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6000873871 







! 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS 



91 ¥oem« 



BY 



ELTZOETH BARRETT BROWNING. 



LONDON : 
CHAPMAN & HALL, 193, PICCADILLY, 

1861. 



^f^.o^.sy. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



This Poem contains the impressions of the writer 
upon events in Tuscany of which .j|be was a witness. 
'^ From a window/' the critic may. J^emur* She bows 
to the objection in the verf tiHc of her work. No 
continuous narrative, nor exposition of poUtical phflo- 
sophy, is attempted by her. It is a simple story of 
personal impressions, whose only value is in the 
intensity with which they were received, as proving 
her warm affection for a beautiful and unfortunate 
country; and the sincerity with which they are 



VI ADVERTISEMENT. 

related^ as indicating her own good faith and freedom 
from all partisanship. 

Of the two parts of this Poem, the first was 
written nearly three years ago, while the second re- 
sumes the actual situation of 1851. The discrepancy 
between the two parts is a sufftcient guarantee to 
the public of the truthfulness of the writer, who, 
though she certainly escaped the epidemic '^falling 
sickness^' of enthusiasm for Pio Nono, takes shame 
upon herself that she believed, like a woman, some 
royal oaths, and lost sight of the probable conse- 
quences of some obvious popular defects. If the 
discrepancy should be painful to the reader, let him 
understand that to the writer it has been more so. 
But such discrepancy we are called upon to accept at 
every hour by the conditions of our nature ... the 



ADVEETISEMENT. Vll 



discrepancy between aspiration and performance, 
between faith and dis-illusion, between hope and fact. 



f< 



trusted, broken prophecy, 

richest fortune sourly crost, 

Bom for the future, to the future lost ! " 



Nay, not lost to the future in this case. The future 
of Italy shall not be disinherited. 



Florence, 1851. 



i 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



PART I. 



I. 



I HEARD last night a little child go singing 

'Neath Casa Gnidi windows, by the church, 
" bella liberta, hella ! " stringing 

The same words still on notes he went in search 
So high for, you concluded the upspringing 

Of such a nimble bird to sky from perch 
Must leave the whole bush in a tremble green ; 

And that the heart of Italy must beat. 



2 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

While such a voice had leave to rise serene 
'Twixt church and palace of a Florence street ! — 

A little child, too, who not long had been 
By mother's finger steadied on his feet; 

And still hella liberta he sang. 



II. 



Then I thought, musing, of the innumerous 

Sweet songs which for this Italy outrang 
From older singers' lips, who sang not thus 

Exultingly and purely, yet, with pang 
Sheathed into music, touched the heart of us 

So finely that the pity scarcely pained ! 
I thought how Filicaja led on others, 

Bewailers for their Italy enchained, 
• And how they called her childless among mothers. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. ; 

Widow of empires, ay, and scarce refrained 
Cursing her beauty to her face, as brothers 

Might a shamed sister, — " Had she been less fair 
She were less wretched,*^ — ^how, evoking so 

From congregated wrong and heaped despair 
Of men and women writhing under blow. 

Harrowed and hideous in their filthy lair, 
A personating Image, wherein woe 

Was wrapt in beauty from offending much. 
They called it Cybele, or Niobe, 

Or laid it corpse-like on a bier for such. 
Where the whole world might drop for Italy 

Those cadenced tears which bum not where they 
touch, — 
'^ Juliet of nations, canst thou die as we ? 

And was the violet crown that crowned thy head 

B 2 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



So over large, though new buds made it rough. 

It slipped down and across thine eyelids dead, 
sweet, fair Juliet?^' — Of such songs enough; 

Too many of such complaints ! Behold, instead, 
Void at Verona, Juliet^s marble trough ! 

And void as that is, are all images 
Men set between themselves and actual wrong, 

To catch the weight of pity, meet the stress 
Of conscience ; though 'tis easier to gaze long 



On personations, masks, and effigies. 
Than to see live weak creatures crushed by strong. 



m. 



For me who stand in Italy to-day. 
Where worthier poets stood and sang before, 
I kiss their footsteps, yet their words gainsay : 



CASA GUIDI TVINDOWS. 

I can but muse in hope upon this shore 

Of golden Amo, as it shoots away 
Straight through the heart of Florence, ^neath the four 

Bent bridges, seeming to strain off like bows. 
And tremble, while the arrowy undertide 

Shoots on and cleaves the marble as it goes, 
And strikes up palace-walls on either side. 

And froths the cornice out in glittering rows. 
With doors and windows quaintly multiplied. 

And terrace-sweeps, and gazers upon all. 
By whom if flower or kerchief were thrown out. 

From any lattice there, the same would fall 
Into the river underneath, no doubt, — 

It runs so close and fast 'twixt wall and wall. 
How beautiful ! The mountains from without 

Listen in silence for the word said next. 



6 CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 

(What word will men say ?) here where Giotto planted 

His campanile, like an unperplexed 
Question to Heaven, concerning the things granted 

To a great people, who, being greatly vexed 
In act, in aspiration keep undaunted ! 

(What word says God?) The sculptor's Night and 
Day, 
And Dawn and Twihght, wait in marble scorn. 

Like dogs couched on a dunghill, on the clay 
From whence the Medicean stamp ^s outworn, — 

The final putting off of all such sway 
By all such hands, and freeing of the unborn 

In Florence, and the world outside his Florence. 
That 's Michel Angelo ! his statues wait 

In the small chapel of the dim St. Lawrence ! 

• 

Da/s eyes are breaking bold and passionate 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 7 

Over his shoulder, and will flash abhorrence 
On darkness, and with level looks meet fate, 

When once loose from that marble film of theirs : 
The Night has wild dreams in her sleep ; the Dawn 

Is haggard as the sleepless : Twilight wears 
A sort of horror : as the veil withdrawn 

'Twixt the artist's soul and works had left them 
heirs 
Of the deep thoughts which would not quail nor fawn, 

His angers and contempts, his hope and love ; 
For not without a meaning did he place 

Princely Urbino on the seat above 
With everlasting shadow on his face ; 

While the slow dawns and twilights disapprove 
The ashes of his long-extinguished race. 

Which never shall clog more the feet of men. 



8 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



IV. 



I do believe, divinest Angelo, 

That winter-hour, in Via Larga, when 
Thou wert commanded to build up in snow 

Some marvel of thine art, which straight again 
Dissolved beneath the sun^s Italian glow, 

While thine eyes, still broad with the plastic 
passion. 
Thawed, too, in drops of wounded manhood, . . since. 

Mocking alike thine art and indignation. 
Laughed at the palace-window the new prince, . . 

"Aha ! this genius needs for exaltation. 
When all's said, and howe'er the proud may wince, 

A little marble from our princely mines ! " 
I do believe that hour thou laughedst too. 



% 



CASA GTJtDI WINDOWS. 9 

For the whole world and for thy Florentines, 
After those few tears — which were only few ! 

That as, beneath the sun, the grand white lines 
Of thy snow-statue trembled and withdrew, — 

The head, erect as Jove^s, being palsied first. 
The eyelids flattened, the full brow turned blank, — 

When the right hand, upraised as if it cursed. 
Dropped, a mere snowball, and the people sank 

Their voices, though a louder laughter burst 
From the window, — Michel, then, thy soul could thank 

God and the prince, for promise and presage. 
And laugh the laugh back, I think, verily. 

Thine eyes being purged by tears of righteous rage. 

To read a wrong into a prophecy. 

And measure a true great man's heritage 
Against a mere Grand-duke's posterity. 



10 CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 

I think thy soul said then, '' I do not need 
A princedom and its quarries, after aU ; 

For if I write, paint, carve a word, indeed. 
On book or board or dust, on floor or wall. 

The same is kept of God who taketh heed 
That not a letter of the meaning fall. 

Or ere it touch and teach His world^s deep heart. 
Outlasting, therefore, all your lordships. Sir ! 

So keep your stone, beseech you, for your part. 
To cover up your grave-place and refer 

The proper titles ! / live by my art ! 
The thought I threw into this snow shall stir 

This gazing people when their gaze is done ; 
And the tradition of your act and mine. 

When all the snow is melted in the sun. 
Shall gather up, for unborn men, a sign 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 11 



Of what is the true princedom ! ay, and none 
Shall laugh that day, except the drunk with wine. 



V. 



Amen, great Angelo ! the day is come ; 
And, if we laugh not on it, shall we weep ? 

Much more we shall not. Through the mournful hum 
Of poets sonneteering in their sleep 

'Neath the pale olives, which droop, tickling some 
On chin and forehead from a dream too deep, — 

Through all that drowsy hum of voices smooth. 
The hopeful bird mounts caroUing from brake ; 

The hopeful child, with leaps to catch his growth. 
Sings open-eyed for Uberty's sweet sake ; 

And I, who am a singer too, forsooth. 
Prefer to sing with these who are awake, 



12 CASA GTJIDl WINDOWS. 

With birds, with babes, with men who will not fear 
The baptism of the holy morning dew, 

(And many of such waters now are here. 
Complete in their anointed manhood, who 

Will greatly dare and greatlier persevere !) 
Than join those old thin voices with my new. 

And sigh for Italy with some safe sigh 
Cooped up in music 'twixt an oh and ah, — 

Nay, hand in hand with that young child, will I 
fiather go singing ''Bella lilerta,'' 

Than, with those poets, croon the dead or cry 
" Se tu men hellafossiy liaUa 1 " 



vi. 



" Less wretched if less fair,^^ perhaps a truth 
Is so far plain in this — ^that Italy, 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 13 

Long trammelled with the purple of her youth 
Against her age^s due activity. 

Sate still upon her graves, without the ruth 
Of death, but also without energy 

And hope of life. " What 's Italy ? " men ask : 
And others answer, '^ Virgil, Cicero, 

Catullus, Caesar/' And what more ? to task 
The memory closer — ^^ Why, Boccaccio, 

Dante, Petrarca,'^ — and if still the flask 
Appears to yield its wine by drops too slow, — 

" Angelo, Eaffael, Pergolese,'' — all 
Whose strong hearts beat through stone, or charged, 
again. 

Cloth-threads with fire of souls electrical. 
Or broke up heaven for music. What more 
then? 



14 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Why, then, no more. The chaplet's last beads fall 
In naming the last saintship within ken. 

And, after that, none prayeth in the land. 
Alas, this Italy has too long swept 

Heroic ashes up for hour-glass sand ; 
Of her own past, impassioned nympholept ! 

Consenting to be nailed by the hand 
To the same bay-tree under which she stepped 

A queen of old, and plucked a leafy branch ; 
And licensing the world too long, indeed. 

To use her broad phylacteries to staunch ' 

And stop her bloody lips, which took no heed 

How one quick breath would draw an avalanche 
Of living sons around her, to succeed 

The vanished generations. Could she count 
Those oil-eaters, with large, live, mobile mouths 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 15 

Agape for maccaroni, in the amount 
Of consecrated heroes of her south^s 

Bright rosary ? The pitcher at the fount. 
The gift of gods, being broken, — why, one loathes 

To let the ground-leaves of the place confer 
A natural bowl. And thus, she chose to seem 

No nation, but the poet^s pensioner. 
With alms from every land of song and dream ; 

While her own pipers sweetly piped of her. 
Until their proper breaths, in that extreme 

Of sighing, split the reed on which they played ! 
Of which, no more : but never say " no more ^' 

To Italy ! Her memories undismayed 
Say rather " evermore ^^ — ^her graves implore 

Her future to be strong and not afraid — 
Her very statues send their looks before ! 



16 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



vn. 



We do not serve the dead — ^the past is past ! 
God lives, and lifts his glorious mornings up 

Before the eyes of men, who wake at last. 
And put away the meats they used to sup. 

And on the dry dust of the ground outcast 
The dregs remaining of the ancient cup. 

And turn to wakeful prayer and worthy act. 

The dead, upon their awful Vantage ground, — 
The sun not in their faces, — shall abstract 

No more our strength : we will not be discrowned 
Through treasuring their crowns, nor deign transact 

A barter of the present, in a sound. 

For what was counted good in foregone days. 

Dead, ye shall no longer cling to us 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 17 

With your stiff hands of desiccating praise. 
And hold uS backward by the garment thus. 

To stay and laud you in long virelays ! 
Still, no ! we will not be oblivious 

Of our own lives, because ye lived before, 
Nor of our acts, because ye acted well, — 

We thank you that ye first unlatched the door — 
We will not make it inaccessible 

By thankings in the doorway any more. 
But will go onward to extinguish hell . 

With our fresh souls, our younger hope, and God^s 
Maturity of purpose. Soon shall we 

Be the dead too ! and, that our periods 
Of life may round themselves to memory, 

As smoothly as on our graves the funeral-sods, 
We must look to it to excel as ye. 



18 CASA GUIDI WINDOTVS. 

And bear our age as far, unlimited 

By the last sea-mark ! so, to be invoked 

By fature generations, as the Dead. 



vm. 



"Ks true that when the dust of death has choked 

A great man^s voice, the common words he said 
Turn oracles, — the meanings which he yoked 

Like horses, draw like griffins !— this is true 
And acceptable. Also I desire, 

When men make record, with the flowers they strew, 
" Savonarola's soul went out in fire 

Upon our Grand-duke's piazza, and burned through 
A moment first, or ere he did expire. 

The veil betwixt the right and wrong, and showed 
How near God sate and judged the judges there, — ^' 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 19 

Desire, upon the pavement overstrewed. 
To cast my violets with as reverent care. 

And prove that all the winters which have snowed 
Cannot snow out the scent, from stones and air. 

Of a sincere man's virtues. This was he, 
Savonarola, who, while Peter sank 

With his whole boat-load, called courageously 
' Wake Christ, wake Christ 1 '^ — who, having tried the 
tank 

Of the church- waters used for baptistry 
Ere Luther lived to spill them, said they stank ! 

Who also, by a princely deathbed, cried 
" Loose Florence, or God will not loose thy soul,'* 

While the Magnificent fell back and died 
Beneath the star-looks, shooting from the cowl, 

Which turned to wormwood bitterness the wide 

c2 



20 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Deep sea of his ambitions. It were foul 

To grudge Savonarola and the rest 
Their violets ! rather pay them quick and fresh ! 

The emphasis of death makes manifest 
The eloquence of action in.our flesh ; 

And men who, living, were but dimly guessed. 
When once free from their lifers entangled mesh. 

Show their full length in graves, or even indeed 
Exaggerate their stature, in the flat. 

To noble admirations which exceed 
Nobly, nor sin in such excess. For that 

Is wise and righteous. We, who are the seed 
Of buried creatures, if we turned and spate 

Upon our antecedents, we were vile. 
Bring violets rather ! If these had not walked 

Their furlong, could we hope to walk our mile ? 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 21 

Therefore bring violets ! Yet if we, self-baulked. 

Stand still a-strewing violets all the while, 
These had as well not moved/ourselves not talked 

Of these. So rise up with a cheerful smile, 
And, having strewn the violets, reap the com. 

And, having reaped and garnered, bring the 
plough 
And draw new furrows ^neath the healthy mom. 

And plant the great Hereafter in this Now. 



IX. 



