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Full text of "Castellan [yearbook] 1966"



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President's Cottage 



19 66 CASTELLAN 

ST. MARY'S COLLEGE DF MARYLAND 
ST. MARY'S CITY, MARYLAND 

VOLUME XIX 




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Sophomores page 9 



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Freshmen page 19 



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Academics page 35 









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Activities page 47 




Advertising page 95 



Margaret Brent Hall 



PRESIDENT RUSSELL HEADS 




Dr. May Russell. President of St. Mary's Col- 
lege, received her A.B. degree from Western 
Maryland College. Having completed further 
studies, she was granted an M.A. degree in Mathe- 
matics from Teachers College of Columbia Uni- 
versity. Graduate studies took Dr. Russell to 
Johns Hopkins University, the University of 
Michigan, and Harvard University. Western 
Maryland, her alma mater, conferred upon Miss 
Russell the L.L.D. degree. Dr. Russell is highly 
respected by both the students and faculty of St. 
Mary's College. 



Dr. Russell, Admiral Johnson and Governor and Mrs. 
Tawes enter Kent Hall for the Governor's Day lunch- 



DUR DISTINGUISHED ADMINISTRATION 




<^v 




This year St. Mary's welcomes a new Dean of 
Men, Mr. William Yancey. His office in Calvert 
Hall is always open to students. He advises the 
Men's Dorm Council and the Honor Court. Mr. 
Yancey is also a welcome addition to the faculty as 
a European History teacher. His willingness to 
help the students is well-known and appreciated. 

Miss Simms, the Dean of Women, is advisor 
to her girls on every subject from boys to Math 
teachers. They have found her opinion to be valu- 
able and usually correct. 

Mr. Anderson and Mr. Fahl are also willing 
and able to advise the students on their academic 
problems. 



WILLIAM H. YANCEY 

M. S. Auburn University 

Dean of Men 



ALLO A. ANDERSON 

M.A. George Peabody College 

Dean of Students 



L. BEATRICE SIMMS 

M.A. University of Kentucky 

Dean of Women 



MR. ELWOOD FAHL 

M.S. University of North Dakota 

Dean of Faculty 









BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




GEORGE A. KAMMERER 
M.Ed., Loyola College 
Director of Admissions 



^^\ 



SAMUEL W. PURSELL 

M.A., University of Nebraska 

Manager of Bookstore 



Without the Administrative Staff our school would lose 
contact with functions of everyday business life. It is from 
these people that we receive our pay checks, new students, 
and necessary publicity that keeps St. Mary's College func- 
tioning as a unit. 



MARGARET E. KEEN 

M.S., Columbia University 

Head Librarian 



BRANTLEY D. GREESON 

M.M., Westminister Choir College 

Publicity Director 





LEONARD M. BROOKBANK. 

B.C.S., Strayer College 

Business Manager 



Secretaries: Mrs. Bean, Mrs. Redmond, Mrs. Kidd, Mrs. 
Thurlby, Mrs. Quarry, Mrs. Leroy, Miss Sandner. 



J 




STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 





Dr. Patrick, our college physician. 



Miss O'Brien is on duty in the Student Infirmary from 
six o'clock to twelve o'clock midnight daily. 



Miss Chance analyzes the symptoms. 



Miss Chance is on call at the 
infirmary from seven thirty to 
six o'clock. In her off duty 
hours she has helped with the 
Christmas Bazaar, the arrange- 
ments for Governor's Day, ad- 
vised the Sophomore Class and 
organized the Artist 8c Lecture 
Series. She has also devoted 
much of her time to the March 
of Dimes. St. Mary's is grateful 
to Miss Chance for unlimited 
patience and devotion. 








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The Garden of 




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Remembrance 



as 



SDPHDMDRES 

The Garden stands in remembrance of 

Spring afternoons on the pier . . . 

the tennis games . . . 

"Charge Retrievers!" 

checking for mail . . . 

the two minute runs to class . . . 

midnight studying . . . 

weekend car jams . . . 

telephone line ups . . . 

bumpy bus trips back to school . . . 

cokes . . . potato chips . . . hunger 

free periods in the gym smoker . . . 

proms . . . 

friends . . . roommates . . . 

St. Mary's. 





CAROL B. AULD 


WENDELL H. BAILEY 


RUBY P. BEAUCHAMP 


SANDRA BENSON 


Lexington Park, Maryland 


Upper Marlboro. Maryland 


Salisbury, Maryland 


Lexington Park, Maryland 


SECRETARIAL 


SCIENCE 


PSYCHOLOGY 


MA THEM A TICS 



ONCE WE WERE FRESHMEN 








PAMELA BLACK 

Towson, Maryland 

EDUCA TION 



PATRICIA D. BOECKER 

Baltimore. Maryland 

SECRETARIAL 



SAMUEL r BROUN 

Collon's Point, Maryland 

BUSINESS 



THOMAS A. BROWN 

Colton's Point, Maryland 

MATHEMATICS 



Where the conversation is: Ernie Hodges, Sheila 
Zubrod, Liz Passarelli, Tilly Woodward. 



VIRGINIA L. BUCKLER 

Prince Frederick. Maryland 

SOCIOLOGY 




ALICE B. BURGESS 
Ellicott City, Maryland 
HOME ECONOMICS 




10 






CYNTHIA CARROLL 
Baltimore, Maryland 
MATHEMATICS 



|\NL CHAPMAN 

La Plata, Maryland 

EDUCATION 



Where the leadership is: President Jimmy Ramer; 
Vice President Maggie Healy; Secretary Stevie 
Neuman; Treasurer Danny Stevens. 



WE STUDIED; WE WENT TD ELASSES 




PATRICIA CLEVENGER 

Grasonville. Maryland 

EDUCA 770A' 



DORA JEAN COOPER 

Bladensburg, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



CAROL |EAN CRAMER 

Frederick. Maryland 

SECRETARIAL 



JUDY DEAN 

Methantcsville, Maryland 

SECRETARIAL 



LINDA DONOVAN 

DECKER 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

EDVCA TIOS' 



DAVID DOWER 

Patuxent River, Maryland 

SCIENI I 



BONNIE DIXON 

Naylor, Maryland 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



THOMAS DRURY 

Bushwood, Maryland 

HISTORY 




WE COULDN'T PLAY BRIDGE. 




DONNA ERHARD1 


SANDRA EVERMAN 


EDWARD FLORENCE 


AMY FOOTE 


Baltimore. Maryland 


Lexington Park, Maryland 


Lexington Park. Maryland 


WiUimantic. Connecticut 


EDVCA TION 


EDUCATION 


ART 


EDVCA TION 




JANET FRAME 


FRANCINE GALIANO 


JOYCE GARGANI 


ANNE GREEN 


Alexandria. Virginia 


Baltimore, Maryland 


Federalsburg. Maryland 


Centreville. Maryland 


LIBERAL ARTS 


EDUCATION 


ENGLISH 


LIBERAL ARTS 




SHARON GUTHRIE 

Lexington Park. Maryland 

BUSINESS 



RICHARD WAYNE GUY 
Lconardtown, Maryland 



12 



Where the parlor arts begin: Carol Auld, Steve Swanson, 
Voni Passarelli, Jane Rabbitt, Tim Mattingly.. 





Where the frustrated are: 
Stevie Neuman. 



JUDV HAMMOND 

Lexington Park. Maryland 

EDUCA TION 





ELLEN HAND 

Pasadena. Maryland 

SCIENCE 



DIANE HASK.INS 
Baltimore. Maryland 
HOME ECONOMICS 



WE VOLUNTEERED. 







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MARTHA HEALV 

Washington Grove. Maryland 

HOME ECONOMICS 



DONNA HILLIS 

Glen Burnie, Maryland 

EDUCATION 



ERNESTINE HODGES 

Bushwood. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



ALICE HOFFMAN 

Thurmont, Maryland 

EDUCATION 





LYNN HORSMAN 


MARY ROSE HURRY 


JUDITH JOHNSON 


SHEILA KEE 


Berlin. Maryland 


Clements. Maryland 


Chesapeake City. Maryland 


Damascus, Maryland 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 


SCIENCE 


LIBERAL ARTS 


LIBERAL ARTS 



13 




BARBARA KELLY 
Baltimore, Maryland 
ART EDUCATION 





Where the dance was sprayed, flocked and 
scotch-taped: Nancy Mattern. 



Where the Bazaar was painted, nailed and 
snowed: Donna Erhardt, Roy Walsh. 



NDW WE KNOW; WE DON'T VOLUNTEER 




\ 









VIVIAN LYNN KREIDER 


RICKEY ELLIS LANDON 


Towson. Maryland 


Alexandria, Virginia 


SCIENCE 


HISTORY 


VIRGINIA MANN 


CATHERINE MASON 


Landsdowne, Maryland 


Crisfield, Maryland 


SCIENCE 


EDUCATION 



SANDRA LISTER 
Washington, D, C, 
LIBERAL ARTS 

JO ANN MATARAZZO 
Baltimore. Maryland 
HOME ECONOMICS 



DANIEL LOGALBO 

Lexington Park. Maryland 

SCIENCE 

NANCY MATTERN 

Towson. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 










J<|S» 4St1- 







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THOMAS MATTINGLY 
Leonardtown, Maryland 

BUSINESS 



SANDRA LEE MAULSBV 

Baltimore. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



HAROLD MCKAY 

California, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



CELIA MYERS 

Baltimore, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



NOW WE LAUGH AND PARTY. 



