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Full text of "Carpenter"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/carpenter92unit 



JANUARY 1972 




1972 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 
Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from -the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, William Konyha 
2830 Copley Rd., Box 8175 
Akron, Ohio 44320 
Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

101 Marietta St., Suite 913 
Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

6323 N.W., Grand Blvd. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

Room 722, Oregon Nafl Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland. Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 

4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 




M. A. HuTCHESON, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPEISTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



17 C^&tsr3(i>rM 



THE 



(g^KP 




E 



VOLUME XCII 



No. 1 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 




JANUARY, 1972 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

International Signs Two Major Agreements 2 

Cooling Towers Serve Nuclear Age 5 

Intricate Concrete Forms for Dallas Cowboys 6 

Job Corps Training Program Shows Results 10 

Republican Governors See Union-Produced Modular Units 12 

Early Retirement Is Union Concern 17 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 9 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 1 4 

We Congratulate 16 

Service to the Brotherhood 18, 20, 30, 33, 34 

Local Union News 21 

Plane Gossip 28 

Apprenticeship and Training 31 

In Memoriam 35 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 37 

What's New? 38 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Foinn 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners ot America. Second class postage paid at Washington 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20(J in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

A pair of alert quail crouch ready 
to fly in a whir of wings on our Jan- 
uary cover. If their readiness portents 
the future, the new year 1972 is oflf to 
a good start. 

We add a day in 1972; February 
29 is with us again, as it has been 
every four years since the time of 
Julius Caesar. 

In early history a lunar calendar 
was used, but when man settled down 
into communities and cultivated crops, 
a solar calendar which coincided with 
the seasons was required. This raised 
many problems, as the time taken by 
the Earth to complete its orbit 
around the sun is not a whole number 
of days. The orbital period is 365.242 
days, or, to a first approximation. 
365.25 days. To account for the odd 
quarter day, an extra calendar day 
is added once every four years. 

An extra day in the new year means 
an extra day of wariness for our wild- 
life. Bobwhite quail, for example, 
have an annual turnover of about 
85%! Of all the birds produced dur- 
ing a summer breeding season — even 
if not a single shot is fired by a 
hunter — only 15% will be alive to 
reproduce the following spring. Na- 
tural predators, the weather, and even 
pesticides now take their toll. 




International Signs 
Two Major Agreements 

New Chimney, Stack, and Silo and Cooling 
Tower Agreements Set Stage for More Anti- 
Pollution Jobs for Three Building Trades 



■ Three Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Unions — the Carpenters, 
the Laborers, and the Iron Workers 
— recently signed joint agreements 
with major contractors in chimney, 
stack, silo, and cooling tower con- 
struction which promise to open up 
greater job opportunities in the fight 
against environmental pollution. 

One international agreement, cov- 
ering work on chimneys, stacks and 
silos, takes the place of an agree- 
ment signed in 1968 and known as 
the Reinforced Concrete Chimney 
Composite Crew Agreement. Its 
major change is the addition of 
standards for slip-form construction, 
a revolutionary building technique 
which was not being used exten- 
sively in North America when the 
previous agreement was signed. 

The second agreement covers an- 
other recent innovation in North 
American construction — the erec- 
tion of hyperbolic cooling towers. 
Such cooling towers have been wide- 
ly used in other countries, but the 
first one was not erected in the 
United States until 1962. 

The two agreements were signed 
at Bal Harbour. Fla., in November. 
The cooling tower agreement was 
applicable to all projects bid after 
November 11. 1971. The Chimney, 
Stack and Silo Agreement went into 
effect January 1. 1972. 

Basically, the agreements provide 
for harmonious and compatible re- 
lationships among the three crafts 
and the employers. They eliminate 
existing inequities which exist in lo- 
cal area agreements and the neces- 
sity of the employers to interpret 
local agreements. They also help 
to prevent encroachments by non- 
union or open-shop contractors in 
this vital field of work. 



The agreements establish equi- 
table, uniform standards of premi- 
um pay compensation to insure the 
standardization of premiums for the 
three crafts involved. They also 
simplify the bidding process for af- 
fected employers. 

The new agreements will super- 
cede all "high time", special skill, 
and condition premium pay clauses 
contained in local agreements. In 
addition, the new pacts include pre- 
mium pay, shift schedules and many 
other provisions governing the work. 

Slip-form construction will be on 
a craft line basis, but there may be 
exceptions to this where it is prac- 
tical and essential to perform this 
work on a composite-crew basis. 
Such determination will be made in 
accordance with Article 3, "Pre-Job 
Conferences," which is required 
prior to the commencement of any 
work. 

The two agreements cover work 
in an area which is fast growing in 
national and international impor- 
tance. There is increasing public 
demand that American industry cut 
down its smoke pollution and its 
contamination of our rivers and 
lakes. The erection of super-tall 
chimneys and hyperbolic water- 
cooling towers are two ways scien- 
tists claim that pollution problems 
can be licked. 

Studies conducted in Great Brit- 
ain and the United States indicate 
that ground-level concentration of 
sulphur dioxide and other pollutants 
emitted from smoke stacks can be 
reduced drastically by the erection 
of high chimneys. One enthusiastic 
researcher concludes that high stacks 
almost eliminate the air-pollution 
problem altogether. 

Continued on Page 3 



THE CARPENTER ■»-. 





In any case, major power compa- 
nies like Commonwealth Edison, 
Ohio Edison, International Nickel, 
and American Electric Power are 
moving up to higher elevations with 
their smoke stacks to cut the amount 
of waste products entering the at- 
mosphere at their production plants. 
The world's tallest, to date, is a 
1,250-foot giant — the same height 
as the Empire State Building — which 
replaces three much-lower chimneys 
and successfully disperses smelter 



gas for International Nickel in Sud- 
bury, Ontario. 

Slip-form construction is a tech- 
nique perfected in Germany. Com- 
pared to the conventional jump- 
forming technique (in which a pre- 
determined height of chimney is 
poured in concrete forms and left to 
harden before more height can be 
added), the slipforming technique 
makes it possible to build the chim- 
ney walls on a continuous basis, 
Continued on Page 4 



LEFT: The world's largest chimney, designed and built by the Canadian Kellogg 
Company, Ltd., helps the International Nickel Company control air pollution. The 
big stack, built by members of the three unions, dwarfs its predecessors at the 
Copper Cliff Smelter in the Sudbury District of Ontario. 




THE CHIMNEY, STACK, AND SILO AGREEMENT— Participants included: 
Seated, John H. Lyons, General President, IW; Peter Fosco, General President, La- 
borers; and M. A. Hutcheson, General President, Carpenters. Standing, left to right, 
Robert McVay, Assistant President, IW; Robert Cooney, Vice President, IW; Juel 
Drake, Secretary-Treasurer, IW; Vernon Reed, Vice President, Laborers; Edward 
Pavlini, Costodis .Construction; John Wilson, Rust Engineering; S. Handler and R. N. 
Martin, M. W. Kellogg Co.; Howard Warshawsky, Continental Heine Chimney Co.; 
and Wm. Sidell, First Vice President, Carpenters. Standing, rear, James Norwood, 
International Representative, Laborers; Frank Stray and George Sear, Custodis Con- 
.stniction; and John S. Rogers, Assistant to President, Carpenters. 




THE COOLING lOWER AtiKEEMENT— Participants included: Seated General 
Presidents John H. Lyons, Iron Workers; Peter Fosco, Laborers; and M. A. Hutche- 
son, Carpenters, Standing, Front row, left to right, William Sidell, First General Vice 
President, Carpenters; Vernon Reed, Vice President, Laborers; Juel Drake, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Iron Workers; Ed Morris, Research Cottrell; and Sid Handler aiid 
R. N. Martin, The M. W. Kellogg Co. Second row, H. C. Skinner, Second General 
Vice President, Carpenters; Robert McVay, Assistant to the President, Iron Work- 
ers; Robert Cooney, Vice President. Iron Workers; James Norwood, International 
Representative, Laborers; Herman Scheller, Research Cottrell; Dennis Carlton-Jones, 
Research Cottrell; Wayne Messer, Ragnar Benson; Gary Wilson, The Marley 
Company; and John S. Rogers, Assistant to the General President — Carpenters. 

JANUARY, 1972 3 




LEFT: The slipfonn rises ever higher, as the hydraulic 
jacks adjust the collar plates for the tapering of the concrete. 
Kellogg used the German-oriented Ahl continuous-slip- 
forming technique to build the Inco chimney. 

BELOW: Members check the jacks. Workers made 624 
manual adjustments to the slipform unit for every 10 
inches added to the chimney height. 



-y -t. '^ ^-~^^^^^^ ^'^i^f;,^ -^^ "^^ ^^2 




International Signs 

Continued from Page 3 

usually around-the-clock. 

Slipforming uses two movable 
collars which become the inside and 
outside forms of the chimney. The 
collars, though, are not solid rings. 
Each collar is made up of overlap- 
ping steel plates which are four and 
five feet deep, and, as the chimney 
goes up, the plates squeeze together 
to create the necessary taper. Chim- 
neys are erected in weeks instead 
of months, which is an important 
factor in the fight against pollution. 

The other new type of structure 
covered by a joint agreement — the 
hyperbolic cooling tower — elimi- 
nates ground fogging, which is some- 
times unavoidable in the operation 
of lower-height, conventional cool- 
ing towers. They have a longer 
service life, lower operating costs, 
and they provide an adequate 
amount of condenser cooling water 
at any site that has available only 
3% of the total water volume re- 
quired by the plant. They are of 
particular value at nuclear power 
plants, which are increasing in num- 
ber in North America. 

The two agreements assure that 
these modern, and progressive con- 
struction techniques will "bear the 
union label" in the years ahead. ■ 



SLIPFORMING A CHIMNEY 



■ .y\y-^..-^-^JiB^.: 




FIVE-TON HYDRAULIC JACKS 



Compared to the conventional jump forming technique (in which a pre- 
determined height of chimney is poured in concrete forms and left to harden 
before more height can be added), the slipforming technique makes it possible 
to build chimney nails in neeks instead of months. 

Slipforming uses tno movable collars which become the outside and inside 
forms of the chimney. The collars are not solid rings, but a series of overlap- 
ping steel plates. As the chimney goes up, the plates squeeze together to create 
the necessary taper. The plates are attachd to yoke assemblies. What holds 
up the yokes and, in turn, the collars, are jack rods imbedded in the concrete 
walls. On each yoke are two double-acting hydraulic jacks, which grip the 
jack rods and move up upon them as the concrete rises. 

The structure is a homogenous mass, because the process of pouring con- 
crete, reinforcing the structure with steel reinforcing rods, and moving the 
slipforms in a 24-hour operation. 



THE CARPENTER 



Cooling Towers Serve the Nuclear Age 



CarpenterSf Laborers, 
Ironworkers Share 
Work on Hyperbolic 
Water Cooling Towers 

■ A $180 million nuclear power 
plant now under construction near 
Sacramento, Calif., may be the fore- 
runner of a new kind of atomic 
energy installation — one which can 
bring smog-free, non-water-pollut- 
ing industrial energy to many inland 
communities of North America. 

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Power 
Plant near the California capital will 
be, upon completion in 1973, the 
only large nuclear plant in the United 
States not on a body of water. It 
will obtain sufficient cooling water 
from the nearby Folsom - South 
Canal and will recirculate the water 
through cooling towers, so that the 
plant will not discharge water into 
any streams, and, being a nuclear 
plant, will not add hydrocarbons 
to the atmosphere. 

Hyperbolic cooling towers make 
the inland installation possible. This 
type of water cooUng only recently 
appeared on the American indus- 
trial scene, after having been widely 
used in many foreign countries for 
decades. Their advantage is that 
they provide an adequate volume 
of condenser cooling water at any 
site that has available only 3% of 
the total water volume required by 
the plant. With this advantage, 
plant designers can locate generat- 
ing stations near to the fuel source; 
less real estate is required, and, 
usually, land cost is less than in 
areas with adequate total water 
resources. 

Hyperbolic cooling towers oper- 
ate on natural draft, and no fans are 
required. As a consequence, oper- 
ating cost is minimal. Also, since no 
mechanical equipment is used in the 
tower, maintenance costs are much 
lower than usually incurred in the 
operating of conventional mechani- 
cal draft water cooling towers. 

Absence of mechanical equipment 
and utilization of construction mate- 
rials which provide maximum pro- 



"^7~rrr" 



"1 




Twin cooling towers, 43 stories tall, are part of the 913 megawatt Rancho Seco 
nuclear power plant developed by Bechtel Corporation for the Sacramento, Calif., 
Municipal Utility District. Site of the towers is 23 miles southeast of Sacramento, 
near the foothills of Northern California's famed Mother Lode Country. The project 
employs members of the Brotherhood, plus union Laborers, Ironworkers, Cement 
Masons, Operating Engineers, and Teamsters. 



tection against natural deterioration 
assure a long service life for the 
tower. 

Industrial planners anticipate tre- 
mendous growth in power generat- 
ing facilities in the years ahead, 
doubling every decade. A growing 
demand for the hyperbolic towers 
is expected. 

The major portion of the work 
on these towers, as in the erection 
of chimneys and stacks, is borne by 
the three crafts — the Carpenters, 
Laborers, and Ironworkers. Work- 
ers are now covered, for the most 
part, by the agreement described on 
Pages 2, 3 and 4 of this issue of 
The Carpenter. 

The Bechtel Corporation is mas- 



ter contractor for the Rancho Seco 
Plant, but contractor for the tower 
work is Research Cottrell, a signa- 
tory to the aforementioned agree- 
ment. The first pre-job conference 
was held on July 22, 1969. Approx- 
imately 40 workers were employed 
at the peak of the project — 20 Car- 
penters, 17 Laborers, 13 Ironwork- 
ers, 4 Cement Masons, 5 Operators, 
and 1 Teamster. It was a jump-form 
installation, each tower rising 600 
feet and running 50 feet wide. 

A 160-acre water reservoir, 
called Rancho Seco Lake, has been 
prepared as standby cooling water. 
It has a 40-mile shoreUne and will 
be open to the public for recrea- 
tional use. ■ 



JANUARY, 1972 




■ It's hardly news to report that 
they do things big in Texas. A few 
issues of The Carpenter ago we told 
of the world's largest and finest air- 
port being built between Fort Worth 
and Dallas. This time, we tell you 
about the world's finest football 
facility, home of one of the world's 
finest professional football teams, 
the Dallas Cowboys. 

The Cowboys began their 1971 
season in a $15 million open-domed 
stadium, even bigger and better than 
the famed Astrodome in Houston. 
The new facility boasts, among 
many extras, 65,000 contoured, 
theater-style seats, all protected by 



The super .sladium is surruunded by :i vast parking lot and is fed by live express- 
ways. It has covered walks from the parking areas to the entrance portals. Sellout 
crowds can be easily accommodated. The partial free-span roof keeps the spectators 
dry in all weather, but lets in Texas sunshine for gridiron action. From 58,000 to 
65,000 spectators can be accommodated. 



RICATE 
RETE FORMS, 
Y MEMBERS 





Job Steward F. R. DcLay worked more 
than two years on the big project. 




Members worked with a prcbuilt forming 
.system to fit and handle any shape or 
size of concrete work. 



THE CARPENTER 



overhead roof, space for parking 
15,000 automobiles, 86 spacious, 
tiled restroom lounges, louvered no- 
glare night illumination, spectator 
stands which begin only 36 feet from 
the sidelines, 78 concession centers, 
escalators serving all concourses, 
and a series of circle suites which 
ring the stadium and which were 
purchased for $50,000 each as City 
of Irving Revenue bonds by wealthy 
Texans and their private firms. 

The constmction work was under 
contract to the J. W. Bateson Com- 
pany, and hundreds of carpenters, 
members of Dallas Local 198, were 
employed. 



The stadium was a major dem- 
onstration of craft skill in concrete 
forming. Complex prebuilt forms, 
suppHed by two companies Economy 
Forms Corp. and Symons Form Co. 
were used. 

From the main concourse, which 
is grade level, the lower deck seat- 
ing was poured on grade down to 
the playing field. Directly above 
the main concourse are two levels 
of private boxes (the circle suites), 
followed by the upper concourse 
and the upper deck seating. To sup- 
port the precast seating of the upper 
deck, 96 riser beams were installed 



around the stadium, supported by 
2-foot-square columns. 

High early concrete was used on 
riser beams, walkway beams, and in 
other ways to keep the work on 
schedule. 

There were numerous dowel-out 
conditions at varying elevations in 
the columns for sloping ramp 
beams. This was handled with bolt- 
on face sheets in varying lengths 
and with pre-punched dowel holes. 
Even with the dowel conditions the 
column forms were cycled every 
two days by five-man crews. This 
included setting the rebars, which 
went up with the forms. ■ 




Symons steel-ply forms are used on these circular walls. 
With the forms and small fillers, a curve can be held 
with a minimum of walling and hracing. 



A form for a riser beam is made ready at the job site. 
The 74-foot beams were formed with four sets of plate 
girder forms set on adjustable support brackets. 




' ^ 



Members of Dallas area local unions set up a form for concrete 
pouring. Two different companies supplied forms — Economy Forms 
Corp. and Symons Form Co. 




/ ' 




An array of poured and cured units in place after the forms were 
removed. More than 87,000 square feet of columns were poured by 
the contractor. 



JANUARY, 1972 




Chevy Blazer lakes on a snow-covered pass in Washington Slate. 



What this country needs is a big, tough, roomy 4- wheel drive Chevy Blazer. 



What this country needs, it's got. 

Chevy Blazer is big. With wide-stance suspension 
to tackle rough terrain. 

Tough. Designed like all Chevy trucks to last a 
long time. 

With features like front disc brakes as standard 
equipment. 

Roomy. Blazer seats up to 5 adults in comfort. 

And Blazer's the one named "Utility Vehicle of the 
Year" by Motor Trend magazine. 

From winter skiing to summer ^^^^ 

cross-country trekking, Chevy 
Blazer can take you just about 
anyplace you want to go. 



Chevy trucks 




1956 '57 58 '59 '60 "61 '62 '63 64 '65 '66 1967 



Proof Chevy trucks last loriRcr. Example: 
over 55% of our '56's arc still in use. No 
other make has even half, based on official 
R. L. Polk industry statistics. 



THE CARPENTER 





ROUNDUP 



NO LIE DETECTORS— An employer cannot discharge a worker for refusing to sulsmit 
to a polygraph or "lie detector" test involving questions about his love life 
or his union a.ctivities, a trial examiner for the National Labor Relations Board 
has ruled. The Board ordered three employees reinstated with full back pay. 
They had been discharged because they refused to take a lie detector test in which 
they would be required to answer questions on whether they had violated a 
company policy forbidding employees to date each other. 

SUPERTREE— A research geneticist at the National Arboretum in Washington is trying 
to develop a new kind of tree, one that will survive the stresses and pollutants 
of an urban environment of the 1970's. A city tree seldom dies of old age, 
says the researcher. He is cross-breeding 20 different kinds of trees in an 
attempt to achieve the best city tree possible. 

COMPUTER LOG-CUTTING— Rep . Julia Butler Hansen, Washington Democrat, recently 
described to the House of Representatives how computers will soon invade sawmills 
and increase the amount of lumber which can be cut from each log. Advanced 
computer technology helps to position each log for the critical first cut, she 
reported, then calculates sizes and amounts of cuts as the log continues 
under the saws . 

AN AUTO'S $11,000 BILL— The average American spends $11,000 to operate an auto- 
mobile during its average lifetime, according to Congressman Seymour Halpern, 
New York Republican. This figure covers the expense to buy an economical car, to 
park it, and to keep it moving. His study shows that the car owner spends 
about $2,037 for gasoline, tires, and oil and about $1,805 for parking and tolls. 

ADDITIONAL PAID-UP Gl INSURANCE?— A Congressional bill which provides that dividends 
may be used to purchase additional paid-up National Service Life Insurance has 
passed the Senate and gone to the President for signature. "Many veterans, 
particularly those of World War II, desire to purchase additional government 
life insurance with their dividends, as they are generally permitted to do with 
private, commercial policies. This bill will make that option available to 
approximately 4.4 million NSLI policyholders," says Sen. Vance Hartke of Indiana, 
who pushed the legislation through. 

PLENTY OF NOTHING— At a meeting of AFL-CIO price monitors here an Internal 
Revenue Service spokesman was explaining Phase II enforcement to union members. 
He told them violators will have to refund any overcharges to their customers. 

"How will the customer know they have money coming?" asked one unionist. 

"The store has to tell them," said the technician. "IRS will not divulge 
any information to a third party, even the one who made the complaint." 

MODEL JOB SAFETY LAW— The framework of a model job safety law for states has been 
issued by the APL-CIO for use in organized labor's coming drive in legislatures 
across the country for enactment of effective occupational safety and health 
measures. 

The working model, distributed to all affiliated unions and state labor 
bodies, incorporates the key features of the existing federal Occupational Safety 
& Health Act, which could be diluted by ineffective state standards and enforce- 
ment. 

NAMED TO BOARD— John A. Penello, regional director for the National Labor Rela- 
tions Board at Baltimore and a 34-year NLRB career man, has been nominated by 
Pres. Nixon for a five-year term as a Labor Board member. 

Penello, a Democrat, is the third Nixon nominee to the board. Penello 's 
confirmation would mean a board composed of three Republicans and two Democrats. 
He would succeed Gerald A. Brown. 

Beginning as a field examiner for the NLRB in 1937 at Baltimore. Penello 
worked his way up through the ranks of the agency. 

JANUARY, 1972 9 




Rep. Edith Green talks with Glenn Smith, right, top corps- 
man at the Timber Lake Job Corps Center in Mt. Hood 
National Forest. In the background are Corpsmen Tony 
Chamberlain, Eddie Zellers and Dennis Brown, 




The party escorting Congresswoman Green on a tour of the 
Timber Lake facilities walks outside one of the Job Corps- 
constructed homes. 

■ U.S. Representative Edith Green recently at- 
tended dedication ceremonies for Forest Service hous- 
ing facilities built by Job Corpsmen at Timber Lake 
Job Corps Center in Oregon. 

Young men trained in carpentry by Brotherhood 
instructors and their leaders conducted Mrs. Green 
on a tour of the camp and the first two of nine houses 
being built by the trainees. 

It was a revealing tour for the veteran Congress- 
woman, and she praised the cooperative work of the 
Brotherhood and the US Forest Service in making 
the program possible. 

The camp, near Estacada, Ore., has been open since 
1968, and it has a current enrollment of 60 Job Corps 
trainees, referred there by federal employment offices 
throughout the nation. 

The houses dedicated during Mrs. Green's visit 
were two of nine planned to accommodate Forest 
Service personnel who work in the Mt. Hood National 
Forest out of the Ripplebrook Ranger Station. Corps- 
men built the houses in training toward an apprentice- 
ship in the building trades. 

Coordinator of the carpentry program is Carl Hen- 
dren of Local 1020. Instructors include Earl Mooney 
and Norman Buckner of Local 2416; Art G. Izer and 
Elmore R. Reese, Sr., Local 226; and Eugene Ben- 
ham, Local 583. ■ 



Brotherhood's Job C 



■ "Lost and Found," a half hour color film telling 
the story of the partnership between the Jobs Corps 
and five building trades unions — including our own 
Brotherhood — was shown to the press and labor offi- 
cials at a special reception in Washington, D.C., last 
month. It will now be made available for public and 
union showings. 

The film features Job Corps trainees learning the 
skills required to get and keep a job in the construction 
industry, and is narrated by Greg Morris of T.V.'s 
"Mission Impossible" fame. 

The story narrows down to a capsule glance at five 
corpsmen — first picking them up before they knew 
about Job Corps, following them through their union 
training, and finally, showing how they are dispatched 
to high paying jobs as members of their craft unions. 

The film shows classroom instruction and on-the- 
job training in the trades of painting, carpentry, brick- 
laying, plastering and heavy equipment operation, as 
well as providing insight into other features of the 
Job Corps, such as individual counseling, group liv- 
ing and athletics. 

Job placement of Corpsmen successfully complet- 
ing their union sponsored programs has been 94%, 
substantially higher than the placement rate for non- 
union programs. The rate of trainees completing the 
union program is also significantly higher, and aver- 
age hourly earnings of union-placed trainees are more 
than 50% higher than those of other graduates. While 
placement of trainees has been difficult during the 
past year because of the slump in construction activity, 
better than nine out of ten of the graduates have 
found a new future working alongside the nation's 
construction craftsmen. ■ 



A Jobs Corps carpenter trainee is photographed at Timber 
Lake Center in Oregon by a team of Washington, D.C., 
cinematographers in the preparation of the movie. 




10 



THE CARPENTER 



rps Training Activities Show Results 



■ Jerome Kovis, director of the Marsing, Idaho, 
Civilian Conservation Center recently turned over the 
keys of the completed comfort station at Parma, Idaho, 
to Mayor Fred Newman. 

The new building is on park grounds recently re- 
claimed from swamp land by the City of Parma. It 
will be used as a comfort facility for motorists in the 
area, who will also be able to stay overnight at the 
park. The comfort station was built to sustain mini- 
mum damage by vandals. It measures 32' x 16' and 
is made with reinforced concrete walls formed to re- 
semble wood planks. The roof is beam and timber 
deck. The building is equipped with dressing rooms, 
shower facilities and a machinery-and-storage room 
between the restrooms. 

Extensive training for Corpsmen in form work was 
received in forming and pouring the reinforced con- 
crete walls. The wood-grain plank effect was created 
by applying rough 1" x 12" to the face of the outside 
concrete forms before placing the concrete. Corpsmen 
also received training in rough framing while installing 
interior partitions and the beam and timber-deck roof 
system. Inside finish work of installing room partitions, 
hanging doors and inside trim provided training in 
finish work. 

The carpentry training was under the supervision 
of Roger Whitney of the Brotherhood. Kenneth 
Wheeler, coordinator of the carpenter program at the 
center, worked with him. 

Under the supervision of James Loveless, the union 
painting instructor, trainees painted the building when 
the Job Corps carpenters were finished. 

The project provided a total of 4,960 hours of car- 
pentry and painting training to complete. ■ 



B The first trainee at Treasure Lake Job Corps 
Center to earn the Brotherhood patch — signifying his 
successful completion of training — was a young man 
named John Waller of Texarkana, Texas. 

Recently, General Executive Board Member Fred 
Bull and Center Coordinator Arthur W. Rice arranged 
for Waller to be interviewed by J. W. Jackson, busi- 
ness representative of Local 977, Wichita Falls, Tex., 
regarding apprenticeship training. Jackson, in turn, 
contacted George Ross, Jr., a partner of Reid-Ross 
Construction Company. Waller was hired and became 
an apprentice under Journeyman John Womack, the 
state's No. 2 apprentice champ two year's before. 

Womack spoke highly of his new apprentice. 

"I have never worked with a man who has shown 
more desire to learn than Johnny," he said. "I can 
be sure that he will complete any task I give him 
without constant supervision. He has retained a lot 
of what he was taught in Job Corps. This is evident in 
his day-to-day work. I foresee a secure future for 
Johnny in carpentry, and I cannot praise too highly 
the work that is being done by the Brotherhood in 
these programs, giving young men a second chance 
to build good futures for themselves." 

Waller paid a return visit to the Job Corps Center 
at Treasure Lake, which is located in the foothills of 
the Wichita Mountains, 25 miles west of Lawton, 
Oklahoma. He made a short speech to the young men 
then undergoing carpentry training. He urged them to 
take full advantage of the opportunities they have in 
the Job Corps to learn a trade and further their edu- 
cation. 

"You men are just like me," he added, "lucky to 
learn a trade." ■ 



Job Corpsmen at work on the comfort station in Parma, 
Idaho. The facility was built at a cost of $18,750, with the 
Job Corps cost placed at $15,800. 




John Waller, second from left, with Job Corps Field Co- 
ordinator Lloyd Larsen, Center Coordinator Arthur Nice, 
and Wichita Falls Business Rep. J. W. Jackson. 




JANUARY, 1972 



11 



Republican Governors See Union-Produced 
Modular Units Assembled in Demonstration 

General President Hutcheson discusses Brotherhood housing goals 



■ The governors of more than 
20 states witnessed a demonstration 
of the capabilities of industrialized 
housing to meet the nation's shelter 
needs, November 19, at French 
Lick, Ind. 

The demonstration, on the pro- 
gram of the Republican Governors 
Conference, was staged by National 
Homes Corporation, the country's 
largest home manufacturer, which 
employs approximately 2.400 Broth- 
erhood members. 

With key federal, state and local 
officials watching. National Homes 
set the last of fo\ir 12' by 48' 3-di- 
mensional modular cubes to form a 
townhouse with two 965 square foot 
living units. The cubes were com- 
pletely finished and assembled in the 
company's Lafayette, Indiana, plant, 
by members of Local 2601, hauled 
to the site on special carriers and 
erected by crane. 

The living units were open to in- 
spection by the governors and their 
guests almost immediately after the 
final cube was erected. Each living 
unit has a living room, 3 bedrooms, 
kitchen and I'i baths. The exte- 
riors arc of maintenance-free alumi- 
num with rouah sawn cedar archi- 



ABOUT NATIONAL HOMES 

Nalional Homes i>> one of the 
largest employers of the Carpenters 
and Joiners in the United Slates, 
employing approximately 2.400 
men. Our first contract was nego- 
tiated in June, 1941. Local 2601 
was formed in the Lafayette, In- 
diana plant. 

All National modular homes 
and most of their mobile homes 
carry the Carpenters and Joiners 
label. We have organized 12 of 
their plants across the country. Be- 
cause of the Carpenters and Joiners 
label on their products, the building 
trades handle their products in the 
entire United States and its posses- 
sions. 

They use the best materials and 
produce housing of fine quality. 



RIGHT: A complete modular 

house, styled and manufactured 

by National Homes. BELOW: 

The assembly demonstration 

for the GOP leaders. 




tectural trim. On the interior, the 
walls are vinyl covered for easy 
housekeeping, and the textured ceil- 
ings have an acoustical quality. 

The townhouses, which have steel 
floor joists and wall studs, utilize 
construction techniques developed 
by National Homes for its Opera- 
tion Breakthrough systems. The ob- 
jective of Operation Breakthrough, 
sponsored by the U. S. Department 
of Housing and Urban Development, 
is to develop new methods and ma- 
terials to increase the supply of 
quality homes and to improve the 
life styles of American families. 

These 3-dimcnsional modular 
homes are relocatable. They have 
since been disassembled by National 
Homes and moved to the Operation 
Breakthrough site in Indianapolis, 
where National Homes is one of the 
contract builders. 

Indiana Governor Edgar D. Whit- 



comb, host to the Conference, said 
that "as Governors, we are keenly 
sensitive to the shelter needs of fam- 
ilies in our states. 

"We can subscribe," he continued, 
"to the National Housing Goal — 
established by Congress — to provide 
decent housing in a suitable environ- 
ment for every American family. 

James R. Price, Chairman of the 
Board and Chief Executive Officer 
of National Homes Corporation, 
said that the company's Operation 
Breakthrough systems include both 
2- and 3-dimensional modular units 
that could be used for single-family 
homes, townhouses and garden 
apartments. 

"I have been saying — and prov- 
ing — for more than 30 years," said 
Mr. Price, "that the assembly-line 
methods of modern industry pro- 
vide the best way to build homes 
for families at every income level. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



"From the very beginning," he 
continued, "our objective has been 
to manufacture as much of the home 
in the plant as possible. There, un- 
der controlled conditions, we are 
able to use the most advanced tech- 
nology, supervise the work and con- 
trol the quality. Certainly the in- 
dustrialization of home building does 
make a substantial contribution to 
cutting costs and conserving skilled 
labor." 

On August 3, 1971, National 
Homes delivered its 400,000th 
home, a feat without parallel in the 
housing industry. The company's 
20 plants serve more than 2,000 
builders in 39 states east of the 
Rockies. 

Edward Durell Stone, a Fellow 
of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, recalled that he had worked 
successfully with the National 
Homes systems in developing an 
architectural concept for Operation 
Breakthrough. 

Pointing out that the National 
Homes systems have "unlimited flex- 
ibility," Mr. Stone added: "We 
found that the modular system of 
construction applied to all problems 
of community housing." 

M. A. Hutcheson, General Presi- 
dent of the Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners, said our union is 
dedicating its capabilities to meet- 
ing the National Housing Goal of 
26 million new homes over a 10- 
year period. 

"Members of the Carpenters Un- 
ion are fully aware of the critical 
housing problem facing our nation 
today," he said. "We feel, as do all 
of you, a great sense of urgency in 
tackling this problem and finding a 
workable solution. 

"Our union wants its members 
— and all Americans — to have the 
right kind of ^ 
shelter in the 
right kind of en- 
vironment. 

"What you see 
here today is the 
beginning of a 
new era in which 
everyone will 
profit," he con- 
cluded. ■ JAMES PRICE 




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13 




ANADIAN 



Unemployment Rises Higher, Like the 
Snow, As Construction Backlog Piles Up 

Canadians enjoy a white Christmas 
and the shimmering glow of fresh- 
failing snow, but few are hankering 
for the weight of snowfalls which hit 
many parts of Canada last year, in- 
cluding the nation's capital, Ottawa. 

In most of the Ottawa Valley snow 
drifted as high as 1 5 feet, two stories 
of a house, and that took some shovel- 



mg. 

But that wasn't the worst disaster 
to strike Ottawa. Most Canadians say 
it was high unemployment arising 
largely from misguided economic poli- 
cies. 

This year the snow may not reach 
so high, but the unemployment, as 
these columns have related, has risen 
higher. This could make for a gloomy 
winter for many thousands. 

So not long before Christmas. Prime 
Minister Trudeau was scheduled to 



visit Washington and confer with Presi- 
dent Nixon. The major subject of his 
talks was economic relations between 
Canada and the United States. 

A few days before he left he tried 
to say some cheering words. 

He told the people of Canada, 
through an address to a blacktie busi- 
ness audience in Toronto, that the 
current expansion of the Canadian 
economy is so strong "that our rate of 
growth for 1971 as a whole will likely 
exceed that in every other major indus- 
trial country in the Western world, and 
even that of Japan." 

He pointed out that, in the first nine 
months of 1971, (the latest figures 
available as he spoke) Canada's gross 
national product was up 6.9 percent 
over last year, while the GNP of the 
United States was up only 3.1 percent. 

In employment, 258.000 new jobs 



were created in Canada between Octo- 
ber 1970 and October 1971. an in- 
crease of 3.2 percent. In the United 
States in the same period the increase 
was only 1.5 percent. 

But he was frank enough to admit 
that these optimistic figures cannot 
cover up the high rate of unemploy- 
ment. In joblessness, we are leading 
the United Slates. 

Even as the Prime Minister was 
speaking the Canadian construction 
industry said it was worried. Last year 
proved to be a poorer year than they 
expected, except perhaps in residential 
construction. 

The industry forecast over Si 5 bil- 
lion in construction in 1971 but fell a 
billion dollars short of the objective. 
Spokesmen said that they don't expect 

1 972 to be much better. 

It's not that the business is not there. 
It is just that businessmen are being 
cautious, so that a backlog is piling 
up which could make itself felt in 

1973 and 1974. 

What the industry fears is boom- 
and-bust cycles, due to the federal 
government using construction like a 
tap, turning it down when business is 
good and turning it up when business 
is bad. 

Why not, asks the industry, even 
things out? Year in and year out? 

Housing construction could reach 
230,000 when final 1971 figures are in, 
40,000 over 1970 when the tap was 
turned down. Lower interest rates 
should help for 1972 — if they stay 
down. 



Contradictions Continue to Plague 
Building and Construction Trades 



One headline read "1972 Building 
Record Forecast for Canada" while 
another headline on the same day in 
the same paper read "Construction 
Survey Finds 18*;^ Unemployed." 

These conflicting headlines point 
up the contradictions which continue 
to plague the construction industry. 

The story imder the first headline 
provides information about residential 
construction which amounted to 210,- 
400 units in 1969, slipped to 190,- 
550 in 1 970 and is expected to reach 
225.000 in 1971. 

The 1971 figure is 10.000 below 
the forecast of federal housing min- 
ister Robert Andras and 25.000 below 
needed construction, according to 



Economic Council of Canada esti- 
mates. 

The second headline refers to the 
level of unemployment in the build- 
ing trades current in the Metro Tor- 
onto area. Yet, according to the story 
under the first headline, "new build- 
ing volume in the Metropolitan To- 
ronto area will exceed SI billion to 
capture \SVc of all Canada's new 
construction." 

The 18% unemployment in the 
Metro area refers to 25.000 building 
trades workers in commercial, indus- 
trial, institutional and apartment proj- 
ects, where union jobs are concen- 
trated. Only in a few areas of Ontario 
is residential construction unionized, 



for example, Windsor and Thunder 
Bay. 

In Metro Toronto, only high-rise 
developments are largely under union 
contracts. 

Unemployment in other areas of 
Ontario is worse than in Metro, ac- 
cording to Henry Kobryn, secretary 
Provincial Building Trades Council. 

While Sudbury, the INCO city, is 
booming, cities like Hamilton and St. 
Catharines where employment is rel- 
atively good, still show jobless rates 
in building trades unions around the 
18';r level. 

But Windsor has had almost 50% 
jobless since the spring, London has 
had that many jobless for about two 
years while Sarnia shows about 75% 
unemployed over a two-year period. 

The Metro Toronto figures were 
provided by Alex Main, business man- 
auer of the Toronto Construction and 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Building Trades Council. His figure 
showed 4,569 unemployed in their af- 
filiates. 

The Laborers have 1,100 jobless, 
the plumbers 946, carpenters 657, 
sheet metal workers 214, bricklayers 
150, hoisting engineers 200, ironwork- 
ers 176, millwrights 120, painters 96. 
Others had fewer jobless. 

The Metro Toronto figures were 
made public in a submission to To- 
ronto Mayor William Dennison's task 
force on unemployment. 

CLC Backs Mackasey 
On Labor Act Changes 

Federal Labor Minister Bryce Mac- 
kasey was under attack at the 15th 
annual convention of the Ontario Fed- 
eration of Labor late last year for 
yielding to the pressures of business 
interests in considering watering down 
new labor act changes. 

Among other things the changes 
would give organized labor more voice 
at the bargaining table on technological 
change. This federal legislation would 
affect only those unions recognized 
under federal legislation, covering 
about 10% of the work force. 

The legislation did not pass in the 
final session of 1971. Undoubtedly 
business is exerting a great deal of 
pressure on the cabinet to wipe out all 
or parts of the proposed changes. 

It is likely that Mr. Mackasey him- 
self would like to see the amended 
legislation pass as he drafted it. After 
all it has taken him six years to get it 
before parliament. 

He may be having trouble carrying 
his point of view in the cabinet and 
the Liberal caucus but the Canadian 
Labor Congress is backing him strong- 

ly- 

Quebec Federation 
Tackles Many Problems 

The QFL convention had before it 
a major study showing that last year a 
record number of plants simply closed 
down, for a variety of reasons, leaving 
many employees jobless at a time of 
high unemployment. 

The convention adopted many very 
progressive policy statements on the 
issue from a shorter work week to gov- 
ernment takeovers where practicable, 
but it was still a moderate policy- 
making convention compared with the 
one which took place in Quebec a few 
weeks later. 

The Quebec Federation of Labor, 



a month or two before its December 
convention, joined with the Confedera- 
tion of National Trade Unions and the 
Teachers' Federation in leading a mass 
demonstration in protest at the failure 
of that province's leading French- 
language newspaper, La Presse, to set- 
tle with its unions. 

The big demonstration was met by 
violent police intervention and broken 
up. 

This provided background for ag- 
gressive leadership at the QFL's an- 
nual convention from its President 
Louis Laberge who led the La Presse 
march. 

His opening address put the QFL 
on record against both the power struc- 
ture in the province and the economic 
system. 

It involved a new alignment of all 
forces in the trade union movement 
for political action which in the past 
has taken Quebec labor in many direc- 
tions, to put it mildly. 

The tenor of the Laberge speech 
struck a sympathetic note with the 
thousand delegates who, before the 
end of the convention, seemed to be 
marching ahead of its newly-militant 
leadership. 

This should not be surprising when 
one considers that, over 25 years, Que- 
bec's unemployment rate has been 
roughly twice Ontario's. 

Add to this, hard-line governments 
both in Montreal and in the provincial 
capital, Quebec City, and you have the 
elements of the serious disconent which 
exists. 

Million and a Half 
New Jobs by Year 1975? 

Canada will need almost a million 
and a half new jobs by 1975 if the 
growing work force is to find employ- 
ment. 

The particular emphasis must be on 
the age 25-34 group, according to fed- 
eral sources. The Social and Family 
Services Department of the Ontario 
government points out that at least 
10,000 people aged 18 to 25 who have 
a high school education or better are 
unemployed in Ontario. 

At one end of the scale, the older 
worker is being laid off and often has 
a tough time finding a job due to age, 
while at the other end the young 
worker can't find his first job. 

In the 1971 splurge of layoffs, exec- 
utives have not been excluded. Many 
of them at the $20,000 a year level or 
more are finding out what it is to look 
for non-existent employment. 



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JANUARY, 1972 



15 





feffl[^[?aitDO 




00 



000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



Connelley, Vice President, National Safety Council 



Paul H. Connelley. safety director of 
the Brotherhood, has been elected vice 
president for labor on the National Safety 
Council. He succeeds Sec.-Treas. Arthur 
P. Gildea of the Brewery Workers, who 
did not seek re-election. 

Connelley was chosen at the week-long 
session of the NSC's Labor Conference 
in Chicago recently. 

The conference focused on the im- 
plementation of the new Occupational 




Safety & Health Act. calling on the AFL- 
CIO and international unions to expand 
training programs that would broaden 
workers' understanding of the law. 

Edward J. Legan succeeded Thomas 
A. Dillon as chairman of the Labor Con- 
ference. Legan. an international repre- 
sentative with the International Brother- 
hood of Electrical Workers, was formerly 
vice chairman. Taking over that post is 
William McCullough of the Canadian 
Union of Public Employes, Toronto. 



STATE OFFICIAL — Deputy Secretary of 
Labor for the Commoimealth of Penn- 
sylvania is C. Ted Donibronski, shown at 
left, who is also business representative 
of Local 81, Eric, Pa., and president of 
both the Erie County Central Labor 
Council and the Erie County Building 
Trades Council. 

Among the other titles of this active 
member are: vice president, Pennsylvania 
State Council of Carpenters, board mem- 
ber of both major Erie hospitals, winner 
of two Outstanding Worker Awards of 
the United Fund, member of the Erie 
Port Commission, the Eric Redevelop- 
ment Authority and the Erie Building 
Code Committee. 



Honorary pa- 
rade marshal of 
(he 1971 Labor 
Day parade in 
Joliet, III., was 
Joseph Ambrose, 
left, a retired 
member of Local 
174 and a veteran 
of World War 1. 
He wore the uni- 
form of the 1917 
doughboy to fol- 
low the parade's 
theme. Ambrose 
is the father of 
the treasurer of 
Local 174. 



■1. l^iHI 


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LANGUAGE MACHINE-The Ladies Aux- 
iliaries of District 1, State Council of 
California — No. 170, East San Diego; 
No. 412, Vista, and No. 506, San Diego 
— recently donated a Language Master to 
the handicapped children of Madison 
Avenue School in El Cajon. To raise the 
$262.50 needed for (he machine a wine- 
tasting party, spaghetti dinner and dance 
was held at the Carpenters Hall of Local 
2398. 

The picture shows Mrs. Mike Kowsun, 
Aux. 170, Mrs. Earl Emmert, Aux. 506 
and district board member, and Miss 
Beth Davis, head teacher with the lan- 
guage master. Presentation was made at 
a bi-dislrict meeting at the San Diego 
Zoo, with members of auxiliaries in Dis- 
trict 2 and state ofhcers present. 




SCHOLARSHIP-Carpenter Ladies Auxili- 
aries, State Council of California, has 
presented a $500 California Labor Fed- 
eration AFL-CIO Scholarship for the 8th 
consecutive year. It is the only auxiliary 
group in the state among 23 union donors 
to the annual program. 

The 1971 winner was Miss Gayle 
Bashaw, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Bashaw, El Cajon, Calif., who plans to 
attend BYU in I'tah, majoring in journal- 
ism. The Auxiliaries in District 1, San 
Diego County, honored Gayle and her 
mother at a luncheon arranged b) Mrs. 
Floyd Cain, state secretary and member 
of Auxiliary 170, and Mrs. Earl Emmert, 
District 1 Board Member and president of 
Aux. 506. 

Miss Gale Bashaw, California scholar- 
ship winner; her mother, Mrs. George 
Bashaw; Mrs. Floyd Cain; and Mrs. Earl 
Emmert. 

• 

Items for "We Congratulate" are wel- 
comed from our readers. Please send as 
much explanatory information about the 
honoree and the honor bestowed as is 
necessary for a complete story. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



Early Retirement 
Is Union Concern 

■ With Social Security, Railroad 
Retirement, pensions and other pro- 
grams, the trend to early retirement 
is picking up momentum. 

The statistics on this are pretty 
startling. 

Among males over 65 in the 1890 
Census, 68.6 percent were in the la- 
bor force, many of them in agricul- 
ture. In the 1960 Census, less than 
one-half of this percentage — 30.5 
percent — were still working. 

This precise picture cannot be 
drawn for women but the trend to- 
ward early retirement is, neverthe- 
less, a fact. 

With the great advance of medi- 
cal science, workers who retire today 
at ages of 50 or 55 have some 15 
years of retirement facing them. 

The adjustment from work to re- 
tirement at such a late age in life, 
for many, is one of the most difficult 
changes a worker has to face. 

The needs of older workers in pre- 
paring for retirement and in making 
retirement productive has become, 
more and more, a responsibility of 
the trade union movement. 

Just what organized labor is doing 
for the middle-aged and older work- 
er in employment and retirement is 
the subject of a new study prepared 
for the National Council on the Ag- 
ing by Leo Kramer, Inc. In addition 
to Kramer, the authors are Ewan 
Clague, former Commissioner of 
Labor Statistics, and Balraj Palli. 

They examine the policies and 
programs of the AFL-CIO and 12 
major international unions in assist- 
ing the older workers. 

The study details the AFL-CIO's 
fight for health insurance, for hous- 
ing for the elderly and for improve- 
ments in Social Security. Four basic 
programs among the elderly have 
been urged by the Federation: 

1. Establish active retired mem- 
bers' clubs and affiliate them with 
the National Council of Senior Citi- 
zens. 

2. Undertake pre-retirement 
planning courses that will better en- 
able the worker to plan for retire- 
Continued on Page 19 



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17 







0^ ih /^ /iH 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




galfery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. 



(1) PASADENA, CALIF., In conjunc- 
tion nith the installation of officers. Local 
769 recently presented 25-year pins to 65 
members. Names are in alphabetical 
order: Milford Anderson, Everett Askren 
Sr., Ray Barber, VVilliani Barstow, Wayne 
Benbow, Donald Black, Kingsley Brock, 
Vernon Bullock, Loren J. Burt, Charles 
Carr, A. O. Cheadic, Carl Clauson, Rob- 
erf Coutu, Howard DeShaine, Thomas 
Emanuelson, Arden Engler, Verner Erick- 
son, Ray Garris, Vincent Gill, Ernest 
Granthen, Gene Griott, Jose Guerrero, 

2 



I 



(^ m 



Charles Haines, Francis G. Hardy, Frcd- 
erice Hillhouse, Louis Hubik, Ernest Hix- 
on, Austin Hyde Sr., Wililam Kelley, 
Marvin Kessel, William Koenig, Stanley 
Krause, Ora Lewis, Ted Limbert, William 
Lundin, J. R. Marks, Frank McKeever, 
W. O. Montgomery, Arthur Morris, Fran- 
cis Murphy, Wilberf Noland, Leo Norris, 
James J. Ogle, Oscar Olson, Wilfred Par- 
ent, Claude Patton, Andrew Patz, Paul 
Peters, Clyde Reynolds, Frank M. Sau- 
vageau, Mannie Shankle, Rice Sims, 
Leonard Small, Glan Snuffer, Clifford 
Speer, Segurth Spendrup, Jalmer Slencr- 
son. Thomas Stout, W. W. Stoval. Evart 
Swardstrom, Manuel Tellez, Merce Tor- 
res, Julian Tucker, Charles Vail, Louis 
Valdivia, Warren Vandello, Kay Wendell, 
Walter C. White, Joseph Wimnier and 
William Winningham. 

(2) ST. CHARLES, MO., On September 
25, 1971, Local 1987 held a pin award 
dinner honoring those who have belonged 
to the union for 25 to 45 years. Shown 
in the picture are: First row, all 25-year 
members, Oliver Illy, William Herin, Ed- 
ward Kruse, Floyd Rothermich, Clifton 
Borgschulte, Edward Lanig, Earl Gust, 
Emil Pordhorsky, Robert Jones, Wilbur 
Bushnell, Albert Prinster, Edmund Bax, 
Harold Schneider, Frank Schnyder, James 
Seigler, and Clarence Sitton. 

Second row, Elmer Kolkmeier, 30 
years; Walter Kolkmeier, 30 years; Ver- 
non Hollrah, 25 years; Sylvester Freed, 
25 years; Robert Pilcher, 25 years; Fred 




-■M^ 



Redell, local president, 25 years; Charles 
Bloebaum, 35 years; Marion Reed, 35 
years; Fred Muegge, 30 years; Wilfred 
Richardson, 30 years; Milton Sylvester, 
30 years; Lawrence Shelton, 30 years; 
Joseph Ledig, 45 years; Morris Filers, 
35 years; Vernon Kuhlmann, 30 years, 
and Henry Sitzer, 25 years. 

Third row, Frank Huning, 30 years; 
Martin Horstmeier, 30 years; John Haake. 
30 years; Clarence East, 30 years; Robert 
Drosfe, 30 years; Harlie Cornelius, 30 
years; John Bnieshaber, 30 years; Elmer 
Bekebrede, 30 years; Joseph Boerding, 
30 years; Henry Wubker, 25 years; Joseph 
Podhorsky, recording secretary, 25 years; 
William Dobrzanski, 25 years; Raymond 
Wehmeyer, 25 years; Garrett Thornhill, 
25 years; Robert Terbrock, 25 years; 
Ernest Schowengerdt, 30 years. 

Some of the recipients were unable to 
be present. Garrett Thornhill accepted 
a 25-year pin for his father, John Thorn- 
hill. Marvin Sutter, a 30-year member, 
nas hospitalized. His pin was accepted 
by his wife. A 30-year pin was given 
posthumously in behalf of the late Victor 
Klotz. 

Five other members who could not be 
present but who received 25-year mem- 
bership pins are Harry Stroud, Francis 
Ochs, Wm. Dreckshage, Henry Piepcr 
and Ed Terbrock. Four 30-year pins were 
given to Wm. Berthold, Rapheal Salfen, 
Joe Koester and Otto Schneider and a 
35-year pin went to Lawrence Platte. 



■■■■Mb ..^jyUHi 



n 




f fVt t 



If ¥ 



Early Retirement 

Continued from Page 17 

ment during his working years. 

3. Work for retiree centers to 
help meet the needs of older people 
for education, retirement activities 
and social relationships. 

4. Support national, state and lo- 
cal programs for opportunities for 
creative service to the community 
and nation and for political educa- 
tion and participation. 

It is the view of the AFL-CIO, the 
study reports, that the union "knows 
the older worker personally, at least 
at the local level, and is in a better 
position to know what his problems 
are. Thus, the union would appear 
to be the legitimate agency to look 
after his needs when he is approach- 
ing retirement and beyond. This 
would be in accord with traditional 
trade union concern not only for the 
strictly economic interests of its 
members but for other reasons as 
well." 

All unions have long stressed sen- 
iority and union security as two 
basic ways of protecting the worker 
on the job. 

The approach of some unions 
differs, however. Some put the great- 
est emphasis in keeping members on 
the job as long as possible and have 
negotiated contracts for protections 
toward that end. Other unions are 
pressing for early retirement. 

"The form of union organization 
is often a determining factor," the 
authors write. "A highly-skilled 
craft union, which has a substantial 
degree of control over the supply of 
workers in the organization, can take 
a different tack than can a large in- 
dustrial union, which represents all 
grades of workers with widely vary- 
ing degrees of attachment to the in- 
dustry or to the firm." 

Whatever approach, however, the 
authors leave the impression that or- 
ganized labor is committed to help- 
ing resolve the problems of the elder- 
ly, both on the job and in retirement. 

The Aging Worker and the Union, 
by Ewan Clague, Balraj Palli, Leo 
Kramer. Praeger Publishers, New 
York and London. 144 pp. 




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JANUARY, 1972 



19 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
i/ice pins. 



(1) HICKSVILLE, N.Y.— Local 1772 
held its annual dinner-dance at the Ga- 
laxie on October 15, and presented 25- 
year phis to the followhig members: Jo- 
seph Andrews, Norman Belland, Edward 
Bcdrewicz, Joseph Boron, Kdmond Bou- 
dreau, Sr., Stanle> Buchinski, Fred 
Buchter, Anthony Chiovaro, Guesippe 
Gianpanti, Andrew Classen, Salvatore 
Cosentino, Hans Oahle, Frank DeRosa, 
Angelo De >'ito, Henry Dcll'enbach, 
.lames Donnell), Ernest Dunekack, Er- 
land Eriandsen, Kingsbury Frey, Walter 
Gebhardt, Fred Grabow, Finn Granstad, 
Edward Haefeli, Gerard Hulsen, Sr., Al- 
fred Hurst, Herman .lacobsen. Roy .la- 
cobsen, Hubert .lohnson, Arthur Kipp- 
statter, Harold Kasten, Charles Knch- 
lewski, Risto Lilja, Frank Masterson, 
Joseph Mulee, Thomas Mullen, Sven 
Nelson, Peter Potocki, Thomas Sccardi, 
Philip Schaaf, William Schroeder, Rcin- 
hardt Schuler, Paul Schwenke, William 
Seiden, George Sipila, Richard Sloan, 
David Snyder, Alanson Sturm, Joseph 
Tanimone, Bjarnc Tobiassen, Albin 
Weiber, Paul Zadrozny, Charles Rubel, 
Jr. 

Those who were able to attend are 
shown in the accompanying photo. 

Pins were presented by Richard Eise- 
mann, flnancial secretary, bottom left, 
and Glenn Kerbs, business agent, bottom 
right. Bottom row center, Sal Cosentino. 
Second row, Joseph Mulee, Harold Kas- 
ten, Walter Gebhardt, President Joseph 
Tammone, William Seiden. Third row, 
Risto Lilja, Frank DeRosa, Norman Bel- 
land, Paul Zadrozny, recording secretary; 
Richard Sloan, a trustee, Kingsbury Frey. 
Fourth row, Keinhardt Schuler, Thomas 
Saccardi, Eriand Eriandsen. Gerard Hul- 
sen, Sr., Albert De \ito. Fifth row, Jo- 
seph Boron, a trustee, Herman Jacohsen, 
Peter Potocki, Hans Dahle, Ernest Dune- 
kack. 

(2) FRAMINGHAM, MASS.— A ban- 
quet was recently held at the Chateau de 
N ille by Local 860, with an attendance 
of about 500. The occasion was to honor 




members with 60, 50, 45, 35. and 25 
years of continued membership in the 
Brotherhood. 

Seated at the head table were members 
of the Executive Board: Richard Griffin, 
National Representative: John Burns, rep- 
resenting the General Office: and Joseph 
Kinnarney, business agent of the Central 
Massachusetts District Council. Griffin 
was the main speaker of the evening and 
presented pins to the honored members. 

In the photo are: left to right, R. L. 
Basley, financial secretarj; Harry Elwell, 
60-yr. member; R. Griffin, National Rep- 
resentative; Charles Haeuber, 60-jr. 
member and Donald Dadmun, president 
of Local 860. 

(3) TORONTO, ONT.— Local 27 held 
a banquet October 15 to honor members 
who have seen 25 years of service with 
the union. Attended by 160 members, 
25-year pins were awarded to 89 mem- 
bers. One member received a 50-year 
pin. 

The picture shows General Executive 
Board Member William Stefanovitch pre- 
senting a pin to 25-year member Jack 
MacNcil. 

Pins were also presented by Derrick 
Manson, secretary-treasurer, Ontario 
Provincial Council of Carpenters. 

Local 27 was chartered November 1, 
18X2, making it one of the oldest active 
union locals in Canada. Its membership 




high was 3,900. The local hijs another 
90 members who will become eligible ior 
25-year pins in 1972. It has 70 pen- 
sioners at present, seven members with 
over 50 years' membership and one who 
joined the Brotherhood, April 2, 1907. 

(4) WASHING- 
TON, D.C.— 
Thomas J. Mc- 
Dowell, 87-years 
old, member of Lo- 
cal 132 for 60 
years, recently re- 
ceived a 60-year 
pin from President 
Joseph N. Groomes. 




20 



THE CARPENTER 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Carpenters Local 1596 Marks Its 100th Birthday 



William Sidell, First General Vice 
President of the Brotherhood was among 
many dignitaries who convened in St. 
Louis, September 25 to pay tribute to 
Carpenters Local 1596, which, at 100 
years of age, ranks among the oldest 
local unions in the nation. 

A formal dinner-dance highlighted a 
three-day celebration of Local 1596's 
100th birthday, September 24-26. Other 
activities included a two-day open house 
at the Carpenters" Hall for all carpenters 
and members of organized labor and 
their families on Friday and Saturday, 
September 24 and 25, and a special open 
house and program for Local 1596 mem- 
bers and their families on Sunday, Sep- 
tember 26. 

Speaking before a black tie audience 
at the Carpenters' Hall 1401 Hampton 
Avenue, St. Louis, headquarters of the 
Carpenters" District Council of Greater 
St Louis, Sidell briefly recounted the his- 
tory of Local 1596, noting that Local 
1596, one of 22 affiliates of the District 
Council, was chartered in 1871, when 22 
cabinet makers met to form the St. Louis 
Cabinetmaker Protective Union, The fol- 
lowing year they affiliated with the Inter- 
national Cabinet Makers Union of Ameri- 
ca and were given the charter designation 
of Local 12. 

In 1903, the Cabinetmakers Interna- 
tional Union affiliated with the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America. Local 12 became known as 
Cabinetmakers and Machine Hands Lo- 
cal 1596, the designation it currently 
holds. 

Originally formed exclusively as a lo- 
cal of cabinet makers Local 1596"s 1700 
members are now employed by firms who 
manufacture, in addition to quality cabi- 
nets, aluminum windows and storm sash, 



truss roofs, prefabricated homes, cooling 
towers, movable partitions, refrigeration 
equipment, Venetian blinds and shades, 
exhibits and displays, stairs, hardware 
and building supplies, barber shop and 
beauty salon fixtures, bars and church 
furniture. 

The Germanic origins of Local 1596 is 
reflected in the fact that for many years 
business meetings were conducted ex- 
clusively in German, Sidell said, adding 
that Local 1596 is one of the "finest 
examples of what the labor movement 
and the country as a whole owes to the 
millions of immigrants who migrated to 
America in the 19th century to escape 
the oppression of the working class in 
their native lands."' 

Sharing the speaker's table with Sidell 
were John Livingston, retired director of 
organizing for the AFL-CIO; Ollie W. 
Langhorst, executive secretary-treasurer 
of the Carpenters' District Council of 
Greater St. Louis; Missouri Congressman 
Richard Ichord; and Gene McNary, St. 
Louis County prosecuting attorney. 

Among the many letters and telegrams 
of congratulations received by Local 
1596 was one from AFL-CIO President 
George Meany who extended his con- 
gratulations to the local union and urged 
the members to continue their record of 
progress and accomplishments. 

Congressman Ichord struck a respon- 
sive note when he told the more than 
500 guests that he was the only mem.ber 
of the Missouri Congressional delegation 
who has held an active working carpen- 
ter's card. He hastened to add that he 
only got as far as a third year apprentice 
carpenter "back in the early days of 
World War II." 

As representative of the largest con- 
gressional district in Missouri, Ichord said 



his job was to "try to strike a proper bal- 
ance between the interests of Labor and 
the interests of management." "Unfor- 
tunately," he continued, "there are ex- 
tremists on both sides. 

"Today, unions represent the voice of 
labor, not only to the government but to 
man. This is quite a contrast to some of 
the totalitarian nations of the world, 
where they also have unions but the un- 
ions represent the voice of government. 

"We must," declared Ichord, "do every- 
thing in our power to preserve the right 
of free, collective bargaining." 

Commendation was given to the Lo- 
cal's Anniversary Committe who planned 
the entire three-day affair. They were 
Chairman Michael Heilich Jr., Secretary 
Walter Fritz, Woody Irwin, William 
Sleinkamp, Edward Haze and Alfons 
Doering aided by Michael Heilich, Sr., 
Council business representative from Lo- 
cal 1596. 

Other dignitaries at the affair were 
Sixth District representative to the Car- 
penters' General Executive Board Fred 
Bull: Richard Cox, secretary-treasurer 
of the Missouri State Council of Car- 
penters; Raymond Harris, chief legal 
investigator of the St. Louis County 
Medical Examiners Office; Greater St. 
Louis Labor Council Officers, President 
Oscar Ehrhardt and Secretary-Treasurer 
James Meyers; Delmond Garst. director, 
AFL-CIO Region 15; Norman Barth, 
president. Carpenters' District Council 
and recording secretary of Local 1596. 

Local 1596's officers are: President 
Glen Jackson; Vice-President William 
Steinkamp; Recording Secretary Norman 
Barth; Financial Secretary Woody Irvin: 
Treasurer Aaron Turnbull; Conductor 
Frank Sommer; Warden Harry Von 
Romer, Sr.; Trustees: Melvin Krumpel- 
man, Eugene Hoppe and Edward Haze. 



A view of the large crowd affciidiug the Local 1596 eclebrafioii. 





iit»w<«uw««mn<- 



1 




iirir^^^- r iJ 



Shown on the dais, left to right, are Father Herbert Reiman; Thomas McMahon, district council attorney; Paul Walters, secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Buffalo District Council; Michael Ricci, district council unemployment representative; Herman J. Bodewes, 
business representative of the Buffalo District Council; William Sidell, First General Vice-President; Herman F. (Buddy) Bodewes, 
president and General agent of Buffalo District Council; Richard E. Livingston, General Secretary; Patrick Campbell, General 
Executive Board Member from the First District; Alfred J. Langfelder, president of Local 9; William Miller, business representa- 
tive of Buffalo District Council; Milton Frey, secretary-treasurer of the New York State Council of Carpenters; William Burke, 
business representative of Piledrivers Local 1978, and Reverend Charles G. Rice. 



Pioneering Local 9, Buffalo, 
Marks Its 90th Anniversary 



Local 9 of Buffalo. N.Y., a local 
union with origins going back to the 
days before the establishment of the 
Brotherhood, commemorated its 
90th birthday recently. 

The anniversary was commem- 
orated by a host of General Officers 
and labor and public officials of the 
New York area. Among the guests 
was General Secretary R. E. Liv- 
ingston, a member of the local un- 
ion. First General Vice Pres. Wil- 
liam Sidell was among the speakers. 
He brought congratulations from 
General Pres. M. A. Hutcheson. 

A memorable banquet was held 
in Buffalo, at which speakers de- 
scribed the early efforts of carpen- 
ters in the area to form a union. 
Members of Local 9 participated in 
the founding convention of the 
Brotherhood in Chicago in 1881. 

Long before the Brotherhood was 
organized, carpenters of Buffalo 
learned the necessity of organiza- 
tion. They got together from time to 
time and formed a union, only to 
lapse after concessions were gained 
from employers. Finally, on August 
31, 1880, the Carpenters and Join- 
ers Union of the City of Buffalo was 
organized. The initiation fee was 
500 and the monthly dues 150 per 



member. Wages at that time ranged 
from $1.75 to $2.50 for a 10-hour 
day. 

During this period there was a 
movement to form an international 
union, and a convention was sched- 





General Secretary R. E. Livingston, a 
veteran member of Local 9, recalls some 
of the illustrious history of the local 
union. 



R 

Milton Frey, secretary-treasurer of the 
New York State Council of Carpenters, 
presents a plaque from the New York 
State Council to Alfred J. Langfelder, 
president of Local 9, on the occasion of 
its 90th anniversary. 

uled for Chicago. Buffalo Carpen- 
ters were so anxious to be chartered 
that it applied for one on June 7, 
two months before the convention 
was held. It took some time, once 
the Brotherhood was formed, for 
charters to be drafted and printed, 
but Buffalo carpenters received 
theirs on January 30, 1882. 

Down through the years Local 9 
fought successfully for shorter hours 
and working conditions for its mem- 
bers, becoming a permanent fixture 
in its home city. It is recognized as 
the first local union of the Brother- 
hood established in the State of 
New York. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Veteran Illinois Leader Is First 
To Benefit from State Pension Fund 





From left to right are James Bannister, executive secretary of the Fox Valley General 
Contractors Association and secretary-treasurer of the Carpenters Pension Fund of 
Illinois; Wilbur E. "Duff' Corbin; Paul Bolger, president of the Fox River Vailcy 
District Council and board member of the Illinois State Council of Carpenters; and 
Raymond E. Waker, administrator, Carpenters Pension Fund of Illinois. 



The first pension check to be presented 
by the Carpenters Pension Fund of Illi- 
nois went recently to Wilbur E. "Duff" 
Corbin, retired International Representa- 
tive. Corbin was initiated in Carpenters 
Local 916, Aurora, 111., in October, 1924, 
and became fulltime business agent of 
that local union in 1936, serving until 
1964. He was president of the Fox River 
Valley District Council of Carpenters 
from 1936 to 1964. 

In February, 1964, he was appointed 
a General Representative and served in 
that capacity until his retirement on Jan- 
uary 15, 1971. Corbin was elected vice 
president of the Illinois State Council of 
Carpenters in 1958 and served as vice 
president until 1963 when he became 
president of the Illinois State Council of 
Carpenters, a position he holds at present. 

In 1949 Brother Corbin started nego- 
tiating for fringe benefits and was not 
successful until November, 1951, at which 
time the welfare fund for the Fox River 
Valley District Council of Carpenters was 
organized with payments effective June 1, 
1952. He served as a member of the 



board of trustees of this welfare fund 
from 1955 to 1965. Effective June 1, 
1957, the Carpenters Pension Fund for 
the Fox River Valley District was orga- 
nized and Mr. Corbin served as a member 
of the board of trustees of this organiza- 
tion from 1957 until 1965. 

In 1962 the welfare fund for Spring- 
field Carpenters, Local 16, was merged 
with the welfare fund of the Fox River 
Valley District Council of Carpenters, 
and these merged funds formed the nu- 
cleus of statewide funds which are now 
known as the Carpenters Welfare Fund 
of Illinois and the Carpenters Pension 
Fund of Illinois. Present participation 
in these two funds includes approximately 
14,000 carpenter members in the Slate 
of Illinois with total contributions of 
well over $8,000,000.00 per year. 

During the term that Mr. Corbin served 
as president of the Fox River Valley Dis- 
trict Council he was instrumental in orga- 
nizing the house builders, and this area 
still continues to be one of the best orga- 
nized areas for house builders in the 
country. 



Ofl&cers of California Local Union 




The offices of Local 769, Pasadena, Calif., installed a few months ago for the next 
two years: life to right, trustee, Carl "Ray" Carlson; delegate, Oscar Osborn; warden, 
Leroy Chapman; treasurer, James B. Nash; financial secretary, Stanley Oakley; presi- 
dent, Lloyd A. Greenhagen; business representative, William D. Kelley; recording 
secretary, William F. Spicer Sr.; vice-president, Harlo B. Walz; trustee, Alfred M. 
LaGree; trustee, Francis "Grady" Hardy. Not in picture: conductor, Talmadge C. 
McClure. 




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JANUARY, 1972 



23 



Precast Concrete 
Building Erected 
By Pa. Menil^ers 

Bison Wall Frame Building, is a 
residence for the elderly in Jeannette, 
Pa., and the first such structure of its 
kind in the United States. 

The project was furnished to Cross- 
gates Inc, of McMurray, Pa., turn- 
key developer for the Westmoreland 
County, Pennsylvania Housing Author- 
ity. Though a first in the United 
States, this system carries an experi- 
ence of some 57,000 living units con- 
structed in the United Kingdom by 
the systems originator Concrete Lim- 
ited of England, a firm known as the 
largest precast producer in the world. 

Dickerson Structural Concrete Cor- 
poration of Youngwood, Pa. acted as 
a subcontractor to AC Schwotzer 
Construction Company of McMurray, 
Pa. to construct the building. 

The precast components; all plant 
manufactured, including stairs, are as- 
sembled with site cast concrete con- 
nections and "no-caulk," exterior 
joints. Dickerson used members of 
Local 462 and Local 333 in the erec- 
tion and placement of all component 
parts. Members of the United Brother- 
hood also erected and dismantled the 
crane used in the erection. 

The photographs indicate how pre- 
cast concrete components combine in 
a unique structural system to achieve 
a, "collapse-proof," fully insulated, and 
waterproof building ready for interior 
finishes. 

Chief components of the system are: 
sandwich panels comprised of an ar- 
chitectural facing, insulation and a 
structural backup used as external 
walls: solid concrete panels as internal 
load-bearing partitions, and prestressed 
hollow core plank as decking. All of 
these component parts were placed by 
members of the United Brotherhood. 

Each vertical and horizontal exterior 
construction joint was waterproofed 
with mastic and vinyl, also installed by 
members of the Brotherhood. All grout 
forms are placed by Brotherhood 
members. Dickerson Corp. used Broth- 
erhood members for each phase of the 
erection with the exception of the 
pouring of the grout for the construc- 
tion joints, this was done by members 
of the Laborers Union of Latrobe, Pa. 

Dickerson, a licensee of Concrete 
Limited, manufactured and erected 
the eight-story, 100-unit project at the 
rate of one complete floor per week. 
The Bison structure was erected early 
this year. 




The new residence for the elderly in Jeannette, Pa., stands bright and new against 
weathered structures surrounding it. The building was erected at the rate of one 
complete floor per week. 







*f/l. 



_ ■---.. •~j^-^.,v 






i 



\ 






k 



/ 



The photo above shows (he typical method used on each floor for the setting of 
precast parts. The nuts on the long bolls projecting from (he panels in the photo, were 
set to grade to carry the panels for the floor above, each panel being cast with bearing 
pla(es in (he bo((om, (no(e access boxes bot(om of panels). The nuts and bearing 
phi(es being welded af(er alignment and plumbing. Each corner joint also was 
welded. All required welding and cutting was done by members of (he Uni(ed 
Bro(herhood. 

Members of the Brotherhood em- 
ployed on this project included: from 
Local 462, Greensburg. William Shoaf, 
Job Steward, Don Rugh, John Gonga- 
ware, John Onusko, Vincent Brohosky, 
Stanley Cordon, Ronald Sell, Robert 
Campbell: from Local 333 New Ken- 
sington, Barney Calabrese: and Ken 
Baringer, Local 2274, job superintend- 
ent for Dickerson. The project was 
under the jurisdiction of Business Rep- 
resentative Bright M. Remaley of 
Local 333. 




Photos and Wchnical ihila were 
furnished hy the courtesy of Tom 
Remhert. Project Manager of Dicker- 
son Corporation. 



T. E. Thompson of Oak Ridge, Tenn., 
has been a member of Local 50, Knox- 
ville, Tenn., for more than 35 years. 
Though now disabled, he and his wife 
recently celebra(ed (heir golden wedding 
anniversary wi(h good cheer. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



Parade Past A Non-union Project 




Members of Carpenters Local 186, Steubenville, O., recently staged a parade of more 
than 100 members past a non-union project being developed by Lippman Associates 
in Steubenville. The local had been picketing the job site for over 14 weeks. The 
enclosed picture shows Business Agent C. W. Daily leading members in the parade. 

50th Anniversary, Skagit Valley Council 




The Skagit Valley District Council of Washington State recently celel)ra<ed its 50th 
anniversary. This district council started out as the Northwest Council of Carpenters 
in 1921 and functioned through many turbulent times. During early years, delegates 
had to travel by interurban and passenger train in order to hold meetings. General 
Office Representative Paul Rudd, an oldtimer himself, spoke of these early times and 
brought members up to date with some of our present problems. 

Some of the oldtimers honored were: front row, from left: Carlos Cook, Paul Rudd, 
BRs Orv Haggen and Bill Sisson. Back row, James Cronibie, John Kelly, Secretary- 
Treasurer Earl Goodland and Ernie Smith. 

Officers of Memphis, Tennessee, Local 




Newly-elected officers of Local 345, Memphis, Tenn., include seated, left to right. 
President William T. Cox, Jr., Recording Secretary William E. Tanner; standing, left 
to right, Conductor S. S. Pike, Business Agent James M. Green, Custodian Oscar 
McLain, Financial Secretary Howard Welch, Installing Officer and newly-elected 
Trustee to the Apprentice Fund Henry A. Kellum, Trustee William J. Salter, Trustee 
Robert H. Schlafer, Trustee Ira D. Stewart, Conductor Ira Welch, Treasurer E. M. 
Sisk. Also installed at this meeting but not in the picture were Vice-President William 
E. Fortner and Trustee to Apprentice Fund, Robert E. Montgomery. 



JANUARY, 1972 



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Washington State Auxiliaries Convention 

On May 12, 13, and 14, 1971, delegates, past presidents, and guests from ladies auxiliaries throughout the state of Washington 
convened for the 32nd Annual Convention of the Washington State Council of Ladies Auxiliaries. One of the highlights of the 
convention, held in Richland, Wash., was an "Hawaiian-theme" luncheon, hosted by Ladies Auxiliary 427 of Pasco-Kennewick. 
Seated above, holding the state council charter, is Mrs. Flora Toland, state president. Seated next to Mrs. Toland, on her left, is 
Mrs. May Clark, state vice-president. On Mrs. Toland's right is Agnes Welsh, state recording secretary. Seated next to Mrs. Welsh 
is Lorraine Meyer, state treasurer. 





Palo Alto Local Celebrates 71 Years 



M. B. Bryant's first assignment after 
his appointment to the General Executive 
Board. 8th District, was to represent the 
Brotherhood on September 17, at a party 
celebrating the 71st Anniversary of the 
charter of Local 668. Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia. Brother Bryant also awarded a 
70-year pin to Brother Louis Dengler 
and 25-year pins to the following: 

Dale Adams. Floyd Adams. Claude 
Alford. Max Bacha. Theodore W. Barnes. 
Adolph Benning. .Arthur J. Benson, F.mil 
Benson. Leon F. Bernard. Virgil L. Bevis. 
Floyd Bowman. Doyle S. Bradford, F. P. 
Bradshaw. Farl A. Brusberg. James A. 
Burke. Frank J. Callaghan, Frederick 
Carbis. Edward J. Carpentier. Cleo O. 
Chandler. Donald A. Cleaveland. C. H. 
Couey. Gene P. Darr. Frank S. Dato. 
James K. Deberry. Alvin W. Dutton. 
Donald P. Eskilson. George M. Evans. 
Ford L. Feldt. Andrew S. Feltrop. Don- 
ald W. Fetrow. Newman Flowers. Grant 
Fretwell. Joseph Fuchs. Jr., John M. 
Gale. Amer G. Gilbertson. Harry E. 
Glawatz. William T. Graham. George 
A. Gregg, Ancie G. Griffin. Doc F. 
Griffin, Earl H. Hansen, Fred Hardy. 



Sanford L. Harmon. Kenneth Harrison, 
Monroe D. Hay, Clifford Headley, Ray- 
mond Holderman. Claude Hutcheson. 
Jess M. January, Oscar Johnson. Elmer 
J. Julian, Ewald W. Kalske, Harry M. 
Keeney. Henry M. Kolbaba. Joseph A. 
Lane, Howard Lang, Clarence P. Leahy, 
John F. Leahy, Vernon Legg. Kermath 
Leslie. Henry Ludgus, Harry Malby. 
James Martin. Harry Mason, Ellis B. 
McGinty, Lloyd McMassey, Frank T. 
McShane, Lester L. Meyer. Paul E. 
Moeller. Theodore C. Moeller, Floyd 
Monroe. Charles J. Moore, David Napier, 
Flmer D. Noll, Albert C. Norris. Donald 
Parmeter. Edward Peregrina. John D. 
Peterson. Sam Polizzi, Otto Radke. John 
Rafaelo. Vestle F. Rodgers. Nick Rogoff. 
Fred G. Rowe. John Ruzicka, Ervin 
B. Schultz. Jergen H. Skogen. Elmer R. 
Small. Lester Small. Arlo R. .Street. How- 
ard Stuart. Glen Sund. Raymond Taylor. 
Alfonso Vasquez. John Vasquez. Junior 
P. Wallace. William D. Watkins. J. C. 
Wayne, Willie E. Williams, Harvey 
Wolfe and Howard Zink. 

Six officers of Local 668 were among 



the members awarded 25-year pins — 
namely. Ervin B. Schultz, president; 
Elmer D. Noll, vice president; John M. 
Gale, financial secretary; Paul E. Moeller, 
recording secretary; Henry M. Kolbaba, 
and Fred G. Rowe. trustees. 

In addition to Brother Bryant, John 
F. Henning. secretary. California Labor 
Federation; James Lee. president. State 
Building and Construction Trades Coun- 
cil of California, Richard Mansfield, 
legislative advocate. State Building Trades 
Council; Bruce Sutherland, administra- 
tor. Northern California Carpenter 
Trusts; John A. Rebeiro. secretary. Santa 
Clara Valley District Council of Car- 
penters; Charles Rigmaiden, chairman, 
Santa Clara Valley District Council of 
Carpenters; the officers of Local 668 
Ervin Schultz. president; Elmer Noll, 
vice president; John M. Gale, financial 
secretary; Paul Moeller, recording sec- 
retary; George Fowler, treasurer: Henry 
Kolbaba. Fred Rowe. and John Deskins, 
trustees; Philip Stavn. conductor; James 
Johnson, warden: and James E. Powers, 
business representative, together with offi- 
cers from neighboring locals. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Local 1787 Members Mark Plant Milestone 




The Ever/Strait Division of the Pease Co., Hamilton, O. recently manufactured 
its one millionth door. To help celebrate the event, approximately 250 members of 
Local 1787 and other company personnel assembled outside division headquarters 
in Fairfield to spell it out in man-sized numerals. The company was also com- 
memorating the 10th anniversary of its production of foam-core steel doors, for 
which it is the world's leading manufacturer. Participants in the commemoration 
included Local 1787 President Jesse McVey, Vice. Pres. Jack Vaughn, Treas. 
Sherman Swihart, Recording Sec. Bill Asher, and Financial Sec. William Swink. 

Officers of Oakland Local 36 Assembled 




The recently-elected officers of Local 36, Oakland, Calif., 1971-1972, are shown 
seated, left to right: Wilson Massey, financial secretary; Robert Griebel, president; 
Claude Dillon, vice president: Allen Linder, recording secretary; Paul Makela, trustee. 
Standing, left to right: Alfred Thoman, bus. representative; Eugene Anderson, con- 
ductor; Clitf Edwards, trustee; Clarence Briggs, general representative; Ira Cook, 
trustee; Harry Yetter, treasurer; Lester Lane, warden; and Gunnar Benonys, business 
representative. 

Patio Project Aids Disabled Member 




LEARN SURVEYING 



Members of Local 1704, Carmel and Kent, N.Y., recently built a patio awning 
for a fellow member who had an operation and was unable to finish the work him- 
self. Enjoying a refreshing drink in the shade, once the job was completed were 
from left to right, front row: Thomas Mclnerey, Tony Castellano, Gino Elicati; 
back row: George McLoughlin, Joe Purdy, Harold Greenwood. 







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JANUARY, 1972 



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27 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 

Bless My Sole! 

She was only a shoemaker's daugh- 
ter, but she was ready to give her awl. 
— John Freeman, L.U. 22, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 




Some Cut-Up! 

A drunk over-celebrating New 
Year's eve bought a half-pint to last 
him on his way home. As he stepped 
into the street a car hit him, sending 
him spinning into the curb. He stag- 
gered upright, felt something wet 
in the vicinity of his hip pocket, felt 
around, then looked with relief at 
his hand. "Thank hevvin," he sighed, 
"It's only blood!" 

TELL M U R UNION! 

Good Second Choice 

Near a school a road sign was 
posted: "Be Careful; Don't Hit a 
Child!" Under it in childish scrawl 
had been added: "Wait for a 
Teacher!" 




The Good O/d Days? 

The little granddaughter, sitting on 
grandpa's lap, asked him, "Grandpa, 
were you on Noah's Ark?" 

"Certainly not!" replied the 
oldster. 

"Then why weren't you drowned?" 
asked the tot. — Betsy Fratoni, Spring- 
field, Pa. 

WORK SAFELY— ACCIDENTS HURT 

Missed the Buss! 

At a wedding, the best man asked 
an old boy friend of the bride, "Have 
you kissed the bride? " 

"Not recently," was the reply. 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 



'Ear This! 

at the planing mil 



Now 

The foreman 
finally argued his son into cutting off 
his shoulder-length hair. But he's still 
not happy . . . now he can see his 
earrings. 

REGISTER AND VOTE 

Nice Clean Joke 

The two morons were driving from 
Philadelphia to Washington when they 
saw a roadside sign: "Clean Rest- 
rooms Ahead." By the time they 
reached the nation's capital they had 
cleaned 62! 



This Month's Limericl( 

Said the framer to his partner, Gus 

Lumb, 
With the bobline between forefinger 
and thumb: 
"I'm telling you, Gussie, 
This boss is real fussy. 
So make it just a bit better than 
plumb! " 

G. P. Spannar, Local 15, Hackensack, 
N.J. 



Right At Home! 

A stranger in town wandered Into 
a church one Sunday morning as the 
minister Intoned: "Oh Lord, we have 
left undone the things we should have 
done and we have done things we 
ought not to have done! " 

"At last," sighed the man as he 
slipped into a pew, "I've finally found 
my kind of people!" 

B SURE 2 VOTE! 

Bitter Prescription 

The doctor sat the patient down 
after a complete exam. "Have you 
been living a normal life?'" he asked. 

"Oh, yes, doctor," replied the pa- 
tient. 

""Well, I'm sorry to tell you that 
you're going to have to cut It out 
for awhile! " 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 




Catty Retort 

A tomcat and a tabby were court- 
ing on the back fence. The tomcat 
leaned over and said, "I'd die for 
you, baby!" 

The tabby gazed back and asked, 
"How many times?" 

UNION DUES — TOMORROWS SECURITY 

Some Box Party! 

In confession, the carpenter told 
the priest that he had been taking 
mlllwork, nails, plywood, etc., off the 
job. "That's a terrible habit, " said 
the priest. "I must give you a pen- 
ance. Did you ever make a novena?" 

"No, father," replied the penitent, 
"But If you can get the plans, I know 
where I can get the lumber and nails!" 
— Gene Urbanowicz, Local 1160, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



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SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
^ervice pins. 



(1) SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH— On Sep- 
tember 25, 1971, Lotal 184 held a din- 
ner to honor and present pins and certifi- 
cates to members of the Urotherhood of 
25 years membership. A bullet dinner 
and decorations were beautifully handled 
by Ladies Auxiliary 218, under the direc- 
tion of Donna Rosenlof, president. Those 
in attendance, left to riyht. FRONT 
ROW: Lloyd .lacklin, M.D.T.A., Joseph 
Bordelon, assistant business representa- 
tive. SECOND ROW: Wm. Chaplin, pres- 
ident; Fred Meadows, vice-president; 
Clifford Adams, conductor; Joe Chiaz- 
zese, trustee; Weldon Freeman, financial 



secretary; Wallis Rosenlof, recording sec- 
retary; Bud Bryant, General Office Rep- 
resentative: Howard Pace, executive sec- 
retary of Utah District Council of Car- 
penters; S. L. DiBella, business represent- 
ative; and Ronald Buchanan, trustee. 
THIRD ROW: (25-year members) James 
Carroll, Francis Brems, Harvey Boyd, 
R. J. Beyk, Ben A. Bell, John Babcock, 
Lavor Allen, (over 50 years) Oscar Os- 
mundsen and Bill Askee. FOL'RTH 
ROW: (25 years) Evan Long, Harry 
Lesher, Earl Landry, Wm. Kent, Arlin 
Jensen, Albert Jenkins, Paul Higley, 
Ralph Heap, Ray Gertsch, C. D. Durts- 
chi, Richard DeMille, Febron DeMille, 
and Don Davidson. FIFTH ROW: 
George Young, James Willden, Myles 
Taylor, Harry Sessions, John Rigler, Wm. 
Riech, Edmond Ray, Pete Pilati, Frank 
Nelson, Cleveland Nelson, E. H. Molema, 
Wilmer Mecham, and Melvin Maxfield. 
LInable to attend were: Marlow Bie- 
singer, Jack Dennis, Joe Larsen, Floyd 
Roberts, Fred Allen, Walter Baese, Mark 
Beardall, Victor Braithwaite, B. L. Ches- 
nuf, E. V. Christopherson, Tnunan Cope, 
Doss Dean, Lee Dickinson, D. L. Doug- 
las, Warren Dunlap, Robert Dunmire, 
Albert Egelstron, Jesse Fawcett, O. A. 
Hardcastle, John Harper, L. E. John- 
son, Jos. Jorgensen, Woodrow Jorgensen, 
Earl Larsen, K. R. Lloyd, Morris NeJson, 
Lawrence Nielsen, Elwin Peterson, Otto 
Reiter, D. A. Richardson, George Rob- 
ertson, Stanley Singleton, David Spafard. 

(2) STILLWATER, OKLA.— Local 
1686 held a special dinner meeting No- 



vember 2, with their families as guests, 
to honor the senior members of the 
Brotherhood who have 20 years or more 
of continuous service. Kermit L. Castle- 
berry, secretary-treasurer of Oklahoma 
State Council of Carpenters, Muskogee, 
Okla., presented the awards. 

Standing, center front, is Kermit L. 
Castleberry presenting a 40-year pin to 
John Heusel. who has been a member 
for 44 years. Other members and their 
membership years are, from left to right, 
front row: Reinhard Klein, 26; Donald 
Taylor, 30; L. R. Sinclair. 30; L. I. 
Bilyeu, 35; Marvin Nance. 23; Frank 
Carr. 25; Horace Ware, Jr., 29, Trustee; 
second row: Laveme Smith, 22; C. T. 
Clark, 25; Herman King, 24; Raymond 
Tracy, 30; Chester W. Drumm, 25; Esco 
Shaver, 25; Otis Stewart, 21, President; 
Warren Brewer, 25; C. C. Maxwell, 25; 
Frank Mansfield, 25; back row: Cecil 
Metcalf, 29; Clarence Rice, 29; Rex 
Lawler, 24; Earl Sharpton, 25, Trustee; 
Bert Hejduk. 29; C. C. McDonald. 29. 
rec. sec'y; W. C. Waite, 29; W. B. Seward, 
23; Buddy Gripe, 21 and Tilford Blair, 
25. 

Other members honored but not in the 
picture arc, Norton Doolin, 36; H. M. 
Hulsey, 35; O. C. Cargill, 30; J. H. Good- 
ner. 29; E. H. Meek, 29; Dewey Norton, 
29; Jerry Wyatt, 25; Robert Cox, 24; 
Leroy J. Craig, 24; Eugene Fulk, 20; 
Paul Lasiter, 24, Warden and Robert 
Silvers, 22. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




Graduation^ District Council of Greater St. Louis 




Members of the 1971 Apprenticeship Class of the Carpenters' District Council of Greater St. Louis, AFL-CIO's Joint Appren- 
ticeship Program pose for a graduation photograph with members of the sponsoring agencies. The commencement exercises were 
held August 10 at the Carpenters' District Council Building at 1401 Hampton, St. Louis. First row, from left — are new journey- 
men Donald Redecker, Norman Rayfield, Richard Prag, Dennis Ploch, Timothy Noonan, James Mack, Gregory Lauber, Michael 
Lane, Jackie Lake, Robert Knoll, Mark Klenke, Charles Junge,'Elroy Hubbard Jr., Daniel Hayden, Leo Green Jr., Larry Forte, 
Roger Dodge, Robert Cuvar, Ronald Childers, Howard Chilcutt, Richard Brower, Carl Biermann and David Artrip. Second row, 
from left: Edward Sosna, Walter Schoenherr, Michael Powell, James Patterson Jr., Daniel Mclntyre, Richard Glynn, Raymond 
Brown, Kenneth Vaughn, Homer Tyler Jr., Warren Travis Jr., Kenneth Terrell, Timothy Talleur, Gary Stelzer, Steven Sebright 
and Edwin Rust. Third row, left to right: John E. Hinkson, Associated General Contractor's director of Apprentice Training; 
Contractor Tim McCarthy; Charles E. Sweeney, U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Apprenticeship; Mathias Kruemmer, Cabi- 
net Makers Apprentice Instructor; Frederick Bull 6th District International General Executive Board member; Carl Reiter, 
assistant executive secretary-treasurer, C.D.C.; Bob Hardy, KMOX news director, principal speaker of the evening; Edward 
Givens, president of the Home Builders of Greater St. Louis; Ollie W. Langhorst, executive secretary-treasurer of the Carpenters' 
District Council; Norman Barth, president, Carpenters' District Council; AI Fleischer, president emeritus. Associated General 
Contractors; C. H. Albers, co-chairman, Joint Apprenticeship Committee; A. "Gus" Uthoff, Carpenters' Apprentice Instructor; 
R. J. Stephens, Home Builders Association of Greater St. Louis; Fred Kleisly, Carpenters' Apprentice Instructor; W. Forrest 
Layne, supervisor, Trade and Industrial Education, St. Louis Board of Education; and Jay Rovak, Apprenticeship Committee 
members. Fourth row: John Morarin, Carpenters District Council trustee; Hermann Henke, business representative; Pleasant 
Jenkins, director of Jurisdiction and Research; Perry Joseph, business manager, Floor Layers' Local 1310; Carpenter District 
Council Business Representatives Ed Thein and Larry Daniels; E. C. Meinert, retired secretary-treasurer, Carpenters' District 
Council; Robert Saunders, retired president. Carpenters' District Council; Gilbert Clark, president, Local 1310; Carpenters' 
District Council's Business Representatives Leerie Schaper, Dean Sooter, James Watson and William Field; Carpenters' District 
Council Trustee Pat Sweeney, and George Thornton, vice-president. 



Apprentices Work 
Arizona Project 



Several apprentice: 
Arizona Carpenters 
Training Committee 
$8 million Navajo 
being erected by the 
at Page, Arizona, 
pects to double the 
tices employed there 



s in training with the 
Apprenticeship and 

are employed on the 
Generating Station 

Bechtel Corporation 

The committee ex- 
number of appren- 

in the coming weeks. 



The 1972 International Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest 

The 1972 International Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest is scheduled 
for August 23-26 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The competition will be held in the 
International Hotel. All states and provinces should be represented in this 
exciting competition with carpenter, mill-cabinet, and millwright contestants. 
For additional information about the contest write: Leo Gable, Technical 
Director, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 101 
Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington. D.C. 20001. 



JANUARY, 1972 



31 




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Governor Is Guest of Graduation 




Gov. Russell Peterson of Delaware was a special guest at graduation ceremonies 
for apprentice trainees of Local 626, New Castle, Del. He is shown standing, second 
row, left, with the honorees. 

In the front row are Paul Row, John Pinque, Brian Ferry, and Richard Santo- 
bianco. Bacit row: Gov. Peterson, Irving Slifer, Paul Swidersiti, Vance Gray (out- 
standing apprentice) Robert Bried, Alfred Howard, Jr. (chairman of the apprentice- 
ship committee), and Merritt Dean (coordinator). 



Hard Hat Winner 




Four-year-old Chris Webb, above right, 
won first prize in the costume competition 
at the annual "June Walk" sponsored by 
American Legion Post 1024 and the 
Woodlawn, N. Y., Taxpayers and Com- 
munity Assn. Chris is the son of Elliott 
Webb of Yonkers, a member of Local 
385. 

His costume consisted of a bright red 
plastic hard hat with an American flag 
decal on its side, a T-shirt and long pants. 
He carried a hammer as though ready for 
a day's work. 



32 



Ten Sure Ways 
To Kill Your Union 

1. Don't come to meetings. 

2. If you do, come late. 

3. If the weather doesn't suit you, 
do not thinl; of coming. 

4. When you attend meetings, find 
fault with the officers and 
members. 

5. Never accept an office, as it is 
easier to criticize than do 
things yourself. 

6. If asked by the chairman to 
give your opinion regarding 
some important matters tell 
him you have nothing to offer 
on the subject. After the meet- 
ing tell everybody how it ought 
to have been done. 

7. Do nothing more than is ab- 
solutely necessary, but when 
other members roll up their 
sleeves and willingly and un- 
selfishly use their ability to 
help matters, howl that the 
imion is run by a clique. 

8. Hold back your dues as long 
as possible, or don't pay at all. 

9. Do not bother about getting 
new members — let George or 
Bill do it. 

10. When the union "busts up," tell 
everyone you knew all along 
it would. 



THE CARPENTER 




SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. 




(1) SAN DIEGO, CALIF.— A large 
group of Local 1296 members were re- 
cently honored upon the completion of 
25 years of service. Most of them are 
shown in the accompanying picture. 

Members eligible for 25-year pins: 
Louis Adams, Jerald Aldridge, John 
Aldridge, D. B. Allums, Otto L. Barnes, 
Robert Bell, Homer Blackman, John W. 
Boatman, Basil Brand, Raymond Briggs, 
Woodrow Brimm, Robert Burns, Herman 
Carlson, Eugene Catton, Neal Cole, Earl 
Collins, James Darby, Tony Devargas, 
Cleo Donnella, Andrew Duran, W. L. 
Fenison, James H. Garner, Martin 
George, WilUam Getz, Marquette Gott- 
wig, Raymond Gumtz. 

Icie Hale, T. F. Halfert>, Bert Hansen, 
Harvey Heaton, Beverley Hensell, Coy 
Hester, Fred E. Hill, Andrew Hinds, 
V. M. Hollingsworth, Cassel Holley, 
Lawrence Holmes, Chester Hudson, John 
Jacques, H. R. Jenkins, Raymond 
Ketchum, Cariel R. Kinsey, Edward 
Kirtz, C. H. Klump, Frederick Krauss, 
R. J. Lainson, Eric Larson, Anthony 
Madruga, Walter Marks, C. R. Mc- 
Connaughey, Raymond McCowen, Mar- 
tin Melchert, John Merfeld, Mauro Mo- 
rales, Ernest Morgan, Ian Morgan, 
George Mueller, Lester Nation. 

J. C. Owings, James O. Palmer, Anton 
J. Peck, A. A. Phillips, M. C. Ramirez, 
Virgil Robinson, Jimmie Rogers, B A. 
Rubalcaba, Elmo Sabine, Benson Scott, 
E. J. Scott, Carl Shepard, Dare! South- 
ward, Charles Stepanof, Hugo Stolpe, 
Clifford Tabadisto, Harold Taylor, King 
Taylor, Chester Tefft, Robert Thomas, 

4 



Walt Thompson, Jesse Uft, Kenneth 
Warner, Leon Warner, James White, 
James Willis, Charles E. Wilson, Clar- 
ence Winnett, Othor O. Young. 

(2) TOPEKA, KANS.— The officers and 
members of Local 1445 held a picnic 
last fall, honoring J. C. Navarre, retiring 
financial secretary, for his many years 
service to the local. Also honored were 
25 and 50-year members. In Picture 1. — 
50-year members from left, Claude Mil- 
ler, and J. C. Navarre. In Picture 3 — 
25-year members from left, Ervin M. 
Davis, Bennett Berggen, Claude Miller, 
Allen P. Streeter, John Shellinbarger, 
Ben F. Johnson, J. C. Navarre, Joe Schie- 
felbein, Louis F. King, Louis F. Rice, 
and Elmer C. Hunter. 

25 yr. members unable to attend were 
Joe Eagan, Geo. Essary, Wm. A. Esser, 
Paul C. Foster, Delbert Faulk, E. W. 
Gish, Lawrence Hahn, Ralph Jones, Rob- 
ert McKnight, Wm. H. Ralston, Earl J. 
Roney, Ernest Sterling, R. A. Taylor, 
Roy Morris, and Ed Snook. 

(4) JERSEY CITY, N.J.— Two 25-year 
members and one 50-year member were 
recently presented with service pins at a 
special meetings of Local 2315. In the 
front row, from left, are 25-year mem- 
ber John Schultz, 50-year member Bill 
Powell, and 25-year member John Gun- 
dry. In the second row, from left, are 
Tom Bifano, business agent; Al Beck, 
Sr., retired business agent; Al Beck, Jr., 
business agent; and Charles Polk, presi- 
dent of Local 2315. 





JANUARY, 1972 



33 




(1) MT. VERNON, ILL. — Members and officers of Carpenters Local 999. Mt. Vernon, are shown at a banquet held recently 
at the Odd Fellows Hall, to honor and present 25 and 50-year continuous service pins to qualified members. Seated from left 
to right: Floyd Adams, vice-president. Noble Davis (25 years), Clarence Fowler (25 years), Verne Hale, trustee, Evan Hampton 
(25 years). Glen Hester (25 years), T. T. Johnson, trustee, W. J. Laughmiller (25 years), Elmer Lowry (25 years), Burel 
Capps, business representative. Standing from left to right: C. H. McDonald (25 years), Lester Page (25 years), Louie Piper 
(25 years), Charles Puckett (25 years). Cliff Scheppel, president, Sam Stanridge (25 years), Coy Treat (25 years), Fred Wede- 
meyer (25 years), John Weisbecker (25 years). 




SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 



A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 




rs 




IC 



In Photo No. lA, Business Representa- 
tive Burel Capps, right, presents Evan 
Hampton, center, and Clarence Fowler, 
left, with their 25-year pins. Others eli- 
gible but not present to receive pins in- 
cluded Raymond Brieseacher, Gene Cof- 
fey Clarence Edminson, William Deth- 



row, Rufus Fisher, R. E. Harris, Delbert 
Keef, Raymond Martin, James Monroe, 
Kelly Reeves, Clement Rubenacker, 
Homer Shaefer, Edward Shannon, Roy 
Smith and James Moran. Kelly Reeves, 
88, of Geff (Picture No. IB), was unable 
to attend the banquet but will receive his 
50-year pin. James Moran, 83, of Ash- 
ley (Picture No. IC), was also unable to 
attend but will receive bis 50-year pin. 



(2) CASPER, WYO.— -A dinner honor- 
ing members of Local 1564 was held 
April 16 at the Carpenters Hall and 
served by Ladies Auxilliary No. 104. Fif- 
teen members were eligible for 25-year 
pins, eight of whom were present. Two 
members received journeyman certificates 



and pins, and two members were given 
their first pension checks. One member, 
Oscar Hagen, was eligible for his 50-year 
gold pin, but was unable to attend. 

Pictured presenting 25-year pins, at 
left, is Carleton Key. recording secretary; 
and, extreme right, H. Paul Johnson, bus- 
iness representative. Receiving pins, left 
to right, M. A. Stephens, President John 
Neifert, Linus Lau and Vice Pres. Sam 
Cordova. James Kennedy and Carl Bes- 
sert received pension checks. Others pic- 
tured receiving pins — Dick Brauer, G. R. 
"Bob" Kelly, Allen Close and E. M. 
Corrigan. Members eligible, but unable 
to attend were: James Brown. Hilmer 
Hansen, Carlton Henning, Ardon Merrill, 
William E. Rissler, Ernest Rivera and 
William J. Sims. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 4 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Decker, Charles 

L.U. NO. 12 
SYRACUSE, N. Y- 

Getlin, Louis 
Portyline, Paul 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

Aberg, John 
Firanze, Elmo L. 
Nyman, Gust T. 
Ost, Victor 

L.U. NO. 18 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Green, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 21 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Roy, John 

L.U. NO. 33 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Keen, Jay B. 

L.U. NO. 34 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Arnold, Jay K. 
Baird, Robert 
Gordon, Warren E. 
Kelley, Jerry E. 

L.U. NO. 36 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Anderson, Herman 
Biehn. Wayne L. 
Carlson, H. J. 
Pallister, Thomas J. 

L.U. NO. 53 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 

Heiner, Fred 
Kellman, Edward 

L.U. NO. 54 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Havelka, William M. 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Beutler, Clarence M. 
Hays, Francis 
Robinson, W. Y. 
Shelton, Charles 
Spicer, Walter C. 

L.U. NO. 67 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Bent, Charles N. 
Carlson, Wilhelm 
Crowell, John T. 
LoCicero, Vincent 
Manganaro, Salvatore 
McCue, Joseph O. 
Scanlon, Francis H. 
Taffalone, Guiseppi 

L.U. NO. 69 
CANTON, OHIO 

Gobeli, Christ 
Hair, William 
Walters, William 



L.U. NO. 87 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Benson, John 
Christ opherson, Henry 
Colten, Chester 
De Mars, Oliver 
Ginder, Roy 
Hoft, Hans 
Jerikowski, Jacob 
Kopischke, William 
Landkamer. John 
Long. N. K. 
Nelson. Herbert 
Noren. Bord 
Olson. Ted 
Petro. Steve 
Poucher, Allen 
Simonson, Glen 

L.U. NO. 88 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Wells, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 89 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Gartman, E. O. 
Lowe. U. F., Sr. 
Thompson, S. L. 
Windham, W. G. 

L.U. NO. 100 
MUSKEGON, MICH. 

Mulder, Jacob 

L.U. NO. 104 
DAYTON, OHIO 

Johnson, Frank 
Kirkpatrick, Creed 
Levan. Clyde 
Macklin, William S. 
Noerr. Ward E. 
Snyder. Frank A. 

L.U. NO. 109 
SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Beard. E. S. 
Perkins, W. D. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Beall, Oscar F. 
Harding, George O. 
Walker, Lawrence D. 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Budlong. James N. 
Busse, William 
Keck, Irving O. 
Matson, Karl 
Swanson. Clyde O. 

L.U. NO. 198 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

AUums, V. B. 
Becker, 1. N. 
Berg, Gus 
Boyd. W. C. 
Marsh. Boyd 
Miles, A. L. 
Pyron, Vance 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Kitchen, Russell 

L.U. NO. 213 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Canady, W. I. 



L.U. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Hales, G. C, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 229 
GLENS FALLS, N.Y. 

Brewster, Clifford 
Grant, Albert 
Mabb, Fred 
Thompson, Clayton 
Wolfe. William 

L.U. NO. 242 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Brewton, Jack 
Deitz. John 
Tunkel, Alex 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Krampe, Henry 
Krogstad, Tobias 

L.U. NO. 257 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Callan, John 

L.U. NO. 261 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Back. Andrew 
Ferguson, Robert 
Flynn. Thomas 
Hallod, Paul 
Kurrilla, Andrew 
McGoff. James 
Skivington, Roy 
Swackhammer, Floyd 

L.U. NO. 283 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Hamilton, Arley F. 
Hood, Isaac -D. 

L.U. NO. 287 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Bartell, Louis 
Forry, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 302 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

Moore, Phillip 
Scott, J. R. 

L.U. NO. 337 
WARREN, MICH. 

Babenista, Louis 
Czapla. Steve 
Elliott, Allen V. 
Gregory, William T. 
Krotman. Osias 
Lapish, Herbert 
Miller, Leroy 
Neal, Willie J. 
Nowicki, Walter 
Peters, John W. 
Priester, Oliver 
Sandahl, Emil J. 
Scott, Fred S. 
Spearman, John 
Wagner, Marvin 
Zebrowski, Casimir 

L.U. NO. 385 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Alvarez, Louis 
Amato, F. 
Angrisani, Antonio 
Beilenson, Jacob 



Bellavia Charles 
Sertoli, Maurice J. 
Bottillo, Ernest 
Businelli. F. 
Caponetta. Angelo 
Cappello, Leopold 
Carchich, Marco. Sr. 
Cerutti, Ernest M. 
Chiabera, P. C. 
Coniglio, Vito 
Chmar. A. J. 
Ciofti. Emilio 
Colombatovich, R. 
Cotroneo. Liugi 
Croce. John 
Daledda, Peter 
Damico. Joseph 
Dedea, John L. 
Denunzio, Sal 
Deturris. Roberto 
Diamond, Sara 
Disalvo. Joseph 
Dobos. John 
Druven. Flor 
Evangelista, Eleuterio 
Ferrari, M. 
Feuer. Louis 
Forte. Richard 
Gabriel. Carmano 
Gargiula. A. J. 
Gerzofi'. Harry 
Giordano, Anthony 
Gogliormella, M. 
Halpern. Sam 
Iglebak. Die 
Kesten. Jacob 
Labozzetta, Antonio 
Lamantia. Salvatore 
Lanaro, Nicholas 
Lapi, Paolo 
Leanza. Joseph 
Leishman. David 
Lombardelli, Alfredo 
Lopez, Luis 
Luppi. William 
Manezon, Izzie 
Mango. Anthony 
Marro. Aniello 
Marron. Sam 
McLean. Kenneth 
Mercaldi, F. 
Merlino, Frank 
Michalec, Joseph 
Migliori, Michael 
Miller. Benjamin 
Modica. Giuseppe 
Montefusco. A. 
Mosea. Dominick 
Musiello. Antonio 
Nardelli. Dominick 
NedelkolT. William 
Nieroda. Joseph 
Noskowitz. Morris 
Olivo, Angelo 
Palmieri. Angelo 
Payne, Wolsiey 
Perrini, Paolo 
Pienkowski. Stanley 
Pollizzano. Clino 
Privitera. Anthony 
Prokopiak. Joseph 
Riccardo, James 
Rodi. Modestovito 
Ronnquist, Gustave 
Rosati, Peter 
Russo, Thomas 
Sacks, Abraham 
Schinina, Vincent 
Scorzelli, Julius 



Shenken, Philip 
Shesko, Michael A. 
Slack, Arnold 
Vallerugo, Giuseppe 
Valentino, Joseph 
Vega, Sixto, Jr. 
Vizzini, Frank 
Williams, C. R. 
Woronkoff, Isadore 
Yorko, George 
Zamuner, Antonio 
Zangrande, Carlo 

L.U. NO. 414 
NANTICOKE, PA. 

Gilbale, Carl 

L.U. NO. 440 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Doten, Art C. 
Miller, Lee 

L.U. NO. 586 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF, 

Dill, L. A. 
Fernandez, Nick 
Hurst, Barney C. 
Mars, James G. 
Mazingo, J. C. 
Sommer, Peter F. 

L.U. NO. 608 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Ayers, Patrick 
Olson, Anton 

L.U. NO. 612 
UNION HILL, N.J. 

Nodyne. Allen B. 

L.U. NO. 621 
BANGOR, Me. 

Mitchell, George K. 
Perry, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 627 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Cauley, Plez D. 
Timmons, Lloyd M. 
Waldrop, Amos V. 

L.U. NO. 642 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Autrey, John W. 
Bates. Elmer J. 
Green, Melvin E. 
McGhee, O. C. 
Newman, George W. 
Nordin, Argie 
Price, Noel L. 
Richmond, Jerry E. 
Roof, Virgil 
Schillinger, Paul 
Urhausen, Don R. 
Wehrlie, W. H. 
Whstley, Mark J. 

L.U. NO. 691 
WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 

Ort, John F. 

L.U. NO. 769 
PASADENA, CALIF. 

Alvord, Floyd S. 
Calkins, Charles O. 
Duckworth. Guy 
Griffith, Edward J. 
Guggisberg, Armin 



JANUARY, 1972 



35 




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IN MEMORIAM, Con«nued from Page 35 



James, Harry E. 
Olson. Alfred T. 
Sleiner, Frank G. 
Terrel, John S. 
Van Vliet, Bastiaan 

L.U. NO. 770 
YAKIMA, WASH. 

McCrory, Claud 
Youngberg, Henry 

I.l'. NO. 787 
BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

Olscn, Bernt 

L.ll. NO. 885 
WOBURN, MASS. 

Allen. James 
Laureiro, Ferdinand 
Surrette, Zacharie 

L.U. NO. 916 
.\llRORA. ILL. 

Wallman, Herman 

L.U. NO. 937 
DUBIQIJE, IOWA 

Miller. Mark 

L.U. NO. 971 
RENO, NEV. 

Byars. Henry F. 
Forson, Alfred E., Sr. 
Rcymiis, Ernest 

L.II. NO. 977 
WICHITA FALLS, TEX, 

Hale. Dewey D. 

L.U. NO. 1065 
SALEM, ORE. 

Oleman. Victor 
Patzer. Theodore 

L.LI. NO. 1098 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Evans. C. E. 
Frazicr, George 
Haas, John 
Hanks. O.L. 
Harris. Ray 
Higginbotham, D. W. 
Hilbun, William S. 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

DeCant. Roy J. 

L.l'. NO. 1235 
MODESTO, CALIF. 

Bates. George W. 
Conway, Everett 
Sandberg. Harold E. 

L.U. NO. 1243 
FAIRBANKS, ALAS. 

Fox. Clifford 
Nolan, Clarence 
Runkle. Lee 

L.U. NO. 1292 
HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

Gieg. Fred 

L.U. NO. 1332 
GRAND COULEE, 
WASH. 

Combs, E. C. 