Of old 'twas so. How step by step was worp. 
As each man gained on each, securely ! — how 

Each by his own strength sought his own ideal. 
The ultimate Perfection leaning bright 

From out the sun and stars, to bless the leal 



22 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And earnest search of all for Fair and Eight, 
Through the dim forms, by earth accounted real ! 

Because old Jubal blew into delight 
The souls of men, with clear-piped melodies. 

What if young Asaph were content at most 
To draw from Jubal's grave, with listening eyes. 

Traditionary music's floating ghost 
Into the grass-grown silence ? were it wise ? 

Is it not wiser, Jubal's breath being lost. 
That Miriam clashed her cymbals to surprise 

The sun between her white arms flung apart. 
With new, glad, golden sounds? that David's 
strings 

(yerflowed his hand with music from his heart ? 
So harmony grows fuU from many springs. 

And happy accident turns holy art. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 23 



Or enter, in your Florence wanderings, 

Santa Maria Novella church. You pass 
The left stair, where, at plague-time, Macchiavel 

Saw one with set fair face as in a glass, 
Dressed out against the fear of death and hell. 

Bustling her silks in pauses of the mass. 
To keep the thought off how her husband fell. 

When sJie left home, stark dead across her feet — 
The stair leads up to what Orgagna gave 

Of Dante's daemons ; but you, passing it. 
Ascend the right stair of the farther nave. 

To muse in a small chapel scarcely lit 
By Cimabue's Virgin. Bright and brave. 

That picture was accounted, mark, of old I 



24 CIAJ3A GUIDI WINDOWS. 

A king stood bare before its sovran graxie; 

A reverent people shouted to behold 
The pictare, not the king; and even the place 

Containing such a miracle, grew bold, 
Named the Glad Borgo from that beauteous face, 
Which thrilled the artist, after work, to think 
That his ideal Mary-smile should stand 

So very near him ! — he, within the brink 
Of all that glory, let in by his hand 

With too divine a rashness ! Yet none shrink 
Who gaze here now — ^albeit the thing is planned 

Sublimely in the thought^s simplicity. 
The Virgin, throned in empyreal state. 

Minds only the young babe upon her knee 3 
While, each side, angels bear the royal weight. 
Prostrated meekly, smiling tenderly 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 26 

Oblivion of their wings ! the Child thereat 

Stretches its hand like God. If any should. 
Because of some stiff draperies and loose joints. 

Gaze scorn down from the heights of Eafifaelhood, 
On Cimabue's picture, — Heaven anoints 

Tht head of ho such critic, and his blood 
The poet^s curse strikes full on, and appoints 

To ague and cold spasms fbr evermore. 
A noble picture ! worthy of the shout 

Wherewith along the streets the people bore 
Its cherub faces, which the sun threw out 

Until they stooped and entered the church door ! — 
T et rightly was young Giotto talked about, 

Whom Cimabue found among the sheep, 
And knew, as gods know gods, and carried home 

To paint the things he pauited, with a deep 



26 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And Mer insight, and so overcome 

His chapel-Virgin with a heavenHer sweep 
Of light. For thus we mount into the sum 

Of great things known or acted. I hold, too, 
That CSmabue smiled upon the lad, 

At the first stroke which passed what he could do, — 
Or else his Virgin's smile had never had 

Such sweetness in 't. All great men who foreknew 
Their heirs in art, for arfs sake have been glad. 

And bent their old white heads as if uncrowned, 
Fanatics of their pure ideals still, 

Far more than of their laurels wliich were found 
With some less stalwart struggle of the will. 

If old Margheritone trembled, swooned, 
And died despairing at the open siU 

Of other men's achievements, (who achieved. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 27 

By loving art beyond the master !) he 

Was old Margheritone and conceived 
Never, at youngest and most ecstasy, 

A Virgin like that dream of one, which heaved 
The death-sigh from his heart. K wistfully 

Margheritone sickened at the smell 
Of Cimabue's laurel, let him go !— 

Strong Cimabue stood up very well 
In spite of Giotto^s — and Angelico, 

The artist-saint, kept smiling in his cell 
The smile with which he welcomed the sweet slow 

Inbreak of angels, (whitening through the dim 
That he might paint them I) while the sudden sense 

Of Eaffael's future was revealed to him 
By force of his own fair works* competence. 

The same blue waters where the dolphins swim 



28 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Suggest the Tritons. Through the blue Immense, 

Strike out all swimmers ! cling not in the way 
Of one another, so to sink ; but learn 

The strong man^s impulse, catch the freshening 
spray 
He throws up in his motions, and discern 

By his clear, westering eye, the time of day. 
O God, thou hast set us worthy gifts to earn. 

Beside thy heaven and Thee ! and when I say 
'Tis worth while for the weakest man alive 

To live and die, — there ^s room too, I repeat. 
For all thie strongest to live well, and strive 

Their own way, by their individual heat. 
Like a new becrswarm leaving the old hive , 

Despite the wax which lempteth violet-sweet. 
So let the living live, the dead retain 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 29 

Flowers on cold graves ! — though honour 's best 
supplied. 
When we bring actions, to prove their's not vain. 



XI. 



Cold graves, we say ? it shall be testified 
That Hving men who throb in heart aad train. 

Without the dead, were colder. K we tried 
To sink the past beneath our feet, be sure 

The future would not stand. Precipitate 
This old roof from the shrine — and, insecure. 

The nesting swallows fly off, mate from mate. 
Scant were the gardens, if the graves were fewer ! 

And the green poplars grew no longer straight. 

Whose tops not looked to Troy. Why, who would fight 
For Atliens, and not swear by Marathon ? 



• 



30 CASA GXJIDI WINDOWS. 

Who would build temples, without tombs in sight ? 

Who live, without some dead man's benison? 
Who seek truth, hope for good, or strive for right. 

If, looking up, he saw not in the sun 
Some angel of the martyrs, all day long 

Standing and waiting I your last rhythms will need 
The earliest key-note. Could I sing this song, 

If my dead masters had not taken heed 
To help the heavens and earth to make me strong. 

As the wind ever will find out some reed, 
And touch it to such issues as belong 

To such a frail thing ? Who denies the dead. 
Libations from full cups ? Unless we choose 

To look back to the hills behind us spread. 
The plains before us sadden and confuse ; 

If orphaned, we are disinherited. 



k 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 31 



XII. 



I would but turn these lachrymals to use^ 
Fill them with fresh oH from the oUve grove. 

To feed the new lamp fuller. Shall I say 
What made my heart beat with exulting love, 

A few weeks back ? 



xm. 



.... The day was such a day 
As Florence owes the sun. The sky above. 

Its weight upon the mountains seemed to lay. 
And palpitate in glory, like a dove 

"Who has flown too fast, full-hearted. Take away 
The image ! for the heart of man beat higher 

That day in Florence, flooding all her streets 



32 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And piazzas with a tumult and desire. 
The people, with accumulated heats. 

And faces turned one way, as if one fire 
Did draw and flush them, leaving their old beats, 

Went upward to the palace Ktti wall. 
To thank their Grand-duke, who, not quite of course. 

Had graciously permitted, at their call. 
The citizens to use their civic force 

To guard their civic homes. So, one and all. 
The Tuscan cities streamed upio the source 

Of this new good, at Florence; taking it 
As good so far, presageful of more good, — 

The first torch of Italian freedom, lit 
To toss in the next tiger^s face who should 

Approach too near them in a cruel fit, — 
The first pulse of an even flow of blood. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 33 

To prove the level of Italian veins 
Toward rights perceived and granted. How we gazed 

Prom Casa Guidi windows, while, in trains 
Of orderly procession — banners raised. 

And intermittent bursts of martial strains 
Which died upon the shout, as if amazed 

By gladness beyond music — ^they passed on ! 
The magistrates, with their insignia, passed ; 

And all the people shouted in the sun. 
And all the thousand windows which had cast 

A ripple of silks, in blue and scarlet, down. 
As if the houses overflowed at last. 

Seemed to grow larger with fair heads and eyes. 
The lawyers passed; and stiU arose the shout. 

And hands broke from the windows, to surprise 
Those grave calm brows with bay-tree leaves thrown out. 

D 



34 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

The priesthood passed : the friars, with worldly-wise 
Keen, sidelong glances from their beards, about 

The street, to see who shouted ! many a monk 
Who takes a long rope in the waist, was there ! 

Whereat the popular exultation drunk 
With indrawn "vivas,^^ the whole sunny air. 

While through the murmuring windows rose and sunk 
A cloud of kerchiefed hands ! " the church makes fair 

Her welcome in the new Pope^s name" Ensued 
The black sign of the ^'martyrs I" name no name. 

But count the graves in silence. Next, were viewed 
The artists ; next, the trades ; and after came 

The populace, with flag and rights as good ; 
And very loud the shout was for that same 

Motto, ^' II popolo,^^ II Popolo, — 
The word meant dukedom, empire, majesty. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 35 

And kings in such an honr might read it so. 
And next, with banners, each in his degree. 

Deputed representatives a-row. 
Of every separate state of Tuscany : 

Siena's she-wolf, bristhng on the fold 
Of the first flag, preceded Pisa's hare ; 

And Massa's hon floated calm in gold, 
Pienza's following with his silver stare ; 

Arezzo's steed pranced clear from bridle-hold, — 
And well might shout our Florence, greeting there 

These, and more brethren ! Last, the world had sent 
The various children of her teeming flanks — 

Greeks, English, French — as to some parliament 
Of Jovers of her Italy, in ranks. 

Each bearing its land's symbols reverent ; 
At which the stones seemed breaking into thanks 

d2 



30 OASA OUIDI WIND0\V8* 

And rattling up to the sky, such sounds in proof 
A roue I tho very house- walls seemed to bend, 

The very windows, up from door to roof, 
Klanluul out a rapture of bright heads, to mend, 

Witli paaaionato looks, the gesture's whirling off 
A hurrioono of loaves ! Three hours did end 

While all tliese passed ,• and ever in the crowd, 
Hudt) menj uncousoious of the tears tliat kept 

Their beartls mdst, shouted ; and some laughed aloud. 
And Wiwo askoil ai>y why they laughed and wept : 

l^>i^ds ki$$ed eaoh others cheeks* and foes loner 

l>id it moitt v^tfudy ; two-mooaths* babies leapt 
Ki^l upw^ iu thar loolher's aims, whose black, 

\YhJe> ^ili^riug <?j«e looibed dsewbe*^ ; lovers pressed 
KdicK bdk«e eiiber> ueiiber gkncing back ; 



CASA GTTIDI WINDOWS. 37 

And peasant maidens, smoothly Hired and tressed. 

Forgot to finger on their throats the slack 
Great pearl-strings ) while old blind men would not rest. 

But pattered with their staves and with their shoes 
StiU on the stones, and smiled as if they saw. 

O Heaven ! I think that day had noble use 
Among God^s days. So near stood Bight and Law, 

Both mutually forborne ! Law would not bruise. 
Nor Bight deny; and each in reverent awe 

Honoured the other. What if, nevertheless. 
The sun did, that day, leave upon the vines 

No charta, and the liberal Duke's excess 
Did scarce exceed a Guelf's or Ghibelline's 

In the specific actual righteousness 
Of what that day he granted ;* still the signs 

* since when the constitational concessions have been complete in Tuscany, 
as all the world knows. The event breaks in upon the meditation, and is too 
fast for prophecy in these strange times..— £. B. B. 



38 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Are good, and full of promise, we must say, 
When multitudes thank kings for granting prayers. 
And kings concede their people^s right to 

pray. 
Both in the sunshine ! Griefs are not despairs. 

So uttered; nor can royal claims dismay, 
When men, from humble homes and ducal chairs. 

Hate wrong together. It was well to view 
Those baimers ruffled in a Grand-duke^s face, 

Inscribed, '^ Live freedom, union, and all true 
Brave patriots who are aided by God^s grace ! " 

Nor was it ill, when Leopoldo drew 
His httle children to the window-place 

He stood in at the Pitti, to suggest 
Tkey, too, should govern as the people willed. 

What a cry rose then ! some, who saw the best. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 3^ 

Sware that his eyes filled up, and overfilled 

With good wann human tears, which unre- 
pressed 
Ran down. I like his face : the forehead^s build 

Has no capacious genius, yet perhaps 
Sufficient comprehension,— mild and sad. 

And careful nobly, — ^not with care that wraps 
Self-loving hearts, to stifle and make mad. 

But careful with the care that shuns a lapse 
Of faith and duty, — studious not to add 

A burden in the gathering of a gain. 
And so, God save the Duke, I say with those 

Who that day shouted it, and while dukes reign. 
May aU wear, in the visible overflows 

Of spirit, fiuch a look of careful pain ! 
Methinks God loves it better than repose. 



40 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



xrv. 



And all the people who went up to let 

Their hearts out to that Duke, as has been told — 
Where guess ye that the living people met. 

Kept tryst, formed ranks, chose leaders, first unrolled 

Their banners ? 

In the Loggia ? where is set 

Cellini's godlike Perseus, bronze — or gold — 
(How name the metal, when the statue flings 

Its soul so in your eyes ?) with brow and sword 
Superbly cahn, as all opposing things 

Slain with the Gmgon, were no more abhorred 
Since ended ? 

Xo ! the people sou^t no wings 

From Perseus in the Lo^ia, nor impk»ed 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 41 

An inspiration in the place beside, 

From that dim bust of Brutus, jagged and grand, 
Where Buonarotti passionately tried 

Out of the clenched marble to demand 
The head of Eome's sublimest homicide. 

Then dropt the quivering mallet from his hand. 
Despairing he could find no model stuff 

Of Brutus, in aU Florence, where he found 
The gods and gladiators thick enough ? 

Not there ! the people chose still holier ground ! 
The people, who are simple, blind, and rough. 

Know their own angels, after looking round. 
What chose they then ? where met they ? 



XV. 

On the stone 
CallM Dante's, — a plain flat stone, scarce discerned 



42 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

From others in the pavement, — ^whereupon 

He used to bring his quiet chair out, turned 
To Brunelleschi's church, and pour alone 

The lava of his spirit when it burned — 
It is not cold to-day. O passionate 

Poor Dante, who, a banished Florentine, 
Didst sit austere at banquets of the great. 

And muse upon this far-off stone of thine, 
And tliink how oft the passers used to wait 

A moment, in the golden da/s decline. 
With ^' good night, dearest Dante ! '' — well, good night ! 

I muse now, Dante, and think, verily. 
Though chapeUed in Bavenna's byeway, might 

Thy buried bones be thrilled to ecstasy, 
Could'st know thy favourite stone's elected right 

As tryst-place for thy Tuscans to foresee 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 43 

Their earliest chartas from ! good night, good morn. 

Henceforward, Dante ! now my soul is sure 
That thine is better comforted of scorn, 

And looks down from the stars in fuller cure, 
Than when, in Santa Croce church, forlorn 

Of any corpse, the architect and hewer 
Did pile the empty marbles as thy tomb ! 

For now thou art no longer exiled, now 
Best honoured ! — we salute thee who art come 

Back to the old stone with a softer brow 
Than Giotto drew upon the wall, for some 

Good lovers of our age to track and plough 
Their way to, through Timers ordures stratified. 