CHERYL MYLLO 
Pasadena. Maryland 
LIBERAL ARTS 



SALL1E NETHERTON 

Parle Hall. Maryland 

SECRETARIAL 



STEPHANIE NEWMAN 

Baltimore, Maryland 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



MARY WINDSOR 

PALMER 

Coltona Point. Maryland 

SECRETARIAL 








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k. 



ELIZABETH PASSARELLI 

Piney Point. Maryland 

EDUCATION 



CHOTIMA PATHAMANUTH 
Washington. D. C. 
LIBERAL ARTS 



JO ANNE PH1PPS 

Salisbury, Maryland 

HOME ECONOMICS 



CHARLES P1LKERTON 

California, Maryland 

BUSINESS 







JOHN J. RALEY 


JIMAXI RAMER 


NANCY RANNEBERGER 


GAYLE REDMOND 


Mechanicsville, Maryland 


Prince Frederick, Maryland 


Bel Air. Maryland 


St. Man's City. Maryland 


LIBERAL ARTS 


THEATRE ARTS 


EDVCA TION 


ENGLISH 



r 



NOW WE THINK WE KNOW IT ALL 




DONNA ROLLEY 


JOSEPH RUSSELL 


SANDY RUTLAND 


JUDITH B. SAYRE 


Salisbury. Maryland 


Hollywood. Maryland 


Lexington Park. Maryland 


Annapolis. Maryland 


LIBERAL ARTS 


EDUCA TION 


ENGLISH 


EDUCA TION 



|AN1 I SCHW \l</ 
Ellicotl City. Maryland 
HOME ECONOMICS 



EILEEN MARIE SMITH 

Germanlown. Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 



PATRICIA SMITH 

Salisbury. Maryland 

SCIENCE 






SHARON LEE SMITH 

Ellicott City, Maryland 

LIBERAL ARTS 






DANIEL STEVENS 

Lexington Park. Maryland 

BUSINESS 



LINDA THOMPSON 

Leonardtown. Maryland 

HISTORY 



I VNICE TRAVERS 

Cheverly, Maryland 

/ HI CATION 



Where a dance begins: Sharon 
Smith, Rusty Lewis, Jean 
Cramer, Leda Raby. 



^%x^ 



NOW WE ARE SOPHOMORES. 




BONNIE VANCE 


ELLEN VOSS 


JOAN WALKER 


WILLIAM WARD 


California. Maryland 


Laurel. Maryland 


Rehoboth Beach. Delaware 


Cheverly, Maryland 


EDUCATION 


PSYCHOLOGY 


EDUCATION 


1 HEMISTRY 


GAIL WATERS 


SUE ANN WATERS 


JOHN WILLIAMS 


E L E A NOR W I T H ER SPOON 


Ellicott City. Maryland 


Clarksburg. Maryland 


Tall Timbers, Maryland 


Deer Park. Maryland 


HOME ECONOMICS 


SECRETARIAL 


BUSINESS 


ART 







Queen Anne Hall 



FRESHMEN 







„ m 




A New Era Takes Shape . . . 

Queen Anne Hall . . . 

the girls' new dorm. 

Calvert Hall houses hoys now. 

The foundations are laid 

for the new student union, 

gymnasium, 

library, and more dorms. 

Two years hence 

and a senior college is realized. 

St. Mary's future begins . . . 

but its roots remain 

in the historic past . . . 

and in the beauty 

of blue St. Mary's shore. 




^i) 



v : 







Sue Addington 



Paul Aldridge 



Barn Allium 



Carol Angier 



Ed Atkins 



Sail) Attaway 



Robert Baron 



Rick Allen 




Linda Arnold 




Melinda Barnhart 



Georgia Beard 




NEW PLACES 




Where the work is: President, John Dordal; 
Secretary Matilda Woodward, Treasurer 
Francine Winkler, Vice President Don Purdy. 



Where the night begins: Sue Ad- 
dington, Rusty Lewis, Michelle 
Hecker. 



Grace Ann Beckwitli Robert Belchic 





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20 




NEW FACES 














John Bennett 



Donald Benoit 



Linda Benson 




*&■■ 






fto. LAX 



-*•*'""" 1 




Bob Beyer 



Louise Bi 



ggs 



Leslie Bislu 



NEW FRIENDS 



Robert Bupp 



Harriet Bullet 



Joe Cairns 



Patricia Cam right 



Q 0S O 





Pain Cecil 



David Chcczum 



Stephanie Cicero 



Doris Combs 




Lucy Coppagc 




Jennifer Cross 




4w* 



Aracelly E. De Leon 




I 



Cecilia Di Blasi 



ni 




Patricia Cowgill 



Doug Dc Lozicr 



Linda Foard 






Georgia Croft 



Gail Cropper 





tfgll 




Mary Crouse 



Jim Daffin 



Where the talent is: Steve Swanson. 



NEW TALENTS 



Peggy O'Neil 






Joan De Lozier 



Frank Fenwick 



Linda Felton 



22 




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Li 




Patrick Dolby 



John Dordal 



Janet Drank 



John Elms 



n 




t,* 



James H. Eslin 




Lynn Farre 





Cheryl Fatzinger 



Sue Harper 



NEW ENDEAVORS 




AM 



Craig Gemmill 





Karen Forbes 



Douglas Fortin 





I 



1 



Roger Foster 



|-j* «crT 



Thomas Frentz 



Shelly De Leon 



Richard Fritz 



o ■ 



i>* 





Patricia Gardner 



"3* •«=" 



23 



4,1 




Where the rat's morning begins: Tilly Woodward. 




Dennis Gilligan Marsha Glasscr 




Alexis Hankins Karen Hanson 



THE FIRST WEEKS 



Cl^ Rl h^S 




Ray Glcssner Alan Goldstein David Gosper 



Where the rats ended up: Bart 
Johnson, Linda Warner, Sue 
Roth, Dave Cheezum. 



James Guy 



Joseph Guy- 



Doug Hackley James Hayden Jeanne Hampshire 



24 






1 



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/ / 



*si 



Susan Harper 



John Haszard 



Michelc Hecker 





Where friendship begins: Peggy Horn and 
Pete Wimbrow. 



■^fctft^ 





Leslie Heiderman 



Cathy Heron 



Charles Hester 



HECTIC... BUT FUN 




> ^ m 



****** 




Elizabeth Hodges 



Margaret Horn 



Phil Howard 



Helen Howland 



Cathy Hunt 



Bob Hutchinson 



Maxine Iglehart 



Lucy Jackson 



Gail Join 




25 




Robert Kelley 



Linda Kern 



STUDY 



Maxinc Johnson Connie Jolley 



Janet Jones 




Cynthia Kelly 



Rose Kennedy 





Where good taste begins: Bruce Millrood, Alan 
Goldstein. 



WKAbh^^I 



«ikJ]l 



Edwin Kesmodel 



Judy Kildow 



Kenneth King 



Dcnise Kirby 



Lois Kissinger 



Edward LeFaivre 



^ ~t> Ml m ML M ,u *f 




26 




MUCH? 




Where the spirit is: Jock Darter, 
David Gosper, Itzy Atkins, Alan 
Goldstein, Bob Beyer, Rich Russell. 



i 





John Lewis 



Patricia Li 



pps 



Linda Lock 




Ivjribtl J 



Jeanne Long 



Linda Lundquist 



Harold Lyo 



Douglas MacLcan 



John Mainella 



Bonnie Manners 



Anthony Marchetti 






tlM*\M*zMlik 



Barbara Maschi 



John Massic 



Where the cleanliness is: 
John Haszard, Joe Satterth- 
waite, Bruce Millrood. 

27 





Gilbert Masters 



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en 




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Peter McGuckian Claudcttc McLaughlin Jo' 1 " Met tarn 







Miliii 



Monte Miles 



Bruce Milirood William Mitchell 




STUDY 




Where the fiction is: Bob Belchic, Carol Brown, Bob 
Turner. 



Thomas Mogle 



Beverly Molitor Christine Moore 



Patricia Nocll 



Richard Norris 




Joseph Orcto 






Fannabclle Offutt 




^ I 



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28 



EVER? 





I 



Where it all begins: Marsha 
Glasser, Mary Crouse, Linda 
Lundquist. 



Where the spirit is: Gil Masters, Leslie Bishop. 




Peggy O'Ncil Charles O'Connel 



Jean Page 




Charles Patrick 



Laurel Pauli 



Nancy Philipp 



Edward Pickering 



Mary Poc 



Donald Purdy 




Donna Purdy 



Led a Rahy 




29 



il 



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Michael Ralcy 



I SS «SW 




i 



EXAMS! 










