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Full text of "Castellan [yearbook] 1968"

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Castellan '68 



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St. Mary's College of Maryland 
St. Mary's City, Maryland 
VOL. XXI 






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To every thing 



there is a season 




Contents 



Introduction 2 

Sophomores 6 

Freshmen 20 

Academics 40 

Activities 62 

Advertisement 110 



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. . . and a 

time 

to 

every purpose 

under 

the heaven: 




"To everything there is a season ..." and to St. Mary's College 
of Maryland this is no exception. She has seen and faced many sea- 
sons throughout her 129 years of existence. St. Mary's has watched 
her seasons change. She now again experiences a tinne to grow 
... a time to transcend ... a time to emerge into the season of a 
four year college. 

St. Mary's College of Maryland is located on the shores of the St. 
Mary's River in Southern Maryland, and her campus is surrounded on 
three sides by bodies of water which contribute to her atmosphere 
and beauty. Her existence began in 1839 as a commemoration to the 
site of Leonard Calvert's landing, and as a living monument to St. 
Mary's City which was the first capital of Maryland from 1634 until 
1694 when it was moved to Annapolis. Here under the patronage of 
Lord Baltimore, freedom of worship was first brought to America. To 
commemorate this event there stands at the entrance to the college 
and the restored State House, a large Freedom of Conscience Monu- 
ment which was erected by the counties of Maryland. 

Adjoining the campus is a replica of Maryland's First State House. 
The First State House was built in 1676, and was the first erected in 
America. In 1939, on the Tercentenary Anniversary of the settle- 
ment's founding, the present building was dedicated. 

The campus of St. Mary's is small, but ever growing. The campus, 
once all of I I acres, now consists of an acreage of 265, much of it 
being on St. Mary's River. 

In the early days of St. Mary's, she was known as St. Mary's Female 
Seminary. Her enrollment was less than 10 students, the youngest of 
which was five years old. In 1931, under the same name, St. Mary's 
became a fully accredited, first class high school. In 1929, the Junior 
College Department was started with one student. By 1940, St. Mary's 
was accredited with Maryland State Department of Education as a 
four-year junior college, the last two years of high school and the 
first two years of college. In 1949, the Legislation changed the name 
of St. Mary's Female Seminary to St. Mary's Junior College. This 
change was due to the fact that the college had turned coeducational. 
In 1958, the discontinuance of the high school was announced and the 
last high school graduation was in I960. In the spring of 1964, St. 
Mary's Junior College was changed again to St. Mary's College of 
Maryland by the Maryland General Assembly. The enrollment for 
the 1967-68 school year was an anticipated 500 students. 

Another change brought about by time are the college buildings 
located on campus. Ten buildings are now being used with construc- 
tion to begin on eight more in the near future. These eight are to be a 
new gymnasium, library, health center, two men's residence halls, one 
women's resident hall, and a fine arts center seating 1,000 persons. 
Recently constructed and now In use, are a student union building 
complete with dining hall, lounging area, and snack bar, and a 
women's resident hall housing 150 students. 

Because of the college's location on the water, last summer St. 
Mary's took another step in expansion upon a new academic venture 
— a summer institute in marine biology. 

St. Mary's College is on the move. She is preparing for many, many 
changes. The most recent change in St. Mary's historical period is 
transition — the junior college has become a four-year Institution of 
higher learning. St. Mary's is now four years! Time has taken her from 
a small school of less than 10 students to a four-year college, from one 
building to 18, from 1 I acres to 265 acres of spacious land. 

Time is a measured period during which an action, process, or con- 
dition exists or continues. St. Mary's College of Maryland has existed 
for 129 years and she continues to grow in land, buildings, faculty, 
students, prosperity and knowledge. 




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A time 
to be born, 
and a 
time to 
die; 
a time to 
plant, and 
a time to 
pluck up 
that which 
is planted; 



Sophomores 



Calvert Hall, now men's dornnitory, is 
the oldest campus structure and re- 
production of the 19th century origi- 
nal which burned in 1924. It served for 
many years as the only campus build- 
ihg. 







LUCINDA BECK ABRAMS 


ANNE KATHERINE BAKER 


SONIA PAMELA BENTZ 


Park Hall. Maryland 


Easton, Maryland 


Centreville, Maryland 


Art 


Psychology 


Home Economics 





LINDA CAROL BLOOM 

Rockville, Maryland 

Education 




AILEEN KAY BONIFACE 

Washington, D.C. 

Liberal Arts 






ELLEN MAY BOSTON 
Woolford. Maryland 
Elementary Education 



JULIA KATHERINE BOUNDS 

Salisbury, Maryland 

Art 



MARGARET ANN BRADBURN 
Washington, D.C. 
Secretarial Science 






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DONNA E. BRIGHAM 
Cambridge. Maryland 
Elementary Education 






SARABETH BUCKLER 

Prince Frederick, Maryland 

Science 



ELIZABETH BURK 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

Art 




V 








MARYJANE CANCRO 

Mount Vernon, New York 

Sociology 



PATRICIA E. CLARK 

Pasadena, Maryland 

Art 







PATRICIA COATES 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 



THOMAS MICHAEL COLEMAN 
Fredealsburg, Maryland 
Business Administration 



EVELYN CORPUS 
Norfolk, Virginia 
Home Economics 






SHARON L. COUCH 

Abingdon, Maryland 

Liberal Ar+s 





MARGARETTA FOURNIER 

New Castle, Delaware 

Liberal Arts 



ROBERT H. FLEMING 

Laurel, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 




BARBARA CRAIG 

Prince Fredericit, Maryland 

Secretarial Science 






MARCIA ANN GLORIUS 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 



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JAMES EVANS FLETCHER 
Leonardtown, Maryland 
Business Administration 




HARRY RONALD EDWARDS 

Patuxent River, Maryland 

Business Administration 



WALTER DAILEY GRAHAM. Ill 

Washington, D.C. 

Liberal Arts 



10 





CARL PARRAN GUY 

Leonardtown, Maryland 

Business Education 





MARY ELIZABETH HOKE 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Elementary Education 



MARY ANN HEARTHWAY 

Snow Hill, Maryland 

Nursing 





KATHRYN E. HOOVER 

Landover, Maryland 

Business 




LOIS ANNE HEASTY 

Oxon Hill, Maryland 

Physical Education 



RITA CLAIR HURRY 
Clements, Maryland 
Secretarial Science 




EARL LANTZHYDE, III 

New Windsor, Maryland 

Science 




AMY SUSAN JACOBSON 

Washington, D.C. 

Elementary Education 



II 





SUSAN M.JAMES 

Annapolis, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 



DEBORAH LOUISE JOYNER 

Catonsville, Maryland 

Business 








TERR! KURRLE 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Home Economics 



CAROL ANNE KURTZ 

Allentown, New Jersey 

Secretarial Science 



ALICE ELIZABETH LANCASTER 
California, Maryland 
Elementary Education 






ELIZABETH PRATT LANGE 

Ridge, Maryland 

Elementary Education 



HARRY LATTEMAN 

Washington, New Jersey 

History 



RONALD LEONARD 
Leonardtown, Maryland 
Business Administration 



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JANE KEITHLEY LINTON 
Grayton, Maryland 
Physical Education 





JEANNE ELIZABETH LOWRY 

Etchison, Maryland 

Art 



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CAROL MANCINI 
Syosset, New York 
Home Economics 





GARY MASENIOR 

Washington, New Jersey 

Social Science 





STEPHEN MATTINGLY 

Chaptico, Maryland 
Business Administration 




VIRGINIA McCREADY 
Glen Burnie, Maryland 
Elementary Education 




PATRICIA ANN McKINNIE 

Annapolis, Maryland 

Art 




ROBYN MEARA 

Baltimore. Maryland 

Biology 



13 






SUZANNE LOVE MERRYMAN 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 



JANET FRANCES MILLER 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Special Education 



