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Full text of "Castellan [yearbook] 1965"

■ ./ .1 «-■. - .^ LI ''.. . . 








I83S 



ASTELLAN 

ISB5 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/castellanyearboo196465stma 



Reflections of 
Old St. Mary's 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 




^-^ 



,C- <i'". 



Trinity Church 
1638 



1965 CASTELLAN 

St. Mary's City, Maryland 

Volume XVIII 




Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 



Trinily Episcopal Church 
18lh Century 



Foreword page 4 






Kcplica III Maryland's First Statclmus 
1634 



Sophomores P^ig^ 14 



i^^:,:-i-^-'M^:-'r^A. 



Tudor Hall 
1756 



Freshmen page 36 



■iiili l.>iiBii^WKa»sJiijii',.: 




West St. Mary's Manor 
17th t'l-ntury 



Academic Life P^g^ 50 








Organizations page 62 



Cremona 
1819 



Activities page 74 




Mulberry Fields 
1760 



vP^ 



-^li.^ 




Advertisements .... page 98 



Porto Bello 
18lh Crnturv 



Foreword 





Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 




Sl. Mary's College, a immument to 
history and to education, was founded on 
a peak of fertile land jutting into the St. 
Mary"s River. With the passage of time, 
the school has taken from its surround- 
ings the atmosphere of the past that pre- 
vails in this, the first capital of Mary- 
land. For .">t. Marys, and. indeed, all of 
the southermost tip i<\ Maryland retains 
the flavor of Maryland's past thrmigh the 
stately and elegant manor houses that 
are still mainlained today. 

Ghosts tales and mistics seem to tradi- 
tionally surround and entwine these old 
manor houses. Every place of shelter, 
be it even a log cabin, houses tales of woe 
and gladness; but. within the walls of a 
manor house the tales always appear to 
have a much deeper intensity with an 
enormous content ol complexity. 

In 1634. the first English settlers on 
the shores of the S. Mary's River founded 
the colony of Mary's Land. W ilhin the 
next decade a tiny settlement. St. Mary's 
City, was carved from the wilderness. 
Lndcr the auspices ot the \awacomoco 
Indians, the prospering city became the 
capital of the Province of Maryland. Here 
the first Slate House was erected in 
1676. But in 1694. when the capital of 
the .State of Maryland was moved to 
Annapolis, the population and industry 
of Sl. Mary's City dwindled. Little re- 
mained of the former (piick pulse of life 
in the old capital. Even the stately 
mansiims of colonial southern Maryland 
acquired an air of agelessness. Such was 
tlie atmosphere that prevailed on the 
historic banks of the .S|. Mary's River 
when the building of .St. Mary's Female 
Seminary (now St. Mary's College! was 
sanctioned by the Marylanii legislature 
in 1839. N<iw. from the doors of the State 
House of the province id" Maryland, let 
us journey to the living landmarks of 
Maryland's past, the beautiful manor 
houses of Sl. Mary's County. 




/, .\ 



iL2l 







^^^Hk^ Jk. ^^^^^i^H- ' ^^v^^^^^^ ^^^1 



Dr. May Russell. President of St. Mary's 
College, received her .\.B. degree from Vt est- 
ern Maryland College. Having completed 
further studies, she was granted an M..\. 
degree in mathematics from Teachers College 
of Columhia Lniversity. Graduate studies 
took Dr. Russell to Johns Hopkins L niversity, 
the University of Michigan, and Harvard 
University. Western Maryland College, her 
Alma Mater, conferred upon Miss Kussell 
the LL.D. degree. Dr. Russell is highly re- 
spected by both the faculty and the students 
of Si. Mary's College, her chosen home. 




Our prcsidi-nl ran play a clfvrr hand of card!.. Ask any faciilly 
member! 



It is hard In uutdislanrr Dr. Russell in the art of 
c-onversalidn. Here we see her wilh Governor Tawes 
on Governor's Day al S.MC. 



Kemp Yarborough 
Receives Doctorate 



Dr. Kemp P. Yarborough. Dean of Faculty, 
ha.s been head of ihe Social Science Depart- 
ment since 1959. He was one of the first male 
faculty members to teach at St. Mary's. 

Having first been educated in the profes- 
sion of law. Dr. Yarborough served in the U.S. 
\rmy in 1942-48 and 1951-53, retiring as a 
Major in the Army Reserve. He then decided 
to enter the field of education. He received 
his M.A. degree from the University of South 
Carolina, and his Ph.D. from (Columbia Univer- 
sity in 1963. Dr. Yarborough is well liked and 
highly respected by the students. 





1 






L. Beatrice .^imms 

M.A. University of Kentucky 

Dean of Women. 1954 



WUi A. Anflerson 

M.A. George Peabody College 

Dean of Students. 1964 




Mrs. Lois C. Donhisfr. 57 

M.S., University of Wisconsin 

Registrar 




Mr. George A. Kammerer, "58 
M.Ed., Loyola College 
Director of Admissions 




Mrs. Mary .Salisbury, '62 
B.A., I niv. of Calif, of Los 

.\ngeles 
Director of Public Relations 




Mr. .Samu.l W . Piirsell. '60 

M.\.. Inivcrsily of Nebraska 

Business Manafier 




Miss Margaret E. Keen. "60 

M.S., Columbia University 

Librarian 




Mrs. Norma Strickland, '50 

M.F.A.. The Kansas City Art 

Institute 

Art 




Mr. Elwood Fahl, '54 

.M.S., University of North Dakota 

Science 



' =^1 




Mrs. Alice Fahl. '54 

B.S., University of North Dakota 

English 




Miss .Simms asks Mr. (irt'csim and Dr. 
Varbnrough if they'd like tii ^i> fur a spin. 




^ 




Mr. Brantley D. Greeson, "57 


Mrs 


Minna L. Irby. "58 


.M.. M.M., Westminister Choir 


B.S.. 


University of South 


College 




Carolina 


Music 




Business 




>^ 



t -^ 



Dr. Carl \^ alker. "59 

M.Ed.. Ed.D.. University of 

Denver 

Business 



Mr. Leon T. Buker. "61 

M.A.T.. Tulane University 

Language 





Mr. Anderson. Mr. Dewey. Rev. Larry 
Lineberger, tell us it's just a sideline 
profession. 



Miss Joanne Allen. '63 

MA.. Columbia University 

English 



^ 


-r /K 



Miss Charlotte Oslund. "59 

M.H.E.. Colorado .State 

University 

Home Economics 



> n 



k ^T^ 



Mr. Howard Kratz. "61 

B.S.. Indiana State College 

.Mathematics 




Mrs. Joan C. Clevenger, '63 
M.S., West Virginia University 
Physical Education and Health 





Mr. David Dewey, '63 Dr. Eloise Rowland, '64 

M.A., Springfield College, Ph.D., University of Tennessee 
Massachusetts Biological Sciences 

Physical Education 



They Guide Us 



Charia Walls, Dr. Yarbiirough, and Mrs. Irby lake a momenl lo chal. 




cs 




^ 



Mr. Rohert L. Trantham. '64 

M.A., Memphis Stale University, 

Tennessee 

Speech anil Dramatics 




^■^k 



.Mr. Charles Henley, '64 

M.A., University of Mississippi 

English 




Miss Ethel Chance, R.N.. '48 
Resident Nurse 





Mr. WiUiam A. Patrick, M.D., '52 

M.D., Vanderbilt University 

College Physician 




Mr. Greeson and Pat Wiliiams are contemplating a serious note. 




Il^ 



Mrs. Mabel Treadwell, '62 
House Mother 




Mrs. Louise N. (lowan, '61 
Dietitian 




^ 



Mrs. Dorothy Kidd. '61 
Assistant to Business Manager 




Mrs. Kiizabeth S. LeRoy, '62 
Receptionist-Secretary 




I 



Mrs. Ellen Thurlby, '59 

Secretary to Director of 

Admissions 




^k 



^ ^ 



Mrs. Aleathea Redmond, '58 
Secretary to Registrar 




Ml \ Ill I'llklTldll. 

"63 
Night Watchman 




Mr. Evirt-tt Milburn. "56 
Night Watchman 




Mrs. .Mary Louise Bean, "64 
Secretary 



^^ 



h 



Mrs. Ruby Lee, "62 
Canteen 



Mr. James Redmond. ".51 
Maintenance Supertisor 



To These We Are Grateful 





Mr. William Lewis. "64 
Maintenance 

Mrs. Li'ona Hradburn. "64 
Library Assistant 






Colbert Barnes. '62 and William 
Shade, '63 



Florence Ball. '57 



Talbert Carroll. "54 and Paul Green- 
well, '54 



r ^ 



Bernard Barnes. '59 and Francis Carroll. 
'54 





.lames Brown, '29. Emma Hall, '48. and Bernard Ball. '56 





.John I lii, iHicilj.i. (lU. .KiiiH->. '48. and 
Jack Sommerville. '52 



Rosa Butler, '57 



Lillie Mae Hewlett. '50 



13 



Sophomores 





Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 




Tudor Hall, a Gci)rgian-type mansion, 
was built by Abraham Barnes in 1756. 
and is the ancesloral home of the Keys 
of St. Mary's. From its location in 
Leonardtown, one can see the beautiful 
Breton Bay and surrounding countryside 
of St. Mary's County. Tudor Hall has 
been restored to much of its earlier 
beauty: and it now belongs to the St. 
Mary's Memorial Library .\ssociation for 
use as a public library. 

This lovely Eighteenth Century manor 
house is distinguished by a recessed 
portico with four large Doric columns, 
graceful hanging stairway, an old kitchen 
wing with a large fireplace, and a Dutch 
oven. 

Tudor Hall is rich in memories of the 
Key family, who were noted people in 
Maryland long before Francis Scott Key 
wrote the '".Star Spangled Banner." 