Charlie Reichert 



William Richl 





Roland Williams 



Michcle Rockhill 



Richard Russell 




f % 



\ 



\ 




William Russell 




Sharon Ray 



> 




Harry Rector 




Marcia Rippard 




Roberta Willing 






Judith Rusling 



Susan Roth 



Joseph Sattcrthwaite 







* mktm 



*,M 



Allan Smith 







•1 >* », 




iil 



Edward Springer 



Juliane Smith 




III 



Steven Swanson 




Annette Throop 



Robert Turner 



r> 



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iik 




Sharon Stumpf 




Diane Thomas 




Lillian Thompson 





Karen Townshed 




Patrick Sullivan 




Margarethe Thorp 



Adelaide Trossbach 




Teresa Tippett 



Where the action 



Kathleen Underwood 




Ai 






Roy Walsh 



Where your friends stand by you: Pete McGuckian, Craig Gemmill, |oe Satterth- 
waite, Ed Strobel. 

AND SO WE ADJUST... 




^f 



Michael Uraxn 








Charles Walter 



Pat Urban 



Hugh Vochl 



Steve Vallandinghan 
Sue Vradenburg 




Avfc 



Sharon Ward 
Linda Warner 







Catherine Warner 





Theresa Wilkie 




n 





John Williams Joseph Wright 




I J i ft 



Matilda Woodward 



Victorine Wooton 



Barbara Zeiler 
Sheila Zubrod 

Alt 



Peter Wimbrow 



Louis Wince 



Scott Young 




TD S.M.C. 



Where the guilt lies: Ed Strobel. 



Francine Winkler 






John Wood 




33 




sai^t "^ 



Calvert 




A 



ACADEMICS 

Calvert Hall, 

the oldest building . . . 

bringing it's tradition to a new generation. 

The academic life is still 

an all Jiight exam vigil, 

too many verb forms, another book to read 

the alarm that didn't go off 

studying by the pier . . . 

finding out that tivo credit courses 

have term papers! 

It's a dance that had to be missed 

walking out of a test . . . numb 

becoming really involved in a subject . . . 

wanting to learn. 










Hall 







GUIDING HAND FOR THE CREATIVE 



The Art Department in a college such as 
ours necessarily serves many purposes: It pro- 
vides an education for the future artists' 
courses such as Basic or Advanced Painting 
and Drawing; it also instructs the future ele- 
mentary school teachers in Art Fundamen- 
tals; the Liberal arts students learn Apprecia- 
tion and History of Art. 

Mrs. Norma Strickland, the department 
head who teaches fundamentals, history, and 
design is known for her broad knowledge of 
the field and her way with colors and design. 

Detailed study in painting and drawing 
is taught by Peter Egeli, who is known as a 
fine portrait painter himself. 



Slides are a feature ot Mrs. Strickland's art lecture 
courses. 




Gay Berryman sketches under Mr. Egeli's expert guid- 
ance. 



Anne Green anxiously views the kiln in the arts 
and crafts course. 





36 



ftis 





Dr. Walker works with the com- 
mercial students t o improve 
their typing skills. 



BUSINESS STUDENTS ADVANCE THEIR SKILLS 




A time test is in store for Miss 
Spring's typing class. 



The Business Department offers many 
opportunities for the studies in the fields of 
Secretarial Science and Business Administra- 
tion. The students have access to the latest 
equipment, as well as two outstanding in- 
structors, Dr. Carl Walker, the Department 
Head, and Miss Marietta Spring. 

Business students may be either transfer 
or terminal. Transfer students receive both 
liberal arts and management courses. Term- 
inal students study technical subjects, such as 
typing, shorthand and secretarial accounting. 



Business Administration students take a class on 
business law from Dr. Walker. 




fa 

w 

\ 




Miss Perkins counsels Ted Fedders. 



Mr. Henley meets with his World Lit- 
erature class. 




MISS PERKINS RETURNS 



After a leave of absence to work on her doctor- 
ate, Miss Perkins has returned to her position as 
head of the English Department. Sophomores ap- 
preciate her British and World Literature classes. 

Mr. Henley teaches advanced English and 
World Literature as well as freshman English. 

New to the staff this year are Mr. Vernoy and 
Mr. Siegel. 





Mr. Siegel lectures to his freshman English class. 



Bruce Millrood, Joe Satterthwaite and 
Linda Lundquist review Macbeth in 
Mr. Vemoy's Freshman English class. 




Mrs. Glevenger distributes test papers to Ruby 
Beachamp, Pat Clevenger, Alice Burgess, Sheila 
Kee, Franny Galiano, and Sheridan Fahnestock. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

St. Mary's physical education department 
offers not only orientation courses but tennis, 
golf, gymnastics, modern dance, bowling, archery, 
badminton and sailing. 

First aid, community health, recreational 
leadership and camp counseling are offered in the 
health department. 





Mr. Zimmerli discusses the latest basketball score 
with Louis Wince. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The Department of Home Economics 
prepares students for professional and 
avocational needs in the science of 
Home Economics. 

Miss Oslund's classes stress the princi- 
ples involved in nutrition, elementary 
clothing and foods. 

There are well laid out kitchens, sew- 
ing rooms, and chemistry laboratories 
for their instruction. 



Mrs. Oslund grades home economic test papers. 



39 



MATHEMATICS 



Mr. Nouri, a native of Iran, specializes in the 
language of mathematics. His department encom- 
passes everything from fundamental concepts to 
calculus. For those whose ground is shaky, Mathe- 
matics is required. But some people actually 
enjoy the subject. For these Mr. Nouri holds his 
smaller seminars; he is well known for his willing- 
ness to help his students. 



Mr. Nouri holds a math seminar for 
some of his more talented students. 




SPANISH AND FRENCH WITH MR. BUKER 




Modern foreign languages are an inte- 
gral part of the liberal arts curriculum; 
Spanish and French are offered at St. 
Mary's. Mr. Buker's classes cover be- 
ginning Spanish and French through the 
intermediate level, and survey classes in 
the literature. 

Mrs. Mcjennett instructs the students 
in lab. Her students appreciate her ex- 
pert help with accents and inflections. 

St. Mary's will sponsor a European 
lour in the near future. 



Mr. Buker prepares for another day of 
correcting; compositions and accents. 



THE MUSIC STUDENTS 




Mrs. Eckart accompanying the choir. 




Brantley 1). Greeson, Department Head. 

LEARN 

AND PERFORM 

The aim of the Music Department is to give 
the student a background in the technical, ac- 
ademic and practical concepts leading to an ap- 
preciation of the art. 

The music majors are given personal atten- 
tion, as they compose a relatively small percentage 
of the student body. 




Mr. Greeson directs the choir. 




Mr. B. Elwood Fahl, science department chairman, 
carefully hovers over the experiment of an aspiring 
science student. 




Miss Madden, biology lab instructor, views micro- 
scopic life intently. 



Dr. Eloise Rowland instructs her inver- 
tebrate /oology students. 



42 



SCIENCE AND 

The science department at St. Mary's is sur- 
prisingly adequate in quantity and quality for a 
junior college. Extensive study in the biological, 
physical and chemical sciences make up the cur- 
ricula. Among the many advantages of the depart- 
ment is its student-teacher ratio which allows for 
much individual help to the student. 

Future plans for the enlargement of the 
science department as the college expands include 
emphasis on studies in marine biology. The col- 
lege's location on the water is responsible for the 
flexibility of the future science program. 




Dr. Lois Huck and Sharon Smith are 
completely absorbed in their study of 
the fetal pig. 




SOCIAL SCIENCES ENLIGHTEN THE STUDENTS 




Miss Swearingen pauses during her lecture to 
listen to a student's comment. 



Mr. Miles and Sharon Smith discuss 
Switzerland's geography. 



Studies in the realm of the Social Sciences 
include surveys of history, geography, govern- 
ment and economics and courses in human be- 
havior such as general psychology, child psy- 
chology, sociology and marriage and the family. 

The Social Science department is large in 
size, wide in scope and vast in its benefits to the 
students. Future years will see the already fine 
qualities of the department improved upon as 
the college expands. 




Dr. Saville takes roll in his first 
American History class of the 
Spring Semester. 



Mrs. Donhiser looks up as one of her many 
advisees comes in for a bit of counseling. 



Mr. Kenny points out the mer- 
its of an assignment to Sam 
Brown. 




SPEECH AND THEATRE ARTS 




Mrs. Fahl reviews speech outlines. 




Mr. Trantham is director of the Theatre Arts and 
Speech Dept. 



Doug McClean, Malcolm Van Kirk, and Mr. Trantham look over a 
Theatre Arts project. 




Theatre at St. Mary's consists 
of a core of academic work 
and extracurricular produc- 
tions. Practical courses in acting 
and stage-craft are supplement- 
ed by study of theatre history 
and appreciation. Emphasis is 
placed on sound, usable knowl- 
edge. The student gains an ap- 
preciation of a play and its pro- 
duction. 



STUDY AND RELAXATION THROUGH BOOKS 



The library contains a collection of 
non-fiction and reference books. Re- 
sources are currently being expanded 
to accommodate the growing curric- 
ula. Students also make use of records, 
film strips, pamphlets, and clippings. 

The Maryland Room is reserved 
for completely quiet study. It contains 
valuable historical volumes about the 
history of Maryland. 




Mrs. Purely and Mrs. Bradburn are kept busy 
assisting students. 




Louis Wince checking out fiction. 



Miss Keen, head librarian, and Peggy Horn review 
historical material in the Maryland Room. 




""*■" 




Charles Hall 




ACTIVITIES 




A 



r» 



T 



Soon, the new student union 

will take the place of 

the smoker . . . 

where we played cards, met friends, 

waited for a turn at the ping pong table, 

danced on Saturday nights. 