L.U. NO. 1394 
FORT LAUDERDALE, 
FLA. 

Levy, George 



L.U. NO. 1407 
WILMINGTON, CALIF. 

Adkins, Lindow 
Chavez, Pablo 
DeHaas, Hank 
Elwell. Dale W. 
Flores, Jos? 
Gaydeski, John A. 
Gilmore, Clay 
Horton, Louis 
Kelly, Frank 
Moine, Paul 
Nelson, Frank A. 
Niles, K. E. 
Pope, John E, 
Shine, George W. 
Stark, Homer L. 
Williams, Walter W. 

L.U. NO. 1441 
BETHEL PARK, PA. 

Bugay, Eddie 
Ewig, Elmer 
Ralston. Charles 
Trunzo, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 1445 
TOPEKA, KAN. 

Frahm, Alan M. 
Kendall, W. C. 

L.U. NO. 1453 
HUNTINGTON BEACH, 
CALIF. 

Austin, Ted 
Hargett, Mac 
Montgomery, Harry 
Moran, Oliver 
Tackman, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1456 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Conway, Richard 
Gordon, Thomas 
Halvorsen, Harry 
Healey, Peter 
Jerstad, Josef 
Jordan. Charles 
Knapp, Harry E. 
Lehman. Gene 
McCorgray, Robert 
O'Halloran, James 
Recz, Peter 
Schneider, Adolph 
Sjoberg, Matt T. 
Skaara. Harry 
Strommen, Ingvar 
Tolncs. Haakon 
Hermanson, Carl 



L.U. NO. 1582 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Birk, Herman 
Wollerman, Herman 

L.U. NO. 1598 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Fair, David 

L.U. NO. 1615 
GRANDS RAPIDS, 
MICH. 

Hesselink, Richard 
Jones, William L. 

L.U. NO. 1667 
BILOXI, MISS. 

Wallace, Joseph L. 
Goggans, Alvin A. 

L.U. NO. 1849 
PASCO, WASH. 

Bennett, George W. 
Grant, Howard P. 
Jansen, George F. 
Kleinow, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 1855 
BRYAN, TEX. 

Gilstrap, C. H., Jr. 
Mosley, J. W. 

L.U. NO. 2006 

LOS GATOS, CALIF. 

Cados, Theodore 

L.U. NO. 2046 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Barrett, Frederick 
Berta, John 
Dye, G. D, 
Eubanks, Gene 
Harkins, Charles 
Hunt, Bazil 
Jansen, John C. 
Williams, Sam 

L.U. NO. 2067 
MEDFORD, ORE. 

Barron, Jesse E. 

L.U. NO. 2235 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Conlon, John 
Gilchrist, Bruce 
McKelvey, Clem 
Osborne, Wilbur 
Summerill, Harry 

L.U. NO. 2274 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Wermter, William 




The new emblem 

of (he Carpenters 

Legislative 

Improvement 

Committee is 

blue and gold. 

Join CLIC and 

wear it in 1972. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




Outdoor 
Meanderings 



Readers may write to 
Fred Goetz 

2833 S. E. 33rd Place, 
Portland, Oregon 97202 



Husband and Wife 




Mr. and Mrs. Paul Siefer and catch. 



Avid angling duo is Paul E. Siefer of 
San Mateo, California, a member of 
Local 1149 in San Francisco, and his 
wife. On a recent two-day trip to waters 
out of San Francisco Bay, a friendly but 
touch-and-go match for supremacy de- 
veloped between the pair. Numerically, 
it ended in a draw with Paul racking up a 
total of two Chinook and the Missus 
boating a small Chinook and 31-lb. Hali- 
but. Here's a look-see at both with their 
catch. 



■ Exciting Trap Line Days 

Retired Carpenter, E. H. Englund of 
Grasston, Minn., says his winter days are 
filled with exciting and ofttimes lucrative 
days on the trap line. Here's a look-in 
on Brother Englund, a member of Local 




386, with pelts from part of the "take" 
he made of red fox and muskrat. 

■ BC Waters Praised 

Eugene Putnam of Seattle. Washing- 
ton, a member of Local 2519. tabs the 
waters out of Smithers, British Colum- 
bia, as the best he's ever fished for 
salmon. Pic in files which, unfortunately, 
was too faint to reproduce, nevertheless 
clearly showed Brother Putnam with a 
pair of Chinook (King) salmon which I 
daresay weighed over 35 pounds each. 

■ Sliark Hunter 




£. H. Englund and Pelts 
JANUARY, 1972 



Donnelly with Atlantic shark. 

Frank Donnelly of Brooklyn, New 
York, a member of the Millwrights Local 
740, is a hunter of fish, specifically a 
hunter of sharks. He's pictured here with 
one from a catch which he and others 
made in Atlantic waters out of Montauk 
Point. He makes three such junkets a 
year. Frank says the one he is standing 
lay tipped the scales at 200 pounds, but 
larger ones have been taken. 

■ Beaver Barter 

The Indians and early settlers of North 
America regarded beaver pelts as a valua- 
ble item. An even-up trade in the early 
days was a pile of beaver skins for a 
musket, the pile to reach as high as the 
muzzle of said musket. Another trade 
was four beaver skins for a wool blanket. 



■ Fast on the Draw 

Way up on the top of the ladder for 
production and maintenance of large and 
healthy deer herds, and trophy specimens, 
is the state of Utah. In order to keep it 
that way, its biologists — as in every other 
state where deer hunting prevails — set 
seasonal bag limits so that the herd will 
be conservatively harvested and kept in 
balance. 

One hunter who knows that is Joe 
Mansfield of El Sabranti, California, a 
member of the Richmond Carpenters 
Local 642. He's pictured here with a 
moose of a mule deer he downed on a 
past deer opener in the Beehive State. 
Packing a Model 760 Remington, 30/06 
caliber, he nailed it on the second shot 
as it came loping out of a draw. It 
dressed out at 224 pounds. 




Left, Mansfield; right. Potter. 

■ A Hunt Near Hunt 

Earl Potter Jr. of Houston, Texas, a 
member of Millwrights Local 2232, got 
his buck, a whitetail, the hard way last 
season — via the bow and arrow route. 
He's pictured here with his prize nailed 
during the archery season near Hunt, 
Texas. 

■ Send Us Items 

Can your tackle box hold another 
fishing lure? We'd be happy to trade one 
of the illustrated BOLO fishing lures for 
a clear snapshot of a fishing or hunting 
scene — and a few words as to what the 
photo is about. Send it to: 

Fred Goetz, Dept. OM 
2833 S.E. 33rd Place 
Portland, Oregon 97202 



=si«»o 



Please mention your Local number. 
The ofi'er is open to all members of the 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, the members of their fami- 
lies and, of course, retired members. 




37 




CLOSURE SPREADER 

A Gang Spreader developed for use 
when installing all-weather fiber glass 
enclosures at construction sites has been 
announced by Kelly Klosure Systems. 

The new E-Z Move Spreader attaches 
to 12' X 12' X 28' sections of Kelly 
Klosures for easy boom placement where 
ever protection is needed on a construc- 
tion job. 

The E-Z Move was developed especi- 
ally for use with Kelly Klosures — the 
wind resistant plastic and steel enclosures 
designed to offer summer-time work 
conditions even in inclement weather. 
Kelly Klosures are manufactured in 
standard size panels of 4' x 12'. Practi- 
cally any width, length or height can be 
obtained by simply joining the steel 
frames with handy installation locking 
keys. 

For further information on the new 
E-Z Move Gang Spreaders and Kelly 
Klosure Systems write: Mr. Michael 
Fagen, KELLY KLOSURE. INC., Box 
443, Fremont, Nebraska 68025. 




ELECTRIC HINGE 

An electric hinge, with leaf conductors 
that carry the current, was introduced to 
architects and contractors in January by 
Hager Hinge Company, St. Louis. 

The design and function of the new 
hinge presupposes the development of a 
companion unit — a lock set activated by 
electrical current and controlled from a 
central source. 

Alert manufacturers have been working 
on various adaptations of wired circuits 
for security programs. In most cases, the 
devices developed require some form of 
electrical current in the door. "Because 
of the advanced stage of this work by 
lock manufacturers," states Clarence H. 



a 



iW 



«& 



PLEASE NOTE: A report on new prod- 
ucts and processes on this page in no way 
constitutes cm endorsement or recommen- 
dation. All perormance claims are based 
on statements by the manuacturer. 



* 



King, Jr., A.H.C., Vice President. Market- 
ing and Sales, "we at Hager felt it would 
be helpful to industry planning to an- 
nounce the electric hinge at this time. 
We are convinced that electronics is the 
coming trend in security as well as in 
providing new approaches to the Open- 
ings Concept now gaining momentum in 
construction methods." 

The Hager electric hinge, patent pend- 
ing, is a big departure from conventional 
hinge function. Coming as it does when 
security is high on the list in commercial, 
industrial, and residential planning, the 
electric hinge can make a valid contribu- 
tion to security advancements. 

Electrical current moves up through 
the frame to the hinges. When the door 
is closed, the current moves across the 
door interior by wired circuit to the lock 
set. When the door opens the contact is 
broken. This action can be utilized in a 
central signal system. 

Because contact points on each leaf 
serve as terminals, the door can be re- 
moved when necessary without disturbing 
the wiring inside the door or inside the 
framing. Because of intended use for ex- 
tra security, the hinges are mounted so 
the pin is not accessible from outside, or 
they have non-removable pins that dis- 
courage tampering. 

While electronic control of doors is a 
widely accepted security measure, most 
systems require rather extensive equip- 
ment and sophisticated operational pro- 
cedures. The direct wired contact from 
hinge to lock set can simplify application. 



NEW PLYWOOD DATA 

"Plywood Construction Systems," a 
56-page guide, has been expanded to 
include current plywood performance in- 
formation for designing and constructing 
commercial and industrial buildings. 

The systems illustrated range from on- 
site construction to shop-fabricated com- 
ponents in which plywood's economy, 
diaphragm strength, fire safety and ap- 
pearance play important roles. 

Sidings, sheathing, shear walls, the 
APA Single Wall System, paneling, back- 
ing and lining are covered in the wall 
construction section. 

Basic information on subflooring, un- 
derlayment, APA glued floors and a num- 
ber of heavy duty and special floor sys- 
tems are offered in the brochure's cov- 
erage of plywood floor construction. 

Building requirements, treated ply- 
wood and sound control construction are 
among the numerous special topics dis- 
cussed in this comprehensive publication. 

For a free single copy of "Plywood 
Construction Systems" for commercial 
and industrial buildings, write to the 
American Plywood Association, 1119 A 
Street, Tacoma, Washington, 98401. Ask 
for Form 65-310. 

TO CUT PARTICLEBOARD 

Everyone who has worked with particle- 
board has foimd it difficult to shape the 
exposed edges without the major prob- 
lem of extensive filling due to tearing 
out of the particles. Spira-Cut Tool Com- 
pany has developed a shaper-cutter, 
called SPIRA-CUT, that permits shaping 
exposed edges of particleboard without 
tearing out particles. This reduces and in 
some cases eliminates filling and sanding. 
The precision ground carbide inserts have 
spiral grooves, which cut the particle- 
board without chipping into it or pulling 
particles from it. Production runs, be- 
tween sharpenings, have rangad from 
30,000 feet to over 50,000 feet. Each 
shaper-cutter is balanced after assembly 
and machining for vibration-free cutting. 
The cutter also has many advantages for 
curly grain and end grain cuts on soft to 
hard woods. Full details may be obtained 
from Spira-Cut Tool Company, 4001 
North 28th Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 
85017. 




38 



THE CARPENTER 




Lakeland 
News 



Items of interest from the Brotherfiood's 
retirement fiome at Lal<eland, Fiorida 



Walter Aunio, of Local 2236, New 
York, N. Y., arrived at the Home Nov. 4, 
1971. 

e 

Olof Ekstrand, of Local 105, Euclid, 

Ohio, arrived at the Home Nov. 4, 1971. 

• 

Frank J. Fuller, of Local 1913, Van 

Nuys, Calif., arrived at the Home Nov. 

11, 1971. 

• 
Anton Johnason, of Local 58. Chicago, 
111., arrived at the Home Nov. 11, 1971. 
• 
Andrew R. Dellgren, of Local 357, 
Islip, N. Y., arrived at the Home Nov. 12, 
1971. 

• 
Charles Ebel, of Local 608, New York, 
N. Y., arrived at the Home Nov. 12, 
1971. 

• 
Willard E. Ross, of Local 132, Wash- 
ington, D. C, arrived at the Home Nov. 
26, 1971. 

• 
Edward J. O'Sullivan, of Local 2168, 
Boston, Mass., arrived at the Home Nov. 
30, 1971. 

• 
John A. Jacobsen, of Local 1456, New 
York, N. Y., died Nov. 4, 1971. Burial 
was at Boynton Beach, Fla. 
• 
Charles Egan, of Local 12, Syracuse, 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel, Theodore 15 

Belsaw Power Tools 23 

Belsaw Sharp-All 32 

Chevy Trucks 8 

Chicago Technical College ... 19 

Cline-Sigmon, Publishers 32 

Estwing Manufacturing 29 

Foley Manufacturing 17 

Fugitt, Douglas 36 

Garlinghouse 25 

Hydrolevel 39 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 23 

King-size Co 15 

Locksmithing Institute 39 

Mason Engineering Service . . 36fi 
North American School of 

Drafting 13 

North American School of 

Surveying 27 

Paneling Specialties 27 

Stanley Hand Tools . . Back Cover 



N.Y., died Nov. 25, 1971. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 
• 

Thomas J. Kelly, of Local 1694, Wash- 
ington, D. C, died Nov. 27, 1971. His 
body was shipped to Hyattsville, Md., for 
burial. 

• 

Gunnar Frostad, of Local 7, Minne- 
apolis, Minn., died Nov. 28, 1971. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 



Move For Senior 
Citizen Support 

The federal government of Canada 
was still digesting its Opportunities for 
Youth program when Barry Mather, a 
newspaperman who is a New Demo- 
cratic Member of Parliament from 
British Columbia, moved a motion in 
the House of Commons for a program 
for senior citizens. 

He got immediate support from Jus- 
tice Minister John Turner who told 
the press that, while the government 
has not fully assessed its youth pro- 
gram, it seems to have worked and "if 
this is so, I'm sure an Opportunities 
for the Aged program would work just 
as well." 

The idea got support from senior 
citizens' organizations which had had 
a national convention in August. 
Many of their spokesmen at the con- 
vention, putting it bluntly, pointed to 
the attention young people were get- 
ting these days compared with the ne- 
glect of older citizens. 

One of their leaders suggested that 
the first thing the federal government 
could help finance for them is a na- 
tional headquarters with a staff secre- 
tary. 

Since the organization has 403 af- 
filiated clubs across Canada, this 
might be a good thing to do. 

A number of trade union retirees 
are very active in the senior citizens' 
organization, and have really provided 
most of the know-how to get it going. 



You'll Like Being a 
SKILLED 

LOCKSMITH € 



You'll EARN MORE, LIVE BETTER 
than Ever Before in Your Life 



You'll enjoy your work as a Locksmitli 
because it is more fascinating than a 
hobby — and liighly paid besides! You'll 
Eo Oil cnjoyiiie the fascinating work, 
year after year, in good times or bad 
because you'll be tile man in demand 
ill an evergrowing lield offering big pay 
jobs, big profits as your own boss. What 
more could you ask! 

Train at Home — Earn Extra $$$$ 
Right Away! 
All this can be yours FAST regardless 
of age, education, minor physical hand- 
icaps. Job enjoyment and earnings be- 
gin AT ONCE as you quickly, easily 
learn to CASH IN on all kinds of lock- 
smithing Jobs. All keys, locks, parts, 
picks, special tools and cnuipment come 
with the course at no extra charge. 
Licensed experts guide you to success. 
Illustrated Book, Sample Lesson 
Pages FREE 
Locksmithing Institute graduates now 
earning, enjoying life more everywhere. 
You can. too. Coupon brings exciting 
facts from only school of its kind Lie. 
by X. J. State Dent, of Ed.. Accredited 
Member. Natl. Home Study Council. 
Approved for Veteran Training. 
LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 
Div. of Tectinical Home Study Schools 
Dept. 1118-012, Little Falls, N. J. 07424 




Earned 

$150 
During 
Training 
I realized with 
LOCKSMITH- 
ING I'd be able 
to double my in- 
come. During 
my training per- 
iodlmadeSISO. 
Paul Funes 
New York, N.Y. 




LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 11^8-012 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Please send FUEE illustrated Book — "Your Big Op- 
portunities in Locksmithing," complete Efiuipment 
folder and sample lesson pages — FKEE of all obliga- 
tion — (no salesman will call). 



Name,,. 

Address . 



(Please Print) 



I City State Zip 

I n Check here if Eligible for Veteran Training 



LAYOUT LEVEL 




• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 



In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, (ixtui-es, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear toufih 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation— outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate «!(»)*' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only $7.95 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
age. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

Ask your tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow tlie usual dealer discount on }.i Doz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSoto, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 




JANUARY, 1972 



39 




In conclusion 



M. A. Hutcheson, Genera/ President 




Will the 18-Year-Old Voter Make a Difference? 



■ After a long and often bitter struggle, legis- 
lation permitting 1 8-year-old citizens to vote has 
finally been written into law. 

At this point in time there is little profit in 
rehashing how many were for or against the right 
of 1 8-year-olds to vote. The fundamental fact is 
that 18-year-olds now have the right to vote. 

For a number of years, the young people in 
our colleges and other institutions have created 
a great furor over the fact that young people 
under 2 1 years of age have had no voice in shaping 
the destiny of the nation. Now the law gives them 
the right to help choose who will call the signals 
in Congress and the White House. 

Ofl'hand, this may seem like a great victory for 
the youngsters between 18 and 21. However, we 
are inclined to be a little skeptical about the im- 
pact that will accrue to the nation from reducing 
the legal voting age from 21 to 18. 

Statistics indicate that only 20% of the people 
in the 21-25 age bracket bother to register and 
vote. There is little hope that the percentage will 
improve by reducing the voting age from 21 to 18. 

There was a time, some 60 years ago, when 
woman's suffrage was hanging in the balance, 
when those who favored giving the vote to women 
insisted that war would become obsolete once 
women had the right to vote. Mothers would never 
commit their sons to war, they said. Unfortunately, 
this prediction did not pan out. 

There are two areas in the world where war is 
a constant threat. One is in India; and the other 
is in the Middle East. In both cases, women are 
in the strategic spots to determine whether the fu- 
ture will bring war or peace. In both cases, it seems 
that the women who head the states in question 



are fully as belligerent as men might be. 

I only bring up this point to emphasize the fact 
that things are not always what they seem to be. 
It is fine for people to visualize that international 
turmoil will end when the right to vote is extended 
to 18-year-olds everywhere. 

However, the same forces of national, regional 
or religious prejudice and ethnic loyalty that gov- 
ern the thinking of the old will undoubtedly sur- 
face in the young. The problem becomes less one 
of giving the vote to younger constituents and more 
a problem of educating people to vote their rea- 
soned judgments rather than their ethnic or tribal 
allegiances. 

History records many brutal and sanguine re- 
ligious wars that in retrospect seem unthinkable, 
yet more people have been slaughtered in the name 
of religion during the past 30 years than any time 
in human history. The Jews in Germany, the Ibos 
in Nigeria, llie Moslems and non-Moslems in 
Pakistan, and the Catholics and Protestants in 
Ireland bear mute testimony to this truism. 

There is some evidence that the youngsters grow- 
ing up today are not going to be swayed so much 
by the traditions and prejudices of the past. If 
this is so, it must be considered a big plus in the 
advancement of human progress. Based on the 
record of the past, there is little to indicate that 
extending the vote to 18-year-olds will have any 
immediate impact on the confused situation exist- 
ing in the nation today. However, it must be recog- 
nized that the potential for achieving great good 
is there, and I think it is the fervent hope of my 
generation that the vast army of brand new voters 
will use their political muscle to help bring about 
peace and justice in the world. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



What makes the 
Stanley Stedmaster 
ydurkinditfhamm^ 




The face is rim-tempered, for 
a safer hammer. Rim- 
tempering minimizes chipping 
in case of a foul blow. That's 
on-the-job safety. 



Handle is hydraulically driven Notice the clean, sharp edges Finally, it's a perfectly balanced 



into the handle hole under 



on the claw. This makes it 



hammer. Set it on its claws and 



10,000 lbs. force. Permanently easier to grip the shank of any notice the exact 45° angle. 



locked head and handle can't 
twist or loosen. 



nail and pull it, without effort. Perfect, 
from the toughest wood. 




Don't settle for anything less than the 
best, time-tested tools. Stanley has been 
known for excellence in hand tools for 
ovei a century. Buy the tool that makes a 
difference. Stanley Tools, Division 
of The Stanley Works, New Britain, 
Connecticut 06050. 



STANLEY 



helps you do things right 



P.S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest power tools. 



FEBRUARY 1972 




ficial Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 









' 


I 


bill 


/ = 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield. New Jersey 07081 

Third District, William Konyha 
2830 Copley Rd., Box 8175 
Akron, Ohio 44320 
Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

101 Marietta St., Suite 913 

Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

2800 Selkirk Drive 

Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

6323 N.W., Grand Blvd. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland. Oregon 97205 
Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor. Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 

4706 W. Saanich Rd. 

RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



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advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
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(§ZA\EP[iBa^[iK 



VOLUME XCII 



No. 2 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

General President Hutcheson Retires 2 

Brotherhood Members Install Synthetic Turf 7 

How Astro Turf was Installed at Soldiers Field 8 

Harpers Ferry, The Millwright's Town 11 

National Transportation Policy, Maritime Goal 14 

Prime Trade Union Weapon: Union Label Buying 14 

Installing Locltsets: Problems and Solutions 25 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Apprenticeship and Training 27 

CLIC Report 29 

Service to the Brotherhood 30, 32 

Plane Gossip 34 

In Memoriam 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Foim 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave.. N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage pjid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Abraham Lincoln was a well-read 
man by the standards of his day. 
Much has been recorded about his 
ability to cite chapters and verses 
from the Bible, documents, and texts 
in pleading cases and causes. 

The eloquence of his address at 
Gettysburg Cemetery bears testimony 
to his literate background. 

The array of books with the framed 
Gettysburg Address on our February 
cover usher in an annual tribute to 
one of our greatest U.S. presidents. 

In February, 1861. Lincoln began 
his journey to greatness at the White 
House in Washington, D.C., one day 
before his 52nd birthday. 

On his trip from Springfield, 111., to 
the nation's capital, he was greeted all 
along the way with shouts of "Save 
the Union, Abe!" People took him at 
once to their hearts. His homespun 
humor and simple manner delighted 
them. They were happy he wasn't as 
bad looking as some people claimed, 
for word had spread the he was 
"awfully ugly." — Photo from H. 
Armstrong Roberts. 

PLEASE NOTE: Readers who wish 
a copy of the cover, iinmurred by a 
mailing label, and suitable for framing 
or display, may obtain one by writing 
the magazine, using the Brotherhood 
address shown at lower left. The me- 
chanical requirements of our printer 
and the needs of our back-cover adver- 
tiser force us to place the label in the 
lower left corner of the cover. 



CARPEMTEI 




GENERAL PRESIDENT HUTCHESON 

RETIRES 

First General Vice President William Sidell 
Moves Up to Top Brotherhood Post 



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January »,W72 



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THE CARPENTER 



■ Maurice A. Hutcheson, for 
three decades one of the towering 
figures in the trade union movement, 
will retire March 1 as General Presi- 
dent of our Brotherhood, a position 
he has held since 1952. 

In announcing his unexpected re- 
tirement, the vigorous, 73-year-old 
President said: 

"After a good deal of soul search- 
ing, I have reached the conclusion 
that the time has come for me to 
step down, while my wife and I are 
still physically able to do some of 
the things we have always wanted 
to do but were prevented from doing 
by the pressures of offices." 

He will be succeeded by William 
Sidell, 56, a General Vice Presi- 
dent since 1964, a member of 
the Carpenters' General Executive 
Board since 1962 and, for a number 
of years before that, one of the 
outstanding labor leaders in Cali- 
fornia. 

During his tenure as General 
President, Brother Hutcheson ren- 
dered distinguished service not only 
to his own union but to the trade 
union movement as a whole. 

He has been a forceful member of 
the AFL-CIO Executive Council 
and also the Executive Council of 
the Building and Construction 
Trades Department, AFL-CIO, both 
of which posts he intends to relin- 
quish even though he will have the 
title of President-emeritus of the 
Brotherhood. 

He was one of the key persons 
in the development of the National 
Joint Board for the Settlement of 
Jurisdictional Disputes in the Con- 
struction Industry and a pioneer in 
establishing mechanisms for better 
labor-management relations in the 
construction industry. 

In recent months, Brother Hutch- 
eson has been one of the main forces 
in a drive to provide more and 
better housing for the nation. The 
Carpenters, joined by the United 
Association of Plumbers and Pipe 
Fitters and the International Broth- 
erhood of Electrical Workers, effec- 
tuated a so-called Tri-Trade Agree- 
ment that is considered a bench- 
mark by the Federal government as 
well as the industry in the organiza- 
tion and development of factory- 
built housing. The Carpenters alone 
have negotiated hundreds of con- 




FEBRUARY, 1972 




nnfe^r^sw 



At the rostrum of a Brotherhood 
General Convention, General 
President Hutcheson guided the 
delegates through many parliamentary 
and fraternal issues, serving as 
chairman of the gatherings. 




Presidential Candidate Richard Nixon 
was assisted to the podium of our 1960 
General Convention by Former Labor 
Secretary .lames P. Mitchell, as 
President Hutcheson pinned on a 
guest badge. 



tracts for the off-site building of 
modular and pre-fabricated resi- 
dences. 

Many Achievements 

As a member of the influential 
Administrative Committee of the 
Building and Construction Trades 
Department, he played a leading 
role in formulating such departmen- 
tal programs as the gigantic project 
agreement to build Disney World 
in Orlando, Florida, entirely union; 
the recruiting, training and appren- 
ticeship placement of minority 
youths in skilled crafts, the recent 
sweeping field reorganization of the 
department, and the establishment 
of new work rules and procedures 
to increase productivity in major 
construction projects, including the 
prohibition of work stoppages be- 
cause of jurisdictional disputes. 

He also participated in the pre- 
liminary discussions which helped 



mold the design of the Construction 
Industry Stabilization Committee — 
of which Vice President Sidell is an 
original member — and the Craft 
Boards. 

The international headquarters of 
the Carpenters at 101 Constitution 
Avenue, N.W., adjacent to Capitol 
Hill and considered one of Washing- 
ton's most beautiful structures, was 
built virtually under his personal 
supervision. 

Broad Experience 

When Brother Hutcheson became 
General President of the Carpenters, 
succeeding his late father, William 
L. Hutcheson, he already had ac- 
quired 38 years of continuous mem- 
bership in his union, which em- 
braced every activity and experience 
from apprentice to general officer. 

On his seventeenth birthday in 
1914, he became an apprentice but, 
before he could complete the train- 



ing. World War I was in full swing. 
Laying down his tools, he enlisted 
in the Navy, served two years, then 
returned home to qualify as a jour- 
neyman carpenter. 

Then followed a period in which 
he worked at his trade throughout 
the United States — dock building in 
New York City, shipbuilding in 
Brooklyn, general carpentry and 
millwork in innumerable cities. 

In 1928, he was appointed a Gen- 
eral Representative. His assignment 
to work with unions across the coun- 
try gave him an intimate knowledge 
of peculiar problems of the Brother- 
hood's subordinate bodies. 

Then, in 1938, when a death cre- 
ated a vacancy in the General Office, 
Brother Hutcheson unanimously was 
elected First General Vice President, 
serving until his election to the Gen- 
eral Presidency when his late father 



THE CARPENTER 




President Hutcheson joined 
in tlie welcome as President 
Eisenhower smiled broadly and 
waved to the delegates to the 
Diamond Jubilee Convention 
of the Brotherhood. 




resigned after 36 years of service. 

Like the man he now succeeds, 
Sidell has had unusual training in 
the ranks and in the leadership of 
the Carpenters. 

Father's Footsteps 

Born in Chicago, 111. on May 30, 
1915, Sidell moved with his mother 
and father, a carpenter-cabinet mak- 
er, to Los Angeles County in 1920. 
There he completed his formal edu- 
cation and then followed in his 
father's footsteps, becoming an ap- 
prentice in Local 721. 

The first office to which he was 
elected was warden of the 4,500- 
member Local 72 1 . Later he became 
recording secretary, organizer, as- 
sistant business representative, busi- 
ness manager and president. 

In 1957, Sidell was elected secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Los Angeles 
County District Council of Carpen- 
Continued on page 10 




Top: Successful Presidential Candi- 
date John Kennedy was welcomed 
to the convention by General President 
Hutcheson. 

Center, above: Longtime friends share 
a discussion at a labor gathering: 
President Hutcheson and AFL-CIO 
President George Meany. 

Bottom: President Hutcheson and First 
Gen. Vice Pres. William Sidell as they 
visited the 1971 International Carpenters 
Apprenticeship Contest in Detroit, Mich. 



FEBRUARY, 1972 




HEMGTOM 




ROUNDUP 



STRIKE ACTIVITY- In 1971 it was TdsIow 1970 levels, the Labor Department reports. 
Man-days of idleness due to work stoppages was 2.5 working days per 1,000 in 1971, 
compared with 3.7 in 1970. 

ANTI-LABOR LAWYERS?— The Brookings Institution held a press conference to announce 
a new book advocating a curtailment of bargaining rights now enjoyed by public 
employees. Syndicated columnist John Herling asked the two authors, both Yale 
University law professors, what kind of law they taught. "We teach labor law," 
was the response. "Thank you," responded Herling, "we almost thought it was 
anti-labor law." There was a long silence, and another reporter claimed after- 
ward that 20 feet away you could feel the heat of the two professors blushing. 

MORE APPALACHIA AID— Six hundred more jobless or under-employed persons through- 
out Appalachia will get on-the-job training in a $400,000 expansion of a Labor 
Department contract with the AFL-CIO Appalachian Council. The expansion adds 
training slots in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, North 
Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West 
Virginia. 

PRODUCTIVITY UP— The National Labor Relations Board reports an 11% increase in 
productivity per employee for itself during the last fiscal year. NLRB says it 
received 10.8% more cases of all types from unions, employers and individuals, 
and completed action on 15% more than in fiscal 1970— and with a 3% smaller staff. 

JOB CORPS SCREENING— The Labor Department's Job Corps is mounting a major effort 
to provide diagnostic screening for sickle cell anemia, an inherited blood 
problem which primarily affects Uegroes. It is estimated that 3,000 to 3,500 
youths entering the Job Corps next year will have the sickle cell trait, making 
it the most common medical problem in the Job Corps. 

CAPITOL COMMENT— As Congress adjourned in December, union printers at the Govern- 
ment Printing Office did some toting up and found that the 100-member Senate did 
nearly twice as much talking, 1,157 hours, as the 435-member House of 
Representatives . 

BLUE-COLLAR PAY"THAWED"-The federal government's 650,000 blue-collar workers will 
be able to collect long-overdue pay raises under an executive order signed by 
Pres. Nixon at the urging of unions and Congress. 

White-collar federal employes and the military received 5.5% raises in 
January under legislation passed by Congress. But the machinery for adjusting 
blue-collar rates to area changes in private industry wage scales had been frozen 
since last summer by presidential order. 

The "thaw" announced by the President will permit retroactive payment of 
those wage increases that were held up by the freeze and resumption of wage 
board surveys to set new pay schedules in other localities. 

The presidential action, however, limited the raises to the 5.5% 
pay guideline. 

PERSONAL INCOME— Despite claims of the Nixon Administration that the economy has 
been advancing, the rate of gain for personal income last year was less than 
in 1970. The 1971 rate of gain was 6.5%. .In 1970 it was seven percent. The 1971 
gain was the lowest in eight years. 

Wage and salary disbursements increased six percent but the manufacturing 
industries showed the smallest gain — only 2.5% as compared with 9.5% in services. 



THE CARPENTER 




Brotherhood 

Members 

Install 

SYNTHETIC 

TURF 



■ Since the Age of Synthetic 
Fibers was ushered in, after World 
War II, thousands of mowers of 
home lawns have dreamed of an 
artificial turf which keeps its color 
year around and never needs to be 
clipped. 

Football coaches who have seen 
their muddy, unrecognizable play- 
ers bogged down and slipping in 
the mire of a rainy weekend grid- 
iron battle have prayed for any kind 
of playing surface but mud. 

Finally, in the early 1960's sev- 
eral manufacturers began studying 
ways and means of answering such 
prayers. 

One of the leaders in the develop- 
ment of a synthetic turf, The Mon- 
santo Co., was asked by the Ford 
Foundation to intensify its work to 
meet growing demands for sports 
and recreational facilities. 

Monsanto had already begun re- 
search work at a plant in Decatur, 
Ala., and as a result of that research 
came out with a pioneering prod- 
uct. In 1966, the Astrodome in 
Houston, Tex., received an indoor 
Astro Turf baseball field. In 1967, 
the world's first two outdoor syn- 
thetic athletic fields were installed 
when Astro Turf went in at the Seat- 
tle, Wash., Memorial Stadium and 
the Indiana State University play- 
ing field at Terre Haute. Union 
Carpenters worked in these early 
installations. 

Astro Turf has been greatly im- 
proved in the few years since. It 
has been adapted to other uses. 
There are specially-engineered nylon 
surfaces for golf tees, golf greens, 
playgrounds, field houses, landscap- 
ing, and tennis. 




A cutaway section of a typical AstroTurf attiletic field installa- 
tion. Next to tlie soil is a layer of crushed rock base, topped by 
a layer of asphalt to assure proper grade and drainage. Bonded 
to the asphalt is the white shock absorbing pad which is bonded 
to the AstroTurf itself. To either side are the anchoring devices. 
In an actual installation a system of drain tiles, positioned next 
to the anchoring devices, provides for rapid drainage of surface 
water. Each AstroTurf installation is especially tailored to the 
climatic conditions of the particular location in order to assure 
year-round service, proper water drainage and a playing sur- 
face that is always uniform. 



In fact, manufacturers of syn- 
thetic turf expect to make their "big 
money" some day in landscaping. 
They aren't always making a profit 
on football fields . . . though such 
installations help to dramatize the 
product. 

There are other synthetic turfs 
besides Astro Turf — Polyturf and 
Tartan Turf, to name two — and 
these are installed by Brotherhood 
members. 

The Brotherhood does not view 
such work as normal building and 



construction work. Therefore, the 
agreement with management which 
covers such work was concluded on 
a vertical basis, wherein the com- 
pany recognizes the United Broth- 
erhood as sole and exclusive bar- 
gaining representative for all em- 
ployees on these installations. In 
1970 a national agreement was 
signed with Sport Install, Inc., the 
Monsanto subsidiary. Though there 
have been some non-union installa- 
tions of competing turfs, union Car- 
penters, for the most part, do the 
work in this growing field. ■ 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



How 

Astro Turf 
was installed 
at Soldier Field, 
Chicago 




*« ■ ,,* 



W^n ■' '"IT. :.i^flJBi-1 



TOP RIGHT: The Special vehicles and equipment needed for precision 
laying of the synthetic turf is unloaded from a flatbed truck, as Brother- 
hood members begin their work. 



MIDDLE RIGHT: Adhesive is spread in a broad swath, as rolls of pad- 
ding are applied to the asphalt base. 



BOTTOM RIGHT: A member of Local 1185, Chicago aligns tape along 
a seam of padding, as workers prepare to lay the synthetic turf. 




■ During June, 1 97 1 , a crew of skilled Brotherhood 
members, employed by Sport Install, Inc., laid 10,000 
square yards of synthetic turf on the playing field of 
Soldier Field, Chicago. It was a smooth, efficient op- 
eration, typical of many Astro Turf installations by the 
Monsanto Company subsidiary. 

Such work has been covered by a national agree- 
ment between the Brotherhood and Sport Install, Inc. 
since February 1 1, 1970. It was one of more than a 
dozen such installations made by our members in 
recent months. 

Astro Turf is put down in rolls 1 5 feet wide by up 
to 200 feet long. The rolls are usually seamed to- 
gether on the marking stripes. The surface and the 
shock-absorbing pad are bonded directly to an asphalt 
base. 

Drainage is achieved by crowning the field by some 
14 to 18 inches. The synthetic material is impervious 
to water, and the crown, lower than many natural 



grass fields, allows the water to drain off the field to 
the sides. 

Monsanto estimates that a typical Astro Turf sur- 
facing for a football field costs in the neighborhood of 
$250,000 FOB factory. The price varies with the 
cost of the subsurface work. The price includes 
material, subsurface work, and installation, with a 
seven-foot out-of-bounds area around the field. 

The installation is highly mechanized. Special 
vehicles had to be designed and manufactured to speed 
and facilitate the work. Because of the special train- 
ing needed for many of the jobs. Sport Install carries 
a crew of specialists to each new job, supplementing 
them with local Carpenters. 

Astro Turf has been used on some outdoor playing 
fields for two and more seasons with no fiber deteriora- 
tion or discoloration. Monsanto warrantees the fields 
for five years. ■ 



8 



THE C ARPENTER 



r 




Sport Install workers check the first roll of Astro Turf Another roll of the ar(i(ici;il };rass is hroiifjlit into posi- 
for configuration. tion. 




A novel piece of special equipment is this adhesive A member uses a power cutter to remove excess turf 
spreader. along a seam. 





The edges of the playing field and the drainage pits are 
Another view of the adhesive spreading, with two trimmed, 
members assisting. 






FEBRUARY, 1972 



To Turf or Not 
To Turf That 
Is the Question 

■ There has been a controversy mov- 
ing back and forth across America's 
sports pages in recent months over 
whether synthetic turf is good or bad 
for the gridiron sport. Some sports writers 
suggested that the Super Bowl was moved 
from Miami back to New Orleans be- 
cause of the synthetic mat in the Orange 
Bowl. Early last year. Dr. James G. 
Garrick, an orthopedic surgeon of Se- 
attle, claimed that the injury rate was 
50% higher on dry synthetic turf than on 
either wet synthetic turf or grass in any 
condition. 

Football, no matter where it is played 
is a rugged contact sport, and injuries 
will occur. Synthetic turf is a dramatic 
innovation in sports, and it has been the 
scape goat for injuries, slippings, and 
abrasions. Tests show however, that, 
compared with plain old grass, synthetic 
turf has many advantages. Alabama 
Coach "Bear" Bryant says: "I feel that 
the availability of a consistent playing 
surface in all kinds of weather has been 
a great help to our program." John Pont, 
head coach at Indiana University, echoes 
many coaches: "Our players simply pre- 
fer Astro Turf." ■ 



HUTCHESON RETIRES 

Continued from page 5 
ters, whose more than 55,000 mem- 
bers make it the largest in the 
nation. He was responsible for main- 
taining and protecting the jurisdic- 
tion of all phases of the Brotherhood 
and coordinating the operations of 
33 local unions and 75 business 
organizations throughout Los Ange- 
les County. 

He was an executive board mem- 
ber of the California State Council 
of Carpenters, and executive board 
member of both the California State 
and Los Angeles County Building 
and Construction Trades Councils, 
secretary of the Southern California 
Conference of Carpenters — the ne- 
gotiating body representing the 
eleven southern counties of Cali- 
fornia — and vice president of the 
California Labor Federation, AFL- 
ClO. 

Sidell's wide civic and social in- 
terests carried him to membership 
on the California Governor's Ad- 
visory Commission on Housing 
Problems, the Los Angeles Mayor's 
Labor-Management Committee; the 



executive board of both the Cali- 
fornia and Los Angeles Committee 
on Political Education and secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Organized 
Labor Voters Registration Service, 
Inc. 

In 1962, Sidell was elected as 
General Executive Board Member 
of the Carpenters for the Eighth 
District. When the late Finlay C. 
Allan moved up to fill a vacancy 
in August, 1964, Sidell was ap- 
pointed Second General Vice Presi- 
dent. Then in April, 1970, follow- 
ing Allan's death, he became First 
General Vice President, taking on 
the responsibilities for apprentice- 
ship and training, fields in which he 
long has had a deep interest. 

In his letter of resignation. Presi- 
dent Hutcheson commented: 

"I have been a part of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America for a long, long 
time. When I point out that ten of 
the fourteen members of the General 
Executive Board who are currently 
serving with me were not even bom 
at the time I received my journey- 
man's card, I think the point is dra- 
matically emphasized." ■ 



Members of the St. Louis Cardinals pro-football team display some of the many 
shoe designs readijy available for use on synthetic turf. Tests conducted by the Monsanto 
Co. with a wide variety of standard football shoes indicate that traction, as least on Astro 
Turf, can vary from a little to a lot simply by shoe selection. 





A view of Harpers Ferry, W. Va., from Maryland Heights on the Maryland shore. The Shenandoah River flows along the Vir- 
ginia shore at upper left, meeting the Potomac to flow southeast at the bottom of the picture. 




ARPERS FERRY 

The Millwright's Town 
That Made History 



■ On the chilled and rainy night 
of October 16, 1859, the little town 
of Harpers Ferry, Va., suddenly 
leaped into the pages of American 
history. 

The abolitionist, John Brown, 
with 18 men, attacked the Federal 
Armory which stood below the town, 
near the junction of the Shenandoah 
and Potomac Rivers. 

Brown hoped by his action to 
strike the spark which would cause 
the slaves to rebel and the abolition- 
ists and their sympathizers to solve 
by force the moral dilemma which 
had long plagued the young nation. 
Instead, U.S. Marines stormed the 
armory engine house, killed 10 of 
the raiders and captured their leader. 



Brown was tried at nearby Charles 
Town for murder, treason, and con- 
spiring with slaves to commit trea- 
son. Found guilty, he was hanged 
on December 2 of the same year. 

It was a brief and tragic encoun- 
ter in American history, and the 
story is retold in museums and 
markers in a picturesque national 
historical park at Harpers Ferry. 

Few visitors know much, how- 
ever, of Robert Harper, the mill- 
wright for whom the town is named, 
or realize that the town itself might 
not have come to be except for this 
millwright's need for a new lease on 
life. 

The millwright of the 17th Cen- 
tury was not the millwright of today. 



There was no such power source as 
electricity or gasoline. James Watt 
had just perfected the steam engine 
and it was not yet in common use. 

Water was the only natural source 
of power. It was diverted into ponds, 
tunnels, and chutes and over mill 
wheels. In this period, except for 
a little help from windmills and 
animals, man had to place his mills 
next to water courses. Power could 
be conducted only as far as a shaft 
or a belt could be run from a water 
wheel. 

Many towns in colonial America 
grew up around water courses and 
grist mills, where farmers gathered 
to turn their grain into flour and 
meal, to exchange news and gossip. 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



11 



RIGHT: One of the earliest views of Harpers 
Ferry, created by an unknown artist about 1806, 
shows a ferry boat crossing the Potomac River. 
The building beside the river is the Large Arsenal. 
On the hillside stands Harper House, before 
additions. 

BELOW, LEFT: A display case in the National 
Park Service museum at Harpers Ferry shows 
relics of Robert Harper's early work there. 

BELOW, RIGHT: The Stone Steps, hand-carved at 
the turn of the 19th century into the natural rock, 
allowed access to the upper levels of the town. 
Msitors climb these steps to the Harper House and 
.left'erson Rock. 




and to sharpen and repair tools un- 
der the skilled eye of a miller or a 
millwright. 

Other towns sprang up at ferry 
landings, where settlers sometimes 
waited for days and weeks for sup- 
plies or for fellow travelers to join 
them on long and arduous treks to 
the frontier. 

It was in such an era as this that 
Robert Harper, Pennsylvania mill- 
wright, was able to bring his vitality 
to bear. Described as an energetic 
man "well suited to pioneer life,'' 
he was of medium height but con- 
siderable physical strength. 

There is some disagreement 
among historical searchers as to his 
place and date of birth; was it Ox- 



ford, England, or the early Quaker 
community of Oxford, Pennsyl- 
vania? Was it in 1703 or 1718? 
His early life is somewhat confused 
by conflicting family records. 

In his youth he was apprenticed 
to an architect, house and mill build- 
er, later becoming a journeyman in 
the Philadelphia area. In 1738 he 
was married to Rachel Griffith. He 
was successful for a time, but then 
"everything went wrong," as he told 
friends later. He erected a church 
for the Protestant Episcopalians in 
Frankfort, six miles outside of Phila- 
delphia, and somehow lost money 
on the undertaking. 

He decided to leave the area and 
start anew. After settling with his 



creditors, he had about 400 guineas 
left (gold coins worth about 21 
shillings each). 

He wavered between Charleston, 
S.C., and Albany, N.Y., as his new 
home and finally decided upon 
Charleston, making plans to leave 
on the first boat. 

At the time he was preparing to 
leave. The Society of Friends 
(Quakers) were holding a major 
meeting in the City of Brotherly 
Love, and members from Apple Pie 
Ridge, Va., were looking for a mill- 
wright to settle in their state and 
build mills for them. They examined 
his work in the area and finally in- 
duced him to come to Apple Pie 
Ridge. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



On March 10, 1747, he started 
south as agreed, leaving his wife 
behind until he could send for her. 
On the sixth day he reached Fred- 
erick, Md. 

About dusk of that same day a 
German peddler named Peter Hoff- 
man arrived in Frederick, riding one 
horse and leading two others packed 
with goods. 

The two became acquainted, and 
Hoffman, learning of Harper's desti- 
nation and route, which was to cross 
the Potomac above Antietam Creek, 
suggested the shorter and more 
scenic route through "The Hole," 
the popular name at the time for the 
beautiful gorge where the Shenan- 
doah and Potomac Rivers met and 
flowed southeast to the sea. 

Hoffman, according to one ac- 
count, described in glowing terms 
the great opportunity offered by the 
water power there to build mills and 
set up small industries. Hoffman 
was persuasive, and he joined Har- 
per in the journey to The Hole. 

There Harper was introduced to 
the only resident, Peter Stevens, a 
squatter on the lands of the colonial 
owner. Lord Fairfax, and the opera- 
tor of a small and uncertain ferry. 

Harper was awed by the scenery 
and the potential before him. He 
bought Stevens' cabin, his com field, 
and his ferry equipment. Then, be- 
ing concerned with the legality of his 
transaction, he went to Greenway, 
Lord Fairfax's estate downriver, and 
obtained a patent to the land. 

Then, according to one biogra- 
pher, he went on to Apple Pie 
Ridge to build a mill for the Quak- 
ers as promised. He returned to 
The Hole, brought his wife from 
Philadelphia, and then moved into 
Stevens' cabin. 

In 1748 there was a great flood 
of the Potomac which drove the 
Harpers from the cabin temporarily. 
Then in 1753 came "The Pumpkin 
Flood," so called because great num- 
bers of pumpkins which had washed 
away from the gardens of Indians 
farther up the rivers came bobbing 
in great numbers into The Hole. 
The house was flooded, and Harper 
decided to build another house. 

In the late summer of 1755 

Harper made one of several trips to 

Philadelphia, partly to advertise for 

Continued on page 16 



THE HARPER HOUSE 




The oldest surviving structure in 
Harpers Ferry is The Harper House, 
shown above a monument to the 
perseverance of the town's founder. 

Harper first hved in a log cabin 
on the mud flats near the junction of 
the rivers. Later, he built a stone 
house and a flour mill on the banks 
of the Shenandoah. Floods and time 
destroyed these structures, and, 
finally, in 1775. he built a third home 
high above all possible flood levels. 

Because of a labor shortage during 
the Revolutionary War, the house 
was not completed until 1782. Neither 
Harper nor his wife lived in Ihis 
house, however, for they both died 
before it was ready for occupancy. 

The building has two rooms on 
each of three floor levels. The lower 
floors were heated by a corner fire- 
place in each room placed back to 
back with a central chimney on the 
north wall. A bench was cut in the 
rock hillside to serve as a foundation 
for the structure using the removed 
stone for a portion of the walls. At 
the basement level were located the 
kitchen and a storeroom. Running 
water was provided by a spring that 
ran underground from the garden 
above the house, through the kitchen 
and out the other side. 

For a few years following Harper's 
death the building was used as a 
tavern. It was during this period that 



Thomas Jefferson and George Wash- 
ington visited Harpers Ferry and 
stayed at the Harper House. 

In subsequent years. Harper House 
was used as a home and was sub- 
jected to several alterations. The most 
extensive of these occurred in 1832-33 
when the Wager House was added 
to the north side of the Harper House. 
As the two buildings were to be oc- 
cupied jointly, several doors were cut 
into the party wall between the two 
and a common stairway was in- 
corporated in the Wager House por- 
tion. With such items as solid silver 
door hardware and expensive wall- 
paper imported from France, the 
combined old and nev/ houses were 
referred to by the townspeople as 
"The Mansion." When the new addi- 
tion passed out of the Wager owner- 
ship, the interconnecting doors were 
closed off. thus leaving the Harper 
House without access between floors. 
The problem was solved by building 
the south porch with its outside stair- 
way together with the cellar stairs 
opening off the Public Way. A bridge 
ran from the second floor porch across 
the Public Way to the garden area 
above the house. 

Many of the numerous occupants ' 
of the Harper House witnessed stir- 
ring events that helped shape the 
course of our nation's history and 
Continued on page 16 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



RIGHT: The Brotherhood delegates to the Maritime 

Trades Department Convention, phis other Brotherhood 

leaders who attended the sessions. Official delegates 

included: Gen. Sec. R. E. Livingston, Gen. Treas. 

Charles E. Nichols, GEB Members Raleigh Rajoppi 

and Patrick Campbell, and Arvid Anderson, Davey 

LaBorde, Sr., and Milton Holzman. 

AT FAR RIGHT: Representing the Brotherhood at 

the recent convention of the AFL-CIO Union Label and 

Service Trades Department were, from left. First 

General Vice President William Sidell, Hugh Allen of 

Portland, Ore., secretary of the Western Council of 

Lumber, Production and Industrial Workers; and Ray 

Cebalt, president of the Michigan State Council and 

business representative of Local 1452, Detroit. 




National Transportation Policy Is 72 
Goal of AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Unions 



B The problems of the entire North 
American transportation industry were 
discussed by delegates to the recent 
biennial convention of the AFL-CIO 
Maritime Trades Department. Though 
the maritime trades are directly con- 
cerned with the decline in shipbuilding 
and the problems of cut-rate, runaway 
shipping, they felt that their problems 
meshed so tightly with all transporta- 
tion problems — land, sea, and air — 
that delegates to the convention called 
for the establishment of a new national 
transportation policy and created a 
special committee to study the matter. 
Pointing to the widespread problems 
in transportation, the enabling resolu- 
tion declared that the Nation needs a 
"national transport policy that will 
answer many of the questions that 
face transportation and that will bal- 



ance the needs and development of all 
the transport modes so that America's 
transport modes will be able to serve 
each other and the public interest," 

Senator Vance Hartke (D-Ind.), in 
a major address to the convention, told 
the delegates that the Nation's trans- 
portation system is in danger of total 
collapse unless action is taken to cre- 
ate a unified network of water, rail 
and motor transit. 

He cited the "danger signs" of a 
transportation crisis — high unemploy- 
ment, low factory productivity and 
inflation. 

"Despite its crucial importance," he 
said, "the American transportation 
system is in serious trouble. The next 
few years may bring more railroad 
bankruptcies, the demise of literally 
thousands of small truckers and a 



The Prime Trade Union Weapon to Counter 
Low-Wage Imports: Union Label Buying 



■ The union label was unveiled as the 
prime trade union weapon to counter 
low-wage imports at the recent 55th 
Convention of the AFL-CIO Union 
Label and Service Trades Department. 
The department's secretary-treasur- 
er, Edward P. Murphy, declared, "It is 
ironic that 97 years ago a union label 
was designed to combat imports. Now 
almost a century later, we are faced 
with the same problem." 



Brotherhood delegates attending the 
convention voiced support of the de- 
partment's efforts to promote the "Buy 
American" slogan, keeping in mind 
their responsibility to bolster the vvel- 
fare of Canadian members with simi- 
lar promotion there. 

They listened with interest to Mur- 
phy's description of the growth of 
multinational corporations, managed 
economics, and restrictive agreements 



trend to increased concentration in the 
inland water industry that could put 
dozens of small and medium-sized 
barge operators out of business." 

AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Lane 
Kirkland told the delegates that de- 
spite the passage of the Merchant 
Marine Act of 1970. "Any hope for 
the future of this industry boils down 
to the simple fact of whether you get 
cargo, or whether you get the busi- 
ness." 

He noted that "only five percent of 
our total imports are carried in Amer- 
ican bottoms" and this "pretty well 
proves" that American importers and 
exporters "are unconcerned about the 
future of this industry or of this vital 
segment of the American economy." 

Imports and exports, directly related 
to the entire question of foreign trade 
and its impact on U.S. jobs, occupied 
the attention of the delegates for a 
considerable period. 

An emotionally-packed session saw 
a parade of union leaders cite the loss 
of thousands of jobs of their members 



— all factors which no longer permit 
the free exchange of exports and im- 
ports. 

"We can no longer support policies 
which promote a decline in our tax 
base, a drop in our industrial produc- 
tivity and our way of life," Murphy 
said. 

Said Murphy: "A half million jobs 
lost due to trade policies is no small 
matter to organizations dedicated to 
preserving job .security of working men 
and women." 

He urged that, among other steps, 
union label agreements should he 
pushed. The "union seal of approval" 
which Murphy called "the consumer's 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




as the convention voted to launch a 
strong campaign to stop the drain on 
the the Nation's labor market of over- 
seas imports. 

President George Baldanzi of the 
United Textile Workers declared that 
foreign trade legislation, now pending 
in Congress, must be broadened to 
provide retroactive protection to 
American industries and workers who 
have suffered from the low-cost for- 
eign imports for more than a decade. 

He called for imposition of quotas 
on foreign textile and apparel imports 
from all Far Eastern countries similar 
to those negotiated recently with Ja- 
pan. Baldanzi and President Charles 
Feinstein of the Leather Goods Work- 
ers have headed an MTD study the 
last two years directed at foreign im- 
ports and their impact on the jobs of 
American workers. 

President Lester Null of the Pottery 
Workers reported that the pottery in- 
dustry had been so depleted that it no 
longer even has the capacity to manu- 
facture more than 10 percent of the 
Nation's total tableware needs. ■ 



guide to a quality product" is the un- 
ion label. 

"If the 14 million AFL-CIO mem- 
bers and their families wholly sub- 
scribed to the union label philosophy 
— it could cause enough waves to slow 
down ships bringing in goods produced 
at low wages in foreign countries," he 
declared. 

Murphy also said that the Depart- 
ment would pursue the consumer boy- 
cott in the future and that it is setting 
up boycott machinery. 

"We will be selective in our boy- 
cotts so we do not render this weapon 
ineffective due to overuse," he cau- 
tioned. ■ 




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FEBRUARY, 1972 



15 



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HARPERS FERRY 

Continued from page 13 
"people to go to the bush." He did 
this by erecting a sign in the city 
square. All he enlisted for his trou- 
ble was a young doctor and his 
bride, who accompanied him to 
Harpers Ferry and then traveled on 
to Winchester, Va., to establish the 
young doctor's practice. 

Despite these setbacks. Harper 
persisted in his determination to 
make a go of his new homesite. His 
old friend, Hoffman, became his 
agent in various pursuits. The Gen- 
eral Assembly of Virginia, during 
its 1763-64 session, granted him a 
charter for his feriy. Harper set up 
a grist mill and a sawmill on the 
Shenandoah. 

About 1775 he moved out of the 
Stevens cabin and into his second 
house. Shortly thereafter he began 
work on a stone residence high up 
on the hill which commanded a view 
of the river fork. 

There was restless change in the 
colonies at this time, and in the late 
70's it erupted into revolution 
against England. At first Harper 
was a Tory in sympathy, but he 
began to side with the colonists 
when officers of the British crown 
in Virginia began extracting finan- 
cial aid from him for the pursuit of 
the war. 

All during the revolution he con- 
tinued to work on his third and final 
house. But craftsmen had gone 
downriver to join General Washing- 
ton, and it was not until 1780 that 
the house was finished. 

It is doubtful that the Harpers 
ever occupied their new home. 
Rachel Harper died in 1780 after 
a tragic fall from a ladder. Robert 
died two years later. They left no 
children. 

At Harper's death there were only 
three houses at Harper's Ferry, but 
he had no doubt that a town would 
spring up there. He set aside a 
parcel of land farther up the hill as 
a cemetery and arranged to have 
himself buried at its center. He 
left his property to a niece and to 
relatives of his late wife. 

Harpers Ferry did grow for a 
time. In 1794, during the adminis- 
tration of President George Wash- 
ington, Harpers Ferry was chosen as 
the site of the national armory for 



the young United States. It is said 
that the Father of His Country him- 
self recommended the site, and Con- 
gress bought Harpers' original tract 
of land from his heirs. 

Hall's Rifle Works was built on 
the Island of Virginius, adjacent to 
Harpers Ferry, in 1817, but it was 
burned in 1861 to prevent its falling 
into the hands of Confederate troops 
during the Civil War. 

The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 
which was dug to carry barge traffic 
to Cumberland, Md., finally reached 
the Maryland Heights, across the 
Potomac from Harpers Ferry, in 
1833, and the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad reached the town a year 
later. 

After the Civil War, Harpers 
Ferry declined, almost becoming a 
ghost town. The old brick buildings 
along Shenandoah and High Streets 
began to decay and crumble. Floods 
came, leaving high-water marks on 
the buildings on the mud flats. 

Finally, in recent years, Congress 
and the National Park Service, 
spurred on by historians and tour- 
ists, turned the lower section of the 
town into an historical park, where 
all may share the dreams and joys 
of the wayfaring millwright of two 
hundred years ago. ■ 

THE HARPER HOUSE 

Continued from page 13 

they watched as Harpers Ferry 
developed from a tiny village to a 
highly industrial community. One 
such occupant was the James McGraw 
family that rented the Harper House 
in 1856 for $60.00 a year. The Mc- 
Graws later moved to other sections 
of this row of buildings which have 
since been referred to as Marmion 
Row. 

Because of much family illness and 
some business adversities, McGraw 
was forced into bankruptcy in 1861. 

By examining an inventory found in 
the court files of the bankruptcy sale, 
the artists of the National Park Serv- 
ice Museum Laboratory were able to 
delineate the furniture once owned 
by this upper middleclass family. The 
Shenandoah and P)otomac Garden 
Council graciously volunteered to 
furnish the Harper House and have 
scoured the Countryside attempting 
to duplicate the original furnishings. 
So. although these furnishings may 
never have been in this house, they 
are pieces that were used in. this area 
during the Civil War era. The Na- 
tional Park Service has restored the 
house to its appearance when the 
McGraw family occupied the house. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



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ANADIAN 
' T REPORT 

New Tax Reform Bill Goes Into Effect, 
Unemployment Insurance Is Improved 



Many legislative changes at all 
levels of government will be coming 
into effect this year, almost all of 
which will affect the living standards 
and the life style of most Canadians. 

The most important measure is the 
hotly-contested tax reform bill, which 
became effective in the new year. This 
involves changes in income tax. cor- 
poration tax. capital gains and death 
duties. 

The new tax bill will abolish in- 
come taxes for a million low-income 
people and reduce taxes somewhat 
for another four million. 

It will gradually cut corporation 
taxes. It introduces for the first time 
a capital gains tax on 50% of the 
profit from sale of investments. 

The NDP opposition wanted a capi- 
tal gains tax on 100% of profits but 
got nowhere with their proposal. 

Federal law experts have computed 
the taxes which will be paid by three 
different income levels in 1972 com- 
pared with 1971. 

A family of two adults, one work- 
ing, and two children under 1 6 with 
income of $4,000 will pay $71 this 
year compared with $184 last year. 

The same size family earning $8,000 
will pay $1 .055 compared with $1 .1 87 
in 1971; and if the family earns $10,- 
000, the 1972 tax will be $1,618 com- 
pared with last year's $1,717. 

Unemployment insurance changes 
will provide 1.200,000 more employ- 
ees with coverage. Up until the end of 
last year, only those earning incomes 
of less than $7,800 were covered and 
eligible for benefits. Under the new 
regulations, almost every employee 
will be covered. 

UI benefits go up to a maximum 
of $100 a week. Coverage now also 
includes sickness and maternity leave 



from employment. But benefits for 
the jobless will be taxable. 

The proposed family allowance 
changes got sidetracked in the last 
session of parliament but will be re- 
introduced this year and may come 
into effect by mid-year. 

The main effect of the changes will 
be to remove the upper income fam- 
ilies from benefits and give more to 
lower income families. At present, 
payments are made to all families re- 
gardless of income. 

The new plan will be called Family 
Income Security Plan (FISP). Pay- 
ments will be based on income and 
size of family. A family with two chil- 
dren under 1 2 and income under 
$5,000 will receive $30 monthly. The 
same family with five children, $75 
monthly. 

About 1 ,400.000 families now get- 
ting benefits will be cut off. About a 
million and a quarter will get maxi- 
mum payments and 850.000 will re- 
ceive partial benefits. 

Changes in legislation at the pro- 
vincial level will also affect the tax- 
payer and consumer. 

In Ontario all people over 65 will 
receive hospitalization and medicare 
without payment. Premiums under the 
provincial plans will be reduced for 
all others. 

The province also brought in a lim- 
ited type of no-fault auto insurance 
but has not gone so far as Saskatche- 
wan and Manitoba, both of which 
operate public no-fault plans of a com- 
prehensive type. 

But one cost has gone up. Effective 
at the beginning of this year, first 
class postage went from 7 cents to 8 
cents for the first ounce, from 1 2 to 
14 cents for 2 to 4 ounces. If the 
government is determined to put the 
post office system on a paying basis, 
this is not the end of it. 



72 Not to Be 'Boom' 
Construction Year 

Housebuilding had a record year 
in 1971, and the carryover of unfin- 
ished houses got 1972 off to a good 
start. But, although final figures are 
not in at this date, the completions 
will still fall short of the need esti- 
mated at 250,000 a year by the Eco- 
nomic Council of Canada. 

But it is industrial and commercial 
building that is not as buoyant as 
builders would like, except in some 
areas. 

However, a new ray of optimism 
has filtered into the industry through 
industrial and governmental expendi- 
tures for pollution control. 

The anti-pollution laws are getting 
tougher, so is the policing of pollut- 
ing industries. This is forcing them 
into heavier and heavier expenditures 
for pollution control installations. 

But predictions are that 1972 will 
not be a boom year for construction. 
Engineers on whose work the industry 
depends are not busy and predict lit- 
tle if any increase over last year's con- 
struction volume of $15 billion. 

Some large engineering firms have 
expressed a contrary view and feel 
that the decline in interest rates will 
encourage new construction although 
the improvement may not be notable 
until the summer months. 

Floating Canadian 
Dollar at U.S. Par 

Canadians were relieved by the re- 
moval of the U.S. surcharge against 
imports of manufactured goods from 
this country, and by the agreement 
reached internationally to allow the 
Canadian dollar to float. 

At this writing the Canadian dollar 
is almost at par with the U.S. dollar. 
But this is an increase of about 7% 
in the value of the Canadian dollar in 
the last year or so. 

This has made Canadian exports 
more costly and hit some big indus- 
tries like pulp and paper badly. Can- 
ada could not afford to revalue its 
dollar higher again and at a fixed 
level. The government is likely to 
arrange matters so that $ Can. won't 
be far off $ U.S. 

So far this is encouraging, but this 
has been tempered with concern that 
the Trudeau administration might have 
to give away something for what it 
got; for example, a change in the auto 
pact between the two countries. The 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



auto pact has given Canada a plus 
balance of payments in the last two 
years or so after 20 years of running 
deficits due to heavy imports of cars 
and parts. 

In 1970 Canada ran a favorable 
balance of payments on merchandise 
trade amounting to three billion dol- 
lars. This slipped to two billion dol- 
lars last year. 

If export of dividends, interest pay- 
ments, shipping costs and tourist 
spending are taken into account, the 
surplus dropped to $1.1 billion in 
1971. Still a lot better than a deficit. 

Canada's sales to the United States 
account for two-thirds of total Ca- 
nadian exports. That is why this coun- 
try's trade relations with our Amer- 
ican friends are so important. 

Canadian sales in 1971 to the U.S. 
were up 1 1 ^ in a year. 

Now 1972 could be a recovery year 
in the United States leading up to the 
November presidential election. This 
could again give a boost to the Ca- 
nadian economy, and encourage the 
Liberal government to call a federal 
election sometime before November, 
say June or October. 



Mackasey Defends 
New Legislation 

Federal Labor Minister Bryce Mac- 
kasey has taken the bit in his teeth 
and strongly defended his new labor 
legislation against concerted and or- 
ganized attacks of big business inter- 
ests. 

Speaking in Montreal to leaders of 
industry, labor and others such as uni- 
versity people involved in industrial 
relations, he charged the Canadian 
Manufacturers Association and the 
Chamber of Commerce with back- 
wardness and told them to get into 
the 20th century. 

His legislation would permit unions 
to bargain or strike on measures in- 
volving technological change intro- 
duced during the life of an agreement. 

The legislation did not pass parlia- 
ment during the last session of 1971 
and will have to be introduced again 
in the House of Commons. If it meets 
rough going from MPs who oppose it, 
it could be held up long enough to vir- 
tually wipe it out until after the 1972 
federal election. 



New Homebuilders 
President Blames Land 

The Toronto Homebuilders Associ- 
ation elected a new, younger president, 
who wasted no time in admitting that 
builders today are producing homes 
that people cannot afford to buy. 

He attributed the high cost of hous- 
ing to land costs. A dwelling selling 
for $37,000, he said, might be a 
$17,000 structure on a $20,000 lot. 

He did not, like others, blame la- 
bor. He said that the relative value of 
labor and materials in homebuilding 
was constant. But land costs and taxes 
were going up and up. 

He failed to mention money costs. 
Mortgage money at 9% and up can 
leave a big hole in any pocket. 

Strike, Lockout 
Time Down in 71 

Figures released by the federal De- 
partment of Labor indicate that time 
lost through strikes and lockouts in 
1971 was well down from previous 
years. Final figures for the year should 
be available next month. 







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19 



People NVith Ideas . . 



14-YEAR-OLD STUDIES EARTHQUAKES 

A carpenter's level is used to determine the levelness of anything. Any 
apprentice can tell yon that. A 14-year-old boy named Brad Herton. who 
lives in the San Fernando Valley of California, about 10 miles from the San 
Andreas Fault, has other uses for it, however. 
He read in a newpaper about how Dr. Arthur Sylvester of the University of 
California at Santa Barbara is able to predict earthquakes with an instnmient 
based on a carpenters' level called a theodolite. So for his 4-H Club science 
project in school, he thought he might by able to set up a simple early-\\;irning 
earthquake alarm system with plain old carpenter' levels. 
He borrowed five of the seven levels which he uses from neighbors and. with 
his mother's permission, set Iheni up in his house and yard. Then he be- 
gan keeping extensive records of every movement of the bubbles on his levels. 
"The first week I predicted four aftershocks (small earth tremors)." Brad 
reports. "Sometimes my levels would predict a shock, and I would have to 
call the California Institute of Technology to verify my prediction, because 
it happened at night. So far I've been lOO'r right." 
Dr. Sylvester and West Coast seismologists concede that young Herton has 
done well, but they also say he's ideally located in the right place at the right 
time for such studies. They're encouraging him, but they'll tell you, 
meanwhile, that a carpenter's level is best used as a craftsman's tool and 

not as a predictor of earthquakes. ■ 





CAKE MAKERS EXTRAORDINARY 

■ The wife of Henry J. Rottinghaiis of Ankeny. la., likes to bake so 
much that Henry and some neighbors sawed a corner off the Rottinghaus 
house a few years ago and moved a four-deck bakery oven into the 
basement. 

Henry by trade is a carpenter and a member of Local 106, Des Moines, 
but his wife's baking has turned him primarily into a baker's helper. He 
spends long evenings in his basement workshop shaping strips of metal and 
plastic into fancy cake cutlers for his wife and a growing number of outside 
customers. 

Henry doesn't mind this, however. He's making money out of it, in fact. 
He recently obtained a patent on his cake cutter, and a mail order house is 
selling all he can turn out. 

For years Mrs. Rottinghaus has been tinning out bread, doughnuts and 
decorated cakes, serving as the family's number two breadwinner, but now 
she and her husband dream of an honest-to-goodness downtown business 
establishment of their own. with cake baking in the front and cake cutter 
manufacturing in the back. ■ 



w 






H r f 


I^S^Ba - "^^1 




■,vV ^" 


P PI 


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'i^l oi>r?v 









WET FEET INSPIRE INVENTOR 

■ Roy S. Stevenson, a member of Local 329. Okla- 
homa City, Okla., for more than 50 years, has been 
a life-long inventor. On his 74th birthday, Stevenson 
was issued a patent on a combination boat trailer 
and boat dock which he had invented. Soon, 
he hopes to find a company which will begin 
production on his new "Travel-Dock." 

The initial idea for the "Travel-Dock" was 
born because Mrs. Stevenson was constantly getting 
her feet wet trying to get in and out of the family 
boat. With the new invention, it is possible to 
back the trailer and boat towards the water's edge 
and into the water on any beach or bank area. 
The boat is launched in the conventional manner, and 
the trailer then forms docking means. The conversion 
from trailer to dock and from dock to trailer can 
be made by one person in as little as one minute, 
with the added luxury now that everybody stays dry. 

Stevenson, like any successful inventor, is not about 
to quit now. He is presently building a dual engine, 
riding mower-tractor. Among his other inventions 
have been a circular saw attachment for a tractor for 
cutting firewood, a pressure cooker for canning 
fruits and vegetables in the home, a windmill, unique 
clocks, chandeliers, and an unusual nut cracker. ■ 




20th CENTURY COACHMAN 

■ The stage coach above is a reproduction of an early type 
which was used in the mail service between San Antonio, Texas, 
and Laredo, Texas, in the late 1880"s. It was hand crafted from the 
wheels up by a retired member of the United Brotherhood and 
Local 1266, J. R. Stubbs, who sits in the driver's seat. Stubbs 
reproduced this coach for an antique dealer in Austin, and his 
handiwork is now displayed in front of the antique shop. ■ 




Pa. 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



WOOD IS HIS STAFF OF LIFE 

■ When Donald E. Wetzler of Millerstown, Pa., was only five 
or six years old he became engrossed in the work of local wood 
craftsmen. 

"There were really only two places I was allowed to go — the 
shops of Danny Gabel. a skilled wood craftsman, and Bob 
Hunter, the undertaker and casketmaker on the next corner," 
says Wetzler. a member of Carpenters Local 287, Harrisburg, 

"I was always fascinated by the shavings from Hunter's 
plane. All the time I was at his workshop, I'd sit on an old keg 
and keep my mouth shut. I was the only kid allowed there. He'd 
throw the others out because they'd torment him so much 
that he couldn't work.'' 

Today, Wetzler is a skilled wood craftsman himself, producing 
beautiful wooden clocks, tables, and other objects. In addition, 
he is one of the most avid wood collectors in his part of the 
country. He has wood samples from all over the world — some of 
which he collected himself and some which came by swapping 
samples with fellow members of the Wood Collectors' Society. 

You name the wood, and Wetzler can describe it for you 
and maybe even show you what it looks like. ■ 



21 



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3022 W. SCOTT AVE. 

McHENRY, ILLINOIS 60050 




(1) ROCHESTER, MINN.— Local 1362 
recently presented 25-year pins to the 
following: 

First row, left to right, Joseph Lamina, 
Raymond Asler, Hilmer Runge, Bernard 
Tiougan, Howard Wright, Melvin Bet 
cher, Wm. Peters, Charles Hammond 

Second row, Gordon Karsten, H. J 
Schoenmann, Chester Koehler, Carl Vol 
herding, Harold Flanders, Ralph Ander 
son, Ernest Niemeyer, Halvor Smidt. 

Third row, Lester Stephen, Harold 
Hovel, Earl Leach, Alvin Schoenfelder, 
Wayne Stephen, Henry Kuhicek, Lloyd 
Wood. 

Other 25-year members not present 
were: Elmer Arch, Mike Balloy, Law- 
rence Crowson, Frank Domaille, Robert 
Fergusson. Ellsworth Gunderson, Al 
Hovel, Andrew Iversrud, Oscar Johnson, 
Kenneth Keller, Paul Kreter, Robert 
Krcter, Dayton Kruger, Henry Lively, 
Wm. Lloyd, Charles Peterson, Rinder 
Rozendal, Merle Sawyer, Elmer Siem, 
Lester Teske, James Trygstad, Gabriel 
Wesolosky, L. A. Wurtzler. 

(I -A) Royer Olson, 25-year member, 
left, with Local 1382 President Wm. 
Kraayenbrink and Financial Secretary 
Leon Vanberg. 

(2) PERRYVILLE, MO.— Membership 
pins were presented to the following 
2S-year members of Local 2022, last 
year: 

From left to right are Leo Vessels, 
Elmer Zahner, Lynn Tucker, Robert 
Meyer, Herbert Williams (who made 
the presentations), and Clarence Brewer. 
Three other members were eligible to 
receive pins, but were not present for 
the occasion. They are Howard Barks, 
Lawrence Barks and B. J. Cissell. 




(3) KENNEWICK. WASH.— Millwrights 
Local 1699 presented 25-year member- 
ship pins at a dinner held December 11, 
1971. Awards went to the following: 

Back row, left to right, Clinton Heuett, 
Richard T. Smith, Earl Gerlach. Front 
row, Louis J. Klein and Louis L. Day. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 




These were the men on the dais when Carpenters Local 13 celebrated its 75th anniversary. From left are Charles A. Thomp- 
son, secretary-treasurer, Chicago District Council of Carpenters; State Representative Thomas J. Hanahan (D-McHenry); John 
Steed, business representative and vice president of Local 13; Michael J. Sexton, financial secretary; Thomas E. Ryan, president 
and business manager of Local 13; Charles Nichols, General Treasurer, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of Amer- 
ica; John Brennan, trustee; Joe Jacobs, attorney; Daniel E. O'Connell, Jr., recording secretary; Morris Miller, warden; Eugene 
Benson, trustee; Thomas E. Paul, secretary-treasurer, Chicago AFL-CIO; A. "Duffy" Dardar, member of Local 13 and apprentice 
coordinator for Chicago Carpenters District Council, and Edward Birmingham, trustee. 

Others in photo (partially hidden) include Rev. Joseph Donahue, Chaplain Chicago Building Trades Council; and Thomas J. 
Nayder, President, Chicago Building Trades Council. 



Local 13, Chicago, Marks 75tli Year 



Modest Marker 



Over 2,000 persons celebrated the 75th 
anniversary of Carpenters Local 13 at a 
dinner in the International Ballroom of 
the Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Ryan, president and business 
manager, headed the committee which ar- 



Support Metlox Boycott 

MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. 
— Members of the International 
Brotherhood of Pottery and Al- 
lied Workers urge you to give 
priority attention to its boycott of 
the products of Metlox Manufac- 
turing Co. of Manhattan Beach, 
Calif. 

The boycott was brought about 
by management's stubborn refusal 
to sign a contract with the Potters. 

The IBP AW has the active sup- 
port of the AFL-CIO Executive 
Council and other major elements 
of the national trade union move- 
ment. 



ranged the dinner and was master of cere- 
monies for the evening. 

Charles Nichols, General Treasurer of 
the Brotherhood, paid tribute to the role 
of Local 13 in the history of the Broth- 
erhood, which was founded in Chicago in 
1881. He called upon the members of 
the union to be alert to events in Wash- 
ington, and to be active in politics to 
guard the gains made by Local 13 and 
other labor organizations in the past 75 
years. 

State Representative Thomas J. Hana- 
han, a member of Local 13, pointed to 
the tradition of the union as the so-called 
"Irish" local . . . now with members of 
all races and many national origins. Han- 
ahan called on the union's members to 
take an active role in the legislative pro- 
gram of organized labor. 

George Vest, president of the Chicago 
District Council, said that Local 13 had 
helped make the Chicago area 100% or- 
ganized in the union's jurisdiction. Wheth- 
er the work is residential, commercial, 
industrial, or public, there is a union 
label on the project. No other area in 
the United States is so well organized. 




The final resting place of the founder 
and first president of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, Samuel Gompers, is 
marked by the simple gravestone shown 
above. It is located ui Sleepy Hollow 
Cemetery, Tarrytown, N.Y., and it was 
photographed by Chauncey Dolen of 
Local 895, Tarrytown. 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



23 



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Swetkovich Honored in Testimonial 




Early last year, Local 1164 of Brooklyn, N.Y., held a testimonial dinner in honor 
of John Swetkovich, who retired as financial secretary and business representative 
after 35 years of service. To commemorate the occasion a plaque was presented to 
Mr. Swetkovich earlier in the evenhig, and the distinguished guests shown admiring 
it are, from left, Ernest C. Svara, financial secretary of Local 1164; WiUiam F. Ma- 
honcy, first vice president of the New York City District Council; John Rosenstrom, 
secretary and business manager of the Nassau County District Council; Patrick J, 
Campbell, General Executive Board Member, First District; John Swetkovich; George 
Bahcock, secretary-treasurer and general agent of the Suffolk County District Council 
and president of the Nassau and Suffolk Building Trades; Eugene Hartigan, president 
of the Nassau County District Council; and Anthony Spilar, business representative 
of Local 1164. 



Arkansas State Council Gets 'Coverage' 




The 17th Annual Convention of the Arkansas State Council of Carpenters was 
held last July in Forth Smith, Ark. The convention was unusual in that it got ex- 
ceptional press and television coverage from the news media. The picture above 
appeared on Page 1 of the Southwest Times Record, local newspaper. 

Shown in the picture are: Sealed, from left, E. G. Cannon, executive committee 
member; P. A. Brewer, secretary-treasurer; and W. N. Micham, vice president. 
Standing, D. E. Breckenridge, executive committee member; Willie Smoth, Jr., exec- 
utive committee member; Ed Creekmore, Local 71; H. F. Hambrick, Local 71; and 
W. H. Brady, executive committee member. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



INSTALLING 
LOCKSETS: 

Problems and Solutions 

From The Locksmithing Institute 

■ Very often, when you're called upon to install a new 
door or rework an old one, you find that the carpentry is 
pretty cut-and-dried, but that the lock and associated hard- 
ware is another story. It seems that the same sort of prob- 
lems keep cropping up, and if you know what they are 
and how to correct them, you can add to your own income 
on any given problem job, just by effecting a simple repair. 
So here are the most common problems that we've run 
across, problems that anybody can cure. 

1. The lock cylinder will not stay in the keyed knob after 
the cylinder has been removed from the lockset. 

Usually this is caused by the cylinder-retaining springs 
having been bent too close together in removing the cylin- 
der. To correct this condition, simply remove the cylinder 
and spread t4ie springs to the original position. If you want 
to reset the position of the springs, if they are too short, 
scribe the cylinder at the end of the spring to form a refer- 
ence mark. Loosen the spring with a screwdriver, as shown, 
and move it endwise to the required amount. Restake it 
with a hammer and punch. 

2. Key sticks in cylinder. 

When this happens, the key may be removed by pushing 
the exterior end of the plug into the cylinder and at the 
same time, pulling out on the stuck key. To permanently cor- 
rect the condition, remove the cylinder from the lockset, 
remove the plug clip, and slightly bend the inward-pointing . 
end of each plug clip arm towards the cylinder, or put 
shims between the clip and cylinder to take up any exces- 
sive end play. 

3. Latch bolt does not retract when knob is turned. 

Disassemble knob from door, and determine that the 
exterior knob stems are in proper engagement with the 
holes in the latch. If they are and the latch bolt still does 
not retract, press the latch bolt with a finger to make sure 
there is sufficient clearance. You might have to reset the 
latch-bolt plate to prevent binding, or make a larger clear- 
ance hole for the latch bolt. If everything else is in proper 
order, this may indicate the need for a new latch, as the 
old one might be worn or damaged. 

4. Latch bolt does not align with strike plate. 

This alignment is something you should not do by eye. 
The template that comes with the lockset should not only 
be used in setting the lock, but also in setting the strike as 
well! If the alignment is incorrect, remove the strike plate 
and if you still have the manufacturer's template, use it to 
reposition the plate. Chisel the additional perimenter, 
remount the plate and fill the excess space with wood 
putty. 

5. The lockset assembly is made for a standard-thickness 
door, and the installation requires a job on a very thick 
door. The spindle won't reach through. 

A spindle extension is available which can be used on 
installations where exceptionally-thick doors are involved. 




1. Spindio 

2. Boss 

3. Slot 

4. Detent 

5. Lock housing 

6. Cylinder 
retaining 
springs 

7. Cylinder 

8. Guides 



The components of a lockset identified. 




1.261— Parts made 1953 and before. 
1.291— Parts mode after 1953. 
(.030 difference.) 



To change position of cylinder retaining springs: 

1. Scribe cylinder at end of spring to reference location. 

2. Loosen spring with screwdriver or other tool as shown. 

3. Move spring .030 endwise. 

4. Restake with hammer and punch. 



IMPROPER 
INSTALLATION 



PROPER 
INSTALLATION 




^^^ 




Locks should be installed for key to enter as shown in the 
view, PROPER INSTALLATION.' Improper installation allows 
dirt and moisture to collect around tumbler pins. 



6. In installing a new door in an old jamb, a strike plate 
already exists. How do you align the new latch with the 
old strike plate? 

Start by hanging the door, and then use the template that 
comes with the lockset. Center this over the old strike 
plate, and then bend it around the edge of the door on the 
high-bevelled side. Proceed to mark and install the lockset 
and latch. Alignment should be perfect. 

Continued on page 26 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



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Installing Lock Sets 

Continued from page 25 

7. Key enters cylinder upside down. 

The key should always enter the cylinder with the straight 
part of the key down. If you install the lockset with the 
cylinder in the wrong position, dirt and dust can enter the 
area around the tumbler pins, as can moisture. In cold 
weather, this is more apt to cause a lock to freeze. To cor- 
rect this situation, remove the interior knob, the exterior 
knob, and then invert and re-install the lockset. 

8. The latch assembly seems to go too deep to align with 
the knob assembly. 

The edge of the door is bevelled. In laying out the temp- 
late, be sure that the template is placed over the HIGH 
side of the edge bevel, or there will be a discrepancy of as 
much as 1/16-inch in aligning the knob set with the latch. 
Should this have happened, a cure can be effected by re- 
moving the latch assembly and filing the clearance holes 
for the knob stem with a small round file. This may effect 
the latch throw to an extent. 

9. The latch does not align properly with the knob assem- 
bly. 

There is usually a slight bevel on the edge of the door. 
It is a common mistake to align the template with the edge 
face of the door, with the result that drilling into the edge 
for the latch assembly will result in a cocked installation 
with reference to the door faces. Always drill for the latch 
assembly in a direction that is parallel with the fuces of the 
door. 

// you'd like additional infornuitioit, write to The Lock- 
smithing Institute, 1500 Cardinal Drive, Little Falls, N.J. 

Extended Jobless Benefits, 
Broader Coverage Now in Effect 

Two important provisions of the Federal unemployment 
insurance system went into effect January 1 . All jobless 
workers should be alerted to these provisions. 

The national extended benefits provision of the Employ- 
ment Security Amendments of 1970 went into effect on 
January 1, 1972, in all states for workers who have ex- 
hausted their regular benefits. Under this provision, up to 
13 additional weeks of benefits will be available to insured 
unemployed workers. 

The Secretary said the national extended benefits provi- 
sion will remain in effect until the insured unemployment 
rate has dropped below 4.5 percent for three consecutive 
months. He estimated that benefits averaging $75 million 
will be paid each month that the provision remains in 
effect. 

The second important provision which went into effect 
on January 1 extended unemployment insurance coverage 
to nearly 5 million additional jobs, bringing the total num- 
ber covered to more than 63 million. 

Newly covered are 2.1 million jobs in nonprofit organiza- 
tions that employ four or more workers; 1.1 million jobs in 
small firms; nearly 1 million jobs in State hospitals and 
State colleges; 210,000 outside salesmen jobs; 190,000 jobs 
in agricultural processing and 160,000 jobs held by U.S. 
citizens working for American employers outside the 
U.S. ■ 



26 



THE CARPENTER 





The Central and Western Indiana Joint Apprenticeship Committee recently honored 
eight apprentices at graduation ceremonies in Indianapolis, Ind. William Konyha, 
Third District Board Member, and Jules Berlin, International Representative, partic- 
ipated in the awarding of journeyman certificates and awards. Graduates were all 
members of Local Union 758. Standing, left to right are: Wendell D. Vandivier, 
coordinator; Apprentices Glen Sparks, Wayne Ott, Charles Gilvin, George Raisor; 
Board Member, Third District, William Konyha; Apprentices, William Sickle, Charles 
Beaver, Tom Scott, Richard Berg; and General Representative Jules Berlin. 



Central and 

Western Indiana 

Ceremonies 



Charles Beaver displays the Golden 
Hammer Award of the Year for out- 
standing achievements in tlie Central and 
Western Indiana Apprenticeship Program. 
Brother Beaver placed second in the 
Indiana State Council of Carpenter State 
Apprenticeship Contest. 




APPRENTICESHIP CONTESTS 
CALENDAR FOR 1972 







Mill 




State Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Millwright 


Alaska 


X 






Arizona 


X 




X 


California 


X 


X 


X 


Colorado 


X 


X 


X 


Delaware 


X 






Florida 


X 




X 


Hawaii 


X 






Idaho 


X 






Illinois 


X 


X 


X 


Indiana 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 


X 


X 


X 


Kansas 


X 




X 


Louisiana 


X 




X 


Maryland 


X 


X 


X 


Massachusetts 


X 


X 




Michigan 


X 


X 


X 


Minnesota 


X 






Missouri 


X 


X 


X 


Nebraska 


X 






Nevada 


X 




X 


New Jersey 


X 


X 


X 


New Mexico 


X 






New York 


X 


X 


X 


North Dakota 


X 






Ohio 


X 


X 


X 


Oklahoma 


X 






Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


Tennessee 


X 




X 


Texas 


X 




X 


Utah 


X 






Washington 


X 


X 


X 


Wisconsin 


X 






Wyoming 


X 






British Columbia X 


X 




Ontario 


X 




X 


Manitoba 


X 






Total 


37 


15 


22 



Completion Ceremony, Dinner 

An annual apprentice completion ceremony and dinner was 
held November 22, 1971, at the Downtown Club, Richmond, 
Virginia. There were seven new journeymen, although only 
five were able to attend the ceremony. 

New journeymen in the picture, left to right, are: Donald 
Millington, Wilbert Jones, Henry Bradbury, Walter Jackson 
and Charles Lambert. Jones was promoted to carpenter fore- 
man last summer. Lambert is doing take-olf work and the 
^ engineering work for Dee Shoring, Inc. Jackson was the out- 
standing apprentice of the year, 1968, and the first apprentice 
from the minority group to be signed into this program. 




FEBRUARY, 1972 



27 




Another Big Graduating Class in Chicago 

On October 28, 1971, the Chicago District Council of Carpenters was honored to graduate 96 apprentices as journeyman 
carpenters. General Executive Board Member William Konyha, keynoted the ceremonies. 

In the near future, the Chicago District Council will be graduating approximately 80 apprentices every quarter, truly a right 
step in perpetuating the trade. 

Awarded certificates were: Stephen J. Alburg, Local 1185; Marnie E. Baker, Local 1996; Kenneth J. Baranski, Local 242; 
Kevin M. Beasley, Local 13; Byron L. Blazek, Local 80; William G. Bresland. Local 1693; Dallas F. Busse, Local 13; Kevin 
Caw ley. Local 13; Phillip J. Chambers, Local 461; Robert K. C launch. Local 58; John M. Clayton, Local 1185; Robert E. Con- 
rad, Local 1786; LaRoyne Cooper, Local 13; William H. Curtin. Jr., Local 1185; Alan B. Cyrocki, Local 1922; Kenneth M. 
D'Alexander, Local 13; Thomas J. Degnan, Local 58; Gerald A. Dumalski, Local 181; Donald W. Fredrickson, Local 181; Pat- 
rick M. Gabor, Local 416; John Garbarczyk, Local 434; Demelrio Garcia, Local 13; Michael J. Gnolfo, Local 1922; Dennis A. 
Gordon, Local 1922; John J. Graf. Local 181; Robert P. Grampovnik, Local 448; Michael B. Gustafson, Local 181; Wm. M. 
Heidenreich, Local 181; Lonnie Hubbard, Local 10; Edmund A. Jakaitis, Jr., Local 448; Stefan J. Janusz, Local 13; Peter L. 
Kartel, Local 58; John N. Koch, Local 461; Wayne C. Koch. Local 461; Paul E. Kowalski, Local 58; Leslie M. Krogh, Local 
1185; Thomas H. Kuehn, Local 54; Thomas A. Kunst, Local 1693; Francis E. LaCour. Local 1539; Phillip Lanzarotta, Local 
416; Robert L. LaPenna, Local 1367; Ronald L. Laski, Local 1185; Louis E. Mack, Local 242; John G. Moirano, Local 434; 
Arthur R. Morby, Local 448; Thomas J. Moran, Local 13; Stephen A. Mueller, Local 839; John R. McCabe, Local 1185; Rich- 
ard M. Negoski. Local 1922; James R. Nevels, Jr., Local 1185; Walter Nowak, Local 1922; Gerald R. Nuckolls, Jr., Local 141; 
Raymond L. O'Donnell, Local 58; Thomas E. Pasiewicz, Jr., Local 461; Frank P. Pavlik, Local 1185; Thomas E. Peters, Local 
1185; Ralph E. Peterson, Local 181; Phillip Pettice, Local 272; Daniel Pickert, Local 1185; Atanasio A. Resendcz, Local 141; 
Paul E. Rost, Local 448; Frank J. Rousar, Local 54; Raymond Rubio, Local 199; Edward M. Ryan, Local 1185; John P. San- 
dula. Local 13; David L. Santeford, Local 1922; Joseph C. Scliabelski, Local 1; Bernard Schell, Local 181; Gerald M. Schroeder, 
Local 448; Michael C. Schultz, Local 13; William J. Sexton, Local 13; Joseph Seibert, Local 1693; Ronald G. Sekerka, Local 
1786; Clifford M. Sherwin, Local 181; Michael W. Shields, Local 13; William J. Sleboda, Local 1185; Harry M. Smith, Local 
1922; Kenneth G. Smith, Local 58; Gene E. Somniers, Local 58; Paul E. Swalwell, Local 199; Harold W. Thomas, Jr., 1693; 
Gerald W. Tomazin, Local 1185; Donald W. Traska, Local 1185; Daniel T. Viktora, Local 242; Jerry P. Watson, Local 1185; 
Jack Wennerberg, Local 1185; Kenneth J. Wojcik, Local 839; Anthony P. Wrubel, Local 1922; Michael S. Yukna, Local 448; 
Edward Zielinski, Local 13. 



Edward Zielinski, Local 13. 

Washington, D.C., JAC Hosts Latin American Labor Leaders 

The Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship l^fei^^\ /^^^igSUBBHiP^'^^" ' ''^"" " "^""""^^^^^^^^B^^ 



The Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship 
Committee of Washington, D.C. and 
Vicinity was host to 39 Latin American 
labor leaders on October 9. 1971. 

The group had been studying a course 
in "Advanced Collective Bargaining" at 
The American Institute for Free Labor 
Development in Front Royal, Virginia. 

The American Institute for Free Labor 
Development is a non-profit organization 
supported by the AFL-CIO and by en- 
lightened representatives of the U. S. 
business community. 

The apprenticeship program and its 
objectives were explained to the visitors 
by the director, Nicholas R. Loope, and 
a description of plans for the future build- 
ing program of the JAC's Forestville, 
Md., campus. 





JAC Director Nicholas Loope, center, describes the training facilities in the D.C. area. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 




"CLIC" REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR 1971 



Local City 



The 1971 Membership Contributions to the 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 



ON THIS PAGE and the pages which follow is a summary of 
the contributions of local union members to the Carpenters Legisla- 
tive Important Committee during 1971. 

The 1971 drive for membership contributions was highly success- 
ful. More local unions than ever before were represented. CLIC is 
becoming, more and more, the grassroots, rank-and-file eifort it 
should be. Every state was shown to be active in our program of 
political education and voter action. 

THE 1972 FUND-RAISING, membership drive is now underway. 
We have a new emblem and new and shiny pins to be worn by those 
who join. We urge every member to participate in CLIC's program 
in this crucial national election year. 

IT'S VOTER REGISTRATION time in many states, and we urge 
each member to see to it that the eligible members of his or her 
family is registered for both the primary and general elections. Let's 
make the Brotherhood's voter strength felt at the polls in the months 
ahead. 

Charles E. Nichols, CLIC Director 



NOTE: Those contributions listed at right which are marked with an asterisk include 
contributions from delegates representing their local unions in state council conven- 
tions. In some instances, these convention contributions were the only monies 
received from the local unions. 




The new 1972 
CLIC emblem is 
displayed by two 
young ladies from 
the General Offices 
— Janet Lyddane 
and Susan Kelleher. 



ALABAMA 



103 Birmingham 
1192 Birmingham 
2429 Fort Payne 



ALASKA 



1243 Fairbanks 
1281 Anchorage 
2520 Anchorage 



ARIZONA 



857 Tucson 

906. Glendale 

1089 Phoenix 

1153 Yuma 



ARKANSAS 

71 Fort Smith 

529 Camden 

576 Pine Bluff 

690 Little Rock 

891 Hot Springs 

1249 Fayetteville 

1470 Conway 

1627 Mena 

1683 El Dorado 

1836 Russellville 

2045 Helena 

2697 Magnolia 

CALIFORNIA 

25 Los Angeles 

34 San Francisco 

36 Oakland 

42 San Francisco 

162 San Mateo 

180 Vallejo 

286 San Andreas 

483 San Francisco 

586 Sacramento 

642 Richmond 

668 Palo Alto 

743 Bakersfield 

751 Santa Rosa 

771 Watsonville 

828 Menlo Park 

829 Santa Cruz 
848 San Bruno 
929 Los Angeles 
944 San Bernardino 

1046 Palm Springs 

1052 Hollywood 

1113 San Bernardino 

1125 Los Angeles 

1140 San Pedro 

1147 Roseville 

1149 San Francisco 

1235 Modesto 

1296 San Diego 

1300 San Diego 

1335 Wilmington 

1358 LaJolla 

1381 Woodland 

1400 Santa Monica 

1408 Redwood City 

1418 Lodi 

1453 Huntington Beach 

1479 Redondo 

1490 San Diego 

1497 E. Los Angeles 

1570 Mai-ysville 

1607 Los Angeles 

1622 Hayward 

1752 Pomona 

1976 Los Angeles 

2006 Los Gatos 



Amount 



10.00 

17.00 

6.00 



10.00* 
100.00 
72.00 



168.22 
21.00 
10.00 
42.60 



11.00* 
1.00* 
2.00* 
1.00* 
1.00* 

20.00 
1.00* 
1.00* 

11.00* 
2.00* 
1.00* 
1.00* 



15.00 
60.00 
10.00* 
25.00 
54.00 
43.00 
11.00 
L134.20 
443.00 
10.00 
16.00 
66.00 
22.00 
20.00* 

5.00 
18.00 
10.00 
10.00 
33.50 
20.00 
60.00 
10.00 
10.00 
46.00 
20.00 
11.00 

5.00 

100.00 

13.00 

2.00 
32.00 

6.00 

147.00 

12.00 

5.00 
24.00 

8.00 
11.00 
110.00 
10.00 
40.00 
22.00 
16.00 
10.00 
11.00 



Continued on page 31 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



29 



SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 






A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 



(1) DFXATUR. ILL.— Local 742 hon- 
ored 65 members with 25-)ear pins and 
four members with 50-year pins recently. 
Two of the 50-year members were pres- 
ent for the picture: Charles F. Miller, 
left, and Gus Sablotney, right. 

(1-A) The 25-year honorees at Decatur, 
shown with Charles F. Miller, center, 
included: Lawrence Stine, Carl Fred- 
erick, Earl Kaufman, James Strachan, 
Philip Sims, Charles Maxwell, John 
Foreman, Vernon Hardin, Charles 
Mauck, John Oliver, Clyde Samuels, 
Victor Kalins, and Eldred M. Halbert. 

(2) OAKLAND, CALIF.— Local 36 
honored its longtime members Saturday, 
October 30, at an Oakland luncheon at 
which pins were presented for member- 
ship of from 25 to 65 years. 

A total of 747 members were eligible. 
Age and illness prevented some from 
attending, but 423 Local 36 members 
attended and heard Business Representa- 
tive Gunnar (Benny) Benoys and General 
Representative Clarence Briggs praise the 
oldtimcrs. 

Recognized at the luncheon at Good- 
man's Hall was the 65 years of Joseph 
Irthuni, former warden. Sixty -year men 



were Ernest M. Crow, who retired in 
1968 as Local 36 Financial Secretary; 
O. M. Alexander, and A. A. Gehl all 
with 60 years. 

Also attending were 65-year plus man 
Harry Harbison, 63-year man VVilliam 
J. Gerllerman and 49-year man Earl 
Huss. 

Others included 55-year men E. F. 
Lebourveau and C. C. Merritt, 50-year 
men Carl Elser, Alexander Ertman, Fred 
Fincken, Napoleon Gagne. O. A. Nail 
and M. G. Sturdivant; 45-year men Lu- 
ther B. Clare. Simon Bandel, Fred 
Dodge, Albert Honore, Everett J. Shan- 
non and Wilford Sprague and 40-year 
members Herman Anderson, Arthur Car- 
son, Axel Christensen, Magnus Erickson, 
A. E. Helmkamp, Abram Kools, A. E. 
Long and \\. \\. Reichert. 

Additionally, 156 Local 36 members 
earned 35-year pins. 273 qualified for 
30-year pins and 291 for 25-year pins. 

Attending was Local 36"s entire exec- 
utive board plus William Marshall, Busi- 
ness Representative for Carpenters Lo- 
cals 1473, 1158 and 194. 

In the picture, a 60-year pin is handed 
to Local 36's retired financial secretary, 
Ernest M. Crow, by President Robert 
Griebel at the union's luncheon honoring 



longtime members of the LInited Brother- 
hood of Carpenters. 

Longest membership, 65 years, was 
that of Harry Harbison, right front. 
Others are, back to front, at left. Earl 
Huss. 49 years; Arthur Carson, 40 years; 
Carl Elser, 50 years and Alexander Ert- 
man, 50 years. 

Center row, back to front, Albert 
Hdnrre, 45 years; Everett J. Shannon, 
45 years and Crow. 

At right, back to front, are William 
J. Gellerman, 63 years; C. C. Merritt, 
55 years and Harbison. 

(3) BAVONNE, N.J.— At a recent meet- 
ing of Local 383, members were presented 
with pins for long and faithful service 
to the Brotherhood. Pins were presented 
by Business Agents Thomas Bifano and 
Albert Beck, Jr.; Retired Business Agent 
Albert Beck, Sr.; and President Louis 
Botwinick. 

Shown in the picture: Seated, left to 
right, Morris Silverman (35 years), Paul 
Press (30), Morris Levine (60). Louis 
Starr (35), David Wolper (35), and Julius 
Wendroff (30). 

First Row Standing. Jacob Cohen (35), 
^^'illianl Rubenstein (35), Retired Business 
Agent Albert Beck, Sr., President Louis 
Botwinick (35), Treasurer Carl Levilan 
(30), Business Agent Thomas Bifano, 
Hyman Rockolf (30) and Bernard Press 
(35). 

Second Row Standing. Recording Sec- 
retary Theodore C. Grasz, Business Agent 
Albert Beck, Jr., Mce President Albert 
Nunez, C. Dellandrea (35). Michael 
Masiello (30) and Eli Smith (30). 

Those not present at photo are: Meyer 
Helfand (62), Hyman Scidman (35), Louis 
Denerstein (30), Arthur Rubenstein (30), 
Hyman Goldberg (30). Albert Wendroff 
(30) and Jacob Hammer (25). 




THE CARPENTER 



CLIC REPORT 




Local 


City 


Amount 










GEORGIA 




Continued from naee 29 
















144 


Macon 


$ 20.00 


Local 


City 


Amount 


225 


Atlanta 


80.00* 








256 


Savannah 


35.00 


2020 


San Diego 


$ 16.00 


1263 


Atlanta 


20.00 


2046 


Martinez 


40.00 








2048 


Corona 


20.00 




HAWAII 




2164 


San Francisco 


10.00 


745 


Honolulu 


10.00 


2172 


Santa Ana 


10.00* 








2288 


Los Angeles 


10.00* 




IDAHO 




2308 


Fullerton 


24.00 


635 


Boise 


17.00 


2341 


Willits 


20.00* 


1258 


Pocatello 


20.00* 


2435 


Inglewood 


30.00 


1482 


Grangeville 


15.00* 


2505 


Klamath 


30.00* 


2816 


Emmett 


60.00* 


2559 


San Francisco 


10.00* 








2608 


Redding 


40.00* 




ILLINOIS 




2652 
2728 
2789 
2801 
2882 
2907 
3006 
3074 
3088 
3184 


Standard 

Oho Ranch 

Areata 

Oroville 

Santa Rosa 

Weed 

Trinidad 

Chester 

Stockton 

Fresno 


10.00* 
20.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 


1 
10 
13 
16 
21 
44 
58 
62 
63 
80 


Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Springfield 

Chicago 

Champaign-Urbana 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Bloomington 

Chicago 


162.00 
10.00* 

187.00 
1,008.00* 
21.00 
50.00* 
1,624.50* 

202.50 
20.00* 

793.50 




COLORADO 




141 


Chicago 


40.00* 








154 


Kewanee 


20.00* 


55 


Denver 


26.00 


166 


Rock Island 


25.50* 


362 


Pueblo 


45.00 


169 


E. St. Louis 


78.00* 


418 


Greeley 


10.00 


174 


Joliet 


65.00 


1351 


Leadville 


20.00* 


181 


Chicago 


209.00 


1396 


Golden 


20.00 


183 


Peoria 


50.00* 


1583 


Englewood 


12.00 


189 


Quincy 


10.00* 


2834 


Denver 


24.00 


199 


Chicago 


30.00* 








241 


Moline 


30.00* 




CONNECTICUT 




242 


Chicago 


67.00* 


30 


New London 


50.00* 


269 


Danville 


20.00* 


43 


Hartford 


99.00* 


272 


Chicago Heights 


17.00 


79 


New Haven 


100.00 


295 


CoUinsville 


20.00* 


127 
196 


Derby 

Greenwich 


15.00 
75.00 


347 
360 


Mattoon 
Galesburg 


30.00* 
35.00* 


210 


Stamford 


30.00* 


363 


Elgin 


20.00* 


1520 


Bridgeport 


20.00 


367 

377 


Centraha 
Alton 


10.00* 
10.00* 




DELAWARE 




433 


Belleville 


30.00* 








434 


Chicago 


67.00* 


626 


Wilmington 


10.00 


448 


Waukegan 


65.00 


1545 


Wilmington 


30.00 


461 


Highwood 


130.00* 








480 


Freeburg 


40.00 




DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 


504 


Chicago 


20.00 


1590 


Washington 


100.00 


558 


Elmhurst 


2.00 


1694 
2311 


Washington 
Washington 


28.50 
90.00 


568 
633 


Lincoln 
Madison 


10.00* 
10.00* 


2456 


Washington 


17.00 


644 
661 


Pekin 
Ottawa 


64.00 
16.00 




FLORIDA 




695 


Sterling 


10.00* 








725 


Litchfield 


20.00* 


627 


Jacksonville 


154.27 


742 


Decatur 


20.00* 


819 


W. Palm Beach 


30.00* 


748 


Taylorville 


10.00* 


959 


Boynton 


20.00 


792 


Rockford 


50.00* 


1250 


Homestead 


110.00 


798 


Salem 


3.00 


1308 


Lake Worth 


10.00* 


812 


Cairo 


10.00* 


1379 


N. Miami 


124.00 


839 


Des Plaines 


961.75* 


1394 


Fort Lauderdale 


20.00 


841 


Carbondale 


10.00* 


1447 


Vero Beach 


30.00 


904 


Jacksonville 


20.00* 


1509 


Miami 


40.00 


916 


Aurora 


10.00* 


1515 


Pensacola 


10.00* 


999 


Mt. Vernon 


24.00* 


1554 


Miami 


10.00 


1092 


Marseilles 


53.00* 


1641 


Naples 


2.00 


1128 


LaGrange 


60.00* 


1685 


Pineda 


45.00 


1185 


Chicago 


74.50* 


1725 


Daytona Beach 


80.00 


1196 


Arlington Heights 


10.00* 


1765 


Orlando 


40.00 


1248 


Geneva 


10.00* 


1766 


Boca Raton 


20.00 


1265 


Monmouth 


10.00* 


1927 


Delray Beach 


20.00 


1307 


Evanston 


10.00 


1947 


Hollywood 


1.00 


1361 


Chester 


42.00* 


1966 


Miami 


20.00* 


1367 


Chicago 


50.00* 


2024 


Miami 


210.00 


1527 


Wheaton 


20.00* 


2217 


Lakeland 


40.00 


1539 


Chicago 


32.00 


2340 


Bradenton 


22.00 


1784 


Chicago 


61.00 


2411 


Jacksonville 


19.00 


1883 


Macomb 


20.00 


2770 


W. Palm Beach 


8.00 


1889 


Downers Grove 


40.00* 


2795 


Fort Lauderdale 


53.50 








3206 


Pompano Beach 


100.00* 




Continued 


on page 33 




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NAME 



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STATE 



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HOME PLANS BY 

I I GARLINGHOUSE 

» Dept. 022 

VP.O. BOX 299, TOPEKA. KANSAS 66601,/ 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



31 




(1) BUFFALO. N.Y.— Local 1377 re- 
cently honored its members with 25 or 
more years of service. Sitting, from left, 
are William Meehan, 47 years; Walter 
Schank. 55 years; Herman F. Bodewes, 
president of Local 1377; and John C. 
Theobold. 55 years. In the second row. 
from left, are William Meyers, 29 years; 
Harold Leggett, 25 years; Joseph Maras- 
co, 25 years; Harold Bro«n, 25 years; 
Harry Oatcs, 25 years; Charles Ryan, 28 
years; Ronald Kessler, 25 years; A. 
Korsh. 25 years; and Robert Roth, 28 
years. Standing in the third row, from 
left, are William Ladany, 25 years; Ray- 
mond Wilson, 35 years; Roy MacDermot, 
29 years; Charles Lambert, 29 years; 
Jake Fries, 31 years; Walter Beam, finan- 
cial secretary of Local 1377, 35 years; 
and James Shaffer, 25 years. Pictured in 
the fourth row from left, are George 
Stewart, 25 years; John Jones 29 years; 
Francis Hembert, 48 years; and Ray 
Schnielzle, 25 years. LInable to attend 
the presentation ceremony, hut also re- 
ceiving service pins, were John Harlnian, 
25 years; Charles Schmidt, 25 years; 
Nelson Waferworth, 28 years. Arnold 
Schint, 45 years; and John \>'elch, 47 
years. 

(2) LYNBROOK, N.Y.— On October 
16, 25-year pins were awarded to (he 
following members of Local 950: Donald 
Anderson, Thoralf P. Andoos, Peter Ba- 
rotti, John Breen, Ray Brower, Axel 
Carlson, R. W. Carman, Jr., Joseph Cid, 
Alonzo C. Clifi'ord, Charles Cruse, Henr> 
Dailledouze, William A. Davis, John J. 
Fcger, William Forbes, James Formont, 
Edward L. Freeman, Peter Gi.annini, 
George Glier. Joseph C. Gunther, Arthur 
L. Haapanen, Frank Halouska, Norman 
Hansen, Leif A. Hendricksen, Fred Her- 
bert, Robert Hirst, Rudolph F. Houdek, 
Edward A. Keough, Robert A. Kilkenny, 
Charles Knudsen, Joseph Komatz Sr., 
Anthony Krummenacker, Harold Mac- 
Phee, Joseph Mador, Richard Mayer, 
Joseph McKinney, Keith H. Moyer, Wal- 
ter Nolan, Leonard Olsen, Frank Owen, 
Arthur L. Pcarsall, Louis P. Pearsall, 
Frank Piccininni, W. Z. Ponchitera, Philip 



SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 



A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 



Poulson, Andrew Racich, Amos Radu, 
Carl Raimondi, Sr., Frank Beimondi, 
John Romano, Jack Rosen, John Sachs, 
Paul Salenius, Herman M. Schuster, Mar- 
co Simicich, Lawrence Smith, Harold 
Snyder, Edward Southoff, Robert D. Syl- 
vester, Otto W. Tews, Raymond H. 
Thornton, Alton Waring, Frank Washer, 
Alfred G. Werner, Axel T. Wilson, G. 
Rowsell, and Jack Petit. 

A moment of silence was held for Otto 
Tews who had died the day before. 

Hahn presented 50-year pins to Charles 
Childres, Selmer Hansen, and Peter Lar- 
son. 

A plaque and pin were given to former 
Treasurer Frank Kumenacker who had 
just completed 26 years as treasurer. 
Another pin was presented to former 
president James K. Morrow. 