LINDA MILLER 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Science 




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DONNA ANNE MORTIMER 

Severna Park, Maryland 

Sociology 



DEBORAH NEWNAM 

Easton, Maryland 

Music 







SANDRA NETHERTON 
Parle Hall, Maryland 
Secretarial Science 



SYLVIA DIANE PALAZZO 

Lanham, Maryland 

Language 



LESLIE deGROVE POTTER III 
St. Michael's, Maryland 
Business Administration 



14 







DONALD PURDY 


ANNE REILLY 


ELIZABETH REYNOLDS 


St. Inlgoes, Maryland 


Baltimore, Maryland 


Oxford, Pennsylvania 


Physical Education 


Theatre Arts 


Secretarial Science 







JACQUELINE I. RIPPLE 

Millersville, Maryland 

Biology 



SHARON LYNN SHELTON 

La Plata, Maryland 

Journalism 








CAROL SHEWBRIDGE 


ALICE CALLIM SPEICHER 


JANE STETLER 


RIderwood, Maryland 


Annapolis, Maryland 


Cheverly, Maryland 


Education 


Home Economics 


Home Economics 



15 




RUTH STETLER 

Cheverly, Maryland 

Home Economics 





MARTHA JANE TAYMAN 

Fulton, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 





JOANNE MARIE TAYLOR 

Ridge, Maryland 

Business Administration 




PHYLLIS ELAINE STRICKLAND 

Millersville, Maryland 

Psychology 





SHARON ANN VARGAS 

Forrestville, Maryland 





BONITA TABAKIN 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

Art 




NANCY ANN TAYLOR 

Hyattsville, Maryland 

Physical Education 




BRIAN THOMAS VEDITZ 

Salisbury, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 





ELLEN WALTERS 

Galena, Maryland 

Liberal Arts 




BONNIE LOU WINDHOM 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

Elementary Education 





DIANNE WILDER 

St. Mary's City, Maryland 

Teacher Education 



VIRGINIA WARFEL 

Lewistown, Pennsylvania 

Liberal Arts 





SANDRA WATT 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Elementary Education 





DEBORAH ELDRIDGE WINDSOR 

Severna Park, Maryland 

Elementary Education 




LUCY SIMS WILSON 

Paris, Kentucky 

Liberal Arts 




EARL BLAINE WINDSOR 
Federalsburg, Maryland 
Business Administration 



17 





BARBARA JEAN YOUNG 

Pocomoke City, Maryland 

Secretarial 



Ifii 



The Student Union Building at night, 
like a Japanese Lantern, radiates a 
cheerful glow. Housed within its glass 
walls are the dining hall, snack bar, 
lounge, bookstore, post office, and Stu- 
dent Senate room. 



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A time 



to kill, 
and a time 
to heal, 



a time 



to break 
down, 
and a 



time to 



build up. 



Freshmen 



21 





Sandra Barflett 



Reid Bingham 



Eileen Borleis 



Donna Bailey 



Fred Bennett 



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Diane Bolger 




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Mary Lee Bowen 




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William Baker 






Louis Benson 



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Nicholas Boszko 




Brady Bounds 




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Paul Aldridge Terri Anderson William Anthony 




Michael Baranski 



Susan Barlow 




The "mixer" in the girls' dorm during orientatic 



We are the 




Photographer, Reld Bingham, views Ellen Boston through 
wrong end of his camera. 



22 



Virginia Briner 




Janet Brown 



mn year 




Sandra Brown 



Joyce Bushell 




Carol Camp 



SheH leads tfie group in song. 







Sharon Chesley 



^^ 



Susan Brooker 



Ann Brown 




Kathleen Cabezas 



Carol Caddie 




Nancie Carr 



Teresa Carrol 






Elaine Clark 



Carolyn Clarke 



23 




Michael Cosgrove 



Karen Coyner 



George Curtin 



Glenn Daugherty 





Donald Davenport 




Karen Deblnski 




Michael DeBow 


John Dohei ry 


Linda Duncan 


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Robert Dyson 


Joseph Ebbenhouse 


Ralph Ebbenhouse 



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Tricksters of S.M.C. ready to call on President Russell 



the first out 
of four years . . ! 



the second hand of a new 



24 



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John Ebner 



Nancy Echert 




James Fedders 




Jeannine Finnacom 



Barbara Shuman's mind will be as worn at the end of study as 
her shoes at the end of the year. 




Mike Ellis 




Gayle Fisher 





Gwyn Ganzert 




Glenn Gass 



era , . . the setter of time . . 



Sharon Faraday 




Thomas Flanagan 




Joan Freeny 



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Carolyn Gardiner 



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Elaine Farlow 




William Fluharty 

\ 

Rolland Frazier 




Charlotte Gardner 






David Geiger 



Clintcn George 



25 




Michael Gilmcre 



Lois Henderson 



fJlNWUMUUWI 



Allen Hicks 




Dale Godfrey 



Wayne Gordon 



Anne Grantham 





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Rodney Hall 



Lora Harbert 






Richard Hester 





Susan Guyther 




Leigh Hartlove 




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Robert Holland 



and 

r • ^ 
jancier 

We are the fun year 



Janet Brown is caught studying in the second floor smoker. 




26 



Paul Hoey 



Ann Hood 



Wendy Hopkins 



Sandra Houts 



Joyce Hudson 






Sue Hurry 





Malan Johnson 



Carol Jones 



Judith Kai 



Bill Fluhar+y, Center for St. Mary's, never goes anywhere without his baslcetball 

ireams . . . 



ind the begun year . . . 



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Frederic Hyman Donna Johnson Gover Johnson 




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Ernest Johnson 



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Wendy Ketcham 



Sue King 




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John Kordish Psggy Kosack 




Eileen Kovich Lynet+e LaCavera 





Howard Lallande Giovanna Lathran 



Linda Legg 



Diane LeGoullon Denise Lessard 



27 



HKi 





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Gary Lewis 



Mike Lewis 



Donald Logue 



Norman Long 








Judy Longest 



Jay Lowery Leon Lukas 



Charles Massey 



Muster for regulations. 



Joseph McCaddin 






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Catherine McSowan Margaret McMahon Williann Miesowitz 



Mardell Moffitt 





Diana Moore 



Thomas Moore Cynthia Mora 



Robert Long 




Joyce Maus 




Pat McGovern 



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Rita Molyneaux 






Elizabeth Morgan 



Joseph Muse 



28 




Maureen Muth 



Pamela Nides 



Glen Palmer 



Thomas Paul 



Counselo Reed 




Barbara Myers 



Mary Nengel 



Craig Nesbitt 



Charles Newkirk 



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Kathleen O'Brien Teresa O'Shea 



Patricia Othmer 



Lynn Owens 




the corner stone 
of a reality . . . 



Peter Pappas 




Jay Pegg 






Glen Plutschak 




t 




Sharyn Pope 



John Popp 




fi|iA 



Robert Reilley 



Lynne Rhatigan 



Raymond Riggin Carolyn Robinson 



29 




Gayle'Schaefer 



Barbara Schunnan 



Steve Shaklee 




In ffie Confines of her room. Sandra Bartlett expresses her 
artis+ic genius. 




Rosalind Snelllngs 



William Snyder 



Sharon Spedden 



Constance Splcer 



and friend-earners . . . 



30 




Darlene Sprinkle 




Cleone Stack 




Ail-4r 



Winifred Stil 




Louis Stone 




Samuel Teel 



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Janice Thomas 



Linda Tincher Christopher Tomaszewski Mary Tucker 




Barbara Ward 



the 

shy and brash 
knowledge — 
seekers 





Fred White 




Nancy Stone 



1^ 

Robert Thompson 



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Judith Warner Richard Watts Marilyn Weseloh 




Clifton Williams Christine Wise 






Richard Wolford 




Barbara Zaizer 



We are the Freshmen, 



31 



Terri Anderson 



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Bob BurnsEde 




/ wish I could 

remember that 

first day . . . 
So unrecorded 

did it slip 

away . . . 
If only I could 

recollect it, such 
A day of days! 

I let it come and g 



Mardell MofiM 



32 




Leigh Har*love 



Rich Wolford 




Ginny Briner 



is traceless as a thaw of bygone snow; 

Christina Rossetti 



Freshmen and parents on first day at S.M.C. . . . after President Russell's welcome. 

M mm--- 





Nancy Stone registers for room. 




. . . there will 

be time 
To prepare 

a face 

to meet 

the faces 

that 

you meet; 



Members of Women's Orientation Committee await arrival of freshman women. 



34 



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Meeting gets under way. 



Cathy Cook, Karen Coyner, Joan Freeny, Judi Kai, Carol Jones await 
meeting in recroom. 




Open House in Queen Anne Hall. 





Les Potter. Sue James, and Barbara Craig. 



35 




and time . . . for a 
hundred visions 
and revisions, 

Before the taking 
of a toast 
and tea. 



Jim Smith 




Preparing for signing of Honor Pledge . . . Barbara Craig, 
Tom Coleman, Anne Baker. 



Susan Barlow 



36 



Kathy Cabezas signs Honor Pledge. 