Upstairs . . . the basketball games 

. . . sometimes, we won . . . 

we learned sportsmanship . . . 

Outside . . . touch football . . . and tennis . . . 

sea nettles, sand and 

softball games . . . a new building took shape 

and we saw the symbol 

of progress for the future. 




CAMPUS LEADERS MEET 




Campus Council: Mr. Fahl, Miss Simms, Mr.Buker, Miss 
Spring, A. Hoffman, S. Attaway, J. Phipps, J. Ramer, B. 
Dixon, J. Gargani, S. Smith, P. Smith, E. Hodges, P. 
Clevenger, J. Dordal, S. Brown, J. Russell, A. Brown, G. 
Redmond, N. Ranneberger. 



Campus Council is composed of the lead- 
ers of the student body and its purpose is to 
keep the entire administration abreast of new 
developments and to discuss problems 
brought up by the students. It acts as a liason 
between students and administration. Some 
of its discussions have included the lengthen- 
ing of library hours, rearranging meal times 
during exams, and acquiring a water foun- 
tain for the second floor of Anne Arundel 
Hall. 

The Constitution Committee drew up St. 
Mary's present Constitution which was rati- 
fied by over 90$ of the students. The new 
constitution provides for better student or- 
ganization and is a big step in the direction 
of a four-year college. 



Constitution Committee: Bev Molitor, Bon- 
nie Dixon, Wendell Bailey, Andy Brown, 
Joyce Gargani, Charlie Patrick, Joe Russell, 
Helen Howland, Bart Johnson. 





The governing body of the 
Honor System at St. Mary's is the 
Honor Court. The three fresh- 
man and four sophomore mem- 
bers examine cases involving in- 
fractions of the Honor System. 
The Honor System itself is an in- 
valuable part of life at the 
college. 



Honor Court: Joyce Gargani, Chairman 
Gayle Redmond. Sue Ann Waters, John Elms, 
Kathy Huntt, Andy Brown, Bart Johnson. 



TO GOVERN AND DISCUSS 



Phi Theta Kappa: Secretary Sue Ann Waters, 
President Cinsy Carroll, Treasurer Ruby 
Beauchamp, Vice President Gayle Redmond. 
Seated: Mr. Buker, Sandy Rutland, Joyce 
Gargani, Ernie Hodges, Sharon Smith. 



The St. Mary's Chapter of 
Phi Theta Kappa is an ac- 
tive academic organization 
composed of students main- 
taining a 3.0 scholastic aver- 
age, exemplifying citizen- 
ship, and embodying leader- 
ship. The members also lend 
their abilities in helping stu- 
dents who are having trou- 
ble with their studies. j 




49 




W.S.G.A. Officers: Secretary Joann Phipps, Advisor Miss Simms, Pres- 
ident Joyce Gargani, Vice President Nancy Ranneberger. Treasurer Pat 
Clevenger. 




STUDENT 



Representatives t o the Women's Stu- 
dent Government: Ruby Beauchamp, 
Peggy O'Neil, Ernie Hodges, Linda Ar- 
nold. 

Men's Dorm Council Officers: Social 
Chairman Dave Cheezum, Vice President 
John Elms, Treasurer Pat Dolby, President 
John Massie, Advisor Mr. Yancey, Athletic 
Director Skip LeFaivre, Secretary Craig 
Gemmill. 



The Women's Student Govern- 
ment Association is the governing 
body of Queen Anne Hall. The offi- 
cers and representatives meet once a 
week to decide on action to be taken 
for infraction of tlie women's dormi- 
tory rules. They also sponsor the May 
Prom and the Saturday night free 
movies. They regulate dorm life so 
well that living in a dorm full of 
women becomes a pleasure. 




50 



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■ 




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Posters lead to success. 



The Men's Student Government As- 
sociation represents all men students on 
campus— dorm and commuters alike. 
Some of their main responsibilities are 
to handle the parking problems and to 
sponsor dances and the May Prom in 
conjunction with the W.S.G.A. Matters 
of dress and conduct of men students are 
also referred to them. 



GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATIONS 




Men's Student Government As- 
sociation: Vice President Joe 
Russell, President Andy Brown, 
Treasurer Wayne Guy. 



The Men's Council sponsors weekly 
dances and intramural teams. The Council 
meets once a week. The members help in 
maintenance by seeing that the halls are 
clean and the laundry is distributed. There 
are four monitors and four proctors to see 
that the noise is held down enough for 
studying. 



Dorm hall monitors and proctors: Bill Riehl, Peter 
Wimbrow, John Massie, Bill Ward, Itzy Atkins, Rich 
Russell, Roy Walsh, Alan Goldstein, Bart Johnson. 





Seated: Pat Clevenger, Donna Rolley, Martha Healy, 
Chairman Ernie Hodges, Cynthia Carroll, Alice Hoff- 
man, Sharon Smith, Bonnie Dixon. Standing: Mrs. 
Treadwell, Nancy Ranneberger, Joyce Gargani, Miss 
Simms, Patricia Smith, and Sue Ann Waters. 



The Orientation Committee, under 
the able leadership of Ernie Hodges, 
welcomed the Freshmen girls to Queen 
Anne Hall and St. Mary's. Their work 
began in the spring of 1965 with letters 
to incoming Freshmen. They offered 
their knowledge and services to the new 
girls so that they could more easily pre- 
pare for dorm life. 

When the Freshmen arrived the Com- 
mittee Members were on hand to see 
them to their rooms and to answer any 
questions. The members of the Orienta- 
tion Committee also organized the Rat 
Week activities which included dances, 
picnics, and Rat Court. 



SDPHDMDRES WELCOME NEW STUDENTS 



Paid Galante, prosecuting attorney of 
Rat Court asks the High Honorable 
Sophomores for a verdict of guilty for 
Peg Horn and Pete Wimbrow; defense 
attorney, Tom Drury, says, "There is no 
defense." 




Peggy ably carried out the sen- 
tence, to beautify Pete. 




52 











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Linda Lundquist, Alan Goldstein, Bart Johnson, Miss Chance, Wendell Bailey, 
Alex Hankins, Jeanne Cooper, and Judy Sayre meet to discuss the coming events. 



CULTURE COMES TO ST. MARY'S 



The University of Maryland Madrigal Singers present My Bonnie 
Lass. 



The Artist Lecture Committee, 
advised by Miss Chance, plans cul- 
tural events for the benefit of the 
student body. They make arrange- 
ments for the use of the Auditor- 
ium and plan accommodations for 
the guests. 

The first semester we were privi- 
lcdged to have the National Sym- 
phony Orchestra, directed by How- 
ard Mitchell. The University of 
Maryland Madrigal Singers per- 
formed in November. 

Second semester, in late March 
we heard the Baltimore Symphony 
Orchestra, conducted by Peter Ad- 
ler. Nelson and Neal gave piano re- 
citals in April that were enjoyed by 
all. 





The Assembly Committee: First row: Judy Sayre, 
Eileen Smith, Mag. Healy. Second row: Skip Choate, 
John Dordal. 



The assembly series of lec- 
turers was planned and ar- 
ranged by a committee of five. 

Through their efforts we have 
been privleged to hear a talk on 
the F.B.I., a spokesman from 
the State Department on the 
crisis in Vietnam, and the poet 
laureate of Maryland. We have 
also had two speakers from Wil- 
liam and Mary appraise their 
honor system and ours. 

Through the committee we 
have gained a broader range of 
information. 



EDUCATION AND ENTERTAINMENT BLEND . . 



The Social Committee: Ruby Brauchamp, Miss 
Simms, Jeff Cross, Janet Drank, Franny Galiano, 
Judy Sayre and Georgia Beard. 



The Social Committee, 
advised by Miss Simms, ar- 
ranges social functions. 

The success of our many 
dances can be accredited to 
these girls. They arranged 
for bands, decorated and or- 
ganized clean up commit- 
tees. The dorm dances, the 
open house, and the St. Pat- 
rick's Day dance are a few 
of the events we will remem- 
ber through their efforts. 




54 




Home Economics Club: First row. Lucy Jackson, Janet Schwarz, Fannabelle 
Offutt, Mary Crouse, Mag Healy, Karen Hansen, Jeff Cross, Joann Phipps. 
Second row: Janet Jones, Joann Matarazzo, President Alice Burgess, Linda 
Lundquist. 

FUTURE HDME MAKERS 
COMPARE PATTERNS WHILE... 

The Home Economics Club has arranged a 
seminar, attended a national home economics con- 
vention and participated in our Christmas Bazaar. 

They are one of the most active clubs on cam- 
pus and put their classroom knowledge to work 
towards practical aims. 

FUTURE TEACHERS 

LEARN 

Headed by President Sandy Ever- 
man, the SNEA (Student National 
Education Association) works to 
keep those students interested in 
teaching informed about what is 
new concerning the National Edu- 
cation Association. 

The students are periodically 
given publications issued by state 
teachers' magazines and talks from 
speakers of SNEA Headquarters in 
Baltimore. 




Janet Schwarz uses the 
Home Economics' modern 
kitchen facilities. 