A woesome trend has instilled itself 
within a grandfather clock which found 
its resting place within the enormous 
center passageway of Tudor Hall. Tra- 
dition says that it only strikes the hour 
when a death takes place in the family. 
When the death of Mrs. Key was near, 
the family sent a servant to Leonardtown, 
to seek a doctor and Mrs. Key's childhood 
nurse. While returning with great haste, 
they stopped as a sound rang out. They 
knew that it was the clock striking off 
the last beat of Mrs. Key's heart. 



15 





Nancy J. Albertson 

Westminster. Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



Mrs. Sharon R. .\rmitagf 

Lexington Park. Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



The class officers have helped the 




Lesl.-y M. Harh.r 

Wasliinfiton, D.C. 

BUSINESS 



Sophomore (Hass Officers: V. I'rc**.. Km Dickson: 
Secretary. Helen Wilke: Prc^., Jiuli Dunn; Treas- 
urer. Dnnna Spalfliii^ 




16 







Catherine B. Beekwith 

Alexandria. Virginia 

PSYCHOLOGY 



Karen Bishnp 
Hollywood. Maryland 
HOME ECONOMICS 



Sophomores to earn a reputation as leaders. 





Kenneth F. Boothe 

Great Mills. Maryland 

SCIENCE 







Shirley L. Bowers 

('umberland. Maryland 

SCIENCE 



Mary Susan Brebner 

Chevy Chase. Maryland 

BUSINESS 



The Christmas Bazaar was only one of 




\ 



Hi.lly W . Muckner 

Alexandria, Virginia 

ART 




Eiphl nVlork dassrs start ihc 
day for Brckv Ji>viut. Julie 
Mrad. Nrll Wad.lrll. ami 
Kalhy Mradf. 



Sally Slunturd lakfs ail- 
vantage nf a brrak to pre- 
pare fur her next class. 





Carol E. Candles 

Hampstead. Maryland 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Cheryl Carter 

Patuxent River, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



their many successful money-makiug ventures. 







Tom Daugherty performs 
his duty al the Christmas 
Bazaar. 



Muffy Russell helps with the 
decorations for the Christmas 
Bazaar by collecting chestnuts. 



Rose A. Cecil 
Great Mills, Maryland 
HOME ECONOMICS 



19 





Margaret Chandler 

Faulkner, Maryland 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Happiness is a letter for Maggie Phelps. Holly Butkiu-r. Calhy 
Beckwilh. and Terry Dolbey. 



They proved themselves able and confident 




k 



Susan Ann (!hei*sman 

Cambridge, Maryland 

EDUCATION 




J k. 



Carolyn I.. Clark 

Betlerton. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



20 




Inn liaia (!oiill>t>iii ii 

Itiilliniuit'. Marvliind 

KI.KMKNTAKY EULICATION 




Thomas Daugherly 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



sportsmen in both varsity and intramurals. 




Jolin W . Df Lozier 

Leonardtown. Marvlami 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bill Salisbury and Kathy Meade enjoy an afternoon 
of sailing on the St. Mary's River. 











PHI 


1 


Mr 
















H 






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J 




^^^^^1 




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^^^ 




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i^^H 


J 


^^^ 




^M 


^B^ 




Ki^^ 




^1 




H 




If !►- ^ 


1 


^H 


1 


BB 


••W 


s 




Kenneth R. Dickson 

Great Mills. Maryland 

PSYCHOLOGY 





Teressa A. Dolbey 

Salisbury. Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDI CATION 



They were true examples of maturing 




.luditli A. Dunn 
Bel Air. Maryland 
LIBERAL ARTS 

Elizabeth Reynolds and Patricia Shawley retreat to 
the serenity of the \n\^\ nn thr sU'\is of Maryland's 
first State HouHe. 




22 





George R. Feldman 

Drayden. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



John G. Fletcher. Jr. 

Lexington Park. Maryland 

ART 



men and women, in public and private. 





Clarence B. Fox 

Tall Timbers. Maryland 

LIBERAL ART."^ 

"Santa, iherc's thii* tall, dark Lieutenant named 
John . . ." 



23 





Florence B. Haischer 

Baltimore. Maryland 

SCIENCE 



Frank G. Hampton. Jr. 

California. Maryland 

.SCIENCE 



On and off campus, the Sophomores tried 




.Sharon L. Harris 

Cheverlv. Maryland 

LIBERA I. ARTS 




t.i/ Ki-ynoliis ^i^Il>i in afliT an A carlnud of liit^tzn^r ami 
rvrninji in lln" jirt-al mclrop- "drays." including Kalhy 
olis, Lrxin^lun I'urk. Mradc. lu'adi^ for Annap- 

n|J8. 



24 





k 



N» 



Mrs. Ellen Havens 

Dameron. Maryland 

EDUCATION 



Faye Horney 

Kent Island. Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



to show the Freshmen a way 





Kathy Snyder didn't 
bargain for ihe stocks when 
she signed up for the trip to 
WUliamsburg: but it looks 
like that's where she ended 
up. 



Pat Shawley. Liz Reynolds. 
Ken Hard man, and Bub 
Schwier study in the sunshine. 



Judith Anne Humphreys 

Salisbury, Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



25 





Catherine C. Janushek 

Glen Burnie. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



Kay Liddell gets sume ht-lp fruiii her ruuinniale, Pat Smith, 
in preparing for the tenni;^ mati-hei^. 



to enjoy college life, while keeping 





Rebecca Joyner 

Baltimore, Maryland 

BUSINESS 



Charlene Lewi;^ 

Salisbury, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



26 






Kay Liddell 

Rising Sun, Maryland 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Margaret J. Longest 

Salisbury, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



the rules. They organized, helped, 




Dianne L. Mason 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 

Sharon Harris. Cathy Janushek, Janel Rathmell. 
Terry Dolbey. Darlene Smith, and Ppgg>- Skinner 
look on as Hully Buckner shows Pal Smith tht* 27 

right note. 







Karen Merritts 

Lexington Park. Maryland 

SCIENCE 



Margaret Moore 

Lexington Pariv, Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



participated, and performed. 






Fay Pegg 
Lexington Park, Maryland 
LIBERAL ARTS 



Linda Perkins 

Leonardtown, Maryland 

HOME ECONOMICS 



28 




f 



Margaret S. Phelps 

Glen Arm. Maryland 

ART 



They were individuals. 








Eileen Piercy 

Leonardtown. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



Bank, our Sophomore student from Thailand, performs an exotic 
dance of her native country at the May Day Festivities. 



29 





^ 



Praphi Prasarttongosoth 
Washington, D.C. 
LIBERAL ARTS 



Pamela J. Price 

Kent Island, Maryland 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



who functioned as a co-operative, efficient 




k 




Janet R. Rathmell 

Millord, Delaware 

BUSINESS 

A lypirally hun(£ry group of Sophomores momrn- 
larily igniirr llif F'rcshmen at the (iet-Acquuinled 
Parly In enjoy a delirious St. Mary's meal. 




30- 





Elizabeth Reynolds 

Cherry Point, North Carolina 

LIBERAL ARTS 



Martha R. Russell 

Chestertown, Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



group, in all of their undertakings. 





« illiam B. Salisbury 111 

St. Mary's City, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



31 





Rdberl M. Schwier 

Lexiiifrton Park. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



Holly IturkiUT and Bill Sali>l>urv arc a familiar >-it;lii mii 
campus. 



The Sophomores lived, studied, and worked 





Suzanne Scott 
R<'rlin, Maryland 
LIBERAL ARTS 



I'atricia Sliawli'v 

liillinjicr. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



32 






A 




Margaret E. Skinner 


Patricia Smith 


Ellicott City. Maryland 


Salisbury, Maryland 


BUSINESS 


SCIENCE 



together preparing for their future 





A 



l\atlileen Snyder 

White Marsh, Maryland 

BUSINESS 

Sally Stanfnni. Al Passarelli, Ken Dickson. Walt 
Sawyer, and Jim Esposilo lake lime oul from their 
strenuous daily acliviiies to view the World Series. 



33 






Donna Spaldint; 

Baltimore, Maryland 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



Sally Stanford 

Severna Park. Marvlanci 

LIBERAL ARTS 



as responsible citizens, on a campus 




Susan ('.. Sifiiarl 

Monkton, Maryland 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Snmir of ihr miirr arlistir j-ophninnri's take \n ihf 
outdoors and allempl to rapture the beauty of the 
historic State House. 




34 




Helen Wilke 

Parkton, Maryland 

ART 



of historic beauty. 




L 




Patricia Williams 

Chevy Chase, Maryland 

MUSIC 



The lamp post which standi in front of the Stale House is a 
constant reminder of our heritage. 



35 



Freshmen 





Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 




West St. Mary's Manor, a late seven- 
teenth century manor house, stands high 
above the St. Mary's River and directly 
opposite the old city. This earliest known 
grant of land in Maryland was presented 
to Captain Henry Fleet for his help in 
establishing the first settlement at St. 
Mary's. \S'est St. Mary's Manor is a story- 
and-a-half structure with small dormer 
windows, frame sides, and brick gable 
ends. The double chimneys with pents 
between at each end are unique in this 
area. This lovely manor house is owned 
by Lt. Col. and Mrs. Miodrag Blago- 
jevich who have furnished it throughout 
with authentic seventeenth and eight- 
eenth century American antiques. 

Tradition has it that many years ago 
when the mistress of the manor died, her 
picture disappeared from the wall of her 
west wing bedroom. Her son. the master 
of the manor, mourned deeply over the 
loss of his dear mother and her beautiful 
portrait. On her birthday the following 
year, as he sal in her old bedroom staring 
at the wall where his mother's portrait 
had hung, it suddenly appeared to him. 
And the tale goes that each year on that 
same day her picture will appear to any- 
one who stares at that wall and thinks of 
her. 



37 



^'A 

^ 





Nancy Adams Marlyn Adamson 



W endell Bailey 



Peter Balt/;ell 




Ruby Beauchainp Sandra Benson Pamela June Black Laura Blevins 

W^ are the Sunrise. 