Mary Tucker. Bill Baker, Laurie Gushing, and Brian Broadwater enter capping ceremonies. 




At times, indeed, almost 

ridiculous — 
Almost, at times, the Fool 



T. S. Eliot 





Anne Baker. Steve Harris. Barbara Craig, Tom Lloyd. Anne Reilly, Tom Coleman, Sue James, Harry 
Latfeman, MaryJane Cancro, Les Potter, and Alleen Boniface. 



Rat Dance 



Skip Smifh and Nan- 
cy Echert at talent 
night. 



37 




Sue Hurry registers for Miss Magaw's freshman English course. 



Registration has its quiet moments of which some take advantage 
. . . Mr. Fahl and Mr. Henley. 




38 



Silence 
. . broken 
by 
song 





Sue Broolter 



Mac; Jerry Fisher; Colorado. 



39 





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A 



time to rend, 
and a time 



to sew; 



a time 



to keep 
silence 



and a 



time 



to speak; 



Academics 



41 




Debby Joyner and Jerry Fisher capture Ray Burrough's head in plaster. 




Mrs. Strickland guides a class in design. 



Department 

of 
Art 



The Art Department's palette ranges in spectrum 
from Advanced Drawing and Painting to Art His- 
tory; from the research to the applied science of 
creativity. Individuals styles borrow from Pollaiulo, 
Pissarro, and Picasso, their works culminating in a 
McKinnie or an Upton. 

Mrs. Stricldand 
Mr. Rowe 



Ken Upton puts the finishing touches on his creation. 



42 



i 





Mr. Rowe and kingsiie soup bowl. 



Design class In session. 



43 



Dr. Walker grimaces over Business Law exams, 





Secretarial Praciice holds ScoHy Walters' atten- 
tion. 



Department of 
Business 



The Department of Business, under the direction 
of Dr. Walker and Miss Spring, is equipped with 
manual and electric typewriters and other up-to-date 
business machines. The courses are designed to equip 
the students with a practical knowledge of the needed 
business skills. 

Dr. Wallcer 
Miss Spring 



■ T 





Miss Spring 



The long gray line . . . typing class. 



44 



Department of English 




Mr, Shaw makes good use of his spare time. 






The English Department Includes English com- 
position for freshmen and British, American, and 
World literature for sophomores. An Honors 
English course, under the direction of Mr. Hen- 
ley, is also offered to those freshman students 
showing a high aptitude In English. 

Miss Perkins 
Miss Magaw 
Miss Hubbard 
Mr. Henley 
Mr. Shaw 




Mr. Henley contemplates the ideas expressed in his Honors 
English class. 



Miss Perkins returns as chairman of the 
English Department. 



45 



New Gymnasium Expands 
Physical Well Being 




"Fore!" 




The move to the new gym, 
complete with swimming pool, 
will prove to be the highlight 
of next year. New courses from 
beginning swimming to scuba 
diving will be offered. 

Mr. Lewder 
Mrs. Clevenger 
Mr. Snyder 
Mrs. Paradis 



Mrs. Paradis points out sail. 



Mr. Louder talces time out to pose. 



Elise Davis shows true tennis form. 




46 



Cooking Up A 
Four-Year College 



The home economics courses provide a ground- 
work for students in furthering their professional and 
avocational needs. The course includes foods, cloth- 
ing, and nutrition. 

Mrs. Levay 




Susan Barlow sits on pins and needles. 




Activity in the kitchen. 



HELP! 



47 



Department of Math 



Mr. Nourl and Mrs. Long instruct classes in Col- 
lege Algebra to provide a general knowledge and 
foundation in mathematics. For those continuing In 
math, Calculus and Analysis are also offered. 

Mr. Nouri 
Mrs. Long 




Mr, Nouri.. . 



Mr. Nouri talks with Dr. Preston C. Hammer, Director of 
Computer Science Planning Department at Penn. State. 



Miss Long conducts a Math 102 das: 



48 



Department of Language 




Mr. Hoagland Is Intent upon his Spanish. 



Mr. Bulter conducts a French lab. 



With the addition of German to our language de- 
partment, St. Mary's has expanded to meet the 
needs of a four-year college. Students are offered 
elementary German, and intermediate and elemen- 
tary Spanish and French, along with a survey of 
French literature. Stress is placed on writing and 
speaking proficiency with the aid of weekly lab 
sessions. 




Milte Lewis pays strictest attention to his language tapes. 



«- ". 




49 



In the 
Beginning 
was 

rhythm . . . 
and the 
beat goes on 




Serious concentration under the direction of Mr. Greeson. 



The general background in the music fine arts are 
offered in courses such as Music appreciation and 
Fundamentals of Music. Students interested in fur- 
ther study may take choir, private piano and voice 
lessons and a course in music theory. 

Mr. Sreeson 
Mrs. Greeson 



Mrs. Greeson points out problem area to Debbie Shelter. 




50 



Curtain Rises on New 
Four Year Scene 



Mr. Fraze 



The second year of Mr. Lonnie Fraze's guidance of the combined 
Theatre Arts and Speech Department proved very active. Samadra, 
the drama club, graced the stage in St. Mary's Hall with two lively 
productions, "The Way of the World," and "Mary Mary." Plans are 
developing for an Advanced Speech course in addition to the Basic 
Speech and acting courses offered. General fine arts courses in 
theatre include Theatre Appreciation and History of the Theatre. 

Mr. Fraze 
Mr. Hayman 
Mrs. Fahl 




Another brilliant performance. 



51 



Marine Biology Expands Lab to 
St. Mary's River 



The Science Department offers a wide range of 
courses. Chemistry and physics are taught. The loca- 
tion of the college is especially conducive to the 
study of marine and environmental biology. Kent 
Hall, the present gym, will eventually house" the 
marine biology laboratory. 

Mr. Fahl 
Dr. Hartman 
Dr. Goldsmith 
Miss Pembroke 
Dr. Huck 




Dr. Hucic supervises biology laboratory. 



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Students identify dissections. 
11 





Bonnie Tabakin artistically interprets her 
view through the microscope. 



Jaclcie Ripple and Mari- 
lyn Weseloh discuss ob- 
servations. 




Alice Speicher prepares 

slide for viewing. 



52 




Mr. Fahl 




I' 



Dr. Hartman 





Dr. Goldsml+h 



Linda Miller consults manual before o-o-^rq 
up lab. 




Evelyn Corpus at work in micro lab. 



53 




Social 

Invades a 

Mind 





Mr, Chovanes strikes a typical Chovanistic pose. 



-^ 




Mr. Smith 




Mrs. Donhiser grimaces at term papers. 



54 



"science 
Complacent 



A knowledge of man, his environment, and his his- 
tory Is necessary for a better understanding of con- 
temporary world developments. The hfistory De- 
partment, under the chairmanship of Dr. Griffen 
presents the past and relates ideas to the present. 
The Psychology and Sociology Department will be 
expanded to include a secondary education course. 

Dr. Griffen 
Mrs. Donhiser 
Mr. Chovanes 
Mr. Smith 
Miss Atkins 
Mr. Kenney 





Miss Atkins describes life in a medieval castle. 



Anne Reilly spends a moment in intense concentration. 



55 




President Russell 



Dr. May Russell received her A.B. degree from Western Maryland College and her 
M.A. degree from Teacher's College of Columbia University. Dr. Russell furthered her 
studies through graduate work at Johns fHopkins University, the University of Michigan 
and Harvard University. Miss Russell was conferred her LL.D degree by her Alma 
Mater, Western Maryland. 

For twenty years Dr. Russell has been Instrumental in St. Mary's progress and growth. 
Having begun with the vague concepts of a dream, Dr. Russell can be proud of the 
reality of a four year college. 



56 




Miss Simms 

Dean of Women 



Mr. Yancey 

Dean of Men 



Mr. Anderson 

Dean of Students 




Mr. Brookbank 

Business Ivianager 



Administration 







Mr. Thompson 

Director of Admissions 



Mr. Vukmer, Counselor 



57 




Dr. Patricic, czHeqe physician, and Miss Chance, college nurse. 



Health Department 



Flu shots, colds and broken noses are all part of the 
health department's normal day. Miss Chance, Miss 
O'Brien, and Dr. Patrick are called on at all tinnes to 
treat student ailments. The health department will 
also undergo a change as they move from the boy's 
dorm to the new health building. 




Bill Fluharty submits to flu examination. 



Ellen Boston undergoes a yearly ritual, the flu shot. 





