 1541 
VANCOUVER, B. C. 

Cameron, James 

L.U. NO. 1571 
SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

Burns, Frank M. 



Butterlield, F. E. 
Collins, John T. 
Deere, Robert Lewis 
Dixon, Darrel 
Ek, Royal C. 
Estes, George W. 
Fitch, Andrew E. 
Hafner, Frank J. 
Johnson. Stephen 
Kallesen, Jens C. 
Kaveney, William F. 
Kiser, William H. 
La Montagne. Sifroid 
Manz, Oliver Dean 
Nebelong, Louis F. 
Rainey, John H. 
Rodig, Gidor A. 
Thomure, Maurice D. 
Tucker, C. Levaughn 

L.U. NO. 1587 

HUTCHINSON, 

KAN. 

Fairbanks. Ivan B. 

L.U. NO. 1811 
MONROE, LA. 

Patterson, B. A. 

L.U. NO. 1822 
FORT WORTH, TEX. 

Barnes, A. C. 
Cagle, Charles 
Turner, S. B. 

L.U. NO. 2274 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Read, Clyde E. 



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*Y\ LOCKS, HCM C 
UJ ofkJ TOOLS 

J^. tuppiied 



PiOCO* 

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JUNE, 1970 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 1118-060 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Op- 
portunities in Locksmithing," complete equipment 
folder and sample lesson pages — Free of all obliga- 
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in conclusion 



M. A. Hutcheson, Genera/ President 




A Study In Contrast: High School vs. Vocational School 



■ Normally, the WALL STREET JOURNAL 

is about the last place any labor official looks for a 
quote to illustrate a point. 

However, a recent issue of the WSJ carried an 
editorial which summarized the causes of turmoil 
and revolt on the college campuses better than 
anything I have so far read. 

In essence, the editorial maintained that a small 
percentage of wild-eyed radicals are able to dis- 
rupt and even close down universities because the 
great majority of students, those whose prime in- 
terest is getting an education, fail to take a stand. 
Additionally, the editorial pointed out that a good 
deal of the trouble stems from the fact that every 
college campus has many students on its rolls 
who do not belong there. 

This is the way the editorial put it: 

"The nation's campuses are overloaded with 
people who have no business there, who have no 
affinity for the intellectual, who would be better 
off in vocational schools or at work. They surely 
are not all rabid radicals, but their fundamental 
incompatibility with academic pursuits greatly 
contributes to the boredom which in turn con- 
tributes to campus unrest." 

I believe there is much truth in this statement. 
College has become a status symbol for rich and 
poor, majority and minority. Not even high schools 
are immune. 

This argument is buttressed effectively by an 
article which appeared in THE WASHINGTON 
POST. The article told about the difference in 
climate between the three vocational high schools 



in the area and the 15 or so regular high schools. 
In the three vocational schools there has been 
no vandalism, no discipline problems, no undue 
absenteeism. In direct contrast, most of the regular 
high schools have one or more of these problems 
to contend with. 

By way of contrast, the article told of Bell 
Vocational School, which is about 50 years old, 
and a new non-vocational neighbor. After half a 
century of use, Bell is still in good shape. The 
machines and equipment are all kept up to snuff. 
On the other hand, the neighboring high school, 
built only two years ago, is already a mess. Much 
of the equipment has been vandalized; fixtures and 
windows have been broken. Four letter words are 
painted all over the halls. 

If all this points up anything, it is that those 
young men who embark on a trade as a vocation 
know who they are and understand what they are 
trying to do. Apparently this is not so true of 
many other youths. 

Nearly every time I see a TV commentator in- 
terview a college or high school rebel, the excuse 
for rioting is nearly always the same; "I am trying 
to gain identity," or "I am trying to find out who 
I am." 

There are no such hang-ups on the part of those 
who go into a trade. They know who they are. 
They know that they are men, doing men's work, 
and they need no greater identity than the right 
to say; "I am a plumber," or a "carpenter." or "a 
printer." or "an electrician," and, above all, "I 
am an American or Canadian." ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 






Your 

Spokesmen in 
Washington 
Can't 

cue 

Without 
You 




ARPENTERS LEGISLATIVE IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 



Stanley gives you 
chatter-free power 





The Model 76 . . . like all Stanley sabre saws . . . has 
a patented* anti-vibration mechanism to provide 
chatter-free cutting, even at 3600 strokes per minute. 
A handle close down to the work gives you the posi- 
tive control needed to follow an intricate line of cut, 
precisely. And a powerful air blast always keeps that 
line clearly visible. 

The powerful motor is equipped with sealed and 
lubricated-for-life ball bearings. All motor leads are 
welded, not soldered. Felt seals on the plunger keep 



Model 76 — $59.50 

out dust and dirt. Its chrome-plated shoe won't 
scratch laminates and has two positions, the rear one 
to permit flush cuts to a vertical surface. 

The Model 76 sabre saw is only one of a 
complete Stanley line which also includes 
speed control and tilt base models. See them 
at your distributor. Stanley 
Power Tools, Division of The 
Stanley Works, New Bern. 
No. Carolina 28560. helps you do things right 



STANLEY 



•U.S. Patent No. 2988924 



P.S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest hand tools. 



©Z^tjQ^' 



Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
. Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 

Members who die or are suspended are 
automatically dropped from the mailing 
list of The Carpenter. 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 
340 Northwest 148th St. 
Miami, Florida 33168 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Natl Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Hi ■■ Hi 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should he mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No : 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS . 



City 



State 



THE 



<S£\D3[PSKnr 




volume xc 



No. 7 



JULY, 1970 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



ij j LABOR PRESS P a 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Shocking "Training" Subsidy Blasted C. J. Haggerty 2 

Carpenter Economic Survey 4 

Formula for Reversing Economic Downturn Exclusive Interview 5 

United States and Canada Celebrate Origins 7 

Campus, Radical Troubles Beset U.S., Canada 8 

Carpenters at Union Industries Show TO 

Proposed Amendments to the Constitution and Laws 13 



DEPARTMENTS 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 



38 



Service to the Brotherhood 41 



In M 



emoriam 



Lakeland News 



45 



47 



In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 48 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 357? should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

July marks the birth of two great 
nations, the United States on July 4, 
1776 and Canada on July 1, 1867. 
Both were born with a heritage of 
political liberty, individual freedom 
and obedience to the law. 