The SNEA. First row: Sandy Benson, Jean Long, 
Denise Kirby, President Sandy Everman. Second row: 
Cecilia DiBlasi, Leslie Heiderman, Bonnie Vance, 
Lynn Farrell. Third row: Judy Hammond, Kathy 
Huntt, Alice Hoffman, Virginia Mann, Joyce Gar- 
gani, Bonnie Dixon, Terry Wilke. 




55 



THE POINT NEWS STAFF IS ALWAYS BUSY 



im i 




Feature Editor Nancy Ranneberger, News Editor Alice 
Hoffman, Circulation Anne Green, Typing Editor Pat 
Boecker, Editor-in-Chief Cinsy Carroll. 



I'omt News Staff: Denize Kirby, Cecilia DiBlasi, Leslie 
Heiderman, Linda Arnold, Mary Crouse, Linda Lund- 
quist, Judy Sayre, Grace Beckwith, Leslie Bishop, and 
Editor Cinsy Carroll. 







The Point News is St. Mary's newspaper, pub- 
lished monthly under the competent editor, Cinsy 
Carroll and the advisor, Mr. Yancey. The mem- 
bers of the staff were constantly amassing facts and 
opinions in an attempt to make the paper interest- 
ing as well as informative. The girls on the Point 
News staff were always busy, and a day did not go 
by during which one member did not write an 
article or Mr. Yancey not take a picture. The 
Point News has developed into a comprehensive 
and well-organized periodical under its 1965-66 
editors. 



The newspaper also sponsors the election of 
St. Mary's entrant in Glamour's Best Dressed 
College Girls Contest; this year's winner was 
Sophomore Cathy Mason. 




56 



ALENTED PEOPLE HAVE FUN AND ENTERTAIN 




Kill Ward accompanies Sharon Stumpf, Leslie 
Kishop and Rose Kennedy during their perform- 
ance at Hootenanny Night. 

The Folk. Music Club meets weekly to discuss 
songs and to teach new members fundamentals ol 
guitar playing. The club sponsors one Hootenany 
a semester for the benefit of the County Scholar- 
ship Foundation, and various other entertaining 
evenings. 



Carol Krown's talents include voice and guitar. 



The most famous of these was Dr. Huck's 
demonstration on the dulcimer, a hand-carved, 
three string instrument. This club was organized 
only last year and has enlarged greatly in its first 
year with the help of its enthusiastic members. 



Folk Music Club: John Mainella, President Amy Foote, Peg O'Neil, Vice President Wendell Hailey, Les- 
lie Bishop, Leslie Heiderman, Bob Belchic, Chelly DeLeon, Itzy Atkins, and John Massie. 





Samadra Officers: Secretary Jimaxi Ramer, 
President Peggy O'Neil, Treasurer Pete Mc- 
Guckian. 




Ed McKeever and Laura Partridge check the 
proxy votes. 



Good news for Ed McKeever, Laura Par- 
tridge, Mark Jenkins and Amelia Shotgraven. 




SAMADRA PRESENTS 



Samadra is the dramatic club of St. 
Mary's. Its members are interested in all 
aspects of the theatre, from lighting and 
props to acting. Their general meetings 
are held once a month. 

Samadra's fall semester production 
was The Solid Gold Cadillac. The mem- 
bers programmed, costumed and did the 
make-up for the production. After three 
presentations in St. Mary's Hall, the cast 
took the play on tour. 

The spring production was an eve- 
ning of one acts: The Valiant, Sorry, 
Wrong Number, and Submerged. 




Miss L'Arriere models for John Blessington. 



58 



"THE SDLID GOLD CADILLAC" 



Laura Partridge Jimmy Ramer 

Warren Gillie Joe Satterthwaite 

Clifford Snell Rickey Landon 

Edward McKeever Malcolm Van Kirk 

John Blessington Joe Raley 

Alfred Metcalf Wayne Guy 

Mark Jenkins Bob Turner 

Amelia Shotgraven .... Eileen Smith 

Miss L'Arriere Stevie Neuman 

Miss Logan J an e Chapman 

Estelle Evans Marilyn Crowley 

Reporters Bill Russell, Doug MacLean, 

Danny Logalbo 




Laura Partridge in a moment ot reflection. 





A happy ending for Mark Jenkins and Amel 
ia Shotgraven. 



Laura Partridge extends a disdainful hand to 
Clifford Snell. 



59 




WORK . . . LAUGHTER 



Editor-in-Chief Sharon Smith 




Photography Editor Bill Russell, Copy Editor Sheila Zubrod, Editor 
Sharon Smith, Business Manager Teensey Voss, Layout Editor Fanny 
Winkler, Art Editor Marsha Glasser. 



Business Stall: Chele Hecker, Teensey Voss, Sue Ad- 
dington, Ernie Hodges. 



^^ 



Wrf ''~V 






Typing Staff: Donna Hillis, Chelly De Leon, Louise 
Biggs, Jeff Cross. 



60 



TEARS... DEADLINES! 






The members of the Castellan Staff are 
both freshmen and sophomores. The girls 
from last year's staff have taken a hand in 
initiating the freshmen members. We have 
worked together to produce this year's an- 
nual, with the help of many people not pic- 
tured on these pages. The students of St. 
Mary's College have been exceptionally will- 
ing to give their time and their abilities; their 
help has been invaluable. 

Miss Simms, Mr. Vernoy's predecessor as 
advisor, was our greatest helpmate; it was to 
her that we turned in moments of indeci- 
sion, and during our countless crises. Miss 
Simms and Mr. Vernoy are the two reasons 
that we have succeeded in producing the 
1966 Castellan. 




Faculty Advisor Collin W. Vernoy. 



Copy Stafl: Peggy O'Neill, Mike Rockhill, Sheila 
Zubrod, Marcie Rippard. 




Photography and Layout Stafl: Bill Russell, Connie 
folley, Laurie Pauli, Fanny Winkler. 




SOUND 

OF MUSIC 



First row: Peg O'neill, Janice Nagley, Pat Lipps. Second rout: 
Melinda Barnhart, Mary Hurry, Roberta Willing, Pat Noell, 
Leslie Heiderman, Leslie Bishop, Stevie Cicero. Third row: 
Mike Rockhill, Louise Biggs, Marcie Rippard, Denise Kirby, 
Jeanne Long, Judy Rusling. Fourth row: Sheila Kee, Sue 
Waters, Donna Rolley, Sharon Stumpf, Nancy Phillips, Pat 
Gardner. 



The Choir is chosen from members of 
the student body who are willing to 
practice each week, and whose voices 
qualify them. 

This year the Choir performed at the 
Candlelight Service, Governor's Day, 
and in the Spring they toured parts of 
Maryland, including the Eastern Shore. 

Mr. Greeson directs the Choir during their rendi- 
tion of Let's Go Fly a Kite. 



Mrs. Echard accompanies the Choir 
during their performance for Governor's 
Day. 






First row: Social Chairman Mag Healy, Treasurer Sue Ann 
Waters, President Bonnie Dixon, Vice President Pat Smith, 
Secretary Alice Hoffman. Second row: Joyce Gargani, Fanny 
Winkler, Kathy Heron, Connie Jolley. Third row: Karen 
Forbes, Ellie Witherspoon, Jenny Buckler, Margarethe Thorp, 
Karen Townshend. 



The Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation is active in many func- 
tions. It sponsors the Christmas 
Prom and a pageant in the May 
Day Festival. The girls also or- 
ganize basketball, volleyball, bad- 
minton, softball, tennis, ping- 
pong, and archery intramurals. 
Its officers are active campus 
leaders. Meetings of the associa- 
tion are held regularly under the 
guidance of Mrs. Clevenger. 

All freshmen women are auto- 
matically members and their en- 
thusiasm makes this a most 
worthwhile organization. 



WELL ORGANIZED ATHLETICS. 



The Men's Athletic Association is 
in charge of men's athletic activities. 
Not only does the association arrange 
and schedule intramural teams, but it 
referees their games as well. Through 
the association's efforts competitions 
were arranged in touch football, bas- 
ketball, volleyball, table tennis, and 
softball. With the addition of the en- 
thusiasm of Mr. Zimmerli, the boys 
are eager to participate in campus 
athletics. 



Advisor Mr. Zimmerli, President Joe Russell, Vice 
President Sam Brown. Secretary-Treasurer Andy 
Brown. 




63 





First row: Wayne Guy. Second row. Coach Zimmerli, Ray Glessner, Bob Smith, Monty 
Miles. Jim Newberry. Ed Pickering, Richard Norris, Phil Howard, Bob Hutchinson, Harry 
Rector. John Elms, Wendell Bailey, Manager Chipper Bupp, Manager Hank Eslin. 




Norris gets ready for rebound. 



THE CRY "CHARGE 




Opponent 

85 . Prince Georges C. C. 

68 Anne Arundel C. C. 

107 Hagerstown J. C. 

95 Essex C. C. 

77 Potomac State J. C. 

62 Baltimore Institute 

94 Strayer J. C. 

49 Charles County J. C. 

121 Wesley J. C. 

119 Montgomery J. C. . 

86 Charles County C. C 

100 Btltimore J. C. 

76 Baltimore Institute 

94 Harford J. C. 
126 . . . Shenandoah J. C. 

119 Catonsville C. C. 
140 Allegany C. C. 



S.M.C. 

59 
67 
99 
.70 
60 
72 
74 
79 
60 
75 
102 

. 46 
65 

. .74 

72 

94 

**69 
** Won by forfeit. 



64 




Jump ball — did he get it? 