And startle broad awake into the dull 
Bargello chamber. Now, thou ^rt milder eyed. 

And Beatrix may leap up glad to cull 



44 CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 

Thy first snule, even in heaven and at her side. 

Like that which, nine years old, looked beau- 
tiful 
At Tuscan May-game. Foolish words ! I meant 

Only that Dante loved his Florence well, 
And Florence, now, to love him is content ! 

I mean too, certes, that the sweetest smell 
Of lovers dear incense, by the living sent 

To find the deadf is not accessible 
To your low livers ! no narcotic, — ^not 

Swung in a censer to a sleepy tune, — 
But trod out in the morning air, by hot 

Quick spirits, who tread firm to ends foreshown, 
And use the name of greatness unforgot. 

To meditate what greatness may be done. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 45 



XVI. 



For Dante sits in heaven, and ye stand here. 

And more remains for doing, all must feel. 
Than trysting on his stone from year to year 

To shift processions, civic hed to heel. 
The town^s thanks to the Htti. Are ye freer 

For what was felt that day ? A chariot wheel 
May spin fast, yet the chariot never roU. 

But if that day suggested somethiifg good. 
And bettered, with one purpose, soul by soul, — 

Better means freer. A land^s brotherhood 
Is most puissant ! Men, upon the whole. 

Are what they can be, — ^nations, what they would. 



xvn. 



Will, therefore, to be strong, thou Italy ! 



46 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Will to be noble ! Austrian Mettemich 

Can fix no yoke unless the neck agree ; 

« 

And thine is like the lion^s when the thick 
Dews shudder from it, and no man would be 

The stroker of his mane, much less would prick 
His nostril with a reed. When nations roar 

Like lions, who shall tame them,^ and defraud 
Of the due pasture by the river-shore ? 

Roar, therefore !" shake your dew-laps dry abroad. 
The amphitheatre with open door 

Leads back upon the benches who applaud 
The last spear-thruster ! 



XVIII. 



Yet the Heavens forbid 
That we should call on passion to confront 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 47 

The brutal with the brutal, and, amid 

This ripening world, suggest a lion-hunt 
And lion- vengeance for the wrongs men did 

And do now, though the spears are getting blunt. 
We only call, because the sight and proof 

Of lion-strength hurts nothing ; and to show 
A lion-heart, and measure paw with hoof, 

Helps something, even, and will instruct a foe 
Well as the onslaught, how to stand Moof ! 

Or else the world gets past the mere brute blow 
Given or taken. Children use the fist 

Until they are of age to use the brain : 
And so we needed Caesars to assist 

Man's justice, and Napoleons to explain 
God's counsel, when a point was nearly missed. 

Until our generations should attain 



48 CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 

Christ's stature nearer. Not that we, alas ! 

Attain ahready; but a single inch 
Will help to look down on the swordsman's pass. 

As Boland on a coward who could flinch ; 
And, after chloroform and ether-gas. 

We find out slowly what the bee and finch 
Have ready found, through Nature's lamp in each, — 

How to our races we may justify 
Our individual claims, and, as we reach 

Our own grapes, bend the top vines to supply 
The children's uses : how to fill a breach 

With olive branches ; how to quench a lie 
With truth, and smite a foe upon the cheek 

With Christ's most conquering kiss ! why, these are 
things 
Worth a great nation's finding, to prove weak 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 49 

The '' glorious arms " of military kings ! 
And so with wide embrace, my England, seek 

To stifle the bad heat and flickerings 
Of this world's false and nearly expended fire ! 

Draw palpitating arrows to the wood. 
And send abroad thy high hopes, and thy higher 

Resolves, from that most virtuons altitude, 
Till nations shall unconsciously aspire 

By looking up to thee, and learn that good 
And glory are not different. Announce law 

By freedom ; exalt chivaby by peace ; 
Instruct how clear calm eyes can overawe, 

* 

And how pure hands, stretched simply to release 
A bond-slave, wiU not need a sword to draw 

To be held dreadful, O my England, crease 
Thy purple with no alien agonies 



50 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Which reach thee through the net of war ! No war ! 
Disband thy captains^ change thy victories, 

Be henceforth prosperous as the angels are — 
Helping, not humbling. 



XIX. 



Drums and battle cries 

Go out in music of the morning star — 
And soon we shall have thinkers in the place 

Of fighters ; each found able as a man 
To strike electric influence through a race. 

Unstayed by city-waU and barbican. 
The poet shall look grander in the face 

Than ever he looked of old, when he began 
To sing that " Achillean wrath which slew 

So many heroes,*^ — seeing he shall treat 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 51 

The deeds of souls heroic toward the true — 

The oracles of life — previsions sweet 
And awful, like divine swans gliding through 

White arms of Ledas, which will leave the heat 
Of their escaping godship to endue 

The human medium with a heavenly flush. 
Meanwhile, in this same Italy we want 

Not popular passion, to arise and crush. 
But popular conscience, which may covenant 

For what it knows. Concede without a blush — 
To grant the '^ civic guard ^' is not to grant 

The civic spirit, living and awake. 
Those lappets on your shoulders, citizens. 

Your eyes strain after sideways till they ache. 
While still, in admirations and amens. 

The crowd comes up on festa-days, to take 



52 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

The great sight in — are not intelligence. 

Not courage even — alas, if not the sign 
Of something very noble, they are nought ; 

Por every day ye dress your sallow kine 
With fringes down their cheeks, though unbesought 

They loll their heavy heads arid drag the wine. 
And bear the wooden yoke as they were taught 

The first day, What ye want is light — ^indeed 
Not sunlight — (ye may well look up surprised 

To those unfathomable heavens that feed 
Your purple hills ! ) — ^but God^s light organised 

In some high soul, crowned capable to lead 
The conscious people, — conscious and advised, — 

For if we lift a people like mere clay. 
It falls the same. We want thee, O unfound 

And sovran teacher ! — ^if thy beard be grey 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 63 

Or black, we bid thee rise up from the ground 

And speak the word God giveth thee to say. 
Inspiring into all this people round. 

Instead of passion, thought, which pioneers 
All generous passion, purifies from sin, 

And strikes the hour for. Eise thou teacher ! here's 
A crowd to make a nation ! — ^best begin 

By making each a man, till aU be peers 
Of earth's true patriots and pure martyrs in 

Knowing and daring. Best unbar the doors 
Which Peter's heirs keep locked so overdose 

They only let the mice across the floors. 
While every churchman dangles as he goes 

The great key at his girdle, and abhors 
In Christ's name, meekly. Open wide the house — 

Concede the entrance with Christ's liberal mind. 



64 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And set the tables with His wine and bread. 

What ! commune in " both kinds ? " In every kind — 
Wine, wafer, love, hope, truth, unlimited. 

Nothing kept back. For, when a man is blind 
To starlight, will he see the rose is red P 

A bondsman shivering at a Jesuit's foot — 
" Vae ! meS, culpfi, \" is not like to stand 

A freedman at a despot's, and dispute 
His titles by the balance in his hand. 

Weighing them " suo jure.'' Tend the root, 
If careful of the branches ; and expand 

The inner souls of men, before you strive 
For civic heroes. 



XX. 



But the teacher, where ? 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 56 

From all these crowded faces, all alive, — 
Eyes, of their own hds flashing themselves bare, — 

And brows that with a mobile life contrive 
A deeper shadow, — may we no wise dare 

To point a finger out, and touch a man. 
And cry "this is the leader/^ What, all these ! — 

Broad heads, black eyes, — ^yet not a soul that ran 
From God down with a message ? All, to please 

The donna waving measures with her fan. 
And not the judgment-angel on his knees— 

The trumpet just an inch off from his Eps- 
Who when he breathes next, will put out the sun ? 

Yet mankind's self were foundered in ecUpse, 
If lacking, with a great work to be done, 

A doer. No, the earth abeady dips 
Back into light — a better day 's begun — 



66 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS.. 

And soon this doer, teacher, will stand plain. 
And build the golden pipes and synthesize 

This people-organ for a holy strain : 
And we who hope thns, still in all these eyes. 

Go sounding for the deep look which shall drain 
Suffused thought into channelled enterprise ! 

Where is the teacher P "What now may he do. 
Who shall do greatly ? Doth he gird his waist 

With a monk's rope, like Luther ? or pursue 
The goat, like Tell ? or dry his nets in haste. 

Like Masaniello when the sky was blue ? 
Keep house like any peasant, with inlaced. 

Bare, brawny arms about his favourite child. 
And meditative looks beyond the door. — 

(But not to mark the kidling's teeth have filed 
The green shoots of liis vine which last year bore 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS* 57 

Full twenty bunches ;) or, on triple-piled 
Throne-velvets, shall we see him bless the poor, 

Like any Pontiff, in the Poorest^ s name, — 
While the tiara holds itself aslope 

Upon his steady brows, which, all the same. 
Bend mildly to permit the people^s hope ? 



XXI. 



Whatever hand shall grasp this oriflamme. 
Whatever man (last peasant or first Pope 

Seeking to free his country !) shall appear. 
Teach, lead, strike fire into the masses, fill 

These empty bladders with fine air, insphere 
These wills into a unity of will. 

And make of Italy a nation — dear 
And blessed be that man ! the Heavens shall kill 



58 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

No leaf the earth shall grow for him ; and Death 
Shall cast him back upon the lap of Life, 

To live more snrely, in a clarion-breath 
Of hero-music ! Brutus, with the knife, 

Bienzi, with the fasces, throb beneath 
Homers stones ; and more, who threw away joy's fife 

Like Pallas, that the beauty of their souls 
Might ever shine untroubled and entire ! 

But if it can be true that he who rolls 
The Church's thunders will reserve her fire 

For only light ; from eucharistic bowls 
Will pour new life for nations that expire. 

And rend the scarlet of his Papal vest 
To gird the weak loins of liis countrymen — 

I hold that man surpasses all the rest 
Of Komans, heroes, patriots, — and that when 




CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 59 

He sat down on the throne, he dispossessed 
The first graves of some glory. See again, 

This country-saving is a glorious thing ! 
Why, say a common man achieved it ? Well ! 

Say, a rich man did ? Excellent ! A king ? 
That grows sublime ! A priest ? Improbable ! 

A Pope ? Ah, there we stop and cannot bring 
Our faith up to the leap, with histor/s bell 

So heavy round the neck of it — albeit 
We fain would grant the possibility 

Tor thy sake, Pio Nono ! 



zxn. 



Stretch thy feet 
In that case — ^I will kiss them reverently 
As any pilgrim to the Papal seat ! 



60 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And, such proved possible, thy throne to me 

Shall seem as holy a place as Pellico^s 
Venetian dungeon ; or as Spielberg^s grate, 

Where the fair Lombard woman hung the 
rose 
Of her sweet soul, by its own dewy weight, 

(Because her sun shone inside to the close !) 
And pining so, died early, yet too late 

IJpr what she suffered ! Yea, I will not choose 
Betwixt thy throne. Pope Pius, and the spot 

Marked red for ever spite of rains and dews. 
Where two fell riddled by the Austrian's shot — 

The brothers Bandiera, who accuse. 
With one same mother-voice and face (that what 

They speak may be invincible), the sins 
Of earth's tormentors before God, the just. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS, 61 



Until the unconscious thunder-bolt begins 
To loosen in His grasp. 



xxm. 



And yet we must 

Beware^ and mark the natural kiths and kins 
Of circumstance and office, and distrust 

A rich man reasoning in a poor man's hut 
A poet who neglects pure truth to prove 

Statistic fact ; a child who leaves a rut 
Por the smooth road; a priest who vows his 
glove 

Exhales no grace ; a prince who walks a-foot ; 
A woman who has sworn she will not love ; 

Ninth Pius sitting in Seventh Gregory's chair, 
With Andrea Doria's forehead ! 



62 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



XXIV. 



Count what goes 

To making up a Pope^ before he wear 
That triple crown. We pass the world-wide throes 

Which went to make the Popedom, — ^the despair 
Of free men, good men, wise men ; the dread shows 

Of women^s faces, by the faggot's flash. 
Tossed out, to the minutest stir and throb 

Of the white lips, least tremble of a lash. 
To glut the red stare of the licensed mob ! 

Tlie short mad cries down oubliettes, — ^the plash 
So horribly far ofif ! priests, trained to rob; 

And kings that, like encouraged nightmares, sate 
On nations' heaxts most heavily distressed 

With monstrous sights and apophthegms of fate. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 63 

We pass these things^ — because *' the times '^ are prest 

With necessaiy charges of the weight 
Of all the sin; and *^ Calvin, for the rest. 

Made bold to burn Servetus — ^Ah, men err ! " — 
And, so do Churches ! which is all we mean 

To bring to proof in any register 
Of theological fat kine and lean — 

So drive them back into the pens ! refer 
Old sins with long beards, and " I wis and ween,^ 

Entirely to the times — the times — ^the times ! 
Nor ever ask why this preponderant. 

Infallible, pure Church could set her chimes 
Most loudly then, just then ; most jubilant. 

Precisely then — when mankind stood in crimes 
Pull heart-deep, and Heaven's judgments were not 
scant. 



» 



64 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Inquire still less, what signifies a Church 
Of perfect inspiration and pure laws. 

Who bums the first man with a brimstone torch. 
And grinds the second, bone by bone, because 

The times, forsooth, are used to rack and scorch ! 
What is a holy Church, unless she awes 

The times down from their sins ? Did Christ select 
Such amiable times, to come and teach 

Love to, and mercy ? Why, the world were wrecked, 
If every mere gre^t man, who lives to reach 

A little leaf of popular respect. 
Attained not simply by some special breach 

In his land^s customs, — ^by some precedence 
In thought and act — ^which, having proved him higher 

Than his own times, proved too his competence 
Of helping them to wonder and aspire. 



CASA GUIDl WINDOWS. 65 



XXV. 



My words are gxiiltless of the bigof s sense ! 
My soul has fire to mingle with the fire 

Of all these souls, within or out of doors 
Of Eome^s Church or another. I believe 

In one priest, and one temple, with its floors 
Of shining jasper, gloomM at mom and eve 

By countless knees of earnest auditors ; 
And crystal walls, too lucid to perceive, — 

That none may take the measure of the place 
And say, " so far the porphyry ; then, the flint — 

To this mark, mercy goes, and there, ends grace,^' 
While still the permeable crystals hint 

At some white starry distance, bathed in space ! 
I feel how nature^s ice-crusts keep the dint 



66 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Of undersprings of silent Deity ; 
I hold the articulated gospels, which 

Show Christ among us, crucified on tree ; 
I love all who love truth, if poor or rich 

In what they have won of truth possessively ! 
No altars and no hands defiled with pitch 

Shall scare me off, but I will pray and eat 
With all these — ^taking leave to choose my ewers 

And say at last, '^ Your visible Churches cheat 
Their inward types ; and if a Church assures 

Of standing without failure and defeat. 
That Church both fails and lies ! " 



XXVL 



To leave which lures 
Of wider subject through past years, — ^behold. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 67 

We come back from the Popedom to the Pope, 

To ponder what he must be, ere we are bold 
For what he may be, with our heavy hope 

To trust upon his soul. So, fold by fold. 
Explore this mummy in the priestly cope 

Transmitted through the darks of time, to catch 
The man within the wrappage, and discern 

How he, an honest man, upon the watch 
Pull fifty years, for what a man may learn. 