Our cover this month shows sym- 
bols related to the July independence 
dates of both nations: Independence 
Hall in Philadelphia; the Provincial 
Building in Charlottetown, Prince 
Edward Island; and the national seals 
of Canada and the United States. All 
bring to mind our cherished ideals of 
freedom, our common heritage. 

One can easily imagine how our 
forefathers felt about their liberty. 
The frontier was a difficult, danger- 
ous place to live and work, but it 
molded a unique sort of character: 
independent, self-reliant, skilled and 
courageous. 

The North American character com- 
bined — and still does — the best kind of 
brotherhood, fidelity and untiring de- 
votion to the principles that keep men 
free. 

In this time of trouble, it's wise to 
remember that our forebearers faced 
similar problems and overcame them. 
The words of Benjamin Franklin still 
echo down through the ages '"They 
that can give up essential liberty to 
obtain a little temporary safety deserve 
neither liberty nor safety." 




Shocking "Training" Subsidy Blasted 
by BCTD President C. J. Haggerty 




A highly significant address on one phase of housing 
was recently made by President C. J. Haggerty of the 
Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL- 
CIO. Mr. Haggerty addressed the New York Building 
Congress at the Commodore Hotel May 4 in New York 
City. The entire speech, with the exception of brief in- 
troductory remarks, is reprinted below for the informa- 
tion of our membership. 

■ I sincerely believe that next to the seemingly endless 
war, no other matter should be of such importance as 
solving our national housing disgrace. The magnitude of 
this problem is compounding itself almost daily. As an 
example, I read about two years ago of a study made 
here in New York City which found that there were 
42,000 structures housing 800,000 persons which were 
found to be sub-standard, inadequate and in need of 
rehabilitation or replacement. Only the total is unique 
— city after city throughout the country has a similar 
problem. 

We have today literally hundreds of thousands of 
persons trapped in a never-ending cycle of sub-standard 
housing which leads to ever increasing deprivation, 
despair and utter hopelessness. 

We in labor long ago recognized this growing prob- 
lem. We also realized it could never be solved by the 
multitude of agencies all halfway involved in urban 
problems — none really dealing effectively with the 
needs. For example, there were 21 Federal depart- 
ments and agencies, 150 Federal bureaus and divisions 
and 92,000 units of local government all tied into 400 
statutory grants in aid programs. I am certain that God 
alone knew how they all operated, how they over- 
lapped, or how they diluted each other's efforts. 

Because of this bureaucratic entanglement, we en- 
thusiastically supported the move in Congress to bring 
all of these programs into focus under one roof by the 



creation of the cabinet Department of Housing and 
Urban Development or HUD as it is referred to now. 

Something must have gone wrong — it's all under one 
roof with 5,000 employees in Washington alone, and 
we're getting less and less housing. In fact, starts are 
down so low that they are now going to start counting 
mobile homes to make the totals look better. This is a 
poor excuse for performance. 

As usual, they blame everything and everybody but 
themselves. In their scramble to solve the housing 
crisis, they have displayed much rhetoric with little 
reason. They are problem oriented but not solution 
oriented. They, of course, tried to blame labor costs 
and restrictive practices for the shortage of housing. 
Actually, labor costs have declined between 1949 and 
1969 from 33% of the cost to 18% of the cost. The 
Kaiser Committee on Urban Housing in its study con- 
cluded that: 

"All on site labor costs represent such a small per- 
centage of monthly rents that a general reduction of 
wages for all workmen of 20% would only mean a 
reduction in rent from $100 to $98 in a typical unit." 
They also continue to claim restrictive practices have 
slowed housing construction. This is utter nonsense and 
so is the charge of labor shortages. The fact remains 
that 20 years ago, in 1950, we built 1,900,000 units not 
counting trailers. If there ever were restrictive practices 
they would have been greater then — if there ever were 
shortages, they, too, would have been greater during that 
post-war period. 

Let's look at some of the real reasons. According to 
the Federal Housing Administration, in 1946 the aver- 
age market price for lots on which single family homes 
were built was $761 — the same lots in 1968 were 
$4,201 — an increase of 552%. In the last 10 years 
alone, land prices have again increased 95%. 

Today a typical $20,000, 30-year FHA insured 

THE CARPENTER 




mortgage at a 9% effective rate, costs the buyer $160 
a month, or $57,600 over the life of the mortgage 
($37,600 in interest alone). 

I think it is easy to see that the rise in land costs 
and the rise in interest rates has literally priced the 
low and middle income family out of housing. 

The present anti-inflation policies have made a 
shambles of the housing industry and we haven't seen 
the worst of it yet. The Congress in 1968 envisioned a 
goal of 26 million units in 10 years, or 2,600,000 per 
year. Two years later, 1970, we will hardly reach half 
of that goal. 

During all of this we continually are assured that 
soon we will have industrialized housing coming off the 
assembly lines like automobiles. They will be cheaper 
because of factory wages. They will go up real fast and 
the crises will be over. 

I don't believe the solution will be that simple. As 
new and practical techniques, tools, methods and ma- 
terials are developed, we should continue to adopt 
them and use them. We should put solving housing 
needs on a crash basis just as we did the need for fac- 
tories, plants, camps and so on in building facilities 
for World War II production. 

Now I want to talk specifically about HUD's Project 
Breakthrough. 

Secretary Romney describes it as: 
"Not a program designed to see just how cheaply we 
can build a house, but a way to break through to 
total new systems of housing production, financing, 
marketing, management and land use. Breakthrough 
supports the development of new and innovative 
housing system concepts and production methods . . . 
it also seeks solutions to many problems impeding 
large scale production of housing such as . . . restric- 
tive zoning and building codes . . . and inefficient use 
of labor forces. . . . 
For about a year HUD has been concentrating on 



this project and I am sure has convinced many persons 
that this would in reality be the breakthrough. 

On February 26, 1970, HUD announced that 22 
producers of housing systems were selected to build 
their prototype models on Operation Breakthrough 
sites in 10 states. 

One of those selected was Christiana Western Struc- 
tures of Los Angeles, California. 

This company manufacturers housing in panels at 
Blythe, California, and is presently shipping them over 
500 miles for erection on different sites in California. 
This transportation distance is about 350 miles further 
than most prefab home manufacturers consider econom- 
ically feasible. One would wonder how they can do it. 

The answer is very simple — extremely low wages 
subsidized by the Government under the guise of train- 
ing. 

