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Full text of "Castellan [yearbook] 1967"




an 1 





Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/castellanyearboo196667stma 



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CASTELLAN 




St Mary's Hall is the oldest building on campus Soon a new auditorium will be built From the old to the new, from a seminary toa 
foui yeai college Tins is symbolic oi a school in MOTK )\ 



St. Mary's College of Maryland 



St. Mary's City, Maryland 



1967 Vol. XX 



ST. 



f MARrLAHO. 



,534-1694 



"*'"" . - AMERICA. 

l5rO BALTIMORE^ J1"|T R U^ LEa - 

OF VAR'OUS BELIEF. ppR0Y |HG 
PRACTICE IMTO LA* J 1 * !■- 1*19 
iSi | ACT CONCERNING REUGIOM. I«49. 

MMTLAMO HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Now primaril; .1 men's dormitory, ( lalvert Hall .it first served as a 
combination classr building and women's dormitorj 



V « 



m ■ 



Standing at the entrance to the main campus, this sign marks a mon- 
ument to the past and a stepping-stone to the future. 




Faded Memories of the Past 




St. Man's College began in reality with 
the landing of Leonard Calvert in 1634, and 
from that day forth has been rooted in bound- 
less and often intangible tradition. A repro- 
duction of the first State House, built in 1934, 
stands as a constant reminder of the past 
against the ever-changing landscape of 
progress. For though the physical aspects 
may change, the spirit of the college remains 
always with the glory of its beginnings. 



Built originally in 1634, this reproduction of the first State House is a 
campus focal-point. 






Queen Anne Hall, the first in the new wave of 
construction, currently houses all women board- 
ing students. 



For the second consecutive year, men boarding students move bag and baggage into 
Calvert Hall. 



A familiar warm-weather scene, students gather between class breaks on the steps of Anne Arundel Hall. 




St. itt members of the new campus literarj magazine, tli<' Scorpion, plan for the next edition. 





Vivid Images of the Future 



Most recently completed is Charles H.ill, student union and dining 
hall. 




In two more years, St. Mary's will be an 
accredited senior college. Between now and 
then lie past years of planning and diligence. 
Under construction soon will he a new men's 
dorm, gymnasium, theater arts center, and 
library. 

It is with pride and confidence that St. 
Mary's faces the years ahead. 




"Should I have tried l> 
that last pass-'" sopho 
more teammate Pat I i 



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But they're not moving" . . . Tilly Woodward and lier microscope. 






"What dress code?" Peggy Horn. 



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Vddington, Sue 
Arnold, Linda 



Bishop, Leslie 
Brm Its, James 




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- 



Atkins, Edwin 



Benoit, Donald 

We Walked the Rolling Highway 

of the Past 



Beckuith, Grace 



Bennett, John 



Watching the annual capping ceremony, sophomores Sharon Stumpf 
and John Bennett display the spirit of the moment. 




Bupp, Bohert 



Cairns, Joseph 



( lainright, Patricia 





i rt Jiil 




( lecil, Pamela 



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Combs, Doris 



Cowgill, Patricia 



( '.ross, Jennifer 



(.'rouse, Mar) 







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Soaking up tin- late September sunshine, sophomores Craig Gemmil, Steve 
O'Neill, Houer Foster and Dennis Gilligan discuss the topic of the day. 




De Leon, Aracelly 
De Lozier, Juan 



Di Blasi, Cecelia 
Dordal, John 



Drank. Janet 
Eslin, James Henry 



Fahnestock, Sheridan 
Fatzinger, Cheryl 



Kelt. in, Linda 
Foard, Linda 




irk 




Frentz, Thomas 
( iardner. Patrii ia 



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Garner, Michael 

Gemmil, Craig 



Glenn, Susan 
Glessner, Ray, Jr. 



Gosper, David, Jr. 
Hackley, Douglas 



Hecker, Michele 

Heidennaii, Leslie 



Heron, Kathleen 
Hester, Charles 



Hewitt, Timothy 
Hodges, Elizabeth 




Hansen, Karen 



We Moved Ahead 




Horn, Margaret 

V 



Howard, Philip 



* 



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ill 




Huntt, \lur> 



Hutchinson, James 



St. Mary's Grew 




Iglehart, Maxine 
Jackson, Luc> Anne 



Johnson, James 
Johnson, Maxine 



Jolley, Constance 
Jones, Janet 



Leonard, Ronald 

Lipps, Patricia 





Making use of the snack bar*S facili- 
ties, Dennis Gilhgan and Peggy 
O'Neil grab a moment ol relaxation. 



Kelley, Robert 



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Lock. Linda 
i ' [eanne 



Mi igle, Thomas 
\\< « ire, ( Ihristine 



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Manners, Bonnie 
Maschi, Barbara 



til 



Masters, Gilbert 
McGuckian, Peter 



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McLaughlin, Claudette 
Methena, Stephanie 



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Mettam, John 
Mitchell, William 




Displaying calm amidst the turmoil, Georgi Croft and Malcolm Van Kirk aid in the 
registration pre, ess 



Noell, Pan icia 



Norris, Richard 



Northam, Ann 



Ottutt, Fannabelle 




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V. 



O'Neil. Pegg> 




O'Neill, Stephen 



Page, Jean I lurst 



Pauli, Laurel 




Deliberating the fate of Rat Dwight Smith, Pete Wimbrow 
and Dennis Gilligan display varied reactions 





Pickering, Edw in 
Poe, Susan 



Km, kl, ill, Carol 
Roth, Susan 



We Shared Our Tears and Laughter 



Raley, Michael 



Ri i tn). Harry 



Reichert, Charles 



Riehl, William 



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Rusling, fudith 



Russell, Richard 



Russell, Wllliall 



Satterthwaite, Joseph 



Pausing from dail) activities, Les Potter, Ed Pickering and Roland Williams skim a magazin 




Thomas, Diane 
Thomas, Leslie 



Thompson, Lillian 
Thorp, Margarethe 



Throop, Annette 
Tippett, Theresa 



Townshend, Karen 
Underwood, Mary 




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Sinnott, Lorraine 
Stumpf, Sharon 



Urban, Patricia 





Vachararuiapi, Vupin 
Van Kirk, Malcolm 

Warner, < lathe 

Wilke, Theresa 



Williams, Roland 
Willing, Roberta 
Wimbrow, Peter, 111 
Wince. Louis Edward 



We Broadened Our Horizons 



Joining an informal discussion, D 
with Connie Jolley. 


■an Yancey chats 


jflfe 




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Winkler, Francine 
Wood, John 



Woodward, Matilda 
Wooton, Victorine 



Zeiler, Barbara 
Zervos, Constantine 





Just a-pickin' and a-strummin' . Mac- Walter 
performs for stunt night 



16 



"No mail again today." . . Les Potter expresses his disgust tor wayward 
letter-writers. 







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"This is our navy?" . . . Janet Miller provides 
a tune for stunt night 



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F 
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S.M.C. Plays Host 
As Parents Visit 



On Saturday, November 12, students and 
parents gathered in the gym to hear Presi- 
dent Russell welcome them to the semi-an- 
nual Parent's Day festivities. After sharing 
lunch, the guests were given a glimpse of 
campus life through model classroom demon- 
strations and open house in both dormitories. 
According to all reports, the day was a mem- 
orable experience. 



Emerging from Kent Hall, participants *>1 Parent's Day 

show characteristic enthusiasm. 




A cure for homesickness Debbie Newnam and Nancy Sallada 
share lunch with their parents. 





(Above) Happy families demonstrate the success of the day. (Below) 
Tony Oreto and his parents find a quiet moment to talk. 










Antonivich, James 
Baker, Anne 



Bickley, David 
Bloom, Limla 



Boniface, Aileen 
Boston, Ellen 



Bounds. Julia 
Bradburn, Mai garet 



Brigham, Donna 
Buckler, Sarabeth 



We Laughed For Today 





Barbara Watkins begins Hat Week 



For Bill Burnett, Jerry Fisher and Ray Burroughs, 
friendship is sharing the front seat of a red Corvette 
convertible. 



Burk, Elizabeth 
Burnett, Bill 



Burroughs, Ray 
Cancro, Man 



Carr, Mary 
Chemacki, Phylli: 



Clark, Patricia 
Coates, Patricia 



Coleman, Thomas 
Corpus, Evelyn 



Couch, Sheron 
Crawley, Robert 









( Min > . Peter 
Da\ is, Elise 
I)a\ is. John 
Dobler, George 
Dorsey, Eleanor 



I h'\\ , Alana 
Ellis, Shirley 
Fair, Dennis 
Farlow, Elaine 
Fleming, Robert 




Welcoming freshman Donna Hudson and family, the orientation committee provides 
needed advice. 



Fletcher, James 
Fournier, Margaretta 
Glorius, Marcia 
Graham, Walter 
Guy, Carl 



Harris, Steven 
Hearthway, Mary Ann 
Heasty, Lois 
Ih mi. Nan 
Heimer, Michael 





Hett, Linda 
Ho l i 
Hoovei . K, ' 
Hopkins, Melisa 
H udson, I )onna 



Hurry, Rita 
Howard, Sharon 
Hyde, Earl 
Jacobson, Ann 

James, Susan 



We Entered a New World 

We Made Friends with Its People 



Cowering under the eyes of their judges, 
Debbie Newnam and Ron Neri prepare 
to inert their fate 




Jameson, James 
Johnson, Karlyn 
Joyner, Deborah 



Kasrai, Fereydoon 

Kramer, Mary Lou 
Kratz, Michael 






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KrepS, Dawn 
Kurrle, Terri 



Latteman, Hany 
Lawson, Milena 



Layton, Judith 
Lemon, Richard 



Linton, fane 
Little, Ellen 



Little, Robert 
Lloj tl, Thomas 



Walters, Ellen 
Maddox, Randall 



We Braved the Academic Tide 



Mancini, Carol McCready, Virginia 

Mattingly, Stephen McKinnie, Patricia 




& 




Concentrating on the subject at hand, Dave Scheible, Joe Cairns, and Scott Dobler make use of 
the library. 

Meara, Robvn Merryman, Suzanne Baker, Christine Smith, Pamela 




© ©ft© A 




Miller, Janet 



Mortimer, Donna 



Mullikin, John 





Neri, Ronald 
Netherton, Sandra 



Newnam, Deborah 
Oland, Joyce 



Looking confused, two freshman approach another registra- 
tion booth. 