Patri<ia U. Bnirki 



-Mary Bootlie 



Our class officxTs conspire lo U>a<l us. 




38 




Carol A. Brown Samut-I Brown 



Jenny Buckler 



Alice Burgess 




Judith Carrick Cynthia Carroll 

A new age dawning 




Jane Chapman Sharon A. Chichester 

Charles Choate Patricia A. Clevenger 

with promise. 



Skip Choate. President; Tom Feller. Vice President; Sue LeRoy, 
Secretary; Eileen Smith. Treasurer; Mrs. TreadwcU. advisor. 



39 




Susan Conrad 



Jean Cooper 



Jeannie Cramer Jacqueline Dalton 




Judy Marie Dean Connie Depew Anne F. Dix Bonnie A. Dixon 

We are the redwood 




We leave . . . 

Jean Cooper and JnAnnr I'hipp^ 



40 




Ann L. Etzler 



tree. 









*, 



\ 



Sandra Flverman Sheridan Fahnestock Juanita Felter 






mi!^ 



Thomas Feher Barbara Karole Fleminsj Lee Florence 



Janet L. Foley 



m ^ 





Amy L. Foote Francine M. Galiano 



made firm by God. 



and ue return. 

Richard Guy. Tom Mattinpjy. Juan l.ink. John Williams, and 

David Alias 




Joyce Ann Gargaiii 



Judith Garner 



I'hyllis A. Graham 



Anne (ircen 




Sharon Guthrie 



Heiene Haduch 



Judith Hammond 



Elh-n G. Hand 



W^ are the swift river. 




Sometimes we learn through books . . . 
KUrn Voss. Martha Hraly. Sht-ilia Kcr. 
and Jan Travers 




Nancv Hensel 



Ernestine Hodges 



Alice Hoffman 



Lynne Horsman 




Mary Rose Hurry Judith Lynne Johnson 

eager to seek our future 



Linda Jones 



Sheila Kee 




Other times « e are taught by nature. 

Kranrine (raliann. Nell Waddel), Stephanie Newman, and 

Winnie Meredith 



43 




Lynn Kreider 



\ icki Lewneji 



Leslie K. Lightner 



Juan Link 



II 




Sandra Mae Lister 



Charles Loffler 



Lorraine Marie Long 



Susan LeRov 




W^ are the singing bird, 



\ irginia Lee Mann Brigilla Ann Maroncy 



^e enjoy ourselves under the uatchful eye of Miss Russell , . . 
Fred Sassrer. (iarol Mrown. Drmna Krhanlt, Uriult-ll Bailey. 
Sue WaliTs. Bob Sihwirr. Matigic Hcaly, Barbara Krily. Amy 
Fool*'. Lynnr Hnr<«man. and Fllen Voss. 





Catherine J. Mason Jo Ann Matarazzo Thomas Mattingly Lee Maulsby 





^ 0^ 



Kathleen Merchant Willamae Meredith Kay Irene Merrey Dale Milburn 

proud to he born free. 




find under the ivalchful eye of a fellotv freshman. 
Anne I)ix and Ann Etzler 



45 




il 



SaUie Netherton Stephanie 1. Neuman Mary \V iiulsur I'almcr Elizabeth Passarcl 




Chutima Palhamanulh JuAnne Phipps 



Liiuisf Pilkertiin 



Jaiif K. Kahbilt 



V\le are the meadow. 




Our songs are the liveliest . . . 

Jimaxi Rumcr. Sandy Rutland. Mr. Hranllry (irt-rsnn 



fJ&^Ml 





M^^ 



Gayle A. Redmond Donna J. Rolley 



Joseph Russel] 



Frederick Sasscer Penny Saulsbury 

yearning to know life 



Judith B. Sayre 



Sandy Rutland 




Janet A. Schwarz 




our campus the toi^eliesl. 

Maggie Healey. Linda Jniu-s. Bnnnir Dixon, ami Jenny 

Buckler 



47 







Eileen Smith 



Daniel Stevens 



Sandra Stone 



Eli/.alirtli las lor 




^i^ 




Susan Eilffii Thayer I.inda A. Thompson 



IVt;g\' A. Tomey Janice Elaine Travers 




Let's sing for St. Vfary's. 

Jarkir Daltrm, Shirley Shrrkells. Wendell Bailey, Donna 
Hills, Virginia Mann, (larnl Hrnwn, Winnie Meredith, an 
Dianne Haskin^^. 




Joan B. Walker 



William Ward Gail Lee Waters Sue Ann Waters 





^m 




Charla Jean Watts Cheryl Weiland 

the Freshman Class. 



Carol Werner 



'inil lore her. 
I 'i>rni studfnts. 



John Williams 




49 



Academics 




Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 




Sotterley picturesquely located on the 
Patuxent River, was built in 1730 by 
George Plater and was named for the 
ancestral home of the Plater and Saterlee 
families in England. The mansion, which 
has housed four generations of Platers, 
including a Governor of Maryland, is 
currently owned by Mrs. Mable Saterlee 
Ingalls and is one of the most achitec- 
turally interesting in St. Mary's County. 
Among the fine pieces of interior wood- 
work can be found a Chinese Chippen- 
dale staircase and carved shell cup- 
boards. 

Legend has it that George Plater was 
one of the wealthiest planters in Mary- 
land and the story of this great wealth 
reached many ears. Among those who 
heard of it was the pirate chieftan. Long 
Arm. who decided to visit Sotterly and 
loot it of these treasures. Quietly Long 
.iVrm sailed up the Patuxent River and 
dropped anchor near shore. Thinking 
that only the women would be at the 
manor on this morning. Long Arm was 
confident that he and his men could 
easily frighten them and make away with 
the riches. His scheme was thwarted, 
however, when a Negro slave sighted the 
brigands creeping up the hill and gave 
the alarm to Plater and several other men 
who had just returned from a fox hunt. 
Long Arm and his crew, two of whom 
were killed in the chase, beat a hasty 
retreat to their ship and sailed off down 
the Patuxent. It is said that the two dead 
pirates were buried on the spot where 
they fell and today their graves remain 
unmarked. 



Beauty In Art 





A. Greene and L. Kliirancc ti!.l iheir skill in ihr leramirs lal). 



II. \X ilk.- and B.J. Ks.li l.„.k im as H. Butktu-r uses her . halks 
in ihe an lab. 



Key To The Business World 





Judy Ht-inhat'k lakr^ short [i.iihI trnm lli>- ilirta|>li<»i(- 



I). lim-rkr-i ami I', (.raliaui wrk iui-ilv v%i!ii adilin^: tnarliini- 



Or Walk., u.ii.li.- |.,■.I.■^ liarh.r a- ^Ii. -lilipnlly lypr^. 



52 





■Tf^-" 




Miidenls schedule semester classes on Rcgislraticm Day. 



Academic help is offered In TDin Mjtiiii^K ami Fd) I'cii^ Inmi 
Mrs. Donhiser. 



An Interest Always Guided 



Social Guidance is ^iven by Miss Simriis tn Amy Fi>nte and Janet 
Km lev. 



Faculty advisor. Mrs. Fahl. has a chat with Loui-^e F*ilkerton and 
Richard \^ asknm. 





53 



English Comes Alive 



Our English Department is composed of Miss 
Allen, Mrs. Fahl, and Mr. Henley. Besides the basic 
Freshman, British, and \^'orld Literature offered, 
specialized and advanced classes are now in session 
with Mr. Henley. St. Mary's College is looking into 
the future and welcomes new ideas. 




Miss Alli-n li'ctures to a British Literature class. 



Better Health For' All 



The health department, under the capulile 
dircclion of Miss Chance, serves both faculty and 
students, and has a doctor who is always on call for 
any emergencies. 



J. Humphreys. A. Greene, and Miss Chance stuffMarcli oi Dimes 

rnvfliipes. 



M. liu^^cll iitid II. Ituckncr scctu unaware ul Miss Lliance" 
presence with Sheila Kee. 





54 





J. Schwarz. J. A. Matarazzo. and C. Weiland are cooking some- 
thing good. 



Mi»i^ Oslund assists R. Cecil as L. Pt- rkiti;- m'w> 



Homemakers Of Tomorrow 
International Flavor 




The Spanish and Frtin ii >[utl< m? ujc 



Ml. liuki I opt ratcii. ihe instrument panel. 



55 




W. Bailey. K. Sa>-scfr. D. Krhardl, \. AJjtii^. S. Arniitafir. J. 
Hammond and L. F'liiranre use our library as a quiet place In 
study. 



D. Wimd and K. Btmilie use our card taIaIoj;ue lo Inul resituret 
materials for their classes. 



The Library is a Busy Place 



For the students of St. Mary's College, the lilirarv 
is the center of academic studies. Books, records, 
film strips and other resource materials can be bor- 
rowed to supplenictil class work. It is a place to 

relax with a ;; 1 book as well as a place for study 

and research. 



The .Maryland Room contains many valuable 
books and momentoes connected with early St. 
Marys (^ity. Here students have an opportunity to 
learn more nf ihc licritaj:)- which is associali-d with 
our campu~. 



Mathematics Department Teaches Accuracy 



The Mathematics Department of St. Mary's 
('olli-f;e offers a variety of courses to aid the student 
in obtaining a well-rounded education, (^)urses in 
calculus, Iriu;onomctry. alf;ebra and business mathe- 
matics are offered to students to allow them a choice 
of studies. 





\Ir. Krar/ ^ivi-^ Tom Hrnwti |irr^">lial airl in ilninj: a (IMti<uIl 
<-i)uali()n. 



'r. Mallin^K and S. Mas. in iim- tin- Kridrn adiiin|£.f-ali iilalin^ 
MiarlntH- li> i-litninaU- •."im- nl the icdinij^ ciitninitarionv. 