On February 12, 1970, the regional Manpower Ad- 
ministrator for the Western Region, U.S. Department 
of Labor, wrote to a Mr. Foy, Manpower Training Di- 
rector of Christiana Western, advising him that he had 
been awarded a Jobs 70 contract. This contract was in 
the amount of $121,580 to hire and train 70 em- 
ployees — 24 in the Blythe factory — at a unit cost per 
trainee of $1,588.00 each; 31 at another location at 
$2,078 per trainee; and 15 others at still another loca- 
tion at $1,318.00 per trainee. All trainees were to start 
at 2.00 per hour and after 9 months training are to be 
advanced to 2.35 per hour. 

Here is how the government costs are broken down: 

For 24 employees the company receives: 

— $870.00 for on the job training costs 

— $ 48.00 for job related education costs 

— $200.00 for special counselling 

— $160.00 for orientation 

— $280.00 for other supportive services 
That is a total of $1,588 for each employee they hire. 
(Continued on Page 42) 



JULY, 1970 



Carpenter Magazine Survey Shows Unemployment Up 
In Most Areas; Construction Workers Hard Hit 



CHICAGO 

Carpenter Jobless Rate 
Highest in Six Years 

Joblessness is at a six-year high 
in the Chicago area, according to a 
special report received covering fig- 
ures up through May. The May un- 
employment figure hit the 4 percent 
mark and reports indicated that the 
number of jobless is rising. 

In the Chicago area 132,000 per- 
sons were actively seeking work and 
were unable to find it. Carpenters 
officials say the number of carpen- 
ters out of work totals 4,000 out of 
the 31,000 in the area. 

George Vest, Jr., president of the 
Chicago Carpenters District Council 
was gloomy when he reported on the 
situation, saying: 

"It hasn't been this bad for car- 
penters since the 1958 recession. 
This time last year you couldn't 
find a single carpenter without a job. 
The trouble for us is in the single 
family houses. This field is dead — 
absolutely dead — as dead as dead 
can be. 

"In good times 15,000 carpenters 
work in single family house construc- 
tion. Now hardly any do. About 
11,000 have gotten jobs in other 
types of construction work." 

Figures from the Department of 
Labor indicate that the joblessness 
totals have risen sharply since the 
first of the year. In January the un- 
employment figure for all workers 
was 2.7 percent; in February 2.9; 
in March 2.8 and in April 3.8 per- 
cent. 

CALIFORNIA 

Construction Jobless 
Estimated at 25-30% 

Unemployment has hit the state 
of California hard and struck with 
special force on the carpenters, ac- 
cording to information received from 
Research Director Gives Knowles 
of the California State Council of 
Carpenters, San Francisco, Calif. 

• General unemployment, sea- 



Unemployment among workers gen- 
erally is higher as the report from 
Government sources shows. What is 
not so well known is the fact that con- 
struction joblessness is as much as two 
and three times that of the average. 
Carpenter unemployment is markedly 
higher than the average. THE CAR- 
PENTER Magazine queried a number 
of key areas and the response is 
indicated in this brief survey. Figures 
from Canada come from the Domin- 
ion Bureau of Statistics. Public un- 
employment figures on particular 
trades are not available and hence 
the survey data had to come directly 
from Carpenter sources. In the answers 
shown, except from Canada, all data 
came from local unions affected 
through the Carpenter Councils. 

sonally adjusted, for the months of 
April was 5.5 per cent with the num- 
ber jobless put at 436,000. 

• In the field of construction un- 
employment the state does not have 
figures. A general estimate, how- 
ever, came from President James 
Lee of the California Building and 
Construction Trades Council. He 
said that construction unemployment 
averages between 20 and 30 per 
cent throughout the state. This fig- 
ure appears to be one of the highest 
yet reported for building tradesmen. 

• On carpenter unemployment, 
Mr. Knowles reports. "An April 
survey of unemployment among ac- 
tive members indicates that outside 
the Los Angeles District Council 
area, unemployment varied between 
25 and 30 per cent. This means 
that there were approximately 12,- 
500 unemployed carpenters in that 
month. In the Los Angeles area, 
unemployment was not running 
more than 2 to 3 per cent in April 
1970." 

TEXAS 

Carpenter Jobless Rate 
More Than Double Average 

Construction and carpenter un- 
employment in Texas on May 1 , 
1970 was more than double that of 



general joblessness, according to a 
report received from the Texas State 
Council of Carpenters. 

Figures sent to The Carpenter 
by Executive Secretary-Treasurer A. 
C. Shirley of the Texas State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters reveal the totals as 
of May 1 for the three categories of 
unemployment; general, construc- 
tion and carpenter. 

• Total general unemployment 
on May 1, 1970 was 2.9 per cent 
of the labor force. On the same date 
in 1969 the figure was 2.3 per cent. 

• Construction unemployment in 
Texas as of May 1 was estimated at 
8 per cent. On the same date in 
1969 the figure was 5 per cent. 

• Union carpenter unemploy- 
ment was 8 per cent on May 1, 
which was 3 per cent higher than 
May 1, 1969. 

Data on unemployed carpenters 
are reported monthly by executive 
committee members over the state. 
The carpenter figure follows the 
trend shown elsewhere in the coun- 
try — decidedly higher than general 
unemployment. 

FLORIDA 

Carpenter Unemployment 
Highest in Three Years 

High unemployment was reported 
in Florida with carpenter joblessness 
at the highest rate it has been in 
three years, according to a report 
from Secretary-Treasurer Andrew 
E. Dann, Sr., Florida State Council 
of Carpenters, Miami, Fla. 

The report from Secretary Dann 
was in the form of a short, narrative 
giving a picture of the Florida situ- 
ation. He said: 

"The tight money situation and 
high interest rate have caused a se- 
rious employment cut-back in gen- 
eral construction. The Administra- 
tion in Washington will have to ex- 
ert itself to make money available 
at a rate construction can afford. 
There is a demand for both corn- 
Continued on Page 6 



THE CARPENTER 



A CARPENTER EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW 



Formula for Reversing Economic Downturn 
Spelled Out by AFL-CIO Research Expert 



Q. From statements and observations you have made, 
may we assume that you think we are in an economic 
recession? Correct? 

Ans. Yes, I believe we are in a recession that got 
under way last summer or fall. Home-building has 
been in a decline since February 1969. Industrial pro- 
duction has been moving down for 10 months. Lay- 
offs have been spreading. In the five months, between 
December and May, unemployment rose 1,300,000. 