Pratt, Elizabeth 
Putnam, Denise 
Redman, Philip 



Reilly, Anne 
Reynolds, Elizabeth 
Hippie, Jacqueline 



Rose, Eric 
Sallada, Nancj 

Scheible, David 




Freshman testing engrosses Shirlej Ellis 



f% & 



Olsen, Linda 




Shapiro, I .indii 
Shelton, Sharon 
Smith, Margaret 



Smith, Pamela 
her, Alice 
Springer, Charles 





Bill Burnett shows competitive spirit 



We Filled Our Free Time 
With Hours of Fun 



I . I I I r ■ 

Stetler, Ruth 
Strickland, Phyllis 
Stringer, Marsha 



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Tabakin, Bi mita 
Lowry, Jeannie 
T,t\ lor, Nunc) 
I iij in. in. Mai Hi. i 



24 





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Thompson, William 

I i .1-1 I-.. 
R 

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Yoreis, Cathy 



Young, Barbara 
Warfel, Virginia 
Waters, Charlotte 
Watkins, Barbara 
Watt, Sandra 




Ray Burroughs shares a musical 
moment. 



For Mac Walters, happiness is a guitar. 



Whitlock, Diana 
Williams, John 
Wilson, Lucy 
Windhom, Bonnie 




Windes, Margaret 
Windsor, Deboi ah 
U indsor, Earle 
Worzask, Alexandra 
Miller, Linda 




&& 




25 




Mr. Xouri 



26 



"Hey Norris, will ya let go of the backboard?" . . Coacb 
Lowder. 








"You did what to the bunsen burner?" . . . Mr. 
Fahl faces a new crisis. 



A 
C 
A 
D 
E 
M 
I 
C 

s 



27 




Dr. Carl Walker, department head, is a familiar face to students throughout 
the campus. 



Business World 
Means Profit 



Under the direction of Dr. Walker and 
Miss Spring, business students prepare for 
future roles through the expansion of basic 
skills. Diversity of available subject matter 
allows for the development of individual 
talents. 



28 




Setting the timer, Miss Spring prepares to test a 
typing class. 



Tom Moore watches a term paper take shape. 




Wi 



) 



/ 






Finding a comment amusing, Mr. Ver 
discussion in his British Literature class. 



listens to 



Mr. Siegel conducts a freshman English class. 



After ending a World Literature class, Mr. Henley 
listens to the remarks of a still-frustrated student. 



English Department 
Literature; Literacy 

Under the guidance of faculty members 
Miss Barbara Magaw, Mr. Charles Henley, 
Mr. Gerald Siegel, and Mr. Collin Vernoy, 
the English department has been rapidly 
expanding. An advanced freshman course 
was again offered, and a course in American 
Literature was initiated this fall. 

Highlight of the year will be a sophomore 
humanities seminar to be offered in the 
spring. 



29 





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Mr. Smith takes a moment to relax before his next geography class. 



Still absorbed by the discussion topic, Tern Wilke 
prepares to leave a psychology class. 




Our World 
Social Studies 



Mrs. Donhiser prepares hei notes foi the next day's psychologj 
classes. 



'.'/ •- •• •• 




Discussing earnestly, Mrs. Donhiser and a representative of the Morman faith meet 
after a World Religions class 




In a Classroom 
and History 

A main function of the History and Social 
Studies departments is to give the student an 
insight into the world in which he lives and 
a basic understanding of its people. It is thus 
that he will be able to trace the development 
of those about him, and will himself develop 
more fullv. 





Having dismissed his sociology class, Mr- Chovenes descends 
the stairs in the classroom building. 



United States History specialist, Dr. Griffen. begins an- 
other informal class session. 



Dr. Griffen lectures to his Recent United States Histon class 



Glancing from a half-graded European History test. Miss Ida Swearingen 
greets one of her frequent office visitors. 




t 



Scientific Challenge 
Department Expands 



Under the direction of Mr. B. Elwood 

Fahl and Dr. Huck the science department 
has been broadening its scope. In addition 
to genera] courses, the new Environmental 
Biology and Comparative Anatomy have 
bolstered the area's already high caliber. An 
initial Marine Biology course will eventually 
become the specialized program at the col- 
lege. A new chemistry and physics laboratory 
has also pointed the way to the future. 




Fascinated by the surrounding proceedings, Tom 
Lloyd and Barbara Maschi watch a chemistry 
demonstration. 



Peering through a maze of apparatus, Mr. Fahl stops to help a student in 
distress. 







Gazing intentl> through the microscope lens, lab instructoi 
Miss Geraldine Madden prepares the following day's as- 
signment. 



Dr. Huck pauses on her way to a biology lecture class. 



Running the traps for shrew in Environmental Biology, are Ri< hard 
Russell, Douglas Hackley, and Dr. Huck. 



Grinning in triumph, Matilda Woodward and Ri< hard 
Russell hold a smooth green snake. 





Math Skills Prove Rewarding 



\n additional instructor in the Mathe- 
matics department has proven to be of bene- 
fit for all concerned. Mr. Nouri and new- 
comer Mrs. Long currently conduct classes 
in areas as diversified as Fundamentals of 
Math and Ad\ anced Calculus, and are able to 
guide their students through the sometimes 
trying subjects at hand. 




Perfect ending to an Algebra class Mrs. Long returns .1 tesl paper to 

Richard Russell 



Giving her complete attention, Joan De Lozier concentrates on an exam 
tor her Fundamentals of Math class 





Mr. Nouri timls a brisk walk to class enjoyable 



Physical Education 
Brings New Interest 



Co-educational Physical Education and a 
better basketball team are the keynotes of 
this year for instructors Mrs. Clevenger 
and Mr. Lowder. 

Currently the department is looking to the 
future, and a swimming pool. 




Following through, team member Dale Milburn practices 
his tenuis form 










&& 

:/-. 



■ - 







Taking a break, Mrs. Clevenger chats with Sheridan Fahnestock in 
the snack bar. 




Checking roll, Mr Lowder begins 
volleyball. 



•ducational class \\\ 



35 



■B 



Mi Fraze diagrams for his Theatre 
Production class. 




Cast and 
"Fanny's 



crew members Tom Coleman and Bill Russell wait for the curtain to go up on 
First Play." 



Theatre Arts 
A World's Stage 



Another acting year brought a new face 
and a new production to campus this fall. 
Mr. Lonnie Fraze assumed guidance of the 
combined Speech and Theatre Arts depart- 
ment and promptly began work on the year's 
first dramatic presentation. 

"Fanny's First Play" reached the stage in 
November, and was a tribute to the task 
accomplished by its cast and crew. 



36 




Behind the scenes . . . Tom Coleman 
and Patsy Cowgill. 



Speech instructor Mrs. Fahl aids a student in distress. 




Language 

Give Knowledge 

Self-application and hard work are prac- 
tices familiar to language students at St. 
Mary's College. It is only through these 
methods that the art of speaking French or 
Spanish fluently may be gained. 

Under the direction of Mr. Leon Buker, 
serious students find hours of memoriza- 
tion turning into years of knowledge. 




Question and answer is an effective method practiced 
bv Mr. Buker. 



Aiding in the development of pronunciation skilK is the main 
task of the lab instructor. 





In the quiet of solitude Ed Kennedy crams for the inevit- 

:il ilt pOp qiliZ. 



37 




A serious moment . Mr. Greeson smooths a musical road-block 
lor the choir. 



Musical Notes 
Brighten Campus 



Variety is the keynote of the music de- 
partment. Besides the usual courses, individ- 
ual lessons are available to piano and voice 
students. The choir takes an annual tour and 
performs at functions throughout the year. 




Mrs. Shirley Echard, instructor and choir accompanist is a main- 
staj oi the department. 




Melod) rings out as sophomores Leslie Bishop and Pat 
Lipps perform with the choir tor Parent's Day. 



38 



Art Department Colors Campus Life 



With the guidance of Mr. Egeli and Mr. 
Rowe, art students are able to discover end- 
less modes of expression. Each is encouraged 
to develop his own talent in his own special 
way. 




\\ ati Mill, Mr Rowe guides the 1i.uk! ol student Bettj Burl, 



School Administration 
Gives Guidance 



Perhaps the most influential force gov- 
erning the actions of the college student is 
the campus administration. Under its guiding 
hand decisions arc made daily which deter- 
mine overall policy concerning the school as 
a whole. The successful running of a college 
relies on these behind-the-scenes workers to 
maintain a balance of essential communica- 
tion between the students and administration. 




: 



• 





President Ma) Kussell is the focal point of campus 



decisions. 



New Director of Admissions Mr. Thompson consults with Dean 
<>| Students Mr. Anderson. 




Public Relations Director Mr. Brantley 
Greeson chats with Dean of Faculty 
Dr. Boyer. 






40 







Office secretaries take a much needed coffee break. 








Dean of Men. Mr. Yancey, checks a hand- 
book with Dean of Women, Miss Simms 



Mr. Brookbank handles campus 
business affairs. 





Varied duties occup) the time of office secretaries. 



41 





I)i Patrick and Miss Chance are familial faces to 
ailing students. 



Health Service: 
Aid For Ailments 



Any morning a unique occurrence takes 
place in the campus infirmary. It is then that 
certain members of the student body appear 
to receive words of comfort and hope from 
our school nurse. Along with dauntless pa- 
tience and words of advice, Miss Chance also 
distributes pills and potions of varying de- 
grees of potency. For some patients' all that 
is needed is a lecture on the topic of "Com- 
mon Sense Health Rules," but for others 
awaits the confines of an infirmary bed. What- 
ever her method, Nurse Chance offers a sym- 
pathetic ear to all who consult her. 

In order to meet the demands of a senior 
college, a new student health center is being 
planned. Larger and more diversified facili- 
ties will provide for improved treatment of 
health problems. 



I 




"Is it that bad?" Miss Chance treats Bob Turner. 




Miss O Brien gives one oi tin- seemingly endless Hu shots. 



42 



Campus Library: 

A World Through Books 

Expansion is the keynote as the campus 
library prepares itself for a necessary move 
to more efficient facilities. In preparation for 
the transition to a four-year college, the li- 
brary is constantly ordering and receiving 
dailv hundreds of new books designed tor 
student usage. New members of the library 
staff also add their specialized training to 
the development of an even more advanced 
source of studv. 




Head librarian, Miss Kern, finds a re- 
serve I k useful. 





