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Full text of ""Carry on" :British women's work in war time."

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BRITISH WO 
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\T is no exaggeration, but the most sober truth, to say that but for the 
women of Britain and their work, Germany would by now have won the 
war. For had they failed to rise to the unprecedented demands which 
their country has made upon them, Britain's industrial effort would have 
collapsed, and her armies in the field would have been paralyzed. Some three 
million men 4iave been withdrawn from British industry to serve with the colours ; 
25 per cent, of the male labour employed in the chemical and engineering trades 
has been drafted into the army ; the normal staffs of offices, factories, railways and 
munition shops have been stripped to the bone at the imperious call of war. Had 
the women of Britain been unable or unwilling to step into the vacant places, the 
war, first lost in the workshop, would have been finally lost in the field. 

But the women of Britain have not failed. Rather, they have taken up 
their unlcoked-for task with an energy, an enthusiasm and an efficiency which have 
been one of the miracles of history. To-day there are some 900,000 British 
women engaged in war industries, and of these more than 600,000 are directly 
employed on the manufacture of munitions. In shipyards and in iron foundries, 
in chemical and engineering works, they are ceaselessly working by day and night. 
Eighteen months ago two-thirds of the 500 processes in the making of munitions 
on which they are now engaged had never been performed by a woman. The 
women of Britain are putting over the barrage, without which their sons, their 
husbands and their brothers could never hope to shatter the German lines. 

But it is not in munition work alone that the face of British industry has 
been transformed by the extension of women labour. As post-women and police, 
as bakers and farm workers, as motor drivers and 'bus conductors— in almost every 
occupation of which the mind can think — British women are now cheerfully 
" carrying on " while their men-folk are away. In her hour of greatest need 
Britain has called to her daughters. She has not called in vain. By their industry, 
their efforts and their heroic sacrifice, the women of Britain have saved their country 
and saved the world. 





"CARRY ON" 1 



British Women's Work in War-time 





Women's Work for the Navy : A Scene in a Shipbuilding Yard. 




I Women at Work in an Aircrait Hactory. — 1. Inspecting Aircraft Fabric Seams. 2. A General View of the Factory. I 




I 3. Testing Electric Aircraft Instruments. 4. Making Seaplane Floats. 5. A View of the Dope Room. 




Women at Work on 9.2'in. High-Explosive Shells. — I. Fitting and Screwing the Nose-Bush of a Shell. 
2. Inspecting a Shell. 3. Rough-fuming a Shell. 





Helping the Boys on Sea and Land. 
Women Working on Condensers for Marine Engines. 2. Women Punching Angles for Trench- Shelters. 




I Heavy Tasks performed by Women Workers.— I. Labouring Work in a Dressing- Shop. 2. Loading Nitrate of Soda into a Skip. 




3. Clearing Eartn exwavateu tor me installation oi llyaraulic Fumps. 4. A Woman Moker. 5. Wheeling Spent Oxide. 




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British Women engaged on War Worl<. 
A Woman in Charge of an Electric Motor. 2. Women machining Admiralty Electrical Fittings. 



10 




Home the Cattle. 3. Loading Hay. 4. Ploughing a Potato Field. 






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Women at work on the Farm. — 1. Ringing the Pig. 2. Feeding the Pigs. 



14 




Women Bakers at Work.— I. Taking Bread from the Oven. 2. Loading up the Deliver)' Van. 




Women engaged in Hospital and Ambulance Work.—I. An X-Kay Examination. I 



16 




2. A Red Cross Ambulance. 3. In the Pathology Laboratory. 4. A Lady Dentist. 




On the Railways : Women Carriage Cleaners and Greasers at Work. | 



18 




Women Window- Cleaners at Work. — I. Starting out on their Rounds. 2. Commencing Operations. 




Carrying on" while the Men are Mvay. — 1. Women Motor- Driveri. 2. A Bus=Condu. tress. 
3. Some of London's Postwomen. 



20 





Carrying on," while the Men are away.^1. Women Painting War Office \ehicles. 2. Women Road=workers in a London Suburb. 



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Harrison, Jehriiig 'S? Co.. Ltd., 

General Printers, 

11-15, Emerald Street, 

London, W.C. 1 




BRITISH WOMEN S 
WORK IM WAR TIME