Contrived to get just there; with what a snatch 
Of old world oboli he had to earn 

The passage through ; with what a drowsy sop 
To drench the busy barkings of his brain ; 

What ghosts of pale tradition, wreathed with hop 
^Gainst wakeful thought, he had to entertain 

For heavenly visions ; and consent to stop 

f2 



68 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

The clock at noon, and let the hour remain 

(Without vain windings up) inviolate. 
Against aU chimings from the belfry. Lo ! 

From every given pope, you must abate. 
Albeit you love him, some things— -good, you know 

Which every given heretic you hate 
Claims for his own, bs being plainly so. 

A pope must hold by popes a little, — yes. 
By councils, — from Nicsea up to Trent, — 

By hierocratic empire, more or less 
Irresponsible to men, — he must resent 

Each man's particular conscience, and repress 
Inquiry, meditation, argument. 

As tyrants faction. Also, he must not 
Love truth too dangerously, but prefer 

"The interests of the Church,'^ because a blot 




CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 69 

Is better than a rent in miniver, — 

Submit to see the people swallow hot 
Husk-porridge which his chartered churchmen stir 

Quoting the only true God^s epigraph, 
" Feed my lambs, Peter ! '' — ^must consent to sit 

Attesting with his pastoral ring and staff. 
To such a picture of our Lady, hit 

Off well by artist angels, though not half 
As fair as Giotto would have painted it ; 

To such a vial, where a dead man^s blood 
Buns yearly warm beneath a churchman^s finger ; 

To such a holy house of stone and wood. 
Whereof a cloud of angels was the bringer 

From Bethlehem to Loreto ! — ^Were it good 
For any pope on earth to be a flinger 

Of stones against these high-niched counterfeits ? 



70 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Apostates only are iconoclasts. 

He dares not say, while this false thing abets 
That true thing, *^ this is false ! '^ he keepeth fasts 

And prayers, as prayers and fasts were silver frets 
To change a note upon a string that lasts. 

And make a lie a virtue. Now, if he 
Did more than this, — higher hoped and braver dared, — 

I think he were a pope in jeopardy. 
Or no pope rather ! for his soul had barred 

The vaulting of his life. And certainly. 
If he do only this, mankind^s regard 

Moves on from him at once, to seek some new 
Teacher and leader ! He is good and great 

According to the deeds a pope can do ; 
Most liberal, save those bonds ; affectionate. 

As princes may be ; and, as priests are, true — 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS, 71 

But only the ninth Kus after eight, 

When all ^s praised most. At best and hopefoUest, 
He ^s pope — we want a man ! his heart beats warm, 

But, like the prince enchanted to the waist. 
He sits in stone, and hardens by a charm 

Into the marble of his throne high-placed ! 
Mild benediction, waves his saintly arm — 

So good ! but what we want ^s a perfect man. 
Complete and all alive : half travertine 

Half suits our need, and ill subserves our plan. 
Feet, knees, nerves, sinews, energies divine 

Were never yet too much for men who ran 
In such exalted ways as this of thine. 

Deliverer whom we seek, whoever thou art. 
Pope, prince, or peasant ! If, indeed, the first. 

The noblest, therefore ! since the heroic heart 



72 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Within thee must be great enough to burst 
Those trammels buckling to the baser part 

Thy saintly peers in Eome, who crossed and cursed 
With the same finger. 



xxvn. 



r 



Come, appear, be found, 
K pope or peasant, come ! we hear the cock. 

The courtier of the mountains when first crowned 
With golden dawn ; and orient glories fiock 

To meet the sun upon the highest ground. 
Take voice and work ! we wait to hear thee knock , 

At some one of our Florentine nine gates, 
On each of which was imaged a sublime 

Face of a Tuscan genius, which, for hate's 
And love's sake both, our Florence in her prime 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 73 

Turned boldly on all comers to her states. 
As heroes turned their shields in antique time. 

Blazoned with honourable acts. And though 
The gates are blank now of such images. 

And Petrarch looks no more from Nicolo 
Toward dear Arezzo, 'twixt the acacia trees. 

Nor Dante, from gate GaUo — still we know. 
Despite the razing of the blazonries, 
♦ Eemains the consecration of the shield, — 
The dead heroic faces will start out 

On all these gates, if foes should take the field, 
And blend sublimely, at the earliest shout. 

With our live fighters, who will scorn to yield 
A hair's-breadth ev^n, when, gazing round about. 

They find in what a glorious company 
They fight the foes of Florence ! Who will grudge 



74 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

His one poor life, when that great man we see, 
Has given five hundred years, the world being judge. 

To help the glory of his Italy P 
Who, bom the fair side of the Alps, will budge, 

When Dante stays, when Ariosto stays. 
When Petrarch stays, for ever P Ye bring swords. 

My Tuscans P Why, if wanted in this haze. 
Bring swords, but first bring souls ! — bring thoughts 
and words 

Unrusted by a tear of yesterday's. 
Yet awful by its wrong, and cut these cords 

And mow this green lush falseness to the roots. 
And shut the mouth of hell below the swathe ! 

And if ye can bring songs too, let the lute's 
Eecoverable music softly bathe 

Some poet's hand, that, through all bursts and bruits 



CASA GTTIDI WINDOWS. 76 

Of popular passion — all uoripe and rathe 

Convictions of the popular intellect — 
Ye may not lack a finger up the air, 

Annunciative, reproving, pure, erect, 
To show which way your first Ideal bare 

The whiteness of its wings, when, sorely pecked 
By falcons on your wrists, it unaware 

Arose up overhead, and out of sight. 



xxvin. 



Meanwhile, let all the far ends of the world 

Breathe back the deep breath of their old delight, 

To swell the Italian banner just unfurled. 
Help, lands of Europe ! for, if Austria fight. 

The drums will bar your slumber. Who had curled 
The laurel for your thousand artists^ brows. 



76 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

If these Italian hands had planted none ? 

And who can sit down idle in the house. 
Nor hear appeals from Buonarotti's stone 

And Eaffael's canvas, rousing and to rouse ? 
Where ^s Poussin's master ? Gallic Avignon 

Bred Laura, and Vaucluse's fount has stirred 
The heart of France too strongly, — as it lets 

Its little stream out, like a wizard^s bird 
Which bounds upon its emerald wings, and wets 

The rocks on each side — ^that she should not gird 
Her loins with Charlemagne's sword, when foes beset 

The country of her Petrarch. Spain may well 
Be minded how from Italy she caught, 

To mingle with her tinkling Moorish bell, 
A fuller cadence and a subtler thought ; 

And even the New World, the receptacle 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Of freemen, may send glad men, as it ought. 
To greet Vespucci Amerigo^s door ; 

While England claims, by trump of poetry, 
Verona, Venice, the Eavenna shore. 

And dearer holds her Milton^s Piesole 
Than Malvern with a sunset running o'er. 



XXIX. 



And Vallombrosa, we two went to see 

Last June, beloved companion, — ^where sublime 
The mountains live in holy families, 

And the slow pinewoods ever climb and climb 
Half up their breasts ; just stagger as they seize 

Some grey crag — drop back with it many a time. 
And straggle blindly down the precipice ! 

The Vallombrosan brooks were strewn as thick 



78 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

That June-day, knee-deep, with dead beechen leaves. 

As Milton saw them ere his heart grew sick, 
And his eyes blind. I think the monks and beeves 

Are all the same too : scarce they have changed the wick 
On good St. Gualbert's altar, which receives 

The convent's pilgrims ; and the pool in front 
Wherein the hill-stream trout are cast, to wait 

The beatific vision, and the grunt 
Used at refectory, keeps its weedy state. 

To baffle saintly abbots, who would count 
The fish across their breviary, nor 'bate 

The measure of their steps. waterfalls 
And forests I sound and silence ! mountains bare. 

That leap up peak by peak, and catch the palls 
Of purple and silver mist, to rend and share 

With one another, at electric calls 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 79 

Of life in the smibeams, — till we cannot dare 

Fix your shapes, learn your number ! we must think 
Your beauty and your glory helped to fill 

The cup of Milton's soul so to the brink. 
That he no more was thirsty when Gt)d's will 

Had shattered to his sense the last chain-link 
By which he drew from Nature's visible 

The fresh well-water. Satisfied by this. 
He sang of Adam's paradise and snnled. 

Remembering Vallombrosa. Therefore is 
The place divine to English man and child — 

We all love Italy. 



XXX. 



Our Italy 's 
The darling of the earth — ^the treasury, piled 



80 CASA 6UIDI WINDOWS. 

With reveries of gentle ladies^ flung 
Aside, like ravelled silk, from life's worn stuff — 

With coins of scholars' fancy, which, being rung 
On work-day counter, still sound silver-proof — 

In short, with all the dreams of dreamers young, 
Before their heads have time for slipping ofif 

Hope's pillow to the ground. How oft, indeed. 
We all have sent our souls out from the north. 

On bare white feet which would not print nor bleed. 
To climb the Alpine passes and look forth. 

Where the low murmuring Lombard rivers lead 
Their bee-like way to gardens almost worth 

The sight which thou and I see afterward 
From Tuscan Bellosguardo, wide awake, 

Wlien standing on the actual, blessed sward 
Where Galileo stood at nights to take 



CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 81 

The vision of the stars, we find it hard. 
Gazing upon the earth and heaven, to make 

A choice of beauty. Tlierefore let us all 
In England, or in any other land 

Eefreshed once by the fountain-rise and fall 
Of dreams of this fair south, — who understand 

A little how the Tuscan musical 
Vowels do round themselves, as if they planned 

Eternities of separate sweetness, — ^we 
Who loved Sorrento vines in picture-book. 

Or ere in wine-cup we pledged faith or glee — 
Who loved Eome's wolf, with demi-gods at suck. 

Or ere we loved truth's own divinity, — 
Who loved, in brief, the classic hill and brook. 

And Ovid's dreaming tales, and Petrarch's song. 
Or ere we loved Love's self ! — ^why, let us give 



82 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

The blessing of our souls^ and wish them strong 
To bear it to the height where prayers arrive, 

When faithful spirits pray against a wrong ; 
To this great cause of southern men, who strive 

In Qod^s name for man's rights, and shall not fail ! 



XXXI. 



Behold, they shall not fail. The shouts ascend 

Above the shrieks, in Naples, and prevail. 
Eows of shot corpses, waiting for the end 

Of burial, seem to smile up straight and pale 
Into the azure air, and apprehend 

That final gun-flash from Palermo's coast, 
Which lightens their apocalypse of death. 

So let them die ! The world shows nothing lost ; 
Therefore, not blood ! Above or underneath. 



OASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 83 

What matter, brothers, if we keep our post 
Or truth's and dut/s side ? As sword to sheath. 

Dust turns to grave, but souls find place in Heaven. 
friends, heroic daring is success. 

The eucharistic bread requires no leaven ; 

And though your ends were hopeless, we should bless 
Your cause as holy ! Strive — and, having striven, 
Take, for God's recompense, that righteousness ! 



Qi^ 



84 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



PAET II. 



I. 



I WROTE a meditation and a dream. 

Hearing a little child sing in the street 
I leant upon his music as a theme, 

Till it gave way beneath my hearths full beat. 
Which tried at an exultant prophecy 

But dropped before the measure was complete 
Alas, for songs and hearts ! Tuscany, 

Dante's Florence, is the type too plam ? 
Didst thou, too, only sing of liberty. 

As little children take up a high strain 
With unintentioned voices, and break off 



CASA GUrOI WINDOWS. S6 

To sleep upon their mothers^ knees again ? 
Could^st thou not watch one hour? Then, sleep 
enough — 

That sleep may hasten manhood, and sustain 
The faint pale spirit with some muscular stuff. 



n. 



But we, who cannot slumber as thou dost. 
We thinkers, who have thought for thee and failed, — 

We hopers, who have hoped for thee and lost, — 
We poets, wandered round by dreams,* who hailed 

From this Atrides^ roof (with lintel-post 
Which still drips blood, — the worse part hath prevailed) 

The fire-voice of the beacons, to declare 
Troy taken, sorrow ended, — cozened through 



* Referring to the well-known opening passage of the Agamemnon of 
^schylos. 



86 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

A crimson sunset in a misty air, — 
What now remaiQs for such as we, to do ? 

— God's judgments, peradventure, will He bare 
To the roots of thunder, if we kneel and sue ? 



in. 



From Casa Guidi windows I looked forth, 
And saw ten thousand eyes of Morentines 

Flash back the triumph of the Lombard north, — 
Saw fi% banners, freighted with the signs 

And exultations of the awakened earth. 
Moat on above the multitude in lines. 

Straight to the Ktti. So, the vision went. 
And so, between those populous rough hands 

Raised in the sun, Duke Leopold outleant. 

And took the patriot's oath, which henceforth stands 



CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 87 



Among the oaths of perjurers, eminent 
To catch the lightnings ripened for these lands. 



IV. 



Why swear at all, thou false Duke Leopold ? 
What need to swear ? WTiat need to boast thy blood 

Taintless of Austria, and thy heart unsold 
Away from Florence ? It was understood 

God made thee not too vigorous or too bold, 
And men had patience with thy quiet mood. 

And women, pity, as they saw thee pace 
Their festive streets with premature grey hairs : 

We turned the mild dejection of thy face 
To princely meanings, took thy wrinkling cares 

For ruffling hopes, and called thee weak, not base. 
Better to light the torches for more prayers 



>f 



88 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And smoke the pale Madonnas at the shrine^ 
Being still ''our poor Grand-duke/^ ''our good Grand- 
duke/ 

'^ Who cannot help the Austrian in his line/^ 
Than write an oath upon a nation^s book 

For men to spit at with scorn's blurring brine ! 
Who dares forgive what none can overlook ? 



V. 



For me, I do repent me in this dust 
Of towns and temples, which makes Italy, — 

I sigh amid the sighs which breathe a gust 
Of dying century to century. 

Around us on the uneven crater-crust 
Of the old worlds, — ^I bow my soul and knee. 

And sigh and do repent me of my fault 



CASA GUrOI WINDOWS. 89 

That ever I believed the man was trae. 

These sceptred strangers shun the common salt. 
And, therefore, when the general board's in view. 

They standing up to carve for blind and halt. 
We should suspect the viands which ensue. 

And I repent that in this time and place. 
Where all the corpse-lights of experience bum 

From Caesar's and Lorenzo's festering race. 
To illumine groping reasoners, I could learn 

No better counsel for a simple case 
Than to put faith in princes, in my turn. 

Heavens ! had the death-piles of the ancient years 
Flared up in vain before me ? Knew I not 

What stench arises from their purple gears, — 
And how the sceptres witness whence they got 

Their briar-wood, crackling through the atmosphere's 



90 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Foul smoke, by princely perjuries, kept hot ? 

