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Full text of "Caswell County in the world war, 1917-1918; service records of Caswell County men"

CASWELL COUNTY 

IN THE WORLD WAR 

1917-1918 



V 








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CASWELL COUNTY IN THE 
WORLD WAR 

1917-1918 



SERVICE RECORDS OF CASWELL 
COUNTY MEN 



COMPILED BY 

GEORGE A. ANDERSON, SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

FOR CASWEIL COUNTY 



EDITED FOR THE PRESS BY 

R. B. HOUSE, ARCHIVIST OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



RALEIGH 

Edwards & Bboughton Printing Co. 

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FOREWORD 

The Board of County Commissioners of Caswell County, 
C. H. King, J. M. Williams, and T. H. Hatcliett, requested 
that I should write a character sketch of as many as pos- 
sible of the Caswell soldiers who took part in the Great 
World War. This Board felt that it was fitting that some 
record should be made. 

In the sketches which follow I have tried in a very humble 
way to carry out the wishes of these gentlemen, but I wish 
to express my very great regret that I have been unable 
to secure full information which would have enabled me to 
write a sketch of each boy who participated. This work 
has been a labor of love on my part, and has been done 
without compensation. I have completed as many sketches 
as I could, and I very much hope that some one may be able 
to secure a service record of the boys whose names do not 
appear which may be added in a future book. 

May I not leave on record this statement ? I saw our boys 
go forth to battle. They were of the finest kind ; strong of 
muscle, clear of mind, and true of vision. They made for 
themselves a record of fidelity and courage. They did their 
duty like men, and, while my sketches are not ornate, and, 
while they show only in a very humble way the record, still 
I feel very grateful that I have had the honor to help pre- 
serve for future generations their names and activities. 

Sincerely, 

George A. Andeeson. 



DEDICATION" 

God in bis mercy and in His unfailing love willed it 
that bnt few of the sons of Caswell, should sleep their last 
dreamless sleep in the land where the Poppies grow. But 
Caswell had four sons who ''went West." Algernon Sidney 
Neal, Benjamin Franklin Brooks, Koy Patillo, and George 
Thomas Warren sleep beneath the lilies of France. To their 
memories I dedicate my humble work. May our County 
forever hold in constant recollection the memory of their 
Supreme Sacrifice, In the service flag of Caswell let their 
golden stars shine with an added lustre through the years. 

In the beauty of the lilies, Christ was born across the sea, 
With a glory in his bosom, which transfigures you and me ; 
As He died to make men holy, so they died to make men free. 
Their souls go marching on. 



Caswell County in the World War 5 

CASWELL COUNTY CHAPTER, AMERICAN RED 

CROSS 

Immediately after war was declared, in many sections of 
the county, men and women became active in the Red Cross 
Work. There were branches at different places in the county, 
and these branches functioned through the Chapters at 
Danville, Va., Reidsville, N. C, and Greensboro, N. C. 

As the needs of our soldiers became more acute, it was rec- 
ognized that the wisest thing to do was to form an organiza- 
tion to function as the Caswell County Chapter of the 
American Red Cross. To bring this about a number of men 
and women met on May 2 in the office of the Yanceyville 
Telephone Company and effected a preliminary organization. 
Mr. B. S. Graves was called to the chair. Dr. S. A. Malloy 
was named secretary; and Rev. George W. Oldham, was 
named as treasurer. A motion was made that a petition 
be forwarded to the Southern Division of the American Red 
Cross, asking for authority to organize a chapter. This 
chapter to be known as the Caswell County Chapter of 
the American Red Cross. The petitioners were promptly 
given authority to form a constructive organiation. A call 
was sent out, and a large number of citizens met in the court 
room May 5, 1918. 

Attorney M. C. Winstead was called to the chair; Super- 
intendent George A. Anderson was made Secretary of the 
meeting. The Southern Division of the American Red Cross 
was represented by its Field Worker for North Carolina, Mrs. 
O. K. Morgan. 

The following board of Trustees was elected for the man- 
agement of the Chapter: Milton Branch, Miss Annie Ir- 
vin and Mr. M. C. Winstead ; Semora Branch, W. L. Tay- 
lor and Mrs. W. O. Smith ; Pelham Branch, Mrs. J. O. Fitz- 
gerald; Leasburg Branch, Mr. George B. Connally; Locust 
Hill Branch, Mr. J. B. Turner; Blanche Branch, Mr. Wilbur 
L. Watkins ; Blackwell Branch, Miss Virginia^d^tt ; Yan- 
cewille Branch, Mr. R. L. Mitchelle and MrsT®^ Graves. 

The Board of Directors immediately held a meeting and 
the following were elected officers of the Caswell County 



6 Caswell County in the World War 

Chapter. County Chairman, jST. R. Claytor, Vice Chairman, 
Miss Mary Pierce; Secretary, George A. Anderson, and 
Treasurer, E. L. Mitchelle. 

The County Chapter and its branches with much earnest- 
ness began work in practically every section of the county, 
the people everywhere eagerly responding. Other branches 
were established at Hightowers, Providence, and Pine For- 
est. The various branches energetically pursued the work, 
and every where throughout the county the women of these 
branches were busy. Garments were collected for the unfort- 
unate children of the war stricken countries. The willing 
hands of the women knitted comforts and sweaters, prepared 
roll after roll of surgical dressing, and in fact met every call 
of the parent organization with cheerfulness and prompt- 
ness. When our boys were called to fill the ranks of the Na- 
tional Army, a delegation of Red Cross Women was always 
present with comfort kits to tell them good-by and bid them 
God-Speed. 

Chapter after chapter could be written about the work of 
the Red Cross in Caswell County, but no pen can fitly re- 
cord the splendid spirit shown by Caswell women wearing 
that badge of honor, the ''Red Cross. '^ 

A very beautiful and touching thing was done by the Yan- 
ceyville Branch. This branch appointed a committee com- 
posed of R. L. Mitchelle, E. F. Upchurch, and George A. 
Anderson, and delegated to it the responsibility to arrange 
for the ringing of the Angelus ; and from that date until the 
armistice of November 11 put an end to the gruesome carnage, 
at seven o'clock every afternoon the old Court house bell 
sounded a call to prayer for our boys in khaki beyond the 
sea. The Red Cross spirit as shown in Caswell during the 
war was indeed fine, and in keeping with the splendid 
spirit of our boys in imiform. 

THE JUNE 5th REGISTRATION 1917 

The'Governor of North Carolina issued an order that R. L. 
Mitchelle, Clerk of Superior Court, T. N. Fitch, Sheriff, and 
Dr. S. A. Malloy proceed immediately to register men for 



Caswell County in the World Wae 7 

military services. This order directed the enrollment of all 
men aged twenty-one years to thirty-one years inclusive. The 
Board, as above constituted, with promptness and dispatch 
obeyed orders. A day was set in each precinct of the county 
and registrars appointed for the respective precincts to en- 
roll men between the ages stated above. We append a list of 
registrars : 

Anderson Precinct: H. J. Hurdle, W. E. Simmons. 

Dan River Precinct: J. A. White. 

Locust Hill Precinct : J. F. White Jr., J. B. Watlington, 

Milton Precinct: M. C. Winstead. 

Semora Precinct: W. O. Smith. 

Ridgeville Precinct: W. L. Compton. 

Hightowers Precinct: W. H. Warren. 

Leasburg Precinct: S. P. iN'ewman. 

Pelham Precinct: J. O. Fitzgerald. 

Stoney Creek Precinct : J. B. Turner and L. L. Lambeth. 

Yanceyville Precinct: Julius Johnson, Alvis Florance. 
These gentlemen discharged their duty as registrars in 
the most capable manner, and the registration of Caswell 
was so complete that the officers of this registration were 
highly commended. The registration cards were prompt- 
ly returned to the Board, there being 1,011 cards. 

It was then necessary that a duplicate copy be made of 
these cards. The following persons offered gratuitous ser- 
vices and assisted in the copying of the cards: Miss Ruby 
Mitchelle, J. A. White; T. H. Hatchett; W. M. Burton; 
George A. Anderson. 

ROBERT L. MITCHELLE 

We feel that it is our duty to make a matter of record the 
energies and activities of the men who were too old to do 
active Military Service and yet during the troublesome days 
of the war, did all in their power to "Keep The Home Fires 
Burning." A prominent example of this class of men in 
Caswell County may be cited in the personage of Robert L. 
Mitchelle. 



8 Caswell County in the "World "War 

Mr. Mitclielle was born on the 22nd day of July 1866, and 
married Miss Lillian James. Both of these people are from 
Old Caswell County families. Mr. Mitehelle was a son of 
Eldridge Mitehelle, a man who was very prominent in this 
County's life. The father of Mrs. Mitehelle was Mr. Wiley 
James. This parent did active service in the "War hetween 
the States, and was regarded as one of Caswell County's most 
useful citizens. 

Mr. Mitehelle received the rudiments of his education in 
the public schools of Caswell County, and attended for sev- 
eral sesions the High School at Cedar Grove under the di- 
rection of Mr. Sam Hughes. He was for two years a stu- 
dent of Oak Ridge Institute, and during this period he took 
a course in Book-keeping and Commercial Law. He has the 
distinction of being the student who completed the Commer- 
cial Course in the shortest period known in the history of 
the school. The writer of this sketch was a student at Oak 
Ridge with Mr. Mitehelle, and was present when he received 
his diploma. He completed this course in thirty days. Af- 
ter his graduation at Oak Ridge, he was for many years one 
of the largest farmers in High Towers Town-ship, and one 
of the most successful. He has held many positions of honor 
and trust in the County, and for the past eighteen years he 
hfis held with signal efficiency and County-wide popularity 
the office of Clerk of the Superior Court. Mr. Mitehelle is 
deserving of much credit for his wise and efficient manage- 
ment of the Bank of Yanceyville, and as President of the 
same, he has made this institution one of the most valuable 
constructive agencies of the County. 

At the beginning of the "World W^ar he was appointed by 
the Governor of ISTorth Carolina, together with sheriff 
T. N". Fitch and Dr. S. A. Malloy, to hold the Registration 
of June 5th, 1017. As chairman of this committee he did 
his work well, and this registration was carried on through- 
out the county with an efficiency which was truly wonderful. 
For the first year of the war, he also served in the capacity 
of County Food Administrator, and, when the Red Cross 
Chapter for Caswell County was organized he was made one 
of the official members, serving as county treasurer, with 



Caswell County in the World War 9 

Eev. N". R. Claytor as chairman, and George A. Anderson 
as secretary. He was also treasurer of the Y. M. C. A., 
the Jewish Relief, and the Armenian and Syrian Relief; 
and in all these various and exacting capacities he perform- 
ed his work with an unselfish and patriotic fei-vor. But 
his greatest work, possibly, during the war was as chairman 
of the Liberty Loan Committee. He was very active in 
securing the quotas allotted to Caswell County, and he han- 
dled the different drives with a masterly hand. 

Miss Virginia Badget as chairman of the Women's Lib- 
erty Loan Committee, rendered much valuable assistance. 



ROBERT THOMAS WILSON 

The responsibility of conducting the War Saving Cam- 
paign for Caswell County was intrusted to Mr. Robert Wil- 
son. A large number of our people responded to his appeal. 
It would be impossible to give the exact amount of War 
Saving Stamps purchased by our people for the reason that 
there were many subscribers who listed their names in 
Reidsville, Danville, and other places contiguous to Caswell. 
However, we may safely assert that but few counties of the 
character of ours purchased more liberally. Mr. Wilson 
was very aggressive in these campaigns although he had many 
other war duties to perform. 

The Governor of North Carolina commissioned him as Cap- 
tain in the Reserve Militia and he had the responsibility of 
training a company. He was also appointed by the Gov- 
ernor as a member of the Legal Advisory Board to aid reg- 
istrants in the preparation of their questionnaires. He was 
also made Chairman of the Council of Defence. All of this 
work he did in a masterly way, and his very fine spirit of 
patriotism and Americanism proved him to be the worthy 
son of a gallant old Confederate soldier. Mr. Wilson was 
never too tired or too busy to respond to any call of the Gov- 
ernment, and his unselfish service entitles him to the grate- 
ful recollection of our people. We append this personal 
sketch. 



10 Caswell County in the "World War 

Robert Thomas Wilson was born in Caswell County in 
Dan River Township, April 8, 1883. His father, Robert 
P. Wilson, who at the age of sixteen became a soldier in 
the Confederate Army, married Miss Virginia Travis, native 
of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. His early education was 
received in the public schools of Caswell where he did the 
usual work of the seven grades. He then entered the Dan- 
ville Military Institute and after spending a part of two 
sessions there, became a student for one year at A and M 
College, Raleigh, N. C. After finishing school he was en- 
gaged for a while in farming, very successfully. 

In 1910 he was nominated and elected by the Democratic 
Party for the office of Register of Deeds, which position he 
has held continuously until this writing. For a number of 
years he studiously applied himself to the law, and in 1915 
being granted a leave of absence by the Board of County 
Commissioners he became a student at Wake Forest. He so 
studiously applied himself that after sixty days tutorship 
under Dr. Gulley he succeeded in passing the Supreme Court 
examinations, and in December of this same year, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar at the December term of Court at Yancey- 
ville, K C. 1915. 

Mr. Wilson has been twice married. His first wife Miss 
Mary Fannie Flintoff, who died on August 5, 1909, was a 
daughter of C. B. Flintoff. In 1911 ho was married to Miss 
Ella Sue White. From this latter union there are two 
children. His home near Purley is indeed a happy one. Mr. 
Wilson is a brother of the late lamented William S. Wilson. 



LEGAL ADVISORY BOARD 

In the execution of the Selective Service Law a large 
amount of work fell to the lot of the Legal Advisory Boards. 
These Boards were appointed for the purpose of assisting 
the Registrants in filing questionaires, and advising as to 
the rights of the Registrants under the law. 

In Caswell this board was composed of the following At- 
torneys : Robert T. Wilson, Marcus C. Winstead, and Julius 



Caswell County in the World War 11 

Johnston. These gentlemen gave efficient service, serving 
without compensation. 

E. F. UPCHURCH 

In compliance with the Selective Service Law the Gov- 
ernor of l^orth Carolina, Hon. Thomas W. Bickett, appoint- 
ed Mr. E. F. Unchurch, a member of the bar of Caswell, as 
tlie Government's Appeal Agent. This appointment, which 
carried with it very grave and serious responsibilities, was 
patriotically accepted. In this capacity he served during the 
entire period of the Great War. He discharged his duties 
during these days of intense activities in such a way as to 
merit the appreciative thanks of the Governor. In addition 
to this service as Government Appeal Agent, as the war 
progressed, bringing a large amount of work to the local 
board he shared for nearly a year with Superintendent An- 
derson the arduous task of Clerk of the Local Board. These 
duties however did not prevent him from taking an. active 
and whole-hearted interest in other war activities, such as 
the Y. M. C. A. war work and the Red Cross. The follow- 
ing is a brief character sketch. 

Mr. Upchurch was born in the County of Wake 
at Cary on August 14, 1877, His father James B. Upchurch 
married Miss Janie Creel. His early educational training 
was received in the Public County Schools and Public High 
School of Wake, Completing this course he became a stu- 
dent at Wake Forest College, remaining there for three years. 
He decided to enter upon the profession of law and was tut- 
ored by Profesor Gulley and Professor Mordecai, the latter 
now being at Trinity College. He passed the State Board 
successfully in 1902 and was appointed to the bar the same 
year. He located at Cary, at which place he was active in 
his Profession until 1909. In the spring of that year he 
moved to Caswell County, associating himself with Hon. L. 
M. Carlton of Person County. In 1911 he was nominated 
and elected by the Democratic Party a member of the State 
Senate from the 18th Senatorial District. As a Senator 



12 Caswell County in the World War 

from Caswell he was given important committee assignments, 
particularly as member of Judiciary Committee I^o. 1. As a 
Senator his name is associated with the Auto-Seizure Law, 
w^hich was state-wide in its application. He placed on the 
Statute Book the following local laws : ''Penalization of de- 
linquent tax payers," "changing the county officers from the 
fee system to the salary system ;" and appended to the general 
State Law the present County Primary System for the nomi- 
nation of candidates. For a number of years he has held 
the position of Attorney of the Board of County Commis- 
sioners and the County Board of Education. 

Mr. Upchurch is a very loyal member of the Missionary 
Baptist Church and has taken much interest in the church 
w^ork at this place. Before coming to Caswell he married 
Miss Mary Stroupe of Forsyth County. Their home in the 
little village of Yanceyville is a happy one ; they have four 
children, three boys and one girl. 



FILING OCCUPATIONAL CAPtDS 

In the early part of 1918, General Crowder issued direc- 
tions to the Local Board to compile and segregate the oc- 
cupations of registered men. The order carried with it a 
tremendous amount of work. To comply with this order it 
was imperative that the questionnaire of each registrant be 
gone over carefully. General Crowder, to carry out this far 
reaching order, appealed to the teachers of America, asking 
that they tender their services. In Caswell County the re- 
sponsibility of securing practical response to this appeal was 
laid on the shoulders of Superintendent Anderson. 

He issued a circular letter to a number of the teachers 
of Caswell County and it is with the most gratifying pride 
that we record the fact that each teacher responded. These 
teachers met in the office of the Local Board and with great 
diligence and efficiency dispatched the task. The following 
teachers participated in this patriotic service: Miss Eva 
Walker; Miss Hallie Newman; Miss Bertha Wilson; Miss 
Fannie Sue Willson ; Miss Perlie Gwyn ; Miss Alma Daniel ; 



Caswell County in the World War Id 

Miss Yirginia Badgett; Miss Wilhelmina Thomas; Miss Ila 
Mitch elle; Mrs. Allen Gwynn; Miss Ida Bell Ledbetter; Miss 
Edna McGiiire; Miss Hattie Herndon; Mr. W. E. Sim- 
mons; Miss Bettie May White; Miss Anna White; Mr. T. 
H. Hatchett. 

Y. M. C. A. WAE WORK 

In the early fall of 1917 the State workers of the Y. M. 
C. A. effected in the various Counties a systematic organi- 
zation. To this County it sent the Rev. Mr. Hester, a Bap- 
tist Minister from Roxboro. A meeting was held in the office 
of the County Superintendent. The needs of the work were 
presented by Mr. Hester, and as a result of this meeting a 
County organization was formed. Geo. L. Williamson was 
elected County Chairman. 

Chairman Williamson proceeded with much earnestness 
to undertake a county-wide campaign. He made appoint- 
ments in many different sections of the county and appealed 
to the people. In his work he was successful and turned in- 
to the treasury a neat sum. The second campaign was un- 
dertaken by Mr. Williamson under different circumstances. 
Since the armistice had put an end to hostilities, he went 
before the people and told them that our boys in the camps 
and on the soil of France needed, perhaps more than during 
the war, the comforts and thoughtfulness which only the 
Y. M. C. A. could give. In this campaign he was very 
ably assisted by Miss Elizabeth Graves, who had in charge 
the Woman's War Work. 



GARY H. KII^G 

Provost Marshall General Crowder has stated in public 
Addresses that no greater task has ever been given to any 
class of men than the work assigned to the Local Boards 
throughout the country. To these men was intrusted the 
fearful responsibility of raising an army, this army to be 
put on foot through the process of the Selective Service 



14 Caswell County in the World "Wae 

Draft. He has also stated that the thanks of the nation are 
due the men who administered this law. 

The local Board of Caswell County was composed of the 
following : C. H. King, Dr. S. A. Malloy, F. R. Warren and 
J. F. Walters. Mr, King was made chairman of this Board, 
and in such capacity he served during the entire war. He 
did his duty with much faithfulness, and when the Local 
Boards were discharged the military authorities expressed 
their appreciation of his work. The following is a brief 
personal sketch. 

Cary H. King was born in the County of Caswell, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1864. His father, William D. King, was a prom- 
inent citizen whose name will be forever associated with the 
founders of the Old Rock Academy, a place where many 
men who have attained prominence received their education. 
This parent was married to Miss Ann Howard and the 
children of this union are well known to our people. Cary 
H. King was a pupil in the Old Rock Academy. He fin- 
ished the course which was given at that place. Later he 
entered a commercial college in the city of Baltimore, and, 
as a result of the training there received, he developed into 
a very proficient business man. For a number of years 
he was engaged in the manufacture of tobacco, one of the 
few manufacturing enterprises that have been established in 
Caswell. He has also been engaged in the sale of com- 
mercial fertilizer, but these business ventures did not take 
his attention from his farm, and he has been reckoned as 
one of the county's most energetic and successful farmers- 
He has had a long life of official service. He served for 
two terms as a member of the County Board of Education ; 
during one of the terms he was made chairman of the board. 
In 1007 he was nominated and elected by the democratic 
party as a State Senator from the Eighteenth District. This 
district is composed of Caswell, Alamance, Orange and Dur- 
ham Counties. As a State Senator he served his district 
with conspicuous ability. He has been chairman of the Board 
of County Commissioners for the past six years, and in this 
capacity his sound business qualifications have been of great 



Caswell County in the World War 15 

usefulness. He married Miss Lily May Pinnix, daughter 
of Colonel Joseph Pinnix. There are six children from this 
union, and this home has been for many years one of the 
happiest of our county. 

J. F. WALTEKS 

J. F. Walters was born in the State of Virginia, January 
4th, 1850. His parents moved to N'orth Carolina, in 1854. 
Mr. Walters grew up on the farm in Caswell developing 
into one of the most successful and prosperous farmers that 
this section knows. His farm today is in Dan River Town- 
ship, about two miles from Blanch, and is almost a model 
one. 

Since reaching the years of maturity, Mr. Walters has 
taken a very prominent part in various activities of the 
County. For ten years he served as justice of the peace 
and his court was always a place where justice was meted out 
with equal hand. He served the county as a member of the 
County Board of Commissioners for four years, and had 
been re-appointed for the additional term but did not serve. 
He then was nominated by the Democratic Party for a seat 
in the lower house of the General Assembly, and was elected 
by an overwhelming majority. He served his county and 
state wisely and well during the sessions of 1903 and 1904, 
and a record of his vote while he was a member of the Gen- 
eral Assembly will show that he was an active supporter of all 
constructive measures. 

All through his life Mr. Walters has been a warm friend 
of Public Education, and for a number of years, he has 
served with great acceptability as a member of the public 
school committee of District 9, which is his home district in 
Dan River Town-ship. To Mr. Walters the Governor as- 
signed the responsible task of becoming a member of the 
Tocal Board of Caswell County. In the performance of 
his many difficult and delicate duties, he made a most con- 
scientious effort to do without fear or favor the things re- 
quired of him. His genial common sense during the days 
of the war added much to the satisfactory administration of 



16 Caswell County in the World War 

tlie Selective Service Law in Caswell. Mr. Walters was 
married in 1877 to Miss Sallie Long, and from this nnion 
there are six children. Mr. Walters served his county well 
in peace and in war. He was patriotic to the core, and in 
those dark days of 1918 he showed his intense Americanism, 
and proved himself a worthy man hy his wise performance 
of difficult duties. 



FRANKLIN RUDOLPH WARREN 

Franklin Rudolph Warren was born at Prospect Hill in 
this county on the 16th day of April, 1861. His father, F. L. 
Warren, was also born at Prospect Hill. The maiden name 
of his mother was Mary F. Warren; she was also a Caswell 
County Woman. 

Mr. Warren nuirricd on December 25th, 1884, Miss Eu- 
dora Satterfield, and from this union reared a family of ten 
children, eight boys and two girls. His was the distinction 
of sending two boys into military service during the Great 
War. His eldest son, Prof. W. F. Warren, has made a 
most enviable reputation as a teacher, serving as Principal 
in se\^eral of our City High Schools, and in the City Schools 
of South Carolina. This son enlisted in the Signal Corps of 
the Army. The other son, Virgil Leroy Warren, who was 
a student at the State College at Raleigh, N. C, enlisted in 
the Students Army Training Corps. These boys by their ac- 
tions illustrate the patriotism of this family. 

Mr. Warren received the rudiments of his education in 
the Public Schools of his community, and afterwards did 
high school work at Wilson, 'N. C. Mr. Warren has for 
many years ranked among the most valuable citizens of Cas- 
well County, and he has always fearlessly espoused all causes 
tending to uplift and prosper Caswell. For many years he 
has served with great efficiency the people of his community 
as Post master at Prospect Hill. He has been engaged in a 
number of business ventures, and his management of them 
has demonstrated his practical efficiency. 



Caswell County in the Would War 17 

At the time of this writing Mr. Warren is a member of the 
County Board of Education, and is aiding materially in 
the development of our public school system. When the war 
was declared by our country against Germany and the Selec- 
tive Service Law was created, Mr. Warren, together with 
Dr. S. A. Malloy, and C. H. King was named by the Gov- 
ernor of IvTorth Carolina a member of the Local Board for 
Caswell County. Mr. Warren served as a member of the 
Local Board, and ho demonstrated fully efficient ability to 
assist in bringing about fair and just solutions of the many 
problems with which the Local Board was confronted. lie 
was relieved from the Board in the fall of 1918, and was 
succeeded by Mr. J. F. Walters. Ho was intensely patriotic, 
and in all of the many calls which the Government made upon 
us he was ready and willing to perforai his part. I had the 
honor to serve as a clerk of the Local Board of which Mr. 
Warren was a member; I know of its many exacting prob- 
lems, problems which require the use of sound, sober, serious, 
judgment. It is indeed proper to record that during those 
fearful years of 1917 and 1918 days wherein the souls of 
men were tried, Mr. Warren stood four-square, a true Amer- 
ican patriot. 

DR. STEPHEN ARNOLD MALLOY 

Stephen Arnold Malloy was born near Reidsville, in the 
County of Rockingham, October 26, 1872. His father, 
David Morton Malloy, was a native of Virginia and was 
reared in Buckingham County of that state. His mother was 
Miss Frances Elizabeth Masse}^, a native of Rockingham 
County. His boyhood was spent on his father's farm. 

He acquired the rudiments of his education in the rural 
schools of Rockingham, and was very fortunate in having 
some of the very best teachers of that day to instruct him. 
Upon the completion of the public school course, he became 
a student at Union High School at East Bend in Yadkin 
County. After completing the high school course at that 
place, he entered Guilford College, taking in addition to 



18 Ca.sweli< County in the World War 

Ilia literary course, preliiniiiary study to fit him for the work 
of his chosen profession, medicine. After the completion 
of his studies at Guilford he became a matriculate at the 
Baltimore Medical College, where he spent two years in the 
study of medicine. From Baltimore he went to the School 
of Medicine at Louisville, Kentucky, from which institu- 
tion he graduated with high honors, June 30, 1897. 

In April of the following year he succeeded in passing 
the examination prescribed by the State Board of North 
Carolina, and entered upon the practice of his profession. 
He had already made some warm friends in Caswell. These 
friends induced him to come to our coimty and look over 
the field. As a result of this survey, in June 1898, he loca- 
ed at Yanceyville, He was married May 14, 1914, to Miss 
I^annie Kerr, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John H. ivorr, 
and from this union there is one child, little Katherine 
Elizabeth Malloy. 

J^r. Malloy with his gonial sympathetic manner, ready 
service, and his devotion to his patients, soon endeared 
himself to the })eople, and from the Ijeginning his services 
have been in demand by day and night. Ho has been ex- 
ceedingly sucessful in his practice, and there are features 
of it that deserve to 1)0 permanently recorded. In the prac- 
tice of mid-wifery, out of 1424 cases he has lost only 3 
patients. This is a record that any Doctor would be ]:)roud 
of. Ho has been associated with all the public Health ac- 
tivities of the county, and on June 7, 1898, was made County 
Physician, which place he has hold with great acceptabil- 
ity since that date. He was instrumental through the assis- 
tance of Supt. Anderson, T. P. Womack, P. M. Sommers, 
and S. G. Covington in securing a hook-worm dispensary 
for this county. It will be perhaps interesting to note in 
passing the following incident : After all matters had been 
arranged to secure the appropriation for this work, which 
was three hundred dollars, a friend on the Court House 
green jocularly remarked to the Doctor, ''You are about 
to s]>ond three hundred dollars of the people's good money 
on a fad." Dr. Malloy at once caught the spirit of the re- 



Caswell County in the World War 19 

mark aud answered, ''Do you see that bo}^ yonder, how 
strong and robust he is ? He was once a pale, sickly, anae- 
mic boy. I gave him treatment for hook-worm, the treat- 
ment which I propose to offer to the people of the county, 
you see the result of it in that case. I want to say that if 
only one little child is made strong and healthy by this treat- 
ment, then the County Commissioners have spent $300 of 
the people's good money, wisely and well." He has always 
sought with earnestness, to impress upon the people's mind, 
the importance of the typhoid vaccination. 

It has been his lot to pass through three of the gTeatest 
epidemics which have ever swept over Caswell. The first 
was the smallpox epidemic in 1890, at Milton, Leasburg, 
and Pelham. He had under his immediate care more than 
six hundred cases, and how wisely and well he handled the 
situation may be judged when we say that there were only 
three deaths. The second epidemic was measles in 1915. 
I regret that I do not have the data by which we may know 
the number of eases, but scarcely a household in his prac- 
tice escaped. 

The influenza epidemic of 1918 gave him greater con- 
cern than any epidemic through which he passed. He told 
me that there was much in this epidemic that perplexed 
him. He worked faithfully night and day, this tremendous 
burden and responsibility wearing him out so that he 
contracted the disease himself. I went to the Doctor's room 
when he was suffering very much and offered to stay with 
him if I could be of service. I want to give you the lan- 
guage he used. "I am in trouble enough without you turning 
fool and getting sick. Don't you know that Mr. King is 
sick, Mr. Walters is sick, Dr. Warren is sick, and if you 
tuni up with the influenza the whole Local Board force will 
be }nit out of commission. I want you to stay well if you 
can, and keep the work of the Board going until we get 
Avell, and then if you want to give the ^flu' a trial, wo will 
take care of you the best we can." 

I might write at much length of his work as Examining 
l)hysician of the Local Board and I feel that I am guilty 



20 Caswell County in the World War 

of no impropriety when I say that no county in the state 
had a more conscientious board member. As an Examin- 
ing physician he was very fortunate in securing the ser- 
vice of Dr. Robert F. Warren, and to these gentlemen fell 
the duty of examining all the registrants of Caswell County. 
How well these duties were performed, and how satisfac- 
torily to the military authorities, may be seen in the report 
which was made by the Surgeon-General of the Army at 
Greensboro. This report gave the following: "Caswell 
County through its Examining Physician has made a per- 
fect score." Up to Decendier, 1917, only one man was re- 
jected at camp, who was sent from Caswell. The first work 
whicli fell to his lot under the Selective Service Law was 
his api^ointment by the Governor to serve with Robert L 
Mitfhelle and T. IST. Fitch as a Registration Board for 
CaswT^ll. These three men made the Board which took the 
registration of June 5th, 1917. He was next appointed a 
member of the Local Board. C. H. King, of Locust Hill 
Township, F. R. Warren of Hightowers Township, were his 
associate members. It was after the organization of this Board 
that my relations with the war work began, being named Chief 
Clerk. Mr. Warren as Board member had proved himself 
most acceptable, but on account of other pressing duties he 
was released by the Governor, and Mr. John F. Walters of 
Dan River township was named to succeed him. There 
were no further changes in the personnel of the Board during 
the war. King, Malloy, and Walters served until they were 
discharged wnth the thanks of the Government. 

December 15, 1017, the Classification system began. 
Tlie Chief Clerk was ordered to issue to each registrant a 
(piestionnaire, and Dr. Malloy being resident member of tli' 
board, it was necessary for him to keep in close touch witli 
the work of the Chief Clerk. 

I think the following incident shows the Doctor's charac- 
ter in a very fine light. I recall one night, and it was near 
midnight. I was still busy in the oifice of the Local Board, 
and was preparing for the morning's mail a large number 
of questionnaires. He knocked at the door of the office and 



Caswell County in the World War 21 

came with a cheery ''good night," but as he looked upon 
the pile of questionnaires ready for mailing, the expression 
of his face changed and he said, "Dern those infernal Ger- 
mans, I wish I could kill the last one of them. Look at that 
pile of questionnaires; do you know what they mean? It 
means that some boy, whose name is among that number 
will be killed in France and some Caswell mother's heart 
will be made sad. But Uncle Sam is going to whip the devil 
out of those infernal Huns ; you just wait until our boys get 
over there." 

I never shall forget one night the latter part of August 
1917 when he came into the office and handed me a tele- 
gram, which was an order from the Adjutant General for 
Caswell County to send five boys to Camp Jackson. I am 
sure I never saw him as serious as he was that night; I will 
never forget his words. "You and I are too tenderhearted 
for this work, still it becomes our duty to notify the first 
of the Caswell boys to report for miltary service. This 
is a fearful thing to do. Our action will carry sadness into 
the homes that have been happy." 

I could record numerous incidents, reflecting the soul and 
the spirit of the man ; but in writings like these space for- 
bids. 

But I feel it is my duty, to leave on record the state- 
ment, that in those days when the souls of men were tried 
as if by fire. Doctor Malloy proved that he was made of 
that metal out of which only men of the highest type are 
moulded. For him service for his country was sweet. 



DOCTOE EGBERT FEANKLIN WAEEEN 

Doctor Eobert Franklin Warren was bom in Person Coun- 
ty, N. C, near Prospect Hill, January 6th 1884. He is 
a son of W. A. Warren and Lula Hester Warren. His 
mother was born at Hester's Store in Person County. 

Dr. Warren's grandfathers were both Confederate sol- 
diers. His early school life was in the Public School of Per- 
son County. After finishing this course he attended the 



22 Caswell County in the World War 

A & M. College at Kaleigh, N. C, from 1901 to 1903. He 
then took a Business Course at Oak Ridge Institute in 1904; 
and for two years he was a representative of the American 
Tobacco Company. In 1907 he matriculated at the Atlanta 
School of Medicine and graduated with honor from this 
school in 1911. In June of this same year he successfully 
passed his State Examination and Licensed for the practice 
of Medicine. Dr. Malloy, who was compelled to give up 
temporarily his work at Yanceyville, requested that Dr. War- 
ren take it in charge. Here he remained for a few months. 
His work at Yanceyville was highly successful. Upon the 
return of Dr. Malloy from the hospital, Dr. Warren defin- 
itely located at Prospect Hill in the late fall of 1911. In 
this field, he is still doing the work of a practitioner with 
signal success. In November 1917, he was married to Miss 
Mary Foster, diiughter of John R. Foster of Alamance 
County. 

The above, in brief, is an outline of the personal history 
of Dr. Robert Warren. In writing what will follow, it is 
very difficult to refrain from making this sketch a personal 
one. As Clerk of the Local Board I had the privilege of 
serving through the war with Dr. Warren, who assisted Dr. 
Malloy in the physical examination of the registrants. T 
was impressed, often impreessed,with Dr. Warren's conscien- 
tious, patriotic work. He lives about twenty miles from 
Yanceyville; his practice is a large one; yet he was both 
ready and willing to make any sacrifice necessary to the ser- 
vice of his country in time of war. I am thoroughly convin- 
ced that no county in I^orth Carolina had more fearless and 
efficient Examiners than Dr. S. A. Malloy and Dr. Robert 
F. Warren. Not only was Dr. Warren ready to give his 
professional sei"vice, but he was responsive to the other 
calls of the war ; in Y. M. C. A. work, in Red Cross Work, 
in the Drive for Liberty Loans and War Saving Stamps : 
.Vt all times he was ready to give his constant co-operation. 

Dr W^arren did a great work for his country, and I feel 
that in writing the sketch of the boys which follow, we 
should keep history straight, and give to the men who 



Caswell County in the World War 29 

wrought, and who wrought well, their just meed of praise. 
Dr. Warren was a hundred per cent American ; earnest, pat- 
riotic, and fearless. As a Medical Examiner he did his 
work with much care and splendid efficiency, and he did it 
willingly. Our county should hold his efforts in grateful 
recollection. He tendered his service to the Government to 
be used at any hour that the Government might call. 



CASWELL COUNTY MILITIA 

Immediately following are the names of the men who 
were selected to make up Company 51 of North Carolina 
Reserve Militia. This roster was furnished by Mr. T. H. 
Hatchett, First Sergeant. Captain Wilson gave much valuable 
service training the men of his Company, and was very ably 
assisted by First Lieutenant, H. S. Turner. There were fre- 
quent drills on the Court House Sqiiare and on the Academy 
Campus. The men of the company were tilled with the best 
of morale and, had occasion demanded, would have given 
a good account of themselves. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY FIFTY ONE— NORTH 
CAROLINA RESERVE MILITIA 

CAPTAIN: ROBERT T. WILSON 

1st Lieut : H. S. Turner 
2nd Lieut: J. L. Warren 
1st Sergeant: T. H. Hatchett 
2nd Sergeant: J. M. Williams 
3rd Sergeant: A. Y. Miles 
1st Corporal: J. W. James 
2nd Corporal: A. W. Moorefield 
3rd Corporal: S. B. Moore 
4th Corporal: Bruce Bradner 
5th Corporal: H. M. Yarborough 
6th Corporal : W. P. Aldridge 



24 



Caswkll County in thk World War 



ROSTER OF COMPANY FIFTY-ONE, Continued: 

7th (^oiM)oral: W. O. Smith 
8th Corporal : M. C. ^Vinstead 
yth Corporal : R, L. Jones 
Chaplain: Rev. C. M. Murchison 



PRIVATES 



Adkins, W. H. 
Aldridge, G. R. 
Bradner, L. L. 
Brandon, H. F. 
Brooks, Jessie 
Cobb, Felix 
Compton, W. L. 
Cook, W. P. 
Dunneveant, W. L. 
Eastwood, George 
Eastwood, Willey 
Foster, T. T. 
Fupna, S. T. 
Fnpua, J. W. 
Gatewood, S. B. 
Graves, B. S. 
Gunn, John O. 
Gunn, E. L. 
Gwynn, J. P. 
Harrelson, P. E. 
Harrison, Robert Lea 
Hester, Allen 
Lindsay, A. C. 
Long, John 
Love, W. D. 
Lnnsford, W. T. 
Murray, J. A. 



Miles, L. A. 
Moorefield, J. E. 
Neal, Robert Lea 
Oliver, J. W. 
Oldham, G. W. 
Parrott, Robert L. 
Reagan, W. E. 
Reagan, R. W. 
Reagan, J. S. 
Riggs, P. D. 
Rudd, A. L. 
Sattorfield, Cabell 
Satterfield, I. W. 
Satterfield, W. R. 
Slaughter, J. G. 
Slaughter, T. P. 
Sutton, P. F. 
Taylor, W. L. 
Thaxton, A. S. 
Thomas, Arch 
Thomas, Joe Y. 
Taylor, D. 
Walters, J. M. 
Williamson, A. K. 
Williamson, Geo. O. 
Woods, S. G. 
Yarl)0 rough, Z. T. 



Caswell County in the World War 25 

FEOM SOME WHERE IN FRANCE 

June 3, 19 It: 
Mr. George A. Anderson, 

Dear Sir: 

I thought the people around Yanceyville would 
be interested in four of the Caswell boys so I am sending you 
a picture of the Big Four. If you will take notice you will 
perhaps see four Caswell boys. We are in the same Com- 
pany and getting on fine. It was luck that we got in the 
same Company. We were transferred from Camp Jackson 
to this outfit. 

Pelham, Purley, and Blanch, all three, are represented. 
I left Yanceyville with four other boys. I am the only one 
in this outfit ; the others I have lost track of altogether. Our 
Company is called the eyes of the army, our duty is to 
keep the aeroplanes going and we are doing our best to have 
bettei' eyes than the Germans. I think we are succeeding 
too, if you will notice the papers; we have almost put the 
Germans' eyes out. 

Give my regards to all. I am, 

Yours luckily, 

Walters J. Allen 

ON ACTIVE SERVICE 

With the American Expeditionary Force. 

May 2, 1918 
Mr. Anderson 

Dear Sir: 

When we left Yance;y^ille on September 5,1917 
for camp Jackson you asked us to let you know how we were 
getting along. Well, I have intended to write to you but 
just kept putting it off. I will give you a brief account of 
myself since then but of course I will have to omit the names 
of places over here. 

I stayed at Camp Jackson until December the 10th ; then 
I was transferred into the Motor Mechanics Signal Corps. 



26 Caswell County in the World War 

We went to Camp Hancock, stayed there for a month or so; 
from there to Camp Merritt and were there for a couple of 
weeks. Then we boarded the transport for some where in 
France, This transport is a ship that the U. S. A. took from 
Germany, and, believe me, she is some ship. That trip is 
something I never will forget. Although we had a smooth 
voyage, I got sea sick and wished several times I could die. 
But after so long a time we landed safely on the shores of 
France. 

Well the first camp we got to was a rest camp for troops 
to stay at, and we only stayed there a little while. From 
there we took a train and when we got oif we were some 
way back in France. We got to our stopping place at eight 
or nine o'clock at night, all worn out and tired, and then 
had to march to camp. It was dark and they lit 
a few lanterns; but just as we started I never heard such 
a noise in all my life; all the whistles and bells in this little 
town were going. Of course we didn't know what was the 
trouble but believe me we soon found out. All Germany 
had come over with her planes and was getting busy. All the 
lights w^ent out, and the French sent planes up after the 
othei-s until, I guess, there were forty or fifty planes. No 
one can imagine what a sight that is until he witnesses it. It 
was a clear, starry night and you could see them darting 
about in the air. The French had lights on their machines 
but the Germans didn't. Then there were search lights going 
from the ground, and now and then one of the planes would 
throw a light across the sky. 

We marched on in silence towards the camp, but things 
got so hot over our heads that we had to fall out and get 
against some buildings. About five minutes after we got up 
against the walls of stores and houses a German came over and 
dropped two bombs pretty close by. Well the buildings shook 
just like an earthquake, some of the fellows jumped up 
and began to run ; but of course it was no use to run, there 
was nowhere to go. Well, things quieted down a little, but, 
still you could see the French planes going every where ; 
so we started for camp again. We got to our barracks where 



Caswell County in the Woeld Wak 27 

some of the men were going to stay. The Captain halted 
us, and just then another plane dropped a bomb in a hun- 
dred yards of us. Now you talk about some jumping, but 
there was some done. !No one was expecting it, and every 
body went up in the air. The plane came right over my 
head, he dropped his bomb a little too soon, and no one 
was hurt. A French plane started after it, but I don't 
think he got it. The last I heard of it was the pop! pop! 
of machine gims. It is a great life, the life of an aviator, 
and I am trying to make it but don't know what I will do 
yet. Tell all of the boys not to worry about coming over 
here; it is lots of fun taking shots at those old Germans. 
Give my regard to all of the Caswell people, and tell them 
that I am expecting to come home in the course of six months. 

Yours truly, 

Walters J. Allex. 



WALTERS J. ALLEisf 

Walters J. Allen was born at Blanch, IST. C. in the county 
of Caswell May 12, 1890. His father, William Jones Allen, 
was a native of Prince Edwards County, Va., and married 
Miss Kate Walters of Caswell. 

The following is from the diary of Walters J. Allen: "I 
was voluntarily inducted by the Local Board of Caswell 
County imdei' a special call on September 5, 1917, and left 
Yanceyville IST. C, the same morning with four other boys, 
landing at Columbia, South Carolina, that night. After get- 
ting supper here, we then went out to Camp Jackson get- 
ting there about 10 o'clock, and spending the rest of the 
night in the Barracks. In a few days we were assigned to 
different companies, and I landed in the 321st, Machine Gun 
Company, and started to drilling right away. It went pretty 
hard with me at first but in a week's time I had caught on, 
and was acting corporal, and in a few weeks more received 
my warrant which made me a warrant corporal. I re- 
mained at Camp Jackson until December 10, 1917, when 
I was transferred to the 1st Company, 1st Regiment, of the 



28 Caswkll Couxty in the Wokld War 

Air Service Mecliaiiics, which was organized at Camp Han- 
cock, and after we hinded, had to walk three miles, with 
our equipment on our l)acks througli the snow out to Camp. 
There had been no preparations made for us. and we spent 
the night in the Mess Hall, hut in a few days we had our 
tents pitched, and were in pretty good circumstances. We 
stayed there long enough to get a full equipment. 