Shown in the picture are Peter Larsen, 
Edward Hahn and Charles Childres. 

(3) MEMPHIS, TENN.— Fifty-year pins 
were presented to F. E. Owen and L. L. 
Whitsett at a regular meeting of Local 
345. held recently. Brother Owen was 
initiated July 29. 1921, and his entire 
membership has been spent in this local 
union. Brother Whitsett was initiated by 
Local 2084 on July 4, 1921, and shortly 
thereafter transferred to this local union 
and his memberOiip has remained in No. 
345 since that dale. 

Presentation of the pins was made 
by Board Member Harold Lewis. The 
photo shows Board Member Lewis, 
Brother Whitsett, and Brother Owen. 




32 



THE CARPENTER 



CLIC REPORT 

Continued from pnge 31 



Local City 


1996 


Libertyville 


2004 


Itasca 


2010 


Anna 


2014 


Barnngton 


2063 


Lacon 


2087 


Crystal Lake 


2094 


Chicago 


2122 


Vandalia 


2158 


Rock Island 


3273 


Olney 




INDIANA 


113 


Chesterton 


215 


Lafayette 


232 


Fort Wayne 


274 


Vincennes 


436 


New Albany 


565 


Elkhart 


599 


Hammond 


694 


BoonviUe 


1003 


Indianapolis 


1317 


E. Chicago 


1355 


Crawfoidsville 


1858 


Lowell 


3000 


Crown Point 


3154 


Monticello 




IOWA 


4 


Davenport 


106 


Des Moines 


308 


Cedar Rapids 


364 


Council Bluffs 


373 


Fort Madison 


534 


Burlington 


678 


Dubuque 


948 


Sioux City 


1039 


Cedar Rapids 


1069 


Muscat'ne 


1260 


Iowa City 


1313 


Mason City 


1835 


Waterloo 


1948 


Ames 




KANSAS 


168 


Kansas City 


201 


Wichita 


561 


Pittsburg 


714 


Olathe 


750 


Junction City 


797 


Kansas City 


918 


Manhattan 


1022 


Parsons 


1198 


Independence 


1212 


Coffeyville 


1224 


Emporia 


1445 


Topeka 


1529 


Kansas City 


1542 


Dodge City 


1724 


Liberal 


1926 


Chanute 


2279 


Lawrence 


2383 


Winfield 


2417 


Osawatomie 


3234 


Hays 




KENTUCKY 


64 


Louisville 


785 


Covington 


1080 


Owensboro 


1734 


Murray 


2058 


Frankfort 




LOUISIANA 


953 


Lake Charles 


1312 


New Orleans 


1476 


Lake Charles 


1811 


Monroe 


1846 


New Orleans 


2258 


Houma 





Local City 


Ainoun 






MAINE 






320 


Augusta 


$ 6.00 


Amount 




MARYLAND 




$ 60.00* 
10.00* 


340 


Hagerstown 


85.00 


1024 


Cumberland 


63.00 


10.00* 

67.00 

30.00* 




MASSACHUSETTS 




32 


Springfield 


220.00 


10.00* 


33 


Boston 


415.00 


58.00* 


40 


Boston 


90.00 


10.00* 


48 


Fitchburg 


80.00 


51.00* 


49 


Lowell 


144.00 


10.00* 


51 


Boston 


80.00 




56 


Boston 


90.00 




67 


Boston 


100.00 


10.00 


82 


Haverhill 


20.00 


40.00 


107 


Worcester 


120.00 


43.00 


111 


Lawrence 


160.00 


15.00 


157 


Boston 


10.00 


40.00 


193 


N. Adams 


20.00 


30.00 


218 


Boston 


364.00 


45.00 


327 


Attleboro 


20.00 


20.00 


351 


Northampton 


40.00 


20.00 


390 


Holyoke 


70.00 


18.00 


424 


Hingham 


20.00 


4.00 


444 


Pittsfield 


60.00 


20.00 


549 


Greenfield 


20.00 


10.00* 


595 


Lynn 


30.00 


6.00 


624 


Brockton 


81.00 




656 


Holyoke 


30.00 




762 


Quincy 


130.00 


58.00* 


831 


Arlington 


20.00 


858 


Clinton 


10.00 


69.00* 


860 


Framingham 


97.00 


16.00* 


866 


Norwood 


33.00 


2.00* 
17.00* 


878 


Beverly 


107.00 


885 


Woburn 


60.00 


23.00* 
8.00* 


888 
988 


Salem 
Marlboro 


20.00 
20.00 


58.00* 


1035 


Taunton 


90.00 


4.00* 
2.00* 


1121 


Boston Vicinity 


20.00 


1144 


Danvers 


10.00 


24.00* 


1210 


Salem 


10.00- 


2.00* 


1305 


Fall River 


40.00^ 


2.00* 


1331 


Barnstable Co. ■ 


20.00- 


8.00* 


1416 


New Bedford 


20.00^ 




1459 


Westboro 


20.00- 




1479 


Walpole 


30.00^ 


70.00* 


1503 


Amherst 


30.00^ 


46.00* 


1531 


Rockland 


20.00^ 


20.00* 


1550 


Braintree 


20.00' 


58.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 


2168 


Boston 


30.00^ 




MICHIGAN 




10.00* 


19 


Detroit 


100.00 


7.00 


26 


E. Detroit 


15.00 


10.00* 


116 


Bay City 


5.00 


10.00* 


297 


Kalamazoo 


90.00 


10.00* 


334 


Saginaw 


40.00 


60.00* 


335 


Grand Rapids 


25.00 


60.00* 


337 


Detroit 


49.00 


10.00* 


674 


Mt. Clemens 


19.00 


30.00* 


898 


St. Joseph 


10.00 


20.00* 


982 


Detroit 


43.00 


20.00* 


1132 


Alpena 


10.00-- 


10.00* 


1373 


Flint 


47.00 


10.00* 


1433 


Detroit 


20.00 


10.00* 


1452 


Detroit 


10.00 




1461 


Traverse City 


20.00 




1513 


Detroit 


100.00 


10.00 


1546 


Detroit 


10.00 


25.00 


1615 


Grand Rapids 


11.00 


60.00 


2026 


Coldwater 


20.00 


10.00* 


2252 


Grand Rapids 


5.00 


39.00 


2265 


Detroit 


20.00 




2585 


Saginaw 


10.00 


4.00 




MINNESOTA 




5.00 


7 


Minneapolis 


19.00 


10.00* 


87 


St. Paul 


13.00 


10.00 


307 


Winona 


12.00 


150.00 








69.00 




Continued on 


page 35 



STARTAM0NEY-MAKING6USINESS 
FOR LESS THAN $50! 




You can have your own lifetime business 
right at home . . . -ivork in spare time... 
and make up to ?200 a month CASH ! My 
FREE PLAN gives you all the facts: How 
to start, how to grow. You don't need pre- 
vious experience. You don't have to sell. 
I'll even finance you. People bring you the 
work and pay cash. Over 90(! of every dol- 
lar you collect is clear cash profit. And you 
work when you want to. Let me prove you 
can't find a more certain, lower cost, higher 
paying business of your own. 



Just Mail Coupon-No Salesman Will Call /^ ^ 



BELSAW SHARP-ALL CO. 

732F Field BIdg., Kansas City, Mo. 64111 J 



Send Free Book. No obligation. 



Name_ 



I 

I Address- 

I City 

! State 



-Zip- 



Made to put in 
a hard day's work 

Designed by Carpenters 
Especially for Carpenters 

There's plenty of comfort, con- 
venience and work-saving fea- 
tures in these overalls. Made 
just like you want 'em ... be- 
cause they're designed by work- 
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be the best you've ever worn or 
we'll take 'em back. No ques- 
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^V ^^^ ^^(g) UNION MADE 

■ -■ Ml 1"R CARPENTERS' 
MA^f^^ OVERALLS 

H. D. LEE COMPANY, INC. , —, 

SHAWNEE MISSION, KANSAS 66201 \\fc\ 

"World's largest manufacturer of \yS.\ 
union-made work clothes." 




FEBRUARY, 1972 



33 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 

And on The Ofher Hand . . . 

The first grader was af the black- 
board trying to make the numeral 3 
when the teacher discovered he was 
left-handed. Busy helping other chil- 
dren, she left him alone for awhile, 
then returned to discover that he had 
switched the chalk over to his right 
hand. "I thought you were left- 
handed," she said. 

The tyke was disgusted. "Teacher, 
you know what? I have found out i 
can't write with either one!" — R. F. 
Fritz, Turner Falls, Mass. 

MAKE YOUR SSS CLICK— GIVE TO CLIO 




-^-v. 






f frirtJ^ 




y^ H* 


K^ 


?f 


^'\h 


7 ^ 


^ 


^Ul J^/f 



He Figured Right! 

"Why are you complaining?" asked 
the husband. "I got home from the 
union meeting last night at a quarter 
of twelve!" 

"You did not, you liar," shouted 
his keeper. "I heard you come in 
when the clock was striking three!" 

"Well, stupid," replied the re- 
sourceful hubby, "isn't three a quar- 
ter of twelve?" 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Not the Necks Best? 

The most dependable reducing ex- 
ercise ever discovered is to turn the 
head slowly from side to side when 
offered second helpings. — Kathleen 
Davis, Springfield, Oregon. 




Daffy-nitions 

Municipal graft — City haul. 
Girdle — Paunch pad. 
hlouse trailer — Roaming house. 
Dog pound — Barking lot. 
hiippie barbecue — Kook-out. 
Bartenders — Pour people. 
Timberland — Chopping center. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 



Can You Top This? 

The office peach was well-pre- 
served, but when the boss' wife found 
out she was her husband's secretary, 
she got canned. 



UNION DUES— TOMORROWS SECURITY 

She Was Really Scent! 

To give her a needed boost after 
a long and trying day, the mother 
took a nip from a bottle of Scotch. 
As she was tucking her young son in 
bed, the youngster asked: "fHey, 
Mom; how come you're wearing Dad's 
perfume?" 

BUY ONLY UNION-MADE TOOLS 



And No Wise Cracks! 

One chorus girl told another she 
was going to marry an eccentric 
trillionaire. "But a lot of people say 
he's cracked!" objected her friend. 

"hie may be cracked, honey," 
replied the first, "but he's far from 
broke!" 



This Month's Limerick 

A little-known author named Bundy 
Stared down at the wild tides of 
Fundy. 

All he got was this notion 

To swim in the ocean 
Sic transit gloria mundi. 



A Spade's Not A Spade! 

The young superintendent's first job 
was on a convent remodeling job. 
After one day, he was summoned to 
the Sister Superior's office where he 
heard a complaint about the language 
his men used. 

"But Sister," he said, "these are 
just rough-and-ready construction 
men. They believe in calling a spade 
a spade!" 

"That's the trouble, they don't!" 
the Mother Superior replied. "They 
call it a #"&@ing shovel!" — Floyd 
Filippi, L.U. 385, N.Y.C. 

B SURE 2 VOTE! 

A Case in Point 

The bashful bride, ouside the 
honeymoon hotel, told her new hubby 
that she didn't want the people in 
the lobby to know they were newly- 
weds. "Okay," replied the groom, 
"but do you think you can carry both 
suitcases?" 

WORK SAFELY— ACCIDENTS HURT 




Choice of Wildlife 

It really doesn't make much sense: 
a girl screams and hollers at the sight 
of a mouse, yet willingly climbs into 
an auto with a wolf! — Mrs. Willard 
Trnka, Silver Lake, Minn. 

LOOK FOR THE UNION LABEL 

Preferred Wage Scale 

A carpenter who "loves the grape" 
was offered double time to work at 
finishing a job on Christmas Eve. But 
he turned it down, saying, "On Christ- 
mas Eve I'd rather settle for straight 
time and a fifth!" — Lee Kissick, L.U. 
2435, Inglewood, Calif. 

R U r^lN 2 D UNION MFFTING.> 

Difference of Opinion 

The inquisitive old lady kept ques- 
tioning the soldier home on leave 
about his military experiences, etc., 
and he kept avoiding her curiosity. 
Finally, in desperation, she said: "You 
ARE with the Army, aren't you?" 

"No ma'am," replied the soldier, 
"I've been agin 'em all the way!" — 
Maurice hlowes, L.U. 444 Ret., Sum- 
merfleld, Fla. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



CLIC REPORT 




Local 


City 


Amount 








620 


Madison 


$231.00* 


Continued from page 33 




715 


Elizabeth 


10.00 








781 


Princeton 


1Q.00* 


Local 


City 


Amount 


821 


Newark 


51.00 








842 


Pleasantville 


11.00 


548 


Minneapolis 


$ 18.00 


1006 


New Brunswick 


10.00* 


617 


Alexandria 


8.00 


1107 


N. Plainfield 


15.00 


649 


Crookston 


10.00 


1209 


Newark 


10.00* 


766 

851 


Albert Lea 
Anoka 


32.75 
12.00 


1489 
1613 


Burlington 

Newark 


1,510.00* 
40.00 


1171 


Shakopee 


3.00 


2018 


Lakewood 


230.00* 


1429 


Little Falls 


7.00 


2098 


Camden 


10.00* 




MISSISSIPPI 




2250 


Red Bank 


310.00* 








2315 


Jersey City 


20.00 


73 


St. Louis 


38.00 








1471 


Jackson 


30.00 




NEW MEXICO 




1518 


Gulfport 


10.00 


1319 


Albuquerque 


496.00 




MISSOURI 




1962 


Las Cruces 


5.00 


5 


St. Louis 


80.00 




NEW YORK 




61 


Kansas City 


227.00 


6 


Amsterdam 


50.00 


110 


St. Jospeh 


15.00 


9 


Buffalo 


40.00 


602 


St. Louis 


40.00 


12 


Syracuse 


260.00 


978 


Springfield 


69.00 


20 


New York 


200.00 


1008 


Louisiana 


15.00 


53 


White Plains 


150.00 


1596 


St. Louis 


50.00 


77 


Port Chester 


21.00 


1635 


Kansas City 


10.00* 


117 


Albany 


927.00 


1739 


Kirkwood 


57.00 


125 


Utica 


60.00 


1795 


Farmington 


8.00 


135 


New York 


218.00 


1925 


Columbia 


33.00 


146 


Schenectady 


90.00 


1987 


St. Charles 


35,00 


203 


Poughkeepsie 


40.00 


2030 


St. Genevieve 


18.60 


246 


New York 


618.00 


2057 


Kirksville 


8.00 


251 


Kingston 


20.00 




MONTANA 




257 
278 


New York 
Watertown 


520.00 
10.00* 


28 


Missoula 


3.00- 


281 


Binghamton 


10.00 


88 


Anaconda 


1.00* 


298 


New York 


375.00 


153 


Helena 


20.00 


301 


Newburgh 


150.00 


286 


Great Falls 


29.00- 


323 


Beacon 


80.00 


557 


Bozeman 


4.00* 


350 


New Rochelle 


60.00 


670 


Poison 


1 .00- 


357 


Islip 


62.00 


718 


Havre 


15.00* 


374 


Buffalo 


60.00 


911 


Kalispell 


6.00* 


385 


New York 


133.50 


1172 


Billings 


29.00* 


412 


Sayville 


60.00 


1639 


Thompson Fall 


2.00* 


440 


Buffalo 


15.00 


2225 


Libby 


2.00* 


447 


Ossining 


90.00 


2405 


Kalispell 


12.00* 


453 


Auburn 


20.00 


2581 


Libby 


31.00* 


488 


New York 


140.00 


2685 


Missoula 


30.00* 


502 


Canandaigua 


70.00 


2719 


Thompson Fall 


11.00* 


503 


Lancaster 


20.00 


2812 


Missoula 


2.00* 


532 


Elmira 


20.00 


3038 


Bonner 


6.00* 


543 


Mamaroneck 


80.00 


3072 


Plains 


10.00* 


574 


Middletown 


60.00 




NEBRASKA 




603 
608 


Ithaca 
New York 


158.00 
220.00 


253 


Omaha 


27.00 


700 


Corning 


9.00 


1055 


Lincoln 


60.00 


729 


Liberty 


35.00 




NEW HAMPSHIRE 




740 

747 


New York 
Oswego 


23.00 
80.00 


625 


Manchester 


51.00 


754 


Fulton 


14.00 


921 


Portsmouth 


89.00 


791 


New York 


48.00 


1031 


Dover 


9.00 


808 


New York 


90.00 


1616 


Nashua 


54.00 


950 


New York 


60.00 


2276 


Berlin 


32.00 


964 


Rockland Co. 


128.00 








1042 


Plattsburgh 


70.00 




NEW JERSEY 




1075 


Hudson 


20.00 


15 


Hackensack 


208.00* 


1093 


Glencove 


20.00 


23 


Dover 


10.00* 


1134 


Mount Kisco 


80.00 


31 


Trenton 


188.00* 


1135 


Port Jefferson 


80.00 


118 


Jersey City 


20.00 


1164 


New York 


46.00 


139 


Jersey City 


14.00 


1167 


Smithtown Branch 


60.00 


155 


Plainfield 


10.00 


1175 


Kingston 


20.00 


299 


Union City 


40.00 


1204 


New York 


60.00 


306 


Newark 


33.00 


1292 


Huntington 


80.00 


325 


Paterson 


220.00 


1318 


Farmingdale 


20.00 


349 


Orange 


20.00* 


1377 


Buffalo 


16.00 


391 


Hoboken 


12.00 


1397 


N. Hempstead 


120.00 


393 


Camden 


10.00* 


1483 


Patchoque 


47.00 


399 


Phillipsburg 


20.00 


1508 


Lyons 


37.00 


432 


Atlantic City 


30.00* 


1511 


Southampton 


30.00 


455 


Somerville 


60.00 


1536 


New York 


165.00 


486 


Bayonne 


40.00 


1577 


Buffalo 


40.00 


490 


Passaic 


110.00* 


1649 


Woodhaven 


100.00 


564 


Jersey City 


20.00 








612 


Union Hill 


15.00 




Continued 


on page 3< 



You'll Like Being a 
SKILLED :, 

LOCKSMITH f 



You'll EARN MORE, LIVE BETTER 
than Ever Before in Your Life 



You'll ciijiiy your wmk as a I..ocksiintli 
because it is more fiisriiiating than ;i 
lioljlt.v — and highly paid besides! You'll 
go oil eiijoyiiit,' the faseinatiiig work, 
year after year, in Rood times or hiiil 
because you'll be the initn in deinimd 
in an evergrowing lield offering big pay 
iobs, big prolits as your own boss. What 
more could you ask! 

Train at Home — Earn Extra $$$$ 
Right Away ! 
All (his can he yimr.s FAST regardless 
of age, education, minor physical hand- 
icaps. Job enjoyment aiu! earnings be- 
gin AT OXrrO as you quickly, easily 
learn to CASH IN on all kinds of lock- 
smithing jobs. All keys, locks, parts, 
picks, special tools and enuipnient come 
with the course at no extra charge. 
Licensed experts guide you to success. 
Illustrated Book. Sample Lesson 
Pages FREE 
Loeksinithlng Institute grnduat(?s now 
earning, enjoying life more everywhere. 
You can, too. Coupon brings exciting 
facts from only school of its kind Lie. 
by N. J. State Dept. of Ed., Accredited 
Member, Natl. Home Study Council. 
Approved Tor Veteran Training. 
LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 
DIv. of Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept. 1118-022, Little Falls, N. J. 07424 




Earned 

$150 . 

During \*^ ^ 
Training 
I reillzcd witli 
LOCKSMITH- 
ING I'd be able 
to double my in- 
come. During 
my training per- 
iod ImudeSlSO. 
Paul Funes 
Xew York. N.Y. 




LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 1118-022 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

riease send FREE illustrated Book—"Your Big Op- 
portunities in Locksmithing," complete Equipment 
folder and sample lesson pages — FKEE of all obliga- 
tion — {no salesman will call). 



Kamc . . . 

Address . 



(Please Print) 



City State Zip 

□ Check here if Eligible for Veteran Training 



Planer- Molder- Saw! 




Now you can use this ONE power feed shop 
to turn rough lumber into high-value mold- 
ings, trim, flooring, furniture . . . ALL pop- 
ular patterns. 

RIP . . . PLANE . . . MOLD . . . separately or all 
at once by power feed . . . with a one horse- 
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commercial output. 

LOW COST. . .You can own this money mak- 
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Send coupon 1oday 
I ,, 

1 BELSAW POWER TOOLS 

I ?«F Field BIdg., Kansas City, Mo. 54111 

I Send me complete facts on the MULTI- 

' DUTY Power Tool. No obligation. 

I Name 



Address_ 
City 



_State_ 



_Zip_ 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



35 



CLIC REPORT 




Local 


City 


Amount 


Local 


City 


Amount 








583 


Portland 


$ 30.00* 




RHODE LSLAND 




Coiilinued from page 35 




738 


Portland 


100.00* 


94 


Providence 


$ 60.00 


Local 


City 


Amount 


849 
1017 


Manitowoc 
Redmond 


20.00 
10.00 


176 
801 


Newport 
Woonsocket 


84.00 
60.00 


1657 


New York 


$ 51.00 


1020 


Portland 


60.00* 


1695 


Providence 


20.00 


1681 


Hornell 


10.00 


1065 


Salem 


30.00* 








1757 


Buffalo 


20.00 


1094 


Albany Corvallis 


20.00* 




SOUTH CAROLINA 




1772 


Hicksville 


41.00 


1096 


Coquille 


20.00* 


1798 


Greenville 


44.00 


1888 


New York 


200.00 


1120 


Portland 


112.00* 








1973 


Riverhead 


20.00 


1157 


Lebanon 


38.00* 




SOL'TH DAKOTA 




1978 


Buffalo 


20.00 


1223 


Coos Bay 


10.00* 


783 


Sioux Falls 


9.75 


2054 


Horseheads 


10.00 


1273 


Eugene 


30.00* 








2100 


Amitvville 


31.00 


1277 


Bend 


10.00* 




TENNESSEE 




2163 


New York 


40.00 


1388 
1411 
1746 


Oregon City 

Salem 

Portland 


60.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 


50 


Knoxville 


195.00 


2236 
2241 


New York 
Brooklyn 


40.00 
80.00 


345 
2473 


Memphis 
Bristol 


15.00 
40.00 


2295 


New York 


10.00 


1857 


Portland 


60.00 








2765 


Nassau Co. 


20.00 


1896 


The Dalles 


30.00* 




TEXAS 




3127 


New York 


10.00 


2066 


St. Helens Vic. 


20.00=^ 


14 


San Antonio 


138.00* 


3211 


Herkimer 


42.00 


2067 


Med lord 


50.00* 


198 


Dallas 


149.00* 








2130 


Hillsboro 


10.00* 


213 


Houston 


212.00* 




NEVADA 




2416 


Portland 


36.00* 


379 


Texarkana 


60.00* 


1780 


Las Vegas 


10.00 


2419 
2530 


Astoria 
Gilchrist 


20.00* 
20.00* 


411 

425 


San Angelo 
El Paso 


30.00* 
45.00* 




NORTH CAROLLNA 




2588 


Bales 


10.00* 


526 


Galveston 


3 1 .50 


1469 


Charlotte 


10.00 


2627 


Cottage Grove 


10.00* 


610 


Port Arthur 


35.00* 


1492 


Hendersonville 


4.00 


2636 


Valsctz 


40.00* 


622 


Waco 


15.00* 








2691 


Coquille 


20.00* 


665 


Amarillo 


35.00* 




NORTH DAKOTA 




2698 


Banden 


10.00* 


724 


Houston 


20.00* 


1032 


Minot 


20.00 


2701 


Lakeview 


9.00 


753 


Beaumont 


50.00* 




OHIO 




2714 
2756 


Dallas 
Goshen 


41.00 
10.00* 


963 
973 


Houston 
Texas City 


10.00 
75.00* 


29 


Cincinnati 


286.00 


2784 


Coquille 


10.00* 


977 


Wichita Falls 


35.00* 


104 


Dayton 


20.00 


2787 


Springfield 


30.00* 


1066 


Houston 


25.00* 


105 


Cleveland 


31.00 


2791 


Sweet Home 


30.00* 


1084 


Angleton 


20.00* 


200 


Columbus 


165.00 


2851 


LaGrandc 


20.00* 


1097 


Longview 


10.00* 


248 


Toledo 


66.00 


2881 


Portland 


10.00* 


1104 


Tyler 


15.00* 


372 


Lima 


168.50 


2896 


Lyons 


10.00* 


1226 


Pasadena 


40.00* 


437 


Portsmouth 


20.00 


2924 


John Day 


20.00* 


1276 


Dallas 


1 1 .00* 


525 


Coshocton 


39.00 


2942 


Albany 


22.00* 


1334 


Baytown 


35.00* 


637 


Hamilton 


10.00 


2949 


Roseburg 


52.00* 


1421 


Arlington 


30.00* 


650 


Pomeroy 


118.00 


2961 


St. Helens 


10.00* 


1423 


Corpus Christ! 


55.00* 


716 


Zanesville 


19.00 


2970 


Pilot Rock 


10.00* 


1565 


Abilene 


10.00 


854 


Madisonville 


40.00 


3035 


Springfield 


10.00* 


1634 


Big Spring 


30.00* 


873 


Cincinnati 


6.00 


3064 


Toledo 


10.00* 


1751 


Austin 


20.00* 


976 


Marion 


35.00 


.3091 


Vaughn 


20.00* 


1822 


Fort Worth 


75.00* 


1079 
1108 


Steubenville 
Cleveland 


10.00 
10.00 




PENNSYLVANIA 




1855 
1884 


Bryan 
Lubbock 


35.00* 
59.00* 


nil 


Ironton 


5.00 


8 


Philadelphia 


56.00 


1971 


Temple 
Harlingen 


10.00* 


1180 


Cleveland 


10.00 


122 


Philadelphia 


291.00 


2190 


25.00* 


1189 


Columbiana Co. 


20.00 


124 


Bradford 


20.00 


2232 


Houston 


50.00* 


1359 


Toledo 


20.00 


191 


York 


1,220.00 


2534 


Te-xarkana 


20.00* 


1393 


Toledo 


35.00 


261 


Scranton 


106.00 


2572 


Wichita Falls 


10.00* 


1426 


Elyria 


40.00 


268 


Sharon 


4.00 


2848 


Dallas 


45.00* 


1438 


Warren 


2.00 


287 


Harrisburg 


622.00 


3106 


San Antonio 


15.00* 


1454 


Cincinnati 


44.00 


288 


Homestead 


1.00* 








1935 


Barherton 


47.00 


321 


Connellsville 


73.50 




ITAH 




2077 
2159 


Columbus 
Cleveland 


50.00 
20.00 


333 
359 


New Kensingtotl 
Philadelphia 


50.00 
10.00 


722 


Salt Lake City 


30.00 


21R0 


Defiance 


4.00 


368 


Allentown 


10.00 


1498 


Provo 


10.00 


2280 


Ml. Vernon 


10.00 


401 


Pittston 


20.00 




VERMONT 




2906 


Jeffersonville 


1.00 


414 

422 


Nanticoke 
New Brighton 


10.00 
40.0(1 


590 


RiillancI 


4.00 




OKLAHOMA 




430 


Wilkensburg 


72.00 




VIRGLNIA 




285 


Altus 


10.00* 


465 


Ardmore 


40.00 








329 


Oklahoma City 


133.00* 


500 


Butler 


33.00 


303 


Portsmouth 


18.40 


653 


Chickasha 


10.00* 


501 


Stroudsburg 


10.00 


319 


Roanoke 


10.00 


763 


Enid 


10.00* 


514 


Wilkes Barre 


40.00 


331 


Norfolk 


20.00 


943 


Tulsa 


80.00* 


691 


Williamsport 


14.00 


388 


Richmond 


98.00 


986 


McAlester 


31.00* 


709 


Shenandoah 


10.00 


396 


Newport News 


223.00 


1028 


Ardmore 


10.00* 


773 


Braddock 


21.00 


1402 


Richmond 


20.00 


1060 


Norman 


3.00 


833 


Berwyn 


20.00 


1534 


Petersburg 


20.00 


1072 


Muskogee 


20.00* 


838 


Sunbury 


653.00 


1 665 


Alexandria 


20.00 


1399 


Okmulgee 


20.00* 


845 


Clifton Heights 


21.00 


2070 


Roanoke 


10.00 


1585 
1659 


Lawton 
Bartlesville 


10.00* 
10.00* 


900 
1044 


Altoona 

Charleroi 


20.00 
30.00 




WASHINGTON 




1686 


Stillwater 


20.00* 


1073 


Philadelphia 


20.00 


98 


Spokane 


40.00* 


1894 


Woodward 


10.00* 


1333 


State College 


162.00 


131 


Seattle 


176.00* 


2008 


Ponca City 


10.00* 


1562 


North Wales 


7.00 


313 


Pullman 


20.00* 


2013 


Ada 


1 1 .00* 


1.595 


Conshohockcn 


90.00 


317 


Aberdeen 


23.00 








1759 


Pittsburgh 


62.00 


338 


Seattle 


40.00* 




OREGON 




1856 


Philadelphia 


80.00 


470 


Tacoma 


80.00* 


190 


Klamath Falls 


31.00* 


1906 


Philadelphia 


100.00 


562 


Everett 


57.00* 


226 


Portland 


215.00* 


2264 


Pittsburgh 


80.00 


756 


Bellingham 


31.00 


573 


Baker 


10.00* 


2274 


Pittsburgh 


200.00 


770 


Yakima 


319.00* 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



Local City 

870 Spokane 

954 Mount Vernon 

1036 Longview 

1136 Kettle Falls 

1148 Olympia 

1289 Seattle 

1303 Port Angeles 

1332 Grand Coulee 

1532 Anacortes 

1597 Bremerton 

1689 Tacoma 

1699 Pasco 

1707 KeJso-Lonaview 

1708 White River Valley 
1715 Vancouver 

1797 Renton 

1845 Snoqualmie Falls 

1849 Pasco 

1862 Spokane 

1974 Ellensburg 

1982 Seattle 

2127 Centralia 

2205 Wenatchee 

2207 Enumclaw 

2317 Bremerton 

2382 Spokane 

2403 Richland 

2498 Longview 

2519 Seattle 

2536 Port Gamble 

2633 Tacoma 

2659 Everett 

2767 Morton 

2805 Klickitat 

3099 Aberdeen 

3119 Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

3 Wheelina 

128 St. Albans 

1159 Point Pleasant 

1339 Morgantown 

2427 White Sulphur Springs 

2430 Charlestown 

WISCONSIN 

161 Kenosha 

252 Oshkosh 

264 Milwaukee 

290 Lake Geneva 

314 Madison 

344 Waukesha 

460 Wausau 

630 Wisconsin Rapids 

657 Sheboygan 

755 Superior 

820 Wisconsin Rapids 

836 Janesville 

849 Manitowoc 

955 Appleton 

1053 Milwaukee 

1074 Eau Claire 

1143 LaCrosse 

1 146 Green Bay 

1181 Milwaukee 

1208 Milwaukee 

1344 Portage 

1363 Oshkosh 

1364 New London 
1521 Algoma 
1573 W. Allis 
1582 Milwaukee 

1709 Ashland 
1733 Marshfield 
1741 Milwaukee 
1801 Hawkins 
1919 Stevens Point 
2073 Milwaukee 
2334 Baraboo 



WYOMING 



469 Cheyenne 
1564 Casper 



Amount 

$ 20.00* 
30.00* 
20.00 
20.00* 
45.00* 
89.00 
10.00* 
10.00* 
38.00* 
40.00* 
24.00* 
20.00* 
26.00* 
20.00* 
92.00* 
20.00* 
60.00* 
52.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
38.00* 
30.00* 
82.00 
20.00* 
20.00 
40.00* 
10.00* 
21.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 



44.00 
10.00 
29.00 
10.00 
5.00 
10.00 



52.00 
17.00 
85.00 
10.00 
55.00 
10.00 
30.00 
12.00 
10.00 
22.00 

5.00 
36.00 
70.00 
50.00 
20.00 
30.00 
33.50 
30.00 
40.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
22.75 
15.C0 
20.00 

1.00 
50.00 
15.00 
12.00 

6.00 

7.00 



20.00 
288.00 



Carpenters, 
Contractors, 
Custom Filers 



Save Time, Save Money 



with FAMOUS 



.^B% 



Sharpening Equipment 




other Foley Equipment 

RETOOTHER cuts fuii set of 

even crosscut or rip_^eeth 
in less than ""^ 

a minute. 



POWER 
SETTER 

gives hand 
and band 
saw teeth 




perfect set «^x 
autonnatically. 



GRINDER 

sharpens 
all rip, 
crosscut and 
combination 
circular saws. 



CARBIDE 
GRINDER 

precision 
grinds top, 
face, sides 
of carbide 
tipped 
teeth. 



Amazing Foley saw filer 
sharpens circular, band and 
hand saws automatically. 
Exclusive jointing principle 
assures uniform teeth; assiu^es 
perfect circular saw round- 
ness. Does a perfect job every 
time. No experience or train- 
ing needed. The Foley auto- 
matic saw filer is the ideal 
way to start a profitable 
business of your own. 

Excellent Business Opportunity 

You start large or small — put in a full day 
or just a few hours each week. Foley sharp- 
ening equipment does all the work for you 
and you make all the money. Foley saw 
filer, retoother, power setter, 314 grinder 
and special precision carbide saw grinder 
will go to work providing a pleasui-able, 
profitable business for you. Start in your 
basement or garage. 

Earn^GanHour 

People just like you, all over the U.S.A. are 
making excellent profits right now. Many 
started small and expanded to full time re- 
warding businesses. You can, too, with 
Foley's exclusive money making plan. 

FREE BOOKLET 



Easy-to-read booklet, "Money Mak- 
ing Facts" tells how you can start 
profitable business of your own. 
Send now! No obligation. No sales- 
man will call. 

FOLEY MFG., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55418 

oley BIdg. 



' ■ I </:/■; 
J'.'n' 



Foley Manufacturing Co., 218-2 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55418 

Send Free Booklet today. 



City- 



FEBRUARY, 1972 



37 





--^^ 



L.U. NO. 5 

ST. LOLIS. MO. 

Knittel.C. J. 

l.U. NO. 12 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

Halpin, G. 
Holden, E. 

L.t;. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK. N.J. 

Zuccone, Peter 

L.U. NO. 18 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Daca, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 22 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Andrews, Elliott 
Benson. Wallie 
Berry, Daniel W. 
De Martini, Ed L. 
De Pew, John T. 
Dybdal, T. Carl 
Gorman, James 
Gottwald, Louis, H. 
Harrison, C. L. 
Hompland, R. 
Morgan, W. M, 
Johnson, Charles August 
Jones. J. L. 
Kaski, A. 
Martinet. W. P. 
Nuss, B. F. 
Oleson, Glenn A. 
Price. Ralph C. 
Romaine. A. L. 
Samuelson, Curt W. 
Scott, James 
Stalin, Gus 
Thomas, Frank E. 

L.U. NO. 35 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Olsen, Sampson W. 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

McKenzie. Hugh 
Strandman. Axel 

L.U. NO. 50 

KNOXVILLE. TENN. 

Bowman, E. 1.. 
Campbell, Carlos R. 

L.U. NO. 51 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Hanson, Carl E. 

L.U. NO. 54 
CICERO, III.. 

Novak, Michael 

L.U. NO. 55 
DENVER, COLO. 

Friedman, Glenn 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Werner, Lester J. 

L.U. NO. 74 
CHATTANOOGA, 

TENN. 
DeFur, Fred L. 
Painter, C. B. 

38 



Prince, H. C. 
Redmon, F. D. 
Rye, C. G. 
Wade, Marvin D. 

L.U. NO. 81 
ERIE, PA. 

Boring, Arthur 
Kuehner, Harold 
Milligan, Arthur 
Pack^ Alan 
Uhlman, Fred 

L.U. NO. 87 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Agnew, Howard 
Kammueller, August 
Livingston, Walter 
Monson, Swan 
Piatt, Jack 
Taylor, Lawrence 

L.ll. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Abel, W. Edward 
Hylla,Emil 

L.U. NO. 117 
ALBANY, N.Y. 

Bell, William T, 
Caringi, Vincent 
Foster, Stanley 
King, John B. 
Luther, Melvin 
Miller, Frank J. 
Miller, Maurice M. 
Russell, Richard L. 
White, Allen C. 

L.U. NO. 121 
VINELAND, N.J. 

Letts, Newton, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Appel, Edgar J. 
England, J. H. 
Franzen, Martin 
Hall, William H. 
Lloyd, William A. 
Ward, Richard 
Watts. Brose A. 

L.U. NO. 133 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

Householder, Clarence 
Rhoads, Paul V. 

L.U. NO. 144 
MACON, GA. 

Johnson. J. D. 
Killibrew, E. L. 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Randolph, Francis 

L.U. NO. 198 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Cowan, N. C. 
Millican, W. F. 
VVrigge,Will 

L.l'. NO. 201 
WICHITA, KANS. 

Barger, John H. 
Burkhead, Kenneth 



L.U. NO. 218 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Cameron, Hugh 
Listorti, Michael 
Maloney, James 
NichoU, James 
Pignatelli. Alfred 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Bannister, L. V. 
Bliss, John R. 
Brugger, J. L. 
Hazeltine, Arthur F. 
Kerwood, Clarence F. 
Pearson, Erick R. 
Timmons, O. C. 
Weeks, Harold A. 

L.U. NO. 235 
RIVERSIDE, CALIF. 

Westerman, Clemence 

L.U. NO. 246 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Stocth, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 264 
MILWAl'KEE, WIS. 

Bognar, John 
DeGrand, Frank 
Petit, Adrian 
Scherr, Edwin 
Stall. Frank 
Zivicki, Clemens 

L.U. NO. 278 
WATERTOWN. N.Y. 

Havas, Stephen J, 

L.U. NO. 281 
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. 

Dolan, Raymond 

L.ll. NO. 302 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

Arthur, Harvey 

L.U. NO. 314 
MADISON, WIS. 

Anderson. Howard 
Bcuthin, Fred 
Endres, Roman J. 
Manning, Carl A. 

L.U. NO. 340 
HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

Martin, Robert F. 
Vcrdier, Robert A. 

L.U. NO. 359 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Shedaker, Charles T. 

L.U. NO. 414 
NANTICOKE, PA. 

Gibale, Carl 

L.U. NO. 453 
AUBURN, N.Y. 

Kaufman, Louis 

L.U. NO. 514 
WH.KES-BARRE, PA. 

Chipin, Fletcher 
Gluchowski, Anthony 
John, Edwin 



L.U. NO. 531 

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

Higdon, James 
Joost, Karl 
Paterson, Harry 

L.U. NO. 579 

ST. JOHNS, NFLD. 

St. Croix. William 

L.U. NO. 672 
CLINTON, IOWA 

Archibald, Gilbert 

L.U. NO. 678 
DUBUQUE. IOWA 

Scheele, Wilhelm 

L.U. NO. 710 

LONG BEACH, CALIF. 

Baldwin, Donald B. 
Bill, Charles N. 
Bjorn, Emil, Jr. 
Couey, Jack C. 
Jackley, Robert 
Steinkamp, Henry 

L.U. NO. 742 
DECATUR, ILL. 

Munjoy, Kenneth G. 

L.U. NO. 751 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

Minesscn, George 

L.ll. NO. 783 

SIOUX FALLS, S. DAK. 

Huhn. Henry 

L.U. NO. 787 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Hansen, Hagerman 

L.U. NO. 833 
BERWYN, PA. 

Croll, William C. 
Elvin, Robert 

L.U. NO. 844 
RESEDA, CALIF. 

Bitts. Golden S. 
Boldt, Jerome A. 
Brighton, J. R. 
Jacobson, John 
Kain, Randall L, 
Kampbell. George E. 

L.U. NO. 848 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 

Goldman, Jesse 
Petrini, Angelo 

L.U. NO. 893 

GRAND HAVEN, MICH 

Bemiss. Robert 
Lasby, Bruce 
Sullivan, James 
Westerhousc, Claude 

L.U. NO. 940 
SANDUSKY, OHIO 

Anderson, A. M. 
Schenk, Edward W. 

L.U. NO. 971 
RENO, NEV. 

Belz.Carl 
Brewer, Henry 
Lyons, Ernest 
McGowan, Ted G. 



L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

McClellan, Charles 

L.U. NO. 985 
GARY, IND. 

Frasurc, Ralph 
Grieve, William 
Hudson, Spencer 
Malizzo, Joe 
Price. James 
Williams, Scott 

L.U. NO. 1035 
TAUNTON, MASS. 

Bousquet, Joseph E., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1040 
EUREKA, CALIF. 

Muir, Mark 

L.U. NO. 1068 
VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Fijol. William 

L.U. NO. 1128 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Nelson, Gust 

L.U. NO. 1135 

PORT .lEFFERSON, N.Y. 

Joyce, Robert 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Pollmann, Eberhard 

L.U. NO. 1146 
GREEN BAY, WISC. 

Seefeldt, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1165 
WILMINGTON, N.C. 

Keyes. Thomas Freeman 

L.U. NO. 1182 
TUCSON, ARIZ. 

Barrett, Guy T. 
Cox, Bush K. 
Somerville, James 



L.U. NO. 1185 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Dawes. Arthur J. 
Gignac, Simon M. 

L.U. NO. 1209 
NEWARK. N.J. 

Berg, Oscar 
Gather, Ralph 
. Fradkin. Nathan 
Kradin. Morris 
Marshall. David 
Olsen, Gustave 
Rose, Herman 
Woloshin, Morris 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Kreitzer, John 

L.U. NO. 1373 
FLINT, MICH. 

Hornbacher. Charles 
Stack, Richard 
Sturgis, Charles 
Walczak, John 

THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 1408 
REDWOOD CITY, 
CALIF. 

Hemm, Otto 
Oliver, Thomas 
Power, Leland 
Van Der Staay, Ernst 

L.U. NO. 1503 
AMHURST, MASS. 

Tenney, Harry C. 

L.U. NO. 1518 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Youngblood, Ora 

L.U. NO. 1590 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Clime, Harry R. 
Fullerton, Gaylord L. 
Garner, Melvin C. 
Hobbs, Samuel M. 
West, Harrison K. 



Hamlin, Robert A. 
Kiser, Carl L. 
Overturf, A. Bert 
Porter, Elmer E. 

L.U. NO. 1849 
PASCO, WASH. 

Dresser, Charles O. 

L.U. NO. 1884 
LUBBOCK, TEXAS 

Erwin, H. E. 
Seymore, T. G. 

L.U. NO. 1922 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Harold 
Baer, John 

L.U. NO. 2022 
PERRYVILLE, MO. 

Welker, Bernard J. 



L.U. NO. 1784 




L.U. NO. 2046 


CHICAGO, ILL. 




MARTINEZ, CALIF. 


Castrellon, John R. 




Zermeno, Michael 


Nickolaus, Anton 






Szymanski, Mike F. 




L.U. NO. 2056 


L.U. NO. 1797 




CLEARLAKE PARK 
CALIF. 


RENTON, WASH. 

Carpenter, W. Keith 




Bauzik, Mike J. 


Checchi, Silvio 
Damron, Dannie L 
Ehlers, Mansel H. 




L.U. NO. 2114 
NAPA, CALIF. 


Halverson, Carl L. 




Knowlton, Robert 


■-SBESlil) 


a^^H 





3 easy \^ays to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes V4" 
to yis", $.90 each. Vs" to 1", $1.00 each. I'/a" 
to 1'/;", $1.50 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, Va" to 
3". Only $5.70. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, %" to 1%". Only $5.00. 

3. Ir^in 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
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L.U. NO. 2170 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Batiste, Urbie 
Bingham, Samuel 
Carlson, N. A. 
Gloyd, Washington 
Headley, James 
James, Mance J. 
Johnson, Lelburn 
Mason, William T. 
Nardinelh, Adolph 
Nelson, Paul M. 
Newby, H. L. 
Rowett, John T. 
Scribner, Clifford 
Shepley, C. B. 
Sherman, E. E. 
Whitsitt, H. M. 
Woodward, Frank 

L.U. NO. 2235 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Sheets, Gaylord 

L.U. NO. 2250 
RED BANK, N.J. 

Albarelli, Ascenzio 
Carlson, Emil 
Gant, Robert 
Gant, Zach 
Johnson, Charles 
Lachenauer, Wallace 
Tanava, Ferdinand 
Thorne. Harold 
Ward, Alexander 

L.U. NO. 2274 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Zinkan, William 

L.U. NO. 2411 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Pittman, Donald L. 

L.U. NO. 2455 
CRESCENT CITY, 
CALIF. 

Rodker, Jack 

L.U. NO. 2523 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Hoyle, Frank Jr. 
James, Sam 

L.U. NO. 2794 
MATTOON, WIS. 

Marten, Edwin 
Wolf, Emil 




INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Arco Publishing Co 39 

Audel, Theodore 15 

Belsaw Power Tools 35 

Belsaw Sharp-All Co 33 

Chevy Trucks 17 

Chicago Technical College ... 15 

Estwing Manufacturing 26 

Foley Manufacturing 37 

Garlinghouse, Inc 31 

Hydrolevel 15 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 39 

Lee, H. D 33 

Locksmithing Institute 35 

North American School of 

Drafting 19 

North American School of 

Surveying 22 

Schaefer Manufacturing Co. . . 22 
Stanley Power Tools . . Back Cover 

Vaughan & Bushnell Mfg. Co. 24 



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39 




in conclusion 



M. A. Hutcheson, Genera/ President 




My Final Installment: 

With Malice Toward None, Best Wishes To All 



■ This month this column actually lives up 
to its name. As announced elsewhere in this is- 
sue. I am retiring as of March 1, 1972. This 
means that this column really is "in conclusion." 

I have been a part of the United Brotherhood 
for a great many years. I have seen it weather 
many difficult periods, and I hope that I have con- 
tributed something to the successes which our 
Brotherhood has achieved over the past half a 
century. 

I know that members who joined our organiza- 
tion in the past few years are not too excited about 
the battles that went on 40 or 50 years ago. How- 
ever, the past struggles are a part of our heritage 
and as such they should not be totally ignored. 

History seemingly has a way of repeating itself. 
In the 58 years I have been a part of our Brother- 
hood, tremendous changes for the better have oc- 
cured. 

When I was starting out. the son or daughter 
of a carpenter who got to college was a rarity 
indeed. Today, thousands upon thousands of 
members' children are making fine records in 
universities all over the United States and Canada. 

At the start of my career there were no such 
things as negotiated pensions. Social Security, un- 
employment insurance, group health insurance, 
or any of the other protections which make for 
better and more secure lives for working people. 

In all the many struggles that took place in 
the legislative halls and at the bargaining table 
to secure these measures, the United Brotherhood 
played a vital role. It affords me considerable 
satisfaction to know that I had some small part 
in these achievements. 

However, the real heroes in the endless struggle 



to bring about better, happier and more secure 
conditions for working people are the thousands 
upon thousands of dedicated Brotherhood mem- 
bers and hundreds upon hundreds of hardworking 
Local Union and Council officers. 

Day by day, they have been on the firing line, 
and they have fought the good fight in good times 
and bad. The cooperation they have given me 
and the General Office over the years constitutes 
the bricks and mortar of the foundation upon 
which our Brotherhood rests. 

Since this constitutes my last column. I want 
to express my deepest gratitude to everybody con- 
cerned for that cooperation. Without the help 
and responsiveness of our subordinate bodies and 
the officers who head them, very little could have 
been accomplished. 

I particularly want to express my thanks to the 
members of the General Executive Board for their 
loyalty and dedication. All of them are sincere 
and capable men. It has been a pleasure and a 
privilege to serve on the same team with them. 

Now it is time to say adieu. If I had my life 
to live over I would not change a minute of it. 
The half century I have spent serving our great 
Brotherhood is filled with wonderful memories 
as well as great satisfactions. 

Not the least of the satisfactions is knowing 
that the Brotherhood remains in capable, ex- 
perienced hands. The Resident Officers and Board 
Members merit your fullest confidence. They are 
seasoned as well as dedicated, and that makes an 
unbeatable combination. 

As I now pass on into retirement. I say good- 
bye with malice toward none and best wishes 
to all. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



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Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA. FOUNDED 1881 




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CHANGING OF THE GUARD 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



"fl 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington. D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, William Konyha 

2830 Copley Rd., Box 8175 
Akron, Ohio 44320 
Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 
101 Marietta St., Suite 913 
Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

6323 N.W., Grand Blvd. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 

4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the Genera! Secretary. 



( 



Secretaries, Please Note 



If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington. D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



THE 



(§/A\[S[? 




VOLUME XCII 



No. 3 



MARCH, 1972 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

William Sidell, Portrait of a Busy Carpenter 2 

Building Trades Move to Counter Nixon, Non-Union Threats 4 

First International Wall and Ceiling Agreement 6 

Reciprocal Pension Plan Agreements 9 

Pay Board, CISC Policies on Construction Wages 10 

International Agreements 10 

Songs by Peter Terzick 11 

People with Ideas 12 

Labor's Assessment Was Correct 40 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 8 

Local Union News 14 

Service to the Brotherhood 15, 16, 19, 25, 28, 29, 33, 34 

Plane Gossip 18 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 22 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 26 

Apprenticeship and Training 30 

Your Union Dictionary 32 

What's New? 35 

In Memoriam 36 

Lakeland News 39 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Foim 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Islsnd Ave., N.E., Weshington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Caioenters and Joiners O"' America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20« in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

The Changing of the Guard: The 
veteran leader of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America, M. A. Hutcheson, seated at 
left on our cover, retired March 1 as 
General President after two decades 
of service in the Brotherhood's top 
post. He is succeeded by the man at 
right, the hard-working First General 
Vice President, William Sidell. 

General President Sidell comes well 
prepared for the biggest job in the 
Brotherhood. A story about him starts 
on the ne,\t page. 

As provided by the last General 
Convention, Brother Hutcheson has 
been granted the title General Presi- 
dent Emeritus and continues as an 
EX officio member of the General Ex- 
ecutive Board. He declined to accept 
full salary for such service. He told 
the GEB: "I am only accepting the 
regular pension which I have earned 
in the same manner and under the 
same terms as all other retired officers 
and representatives." 



PLEASE NOTE: Readers who wish 
a copy of the cover, unmarred by a 
nuiiling label, and suitable for framing 
or display, may obtain one by writing 
the magazine, using the Brotlierhood 
address shown at lower left. The me- 
chanical requirements of our printer 
and the needs of our baclc-cover adver- 
tiser force us to place tlie label in the 
lower left corner of the cover. 





TVdiCdm SidM 



. . PORTRAIT OF A BUS 



■ In a way, William Sidell 
helps to build an organization the 
way a carpenter helps to build a 
house. 

He's on the job early. He's usu- 
ally behind his desk on the fourth 
floor of the General Offices in 
Washington before 7:30 a.m. 

Instead of blueprints, he has 
spread out before him the latest 
findings of the Pay Board, a sum- 
mary of apprenticeship training 
programs in various parts of the 
country, actuarial tables on pen- 
sion plans. 

His tools are a steadily ringing 
telephone, the International Con- 
stitution, a sharp pencil, and 
plenty of facts on file. His helpers 
are a busy office staff. 

Like an experienced journey- 
man — a man for all seasons — Bill 
Sidell never "loses his cool." 
though he shoulders a work load 
as heavy as any man in the Broth- 
erhood. 

On March 1 he became Gen- 
eral President of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, moving up, under 
constitutional provision, to re- 
place Maurice A. Hutcheson in 
the top office. 

Sidell changed to his new post 
with ease. He has worked closely 



with President Emeritus Hutche- 
son since he moved to the Broth- 
erhood headquarters from Cali- 
fornia in 1 964 to become Second 
General Vice President. In addi- 
tion to the assigned tasks of a 
General Vice President, President 
Sidell took on many jurisdictional 
problems. In his quiet but effec- 
tive way, he was instrumental in 
negotiating several industry- 
Brotherhood agreements. 

A sturdy, affable person, com- 
petitive by nature. Bill Sidell was 
a high school football player and 
track man in Southern California. 
He maintains a steady work pace 
all day. At the present time, the 
problems brought on by the wage- 
price freeze keep him busy ap- 
proximately two days each week 
as he serves on the Construction 
Industry Wage Stabilization Com- 
mittee. Speaking engagements 
take him to many parts of North 
America each month. 

He was elected to the General 
Executive Board from the Eighth 
District in 1962 at the 29th Gen- 
eral Convention of the Brother- 
hood, held in Washington, D.C. 

He had a distinguished career 
in the labor movement of Califor- 
nia before becoming a member 
of the General Executive Board. 



THE CARPENTER 




He served as secretary-treasurer 
of the 55,000 member Los An- 
geles District Council and held a 
number of important posts in both 
the state federation and in vari- 
ous civic bodies. 

He is a member of Local 721, 
Los Angeles, with over 30 years 
of membership. Immediately upon 
beginning his apprenticeship. Bill 
showed keen interest in the affairs 
of his local union and was soon 
elected an officer and continued 
to serve in local union positions 
prior to his elevation within the 
district council in 1957. 

He assumed his previous offices 
well grounded in all phases of 
Brotherhood activities, and as 
First General Vice President took 
on the responsibility for appren- 
ticeship and training, fields in 
which he has a deep interest. 

President Sidell is well known 
in the labor movement for his 
work on jurisdictional dispute 
panels. He was a member of the 
Jurisdictional Appeals Board. 

Now living in suburban Mary- 
land with his lovely wife, Frankie, 
the Brotherhood president is a 
father of three and grandfather 
of 5. He is a most worthy succes- 
sor to President Hutcheson and a 
man well suited to the traditions 
of the craft. ■ 



ABOVE: Bill Sidell 
addressing a gen- 
eral convention of 
the Brotherhood 
from a floor micro- 
phone. 

RIGHT: The 
General President, 
second from 
left, participating 
in a session of the 
Construction 
Industry Wage 
Stabilization 
Committee. 




ABOVE: At the 
far end of a busy 
table, Sidell chairs 
a meeting of the 
International Ap- 
prenticeship and 
Training Committee. 



RIGHT: General 
President Sidell is 
interviewed on a 
television "talk 
show" in Detroit. 




MARCH, 1972 



Legislative Conference Called Off, 
General President Sidell to Council 



The Brotherhood's new General 
President. William Sidell. left, is 
sworn in as a member of the 
Executive Council of the AFL-CIO 
Building and Construction 
Trades Department, during that 
organization's recent winter meet- 
ing in Florida. He replaces 
retiring General President M. A. 
Hutcheson. Swearing in Sidell 
is Building Trades President Frank 
Bonadio. In the background arc 
Electrical Workers President 
Charles Pillard and Building 
Trades Secretary-Treasurer Robert 
A. Georgine. 




Building Trades Move to Counter 
Nixon. Non-Union Labor Threats 



■ RestRicturing of the AFL-CIO 
Building and Construction Trades 
department to give it greater effective- 
ness in a two-pronged fight against the 
anti-labor moves of the Nixon Ad- 
ministration and the in-roads of non- 
union labor in the industry is now in 
progress. 

Deeply concerned by these two new 
factors in the relationship of labor and 
management in the industry, the Ex- 
ecutive Council of the Department, 
meeting in Florida, is considering a 
number of steps to restructure the De- 
partment "to meet the new challenges 
and opportunities of this period." 

Among the new challenges presently 
facing the building and construction 
unions has been the Nixon Adminis- 
tration efforts to weaken the protec- 
tions of the Davis-Bacon Act and to 
set up apprenticeship quotas and goals 
causing problems to the industry. 

A second challenge is the growth of 
non-union contracting, which has 
caused hundreds of millions of dollars 
in lost work for union building and 
construction trades members. The 
meetings of the Executive Council 
have therefore, been concerned with 
discussions on productivity, hours and 



By ALEXANDER UHL 

working conditions as well as greater 
efficiency on the part of contractors 
to make union labor more competitive 
with non-union labor. 

One of the major decisions already 
taken by the Executive Council here 
is to call off the Department's national 
legislative conference this year. Sus- 
pension of the four-day session which 
brings to Washington. D.C. nearly 
4,000 delegates from throughout the 
U.S., "is part of a sweeping reorgani- 
zation of the three million-member 
Department that was authorized at 
the 56th biennial convention last 
December." 

"We are taking entirely new ap- 
proaches to a number of situations," 
BCTD President Frank Bonadio said. 
"The Department has conducted a na- 
tional legislative conference 16 times 
in the last two decades. We have been 
addressed by Presidents of the United 
States, the top leaders and members 
of both parties of the U.S. Senate and 
House of Representatives, cabinet 
members, the president of the AFL- 
CIO, heads of dcoartments and divi- 
sions of the AFL-CIO governors, 
mayors, officials of governmental 
boards and agencies and outstanding 



representatives of the construction in- 
dustry. Our delegates have visited with 
the Senators and Congressmen from 
their states on Capitol Hill." 

"These conferences have been gen- 
erally highly successful." Bonadio con- 
tinued, "but the Executive Council 
feels that the time now has come to 
consider a change in the format, just 
as we are restructuring a number of 
other activities to meet the new chal- 
lenges and opportunities of this period. 
It. therefore, seemed practical not to 
proceed with the legislative conference 
at this time.'' 

Bonadio said that this decision was 
unanimous. 

Members of the Council include 
Bonadio and Secretary-Treasurer Rob- 
ert A. Georgine. Others are General 
presidents M. A. Hucheson of the 
Carpenters, Peter Fosco of the La- 
borers, John A. Lyons of the Iron- 
workers. Hunter P. Wharton of the 
Operating Engineers, Thomas F. Mur- 
phy of the Bricklayers (absent because 
of illness), S. Frank Raftery of the 
Painters. Charles H. Pillard of the 
IBEW. Joseph T. Power of the 
Plasterers. Harold J. Buoy of the 
Boilermakers, and Martin J. Ward of 
the Pkmibers and Pipefitters. (PAD ■ 



THE CARPENTER 



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First International Agreement 
With Wall and Ceiling Contractors 

PACT EXPECTED TO EASE DRYWALL-PLASTERING JURISDICTIONAL TENSIONS 



B The first international 
agreement between the United 
Brotherhood and the Interna- 
tional Association of Wall and 
Ceiling Contractors was signed 
during the recent lAWCC con- 
vention in Denver, Colo. 

The agreement is the result of 
actions taken by the General Of- 
fice in Washington. D.C., to ease 
the traditional tensions which 
have existed between the plaster- 
ing and drywall industries. 

President Emeritus M. A. Hut- 
cheson, in a memorandum to all 
construction locals, and district, 
state, and provincial councils, last 
December, pointed out that, while 
the agreement basically concerns 
drywall and acoustical installa- 
tions, it also concerns various 
forms of plaster finishes, "as had 
been their traditional back- 




Nfw Brotherhood President William 
Sidell, right, was a speaker at the 
recent convention of the International 
Assn. of Wall and Ceiling Contractors, 
where the agreement was consummated. 
Shown with him on the speakers' dais are 
Harry Martin, executive assistant to the 
President of the International Brother- 
hood of Painters and Allied Trades, and 
Dale Witcraft, director of labor relations 
for the Associated General Contractors. 




Participating in the signing of the first national agreement with the lAWCC were, 
from left: William J. Anderson and Frank .1. Krafft of lAWCC; Brotherhood Presi- 
dent William Sidell; J. Munroc. . McNulty, former president of lAW'CC; John Rogers 
special assistant to the Brotherhood's General President; General Executive Board 
Member Patrick Campbell; and Donald Chambers of lAWCC. 



ground." The agreement provides 
for recognition of the Brother- 
hood's jurisdiction, the continued 
training of skilled journeymen to 
perform the work, and provision 
for the settlement of disputes 
which may arise between contrac- 
tor members of the lAWCC and 
Brotherhood affiliates. 

The memorandum from the 
General Office further stated: 
While this agreement does not de- 
tail the jurisdiction of the United 
Brotherhood as contained in the 
Carpenter-Dry wall Specialties 
Agreement, it is recognition that 
Brotherhood members perform 
the majority of work assignments 
for these employers. Your contin- 
ued cooperation and efforts will, 
we believe, in the long run, hasten 
the time when there will be no 
jurisdictional conflict concerning 
that work covered by the status 
quo agreement, which is and shall 
remain in full force and effect 
between the United Brotherhood 



and the Lathers International Un- 
ion until you are otherwise ad- 
vised. . . ."' 

The agreement with lAWCC, 
which was formerly known as the 
Contracting Plasterers and Lath- 
ers International Assn., provides 
for the establishment of a national 
Carpenter-IAWCC Committee, 
comprised of four persons repre- 
senting the United Brotherhood 
and four representing the Associ- 
ation for the purpose of meeting 
periodically to implement the 
agreement. 

Signing the agreement for the 
Brotherhood was General Presi- 
dent Hutcheson and for the 
lAWCC were outgoing lAWCC 
President Munroe McNulty and 
Secretary Frank J. Krafft. Rep- 
re.senting the Brotherhood during 
the negotiations were William 
Sidell, new General President of 
the Brotherhood, and John Rog- 
ers, special assistant to the Gen- 
eral President. ■ 



THE C ARPENTER 




Mizmioi^e 





.»...« »<vjjaj^j^,^_^^ ^ 






Thunk. 



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No other tape has it. 

Which isn't surprising, 
since we've been in the 



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century. And in all those years 
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button. 



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CRESCENT- KEN-TOOt- lUFWN • WEUER 





j^j^^e^fm^iti 



TON ROUNDUP 



LUNA TO STIRLING HOMEX — Charles Luna, President-emeritus of the United Trans- 
portation Union, has joined Stirling Homex Corp., the Nation's largest modular 
housing manufacturer, as vice president and Director of Transportation. 

Company officials, who announced Luna's affiliation with the firm at a 
luncheon, said he will be hased at the firm's Washington office and will be 
responsible for direction and coordination of transportation matters. 

NLRB GOES PART WAY — The National Labor Relations Board, which is struggling with 
the problem of how to really hurt a stubbornly anti-union employer who defies 
the National Labor Relations Act, has taken an important step forward but has 
refused to come through with a really basic penalty. 

The Board has imposed serious sanctions on an anti-union company such as 
requiring it to meet the costs of litigation brought on by its "frivolous" conduct, 
but has rejected the plea that it be made to pay its workers what they would have 
gained had a contract been negotiated. 

CANDIDATES MUST WAIT — The official position of the AFL-CIO, that it "does not 
support or oppose any candidate in the 19 72 Presidential election," has been 
spelled out by AFL-CIO President George Meany. 

"Endorsements of Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates," Meany said, 
"are, under our traditional practice, a matter for decision for the General Board 
which meets for such purposes after major parties have chosen their candidates. 
The decision of the General Board is always official and publicly announced." 

He added that "until this decision, the political activities of the AFL-CIO 
will include a vigorous pursuit of our registration campaign, a major drive to 
inform union members about the issues and the voting performances of public 
officials and plans for a massive get-out -the-vote drive on Election Day." 

YEAR-END JOBLESS? — President Nixon's Budget Message held out little hope for a 
significant drop in unemployment this year despite rosy forecasts of what's ahead. 
His Council of Economic Advisers now reports that a five percent jobless rate — or 
more than four million unemployed — can be expected by the end of 1972. 

The report is optimistic that the national economy will advance, that wages 
and prices will be held down and that jobs will be created as a result of Nixon, 
measures, but it is hedged all over by numerous "if's". 

CREDIBILITY GAP — President Nixon's track record as an economic forecaster is not the 
best. It's not only true on unemployment but on cost-of-living as well as the 
Federal Budget. 

In January 1970, he predicted a $1.5 billion surplus in fiscal 1971 that 
turned out to be a $23 billion deficit. Last January he forecasted an $11.6 
billion deficit for fiscal 1972 that is proved to be a $38.8 billion in the red. 

SAVED PUBLIC TRANSIT — Representative Robert N. Giaimo (D-Conn.) has been honored as 
"the man who saved Metro" by the Washington, D.C. Central Labor Council. Giaimo 
bucked House leaders to free funds for a public transit system at a critical 
point. 

SANCTIONS ON LABORERS — AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany has notified all affiliates that 
the Laborers' International Union of North America has been found to be in non- 
compliance with the decision of an impartial umpire under the AFL-CIO 's internal 
disputes procedures and is therefore subject to sanctions under the federation's 
constitution. 

In addition to the Laborers, the following unions are currently in non- 
compliance with an impartial umpire's decision: the Air Line Pilots Association, 
National Maritime Union, International Typographical Union and International 
Printing Pressmen. 

8 THE CARPENTER 




Pension Plans in 17 States Have Signed Pro Rata Agreements to Date 



Since the Pro Rata Pension 
Agreement was made available last 
summer, an increasing number of 
Brotherhood pension plans have 
signed the reciprocal agreement. The 
pension plans which have already 
extended to its Brotherhood mem- 
bers the advantages of participation 
in a reciprocal agreement with all 
other participating pension plans are 
listed below: 

ARKANSAS 

Carpenters Pension Fund of Arkansas 

504 Victory Street 

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 

CALIFORNIA 

Carpenters Pension Trust for Soutliern 

California 
520 South Virgil Avenue 
Los Angeles. California 90020 

COLORADO 

Centennial State Carpenters Pension 

Trust Fund 
333 Logan Street 
Denver. Colorado. 80203 

CONNECTICUT 

Connecticut State Council of Carpenters 
State-Wide Pension Plan 
860 Silas Deane Highway 
Wethersfield, Connecticut 06109 

FLORIDA 

Broward County Carpenters Pension 

Trust Fund 
Florida Administrators, Inc. 
1000 Ponce De Leon Blvd. 
Coral Gables, Florida 33134 

South Florida Carpenters Pension 

Trust Fund 
Florida Administrators, Inc. 
1000 Ponce De Leon Blvd. 
P.O. Box 220 
Coral Gables. Florida 33134 



ILLINOIS 

Chicago District Council of Carpenters 

Pension Fund 
12 East Erie Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 

KANSAS 

Kansas Construction Trades Open End 

Pension Trust Fund 
c/o Fringe Benefit Funds 
202 West Thirty-third Street 
P.O. Box 5096 
Topeka, Kansas 66605 

MARYLAND 

Cumberland, Maryland and Vicinity 
Building and Construction Employees' 
Trust Fund 

125 South Liberty Street 

Cumberland, Maryland 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Massachusetts State 

Carpenters Pension Fund 

1 Militia Drive 

Lexington, Massachusetts 02173 

Western Massachusetts Carpenters 

Pension Fund 
26 Willow Street — Room 24 
Springfield, Massachusetts 01103 

NEW MEXICO 

New Mexico District Council of 

Carpenters Pension Fund 
5301 Central Avenue N.E. 
Suite 1618 First National Bank 

Bldg.— East 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 

NEW YORK 

New York City District Council 
Carpenters Pension Fund 
204-8 East Twenty-third Street 
New York, New York lOOIO 

Westchester County, New York 
Carpenters' Pension Fund 
Box 5, North Station 
White Plains, New York 10603 



OHIO 

Ohio Valley Carpenters 

District Council Benefit Funds 

c/o Pension and Group Consultants, Inc., 

Administrator 
Room 902—6 East Fourth Street 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 

Miami Valley Carpenters' District 
Council Health and Welfare Fund 
Far Oaks Building 
2801 Far Hills Avenue 
Dayton, Ohio 45419 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Carpenters' Pension Fund of Western 

Pennsylvania 
One Allegheny Square — Suite 310 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 

RHODE ISLAND 

Rhode Island Carpenters Pension Fund 
945 Eddy Street 
Providence, Rhode Island 

TENNESSEE 

Tri State Carpenters and loiners District 
Council of Chattanooga, Tennessee 
and Vicinity Pension Trust Fund 

P.O. Box 6035 

Chattanooga. Tennessee 37401 

WASHINGTON 

Millmen's Retirement Trust of 

Washington 
c/o Local Union 338 
2512 Second Avenue — Room 206 
Seattle, Washington 98121 

Washington-Idaho-Montana Carpenters- 
Employers Retirement Trust Fund 
East 123 Indiana— P.O. Box 5434 
Spokane. Washington 99205 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Chemical Valley Pension Fund of 

West Virginia 
Raymond Hage and Company, Inc. 
Employee Benefit Plan Consultants 
1050 Fifth Avenue 
Huntington, West Virginia 25701 



MARCH, 1972 




Join cue 
This Month! 



The 1972 iiienibership campaign 
of the Carpenters Legislative Im- 
provement Committee is now un- 
derway. Each year you are called 
upon to renew your support of 
the Brotherhood's vital legislative 
and political programs. Oon't let 
this year be an exception. Your 
membership contribution fights 
your causes for you in the na- 
tion's capital every day of the year. 
Join CLIC today. . . . 

.... And once you join, wear 
your CLIC lapel emblem proudly. 
(It's shown above and below in 
mammoth enlargement ... so 
you'll remember.) 



A-\ 




197- 



Pay Board, CISC Announce New 
Policies on Construction Wages 



■The Pay Board and the Construc- 
tion Industry Stabilization Committee 
have jointly announced the adoption 
of pohcies under which the Committee 
will carry out its wage stabilization 
responsibilities. 

The tripartite construction commit- 
tee, established by President Nixon 
nearly a year before his establishment 
of overall wage-price controls, will ad- 
minister Pay Board regulations "to the 
extent applicable with respect to col- 
lective bargaining agreements in the 
construction industry." 

Asked to define what this means. 
Board sources said the Committee will 
seek to apply the pay panel's guideline 
limiting new wage increases to 5.5 
percent a year. However, it also 



pointed out that the Committee is "not 
fixed" to the guidelines and retains 
almost complete autonomy in admin- 
istering collective bargaining settle- 
ments in the building industry. 

The policies also provide for the 
establishment of liaison groups repre- 
senting the Board and the Committee 
to consult with each other regularly 
and coordinate activities and proce- 
dures as far as possible. 

The Committee will refer to the 
Pay Board any request for legal action 
by the Justice Department needed to 
enforce compliance with its standards 
and orders. Significant reports and 
public information releases of the 
Committee shall be subject to review 
by the Board. (PAI) ■ 



INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS 



The following are additions and 
deletions to the last published list of 
firms holding International Agree- 
ments with the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters & Joiners of America 
which was dated August 10. 1971: 

ADDITIONS, as of February 11. 1972: 
Baumgartner Fixture Co., Billings. 

Montana 
Bane-Nelson Inc., Kenosha, Wisconsin 
Bigge Crane & Rigging Co. (Div. of Big- 

ge Drayage Co.), San Leandro, Calif. 
Boldt Construction Co., Oscar J., Ap- 

pleton. Wise. 
Brand Structures Inc., Chicago, 111. 
Brightmor Erectors Inc., Jefferson City, 

Mo. 
Can Lines Inc., Downey, Calif. 
Canton Floors Inc., Canton, Ohio 
Chicago Reinforcing Bar Fabricating 

(Div. of Bethlehem Steel Corp.), 

Chicago, III. 
C I Engineers & Constructors Inc., La- 

Mirada, Calif. 
Compass Floors Inc., Scotlsdale, Ariz. 
Diamond Steel Construction Co., Youngs- 
town, Ohio 
Drake Construction Co., Lyndhur.st, Ohio 
Elster's (Div. of Hyatt Corp.), Los An- 
geles, Calif. 
Filkill Inc., H. K.. Canton, Ohio 
Gaskell Co. Inc., Memphis, Tenn. 
Glass Co. Inc., James A., Chelmsford, 

Mass. 
Gold Circle Discount Stores. Worthing- 

ton, Ohio 
Hoffman Contractors Co., Portland Oreg. 
International Installations Inc. {subsidiary 

of McNally Bros. Inc.), New York, 

N.Y. 
James Howden & Parsons of Canada 

Ltd., Scarborough, Ontario 



Langford Installation Co., Clarksville, 

Tenn. 
Louverdrape Installation Service Inc., 

Santa Monica, Calif. 
Mahon Industrial Corp., Roseville, Mich. 
Melbourne Brothers Construction Co., 

North Canton, Ohio 
MHE Contracting Inc., Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 
National Door Corp., Waltham, Mass. 
Power Generation Service (Div. of West- 

inghouse Electric Corp.), Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Ross Company & Ltd., A. D., Montreal, 

Quebec 
Scott Inc., Robert, West Roxbury, Mass. 
Silva Store Fixture Co.. Los Angeles. 

Calif. 
Stout Erection & Engineering Co. Inc., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Superior Fireproof Door & Sash Co. 

Inc., Scranton, Pa. 
Taylor Industrial Corp., Las Vegas, Nev. 
Thompson Construction Co. Inc., W. L., 

Alton, 111. 
Towne Construction Co., Canton, Ohio 
Tri-City Electric Co. of Illinois, Chicago, 

111. 
Vermont Construction Inc., Laval, Que- 
bec 
Vermont Construction Inc. (Canadian), 

Laval, Quebec 
Vogt and Conant Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
Walden Book Co. Inc., Stamford, Conn. 
Young Industries Inc., So. Windsor, 

Conn. 

DELETIONS: 

Christopher Construction Co., Columbus, 

Ohio 
Construction Systems Inc., Des Moines, 

Iowa (effective 5/1/72) 
Speaker & Associates Inc., Detroit, Mich. 
Westwood Structures Inc., Portland, Oreg. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




Editor Turns Songwriter 

One of the many talents of The Carpenters editor, 
Peter Terzick, is songwriting. Some of his hymns appear 
in Lutheran hymnals. His ballads and parodies were sung 
during his college days in the Pacific Northwest. Since 
his retirement as General Treasurer of the Brotherhood, 
last year, he has returned to this avocation in his spare 
time. Three of his songs, shown here, were sung by labor 
balladeer Joe Glazer, above, at the recent convention of 
the International Labor Press Assn. Brother Terzick is a 
former president of the ILPA. 



THE BLOWING SAND 

Tke fences are doy.n,thejeW. run dry, 

It hasn't rained since last July, 
The wheat is lost, the corn, s dead. 

The barn is sagging overhead 

The kid^ are gone, they left this land 

I'o'^eZ Maw and the blowing sand. 

The cows are all sold, so we could jay 
All the bills we ran up, for their hay 

i;tfi:^^a^a:dtj::;:td. 

When Grandpa bought tHis pne of sand, 

ll' Zand Maw and the blowing sand. 

We fought the drought and hail and blight 
I: worled all day and half rhe JgR 
n„t nil these years, the good Lord knows 
Thefropsodown, the mortgage grows; 
And Z'^at's left of what was grand 

Ismeand Maw and the blowing sand. 



f'^^^t;::::^ praise 

r '^ ]ail. 

r '^°'t at ri, 

i '°°k Cat ^^^''^e 

^'^'^^^ ^ eoZj:° 'ou,, 
^ ^^ore at I 

P^ ^'oJ/;i^-d faiil 

S at y^alls, 
T^ '""■^'^ is a 

^ ^^'^'hl'l'^' - 4e to ^y 

■^ I' !%'■:•' '"ZiT'- ■■>''''' 
'"^-^". /*''*"-"»»■. 

l°"-*^«., "'° *-«-«•. 



t 






People W^ith Ideas 



HEAVYWEIGHT CHALLENGER 



29 



Larry Middleton, with fist doubled at right above, is 
years old and weighs in at 205. He is a husky member of 
Carpenters Local 101. Baltimore, Md., and he is also ranked 
No. 9 among heavyweight boxers of the world. He recently 
beat the Commonwealth Champ of England, Joe Bugner, and 
finished otT club fighter, Tony Doyle in a 10-round decision 
in Baltimore. His record in the ring is 20-1-1. having 
fought in 22 professional fights. Fight Promoter Charles 
Wagner of Baltimore recently offered World Heavyweight 
Champ Joe Frazier a guaranteed quarter-niillion-dollar 
purse, if he'd meet Middleton in the ring in Baltimore. 
Meanwhile. Larry Middleton is a combination carpenter-boxer, 
waiting for the big event. 

The fellow at left in the picture, who lets his hair grow and 
dares you to make something out of it. is Josh Hall, 27, a 
middleweight fighter and also a member of Local 101. Two 
years ago, a Baltimore fighter, Julius Dickens, knocked Hall 
out in the first round. In July, 1971, Hall came back to 
knock Dickens fiat in the seventh round. His record is 18-4-12, 
his most recent win being a decision over Nick Peoples of 
Columbus, O., in a 10-rounder. 

Both men are trained and managed by Mack Lewis of 
Baltimore. 





. ti^ilMi QUARTER HORSEMAN 



Don Beckner of Local 428, Fairmont, W. Va., has a 
winner in Mark V. Bars, his registered quarter horse stallion 
which he sits astride in the accompanying picture. The 
horse recently won, for the second straight year, the 350-yard 
quarter horse race at the State Fair of West Virginia, and 
Dt)n plans still further glory for the spirited stallion. 

Beckner is also an avid hound dog fancier and coon hunter. 
His black and tan coon hound, Beckner's Timber Frank, and 
his Walker hound. Merchants Mt. Cindy, have taken trophies 
in recent competition. 



ALMOND, THE RUG MAKER 

Almond A. Hager of Keene, N.H., a past vice president 
of Local 48. Fitchburg, Mass., designs and makes hooked rugs 
about as well as he can handle tools of the carpentry craft. 
He stands beside one of his creations; a 4' x 4%' rug 
bearing the Brotherhood emblem. 

He wrote to the late First General Vice President Finlay 
Allan and obtained permission to adapt the Brotherhood 
emblem to a rug, and with information supplied by General 
Representative Richard Griffin, he produced a small supply 
of stamped burlap, by which the rug shown in the picture 
can be duplicated. (He tells us he can supply stamped burlap 
to a limited mmiber of members and /or their wives, if 
they'll write to him at 126 Armory St., Keene, N.H., 03431. 

Hager has been a member of the Brotherhood since 
1952, a representative of the Northern Massachusetts District 
Council for six years, a trustee for health and welfare for 
eight years, and a delegate to many Brotherhood and 
AFL-CIO state functions. Hooking rugs is only one of several 
Hager hobbies. 




12 



THE CARPENTER 




Bruce Lhiska of Local 1433. Detroit, used to do a lot of 
fishing in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, where he was born. 
He fished with plugs and he fished with feathered jigs, and he 
began to wonder if he could catch more fish by combining the 
plugs and the jigs. 

He began to experiment. He tried plugs and spoons with 
feathers in various combinations. Too many feathers and the 
lure action would boe down; not enoush feathers and the 



LURE OF THE FISHERMAN 



fish didn't seem to be interested. Models were carved out of 
cedar and pine, hand painted, feathers attached, until he 
finally hit upon the right combination . . . which he has pat- 
ented as his "Dolfinn." 

He's now marketing the Dolfinn in many color combinations 
for various types of fish. Priced at $2 each, they can be 
obtained by writing Liuska Lures, 650 E. Troy, Frendale, 
Michigan 48220. 



ANTIQUE CAR COLLECTOR 



njohn Greenland, of Boston, Mass., carries around pic- 
' tures of his antique cars, as some members carry 
4 I around pictures of their families. He's proud of his 1 1 
» ■ cars, ranging in age from 1909 to 1941, and justly so, 
I , for he's known far and wide for his special interest. 

If you saw the movie about the Sacco and Vanzetti 
^g[^ ,.«' ; Case, making the rounds of the movie houses recently, 

^^^k f fc^^^ the getaway car in that film is a 1923 Dodge Brothers 
^^^|k \ ^Hk touring car belonging to John Greenland.. He won a 

national award for his hobby at the Henry Ford Museum 
at Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. His cars have been exhibited 
at museums, and he has won a total of 37 trophies. 

He purchased his first vintage motor car in 1957 — the 1929 Ford town 
car shown in the accompanying photographs. It was in deplorable condition, 
and John spent 1 Vz years restoring it. 

He estimates he has approximately $50,000 worth of vintage motors now. 
Or. that is, he did until a fire last month burned his storage garage and 
every car and trophy in it. The story of the catastrophy was reported by the 
wire services. Arson is suspected. 

The fire almost caused Greenland to throw in. his polishing cloths in despair. 
There was no insurance to cover the damage, and Greenland figures he 
has a decade of work ahead of him just restoring the cars to what they were. 

But a host of friends, including young auto buffs in the neighborhood 
and fellow members of the Brotherhood, have offered to help. Greenland is 
director of the apprenticeship and training committee of the Boston Carpenters 
Apprenticeship and Training Fund, and a group of apprentices helped 
him clean up after the fire. 

Greenland joined Local 40 of Boston as an apprentice in 1953 and received 
his journeyman's certificate in 1957. He has been active in union affairs 
ever since. His apprentices are frequent contestants in the International 
Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest. 




1929 Buick Sport Coupe 




1929 Ford Taxi 



1929 OUIsmobile Touring Car 



1929 Ford Town Car 

1923 Dodge Touring Car 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Rotating Laser Beam is Latest Tool of Detroit Area Members 



A rotating laser beam on a tripod re- 
places the traditional water level and dry 
line to help assure faster, more accurate 
construction of suspended ceilings at the 
new Brandon District High School in 
Ortonville. Mich. The instriunent enables 
workmen to construct ceiling layouts sev- 
eral hundred feet long that are accurate 
to 1/16 of an inch, according the manu- 
facturer. The beam is intercepted by 
small tags called "targets." which are 
placed where ceiling grids are being in- 
stalled. The resulting blip of light on the 
target guides workmen in constructing 
the ceiling layouts. The new equipment, 
operated by Brotherhood members, 
comes from: Laser Alignment, Inc., 
6331-28th St., S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
49506. 




ABOVE: One of the target tags for the 
rotating laser beam is held by Richard 
Featherstone, owner of Waterford Con- 
struction Co., contractor for the school 
installation. Looking on are Walter 
VVilberg, Brandon School inspector, and 
Joseph Stout, project architect of O'Dell/ 
Hewlett & Luckenbach, Birmingham, 
Mich. Adjusting the laser beam at rear is 
Jerry Hansen of the Milbrand Company 
of Warren, Mich., ceiling contractors. 

The laser is sometimes attached to a 
fixed column and operated from there. 

Members of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America in 
the Detroit area are employed in the 
work. Completion of the $2.5 million 
high school is scheduled for early sum- 
mer, 1972. 




In addition to being used on a tripod, 
as shown in the picture at lower left, 
the rotating laser beam can be clamped 
to an inside column, carefully aligned 
vertically, and placed in operation, as 
shown above. The Laser Beacon System 
has been used for ceiling and interior sys- 
tems for almost two years. 

LA Building Trades 
Honor Neal Wagner 

On January 4, 1972. Neal Wagner 
of Local 769. Pasadena. Calif., ex- 
perienced one of the high points of 
his lifetime when he was presented with 
an award and gold plaque by James 
W. Hall, business representative of the 
Los Angeles Building and Construction 
Trades Council. 

This was the first time such an award 
has been presented to any business rep- 
resentative by the Los Angeles Building 
Trades and Construction Trades Council. 
The inscription reads: "To Neal Wag- 
ner, Carpenters Local No. 769. In ap- 
preciation of your years of untiring 
efforts to improve conditions for all con- 
struction workmen in the Pasadena area. 
We are bigger men 
for having known 
and worked with 
you." 

Wagner joined 
Local 769 in 1925, 
served as secretary- 
treasurer for 32 
years; he was 
elected business 
representative and 
served for 12 
years, retiring July, 
Wagner 197L 




Plaque For Member 
On Hospital Job 

A plaque presentation ceremony, spon- 
sored by the Central Indiana Building 
and Construction Trades Council, was 
conducted at Marion County General 
Hospital, Indianapolis, recently to honor 
the late Peter Anthony Morris, who died 
in 1965 from injuries sustained during 
construction of the hospital's Myers 
Building. 

Morris. 62, Monrovia resident and a 
member of Local 60, died at 1:25 a.m., 
Dec. 28. 1965. at General Hospital, 
where he had been admitted less than 
24 hours earlier with internal injuries 
incurred when he fell from a 5-story level 
while buttoning up a support column 
early in construction of the Myers Build- 
ing. The completed building was dedicated 
in 1968. 

Accepting the plaque, which is now 
mounted at the hospital, was the widow 
of the deceased carpenter. Participating 
in the tribute Bernard Landman, Jr., 
chairman of the board of trustees of the 
Health and Hospital Corporation: Mayor 
Richard G. Lugar, and Thomas C. Has- 
brook, president of the City-County 
Council. 




Participating in the plaque presentation 
ceremony were, from left, Richard G. 
Lugar, mayor of Indianapolis; Mrs. 
Morris, widow of the deceased; Edwin D. 
Brubeck, business representative for the 
Central Indiana Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Council; and Bernard Land- 
man, board chairman for the Health and 
Hospital Corporation of Marion County. 



14 



THE C ARPENTER 



Pin Presentations By Local Unions 




(1) DAYTON, OHIO— Ray Evans, 
financial secretary of Local 104, is siiown 
presenting a plaque to tlie oldest member 
of the local, Ira D. Allen, age 88. Sec- 
retary Evans stated, that his local pre- 
sents a plaque each year to the oldest 
active member. The words on the plaque 
are: "Presented to Ira D. Allen in 1970 — 
oldest active member of Carpenters Lo- 
cal 104, Dayton, Ohio." 

The local implemented this award in 
1966. Brother Frank Galloway received 
the 1966 award. Brother John Zwirner 
(1967), Ray C. Vore (1968), Otto H. 
Bendig (1969) and in 1970 Brother Ira 
D. Allen received the award. 

Ira Allen has been a member of Local 
104 since April 12, 1913 and still par- 
ticipates in many of the local's functions. 
Ira has been honored with 25, 40 and 50- 
year pins. He has been instrumental in 
the construction of many present-day 
buildings in the Dayton area. He worked 
for Charley Van Grove Construction. 
Rike Kumler, Ziegler and many other 
well known construction companies in 
the area. He worked on the U.D. Build- 
ing, Knott building. The Third National 
Bank Building, and many of the present 
land marks in downtown Dayton. 

He was financial secretary from 1923 
to 1927, and he served as treasurer from 
1932 to 1940. 



(2) MADISON, WIS.— President Ken- 
neth Fischer, Local 314, is pictured above 
presenting a 50-year pin to Ingvald Oli- 
verson. Oliverson joined the local on 
Sept. 14, 1921, the same year he came 
over from Norway. He was an active 
member, a skilled mechanic, as are his 
brothers. His brother Otto joined in 1926, 
and Trygve in 1923, and his nephew 
joined in 1952. 



(3) GREENWICH, CONN.— At a spe- 
cially-called meeting, four members re- 
ceived pins for 49 years of continuous 
membership in Local 196. Left to right, 
Julius Fazekos, Hilmer Larson, Michael 
Castiglione, Michael Sandor, Sr. Albert 
Green, a 53-year member and former 
business representative, does the honors. 



(4) NILES, O. — Membership pins were 
awarded January 14, 1972, by Carpenters 
Local 1514. At the bottom: Edward 
Strohmeyer (70 years), next Joseph Gil- 
bert (35 years), left to right, C. E. 
Remalia and Harold Gilbert, Bus. Rep. 
(30 years). Next row: (L. to R.) Wilbert 
Cessna (25 years) and Charles Williams 
(30 years). Top Row: Raymond Filipan 
and Ray Baer (both 25 years). Guy Nori 
and Harvey Anderson (both 30-year 
members) were not present for picture. 



Safety Sheriff 
Joe Higgins says: 




's 



Y'allgiveto 

Easter Seals... 

heah? 

February 28 — April 2 



Estwing 




SAFETY 
GOGGLES 



For Safety Sake— Always Wear 
Es+wing Safety Goggles when using 
hand tools. Protect your eyes from 
splinters, fragments, dust, chips, 
etc. 

• Soft, comfortable vinyl frame 

• Fit contour of all faces • Gen- 
erous ventilation • Fog and dust 
proof • Go on over glasses • 
Lightweight. 

Onhi, 

U^ Clear Lens 

|X Green Lens ^J-OJ 
l^ Amber Lens 

Individually Boxed 

Mfg. Co. 

2647-8th 



Estwing 

Rockford, III. 61101 



Dept. C-3 



MARCH, 1972 



15 




SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 



(1) SANTA ROSA, CALIF.— On Octo- 
ber 28 Local 751 presented service pins 
to many members. Twenty-two received 
30-year pins; 38 received 25-year pins; 
and two received 50-ycar pins. Those 
honored are shown in the following 
photographs: 

Han Glow and Dan Bossa, 50-year 
members, third and fourth from left in 
the photo. They are shown with Joseph 
Kiefer, secretary of the North Coast 
Counties District Council; Walter Pax- 
ton, president of Local 751; and Frank 
Morabito, secretary-treasurer of Local 
751. 

(lA) Thirty-year members included, front 
row, left, Eugene Bentley, Joe Brum, Ed 
Boudreau, David Orr, Al Eslinger, John 
Stone, Alan Stiles, Deforrest North, J. 
Faoro. Standing, left to right, Don Mc- 
Rury, Dale Mosher, Chester Rowland, 
Henry Salisbury, Chester Horn, John 
Marchach W. McNaniee, Frank Jacob, 
Leo Pawlick, Louis Blank, E. G. Black- 
shear, Al Prebllch, and Roy Reine. 



(IB) The 25-year tnenibers 



included 



front, left to right, Elden Crane, Carl 
Brekke, Otto Radon, M. Moorehead, 
Walter Broun, R. Bianchi Rossi, Frank 
Marchetti, Aldo Bianchi, Ted Anderson. 
Middle row, from left, Wesley Diggs, 
Sam Furia, Harold Hodapp, Roy Ricci, 
Ken Caven, Elmer Bloomquist, Muriel 
Johnson, Dan Murlin, M. Billigmier. 
Back row, Harry Valentine, Bill Cowart, 
C. Tam, Al Hughes, Les Moorhous, 
Andy Olscn, Jack McCall, J. S. Robbins. 
Clif Thorne, W. A. Grant, Clarence 
Thill, Milton Peterson, D. MacRury, Roy 
Wright, N. Kruse, Oscar Niemi, J. Stock- 
ton, Jack Chandler, L. T. Shields, Paul 
Klapp. 

(2) ANOKA, MINN.— On November 
13 members of Local 851 held a 25- 
year pin presentation dinner. Those pres- 
ent to received the award had their 
picture taken, and were as follows: front 
row, from left, Harold Tennison, Wal- 
lace Ostlund, Harry Erickson, Clarence 
Bever, Arnold Martinson. Back row from 
left, James Antil, Jerome Gmach, Allen 
Wolhart, George Wirz, Olaf Steffenson, 
INIiu'vin Luke. 



A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
* service pins. 




16 



THE CARPENTER 



Chevrolet. Building a 
better way to see the U.S. A. 




4-wheel-drive Blazers al New Harbor Beach, Massacitiisells. 



'72 Chevy Blazer. Because the good places start where the good roads end. 



Blazer just happens to be a 
very tough, very roomy, very 
wide-tracked runabout. 

Just happens to come from 
a family of trucks that are 
built to last. Take a look at 
the chart at right. It shows 
that over 55% of Chevy's 1956 
model trucks are still working. 



No other make has even half. 

Blazer. Your best bet for 
the good places. For a good 
long time. 



Chevy trucks 




MARCH, 1972 



17 




SEND IN YOUR FAVORITES! MAIL TO: PLANE GOSSIP. 101 
CONST. AVE., N.W., WASH. D.C. 20001. (SORRY, NO PAYMENT) 



Not Much Change! 

Our foreman sent his boy to col- 
lege, paid $10,000 in tuition and fees, 
and all he got was a quarterback! — 
Ursula Schollmeyer, Carmel, N.Y. 
STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

Daffynitions 

Confusion — one woman plus one 
left turn. 

Excitement — Two women plus one 
secret. 

Bedlam — Three women plus one 
bargain. 

Chaos — Four women plus one 
luncheon check. 

1 4 All— ALL 4 1 




'Ask A Loco Question . . .' 

The man, breathing hard, walked 
back to the station after falling to 
catch his train. "Did you miss the 
train, sir?" asked a porter. 

"Of course not!" snapped the dis- 
appointed commuter. "I simply didn't 
like Its looks, so I chased It out of 
the station!" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

And Nun Too Soon.' 

Three nuns were given $100 each 
to do with as they pleased. The first 
nun put hers in the poor box. The 
second gave hers to a charity. The 
third, preferring to give hers on a 
personal basis, went out on the street 
until she found a dejected, forlorn 
figure of a man. She pushed the $100 
bill into his hands and hurried off. 



Puzzled, the man shouted after her: 
"What's this all about?" 

"It's God's will!" shouted back the 
nun, closing the convent door. 

The next day the door opened, the 
man rushed in and started dumping 
$10 and $20 bills on a table before 
the startled nun. "What in the world 
does this mean?" she cried. 

"God's Will!" he shouted. "Hie 
came In first in the fifth at 100 to 
one! This is your share!" — D. A. 
McDougall, L.U. 1296, San Diego, 
Calif. 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Two Hot Prospects 

Grandma was explaining her early- 
days problems. "I had two problems 
... Pa and the fire. Every time I 
turned to look at one, the other 
would go out!" 

BE UNION— BUY LABEL 

Protective Coloration 

The errant husband staggered in 
through the kitchen door and pro- 
ceeded to tie up all the pots and 
pans to a handy clothesline. Then he 
stumbled up the stairs, muttering 
happily to himself: "She'll never hear 
me comin' in over all thish racket!" 

UNION MEN WORK SAFELY 

She's A Real Card! 

The mother was shocked and wor- 
ried over what her 8-year-old daugh- 
ter had told her, so she decided to 
explore the matter farther. "You say 
you proved to this little boy that you 
were a girl? hlow did you do that?" 

"Easy," replied the child. "I showed 
him my Brownie membership card!" 

UNITED WE STAND 



This Month's Limerick 

I once went with a girl whose frigidity 
Approached absolute cataleptic 
rigidity. 

'Til you gave her a drink, 
Whereupon she would sink 
Into a state of complaisant liquidity. 



He Was Dead Wrong! 

The weary traveling man was told 
by the desk clerk that there wasn't 
another room in the hotel. "But I 
can give you a cot in the ballroom," 
he said. "There's a lady already in 
there on the far corner. But If you 
go in quietly and don't turn on a 
light, I'm sure she won't mind. " 

The traveling man agreed and left, 
only to come running out a few min- 
utes later to blurt: "That woman In 
there; she's dead!" 

"Yes, I know," wearily replied the 
clerk. "But how did you find out?" 

BE AN ACTIVE UNIONIST 

The Bare Truth 

The model called up the artist and 
said she wasn't going to report for 
work that day. "I don't feel In the 
nude for work," she said. (This Is why 
she barely made a living.) 

FOR BETTER LAWS GIVE TO CLIC 




No Kickback 

The preacher called the Board of 
Health to ask that a dead mule be 
removed from In front of his parson- 
age. The young clerk, wanting to be 
funny, said; "I thought you ministers 
took care of the dead!" 

"We do," nlftled back the parson, 
"but first we like to contact their 
relatives' 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 

Strongly Held View 

The average number of times a 
modern girl says "No! " is once weak- 

ly. 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH! 

The Spice of Life! 

If more than one mouse is mice and 
more than one louse is lice, then it 
must follow that more than one 



spouse IS spice 



18 



THE C ARPENTER 



I 



■n 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures sKowing 
I some of the senior members of 
I the Brotherhood who recently 
I received 25-year or 50-year 
\ service pins^ 



(1) CHICAGO, ILL.— Local 1 held a 
special meeting November 10, 1971, to 
honor those members who completed 50 
and 25 years of membership. Identifica- 
tion is as follows: 

First Row, left to right: Carl A. 
Moews, 50 years, and the following are 
all 25 years; Victor A. Algmin, Clarence 
Anderson, Anton Antolak, Carl S. Berg- 
lund, Edward Blaha, John Blaha, Theo- 
dore S. Buckle, Joseph J. Budz, Otto 
Bulster, Henry J. Burmeister, William R. 
Caspers, Frank Cognato. 

Second Row: Perry Dalianis, David K. 
Donaldson, Louis M. Engert, Harold W. 
Giese, Bias B. Granato, Holger Harvey, 
Raymond G. Heidman, George L. Hen- 
driksen, Ludwig, A. Hirz, James E. Hud- 
son, Jesse Ingalls, Wallace H. Jobe, Del- 
bert E. Jones. 




Third Row: Ernest W. Loberg, George 
A. Mayer, Roscoe L. Meentemeyer, Ken- 
neth E. Mendenhall, Harold F. Meyer, 
John Motto, Edmund R. Naraowicz. 
George A. Paulin, George W. Pavlicek, 
Thomas I. Pendergrass, Raymond Po- 
teracki, Henry Priebe, Robert C. Prill. 

Fourth Row: Gerson Reisler, Joseph 
J. Sabis, Otto F. Seidl, Roman R. Sliwa, 
George M. Smith, William R. Steffey 
Edward J. Szurgot, Frank J. Vesely 
Harry J. Wennstrom, Herman D. Wester- 
berg, Frank O. Westerlund, Leo Witkow 
ski. 

Fifth Row: Officers of Local No. 1: 
John T. Coughlin, conductor; Norman 
M. Ericksen, trustee; Kenneth J. Kinney, 
recording secretary; August Vollmer, vice 
president; Earl W. McLennan, president, 
James J. Garnett, trustee; Richard 
Garnett, secretary-treasurer; and P. A. 
Vinje, trustee. 

The following members with SO and 25 
years membership were unable to attend: 
50 years, Edwin Hookanson and Jacob 
Kay; 25 years, Wallace Aaron, Chester 
J. Baker, Henry C. Beck, Orville Brit- 
tingham, Sigurd Carlson, George D. Con- 
nor, Clarence F. Domke, Fred Dykstra, 
Lucien Evans, Floyd Hemdon, Hugo W. 
Herrgard, Harvey O. Johnson, John 
Keller, Dan Korich, Steve Maksinski, 
LeRoy Marach, Frank Marra, LeRoy 
Marshall, Gordon McGann, Gene Parker, 
R. J. Ricke, Silvio D. Rizzo, LeRoy 
Ruud, Joseph Sabella, Elmer J. Scott, 
Virgil Skogsbergh, John J. Smith, C. H. 
Storlie, John Thieda, John H. Thomas, 
Frank Valenti, Werner A. Wick, Carl L. 
Witte, Ted Wodecke, Moody E. Peterson 
and Rock E. Warren. 



n 



(2) ST. LOUIS, MO.— Local 1739 mem- 
bers receiving their 25-year membership 
pins at special ceremonies December 20, 
were: 

FIRST ROW seated, from left, Harry 
Evans, Morris Clark, Bernard Bosse, 
Gustav Stellhorn, Martin Hartzell, Clar- 
ence Stolz, William Mudd (warden), Wil- 
liam Beckman, Leroy Shuhwerk, Bud 
Lueddecke (trustee); 

SECOND ROW seated, from left: 
James Thompson, Roy Ragan, Joseph 
Gergurich, William Riggs, Gus Uthoff 
(treasurer), August Kasparek, L. D. Whit- 
tenberg, Sam Mosby, Virgil Pressley, 
Raymond Crandell, Peter Scharf, Alfred 
Schlegal, John Leuthen; 

THIRD ROW seated from left: James 
Copeland Jr., Roy Erfurth, Kenneth 
Baldwin, Richard Sherman, Victor Alte- 
meyer, E. C. Caldwell, Elmer Klinge- 
mann, Joseph Turek, Vincent Beck, Ken 
Johnson, Dwight Elam, Jerry Headrick, 
Walter Lucas; 

FOURTH ROW, standing from left: 
CDC Business Representatives Hermann 
Henke, James Watson, Leerie Schaper, 
Larry Daniels and Bill Field; pin recipi- 
ents Albert Jacob Jr., Walter Kropp, 
Frank Laurentius, John Marincel, James 
Day, Chester Kurrelmeyer, Harvey Pe- 
ters, Al Struckhoff, Murl Gan, Gilbert 
Sterling, Eldon Luma; 

FIFTH ROW, standing from left, 
CDC Business Representatives Leonard 
Terbrock, Ed Thien, Mike Heilich, Direc- 
tor of Jurisdiction and Research Pleas 
Jenkins, Assistant Executive Secretary- 
Treasurer Carl Reiter and Executive Sec- 
retary-Treasurer OIlie Langhorst; Local 
1739 officers, President Kenneth Robben, 
Vice President George Schuhwerk (also a 
pin recipient). Trustee Gordon Ruck, Fi- 
nancial Secretary George Bach and Re- 
cording Secretary Fred Kleisly. 




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ANADIAN 
' T REPORT 



Trudeau Faces Two 
Political Factors 

Prime Minister Trudeau is clearing 
the decks for a federal election, prob- 
ably in June or October this year. 

In political terms, there are two 
factors he has to take into account. 
One is the contributions of big busi- 
ness to the Liberal campaign funds. 
The other is the sharp drop in his 
popularity since he was elected by a 
big majority in 1 968. 

Big business money went Liberal 
in 1 968 at least in the proportion of 
60% to them and 40% to the other 
big business party, the Conservatives. 

For many months the business in- 
terests have openly and privately ex- 
pressed their dissatisfaction with leg- 
islation which the government has 
introduced, mainly the tax reform 
which became effective January 1 st; 
second, the competition act which did 
not pass the last session: third, the 
changes in labor legislation which 
were mentioned in the last two issues 
of the CARPENTER. 

The effectiveness of the business 
protest became apparent when the 
prime minister removed the three cabi- 
net ministers responsible for the three 
contentious measures and shifted them 
to other posts. 

As the CARPENTER said last 
month, "the price of big business cos- 
tributions to the Liberal Party might 
be Mackasey's scalp." 

Last month Labor Minister Bryce 
Mackasey, considered by many trade 
unionists as Canada's best labor min- 
ister ever, was shifted out of this port- 
folio into Manpower and Immigra- 
tion. It was not a demotion, but it 
saved him from having his labor bill, 
on which he had set his heart, drasti- 
cally altered or killed while he was 
still labor minister. 

The new labor minister is Martin 
O'Connell who, on his appointment, 
wasted no time in telling the press 
that the proposed labor legislation will 



be amended. The protection of work- 
ers against technological change will 
be lessened, even though the original 
bill did not go as far as organized 
labor thought it should. 

What makes the government's re- 
treat on the Bill. C-253. so galling to 
the labor movement is that they have 
been waiting seven years for promised 
legislative changes, but now. gratified 
with a small breakthrough, they find 
the rug pulled out from under. 

It was seven years ago, in 1965, 
that Justice Samuel Freedman wrote 
a historic report which proposed that 
employers be compelled to negotiate 
the introduction of technological 
change with the unions affected. 

The amendment O'Connell pro- 
poses will leave technological change 
to collective bargaining. But what if a 
company refuses to bargain, or backs 
a union into a corner where it has to 
strike for a new contract clause on 
the issue even if the wage packet is 
o.k'd? The pressures to settle without 
strike, with little or no protection on 
technological change issues, will be 
heavy. 

That is why unions, and even the 
working force not in unions, need leg- 
islative protection. That is why the 
switch in the labor ministry looks like 
a sell-out. 

As for relieving Finance Minister 
Benson of his portfolio, Benson was 
glad to get out. He has had a hard 
ride from the business community, 
and in labor's view, was so tied up 
with mistaken economic policies and 
incomes policy, that his going brought 
no tears. 

Shifting Ron Basford out of Con- 
sumer and Corporate Affairs was the 
third sop to big business. They con- 
sidered him pro-consumer and fought 
bitterly against his competition bill 
which would have given the consumer 
and taxpayer some protection against 
companies ganging up against them 
for their own private gain. 

That's part one of the pre-election 
scenario. 



Part two about Trudeau's unpopu- 
larity is another matter. He was so 
popular in 1968 that the term "Tru- 
deaumania" was coined to describe 
that particular kind of hero worship. 
Now four years later he has, according 
to the polls, the confidence of less than 
409fof the voters. 

His advisers tell him he needs at 
least 44% to win the next election. So 
the PR battle to build up Trudeau's 
image again has begun. And the un- 
ions are countering by building up 
their support for the New Democratic 
Party led by David Lewis. Without 
any control over the mass media, this 
is the usual formidable task. 

Carpenter Wage 
Boost in Manitoba 

Manitoba is leading all Canada in 
providing a floor under wages in the 
construction industry. In fact the floor 
in this province is as high as the ceil- 
ing in others. 

Labor Minister Russell Pauley an- 
nounced last month that construction 
industry workers in Greater Winnipeg 
will receive an increased minimum 
wage effective March 1st. 

Journeymen carpenters receive a 
wage boost from $5 an hour to $5.50. 
Sheet metal workers also get this raise. 

This is about the average in the new 
rate regulations, some getting more, 
some less, among the various building 
trades. 

All hours worked in excess of stand- 
ard weekly hours must be paid at not 
less than time and a half. 



Still Need For 
Public Housing 



Now that final 1971 reports show 
that housing starts made a new record 
with over 230,000, the homebuilding 
industry is now talking about 250,000 
or more this year. 

This objective should be possible. 
The mortgage money is available, and 
interests have eased. The homes are 
needed. 

But the problem of rising costs is 
still worrisome, with the majority of 
wage and salary earners priced out of 
the conventional market. 

This makes it all the more impor- 
tant that public housing starts be 
increased substantially. Yet in 1970. 
less than 10% of housing starts were 
for public housing with rents-geared- 
to-income. 

This small proportion of public 
housing in the total number built has 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



been the case since 1946 when federal 
housing legislation was first adopted. 

In 25 years, low income housing 
with federal funds loaned to limited 
dividend and non-profit corporations 
and for public housing and student 
housing, represented only 267,568 
units, or just 4.4% of the total housing 
stock in Canada to the end of 1970. 

This figure includes housing under 
federal-provincial agreements. Only 
Ontario in the last five years or so has 
taken advantage of the availability of 
federal housing funds to any great ex- 
tent. But other provinces like Quebec 
and Manitoba are now gearing for 
higher public housing production, to 
make good homes available to work- 
ing people and to provide jobs. 

Minimum Wages 
Up in Nova Scotia 

The province of Nova Scotia has 
boosted its minimum wage sharply. 

This may sound courageous in an 
area with very high unemployment. 
Employers usually say that higher min- 
imums will force them out of business 
and create more unemployment. 

This argument has been proved 
false in other provinces. Saskatchewan 
increased its minimum last year, also 
against protests, with little or no dis- 
location of workers. 

At least two good arguments favor 
the higher minimum wage. The first 
is that it helps keep your working force 
in the province instead of moving 
away to areas where wages are higher. 
The second is that higher wages im- 
prove purchasing power where it is 
most needed and where all of it is 
spent on essentials. 

The Nova Scotia minimum goes to 
$1.55 for both men and women on 
July 1st. Persons under 18 and in- 
experienced workers in their first three 
months of employment are exempted. 

The minimum goes up to $1.65 an 
hour on July 1, 1973. For those under 
18 and the inexperienced, it will be 
$1.40. 

The male minimum is now $1.35, 
female minimum $1.20; under 18 
minimum for males $1.15, for females 
$1.00. 

Jobless Rate 
Remains at 6% 

Canada has had an unemployment 
rate of 6% or more for more than 20 
months, but some areas have been hit 
harder than others. 

Contijiued on page 24 



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CANADIAN REPORT 

Continued from page 23 

Latest figures show that British Co- 
lumbia has 6.9% jobless (64.000): the 
Prairie provinces just 4.3% (64,000); 
Ontario 4.9%. (147.000); Quebec 7.9% 
(186,000): the Atlantic provinces 
10.5% (69,000). 

Some government officials are be- 
ginning to say that Canada will never 
again see full employment conditions. 
Many agree that the 6% rate will 
continue into 1973 at least. But few 
accept the argument that high un- 
employment in a technological age 
must always be with us. 

A lot of these lost jobs are in con- 
struction. In the Metro Toronto area 
where the building trades council has 
been taking a tally, 27% of organized 
construction workers were jobless last 
month. 

Argument Concerns 
'Essential Industry' 

Last month's strike of air traffic con- 
trollers, which shut down all air serv- 
ices in Canada for about 1 days, 
brought out the usual cries of "down 
with strikes in essential industries." 

The argument must center around 
"what is an essential industry?" and is 
compulsory arbitration a satisfactory 
alternative to strikes? 

David Archer. President, Ontario 
Federation of Labor, commented that 
some of the best brains on the North 
American continent have delved into 
the question of "essential industries", 
but few have concluded that compul- 
sory arbitration provides a satisfactory 
alternative to deadlocked negotiations. 

"After all," said Archer, "if once 
you agree that police and firefighters 
and hospital workers are essential (and 
most of society does) and then add air 
traffic controllers and hydro employees 
and gas workers and milk drivers, and 
so on, what would you have left of 
free collective bargaining?" 

Many Tax Inequities 
For Small Businesses 

Tax inequities in business are also 
gross. 

In the last 10 years small business 
paid taxes on 90 percent of their prof- 
its; wholesalers paid taxes on 87 per- 
cent of their profits; the construction 
industry on 67 percent, manufacturers 
on 65 percent, mining companies on 
13 percent and oil ancl gas companies 
on 5.7 percent. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




gallery of pictures showing 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 



(1) NEWPORT, KY.— Carpenter Local 
698, Newport, honored its members with 
25 or more years' service. This picture 
was taken at the local's annual picnic on 
July 24, 1971. 