Forgive me, ghosts of patriots, — ^Brutus, thou, 
Who trailest downhill into life again 

Thy blood-weighed cloak, to indict me with thy slow 
Eeproachfol eyes ! — ^for being taught in vain 

That while the illegitimate Csesars show 
Of meaner stature than the first fall strain, 

(Confessed incompetent to conquer Gaul) 
They swoon as feebly and cross Bubicons 

As rashly as any JuUus of them all. 
Forgive, that I forgot the mind that runs 

Through absolute races, too unsceptical ! 
I saw the man among his little sons, 

His lips warm with their kisses while he swore, — 
And I, because I am a woman, I, 

Who felt my own chfld^s coming life before 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 91 



The prescience of my soul, and held faith high, 

I could not bear to think, whoever bore. 
That lips, so wanned, could shape so cold a Ke. 



VI. 



From Casa Gnidi windows I looked out, 
Again looked, and beheld a different sight. 

The Duke had fled before the people^s shout 
"Long live the Duke ! " A people, to speak right. 

Should speak as soft as courtiers, lest a doubt 
Turn gracious sovereign brows to curdled white. 

Moreover that same dangerous shouting meant 
Some gratitude for fature favours, which 

Were only promised; — ^the Constituent 
ImpUed ; — ^the whole being subject to the hitch 

In motu proprios, very incident 



92 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

To all these Czars, from Paul to Paulovitch. 

Whereat the people rose up in the dust 
Of the Duke^s flying feet, and shouted still. 

And loudly, only, this time, as was just. 
Not " Live the Duke,^^ who had fled, for good or ill 

But " Live the People,'^ who remained and must. 
The unrenounced and unrenounceable. 



VII. 



Long live the people ! How they lived ! and boiled 
And bubbled in the cauldron of the street ! 

How the young blustered, nor the old recoiled. 
And what a thunderous stir of tongues and feet 

Trod flat the palpitating beUs, and foiled 
The joy-guns of their echo, shattering it ! 

How they pulled down the Duke^s arms everywhere ! 



CASA GUrDI WINDOWS. 93 

How they set up new caf^-signs, to show 

Where patriots might sip ices in pure air — 
(Yet the fresh paint smelt somewhat). To and fro 

How marched the civic guard, and stopped to stare 
When boys broke windows in a civic glow. 

How rebel songs were sung to loyal tunes. 
And the pope cursed, in ecclesiastic metres ! 

How aU the CSrcoh grew large as moons. 
And aU the speakers, moonstruck ! — thankftd greeters 

Of prospects which struck poor the ducal boons, 
A mere free press, and chambers ! — frank repeaters 

Of great Guerazzi's praises. ..." There 's a man 
The father of the land ! — ^who, truly great, 

Takes off that national disgrace and ban. 
The farthing tax upon our Florence-gate, 

And saves Italia as he only can.^^ 



94 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

How all the nobles fled, and would not wait. 
Because they were most noble ! which being so. 

How the mob vowed to bum their palaces. 
Because they were too free to have leave to go. 

How grown men raged at Austria's wickedness. 

And smoked, — ^while fifty striplings in a row 
Marched straight to Piedmont for the wrong's redress ! 

Who says we failed in duty, we who wore 
Black velvet like Italian democrats, 

Who slashed our sleeves like patriots, nor forswore 
The true republic in the form of hats ? 

We chased the archbishop from the duomo door — 
We chalked the walls with bloody caveats 

Against all tyrants. If we* did not fight 
Exactly, we fired muskets up the void. 

To show that victory was ours of right. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 96 

We met, discussed in every place, self-buoyed 

Except, perhaps, i^ the chambers, day and night : 
We proved that all the poor should be employed. 

And yet the rich not worked for anywise,— 
Pay certified, yet payers abrogated. 

Full work secured, yet liabilities 
To over-work excluded, — ^not one bated 

Of all our holidays, that still, at twice 
Or thrice a-week, are moderately rated. 

We proved that Austria was dislodged, or would 
Or should be, and that Tuscany in arms 

Should, would, dislodge her, in high hardihood ! 
And yet, to leave our piazzas, shops, and farms. 

For the bare sake of fighting, was not good. 
We proved that also — " Did we carry charms 

Against being killed ourselves, that we should rush 



96 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS, 

On killing others ? What ! desert herewith 

Our wives and mothers ! — was that duty ? Tush ! '' 
At which we shook the sword within the sheath. 

Like heroes — only louder ! and the flush 
Ban up our cheek to meet the victor's wreath. 

Nay, what we proved, we shouted — ^how we shouted, 
(Especially the little boys did) planting 

That tree of liberty whose fruit is doubted 
Because the roots are not of nature's granting — 

A tree of good and evil ! — ^none, without it. 
Grow gods ! — alas, and, with it, men were wanting. 



vm. 



holy knowledge, holy liberty, 
holy rights of nations ! If I speak 
These bitter things against the jugglery 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 97 

Of days that in your names proved blind and weak, 

It is that tears are bitter. When we see 
The brown skulls grin at death in churchyards bleak. 

We do not cry, "This Yorick is too light/^ — 
For death grows deathlier with that mouth he makes. 

So with my mocking. Bitter things I write, 
Because my soul is bitter for your sakes, 

O freedom ! my Florence ! 



IX. 



Men who might 

m 

Do greatly in a universe that breaks 

And burns, must ever know before they do. 

Courage and patience are but sacrifice; 
And sacrifice is offered for and to 

Something conceived of. Each man pays a price 



98 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

For what himself counts precious, whether true 
Or false the appreciation it implies. 

Here, was no knowledge, no conception, nought ! 
Desire was absent, that provides great deeds 

From out the greatness of prevenient thought ; 
And action, action, like a flame that needs 

A steady breath and fuel, being caught 
Up, like a burning reed from other reeds. 

Flashed in the empty and uncertain air. 
Then wavered, then went out. Behold, who blames 

A crooked course, when not a goal is there. 
To round the fervid striving of the games ? 

An ignorance of means may minister 
To greatness, but an ignorance of aims 

Makes it impossible to be great at all. 
So, with our Tuscans ! Let none dare to say. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 99 

Here virtue never can be national, 
Here fortitude can never cut its way 

Between the Austrian muskets, out of thrall. 
I tell you rather, that whoever may 

Discern true ends here, shall grow pure enough 
To love them, brave enough to strive for them. 

And strong to reach them, though the roadsbe rough : 
That having learnt — by no mere apophthegm — 

Not the mere draping of a graceful stuflp 
About a statue, broidered at the hem, — 

Not the mere trilling on an opera stage. 
Of ' libertSl' to bravos— (a fair word. 

Yet too allied to inarticulate rage 
And breathless sobs, for singing, though the chord 

Were deeper than they struck it !) — ^but the gauge 
Of civil wants sustained, and wrongs abhorred, — 



100 CA8A GUIDI WINDOWS. 

The serious^ sacred meaning and full use 
Of freedom for a nation, — ^tlien, indeed. 

Our Tuscans, underneath the bloody dews 
Of a new morning, rising up agreed 

And bold, will want no Saxon souls or thews. 
To sweep their piazzas clear of Austria's breed. 



X. 



Alas, alas ! it was not so this time. 
Conviction wa&not, courage failed, and truth 

Was something to be doubted of. The mime 
Changed masks, because a mime ; the tide as smooth 

In running in as out; no sense of crime 
Because no sense of virtue. Sudden ruth 

Seized on the people . . . they would have again 
Their good Grand-duke, and leave Guerazzi, though 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 101 

He took that tax from Morence : — " Much in vain 
He took it from the market-carts, we trow. 

While urgent that no market-men remain. 
But all march off, and leave the spade and plough, 

To die among the Lombards. Was it thus 
The dear paternal Duke did ? Live the Duke ! '' 

At which the joy-bells multitudinous. 
Swept by an opposite wind, as loudly shook. 

Eecall the mild Archbishop to his house. 
To bless the people with his frighteued look, 

For he shall not be hanged yet, we intend. 
Seize on Guerazzi; guard him in fdl view. 

Or else we stab him in the back, to end. 
Rub out those chalked devices ! Set up new 

The Duke's arms; doff your Phrygian caps; and mend 
The pavement of the piazzas broke into 



102 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS, 

By the bare poles of freedom ! Smooth the way 
For the Duke's carnage^ lest his highness sigh 

" Here trees of liberty grew yesterday/' 
Long live the Duke ! — How roared the cannonry. 

How rocked each campanile^ and through a spray 
Of nosegays, wreaths, and kerchiefs, tossed on high. 

How marched the civic guard, the people still 
Shouting — especially the little boys ! 

Alas, poor people, of an unfledged will 
Most fitly expressed by such a callow voice ! 

Alas, still poorer Duke, incapable 
Of being worthy even of that noise ! 



XI. 



You think he came back instantly, with thanks 
And tears in liis faint eyes, and hands extended 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 103 

To stretch the franchise through their utmost ranks ? 
That having, like a father, apprehended. 

He came to pardon fatherly those pranks 
Played out, and now in filial service ended ? — 

That some love token, like a prince, he threw. 
To meet the people's love-call, in return ? 

Well, how he came I will relate to you; 
And if your hearts should bum, why, hearts miist bum, 

To make the ashes which things old and new 
Shall be washed clean in — as this Duke will learn. 



xn. 



From Casa Guidi windows, gazing, then, 
I saw and witness how the Duke came back. 

The regular tramp of horse and tread of men 
Did smite the silence like an anvil black 



104 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And sparkless. With her wide eyes at full strain^ 
Our Tuscan nurse exclaimed, " Alack, alack, 

Signora ! these shall be the Austrians/' '' Nay, 
Hush, hush,^^ I answered, *^ do not wake the child ! " 

For so, my two-months^ baby sleeping lay 
In milky dreams upon the bed and smiled ; 

And I thought "he shall sleep on, while he may. 
Through the world's baseness. Not being yet defiled. 

Why should he be disturbed by what is done ? ^' 
Then, gazing, I beheld the long-drawn street 

Live out, from end to end, full in the sun. 
With Austria's thousands. Sword and bayonet. 

Horse, foot, artillery, — cannons rolling on. 
Like blind, slow storm-clouds gestant with the heat 

Of undeveloped lightnings, each bestrode 
By a single man, dust-white from head to heel. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 106 

Indifferent as the dreadful thing he rode, 
Cahn as a sculptured Fate, and terrible ! 

As some smooth river which hath overflowed. 
Doth slow and silent down its current wheel 

A loosened forest, aU the pines erect, — 
So, swept, in mute significance of storm, 

The marshalled thousands, — ^not an eye deflect 
To left or right, to catch a novel form 

Of the famed city adorned by architect 
And carver, nor of Beauties live and warm 

Scared at the casements, — all, straightforward eyes 
And faces, held as steadfast as their swords. 

And cognisant of acts, not imageries. 
The key, Tuscans, too well fits the wards ! 

Ye asked for mimes ; these bring you tragedies — 
For purple ; these shall wear it as your lords. 



106 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Ye played like children : die like innocents ! 
Ye mimicked lightnings with a torch : the crack 

Of the actual bolt, your pastime, circumvents. 
Ye called up ghosts, believing they were slack 

To follow any voice from Gilboa's tents, . • . 
Here ^s Samuel ! — and, so. Grand-dukes come back ! 



xm. 



And yet, they are no prophets though they come. 
That awful mantle they are drawing close. 

Shall be searched, one day, by the shafts of Doom, 
Through double folds now hoodwinking the brows. 

Resuscitated monarchs disentomb 
Grave-reptiles with them, in their new life-throes : 

Let such beware. Behold, the people waits. 
Like God. As He, in his serene of might. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 107 

So they, in their endurance of long straits. 
Ye stamp no nation out, though day and night 

Ye tread them with that absolute heel which grates 
And grinds them flat from all attempted height. 

You kill worms sooner with a garden-spade 
Than you kill peoples : peoples will not die ; 

The tail curls stronger when you lop the head; 
They writhe at every wound and multiply. 

And shudder into a heap of life that 's made 
Thus vital from God's own vitality. 

^Tis hard to shrivel back a day of God's 
Once fixed for judgment : 'tis as hard to change 

The people's, when they rise beneath their loads 
And heave them from their backs with violent wrench, , 

To crush the oppressor. For that judgment rod 's 
The measure of this popular revenge. 



108 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 



XIV. 



Meantime, from Casa Guidi windows we 
Beheld the armament of Austria flow 

Into the drowning heart of Tuscany. 
And yet none wept, none cursed; or, if *twas so. 

They wept and cursed in silence. Silently 
Our noisy Tuscans watched the invading foe ; 

They had learnt silence. Pressed against the wall 
And grouped upon the church-steps opposite, 

A few pale men and women stared at all. 
God knows what they were feeling, with their white 

Constrained faces ! — ^they, so prodigal 
Of cry and gesture when the world goes right. 

Or wrong indeed. But here, was depth of wrong. 
And here, still water : they were silent here : 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 109 

And through that sentient silence, struck along 
That measured tramp from which it stood out clear. 

Distinct the sound and silence, like a gong 
Tolled upon midnight, — each made awfaller ; 

While every soldier in his cap displayed 
A leaf of olive. Dusty, bitter thing ! 

Was such plucked at Novara, is it said ? 



XV. 



A cry is up in England, which doth ring 

The hollow world through, that for ends of trade 

And virtue, and God^s better worshipping. 

We henceforth should exalt the name of Peace, 

And leave those rusty wars that eat the soul, — 
(Besides their clippings at bur golden fleece.) 

I, too, have loved peace, and from bole to bole 



110 CASA GUrOI WINDOWS. 

Of immemorial, undeciduous trees. 
Would write, as lovers use, upon a scroll 

The holy name of Peace, and set it high 
Where none should pluck it down. On trees, I 
say,— 

Not upon gibbets ! — ^With the greenery 
Of dewy branches and the flowery May, 

Sweet mediation ^twixt the earth and sky. 
Providing, for the shepherd^s hoHday ! 

Not upon gibbets I — ^though the vulture leaves 
Some quiet to the bones he first picked bare. 

Not upon dungeons ! though the wretch who grieves 
And groans within, stirs not the outer air 

As much as little field-mice stir the sheaves. 
Not upon chain-bolt^ ! though the slave's despair 

Has duUed his helpless, miserable brain, 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. Ill 

And left him blank beneath the freeman^s whip. 

To sing and laugh out idiocies of pain. 
Nor yet on starving homes ! where many a lip 

Has sobbed itself asleep through curses vain ! 
I love no peace which is not fellowship. 

And which includes not mercy. I would have 
Eather, the raking of the guns across 

The world, and shrieks against Heaven's architrave. 
Eather, the struggle in the slippery fosse. 

Of dying men and horses, and the wave 
Blood-bubbHng. . . . Enough said ! — By Christ's own 
cross. 

And by the faint heart of my womanhood. 
Such things are better than a Peace which sits 

Beside the hearth in self-commended mood. 
And takes no thought how wind and rain by fits 



112 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Are howling out of doors against the good 
Of the poor wanderer. What ! your peace admits 

Of outside anguish while it sits at home ? 
I loathe to take its name upon my tongue — 

It is no peace. ^Tis treason, stiff with doom, — 
^Tis gagged despair, and inarticulate wrong. 