Then one morning we marched down to the station, and 
left for Camp Merritt, jST. J., remaining there for ten days 
under quarantine. Then we boarded the train on the morn- 
ing of 9th February for Hoboken preparatory to sailing 
to France. We went over on an old German freighter, that 
was taken by the Americans and renamed "President Lin- 
coln." It took us eighteen days to cross, but we landed 
without any serious trouble ; only had a storm which lasted 
about forty-eight hours. We landed at St. jSTazaire and 
marched out to Ttost Camp, No. 1, and were kept there for 
fifteen days. 

The 1st, • 2nd, and 3rd Companies of my Regiment were 
attached to the French Army, and we left St. Nazaire for 
the large Aviation Fields, located about twelve miles from 
Paris. We landed there about 10 o'clock one night, and as 
soon as we got off the train the Germans started bombing 
us ; there were about thirty planes, but it looked to me as if 
there were a thousand. We got to cover, and only one of 
us got hurt. We got three and four air raids every week, 
as long as we stayed there. Finally the ''Big Bertha," the 
German long range gun, got range on us, and we had to move 
the Aviation Field to Elampis. 1 stayed there for four 
months, repairing Aeroplanes; then I was sent off on detach- 
ment service with a bunch of men to Palesian. There I 
stayed until the Armistice was signed. My work was to 
take cars to different places where they were needed, some 
times up on the front, and sometimes to Aviation Fields. 

We were in the French Army until January 1910, when 
we were sent to the American Army, to do work with the 
Motor Truck Company, getting old cars off the battle fields 
and repairing them. T left my Company there on April 18, 



Caswell County in the World War 29 

for St. Aignan, to be attached to a special Casual Company, 
'No. 4413, and sailed from Marseilles for the good old U. S. 
A. on the "Rex T3e Italia. "We came by way of the Straits 
of Gilbraltar staying there by the side of the Rock all day ; 
we set sail and after a rather rough voyage, landed at New 
York. We were sent to MacClesfield, Long Island, where 
I got my discharge, on May 20th, 1919." 

Before leaving for over seas he was made a Sergeant in 
his Company, and he won commendation from his officers 
for the faithful and efficient way in which he dischargetl 
his duty. During his stay with the French people, soldier 
Allen tells us, he was treated with uniform kindness and 
courtesy. The French soldiers were very companionable 
fellows, and the civilian population which he came in con- 
tact with bestowed upon him many kindnesses and courtesies ; 
many times the French people expressed to him their grati- 
tude to the American people. 



WILSON" ALLEJT 

Wilson Allen was born at Semora, N. C, on the 7th day 
of February, 1897. His father, T. M. Allen, married a Miss 
Kersey. Both of these parents were natives of Caswell. 
Young Allen gTaduated from the Semora High School, and 
at the time of his enlistment into Naval Service on July 
11th, 1918, he was engaged in clerical work in Washington 
D. C. 

From the Recruiting Office in the above named city he 
was sent to the U. S. Naval Operating Base at Hampton 
Roads on August 12th, 1918. He remained at this place 
in training until November 20th, and was then put in Trans- 
port Service, being assigned to the U. S. Ship, "Aeolus." 
During his assignment to Transport duty he made seven 
trips across the Atlantic. 

The following extracts from the diary of this sailor, will 
give some idea of his active service. "I went aboard the 
"Aeolus" November 20, 1918. W^e sailed from Hampton 
Roads for New York, at which place the following day wc 



30 Caswell Cotnty in the World Wak 

took on cargo and a few passengers, and on the 1st of Dec- 
ember set sail for Bordeaux, France, It feels pretty funnv 
the first day or so, but you soon get used to it. I was never 
sea-sick, I was on the 'Aeolus" a little over ten niontbs. 
We made seven trips to France, and brought back 25,000 
of the boys. On one trip we carried to France about 2,000 
of the Czecho-Slovak Army, that had been fighting in Russia. 
During this voyage we put in to three different ports, Bor- 
deaux, St. Nazaire, and Brest; and I got two leaves of ab- 
sence which permitted me to go to Paris and also to Rheims, 
While on one of these leaves of absence I had the oppor- 
tunity of going over the battle field of Chateau Thierry.'' 

In the performance of his duties as a seaman this sailor 
made a splendid record for all round efficiency. He was 
discharged from the U. S. Naval Operating Base at Hamp- 
ton Roads, Va., on September 24th, 1919. At this writing 
lie is holding a very lucrative position in Washington, D, C. 



EARL FARRISS ALLISON 

In the years to come, when men read the wonderful story 
of the great war, doubtless many will recall the famous 
Avords; ''The Army is the clover, but the Navy took them over, 
and the Navy brought them back,'' 

Earl Farriss Allison, seaman in the U, S. Navy, enlisted 
at the age of sixteen. He was born in the county of Caswell, 
September 22, 1901, He Avas the youngest son of -Joseph 
C. Allison, and Mollie A. Allison, wdiose maiden name was 
Mollie A. Mitchell, The father of this young sailor was 
:i native of Orange (*onnty, and saw service for four years 
in the Confederate Army, This parent was very prominent 
in the social and ix)litical life of Caswell, and for many 
years was a member of the Board of County Commissioners, 
and was also very prominent in Masonic circles. 

Earl Allison received his education in the Public Schools 
of this county. Afterward he attended the Farm Life 
School at Swannanoa, near Asheville, As has been previ- 
ously stated, he enlisted July 10th 1917. and was sent to 



Caswell County in the Wokld War 31 

the Naval Training Station at Newport, R. I. He re- 
mained in the Navy for two years and four months, and 
while in the uniform of his country he passed through many 
thrilling experiences. He saw active service on the follow- 
ing ships: U. S. "Maine," U. S. Destroyer "Preble," the 
"William Rockefeller,'' and the "Sylvan Arrow," these 
two being Oil Tankers; and the U. S. Cruiser, Chicago. 
During his service he visited the following countries : Scot- 
land, England, France, Columbia, Brazil, Panama, Hon- 
duras, San Salvador, Mexico, Ne^vfoundland, and British 
Indies. He also made one trip from New York City to San 
Francisco by way of the Panama Canal. 

The most thrilling experience which came to this brave 
young sailor was the time when his ship "The William 
Rockefeller,*' was torpedoed by a German submarine off 
the Coast of Scotland. The "Rockefeller" was sunk, and 
young Allison's life was saved, almost by a miracle. As 
his ship was sinking, he dived through a port hole, into the 
open sea, where he luckily made his way to a lifeboat. 
It will be of interest that we keep on record an accurate 
description of this occurrence, which we have gathered from 
his diary. "We were torpedoed about seven o'clock, P. M., 
on May 18, 1918, eight miles off Petershead, Scotland. 
At this time we were being accompanied by another ship, 
carrying oil, and convoyed by the English Destroyers. Noth- 
ing was seen of the U-boat, until after we had been hit. 
Several shots were fired from our ship, and a couple of 
depth bombs were dropped by one of the Convoys; whether 
this Sub-marine was destroyed by the depth bomb I do not 
know. We were stranded in our life boats for about fifteen 
minutes, and then picked up by a Destroyer, and that night 
carried into port." All through the war, this young sailor 
was in constant and active service, and, until he was dis- 
charged, after the war, he was engaged in doing the great 
work which fell to the Navy in those days. 

On October 20th, 1919 he was discharged from service. 
Young Allison since his return to his home has been employed 
by a large commercial establishment, and is at present located 



32 Caswell Coua^ty in the Would War 

at Reidsville, N. i\ He is a brother of E. A. Allison, our 
( *onntv Treasurer. 



KENNETH GORDON AN'DERSONT 

Kenneth Gokuon Anderson, who was a Yeoman in the 
U. S. Naval Reserve Force, was born in Caswell County, 
on March Sth, 1897. His father, George A xVnderson, mar- 
ried Miss Mary Elizabeth Slade, both of these parents 
being native born Caswell Comity people. On his mother's 
side, his grandfather was Capt. Ezekiel Slade, an old Con- 
federate Veteran, who served through the civil war, as a 
meinber of Rheinhart's Cavalry. His great grandfather, on 
his maternal side was Thomas Harrison, a veteran of the 
Revolutionary war. On his paternal side, he is a grandson 
of Dr. John Qninton Anderson, and on his father's mater- 
nal side, his great great grandsire, \Villian! Hickerson Rice, 
was a veteran of the Revolutionary war, who fought with 
the North Carolina Militia at the IJattle of Guilford C'ourt 
House. 

Kenneth Anderson attended the Public Schools in Caswell, 
his first work being done at the old Bellefield school house 
in Anderson Township. His parents moving to Yancey ville 
in 1905, he there attended the graded and high school. x\f- 
ter finishing this course he accepted a ])osition as Shipping 
Clerk in tlie Glen Raven Cotton IMills, near Burlingfon, in 
Alamance County, and was at work' there when war was 
declared against Germany. 

In June 1918 he resigned his position which he held at 
the Glen Raven Cotton Mills, and oflcred himself for enlist- 
ment in the 11. S. Navy before the Recruiting Officer in 
Raleigh, and was received for service. lie was sent to the 
U. S. Naval Operating Base at Hampton Roads for his pre- 
liminary training. During this training he was transferred 
to the Yeoman Branch of the service, and finishing the re- 
quired course, was made a Yeoman. The Armistice |)Ut- 
ting and end to hostilities, he did not see war-time service, 
but was transferred to the U. S. S., "Prometheus", this be- 



Caswell County in the World War 33 

ing the mother-ship for the Atlantic Battleship Fleet. After 
several months service on board this ship, he was transferred 
to the U. S. S., 'Trincess Matoika", and was ordered over- 
seas. 

While in transport service he crossed the Atlantic four 
times. His first voyage was by way of the Azores, to St. 
i!^azaire, from which place they brought back to ISTew York, 
about 6000 soldiers. The second voyage was from JSTew 
York to St ]SI"azaire, bringing home American Troops, land- 
ing at Charleston S. C. His next trip was possibly his most 
interesting one, carrying from Charleston, S. C, a large num- 
ber of German prisoners, who had been interned in America 
during the war. As he stated in one of his letters, ''we are 
carrying back to Rotterdam, Holland, a very motley crew. 
We have all grades of Germans, from Sea Captains, down 
to the crew of treacherous Germans who scuttled the Vater- 
land, and also a number of German spies, the entire num- 
ber being about 2200." These prisoners were carried to 
Eotterdam, Holland, and there turned ovjier to Military 
authorities. He came back from Eotterdam through the 
ISTorth Sea, and England Channel, to Brest ; taking on there 
a ship load of American soldiers, landing at New York. 
His fourth and last trip was to Brest, bringing back, this 
time, a large labor brigade. While he was at Brest, he was 
given a seven days leave of absence, and during this time 
he had the opportunity of visiting many of the battle-fields 
in France; visiting such cities as Soissons and Rheims, 
spending more than a day at Chateau Thierry; and did 
much sight-seeing in Paris. He came back to N"ew York, 
at which place the "Princess Matoika," went out of com- 
mission, and he was sent to the Naval Operating Base at 
Hampton Roads, and there placed on the Receiving Ship 
imtil the 29th day of September 1919, when he was dis- 
charged from active service. 

RALPH WALKER ANDERSON 
Ralph Walker Anderson, who enrolled his name in the 
Registration of June 5, 1917, was born in the County of 
3 



34 Caswell County in the "World Wab 

Caswell, in Stony Creek Township. His father, Quentin 
Thach Anderson, was a Confederate Soldier, who served in 
Company H of the 6th Regiment of the Army of I^orthern 
Virginia. His mother, whose maiden name was Jennie 
Walker, was also horn in this connty. The grandfather of 
young Anderson was Albert Anderson, a Minister of the 
Gospel of the Christian Chnrch, who at one time was Prin- 
cipal of the Church School at Graham, JS[. C. This school 
is, perhaps, the first school founded by the Christian Church. 
At the time of his induction in the Military Service the 
young soldier who is the subject of this sketch was a Ship- 
ping Clerk in one of the large Cotton Mills in Danville, 
Virginia. On physical examination, he was placed in limited 
service. He earnestly requested the Clerk of the Local Board 
to be inducted into military service at the first opportunity 
and under a call for limited service men, he was sent in the 
spring of 1918, to Camp Humphries and placed in the 
Engineer Corps. He was at this place when the Armistice 
was signed, and was discharged in December 1918. After 
his discharge he made another effort to get back into the 
service, but on account of his physical defect, lack of eye- 
sight, he was rejected. Since his return to civil life he has 
expressed his great disappointment in not being able to do 
over seas service. 



HARVEY JAMES BARKER 

Harvey Jaivies Barker was born November 3rd, 1895, 
in Milton Town-ship of this county. His father, William 
H. Barker, married Miss Laura Bray of Woodsdale, Va. 
His grandsire, James E. Barker, was a Caswell County 
Confederate Veteran who saw active service during the entire 
period of the Civil War. This young soldier did the usual 
work of the seven grades in the county public schools, and 
upon the completion of same, was a student at Milton, in 
the High School at that place. 

At the time of his induction into military sirvice he was 
actively engaged in farm operations. On September 17, 



Caswell County in the World "War 35 

1917, with a contingent of Caswell boys, he left Yanceyville 
for Camp Jackson, S. C. After preliminary training at 
Camp Jackson he was transferred to Camp Sevier, his en- 
tire training covering a period of nine months. He was 
placed in Company A of the 306th Train Headquarters 
of the 81st Division, and was sent to Camp Mills, preparatory 
to his sailing over seas. 

On July 30, 1918, he set sail on the "Megantic" from 
J^ew York, and after a safe voyage through the submarine 
infested zone, he landed at Liverpool, England. At this 
place he was detained for a short while in a rest camp and 
then sent across the English Channel to France, by the 
usual route of transportation. He saw active military service 
in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. The signing of the Armis- 
tice found him with his Division in the battle area of France. 
He remained ovei- seas until June 25, of the following year, 
doing the allotted duties of the men of the 81st Division. 
Before returning home he had the privilege of visiting 
many of the historic places and cities of France. He was 
brought home on the U. S. S. "Martha Washington," land- 
ing at Charleston, S. C. From this port he was sent to 
Camp Jackson, and was discharged from that place on June 
25, 1919. The service record of this soldier, while in the 
uniform of his country, was one of splendid efficiency. He 
is now actively engaged in farming in Milton Township 
of this County. 



WILLIAM LUCIAI^ BAENETT 

William Lucian Barnett was born in the County of 
Person in this State on November 17th, 1892. His father, 
William Thomas Barnett, a native of Person County, mar- 
ried Miss :Narcissa Virginia Turner of Halifax County, Va. 
On his paternal side his grandfather, Benjamin Thomas 
Barnett, was a brave old Confederate soldier who fought 
during the war between the States. This family moved to 
Caswell a few years ago and set up their home near Pros- 
pect Hill in High Towers Town-ship. Lucian Barnett had 



36 Caswell County in the World War 

the privilege of completing the usual Public School course, 
and afterwards of attending the Leaksville-Spray Institute, 
in Rockingham County. 

He enrolled his name in the ranks of the National Army 
in the June registration of 1917, and on September 17th, 
following this registration he was sent with a contingent of 
Caswell boys to Camp Jackson, S. C, and later transferred 
to Camp Sevier. He remained in Camp for eight months, 
and, when he was fitted out for over-seas service, it fell to 
his lot to be placed in Co. 1, 120th Eegiment 30th Divi- 
sion. On May 17th he set sail for France, leaving Boston, 
Mass., on the Transport ''Militiades", and after a safe 
voyage across, landed in England on June -1th, 1918. He 
was sent across the Channel, landing at Calais, France, 
on June 5th. For a short while he remained with the men 
of his Divi-sion in a Rest Camp. 

As a soldier of the immortal 30th Division he was in 
numerous engagements. It is needless for us to name the 
activities of young Barnett during his service with the 30th 
Division, except to say that he did a man's part in all of 
these fierce conflicts; but it should be recorded with much 
care for the sake of history that this Caswell Soldier was 
in the ranks of those immortal warriors who broke the Hin- 
denburg Line. And when we read in the larger history of 
the war about the wonderful engagements we will point with 
just pride to the fact that this Caswell boy helped to per- 
from one of the mightiest military feats of the world's his- 
tory. It is with a sense of genuine gratification that we 
record the fact that he passed through these battles un- 
scathed, with the exception of being gassed on one occa- 
sion. This dreaded infliction, however, proved to be not 
very serious. He was at Beaucourt, France, when the Ar- 
mistice put an end to hostilities. He remained in France 
until April 1st of the following year, doing the required 
work of the men of his Division, and while remaining there 
he had the opportunity of visiting many of the historical 
places and beautiful cities of our sister Republic. On April 
1st, 1919, he set sail from St. Kazarre, on the U. S. S., 
"Martha Washington'', and landed safely at Charleston, S. 



Caswell County in the World War 37 

C. 'Next we find him at Camp Jackson, from which phice 
he was discharged on April 18th. The Ami}- Serial Num- 
ber of this ex-service man was 1321381. 



BASCOM THOENTON^ BAYNES 

Bascom Thoenton Baynes was born in Anderson Town- 
ship in Caswell County on August 4th 1892. He is the eld- 
est son of James E. Baynes and Ella Baynes. His mother's 
maiden name was Ella Harrelson. The grandfather of this 
young soldier on his father's side was Thornton Baynes. 
This grandparent was very popular, and one of the most 
beloved men of South Caswell. 

It will be interesting to note that the mother of young 
Baynes had five brothers in Confederate service, and in or- 
der to give some of the family history, we feel that it is 
proper to record their names : Brice Harrelson, who was 
wounded in that famous fight between the ''Merrimac'' and 
the ''Monitor," in Hampton Eoads. This uncle, being a 
sailor of the Confederacy, was serving at that time on the 
ill-fated ''Merrimac." A second uncle, Allen Harrelson, 
fought through the entire period of the Civil War, and re- 
ceived a very painful, but happily, not a very serious wound 
at the last charge at Appomattox. Logan Harrelson, Will- 
iam Harrelson, and Matthew Harrelson, saw active and 
strenuous service from 1861 to 1865. 

The first school which Bascom Baynes attended was 
taught by the writer of this sketch. I am pleased to record 
here, that no teacher ever had a more faithful and obedient 
pupil. At a very early age he was clerk in his father's 
stO]-e, and began there to develop marked business ability. 
After finishing his Public School Course in Caswell he en- 
tered Oak Eidge Institute, and while a Student at that In- 
stitute, he graduated in the Commercial Department. He 
was recommended for a position in the Odell Hardware 
Store of Greensboro, N^. C, and was in the employ of this 
large concern when war between the United States and 
Germany was declared. 



38 Caswell County in the World War 

Inheriting the patriotism of his ancestors, he resigned 
his position with this Company, went to Ealeigh, and offered 
liimself for enlistment in the U. .S„ l^avj. However, his 
physical examination disclosed certain defects which made 
him nnfit for ISTaval Service, and he was rejected. On 
March 24th, 1918, he was inducted into Military service 
by the Local Board at Greensboro and sent to Camp Jack- 
son for training. He remained at this Camp for a period 
of seven months. He was assigned to the Hospital Corps 
of the Army; later he was transferred to Camp Mills, 
X. Y. 

On October 10th, he sailed on the Transport, "Olympia," 
and landed at Southhampton. From this port he crossed 
over the English Channel, to Cherbourg, France, and was 
then placed in service in the Medical Evacuation Hospital 
'No. 26, in the Meuse-Argonne Sector, where he did first aid 
work. From that period until the time of the signing of 
the Armistice he was continually in service, being near Ver- 
dun when hostilities ceased. After the signing of the Ar- 
mistice he was attached to the Rainbow Division and sent in- 
to Germany as a part of the Army of Occupation. He re- 
mained with this Division until it sailed for America. Next 
he went to Coblenz and was there placed with the Army 
Motor Troops. At this place he performed active duties from 
May 25th to July 10th. After this latter date, he came 
back through Belgium, to Brest and thence home. Wliile 
in France he had the privilege of visiting many of the French 
cities and a number of historic places of that country. Among 
the places visited in France were Paris^ Toul, Marseilles, 
Le Mans, !N"ancy, and in addition, he visited the battle fields 
of Chateau Thierry, and Belleau Wood. He was fortunate 
that his visit to Paris was timed so that he was able to be 
present at the Gala Fete, July llth, 1919. While he was 
in service he also visited Brussels, passed through Luxem- 
burg, and had a two days stay at Metz. On July 23rd, he 
sailed from Brest), on the TJ. ^. S., "Prindess Matoika," 
landing at New York, on August 8th. 

It will be interesting, we know, to record the following 
concerning two Caswell boys ; the boy-hood homes of Bascom 



Caswell County in the World War 39 

Thornton Baynes and Kenneth Gordon Anderson, were in 
two miles of each other; Anderson was a Yeoman, in the 
U. S. ^STavy, and the "Princess Matoika/' was his ship; 
these two boys came across the Atlantic, all the way from 
Brest to N^ew York, and neither knew of the presence of the 
other. After remaining in New York for a few days, he 
was sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, and there discharged on 
August 10th, 1919. His Army Serial Number was 1861131. 
It is worth while to conclude this sketch, by saying that im- 
mediately upon his return he was notified by the Odell Hard- 
ware people that the position which he held with them be- 
fore entering service was awaiting him. He is now in 
Greensboro with his old employers, serving them in a most 
responsible and efficient capacity. 



JAMES ^MACON BAYNES 

James Macon Baynes was born in Anderson Town-ship, 
Caswell County, March 27th 1896. He is a son of James 
E. Baynes, and Ella Harrelson Baynes. His grandfather, 
Thornton Baynes, for many years ranked among the most 
popular and useful men of South Caswell. The mother of 
young Baynes had five brothers in the Confederate service, 
and in order to give some of the family history of this young 
man, we will record their names : Brice Harrelson, who was 
wounded in that famous fight in the Hampton Roads, be- 
tween the ''Merrimac" and the ^Monitor,'' he being a sailor 
of the Confederacy, and serving on the ''Merrimac ;" another 
uncle, Allen Harrelson, fought through the entire period of 
the Civil War, and received a very painful, but happily, 
not a dangerous wound, in the last charge at Appomattox. 
Three other uncles, I^ogan Harrelson, William Harrelson, 
and Matthew Harrelson, saw active and strenuous service 
during the struggle from 1861 to 1865. 

The early education of young Baynes was received in the 
Public Schools of Caswell, and for six years he was a pupil 
of Superintendent Anderson. On July 5th 1918 he was called 
by his Local Board for induction and sent to Camp Jackson, 



40 Caswell County in the World Wab ' 

S. C. Here he was placed in the Medical Corjjs of the Army. 
His Unit did not go over-seas the Armistice having put 
an end to hostilities. He was held at Camp Jackson for 
evacuation service until June 15th 1919, when he was dis- 
charged. At the time of his inducion into military service 
he was Clerk in the Store of Baynes k Harrelson, and since 
his discharge from the Army he has been happily married 
to Miss Lucille Warren. 

LIEUTENANT HUNTEE BLACKWELL 

Lieutenant Rufus Hunter Blackwell was born in 
Caswell County in Anderson Township. His father, Rufus 
Hunter Blackwell, married Miss Birdie Anderson, daughter 
of Dr. John Q. Anderson of Anderson Township. He re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools of Caswell 
County and in the city shools in Waynesville, !N". C. his 
parents having moved from Caswell to that city. 

At the age of seventeen he enlisted in the United States 
Navy and served as a gunner and a mechanician, his enlist- 
ment period expiring a short while before the breaking out 
of hostilities against Germany. He decided to re-enlist at 
once. He was accepted for aviation service and was among 
the first to be sent across for work in European waters. His 
outfit was stationed at a base in Scotland, from which base, 
with his plane he made many flights over the North Sea 
and Channel, all this while keeping a lookout for German 
Submarines, and assisting repeatedly in the bombing of Ger- 
man submarine bases. Although he saw exceedingly strenuous 
service in this very dangerous sphere of action, he luckily 
escaped injury. Tlie war having ended he was discharged 
with the rank of Lieutenant, and today he is in the employ 
of the United States Government as a teacher at one of the 
Government's large aviation fields. 

JAMES YANCEY BLACKWELL 

James Yancey Blackwell, a volunteer soldier in the 
great war, was born near Ruffin, on the 27th day of March, 



Caswell County in the World War 41 

1888. His parents, John B. Blackwell and Lelia E. Black- 
well were natives of Caswell County. This young soldier 
was a great grandson of James Roach, a Revolutionary 
Volunteer, who fought with splendid bravery in that great 
struggle for American Liberty. This grandsire lies buried in 
the Wolf Island graveyard near Reidsville, ]^. C. The early 
educational advantages of the subject of this sketch were 
as follows : After finishing the Public School Course of 
Caswell, he was a student for several sessions at the A. & M. 
College at Raleigh, 

Young Blackwell placed his name on the registration list, 
June 5, 1917, and on July 24 he volunteered for service. 
His enlistment papers were sigiied with Battery E. a Mili- 
tary Company organized in the city of Danville, Va. He 
was sent with this Company to Camp McClellan, and after- 
wards transferred to Anniston, Alabama. He was given 
the assignment of a Farrier in the Detached Veterinary 
Service of the 104th Train Headquarters, 29th Division. 
After eleven months service in various training camps he 
sailed over-seas on July 6, 1918, from 'New York, on the 
transport, "Louisville." He landed at Liverpool, England 
and was sent across the channel from Southampton to 
Le Havre. Young Blackwell participated in a number of 
battles, skirmishes, and expeditions. He was almost con- 
tinually engaged in battle, in Haute Alsace, from July 25 
to Sept. 20, 1918; and with the army near Verdun, from 
Sept. 25, to Oct. 7. His Division did constant fighting in 
the drive on the East bank of the Meuse River, from Octo- 
ber 18th to the 31st. 

In an official memorandum of this Company the following 
is a list of engagements with which the 29th Division is 
credited. From July 25 to Sept. 23, defending the Center 
Sector, Haute Alsace; on Oct. 8, the battles of Molbroke 
Hill; Oct. 10, the battle of Molleville Farm; Oct 11, attack 
on Bois D'Ormont; Oct 16 attack on the great Montague; 
Oct. 23 capture of Etraye Ridge; Oct 26, attack on Bois 
Belleau. These latter battles were a result of the campaign 
north of Verdun. Fortunately, this brave young soldier was 
not the recipient of any wounds. At the time of the signing 



42 Caswell County in the World Wae 

of the Armistice lie was at Combles. After the time of the 
signing of the Armistice, until he sailed home he did the 
routine work that was allotted to the 29th Division. He 
sailed from St. Nazaire on the "Manchuria," sailing date 
being May 12, 1919, and landed at Hoboken, IST. J. He was 
sent to Camp Dix on June 2, 1919, and there received his 
discharge from service. His Army Serial ISTumber was 
1272417. 

It will be interesting to note in closing this sketch, that 
the symbol of the 29th Division, (blue and gray) was de- 
signed by Mrs. Woodrow Wilson. This is a Korean Symbol, 
and has an allusion to the Union of the ISTorth and South. 



JOHN REID BLACKWELL 

John Reid Black well_, who was sent to the Army from 
the State of ^^irginia, was born in Caswell County, near 
Ruffin, July 27th 1894. He was a son of John B. Blackwell, 
Jr., and Lelia E. Blackwell. He was a brother of James 
Yancey Blackwell, the subject of the preceding sketch. 

This young soldier received the rudiments of his educa- 
tion in the public Schools of Caswell County, and after- 
ward attended the High School at Ruffin. He was sent to 
Camp on October 21, 1918, by his Local Board, and was 
assigned to Ft. Washington Md., for training. At this 
camp he was placed in the Coast Artillery, and here he 
remained for two months. While he was in camp await- 
ing orders to sail the Armistice was signed, and on Decem- 
ber 20th, 1918, he was discharged from Ft. Washington, 
Maryland. Before entering service, the occupation of this 
young soldier was that of a farmer. 



THOMAS DIXOT^T BOSWELL 

This soldier, who was honorably discharged from service 
in the TJ. S. Army on the 3rd day of April, 1919, was 
born at Fitch, N. C. on the 27th day of April 1887. At 



Caswell County in the World Wab 43 

the time of his induction into military service he was a 
farmer. His father, B. B. Boswell, who married Miss Annie 
Elizabeth Donoho, has been for many years one of the most 
successful farmers in his section of the county. The grand- 
father of this soldier on his mother's side was Thomas Don- 
oho, a Veteran of the Civil War; who did valiant service, 
during four years in the Army of Northern Virginia. 

The educational qualifications of Thomas Dixon Boswell 
were such as could be obtained in the Public School of Cas- 
well. After finishing the seven grades he attended for two 
sessions the High School at Yanceyville, where he made 
a very excellent record by reason of his studious habits and 
attention to duty. On March 22nd 1918, he was sent to 
Camp Jackson, S. C. Here he was placed in Company M 
of the 118th Regiment of the 30th Division. After two 
months training he passed his over-seas examination and on 
June 5th was sent over-seas, sailing from Montreal, Canada, 
on an English Transport, "The Asquama," and landed at 
Liverpool. 

We need not trace in this sketch the war activities of 
this soldier further, because the splendid achievements and 
the wonderful accomplishments of the 30th Division are writ- 
ten in the large histories where all men may read them, but 
we say with much emphasis that through all the dangers 
and the fearful activities of the 30tli Division Thomas 
Dixon Boswell, a Caswell boy, on the fields of France, did 
his duty like a man. After the Armistice was signed he 
remained in France until March 17th 1919. 

While in France he had the opportunity of visiting nearly 
all the places of interest which were sought after by the 
American soldiers, Paris, of course, being included in the 
number of places. He sailed from Brest on the U. S. S. 
"Pocahontas,'' and landed at Charleston S, C. We should 
note here that when Company M. of the 30th Division ar- 
rived in America this Division paraded through the 
streets of Charleston. We have all read about that parade, 
and of the wonderful enthusiasm that attended it ; young 
Boswell was in this parade. Since his return from service, 



44 Caswell County in the World War 

he has taken up active work on his farm near Fitch, N. C. 
His Army Serial Number was 1880436. 



JOHiS^ CLAUD BKADI^ER 

John Claud Beadxek was born in Pittsylvania County, 
State of Virginia, on the 14th day of October 1890. This 
young man was a son of John Bradner, who was a native of 
Virginia. We may well record in passing, that no braver 
soldier ever followed Lee. He gave three years and six 
months of his life to the service of his beloved South-land, 
and when he died in this county, he carried on his body, 
honorable scars which he received in that terrible third day's 
fight at Gettysburg, The mother of this young man, Miss 
Mairtha J. Bird, was also from Virginia. These parents 
moved to this State about 20 odd years ago, and lived for 
a while in Pelham Town-ship, near Shady Grove Church ; 
afterwards, Mr. Brander purchased a farm near the town 
of Yanceyville, and moved his family to that place. In this 
home John reached his years of Man-hood, and enrolled his 
name in the great Army of the Republic on June 5th 1917. 
This young soldier attended the Public Schools of Caswell, 
including two years at the Yanceyville High School. After 
the widowhood of his mother young Bradner with his broth- 
ers was engaged farming on the farm left to them by 
their father. 

Inheriting the patriotism of his honorable father, John 
Bradner accepted with willingness the call of his Local 
Board; and in the early spring of 1918 he was sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C, for training. At this place he was assigned 
to Co. B., 306th Ammunition Train, of the 81st Division. 
On the 4th day of August of this same year he was ordered 
over-seas, sailing from Holwken, I^. J. on a British trans- 
port, "The Crittic,'' and after a voyage of eleven days landed 
at Liverpool. From that port, he was sent across the Chan- 
nel to Le-Havre. In the Argonne Forest and on the Verdun 
Front, this young soldier was called upon to do strenuous 
service, supplying the 321st, 322nd, and 323rd Infantry. 



Caswell County in the World War 45 

As a member of the Ammunition Train, lie had to go into 
many parts of France. However, at the time of the sign- 
ing of the Armistice he was doing active work near Verdun. 
At this point it will be interesting to record that at the 
time when Paris was in consternation as a result of the long 
range bombardment from "Big Bertha," he was stationed 
in Paris, and witnessed there the scenes which followed 
as a result of this terrible bombardment. After the sign- 
ing of the Armistice, up to the time of his embarkation 
for home, he did the usual work as was required in his line 
of service, and during this period he had the privilege of 
visiting the following interesting cities: Paris, Bordeaux, 
Brest, Toul, and Nancy. 

He came home from the port of Marseilles, and was on 
the Transport, 'Tanonia," which was a British ship. This 
vessel came home by way of Gibraltar. He was held there 
for twelve days in order that his ship might take on coal 
and other supplies. During the progress of this voyage 
soldier Bradner could see from the deck of his vessel the 
long, low, sandy coast of Africa. He arrived in the United 
States at JSTew York, and was sent to Camp Mills, from 
which place he was discharged on June 11th 1919. Immed- 
iately upon his return to his home, he took up his accus- 
tomed work on his mother's farm, and at this writing he is 
actively engaged in farm operations. His Army Serial 
Number was 2992952. 



EMMETT HARROLD BRANDON 

Emmett Harrold Brandon was born in Halifax County, 
Ya., on July 31, 1888, being a son of Alex Andrew Brandon 
of Halifax County, Ya., and Isabella Mise of Henry County, 
Ya. He attended the Public Schools of Halifax County, 
and also of Caswell, and before his call to service was asso- 
ciated with his father in farm work. 

He was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, May 29, 1918, and 
was trained for the 306th Trench Motor Battery of the 81st 
Division, but remained at Camp Jackson only two months, 



46 Caswell County in the "World War 

and was sent overseas, July 31st 1918, sailing from ISTew 
York on a British transport and arriving at Liverpool. 
His service while in France may be read in the record of 
the 81st Division, which is a matter of general history. He 
was in Verdun at the time of the signing of the Armistice, 
and on March 9, 1918, he was sent home from St. JSTazaire, 
sailing on the U. S. S. 'Trincess Matoika," This ship rode 
out a very severe storm for three days, but landed at 
]S"ewport 'News in safety. From this place he was sent to 
Camp Lee, Va., and discharged here on April 1, 1919. 

Young Brandon has a record of being an efficient soldier 
and is now engaged in farm operations near Yanceyville, 
N. C. ^ ^ 

HAKVEY HAMILTON BRANDOI^ 

Haevey Hamilton Brandon was born in Halifax 
County, Virginia, June 23, 1896. His father, Alexander 
Brandon, married Miss Isabella Mise. He is a lineal descen- 
dant of a Confederate Soldier ; his grandfather on his moth- 
er's side having seen active service in the war between the 
States. At the time of the opening of the war, he was a 
helper on his father's farm near Yanceyville, N". C, The 
education of young Brandon was obtained in the Public 
Schools of Caswell. 

On September 6, 1918, he was called by his Local Board, 
and received his induction into Military Service, and was 
sent with a contingent of other Caswell Boys, to Camp Jack- 
son, S. C. There he was assigned for service in the Re- 
placement Artillery. After completing his necesary train- 
ing, he was iitted for over-seas service, sailing from N"ew- 
port ISTews. He had this very remarkable experience; on 
ISTovember 11, on the Transport, ^'Shenandoah," his ship 
l)eing seven hours out at sea, a wireless message was received 
informing the Captain of the ship of the Armistice, where- 
upon, his ship returned to ISTewport ISTews, Virginia. After 
remaining a few days at that place, he was sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C. for demobilization, and there discharged on 
the 24 day of Januarv 1919. 



Caswell County in the "World War 47 

LIMMIE HASSELL BRIGGS 

LiMMiE Hassell Bkiggs^ who registered on August 12th 
1918, was born in Person County, August 24th 1896. He 
was a son of James Briggs, and Emma Clayton Briggs, 
both of these parents being natives of this County. This 
family moved to Caswell in 1903, and located near Leas- 
burg. This young man received his education in the schools 
of Person and Caswell County, and at the time of the registra- 
tion he was actively engaged in farm work on his father's 
farm. 

On August 30th 1918 he was inducted by his Local Board 
into Military service, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. ; 
here he was trained for over-seas service, when the signing 
of the Armistice put an end to hostilities. He remained at 
Camp Jackson until the 21th day of January, 1919, and 
on this date he was discharged. Immediately upon return- 
ing to Caswell he resumed his agricultural activities. 



BEI^JAMII^ FRANKLIN BROOKS. 

Benjamin Franklin Brooks, a Caswell County soldier 
who was destined to lose his life in the service of his country, 
enrolled his name in the ranks of the National Army in 
the registration of 1918. He attained his twentyfirst birth- 
day just a short time before this registration was held. His 
father, Sam Brooks, married Miss Long, both of these parents 
being natives of Person County. Young Brooks saw the light 
of day in that County. This family moved to Caswell sev- 
eral years ago and set up their home in Hightowers Town- 
ship. Young Brooks received the usual education to 
be obtained in the Public schools, and at the time of his 
registration was actively engaged in farming. 

On August 5, 1918, he answered the call of his Local 
Board and was sent to Camp Wadsworth for training. He 
was given an Infantry assignment, and his comrades tell us 
that he developed into a very high type of a soldier. In 
the early days of October 1918, he was sent overseas, sailing 



48 Caswell County in the World War 

from Newport News, Va., and lauding at St. Nazaire. Dur- 
ing the voyage across the Atlantic, he became ill. His ill- 
ness developed into pneumonia, and three days after he 
landed on French soil he breathed his last. With Military 
honors, and wrapped in the flag of his country, he was 
buried in the Military Cemetery at St. Nazaire. This soldier 
of freedom made the supreme sacrifice. All that is mortal 
of him remains in a foreign land, but his spirit still abides 
with us, and through years to come let us hold in reverence 
the sacrifice of this num. 



THOMAS BUCKS 

Thomas Bucks of Casw^ell County volunteered and was 
accepted for service in Company M., May 1st 1917, He 
had not reached, at the time of his volunteering, the age 
of twenty-one. He was born in Caswell County, August 
2nd, 1897, being the son of John Bucks, and Lucy Hamlet 
Bucks. On his mother's side, he was a descendant of an 
old confederate soldier, Jesse Hamlet. 

He was sent with Company M. to Camp McClellan, wdiere 
he remained for eleven months, and was placed in Company 

C. of the 116th Regiment of the 29th Division. He was 
sent over-seas on June, 15th 1918, sailing on a transport, 
"The Finland," from Hoboken, N. J., landing July 1st, at 
St. Nazaire. Just after his arrival in France he was placed 
in the Argonne Sector. He fought in a number of battles 
during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, and during those ter- 
rible actions in the Argonne Forest he received a very ser- 
ious wound. A piece of shrapnel hit him on his side; and as 
a result of this wound, he was sent to Base Hospital, No. 26, 

D. Ward, where he was tenderly nursed. Here he remained 
for two months and was in this Hospital at the time of the 
signing of the Armistice. On March 1st, 1919, he sailed 
from St. Nazaire, and landed safely at New York. From 
this port of debarkation, he was sent to Camp Meade Md., 
and there, on April 15th, received his discharge. The Army 
Serial Number of Young Bucks was 12. 



Caswell County in the World War 49 

DKUE FEANCIS BUKTON 

Deue Feancis Bueton whose Army Serial ISTumber was 
1363976, was a volunteer in the great war. His father, 
T. J. Burton, was a native of Anderson Town-ship, in this 
county. His mother, whose maiden name was Miss Margaret 
Trollinger, was a native of Catawba County. From this 
union Drue Francis Burton was born February 26th, 1894, 
He attended the Public Schools of Caswell, and for several 
years, he was a student of Supt. Anderson. After finishing 
his public course he attended for two years the High School 
at Stony Creek in Alamance County. 

His enlistment papers were signed May 6th, 1917, at 
Greensboro, N. C, and he was sent to Ft, Thomas, Ky., 
for training. Here he was made Corporal, and afterwards, 
Sergeant in the Veterinary Corps of the Mobile Veterinary 
School, member of 7th Division. The length of his service 
was two years and four months. He was sent over-seas on 
August 16th, 1918, sailing from Hoboken, New Jersey on 
a French Transport, "The Magaia," and landed at Bor- 
deaux. In his work as a Veterinary Sergeant young Bur- 
ton was sent practically all over France and Luxemburg, 
He saw active service in the battles which raged in the 
Puvenelle Sector, west of Moselle, and also in the occupa- 
tion of this same sector. The record of young Burton, as 
made out officially, is one of which he may well be proud. 

After the signing of the armistice he was detailed for 
much responsible work, and in this active service he had 
the privilege of visiting Paris and practically all the most 
interesting places of France. He sailed for America July 
23rd, 1919, from Brest, France, on the U, S, S., "Santa 
Clara,'' and landed at Brooklyn, IST. Y. From here he was 
sent to Camp Lee, and there received his discharge on 
August 16th, 1919. At the time of his induction into Mili- 
tary service he was an Employee in one of the large Carne- 
gie Manufacturing plants in Pennsylvania. 



50 Caswell County in the World War 

ROBERT BOWMAN BURTOIST 

RoBEKT Bowman Burton was born at Ridgeville, IST. C, 
in High Towei- Township in the County of Caswell May 
10, 1894. His father, John Henry Burton, married Miss 
Frances R. Fuller. Both of these parents are natives of 
Caswell County. On his father's side his grandfather was 
John Henry Burton, a Caswell man who did Military Ser- 
vice from 1861 to 1865 with Lee in Virginia. He completed 
the usual Public School course of his County, and at the 
time of his induction into Military Servee he was engaged 
in farming near Ridgeville. 

On July 26th, 1018, he was called by his local board, 
and sent to CVimp Greenleaf for training. He was trans- 
ferred from that place to Camp Jackson, S. C, and was 
there assigned for service in the Medical Corps of the Army. 
He remained in Camp for eight months, and was doing ac- 
tive service in Base Hospital 'No. 146 at the time of the 
signing of the Armistice. Because the Armistice put an 
end to hostilities he did not go over-seas, but was held at Camp 
Jackson until March 12th of the following year, being a 
very valuable man in the Base Hospital. 

On the date mentioned above he received his discharge 
from Military Service, and returned to his home in Cas- 
well where he took up actively his former occupation of 
farming. The Army serial ISTumber of this ex-service man 
was .3025714. 



JASPER MARIOX BUTLER 

Jasper Marion Butler was born in the County of Cas- 
well May 15th 1805. His father, James E. Butler, who was 
also born in Caswell married a Miss Ellen Shackleford, a na- 
tive of Halifax Co., Va. At the time of his induction into 
Military Service, young Butler was engaged in farming. Be- 
fore he reached the years of his manhood, he received the 
usual education to be obtained in the Public Schools 
of Cu swell. He was sent by the Local Board, on May 29th 



Caswell County in the World War 51 

1918, to Camp Jackson, S. C. Here he remained in training 
for two months. At that place, he was made a member of 
Battery C. 317th Eegiment of the Field Artillery, of the 
81st Division. On August 7th, he sailed from Camp Mills, 
I^ew York, on a British Transport, "The Metagonia," land- 
ing at Liverpool ; he remained at this place for three days, 
and was then sent across the English Channel, to Brest. 

We all know, because it is recorded in larger histories, 
about the activities of the 81st Division, and how this Divi- 
sion was making ready for service, when the Armistice came, 
putting an end to Military operations. Young Butler was 
at Vallahome at the time of the signing of this Instrument. 
During his stay in France, he received furloughs, which 
enabled him to visit a number of interesting places, both 
in France and Italy. On May 19th, he set sail from Mar- 
seilles for America, and came back through the Mediter- 
ranean Sea, by way of Gibraltar. At Gibraltar, his ship 
was held for eight days to take on coal and water. This 
ship was an Italian one, named "The Allemontgree." He 
landed safely at 'New York, was sent to Camp Mills, and 
from this place he was discharged on June 25th, 1919, His 
Army Serial Number was 2997151. Young Butler is now 
actively engaged in farm work near Yancejwille, l^orth 
Carolina. 