56 



1 V 



b roni \\. Hurry. B. Fleming. A. Green. P. Shaw ley. E. Smilli. S. Cht-r-^man. J. Ht-mhai li. Seromi Ron: S. Vi alers, K. Bishop. L. Pilkerlon. 
I', \\ ilham^-. S. Chichester. M. Franris. Back: S. Chuale. J. Fletcher, H. W ard. 



The Joij of Music 



St. Mary's College is very proud of the accom- 
plishments of its Music Department. The choir, 
under the direction of Brantley D. Greeson, has 
sung for many churches and civic organizations as 
well as for college functions. During its annual 
spring tour, the choir will sing in the Maryland 
Pavillion at the New York World's Fair. For the 



lirst time in the history of .St. Mary's, boys have 
heen added to the choir. 

Students are offered courses in practical and 
ihcciretical music in the fields of voice and piano. 
This department has a program for all students, 
novice and experienced. 



Karen iiishop is arcumpanied by Mr. (ireeson as she tak-es .'^andra Kullarul gains experience through her hnurs of practice 

her vocal lesson. at the piano. 






i 


*^N>. 



57 








Zl 




.JlBSBiS^Bfl 


" 








'^'^Hk 4i^^H 










p^~^^^^^^^r [[ ^^^^^^1 




















i^^^^Hi 1 ^H H 




HMHU 


^ Ml 


^^gl 




Stan Chemacki keeps iil Mr. Dewey helps Fay Pegg practice on the Dave Berg watches as Eileen Smith tries for a strike 

doing exercises on the parallel balance beam. 

bars. 

Exercising for Physical Fitness 




The Phsyical Education Department of SMC 
provides the sludenl with physical activity to keep 
the l)ody healthy. Classroom work and recreational 
activity lend variety to this required program. Stu- 
dents are able to select the course in which they 
would like to participate. This enables a student 
to widen his field of interest and to have fun as well. 



K. Blake. R. Joyner, C. Canoles. E. Piercy, K. .Snyder, and 
P. Williams shoot on the archery range. 




S. Brebner. B. .Salisbury. J. Ksposilo, V. Ilamplon. and K. 
Meade lallneh the boat. 



R. Joyner, J. Esposilo, E. Piercy and P. Shawley praeiire ibeir new 
badminton skills. 



58 




-Shirley Bowers works as Dr. Rowland's assistant in the 
bit)log>- lab. 



Dr. Rowland aids Florence Haischer in studying the structure 
ot the cat. 



Marine Biology to be Introduced 



Dr. Ru>seU accept!? the valuable shell cullectiun Iniin Hcward 
Joynt. whose grandmother had collected the more than three 
thousand shells from all over the world. 




The advent nt' Dr. Elnise Rowland on the facuhy 
of S-MC is bringing the long-planned marine biolog\- 
departiTient closer at hand. Students now have an 
opportunity to take courses leading to such fields 
as botany, cheinistry. zoology, nursing and various 
fields of technology. Lectures and laboratory ses- 
sions provide an atmosphere conducive to learning. 




Jackie Dalton helps Dr. Rowland classify and catalogue the de- 
partment's new shell collection. 



59 




Back row: C. Weiland. Second rou: J. Esposiio. D. Smith. J. Dunn. J. Si-huar/, B. Salisbury. Mr. Kalil. First rou: A. Burjicss,.!. Phipps. I,. 
Reynolds. J. Russell. 



The Arts and Sciences 



Chemistry is not only a requirement hut a pleas- 
ure for a numlier of our students with Mr. Fahl as 



instructor. This course is offered to lliose in ti 
Home Economies and .'><ience c urricula. 




."social Science, ineludinf; History. 
Government. Sociology and Psy- 
chology, are popular courses at 
.St. Mary's. These courses are open 
to any student wishing to broaden 
his or her cultural background, and 
wanting to advance in the knowl- 
edge of ludav's wcirld. 



.^ \ Dr. Yarbt>rough and imr of his history 



classes. 



60 





Eileen Sniilli deli\erin^ une of her carefully prepared speeche>. 



\^ . Meredith, and i.. ^\ arner praeliciiiji new teehnique^ with 
make-up. 



The Whole World is a Stage 



Spt't'cli. a mandatury course, is taught by Mr. 
Robert Trantham. His classes learn to express 
ibemselves vocally through learning the basic 
fundamentals of rhetoric. 



1 heatre Arts, also under the supervision of 
Mr. Trantham. aids the students in understanding 
the theatre. The stage, make-up and acting are but 
a few of the varied areas of drama that are covered. 



G. Redmond. P. Haa. E. Smith, and J. Dunn are the itffieers i»f our C. Clark. L. Lightner, Mr. Tralham. and I.. Thomp-ion 

.'^amadra group prepare scenery. 





61 



Organizations 




Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 




Cremona was built about 1819 by 
Doctor Vi illiam Thomas on a beautiful 
piece of land along the Patuxent River. 
The estate, orifiinally known as West 
Ashcomb. was given to John Ashcomb by 
Lord Baltimore in 1659 and the Land 
Grant still hangs in the hall of Cremona. 

Creinona is considered to be one of the 
finest existing examples of early Repub- 
lic architecture in Maryland. Particularly 
striking is an unusual hanging staircase 
in the great hall which is mounted from 
either end of the hall. Oemona is pres- 
ently owned by the Davidson family who 
have restored the manor house and 
furnished it with antiques from England 
and America. 




p. Shawlry. Miss Stmms. S. W alers. J. Iravers. (!. Janii^ln-k. J. (iar^iani. J. Schwar/.. j. Humphn-ys. I). Spalding. 



Diligent Workers 



V. Ilarii|itMn, B. Salisbury, B. SchwiiT, K. Bci.ilhi- 



I'lic piMTiiMiinl organizations at St. 
Mary's, tlu- Men's and Women's Sludcnl 
(Jiivcrnmcnis. have as tiipir i;oal ad- 
vanoini; llic ideals of our studcnl^. TIhv 
are our leaders, whom we look u|j to. 
Throufili the refiuJations they set up. we 
are led on to fuller maturity in the world 
of lomurrow. 




64 




The Honor (iuurt at St. Mary's is 
organized to uphold our rules and regula- 
tions. Honor Court is comprised of mem- 
bers of our student body chosen by the 
Executive Council. Their ultimate goal is 
to make good citizens of us. 

The Campus Council, made up of 
members of our faculty and students, 
discusses and solves social problems 
that arise. Their aim is to foster a gooil 
relationship between the faculty and 
student body. 



(;. Kfiimimd. I'. Tcimcy. C .lanushek. C Fox. J. Humphreys 



Our Student Governments 



Faculty advisor? and sludrnl representatives of the Campus Council 




65 




S. Stanl..rii. M H11--C II. C. Clark, C. Janushck, P. Shawlry. K. Liddill. J. Humphn-ys. S. Harris, C. Canoles. C. Lcwij.. M. Alwill. S. 
BrcbnfT. 



Tlif Orientation (^unniittee is com- 
posed of a group of sophomore girls. 
Their job is to help the new girls prepare 
for and adjust to college life. They give 
information, counciling. and a general 
(iinira(l>hip that liilps the freshmen feel 
at home. 



The Social Committee plans student 
social events such as dances, and acts as 
hostesses for the sundry social gather- 
ings on campus. 



T. Tnlhcy. K. Silnvi.r. G. R.-dm.ind. H. Bu.kii.r. .'i. ttal.T>. H. K.lly. \IUs Simm^ 




66 




B. Salisbury. Mrs, Salisbury. BJ. Egeli, F. Sasscer. H. Bucl^nrr. 
E. Smith 



The Assembly Committee plans the weekly 
priigrams for the college. They tiiul interesting 
and informative entertainment for the faculty 
and student body. 



The Artist and Lecture Coinmittee helps with 
the organization of the four programs presented at 
St. Mary's College throughout the year. Their 
aim is to bring cultural enlightenment to the 
college and the surrounding area. 



They Make Our Days Bright 



C Myllo, F. Sasscer, S. Brebner, W. Bailey. T. Dolbey. \X . Merediili, S. Chessman, f 



i' I ■•iney. Miss Chance 





Phi Theta Koppa 
Means 3.0 



\n<\ llials nut all . . . soini- nl tin- numbers arc 
• m llic I)i-an"s List, with a 3.5 nvcrall avoragf. St. 
Marys aii|iiirctl a Phi Thi-ta Kappa CliarliT in 
]9r,9. The organization requires a high stan<lar(l of 
acailernic acliiivement of its members, who com- 
pose llic lop ten per-cent of the .*^lll(lenl l?ody. The 
nicmliers offer tlieir services as tutors to the rest of 
the sllldenls. 



I'lll TIIITX KM'I'A: K. .Snyil.T. C. Cam.l.-s. S. Situarl. C. 



Samadra Players Present 



Anyone who is interested in dramaties and eur- 
rent theatrical news is eligible for membership in 
the Samadra Players. 

This year the group presented twn plays. "Bus 



.Slop" and ■■Kclicl Willioul a Cause." "Mr. Ts" 
experience and willingness to help, were a great 
factor in this successful theatrical year. 



I' 1 1.1.1. I. I!arn.r..l. Dunn. H. W ard. S. H..%v.r> an.l T. Krllrr in cinr la«l rr-lirar»al li.fnn- "Hu- Slop" p< 



■- I'tt I'Mir 




The MAA. 
Organizes 



Tlir Men's Athletic Association was 
first organized this year. It sponsors 
men's varsity and intramural sports, 
and provides transportation for the 
Basketball Team to the "away " 
games. The money is obtained by a 
picnic which is held each spring. 




Treasurer. A. Bntun; .Advisor. M. Dewey; \ ice Prc^idcnl, 1'. Ballzell; I*resideiU. 
B. .Salisbury 



i^^S22z?:?r^' 




The WAA. Keeps 
The Girls Busy 



The \^ omen's Athletic .Association is an 
organization designed to promote athletic com- 
petition and to increase class spirit and loyalty 
toward the college. 