Annihilated Poland, stifled Some, 
Dazed Naples, Hungary fainting 'neath the thong. 

And Austria wearing a smooth olive-leaf 
On her brute forehead, while her hoofs outpress 

The life from these Italian souls, in brief. 
O Lord of Peace, who art Lord of Bighteousness, 

Constrain the anguished worlds from sin and grief. 
Pierce them with conscience, purge them with 
redress, 

And give us peace which is no counterfeit ! 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 113 



XVI. 



But wherefore should we look out any more 

From Casa Guidi windows ? Shut them straight ; 
And let us sit down by the folded door 

And veil our saddened faces, and so, wait 
What next the judgment-heavens make ready for. 

I have grown weary of these windows. Sights 
Come thick enough and clear enough with thought. 

Without the sunshine; souls have inner lights : 
And since the Grand-duke has come back and brought 

This army of the North which thus requites 
His filial South, we leave him to be taught. 

His South, too, has learnt something certainly, 
Whereof the practice will bring profit soon ; 

And peradventure other eyes may see. 



114 OASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

From Casa Guidi windows^ what is done 

Or undone. Whatsoever deeds they be. 
Pope Rus will be glorified in none. 



xvn. 



Eecord that gain, Mazzini I — ^it shall top 
Some heights of sorrow. Peter's rock, so named. 

Shall lure no vessel, any more, to drop 
Among the breakers. Peter's chair is shamed 

Like any vulgar throne the nations lop 
To pieces for their firewood unreclaimed; 

And, when it bums too, we shall see as well 
In Italy as elsewhere. Let it bum. 

The cross, accounted still adorable. 
Is Christ's cross only ! — ^if the thief s would earn 

Some stealthy genufiexions, we rebel ; 



CASA GUrOI WINDOWS. 115 

And here the impenitent thief s has had its turn. 

As God knows ; and the people on their knees 
Scoff and toss back the croziers^ stretched like yokes 

To press their heads down lower by degrees. 
So Italy, by means of these last strokes, 

Escapes the danger which preceded these, 
Of leaving captured hands in cloven oaks . . . 

Of leaving very souls within the buckle 
Whence bodies struggled outward ... of supposing 

That freemen may like bondsmen kneel and truckle. 
And then stand up as usual, without losing 

An inch of stature. 

Those whom she-wolves suckle 
Will bite as wolves do, in the grapple-closing 

Of adverse interests : this, at last, is known, 
(Thank Pius for the lesson) that albeit, 

i2 



116 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Among the Popedom's hundred heads of stone 
Which blink down on you from the roofs retreat 

In Siena^s tiger-striped cathedral, — Joan 
And Borgia 'mid their fellows you may greet, 

A harlot and a devil, you will see 
Not a man, stiU less angel, grandly set 

With open soul, to render man more free. 
The fishers are stiU thinking of the net. 

And if not thinking of the hook too, we 
Are counted somewhat deeply in their debt : 

But that 's a rare case — so, by hook and crook 
They take the advantage, agonizing CJhrist 

By rustier nails than those of Cedron's brook, 
F the people's body very cheaply priced ; 

Quoting high priesthood out of Holy book. 
And buying death-fields with the sacrificed. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 117 



xvnL 



Priests, priests ! — ^there's no such name, — God^s own, 
except 
Ye take most vainly. Through Heaven's lifted gate 

The priestly ephod in sole glory swept. 
When Christ ascended, entered in, and sate 

With victor face sublimely overwept. 
At Deity's right hand, to mediate. 

He alone. He for ever. On his breast 
The Urim and the Thummim, fed with fire 

From the full Godhead, flicker with the unrest 
Of human, pitiful heartbeats. Come up higher, 

AU Christians ! Levi's tribe is dispossest ! 
That solitary alb ye shall admire. 

But not cast lots for. The last chrism, poured right. 



118 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Was on that Head, and poured for burial 

And not for domination in men's sight. 
What are these churches ? The old temple wall 

Doth overtook them juggling with the sleight 
Of surplice, candlestick, and altar-pall. 

East church and west church, ay, north church and 
south, 
Eome's church and England's, — ^let them aU repent. 

And make concordats 'twixt their soul and mouth. 
Succeed St. Paul by working at the tent. 

Become infallible guides by speaking truth. 
And excommunicate their own pride that bent 

And cramped the souls of men. 

Why, even here. 
Priestcraft bums out; the twined linen blazes, 

Not, like asbestos, to grow white and clear. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 119 

But aU to perish !— wMe the fire-smeU raises 

To life some swooning spirits who, last year, 
Lost breath and heart in these church-stifled places. 

Why, almost, through this Kus, we believed 
The priesthood could be an honest thing, he smiled 

So saintly while our com was being sheaved 
For his own granaries. Showing now defiled 

His hireling hands, a better help 's achieved 
Than if he blessed us shepherd-like and mild. 

False doctrine, strangled by its own amen. 
Dies in the throat of all this nation. Who 

Will speak a pope^s name, as they rise again ? 
What woman or what child will count him true ? 

What dreamer praise him with the voice or pen ? 
What man fight for him ? — ^Pius has his due. 



120 CASA GUrOI WINDOWS. 



Becord that gam, Mazzini ! — ^Tes, but first 
Set down thy people^s faults : — set down the want 

Of soul-conviction ; set down aims dispersed. 
And incoherent means, and valour scant 

Because of scanty faith, and schisms accursed 
That wrench these brother-hearts from covenant 

With freedom and each other. Set down this 
And this, and see to overcome it when 

The seasons bring the fruits thou wilt not miss 
If wary. Let no cry of patriot men 

Distract thee from the stem analysis 
Of masses who cry only : keep thy ken 

Clear as thy soul is virtuous. Heroes^ blood 
Splashed up against thy noble brow in Rome. — 



CASA. GUIDI WINDOWS. 121 

Let such not blind thee to the interlude 
Which was not also holy, yet did come 

^Twixt sacramental actions : — ^brotherhood, 
Despised even there, — and something of the doom 

Of Eemus, in the trenches. Listen now — 
Rossi died silent near where Ctesar died. 

He did not say, " My Brutus, is it thou ? '^ 
Instead, rose Italy and testified, 

"^Twas Ti and /am Brutus. — ^I avow.^^ 
At which the whole world^s laugh of scorn replied, 

" A poor maimed copy of Brutus ! ^' 

Too much like. 
Indeed, to be so unlike. Too unskilled 

At Philippi and the honest battle-pike. 
To be so skilful where a man is killed 

Near Pompe/s statue, and the daggers strike 



122 CASA GTJIDl WINDOWS. 

At unawares f the throat. Was thus fulfilled 

An omen of great Michel Angelo, — 
When Marcus Brutus he conceived complete, 

And strove to hurl him out by blow on blow 
Upon the marble, at Arfs thunderheat. 

Till haply some pre-shadow rising slow 
Of what his Italy would fancy meet 

To be called Betjtus, straight his plastic hand 
Fell back before his prophet soul, and leffc 

A fragment ... a maimed Brutus, — but more grand 
Than this, so named of Some, was ! 

Let thy weft 

Be of one woof and warp, Mazzini ! — stand 
With no man of a spotless fame bereft — 

Not for Italia ! Neither stand apart. 
No, not for the republic ! — ^from those pure 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 123 

Brave men who hold the level of thy heart 
In patriot truth, as lover and as doer, 

Albeit they will not follow where thou art 
As extreme theorist. Trust and distrust fewer ; 

And so bind strong and keep unstained the cause 
Which, at God^s signal, war-trumps newly blown 

Shall yet annuntiate to the world^s applause. 



zx. 



Just now, the world is busy : it has grown 
A Fair-going world. Imperial England draws 

The flowing ends of the earth, from Fez, Canton, 
Delhi and Stockhohn, Athens and Madrid, 

The Eussias and the vast Americas, 
As a queen gathers in her robes amid 

Her golden cincture, — ^isles, peninsulas, 



124 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Capes, continents, far inland countries hid 
By jaspar sands and hills of chrysopras, 

All trailing in their splendours through the door 
Of the new Crystal Palace. Every nation, 

To every other nation, strange of yore. 
Shall face to face give civic salutation. 

And hold up in a proud right hand before 
That congress, the best work which she could fashion 

By her best means — " These corals, will you please 
To match against your oaks ? They grow as fast 

Within my wilderness of purple seas/^ — 
" This diamond stared upon me as I passed 

(As a live god^s eye from a marble frieze) 
Along a dark of diamonds. Is it classed ? " — 

" I wove these stuffs so subtly, that the gold 
Swims to the surface of the silk, like cream. 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 126 

And curdles to fair patterns. Ye behold ! '' — 
" These delicated muslins rather seem 

Than be, you think? Nay, touch them and be 
bold, 
Though such veiled Chakhi's face in Hafiz' dream/' — 

" These carpets — ^you walk slow on them like kings. 
Inaudible like spirits, while your foot 

Dips deep in velvet roses and such things/' — 
"Even ApoUonius might commend this flute.* 

The music, winding through the stops, upsprings 
To make the player very rich. Compute." — 

" Here 's goblet-glass, to take in with your wine 
The very sun its grapes were ripened under. 

Drink light and juice together, and each fine.'' — 

• Philostratus relatets of Apollonius that he objected to the musical 
instroment of Linns the Rhodian, its incompetence to enrich and beautify. 
The history of music in our day, would, upon the former point, sufficiently 
confute the philosopher. 



126 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

'' This model of a steam-ship moves your wonder ? 

You shordd behold it crushing down the brine. 
Like a blind Jove who feels his way with thunder/^ — 

" Here 's sculpture ! Ah, we Kve too ! Why not 
throw 
Our life into our marbles ? Art has place 

For other artists after Angelo/' — 
" I tried to paint out here a natural face — 

For nature includes Eaflfael, as we know. 
Not Eaflfael nature. Will it help my case ? " — 

" Methinks you will not match this steel of ours V* — 
" Nor you this porcelain ! One might think the clay 

Eetained in it the larvae of the flowers. 
They bud so, round the cup, the old spring way/' — 

"Nor you these carven woods, where birds in bowers. 
With twisting snakes and climbiag cupids, play.'' 



OASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 127 



XXL 



Magi of the east and of the west^ 

Your incense, gold, and myrrh are excellent. — 

What gifts for Christ, then, bring ye with the rest ? 

Your hands have worked well. Is your courage 
spent 

In handwork only ? Have you nothing best. 
Which generous souls may perfect and present. 

And He shall thank the givers for ? No light 
Of teaching, Hberal nations, for the poor. 

Who sit in darkness when it is not night? 
No cure for wicked children ? Christ, — ^no cure ! 

No help for women sobbing out of sight 
Because men made the laws ? No brothel-lure 

Burnt out by popular lightnings ? — Hast thou found 



128 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

No remedy, my England, for sucli woes ? 

No outlet, Austria, for the scourged and bound. 
No entrance for the exiled ? No repose, 

Bussia, for knouted Poles worked underground. 
And gentle ladies bleached among the snows ? — 

No mercy for the slave, America ? — 
No hope for Eome, free France, chivalric France ? — 

Alas, great nations have great shames, I say. 
No pity, O world, no tender utterance 

Of benediction, and prayers stretched this way 
To poor Italia bafiBed by mischance ? — 

O gracious nations, give some ear to me ! 
You aU go to your Fair, and I am one 

Who at the roadside of humanity 
Beseech your alms, — a justice to be done. 
So, prosper ! 



CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 129 



XXII. 



In the name of Italy, 
Meantime, her patriot dead have benizon ! 

They only have done well ; and what they did 
Being perfect, it shall triumph. Let them slumber. 

No king of Egypt in a pyramid 
Is safer from oblivion, though he number 

Full seventy cerements for a coverlid. 
These Dead be seeds of life, and shall encumber 

The sad heart of the land until it loose 
The clammy clods and let out the spring-growth 

In beatific green through every bruise. 
The tyrant should take heed to what he doth. 

Since every victim-carrion turns to use. 
And drives a chariot, like a god made wroth. 



130 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Against each piled injustice. Ay, the least 
Dead for Italia, not in vain has died. 

However vainly, ere life's struggle ceased. 
To mad dissimilar ends they swerved aside. 

Bach grave her nationahty has pieced 
By its own noble breadth, and fortified. 

And pinned it deeper to the soil. Forlorn 
Of thanks, be, therefore, no one of these graves ! 

Not Hers, — ^who, at her husband's side, in scorn. 
Outfaced the whistling shot and hissing waves. 

Until she felt her little babe unborn 
Recoil, within her, from the violent staves 

And bloodhounds of the world : at which, her life 
Dropt inwards from her eyes, and followed it 

Beyond the hunters. Graribaldi's wife 
And child died so. And now, the sea-weeds fit 



CASA GXJIDI WINDOWS. 131 

Her body like a proper shroud and coif. 
And murmurously the ebbing waters grit 

The little pebbles, while she lies interred 
In the sea-sand. Perhaps, ere dying thus. 

She looked up in his face which never stirred 
From its clenched anguish, as to make excuse 

For leaving him for his, if so she erred. 
Well he remembers that she could not choose. 

A memorable grave ! Another is 
At Genoa, where a king may fitly lie, — 

Who bursting that heroic heart of his 
At lost Novara, that he could not die. 

Though thrice into the cannon's eyes for this 
He plunged his shuddering steed, and felt the sky 

Eeel back between the fire-shocks ; — stripped away 
The ancestral ermine ere the smoke had cleared, 

K 2 



132 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

And naked to the soul, that none might say 
His kingship covered what was base and bleared 

With treason, he went out an exile, yea, 
An exiled patriot ! Let him be revered. 



xxm. 



Yea, verily, Charles Albert has died well : 
And if he lived not all so, as one spoke. 

The sin pass softly with the passing bell. 
For he was shriven, I think, in cannon smoke. 

And taking off his crown, made visible 
A hero's forehead. Shaking Austria^s yoke 

He shattered his own hand and heart. ^ So best,' 
His last words were upon his lonely bed, — 

' I do not end like popes and dukes at least — 
' Thank God for it.' And now that he is dead. 




CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 133 

Admitting it is proved and manifest 
That he was worthy, with a discrowned head. 

To measure heights with patriots, let them stand 
Beside the man in his Oporto shroud. 

And each vouchsafe to take him by the hand. 
And kiss him on the cheek, and say aloud, 

' Thou, too, hast suffered for our native land ! 
* My brother, thou art one of us. Be proud/ 



XXIV. 



Still, graves, when Italy is talked upon ! 
Still, still, the patriot's tomb, the stranger's hate. 

Still Niobe ! still fainting in the sun 
By whose most dazzling arrows violate 

Her beauteous offspring perished ! Has she won 
Nothing but garlands for the graves, from Fate ? 



134 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Nothing but death-songs ? — ^Yet, be it understood. 
Life throbs in noble Piedmont ! while the feet 

Of Eome's clay image, dabbled soft in blood, 
Grow flat with dissolution, and, as meet, 

WiU soon be shovelled off, like other mud. 
To leave the passage free in church and street. 

And I, who first took hope up in this song. 
Because a child was singing one , . . behold. 