St. Mary's present library located in Anne Arundel Ha 



Library 



Change marks the atmosphere of the campus in- 
cluding the library. The new location, next to the 
Student Union, will bring the burden of moving old 
books and adding to the supply to meet the needs 
of a four year school. 



New library now under construction should see its completion 
by the fall of '68. 







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59 




Calvert Hall Boys: Bfaine Windsor, Steve Harris, Tom Lloyde. Bill Burnett, Ray Burroughs. 
Dick Urban. Ken Upton. Harry Latteman, Randy Maddox. Tom Coleman. Lartz Hyde. Brian 
Veditz. 




Maureen Mufh 



Familiarity 




60 



Classroom building after dark. 



Mary Holte 



Mrs. Redmond 



Friendship and Tolerance Is 
Their Aim 




Mrs. Hindman pauses for a brief moment, iust long enough to have a picture 
talen, and then returns to her duties as housemother of Calvert Hall, men's dorm. 



In charge of the women of Queen Anne 
Hall is Mrs. Treadwell, housemother. 




Night skaters brealt the patterns of light reflected upon St, John's Pond by the lighted windows of Queen Anne Hall. 



61 












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to laugh, 
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% Activities 






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63 




Front Row: Elise Davis, Sharon Couch, Elizabeth Lange. vice president: Sandra Nether+on. Aileen 
Boniface, president. Second Row: Thomas Coleman, Steven Harris, Martha Tayman, secretary: Kenneth 
Upton, Jeanne Lowry, treasurer: Julia Bounds. Mrs. Greeson. advisor. 




Phi Theta Kappa 



Phi The+a Kappa is a national junior college fraternity to honor the 
students who achieve a high scholastic average. Its aims are to pro- 
mote scholastic achievements and citizenship. This year the main 
projects were the formation of a new scholastic society for the four- 
year students and a campaign to promote blood donations from the 
St. Mary's students and faculty. 



64 




Rich Wolford, Barbara Craig, chairman; Anne Baker. Ron Neri, Joe McCaddin. Debbie Sheffer, Steve 
Harris, Tom Coleman. 



Honor Council 



Since 1949, the Honor Council of St. Mary's has set standards for achievement 
within the academic scope by creating an environment of understanding and accepting 
personal ethics of a high caliber. 

The basic belief of the council is that the student is quite capable of accepting the 
responsibilty of maintaining standards in social as well as academic life. 

The Honor Council is comprised of four upperclassmen, one being elected chairman, 
plus three freshmen who are chosen later in the year after a close study of personalities 
and an interview. 



65 



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Seated: Miss Slmms, sponsor; Sue James, secretary: Tom Coleman, president; Anne Reitly, vice presi- 
dent; Harry Latteman, treasurer. Standing: Ann Hear+hway, Barbara Craig, Joe McCaddin, Bill 
Burnett, Les Potter, Ron Edwards, commuters* representative; Steve Harris, MaryJane Cancro, Ray 
Burroughs. 



Student Senate 



With St. Mary's changing from a junior to a senior college, the Student Senate is 
facing many new and challenging situations, it must try to react to these challenges in 
an effective yet mature manner. With this growth many of the aspects of student gov- 
ernment must be redefined. Perhaps the solution is merely time. 



66 




Barbara Craig, Anne Baker, Linda Legg, Jay Pegg, Bonnie Bond, chairman; Skip Smith, Sue Brooker, 
Les Pottes, Maggie Fournier, Denise Putnam, Dick Urban, Linda Bloom. 



Student Union Board 



The purpose of the Student Union Board is to plan and sponsor various types of 
activities for the student body's entertainment. For instance, this year they spon- 
sored a bazaar which was profitable and enjoyable. 

The Student Union Board is also in charge of any activity that' goes on in the 
Student Union including the "Itch" Board which students can use to air their 
grievances in a respectable way. 



67 




Front Row: Anne Rellly. Debbie Newman. Anne Baker. Ann Hearthway. Bonnie Bond. Jane Linton. 
Second Row: Janet Milter, Brian Vediti, Blaine Windsor, Bill Burnett, Les Potter. Randy Maddox. 
Elise Davis, Linda Bloom, Barbara Craig, Sue James. Third Row: Jeanne Lowry. Ron Neri. Ray 
Burroughs. Tom Coleman. Betsy Reynolds. Steve Harris, Ron Edwards, Harry Latteman. MaryJane 
Cancro. 



Orientation Committee 



Commit+ees — Plans — People — Freshmen — Sophomores — Receptions — 
Rat Week — Classes — this is orientation. With a little help from sopho- 
mores, -freshmen become acquainted with life on campus. Adjustment is a 
key work in life — by helping others it doesn't make it quite so hard. 



I 



68 




FRESHMAN OFFICERS; Debbie Sheffer. vice president; BIN Snyder, treasurer; Gayle 
Schaefer. secretary; Joe McCaddln. president: Radolph Rowe, commuters' representa- 
tive. 




SOPHOMORE OFFICERS: Bill Burnett. 
Harris, president; Anne Baiter, secretary. 



vice president: Donna Brlgham, treasurer; Steve 



Class Officers 



Offering your services — school spirit — taking the time — this is what a class officer 
must do. Each year elections create not only anticipation and excitement, but the high 
hopes of those running. Freshmen have fellow classmen running whom they've known 
since September and make their choice by working and living together. Sophomores 
have a year's experience behind them and know from a year's trial who is best qualified 
for office. Living up to the expectations of the voters and creating unity among their 
classmates are the main jobs of the newly elected officer. 



69 



•2 ^-'. m^ '. _W7 




Men's Dormitory 
Council 



First Row: Steve Harris, vice president; Brian Veditz, treasurer; Ken Upton, secretary; Ray 
Burroughs, Tonn Lloyd, Randy Maddox. Second Row: John Popp, Tom Coleman, Harry 
Latteman, Dlclc Urban, Ron Nerl, Don Anthony. Third Row: Howard Lallande, Skip Smith. 
Les Potter, Bill Fluharty, Bill Burnett, president; Lantz Hyde. 



Women's Dormitory 
Council 





Among Miss Simms' many duties is the sponsorship of women's dorm council. Here during a 
quiet moment tvliss Simms advises a freshman. Susan Barlow. 



Linda Bloom, treasurer; Elise Davis, vice president: MaryJane Cancro. president: Betsy 
Reynolds, Bonnie Bond, secretary: Barbara Zaiser. 



The Women's Dormitory Council and the Men's 
Dormitory Council are certainly two of the most in- 
fluential groups on campus. Their purpose is to main- 
tain order among, and proper conduct of, the stu- 
dents living in the dorms. 

The Dorm Councils are both legislative and execu- 
tive organizations. For serious offenses, concerning 
suspension or expulsion, the councils with their spon- 
sors, send a recommendation to the administration. 
Not only does the council meet weekly to select 
proper punishments for the offenders, but also to 
discuss and plan various social activities. 

The presidents of the dorm councils have an im- 
portant position with many responsibilities. As presi- 
dents of their dorms, they are automatically mem- 
bers of senate. 

The council's duty is to present to senate the opin- 
ions of the boarding students, and to coordinate the 
activities of the dorm with those of the entire 
campus. 



70 




Seated: Phyllis Strichland, Ginny McCready, treasurer; Sylvia Palazzo, secretary; Aileen Boniface, 
Margaret+a Fournier, president. Standing: Gwen Ganzert, Mardell Moffltf. Mr. Hoagland, advisor; 
Mr. Buker, Peggy Bradburn. Rich Wolford. Craig Nesbitf. 



International Club 



The International Club is a campus organization for all students interested in pro- 
moting cultural understanding of foreign countries. It sponsors activities typical of a 
foreign recreation and cultural instruction through enjoyable lectures and dinners. The 
club's second year at St. Mary's proved successful in sponsoring Italian and French 
dinners, French and Israeli lectures, and Germanic hayrldes. Informal discussions en- 
hanced regular meetings. The height of the year's activities culminated in portrayal of 
several countries at once in the International Fiesta. 





International Club Italian dinner. 



71 




Ginny Warfel. Lois Henderson, Debbie V/indsor, Sonia Bentz, Bll 
Susie Merryman, Jay Peg, Karen Coyner, Pam Nides. 



Fluharty, Linda Legg. Gary Sanner, 



Artist Lecture Series 



Through the Artist Lecture Series, guest performers presented enriching 
perfornnances on the campus grounds. This year we were fortunate in 
having both the Baltimore and Washington Symphony orchestra. The 
committee under the guidance of Miss Ethel Chance, greeted the differ- 
ent groups and helped during the concert. 