.Any member of the .Association is eligible 
tor the Board, which is the governing body of 
ihe organization. The Board consists of the 
iifficers and a manager for each of the sports 
participated in during the school term. The 
lull alhletic program is handled entirely by the 
Association which sponsors social as well as 
.itlilclic activities. 



Fourth row: S. Sl(-uarl. Treasurer; K. l.iddell. President; 
S. Itrehner. \'iee President. Third ran: M. .\luell. .Social 
liliairniai); P. .Smith. Tennis; T. Dolbey. Secretary. Second 
rou: J. Frame. Basketball. I.. Barber. Arrherv. Bottom rote: 
H. W ilke. H..ekev. 



The Castellan Staff Enjoys Its Work 




(^ari)l (^annlt's. Kdilnr-iii-uhifl. ha>i spent a gjeat deal 
of time in organizing the yearbook. Under her super- 
vision the yearhonk has been systematieally and effi- 
ciently prepared. 




Till-. I.AYOIT STAFF: J. Gargani. S. Smith. C. Brown. K. Snyder 




TVl'lSTS: I), llillis. .1. Halbuiell. H. .loyner. J. Dalton (Literary Editor) 



The yearbook has its staff chosen from tlie .-stu- 
dent body. It concerns itself with the financial as 
well as the literary side of yearbook editing and is a 
valuai)U' experience to anyone interested in this 
type of work. 

The literary and layout staffs have worked side- 



by-side, in preparin" the uniuiai. I h<' members ol 
the staff attended the annual Y Carbook Convenliim. 
which was held at .American L niversily, where ihey 
learned many new ideas, as well as the essentials 
of planninj; a yearbook. 



■\l)\ KKTISING: E. H(.dges. T. Maitingly. K. Ceeil. K. Ri~h..p. .1. Dean, 
\I. longest. K. Pierey. C. Clark. 



AKT: H, Kgeli. \1i" Simnis, H Huekner 






C. Clark. H. BuckntT. L. l.ont;. L. Tayltir, M. Palmer, L. Florence, M. Bnnth. K. Braucltdtiip 

The Members of the I.R.C. 
Are Interested in World Affairs 



The International Relations (^lub was organized 
to promote an interest in world affairs. The dull 
tries to achieve this goal by several means — speak- 
ers, filmslrips, newsreels. discussions and debates. 
The club is climaxed each year by the Annual 
Time Magazine test, which is a nationwide contest. 



It is given to aU interested students, and certificates 
of excellence and merit are given to the top scorers 
on the test. The club meets twice a month with 
Dr. Yarborough as the sponsor who does much to 
promote an interest in world affairs. 



The Home Ec. Club's Services Are Extensive 



J. .Swartz, Mis^s Osland. J. .\Iatarozzo. K. Bishop, President: L. Pilkerlim, V.. 
Weilaiid. Secretary: J. Phipps. \ ice President: L. Perkins. R. Cecil. 




The Home Kconomics i'Auh works to 
make its members aware of the oppor- 
tunities in the field of Home Economics 
anil til prepare them for a future in this 
field. 

Their Thanksgiving baskets and favors 
for retarded children in Lexington Park 
are only examples of the services that 
make them highly respected by all. 



'fff>:^^^ fi 




A. Hutlnidti. J. Huinplire>>, U. >paUiing. t-. Jdiiu^ht-k. J. Hdtiininn.l. S. twriiian. K. lidii.l. (.. lu^liiunid. A. F.«.i<-. T. [J..lbi>.r. lib. k.>. 
Cheesman. J. Gargani, B. Dixon, C. Mason. M. Palmer. 

The S.N.E.A. Prepares Our Students 
For the Teaching Profession 



riic Suidi'tit Naliiinal Education A^>(i<ialicin 
invites to memliership any student who is interested 
in the teaching profession. The principal purpose 
of the club is that of providing opportunities for 
learning about the profession and its role in our 



society, (^iinpitcnt teachers and other educators 
are invited to speak at club meetings and actual 
teaching situations are visited by the club as a 
group. 



The Campus Development Planning Committee 




The Campus Development Planning (loinniillee 
brings the students view points to the administra- 
tion in llic design of tin- future campus. The mem- 
bci> meet regularly with Miss Simms and Mr. 
Anderson and are very influential in the planning 
of tile enlargi'd campus. 



II. Km knir. \\ . S;ili>liliry. Mi^> .SiTnni>. K. li.iwlh. . J, Dunn 



72 




Front rou: K. Snyder, tu-editur K. Liddell. advisor Mrs. Salisbury, co-editor J. Dunn. S. Harris. F. Galiain*. f. Hais<her. K. Hand. Back- 
row: P. Skinner, R. Joyner. S. Brebner, J. Dalton, A. Hoffman. A. Green. N. Alberlson. N. Ranneberger. H. Wilke, K. Piercy, S. Rutland. 

The Point News Staff Is Always Busy 



The Point News is published eight times a year. 
The members of the staff are constantly amassing 
facts and opinions, in an attempt to maice the 
paper objective and informative. The paper has 
been enlarged for our larger student body, and Mrs. 
.Salisburv is the new advisor. 



The newspaper sponsors the election of St. 
Mary's entrance in Glamour's Best Dressed College 
Girls Contest. Two members of the staff attended 
the Maryland-Deleware Press (^invention in 
February. 



The Folksinging Group Combines 
Fun With Learning 




The members of the folksinging group are begin- 
ners as well as knowlegable musicians. ,\nyone who 
is interested in singing, learning, or listening is a 
welcome member of the recently formed organiza- 
tion. 



Front row: F. Sasscer. C Brown. K. Smith. L. Htirsfinan. E. 
Viiss. MitUle row: D. Erhardl. W. Bailey. R. .Srhweir. B. Kelly. 
A. Kiiote. Back roll: S. Waters. M. Healy. 



73 



Activities 





i^i 



^y 



Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 




Mulberry Fields, once an extensive 
tobacco plantation, is situated on a high 
bluff overlooking the Potomac River and 
Blake's Creek. Built in 1760, by John 
Sommerville, a Scottish merchant, the 
Georgian mansion, with its formal gar- 
dens and bowling green, is one of the 
most beautiful in .St. Mary's County. One 
of the more interesting features of the 
estate is the manner in which the bor- 
dering hedgerows and columns of trees 
are planted. They appear to be in parallel 
rows extending to the water, but were 
actually placed in converging lines so 
as to create the illusion that the river, in 
reality a mile away, is much closer to 
the house. Mulberry Fields is presently 
owned by Mr. and Mrs. Holger B. Jans- • 
son. 



75 



L#JMwfel 







Day sluHenls ^v\ lu kmiw raifi niher at iheir first St. J.A. Phipps. Tuna. \ . Burklrr. and J. KamtT prrparc tu enjoy a pin»d 

Mary's tea. 'I'hank>t:ivin(: meal. 




'^'Fnir 



S. Stanford. W. Sawyer. M. Russell. T. Daugherly. A. Passe- 
rilli. K. Dixun. T. Doibcy. and C. Clark are enjoying their 

Thanksgiving turkey. 



Friendly Gatherings 




D. Mill-. \lr- .1. K.'ller. K. Crnl. t^;. Kux..^. Kvrrm.iii. \1. trancis. 
K. Bi-litip, Mr. B. (ireeson and S. Chuale pet arciuaintrd at the 
Facuhy-Studeni Coffee. 



Kveryone sernl^■ to gel In the spirit at the annual ("liristmas l)an<iiiet. 





[i 







ismi i 





A group of Si. Mary's girls pose in frunt of the Court House at 
Williamsburg during tKe annual Williamsburg trip. 



S. Kee. L. Vlaulsby, and Ti>ua look on as twn drum and tlfr hoys 
play thf "Battle Hymn of the Kepublir." 



And Thetj Traveled Far 



p. Ilaa, N. II<-nscl. C. Brown. Mr. Tranlham, K. Hand. D. Hillis. 
.1. Dwy.-r. J. Kamcr. T. Fritcr. S. B.nv.-rs. T. Drury. J. Dunn. C. 
Di'|ii« .WW ar.l. Mrs. Treaclwcll on Iciur wilh Bus Snip. 



.*^t. Mary's Homf Ec. majors. K. Bishop. .S. W'riland. J..^. Phipps. 
and Miss Oslunrl. on their way to the Home V.c. Convention in 
(;hi-%v Chase. .Mil. 



m 


i? 






\iV 


1 • Jff^ '• ^^'^' 


^^ 


!r.».l 


i Jt'. . 


4j^^^ pi^^^^^HB^U 


M 


mk'^' 




i Z \\ 


t'^ 


%■ 


'^^^HpnOPV 1 


f 1 ' 

m 





riir \jti..naU.all<Ty Or. Iii--lra |,ri->.-n(i-,l j -liniulalirii; |ir"[:i.iiii a I lli,-lir>l i..rR-.Tl ..1 llj,- Aili-1 I.., lun .■miu-.-. 

Variety Sparks the Cultural Program 



A larf;c variety dI ciiltiiral activities enliven tile 
St. Marys campus. The Artist Lecture Series Fro- 
fn-ani uliicli includes the National Gallery Orchestra, 
the National Opera Company in I'ligdtioiul Kirif:. 
the Baltimore .Symphimy Orchestra and the Nation- 
al Players from Catholic University in Twelfth 
Night. Other types of cultural activities on campus 
are The World Around L s Lecture Series, the Metal 
Sculpture demonstration, the Keith Martin Exhibit, 
and the landscapes on loan from the National 
Gallery of Art. 




1%+ Cimimunity .\rl Judgi-s H.iwar.l K!i-ih an. I i ..Iti.' I^. 1. 