T. C. BUTLEE 

T. C. Butler, who was voluntarily inducted into Mili- 
tary service of the U. S., on Sept. 19th, 1917, was born in 
Alamance County, ISTovember 9th 1892. His father, E, C. 
Butler, was born in Cumberland County, of this State, and 
his mother, whose maiden name was Miss Margaret Yar- 
brough, was born in Person County of this State. This 
young soldier attended the County Schools and also the 
Graded Schools in the City of Burlington. 

He reported at Camp Jackson, September 19th, 1917, 
and was placed in the 120th Regiment of the 30th Division. 
After the training which was received at Camp Jackson, he 
was sent to Camp Sevier, and from that place he was sent 



52 Caswell County in the World War 

over-seas on May 17th, 1918 sailing- from Boston, Mass., 
and landing in England, his ship having passed the sub- 
marine zone in safety. He crossed the English Channel at 
Dover, and landed at Calais, France. Young Butler has 
a very prominent fighting record ; he participated in a num- 
ner of battles, engagements, skirmishes, and expeditions. 
He fought of Ypres, in Sept., next in action at the Hin- 
denburg Line. In fact, his battle activities were part of the 
activities which are written in larger histories of the famous 
30th Division. 

After the signing of the Armistice, he remained in France 
until April 1st 1919. When in France, he visited many 
of the most interesting places of our Sister Republic. He 
sailed from St. Nazaire on the U. S. S., "Martha Washing- 
ton," and landed at Charleston S. C, and took part in the 
parade with the men of his Regiment of the 30th Division 
through the streets of the Capital of South Carolina. He 
was discharged from Camp Jackson. The Army Serial 
ISTumber of this young soldier was 1321387. Before enter- 
ing service, he was engaged in farming; since his return 
to Civil life he has resumed agricultural operations. 



LOUIS GLENN CARTER 

Louis Glenn Carter was born in Caswell County, Decem- 
ber 3, 1891. His father, Lewis S. Carter, has ranked for 
many years as one of .the most successful and prosperous 
farmers of his community. This parent was born in Vir- 
ginia, near the city of Danville, and married Miss Mamie 
Hodges, who was a native of Caswell. The grandfather of 
this young soldier, on his father's side, was Iverson Carter, 
who was a soldier that saw service in the war between the 
States. Before entering service, young Carter was engaged 
in work on his father's farm. He attended at the public 
schools of Caswell, in which he completed the usual seven 
grades, and spent two years in the City Schools at Pelham. 

On December 4th, 1917, he was sent by his Local Board 
with a large contingent, to Camp Jackson, S. C, for train- 



Caswell County in the World War 53 

ing. Later lie was transferred to Camp Hancock for more 
intensive work and there he was placed in the Air Service, 
vpith rank of Corporal, in Co. 1, remaining at Camp Han- 
cock two months. He next passed successfully his over- 
seas examination, and sailed from the embarkation port of 
Hoboken, Febuary, 8th, 1918, on the U. S. S. "President 
Lincoln", landing on French soil at St. ISTazaire. This voy- 
age was an eventful one, on account of the very imminent sub- 
marine dangers. The ship w^as given a circuitous, route 
taking eighteen days for the trip. However he landed in 
safety at St. JN^azaire, where he was placed with the French 
Army for ten months in the Air Service Mechanics, Co. I 
1st Regiment. His first duty was in a French Aviation 
Field, at Le Bourget, a village north of Paris. Here he 
was subjected to frequent air raids, often as many as two 
or three a night. He was at this place when the Great 
German Drive was nearest Paris, and was under the bom- 
bardment of that long range gun, "Big Bertha," which des- 
troyed so many lives and so much property in Paris. A 
shell from this gun exploded within a hundred feet from 
where he stood, and he brought back to Caswell as a souvenir, a 
fragment of Big Bertha's shell. This young soldier was 
near enough to the front to hear the sound of the cannon 
in the last great German Offensive, and to see the skies 
lighted up with the bursting shells. He was stationed be- 
tween the Marne and Paris at the time of the signing of 
the Armistice. 

After the signing of the Armistice, the French had no 
need for the Company, and young Carter, among other 
American Soldiers, was turned over to the x\merican Army. 
He was then sent across France to a place near the German 
border, where he was placed with the ]\[otor Transfer Corps 
for rehabilitation work. While engaged in such service, 
he had the opportunity of passing in many directions through 
the wrecked country, where much terrible fighting had en- 
sued. Among the battle fields that he helped to clear up 
were: St. Mihiel, Verdun and the front line trenches of the 
famous Hindenburg Line. After this work was cleared up, he 
was ordered to prepare for his sailing overseas. After a 



54 Caswell County in the World War 

journey across France, he had the good hick to be back in 
Paris on "Peace Day," and was at the Place Concorde, 
where he saw President Wilson reviewing that famous par- 
ade. He sailed from Brest for America June 8, 1919. On 
the morning of June 18, as he expressed it in a letter "my 
heart was made glad when my eyes beheld the Statue of 
Liberty in the Harbor of New York.' From New York 
he was next sent to Camp Meade, Md., and from that place 
he received his discharge. 



ALVIS JULIAN CHANDLER 

Alvis Julian Chandler was born on the 16th day of 
August, 1895, near Hainer, in this County. He was a son 
of T. Y. Chandler and Sallie Elizabeth Chandler. The 
mother's maiden name was Miss Elizabeth Bohaimon. She 
was a native of Pittsylvania County, Va. The grandfather, 
George Chandler, saw Service for much of the time during 
the war between the States and was slightly wounded in one 
of the battles in Virginia. This young soldier, having com- 
pleted the Public School Course in Caswell, spent two years 
at Wallburg. 

At the time of his Registration, he was actively engaged 
in farming, and on August 15th 1917, ho volunteered for 
service ; his enlistment papers being signed at the Recruit- 
ing Office, in the City of Danville, Va. He was sent to 
Fortress Monroe, and was assigned to service in the Coast 
Artillery ; afterward he was transferred to Ft. Monroe, and 
there assigned to a company of the Field Artillery. 

Wliile in active training for overseas service, he contracted 
the measles ; complications setting in, of such a serious na- 
ture, that on Febuary 28th 1918, he died in the Hospital, 
at that place. The body of this young soldier was brought 
back to Caswell, and tenderly buried in the Grave-yard at 
the Presbyterian Church, in the little village of Yanceyville. 
Of Alvis Julian Chandler, it may truly be said; "His 
Soul has gone West ; He laid his young life on the Altar of 
his Country ; the Great God of Battles accepted the Sacri- 



Caswell County in the World War 55 

iice ; let the people of Caswell County hold in constant recollec- 
tion the memory of one of her sons who loved his country, 
and in loving, made the Supreme Sacrifice: God rest 
him." 

JACK CLAEK 

Jack Clark^ who enlisted as a Seaman in the U. S. J^avy, 
on April 18th, 1918, was born at Knoxville, Tenn., March 
4th 1900. His father, George Wilson Clark, married Miss 
Lucy Henderson, a daughter of Dr. Buck Henderson; for 
a number of years, these parents lived at Bristol, Tenn. and 
moved to Caswell about six or eight years ago. Before his 
enlistment in the ]^avy, young Clark had attended the Pub- 
lic Schools and City School at Bristol, Tenn. 

He enlisted at the Recruiting Office, in the City of Dan- 
ville, and was sent to the Training Station at l^Tewport, 
B. I., remaining there for two months, and was then transfer- 
red to the Submarine Base at Meridon, Connecticut. While 
in service, he did the duties on Eeceiving Ship, at the Naval 
Training Base, at Hampton Roads, on the U. S. Sub-marine 
tender, "The Fulton." For three months, during the time 
of the submarine menace threatening the Atlantic cities he 
did coast patrol duty. Three times he assisted in the convoy 
of troop-ships across the Atlantic, and through the submar- 
ine zone. On his first trip, his ship landed at Edinburgh, 
Scotland, but he remained there only three days to allow 
the "Fulton'' to take on supplies from the submarine tender, 
the U. S. S. "Savannah". 

On his second trip across, his vessel escorted Troopships 
bound for France. On this trip he had the privilege of visit- 
ing London. On his third trip across, his vessel convoyed two 
Troop Ships, which landed at Brest. After the war, and up 
to the 9th day of September, 1919, he did the usual service 
that was required of men on Submarine tenders. 



WILLIAM PINK COBB 

William Pink Cobb was born in the County of Caswell, 
June 16th 1896. This young soldier was the eldest son of 



56 Caswell County in the "World War 

Samuel J, Cobl), who married Miss Lugonia Cook. Both 
of his parents were natives of Caswell County. It will be 
interesting to record the fact that young Cobb was a grand- 
son of Jack C\>bb ; this grand parent served for more than 
three years in the Confederate Army, and was one of the 
bravest of Lee's Soldiers. Before being called into military 
service, he was engaged in farming, about seven miles south 
east of Yanceyville. 

On September, 6th 1918, he was called by his Local Board 
for induction into Military Service, and was sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C. At this Camp he was placed in Company 
C, 7th Regiment, for a Replacement Man, in the Artillery 
Division. After two months training at Camp Jackson, he 
was transferred to Camp Hill, Va. His record for faith- 
ful service was such that he was entrusted with the very 
responsible duties of a INfilitary Police, and was sent to ]S[ew- 
port News for further service. Before his replacement was 
called into action, news came that the Armistice was signed, 
and on the 16th day of March, 1010 he received his discharge 
from further military service. His Army Serial Number was 
4487604. 

Upon returning to hi^^ home, this young soldier took up 
his former occupation of farming, and we may also state, 
as this will be a matter of interest, that he has recently 
been married to Miss Myrtle Webster, who is also a native 
of this County. 



HERBERT WEBSTER COLEMAN" 

Herbert Webster Coleman was born May 15, 1895 at 
Stokcsland, Va. His father, Stephens W. Coleman, was a 
native of Caswell County. His mother, Ida D. Coleman, was 
a native of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. His grandfather, 
Washington L. Coleman, was a soldier who fought in the 
Confederate Armies from '61 to '65. Young Coleman atten- 
ded the Public Schools of Caswell and also w\as a student 
for several years in the graded school at Pelham. 



Caswell County in the World War 57 

At the time of his induction into Military Service he 
was engaged in farning. His Army Serial Xuniber was 
2616854. The following is a service record which he handed 
to the writer: "I arrived at Camp Humphries on September 
6th, 1919 and was placed in Company B. of the 7th En- 
gineers Training Ivegiment where I received the usual train- 
ing. Then we went to make up the 20th American Replace- 
ment Division and were sent to Camp Merritt, N. C. from 
which place he went to Hoboken, JST. J. and were to set sail on 
]^ovember 11 the day of the Armistice. After receiving 
the news we did not sail. We returned to Camp Humphries 
and were placed in Company B. of the 3rd E. T. R. from 
which I was discharged on the 12th day of December 1919.'' 



LEWIS ANDREW CORBETT 

Lewis Andrew Cobbett, whose Army Serial Number 
was 4774347, was born at Corbett in Hightower Township, 
Caswell County, and at the time of his registration he was 
twenty-four years of age. His father, John C. Corbett, 
married Miss Elizabeth Cooper, and this family for many 
years was prominently identified with the best of business 
and social life of this county. Young Corbett received his 
early education in the splendid fitting school at Cedar Grove 
in Orange County. After completing the work of this school 
he became a student at Oak Ridge; while student at this 
institute, he was held in very high esteem by both faculty 
and students. Prior to his induction into Military Service, 
he was in the service of the Government, as rural carrier, 
serving the people of his section with great efficiency. 

He was placed by his Local Board in Limited Military 
Service, and under a call for men of this class was inducted 
on August 29, 1918, and sent to Camp Green. His quali- 
fications so impressed themselves upon the commanding offi- 
cers that he was made 1st Sergeant of the Infantry, Company 
14, Recruiting Camp of Q. M. 349, Labor Brigade. He 
was rapidly being made ready for service over-seas when 
the Armistice put an end to hostilities. He remained at 



58 Caswell County in the World War 

Camp Green until December 1918, doing regular assigned 
work of the men of his Company and there discharged from 
Military Sei'vice. Since his return to civil life, he has iden- 
tified himself with a very successful business enterprise at 
Mebane, where he enjoys the confidence of the people of that 
place. 

CLEM DeWITT COVINGTON 

Clem DeWitt Covington was a native born Caswell 
boy, being a son of W. G. Covington, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Taylor Montgomery Covington. His grandfather, E. G. Cov- 
ington, saw service during the Civil War. He was sent to 
Camp Lee on November 22nd, 1917; here he was assigned 
to service in the Field iVrtillery of the 80th Division. He 
remained at Camp Lee, doing intensive training, until the 
spring of 1918. During the month of May, he was given 
his over-seas examination, and on the 29th day of that month, 
sailed from Norfolk, Ya., on a U. S. Transport, and landed 
at Bordeaux. 

After his arrival on French soil his Division went into 
active fighting, and young Covington passed through the 
dreadful battles which raged during the Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive, but fortunately, he was neither wounded nor gassed, 
and at the time of the signing of the Armistice, he was with 
his Division beyond the Meuse River. He remained in France 
until May of the following year doing the accustomed mili- 
tary duties attached to the Division, and sailed from Brest 
on the ITtli of that month, and landed at Newport News, 
Va. He was transferred to Camp Lee; where on June 9th 
1919, he was discharged from service. His Army Serial 
Number was 1836358. Before entering service, this young 
soldier had successfully completed the Course in the Yancey- 
ville High School, and had been engaged in agricultural 
work, and also was a salesman in a hardware establish- 
ment ; since his return from service, he has taken up work 
with the Union Hardware Company in the City of Danville. 



Caswell County in the "World War 59 

HENRY SPENCER COVINGTON 

Henky Spencer Covington was born Jan. 23rd 1895, 
and on Dec. 13th 1917, enlisted in the U. S. Navy. He 
was a son of William Green Covington, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Montgomery Covington. The father was born in Halifax 
Connty, and the mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth 
Montgomery, was a native of Iredell Co., in this State. He 
was a grandson of Ed. G. Covington, who for many years 
was a very successful farmer and merchant. This grand- 
parent did service in the war between the States. The 
educational qualifications of young Covington were limited 
to the Public Schools of this County, the pupil working 
during his vacations on his father's farm, near Yance^^ille. 
At the time of the beginning of the World War, he was in 
the employ of Swift & Co., Washington, D. C. 

Before our country entered into the great struggle, this 
young man enlisted in the U. S. Navy, and was accepted 
for service as "Fireman." His enlistment papers being 
signed by the Naval Recruiting Station at Washington. D. 
C, he was immediately sent to the Naval Station at Ports- 
mouth and from there, to the U. S. Ship, "Nevada," on 
which ship he did service for two months. From the "Ne- 
vada," he was transferred to the U. S. Ship, "Utah,'' and 
received intensive training, during the manoeuvers around 
Hampton Roads and Yorktown. His ship, "The Utah" 
was ordered to go over-seas for service in European waters, 
and sailed on August 29th 1918. This ship went across 
without a convoy, and while she was attacked three times by 
Submarines, unsuccessfully, and also was lost for three 
days in a terrible storm, north west of the Azores, she arrived 
safely at Bantry Bay, Ireland. At this place, she joined 
the 6th Battle Ship Division, and became its Flag-ship. For 
three months operating from this Base, the "Utah" did Pat- 
rol and Convoy duty. When his ship was sent to Portland 
and was held there for sometime, this young sailor was for- 
tunate enough to secure liberty, which enabled him to visit 
the following places : Queenstown, Dublin, Cork and Lon- 
don. On his way to England, he passed through Wales. His 



60 Caswell County in the World War 

ship was actively engaged in the manifold duties of Sea Ser- 
vice up to the time of the signing of the Armistice. 

The end of the war, however, did not bring the closing 
of his labors, and he had the opportunity of passing through 
some very rare experiences before his discharge. His ship 
v/as in the convoy which escorted President \Vilson into 
Brest, and also in line when the Cerman High Seas Fleet 
surrendered to the Allies, beyond the Scapa-Flow. The "Utah" 
was a part of the convoy which escorted President Wilson 
back from Brest. From this place, the ship with the entire 
Atlantic Fleet, set sail for l^^ev^^ York and anchored for several 
weeks in the North River. From here he w^as sent to Guan- 
tonomo, Cuba, and was in tropical waters for more than 
three months. He was given a short leave in Cuba, which 
enabled him to see most of the interesting places on that is- 
land, and also Hayti. Going further south, he stopped at 
Port de France, near Martinique, and while there, saw the 
ruins of St. Pierre. From this place he brought back as a 
souvenir, the picture of one of the two survivors of the erup- 
tion of Mt. Peele. His ship went back to Guantonomo, and 
after remaining there for three days, sailed with the entire 
Atlantic Fleet to iSTew York. The next duty performed by 
his ship was that of standing by in the famous Trans-Atlan- 
tic Aeroplane Flight. This ship was stationed about four 
hundred luiles south of Greenland, in the land of ice and 
whales. His ship was sent back to New York, from there 
to Hampton Roads, then back to New York, where it took 
a pai't in the convoy of President Wilson, on his return 
from his last voyage to France. After this duty was per- 
formed, the ship was sent to Newport, R. I., for a stay of 
two weeks; thence to the Navy Yard for repairs. Here he 
was detached from the ''Utah," and sent to the Receiving Ship 
at the Washington Navy Yard, and there discharged, Aug- 
ust 16th 1010. 

GILBERT LEA CRUMPTON 

Gilbert Lea Crumpton was born in Caswell County, Nov. 
15th 1893. His father, S. L. Crumpton, and his mother, 



Caswell County in the Yv^orld War 61 

jSTanuie Echols Crumpton, were both natives of Virginia, 
but moved to this State about twenty live years ago. Both 
grand parents of this young soldier fought during the Civil 
War. Both entered the Confederate Service in the State of 
Virginia. The grandfather Crumpton passed through the 
war without injury, while the grandfather Echols was seri- 
ously wounded at Manassas, but recovered from his wounds, 
and remained in service until the end came at Appomattox. 
The education of young Crumpton was such as could be 
obtained in the public Schools of Caswell. He registered 
June 5th 1917, and was voluntarily inducted into Military 
Service, Sept. 19th 1917, and was placed in training at 
Camp Jackson, S. C. At this cantonment, he was placed 
in Company 306th Training Head Quarters of the Military 
Police. Erom Camp Jackson he was transferred to Camp 
Green, and there made military police, in the 3rd Division 
of the Regular Army. He sailed for France on March 23rd 
1918, from Hoboken on a transport "Antigone." This ship 
was one of the many German ships which were interned 
at the beginning of the war. He landed at St. iSTazaire, and 
was assigned to his duties for six months in Southern France. 
After this service, he was transferred to Boulogne, and was 
doing service at this place, as a Military Police, when the 
Armistice was signed. He remained in France with his Divi- 
sion until March 28th 1919, and was sent home from Brest 
on the U. S. S., "Georgia", landing safely at Newport News, 
Va. From this place he was sent to Camp Lee where he 
was discharged on April 12th 1919. His Army Serial 
Number was 239840. 

OBED DABBS 

Obed Dabbs was born in the County of Caswell, Anderson 
Township, on the 27th day of June, 1893. His father, Rufus 
B. Dabbs, married l^.Hss Sarah Arnold. Both of these parents 
were natives of Caswell County. His grandfather, J .L. 
Dabbs, was a Veteran of the Civil War, and his Great grand- 
father, Lemuel J. Dabbs, was a Revolutionary Soldier, who 
is buried in the family burying ground near Fitch, of this 



62 Caswell County in the World "War 

county. Young Dabbs attended the Caswell Public Schools 
and at the time of his induction into Military Service, he 
was actively engaged in farm operations with his father, 
in Anderson Township. 

On October 23, 1917, he was sent by his Local Board to 
Camp Jackson, S. C, and there placed in the Engineer 
Corps of the 306th Engineer's Train of the 81st Division. 
He spent seven months at Camp Jackson, doing the required 
training, and was then transferred to Camp Sevier remain- 
ing at that place for two weeks, preparatory to over-seas 
sailing. On July 31, 1918, he sailed from N"ew York, on 
the Transport, ''Canada," and after a voyage of twelve days, 
arrived at Liverpool on August 11. He was next placed in 
a Eest Camp at Mornhill, England, remaining there until 
the 19th, on which date he was sent to Southampton, and 
sailed across the Channel, arriving at Cherbourg, on August 
20. From that time and up to the signing of the Armistice, 
he was engaged in the usual work which fell to the 81st 
Division, until tlie time of his sailing. An information 
sketch furnished by Soldier Dabbs, conveys a very interest- 
ing description of the many places visited while doing ser- 
vice over seas. Suffice it to say, that his activities took him 
to many of the most interesting places, and beautiful cities 
of France. On the 30th day of May, he arrived with the 
men of his Company, at St. ISTazaire, which was the place 
of his embarkation. He left that place on June 3, and on 
June 15, he arrived at Charleston, S. C. in safety. From 
this place he was sent to Camp Jackson, where he was dis- 
charged on the 20th day of June, 1919. His army serial 
number was 1850397. 

IPtA DAMERON" 

But few families in Caswell made a greater contribu- 
tion of sons during the World War, than the family of Mr. 
George M. Dameron. This family enrolled three sons into 
the rank of the national army and these three sons each 
one of them did their duty like men. 

Ira Dainieron, the youngest son of George M. Dameron 
and ];nla Baldwin Dameron, was born in the County of 



Caswell County in the World War 63 

Caswell, Anderson Township, on the 31st day of October 
1896. On his father's side, he was a grandson of a Confed- 
erate soldier; one who fought with Lee and Jackson in Vir- 
ginia, all through the Civil War, and died in Kichmond 
on his way home, after the surrender. He attended the 
Public Schools of Caswell County, in which he made a repu- 
tation of being a very studious and earnest pupil. 

He placed his name on the Registration list, June 5th, 
1918, and was called by his Local Board for induction into 
military service, October 30th, and was sent to Camp Jack- 
son for training. This young soldier was placed in Battery 
D. of the Artillery Regiment as a Replacement man. He 
was in Camp, where he was engaged in intensive training 
at th time of the signing of the Armistice; the war having 
put an end to hostilities, of course he did not go over-seas. 
He remained at Camp Jackson until December 9th, 1918, 
doing the usual work that was assigiied to the soldiers at 
at that period, after which he was discharged. Since his 
return to Caswell, he has taken up active work on his father's 
farm in Pelham Township, of this county. 



LINDSEY MARSHALL DAMEROInT 

LixDSEY Marshall Dameron_, subject of this sketch was 
born in the County of Caswell, being the second son of 
George M. Daraeron and Lura Boswell Pameron. He received 
his early education in the public schools of this county, and 
made a record while such a student of efficiency and atten- 
tion to duty. He was also a leader in athletics. After com- 
pleting the usual public school course, he entered school at 
Wallburg in this state, and was a student there for several 
sessions. 

After his induction by his local board, he was sent to 
Camp Hancock, Georgia. At this place he was made 
a member of the 60th Machine Gun Corps, 4:9th Company 
of Replacement Troops. After remaining in camp for three 



64 Caswell County in the World War 

moiitlis, he was made ready for over sea service, and sailed 
from Hoboken, New Jersey on the transport "Mauretauia'' 
and after a very propitious voyage, hiuded at Liverpool, Eug- 
Jand. From this port he was sent to Winchester and there 
became a replacement man in the 83rd Division. The 
Armistice putting an end to military operations, prevented 
his participation in battle engagements. He remained oversea 
nntil January 22, 1019, at which time he sailed from Brest 
on the transport "Menecarter,'' and landed in New York. 
From New York he was transferred to Camp Lee, Virginia 
at which place he remained until February 16, 1019, 
and was on that date discharged from military service. 
His army serial number was 4160379. Before entering 
service he was actively engaged in farming, and since his 
return to civil life, he has resumed his former occupation. 
His two brothers who were also in Military Service during 
the great war, were Pliilip Fletcher Dameron and Ira 
Dameron. 

PHILIP FLETCHER DAMERON 

Philip Fletcher Dameron was born in Anderson To\\ti- 
ship, in Caswell County, September 14th 1893, he being 
the third son of George M. Dameron and Lula Dameron, 
whose maiden name was Miss Lula Baldwin. Both of these 
parents were natives of Caswell County, and it is worthy 
of being preserved in history, that this family ranked among 
the most patriotic of Caswell, furnishing as soldiers, in the 
great war, three sons. The grandfather of this soldier on 
the Dameron side was in the Confederate service, and gave 
four years of his life for his beloved South land, and died 
at Richmond, just after the surrender. Our young soldier 
attended the Public Schools of Caswell, and during his 
vacation, worked as a helper on his father's farm in Pelham 
Town-ship of this county. 

On A]n'il 28th 1918, he was called by his Local 
Board to the Military service, and was sent with a 
contingent of Caswell hoys, to Camp Jackson, S. C, for 
training. At this place he was assigned to the Artillery, 



Caswell County in the World War 65 

and was made a member of Battery C. of the 317th Regi- 
ment of the 81st Division. After three and one-half months 
intensive training at Camp Jackson, he successfully passed 
his over-seas examination, and on August 7th, 1918, he set 
sail from New York, on an English Transport, and after 
a voyage of thirteen days, landed at Liverpool. His ship 
passed through the Sub-marine zone in safety. After arriv- 
ing at Liverpool, he was sent to a rest camp, named "Wood- 
leigh," and then sent across the English Channel, from 
Southampton to LeHavre. He was placed, with the other men 
of his Division, in a French Sector, near the border of Swit- 
zerland. While he did not take an active part in any battles, 
still his Company had received orders, and were on their 
way to the front line, when the notice was posted that the 
Armistice had been signed, thus putting an end to hostilities. 
When the news of this reached him, he was at Vallahome. 

After the signing of the Armistice, soldier Dameron did 
the usual routine work of his Division, receiving leaves of 
absence which enabled him to visit most of the prominent 
cities of France. On July 2nd 1919, he set sail from France 
on a French Transport, from LeHavre, and landed safely 
at New York. After his arrival in New York, he was 
sent to Camp Mills, then transferred to Camp Lee, and here 
he received his discharge on the 28th day of July, 1919, 
Army Serial Number of our young Dameron was 2992736. 
Since his return to civil life he has taken up active 
farm pursuits. 

BERKELEY R. DANIELS 

Berkeley R. Daniels was born June 21st, 1894. His 
father, George W. Daniels, was born in Caswell County, and 
his mother, whose maiden name was Miss Mary Williams, was 
a Virginia woman. His grandfather, Sam Williams, was 
a Confederate soldier, who lost his life at the battle of Gettys- 
burg, His educational acquirements were such as might be 
obtained in th Public Schools of Caswell, 

On December 4th, 1917, he was called by his Local Board 
for induction into Military service, and was sent to Camp 
5 



66 Caswell County in the World War 

Jackson, S. C, and later transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga. 
Here he was placed in Company I, Air Service Mechanics 
Ilegiment, and remained in training for two months, and on 
February 10th, 1918, was sent over-seas from iNTew York, 
on the U. S. S., "President Lincoln," and landed at St. Na- 
zaire. After remaining there for a short while in a Rest 
Camp, he was assigned to duty with an Air Service Out-fit. 
He saw active fighting service in the Battle of the Somme, 
and was located in Paris during the time of the long range 
bombardment of that City, by the ''Big Bertha' and he was 
in that City at the time of the signing of the Armistice. 
After that time, and until he sailed to America, he was engag- 
ed in such service as was imposed upon the men in his line of 
work. On the 6th day of June, 1919, he sailed from Brest, 
and landed at New York. He was sent to Camp Jackson, 
S. C, and there discharged on July 1st, 1919. 

Before entering service, young Daniels was reckoned as 
being among the best farmers of the County, and since his 
return to Civil life, he has actively resumed his former 
work. 

ALFRED ELLIS DAVIS 

Alfred Ellis Davis was bom in Caswell County, l^ov- 
ember 30, 1896. His father, Alfred Coleman Davis, was 
born in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and while living in 
that State, married Miss Martha Fowlkes. His parents 
moved to Caswell quite a number of years ago and built a 
home near Providence, in Dan River Township. Young 
Davis on his maternal side, is the grandson of William Fowl- 
kes, an old Confederate soldier, whose record in the Civil 
War was one of valiant service. He attended the Public 
Schools of Caswell, and after completing the seven grades, 
he did the required High School work in the Providence 
Graded School. At the time of his registration, he was ac- 
tively engaged with his father in farm work. 

On August 5, 1918, he was sent by his Local Board to 
Camp Wadsworth ; here he was given an Infantry Assign- 
ment, in Company L, of the 107th Regiment of the 27th 



Caswell County in the World Wa.r 67 

Division. He remained in Camp only five weeks ; was given 
his over seas examination, and set sail from Newport News, 
on September 14, on the Transport, "Aeolus," and landed 
at Brest, France. While in France he did such active service 
as was imposed upon the men of the 107th Regiment, until 
the signing of the Armistice. After the cessation of hos- 
tilities, our young Davis had th^ opportunity \oi visiting 
many of the most beautiful cities of France, and places of 
interest. He landed in New York, March 1, 1919, having 
sailed from Brest on the U. S. S., "Amsterdam." From New 
York he was sent to Camp Lee, where on April 2nd, he re- 
ceived his discharge from Military service. 



LINWOOD DIX 

LiNwooD Dix was born in Dan River Town-ship, in this 
County, in October 1887. He is a son of Thomas H. Dix, 
and Amanda Hall Dix. Both of these parents were born 
in Virginia. On the 26th day of April, 1918, he was called 
for Military service, and sent with a Caswell Contingent, 
to Camp Jackson, S. C. Here he was placed in the 16th 
Depot Brigade ; later he was transferred to Camp Greenleaf , 
Ga., and placed in the Medical Corps of the Army. Next 
he was transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga,, and was being 
trained for first-aid work. This Hospital Unit had passed 
its over-seas examination, and was packed up, ready for sail- 
ing, when news came that the Armistice would go into effect. 
He was sent to Camp Hancock, Ga., and there he received 
his discharge, on December 20th, 1919. Before his induction 
into military service, he was engaged in farming and saw- 
milling. Since his return to civil life, he has actively taken 
up work on the farm. 

FRED PRESTON EAST 

Feed Preston East, who registered in the June Registra- 
tion of 1917, was born in Caswell County, and at the time 
of his registration, was twenty-one years of age. His father. 



68 Caswell County in the World War 

Robert East, was born uear Ruffin iu this State. He attended 
the Public Schools in Rockingham County, and also did High 
School work in the Ruffin High School. At the time of his 
induction into Military Service, he was actively engaged 
in farming. 

On May 28th, 1918, he was inducted by his Local Board, 
and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Here he was placed in 
Battery C, 317th Artillery, of the 81st Division. He re- 
mained at Camp Jackson for four months. Passing success- 
fully his over-seas examination, he sailed on the 1-ltli of 
August, from Hoboken, with the men of the ''Wild Cat 
Division", on the Transport, "Mongolia", and landed at 
Liverpool England. After being held there for a short while 
in a Rest Camp, he was sent across the Channel, by the usual 
route, and placed in the field with the 81st Division. 

The Armistice putting an end to hostilities, he was not in 
any battles and engagement, although his out-fit was prepar- 
ing for front line service on ITovember 11th. He remained 
in France until June of the following vear, and before leav- 
ing, he had many very interesting experiences as he 
visited places of note and interest in our Sister Republc 
His service record is a good one, and shows that he measured 
up fidly to the requirements of a soldier of the famous "Wild 
Cat Division." He came back from Erance, sailing from 
Brest, on the U. S. S., "South Carolina," and landed at 
N'ewport ISTews, after a speedy voyage. He was sent from 
that place to Camp Lee, where on June 10th, 1919, he re- 
ceived his discharge from Military Service. The Army 
Serial :Nrumber of Fred Preston East, was 2991742. It i» 
pleasant to close this sketch by saying, that at this writing, 
he is back in Old Caswell, and is makins' good as a fariner. 



DAVID BERIv^ARD EDMUNDS 

David Bernard Edmunds, whose Army Serial iSTundier 
was 1870188, was born in Pitsylvania County, Virginia, 
March 30, 1895. His father, D. L. Edmunds, who was a na- 
tive of the same countv, married Miss Alice M. Wood, of 



Caswell County in the World War 69 

Bedford County, Va. His grandfather, James A. Edmunds, 
died in service, during the Civil War, at Point Lookout, 
Virginia. The parents of young Edmunds moved to Caswell 
County in 1904, and made their home near Yanceyville, 
]Sr. C. This son attended the Graded School at that place. 
Before entering Military Service, he was an operative in one 
of the large ammunition plants, located near Richmnod, Vir- 
ginia. 

He was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. by the Local Board, 
early in the year of 1918, and was there placed in the medi- 
cal Corps of the Army. On August 31, he was sent over 
seas, landing at Liverpool England, and was placed in 
Erance, in Base Hospital 78. This being an Evacuation 
Hospital, just back of the French Lines. At the time of the 
signing of the Armistice, he was doing service in a Base 
Hospital, located at Toul, France. 

After the Cessation of hostilities, he was permitted to visit 
the beautiful cities of France, including Paris, Lyons, Mar- 
sailles and others. On his arrival from over seas, to this 
country, he was sent to Camp Mills, from which place re- 
ceived his discharge on June 28, 1919. The notations on 
this soldiers discharge were indeed highly complimentary. 



FELIX ELMER EDMUNDS 

Felix Elmer Edmunds was born in Pittsylvania County 
Va., April 25, 1899. He was a brother of David B. Ed- 
munds, who served as a soldier during the war, in Medical 
Corps of the Army, while over seas, whose family sketch 
appears in a previous chapter. He attended the Public 
Schools of Caswell County, and for three years, was a stu- 
dent in the Yanceyville High School. While a student 
at this place, he was successful in winning a Medal for 
Oratory, and also for General Improvement. He represented 
the Yanceyville High School with much credit at the Debat- 
ing Contest at the University of North Carolina 1918. He 
entered school at Mars Hill College, August 13, 1918 and 
while there he registered, September 12th 1918 and 



70 Caswell Coui^ty in the World War 

immediately tliereafter enlisted iu the Student Army Train- 
ing Corps. He was sent to the North Carolina State A & E 
College, under the command of Major Charles N. Hulver. iw 
intensive training. The Annistice putting an end to hos- 
tilities, young Edmunds was discharged from service, Dec- 
ember 5, 1918. At this writing he is a student of Richmond 
College. 



-&^ 



GEORGE THOMAS FEATHERSTONE 

George Thomas Featiiekstone was born near Leasburg 
in Caswell County, February 19, 1894. His father T. P. 
Featherstone, married Miss Maggie Hester, of Person 
County. His grandsire Br. Robert Hester, was an army sur- 
geon of the Confederacy. The early educational training of 
young Featherstone was such as could be obtained in the pub- 
lic schools of Caswell. 

He enlisted for military service July 16, 1917, his enlist- 
ment being at Durham, ISTorth Carolina. On September 16, 
1917, he reported for duty at Camp Sevier, at which place 
he was made a Corporal in the 113th Field Artillery of the 
30th Division. He had intensive training at Camp Sevier 
for nine months, then successfully passing his over seas ex- 
amination, he sailed from Hoboken on the LT. S. S. transport 
''Armach," May 25, 1918, and landed at Liverpool, ^ext 
he was sent by the usual course across the English Chauupl 
into France. He participated in the following battles: St. 
Mihiel, Argonne Forest, Toul Oifensive and the Mouse 
Argonne Offensive. It is indeed remarkable that although 
he was a member of the shock troops and although he partic- 
pated in a number of battle engagements, he escaped being 
wounded or gassed. At the time of the signing of the Armis- 
tice he was in the Woevre Plains near Metz. He remained 
in France until March 9th of the following year when he sail- 
ed for France on the U. S. S. ''Santa Teresa," and landed 
safely in America at Newport News. From this port of 
debarkation he was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. and there dis- 
charged on March 28, 1919. 



Caswell County in the World War 71 

Before entering service he was engaged as a traveling 
salesman and since his return to civil life he has taken up his 
same occupation. It will be of interest to record, that two days 
before his sailing over seas, he married Miss Myrtle Strain. 



CHAKLIE LANE FITCH 

Chaelie Lane Fitch was born in Orange County, June 
29th 1893. He was a son of Jasper Fitch, and Mrs. Susan 
Scott Fitch. Both of these parents were natives of Caswell. 
He attended the Public Schools of Caswell, and was a Student 
of Cedar Grove Academy for one year. 

He was inducted into Military Service, May 10th 1918, 
and sent by his Local Board to Camp Jackson, S. C. At 
this Camp he was placed in Company G of the 306th Ammun- 
ition Train Regiment, of the 81st Division. After three 
months intensive training, he was ordered over seas, sailing 
from I^ew York on August 8th, on an English Transport, 
"The Cretic." He landed at Liverpool, and from that city 
was sent across the English Channel to LeHavre. The activi- 
ties of this young soldier were such as are recorded in larger 
histories of the 81st Division. He was on the Verdun Front 
at the time of the signing of the Armistice. He had the 
opportunity before sailing for home, of visiting practically 
all the large cities of France. He sailed from Brest on May 
28th 1919, on the Transport, "Zenobia," and landed at New- 
port News. From this port of debarkation, he was sent 
to Camp Lee, and was discharged on the 2nd day of June 
1919. 

PAUL VINCENT FITZGERALD 

Paul Vincent Fitzgerald was born in Caswell County, 
on November 19, 1896. His father, James O. Fitzgerald, 
who married Miss Mary R. Shelton, has been for many years, 
a very prominent citizen of Caswell County, and is a man 
of large and successful business affairs. Paul attended and 
completed the course in the Pelham Graded School, and was 



72 Caswell County in the World Wab 

a student at Guilford College at the time of the Kegistra- 
tion of 1918 he having become twenty-one years of age since 
the first registration. 

After the Commencement at Guilford College, he returned 
to his father's home at Pelham, and immediately thereaf+f^r, 
decided to olfer himself for enlistment in the U. S. Navy. 
He went to the Recruiting Station at Richmond, Va., and 
offered himself for Naval Service. He was accepted by the 
Recruiting Officer, and was immediately assigned to the hos- 
pital Corps of the Navy, and sent to the U. S. Naval operat- 
ing Base at Norfolk, Virginia. Here he was held under em- 
ergency orders, until the Armistice put an end to hostilities. 
He remained in sei'vice twelve months, as his training made 
him an exceedingly valuable man for Hospital Service. 

Upon his discharge from Naval Service, at the urgent re- 
quest of the Trustees of Pelham City Schools and also of 
the County Superintendent of Schools, he accepted the prin- 
cipalship of the school at that place, and did most excellent 
work. At this writing, he is engaged with his father, in the 
mercantile business at Pelham. 



ALVIS LEA FLORANCE 

Alvis Lea Flojrance, whose Army Serial Number was 
636944, was born at Yanceyville, N. C, on October 15th 
1889. He is the only son of Thomas J. Florance, a Caswell 
County man, born in Anderson Town-ship. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Miss Nannie Lea, was a daughter of 
Capt. Jerry A. Lea, of Stony Creek Town-ship. This grand- 
parent was a Captain in Co. H. of the 6tli North Carolina 
Regiment, and served with dashing bravery in the Civil War 
for three years. The remainder of the war, he was a prisoner, 
taken by the Federal Army, sent to Johnson Island. The 
early life of young Florance, during the vacation periods 
and also after school hours, was spent as a clerk in his father's 
store, and at the time of the Registration of June 5th 1917, 
he was a partner with his father, doing mercantile business 
in the town of Yanceyville. 



Caswell County in the World War 73 

At his request, on May 31st, he was voluntarily inducted 
into the Medical Corps of the Army, and was sent to Wash- 
ington, D. C. for training. After two months service, at 
this place, he was transferred with the rank of Sergeant, to 
Plattsburg, 'N. Y. Here he was given further intensive 
training, and his Company was in the process of embarka- 
tion for front line service in France, when the Armistice 
was signed. While in this service at Plattsburg, he was 
detailed as Evacuation Sergeant, and in such capacity, it 
was his duty to carry Casuals, who had suffered from gas 
and shell-shock or other causes, to their homes, in many sec- 
tions of the State. His previous knowlege of mercantile 
affairs made him a very valuable man in his Company, and 
while at the Base, he was charged with the very responsible 
duty of Inspector of Clothes and Equipment. His discharge 
came to him, Jan. 1st 1919. Since his return to Civil life, 
he has actively engaged in Mercantile duties. 



EUFUS EDDIE FOSTER 

RuFUS Eddie Foster, whose Army Serial N^umber was 
3349397, was born in Caswell County, May 1, 1897 His 
father, John Foster married Miss Lula Poteat. His parental 
grandfather was Allen Poteat, and we should record in pass- 
ing, that no braver soldier ever followed Lee and Jackson. 
The educational qualifications of this yoimg soldier were 
limited to the Public Schools of Caswell. 

At the time of his call for service, he was engaged in farm 
work near Yanceyville, 'N. C, and in August, 1918, he was 
sent by his Local Board to Camp Wadsworth S. C. Here 
he was placed in the Pioneer Infantry of Company 76, and 
as such, he was trained as a replacement man. He sailed 
from N"ewport I^ews on the U. S. S. "Aeolus," on September 
15, 1918, and landed at Brest on Sept. 28. Here he was 
placed in a rifle range for three weeks, and with this pre- 
liminary training he was assigned to the 107th Infantry 
of the 27th Division. We need not record the activities of this 
young soldier further than to say, that he took a part in all of 



74 Caswell County in the World War 

the splendid activities which are associated with this historic 
Division. The Armistice having put an end to hostilities, he 
remained in France until February 28 of the following year, 
and while there he did the usual duties imposed upon 
the men of the 27th Division. On the date just named, he 
sailed from Brest, on the "N"ew Amsterdam," a ship named 
by Dutch sailors, and after an uneventful voyage of nine days 
arrived at New York. He was held there at Camp Merritt, 
in order that he might be with the men of the 27th Divi- 
sion in the famous parade through the Streets of New York, 
a parade, which is a matter of history, on March 25. Next 
he was sent to Camp Lee, and at that place he was discharged 
from service on April 2, 1919. At this writing young Foster 
has resumed his former occupation of farming. 



ARNOLD JETER FUQUA 

Arnold Jeter Fuqua whose Army Serial Number was 
3349386, was born in Caswell County, on the 30th of March, 
1892. His father, N. G, Fuqua, and his mother, whose 
maiden name was Miss Agnes Gillispie, were also born in this 
County. His grandfather, Edward Gillispie, was a mill- 
wright, and during the war between the States, served four 
years in the Confederate Army. This young soldier attended 
the Public School in Caswell, and from boyhood until the 
time he was called into Military Service, he was engaged 
in agricultural operations on his father's farm about four 
miles from Yanceyville, and in such operations, he was reck- 
oned as one of the most energetic young farmers of his com- 
munity. As Clerk of the Local Board, I was nuich impressed 
with the patriotism of this young man, and he often told me, 
"When Uncle Sam wants me I am ready." 

He was called for Military Service on the 5th day of Aug- 
ust, 1918, and was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. where 
he remained only fourteen days, and was tranferred from 
that place to Newport News, Va. He sailed on August 18, 
on the U. S. S. "Aeolus," for over seas. After a safe and 



Caswell County in the World Was, 75 

uneventful voyage, he arrived at Brest; from Brest he was 
sent to military encampment in France and was held eight 
days. From there, he was ordered to report at Millares, 
and was made a member of Company F, of the 55th Pioneers 
Replacement of the 27th Division, stationed near Metz ; and 
while he did not see any active service on the firing line, 
his Company was held in reserve, to replace casualties in the 
Famous 27th Division. It is needless for us to trace the ser- 
vice record of his Company from this place, for all of that 
will be told in larger history in which the movements of the 
27th Division are given. After the cessation of hostilities, 
this young soldier was given a leave of absence, which en- 
abled him to visit many of the famous and beautiful cities 
of France, such as Paris, Marseilles Le Mons, and others. 
He left France on February 29, on a Dutch vessel named 
"N^ew Amsterdam," with men of the 27th Division, and 
after a prosperous voyage, arrived at New York on March 
9, and was sent to Camp Merritt, ISTew Jersey. At this Camp 
he was held with the men of the 27th Division, for the pur- 
pose of engaging in the famous parade of the 27th Division, 
which occurred in N^ew York, March 25. After this parade 
he was next sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, and was discharged 
on April 3rd, 1919. 