The hope and omen were not, haply, wrong ! 
Poets are soothsayers stiU, like those of old 

Who studied flights of doves, — and creatures young 
And tender, mighty meanings, may unfold. 



XXV. 



The sun strikes, through the windows, up the floor 
Stand out in it, my own young Florentine, 



CASA GTJIDI WINDOWS. 136 

Not two years old, and let me see thee more I 
It grows along thy amber curls, to shine 

Brighter than elsewhere. Now, look straight before. 
And fix thy brave blue English eyes on mine. 

And from thy soul, which fronts the future so, 
With unabashed and unabated gaze. 

Teach me to hope for, what the Angels know. 
When they smile clear as thou dost. Down God^s ways. 

With just alighted feet between the snow 
And snowdrops, where a Kttle lamb may graze. 

Thou hast no fear, my lamb, about the road. 
Albeit in our vain-glory we assume 

That, less than we have, thou hast learnt of God. 
Stand out, my blue-eyed prophet ! — ^thou, to whom 

The earliest world-day light that ever flowed. 
Through Gasa Guidi windows, chanced to come ! 



136 CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 

Now shake the glittering nimbus of thy hair. 
And be God's witness ; — that the elemental 

New springs of life are gushing everywhere, 
To cleanse the water courses, and prevent all 

Concrete obstructions which infest the air ! 
— ^That earth 's alive, and gentle or ungentle 

Motions within her, signify but growth : 
The ground swells greenest o'er the labouring moles. 

Howe'er the uneasy world is vexed and wroth. 
Young children, lifted high on parent souls. 

Look round them with a smile upon the mouth. 
And take for music every bell that tolls. 

Who said we should be better if like these ? 
And we . . , despond we for the future, though 

Posterity is smiling at our knees. 
Convicting us of folly ? Let us go — 



CASA GUIDI WINDOWS. 137 

We will trust God. The blank interstices 
Men take for ruins. He wiU build into 

With pillared marbles rare, or knit across 
With generous arches, till the fane ^s complete. 

This world has no perdition, if some loss. 



XXVI. 



Such cheer I gather from thy smiling. Sweet 

The self same cherub faces which emboss 
The rail, lean inward to the mercy-seat. 



NOTES. 



Page 4, 1. 6. 
" Void at Verona," &c. 

They show at Verona an empty trough of stone as the tomb 
of Juliet. 

Page 6, 1. 18. 
" That 'a Michel Angela / his statues wait." 

In the Sagrestia Nuova, where the statues of Day and Night, 
Dawn and Twilight, recline on the tombs of Giuliano de' Medici, 
third son of Lorenzo the Magnificent, and Lorenzo of Urbino, 
his grandson. Strozzi's epigram on the^ Night, with Michel 
Angelo's rejoinder, is well known. 

Page 8, 1. 8. 
" TJiou wert commanded to build up in snow." 

This mocking task was set by Pietro, the imworthy successor 
of Lorenzo the Magnificent. 



NOTES. 139 



Page 18, 1. 9. 



" WAcn mm make record, trith the flowers they strew, 
' SavonardkCa soul, " &c. 

Savonarola was burnt in martyrdom for his testimony against 
Papal corruptions as early as March, 1498 : and, as late as our 
own day, it is a custom in Florence to strew violets on the pave- 
ment where he suffered, in grateful recognition of the anniver- 
sary. 

Page 28, 1. 3. 
" where, at plagrte-time, MacchiavelJ 



See his description of the plague in Florence. 

Page 24, 1. 1. 
"A king stood hare before its sovran grace." 

Charles of Anjou, whom, in his passage through Florence, 
Cimabue allowed to see this picture while yet in his " Bottega." 
The populace followed the royal visitor, and in the universal 
delight and admiration, the quarter of the city in which the 
artist lived was called " Borgo Allegri." The picture was carried 
in a triumph to the church and deposited there. 

Page 25, 1. 13. 

" Tet rightlg toas young Giotto talked about, 
Whom Gimdbue found among the sheep" 

How Cimabue found Giotto, the shepherd-boy, sketching a ram 



140 NOTES. 

of his flock upon a stone, is a pretty story told by Vasari, — who 
also relates how the elder artist Margheritone died ''infastidito '* 
of the successes of the new school. 

Page 48, 1. 6. 

" in Santa Croce church, forlorn 

Of any corpse,^ &c. 

The Florentines, to whom the Ravennese denied the body of 
Dante which was asked of them in a '' late remorse of love/' have 
given a cenotaph to their divine poet in this church. Something 
less than a grave ! 

Page 48, 1. 18. 
" Good lovers of our age to track and plough." 

In allusion to Mr. Kirkup's well-known discovery of Giotto's 
fresco-portrait of Dante. 

Page 80, 1. 14. 
," From Tuscan BeUosguardo," &c 

Galileo's villa near Florence is built on an eminence called 
Bellosguardo. 



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9 



DIAGRAMS (A SERIES OF), Ulnstratiye of the PrincipleB of 
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1. The Lever— Balunce. 

S. Lever of First and Second Order. 

3. Stable Equilibrium and Bent Levers. 

4. Section of Fire Bnjcine. 

5. Wheel and Axle— Differential Axle. 
6. Capstan, Spring, and Fusee. 

7. Wheel and Axle— Toothed Gear. 

8. Blevaticm of Crane. 

9. — — Friction Bands, Circular Saw, 

ftc. 
10. The Pulley, fixed and moveable. 



11. Compound and Whitens. 

13. Smeaton's. 

13. The Inclined Plane. 

14. Inclined Pkme and Wedge. 
15. Tilt Hammer. 

16. The Screw. 

17. Endless Screw and Fty Preas. 

18. Screw, Standing Press. &c. 

19. Machines, Section of Saw Frame. 
20. Shears for Cutting Iron. 

21. an Eight-days' Clock. 



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kliahed'apcaciiai Iramlaled."— A^Ibh. 



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Sea Lands — The Towns — The House of Burgundy— The Empire— A 
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C 2 



20 LIST OF BOOKS PUBLISHED BY 



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MICHELETS (M.) HISTORY OF FRANCE. Translated by 
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Some Aca)unt of Knole House— The Farmyard — Alexandria — A Visit 
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Baalbec and Palmyra — On Deer and Deer-Stalking^— Cairo^The Story 
of Fawnia the Fair and the Prince Dorastus — Lirerpool and its Docks— 
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MITCHELL'S (SIR ANDREW, K.B.) MEMOIRS AND PAPERS; 

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ascribe to him more than human exemption flrom error. Sagacious, wary, and honest : 
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of Patient Grissel— The Romantic Story of the Princess Rosettar— The 
Mad Pranks of Robin Goodfellow— A Rare Ballad of the Blind Beggar's 
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PARRY, (EDWARD) ROYAL VISITS AND PROGRESSES TO 
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PENN (WILLIAM). An Historical Bioorapht. With an extra 
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Contents -.—The Father's House; 1620— 1667.— In the World; 1667— 
1670.— Trial by Jury; 1670. -Guli Springett; 1670— 1673.— The Begin- 
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Democracy ; 1680— 1682.— The Holy Experiment ; 1681— 1683.— Day of 
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Land of Promise; 1694— 1701.— The Closing Scenes ; 1702— 1718.— "The 
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PICKERSGILL'S (F. R., A.R.A.) SIX COMPOSITIONS FROM 

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Prussia and Gorman States. Nortliem Africa. 2 Maps. 

Germany and Switserland. 4 Maps. Western Africa. 3 Maps. 

Anstnan Empire. Soutiiem Africa. 2 Maps. 

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Russia in Europe. North America. 

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PRIOR (JAMES, F.S.A.) — Thb Country House, and other Poems. 
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SABBATH (THE MOSAIC); or. An Inqxtirt into thb sttppoSUB 
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SABBATH (Thb) ; or, An Examinatioh of the Six Tsxts Oom- 
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CoNTEKTS : — Examination of the Six Texts adduced from the New Testa- 
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Simday, not as a Sabbath, but as a Stated Day of Assembling for the 
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the Example of the Apostles with reference to the Religions ObBervanoe 
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Motes. 

SCHLOSSERS (F. C.) HISTORY OF THE EltSHTEENTH 
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CoKTENTs '.—Reformation or Revolution of Philosophy and Literature 
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till the Letters upon Literature — France, Remarks upon some of the 
Manifestations of English Literature — Oermany till the beginning of 
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— France, Austria, Prussia, England, till the French Republic — Internal 
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From the Truce of Leoben till the Second War of the Coalition — Europe 
from the Peace of Campo Formio till the Consulate of Bonaparte- 
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the Peace of Luneville— France, Russia, and England till the Peace of 
Amiens— Europe till the Peace of Presburg— Till the Peace of Tilsit- 
Till the Peace of SchOnbrunn. 

SCOTT'S (PATRICK) LELIO: A Vision op Reality; Hsrvob, 

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Being — On my being Daguerreotyped by my Friend Captain Revnidds 
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CoT^^l^TH^ 



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IS. IwHlMlud. 3t. Tl» Cunnlio, 

U. Tutor wd WVBC^ «. Indlt— 'Ofnen 

li! ffptfoud PortnsmL ^J. Briiltb^dith 



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laWmLChui.'MS'gmtii 






Indii-iUr;baiil>uii. PoBjab, Be^ 






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SHARPES STUDENT'S ATLAS. A Selection of Tw«ity-dx of 

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ST. JOHN'S (J. A.) EGYPT AND NUBIA; their Scenery and 
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Author of " Egypt and Mohammed Ali," " Manners and Customs of 
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8vo, cloth gilt, 9«. ; or morocco gilt, 16«. 

ST. JOHN'S (BAYLE) TWO YEARS' RESIDENCE IN A 

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ST. JOHN'S (BAYLE) FIVE VIEWS IN THE OASIS OF SI WAN, 

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SINNETT'S (MRS. PERCY) HERDSMEN AND TILLERS OF 

THE GROUND ; on, Illustrations of Eablt Civilisation. With 
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Contents:— The Nomadic Herdsmen of Siberia — The Pastoral Tribes of 
the Asiatic Table Land — Calmucks and Kirghis, or Cossacks of Inds- 
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SINNETT'S (MRS. PERCY) HUNTERS AND FISHERS; oB, 

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Contents: — Forest Indians of South America — Wild Indians of the 
Plains— The Land of Fire— The Australians— The Men of the Frozen 
North — The Bosjiemen of the African Deserts — The Region of many 
Islands, or Polynesia — The Wild Indians of the Prairies. 

SINNETT'S (MRS. PERCY) STORY ABOUT A CHRISTMAS 

IN THE OLDEN TIME. With Coloured Illustrations. Small 4to» 
fancy cloth. 2«. 6d. 

Contents :— Christmas Festivities — An Agreeable Guest — The Tables 
Turned— Keeping New Year's Day — The Hermitage— The Rencounter 
— A Discovery— An Exploring Expedition — A Friend in Need — The 
Prisoners— Now or Never— A City of Refuge— A Table In the Wil- 
derness. ^ 

SKETCHES OF YOUNG LADIES: in which these interesting 
members of the Animal Kingdom are classified according to their sevoiM 
Instincts, Habits, and General Characteristics. By "Quiz." With 
Illustrations by *' Phiz." Small 8vo, sewed. 1«. 

Contents : — The Young Lady who Sings — The Busy Young Lady — The 
Romantic Young Lady — The Evangelical Young Lady — The Matter-of- 
Fact Young Lady— The Plain Young Lady — The Literary Young Lady 
— The Manly Young Lady — The Young Lady who is Engaged— The 
Stupid Young Lady— The Interesting Young Lady — The Petting Young 
Lady— The Natural Historian Young Lady— The Indirect Young Lady 
—The Hyperbolical Young Lady— The Whimsical Young Lady— The 
Abstemious Young Lady — The Sincere Young Lady — The Affirmative 
Young Lady — The Clever Young Lady — The Mysterious Young Lady^ 

The Extremely Natural Young Lady — The Lasy Young Lady The 

Young Lady fix)m School — Conclusion. 



CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY. 27 

SKETCHES OF YOUNG GENTLEMEN. Dedicated to the 
Young Ladies. With Six Illustrations by " Phiz." Small 8vo, sewed. 1». 

Contents '.—Dedication — The Bashful Young Gentleman— The Out-and- 
Out Young Gentlemen — The very Friendly Young Gentleman — The 
Military Young Gentleman — The Political Young Gentleman — The 
Domestic Young Gentleman — The Censorious Young Gentleman — 
The Funny Young Gentleman — The Theatrical Young Gentleman — The 
Poetical Young Gentleman — The Throwing-off Young GenUeman — The 
Young Ladies' Young Gentleman — Conclusion. 

SKETCHES OF YOUNG COUPLES: with an Urgent Remon- 
strance to the Gentlemen of England (being Bachelors or Widowers), on 
the preseut alarming crisis. By the Author of " Sketches of Young 
Gentlemen." With Six Illustrations by " Phiz." Small 8vo, sewed. Is. 

Contents : — An Urgent Remonstrance — The Young Couple — The Formal 
Couple — The Loving Couple — The Contradictory Couple — The Couple 
who Dote upon their Children— The Cool Couple — The Plausible Couple 
—The nice Little Couple— The Egotistical Couple— The Couple who 
Coddle Themselves — The Old Couple — Conclusion. 

SKETCHES OF YOUNG LADIES, YOUNG GENTLEMEN, 
AND YOUNG COUPLES. With Eighteen Illustrations by 
" Phiz." Complete in 1 vol. small 8vo, cloth gilt. 4s. 

SLOUS (ANGiOLO R.) The Templar. A Play in Five Acts. 

8vo, sewed. •2s. 6d. 

SMITH'S (JOHN) IRISH DIAMONDS; or, A Theory op Irish 
Wit and Blunders ; combined with other kindred Subjects. With Six 
Illustrations by "Phiz." New and Cheaper Edition. Small 8vo, 
doth. 28. 6d. 

Contents :— Introduction, short, because intended to be read — The 
English, the Scotch, and the Irish— Definitions of Wit and Blunder— 
The Author's Theory of Irish Wit, &c.— Genuine Irish Bulls— Genuine 
Irish Wit — A few English Specimens — Genuine Irish Wit, continued — 
Wit of all Nations — Blunders of all Nations — Irish Humour — English 
Humour — Conclusion— The Theory submitted to a Verdict. 

SURTEES' (W. E.) SKETCH OF THE LIVES OF LORDS 

STOWELL AND ELDON ; Comprising, with Additional Matter, 
some Corrections of Mr. Twiss's Work on the Chancellor. By William 
Edwabd Subtees, D.C.L., Barrister-at-Law. 8vo, cloth. 58. 

SYRIA AND THE HOLY LAND, their Scenery and their 
People, Incidents of Travel, &c. From the best and most recent Autho- 
rities. By Walter K. Kbllt. With One Hundred and Eighty Ulna- 
tratiLons. 8vo, cloth gilt 80. 6d, Or morocco. 14». 

TALES FROM THE GERMAN. Comprising Specimens from the 
most celebrated Authors. By J. Oxbnfobd and C. A. FsiLiNa. 8vo, 
cloth, 11«. 