IIh- \I.lal s, i,l|iti]ri- Kxhiliil .>f (Ji'urcr .Acki-rman ilriw iiiaiiy 
inlfri-^l.-.l |H-.i|>li-, 




\ ;: ill.- lllall^ M-.il..r- I., tin- l')(it .si. Mai\- C.iinU An '. 

.SIh.u win- Cfclric Kp-li. a risinc ymm); artist anil juilp' iil lllf ' 
»li..», an.l his fallii-r. Bji.rii Ktiili. 'mr .if lllf lii|i-raliil |>..rlrail 
arli-N in ill.- .-..uillry. 



78 





Orsino speaks his silver-tipped pnelry tu Olivia in Shakespeare's 
comedy. Twelfth Night, as presented hy the Natirmal Players. 



Prafihi Pra>.arttnnjitisi»lh and friend dance to 
the rlivthin ot their native Thai folk music. 



Part (if the learning here at St. Mary"s certainly 
belongs tu the assembly program. .Assemblies on 
Kiissia, Brazil, physical fitness, religion and art, 
the Honor .System at William and Mary, and the 
preservation of the natural beauty of St. Mary's 
('ily have been some of the interesting and varied 
topics. 




The Hioiiirahle James Duff spoke on the preser- 
vation of natural beauty in .St. Mary's City. 




The Honor .System at the Colleiie of William and Mary was discussed liy Mr. Miihael Sopcliak feenterl. With 
him are C. Fox (left). Honor ('ourt chairman, and F. Hampton (ri[:htl. Men's .Student Government President. 



79 





J. Rathnx-ll. H. Skinner. S. Cheesman. I*. Hdli/< li, and >. Harri> 
ru^h tu get sluckings done. 



Miss Cham-r. J. Hi-inbarh. Mrs. J. Keltrr. t. Hansen, and Mrs. 
Armilage prepare fi)r the Suphomore dinner. 



Christmas Activities . . . 




Sue Cheesman. c haii tnan ot ilu- lia/.aar sficiws ju-^t a IVw >aniph's of the Ba/aar g<mds. 

. . . Bring Lots of Hard Work 

and Fun With the Christmas Bazaar . . . 

liel^iurii honth c■lltne^ alive with (iamlyn Kgeh. Tuin Daugherty. 
Santa lalia> Mr. Greeson) Nslens to Jamie Po.sh's (Ihrislmas hsi. and Hnlly Biu-kner. 





80 




riir grain! injnli l^ It J b> (^ucill Jutli Dunn Jiitl luT t->curt. Lew Kdwrciui-. 

And Keep Winter Alive With 

the Christmas Prom. 




'\'\u> year".- pmm was icigricil Ijy Jiicli Dunn with 
ciiurt Sue X^ aters. Judy Humphn-ys. Karen Bisluip. 
and Margaret Chandler. Kacli girl represented an 
organization un campus and was elected by the 
student lindv fcir the cciurl. 



\\ W Pn-sidrnl. Kay LiddfU, and \^ A,A Sponsnr. Mrs. Clevenger. 
awail iht-* \\ .\-\'s big yearly event. 




81 




i'.. .lanii^hfk tiivf^ (^hristma^ present^ In K. Butler. 



(iiiristmas at Saint Mary's is a lime for givinj;: 
tvit nniy 1)1 material nhjeels. hut (it (ineself. Iiici. The 



true joy <il this season laii he lound (inl\ on selfless- 
ness as is shown in these pictures. 






Miss Russili 1^ all liiiii.lli-cl up Ici wan! i.ff llii- <-li-nn-nts. 



I). Liigalbci taking a n-st during a night cif skating. 



Winter is a cold season on tlie Saint Mary's 
River. Cold winds howl at lite windows and ice 
forms everywhere. The snow piles up and invites 
fun and frolic: snow-ball battles, sleddinji, and ice- 
skating on the nearby pond. 



K. S<hwitT. F. Hampton. B. Salisbury testing tlu- ic 





L. Reynolds and P. Skinni-r- playing leap-frog? 





I 




L. LinhtntT. J. Daltnn, Ti'ua 



K. M.acic, li. Salisbury 





J. Dian. I). Masking 
W . Bail.y 



I!. H.iniiij:. I). Kriiarill. S. Walirs 
\ ll.n~,l. \I I'li.-lpv. \l \l«. II I'. Smith. K. I.i.l.lfll 






84 





F. Tonifv. K. Bishop. D. Mills. Mr. Fahl 



K. Blake 




V. I.i-wiips. M. Palni<-r. A. Passa- 
rrllc. 1'. (Jraliam 



PASTIME ACTIVITIE.S at 
St. Mary's are for one and 
all. Boating, picnicing and 
just lying in the sun are en- 
joyed by our students. The 
Kent Hall Smoker provides 
a place for studying, play- 
ing cards, and watching 
television: as well as a 
place for quiet talks, and 
controversial discussion. 



I.. Horsnian. ('.. Brown. F. Sasscer 




S. Brown, Mr. Kenney, G. Feldman 



.S. .Stanford. A. I'as^a 
Sawyer. J. Fsptisilo 



K. Diekson. \V. 





85 




\ isiling (tignilarie^ look on as Queen [)onna Spalding takes her plaee fur the coronation ceremonies. 




Juililli Dunn. IVu-r Haa. Mr. KciLcrl Tranlhani. Ji.Jin Klrti her, and J»ihn Drury 
re-enacl the firsi selllement of St. Mary's t'.\i\ . 

Kulliy Snyder. Keberca Jiiyner. Martha Healey. and Su»an Brebner 

adfl aiith<'nti<ity U> the feslivitir*. with iheir «<i|niiial dress. 



May Festivities 



The first of May was a very special event 
on the St. Mary's campus this year. In 
kccpiiif; with the fact that this was Law Day 
as well as May Day. the celel)ratii)n, which 
tiiiik place in front of Maryland's first Slate 
House, was opened with the introduction 
of visiting lawyers and dignitaries. A speech 
by Maryland .\tlorney-General Thomas 
Finan on religious toleration was followed 
with the acceptance hy .'^tate ("oniptroller 
Louis Goldstein of a phu ipic coniincin- 
orating the settlement of Maryland. Ihe 
climax of the afternoon came with the 
crowning of Miss Donna Spalding as Queen 
of I he May. The college Drama Depart nicnl 
hniught the program to a dose with an 
excellent pageant depicting the settlement 
of St. Mary's Gity. .Accompanying this was 
till' college choir singing ""Maryland, My 
Marylanil. " The festivities continued 
throughout the day. inchaling a tea held in 
the Ciarden of Keniemhrance, the dormitory 
open house, and the .St. Mary's (^>llege 
Student Art Exhibit. The highlight of the 
evening was the May Prom, over which the 
Queen and her court presided. 







? 






Donna Spalding 
Queen of the May 






Hully Buckner 
Shfnanthah Apple Blossom Princess 



Margaret Chandler 
Sophomore Princess 




The Queen s Court 




Judith Humphreys 
Sophomore Princess 




Marlvn Adainson 
Frrshnion Princess 



jt) \nn \I;il;irn//.o 
Frrshmnn Princess 

88 



Sue Ann Waters 
Freshmon Princess 




"^SSHHI^^^^^^H^^^^I 


^Ht a-^^^I^I^^^^^^^^^^H 


1 


'^ 


^^ *^" 


1 



THE OLEEN AND HER COURT: Marlyn Adams.. n: Margaret 
Chandler: H.tUy Buckner; Queen. Donna Spalding: Judith 
Humphreys; Sue U aters; Jo Ann Malan.zzo: Train Bearer, 
Brenda Greeson; Crown Bearer. Jamie P.)sch: Train Bearer; 
("aroline Donhiser. 



The Queen and her Court were honored at the 
May Prom after the day's festivities had closed. 
They danced to the music fo Lee Maxfield"s Orches- 
tra, and enjoyed the beauty of the decorations which 
represented Daisy Fantasy. Water flowed from the 
leveiy fountain, and a huge daisy behind the throne 
gave the prom a garden Hke appearance. 




89 




Despite a rather unsuccess- 
ful season, the Retrievers were 
enthusiastically supported by 
the students. The team, though 
lacking in height, showed steady 
improvement throughout the 
year. Many of the players will be 
returning next year and we are 
all hoping for a more successful 
season. 



<Back ntwl Manajlrr^i. K. Schwier. T. Kfllcr; W . Salisbury; M. Fitzgerald: \Ianagrr. F. 
Hampinn; (!oarh. Mr. Dewpy: (Front rowl D. Berg: W. Bailey: J. KusscU 



''Fight, team, fight." 



This season's high scorer. Wall Sawyer, shoots 
a foul shot, while freshman Skip Choate (21 1 

looks lltl. 



Wesley Junior College 122 

Shenandoah Junior College 1)0 

Potomac .Stale Junior College 115... 

Kssex Junior College 120 

Halliinore liisliliite 80 

Harford juiiior (!ollcge 71 

Prince (George's County College 120 

.Monlgotiiery Junior (College l.% 

Baltimore Junior College 112 

Hagerstown Junior College 107 

Charles County C.C. 101 

Calonsville C.C. 86 

Anne .\rundcl (;.C. 6.5 

Allegany Junior College 11.3 



..S.M.C. 58 
..S..M.C. 83 
..S.M.C. 49 
..S.M.C. 82 
..S..M.C. 58 
..S.M.C. 57 
..S.M.C. 59 
..S.M.C. 61 
..S.M.C. 41 
..S.M.C. 52 
..S.M.C. 77 
..S.M.C. 68 
..S.M.C. 71 
..S.M.C. 45 



90 





'Go Retrievers 



The cheerleaders' attributes included pep 
and skill, and they will always be remembered 
for their enthusiasm and successful attempts 
to instill it in the spectators. Their stamping 
feet and clapping hands constantly reminded 
the team that the whole school was behind 
them. 