Mrs. Purd) is eve] willing to aid 

a student in the pursuit ot 
knowledge. 



Librar) assistants "Lilly" and Claudette McLaughlin catalogue the newest order 

i >l liooks. 



New stall member Mr Wang consults a 

reference source. 



L 



Keeping the library in working order: Mrs. Ridgell, Mrs. Potyen, 
Assistant Librarian, and Mrs. Bradburn. 




We Depended Upon Them 




Mrs. Hindmun keeps good charge over the young men in Calvert 
Hall. 

Queen Anne Hall maids, Lilly Mae and Geral- 
dine, keep our hallowed halls in spotless con- 
dition. 





Queen Anne Hall possesses as her guiding hand. Mrs. Treadwell. 



Among the people most influential in the 
life of the college student must he included 
the dormitory house-mothers. These ladies 
give of their time and energy to make our 
lives easier and our prohlems less severe. 
Their devotion to duty may be witnessed 
through dreaded but inevitable room inspec- 
tions and weekly pleas to "Please bringdown 
your laundry." To them is owed a boundless 
debt of gratitude. 

Also essential to dormitorv life are the 
people who keep the buildings in a present- 
able condition. It is their endless job to main- 
tain in smooth working order the place that 
so many of us call home. 



Behind The Scenes 



Without the earnest effort of its back- 
ground staff, no institution could function 
to fulfill its ultimate purpose. St. Mary's 
College is no exception to this statement. 
The loyal devotion of her staff makes it pos- 
sible for the student body to enjoy those con- 
veniences that are taken so much for granted. 
Without it, St. Mary's could never continue 
its operation as an educational unit. 









Dietitians Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Cowan plan balanced dirts hi 
n student appetites. 



The preparation of endless meals is an important job. 



Members ot the cafeteria staff solve well the problem of feeding a large group of people! 




45 




46 



A unique form of exercise — Bill Russell wheels out on a spring 

afternoon. 





Mac "Walters manages to combine his favorite 
activities. 



A 

C 
T 
I 

V 
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T 
I 
E 
S 




PHI THETA KAPPA: Front Rdw: E. Kennedy, B. Manners, treasurer; L. Arnold, vice president; P. Gardner, secretary. Second Row: L. Sinnott, P. 
Noell. P. Lipps, D. Combs, C. Moore, R. Willing, P. O'Neil, M. Van Kirk, D. Kirby, j. Wood, B. Kelley. 



Scholarship Plus Integrity 
Through Student Life. 

Phi Theta Kappa is the honorary fra- 
ternity recognizing outstanding scholastic 
achievement. Members must maintain an 
accumulative average of 3.2 for two semes- 
ters. Students with a 3.5 or above average 
are entered on the Dean's List, with those 
having a 3.2 to 3.5 included on that of Hon- 
orable Mention. 

The campus Honor Council sets stand- 
ards for achievement within the academic 
scope. Emphasis on integrity is enforced 
through the Honor Code, aiding students in 
the development of personal morality. 




John Dordal, President of 
Phi Theta Kappa and holder 
of die highest accumulative 
average. 



HONOR COUNCIL: B. Johnson, chairman; R. Neri, P. Noell, P. Choiffi, L. Arnold, J. Massie. 





STUDENT SENATE: Front Ruu: P. O'Neil, D. Gilligan, L. Wince, treasurer;]. Drank, secretary; C. Jolley, E. Atkins, B. Johnson. Second Ro 
Mr Yancey, B. Mettam, commuters' representative. M. Garner, J. Massie, president. E. Pickering, T. Lloyd. 



Student Senate 



Meets New Challenge. 



Provided by the Student Senate, the 
means ol airing student gripes. 



■'ltd. Board" 



ed 



proved a popular 



la. 




Designed to ease the necessary but often 
painful transition from a junior to senior 
college, the Student Senate functions as an 
effective means of student government. Re- 
placing the former M.S.G.A. and W.S.G.A., 
the Senate determines scholastic government 
policy through student-administrative rela- 
tionships. This body of both men and women 
students, performs such duties as the regula- 
tion of various clubs and organizations, and 
the solution of general campus problems. 





Another sale is completed as Lorraine Sin- 
nott purchases a book from John Bennett. 



Student Union: 
School Focal Point 



Snack bar manager Johnny Dolack serves 
another Coca-Cola. 



Evening darkness brings a warming glow to the main 
lounge of the student union. 



Taking a break, Robert Bupp and Linda Arnold are served bv Mrs. Lee. 






To anyone even remotely familiar with 
St. Mary's College, it is obvious that the stu- 
dent union is the mainstay of campus lite. 
It is here that students gather for after-class 
snacks, purchase school supplies from the 
bookstore, conduct various club meetings, 
or just relax while waiting for the dining 
hall to open. Members of the Student Union 
Board coordinate group activities and deter- 
mine the social events taking place in the 
building itself. 




Lunch occupies the attention of Dino Zervos, Bob Fleming, 
Phil Howard, and Walter Graham. 



STUDENT UNION BOARD: Front Bow: J. Williams, W Crowley, M. Thorp, K. Donahue, A. Baker, Mr, Yancey, B. Windham, D. Putnam. 
Second Row: M. Garner, J. Massie, W. King, M. Crouse, S. Mattingly, B. Skinner, chairman: S. Addington, J. Jones, L. Arnold, G. Masters, L. 
Wince, M. Woodward, L. Potter. 



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*» A 



Orientation to Campus Life 
Through Sophomore Guidance. 



Aiding incoming freshmen in the adjust- 
ment to campus life is the main objective of 
the orientation committee. Under the guid- 
ing c\ e ol leading sophomores, new students 
plan and conduct a talent show, look forward 
to the suspense ot rat week, and initiate last- 
ing friendships. They are further introduced 
to the honor code and academic system ot the 
college. 




Displaying signs of ■.tievs, Dwight Smith endures the 
rigors of ii.it ( louri 




ORIENTATION COMMITTEE: Front Row: K. Heron, P. 
O'Neii, C. Jollev, Miss Simms. Second Row: R. Russell, E. 
Atkins, B. Johnson. Third Row: D. Kirbv, L. Lock, X. Philipp, 
G. Croft. Fourth Row: L. Kern, Chairman: F. Winkler, G. A. 
Beckwith, M. Van Kirk. Fifth Row: J. Massie, R. Williams, D. 
Gilligan, L. Arnold, M. Thorp. Sixth Row: E. Pickering, P. 
Wimbrow. 



I u i \ members Ed Pickering, Louis Wince, John 
Massie, Pegg) O'Neii, and Connie Jollev set rules 
tor freshman rats. 




_ 



<< "-:'- - 




Class Officers 
Aid School Spirit. 



Initiating campus spirit is just one of the 
many duties of the freshmen and sophomore 
class officers. These leaders direct the vari- 
ous activities planned bv each group, and 
coordinate major decisions made by the stu- 
dents. The responsibility of setting the stand- 
ards for future classes also rests in the hands 
of the present officers, who are paving the 
way to ever more achievement. Successful 
transition from a two to a four year college 
will depend largely on the cooperative atti- 
tude of its student body, an attitude which is 
currently being developed by these chosen 
representatives of the group. 



FRESHMAN OFFICERS: Turn Lloyd, president; Dick Urban, tin 
president. Tom Coleman, treasurer Debbie Windsor, secretary. 




SOPHOMORE OFFICERS: Bonnie Manners, secretary; Dennis Gilligan, president; Roland Williams, itee president. 
Matilda Woodward, treasurer; Bartlev Mettam, commuters' representative. 



53 




DORM COUNCIL MEMBERS: M. J. Cancro, G. Croft, secretary; K. Underwood, P. O'Neil, president; Miss Simms, L. Lock, treas- 
urer, 1) Kirby, ( ice president. 



Mar) Crouse stops For a treat hum the machine in- 
stalled through the influence of the Women's Dorm 
Council. 




Dorm Councils . . . 



k 



J 




Basking in unseasonabk warm fall weather, Queen 
Anne Hall girls make use of patio furniture supplied 
by the Dorm Council. 




Bob Hutchinson watches as John Dordal, Ed Pickering. Roland Williams, 
and John Williams relax with a friendly game of Hearts in the boys' 
recreation room. 



For Student Guidance 



Assuming the difficult hut influential 
task of guiding the actions of both men and 
women dormitory students, the Dorm Coun- 
cils of St. Man's College play an important 
role in the guidance of daily campus life. Its 
members take on the responsibility of making 







Richard Norris makes use of barber facilities 
provided 1>\ the Men's Dorm Council. 



decisions concerning dormitory policy, and 
govern individual reactions to these policies. 
The councils also provide such services as 
the establishment of the new boys' recreation 
room, doing its part to make the routine of the 
college student more enjoyable. 



DORM COUNCIL: Front Rou E. Atkins, president, K. Russell, S. Harris, T. Coleman, B. Veditz, B. Beyer, II. Eslin, E. Hyde, B. 
Johnson, set retary. Second Ron J. Broyles, B. Hutchinson, P. Wimbrow, social director; M. Van Kirk, athletic director, |. Massie, P. 

lieu aril. B. Burnett. T Onto. T. Lloyd. 





INTERNATIONAL CLUB: Seated: L Milgrim, E. Little, S. B. Buckler, S. Windsor, B. Pratt, A. Boniface, V Vachara- 
rungsi. Standing; F. K.tsr.ii, president, V Lloyd, A. Hankins, E. Boston, M. Glorius, M. Hoke, M Crouse, D. Gosper, 
B. Beyer, B. Hutchinson, 



International Club New This Year 



A welcome addition to the campus scene 
this year is the International Club. Although 
not yet an officially recognized club, mem- 
bers of the organization have already proved 
their interest in college life through sponsor- 



ship of social activity. The purpose of the 
club is to aid students in developing a better 
understanding of the world around them, 
striving always to develop contact with its 
people. 








S.N.E.A.: Seated: C. Di Blasi, L. Heiderman, secretary; C. Vories, treasurer; V. McCready, P. 
S. Palazzo, M. Crouse, M. Van Kirk, E. Boston, B. Pratt, D. Windsor, S. Couch, lice president. L 



Strickland. Stuiidiu 
Bloom, B. Windha 



: J. Long, 
'.J- Page. 



S.N.E.A. Spells Leadership 



Members of the Student National Edu- 
cation Association, a newly recognized club 
this year, have managed to present them- 
selves as influential participants in college 



life at St. Mary's. Sponsorship of the "Sweet- 
heart Dance" provided a social event of 
major importance which was appreciated by 
the entire student bodv. 