Contents : — Libussa — The Criminal firom Lost Honour — The Cold Heart 
— The Wonders in the Spessart — Nose, the Dwarf— Axel — The Sandman 
— Michael Kohlhaas — The Klausenburg — The Moon — The Elementary 
Spirit— St. Cecilia— The New Paris— Ali and Gulhyudi— Alamontade— 
The Jesuits' Church in Q The Severed Hand. 



28 LIST OF BOOKS PUBLISHED BY 

TARAN TAS (TH E).— Travelling Impreaaions of Young Rusaia. By 
Count Sollooub. With Eight lUasfcnttioiifl. Foolscap 8vo^ doth, 6s. 

CoirrENTS : — The Encounter— The Departure—" Travelling Impressions" 
—The First Stage— The Hotel— A Government Town— A Simple Silly 
Story— Gipsies — The Ring— About Literature — An Aristocrat— The 
Monastery of Petdiora— The Model Landownei^Merchants — A Village 
Fair— The Dream. 

TAYLER (REV. CHARLES B.)— Mark Wilton, the Mibchaht's 

Clebk; a Tale, bv Chablbs B. Taylbb, MA., Author of "Records 
of a Good Man^B Life," &c. With Illastrations on Wood. Small Svo, 
cloth. 9«. 

THACKERAY'S (W. M.) WORKS r- 

REBECGA AND ROWENA. A Rohangb xtpon Romance. By 
Mb. M. a. Titmabsh, Author of " Pendennis," "Vanity Fair," &c. 
With Illustrations by Richabd Dotlb. Small 4U>^ tilaey boards, 
plain, 6s. ; or coloured plates, 7«. 6d. 

Contents : — The Overture— Commencement of the Bnsinefla — ^The Last 
Days of the Lion — St. George for England — Ivanhoe Redivivus — Ivan- 
hoe to the Rescue — Ivanhoe the Widower — The End of the Perfiarmanee. 

DOCTOR BIRCH AND HIS YOUNG FRIENDS. With Sixteen 
Illustrations by the Author. Small 4to, fancy boards, plain, ba. ; or 
coloifred plates, 7«. 6d. 

Contents :— The Doctor and his Staff— The Cock of the School— The 
Little School-Room— The Dear Brothers— A Hopeless Case — ^A Word 
about Miss Birch— A Tragedy— Briggs in Luck — A Yoang Fellow who 
is pretty sure to Succeed— Duval, the Pirate— The Dormitories— A 
Capture and a Rescue — The Garden, where the ParlomsBoarderg Go— 
The Old Pupil— Epilogue. 

OUR STREET. With Sixteen Illustrations by the Author. Second 
Edition. Small 4to, fietncy boards, plain, 6a. ; coloured plateo, 7<. 6cL 

Contents : — Our Street — Our House in Our Street— The Bungalow— 
Captain and Mrs. Bragg — Levant House Chambers — Mr. Rum- 
bold, AJEt.A., amd Miss Rumbold — Some of the Servants in Oiur Street 
— What Sometimes happens in Our Street— Somebody whom Nobody 
knows — The Man in Possession — The Lion of the Street — ^The Dot* of 
Our Street— The Bumpshers — Jolly Newboy, Esq. MP. 

MRS. PERKINS'S BALL ; Depicted in Twenty-three Plates : contain- 
ing Portraits of the principal Personages present, with their Gnuawtarl. 
Third Edition. Small 4to, fancy boards, 7». 6d. ; coloured plates, 10».6(f. 

Contents : — The Mulligan (of Ballymnlligan), and how he went to 
Mrs. Perkins's Ball — Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, their Hooae, and their 
Young People — Everybody begins to come, but especially Mr. Minchin 
— The Ball-Room Door — Lady Bacon, the Miss Bacons, Mr. FlBQ'p 
Mr. Larkins— Miss Bunion- Mr. Hicks — Miss Meg^o^— Miss BauvUle, 
Rev. Mr. Toop, MissMullins, Mr.Winter— Miss Joy, Mr. and Mrs. Joy, 
Mr. Botter — Mr. Ranville Ranville and Jack Hubbard— Mrs. Trotter, 
Miss Trotter, Miss Toady, Lord Methuselah — Mr.Beaumoris,Mr.Grig, 
Mr. Flynders- Cavalier Seul — M. Canaillard, Chevalier of tibe Le^on 
of Honour — Lieutenant Baron de Bobwitz — Grand Polka. 

NOTES OF A JOURNEY FROM CORNHILL TO GRAND 
CAIRO, by way of Lisbon, Athens, Constantinople, and Jemsalem. 
With a coloured Frontispiece. Second Edition. Small 8vo, 6a. 

CoNTENT8:—Vigo— Lisbon and Cadiz — The Lady Mary Wood' 
Gibraltar— Athens — Smyrna ; first Glimpses of the East— Constantt- 
nople— Rhodes— The White Squall— Telmessus ; Beyront — A Day and 
Night in Syria — From Jaffa to Jerusalem— Jemsalem — ^From Jafb to 
Alexandria — Alexandria — To Cairo. 



CHAPMAN AND HALL, 198, PICCADILLY. 99 

THACKERArS (W. M.) yNORKS.-{Cmimued.) 

THE IRISH SKETCH-BOOK. With numerous Engravings on 
Wood, firom the Author's Designs. Second Edition. Two Vols. Post 
8vo, 14s. 

Contents :— A Summer Day in Dublin— A Country-House in Kildare 
—From Carlow to Waterford— From Waterford to Cork— Cork, The 
Agricultural Show, Father Mathew — The Ursuline Convent — From 
Cork to Bantiy ; with an account of the City of Skibbereen— Rainy Days 
atGlengariflf— From Glengariffto Killamey— Killamey ; Stag-Hunting 
on the Lake — The Races — Mucross — Tralee— Listowel — Tarbert— Lip 
merick— Galway— Kilroy's Hotel— Galway Night's Entertainments— 
An Evening with Captain Freeny — From Galway to Ballynahinch — 
Roundstone Petty Sessions— Clifden to Westport— Westport— The 
Pattern at Croagh-Patrick— From Westport to Ballinasloe— Balllnasloe 
to Dublin— Two Days in Wioklow— Country Meetings in Kildare— 
Meath— Drogheda— Dundalk— Newry, Armagh, Belfast— From Dun- 
dalk to Newry- Belfast to the Causeway— The Giant's Causeway— 
Coleraine — Portrush — Peg of Limavaddy — Templemoyle — Deny — 
Dublin at Last. 

TINDAL'S (MRS. ACTON) LINES AND LEAVES. Poems. 
By Mrs. Acton TiNDAL. Foolscap 8vo, doth, gilt Bs.Sd. 
Contents :— Pax in Novissimo — The Lament of Joanna of Spain — The 
Phantom Hand — The Imprisoned Princes — The Widow Mother to her 
Infiint— The Pilgrim— The Baptism of the Gypsy Babe— The Sinner's 
Child— The Message of the White Doves— St. Mary Magdalene— The 
Fairy Ladye's Love — Isabella of Valois — The Dark Thought— An Aged 
Lady— Fear not to Die— The Martyr's Gift— The Mortality of Love— 
The Brother's Summons— The Lambs of Christ— The Visit to the Tomb 
—The Birth Wail— Saint John Baptist— Four Scenes in a Life— The 
Infant Bridal — The Village, the Church, and the Priest — Glimpses of 
Former Being — The Burial In London — The Three Wishes— To My 
Guardian Angel — The Vengeance of Home of Wedderbume — The Bro- 
ther of La Trappe— Is it well with the Child? 

TOWNSEND'S (J. P.) RAMBLES AND OBSERVATIONS IN 
NEW SOUTH WALES; with Sketches of Men and Manners, 
Notices of the Aborigines, Glimpses of Scenery, and some Hints to 
Emigrants. Post 8vo, cloth. 9^. 

TOWNSHEND'S (CHAUNCY HARE) DESCRIPTIVE TOUR IN 
SCOTLAND. With Twelve Illustrations. 8vo, cloth. 9*. 

TOWNSHEND'S (CHAUNCY HARE) SERMONS IN SONNETS; 

wriH A Text on the New Year : and other Poems. Small 8vo, cloth. 
78. 6d. 

Contents :— The Months— The New Year— Sermons in Sonnets— The 
Two Mansions — The Breeze — Miscellaneous Poems and Sonnets. 

TRAVELS IN THE STEPPES OF THE CASPIAN SEA; thk 

Cbdiba, the Caucasus, &c. By Xavieb Hohhaire de Hell, Civil 
Engineer, Member of the Society G^ologique of France, &c. With 
Additions from various sources. 8vo, cloth. 11«. 
Contents : — Odessa — Nikolaief, Olvia, Otshakof— The Dnieper— Steppes 
of the Black Sea — Jekaterinoslav — Taganrok— Rostof— Novo Tcherkask 
— The Volga — Astrakhan— Love of the Kalmucks for their Steppes- 
Review of the History of the Kalmucks — View of the Caucasian Moun- 
tains — Situation of the Russians as to the Caucasus — Political and Com- 
mercial Revolutions of the Crimea— Historical Sketch of Bessarabia. 

TRUE AND FAYTHFULL RELATIONN, Of a Warthye Discourse 
held, June y« eleauenth, in y« Yeare of Grace, 1643, betwene y«late Colonell 
HAMPDEN, Knighte of y« Shire for y« Countye of Buckingham, in y« pre- 
sente Parliammt, and Colonell OLIVER CROMWELL, Burgeaae for ^« 
Towne of Oambridge, in y« same. Foolscap 4to,lii ve\>xo^^^\ft"VkVa.^^v%. '^. 



82 LIST OF BOOKS PUBLISHED BT 



CHAPMAN AND HALL'S JUVENILE WORKS. 



ANDERSEN'S WONDERFUL STORIES FOR CHILDRB: 

Translated from the Danish by Maby Howitt. With Coloured HIi 
trations. Small Sro, fancy doth. 9«. 6cL 

ANDERSEN'S SHOES OF FORTUNE, and other Tales. Wi 
Foot Drawings by Otto Spbckteb, and other IllustrationB. Fcap & 
dotih. 68. 

AUNT JANE'S BUDGET OF STORIES. With Six lUustratio: 

16mo, cloth. 29. 6d. 

HARWELL'S (MRS.) NOVEL ADVENTURES OF TO 
THUMB THE GREAT; showing how he Visited the Insect World, a 
learned much Wisdom. New Edition. Eight Ulnstrations. 16mo, do 
29. 6d. 

HARWELL'S (MRS.) CHILDHOOD'S HOURS. With Fo 
Illustrations. Fcap. 8vo, cloth. 8«. 

BONER (CHARLES) — . The Mbrbt Wbddiko, and other Talc 
in Prose and Verse. With Illustrations by Count Pocox. Small & 
doth. 2«. 6d. 

BOOK OF STORIES FROM THE HOME TREASURY, i 

eluding the Fairy Talcs and Ballads. With Thirty Coloured Ulustratio: 
Cloth, gilt back and edges, la. dd. 

FAIRY TALES FROM ALL NATIONS. By Anthony 

MoNTALBA. Embellished with Twenty-four Illustrations by Richa 
DoTLB. In an elegant Volume. Small Sto, fitnoy boards. 98. 

GAFFER GOODMAN'S PICTURE HORN-BOOKS. A Progregai 
Series. Neatly printed on Cardboard, with Engrayings on Wo 
Six Cards. 2d. each. 

GAMMER GURTON'S STORY BOOKS : newly revised » 
amended, for the amusement and delight of all good little Masters a 
Misses. By Ambrobb Mebton, Gent., F.S.A. With Coloured Illustratic 
by Absolok, Fbanklin, and F. Taylbb. New Editions. Square, Fan 
Wrapper. 6d. each. 

HORSE (THE) AND HIS RIDER; or, Sketches and Aneodot 

OF THB NOBLB QUADBUPBD AND OF EQUBSTBIAN NATIONS. By ROL 

Spbinqfibld. With Illustrations. Small Svo, cloth. 6b. 

KAVANAGH (JULIA)— The Three Paths. A Story for Youi 
People. With Illustrations on Wood firom Designs by Akdbi 
Maclube. Small Svo, cloth. Price 68. 

LITTLE POEMS FOR LITTLE PEOPLE. By M. S. C. Wi 

Numerous Illustrations on Wood. Small gTvo, cloth. 3s. 

MILLER (THOMAS)— The Country Year-Book : Descriptive 

the Seasons ; Birds, Insects, and Quadrupeds ; Rural Scenes and Amni 
ments. With Eight Coloured Pictures and One Hundred and Foi 
Illustrations on Wood. Small Svo, cloth, 9«., or eleganUy bound 
morocco, gilt edges, 12s. 

MY OWN TREASURY. A Gift-book for Boys and Girls. Wi 

Two Hundred Engravings. In a thick Post Svo Volume. Cloth, g 
back and edges. 7«. 6d. 



CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY. 33 



iJBUHR'S (BERTHOLD) HEROIC TALES OP ANCIENT 

GREECE. Related by Bkethold Niebuhb to his Little Son Marcus. 
Edited, with Notes, by Felix Summerly. With Four Coloured Illus- 
trations by H. J. TowNSEND. In small 4to, bound in fancy cloth. 4a. 6d. 

[) STORY BOOKS OP ENGLAND; newly revised and 
amended for the amusement and delight of all good little Masters and 
Misses. By Ambrose Mebton, Gent., F.S.A. With C-oloured Illustra- 
tions by Absolon, Franklin, and F. Taylek. Small 4t<), cloth, gilt 
back and edges. 7s. 6d. 

TAL NURSERY ABC BOOK. With 500 Woodcuts, and 
Eight Coloured Pages. Crown 8vo. Is. 

NETT'S (MRS. PERCY) HERDSMEN AND TILLERS OP 

THE GROUND; or, Illustrations of Early Civilization With 
Coloured Illustrations. Small 4to, fancy cloth. 2«. Gd. 

'MITT'S (MRS. PERCY) HUNTERS AND PISHERS ; or, 

Sketches op Primitive Races in Lands Beyond the Sea. "With 
Coloured Illustrations. Small 4to, fancy cloth. 2s. (id. 

NETT'S (MRS. PERCY) STORY ABOUT A CHRISTMAS 

IN THE OLDEN TIME. With Coloured Illustrations. Small 4tc., 
fancy clofh. 2«. 6d. 

YLER (REV. CHARLES B.)— MARK WILTON, THE 

MERCHANT'S CLERK. A Tale. By Charles B. Tayler, M.A., 
Author of " Records of a Good Man's Life," &c. With Illustrations on 
Wood. Small 8vo, cloth. 9*. 

NDBRPUL INVENTIONS (THE HISTORY OF). With 

Two Coloured Pictures and Sixty-six Illustrations on Wood. Small 8vo, 
cloth. 58. 



URADBURV ANO KVANS, PhlNI LK-^. Wlin r.FI'.IAE.-'. 



CATALOGUE OF BOOKS 



PUBLISHED BY 



CHAPMAN & HALL, 193, PICCADILLY. 



1851. 



\