Front row, left to right — George Wiley, 
Carl Cooper, Lee Groeschen, Harry Rein- 
ert, Ernie Marschman, Joe Steffen, Ed 
Lutkenhoff, Chester Henderson, Ralph 
Beiting, Al Andrews, Chas. Kahl, Ed 
Hoffman. 

Middle row — Jim Sexton, Paul Steffen, 
George Heck, Harry Schaffeld, Charles 
Witte, John Witte, John Tarvin, Charles 
Beiting, Stan Skirvin, Joe Schumacher, 
Charles Ashcraft. 

Back row — Art Tuttle, Bill Belting, Ed 
Beiting, Walter Koch, Alvin Goetz, Rich- 
ard Heck, Earl Egan, Delbert Klump, 

2A 



Paul Kidd, Chris Schweitzer, Ray Beiting, 
Carl Kattenhorn. 

(2) ROCKFORD, ILL.— Here are two 
pictures taken at a meeting of Local 792, 
July 19, 1971, at which time members 
were presented 50-year and 25-year mem- 
bership pins by Rudy Peresich, Interna- 
tional Representative. 

In Picture (2) Ernest Ostrom received 
a 50-year membership pin. Left to right 
were Bernard Hunter, president. Local 
792; Ernest Ostrom, 50-year member; 
and Rudy Peresich, International Repre- 
sentative. 

In Picture (2-A) members of Local 
792 who received 50-year and 25-year 
membership pins. The list included: 

50-YEAR PIN— Ernest Ostrom. 



25-YEAR PINS— Harry Amelung, Er- 
nest Anderson, Evert Anderson, William 
Bankord, Gunnard Bjork, Hugo Bjork, 
Donald Blakely, W. F. Blomquist, Earl 
Burd, Joe W. Bunk, Cloe Calhoun, Har- 
old Carlson, John A. Carlson, Dan Car- 
ney, Joe Chorzempa, Donald Clark, Al 
Clauson, Stanley Cutter, Elmer Deiter, 
Gust Elming, Harold Fair, George Ford, 
Emery Frang, Ed Franklin, John Gostol, 
William Grafstrom, Arthur Green, Ger- 
ard Grey, William Highbarger, Floyd 
Holm, Roy Hunt, Vivian Jamison, Har- 
old Knapely, Orville Klukken, John Ku- 
cynski, Carl W. Larson, Harry Liljeberg, 
Herbert Lobbins, Gasper Lyskawka, Earl 
Magnuson, Grady Mays, Wayne Neff, 
Glen Oldenburger, Dale Riggle, Donald 
Roberts, Henry Stark, Bill Summers, Ar- 
vid Sundell, E. D. Swanberg, Bertil Swan- 
son, James Trussoni, Heber Wildish, Har- 
old Wilson, Al Woodward, 





MARCH, 1972 



25 




^- "^ 



^,ii ■ i^:4§ 




Outdoor 
Meanderings 



Readers may write to 
Fred Goetz 

2833 S. E. 33rd Place, 
Portland, Oregon 97202 



B A Touch of Color 

Recent tests at Brown University by 
scientists proved that fish respond to 
certain colors, a conclusion which anglers 
made a long time ago and have stocked 
their tackle boxes accordingly. 

Some fishermen paint their own lures, 
and Harlan DaflFron. a charter member 
of St. Helens. Oregon Carpenters Local 
2066 adds a deft stroke of red paint to 
the wings of his green spinglo lure. 

"This could be one of the reasons why 
Daffron is such a successful salmon 
fishermen." writes Gar Larsen. business 
representative, "he has an impressive 
record, and I'm enclosing a photograph 
of him with his eighth salmon for 1971, 
a Chinook which tipped the scales at 35 
pounds and was caught in the lower 
Columbia River which forms a natural 
boundary here between Oregon and 
Washington." 




I);iltroii KirniiR'l 

■ Albino Pheasant 

From time to time, we've talked about 
the downing of albino game — four legged 
and winged. Here's an account of the 
latest report from Kennewick. Washing- 
ton. A. J. Kimmel is depicted here with 
two normal-hued ringnecks and an albino 
specimen in the middle. 

B Wrens Like Red 

Getting back to the subject of color 



preference, here's the result of a study 
conducted by Dr. Robert A. McCabe of 
Wisconsin University, an II -year test in- 
volving wrens which were given a choice 
of utilizing red. yellow, blue, white and 
green nest boxes. Ninety-eight nests 
were constructed in the boxes by the 
wrens: 

Red 41 times 

Green 31 limes 

Blue 16 times 

Yellow 8 times 

White 2 times 

I Wrong-Way Mallard 

A banded, pen-raised Illinois mallard 
duck from the Nilo Farms Shooting pre- 
serve at Alton, flew the coop and con- 
tinued on its merry way across the coun- 
try to the West Coast. It saw a lot of 
territory before it was downed over a 
river marsh by Oregon hunter Bob 
Queirolo. 

I Half-Hour Sail Tussle 

One of the few fish in the ocean that 
is almost as tall as it is long is the sail- 
fish, that is if you'll rate it from the tip 
of its magnificent dorsal fin to the bottom 
of its belly. Fred Ernest of Cambridge. 
Massachusetts, a longtime member of 
Local 33. Boston, cherished, for many 
years, a desire to add one to his variety 
of catches and knew he'd have to travel 
to realize that ambition. So he tripped 
far south, to the salty Pacific deep out of 
Acapulco, ten miles off Mexico's south- 




west coast, and there hit the finny jack- 
pot. He's pictured here with his prize, a 
131-lb. "sail" which took over a half 
hour to land after he set the hook. 



H Scrappy Florida Snook 

If you want to know of a good fishing 
spot in Florida, ask Harry Mangerich of 
Chicago, Illinois, a member of Local 275 
for close to a half century. On a recent 
southern junket to Florida waters, he 
nailed a half dozen of scrappy snook 
from the saltchuck. He's shown here 
with a stringer holding five of 'em which 
measured over 18 inches from nose to 
tail. The one under 18 inches was. in 
accordance with the fishery regulations, 
returned for sizing. Oh yes. they were all 
caught on light spin gear off the old 
bridge at Punta Gordo on the west coast. 




Mangerich 



Coultas 



Fred Ernest, right, and sailfish. 



■ Hot Time With Salmon 

The recent pop tune. "When You're 
Hot, You're Hot: When You're Not, 
You're Not." might well serve as a theme 
song for the salmon fishermen of the 
West Coast. I've had my share of good 
days ofl" the Oregon. Washington, and 
B. C. coasts in pursuit of Coho and 
Chinook, but after receiving a letter and 
photograph from Mrs. Donna Coultas, 
wife of Gary Coultas. a member of Local 
1752. Pomona. Calif.. I'm bound and 
determined to have a "go" at briny waters 
off the coast of Northern California, 
specifically out of Crescent City. 

On a recent junket there, the Coultas 
family, accompanied by Gary's dad, 
amassed a total of 30 salmon for five 
excitement-packed days. Here's a photo- 
graph of the senior Coultas with the 
largest salmon taken on the trip — a 40 
pounder! 

■ Hunting-Fishing Day 

Many sportsman groups and conserva- 
tion organizations, at local, state and na- 
tional levels are urging Congress to 
establish a national hunting and fishing 
day as called for in S. J. Resolution 1 17 
by Senator Thomas J. Mclntyre (N.H.). 
Mclntyre's resolution is supported by 
many of his colleagues and it is this 
writers' hope of seeing it pass both 
houses. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



I find that, to date, 18 governors have 
signed proclamations designating Septem- 
ber 25 as a state hunting and fishing day. 

■ 28-Point Deer! 




Allbritton and 28-point deer. 



Brace yourself, you hunt-fan members 
of the Brotherhood, we're in receipt of a 
report of a buck being dovi'ned in Arkan- 
sas having the greatest number of points 
on its antlers than any yet recorded in 
these columns. That is my conclusion 
after word from J. W. West, recording 
secretary of Local 2032 at Bastrop, 
Louisiana. West reported that Brother 
H. P. (Britt) Allbritton of that local 
bagged a buck deer in Drew County 
which dressed out at 230 pounds; sported 
28 points on its rack, and sent in the fol- 
lowing photograph to back up his claim. 

H Muskies Taken 

Muskie anglers will admit that the 
object of their finny affections is the most 
contrary fish flesh in the world. It's not 
unusual for the most seasoned veteran 
to log days, weeks, even a month with- 
out as much as a strike. In view of this, 
it seems especially noteworthy to pass on 
information submitted by Josep'n^ W. 
Kowalski, financial secretary of Local 
146, Schenectady. He says that fellow 
local member, Roger Sission of Wamer- 
ville, caught his first muskie this past 
September, an 18 pounder on the troll in 
the Thousand Islands area, then cam.e 
back a month later and nailed a 40'/4 
pounder which took the lead in local 
Muskie tournament. Here's a look at 
newspaper clipping of Sission and his 
brother Origen, who was with him when 
he made the catch near Clayton on Octo- 
ber 16, 1971. 




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27 




(1) SANDUSKY, O. — The member- 
ship of Carpenters Local 940 recently 
honored fellow members who had 
achieved 25 and 50 years of service in 
the organization. Lake Eric District 
Council President Paul Loper presented 
a 50-year pin to Edward Hegner. Also 
eligible but not in attendance was George 
Hornig. Receiving 25-year pins and 
shown in the photograph, are: Leon 
Matter, Elton Winck, Roy Humberger, 
Jacob VVeilnau, Charles Lawyer, Sterling 
Riccelli, Louis Reinheinier, James Porter, 
Ralph Myers, Carmen Zeiter. Fred 
Wobster, Sr., Paul Jarrett. Howard Har- 
ris, B. M. Garton. Carl Nickoli. William 
Gundelsberger, Clarence Popke, Harvey 
Yontz, Carl Lau, Harlcy Brown, Arthur 
Lindrose, Richard Linhart, John Sharick, 
James Grosser, Gerald Eberly, Raymond 
Reed, Charles Bruens, Earl Wachtel, 
Vincent Kaufman, and Russell Welschen- 
bach. 

Eligible for 25-year pins but not in 
attendance were: Alfred Brandt, George 
Bertch, Cecil Biff, Kenneth Bailey, 
Frank Burdue, Eugene Didion, Herbert 
Didion, Dan Faggianato, Alfred Howard. 
Alfred Knupke, Harold Lichtle, Albert 
Lippus, F. C. McArthur, Jay Mesnard, 
Zeldon Mesnard, John Nutter, Floyd 
Price, Edward Robinson, Max Schallen- 
berg. Edward Schenk, Lloyd Sutton. Al- 
bert Scagnetti, Edward Voegle, Gerald 
Ryan, and Richard Windisch. 





(2) NEW YORK, N.Y.— At the regular 
meeting of Local 257, held October 18, 
1971, Martin Porges was presented with 
a plaque from the New York State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters for his distinguished 
service as a Board Member, 1st District 
of the New York State Council of Car- 
penters. 

Brother Porges, was initiated into the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters & 
Joners of America on December 6, 1905. 
As of October 31. 1971. he completed 52 
years of service as secretary-treasurer of 
Local Union 257. 

At the same meeting of Local 257, 
President Conrad F. Olsen appointed 
Ernest B. Danielson to the office of sec- 
retary-treasurer and appointed Gene 
Hanley to the office of vice-president of 
Local 257. Martin Porges will continue 
as emeritus. 

In the picture. Conrad F. Olsen pre- 
sents Martin Porges with the plaque. 



From left to right are: Attilio Bitondo, 
business representative; Conrad F. Olsen. 
president of Local 257 and president of 
the New York District Council of Car- 
penters; Martin Porges, retiring secretary- 
treasurer; Gene Hanley, new vice-presi- 
dent and business representative; and 
Ernest B. Danielson, new secretary-treas- 
urer and business representative. 



(3) POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.— On Sept. 
24, 1971, Local 203 sponsored a testi- 
monial dinner-dance: "A Tribute to 
Three Men." Honored for over 100 
years of service to the union were former 
Treasurer William Beck, Financial Sec- 
retary William Korber and Recording 
Secretary Walter Stanton. Jr. Among 
the over 200 guests present were, left 
to right, Treasurer William H. Cargain, 
Stanton. Beck, Korber and Business 
Agent Stewart Malcolm. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 



A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 




(1) CHESTER, PA.— On November 20, 
1971 the officers and members of Local 
207 paid tribute to members for the 
years that they had belonged to our 
Brotherhood by having a dinner, at which 
time Business Representative Joseph See- 
feldt and President Evan J. Phillips pre- 
sented service pins. 

Recipient of a 50-year pin was (left to 
right) Harry Hatzel, trustee. He is shown 
with Joseph Seefeldt, Business Agent; and 
Evan J. Phillips, President. 
(1-A) Recipients of 35-year pins were, 



left to right, Charles Crysfle, Thomas L. 
Boulden, Arthur Cardamone, Joseph See- 
feldt, Business Agent, Sidney W. Knott, 
William G. Dillon, Henry Malick, and 
Evan J. Phillips, President. 
(1-B) Recipients of 30-year pins, front 
row, left to right, Peter Holm, conductor 
& trustee, D. T. Bibb, Charles Wilbank, 
Thomas Russo, John Kosty, Daniel Mc- 
MuUen, Raymond Lee, Evan J. Phillips, 
president, James T. Jones, Joseph See- 
feldt, Business Agent; and Thomas 
Hamilton. 



Back row, left to right, John H. Evans, 
Thomas H. Todd, James Meehani, Gil- 
bert Stonier, Edward Hammond, Frank 
DePlacido, Ransom Wilgus, Leroy C. 
Innis, treasurer and delegate to District 
Council; James Crystle, and Martin 
Fabian. 

(1-C) Recipients of 25-year pins were: 
Edward Toniaski, Harvey Hutton, 
Charles Hammond, Michael Kostyk, 
John Manchak, delegate to District Coun- 
cil, Joseph Seefeldt, Business Agent, Evan 
J. Phillips, president, Norman A. Spiegel, 
Recording Secretary. 



lA 








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ItObROTHjERI 
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(2) TORONTO, ONT. — Members of 
Local 27 attended a dinner on October 
15th, hosted by the local union, for the 
purpose of presenting 25 and 50-year 

2 



pins. It is not possible to identify the 
recipients in the photo. However, Board 
Member Wm. Stefanovitch, who present- 
ed the pins, is standing at the extreme 
left. 



Twenty-five-year pins were presented 
to 89 members, who attended with their 
wives, and one 50-year pin was to be 
presented. However, the brother was un- 
able to attend. 




MARCH, 1972 



29 



RPPREnnfisiifp 
& iRmninii^Wi 




Brotherhood Job Corps Leaders and Government Representatives Hold Seminar 



■ Leaders of the Brotherhood's Job 
Corps Program held a Seminar in Las 
Vegas, Nev.. January 10-14. The seminar 
was a joint meeting of representatives of 
the Brotherhood. U.S. Department of 
Labor. U.S. Department of Agricul- 
ture/Forest Service and the U.S. Depart- 
ment of the Interior. 

The piirpt)se of the seminar was to 
bring the three agencies and the 27 Civil- 
ian Conservation Center staffs and the 
Brotherhoods center coordinators and 
field coordinators together to discuss 
problems that might exist, their solu- 
tions, and ways and means to have a 
more successful program in the future. 

New training projects were discussed 
and the importance they play in the over- 
all training of a corpsman when he has 
actual on-the-job training to acquire the 
skills needed to meet the demands of the 
industry. (These projects are those that 
are not let out on regular contracts). 
John Blake, director of Job Corps, dis- 
cussed the important role the Job Corps 
plays in the training of America's dis- 
advantaged youth. He also introdced the 
new Job Corps recruitment film. "Lost 
and Found." 

Attendance at the seminar, representing 
the government agencies and the Brother- 
hood, were: Brotherhood — 33. Depart- 
ment of Labor — 12, Department of 
Agriculture/ Forest Service — 18, and De- 




Al Rchr, U.S. Dept. of Interior, presents 
plaques and letters to Jack Harshaw, 
project coordinator; Brotherhood .lob 
Corps Program, Leo Gable Technical 
Director, Brotherhood Apprenticeship 
and Training. 




Left to right: Jack Harshaw, Brotherhood project coordinator; James Dryden, con- 
tracting officer, Dept. of Agriculture/Forest Service, Governor .\ker, director of Office 
of Manpower Training and Youth Activities, U.S. Dept. of the Interior; John Blake, 
director. Job Corps, U.S. Dept. of Labor; Leo Gable, Technical Director, Apprentice- 
ship and Traijiing; Dave Kelly, project manager. Job Corps, U.S. Dept. of Labor, 
and Ralph Didriksen, Associate Division Director, manpower. 



partment of Interior — 15. There were 
also two guest speakers bringing the 
total to 80. 

Representing Ralph Conroy, associate 
director of the Job Corps, Department 
of Labor, was Dave Kelly, project man- 
ager. The Department of Agricul- 
ture/Forest Service was represented by 
Ralph Didriksen. associate division di- 
rector. Manpower, and James Dryden. 
contracting officer. Representing the De- 
partment of the Interior, Governor Aker. 
director of Office of Manpower Train- 
ing and Youth Activities. The adminis- 
trative staff of the Brotherhood was Leo 
Gable, technical director, apprenticeship 
and training. Jack Harshaw, project co- 
ordinator, and Field Coordinators Henry 
R. Boone, Jr., Lloyd J. Larsen and 
Charles F. Miller. 

Wednesday, January 12, was set aside 
for meetings of each agency and for the 
Brotherhood staff only. At the Brother- 
hood meeting the new Handbook for 
Center Coordinators was discussed in de- 
tail. The purpose of the handbook is to 
bring all centers imder one type of 
reporting, operational procedure, inven- 
tory, classroom instruction, accountability 
reports, and job placements. 



Also at this meeting, plans were dis- 
cussed to develop a drywall program for 
Job Corps trainees that would enable 
them to go immediately, upon comple- 
tion, into a bona-fide drywall apprentice- 
ship program. The necessary tools for 
the trainees would be furnished to them 
upon completion. 

Dave Kelly, Department of Labor, was 
complimentary in his remarks as to the 
success of the Carpentry Job Corps Pro- 
gram. He said the record of 95 ^r place- 
ments was outstanding. He also praised 
the other union programs — the Painters, 
Operating Engineers, Plasterers and Brick- 
layers. 

At the Wednesday evening banquet, 
plaques and letters of appreciation signed 
by all the graduated trainees of the 27 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America Civilian Conservation 
Center Programs, were presented by Al 
Rehr, U.S. Department of the Interior, 
Biueau of Reclamation, to Leo Gable. 
Jack Harshaw, Henry R. Boone, Jr., 
Lloyd J. Larsen and Charles F. Miller. 

Guest speakers at the seminar were 
Al Preheim, job development coordina- 
tor. Project Transition, and Rich Jeffs, 
vocational coordinator. Wolf Creek Job 
Corps Center. ■ 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Advance Blueprint Reading at College 




The men shown above are all members of Pcni, Illinois, Locail 195. They are 
enrolled in an advanced blueprint reading class at Illinois Valley Community College, 
Oglesby, III. 

This is one of a number of classes conducted by the college in cooperation with 
Local 195 and the Illinois Valley Contractors Association, using college instructors 
and facilities. 

In addition to the classes for journeymen, the college also runs apprenticeship 
classes in cooperation with the local joint apprenticeship council. 

Pictured are (seated, from left) Jerry 

— Zera, Adolph Gnidovic and Nick Pacetti. 

Standing (from left) are Paul Wagner, 
Errain Zamin, Edward Nickel, Carl 
Schmidt, Dick Kotecki, Chester Turczyn, 
Jim Lucas, Albert Macchi, and John 
Murphy, IVCC instructor. Turczyn Is 
president of Local 195. 




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from 



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Local Union Tribute 




ORDER TODAY 



Name . . 
Address 
City ... 



State Zip Code 

(please print clearly) 



Joseph N. Groomes, president of Lo- 
cal 132, Washington, D.C., recently pre- 
sented plaques to George Sannders, left, 
contestant in the International Carpenters 
Apprenticeship Contest in 1970 and Wil- 
liam Champ, right, contestant in the 
International Apprenticeship Contest of 
1971. It was the local union's expression 
of appreciation for the two men's efforts 
in the competition. 

Winnebago Non-Union 

The Tri-Cities Carpenters District 
Council has called to our attention the 
fact that the Chevrolet truck advertis- 
ment in the Febuary, 1972, issue of The 
Carpenter displayed a camper unit atop 
a truck which was manufactured by Win- 
nebago Industries of Forest City, Iowa. 
Please be advised that Winnebago is an 
anti-union employer. We are notifying 
the advertiser of this fact. 



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MARCH, 1972 



31 



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DICTIONARY 

This is the 8th of a new feature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to collective bargaining, 
union contracts, and union business. Follow it closely, and your union 
membership will become more meaningful, and your ability to partici- 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength- 
ened. It was compiled by the International Labor Press Assn, and is 
used with permission. 

G 

good-faith bargaining: Meeting regularly, conferring in good faith 
on both union and company proposals, as required under Taft- 
Hartley Act. See arm"s length bargaining. 

goon: A thug hired to incite violence during a strike, organizing 
drive or other aspects of labor-management relations. 

graveyard shift: Usually the third shift; one beginning at midnight. 

grievance: In management-labor relationships, a complaint handled 
formally through contractually-fixed procedures. If unsettled, a 
grievance could lead to the arbitration process. 

group incentive plan: Plan under which pay is based on total or 
group output. 



ILu^ 




THE CARPENTER 







SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




Leo Bride, Cecil Boscck, Andrew G. 
Bolilin, John Boehni, Albert Berdan, Al- 
fred Bawden, Laurence Ayers, Gilbert 
Anderson, and Albert Alexander. Stand- 
ing, Clyde Gcrfers, Clarence Fosberg, 
Harry Forar, Elmer Deering, Walter 
Cziske, Ome Daiber, Donald Casten, 
Gaylord Castle, Herbert Carlson, John 
Campbell, and Ivan Burns. 
(2) Other 25-year veterans of Local 
1289 included, seated, left to right, Mar- 
tin Kaltenbach, Clinton Johnson, Leonard 
Jensen, George Jensen, Leonard Ibsen, 
B. J. Huber, Forrest Howlett, Ralph 



Horstman, Gunnar Halverson. Standing, 
Russell Noreen, Clarence Newton, Fred 
Micera, Lynn Mclntyre, Frank Martin. 
Clarence Magnuson, Frank Lukenbill, 
Art Keski, Ervin Koth, Albert Korbol. 
(3) Also awarded pins by Local 1289 
were, seated, left to right, Harry Thurek, 
William A. Thatcher, Oren N. Stewart, 
Borden Sagmoen, Fred Schreiber, Ken- 
neth Roberts, C. K. Schwab. Standing, 
Olaf Tweten, Arthur H. Wilson, Alfice 
Williams, Walter Walvatne, Charles 
Thrasher, Lester Sundberg, Lloyd Roten, 
Fred Schmidt. 



A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. 



(1) SEATTLE, WASH. — Local 1289 
held a 25-year dinner, last year, in honor 
of those members who have held mem- 
bership for that length of time. Those 
honored included: Seated, left to right, 




MARCH, 1972 



33 




(1) LOUISVILLE, KY.— Recently Lo- 
cal Union 909 honored members of Lo- 
cal 909 who had held membership 25 
years and longer and presented them 
with 25-year pins. Seated, left to right: 
J, W. Redmon, 25-year member of Lo- 
cal 909; T. A. Pitts, secretary. Falls 
Cities Carpenters District Council; and 
L. E. Fogle, business representative. Lo- 
cal 64. 

Standing, left to right: William Smith, 
conductor; Amos Garmon, president; 
VVm. Redmon, treasurer and 25-year 
member; Henry Heick, 53-year member; 
John Rexroat, 25-year member; Earl 
Brumley, recording secretary; Boyd Mil- 
ler, trustee; Kenneth Bowles, warden; 
James Haysley, 25-year member; George 
Thompson, trustee; George Broumas, 
financial secretary; Nolon K. Petty, vice 
president; Frank Salvagne. 25-year mem- 
ber; Louis Hogan, 25-year member; and 
Wni. Alfred, 26-year member. 

The following named were not present 
to receive their pins: Richard Hall, Wm. 
Hall, Charles N. Bess and Gie Jackson. 

(2) THE DALLES, ORE.— At a ban- 
quet held November 6th 54 members of 
Local 1896 were awarded membership 
pins. Pins were presented by Interna- 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. M 

tional Representative John Truman. 

The 25-year pins were presented to: 
Earle Cox, George DeJarnatt, Howard 
Downey, Ralph Haugann, Carl Jasper- 
son, Theo E. Lanman, Herman P. Lingo, 
Karl Moore, J. R. Reaves, Roy H. Red- 
den, Lloyd Rhoads, Robert Rolen, Sr., 
Cliff Sansburn, Leonard Sansburn, Wal- 



ter Scott, Robert Shouse, Ernest A. Still- 
well, H. J. Wasmund, George White, and 
Dallas Worth. 

Not present, but awarded 25-year pins, 
were: Orville Aas, Herman Bariletti, T. 
W. Bumgardner, Loyd Cunningham, 
Thomas Faa, Charles N. Jones, Fred 
Hovey, Cliff James, Edwin Olsen, Ro- 
land Z. Perkins, Edwin Turner, Richard 
Wise, and Walter White. 

Nine 30-year pins were presented to: 
Lloyd Cameron, Henry Crane, George 
Dean, Ted Hinck, Arthur Howell, Fred 
E. May, M. L. Meattle, John Moore, 
and Grant Thelen. 

Three 35-year pins were presented to: 
George Jacobson, Elmer R. Meyers, and 
Joe Moore. 

A 40-year pin went to William DeFoe, 
and a 45-year pin to Ellis House. 

Not present for 30-year pins: Ted An- 
drews, R. E. Lackey, and William F. 
Wagner. 

Not present but awarded 35-year pins 
were Wm. H. Aylsworth, Albert Jacob- 
son, and Lund Marble. 

The photograph shows the recipients 
of the pins and officers of the local union. 
The lady shown is Mrs. Ellis House, who 
was presented roses "for being able to 
live with a carpenter for 47 years." 




34 



THE CARPENTER 




DIAL INDICATOR HOLDER 




A new dial indicator holder has re- 
cently become available to tradesmen in 
the United States and Canada. Drilled 
and tapped on top and on both sides to 
receive posts from Lufkin or Starrett 
dial indicator kits, the device has been 
used for aligning turbine couplings and 
smaller type couplings which were re- 
quired to function as one unit. It is not 
a magnetic holder. However, due to the 
trunnion barrel and the pivotal arm, it 
will adapt itself to any size shaft without 
bending the tightening bolt. 

Made of 6051 steel and heat treated 
to withstand pressure, this new dial indi- 
cator allows the workman to rotate shafts 
in order to check side alignment at 
quarter-turns or half-turns, or to face 
the alignment of shafts. The device is 
available, with full money-back guarantee 
if the customer is dissatisfied, from the 
Dial Indicator Co., 12771 Hemmingway 
St., Detroit, Michigan 48239. 

SAFETY INSOLE 

A new safety insole intended to pro- 
tect the foot against puncture wounds is 
being marketed by Bar-Way Manufac- 
turing Company. 

Known as Lamisoles, they can be 
slipped into ordinary work shoes or into 
boots, such as worn by firemen. 

Protection is provided by a single piece 
of spring-tempered stainless steel which 
extends from heel to toe. Laminated to 
the top of the stainless sheet is a latex 



foam cushion which Bar-Way claims 
makes shoes with the Lamisole insole 
more comfortable than shoes without the 
insole. 




Using stainless materials insures against 
rust which is an extra hazard in puncture 
wounds. 

Lamisoles are available in work shoe 
sizes from 6 to 15 and in boot sizes from 
4 to 13. They sell for $3 a pair. 

For further information, contact Bar- 
Way Manufacturing Company, Box 640, 
Stamford, Connecticut 06904, telephone 
(203) 327-0670. 

QUIK BRACE LOCK 




Deal Products, Easton, Pa., a manu- 
facturer of tubular steel scaffolding, has 
announced a technical advance in con- 
struction of its Quik Brace Lock feature. 

The notched section of the Quik Brace 
Lock slides easily over a fixed stud to 
provide quick, positive seating of the 
bracing. 

The new unit offers modifications to 
retainer clip and Quik Lock Slide as- 
sembly. The new retainer clip is made 
of tempered steel and is now fastened to 
the upper stud by means of a retainer 
coupling. The relocation of the retainer 
clip and the use of a harder material 
assures trouble-free performance. 

For details, write: Deal Products, P. O. 
Box 667, Easton, Pa. 18042. 



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MARCH, 1972 



35 




I r^^Jsi^ E M O R U\ M 



L.U. NO. 1 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Campbell, Lowe 
Carlson, Edward P. 
Duffels. William 
Franke. Walter R. 
Gorman. Frederick M. 
Powell, Lyman E. 
Sallander, A. L. 
Theisen, Anton 
Wennerslrand, Karl 
Williamson, J, O. 
Young, Durward S. 

L.U. NO. 4 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Connor, Harley R. 
Glasgow. Sumner 
Wulf, Fred H. 

L.U. NO. 5 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Knittel.C. J. 
McDonald, Robert W. 
Robke, Harry 

L.U. NO. 8 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Anderson, John H. 
Feindt, H., Sr, 
Haber, Michael A. 
Hent7. James 
Langreder, William C, 
Portscheller, Nicholas 

L.ll. NO. 12 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

Diecuch, Marco 
Dolphin, Bert rand 
Lewis, Leland 
Malone, John T. 
Youngs, Walter 

L.U. NO. 13 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Adamo, Frank 
Borst, John 
Coffey, Michael 
Fitzmaurice. Patrick 
Marasco, Tony 
McNeela, Martin 
Pantil, Joseph G 
Radice, Vincent 
Reiland, Arthur F. 
Reilly, Joseph 
Svcnson, Robert W. 

L.U. NO. 14 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 

Dameron, Clyde R. 
DeHart, Ralph A. 
Fischer, Earl H. 
Henry. Everett O. 
Lane, J. E. 
Lucas, T. P. 
Mangham, Johnny L. 
Monaco, Adam 
Petty, R. E. 
Weimer, E. L. 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

Chamberlain, Charles 
Kirkpatrick, Alfred 



L.U. NO. 19 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Conway, Ivan 
Cordell, Arthur 
Dick, David 
Gonda, Carl 
I.owry, Walter 
Mahoney, James A. 
Montpetit, Rosario 
Ruggles. Clarence C. 
Siris, James A. 
Slover, Jasper 
Smith, Charles T. 
Stribrny, Charles 
Turrill. Malcolm 

L.U. NO. 34 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Archibald, R. J. 
Arntsen, Albert 
Battenfeld. Arthur 
Blum, Andrew 
Farley, Theodore R. 
Swanson, Algot 
Wilson, Zynn M. 

L.U. NO. 35 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Caswell, Edisen 
Garvey, Michael J. 
Hromek, A. J. 

L.U. NO. 37 
SHAMOKIN, PA. 

Rhodes, William 
Smith, Jacob L. 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Griffith, Pat 
Isbell, Grover 
Vaughn, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 51 
BOSTON, MASS. 

LeBlanc, Dedos J. 

LU. NO. 53 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 

Holzner, Peter 
Johnson, Olaf 

L.U. NO. 54 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Dezort, Frank, Jr. 
Fench, John 
Pitra, William 

L.U. NO. 60 
INDIANAPOLIS, USD. 

Arney, Charles 
Bagman, Louis 
Beard, W.O. 
Fansler, Ralph W. 
Fischer. Adolph 
Gillette, Loren F. 
Gray, Frederick 
Hight, Virgil 
Humphrey, Carl 
Jones, Robert O. 
McDonald, Covert 
Miller, Charles E. 



Patterson. Cairns 
Reardon, Lawrence 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Kuykendall, J. M. 
Rasmuss;n, Jim 
Sartwell, Frank 

L.U. NO. 62 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bohman, Daniel 
Collins, Joseph C. 
Dambrauskas, Isador 
Haggard, J. W. 
Isganaitis, Judas 
Larson, Axel 
McClarence, Thomas 
Meneguzzo, John 
Olson, Wilhelm 
Peteison, Gust 
Schindel. Fred 
Silas, Alfonse 
Swanson, Oliver W. 
Topolski, Robert R. 

L.U. NO. 65 

PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 

Diakum. Michael 
Jensen, Jens 
Langford, Edward 

L.U. NO. 73 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Dougherty, Andrew 
Duckworth, David 
Jeffryes. Harry C, 
Lauff, Jacob 
Lewis. Chester E. 
Mabury, Winfred 
Roper, Harold D. 
Williams, William 
Wink, William 

L.U. NO. 90 
EVANSVILLE. IND. 

Evans, Arnold E. 
Hile, Herbert 
Hillenbrand, Robert J. 
Kincheloc, Ennise 
Pfingston, Edward 

L.U. NO. 93 
OTTAWA, ONT. 

Billings, Army 
Levesque, Amede 
Meunier, Roland 
Sheldrick, Hartley 
Villeneuve. Albert 



L.U. NO. 94 
PROVIDENCE, R.L 

Grossi, Luigi 
Hill, Robert 
Horton. Frederick W. 
Maltais, J. Thomas 
Mashtaler, Peter 
Russillo, Filimoni 

L.ll. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Dehn, Gordon F., Sr. 
Myers, C. Oscar 



L.U. NO. 113 
CHESTERTON, IND. 

Povlock, Martin 

L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Erwin, Arthur E. 

L.U. NO. 131 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Anderson, Henrik 
Davis, Clifford 
Dillard, A. C. 
Dunham, David L. 
Ferguson, William D. 
Hansen, Nathan O. 
Harrington, Gilbert H. 
Huseby, Hans T. 
Kachur, Anton 
Keith, James G. 
Larson, Lars A. 
Leader, Robert J. 
Olsesen, Charles M. 
Russell, Claude T. 
Schmitt, Francis A. 
Smith, Clement A. 
Turnquist, John 
Wilson. Robert L. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Doodv, Donald V. 
MacDonald, George H. 
Smith, John M. 
Tingen, John R. 
Valentine, William F. 

L.U. NO. 169 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Crick, Hardin 
Falkner. John 
Hayter, Fred. Sr. 
McCoy, Henry 

L.U. NO. 180 
VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Caldera, Joseph 
Harper, Fred 
Hildebrandt. MH. 
Standfill. R. H. 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Eklund. Charles 
Lambrecht, Rene 

L.U. NO. 184 
SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 

Hensen, H. S. 
Kleingeld, John 
Lees, Kenny 
Petersen, John 
Russell, Bert 
Sorensen, Joseph L. 
Taylor, Myles L. 
Wavne, John 
Weils, Fred 

L.U. NO. 186 
STEUBENVILLE, OHIO 

Kundrat, Mike 
Williamson, Joseph 



L.U. NO. 198 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Parker, James, Jr. 
Shearer, B. 
Sprayberry, J. L. 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Cherry, Dan 
Coffman, William L. 
Taylor, Seymour 

L.U. NO. 213 
HOUSTON. TEX. 

Matthews, I_uther P. 
Stephens, Billy R. 

L.U. NO. 218 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Collins, Joseph 
Pearson, Carl 
Sheppard, Richard 

L.U. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Collins, J. D. 
Deal, Leonard 
Edwards. Troy C. 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

George, E. A. 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Bergstrom, Carl 
Goldstein, Samuel 

L.U. NO. 257 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Blumberg, Pincus 
Deckert, John 
Holmes, Walter 
Laito, Kalle 
Meyn, George 
Papp, John 
Rosol. Stanley 
Santangelo, Thomas 
Short, James 
Sokolowski, James 
Sonenstein, Daniel 

L.U. NO. 262 
SAN JOSE, CALIF. 

Bottini, George 
Clark, C. E. 
Dellamaggiore, Adolf 
Dinapoli, Anthony 
Haste, Robert 
Magallon, Rodrigo C. 
Mollinedo, Alex 
Salcido, Mike 
Trevino, Theodore R. 

L.U. NO. 266 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 

Bryant. W. F. 
Zanirato, Frank 

L.U. NO. 274 
VINCENNES, IND. 

Quick, Aurel 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



I 



L.U. NO. 278 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Scott, Winfield 
Trusdell, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 322 
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. 

Connell, John 
Gauthier, Sianl 
McMasters, Alex 
Paonessa, Anthony 
Wilson, Edward 

L.U. NO. 331 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Andersen, Sigfred 
Bryant, James 
Davis, Charles L. 
Lette, J. C. 
McClanan, L. C. 

L.U. NO. 345 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Dailey, Charles O. 
Downs, T. J. 
English, J. O. 
Foster, Lloyd 
Gardner, P. R. 
Hubler, Frank A. 
Kirkland, C. V. 
McPherson, C. N. 
Saine, James E. 
Thomas, T. W. 
Thompson, Elmo C. 
Webster, Leon C. 
Worrell, Richard C. 

L.U. NO. 361 
DULUTH, MINN. 

Helsten, Einar 
Stenberg, Oscar 
Sundquist, Carl 
Sundquist, Henning 
Ziells, Edwin 

L.U. NO. 362 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Hill. Guy M. 

L.U. NO. 372 
LIMA, OHIO 

Gardner, Cletus 
Neu, William 

L.U. NO. 385 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Spano, Antonio 

L.U. NO. 440 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Allespack, George 
Fierle, Joseph 
Filer, John 
Sennett, Fred 

L.U. NO. 507 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Batey, Johnny L. 
Duer, Thomas E. 
Elder, Edwin P., Sr. 
Hatcher, J. A, 
Heath, John F, 
Helm, Sam 
Merryman, Ben T. 
Moore, A. B. 
Moore, William G. 
Pergerson, Edward H. 
Smotherman, J. F. 

L.U. NO. 620 
MADISON, N.J. 
Hrickson, Bertil E. 



Johnson, Harold N. S. 
Ohlweiler, Robert F. 
Ortman, George 

L.U. NO. 668 

PALO ALTO, CALIF. 

Cowart, Oscar T. 
UUven, Don 

L.U. NO. 674 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Becken, William H. 

L.U. NO. 678 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Shaffer, William 

L.U. NO. 698 
NEWPORT, KY. 

Reinert, Harry 
Springer, Levi 

1 .U. NO. 715 
ELIZABETH, N.J. 

Darner. Michael 
Finizio, Ernest 
Framnes, John 
Giitowski, John 
Murray, John W. 
Lowe, Victor 
Sadlon, John 

L.U. NO. 726 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Nelles, Francis H. 

L.U. NO. 729 
LIBERTY, N.Y. 

Vasko, August 

L.U. NO. 740 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Edwoodsen, August 
Froschauer, Alex 
Wren, James 

L.U. NO. 751 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

May, James 

L.U. NO. 787 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Nilsen, Nicolai 

L.U. NO. 791 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Christiansen. Ole 
Koliner, George 

L.U. NO. 792 
ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Carlson, Edor 
Foster, Dale 
Fradine. Carl 
Hagaman, Glen 
Holm, Floyd 
Klaung, Henry 
Lindstrom, Folke 

L.U. NO. 829 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 

Calhoun, John 
Hennington, A. L. 
Landre, Ralph 
Lechleiter, Joe 
McKibben, Rex B. 
Merario, Louis 

L.U. NO. 865 
BRUNSWICK, GA. 

Bowen, Walter M. 
Bowen, Wilbur E. 



L.U. NO. 916 
AURORA, ILL. 

Hefner, Floyd 

L.U. NO. 937 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Noesen, Frank 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Matatall, James D. 

L.U. NO. 1006 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. 

Cannon, Leo J. 
Connolly, Andrew 
Corliss, Earl B. 
Hoist. Karl 
Kwiatkowski, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1040 
EUREKA, CALIF. 

Katuola, John 
Olson, Henry 

LU. NO. 1098 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Bryant, T. E. 
Houston, Douglas S. 

L.U. NO. 1108 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Barb^ly. M'chael 
Bilton, David 
Crowell, Edward 
Holick, John 
Irwin, Charles 
Luvera, Frank 
Moore, John 
Teppenkamn. Fred 
Schowerth, Elmer 
Vander Wiel, John 

L.U. NO. 1134 
MT. KISCO, N.Y. 

Russell, B. Herbert 

L.U. NO. 1140 

SAN PEDRO, CALIF. 

Ballatyne, LeRoy 
Best, Reno <" 
Mason. Claude A. 
Nieman. M'lton H. 
Norwood, Raymond 
Reid, Harry J. 
Valdez. Tranquilino 

L.U. NO. }tii^ 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Petrovlch, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1172 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Metcalf, Lloyd V 

L.U. NO. 1175 
KINGSTON, N.Y. 
Cervantes, Jack A. 
.Ten?y, Frank. S''. 
Quick, Dewitt B. 

L.U. NO. 118^ 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Lanz'Ilo. H'""cu'es A. 
Tyszlak, John 

L.U. NO. 119= 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Noiele, Everett J. 
Ostrom, George 

Continued on page 38 



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Continued from page 37 

L.U. NO. 1214 
VVAI.I.A WALLA, 
WASH. 

Blakley, Glen 

L.U. NO. 1215 
CRESTON, IOWA 

Porter. Merle A. 

L.U. NO. 1235 
MODESTO, CALIF. 

Maddux, Monroe S. 

L.U. NO. 1266 
AUSTIN, TEX. 

Crow, Boyd 
McElrath, Robert H. 
Ortega, Henry 
Robertson, J. B. 
Tronrud, John 
Whitt, John C. 

L.U. NO. 1292 
HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

Clauss. Ernst 
Levine, Morris 
Webb, Harold 

L.U. NO. 1363 
OSHKOSH, WIS. 

Rothe, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 1396 
GOLDEN, COLO. 

Olson, B, Alvin 
Watson, William K. 

L.U. NO. 1397 
ROSLYN, N.Y. 
Arasim, Peter 
Johnsen. Paul 
Young, Victor, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1400 
SANTA MONICA, 
CALIF. 

Abranis, Johnnie B. 
Hooker, R. E 
Kersting. A. W. 
Parker, Harry W. 
Tompkins, Al 

L.U. NO. 1419 
JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Kautz, James C. 

L.U. NO. 1452 
DETROIT. MICH. 

Haire, Elmer 
Hartley, Chester 
Jamrog, Stanley G. 
Johnson, Leslie 
Moore, David 
Romine, Fred 
Sagaert, Omer 
Tomaszko. Henryk 
Wasson, Bruce 

L.U. NO. 1456 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Creamer. Michael 
Ellingsen, Olaf 
Ferritti, Biagio 
Knapp, Harry 
Kuenzler, Ernest 
MacDuff, Charles 
Mislak, Walter 
Ornmark, Oscar 
Pettersen, Magne 
Raastad, Andreas J. 
Skaara, Harry 

38 



Solhaug. Rolf 
Strom, Joseph 
Sundman, Edgar 

L.U. NO. 1489 
BURLINGTON, N.J. 

Butler, Will B. 
Christensen. Marinus 
Knowles, Robert W. 
Kopcho, Leo 
Thomas, James A, 
Wunder, Harry E. 

L.U. NO. 1513 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Achatz, Howard D. 
Duvall, Bailus 
Schneider, Paul 

L.U. NO. 1533 
TWO RIVERS, WIS. 

Walters, Glenn L. 

L.U. NO. 1545 
WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Heal. William 
Heim, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1598 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Barnes, Kenneth B 
Curtis, Frank W. 
Slater, Joseph W. 

L.U. NO. 1609 
HIBBING, MINN. 

Dreis, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1644 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Brenner, Bert 
Haluptzok, James 
Heilman. Jerome 
Johnson. Walter 
Lalli. August 
Mickelson, Ervin 
Miller, David 
Moen, Palmer 
Nelson. Edward 
Olson, William 
Richardson. Kenneth 
Seifert, Edward 
Thompson, Leonard 

L.U. NO. 1683 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

Hines, E. A. 

L.U. NO. 1693 
CHICAGO, ILL, 

Berndt, Roy 
Blomgren, Axel 
Chase, Clifford 
Ginerich, Howard 
Langman, Edwin 
McQuilling, Charles 
Paterson, Everett 
Swanson. Axel 



1707 
ONGVIEW, 



L.U. NO. 
KELSO, 
WASH. 

Holt, Soren 
Janicki, Andrew I. 
Jellison, Walter E. 
Kietzman, Benjamin W. 
Myers. John D. 
Napper, Rupert J. 

L.U. NO. 1846 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Arthur, Joseph, Jr. 



L.U. NO. 1849 
PASCO, WASH. 

Lowe, T. E. "Erv" 

L.U. NO. 1889 
DOWNER'S GROVE, 
ILL. 

Pelling, George 
Van Dorpe, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 1922 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Bortoli, Natalino 
Moore, Ernest 
Vanek, James J. 

L.U. NO. 2018 
LAKEWOOD, N.J. 

Feeley, Michael 
Fisher, Charles 
Mainard, Leonard 
McAteer, Thomas 
Miller, Edward 
Sculthorp, Thomas 
Simon. Frank 

L.U. NO. 2046 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Jenkins, Herbert 
Lahti, Ronald 
Newell, Charles 
Olsen, W. E. 
Tariel, Philip C. 

L.U. NO. 2067 
MEDFORD. ORE. 

Salyers, Marvin L. 

L.U. NO. 2308 
FULLERTON. CALIF. 

Dellinger. Charles L. 
Hook, Phil E. 

L.U. NO. 2375 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Colvin, W. A. 
Davis, Cecil R. 
Hieldbrandt, E. L. 
Hoover, Duane 
Kaich, Travis 
Kapsh, Martin 
Spina, Tony 
Tack, Louis 
Ter Haar, Dirk 
Tregarthen, William 3. 
Winkleman, WiUiam 

L.U. NO. 2398 

EL CAJON, CALIF. 

Cooper, Melvin 
Gilroy, Gordon 
Kay, David 
Lynch, Wallace 
Reynolds, Glen 
Skeen, M. W. 
Walker, F. C. 

L.U. NO. 2435 
INGLEWOOD, CALIF. 

Arndt, Gus 
Barber, Victor H. 
Burrell, Alex 
Burrell, Alex L. 
DeBaca, Robert C. 
McCombs, LeRoy 
Parrish, Forrect 
Pilling, Frank C. 
Schelecht, Ed 
Stromme, O. A. 
Tracy, James W. 
Wolcott, Harry K. 

THE CARPENTER 




Lakeland 
News 



Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida 



Edward A. Fitzpatrick, of Local 1602, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, arrived at the Home 
Dec. 3, 1971. 

• 
Albin B. Anderson, of Local 58, Chi- 
cago, III., arrived at the Home Dec. 6, 
1971. 

• 
Ernest Lindberg, of Local 958, Mar- 
quette, Mich., arrived at the Home Dec. 
6, 1971. 

• 
Fred Thelin, of Local 769, Pasadena, 
Calif., returned to the Home Dec. 7, 
1971. 

• 
Otto Jarvi, of Local 1308, Lake Worth, 
Fla., arrived at the Home Dec. 27, 1971. 
• 

Kazimierz Glovi'acki, of Local 199, 
Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home Dec. 
28, 1971. 

• 

Nick O. Bull, of Local 181, Chicago, 
111., arrived at the Home Dec. 28, 1971. 
• 
H. Earle Mann, of Local 1497, Los 
Angeles, Calif., died Dec. 1. 1971. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
Thos. Hayes, of Local 791, Brooklyn, 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Audel, Theodore 


39 


Belsaw Power Tools 


37 


Belsaw Sharp-All Co 


35 


Berger Instruments 


24 


Cheverolet 


17 


Chicago Technical College . . 


27 


Cooper Industries 


7 


Craftsman Book Co 


24 


Estwing Manufacturing 


15 


Estwing Manufacturing 


32 


Foley Manufacturing 


23 


Fugitt, Douglas 


31 


Goldblatt 


32 


Hydrolevel 


37 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


31 


Lee Overalls 


35 


Locksmithing Institute 


31 


North American School of 




Drafting 


39 


North American School of 




Surveying 


38 


Paneling Specialties 


38 


Rockwell Manufacturing .... 


5 


Stanley Hand Tools . . . Back Cover 



Pill Presentation 




Lakeland Home Superintendent Joseph 
Plymate presents a 55-year pin to a 
member of Local 377, Alton, 111., Wm. 
Johansen, who resides in the Home. 
Brother Johansen, born April 10, 1878, 
joined the Brotherhood in Local 377 on 
Sept. 11, 1916. 

N. Y., died Dec. 8, 1971. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
Albin Larson, of Local 226, Portland. 
Ore., died Dec. 8. 1971. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
Wm. A. Dent, of Local 993, Miami. 
Fla., died Dec. 9, 1971. He was buried in 
the Home Cemetery. 
• 
Perry J. Evans, of Local 69, Canton, 
Ohio, died Dec. 12, 1971. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
Christ Nelson, of Local 58, Chicago, 
111., died Dec. 24, 1971. He was buried in 
the Home Cemetery. 
• 
Ralph McPherson, of Local 22, San 
Francisco, Calif., died while on leave. 
• 
Claude F. Herring, of Local 1725, Day- 
tona Beach, Fla., withdrew from the 
Home Dec. 3, 1971. 
• 
Albert B. Moore, of Local 26, E. De- 
troit, Mich., withdrew from the Home 
Dec. 20, 1971. 

• 

Joseph O. Supper, of Local 122, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., withdrew from the Home 
Dec. 22, 1971. 



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39 



By 
Hindsight 

Or 

Foresight 

Labor's 

Assessment 

Was 

Correct 



■ At its mid-winter meeting in Miami Beach, last month, 
the AFL-CIO took a long hard look at the economic stagnation 
which had been driving unemployment figures upward and cre- 
ating an ever-increasing deficit in foreign trade. For the past 
two years the Nixon Administration has been delivering a great 
deal of optimistic rhetoric but very little in the way of action 
capable of moving the country oflf dead center. Oddly enough, 
the labor movement has been providing the administration with 
a program essential to getting the job done. As far back as 196Q 
labor has held national conferences aimed at focusing national 
attention on the sad plight of our foreign trade situation. It was 
very obvious to the labor movement that far back that the flight 
of American capital and American technology to foreign coun- 
tries was heading America toward a real economic crisis. When 
a multi-national corporation licenses a product abroad and when 
it exports American technology and capital to back up that 
licensing, the inevitable effect is a decline in American jobs. 

The sad fact is that the flight of American capital and tech- 
nology to Asia and South America continues to escalate. Under 
prevailing conditions there is little hope for change until such 
time as the tax loopholes whereby multi-national corporations 
avoid paying regular annual taxes on their foreign profits is 
closed. General Electric has factories or leasing arrangements 
in more than 50 nations. The company makes a profit whether 
the product is made in Taiwan, Japan. Brazil or America. How- 
ever, American workers have jobs only if the products are made 
in the U.S. or Canada. 

Consequently the real scapegoat in the situation is the Amer- 
ican worker. He must pay for the schools which develop the 
advanced technology, which, when exported, robs him of his job. 

All this the labor movement has pointed out continuously for 
the past three or four years. The fact that our foreign trade is 
showing a persistent deficit for the first time in 75 years is 
clearcut proof that organized labor was not merely whistling 
Dixie. 

The Miami AFL-CIO Executive Council Meeting also em- 
phasized that the current program of freezing wages but not 
profits can only lead to more woe for working people. As an an- 
swer for most of the problems, the Council determined that the 
labor movement needs to intensify its political efl'ectiveness. 
Since its very inception the motto of the America labor move- 
ment has been: let's elect our friends and reject our enemies. 
That motto looms larger in the current economic and political 
situation than ever before. 

For anyone who has been keeping in touch with economic 
and political developments for the past four or five years, it's 
obvious that the labor movement has been dead on target with 
its recommended programs. However, very few politicians have 
been listening and the time has come when those who have 
failed to pay any heed must be called to task next November. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



SYMBOLS OF OMIITY 




THE LEOPARD'S HEAD 

A statute of 1300 AD, provided that, 
no gold or silver could be sold in Eng- 
land until it was tested by "the Gar- 
diens of the Craft" and struck with the 
Leopard's Head — -a hallmark indicat- 
ing that the metal conformed to legal 
standards. 




BETTER GOAT'S MILK 

Nearly 2,000 years ago a goat's milk 
merchant in ancient Pompeii used this 
sign bearing a drawing of a goat to 
identify his dairy. 




STONE MARKER 

Stonemasons during the Middle Ages 
created graphic devices which, like 
a signature, were used to identify their 
work. 




AN ARTIST'S NOTATION 

Although his works bore the unmis- 
takeable imprint of his unsurpassed 
skill and feeling, Michelangelo also 
used this symbol to identify his art. 



YOUR OWN LABEL 

As a member in good standing of your union, skilled in your 
trade, your products and services may bear the imprint of this 
label. See that it's there. 




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APRIL 1972 



NT 



Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 






GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington. D. C. 20001 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, William Konyha 
2830 Copley Rd., Box 8175 
Akron, Ohio 44320 
Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

101 Marietta St., Suite 913 

Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

2800 Selkirk Drive 

Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

6323 N.W., Grand Blvd. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 
4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3. Victoria, B. C. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filline out this coupon and mailing it to tlie CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPEISTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



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Number of your Local Union must 
be (riven. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



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THE 



(§/A\[S[p[i[Jn'iT[l[I2 



VOLUME XCII 



No. 4 



APRIL, 1972 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Conflict in Our National Forests 2 

Labor Members Resign From Pay Board 5 

General Treasurer Nichols Honored in California 6 

Building Trades Explain Cancellation of Conference 12 

Building Trades, Architects Move for Closer Ties 14 

Konyha Named Second General Vice President 15 

New Training Facility in Fairbanks, Alaska 18 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 8 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 10 

Local Union News 16 

Apprenticeship and Training 20 

Service to the Brotherhood 23, 23, 3Q, 33, 34, 38 

CLIC Report 25 

Plane Gossip 29 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 31 

In Memoriam 35 

What's New? 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
0. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 

Printed in D. S. A. 



THE COVER 

April 13 marks the 229th anniver- 
sary of the birth of Thomas Jefferson, 
third President of the United States, 
author of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, and man of multiple skills 
and virtues. 

Many tributes have been paid to 
this great man and many memorials 
erected. One of the finest is the 
Thomas Jefferson Memorial, which 
gleams in white Vermont marble on 
our April cover. 

The Thomas Jefferson Memorial 
stands on the south shore of the Tidal 
Basin in West Potomac Park, Wash- 
ington, D.C. It is a circular stone 
structure which combines the archi- 
tectural elements of the dome of the 
Pantheon in Rome and the rotunda 
designed by Jefferson for the Univer- 
sity in Virginia. 

The central circular chamber, 86.3 
feet in diameter, is dominated by a 
full-length figure of Jefferson which is 
19 feet tall. 

The Memorial was dedicated by 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt on 
April 13, 1943. 

PLEASE NOTE: Readers who wish 
a copy of the cover, unniarred by a 
mailing label, and suitable for framing 
or display, may obtain one by writing 
tlie magazine, using tlie Brotherliood 
address sliown at lower left. The me- 
chanical requirements of our printer 
and tlie needs of our back-cover adver- 
tiser force us to place the label in the 
lower left corner of the cover. 





A proud forester surveys a clear-cut patch where 
Douglas lir was harvested 10 years before as part of an 
all-purpose, multiple-use forest management plan. 
The clearing now provides food for wildlife as well as 
sunlight for regeneration of new trees. 



Fast-growing suburbia keeps pace with the nation's 
housing needs only because the lumber industry is 
allowed to show discretion in timber management. Vital 
timber for housing, otherwise inaccessible in wilderness 
areas, will be lost if super conservationists take control. 



Jobs Threatened. . . . 

CONFLICT IN OUR 
NATIONAL FORESTS 

Resource Use? Or Wilderness Preservation? 



■ The 187 million acres of the 
National Forests managed by the 
Forest Service of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture contain some of 
America's most important resources. 
By law their bounty must provide a 
host of benefits to the American peo- 
ple — timber for housing, recreation, 
wildlife welfare, hunting and fishing, 
grazing, mining, and water. 

In addition to these values. Na- 
tional Forests provide jobs. 

These jobs and the economic well- 
being of hundreds of thousands of 
workers in communities throughout 
the United States are threatened 
more each day in the controversy 
over how much area of the National 
Forests should be managed as Wil- 
derness Areas and how much should 
be managed for timber and other 
multiple-use values. 

There need be no controversy if 
the needs of the American people 
are properly weighed and the facts 
of use versus non-use are understood 
by everyone. 

Union leaders, professional forest- 



ers, home builders, recreationists, 
the forest products industry, and 
state and county officials are mighti- 
ly concerned about the trend toward 
a massive lockup of commercial 
forest lands in the National Forest 
System. It is on those lands where 
the present thrust for Wilderness 
Preservation is concentrated. 

Genuine concern is justified. With- 
drawal for Wilderness Preservation, 
stated simply, means a nationwide 
loss of jobs because National Forest 
timber for mills will be in short sup- 
ply, as will finished wood products 
for housing and general construc- 
tion. 

The effects of a substantial reduc- 
tion in the supply of timber from 
the National Forests are widespread: 

• It means shutdowns or slow- 
downs for lumber, plywood, pulp 
and other wood product mills. 

• It means loss of jobs or income 
for our members in both woods and 
mills, as well as for carpenters and 



other construction trades because 
lumber and plywood for housing will 
be in short supply. 

• It means higher prices for hous- 
ing, in what promises to be another 
record year for housing, and disrup- 
tion of the national program to build 
26 million new and rehabilitated 
housing units during the 1970\s. 

• It means economic depression 
in forest products manufacturing 
areas, as well as loss of revenue for 
schools in National Forest depend- 
ent counties which share in the re- 
ceipts from Federal timber sales. 

• It means a negative environ- 
mental impact in the woods them- 
selves since major portions of the 
National Forests and other public 
lands would be denied management 
and protection essential to prevent 
wildfire, insect and disease epidem- 
ics, improve wildlife habitat, and 
enhanced water values. 

• It means that about tme percent 
of the American people will have 



THE CARPENTER 



been successful in establishing an 
almost exclusive system of play- 
grounds for an elitist minority — 
those with the means, stamina and 
inclination to sample the wilderness 
— at the expense of recreational op- 
portunities all Americans can enjoy. 

As defined by statute in the Wil- 
derness Act of 1964, "A Wilderness, 
in contrast with those areas where 
man and his own works dominate 
the landscape, is hereby recognized 
as an area where the earth and its 
community of life are untrammeled 
by man, where man himself is a visi- 
tor who does not remain." 

The 1964 Act immediately placed 
some 9.1 million acres of National 
Forest lands in the National Wil- 
derness System. Additionally, some 
5.5 million acres of Primitive Areas 
in the National Forests were set 
aside for study for addition to the 
Wilderness System at some future 
date and are managed by the Forest 
Service as if they already are Wil- 
derness Areas. 

Hearings Held 

Currently the Forest Service is 
holding field hearings in the West on 
the suitability of some 35 million 
acres of National Forest roadless 
areas for inclusion in the Wilderness 
System. 

The consequences of these possi- 
ble additions are staggering and al- 
ready being felt by reduced National 
Forest timber sale ofi'erings. 

The National Wilderness System 
now contains over 9.9 million acres 
of National Forests. Adding to this 
the 4.5 million acres of Primitive 
Areas now treated as wilderness, a 
total of 14.4 million acres of Nation- 
al Forest lands (more than 20,000 
square miles) have been withdrawn 
from multiple-use management for 
those people who want what they 
call "the wilderness experience." 
The land area involved in wilder- 
ness withdrawal is already greater 
than the area of the states of New 
Hampshire, Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut and Rhode Island put to- 
gether. 

In addition to Wilderness and 
Primitive Areas, where timber 
management and harvesting are out- 
lawed, the Forest Service has classi- 
fied 90 million of the 187-million- 
acre National Forest System as 



"noncommercial" and has classified 
over 27 million acres of "commer- 
cial" forest land primarily as recrea- 
tion or scenic zones. This leaves less 
than 70 million acres available for 
high production timber management 
and harvesting within environmental 
and other multiple-use constraints. 
About one-third of this area is still 
not managed for high timber produc- 
tivity when the citizens of this na- 
tion are demanding more wood for 
homes than at any other time in the 
nation's history. 




Government officials have fore- 
cast that unless timber growing pro- 
grams are intensified on the com- 
mercial timber areas of the National 
Forests, a gap of 11 billion board 
feet will exist between timber sup- 
ply and demand by the year 1974. 
But the gap is already evident. 

The use versus non-use controver- 
sy, plus the environmental awaken- 
ing of the public, has added 10 to 
15 percent per year to the cost of 
National Forest management. 

Forest Service Chief Edward P. 
Cliff recently told a Senate commit- 
tee that the "conflicting demands 
and viewpoints . . . make the life of 
a Federal forest administrator akin 
to that of a tightrope walker con- 
tinuously balancing on the wire." 

The Forest Service has withdrawn 
over two billion board feet of timber 
from scheduled sales because of 
preservation and other pressures, 
law suits and real or imagined en- 
vironmental problems. Scientifically 
proved forest management practices, 
recognized as essential to regenerate 
future timber crops, are under attack 
by the preservationists. Legislation 
has been introduced in the Congress 



to halt all clearcut timber harvesting 
on public forest lands for a two-year 
period while yet another study is 
conducted. 

The issue for the working man to 
understand is how these controver- 
sies and pressures affect him and his 
family. They do in both direct and 
subtle ways. 

The closest-to-home effect for 
woods and millworkers and carpen- 
ters is the threat to employment. 
Facts tell the story. 

The forest products industry is de- 
pendent for two-thirds of its wood 
supply from sources other than its 
own lands. One-third of the total 
supply comes from Federal lands, 
principally the National Forests. 

But these facts alone do not tell 
the whole story. In the West, the 
situation is much more critical. 
Western National Forests contain 61 
percent of the timber inventory in 
the region and 42 percent of the soft- 
wood sawtimber harvest comes from 
these lands. 

Many Jobs At Stake 

Hundreds of mills are wholly de- 
pendent upon National Forest tim- 
ber for their raw material; hundreds, 
too, are partially dependent upon 
National Forest timber to keep their 
mills open. And the communities 
and counties in which the bulk of 
these mills are located also are de- 
pendent in full or in part upon the 
forest-based industries for their eco- 
nomic viability. 

The National Forest System con- 
tains 53% of the nation's inventory 
of standing softwood sawtimber. 
This fact alone has been cited by 
committees of the Congress and in 
recommendations of a Presidential 
Task Force as the basis for recom- 
mendations that timber management 
be intensified on National Forest 
areas designated for commercial 
timber production. But the forest 
land base is being eroded. The great- 
est threat is from those who call 
themselves conservationists while ad- 
vocating preservation. 

The Sierra Club and other groups 
are encouraging local citizens to 
work for wholesale additions to the 
Wilderness System. From its wilder- 
ness policy statement it can be de- 
duced that the Sierra Club is work- 



APRIL, 1972 



ing for the ultimate withdrawal of 
approximately 122 million acres for 
Wilderness Preservation. The Club 
is on record in its wilderness policy 
as advocating that "at least twice 
the area now devoted to urban uses 
such as buildings, roads, parking 
lots, railroads and airports" con- 
stitute an adequate wilderness reser- 
vation. Government reports reveal 
that 13 percent of the land area — or 
61 million acres — is in urban or 
built-up use. Twice this figure would 
put wilderness preservation at 122 
million acres. 

To attain the housing production 
called for by Congress in the Hous- 
ing Act of 1968 — for 26 million new 
or rehabilitated units of housing by 
1978 — will require intensified silvi- 
cultural management on the nation's 
public as well as private non-indus- 
trial forest lands. 

Brotherhood Position 

The United Brotherhood is force- 
fully on record as to its position on 
housing needs and National Forest 
timber management. Peter E. Ter- 
zick, now retired general treasurer, 
told a Senate committee last June 
that the nation's housing goals are 
"not vague dreams snatched from 
clouds." He said: 

"They represent need — economic 
and social. They represent consumer 
demand. The consumer wants new 



and improved housing. He will have 
the money to pay for it. It must be 
available to him. And this can be 
done only through assurance of a 
continuous flow of construction ma- 
terials — wood, the spinal column of 
a house, in particular." 

Even if jobs weren't threatened, 
the nation should ask itself. "What 
does Wilderness provide in the way 
of recreational opportunities?" 

It provides hikers and backpack- 
ers with more than ample room to 
sample nature in the raw. It means 
no roads, no restaurants, no motels 
or campgrounds, no sanitation ac- 
commodations. 

A Forest Service survey that the 
typical wilderness visitor is a college 
graduate, usually has an advanced 
degree, is in the upper-income 
brackets, and camps out for a week 
or more pursuing a hobby that often 
is related to his professional work. 

Families who in their entire life- 
time never see a wilderness could 
benefit more from the expenditure 
of government funds for develop- 
ment of outdoor recreation areas in 
cities and their environs. Even for 
people who can afford trips to 
Wilderness Areas, their inaccessibil- 
ity creates problems. 

The very concept of Wilderness is 
restrictive, says Los Angeles attor- 
ney and conservationist Eric Julber. 
"What an irony that in Europe — the 




"I can't believe they ate the whole thing!" 



old world, the land of aristocracy — 
the common working people can see 
the wonders of Our Creator, while 
in America, land of democracy the 
common people are excluded." 

Julber points to the Swiss philoso- 
phy as being diametrically opposed 
to our purist philosophy. "The purist 
says: Keep people out. The Swiss 
ethic says: Invite them in, the more 
the better." 

He terms wilderness preservation 
a "purist-conservationist" philoso- 
phy since the acreage consigned to 
wilderness results in a 600 to 1 dis- 
parity between what is provided to 
the elite and what is provided to 
middle- and low-income Americans. 
He says the practical elTect of Wil- 
derness Preservation is to make the 
most beautiful areas of America "off 
limits" to anyone who is not willing 
or able to backpack or hike into 
them. 

In September 1971. Julber told a 
Senate committee that actual Forest 
Service figures for recreation use of 
Wilderness and Primitive Areas of 
the National Forests reveal "use by 
less than one million persons . . . 
less than one-half of one percent of 
our population." 

Groups Organizing 

Since the National Forests belong 
to all U.S. citizens — not just an 
elitist minority — working men and 
women are making their voices 
heard in the debate — with their Sen- 
ators and Congressmen, at regional 
and local Forest Service hearings on 
additional Wilderness set asides, and 
with their elected state and local of- 
ficials. 

The wives of woods and millwork- 
ers are organizing too. In Montana 
workers' wives have established an 
organization known as WOOD — ■ 
Women Opposed To Official De- 
pression. They are attending hear- 
ings and are getting on record as to 
the economic consequences that will 
result for their families from wil- 
derness set-asides. 

Working men and women can 
recognize that conservation means 
the "wise use of the earth and its re- 
sources," not the preservation of the 
earth and its resources which will 
provide no benefits for the greatest 
good or for the greatest number of 
people. ■ 



THE CARPENTER 




Labor Members Resign from 
Industry-Dominated Pay Board 

Consfrucflon Unions to Stay in CISC 
So Long as It Remains an 
Autonomous Tripartite Panel 



■ After eight months of persistent 
eifort to make the Wage Board a truly 
tripartite and viable instrument for 
fighting inflation, George Meany, 
AFL-CIO President, and three other 
labor members of the Board handed in 
their resignations on March 22. 

The fact that wholesale prices in- 
creased at an annual rate of 8.4 per- 
cent during February while wages re- 
mained frozen undoubtedly helped to 
precipitate the decision of the four out 
of five labor members on the Board to 
sever their connections with the Board 

In announcing his resignation, Pres- 
ident Meany pointed out that the Pay 
Board is actually under the domination 
of the Nixon administration. Tripartite 
in theory only, the Board has been 
dominated by business interests. It has 
maintained a rigidity in wage matters 
that has been totally incompatible with 
the failure of the Price Board to hold 
down prices. 

While prices have been going up 
steadily and profits have been climbing 
rapidly, workers' wages have been held 
down within a rigid formula. 

This unhappy situation is the direct 
outgrowth of the fact that the ma- 
chinery for controlling prices has been 
very ineffective, whereas the wages of 
workers falling within the purview of 
the Wage Board have been rigidly 
controlled. 

The labor members of the Pay 
Board found this to be an untenable 
position. Hence, they took the only 
avenue that was logically open to them 
— resignation from the Board. 

In contrast to the miserable failure 
of the Pay Board, the Construction In- 
dustry Stabilization Committee, the 
agency which deals with wage matters 
in the construction industry, has suc- 
ceeded in achieving flexible and far 
more equitable procedures for stabiliz- 
ing wages in construction. 



Following the resignation of the 
four labor members of the Pay Board, 
the Executive Committee of the Build- 
ing and Construction Trades Depart- 
ment carefully considered all the im- 
plications involved for building trades 
unions, as well as all the alternatives 
available. 

It was determined that so long as the 
Construction Industry Stabilization 
Committee remains a truly tripartite 
body, and so long as it remains an 
autonomous organization, the labor 
members of the Committee should con- 
tinue to serve. 

The following resolution adopted by 
the Building Trades Department spells 
out the position which will remain in 
effect so long as the Committee main- 
tains its independence: 

WHEREAS, it has been the con- 
sistent objective of the American labor 
movement, including the Building and 
Construction Trades Department, to 
support the objective of stabilizing the 
economy since the detrimental con- 
sequences of inflation are felt most 
severely by the working population in 
contrast to the gains derived from in- 
flation by the owners of land and other 
property whose capital values grow in 
proportion to the excesses of the in- 
flationary spiral; and 

WHEREAS, the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department together 
with the other importpnt parts of the 
labor movement are determined that 
any program for stabilizing the econ- 
omy should in the language of the 
Economic Stabilization Act Amend- 
ments of 1971 "be generally fair and 
equitable" and "call for generally com- 
parable sacrifices by business and labor 
as well as other segments of the econ- 
omy"; and 

WHEREAS, the American labor 
movement specified as an indispensable 
requirement of its participation in the 



wage stabilization program that the 
administrative machinery for conduct- 
ing such program should be truly tri- 
partite with representatives from labor, 
management and the pubhc; and 

WHEREAS, this request was ac- 
cepted by the President of the United 
States; and 

WHEREAS, the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department is in 
complete agreement with the statement 
of the Executive Council of the AFL- 
CIO dated March 22, 1972, which 
proves indisputably that "The (Pay) 
Board is not tripartite. It is not inde- 
pendent and autonomous. The Pay 
Board represents Government control. 
It represents political and business in- 
terests"; and 

WHEREAS, the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department fully sup- 
ports the position of the AFL-CIO 
Executive Council that the labor mem- 
bers of the Pay Board will not be "a 
part of the window dressing for this 
system of unfair and inequitable Gov- 
ernment control of wages, for the 
benefit of business profits"; and 

WHEREAS, the Construction In- 
dustry Staisilization Committee includ- 
ing its system of craft dispute boards 
made up of representatives of man- 
agement and labor was established by 
Executive Order No. 11588 in March 
1971 prior to the establishment of the 
Pay Board which was established Oc- 
tober 15, 1971; and 

WHEREAS, the Executive Order 
establishing the Construction Industry 
Stabilization Committee stated among 
other things that "stabilization of wages 
and prices is most effectively achieved 
when accompanied by positive action 
of labor and management" and "this 

Continued on Page 12 



APRIL, 1972 




Nichols Hono 
in California 



■ Calif ornians bid Godspeed to one of their own, Febru- 
ary 14, as nearly 1,000 persons filled the ballroom of the Air- 
port Plaza Hotel, San Mateo, Calif., to pay tribute to the 
Brotherhood's General Treasurer, Charles E. Nichols. It was a 
gala St. Valentine's Day, as West Coast friends joined with 
international leaders of the Brotherhood in opening their hearts 
to a man who has worked hard and well for the craft and the labor 
movement. Representatives of management and of local and 
state governments participated in the testimonial dinner. ■ 



1. General President William Sidell, a 
Californian liimself, joins the tribute. 

2. The Bay Counties District Council 
presents a Bay scene in metal sculpture. 
D.C. Sec. A. A. Figone is at right. 

3. Gordon McCulloch presents a testi- 
monial plaque on behalf of the Los An- 
geles District Council to the bouoree and 
his wife. 

4. State Building Trades President Jimmy 
Lee presents a resolution in tribute from 
the California State Senate. 

5. 8th District GEB Member M. B. 
Bryant presents a book filled with letters 
of best wishes. 

6. Exec. VP Mel Roots of the Operative 
Plasterers and Cement Masons presents a 
plaque from his union. 

7. A six-foot loaf of San Francisco sour- 
dough bread is proffered on behalf of the 
Bay Counties by John Watts. 

8. The Nichols' daughter (standing) and 
son-in-law, left, Mr. and Mrs. Don Garcia 
of Stockton, are recognized. 





HIIMGTOM 




jrf&ifc 



ROUNDUP 



NIXON PROMISE— Largely overlooked in the press has been a very special effort 
President Nixon has made to reduce the unemployment problem. During his election 
campaign, Nixon promised to reduce the size of Lyndon Johnson's White House 
staff. He's more than doubled it. In fact, one office alone, Dr. Henry 
Kissinger's National Security Council, has more employees, 85, than President 
Franklin Roosevelt's entire White House advisory staff during World War II. And 
the new WTnite House Domestic Council has 73 employees whose average salary 
is $17,000. 

STRIKES AT LOW LEVEL— The number of workers engaged in work stoppages is currently 
at the lowest level in more than three years. J. Curtis Counts, director of 
the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, reported that as of the end of 
February, Federal mediators were involved in 161 strike situations involving 
30,463 idled workers. The lowest previous figure was the 120 disputes in- 
volving 27,079 workers as of December 27, 1968. The Agency's highest recent 
work stoppage total involved 407 disputes with 499,723 workers during the week 
of July 21, 1971. 

INFORM JOBLESS ON BENEFITS-AFL-CIG President George Meany has urged Secretary of 
Labor James D. Hodgson to require state unemployment compensation agencies to 
inform jobless workers of the extended unemployment compensation benefits enacted 
by Congress late last year. 

"Failure by the states to inform unemployed workers about the extended 
benefit program is depriving thousands of jobless workers of extended unemployment 
compensation benefits Congress meant them to have," Meany wrote Hodgson. 

DEVALUATION of the dollar through an increase in the price of gold is acceptable 
so far as it goes, but much more is needed if the American economy is to be 
strengthened, the AFL-CIO has told Congress. 

Comjnenting on legislation that would raise the price of gold to S38 an ounce, 
AFL-CIO Legislative Director Andrew J. Biemiller told the House Banking Commit- 
tee that "devaluation of the U.S. dollar in itself cannot solve America's 
problems. " 

Biemiller pointed out that foreign countries will be able to counter this 
U.S. move through manipulating their own currencies and warned that international 
speculation involving the export of billions of dollars in American jobs, tech- 
nology, capital and industrial capacity abroad is accelerating. 

2,500,000 JOBS— If the Nixon Administration really wants to cut down on unemployment 
significantly, it will have to provide between 2,500,000 and 3,000,000 jobs 
during the next twelve months, in the opinion of the AFL-CIO. 

And there are no indications that its economic policies will produce 
anywhere near that number of jobs. Meanwhile, business profits go up. Corporate 
after-taxes profits in the second half of 1971 were 18 percent greater than in 
the same period of 1970. 

CORPORATION TIES— Labor has charged that President Nixon's Phase II program is 
shaped to favor corporations over workers and consumers — and revelations about 
the people running it continue to show a tilt in that direction. 

Leo Perils, director of AFL-CIO Community Services, told a luncheon meeting 
of the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Department that all of the present Price Commission 
members have strong ties to corporate managements. 

Meanwhile, an examination of the Pay Board shows that four of its ten top 
staff people are from business. Three are from government, one from education, 
one is a lawyer and one is a former Air Force officer. There are no key people 
on the staff with union backgrounds. 

OIL IMPORTS-The AFL-CIO urged passage of legislation that would require half of 
all petroleum imported to the United States to be transported aboard 
U.S. -flag ships. 

8 THE CARPENTER 



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4 







CANADIAN 

^m T" 'HT M 

T^ REPORT 




I UK INKMl'l.in MKM- I'llll UK \( HDSS CAN MIA 



CLC Submission to Government 
Received Quietly, with Little Comment 



The annual submission of tiie Ca- 
nadian Labor Congress to the gov- 
ernment of Canada, March 6, was a 
good measure of the progressive, yet 
considered and down-to-earth, ap- 
proach of the trade union leadership 
to the major economic, social and 
political problems of the day 

A summary of the 20.000 word 
brief was read by CLC President Don- 
ald MacDonald and was listened to 
by Prime Minister Trudeau and most 
of his cabinet intently if not with 
enjoyment. 

The exercise was not planned to be 
pleasurable. The Prime Minister was 
told in unmistakable terms that the 
measures which the government has 
adopted and which have helped cre- 
ate such heavy unemployment are 
exactly those which the CLC warned 
the government against in its last two 
submissions — in 1970 and 1971. 

Not only has the government wor- 
ried unduly about price stability in- 
stead of unemployment but it has been 
so slow in realizing the error of its 
ways that it is very unlikely that the 
situation will improve this year. 

"Many Canadian families." said the 
CLC, "will continue to suffer because 
of past policies, probably the most 
inept, ill-advised and inhuman policies 



ever thrust upon any nation in mod- 
ern times." 

This was strong language, but the 
Prime Minister sat, listening without 
offering one word of explanation or 
reply. What reply could he make when 
a month earlier he had said publicly 
that jobs were available for anyone 
who wanted one, but his own Man- 
power Department's figures showed 
that there were only 44.300 job open- 
ings in all of Canada for 665,000 
jobless? 

That was the opening gun. The CLC 
brief then urged the government to 
ignore management protests against 
revisions to the national labor legis- 
lation which would give unions some 
protection for their members in con- 
nection with technological change. The 
new minister of labor Martin O'Con- 
nell replied after MacDonald was 
finished, that the labor act changes 
were almost ready for submission to 
parliament with a preamble which, he 
thouiiht, trade unions would like. Time 
will fell. 

Another piece of legislation on 
which the CLC urged the government 
not to yield to the pressures of the 
corporations was Bill C-256 which 
would help the consumer and provide 
for more efficient operation of the Ca- 



nadian economy. But on this point 
the appeal probably fell of deaf ears. 
The bill as originally planned is as 
good as dead. The responsible min- 
ister Ron Basford has been shifted to 
another portfolio. 

The Congress also severely criticized 
the so-called tax reform bill which 
became effective January 1. It said 
the bill was so clumsy and complex 
that it will be a bonanza for tax law- 
yers "if they themselves are able to 
decipher it." 

The total tax burden still falls most 
heavily on working people and the 
lower income groups due to a heavy, 
regressive sales tax among other 
things. 

The CLC again voiced support for 
a guaranteed annual income plan and 
urged an increase in the basic old age 
pension to $100 a month from $80 
with the age of eligibility reduced to 
60 from 6.5". 

All in all it was a very well thought- 
out presentation which deserved a bet- 
ter response from the government than 
it got. 

But this is an election year. The 
Prime Minister has put his foot in 
his mouth so often that he decided 
to be cautious about the CLC presenta- 
tion. After allowing a few of his 
ministers to deal with some particular 
points, he quickly adjourned the 
meeting. 

BC Building Trades 
In CLRA Negotiations 

The building trades are having a 
tough time in negotiations with man- 
agement in British Columbia. 

At a special meeting called in Van- 
couver the same day as the CLC sub- 
mission in Ottawa, representatives of 
the building trades unions reported 
that the Construction Labor Relations 
Association was not budging an inch 
from its adamant position in this 
year's negotiations. 

CLRA threatened to use industrial 
unions to defeat the building trades, 
but the meeting heard from the B.C. 
Federation of Labor that this was just 
nonsense. No unions were going to 
allow themselves to be used against 
the building trades. 

In Ontario the province's construc- 
tion companies ran large advertise- 
ments calling for compulsory arbitra- 
tion in building trades disputes. But 
one of the building industry publica- 
tions in which the advertisement ap- 
peared said that this was just non- 
sense. Compulsory arbitration would 
do nobody any good. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Growing Economy 
Despite Jobless 

A report released by Statistics Can- 
ada last month show that it is possible 
to have a growing economy on the 
one hand and heavy unemployment 
on tl:e other. 

Few would have guessed it but eco- 
nomic growth last year was almost 
double 1970. Yet unemployment in 
1971 was worse than in the previous 
year — 6.4% on an annual average 
compared with 5.9%. 

Economic output in 1971 had an 
increase of 4.5% in 1971 against only 
2.4% in 1970. 

Still this increase was below the 
average for the 10-year period from 
1961 to 1970. In this period eco- 
nomic growth went ahead by 5.6% 
a year. 

These figures measured real growth, 
not inflated by price increases. 

1971 Business Profits 
Up 18.2% During 1971 

If the economy was statistically 
healthy last year but there were still 
so many jobless, then who benefitted? 

Statistics Canada has produced an- 
other set of figures which might pro- 
vide a clue. 

These figures show a sharp rise in 
profits in 1971 over 1970, by 18.2% 
to almost $4V2 billion. 

The evidence is, therefore, that pro- 
ductivity and prices went up more than 
labor and other costs. The figures ex- 
clude agriculture, fishing, trapping and 
construction. 

It should be taken into account, 
however, that profits were down by 
9% in 1970 over 1969. Still the 1971 
profit increase is impressive. For ex- 
ample, the last three months of the 
year showed a profit increase of 37% 
on a total revenue gain of only 14%. 

Wori( Stoppages 
Were Low Last Year 

Time lost through work stoppages 
last year were well down from 1969 
and 1970. Only 17 man-days were 
lost for every 10,000 worked com- 
pared with 39 man-days lost in the 
previous year and 46 man-days lost 
in '69. 

This was the best record since 1961 
when only 1 1 man-days were lost for 
every 10,000 worked. 

This low rate of time lost through 
strikes and lockouts proves once again 



that in an average year most nego- 
tiations are settled peacefully. 

This was clearly shown in the fig- 
ures released by the Ontario Depart- 
ment of Labor for time lost through 
work stoppages last year, down almost 
50% from 1970. 

And in 1971, 94% of all negotia- 
tions were settled peacefully This was 
a splendid record. 

Manufacturing accounted for 75.3% 
of time lost through strikes and lock- 
outs in 1971 compared with 91% in 
1970. On the other hand, construction 
accounted for 15% of time lost last 
year compared with only 5.5% 
in 1970. 

The way 1972 started, it is likely 
that time lost through work stoppages 
will be higher. Three important strikes 
took place before the year was two 
months old and none were in manu- 
facturing or construction. 

All three were in public service 
organizations. The air traffic control- 
lers and the electrical technicians 
struck against Air Canada. The broad- 
Cast engineers and technicians struck 
against the Canadian Broadcasting 
Corporation. 

The feeling is that the Treasury 
Board was determined to hold down 
wages in the public sector and that 
the negotiators in the public services 
were too tough or not well-informed 
about what makes for successful col- 
lective bargaining. 

Knowles Seeks Lower 
Retirement Age 

Member of Parliament Stanley 
Knowles, who has represented the 
Winnipeg North Centre seat since 
1972, is the top parliamentary expert 
on parliamentary procedure. But he 
has an even more important claim to 
fame. He has worked all these years 
for a better deal for senior citizens 
and no session of parliament has gone 
by without his putting forward some 
claim for more help for old age 
pensioners. 

Knowles, who still holds a typo- 
graphical union card in good stand- 
ing, is now campaigning for changes 
in the Old Age Security Act and the 
Canada Pension Act to allow em- 
ployees to voluntarily retire at age 60 
with an adequate pension. This would 
not only give oldsters a chance to live 
in dignity but open up jobs for 
younger people. 

The motion he put before the 

House of Commons would reduce the 

pensionable age from 65 to 60 and 

Continued on Page 12 




\ 



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APRIL, 1972 



11 



Canadian Report 

Continued from Page 11 

increase the basic pension to $150 a 
month. The basic pension is now $80 
a month at age 65 with a 2% cost 
of living escalator. 

The Winnipeg M.P. says the c-of-1 
escalator is ridiculous when the cost 
of living went up 5'^c in 1971. 

Labor Members Resign 

Continued from Page 5 
Order is required to establish an ar- 
rangement for the application of gen- 
eral criteria by an operating structure 
with a minimum of Government in- 
volvement and sanctions within which 
labor and management may act to ef- 
fectuate the stabilization of wages and 
prices consistent with and in further- 
ance of effective collective bargaining 
in the industry"; and 

WHEREAS, the Construction In- 
dustry Stabilization Committee and its 
craft dispute boards were continued by 
subsequent Executive Orders of the 
President including Executive Order 
No. 1 1 640; and 

WHEREAS, the Construction Indus- 
try Stabilization Committee and its 
craft dispute boards have succeeded 
thus far in stabilizing wages in the most 
complex industry in the United States 
economy and have facilitated the set- 
tlement of labor disputes in the indus- 
try, with due regard to the interests of 
the workers and the maintenance of 
our system of free collective bargain- 
ing; and 

WHEREAS, the Pay Board has 
sought to interfere in the administra- 
tion of the Construction Industry 
Stabilization Committee: and 

WHEREAS, the Construction In- 
dustry Stabilization Committee has 
vigorously maintained a consistent 
position that it is a separate and auton- 
omous body established by a separate 
Executive Order of the President of 
the United States free from the super- 
vision and control of the Pay Board. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RE- 
SOLVED: That the labor members of 
the Construction Industry Stabilization 
Committee will continue to serve on 
the Committee only so long as the 
Construction Industry Stabilization 
Committee continues to maintain ef- 
fectively its separate and autonomous 
position free from the supervision or 
the control of the Pay Board. 



Building Trades Explain Decision 
To Cancel '72 Legislative Conference 



The Executive Council of the Build- 
ing and Construction Trades Depart- 
ment, AFL-CIO, decided at its regular 
quarterly meeting in Bal Harbour. 
Florida, February 7, 8. and 9 that the 
Department would not issue a Call for 
a National Legislative Conference this 
year. 

It was the view of the Executive 
Council that the convening of a Na- 
tional Legislative Conference is not a 
routine matter and that the expense of 
such Conference to Local Unions. State 
and Local Building and Construction 
Trades Councils. International Unions 
and the Department is justified only if 
there is a reasonable anticipation that 
practical results could be accom- 
plished. 

The Department and the Executive 
Council are proud of the record of the 
National Legislative Conference in pre- 
vious years in aiding in the enactment 
of laws which are of direct benefit to 
members of the building and construc- 
tion trades unions, such as: 

The 1959 Construction Industry 

Amendments to the Taft-Hartley 

Act 

The Fringe Benefit Amendments to 
the Davis-Bacon Act 

The Contract and Work Hours Stan- 
dards Act 

The Federal Construction and Safe- 
ty Act 

A careful review and evaluation by 
the Executive Council of the pending 
bills which are of direct interest to 
building and construction tradesmen 
show that very small, if any. practical 
results could be reasonably expected 
at this session of the Congress. 

As an illustration of this point, it 
was determined that the Situs Picket- 
ing Bill could be moved through the 
preliminary legislative processes on 
Capitol Hill but no final favorable ac- 
tion could he reasonably expected at 
this time. 

It was therefore decided not to hold 
the Legislative Conference. 

The Department, of course, will con- 
tinue to keep close watch on the legis- 
lative moves on the Hill and will alert 
affiliated unions and Councils to ex- 
press their views by letter or telegram 
when such action appears advisable. 

Conference Statement 

After the Executive Council had 
reached its decision on the 1972 Leg- 
islative Conference, President Frank 



Bonadio and the Departmental Vice 
Presidents felt that earlier notification 
could be given those who had planned 
to attend the sessions if a statement on 
the action was immediately released, 
without waiting for the preparation of 
a formal announcement. 

This statement was handed out to 
the press, some sections of which pro- 
ceeded to give their own erroneous no- 
tions of the "real" reason for the can- 
cellation. Thus, some newspapers 
carried stories which had no basis in 
fact. 

The real and only reasons for the de- 
cision were those contained in the for- 
mal notification and the statement, 
which read: 

BAL HARBOUR, FLA. Feb. 7— 
The Executive Council of the Building 
and Construction Trades Department, 
AFL-CIO, today decided that the De- 
partment would not conduct a Na- 
tional Legislative Conference this year. 

Suspension of the four-day session, 
which brings to Washington nearly 4,- 
000 delegates from thoughout the 
United States to concentrate on mat- 
ters of legislative importance to the 
building and construtclion trades, is 
part of a sweeping reorganization of 
the three-million member Department 
that was authorized at the 56th bien- 
nial Convention last November. 

"We are taking entirely new ap- 
proaches to a nximber of situations," 
President Frank Bonadio explained. 

"The Department has conducted a 
National Legislative Conference 15 or 
16 times in the last 20 years. We have 
been addressed by Presidents of the 
United Slates, the top leaders and 
members of both parties of the United 
States Senate and the House of Repre- 
sentatives, cabinet members, the Presi- 
dent of the AFL-CIO, the heads of the 
departments and offices of the AFL- 
CIO and outstanding representatives 
of the construction industry. 

"These conferences have been gen- 
erally highly successful. 

"But the Executive Council feels 
that the time now has come to consider 
a change in the format, just as we are 
restructuring a number of other ac- 
tivities to meet the new challenges and 
opportunities of this period. It there- 
fore seemed practical not to proceed 
with the Legislative Conference at this 
particular time." 

Bonadio said that the decision not 
to hold a National Legislative Confer- 
ence this spring was unanimous. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Preparations for 1973 Talks 
With GE and Westinghouse 




Meeting in Wasiiington, January 27, the Steering Committee 
for tlie Conference Board whicli deals witli General Electric 
and Westinghouse made preparations for the 1973 negotiations. 
Subcommittees will cover contract language, general research, 
legal problems, wages and cost of living, pension and insurance, 
national bargaining goals, and publicity and education. Chair- 
men and members will be from all CBC unions. A timetable 
was suggested and pre-negotiation programs, such as a national 
rally and grass roots meetings, were discussed. The Brother- 
hood's Director of Organization, Peter Ochocki, at right in the 
picture, participated in the talks. Another CBC session is sched- 
uled this month. 



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13 



Building Trades, Architects Move For Closer Ties 



■ To establish for the first time a 
close working relationship between the 
Building and Construction Trades De- 
partment. AFL-CIO and The Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects in a num- 
ber of construction industry matters, a 
series of meetings between top repre- 
sentatives of the two organizations has 
been inaugurated. 

Representing the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department is the 
Executive Council, composed of Gen- 
eral Presidents of ten of the 1 7 Na- 
tional and International Unions affili- 
ated with the 3-million member De- 
partment, and the President and Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the Department. 

Representing The American Insti- 
tute of Architects, composed of 24,000 
individual architects throughout the 
United States, is its Labor Liaison Task 
Force, headed by George M. White, 
Architect of the Capitol; Francis 
Kelly. A. LA. Administrator of Govern- 
ment Affairs: Hillard T. Smith. Jr. of 
Lake Worth. Florida: James A. Scheel- 
er. Deputy Executive Vice President; 




William L. Slayton. Honorable A. LA. 
Executive Vice President and William 
M. Linscott of Kansas City, Missouri. 

"The group is prepared to discuss 
anything submitted by either side which 
will be helpful in creating a friendly 
and constructive relationship between 
the Architects and our affiliated Gen- 
eral Presidents," explained Robert A. 
Georgine, Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Building and Construction Trades De- 
partment. 

White and Georgine both said that 
the A. LA. long had worked closely 
with owners, contractors, engineers, 
practically everyone concerned with 
construction. Now it is their joint 
wish to have a closer relationship with 
the people who actually do the build- 
ing. 



"We are off and running," they said 
concerning the meetings. 

Items for possible discussion at the 
continuing scries of meetings will be: 

• Industrialization of the building 
process — the roles of architecture and 
labor, 

• A joint scholarship program for 
apprentices or journeymen who wish 
to become architects, 

• Urban housing — -craftsmanship 
required in the midst of production 
needs, 

• Unification of the construction 
industry, 

• A center for the joint study of 
building codes and regulations, 

• The construction seasonality 
problem, 

• Manpower shortages and appren- 
ticeship programs, 

• Jurisdictional disputes, 

• Safety, and 

• Construction financing problems, 
including the cost of money. ■ 



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14 



THE CARPENTER 



William Konyha Is Named 
Second General Vice President 



■ William Konyha, General Ex- 
ecutive Board Member from the 3rd 
District, has been named new Sec- 
ond General Vice President of the 
Brotherhood. 

His appointment was announced 
April 1 by General President Wil- 
liam Sidell, after the General Execu- 
tive Board confirmed his nomination. 

Brother Konyha fills a vacancy in 
the top leadership of the Brother- 
hood which was created March 1 
with the elevation of William Sidell 
to the General Presidency and the 
subsequent elevation of Herbert C. 
Skinner to the First General Vice 
Presidency, following the retirement 
of M. A. Hutcheson. 

Bill Konyha has been active in 
Brotherhood affairs for more than 
three decades. He began learning the 
craft at the early age of 1 4, working 
beside his father, a home builder, on 
construction jobs. In 1932 he be- 
came an apprentice in Local 1180, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

In 1938 he became a Brotherhood 
organizer and assisted the late Harry 
Schwarzer in organizing lumberyards 
and shops in the Cleveland, O., area. 
He volunteered for service with the 
Seabees in World War II and served 
as a first class carpenter in the South 
Pacific until October, 1945. when he 
received an honorable discharge. 

He returned to Local 1180 and to 
the trade, and in 1947 he became a 
safety representative of the Cleve- 





KONYHA 

land District Council and president 
of his local union. 

A strong advocate of job safety 
practices. Bill Konyha initiated new 
safety laws in construction which 
have become part of the safety stan- 
dards of the State of Ohio. His work 
in this field has brought him citations 
from the City of Cleveland, from 
Cuyahoga County, the Ohio Senate 
and House of Representatives, and 
from other official groups. 

In 1952 he was appointed a Gen- 
eral Representative of the Brother- 
hood, and his work at that time was 
directed primarily to representations 
at the atomic energy plant in Waver- 
ly, O. There were 2,000 Brother- 
hood members employed at this 
project at the height of construction, 
and the sound labor record achieved 
there prompted the U.S. Secretary of 
Labor to cite Brother Konyha for 
his work there. 

The new Second General Vice 
President has served as president of 
the Ohio State Council of Carpen- 
ters since 1962. He helped to launch 
a state pension program and a health 
and welfare program covering most 
of the State of Ohio., 

A vice president of the state AFL- 
CIO, he is now president emeritus 
of Local 1 1 80. 

He was elected as a member of 
the General Executive Board at the 
31st General Convention in San 
Francisco, Calif. ■ 



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APRIL, 1972 



15 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 




Perth Amboy Local Celebraies Diamond Anniversary 

The officers of Local 65 celebrated the 75tli anniversary of their local union at a dinner-dance held recently. From left to 
rijjht are: Martin Pollack, trustee; William Stewart, trustee; Frank Barsi, trustee; Carl Leonhard, conductor. Donald I.ucov. vice 
president: Edward Szyrwiel, president: Edward Grobleski, business agent; Raleigh Rajoppi, General Representative, Second 
District; Louis Paone, financial secretary; John Sindet, recording secretary; Soreii Jensen, retired president; and Teddy \>'alkoczy, 
Roofer's business agent. 



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Hartford Retiree 



Raleigh Kajoppi left, presented a gift to 
Louis Paone for 30 continuous years as 
financial secretary of Local 65, 




Edward Grobleski, business agent of 
Local 65, acted as toastmaster during the 
local's 75th anniversary dinner-dance. 



At COPE Banquet 

Robert Gray, secretary-treasurer of the 
Carpenters' Metropolitan District Council 
of Philadelphia, Pa. and Mcinity, talks 
with I'.S. Senator Hubert Humphrey on 
the occasion of the 23rd Annual Banquet 
and Victory Celebration of the Philadel- 
phia Committee on Political Education, 
AFL-CIO, held Saturday. February S, 
1972, at the Bellevue Stratford Hotel. 
The banquet was the largest in COPE's 
history, with attendance exceeding 1100 
union members and friends of the labor 
movement. Senator Humphrey was prin- 
cipal speaker at the banquet. 




Carl Loren/.en, a charter member of 
Local 1941, Hartford, Conn., has retired 
after 37 years as financial secretary. 

Here, Brother Lorenzen accepts a 
check presented to him at a testimonial 
given in his honor. The check was pre- 
sented by President David Kutcher, left, 
on behalf of the men of Local 1941. At 
the time of retirement Brother Lorenzen 
was 81 years old. 

Union Industries Show 

The 1972 AFL-CIO Union Industries 
Show will be held in San Diego. Calif., 
June 9-14. Exhibits will be on display 
in the San Diego Community Concourse. 

Members of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
in Southern California are urged to visit 
the big exposition. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



First Buyers of 
Breakthrough Home 

The first purchasers of homes designed 
and built by National Homes Corpora- 
tion especially for HDD's "Operation 
BREAKTHROUGH" Program were re- 
cently introduced in ceremonies at 
Kalamazoo, Mich., marking the first 
BREAKTHROUGH units to be occupied. 

National Homes, which employs 
members of the Brotherhood, is the larg- 
est of the seven producers of systems- 
built housing which have erected homes 
on the Kalamazoo test site, a coopera- 
tive community of 245 homes, including 
townhouse and apartment units. 

BREAKTHROUGH test sites are being 
developed at eight other locations scat- 
tered throughout the country, but the 
Kalamazoo development is the first to be 
completed. 

Don MacLaughlin, National's program 
manager for Operation BREAK- 
THROUGH said, "The National units 
are two-story townhouses, with two or 
three bedrooms, full basement, central 
air-conditioning and heating. They are 
also equipped with all major kitchen and 
laundry appliances." 

He said that the company's Operation 
BREAKTHROUGH systems include 
both two and three-dimensional modular 
units that could be used for single- 
family homes, townhouses and garden 
apartments. 

First occupants of National Homes at 
Kalamazoo are a couple with one child, 
Dr. and Mrs. Tai-Shun Lin. Lin is a 
post-doctorate research associate at West- 
ern Michigan University where his wife 
is a student in the Graduate School of 
Business. 

To acquire their home, the Lins paid 
a $460 membership fee which is return- 
able if they move. Their monthly pay- 
ments are $159.00 including all home 
repairs, yard maintenance and their share 




Pictured in the roomy kitchen of the 
National Homes' townhouse they've 
selected at New Horizon Village are Dr. 
and Mrs. Tai-Shun Lin and son, Ted. 
Lin is a post-doctorate research associate 
at Western Michigan University where 
his wife is a student at the Graduate 
School of Business. 



of the interest and taxes on the cooper- 
ative. 

National's BREAKTHROUGH town- 
houses are completely finished and as- 
sembled in the company's main Laf- 
ayette, Indiana plant, which is one of the 
company's 18 modular and mobile home 
plants in the U.S. They consist of four 
three-dimensional modules which form 
a two-family townhouse. 

Still Going Strong 

The Typographical Union insists that 
this story of a 98-year-old mailer is true: 

A newspaper photographer took his 
picture for an article. As the photogra- 
pher left, he told the oldster: "I hope 
I'll be right here taking your picture 
when you're a 100." 

"Don't know why you shouldn't be," 
the mailer replied. "You look healthy 
enough to me." (P AI) 

AFL-CIO Addition 

Construction has begun on an 8-story 
addition to the AFL-CIO headquarters 
in Washington, D.C., on the site where 
the old Lafayette Hotel stood. (See pic- 
ture, top right.) The House of Labor 
will double its facilities with this proj- 
ect, which is expected to take about 18 
months to complete. Members of the 
Brotherhood, shown in the picture at 
right, construct a barricade for "side- 
walk superintendents." 





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APRIL, 1972 



17 




It's Alaskan cold outside, but the new training school at Fairbanks, Alaska, is warm and busy within. 



NEW TINNING 

FACLfTY IN 
FAIRBANKS ALASIC^ 

A "Thank You Wall" bears the names of individuals and In the new office, from left: Stewart Stephens. Peter Kiewit Sons Co.; 

organizations which contributed time, labor, and mate- Raymond Young, Ka Mar Construction; Raymond Moran, Local 

rial to the new facility. This display is in the main hall 1243; James Lundgren, Pacific Construction; Ed Perkowski, Local 

of the building. »here manipulalive skills are learned. 1243; and Ireland Hensley, president. Local 1243. 






Tm-^ 




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%U'%L3^i4s%urujrujns 



18 



THE CARPENTER 





Bert Manske installs duct work, as Sheet 
Metal BA Fran Dewey oifers advice. 



The main hall of the new training build- 
ing before completion last winter. 





Trustee Richard Bamett puts the finish- 
ing touches on an insulated door jam. 



Julius Kornfeind and Jack Conger work 
on the stairway to the supply area. 



Apprentice School Graduate Robert 
Backer drills through sheet asbestos 
which will line the welding area. 



Lee Roy Parham checks the railing on an 
overhead supply storage area. 




■ Brotherhood members in Fair- 
banks, Alaska, began their carpen- 
ters' apprenticeship training pro- 
gram 18 years ago, when "the going 
was rough." 

Funds for equipment and supplies 
were limited, and donations were al- 
ways needed. The one instructor, 
Stanford Stowell, kept the training 
program moving on schedule only 
with the parttime help of other 
members scattered through the ter- 
ritory. (This was before statehood 
was achieved in 1959.) 

The situation changed dramati- 
cally three years ago at the bargain- 
ing table when the Associated Gen- 
eral Contractors aareed to give — 
over and above the wage package 
— five cents an hour for every Car- 
penter hour worked in the area to- 
ward an apprenticeship and train- 
ing program. 

These additional funds opened 
up many possibilities, including 
plans for a building to house the 
program. They also permitted ex- 
pansion of training activity into out- 
lying areas and the bringing of 
more minority trainees into the pro- 
gram. (They now represent more 
than 30% of trainees.) 

Last December the Fairbanks 
Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship 
Committe opened and dedicated its 
new training headquarters, shown 
on the opposite page. It is one of 
the most modern in Alaska and is, 
in fact, one of the most complete 
apprenticeship training facilities in 
the realm of the Brotherhood. 

The new building, with shops, 
classrooms, and an office, was built 
primarily with donated materials 
and labor. Labor was provided in 
part by members of the local union. 
Business representatives from the 
Painters, the Electrical Workers, 
and the Sheet Metal Workers Un- 
ions were among those who rolled 
up their sleeves and helped to get 
the job done. 

The main working area of the 
facility is large enough for the con- 
struction of a complete house, and 
this is one of the periodic projects 
undertaken by the students. Upon 
the completion of such a house, 
massive doors open (See picture, op- 
posite page.) and the house is moved 
outside, where it is offered for sale 
by bid. 

Such a project is not meant to be 
a money-making venture, JAC 
leaders state. Instead, it is intended 
as a means of reclaiming the bulk 
of the funds expended to build the 
house and undertake other student 
projects. ■ 



^1 



nPPREllTICESHIF 



jiyi 




^ TR 




APPRENTICESHIP CONTESTS 
CALENDAR, FEBRUARY, 1972 



New MDTA Contract Signed in Washington 

General President William Sidell and training leaders of the Brotherhood met 
with US Department of Labor officials March 17 to sign our fourth 18-month 
Manpower Development and Training Agreement. General President Sidell and 
Secretary of Labor James Hodgson sign the pact, above. Standing, from left, are: 
Bob McConnon, director of the National Projects Administration, USDL; Brother- 
hood Technical Director Leo Gable; Robert Worthington, Social Commissioner, 
Bureau of Adult Vocational and Technical Education, HEW; First General Vice 
President Herbert Skinner; Project Coordinator H. E. Morris; Assistant Secretary 
of Labor W. J. Llserj, Jr.; and Paul J. Fasser, Jr., Assistant Secretary and Man- 
power Administrator. 

South Florida Holds 
Apprentice Contest 

The South Florida Carpenters' Joint 
Apprenticeship Program, sponsored by 
both labor and management, recently 
held its annual contest to select the "Ap- 
prentice of the Year." 

Ten fourth-year apprentices competed 
in the contest. These young men were 
selected by the Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee on the basis of their overall 
school and work records. 

The apprentices were competing for 
the coveted Arthur E. Stewart Memorial 
Trophy, which was initiated by the 
Miami Carpenters' District Council in 
memory of the late business representa- 
tive. 

The contest was won by David L. Left to right: John L. Hickey, .secretary- 
Hurst; second place, Donald A. Keen, treasurer of the Miami Carpenters Dis- 
and third place. Glen E. Johnson. trict Council; David L. Hurst, winner of 

David will compete in a statewide con- the contest, and William G. Oliver, busi- 
test to be held in Pensacola, May 11-12, ness representative of Miami District 
1972. Council. 




Carpenter 

X 



State 

Alabama 

(April 28, 29) 
Alaska 
Arizona 

(May 20) 
California 

(June 1,2, 3) 
Colorado 
Delaware 
District of Col. 
Florida 
Hawaii 
Idaho 
Illinois 

(May 25. 26) 
Indiana 
Iowa 
Kansas 
Louisiana 
Maryland 

(May 26) 
Massachusetts X 

(May 19,20) 
Michigan X 

(May 23, 24) 
Minnesota X 

Missouri X 

(May 17) 
Nebraska X 

Nevada X 

(April 14, 15) 
New Jersey X 

New Mexico X 

(May 5, 6) 
New York X 

(June 7, 8) 
North Dakota X 
Ohio X 

Oklahoma X 

Oregon X 

(Feb. 12, 13) 
Pennsylvania X 

(May 19, 20) 
Tennessee X 

Texas X 

(April 27. 28) 
Utah X 

(May 13.20) 
Washington X 

(May 21, 22, 23) 
Wisconsin X 

Wyoming X 

(May 6, 7) 
Alberta X 

(March 17, 18) 
British Col. X 

Ontario X 

Manitoba X 

Total 40 



Mill 
Cabinet 



X 

X 



X 

X 
X 



X 
X 



X 



X 



X 



Millnright 

X 

X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 
X 



16 



X 

23 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



Ontario Certificates 




Journeyman's certificates «ere recently 
presented at the Pickering Generating 
Station, a nuclear power facility near 
Toronto, Ontario. Bill McMorrovv, sec- 
ond from left, above, a member of Car- 
penters Local 27, received his carpenter 
certificate from General Foreman Rudy 
Kalnins. At left is Foreman John Barons, 
and at right is Chief Steward Len Buck- 
land, Barons is a member of Local 666, 
Etohicoke, and Buckland is a member of 
Local 3233, Richmond Hill. 




Ray Monette, left, receives his mill- 
wright certificate from Foreman Jim 
Nicboll. Both men are members of Mill- 
wright Local 2309. 

Unions Cover Wide 
Area of Concern 

Trade unions are interested in far 
more than collective bargaining alone- 
according to a survey on social action 
made by the Canadian Labor Con- 
gress. 

Areas of union involvement include 
education and participation in citizen 
organizations, consumer affairs, health 
concerns, human rights and anti- 
pollution activities. 

More and more unions are becom- 
ing anti-pollution advocates and are 
setting up anti-pollution committees. 
Some are trying to get anti-pollution 
clauses into their contracts. A few 
have succeeded. 



Look for the union label when you 
shop. Check for the union shop card 
when you're seeking goods and services. 
They are your assurance of quality work, 
performed under fair working conditions. 




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APRIL, 1972 



21 



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DICTIONARY 



This is the 9th of a new feature series pfannecf to keep your better 
informed on the meoning of terms related to collective bargaining, 
union contracts, anci union business. Foilow it closely, and your union 
membership will become more meaningful, and your ability to partici- 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength- 
ened. It was compiled by the International Labor Press Assn, and is 
used with permission. 



guaranteed rate: Minimum rate guaranteed to an incentive worker. 

giiideposts: A concept developed by the Council of Economic Ad- 
visers in 1963-64 that wage increases, in general, should be lim- 
ited to the national rise in manhour productivity, and that prices 
should be cut in any industry whose productivity exceeded the 
national average. The objective was to guard against inflation. 
The AFL-CIO, while embracing the objective, rejected the device 
as unworkable. Employers, while hailing the notion of wage 
limitations, spurned any hint of government influence on prices. 

guild: A labor union, e.g.. Guild of Musical Artists, American 
Newspaper Guild. 

GAW: Guaranteed annual wage. 

H 

hightime: Extra pay for a worker employed in high places above 
ground, or deep places below ground. 

hiring hall: A place where out-of-work members of a union apply 
for jobs. There are legal restrictions on how such hiring is con- 
ducted. Such halls are run by unions in industries where the em- 
ployer hires through the union. Examples are the maritime unions 
and the building and construction trades. 

hit the bricks: Go on strike. 

holiday pay: Wages for holidays not worked; the premium rate 
established for work performed on holidays. Holidays are 
specified and premium rates established in most union contracts. 

hot cargo: Goods made or shipped by non-union labor. Many 
unions refuse to handle such products, especially when produced 
or shipped by a struck company. 

hourly-rated workers: Those whose pay is figured on hours actually 
worked during a week. 