Eileen Smith. Captain: Margaret Chandler. Faye Pegg 



The most popular sport. 



The most popular of the girls' winter sports is 
basketball. Anyone is eligible to play in intra- 
murals, and from these teams Mrs. Clevenger 
chooses the varsity. 

The varsity team participated in a Sports Day 
at Towson State this year, where they played 
Notre Dame, Goucher and Towson, as well as 
regular games with near-by colleges. 




.Standing: Mrs. Clevenger. K. Liddell. J. Gargani, W. Mere- 
dith, .'^. Scheckles. P. Smith. J. Frame. P. Price. Front; 
D. Mill*. B. Dixon. J. Rabbitt. B. Kelly. M. Aiwell. 



Donna Mills prepares for a rebound of .Milzi AtwelPs .shtit. in 
the opening game with Salisbury State. 




^ #» f» ,,« fip^ $ 




91 




i 



Hiittcun TOW. S. Chet-sman. B. Dixon. J. Kabbilt. J. Kramt.-. S. IStantord. H. Hatiurh. k. l.i.l<l.-ll. .1. (.ar^ani, W . 
MiTi-Hilh. S. Scheckles. P. Price. S. Newman, P. Lnngesl. Mrs. Clevrnger. 

Volleyball means, "Practice, Practice, Practice" 

The members of the vnneyhall team played 
games with SaHshury State and Bahimore Juninr 
College. They also participated in the Sports Day 
at Towson. playing Notre Dame. Goucher. and 
Towson. 

The highliiihl nt the season is the Kaeuhy-Stu- 
dent game. 



Jarifl Frame rt'turns a serve in tlie fir^I iiarne (if tin- >rasnn willi Salisbury .Slate 




92 




Girls' Hocketj 



Hockey is a sport that is eagerly 
participated in at St. Mary's. The 
varsity team played Salisbury State 
and participated in games at a 
Sports Day at the University of 
Maryland with Frostburg State. 
Bowie .State. Gallaudet and .\meri- 
can University. 

Janet Frame was chosen as -St. 
Mary's outstanding player. 



Jiiyce Gartidiii and >ii~i.- Sli-wart ^larl praclice wilh a < inlcr volley. 



Judy Carrick and EUen Hand look on as Joyce Gargani stioots for the goal guarded by goalie Bonnie Dixon. 




93 





I ui. |ini-.|Hi li\t- mtniiitT-. ul thr t;iri- liiim- itjiii ilrini W ilkr 
anil Judi Dunn, discuss some of the games" finer points with 
Mrs. (Jleven^er. 



Front: L. Bui» liei. l>. Atlas. S. Choale. B. >rli»iri. 
Standing: T. Mallingly. C. Pilkerion, W. Guy 



Physical Fitness and good, clean fun 



The faculty members, as well as the students 
enjoy tennis almost every day. if weather permits. 
The warm afternoons of .Southern Maryland eom- 
bined with the excellent tennis courts of .St. Mary's 
enable a number of people to enjoy one of Americas 



top individual sports regularly. 

Early in the Spring, men and women students 
begin practice for the varsity tennis teams which 
play other colleties during; late scccmd semester. 




Ml. Uukt-I .iii'l Mr ll« vw \'. altrriH!(ni> ol u-mii^ arc a regular !r,irrrr<- "I Si- \Iar\'^ ( jillr-yr-. 



94 




p. Shawlfv, K. Snyder. L. Horsman. antl J. Humphrey 
(lance "Green Sleeves." 



N. Ranneberger. L. Burner, L. H"r;<man. L. Lung. J. Humphreys 
enjoy learning the "Pally (^ake Hoika." 



Dance 



One of the most popular of the Physical Educa- 
tion courses is Folk and Square Dancing. The stu- 
dents learn dances of many countries, as well as 



square dances. Modern dance is new this year and 
is becoming very popular. Both courses teach 
rhythm and coordination, and are fun. as well. 



Front: \I. Chandler. .Mrs. Clevenger. M. .\twp||; .Standing: P. Graham. B. Di.xun. N Ml 



. P. Salisbury. -S. Newman. 





Individual and 

team efforts 



Because of the mild Southern Maryland weath- 
er, and the opportunities afforded by schedules, 
individual and team athletics are the most popular 
student activities. 

Through physical education classes and prac- 
tice the students have become (|uite adequate at a 
number of sports. One of the most popular is boat- 
ing. .'Mmost any warm afternoon will find a group 
of students sailing or can<ieing im the ."^t. Mary's 
River. 

This year a varsity Cross Country team was 
organized. The men students on the team partici- 
pated in meets with various Junior Colleges. It has 
been one of the regular sports at St. Mary's. 

The students also participated in intramural 
badminton and table tennis. 



Juli*' \lrail«- returns the Inrdic in liaiiiiiiriluu c■ia^^. 




^jtS*-*^"^*" ' 



Joe Ku-sM-tl aiitj l.aii > huti In i piatlui l.u <..i; 




.l.uiiiu I.S".MI" .in. I Kill >.il. 
wlin lakr aHvanlaK<' •>! ill)' 
\larvV. 



. .ii< .iiuoii^ iIk- main sllidriil- 
f-Ilt'til Itoalinf; farilitirs ar M 



96 



On the banks of blue St. Mary's -near Potomac 

strand. 
Stands our dear old Alma Mater — best school in 

the land! 
Built of bricks from the first state house — near 

the mulb'ry's shade 
Where Lord Calvert with the Indians once a 

treaty made 
Boldly stands she by the waters, faithful to 

unfold 
Knowledge to her sons and daughters — worth 

more than pure gold. 
Age and fire cannot destroy her — she has stood 

the test. 
We will always love St. Mary's — she deserves our 

best. 
We tvill ever love St. Mary's — love to praise her 

name; 
Strive to make our lives add luster to her 

glorious fame. 
Let your glad song wake the echoes, sing with 

voices free 
Hail to Thee, Dear Alma Mater! Hail, all hail, 
'j\ to Thee! 



\Alyy 



l> 



•^n 



Till 



Advertisements 




Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 




Porto Bello, overlooking the St. 
Mary's and Potomac Rivers opposite 
St. Mary's City, is a beautiful, gambrel 
roofed, "pent-type" manor house. The 
mansion, dating from tlie eighteenth 
century, is believed to have been built by 
William Hebb who is buried in an elabo- 
rate sarcophagus on the grounds. Hebb. 
who was a midshipman in the British 
Navy under Edward \ernon (for whom 
Lawrence \^ ashington named his .Mt. 
Vernon) during the British-Spanish \V ar, 
named the house after the battle of Porto 
BeUo in The West Indies. Porto Bello is 
now the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. .\llen 
Coad. 




Winter's white snow 



THE ENTERPRISE 

Southern Maryland's Reading Weekly 
With over 7000 in circulation 

In Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1011 



Compliments of 

BURCH OIL COMPANY, INC. 

Gulf Oil Products 



Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2131 



DYSON'S SERVICE STATION 

Gas — Oil — Tires — Tubes 
Lubrication Accessories 

Great Mills, Maryland 
Phone: 944-1224 



J. A. CECIL 

General Merchandise 

Great Mills, Maryland 
Phone: 994-1133 



ADAM'S APPLIANCE SHOP 

Sales and Service 
Appliances — Television 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone 373-2253 




>MriinuT s I;i/\ nvt-r 



100 



ROGER H. DEAN AND SONS 

General Contractors 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2291 



THE NEW HOLLYWOOD 
GENERAL STORE 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2261 



WOOD'S ESSO SERVICE 

1-Day Tire Recapping Service 

Hollywood, Maryland 

Phone: 373-2266 

@) 




ffi:^ 




Spring's new life 




Autumn's falling leaves 



BOWL - - - IT'S FUN 

Pleasant snack Ijar where you can relax 
between games is just one of the extras here. 

Plenty of Parking 

Make your mark with the family — 
take them bowling. 

ESPERANZA BOWL 

Route 235 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 863-3391 



Compliments of 

ALDRIDGE FORD, INC. 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 863-8111 

"Our Speciality is Good Service" 




Flap your wings 



CENTER GARDENS 

Serving Southern Maryland with 
Furnished and Unfurnished Apartments 

Phone: 862-2722 



COIN-OPERATED 
WASHING MACHINES 

434 Great Mills Road 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-8736 



THE DIETZ SHOE COMPANY 

Shoes of quality for the entire family 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone 862-5171 



BLAIR'S 

Jewelry — Silver — China 
Studio Cards 

Lexington Park and Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1271 



Compliments of 
TONY and GARY 

Owners of 

CLASSIC SHOE SHOP 

and 

CLASSIC DRESS SHOP 



COOK AND MEREDITH 
MARINE SALES 

Mercury Outboards 
Crosby — Larsen — MFC Boats 

Route 1, Box 465 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 862-0411 




Ft..NA 
a OOF r STUFF 



.iihI <li\' li^iii in 



ELECTRONICS SERVICE CO. 

714 Great Mills Road 
Lexington Park, Maryland 

Complete T.V. and Appliance Service 
Phones: 863-3291, 863-6341 



HEWITT 



Lumber and Supply 



Calloway and Lexington Park, Maryland 



KING'S SHOPARAMA 

Your one stop shop in Southern Maryland 
Central Charge 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-0011 





Looking 



THE HUB 

Southern Maryland's Leading 
Department Store 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-3611 



LEXINGTON PARK 
DRY CLEANERS 

For Prompt Pick-up and Delivery Service 
Complete Laundry Service 

/Fe Operate a Licensed Sta-Nu Plant 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 994-0200 



Compliments of 

LEXINGTON PARK HOTEL 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1666 



'Ijlkiii:: 



103 





Durni pajama parl\ 




CATO'S TEXACO 

Lexington Park 
Maryland 


DEAN AND BEAVERS 

Hollywood, Maryland 

General Contractors 
Road Building — Asphalt — Asphalt Paving 

Office: 373-2121 


DEAN'S LUMBER AND SUPPLY 
COMPANY, INC. 