56 




Folk club member Pat Lipps chats with Richard Dyer- 
Bennett alter his performance in Kent Hall. 




Noted art folk-singer Richard Dyer-Bennett perfi 
for the Artist Lecture Series. 



Artist Series Provides Culture 



Through the Artist and Lecture Series, 
guest performers of the highest caliber pre- 
sent enriching performances on the campus 
grounds. Among those here this season was 
the world-renowned folk singer Richard 



Dver-Bennett, who later talked with mem- 
bers of the school's folk music club. Mr. 
Dver-Bennett proved to be an interesting 
personality as well as a fine musician. 



ARTIST SERIES COMMITTEE: G. Masters. D Gilligan, Miss Chance, adiisur; L. Heiderman, S. Bentz 





57 



Assembly Committee Sets Speakers 
Students Profit 



The responsibility for securing and pre- 
senting weekly guest speakers for the bene- 
fit and enjoyment of the student bodv rests 
in the hands of the campus Assembly Com- 
mittee. Mi. Brantley Greeson is in charge of 
obtaining these lecturers, who inform their 
audience on a wide variety of subjects, and 
bring diversified sources of information to 
their listeners in Kent or St. Man's Hall. 



^ ^^^ m 


1 ■r»U 











1 


5 






i 


■ 




**m 


m 

t 


f 

i 

t 



Ann Northam, who introduces various guest speakers, goes over pro- 
gram notes with Mr. Greeson. 



Dr. Norton F. Dodge addresses Ins audience at the assembly honoring student academic achievement. 




58 




SOCIAL COMMITTEE: Front Row: M. Clonus, M. Crouse, L. Bishop, P. Lipps. Second Row: S. Roth, D. Hackley, P. Urban, | Page, R. Wil- 
liams, chairman; M Van Kirk, A. Hankins, B. Burnett, P. O'Neil, D. Urban, R. Russell 



Dances sponsored by the Social Committee are an impo 
taut source of student entertainment 



Social Committee 
Plans Functions 



Planning and producing dances, con- 
certs, and other entertainment mediums 
comes under the direction of the school 
Social Committee. Its members strive to pro- 
vide a series of events designed purely for 
recreation and relaxation throughout the 
academic year. Their efforts are rewarded 
through student attendance and support of 
the variously sponsored events. 




59 




POINT NEWS STAFF: Seated Mr Siegal, advisor; C. Di Blast, distribution editor; D. Mortimer, A. Hankins, news editor; N. Philipp 
S Stumpf, D. Kirl>\ , M Crouse, B. Reynolds, (! A. Beckwith, editor. G. Croft, typing editor; M Van Kirk, sports editor. Standing L. 
Heiderman, feature editor: E. Rose. S Shelton, A. Northam, C. Warner, R. Williams 



Point News "Sells' 



Staff members of the Point News have 
successfully proven that even the newspaper 

of a smaller college can provide information 
and entertainment for its readers. Reporters 
for the paper have covered every phase of 
campus life, keeping students in touch with 
the activity surrounding them. 



Staff members Ann Baker. Donna Mortimer, Alex Hankins. Cathy 
Wai ner, Be tsv Reynolds, and Nancy Taylor prepare to meet another 
deadline. 





Cathy Warner, campus winner of the Glamour maga- 
zine contest, was chosen through tile sponsorship of 
the Point Yru \ Stuff. 



60 



Scorpion Proves A Literary Success 



Now in only its second year of publica- 
tion, the Scorpion has proven to be a success- 
ful campus publication. Containing creative 
literary pieces submitted by interested and 
capable students, the magazine this season 
also possesses a section of drawings and 
sketches done bv talented art enthusiasts. 
Pieces are submitted to and judged by the 
editorial staff, who determine appropriate 
subject matter for publication. 





■TtB 


mm fi mm 








■ '"'%■* 4± 





Editorial staff member Bonnie Manners and Richard Norris evaluate 
last year's magazine. 



SCORPION STAFF: S. Stumpf, N. Philipp, P. Lipps, J. Bounds, M. J. Cancro, P. O'Neil, editor; Mr. Henley, adt isoi 




< kSTI I I \N STAFF: I Bishop, layout editor; B. Kelley, ass'l editor, D. Zervos, /justness manager; K Willing, M Crouse, J Cross, typing 
editor, C. M< Laughlin, editor-in-chief, \l Cam ro, S Stumpf, copy editor; B Windham, L. Bloom, S Pallazzo, MissSimms, adi n.>r 



FB 




Castellan Meets Deadlines, 



Editor Claudette McLaughlin takes a moment ot relaxation before 
deadline headaches begin again. 




Once again members of the Castellan 
staff struggled successfully against deadlines 
in order to publish one of the major cam- 
pus annuals. Working under editor-in-chief 
Claudette McLaughlin, students interested 
in the production technique of a yearbook 
gained first-hand knowledge of their subject. 
Pictures were taken, layouts made, and copv 
written to give an accurate picture of college 
life. 



Readying pages for the printers is only 
one of the man) jobs of a yearbook editor. 



62 





n, 








Layout editoi Leslie Bishop prepares another picture For publication, 



Staff Wins! 




Recording the hill scope of campus 
events, the yearbook staff managed to cap- 
ture significant daily events in the life of 
the college student. Functioning as the hub 
of school activity, the group again gathered 
memories of a season past. 

Jeff Cross, tvping editor, works late to complete 
a sheet of copy 



Cop> editor Sharon Stump! gathers first-hand informa- 
tion concerning the Artist Lecture Series. 



Business manager Dino Zervos makes another advertising call. 






Janet Miller, Barbara Watkins and Mary Hoke 
prepare the ever important advertising slips. 





SAMADRA MEMBERS: Front Row: Mr. Fraze, advisor; A. Northam, Dice president; M. Woodward, A. Baker, }. Bounds, 
!,. Bishop, secretary; A. Throop. Second Rote |. Massie, T. Coleman, treasurer; E. Atkins, S. Harris, P. McGuckian, president; 

B. Windsor. 



Samadra Players Present 



The Samadra players of St. Mary's Col- 
lege presented this season Fanny's First Phu/ 
by the contemporary playwright George Ber- 
nard Shaw, and Comedy of Errors hv William 
Shakespeare. Under the direction of Mr. 
Lonny Fraze, the group established itself 
as an efficient and capable theater group, 
drawing vast audience attendance at each 
of their productions. Each member gained 
also a unique opportunity to display indi- 
vidual talents and aptitudes in the theatrical 
field. 




CAST MEMBERS OF Fannys First Play: Bobby, Pete McGuckian; Dora, [oyce Oland; Mr. 
Gilbey, Mary Carr, Mrs. Knot, Ann Northam; Juggins, Doug McClean; Margaret Knox, \m 



Gilbey 
Reilh 



Dwight Smith; Mr. Knox, Steve Harri '/. 
Lieutenant Du\ diet, Mill Russell. 




Lieutenant Duvalet, played by Bill Russell, charms Mar- 
garet Knox, as played l»\ Ann Reilly, unaware th.u she is 
a former fellow prison-mate. 



Dwight Smith as Mr. Gilbey, and Steve Harris as Mr Knox meet 
for their regular business meeting on the third Tuesday of the 
month. 




65 




Commuters Club 
Keeps In Touch 



Designed to keep commuting students 
in touch with daily campus events, the Com- 
muter's C!lul) emerges as one of the most sig- 
nificant new organizations this year. Non- 
boarding participants now have a more 
discerhable voice in the school affairs that 
so often directly affects them, furthering even 
more their security as an active and inter- 
ested campus group. Through sponsored 
dances and similar activities, the club 
strengthens contact with dormitory students. 




* 



^ 



Commuters |ohn Paradis, Dave Scheible, and Paul 
Bishop enter a car for the long drive home. 



COMMUTER'S CLUB officers Mike Garner, president; Cathy Donahue, secretary; John Wood, vice president, and Bart 
Mettam, senate representative. 




66 




FOLK CLUB: Front Row: S. Stumpf, secretary-treasurer; D. Neunam, L. Bishop, P. McKinnie. Second Rou M Walter, president. B. Watkins, 
A Northam, M. Hoke, L. Bloom. Third Ron I) Urban, P. Noell, J. Bounds. P. Lipps. B. Pratt. Fourth Ron J. Miller, P. Coates, J.Fisher.R. 
Burroughs, nice-president. 

Folk Music: The Sound of Today 



Having existed previously as an informal 
group of interested students, the Folk Music 
Club of St. Mary's College became this year 
an officially recognized organization. De- 
signed to promote the appreciation of the 
folk music medium, the club functions as an 
effective means of school entertainment, as 



well as providing a home base for several 
campus guitarists and singers. Through annu- 
ally sponsored hootenannies, the group gains 
an opportunity to project its activity to the re- 
mainder of the college and surrounding area. 
Weekly meetings provide a much-welcomed 
period of relaxation and fun for its members. 



"Colorado" and Mac pursue their Favorite pastime. 





FUTURE HOMEMAKERS: Seated: Miss Oslund, advisor; J. Jones, president; M Crouse, T. Kurrle, C. Voiries, J. Cross, S. Bentz, 
H. Stetler, | Stetler, treasurer, K. Hansen, C. Mancini, K. Underwood. 



Future Homemakers Plan Ahead 



Better known as the F.H.A. or the Home 
Economics Club, the Future Homemakers 
Association has once again demonstrated its 
capabilities in organizing interested students 
in their chosen field of the home sciences. 



Members of the club again sponsored an an- 
nual International Tea, providing a showcase 
for varied culinary skills as well as a welcome 
treat source for the student bodv. 



Sampling tin- goodies at the International Tea, F.H.A. members and guests display obvi 



■ntlins 



68 




. * . 



Campus Choir 
Hits High Note 



Once again under the direction of Mr. 
Brantley Greeson, and accompanied by Mrs. 
Shirley Echard, the choir this season demon- 
strated its capacity for providing entertain- 
ment of the highest caliber. Performing at 
Parent's Day acth ities and the annual Christ- 
mas Candlelight Service, the group proved 
that it is able to handle any and all styles of 
music. Again this year the regular May con- 
cert tour encompassed such areas as Virginia 
Beach and Ocean Citv, with performances 
also being given in the local sphere. 




Mrs, Shirle) Echard is seated at the piano as the 
choir delivers another song. 