House of Labor: The AFL-CIO: 



ICFTU: International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, a fed- 
eration of labor movements in the free nations. It was formed in 
1949 after it predecessor, the World Federation of Trade Unions, 
fell under unbreakable communist control. 

illegal strike: A strike in violation of contract, or one not properly 
voted by the union membership or not authorized by established 
union or legal procedure; or one in violation of a court injunc- 
tion. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 




(1) DETROIT, MICH.— Robert Millar's 
membership record dating back to Dec. 
12, 1923, made him the oldest member 
from a standpoint of union service at the 
30th anniversary celebration of Carpen- 
ters Local 19 back in 1969. President 
Harry Manchester is presenting a 45- 
year lapel pin to Millar. From left, are 
Vernon W. Lough, a 40-year member; 
John Harrington, secretary-treasurer, De- 
troit Carpenters District Council; Robert 
J. McArthur, another 40-year member; 
Amos Stewart, the local's financial sec- 
retary-business manager; Millar; Jack 
Kelley, a member and former officer of 
Local 19, Manchester, and Business 
Agents James King and Kenneth Mac- 
Donell. 

(2) PORTLAND, ORE. — Local 226 
recently honored four 50-year members. 
They are shown seated, front row, left 
to right: Anfelt B. Hansen, J. J. Man- 
wilier. E. A. Johnson, and L. A. Loren- 
zen. Standing are: Kenny Davis, U.B.C. 
West Coast, Coordinator; Lyie Hiller, 71h 
District Board Member; Swan Nelson, 
executive secretary District Council; John 
DeFrance, financial secretary, 226; and 
Gary Larsen, president 226. 

There were 135 members who received 
their 25-Year pins for 1970-71. 

(3) CHICAGO, ILL. — Presentation of 
25-year and 50-year membership pins 
were made to members of Carpenters 
Local 80 on July 13, 1971. 

The 50-year pin presentation included, 
left to right — Don Rawcliffe, director of 
Welfare Department, Chicago District 




Council; Herman M. Koop, financial sec- 
retary, Local 80; George Vest, Jr., presi- 
dent, Chicago District Council; Charles 
A. Thompson, secretary-treasurer, Chi- 
cago District Council; Albert Schon and 
John J. Watt, business representative, 50- 
year members of Local 80; William Cook, 
Business representative, Chicago District 



Council; Stewart F. Robertson, president, 
local 80; Stanley Jaworowski, business 
representative, Chicago District Council; 
and Rudy Perisich, General Office Rep- 
resentative. 

Photographs (3-A) and (3-B) show 
members of Local 80 who received 25- 
year pins. 




APRIL, 1972 



23 



^ a^r 



jSP""- 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. ^ 



(1) PERTH AMBOY, N. J.— The mem- 
bership of Carpenters Locul 65 held a 
dinner and dance honoring fellow mem- 
bers who had achieved 25 years and 
more of service in the organization. 

Shown in the photograph. First row 
seated, left to right, Edward Szjrwiel, 
president; Raleigh Rajoppi, General Rep- 
resentative, Second District; and Edward 
Grobleski, business agent. 

Second row seated, left to right, James 
Harkay, Mike Kielian, Salvatore Tufaro, 
William Sedlak, John Sorensen, Auge 




Nielsen, Joseph Sobcyk, James Leone, 
Andrew Farkas, Alex Melega. Carl Bang, 
Stephen Opitz, Al Beyers, John Sockvist, 
George Kourtz, Peter Eliff, Alex Zelin- 
ski, James Kozo. 

Third row seated, Walter Palawada, 
Everett Moore. Wilham Francz, Thomas 
Stasko, Vincent Burdash, William Ko- 
chek, John Warrick, John Kalamin, John 
Sindet, Louis Paone, John Selin, Soren 
Jensen, Martin Pollock, Harold Olsen, 
Carl Beck, Viggo Pedersen, Adolph Kun- 
ciewicz. 

Standing, left to right, Robert Varrel- 
man, Robert Jorgensen, Franklin Fred- 
ericks, Russell Sharyk, John Sydocko. 
John Hricz, Frank Schmitz, Steve Mun- 
yak, Henry Clausen, Raymond Nelson, 
John Bucholz, Royal Lybeck, Francis 
Petersen, Stanley Fredericks, Mike Ra- 
pach, Oliver Kenen, Henry Nelson, Ed- 
ward Jensen, Norman Laricy, George 
Homan, Anthony Covino, Axel Jensen, 
Carl Rasmussen, Emil Springer, David 
Roswall, Herbert LaForge, Hans Nielsen, 
Albert Aymer, Robert Behr, Niel Men- 
ucci, Al Moyer, Edger Talbot, Hunter 
Ward, Frank Herman, Louis Guarnieri, 
John Elko, Edward Hirshak. David Kap- 
lan, Joseph Fuchs, William Koenig, 
Daniel Sandorff, John Montani, Nick 
Post, Michael Sharick, Frank Mickalow- 
ski, Hans Rasmussen. 

Not in the picture, but also receiving 
pins for 25-years or more service: George 
Pedersen, Finer Jensen. Robert Harrison, 
Jens Jensen, Harvey Miller, F-dward 
Miljes, Chris Lehman, Rudolp Weissman, 
Viggo Waldsen, Anton Volky, Otto Strobl. 
Joseph Smith, Carl Schuman, Herman 
Hansen, Steve Fedor, Walter Buhlman, 
Donald Aarne, Richard Meyers, George 



Maleski, Chris Mark, George Martin, 
Alex Zero, Michael Volosin, Finer Ton- 
nesen, V. Jestin, Joseph Slinsky. John 
Salaki, Lief Piersen, Gunnar Pearson, 
James Kozo, John Goetz, Vaina Koski, 
Joseph Koeth, Norbet Jost, Frank Her- 
man. Morris Gelber. Wendell Fischer, 
Viggo Ferdinander. William Fedor. Paul 
Christensen. Andrew Christensen, Karl 
Bender, John Andersen, Chris Lehoj, 
Leon Larson, Alex Vollman, Frank 
Stnicz, Walter Ostergaard. William Miller, 
William Knox, David Kertes, Olaf Hus- 
land, Leo Dressier, Nis Dinesen, John 
Christensen, Arthur Carstensen, Arnold 
Beck. Sam Asman. 

(I A) Ralph Rajoppi, General Represent- 
ative, presenting gifts to John Selin. left, 
for 62 years continuous membership in 
Local 65. and Edward Hirshak. center, 
receiving for his father John Hirshak 
who could not attend. 

(2> SASKATOON. SASK.— A number 
of members of Local 1805 have received 
their 25-year membership pins. Leo Fritz, 
General Representative, presented the 
pins to the brothers at a regular meeting. 
Shown with Gen. Rep. Fritz, left, stand- 
ing: Ken Devitt, George Altmann, Nick 
Gruza, Earl Herlen John Cook, and 
W. R. G. (Sandy) Gamett. Seated, left to 
right: Alf. Christensen. Alex Ringberg, 
Peter Gruza, George Cole, Peter Erick- 
son and Ben Grimsteit. Missing from the 
picture were Arthur Andall and Walde- 
mar Arnold. 

These 14 members have done and are 
still contributing a great deal to Local 
1805. They were honored, along with 
their wives, at a dinner in a local res- 
taurant. 




24 



THE CARPENTER 




Plaques, Certificates Planned for 
Locals with High CLIC Activity 



To give recognition to those local 
unions which do an outstanding job 
of cooperating with the Carpenters 
Legislative Improvement Committee, 
two awards have been instituted. 

One is a bronze plaque which will 
be awarded to the local union in each 
district which showed the greatest rec- 
ord of CLIC participation — on a per- 
centage of members making contribu- 
tions — during 1971. (Recipients of 
these plaques will be announced in a 
later issue of The Carpenter.) 

A special certificate is also being 
presented to local unions which have 
shown dramatic improvement in their 
local CLIC programs during the past 
year. 

• 

State council conventions continue 
to give active support to the 1972 
CLIC program. The California State 
Council, which met in February, 
raised a total of $3,233.00, for a new 
record. 

The Western Council of Produc- 
tion and Industrial Workers, which 
met in convention in Portland, Ore., 
during March, also came up with a 
sizable total. The delegates to this 
convention contributed $2,130.00. 



In light of the current economic 
climate, when labor is getting short- 
changed on all fronts, the importance 




Two members of CLIC staff display 
certificate and plaque. 

of political action has never been 
greater. Wages are frozen, but price 
controls are a farce. Unemployment 
is stuck at the 6% level. There is 
inflation and unemployment at the 
same time, a new phenomenon in 
American economic history. The solu- 
tions to these problems will come only 
through political action. Therefore, it 
is imperative that the Administration 
and Congress elected next November 
have a sympathetic understanding of 
the sorry plight existing among work- 
ing people. 



1972 Membership Contributions to the 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 



Local City 

221 Morenci 
445 Kingman 



Amount Local City 



ARIZONA 



$ 15.00 
20.00 



ARKANSAS 

1249 Fayetteville 20.00 

CALIFORNIA 

California State Council Convention $3233.00 
25 Los Angeles 50.00* 



34 San Fiancisco 

35 San Rafael 

36 Oakland 

42 San Francisco 

102 Oakland 

180 Vallejo 

235 Riverside 

266 Stockton 

300 Ventura 

316 San Jose 

354 Gilroy 



Amount 

120.00- 
10.00* 
40.00* 
10.00* 
60.00* 
40.00* 
30.00* 
20.00* 
20.00* 
80.00* 
10.00* 



Local 


City 


Amount 


386 


San Andreas 


10.00* 


483 


San Francisco 


30.00* 


530 


Los Angeles 


45.00* 


550 


Oakland 


20.00* 


586 


Sacramento 


238.00* 


642 


Richmond 


40.00* 


668 


Palo Alto 


10.00* 


701 


Fresno 


30.00* 


703 


Lockland 


16.00 


710 


Long Beach 


40.00* 


721 


Los Angeles 


40.00* 


743 


Bakeisfield 


40.00* 


751 


Santa Rosa 


40.00* 


769 


Pasadena 


10.00* 


771 


Watsonville 


10.00* 


829 


Santa Cruz 


10.00* 


844 


Reseda 


50.00* 


848 


San Bruno 


30.00* 


925 


Salinas 


20.00* 


929 


Los Angeles 


20.00* 


944 


San Bernardino 


110.00* 


946 


Los Angeles 


20.00* 


1046 


Palm Springs 


20.00* 


1051 


Sacramento 


10.00* 


1052 


Hollywood 


40.00* 


1062 


Santa Barbara 


30.00* 


1109 


Visalia 


10.00* 


1113 


San Bernardino 


10.00* 


1125 


Los Angeles 


20.00* 


1140 


San Pedro 


30.00* 


1149 


San Francisco 


10.00* 


1158 


Berkeley 


11.00* 


1205 


Indio 


10.00* 


1235 


Modesto 


20.00* 


1280 


Mountain View 


40.00* 


1288 


Chico 


20.00* 


1296 


San Diego 


20.00* 


1300 


San Diego 


10.00* 


1323 


Monterey 


50.00* 


1358 


LaJolla 


69.00* 


1400 


Santa Monica 


50.00* 


1408 


Redwood City 


162.00* 


1418 


Lodi 


30.00* 


1437 


Compton 


30.00* 


1453 


Huntington Beach 


45.00* 


1473 


Oakland-Fruitville 


30.00* 


1478 


Redondo 


160.00* 


1490 


San Diego 


30.00* 


1495 


Chico 


20.00* 


1496 


Fresno 


20.00* 


1497 


E. Los Angeles 


20.00* 


1506 


Los Angeles 


40.00* 


1507 


El Monte 


60.00* 


1570 


Marysville 


20.00* 


1571 


E. San Diego 


30.00* 


1599 


Redding 


10.00* 


1607 


Los Angeles 


50.00* 


1618 


Sacramento 


30.00* 


1622 


Hayward 


101.00* 


1632 


San Luis Obispo 


20.00* 


1648 


Laguna Beach 


30.00* 


1662 


Van Nuys 


20.00* 


1752 


Pomona 


40.00* 


1789 


Bijou 


10.00* 


1815 


Santa Ana 


45.00* 


1861 


Milpitas 


20.00* 



* Includes contributions from delegates 
representing their local unions at the State 
Council Conventions. In some instances, 
these convention contributions were the only 
monies received from the local unions. 

■Consists of 1% voluntary payroll deduc- 
tions rom the Recording Secretary of the lo- 
cal union. 

-Consists of 1% voluntary payroll deduc- 
tions from the B.A. and Officers of the local 
tmion. 

"Consists of 1% voluntary payroll deduc- 
tions from Officers of the district council. 

'Consists of 1% voluntary payroll deduc- 
tions from B.A. of the local union. 



APRIL, 1972 



25 



CLIC Report 



Continued from Page 25 



Local City 



1869 
1903 
1913 
1930 
1959 
1976 
2006 
2015 
2042 
2046 
2048 
2078 
2095 
2114 
2164 
2170 
2172 
2185 
2203 
2288 
2308 
2361 
2375 
2398 
2435 
2463 
2665 
2882 
3088 



Manteca 

Grass Valley 

San Fernando 

Santa Susana 

Riverside 

Los Angeles 

Los Gatos 

Santa Paula 

Oxnard 

Martinez 

Corona 

Vista 

San Rafael 

Napa 

San Francisco 

Sacramento 

Santa Ana 

A V Palmdale 

Anaheim 

Los Angeles 

Fullerlon 

Garden Grove 

Los Angeles 

El Cajon 

Inglewood 

Ventura 

Santa Ana 

Santa Rosa 

Stockton 



COLORADO 

2249 Adams Co. 



Amount 

10.00* 
10.00* 
50.00* 
10.00* 
40.00* 
63.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
40.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
20.00* 
lO.OO* 
20.00* 
30.00* 
69.00* 
20.00* 
60.00* 
98.00 
40.00* 
30.00* 
100.00* 
33.00* 
40.00* 
47.00* 
50.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 



!.00 



Local City 

CONNECTICUT 

43 Hartford 
79 New Haven 
210 Stamford 



Amount Local City 



120.00 
40.00 
40.00 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

1631 Washington 4.00 

2311 Washington 30.00 



FLORIDA 

1250 Homestead 

1308 Lake Worth 

1510 Tampa 

1765 Orlando 

2024 Miami 

2795 Fort Lauderdale 



547 Athens 
1263 Atlanta 



GEORGIA 



IDAHO 



609 Idaho Falls 

ILLINOIS 

1 Chicago 

62 Chicago 

174 Joliet 

480 Freeburg 

644 Pekin 

742 Decatur 

1196 Arlington Heights 

1889 Downers Grove 

1922 Chicago 

3273 Olnev 



89.00 
8.00 
21.00 
41.00 
83.00 
24.00 



10.33 
20.00 



23.00 



100.00 

140.00 

156.50 

40.00 

47.00 

3.00 

5.00 

3.00 

121.00 

1.00 



INDIANA 

934 New Albanv 
1 899 Hobarl 
3154 Monticello 



IOWA 



4 Davenport 
534 Burlington 
937 Dubuque 



KANSAS 



1724 Liberal 



LOUISIANA 

1846 New Orleans 

MARYLAND 

1126 Annapolis 

MASSACHUSETTS 

49 Lowell 
107 Worcester 
444 Pittsfield 
624 Brockton 

MICHIGAN 

19 Detroit 

337 Detroit 

1301 Monroe 

1433 Detroit 

1615 Grand Rapids 

2265 Detroit 

MINNESOTA 

87 St. Paul 
1644 Minneapolis 



Amount 



7.50 
22.00 
33.00 



85.00 
14.00 
20.00 



20.00 
29.00 
48.00 



1.00 
60.00 

5.00 
31.00 



10.00 
67.00 
54.00 
16.00 
11.00 
43.00 



5.60 
17.00 




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26 



THE CARPENTER 




C'lec STA.iify/r£ 



Tou're going to register to vote now 
•—if I have to drive you there!" 



Local City 



2230 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Greensboro 

OHIO 



Local 


City 

MISSOURI 


Amount 


61 


Kansas Cily 


70.00 


110 


St. Joseph 

NEVADA 


42.00 


971 


Reno 


30.00" 


1780 


Las Vegas 

NEW JERSEY 


62.00* 


D.C. 


3f South Jersey 


229.50^' 


23 


Dover 


60.00 


121 


Vineland 


101.00 


325 


Paterson 


59.00 


349 


Orange 


20.00 


391 


Hoboken 


17.00 


393 


Camden 


36.55^ 


612 


Union Hill 


1.00 


620 


Madison 


1.00 


1006 


New Brunswich 


55.00 


1489 


Burlington 


63.44= 


1743 


Wildwood 


20.00 


2315 


Jersey City 


20.00 



NEW MEXICO 
1319 Albuquerque 
1962 Las Cruces 





NEW YORK 


6 


Amsterdam 


53 


White Plains 


78 


Troy 


99 


Cohoes 


125 


Utica 


146 


Schenectady 


229 


Glens Falls 


278 


Watertown 


355 


Buffalo 


366 


New York 


369 


N. Tonawanda 


488 


New York 


662 


Mount Morris 


787 


New York 


956 


New York 


1015 


Saratoga Springs 


1093 


Glencove 


1135 


Port Jefferson 


1483 


Patchoque 


1701 


Buffalo 


1837 


Babylon 


2161 


Catskill 


2305 


New York 


2440 


Montrose 


2669 


W. Islip 



356.00* 
25.00 



40.00 
60.00 
10.00 
15.00 
60.00 
73.00 
40.00 
10.00* 
9.00 
36.00 
20.00 

110.00 
43.00 

100.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
32.00 
49.00 
20.00 
41.00 
53.00 
20.00 
10.00 
9.00 



171 Youngstown 

254 Cleveland 

404 Lake Co. 

525 Coshocton 
639 Akron 
650 Pomeroy 

1180 Cleveland 

1426 Elyria 

1454 Cincinnati 

1935 Barberton 

2280 Mount Vernon 

OKLAHOMA 

763 Enid 

986 McAlester 

1659 Bartlesville 

OREGON 

1020 Portland 

1120 Portland 

1388 Oregon City 

2416 Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

8 Philadelphia 

59 Lancaster 

122 Philadelphia 

191 York 

261 Scranton 

321 Connellsville 

500 Butler 

709 Shenandoah 

768 Kingston 

845 Clifton Heights 

972 Philadelphia 

1320 Somerset 

1333 State College 

1906 Philadelphia 

2274 Pittsburgh 

RHODE ISLAND 

176 Newport 

801 Woonsocket 

TENNESSEE 

50 Knoxville 

1818 Clarksville 

TEXAS 

425 El Paso 

526 Galveston 
2190 Harlingen 

UTAH 

722 Salt Lake City 

1498 Provo 

VIRGINIA 

396 Newport News 

WASHINGTON 

98 Spokane 

131 Seattle 

338 Seattle 

870 Spokane 

1036 Longview 

1289 Seattle 

1332 Grand Coulee. 

1 7 1 .'^ Vancouver 

2317 Bremerton 

2382 Spokane 

2498 Longview 

3099 Aberdeen 

WISCONSIN 

91 Racine 

290 Lake Geneva 

820 Wisconsin Rapids 

849 Manitowoc 

2246 Fennimore 

3187 Waienown 



Amoiiul 



60.00 



20.00^= 

4.00 
40.00 
20.00 
10.00 

133.00 
20.00* 
40.00 

200.00 
38.00 
10.00 



10.00 
10.00 
11.00 



10.00 
90.00 
33.00 
10.00* 



48.00 

30.00 

40.00 

37.30' 

1.00 

15.00 

32.00 

8.00 

20.00 

21.00 

20.00 

8.00 

153.00 

384.00 

200.00 



50.00 
60.00 



174.00 
20.00 



20.00 
20.00 
21.00 



20.00 
10.00* 



100.00 



10.00* 

94,50 

10.00* 

20.00 

10.00 

80.00 

25.00 

126.00 

8.00 

20.00 

100.00 
10.00 



13.00 
11.00 
10.00 
20.00 
12.00 
1.00 



Credit is Due 

CORRECTION: In the final listing for 
1971, we failed to note that the local 
unions (#121, 393, 432, 542, 842, 1743, 
& 2098) comprising the South Jersey 
District Council had contributed a total 
stun of $1,500.00. 

This was a collection taken up at a 
mass meeting of the district council, and 
there was no way to itemize the contribu- 
tions by individual locals. 

Also, we failed to give credit to the 
district council for the 1% payroll deduc- 
tion that the business agents and the Sec- 
retary-treasurer of the district council 
are making to CLIC. Therefore, the 
total contribution by the South Jersey 
District Council and its affiliated locals 
for 1971 is $1,766.05. 

We also regret that we neglected to 
include in the contributions for Local 
191 the 1% check-off of the business 
agent, and in the case of Local 1489, the 
ITi) contributed by the business agent and 
the local union officers. 

This would increase the contributions 
of Local 191 to $1,257.30, and that of 
Local 1489 to $1,626.45. 

In the case of both of these local un- 
ions, the contributions by their business 
agents and officers make them the top 
locals in each state. 

We deeply regret our oversight in 
these matters. 



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iVF 




APRIL, 1972 



27 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
wservice pins. ^ 



(I) PHILADELPHIA. PA.— Four char- 
ter members of Local 1728 received serv- 
ice pins several months ago. J. Dolan, 
center, an International Representative, 
made the presentations. Honored mem- 
bers are, left to right: A. Goldman, 29 
years; W. Parnell, 29 years; and J. Glea- 
son. 33 years. Standing at right is T. 
Uiottavio, 31 years. Not shown is W. 
Rasmussen, 29 years. 



(2) NIAGARA FALLS. N.Y. — At its 
72nd Anniversary Banquet Local 322 
presented 115 membership pins totaling 
3855 years of service to the Brotherhood. 
In the picture, from left, are Joe Onesi, 
chairman; Ednard Mietlicki; Robert 
Jamieson; and Bert McDonald, financial 
secretary. The picture shows Brother 
Mietlicki presenting a 55-year member- 
ship pin to Brother Jamieson, who is 92 
years young. In turn. Brother Jamieson 
is presenting a joumeymans certhcate to 
Brother Mietlicki. 

(3) VALLEJO. CALIF. — Local 1068 
held a dinner February 12, 1972. at the 
Redwood Inn in Vallejo, Calif., to pre- 
sent 25-year membership pins to five of 
its members. Reading left to right: T. V. 
Boatwright. J. A. Dane, President Paul 
Kanouff, presenting the pins, W. C. Brad- 
ford, E. Bertoncini, and W. Edwards. 

(4) LETHBRIDGE, ALTA.— Ten mem- 
bers of Local 846 were honored for long 
membership at the 52nd Anniversary of 
the local union. Left to right, front row: 
Andy Thompson, 32 years; John Rempel, 
26; R. A. Berlando. R. S. & B. R.; Henry 
Friesen. 26; Carlos Chiste, 27; Left to 
right, back row, Arnold Dogterom, 42; L. 
Stotyn, 26; Lee M. Johnson, 25; G. Ny- 
hof, 27; Clarence Barby, 32. Total years 
in membership, 384. 



(5) SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIF. — 
Twelve members of Carpenters Local 
1632 were present to receive their 25- 
year service pins. The meeting was held 
last summer at the Carpenters Hall. 

Members present, reading left to right: 
Michael Morris, Henry Terry, Jesse Nick- 
erson, William Gunter, Tommy Davis, 
Herbert Betz, Leo Fallon, J. Rex Bowlby, 
(California State Council of Carpenters 
Special Representative Arthur Eisele), 
Hollis Poage, Charles Broadway, Henry 
Shaw, Walter Smith Sr. 

Members not present but receiving pins: 
Shelton Bower. H. V. Bradshaw, Thomas 
Pryor, Earl Shields, Billy Timmerman. 

(6) VINCENNES, IND. — On Novem- 
ber 19, 1971, Local 274, Vincennes, held 
a banquet at which time several members 
received their 25-year membership pins. 
Here is a picture taken at the banquet 
which includes the members who received 
25-year pins. They are as follows: Left 
to right, first row, Franklin Smith, Inter- 
national Representative; Bernard Roach; 
Harold Bathe, White River Valley Dis- 
trict Council Business Representative; 
Arthur W. Wright; E. L. Osborn; and 
Noah Shields. Second row, William Bow- 
man and Earl Dillon. 









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28 



THE CARPENTER 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 

Told Them The Truth 

A minister, telling his congregation 
the story of Ananias and Sapphiro, 
who were struck dead for lying, roared 
to his flock, "God doesn't strike 
people dead for lying anymore like 
He used to! If he did, where would 1 
be today?" 

The congregation began to snicker, 
and the parson gave them his "snap- 
per"; "I'll tell you where I would be," 
he shouted. "I'd be right here . . . 
preaching to an empty church!" — 
F. S. Millham, Fullerton, Pa. 

GIVE A DOLLAR TO CLIC 




Everybody's Happy 

"The doctor said that both my wife 
and I need more exercise, so she 
gave me a set of golf clubs for 
Christmas." 

"But what did you give her?" 
"I gave her a lightweight lawn- 
mower and a new set of washtubs!" 

REGISTER AND VOTE 

Deathly Taxes 

Taxes could be worse. Suppose we 
had to pay on what we figure we're 
worth and our deductions were based 
on what the boss figured we were 
worth? 




Carpenter's Dictionary 

Abode — A piece of wood. 

Annul — Something you hit with a 

hammer. 
Awl — Everything. 
Bit — Past tense of bite. 
Bolt — To leave suddenly. 
Chisel — To cheat. 
Cold chisel — To cheat an Eskimo. 
Doll — When a thaw won't cut abode 

fast. 
Dormer — Something excessively dorm. 
Fir — A long way off. 
Floor — Chinese number just before 

flive. 
hHammer — A bum comedian. 
Level — To tell the truth. 
Line — Not telling the truth. 
Oak — Everything is in order. 
Pane — Unpleasant feeling. 
Plane — Hijacker heaven. 
Rule — To govern. 
Rafter — Chinese chuckles. 
Shop — When a dull thaw is fixed and 

cuts abode fast. 
Thaw — A tool to cut abode with. 
Vise — Everything enjoyable. 
Walnut — Insane drywall applier. 

—Thanks to Louis Delin, L.U. 608. 
N.Y.C., and others. 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH! 

Kept His Word 

"Does your husband keep his 
promises from his courtship days?" 

"He certainly does! Before we 
were married he said he wasn't good 
enough for me. Now he's been prov- 
ing himself right for 30 years!" 



This Month's Limerick 

An adventurous young girl named 

Banker 
Stowed away while the ship was at 
anchor. 

Sleeping, she awoke in dismay 
When she heard the Mate say; 
"Now haul up the topsheet and 
spanker!" 



Safari, So Good 

The cocktail bore, back from his 
first African safari, was relating his 
adventures. ". . . and right there on 
the edge of the village, 1 spotted a 
leopard!" 

"Don't be absurd," replied his 
dizzy hostess. "They grow that way!" 

LIKE TOOLS, BE SHARP & SAFE 

Piece . . . And No Quiet 

The headshrinker reluctantly faced 
the husband and said; "I'm sorry to 
tell you, sir, that your wife's mind is 
completely gone!" 

"I'm not surprised," replied the 
husband. "She's been giving me 
pieces of it daily for 15 years!" 

UNION DUES BU"i' RAiSI-S 




Reason Enough 

"What do you mean by coming 
home half-drunk?" demanded the 
wife of the wayward husband. 

"I'm shorry," he replied, "but I 
shimply ran outa dough!" 

BUY AT UNION RETAIL STORES 

Heavenly Daze? 

After he had taken his young son 
to church for the first time, the father 
asked his son, "What did you think 
of the service?" 

"The music was nice," replied the 
lad, "but the commercial was too 
long." 

R U A UNION BOOSTER? 

Raking It In! 

Political plums are not raised from 
seed; they are the results of clever 
grafting. 



APRIL, 1972 



29 




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V A UGH AN A BUSHNELL 
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i;-i",':^L<s»L»wj':;;'.:(»(°_i;ji:T<riK)ii..'>;!-,-^.';:-'!;i'.i_'/v.'-..!;.V'' ■. ••-^;7i 

SERVICE TO THE 
ROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 



some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. 



(t) LIBERTYVILLE. ILL.— At a Local 
1996 dinner dance on October 2, 1971, 
25-year members were presented with 
pins. Six hundred members and };uests 
were present as 35 members received pins 
from President Bennes and Financial Sec- 
retarj Dorfler. Those receiving pins in 
person were as follows: First row, left to 
right, C. Bennes, L. Dorfler, A. Brecoll. 



Second row, C. Schwerman, F. Cash- 
more, C. Knigse, F,. Lenzen, J. Drabrant, 
H. Severson. Third row. L. lefHins, J. 
Dorfler, G. Olsen, K. Hess, R. Westphal, 
M. Radlolf. Fourth row, F. Fluscr, A. 
Davis. W. Markus. G. Kane, J. Elder, St., 
K. Mortsen, L. Wehrenberg. 

(2) NORWOOD PA. — Local 845 held 
its annual Award Night recently, with 
300 members and their wives attending. 

On this occasion, members with 25 
years of active service were honored and 
presented with membership pins. Pic- 
tured, left to right, kneeling: .lames Mor- 
rison, .Tames Burdsall, Daniel Danen- 
howee, Dennis Doody; second row, stand- 
ing: Thomas Bamett, Wm. Carpenter, 
Richard O'Driscoll, assistant supervisor 
of the Carpenters' Health and Welfare 
Fund of Phila. and Vicinity, .lames Daw- 
son, Joseph Seefeldt, business representa- 
tive of Delaware County and member of 
Local No. 845, Robert Moccia, Edward 
Rosato, .lames France, Joseph Medd, and 
Douglas Quigg, financial secretary of 
Local 845. Not pictured, but receiving 
pins were Harold McCombie, Martin 
Semcheski, Ralph Bamett, Francis Gal- 
lagher, Benjamin Gertz, Glen Johns, 
Ivan LucaSj Robert Terry, Leonard Ware, 
and Thomas McCloy, which was a total 
of 23 25-year pins. 



rr>rw' 



f f5 f • f' 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




-i'^^^Tii 



Readers may write to 
Fred Goetz 

2833 S. E. 33rd Place, 
Portland, Oregon 97202 



B Backcasts, Spent Powder 

. . . Many deer hunters travel hun- 
dreds, sometimes thousands, of miles in 
quest of Christmas venison but accord- 
ing to note from Mrs. E. Buetnner of 
Waterloo, 111., her husband Ed. a mem- 
ber of Local 1997, nailed his big buck 
within 250 yards of their back door. A 
head mount was subsequently fashioned 
by fellow local member, and a veteran 
taxidermist, Harold Metter. 

... If four-year old Ronald Goforth, 
Jr., son of Ronald Goforth, Sr., Train- 
ing Director of New Mexico's Appren- 
ticeship Program, keeps progressing as 
an angler, he's almost certain to wind up 
with a world record catch. He's pictured 
here with two chunky German brown 
trout he caught this summer from home 
waters. The trout weighed four and three 
pounds respectively; measured 22 and 20 
inches. Only help he had in landing them 
was net assist from dad. 




Young Ronald Goforth 

. . . Another hunter who didn't have 
to travel too far for his buck is John 
Bain of Landers, California, a member 
of Local 2288 for 20 years. He nailed 
one at 150 yards with one shot from his 
30-06, Model 742 Remington. It was 
downed in a sector bordering the West 
Fork of the San Gabriel River in Los 
Angeles County, not too far from the big 
city. Noteworthy, says Bother Bain, is 
that game department officials were under 
impression that blacktail was only species 



in this area. But the buck was a mule 
deer, the largest deer he's ever taken 
from the area. 

. . . When you're hunting close to a 
populated area in the east, where only 
low-velocity, but none-the-less potent, 
weapons are allowed — such as shotguns, 
muskets or bows — you must get in close 
to make the grade. Such was the prob- 
lem facing Galen Coughenoar, a mem- 
ber of Local 9, Buffalo, New York, and 
his hunt partner Rick Guile. Both, tot- 
ing a 12-gauge Browning in the eastern 



part of New York State, downed their 
game with rifled slugs, one at 40 yards, 
the other at 50 yards. Their game was 
hit on the run, Galen's buck was a seven 
pointer. Rick's a nine pointer. 

H In My Own Pasture 

A recent fall fishing jaunt to the 
Clackamas River of Oregon with George 
Farnsworth. a member of Portland's Lo- 
cal 1120, explodes 
the theory — least- 
wise for us — that 
the grass is always 
greener in the 
other man's pas- 
ture. Both George 
and I found it 
green in our own 
and knocked oflE a 
limit of Coho (sil- 
ver) salmon from 
the aforementioned 
Clackamas, which 
is about 30 minutes from my home 
— and flows right by George's door. 
Right; he lives right on the river. Occa- 
sion was to test out a Whitewater drift 
boat he built in his garage. I must say 
that his boat worked fine; his guidesman- 
Continued on Page 32 




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ship was flawless, and the fish hit like 
mad. Here's a look-see at George with 
one of the four we boated. 

■ Elk Close By 

One of the most treasured of big- 
game species in the west is the elk, other- 
wise known as the Wapiti. IVIany hunters 
travel thousands of miles to stalk one but 
not Bill Beaty of Wenatchee. Washing- 
ton, a member of Local 2205. Mrs. Beaty 
reports that Bill got one less than an 
hour from their front door step, a husk>' 
hull elk in the Clocktim area — due north 
of their home town. 

■ Rocker-Like Rack 

Another outdoorsman who hunts and 
fishes near home base is Walter E. 
Hayen of Sacramento, California, a 
member of Local 586. But he'll also put 
a lot of miles on the old jalopy in pur- 
suit of big game which cannot be found 
at close range. Recent jaunt to Wyoming 
netted a moose-sized mule deer buck for 
Walter which sported 10 points: had a 
33-inch spread and weighed over 300 
pounds on the hoof. Here's a photograph 
of Walt with the rocker-like rack. 




Walter Hayen and rack 

I Lenard Creek Deer 

Each year an ecologically-sound por- 
lit)n of deer is harvested from wildlife 
areas over this nation's far-flung acres, 
one in point being the Lenard Creek area 
of Humbolt County in the pine forest 
range country of Nevada. Two hunters 
who are familiar with the deer-lush sec- 
tor are Gene Raiche of Reno, a member 
of Local 971 for 32 years, now retired, 
and his son Alfred, a member of the 
same local for 10 years. The nimrods 
are pictured here with a pair of mule 
bucks they bagged in the aforementioned 
area, largest being a nuxjse of a mulie 
which dressed out at 270 pounds and was 
estimated by Game biologist to be close 
to 12 years of age. 




Gene Raiche and son 

THE CARPENTER 




^MMMMiMiEM^- 



SERVICETOTHEffinrTIOHOO 




A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25> 
year or 50-year service pins. 



(1) MICHIGAN CITY. IND. — Veteran 
members of Carpenters Local 1236 were 
honored for 25 to 50 years of member- 
ship in the union. Seated, from left: W. 
D. Stanley, recording secretary (37 years), 
Clarence Rieck (44), Wm. Somerfeld (47), 
Fred Larson (48). Raymond Schultz (37), 
Edw. Kissman (30), Walter Wintek (30), 
Michael Kulakowski (29). 

Standing, from left: Harold Bruemmer, 
president (25 years), Norman Foldenauer, 
vice president (25). Belmont Edwards, 
trustee. Harold Sigle (31), Norman 
Klemz (25), Wm. Novak (34), La Verne 
Malott (26 years), Charles Malott (25), 
George Koelln, trustee (52), Leonard 
Malott, trustee (25), F. G. Cooper, past 
president, Howard Rieck (32). 

Not present for the picture but also 
receiving pins were: Joseph Balsanek (25 
years), Luke Barnhill (29), Fred Bartels 
(53), Walter Bartels (35). Clyde Bolen 
(25), Edgar Boze (35), George Claflin 
(29). Ervin De Vauz (31), Dee Doran 
(31). Leonard Hill (25). Carl Hope (32), 
Alex Keen (31), Chester Keen (25). Ar 
thur Klemz (34). Robert Klint (25). Hen 
ry Kreft (51), Walfred Kresminski (30), 
Edw. Lijewsld (25), Gus Lindgreen (35), 
Joseph Magon (42), Jesse Malchow (30), 
John Ohms (31), Theral Rice (26). Harry 
Schetf (30). Fred Schluge (25), George 
Schreiber (48), Lewis Tener (25), Herbert 
Tews (26), John Valecek (26), Otto Voss 
(26), Herman Wilke (34), and Edw. Wi- 
tek (33). 

(2) CHICAGO, ILL.— At a recent meet- 
ing of millmen's Local 1367 two members 
were presented gold pins in honor of 
achieving 60 years membership in the 
Brotherhood. Shown on the accompany- 




ing picture are officers and members as 
follows: Seated, left to right: Vice Presi- 
dent Sylvester Wilkoszewski; 60-year 
members Ernest Iversen and William 
Burgbacher, President Helge Nelson, 
Trustee Kasmer Jakubowski. Standing: 
Trustee William Binning, Conductor Gun- 
nar Johnson, Recording Secretary Ray 
Hansen. Trustee Leonard Anderson. 
Treasurer Wilbur Anderson, Financial 
Secretary Ingvald Pollestad, and Sick 
Committeeman Leonard Selby. 

Brother Iversen was initiated into Lo- 
col 1367 in 1910. from Local No. 17 of 
the Amalgamated Woodworkers. Brother 
Burgbacher joined the Brotherhood as an 
apprentice in June. 1911, and has in his 
possession every dues book since that 
date, as shown in the second picture 
(2B). During World War I brother 
Burgbacher was ordered to report to 
Key West Navy as a jointer, and trans- 
ferred back to Chicago at the end of 
hostilites. 

Picture No. 2A shows Chicago Dis- 
trict Council Secretary-Treasurer Chas. 
A. Thompson (in center) who officiated 
in presentation of the pins to Burgbacher, 
left, and Iversen. 

Secretary Thompson recalled that he 



decorated Brother Burgbacher with a 50- 
year pin a decade ago. 

Brother Burgbacber's father (not 
sho^n) joined Carpenter Local No. 1 in 
1898. and passed away in 1928, totaling 
a family membership of 90 years. 

At 78, Bill is the oldest delegate, in 
the Chicago District Council, spanning 
a period of 46 years. 



APRIL, 1972 



33 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. 




(1) CLEVELAND. O.— Local 2159 had 
a meeting and party for one 50 and 23 
2S-j'car members recently. President 
Henry Simon is shown in Picture No. 1 
with 50-year member Ladimer Charles 
Gardner, who is at right in the picture. 
Among the 25-year members present 
for the ceremonies were: (I A) George 
Gnimney, Leo Stcnger, Reino Hekkinen, 
and Paul A. Aarona. (IB) Kenneth 
Wright, Pete King, Americo Rocco, and 



Paul Kinnunen. (7C) Lou Tolh. fi- 
nancial secretary; Harold L. Reid; and 
Charles Sharp, recording secretary. 

Not present but entitled to the 25-year 
pin are: Frank Bendokas, Julius Pietz. 
Robert Olson. Charles Seda. Harry 
Wainio, Earl Stocker. Gaza Vambor. R. 
A. Deimline. Dean Knupp. Henry Burk- 
holder. Robert Eirick, and Albert Rolar. 

(2) ALTON. ILL.— On .lune 24. 1971. 
Local 377 held a Service Award Banquet 
and Dance in the new \'FW Hall, Alton, 
honoring 92 members with 25 years 
through 60 years, a grand total of 1780 
years of service. 

Shown at left in the picture is Leo 
Schmidt, a 60-year member, and. at right. 
Fred E. Glassbrenner. president of Alton 
local, presenting him with his 60-year pin. 

Other honored members of Local 377 
were the following: 

25-YEAR PINS— George Applegate, 
Ed Bobbs. Rolland Brown. Clifford Cary. 
Clinton Champlin, Sr., James Cope. Ells- 
worth Crablree. Henry Craig. Thomas 
Dean. Charles Dover. Lester Edier. Wil- 
bert EdIer. Charles Edwards, .lohn Epper- 
heimer. James Ervin. Allen Fields. Ernest 
Garrett. Orville Goff. Olin Gray. Rupert 
Creeling, Vincent Guccione, Lewis Hal- 
corn, Robert Hall, William Hardin, l^evi 
Hauversburk, Harvey Hawkins, Mather 
Hawkins, Charles Hodge. Richard Inger- 
soll. Maurice Kennedy. Ebert King. Percy 
Kortkamp. Milton Masters. Louis Mundy. 
Adolph Otto. Henry Peiperf. Clell Perot- 
ka. Leiand Pitchford. Isaac Powell. Ross 
Ragusa. August Rhea. Marion Skinner. 
Winifred Smith. Clarence Vanhoy. Den- 
nis Whipple, William Whittleman, Russell 
Willis, John Wohnlich, and Harry Wy- 
dick. 

30- YEAR PINS — Herbert Ashlock, 
Frank Bode. John Carroll. Herbert Hard- 
ing. Earl P. Hill. Henry Laux. Francis 
Maher. Nelson P. Miller. Russell Noble. 
Victor Ohm. Orlando Osterdock. George 
Parker. Ross Penrod. Ted Surman. Harry 
Thomure. Elmo Walter, and Lester Wil- 
son. 

35-YEAR PINS— Charles Allen. Har- 
old Butcher. Thomas Edsall, Henry .la- 
cobs, Henry Lind, Edward Russell, Henry 
Thomure, E. J. Trendley, and Norval 
Wells. Sr. 

40-YEAR PINS— Arthur Kramer and 
Henry Manns. 

45-YEAR PINS— John Sehcnk and 
George Roth. 

50-YEAR PINS — Harold Chessman, 




William O. Hays. Arthur Holden, C. L. 
Mitchell, William Reed, Thomas Tuohy, 
and Alex Zerwas. 

55-YEAR PINS — Ed. Burmaster and 
Otis LInterbrink. 

60-YEAR PINS— William Eisenrich, 
John Hansen, and Leo Schmidt. 

(3) FAIRBANKS. ALASKA— During the 
Christmas Season, Local 1243 dedicated 
its new apprenticeship and training facil- 
ity. At that lime, it presented 25, 30 
and 35-year membership pins and a past 
vice president's pin. Two apprentices 
were promoted to journeymen carpen- 
ters. International Representative Brother 
Paul Rudd presented the pins and had a 
major role in the ceremonies. 

In the picture, First row. Left to Right, 
James Mount (25-year pin). Phil Summers 
(apprentice praduation). Olaf Thorgaard 
(30-year pin). Jack Pendley (apprentice 
graduation). John Martin (past vice pres- 
ident pin), and Matt Wold (35-year p'n). 
Second row, Frank Lucas (25-year pin), 
Dan Sandal (35-year pin). Ed Perkowski 
(bus rep and F S-T and secty.. Joint Ap- 
prenticeship CommitSee). James Lundgren 
(chairman. Joint Apprenticeship Commit- 
tee), Paul Rudd (International Represent- 
ative). James Dufcher (30-year pin), Law- 
rence Christie (35-year pin), Robert Bance 
(30-year pin), and Robert Smith (25- 
year pin). Back row, Parker Murphy (30- 
year pin), Michael Soniers (30-year pin), 
Oliver Olilla (25-year pin), Forrest M. 
McClurc (30-year pin), Lawrence Pippin 
(25-year pin), William Norman (2S-year 
pin). E. B. Dirk (25-year pin), Oscar 
Queen (25-year pin). Earl Fetterman (30- 
year pin), Ray Salisbury (25-year pin), 
and Dan Salisbury (25-year pin). 




34 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMO R 1AM 



L.U. NO. IS 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

Brennen, Cyril 
Rekow, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 21 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Covelli, J. 

L.U. NO. 33 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Arsenault, Ernest 
Chisolm, Earl 
Hill, Harry 
Keen, Jay 
Lumsden, Duncan 
Marotta, Louis 
McLeod, George 
Rowe, Steven 

L.U. NO. 35 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Dittmar, Paul 
Jones, Kenneth 
Wedlesky, William 

L.U. NO. 37 
SHAMOKIN, PA. 

Duncheskie, Charles L. 
Kearney, William A. 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

David, Rezuk 
Hiscock, Andrew 
MacGlashan, Charles 
Mowat, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 51 
BOSTON, MASS. 

McDonald, John P. 
Worth, John P. 

L.U. NO. 55 
DENVER, COLO. 

Carbine, Cecil F. 
Deffenbaugh, George 
Friedman, Glenn 
Johnson, Paul 
Left', Rudolph 
Pazzin, Joseph 
Popick, Jerome 
Rockwell, William 
Van Buren, Ruben 
Wahlberg, John 
Weldenheimer, Otho 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Campbell, D. R. 
Fisher, I. A. 
Hackley, Roy O. 
Hogue, Robert F. 
McQueen, J. A. 
Montgomery, John L. 
Singleton, John D. 

L.U. NO. 64 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Allen, W. P. 
Frans, Elsey 
Hudson, F. T. 
Mullen. George S. 
Riley, M.C. 
Troll, Ernest 



L.U. NO. 69 
CANTON, OHIO 

Byers, Lester 
Davis, Merton 
Gobeli. Christ 
Ruckle, Hari'y 

L.U. NO. 72 
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

Dettman, Henry 
Kruger. Albert 
Lindermuth, Richard B. 
O'Connell, Robert 
Pappert, Russell W. 
Zwemer, Jan D. 

L.U. NO. 98 
SPOKANE. WASH. 

Haas, Ernest F. 
Hampton, Wade M. 
Harris. Joseph L. 
Johnson. Walter 
Nagaoka. Jack K. 
Seegcr. Chares W. 
Simpson. James 
Spurlock. Kruger P. 
Stumbough, Leo H. 
Ward, Clarence V. 
Webster. Frank G. 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Hoft'man, John Leo 
Richards, William D. 
Seller, Raymond P. 

L.U. NO. 109 
SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Green. W. R. 
Pickens, Alonzo E. 

L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Bahrt. Walter C. 
Leshko, John (Sparky) 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Ritter, Paul 

L.U. NO. 134 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

Leger, Hector 

L.U. NO. 144 
MACON, GA. 

Wilson, David B. 

L.U. NO. 154 
KEWANEE, ILL. 

Heideman, Lawrence 

L.U. NO. 166 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Matthew. John M. 

L.U. NO. 169 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Carl, Michael J. 
Clendenin. Robert 
Seyler. Richard 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Solomon, Joseph 



L.U. NO. 183 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Bremer, Harry 
Christianson. Walter 
Dwyer, William J. 
Jackson. James A. 
Miller, Ralph E. 
Simmons, Charles E. 
Steinbach, Jacob 
Vickroy, Harold 
Young, John O. 

L.U. NO. 185 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Coombs, R. H. 
Cunningham, William J. 
Duckworth, Arch 
Erickson, Victor 
Howard, C. B 
Piper, Emanuel H. 
Schlottman. Henery 
Witte, Wilbert H. 
Zimmerman, George 

L.U. NO. 198 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Thompson, J. A. 

L.U. NO. 199 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Byron, Richard 
Engblad, John 
Held, Henry A. 
Olson, Eric 
Sell, John 
Steck, Walter B. 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Brown, C. H. 
Young. Kenneth R. 

L.U. NO. 224 
CINCINNATL OHIO 

Beilman, Nelson 
Schroll, Lewis 

L.U. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Atkins, G. V. 
Daniel, Otis, Jr. 
Miller, O. M. 
Shannon, W. T. 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Christiansen. S. H. 
Engberg, Frank 
Larsen, Magnus R. 
Robinson. Wayne 

L.U. NO. 242 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bruhl. Louis R. 
Nemeth.Charles, Sr. 
Zielke, Charles 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Del Gaudio, Joseph 
Mysterios, Alcino 
Sassi, Terenzio 

L.U. NO. 257 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Cherry, Aron 
Haugland, Hans 



Helm. Arthur 
Johnson, Nils 
Karlson. Karl A. 
Stempien, .Adam 
Wade, Frank 
Wiethop, Frederick 

L.U. NO. 264 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Balzenlis, Charles 
Carle, Renie 
Hecker, Jack 
Mazsick, Frank 
Poize, Andrew 
Redlinger, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 283 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Cobb, Pinky J. 

L.U. NO. 287 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Bricker. Robert 
Hertzler, Cletus 
Rice, Carl 
Strickner, Paul E. 

L.U. NO. 302 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

Saunders. William 

L.U. NO. 303 
PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

Pruitt. Earl 

L.U. NO. 323 
BEACON, N.Y. 

Moeller. Julitis 

L.U. NO. 325 
PATERSON, N.J. 

De Vido, Vito 

L.U. NO. 362 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Sandoval, Floyd F. 

L.U. NO. 385 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Kirchman, Louis 
Mehr, Samuel 

L.U. NO. 411 

SAN ANGELO, TEXAS 

Howell, James W. 

L.U. NO. 446 
SAULT STE. MARIE, 
ONT. 

Charters, EUis 
Fergus, Eric 
Janakka, Waino 

L.U. NO. 469 
CHEYENNE, WYO. 

Moody. Oscar 

L.U. NO. 522 
DURHAM, N.C. 

Chandler, Daniel T. 
Cribb, Clyde W. 

L.U. NO. 562 
EVERETT, WASH. 

Barnett. Max 
Flynn. Horace 
Larson. Olaf A. 
Stickles, Jack D. 



L.U. NO. 579 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Parsley, William J. 
White, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 586 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Buzynski, Joseph M. 
Edgemon, Fred 
Emerick, V. O. 
Martin, Clarence J. 
Pearson, Carl H, 
Perry, Frank 
Ridge, James H. 
Sepponen. Karl E. 
Songer, Lee 

L.U. NO. 608 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Ahearn, Jeremiah 
McDonald, Randal 
Wheeler, John 

L.U. NO. 657 
SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 

Brandt, Gustave 
Kupfahl, Louis 
Meyer, Walter 
Quasius, Hugo 
Skelton, John 
Wuestenhager, George 

L.U. NO. 674 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Sudan, Donald G. 

L.U. NO. 678 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Repphun, John 

L.U. NO. 682 
FRANKLIN, PA. 

Greene, W. Kenneth 
Hazlett, Jerry A, 
McCarthy. Charles W. 
Williams, M, Perry 
Wyatt, Robert E. 

L.U. NO. 710 

LONG BEACH, CALIF. 

Earnshaw, Harry 
Haney, A. A. 
McClure, John J. 
Nelson, Arthur M. 
Patterson. Charles A. 
Piatt, Carol S. 
Willson, Kenneth L. 

L.U. NO. 735 
MANSFIELD, OHIO 

Blair, Everett 
Garverick, Harold 
Hull, Ralph 
Richcreek, W. C. 
Raudabaugh, Paul 
Stone, Paul, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 770 
YAKIMA, WASH. 

Baker. Earle W. 
Molt. George 
Wentz, George T. 

L.U. NO. 783 
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. 

Wolenetz, Lester 

Continued on next page 



APRIL, 1972 



35 



In Memoriam, 



Concluded 



L.U. NO. 845 
CLIFTON HGTS., PA. 

Busa. Domenic J. 
Erdman, William 
Gronski. John 
Lehman, Herman 
Loughead. Milton 
Preston, Edward M. 
Proffitt, Willie E. 
Stanitis. John 
Wallin, Frank A. 
Wright, Howard 

L.U. NO. 899 
PARKERSBHRG. W. VA, 

Belyus, Frank 

L.LI. NO. 950 
LYNBROOK, N.Y. 

Olsen, Norman 
Salenious. Paul A. 

L.LI. NO. 976 
MARION. OHIO 

Cogan, Vernon E. 
Salsbury, Clinton D. 

L.U. NO. 977 
WICHITA FALLS, 
TEXAS 

Williams, Lewis 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Sheppard. Thomas R. 

L.U. NO. 1065 
SALEM, ORE. 

Baiighman. B. C. 
Gardner, W. 
Mathieson. Robert 

L.U. NO. 1068 
VALLFJO. CALIF. 

Gutzman. Mark 
Smith, Walter C. 

L.U. NO. 1134 
MT. KISCO, N.Y. 

Genett, Fred 
Gullotta, Aneielo 
Sivertsen, Nils 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

McLaughlin. Howard 
Mauser, Karl 
Nadeau, Cletus 
Warley, Harold 

L.U. NO. 1151 
BATAVIA, N.Y. 
Olsen, Omar 
Ostrowski, Alex 

L.U. NO. 1164 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Braito, Michale 
Friedfeld, Max 
Horwitz. Herman 
Kobetitsch, Frank 
Schelhas. John 
Sternecker. Leonard 

L.U. NO. 1236 
MICHIGAN CITY, IND. 

Hoxie, Vernon 
Kreft, Henry 
Scheff, Harry 

L.U. NO. 1243 
FAIRBANKS. ALASKA 

Kaup, Meredith 



L.U. NO. 1256 
SARNIA, ONT. 

Sunby, Allan B. 

L.U. NO. 1274 
DECATUR. ALA. 

Shoemaker, Floyd 

L.U. NO. 1292 
HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

Sagsveen, O. Maurice 

L.U. NO. 1302 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Larson. Herbert 
Peloquin, Paul 

L.U. NO. 1308 
LAKE WORTH, FLA. 

Croft, George D. 
Loveless, E. A, 

L.U. NO. 1363 
OSHKOSH, WIS. 

Zilz, Ervin 

L.U. NO. 1382 
ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Gillies, William D. 

L.U. NO. 1394 
FORT LAUDERDALE, 
FLA. 

Clark, WillardS. 

L.U. NO. 1397 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N.Y. 

Herbst. John 
Koshienske, Frank 
Lindberg. Harry 

L.U. NO. 1445 
TOPEKA. KANS. 

Hornecker, Johnnie D. 
Murphy, Starr (Jim) 

L.U. NO. 1514 
NILES, OHIO 

Hofmeister, Lloyd 
Mikkila, Lauri 

L.U. NO. 1515 
PENSACOLA, FLA. 

Bratcher, John E. 

L.U. NO. 1667 
BILOXI, MISS. 

Champlin. Louis A. 

L.U. NO. 1683 

EL DORADO. ARK. 

Mitcham, Walter P. 

L.U. NO. 1699 
PASCO, WASH. 

Butlncr, Ruebel 

L.U. NO. 1723 
COLUMBl'S, GA. 

Comer, Clifford 
Curry, A. E. 
Daniels, J. W. O. 
Franklin. H, C. 
Hardy, A. D. 
Hughes, A. E. 
Mann. W. O. 
Robertson, L. E. 

L.U. NO. 1743 
WILDWOOD, NJ. 

Sinclair, William 
Steelman, Harry 



L.U. NO. 1752 
POMONA, CALIF. 

Bartel, Joseph 
Baumunk, H. E. 
Beck. Lawrence 
Condon. Raymond 
Cooper, James F. 
Cox, Victor T. 
JefTress, Kenneth 
Orquist, Waine 
Sanderson, Thomas 
Seism, Russell 
Schiszler, Albert 
Shoemaker, Virgil 
Smalling, W. J. 

L.U. NO. 1805 
SASKATOON, SASK. 

Johnson, George E. 

L.U. NO. 1846 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Airhart, William 
Arthur, Joseph, Jr. 
Bebler. Walter S. 
Bertucci, William 
Bracamontes, C. J. 
Conway, Neil 
Delatte. R. E. 
Estrade, Lawrence 
Goutierrez, Wiltz J. 
Hankel, Bernard 
Harry, T. J. 
Heriard, Clarence 
Hughes. John C. 
Johnson, Vincent S. 
Kugler. George F. 
Labit, Wilen K, 
Landry, Gerald 
Oggs. Edward P. 
Poche. Caliste 
Poche, Elphege M. 
St. Julien, George 
Saizon. Joseph 
Trascher, Conrad 

L.U. NO. 1849 
PASCO, WASH. 

Harris, Thomas N. 



L.U. NO. 1884 
LUBBOCK, TEXAS 

Linch, L S. 
Walker, M. B. 

L.U. NO. 1889 
DOWNER'S GROVE, 
ILL. 

Bastian, Andrew A. 

L.U. NO. 1913 

VAN NUYS, CALIF. 

Atkinson, M. L. 
Bowman, John H. 
Busby. R. L. 
Crance, Roscoe 
Croner, George P. 
Davidson, Andrew 
Deem, William 
Dyer, Charles 
Essary, Elmo 
Fels. C. J. 
Hall, Augustus W. 
Hayward, Ralph 
Hoenisch, Alexander 
Irving, Uslan 
James, William 
Knowles, Ray E. 
Kuhnel. L. W. 
LaDani. Charles E. 
LaVigne. Joseph 
Lidbcrg, Ernest 
Long, L. E. 
McKaie, Emmett F. 
Math'cs, James 
Mayfield, H. T. 
Miller, John A. 
Mills, J. B. 
Misskelley. Henry L. 
Morrison, Herman 
Moscrip, Max 
Nordahl. Matt 
Nowlin, Lee 
Olson, Clarence G. 
Richter, William 
Rucbush, John 
St. George. Clarence 
Searock, Charles 
Stasiefski, Frank 
Sundqu'st, Herbert 



Vetter, Frank 
Wash, James O. 
Wilkerson, Stephen 
Worsley, Norman 

L.U. NO. 1974 
ELLENSBURG, WASH. 

Ackerman, Edward P. 

L.U. NO. 2028 
GRAND FORKS, N.D. 

Swanson, Walter, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 2067 
MEDFORD, ORE. 

Poulin, Burt J. 

L.U. NO. 2274 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Black, Veryl 
Coulter, James M. 
Hoffman, Francis 
Smith, Robert P. 

L.U. NO. 2396 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Adams, Theodore J. 
Douglas, Andrew V. 
Dschaak, Eubert E. 
Hanson, Oscar 
Harrigan, Maurice 
Hudina, Andrew 
Jacobson, Clifford R. 
Paki, Daniel M. 
Steele, Francis R. 
Stewart, Alex D. 
Ware, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 2523 
MEMPHIS. TENN. 

Wiley, Richard L. 



L.U. NO. 2837 
MIFFLINBURG, 

Ring, Joseph N. 



PA. 



L.U. NO. 3127 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Adams, Charles 



LEGACIES OF LONG SERVICE 

Garrett Wyman. former business agent of Local 455, Somerville. N.J., 
died on January II, 1972. at the age of 90. According to the local union 
records, "Gat" was born August 15, 1882, and was initiated into the Brother- 
hood on May 20, 1909. He served as business agent for 34 years, retiring at 
the age of 87. Local 455 believes that this is the longest continuous term 
of office ever for a business agent in the State of New Jersey. 

B. Herbert Russell of Mt. Kisco, N.Y., passed away October 29, 1971: he 
would have been 90 years old last December 15. Russell was a member 
of Local 1134 in good standing for 58 years. 

Local 1889, Downer's Grove, III., has informed us of the death of Ralph 
VanDorpe. a past officer of the local union and a Brotherhood member 
for more than 50 years. 

Local 37, Shamokin, Pa., reports the loss of William Rhodes, Sr., who 
passed away last October 22 at the age of 95. Born January 26. 1876, he 
was initiated into the Brotherhood August 15, 1907, and was a member 
for 64 years. 

C. J. Knittel, a 65-year-member of Local 5, St. Louis, Mo., died last 
August 27, shortly before his 94lh birthday, Knittel was initiated into the 
Brotherhood in 1906. 

Local 200, Columbus, O.. mourns the passing of Dan Cherry, a member 
for 66 years, who recently died at the age of 87. 

Local 37. Shamokin, Pa., also reports the death of Jacob Leroy Smith, 
age 76, who passed away December 27, 1971. A member of the Brotherhood 
for 55 years, he was a past president of the local union. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



NEW STUD-LOCK SCREW 




SCREW-HOLDING DRIVERS 




The unique Quick-Wedge Screw-Hold- 
ing Screwdriver is now offered in 17 dif- 
ferent sizes of five basic categories. 

First manufactured in 1945, this unu- 
usual tool holds, starts, drivers and sets 
the screw in sizes ranging from the tiniest 
of screws in size O-80 up to No. 24 Sheet 
Metal Screws. Model No. 1253B for in- 
stance, known as Ultra-Miniature, has a 
blade diameter of Vs" and a bit thickness 
of .012", and is becoming increasingly 
popular with persons engaged in repair 
and manufacture of extremely intricate 
instruments and apparatus, optical equip- 
ment and photographic lenses, etc. 

The 17-inch long Model 23514 can be 
utilized to securely grip a large screw 
while reaching it into an otherwise com- 
pletely inaccessible location. The same 
benefit is true of No. 17312 which is 14 
inches long and will firmly grip No. 4 to 
6 sheet metal screws, or No. 4 to 7 wood 
screws or bolts so a screw can be reached 
into an area, started and driven. 

The shockproof, unbreakable Tenite II 
handles are color coded in green, red or 
blue for easy identification. For use .n 
circumstances in which electrical shock 
may be a hazard, these srewdrivers may 
be obtained with a similarly color- 
matched shockproof, vinyl covered 
tubing which is effective in withstanding 
electrical shock to the point of 20,000 
volts. 

For more information, write: the Ked- 
man Co., 762 South Redwood Road, Salt 
Lake City, Utah 84110, 



A screw with a new thread design for 
faster attachment of drywall to metal 
studs has been introduced by the Uni- 
versal Screw Company. The Universal 
Stud-Lock 1-2 has a wide-spaced, high- 
thread on the front portion of the screw 
which picks up the board and delivers it 
to and through the stud. A self-drilling 
point penetrates the stud and the high, 
wide front thread taps the opening. The 
final portion of the screw has a double 
thread which seats the screw securely and 
increases holding power. 

Over one-half million of these fasten- 
ers were tested by contractors across the 
country. They reported faster driving and 
better holding with the Stud-Lock 1-2. 
Vibration resistance also is greater, which 
is important near elevator shafts or in 
high-rises where movement due to winds 
is significant. In addition to application 
of wall board on metal studs, the Stud- 
Lock 1-2 Screw can be used on plywood, 
pressed board and particleboard. The 
1 ',8 " length is designed so that the double 
thread portion engages when used with 
either Vi " or % " drywall. Thus, only one 
size screw need be stocked for these two 
thicknesses. Other sizes for other thick- 
nesses are available. For free sample, 
write Universal Screw Company, MSL 
Industries 11000 Seymour Avenue, 
Franklin Park, Illinois 60131, 

SCARCE-TOOL CATALOG 

An expanded 48-page catalog which 
includes 185 new, unusual and extremely 
useful hard-to-find tools has been pub- 
lished by the Brookstone Company, Peter- 
borough, New Hampshire. 

Brookstone tools are rarely sold by 
industrial distributors or stores and many 
have never been offered for sale before 
in this country. Among the several new 
items included in this unique collection 
are: wire strippers, tungsten carbide grit 
files, files and drills for plastics, side- 
action funnels, garnish awls, eight way 
scrapers, handsaws, and tenon saws. Also 
included are pruning saws, portable sand 
blast guns, range finders, fire detector 
alarms and nylon vise jaws. Plus hun- 
dreds of other versatile hand tools and 
small power tools. 

All are quality tools and sold with a 
full money-back guarantee. Available only 
by mail. Write: Brookstone Company. 
2963R Brookstone Building, Peterbor- 
ough, New Hampshire 03458. 



HOLD-DOWN CARRIAGES 

Hyster Company of Portland, Ore., 
announces the availability of special new 
log hold-down carriages. They can be 
used on standard and rough-terrain pneu- 
matic tire Hyster lift trucks with lifting 
capacities ranging from 12,500 to 25,000 
pounds. 

Constructed of high strength steel, the 
two basic models consist of a set of pin 
mounted 72 inch lifting forks on 90 inch 
carriages with integral, but hydraulically 
actuated, hold-down arms that close in 
an "upper jaw" motion towards the forks. 

Capacity of such a "bite" in pounds 
depends upon the capacity of the lift 
truck. In terms of cords of wood, it 
depends upon the type of load being 
handled. In most cases, the two standard 
attachments will handle at least two cords 
of logs. 

The new carriages are used in loading 
and unloading small logs, poles, rough 
lumber and railroad ties. The clamping 
action of the hold-down arms prevents 
wasteful spillage. In the fully opened 
position, the arms are completely out 
of the way for conventional lift truck 
operations. 

These special carriages do not increase 
the load face (distance from center of 
front axle to front of carriage) in per- 
forming their function, so there's no loss 
of lifting capacity to a separately mounted 
attachment, 

Hyster Company can equip the basic 
carriages with hydraulically operated "re- 
verse flipper arms" for steadying small 
loads. These flat steel arms simply come 
down on top of any partial load and sta- 
bilize it on the forks. It's particularly 
useful when handling less than full loads 
of small logs or large single poles. Spe- 
cial arrangements can also be made 
(through your Hyster dealer) to have 
these special new log hold-down car- 
riages equipped with various sized forks 
to meet the particular needs of any cus- 
tomer. 

For more information, write: Hyster 
Company, P.O. Box 2902, Portland, Ore., 
97208. 




PLEASE NOTE: A report on new prod- 
ucts and processes on this page in no way 
constitutes an endorsement or reconimcn- 
dalion. All performance claims are based 
on statements by the manufacturer. 



APRIL, 1972 



37 



Be Better Informed! 

Work Better! Earn More! 

ORDER YOUR COPY 



SIGMON'S 

'A FRAMING GUIDE 
and STEEL SQUARE" 




• 


312 Poges 


• 


229 Subjects 


• 


Completely In- 
dexed 


• 


Handy Pocket 
Size 


• 


Hard Leatherette 
Cover 


• 


Useful Every 
Minute 



Giilil mine of iiiiderslantl- 
able, aulhciUic and prac- 
tical information for all 
carpenters and building 
mechanics, that you can 
easily pnt to daily usi- 
Dozens of tables on meas- 
ures, weights, mortar, 
brick, concrete, cement, 
rafters, stairs, nails, stee! 

beams, tile, many others. Use of steel square, square 

root tables, solids, windows, frames. Every building 

component and part. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY 
REFUNDED 

ORDER ^yi nn Postpaid, or COD, you 

TODAY *P*f •*'*' pay charges. 

CLINE-SIGMON, Publishers 

Department 4-72 
P. O. Box 367 Hickory, N. C. 2S601 



NOW - TWO ADJUSTABLE 
MODELS - 1" to IVi" & I'h" to 4%" 




Lir Doll takes the work out of working. 
There is no need to carry your loads, 
just adjust the Lil' Doll, tip your ma- 
terial in and walk away. Made of pad- 
ded 3/16 inch steel and 8 inch wheels - 
Lir Doll carries more than 300 lbs. 
through crowded halls and small open- 
ings with the same 
ease as walking. 



Writefor complete 
information to 




SCHAEFER MFG. CO. 

3022 W. SCOTT AVE. 

McHENRY, ILLINOIS 60050 



ERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 




(1) ZANESVILLE, OHIO— On Decem- 
ber 10, 1971, Local 716 honored mem- 
bers who had compiled 20 or more years 
of devoted service. Service pins were pre- 
sented to: 

Seated, left to rieht, Harold Boetcher, 
25 Years; Theron Brown, 25 Years; 
Jesse Evans, 25 Years; Chester Reed, 30 
Years; John Wheeler, 45 Years; Lane 
Dike, 40 Ye:'rs: William Esselstein, 35 
Years; Paul Jenkins, 35 Years; Stanley 
Sheck, 20 Years. 

Standing, left to right, Myron Rugg, 
20 Years; Delbcrt Helter, 20 Years; 
Charles Bishop, 25 Years; Donald Jen- 
kins, 30 Years; Corbyn Smitley, 25 Years; 
Donald Brown, 25 Years; Norman Hcn- 
drickson, 25 Years; Culbertson Combs, 
25 Years; Donald Baldwin, 30 Years; 
Mark Hill, 25 Years; Harry Ross, 25 
Years; Edward Duffey, 30 Years; Russ 
Walton, 25 Years. 

Not present but also presented service 
pins were; 35 Years; members Henry 
Fuchs Fred Long, Irvin Longshore, 
Homer Showers, Jeff Showers, Neal Smit- 
ley, Bert Wayble; 30-year member, 
George Klies; 25-year members Hazlett 
Dailey, Ted Dixon, Charles Jenkins, Rob- 
ert Jenkins, William Linn Jr., Joe Mc- 
Cann, John Painter, Lyle Welker, Charles 



Wilson; 20-year members Wilbur Shinn, 
Kenneth Smith. 

(2) AUGUSTA, GA.— Carpenters Lo- 
cal 283 presented its eligible members 
with 25-year service pins at a recent 
meeting. 

Those present to receive service pins 
are shown in the photograph, standing 
left, receiving pin from Representative J. 
G. Brown, J. Harold Dye, business rep- 
resentative; G. R. McKay (50 years), 
Grover Hammond, E. A. Schmidt, R. H. 
Partridge, Treasurer, Lonnie E. Hall, R. 
O. Timmerman, Paul Gavitt and visitor 
Thomas B. Strickland, secretary-Treas- 
urer, State Council of Carpenters, Seated, 
left, J. H. Kitchings, A. W. Glaze, Oliver 
L. Jones, W. D. Alewine, Nolan Kirby, 
Mack E. F'reeman. 

G. R. McKay and E. F. McKay re- 
ceived watches in honor of their 50 
years of service. E. F. McKay was unable 
to attend. 

Those awarded 25-year service pins 
who were unable to attend the presenta- 
tion ceremony were George B. Abney, 
J. P. Cunningham, W. C. Fox, J. H. 
Freeland, E. C. Mundy. K. W. Shealy, 
W. Q. Wansley, Earl T. Wilson and Dur- 
ward A. Wright. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




Lakeland 
News 



Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida 



Howard A. Howdeshell, of Local 1632, 
San Luis Obispo, Calif., arrived at the 
Home January 5, 1972. 
• 
Arvo Edward Saari, of Local 1590, 
Washington, D. C, arrived at the Home 
January 7, 1972. 

• 
Peter M. Bower, of Local 696, Tampa, 
Florida, arrived at the Home January 13, 
1972. 

• 
Antonius Bergman, of Local 1636, 
Whiting, Indiana, arrived at the Home 
January 13, 1972. 

• 
Walter Volker, of Local 599, Ham- 
mond, Indiana, arrived at the home Jan- 
uary 24, 1972. 

• 
Willis Oscar Ellis, of Local 345, Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, arrived at the Home 
January 28, 1972. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Audel, Theodore 


.. 39 


Belsaw Power Tools 


.. 13 


Belsaw Sharp-All Co 


.. 15 


Berger Instruments 


. . 17 


Chicago Technical College . 


.. 21 


Cline-Sigmon, Publishers . . 


.. 38 


Craftsman Book Company . 


.. 32 


Ellason Stair Gauge Co. . . . 


.. 22 


Estwing Manufacturing .... 


.. 31 


Foley Manufacturing 


.. 14 


Goldblatt Tool 


.. 32 


Hydrolevel 


.. 11 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


.. 11 


Knaack Manufacturing .... 


.. 13 


Lee, H. D 


.. 27 


Locksmithing Institute .... 


.. 26 


North American School 




of Drafting 


.. 39 


North American School 




of Surveying 


.. 22 


Rockwell Manufacturing . . 


.. 9 


Schaefer Manufacturing . . . 


,. 38 


Stanley Power 




Tools Back Cover | 


True Temper 




Corp Inside Back 


Cover 


Vaughan & Bushnell 


.. 30 



Arthur C. Tagtmeyer, of Local 61, 
Kansas City, Missouri, died January 7, 
1972. Burial was at Almo, Mo. 
• 

Foster C. Belts, of Local 1275, Clear- 
water, Florida, died January 16, 1972. 
Burial was at Clearwater. 
• 

C. T. Christensen, of Local 1447, Vero 
Beach, Florida, died January 25, 1972. 
Burial was at Ft. Pierce, Fla. 

• 
George W. Borman, of Local 117, 
Albany, New York, arrived at the Home 
February 8, 1972. 

• 
Arthur J. Johnson of Local 1367, Chi- 
cago, Illinois, arrived at the Home Feb- 
ruary 10, 1972. 

• 
Willis E. Smith of Local 144, Macon, 
Georgia, arrived at the Home February 

17, 1972. 

• 
Albert E. Somers of Local 993, Miami, 
Florida, arrived at the Home February 

18, 1972. 

'• 
James W. McClendon of Local 1590, 
Washington, D.C., died February 9, 1972. 
Burial was at Gadsden, Alabama. 

• 
Elmer Borgstrom of Local 141, Chicago, 
Illinois, died February 7, 1972. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 

• 
Ole Lorenson, Local 1456, New York, 
New York, died February 14, 1972. 
Burial was at East Orange, New Jersey. 

• 
Henry Gordh of Local 791, Brooklyn, 
New York, died February 8, 1972. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

• 
David J. Ridgway of Local 753, Beau- 
mont, Texas, died February 8, 1972. 
Burial was at Artesia, New Mexico. 

• 
Waino Joki of Local 8, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, died February 16. 1972. 
He was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

• 
Wilfred J. Pickard of Local 107. 
Worcester, Massachusetts, died February 
27, 1972. He was buried in the Home 
Cemetery. 

• 
Peter M. Bower of Local 696, Tampa, 
Florida, withdrew from the Home on 
February 19, 1972. 



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complete course for the apprentice, a ready reference for 
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Thousands of photos, diagrams and charts tell and show short 
cuts, new methods, solutions and money-saving ideas . . . how 
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APRIL, 1972 



59 




in concLUsion 



WILLIAM SIDELL, General President 




The Challenges Which Face Us in the Years Ahead 



■ I suppose nine out of ten men who step into 
a new job make the comment that they have 
some "mighty big shoes to fill." Trite as the ex- 
pression is, I must make it. since in my case it 
happens to be very true. I really do have some 
very large shoes to fill. 

Over some 58 years of participation in Brother- 
hood afl'airs. General President Emeritus Hutche- 
son acquired experience and wisdom that made 
him a truly outstanding administrator. His imprint 
on our Brotherhood will endure for generations. 

To follow such a man is a tremendous challenge; 
I accept it willingly. However. T draw great com- 
fort from the fact that he will be available for con- 
sultation and advice in the months ahead. 

The foundation which enabled our Brotherhood 
to survive for almost a century was built in large 
part by General President Emeritus M. A. Hutche- 
son and his predecessor. William L. Hutcheson. It 
is a foundation that is as solid as democracy itself. 
To meet the new challenges we face it may be nec- 
essary to make changes in the framework which has 
been built on this foundation. However, the founda- 
tion itself will remain the solid base upon which 
we build our future. 

The problems confronting the labor movement 
in general and our Brotherhood in particular loom 
ominously on the horizon. 

The Phase II efforts to curb inflation are failing 
to do the job. Prices keep climbing steadily. On 
the other hand, the Wage Board continues to keep 
a tight rein on wage increases. Unemployment is 
stubbornly holding close to the 69^ mark. 

The trade deficit reaches a 75-year high as 
American (and Canadian) firms export capital and 
technology to low-wage countries in Asia and 
South America. 

The result is an ever-increasing flood of imports 
from these low-wage countries. Such goods con- 
tribute a great deal to the discouraging unemploy- 
ment picture in the United States and Canada. 

Tax loopholes that favor the rich at the expense 



of the wage earner remain untouched. 

All this adds up to a challenging picture. 

In our own industry, jurisdictional disputes are 
as frustrating as ever. The need for a workable 
mechanism for eliminating the bulk of such dis- 
putes has yet to be developed. This is a challenge 
the building trades must meet if the growth of non- 
union work is to be stemmed, or. better yet, elimi- 
nated entirely. 

Not since the 1920's have the employers been 
so throughly organized for an assault on union 
wages and working conditions. Through the Con- 
struction Users Round Table, the major purchasers 
of construction are enlisted in a joint effort, in my 
opinion, to strangle the effectiveness of building 
trades unions. 

The apprenticeship concept which our Brother- 
hood developed over the years, a concept that has 
served particularly well, is threatened by arbitrary 
goals and timetables — which are tantamount to a 
quota system and which rely on factors other than 
aptitude and initiative in the selection process. 

I have merely touched on some of the challenges 
which face our Brotherhood in the years ahead. 
While they appear to be ominous, they can all be 
met and conquered, if we all work together har- 
moniously. 

Our Brotherhood was born in a period of up- 
heaval and strife. It survived wars, booms, depres- 
sions, and anti-labor drives of many kinds. It suc- 
ceeded because a spirit of cooperation and trust 
existed among the General Officers, the subordi- 
nate bodies, and the membership. 

I sincerely hope that this spirit of cooperation 
and trust can be maintained and, perhaps, even 
enhanced in the years ahead. With such singleness 
of purpose. I am confident that nothing can stop us 
from growing, prospering, and increasing our ef- 
fectiveness as an important segment of the great 
American dream, particularly in building a better 
standard of living for the great mass of working 
people. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




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MAY 1972 








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^ X 



Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 








National Parks Centennial t872i-1972 





^IliTION 




GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington. D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

•Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

101 Marietta St., Suite 913 

Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

2800 Selkirk Drive 

Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

6323 N.W., Grand Blvd. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 
4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B.C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Ciirpeuter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should l)e mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington. D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local No. 

Number of your Local LTnion must 
be (riven. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your chanKe of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



@Zi\EP 




VOLUME XCII 



No. 5 



MAY, 1972 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

It All Started Around a Campfire a Century Ago 2 

National Pension Reciprocity: Growing, Not Complete 7 

Ochocki Succeeds Konyha to Board 8 

The Cluster Concept Is Coming Back 10 

First Meeting Place for Presbyterians in Washington 12 

Matters before the Congress Charles E. Nichols 13 

Team Studying Earthquake Calls for New Methods 18 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Local Union News 14 

Service to the Brotherhood 20, 23, 24, 29, 30, 32, 34 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 21 

We Congratulate 25 

Apprenticeship and Training 26 

Your Union Dictionary, No. 10 28 

cue Report 31 

Plane Gossip 33 

In Memoriam 36 

What's New? 38 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Foim 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington. D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E.. Washington, 0. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20j In advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Postage stamps commemorating the 
100th anniversary of the U.S. Na- 
tional Parks System bring color to our 
May cover. 

At upper left is Mount McKinley, 
20.320 feet, the highest mountain in 
North America and the focal point 
of 3,030 square miles of Alaskan wil- 
derness set aside as a national park. 
It became a park in 1917. 

Old Faithful Geyser spouts forth to 
the upper right on an 80 stamp, just 
as it has done for centuries in Yellow- 
stone National Park. 

Blocks of four 20 stamps combine 
to complete a design showing Cape 
Hatteras National Seashore. Each 20 
section may be used separately, or the 
entire stamp can be used as a regular 
80 stamp. (This is the first four-part 
stamp ever created by Uncle Sam.) 

The City of Refuge National His- 
torical Park on the Island of Hawaii 
was created in 1955. Until 1819, 
Refuge was a sanctuary for Hawaiians 
vanquished in battle and those guilty 
of crimes or breaking taboos. 

The 60 Wolf Trap Farm stamp will 
be issued June 26 at Vienna, Va. 
Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Per- 
forming Arts, near the nation's capital, 
is a new concept in the National Park 
System. It opened last summer. 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover unmarred by a mailing label 
may obtain them by sending 10(j' in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 




It all 
started 
around a 
campfire 
a century 
ago 



■ In this era of tightly-packed 
people . . . when you push and 
shove into subways . . . when you 
groan and drum your fingers against 
the steering wheel in daily traffic 
jams . . . it's good to know that 
somewhere out there your fellow 
man has set aside and made avail- 
able to you acres and even miles of 
natural scenery . . . woods, moun- 
tains, desert . . . where you might 
some day get away from the mad- 
ding crowd. 

One hundred years ago — in 
March, 1872, to be exact — Presi- 
dent Ulysses S. Grant signed a Con- 
gressional bill to make this scenery 
available to you and to millions of 



US acfion fo preserve ifs 
national heritage stimulated 
similar moves in 90 other 
nations of the world. 



A view of Bryce Canyon, National Park. 
Utali, wiiere nature has carved grotesque 
shapes from the earth. 




Sand dunes near Stovepipe Wells in Death 
Valley, California. The Cottonwood 
Mountains loom in the background. 



others for generations to come. He 
signed a document setting aside 
more than two million acres in the 
Wyoming and Montana Territories 
"as a public park or pleasuring 
ground for the benefit and enjoy- 
ment of all the people." 

This was the beginning of the 
US National Park System, which 
has grown today to 38 national 
parks and more than 240 historic 
sites and monuments. Its 30-million 
acre domain embraces forested 
mountains and vast limestone cav- 
erns, volcanoes and hot springs, 



famous buildings, battlefields, gey- 
sers and glaciers — man and nature's 
wonders. 

The US National Park System is 
truly something of which we can 
all be proud ... a direct rebuttal 
to the radicals who see Uncle Sam 
as a symbol of industrial pollution 
and corrupt capitalism. The park 
system was unique when it was 
established in 1872. Today it is 
emulated by 90 nations of the 
world. 

Glacier Bay National Monument, 
covering 2,803,840 acres of Alaska, 
is the largest site in the national 
park system. 

The smallest is an old brick house 
that occupies l/20th of an acre of 



land in the center of Washington, 
D.C. The mortally wounded Abra- 
ham Lincoln was carried to a room 
in this house after being shot in 
Ford's Theatre across the street. 

The theater, now restored and 
the scene of regular stage perform- 
ances, also is administered by the 
National Park Service. 

Americans paid some 380,000 

visits to the Nation's parks in 1916. 

By 1941 the number exceeded 20 

miUion, and in 1955 it reached 50 

Continued on page 4 





r 



Above, Left: Two hikers cross a 
grassy knoll in the Glacier Creek 
area of Mt. McKinlcy National 
Park, Alaska. 

Above, Right: A dramatic view 
across the white marble shoulders 
of an heroic statue to the 16th 
U.S. President in the Lincoln 
Memorial, Washington, D.C. 

Left: The undisturbed greenery of 
Muir Woods National Monument, 
near San Francisco. 

Right: This picture of Old Faithful 
in Yellowstone National Park was 
taken in 1S71 and was probably 
the first ever taken of the famous 
geyser. 





MAY, 1972 



This Page, Belo», Left: A setting sun picks up faint 
sparkles from the g>psuni crystals of White Sands 
National Monument, New Mexico. 

This Page, Below, Right: A Rocky Mountain Bighorn 
ram surveys his domain in Yellowstone National Park. 

This Page, Below. Right: The house where naturalist 
John Muir lived near San Francisco is now 
a national monument. 

Opposite Page, Right: Young pelicans at Molly Islands 
Yellowstone River and Lower Falls as seen 
from Artist Point. 

Opposite Page, Right: Young Pelicans at Molly Islands 
in the Southwest Arm of Yellowstone Lake. 

Opposite Page, Lower Right: Brain coral in the 
subtropic waters off Fort Jefferson National Monument, 
Florida. 



million. Officials anticipate vaca- 
tioners will pay more than 212 mil- 
lion visits to national parks and 
memorials this year. 

Commenting recently on the cen- 
tennial of the park program. Secre- 
tary of the Interior Rogers C. B. 
Morton observed: 

"What began at Yellowstone has 
developed into a system of national 
parks that has vastly improved the 
quality of life for many Americans 
and now plays a vital role in the 
effort to understand and sustain our 
environment . . . 

"When President Grant signed 
into law the Yellowstone Act, he did 
more than set aside two million 





acres of superlative scenery and 
natural wonders. He gave birth to 
a revolutionary concept in the cus- 
tody of our nation's resources and 
bequeathed us a trust of undefiled 
land . . ." 

As open space in the United States 
has decreased, the country's national 
parks have expanded. 

Slightly more than a century ago 
it appeared unnecessary to set aside 
public land for parks. America's 
supply of clear streams and lakes, 
unspoiled forests and beaches 
seemed inexhaustible. 

Montana Territorial Judge Cor- 
nelius Hedges is credited with ad- 



vancing the national park concept 
around a campfire on September 
19, 1870. With 14 others, he had 
just spent three weeks surveying the 
scenic wonders of Yellowstone. 

Several in the mapping party 
wanted to stake claims. Judge 
Hedges proposed the area be pre- 
served for all to enjoy, and sug- 
gested asking the government to 
designate it as a public park. 

His companions agreed, but Con- 
gress was skeptical. Congressmen 
felt there always would be sufficient 
space for Americans to hunt, hike, 
fish, or camp. It was a big country. 

Nor were descriptions of Yellow- 
stone's beauty always believed. One 
member of the survey group who 



told of the region's geysers, boiling 
springs, and cliffs of black volcanic 
glass was labeled "the champion liar 
of the West." 

Ridicule stopf)ed only when pho- 
tographer WiUiam H. Jackson vis- 
ited the area a year later and re- 
turned with pictures. 

Jackson was the first of countless 
photographers who have pointed 
their cameras at the sights of the 
US National Park System. In the 
decades ahead, millions more will 
follow. ■ 




MAY, 1972 




TOM 




ROUNDUP 



PROFIT VIOLATIONS — More than 20% of the nation's largest corporations are violating 

Price Commission regulations by raising their profit margins 'beyond permissible 
levels, according to a Nixon Administration official. Donald Rumsfeld, director 
of the Cost of Living Council, said a review of 105 quarterly reports from firms 
with S50 million or more in annual sales revealed that at least 24 of them 
"apparently (are) operating at profit margins in excess of those permitted by 
the regulations." 

UNEMPLOYMENT climbed back near the 6% level that has prevailed for almost a 
year and a half, and AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany declared that the increase, 
coupled with a new rise in the Wholesale Price Index, reveals "the continuing 
economic mess confronting the American people." 

The jobless rate edged up to 5.9% in March on a seasonally adjusted basis 
after dipping to 5.7% in February. And although the number of persons with jobs 
made its greatest increase in nearly five years, there were still 5.2 million 
persons unemployed — not far below the 10-year high of 5.5 million reached 
last July. 

COMPULSORY ARBITRATION — "We regard compulsory arbitration of emergency disputes 
as an anti-labor measure masquerading as public interest legislation, and we 
intend to fight it with all the strength at our command." 

That was the message AFL-CIO President George Meany took to Congress in 
testimony before the Senate Labor Committee against two bills dealing with 
so-called emergency strikes that would affect not only the railroads and airlines, 
but also the maritime, longshore and trucking industries. 

PUBLIC WORKS — Strong endorsement for a Senate bill that would create a national 
public works development program to meet today's critical needs for both jobs 
and public facilities has been expressed by the AFL-CIO. 

AFL-CIO Legislative Director Andrew J. Biemiller told the Senate Public 
Works Committee that labor "heartily endorses" the greater Federal commitment to 
jobs and public investments provided in S.3381, the proposed Public Works Act. 
But he urged that Congress require creation of a Federal Office of Development 
to make sure that funds are used effectively and apportioned fairly, that 
regional commissions conform to national development goals and that labor 
standards provisions are enforced. 

'REVENUE-SHARING' — The House Ways and Means Committee has approved a "revenue- 
sharing" bill which is getting close study by labor legislative representatives 
who think it may open the way to tax relief for property owners rather than 
create new jobs. 

The bill would provide $4.5 billion this year to state and local governments 
with a total of about $30 billion over five years. The money could be spent on 
public safety, public transportation, pollution control including sewers and 
garbage disposal. The bill differs from the original Nixon proposals which 
would have given more to the states and less to the cities. 

What is of concern to organized labor is that the measure would largely 
leave the states and localities free to use the money as they see fit. Thus it 
could be used to carry on current services and permit tax cuts without being 
used for new and needed projects that would create new jobs at a time of high 
unemployment. 

WINDFALL PROFITS — Obviously stung by labor criticism that wage cuts ordered by 
the Pay Board are resulting in "windfall profits" for employers, the Price Com- 
mission now says that it is ordering price cuts in such situations. 

So far, however, the Commission is taking action only in cases where 
corporations boosted prices in anticipation of paying higher wages that were pared 
down by the Pay Board. 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONFERENCE — Environmental problems affecting labor will be covered 
by experts at a four-day conference May 15 at the AFL-CIO Labor Studies Center 
in Washington. Up for discussion are the energy crisis and nuclear plants, air 
pollution and the Clean Air Act, and the effect of the Occupational Health and 
Safety Act on the job environ.ment . 



THE CARPENTER 




Areas in color are those in which Brotherhood members are covered by pension reciprocity agreements. 



National Pension Reciprocity: 
GROWING... But Not 



■ The idea of portable pensions 
for members of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America is taking hold, as the ac- 
companying map shows. Many large 
pension funds serving Carpenters 
have signed the Pro Rata Pension 
Agreement, as urged in General 
President M. A. Hutcheson's letter 
to local unions and councils of April 
30, 1971. 

Carpenters can now transfer em- 
ployment freely within the shaded 
areas of the map without losing ac- 
cumulated pension rights. This is 
because their pension fund trustees 
have signed the National Pro Rata 
Pension Agreement. 

This is an important new develop- 
ment for Carpenters. It is needed, 
too. Everyone knows that in the con- 
struction industry workers must go 



by WILLIAM SIDELL 

General President 

where the work is. A factory exists 
to bring the work to the worker, but 
construction work is different and 
often requires travel. 

Many of our members, of course, 
are fortunate enough to always find 
work in their home jurisdiction. 
Others have to transfer, as the work 
requires. Still others move as a 
matter of choice. 

We have been striving for a prin- 
ciple: that whenever a member 
moves, for whatever reason, it 
should not result in a loss of his pen- 
sion rights. 

Pensions are too valuable to lose. 

Under most pension plans, a rec- 
ord of work over a long period of 
time, and generally covering one 



area, is necessary to qualify for a 
pension. Ten, 15, 20, or more years 
of service may be required as a con- 
dition of receiving a pension, de- 
pending on the specific rules of a 
particular plan. Such rules are nec- 
essary. They were established to en- 
able pension plans to pay adequate 
benefits to those with long service in 
the industry. 

But, we say, the rights of some- 
one who has been a Carpenter in 
several jurisdictions should be 
greater than the rights of someone 
who has only spent a relatively short 
period of time in the craft. The Pro 
Rata Pension Agreement is a prac- 
tical way for pension fund trustees 
to recognize this. A Pro Rata Pen- 
sion Agreement means that each 
pension fund pays its pro rata share 
Continued on Page 35 



MAY, 1972 



this can put you 
in the hospital 





Practice the rules of safety on 
the job and at home. 



LEARN 

from 
NEW BOOKS 



STAIRWAY CONSTRUCTION 

by Douglas Fugitt 
Q $3.50 postpaid. For airmail add 55?. Even with 
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good stair the first time. It gives complete, detailed 
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and build a more perfect stair. It shows the basic 
construction methods used for all types of stairs. 

In plain language and with over 50 illustrations, 
you are shown the methods that have proven the 
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1400 illustrations. 

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Satisfaction Guaranteed 

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Name 


ORDER TODAY 






City . . . 




state 






(please print clearly) 



Ochocki Succeeds 
Konyha to Board 

Anthony "'Pete" Ochocki has been 
named to the General Executive 
Board of the United Brotherhood, 
as Board Member from the 3rd Dis- 
trict, it was announced last month 
by General President William Sidell. 

Ochocki fills the vacancy created 
by the recent election of William 
Konyha as Second General Vice 
President. 

He brings to this new post a 
wealth of grassroots experience in 
organizing, craft training, and local 
union and district council adminis- 
tration. 

Ochocki started working at the 
trade at an early age after being 
orphaned and going to live with an 
uncle, who was in the general con- 
tracting and logging business. 

He worked in both these areas 
of the industry until going into mili- 
tary service in 1942. 

Upon returning from the service, 
he worked on many of the commer- 
cial construction jobs in Detroit, as 
well as spending some time in the 
shops and mills. 

Active in Brotherhood affairs 
since 1947, he served Local 337 as 
secretary pro tem in 1949 and was 
elected recording secretary in 1950. 

Appointed business representative 
of Carpenters District Council. De- 
troit, Michigan, August 8, 1952, he 
served in that capacity until Septem- 
ber 1, 1958. when he resigned to 
take a position as business repre- 
sentative and organizer for Shop and 
Mill Local 1452. 

He continued in this position until 
July 1, 1960, when he took office 
as financial secretary and business 
agent of his home Local 337. He 
served as member of the apprentice- 
ship committee and then as secre- 
tary of the committee. 

He served in this capacity until 
he resigned in late summer, 1963, 
to return to the Carpenters District 
Council, Detroit, as administrative 
assistant to the secretary-treasurer. 
He served one two-year term as 
president of the Michigan State Car- 
penters Council. 

He resigned this position in 1966 
to take employment with the Intcr- 




ANTHONY OCHOCKI 

national Union as national project 
coordinator in the Brotherhood's 
MDTA Apprenticeship Program, 
where he served until he was ap- 
pointed by the General President, 
August 1, 1969, as director of orga- 
nization. 

He served in this capacity until 
his appointment as General Execu- 
tive Board Member of the Third 
District April 15, 1972. 

During the period of his employ- 
ment as a representative of the 
United Brotherhood in the City of 
Detroit, Michigan, in addition to 
serving as an official of the local 
union, Pete was elected delegate to 
the International Convention, was 
the chairman of the Carpenters Dis- 
trict Council Educational and Re- 
search Committee, appointed by the 
governor to the State of Michigan 
Housing Codes Commission, served 
as an executive board member of 
the Carpenters District Council, 
member of the Trial Board Commit- 
tee, member of the executive board 
of the District Council of Carpen- 
ters, executive board member of the 
American Federation of Labor, 
prior to its merger with the CIO and 
he was active in many state and 
local community affairs programs. 



TOOL TALK by B. Jones ' 




f^.i><^ 



"I told ynu the rain in Spain falls 
mostly un the plane." 



THE CARPENTER 



This nameplate on the side 

means a solid foundation 

underneath. 



That "Custom Camper" 
nameplate's important on your 
M- or 1-ton Chevy pickup. It means 
your truck's specially equipped to 
carry a particular camper. You 
get all the long-life features built 
into every Chevy pickup. Plus a front 
stabilizer bar to minimize sway, 
improve handling. And extras like 
heavy-duty shock absorbers and 
extra-large tires. It's a basic camper 



package at a basic price. You add 
just what you need, no more. 

Also available for Chevy campers: 
auxiliary battery, extra fuel tank, 
sliding rear window, camper wiring 
harness and enough other things 
to fill a small book. You'll find the 
book at your Chevrolet dealer's, and 
people who know how to use it. 
We want your Chevy Custom Camper 
to be the best pickup you ever owned. 




Chevrolet. Building a better way to see the U.SJI. 



Chevrolet 



JL 




CLUSTER PLAN 

7,500 sq ft lots 

366 housinff units 

23.5 acres of park 

17,700 linear feet of street 




LLLLmJllLJlULULJlIJ 



CONVENTIONAL PLAN 

12,500 sq ft lots 
368 housing units 
1.6 acres of park 
23,200 linear feet of street 



The Cluster Concept is 



The advantages of a planned community are many 
—better community services, more open space, safer 
living conditions. FHA applications for 
planned communities have quadrupled in recent years. 



Below: Clustered houses maintain privacy and 
open space in a natural setting. The street design places 
houses away from traffic, cutting noise problems 
and offering greater safety. 



Below: The use of natural wood building materials 
helps create a harmony between the houses and the wooded 
environment of Greenwood Village. Wood siding, wood 
shingles, and stone chimneys enhance the picture. 




10 



THE CARPENTER 



■ Our exploding population keeps 
moving closer together. Soon, 70 per- 
cent of the people will be living on 
only 10 percent of the land. And land 
surrounding our largest urban areas 
is running out. 

It's easy to talk about moving peo- 
ple to less populated areas, but people 
are not easily shuffled from their 
homes to "colonize" vacant areas. 
American builders can build almost 
anything — except more land. So, it's 
impossible to move the land to the 
people. What Americans in increasing 
numbers seem to want, and cannot at- 
tain right now, is a country lifestyle 
near an urban center. 

What are the solutions to the land 
shortage problem? While some people 
see the skyscraper apartment building 
as the typical future dwelling, others 
are looking to history for guidance — 
specifically, to our colonial villages. 
In early American towns, such as 
Williamsburg and Savannah, the dom- 
inant feature was a "common" or 
"green" where people gathered to en- 



joy community life. Homes were clus- 
tered around these open areas. 

This cluster idea was gradually re- 
placed by the new "American Dream" 
the single family detached house, set 
squarely amidst its own front, back 
and side yards, and facing streets 
which favored cars above pedestrians. 
After World War II, America's fast 
growing population needed living 
space in a hurry, so cookie-cutter sub- 
divisions with row upon row of look- 
alike houses were hastily built. 

Can this much lamented suburban 
sprawl be halted? The new interest 
in our environment is one positive 
sign that builders will have to find 
different directions. In the past, some 
developers bought parcels of land and 
leveled them completely before be- 
ginning construction. Trees, hills and 
other "obstacles" were bulldozed into 
oblivion. 

Today's sophisticated consumers, 
however, no longer want to live in 
barren communities where the only 
personality expressed is in the color 



Vaming Sack 



Right: In planned 

unit development resident 

often enjoy several 

recreational facilities, 

including swimming 

pools, club houses, 

tennis courts and 

park areas. 









Left: A group of country 
bams and farmhouses 
form a neighborhood 
center, which brings 
community residents 
together in a relaxed, 
informal atmosphere. 



of a house's shutters. They want 
houses of distinctive design and com- 
munities which offer a variety of op- 
portunities for recreation and neigh- 
borhood activities. They want an end 
to "bedroom communities." 

To satisfy these desires, builders 
and developers resorted to some plan- 
ning techniques which, while not en- 
tirely new, have not been widely used. 
They found they could provide the 
space needed for hiking trails, swim- 
ming pools, tennis courts and com- 
munity buildings by reducing the size 
of individual lots. 

The houses are then grouped around 
cul-de-sacs and curved streets, as op- 
posed to the usual gridiron pattern, 
with private patios and desks replac- 
ing the fenced-in backyards. The street 
design places houses away from traf- 
fic, providing more privacy and greater 
safety. 

Many developers are now using 
these cluster ideas in planned com- 
munities where land is treated as one 
overall unit, not a collection of indi- 
vidual identical lots. These communi- 
ties include several different types of 
dwellings — single family houses, town- 
houses, apartments — as well as com- 
munity centers, churches and schools. 

An important goal of this unified 
planning is to keep the buildings com- 
patible with the natural and existing 
landscape. To help accomplish this, 
exterior wood siding, shingles and 
roofing have been used effectively as 
natural materials, so the housing 
blends in with the natural settings. 

Is the planned community concept 
catching on? According to the Ameri- 
can Wood Council, 91 Federal Hous- 
ing Administration planned communi- 
ty applications were approved in 1 968. 
The figure in 1970 jumped to 353. 
But, while many people are supporting 
new planning concepts and other 
housing innovations, some remain sus- 
picious about any development that 
contains more individual units. 

They forget when an area has a 
slightly higher population density, 
taxes are lower and it's easier to pro- 
vide essential services. Even with 
more people, a planned community 
has a greater amount of open space 
and recreational area than a typical 
suburban subdivision. 

The goal of many concerned citi- 
zens today is flexible, creative zoning 
which se s an accepted density of 
housing per acre, rather than setting 
minimum, standardized lot sizes. 
Zoning by density, with provisions for 
open space, could be achieved by 
amending existing ordinances to allow 
for planned communities. ■ 



MAY, 1972 



11 



First meeting 
place for 
Presbyterians 
in Washington: 
a carpenters' 
shed on the 
White House 
grounds . . . 




■ The cornerstone for the White 
House — a slab of pale gray lime- 
stone from a nearby quarry in Vir- 
ginia — was laid on October 12, 
1792, exactly 300 years after Co- 
lumbus sighted the new lands of 
America. 

It was to be the first Federal 
building in Washington City and, 
for the ensuing eight years, it was 
site of much construction activity. 

Called at that time "The Presi- 
dent's Palace," the building had the 
characteristic features of an 18th- 
century English country house. Its 
principal ornamentation lay in the 
fenestration — large windows with 
alternating arched and triangular 




The new and modern National Presbyterian Church and Center in Washington, D.C. 



pediments. A three-story structure 
of more than 100 rooms, it required 
the services of many stone masons. 

It was these stone masons — pri- 
marily craftsmen brought in from 
Scotland — who founded what has 
become the National Presbyterian 
Church and Center in the nation's 
capital. Lacking a formal place of 
worship, the masons assembled reg- 
ularly in 1793 in a wooden carpen- 
ters' shed on the White House 
grounds. Two years later the group 
organized St. Andrew's Presbyte- 
rian Church, from which the First 
Presbyterian Church of Washington 
evolved. 

The Rev. John Brackenridge, a 
26-year-old Dickinson College grad- 
uate, came from Baltimore to be- 
come minister of St. Andrew's, and 
he labored long and hard with his 
small group of workmen to estab- 
lish a church. Finally, in 1811 the 
First Church was organized, and he 
became its fulltime pastor. 

From this small beginning, Pres- 
byterians in Washington, D.C., have 
created the national church and re- 
ligious center, shown in the accom- 
panying picture, which was dedi- 
cated three years ago. 

The center, located at Nebraska 
Ave. and Van Ness St., N.W., is 
one of several such centers estab- 
lished by various denominations in 
the nation's capital as focal points 
for their religions as they relate to 
national life. ■ 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Matters Before The Congress 
And Labor's Watchful Eye 



BY CHARLES E. NICHOLS 

General Treasurer and Director of Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 




■ So far this year Congress has 
operated with one eye on the needs 
of the country and the other eye on 
the election scheduled for November 
7. The result has been a great deal of 
rhetoric on important matters, but 
not too much constructive action. 

As director of CLIC, I would like 
to briefly summarize some of the im- 
portant matters which are pending be- 
fore the Congress. 

There are a host of anti-labor bills 
in the hopper, but none seem to have 
much serious support. However, it is 
necessary to monitor what the various 
Congressional committees are doing to 
insure that some particularly bad leg- 
islation is not sneaked through. 

A major concern of most people is 
the problem of taxes. Several compre- 
hensive tax reform bills are before 
both Houses. We are exerting all the 
eifort we can to have tax reform 
brought up this year. 

A study made by a Scripps-Howard 
reporter concludes that 40% of U.S. 
corporations escape paying their full 
share of taxes through loopholes of 
various kinds. He pointed out that 
U.S. Steel paid only token taxes to the 
United States on a net income of 
$150 million. In fact, it paid four 
times as much taxes to Venezuela on 
its operations there as it did to the 
U.S. Treasury, where the vast bulk 
of its income was earned. 

The chances of getting through tax 
reform are directly geared to the 
amount of pressure which organized 
labor can generate on Capitol Hill. 

Another major item of concern to 
our members is pension fund legisla- 
tion. A number of bills have been 
introduced in both Houses to regulate 
pension plans in private industry. Sev- 

MAY, 1972 



eral of the measures are very danger- 
ous in that benefits could be reduced. 
We are closely watching all develop- 
ments in pension legislation to insure 
that no damaging bills are passed. 

Last year. President Nixon vetoed 
a bill designed to pep up the economy 
through an accelerated public works 
program. A new bill has been intro- 
duced to increase public works author- 
ization for the next year in areas of 
critically high unemployment. We are 
lending our best efforts to get this bill 
reported out and passed. 

Anti-strike legislation, too. is get- 
ting some attentibi from the labor 
foes in Congress. Compulsory arbitra- 
tion of strikes in the transportation 
industry is an important aim of the 
reactionary forces in the Congress. 
Labor is opposing the imposition of 
compulsory arbitration in any form. 

Two years ago the Occupational 
Health and Safety measure was passed 
as a result of a great deal of hard 
work on the part of CLIC and the 
political arms of many other labor 
unions. The bill has never been prop- 
erly funded, with the result that the 
protective features of the Act have 
not been adequately enforced since 
the required staff of inspectors was 
never hired. One of our major roles 
is to get adequate funding for the 
Health and Safety Act. Of equal im- 
portance is passage of the National 
Health Security Bill, which has been 
held over from last year. The AFL- 
CIO considers passage of the Kennedy- 
Griffiths Health Security Bill as a 
number one objective for 1972. Under 
the terms of this bill, the costs of 
medical care would be brought under 
control and the calamitous burdens 
which health care now places on work- 



ing people unfortunate enough to be 
hit by prolonged illness will be elimi- 
nated. 

No-fault auto insurance to reduce 
the escalating costs of automobile in- 
surance is another objective of the 
labor movement. A uniform motor 
vehicle insurance bill is pending in 
Congress, and a great deal of work 
will be needed to get it through the 
committee procedure and on to the 
floor of the House and Senate. 

A bill to establish a consumer pro- 
tection agency is still bogged down in 
committee, and a good deal of pres- 
sure will need to be generated before 
it gets serious consideration. 

A new Housing and Urban Devel- 
opment Bill passed the Senate by a 
nearly unanimous vote last March. 
However, the bill is still before the 
House Banking and Currency Com- 
mittee. There are many members of 
Congress who want to see Davis- 
Bacon provisions eliminated from all 
construction. They see the Housing 
bill as a place where they can start 
their battle to knock out the whole 
Davis-Bacon concept. Therefore, it re- 
quires eternal vigilance on our part 
to see that the Housing bill is not 
used as a vehicle for destroying Davis- 
Bacon. 

These are only a few of the matters 
which are pending in Congress at the 
present time. There are many other 
matters being kicked around which 
are of vital interest to our members, 
and they are being watched very care- 
fully by not only CLIC but also the 
entire labor movement. 

For all these reasons, it is impor- 
tant that CLIC be given greatest possi- 
ble support this year. ■ 



13 




LOCAL ONION NEWS 



4 Locals Joined 
In Lake Comities 

The business representative of the Lake 
County District Council of Carpenters 
(Indiana and Michigan) has announced 
the consolidation of the four eastern di- 
vision locals under the guidance of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Bill Rees, business representative, re- 
ports that the final consolidation took 
place at a joint meeting of all locals in- 
volved at the National Guard armory in 
LaPorte. Ind. 

Rees traced the origin of the four 
locals: 

A survey revealed the chartering dates 
of the locals as follows: 

Local 1485. chartered March 11. 1903; 
Local 113. Chesterton, chartered in Jan- 
uary. 1907; Local 1236. Michigan City, 
chartered in August. 1908; and Local 
1873, Valparaiso, chartered in October, 
1918. 

The consolidated Local will be Local 
1485. Eastern Division. 

Officers serving the consolidated local 
are as follows: James Principe. Valpar- 
aiso, president Norman Foldenauer, 
Michigan City, vice president; Harold 
Bruemmer, Michigan City, recording sec- 
retory; William Thoesen, Chesterton, 
financial secretary; Marion Robinson, 
LaPorte, treasurer; Donald Greig, Val- 




New officers of the recently consolidated Local 1485 of the Brotherhood of Carpenters 
are pictured as members convened in LaPorte. Pictured, front row, left to right, 
Michael L. Beckes, General representative; James Principe, local president; Larry 
Strode, president, district council; Bill Rees, business representative; John Katzmarek, 
trustee, and Marion Robinson, treasurer; Back row, left to right, Howard Falls, 
trustee; William Thoesen, financial secretary; Harold Bruemmer, recording Secretary; 
William Shuta, trustee; Donald Grieg, conductor; Jesse Williams, trustee, and Norman 
Foldenauer, vice president (Herald-Argus photo) 



pariaso, conductor; Larry White. LaPorte, 
warden. 

The trustees elected are William Shuta, 
LaPorte; Jess Williams, Chesterton; How- 
ard Falls, Valparaiso; John Katzmarek, 
Michigan City. 

The Local will convene on the first 
and third Thursdays of each month in 
temporary headquarters in LaPorte. 

The newly consolidated local issued 
the following statement: "The newly ap- 
pointed officers pledge their dedication 
to performing the duties of their oflfice. 
We feel with the consolidation we will 



be recognized as a proud group of build- 
ing tradesmen to better our community 
to strengthen our union and to sell imion- 
ism to the public. 

"We want to make this city and surround- 
ing communities better for the citizens 
and taxpayers to work, live, play, send 
the children to school, by being involved 
in the civic activities as well as the gov- 
ernment. 

"If we all work together, we can do 
much to restore dignity of work and pride 
in craftsmanship to their rightful place in 
our communities and in our nation." 



Neiv York City Council Holds Health and Safety Seminar 




The New York City District Council of Carpenters, under 
the leadership of Conrad F. Olsen, recently concluded a 12- 
hour safety seminar dealing with the newly-established Federal 
occupational, safety and health standards. 

Council President Olsen appointed William F. Mahoney, vice- 
president, and John O'Connor, business representative, as co- 
chairmen of the safety seminar. The seminar was conducted 
by Robert M. Anderson, safety director of the Building Trades 
Employers Association. 

Shown in the photograph at left are, from left: William F. 
Mahoney, vice-president. New York City District Council, co- 



chairman. Safety Seminar; Thomas Tobin, secretary-treasurer, 
Building and Construction Trades; Conrad F. Olsen, president. 
New York City District Council; Theodore B. Corcoran, safety 
compliance olHcer, OSHA, U.S. Department of Labor; Nicholas 
Di Archangel, area director, OSHA, U.S. Department of Labor; 
John O'Connor, business representative, co-chairman. Safety 
Seminar; and Robert M. Anderson, safety director, Building 
Trades Employers Association. 

In the photograph at right: Business representatives of the 
various local unions affiliated with the New York City District 
Council of Carpenters attending the seminar. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Tulsa Local Opens New Headquarters 




Local 943's new headquarters building at 8220 East Skelly Drive in Tulsa, Okla. 
The local union moved here last year from 416 South Detroit Street in downtown 
Tulsa. 