72 




Seated: Chris Wise, Sharon Shelton, Jane Stetler, Stbdent Rep. for Maryland Home Economics 
AssociaMon; Sandy Waft, Sonia Bentz, Vice President; Ruth Stetler. President; Evelyn Corpus, 
Carolyn Clarlc, Secretary; Terr! Kurle, Social Chairman. Standing: Susan Barlow, MaryJane Cancro. 
Susie Merryman. GInny Warfel, Debbie Windsor. Joan Freeny, Treasurer (absent.) 



Home Economics Club 



The Home Economics Chapter Is an organization for students who 
are interested in professional careers in home economics and in home- 
malting. Members are given the opportunity to demonstrate their capa- 
bilities through various activities sponsored by the chapter. This year 
the club participated in the Christmas bazaar by preparing a buffet 
for all to enjoy. It has also helped in providing cookies for other campus 
organizations such as the Women's Dorm Council and the Sophomore 
class. Through such activities, the Home Economics Chapter tries to 
increase the interest of its members as well as others in the field of home- 
malcing. 



73 




Tom Coleman. Barbara Ward, Debbie Sheffer, Kathy O'Brien, Maggy Fournier, Don Logue, Mr. Fraze, 
sponsor; Ann Grantham. Dwlght Smith, Mary Turner. S+eve Harris, vice president Anne Reilly, presi- 
dent; Peggy Kosaclc, secretary; Blaine Windsor, treasurer. 



Samadra 



The world's a stage . . . 

. . . And each Samadra member played his part effectively in the club's fall and 
two spring productions. November found St, Mary's theater group presenting their 
version of William Congreve's "The Way of the World." An original touch was added 
to the Restoration comedy with the employment of "mod" 20th century scenery, sound, 
and costuming. St. Mary's play goers enjoyed the most popular non-musical hit of the 
early I960's in March, with the group's presentation of Jean Kerr's "Mary, Mary," 
Samadra continues its second year of direction by Mr. Lonnie Fraze, whose talent for 
adding "just the right touch" to the productions, is emphasized by the success and 
professionalism with which the club's plays have become associated. 



74 




Sealed: Ellse Davis, editor; Steve Harris, assistant editor. Standing: Linda Duncan, Sharon Shelton, 
Carol Kurtz, feature editor; Betsy Reynolds, typing editor; Nancy Taylor, sports editor; Donna 

Mortimer, news editor. 



Point News 



The Point News, the school newspaper of St. Mary's College, has proven that small 
colleges can put out a well informed newspaper. The paper covers all phases of campus 
life from basketball games to editorials. 

Meeting the deadline is quite an ordeal — finishing a "last minute" assignment, 
writing a forgotten article, typing and setting the pages — all of this takes a lot of time 
and a lot of people to make the paper successful. 



75 




Sharon Chesley, Bonnie Tabakin, art editor; Lantz Hyde, literary editor; MaryJane Cancro, Craig 
Nesbitt, Maggie Fournier, literary editor; Kathy O'Brien. 



Scorpion 



The Scorpion, under the advisorship of Mr. Henley, 
is a student literary-art magazine published yearly. 



76 




Seated: Lois Henderson, treasurer; Winnie Still, Sharon Chesley, vice president. Standing: Jim Smith, 
president; Louis Benson, Charlotte Gardner, secretary, (absent) 



St, Mary's Honor Society 



Phi Theta Kappa, the junior college honor fraternity, was replaced this year by a new 
honor society or oriented to a four-year college. 

With six charter members, the Honor Society will assume the duties of Phi Theta 
Kappa. 



77 




Froni Row: Linda Legg, Atleen Boniface, Jane Lfnton. Sherry Smoat, Debbie Newman, Debbie 
Sheffer, Joyce Maus. Second Row: Janet Miller, Ginny Warfel. Alice Lancaster, Pat Thomas, Sharon 
Patrick, Donna Brigham, Sue Brooker. Third Row: Bob Thompson, Paul Aldridge, John LeRoy, Mac 
Walter, Gary Sanner, Brian Broadwater, Ray Burroughs. 



Campus Choir 



Something new was added to the choir this year — men! With this added attraction, 
the choir is now able to perform a wider range of selections. The choir performed at 
various activities on campus, such as Governor's Day, Parent's Day, Christmas Service, 
and at meetings around the county. The annual choir tour took place in early May, when 
the choir — under the direction of Brantley Greeson and accompanist Mrs. Greeson — 
travelled throughout Maryland, performing at schools, churches, various organizations, 
and on television. 



I 



78 



A th letic A ssociations 




WAA 



Ann Hearthway, President; Jane Linton, Social Chairman: Nancy Taylor, Vice President: Janet 
Miller, Treasurer; Sonia Bentz, Secretary. 




As the coordinator of athletic events on 
the campus of St. Mary's College, the Ath- 
letic Associations move actively onwa'd 
with the expansion of the entire campus. 

The Men's Athletic Association orga- 
nizes and promotes recreational activities 
of interest to men. The M.A.A. with the 
help of the Men's Dorm Athletic Director 
is in charge of the men's intermural sports. 
The presidents of both the M.A.A. and the 
W.A.A. serve on the Student Senate. 

Under the direction of its sponsor and 
officers, along with the participation of the 
women on campus, the W.A.A. actively 
supports varsity field hockey and volleyball. 
Basketball was dropped from the rank of 
varsity sports this year, but the consensus 
of students on campus hope to see it rein- 
stated next year. 

Besides varsity sports, the W.A.A. spon- 
sors a wide intramural program consisting 
of ping pong, volleyball, basketball, Softball 
and badminton. Both sailing and swimming 
are pursued, weather permitting. 

The Women's Athletic Association at St. 
Mary's College is expanding as the college 
takes rank with the four year institutions of 
higher learning. The W.A.A. looks ahead to 
the day when St. Mary's can truly boast of 
an active varsity hockey, basketball, and 
Softball program, backed by an already ex- 
tensive intramural program. 

The extension of the intramural program 
will be aided by the huge gymnasium be- 
ing built. One of its main attractions will 
be an olympIc Indoor pool. Even though 
physical education will be dropped as a 
major at St. Mary's, the W.A.A. and the 
M.A.A. have plans for the use of this new 
addition to their program. 



MAA 



Les Potter, President; Brian Veditz, Treasurer; Randy Maddox, Secretary; 
President. 



Burnett, Vice 



79 




CHAMPION TEAM. THE ORANGEMEN: Front Row: T. Foley. M. Chase. B. Bounds. B. Long. J. 
Doherty, H. Lallande. Second Row: T. Crout. M. DeBow. 5. Harris. R. Hester. M. Holland. P. 
Sarelas. G. Daugherly. teann captain; Lantz Hyde. 



Intramural Football 



The turn-out for the football Intramurals this year 
was exceptional. It seems we have a nnore vigorous 
and energetic group -from the men's dorm than ever 
before. Commuters and dorm students fought for 
yards at the unmarked North field four days a week. 
Two games were played regularly Monday through 
Thursday with the Orangemen capturing the title. 



80 




The men take out their tensions on North Field. 





THE SAINTS: Kneeling: Joe McCaddin, Mike Ellis. Tom Foley, Tom Moore, Don Anthony, John Popp. 
Skip Smith. Standing: Bob Collins, Bill Fluharty. Les Potter, Randy Maddox, Mike O'Brien, Ray Riggen, 
Jay Lowery, Mr. Snyder. 



Varsity Basketball 



For the second year in a row the "Saints" have 
proven themselves to be the best players St. Mary's 
has had. With the hope that many of this year's 
■freshman players will stay on, the team should have 
another winning season. 

Although there were moments of great doubt and 
intense worry, the "Saints" pulled through and 
showed themselves worthy of support. The "Saints" 
played a successful season under the coaching of 
Mr. Snyder. Their winning record was for this year 
12-8. 



82 




Randy Maddox stretches to score. 



83 





RAH — RAHS: Kneeling: Diane LeGoullon. Debbie Newnan. Nancy Taylor, Ellen Walters. Standing: Lois Heasty. Carol 
Kurh, Gayle Schaefer, Sue Broolter, Barb Zaiser. 



Intramural Basketball 



Women's intramural basketball was in full swing 
again this year. Several teams competed for the 
championship, but the Rah-Rahs proved the most 
slcillful. Interest In Intramural basketball signified a 
hopeful season for women's varsity basketball. How- 
ever, the college's athletic board voted to drop all 
women's varsity sports after the completion of field 
hockey season, thus, women's varsity basketball never 
started. No plans for varsity sports are seen for next 
year. Varsity sports should be revived when Interest 
and support Is seen from students. 



and Badminton 



BADMINTON CHAMPIONS: Kathy 
Hoover. Jackie Ripple. 