Mr Fuqua, during his service, was associated with other 
Caswell boys, namely: Rufus Eddie Foster of Yanceyville, 
N. C, Willie B. Baily, of Pelham N". C. and was with Ben- 
jamin Franklin Brooks, of High towers Town-ship, who died 
immediately after landing in France. Mr. Fuqua was very 
warmly attached to young Brooks. Upon his discharge from 
Military Service, he immediately took up his work on his 
father's farm, with the same thorough-going ,eai*nestness 
which he manifested before the war. 



ISAAC DEWEY GAMMOl^ 

Isaac Dewey Gammon was bom in Pittsylvania County, 
Virginia, April 20th, 1885. He was a son of W. W. Gam- 
mon, who married Miss Lula Marshall. The father of each 



76 Caswell County in the World Wae 

of these parents was in the Confederate Army. Mr. Gam- 
mon with his family moved to Caswell County several years 
ago from Virginia, and was living in Dan River Town-ship 
at the time of the Registration of June 5th. 

Young Gammon was called by his Local Board for induc- 
tion August 5th 1918, and was mobilized at Camp Wads- 
worth. At this place, he was placed in the 55th Pioneer 
Infantry, and was sent to France, Sept. 5th 1918, sailing 
on the "Vaterland,'' from jSTewport News. He landetl at Brest 
and was placed for service in the 27th Division. He was in 
active service at the storming and the breaking of the Hinden- 
burg Line. It is needless to attempt to trace the career of this 
young Caswell Soldier, because it is written in the large His- 
tories of the wonderful operations of the famous 27th Divi- 
sion, but he did a soldier's part in all these operations, and 
came back with his Division on the U. S. S., "Leviathan," 
and landed at Hoboken, IST. J. He was held in Camp for 
some time in order that he might take part in the parade 
through the streets of New York, with the famous 27th Divi- 
sion. 

At the breaking of the Hindenburg Line, young Gammon 
was gassed, but fortunately he recovered from this fearful 
experience. While in France and before sailing to America, 
he had the privilege of visiting many of the principal cities 
of that country. He was discharged from Camp Lee on April 
16th 1919. 

ALLEN GATEWOOD 

Allen Gate wood was born in the City of Danville, Vir- 
ginia August 2, 1896. His father, W. H. Gatewood, of Pel- 
ham, N. C, married Miss Lelia Howard, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gatewood are both Caswell County people, and Mr. Gate- 
wood has been many years one of our most enterprising far- 
mers and public spirited citizens. Young Gatewood com- 
])leted the public school course of Caswell, and at the time 
of his induction into Military Service, was engaged in farm 
work. 



Caswell County in the World War 77 

Ou July 2, 1918, immediately after his registration, he 
decided to enlist in the U. S. Navy; and on July 20, he took 
up his work at the U. S. Naval Training Station, at New- 
port, Ehode Island. He remained in training three mouths, 
and during this period, he was transferred to the Brooklyn 
Navy Yard. For ten months he was actively engaged in 
Coast Patrol duty, on the U. S. S., ''Inca," and the perfor- 
mance of his duty as a Seaman, in the TJ. S. Navy, was 
highly commended by his superior officers, and his service 
record is a good one. The signing of the Armistice, which 
put an end to active Patrol Sei-vice, prevented his going 
over seas. However, we all know that the men of the Coast 
Patrol did an exceedingly important work in keeping the 
sea lanes open for transports and battleships, and heading 
off hostile Submarines. At this writing, this ex-seaman has 
returned to civil life, and is actively engaged in farming. 



AKTHUR BERKLEY GOODSON 

Arthtr Berkley Goodson^ who was a member of Co. A. 
323rd Regiment of the 81st Division, was born in the County 
of Caswell. His father, L. P. Goodson, is a native of Cas- 
well. His mother, whose maiden name was Miss Annie 
B. Fallon, was a native of the State of Virginia, being born 
at Richmond. The father of this young soldier has been 
for many years one of the most patriotic and progressive 
citizens of his county, and is at this writing a member of 
the County Board of Education. On his father's side, his 
grandfather George Turner Goodson, was a valiant soldier 
of the Confederacy. The early education of this young sol- 
dier was received in the Public Schools and Graded Schools 
of this County. Before entering service, he was a tobacconist. 
and was located at Durham, N. C. 

On May 27th 1018, he was sent by his Local Board, of 
Durham County, to Camp Jackson, S. C. From this place, 
he was transferred to Camp Sevier, where he remained for 
two months. On July 31st 1918 he was sent over-seas, sail- 
ing from Hoboken, N. J., on a British Transport, "The 



78 Caswell County in the World War 

Empress of India/' and landed at Liverpool. After remain- 
ing for a short while at a Eest Camp at Woodleaf, he was 
sent with the men of the 81st Division, across the English 
Channel, to Le-Havre. Wo need not trace the service of 
this young soldier further, because it only remains to be said 
that he saw such service as was performed through the war 
by the 81st Division. After the signing of the Armistice, 
he was given sufficient leave to enable him to visit practi- 
cally all of the most important cities of France. He sailed 
from Brest on the Transport, "Matsonia," and landed, Aug- 
ust 20th, 1919, at Hoboken. From this place he was sent 
to Camp Dix, where, on August 28th 1919, he received his 
discharge from Military service. Young Goodson's Army 
Serial Number was 2990645. 



FALLON BARKSDALE GOODSON 

Lorenzo P. Goodson, who married Miss Annabel Fallon, 
of Richmond, Virginia has the distinction of sending into 
the great war, five sons. The last son of the family to be 
inducted into Military Service was Fallon Goodson, who 
was born in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. As a student in 
the public schools, also in the High School at Providence, 
he made a most enviable record. At the time of his induc- 
tion into Military Service, he was engaged with his father 
in farm work. 

He was called by his Local Board, and on August 5, 
1918, was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C, and there assigned 
to the 5th Pioneer Infantry. He was discharged from that 
place. His Army Serial Number was 3349385. 



PHILIP L. GOODSON 

Philip L. Goodson was born August 7th, 1894. His 
father, Lorenzo P. Goodson, was born in Caswell. This 
parent, married Miss Annabelle Fallon of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. The grandfather of this young soldier was George 



Caswell County in the World War 79 

T. Goodson, who did active service during the War between 
the States. He finished the usual public school course at 
Providence High School, and afterward spent several ses- 
sions at the Chatham Training School, located at Chatham, 
Va. 

On May 23, 1918 he received his induction into Military 
Service, and was sent to the University of Virginia, and there 
assigned to the Motor Truck Training School. He was unat- 
tached to any Division, until after his arrival in France. 
After undergoing training for two months at the University 
of Virginia, he sailed on July 29, from Xew York, on the 
Transport, "Empress of Asia," and landed at Liverpool. 
Upon his arrival over-seas he was assigned to Company B 
168th Infantry of the 42nd Division. He saw active service 
in the battle at St. Mihiel and in the drive through the 
Argonne Forest. He escaped serious injury in those battles, 
although he was hit by a piece of shrapnel, and almost mir- 
aculously, he was saved from a severe wound by his cart- 
ridge belt catching most of the fragments from the shrapnel. 

The Armistice of November 11th found him in an ambul- 
ance, which was taking him to a hospital, for first aid 
treatment. After recovering from the eifect of his wound, 
he performed the usual duties that were assigned to Casuals, 
until April 14, 1919, when he was sent home, sailing from 
France on the Transport, "Manchuria," landing at ISTew 
York. From ISTew York he was transferred to Camp Mead, 
Maryland, at which place he was discharged from service on 
May 9th, 1919. 

Before entering service he was a tobacconist, attached 
to one of the large Manufacturing Companies in the City 
of Danville, Va. His Army Serial ISTumber was 2736453. 



HENRY ALLEN GUNN 

Henry Allen Gunn, a son of George Lea Gunu, and 
Mary Frances Dunnivent Gunn, was born near Purley, in 
this County, the 20th day of December, 1896. He was a 
grandson of Dr. George Gunn, a prominent physician, and 



80 Caswell County in the World War 

one who rendered very efficient service for the Confederacy, 
during the war between the States. After this young soldier 
had completed the public schools of Caswell, he was for sev- 
eral years at college in Kichmond, Virginia. 

In August, he was called by his Local Board, and sent 
to Camp Upton, New York ; next he was transferred to Ft. 
Monroe, and there placed in the Artillery, with the rank of 
corporal. His assignment was Headquarters, 3rd Batallion, 
74th Artillery, of the 40th Brigade. He remained in Camp 
nineteen months, and was sent over-seas, sailing from ISTew 
York, on the U. S. S., ''President Grant," and landed at 
St. Nazaire. His Brigade did not receive a Division assign- 
ment but was held for replacement. 

At the time of the signing af the Armistice, he was at 
Mailly, France. After the signing of the Armistice, and 
until he set sail for America, he was engaged in such work 
as was usually assigned to men of such Companies. On 
December, 13th 1018, he sailed from Brest, on a Transport, 
''The jMongolia," and landed at New York. He was then 
sent to Ft. Totten, and there discharged on January 2nd 
1919. The Army Serial Number of this young soldier was 
613373. 

STEELING LEROY GUNN 

Stert.ing Leroy Gunn was born in Locust Hill Towai- 
ship on October 1, 1886. His father, Hiram L. Gunn, mar- 
ried ]\nss Jennie B. Jones. Both of his grandsires were con- 
federate soldiers. Their names respectively were John 
Gunn ;nid Bichard Jones. They fought for four years, cover- 
ing the entire period of the Civil War. His grandsire Bicli- 
ard Jones was a very prominent educator of his day and did 
a great deal to advance the cause of public education. 

Our young soldier made a very excellent record as a stu- 
dent in the public schools of his County. After finishing 
this course he entered the city school at Reidsville, where he 
did high school work. Beturning to his home in Caswell, 
he taught for several years in the public schools. His work 
as teacher w^as of a very high order. However, he taught but 



Caswell County in the World War 81 

a few years, deciding to make for himself a business career. 
He graduated at a commercial college in the city of Raleigh, 
and then engaged in business at Kaleigh and also at Nash- 
ville. He was at the latter place when his induction into 
Military service came. 

Early in September of 1917, he began military training 
at Camp Jackson. He was transferred from that place to 
Camp Sevier where he obtained completion of his training. 
He was made corporal of Infantry in the 81st Division, and 
was sent over-seas. On his arrival in France, he performed 
with much ability his duties as a soldier and his record 
was a good one. A short while before the Armistice was 
signed, he was transferred to one of the Officers' training 
schools, and was at this school when the great struggle ended. 
He returned to America in the spring of 1919, was sent to 
Camp Lee, Va., and there given his discharge from Military 
Service. Since his return to civil life, he has resumed his 
pre-war work, and at this writing is holding a lucrative posi- 
tion in the city of Danville, Va. 



ALLElsT HATCHETT GWYN'N 

Allen Hatchett Gwynn was born at Locust Hill, Cas- 
well County, N. C, on the 12th day of November, 1893. 
His father, J. P. Gwynn, married Miss Sallie Eliza Hatch- 
ett ; this young soldier was the eldest son of this union. 
Both of the grandparents of young Gwynn saw active ser- 
vice during the war between the States. These grandparents 
were respectively Robert Gwynn and Allen Hatchett. He 
attended the public schools in this county, and made a most 
excellent record as a student ; completing the public school 
course, he entered the Liberty Piedmont Institute, in 1910, 
and in 1911, he became a student at the Trinity Park School 
at Durham, 'N. C. He completed the work of this school, 
and entered upon the college course at Trinity in the Fall 
of 1913, and he was a student there when enrolled in the 
Registration of 1917. 
6 



82 Caswell County in the World War 

He was sent to Camp Jackson by his Local Board, on 
Sept. 19tli, 1917, with a contingent of Caswell boys. He 
was captain of this contingent. He was placed in the Mili- 
tary police of the 81st Division, and was next transferred 
to the Officers Training School at Camp Sevier ; at this place, 
on June 3rd, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant, and 
immediately thereafter, transferred to Camp Pike, Ark. On 
June 10th, he was attached to the 0th Training Battalion 
of the 162nd Depot Brigade, and while a member of this 
Battalion, he served as Supply Officer. Most of his time 
was given to assisting in the training of men for over-seas 
service. He was engaged in this work when the Armistice 
put an end to hostilities. 

On January 24:th, 1919. he received his discharge from 
service. On August 25th, 1917, and just before he was 
inducted into Military service, he married Miss Janie John- 
son, of Yanceyville, N. C. Mrs. Gwynn was a daughter of 
the late Julius Johnson, who was for many years, a very 
prominent man in the life of Caswell. 



MISS A:N"NIE YANCEY GWYN"N" 

In attempting to preserve the activities of the Caswell 
people who took part in the great struggle it is very difficult 
to refrain from a personal tribute when we begin to 
write about the work of the Red Cross. Our hearts have 
been filled with admiration for the splendid service given by 
this, "The greatest mother in all the world,'' and how on 
the battle fields and in tlie Army Hospitals, this "Great 
Mother'' gave tender ministrations of her love. We must 
not fail to record the fact that in this great Army of woman- 
hood, Caswell County had its own personal representatives. 
The subject of this sketch, a Caswell woman, was a Red 
Cross l^urse. 

Miss Annie Yancey Gwynn, who was born in Caswell 
County, January 12, 1892, is a daughter of J. P. Gwynn, 
and Sallie Eliza Gwynn. The paternal grandfather of this 
young lady was a Confederate soldier, Robert Gwynn, who 



Caswell County in the World War 83 

did service in the war between the States, under the command 
of General Robert E. Lee. Her mother, whose name was 
Miss Sallie Eliza Hatchett, was a daughter of Allen Hatchett, 
who was also a brave confederate soldier, and one of Cas- 
well's best citizens. Miss Gwynn attended the public schools 
of Caswell, in which she did effective work, and after com- 
pleting the public school course, she was a student for two 
years at the Greensboro Female College, now known as 
Greensboro College for Women. After leaving this college, she 
taught for two years in the public schools of Caswell County 
in District N^o. 13, Locust Hill Township. Miss Gwynn was 
granted her first certificate to teach, which was a First Grade 
Certificate, by Supt. Anderson, and her record as a teacher 
of this County, as shown by official files, is a good one. 

After this experience as a teacher. Miss Gwynn felt that 
her life's work lay in a different direction, and following 
that impulse, she entered the Richmond Medical College, 
the Memorial Hospital, for training as a nurse. She gradu- 
ated at this Hospital in 1916, and her efficiency as a nurse, 
was so plainly marked, that for a time she was made assis- 
tant Superintendent in the Hospital. While serving in this 
capacity, she joined the Red Cross, and enlisted in the Mc- 
Guire Unit, which was called into service, March 23, 1918, 
and was placed at Camp Pike, Little Rock, Ark. She re- 
mained at that place until July 16, and was sent to I^ew 
York for equipment, and sailed from ISTew York on August 
23, on the "Adriatic" a ship of the "White Star Line," for 
over-seas landing at Liverpool. From this place she was 
sent to Southampton, from Southampton over the Chan- 
nel, to LeHavre. After remaining for a short while at that 
place, she was sent to Paris, and later to Toul. At this place 
she served as a nurse in the Evacuation Base, near the front 
line. Much of this service was attending upon those who were 
being given first aid treatment. Her work at Toul need 
not be discussed in this character sketch, because the world 
knows of the incomparable service which was given at this 
base. She remained at this base, ^N"©. 45, until February 
16, and was then transferred to Base N'o. 82 for two weeks. 
Next she was transferred to Base 87, and was at that place 



84 Caswell CorNXY in the World War 

for five days, next sent to La Boul, near St. JSTazaire, and 
was there for five days, next at Brest, then sailed on the 13th 
day of April on the U. S. S. ^'Mobile,'' this ship being among 
the interned German ships of the Old Hamburg-American 
Line. After an uneventful ocean voyage of ten days, she ar- 
rived at Staten Island, on April 23, 1919, and was held there 
for two weeks, and then sent back to Ft. McHenry, Balti- 
more, where she was discharged on the first of July, 1919. 

Since her discharge, Miss Gwynn has re-entered the service 
of her profession, and continues to do active work in same. 

HOUSTON^ LAFAYETTE GWYI^N 

Houston Lafayette Gwynn was born near Yanceyville in 
Caswell County, April 1, 1896. His father Littleton A. 
Gwynn, has been for many years one of the most successful 
and prosperous farmers of the county and has given much 
of his life for the county's betterment. It is but fitting to 
say that this parent has been one of the prime factors in the 
educational life of Caswell, a warm friend of Public Educa- 
tion, one who has served with great efficiency and devotion 
in all educational matters, and for a number of years has 
been the Chairman of the Board of Education and his untir- 
ing activities have done much to shape the educational policy 
of the county. The mother of our young soldier, whose 
maiden name was Annie Elizabeth Blackwell, was born near 
Ruffin. Houston Lafayette Gwynn received the rudiments 
of his education in the public schools of Caswell County. 
He completed the course of the seven grades with much credit 
to himself. He then entered the high school at Reidsville, 
doing high school work at that place. He was a student at 
Mars Hill College for several terms and at the time of the 
registration of June 5, 1917, he was a student at Wake 
Forest College. 

At his request, on September 19, 1917 he was voluntarily 
inducted into Military service and sent with a large contin- 
gent of Caswell boys to Camp Jackson, S. C. On May 1. of 
the following year he was transferred to Camp Sevier. He 
rapidly acquired great skill in military tactics and was ap- 



Caswell County in the World War 85 

pointed to the rank of Second Lieutenant in the United States 
Infantry. After remaining for a time at Camp Sevier he 
was again transferred, and this time to Camp Pike, Arkan- 
sas. At this place further honors awaited this Caswell 
soldier and on October 9, 1918 he was commissioned as First 
Lieutenant in the United States Infantry of the 77th Com- 
pany Depot Brigade and made Company Commander. On 
account of his splendid mastery of military tactics he was 
used at Camp Pike for the training of troops for over seas 
service and was at that place when the Armistice put a 
cessation to military operations. On December 27, 1918, 
with most honorable mention, he was discharged from mili- 
tary service. His Army Serial Number was 1866365. 

Lieutenant Gwynn, at this writing, is a matriculate of one 
of our foremost Medical Colleges, where he is preparing him- 
self for the practice of medicine. 



PETEE HAKRELSON 

Peter Haekelsois^ was born in the County of Caswell, 
February 19, 1894. His father, Hiram W. Harrelson, na- 
tive of Caswell, married Miss Eliza Perkins of Virginia. On 
his mother's side his grandfather, Robert Perkins, was a 
confederate soldier, who was active service in the war be- 
tween the States. Young Harrelson received the rudiments of 
his education in the schools of Caswell and afterwards did 
high school work at Reidsville Seminary. 

He enrolled his name in the ranks of the !N^ational Army 
in the registration of June 5, 1917, and on December 17 
of the same year he was inducted by his Local Board and 
entrained for Camp Jackson, S. C, at which place he was 
made a Corporal, assigned to the 306th Ammunition Train of 
the 81st Division. He remained at Camp Jackson eight months 
and one half, receiving the necessary training for overseas ser- 
vice. He passed successfully his over-seas examination, and on 
August 8, 1918, sailed from Hoboken, INT. J., and after a safe 
voyage through the submarine zone, landed at Liverpool. He 
was held at Camp Winchester near Liverpool, for a short 



86 Caswell County in the World Wab 

while, and then sent across to France by the usual sea route. 
He was placed in service near the Verdun Front. His Divi- 
sion, as those of us know who are familiar with the opera- 
tions of the 81st Division, was about to be hurled against 
the German army, when the Armistice put an end to mili- 
tary operations. He remained in France until June 9 of 
the following year, on which date he set sail from French soil, 
from St. l^azaire on the U. S. S. "Roanoke." He arrived 
at Charleston, S. C. and from this place he was sent to 
Camp Jackson and on June 26 was discharged from mili- 
tary service. 

Before entering Military service, this man was engaged 
in farming and since his resumption of civil life, has actively 
resumed the occupation of farming. Serial 'No. 1802197. 



ISAAC DOUGLAS HAREISON 

Isaac Douglas Harrison^ born at Blanch, N. C, volun- 
teered on the 28th day of June, 1917, as a member of the 
1st Virginia Cavalry, enlisting at Richmond, Va. His father 
Thomas S. Harrison, Esq., who was an old Confederate 
soldier, has been for many years a man of much prominence 
in the affairs of Caswell, Esquire Harrison is a man of nmch 
culture and refinement, and his many sketches, signed un- 
der the 7iom de plume of Jeems Goslin, J. P., have been read 
with much interest throughout the country. The great-grand- 
father of Douglas, was Thomas Harrison, a Veteran of the 
Revolutionary War, who fought with much courage in the 
battle at Guilford Court House, in Guilford County. His 
mother's name, before marriage, was Miss Mary J. ]^>urk- 
holder, who was of a Virginia family, living at Lynchbiirg, 
at the time of her marriage. The boy-hood days of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, were spent on the farm of his father, near 
Blanch, and during the winter, he attended the public schools 
of the county. Completing the public schools, he spent two 
years in the high school at Yance^'\nlle. We are pleased to 
say tliat this young volunteer fortunately kept a diary of 
his service during the great war, and this diary will aive 



Caswell County in the World War 87 

his record, adding thereby much to the interest of this little 
history. 

Diary of Isaac Douglas Harrkon. On the 28th day ol 
June 1917, I volunteered as a member of the 1st Virginia 
Cavalry, of the State of Va. I felt that it was my duty to 
render the best service I could for my country in the Great 
War. Prior to the time that I volunteered, I was employed 
in the American Locomotive work, running the big ammuni- 
tion lathe ; this lathe was turning out three-inch shells. I was 
placed in a Company for three months, and then assigiied to 
Troop A, of the 1st Va. Cavalry, which was stationed in the 
city of Danville. On Sep. 1st, I was assigned to guard 
duty, at the Armory; at one o'clock the Western Union 
News Boy handed me a telegram, addressed to Maj. E. W. 
Bowes. I promptly signed for the telegram, and gave it to 
Lieut. Featherston and he turned it over to Maj. Bowes. 
This telegram proved to be an order from the war depart- 
ment at Washington, for us to prepare to break camp, and 
to proceed to Camp McClellan, Ala., for further mobiliza- 
tion. We were entrained and sent to Kichmond, Va., and 
on the night of Sept. 5th, at 10, o'clock, we marched to Bird 
Station, and at 11-30, pulled out for the Southern Camp 
in Alabama. We landed in our Camp at 6-30, P. M. on 
the 7th. My first assignment off the bat was to be placed 
on picket guard; next day I grubbed stumps and helped 
pitch tents." We were at this place for three weeks, and then 
got orders to move to the Auxiliary Depot, No. 309. We 
were there for three months, and then got orders to move back 
into the Marie Camp. At this place, we were "busted" from 
Cavalry, into the 104th Ammunition Train. We soldiered 
there for ten months and eleven days, and then left for 
Camp Mills, Long Island. 

On June 13th, I left the Base Hospital at Camp McClel- 
lan, Ala., and signed up for duty. It was a beautiful day 
when we left Camp McClellan although the weather was 
exceedingly hot, the thermometer registering 112 degrees in 
the shade. On June 20th, we arrived at Richmond; our 
next stop was at Washington, D. C, where we left the train 
and tramped into town. After the exercise of this parade. 



88 Caswell County in the World War 

we were again entrained and pulled out for Camp Mills. 
We remained here for several days, drilling eight hours each 
day, and on June 29th, orders came for us to prepare to 
leave camp, and we pulled out for New York Harbor. We 
landed at the dock at one o'clock, took a boat up the Hudson 
Eiver, about two miles, and there transferred to a big old 
British transport, named "Medic." 

On June 29th, we pulled out of the New York Harbor, 
and were off for Liverpool. After being on the water for 
four days, we landed at Halifax, Nova Scotia. Owing to 
the delay caused by a fog, we missed our convoy, and w^e 
were forced to pull up to the great Halifax Harbor, and 
drop anchor. During our voyage to Halifax, when we were 
three days out at Sea, we ran into a bunch of whales, and 
one of the huge creatures followed us for many miles. I 
celebrated my 4th of July, in the Harbor at Halifax, by 
playing set-back with Corporal Lawrence ; Wagoner Salem 
Sanger, and Private Willie Emmanuel Allen. On the after- 
noon of this day, I became very ill, and the Doctor put me 
in a Ward upon the top deck of the ship and sent me over 
to Halifax, Canada. I knew this meant that for a time 
I would be unable to go over-seas. As I pulled away from the 
ship the Quartette of my Company sang to me in parting, 
"Farewell to thee." I recall this experience. While in Halifax, 
one night, as I was standing in front of a dance hall, up 
walked several of my officers, namely; Maj. Harvey L. Jones, 
C^apt, James Burk, and Lieut Sweeney, They were all very 
kind to me. After talking with me for a short while, they 
carried me into an ice-cream palor. We were there until 
twelve o'clock ; and as they told me good-bye, each one of my 
officers gave me a fist of money, and left me with the wish 
that I would have better luck next time, in getting across. 
The following day, I was entrained and sent back into the 
U. S. I had a parlor car during the day and at night, a 
sleeper. When we arrived in Boston, Mass., stopping at the 
Northern Station, representatives of the Red Cross met me 
there, and gave me a good breakfast; a hot cup of coffee, 
sweet milk, boiled ham, bananas and cream. This repast was 
very tempting, even to a sick man. Wliile I was in Boston, 



Caswell County in the World War 89 

I called up my godmother, her name being Mrs. Susie Fitus. 
Just as soon as she got my message, she hurried down to the 
station to see me, and remained at the station until I left 
Boston. The following day, I arrived at New York; here 
the Eed Cross took me in charge, and carried me to St, 
Nichols Hotel. After supper, they put me in an ambulance, 
and carried me to the Hudson River, where I was ferried 
over to Hoboken, IST. J., and there put in St. Mary's 
Hospital No. 2, at Secancus, N. J. Here I remained until 
August 25th, and on that date, I was transferred to Camp 
Merritt, JST. J., and put in a Casual Battalion, Company E. 
A few days thereafter, I was in pretty good physical condi- 
tion, and while at this camp, I was given leaves of absence, 
which permitted me to visit Coney Island, Newark, N. J. 
and Jersey City. 

On Sept. 16th, we received orders to pack up for over- 
seas, the 398th Casual Company being stationed at Camp 
Merritt, and on the following day, Sept. 17th, we pulled 
out of Hoboken Harbor, at New Jersey, Pier No. 59. This 
was my second attempt to go over-seas. I went over on the 
"Lapland," There were fourteen other ships in our convoy. 
For thirteen long days, we plowed the briny deep and landed 
at Liverpool, England, and on Sunday, Sept. 29th, we march- 
ed off board the ship, in the usual formation. The same after- 
noon, we hiked up to an English rest camp, named Knotash, 
just out of Liverpool. On October 2nd, we hiked out of this 
came, to Camp Woodleigh, and on the 4th day of October, 
we left this latter place, and arrived at Southampton. 
While at Southampton we were detailed to unload wounded 
soldiers. My first service was to assist in the unloading of 
four Red Cross Ships of wounded soldiers just from the bat- 
tle fields of France. 

On October 8th, we boarded one of these Red Cross Ships, 
and pulled out of Southampton, headed for France. The 
following morning, at 2 o'clock, we were awakened by a fear- 
ful crash, which proved to be a submarine, which was located 
about three miles off, and was firing upon us. We had four 
Submarine chasers with us ; these little ships at once got busy, 
chasing the submarines, and dropping depth bombs. I 



90 Caswell County in the World War 

must admit, that all of lis were a little nervous for a while, 
but we soon became convinced that our Sub-marine Chasers 
were equal to the situation. Early that morning, we pulled 
into Le-Havre; here we unloaded, and hiked for miles to an- 
other rest camp. Resting here for one day, we boarded a 
train for Southampton, just 20 kilometers below Baidant. 
This was a replacement camp. I was here four days. jSText 
I boarded an American Battalion troop train, and traveled 
three days and nights, until finally, I got up with my Com- 
pany. You may readily understand how happy I was to be 
again with the men of my old company. I found them 
stationed at camp De-Mucor-Vannes, and I also found them 
quarantined for thirty days. I v^^as held there about a week ; 
then the quarantine was raised, and orders were received 
for the 54th Field Artillery Brigade to pack up. The next 
day, we pulled out of camp loaded our Ammunition trucks 
and wagons, and landed at Bar-Le-Duc, and were stationed 
there as a reserve for the Meuse-Argonne Sector nntil the 
Armistice was signed. We were 16 Kilometers from the 
front, when the allied armies ceased firing. We remained 
at Bar-Le-Due a few days, and were then sent to Jussy ; 
from there we were ordered to Bonrben Les Brains and 
stationed for four months. During this time, they gave me 
a job chasing garrison and general prisoners. 

While at this place, I had a very pleasant experience. One 
night, while at supper in the company mess hall, I looked 
across to an opposite table ; I saw a soldier, whose face was 
turned toward me that looked familiar ; the soldier saw me 
about the same time and as a result of these looks, in less than 
a second, John Bradner and I were hugging each other. T 
soon found that John was out on detached service, and had, 
while performing his required duties, accidentally come my 
way. I need not say that we two Caswell boys were happy. 
John told me that I was the first Caswell man that he had 
seen since his arrival in France. In a few days after meet- 
ing with John, I was given a furlongh, which carried with 
it a twelve days leave of absence. I had the privilege of 
going down the Mediterranean Coast, right at the foot of 
the Alps Mountains, and visiting a city, by the name of Nice. 



Caswell County in the World War 91 

This city was the most beautiful place I saw, exept Paris. 
On the 9th day of April, I went over the Alps Mountains 
into Italy. Monday after Easter Sunday, I left Nice, for 
St. Nazaire; at this place I found my company ready for 
embarkation. We were placed, first in Camp No. 1, then 
transferred to Camp No. 2, and while in these camps, we 
were inspected and deloused. On May 13th, at 5. P. M., 
we boarded the big Transport, the "Virginia" and pulled 
out of the docks at St. Nazaire, bound for the good old U. S. 
A. This big ship carried 5600 soldiers, 500 merchant mar- 
ines, and 250 sailors. On the 17th of May, our ship was 
hitting high places on the seas, when we ran into an awful 
storm, that lasted twelve hours, and on the 20th of May, 
we ran into another storm that lasted twenty hours ; this was 
the time the boys fed the fish. On May 25th, the "Virginia" 
landed at Newport News ; we marched off ship, formed our 
company, and hiked through Newport News, and over to 
Camp Hill. On the 29th of May, we boarded a big boat at 
Newport News, and at 7 P. M., pulled out from the pier, 
and came up the James Kiver, to Eichmond, Va. On the 
30th of May, we paraded through the streets of Richmond ; 
after which we were sent to Camp Lee, from which place, on 
the 1st day of June, I was discharged from military service. 

We wish to append to the diary of young Harrison the 
fact, that at this writing, he has been given his passports, 
by the State Department at Washington, and has gone to 
Cuba. He has in waiting for him on this island a very 
lucrative position in a large business enterprise. 



J. S. HARVEY 

J. S. Harvey was born on August 7, 1893. His father, 
J. Shields Harvey, a native of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, 
married Miss Louise Hodges. The grandfather of young 
Harvey on his paternal side was Booker Harvey, a very 
enterprising citizen of Virginia. On his maternal side he 
was a grandson of Henry E. Hodges. This grandparent was 
for many years a very prominent and successful farmer, 



92 Caswell County in the World War 

living near Gatewood's Store. Both of these grandparents 
were confederate soldiers, who saw active service during the 
troublesome days from '61 to '65. 

Young Harvey made five repeated attempts to be received 
into the military service of his country but on account of some 
physical defect he was four times rejected. Finally he was 
accepted for service in the signal corps of the Army. After 
being held in camp for only sixty days, he was sent over 
seas. As a member of the signal corps he was immediately 
put into active service. He participated in the Battle of St. 
Mihiel and several other engagements. Fortunately he was 
neither wounded nor gassed. He returned over-seas in the 
of.rly summer of 1910 and was sent to Camp Lee, Va,, from 
which place he was discharged from military service. The 
father of this ex-service man was for a number of years 
Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners of Caswell 
C'ounty and held other positions of influence and responsi- 
bility. 

lEVING HOWAED JEFFRIES 

Irvin Howard Jeffries^ who was voluntarily inducted in- 
to military service, was born in the county of Caswell, Octo- 
ber 27, 1894. His father, J. J. Jeffries, married Miss Mol- 
lie Carter of Virginia, and on his father's side, he is a lineal 
descendant of Addison Jeffries, an old confederate soldier, 
who saw active service in the war between the States from 
1861 to 1865, He received the rudiments of his education 
in the public schools of Caswell County, and afterwards, 
had the opportunity of attending for several sessions, the 
Chatham high school, located at Chatham, Virginia. 

At the time of his induction into Military service he was 
engaged in farming, and was sent to Camp Sevier for train- 
ing. Here he was made corporal, in the Headquaarters Com- 
pany, 113 Regiment of the 30th Division. He remained at 
this camp, doing intensive training, for a period of nine 
months, after which he successfully passed his over-seas ex- 
amination, and on May 27th, 1918, he sailed from Hoboken, 
on an English Transport, "Armagh," landing at Liverpool. 



Caswell County in the World War 93 

From Liverpool he was sent by the usual course from South- 
ampton, across the English Channel, to LeHavre. We need 
not trace the military activities of young Jeffries further 
than to say that he took an active part in the many fearful 
engagements which fell to the lot of the 30th Division. He 
was in the battle at St, Mihiel, and the Argonne Forest, and 
the numerous battles which raged about the Verdun front. 
Fortunately for him, in his participation in these stubbornly 
fought battles he was neither wounded nor gassed. At the 
time of the signing of the armistice, he was with his Regi- 
ment on the Verdun Front. He remained with his Division 
in France until March 6, 1919, when he sailed from St. 
Nazaire, on the U. S. S. ''George Washington," landing 
safely at Newport News, Va., and from Newport News he 
was transferred to Camp Jackson where he received his dis- 
charge. The Army Serial Number of this young soldier was 
1323283. After the signing of the Armistice he visited 
many of the most interesting cities and places of the French 
Eepublic. 

CLYDE RAY JONES 

Clyde Ray' Jones was born at Milton, N. C. June 26th 
1891. His father, Frank B. Jones, a native of Caswell 
married Miss Ella Ray of Leakville, N. C. After finishing 
the Public School Course of Caswell, young Jones attended 
the High School of Cary, N.C. 

When war was declared against Germany, he was muni- 
tion worker at Hopewell Va., and was sent from that place 
to Camp Lee, on March 29th, 1918. Here he was assigned 
to the Regiment Supply Co. of the 320th Infantry, of the 
80th Division. His stay at Camp was a very short one ; 
after thirty days training, he was given his over-seas exami- 
nation, and on May 18th, 1918, sailed from Newport News, 
Va., on an Italian Transport, and landed at St. Nazaire. 

After his arrival in France, he went into action with the 
men of the 80th Division, and performed active service at 
Averley Woods, Arras, St. Mihiel, and the Meuse-Argonne 
offensive. Durina: the Meuse-Aro-onue offensive, he was 



94 Caswell County in the World Wae 

placed with the shock troops, and in the cleaning up of the 
Argonne, he was partially shell-shocked. The Armistice 
having put an end to hostilities, he was sent home on April 
Sth 1910; sailing from St. Nazaire, on the U. S. S., 
"Dekalb," as a casual, he landed at Newport ISTews, Va., and 
quartered for a while at the Soldiers Home, in that place. 
He was then sent to Columbia S. C, and there discharged. 
His Army Serial Number was 2468835. ■ 



MARVIN MILTON JONES 

Marvin Milton Jones^ who was voluntarily inducted into 
the Air service on Dec. 13th 1917,, and sent to Ft. Thomas, 
Ky., for training, was born in the county of Caswell, Sept. 
14th 1893. His father, Milton Jones, was born in Person 
County, and moved to Caswell about twenty-one years ago. 
This parent married Miss Mary Frances Holdercroft of 
Caswell. This young airman completed the public school 
course of Caswell, and also the high school course at Semora. 
Prior to his induction he was a very efficient worker on his 
father's farm about three miles from Semora. 

He remained at Ft. Thomas, Ky., for two months, and 
was tlien sent to Camp Sevier, where he received two months 
additional training. Next he was transferred to Camp Mer- 
ritt and iitted out for over-seas service, and, on November 
loth, sailed from Holwken on the U. S. S., "George Wash- 
ington," and landed at Brest. For a short while after land- 
ing over-seas he was stationed at a Summer Resort at Biscoe 
Bay ; thence he w^as sent to the officers' training school, for in- 
struction before going to the front. He was actively engaged 
in preparing himself for air service, when the armistice put 
an end to hostilities. After the signing of the armistice he 
performed such duties as were required of the men that 
were in air service. In the intervening period, before his 
sailing for America, he had the opportunity of going on 
furloughs to many sections of France, visiting many of the 
most interesting cities ; of course, in this number Paris was 
included. He sailed from France, from St. Nazaire, on 



Caswell County in the "World War 95 

the "Manchuria," and arrived safely at New York; from 

New York, he was sent to Camp Meade, Md., and there 
discharged on April 12th 1919. 



JAMES EDWIN KING 

James Edwin King was born in Locust Hill Town-ship 
in Caswell County, on the 25th day of December, 1895. 
His father, the late Robert A. King, was married to Miss 
Pattie Johnston. On his maternal side, Edwin King was 
a great-grandson of Lancelot Johnston, who years ago was a 
man of much prominence in the life of Caswell. Robert 
King, the father of this young soldier, was a very successful 
business man, and during his life, was engaged in a number 
of successful business enterprises. 

After completing the usual public school course of Caswell, 
this future soldier entered the seminary at Reidsville, N. C. 
At this place he made a most enviable record, and upon his 
graduation, was awarded a state scholarship, which entitled 
him to enter the University of North Carolina. He was at 
the University for four years, and graduated with honor, 
receiving the degree of Master of Arts. After leaving college 
for sometime he was in the employ of the Liggett-Myers 
Tobacco Company, with head-quarters at Durham, N. C. 
Upon the declaration of w^ar against Germany, he offered 
himself for enlistment in the U. S. Navy, at the recruiting 
office, in the city of Raleigh, N. C, but owing to defective 
eye-sight, was rejected. He was placed in limited service 
by the local board of his County and under a call for limited 
service men, he was sent to Syracuse, N. Y., where he was 
made a mechanician in the Aviation Corps and was prepared 
for over-seas service. He was transferred from Syracuse, 
to three other aviation camps of Long Island, and his out- 
fit had received its final training for service in France, when 
the armistice put a cessation to hostilities. 

In January, 1919, he was discharged from military ser- 
vice. At this writing, he is located at Huntington, Ky., 
having resumed his former occupation as a tobacconist. 



96 Caswell County in the World War 

AZZIE CONALLY LONG 

AzziE CoNALLY LoNG wRs bom ill the County of Cas- 
well. His father, John I. Long, a Person County man, was 
a brave old confederate soldier, and did his full duty in the 
Civil War as a member of Co. A of the 30th North Carolina 
Regiment. This parent married Miss Frances Xelson, a 
native of Caswell. The boyhood life of Azzio- Conally Long 
was spent near Prospect Hill at which place his father lived. 
He attended the public schools near his home, and had the 
further opportunity of doing work in the graded school at 
Graham. 

He was twenty-one years of age at the time of his regis- 
tration in 1917. He was inducted into military service in 
July 1918, and sent to Camp Greenleaf, Ga., and later 
transferred to Camp Joseph E. Johnson. Here he was placed 
in the Medical Corps of the Army, and was attached to the 
Infirmary No. 2. His out-fit did not go over-seas, the armis- 
tice putting an end to hostilities; but he was held at this 
place until January 15, 1919, doing the accustomed work 
which was assigned to his corps. He was given his dis- 
charge from service on the date named above. The service 
record of Soldier Long shows that he was very attentive to 
duty, and had made much proficiency in his work as a 
member of the Medical Corps of the Army. 

Before his induction into Military Service, he was actively 
engaged in farming. Upon his return to civil life, with 
accustomed energy, he has resumed farm operations. The 
Armv Serial Number of this ex-soldier was 3025715. 



WILLIAM TAYLOR LONG 

The subject of this sketch, WiLLiA:\r Taylor Loxg^ of Mil- 
ton, N. C. Route 1, was born on the 4th day of March 1895. 
He was the second son of James Monroe Long, and Winnie 
Taylor Long. Both of these parents were Caswell County 
people. The father of this young soldier, was for many 
years prominently identified with all the interests which were 



Caswell County in the World War 97 

for our County's uplift and he set a very line patriotic ex- 
ample for his boys. When he was a student as Chapel Hill 
in the days of the Civil War, he volunteered with his class, 
and rendered the Confederate States valiant service, giving 
to his beloved Southland, the most zealous loyalty and ser- 
vice. We should record, in passing, that a few years ago, 
this worthy man in recognition of his devotion to the South, 
in the time of her peril, was given the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, by the University of North Carolina. As a matter 
of history, we should also record the fact, that four Uncles 
of our young soldier fought in the war between the States, 
two of them giving up their lives on the battle fields of Vir- 
ginia. The maiden name of his mother was Miss W'innie 
Taylor, who was a daughter of Mr. W. S. Taylor. This 
grandparent also was a confederate soldier, and fought with 
devotion for the southern cause. After the civil war, Mr. 
Taylor rendered most valuable service to his County, and was 
for many years County Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion; in this capacity he wrought with nuich efficiency and 
distinction. 

The early education of William Taylor Long was obtained 
in the public schools of Caswell, and in the graded school 
at Semora. After finishing this high school work at Semora, 
he spent three years as a student at Guilford College, in 
Guilford County of this State. He was called by his local 
board for entrainment. May 28th, 1918, and sent to Camp 
Jackson. Here he was given an artillery assignment in the 
317th Kegiment of the 81st Division. After remaining at 
Camp Jackson, S. C, two months for training, he was trans- 
ferred to Camp Mills, at which place he was fitted out for 
over-seas service and on August 8th he sailed from Hoboken, 
IsT. Y. on the transport "Megantic," and landed at Liverpool. 
From that place he was sent across the English Channel, land- 
ing on French soil at LeHavre ; next ordered to a training 
camp near the Swiss Border. Young Long's Division, which 
was commonly known as the ''Wild Cat'' Division, had been 
ordered into action and was on the way to the front when 
notification was received of the sigiiing of the armistice. 
After this period, his movements were such as were the 



98 Caswell County in the World War 

movements of the famous 81st Division, all of wliicli are 
recorded in the history of the Great War. 

Before sailing to America, young Long had the privilege 
of visiting quite a number of the most celebrated and impor- 
tant cities of France including among that number Paris. 
On the 27th day of May, 1919. he sailed from Brest on the 
U. S. S., ''South Carolina,'' and landed at N^ewport News. 
From this place he was sent to Camp Lee, Va., and there 
received his discharge. Since returning from service, soldier 
Long has taken up his previous farm operations, and at this 
writing he is engaged in conducting the large agricultural 
interest belonging to his lamented father's estate. His army 
serial number was 2991807. 