CHOIR MEMBERS: Front Row: L. Hett, P. O'Neil, J. Negley, P. Lipps. Second Row: P. Noell, J. Linton, J Long, L. Heiderman, B Watkins 
P Gardner Third Row: J Miller, G. Warfel, A. Northam, N. Phillips, A. Lancaster, S. Srumpf. 



69 



Athletic Associations Score 




M.A.A. officers Charles Hester, treasurer; Lus Potter, secretary 
and !*.*! Pickering, president; meet in the snack bar. 




WAV officers Nancy Philipp, secretary; Margaret Thorp, treas- 
urer; Connie folley, president; Francine Winkler, social chairman; 
and k.iili\ Heron, vice president gathei t<>i a needed break. 



70 



Sponsored each year by the Athletic 

Associations, the intramural games mark one 
or the high points of the season. Both girls 
and boys participate in intramural basketball, 
volleyball, tennis, badminton, and even ping- 
pong. Also under the direction of the W.A.A., 
the Christmas Prom again emerges as the 
center of the campus social scene. S.M.C. 
students and their dates, dressed in seasonal 
finery, danced tirelessly to the beat of an ex- 
ceptional band until reminded of the late- 
ness of the hour. 



Participants await the return ot the ball in an M.A.A. spon- 
sored intramural volleyball game. 





Chellv DeLeon and Bett\ Burk compete during a game ol dormitorj ping-pong spon- 
sored by the W.A.A. 



Sylvia Palazzo and Pat McKinnie board the bus that will 
take them to a Civic Center basketball game. 





Entering into the spirit of the season, Milena 

I. aw son and date dance at the Christmas Prom. 




Sophomores Mary Crouse, "Toua," and Leslie 
Heiderman hast at the Kill picnic held in Sep- 
tember. 



71 




TEAM MEMBERS: Mr. Cole, coach; L. Thomas, H. Rector, R. Maddox, M. O'Brien, P. Howard, R. Norris, L. Potter, E. Pickering, D. Bickle) 
M. Van Kirk, R. Fleming, Mr. Lowder, coach. 



"Retrievers' Reap Victories 



Opposing teams gather under the basket as the 
"Retrievers" take on Anne Arundel Community 
College. 




Opponent 

107 

80 



1966-67 SCHEDULE 

SMC. 

...Prince George's C. C 77 

...Anne Arundel C. C 81 

65 Essex C. C 80 

91 Hagerstown J. C 72 

62 Baltimore College of Commerce 89 

62 Baltimore Institute 86 

75 Charles County C. C 96 

84 Anne Arundel C. C 78 

74 Catonsville C. C 97 

102 Harford J. C 89 

86 Shaver J. C 79 

51 Frederick C. C 102 

76 Allegany C. C LOO 

64 Baltimore C. C 81 

85 Baltimore Institute 75 

68 Charles County C. C 77 

57 Anne Arundel °84 

66 Catonsville C. C 80 

77 Strayer J. C 66 

forfeit Frederick C. C 

75 Charles County C. C "51 

° Tournament Game 



72 



Game Excitement Runs High 



The "Retrievers" of St. Mary's College 
swept onward to victory this season in a 
record-shattering number of winning games. 
In a total of thirteen games the team proved 
beyond a doubt that its membership consti- 
tuted a winning combination of cooperation 
and accuracy. To the "Retrievers" go a heart- 
felt "Thank vou" for a season well-played. 




"Two points!" The score is tied as R.uuh Maddox makes il again 




"Gel thai rebound!" The Retrievers are again in the clear. 




The longest wait in the world.' 



Team members take to the floor a> the second hall begii 




73 



GirVs Tennis Nets Rewards 




Exciting Season 



Accurate playing and overall good sports- 
manship marked a successful season for the 
members of the Girls' Tennis Team. Under 
the leadership of team captain Kathy Heron, 
the girls proved that the spirit of the game 
indeed makes up an important part of the 
total season picture. 



1966 SCHEDULE 

Opponent SMC. 

-I Western Man land 2 

3 University of Md 5 

2 Baltimore J. C 3 



Team members Kath) Heron, Connie Jolley, Laurel Pauli and 
Mar) Crouse proved to be a successful combination. 



Captain Kathy Heron takes time for a practice session in the gym. 





GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM: First Ron Mrs. Clevenger, coach: N. Taylor, K. Heron, C. Jollev, captain: A. Speicher, D. Newnam. 
Second Row: J. Linton, manager; D. Hudson, T. \\ like, P. Horn, J. Ripple, N*. Philipp, K. Townshend, manager. 



Basketball Team Hits The Mark 



Waiting tor a rebound, team members displa) full 
concentration on the subject at hand. 




This season the Girls' Basketball Team 
completed a series ot hard-fought games, 
during all of which the members displayed 
a commendable talent tor teamwork and co- 
operation. Captain Connie Jollev led her 
players through a number of strategic moves 
during each game, demonstrating that to- 
getherness is indeed important to the overall 
result accomplished. 





1966 SCHEDULE 




( )pponent 




S M C 


36 




...31 


48 




36 






O 


32 




39 




Baltimore |. C 


o o 




Towson State College 


o o 




° game cancelled 






00 yet to be played 





75 




Team Sports 
Gather Support 



John Bennett scores once again for the 
cross country team. 



CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE 

Essex C. C won 

Catonsville C. C lost 

Montgomery C. C lost 



Male team sports this season reached 
new heights. Strengthened by better student 
support and guided by Coach Lowder, mem- 
bers of the various teams proved their mettle 
in a number of competitive events. Games 
and meets were marked by higher scores and 
obvious improvement in team accuracy and 
cooperation. 



BASKETBALL TEAM: Front Row: M O'Brien, Mr. Cole, coach: M. Van 
Kirk. H. Rector, R. Maddox, D. Bicklev, L. Thomas, Mr. Lowder, coach. 
Second Row: E. Pickering, L. Potter, R. Norris, P. Howard 




76 





SPORTS' CHEERLEADERS: B. Craig, D. Windsor, P. Chemacki, B. Man- 
ners, captain. 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE 



Opponent 

2 Catonsville 



Members of (lie girl-.' Hockey Team tr\ for another 
point 



S M.C. 

3 

0... ...Baltimore J. C 4 

5 Gauludette 2 

1 U. of Maryland 1 

5 Salisbury 2 

1 Man Webster 

1 Mt. Vernon 2 

1 Frostburg 2 



New Team Spirit 




Hockey team members Sharon How- 
ard, Caro! Mancini, and Linda Lock 
board the bus for an away game. 



In Girls' Sports 



Meeting the challenge of a new season, 
members of the girls' sports teams have 
rallied in an effort to increase the athletic 
prestige of the college. In all instances the 
girls performed to their greatest capacity, 
ever helping to build a better image. 



77 



Intramural Sports 



Dale Millmin prepares to roll another strike. 




k.iili\ Heron challenges Hank Eslin in a game of ping-pong. 



Participants in the various intramural 
sports activities sponsored by the Men's and 
Women's Athletic Associations find that com- 
petition often proves to be one of the most 
enjoyable aspects of the game. 




Battling all the way, members of an intramural volleyball team 
displa) their enthusiasm. 



A lull breeze provides an opportunity tor an atter- 
noon of sailing. 





For Relaxing Fun 



Games emerge as hard-fought battles 
ending in a much deserved victory or a shat- 
tering loss. Team members learn that sports- 
manship and fair play pays off in favorable 
results. 





'* + * 



m.- 




Rough-and-tumble Football again graces the archery field. 



A team waits as a contrary basketball bounces from 
tlif backboard. 



Phil Howard aims high in a crucial game 



Archery plavs an important part in spring sports. 






As the beat gathers momentum, dancers swing to the music of the rhythm and blues band. 



Prom Boosts Holiday Spirit 



Court princess Connie Jollev and escort Ed Pickering pro- 
ceed down the runway. 




Under the auspices of the Women's Ath- 
letic Association, the Christmas Prom once 
again proved to be the highlight of the season 
as well as the entire year. Swirling skirts, gav 
decorations, and an overall festive mood pre- 
vailed throughout the evening, the highlight 
of which was the crowning of the annual 
prom queen. Francine Winkler was awarded 
the coveted title, with princesses Donna 
Hudson, Michele Hecker, Connie Jollev, 
Cathy Warner, and Debbie Newnam in 
attendance. 



Rising to the spirit oi the occasion, couples demonstrate their "ballroom" 
talents 




80 




The high-point of the evening is reached as Francine Winkler is 
crowned queen of the Christmas Prom. 




The queen and her court await the opening 
strains <>t the next number. 



Leading the queen's dance, Francine Winkler and her escort 
shine in the spotlight. 




81 





Shenandoah Apple Bio 



en Pegg> O'Neil 



May Queen and Her Court 



Each year the selection and crowning of 
the May Queen and her court highlights the 
spring season and brings to a festive climax 
the activities of the social and academic year. 
Chosen by the entire student body, these 
girls are excellent examples of the vivacious 
spirit of youth and enthusiasm so character- 
istic of the college person. Reigning over the 



various activities of May Day itself, the 
Queen and her Princesses serve as the focal 
point of the day's solo and group perform- 
ances by interested students. It is evident 
each year that this event brings to both aud- 
ience and participants alike a much-wel- 
comed source of entertainment and relaxa- 
tion. 



82 





Sophomore Princess Matilda Woodward 



Freshman Princess Susan James 



Freshman Princess Donna Huds' 



Freshman Princess Debbie Neunan 



Sophomore Princess Pamela Cecil 






83 




Fans glow as May Queen Peggy O'Xeil and her Princesses assemble after the crowning. 



Spring Spirit . . . May Day Festivities 



Highlighted by student performances of 
all types, May Day brings each year a refresh- 
ing atmosphere of fun and frolic to the al- 
ready blossoming campus. Designed this 
time around a folk theme, the days activities 
were marked by vocal renditions and modern 
dance arrangements on the same line. Bright- 
ly-colored costumes and a vast amount of 
lively spirit added to the overall gay mood, as 
performers displayed varied talents before an 
enraptured audience. The day's climax was 
reached as the royal crown was placed upon 
May Queen Peggy O'Neil, who stood at- 
tended by her six lovely princesses. Culmin- 
ating the events that evening was the annual 
May Prom, during which students and their 
dates whirled gaily to the strains of modern 
melody. All who attended agreed that the 
day had certainly been a time to remember. 