Q. How near are we to an old-fashioned depression? 
Ans. The country now has some protections against 
an old-fashioned depression, which didn't exist before 
the 1930s. We now have unemployment insurance, 
Social Security, federal insurance of bank deposits 
and a degree of federal regulation of the stock market. 
These kinds of federal laws help to reduce the possibili- 
ties of the bottom dropping out from under the econ- 
omy — such as another run on the banks. But these 
laws do not provide a guarantee. And the existence 
of a strong trade union movement, now, is a barrier 
to widespread wage cuts — which used to accompany 
recessions in the past — but a strong labor movement 
is not a guarantee either. 

If we were to get a sharp drop in production and 
sharp rise in unemployment, combined with a loss 
of confidence in the government's ability to halt the 
decline, we could get into a depression. That's one of 
the reasons why it's so important for the government 
to prevent a recessionary decline from developing down- 
ward momentum. Once a recession begins to snow- 
ball, there's the danger that it can develop into a de- 
pression. 

Q. How does our present situation compare with 
earlier downturns in the last 20 years? How is it 
similar, how different? 

Ans. So far, this recession has been milder than the 
previous recessions of the past 25 years — the recessions 
of 1949-50, 1954, 1958 and 1960-61. The drop in 
employment and production, thus far, has been less. 
But this recession is not yet over. 

Q. What in your opinion are the principal causes 
of the economic state we are now in? 
Ans. This recession is the direct result of the Adminis- 
tration's economic policies. In the name of fighting 
inflation, the Administration squeezed the economy 
through a very tight-money policy, skyrocketing in- 
terest rates and attempts to freeze public construction 
outlays. The results of such severe squeeze on the 
economy have been what should have been expected 
— a slump in homebuilding, declining industrial pro- 
duction, cutbacks in weekly working hours and layoffs. 
However, prices continue to climb. As a result. 
in recent months, we have had the worst of all possi- 




NATHANIEL GOLDFINGER, Director of Research, AFL-CIO, is one 
of the nation's leading economists and experts observing and 
analyzing the changing manpower picture. In an interview with 
THE CARPENTER he answers a series of questions put to him 
concerning the current economic situation. 

Native of the Bronx, N. Y., he is a graduate of the College of 
the City of New York and has had graduate courses from CCNY, 
New York University, the New School for Social Research and 
American University. He was formerly Director of Research and 
Education of the United Paperworkers of America, secretary of the 
CIO Committee on Economic Policy and has held various key re- 
search posts in the national CIO and the AFL-CIO. He has been 
Director of Research, his present position, since January 1, 1963. 

Mr. Goldfinger is author of "Trade Union Behavior in Wage 
Bargaining," a chapter of "New concepts of Wage Determination" 
by Geo. W. Taylor and Frank Pierso, editors. He has written numer- 
ous articles for labor publications and for the Department of Labor's 
Monthly Labor Review. 

bilities — the worst inflation in 20 years, the highest 
interest rates in 100 years and the sharpest increase 
in unemployment in 10 years. 

Q. What do you see as the principal steps to reverse 
the trend and get us back on the road to economic 
progress? Action by the President? by Congress? by 
other agencies? 

Ans. The main step to get us back on the road to 
economic progress is to combine an easier money 
policy with selective credit controls, interest-rate ceil- 
ings on specific types of loans and the allocation of 
available credit to where it will do the most good. 
Such measures are necessary to increase the amount 
of credit, at reasonable interest rates for home-building 
and for state and local government projects, as well 
as normal business operations, while curbing the flow 
of credit for foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies, 
conglomerate take-overs and gambling casinos. Such 
action is needed to boost economic activities, while 
reducing inflationary pressures. In addition, the AFL- 
CIO has stated that it would cooperate with wage 
and price controls, if necessary, provided that the 
(Continued on Page 43) 



JULY, 1970 



Survey 



Continued from Page 4 

mercial buildings and houses but 
the money is too costly. 

"General construction unemploy- 
ment is at the highest level in a 
number of years. In the carpenter 
trade unemployment is at the high- 
est rate that it has been in over 
three years. Some of this unem- 
ployment has been caused by other 
trades being on strike. Some of our 
people will return to work when 
these strikes are settled, but we do 
not expect full employment until 
there is a change in the economy." 

CANADA 

Construction Jobless 
Triple That of Average 

Unemployment in Canada is se- 
vere, but construction joblessness is 
more than triple that of the general 
out of work group. 

At press time the Dominion Bu- 
reau of Statistics, Ottawa, Ont., sup- 
plied The Carpenter with the 
latest available figures for general 
unemployment and construction un- 
employment. 

Unemployment for the first quar- 
ter in 1970 reached 6.5 per cent of 
the work force. As high as this, it 
did not touch the figure for the job- 



less in construction which was re- 
ported as 21.9 percent. It should 
be noted that in Canada the weather 
has an impact on jobs in construc- 
tion and the first quarter included 
winter months. 

The Dominion Bureau gave a 
report on the unemployment among 
the general work force and among 
construction workers for the four 
quarters of 1969: 

• fourth quarter general unem- 
ployment was 4.3 percent; construc- 
tion unemployment was 10.4 per- 
cent; 

• third quarter general unemploy- 
ment was 3.8 percent and construc- 
tion unemployment was 6.5 percent; 

• second quarter general unem- 
ployment was 4.9 percent and con- 
struction unemployment 1 1 .4 per- 
cent; 

• first quarter general unemploy- 
ment was 5.9 percent and construc- 
tion unemployment was 18.2 per- 
cent. 

The bureau said that the labor 
force in the first quarter totalled 
8,027,000 persons. 

NEW YORK CITY 

Varied Picture; Some 
Optimism is Voiced 

President Conrad Olsen of the 
New York State District Council. 



New York City, sends a narrative 
appraisal of the unemployment sit- 
uation. He discusses chiefly the 
construction picture and the car- 
penter situation, and says: 

• "We have contacted the vari- 
ous Associations, the Building and 
Construction Trades Council and its 
subordinates regarding their opin- 
ions and enclosed is their estimate 
of the unemployment situation. As 
their opinions indicate, the employ- 
ment situation varies; such as in the 
heavy construction field where work 
is slow because of tight money and 
in the building construction where 
due to the high-rise construction 
both in office buildings and apart- 
ment houses, there seems to be full 
employment." 