GEORGE THOMAS LANSDELL 

George Thomas Lansdell^ Jr., was born at Semora, 
January 26th 1893. His father, George T. Lansdell, Sr., 
was born at Elizabeth City, in this State. He moved 
to Caswell about thirty years ago, and married Miss Lucy 
Epps Stanfield of Milton, N". C. His grandfather Stan- 
field was a chaplain in the Confederate States Army, and in 
such capacity, served through the entire length of the Civil 
War. Young Lansdell finished his High School Course at 
Semora and for one year thereafter, was a student at the A. 
& ]\[. College at Baleigh. At the time of his registration, 
June 5th 1917, he was engaged in farming. Before his order 
number was reached by his local board for induction. Young 
Lansdell received a permit and volunteered in the aviation 
section of the Signal Corps on December 8th 1917, and was 
sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., thence to Camp Hancock, Ga., 
thence to Camp Merritt N. J., for intensive. He was placed 
in the 2nd Regiment of the Mechanics SigTial Corps, and 
passing successfully his over-seas examination, sailed from 
Hoboken, March 4th 1918, on the TJ. S. S., "Leviathan," 
landing at Liverpool. From this port of debarkation 
he was sent from Southampton, across the English Channel, 
to Le Havre. After landing on French soil, he was given 



Caswell County in the World War 99 

work in an air service camp, three miles from Tours, and 
from this point he did much constructive work, and was 
here at the time of the signing of the armistice. After 
the signing of the armistice, he was held in France for 
transportation work until May 23rd 1919. His work in 
France having been finished, he sailed from Brest on the 
5th day of June, and after seven days voyage, landed at 
Hoboken, N. J., from which place he was sent to Camp Mills, 
and later to Camp Meade, where he was discharged on June 
23rd 1919. 

Mr. Lansdell, Serial number 12655036, was a sergeant 
in the Motor Mechanic Signal Corps. 



WILLIAM THOMAS LEA 

The subject of this sketch has given many years of hon- 
orable service to his country, and it is due to the patriotism 
and the splendid courage of this young man to say that he 
has served his country in the uniform of the army and of 
the navy. Before entering into military service, he had 
served four years in the U. S. Navy ; and while in the navy, 
saw active service during the trouble with Mexico and 
was with the Marines when they occupied Vera Cruz. He was 
discharged from the navy, his term of enlistment having ex- 
pired, with honor, on November 17th 1915. 

He was born near Hamer, in Dan River Township, on 
Dec. 13, 1888. His father, William Lea, married Miss Mollie 
J. King, a Virginia woman. His educational advantages 
were limited to the public schools of Caswell, and one addi- 
tional year at Guilford College. At the time when war was 
declared between the U. S., and Germany, young Lea was 
working at the E. I. Dupont Powder Plant, at Hopewell 
Va., and was sent to the army from that place. 

He was mobilized at Camp Lee, on October 17th, 1917, 
and made a sergeant in the Infantry, Company K. 318th 
Regiment of the 80th Division. This division has been 
called the "Blue Ridge Division," He remained at Camp 
Lee, where he did intensive training for seven and a half 



100 Caswell County in the World War 

months, and on May 30th 1918, he sailed for France from 
Hoboken. He went across on the "Leviathan." It will be 
recalled that the Leviathan was an interned German liner, 
whose German name was "The Yaterland." He landed at 
Brest after a voyage of eight days. In the submarine zone, 
his ship had a rnnning fight with four German submarines. 
A convoy of U. S. Destroyers appeared on the scene in time 
to drive them off, two -of the submarines being sunk by 
the Destroyer. He remained for a short while in a rest 
camp, near Brest, and for the first two months of service 
over-seas, he was brigaded with the English troops. 

This ex-sailor, now a soldier, received his baptism of fire 
while brigaded with the British, in the drive on the Ortoise 
Sector. It fell to his lot to be transferred, and he was in 
the first line during the St. Mihiel Ofi'ensive, from Sept. 
12th to Sept. lOth ; and in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive from 
Sept. 26th to Octol)er 12th. He continued in active fight- 
ing service until ISTovember 7th, of that same year. In 
order that our people may understand something of the terri- 
ble danger through which this son of Caswell passed, we 
will record the fact that in a little village called Xautilaus, 
on October 4th, his Platoon went over the top with forty 
men, and came back with only sixteen. Despite the fact 
that young Lea assisted in so many engagements, and in 
engagements of such terrible fierceness, he escaped without 
being wounded or gassed. 

He remained in France until May 17th, 1910, and during 
the time he was there, he did the usual service that was as- 
signed to the men of his Division. He sailed from Brest on the 
day named above, on a U. S. Transport, and landed at New- 
port News, Va. He was next sent to Camp Lee where on 
June 4th 1919, he received his discharge from service. The 
Army Serial Number of this young soldier was 1822041. 

EAEL LONG 

Earl Long was born in Milton town-ship, near Semora, 
on the 13th day of November, 1897. He is a brother of 
William Taylor Long, whose sketch appears on the previous 



Caswell County in the World War 101 

page, and the family history of this young man is given in 
that chapter. 

His early education was received in the public schools of 
this County, and next, he spent three years at Guilford 
College afterwards graduating with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, at Trinity College. He was taking a post-graduate 
course at Trinity College, when it came to his turn to register 
in the registration of Sept. 12th, 1918. Inunediately after 
this, he enlisted in the infantry of the Student's Army Train- 
ing Corps, and was inducted in the military service, at Trinity 
College, Company Commander Holmes. He was taking the 
usual training that was given to the men of this Corps of 
the Army when the armistice put an end to military opera- 
tions. He was discharged on October 14th, 1918. 



JOHN WILBERT LUN"SFORD 

John Wilbert Lunsfokd was born in Caswell County, 
August 19th, 1895, being the eldest son of John W. Lunsford 
and Adeline Tate Lunsford. The educational advantages 
of this young soldier were such as were usually received in 
the public schools of Caswell. 

His name was enrolled in the Registration of June 5th, 
1917, and he was called into service May 27th, 1918, and 
the following day, sent to Camp Jackson, at which place he 
was trained for military service, being placed in Battery A, 
Field Artillery of the 81st Division. At the completion 
of his training, he was sent from Hoboken, N. J., Augaist 
8th, 1918 landing safely at Liverpool. He was kept at this 
place in a Rest Camp for three days, and next sent to South- 
ampton, for transportation across the English Channel, to 
Le-Havre, arriving at that place on August 24th. 

The Military operations of this Division are written in 
much larger history, and he was with it through the war. 
He did not take part in any battles, but was under orders 
to go to the front lines when news came of the signing of 
the armistice. From l^ovember until May 27th, he remained 



102 Caswell County in the World War 

in France, doing regulation Army duties. During this per- 
iod, this young soldier made a record for willing-ness and 
efficiency 

He came back on the U. S. S. "South Carolina," sailing 
from St. Nazaire, on May 27th, and landing after an un- 
eventful trip, at Newport News. He was held for a short 
while at Camp Morrison, and sent from that place to Camp 
Lee, where he took up his former occupation of farming, 
and at this writing, he is still engaged in active agricultural 
operations. 

THOMAS EUGENE McCEARY 

Thomas Etgene McCrary was born at Blanch, N. C. on 
the 16th day of April, 1894. His father, Thomas H. Mc- 
Crary, was born in Richmond, Arkansas, and his mother, 
Carrie J. McCrary was born near Danville, Va. This young 
soldier attended the public schools of Caswell, and after 
completing the work of the seven grades, spent several ses- 
sions at the Providence Graded School. 

Before the beginning of the Great War, he had previous 
military training. He served as a volunteer for three years 
in Co. M, of the 1st Virginia Infantry, and was given an 
honorable discharge from service. At the time of his en- 
listment he was seventeen years of age. Wlien the trouble 
broke out in Mexico, in 1913, and when it seemed that v/ar 
was imminent with that country, he again volunteered for 
military service, in Company M. of the 1st Virginia Infantry. 
He was sent to Camp Stuart, Va., and after remaining at 
that place for about two months, he was discharged by reason 
of the fact that he had a broken arm, which injury made him 
imfit for general military service. He registered in the gen- 
eral registration of June 5th, 1917, and owing to the fact 
that he only had one good arm, he was placed in limited 
service. He was sent by the Local Board, under a call for 
limited service on August 5th, 1918 from Yanceyville, N. C. 
to Syracuse, N. Y., and there placed in the 63rd Company 
of the 16th Bn. Infantry, and kept at that place until Sep- 
tember. He was next transferred to Camp in Maryland, 



Caswell County in the World War 103 

and placed in Co. A. M. T. C. Unit, 311,and made an acting 
sergeant. The unit of which McCrary was a member did 
not go over seas, for the reason that the armistice put an 
end to hostilities. After the signing of the armistice he 
remained in charge of the same department, although he 
was transferred to several different units, and on March 
10, 1919, received his discharge from military service. 

We are much pleased to append to this sketch, that the 
superior officers of this young soldier were highly pleased 
with the very efficient manner in which he discharged his 
military duty. His Army Serial iSTumber was 4307543. 



NEAL WAEREN McGUIRE 

Neal Warren McGuire was born at Mocksville, N. C, 
Davie County, June 6th 1893. His father, William Frank- 
lin McGuire, was a native of the same county. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Sophia Moore, was a native of 
Pender County, IST. C. The father of this young man was 
an old confederate veteran, who fought with distinguished 
bravery through the entire period of the Civil War. After 
finishing the high school course at Yancewille, young Mc- 
Guire entered the Reidsville Seminary, and graduated with 
high honor, in 1913, winning a medal for Oratory. 

He volunteered for service in the great war on July 30th 
1917, and was sent to Camp Sevier for training. Here he 
was made Corporal, in the 113th Field Artillery, of the 30th 
Division. He sailed over-seas on the 26th day of May, 1918, 
from Hoboken, on an English transport, "The Armagh" and 
landed at Liverpool. On his way across the "Armagh" was 
attacked by a flotilla of German submarines. It was the 
good fortune of his ship to escape, but the peril was of much 
magnitude because at the time of the attack the attending 
convoy had been scattered. He crossed over into France by 
the usual route of the soldiers on the way to the front. At 
St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest, Woevre, young McGuire was 
in almost continuous action. He passed through these fiery 
battles unscathed, with the exception of injuries received in 



104 Caswell County in the World War 

the Woevre from mustard gas. We need not record bis 
future movements after the signing of the Armistice, fur- 
ther than to say, that he did such service as was assigned 
to the man of the 30th Division. 

He sailed from France on the 7th day of March, from 
St. Nazaire, on the "Santa Teresa," and landed at Newport 
News. His Regiment was brought from Newport News to 
Raleigh, N. C, where be took part in the famous parade 
through the streets of our Capital City, on March 24tb. 
From Raleigh, he was sent to Camp Jackson, and there 
received his discharge, on March 29th 1919. At the time 
of young McGuire's enlistment in the U. S. iVrmy, he was 
a salesman for the Reynolds Tobacco Co., of Winston-Salem, 
N. C. Since bis discharge form Military service, he has 
been given a substantial promotion by the same Company. 
Army Serial Number 1323287. 



; CHARLES LEWIS MALONE 

Charles Lewis Maloxe was born in the County of Cas- 
well in Hightower township. His father, Charles L. Malone, 
married Miss Mollie Warren, both of these parents being 
Caswell County people. On his father's side, young Malone 
is a grandson of Bartlett Yancey Malone. This grandparent 
was very prominent in his day, ranking among our best 
citizens and was as brave a soldier as ever followed Lee or 
Jackson. Young Malone finished with much credit to him- 
self the usual course obtainable in the public schools of Cas- 
well and spent one year at Bingham School, Asheville, N. C. 
and three years at Elon College. 

In keeping with the patriotism of his ancestors, he offered 
himself on March 20, 1918, before the recuiting officer at 
Raleigh for enlistment into naval service and was accepted. 
He was assigned to the Naval Base at Charleston. From 
Charleston he was transferred to Pensacola, Florida, where 
he underwent further training. From Pensacola he was 
transferred to Philadelphia, and after remaining at that 
place some while was next sent to North Sidney, Nova Sco- 



Caswell County in the World War 105 

tia. The armistice putting an end to hostilities, he did not 
engage in over seas service, but his outfit was being prepared 
for active duty in European waters, and was upon the point of 
sailing. After the armistice he remained in Nova Scotia 
for a while, was then sent to the United States naval operat- 
ing base at Hampton Roads, from which place he was dis- 
charged April 9, 1919. 

Before his enlistment into Naval Service he was engaged 
in farming near Prospect Hill. Since his return to civil life 
he is engaged in commercial operations in the town of Me- 
bane. 

GEORGE WESLEY THOMAS MARTIN 

George Wesley Thomas Martin is a native born Caswell 
County boy, his birthday being July 16th, 1802. His 
father, Robert R. Martin, is a Caswell man and his mother, 
whose maiden name was Mary E. Warren, was a daughter 
of Drury Warren of Alamance County. This grandparent 
saw active service in the war between the States, fighting 
with Lee in Virginia to the close of that struggle. Young 
Martin is a nephew of George Martin, who was a confederate 
soldier, and wounded at Fredericksburg, and his great great 
grandsire was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

This young soldier received his education in the Public 
Schools of Caswell, and up to the time of his induction into 
military service, was a very efficient worker on his father's 
farm, near Yancewille. 

He was called by his Local Board, for mobilization, on the 
28th day of May, 1918, and was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. 

At this place, he was assigned to the artillery, and made 
a member of Battery A. 317th Regiment, of the 81st Divi- 
sion. After two months intensive training at Camp Jackson, 
he was transferred, with several other Caswell boys, to Camp 
Mills, N. Y., and on August 8th of this same year, he sailed 
from Hoboken, on a British Transport, "The Metigama," 
and after a safe and speedy voyage, arrived at Liverpool. 
Here he was placed for several days in a Rest Camp, at 
Winchester, then sent to Southampton for embarkation across 



106 Caswell County in the World War 

the English Channel, to LeHavre. From LeHavre, his Regi- 
ment was despatched to Lorraine, France, near the Swiss 
Border. From this time, and up to the signing of the 
armistice, he was engaged in general training with the men 
of the 81st Division. After the signing of the armistice, 
until he was ordered home, he was engaged in the usual 
routine work of the 81st Division. On the 27th day of May, 
he sailed from Brest, on the U. S. S., ^'South Carolina, 
and landed at Newport ISTews, Va., from which place he was 
sent to Camp Lee, and in June, received his discharge. His 
Army Serial Number was 2991814:. 

It will be interesting to note, that from the time he left 
Camp Jackson, until he arrived safely at Newport News, 
he was comrade all the way through with AVilliam Taylor 
Long, of this County; and it may be further interesting to 
note, that the ship that carried him across was sunk by a 
German Submarine, on its return voyage. Since his return 
to civil life, he has actively taken up work on his father's 
farm. His brother, Ross Martin, was an enlisted man in the 
U. S. Navy, and served in the Hospital Corps during the 
War. 



AZARIAH HUTCHINS MASSEY 

AzAEiAH HuTCHiNS Massey was born near Anderson, in 
Caswell County, April 4th 1806. Both of the parents of this 
young man are Caswell people. His father, T. J, Massey, 
married Miss Fannie Aldridge, and our young soldier is the 
second son of this union. Two of the uncles of young Massey 
did service in the Confederate Army. One of the uncles, 
Thomas Massey, died in camp with measles. Young Mas- 
sey was a very intelligent young pupil, and received the us- 
ual instruction given in the Public Schools of Caswell. 

He was called for mobilization, and sent to Camp Jackson, 
S. C, on Oct. 23rd, 1917, and was placed in the ranks of the 
Engineers of the 306th Regiment, of the 81st Division. 
After remaining in this camp for five months, he successfully 
passed the required over-seas examination, and sailed from 
Hoboken, on a transport, "The Great Northern," and landed 



Caswell County in the World War 107 

after a stormy voyage, at Brest. While over-seas, he per- 
formed the duties which were assigned to the men of the 
Division, with much faithfulness. The Armistice putting 
a stop to hostilities, young Massey was not engaged in any 
battles. He remained in France until Feb. 4th, of the fol- 
lowing year, and sailed on the U. S. S., "Kansas," from 
Brest, and landed at Hoboken. From Hoboken, he was sent 
to Camp Lee, Va., and there discharged, March 2nd, 1919. 
It will be interesting to record the fact that on April 19th, 
1919, and after his return to his native land, he was happily 
married to Miss Nannie Byrd, a daughter of W. E. Byrd, 
of Anderson Township. His Serial Number was 2312104, 



JOSEPH EARL MASSEY 

Joseph Eael Massey was born at Milesville in this county 
on October 22, 1897. His father William G. Massey mar- 
ried Miss Ella Pritchette of Guilford County. On his fath- 
er's side he was a grandson of Joseph N. Massey, a veteran 
of the war between the States. Young Massey completed 
with much credit the usual public school education of Caswell, 
and was a student at Elon College at the time of his registra- 
tion. 

On October 7, 1918, he was voluntarily inducted into the 
Student's Army Training Corps and was being trained for 
over-seas service when the armistice of November 11, pat an 
end to hostilities. This ex-service man made a very fine re- 
cord as student at Elon College and since completing his 
course at that place he has served with signal success as prin- 
cipal of the Elon Graded school. 



REID ATWATER MAYNARD 

Reid Atwater Maynard was born in Stony Creek Town- 
ship, in Caswell County. His father, Walter A. Maynard, 
is a native bom Caswell man, and has for many years 
been reckoned as one of the most intelligent farmers of our 



108 Caswell County in the World War 

County. His mother, whose maiden name was Miss Olivia 
At water, was born in Orange County, N. C, and was a 
niece of the late Congressman Atwater. On his paternal 
side, he was a grandson of Wagstaff Maynard, a man who 
was very prominent in the affairs of the County in the days 
before the war. On his mother's side, he was a grandson 
of John F. Atwater, an old Confederate Veteran, who fought 
with much bravery, during the Civil War. 

As a boy, Eeid was exceedingly industrious, and although 
he worked steadily on the farm during the summer, he lost 
no opportunity to read the best of books, and magazines all 
that he could lay hold upon. After finishing the public 
school course in Caswell, he did the required work at Gilliam 
Academy, and next entered the University of North Carolina, 
and while he was a student at the University, and before he 
was twenty-one years of age, he voluntarily enlisted in Com- 
pany A of the Coast Artillery. Immediately after this 
enlistment, he was sent to the Officers Training Camp, at Ft. 
Monroe, Va., at which place he was commissioned as a 2nd 
Lieutenant, on August 13th 1919. The Armistice bringing 
about a cessation of hostilities. Lieutenant Maynard, with 
his Company, did not go over-seas. He remained at Ft. 
]\ronroe until Dec. 1918, and w^as there discharged from 
]\[ilitiiry Service. His Army Serial ISTumber was 614406. 

Immediately after his discharge, he re-entered the Univer- 
sity, and graduated with his class, at the June Commence- 
ment of 1919, receiving at that time the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts. In August following his graduation, he accepted 
a position with the First National Bank in the city of Bur- 
lington and at this writing he is holding with that bank 
a position which is both lucrative and responsible. 



ROBERT EDWARD MILES 

Robert Edward Miles, whose Army Serial Number was 
2586926, was born in Caswell County, December 30, 1889. 
His father, J. B. Miles, of the same County, married Miss 
Sallie B. Aldridge. The grandparents of young Miles, both 



Caswell County in the World War 109 

on the Miles side and also the Aldridge side, were in the 
Confederate service, and both of them fought through the en- 
tire period of the Civil War. 

Robert attended the Public Schools of Caswell County. 
He registered in the Registration of June 5, 1917, and was 
sent by his Local Board to Camp Greenleaf, Ga-, July 5, 
1918. Here he was placed in the Medical Corps of the 
Army. After training at that place for nine months he 
was ordered to make ready for over seas service. He had 
taken his over-seas examination, and just about the time 
that his ship was ready to sail he contracted measles, and 
the resultant illness prevented his going across. He was 
discharged from Camp Lee, May 2, 1919. 

This young soldier is a splendid farmer, and is now ac- 
tively engaged in agricultural operations. 



WATER CURRIE MILES 

Walter Cukeie Miles, who at the time of the registration 
of June 1917 was twenty one years of age, was born in 
Anderson Township of Caswell County. His father, A. Yan- 
cey Miles, married Miss Sallie Walker. Both of the grand- 
sires of young Miles were in the Confederate service and 
his grandfather, Lieutenant L, H. Walker of the 6th Xorth 
Carolina Regiment, was severely wounded in the third 
days fight at the Battle of Gettsysburg. 

Young Miles received the education obtainable in the pub- 
lic schools and at the time of his induction into military 
service was engaged in farming. He was voluntarily in- 
ducted into Military service on September 19, 1917 and was 
sent to Camp Jackson. Here he received the required train- 
ing and was sent over-seas with the men of the 81st Disi- 
sion. The record shows that he did exceedingly fine service 
as a member of this division and made a faithful and trust- 
worthy soldier. After his discharge from military service 
he resumed his former occupation of farming. 



110 Caswell County in the World War 

WILLIAM HENEY MISE 

William Henry Mise^ Army Serial Number 2991823 was 
born in the County of Halifax, Va., August 24tb 1896. Both 
of his parents were natives of that same State. His father 
was Hannibal Mise; his mother, Mrs. Julian Griffin Mise. 
On both his father's and mother's side, he was a grandson 
of a confederate soldier, who went into the Confederate Army 
from Virginia. Before moving to North Carolina, young Mise 
attended the public schools of Pittsylvania County ; in North 
Carolina he was a student of the Yanceyville High School. 
In this school young Mise made a splendid mark for deport- 
ment, for doing and all round thoroughgoing honest worker. 

He was inducted into Military Service, May 28th, 1918, 
and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, to receive training. He 
was in Battery A of the 317th Artillery, under Kegimental 
Commander, Colonel Margette, and placed in the 156th Re- 
gimental Brigade, of the 81st Division, General Moses in 
command. He took his over-seas examination and sailed for 
France from Hoboken, N. J., the Transport, '^Metigonia," 
landing at Liverpool. He was placed in a rest camp for 
four days, known as Camp Woodley, and sailing from South- 
ampton, landed at LeHavre. His Division was on the way 
for an attack when the news came of the signing of the armis- 
tice. His after-movements were those of the soldiers of the 
81st Division. He was sent to St. Nazaire, and on June 9th, 
sailed for America on the U. S. S., "Roanoke", and after 
a sea voyage of twelve days, landed at Charleston S. C, 
from which port he was sent to Camp Jackson, and there re- 
ceived his discharge on the 26th day of June 1919. On his 
return from service, this young soldier energetically began 
work on his father's farm. 



ALEXANDER ROSS MOORE 

Alexander Ross Moore was born at Blanch, N. C, in 
Caswell County, September 18, 1892. His mother, whose 
maiden name was Miss Carry Lea Moore was born at Rich- 



Caswell County in the World War 111 

mond, Arkansas, and the father, Robert H. Moore was born 
in this county. His grandfather, Alexander R. Moore, was 
a confederate veteran, who served with the armies of Lee 
and Jackson, from 1861 to 1865. After completing the 
county public school course, young Moore had the opportunity 
of spending several sessions in the Durham City Schools. 

He enlisted in Company M of the 3rd !N^orth Carolina 
^National Guard, and after he was sent to Camp Sevier, S. 
.C, he was assigned to the 120th Infantry, of the 30th 
Division. He remained at Camp Sevier from August 16th, 
1917, to April 8, 1918, receiving during this period the 
necessary training for service in France. On May 17, 1918, 
he set sail from Boston, Mass., on a British Transport, 
"Miltiades," arriving over-seas at Gravesend, England. Af- 
ter remaining for a short while at Dover and Calais, his 
Division was brigaded with the British 4tli Army. Almost 
immediately upon his arrival on French soil, he was placed 
in battle engagements, and received his baptism of fire at 
Ypres, Belgium. In this battle, he took part in patroling, 
gas attacks, and in one advance. He suffered very severely 
from the effects of a German gas attack, in the battle of 
Ypres. During that historic drive on the St. Quentin front, 
on Sept. 29, 1918, he was severely wounded. 

Fortunately for Caswell's history, young Moore has pre- 
served some general description of the battle in which he 
received this severe wound. "On the 29th of September, 
my Division was on the Taps. At about 5 o'clock, A. M., 
the 27th American Division was on our left, and the Black 
Watch, a Scotch Division, was on our right. We were sup- 
ported by one of the Australian Divisions. At 5 :30 our 
barrage started, and we moved forward "Over the Top" 
on a seventy mile front. I was wounded about 6 o'clock, 
before we reached our main objective. It was impossible 
for me to proceed further with my Company, because a 
bursting shell had broken my right leg, and my left foot was 
also broken. In addition to this, one piece of the shell passed 
through my right arm. From 6 o'clock to 11, I was on the 
field. I was then taken back to an advance dress station, 
and was held at that place until the following night; then 



112 Caswell County in the World War 

I was carried to a Field Hospital, and from that place to a 
British base Hospital, ISTo. G, at Rouen. On October 13th, 
I was sent by way of LeHavre, and Southampton, to Bas- 
ingstoke, Eng., where I was in an American Hospital, Base 
Xo. 21. I was kept at this place until my return to the 
States in December. All this time I was a "stretcher case," 
and I had to be carried on stretchers until I set sail for 
Xew York, December 27." At the time of the signing of 
the armistice, he was in an American Hospital, Base No. 
21. On December 2, he was sent home from Liverpool, 
England, by way of Brest, France, on the U. S. S. "Levia- 
than,'' landing at New York, December 16. He was sent 
to Camp Lee, Va., and later, March 5, 1910, was sent to 
Ft. McPherson, Ga. The last eight months of the military 
life of this soldier were spent in the army hospital at Ft. 
McPherson, and while at that place, he underwent several 
operations, but was finally discharged from service on the 
20 of November, 1010. The Army Serial Number of this 
soldier was 1322058. Before entering military service, he 
was a salesman with the Liggett Myers Tobacco Company, 
located at Durham, N. C. At this writing, while he has 
not recovered entirely from the effects of his wounds and the 
strenuous life in France, he has made wonderful improve- 
ment, and is at the home of his father, near Blanch, in this 
County. 

LINNIE JAMES MOORE 

LiNNiE LaiNies Moore was born in the State of Virginia, 
May 16th, 1800. His father, James P. Moore, was also a 
native of Virginia. His mother, whose maiden name was 
Miss Agups Staten, was Caswell County woman, and was 
born at ^lilton, N. C. On his father's side, he was a 
grandson of James P. Moore, a Confederate Soldier, who 
fought in the Civil War, and was wounded severely, but 
not fatally, at Manassas. He attended the public school in 
this County, and on July .5th 1018, was sent to Camp Green- 
leaf, Ga. There he was placed in the Depot Brigade, and 
upon final physical examination, he was found to be unfit 



Caswell County in the World War 113 

for general Military service, and was given an honorable 
discharge from same. 

THOMAS EDWIX MOOKE 

Thomas Edwin Mooee who was born at Blanch, I^T. C. 
on October 23, 1894, was the second son of Kobert H. Moore 
and Carry Moore to be indncted into Military Service dur- 
ing the Great War. Edwin was a brother of Ross Moore, 
whose service sketch appears elsewhere in this record. It 
is almost impossible to write about the service record of 
Thomas Edwin Moore, without giving full vent to the feeling 
of my heart, and pay to him a tribute of love and praise. 
However, because the people of our County will want to 
know in years to come, something abut this brave boy, whose 
life was laid on the Altar of his Country, we will state the 
facts of his service, as briefly as possible. 

The early education of young Moore was received in the 
schools at Yanceyville, Durham, and Mars Hill ; and as a 
student in these places, his record was one of very great 
efficiency. At the time of his induction into military ser- 
vice he was doing clerical work in the office of the Danville 
Knitting Mill Co., and on July 5th, 1018, with a contin- 
gent of Caswell boys, he was sent to Camp Greenleaf , at 
Chicamauga Park, for training. He was placed in the Offi- 
cers' Training School, and at the time of the signing of the 
armistice, he was a Sergeant in the Medical Corps of the 
Army, and was given the Army Serial ISTumber of 2586927. 

Those of VIS who had loved ones or sons in this Great War 
will always look with interest on the date when the discharge 
was given, because we knew that our loved ones would soon 
be with us again ; but in the case Thomas Edwin Moore, 
this reception of a discharge was a tragedy. At Camp Green- 
leaf, Ga., on the 21st day of December, the boys were in 
line, passing one by one before the proper Officers and re- 
ceiving their discharges from service. Edwin was in this 
line, and it was raining; while standing with the passing 
throng he was stricken with a severe chill, which later deep- 



114 Caswell County in the World War 

ened into pneumonia. His recovery from pneumonia 
left him weakened, and be was seut by the Government to 
New Mexico for treatment ; bowever, tbis treatment proved 
to be of no avail, and on Jan. 20, 1920, tbis brave young 
soldier went "West." 

May I not add in the closing of tbis sketcb tbat I knew 
Edwin Moore as a school boy, and I loved him, because be 
was attentive to duty ; I saw him grow into the first flush 
of young manhood and I honored him, because I knew bis 
ideals were high, and his aspirations noble. I saw him that 
day when be left the oifice of the Local Board, a soldier in- 
ducted into Military Service, and I watched bis face, so 
handsome, so noble and so unafraid ; there was a light in 
bis eyes — such a light as can be seen nowhere else on earth, 
neither upon land or upon sea, which told me that Edwin 
Moore was going away with a spirit of chivalry, as pure as 
the spirit of the bravest Crusader. God willed it that be 
should not come back ; and it took just such boys as be to 
redeem tbis old earth from the scourge of war. 

Caswell County should hold in tender memory, the name 
of tbis son. Let our people ever remember, tbat in the year 
of 1918, when the world was on fire, and the fate of men, 
women and children were hanging in the balance, tbat tbis 
son, fearless and unafraid, was ready to go and make the 
Supreme Sacrifice. Down yonder in the church yard of 
'New Hope he tenderly sleeps. It was in the sacred build- 
ing at that place tbat tbis young soldier of democracy enlisted 
in the ranks of the army of the Prince of Peace. In the 
service of his Master he was faithful. In life he carried the 
torch of Liberty ; it was struck from his falling bands ; let 
those of us who move amid the scenes be loved so well take 
up the torch where be dropped it, and under the inspira- 
tion of bis life may many men and women resolve, tbat 
even as he was willing to give bis life to make the world 
safe for Democracy, so they will live to make Democracy safe 
for the world. 



Caswell County in the "World War 115 

GEOKGE WASHINGTON MORGAN 

George Washington Morgan. The subject of this sketch 
was born in Catawba County, in this State, on July 20th 
1896, being the son of Mr. an^ Mrs. P. K. Morgan. Both 
of these parents are natives of Caswell County; and Mr. 
Morgan has for many years been one of our most industrious 
and successful farmers. 

This young soldier, who was called by his local board on 
the 2nd day of DecembeFlOlT, was educated in the public 
schools of Caswell, and as a pupil in these schools he was 
hard working. At the time of his call, he was industri- 
ously laboring as a helper on his father's farm. With a 
number of Caswell boys, he was entrained for Camp Jackson, 
S. C. Here he was held for three months in the Depot 
Brigade, and on account of physical defects, this young 
soldier was discharged with honor on March 28th 1918, 
This young soldier was possessed with a very high order of 
patriotism, and expressed a willingness to serve his country 
to the best of his ability. However, his physical defects 
were of such a nature as to prevent his acceptance for Mili- 
tary service. On his return from camp, he most energetically 
took up work on his father's farm. 



CURRIE MURPHEY 

CuEEiE MuRPHEY was born in the County of Caswell 
December 6, 1895. His parents, Henry Murphey and Min- 
nie Murphey, are both Caswell county people. He attended 
the public schools of the County, and at the time of his induc- 
tion into military service was engaged in farming. 

On Ma}^ 29, 1918 he was sent with a contingent of boys 
from Yancej^ille N. C, to Camp Jackson, South Carolina 
for training. He was made a member of Company A, 317th 
Regiment of the 81st Division. He passed successfully 
his over-seas examination, and on August 7, 1918 he sailed 
from Hoboken on the transport, "Metagonia,'' and after a 
safe voyage through the submarine zone landed at Liver- 



116 Caswell County in the World War 

pool, England, He was sent from this place across the 
English Channel to France. 

The activities of the famous 81st Division are so well 
known that it is needless for us to trace further the move- 
ments of this Caswell soldier other than to say that he per- 
formed with willingness the many duties assigned to the 
men of this Division. The Armistice bringing a cessation 
of hostilities, this soldier was not engaged in battle engage- 
ments ; he was at Vallehome at the time of the signing of the 
Armistice. He remained in France until June of 1919, 
coming home on the U. S. S, "South Carolina," landing at 
Xewport xvTews ; from this port he was sent to Camp Lee, 
Virginia; and from that place, on June 20, 1919 received 
his discharge from Military Service. The Army Serial 
Number of this soldier was 2991829. He has since his re- 
turn to civil life taken up his previous occupation of farm- 
ing. His brother, Thomas Murphey, was an enlisted man 
in the U. S. ISTaval Reserve Force. 



THOMAS WILEY MUEPHY 

Thomas Wiley Murpuy' was born July 4th 1897. He 
was a son of H. A. Murphy, and Minnie Oliver Murphy. 
His father was a. native of Orange County. His mother 
was a daughter of Monroe Oliver, Esq. This grandparent of 
young Murphy was for many years one of the most promi- 
nent citizens of Caswell and a veteran of the Civil War who 
gave four years to the service of the South and was wounded 
in one of the battles in Virginia. 

Young Murphy registered June 5th 1918. On July 3rd 
of this same year, before his call came for service, he enlisted 
in the U. S. Navy, and was sent to the LT. S. operating base 
at Hampton Boards for training as a seaman. While a 
mend)er of Unit X., he had a very severe attack of influenza, 
which deepened into Pneumonia. After partially recover- 
ing he was given sick leave for several weeks, and on his 
return to Camp was discharged on December 14th, 1918. 



Caswell County in the World War 117 

ALGERNON SIDNEY NEAL 

September 5, 1917 will be remembered in our county's his- 
tory as the most epochal day that Caswell has known since 
the Civil War ; perhaps the language would not be too strong 
should we say that this day was the most momentous in all this 
county's history, because on this autumn day Walters James 
Allen, Lawrence Lea Powell, De Gee Watkins, James Wel- 
don Pinchback, and Algernon Sidney Neal gathered to- 
gether in the office of the Local Board of Caswell County, 
in the court house at Yanceyville, and received their induc- 
tion into military service. These brave young men receiving 
voluntarily this induction, were the first boys under the 
Selective Service Draft to hurl themselves into the mighty 
maelstrom of the Great War. 

They received their induction with an earnestness of pur- 
pose, with a patriotic submission and with a steady con- 
secration, which was worthy of the best in the traditions 
of Caswell. Like men they underwent the rigors of the 
training camps ; unafraid, they braved the mighty Atlantic, 
filled with German treachery and assassination ; they fought 
in that land where the poppies grow ; they heard the bursting 
of the shells ; they saw war in all its horror and its naked- 
ness; but through all this terrible Armageddon they proved 
themselves men. Four of those boys, under the providence 
of God, came back ; came back to those who loved them, 
came back to this land of law and order and liberty; came 
back in victory to the land of the free and the home of the 
brave ; but Algernon Sidney Neal fell on the Fields of France. 
Over yonder, across the seas, in the land of poppies, and of 
tears, he sleeps, awaiting God's Resurrection. He died, 
because God willed it that it was his duty to die, but may 
we not truly say that he was blessed in such a death. It 
is true that his sun went down in the morning; it is true 
he died while the ardor of youth was pulsing in his heart ; 
but think of it, such death ; he died because it took men like 
him and thousands of them, to set forever in the sky of the 
world's mightiest endeavor, the bright star of liberty, which 
shall shine forever, and shine with a glory akin to that which 



118 Caswell County in the World War 

fell froiii the Star of Bethlehem. But we are writing his- 
tory, and we nmst not be given too long to the full tribute 
of our heart. 

Algeenon Sidney Neal was born in the county of Cas- 
well on the ith day of March, 1890. His father, Thomas 
Chalmer Neal, one of the bravest of the brave, who fought 
with Lee and Johnson, married Miss Rebecca Neal Graves. 
Both of these families have been associated with the activi- 
ties of our county's life. He received his early education 
in the public school at Trinity, in this county, and after- 
wards completed a course in the Macon High School at Ma- 
con, Ga. 

He made two attempts to enlist in Military Service. He 
volunteered for service in the Officers Training Camp in 
Georgia, but was rejected on account of lack of weight. ISText 
he oifered himself for enlistment in the U. S. Navy, but 
on account of some defect of his was not accepted. After 
doing this, he sold his interest in a wholesale tobacco busi- 
ness in Valadosta, Ga., and came back to Caswell, register- 
ing in the June registration of 1917, and was sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C, with CaswelFs first contingent. At this 
camp he was placed in the 321st Infantry, and sometime 
about the 15th of March, 1918, was transferred to Camp 
Merritt, and from that place was sent over-seas. His ship 
landing safely, he was sent across the England Channel 
into France. He was then placed in service in Company 
E of the 2nd U. S. Engineers, in which service he was des- 
tined to lose his life. He was in many battle engagements; 
going over the top many times. In one letter, he wrote 
'T am thankful that I am all together, and in pretty good 
shape." In one of the battles his helmet was severely bat- 
tered by a fragment of shrapnel, but fortunately the helmet 
saved him from serious injury. 

We think it is very fortunate that we have from his First 
Lieutenant a description of the action in which he was 
wounded, in consequence of w^hich he died. This letter was 
written from Germany by Lieutenant Watkins on the 5th 
dav on June, 1010. Lieutenant Watkins was at the time 



Caswell Couaty in the World War 119 

a member of the Army of Occupation. We append the let- 
ter in full, written by him to Miss Rebecca G. Neal. 

"In reply to yours of May 14th, will say that your brother, 
Corporal Algernon Sidney Neal, was wounded November 1, 
1918, near Bayonville, France, by a shell fragment. He 
was immediately evacuated to the Hospital, and died there 
as a result of the wound, December 25th, 1918. The morn- 
ing of November 1st, a large assault was made upon the 
Germans along the whole front in the Meuse-Argonne Sec- 
tor. Your brother was one of a detachment of Engineers, 
who went over the top, with the infantry, as a wire cutting 
detail. As you know the assault was a complete success, 
but the sad part of it is, that many of our brave men gave 
their all in that charge. But by their noble sacrifice, they put 
through the last large assault which ended in the complete 
defeat of the enemy. 

During the St. Mihiel Drive in September and the Blanc 
Mont offensive of November your brother was a member of 
my Platoon. He was an ever ready, willing and efficient 
man ; always striving to do his best whatever mission we 
were engaged in. I always felt that I could place full con- 
fidence in him, and rest assured that he would to the best 
of his ability, perform the work of his mission. I remember 
a mission he undertook and fulfilled, very well. During 
the fighting at Blanc Mont, early in October, we were called 
upon at night to help pick up wounded on the field. This 
was hard, dangerous and tiresome work ; your brother led 
his men over the field all night, bringing in many wounded 
to the first Aid Station. The work that night was one of 
mercy, and was thoroughly and well conducted. This only 
illustrates his ever readiness and thoroughness in his desire 
to execute his duty. 

I wish to extend to you, and the remainder of Corporal 
Neal's friends and relations, my deepest sympathy in your 
loss. It has been my duty to write to numbers, bereavcl 
as you are. Each one brings new pangs to me, but there 
are few whom I so intimately knew and so thoroughly 
regret, as the loss of your brother. 



120 Caswell County in the World War 

But our frieuds gave their all for our cause, aud are now 
most certainly enjoying their reward. We who are left 
mourn for them, but we have this consoling thought with 
US, that they gave, and gave willingly, to our Country, and 
in leaving, they leave that Country and that Cause for us 
to forward. There then remains but for us to dedicate 
our lives to the advancement of our Country, so that they 
shall not have sacrificed in vain." (Signed) Samuel T. Watkins, 
1st Lieutenant Engineers, 3rd Division. 

In concluding this sketch, it seems to me that we can use no 
finer thought than to repeat the very beautiful words of his 
Lieutenant: ''He was an ever ready, willing and efficient man, 
always striving to do his best along any mission we were en- 
gaged in." This remarkable tribute illustrates, with lasting 
beauty, the spirit which prompted the actions of Algernon 
Sidney iSTeal. He fought a good fight, he kept the faith, and the 
works of such men as Sidney Neal will live in the world's 
history, as long as the poppies bloom in Flanders Fields, 
and Chateau Thierry stands near the Marne. 

''In the beauty of the Lilies, Christ was born across the 

sea 
With a Glory in his bosom, that transfigures you and me, 
As He died to make men holy, so He died to make 

men free.'' 

Sidney Ideal's soul goes marching on. 



HAEVEY ELLIOT NEWMAN" 

Harvey Elliot Newman was born in the village of 
Milton, in this county, October 10, 1899. His parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles B. Newman, are both Caswell County 
people and this family has for a number of years ranked 
with our most progressive people. Mr. Newman has been iden- 
tified with many successful business ventures and he has also 
given much valuable service to the cause of public education. 

At the time of the registration of September, 18, 1918, 
Harvey E. Newman was a student at the A. and E College 



Caswell County in the World War 121 

at Ealeigh, 'N. C. He had previous to his entrance at this 
institute completed with singular efficiency the public school 
and high school course at Milton. Following the patriotic 
example of his older brother, he immediately enlisted in 
the Student's Army Training Corps and was rapidly being 
made readj^ for active field service. The armistice of Novem- 
ber 11, causing a cessation of hostilities, put an end to the 
training of this young soldier, and on December 1, 1918 he 
was discharged from military service. 

The grandsires of this man were brave confederate soldiers, 
who served with splendid devotion the sacred cause of the 
fair South laud. 



JOHN ANDERSON NEWMAN 

John Anderson Newman was born May 21, 1896 at 
Leasburg in this County. His father, R. I. Newman, who 
has for many years been one of the most useful of our citizens 
and who has served his county in the capacity as a member 
of the County Board of Education for fifteen years, mar- 
ried Miss Nannie Pulliam. The gTandfather of this young- 
soldier was Banks Newman, who was well known to the peo- 
ple of this county. At the time of the registration of June 
5th, 1917, John Anderson Newman was associated with his 
father in agricultural operations at Leasburg. He finished 
the usual public school course of the county and afterwards 
did further work at Elon College. 

In the early summer of 1918 he was called by his Local 
Board and entrained for Camp Hancock, Georgia. At this 
camp he was commissioned as a Sergeant in the M. T. D, He 
made very fine progress in military tactics and at the time 
of the signing of the Armistice he had been promoted to the 
rank of an instructor in the Physical and Bayonet School. 
His detachment did not go over seas, the Armistice having 
put an end to hostilities. He received his discharge and 
returned to Caswell and is at present engaged in his former 
occupation of farming. The Army Serial Number of this 
ex-service man was 4160389. 



122 Caswell County in the World War 

WILLIAM JENNINGS NEWMAN 

William Jennings Newman, who was a corporal in the 
81st Division, and whose Army Serial Number was 2993041, 
was born at Leasbnrg, N. C. in Caswell County, May 5, 
1896. His father, S. P. Newman, who for many years has 
been one of the most prominent and successful of business 
men, married Miss Elizabeth Chandler, of Topnot, Caswell 
County, N. C. The early educational life of this young 
soldier was spent in the public school at Leasburg, and later 
he attended two sessions at Creedmore High School in Gran- 
vill County. 

Young Newman patriotically answered the call of his local 
board, and was sent to Camp Jackson on May 25, 1918, and 
later transferred to Camp Sevier, and in July of this year, he 
was ordered to Camp Upton. From this place he was prepar- 
ed for overseas service, and on the 31st of July, he sailed from 
Philadelphia, on an English transport, and landed at Winches- 
ter. He was next sent across the Channel into France and 
placed on the St. Die Front, and saw active service from Nov- 
ember 9th to 11th in the Meu.-^e Argonne Offensive. He was 
in the front ranks during this drive. On June 9. in the fol- 
lowing year, ho took his departure from France, sailing from 
St. Nazaire, on the IT. S. S. "Manchuria,'' arriving at New- 
port News, Va., from which place he was sent to Camp Stuart, 
June 28, 1919, for discharge. 

Before entering service, young Newman was engaged in 
farming and in merchandise. Since his discharge, he has 
engaged in commercial activities. 