84 




Varsity 
Hockey 



OFFENSIVE: Winnie Still, Debbie Sheffer, Sue Brooker, Sonia Bentz. 
Ann Hear+hway. 



The varsity field hockey team played five games 
this year, all of which were away because of not be- 
ing able to secure officials for home games. The 
team travelled to Baltimore, Salesbury, Washington, 
and Catonsville, as well as to the University of Mary- 
land for Sports Day. Though the season wasn't a 
winning one, it is hoped that the increasing em- 
phasis being placed on varsity sports and the ad- 
vancement of St. Mary's as a four year college will 
be an incentive for varsity field hockey to grow. 




DEFENSIVE: Connie Spicer. Cathy Coak. Terrl Kurrle. Debbie Newnam, 
Barbara Jean Young, Nancy Taylor, Linda Miller. 









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Bill Baker 



Intramurals 
and just 
plain fun . 



Men's Intramural basltetball 



Tom Flanagan 

Ice boating on St, John's Pond. 




86 



Peggy Bradburn strikes a familiar golf pose. 



Randy Sun bathers at Queen Anne 

Maddox Hall. 




Terrle Anderson, Ri+a Molyneaux, Debbie Windsor, captain; Phyllis Chemacti. Nancy Carr. 



Cheerleaders 



The cheerleaders are a group of peppy, high-spirited young women 
who cheer our teams at both away and home games. The squad Is 
made up of girls who are selected at the beginning of each academic 
year by a carefully chosen panel consisting of the various student 
leaders on campus. The captain is chosen by the sponsor, Mrs. 
Clevenger. 

The purpose of the cheerleaders is to boost the morale of the team 
and to encourage spirit and good sportsmanship from the students. 



87 




Culture finds 
St, Mary's 



St. Mary's campus this year has been hostess to a 
variety of cultural activities. 

First semester we were privileged to have the Na- 
tional Symphony Orchestra and a piano recital by 
Nelson and Neal. 

Second semester brought the Baltimore Symphony 
Orchestra and a Brahms Concert. 



\ 



The Washlnqfon National Symphony conducted by Howard ti ^ ■ Ci. i r • t i,* i j "i: ■ c- i di ■ 

'. , ,, 7 \ ' T L, ri The Center Stage players, professional acting company, presented Fannys First Play. 

Mitchell performs at Kent Hall. 




The Maryland Arts Council brought to St. Mary's a 
wide range of works created by contemporary pro- 
fessional Maryland artists. Featured was the wood 
sculpture of Bruce Colvin, "C&l." 




88 



The 1967 Christmas Bazaar was held on De- 
cember 2. As a project of the Union Board, the 
proceeds went toward improvements on !h-' 
Student Union building. Among the attractions: 
Savings Bond Raffle, Bake Sale, Talent Show, 
Marriage and Divorce Booth, Buffet and Art 
Display Rummage Sale, Prize-Winning Booth, 
Santa Booth. 



Christmas 
Bazaar 




Visitors patronize the Bazaar Bake Sale which was arranged by Linda Bloom. 




The Savings Bond Booth was headed by Lanti Hyde. 
The Bond was donated by the First National Banic of 
S+, Mary's, 




Santa Claus, Jay Pegg. also made a visit io the 
Christmas Bazaar, The booth was headed by Sue 
Broolcer. 



89 




Christmas Prom Queen Denise Putnam and her escort 
Wayne Crawley. 



Christmas Prom 



Sponsored by the Women's Athletic Association, the annual Christ- 
mas prom was held on Satu'day night, December 9 at Charles Hall. 
Students danced to the music of the Britons. 

"Winter Wonderland" was decorated for the season with pine, 
holly, and mistletoe with a Christmas tree in one corner. The highlight 
of the evening was the crowning of the Christmas Prom Queen. Denise 
Putnam, a sophomore, was chosen. Her court, Included Jane Linton, 
Anne Rellly, Rita Molyneaux, and Wendy Hopkins. "Winter Wonder- 
land" proved to be an enjoyable event. 




The queen and her court, Jane Linton, Rita Molyneaui, Denise Putnam, Wendy Hopkins, Anne Reilly. 



90 



and a St, Mary's 
Christmas 





The Spirit of Christmas, Anne Baleer. 



One of the most meaningful traditions with St. Mary's is the Candlelight Service. 
Choral voices fill the crisp December night. 





Aileen Boniface, Sue James, Carol Kurtz, Donna 
Brigham, and Anne Reilly decorate Queer, Anne 
Hall's Christmas tree . . . 




. . . while Barbara Craig, Debbie Windsor, Donna Mor+i- 
mer, Susie Merryman, Anne Baker, and Sandy Watt add 
some Christmas splendor to the rec room. 



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Debbie Joyner 



Queen of the May 



92 




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Rita Molyneaux 

Freshman Princess 



Donna Brighanrv 

Sophomore Princess 



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Linda Bloonn 

Shenandoah Apple Blossom Princess 



. . and court 



A long tradition with St. Mary's is the May Day 
Festival. The crowning of the Queen and her Court 
kindles a week's festivities of sport, dance and 
feast climaxed by the May Prom. 



Nancy Echert 

Freshman Princess 



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11 III 

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Kathy Cabezas 

Freshman Princess 



Mary Hoke 

Sophomore Princess 



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Samadra 



"I told you nof to marry her." is Grandma's advice to 
Daddy. 




Grandma whispers the story of the III fated baby to Mrs. Barker. 





Grandma apprises The Young Man of her belief that he is "The American 
Dream". 



Grandma revels In her plot. 



94 




Reminiscing his youth 




Steve Harris as Krapp. 




Samadra ended Its year of successful productions in a rather "absurd" 
way. Its presentations of Samuel Beckett's "Krapp's Last Tape" and 
Edward Albee's "The American Dream" introduced a relatively new as- 
pect of drama to the St. Mary's audience. The Theater of the Absurd 
allows the playgoer to experience a unique awareness of the reality of 
life itself. 

Steve Harris' portrayal of Krapp in this one-man show absorbed the 
audiences' concern and interest in the life of an old man whose entire 
existence centers around his tape recorder and the diary-like entries 
which he has recorded over the years. An old man reminisces his youth 
and the audience watches — silently, anxiously, appreciatively. 

The second one act play performed the nights of May 2. 3, and 
4 broke the seriousness and awe produced by the preceding one by 
capturing the humor of American life in a "typical" American family. 
The simple things in everyday life become major productions — artificial 
and exaggerated. Grandma is the "observer" with more sense and in- 
genuity than she's given credit for. Mommy is the "boss" with a detest for 
Grandma and a "whip" for Daddy. Daddy is the castrated "mouse" with 
tubes where he used to have tracts." Mrs. Barker is the "community 
organizer" with her nose in everything. And the young man Is "The 
American Dream " with the looks of a movie idol. 

The audience seemed to enjoy it as much as the cast enjoyed making 
them laugh. 



Grandma Debbie Sheffer 

Mommy Anne Reilly 

Daddy skip Sml+h 

Mrs. Barker Susan Brooker 

The Young Man Joe McCaddIn 



in solitude. 



95 





For Lynn Rhatigan, being alone on stage Is a soul-searching monnent. 



Steve Harris defends himself as Blaine 
Windsor draws his sword. 



96 




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ow.;i^ 3.<i:r,e Cl^htoh' 





Cast: The Way of the World 
(in order of appearance) 

Merabell — Steve Harris 

Falnall — Dwight Smith 

Betty — P^ffi Othmer 

Footman, Messenger — Tom Coleman 

Witwoud — Don Purdy 

Coachman — Fred Bennett 

Mrs. Fainall — Julie Bounds 

Mrs. Marwood — Lynn Rhatigan 

Mrs. Millanant — Anne Reilly 

Mincing — Anne Grantham 

Waltwell — Blaine Windsor 

Follde — Peggy Kosack 

Lady WIshfort — Carolyn Gardiner 

Peg — Debbie Sheffer 

John — Fred Bennett 

Second Footman — Clinton George 

Petulant — Bob Reilly 

Sir Wllfull Witwoud — J. J. Pegg 




During rehearsal. Pafti Othmer serve: Fred BenneH wine. 