KOIK^J 




A group of 55-year veterans of the Brotherhood 
who were honored in recent Local 943 ceremonies. 




Among the 25-year members of the local union were 
those above. (The names are listed on another page.) 




Gen. Pres. Wm. Sidell (who was then 
First Gen. Vice Pres.) presents a pin to 
65-year-member Ray Powless. 



Lewis Gibson, a 45-year member of the 
local union, was among those honored 
at recent ceremonies. 




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MAY, 1972 



15 



Canadians Say They Can Have Jobs and Protect Forests, Too 



Two strong and valid points of view 
clashed when the Canadian govern- 
ment expressed its official view before 
the United Nations that, as a choice 
between growth and ecology under 
present economic conditions, growth 
must come first. 

This view clashed with that of the 
Science Council of Canada which 
said it had many reservations about the 
possibility of reconciling growth with 
the improvement of environmental 
quality, which the government thinks 
is possible in the next 10 or 20 years. 

The black-or-white dilemma which 
seems to face the nation is growth 
(jobs) or a clean environment. 

Woodworkers in British Columbia's 
forest industry who were asked which 
they wanted, jobs or fishing, replied 
that in their opinion they could have 
both. They are interested actively 
in "keeping Canada clean" and are 
convinced that, if this objective is 
gone after in the right way, they will 
have their jobs, and will be able to 
spend their leisure time fishing if they 
want to. 



The federal government is under 
heavy pressure of unemployment right 
now. so it may be unrealistic to ex- 
pect them to publicly take a longterm 
view of the problem. But the Science 
Council has a responsibility "to tell 
it like it is". It made five major 
proposals. 

First, more planning in all provinces 
and regions of Canada and establish- 
ment of a national institute of ur- 
ban analysis. 

Second, experimental programs in 
urban transportation, and in schemes 
to make urban living more bearable. 

Third, more public ownership of 
urban and expansion-area land to 
counter land speculators and encour- 
age planning. 

Fourth, revitalization of the con- 
struction industry. 

Fifth, a major study in waste dis- 
posal which should get top priority. 

Not surprisingly the construction 
industry got a raking over. As any- 
one who knows the industry is aware, 
it is very well managed in some areas 



which can compare with the best on 
the continent, but as a whole it is 
chaotic. 

The Science Council which made its 
views known in a report to the gov- 
ernment says that the construction in- 
dustry is fragmented, undercapitalized, 
too seasonal, too many hazardous 
working conditions, and doesn't make 
enough use of Canada's highly quali- 
fied manpower. 

In short the industry is really in- 
efficient, is a drag on the economy, 
and this situation is aggravated by 
the government's stop-and-go policies 
with respect to housing. 

The Council makes a strong attack 
against present practices in land own- 
ership where land speculators hold 
needed land off the market until they 
get the price they want, usually a 30 
percent net profit which is "why land 
makes up a third of the purchase 
price of a house". 

It urges more public ownership of 
land. 



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16 



THE CARPENTER 



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This residence shows the dcslructive force of the Februarj, 1971, 
San Fernando, Calif., earthquake. An NBS study and report has 
pointed out that damage to buildings could have been less severe 
if better design and construction practices nere followed. 



Team Studying San Fernando Earthquake 
Calls For New Construction Methods 



■ A destructive earthquake struck 
the San Fernando. Calif., area on Feb- 
ruary 9, 1971, causing 64 deaths and 
one-half billion dollars damage. 

This Richter magnitude 6.6 shock 
was not a major earthquake, but it 
occurred in an area with a concentra- 
tion of large and costly public facilities 
which sustained severe damage. With- 
in 24 hours a team of specialists from 
the National Bureau of Standards in 
Washington was on the scene to re- 
cord and report on structural damages. 
Dispatched at the request of the White 
House Office of Emergency Prepared- 
ness, four members of the NBS Build- 
ing Research Division examined and 
photographed homes, schools, hospi- 
tals, roads, bridges, public services, and 
flood-control facilities. A major re- 
port, summarizing their findings, and 
including some recommendations to 
minimize future earthquake damage, is 
now available.' 

EVALUATE PROCEDURES 

After careful study of the San Fer- 
nando area, the engineers agreed that 
present procedures used to update 
design regulations should be evaluated 
to find more expeditious ways to in- 



* Engineering Aspects of the 1971 San Fer- 
nando Earthquake, NBS Building Science 
Series, No. 40 (SD Catalog No. €13.29:40), 
may be purchased for S.I a copy from the 
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 
20402. 



corporate new knowledge into design. 
At the Olive View Medical Center, for 
example, the Psychiatric Unit col- 
lapsed, they believe, because of insuffi- 
cient first-story column shear strength. 
The stresses used in the design were 
based on an older building code. Had 
those incorporated in a 1966 code been 
applied, which require the use of addi- 
tional lateral reinforcement in the col- 
umns, the collapse could possibly have 
been prevented. 

The team recommends that evalua- 
tion of the earthquake hazard of struc- 
tures built under old building codes 
should begin immediately. This is par- 
ticularly important for critical public 
buildings. They cite the collapsed San 
Fernando Veterans Administration 
Hospital buildings which were built 
well before the existence of earthquake 
requirements. Critical public buildings 
should be scheduled for rehabilitation 
or removal. Design requirements of 
hospitals, emergency services such as 
fire and police, utilities, communica- 
tions, transportation netuorks, schools, 
and high-occupancy buildings should 
reflect the importance of the facility 
and the degree of danger involved in 
its failure. 

Four hospitals in the area of the 
earthquake were unable to function 
because of datnage. Water, sewage, 
gas. and electric facilities were severe- 
ly damaged in the San Fernando 
Valley as were bridges important as 
potential evacuation routes. Disrupted 
power and telephone switching equip- 



ment added to the seriousness of the 
situation. 

Deformation and deflection, as well 
as strength, should be considered in 
earthquake-resistant design. This is 
illustrated by the horizontal and verti- 
cal movements which caused bridge 
girders to move off their supporting 
abutments and piers. Ground displace- 
ments must be studied carefully to de- 
termine appropriate magnitudes of 
movement which should be accounted 
for in design. 

Hazards of falling light fixtures, 
emergency lights, suspended ceilings 
and other overhead objects should also 
be given engineering consideration. 

It also calls for more adequate tying 
together of units where large openings 
in walls are provided for garages or 
entranceways, as this was found to be 
a particular weak spot by the survey- 
ors. Chimneys, too, should be ade- 
quately reinforced and anchored to the 
main structure. The report also calls 
for the developtnent of improved meth- 
ods for supporting mobile homes. 

The adequacy of present design re- 
quirements for the seismic design of 
dams should be reviewed, says the re- 
port, citing the near-failure of the Low- 
er San Fernando Dam located above 
a densely populated residential area. 
All existing dams located close to a 
dense population should be examined 
for strength and stability due to ground 
faulting and acceleration. 

FLEXIBLE JOINTS 

The report recommends flexible 
joints and automatic cut-off valves to 
forestall seepage of water and sewage 
into gas lines which may fracture dur- 
ing severe ground movements. Proper 
anchorage of heavy electrical equip- 
ment to structural elements of a build- 
ing is essential. 

Design of elevator systems should 
be reviewed to insure their operation 
after a disaster. During the San Fer- 
nando earthquake, many elevators 
were put out of commission. Had the 
quake occurred during hours of heavy 
use instead of six o'clock in the morn- 
ing, lives would have been endangered. 
Had fires occurred, the passengers of 
immobile elevators almost surely would 
have died. 

The report concludes that an ex- 
panded and improved seismograph net- 
work should be installed in public 
buildings in earthquake-prone regions 
throughout the United States. Infor- 
mation provided by the strong-motion 
seismograph is the single best source of 
scientific data that can be used in post- 
earthquake studies of structure per- 
formance. ■ 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



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SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 



A gallery of pictures showin 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-yea 
'<^^»rvice pins. 



i 




(I) COLUMBUS. O.— On July 29. 1971. 
Local 200 had a Recognition Night to 
sive rccosnition to members who had 
become eligible to receive 25- and 50- 
year pins since its last presentation, which 
was September 4, 1969. 

In 1969 the local presented five 50- 
year pins and 90 25-year pins. 

At thi.s presentation vve had two mem- 
bers eligible for 50-year pins and 120 
eligible for 25-year pins. There were two 
50-year members and 59 25-year mem- 
bers present and 62 25-ycar members 
not present. 

In the picture, from left, are Robert 
Jones, business agent; A. C. Jackson, 50- 
ycar member; S. J. Virta. 50-year mem- 
ber; and Parker Dunigan, president. 

In photo (1-A) the 25-year members 
present were: First Row: Walter Wyckoff. 
Herbert Dusz, Bechard Carroll, Lane 

lA 




Land, Ralph Windle, Robert McConnell, 
Lester Thomas. Dakota Adams, Clint 
Orr. I. O. Willison. 

Second Row: \'ernon Fairchild. Lloyd 
Rich, H. Lemming, H. McClaskey, O. 
Fee, Ralph Ames, Willie Cash, Chester 
Allen, Thomas Kimmel. Herbert Doss, 
Glen Jones, L. Hindcrer, Robert Penney. 

Third Row: Richard Haas, Warren Mc- 
Clain, Millard Wolfe, Robert Minnix, 
Robert Boyd. C. W. Hedges. Earl King. 
Tom McClelland, Glen Henson, V. E. 
Puckett, Charles Crawford, William Doss. 
Paul Wohrle, Max Davis, Doug. Meaige, 
Howard Wcstkamp, Parker Dunijjan. 

Fourth Row: Pearlie Morris. Joe Mat- 
to, John Renner, Clyde Baxter. F. Clay- 
pool. A. Masterson, K. Sater. Don Fleck, 
Francis Faivre, John Reed, Martin Mc- 
Donald, M. Reeves, Gene Hall, John 
Rider. Dan Davis. 

Fifth Row: Frank Meade, Kerniil 
Barrett. 

Sixth Row: Glen Shover, Geo. Mc- 
Nanier. 

Not in the picture: Luther Adams, Wil- 
lis Anders, Norris Badgley, Homer Baker, 
Pari Berry Sr., Dewey Boggs, Leander 
Brandel, John Brewer, Roy Bullock, 
Eugene Butler, Ray Cartwright, Sr., Wal- 
ter Cecil, Sam Chadwell, Arthur Cheese- 
brew, Forest Coon, Charles Darnell, 
Thomas Davis, James E. Dillon, Paul 
Eads, Harold Ferko, Ralph Fleck, Ezra 
Flora, Stanley Folk, Hoyt Garrison, Lau- 
rice Giles, Dwight Gill, A. R. Graham, 
Willard Hale, Carson Harrington, Ed 
Haselmire, Ralph Heil, Richard Helsel, 



T. V. Henson, Robert Huntsman, Richard 
Johnson, Edward Joseph, Victor Jung- 
kurth, George Kautz, Clarence Lay, Rob- 
ert Luft, Gerald McCormick. Harold Mc- 
Creary, Kenneth McDaniel, Clifford 
Molt, Francis Morris, John Motil, 
George Rich, George Scott, W. Ricken- 
bacher. Earl Rickard, Earl Stover, Geo. 
Swisher, Glen Tipton. David Turner. 
Thomas Uhl. Earl Weaston, Wni. Wil- 
liams, Lawrence ^^■olfo^d, Frank W. 
Wright, Don Spindler, Dale Swetland. 

(2) PORTLAND, ORE. — On Septem- 
ber 24, 1971, Carpenters Local 1020 hon- 
ored its 25- and 50-year members at a 
dinner held at the Portland-Hilton Hotel. 
All of the following received 25-year 
pins except Carl Edwards, who received 
a 50-year pin. 

Front row, from left: E. T. Perkins, 
Leslie J. Mares, E. O. Lofthus. Second 
row, from left: Kenneth E. Wall. Bryan 
M. Davis, Elmer D. Long. Carl M. Ed- 
wards (54 years), Robert J. Brady. Back 
row, from left: James A. Cowan, Ronald 
Dickson (who accepted pin for his father, 
David Dickson), Peter J. Schweitzer. Lo- 
gan A. Read, Vincent Chiotti. 

Twenty-five-year members unable to 
attend the banquet were David G. Be- 
hunin, Verl W, Church, V. J. Coats, Jo- 
seph Endicolt, Hilding W. Erickson, Gor- 
don W. Hastings, Charles M. Lotspeich, 
Lawrence M. Schloltman, Eriing F. 
Thompson, Woodrow Wallace and Ernest 
Wcstcrlund. A 50-year member, John K. 
Jensen, also was unable to attend. 




H^ # 



f\- 




hji 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




ANADIAN 
' T REPORT 

Labor Defends The Public Interest: 
Three Prime Examples Are Cited 



The trade union movement can 
point to tliree examples in recent 
months where it has tried to defend 
the public interest against both big 
business and big government. 

Interestingly enough, each example, 
if taken back to its starting point, can 
be said to have had a six-year history 
at least. 

First Example: 
Taxation Report 

The first example goes back to the 
time when the Royal Commission on 
Taxation reported in a memorable 
document which came to be known 
as the Carter Report. Its chairman 
was not a radical but a corporate 
chartered accountant named Carter. 

In a nutshell Carter said that lower 
income groups were paying in taxes 
a higher percentage of their income 
than the higher income groups. He 
called for thorough tax reform. 

Big business launched a terrific on- 
slaught against Carter's recommenda- 
tions. The government introduced a 
bill which didn't go as far as Carter 
proposed, then modified even that in 
the tax reform bill which became ef- 
fective January 1st of this year. 

The trade union movement sup- 
ported Carter to the hilt. It is still 
fighting to narrow the gap between 
rich and poor through effective tax 
and social legislation. 

Second Example: 
Labor Amendments 

The amendment of federal labor 
legislation provides a second example. 
Over six years ago the Freedman Re- 
port urged the federal government to 
amend the labor legislation to give 



the workingman and his family some 
protection against technological 
change. 

The report, while dealing specifi- 
cally with railway run-throughs, de- 
clared "there is a responsibility upon 
the entrepreneur who introduces 
change to see that it is not affected 
at the expense of his working force." 

This report was welcomed as a 
rallying point by the trade union 
movement. 

Big business attacked it. When the 
federal labor department introduced 
amendments which would give em- 
ployees in unions under federal legis- 
lation at least some protection, the 
legislation was bitterly attacked by big 
business and before the end of last 
year, was withdrawn from the order 
paper. 

The trade unions didn't think that 
legislation went far enough. But it 
was accepted as a step in the right 
direction. Improvements could be 
fought for later. 

Third Example: 
Competition Act 

The so-called Competition Act pro- 
vides a third example. 

In June 1971, the Federal Depart- 
ment of Consumer and Corporate Af- 
fairs submitted proposals which, if 
passed into law, would give the public 
some protection against false adver- 
tising, the fast buck salesman, the 
false warranty and various other de- 
ceptive practices which business uses 
to get more dollars for less value. 

Consumer organizations and the 
trade union movement supported the 
legislation. 

Again big business attacked the bill. 
It was withdrawn, temporarily at least. 



Is This a Prelude 
To New Labor Code? 

Tax reform, as mentioned above, 
has come into effect in modified form. 
Business isn't happy because it is too 
complex and too burdensome. Orga- 
nized labor isn't happy because the 
capital gains tax is only on 50% of 
profits instead of 100% and so on. 

Now labor legislation is back in the 
picture. 

The new Labor Minister Martin 
O'Connell has re-introduced labor act 
amendments which, if adopted, really 
mean a new Canada Labor Code. 

The changes will go before a par- 
liamentary committee for discussion 
before going to parliament for enact- 
ment. 

It is a long document, but its ini- 
tial reception in union circles has been 
good. 

According to Mr. O'Connell, the 
legislation is intended "to protect the 
public interest by increasing stability 
of labor-management relations 
throughout the collective bargaining 
process." 

He went on to say that the acceler- 
ating pace of technological change is 
creating conditions which seriously 
jeopardize that stability. 

The new legislation aims at en- 
couraging employers and unions to 
reach some kind of agreement during 
normal contract negotiations on the 
issue of technological changes which 
could occur during the life of a new 
contract. 

A weakness is that the legislation 
does not cover current agreements and 
this has already been pointed out by 
the Canadian Labor Congress. 

Mr. O'Connell proposes to set up a 
full-time National Labor Relations 
Board. It would have the power to 
deal with unfair practices, individuals' 
rights and other factors as well as 
technological changes. 

One thing in particular which the 
CLC likes in the new labor legislation 
is its preamble, which states that the 
bill is written to strengthen free col- 
lective bargaining and to promote the 
constructive settlement of disputes 
through an improved legal framework. 

The arguments pro and con before 
the parliamentary committee — busi- 
ness on one side and labor on the 
other — will be worth watching. 

When adopted, the legislation will 
cover only 530,000 unionized em- 
ployees under federal law. 

The balance of the working force — 
Continued on Page 22 



MAY, 1972 



21 



CANADIAN REPORT 

Continued from Page 21 

about 7 million — is covered by prov- 
incial laws which will also bear re- 
vision. But the federal statutes provide 
a lead. 

Views on Task Force 
CMHC Housing Study 

When Robert Andras was minister 
of urban affairs, he authorized a task 
force study of low income housing 
through the federal agency, Central 
Mortgage and Housing. 

The task force was set up with six 
research groups going to work on 
different aspects of housing for low 
income families. 

The research reports were in the 
hands of the urban affairs department 
and CMHC last October. They were 
not made public. Its chairman, a To- 
ronto lawyer, was suDPosed to sum- 
marize the research before the mate- 
rial would see the light of day. 

Months went by and no report. 

So one research group just went 
ahead and made its own findings pub- 
lic. This group was made up of three 
University of Montreal professors 
headed by Melvin Charney, professor 
of architecture. 

The Charney report charged that 
the federal government was function- 
ing without an established housing pol- 
icy while its agency, CMHC, was act- 
ing simply as a banker and technical 
adviser in the interests of the devel- 
opers and not of the home-buying 
public. 

The CMHC president, H. W. Hig- 
nett, called the report "a lot of bloody 
nonsense," but the facts are that until 
about 1970, 90% of the housing 
built with CMHC federal funds were 
for 109f of the people — the upper in- 
come groups. 

Only during the last two years has 
CMHC acted as though the lower 
income groups deserved some particu- 
lar consideration. 

Charney proposes that CMHC adopt 
a comprehensive policy which would 
include new construction, rehabilita- 
tion and maintenance and that prov- 
incial and municipal authorities and 
non-profit organizations take over the 
role of developer-builders in the home- 
building industry. 

If matters continue as they have, 
the housing situation will get worse, 
says Charney. 

No wonder CMHC is sitting on the 
reports. 



Canada's Inflation 
Rate Is Compared 

Canada has contained inflation bet- 
ter than any other developed country 
in the last few years, but has paid the 
price in unemployment. 

This was the view expressed in an 
economic analysis from the Organiza- 
tion of Economic Co-operation and 
Development. This is a body on which 
most of the major developed nations 
are represented. 

Price increases for all goods and 
services rose less than 3% last year 
over 1970. This compares with 4% in 
the United States, 4.9% in Italy and 
9.4% in Britain, for example. 

But when it comes to unemploy- 
ment, OECD says that Canada had 
more people out of work than France, 
Germany and Norway combined. 

In the 10 years from 1962, Can- 
ada's inflation rate has averaged 3.1%. 
The United States has averaged 3.3% 
and France 4.2%. 

Is Personal Income 
Meeting Housing Rise? 

Real estate reporters are using in- 
come and cost of living figures to 
show that over a period of 10 years, 
incomes across Canada have kept up 
with rising prices for housing. 

Taking 1961 as 100, the consumer 
price index was 136.3 in December, 
1971. But the shelter index stood at 
153.5%. Shelter costs went up faster 
than living costs in general. 

However, so did incomes. Average 
incomes in the same period went up 
as much as shelter costs — 54% . 

Here is where further analysis is 
necessary. Not everyone gets the aver- 
age income or more. Half get less, 
and for those the index isn't very 
helpful. 

In addition, in some areas of Can- 
ada, housing costs have gone up far 
faster than incomes. People in these 
areas aren't helped by the fact that in 
some areas housing costs may have 
gone up less than incomes have. 

The third point is that prices of 
houses for sale have gone up faster 
than rents. The family that wants a 
single family home and not an apart- 
ment will likely be paying out more 
of its income than if it had rented. 

On the other hand paying for a 
home entails some saving. When the 
home is paid off, it's a major asset. 

Finally — housing costs are still 
headed up. Will incomes rise as fast? 



Urban Canada Has 
Big 30-Year Outlook 

In the next 30 years, a new urban 
Canada will be built equal in size to 
the one developed in the past 400 
years. 

This presents a mind-boggling chal- 
lenge to the legislators, planners and 
developers and all others involved in 
the decision-making process. 

The job ahead is of such immense 
proportions, according to one of Can- 
ada's leading architects, J. C. Parkin, 
that it could easily be botched unless 
new techniques and design values are 
adopted. 

He has in mind the particular prob- 
lems of a country like Canada, most 
of which is affected by cold climate 
many months of the year. 

He makes a number of original 
suggestions, but one part of his ideas 
is worth quoting here: 

"On our side we have two things. 
One is the kind of people we are — a 
quiet, stubborn, northern race with a 
talent that may be a genius for com- 
promise, a streak of wry humor and 
a sense of human values. 

"The other ... is that we haven't 
yet made any irretrievable mistakes. 
Our cities are still viable; our air is 
not yet the air of death; we still have 
fresh water and free land." 

Canadian Industry 
More Tightly Held 

Canada's manufacturing industry is 
more tightly held than its counterpart 
in the United States. 

This was one conclusion of a study 
by the Combines Investigation Branch 
of the federal government which found 
the heaviest concentrations of owner- 
ship in finance, manufacturing and 
mining. 

The study used 1965 figures which 
showed that 50 corporations, each 
with assets of $100 million or more, 
accounted for 40% of total assets in 
manufacturing. 

Of 20,000 manufacturing corpora- 
tions with total sales of $34 billion, 
half of the output came from only 453 
of them. 



|— TOOL TALK by B. Jones ' 




"He's your baby. Either cure him 
or give him a hanky." 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



r 




(1) GREENWICH, CONN. — Twenty- 
year pins were awarded to this group of 
senior members of Local 196. Also in 
the picture are, Paul Mudry, business 
representative, and Robert Sandor, pres- 
ident. 

First Row left to right, .Tohn McMillon, 
John Nelson, Olof Olson, Verner Erick- 
son, Joseph Pankoski, Joseph Poltrack, 
Arrin Husted, Frank Cofone, Leo Rother- 
mel, Hilmer Larsen. 

Second Row, Joseph J. Quatrone, 
Joseph Seagren, John Scofield, Hilmer 
Larson, Philip R. Comeau, Joseph Doci- 
mo. Max Peters, Peter Kasciwicz, Vito 
Christiano, Paul Mudry, Business Repre- 
sentative, Robert Sandor, President. 

Third Row, John Fado, Carl Jensen, 
Daniel Jasensky, Julius Fazekas, Albert 
DeNicolo, Mike Sandor, Sr., Michael 



Castiglion, John Delia, John Dempsy. 

Members unable to attend were, Hans 
Hansen, Frank Daur, Warner Petersen, 
William Diehl, George M. MacCollough, 
Adian Levesque, Hans Roos, Fred Sa- 
banski, Knud Svendsen, Joseph Mar- 
zullo, Carl J, Anderson, Raymond Knapp, 
James Z. Miller, Sr.-, Joseph Bove, Aage 
Schonnlng, Joseph Biase, Henry Eller- 
weyer, Baver Osterberg, Borge Swen- 
son, William Tuefel. 

(2) PETALUMA, CALIF.— Local 981 
honored its oldtimers at a special called 
meeting on July 6, 1971. Pins were 
awarded to 25 members with 25 or more 
years of membership. 

The 55-year gold pin awarded Loyal 
Rideout, upper right, highlighted the 
ceremonies with a close runner-up in the 
50-year gold pin received by Lyn Bryan, 
right. 



E. A. (Al) Brown, who first joined the 
local union in the 1920'$, acted as mas- 
ter of ceremonies. Many of the men re- 
ceiving 25- or 30-year pins were intro- 
duced as, "this is another one of my ap- 
prentices" or "re- 
member the night 
I initiated you back 
during the war?" 

The large audi- 
ence included cur- 
rent apprentices, 
who were graphi- 
cally reminded of 
the fraternalism 
which knits the 
bonds of our un- 
ion so closely to- 
gether. 

(2 A) Other members of Local 981 pre- 
sented pins included, front row, seated, 
left to right: William S. Jones (30 years), 
D. L. Herrick (30), Frank Lowe (35), 
Fred Zanders (25), Ernie Curtis (25), 
Milas Cooper (25), John Brazil (25), L. F. 
Bryan (50), and Floyd Dodson (30). 

Standing, left to right: Riley Kindle 
(25). E. A. Brown, John Sholden (35), El- 
mer O'Haver (30), Loyal Rideout (55), 
Edward Haney (25), Lawrence Miller 
(35), Lonnie Wagley (25), Herman Swen- 
sen (25), Hugh Ivarson (35), Roy John- 
son (35), Peter Paulas (30), Ralph Jensen 
(25), Herman Ballert (25), Homer Rob- 
bins (30), and Clyde Jenkins (35). 





fy-Y^ 



■J 



MAY, 1972 



23 




SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




gallery of pictures showing 

some of the senior members of 

Brotherhood who recently 

received 25-year or 50-year 

trvice pins. jl 

(1) SOUTH GATE CALIF.— Substan- 
tial contributers to the Carpenters Bro- 
therhood progress are these members of 
Carpenters Local No. 929. who at a re- 
cent local union ceremonies received 



lapel emblems denoting 25 years of con- 
tinuous membership: Wm. Bereal, Merle 
Bird, Gene Brownheld, James Buchanan, 
Brown Burrell, C. E. Carlson, John Claf- 
in. Earl Clinton, N. W. Daniels, Elmo 
)ecuir, Charles DeVeau, George Dunn, 
lenry Ellis, Dave Espinoza, Roy Good- 
ing, Hank Haner, Albert Harmon. Henry 
Harper, Sylvan Hess, Paul Houpt, Robert 
Irving, Willie Irving, Harry Jenkins, R. IVI. 
Johnson, Steve Jones, Walter Kentner, 
Clarence Liebig, J. C. Lightfoot, Morris 
Lindgren, John McClendon, Ernest Mc- 
Graw, James Mehan, Ernest Ortiz, D. 
Lynn Paine, Charles Piggie, R. W. Ran- 
kin, Ralph Renner. J. C. Ross, Morris 
Rouse, T. E. Sanford, Frank Smith, C. L. 
Tabler, M. C. Thomas, Edmond Turmel, 
Bruce Watson, Ross Wark, and Henry 
Woods. Included in the picture are the of- 
ficers of Local 929 and our honored 
guests. Brother Oscar Lynch, Special Or- 
ganizer, Los Angeles County District 
Ccuncil of Carpenters, and Brother Rob- 
ert Clubb, business representative of 
Carpenters Local 2435 in Inglewood. 
Brother Terry Slawson, business repre- 
sentative of the Los Angeles County 



District Council, is not pictured, as he 
is the one who took the picture. 

(2) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. — This 
photograph was taken upon the occasion 
of the annual 'Old Timers' Luncheon, 
held on January 19, 1972, at the Union 
Hall of Pile Drivers Local 34. 

Presentation of 25-year Pins and a 
past-president pin presentation were made 
at the time. 

Guests in attendance for the occasion 
were as follows: 

Clarence Briggs, Carpenters Interna- 
tional Rep., 8th District; Al Figone, Sec- 
retary, Bay Counties Dist. Co. of Car- 
penters; Anthony Ramos, Secretary, Calif. 
State Council of Carpenters; John Watts, 
assistant business agent of District 
Council of Carpenters; Joe O'Sullivan, 
president. Bay Counties District Company 
of Carpenters; Dave Williams, Trustee, 
Carpenters Trust Fund; M. B. (Bud) 
Bryand, Executive Board Member, 8th 
District; Gordon Liftman, apprenticeship 
training program coordinator; J. Wilcox, 
apprenticeship training program; and 
John Anderson, apprenticeship coordin- 
ator for apprenticeship standards. 




24 



THE CARPENTER 





(^©oomija^Dauafli 



^000 





. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to pubhc offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



ROLLS 300-B O b 
Cline of Local 
2506, Marion, O., 
achieved tlie goal 
of every bowler 
recently when he 
rolled a perfect 300 
game. His previous 
high single had 
been 289. It was 
the first perfect 
game at Southland 
Lanes in 11 years 
of operation. 

Bowling distinc- 
tions have been 
many for Cline. He 
was named male 
bowler of the year 
twice at the Marion 
County All Sports Banquet. In the 1967- 
68 season perhaps his best ever, he 
averaged 204 for the year. In that year 
he brolte 700 four times, blasting 725, 
715, 707, and 701, the 725 his lifetime 
high series. 



SCHOLARSHIP— Ms. Rita Boarman of 
North Liberty, left, near South Bend, 
Ind., received the 1971 $500 scholarship 
award from Local 413. She attends Indi- 
ana University. Presenting the $500 check 
to her were George EIrod, center, business 
representative, and Roy Klein, president 
of Local 413. 



OUTSTANDING LEADER-H. P. Johnson, 
left, secretary-treasurer of the Wyoming 
State Council of Carpenters, business 
representatives of Local 1564, Casper, 
and president of the Central and Western 
Building Trades, was declared "The Out- 
standing Labor Leader in Wyoming" at 
a recent statewide Building Trades meet- 
ing. He was presented a plaque in recog- 
nition of this title by Harold Green, 
regional director of the AFL-CIO Build- 
ing Trades. 





Arctic Bell Saved 
By Boston Member 

A member of Carpenters Local 40, 
Boston, Mass., has anonymously donated 
to his local union an historic ship's bell 
from the USS Bear, a wood-hulled vet- 
eran of 48 Arctic voyages and World War 
II service. 

The bell, which had been on display 
in a showroom of the Atlantic Marine 
Exchange Corp., in Boston, cost the donor 
more than $2,000. The local union plans 
to display the bell at its headquarters. 




Fred Fletcher, right, general agent of 
Boston Carpenters District Council, pre- 
sents a check for the bell to Ed Arsenault, 
manager of Atlantic Marine Exchange, 



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25 




ilESHI 









Detroit Contest 
Picks Happy Trio 

Top finishers in the recent Detroit 
Area Carpentry Apprentice Contest at 
Cobo Hall in the Motor City are all 
members of Royal Oak Local 998. First 
place and $100 went to Thomas Valen- 
tine: second place and $75 went to Randy 
Merrill; Randal Book won $50 and third 
position. 

The three Berkley carpenters, along 
with James Mort of Local 1433, who 
finished fourth, will carry the hopes of 
the Detroit Area Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee to the state finals at Flint, 
May 22-23. 

The winner there will go on to Las 
Vegas, Nev., in August for the interna- 
tional competition. 





Chosen from some 200 Detroit-area fourth-year apprentices for the 1972 compe- 
tition were these 10 contestants, from left: Randy Kemp, Randy Book, Michael 
Campion, Thomas Valentine, Michael Freeland, Randy Merrill, Donald Auch, Ron- 
ald Holbrook, Robert Gauss, and James Mort. 



LEFT: Holding plaques are winners — 
Merrill, Book, and Valentine. With them 
are Head Carpentry Instructor Herbert 
Schultz, District Council President and 
JAC Chairman Ray Fair; and Clay 
Langston, .IAS secretary and contractor 
representative. 



Hanna Heads New California Program 



Charles F. Hanna. former chief of the 
California State Division of Apprentice- 
ship Standards, has been named director 
of the Northern California Carpenters 
Apprenticeship and Training Program. 

Hanna, who served as DAS Chief from 
1955 until April 1971, recently took over 
the task of pulling together two merged 
programs which had been separately de- 
veloped — one in the five San Francisco 
Bay counties and the other in the 41 
other Northern California counties. 

Hanna, a product of apprenticeship 
training himself who worked for years as 
a carpenter before becoming a union offi- 
cial, was selected after the 46-County 
Board of Trustees established earlier this 
year to oversee the merged program had 



interviewed more than 200 applicants. 

Gordon Littman. who had served as 
director of the Five Bay Counties pro- 
gram, has been named assistant director. 

Littman, who has worked with Hanna 
on apprenticeship problems for some 16 
years, said he was looking forward to the 
task. 

"In my book he is the most knowledge- 
able man in the field of apprenticeship 
in this country," Littman said, referring 
to Hanna. 



The 1972 liitcnialionul Carpenters Ap- 
prenticeship Contest will he held in Las 
Vcaas, New, Aiif>. 23-26. Your stale or 
province should be represented. 



On-Job Training 
Programs Continue 

The Brotherhood recently signed a 
new government agreement to train 3,235 
jobless and underemployed workers in 
an on-the-job training program operating 
in 44 states. 

The union will conduct the training 
through its joint apprenticeship com- 
mittees and modular housing contractors 
who have bargaining agreements with the 
union. 

Financed with $2,570,000 in Man- 
power Development & Training Act 
funds, the 18-month program will focus 
on recruiting jobless Vietnam era vet- 
erans, minority group members and dis- 
advantaged workers. 

Four types of training will be offered: 
pre-apprenticeship for 525 persons, ap- 
prentice-entry for 570. skills upgrading for 
1.140 and modular housing construction 
for 1.000. 

In an existing training contract with 
the Labor Dept., the Brotherhood re- 
cruited 4.500 persons, graduated 1,860 
and have 1,950 still in training. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



APPRENTICESHIP CONTESTS 
CALENDAR, MAY, 1972 







Mill 




State Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Millwright 


Alabama 


X 






(April 28-29) 








Alaska 


X 






Arizona 


X 




X 


(May 20) 








California 


X 


X 


X 


(June 1-3) 








Colorado 


X 


X 


X 


Delaware 


X 






District of Col. 


X 


X 


X 


(May 13 & 20) 






Florida 


X 




X 


(May 11-13) 








Hawaii 


X 






(May 26-27) 








Idaho 


X 


X 




(May 13) 








Illinois 


X 


X 


X 


(May 25-26) 








Indiana 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 


X 


X 


X 


(June 2-3) 








Kansas 


X 




X 


Louisiana 


X 




X 


Maryland 


X 


X 


X 


(May 26) 








Massachusetts 


X 


X 




(May 19-20) 








Michigan 


X 




X 


(May 23-24) 








Minnesota 


X 






(June 2) 








Missouri 


X 




X 


(May 17) 








Montana 


X 






Nebraska 


X 






(June 10) 








Nevada 


X 




X 


(April 14-15) 








New Jersey 


X 


X 


X 


(May 20 & 27) 






New Mexico 


X 






(May 5-6) 








New York 


X 


X 


X 


(June 6-7) 








Ohio 


X 


X 


X 


(May 23-24) 








Oklahoma 


X 






(May 11-12) 








Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


(May 1, June 


2, 3, 16 


17) 




Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


(May 19-20) 








Rhode Island 


X 


X 




April 15 & 18) 






Tennessee 


X 




X 


(April 7-8) 








Texas 


X 




X 


(April 27-28) 








Utah 


X 






(May 13&20) 






Washington 


X 


X 


X 


(May 21-23) 








Wisconsin 


X 






(June 9, 10) 








Wyoming 


X 






(May 6-7) 








Alberta 


X 






(March 17-18) 






British Col. 


X 


X 




(May 26-27) 








Ontario 


X 




X 


Manitoba 


X 






Total 


41 


17 


23 


MAY, 1972 







i 



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DICTIONARY 



This is the 10th of a new feature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to collective bargaining^ 
union contracts, and union business. Follow it cfosefy, and your union 
membership will become more meaningful, and your ability to partici- 
pate in decisions which affect your future ancf security wifl be strength- 
eneci. It was compiled by the International Labor Press Assn, and is 
used with permission. 



impartial chairman: Arbitrator jointly employed by union and man- 
agement to decide disputes arising out of interpretation of con- 
tract. 

Improvement factor: See productivity factor. 

incentive pay: A wage system based on the productivity of a worker 
above a specified level. 

independent union: A labor organization not affiliated with a na- 
tional or international union: or a national of international union 
not affiliated with the AFL-CIO. 

indirect labor costs: Wages of non-production employees, such as 
maintenance crews, inspectors, timekeepers, tool crib attendants, 
sweepers and the like. 

industrial engineering: As officially defined by American Institute 
of Industrial Engineers. Inc., industrial engineering is concerned 
with the design, improvement and installation of integrated sys- 
tems of men, materials and equipment. It draws on specialized 
knowledge and skill in the mathematical, physical and social 
sciences together with the principles and methods of engineering 
analysis and design, to specify, predict, and evaluate the results 
to be obtained from such systems. See time study, motion study. 

industrial union: A union with members in a particular industry, 
embracing various skilled and unskilled occupations, relying for 
its bargaining strength on full union organizations rather than on 
category of skills: a vertical union. 

informational picketing: Picketing advising public that employer is 
selling goods or providing services produced by a non-union firm 
or one against which a strike is in progress. 

inequities: Rates or conditions substantially out of line with those 
paid for comparable work, in a plant, locality or industry. 

injunction: A court order restraining an employer or a union from 
committing certain acts. A temporary restraining order is issued 
for a limited time. A permanent injunction is issued after a full 
hearing. 

intermediate report: Report by NLRB trial examiner after hearing 
on charges of unfair labor practices, on his findings of fact and 
recommendations. If either party objects, matter goes to NLRB 
for decision, which may be appealed to courts. 

International Labor Organization: Tripartite body representative of 
labor, management and government, first organized as an agency 
of the League of Nations in 1919, now continued with the United 
Nations. It disseminates labor information and sets minimum in- 
ternational labor standards, called "conventions," offered to mem- 
ber nations for adoption. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 




gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 



(1) MO>rrEREY, CALIF.— On Janu- 
ary 22, Local 1323 presented 25-year pins 
following a banquet at the Casa Munras 
Hotel. General Representative Curry was 
the principal speaker and presented the 
pins. C. Bruce Sutherland, administrator 
of the Carpenters Trust Funds of North- 
California, was a guest. He spoke of re- 
cent improvements in the pension pro- 
gram. 

A total of 95 members were eligible 
to receive 25-year pins; one was eligible 
for his 50-year pin (Ed Brooks), and one 
was eligible for his 60-year pin (George 
Webster). Unfortunately, neither was 
able to be present. Brooks and Webster, 
along with Tom Eide, a 40-year mem- 
ber, are the surviving charter members 
of Local 1323. 

On Picture No. 1, front row, Tom 
Eide, M. E. Getz, Caper Aliotti, George 
Womack, Walter Schafer, Herbert Low- 
rimore, Virgil Baker, George Gruber and 
Robert Dalton. Second row, Leonard Pi- 



azza, Donald Laycock, Frank Bardsley, 
Clem A. Savoldi, Elmer Glover, Wallace 
Waddle, W. C. McGowan, Bob Rush and 
Clayton Askew. Shown standing, left to 
right, James Adams, president; C. Bruce 
Sutherland, administrator of Carpenter 
Funds of Northern California; General 
Representative James Curry, Joseph 
Torres, Olvey Crandell, Warner Dodge, 
Al Augustitus, William Lingg, Carl 
Voigt, Joe Patrick, Ronald Vining, 
Manuel George, Elias Houck, Gerald 
Parks, Ray Mann and Virgil Spencer. 

In Picture No. lA Tom Eide receives 
a 40-year pin from Representative Curry. 

(2) SAGINAW, MICH.— Eleven mem- 
bers of Local 334 received their 25-year 
pins at a special called meeting held on 
December 21, 1971. Those in the pic- 
ture are, seated, left to riglit, Donald J. 
Basinger, Vem N. McCallum, John H. 
Wetzel, Herman Enser, Orley D. Beech- 
ler, Sr. Standing, left to right, Merrill 
Schram, Harold K. Stenzel, Lancy La- 
Rose, Clifford G. Akehurst, Henry C. 
Ensminger, Harry E. Hudson. 

Those eligible for their 25-year pins 
but not in attendance were James Brech- 



telsbauer, Francis Coaster, Anthony 
Grayzar, Russell Herbers, Robert Lemcke, 
Vincent Matuzak, Kenneth Mead, Stan- 
ley Schultz, Lewis Seiferlein, Bernard 
Taylor, Arnold Weber, James Young, 
Clarence Zissler. 

(3) CENTRALIA, ILLINOIS — At a 

special meeting held on January 6, Car- 
penters Local 367 honored its 25- and 
50-year members. Those to whom serv- 
ice pins were presented are seated from 
left, Harold Gott, Eugene Parker, Wood- 
row Spears, Eugene Smith, Ralph DePew, 
Burrell Foutch, Farrel Schlueter and G. 
P. Williams. Standing, left to right, G. D. 
Meyer, business representative. Local 367, 
presenting pins, Elmer J. Michael, Paul 
Drenckpohl, William E. Owen, Robert 
Adams, Joseph Braml, Thomas Gott, 
Alva Wires, and Gus A. Steinkamp, re- 
cording secretary. Local 367, helping 
present service pins. Also receiving serv- 
ice pins but not in the picture were, Rus- 
sell Griffin, Dan Stover, Harold Stover, 
Richard Schnake and William L. Jones. 

Five members, Harold Gott, Ralph 
DePew, G. P. Williams, Paul Drenckpohl 
and Richard Schnake, received 50-year 
service pins. 




(1) and (lA) PORTLAND, ORE.— On 
December 3, 1971, Millmens Local 1120 
honored 78 members who qualified for 
their 25-year pins at a party in the Port- 
land Labor Center. 

The members who received this honor 
were, Wayne Abbott, Wm. F. Arola, 
Bobby H. Bigger, Cecil J. Bondell, John 
P. Brady, Melvin E. Carman, Harry A. 
Coppinger, George M. Craven, Sam Den- 
ner, George H. Elkerton, .Ir., Joe E. 
Fresh, N. Glendinning, Marvin L. Hall, 
financial secretary, Lyman Harlow, Ben- 
jamin Hinkle, Nelson E. Kennedy, Henry 
E. Krokum, Robert Krueger, Edward J. 
Lanctot, Carl V. Lund, John L. Murphy, 
Harold L. Peterson, Lyle A. Peterson, 
C. L. Reynolds, H. E. Rife, Jacob Ruda- 
mel, Joseph Schneider, Lawrence Scott, 
Willi Siebert, Roy L. Sims, Dunne L. 
Smith. Kenneth J. St. John, L. H. Stobbe, 
Marvin Strother, Ray D. Sutter, and Al- 
vin A. Wohlgemuth. 

(2) HILLSBORO, ORE. — Local 2130 
recently presented lapel pins to eligible 
members as follows: 

Photo — 2A, 25 years. Standing, left to 
right: Leo Wilson, Estavan Walker, Cecil 
Beals, Carl Hoffman, Lue Cunningham, 



Cliff Lane, Russell Rice, and Robert 
Ficken. Seated: Darrell Kent, Art Van- 
derzanden, David Anders, Ellis Nylund, 
Harold Duncan. 

Photo — 2B, 30 years, standing, P. R. 
Stark, Monrad Bentson, Bert Halverson, 
PhiUp Kaiser, seated. Jack Hume, R. A. 
Morgan, Earl Montgomery, M. J. Moret, 
Lester Batchler. 

(3) TUCSON, ARIZ.— Service pins were 
awarded to 25-year members of the 



United Brotherhood by Millwright Local 
1182, Tucson. 

Those members honored included, 
standing, from left to right: Earl Moody, 
Garold Powell, Carl Greene, William 
Sheeby, Sr., Herman McKinley and Clay- 
ton Shelpman. Kneeling, from left to 
right, in front row: John Lucas, T. H. 
Oldham and George Weeman. 

Absent when pictures were taken were: 
John Wells and Francis Welsh. Wells is 
shown with the children in Photo (3-A). 




30 



THE CARPENTER 



The officers and business agents of the 
District of Columbia District Council, 
which covers parts of Maryland and Vir- 
ginia in addition to the nation's capital, 
have signed up 100% for CLIC. 

This means that they have agreed to 
contribute 1% of their salary each pay 
day to the Carpenters Legislative Im- 
provement Committee. 

They are shown in the picture at right 
with CLIC Director Charles Nichols and 
Brotherhood Legislative Advocate James 
Bailey. 

Seated from left to right: Louie Pugh, 
secretary-treasurer, district council; C. P. 
Vaughn, collector of health and welfare; 
William Massa, financial secretary of 
Local 1590; Nichols; Bailey; and Richard 
Lichliter, business agent for the district 
council. 

Second row: William Pritchett, ward- 
en; Melvin Bolt, vice president; Paul 
Wedding, business agent; Jack Smith, 
business agent; Charles Menges, orga- 
nizer; Cecil Amos, business agent; Ben 
Sanford, business agent; Miles Caudle, 
business agent; James Merkle, business 
agent; Luther Harper, business agent; 
Robert Gardner, financial secretary of 
Local 132; Hugh Turley, business agent. 
Not present for the picture was Business 
Agent Herman Schneider. 



n ■ 






s a s 


s s 


MflBSi 


VKSfl 








100% for CLIC in DC District Council 




Local City & State 
ALASKA 

2362 Wrangell 



Amount 



180 
1752 
2341 
2505 
2559 
2561 
2592 
2608 
2652 
2687 
2688 
2749 
2789 
2808 
2882 
2907 
2927 
3074 
3088 
3170 
3184 



CALIFORNIA 

Vallejo 

Pomona 

Willit 

Klamath 

San Francisco 

Fresh Pond 

Eureka 

Redding 

Standard 

Auburn 

Elk Creek 

Camino 

Areata 

Areata 

Santa Rosa 

Weed 

Martell 

Chester 

Stockton 

Sacramento 

Fresno 



20.00* 



85.50 

10.00* 

30.00* 

20.00* 

20.00* 

10.00* 

30.00* 

50.00* 

10.00* 

20.00* 

10.00* 

10.00* 

20.00* 

10.00* 

10.00* 

50.00* 

10.00* 

20.00* 

10.00* 

30.00* 

10.00* 



Local City & State Amount 

1922 Chicago 20.00 

2087 Crystal Lake 14.00 



Local City & State 
OREGON 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

1631 Washington 70.00 

2311 Washington 30.00 

FLORIDA 

1250 Homestead 54.00 

1685 Pineda 41.00 

IDAHO 

2257 Ahsahka 10.00* 

2816 Emmett 30.00* 

ILLINOIS 

13 Chicago 146.00 

58 Chicago 339.00 

242 Chicago 8.00* 

1889 Downers Grove 97.00 



IOWA 

308 Cedar Rapids 

LOUISIANA 

764 Shreveport 
2258 Houma 



70.00 



10.00 
42.00 



MASSACHUSETTS 

32 Springfield 24.00 

157 Boston 10.00 

624 Brockton 18.00 

860 Framingham 60.00 

885 Woburn 20.00 

MINNESOTA 

548 Minneapolis 



417 
602 



2405 
2581 
2685 
2719 
2812 
3038 



11 

1454 



11.00 



MISSOURI 

St. Louis 
St. Louis 

MONTANA 
Kalispell 
Libby 
Missoula 
Thompson Fall 
Missoula 
Bonner 



50.00 
40.00 



10.00* 
50.00* 
30.00* 
20.00* 
10.00* 
40.00* 



NEW JERSEY 

15 Hackensack 158.00 

620 Madison 205.00 

2018 Lakewood 140.00 



NEW YORK 

53 White Plains 



OHIO 

Cleveland 
Cincinnati 



50.00 



10.00* 
140.00 



738 
1017 
1157 
1746 
2066 
2195 
2521 
2522 
2530 
2531 
2554 
2573 
2588 
2627 
2636 
2691 
2698 
2714 
2750 
2756 
2769 
2784 
2787 
2791 
2822 
2851 
2881 
2896 
2902 
2916 
2924 
2942 
2949 
2961 
2970 
3009 
3035 
3064 
3091 



Portland 

Redmond 

Lebanon 

Portland 

St. Helens Vic. 

Gardner 

Triangle Lake 

St. Helens 

Gilchrist 

Portland 

Lebanon 

Coos Bay 

Bates 

Cottage Grove 

Valsetz 

Coquille 

Bandon 

Dallas 

Springfield 

Goshen 

Wheeler 

Coquille 

Springfield 

Sweet Home 

St. Helens 

LaGrande 

Portland 

Lyons 

Burns 

Kinzua 

John Day 

Albany 

Roseburg 

St. Helens 

Pilot Rock 

Grants Pass 

Springfield 

Toledo 

Vaughn 



Amount 

10.00* 

20.00* 

40.00 

10.00* 

19.00 

10.00* 

10.00* 

20.00* 

20.00* 

10.00* 

50.00* 

10.00* 

10.00* 

10.00* 

20.00* 

30.00* 

20.00* 

20.00* 

30.00* 

10.00* 

10.00* 

30.00* 

20.00* 

20.00* 

20.00* 

30.00* 

10.00* 

10.00* 

40.00* 

10.00* 

20.00* 

50.00* 

30.00* 

20.00* 

40.00* 

30.00* 

30.00* 

30.00* 

30.00* 



OKLAHOMA 

943 Tulsa 120.00 



PENNSYLVANIA 

287 Harrisburg 10.00* 



Local 


1 City & State 


Amount 


501 


Stroudsburg 


40.00 


541 


Washington 


11.00 


843 


Jenkintown 


11.00 


1050 


Philadelphia 

TENNESSEE 


268.00 


50 


Knoxville 

TEXAS 


50.00 


1084 


Angleton 
WASHINGTON 


8.00 


870 


Spokane 


30.00 


1054 


Everett 


20.00 


1136 


Kettle Falls 


20.00* 


1238 


Woodland 


20.00* 


1597 


Bremerton 


24.00 


1845 


Snoqualm Fall 


40.00* 


2498 


Longview 


20.00* 


2519 


Seattle 


30.00* 


2536 


Port Gamble 


30.00* 


2628 


Centralia 


10.00* 


2633 


Tacoma 


50.00* 


2637 


Sedro WooUey 


10.00* 


2655 


Everett 


20.00* 


2659 


Everett 


20.00* 


2667 


Bellingham 


10.00* 


2739 


Yakima 


20.00* 


2767 


Morton 


50.00* 


2805 


Klickitat 


40.00* 


2841 


Peshastin 


20.00* 


2894 


Twisp 


10.00* 


2935 


Creston 


20.00* 


3023 


Omak 


40.00* 


3099 


Aberdeen 


10.00* 


3119 


Tacoma 


10.00* 


3121 


Seattle 


20.00* 


3185 


Creosote 


10.00* 



321 Connellsville 
414 Nanticoke 



15.00 
10.00 



WEST VIRGINIA 

3 Wheeling 23.00 

WYOMING 

1564 Casper 109.00 



MAY, 1972 



31 



SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 



A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 



(1) BOSTON MASS. — A banquet was 
held at the Sheraton Boston by Local 67, 
with an attendance of about 900 people. 
The occasion was to honor members with 
50 years of continued membership in the 
Brotherhood. In the small pictures: 

Business Agent John J. McSharry of 
Local 67 presents a 50-year pin to Harry 
Wornick, while Secretary-Treasurer, Gen- 
eral Agent Frederick Fletcher looks on. 
(lA) Front row are 50-year members 
left to right: Jacob Freeman accepting 
for his father, Morris; William Cullerton; 
Walter Ross, Jr.; Harry Wornick; William 
LaBlanc; Alfred Michaud. Second Row: 
General Agent Frederick Fletcher; Busi- 
ness Agent John J. McSharry; President 
Matthew O'Connor; Treasurer Edmund 

F. Ward; Financial Secretary Robert J. 
McNulty; Vice President Thomas Gan- 
non; Trustee, Michael McGrath: Re- 
cording Secretary Christopher Doyle; 
Warden Thomas Finnerty; Trustee Pas- 
chal McCafferty. 

(2) TULSA, OKLA. (No picture)— A for- 
mal dedication of its new building and a 
pin ceremony was held by Local 943 re- 
cently. General President William Sidell 
gave the dedication speech and also pre- 
sented a 60-year pin to senior member, 
R. A. Powless. 

There were 91 members eligible for 
2S-year pins: Gene Anderson, Owen 
Baker, Carl E. Balland, Alvin A. Barnett, 
Orvill Baughman, C. M. Blackwell, Ray- 
mond Bowman, A. L. Bradley, James 

G. Bryant, Jewell E. Busch, Jack Camp- 
bell, Charles Cannon, B. W. Carpenter, 



Ott Carpenter, Orville Cavins, Marvin 
Chaffin, Carl Cleveland, Jimmy Corne- 
lius, Earl Curry, Jack Davis, Leonard 
Davis, R. B. Dunn, Clarence Fain, Lee 
Fillmore, Paul Gardner, F. F. Groom, 
Ralph Hancock, Oscar Harris, Levi Har- 
rison, Andy Haskins, George Hcnson, 
Richard Henson. M. G. Hewling, Billy 
C. Holman, Harrison Humphreys, Ray- 
mond Inglett, H. G. Jaggars, Luther 
Johnston, L. D. Jones, Vernon C. Jones, 
Fred Kampen, Charles Lancaster, An- 
drew J. Lane, R. T. Langston, Lloyd P. 
Lankford, L C. Lewis, Walter W. Lile, 
James O Linch, Robert Loveless, James 
J. Mareck, Vernon McKelvey, Arthur 
Meledeo, George Munns, John W. Nich- 
ols, Bob E. Nobel, Cecil O'Neal, Fred 
Peterson, L. L. Pittman, Grady Pitts, 
Ira V. Powell, Charles H. Pratt, Richard 
Pritcbett, Melvin Ray, Wayne Reynolds, 
Pery Rice, L. L. Rippetoe, Ema Robbins, 
Jim Rozell, Raymond Schultz, J. C. 
Scott, Earl Self, Olen, D. Self, Homer 
Sharpton, C. E. Shaver, Luther Shields, 
Lawrence Smith, Norbert L. Smith, Nor- 
bert Soerries, Frank Stainbrook, Sam 
Stewart, E. C. Stoops, Earl Tackelt, Nor- 
man Tenneson, Joseph L. Thomas, Carl 
S. Tidwell, Ford Tinsley. Delmo Todd, 
Tommy Tucker, Thomas E. Wise, Donald 
E. Wright and Paul Soerries. 

A total of 86 members were eligible 
for 30-year pins: Leslie Bates, Hooley 
Benge, Clifford Bogle, O. W. Bruce, Gene 
Bryant, E. M. Burke, Sr., James O. 
Caffey, J. R. Cochran, Emil Colburn, S. 
J. Collins, Ralph Conrad, Jess Crafts, 
Wesley Crane, Wayne Crown, I. L. Cun- 
ningham, Harry Daves, H. H. Dignan, 
Paul Dixon, Lee Donaldson, J. B. Duke, 



A. T. Eaton, L. C. Eckenrode, W. B. 
Fish, Raymond Galvin, John A. George, 
V. P. Goforth, Ned Hansen, B. M. 
Haynie, Bernard Henshaw, Don Holland, 
Walter A. Hough, Billy Huffman, Robert 
Inglett, Wm. Ingold, Turner D. Jones, 
H. B. Klossen, Grant Koontz, Leonard 
Kragel, N. L. Lundquist, Earl Lutz, C. 
R. McDonald, Glenn McLimans, Earl 
W. McNiel, R. V. Merrell, Ralph Miller, 
Fred Navert, Frank Newton, T. K. Park, 
Harry Pease, A. L. Pennington, Eldon 
Pennington, J. W. Perkins, Lawrence 
Perkins, Lee Porter, Ralph Piper, H. J. 
Pryor, G. C. Queen, Walter L. Rice, 
Walton Rice, Morris Rife, D. A. Rinnert, 
James Roberts, Roy Rothhammer, Ervin 
Rowland, Clarence Scbuiz, Verl J. Shar- 
ron, J. D. Snow, Lee A. Stevens, Jess 
Stevenson, J. F. Stewart, Hubert Stites, 
Cecil Tarr, J. W. Vanlandingham, Bill 
Wagner, A. J. Walls, Lester Watson, H. 
H. Wells, Walter Willard, Depurda Wil- 
lits. Grant Wilson, J. K. Wilson, Lloyd 
T. Wood, Eldron Woodfin, E. N. Woods 
and Jesse Wright. 

There were 17 members eligible for 
35-year pins: W. W. Adams, H. L. 
Blackburn, George Burley, W. W. Camp, 
George Campbell, C. W. Carlson, F. E. 
Fellows, Lyie A. Gwin, W. J. Harmon, 
Carl Hof, Charles E. Lander, Earl Lauer, 
Jimmy Mclntire, W. B. Millspaugh, 
Charles Schmoll, Raymond Snider, J. 
D. Snook. 

Two members were eligible for 40- 
year pins: Ray Corrin and Vernon John- 
son. 

Five members were eligible for 45- 
year pins: Vick C. Carlson, Howard 
Curtis, Louis Gibson, E. V. Raper, Fred 
Sanders. 

Seven members were eligible for 50- 
year pins: J. W. Benton, Edgar Bowen, 
Joe Horton, Carl Huffman, D. L. Jack- 
son, Oscar Loflin and D. S. Lovejoy. 

Seven members were eligible for 55- 
year pins: E. F. Dougan, T. R. Hum- 
phreys, Andrew Nilson, Guy Rice, C. G. 
Robinson, Sam Robinson, and R. D. 
Wilkerson. 

One member was eligible for a 60-year 
pin: R. A. Powless, 

Ninety members were eligible for pen- 
sion checks. 




lA 



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32 



THE CARPENTER 




GOSSIP 

SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 

Mr. Pert Sez; 

Letting the students decide how the 
school's to be run is like having the 
baby tell you how to change his 
diaper. 

R U GOING 2 D UNION MEETING? 




Now Hare This . . . 

Said the Mama Rabbit to her small 
bunny: "A magician pulled you out 
of a hat! Now will you stop asking 
questions? 

UNION-MADE IS WELL-MADE 

Some Body English 

There's not much difference be- 
tween keeping your chin up and stick- 
ing your neck out . . . but you'd bet- 
ter know it! 

MAKE YOUR SSS CLICK — GIVE TO CLIC 

Flushed With Success 

The lecturing psychologist had just 
stated that a superb poker player 
could hold down any executive job 
when he was interrupted by a meek 
little man. "Tell me, professor," he 
asked, "what would a superb poker 
player want with a job?" 
—Hans Haase, L.U. 2155, Dix Hills, 
N.Y. 




Po-Light Linguist 

Said one drunk to another: "Shay 
. . . after you bin drinkin' a lot, does 
your tongue burn?" 

"I dunno," replied the other, "I 
ain't never been drunk 'nuff to try to 
light it!" 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE.' 

Unfair Competition 

When the husband came home he 
was met by his wife who said angrily: 
"I've been- to a Women's Lib meet- 
ing. From now on, I'm not catering 
to your whims! I have my own life 
to lead and I'm not going to be 
treated as an object instead of a 
real person! I'm going on strike!" 
The husband silently gathered her in 
his arms and kissed her thoroughly. 
As she went limp, she managed to 
shudder: "Strikebreaker!" — Dulcie 
Leche, Eggnog Branch, Texas. 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Example of Double-Think 

"I have to think twice before I 
can get out of the house," said a 
much-married husband. "First I have 
to think up a reason for going out. 
Next I have to think up a reason why 
she can't go with me!" 

B SURE 2 VOTE! 

Cracks That Were Never Made 

". . . Another thing, Gen. Wash- 
ington. If you were to become the 
first President, you wouldn't be able 



This Month's Limerick 

There was a waitress named Gertie 
Who never said anything dirty. 

But one day a guy 

Remarked on the pie 
And Gertie said something not purty! 

— Gertrude Peterson, Bradford, Pa. 



to say you inherited your problems 
from somebody else!" 

"This is a new story by that Dickens 
fellow. Something about a worthy 
banker named Scrooge who finally 
degenerates into a sentimental weak- 
ling." 

"Come in out of the rain with that 
kite, Benjamin, before you get amps 
in your pants!" D. Roworth, Warren, 
Ont. 

I 4 ALL— ALL 4 I 

Adding Another Wrinkle! 

He had been made a vice-president 
of his firm and bragged about it so 
much that his wife finally said; "You 
know vice presidents at your plant 
are a dime-a-dozen. Why, at the 
supermarket they even have a vice- 
president-in-charge-of-prunes!" 

Furious, the husband phoned the 
supermarket and asked to speak to 
"the vice-president-in-cha rge-of- 
prunes." 

"Which kind?" was the reply. 
"Packaged or bulk?" 




The Worm Turns 

Two caterpillars were crawling 
across a leaf when a butterfly flew 
over. One caterpillar nudged the 
other and said: "You couldn't get 
me up in one of those things for a 
million bucks!" 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

Uncovered the Cause! 

A marriage counsellor, questioning 
a wife, asked, "Did you wake up 
grumpy this morning?" 

"No," she replied. "I let him 
sleep!" — Patrice D., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

UNION MEN WORK SAFELY 

Now That I Think of It . . . 

The trouble with a guy who talks 
too fast is often that he says some- 
thing he hasn't thought of yet. 



MAY, 1972 



33 



QUALITY 

Work Requires 
Quality Tools 



E3-16C 
16 oz. 




USE . . . 
♦ Estwing^ 

Solid Steel Hammers 

Head and Handle Forged One- 
Piece Solid Sfeel, Strongest 
Construction Known. 
Exclusive Estwing Temper, Bal- 
ance and Finish. 

Estwing's Exclusive Nylon-Vinyl 
Safe-T-Shape Cushion Grip Ab- 
sorbs Each Blov/ — Grip is Mould- 
ed Permanently to Steel Shank 
(Not a Glued-On Rubber Grip). 
It Will Never Loosen, Come Off 
or Wear Out As Rubber Grips 
Do. 

For Safety Sake 

Always wear 
Estwing Safety 
Goggles to 
protect your 
eyes from 
flying nails 
and fragments. 

ONLY $1.85 

Soft, comfortable, flexible 

*Mark of the Skilled 

EstWSig:^MFG.CO. 

2647 8th St. Dept. C-5 

ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 61101 




SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. 




(1) NEW YORK, N.Y.— John E. Pes- 
solano, president of Local 2710, and 
George Clark, shop steward of Verticals 
Inc., make a presentation of a 25-)ear 
membership pin to Robert Sampson. 
Brother Sampson has the distinction of 
being the first member of Local 2710 
to receive this pin. The presentation was 
made at a shop party attended by mem- 
bers and management representatives. 

(2) HUNTINGTON, W. Va. — Local 
302 recently presented 25-year pins to 
the following: Left to right, front row, 
T. T. Wetherholt, Robert A. Miller, Bazil 
Hatfield, (56 years), Ernest Brandum, 
Oscar Hatfield, N. E. Morrison, F. E. 
McNeely, A. C. Camp, who is president 
of Local 302. Second row, R. L. Dillon, 
Charlie Craft, Uelbert Beckley, H. C. 
Ashworth, B. F. Rife, F. L. Burchett, 
Albert Larson, A. B. Hazlette, and Don 
W'ellman. 

(3) CHICAGO, ILL.— At a recent meet- 
ing Local 434 honored one of its mem- 
bers who had completed 50 years in the 
Brotherhood. In the picture are: Seated, 
from left. Secretary Charles Sprietsma, 
49 years; Alphonse Reigert, 50 years, 
honored guest; and George Bensema, 48 
years. Standing, left to right, Wm. Beem- 
sterboer, president; Richard Sarvey, 
trustee; Jeshire Reichert, 53 years; Rob- 
ert Scholtens, trustee; Thomas Cure, 
treasurer; Stephen Perz, conductor; Dale 
W. Garner, financial secretary; Patrick 
Moran, warden; and Edward L. Nelson, 
business representative. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



U-I Show To Be 
In San Diego 

The world's largest labor-management 
exposition will be in sunny California 
at the San Diego Community Concourse 
from June 9 through 14. 

The setting for a unique exposition 
such as the U-I Show with over 300 ex- 
hibits and $100,000 in free prizes, et 
cetera, is most appropriate. The host city 
is as exceptional as the show. 

Founded in 1769 by Gaspar de Portola, 
governor of Lower California, San Diego 
was named after Didacus de Alcala, a 
Franciscan Saint. It was here the re- 
nowned Father Junipero Serra set up 
the first of 21 missions. 

The mission of the Union-Industries 
Show is to display firsthand how labor 
and management have worked together 
for the common good. 

"Progress thru Cooperation" is the 
whole idea behind the Show and the 
people of San Diego are people with their 
eyes toward the future and their feet on 
the ground — all building together. 

NATIONAL PENSION 

Continued from Page 7 

of a pension to a worker who quali- 
fies and who has spent his career 
in more than one jurisdiction. 

How it works can be illustrated 
by citing a simple example: Suppose 
a Carpenter has a 30-year career in 
the trade, and he works 20 years 
under the jurisdiction of Plan A, 
and ten years under the jurisdiction 
of Plan B. When he retires, Plan A 
would pay his two-thirds of its $300- 
per-month normal pension, or $200 
per month. Plan B, where the nor- 
mal pension is $400 per month, 
would pay one-third, or $133 per 
month. Each plan would apply its 
own rules (with the exception of the 
Pro Rata Pension rules, which are 
uniform). Each plan would inde- 
pendendy determine the Carpenter's 
eligibility for benefits. Each plan 
would be operated by its own board 
of trustees. The Pro Rata Pension 
Agreement simply provides that 
each participating plan will recog- 
nize service credits under other par- 
ticipating plans for limited purposes. 

A great deal has been accom- 
plished toward achieving the goal of 
transferable pensions. The United 
Brotherhood stands ready to assist, 
in furnishing full information to trus- 
tees of pension funds which are now 
considering this matter. ■ 

MAY, 1972 




These 

FREE BLUE PRINTS 

have started thousands toward 

BETTER PAY AND PROMOTION 



That's right! In all fifty states, men who 
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enjoying big success as foremen, superin- 
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the practical details of construction. Now 
CTC home-study training in building offers 
you the same money-making opportunity. 

LEARN IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

As you know, the ability to read blue prints 
completely and accurately determines to a 
great extent how far you can go in building. 
What's more, you can learn plan reading 
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prepare yourself to run the job from start 
to finish. 



CASH IN ON YOUR EXPERIENCE 

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lesson — today! Approved for Veterans. 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

E-144 TECH BLDG., 2000 S. MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 60616 

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FREE 

BLUE PRINTS 

AND 
TRIAL LESSON 

Send for your free trial lesson 
now. You'll agree that this 
training is simple yet practical — 
your surest way to promotion 
and increased income in build- 
ing. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Chicago Technical College 

E-144 Tech BIdg., 2000 S. Michigan 

Chicago, Illinois 60616 



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Vets check here 



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Please mail me Free Trial Lesson, Blueprints and Catalog". 
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35 




'-T 



L.U. NO. 4 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Sprague, Allen 
West, John E. 

L.tl. NO. 11 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Belknapp, Austin 
Bleiciffer, Anton 
Buzi. William 
DiCarro. Louis, Sr. 
Fannin, Leon 
Fiegland. Larry W. 
Floodman. J. E. 
Hykin, Albert 
Ikonen, Franz 
Johnson, Clarence J. 
Kewley. John T. 
Klein. John 
McGuirk. Harry 
Makuch. Andrew 
Manuel, P. D. 
Miller. Ernest P. 
Mills. Edward M. 
Nicmine. Albert 
Sedoski. L. H. 
Smogyi, John 
Stephens. Ivo C. 
Stumpf. George, Sr. 
Sykes, Daniel J. 
Thompson, Isaac 
Underwood, Walter J. 
Votruba. Edward 
Wester. John 
Wiesel. Oskar 
Wiggins. Charles 

L.U. NO. IS 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

DeRitter. Daniel 
Maggio. Bernard J. 
Petrie, Louis O. 

L.U. NO. 18 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Webb, James E. 

L.U. NO. 36 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Acely. Leonard 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anwav. Dale E. 
Bethel. Phil 
Fields, E. J. 
Lapham, B. E. 
Henrietta. James W. 
Imbrulia, Albert 
Irthum. Joseph 
Karageris. Spero B. 
Klehm. Rudy 
Lapham, B. E. 
Muirhead, Robert 
Ott, Noah L. 

L.i;. NO. 37 
SHAMOKIN, PA. 

Cannon. Raymond E. 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Murphy. David 
Sparks, Ambrose 
Sutherland. Robert 

L.U. NO. 47 
ST. LOULS, MO. 

Buettner, Louis 
Burton, Wilson 



Dunn, W.J. 
Felsch, Paul W, 
Foeller, Frank 
Harry, E. P. 
Hasebrink, Bernard 
Kelts, William 
Klocke. Henry 
Koplowicz. Henry 
Latta. Thomas 
Lee. Alvin 
Meredith. Herley 
Moehlenhoff. Julius 
Netlo. Joseph 
Reed. Arthur A. 
Schock, Raymond 
Zotz. Raymond 

L.II. NO. 51 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Drews. Frank 
Hazel, William F. 
Johnson, John S. 

L.U. NO. 53 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 

Arvidson, Victor 
Baker. Alfred 
Griffcn. Charles 

L.U. NO. 55 
DENVER, COLO. 

McDonald. Robert 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Brown. James M. 
Brown. Joe H. 
Hii 'h"s. John E. 
Kelling. A. A. 
Orr, Clifford R. 
Van Ness, Richard 

L.U. NO. 71 

FORT SMITH, ARK. 

Pollard, Fred 

L.U. NO. 100 
MUSKEGON. MICH. 

Walters, John 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Boyd. Roy A. 
Yocum, Lee W. 

L.U. NO. 103 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Bales, David L. 
Henderson. John 
Presley, C. A. 

L.U. NO. 104 
DAYTON, OHIO 

Kiser. Hiram A. 
Morrow, Oscar 
White, Felton 
Wise. Earl B. 

L.U. NO. 125 
UTICA, N.Y. 
Baker. Samuel 
Mori;an. William V., Jr. 
Risley, Elwin 
Stein. George 
Williamson. Alex 

L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Doria, James V. 



L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Chamness, David 
GoUaday. William L. 
Gordon. B. B. 
Johnson, Bernard 
Mercurio. Ralph 

L.U. NO. 134 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

Pegrin, Hans 

L.U. NO. 141 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Dahlberg. Axel 
Kenechtgas. John 
Nelson. Charles 
Pearson. Ragner 
Zetterberg, Roger 

L.U. NO. 169 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Lemmerman. Wendeling 
Sanderson. Arvid 
Works, Richard 

L.U. NO. 174 
JOLIET, ILL. 

Boresen. Hans 
Brisbin, Elmer 
Carey, Robert 
Eddy, Maurice 
Kleinwort. Emil 
Leksander, John 
Salopek, John, Jr. 
White. Powell 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Erickson. Abel N. 
Meyer. Gregory 
Nelson. Ivan H. 
Sieverstsen, Sigvart 

L.U. NO. 198 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Franklin, Jefferson E. 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Moreland, Corbett 
Nairn, William 

L.U. NO. 201 
WICHITA, KANS. 

Arndt. Leo F. 
Parker. E. R. 

L.U. NO. 203 
POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. 

Barley. Daniel 
Goodchild, Norman 
Hoag. Murray, Sr. 
Kowalchick, William 
Kroger, Fritz 

L.U. NO. 213 
HOU.STON, TEX. 

Ray, Sylvester 

L.U. NO. 218 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Cotreau. Andrew L. 
Hillier. William 
MacDonald. Daniel 
Norton, Stanley 
Piscitelli, Clement 
Sansome, Jonathan 



L.U. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Andrews, Wendell G. 
Burnett. A. E. 
Feininger, Ralph N. 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Keister. M. H. 
Lanpheir, James 
McElroy. J. L. 
McKercher, Edgar M. 
Zenger, F. W. 

L.U. NO. 243 
TIFFIN, OHIO 

Goetz, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Johnson, Sven 

L.U. NO. 278 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Gill, John B. 

L.U. NO. 281 
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. 

Moduno. Fred 

L.U. NO. 350 

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. 

Borski. Max 
Brandt, Sidney 
Corsaro. Chester 
Felch, Fred 
Heidig, Otto 
Johnson, Charles 
LoRler, John 
Meincke, Henry 
Nicholson, John 
Noonan, Ralph 
Russillo. Anthony 
Saltman. Isaac 
Servello, Dominick 

L.U. NO. 404 
MENTOR, OHIO 

Coach. John M., Sr. 
Manley, James 
Rizor, William 

L.U. NO. 447 
OSSINING, NY 
Fowler, Peter U 

L.U. NO. 465 
ARDMORE, PA. 

Peterson, Carl 
Wolfe, Hunter 

L.U. NO. 486 
BAYONNE, N.J. 

Ahfcld, Albert 
D Bvrnardis. John 
Higgins. William 
Hrynyk. Leo 
Maloney. Joseph 
Minard, Frederick 
Tverdack, Michael 

L.U. NO. 490 
PASSAIC, NJ. 

Krupa. Carl 
Rentier, Fred 
Scalera, John 



L.U. NO. 531 

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

Omand, Wallace J. 

L.U. NO. 545 
KANE, PA. 

Andersen, N. C. 

L.U. NO. 558 
ELMHURST, ILL. 

Luff, Fred 

L.U. NO. 562 
EVERETT, WASH. 

Hughes, Martin H. 

L.U. NO. 574 
MIDDLETOWN, N.Y. 

Ohnemus. William 
Osterdahl. B. S. 
Spraugc. Nial H. 

L.U. NO. 627 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Adams, Fred J. 
Boes, William T. 
Chitwood, Herman W. 
Harding, Harold 
Lane, Lewis L. 
Wilson, Julian E. 

L.U. NO. 661 
OTTAWA, ILL. 

Ackley. Budd 
Betts, Lloyd 
Gray, Thomas 
Prentice, Russell 

L.U. NO. 691 
WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 

Dunlap. Glen E. 

L.U. NO. 726 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Blomgren. Carl W. 

L.U. NO. 743 
BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 

Anson. J. G. 
Bennett, J. E. 
Branson, Walter W. 
Burns, Howard T. 
Chelf, Lester L. 
Cotton, J, R. 
Dowdy, I. J. 
Edholm,CarIW. 
Glenn, J, C. 
Harris, L. L. 
Holliman.J, W. 
Huff, Horace 
Kindred, E, J, 
McAbee, John 
Martinez, Manuel 
Metcalf, 1, W„ Sr. 
Owens, R. C, 
Ray, Vern R, 
Shaffer, Glenn 
Stewart, Jack 
Thompson, O. E. 
Wilkinson, Dordon L. 

L.U. NO. 787 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Hoaland, Signold 

L.U. NO. 808 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Anderson, Bertil 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



Fors, Harry 
Gaudette, Joseph 
Henrichsen, John 
Hocke, Fred 
Kruszynski, Frank 
Schaefer. Henry 
Scherer, Charles 
Wieliinski, Henry 

L.U. NO. 820 
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, 
WIS. 

Peterson, Walter A. 
Yeske, Edward J. 

L.U. NO. 844 
RESEDA, CALIF. 

Everett, William C. 
Goheen, Gerald 
Molle, Raymond 
Woodruff, WilUam B. 

L.U. NO. 846 
LETHBRIDGE, 
ALBERTA 

Tillack, Theodore 

L.U. NO. 871 

BATTLE CREEK, MICH. 

Hansen, Edward 

L.U. NO. 888 
SALEM, MASS 

DeEntremont, Benjamin 

L.U. NO. 929 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Alvarez, Richard E. 
Anderson, P. W. 
Brown, U. S. 
Cranmer, E. J. 
Dunlap, Donald A. 
Engle, J. I. 
Linsey, Otto C. 
Meclenburg, Fred 
Pacheco, Frank S. 
Porter, J. D. 
Rendon, Rudy 
Sperhng, Donald 
Stafford, Fred L. 
Trammell, W. E. 

L.U. NO. 937 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Tuthilf, John, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 948 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

KJosterman, Henry J. 
Stansbury, Wilham 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Comiska, Albert 
Kalita, Albert 

L.U. NO. 1042 
PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. 

Bouvier, Harold 
Garvin, Alton 
Jackson, Claude 
Reynolds, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1060 
NORMAN, OKLA. 

Mays, Marvin Clyde 

L.U. NO. 1093 
GLEN COVE, N.Y. 

Bathie, James 
Faraco, Orlando 



L.U. NO. 1128 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Calek. Joseph 
Carlson, John B. 
Fisher, Albert 
Wendell, Alex W. 

L.U. NO. 1143 
LA CROSSE, WIS. 

Erickson, Erick 
Masewicz, Adolph 
Strasser, George 

L.V. NO. 1215 
CRESTON, IOWA 

Thorp, David Byron 

L.U. NO. 1243 
FAIRBANKS, ALSK. 

Nelson, Joel R. 

L.U. NO. 1323 
MONTEREY, CALIF 

Aldridge, WaUer 
Heiden, Walter G 
Witulski, Martin 
Yoshiyama, Robert 

L.U. NO. 1363 
OSHKOSH, WIS. 

Linger, George 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kagan, Alex 
Mitchell, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1368 
RENTON, WASH. 

Jensen, Sigurd H. 
Pangburn, Wilham T. 

L.U. NO. 1394 

FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 

Stone, Robert C. 

L.U. NO. 1396 
GOLDEN, COLO. 

Loper, Clyde 
McCauley, Herbert J. 
Ware, Warren W. 

L.U. NO. 1445 
TOPEKA, KANS. 

Ramsey, Bert. A. 
Reeves, Cecil E. 
Siebuhr, Murl L. 

L.U. NO. 1485 
LA PORTE, IND. 

Zakin, Cody 

L.U. NO. 1509 
MIAMI, FLA. 

Armstrong, K. N. 
Bourget, Joseph 
Davidson, John H. 
Farrell, William A. 
Hall, Clarence M. 
Kirkpatrick, Cleat 
Kusch, Adrian A. 
Orr. George W. 
Sewell, Edward J. 

L.U. NO. 1533 
TWO RIVERS, WIS. 

Hagenow, Hilary G. 



L.U. NO. 1560 
ANTIGONISH, N.S. 

Gavel, Arthur C. 

L.U. NO. 1592 
SARNIA, ONT. 

Lewis, Lloyd Arthur 

L.U. NO. 1598 
VICTORIA. B.C. 

Bennett, David E, 

L.U. NO. 1613 
NEWARK, N.J. 

Lorello, Silvio 
Mercurio, Matthew 
Tripodi, Salvatore 

L.U. NO. 1725 
DAYTONA BEACH, FLA. 

Corbett, Floyd 
Devane, Harry 

L.U. NO. 1772 
HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 

Troll, Theodore 

L.U. NO. 1804 
MOOSE JAW, SASK. 

Hanham, Macken Philhps 

L.U. NO. 1884 
LUBBOCK, TEX. 

Crowder, Raymond 
Davis, G. W. 
Williams, O. B. 

L.U. NO. 1963 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Pold, Herman 
Werderits, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1971 
TEMPLE, TEX. 

Schramm, James Dale 
Walters, E. R. 

L.U. NO. 2046 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Aiello, Ratzi 
Nevis, Frank 

L.U. NO. 2114 
NAPA, CALIF. 

Herrick, E. O. 

L.U. NO. 2203 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Blikstad, Daniel B. 
Delgadillo, Tony 
Ford, Harold L. 
Hangsleben, Edgar 
McClure, Glenn E. 
McDermed, Charles F. 
Motley, Clyde 
Sanner. Jeffie 
Snider, L, B. 
Thornton, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 2274 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Ditty, Darius 

L.U. NO. 2466 
PEMBROKE, ONT. 

Sell, Harold M. 

L.U. NO. 3127 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Kapral, Michael, Jr. 




You'll EARN MORE, LIVE BETTER 
Than Ever Before In Your Life 

You'll enjoy your worli as a Locksmilii 
because it is more fascinating than ;i 
hobby — and highly paid besides! Youll 
go on enjoying the fascinating work, 
year after year, in good limes or bad 
because you'll be the man in demand in 
an evergrowing field offering big pay 
jobs, big profits as your own boss. What 
more could you ask! 

Traill at Home - Earn Extra $$$$ Rigirt Away! 
All this can be yours FAST regardless 
of age, education, minor physical handi- 
caps. Job enjoyment and earnings begin 
A"!" ONCE as you quickly, easily learn 
to CASH IN on all kinds of iocksmithing 
jobs. All keys, locks, parts, picks, special 
tools and equipment come with the 
course at no extra charge. Licensed 
experts guide you to success. 

jllustratet! Book. Sample Lesson Pages FREE 
Locksmithing Institute graduates now 
earning, enjoying life more everywhere. 
You, can, too. Coupon brings exciting 
facts from the school licensed by N. J. 
State Department of Ed., Accredited 
Member, Natl. Home Study Council. 
Approved for Veterans Training. 

LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 

Div. Technicial Home Study Schools 
Dept. 1118052 Little Falls, N.J. 07424 



r 



^ 



"While in train- 
ing I earned 
$200 . . . now 
have a mobile 
unit ... it was 
best instruction 
one can get." 
Orville Pierce 
LaPuente. Calif. 



Everything 
necessary: 




KEY MACHINE 
locks, picks, 

tools supplied 
with course. 




LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 1118-052 
Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Oppor- 
tunities in Locksmithing," complete Equipment folder 
and sample lesson pages — FREE of all obligation — 
(no salesman will call). 



Name.. 



(Please Print) 



City/State/Zip 

n Check here if Eligible for Veteran Training 




-/- 



This point 
lets you bore 
holes up to IV2'' 

with small electric drill 



IT'S HOLLOW GROUNDio bore 
cleaner, faster at any angle 

Now step-up the boring range of 
your small electric drill or drill 
press to V/2" with Irwin Speed- 
bor "88" wood bits. I/4" shank 
chuclcs perfectly. No wobble. No 
run-out. Sharp cutting edges on 
exclusive hollow ground point 
start holes faster, let spade type 
cutters bore up to 5 times faster. 
You get clean, accurate holes in 
any wood at any cutting angle. 
Each Irwin Speedbor "88" 
forged from single bar of finest 
tool steel. Each machine-sharp- 
ened and heat tempered full 
length for long life. 17 sizes, '/j" 
to l'/2"i ^"^ 5®ts. See your Irwin 
hardware or building supply 
dealer soon. 



SPEEDBOR "88" 
WOOD BITS 

at Wilmington, Ohio, Since 1885 



MAY, 1972 



37 




PORTABLE GENERATORS 




The Black & Decker Manufacturing 
Company will market nationally a new 
line of portable generators which will 
provide power for portable electric tools. 
The company has been selling the gen- 
erators in selected markets since January. 

Patrick .T. McDonough. vice president 
and general manager of the firm's Pro- 
fessional Products Division, said. "These 
new generators will permit operation of 
power tools in areas where there are no 
existing power lines. The need for this 
type of secondary power source is partic- 
ularly great in construction operations, 
and many types of maintenance." 

Powered by Briggs & Stralton gasoline 
engines operating at 3600 rpm. the 
rugged generators include a 2000-watt 
model No. .■i620. 2500-watt model No. 
3625. 4000-watt model No. 3640 and 
5000-watt model No. 3650. 

All four of the Black & Decker AC. 
generators are statically excited to elimi- 
nate commiUators and commulalor 
brushes and reduce maintenance. They are 
painted brieht orarge for ma^imimi 
visibility and are furnished with vibra- 
tion isolators to minimize walking. 

The compact 2000-watt generator 
weighing 75 pounds can be carried by 
one man. The model No. 3620 generator 
produces 16.6 amps at 120 volts A.C, from 
the 5-h('rsepouer engine and a'so has a 
15-amp capacity at 12 volts DC. for re- 
charging batteries. This unit features 



a recoil starter, two 3-prong grounding 
receptacles, battery terminals, and runs 
quietly with a low-tone muffler. 

The 2500-watt, 4000-watt and 5000- 
watt generators are powered by 5, 8, and 
lO-horsepower engines, respectively. 
Each has an automatic idling control that 
reduces engine speed to about 2000 rpm 
when the load is removed, economizing 
on fuel and extending engine life. Normal 
speed is resumed when 100 or more watls 
are applied. Steel outlet boxes are located 
on top of the units for convenient access. 
The model No. 3625 generator produces 
20.8 amps at 120 volts A.C, is recoil 
started and weighs 105 pounds. Also re- 
coil started, the model No. 3640 gener- 
ator weighs 160 pounds and produces 
either 30 amps at 120 volts A.C. or 
16.7 amps at 240 volts A.C. The model 
No. 3650 generator has capacities of 38 
amps at 120 volts A.C. and 21.7 amps at 
240 volts A.C. It weighs 22S pounds and 
is started with a pull cord. 

Any combination of 120 and 240 volts 
A.C. output, up to total capacity, is avail- 
able from the 4000 and 5000-watt units 
without having to balance the load. Up 
to 90 per cent of total wattage can be 
taken from a single 120-volt outlet, with- 
out having to divide the output between 
two circuits. 

Available from industrial and construc- 
tion distributers handling Black & Decker 
professional power tools, model No. 3620 
sells for $375, model No. 3625 for S479, 
model No. 3640 for $669 and model No. 
3650 for $849. 

TOOLS, SETS CATALOG 

A new 20-page catalog describes the 
complete line of quality Metric hand tools 
and sets. The catalog features a wide 
variety of precision made Metric tools 
and sets for craftsmen, mechanics, mo- 
torists, engineers, hobbyists and mainte- 
nance/installation personnel. 

Listed are measuring devices, measur- 
ing microscopes, wrenches, tap and die 
sets, nutdrivers. hex keys, torque tools, 
socket sets and motorists" sets. All tools 
are precision made for exact fit of any 
Metri : fasteners or adjusting screws. 

A free copy of the catalog can be ob- 
tained by writing BEVCO. P.O. Box 5023. 
Glendale. Calif. 91201. 

CEDAR CICSET PANELS 

A new colorfid and descriptive circular 
describes Cedarline. the modern cedar 
closet lining material that comes in panels 
and arc easier to apply than outmoded 
tongue-and-groove cedar boards and are 
less wasteful because matching is un- 
necessary. 

Cedarline is lOO^fi aromatic red cedar 
that has been flaked and pressed into at- 
tractively-textured standard panels, 4 ft., 
by 8 ft., 'A inch thick. 

The circular suggests many uses of 
cedar lining in the home and it can be 
obtained free of charge from Giles and 
Kendall, Inc., Box 188, Huntsville, Ala. 
35804. 



'LIVING WEDGE' 




A new patented "living wedge" which 
more permanently locks the head of the 
hammer to the wood handle than the 
usual wood or steel wedge, has been 
announced by Vaughan and Bushnell 
Manufacturing Company, 11414 Maple, 
Hebron, Illinois 60034. Specially de- 
signed and manufactured, the plastic 
wedge is compressed as it is installed, 
under 5,000 lbs. hydraulic pressure. As 
the moisture in the wood handle dries 
oui over a period of time, the "shrinking" 
of the wood may result in the loosening 
of the usual hammer head. The new 
Vaughan "living wedge" slowly expands 
to its original shape as the wood shrinks, 
thereby automatically compensating for 
this natural drying-out process and cre- 
ating a permanent handle tightness. The 
new wedge is being introduced in 
Vaughan's Value brand and Double Duty 
hickory handled hammers, and is being 
identified by a special label on the head. 

VERSATILE ROUTER 




A first-of-its-kind production router, 

the Stanley Super Duty 90205. enables 

the operator to "plunge" the router bit 

Continued on next page 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




Lakeland 
News 



Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida 



Walter Giesecke of Local 200, Colum- 
bus, Ohio, arrived at the Home March 
6, 1972. 

• 

John H. Sundstrom of Local 1 1 , Cleve- 
land, Ohio, arrived at the Home March 
13, 1972. 

• 

Ralph N. Hansen of Local 8, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., arrived at the Home March 
20, 1972. 

• 

Albert E. Somers of Local 993, Miami, 
Florida, died March 1, 1972. Funeral 
services were held here in our chapel, 
and then burial was in Miami, Florida. 



B. B. Williams of Local 977, Wichita 
Falls, Texas, died March 3, 1972. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
William Gollnow of Local 1367, Chi- 
cago, 111., died March 16, 1972. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 

Arthur J. Koeller of Local 160. Phila- 
delphia, Pa., died March 26, 1972. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 

George Hahn of Local 637, Hamilton, 
Ohio, withdrew from the Home March 
1, 1972. 



WHAT'S NEW? 

Continued from preceding page 

directly down through the workpiece to 
start a cutout, instead of "tipping in" the 
bit. When the bit reaches a pre-set depth 
of cut, the motor shaft locks automa- 
tically at that depth. 

At the finish of a cut, a fingertip touch 
of a release lever unlocks the motor shaft 
which retracts automatically back up into 
the base, zeroing out the bit. This feature 
eliminates the danger of gouging the 
workpiece when withdrawing the tjit at 
the end of a cut. It also lets the router 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Arco Publishing 25 

Audel, Theodore 25 

Belsaw Sharp-All Co 15 

Chevrolet Trucks 9 

Chicago Technical College . . 35 

Cooper Industries 17 

Craftsman Book Co 27 

Dictaphone 27 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 39 

Estwing Manufacturing 34 

Foley Manufacturing 16 

Fugitt, Douglas 8 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 37 

Lee, H. D 15 

Locksmithing Institute 37 

North American School of 

Drafting 39 

North American School of 

Surveying 28 

Paneling Specialties 28 

Rockwell Manufacturing .... 19 

Stanley Tools Back Cover 



be set upright on bench or workpiece even 
before the bit stops spinning. 

Another exclusive feature is a "quik- 
change collet" that is hand loosened and 
tightened simply by turning a knob atop 
the motor housing. This makes bit chang- 
ing a fast, one-hand operation requiring 
no wrenches. The knob is connected with 
a shaft lock and can be loosened only 
when the shaft lever is in "lock" position. 

Also a "first" for this router is the loca- 
tion of the handles on the motor housing 
rather than the base. This location gives 
the operator more positive control be- 
cause the trigger switch is built into the 
handle and is less tiring in continuous 
production use. 

The depth adjustment gauge is scaled 
in inches and millimeters for very fine 
depth adjustments. 

Designed for the heaviest duty produc- 
tion operations, the Stanley 90205 router 
puts out over 2'/i hp., operates at 21,500 
rpm., weighs under 16 lbs. The motor 
has all ball-bearings, oversized, sealed and 
lubed for life. Oversized fan keeps the 
tool cool in production applications. Ex- 
tra length brushes are provided for longer 
life and less maintenance. Leads are 
welded and of highly heat-resistant wire. 
The power cord is an eight-foot type S 
rubber cord. 

Write for brochure E520 to Dept. PID, 
The Stanley Works, New Britain, Con- 
necticut 06050. 



A report on new products and processes 
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39 




in concLUSion 



WILLIAM SIDELL, General President 




Spiraling Prices and Profits Caused Labor to Walk Out 



■ Organized labor never has had a very good 
press. As a matter of fact, the more successful 
the labor movement has become, the more anti 
the newspapers and electronic media have become. 

However, the attacks on labor have never been 
as vitriolic as they have been since George Meany 
and three other members of the Pay Board turned 
in their resignations. 

The press seems to be doing its best to create the 
impression that organized labor is to blame for all the 
inflation which has taken place during the Nixon 
administration. 

Actually, the wages of working people are lagging 
far behind price increases. The game plan devised by 
the Nixon administration simply is not working. 

In the four months that the administration's price 
controls have been in effect since last November the 
wholesale price index has risen at a yearly rate of 6%. 
During the 6-month period immediately oreceding 
the imposition of price and wage controls, the annual 
rate of increase was 4.6%. In other words, under the 
existing controls, prices increased much faster than 
they did before the control program was instituted. 
The reason is not hard to fathom. There are some 
5 million employers in the United States. Each one of 
them is a controller of wage rates in his operation. 
His pocketbook dictates that he resist any efl'orts to 
increase wages in his plant above and beyond the 
acceptable formula. 

On the other hand, a few IRS agents are supposed 
to control prices in untold millions of sales outlets. 
That their puny eff^orts are ridiculous is reflected by 
the upward spiraling of prices. 

The Community Services Department of the AFL- 
CIO has been endeavoring to monitor price increases 
in food stores. Their findings are solid testimony that 
the efforts of the Price Board to control prices are a 
complete failure. For example; 



The Community Services Committee study found 
peanut butter increasing 21% in a Denver Safeway 
Store between January 17 and March 16. In Hono- 
lulu, in a chain store, Gerber's baby food increased by 
75% between January 5 and March 9. In Indianap- 
olis, Indiana, Pet Evaporated Milk increased 27% 
between February 3 and March 13. In a food store 
in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Crisco cooking oil in- 
creased 10% in a 35-day period, between January 
and March. 

These are only a few out of hundreds upon hundreds 
of examples which the Community Services Depart- 
ment has authenticated by actual shopping. 

This gives some indication of the reason why the 
labor members of the Pay Board decided to take a 
walk. 

The Pay Board members did not resign arbitrarily. 
Rather, the whole situation was discussed at a meet- 
ing of the AFL-CIO Executive Council on March 22. 
After careful consideration, the meeting determined: 
"The Board is not tripartite. It is not independent 
and autonomous. The Pay Board represents govern- 
ment control. It represents political and business 
interests. If the wage stabilization program is to be 
government-controlled, let it be so, openly and clearly. 
Let the people who are exercising the power take the 
full responsibility for their decisions — without the 
facade of labor representation and the pretense of 
tripartitism. 

"We will not be a part of a window dressing for 
this system of unfair and inequitable government con- 
trol of wages for the benefit of business profits." 

In a situation where wages are controlled but prices 
are not, the inevitable result must be spiraling profits 
for corporations and unemployment for workers who 
do not have the necessary purchasing power to buy 
back the goods they produce. The result inevitably 
must be more unemployment, more misery for work- 
ing people, and eventual depression for the nation. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



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JUNE 1972 



©Z^\[^[p 





Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 





rfi^n/A\n 



iMATlON 





GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased naembers in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending m the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



First District. Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W„ 
Washington. D.C. 20001 
Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

101 Marietta St., Suite 913 
Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

6323 N.W., Grand Blvd. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 
Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 

4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it fo the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should l)e mailed to THE CARPEISTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME- 



Local No. ■ — 

Number of your Local Union must 
be piven. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



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THE 



(§5\EI5) 




m^mH PRESS | - 
' pwHliBH8if| 



VOLUME XCII 



No. 6 



JUNE, 1972 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Maurice Hutcheson Honored at Testimonial Dinner 2 

Letter from President Nixon 4 

Address by General President Sidell ; 6 

General President Sidell Joins AFL-CIO Council 11 

President Emeritus Hutcheson Receives First Pension Check 11 

These Are The Issues in 1972 12 

Jim Parker Named Director of Organizing 21 

Wood Frame and Finish Featured in Synagogue 23 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 10 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 18 

Service to the Brotherhood 16, 20, 27, 28, 31, 32, 42, 46 

Local Union Nev/s 22 

We Congratulate 26 

CLIC Report 29 

Plane Gossip 30 

Apprenticeship and Training 33 

Your Union Dictionary, No. 1 1 40 

In Memoriam 44 

Lakeland News 47 

In Conclusion William Sidell 48 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent 1o 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price; United States end Canada $2 per year, single copies 20f in advance. 



Printed in TJ. S. A. 



THE COVER 

The famed rockbound coast of 
Maine is haven for millions of tour- 
ists each summer. The Pine Tree State 
estimates that tourism brings $540- 
million each year to its private and 
public cotfers. 

One popular attraction is Acadia 
National Park and its picturesque 
Bass Harbor Light, shown on our 
June cover. Established in 1919 as 
Lafayette National Park, with head- 
quarters at Bar Harbor, Acadia Na- 
tional Park is the only national park 
in New England and the oldest east 
of the Mississippi River. The National 
Park Service reports that there were 
2,867,000 visits to Acadia National 
Park last year and that by 1980 the 
annual number of visits there should 
reach almost 4,000,000. 

Other attractions help to make 
Maine a summer vacationland. Its 
beaches, lakes, mountains and resorts 
are exciting havens for outdoor rec- 
reation. With more than 80% of its 
land area covered by forests, the state 
is popular with campers, white-water 
canoeists, and other outdoorsmen. 

NOTE: Readers wlio would like a 
copy of this cover iinmarred by a 
mailing label may obtain one by send- 
ing 104- in coin to cover mailing costs 
to: The Editor, The CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution. Ave., N.W., Wash- 
ington, D.C. 20001. 

O 
The picture of the senior carpenter 
building the dog house inside the 
back cover is reprinted by popular 
demand and through the courtesy of 
Vaughan & Bushnell Mfg. Co. 



1 




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A view of the International Ballroom of the Washington Hilton Hotel and testimonial dinner guests. 

Maurice Hutcheson 

Honored at 

Memorable Testimonial Dinner 

in Washington, D.C. 



■ Maurice Hutcheson, who retired March 1 as General President 
of the Brotherhood after more than a half century of leadership, was 
honored April 20 at one of the largest testimonial dinners ever held in the 
nation's capital. 

Representatives of local unions and district councils from all 
over North America joined leaders of the labor movement and personal 
friends in a tremendous tribute to the veteran leader. 

AFL-CIO President George Meany led a host of well-wishers at the 
rostrum. Congressional leaders joined in the testimony at a reception 
preceding the testimonial dinner. The International Ballroom of 
the Washington Hilton Hotel was filled for the event. ■ 




General President Emeritus M. A. Hutchesun and Mrs. Hutcheson shared the spotlight at the festivities. 




General President Sidell and General President 
Emeritus Hutcheson with honored guest and speaker, 
AFL-CIO President George Meany. 



U.S. Senate Minority Leader Gerald Ford 
of Michigan extends best wishes to the 
honoree. 



T^HE WHITE H0L:SE 

^VASHINGTON 

March 27, 1972 



Dear Mr. Hutcheson: 



., Mr. Huxc». = ^^ .,, President o£ 

:tLr:ts% ^o aaa ^V;— tr . .e .ars aheaa. 
your many fr.en ^^^^ ^.^^^ ^^ 

n ot forget the steadfast ^-PP^JJ/,, v^Uingness 
I shall not forg ^^^^,^ ^^^^,,ty ^^^J,^,,,ests were 

on matters °^ °;;^^^^,,y ^hen such -^^^^^^^^^^ drying ones 
to speak out forthr g^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ tTrtime economy to 
questioned. The p ^^ed from a ^^^''^" ^his trans- 

fer our country -7;,^ peace, yet i- -^^^,^,t,e required 
an economy dedicatee ^ international aftair ^^^ 

Srn.ation. .^^ "ot^ iong-Honal ^f ^-fa^'^^a tribute 

that we maintain our ^^ ^^^l to m 

tcWs *«,*'!,*:irnaUonaf labo. aHairs. 

to your leader=h.p Brotherhood, you 

X-.e .ha. as -^f-rrhryVr ;— eoS^ 
HS23roVrrrei:Xar«eUaroo.e.ry 

American. 



With kindest regards, 



Sincerely, 



.^ZJ^^-/-- 



T.A /^ Hutcheson 
Mr. M. A. ^ tEn^eritus 
?reT.u!rB:r rhooa o. carper. 



rs 



101 Cons 
■Washington, 



D.C. 



20001 




. ilVt^"'^T^^V|N!"*. 



"/ have never known a man more adept at piercing the shell 
of rhetoric to arrive at the kernel of fact or truth ..." 

AN ADDRESS BY GENERAL PRESIDENT WILLIAM SIDELL AT THE M. A. HUTCHESON TESTIMONIAL DINNER 



■ My tenure as General President 
goes back to all of seven weeks, not 
a vei-y impressive statistic from the 
viewpoint of tenure. However, I am 
confident that if I remain in office for 
fifty years, I will never receive an- 
other assignment that will give me 
more personal pride or pleasure than 
this one. 

Tonight we are honoring one of the 
most outstanding labor leaders of all 
time. His contributions run like a 
thread of gold through more than a 
half century of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America's history. 

The United Brotherhood will he cel- 
ebrating its 91st anniversary come 
August 12th. For more than two- 
thirds of that time we have been priv- 
ileged to have a Hutcheson at our 
helm— William L. from 1915 to 1952 
and Maurice A. from 1952 to 1972 — a 
glorious twenty years. 

Together these two great General 
Presidents built a strong and enduring 
foundation for our Brotherhood to 
meet the hazards that lie ahead. 
Through wars, booms and busts, they 
kept the United Brotherhood on an 



even keel. The challenges and ob- 
stacles were great . . . financial crises, 
anti-labor drives, and secessionists' 
movements. Being able and dedicated 
leaders, they charted a straight and 
true course through those rough and 
troubled waters. Bringing order from 
chaos, greatness from despair. A task 
that would have been insurmountable 
for ordinary men. 

To have worked with our guest of 
honor is a privilege I shall never for- 
get and will cherish all of my life. I 
have never known a man more adept 
at piercing the shell of rhetoric to 
arrive at the kernel of fact or truth. 
I have never known a man more im- 
mune to flatter.v, apple polishing or 
personal image building. I have never 
known a man more dedicated to ad- 
vancing the common good. I have 
never known a man more deeply com- 
mitted to love of country, the princi- 
ples of democracy or the free enter- 
prise system. 

I have never known a man more 
compassionate and understanding to 
the needs of the poor, the neglected 
and the dispossessed. I have never 
known a man of broader vision, higher 



ethics or more humane instincts than 
Maurice A. Hutcheson . . . 

Knowing Maurice Hutcheson as I 
do, and as most of you do, it would 
only embarrass him to cite his specific 
accomplishments or dwell upon his 
total dedication to the United Brother- 
hood and its ideals. 

It is said that in order to get along 
you must make friends, and you can 
best make friends by being honest in 
.vour dealings, sincere in your intent. 
Maurice A. Hutcheson has legions of 
friends. Look around you. This gather- 
ing, which I believe is the largest in 
United Brotherhood history, surel.v at- 
tests the fact this has been his credo 
. . . and . . . this is just the tip of the 
iceberg. 

There are literally thousands more 
who are unable to be here tonight but 
they are, in absentia, no less his fast 
friends. Our headquarters has been 
overwhelmed for weeks with good 
wishes fi'om Maurice's friends. Some 
.fust say "thanks." Others spill out 
their emotions in more eloquent ways. 
But always, it's the same, "thanks for 
being our President, thanks for a .iob 
Continued on page 43 



THE CARPENTER 




Upper Left: Secretary of Labor James Hodgson presents a 
framed certificate of tribute to the honoree. 

Left: Retired General Executive Board Member Charles 
Johnson, Jr., who recalled his early days with Brother 
Hutcheson and AFL-CIO President Meany. 

Below Left: House Speaker Carl Albert presents a memento 
to General President Emeritus Hutcheson, a pen set made 
from wood used in construction of the U.S. Capitol. 

Below Right: Boilermakers' President Harold Bouy with 
Brother Hutcheson. 






Top Row, Left: A delegation 
from Local 60, Indianapolis, Ind., 
presents a governor's appointment 
to the Sangamore Society of 
Indiana. 

Above: A. C. Shirley presents an 
engraved platter on behalf of the 
Texas State Council of Carpenters. 

Second Row, Left: Robert E. 
Hayes, tinancial secretary of Local 
94, Providence, presents a gift on 
behalf of Rhode Island members. 
With him, at left, is William 
Forward, bns. rep., and at right 
Holmes Herbert, bus, rep., and 
GEB Member Pat Campbell. 

Second Row, Right: John Maxim 
of Jacksonville and C. E. 
Honnicutt, president of Millwrights 
Local 2411 present a plaque on 
behalf of Florida Carpenters. 

Third Row, Left: Ed. 
McDonald of Hartford Local 43 
and "Red" McDonald join GEB 
Member Pat Campbell in a 
presentation on behalf of 
Connecticut members. 

Third Row, Right: Ben Catterton, 
secretary of the Baltimore, Md. 
District Council, presented a 
plaque. At left, J. K. Miller, 
administrator of the Baltimore 
Carpenters Benefits Fund; right, 
Robert Kearney, Secretary, JAC. 

Fourth Row, Left: Pete Ramos 
of the California State Council 
presents a symbolic wine keg, as 
GEB Member M. B. Bryant 
stands by. 

Fourth Row, Right: John F. Bums 
presents a memento from the 
Massachusetts State Council. 



From left: Bricklayers' President Tom Murphy, Building Trades Secretary Bob 
Georgine and Mrs. Georgine, Plasterers Vice President Mel Roots, Building Trades 
President Frank Bonadio, and Lathers' President Kenneth Edwards. 




Wm. Sidell and M. A. Hutcheson with 
Electrical Workers' President Charles 
Pillard. 



George Meany and llnlon Label and 
Service Trades Secretary-Treasurer Ed- 
ward Murphy and Mrs. Murphy. 




General Treasurer Emeritus Peter Ter- 
zick, right, and Washington Police In- 
spector Kratovil. 



The honoree with Operating Engineers' 
President Hunter P. Wharton. 




Sheet Metal Workers' President Edward 
J. Carlough and Mrs. Carlough with the 
honoree. 



The Rev. Joseph F. Donahue, who de- 
livered the invocation, with Brother 
Hutcheson. 




Ironworkers' President John Lyons ex- 
tends best wishes to President Emeritus 
Hutcheson. 



Painters' President S. Frank Raftery in 
conversation with the honoree. 






ROUNDUP 



FAT EXECUTIVE PAY — Huge management pay increases have reached the point where 
the Pay Board is beginning to scrutinize them and the Internal Revenue Service, 
its enforcement agency, to study them. 

IRS agents, the Wall Street Journal says, "are testing Pay Board forms 
for keeping tabs on executive job perquisites as regular tax audits are 
conducted. " 

Disclosure has been made that the 5.5 percent wage increase level now being 
strictly enforced on ordinary pay increases has been far exceeded by management 
increases — Henry Ford II, for example, got a 37.8 percent pay increase while 
Ford President Lee A. lacocca jumped 48.3 percent. 

FEDERAL INSURANCE — The House of Representatives approved a labor-backed bill to 
increase the Government's share of the cost of Federal employees' health insurance 
premiums from 40 to 55 percent. 

AIRPORT DISASTER CENTERS — Disaster-planning, focusing on airports as the center for 
aid in local area emergencies, was discussed by a panel titled "D-Day 1972" at 
the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) Air Safety Forum, May 23-25. 

Probed were ways in which today's airports, with proper planning and 
implementation, can play a vital role in assisting adjacent communities when 
disaster strikes. 

"D-Day 1972" also included disaster-planning for aircraft accidents that 
might occur on or near airports. With the advent of the wide-bodied jets, the need 
for better accident precautions at airports becomes particularly critical. 

FORCED-WORK SCHEME — The AFL-CIO Executive Council has issued a stinging 
criticism of "a starvation-pay forced-work scheme" adopted by the Senate Finance 
Committee to replace the present public-assistance program. It also had sharp 
criticism on the first anniversary of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, 
which has been roundly criticized by many labor unions. 

On welfare reform, the Council completely rejected "the Neanderthal approach" 
of the Senate Finance Committee, saying that it "would force adults, mostly 
mothers with children over the age of six, to accept jobs offered by private 
employers paying as low as $1.20 an hour or to work in publicly-financed make- 
work projects at an abysmally low wage." 

In another statement, the Council said OSHA's first anniversary "was an 
occasion for bitter disappointment," and accused the Nixon Administration of 
feeding it a starvation budget "to soften the impact of its enforcement provisions 
on business." 

WHEN WILL PHASE II END? — There is speculation in Washington that President Nixon 
might end Phase II of his controversial inflation-control program prior to the 
November election and then institute a Phase III if he's re-elected. 

The speculation followed an Associated Press report that quoted Robert P. 
Tiernan, executive director of the Pay Board, as telling a Teamsters' meeting in 
San Diego that he expects that "since it's an election year, the Board will stop 
operations by December." 

Tiernan went on to say "it would be a pretty smart thing to drop it with the 
elections coming up." At the same time, he speculated that a third phase of 
controls would be likely at a later date. A spokesman for the Board later said 
Tiernan had been misquoted. 

Later, at a press conference. Chairman Herbert Stein of the Council of 
Economic Advisers was asked about the possibility of an end to Phase II. He said 
it is "very unlikely" that it will end before the , end of 1972 but hedged that he 
couldn't "make you any promises" on this. 



10 THE CARPENTER 



General President Sidell to AFL-CIO Executive Council 



General President William Sidell 
was elected to the AFL-CIO Execu- 
tive Council, May 2, filling the va- 
cancy left by the resignation of 
General President Emeritus M. A. 
Hutcheson. 

He joined the council as a new 
AFL-CIO vice president at the 
same time as Martin J. Ward, presi- 
dent of the Plumbers and Pipe Fit- 
ters, who succeeded Peter T. Schoe- 
mann, president emeritus of that 
international union. 

General President Sidell became 
president of the Brotherhood in 
March, and subsequently was elected 
to the council of the AFL-CIO 
Building and Construction Trades 
Department and to other represen- 
tative positions in national labor 
federations. His election to the 
AFL-CIO's main governing body 
gives the Brotherhood full represen- 
tation in national and international 
councils. 

President Sidell's first meeting 
with the AFL-CIO Executive Coun- 
cil in Washington was a busy one. 
The council heard reports on many 
key domestic and foreign issues. 
Among the actions taken by the 
council were the following: 

• It called the Nixon Administration's 
Congressional bill to impose compulsory 
arbitration in transportation disputes a 
"totalitarian" action. 