Members ot the modem dance group -display grace and style in 
their talent rendition. 




84 





Linda Lock step-, high! 



Mac Walters and Ray Burroughs deliver another polished arrange- 
ment in the folk style. 



Assembled onstage, the May Day dancing cast makes a bright and lively portrait 






When there's cramming to be done, anywhere will 
(In Mieke Rnekhill in the Student Union lounge. 



Breaking awaj from the mob, Man Hoke, Janet Miller, 

and Dwight Smith register for the spring semester. 



Student Life: 



Each day at St. Mary's moves smoothly 
with tlu' usual routine ol campus life, yet 
each (lav is unique in its own way. Morning 
classes take their toll ot sleepy-eyed stu- 
dents, assemblies and class meetings bring 
together the entire student body, and the 
dining hall provides a convenient rendez- 
vous for friends and acquaintances. Yet 
throughout each day the pattern is broken 
by the restless nature of the college student. 
The snack bar and lounge is a popular meet- 
Long hours in chemistr) lal> give wa) to .1 
well-deserved rest for Bill Riehl, Cath) 
Warner, and Sue Addington. 





Roland Williams and Margarete Thorp meet during a 
break in morning classes. 



86 




Campus Candids 

ing place for those weary of the academic 
routine, with the gymnasium providing a 
healthful and convenient way to "let off 
steam." With the coming of spring the pier 
and surrounding beach emerges as the most 
popular spot on campus, providing students 
with relaxation and an early tan as well. Left 
to himself, the student will discover methods 
of altering his daily routine to allow for the 
variety that is so much a part of his life. 





Tlie school library provides a convenient place for study and 

chatter fur Bill Russell and Man Can 



Sharing a doughnut, Sharon Stump! cultivates the friendship of 
the campus mascot. 



Lunch-rime brings a source ot relaxation 
as well as nourishment to Brian \ edit/ 
ami \\ a\ in' King. 





87 




Elise Davis, Linda Wheir, and Ja 



await the ojx 



»t the dining hall. 




After-Class Moments 



When the final bell rings and the stu- 
dent is on his own, a complete change in out- 
look is achieved. Weary bones and aching 
backs find solace in mutual companionship 
as groups meet in the student union, parking 
lot, or library to discuss the day's future 
plans. Sights and sounds of relaxation take 
the place of quiet study, at least until some- 
one mentions an eminent class assignment. 



Dave Seheible, Kathv Robeson and John Mullikin tackle a 
game of Hearts in the student union. 



Resting from a hard <la\ m tin- academic world, Charles Hester. 
Joe Satterthwaite, and Bt>l> Beyei meet in the classroom lounge. 




Time For Relaxation 




DTD 




Taking advantage of a mid-winter fire, Richard Norris and 
Bonnie Manners retreat to a world of then own. 




Relaxation on campus takes man) forms. 
Sports, dances, informal meetings, or just 
lazy dreaming before the fire provides the 
moment of rest needed after a day at the 
books. Students find in these times the spirit 
that is so often depressed by hours of study 
and endless assignments. They find the en- 
couragement they need in each other, and 
in so doing discover the basic meaning of 
human relationship. 



Spring afternoons provide a chance lor fun and exercise for the boating 
enthusiast. 



Frustrations are released as dancers swing with the beat. 




89 



Sophomore Directory 



Carolyn Sue Addington 

Washington, 1 1 ( 
Art 
Student Union Hoard 



Robert E. Bupp 

Indian Head, Maryland 
Business 
Basketball Manager; Intramurals 



Linda Manon Felton 

Park Hall, Maryland 

Psychology 
SNEA; Commuters Club. 



Linda Lee Arnold 

Hyattsville, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 
V.P. Phi Theta Kappa; Honor Court, Wo- 
men's Dorm Council, Student Union Board, 
Point News; Intramurals. 

Edwin Charles Atkins 

Wheaton, Maryland 
Music 

Student Senate; Pres. Men's Dorm Council; 
Orientation Comm.; Samadra; Social and 
Assembly Comms 



Patricia Lynn Carnright 

Suitland, Maryland 
Home Economics 
Home Ec. Club, Point Sews Staff. 



Pamela Beth Cecil 

Baltimore 12, Maryland 
General Education 
Dorm Council Mem.; Drill Team; Intramural 
Volleyball. 



Cherie Ann Fatzinger 

Ellicot City, Maryland 
Elementary Education 



Jerome Frank Fisher 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Art 
Folk Club. Commuters Club. 



Grace Ann Beckwith 

Cecilton, Maryland 
Education 
Intramurals. Point Sews Editor. 



Jennifer Anne Cross 

Towson, Maryland 

Home Economics 

Home Ec. Club; Intramurals; Volleyball; 

Volley tennis. Castellan, typing editor; Dorm 

Social Comm. 



Linda Yvonne Foard 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Home Economics 
Dorm Council; Hockey; FHA; Campus 
Council. 



John Roland Bennett Aracelly E. De Leon 

Leonardtown, Mary land Panama, Republic of Panama 

History Business 

Cross country; Intramurals, Phi Theta Kappa. Folk Club; Point News, staff; International 

Club. 



Roger William Foster 

Hereford, Maryland 

Physical Education 
Trainer, Intramurals; Basketball; Pron 
Comm.; Orien. Comm. 



Donald Wilfred Benoit 

Oxon Hill, Maryland 
Art 
Tennis; Cross Country 



Joan Diane DeLozier 

Rockville, Maryland 
Secretarial 



Thomas A. Frentz 

Glen Burnie, Maryland 
Business 
Newman Club, Samadra. 



Gaye Marshall Berryman 

Baltimore, Man. land 
Art 



Cecilia DiBlasi 



Marriotts ville, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 
SNEA, Point Sews, staff. 



Patricia Lynn Gardner 

Newark, Delaware 
Secretarial 
Choir; Phi Theta Kappa, Sec. 



Leslie Bishop 



Colora, Maryland 
Theatre Arts 
Castellan lay-out editor; Social Comm.; 
Samadra; Folk Club. 



John Allen Dordal 

Oxon Hill, Maryland 
Business 
Phi Theta Kappa, Pres.; Honor Council; 
Fresh. Class, Pres. 



Craig Reece Gemmill 

Catonsville, Maryland 
Business 
Student Senate, Vice Pres.; Dorm Council; 
Commuters Club. 



Paul Lawrence Bishop 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Business 



Janet Marie Drank 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Business Education 
Student Govt., Sec; Social Comm.; Union 
Board; Fresh. Orien. Comm. 



Dennis William Gilligan 

Pasadena, Maryland 

Business 

Folk Club; Sophomore Class, Pres.; Student 

Senate; Newman Club; Orien. Comm.; Artist 

Lecture Series Comm. 



90 



SNEA. 



Susan Kay Glenn 

Clover, South Carolina 
Liberal Arts 



Timothy David Hewitt 

Valley Lee, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 
Men's Athletic Association, Intramural 
Comm. Commuters Club. 



Linda Lee Kern 

Timonium, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 
Choir; Dorm Council; Prom Comm . In 
tramurals; Orien. Comm. 



David L. Gosper 



Glen Burnie, Maryland 
Business 
International Club. 



Elizabeth Rasine Hodges 

Leonardtown, Maryland 

Elementary Education 
SNEA, Newman Club. 



Judith Marlene Kildow 

Oakland, Maryland 
Home Economics 
Home Ec. Club. Volleyball Intramurals. 



Douglas Norman Hackley 

Glen Burnie, Maryland 
Biology 
Social Comm.; Folk Club. 



Margaret Eleanor Horn 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Elementary Education 
Hockey; Basketball; Tennis; Point News, 
staff; Intramurals. 



Denise Scott Kirby 

Baltimore, Maryland 
French 
Dorm Council, Vice Pres.; Phi Theta Kappa, 
SNEA; Point News, staff; Choir. 



James duVal Haden 

Clements, Maryland 
Business 



James Robert Hutchinson 

Upper Marlboro, Maryland 

English 

Point News, staff; Scorpion, Dorm Council, 

Student Senate, Parliamentarian, Basketball 



Edward Norris LeFaivre 

Alexandria, Virginia 

Physical Education 
Cross Country, Tennis, Basketball, Dorm 
Council; Campus Council; Athletic Director, 
Men's Athletic Association, Vice Pres. 



Alexis Lee Hankins 

Izmir, Turkey 

Business 

Social Comm.; Point News, Editor. Artist 

Lee. Series Comm.; Basketball; Volleyball 

Intramurals. 



Maxine Toanne Iglehart 

Ellicott City, Maryland 
Secretarial 
Newman Club; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 



Ronald L. Leonard 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Business 
Cross Country; Intramurals, Football 
Basketball. 



Karen Aliee Hansen 

Somerset, New Jersey 
Home Economics 
Home Ec. Club; Volleyball Intramurals. 



Luey Anne Jaekson 

Winter Park, Florida 
Home Economics 
Home Economics Club. 



Patrieia Ruth J ,ip|» 

Lanham, Maryland 
English 
Scorpion; Castellan, staff; Choir; Phi Theta 
Kappa, Women's Athletic Association. 



Miehele Louise Hecker 

Hillcrest Heights, Maryland 
Art 
Point News, staff. 



Janet Lee Jones 

Salisbury, Maryland 
Home Economics 
FHA; Intramurals, Volleyball; Student 
Union Board; Social Comm. 



Linda Lou Loek 

Seat Pleasant, Maryland 
Science 
Orien. Comm.; Women's Dorm Council, 
Tres.; Hockey. 



Leslie Alice Heiderman 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Elementary Education 
Student National Ed. Association; Sec.. 
Point News, News ed. 



Fereydoon Kasrai 



Iran 
Engineering 
International Club. 



Jeanne Mae Long 

Westminster, Maryland 
Education 

SNEA; Point News, staff. Choir. 



Charles Louis Hester 

Cambridge, Maryland 
Business 
Men's Athletic Association, Tres.; Intra- 
murals. 



Robert Edward Kelley 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Biology 
Phi Theta Kappa; Castellan, ass't Editor. 



Bonnie Lynn Manners 

Randallstown, Maryland 
Secretarial 
Sophomore Class, Sec; Phi Theta Kappa, 
Trea.; Scorpion; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, Exec. Board; Cheerleader, Capt. 



Kathleen Moore Heron 

Kinnelon, New Jersey 

Physical Education 

Hockey, Basketball; Tennis, Women's 

Athletic Association, Vice Pres.; Orien. 