Mr. Olsen enclosed comments 
from associations. From the Gen- 
eral Contractors Association, the 
opinion expressed indicated "Slow — 
strange picture — some unemploy- 
ment; should not be any at this part 
of year — anticipate picking up. In- 
dustry not at its best — about 80 
per cent of what it should be with 
turn-about in next 3 or 4 months — 
going through but not as quickly as 

Continued on Page 12 



Two Decades of Unemployment 

Construction Compared with Total Joblessness 

1 6.0 % PERCENT Percentage of Labor f orce 

14.0 
12.0 
10.0 

8.0 

6.0 



4.0 



2.0 





















.'♦. 








.- V 


f 




Construe 


tion 


♦ 
• 




f» 


• 


♦ 
* 


• 
J 


/ -J 


., 


'••.. 


• 
• 


• • 

* • 


*-.X 






• 

m 


\ 






* 
• 




\ 






■■■». 


*. • 


'••«.••"■ 






"*«• 










v / 


\ Total/ 


— "~ 




\ / 








-» — / 



















1950 



1955 1960 1965 1970 

Source: "Statistic* on Manpower"— from 1970 Manpower Report of the President— U.S. Department of labor 



THE CARPENTER 



United States and Canada Celebrate Their 
Origins in July; Both See Bright Future 





AMERICAN Independence Day is celebrated July 4 
as the anniversary of the signing of the Declaration 
of Independence in 1776 by representatives of the 
colonies desiring to separate from England. The fact 
is that the independence resolution was signed July 2 
and the discussions of the next two days were mere 
formalities. John Adams thought that July 2 should 
actually be celebrated as the nation's birthday. 

Only John Hancock and the secretary, Charles Thom- 
son, signed the document which went out for signature. 
Other signers affixed their names at various times after 
July 4. They did not line up to sign as the legendary 
paintings and storybooks have it. Some of the signers 
were not in the hall when the resolution was voted on 
and some who voted for the resolution never got around 
to signing the Declaration. 

The epochal document came into reality only after 
some two decades of strife and following a train of 
abuses from the British Crown. Writs of Assistance 
were passed to keep down New England smuggling; 
these called for ship searches. The Stamp Act of 1765 
passed by Parliament was unenforceable, so great was 
colonial resistance. The same fate followed the Town- 
send Acts, designed to tax certain items. The tax on 
tea led to the famous Boston Tea Party of December 
1773. 

This famous episode was followed by the Intolerable 
Acts of 1774 and the colonists were growing more and 
more hostile. Soon the Crown knew that it had a full- 
blown rebellion on its hands. Leaders of the forces of 
American liberty included such personalities as Patrick 
Henry in Virginia, John and Sam Adams and John 
Hancock in New England, Benjamin Franklin in Penn- 
sylvania, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and 
Richard Lee in Virginia. 

The First Continental Congress met in 1774 for seven 
weeks of discussion. In the spring of 1775 the spark 
of revolution was lighted at the battles of Concord and 
Lexington April 19, 1775. The Second Continental Con- 
gress was convened and named George Washington as 
commander-in-chief of the 20,000-man army. The war 
was on and independence was declared before hostilities 
ended. 



CANADA celebrates as its birthday July 1, but unlike 
the U.S.A., Canada does not rest its commemora- 
tion on the results of revolution. The formation of 
modern Canada is based on the British North America 
Act of 1867. 

Canada did not emerge from a revolution, but war 
was part of its background. The years 1534 to 1713 
made up the period regarded as the colonial era in 
which the French and English explored the New World. 
From 1713 to 1763 the two powers struggled for the 
mastery ending with British victory and the Treaty of 
1763, marking the end of French power. 

In 1774 the Quebec Act extended French Canada's 
control south to the Ohio river and westward to the 
Mississippi. After the American Revolution the Con- 
stitutional Act of 1791 was passed separating the area 
into Upper Canada (Ontario) and Lower Canada (Que- 
bec). 

Lord Durham in 1838 came to govern the Canadas 
and recommended unifying all British North American 
possessions and the Act of Union was passed in 1840. 
In 1864 Sir Charles Tupper, Nova Scotia's Prime Minis- 
ter, called a meeting of delegates from Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. The meet- 
ing convened in September in Charlottetown but ad- 
journed for an October session in which all provinces 
would be represented. 

The Quebec Convention of October 10-28. 1864 had 
32 delegates who passed 72 resolutions. Actions of the 
convention were not accepted by Prince Edward Island 
until 1873 and Newfoundland did not join the union 
until 1949; British Columbia and Manitoba joined in 
1871 and Alberta and Saskatchewan became full- 
fledged provinces in 1905. 

In March 29, 1867 the British Parliament passed the 
British North America Act and proclaimed July 1 as 
Canada's official birthday and the nation became the 
''Dominion of Canada," a status it held until the Statute 
of Westminster in 1931 giving Canada autonomy and 
in 1947 the Canadian Citizenship Act was passed giving 
the Canadians the right to call themselves '"Canadian 
citizens." 



JULY, 1970 



Campus, Radical Troubles Beset (I.S 

Determination Necessary to Overcome Danger to Democrat 



THIS is a month of celebration 
for both the United States and 
Canada. The traditional recollection 
of the Declaration of Independence 
or the establishment of the Confed- 
eration as parts of the two nations' 
activities this month. No doubt the 
celebrations in many places will be 
or will have been carried out in the 
customary pomp and circumstance 
as befits the occasion. 

But as the two nations look back- 
ward at the heritage of courage and 
the patriotism of their founders, they 
are caught short by the disturbing 
events of our troubled times. Much 
of the difficulty of our era is common 
both to the United States and to 
Canada. This is particularly true of 
the disturbances created by the far- 
out radicals of the "new" students 
in our colleges and universities. 

Dissent Corrupted 

Dissent which has always been 
a cardinal part of our tradition has 
broken all democratic bounds and 



has been corrupted into disruption 
and destruction. The headlines of the 
newspapers and the news reports 
on the television screen have pro- 
claimed the misdeeds of the dis- 
rupters, a small, vocal minority. 

The outcry which is well nigh uni- 
versal by the campus rebels is a con- 
demnation against the "establish- 
ment" — whatever that is. In the 
case of the universities it happens to 
be the administration and the boards 
of regents, trustees and whatever are 
the governing bodies of the institu- 
tions. Whatever the establishment is 
for, the radicals seem to be against. 

Many protestors are against grad- 
ing. Such a matter as evaluating and 
indicating to a student where he 
stands is tabbed as old-fashioned and 
as woefully out of date as the Model 
T. It would be interesting to note 
how many of the protestors who are 
against grading are actually among 
the intellectual leaders of the 
schools. 