97 




' •mm 



Mr. Alec Lolcer, Chairman of the Board Mr- T. Brax+on Woody, Department of Mod- 

Trustees, introduces Governor Agnew. em Languages University of Virginia, ad- 

dresses Honors Assembly. 





Jl 



President Russell chats with Dr. and Mrs. Talum. 
Dr. Russell Tatum, President — Vitro Laboratories, 
spoke on "What Industry Expects of the College 
Graduate." 



Dr. J. Renwick Jackson Dean of Students — York College, 
speaks on "The Dual Responsibility of the Student and 
the College." 



Every year St. Mary's Is fortunate to have Interesting and informative 
speakers. Among them . . . 



General Robert E. Hogaboom, Chairman of 
St, Mary's City Commission, relates the his- 
tory of St. Mary's City. 



Congressman Rogers C. B. Morton of Maryland's first district discussed American 
policy in reference to economics, politics, and the Viet Namese war. 



98 




Governor's Day '67 




Governor Spiro Agr, 



The annual Governor's Day Progrann was held Saturday, October 
21. Along with guests of honor, Governor and Mrs. Agnew, many 
prominent Marylanders attended the luncheon at Charles Hall. 

The menu included Maryland's famous oysters on the half shell 
along with several other superb dishes. 

During lunch the guests heard several prominent speakers. The main 
topic was St. Mary's County — past and future. Among the speakers 
were Rear Admiral Daniel Smith, Jr., General Robert Hogaboom and 
Mr. William Aleck Loker, Chairman of the St. Mary's Board of Trust- 
ees. Toward the end of the meal, the Governor spoke, after his ad- 
dress, the St. Mary's Choir presented a medley. 




"fhe Governor addresses his assembly. 




President Russell converses with Mrs. Agnew. 




Tom Coleman presented Mrs. 
Agnew with a memento of the 
occasion and then Benediction was 
offered. 

It was a successful and memor- 
able afternoon. 



Barbara Craig, Debbie Windsor. Governor Agnew. Carol Shewbridge, and Denise Putnam. 



99 



President's cottage, built in 1927, overlooks the waterfront. 



Margaret Brent Hall, ad- 
ministration building. 



'W-"--^' 




Kent Hall, gymnasium, built in 1940 to commemorate the one-hundredth anniversary of 
St. Mary's College. 



Anne Arundel Hall, classroom 
building, completed in 1954. 



100 





St. Mary's Old and 
Familiar Buildings . 



St. Mary's Hall, auditorium, the second oldest building on campus, has undergone many 
interior changes. Having served as gym, library, and lecture hall, the old, portico'd 
theltre was last refurbished with sloping floors and stage. 




101 




102 



Alice Lancaster, Bob Thompson 




Ron Edwards 



103 




Dicit Urban, Wendy Hopkins, Connie Spicer, Ray Burroughs. 



Elise Davis 



104 




Phyllis Chemacici, Ray Burroughs, Jane BareleH, Marcia Glorius. 




Mike Baransici, Clinton George, Rick Hester, Bob Long, Ken Brison, Bob Burnside, George Curtin. 



w 


1 



Dr. Goldsmith 



105 



f^ 



#^. 





Steve Harris 




Mary Turner, Bob Thompson, Jinfi Fedders 



Pb.^M 



Sing-Out 




Charles Shulti, Jim Antonovich 



Mrs. Donhiser at Trinity's 
Spaghetti Dinner. 



Dr. GriHen 



106 




ady Bounds, Karen 
oyner. 



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Mm v» 


gfc un / 




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1 


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■-- ■ V 





Kathy O'Brien 



Clin+on George, Lee Johnson, Don Logue, Jane Linton. 




MaryJane Cancro 



107 




Seated: Jeanne Lowry, Susie Merryman. Standing: Phyllis Strickland. Alleen Boniface, Lois Henderson, 
Reid Bingham, Paf McKinnie, Peggy Bradburn. Miss Sinnms. 



Castellan 



To capture an entire year on a sheet o'f paper, to ask a great deal of a few, to be 
dependent upon a couple — all present hurdles. If successfully cleared a smooth race 
leaves nothing to be had but the winning. 



108 



^(jjfQr Jeanne Lowry 

Photograhpy editor Reid Bingham 

Suzanne Merryman 

Layout editor Patricia McKInnle 

Phyllis Strickland 

Copy editor Sharon Shelton 

Lois Henderson 

Typing editor Peggy Bradburn 

Sylvia Palazzo 

Business manager Alleen Boniface 

Advisor Miss L. Beatrice Simms 




Jeanne Lowry, Reid Bingham, Sharon Shelton. 



109 




>1^-«. 



"Sfe^^ 




A 



time 



to get, 
and a time 
to lose; 
a time 
to keep, 
and a time 
to cast 
away; 



Advertisements 



1 1 1 



Mrs. Helen L Ahalt 

Mr. and Mrs. William D. Anfhony 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Asplen 

Mr. Walter Block 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry I. Bond 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Borleis 

Mr. and Mrs. Brady C. Bounds, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Nornnan Bounds 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bradburn 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Brigham 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Brlner 

Mr. John Hanson Briscoe 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Brooker 

Mr. and Mrs. Fulton F. Brown 

CM Sgt. and Mrs. Otis L. Burnett 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd E. Burroughs 

Mrs. Eileen Caddie 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cancro 

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Clark, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Collins 

Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe H. Conklin 



Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Couch, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin G. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Kirk DeBow 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Farlow, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Fisher 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Freeny 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Glorius 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Maurice Godfrey 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton T. Hastings 

Mrs. Jean Hartlove 

Mr. and Mrs. George Hicks 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry P. Hoey 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Houts 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester V. Hearthway 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Lee Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. King 

Mr. J. A. Kenny III 

Mr. and Mrs. Emil Kordish 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Krati 



Compliments 
of 

Loffler Construction, Inc. 

Hollywood, Md. 



112 



Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 
Mrs. Mary E. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr .and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. 



Howard A. Lancaster 
Harold M. Legg 
Bernard LeGoullon 
Lewis 

William Longest 
Arthur H. Lowry 
William Maus 
Walter G. McCready 
Harry J. McMahon 
R. A. Meara 
John Merryman, Jr. 
John F. Miller 
Harold L. Morgan 
Joseph E. Muse, Jr. 
Vernon P. Nengel 
Stanley Nesbitt 
William Newnam, Jr. 
John A. Nial 
William D. O'Brien 
Richard Othmer 



Lt. Col. and Mrs. Douglas G. Putnam 

Dr. and Mrs. Ernest D. Rehm 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace E. Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace H. Sheffer 

Mrs. Benjamin B. Shewbridge 

Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Smoot 

Dr. and Mrs. Roy H. Stetler, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Tabakin 

Mr. Joseph W. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Tayman 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Urban 

Mr. and Mrs. Casper Vecchioni 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Vediti 

Mrs. Christine Walter 

Mr. and Mrs. Elliot Weisman 

Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Windsor 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Edgar Woodburn 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wrightson 



The Alumni Association 

of 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 

Extends Congratulations to the Graduating 
Class of 1968 



113 



Compliments 
of 

Mervell M. Dean, Inc. 

General Contractors 

Hollywood, Md. 



Compliments 
of 

PEPSI-COLA 



FOODLINER— IGA 

Phone: 475-9201 

MEATS— GROCERIES— FRUITS 
VEGETABLES— FROZEN FOODS 

Leonardtown, Maryland 



Compliments of 

M. ADELE FRANCE 

Alumni Chapter 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 



114 



ADAM'S APPLIANCE SHOP 

Sales and Service 
APPLIANCE— TELEVISION 

Hollywood, Maryland 
Phone: 373-2253 



Compliments of 

Coca-Cola 

The Pause That Refreshes 



CITIZENS NATIONAL 


BANK OF 


SOUTHERN MARYLAND 


WALDORF, MARYLAND 



CENTER GARDENS 

Serving Southern Maryland With Furnished and Unfurnished Apartments 

Phone: 862-2722 



115 







Compliments of 
BALTIMORE 


Compliments of 


ALUMNI CHAPTER 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 


J, Frank Raley 







PARK PHARMACY 

YOUR REXALL STORE 

"Through These Portals Pass the Prettiest Girls 

in the World" 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 863-6161 



Compliments of 

ALDRIDGE FORD, INC. 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
VO 3-81 1 1 

"Our Specialty is Good Business' 



Park TV & Record Shop 

RCA COLOR TV HEADQUARTERS 

SALES AND SERVICE 

DISCOUNT RECORD SHOP 

26 Shangri La Drive 

862-8411 



116 




CompI 


merits of 




BEE'S AUTO 


SUPPLY, 


INC. 