Newly-elected members of the AFL-CIO Executive Council chat during a break in 
session at May 2 meeting. At left, General President Sidell; at right, Plumbers and 
Pipe Fitters President Martin J. Ward. 



• It called for implementation of the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act 
which is still lacking adequate funds. 

O It endorsed legislation to permit 
unions to establish group legal service 
plans through collective bargaining by 
allowing the establishment of joint labor- 
management trust funds. 

• It revised the structure of the AFL- 
CIO Committee on Political Education 
to bring it in line with the new federal 
laws on campaign expenditures and re- 
porting and to allow contributors to 
COPE to take advantage of new tax laws 
on political contributions. 

• It set up a council subcommittee 
to work with the Advisory Committee to 
the Dept. of State and Local Central 
Bodies to develop a program for increas- 



ing local union affiliations with local 
bodies. 

• It amended the rules governing state 
and local central bodies to prohibit paid 
political advertising in their publications 
and end their ties with advertising boards, 
year-books and directories that accept 
commercial advertising. 

• It adopted a resolution referred to 
it by the convention calling for prison 
reform keyed to programs dealing with 
the real needs of the inmates and helping 
prepare them for productive lives. 

• It called on Congress to improve 
educational benefits for Vietnam vet- 
erans, provide more jobs programs for 
those not going to school and improve 
hospitalization and rehabilitation facili- 
ties for those wounded or injured. 



First Pension Check For President Emeritus Hutcheson 



President Emeritus M. A. Hutch- 
eson recently received his first 
monthly check from the General 
Officers and Representatives Pen- 
sion Fund. 

Although the 31st General Con- 
vention ofl'ered the retiring president 
full salary to continue as president 
emeritus and as an ex officio mem- 
ber of the General Executive Board, 
he declined the offer, stating at the 
time: "I am only accepting the reg- 
ular pension which I have earned in 
the same manner and under the 
same terms as all other retired offi- 
cers and representatives." 



RIGHT: Presenting the pension check to 
President Emeritus Hutcheson, right, is 
Ken McPeak of the Indiana National 
Bank, administrators of the fund. 




JUNE, 1972 



11 



U.S. I^ahar Tells the PalitictBl Parties... 

THESE ARE 



On May 12 the AFL-CIO distributed to all of its 
affiliates and to the press its platform proposals to the 
1972 Democratic and Republican Party National Con- 
ventions. 

The presentation contains organized labor's policy 
views on major issues facing the United States. 

These are only excerpts and highlights in four cate- 
gories — housing, occupational health and safety, inter- 
national trades, the national economy and health. We 
e.xpect to supply information regarding other proposals 
in a later issue of The CARPENTER. 



HOUSING 



■ The concept of decent housing for all Americans 
in viable neighborhoods and at prices they can afford 
is no nearer today than in 1949 when the first major 
housing program was passed. 

Housing — particularly low income housing — con- 
tinues to be the victim of fiscal and monetary policy. 
Basic shelter needs remain unmet. 

While the Administration talks about labor costs, 
it says nothing about the more significant land and 
money costs which continue to soar. A recent FHA 
estimate of average land market prices for FHA- 
insured one family home sites indicated that prices had 
increased lOI.l percent from 1960 to 1970. 

The ability of homeowners, particularly the low 
income minority family, to obtain financing at afl'ord- 
able interest rates has not improved markedly and 
future projections are pessimistic. 

Efforts to revitalize the central cities fail repeatedly 
because the total neighborhood is rarely given adequate 
attention, preventing even new housing efforts from 
creating "communities." 

Housing production is increasingly impeded by the 
failure and/ or financial inability of states and local 
government to provide adequate supportive facilities. 
Housing moratoriums are becoming a common phe- 
nomenon as a result of inadequate sewage treatment 
facilities. Poor transportation facilities and over- 
crowded schools have further complicated site deci- 
sions for new housing. The failure to match employ- 
ment opportunities with housing availabilities is crit- 
ical. 

A much greater commitment to policies employing 
both public and private efforts is required if America 
is to meet its housing needs for all income levels 
throughout the nation. There must be a compre- 
hensive housing program in which, at least, the fol- 
lowing factors are dealt with: 

1. A basic prerequisite is low interest rates for 
home building and home purchasing. 

2. Congress should direct the Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem to allocate a significant portion of available bank 



credit, at reasonable interest, to encourage the con- 
struction of housing and other socially desirable 
construction over the building of such structures as 
luxury homes, gambling casinos, etc. 

3. Low income housing programs must be so ad- 
ministered as to avoid deterioration of projects and 
give occupants a real sense of participation. 

4. A national land use policy should be pursued 
that will make land available at reasonable costs. 

5. An urban development bank should be estab- 
lished to assist in financing community facilities by 
state and local governments such as parks, schools, 
recreational centers, day care centers, etc. 

6. There should be complete dedication to the im- 
plementation of the full spirit of the fair housing laws. 
Until we have fair housing in fact and not just on 
the statute books, America will never solve its housing 
problems. 

7. State and metropolitan housing authorities should 
be established with the responsibility for planning 
and implementing programs responsive to regional 
housing and community needs. ■ 

NATIONAL ECONOMY 

■ The chaotic state of the national economy poses 
serious problems for today and for the future. 

The Administration taking office in January must 
initiate decisive action to counter the cumulative im- 
pact of economic policies which threaten the intrinsic 
fibre of the nation, warp the economy and divide the 
people. 

The incumbent Administration has relegated work- 
ers, middle income citizens and consumers to second- 
class economic status. Its policies have provided lush 
dividends to the corporate community, banks and 
wealthy individuals and families. 

These policies have fueled the alarming trend toward 
a massive and unhealthy redistribution of income — 
making the rich richer and the poor poorer. The middle 
income groups are in a major economic bind. 

Since this Administration took office on January 
20, 1969, it has operated on the single-minded and 
misguided belief that the only economic problem in 
America was inflation. It has not solved the problem 
of inflation but it has created major new problems 
in the economy, including: 

• Continuing high unemployment. 

• The first increase in the number of people below 
the government-defined poverty line in a decade. 

• The highest interest rates in a century. 

• A massive rise in the number of welfare recipi- 
ents. 

• A drastic slowdown in the war against poverty, 
in the campaigns to end urban decay and to improve 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



THE ISSUES IN 1972 



America's educational opportunities and meet social 
welfare needs. 

• Persistent industrial slack, with industry operating 
at only 75% of productive capacity. 

• Record balance-of-payment deficits. 

• First balance-of-trade deficit in this century. 

• Record peacetime federal budget deficits . . .To 
create jobs and turn the economy around, we urge: 

1. An expanded and strengthened public-service 
employment program — federal grants to the states, 
local governments and federal agencies for the creation 
of jobs to provide needed public services. 

A special program of federal financial aid is required 
to step-up job-creating, short-term public works con- 
struction and repairs in areas of high unemployment. 

2. Justice in the federal tax structure and additional 
tax revenues can be achieved by eliminating the major 
loopholes of special tax privilege for corporations and 
wealthy famihes. 

3. Congress should direct the Federal Reserve Sys- 



tem to allocate a significant portion of available bank 
credit, at reasonable interest rates, to effectuate the 
construction of housing and community facilities. 

A Congressional review of the entire Federal Reserve 
System and the nation's monetary policy is long over- 
due. America's central bank must be brought fully 
into the federal government structure and be made 
more representative of the major groups of the econ- 
omy, including workers and consumers. 

4. Congress must increase the federal minimum 
wage to S2.50 an hour and extend the coverage of 
the Fair Labor Standards Act to millions of low-wage 
workers who are still outside of the law's protection. 
Early action along these lines would improve the living 
standards of the working poor and provide the econ- 
omy with high-velocity buying power that will be 
quickly spent. 

5. Increases in the buying power of workers' wages 
and salaries are a basic prerequisite for economic 
growth — to provide workers with a share in the bene- 
fits of economic progress and to establish the founda- 




©HVAS 



U.S. Lahar Tells the Palitical Parties 



Continued from preceding page 

tion of the needed expansion of consumer markets. 
Rapid economic growth will not be possible without 
a substantial boost of consumer sales, which account 
for almost two-thirds of national output. The needed 
rise of consumer expenditures completely depends on 
increases in the real incomes of workers. 

6. Eliminate the inequities that abound in the sta- 
bilization program and are undermining public con- 
fidence in the government's ability to manage the 
national economy on a fair and equitable basis. 

7. Congress should adopt the Burke-Hartke bill 
to stop the export of American jobs and to repatriate 
the profits of American subsidiaries abroad. ■ 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE 
AND INVESTMENT 

■ This nation's most disastrous year in world trade 
was 1971. 

For the first time in 79 years, the U.S. had an 
officially reported trade deficit — $2 billion. The deficit 
for the first quarter of 1972 was $1.5 billion or at an 
annual rate of $6 billion. 

Behind these grim statistics lies the deterioration 
of this nation's position in world economic relationships 
and the erosion of America's economic well-being 
through the export of technology, capital, productive 
capacity and jobs. 

International trade relationships have undergone 
fundamental changes in the years since the end of 
World War 11. These changes have acelerated in the 
last decade and this nation must face up to this changed 
picture: 

• Other nations have managed economics which 
provide direct and indirect subsidies for exports as 
well as direct and indirect barriers to imports. 

• American technology has been rapidly exported 
through the shifting of American industrial plants to 
other countries spurred by foreign subsidies of Ameri- 
can companies as well as licensing and patent arrange- 
ments with foreign firms. 

• Vast amounts of American capital have been ex- 
ported since the late 1950's. 

• Multinational corporations, that know no national 
loyalties, have been mushrooming in the past dozen 
years. 

• Powerful new trading blocs have developed in 
places like the Common Market. 

• The composition of these imports has sharply 
changed from raw materials to finished products and 
components. 

No longer do the old cliches of the past — "free 
trade" and "protectionism" — apply to the world trade 
picture. This nation must deal with the new realities 
with new remedies. 

Today the U.S. worker is virtually helpless in pro- 



tecting his job and his standard of living. U.S. markets 
have been overrun with imports costing tens of thou- 
sands of U.S. jobs in such industries as textiles, apparel, 
office machinery, shoes and electronics . . . Clear leg- 
islative direction is necessary to give the President 
authority to regulate, supervise and curb the outflow 
of U.S. capital. At the present time, controls on for- 
eign investment are loose, inadequate and not related 
to trade and production. 

Authority within the President's hands should in- 
clude consideration for the kind of investment that 
would be made abroad, the product involved, the 
country where the investment would be made, the 
linkage of the investment to the flow of trade and its 
effect on U.S. employment and the national economy. 

The President should be granted clear authority 
to regulate, supervise and curb licensing and patent 
agreements on the basis of Congressionally determined 
standards. All of these presidential determinations 
should be on the basis of the impact of the U.S., 
particularly the impact on employment. 

A "sliding door" concept on quotas should be ap- 
plied to products and parts of products imported into 
the United States, allowing for a flexible growth factor 
related to U.S. production of each item. Only by 
nourishing America's economic base can this country 
prevent it from being overrun and smothered. 

Exceptions should be permitted, where a voluntary 
government agreement exists or is negotiated or where 
a failure to import the item would disrupt U.S. pro- 
duction and/or markets. 

A single agency should be established with quasi- 
independent authority to serve the Congress in all 
matters afl'ecting trade and international investment. 

U.S. negotiators should press for international fair 
labor standards in international trade agreements. ■ 

OCCUPATIONAL SArETY 
AND HEALTH 

■ At least 14,000 deaths and more than 2.2 million 
casualties are reported on-the-job each year. 

Both the National Safety Council, which compiled 
these statistics, and the Department of Labor acknowl- 
edge that these estimates are understated. The full 
extent of on-the-job casualities is really unknown. 

And now, recent scientific studies point to a fright- 
ening relationship between a number of occupations 
and cancer and other diseases that reach beyond the 
plant site and into the community. 

Even before the country became fully aware of 
the dimensions of the occupational disease problem, 
the AFL-CIO worked hard for the Occupational 
Safety and Health Act and hailed its passage. We 
pledged our full cooperation to the federal agencies 
responsible for its administration and programs de- 
signed to show organized labor's responsibilities in 
helping make it work. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



I 



The Act has been in effect for more than a year. 
At the time it was passed, the President termed it 
one of the most important and far-reaching laws of 
recent decades. He promised the highest priority to 
its enforcement and effective administration. 

The performance came nowhere near matching the 
promises. The record of the first year of the Act 
shows dragging, flabby enforcement and adulteration 
of the specific provisions setting forth specific rights 
and protection for employes. 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and 
Health is under the Secretary of Health, Education 
and Welfare. Its effective functioning is indispensible 
to carrying out the intent of the Act by NIOSH. To 
date, NIOSH has shown a callous indifference to its 
role. The budget does not provide authorization for 
training needed occupational health personnel as re- 
quired under the Act. 

We urge that $28.3 million authorized for the 
vitally important program of NIOSH be doubled. 
This will enable more rapid development of criteria 
and recommended occupational health standards, ex- 
panded hazards evaluation, and plant surveillance, 
and accelerated training of critically needed occu- 
pational health personnel. 

The Review Commission, which is responsible for 
adjudicating contested citations for violations of the 
Act, is both shorthanded, and faced with a weekly 
rate of new cases greater than contested decisions 
by the National Labor Relations Board. This has 
created a bottleneck to the entire occupational safety 
and health program. 

The budget request of $1.3 million for the Review 
Commission is only $220,000 over that of the pre- 
vious year. That is completely inadequate. We urge 
the Congress to increase it substantially. 

We also urge the Congress to appropriate the nec- 
essary funds and provide for an adequate staff to 
enforce the Railroad Safety Act and carry out the 
intent of that law. ■ 

NATIONAL HEALTH 
SECURITY 

■ There have been a number of proposals made 
to meet the health care crisis but only one faces up 
to all aspects of the problem. That is National Health 
Security which has bi-partisan support and is known 
as the Kennedy-Griffiths bill. 

Of all the proposals offered, only National Health 
Security provides for equal access to health care for 
all people; comprehensive coverage, restructuring of 
the health care system; effective incentives for quality 
and efficiency or controls on costs and elimination of 
the middlemen — the inadequate private insurance car- 
riers. 

More specifically, National Health Security incorpo- 
rates the following features: 

• Universal coverage as a matter of right. 



• Comprehensive benefits without deductibles or 
co-insurance; no arbitrary cutoff points in dollars or 
number of days of coverage. There will be no exclu- 
sion of coverage for pre-existing conditions; no limita- 
tions on physical examinations and other preventive 
services and no waiting periods. 

• Free choice of physician. 

© Financed through Social Security approach with 
matching contributions from federal revenues. 

® Provides for a Health Resources Development 
Fund to be used for health manpower education and 
training, group practice development and for expand- 
ing and improving health services. 

Effective cost control. Only National Health Secu- 
rity provides health care directly at the lowest cost 
with no wastes of the health dollars on private insur- 
ance carriers as middlemen and with prior budgeting 
to assure effective control on all costs. 

A number of bills have been introduced into the 
Congress which are designed to provide protection 
against catastrophic costs associated with expensive, 
acute episodes of illness. 

These bills do not purport to establish a national pro- 
gram to provide health services to all or a substantial 
proportion of the American people, but are designed 
to financially assist those persons who incur high med- 
ical costs. 

All such proposals have common features: 

1. There is a sizable deductible that must be met 
before any benefits are payable. 

2. When benefits are payable, the beneficiary must 
pay a proportion, usually 20 percent of the total bill. 

Catastrophic insurance is a rich man's program. 

A $1,000 medical bill is not a catastrophe in the 
home of a corporation president making $50,000 or 
more a year. To a $100-a-week worker with a family 
to support a $1,000 medical bill is a catastrophe. 

Although large numbers of people with relatively 
low incomes would derive no benefit from the pro- 
gram, they would be subject to payment of the Social 
Security tax on private insurance premiums. Thus, 
adoption of the program would result in the strange 
situation that low income people would be contributing 
toward a program which would largely benefit those at 
higher incomes. ■ 




JUNE, 1972 



15 




(1) EAST ST. LOUIS. ILL.— The 25- 
year members of Carpenters Local 169 
of East St. Louis who received their 
veteran membership pins are shov\n. They 
are Laddie R. Anderson, W. Jacl< Austin, 
James Bugg, John Burrelsnian, Victor 
Canty, Joseph Carriel, James Darnell, Le- 
roy Davinroy, Floyd Uutton, Thomas 
Fitzpatrick, Ray Fournie. Arzy French. 
Charles Fulford, William Gladdue, John 
Gregory, Charles Harris, James Hotfman, 
Leonard Johnson. George Kimhrell. Hugh 
Kimmie. Joseph Kinsella. Richard Kohl- 
haas, Bert Levan. James Martin. Richard 
Meile. Joseph Minor. Sr., Joe Mori, Ralph 
Nevcius, Jess Overby, Frank Rekosh, Ver- 
non Seger, Milo Sulya, James Tolley, Ira 
Waggoner and Russeil Whittakcr. Ab- 
sent when photo was taken were Chas. 
Bourland. Otis Bourland. Chas. Bunge. 
Robert Clarkson, Earl Geaschel. George 
Gray. Harvey Haglcr. Walter Kostc, Jess 
Mumby, Orville Perry, Clinton Proffer, 
Carl Renspurger, Felton Schmidt, Elmer 
Scott, Roy Shifle>, George Sweet, Jr.. 
Jerry Wallace, August Werner and Dale 
Williams. 

(2) BERKELEY, CALIF. — On March 
24, Carpenters Local 1158 of Berkeley 
held a dinner and pin presentation at 
the Claremont Hotel to honor veteran 
members. Past President Charles Spaiji- 
hower and Bill Mahaffey, financial secre- 
tary, were in charge of arrangements 
and confirmations. A total of 247 guests 
were present. 

President Don Keebler was master 
of ceremonies. Attending were Clarence 
Briggs, general representative; Joe O. 
Sullivan, president of the District Coun- 
cil of Carpenters; Al Figone, secretary- 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 



^t^^fBw, ;ieS^K. 



'A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members 
the Brotherhood who recently 

.received 25-year or 50-year 
ervlce pins. J 



treasurer of the District Council of Car- 
penters; and other officials. 

(Photo No. 2) — Those presented 25-year 
pins included, standing, left to right, John 
Lijio, William Balcom, Herb Weidler, 
Tony Satori, Walter Davis, Jr.; seated, 
Fred Fowler, James Isaac, Joseph Lil- 
lard. Ken Moon, and Gerald Burney. 

(Photo No. 2A) — A 50-year pin was 
presented by General Representative 
Clarence Briggs to Paul Hirshler. 

(Photo No. 2B) — 30-year pins went to 
Wm. McCauley. Earl Potter, and John 
Szucs. 

(Photo No. 2C) — 35-ycar pin awards 
went to Charles Byars. John Dick, John 
Sobey, and Frank Chichantek. 




2C 






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16 



THE CARPENTER 




\ 






He's using our saw Free 
while we repair his. 



That's how the new Skil Substitool Pro- 
gram works. If one of your Skil Trades- 
man's tools breaks down and we can't 
repair it immediately, we'll loan you a free 
Substitool to use on the job until yours 
is repaired. 

If you are a Tradesman all you have to 
do is register at your Skil distributor. You 
get a special Skil Tradesman's Identicard 
and a free personalized label to identify 
your Skil tool on the job. 

Then if your Skil Tradesman's tool re- 
quires repair simply take it to our nearest 



Service Center and present your Identi- 
card. If we can't repair it while you wait, 
we'll give you a Substitool until yours is 
ready. 

The new Substitool Program— it keeps 
your Skil tools on the job. For more infor- 
mation, ask your distributor or Skil 
Service Center. 



Nobody was ever sorry he bought the best there is 



JUNE, 1972 



17 




ANADIA 
' T^ REPORT 

Ontario, Quebec Expected to Take Action 
Against Safety Infractions, Job Hazards 



Governments in Ontario and Que- 
bec are moving to tighten up and im- 
prove safety regulations in the con- 
struction industry. 

Accidents in construction have been 
continuing at a high rate while fatali- 
ties are among the highest in any 
industry. 

Accidents in Ontario showed an im- 
provement last year over the year 
before, but time lost per accident has 
remained fairly constant. 

The average length of time a con- 
struction worker is off work because 
of an accident is about 30 days. 

It is expected by the industry that 
Ontario will double the fines for in- 
fractions of safety regulations on con- 
struction job sites before long. 

The province is taking over the job 
of safety inspection from the munici- 
palities. In the process it may reduce 
the number of fulltime inspectors, 



rely on more spot checks and heavier 
fines to reduce the accident rate. 

The Construction Safety Association 
believes that the new procedure will 
put a bigger burden and responsibility 
on them to make sure the industry 
does a better job in adhering to strict 
safety measures. 

The province of Quebec has en- 
trusted a great deal of responsibility 
for policing its safety regulations to its 
Construction Industry Commission. 

The Commission is a labor-manage- 
ment body set up to sup)ervise legisla- 
tion which regulates wages and work- 
ing conditions. 

The same inspectors now function- 
ing under CIC will have responsibility 
for safety standards. There are at 
present 126 CIC inspectors at work. 
Up until now only 15 inspectors in 
the labor department dealt with safety 
in this big province. 




BC loggers mute logs out ol Ihc mill pond Into line for the mill. 



Steering Committee 
May Guide Bargaining 

In Ontario, too, the new minister 
of labor, Fernand Guindon, is planning 
to establish a three-way steering com- 
mittee to guide him when major nego- 
tiations in the building industry in this 
province take place next year. 

This committee will be made up of 
labor, management and government 
personnel for the purpose, said the la- 
bor minister, "of re-examining prob- 
lems in the industry and of working 
toward a definite program of settle- 
ments, not only during the periods of 
crisis but on a continuing year-round 
basis." 

Mr. Guindon seems to be taking the 
hint from the federal department of 
labor which made effective use of a 
system of preventive mediation in rail- 
way negotiations two years ago and 
in a longshoremen's contract settle- 
ment this year. 

The federal department maintains 
fulltime staff experts who become in- 
volved in contract-to-contract negotia- 
tions, some of them experienced trade 
unionists. 

The Ontario department intends, if 
the minister's words are taken at face 
value, to use the tripartite committee 
to do the job. 

The Ontario labor minister ex- 
pressed his confidence in the present 
system of collective bargaining and he 
is hoping that his new committee "will 
make the institution of free collective 
bargaining function more effectively 
with the least amount of friction." 

MP Urges Changes 
In New Labor Code 

Members of parliament have been 
debating the new Canada Labor Code 
at length. 

Some are attacking the legislation 
and the trade union movement in the 
process. The resort to strikes in indus- 
trial disputes, and this year in the pub- 
lic service in particular, came under 
particular attack as usual from the 
more conservative members. 

A minority of MPs defended the 
trade union movement and free col- 
lective bargaining. One of the best 
speeches was made by Max Saltsman, 
M.P. for Waterloo. Ontario, who was 
a trade unionist, then a university stu- 
dent, then a businessman and success- 
ful civic politician, and is now an 
NDP member of parliament and finan- 
cial critic for the party. 

His speech on labor's rights April 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



17th is being reprinted by the Ontario 
Federation of Labor and is available 
without charge on request. 

Among many other things, Mr. 
Saltsman said that the best way to 
avoid industrial strife would be to 
incorporate a clause in the new labor 
code which would give the worker a 
voice in technological change. 

"If you bring the workingman into 
the picture when you consider making 
technological changes, there will be a 
great deal more labor peace in the 
country than there has been in the 
past." 

The new labor code makes a move 
in this direction. It would permit un- 
ions to call for negotiations with man- 
agement during the life of a contract 
if management announces technologi- 
cal changes that endanger jobs. 

But it would apply to future con- 
tracts only and not to those already 
signed. Unions want the bill strength- 
ened. 

Many Unemployed 
May Be Uncounted 

Even though Canada's unemploy- 
ment figures are very high compared 
with other industrialized nations, the 
government is still underestimating the 
true situation. 

This is the view of Executive Vice- 
President Joe Morris, Canadian Labor 
Congress, who charged that the gov- 
ernment's figures are inaccurate. 

Why? Because they do not include 
people in manpower training programs 
and in temporary subsidized projects, 
people who need work but have with- 
drawn from the work force through 
discouragement, older people who 
can't find jobs, students who stay in 
school because they can't find jobs and 
so on. 

Building Tradesmen 
Locked Out in BC 

The construction industry in British 
Columbia has locked out 50,000 build- 
ing trades workers represented by 18 
unions. 

About 800 contractors in the indus- 
try are in the Construction Labor Rela- 
tions Association which stage-managed 
the lockout, after offering the unions 
a 6.35% wage increase and some 
fringe benefits. 

The union spokesmen in the B.C. 
and Yukon Building Trades Council 
said such an increase is wholly inade- 
quate. While the hourly rates in B.C. 




may look good, the fact is that the av- 
erage union member works about eight 
months a year and is lucky if he makes 
$8,000 to $9,000 annually. 

Public Service Workers 
Still Denied Rights 

Speaking to the 59th convention of 
the Ontario Provincial Council of Car- 
penters, David B. Archer, President, 
Ontario Federation of Labor, said that 
strikes in the public service this year 
have re-opened the demand from some 
quarters for compulsory arbitration. 

The OFL spokesman has been 
pointing out that not many public serv- 
ice unions have the right to strike. 
Too many of them already are bound 
by compulsory arbitration clauses or 
are simply denied the right to strike. 

In Ontario unionized hospital work- 
ers may not strike and are bound to 
compulsory arbitration when negotia- 
tions fail. The Ontario hospital board 
indirectly sets limits on wage increases 
so that sometimes the results of arbi- 
tration are a foregone conclusion. 

Up until recently Ontario civil serv- 
ants were not allowed to join a union 
of their choice. They were bound to 
the Ontario Civil Servants Association 
which, if not exactly a tool of the gov- 
ernment, was close to it. 

But suddenly, early in May, the 
provincial government introduced new 
legislation which will allow the prov- 
ince's 53-,000 civil servants to select 
a union of their own choice. 

The legislation has strings attached. 
The union of their choice may not 
strike and when contract negotiations 



reach deadlock, compulsory arbitra- 
tion will come into effect under an 
Ontario Public Service Labor Relations 
Tribunal. 

This is the system used in the federal 
civil service except that federally the 
union may make a choice between the 
right to strike on the one hand and 
compulsory arbitration on the other. 
Most have opted for the latter. 

The civil service union will be able 
to bargain for wages, hours of work, 
overtime, fringe benefits, grievance 
procedure, promotion, demotion and 
layoffs, but will be denied the right to 
bargain on a long list of items includ- 
ing work methods and procedures, job 
evaluation, merit system, discipline 
and termination of employment. 

As they say, it is a step in the right 
direction but . . . 

Job Disabilities 
Get New Attention 

The government of Saskatchewan 
has adopted new legislation to protect 
the health and safety of workers in 
dangerous occupations. Construction 
is of course included. 

NDP Labor Minister Gordon Sny- 
der said that, despite the improvement 
in industrial health, some conditions 
are actually getting worse. As exam- 
ples, he named chronic bronchitis, skin 
diseases and mental disorders. 

In addition there are a whole new 
set of ailments including neuro-muscu- 
lar weaknesses caused by vibration, 
deafness produced by noise of ma- 
chines and chemical poisoning. 

Pneumatic tools and mechanized 
equipment cut down on injuries, said 
the labor minister, but they cause an 
increase in bone damage and injury to 
joints and muscles. 

The know-how to provide solutions 
is available, he added. What is needed 
is the determination to apply them. 

He is setting up an occupational 
health council which will include rep- 
resentatives of labor, management and 
agriculture. 

Statistics For 1971 
Show Labor Stability 

In 1971 the time lost due to strikes 
in Canada amounted to 2,910,580 
man-days, or 2/ 10th of 1 % of time 
worked. 

The time lost due to unemployment 
was 6.7% of total time worked. 

Last year, too, 95% of contract 
negotiations ended in peaceful settle- 
ments. 



JUNE, 1972 



19 



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(1) SHEFFIELD, ALA.— Guests at a 
recent banquet honored members of Lo- 
cal 109 who have been members 25 years. 

Standing in front is R. H. Clay, Joint 
Representative, presenting W. D. Ho- 
vater with a 50-year pin. 

Those members receiving 25-year pins, 
seated, left to right, are as follows: L. D. 
Cossey, Gather Adams, J. B. Mitchell, 
J. A. Richardson, E. F. Bryan and \. Q. 
Thompson. Standing, left to right: C. T. 
Jones, J. C. Reynolds, C. P. Kimbrough, 
W. A. Dickson, Broze Dixon, L. E. But- 
ler, P. B. Smith, R. E. Counce, Fred 
Kimbrel, E. O. Hanback, D. C. Duggar, 
M. A. Good and J. W. Brewer. 

(2) EAST LIVERPOOL, O.— Members 
of the Columbiana County Carpenters 
Local 1189 shown here have a total of 
282 years of continuous membership in 
the Brotherhood. Left to right, William 
Treleven, 58 years; Harold Babb, 59 
years; Nott Wolf, 54 years; George L. 
Miller, 53 years; and Homer Graham, 
58 years. 

(2A) During a special awards meeting Lo- 
cal 1189 honored these members for their 
faithful and continuous service to the 
Brotherhood. Bottom row, left to right, 
Wayne Helm, 37 years; Natt Wolf, 54 
years; William Treleven, 58 years; Edgar 
Beaver, 45 years; Joseph Kenney, 38 
years; Harold Babb, 59 years; George L. 
Miller, 53 years; Homer Graham, 58 
years. Second row, left to right, Robert 
Laughlin, 29 years; Peter Lemal, 29 
years; Vincent Haidet, 27 years; Robert 




Morrison, 29 years; Paul Wolf, 28 years; 
Jack Norton, 30 years; Leonard Gamble, 
30 years; Bernard Cunningham, 32 years. 
Third row, left to right, Andrew G. 
Myers, Jr., 26 years; Lloyd Walker, 25 
years; George M. Miller, 26 years; Earl 
Brown, 29 years; Edwin Burkhart, 36 
years; Clarence Thompson, 30 years; Earl 



Cain, 37 years; George Woessner, 37 
years; Leiand Miller, 25 years. Members 
not shown, Victor Martin, 68 years; Ernst 
Schmid, 61 years; Fred Snowden, 62 
years; Loren Orr, 60 years; Harry Led- 
erle, 29 years; Walter Lederle, 25 years; 
Robert Lyon, 30 years; Stanley Rice, 27 
years; and Robert Wolf, 29 years. 




20 



THE CARPENTER 



Jim Parker Named 
Organizing Director 

■ James A. "Jim" Parker has been 
named director of organization of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. General 
President William Sidell announced 
the appointment effective May 1, 1972. 

Parker fills the vacancy created by 
the appointment of Anthony "Pete" 
Ochocki to the position of Third Dis- 
trict Executive Board Member. 

He served as a representative and 
organizer of the Brotherhood for 25 
years and brings to this new post con- 
siderable experience in the field of 
organization. 

Parker was born September 8, 1916, 
in Clarendon County, S.C., the son of 
B. Beauregard and the late Eva White 
Parker. He started work at an early 
age following the depression of 1929, 
when his father was forced by eco- 
nomic conditions to leave his farm and 
take employment in a sawmill at 
$1.50 for a 10-hour day. His first 
job was that of a tadder in a stave mill 
for 75^ a day. Later he obtained 
employment in a furniture manufac- 
turing plant in Sumter, S.C. and joined 
UBC Local 1992 during the organiza- 
tion of employes of this furniture com- 
pany. Although organizing Local 1992 
and negotiating the first contract was 
a difficult experience, the efforts were 
initially successful, resulting in an in- 
crease of the minimum wages from 10 
to 20^ per hour. However, the suc- 
cess was short-lived, following a deter- 
mined effort by a hostile management 
to destroy newly-organized Local 
1992. 

Subsequently Jim tried selling in- 
surance and afterward entered the 
craft of carpentry. He joined Local 
159 in Charleston, S.C. on January 21, 
1941. He was elected recording secre- 
tary and served in this office and as 
a member of the examining commit- 
tee of his local union until 1945. 
During this period he also served as 
secretary of the Charleston Central 
Labor Union. He also served as man- 
aging editor of The South Carolina 
Labor News during 1944 and 1945. 

In November, 1945, he was elected 
financial secretary of Local 159 and 
served on a fulltime basis until early 
1947, when he was appointed as an 
AFL organizer on the staff of the late 
George Goode, Southern Director of 
Organization for the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. Jim was on the AFL 
staff for only a couple of months when 
he was appointed as an organizer- 




JAMES A. PARKER 



representative for the Brotherhood on 
May 12, 1947, by General President 
Emeritus M. A. Hutcheson. 

On April 1, 1957, Jim Parker was 
transferred to Atlanta, Ga. as assistant 
to the director of the Southern States 
Organizing Office, the late George L. 
Mitchell. Following the death of 
Mitchell in 1961, he was appointed 
regional director of the Brotherhood's 
Southern States Organizing Office, 
where he served until his appointment 
as Director of Organization. 

Jim Parker attended public schools, 
in Manning and Sumter, S.C. He com- 
pleted an extension course in person- 
nel management at the Citadel, a mili- 
tary college in Charleston, S.C. and 
during the late 30's and early 40"s took 
several courses including architecture, 
furniture designing and building, con- 
tracting and estimating. In 1960, fol- 
lowing a study of law, he was awarded 
a bachelor of law degree by the Black- 
stone School of Law. 

He is a life member of Hammerton 
Masonic Lodge No. 332, N.C., S.C. ■ 
• 

Memo to Apprentices 

In order to rate, must you go through 
college? NO. There are many roads to 
responsible citizenship. Tlie young person 
who feels that he must go tlirough college 
in order to carve out a respectable future 
for lu'mself is sadly mistaken. Our world 
needs good carpenters and other skilled 
craftsmen quite as much as it needs 
doctors, lawyers and other professionals 
for whom college is a requisite. 

Better to be a top-notch carpenter who 
takes pride in his work than a disillu- 
sioned school graduate in the wrong field. 
And every morning I would say LORD 
help me to be a neii' man, a man who 
remembers my mistakes and learns from 
them. 

— John A. Boyd 
Local Union 608 
Little Neck, L.L, N.Y. 



We're 

close to 

a cure 

for , 

leukemia. 



A whole crop of kids are alive 
and well 5 years or more after get- 
ting a new kind of drug treatment 
for leukemia. And each year, the 
children who get leukemia have a 
better chance of cure than those of 
the year before. 

The American Cancer Society 
plays a vital part in this exciting 
work. So, when our volunteer 
comes to your door this month, be 
generous. Especially if you have 
children. Or grandchildren. 

American 
Cancer Society ^^ 

We want to wipe out cancer in your lifetime. 




3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes V^" 
to '/,*", $.98 each. Ye" to Ve", $110 each, ^^t," 
to 1", $1.15 each. IVa" to Wi". $1.70 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, Vs" *o 
3". Only $6.30. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, Vs" to 1V4". Only $5.60. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes V4" to 
1 Vi". V4" size only $1.75. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-shai'pened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 

only $1.50 for SO ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
o perfect chalk line every time. 



Wilmington, 
Ohio 45177 



every bit as good as the name 




JUNE, 1972 



21 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



New York Member 
To Child's Rescue; 
Also Victim Himself 

Maurice Shields, a 61 -year-old mem- 
ber of Local 2155, New York City, 
was on his way to a synagogue to 
celebrate a Jewish holy day, one year 
ago. this month. 

He came upon a 13-year-old girl 
being abused by a 25-year-old cah 
driver. He told police at the Coney 
Island station house later that he saw 
Frederick Parasacco fondling and kiss- 
ing the girl despite her protests and 
those of her six-year-old brother. 

Shields was indignant because other 
passersby seemed to ignore the man's 
action, and he ordered Parasacco to 
stop. The cabbie started walking away, 
and Shields followed him, shouting, 
"Why did you bother the little girl?" 

Shields reported that the cabbie 
turned on him and swung, but missed. 
Shields, a slight man and four inches 
shorter, retaliated and sent the cabbie 
sprawling. 

A police officer happened by in a 
squad car in time to arrest Parasacco 
and take Shields to Coney Island Hos- 
pital, where he was treated for a 
broken right hand. The cabbie was 
booked on charges of sexual abuse on 
a complaint of the girl's mother. He 
was also charged with assault on 
Shields. 

As a result of the broken hand. 
Shields was out of work for almost 
seven weeks and he incurred approxi- 
mately $400 in medical expenses. 

The State of New York has a Crime 
Victims Commission which compen- 
sates victims of assaults, etc., and 
Shields applied to this commission for 
restitution of the losses incurred. 

His application was turned down 
because he was not considered desti- 
tute, Shields reports. 

Last month. Shields appealed this 
decision, and he is now awaiting the 
results of this appeal. 

Shields is an active member of 
Local 2155 and serves as a delegate 
to the New York District Council of 
Carpenters. 



75th Anniversary Marked by Kenosha 
Local Union in Special Ceremonies 




Local 161, Kenosha, Wis., was chartered on March 24, 1897, when the Brother- 
hood was in its infancy. Last March 24, the union commemorated its 75th birthday 
at a special party in the Union Club Ballroom. The crowd of members and well- 
wishers enjoyed a lavish banquet. 



Among the leaders and guests participating in the festivities were those shown 
below: Seated, Robert Strenger, General Representative, and Ronald Stadler, presi- 
dent of the Wisconsin State Council. Standing, Ben Yantorni, Business Agent Lewis 
Blaney, Congressman Les Aspin, and State AFL-CIO Secretary Jack Riehl. 




22 



THE CARPENTER 




This scene was taken from the entrance area off Route 117. 
The concrete walls at left lead to the sub-basement and utility 
area from the outside. 



A view from the floor to the top of the tower. The pipe 
scaffolding was erected by Carpenters. The banner is a sample 
of a possible religious decoration. 




Laminating columns and beams taking shape. Some roof 
planking is down. Concrete forms are visible in these early 
phases of construction, last year. 



A view of the shingled roof, two carpenters covering the out- 
side with 3-inch redwood siding. One man cutting, the other 
fitting. 



Wood Frame and Finish Featured in Synagogue 



Nestled in the wooded hills of rural 
Chappaqua, Westchester County, New 
York, sets the newly-completed Temple 
Beth-El of Northern Westchester. 

The site, a carefully selected SVi-acre 
wooded area, has hemlock, white oak, 
tulip, dogwood and white birch trees, 
which were carefully protected to save 
them from destruction during the entire 
construction period. Diseased elms were 
removed and burned to stop spread of 
the Dutch elm disease. 

A creation of Architect Louis I. Kahn 
of Philadelphia, Penna., the 137' x 137' 
octagon structure was built by Cuzzi 
Bros, and Singer of nearby Mount Ver- 
non, N.Y. Framed by laminated timbers, 
fabricated by Unadilla Laminated Prod- 
ucts Inc. of Unadilla, N.Y., the structure 
sets on a foundation and first floor of 



reinforced concrete containing 1,250 
cubic yards of concrete. All concrete 
forms were made of plastic coated ply- 
wood, with all concrete surfaces exposed, 
to blend in with the natural wood and 
rock surroundings. A 25' x 44' concrete 
entrance on the west side of the build- 
ing enhances the beauty of the structure. 
The superstructure, framed, in wood 
studding, covered on both sides with 
%-inch plywood, has, on the outside, 
over 13,000 square feet of 3-inch flush 
finish, vertical redwood siding. The in- 
terior of the outside walls, insulated, cov- 
ered with plywood and finished in ver- 
tical 8-inch flush finished spruce. All in- 
side partitions are wood studded, ply- 
wood sheathed and the same 8-inch 
spruce vertical flush finish. A total of 
42,000 square feet of spruce y/as used 
for this purpose. 



All wood surfaces, both inside and out, 
doors, windows, siding, and roof plank- 
ing are finished in natural wood finish. 

A 40' X 40' tower, extending 50 feet 
from main floor to peak of roof is cov- 
ered with double tongue and grove plank- 
ing, insulated, cross-furred, and shingled 
with fire-proofed red wood shingles ex- 
posed SVi inches to the weather. All 
other pitched roofs were covered the 
same way. 

AH carpentry work from concrete 
forms to close-in was under the super- 
vision of William Amato, a member of 
nearby Local 895, who was recently 
elected as business representative, replac- 
ing the late Frederick Wagner. All other 
mechanics were from the local area: Lo- 
cal 1115, Pleasantville; Local 447, Ossin- 
ing, and Local 895, Tarrytown. 



JUNE, 1972 



23 



Fellow Members Aid Family of Local 1772 
Member Injured by Job Crane Accident 



Ladies Give a Hand 




Officers of Local 1772, 
Hicksville, N.Y. present a 
check for $2500.00. col- 
lected in six weeks, to 
Thomas Ryan, as his wife 
and son look on. 

Left to right: Joseph 
Boron; Jack Michaels, chair- 
man; Bill Hydek; Jacob 
Olsen, vice president; Mrs. 
Ryan; Glenn Kerbs, business 
representative; Walter Geb- 
hardt, president, and Ricky 
Ryan. 



On the morning of September 27, 1971, shortly after the start of work, there was 
a tragic accident on the job at a Woodbury, N.Y. building site. A small crane 
swinging a concrete-pouring bucket toppled, striking Thomas Ryan, a member of 
Local 1772, across the lower torso and severing his right leg below the hip. His 
partner, Joseph Carinha of Local 516 was also hit by the falling bucket, killing 
him instantly. 

First aid was administered by men on the job; a tourniquet was applied to the 
mangled leg, and thanks to the quick response of the Nassau County Police, Brother 
Ryan was taken to the Syosset Hospital where emergency treatment was performed, 
saving his life. He was so badly injured that he was under intensive care for 
several weeks. 

At a regular meeting of Carpenters Local 1772, Hicksville, N.Y., it was decided 
to initiate a drive to financially help Ryan's family, wife, child and "another on the 
way." Because of the circumstances, the fund grew to over $500 in a matter of 
days. At the time of the photo $2500.00 had been collected by the Brotherhood 
Committee, John Michaels, Joseph Boron and William Hydek. Total amount at the 
time of the raffle drawing, Dec. 9, 1971, was $4870.00, a tribute to the Brotherhood 
committeee, the local union, and to all who participated. 

NY Meniliers Erect Temporary Bridge 
While Permanent Bridge is Being Built 




A temporary Baile Bridge was recently consfniefed by members of Westchester 
County, New York, Carpenters Local 188, Yonkers, N.Y., over the Saw Mill River 
Parkway in Yonkers. The job was done for the Westchester County Parkway Author- 
ity. These bridges are rented from Baile for use while a permanent bridge is being 
constructed. The contractor is Thalle Construction Company. 

In the picture, Angelo J. Cipriano, business representative, Local 188, and his 
shop steward, Raymond Jubak, Local 188, inspect the work. 




Members of the Ladies Auxiliary 521, 
Inglewood, Calif, assisted in cake cutting 
ceremonies at a recent pin presentation 
of Local 2435. In the foreground, Mrs. 
Robert B. Clubb, wife of the president 
and business representative, helps Mrs. 
J. T. Killinger, wife of the vice president 
of Local 2435. Watching the two ladies 
is Mrs. Rose Waters, wife of one of Lo- 
cal 2435's trustees. 




Office Secretary Gladys Bukin assists 
in the pin presentation of Local 2435, 
with Harry Dawson, president of the 
Los Angeles District Council of Carpen- 
ters, and Robert Clubb, local president. 

East St. Louis Group 




The officers of East St. Louis, III., 
Carpenters Local 169. Seated from left 
are: Business Representative and Fin. 
Secy. Herb Rainbolt, President Richard 
Meile, Vice Pres. Morris Pratt and 
Warden Bill Cladue. Standing are Con- 
ductor Pete Herrington, Rec. Secy. Har- 
old Kuhn, Trustees Louie Popp and Roy 
Thomas and Assistant Bus. Rep. Jack 
Simpson. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



70th Anniversary 
At Roanoke, Va. 

Local 319, Roanoke, Va., held its 
70th Anniversary Banquet at Hotel 
Roanoke, August 20, 1971. 

Local 319 was chartered by the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, August 20, 1901, 
and has been in continuous existence 
since. As near as can be determined from 
the old records, there were approxi- 
mately 54 members admitted between 
August 20, 1901 and December 20, 1901. 
The initiation fee was $5; dues were 500 
per month for members admitted under 
the age of 50; dues were 300 per month 
for members admitted after 50 years of 
age. 

There is no record of how much 
the wages were at that time (J. R. 
Gusler said "as well as he could remem- 
ber, a carpenter received $ 1 per day for 
10 to 12 hours per day.") However, the 
records show that on December 20, 1912, 
an agreement was reached with a con- 
tractor for 350 per hour and a 9-hour 
day with IVi time for overtime and 
double time for Sundays and legal holi- 
days. 

As near as can be determined. Car- 
penters Local 319 is the oldest labor 
union in Roanoke in continuous exist- 
ence. One member, J. R. Gusler, has 
been a member in good standing since 
January 3, 1902. He was 22 years old 
when he joined the local union and re- 
mained an active member until six or 
seven years ago. He was hit by a car 
and received a broken leg. He is a finish 
carpenter and cabinet maker. 

Edgar T. Hobbs has been a member 
of the Brotherhood 48 years; he was 
initiated in Local 1207, Charleston, West 
Virginia, June 3, 1923; cleared into Local 
319, May 18, 1971, from Local Union 
2207, Fort Pierce, Florida. 

The following members have more 
than 35 years continuous membership in 
the Brotherhood: D. O. Cabaniss, 37; O. 
J. Cromer, 37; J. L. LaBrie, 37; H. F. 
Robinson, 35; O. D. Ross, 37; and Bernie 
Whitt, 35. 

92 Candles Needed 







Alfred Schade, a 
meiiibef^ of Local 
62, Chicago, 111. 
and a 75-year 
member of the 
Brotherhood, en- 
joys a birthday. 
Schade joined the 
Brotherhood in 
1879 and is now 
enjoying his 92nd 
year of life. 



BC Auxiliary Raises Funds For Scholarship 
To Be Awarded to Local Son or Daughter 




Ladies Auxiliary 855, with Local 1540, Kamloops, British Columbia, recently com- 
pleted a most successful year of activity. A highlight of one of their membership 
efforts vfas a rafHe with proceeds going toward a scholarship fund. Such a scholar- 
ship will be awarded annually within School District No. 24 of Kamloops to a 
Carpenter's son or daughter. 

Lome Rohson, provincial council executive secretary, drew the lucky tickets at 
the annual banquet and dance. Pictured above with raffle items are, left to right, 
front row: Vice President Helen Dupont, Trustee Rozanne Shannon, Entertainment 
Convenors Karin Berger and Hazel Lahoda, Trustee Barbara Bossert, Trustee Len 
Lewis, and Telephone Convenor Elda Lane. 

Back Row: Recording Secretary Marge Lickacz, Sick-and-Visiting Chairman Lillian 
Parkinson, President Evelyn Hopp, and Treasurer Dorothy Comerford. 

Missing from the photo are Marie Harvy, Connie Komori, Gail Christenson, Stella 
Tozer, Phylis Venery, Ruth Schmidt, conductor. 

Family Fun For Ponipano Beach Members 
With Food, Gifts, and Harness Racing 




Local 3206, Pompano Beach, Fla., recently gave its annual party for the children 
of their members. Over 300 hamburgers, 300 franks and 25 cases of soft drinks 
were consumed. There was a Santa who gave out presents and stockings. Then two 
clowns appeared doing magic and blowing balloons. 

On Saturday after New Years Day, the "Nite at the Harness Track" was held. 
Over 600 members and guests were provided with a fine buifet, beef and chicken 
and all the other fixings. 



JUNE, 1972 



25 





ra^r-1 



ilD®fflffl[f'm¥(B 




000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to pubhc offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is oflF to the following: 




IRISH AWARD— A plaque was recently awarded to John J. O'Connor, president and 
business representative of Local 608, New York City, by the American Irish Immigra- 
tion Committee. 

In the photo, left to right, are Paul Sullivan, business representative; O'Connor; 
Peter Brennan, president of the Building & Construction Trades Council of Greater 
New York, who presented the plaque; Paschal McGuinness, secretary-treasurer, 
and Michael Keane of the American Irish Immigration Committee. 



RECYCLING CENTERS-Apprentices of the 
joint carpenter apprenticeship classes at 
Spol<ane. Wash,, Community College re- 
cently htiilt booths which serve us centers 
for the collection of recyclable bottles 
and cans. Recyclable items turned in at 
the booths are sold to glass and alumi- 
num firms, and the proceeds go to the 
Washington State Association for Re- 
tarded Children. Helping in the project 
are students of the Gonzaga University 
School of Business. 

The project was kicked off by Weldon 
F. Newbury, executive secretary of the 
Spokane District Council of Carpenters; 
Emmett H. Nelson, president of the In- 
land Empire Chapter of the Associated 
General Contractors: and Dan E. Brown 
of the Washington Assn. for Retarded 
Children. 



Food St€inips 

We are reminded by piihlic welfare au- 
thorities that the food stamp program of 
tlie Federal Government is open to many 
senior citizens and to many unemployed 
persons who are not now receivini; them. 

Food stamps are provided by local 
welfare authorities to needy persons in 
accordance with the number of their de- 
pendents and other factors. Such stamps 
are e.xchtinged for food and other essen- 
tials at local super markets. 

If you are destitute because of ex- 
tended joblessness or insufficient funds as 
an elderly citizen, we suggest you check 
with local welfare offices as to your 
qualifications for the statnps. 



Lafayette, Indiana, Auxiliary Marks 25th Anniversary 




Ladies Auxiliar\ 462, I^fayette, Indiana, celebrated its 25th 
anniversary last October by having dinner and a program at 
the Holiday Inn for members and husbands. Charter members 
present were, left to right, seated, in picture at left, above, 
are Mrs. Charles Leaf, Mrs. Marie DeWitt; standing, Mrs. 
Frank Johnson, Mrs. Doris Lijidburg, Mrs. Stanley Jones, Mrs. 
Meredith Allyn. Charter members not present were Mrs. 
Gertrude Eylens, Mrs. Harry Ford, Mrs. Richard Heide, Mrs. 
Enos Houmard, and Mrs. Pearl Nickels. 



Among those playing leading roles in the quarter-century com- 
memoration of Ladies Auxiliary 462 were the current officers 
of the organization. Each was introduced, in turn, to the large 
gathering of members and guests. 

Shown in picture at right, above, left to right is Mrs. William 
Hobbs, current president, followed by past-presidents Mrs. 
Floyd Lane, Mrs. William Chambers, Mrs. Kenneth Runkle, 
Mrs. Harold Oland, and Mrs. Frank Johnson. The auxiliary 
had as a guest Mrs. Mercedes Dragoo, who is state-president. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 




(1) WAUKEGAN, ILL. — Local 448 
presented a 65-year service pin and sev- 
eral 25-year pins at its regular meeting 
last October. Those present and par- 
ticipating in the ceremonies are shown 
in the photograph and include, from left, 
front rovr: Edward H. Ellis, president 
and business representative; Bud Walden; 
Ivan Harlow; Clarence Maxwell, 52-year 
member; Victor Samson, 65-year mem- 
ber; Merlin Engles; Larch Barton; Hugh 
Hanson, treasurer; Curtis Peterson; Lloyd 
Carlson and Alvin Malsek, 48 years. 

Back row, from left: Edmund Thiug- 
lum, conductor; Jack Kerpan; Maurice 
Mcintosh; Jack Germer; Chester Boryc, 
trustee; Tony Yukos; Paul Peckley; Vem 
Gardner; Gene Hendee; Charles Hilliard; 
Arthur Staves; Norman Gray; Charles 
Morise; Walter Shank; Everett Johnson, 
recording secretary; and Richard Wallace. 

Those eligible but not present for the 
picture were Dean Ehlert, Warren Erick- 
son, Raymond Flament, Lawrence Han- 
sen, Joseph Horcher, Jacob Kaiser, Alan 
Nelson, William Oke, Arvid Olsen and 
Merl Peterson. 

(2) INGLEWOOD, CALIF.— A cele- 
bration was held recently at Carpenters 
Local 2435 honoring members with long- 
time service to the Brotherhood. Harry 
Dawson, president of the Los Angeles 
District Council of Carpenters and busi- 
ness representative of Local 1140, made 




A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received 25- 
year or 50-year service pins. 



the presentations. Robert Clubb, presi- 
dent and business representative of Local 
2435, made the introductions. William 
Baker, financial secretary of Local 929, 
gave the invocation. 

Those shown in the photographs are 
as follows: 

(Picture No. 2)— 30-YEAR MEMBERS, 
first row, left to right, O. White, L. Ortiz, 
D. Olsen, L. Rudd; second row, Pres. 
Robert B. Clubb, A. Fierro, P. Braun- 
beck, P. Gilbert and J. Alvarado, Finan- 
cial Secretary, Steve Markasich. 

(Picture No. 2A)— 25-YEAR MEM- 
BERS— First row, left to right. President 
Robert B. Clubb, L. Graley, R. Riding, 
W. Bunce, W. Foltz and Financial Sec- 
retary Steve Marasicb; second row, left 



to right, O. Berg, J. Berg, H. Azbell, F. 
Johnson and G. Jarosz. 
(Picture No. 2B)— 25-YEAR MEM- 
BERS, first row, J. Smutney, D. Todd, 
M. Perry, F. Blada, G. Mello, L. Hoeifer 
and P. Hall; second row, left to right. 
President Robert B. Clubb, R. Johnson, 
L. Moe, J. Lydon, H. Magnuson, S. 
Chowka, C. Peters and Financial Secre- 
tary Steve Marasich; third row, left to 
right, L. Kissick, E. Rucinski, F. Lang- 
ley, H. Waters, J. Schweighardt, L. Buf- 
terfield, H. Owen. 

(Picture No. 2C)— 25-YEAR MEM- 
BERS, first row, R. Crouch, H. Fessler, 
L. Stinchcomb, W. Seppanen; second 
row, left to right. President Robert B. 
Clubb, G. Birnie, R. Sadahiro, M. Net- 
teberg, J. Heintz and L. Lee, Financial 
Secretary, Steve Markasich. 




JUNE, 1972 



27 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. 

(1) LINCOLN, NEB.— Here is a group 
picture taken at the February 10, 1972, 
25-Year Service Award Banquet of Local 
1055. There were 26 members honored 
that night, but only 16 were present to 
receive their awards in person. 

Those unable to attend were: Wayne 
Ackerman, Thure Anderson, Thomas 
Cooper, >'ernon Grabber, Marlyn F. Hu- 
ber, Raymond Korb, Joseph Morrow, 
Edgar Scdoris, Roderick ^'andevort, and 
Harvey Zimmerman. 

Guest speakers were Norman Nielan, 
General Office Representative, and Ralph 
Nelson, city corporation counsel for Lin- 
coln, Nebraska. 

In the picture, left to right, Gail 
Adams, Prudent Baete, General Repre- 
sentative Norman Nielan, Dean Perry, 
Charlie Davis, and Howard Silvey. Back 
row: Homer Stephen, Delbert Hurd, VVil- 
lard Frey, Alex Becker, Henry Bossung, 
Edward Brotzman, Alvin Beahr, John 
Ford, Charles Cowling, Ray Crumb, and 
Jack Portsche. 

(2) OSSINING, N.Y.— Twenty-five-year 
pins were recently presented by Local 
447 at a dinner-dance at Pines Bridge 
Lodge, Route 100, just North of Ossinlng, 
N. Y. 

Shown, left to right, are ex-trustee 
Albert Windsor, George Partelow, An- 
thony Bardari, Louis Gualtiere, trustee 
Elwin Daby, Mrs. Evert Johnson, repre- 
senting her husband who was in Florida, 
Business Representative William A. Kerr, 
Trustee Albert MacDougall, James Al- 
bohn, and Peter Caimi. 




Other 25-year members not pictured 
are David Johnson Jr., Kenneth Ryder, 
Henry Beck and Harry Mansfield, all 
of whom were unable to be present. 

Also attending the dinner but forced to 
leave early before pictures were taken 
was 61-year member Peter LI. Fowler. 
He was presented with a 60-year pin the 
next day at his home in Ossining by Busi- 
ness Representative William A. Kerr. 

Shortly after the dinner, Brother Fow- 
ler passed away, and the Brotherhood 
lost one of its finest members. 

(3) ELIZABETH, N.J.— Local 715 re- 
cently presented 25-year pins to 37 mem- 
bers and paid tribute to its oldtimers. In 
the photo, left to right: Business Manager 
John A. Williams with Herb Myers (54 
years), Louis Soil (50 years), Andrew 
Broberg (54 years), and President William 
Wolf. (Photo by Ewald Friedrich) 



(4) NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. — On 
March 3, 1972, Local 350 held an anni- 
versary dinner and dance at the Beach 
and Tennis Club in New Rochelle. Local 
350 is one of the oldest local unions in 
the State of New York. Sam Summo re- 
ceived his 50-year pin. Approximately 
300 members and guests attended. Pic- 
tured, left to right: Sal DeSiena, vice 
president; Anthony Blasie, business rep- 
resentative; Sam Summo, guest of honor; 
John DiNapoli, president; and Frank Pa- 
terno, dinner chairman. 

(5) GULFPORT, MISS.— This picture 
was taken during presentation of 25-year 
membership pins at a recent meeting of 
Carpenters Local 1518. Left to right, seat- 
ed: Willie Owens, Colon McMurphy, and 
Ralph Wittal. Standing: D. E. Shannon, 
L. E. Dunaway, John Lizana, and Joseph 
Windom. Presenting pins is James Bubuis- 
son, vice-president of Local 1518. 




28 



THE CARPENTER 



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Local 483 of San Francisco collected 
funds for the Carpenters Legislative Im- 
provement Committee recently. Russ 
Pool, financial secretary, left, presented a 
check for $1,200 to CLIC Director 
Charles Nichols, right, and Legislative 
Advocate Jim Bailey during a recent visit 
to Washington, D.C. 



CLIC Contributions 

As of May 17 

Local City & State Amount 

120.00 



Local City & State Amount Local City & State Amount Local City & State Amount 



ALASKA 

1243 Fairbanks 



Arizona 

1089 Phoenix 40.00 



34 
483 
1051 
1113 
1495 
2046 
2762 

CONNECTICUT 

43 Hartford 614.00 

196 Greenwich 80.00 

260 Waterbury 40.00 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

1590 Washington, D.C. 183.00 



CALIFORNIA 




San Francisco 


10.00* 


San Francisco 


1200.00 


Sacramento 


20.00 


San Bernardino 


20.00 


Chico 


5.00* 


Martinez 


114.00 


North Fork 


10.00* 



FLORIDA 




1379 N. Miami 


40.00 


1509 Miami 


44.00 



GEORGIA 

225 Atlanta 80.00 

ILLINOIS 

1 Chicago 10.00 

58 Chicago 297.00 

62 Chicago 30.00 

166 Rock Island 11.00 

174 Johet 181.00 

242 Chicago 44.00 

448 Waukegan 50.00 

839 Des Plaines 709.00 

1307 Evanston 41.00 

1996 Libertyville 40.00 



32 

33 

49 

595 



100 

335 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Springfield 41.00 



Boston 
Lowell 
Lynn 

MICHIGAN 

Muskegon 
Grand Rapids 



300.00 
19.75 
45.00 



20.00* 
10.00 



1433 
2703 



87 

674 

1429 



618 

15 

23 

65 

118 

155 

349 

393 

432 

455 

486 

490 

542 

620 

715 

781 

842 

1209 

1489 

1613 

2018 

2212 

2250 



135 

257 

357 

502 

729 

1134 

1135 

1167 

1511 

1649 

1657 

1772 

1973 

2241 



650 



190 

226 



Detroit 
Grand Rapids 

MINNESOTA 

St. Paul 

Mount Clemens 
Little Falls 

MISSOURI 

Sikeston 

NEW JERSEY 

Hackensack 

Dover 

Perth Ambdy 

Jersey City 

Plainfield 

Orange 

Camden 

Atlantic City 

Somerville 

Bayonne 

Passaic 

Salem 

Madison 

Elizabeth 

Princeton 

Pleasantville 

Newark 

Burlington 

Newark 

Lakewood 

Newark 

Red Bank 

NEW YORK 

New York 

New York 

Islip 

Canandigna 

Liberty 

Mount Kisco 

Port Jefferson 

Smithtown Branch 

Southampton 

Woodhaven 

New York 

Hicksville 

Riverhead 

Brooklyn 

OHIO 

Pomeroy 

OREGON 

Klamath Falls 
Portland 



10.00 
10.00 



8.00 
10.00 
15.00 



15.00 

45.00* 
15.00* 
10.00* 
20.00 
10.00* 
10.00* 
20.00* 
25.00* 
30.00* 
10.00* 
100.00* 
40.00 
95.00* 
10.00* 
10.00* 
55.00* 
20.00* 
55.00* 
10.00* 
75.00* 
30.00* 
40.00* 



309.00 
600.00 
60.00 
60.00 
23.00 
80.00 
50.00 
60.00 
44.00 
10.00 
13.00 
42.00 
20.00 
80.00 



40.00 



30.00* 
215.00* 



573 
583 
738 
780 
1020 
1065 
1094 
1120 
1273 
1277 
1388 
1411 
1857 
1896 
2066 
2067 
2416 
2756 



Baker 

Portland 

Portland 

Astoria 

Portland 

Salem 

Albany-CorvaUis 

Portland 

Eugene 

Bend 

Oregon City 

Salem 

Portland 

The Dallas 

St. Helens Vic. 

Medford 

Portland 

Goshen 



25.00* 
60.00* 
30.00* 
30.00* 

135.00* 
45.00* 
55.00* 

235.00* 
60.00* 
10.00* 
40.00* 
25.00* 
81.00* 
60.00* 
35.00* 
50.00* 
15.00* 
5.00* 



PENNSYLVANIA 

122 Philadelphia 100.00 



288 Homestead 
677 Lebanon 



20.00 
20.00 



94 



RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 40.00 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

1798 Greenville 20.00 



TENNESSEE 
50 Knoxville 
2473 Bristol 

TEXAS 

1104 Tyler 
1634 Big Spring 



20.00 
20.00 



20.00 
5.00 



WASHINGTON 

98 Spokane 70.00* 

131 Seattle 114.00* 
149 Olympia 

(Ladies Aux.) 5.00* 

317 Aberdeen 35.00* 

338 Seattle 125,95* 

470 Tacoma 65.00* 



562 
770 
870 
1148 
1289 
1332 
1597 
1689 
1708 
1715 
1797 
1849 
1974 
1982 
2127 
2205 
2317 
2382 
2396 
2403 



Everett 

Yakima 

Spokane 

Olympia 

Seattle 

Grand Coulee 

Bremerton 

Tacoma 

Auburn 

Vancouver 

Renton 

Pasco 

Ellensburg 

Seattle 

Centralia 

Wenatchee 

Bremerton 

Spokane 

Seattle 

Richland 



55.00* 
348.00* 
5.00* 
10.00 
25.00* 
25.00* 
45.00* 
26.00* 
30.00* 
25.00* 
10.00* 
60.00* 
10.00* 
30.00* 
50.00* 
20.00* 
20.00* 
15.00* 
75.00* 
10.00* 



WEST VIRGINIA 

1159 Point Pleasant 45.00 



WISCONSIN 

264 Milwaukee 
1074 Eau Claire 
1208 Milwaukee 
3187 Watertown 

WYOMING 

1564 Casper 



10.00 

29.00 

10.00 

4.00 



265.00 



Massachusetts State 

Council Convention $2595.00 
Louisiana State 

Council of 

Carpenters 
Kansas State Council 
Oregon State Council 
New Jersey State 

Council Political 

Education Meeting 
Washington State 

Council Convention 



327.00 

960.00 

1235.00 



555.00 



1245.00 



The Carpenters' Legislative Improvement Committee is an independent 
committee associated with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. It has not been authorized by any candidate to act 
on his behalf, and no candidate is responsible for any activity of CLIC. 
A copy of our report filed with the appropriate supei-visory officer is 
(or will be) available for purchase from the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments, United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 
20402 



JUNE, 1972 



29 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 

Made His Mark 

First student: What marks did you 
get in Physical Ed? 

Second ditto: None . . . just a few 
bruises. — Bob Esdorn, River Grove, 



MAKE YOUR SSS CLICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

Pointed Remark 

The stranger in town asked a kid 
on the street how to get to the bank. 
"I can tell you, but it'll cost you a dol- 
lar," answered the boy. 

"A dollar?' replied the man. "That 
seems kind of high!" 

"Yeah," replied the urchin. "We 
bank directors get big pay!"— John 
Freeman, L.U. 22, San Francisco. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE.' 

That Sweet Heat! 

Many a heated domestic argument 
has been rekindled by an old flame. 

BE UNION— BUY LABEL 




y^^-^X 



Same Old Story 

"I heard you finally got married," 
said the older man. 

"Yeah, I finally gave in," the young 
man said. "Although for a long time 
it was touch and go." 

"In my day it was called love 'em 
and leave 'em," replied the older man. 




Mr. Pert Sez: 

in Congress, there's the Roy-Rogers 
Bill which has Triggered a lot of com- 
ment. Most folks think it'll get by if 
it ain't loaded with a lotta riders! 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 

Neither Hare Nor There 

The judge said: "You're charged 
with hunting with last year's license. 
How do you plead?" 

"Not guilty, your honor," replied 
the hunter. "I was only shooting at 
rabbits I missed last year!" 

GIVE A DOLLAR TO CLIC 



Checks and Balances 

The husband was taking up the 
matter of excess spending, a sheaf of 
cancelled checks in his hand. "You 
mean to say," asked the wife, "that 
the bank saves all the checks I write,' 
then sends them to you? What a 
sneaky thing to do!" 

UNION MEN WORK SAFELY 

A Post Script 

Two hillbillies were hired to dig a 
well. After going down 500 feet and 
hitting no water, they were moved to 
another location. Rather than waste 
their labors, they decided to pull up 
the -dry well, cut it into three-foot 
sections and sell it for prefabbed post 
holes!— John Gilliland, L.U. 26, East 
Detroit, Mich. 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Going Up In Smoke? 

Okay ... so the nation doesn't 
have a good five-cent cigar. It at 
least has a good nickel quarter. 



This Month's Limerick 

A timorous Bishop of Crete 
Decided to be indiscreet, 

But after one time 

Of his secretive crime 
He began to repeat and repeat and 
repeat. 



Stating His Position 

"I'm ashamed that none of you 
can name all the states," said the 
teacher to her class. "When I was in 
school, everybody in our class knew 
them all!" 

"But, teach," said a boy in the 
rear, "when you were in school there 
were only I 8!" 

REGISTER AND VOTE 

He Looked Peaked! 

The two morons on a bicycle built 
for two at last reached the top of a 
steep hill. "That was a steep 'un," 
said the perspiring front rider. 

"It certainly was," agreed the sec- 
ond, "and I'm sure that we would 
have rolled backward for sure if ! 
hadn't held the brake on!" 

BUY AT UNION RETAIL STORES 




Biting Rejoinder 

The termite pushed open the sa- 
lon's swinging doors and asked: "Is 
the bar tender here?" 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

The Real Lowdown 

Said the mother to her daughter: 
"I want to tell you about the evil of 
se.x. It leads to housework!" 

TELL M U R UNION! 

Fair Is Fair 

He sidled up to the gorgeous crea- 
ture and whispered; "Gentlemen pre- 
fer blondes." 

Looking for a way out, she replied, 
"But I'm not really a blonde!" 

"That's all right," rejoined the wolf, 
"I'm not really a gentleman!" 

TAKE PART IN UNION AFFAIRS 

A Good Question! 

"My grandfather has never in- 
dulged in liquor, never has smoked 
or chased women or gambled, and 
next week he's going to celebrate his 
87th birthday!" 

"How?" 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




(1) CINCINNATI, O A total of 101 

members of Local 1602 recently became 
eligible for 25, 50, and 60-year service 
pins. They were presented the pins dur- 
ing the local union's dance party on 
April 1. Honorees present for the cere- 
mony are shown in Picture No. 1. 

Picture No. lA represents 234 years 
of Brotherhood membership. In the first 
row, from left, are Elmer Bauer, 55 
years; Joseph Stoffel, 60 years; John 
Berkemeyer, 61 years; and Walter Ritter, 
58 years. Second row. Ken Busch, finan- 
cial Secretary; Russell Austin, district 
secretary; and Stanley Jeurgens, presi- 
dent. Local 1602. 

Picture No. IB shows three genera- 
tions of members of Local 1602 with 
local officers. In the front row, from 
left, are Thomas McElroy, grandson; 
Harry McEIroy, grandfather; John Mc- 
Elroy, his son; and Daniel McElroy, 
grandson. In the rear are Stanley 
Juergens, local president, and Russell 
Austin, district council secretary. 

(2) CANTON, OHIO— Local 69 held a 
banquet March 25 at which 25-year 
members were honored and special atten- 
tion was given to Ross Grifiin, who is 92 

2A 



SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 



A gallery of pictures showing some 
of the senior members of the Broth« 
erhood who recently received 25* 
year or 50-year service pins. 



years of age and has 59 years of con- 
tinuous service in the Brotherhood. 
Griiiin has held many offices in the local 
throughout this span. 

Griffin is shown in Photo No. 2 with 
local president Paul Larson. 

The 25-year-pin recipients are shown in 
Photo No. 2A. 

First row, seated: Paul HoU, Jim Boy- 
Ian, Bob Moyer, Lee Cassidy, Bob Ditty, 
Ross Grifiin, Ernie Courtheyn, Charles 
Shackle, Frank McDaniel. 

Standing, left to right: Don Smith, ex- 
ecutive business agent for Local 69; 
Milan Marsh, secretary of the Ohio 
State Council of Carpenters; Harold 



Douglass, Richard Rolli, Henry Miller, 
Ken Barrick, LaVeme Miller, Ernest 
Detchon, Ray Moyer, Ed Altenhof, Cran- 
ston Knoutf, Willard Gravius, Karl 
Mayer, Ray Limbacher, Wayne Mizer, 
Arvine Gravius, Bill Nelson, Elmer 
Roberts and Ed Kantorik, 




a#; 



w 

•^J^ 






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A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-yea 
^■•rvice pins. 



■( 



(1) PHOENIX. ARIZ.— Local 1089 re- 
cently presented 25-year membership 
pins. Honored were the followin};: 

First row, sittin;;: Frank Carioto, Fred 
Melander, Joseph Shull, Steve Rider, 
Harold HolmberK, Vern J. Atherton, G. 
L. Gnau, D. B. Currj, John Justus, and 
Fred North. 

Second row, kneeling: Victor Mann, 
Al Kitchen, W. F. Holt, Deno Pctruc- 
ciani, C. B. Stultz, Anthony Hodor, L. 
G. Patton, Earl Parks, H. W. Sterner. 
Howard Miskinien, Robert E. Barrett, 



assistant business representative and E. 
A. Jastrzebski. 

Third row, sitting: Kenneth L. RatclilT, 

D. E. Bergstrom, L. F. Browne, J. T. 
Cutbirth, R. H. Perkins, Gordon Thoen, 
Charles Campbell, Harry Oldsen, Leron 
Henson, C. F. Sorg, R. V. Hernandez, 
Richard Ransom, Roland J. Kies, A. L. 
Perkins. George Deck, and Andrew 
Roman. 

Fcurth row standing: Ed Hammer, 
Julius \ersteeg, H. J. Koepke, R. F. 
Newman, C. B. Ard, Arthur loli, E. D. 
Gould, \V. E. Schuster, Martin Nehr- 
bass, A. K. Burey, Robert V. Chance — 
trustee and center coordinator for Job 
Corps Program in Heber, Arizona, Nor- 
man E. Schalk. E. C. Ward, E. Mordini, 
C. J. Maletich, C. H. Foreman, Walter 
Rosenthal, Joe Kellwood and H. C. 
Christy. 

Fifth row, standing: J. 1). Hawkins, 
Ora J. Hippie, L. G. McLane. Arnold 1>. 
Brown. P. F. Solosky, David Stamper, 
James D. Hyde, Joseph B. Martin, W. M. 
Lee. W. V. Thomas, A. J. Mills, A. D. 
Jaquith, Grady Richey, Charles Hall 
and W. C. L'sry. 

Other 25 year members not present 
were: Joseph Bass, E. A. Davis, C. F. 
Fine, S. B. Goodnight, Travis Grant, 
Mark T. C. Grantham, Ray H. Hamm, 
Jr., Orville Handley, Sr.. L. E. Harris, 

E. B. Howard, A. R. Knudson, Wayne 
Macklem, John McElroy, Nolen C. 
Myers, Nathan Orsborn. Fred Pavlat, 
V. J. Raley, J. V. Rouse, Herman Syl- 



vania, Allen Wright, R. M. Bovee, Don- 
ald Doyle, H. A. McDade, C. L. Mc- 
Farland. 

(2) MELBOl'RNE, FLA.— Local 1685 
recently presented 25-jear pins. Left to 
right, seated: Thomas Long, Joseph J. 
Kara, James H. Turner, Sr. Standing, left 
to right, James Coyle. Donald Hardy, 
Stuart Price, Mce President, presenting 
the pins, Ira Miller, > irgil Self, and Guy 
Sherouse. The pins were presented in the 
meeting on April 10, 1972. 

(3) WOONSOCKET, R.I.— Long-service 
members of Local 801, were honored 
recently. From left are Lindor Bolduc, 
and Elphege Auger, 50 years each; Fer- 
nand Paul, local president; Arthur Davis, 
general representative; Emile Dussault, 
57 years; Lucien Gignac, also 50 years, 
and Leo LeMay, business agent. Theo- 
dore Aubin, who was unable to attend 
because of illness, is scheduled to receive 
a 50-year pin at his home. 

Several 25-year pins were awarded. 
Presentations were made by Fernand 
Paul, local president, aided by Leo Le- 
May, business agent. 

Guests included Arthur Davis, First 
District representative, and Mrs. Davis; 
Robert Hayes, president of Rhode Island 
Council of Carpenters, and Mrs. Hayes; 
Leroy Bartlctt, administrator of the state 
Health and Welfare Program, and Mrs. 
Bartlett. 




32 



THE CARPENTER 




Koiirth->tar iippreiilircs assembled for the recent Tacoiiia, Wash., Carpenters and Shipwrights Joint Apprenticeship Competi- 
tion. 

Front row, from left: Pat Doles, Robert Oslin, Lanny Natucci, Steven Lantz, LeRoy Cooley, Bruce Baird, Richard Fithen, 
John Vctter, Larry Ezell, Curtis Anderson, Gary Hammond, and George Warter. 

Second row: Michael Jones, Gary Westby, Rodney Hamilton, John Hendrickson, Willson Stocking, William Rice, Curtis Dock- 
en, Terry Houston, Richard Geiger, Timothy Fisher, James Shelton, III, Robert Gagnon, Bob Bennett, Earl Miller, Gary Fergu- 
son, and Instr. Ben Deibert. 

Third row: Coord. Len Liebelt, James DeGeeter, Jack O'Conner, Loren Chambers, L. D. Palmer, Errol Snowden, Gary Kreh- 
beil, Ted Schwab, James Reinholtz, Roger Hanson, Leonard Vander Linda, and Arthur Lawton. 

All by himself at the top is Mar»in Morlin. 



Tacoma, Olympia 
Hold Local Tests 

Fourth-year apprentices in Tacoma 
and Olympia. Wash., held separate ma- 
nipulative and written tests during April 
to select entries in the state competition. 
Their competition was sponsored by the 
Western and Central Washington Car- 
penters Joint Apprenticeship and Train- 
ing Committees. 

Each apprentice was required to build 
a tool box to exact detail and dimension. 
The boxes were graded by two judges 
representing labor and two representing 
management. A written test was also 
held, and winners in Tacoma were: 
Robert Oslin. first place; Roger Hanson, 
second place; and Errol Snowden, third. 

In Tacoma, Dave Gaubatz took top 
honors and Gary Binford, second. 




Apprentice contestants at Olympia, Wash., with joint apprcniiceship committee 
members. From left, are: Adrian Brown, chairman of the joint apprenticeship and 
training committee of Local 1148; Ira McCullough, fourth-year instructor; Appren- 
tice Gary Binford, second place winner in the competition; Apprentice Kenneth Loine; 
Charles Clark, business representative and assistant secretary, JATC; Apprentice 
Howard Bodine; L. J. Liebelt, Southwest and Central Washington Apprentice Co- 
ordinator; and Apprentice Dave Gaubatz, first place winner. 



JUNE, 1972 



33 




Members listen as \\ illiuin Higgins instructs tliem in the safe operation of powder- 
actuated tools. Almost 300 members and guests attended the sessions. 

Illinois Members Receive Training for 
Licensed Use of Powder-Actuated Tools 



Illinois state law now requires that 
operators of any powder-actuated tool, 
such as Ramset, Remington, Hilti, 
Omark, and other trade products, to 
have been instructed in the use of these 
tools, and to know how to safely operate 
them. . . . and to have in their possession 
when they use these tools a license to 
verify this fact. 




The men behind the special training 
meeting, from left: William Higgins, in- 
structor; Sherman Uautel, president of 
Local No. 839; and Richard Day, re- 
cording secretary of Local No. 839. 



Because of this, the executive board of 
Local 839. Des Plaines, 111., proceeded 
to help the members receive this instruc- 
tion and obtain their licenses. 

Members were polled as to the differ- 
ent types of powder-actuated tools they 
are using. 

Sherman Dautel, president, and Rich- 
ard Day. recording secretary, then began 
making final arrangement for the train- 
ing program. 

William Higgins, a representative of 
Powder Actuated Tool Company, one of 
the most qualified people in the state, 
was asked to give instructions to the 
members. 

Charles Schultz, a state inspector for 
Illinois, offered assistance. Members were 
notified of plans at local meetings and 
by a special letter. Then, on March 20, 
the special meeting took place, with over 
285 members and guests in attendance. 

Mr. Higgins and his associates gave 
instructions on both high and low-veloc- 
ity tools of just about every make, model, 
shape, and color. Along with this, he 
instructed members on the rules for the 
safe operation of these tools, such as the 
wearing of hard hats and goggles when 
operating these tools, the posting of signs 



to let workmen know when there are 
powder-actuated tools being used in an 
area, and what to do in case of a fire. 
Then Higgins explained the diflferent pro- 
cedures on the upkeep and general main- 
tenance of these tools to keep them in 
operating condition, along with the sev- 
eral types of guards and accessories for 
the tools. After this the different types 
of shells and charges for the tools were 
explained, along with the various types 
of nails. Higgins explained that all types 
of tools do not take the same kind of 
nails and shells and that great care must 
be taken to make sure that the operator 
has the right shells and nails for the tool 
he is using. 

Upon completion of the instruction, 
the company representative gave mem- 
bers tests to qualify for a license. After 
the tests were given, they were graded 
by Mr. Higgins and his associates, and 
licenses were issued to those members 
passing the tests. 

By having training such as this, there 
can be a greater number of Illinois Car- 
penters who are better acquainted with 
these tools and can operate them safely 
on the job. 

Next year, at approximately the same 
time, the local union plans another eve- 
ning of instruction. 




*I Icnow you said an apprenlice 
must learn lo use his head, but—" 



Certificates to Oakland MiJIwrights 

Journeyman certificates were presented recently to appren- 
tice graduates by Millwrights and Machinery Erectors Local 
102, Oakland, Calif. Three are shown iji the picture, right. 
From left, are: Ray Green, retired business representative of 
Local 102; Journeyman Andre Klolin; Douglas Rochelle, busi- 
ness representative and secretary of the joint apprenticeship 
committee; Journeyman William Napier and Jim Jeffries; and 
General Representative Jim Curry. Other new journeymen who 
were not present included: Raymond Hernandez, Joseph Mar- 
tinez, Cecil Smith, and Robert VVishman. 

Plioio by D. E. House, prcsiilent, Local 102. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



Alberta Holds Provincial Contest 




The Alberta Provincial Apprenticeship Contest, sponsored jointly by labor and 
management, was held March 17 and 18 at the Northern Alberta Institute of 
Technology, Edmonton. 

Nine fourth-year apprentices took part in the contest. They were chosen from the 
southern and northern areas respectively. They were competing for the right to 
represent Alberta at the International Contest in Las Vegas in August. The contest 
was won by Garry McMillan from Calgary. At a dinner held in the McAuley Plaza, 
plaques were presented to all contestants by retired General Representative W. G. 
Stanton, contest coordinator. 

Shown in the picture, from left, are Dwight Steen, Mark Marin, Ed Drapka, 
Joe Gervais, Garry McMillan, Heinz Mader, Dennis Tung, Jim Yeremy, and 
William Yeremy. 

Apprentice of the Year in Chicago 




Apprentice John Pomper, of Local 1784, Chicago, received his apprentice of the 
year award in 1971. Pictured, left to right, are Business Agent Charles Svec, Busi- 
ness Agent Stanley Jaworowski, Washburne Trade School Instructor Ronnie Bazata, 
Apprentice Pomper, and Business Agent Joseph Klosterman. 

14 New Journeymen in Wichita, Kansas 




Certificates of apprenticeship training completion were presented recently to 14 
carpentry graduates of the Local 201, Wichita, Kan., Apprenticeship Training Pro- 
gram. James Tinkcom, Director of Apprenticeship, and Fred Bull, Executive Board 
member, presented the certificates at a banquet in their honor. 

The new journeymen include, from left: Travis Jones, Michael Bernritter, Phillip 
Wohlford, Jack Lynch, Larry Clasen, Quinnie Davis, James W. Mead II, Eddie 
Drake, Kenneth Pruitt, Roy Bandhauer, Barry Roberts, James Tijikcom, Director of 
Apprenticeship; Frederick Bull, Executive Board Member 6th District. 

Three graduates, Donald Shock, Burwell L. Gutrie and Melvin Hooper were not 
present. 



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.lohn Sadowski was the first place win- 
ner in the Cleveland, C, Carpenter Ap- 
prentice Contest held recently at the 
Great Lakes Mall in Mentor. Sadowski, 
winner of a $100 savings bond, partici- 
pated in the Ohio State Contest in Akron 
on May 23 and 24. 

Sadowski is a fourth-year apprentice 
with Seidl Builders. An Army veteran, 
with service in Germany, he attended 
John Carroll University (Cleveland) and 
Cleveland Technical School. 



New Journeymen 




Five young men nieiilly received cer- 
tificates indicating that they have com- 
pleted the apprenticeship training pro- 
gram in Local 308, Cedar Rapids, la. 
Shown with the apprentice coordinator. 
Harold Heath, front row, left, arc Don- 
ald McKee, and James Kalina, and on 
second row, Daniel Olmstead, Jerry Mc- 
Vay, and Dennis Pfiffner. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



Twin Cities Millwrights Attend Saturday Optics Tooling Classes 




UPPER LEFT: Studying a transit are Jack Shoemaker, Mar- 
shall Case, Don McFarling, Paul Peyton, George Heinz, Clar- 
ence Dochniak, William Rassler, Maurice Nadeau, and AI 
Yickerman. The local union is getting support from local con- 
tractors in this training program, because it is preparing me- 
chanics for many special jobs and projects. 



UPPER RIGHT: From left, standing with a jig transit, are 
Art Franzmeier, Al Vickerman, Wilmar Shequen, Orville Hechf, 
John Jeanette, William Dickering, Bob Stahlberg, Emmanuel 
Bachman, Stan Pieckert, Arden Lindemoen, Marshall Case, Jim 
Leach, Ed Meyer, Jack Shoemaker; kneeling, from left, are 
Larry Halvorsen, Maynard Tralle, and Dave Anderson. 



Millwrights and Machinery Erectors Lo- 
cal 548 of St. Paul, Minn., is currently 
conducting a training program on optical 
tooling for its journeymen. Thirty mem- 
bers are being taught an extensive course 



in the use of various instruments for 
leveling and aligning machinery, "on- 
veyors, etc. 

In addition, the men are beng schooled 
in welding, machine setting, and other 



aspects of their worlc. 

"We are looking toward a very pro- 
gressive four years in our educational 
program for the membership," reports 
Al Vickerman, business representative. 



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JUNE, 1972 



37 



Austin, Texas, J AC Holds Apprentice Awards Banquet 



The Austin, Tex., Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship and Train- 
ing Committee recently graduated 34 apprentices and honored 
them at a special awards banquet. 

Many distinguished labor leaders of the state participated in 
the ceremonies. Guest speaker was James U. Cross, executive 
director of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. H. E. 
Morris, project coordinator for the Brotherhood's Apprentice- 
ship and Training Department, delivered an address. A wel- 
come was extended by Austin City Councilman Dick Nichols. 

The apprentice graduates honored included: Harvey S. 



Abbett, Alton O'Neal Bell, Everett E. Brock, Lawrence Crain, 
Bobby W. Dodd, Thomas C. Franklin, Billy Joe Franklin, 
Charles E. Franks, Milton S. Gage, Pedro G. Garcia, John W. 
Godwin, Guadalupe Galvan, Robert A. Herrera, Jimmy Thomas 
Hibler, Bobby C. Hill, Jimmie D. Hobbs. James R. Holmes, 
Carl H. Holbrook. Samuel Lee Isaac, Herman Tall Lamme, 
J. R. Lane, Jr., Sylvester M. Lopez, Roger Dale Moore, Manuel 
Muniz, Robert Pardo, Lanny D. Ruthven, James M. Shafer, 
Roy Schafer, Larry James Shugart, Wilbur M. Smith, Thomas 
C. Spell, Richard T. Sustaita, Cecil Ray White and Jimmy Gale 
Whitehead. 




Among those at the bead table were, from left: the Rev. John 
Barclay of the Central Christian Church of Austin; H. E. Mor- 
ris, project coordinator of the Brotherhood''s Apprenticeship 
and Training Department; Mrs. James U. Cross; and James U. 
Cross, guest speaker and executive director of the Texas Parks 
and Wildlife Department. 




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Part of the 125 persons who attended the apprenticeship ban- 
quet in Austin. 




From left: Mr. and Mrs. Hiawata Franks, Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Shafer, and Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Speall. 




From left: Mr, and Mrs. Robert Herrera, Mr. and Mrs. Pedro 
Garcia, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pardo. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



APPRENTICESHIP CONTESTS 
CALENDAR, JUNE, 1972 







Mill 




State Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Millwright 


Alabama* 


X 






Alaska 


X 






Arizona* 


X 




X 


California 


X 


X 


X 


(June 1-3) 








Colorado 


X 


X 


X 


(June 17) 








Delaware 


X 






DistrictofCol.* 


X 


X 


X 


Florida* 


X 




X 


Hawaii* 


X 






Idaho* 


X 


X 




Illinois* 


X 


X 


X 


Indiana 


X 


X 


X 


(June 16, 17) 






Iowa 


X 


X 


X 


(June 2-3) 








Kansas 


X 




X 


Louisiana 


X 




X 


Maryland* 


X 


X 


X 


Massachusetts* 


X 


X 




Michigan* 


X 




X 


Minnesota 


X 






(June 2) 








Missouri* 


X 




X 


Montana 


X 






(June 9, 10) 








Nebraska 


X 






(June 10) 








Nevada* 


X 




X 


New Jersey* 


X 


X 


X 


New Mexico* 


X 






New York 


X 


X 


X 


(June 6-7) 








Ohio* 


X 


X 


X 


Oklahoma 


X 






(June 22) 








Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


(May 1, June 2, 3, 16 


17) 




Pennsylvania* 


X 


X 


X 


Rhode Island* 


X 


X 




Tennessee* 


X 




X 


Texas* 


X 




X 


Utah* 


X 






Washington* 


X 


X 


X 


Wisconsin 


X 






(June 9, 10) 








Wyoming* 


X 






Alberta* 


X 






British Col.* 


X 


X 




Ontario 


X 




X 


(June 1, 2) 








Manitoba 


X 






(June 16, 17) 






Total 


41 


17 


23 


*Indicates that contest h 


as already been held. 



-— TOOL TALK by B. Jones " 



"Oh, Jack, you're not really 
going to push the world away, are 
you?" 




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the practical details of construction. Now 
CTC home-study training in building offers 
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As you know, the ability to read blue prints 
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great extent how far you can go in building. 
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as a carpenter or apprentice, you already 
have valuable experience that may let you 
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39 



A TRUSTED 
FRIEND OF 





DICTIONARY 

T/iis is the TOfh of a new feature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to collective bargaining, 
union contracts, and union business. Follow it closely, and your union 
membership will become more meaningful, and your ability to partici- 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength- 
ened. It was compiied by the International Labor Press Assn, and is 
used with permission. 



international representative: An agent of a national or international 

union, wtno may be primarily an organizer, an administrator or 

all-around trouble shooter. 
intervention: Entry by another union or unions in a representation 

election ordered by the NLRB. as a competitor of the union or 

unions which originally had sought the election. 
lUD: Industrial Union Department, AFL-CIO. 



J 



job analysis: Survey of major requirements of a job. as a means of 

defining and establishing necessary bases for performance and 

pay rate. 
job classification: Evaluation of job content and required skills, for 

the purpose of setting up wage brackets for each category. 
job content: For a given job classification, its duties, functions and 

responsibilities. 
job bidding: Application by an employee for consideration for a job 

open in the plant. In most union contracts, if other qualifications 

are equal, first preference is given to the most senior applicant. 
job description: List of elements of a job or occupation. 
job evaluation: Systematic rating on factors such as skill, responsi- 
bility or experience. Used often to end wage inequities. 
job posting: Management announcement, by bulletin or other 

means, of a job open in the plant. Mandatory in many union 

contracts. See job bidding. 
job security: A union contract provision protecting a worker's job, 

as in the introduction of new methods or machines. Also used as 

a synonym for seniority. 
joint board: joint council: A group of local unions in the same 

national union which unite in a specific area for over-all collective 

bargaining, administration or both. 
journeyman: A craftsman who has completed his apprenticeship 

and is entitled to the highest minimum rate established for his 

job classification. 
jurisdiction: The area of work or group of employees for which a 

union claims the right to bargain collectively. 
jurisdictional dispute: A dispute between unions as to which has 

jurisdiction over certain work. See jurisdiction. 
jurisdictional strike: A walkout by one union because of dispute 

with another over representation rights or performance of cer- 
tain jobs. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



iliiirl 




^ "IP- 



HORSE ANCHOR 



"!*# 




The new Ackerman Johnson Horse 
Anchor provides an attractive headed 
bolt rather than the usual threaded stud 
that protrudes from the surface. It is a 
strong, attractive and easy-to-install fas- 
tening device for concrete and masonry. 
Once installed, there is no need to as- 
semble nuts to effect the fastening. 

The Horse Anchor may be removed 
and reinstalled in the same pre-drilled 
hole without loss of holding power or 
damage to the anchor. Simply back out 
the Horse Anchor and remove the mount- 
ed unit. These anchors can be installed 
through the provided mounting holes in 
equipment, fixtures or clamps without 
having to move these units. 

Positive anchoring is achieved by the 
turning action of the bolt which draws 
up and expands the preassembled lock 
nut over the shank of the bolt, embed- 
ding the nut firmly in the concrete. 

Write for new catalog sheet. Acker- 
man Johnson Products, Buildex Division, 
Illinois Tool Works Inc., 801 N. Hilltop 
Drive, Itasca, Illinois 60143. 

PORTA/GUIDE 

With the new Porta/Guide, it is now 
possible to convert a circular saw into a 
portable table saw. The easily-assembled 
Porta/Guide forms a sturdy, adjustable 
base to which the circular saw may be 
attached. Thus, the saw may be used 
safely on work bench, floor, table, etc. 
In addition, the saw may be easily trans- 
ported to any location desired. The 
Porta/Guide is lightweight, can be used 
with any size or type circular saw, and 
can cut any material compatible with the 



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the door is open. And the hinge's large 
electrical capacity also makes 48 volt, 1 
ampere installations possible. 

It's tamperproof and weatherproof too 
because electrical parts are concealed be- 
hind the hinge leaves. It's ideal for trans- 
mitting signals from smoke detectors to 
closers mounted on the door, or operating 
locking devices, without fear of interrup- 
tion. 

'f 



blade being used at any angle within 45 
degrees. For further information, con- 
tact: D&R Products Company; Oxford, 
Ohio 45056. 

ELECTRIC HINGE 

A new, exclusive concealed conductor 
electric hinge has the same appearance 
as a conventional hinge, has no electrical 
parts visible after the hinge is installed. 
Recently introduced by Stanley Hard- 
ware, the hinge is deceptive. Applied to a 
door it looks the same as the Stanley 
CB1900 hinge with its neat appearance, 
slim barrel, flush tips and bearing. 

Now for the first time this hinge pro- 
vides a continuous flow of electric current 
through the hinge to the door — even when 




Specify concealed conductor electric 
hinges CECB1900, A-Vi x A-Vi (steel) 
or CECB I960, A-V2 x A-V2 (bronze). 
Each has four conducting wires which 
are color coded in red, yellow, blue and 
black. The pin is permanently fastened 
and non-removable; finishes are specified 
in the regular manner. The hinge is de- 
signed for use in low voltage class 2 
circuits; packed one hinge (V2 pr.) per 
box. For more information write: Stanley 
Hardware Div. of The Stanley Works, 
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jljl^jlj' 






JUNE, 1972 



41 



^1 " 




gaiwry ot pictures shewing 
some of the senior members of 
■the Brotherhood who recently 



lA 



received 25-year 
service pins. 



or 50-ye< 



9 



(1) CHICAGO, ILL.— Local 419 re- 
cently honored its 25- and 50-year vet- 
erans at the local's annual Get Together 
Party. In Photo No. lA President Sam 
Durso, second from left, presents 50-year 
pins to Arthur Jude, Theo Bethke, Eric 
Pelz, and Steve Eckmeyer. 

The 25-year honorees, shown in Picture 
No. 1, include: 

First row, left to right, A. Poltermann, 
H. Laechelt, C. Gutberlet, C. Homes, 
Pres. Sam Durso, F. Haueisen, A. Arnold, 
M. Baumann, E. Schmidt, financial secre- 
tary W. Badekow, treasurer H. Ritter, A. 
Anderson. 

Second row, left to right, J. Zollner, R. 
Poltermann, J. Dorfmeister, O. Frischolz, 
R. Walz, R. Huebncr, H. Kettlcr, R. 
Miloch, E. Seehase, C. Hoffmann, L. 
Brinkmann, F. Holzer, F. P. Holzer, 
trustee .1. .lensen, M. Noehring, T. Looft, 
G. Hansen, J. Lorenz. 

Third row, W. May, Vice Pres. R. 
Neumann, E. Dentlcr, E. Schmidt, J. 
Gorr, C. Grendl, M. Czyzewski. 

Those not present were, T. Jenkins, 
P. Klauss, E. Krausc, D. Shea. 




(2) FORT MYERS, FLA.— At its an- 
nual Christmas party Local 2261 awarded 
25-year pins to nine members. The pre- 
sentation was made on December 6, 1971 
to: Front, left to right, Salvatore Cipri- 
ano, K. S. Simmons, Leonard J. Myosky, 
business representative, who was on hand 
to help make presentations but did not 



receive a pin, and William Rawchuck. 
Back row, left to right, Jean LaPrise, Ted 
Earl, Walter Gehner, Pete Parent, James 
A. Nelson, and Louie Crow. Paul Long, 
back, right, business representative of 
Gulf Coast District Council, Florida, was 
on hand to make the presentations. 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



SIDELL ADDRESS 

Continued from Page 6 

well done" . . . "May you and Ethel 
enjoy all the blessings you both so 
richly deserve." 

I am certain history will record the 
last twenty years as the most turbu- 
lent in our country's history with the 
exception of the Civil War. The able 
leadership of Maurice Hutcheson has 
protected and advanced the best inter- 
ests of the United Brotherhood 
through them all. He has adhered 
strictly to the words which the found- 
ing fathers of the United Brotherhood 
wrote and inscribed in our first con- 
stitution nearly one hundred years 
ago: "We recognize that the interests 
of all labor are identical regardless of 
occupation, nationality, religion or 
color, ... a wrong done to one is a 
wrong done to all." 

Wrongs Righted 

Maurice has remained untiring in 
his efforts to see that every wrong was 
righted. He has been steadfast in his 
determination that the members of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America enjoy their 
right to a fuller and richer life in 
providing themselves, their families, 
with a better standard of living. 

He has been dedicated in accom- 
plishing these goals for all working- 
men and women. Because Maurice 
Hutcheson has remained unaltered in 
all these objectives, I am as confident 
as you that he enjoys great personal 
satisfaction and personal triumph few 
men ever know. He has done this by 
fully utilizing the talents God had 
granted him. 

If a man has talent and does not 
use it, he has failed. If he has talent 
and only uses half of it, he has par- 
tially failed. If he has talent and ex- 
ploits it to its fullest potential he has 
indeed succeeded gloriously. Maurice 
Hutcheson is the latter, he has the 
exceptional talent and what is more 
important, he learned to use it long 
ago. All of us in this great gathering 
tonight, plus countless thousands of 
others, thank God he did so! 

I'm sure you know, as I know, the 
highest reward a man receives for 
his toil is not what he gets for it, but 
what he becomes by it. Maurice A. 
Hutcheson has become — through his 
honesty, his principles, his dedication 
and hard work — respected, loved and 
admired by all who know him. That, 
my friends, is man's highest reward. 

President Hutcheson has unfailing 
faith in his fellow man. He has a 
burning desire to see every wrong 
righted. His deep thirst for justice 
compelled him to be honest and above 



all fair in reaching decisions, without 
regard to consequences. He knows that 
right makes might, and Maurice A. 
Hutcheson has never deviated from 
this principle. 

Having been closely associated with. 
Maurice for many years, I was con- 
tinually amazed by his ability to see 
through flowery rhetoric and partisan 
pleadings in situations which con- 
fronted him daily, and to clearly il- 
luminate the core of a problem. His 
knowledge of the labor movement is 
amazing, his insight into human na- 
ture is sharp as the surgeon's scalpel. 
His counsel and advice have been 
sought by many, including Presidents 
of the United States. The shame, of 
course, is that they have not always 
followed that advice. 

One thing surfaces above all — his 
plain, warm and humane life-style — 
an attitude of respect for others, a 
feeling for and a longing to aid his 
fellow man, and an inherent sense of 
compassion and gratitude which does 
not allow him to forget a kindness or 
permit him to fail to repay an obliga- 
tion, many times over. 

He is closely akin to America. As 
America is a great land, Maurice 
Hutcheson is a great man. He has 
grown with America and America has 
grown with him. He is its product. 

How do we possibly honor this man 
who has served the United Brother- 
hood, the trade union movement, the 
United States of America, so well. 
The delegates at the last General Con- 
vention of the United Brotherhood 
adopted a President Emeritus resolu- 
tion which provides and insures that 
he will be available in the future for 
the guidance and counsel that we shall 
need, which only he can give. For me 
as a "rookie" General President, you 
have no idea how assuring that can be. 

It is not possible to articulate how 
everyone in this room feels . . . what 
thousands of his fellow men think. But 
we shall try. I am privileged at this 
time to make an announcement on be- 
half of the officers and membership of 
our United Brotherhood. It is un- 
precedented in custom. It is a "first" 
for the United Brotherhood. 

Plaque Planned 

I believe you are all familiar with 
our beautiful building near the Cap- 
itol of the United States which is the 
headquarters of the United Brother- 
hood, a structure that Maurice person- 
ally helped design and the erection he 
personally helped supervise. In its 
lobby, gracing one wall, are four mag- 
nificent bronze plaques. They honor 
Peter J. McGuire, our Pounder; 
Gabriel Edmonston, our first General 



President; William L. Hutcheson, Gen- 
eral President from 1915 to 1952; and 
Frank Duff'y, our General Secretary 
from 1901 to 1948. Four great Ameri- 
cans, four great leaders. 

Ladies and gentlemen, I am author- 
ized to announce that a fifth plaque ia 
presently being designed and will be 
installed to grace that wall — in the 
company of our organization's found- 
ers — and outstanding leaders — in trib- 
ute to Maurice A. Hutcheson — a 
LIVING example of the finest caliber 
man the United Brotherhood, or the 
United States, can possibly produce. 

In closing, I'm reminded of what 
S. W. Foss wrote. He penned it as if 
America itself were writing it. I be- 
lieve it is as if the article were writ- 
ten directly to and for Maurice. He 
wrote: 

"Bring me men to match my 

mountains, 
Bring me men to match my plains — 
Men with empires in their purpose — 
And new eras in their brains". 

Ladies and gentlemen, Maurice A. 
Hutcheson has been, and is, such a 
man. ■ 




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43 




■^ 



L.r. NO. 13 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Anderson. James K. 
Beckley. F. A. 
Cross, Clyde 
Ekdahl. Berger 
Hoffman. William 
Lindh. Fred A. 
Rouhick, Albert J. 
SantLicci. Rosaline 
Woje, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK. N.J. 

Hartley, William 

L.U. NO. 30 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Alley. William R. 
Bliven, Allen 
Cotnoir, Nelson H. 
Faulkner. Arthur W. 
Hamlin, Edward 
Hoy, Benjamin 
Mathieu. Ernest 
McCarthy, Thomas J, 
Nolan, John D., Jr. 
Peltier, Wilfred O. 
Rys, Stanley P. 
Stefanski. Michael J., Sr. 
Wilcox, Rufus F. 

L.U. NO. 34 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Hipner, Raymond J. 
Petersen. Mariiis 
Rudowsky. Joseph 
Schadi. John 
Smith. Guy B. 

L.U. NO. 37 
SHAMOKIN, PA. 

Cannon. Raymond E. 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOXVILLE, TEIVN. 

Kidd, J. L. 
Tillett. Joseph F. 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Bair. James E. 
Basch. F. H. 
Berry, Harvey B. 
Hutchison, Jay 
Mahaney, William G. 
Owings, William T. 

L.U. NO. 62 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Hofzcll, Carl 
Johnson. Walter H. 
Johnson. William A. 
Madscn, Paul 
Rodstroni. Arthur 
Tadin. Andrew 
Watt. John 

L.U. NO. 63 
BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 

Dupree. Virgil M. 
Halsema, Lambert 
Hauser, Albert J, 
Livingston, M. L, 
Newberry, Irvin V. 



Oliver, Robert Gibson 
Perschall.T. E.. Jr. 
Ploense, Walter 
Powell. Clarence 
Price. John W. 
Smith, Delvyn 

L.U. NO. 69 
CANTON, OHIO 

Croskey. Robert 
Lamson. George 
Wagner. Peter 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Radford, John D. 
Shores. William F. 

L.U. NO. 105 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Andrasovsky. Gabriel 
Armstrong, Lawrence 
Austin. Fred 
Beige. C. E. 
Benson, Henry 
Benson, Nels 
Brackenridge, Alex 
Brunton, William 
Conner. Paul N. 
Corell. Claude 
Dalrymple. Fay 
D'Arcy, Michael 
Davidson. Albin 
DeFranco. Antonio 
Elmenthaler, William 
Elrick. Ralph 
Erickson, Nils 
Gray. Herman 
Gregory Thomas R. 
Higgins. John E. 
Jackson. Earl A. 
Jansa. Frank 
Jensen, Carl G. 
Kearns. James M. 
Kissel, Carl R. 
Lampe, Ralph 
I ippert, Hugo 
Lombardozzi. Frank 
Madaras, Mike 
McClinlock, Irwin 
Medling, Russell S. 
Miles, Allen B. 
Morganthaler, Carl 
Mowls, Virgil L. 
Mungall, Harry 
Nook, Herman 
O'Connor, James 
Olson, A. R. 
Pfarr, William 
Pytel, Charles J. 
Rinehart. J. Paul 
Salomon, Joseph 
Schinchick. Steve 
Schulte, Gus 
Sivertsen, Olaf 
Soper, Clifford 
Swanson, Lars 
Sweeney. Ben 
Sweeney. James V. 
Toland. Charles 
Toland. Walter E. 
Tubman. William, Sr. 
Walters. Nathaniel 
Weinkamer. Clarence 
Weinkamer. William 
Witherup. Wilbur M, 
Woodmansee, Clyde 
Zanella, John 



L.U. NO. 109 
SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Pickens, Alonzo E. 

L.U. NO. 121 
VINELAND, N.J. 

Reed, Herbert, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Prebula, Andrew J. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Brown, Denver E. 
Evans, Homer M. 
Evans. Waller 
Huffman. Carl Jennings 
Thorn, Harry E. 

L.U. NO. 134 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

Lefrancois. Raoul 
Mallet, Aldeo 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Lester, Hannibal 
Thompson, Paul 
Wells. Leo 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Doll. Charles F. 
Foote, Wallace D. 
Likens. Rudy 
Nudelman. Jacob H. 

L.U. NO. 229 
GLENS FALLS, N.Y. 
Gakis, Emil 

L.U. NO. 242 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Czajkowski. Joseph 
McCallum, John 
Nosek, James 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

DeLuca, Edward 
Essing, Charles 
Sikorski, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 257 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Erickson. Bror 
Wilkerson, Rudy 

L.U. NO. 264 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Bissell. Oren 
Kreueer, Gilbert 
Peterson, Russell 
Resler, Herman 
Storm, Leonard 

L.U. NO. 325 
PATERSON, NJ. 

DeLotto. James 
DePow, Charles 
Lettau, Walter 
Lucas, Marinus 
Peterson, Paul 



L.U. NO. 331 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Harrell, Jesse P. 
McLaughlin, G, W. 

L.U. NO. 353 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

DiPietro, Vito 
DiResto, Thomas 
Forsman, John 
Karl, Jacob 
Ralph, Thomas 
Templeton, James 

L.U. NO. 366 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Syvert, Ertzeid 
VanMeulebroeck, H. P. 

L.U. NO. 385 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Franzoi, Elvio 

L.U. NO. 470 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Belair, Gordon 
Deniston, Walter 
Espeland, Daniel 
Ginter, Alex 
Johnson, Edward 
Loyd. Alfred 
Lumsden, Thomas 
Mikshus. M. E. 
Olson. Arthur R. 
Parker, George M, 
Sullivan, R. J. 

L.U. NO. 493 

MT. VERNON, N.Y. 

Wadanoli, Amadeo 

L.U. NO. 531 

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

Cate. Howard 
Goodrich. Harold 
Lowe. William E. 
Omand, Wallace J. 

L.U. NO. 558 
ELMHURST, ILL. 

Luff, Fred 

Tross, Raymond W. 

L.U. NO. 579 

ST. .lOHN'S, NFLD. 

Lamswood, Ananias 
Mercer, Eugene 

L.l'. NO. 621 
BANGOR, ME. 

Drottar, John A, 

L.U. NO. 651 
JACKSON, MICH. 

Howard. Clyde R. 
Tinney, Laurence 

L.U. NO. 665 
AMARILLO, TEXAS 

Atkins, H. E. 
Baker, E. R, 
Bradley, Roy 
Gatlin. Grady 
Hanson, Frank 
Watkins, W, O. 



L.U. NO. 674 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Blomme, Leon 
Eschenberg, Paul 

L.U. NO. 726 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Dudley, Robert J. 

L.U. NO. 740 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Bechenhaupt, Bill 
Cahill, Vincent 

L.U. NO. 764 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Alpigini, Elmer B. 

L.U. NO. 848 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 

Murphy. S. W. 
Osborne. Ben 

L.U. NO. 948 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

Rustwick. Jeris B. 

L.U. NO. 977 
WICHITA FALLS, 
TEXAS 

Holder. Perry A. 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Jennings, George O. 

L.U. NO. 1035 
TAUNTON, MASS. 

Garceau, Raymond D. 
Sousa, Joseph G. 

L.U. NO. 1093 
GLEN COVE, N.Y. 

Beveridge, James 

L.U. NO. 1098 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Blackwell, M. G. 
Keys. Thomas E. 
Michelli, Joe 
Ogden, M. Z. 
Peterson. Paul P. 
Quebedeaux. Berchman 
Talley. Lionel 

L.U. NO. 1128 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Fisher, Albert 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Swich, S. B. 

L.U. NO. 1175 
KINGSTON, N.Y. 
Jablonski, Joseph S. 
Lockwood, Charles J., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1227 
IRONWOOD, MICH. 

Slanzi. Frank 

L.U. NO. 1256 
SARNIA, ONT. 

Lepotvin, Carl 
Vigneault, Alcide 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 1292 
HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

Denton, Fred, Sr. 
Hoyer, Algol 

L.U. NO. 1301 
MONROE, MICH. 

Thomas, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 1363 
OSHKOSH, WIS. 

Schuster, Frank 
Wood, Earl E. 

L.U. NO. 1456 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Anderson, Arthur 
Damsgaard, George 
Danielson, Daniel 
Grissel, John 
Hansen, Niels C. 
Hanson, Peter 
Hantho, Harold 
Jacobsen, William H. 
Johnson, Alex 
Koskinen, Arne 
Lester, Joseph 
Lystad, Henry 
McGuinnes, Michael 
McKenna, Daniel 

L.U. NO. 1483 
PATCHOGUE, N.Y. 

Hulse, George 
Olson, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1513 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Achatz, Howard D. 