Diary of William Jennings Newman 
Route of Company "L" 321 Inf. 81st Division 

1918 

July 14th 1918. Left Camp Sevier, S. C, for Camp 
Upton, N. Y. 

July 16th. Arrived at Camp Upton, N. Y., about 6 :00 A. M. 
July 31st. Left Camp Upton about 1 :00 A. M. by train 



Caswell County in the World Wak 123 

for Philadelphia, Pa., port of embarkation. Arrived about 
11 :00 A. M., embarked about noon and sailed at 2 :00 P. M., 
on the Transport "City of Glasgow." 

August 3rd. Arrived at Halifax, N". S., 8:00 P.M., 
anchored in harbor for the night. 

August 4th. Left Halifax, N. S., about 1:00 P.M. (across 
the briny deep) 

August 16th. Arrived in harbor of Liverpool, Eng., about 
10 :00 A. M., anchored in the mouth of the Manchester Canal 
for the night. 

August 17th. Left Liverpool on board the Transport, ''City 
of Glasgow," arrived Manchester via the Manchester Canal 
about noon, after marching through the town, arrived at 
Camp Woodley, a British Rest Camp. 

August 10th. Left Camp "Woodley, marched to Southamp- 
ton, arrived about 5 :00 P. M., embarked about 7 :00 P. M., 
on Transport "Londonderry," crossed the English Channel. 

August 20th, Arrived Le Havre, France, about 5 :00 A. M. 
Landed about 7 :00 A. M., and marched to Rest Camp No. 1, 
another British Resi Camp. 

August 21st. Left Rest Camp 'No. 1, marched to Station in 
Le Havre and boarded train about 4 :00 P. M. 

August 22. Arrived Le Havre, France, about 5 :00 P. M. 
Marched to Flogny where we pitched tents about midnight. 

August 25th. Left Flogny, marched to Lignores (about 
6 miles), where we were billeted about three weeks for our 
first time in French Billets. 

September 14th. Left Lignores marched to Ervy, arrived 
about 2 :00 P. M., pitched tents 'and spent the night. 
September 15th. Entrained about 1 :00 P. M, - 
September 16th. Arrived at Bruyores about 7 :00 A. M., 
marched to Donf aign, arrived about 2 :00 P. M. Billeted in 
a mess shack and some old houses. 

September 17th. Left Donfaign about 8 :00 P. M., in 
motor trucks. 

September 18th. Arrived at Petit Hamburg about 5 :00 
A. M., and marched to Bon de Sopt, arrived about 9 :15 P. M. 

September 23'rd. Left Bon de Sopt, marched to (2:30 
A. M.) Hoyonnitier arriving about 5 :30 A. M. Marched to 



124 Caswell Couivty in the World War 

Hiirbache about 6 :00 P. M., marched to Le Yille , arrived 
9:00 P. M. 

September 24tb. Left Hurbacbe about 6 :00 P. M., marched 
to Le Ville, arrived 9 :00 P. M. 

September 26tb. Left Le Yille about 6 :30 P. M. Marched 
to Jean de O'mount, arrived about 9 :30 P. M. 

September 27th. Left St. Jean O'mount, marched to front 
line trenches in Luneville Sector near St. Die. Took post 
about 10:30 P.M., relieving a French detachment. 

October 9th. Hell broke loose about 5 :00 A. M. The Ger- 
mans sent us over a bombardment of shells, and about an hour 
later they came over after us, but they found "L" Co. on the 
job and were soon turned back, — what they didn't lose as 
Casuals. "L" Co. only had 6 men slightly wounded and the 
enemy lost 1 captured and from unofficial reports 15 killed. 

October 10th. We were relieved by "L" Co. 521st Inf., 
from duty in the front line trenches and marched to Raids de 
Robache; arrived about 11:00 P.M., and took position in 
support. 

October 12th. Left Raids de Robache about 7:00 P.M. 
Marched to dugouts near St. Jean de O'mount relieving; "M" 
Co. 321st Inf. in support. 

October 15th. Left positions in support and marched to 
St. Roches Barracks at St. Dio; arrived about 4:00 A. M., 16th. 

October 31st. Left Domevre about 11 :00 P. M., marched 
to Chatel, arrived about 3 :00 A. M., November 1st. 

November 1st. Left Chatel about 6 :00 A. M., entrained for 
Sampigny; arrived about 4:00 P.M., and marched through 
St. Mihiel to Bois de Dompeevrin, where we bivouaced for 
the night. 

November 2nd. Left Bois de Dompeevrin about 3 :30 P. M., 
marched to Petit Montharion; arrived about 2:30 A.M., 3rd. 

November 3rd. Left Petit Montharion about 6 :30 P. M., 
marched to Camp de Tir, arrived about 2 :00 A. M. Novem- 
ber 4th (Here in dugouts 35 ft. under ground). 

November 6th. Left Camp de Tir about 6 :30 P. M., 
marched to dugouts on Dead Man's Hill in the Verdun Sector 
(Meuse-Argonne) ; arrived about 9:00 P.M., relieving Co. 
''D" 159th Inf. 35th Division. 



Caswell County in the World War 125 

N'oveniber 9tli. Left the Forest about 6 :00 A, M., marclied 
to Moranville where we were subjected to a heavy bombard- 
ment of enemy artillery fire (gas shrapnel, and high explos- 
ives). About 7:00 P.M., we succeeded in finding cover for 
the night in shell holes and behind the hedge along the road. 
This night will never be forgotten by "L" Co. as it was very 
cold and frosty, and all through the night an assortment of 
shells were bursting over and around us. 

November 11th. At 6:00 A. M., we went over the top under 
a heavy Machine Gun and Artillery fire. The Co. advanced 
about 3 Kilometers and every inch of the way was covered 
by the enemy guns, both artillery and machine gun. Our 
losses were 1 officer and 19 men killed and 1 officer and 44 men 
wounded. The enemy had retreated, and when the end came 
at the eleventh hour, eleventh day, eleventh month, "L" Co. 
was well up into the enemy trenches. When hostilities ceased 
we were so close that the enemy artillery fire was no longer 
effective. 

N'ovember 12th. We spent the night on the battlefield, 
leaving about 5 :00 P. M., as they were blowing Taps over 
our heroes left behind us. We marched to Moulanville where 
we bivouaced for the night. 

November 15th. Left Moulanville about 7 :00 A. M., 
marched to Naudanville, arrived about 2 :00 P. M. 

November 15th. Left Naudanville about 7 :00 A. M., 
marched to Camp de Bois, Sector 3. 

November IS-th. Left Camp de Bois about 6 :00 A. M., 
marched to Nubecourt, arrived 4 :00 P. M. 

November 22nd. Left Nubecourt about 7 :00 A. M., marched 
to Laimont. 

November 23rd. Left Laimont, marched to Robert Espagne, 
arrived about 3 :00 P. M. 

November 24th. Left Robert Espagne about 7 :00 A. M., 
marched to Perthes. 

November 25th. Left Porthes, marched to Soulaines, ar- 
rived about 5 :00 P. M. 

November 27th. Left Planrupt, marched to Soulaines, 
arrived about 4:00 P.M. 



126 Caswell County in the World "War 

November 28tli. Left Soulaiiies, marched to Holance, ar- 
rived about 3:00 P.M. 

N^ovember 29th. Left Holance, marched to Bliguy, ar- 
rived about 3 :00 P. M. 

December Ist. Left Bliguy, marched to Cuufiu, arrived 
about 2 :00 P. M. 

December 2ud. Left Cuufin, marched to Brion, arrived 
about 3:00 P.M. 

December 3rd. Left Brion, marched to Couhiiier le Sec, 
arrived about 2:00 P.M. (Stuck here over five months.) 

1919 

March 20th. Reviewed by Commander in Chief of the 
American E. F. and the King and Queen of Belgium (At 
Chatillon). 

April 10th. Inspected by General Pershing and our colors 
decorated for action. 

May 7th. Starting for home— "Toots Sweet." 



RICHARD HENRY NORRIS 

RiciiAED Henry jSTorris was born iu Person County Dec- 
ember 12, 1896. His father, J. W. Norris, married Miss 
Cora Cates. This family moved to Caswell, and at the time 
of the registration of June 5, 1918, was living in Anderson 
Township. This young soldier was a grandson of Will Nor- 
ris, a very loyal veteran of the Confederate Army. Young 
Norris finished the course obtainable in the schools of Cas- 
well County and at the time of his induction into Military 
Service he was engaged in farming. 

On September 5, 1918 he was called by his local board 
and entrained for Camp Wadsworth and there assigned to 
the Pioneer Infantry, as a replacement man. He remained 
in camp but twelve days and, being fitted for over seas ser- 
vice, sailed from Newport News on September 18, on the 
transport "Pastoria." After a voyage of fourteen days, 
he landed at St. Nazare, He was unattached to any division 
until Nqvember 12, the day after the armistice, at which 



Caswell County in the World War 127 

time he was assigned to the 42iid on Rainbow Division. He 
went with this Division into Germany where he remained 
for four months with the army of occupation. In the early 
spring of 1919 he was sent back into France and while on 
French soil he was given two leaves of absence which per- 
mitted him to visit many of the most beautiful cities of our 
sister Republic, making two trips to Paris. On April 5, 
1919 he set sail from Brest on the U. S. S. "Montana," and 
arrived safely at New York. He was then assigned to Camp 
Meritt and later transferred to Camp Lee, where on May 
2, 1919 he was discharged from Military Service. 



JOSEPH ELLIOTT OAKLEY 

Joseph Elliott Oakley was a Caswell County boy, born 
Febuary 1, 1896. His father, H.T. Oakley, was married 
to Miss Elizabeth Moore, both of these parents being na- 
tives of Caswell. He was a lineal descendent of Joseph E. 
Moore, who was one of the bravest of Lee's soldiers, and who 
was killed at the third day's fight at Gettysburg. 

He attended our County Schools and was industriously 
engaged in farming at the time of his call for Military 
Service, August 5, 1918, and was sent to Camp Wadsworth 
for training. Here he was placed in the 5th Pioneer Infan- 
try, but later transferred to the 4th Artillery Corps, and 
attached to a replacement division. His stay at Camp Wads- 
worth was a very short one, being there only twenty-three 
days, when he was called for over-seas service; sailing Sep- 
tember 3, 1918, from ISTew York, on a French steamer, "City 
of Marseilles," he landed at Liverpool, and from that port 
was sent by way of Southampton, across the Channel to Le- 
Havre. Almost immediately upon his arrival in France, 
he was ordered into service as a replacement man, and sent 
to St. Mihiel Front to take part in the battle of Dead Man's 
Hill. After the signing of the armistice, the division of 
which he was a member was made a part of the army of 
occupation, and sent to Coblenz, Germany. There he re- 
mained five months, and was sent home on a French Trans- 



128 Caswell County in the World War 

port, sailing from Marseilles, by way of Gibraltar, and 
landed in Xew York. He was sent to Camp Mills for hio 
diseharge, wliieli be received, May 15, 1919. 



MALCOLM EVEEETT OLIVER 

The birth place of Malcolm Everett Oliver was Milton, 
N. C. Here he was born on May 7th, 1895. His father, 
J. M. Oliver, was an old Confederate Soldier, who served 
in the Virginia Infantry, during the Civil war, under the 
Command of Captain J. W. Lewis; he was a native of 
Halifax County, Va., and married Miss ISTettie E. Freeman, 
of Person County, of this State. This family moved to Mil- 
ton a number of years ago, and while living at this place, 
young Oliver attended, and graduated from the Milton High 
School. 

On June 4th, 1917, just one day before the famous Eegis- 
tration of that year, Malcolm Oliver enlisted in the service 
of his country, becoming a volunteer in Battery E of the 
15th Virginia Field Artillery. He enrolled his name with 
the recruiting officer in the City of Danville, Va,, and was 
sent to Camp McClellan, Ala., and there made a personnel 
sergeant in the 111th Field Artillary of the 29th Division. 
This Division carries with it the historical name <>f ''The 
Blue and Grey." He remained at Camp McClellan until 
June 20th, 1918, and was then transferred to Philadelphia ; 
then to Halifax, N"ova Scotia, from which place he sailed, on 
the 28th day of June, for Liverpool, where he landed on 
July 4th, 1918; being carried over on His Majesty's Ship, 
"The City of Exeter.'' He traveled by train to Southamp- 
ton, England, there remained for a few days in a rest camp, 
then next went across the English Channel, landing at Le- 
Havre, July 17th, 1918. Young Oliver was in no battle 
engagements. At the time of the signing of the armistice 
he Avas in the Vosges Mountains, south-east of Verdun. 

He remained in France until May 13th of the following 
year, doing his regularly assigned duties, and on the date 
named, he sailed from St. Nazaire, France, on the U. S. S., 



Caswell County in the World War 129 

"The Virginian," and arrived on May 25th, at Newport 
News, Va. He was transferred to Camp Lee and there dis- 
charged on June 2nd 1919. 

At the time of his entering Military Service he was a 
tobacconist. The Army Serial number of this yovmg soldier 
was 1293709. Young Oliver at this writing has taken up 
work in this county. 



WILLIAM THOMAS OLIYEE 

William Tpiomas Oliver was born in the County of 
Caswell, near Yanceyville, N. C, on September 22. 1897. 
His father, John W. Oliver, married Miss Mattie Fitch, 
both of these parents being natives of Caswell, and both of 
them lineal descendants of Confederate Soldiers. The grand- 
father of young Oliver, on his father's side, was Thomas 
Oliver, and, on his mother's side, was William Fitch. Both 
of these men did active service through the entire Civil War, 
and were reckoned among the bravest of Caswell Soldiers. 

This young man attended the public schools of Caswell, 
and immediately upon his arrival at the age of twenty-one 
he was called upon to register in the June Registration, of 
1918. On August 30, of this same year, he was called by 
his local board, and sent to Camp Sevier. Here he was 
assigned to the Depot Brigade. The armistice putting an 
end to hostilities, after four months service at Camp Ser- 
vier he was discharged from Military Service in December. 

Since his return to civil life he has been married to Miss 
Hennie Bradncr a sister of John Claud Bradner, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere. 



JOHN BENTLEY PAGE 

John Bentley Page was born near Yanceyville on March 
14, 1896. His father, Ludolphus B. Page of Caswell, mar- 
ried Miss Parthenia Hodnett of Mt. Airy, Virginia. His 

grandfather, James Bentlev Page, was a soldier in the Con- 
9 



130 Caswell County in the World Wak 

federate Army. This graudsire did valiant service during 
the War betvi^een the States, and fought with much bravery 
for the Southern cause until he was taken prisoner in one 
of the tierce battles around Richmond and was sent to Point 
Lookout. Here he was held a prisoner of war until Lee*s 
surrender. His grandfather, John Hodnett, was a confeder- 
ate soldier who went into the army from the state of Vip 
ginia. It will be interesting to record that our young sol- 
dier was a great, great, great grand son of Starling Gunn, who 
fired the first gun at York, Pennsylvania, in the revolutionary 
war, and who also had the very remarkable experience of 
being an eye witness to the surrender of Cornwallis at 
Yorktown. It will perhaps be of further interest to record 
that this same ancestor lies buried in the family burying 
ground near the present home of J. L. Murray, about two 
miles north of Yancewille. Our young soldier attended the 
public schools of Caswell County, doing high school work 
at Yanceyville, after which he did work in the farm life 
school near Asheville, after which he was a student at Mt. 
Hermon, Mass, and also at Lincoln Memorial University. 

On April 28 1918, he was called by his local board, and 
sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, later transferred to Camp 
Greenleaf, Georgia, and still later to Camp Green at Char- 
lotte, ]^. C. He was a member of Motor Company No. 10, 
and Battalion N^o. 4, of the Motor Group in the Medical 
Corps of the Army. He remained in service from April 27, 
1018 until January 10, 1910. The armistice putting an 
end to military activities, he did not go over-seas. However, 
he remained in service until January 10, 1919, on which 
date, from Camp Greene, he was discharged from IMilitary 
Service. 

NUMA D. PAGE 

NuMA D. Page was born in this County on December 23rd 
189(). He was the eldest son of Williard Page, and Mamie 
Page. Both of his grandfathers, namely, B. J. Page, and 
R. C. Gwynn, were in confederate service during the war 
between the States. He attended the public schools of Cas- 



Caswell County in the World War 131 

well County, in which he made a most excellent record, and 
was distinguished for his thorough-going earnestness. At the 
time of his call for service he was Clerk in Hotel Burton 
in Danville, Va. 

On August 5th, 1918, he was sent to Camp Wadsworth, 
Ga., and there placed in the Medical Corps of the Army. 
While training at this place young Page received the commen- 
dation of his superior officers, by reason of his attention to 
duty, and his all round fitness for the work. This unit of 
the Medical Corps, however, did not have the opportunity 
of doing over-seas service, by reason of the fact that the 
signing of the armistice put an end to active military opera- 
tions. He was discharged from Camp Wadsworth January 
17th, 1919. At this writing, he is hotel clerk and accoun- 
tant in Winston-Salem, IST. C, at Hotel Zinzendorf. 



EOY PATILLO 

Roy Patillo, who enrolled his name in the registration of 
June 5, 1917, was born in Anderson Township of Caswell 
County, JSTorth Carolina. His father, Thomas H. Patillo, 
was married to Miss Mary Miles ; both of these parents are 
Caswell County people. Young Patillo spent the early years 
of his life on his father's farm and received the usual educa- 
tion obtainable in the public schools of Caswell. He was 
inducted into military service on March 23, 1918 and was sent 
to Camp Jackson for training. Here he was placed in Com- 
pany 14 of the 4th Train 156th Depot Brigade. On is 
April he was transferred to Camp Joseph E Johnson, Jack- 
sonville, Fla., and placed in the Medical Training Corps of 
the Army. He was fitted for service in this important branch, 
and on June 25 he set sail for France. He arrived in 
Prance on 4th August and at once began to do active work 
in the Medical Corps of the army. It is with much regret 
that we are forced to record that he gave such service, only 
for a short time. While actively engaged in the performance 
of this duty he was stricken with that fearful disease cerebro- 
spinal meningitis; the attack proved fatal, and he died on 



132 Caswell County in the World War 

September 23, 1918. Fortunately we have tlie advices of the 
circumstances attendant upon his death and the letter from the 
Secretary of the Red Cross to Roy's sister. Both of them 
attest the high estimation in which this son of Caswell was 
held, this son who made the supreme sacrifice for his country. 
As the humble writer of this sketch I wish to express my 
grateful appreciation and tender recollection of the splendid 
spirit of this boy. ISTo higher tribute could be bestowed upon 
him than to say that he did his duty like a man and after 
life's fitful fever he sleeps well. "God rest him." 

American Bed Cros.s. 

Oil Active Service 

ivith the 
American, Expeditionary Force 
Name : Boy Patillo 
1880 It 81 
Motor Supply Train 416 M. D. 

Dear Mrs. Patillo : 

It is my sad duty to inform you that your son Roy 
died of acute cerebro-spinal mengitis, on September 23, at 
21 :15 P. M. at Naval Base Hospital No.l. He was considered 
fatally ill when he was brought in but he got along so well 
that we thought perhaps there was a chance for his life. 
He was unconscious all the time, so could not send any mes- 
sage home. The boy who took care of him (one of the Hos- 
pital nurses) was Buel Frazier, East Davis St., Burlington, 
N. C. Box 307. As the Red Cross representative for the 
Hospital I attended his funeral which was conducted with 
full military honors. An American flag was draped over 
the casket and a beautiful bunch of flowers presented by the 
Y. M. C. A. was placed on top of it. A military guard 
followed the hearse on foot to the cemetary when the Army 
Chaplain read the service for the dead, the bugler sounded 
"taps" and he was laid to rest. The grave is marked and 
the French women here look after it and keep it in order. 
With sincerest sympathy, I remain 

Yours truly, Edith J. Davis 

■ Home Communication Service A. B. C. 



Caswell County in the World War 133 

Brest, France 

December 18, 1918 
Miss Annie Patillo 

Union Eidge, N. C. 

Dear Miss Patillo: 

In reply to your letter of November 19. I am 
indeed glad to give you all the information I can regarding 
your brother Koy Patillo's sickness and death. Your brother 
came to this hospital (a N^aval Base) September 2, from an 
Army Hospital, near here. He was very ill at the time of 
his admission and placed in the ward where I worked. 

Learning immediately after admission that he was from 
near my home, and knowing his uncle, Mr. Patillo in Bur- 
lington, I took special interest in his case. They gave him 
the best attention and did all they could for him while sick. 
'No, his watch, pictures and letters were not misplaced. All 
his personal belongings were put in a small package and 
sent home. If you have not received them, you will soon. 
Roy was a good patient, one of the best we ever had. He 
was so patient and appreciative, l^ever complained of any- 
thing but a severe headache and a sore neck. I am sure 
he will be missed by all who knew him; they will miss his 
broad smiles and his kindness. In the dark hours of grief 
may God's richest blessing rest upon you comfort and cheer 
you. 

With many good wishes, I close 

Yours sincerely 

Buel Frazier, Ph. M. 2c. 

United States IS'aval Base Hospital ISTo. 1. 

American Expeditionary Forces. 



JAMES weldo:n' pi:n'chback 

James Weldon Pinchback was born in the County of 
Caswell, Dan River Town-ship, June 14th, 1889. His father 
Thomas A. Pinchback, married Miss Mary J. Chandler of 
this county. As were most of the Caswell boys prior to in- 



134 Caswell County in the World "War 

ductiou into military service, be was engaged in farming, 
and he possessed the educational advantages of the schools of 
this county. 

This young man had a very dramatic induction into mili- 
tary service, as he and four others were the first of the boys 
to be sent by the Local Board of Caswell County. The re- 
maining young men who answered this call, were D. G. Wat- 
kins, Lawrence Lee Powell, Walter Allen, and the lamented 
xVlgernon Sidney Neal, who was killed in France. He left 
Yancey ville the 5th day of Sept, 1917, and was sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C, for training, and remained at this camp for 
nine months, and was attached to the ordnance service, and 
was a member of Supply Company of the 321st Regiment 
of the 81st Division. He sailed for over-seas from New York, 
August 1st, 1918, on a British transport, landing at Liver- 
pool, and was sent from that place to Southampton, and 
from the latter place, across the English Channel, to Cher- 
bourg, France. 

He was under fire and in action from the 6th of Novem- 
ber to the 11th, on the Meuse-Argonne front, near Verdun. 
Luckily he escaped without wound, Init suifered severely 
from being gassed, while in the Alsace-Lorraine Sector. 
During the time he was in this sector he had the experience 
of twenty days service in the trenches. After the signing of 
the Armistice he had the good fortune to visit many of the 
largest and most prominent places in France and Italy. On 
June 9th, 1919, he turned his face from the battle fields 
of France sailing from St. Nazaire, and, after a prosperous 
voyage of ten days, arrived at Newport News, and, from 
this place of debarkation, he was sent to Camp Lee, Va., 
where he received his discharge on June 29th. The services 
of this young soldier received favorable comment from his 
superior officers. 

ROY POTEAT 

Roy Poteat was born in Caswell County June 3rd, 
1895, about five miles from Yance^^ille. His father, James 
A. Poteat, married Miss Laura Foster. This vouns; soldier 



Caswell County in the Wokld War 135 

was a grandson of William Poteat. This grandparent saw 
service in the war between the States. He was called by 
his local board for induction into military sei*vice September 
19th, 1917, and was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, to receive 
his initial training, and while at Camp Jackson he was 
placed in the Medical Detachment 306th Training Head- 
quarters Co., of the 81st Division. He remained at Camp 
Jackson for eleven months, and on August Ist, 1918, he 
sailed from Hoboken, N. J., on a British Transport, "The 
Megantic," and landed at Liverpool. 

Much of the history of this young soldier, after his ar- 
rival in France, can be readily understood when we record 
the fact that he was in the supply service of the 81st Divi- 
sion, in the St. Die Sector, and in the Vosges, where lie 
was under artillery fire. He did service during the Meuse- 
Argonne Offensive, and in the actions around Verdun. He 
was in this latter sector at the time of the signing of the 
armistice. Between this time and the time of his sailing for 
America Mr. Poteat had the privilege of visiting quite a 
number of historical places in Prance; Monte-Carlo and 
Paris were included in this list. On June 7th, 1919, he 
sailed from St. ISTazaire on the TJ. S. S. After his debark- 
ation he was sent to Camp Jackson ; at which place, on June 
26th, 1919, he was discharged from service. Since his r^ 
turn home Mr. Poteat is engaged in farming His Army 
Serial Number was 1865913. 



JOHN SPENCEE POWELL 

JoiiJvT Spencer Powell was born in the County of Caswell 
on the 13th day of January, 1896. He is a brother of 
Thomas Powell. At the time of his call for military service, 
he was actively engaged in farming. His father, John 
Powell, a native of this County, married Miss Sallie War- 
ren, of Halifax County. On May 29th, 1918, he was called 
by his local board, and sent from Tanceyville, N. C, with a 
contingent of other Caswell boys to Camp Jackson, S. C 
Se remained at this place for five months, then he trans- 



136 Caswell County in the World War 

ferred to Camp Sevier for more intensive training. He 
was at the latter place when the armistice was signed, put- 
ting an end to Military operations, and was discharged on 
A^vember 21st, 1919. 



LAWJ^EiSrCE LEE POWELL 

La WHENCE Lee Powell was born at Blanch in Dan River 
Township of this county. His father, Felix Banks Powell, 
married Miss Bettie Lee Graves, who was a daughter of W. 
G. Graves, Captain of the 56th JSTorth Carolina Regiment 
during the Civil War. He did the usual work of the grades 
in the Caswell County Schools and afterwards spent several 
sessions in the Danville City schools. 

As has been stated in other sketches, the first call which 
came to our Local Board was for a contingent of five men 
to be sent to Camp Jackson on September 5, 1917. Law- 
rence Lee Powell was one of this historic five who received 
this voluntary induction. We offer no apology for repeating 
in this sketch, that no finer spirit was ever exhibited, than 
was shown by these Caswell boys, who were to be hurled 
into the titantic struggle of the World War. He was made 
sergeant in the 321 Infantry of the 81st Division. He was 
given intensive training at Camp Jackson for nine months, 
then transferred to Camp Sevier, where he remained for 
four months, completing there his training. On July 31, 
1918 he sailed from Hoboken on a British transport "Walmer 
Castle," landing at Liverpool. He remained for a short 
while at a rest camp at Winchester and Southampton ; sailing 
from the latter place across the English Channel, landing 
on French soil at LeHavre, his Company was placed in the 
St. Die Sector, in the Vosges Mountains. 

On I^ovember 2, 1918, he was entrained for the Verdun 
Sector, and was billeted on the outskirts of Verdun for two 
days. N'ext he went into the dugouts on Dead Man's Hill, 
and remained there until IsTovember 8, on which date the 
321st advanced in force as a support to the 322nd, relieving 
the 322nd on the evening of November 10. This regiment 



Caswell County in the "World War 137 

went over the top in the early morning hours of November 
11, and advanced on the German front until 11 o'clock, when 
the armistice order ''Cease firing!" went into effect. We 
are pleased to record that this young soldier passed through 
the ordeals of battle without being wounded or gassed. He 
remained in France until June of the following year, and 
on the 9th day of that month set sail from St. Nazaire, and 
after a safe voyage landed in America at Newport News. 
From this place he was sent to Camp Lee, and there dis- 
charged from military service. The Army Serial Number of 
this man was 1857130. 



EGBERT GUY POWELL 

Robert Guy Powell^ whose Army Serial Number was 
11467, and who received voluntarily his induction into Mili- 
tary Service, was born near Blanch, in Dan River Town- 
ship, August 8, 1892. His father, Rufus E. Powell, one of 
our most valued citizens, married Miss Madora Stanfield. 
Our young soldier attended the public schools of Caswell, 
finishing the work of seven grades, and afterwards was a 
student at Mars Hill College for several sessions. 

On November 12, 1917, he was entrained for McPherson, 
at which place, on account of his peculiar fitness, he was 
assigned to the Medical Corps of the Army. He remained at 
this camp for eight weeks, receiving intensive training. He 
made rapid progress and was sent to Hoboken, preparatory 
to his sailing over seas, on January 9, 1918. He sailed on 
the British transport, "Carmania," and passed through the 
submarine zone with out mishap and landed safely in France. 
This young soldier had an exceedingly interesting experience 
while on French soil and his work in the Hospital Corps of 
the Army was of such efficiency as to merit the approval 
of his superior officers. He remained on French soil, doing 
the assigned work of the Medical Corps of the Army until 
December 28, 1918, on which date he set sail on the U. S, S. 
"Netherland,'' from St. Nazaire, and after a prosperous voy- 



138 Caswell County in the World War 

age landed safely at J^ewport News, Virginia. From this 
place he was transferred to Camp Taylor and discharged 
from military service on February 8, 1919. 



THOMAS MARSHALL POWELL 

Thomas Marshall Powell was a native of Caswell 
County, born June 8th, 1888. He is a son of Jack Powell, 
of Caswell, and his mother, whose maiden name was Miss 
Sallie A. Warren, was from Halifax Co., Virginia. The 
grandfather of this young soldier, on his mother's side, was 
Jerry Warren, who fought with the Armies of Lee and Jack- 
son through the Civil W^ar. He attended the public schools 
and before induction into military service was engaged in 
farm work. 

He was called by his local board, August 5th, 1018, and 
sent to Camp W^adsworth, Georgia. He was held at this 
place for only three weeks, and was then sent to Camp Mer- 
ritt, ]Sr. J., and placed in Company D. of the 56th Regiment 
of Pioneer Infantry. These men were un-attached. He 
sailed with his regiment from Hoboken, N. J., on Sept. 4th, 
on the transport, *'Mauhi," and after a voyage of nine days, 
landed at St. Nazaire. Here he was held for two weeks in 
a rest camp and then assigned to the 1st Army, reaching 
the battle front on October 2nd. This front was in the 
Meuse-Argonne Sector. Here he remained, doing active 
fighting, until five days before the Armistice was signed. 
While in the Meuse-Argonne Sector he was almost constantly 
imder fire; luckily, however, he escaped without woimds, 
but suffered from the consequence of a gas attack, and was 
sent to Base Hospital ]^o. 88, at Savenay, France, and was 
evacuated from Hospital ]Mo. 49. on November 15th 1918. 
He was then put in the 3rd Army Corps, as a part of the 
Army of Occupation, which was mobilized at Donasile; sent 
into Germany by way of Luxemburg, and quartered at Neu- 
wied. On December 15th, he was sent to Coblenz. Germany, 
where he remained doing active duties, until March 27th. 
Wliile engaged in the performances of the duties named above, 



Caswell County in the World War 139 

he became sick, and was sent to a Eed Cross Hospital, where 
he was tenderly nursed back to health by an American Red 
Cross nnrse, this nurse being a Southern girl. He sailed 
June 12th, from St. Nazaire, France, on the U. S. S.," De- 
Kalb," (the DeKalb being formerly, "The Princess Irene,'' 
of the German Navy). He landed, June 3rd, at Newport 
News, and was sent to Camp Mills ; there he was assigned to 
the 715th Casual Co., and sent to Camp Lee, where on July 
10th 1919, he was discharged. His Army Serial Number 
was 3349383. 

It will be interesting for us to append to this sketch the 
following: From the time young Powell left Caswell, and 
until he landed in France only one month and eight days 
had elapsed. He is now actively engaged in agricultural 
interprises. 

HENRY PRUITT 

Henry Pruitt was born on the 7th day of May, 1880, 
being a son of John Pruitt, and Fannie Crowder Pruitt. 
Both of these parents were born in Virginia. Our young 
soldier was a grandson of James Crowder, who was killed 
at Petersburg, a few weeks before Lee surrendered at Appo- 
mattox. His mother had four brothers who were in service 
under General Lee. 

On November 19th, 1917, he was inducted into military 
service, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, Here he was placed 
in the over-seas repair section 1, of Company B, of the 318th 
Regiment of the 81st Division. He remained in camp only 
forty days, and on January 13th 1918, he was sent across, 
sailing from Hoboken on the U. S. S. "The Great Northern," 
and landed at Brest. He saw service with his Division, on 
the Toul and Alsace-Lorraine Front. 

At the time of the signing of the armistice he was stationed 
at Chateau Rue, and from the time of the signing of the 
Armistice until he sailed to the IT. S., he was engaged in the 
routine work assigned to his Division. He sailed on May 
17th, 1919, from Brest, on the Transport, "Calacia," and 
landed at New York. From this port he was sent to Camp 



140 Caswell County in the World War 

Lee, where ou June 13tli 1910, he received his discharge 
from service. His Army Serial Number was 1223607. 



JAMES EDGAR REAGAN 

James Edgar Reagan was bom in the County of Caswell 
on the 22nd day of May, 1890. His father, James A. Rea- 
gan, married Miss Pattie Frances Manly. Both of these 
parents are natives of Caswell. On both the paternal and 
maternal side young Reagan was a grandson of Confederate 
Veterans ; respectively, Thomas Reagan and William Manly. 
These two grandparents did active, faithful, and efficient 
service during the war between the States. This young 
soldier, as a boy, attended the schools in Caswell and com- 
pleted the high school course at Gilliams Academy, in Ala- 
mance County. After completing this course he taught school 
very acceptably in the public schools of Caswell. 

At the time of his induction into military service he was 
a foreman and time-keeper for the R. J, Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, of Winston Salem, N. C. On May 9th, 1918, 
he was called by his Local Board, and sent to CaniD Jack- 
son, S. C, for training. After remaining at Camp Jackson 
for a short while, he was transferred to Camp Sevier, and 
made sergeant in the infantry, and placed in Battalion 3rd 
C. S. Dot. His stay in both of these places were very brief 
for after three months training, he was sent over seas, in 
August, from Hoboken, on the "Mauretania," and landed 
at LeHavre. While he was not actively engaged in battles, 
still his detachment was held ready for replacement, and at 
the time of the signing of the armistice, he was with his 
battalion on the banks of the river Marne, not very far from 
r^hatenu Thierry. He remained in France until July 5th 
of the following year, and, while on French soil, he had the 
opportunity of visiting many places of historic note, and 
many of the beautiful cities of France. He set sail from 
France on a LT. S., transport, which was formerly a Ger- 
man Cruiser, ^'Prince Frederick William." Landing at Ho- 
boken he was sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, and from that 



Caswell County in the World War 141 

place was discharged from service July 24, 1919. The 
Army Serial number of youug Reagan was 1889579. 

At this writing he has resumed his work with the R. J. 
Reynolds Tobacco Company of Winston-Salem. N. C, who 
held his place open while was away in defense of his Country. 



JOHN CALVIN REAGAJSr 

John Calvin Reagan was born in Caswell County, Sep- 
tember 10, 1893. He was the second son of James Albert 
Reagan and Pattie Manly Reagan to be inducted into mili- 
tary service during the Great War. Both of his parents 
were Caswell County people, and his grandsires, W. T. Rea- 
gan and W. S. Manly, were both in Confederate Service, 
during the Civil war, from 1861 to 1865. 

Young Regan attended the Public Schools of Caswell, and 
at the time of his induction into Military Service he was en- 
gaged with his father in operating a large farm in Stony 
Creek Township. 

On July 5, 1918, he left Yanceyville with a large con- 
tingent of boys, and entered military training at Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, Georgia. Here he was placed in Company 43, of 
the Medical Corps of the Army. He remained at Fort Ogle- 
thorpe for seven months and three days, and at the time of 
the signing of the armistice his outfit was being prepared 
for over-seas service. However, the cessation of hostilities 
prevented young Reagan from going over seas. He was 
transferred to Camp Stuart, Newport News, Va., and there, 
on February 8, 1919, discharged from Military Service. His 
Army Serial Number was 2586928. 

Immediately upon his return to civil life, he actively re- 
sumed his former occupation of farming, and at this writing 
he is at work with his father, in Stony Creek Township, in 
this county. 

HILLIARD WOODS ROBERTS 

Htlliarb Woods Roberts was born in the County of Cas- 
well, Nov. 1st, 1897. His father E. T. Roberts, and his 



142 Caswell County in the World War 

mother, whose maiden name was Miss Georgiana Woods, 
were both of Caswell. This young soldier was a grandson 
of John Roberts, who was in the Confederate Service for four 
years. He received his education in the public schools of 
our County, and was engaged in farming. On March 17th, 
1918, he was sent to Camp Jackson, where he was placed in 
Battery E. of the First Eegiment, of the Field Artillery. 
He was at Camp Jackson when the armistice was signed. 
He is now engaged in active farming operations near Yan- 
ceyville, North Carolina. 



JOHN WILLIAM ROBINSON 

John William Robinson, whose Army Serial Number 
was 29918G8, was born in the County of Caswell, Septem- 
ber 12, 1898. His father John Robinson, married Miss Mary 
Dove, both of these parents being Caswell County people. 
His grandsire, Green Robinson, was an exceedingly bravo 
Confederate Soldier and was a member of Company H. Gtl- 
N. C. Regiment. This ancestor fought with much bravery 
in the Armies of Lee Jackson, and was wounded at the Battle 
of Gettysburg. 

The early educational advantages of young Robinson were 
such as could be obtained in the County Schools, and, at the 
time of his induction into military service, he was engaged 
in general farm work. 

On May 29, 1918, he answered his call to the "Colors," 
and was entrained with a large contingent of Caswell boys 
for Camp Jackson, S. C. At this mobilization point he was 
placed in Battery D, 3l7th Regiment of the 81st Division. For 
two months he had intensive training and practice. Next 
he was transferred to Camp Mills, having previously success- 
fully passed his over seas examination. He set sail on Aug- 
ust 12, from Hoboken, on the English transport "Metagia. 
He passed safely through the submarine zone and landed at 
Liverpool. Next he was sent to a rest camp at Winchester, 
after a few days at this place he went to Southampton, then 
sailed across the English Channel, landing on French soil at 



Caswell County in the World War 143 

LeHavre. He was placed v/ilii the men of his artillery Regi- 
ment in the Verdun Sector. He had active service there 
until he was stricken with influenza ; a very serious com- 
plication of Pneumonia developing, he was sent to Base 
Hospital ISTo. 81. We are pleased to say that, finally he 
made a successful recovery from his illness, but this illness 
prevented him seeing more active service. On March 25, 
1919 he was brought home as a casual, sailing on the U. S. 
S. '"American," from Brest, and after a safe voyage of eight 
days, arrived at jSTew York. From liew York he was sent 
to Atlanta, Georgia, and placed in the Government Hospital 
where he remained two months. His recovery being rapid, 
he was assigned to Camp Jackson, from which place on July 
2, 1919 he was discharged from Military Service. 



CHARLIE GIBBON ROGERS 

C^iiAELiE Gibbon Rogers was born in the County of Rer- 
sun, in this State, November 3, 1896. His father, George 
Rogers, was also born in Person County. His mother's mai- 
den name was Miss Nettie Duncan, a native of Granville 
County. Young Rogers is a grandson of John Rogers, who 
was an old Confederate Veteran, during the days from 1861 
to 1865, and who was a very valiant soldier. Before enter- 
ing military service, the subject of this sketch was engaged 
in farming. He had completed the public school course in 
the graded school at Semora, and was a student for several 
sessions in the Milton High School. 

At the age of nineteen, he voluntarily enlisted for military 
service, the date of his enlistment being December 14, 1917. 
He was sent to Fort Thomas, Kentucky, for training. He 
was placed in the 16th Company of the 3rd Regiment of the 
air service. On June 23, 1918, he sailed for over-seas, on 
a French Transport, "Pastoria," and landed at Brest. Here 
he, with the men of the 3rd Regiment, was placed in active 
Air Service. 

It will be interesting to note in the sketch of young Rogers 
that during his work at the Air Service Base in France a 



144 Caswell County in the World Wae 

part of liis duty was the regulation work in the assembly 
plant, where the l.iberty Motors were assembled. In this 
important phase of military operations he did a great work 
and at the time of the signing of the armistice he was busily 
engaged in the required work of the Air Service. After the 
signing of the armistice, he had the opportunity of sight- 
seeing in many of the most historical placets, and the beautiful 
cities of France. In June of 1919, he sailed froui Brest, 
on board the U. S. Transport, "Harrisburg," and landed at 
Xew York. From that port of debarkation he was sent to 
Camp Meade, where on July 12th, 1919, he was discharged 
from Military Service. The Army Serial Number of this 
ex-service man was 2402653. 

KOBEET CLARENCE SATTERFIELD 

Robert C^larence Satterfield was born at Milton, N. C. 
His father, J. W. Satterfield, married Miss Ella Burton, of 
Person County. This family for many years has been one 
of the most progressive and useful of the County. The 
father has served the County in many positions of trust and 
influence, and was at one time a State Senator ; and as a 
member of the General Assembly, he rendered the County 
and State a very valuable service. Young Satterfield ob- 
tained the rudiments of his education in the public schools 
of the County, and afterwards, completed a course at Hor- 
ner's IMilitary School, located at Oxford. 

At the time of his induction into ]\rilitary Service he was 
engaged in farm work. In August 1917, he was sent, with 
a contingent of Caswell men, to Camp Greene, Charlotte, IST. 
C. Here he was ]Jaced in the Quartermaster Department 
being made a member of Company I, which was un-a^^signed 
to any division. He remained in camp for five months. 
The armistice, which put an end to active military operations, 
rendered it unnecessary for his company to be sent over-seas. 
Soldier Satterfield received his induction into Military ser- 
vice with patriotic ardor. He was discharged at Camp 
Greene in January, 1919, and his Service record shows 
that he measured up fully to the requirements of a soldier. 



Caswell County in the World War 145 

WILLIAM xVRTHUR SATTERFIELD 

William Arthuk Satterfield^ whose Army Serial Num- 
ber was 1319631, was born in the County of Caswell, Sep- 
tember 17, 1891. Hs father, B. C. Satterfield, a native of 
Halifax County, Va., married Miss Bettie Hooper, of this 
County. Young Satterfield attended the public schools of 
Caswell. 

He enrolled his name in the ranks of the National Army 
in the registration of June 5, 1917. At this time he was 
employed in one of our large industrial plants. In August 
following his registration, he visited his home people, 
and while he was here decided that he would not wait for his 
selection under the selective service draft. He went to the 
city of Raleigh, and on August 20, 1917, volunteered for 
military service. He was accepted and sent to Camp Sevier, 
S. C, and there placed in the infantry. Company B, 120th 
Regiment of the 30th Division. He was given intensive 
training for nine months, and in the early days of June, 
1918, he was sent over-seas, sailing from Hoboken on the 
transport, ''Bohemia," arriving overseas at Liverpool, Eng. 
From Liverpool he went with the men of his Company from 
Southampton across the English Channel, landing at Calais. 

The activities of the 30th Division are familiar to every 
student of history and we only need to record the fact that 
young Satterfield did a soldier's part with great bravery in 
the many battle engagements, which have fallen to the glory 
of the 30th Division. He received his baptism of fire at 
Ypres, Belgium. He was among that number of immortals, 
who broke the Quentin Switch of the dreaded Hindenburg 
Line. Despite the intensity of his activities, fortunately, 
he escaped being wounded or gassed, and at the time of the 
signing of the armistice he was in Amiens. He remained 
in France until March 28, 1919 doing the regular assigned 
work of the men of his Division. On that date he set sail 
from St. Nazaire on the U. S. S. ''Powhatan." and arrived 
safely at Charleston S. C. Next he was sent to Camp Jack- 
son, from which place on April 18, 1919, he was discharged 
from military' service. 
10 



146 Caswell County in the World War 

SILAS SEAMSTER 

Silas Seamstee was born in the County of Caswell on 
July 4th, 1893. His father, Monroe Seamster, was a native 
of Halifax County, Va., and married Miss Maggie Welch, 
a native of Person County in this State. On both his mater- 
nal and paternal side young Seamster is a lineal descendent of 
a Confederate Soldier. His grandfather, Seamster, was killed 
in action during the war, and his grandfather, Morris Welch, 
served during the entire period of the struggle between the 
North and the South. 