Pickering goes in for the shot. 



RETRIEVERS" OPENS THE SEASDN 



The St. Mary's Retrievers 
traveled all over the state 
and into Delaware to play a 
hard schedule. They finish- 
ed with four wins and seven- 
teen losses. 

Only two members of the 
team are sophomores and 
will graduate in June. This 
leaves a strong, experienced 
team that will be returning 
next year. 

Coach Zimmcrli and the 
team deserve a lot of thanks 
and credit for the long hours 
of practice which resulted in 
one of St. Mary's most suc- 
cessful seasons. 



Pickering tries for the re- 
bound in the Hagerstown 
game. 




Slarkey waits for the rebound as Rod shoots 



GD RETRIEVERS 



Our four cheerleaders met and 
practiced often in order to meet 
the challenge of raising school 
spirit to encourage the team. 

Through their contagious en- 
thusiasm and vitality we have all 
felt a sense of participation. They 
performed for all the home bas- 
ketball games and some of the 
away games. 










68 




,. 



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1 



■ i 1 I 



First row: Edelen Morgan, Joe Russell, Wayne Guy, Andy Brown, Sam 
Brown. Second row: Dale Milburn, Don Benoit, Mr. Zimmerli, David 
Dower, Jim Newberry. 



TENNIS TEAM ORGANIZED 




Dale Milburn practices his serve in 
hopes of an undefeated season. 



One of the most popular sports on campus, 
tennis is highly competitive. From the students 
coach Zimmerli has picked a varsity team. Al- 



though they have not started the matches as of this 
printing, we have much faith in their competence 
and hope for a successful season. 




CROSS COUNTRY 

TEAM. 

The newly organized Cross Country Team's 
six members were chosen for their endurance 
and speed. They met with success in the meets 
in which they have thus far participated, and 
hope for continued success. 



first row: John Bennett, Louis Wince, Don Purely. 
Second row: Skip LeFaivre, David Dower, Don Be- 
noit, Coach Zimmerli. 



69 



WOMEN CDMPETE IN VARSITY 



EH1 

Leslie Bishop, Rose Kennedy, Maxine Johnson, Janet Frame, Janet 
Schwarz, Gayle Redmond, Karen Townshend. 



The members of the women's 
Varsity Volleyball team are 
usually found practicing in the 
gymnasium. Their ability and 
enthusiasm have made the few 
games that they've played so far 
this year very popular. The 
team's season includes games 
with Towson State College, 
Salisbury State College and 
Catonsville Community Col- 
lege. 

The highlight of the volley- 
ball season is always the faculty- 
student game, during which the 
men and women students team 
up against the faculty. 



fanet Frame serves SMC's ball in a practice session 
while Gayle Redmond, Janet Schwarz and Karen Town- 
shend look on. 



Gayle Redmond returns Salisbury's serve as Janet Frame 
and Janet Schwarz anticipate her success. 




70 




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.1 



LsLt 




Connie Jolley, Stevie Cicero, Bonnie Dixon, Leda Raby, Donna Purdy, Kathy Heron, Nancy Phillips, Karen Forbes, Peg 
Horn. Joyce Gargani, Pat Smith, Linda Warner, Terry Wilke, Sue Ann Waters. 



SPORTS 



Womens' Varsity basketball practice sessions were vigor- 
ous and well participated. 



The Women's Varsity Hockey Team is com- 
posed of hardy individuals who practice daily on 
brisk autumn afternoons. Each afternoon saw 
scrimmages, hikes to the hockey field, drills and 
exercises. 

The girls had a rather short but nonetheless 
successful season. They participated in a Sports 
Day at the University of Maryland which in- 
cluded games with Towson, Salisbury, Galludet, 
B.J.C., Hood, Villa Julie, Goucher, American 
University, and Maryland. 





The members of the Women's Varsity Basket- 
ball team are able sportswomen. This year, for the 
first time, Mrs. Clevenger held try-outs and the 
team was chosen. From the members of the Var- 
sity team captains of the Intramural teams were 
chosen. 

This year the girls play games with Catonsville 
Community College, Towson State and Salisbury 
State College. 

Joyce Gargani, Pat Smith, Kathy Heron, Bonnie Dixon, 
Linda Benson, Connie Jolley, Sue Vradenberg, Bev 
Molitor, Peg Horn, Karen Forbes, Pat Boeker, Dianna 
Thomas, Linda Ford, Judy Dean, Jean Cooper, Mania 
Rippard, Mrs. Clevenger. 




The Hot Nuts vs. the Day Trippers in the 
Intramural Basketball Playoffs. 



Andy Brown practices tennis on a warm afternoon. 




SPORTS 



Pastime activities at St. Mary's are 
mainly sports— in and out of doors— indi- 
vidual and intramural. The boys partici- 
pate in a highly competitive series of intra- 
murals, including football, soccer and bas- 
ketball. The girls' games are a bit less 
rough, but equally as competitive. 

When the weather warms up, the stu- 
dents take to the outdoors for tennis, boat- 
ing, biking or walking. 



Phil Howard goes up for a shot. 




72 



DUT OF DDDRS AND IN 





Teensey Voss is one o£ the many students who 
enjoy bowling as a pastime. 



Teensey Voss and Bill Russell take advantage 
of nice weather for a bike trip. 



The boys' biggest innovation this year was intramural lootball. 




GOVERNOR'S DAY '65 SEES 




President Russell greets Comptroller General Goldstein, 
Governor and Mrs. Tawes, and Admiral Johnson as 
they arrive for Governor's Day. 



Governor's Day is held at 
the campus of St. Mary's 
every two years and is a wel- 
come addition to school fes- 
tivities. Distinguished guests 
throughout the state of 
Maryland are invited to 
share in honoring Mary- 
land's governor. The stu- 
dents, faculty, and adminis- 
tration combine their efforts 
to make the day a successful 
tribute to the governor. 

This year, the day's agen- 
da included the unveiling of 
a portrait of the governor's 
wife, painted by Mr. Bjorn 
Egeli, Sr., which now hangs 
in the Tawes Lounge of 
Queen Anne Hall. The girls 
consider the portrait an ex- 
quisite addition to the new 
dormitory. 



Miss Sandner makes a final adjustment to the table 
arrangement. 



Nancy Ranneberger, Ernie Hodges, Pat Clevenger, and 
Joyce Gargani act as hostesses and welcome the guests. 





74 





Governor Tawes extends greetings and thanks to all 
those who participated in Governor's Day. 



President Russell accepts a miniature Maryland flag for 
her office from Governor Tawes. 



THE UNVEILING DF A PORTRAIT 



President Russell receives 
her gift in front of the 
newly unveiled portrait of 
Mrs. Tawes. 




SX.O'PPt 




Barbara Maschi and Donna Purely await the Baked 
Goods Table's first customers. 




Bill Russell and fane Rabbitt arrive at Santa's Post 
Office to receive "mail" from Janet Schwarz, foann 
Phipps and Sheila Kee. 

Santa seems to have told Scotl Young that a blond will 
be under his tree on Christmas Morning. 




CHRISTMAS 



The annual Christmas Bazaar 
is one of the busiest and most lu- 
crative events sponsored by the 
sophomore class. Coordinated by 
such able individuals as Miss 
Chance, Bill Ward and so on, this 
year's Bazaar was without a 
doubt a smashing success. 

The most rewarding were the 
Baked Goods, Homemade Artic- 
les, and Post Office booths. Prob- 
ably the most enjoyable event of 
everybody's day was a trip 
through the Fun House. A 
scrumptious meal was served in 
a delightfully decorated gym 
smoker to end the perfect Bazaar. 




"Toua" and Bill Ward do a silhouette ol Brenda 
Greeson. 



SEASON BEGINS WITH THE BAZAAR 





Alan Goldstein. Bruce Millrood and Bob Bel- 
chic stop for a chat with Santa's Citi/en Bank 
teller (tidy Sayre. 



Miss Chance and Bill Ward stop to consider the 
location of Santa's throne. 



Santa gets a well deserved rest. 



Christmas Bazaar live saw Sophomores Judy Sayre, 
Danny Stevens, Cinsy Carroll and Toua preparing 
their booth. 





77 







AND IS FDLLDWED BY A DANCE 





The dance held alter the Christmas Bazaar was a huge 
success. 



The dancers lost their frustrations as they jerked and 
f rugged. 



Boys from Calvert Hall supplied the musical entertain- 
ment. 



Decorations materialized as a result of Sheila Zubrod's 
ingenuity. 





78 






AND A HOUSEWARMING 





Joan Delozier adds the final touch to 
her Christmas door. 



Jan Travels, Linda Arnold, Ruby Beauchamp and 
Fanny Winkler stop for a bit of punch. 





Queen Anne girls greet Calvert boys at open house. 



Mr. and Mrs. Fahl are welcome to the house- 
warming. 




CHRISTMAS PRDM 






Michele Hecker and escort Rusty 
Lewis begin the Grand March. 




5% A 




The Queen and her Court: Francine Winkler, Judy Sayre, Queen Michele 
Hecker, Cathy Mason, and Sue Ann Waters. 



Our own "Babes In Toyland" look on with awe 
and envy. 