Lexington Park, Marylan 


d 


Phone: 


862-1411 




Branch Store: Prince Frederick, 


Maryland 


Phone: 


535-1091 





LEXINGTON PARK DRY CLEANERS, INC. 

For Prompt Pick-up and Delivery Service 

COMPLETE LAUNDRY SERVICE 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 994-0200 



Get Your Favorite Bread 



■Wonder" 



Always Fresh at Your Grocery 



"WONDER BREAD" 



Mechanicsville, Maryland 
Phone: 884-3251 



Compliments 
of 

CONNOR SHOE REPAIR 

LEXINGTON PARK. MARYLAND 



TENNISON 
DISTRIBUTING CO. 

BOX 130 
LEONARDTOWN, MARYLAND 

Rock Creek — Hires — Blair House 
7up — Dr. Pepper — TruAde 
Phone: 475-9770 475-385! 



117 



Why Pay More for Gasoline 
Drive Into Your 

SAVON GAS STATION 

Save 10% 

Phone: 862-9933 



Compliments of 

SPRINGER'S MEN'S SHOP 

Formal Wear Service 

Lexington Pari, Maryland 

Phone: 863-5622 



ST. MARY'S 
ICE AND FUEL, INC. 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-5251 



(The Jliirst National ^ank nf i^t. Harm's 



Leonardtown — Lexington Park — Patuxent River 
Maryland 

Member Federal Reserve Syl+em 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




118 



MATTINGLEY FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

MONUMENTS 

LEONARDTOWN, MARYLAND 

Phone: 475-8068, 475-8069 



BLAIRS 

JEWELRY— SILVER— CHINA 
STUDIO CARDS 

Lexington Parle 

and 
Leonardtown 

Phone: 862-1271 




TOWN AND CASUAL SHOP 

I 17 ShangrI La Drive 
Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 862-7201 



HEWITT LUMBER 
& SUPPLY CO. 

GENERAL BUILDING MATERIALS 
HARDWARE and PAINTS 

Callaway and Lexing'fon Park 
St. Mary's County 

994-1441 863-6611 



119 



BACON & PASSARELLI, INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
and BUILDERS 

RESIDENTIAL— COMMERCIAL— INDUSTRIAL 

OFFICE 

863-5144 

863-5355 

LEXINGTON PARK, MD. 



Congratulations 

to the 
CLASS OF '68 



THE LEONARDTOWN DAIRY CO. 

Leonardtown, Maryland 



JOHN R. DRURY AND SON 

INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 

Leonardtown, Maryland 

Phone: 475-9173 




120 



PECK'S TAVERN 

Steaks — Sea Food — Pizza 

Business Men's Lunch 
Carry Out Food Service 

Located 5 Mi. South Navy Base 
on Rt. 235 

862-8051 



Compliments of 

ARH MARTT 

Route 235 
Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 863-5613 




Compliments of 

ATLANTIC VAN LINES 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-1211 



Compliments of 

ST. MARY'S PHARMACY 
Your Rexall Store 

Leonardtown, Maryland 



Compliments of 

PARK JEWELERS 

Lexington Park, Maryland 
Phone: 862-3121 



Phone 863-8904 

PARK AMERICAN 

ATLAS 

TIRES— BATTERIES— ACCESSORIES 

TUNE-UPS— BRAKES 

WHEEL BALANCING 

197 Great Mills Road L. L Jenkins 

Lexington Park, Maryland 



121 



PHONE: 863-6233 

HOME EXTERMINATING COMPANY 

COMPLETE PEST AND TERMITE CONTROL 



V. O. WOODARO 

MANAGER 

P. O. BOX 183 

LEXINGTON PARK. MD. 

20i53 



THE HUB 

Lexington Parlt, Md. 

"Southern Maryland's 

Leading Department 

Store" 



122 



Dean's Lumber and Supply 
Company, Inc. 

GENERAL BUILDING MATERIALS 

HOLLYWOOD, MARYLAND 
Phone: 373-2111 



CATO'S 
TEXACO 

Lexington Park, Maryland 



FENWICK FORD, INC. 

Your Ford Dealer 

in 
Leonardtown, Maryland 

Phone: 475-9166 



Compliments of 
J. T. DAUSHERTY'S 

ANCHOR 
VAN 
LINES 





■ ■ 



Compliments of 

MODERN CLEANERS 

Lexington Parle. Maryland 



KING'S SHOPARAMA 

Lexington Park, Maryland 

One Stop Shop in Southern Maryland 

Central Charge 

VO 2-0001 



TOWNE FLORIST 
Flowers for All Occasions 

JAMES G. AND RUBY CHESELDINE, owners and operators 

475-4331 

Fenwicit Street, Leonardtown, Maryland 
Opposite Old Flrehouse 



Greetings From 

TIDEWATER REALTY, INC. 

13 Shangri-La Drive 
Lexington Park, Maryland 

Next Door to Citizens National Bank 

Phone: 863-7051 

JACK RUE JIM HENDERSON 




Compliments of 

HARRIS 

JEWELERS 

Leonardtown, Md. 



Compliments of 

THRIFT 

OIL 

COMPANY 

Phone: 475-9111 
Leonardtown, Maryland 



123 



'Flowers for Every Occasion" 

KENNY'S FLOWERS 

Leonardtown and Lexington Park 
Maryland 



Phones: 475-8025 
863-7056 




CARPETS FURNITURE 
Sill ^eUe^'i. 



SALES CENTER 



Appliances — Television — Appliance Service 

Main Office and Warehouse 

Lexington Park, Md. 

VO 3-8181 

Leonardtown, Md. 

GR 5-9121 



Television 
Telephone 



Efficiency Kitchen 
Cocktail Lounge 



Restaurant 
Valet Service 



LEXINGTON PARK MOTOR HOTEL 

90 AIR-CONDITIONED ROOMS 



97 Coral Drive South 
Lexington Park, Maryland 



Telephone: 
301 862-1666 





CANNON SHOE STORE 








QUALITY SHOES 










at 










POPULAR PRICES 










for 










ALL THE FAMILY 








189 


Shangri-La Drive 


G. E. HOPPLE, 


Mgr. 


Lexington Park, Md. 20653 


Phone: 


863-8951 



Compliments 
of 



MEADOW GOLD 
ICE CREAM 



Compliments ot 

NATIONAL 

MOBILE HOME 

SALES, INC. 

Three Notch Road 
Lexington Park, Maryland 

Phone: 862-4721 



124 




Compliments of 

JIM'S 

GULF 

SERVICE 

Leonardtown, Md. 



Many "thanks" to Ann Hearfhv/ay. 



MCKAY IMPLEMENT & 
TRUCK CO., INC. 



Leonardtown, Md. 

FARM & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 

NEW HOLLAND AND NEW IDEA EQUIPMENT 

475-9190 
475-9150 



LEONARDTOWN 
LAUNDRY 

DRY CLEANING 
RUG CLEANING 

COMPLETE MODERN STORAGE 



Compliments of 

FRANK A. COMBS 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-9116 



MARYLAND NATIONAL BANK 

. . . does so much for so many people 
63 offices serving Metropolitan Baltimore 
The Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland 

Leonardtown and Mechanicsville 

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



BELL MOTOR COMPANY 

CHEVROLET— BUICK—OLDSMOBILE 
Sales and Service 

Leonardtown, Maryland 
Phone: 475-8004 



125 



(ftthtson ©litmpir d'lub 



Mark Smith 
Keith Sturgill 




Chris Lowry 
Joe Surk 



BRIAN LOWRY— Pres. and Founder 



THE ENTERPRISE 

Southern Maryland's Reading Weekly 

With Over 7000 in Circulation 

In Lexington Parle, Maryland 

Phone: 862-1011 



Professional Beauty Care 
Telephone: 863-6221 

PARK BEAUTY SALON 

PAM ALLGOOD 

183 Shangrr-La Drive 

Lexington Park, Md. 20653 

Styling 
for the Gracious Look 



126 










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AndJIierS is a'timeTor fulfill^nent of 
purpcjse..-. 11 a time to witness the fi- 
np7V<5sditatifn'5(f^t. Mary's- as a Touf 
•year college. • " •■ , 

V Time has broO^ht us^ this far .'.'-jj 
%he future Is In the time whichjfew fa<^^ 
and new talenji will bring to her. • r^ 



,S9.S 
C3 

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