Donaldson, William 
Feldman, Simon 



L.U. NO. 1571 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Baker, Leslie L. 
Cook, Elzie P. 
Etchison, William L. 
Cast, Myron B. 
Goetz, Charles 
Hausman, Gene A. 
Lindeman, Louis 
Norwood, W. H., Jr. 
Pearson, Carl Emil 
Peterson, Eugene D. 
Vanderpool, Louis 
Vincent, Ralph E. 

L.U. NO. 1683 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

Perdue, Cawthon B. 

L.U. NO. 1784 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Acker, George 
Bassler Carl 
Denk, Bruno 
Meyer, Alex 
Nelson, John 
Peters, George 
Sabo, Frank 
Varhegyi, Josef 
Wrecenyar, John 



L.U. NO. 1837 
BABYLON, N.Y. 
McGarity, Horace 

L.U. NO. 1997 
COLUMBIA, ILL. 

Deul, Henry G. 
Eckert, Theodore F. 

L.U. NO. 2046 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Johanson, Waldo 



L.U. NO. 2305 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Kerr, Fred 
Kristiansen, Ernest 
Montgomery, William 
Olsen, Olaf 
Wells, Frederick 
White, Jacob 

L.U. NO. 2340 
BRADENTON, FLA. 

Brands, Herbert J. 



Goethe, George H. 
Parrish, Barney F. 

L.U. NO. 2411 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Sparks, G. F. L. 

L.U. NO. 2590 
KANE, PA. 

Sundberg, Gust 



LEGACIES OF LONG SERVICE 

Frank Slanzi, a charter member and trustee of Local 1227, Ironwood, Mich., 
passed away on April 4. He had 55 years of continuous service with the 
Brotherhood, having joined in 1917. 

Local 1128, LaGrange, 111., mourns the passing of Albert Fisher, business 
representative of the local union for 38 years prior to his retirement in 1960. 
Fisher was born on June 25, 1890, joined the Brotherhood in June, 1911, and 
passed away last January 14 at the age of 81, having been a member for 60 
years. He was the last surviving member of the building committee which con- 
structed the original Chicago District Council of Carpenters Building at 12 
East Erie in Chicago in 1925. 

• 

Local 1031, Dover, N.H., and Local 344, Waukesha, Wis., reported the 
deaths, last year, of two veteran members of the Brotherhood. 

Perley E. Wiggin of Local 1031 died April 29, 1971, at the age of 88 years. 
He was one of the charter members of the local union, serving for more 
than 50 years. He was financial secretary and treasurer until six years ago. 
He died only three days after attending his last local union meeting. 

N. C. Spellman of Local 344 died March 17, 1971, at the age of 94, after 
69 years of active service with the Brotherhood. 



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45 




(1) TAMPA. FLA. — At the regular meeting of the Local 696 on March 20, 1972, 25-year pins were presented to 62 eligible 
members. Two past presidents were presented with past president pins. 

After the presentations, refreshments were served by Ladies Auxiliary No. 87. 

In the accompanying photograph, left to right, are: 

Front row— James C. Cook, W. H. Pitts. Hector C. White, P. M. Norris, A. L. Vetzel, C. C. Rushing, Carlos Gomis, 
Lionel Diaz, E. P. Murphy, Manuel Barcia, and M. K. Robinson, B.A. 

Second row— Wyllie Goddard, L. C. Sparling, Richard Suarez, Efren Vega, John L Stewart, C. C. Pino, A. C. Bell, L. M. 
DeVeau, T. M. Gushing, Wm. E. Allen, Secretary of Fla. AFL-CIO, who made the presentations, Peter Labruzzo, Past Presi- 
dent, Jack Sheppard, International Representative, T. L. Carlton, International Organizer, and Henry A. Prine, Past President. 

Third row— C. G. Pate, J. C. Moon, J. M. Moody, R. G. Lynn, F. W. Lochel, Paul M. Howard, G. H. Lisse, H. L. 
Lauresen, Chas. E. Johnson, A. R. Humphrey, E. S. Hendrix, Merle Harvey and Andrew Harrison. 




(2) OREGON CITY, ORE.— A father- 
son combination with 85 years' member- 
ship was saluted by Oregon City Carpen- 
ters Local 1388 at a recent pin ceremony. 
In Photo No. 2 Ed Werdell (left) is a 
55-year member and son Bill has been 
a member for 30 years. 

(No. 2A) — Three 35-year members of the 
Carpenters Brotherhood plus a special 
35-year pin winner were honored by 
Local 1388. Left to right: Mrs. Dick 
(Clementina) LaManna, wife of the lo- 
cal's financial-secretary, who received a 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 





A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
service pins. M 

pin in honor of her 35th wedding an- 
niversary; 35-year member Gust Swan- 
son; Swan Nelson, executive secretary 



of the Portland District Council of Car- 
penters, and 35-year pin winners, Mer- 
land Temple and Ernest Cullison. 

(2B) Twenty-eight Oregon City Local 1388 
members surround a buffet table after re- 
ceiving Brotherhood pins. At left front 
is Dick LaManna, the union's financial 
secretary. Thirty-year pin winners from 
left: Ben Johnson, Sylvester Beko, Joe 
Henkes, Clarence Brookshire, Henry Witt, 
Walter Simonson, A. H. Schaefer, Les 
Margason, Loman Moxley, Willard 
Wehrt, Everett Tinner, Bill Werdell, Eu- 
gene Lausche, Walter Maurer. Right front 
to rear: Lester Irvin, William Jacobs, 
Howard McLaren, Winfield Bamum, E. 
L. Rushton, Clifford Jacobs, Howard 
Dent, Ed Mooney, Roy Hamlin, Richard 
York, Byrdette Byrd, Charles Menden 
hall, Josiah Rogers, William Rusboldt. 
Pins were awarded by Roy Coles, execu 
five secretary of the Oregon State Coun^ 
cil of Carpenters, and Swan Nelson, ex 
ecutive secretary of the Portland Districi 
Council of Carpenters. 




46 



THE CARPENTER 




Lakeland 
News 



Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lal<eland, Florida 



f^ r% 




«.i\-- - 1 IMllllll -...J 

General President William Sidell, General Executive Board Member Patrick J. Camp- 
bell, and New York State Council Secretary Milton Frey admire new furniture do- 
nated by the First District to the Carpenters' Home in Lakeland. The First District 
gift consisted of several lounge chairs, two sofas, and three loveseats for the tele- 
vision lounge. 



Harry Partridge of Local 171, Youngs- 
town, Ohio, arrived at the Home April 
25, 1972. 



Emil Caliebe, 



of 



Local 246, New 




York, New York, arrived at the Home 
April 25, 1972. 

• 

Walter Aunio of Local 2236, New 
York, New York, died April 21, 1972. 
He was buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 

George W. Borman of Local 117, 
Albany, New York, withdrew from the 
Home April 18, 1972. 



Andrew R. Dellgren, right, of Local 
357, Islip, N.Y., recently became a resi- 
dent of the Carpenters Home at Lake- 
land. A member of Local 357 since 
September 7, 1912, Dellgren is 88 years 
old. In the picture. Local 357 President 
John Cavanaugh extends best wishes at 
a farewell local union meeting. 



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45 


Gary Distributing Co 


38 


Goldblatt Tool Co 


36 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


21 


Knaack Manufacturing 


41 


Locksmithing Institute 


43 


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Surveying 


35 


Schaefer Manufacturing Co. . 


47 


Skil Corporation 


17 


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47 




in concLusion 



WILLIAM SIDELL, General President 




There Stiould Be No Contest 



■ At the present time there is a behind-the-scenes 
struggle going on within the Social Security structure 
that certainly will have far-reaching implications for 
the whole Social Security System. 

Simply put, Social Security reserves are growing 
too fast. Up to now, the assumptions which the Social 
Security Administration used in predicting income to 
the fund was based on stationary wage rates. In other 
words, in predicting the amount of money that would 
come into the trust fund, it was assumed that wage 
rates would not go up. 

This, of course, proved to be unrealistic. Wage 
rates have gone up and undoubtedly will continue to 
go up in the years ahead. Since higher wages mean a 
higher income to the Social Security Trust Fund, the 
amount of revenue accruing to the Trust Fund is 
bound to grow. 

The Social Security Advisory Council recently made 
a study of the situation. Based on this study, there is 
no doubt but that Social Security benefits can be in- 
creased substantially without any increase in the con- 
tribution rate. Or, conversely, if benefits are not in- 
creased, the contribution rate can be cut back from 
the current rate of 4.6% for employer and employee 
to about 4.2%. 

Sentiment in the Nixon Administration seems to 
lean toward leaving benefit schedules as they are. or 
perhaps increasing them slightly, and instead reducing 
the contribution rate from 4.6% to 4.2%. In fact, Mr. 
Nixon's recommendation is for an increase in benefits 
of only 5%. 

On the other hand, Congressman Wilbur Mills, 
chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, 
recommends an immediate increase of 20% in the 
benefit schedule. His recommendation is based on 
the findings of the Social Security Advisory Council. 

With unemployment running at somewhere near 6% 
month after month, it seems to me that a 20% increase 
in Social Security benefits is imperative. Such a boost 
would greatly increase the purchasing power of our 
retirees. More important, however, is the fact that 
a 20% boost would raise millions of retirees from dire 
poverty to something more closely approaching a 
decent living standard. 

There are nearly 25 million poor in the United 
States. A very substantial percentage of them is to 



be found among the old. In one fell swoop, a 20% 
increase in Social Security benefits would enable sev- 
eral million old people to rise above the subsistence 
level. 

On the other hand, business profits have sky-rock- 
eted phenomenally in the first five months of this year. 
Corporations generally are more prosperous than they 
have ever been. They scarcely need the additional 
windfall in the form of a reduction of Social Security 
contributions from 4.6% to 4.2%. 

The way I see it, there is a choice between making 
life a little bit better for our retirees through higher 
Social Security benefits or fattening the profit picture 
for corporations which are already in healthy circum- 
stances. In my opinion, there should be no contest. 

This does not mean that there will not be one. 

Former Secretary of the Treasury Connally has ex- 
pressed himself as being in favor of a reduction in the 
tax. So has presidential advisor George Shultz. 
These men carry considerable weight with the Presi- 
dent, and, certainly, the entire business community 
will throw all available muscle into the fight to reduce 
contribution rates rather than increase benefit sched- 
ules. 

H.R. 1, the measure aimed at tax and welfare re- 
forms, contains a provision for a mere 5% increase 
in Social Security benefits. The bill is now work- 
ing its way through the Committee maze in the Senate. 
It has already passed the House. Some time in the 
near future, floor action will be forthcoming in the 
Senate. 

In the meantime, another bill calling for a much 
more substantial increase in Social Security benefits 
has been introduced by Senator Church of Idaho and 
has the backing of a large number of senators. This 
indicates there is a great deal of sentiment in the Senate 
for an increase in benefits of much more than 5%. 

However, in politics, nothing can be taken for 
granted. I am sure the labor movement will exert all 
the pressure it can to increase benefits substantially 
rather than give the corporations an additional wind- 
fall in the form of reduced Social Security taxes. 

The United Brotherhood is already working hard 
contacting senators and urging them to opt in favor of 
people rather than corporations. We will continue to 
do so until victory is achieved. ■ 



48 



THE CARPENTER 




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STANLEY 






JULY 1972 





Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 



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JULY . . . Freedom's Golden Month '' 

luly 4, 1716— The Declarafion of Independence if /u/y /, 1861— Canadian Confederafion 






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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington. D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



First District. Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 
Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
1 01 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington. D.C. 20001 
Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 
101 Marietta St., Suite 913 
Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 731 16 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nafl Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 
Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 
4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington. D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No. 



Number of your Local Union must 
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be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



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klliBORPRESSfei 



VOLUME XCII 



No. 7 



JULY, 1972 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Today's Ecological Challenges to Tomorrow's Home Builders 

William Sidell 2 

Pruitt-lgoe, Case History of Public Housing 4 

Two State and Provincial Drywall Agreements 6 

Californians Flock to Union-Industries Show 8 

These Are the Issues in 1972, Part 2 Platform Proposals 10 

Free World's Largest Electric Motor 12 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 7 

Local Union News 13 

People With Ideas 14 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 16 

We Congratulate 18 

Apprenticeship and Training 19 

Your Union Dictionary, Part II 22 

Service to the Brotherhood 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 30, 33, 34, 36 

CLIC Report 25 

Plane Gossip 32 

In Memoriam 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS. ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island A--?., N.E., Wsshington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of A.~enca. Second class postage p^id at Washington, 
0. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

The United States and Canada 
share July commemorations of na- 
tional freedom. July 4 is the tradi- 
tional holiday for United States citi- 
zens: July 1 is Confederation Day 
in Canada. 

Our cover artist has assembled atop 
a map of our two nations symbols of 
freedom recognized by each. 

The red and white maple leaf flag 
serves as a backdrop to the noble 
statue to Britannia. To the right, a 
portion of the Parliament Building in 
Ottawa is displayed beside the Mari- 
time Provinces. 

The United States map is dominated 
by the head of the Minuteman, the 
Eagle and Shield, and the tower of 
Independence Hall in Philadelphia, 
where U.S. freedom was born. 

Canada and the United States are 
truly neighbors in democracy. They 
share the longest unfortified border in 
the world; they share, too, a common 
destiny in the development of the 
North American continent and rela- 
tions with the rest of the world. 

This fact is borne out clearly in 
the speeches to the recent conven- 
tion of the Canadian Labor Congress, 
reported on page 16 of this issue. 

NOTE: Readers who would like a 
copy of this cover unmarred by a 
mailing label may obtain one by send- 
ing lOf in coin to cover mailing costs 
to: Tlie Editor, The CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution, Ave., N.W., Wasli- 
inglon, D.C. 20001. 




Today's Ecological Challenges 

to Tomorrow's Home Builders 



Home building is in for some difficult days, 
General President William Sidell told the 
Pacific Coast Builders Conference in San 
Francisco, last month . . . "How much 
shall progress in providing decent 
housing for all be sacrified for a cleaner 
environment?" he asked. Here is the full 
text of his address. 




■ Ecology is a word nine people 
out of ten never heard of 20 years 
ago. Today, virtually everyone is an 
expert on the subject. Second and 
third graders talk about pollution 
and the cco-system with a sophisti- 
cation that baffles their parents. 

All of this is an indication of how 
far we have come in recognizing the 
seriousness of the ecological crisis 
that confronts us in this, the last 
third of the Twentieth Century. 

I am sure there is no need for me 
to belabor the point that the ability 
of the human race to survive its own 
capacity for making its air unbreath- 
able, and its cities unlivable, is hang- 
ing in the balance. 

There is little doubt but that hu- 
man survival is a race against time, 
and time seems to be in the lead at 
this moment. 

Every segment of our society is 
involved to greater or lesser degree 
in the battle to bring about a livable 
world. However, I believe that more 
changes and more challenges face 
the home-building industry than 
most other industries. 

Let me give you a quick rundown 
of what is happening in the area of 
the nation's capital. The implica- 
tions for home-building are obvious. 
T live in a suburban community of 
Maryland, which bounds the district 
of Columbia on the north. It is only 



one of a dozen cities which make up 
the county. The county is the basic 
unit of government. The schools, 
the police force, etc., are all county 
operations. So, too, are zoning reg- 
ulations, building codes, etc. 

This particular county was one 
of the fastest growing residential 
areas in the nation. Today, however, 
it is slowing down at an alarming 
rate. The sewage system is extended 
beyond its recognized capacity, and 
much of the soil is unsuitable for 
septic tank installation. Therefore, 
the number of building permits is- 
sued for both individual dwellings 
and apartment houses is being cur- 
tailed steadily. Until such time as 
new sewage treatment facilities can 
be placed into operation, there is 
bound to be a continued downward 
spiraling in home-building. 

Reduced L'tilities 

On top of this, the utility which 
supplies natural gas recently an- 
nounced that it is not taking on any 
new customers. It will service only 
those customers it already has. This 
edict placed many home builders 
in a precarious position. Some 
switched to oil or electric heat, but 
these are not viable solutions. Oil 
is short and the electric supply un- 
certain. 

Last year, brown-outs were the 



order of the day during much of 
the months of July and August. 
There is little doubt but that similar 
curtailments of electric power will 
be required this summer. 

The major atomic generating plant 
under construction nearby which 
was scheduled to go into operation 
in 1973, has been bogged down by 
court suits brought by environmen- 
talists. There is really no telling 
when this plant will go into opera- 
tion, if ever. 

Or take the case of another large 
county bordering on the District of 
Columbia. During the past decade 
it has grown steadily at the average 
rate of 31,000 new residents per 
year. The county council has de- 
cided that the growth rate must be 
held to 15,000 per year because of 
the lack of adequate utilities and 
facilities. 

From all this, 1 think it is logical 
to deduce that home-building is in 
for some difficult days in the imme- 
diate future in these counties. Until 
such time as adequate sewage treat- 
ment plants are placed in operation, 
the number of homes to be built 
each year is destined to shrink de- 
spite growing needs. Growing short- 
ages of gas and electricity place 
further obstacles in the path of 
home-building. 

Adequate supplies will not be 



THE CARPENTER 



easy to obtain. Electricity requires 
power, and power means pollution, 
whether fossil fuels or atomic fuels 
are used. This means that environ- 
mentalists and power people inevit- 
ably will be working at cross pur- 
poses in many instances. 

I think this struggle highlights the 
crux of our dilemma; namely, how 
much shall progress in providing 
decent housing for all be sacrificed 
for a cleaner environment? 

Certainly, we need both a cleaner 
environment and millions of new 
homes. Balancing the priority of the 
needs is one of the major challenges 
of our time. I may be biased, but it 
is my conviction that the environ- 
mentalists deliberately endeavor to 
stampede the American people into 
unrealistic programs aimed at curing 
generations of ecological neglect in 
one fell swoop. Scare headlines and 
science-fiction predictions are the 
modus operandi. 

Jobs and Health 

Certainly, no one can deny that 
pollution poses a serious threat to 
the future welfare of the nation, but 
so, too, does malnutrition. Malnu- 
trition is a disease that stems from 
unemployment, and its efi'ects can be 
as devastating as the worst of pol- 
lution. We need a cleaner environ- 
ment, but we need jobs too. I believe 
we can have both. 

I think of the situation in Everett, 
Washington. Two pulp mills there 
have been polluting the bay for 
seventy years. Suddenly, they are 
given drastic orders to curtail pol- 
lution almost instantaneously. Be- 
cause the mills were old and com- 
paratively inefficient, this edict 
amounted to a death sentence. 
Thirteen hundred jobs were in- 
volved in an area already hard hit by 
layoffs in the airplane industry. 

The point I want to make is that 
these mills had a long history of 
polluting the bay. The bay naturally 
suffered, but it survived for seventy 
years. It seems to me that an or- 
derly program for gradually reduc- 
ing the pollution might have kept 
the mills alive for some time to 
come, and would have started re- 
versing the seventy year trend. 

I am sure that no blueprint is 
necessary to pinpoint the implica- 
tions for home building in the Ever- 



ett situation. It must be all but dead 
there. I think this is a small exam- 
ple of the pressures which are build- 
ing up between ecology and indus- 
trial progress. 

One of the areas in which our 
brotherhood has been deeply in- 
volved in the ecological controversy 
is in the management of national 
forest lands. I do not think I need 
to point out that wood is a highly 
desirable building material in the 
housing field. It has flexibility, and 
up to now, it has had an availability 
unmatched by any other building 
materials. In addition, it has a spe- 
cial significance in that it is a renew- 
able resource. 

Unlike minerals and fossil fuels, 
which once mined are gone forever, 
wood can be produced in an endless 
cycle of new crops. This is of major 
importance to the nation and, for 
that matter, to the world, which is 
faced with the tremendous problem 
of husbanding inadequate supplies 
of basic raw materials. 

With federal lands containing 
about fifty percent of available mer- 
chantable timber, the policies which 
the government pursues on these 
lands is of considerable importance 
to your members and to ours. As a 
result of the wilderness act of 1964, 
the federal government placed some 
9.1 millions of acres of national for- 
est lands in the national wilderness 
system. A sizable percentage of 
these lands contained valuable tim- 
ber assets. Some additional 4.5 mil- 
lion acres are designated as primitive 
areas at this time, and they, too, 
are withdrawn from any logging 
activities. 

Forest Contribution 

No one can quarrel with the idea 
that scenic and spectacular areas 
of the United States should be pre- 
served intact for the enjoyment of 
future generations. On the other 
hand, lands that are best suited to 
producing successive crops of wood 
products ought to be carefully stud- 
ied and evaluated as to the maxi- 
mum contribution they can make to 
the common good. 

I firmly believe that there is ade- 
quate acreage under federal owner- 
ship for both outdoor recreation and 
the continuing supply of timber 
products. 



A Forest Service survey shows 
that the typical visitor to our wilder- 
ness areas is a college graduate in 
an upper income bracket who camps 
out for a week or more, pursuing 
a hobby of photography or rock 
collecting, or something of that na- 
ture. 

The vast bulk of American citi- 
zens will live out their lives without 
ever visiting a true wilderness area. 
Picture post cards are about the only 
contact they will have. In effect, 
what the wilderness areas achieve is 
the reservation of vast areas for a 
few hobbyists and outdoor fanatics. 

Population Change 

By and large, Americans today 
are a nation of city dwellers. At the 
turn of the century, less than one- 
half of the population lived in urban 
areas. That figure is now above 
seventy percent and by 1980 it will 
be around eighty percent. In 1900, 
the country had only seventy-five 
million people; now its population 
exceeds two hundred million. 

The urbanization process — to- 
gether with the desire for a more 
comfortable life — had led to a 
steadily-growing demand for addi- 
tional public facilities and public 
services: schools, libraries and col- 
leges; hospitals and clinics; bridges 
and tunnels; streets and highways; 
storm sewers and sanitary sewers; 
airports; recreation centers; muse- 
ums and theaters; clean air and 
clean water; police and fire protec- 
tion; public utilities and urban mass 
transit. 

Some of these facilities and serv- 
ices are provided by private busi- 
ness for a profit. This is true, for 
example, with respect to most gas 
and electric utilities, and some are 
provided by private, non-profit or- 
ganizations, as in the case of many 
hospitals. In the main, however, for 
most of these services — and the fa- 
cilities they require — the people 
look to the government and to the 
investment of public funds. It is 
quite obvious that government's ef- 
forts in this area have fallen far 
short of the need. 

I have only touched lightly on 

some of the ecological problems 

which I think are looming on the 

Contijiued on Page 29 



JULY, 1972 




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PRUITT-IGOE 

Case History of a Public Housing 
Project That Went Wrong. 



■ In 1955 the Pruitt-Igoe Pub- 
lic Housing Project in St. Louis was 
acclaimed by architects and city 
planners alike for its design and 
practicability. 

Today, Pruitt-Igoe is viewed as 
a prime example of urban bungling 
and ill-planning. In fact, the low- 
rent housing complex is virtually 
uninhabitable right now. 

The dream has turned into a 
nightmare. 

Criminals and \andals have made 
a haven of Pruitt-Igoe. More win- 
dows are broken than remain intact. 
Plumbing is ripped out, walls and 
ceilings have gaping holes in them, 
and elevators for the 1 1 -story high- 
rises are continually on the blink or 
filled with the strench of urine. Only 
wary repairmen and deliverymen en- 
ter the area. Even police, fire, and 



RIGHT: This aerial view of Pruitt-lfjoe 
public housint: project in 1956 also shows 
part of the high-crime area that com- 
pletclj surrounds the development. Chil- 
dren have often gotten lost trying to 
distinguish the entrance to their own 
apartment building. 



ambulance drivers try to avoid 
Pruitt-Igoe. and taxis are rarely if 
ever seen near the premises. Snipers 
have been known to perch on the 
roofs of one of the country's tallest 
slums. 

What happened to this "model" 
public housing project? 

The main problem seems to be 
population density. Pruitt-Igoe was 
designed to pro\ide minimum-rent 



housing for about 13.000 people in 
approximately ten city blocks. In 
other words, a federally-funded proj- 
ect created a relatively large city, 
a vertical slum, in a tiny area sur- 
rounded by blighted homes and 
abandoned shops in St. Louis' near 
northside. 

Such a project was doomed from 
the start. In 1955, 43 buildings 
were constructed at a cost of .$36,- 
000,000. One of the many cost- 
rises, besides cheap insulation and 
saving features of the 1 1 -story high- 
wiring, was the now-infamous skip- 
stop elevator system. These under- 
sized elevators which stopped only 
at the fourth, seventh, and tenth 
floors, were highly acclaimed as an 
architectural economy measure at 
Continued on page 35 





FAR LEFT: A dynamite blast brings 
down an entire section of an 11-story 
building in tlie Pruitt-Igoe public housing 
project in St. Louis. Most of the windows 
have been brolien by vandals. Bottom- 
floor apartment windows are boarded up 
with plywood. 



LEFT: From an eleventh-floor Pruitt-Igoe 
apartment, the view encompasses a deso- 
late canyon of concrete and scrubby grass. 



BELOW: Walls of public areas inside 
buildings look desolate. Many damaged 
or missing firehoses were not replaced. 
At night, the center stairwells, elevators 
and laundry rooms, because they are iso- 
lated from apartments, are trouble spots. 




ABOVE: Elevators stop only at gallerj floors (fourth, seventh, and tenth) 
where laundry rooms (left, locked with chain) and garbage chutes are 
located. The seldom-used laundry rooms were eliminated and the corridor 
narrowed to make new apartments and reduce the gantlet area for residents 
trying to reach apartments. The battered elevators in each building, though 
they were completely reconditioned, could not be changed. 



RIGHT: Children can have fun wherever 
they gather — even near a trash container. 
Presently, they have little to play with 
and often wander out of sight of the 
apartment windows. It was difficult to 
protect small children from gangs of 
older ones. 



LEFT: Officials from the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 
and the St. Louis Housing Authority tour 
the Pruitt-Igoe public housing project. 
Plans are being made for an estimated 
$39,000,000 renovation of the project. 










ONTARIO AND NEW JERSEY TAKE ACTION 

Two State And Provincial Agreements 
Supplement Recent Int'l Drywall Pact 



■ Two recent agreements 
strengthen the Brotherhood's posi- 
tion in drywall and acoustical con- 
struction and supplement the recent- 
ly-established international agree- 
ment between the Brotherhood and 
the International Association of Wall 
and Ceiling Contractors. 

In mid-March a province-wide 
acoustical and drywall agreement 
was negotiated by the Ontario Pro- 
vincial Council with the Acoustical 
Association of Ontario. Shortly af- 
terwards, the New Jersey State 
Council of Carpenters signed a hard- 
won Carpentcr-Drywall Specialties 
Agreement with the New Jersey 
Drywall Contractors Association. 

The New Jersey agreement was 
complicated, due to the fact that the 
Building Code of New Jersey had 
previously discriminated against the 
use of drywall interiors. Through 
the efforts of the General Office and 
General Executive Board Member 
Raleigh Rajoppi, the code was 
amended and the way cleared for 
drywall agreement. 

On May 19, General President 
William Sidell sent a letter to all 
New Jersey construction locals, ex- 
plaining the pact. 

The New Jersey drywall agree- 
ment became effective on July 1, 
1972. 

The Ontario agreement has been 
in effect since March 14 and ex- 
tends to April 30, 1974. It was de- 
signed to "pick up" several local 
agreement terms spelled out in an 
appendix which each local union 
and district council signs. More than 
85 companies will become party to 
the agreement covering almost 2,000 
members in the field of acoustical 
and drywall construction. 

Both the Ontario and New Jersey 
agreements provide for recognition 
of the Brotherhood's jurisdiction in 
wall and ceiling work assignments, 
and each helps to ease the tensions 
which have traditionally existed be- 
tween the plastering and drywall 
industries. ■ 




ONTARIO AGREEMENT— >V III. Stefaiioviti'h, Genenil K.xeculivc Board Member, witnesses 
the Acoustic and Drjnail Agreement Hanlted by members from both negotiating 
committees. Front row, left to right, Moc Sawka, Bruce L'pton, Mm. Stefanovitch, 
Bacli row, left to right, Noel Guilbeault, Local 2041, Ottawa; Joe Liberman; Ken 
Mace, Fred Leger, Local 1747 and Toronto District Council; Tom Harkness, Inter- 
national Representative. (Fhuto: Bob Reid) 




NEW JERSEY AGREEMENT— Participants in the signing of llic Ni'» .lersey agreement 
were: left to right, Henry Frank, business representative. Local 15, Hackensack; .lames 
Mos, secretary, N..I. State Council; Sewcll Peckhain, business representative. Local 
1006, New Brunswick; George Loufenberg, business representative. Local 620, 
Madison; George Salvadore, Clareniont Drywall; Robert Blank, National Applicators; 
Patrick .1. Herbert, P. J, Herbert Co., Inc.; .lack Newton, business representative, 
Passaic Count) District Council; (seated) Sigurd Lucasscn, General Representative; 
and Rak'igh Rajoppi, General Executive Board Member, 2nd District, 



THE CARPENTER 




TOM 




ROUNDUP 



REPOSSESSIONS-The U.S. Supreme Court has struck a blow for the consumer — ^holding 
that creditors cannot seize merchandise purchased on time payments, when payments 
are in default, without a hearing. 

By a four-to-three vote, the High Court struck down Pennsylvania and 
Florida laws which permit creditors to take the merchandise after payment de- 
faults without giving the purchasers a chance to tell a court why the 
repossession is unwarranted. 

Almost all states have statues similar to those in Florida and Pennsylvania. 

JOBLESS YOUTH— The numher of youths in the school -age work force this summer — 
that is, in the 16-to-24 age group — will he ahout 22.4 million, the Lahor 
Department estimates. The 3.6 million increase from April of this year will 
not he quite as great as it was last year. 

YOUTH OCCUPIED— There were 756,100 disadvanteged youths enrolled in the Neigh- 
borhood Youth Corps (NYC) program in, 1971, an increase of 118,000 or 19% over 
total enrollees for 1970, the Labor Department reports. 

MEANY ASSISTANT— Tom Kahn has been named an assistant to AFL-CIO President George 
Meany. Kahn is on leave as executive director of the League for Industrial 
Democracy. He has written widely in the areas of politics, civil rights and youth 
problems. 

MANPOWER PROGRAMS— Labor unions are participating in Federal Manpower training 
programs amounting to more than $30,000,000 this year as compared with less than 
$8,000,000 in 1968, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. 

More than 53,000 workers have been placed in jobs by labor unions since 
January of 1969, the great majority in the building and construction" trades, 
with an average starting wage of $3.50 an hour. 

THE MESSAGE— One of the most simple, direct messages to President Nixon is being 
carried on bumper stickers hereabouts. It reads: "UMMPLOYMMT ISN'T WORKING". 

BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD-The last Wholesale Price Index was something of a 
disaster for the Nixon Administration, providing some sound evidence that his 
New Economic Program is close to a shambles. 

The May WPI tells us that prices rose faster the six months since Nixon's 
wage-price freeze — ^with pay controls — than in the six months prior to the freeze. 

SANCTIONS AGAINST HAITI — The AFL-CIO wants the U.S. Government and all inter- 
national agencies to impose strict economic sanctions against Haiti until its new 
regime "translates its promises into performances by ending its despotic denial 
of all human rights and freedoms." 

MINIMUM WAGE FOR TEENAGERS — The Nixon proposal to establish a substandard 
minimum wage for teenagers would neither create new jobs for young workers nor 
spur the economy toward expanded job opportunities to cut high unemployment, in 
the view of the AFL-CIO. 

"Jobs are created by demand in the economy," not by cutting the minimum 
wage, Rudolph Oswald of the AFL-CIO' s Department of Research stressed, in a 
network radio interview. He noted that the below-par wage for teenagers urged by 
Administration spokesmen would have no effect on "teenage employment and 
unemployment" — a fact borne out by a "detailed, year-long study . . . the Labor 
Department itself commissioned." 

MATH WIZARD? — Don Cutler, of the American Federation of State, County and 
Municipal Employees, an organizer with a mathematical bent of mind, figured out 
that within one hour 56,700 pickets could march past any given picketing 
point. (PAI) 



JULY, 1972 




Show visitors crowd the aisles in one of two large halls of San Diego's Community Concourse, where the 1972 Union 
Industries Show was held. The Brotherhood displays can be seen in the upper right portion of the picture above. 



CALIFORNIANS FLOCK TO 
1972 UNION INDUSTRIES SHOW 



■ It was almost like a second 
California gold rush: the 1972 Un- 
ion Industries Show, June 9-14, in 
San Diego's big. new Community 
Concourse. 

When word got out via news- 
papers, radio, and television that 
there was much to see and win . . . 
and all of it free . . . the scene 
changed from a few early prospec- 
tors on opening day to big, enthusi- 
astic crowds on Saturday and Sun- 
day nights, and the biggest crowd 
of all on closing night. June 14, 
when a mother lode of television 
sets, a tiberglas boat, complete 
kitchens, and much, much more was 
given away in final, free drawings. 

The Brotherhood was a big and 
active part of the 1972 show, 
filling 10 exhibit spaces with dis- 
plays promoting our union label and 
the advantages of union skills and 
workmanship. ■ 



W^Sf 'W 



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iiiMiiy-iriiin nfffftiinnifniiii 

£5 



^*»^*^ 




General President William Sidell, third from left, discusses the exhibits with US 
Secretary of Labor James Hodgson, AFL-CIO Union Label and Service Trades 
President Richard Walsh, and Assistant Secretary of Labor William Usery. With 
President Sidell are GEB Member M. B. Bryant and Gen. Sec. R. E. Livingston. 



Ml^l 




General President Sidell talks with Job 
Corps Carpenter Trainee Daniel Navarro, 
who helped to man the exhibit of the 
Brotherhood's Job Corps program. 



Union Bakery Workers prepared a special 
cake with the Brotherhood emblem, dis- 
played here by Les Parker and Arthur 
Eisele, West Coast Brotherhood leaders. 





Above: An exhibit of old and modern 
jigsaws and lathes was supplied by the 
Hammond Machinery and Supply Co. of 
San Diego. 



Left: $25 savings bonds were given away 
daily to lucky visitors to the Brotherhood 
exhibits. People also gathered for free 
rulers and literature about the craft. 



Below: Tired but satisfied show visitors 
with filled shopping bags sit on the stairs 
of San Diego's Community Concourse. 



A chain saw from a bygone era drew the attention of General President 
Sidell and Les Parker, executive secretary of the San Diego District Council. 
The saw was part of the exhibit of Southern California Pile Drivers, Bridge, 
Wharf, and Dock Builders and the Staite Engineering Co. 



UmS. JLubar Tells the Palitieul Parties . . . 

THESE ARE THl 



PART TWO 



The June CARPENTER jeatiiied excerpts 
in five categories from the 1972 AFL-CIO plat- 
form proposals: hoitsiiii>. occupational liealth 
and safety, international trade, national health 
security, and the national economy. 

This month, the important concerns of man- 
power, pensions, and lalior relations are high- 
lighted. 

These and otlier AFL-CIO policy statements 
are being presented to the Democratic and Re- 
publican national conventions this summer in 
an effort to clarify the positions of organized 
labor on issues affecting every American. 



Labor-Management Relations 

Collective bargaining is the keynote in the arch 
of America's system of economic democracy and 
private enterprise. 

There is no compatibility between effective eco- 
nomic democracy and control of the collective 
bargaining process by governmental fiat. The to- 
talitarian regimes have established that beyond 
question. 

The national labor policy established a gener- 
ation ago by the Congress of the United States, 
with the passage of the Wagner Act. recognized 
this. Despite successive amendments of that Act 
by the Taft-Hartley and Landrum-Griffin changes, 
the National Labor Management Relations Act 
still retains, in its preamble, the original declara- 
tions and intentions of encouraging "the practice 
and procedure of collective bargaining" and the 
preliminary process of organizing to obtain bar- 
gaining. 

Barriers designed to circumvent these declara- 
tions, however, remain in one form or another: 

• The intervention of the employer into what 
should be essentially an employe determination 
of whether collective bargaining is desired has 
been sanctioned under the guise of the "free 
speech" section. 

• Employers have been able to distort and in- 
fluence the outcome of representation elections 
on the premise that words, that are not established 
as clear and instant coercive threats, are not an 
unfair labor practice. 

• So-called "labor-consultants" are being hired 
by anti-union employers to advise their clients on 
how to break or bend the law maintaining a facade 
of compliance but, in effect, violating its intent. 



• The Act continues to contain Section 14(b) 
which permits states to restrain union security in 
ways more restrictive than the federal statute. 
This section is patently inconsistent with the pur- 
pose of the Act. 

• The Act permits employers to receive physi- 
cal and financial assistance from fellow-employers, 
individually and collectively, during labor-manage- 
ment disputes, while, at the same time, denying 
employes the right to enlist the aid of fellow work- 
ers or fellow unionists. 

• Workers in desperate need of union organi- 
zation, such as agricultural workers and employes 
of non-profit hospitals, are excluded from coverage 
of the Act. 

• More adequate remedies are needed for an 
employe who has been illegally dismissed by an 
employer in violation of the Act. 

• Appropriate legislation should be enacted in- 
suring state and local government employes the 
right to bargain collectively. 

The National Labor Relations Act must be re- 
vised in order to return the national labor policy 
to its original purpose. It should also be broad- 




ened in coverage so that no group of employes, 
eligible for congressional concern, should be de- 
nied the benefits of participation in the national 
labor policy. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



ISSUES IN 1972 




Manpower and Training Policy 

With unemployment continuing at critically high 
levels, a meaningful manpower policy must receive 
a special priority. 

The key to an effective manpower program is 
job creation. Training, while important and neces- 
sary, is not an end in itself. Training must be fol- 
lowed by a job if it is to have any value. 

Attainment of full employment is the basic pre- 
requisite of an effective and comprehensive, na- 
tional manpower policy. 

When the regular job-creating channels in the 
economy, both private and public, do not create 
enough jobs, the federal government must pro- 
vide sufficient funds for a large-scale public-service 
employment program. Such a program to create 
jobs for the unemployed and seriously under- 
employed would provide badly needed services in 
hospitals, schools, fire and police departments, 
recreational facilities, sanitation, pollution controls 
and other state, local and federal government fa- 
cilities. 

In the establishment of manpower programs, in 
both the public and private sectors, we insist on 
provision of adequate wage and working stand- 
ards. Wages, under these programs, should be at 
least at the level of federal minimum wage or the 
prevailing rate of pay for the occupation, which- 
ever is higher. 

Manpower programs should not be used to sub- 
sidize low-wage, substandard employers and to 
undermine the wage and working standards of 
other workers, to aid runaways. . , 



Pension Legislation 

Adequate income for retirement has become 
one of the goals of the American labor movement. 
Logically, this should be provided under the So- 
cial Security program, which organized labor has 
done everything possible to improve, but since 
Social Security fails to meet these needs the labor 
movement has negotiated private pension pro- 
grams through the collective bargaining process. 

However, as private pension plans have grown 
certain problems have emerged. Many workers 
fail to qualify for a pension because of their in- 
ability to meet length of service or vesting re- 
quirements established under private pension and 
profit sharing plans. Workers have also lost their 
rights to a pension because of business failures, 
mergers, and acquisitions. Because of family busi- 
ness failures, as well as plant shut-downs in firms 
continuing to operate, a small but significant pro- 
portion of employes covered by private pension 
plans have lost not only their jobs but also their 
earned rights to pensions. 

Others have been similarly victimized when their 
employers have been delinquent in making pre- 
viously stipulated contributions to pension funds 
thereby seriously jeopardizing the soundness and 
stability of the trust. Still others have lost their 
pension rights when runaway employers, often en- 
couraged by plant piracy through tax-free indus- 
trial bonds, have moved their operations to other 
communities. 

Any legislation to meet these problems, which 
might be enacted by the Congress, must take into 
consideration the great diversity of employe bene- 
fit programs, the wide variation of conditions un- 
der which these plans have been established and 
the substantial and varying impact on costs which 
such regulations might entail. . . . 




JULY, 1972 



11 




Workers secure the free world's hiruest electric motor at Kaiser Steel's plant in Fontana, Calif. Millnright 
and Machinery Erectors Local 1113 of San Bernardino, Calif., did the installation of this massive unit. 



FREE WORLD S 

LARGEST 

ELECTRIC 

MOTOR 

. . . installed by 
members of 
Local 1113, 

San Bernardino, 
California 



■ Millwrights of Local 1113, San 
Bernardino, Calif., recently installed 
the largest direct current, single 
armature electric motor ever built 
in the Free World. The 10,000 
horsepower motor was installed in 
the Kaiser Steel plant in Fontana. 
Calif. 

The motor was built in one year's 
time by the General Electric Com- 
pany's plant in Schenectady, N.Y., 
and was shipped to California by 
rail. Four railroad flat cars were 
used to carry the \arious compon- 
ents and controls of the motor. The 
unit's rotor alone required mount- 
ing in a steel skid on a special 
widened and underslung fiat car, 



cushioned on 44 shock absorbers. 

After a 28-year-old 7,000 horse- 
power motor had been removed 
from the installation site. Mill- 
wrights extended the existing foun- 
dation and pedestal. Then the com- 
ponent parts of the motor were 
moved to the point of installation. 
Using hand and power rigging, mem- 
bers of Local 1113 leveled, aligned, 
and secured the 243-ton motor 
which is 18 feet in diameter and 
27 feet long. 

The new motor now drives Kaiser 
Steel's 4-Hi plate finishing mill at 
speeds up to 80 revolutions per min- 
ute. The replaced motor, built by 
Continued on Pag^e 31 



THE CARPENTER 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Harold Coleman 
Retires With 
37 Years Service 

Harold A. Coleman, a member of 
Local 125, Utica, N.Y., since 1935, was 
honored with a testimonial dinner on 
April 15. The dinner was held at the 
Twin Ponds Golf and Country Club, 
New York Mills, N.Y. 

Brother Coleman was presented with a 
plaque by General Secretary Richard E. 
Livingston and a scroll by Martin Ber- 
ger, president of the Utica Federation of 
Labor, for his many accomplishments in 
local, state, and international service. 

While serving as recording secretary 
of Local 125 from 1940 to 1971, he 
was president of the Mohawk Valley 
District Council of Carpenters for 16 
years, and he was very active in the 
Utica Federation of Labor for nearly 
all of his career. From 1947 until his 
retirement this year. Brother Coleman 
was Apprentice Training Representative 
to the New York State Department of 
Labor. 

Playboy, Chicago 




A new $2.6 million Playboy Club is 
being created in Chicago, III., and union 
Carpenters are doing the work. 

In the photo above, Playboy Bunny 
Lieko English watched Donald Burley of 
Local 2004 finish off a stair railing for 
the 550-seat club. 

Right: Bunny English climbs a ladder 
to inspect the sculptured doors being 
installed by Dieter Schoenberg of Local 
419 and Walter Amott of Local 80. The 
doors, are made of polished brass, bronze, 
and 14-carat gold sprayed over cast 
aluminum. 




At a testimonial dinner in New York Mills, N.Y., honoring Harold A. Coleman, 
seated far right, General Secretary Richard E. Livingston addresses dinner guests 
before the presentation of the plaque. The main speaker, Patrick J. Campbell, General 
Executive Board, First District, is seated at the left. The Honorable John J. Walsh, 
Oneida County judge and toastmaster for the event, is seated next to Coleman. 

Officers for Los Angeles Local 1976 




The board members and officers of Carpenters Local 1976, Los Angeles, Calif., 
were installed last year. They assembled for this picture. From left, they include: 

George Sims, trustee; Jesse Martinez, trustee; James Simmons, conductor; Randle 
Fairchild, Warden; Albert Wise, president; Alex Bodin, treasurer; Vernon Thompson, 
vice-president; John Headley, recording secretary, and Nathan Fleisher, financial 
secretary. 



Port Council Van 





Les Parker, executive secretary of the 
San Diego, Calif., District Council; Gen. 
Sec. R. E. Livingston; and Peter Mc- 
Gavin, executive secretary of the AFL- 
CIO Maritime Trades, examine a new 
vehicle acquired by the San Diego Port 
Maritime Council. 



JULY, 1972 



13 



People W^ith Ideas . 



COVER 
ADMIRATION 



-.-^afSS'^?^^-^ 





"1 have often admired the front cover of our magazine." writes Kenneth 
G. Rcames, member of Local 266. Stoctvton. Calif. "This time I 
have done something about it." 

Inspired by the cover of last November's Carpenier. Reames did 
an oil painting of the autumn scene which enhances the beauty of the 
original color photograph. 

Rcames first joined Local 1240. Oroville, California, in 1934. He 
hopes that his old friends will see what he is doing now that he 
is retired and jixing in Stockton. 



PAINTING WITH WOOD 

Willy Grawe's latest major work in the art of mar- 
quetry is a 47-by-41-inch depiction of the Sermon on 
the Mount, inspired by a magazine photograph of the 
original painting by a Danish master. Grawe is known 
as a "Danish Master Craftsman" of inlaid wooden 
pictures. 

A member of Millmen's Local 1220, Portland, Oregon, 
Grawe composed the inlaid wood picture by cutting and 
fitting hundreds of pieces of naturally colored wood 
from all over the world. Christ's face, for example, 
was done in rosewood that came from Switzerland, while 
His red robe comes from an African wood. Some of the 
other woods include Swedish birch, swamp oak, ma- 
drone, and koa from Hawaii. 

The picture began four-and-one-half years ago with 
a detailed blueprint of the subject, each piece marked 
for color. "It looked like a paint by numbers picture." 
says Grawe. Then each piece is cut with a knife or 
with the jigsaw he brought from his homeland of Den- 
mark. 

The wood inlaid "Sermon on the Mount" was the 
feature display at the Western Forestry Center in Port- 
land during the Easter season this year. An earlier 



work of Grawe's, a wood portrait of George Wash- 
ington, became the front cover of the February, 1966, 
Cctrpenler. 

Grawe has his studio at his home at 8132 S.E. Bybee 
Street, Portland, Oregon 97206. 




14 



THE CARPENTER 



MINI-COACH 

Kenneth Keith of Local 669, 
Vienna, III., is the maker of this 
reproduced 1884 Concord Stage 
Coach. Keith followed authentic 
blueprints throughout every detail 
of this % scale reproduction, using 
power tools not even dreamed of 
90 years ago. 

Two 40-inch-high "mini-mules" 
are used to pull the stagecoach in a 
fall festival parade. Norman Jones, 
the trainer of the mules, is the 
driver of Keith's stagecoach, and 
"Spot" is riding shotgun. 

Native walnut is found through- 
out the coach, except for the wheels 
which are made of hickory. The 
upholstery, luggage rack, and blinds 
are genuine leather, and most of 
the fittings are brass. 





BASEMENT FLEET 



C. Dick Craig has built and stored a fleet of about 25 ships — in his basement. 

"Building model ships keeps me feeling frisky," says the 80-year-old retired 
member of Local 1062, Santa Barbara, Calif. But instead of assembling a 
model kit sold in stores, Craig starts with a blueprint and makes every single 
part himself. 

His first efi^ort in model shipbuilding came six years ago when he came 
across some plans for model ships in a series of articles in Popular Mechanics 
dating back to 1925. Since then he has completed a number of models from 
the famous "Flying Cloud" to a Civil War paddle steamer. 

A few months ago the Craig fleet was on public display in Santa Barbara's 
Upham Hotel during the hotel's centennial celebration. One of the ships 
on display was Craig's first accomplishment, a model of Henrik Hudson's 
"Half Moon," pictured with Craig. 

After joining Local 701, Fresno, in 1917, Craig transferred to Local 642 in 
Richmond, California. He now lives at 2049 Mountain Avenue in Santa 
Barbara. His son, Howard "Don" Craig, is an active member of Local 1062. 




FROM 
EYESORE 
TO ICON 

What do you do with a 
Majestic red oak tree that 
begins to die? Most people 
would cut the tree into 
firewood, but Augustine 
Patros of Clayton, Wis., a 
member of Local 957, 
Stillwater, Minn., had a 
better idea. 

The tree was standing 
next to Patros' lakeshore 
home on Clear Lake when 
it began to die for some 
unknown reason. Six 
months of painstaking 
work resulted in an inter- 
esting addition to any 
home, a multi-colored 
totem pole with carved 
figures on both sides. 




TURNIP 
KING 

Some members take great pride in catching the biggest fish 
in the pond or bringing back the biggest buck in the forest, 
But L. R. Lord, president of Local 2461, Cleveland, Tenn., takes 
great pride in being the "turnip king" of Bradley County. 

Lord, whose turnip patch is in the Tasso community north 
of Cleveland, grew one turnip weighing 1 1 Vi pounds. 



JULY, 1972 



15 




ANADIAN 



U.S. and Canada Share Multi-National 
Corporation Dilemma, CLC Delegates Told 

Delegates to the 9th Constitutional 
Convention of the Canadian Labor 
Congress had the good fortune to hear 
both sides of the story in the current 
debate going on in the trade union 
movement about trade relations be- 
tween Canada and the United States. 

The convention took place in Ot- 
tawa in mid-May. The two sides were 
effectively presented, first, by Donald 
MacDonald. president. Canadian La- 
bor Congress, in his opening address: 
then by the AFL-CIO fraternal dele- 
gate. Peter Bommarito. 

The labor movement in both coun- 
tries is faced with similar problems, 
the threat of inflation on the one hand 
and high unemployment on the other, 
with governments inclined to put pres- 
sure on wages as a prime anti-inflation 
measure. 

Labor is being made the scapegoat 
for inflationary trends and is. as fra- 
ternal delegate Bommarito told the 
1 ,700 delegates, being blamed for the 
spread of multi-national corporations 
who are exporting production facilities 
and jobs to more "labor-friendly coun- 
tries", meaning countries where wages 
arc lower. 

The problem is very similar on both 
sides of the border. So what is the 
argument about? 

CLC President MacDonald first 
rapped the federal government in 
Canada for being largely responsible 
for the continuing heavy unemploy- 
ment. "Disastrous economic policies," 
he charged. 

Then he turned to Canadian-U.S. 
economic relations. Canada, he said, 
was being confronted with ever-rising 
protectionist trends in the United 
States which could hurt Canada. 

He referred to the Hartke-Burke 
bill before Congress which is being 
backed by U.S. unions. This legisla- 
tion, he said, would impose a restric- 



tive quota on nearly all exports to the 
United States including those from 
Canada. 

He also referred to the U.S. DISC 
program, the Domestic International 
Sales Corporation, which in effect sub- 
sidizes U.S. corporations on their ex- 
port business. 

Since many of these corporations 
also operate in Canada, subsidized ex- 
ports could undercut products made 
by these same corporations in Canada. 

For example. Canadians might be 
able to buy a car in the United States 
at a subsidized price because it was 
to be taken north of the border for use 
in this country. The same car made 
by GM, Ford or Chrysler is already 
more expensive in Canada due to com- 
pany pricing and Canadian taxes. 

That's one side of the story in a 
nutshell. 

Mr. Bommarito took up a good 
part of his speech in dealing with 
the multi-national corporations which, 
through their foreign subsidiaries, 
prosper "while the labor force of our 
two great countries suffers from high 
unemployment." 

Multi-national corporations are the 
fastest-growing institution in Ameri- 
can society, he told the delegates, and 
the third largest productive force in 
the world next to the U.S. and Russia. 

They know no boundaries. They 
don't care where they produce, U.S., 
Canada, Iron Curtain countries or 
South America, as long as they make 
money. Jobs are not important to 
them. Machines are. 

He gave numerous examples of 
how these huge companies have af- 
fected jobs in the United States. One 
example was the shoe industry, where 
250 shoe factories have been shut- 
down and "the equivalent of 1 65,000 
U.S. jobs will have been exported to 
foreign countries". 



The U.S. shoe worker whose aver- 
age age is 52 is laid off. goes on un- 
employment compensation, then on 
public welfare or the charity of friends 
or relatises until he is old enough to 
be entitled to social security. 

The AFL-CIO spokesmen spelled 
it all out \ery well. "Workers lose 
their jobs, the foreign workers work 
for slave wages and the consumer is 
raped." 

"'n Canada." he continued, "we 
find the same story repeated in the 
textile industry, in the electrical in- 
dustry, in auto and steel." 

Defending the position of the trade 
union movement in the United States, 
Mr. Bommarito was aware and con- 
cerned about workers in Canada and 
elsewhere. 

"We believe that no worker's job 
is expendable on the altar of increased 
profits, whether the worker be in the 
United States or in Canada. 

"We beliexe in fair competition as 
far as wages are concerned, but we 
don't want to, nor can we. compete 
with the unrealistic wage level existing 
in Taiwan. Spain and Hong Kong." 

He then told the convention that 
the AFL-CIO has set up a task force. 
He is a member of it. and both as 
AFL-CIO vice-president and president 
of the United Rubherworkers "with 
a healthy and \igorous membership 
here in Canada. I will do everything 
possible to insure that the new trade 
bill will provide fair trade with Can- 
ada." 

That was good communication. 
More of it is needed. Mr. Bommarito's 
speech and the Canadian position 
should be published side by side. 

Intelligent dialogue can lead to 
better understanding. 

Business Handouts 
In Federal Budget 

The federal budget for the current 
fiscal year was introduced into the 
House of Commons in May. It did 
what Canadian governments have been 
doing for many years. It gave more 
handouts to big business. 

The Trudeau government, through 
its new finance minister. Montrealer 
John Turner, is distributing a total of 
$850 million in two ways: $500 mil- 
lion is going to the manufacturing and 
processing industries in tax write-offs 
and cuts: $350 million is going to old 
age pensioners and disadvantaged per- 
sons. 

As Turner explained it. the "bo- 
nanza for big business" as the Toronto 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



Star called it, is supposed to provide 
jobs. But there is absolutely no assur- 
ance that the money will be used in 
that way and not put into the pockets 
of stockholders. 

And why should a multi-national 
corporation like General Motors get 
a windfall of perhaps $15 million 
from the Canadian government? 

What the budget has done is shift 
more of the tax load from corpora- 
tions to individuals. As the corpora- 
tion tax is reduced, the personal in- 
come tax will go up, by 3% Jan. 1, 
1973. The company tax break was 
made effective immediately. 

About 20 years ago the govern- 
ment took about the same percentage 
of taxes from the corporate sector and 
from individual tax payers. Now per- 
sonal income tax accounts for about 
four times as much as corporate taxes. 

As for pensioners, they get little. 
Most of them will get only $2.88 more 
per month on top of the basic pension 
of $80. This is to make up for the 
increase in cost of living to the end of 
1971. 

Pensioners with little or no other 
income, do better. The single person 
will get $1 50 a month, up $1 5; married 
pensioners, both over age 65, will get 
$285 a month. 

From now on living cost adjust- 
ments will be made every April. 

One serious fault in the plan is that 
a married couple with only one per- 
son over 65 will get only a single 
pension of $150 (if they are virtually 
destitute). 

Another is that the pensionable age 
has not been reduced to 60. With 
heavy unemployment continuing, a 
demand is growing for a lower pen- 
sionable age. 

U.S.-Canadian Forces 
Fastest Growing 

The new federal minister of labor 
Martin O'Connell told an industrial 
relations conference that between 1 967 
and 1980, Canada's population will 
have grown about 3 million. 

This will mean a growth in the labor 
force of close to 50% so that 250,000 
new jobs have to be found every year. 

In comparison, the labor force in 
the United States is expected to in- 
crease by 29.5% in the same period; 
Britain by only 4%, France by 13.5%, 
Germany 5.5%, Italy 1.7% and 
Sweden just 0.3%. 

The fact that the labor force in 
Canada and in the United States will 

JULY, 1972 



grow faster than in other countries 
will make the problem more difficult 
on this side of the water. 

An additional factor to take into 
account is the increasing number of 
women entering the labor force. 

Job Security 

Is Now Key Issue 

Labor Minister O'Connell also told 
his listeners, most of them experts in 
industrial relations, that unemploy- 
ment is making job security a major 
issue at the bargaining table. 

Union leadership is under pressure 
to include "no-layoffs" and other 
schemes for job protection in their 
demands. 

This has led to more conflict in 
some areas where technological change 
is rapid as in telecommunications. 

Technological change, said O'Con- 
nell, may be good for the nation, but 
it can be pretty shattering for indi- 
viduals who lose their jobs. 

So the cost of technological change 
must be borne, not by the individual, 
but by those who stand to benefit 
most. 

CLC Calls For 
Higher Wage Base 

The Canadian Labor Congress con- 
vention adopted a resolution which 
urged its affiliates to exert pressure on 
governments for a $2.50 minimum 
wage with an escalator clause. 

The federal minimum wage is now 
$1.75 an hour. Most workers are cov- 
ered by provincial minimum wage 
legislation which varies between $1.50 
and $1.75 an hour. 

Conservative Hits 
Federal Housing 

It was most unusual for a Con- 
servative member of parliament, but 
one of them, Robert McCleave, of 
Halifax, condemned federal housing 
policies on one ground: he said the 
average purchaser of a $30,000 home 
in Canada will have paid a total of 
$103,000 for his home by the time it 
is paid off. 

Naturally as a Conservative what 
he didn't say was this high cost is due 
to the exorbitant rates of interest now 
being charged on mortgages. They've 
come down from 10% to about 9%, 
but latest news is that the first mort- 
gage rate is going back up — to 10%. 



17 




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. . . those members of our Brotlierhood who. in recent weeks, h;i\e been n^imed 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other wu\s. "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 




CEREBRAL PALSY TELETHON— Ralph Cunnizzaro. president of the Westchester Count), 
N.V., District Council, standing second from left, joins hands with members of the 
joint labor-management committee which raised $57,000 for the United Cerebral 
Palsy Association of Westchester County, N.Y.. at CP"s 21st annual telethon iji Janu- 
ary. Cannizzaro organized the support of Westchester County's local unions, result- 
ing in a substantial contribution to the fight against cerebral palsy. Members of the 
district council were commended for their help at the telethon center, working around 
the clock for nearly 30 hours. 



Two General Office 
Staff Appointments 




Danielson 



Loope 



Two start changes were announced 
last month at the General Offices in 
Washington. D.C. 

Don Danielson. director of research 
for the Brotherhood since 1954. has 
been named assistant to the General 
President. 

Nicholas Loope. secretary of the 
International Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee and. for 22' 2 years, direc- 
tor of the joint apprenticeship and 
training program for the District of 
Columbia and nearby Maryland and 
Virginia, has been named to succeed 
Danielson as director of research. 

Danielson was apprenticed to Local 
12.'^2. St. Paul. Minn., in 1942 and 
has been a member of Local 87. St. 
Paul, since 19.'i4. He graduated from 
the University of Minnesota School of 
Industrial Relations in I9.'51 and joined 
the Brotherhood General Offices at 
Indianapolis. Ind., in 19.54. 

Loope has been a member of Local 
1590. Washington. D.C. for more 
than .^0 \ears. A native of Pennsyl- 
vania, he came to the area of the na- 
tion's capital during World War II, 
later became recording secretary of 
Local 1590. He has held many public 
and union posts, including serving as 
director of youth employment pro- 
grams for the Nalioruil Institute of 
Labor Lilucation. 



$5,000 HISTORICAL GRANT— Alvin Mc- 

Curdy. president of Local 494. Windsor. 
Ontario, is recipient of a $5,000 grant 
from the Canada Council to continue his 
research into Canadian Negro history. 
McCurdy is presently cataloguing a scries 
of biographies of outstanding Canadian 
Negroes for the provincial department of 
education. 

The grant will enable McCurdy. 55. 
to continue an interest in Negro history 
that he developed when he was a school- 
boy in Amhcrslburg, Ontario. In recent 
years he has concentrated on biographical 
material. He intended to continue his 
Negro biographies with or without the 
Canada council grant for his independent 
research. 



3 of 4 Workplaces Fail 
Safety-Health Inspections 



Three of every four workplaces in- 
spected during the 10 months ended 
April 30 were found in violation of 
the Occupational Safety & Health Act. 

Only 5.791 of the 23.662 employers 
inspected were in compliance with 
federal job safely and health standards, 
the Occupational Safely t<: Health Ad- 
ministration reported. 

Federal inspectors attribulcil 75.S64 



violations in government safety stand- 
ards to IS. 449 employers. Fines pro- 
posed by the enforcement agency — 
subject to appeal by employers — total 
$1.7 million. 

The 2.3.662 workplaces that were 
inspected during the period employ 
4.6 million workers. The federal job 
safety act has jurisdiction over more 
than 4.1 million employers covering 
more than 57 million workers. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




St. Louis Apprentice 
Wins State Contest 

Ronald Bruder, 22, won the statewide 
competition for carpenter apprentices at 
the recent Missouri State Council of Car- 
penters Meeting. Bruder is a member of 
Local 1739, St. Louis. 

The state contest was sponsored by 
the United Brotherhood, the AFL-CIO, 
Associated General Contractors, and the 
National Association of Home Builders. 
A four-member panel of carpenters and 
contractors decided unanimously on Bru- 
der's win. 

Competition for the fourth-year ap- 
prentices lasted a day and a half. The 
first day was spent in building a small 
house from blueprints. A four-hour writ- 
ten examination was held the next day. 

Bruder works for the Emmendorfer 
Construction Co. in St. Louis. He is now 
entitled to represent the State of Mis- 
souri in the International apprenticeship 
competition in August. . 



Safety Trainees in Somerville, NJ, 




r..MI ^imsm^ j 

Top Missouri carpenter apprentice Ron- 
ald Bruder accepts a savings bond and 
the riglit to represent Missouri at the 
international competition from Sixth Dis- 
trict Representative Frederick Bull. Also 
pictured are Gus Utoff, left, Ron's ap- 
prenticeship instructor, and OUie Lang- 
horst, right, chief executive officer of the 
St. Louis District Council. 

One Contest to Go 

The state apprenticeship contests are 
almost over. The Connecticut contest, 
July 28, is the only one scheduled this 
month. The International contest is next 
month in Las Vegas, Nev. 




These members of Local 455, Somerville, N. J., are among the first graduates of the 
new 10-hour safety course sponsored by the Federal Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration (OSHA). Left to right, front row: J. Simmons, G. Clarke, C. Dressier, 
Instructor G. Sesamon, Business Agent S. Barratt, S. Susho, and B. Vredand. Second 
row: B. Gannone, E. Coddington, F. Sarrin, H. Loansburry, P. DiBiase, A. Scott, S. 
Paduch, and E. Gransky. Back row: J. Herasymuch, E. Widasny, J. Kurylo, G. Ernst, 
F. Ryan, and R. Heruel. 

Recent Graduates in Madison County^ III 




At graduation ceremonies on April 28, these 13 apprentices from the Carpenters' 
District Council of Madison County and Vicinity, 111., received certificates of comple- 
tion. Left to right, seated: R. Mike Mayes, Local 633; James Doolin, Local 633; 
William Wise, Local 633; John Hawley, Local 990; Paul Bohnenstiehl, Local 295; 
David Brandt, Local 378. Standing: Dennis Lucido, Local 633; Duane Hamann. 
Local 1267; David Rezabek, Local 1267; Roger Jones, Local 377; Steven Kochan, 
Local 1808; Kerry Cavanaugh, Local 633; Gary Wright, Local 295; Program Coor- 
dinator E. L. Rule. 



JULY, 1972 



19 




kneeling, left to right, Ralph Caruso, coordinator. Millwrights Joijit Apprentice Committee, Local 1102; John S. Boyce, car- 
penter field judge, financial secretary of Carpenters Local 1373, Flint; David Spencer, carpenter. Local 1373, Flint; Thomas Berg, 
carpenter. Local 335, Grand Rapids; Robert Micklatcher, carpenter. Local 871, Battle Creeks; Randolph Bloomfield, carpenter. 
Local 1654, Midland; Thomas Valentine, carpenter, Local 998, Royal Oak (third place winner); Glen Arndt, carpenter field 
judge. Ellis Arndt & Trucsdell, architects of Flint (Architect). 

Standing, left to right, Raymond Cooks, chief coordinating judge, coordinator, Detroit Carpentry Joint Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee; Kenneth Block, carpenter. Local 334. Saginaw; Brian Boyko. carpenter. Local 100, Muskegon; Tyler Jenkins, assistant 
coordinating judge, Tyler Jenkins Construction Co. of Flint (Employer); Randal Book, carpenter. Local 998. Royal Oak (first 
place winner); Keith Clinton, assistant coordinating judge, secretary, Southwest District Council (Labor); Bernard Kelley. car- 
penter. Local 898. St. Joseph; Ralph Teeples. carpenter. Local 512, Ann Arbor; Michael Hubble, millwright. Local 1102, Detroit 
(third place winner); Daniel Connell>, millwright. Local 1102. Detroit (second place winner); Robert LaRo>. carpenter Local 297, 
Kalamazoo; Lairy Varga, millwright, Local 1102, Detroit (first place winner); James Mort, carpenter. Local 1433. Detroit; Randy 
Merrill, carpenter, Local 998, Royal Oak (second place winner); Earl Meyer, secretary, Michigan Carpentry Apprenticeship 
Contest Committee and secretary-treasurer. Michigan State Carpenters' Council; and Pete Stuki, carpenter field judge, president, 
Erickson & Lindstrom Co. of Flint (Employer). 

Michigan Contest Features 16 Hard-Working Apprentices 



The Seventh Annual Michigan Car- 
pentry Apprenticeship Conte^t was held 
in Flint. Nlich.. on May 22 and 23. 

The written portion for both carpenter 
and millwright was held May 22 at the 
Howard Johnson Motor Lodge, and the 
manipulative portion for both carpenter 
and millwright was held on May 23 at 



the Eastland Mall. There w ere 1 3 car- 
penter contestants and three millwright 
contestants. 

An awards banquet was held on the 
evening of May 23 at the Masonic Tem- 
ple, where each apprentice received a 
certilicate of participation and a trophy. 
In addition, the first, second and third 



place winners received $100. $75 and 
S50 respectively for both carpenters and 
millwrights. The Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee sponsoring the winning car- 
penter contestant was presented the 
George Burger Traveling Trophy to keep 
in its possession until the 1973 contest. 



The George Burger Traveling Trophy, which was designed 
and constructed by Ralph Wood of Carpenters, Local 982, is 
presented to the joint apprenticeship committee sponsoring 
Michigan's winning carpenter apprentice. 

Left to right in the picture are; Earl Meyer, secretary. Michi- 
gan Carpentry Apprenticeship Contest Committee and secre- 
tarj -treasurer, Michigan State Carpenters' Council; Raymond 
Fair, business representative. Local 998, Royal Oak, Chairman 
of the Detroit JAC; Thomas N'alentine, carpenter contestant 
from Local 998, third place winner; Randal Book, carpenter 
contestant from Local 998, first place winner; Randy Merrill, 
carpenter contestant from Local 998, second place winner; 
Grady Pinner, business representative. Local 998; and Hal 
Bell, chairman, Michigan Carpentrj Apprenticeship Contest 
Committee and assistant executive secretary of the Associated 
General Contractors, Michigan Chapter. 




20 



THE CARPENTER 



From Job Corpsman 
To Journeyman 

BY WILDA HAYNES 

■ On March 17, 1971, Paul Jon 
Lundberg of Lehigh, Iowa, arrived at 
Pine Ridge Civil Conservation Center, 
Chadron. Neb., as an enroUee in the 
Job Corps Training program. Today 
he is serving an apprenticeship with 
Dilly Construction Company of Rapid 
City. S.D. He is presently working on 
the Hot Springs Housing Project. 

Upon completion of the orientation 
program at the center, Lundberg chose 
carpentry as his vocation and entered 
a pre-apprenticeship training program 
of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. During his Job 
Corps training at Pine Ridge he also 
received his high school diploma in addi- 
tion to his vocational training. The cur- 
riculum inckided almost all of the basic 
skills of the trade, plus actual on-the-job 
training. He worked on a building for the 
U. S. Forest Service "from the ground 
up." 

Lundberg scored 106.98 in the appren- 
ticeship qualifying test, the highest score 
to date at Pine Ridge. At the time of his 
placement. November 17, 1971, he had a 
total of 854 training hours. 

In visiting Lundberg at his new appren- 
tice-training job, we found him happy in 
his work and enthusiastic about working 
with Dale Banck, journeyman from 
Rapid City. 

Jon attributes his success thus far to the 
services available through the Job Corps 
Program and the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. He 
feels young men between the ages of 16- 
21 who are unemployed and lacking a 
skill should look into the possibility of 
Job Corps enlistment, with "an eye to the 
union carpentry program." 

Last December, Jon married a young 
woman of Chadron, the former Peggy 
Hoist. They now live in Rapid City, and 
Jon is a member of Local 2027, Rapid 
City, S.D. ■ 






Pine Ridge carpentrj trainees receive on- 
the-job training worthing on the district 
ranger's building at the Chadron Worl< 
Center, by such erection worlt as the 
above. 



Herb Tool, supervisor; left, and Dale 
Bancli, journeyman, right, working witli 
Lundberg on the Hot Springs job. 



Bremerton Graduates Apprentice Class 




New journeymen for Local 1597, Bremerton, Wash.: Front Row, left to right: 
Dennis E. Richardson, Robert A. Medrano, Franli R. Bruns, J. Alan ^Vhitworth. 
Back row: Lyle Hiller, 7th District, Donald L. Warner and Thomas M. Erickson, 
apprentice instructors; Michael J. Mclntyre, R. Neil Berger, Stuart M. Eldridge and 
Pete Hager, 7th District. 

First Graduates of Mattoon, Illinois, JAC 




Paul Jon Lundberg at work on a Hot 
Springs, S.D., housing project for his new 
employer in South Dakota. 



Carpenters' Local 347, Mattoon, 111., graduated its first class of apprentices on May 3L 
The apprentices are: seated, left to right, Forrest Hirsch, Rex Evans, Norman Gabel, 
Kenneth Gank, Orville Fetters, and Paul Batson. Not pictured: David Perry. Standing, 
left to right, Joe Gilliam, International Representative; Bill Level, apprentice instruc- 
tor; Verlan McWilliams, secretary-treasurer, JAC; Jack Wilt, chairman, JAC; Jack 
Hughes, BAT field representative; Bill Anderson, JAC; L. V. Foreman, JAC Coordi- 
nator. Not pictured: Lennox Crooks and R. M. Roberts, JAC board members. 



JULY, 1972 



21 



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DICTIONARY 



This is the Mfh of a new ieature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to collective bargaining^ 
union contracts, and union business. Follow it closely, and your union 
membership will become more meaningful, and your ability to partici- 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength- 
ened. It was compiled by the International Labor Press Assn, and is 
used with permission. 



K 



kick-back: The racketeering practice of forcing employees, as a 
condition of employment, to return a part of wages established 
by law or by union contract to the employer. Outlawed in fed- 
erally-financed employment. 

Knights of Labor: A 19th century labor organization. 



labor grades: Job or job groups in rate structure, set usually through 
job classification and evaluation, or by agreement with union. 

Labor-Management Relations Act of 1947: Formal name of Taft- 
Hartley Act. 

labor monopoly: The claim that some unions, by dominance in an 
industry, or through control of hiring, or control of apprentice- 
ship or other practices, have monopoly power over the supply of 
labor. 

labor skate: A semi-humorous name for a full-time union employee. 

lockout: A phase of a labor dispute in which management refuses 
work to employees or closes its plant, in order to force a settle- 
ment. 

leadman: An employee whose job involves some supervision, plan- 
ning and organization of tasks and materials performed by a 
group. A leadman usually gets added pay. 

leave of ab.sence: Under contract conditions, time off without loss 
of seniority, and right to reinstatement. 

loyal worker: A term used by an employer for a worker who refuses 
to join fellow employees in an organizing drive, or votes against 
the union in a representation election, or refuses to take part in 
a strike. 

legislative representative: A lobbyist. 

M 

maintenance-of-membersbip: A contract provision requiring union 
members to retain good-standing membership during the life of 
the contract, as a condition of employment. 

make whole: As used in an arbitration award or government agency 
ruling reinstating a discharged employee, an order to the employer 
to pay the worker all wages lost dating from date of firing, minus 
what he may have earned elsewhere meanwhile. 

master agreement: A contract covering a number of companies and 
one or more unions, or an agreement covering several plants of 
a single employer. This is often supplemented by local contracts 
covering conditions that vary among the individual plants or com- 
panies. (.See multi-employer bargaining.) 



22 



THE CARPENTER 




(1) LAKE WORTH, FLA.— Local No. 
1308 honored its longtime members with 
a special dinner recently. Wilfred Carl- 
son, with 60 years membership, was un- 
able to attend. Those attending included: 

Front row, left to riglit, Fleetwood 
James, Charles Chaney, Joe Bogovich, 
Jos. Chrzanowski, "Pete" Fritz, J. K. 
Norris, Fred Lisle, James H. Wise, and 
Cyril Grammes, all with 25 years mem- 
bership. 

Second row, J. E. Sheppard, Brother- 
hood Representative; H. L. Lovetf, Jr., 
Win. Stephens, Robert Webb, Arnold 
I'erry, John Lehto, Lauri Linden, all 25 
years, and Art Hallgren, vice president, 
Florida AFL-CIO. 

Third row, Fred Dickeson, 50 years, 
Oiva Matson, 25 years, Herbert Schuette, 
local president; Alex Wilson, 25 years; 
Kenneth H. Moye, local business rep- 
resentative; Warren Conary, Fla. State 
organizer; Wm. Senior, Walfred Milli- 
niaki, and Jack Turley, all 25 years. 

(2) PROVO, UTAH — Local 1498 re- 
cently presented 34 pins to members in 
good standing for 25 and 30 years. A 
light luncheon was served to them and 
their wives. There were 24 members eli- 
gible for 25-year pins and 57 members 
eligible for the 30-year pins. 

Pins were presented by President How- 
ard Pace and hy Harold S. Lassen, finan- 



SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




A gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently 
received 25-year or 50-year 
rvice pins. 



cial secretary. Those members in the pic- 
ture are: 

Front Row, left to right: Jack Miller, 
E. H. Rasmussen. Don Loveridge, Wm. E. 
Drage, Harry Chittock, David Roberts, 
Archie Banner, A. O. Bartholomew, W. J. 
Ellsworth, T. C. Atkinson, J. Wm. Chris- 
tensen, R. W. (Rudy) Clark, Cliff Carson, 
J. J. Cathey, Dean Bethers and Spencer 
Madsen. 



Back Row, left to right: Harold S. Las- 
sen, B.R.&F.S.; J. D. Pyne, Rulon West- 
ern, Walter Willis, Henry Dockstader, 
John I. Evans, Aldred J. Jones, Angus 
Mortsen. Howard Pace. Pres. Blake 
Reynolds. D. C. Brimhall, A. B. Olsen, 
Wm. L. Rigby, Paul Luster. Ray Taylor, 
Hugh Sellers, George Knuteson, A. M. 
Thacker and Clarence Zobell. 

Those members eligible for the IS-jear 
pins who were not present included: 
Burton Alder, Joseph Bingham, Clar- 
ence Bliss, Basil Brimhall, Darwin Chris- 
tensen, Clyde Craven, Jean Daley, John 
V. Diamond, Harold H. Dodge, George 
Hansen, Victor Jackson, John T. Lazen- 
by, Lloyd Lott, Stanley Ness, Jerry 
Reece, Arthur Trissell, Frank Passarelia, 
and Walter Zobell. 

Those members eligible for the 30-year 
pins but not shown in the picture were: 

G. Spencer Barnett, A. W. Bojack, 
Mark Brown, Wm. Glen Clark, W. Clark 
Collings, Don Curtis, Keith Foote, Mark 
Foote, Reed Gammon, Lou Hansen, W. 
B. Haws, George Higgins. Orvelle Jack- 
son, C. M. Kerby, Cree Kolford, Don 
Loveridge, Alfred Lupus, Cliff Jolley, A. 
J. Jones, Charles Mason, Frost Mitchell, 
Urcel K. Moulton, Parley Ney, Clarence 
Nielsen, Marion Roundy, Ted Spencer, 
Clawson Taylor, Harold Williams, Wayne 
Williams, Thomas Worley, and Walter 
Wyler. 




JULY, 1972 



23 




Lawrence W. Heiden, Robert S. Howie, 
Victor Cardella. 

Rear, from left, John A. DiNardo, Or- 
rln A. Mason, Eugene R. Goodman, Wil- 
liam Fleisher, Frederick O. Kremer, The- 
odore Jeft'ries, Robart S. Lucas, John 
Lutz. Henry C. kassel. 

(2) MOOSE JAW, SASK. (No picture) 
— Twenty-five year membership pins 
were presented to Carl Gessel, Alvin 
Hewitt, and Harold Shaw at a social 
evening held in the union center in 
Moose Jaw recently. 



(1) ROCHESTER, N.Y.— Local 72 pre- 
sented 25-year pins to 117 members re- 
cently. Those honored in the big cere- 
mony are shown in the accompanying 
photographs. 

(1-A) Front row, from left, Donald 
MacAnn, Tburman Lee Moxley, Peter 
Pillarocia, William Kremer, Joseph Kuso- 
vich, William A. Morris, Frank DeCarlo. 
Rear, from left, Peter Onofryk, Alfred 
E. Sleep, George Noeth, Alexander Ma- 
tula, James Manfredi, Frank Levich, 
Richard Lippold and Joseph Requa. 

(1-B) Front row, from left, Angelo 
Montalbano, Christopher Scaizo, Joseph 
Vaccaro. Charles Scorcese, Joseph San- 
FiMppo, George Rendsland, Arthur New- 
bert, Daniel Vaillancourt. 

Rear, from left, Louis Uttaro, Donald 
Withington, John Creary, Arthur S. Reid, 
Local Union No. 72 President Joseph 
Catalfano, Anthony Mazza, Dante Seconi, 
Edward Stira, John A. Strapp, Hooken 
Thoresen, Art Wiler. 

(1-C) Front row, from left, Walter F. 
DeLorme, John J. Dabrody, Stephen 
Evancho, Angelo F. Coppini, William R. 
Guthiel, Carl A. Johnson, Ubald Legault. 
Rear, from left, David Gerhardt, Harry 
Cranmer, Fletcher McTaggart, Frederick 



A. Jay, Sebastian J. Lippa, Gerald J. Hu- 
berth, Bernard G. Kipput, James V. Lom- 
bardo. 

(1-D) Front row, from left, Samuel 
Divito, Samuel Domenica, Larry Bella, 
Paul Ange, Anthony S. Greco, Michael 
Battle, Robert Englert. 

Rear, from left, Arthur DiSanto, Hen- 
ry Balch, Edward Frohm, Walter Hol- 
man, Howard Crane, Richard DiPalma, 
Salvatore T. DiRose, Donald DiLorenzi. 

(1-E) Front row, from left, Gaetano 
Manfriedi, George C. Mastrodonato, 
Francis J. Carrick, Walter Kusmider, 



lA 



NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS: 

When sciiiiin;^' pictures and cap- 
tions for the "Service to the Broth- 
erhood" pages of The Carpenter, 
please list the names and/or titles 
from left to right, beginning with 
the front row and going to the 
rear. Please check spelling care- 
fully and write legibly. 





24 



THE CARPENTER 





^ 


1 




1 

i 


fcis^^^t^ -^!:->**^^>'5!Pi 





CLIC Contributions 






NEBRASKA 






As of June 19. 1972 




1055 


Lincoln 


64.00 




ARIZONA 






NEW HAMPSHIRE 




906 


Glendale 


33.00 


625 


Manchester 


40,00 








2276 


Berlin 


20.00 




CALIFORNIA 










1205 


Indio 


20.00 




NEW MEXICO 




1490 


San Diego 


21.00 


1319 


Albuquerque 


127.00 


2046 


Martinez 


3.00 




NEW YORK 






DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 




20 


New York 


200.00 


132 


Washington 


10.00 


163 


Peekskill 


80.00 


1590 


Washington 


183.00 


231 


Rochester 


20.00 








412 


Sayville 


60.00 




FLORIDA 




453 


Auburn 


40.00 


2376 


Sanford 


209.00 


747 


Oswego 


60.00 








1577 


Buffalo 


40.00 




ILLINOIS 




1649 


Woodhaven 


100.00 


58 


Chicago 


500.00 


2287 


New York 


60.00 


242 


Chicago 

INDIANA 


20.00 


3211 


Herkimer 

OHIO 


40.00 


232 


Fort Wayne 


45.00 


200 


Columbus 


187.40 


1858 


Lowell 


20.00 


650 


Pomeroy 


50.00 








1359 


Toledo 


20.00 




KENTUCKY 










64 


Louisville 


10.00 




OKLAHOMA 










763 


Enid 


10.00 




MASSACHUSETTS 




943 


Tulsa 


60.00 


32 


Springfield 


24.00 








49 


Lowell 


39.50 




OREGON 










1157 


Lebanon 


31.00 




MICHIGAN 




2701 


Lakeview 


29.00 


334 


Saginaw 


40.00 




PENNSYLVANIA 






MINNESOTA 




287 


Harrisburg 


1193.00 


766 


Albert Lea 


34.00 


333 


New Kensington 


40.00 








838 


Sunbury 


105.00 




MONTANA 




1050 


Philadelphia 


268.00 


1172 


Billings 


10.00 




TENNESSEE 










345 


Memphis 


10.00 



TEX.\S 




Local 483 of San Francisco is one of 
many local unions which have contributed 
more than 100% to CLIC during the past 
year. Russ Pool receives a special plaque 
from CLIC Director Nichols in recogni- 
tion of this work. 



2190 


Harlingen 

UTAH 


21.00 


1498 


Provo 

WASHINGTON 


25.00 


98 


Spokane 


85.00 


338 


Seattle 


14.00 


1289 


Seattle 

WISCONSIN 


52.00 


2334 


Baraboo 

WYOMING 


11.00 


469 


Cheyenne 


29.00 


Lament of a Carpenter's 


Wife 


Whei 


trousers need wending 




Why 


must it he, 




They 


always need mending 




n.qht 


at lite knee? 






— Mrs. Norman Dcshaies 




.^ Lake Worth, Fla. 





cA Quide 

to cigarette 

cAds, 

read the small print! 




The big print shouts about 
tobacco taste and pleasure; the 
small print gets to the nitty 
gritty: how much tar and nico- 
tine each cigarette contains. 
Protect yourself: smoke low 
tar-and nicotine brands; bet- 
ter yet, don't smoke at all. 

american cancer society 



Estwing 




SAFETY 
GOGGLES 



For Safety Sake— Always Wear 
Estwing Safety Goggles when using 
hand tools. Protect your eyes from 
splinters, fragments, dust, chips, 
etc. 

• Soft, comfortable vinyl frame 

• Fit contour of all faces • Gen- 
erous ventilation • Fog and dust 
proof • Go on over glasses • 



Lightweight. 



Onh}^ 



l^ Clear Lens 

l^ Green Lens •?/• ^3 
\^ Amber Lens 

Individually Boxed 



Estwing_ 

Rockford, III. 61101 



Mfg. Co. 

2647— 8th 
Depf. C-7 



JULY, 1972 



25 




SERVICE TO THE 
BROTHERHOOD 




gallery of pictures showing 
some of the senior members of 
the Brotherhood who recently i 
received 25-year or 50-year 
.service pins. 



(1) WATSONVILLE. CALIF.— At a 
banquet held at the Watsonville Elks 
Club on March 24, 27 members of Car- 
penter's Local 771 representijig 711 years 
of continuous membership in the L'nited 
Brotherhood of Carpenters were honored 
with 25 and 30-year pins. 

Front row, from left, Frank Schlitter, 
Lee Roy Gotcher, Jr., Fowler Belcher, 
Robert Miller, (kneeling) Normand Par- 
ker, (seated) William Newton, Vince Win- 
chester, Anthony Ramos, and H. M. 
Cornell, business representative, making 
the presentations. 

Standing, left to right, in the back row: 
Dale Reich, Clyde McGinnis, James 
Bradley, Martin Brown, Val Panzicb, 
Ross Weatherbie, Alfred Beck, Albert 
Patterson, Clifford McNamara. 

Other members receiving pins who 
were not present for health or other rea- 
sons include: Tage Christensen, Elgin 
Eaker, Darrell Hannon, C. A. Pace, 
Luther Rogers, Robert Sheetz, John 
Szabo, Douglas Franusich, Eugene K. 
Anderson, and Karl Kerber. 



(2) HARRISBURG, PA.— Robert H. 
Getz, president of Carpenters Local 287, 
presented pins at its May 22 meeting. 

Shown, left to right, front row: Charles 
M. Hain, William E. Swearingen, Paul O. 
Carbaugh, Walter Brcininger, Amos M. 
Decker, Louis K. Shaffer, Albert Atkins, 
William L. Henderson, Isaac H. Metzler. 

Second row: Merle Bower, Robert D. 
Gerbcr, Marino Taraschi, Sylvan J. An- 
derson, John Ebert, Clarence F. Morton, 
Harry B. Shuller, John J. Lahr, V'erling 
Brigtitbill, Miles G. Briner. 

Third row: Robert H. Getz, Leon E. 
Mattern, Woodrow W. McCullough, 
Henry H. Miller, Max K. Kitzmiller, 
John H. Hoffman, John R. Henderson, 
Sr., Roy E. Noss, Grant Ort. 

Fourth row: Arthur E. Whitehaus, 
Maurice E. Peck, Sr., George W. Snyder, 
Pasquale J. Bracale, Gervis F. Sponseller, 
Robert D, Zimmerman, William D. 
White, Richard V. Sponseller, Randall R. 
Bickel, Joseph H. Via and John E. Nell. 

Not present for the picture: George 
S. Moore, Ralph Richwine, John A. 
Swamer and Charles L Williams. 




THE CARPENTER 




(1) roAHO FALLS, IDAHO— Carpen- 
ters' Local 609 celebrated its 62nd an- 
niversary on March 17. It held a mem- 
bership banquet in honor of this 
occasion. Present at the banquet was 
Paul Rudd of Tacoma, Wash., Interna- 
tional Representative. 

Lloyd Burnside, president of Local 
609, presided as master of ceremonies. 
Glen Hook, past business representative, 
entertained with a history of Local 609, 
which was chartered in 1910. Rudd took 
part in the program by presenting the 
25-year pins to the following members: 

Front row, left to right: Berkley Bar- 
nett. Recording Secretary, LaSell Crook, 
Vice President, Paul Rudd, International 
Representative, Leorin Crook, Journey- 
man Carpenter Retired. Back row left to 
right: Frank Butler, carpenter foreman, 
Cleston Taylor, apprenticeship Co-ordl- 
nator, Willard Fager, journeyman car- 
penter, Lester Martin, journeyman car- 
penter. 

(2) LITCHFIELD, ILL.— On April 5, 
at its regular meeting. Local 725 pre- 
sented a 65-year membership pin to J. O. 
Rouland. Brother Rouland joined Local 
204 at Cofteen, III., on March 16, 1907. 
Now a member of Local 725, he is still 
quite active and attends union meetings 
more regularly than do many younger 
members. He will be 95 years old next 
October. 

Pictured from left to right are: Gene 
Eskew, business representative, present- 
ing the pin; Rouland; Carl Leetham, 
president. In the back row are members 
of the executive board, W. F. Nelson, 
Earl Hagerman, Roy Logsdon, John 
White, Howard Ogden, Dick Hantla, Lee 
Koonce, and Chalmer Pierce. 

(3) TAMPA, FLA.— Millwright mem- 
bers of Local 1510 received 25 and 50- 
year pins a few months ago. Paul A. 
Long, business agent of Gulf Coast Dis- 
trict Council, of Carpenters, made the 
presentations. Pictured from left: Carl 
Denis, business agent; Gene Turner, 
business agent; Noah Dixon, 25-years; 
Stanley Hart, 25-year; John Bryant, 
25-year; Bert Stonecipher, 50-years; and 
William Simons, president of Local 1510, 
25-years. 




(4) ROCK ISLAND, ILL.— Carpenters 
Local 166 honored 16, 25-year members 
and one 50-year member at a smoker 
January 21. Those participating in the 
ceremonies are shovin in the accompany- 
ing photograph. First row, from left, are 
Local President and Business Represen- 
tative Charles A. Dunlop; Herbert Oscar- 
sou, the 50-year member; and General 



Representative Rudy Perisich. In the sec- 
ond row, from left, are James Kapeta- 
nakis, William Yokas, Samuel Jacobs, 
and Richard Ling. The third row in- 
cludes John Bolwar, Richard Hoskins, 
James Kramer, and Harold Ellison. 
Those in the last two rows are all 25- 
year members. Eight others received pins 
but were unable to attend the ceremonies. 



JULY, 1972 



27 



r ■ 



nHPHHI ' ' f'f ilffi 




(1) CHARLEROI. PA. At its 70th An- 
niversary Banquet Local 1044 presented 
tiie following 25 and 50-year member- 
ship pins: 

First row, left to right, are: Eugene 
Solomon, B. R., Henry Degrazio, 
Leonard Nevela, Edward Dopier, R. E. 
Gregg, Michael Partzema, Arthur Do- 
nati, Charles Grago, Andrew Hanas. and 
John Notcha. 

Second row: Andy Sevec, John F. 
Brown, Daniel Kovacs, David Summers, 
Carl Juran, Roy Smock, Arthur Krepps, 
Joseph McCallister, Milan Veres. Joseph 
Dubrovich, Edward Comet. Thomas 
Mitchel, Richard Selby and Charles 
Miller. 

Third Row: Bert Kovacs. William 
Binns, Sr., Harry Swerington, Wilber 
Blum. Robert Neth, John H. Barringer. 
and Milo Careatti. Not present for pic- 
ture with 25 years membership were: 
Robert Blasko. Glenn Baldwin. Paul 
Chenger, George Coflield, Earl Davis, 
Harry Heath, Albert Kendall. Gould 
Linaberg. Paul McMurray. Jack Mood, 
Anson Murphy. Voyle Patterson, John 
Phillips, Jr., Fred Shallenberger, Fred 
Shearer, Louis Wetzel and John Tokar. 

The 50-year members honored but not 
present were Walter Rockwell and John 
E. Ross. Also honored were two past 
recording secretaries, Edward Dopier and 
Theodore Hojo. 

(2) LOS ANGELES, CALIF.— At the 
time of the installation of officers, last 
year. Local 1976 presented pins to its 
veteran members of 25 years and more 




service. Among those honored were: 
front row. from left. Ben Yavitz, Bennie 
Andry Sr., Morris Pass, David Jacobson, 
Harry Shapiro, Charles Barsh, Louis 
Levoff, Frank Rosenberg, Nathan Fleish- 
er and Percy Hooton. 

Second row, H. T. Graham, Ramon 
Duran, Fred Smith, Calvin Honisby 
Anthony Caparella, Albert Morales, 
Albert Wise, Bob Zabolio, Alex Stolo 
wicz, Frank Varela, Harry Baizman 
George Pedroza, Charles Lineberger. 

Third row, Jesse Colvin. Frank Sand 
ers. Gilbert Alvarado. Harold Li.eber 
man, Ralph Bieggar, Alter Blow, Arthur 
Buechle, Danny Castillo, Johnny Chavez, 
Jesse Martinez Sr., Isidor Rosenberg, 
Robert Terrazas, Robert Munoz, Jose D, 
Garcia. 

Fourth row. Randolf Gill, Willie Full 
er, Louis Greenfield, Alfred Larrazola 
Louis Longoria, Frank Reeves, Jose 
Ruiz, James Simmons, George Sims. 
Fred Sinko, Mitsugi Tuniguchi, John 




Zamora, Edward Lumas. 

Not shown but also honored were 
Albert Jones, Tony Fierro, Ray Lopez, 
Reiuold Fehlberg, and Steve Hearn. 

(3) ISLIP, N.Y. — John Cavanaugh, pres- 
ident of Local 357, third from left, offers 
congratulations to three 25-year-pin re- 
cipients: from left, Richard Homeyer, 59; 
William Schrocder, 66; and Charles 
Kurka, 63. 




28 



THE CARPENTER 



Ecology Challenge 

Continued from Page 3 

horizon for the home building indus- 
try. In a way, the industry has made 
its own contributions to the pollu- 
tion picture and thereby incurred 
the wrath of environmentalists and 
public alike. 

Too often in the past, a devel- 
oper has bulldozed down every liv- 
ing piece of flora on a development 
site. The result has been too much 
erosion, which contributed to the 
silting of streams and rivers. I be- 
lieve that henceforth some prompt 
sodding ought to be required in situ- 
ations where erosion is a threat. 
Then, too, greater consideration 
ought to be given to saving trees. 
While this may increase costs 
slightly, it ought to balance itself 
out in respect to land clearing costs, 
as in some areas it did cost five 
hundred dollars per acre for burn- 
ing stumpage and trees. Under the 
present requirements of hauling the 
trees out of the area, the cost is 
estimated at twenty-five hundred 
dollars per acre. 

Saving Trees 

Few people realize that saving a 
tree during construction is a difficult 
business because any radical dis- 
turbing of the topography by adding 
or detracting topsoil often results 
in the death of the tree. However, 
the effort to save trees should be 
made as often as possible as a pub- 
lic contribution to a better environ- 
ment. 

In the final analysis, the obliga- 
tion of our industry to making life 
richer and better for all Americans 
transcends any narrow preoccupa- 
tion with profits or jobs. There is no 
doubt in my mind but that Ameri- 
can technology and know-how which 
created the mightiest industrial em- 
pire ever conceived by the mind of 
man can solve the problem of a 
livable environment. 

For a hundred years the inge- 
nuity and brains and skill of our 
people have been devoted to pro- 
ducing goods and consumer prod- 
ucts that achieved for us a standard 
of living undreamed of even half a 
century ago. All the emphasis was 
on production, none was given to 
environment. 



I am sure the same genius which 
created our mighty record of pro- 
ductivity, once it has been turned 
to environment, can solve the prob- 
lem of pollution in a relatively short 
time. 

It took a century to produce the 
pollution we have to contend with 
today. I am confident that in five 
to ten years the means for bringing 
pollution into acceptable standards 
will be achieved, if the public can 
be persuaded to accept the price, 
and no one should overlook the 
fact that a price is involved. So 
long as one can can drive a 400 
horsepower car to work, there is 
bound to be pollution beyond the 
point that common sense dictates. 
So long as we use three or four 
gallons of water to dispose of a cup- 
ful of urine, we can expect a crisis 
in our water supply in the not too 
distant future. 

As far as the home-building in- 
dustry is concerned, I think it faces 
a challenge it can meet without too 
much difficulty. I mentioned before 
that more emphasis needs to be 
given to controlling soil erosion dur- 
ing construction. There needs to be 
more attention paid to saving trees 
on construction sites. 

Many constructive steps have al- 
ready been taken. The cluster con- 
cept of layout offers considerable 
promise for producing more livable 
communities. It needs to be given 
additional study. 

The Sun's Power 

The use of solar heat needs to be 
given additional study. The more 
the power of the sun can be used 
directly to heat water or houses 
themselves, the less fossil fuels need 
to be used. Consequently, pollution 
can be reduced to that extent. Better 
insulation can achieve the same re- 
sults, and therefore, some experi- 
mentation in this area needs to be 
developed. 

In closing, I believe that the years 
ahead will dump many serious prob- 
lems into our laps. However, none 
of them should be insurmountable. 
An industry that can build two mil- 
lion houses in a single year cer- 
tainly can overcome the problems 
presented by the demands of the 
nation for a better environment. ■ 




Lee 



(g) UNION MADE 

CARPENTERS' 
OVERALLS 

Made to put in 
a hard day's work 

Designed by Carpenters 

Especially for Carpenters 

There's plenty of comfort, con- 
venience and work-saving fea- 
tures in these overalls. Made 
just like you want 'em . . . be- 
cause they're designed by work- 
ers like yourself. Guaranteed to 
be the best you've ever worn or 
we'll take 'em back. No ques- 
tions asked. 

H. D. Lee Company, Inc. 

Shawnee Mission, Kansas 



A companv of r corporation 



>£p 



GUS'S """" 



JACK 



A BRAND NEW TOOL FOR 
INSTALLING DOORS. 




• Carpenter carries door around site with ease. 

• Holds uninstalled wooden door in pertecl 
position for scribing and fitting. 

• Allows carpenter to hang door without bending 
or back strain. 

• Anchors door (irmly in open position 
(or installation of hardware. 



Speeds installation. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



f GUS'S DOOR 



^ 



GUS'S DOOR-JACK 

4814 S. Monroe Street 
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46806 

Please ship me Gus's Door-Jacks (S) S24.95 each, 

C.O.D, 1 agree lo pay COD. charges" and shipping 
charges. 11 I am nol completely satisfied I may relurn 
within 7 days (or refund. 



^ 



NAME --- 












ADDRESS 


CITY 

[— 1 SAVE 
1 I sales 


COD. 
lax. il a 


8 

ry) 


— STATE 

POSTAGE, Enclose 
and Gus pays C.O.C 


. ZIP 

$24.95 (plus 
. & postage. 



J 



JULY, 1972 



29 





gallery of pictures showing 

some of the senior members of 

[the Brotherhood who recently 

' received 25-year or 50-year 

service pins. 






1 i 



(1) WICHITA, KANSAS — Three 50- 
year members were presented with mem- 
bership pins at an awards banquet held 
in their honor. Frederick Bull. Execu- 
tive Board Member, 6th District, pre- 
sented pins to Paul Bruce, M. E. Holder 
and T. H. Milligan. One member, Don- 
ley Matthew, was not present. 



In Picture lA, 36 members of Local 
201 received pins for 25 or more years 
of service. Presenting the pins were Ex- 
ecutive Board Member, 6th District, Fred 
Bull, Technical Director of Apprentice- 
ship James Tinkcom; and Secretary 
Kansas State Council, Morris Eastland 
Front row, left to right, Herman Sanborn 
Ed Miller, Donald Duncan, Cecil Mc- 
Glothlin, Jesse Lacy, Robert Ingalls, Ken 
neth L. Byers, Wilbur Poland, Kenneth 
Polk, Ben Hadley, Harold Rausch, Merle 
Silkey, and James Tinkcom. Back row: 



HOUSE CONSTRUCTIOM 



LABORaid MATERIAL COSTS 




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Use your Master Charge 

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ALL SALES ON A 10 DAY 
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1972 UNIT COSTS 
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Plus 29(: sales tai in Calif 




• ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS IN DOLLARS AND CENTS 

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a FREE - 50 PAGE BUILDING BOOK CATALOG!! 

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Firm Name . 

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City_ 



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Zip 




A. J. Richardson, Lesley P. Hodge, 
Henry Mans. August Ricke, Marvin Har- 
ter, A. C. Willen. Ralph Lyon, Chet Rob- 
inson, D. I. DeNeen, Cecil Williams, Ed 
Graves, Elmer Werth, Earl Ford, Ray- 
mond Tronsgard, Walter Wood, Connie 
Friend, Walter Shafer, B. R. Kennedy, 
Ernest Dimick. Dale Jerome. Herb Gray, 
Edwin A. Clark, John Kroeker, Morris 
Eastland, Ralph Seery, and Frederick 
Bull. 

(2) CHESTERTON. IND.— At the an- 
nual banquet of Carpenters Local 113 
held recently, members honored their 
oldest brother, John Nordstrom, age 94, 
as guest of honor. John is a 55-year mem- 
ber of Local 113, 67 years a member of 
the United Brotherhood and 75 years 
a union carpenter, having joined a car- 
penters union in Sweden in 1897. 

Eight members were also presented 25- 
year pins. They were Elmer Coffman, 
Oliver Dille, willard Holdren, Robert E. 
Howard, Irving Nelson, Robert Niksch, 
Harvey Paul and Walter Pliske Jr. 

Due to the reorganization of all locals 
in the Lake County District Council of 
Carpenters, this was the final annual ban- 
quet of Local 113. 




30 



THE CARPENTER 



COMBINATION PUNCH 

A precision tool for all 
crafts, building trades and 
maintenance mechanics has 
been developed by H. K. 
Carter, a member of Mill- 
wright Local 1357, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Called a "Per- 
fecto," it has ■JW'-'/s" diame- 
ter range. 

A compact all-in-one 
transfer punch that takes the 
place of a costly tracer set 
and will transfer counter 
sunk and square holes, the 
Perfect© Center Finder and 
Transfer Punch has a IV^" 
long point, ground and hard- 
ened for long use. Longer 

points for deeper holes are available from 

the factory. 

Easy to use: Place centering cone in 
hole, press spring loaded knurled barrel 
down to line up vertically. Then raise 
spring-loaded punch up and drop. 
Tliis punch is designed to be a prick 
punch. It comes in a plastic storage case. 
Allow up to 20 days for delivery. It's 
priced at $6.95, postase paid. Write the 
Hol-CAR Tool Co. Inc., P.O. Box 12041. 
Memphis, Tenn. 38112. 



Big Electric Motor 

Continued on Page 12 

Henry J. Kaiser in 1943, helped to 
turn out an estimated 16.8 million 
tons of plate and is now retained 
as a spare in the Kaiser plant in 
Fontana. ■ 



THE BIG MOTOR 

10,000 horsepower direct current 
single armature General Elec- 
tric motor 

40 RPM base speed— 80 RPM top 
speed 

Will reverse direction at base speed 
of 40 RPM in two seconds, will 
reverse direction at top speed of 
80 RPM top speed in five seconds 

Will produce 275% power for 
short period of time 

750 volts DC 

10.930 ampere 

Shunt field 

Cooled by 85,000 CFM blower 
powered by 200 horsepower 
motor 

15,750,000 inch pounds torque 

WEIGHT: 

Rotor with shaft 232,530 lbs. 

Stator & assembly. .236,465 lbs. 
Bearings & 

Pedestals 15.054 lbs. 

Tach generators.... 1,100 lbs. 



Total 485,149 lbs 




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LEARN IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

As you know, the ability to read blue prints 
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JULY, 1972 



31 




GOSSIP 

SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 

Change for The Better 

The Catholic priest was showing his 
friend, a Protestant minister, through 
the newly-built rectory. "You cer- 
tainly have better quarters than I do," 
remarked the minister. 

"Yes, but since you have a better 
half, you shouldn't begrudge me bet- 
ter quarters! ' replied the priest. — 
Henry J. Kemjker, Emporia, Ka. 

R U GOIN 2 D UNION MEETING.' 




The Lesser Evil 

When you see what some girls 
marry, you begin to realize just how 
much they must have hated working 
for a living. 

WORK SAFELY— ACCIDENTS HURT 

The Plane Facts 

The World War II pilot was ex- 
plaining to the Air Force Academy 
cadet how they identified planes in his 
time. "No more," replied the cadet. 
"Nowadays any plane you can see is 
obsolete!" 

BUY AT UNION RETAIL STORES 

Pun Fun 

When the fencing Instructor left for 
his noonday meal he left this sign on 
the door to his studio: Out to Lunge. 




Daffynitions 

Tack — Different direction In a sail- 
boat. 

Sill — Decoration for Christmas 
packages. 

Drill — Uniform Marine activities. 

Sledge — Winter sports vehicle. 

Pine — To mourn excessively. 

Wood — Imperative form of "will." 

Plumb — Completely: "Bob Is plumb 
tuckered." 

Wall — Large group of Southerners; 
"Wall went to the square dance." 

MAKE YOUR SS< CLICK -GIVE TO CI.IC 

"Sex and The Spirits" 

The personnel director of a large 
furniture factory received a govern- 
ment questionnaire which asked, 
among other items: "tHow many em- 
ployees do you have, broken down 
by sex?" 

The director wrote: "Liquor is more 
of a problem with us." 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE.' 

A Shocking Surprise 

The art student spent several hours 
in the exhibition of abstract and cubist 
art. Finally she found one she liked: 
a little black dot on a field of white, 
framed in brass. She asked the attend- 
ant how much It was. 

"That's not for sale," he replied. 
"That's a light switch!" 



This Month's Limerick 

A toothless old man from Tarentum 
Gnashed his upper plates 'til he bent 
'em. 
When they asked him the cost 
Of the molars he'd lost 
FHe said, "I don't know; I just rent 
'em!" 



One For The Birds 

The carpet layer had just finished 
laying wall-to-wall in a huge living 
room when he noticed a small lump 
in the middle about the same time he 
reached for a clgaret, but found his 
package missing. Reasoning that he 
had covered the part-pack, he de- 
cided to flatten It out rather than rip 
out about 35 feet of tacking. As he 
was pounding It flat with his hammer, 
the lady of the house came in and 
said: 

"You left your cigarets next to the 
'phone when you called your office; 
here they are. And have you seen my 
parakeet? He got out of his cage!" 
— Vincent Mandallni, L.U. 13, Chi- 
cago. 

UNION DUES— TOMORROW'S SECURITY 




The Very Last Word! 

The worried patient said, "My 
other doctors disagree with your di- 
agnosis. Doc." 

To which the attending physician 
replied, "Yes I know. But I'm con- 
fident that I'll be proven correct by 
the post-mortem!" 

n SURE 2 vote: 

Have A Car, Mama! 

Our neighbor's wife had her baby 
In the family Ford while being rushed 
to the hospital. She laughed too hard 
when they passed a billboard: 
"Wouldn't You Really Rather Have 
a Bulck?" 

I 1 ALL— ALL 1 1 

No Extra Charge? 

He put 1 5 cents In the vending 
machine. Out poured coffee, double 
cream and sugar . . . but no cup. 
After It had all gone down the drain, 
the customer marvelled: "That's real 
automation; the machine even drinks 
It for you!" 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




(1) PARKERSBURG, W. VA.— At a 
special called meeting of Millwright Local 
1755, March 8, George Heiney, president 
and Donald Ulluni, buriness representa- 
tive and financial secretary, presented 25- 
year pins to the following members: 
Seated, left to right, Leo Casto, Romeo 
Calhoun, Gerald Beardsley. Standing, 
left to right, George Heiney, Joseph 
Hiener, Leonard Massar, Bernard Smith, 
Roy H. Robinson, Jr. and Donald Ullum. 

(2) PARSONS, KANS.— Local 1022 held 
a dinner recently for its members 
and wives. Some of the members re- 
ceived 25-year pins, which were pre- 
sented to them by Morris Eastland, secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Kansas State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters. From left to right: 



Sherman Collins, George L. Stephenson, 
Charles M. Sawtalle, Arthur L. Hill, 
Sr., Morris Eastland, Edward B. LaForge 
and W. A. McClure. 

(3) COLUMBUS, MISS.— Members of 
Local 387 received 25-year pins recently. 
Front row: E. D. Lowery, James Her- 
man Egger Jr., James A. Swartz, Frank- 
lin E. Nichols, Charlie Ray, Howard 
Ray, Frank Robertson. Back row: Lonnie 
B. Aldridge, R. W. Bolton, Harry F. 
Grant, J. B. Fields, Marvin E. Taylor, 
business representative, E. L. Reese, 
J. E. Weathers, Robert E. Forrester, 
James R. Holloway. 

Eligible to receive pins but not present 
were Homer Burks, A W. Wright, Selvin 
Rector, J. C. Adams, and Clarence 
Brown. 



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33 




(1) SAYVILLE. L.I., N.Y.— At its last an- 
nual dinner. Local 412 expressed appreci- 
ation to some of its members »itb special 
gifts and service pins. Gifts were given 
to William Johnson and Everett Buys, 
shown receiving the gifts at top left and 
right, and Andrew Van DerBorgh, Sr., 
accepting a gift in the bottom picture. 

Twent>-fivc-\ear service pins were pre- 
sented in the middle pictures, from left: 
Joseph Ciccarrello, Robert Bleimiller, and 
Andrew Van DerBorgh, Sr. 

(2) NEW KENSINGTON, PA.— Local 
333 held awards ceremonies on the occa- 
sion of its recent 80th anniversary. Pres- 
entations were made at the Holiday Inn 
in New Kensington. Seated are two 50- 
year members, John Sinchak and Charles 
Slinker. 

First row, standing, from left: George 
More, Elphie Knapp, Elmer Shoemaker, 
Robert Alcorn, Aime Gerard, Lavem 
Householder, Robert McDade, Merle 
Anthony, Charles Wikited, Charles 
Bryon, LeRoy Stcffy, Harry Waugaman. 

Second row, Frank Caruso, William 
Davis, Lester Hancock, Bright Remaleys, 
Herbert Coggen, John Jarisk, Russell An- 
derson, Edward Huezdos, Alvin Mont- 
gomery. 



Third row, Dewane Spires, Alex Hock- 
muth, John Bahnak, Alpherd Wilhelm, 
Stanley Pickarski, Julius Harnan, John 
Ciscus, Thomas McDade, Jr., Thurmond 
Haught, Albert Cervenak, and William 
Wagner. 



(3) OSWEGO, N.Y.— (no pictures)— Af 
a recent dinner dance held at the Elks 
Club in Oswego, Local 747 presented 
over 50 25-year pins, seven 50-year pins 
and one 65-year pin. About 125 members 
and wives attended. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



Pruitt-lgoe 

Continued from Page 5 

the time. Children who lived on 
the II th floor, however, often could 
not get home in time from the play- 
ground and first floor where there 
were no toilets. Elderly occupants 
found the stairways between floors 
too difficult and unsafe, especially 
when the elevator was out of order. 
Bottom floors of the high-rise were 
largely uninhabited, vandalized, and 
boarded up. 

Ten years later, Pruitt-lgoe was 
almost one-third empty. More than 
half of the occupants were welfare 
recipients, with a notable scarcity 
of adult males. Broken families were 
added to the to