Sophomore Princess Cathy Mason and her date 
enter the ballroom. 



80 



"BABES IN TDYLANE" 



Greeted by enormous toy soldiers, everyone at- 
tending "Babes In Toyland" agreed it was an out- 
standing success. The first of the two formal 
dances at St. Mary's, the Christmas Prom was 
sponsored by the Women's Athletic Association. 
Bonnie Dixon, president of WAA, and escort 
Wayne Dean served as host and hostess of the ball. 

Situated beneath a Christmas tree, the toy sol- 
diers and oversized presents gave a very romantic 
effect. The attenders danced to the music of Lee 
Maxfield's Orchestra. The ball reached its climax 
at ten o'clock when members of the court were 
introduced and the queen, Michele Hecker, was 
crowned. The queen then led her official dance 
and was joined by Cathy Mason, Judy Sayre, Sue 
Ann Waters, and Francine Winkler, the members 
of her court. This year's Christmas Prom was 
hailed by all as the best ever. 




Queen Michele Hecker and her 
escort Rusty Lewis lead off the 
first dance. 



Freshman Princess Fanny Winkler 
and date Dave Cheezum. 





The queen and her court dance in the spotlight. 



81 



QUEEN TDUA REIGNS DVER 




Chotima Pathamanuth 

Qaceu of the May 



fi£_H 




82 




Mary Windsor Palmer 
Sophomore Princess 



Sue Ann Waters 
Shenandoah Apple Blossom Princess 



Janet Frame 

Sophomore Princess 



MAY DAY FESTIVITIES 



Francine Winkler 
Freshman Princess 



Michele Hecker 
Freshman Princess 



Matilda Woodward 
Freshman Princess 








The Queen and her Court wait patiently for the festivities to begin. 



THE DUEEN IS ENTERTAINED 



Queen Toua enters her courtyard through the drill 
team's salute. 




The drill team salutes the Stars anil Stripes as 
well as the Queen. 






84 





Yield W'ooten and Lee Hoience do an interpre- 
tation of "The Moth and ihe Flame". 



May Day began with Tenia's Coronation by 
Vice Admiral Felix Johnson. USX. Ret. The 
theme of May Day, Many Moods of Color, was 
beautifully carried out in the varied shades and 
hues of the Queen's entertainment. The festivi- 
ties were followed bv a tea in the Garden of 
Remembrance and Open House in Queen 
Anne Hall. 



':^*v*«*u». 



qmm 




The Sophomore girls present the traditional Ma) Pole 
dance for the Oneen. 



Girls from the Freshmann P.t. classes do a selection ol 
folk dances from foreign countries. 





> 



The Modern Dance Class perform to The Pink Panther. 




THE PERFECT DAY'S ENDING 




As a climax ol May Day, Queen 1 oua 
reigned in the setting of Camelot in May thai 
evening at the Prom. The court processed 
over the moat into the stone castle. Her 
throne waited in dignity as the Queen ap- 
proached her regal seat. Introduced by Mr. 
Elwood B. Fahl, Queen Toua and her escort, 
John Koontz, led the first waltz. All the loyal 
subjects watched as the court joined the 
Queen: Miss Sue Ann Waters, Apple Blos- 
som Princess: Miss Mary Palmer. Sophomore 
Princess; Miss Janet Frame, Sophomore 
Princess; and Freshman Princesses, Miss 
Michele Hecker, Miss Francine Winkler, and 
Miss Matilda Woodward. 

Sponsored by the Women's Student Gov- 
ernment Association, the May Prom was the 
biggest formal dance held at St. Mary's. 
Hours and hours of work, directed by Presi- 
dent Joyce Gargani, made the occasion the 
success it was. 



The Queen and her escort, |ohn Koontz, arrive to start 
the evening's enchantment. 



Toua takes her place at the throne, surrounded by her 
courtiers. 



The largest crowd in S.M.C. histor 
filled the Queen's palace lor ai 
evening of dancing. 





86 



THE PERFECT PROM 





I 
I 



Janet Frame and Mike Garner, and Alice Burgess and 
Sonny Richard dance to the music of "The Sentries". 



WSGA President Joyce Gargani and hc-i escort, Bob 
Baron enter the magic realm of Camelot. 



The Oueen and her court lead the first dance. 





87 



THE DDRM STUDENTS ARE AWAKE... 





Queen Anne Hall. 



Mabel Treadwell 
House Mother 



A recroom party with Linda Benson, Leslie 
Bishop and Teensey Voss. 



Seated: Leslie Heiderman, Lucy Jackson. Standing: 
Lorraine Sinnott, Linda Felton, Jeff Cross, Maxine 
Johnson and Margarethe Thorp inspect an old time 
punishment on an annual trip to Williamsburg. 





88 



AND OFF TO CLASSES, THEN... 






i 



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/ 



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ft 



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Z-V 







Margaret Jaynes 
House Mother 



Calvert Hai 



Bruce Millrood gets a flu shot from Miss O'Brien. 



Dennis Gilligan starts down the steps for a day of 
classes. 





89 






...TAKE TIME OUT FDR LUNCH. 








David Gosper, Pam Black, Patsy Cowgill 
and Lynn Kreider enter the cafeteria. 



Going through the lunchline with Margarethe Thorp 
and Linda Locke. 



Sue Ann Waters and Chuck Walters try the rolls as 
Pat Urban watches. 



Fran Galiano, Jenny Buckler, Sheila Kee and Jane 
Chapman enjoy lunch. 





90 



THEN BACK TD THE CLASSROOMS . 







Anne Arundel Ha 



Mrs. Strickland views a watercolor with John 
Wood. 



Miss Swearingen's American History students busily take notes. 




DN TD THE GYM SMOKER DR 





Kent Hall. 



Mr. Yancey talks with some of the students at an 
informal dance. 



Kaien Forbes watches Barry Allnut and Tony 
Oreto at a game of Hearts. 



Karen Hansen and Bartley Mettam listen to Bob 
Belchic at the piano. 





92 



TD WORK OR RELAX IN THE DDRM. 





Carol Braddock is one of the four dorm girls who 
work in Miss Chance's office. 



Sandra Benson is one of Mr. Pursell's helpers in 
the bookstore. 



Bob Kelley, John Bennett and Pete McGuckian wait for a good T.V. show at 
their smoker. 





St. Mary's 



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-iittste 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

S^. Mrtcyi //«// . . . 
where the world came to visit 
. . . orchestras, lectures, choirs . . . 
meetings were held, decisions made 
. . rehearsals became plays . . . 
. . Solid Gold Cadillac, The One Acts . . 
. . songs of Christmas . . . the candles 
. . we visited the world. 
. . our bus to town . . . 
■ . allowance checks to cash . . . 
and money to squander in 
drugstores, clothes store, 
supermarkets, restaurants, dime store, 
gas stations. 

. . . we met the world of Lexington Park 
and made friends with its people. 



\ I 



Hall 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



ST. MARY'S COLLEGE DF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



f-^atrond 



Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Addington 
Col. and Mrs. Frank E. Angier 
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Adkins 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Atkins, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Beckwith 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Berryman 
Mr. and Mrs. Gottfried J. Beyer 
Mrs. Paul H. Black 
Col. and Mrs. R. R. Boyer 
Mr. and Mrs. F. X. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Kenneth Buckler 
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd E. Carnwright 
Mrs. John C. Cecil 
Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Cheezum 
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Choate, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Cicero 
Mr. and Mrs. Toy T. Cooper 
Mr. and Mrs. K. M. Crouse 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Dordal 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Erhardt 
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Fatzinger 
Mr. Frank Fenwick 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Foard 

Capt. and Mrs. R. W. Frame 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl E. Frentz 

Herbert and Shirley Goldstein 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Guy 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Hand 

Mr. Norman Healy 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Hecker 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert L. Heiderman. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Hodges 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Horn 

Mr. John C. Hoskins 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kee 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Kern 

Irvin and Laura Kissinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Kreider 

Col. and Mrs. E. N. Le Faivre 

Mary Lock 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl P. Long 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth S. Massie 

Kathleen E. Masters 

Margaret W. Milburn 



Albeit Edelen Morgan. Jr. 

A. M. Myers, Jr. 

Col. (Ret.) and Mrs. A. T. McGuckian 

Mr. and Mrs. Garland McLaughlin 

Mrs. J. H. Offutt 

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Patrick 

Park Hall Men's Shop 

Mrs. Robert D. Pauli 

Alton E. Rabbitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Raley 

Mr. and Mrs. James Redmond 

Wm. K. Riehl 

Capt. and Mrs. Alex Roth 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Russell, Jr. 

Smith's Inc. 

Pearl Strobel 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Turner. Sr. 

Richard H. Urban 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Waters 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Zeiler 

A Friend 



96 



Compliments of 

THRIFT OIL COMPANY 

Phone: 475-9111 
Leonardtown, Maryland 



ELECTRONICS SERVICE CO. 

714 Great Mills Road 
Lexington Park, Maryland 

COMPLETE T.V. and APPLIANCE SERVICE 

Phones: 863-3291, 863-6341 



DYSON'S GULF SERVICE 

Great Mills, Maryland 

TIRES — TUBES — GENERAL REPAIRS 
GAS OIL — LURRICATION 

994-1224 



Compliments of 
Lancaster's 

"Maryland Beauty Lounge' 

Lexington Park, Maryland 



Compliments 



of 



HEWITT 
LUMBER & SUPPLY CO. 