Comm.. Basketball, Volleyball Intramurals. 



Edward Harry Kennedy Anthony Conrad Marchetti 



Patuxent River, Maryland 
History 

Phi Theta Kappa. 



Camp Springs, Man land 
Liberal Arts 



91 



Barbara Ann Masohi 

Marlow Heights, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 
Newman Club; Saxnadra; Castellan. 



Patricia Elizabeth INoell 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Psychology 
Samadra; Folk Club, Choir. Honor Council, 
Phi Theta Kappa. Newman Club. 



Donald Wayne Purdy 

St Inigoes, Maryland 

Physical Education 

Cross Country; Track, Intramurals. Men's 

Athletic Association, Sec; Fresh. Class, 

Vice-Pies. 



John Miles Massie 

Joppa, Maryland 
Theatre Arts 
Dorm Council; Samadra; Student Govt., 
Pres. 



Gilbert St. John Masters 

Port Republic, Maryland 
Art Education 
Student Union Board; Artist Lecture Comm.; 
Intramurals. 



Richard Nelson Norris 

Scotland, Maryland 
Physical Education 
Basketball, Co-captain 



Ann Jewell Northam 

Snow Hill, Maryland 
Speech and Drama 
Samadra, SNEA, Pres.. Point Sews, staff; 
Choir. 



Michael Anthony Raley 

Leonardtown, Maryland 

Business 

Newman Club; Folk Club, Commuters Club. 



Charles C. Reichert 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Chemistry 
SNEA 






Stephanie Shawe Mathena 

California, Maryland 
Elementary Education 
Basketball; Choir; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion. 



Fannabelle G. Offutt 

Arlington, Virginia 
Home Economics 
Home Ec. Club; Volleyball Intramurals. 



Susan Elizabeth Roth 

Salisbury, Maryland 
Marine Biology 
Social Committee; Point Sews, staff; Intra 
murals, volleyball, basketball. 



Peter T. McGuckian 

Silver Springs, Maryland 
Elementary Education 
Samadra, Pres.; Intermurals; Dorm Council. 



Peggy Ann O'Neil 

Pasadena, Maryland 

English 

Folk Club; Women's Dorm Council, Pres.; 

Scorpion, Editor; Newman Club; Student 

Senate, Orien. Comm. 



Judy Wyllie Rusling 

Eastport, Maryland 
Sociology 
Choir; Prom Comm., Scorpion 



Claudette Ann McLaughlin 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Biology 
Castellan, Editor; Orien. Comm 



SNEA. 



Jean Hurst Page 

Hollywood, California 
Elementary Education 



Richard Wayne Russell 

East Riverdale, Maryland 
Biology 
Men's Dorm Council, Social Comm.; Intra- 
murals. 



Bartley V. Mettam 

Ridge, Maryland 
Business 
Commuters Club; Student Senate. 



Laurel Charlotte Pauli 

Annapolis, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 
Intramural?; Newman Club. 



William Everett Russell 

Woodbine, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 
Samadra. Castellan, staff. 



Dale H. Mill. urn 

St. Mary's City, Maryland 
Biology 



Nancy Ann Philipp 

Baltimore, Maryland 
French 
Choir, Point Sews, staff, Women's Athletic- 
Association, Sec. 



Lorraine Elizabeth Sinnott 

Solomons, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 
Phi Theta Kappa, Newman Club. 



William Harold Mitchell 

District Heights, Maryland 
Samadra; Liberal Arts 



Edwin Owings Pickering 

Rock Hall, Maryland 
Physical Education 
Student Senate, Men's Athletic Association, 
Pres.; Basketball, Co-captain. 



Carole Clay Shewbridge 

Riderwood, Maryland 
Elementary Education 



Christine Lamont Moore 

Chestertown, Maryland 
Sociology 
Phi Theta Kappa. 



Mary Suzanne Poe 

St. George Island, Maryland 
Secretarial 



Sharon Stumpf 

Baltimore, Maryland 
English 
Folk Club, Sec.-Tres.; Choir; Scorpion, Point 
Sews, staff; Castellan, Copy Editor; Samadra. 






92 



Diane Thomas 

Simpsonville, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 
Hockey; Intramurals; Phi Theta Kappa. 



Robert Nixon Turner 



Bel Air, Maryland 
Business 



Samadra. 



Roland Hammond Williams 

Salisbury , Mar} lam I 
Government 
Men's Dorm Council, Treas., Social Comm., 
Chairman 



Lillian Joanne Thompson 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Elementary Education 
SNEA; Commuters Club 



Mary Kathyleen Underwood 

Severna Park, Maryland 
Home Economics Education 
FHA; Dorm Council. Women's Athletic 
Association. 



Peter Ayers Wimbrow III 



Berlin, Maryland 
Dorm Council, Intramurals 



Margarethe Dorothy Thorp 

Annapolis, Maryland 

Secretarial 

Women's Athletic Association, Tres.; Orien. 

Comm., Intramurals, Student Union Board. 



Patrieia Gertrude Urban 

Mt. Air>, Maryland 
Art 
Newman Club; Dorm Council, Social 
Comm., Prom Comm. 



Janiee Franeine Winkler 

I, ..Plata, Maryland 
Secretarial 
Castellan, Freshman Class, Treas.; Prom 
Courtv Newman Club, Sec. 



Annette Beatrice Throop 

Forest Heights, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 



Malcolm Richard VanKirk 

Beltsville, Maryland 

Physical Education 
Phi Theta Kappa, Samadra, Point Sews; Bas- 
ketball, Intramurals, Men's Dorm Council, 
Orien. Comm., Social Comm., Cross Country. 



John Gibbons Wood 

St. Mary's City, Maryland 
Business 
Commuters Club, Yice-Pres. 



Teresa Ann Tippett 

Mechanicsville, Maryland 
Elementary Education 
SNEA, Vice-Pres., Commuters Club. 



Catherine Elizabeth Warner 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Liberal Arts 
Point Seas, staff, Newman Club. 



Matilda Heighe Woodward 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 

Samadra, Freshman Class, Sec, Sophomore 

Class, Treas., Student Union Board, Phi 

Theta Kappa, May Court. 



Karen Lynn Townshend 

Mitchellville. Maryland 
Sociology 
Artist Lecture Series Comm., Basketball, 
Manager; Intramurals. 



Theresa V. Wilke 

Parkton, Maryland 
Education 
Basketball, Folk Club, Intramurals, Women's 
Athletic Association. 



Constantine E. Zervos 

Hartford 6, Connecticut 
Education 
Castellan, Business Manager. 



Roberta Ann Willing 

Shardtown, Maryland 
Business 
Choir; Phi Theta Kappa; Castellan. 



93 



TIZEN! 

ANK 



Where we kept our cars m gas 



■ 




Where 
fairs 




|XA< 





W here we cashed our checks . 



94 



Where we did our shopping 



WESTERI 



ASXOCUTl 
STOtI 



m 



f 



itoSM 



^ y~ . '^ -t-c 






T — "T — T~ X ' 

1 — J r- ■•*•"■% — ' - 







\\ here we gathered for nourishment . 



A 
D 

V 

E 

R 

T 

I 

S 

E 

M 

E 

N 

T 

S 



95 



PATRONS 



Mr. .mil Mrs. |olin E. Adkins 
Mi. and Mis Russell Beckwith 
Mr .uiil Mrs Charles Benyman 
Mi and Mis. Gottfried Beyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Burton D. Bishop 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold K. Bloom 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Bounds 
Mr. .ind Mrs. Edward H. Brigham 
Mr. Otis L. Burnett, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Llovd E. Burroughs 
Mr. Llovd E. Carnright 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cioffi 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Clark 
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Craig 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene G. Cross 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph M. Crouse 
Mr. and Mrs. Phil H. DeLozier 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Dordal 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Eslin 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Foard 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl E. Frentz 
Mr. and Mrs. |. D. Gardner 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Hackley 
Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Heiderman, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse L. Hester 
Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Hett 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hoover, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Horn 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Howard 

Capt. and Mrs. L. L. Jackson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. fames H. [ames 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Kern 

Mrs. Margaret Kirbv 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Kratz 

Col. and Mrs. Edward LeFaivre 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshy C. Little 

Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Lock 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl P. Long 

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Lowrv 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Manners 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Mason 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth S. Massie 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. McCreadv 

Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose T. McGuckian 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh O. McKinnie, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garland McLaughlin 

Mr. and Mrs. John Merrvman, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Mettam 

Mrs. Margaret Milburn 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony T. Mocarskv 

Mr. and Mrs. Winifred H. Mulliken 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. D. 

Newnam, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Nial 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney O. Northam, |r. 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Palazzo 
Cdr. and Mrs. R. H. Pauli 
Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Pickering 
Lt. Col. and Mrs. Douglas G. 

Putnam 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Reichert 
Mr. and Mrs. Horace E. Reynolds 
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Russell, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd W. Scheible 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin B. 

Shewbridge 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy H. Stetler, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Tabakin 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie M. Thomas 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thorp 
Mr. and Mrs. V. M. Throop 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. Townshend 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Veditz 
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin E. S. Walter 
Dr. and Mrs. L. Edward Warner 
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn A. Watkins, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Weir 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Whitlock, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Willing 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Franklin Winkler 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wrightson 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Zeiler 



ST. MARYS 
ICE AND FUEL INC. 



Leonardtown, Maryland 



Phone: 475-5251 



96 





Deserting the dance floor momentarily, Les Thomas and 
Barbara Maschi take a needed break- 




LEONARDTOWN LAUNDRY 

DRY CLEANING — RUG CLEANING 
COMPLETE MODERN STORAGE 


Compliments of 

WESTERN AUTO 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-3011 


Telephone : Ru 6 £ Iea "jSB " " a ' S c ervic 5 
s- n * , _ .,„, rurs Cleaned a stored 
GReenwood 5-4171 Forraal Wear Rented 

TOWN CLEANERS 

OFFER QUALITY 

Dry Cleaning & Pressing — Laundry Service 

(Specializing In Shirts) 

Alterations T . ... 
Of Any Kind Leonardtown, Md. 


COIN -OPERATED 
WASHING MACHINES 

434 Great Mills Road 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 863-8736 


Compliments of 

BACON and PASSARELLI 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 


Compliments of 

J. T. Daugherty's 
ANCHOR VAN LINES 



97 



J/P^ Mr. 