Thousands of building tradesmen have taken to the streets to demonstrate support 
of flag and country. This "hard hat parade" in New York City was one of the first. 



Too many of the protestors pro- 
claim their right to pass on the abili- 
ties and the qualifications of the 
coips of instructors, from first year 
teachers to full professors. What 
qualifies the protestors to pass judg- 
ment on men and women of superior 
education and experience? 

The new students scream about 
their "rights" and their "freedoms" 
while at the same time they are the 
acme of intolerance when it comes 
to hearing the views of others in- 
cluding their faculties or the student 
majority. The manifest intolerance 
of the radicals raises a barrier to un- 
derstanding and discussion that is 
almost insurmountable. 

The dissent and intolerance go 
beyond the classroom where dia- 
logue could or should take place. 
The dissenters become disrupters 
and destroyers. The stories of van- 
dalism and destruction are many and 
shameful. Often the destruction is 
preceded by mob action appealing 
to alleged injustices to students, to 
alleged racism or to programs of 
teaching which they regard as un- 
acceptable. The work of years of 
research has been destroyed in sev- 
eral institutions. Property damage 
assessed in the millions has been 
wrought. 

Add to the destruction the dam- 
age to the schools caused by compul- 
sory closing. The new students rep- 
resent in too many situations a truly 
ultra left wing attempt at revolution. 
If anyone doubts that revolution is 
the aim, he has only to listen to some 
of the leadership of the left or to 
read some of the fulminations of the 
underground press. 

Across the Border 

These disturbances from the left 
cross international borders. We may 
not have heard as much of the trou- 
bles in Canada as we have from the 
news of incidents in the United 
States, but the basic problem appears 
to be present. The Yippies — Youth 
International Party — some time be- 
(' on tinned on Page 12 



THE CARPENTER 



mada in Anniversary Period 

North America; Brighter Outlook Ahead 




"Hard Hats" Show Patriotic Support 

Photos on this page show construction workers in parades and 
demonstrations. Top and left center photos are from 40,000- 
man march in St. Louis, Mo., June 7. Right center photo is 
from New York parade May 20. Shown, from left, are Business 
Representatives Ernest It. Danielson, AttiJio Bitondi and Gene 
Hanley. At lower right is photo from Baltimore, Md., parade 
and demonstration June 15. (Top photo courtesy St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch.) * " 








■Jr tl MK \ 





Thousands View Brotherhoo 





A view from on high shows the big 
busy Brotherhood exhibit. 
Below: Peter McGavin. executive se< 
tary of the AFL-CIO Maritime Tra 
Department, discusses 
promotional material 
Livingston and First 
Sidell. 



"Use US Shi 
with Gen. ! 
Gen. Vice-P 



Above: Some of the Brotherhood leaders who participated in the exhibition work. 
They included (not in order): First Gen. Vice-Pres. William Sidell; Gen. Sec. R. E. 
Livingston; Gen. Exec. Bd. Member Harold Lewis; Retired GEB Member Henry 
Chandler, Intl. Rep. Richard Spears; Davy P. LaBorde, Sr., executive secretary of 
the New Orleans District Council; Tom LaBorde, chairman of the exhibit committee; 
John Wright, assistant coordinator of the apprenticeship program in the council and 
exhibit co-chairman. Among those who assisted were D. J. Breaux and Dennis 
LaBorde. 




The 1970 AFL-CIO Union Industries Show was a hit in its host city — New Orleans, 
Louisiana. More than 200,000 persons crowded into Rivergate Exhibition Center for 
the five-day extravaganza, May 22-27. The exhibit of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America — 90 feet long by 20 feet wide and packed with 
exhibits of craft skills — helped to make the annual exhibition a success. The Brother- 
hood distributed 24,000 tickets in drawings for 40 $25 bonds. A total of 10,000 rulers 
and pencils bearing the Brotherhood union label was given away. As pictures below 
show, the exhibition was a great success. 



displays at Union Industries Show 





k i 



Above: Ed Lewis, a third-year apprentice, 
is the center of attention as he turns out 
objects of beauty on a wood lathe. Many 
of his products were given away to ex- 
cited show visitors. 



Right: Many union employers and manu- 
facturers shared space in the Brotherhood 
display. Here are sample tools and 
equipment in the exhibit of the Wood- 
ward Wright Co.. Ltd. 



Below: General Secretary Livingston 
presided over meetings of the AFL-CIO 
Secretary-Treasurers' Conference in New 
Orleans, held during the show. 



^ .;-;-- y 








Campus Radical 

Continued from Page 8 

fore the holidays called for a big 
rally in Washington. D.C., on July 
4th. And incidentally, the new left 
spells the word Amerika — ka, not 
ca. 

A leading spokesman said. "We're 
asking people from all over Amerika 
to come to D.C. for a Constitutional 
Convention in July. First we're 
gonna proclaim ourselves a new na- 
tion, then we're gonna declare war 
on Amerika. It's gonna be a sum- 
mer of siege in Washington." Hap- 
pily these plans failed to work out. 

The mobs of the new left, includ- 
ing students and others of the motley 
crew travelling under the tattered 
banners of the extremists, are mak- 
ing every effort to redirect the aims 
of the nation. One aim is to wreck 
the universities and in that endeavor 
they have had initial success. An- 
other aim is to wreck the "system" 
or the "establishment" without any 
indication of what would be sub- 
stituted. 

In their efforts to wreck the peace 
and tranquillity of our times, the ex- 
tremists are using a formidable array 
of communications, an apparatus 
that extends from coast to coast and 
well into Canada. The underground 
press has a national news service and 
it is fully in touch with what goes on 
in the radical and revolutionary 
movements of other lands. How 
much of the North American left- 
wing activity is motivated, directed 
or financed from overseas sources no 
one can say. That there is a relation- 
ship would appear obvious. 

In the efforts to push their tactics 
of trouble the underground press 
publishes pictures and full directions 
on the making of Molotov cocktails, 
hand grenades and homemade 
bombs. Pictures are shown with 
how-to-do-it diagrams and full direc- 
tions on the chemistry and manufac- 
ture of the lethal weapons. Anyone 
who thinks that these revoluntion- 
aries don't mean business is not 
reading the signs correctly. 

And speaking of signs, are there 
any signs visible which indicate any 
change in our troubled climate? The 
answer is a highly qualified "yes" 
with the further amendment that 



there is some hope building for a 
turn for the better. What are the 
signs? 