General Building Materials 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 375-2111 


Compliments oj 

J. T. DAUGHTY'S 
ANCHOR VAN LINES 


BEE'S AUTO SUPPLY, INC. 

The Best Source of Quality and Service 

Automobile Parts 

Supplies and Equipment 

Phone: 862-1411 



104 









CITIZENS NATIONAL 






BANK OF 






SOUTHERN MARYI.AND 


^^■^^^^^^^^^^^■||V 




Lexington Park, Maryland 


Im^^^'^'^^^fs 






'.^mks ^'^> ' HI 




Phone: 863-7061 


1* ^^mw^^ ^^^^^1 






A night out 


BELL MOTOR COMPANY 




Chevrolet — Buick — Oldsmobile 


HOMPSON'S FURNITURE CITY 


Sales and Service 




Leonardtown, Maryland 


Hollywood, Maryland 


Phone: 475-2351 




PARK T.V. AND RECORD SHOP 




RCA and Motorola 


BEN FRANKLIN STORE 


Color T.V. Headquarters 
Sales and Service 


J. .Abell Loncmore 


Phono Records Phono Records 


Leonardtown, Maryland 


Lexington Park, Maryland 


Phone: 475-8412 


Phone: 862-8411 





PARK PHARMACY 

Your Rexall Store 


PEGGY GENE'S 
HOUSE OF FURNITURE 


"Through These Portals Pass The 




Prettiest Girls In The World" 


Lexington Park, Maryland 


Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-6161 


Phone: 863-8060 


Compliments of 




PARK JEWELERS 


HORTON DODGE, INC. 


Lexington Park, Maryland 


Lexington Park, Maryland 


Phone: 862-3121 






Serenity on St. Mary's River 


LEXINGTON PARK PHARMACY 


^KT *f 1' 


19 Tulagi Place 


wmm^Jkj 




Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-3481 


WBUfmr^ 


rf^ 




"i 


"Dedicated lo Serving the County" 
















- --^-SB^h^ 




Lincoln Mercury 
Compliments of 


^ ^ ^ 








PATUXENT MOTORS 


I^K^ 








Lexington Park, Maryland 


^^Bn^ 








Phone: 862-1333 
Comet Rambler 


^'-^ 




— ■— ^ " 









106 






1 Complete 
Home 
Outfitters 




BILL RALEY'S SALE CENTER 

Sales Representative 

Lexington Park Maryland 
Phone: 863-8181 



Compliments of 

'THE SPINNING WHEEL" 
RESTAURANT 

Phone: 863-3301 




Leslie Lightner and Barbara Kelly observe progress on 
campus: a new dorm. 



Compliments of 

BALTIMORE ALUMNI CHAPTER 
St. Mary's College of Maryland 




Compliments of 

M. ADELE FRANCE 
Alumni Chapter 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 



Compliments o/ 

NATIONAL 
MOBILE HOME SALES, INC. 

Three Notch Road 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 862-4721 



SOUTHERN MARYLAND 
OIL COMPANY, INC. 

Texaco Products 
Heating Oils — Burner Service 24-hour 

La Plata - Mechanicsville, Maryland 
Phones: 934-8101, 884-3161 



107 




Nell Waddell. Pal ^^milh, and Terr)' Dolbey — sludying? 



Compliments of 

FRANK A. COMBS 
Insurance Agency 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9116 



MARYLAND NATIONAL BANK 

— does so much for so many people 

63 offices serving Metropolitan Baltimore, 

The Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland 

Leonardtown and Mechanicsville 

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



JOHN R. DRURY AND SON 

Insurance and Real Estate 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9114 



FOODLINER — IGA 

Phone: 475-5201 

Meats — Groceries — Fruits 
Vegetables — Frozen Foods 

Leonardtown, Maryland 



Janice 

Phone: 475-3191 

Speciality Shop for Ladies Apparel 
Leonardtown, Maryland 




Pete Ballzell and Sharon Harris enjoy a German taste 
of Christmas 



LEONARDTOWN BUILDING 
AND SUPPLY COMPANY 

"All in the way of Building Materials" 

Fenwick Street and Lawrence Avenue 
Phone: 475-9200 



108 



LEONARDTOWN LAUNDRY, INC. 

Dry Cleaning — Rug Cleaning 
Complete Modern Storage 




Sfe-->-^-!'> -^k, ^'^^ 



Our busy bees — that's V. Buckler, Miss Chance, 
and J. Chapman 



LEONARDTOWN MOTEL 

Leonardtown, Maryland 

Free Television — ■ Air Conditioning 
Tub and Shower 

Phone: 475-9135 



MCKAY 
IMPLEMENT AND TRUCKS, INC. 

Farm Equipment — Industrial Equipment 
International Motor Trucks 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9190 



THE ROOST 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-5051 



Vtel^ood 




Two students study in our library. 



Compliments oj 



MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM 



109 



THE 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF ST. MARY'S 

Leonardtown - Lexington Park, Maryland 






% 



Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




And what wuuld Lord Calvert say? 



PARGAS, INC. 

Gas by Tank or Meter 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-2221 



Compliments of 

WESTERN AUTO 

Lexington Park Maryland 
Phone: 863-3011 




The bowling class relaxes. 



Compliments of 

SPRINGER S ESSO SERVICE 

Lexington Park Maryland 
Phone: 863-5574 



Complimelns of 

ERNEST L. STONE AND SON 

Park Hall, Maryland 
Phone: 994-0500 



MARYLAND 
TOBACCO GROWERS ASSN. 

Feed, Seed & Fertilizer 
Phone: 475-9196 



SPARLING'S 



Leonardtown's Finest Department Store 



Leonardtown, Maryland 




The busy day ended . . . classes over. 



Compliments of 

TAYLOR GAS COMPANY 

Gas and Electrical Appliances 
Bottle Gas Distributor 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-4091 



r^:/^^^mt'- 




A full day ahead. 



Compliments of 

PATUXENT 
RECREATION CENTER 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-6381 



FRIENDLY 
CAB COMPANY 

Reliable 24-houi- service is put to 
good use by the students 

Phone: 863-8141 



111 



V. and H. BAKERY 






Compliments of 


Lexington Park and Leonardtown, 




Maryland 






JOSEPH A. KENNY III 


Phone: 475-8495 





/I 





S. Kee, F. Caliano 



MATTINGLY 
FUNERAL HOME 


ST. MARY'S 
ICE AND FUEL INC. 


Ambulance Service — Monuments 


Leonardtown, Maryland 




Phone:475-5251 


Leonardtown, Maryland 




Phone: 475-2061, 475-2071 





PEPSI-COLA 

of Washington 




PEPSI-COLA 




Compliments to 
THE CLASS OF 1965 

THE LEONARDTOWN 
DAIRY COMPANY 



Bottling Co. 

At St. Mary's, Coca-Cola 
is a Sign of Good Taste 




Miss Russell, Mrs. Fall!, standing 
C. Wernt-r. L, Krit-clt-r. sealfd 



113 



Why Pay More for Gasoline 
Drive in to your 

SAVON GAS STATION 

Save 10% 
Phone: 862-9933 


"Flowers for Every Occasion" 

HARRIS FLORIST 




Compliments of 

WASHINGTON 
ALUMNI CHAPTER 


LEONARDTOWN and 
LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 

Phones: 475-2161, 863-7056 




TOWN AND CASUAL SHOP 

117 SHANGRI LA DRIVE 

LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 
Phone: 862-7201 






bfliHRMHUT ^S^Bl 


1 










r^^ 




i V 


■ -. - i 




T 


Qua. Tliailand mail? 





TRI-COUNTY FEDERAL 
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOQATION OF WALDORF 



Home Office: 




Branch Office: 


Waldorf, Maryland 




Leonardtown, Maryland 


Phone: 645-3421 


11/1 


f Phone: 475-9328 


/ 


\k 


PER 

ANNUM 



Dividend? Compounded Quarterly 



Home Loans to Buy, Build, Remodel, Refinance 



PATRONS 
LIZ AND MYRT'S KNIT SHOP 

Esperanza Shopping Center 
Free Instructions 

PARK MEN'S SHOP 
AGGIE'S DRESS SHOP 
MR. and MRS. W. H. CHAPMAN 
MR. and MRS. JOHN P. RUE 
SENATOR J. FRANK RALEY 
LEONARDTOWN FASHION CEN. 
HAYDEN'S AUTO SUPPLY 
DYSON'S LUMBER COMPANY 
SMITH'S INC. 




J. Rabbitt. C. Pilkerton, S. Stanford, E. Smith, 
S. Brebner, B. Wise 



115 



ST. MARY'S PHARMACY 



Your Rexall Store 



Leonardtown, Maryland 



Compliments of 

THRIFT OIL COMPANY 

Phone: 475-9111 
Leonardtown, Maryland 




Each year we attempl l<i jiroduce a better yearbook h\ 
sending representatives lo one of the annual forums pre- 
sented by a publishing eompany. This year, we attended 
the American Yearbook Forum in Washington, D.C. where 
we compared our yearbook and its needs witli those dis- 
played. Througli lectures and fihnstrips we learned how 
lo improve our book. In exchanging ideas with other 
groups we gained the incentive to strive for a belter year- 
i)ook. 



J. Dalt.m, (;. lirown. C. Canoles, S. .Smilli 



Editor 

Literary Editors 
Layout Editors 

Art Editors 
Business Manager 
Typists 
Faculty Adviser 



Carol Canoles 

Jackie Dalton, Leslie Lightiier 

Joyce Gargani, Sharon Sinitli. 
Carol Brown, Katliy Snyder 

Holly Buckner. B. J. Egeli 

Becky JiiNUci 

.iniii'l ivitlinicll. IJiiiiil.i Hiili.-. 

!,. RtMliici- Siiiinis