Congratulates 


U J « 




\# 


the 


ED THOMPSON 


CLASS OF 67 


*76&Hfi4a*td 






Route 235 


FURNITURE CITY "°°°- 


DYSON'S GULF SERVICE 




3 


1 


Great Mills, Maryland 


-^frW 


" * [ 


i 


TIRES — TUBES — GENERAL REPAIRS 


• T m 11 




GAS OIL — LUBRICATION 


— U**} «2a. , »- P_^ 




994-1224 


■^^^^^■•n 






Meeting a new day, students head once again for morning 
classes. 




Compliments of 


FOODLINER-IGA 


FRANK A. COMBS 
INSURANCE AGENCY 


Phone: 475-5201 




MEATS — GROCERIES — FRUITS 


Leonardtown, Maryland 


VEGETABLES — FROZEN FOODS 


Phone: 475-9116 






Leonardtown, Maryland 



98 




Queen Anne Hall stands serene on a quiet Sunday afte 



Compliments 



of 



HEWITT 
LUMBER & SUPPLY CO. 



Compliments of 

THRIFT OIL COMPANY 

Phone: 475-9111 
Lconardtown, Maryland 



Compliments of 
Lancaster's 



"Maryland Beauty Lounge" 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-8100 



99 







Jt {iuub — a Inf 1 ■ 








^P^ 






t ^ruar-r 




PEPSI-COLA 




Taking time out from her manv activities, Miss Simms stops 
to visit the snack bar, operated by Johnnv Dolak. 






^■^ 




CATO'S 
TEXACO 








Lexington Park, Maryland 


TOWN AND CASUAL SHOP 


BLAIRS 




JEWELRY — SILVER — CHINA 


117 SHANGRI LA DRIVE 


STUDIO CARDS 


LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 






Lexington Park and Leonardtown 


Phone: 862-7201 


Phone: 862-1271 


Compliments of 




M. ADELE FRANCE 


Compliments 


Alumni Chapter 


of 




Meadow Gold Ice Cream 


St. Mary's College of Maryland 





1 00 



MERVELL M. DEAN, INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Commercial - Residential - Industrial - Institutional 

Route 1, Box 25, Hollywood, Maryland 

Phone; 373-2143 


Compliments of 

"THE SPINNING WHEEL" 
RESTAURANT 

Phone 863-3301 


THE ENTERPRISE 

Southern Maryland's Reading Weekly 
With over 7000 in Circulation 

In Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1011 


WHY PAY MORE FOR GASOLINE 
DRIVE INTO YOUR 

SAVON GAS STATION 

SAVE 10% 
Phone: 862-9933 



101 



She JFirstOXattanal iBank of St.JTlanj's 

Leonardtown — Lexington Park — Patuxent River 
Maryland 



Member Federal Reserve System 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



LINCOLN 



MERCURY 



Compliments of 

PATUXENT MOTORS 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1333 



COMET 



RAMBLER 



BELL MOTOR COMPANY 

CHEVROLET — BUICK — OLDSMOBILE 

Sales and Service 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-2351 



ELECTRONICS SERVICE CO. 

714 Great Mills Road 
Lexington Park, Maryland 

COMPLETE T.V. and APPLIANCE SERVICE 

Phones: 863-3291, 863-6341 



Compliments of 



YOUR COLLEGE BARBERS 



Jack and Ben 




Compliments of 

SPRINGER'S MEN'S SHOP 

Formal Wear Service 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-5622 



Checking for mail. Steve Mattingley and Bart Johnson dei 
strate a ilailv event in the life of the college student. 



102 




Dean's Lumber and Supply 
Company, Inc. 

GENERAL BUILDING MATERIALS 

HOLLYWOOD, MARYLAND 
Phone: 375-2111 



Maryland National Bank 

. . . does so much for so many people 
03 offices serving Metropolitan Baltimore 
The Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland 

Leonardtown and Mechanicsville 

Member oj Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MARYLAND 
TOBACCO GROWERS ASSN. 

FEED, SEED & FERTILIZER 
Phone: 475-9196 



Marking the entrance to the original campus, the ''Freedom "t 
Conscience" statue is a familiar landmark to all. 



TOWNE FLORIST 

Flowers For All Occasions 

James G. & Ruby Cheseldine, owners and operators 

475-4331 

Fenwick Street, Leonardtown, Maryland 

Opposite Old Firehouse 



103 



Compliments of 
The Pause That Refreshes 


Compliments of 

Leonardtown Fashion Center 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: GR. 5-9726 


Compliments of 

ALDRIDGE FORD, INC. 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
VO. 3-8111 

"Our Specialty is Good Business'' 


JOHN R. DRURY AND SON 

INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9114 


BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

J. Abell Loncmore 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-8412 


RDMA'S 

Italian American Restaurant 

CATERING - BANQUETS 

424 GREAT MILLS ROAD 

LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 

Phone: 863-8914 




A constant reminder of heritage, the State House reproduction 
also overlooks the pillars of campus progress. 



ESPERANZA 
RECREATION CENTER 

BOWLING — BILLIARDS 

NORTH OF LEXINGTON PARK 
ON 235 

PARK PHARMACY 

YOUR REXALL STORE 

"Through These Portals Pass the Prettiest Girts 
in the World" 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-6161 

Compliments oj 

BURCH OIL COMPANY, INC. 

GULF OIL PRODUCTS 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2131 

Compliments of 

NATIONAL 
MOBILE HOME SALES, INC. 

Three Notch Road 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 862-4721 



105 



Compliments of 

LEXINGTON PARK 
MOTOR HOTEL 

Lexington Park, Maryland 



Phone: 8621666 



PECK'S 

Steak — Sea Food — Pizza 

Route 235 

Opposite Evergreen Park 

Phone 862-8051 



Compliments of 
FRANK ENTREKIN- Studio 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone 863-4411 



SOUTHERN MARYLAND 
OIL COMPANY, INC. 

Texaco Products 
Heating Oils -Burner Service 24 hour 

LaPlata- Mechanicsville, Maryland 
Phones: 934-8101, 884-3161 



CENTER GARDENS 

Serving Southern Maryland with 

Furnished and Unfurnished 
Apartments 

Phone: 862-2722 




Sailboat races mark the coming of warmer weather and 
the development of sailing skills 



106 



Compliments 
to 

the Class of '67 



The Leonardtown Dairy 



Leonardtown, Maryland 



Compliments 
to 

CONNOR SHOE REPAIR 



LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 



Compliments of 



ATLANTIC VAN LINES 



Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1211 



Compliments of 

ARTT MARTT 

Route 235 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-5613 



FRANCIS POLY CLEAN COIN- 
OPERATED DRY CLEANERS 

436 Great Mills Road 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-7091 



Compliments 






of 






FOODLAND 






oily wood— Leonardtown 


Ro 


ad 


Phone: 475-4111 








Enjoying the late Kill sunshine, sop] 
acquainted at the W.A.A. picnic. 



rrs ami hvshint-n get 



107 



Lexington Park Cleaners 

For Prompt Pickup and Delivery Service 
COMPLETE LAUNDRY SERVICE 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 994-0200 



Compliments of 

PARK JEWELERS 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-3121 



J. A. CECIL 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Great Mills, Maryland 
Phone: 944-1133 




CARPETS 



FURNITURE 



BILL RALEY'S 

SALES CENTER, INC. 

Appliances — Television — Appliance Service 



Main Office & Warehouse 

Lexington Park, Md. 

VO. 3-8181 



Leonardtown, Md. 
GR. 5-9121 



Announcing once again the coming of spring, oyster boats 
dock annually at the campus pier. 



ST. MARY'S PHARMACY 

Your Rexall Store 
Leonardtown, Maryland 



COMPLIMENTS DF 

ST. MARY'S CDLLEGE DF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


A Phone 863-8904 

,» PARK AMERICAN 

^^S^^ TIRES BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 
TUNE-UPS - BRAKES 
WHEEL BALANCING 
197 GREAT MaLS ROAD LI JENKINS 

LEXINGTON PARK, MD , 


THE ROOST 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 863-6161 


ADAM'S APPLIANCE SHOP 

Sales and Service 
APPLIANCE — TELEVISION 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2253 




(■■•^^■■mI 




ihel&od 









109 



CITIZENS NATIONAL 

BANK OF 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND 



LEXINGTON PARK, MARYLAND 



Phone: 863-7061 



Compliments of 

BALTIMORE 
ALUMNI CHAPTER 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 



HOME EXTERMINATING 
COMPANY 

Complete Pest and Termite Control 

V. O. Woodward P. O. Box 183 

Manager Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 863-6233 




Viewed from across the river, the campus stands in quiet beauty. 



110 



MATTINGLY 
FUNERAL HOME 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 
MONUMENTS 

LEONARDTOWN, MARYLAND 
Phone: 475-2061, 475-2071 




The Christmas Prom witnesses the crowning of queen Francine 
Winkler. 



"Flowers for Every Occasion" 

KENNY'S FLORIST 

Leonardtown and Lexington Park 
Maryland 

Phones: 475-2161, 863-7056 



Get Your Favorite Bread "Wonder' 
Always Fresh at Your Grocery 

"WONDER BREAD" 

Mechanics ville, Maryland 
Phone: 884-3251 




Looking back to the termination of the past academic year, sopho- 
mores anticipate their own graduation. 



Compliments of 

LEONARDTOWN FASHION 
CENTER 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9726 



in 



Queen Anne Hall . . . 
Markings Of The Future 



As the* dawning <>! warmer days heralds 
the close of another academic year, thoughts 
turn once again to the future of the college 
and its students. St. Marx's, though rooted 
in the past, looks constantly to that which 
is to come. With each year comes a new 
group of individuals with fresh ideas and 
unique outlooks, bringing an ever-present 
aura of transition to their campus. It is with 
these representatives of change that the des- 
tinv of the college lies. She must of neces- 



sity meet the shifting presence ot each year, 
yet remain secure in her belie! in the ulti- 
mate goal of higher education. She must 
grow, vet in growing lose not the ideals in 
which she lias trusted since the conception 
of the institution itself. In short, it is only 
through a sincere belief in the wisdom and 
integrity of her student citizens, and a firm 
faith in herself, that St. Mary's will emerge 
as the college that she was meant to be and 
has always been. 




^--w2 



Serving as a guideline to the future, Queen Anne Hall construction marked the beginning of a new era of progress. 



112 



*