There appears to be a more realis- 
tic, perhaps tougher is the better 
word, attitude developing toward the 
hippies, the yippies, the freak outs 
and others. There is less likely to 
be a tolerant acceptance of misdeeds 
of disruption and destruction in the 
future than there has been in the 
immediate past. The public patience 
is wearing thin. 

We are now hearing about some 
stiffened backbones in the academic 
community. Some schools are ac- 
tually expelling the offenders who 
have forfeited all right to be num- 
bered among the members of soci- 
ety. School administrators are re- 
ceiving the backing of the public, 
which is to say the taxpayers. The 
citizens do not want to see tax-sup- 
ported buildings and equipment 
destroyed by wanton vandalism. 

Another sign is from the youth 
group itself. There is developing a 
deepening division among the radi- 
cal farout groups. After the recent 
mass demonstration in Washington, 
there was sharp criticism registered 
against the New Mobe outfit, spon- 
sors of the demonstrations. Some of 
the underground press dubbed the 
big rally a failure and one brain 
truster of the hippies called it a "dis- 
aster." In the meantime the Yippies 
(Youth International Party) are tak- 



ing a more radical stance and leaving 
some of their erstwhile associates 
in the shade. As the divisions in- 
crease, the strength and power of 
some of the radicals may decrease, 
we are hopeful. 

What seems to be happening is 
that there is a growing maturity on 
the part of some of the young people. 
They are beginning to realize that 
the tactics of destruction and dis- 
ruption are not paying off. And 
many are going to turn to the polls. 
In this effort we may find that the 
leftists may discover a few facts of 
political life which may modify their 
long-range efforts. 

Last month Senator Margaret 
Chase Smith, Rep., Me., in a Senate 
speech made an appeal for reason 
on the part of all and was critical 
of those who would resort to vio- 
lence. She predicted that the choice 
could come between anarchy and 
repression and she forecast the 
Americans' choice would be repres- 
sion over the anarchy of the farout 
left. Her speech was not long, but 
it had a sobering effect on all. 

Those North Americans who want 
to live in peace and not be bothered 
or vandalized by the various breeds 
of farout radicals are hoping the 
signs of a change will increase. The 
public can be patient just so long 
and then there could be a powerful 
frontlash and in such an event de- 
velopments might make for an ex- 
tremely critical situation. ■ 



Job Survey 

Continued from Page 6 

previously promulgated — primarily 
due to Government problems in se- 
curing permits and approvals." 

This viewpoint was concurred in 
by spokesmen from the Building and 
Construction Office of the Board of 
Urban Affairs and by the Building 
and Construction Trades Council 
secretary-treasurer. The Building 
Trades Employers Association 
spokesman commented, saying, 
"Full employment with shortages in 
other trades — probably due to pri- 
vate enterprises — have not had any 
calls with regard to shortage of car- 
penters." 

• Commenting on the carpenter 
situation President Olsen reports: 



"We have contacted our various 
carpenter local unions and they in- 
dicate that the above information 
is quite accurate. . . . Heavy and 
general construction . . . averages 
above 80 percent of our Brother- 
hood members employed. On build- 
ing construction all are working, but 
there is a turnover which may be 
considered fairly normal; and this 
is due to many high-rise buildings 
such as the World Trade Center and 
many high-rise office buildings plus 
luxury apartment houses and union- 
sponsored housing such as COOP 
City, etc." 

The response from the carpenter 
locals indicated general agreement 
with the information given by the 
General Contractors Association and 
the B.T.E.A. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



PROPOSED AMENDMENTS 

to the 
CONSTITUTION and LAWS 

"All amendments to the Constitution and Laws submitted by Local Unions, District, State or Provincial Coun- 
cils for the consideration of the Convention shall be forwarded to the General Secretary not later than sixty 
days preceding the holding of the Convention, and the said amendments shall be published in our Official 
Journal in the issue immediately following their receipt by the General Secretary, and no further amendments 
shall be considered by the Constitution Committee other than those submitted in accordance with the above, but 
amendments to any Section can be offered from the floor during the report of the Constitution Committee." 

In accordance with this constitutional provision (Section 63 E), the following proposed amendments are 
published in the July 1970 issue of THE CARPENTER. The Thirty-First General Convention of the United 
Brotherhood will convene in San Francisco, California, on Monday, August 24, 1970. 



SECTION 7 

Submitted by San Bernardino & Riv- 
erside Counties District Council of 
Carpenters 

Amend Section 7. Paragraph B: 

"Whereas, the International Hod 
Carriers', Building and Common La- 
borers' Union of America on a na- 
tional basis have a policy of adding 
classification which is an invasion of 
the Brotherhood of Carpenters' juris- 
diction, 

"Whereas, the Laborers' Interna- 
tional Union in recent negotiations in 
their contract have been successful in 
negotiating classifications; such as, 
Form Setting, Scaffold Erection, Form 
Stripping, Erection of Precast Concrete 
Units, etc. 

"Now therefore be it resolved, that 
the 31st General Convention to con- 
vene August 24, 1970 in San Fran- 
cisco, California consider amendments 
to the General Constitution TRADE 
AUTONOMY, Section 7, Para. B, to 
include 'HELPERS'." 

SECTION 9 

Submitted by Local Union No. 1081, 
Kitimat B C Canada 

Amend Section 9, Paragraphs A and 
B and insert new Section before Sec- 
tion 17 outlining duties of Canadian 
Vice President 

"Whereas, there is a tremendous 
upsurge in the growth of Canadian 
nationalism, particularly in the eco- 
nomic, natural resource and Union 
aspects, and 

"Whereas, members of the Cana- 
dian Parliament have raised in the 
House of Commons the wisdom of 
Canadian branches of International 
Unions being controlled from Head 
Offices in the United States, and have 
questioned the practice of remitting 



per capita taxes to the United States, 
and 

"Whereas, it is to be expected that 
in the not too distant future Canadian 
Parliamentarians will enact legislation 
prohibiting control of Canadian affili- 
ates by, and the sending of monies to 
International offices in the United 
States, and 

"Whereas, the voluntary relinquish- 
ing of complete control would be more 
acceptable to the whole Brotherhood 
membership than would a forcible 
severance through enacted legislation, 

"Now therefore be it resolved, that 
Paragraph 'A' of Section 9 of the 
Constitution be amended by inserting 
between 'General President' and 'First 
and Second Vice-Presidents' the words: 
'A Canadian Vice-President', 

"Be it further resolved, that Para- 
graph 'B' of Section 9 of the Consti- 
tution be amended to read: 

" 'Except for the Canadian Vice- 
President, who shall be elected by a 
referendum vote of all Canadian mem- 
bers, the General Officers shall be 
elected at the General Convention, 
etc., etc.' 