Jane Chapman, Rich Russell. Jimmy Ramer and Judy 
Johnson register for one of Mr. Trantham's courses. 



97 



Compliments of 

Ernest L. Stone and Son 

Park Hall, Maryland 
Phone: 994-0500 



Compliments of 

PARK JEWELERS 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-3121 







Sharon Stumpf. Leslie Bishop and Rose Kennedy per- 
form at the Hootenanny. 



MERVELL M. DEAN, INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Commercial - Residential - Industrial - Institutional 

Route 1, Box 25, Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: FR. 3-2113 



98 



Compliments of 

FRANK A. COMBS 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9116 



Compliments of 



J. T. Daugherty's 



ANCHOR VAN LINES 



BELL MOTOR COMPANY 

CHEVROLET — BUICK — 0LDSM0B1LE 

Sales and Service 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-2351 



COIN -OPERATED 
WASHING MACHINES 

434 Great Mills Road 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 863-8736 




99 



ROMA'S 

Italian American Restaurant 



CATERING - BANQUETS 



424 GREAT MILLS ROAD 

LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 

Phone: 863-8914 



Compliments of 

WESTERN AUTO 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-3011 



WHY PAY MORE FOR GASOLINE 
DRIVE INTO YOUR 

SAVON GAS STATION 

SAVE 10% 
Phone: 862-9933 




Bill Russell, Linda Warner, Bob Hutchenson, Mag 
Healy and Harry Rector stop for dinner at Roma's. 



100 



"Flowers for Every Occasion" 



MARYLAND 
TOBACCO GROWERS ASSN. 

FEED, SEED & FERTILIZER 



HARRIS FLORIST 



Phone: 475-9196 



LEONARDTOWN and LEXINGTON PARK, 



MARYLAND 



SPARLING'S 



Phones: 475-2161, 863-7056 



LEONARDTOWN'S 
FINEST DEPARTMENT STORE 



Leonardtown, Maryland 




'HEAT WITH PARGAS" 

24 HOUR SERVICE 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-2221 



Compliments of 

M. ADELE FRANCE 
Alumni Chapter 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 



TOWNE FLORIST 

Flowers For All Occasions 

James G. & Ruby Cheseldine, oivners and operators 

475-4331 

Fenwick Street, Leonardtown, Maryland 

Opposite Old Firehouse 



Compliments of 

BALTIMORE 
ALUMNI CHAPTER 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 



FOODLINER-IGA 

Phone: 475-5201 

MEATS — GROCERIES — FRUITS 
VEGETABLES — FROZEN FOODS 

Leonardtown, Maryland 



LEONARDTOWN MOTEL 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
FREE TELEVISION — AIR CONDITIONING 



MATTINGLY 
FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

MONUMENTS 

LEONARDTOWN, MARYLAND 
Phone: 475-2061, 475-2071 



Phone: 475-9135 



102 



c ffirst Jlafional Bank of 5t . 3TI ary's 

Leonardtown — Lexington Park — Patuxent River 
Maryland 



Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



JOHN R. DRURY AND SON 

INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9114 



Compliments of 




eca 




The Pause That Refreshes 




Rat week victims: Denise Kirby. Cherie Fatzinger, 
Beth Hodges, Mary Crouse, Linda Kern, Cecila Di- 
Blasi. 



BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

J. Abell Longmore 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-8412 



103 



CARPETS 



FURNITURE 



BILL RALEY'S 

SALES CENTER, INC. 

Appliances — Television — Appliance Service 



Main Office & Warehouse 

Lexington Park, Md. 

VO. 3-8181 



Leonardtown, Md. 
GR. 5-9121 



Compliments of 

NATIONAL 
MOBILE HOME SALES, INC. 

Three Notch Road 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 862-4721 



THE ROOST 



ike1?ood 



LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 



Phone: 863-6161 



Robert G. Dean Raymond Beavers 

Phone: 373-2121 

DEAN 6C BEAVERS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Hollywood, Maryland 



Lexington Park Cleaners 

For Prompt Pick-up and Delivery Service 
COMPLETE LAUNDRY SERVICE 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 994-0200 



KING'S SHOPARAMA 

Your One Stop in Southern Maryland 
Central Charge 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-0011 




FOOTWEAR for the FAMILY 

PARK HALL 
SHOES 

(Next Door to Asbury's) 

Quality Shoes — Reasonable Prices 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-5600 

Paul A. Tippett. proprietor 



104 



CITIZENS NATIONAL 

BANK OF 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND 



PARK PHARMACY 

YOUR REXALL STORE 

'Through These Portals Pass the Prettiest Girls 
in the World" 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-6161 



LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 



Phone: 863-7061 



Compliments of 

ALDRIDGE FORD, INC. 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
VO. 3-8111 

"Our Specially is Good Business" 



Compliments of 

"THE SPINNING WHEEL" 
RESTAURANT 

Phone 863-3301 




Compliments of 

CONTINENTAL BAKING CO. 

"WONDER BREAD" 



FRIENDLY CABS 



Reliable 24-hours service is put to 
good use by the students 



Telephone: 863-8141 



Mechanicsville, Maryland 
884-3251 



105 



TOWN AND CASUAL SHOP 



117 SHANGRI LA DRIVE 

LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 

Phone: 862-7201 




Mag Healy and Linda Warner shop at 
Town and Casual. 



Telephone: 
GReenwood 5-4171 



Rug Cleaning - Hat Service 

Furs Cleaned & Stored 

Formal Wear Rented 



TOWN CLEANERS 

OFFER QUALITY 

Dry Cleaning & Pressing — Laundry Service 



Alterations 
Of Any Kind 



(Specializing In Shirts) 

Leonardtown, Md. 



Compliments of 

Leonardtown Fashion Center 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: GR. 5-9726 



JOY SHOP 



'TOTS TO TEENS" 



House of Wellington Beauty Salon 

COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICE and 
HAIR CUTTING OUR SPECIALTY 



Lexington Park, Maryland 



Esperanza Shopping Center 
862-1444 



106 



THE ENTERPRISE 

Southern Maryland's Reading Weekly 
With over 7000 in Circulation 

In Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1011 



Compliments oj 

BURCH OIL COMPANY, INC. 

GULF OIL PRODUCTS 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2131 



C/VTO'S 
TEXACO 




LEXINGTON PARK 



MARYLAND 



FORTIN REALTY, INC. 

Sales — Rentals — Loans 
Leonardtown Hollywood 



J. A. CECIL 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Great Mills, Maryland 
Phone: 944-1133 



Compliments of 



DUFFS DRIVE-IN 



107 



ESPERANZA 
RECREATION CENTER 



BOWLING — BILLIARDS 



NORTH OF LEXINGTON PARK 
ON 235 










-~M /~*£f2 


7 


* 










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. 


^ 




«-^~ " 






1 


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^A 




■ *< 









Sharon Smith and Ned Kesmodel gaze at 



LEONARDTOWN LAUNDRY 

DRY CLEANING — RUG CLEANING 
COMPLETE MODERN STORAGE 






BLAIRS 



JEWELRY — SILVER — CHINA 
STUDIO CARDS 

Lexington Park and Leonardtown 
Phone: 862-1271 



Bob Belchic saves Helen Howland a few steps back to 
Queen Anne Hall. 



108 





Donald E. Garner and Son 

PLUMBING — HEATING 
SEPTIC TANK SERVICE 

Great Mills, Maryland 
Phones: 944-0909, 944-0555 



St. Mary's River. 



Dean's Lumber and Supply 
Company, Inc. 

GENERAL BUILDING MATERIALS 




Bill Russell and Teensey Voss while away a spring 
afternoon. 



HOLLYWOOD, MARYLAND 
Phone: 375-2111 



Compliments 
of 

Meadow Gold Ice Cream 



Maryland National Bank 

. . . does so much for so many people 
63 offices serving Metropolitan Baltimore 
The Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland 

Leonardtown and Mechanicsville 

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



109 




Mr. 
Ed 



ED THOMPSON 



*764*Hfe4a*td 



Congratulates 



the 



CLASS OF '66 



FURNITURE CITY 



Route 235 
HOLLYWOOD. MD. 








Bob Turner doesn't seem to be overcome by the task 
of ironing his own clothes. 



David Gosper needs money. 



110 




ADAM'S APPLIANCE SHOP 

Sales and Service 
APPLIANCE — TELEVISION 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2253 



LINCOLN MERCURY 

Compliments of 

PATUXENT MOTORS 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1333 



Scott Young and Roger Foster discuss a Biology 
assignment. 



COMET 



RAMBLER 



BEE'S AUTO SUPPLY, INC. 

The Best Source of Quality and Service 

Automobile Parts 

Supplies and Equipment 

Machine Shop 
Phone: 862-1411 



Compliments of 

BACON and PASSARELLI 



THE HUB 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND'S LEADING 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-3611 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 





\ i 



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Editor Sharon Lee Smith 

Literary Editor Sheila Zubrod 

Layout Editors Fanny Winkler, Ned Kesmodel 

Business Manager Teensey Voss 

Photography Bill Russell 

Typists Donna Hillis, Jeff Cross, 

Carol Braddock