Young Seamster received such education as could be ob- 
tained in the Public Schools of this county, and, at the time 
of his induction into military service, he was actively and 
industriously engaged in farm work. On May 29th, 1918, 
with a number of other Caswell boys he was sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C, for training. He was placed in Battery D 
317th Kegiment of the Field iVrtillery of the 81st Division. 
He remained at Camp Jackson just one month and twenty- 
seven days, and was sent to Camp Meade, Md., at which 
place he received his over-seas examination, and on August 
7th sailed from Hoboken, on a transport, "The Metigomia," 
landing after an uneventful vc.yage through the submarine 
zone, at Liverpool. ISText he was sent across the Channel 
from Southampton, and arrived on French soil at LeHavre. 
He was placed in the Meuse-Argonne sector, and was, with 
a niunber of the men of the 81st Division, entrained and on 
th(> way for front line attack wdien the news came that the 
armistice had been signed. He was in good health much 
of the time while in France but, as a result of a severe attack 
of rheumatism, he was confined for twenty-three days in a 
French Hospital, Base No. 10. After his discharge from 
tlio hospital and before sailing to America he had the ]dep- 
sure of visiting many of the interesting places of our sister 
Republic. 

Early in June of 1919 he sailed on the IT. S. S., "South 
Carolina,'' from Brest, and landed at Newport News. From 
this place ho was sent to Camp Lee, Va., where on June 
19th, 1919, he was discharged from military service. The 



Caswell County in the World War 147 

Army Serial N^umber of this ex-soldier was 2992966. At 
this writing, he has resumed with energy, his previous occu- 
pation of farming. 



IKVII^G LEA SLAUGHTER 

Ieving Lea Slaughter was born in the County of Per- 
son, on April 12th, 1897. He is the eldest son of Jake 
Slaughter, who was born in Granville County, of this State. 
Both the grandsires of Irving Lea Slaughter did service for 
the Confederate States, during the Civil War. This family 
moved to Caswell County in 1907, and, at the time of the 
Registration of this sou, was living at Estelle, near the town 
of Milton. 

He was called for mobilization on Sept. 6th, 1918, and 
sent to Camp Wadsworth for training. He only remained 
in camp two weeks, and was sent over-seas on Sept. 23rd, 
sailing from ISTewport News, on the transport, "Pastoria," 
and landing at St. ISTazaire. He was receiving intensive 
training in France at the time of the signing of the armis- 
tice, and was about twelve miles from St. Nazaire when 
hostilities ceased. While in France he suffered from a 
very serious attack of Influenza, but fortunately escaped 
the complication of Pneumonia. While he was sick in the 
American Hospital near St. Nazaire he was nursed by a 
Red Cross Woman whose home was in ISTew York. After 
recovering from his attack of Influenza this young soldier 
had the privilege of visiting quite a number of the most in- 
teresting cities of France, and it was good fortune to be 
in Paris at the Eastertide of 1919. 

He sailed from St. IvTazaire on June 17th 1919, on a U. S. 
Transport, and landed without mishap at ISTew York. From 
Xew York he was transferred to Camp Lee and there dis- 
charged on the 23rd day of July 1919. His Army Sei'ial 
ISTumber was 4247513. Just before his induction into mili- 
tary service our young soldier was married to Miss Mary 
Smith of Yancevville, 'N. C. 



148 Caswell County in the World War 

ALLIE SMITH 

Allie Smith^ at the age of twenty-two, was inducted by 
the local board of Caswell County, into military service. He 
was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, for training. His 
father married Miss Lena Hall ; both of these parents 
were Caswell County people. His early education was such 
as was usually received in the public schools of Caswell, and, 
at the time of his induction by his local board, he was actively 
engaged in farming. 

On his arrival at Camp Jackson he was placed in the 306th 
Train Headquarters Company of the Military Police, of the 
81st Division. He was held at Camp Jackson for ten months, 
in training for this service. Then, passing successfully his 
over-seas examination, he sailed with a number of other Cas- 
well hoys from Hoboken, New Jersey, on the British trans- 
port, "Megantic," and after a rather eventful voyage through 
the submarine zone, he landed at Liverpool, and was later 
sent across the English Channel to Cherbourg. His service 
record shows that he took part in the following battle engage- 
ments and adventures — Meuse Argonne, Alsace Lorraine, 
and was in action near Metz, at the time of the armistice. 
Tlie armistice putting an end to hostilities, he remained in 
France until June 12 of the following year, at which time 
he sailed from Brest, on the U. S. S., "Imperator," and 
arrived at Hoboken, N. J. without mishap. The Army Ser- 
ial Number of this soldier was 1866000. 



ARTHUR LEWIS SMITH 

Aethur Lewis Smith was born in the County of Caswell 
January 30th, 1801. He is a son of the late J. P. Smith, who 
married Miss Sallie Pettigrew. Both of these parents were 
natives of Caswell. This father was a Confederate soldier, 
who was wounded twice, once at Manassas and once at Gettys- 
burg, but served through the entire Civil war. He was a sol- 
dier in General Pender's Brigade. Young Smith attended 
the public schools of Caswell, after which he spent two years 
at Elon College; after his work at Elon College, at the ur- 



Caswell County in the World War 149 

gent request of the people of his commuuity, and the Supt. 
of Schools of the county, he was induced to teach for the 
people of District ISTo. 20, Stony Creek Township. He did 
a great work, and was greatly beloved by the children of his 
school. 

On September 19th, 1917, with a large contingent of boys, 
he was sent by his Local Board to Camp Jackson, South 
Carolina, for training. He was placed in the Ordnance 
Train 'No. 306, of the 81st Division. After remaining in 
camp for seven months, he sailed on July 31st 1918, from 
Hoboken, on a British transport, "The Metagonia." Arriving 
safely at Liverpool, he crossed over the English Channel, 
landing at Cherbourg. For two months he served in the 
Alsace-Lorraine Sector, while there, issuing equipment and 
ammunition. We need not speak further of the activities 
of this young soldier, because, his duties, and they were 
performed with much patriotism, were such as were assigned 
to the men of the 81st Division. After the signing of the 
armistice he was given furloughs, which permitted him to 
visit Paris, Marseilles, and quite a number of other beautiful 
cities of France. 

On June 7th, 1919, he set sail from St. ISTazaire, on the 
IT. S. S. "Martha Washing-ton," and after a prosperous voy- 
age, landed at Charleston, S. C. He was sent to Camp Jack- 
son, and there on June 25th 1919 he received his discharge. 

His Army Serial Number was 1865912. At this writing 

soldier Smith, after being earnestly requested by the people 

of his community and his County Superintendent of Schools 

is teaching with great effectiveness in one of the public schools 

" of the county. 



HEEMAN ALONZO SMITH 



Hekman Alonzo Smith was born at High Tower in 
Caswell County October 23, 1894. He was a son of S. H. 
Smith and Eugenia Smith. Both of jtliese pau'ents ai'e 
natives of Caswell. After finishing the Public School 



150 Caswell County in the World War 

Course in this County young Smith was for two years a 
student of Elon College. 

He was sent by his Local Board to Camp Jackson, South 
Carolina, on the 19th day of September, 1917, where he was 
made a Corporal of Co. I, of the 120th Infantry of the 30th 
Division. He remained at this camp eight months for train- 
ing. He was sent over-seas on May 17, 1918, sailing 
from the jwrt of Boston on a British Ship, "Miltiades," 
landing at Dover, and from that point was sent across the 
Channel to Calais, and placed on the Ypres Front, in Bel- 
gium. Here he assisted in holding this line against the re- 
peated attacks of the Germans. It is needless for us to 
attempt to recall the strenuous life which came to this Sol- 
dier; we need only to say that he was a participant in all 
of those desperate struggles which will be forever associated 
with the world-renowned Thirtieth Division. He fought at 
St. Quentin and was with those men whose names will forever 
make bright the pages of history, who, on September 29tli, 
broke the Hindenburg Line. 

Corporal Smith was at Corbie when the Armistice was 
signed. He remained in France until June 30th. 1919, at 
which time he sailed from St. Nazaire on the U. S. S., 
•"■Martha Washington" and landed at Charleston South Car- 
olina. Mr. Smith's Army Serial Number was 1321327. 
Since his return from the army, he has been actively en- 
gaged in agricultural operations. It will be interesting in 
conclusion of this sketch to note that, on April 13th, 1918, 
while this soldier was at home on a furlough, Miss Katherine 
Allen, who was for many years one of the most efficient 
teachers of Caswell, became his war bride. 



JOHN FRANKLIN SMITH 

John Franklin Smith, who enrolled his name in the 
Ranks of the National Army in the registration of June 5, 
1918, at the age of twenty-one, was born in Caswell County. 
His father, W. S. Smith, married Miss Lucy Rudd. Both 
the maternal and paternal grandparents of this young soldier 
Avere valiant Confederate Verterans who fought for the South- 



Caswell County in the World War 151 

em cause. Young Smith received the education obtainable 
in the public schools of Caswell County. In September 1918 
he was called by the local board and sent to Camp Jackson, 
S. C. and assigned to artillery service. He did not go over 
seas for the reason that his company had boarded the ship 
and they were about to sail when the news of the armistice 
came. He was discharged from Camp Jackson early in the 
year of 1919. 

JOHN PAUL SMITH 

John Paul Smith was born August 27, 1897, at Pros- 
pect Hill, N. C. His father, J. R. Smith, has been for many 
years a very prominent citizen of Caswell County, and has 
been closely identified with the best in social, business, and 
political life of Caswell. This parent has been for a 
number of years a member of the Board of County Commis- 
sioners, and has held many other places of trust and influence. 
The maiden name of the mother of this young soldier was 
Miss Eudora Warren. She was born near Prospect Mill 
in this county. He is a grandson of E. R. Smith, a very 
valiant Confederate Soldier. After completing the public 
school course in Caswell, he was for several sessions, a stu- 
dent at Elon College, and, afterwards, at the University of 
N^orth Carolina. 

He enlisted at Raleigh, N. C, July 13, 1918, in the avia- 
tion corps of the army, and was sent to Fort Thomas, Ky., 
for training. At Fort Thomas he was transferred to the 
ambulance section of the Medical Corps, as an ambulance 
driver. He remained in camp eight months. The armistice 
having put an end to hostilities, he was not sent over seas. 
In March of 1919 he was discharged from Fort Thomas. 

Before entering service young Smith was assistant cashier 
of the Mebane Bank and Trust Company of Mebane, IST. C. 
His Army Serial Number was 3238980. ' 

LIEUTENANT ROBERT WINSTON SMITH 

Lieutenant Robert Winston Smith was bom in the 
County of Caswell, in High Towers Township, on the 4th 



152 Caswell County in the World Wae 

day of July, 1800. His father, John R. Smith, who mar- 
ried Miss Eudora Warren, was for many years one of Cas- 
well's most prominent and successful citizens, serving for a 
number of terms as a member of the Board of County Com- 
misioners. This family has the distinction of sending three 
boys into military service, the other two boys being Herbert 
Smith and John Paul Smith. Dr. Smith is a grandson of 
E. H. Smith, who was a very valiant old Confederate Soldier, 
and who did whole-hearted patriotic service during the War, 
as follower of Lee and Jackson. 

Tiobert Smith completed the Public School course at Proe- 
pect Hill, N. C. ; afterward, he did High School work at 
Cedar Grove, and next completed the courses at Oak Ridge 
Institute in Guilford County of this state. After his grad- 
uation at the latter place he entered the Atlanta Dental Col- 
lege at Atlanta, Ga., and graduated from same with high 
honors. 

Upon his induction into military service he was placed In 
the Dental Corps of the Army and was assigiied to the rank 
of 1st Lieutenant. He was first sent to Camp Hancock, Ga., 
then to Camp Morison, Va., then to Camp Stuart, Va., and 
then to Camp Holabird, Baltimore. In all, he was in mili- 
tary service from June 5, 1918, to November 15, 1919. Dr. 
Smith's service record was one of great efficiency, and one 
which merited the commendation of the War Department. 
He was discharged from Camp Holabird on November 15, 
1919. Before entering military service in the Dental Corps 
of the A*rmy, Lieutenant Smith had been engaged in the 
]>ractice of his profession. He had made signal success in 
same, and since his return to civil life he has actively resumed 
work in his chosen profession, and is now enjoying a large 
and lucrative practice. 



WALTER HERBERT SMITH 

Walter Herbert Smith, who was made a Lieutenant 
in the United States Naval Reserve Corps and who did ex- 
ceedingly efficient service in this branch of national defence, 
was born in the Count v of Caswell at Ridgeville, N. C. Nov- 



Caswell County in the World War 153 

ember 21, 1888. His father, John Robert Smith, married 
Miss Eiidora Katherine Warreu. Both of these parents 
were Caswell people. The grandfather of this young sea- 
man was Elijah Smith, who was in the Confederate Service 
during the war between the States. After attending the 
schools of Caswell he entered the North Carolina State School 
at West Raleigh and a was a member of the class of 1914. 

Immediately after his enlistment into the United States 
Naval Reserve Force he was sent to the Naval Academy at 
Annapolis, Maryland, where he remained for one month, 
and was then put in convoy service and assigned to the U, S. S. 
''Huntington.' For some time he was engaged with the men 
of his ship in the very dangerous work of keeping the sea 
lands open, being in constant danger of German submarine 
attacks. He returned to New York and was later attached 
to the Bureau of Steam Engineering, Washington, D. C. 
Here he remained until February of the following year. On 
February 11 of 1919 he was detailed to the U. S. S. "Ari- 
zona," and was sent to Brest, France. He was sent from this 
port to Smyrna, Asia Minor, where he remained until June 
10, 1919. Wliile at Smyrna he had the very remarkable 
experience of witnessing the landing of the Greek army of 
occupation. After remaining for a time with this vessel at 
this place he was sent to Constantinople, Turkey, for further 
duties. After his return to America on July 3, 1919 he 
was released from active naval duty. 

Since his return to civil life he has associated himself with 
the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Co-, East 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



HENRY ANDERSON SOLOMON 

He?^"ry Anderson Solomon was born in the County of 
Person, October 25, 1894. His father. Garner Solomon, 
married Miss Lula Pulliam, both of these parents being 
natives of Person County. His grandsires were confederate 
soldiers who ser^'-ed the cause of the Confederacy with much 
bravery during those dark days from 1861 to 1865, Young 



154 Caswell County in the World War 

Solomon's parents moved to Caswell some years ago, and 
located near Eidgeville, at wliich place they were actively 
engaged in farming. 

He enrolled bis name in the ranks of the National 
Army, June 5th, 1917. On July 25th, 1918 he was inducted 
by bis local board into military service, and assigned for 
duty at Camp Hancock, Ga. He was rapidly developing into a 
very line type of soldier, one who had by his attentiveness to 
duty won the respect of his superior officers, and the love of 
his comrades. It is with special sadness that we recall the 
fact that while undergoing training he was stricken with di- 
seased and died October 13, 1918. They brought him back, 
clothed in the uniform of his country, and tenderly bore 
him to the place near which he was born, and buried him at 
Ceffo, in Pearson County. All that is mortal of this soldier 
lies buried, waiting resurrection, under the provi- 
dence of God, and we should thank him with reverence that 
the roll of the Caswell boys who "went west" is a short one; 
but on that roll are names which this county should ever hold 
dear. On this roll of heroes the name of Henry Anderson 
Solomon is written in letters of gold. He made the ''Supreme 
Sacrifice." He gave all that God had given him for his 
country. He gave his life to help make this old world a fit 
place for men to live. Under brighter skies may we meet 
asain. God rest him. 



ROY JULIUS SOMERS 

Roy Julius Somers was born in the County of Caswell 
on January 27, 1897. He was a son of A. H. Somers and 
Annie Somers. The maiden name of his mother was Miss 
Annie Davis. Both the grandsires of this young man served 
through the entire period of the Civil War. He completed the 
public school course of Caswell. And under a special call 
for men to be assigned for special service, Mr. Somers with 
John Howard Lee, and Haywood Ralston Thomas, was sent to 
the University of South Carolina, at Columbia, where he 
was trained as a telegrapher, fitting himself for over-seas 
service in this important branch. He remained at that place 



Caswell County in the World War 155 

until October 28, 1918, aud was sent from there to Camp 
Humphrey, Virginia, and placed in the Engineers Camp, 
Company L, 7th Regiment. This Regiment was being fitted 
out for over-seas service at the time of the armistice. After 
the signing of the armistice, he was transferred from this 
Regiment to the 23rd Regiment, Company K, and placed 
in a Surveying School. 

It will be interesting to note that during this latter train- 
ing the place where same was given was on the lands near 
Mt. Vernon, the birthplace of General Washington. On 
December 17th of this same year he was discharged at Mt. 
Vernon from military service. The Army Serial Number of 
this young man was 4456209. On his return to Caswell, 
and at the urgent request of the County Superintendent of 
Schools, and also the Committeemen of his District, he is 
now teaching in District ISTo. 21, Stoney Creek Township, 
and the work which he is doing is of marked efficiency. 



JOH:Nr RALEIGH STADLER 

JoHX Raleigh Stabler^ whose Army Serial JSTumber was 
1321728, was a Caswell County boy, born August 31, 1895. 
His father, John A. Stadler, native of Caswell County, mar- 
ried Miss Annie Eliza Walker of Guilford, IsT. C. His 
grandfather, Joe Stadler, was a very valiant soldier and has 
been for many years a well known and useful citizen of our 
county. Young Stadler attended the public schools of Cas- 
well, finishing the usual course given in these schools. 

He was called by his local board for mobilization, Septem- 
ber 20, 1917, and with a large contingent of Caswell boys 
was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. After remaining at Camp 
Jackson for several months he was transferred to Camp Sev- 
ier. At this place he was assigned to the Infantry, Company 
K. 120 Regiment of the 30th Division. His division having 
been fitted out for over-seas service, he set sail from Boston, 
Mass. May 11, 1918. and after an eventful voyage across 
the Atlantic and through the submarine zone, he landed at 
Liverpool. From this place he was sent to France by the 
commonlv traveled route. He saw active service in trench 



156 Caswell County in the World Wae 

raids and in battle engagements. While in a battle engage- 
ment he was seriously wounded at the breaking of the Hinden- 
burg line, but from this wound which at one time seemed 
fatal, he fortunately recovered. After jbeing discharged 
from the evacuation hospital he was sent to England, and 
there remained until he was sent home as a casual, December 
6, 1918. He sailed from Liverpool on the transport "Vater- 
land," and arrived safely in New York, on December 16. He 
was sent to Spartanburg, S. C, from which place he was dis- 
cliarged, February 21, 1919. 

Before entering service he was actively engaged in farm- 
ing and since his return to civil life this ex-service man, who 
bears on his body honorable scars received in defence of his 
country, has resumed his former occupation. 

JOHN GWYNN STAMPS 

John Gwynn Stamps was born in Caswell County, October 
27. 1891, being the eldest son of Rufus Stamps and Ella 
G. Stamps. Immediately after his registration of June 5th, 
1917, he volunteered and enlisted in the Coast Artillery, and 
was sent on the 4th of July over to Fortress Monroe, for 
training, and was transferred to the Coast Artillery School 
and was kept there during the war; he was at that place at 
the time of the signing of the Annistice. He was dischare;xl 
from service on December 8, 1918. After remaining for 
a short while at his father's home in Caswell County, this 
young soldier re-enlisted, the enlistment papers having 
been made out in Greensboro, N. C, on the 17th day of 
September, 1919, for three years. 

He was sent to Ft. Thomas Kentucky to wait further 
orders. At the time of this writing he is still a soldier in 
the United States Army. Before enlistment, he did the usual 
work of ii ] I el per on his father's farm about five miles from 
Yancewille, 'N. C. 

JAMES SIDNEY STANDFIELD 

James Sidney Standfield whose Army Serial Number 
was 1858455, and who served as a soldier through the great 



Caswell County in the World Wak 157 

war with fidelitj^ and patriotism, was born in the County 
of Eockinghani, December 5, 1893. His father, James A. 
Standfield, was born in Person Connty. His mother was 
Miss Baynes, a native of Alamance, His grandsire, John 
Stanfield, was a Confederate soldier, who gave four years 
of his life to the service of his beloved Southland. This 
family moved to Caswell a number of years ago, and at the 
time of the opening of the great war was living in Ander- 
son Township. Our young soldier attended the schools of 
both Rockingham and C^aswell, and upon the completion 
of the public school course, became a student for several 
sessions in the Gilliam's High School, in Alamance County. 
We are very much pleased in writing this service sketch 
to be able to record in the language of this brave young 
soldier, the record of his military experience. "I was sent 
from Yanceyville, N. C. on December 20, 1917, to Camp 
Jackson, S. C, After remaining a while at this camp, I 
was transferred to Camp Sevier where I was placed in 
the Supply Company of the 324th Infantry of the 81st Divi- 
sion. Altogether I was in camp at both places from Decem- 
ber 20, 1917 to August 5, 1918. After being made ready 
for over seas service I sailed from New York on the 5th of 
August, 1918. I went over in the "Aquitania," a great Eng- 
lish vessel, which carried a crew of about eight hundred 
men and more than eleven thousand soldiers and officers. 
We remained at Liverpool for a few days, and next were 
sent to a rest camp not far from that place. They kept 
us at this rest camp only one night and then we were car- 
ried to Southampton and placed on board a cattle boat and 
sailed across the English Channel, landing at LeHavre. 
I was not long at this place, and in a few days was on the 
front. This first station was not a very difficult one. I^ext 
I was transferred to the Argonne Front and was there at 
the time of the signing of the Armistice. Luckily, I was 
neither wounded nor gassed while on the military front. 
After the cessation of hostilities, I took a Ford truck and 
for eight or ten days moved across France, being of course 
with my company during this period. At the end of this 
automobile hike, I was stationed at the small village of 



158 Caswell County in the World War 

Biron, Here I remained until I was homeward bound. 
I sailed from St. Nazaire on the steamship "Martha Wash- 
ington," June 7, 1919 and landed at Charleston on the 18th 
of the same month. From Charleston I was sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C, and from this place was discharged on 24 
July, 1919. 

VOSS MACK STEPHENS 

Voss Mack Stephens was born near the village of Leas- 
burg, in Caswell Countv, October 8th, 1888. His father, 
Thomas J. Stephens, married Miss Nannie Morton, who was 
a daughter of Vincent Morton, for many years a very 
prominent man in the business, and social affairs of the 
county. Young Stephens' father was a Confederate soldier 
who served during the entire war, with the armies of Lee. 
in Virginia. Voss attended the public schools of Caswell, 
and also had the advantages of the Leasburg Academy. 

He was inducted into military service December 20th, 
1917, and was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, and afterwards 
transferred to Camp Sevier. He was made Corporal in sup- 
ply Company of the 324th Regiment, of the 81st Division, 
was given eight months training in camp, and was then 
sent over-seas, August Sth, 1918. His ship, "Aquitania,'' 
sailed from New York, and landed at Liverpool. He was 
ill active service during the time of the Meuse-Argonne 
offensive and was at this front at the time of the signing 
of the Armistice. He came back home, sailing from the 
French Port, St. Nazaire, on the TJ. S. S., "Martha Wash- 
ington," landing at Charleston, S. C, on June 18th. and 
was sent to Camp Jackson for his discharge, which he re- 
ceived on June 25th, 1919. 

Before entering service, his occupation was that of a farm- 
er; he is now engaged in the same work. His Army Ser- 
ial Number was 1858457. 



AZARTAH JAMES STRADER 

AzAEiAH James Straber was born at Pelham, N. C, on 
the 7th dav of June 1892. His father, Robert Frank Strader, 



Caswell County in the World War 159 

married Miss Matilda Travis; both of these parents were 
Caswell County people. He finished the High School Course 
in the Pelham City Schools. 

On September 5th, 1918 he was called by his Local Board 
and sent to Camp Humphries and placed for service in the 
Engineers' Company, Co. I, of the 71st Kegiment, being 
assigned to the 71st Division. He was actively engaged in 
training for Engineer Service, preparatory to over-seas 
sailing, when the Armistice of November 11, put an end 
to his military operations. He remained at Camp Hum- 
phris three months after the Armistice, then transferred to 
Port Washington, and was there discharged on December 5, 
1918. The Army Serial Number of this young soldier was 
2616855. 



LIEUTENANT NATHANIEL HENDERSON SWANN 

Lieutenant Nathaniel Henderson Swann was born at 
Pelham, »r*T?r in IS^^lpis father, Joseph Algernon Swann, 
who^as for many years identified with the life of Caswell, 
and hi? mother, whose maiden name was Miss Hannah Slade 
Henderson, were both Caswell stock, and natives of this 
County. It will be interesting to note that the grandfather 
of Lieutenant Swann was Dr. N. S. Henderson, who was 
rated as a very efiicient surgeon in the Confederate States 
Army. 

Young Swann was a graduate of Pelham High School, 
and after the begining of the war, he was sent to the officers 
Training Camp at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. He was at this place 
from August 20th until November 27th 1918, was commiss- 
ioned there as 1st Lieutenant, and placed in Co. M. 54th 
Infantry of the 6th Division. He remained in service for 
eighteen months. He was sent over-seas, sailing from New 
York on July 6tli on a British transport, "The Briton", 
and landed at Glasgow, Scotland. His Division was sent to 
the Vosges Sector, and while he was not actively engaged 
in hostile operations, much of the time up to the signing of 
the Armistice, he was under artillerv fire. A short while 



160 Casvvell County in the World "War 

before the signing of the Armistice, he was seut to the Gas 
School at Homlon Field, Chauniont. 

After the signing of the Armistice, he was kept with his 
Division until the first week in January, 11)19, and was 
transported home from Brest, France, on a Dutch Ship, 
"The Lapland," landing safely in New York. lie was dis- 
charged from Camp Dix, 'N. J., Jan. 10th 1910. 



VANCE EVERETT SWIFT 

Vance Everett Swift was ])orn in the County of Cas- 
well on January 22, 1809. His father Robert B. Swift, 
a native of Caswell, married Miss Ella Simpson of Orange 
County. The father of young Swift w^as an exceedingly 
valiant soldier, who served through the war and was a mem- 
ber of the 6th North Carolina Regiment, Company H. 
After finishing the usual ])ublic school course in Caswell 
County, young Swift spent four years at the Whitsett In- 
stitute, in Guilford County, and afterwards became a stu- 
dent at the University of NoTth Carolina, at which place lie 
took the full four years course. 

On October 5, 1018, while a student in the Senior Class 
at the University, he enlisted in the Officers' Training School 
for hospital duty in the Students Army Training Corps. 
The records show that he was rapidly developing into a fine 
type of officer ; the Armistice putting an end to hostilities, 
he did not see active military duty, and on January 6. 1010 
he discharged from military service. 



WILLIAM F. LATUM 

WiLijAM F. Tatu]\[ was born in Person County, N. C., 
August 16th 1880. His father, William Tatum, was born in 
the State of Texas, and moved to Person County, and while 
living in that county, married Miss Mary Wrenn. His 
grandfather. Berry Tatum, was a confederate soldier who 
saw four years of service with General Lee. He attended 



Caswell County in the World War 161 

the public schools of Caswell and Person Counties, and 
before his entrance into Military Service, was associated 
with his father on the latter 's farm, near Leasburg, N. C. 

He was called by his Local Board for induction, Sept. 
18th, 1917, was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, and later 
transferred to Camp Sevier. To young Tatum fell the honor 
of becoming a member of the famous 30th Division ; he was 
in Co. K. of the 120th Kegiment. He was sent over-seas, 
April 29th 1918; sailing from Boston on an English trans- 
port, he arrived at Liverpool. 

He served with his regiment in Belgium and in the battle 

of the Hindenburg Line. In a subsequent action in the 
Somme Offensive he was gassed. For two weeks he was 
completely paralyzed. He was taken to British Hospital 
'No. 12 for treatment. We are pleased to record here that 
this brave young soldier who fought so valiantly for his 
county has recovered from this attack. He was in this 
Hospital No. 12, when the Armistice was sig-ned, and was 
sent home on March 5th 1919 from Brest, France, on the 
U. S. S. ^'South Carolina," as a casual. He arrived at iSTew- 
port News, Va., after a safe voyage across the Atlantic. 
He was sent to Camp Lee, from which place he was dis- 
charged March 7th 1919. 



JOHN BAEKEK THACKER 

John Barker Thacker enrolled his name in the ranks 
of the National Army in the registration of June 5, 1917, 
at the age of twenty three. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Thacker, are Caswell people, living near Milton. This 
young soldier, who was destined to give his life for his 
country was engaged in farming at the time of his induc- 
tion into military service. He received the usual educa- 
tion obtainable in our public schools and was a young man 
of very fine spirit, popular, earnest and reliable. 

11 



162 Caswell County in the World Wae 

He was called for induction into military service on Sept. 
19tli 1918, with a large contingent of Caswell boys, and 
sent to Camp Jackson. He was rapidly obtaining proficiency 
in military tactics and there is no doubt, had he lived, but 
that would have made one of the bravest soldiers of the 
Great War. He was stricken with disease and died while 
in camp undergoing his military training. As a matter 
of history, we should record this fact that John Barker 
Thacker was the first Caswell County boy to make the 
"Supreme Sacrifice." I recall even as I write these lines, 
the fine spirit which was his, and the bravery of his young 
life, as he told ine good bye the day he left Caswell. We 
owe to the memory of this brave young soldier an everlast- 
ing debt of love and gratitude, and ''greater love no man 
than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends." Let 
little children be told through the tract of years which may 
come, that John Barker Thacker gave his life for his county 
and gave his life that others might live, and have life more 
abundantly. His ancestors fought in the ranks of the great 
army of Lee and Jackson. He was a worthy son of these sires. 
May he rest peacefully with them ''over the river and under 
the shade of the trees.' 



CHAELES KANDOLPH THOMAS 

Charles Eandolph Thomas was born in the village of 
Leasburg IST. C. in Caswell County, on October 19, 1895. At 
the time of his induction into military service he was living 
at Milton, N. C, his parents having moved to that place 
in ISTovember of 1912. The father of this young soldier, 
Mr. Walter L. Thomas, married Miss Elizabeth Dixon, 
Charles Thomas was the second son of this union. On his 
father's side he was a great grandson of Solomon Lea, a 
man who was much beloved by the people of Caswell, and 
the State knows of the splendid service given to it by Solo- 
mon Lea. He was a leading educator of his day, and at one 
time President of the Greensboro Female College, of Green- 
boro, N. C. Two of the great-uncles of young Thomas, Arch 
Bradsher, and Ed. W. T^ea, were confederate veterans of 
the Civil War. 



Caswell County in the World War 163 

The early educatiou of young Thomas was received in the 
Public School at Leasburg. Here he made marked proficiency 
in his studies and after his family moved to Milton he 
entered the Milton High School and graduated with honor. 
The father of young Thomas has been for many years one of 
the largest and most successful merchants of the County, 
also being extensively engaged in farming. In both of these 
enterprises the son was a very valuable assistant. 

On December 4, 1917, he was sent to Camp Jackson, 
and later transferred to Camp Sevier. Here he was placed 
in the 81st Division, and remained in camp eight months, 
in the 81st military police. On July 31, 1918, after leaving 
Camp Mills, he was sent to Hoboken, N. J., and with the 
other men of the "Wild Cat Division," was placed on an 
English vessel, "Megantic," and landed at Liverpool, from 
which place, he soon crossed over into France for service. 
While on the front he was subjected to a number of very 
dangerous air raids, which we record from a Diary of 
young Thomas. ''When the 81st was going up to the 
front, aeroplanes flew over one of the troop trains. They 
opened up machine gun fire, and flew up and down the train. 
Lots of the boys were in open box cars, just regular flat cars 
with no top, and lots of them were wounded, but only three 
killed. This air raid was at Bourges, France. Then in the 
St. Die Sector, German planes flew over, and opened up 
their machine guns, but only killed one man and wounded 
one or two others, the rest taking cover. This plane was 
brought down a few minutes later by one of the Companies 
of the 81st Infantry Division. This Company was march- 
ing to the front, and all at once the whole Company opened 
up fire and brought the plane down. When the Armistice 
called a cessation of hostilities, we were near Verdun. 

After the Armistice was signed, we started from Verdun 
on a long hike. The sun was shining bright, something 
unusual for France; and we hadn't been hiking very long 
before the rain began to fall in torrents. The roads were 
muddy, packs heavy, but we hiked on ; and after hiking all 
day, we were only too proud to crawl in someone's cow stalls 
or pig pen, and let the stock take the rain for the night. 



164 Caswell County in the World War 

We hiked 200 kilometers. We lost a boy in the hike, the only 
one we lost while the Company was organized. We were 
on this hike about two weeks, and it rained ten days during 
this time. AVhen we reached our destination, we found that 
we were down on the Meuse river, in the little town of St. 
Colombe. Here we remained until Ave got sailing orders. I 
had several nice trips, two to Paris and Bordeaux; we fared 
like ''Kings," so to speak. We had Mademoiselles to wait 
on us, and everything for our comfort. After this trip Vv-as 
over, Ave went back to our same coav sheds, where the cooties 
Avere ahvays Avaiting for us. I Avas lucky to get not one. 
On June 10, 1010, Ave set sail from St. iN^azaire, on the U. 
S. S. "Koanoke," and landed at Charleston, S. C. I Avas 
then sent to Camp Jackson, where on December 27, I Avas 
discharged from military service. My Army Serial Xum- 
ber was 1866140," Since the return of this ex-service man 
to civil life he has associated himself with his father and is 
now engaged in merchandise at Milton. 



JOHIi LESLIE THOMASSOI^ 

John Leslie Tpio:massox volunteered on July 2nd, 1017, 
in the State of Virginia, at Danville, in the 6th Virginia 
Coast Artillery. He was born at Hickory, X. C., June 
23rd 1801. He Avas a son of Kichard Thomasson, and 
Clarabella Herman Thomasson. His grandfather. Adolphus 
Herman, Avas a Confederate Verteran. 

After volunteering at Danville, he was sent to the Regular 
Army Base at Fort Monroe, Va., and placed in Battery 
B. 6bth Coast Artillery, of the 5th Division of the Eegular 
Army. He sailed over-seas on April, 15th 1018, on the 
"Siboney," an English transport, landing at Brest. On 
account of the splendid physical characteristics of young 
Thomasson, he Avas selected and placed among the shock troops 
and his Company Avas in the first line of attack at St. 
Mihiel, the Argonne Forest, and the battles Avhich raged 
around Verdun. 

At the time of the sigiiing of the Armistice, he Avas four 
kilometers from Sedan, on his way, with other men of the 



Caswell County in the World War 165 

Division, to Metz. After the signing of the Armistice, 
young Thomasson assisted in reclamation work in many parts 
of France, and while engaged in this service he had the privi- 
lege of visiting many of the principal cities and places of 
interest in our sister Republic. On June 26th 1919, he 
sailed on the "Cedric," an English transport, and landed 
at Hoboken. From this place he was sent to Ft. Howard, 
Maryland, where he received his discharge. The Army 
Serial iSTumber of this volunteer was 633136. 

HAYWOOD RALSTOIsT THOMPSON 

Haywood Ralston Tho:mpson was born in the county 
of Caswell near Semora, on July 2, 1897. His father C. 
K. Thompson, was a native of iVlamance County, and mar- 
ried Miss Willie E. Long, of this County. This family has 
been for a number of years, one of the most progressive, and 
patriotic in Caswell. Haywood's early education was re- 
ceived in the Public Schools of Caswell. After completing 
the seven grades in same, he attended for a while the Semora 
High School, located at Semora, and the Aycock High School 
at Haw River, N. C. 

He registered during the registration of August 24, 1918, 
and was voluntarily inducted, under a special call, on Sept- 
ember 1, 1918, and sent to the University of South Carolina 
where he received intensive training in the Signal Corps of 
the Army. It will be worth while to note that two other 
young men were sent out under this same call to this Uni- 
versity, to wit : John Howard Lee, and Roy Somers. After 
finishing the required course at this College, he was trans- 
ferred to Camp Meade, Md., and was being prepared for 
over-seas service when the Armistice put an end to hos- 
tilities. He was kept at this camp until January 23, 1919, 
and given there his discharge. The Army Serial IsTuraber 
of this young soldier, was 4456223. 

WILLIAM LONG THOMPSON" 

WiLLTAM Long Thompson was born in Milton Township, 
Cflswel] County. December 20, 1898. His father, Mr. C. 
K. Thompson, was born in Alamance County, at Mebane, 



166 Caswell County in the World War 

and his mother whose maiden name was Miss Willie E. Long, 
was born in this county, at Milton. Young Thompson at- 
tended the Public Schools of Caswell and the High School 
at Semora, and two additional sessions at Mebane, and 
Kaleigh N. C. 

On July 11, 1918, while in his nineteenth year, he volun- 
tarily enlisted for service as a member of the U. S. Marine 
Corps, and was sent to Paris Island, and afterward to Quan- 
tico for training. After finishing the required training he 
was sent ovor-seas with the 13th Kegiment of the U S, Mar- 
ines. He sailed from New York on Sept, 14, 1918, and 
landed at Brest, on the 28th of the same month. He was 
carried over by the U. S. S. "Henderson." His voyage across 
the Atlantic was an mievenful one until his ship was about 
three days out from Brest when it was rammed one night 
by the "Finland;" but fortunately, no lives were lost on 
account of this accident, although the U. S. S. "Henderson, 
had a large hole smashed in its side above the water line. 
He served his country in France with his Regiment of Mar- 
ines until the Armistice put an end to active operations. 
This young marine was discharged from service August 30, 
1919. During this service he made a splendid record for 
efficiency and general attention to duty, and he has the fur- 
ther distinction of being the only man that Caswell County 
furnished to the Marine Corps of the Army. 

It will be of interest to append to this sketch that, while 
young Thompson was in the service of his country, he was 
given sufficient leaves of absence to enable him to visit many 
of the most interesting places in France, and to sight-see 
in some of the most beautiful cities of the French Republic. 
He also had the further opportunity to go over into Spain 
crossing the Pyrenees Mountains. 



GEORGE EMMETT TRAVIS 

Geokge Emmett Travis was born March 27, 1888, in 
Caswell County. His father, R. S. Travis, was a native of 
Virginia, and married Miss Rosa Cole, also from that State. 
His grandfather, -John Cole, was a soldier in the Confederate 



Caswell County in the World War 167 

Army, and did service for four years. This young soldier 
attended the public schools of Caswell, and during the vaca- 
tion period was a helper on his father's farm. 

He went to Camp Jackson, S. C. Sept. 19, 1917, and 
was made a member of the military police; in this capacity 
he received commendation for his faithfulness, by his sup- 
erior olKcers. He was placed in Company B. 306th Military 
Police, of the 81st Division. July 31st, 1918 he was ordered 
over-seas for foreign service, and sailed from Hoboken, N. J. 
on the British transport, "Megantic," landing at Liverpool. 
He saw active service in the Alsace-Lorraine Sector, and in 
the Vosges Mountains and the Meuse-Argonne Front. His 
health while in the army was excellent, and, at the time of 
the signing of the Armistice, he was stationed at the historic 
place, Grand-Pre in the Argonne Forest. He remained in 
France until the 19th of May of the following year. He 
was brought home on the U. S. S. ''Imperator" sailing from 
Brest and landing without mishap, at Hoboken, where he 
was sent to Camp Lee, Va., and remained there until he was 
discharged on July 10, 1919. At this writing he is engaged 
in agricultural operations in Caswell County. His Army 
Serial ISTumber was 1866151. 



SAMUEL WESLEY TRAVIS 

Samuel Wesley Travis was born in the County of Cas- 
well, Dec. 18th, 1894. He is the third son of Robert Samuel 
Travis and Mrs. Rosabella Travis. His father was a native 
of Virginia; his mother, whose maiden name was Cole, was 
also a native of that State. This young soldier attended the 
public school of this County, and, up to the time of his in- 
duction into military service, was engaged with his father in 
farm work. In passing, we should record the fact that he 
was the second son in this family who took a part in this great 
war, his brother, George Travis, having entered the service 
several months before the subject of this sketch was called. 

He was inducted by the Local Board of Yanceyville, N. C, 
July, 23rd, 1918, and sent the following day to Camp Han- 
cock, Ga. Here he was assigned to hospital ser^dce in Camp 



168 Caswell CouiSTXY in the World War 

Hospital No. 29. After remaiuing iu this Camp for six 
weeks, he successfully passed his over-seas examination, and 
sailed from Hoboken on a British transport, "The Mercury,'' 
and landed at Brest. While in France, he did the active 
work usually assigned to a member of the medical corps of 
the Army. At the time of the signing' of the Armistice, Mr. 
Travis was in the Sector near Verdun. He remained in 
France until June of the following year. On the 19th of 
June he sailed from Bordeaux on the Transport, "Infanta 
Isabella," a Spanish ship, and arrived at New York in 
safety. From that place he was sent to Camp Lee, Va., 
where on July 16th, 1919, he received his discharge from 
service. His Armv Serial Number was 4160391. 



I AMMON FPtANKLIN TUCK 

Aminion Feanklin Tuck was born in the County of Hali- 
fax, Va., April 20, 1897. His father, William Henry Tuck, 
married Miss Louise Wilkins. Both of these parents were 
natives of Virginia. Young Tuck's parents moved from Vir- 
ginia to Person County, and later from Person to Caswell. 

At the outbreak of the war he was at work in a powder 
plant at Hopewell, Va., and at that place enrolled his name 
in the ranks of the National Army. He was inducted 
into military service and placed in the Infantry of the 
83rd Division. He went with the boys of this company 
over seas and did with great cheerfulness the work which 
was assigned to the men of the 8ord Division. After the 
signing of the Armistice he remained in France until the 
ord of January, 1919, sailing on that date from Brest on 
LL S. S. "Adriatic." After a safe voyage across the Atlantic 
he landed at New York ; then he was sent to Camp Mills, 
R. I. and next transferred to Camp Lee, where he received 
his discharge on February 14, 1919. 



LUTHER FLOURNOY TUCK 

LrTHER Flournoy Tuck was born in Halifax County, 
Virginia, April 28, 1887. His father. William Henry Tuck, 
married Miss Louise R. Wilkins. He spent the early years 



Caswell County in the World War 169 

of his life in the public schools of his native county. His 
father's family moved from Virginia to Person aul later to 
Caswell County. 

He enrolled his name in the ranks of the JSTational Army 
iu the registration of June 5, 1917. He was inducted into 
military service on September 18, 1917 and sent to Camp 
J ackson and later transferred to Camp Sevier. He was made 
Military Police of Company A, 306 Train Head Quarters 
of the 81st Division. Having been made ready for over-seas 
service he sailed from ISTew York on July 30, 1918 on the 
transport "Megantic," and after an eventful voyage through 
the submarine zone he landed at Liverpool. From Jhis place 
he was sent across the Channel into France, by way of South- 
ampton to Cherbourg. Not long after his arrival in France 
he was brigaded with the French Army. He was in Battle 
engagement in the St. Die Sector and the Argonne Forest, 
being almost continuously under shell fire for fifty one days. 
Luckily he escai>ed being wounded, but had a very narrow 
escape at Grand Pre, when his helmet was knocked off by 
a fragment of shrapnel. 

After the Armistice had put an end to hostilities he was 
assigned to the 8th Army Corps of the French Army and 
from this body he was re-transferred to the 306 Sanitary 
Train of the 81st Division. P3efore sailing to the States he 
had the opportunity of visiting many of the most beautiful 
and interesting places of our sister Republic, including Paris. 
On the 9th day of June 1918 he set sail from St. Nazaire 
on the U. S. S. "Manchuria," and landed at Newport News. 
He was transferred to Camp Lee, where on June 29, he re- 
ceived his discharge from military service. His Army Ser- 
ial Number was 1866020. 