"And be it finally resolved, that a 
new Section be included in the Con- 
stitution, to be inserted before Section 
17, Revenue. The new Section to be 
drafted by the incoming Executive 
Board to outline the duties of the 
Canadian Vice-President, to ensure 
that he is a Canadian, that he shall 
be the final arbiter in all matters 
strictly Canadian, and that his office 
shall receive and disburse all per cap- 
ita taxes previously remitted to the 
General Office." 



Submitted by Local Union No. 159S, 
Victoria B C Canada, and Vancouver 
Island Vicinity District Council 
Amend Section 9, Paragraphs A 



and B and insert new Section before 
Section 1 7 outlining duties of Cana- 
dian Vice President 

"Whereas, there is a growing and 
genuine desire on the part of most 
Canadians for an assertion of our na- 
tion's independence particularly in 
matters relating to economics, natural 
resources and Trade Unions, and 

"Whereas, members of the Cana- 
dian Parliament have questioned in 
the House of Commons the desirability 
of Canadian Branches of International 
Unions being controlled from Head 
Offices abroad, and have also ques- 
tioned the practice of union funds 
being remitted abroad, and 

"Whereas, it is to be expected that 
in the not too distant future the Cana- 
dian Government may enact legisla- 
tion prohibiting control of Canadian 
affiliates by, and the sending of monies 
to, International offices beyond our 
borders, and 

"Whereas, Brotherhood members in 
Canada are not desirous of severing 
the valuable connections which have 
helped us to establish the Union's 
strength we now possess, and 

"Whereas, a voluntary diminution 
of complete control would be more 
acceptable to the whole membership 
than a forcible severance through en- 
acted legislation, 

"Now therefore be it resolved, that 
Paragraph 'A' of Section 9 of the 
Constitution be amended by inserting 
between 'General President' and 'First 
and Second Vice-Presidents' the words 
'A Canadian Vice-President', 

"Be it further resolved that. Para- 
graph 'B' of Section 9 of the Consti- 
tution be amended to read: 

" 'The General Officers shall be 
elected at the General Convention, ex- 
cept for the Canadian Vice-President, 



JULY, 1970 



13 



by a plurality vote of the delegates 
present and voting by secret ballot. 
The nominations shall be made on the 
third day of the first week of the 
Convention, and the election shall be 
held on the fourth day of the first 
week of the Convention. The Cana- 
dian Vice-President shall be elected 
by referendum vote of all Canadian 
members'. 

"And be it finally resolved, that a 
new section be included in the Con- 
stitution, to be inserted before Section 
17, Revenue. The new Section to be 
drafted by the incoming Executive 
Board. It will outline the duties of 
the Canadian Vice-President, ensure 
that he is a Canadian and provide that 
he shall be the final arbiter in all mat- 
ters strictly Canadian, and that his 
office will receive and disburse all 
monies received from Canadian Lo- 
cals previously remitted to General 
Headquarters." 

Submitted by Local Union No. 432, 
Atlantic City New Jersey 

Amend Section 9. Paragraph B: 

"Whereas, in the past it has been 
the custom to elect District Board 
Members by a vote of all the delegates 
at a General Convention and 

"Whereas, this results in delegates 
voting for a Board Member of whom 
they have no knowledge of his abilities 
and 

"Whereas, it is the feeling of this 
Local Union that this could result in 
the election of a member not qualified 
to perform the duties of a District 
Board Member 

"Be it now resolved, that beginning 
with the 31st General Convention and 
thereafter District Board Members be 
elected by the vote of delegates from 
their individual districts only who are 
in attendance at each convention." 



Submitted by Local Union No. 337, 
Detroit Michigan 

Amend Section 9, Paragraph G, by 
adding the following: 

"All General Officers shall be man- 
datorily retired at age 65 with full 
salary and shall be considered as Board 
Members emeritus." 

SECTION 13 

Submitted by California State Council 
of Carpenters 

Amend Section 13, Paragraph C: 
"Whereas, numerous language bar- 
riers do exist in many geographic 
areas of the U. S., her Territories, in 
Canada, and, 

"Whereas, many members and po- 
tential members cannot effectively 



read, comprehend, or interpret the 
English language, and 

"Whereas, many members and po- 
tential members would feel that they 
were more of a part of the Brother- 
hood, and 

"Whereas, more good Union mem- 
bers would become involved with the 
activity of their Local Union, and 

"Whereas, greater harmony and un- 
derstanding among members with dif- 
ferent ethnic backgrounds would be 
promoted, and 

"Whereas, public relations in the 
community would be improved, and 

"Whereas, it would help spread our 
principles and elevate our trade, and 

"Whereas, Business Agents and Or- 
ganizers as well as other Officers would 
be aided in the performance of their 
duties, now 

"Therefore be it resolved, that the 
language of Section 13, Paragraph 'C 
of the General Constitution and Laws 
shall be amended to provide: 'In order 
to promote a better understanding, 
the General Secretary shall print trans- 
lated versions of the Constitutions and 
Laws of the United Brotherhood in 
such other languages as he may deem 
to be appropriate for geographic areas 
where a large number of members, 
or potential members, speak a lan- 
guage other than English, but the in- 
terpretation of the Constitution and 
Laws in the English language shall be 
the only one by which the United 
Brotherhood shall be governed.' " 

SECTION 18 

Submitted by Local Union No. 337, 
Detroit Michigan 

Amend Section 1 8, Paragraph C, 
by proposing: 

"To delete the first sentence and in- 
sert a plan that would institute as 
closely as possible the one-man one- 
vote system at both the District Coun- 
cil and International levels." 



Submitted by Local Union No. 115, 
Bridgeport Connecticut 

Amend Section 18, Paragraphs C 
and I: 

"Whereas, determining the number 
of delegates to the National Conven- 
tion is obsolete, unfair and discrimi- 
natory. 

"Whereas, under the present system 
of representation our membership is 
not being fairly represented. 

"Whereas, now one delegate may 
represent as few as fifty or as many 
as three hundred and fifty members 
with equal voice and v