EDWARD OLIVER TURNER 

Edward Oliver Turner was born in the County of Pitt- 
sylvania, near Danville, Virginia. He registered for military 
service in the June registration of 1918, having just become 
twenty-one years of age. His father, Oliver Perry Turner, 
married Miss Marv Elizabeth Hamlet, a native of Person 



170 Caswell County in the World War 

County of this state. His family lived for a numloi- of 
years in Pittsylvania County near Danville. At the time 
of the induction of this son into military service, this family 
was living near Purley. On his paternal side, Edward 
Turner was a grandson of Green Turner. This grandsire 
was a valorous Confederate soldier, who saw service in the 
war between the States, The early education of young Tur- 
ner was received in the public schools of Pittsylvania County. 

On August 30, 1911), with a contingent of Caswell boys 
lie was inducted by his local board and sent to C^amp Jack- 
son South Carolina, for training; at this place he was made a 
corporal of artillery in the 3rd Kegiment, F. A. D. The 
Armistice putting an end to hostilities, he did not see over- 
seas service. He was discharged December 11, 1911). The 
army serial nund^er of this ex-service man was 4438224. 

Young Turner made a good record while in military ser- 
vice and was popular with the men and officers of his Kegi- 
ment. In addition to this record along military lines, he 
also took a leading part in the athletics of his regiment. Bat- 
tery A, had the distinction of winning the baseball champion- 
ship of the 3rd Regiment, and young Turner was the pitcher 
for Battery A's team. 



HENRY FRANKLIN TURNER 

Henry Franklin Turner was born near Danville, Va., 
February 3, 1895. He is a son of Oliver Perry Turner, 
and Mary Elizabeth Turner. His father was a native of 
Caswell County, and his mother was born in Person County. 
Henry Franklin Turner was a grandson of Green Turner, 
who was with Jackson in his campagin through the Shenan- 
doah Valley, This young soldier attended the public schools 
of Caswell County, and also at Schoolfield Va. 

On Dccend)er 4. 1917, he was called by the local board 
of Caswell County nnd sont to Camp Jackson, S. C. thence 
to Camp Hancock, Gn. After preliminary training he was 
sent to Camp Merritt, N. J. There he was placed for service 
in Company I, first Air Service Mechanical Regiment. Just 
in this connection it will be interesting to note that three 



Oaswell County in the World War 171 

other Caswell boys were with young Tvirner through the 
entire period of the war ; namely, Berkley E. Daniels, Louis 
Glenn Carter, and Walters James Allen. The author of 
this sketch has in his private files the photograph of these 
four boys, taken in Paris while they were in that City on 
a leave of absence. Our soldier remained two months and 
four days in Camp for training, and on February 10, 1918, 
having successfully passed his over-seas examination, he 
sailed from Hoboken, N. J., on the U. S. transport, ''Presi- 
dent Lincoln," and landed at St. Nazaire. Here he was 
attached to the French Aviation, From the time of his 
arrival in France and up to the time of the signing of the 
Armistice, he was actively engaged in the Mechanical Ser- 
vice, which service played, as we all know, such an important 
part in the winning of the war. To tell you about the danger 
of this service we will record the fact that for thirty-seven 
days and nights this detachment wsis subjected to the most 
severe air raids on the part of the Germans. 

After the signing of the Armistice, up to the time of his 
departure to the United States, he did the service which was 
detailed to his regiment. On the 9th day of June, 1919, he 
sailed from Brest, on the U. S. S. ''America," and landed 
in New York. From New York he was sent to Camp Jack- 
son where, on July 1st, 1919, he received his discharg-e. His 
Serial Number was 265068. 



EDWAKD LEA UNDEEWOOD 

Edward Lea Underwood was born in the County of Cas- 
well, in Stony Creek Town-ship. His father, Thomas Will- 
iam Underwood, and his mother whose maiden name was 
Minnie McCullum, were both Caswell County people. He re- 
ceived the usual education given in the public schools of 
Caswell, and at the time of his induction by his Local Board 
into military service he was engaged in farming. Li this 
occupation he was making a distinctive success. 

On August 5th he was sent with a' contingent of Caswell 
boys, to Camp Wadsworth, S. C, and remained at that place 
for five weeks, doing intensive training. He was transferred 



172 Caswell County in the World War 

on September 17th, to Camp Stuart, Va., and there fitted 
out for over-seas service, passing successfully the required 
physical examination for service in France. He sailed from 
^^ewport News, Va., on Sept. 22nd, 1918, and was on board 
ship for fourteen days and fifteen nights. After a rather 
un-eventful voyage he landed on October 7th at St. Nazaire. 
Here he was placed for three weeks in a rest camp, near 
LeMans, and was then assigned to Co, B of the 115th Infan- 
try, of the 29th Division, and left LeMans for the front on 
the 29th of October. For fourteen days after reaching the 
front he was engaged in almost continuous fighting in the 
terrible battles which raged in the Argonne Forest, and was 
relieved of his strenuous duties on the 9th of JSTovember. 
During the battles of the Argonne he was slightly gassed at 
a place near Longueville. Fortunately, he received no 
wounds. 

The Armistice of November 11th, which put an end to 
hostilities, prevented soldier Underwood from participating 
in any further battles. After the Armistice, he did the 
usual duties imposed upon the men of the 29th Division, and 
I am sure it will be of interest to the people of the County 
to read that on Christmas Day of 1918 young Underwood 
was in the parade which was reviewed by President Wilson 
and General Pershing at Schermont. At different times he 
received leaves of absence which permitted him to visit many 
of the most beautiful cities of France and many of the most 
historical places of our sister Republic. 

On the 11th day of May, 1919, he set sail from France, 
sailing from St. ISTazaire, and after a prosperous voyage of 
fourteen days, landed safely at an American port. He was 
sent to Camp Stuart, and next transferred to Camp Lee, 
and at that place received his discharge from military service. 
He arrived at home on the 30th day of May, and actively 
resumed his former occupation of farming. The Amiv 
Serial Number of this young Soldier was 3349380. 

EDWARD ROSE VERNON 

Edward Rose Vernon, who enlisted in the United States 
Navy in the early summer of 1917, was born in Caswell 



Caswell County in the World War 173 

County, near the Village of Milton. His father Edward 
Vernon, married Miss Mary Barker. His grandfather, 
James E. Barker, was a valiant Confederate soldier. 

We regret very much not being able to obtain a service 
record of young Vernon in detail because his service in t\ o 
United States Xavy was indeed very remarkable. He was 
assigned to the x\tlantic Battleship fleet and was fireman 
during the entire period of the war. Much of his service 
was on submarine chasers and his vessel has the record of 
destroying three of the German submarines. At the time 
the above information was obtained he was still a member 
of the United States Navy. His oflicers are reported as 
saying that Edward Eose Vernon was one of the most effi- 
cient and bravest of the enlisted men of the fleet. 



MELVIN CALVII^ VEKKON 

MELvi]sr Calvin Vernon was born near Milton in Cas- 
well County, August 9, 1895. His father, Calvin H. Vernon, 
married Miss Mary Elizabeth McSherry. Both of these 
parents were Virginia people. This family moved to Cas- 
Avell a number of years ago. The grandfather of this young 
ex-service man on his father's side was Robert Vernon who 
served in the 6th Cavalry in the war between the States. On 
his mother's side he was a grandson of Philip McSherry who 
served in the Virginia Infantry under the command of 
Robert E. Lee. 

Young Vernon received the rudiments of his education in 
the public schools of Caswell County. He enrolled his name 
in the ranks of the National Army and on August 30, 1918, 
he was sent to Camp Jackson where he was placed in the 
Artillery, being a member of the 3rd Regiment of the same. 
He remained in camp but sixty days, sailing from Newport 
News on the U. S. S. "Powhatan," landing at Brest, France. 
The Armistice putting an end to hostilities he did not see 
active military service, but his regiment was being prepared 
for first line duty when the order to "cease firing" was given. 
He remained in France until May 25 of the following year, 



174 Caswell County in the World War 

oil which date he sailed from Bordeaux on the U. S. S, 
"Chicago," and hiiided at Newport I^ews, Virginia. He 
was sent to Camp Lee from this place. On June 22, 1919, 
he received his discharge from military service. His Serial 
Xumber was 4482235. 



WILLIAM WATSON VERNON 

William Watson Veenon was born in the County of 
Caswell, November 25, 1892. His father, C. H. Vernon, 
married Miss Marv Elizabeth McSherry. His grandsires, 
Robert Vernon, and Philip McSherry, were confederate 
soldiers, who went into the Confederate Army from the State 
of Virginia. The latter grandparent was born in Ireland. 
Young Vernon attended the public schools of Caswell County, 
Before entering service for his country he was engaged in 
farming. 

He was voluntarily inducted into military service on the 
28th of March, 1917, and made a member of the 116th Inf., 
of the 29th Division. After remaining in camp for thirteen 
months, he passed successfully his overseas examination and 
on June 15, 1918, set said from Hoboken on the U. S. S. 
"Finland," and arrived over seas at St, Nazaire, France. 
In July he was placed in an active sector ; in September 
he was sent to Haute Alsace; and later saw active at St. 
Mihiel and in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Luckily he 
was not wounded in any of these engagements, although he 
was slightly gassed while fighting in Alsace. He took an 
active part in several raids into "No Man's Land," and had 
the fiery experience of going over the top in the Meuse Ar- 
gonne three times. His Division, during these offensives, 
took twenty-one hundred prisoners, three hundred Machine 
Guns, and thirty-five pieces of Artillery. He remained in 
France until May 10 of the following year, when he set 
sail from St. Nazaire on the IT. S. S. "Mauretania," and 
landed in Newport News, May 21. He received his discharge 
at Camp Lee, Vrginia, on May 29, 1919. His Army Serial 
Number was 1290217. 



Caswell County in the World War 175 

HAEVEY CURRIE WALKER 

Hakvey Cukeie Walkek was born in Caswell County 
near Higlitower on the 17th day of February, 1893. His 
father, L. A. Walker, was married to Miss Keron Smith, 
both parents being natives of Caswell County. On his pater- 
nal side he was a grandson of Jefferson Walker, a valiant 
soldier of the Confederacy who died in service during the 
Civil War from typhoid fever. 

Harvey Walker's early life was spent on the farm, and at 
the time of his induction into Military service he was engaged 
in farming with signal success near Higiitowers. He was 
called by his Local Board for entrainment and in May, 
1918, was sent to Camp Jackson for training. He was 
transferred from this camp to Camp Sevier, remaining al- 
together at both places six weeks. He was assigned to Com- 
pany M., 321 Regiment of the 81st Division. From Camp 
Sevier he was transferred to Camp Upton. Passing success- 
fully his over-seas examination, he sailed on July 29, 1918, 
on the transport, "The City of Glasgow" from Philadelphia. 
After an ocean voyage of 17 days his ship cast anchor at 
Liverpool, England. He remained with the men of his divi- 
sion for a short time at Winchester and was then sent over to 
France by way of Southampton, landing at LeHavre. His 
company was placed in service on the Alsace-Lorraine Front. 
In this sector he was in the trenches for five weeks. On 
November 11th, Armistice Day, he was engaged in the opera- 
tions around Verdun, and it was there he was very seriously 
and painfully wounded. 

There is a very beautiful story of heroism, which should 
be made a matter of history attending this casualty. A first 
sergeant of his Company, Calloway by name, was stricken 
at ten o'clock, just one hour before the Armistice put an end 
to hostilities, by machine-gun fire, and was bleeding to death. 
Harvey Walker chanced to be near and hastened to the assis- 
tance of this stricken soldier, and while performing this act of 
mercy and of heroism was himself wounded, the fragments of 
the bursting shrapnel striking him on the hand and shoulder. 
He was carried to the first aid Evacuation Hospital No. 117, 
and later moved to Base Hospital No. 14. He remained at this 



176 Caswell County in the World War 

place imtil December 19, 1918. Isext he was sent to the con- 
valescing hospital at St. Agnes and kept there for seven weeks 
On February 12, 1919, he was sent home as a casual, on the 
transport "Orizaba,'' sailing from Bordeaux, and landing 
at Hoboken February 12. He was next sent to Camp Mer- 
ritt, then transferred to Camp Lee, Virginia, and from this 
latter place discharged from military service on March 5. 
1919. 

Since his return to civil life this ex-service man has re- 
sumed his former occupation of farming, and at this writing 
he is actively engaged on his farm near Hightowers. We are 
pleased to record the fact that he has in a great measure 
recovered from the effects of his wounds. 



JULIAN FRANKLIN WALKER 

Julian Franklin Walker was born in Caswell County 
in Stony Creek Town-ship on the 22nd day of February, 
1893. His father, Benjamin F. Walker, and his mother, 
whose maiden name was Miss Cora Piunix, were also born 
in Caswell County. He was a grandson of Dr. Jackson 
Pinnix, who was for many years very prominent in the life 
of Caswell. His grandfather, Capt. Mitchell Walker, was 
a very loyal and devoted confederate soldier, and served 
with much faithfulness for the cause of the South for four 
years, and was with Lee at Appomattox at the time of the 
surrender. 

Young Walker was sent l)y his Local Board to Camp Han- 
cock June 22nd 1918, and was made a member of a Machine 
Gun Company, but afterwards was transferred to the ]\redi- 
cal Corps of the Army. He sailed over-seas from New York 
on Sept. 8th, on a British transport, "The Mercury". On 
arriving at Brest without mishap he was placed in a Casual 
Company, and was in Southern France at the time of the 
signing of the Armistice. After the armistice he visited 
a number of the principal cities of France, including Paris 
nnd Bordeaux. Lie left for America on June 10th, sailing 
on the "Vaterland", and arrived nt Philadephia. He was 



Caswell County in the World War 177 

transferred to Camp Lee for his discharge, which he received 
on July 8th 1919. Army Serial Number 4160389. Before 
entering military service this young soldier was engaged 
for a number of years in farm work, but at the time of his 
induction he was employed by the Reynolds Tobacco Co., 
of Winston-Salem, N. C. ... 

RICHARD CALVIN WALKER 

Richard Calvin Walker was born in Caswell County 
near Anderson, May 13th, 1893. He is the son of Albert 
A. Walker and Mary Simpson Walker. Both of these parents 
were natives of Caswell, and his mother was a daughter of 
James M. Simpson, an old confederate soldier who after 
the civil war, taught in the Public Schools of Caswell. This 
young soldier attended the County Public Schools, after- 
wards graduated at Whitsett Institute in Guilford County ; 
and also finished the required course at King's Business 
College, at Raleigh, N. C. 

He was inducted into the Military service, July 7th, 1018, 
and sent to Camp Greenleaf, Ga., where he was assigned 
to the medical corps of the Army. After four months of 
training, he was sent over-seas from New York on November 
10th, 1918, on the transport, "Mauretania", landing at Liver- 
pool, England. After a few days in an English rest camp, 
he was sent across the English Channel from Southampton, 
landing at LeHavre. Erom this place he was taken with 
other members of the Corps in a box car to Brest, where he 
stayed until December 15th. Erom that place he went to Save- 
noy, after which he was sent out on Detachment Service, Hos- 
pital Train No. 57, and was on duty in this service until 
May 10th. At this date he was taken very ill and was sent 
to a Base Hospital, No. 88, at Savenoy. During his 
stay in Erance in this Detachment Service, he traveled prac- 
tically over the entire country, bringing patients to the ports 
of debarkation as fast as they were able to move. He also 
went to Lemburg, Germany, which is beyond Coblenz, and 
across the Rhine River. This trip was made necessary be- 
cause his corps was removing German patients from St. 
12 



178 Caswell County in the World War 

Pierre, France, to Lemburg. (3n his return from Germany 
lie was given other Detached Service duty until July 1st, at 
which time he was placed in a new organization Company 
Hospital No. 43, and after this Company was discharged, he 
was ordered to proceed to St. iSTazaire. From this place he 
was sent to America, sailing July 10th, and arriving with- 
out mishap at Newport News, Va. He was then sent to 
Camp Stuart, and thence to Camp Lee, where he received 
his discharge on July 29th, 1919. 

Before entering service young Walker was hotel clerk and 
accountant at the Dewey Hotel, Washington, D. C, and 
since his discharge, he has connected himself with a large 
commercial concern, with a handsome salary. His Army 
Serial Number was 2586930. 



GEOEGE THOMAS WAEREN 

Geouge Thomas Warren was born in Caswell County. 
Hightower Townshi}), near Corbett Post Office on the 18th 
day of May, 189G. He was the son of Allen Williamson 
Warren and Junita Malone Warren. Both of his parents 
were natives of Caswell; his mother was a daughter of Mr. 
James Thomas Malone who was for many years one of the 
most useful and prominent citizens of Hightowers To^vllsllip. 
This young soldier received the rudiments of his education 
in the public schools of Caswell after which he was a student 
at Oak Ridge Institute and later a student of Elon College 
in Alamance County. 

In April, 1917 he volunteered for service and was sent 
to Fort Ethan Allen, in Vermont for training. He was 
placed in the 7C)th Field Artillery 3rd Division cf the Kegular 
Army , and sailed for overseas the 31st of June 1918 from 
Hoboken, New Jersey, arriving in France without mishap. 
He was very soon called into action, taking part in the fol- 
lowing battles : Chateau Thierry, Argonne Forest, St. Mihiel, 
and the action around Verdun. In the battles which raged 
during the first days of October he was engaged in carrying 
supplies to the front, and bringing back wounded soldiers. 
In this service he was destined to lose his life. On October 



Caswell County in the World War 179 

4th the g-imners of his Division had succeeded in bringing 
down a German aeroplane, which had been bombing the lines. 
This German machine came to earth near the spot where our 
young Caswell soldier, with two other companions, was 
posted. They rushed up to take the Aviator prisoner, and 
while so doing another German Aeroplane ventured near 
enough to get his machine gun in line striking each of the 
boys with machine gun bullets. George was mortally wound- 
ed. He received first aid treatment almost immediately, and 
was carried to the American Red Cross Hospital where he 
died the following day, Oct. 5th, 1918. His companions 
tell us that he bore the pain without a murmur as he was 
being carried to the hospital, and died with a smile upon his 
face. He was buried with military honors in the French 
Military Cemetery number 64, which is located in the 
Depfirtment of the Meuse 

George Warren — Serial ISTumber 1551498 — Caswell hero 
— is sleeping in the fields where the poppies grow. He made 
the Supreme Sacrifice. Let the children of Caswell keep 
green his memory. A great love was his, and no greater 
love can there be than this, that he lay down his life to 
make lives of other men worth living. 



HENEY LAFAYETTE WARREN 

Henky Lafayette Warken was born in the County of 
Caswell, Hightower Township, on ISTovember 1, 1892. His 
father, J. L. Warren, has been for many years one of most 
prominently men of his section, serving the county very effi- 
ciently as a member of the County Board of Election, mem- 
ber of the County Board of Commissioners, and more recent- 
ly as a member of the Caswell County Highway Commission. 
He married Miss Lessie Walker, who was a native of Cas- 
well '^ounty. Tho gi-andf^tlier of young Warren 3n hi=! 
maternal side was Thomas Jefferson Walker, a valiant old 
Confederate veteran who was severely wounded at the battle 
of Gettysburg and who afterwards died in camp from typhoid 
fever. His paternal grandfather, John Warren, gave four 



ISO Caswell Coukty in the World War 

years of his life for the cause of the South, and received 
his parole at Appomattox. 

Young Warren received the rudiments of his education 
in the public schools of Caswell. He enrolled his name in 
the ranks of the JSTational Army in the registration of June 
5, 1917 and on July 16 of the following year he volunteered 
for service, enlisting at Raleigh, 'N. C. in the United States 
Xaval Reserve Force. He was ordered to report for duty 
at the United States operating liase at Hampton Roads and 
was there placed in Company 47, Unit X. He made rapid 
progress in his work and after completing the required train- 
ing was assigned to the-U. S. S. "Michigan." From this 
place he was sent with his ship to the Great Lakes Xaval 
Training Station, at which station he remained three months, 
and on March 2, 1019, was placed with the men of the U. S- 
Reserve Force on inactive status. 

This ex-seaman since his return to civil life, has been 
associated with his father in large farming operations at 
Hightowers. 

VIRGIL LEROY WARREN 

ViEGiL Letjoy Watjken was born at Prospect Hill in Cas- 
well County October 17th, 1897, being a son of Franklin 
Rudolph Warren, and Ida Sattorfield Warren. The father 
of young Warren has been for many years very prominent 
in the affairs of Caswell, serving the people of his community 
as Postma'^ter at Prospect Hill with great acceptabi]4y, and 
at this writing he is a very useful and efficient member of the 
County Board of Education. The mother of young Warren 
was a daughter of William Tf. Satterdeld, who as a Confed- 
erate Soldier saw service during the war between thp States. 
The grandfather of young Warren on his father's side also 
did his part in that great struggle. 

At the time of the registration of Sept. 12th, 1918, young 
Warren was a student at the University of North Carolina. 
Immediately upon his registration, he enlisted in the students 
Army Training Corps, and was being prepared for Armv 
service when the signing of the Armistice put an end to mili- 



Caswell County in the World War 181 

tary operations. He was discharged at Chapel Hill, Decem- 
ber 9th, 1918. His Army Serial Number was 4467483. 



WILLIAM FRANKLIN WARREN 

William Fkanklin Waeren is the eldest sou of Frank 
R. Warren, of Prospect Hill in this county. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Miss Eudora Satterfield, is also a 
native of Caswell. The grandfather of young W^arren on 
his mother's side was W. D. Satterfield, who was in the Con- 
federate service during the Civil War. After completing 
the public school course in Caswell he went to Cedar Crove 
Academy, where, under the direction of Miss Annie L. 
Hughes, he received his high school instructiou. From this 
place he next entered Elon College, and received in 1910 the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. The following year he was in 
attendance at the University of North Carolina, and received 
in June, 1911, the degree of Master of Arts. After his gradu- 
ation from the State University, he also attended the 
Summer School at Columbia University, New York, in 1919. 
This son of Caswell has taken a high rank as an educator, 
from 1911 to 1913 he was Principal of the Reidsville High 
School ; from 1913 to 1916 he was Principal of the Greens- 
boro City High School; in 1916 he was Principal of the 
McMaster School, of Columbia S. C, and 1917 and 1918 
he was Principal of both Richland Night School and Colum- 
bia Summer School. 

On July 1st, 1918, he was inducted into Military ser- 
vice and sent to the Radio School, at College Park, Md., 
later, to Camp Alfred Vail, N. J. He was placed in the Train- 
ing Battalion of the Signal Corps of the Army, and was 
being prepared for over-seas service when news came of the 
signing of the Armistice. He was discharged from Vail, N. 
J. His Army Serial Number was 2544845. Since his dis- 
charge from service Mr. Warren has taken up his work as 
an educator, and is now Professor in the City Schools of 
South Carolina, at Columbia. 



182 Caswell County in the World War 

DEE GEE WATKINS 

Dee Gee Watkins was born April 26, 1896, at Blanch, 
X. C, in Dan Eiver Township. His father, D. G. Watkins, 
married Miss Lydia Ann Powell, both parents being native 
Caswell County people. After finishing at the public schools 
of Caswell he was a student for one year at the Milton High 
School, and later for three years at Mars Hill College, and 
was there at the time of the registration of 1917. 

He was voluntarily inducted into military service, and 
on September 5, 1917, with Lawrence Lea Powell, Walters 
Allen, James Pinchback, and Algernon Neal, was sent to 
Camp Jackson. He was made Sergeant in Company G 
321st Infantry of the 81st Division. He was held at Camp 
Jackson for eleven months, passing his over-seas examination, 
and was sent aboard for foreign service, July 1st, 1918, 
sailing from Hoboken, N. J., on a British transport, "The 
Scandinanvia." Arriving at Liverpool, he was sent to Cher- 
bourg, France, by way of Plymouth. He did service for 
five weeks in St. Die Sector, and was under heavy Artillery 
fire during the battles which raged in the Vosges Mountains. 
At the time of the signing of the Armistice he was in the 
front line in the Mouse- Argonne, near Verdun. Young Wat- 
kins luckily escaped without being wounded or gassed. As 
the movements of all the Caswell boys while in France will 
ever be matters of great interest, it is proper that we record 
the fact that young Watkins was given sufficient leaves of 
absence to enable him to visit many of the principal cities 
of France, one of them being Paris. He sailed for the good 
old U. S. A, from St. jSTazaire, arriving safely at Newport 
Xews, Va., and was sent to Camp Stuart, and from this camp 
to Camp Lee, where he was discharged on June 28, 1919. 



HOWARD EARLY WILLIAMS 

Howard Early Williams was born at Pelham, ]^. C, 
May 17, 1896. His father, John Lindsey Williams, who 
was born in the county of Rockham, married Miss Sallie 
Virginia Mitchell. His grandfather on his paternal side 



Caswell County in the World War 183 

was a Captain in the Confederate Army. Young Williams 
completed the State High School Course at Ruffin N. C, 
and at the time of his induction into military service, he was 
engaged in farming. 

On the 4th of August, 1918, he was sent to Camp Wads- 
worth for training. Here he was placed in the pioneer In- 
fantry, and after three weeks service in same, he was trans- 
ferred to a Motor Supply Train, called the 4th Artillery 
Park. His Company was a mobile one, and, for that reaspn, 
he served in several different divisions, not in any one divi- 
sion for a very long period. After remaining in camp only 
twenty-four days, he was placed for over-seas service and 
sailed from Ho'boken on 3rd of September 1918, on a trans- 
port, "The City of Marseilles," landing on September IG 
at Liverpool. Next he was tugged up the Manchester Canal 
to Manchester where a train was boarded, and he was carried 
to Southampton. He sailed from Southampton across the 
English Channel and landed at LeHavre. 

Almost immediately upon his arrival in the sphere of 
hostilities he was put into active service in the Mo- 
selle Drive, and was under shell fire for seventeen days. 
While he received no wounds during this period, he suffered 
from one infliction of gas. The Armistice putting an end 
to hostilities, this young soldier was given a number of leaves 
of absence, which enabled him to visit many of the most 
interesting places in France, and gave him further oppor- 
tunity of sight-seeing in a number of the most beautiful 
cities of our sister Republic. On June 20 he left France, 
sailing from St. Nazaire, on the IT. S. S. "Santa Paula, '^ 
and after an uneventful voyage, he landed at "Hoboken," 
on June 30th. 1919. He was sent to Camp Lee, where, 
on Julv 13, he was discharged from service. His Army 
Serial Number was 3349399. 



GEORGE MARION WRIGHT 

George Mariox Weight, whose Army Serial Number 
was 3349381, was bom in the County of Caswell February 
21st, 1896. His father, James Wright, was a son of Wash- 



184 Caswell County in the Woeld War 

ingtoii Wright who was killed in action at Fredericksburg 
during the Civil War. His mother, whose maiden name 
was Miss Betty Simpson, was a daughter of Squire James 
M. Siuipson, who also was in the Confederate service and 
was wounded at Gettysburg. 

Young Wright was sent bj his Local Board from Yancey- 
ville on August 3rd, 1918, to Camp Wadsworth, Ga., for 
training. His stay at camp was a very short one, as he was 
ordered to take his over-seas examination, and, on Sept. 13th 
of the same year, he sailed from Newport ISTews on a French 
Transport, "The St. Agnes", and landed on October 6th at 
St. Xazaire. He was used as a replacement man for the 83rd 
Division, and for a while did guard duty over German 
prisoners at a French camp two miles from St. Nazaire. 
While he was in this same service news came of the signing 
of the Armistice. After this time, until his sailing for 
America on May 23rd, he was engaged in the work assigned 
to his Division, but came home on a British transport, "The 
Madawaska," which ship brought him safely to New York. 
He was ordered to Camp Mills, and thence to Camp jMac- 
clesfield, where he was discharged on the 13th of June 1919. 
Before entering service young Wright was a very successful 
farmer, and, at this writins:, he has resumed the same work. 



CLEM COVINGTON YARBKOUGH 

Cle?.! Covington Yaebeough was born at Locust Hill in 
Caswell County on September 29, 1892. His father, Charles 
J. Yarbrough, who was for many years very prominent in 
the social and political life of Caswell, married Miss Jessie 
Bradsher of Person County. After finishing the usual jnib- 
lic school course he became a student at A and M College 
of North Carolina, located in West Raleigh, completing the 
course in Engineering. He became a mechanic and identi- 
fied himself with a large plant in one of the western states. 

On June 1918 he was inducted into Military Service 
and sent to Camp Cody, New Mexico. He was transferred 
from this place to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and, later, Septem- 



Caswell County in the World War 185 

ber 13th, 19 18, he was transferred to Camp Upton, New York, 
where he was placed in the Field Artillery, Battery C 126 
Regiment 3-i Division. Having been made ready for over- 
seas duty, he sailed from Hoboken on the U. S. S. "Kashmir" 
September 23, 1918, and after a voyage of 14 days landed 
at Glasgow, Scotland. From this place he was sent to Camp 
Windle Downs, near Winchester, England. He was sent 
across the Channel by the usual course and landed at Le- 
Havre. He was next sent with the men of his division to 
La Marque, France, and thence to Camp De Souge and was 
at this place when the Armistice put an end to hostilities. 
He remained in France until December 24, 1918, and on 
that date he set sail from Bordeaux on the U. S. S. 
"Pocahontas," and landed at Newport News, Virginia. From 
this place he was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa, where on Janu- 
ary 21, 1919, he received his discharge from military service. 
His Army Serial number was 1429065. 



OSCAR L. YATES 

Oscar L. Y^ates was born in Pelham township of this 
County near Gatewood on the 25th day of December, 1888, 
His father, J. M. Yates, was born in Mecklenburg County, 
Virginia, but made his home in Caswell a number of years 
ago, and has ranked high among our mpst prominent and 
useful citizens. The mother of this young soldier, whose 
maiden name was Lou Gatewood, is a native born Caswell 
woman. As a boy this soldier attended the public schools of 
the county, and made a splendid record as a student. 

He received his induction into military service on the 29th 
of May, 1918., and was sent to Camp Jackson, South Carol- 
ina, for training. There he was assigTied to the Infantry 
and placed in Company G. 321st Regiment of the 81st Divi- 
sion. His stay at Camp Jackson was indeed a short one, 
for, after only two months of training, he was made ready 
for over-seas, sailing from Hoboken on an English transport. 
July 29, 1918. After a safe voyage through the submarine 
zone he landed at Liverpool. From this place he was sent 



186 Caswell County in the World War 

across the Channel to France by the usual route. Imme- 
diately upon his arrival on the Continent he was placed in 
active service in the St. Die Sector and the Meuse-Ar- 
gonne offensive. Fortunately he escaped being wounded or 
gassed. The signing of the Armistice found him with his 
Division in the Argonne Forest. He remained in France 
until the lltli off July 1919, doing the regular assigned 
duties of the men of his Division. On the date mentioned 
above, he sailed from Brest on the U. S. S "Plattsburg", and 
landed at Hoboken, New Jersey. From this port of debarka- 
tion, he was sent to Camp Dix, and there on the 27th day 
of July 1919 he was discharged from service. The army 
serial number of this ex-sei*vice man was 2991944. Before 
entering service he was engaged in mercantile pursuits, since 
his return to civil life he has resumed the same. 



MARION TABB ZIMMERMAN 

This young soldier, who was born in Caswell County, Nov- 
ember 5th, 1893, was a son of George W. Zimmerman, who 
married Miss Mary Gillispie. The subject of this sketch 
was a lineal descendant of a Confederate soldier. His grand- 
father, William O. Gillispie, was a Veteran of the Mexican 
War, and his great grandfather, Zimmerman, fought in the 
war of the Revolution. His grandfather, Henry Zimmerman, 
went to the Civil War from Davidson County, and his grand- 
father, Gillispie, from Caswell ; and both of them saw active 
service during that entire struggle. He completed the work of 
the seven grades in the Public Schools of Caswell, after which 
he entered school at Chatham, Va. 

On December 20th, 1918, he was called by the Local Board 
for induction, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C, for training. 
He remained at this place three months, and then was placed 
in Company H, 128th Regiment of the 32nd Division, and 
sent over-seas on April 1st, 1918, sailing from New 
York on the U. S. Transport, "America," landing at Brest. 
Almost immediately after his arrival there, he was sent to 
the Alsace-Lorraine Sector, and fought at Chateau-Thierry, 



Caswell County in the World War 187 

Soissons, through the Argonne Forest and in the battle which 
raged about the Meuse Kiver. In the Chateau Thierry Sali- 
ent he suffered a very serious gas attack, and was in hospital 
for two weeks, being carefully attended by an American Red 
Cross Nurse. After the signing of the Armistice his Divi- 
sion was made a part of the Army of Occupation, and he was 
stationed at Dierdorf, Germany. 

Soldier Zimmerman had this bit of pleasant experience; 
on his homeward bound voyage, as he came back from Brest, 
on the U. S. S., ''George Washington," he was a fellow-voy- 
ager with Secretary of War, Newton D. Baker. He landed 
at New York, was sent to Camp Mills, and from there to 
Camp Lee, at which place he was discharged May 16th, 1919. 
At this writing, young Zimmerman has entered upon his 
previous occupation of farming. 



OSCAE WILSON LEATH 

Private 1st class— Battery B, 317th Field Artillery, 81st 
Division. Born at Stoney Creek, Caswell County, N. C, 
November 3rd 1891. His parents were William Mack Leath, 
and Annie S. Leath. His grandfathers were, on his father's 
side, John F. Leath — Confederate soldier, and on his moth- 
er's side, Elder James A. Burch, Captain in the Confederate 
x\rmy. On his father's side, his grandmother was Cornelia 
Anne McNutt, and on his mother's side, Margaret Jones. 

He was educated in the public schools of Caswell County 
and graduated at Gilliam's Academy of Alamance County. 
He also studied at Shenandoah Collegiate Institute, Va., and 
at the time of his enlistment was holding a position with the 
American Tobacco Co., at Reidsville, N. C, from which place 
he entered the service of the United States Army. 

He entered service May 29, 1918, was trained at Camp 
Jackson, S. C, and Camp Mills, Long Island, N. Y., and 
sailed from Hoboken, N. J., August 8, 1918, aboard the 
Metagama. He landed in Liverpool, England, August 19, 
1918, and in France about August 23, 1918. Completed 



18& Caswell County in the World War 

f raining in the Artillery camp at \^ildalion, France, and en- 
trained for the front line on November 11, 1918. When the 
Armistice was signed Battery B, 317th F. A., of which he 
was a member, took up winter quarters at Courteron, on the 
Seine river, at which place he remained until placed in Casual 
Co. No. 4497 at St. Aignan, May 5th, 1919. 

He sailed from St. ISTazaire, May 18th aboard the ''Anti- 
gone'' and landed at Newport News, Va., May 29th 1919, 
and was honorably discharged from the service at Camp Lee, 
Va., June 3, 1919. 



APPENDIX 

111 the center of the Public Square, in the village of 
Yaiicewille, there stands a very imposing monument erect; d 
bv the Caswell County Chapter of the United Daugiiters of 
the Confederacy. For a number of years this chapter 
worked with much patience and diligence to obtain the neces- 
sary funds. The women of this Chapter secured the co- 
operation of the County Board of Commissioners, namely, 
C. H. King, T. H. Hatchett and J. M. Williams ; this Board 
making a donation of one thousand dollars. After this do- 
nation, a county-wide campaign was put on and the required 
funds were raised. Following will be found the appeal and 
the progTam of the unveiling exercises, together with the 
addresses of Mesdames W. O. Spencer, and Geo. A. Anderson, 
and Mr. T. H. Hatchett. At the time of the unveiling Mrs. 
T. J. Florance was President of the Caswell County Chapter. 

ATTENTION 

To the Citizens of Caswell County: 

From 1861 to 1865 Caswell County was called upon to 
send her sons to battle for a just and honorable cause. Those 
men, feeling it was a privilege as well as a duty to uphold 
with their manhood PRINCIPLES which were RIGHT, 
protected with their lives our beloved Southland from the 
invading armies which were seeking to destroy our homes. 

Many of those soldiers w^ho fought so bravely and so well 
were not permitted to return to their homes and mingle again 
with those they loved. They were not permitted to help re- 
build this fair land of ours which had been devastated by 
the enemy's shot and shell. 

A number of those brave men were permitted to return 
and with the same righteous determination and patriotism 
rebuilt a war-torn land. Many of them have since crossed 
over the River, and are now mingling with their comrades 
who gave their lives on the field of battle. There is in our 



190 Caswell County in the World War 

midst a scattered remnant of the Boys Who Wore the Gray. 
It will not be long before this remnant shall have passed 
away. 

It has been fifty-four years since the close of the war be- 
tween the States. The sons and daughters of our Confed- 
erate soldiers and the people wdio live in Caswell have done 
nothing that in the years to come will show our appreciation 
of the lives sacrificed for our State and County. 

The Caswell County Chapter of the United Daughters of 
the Confederacy fully realize that the day is not far distant 
when those who wore the Gray will be with us no more. 
While opportunity is present, while a few of the old soldiers 
are still living, our Chapter with its Committee is making 
a most earnest appeal to the people of Caswell to contribute 
as much as they can in order to erect a MOj^TJMENT on the 
Public Square at Yanceyville. This Monument will com- 
memorate in a small way the deeds wrought by our ancestors, 
and will show our appreciation of their bravery and patriot- 
ism. 

In order to see how much our people appreciate what these 
Confederate Veterans have done, the United Daughters of 
the Confederacy of Caswell County have set apart the week 
beginning October 27th, 1919, to give the people an op- 
portunity of showing their appreciation by their contribu- 
tions to this most worthy cause. Before you decide fully as 
to the amount of your contribution, we beg you to think of 
the advantages which have been yours, but which were de- 
nied these men whom we now seek to honor. 

We beg you to bestir yourselves. Make a liberal con- 
tribution. SeeV'Our neighbors and friends and insist that 
they do likewise. This is a County Drive. We want the 
names of every citizen of the County enlisted in this cause. 
A record will be kept of those who helj). Committees ap- 
pointed by the United Daughters of the Confederacy will try 
to see every one of you. But in the event that our Tov/n- 
ship Committee does not see you, do not hesitate a moment, 
but send in your contribution and the contribution of any 



Caswell County in the World War 191 

others that have not been seen, to your Township Chair- 
man, or to the Campaign Committee, Yanceyville, IST. C. 

On the night of ISTovember the first, at the close of this 
Drive, let it be said that the people of Caswell have responded 
— and responded nobly to this Cause. 

Mks. B. S. Graves^ 
Mes. T. J. Floeance, 
Mes. G. a. Andeeson^ 
Campaign Committee. 



PROGRAM 

of the 

UNVEILING OF THE CONFEDERATE MONUMENT 

AT THE U. D. C. ANNUAL PICNIC FOR THE 

CONFEDERATE VETERANS OF 

CASWELL COUNTY 

YANCEYVILLE, N. C. 

Saturday, September 10, 1921 

Song— "America" -......._ The Audience 

Prayer Rev. N. R. Claytor 

Report by Chairman of the Monument Committee. 

Unveiling of Monument Miss Elizabeth Graves 

Presentation of Monument for the Caswell County 

Chapter, U. D. C. - - - - Mrs. G. A. Anderson 

Acceptance of Monument on behalf of the County 

- Mr. T. H. Hatchett 

Expression of Appreciation on behalf of the Con- 
federate Veterans of Caswell County - Dr. J. A. Pinnix 

Decoration of Monument. 

Benediction Rev. N. R. Claytor 

EXERCISES CONTINUED IN THE COURTHOUSE 

Song— "The Old North State" The Audience 

Address of Welcome Mrs. E. A. Allison 

Response ------... mjI. T. S. Harrison 

Duet— "Dreaming of Home and Mother,, Miss H'S.tchett, Mrs. Moser 
Address - - - -..._. Mr. G. A. Anderson 

Introduction of State 1 resident U. D. C. - Mrs. F. G. Harrelson 
Addrcrs and Greetings from N. C. Division U. D. C, 

Mrs. '1. W. Wilson, State President 
Solo— "Old Folks at Home" 

"De or Ark's a-Mbverin' " - - - Miss Elizabeth Graves 

Introduction of Speaker Mr. T. J. Henderson 

Address Mrs. W. O. Spencer 

Song— "Dixie" - - The Audience 

DINNER ANNOUNCEMENT 



102 Caswell County in the World War 

ADDRESS AT UNVEILING OF CONFEDERATE 
MONUMENT 

Daughters of the Confederacy, Veterans of CasAvell County, 
and Friends : 

I indeed esteem it a very great privilege that through the 
gracious courtesy and kind consideration of the Caswell Coun- 
ty Daughters of the Confederacy it is my pleasure to partici- 
pate with you in the exercises upon this most auspicious 
occasion. 

'Tis indeed a privilege to he here, and while I had expected 
to have had the pleasure of bringing you merely a few words of 
cordial greetings from my home chapter, the Jas. B. Gordon 
chapter, of Winston-Salem and also of bidding you God's 
speed in your every undertaking in the name of your great 
sister organization, the National Society Daughters of the 
American Revolution, Avhich I have the honor of representing as 
chief executive in the state of North Carolina, I must admit I 
did feel rather appalled Avhen a few days ago — and a very few 
days it was, the President of your local chapter requested 
me to fill the place on the program assigned to His Excellency, 
the Governor of our state, who was unable to be present. 
(Please remember that I have said: The place on the program 
assigned to the Governor, for believe me, I would under no 
circumstances attempt to fill his place; I certainly could not, 
in such a limited time. 

I am thinking today, as I glance over this splendid audience, 
of the many gatherings that have taken place in this historic 
spot ; of the great men who, in the days gone by, have faced 
this rostrum with various reasons for their gathering together; 
and I am convinced that never before in the history of Caswell 
has such a body of men and women gathered here for such a 
purpose as this that has brought you together today. 

I am thinking also, as I look into your faces, of the won- 
derful history that this county has made, and the part she 
has played in the making of a great commonivealfh, the com- 
monwealth of l^orth Carolina, a history equalled by few 
counties, and certainly excelled by none, Caswell County, 
you will recall, was the home of a great treasurer of our state, 
of whom it has been said, he laid the foundation of the state's 
financial system, and established a credit for her, which has 
never ceased to exist, — the Hon. Romulus B. Saunders. 

And again, it was Avithin the brain of Caswell's incom- 
parable Bartlett Yancey, abetted by his life-long friend Judge 
Archibald D. Murphy, that the first idea of the great public 
school system for our state Avas conceived. 



Caswell County in the World War 193 

'Twas because of the undaunted honor and loyalty to his 
state that that splendid statesman and Christian gentleman, the 
Hon. Calvin Graves, braved his own political death and cast 
the deciding vote in the legislature against the policy of his 
party, and established the North Carolina railroad, thus insur- 
ing by his own political death prosperity and wealth for his be- 
loved state. Down the years to the honor of Caswell it is known 
that she probably has furnished more law-makers who built the 
constructive laws for North Carolina, and thereby laid the 
foundation for her future prosperity, than any other county in 
the state. Truly this county has ever furnished her full quota 
of men of intellectual worth and ability — even down to the 
present day, in the making of this state; and indeed no less 
splendid have been her women. 

Today, it is fitting, that you should feel a peculiar pride in 
the achievements of this, jour native heath. 

Personally — if you will pardon a personal allusion, the 
splendid part that Caswell has played in making North Caro- 
lina what she is today, is a source of unlimited pride and 
pleasure to me, for when I recall that I am indebted to the 
four brothers and sisters of one Caswell family for every one 
of my great grand parents, I feel indeed and in truth that 
I may be pardoned for my love and pride in this, my native 
county, even after twenty years of absence. 

But not only has Caswell done her part in a political way, 
in establishing the great policies of our state, but she has never 
failed, when the necessity arose, to send her full quota of 
men to fight to establish these great principles, and to uphold 
these policies beyond question. 

Even before the county limits were established she sent 
her quota of men to do her part in the establishment of inde- 
pendence in the Revolutionary war, while her records of the 
war of 1812, and those of the Mexican war, show that she 
failed not then. 

And when finally the great living, throbbing issues, brought 
into being by the war between the states, confronted her, no 
county in the state responded mora readily, and none made a 
better record. As to the great issues at stake, whether polit- 
ical, sectional, or incited by prejudice and ignorance, every 
Confederate soldier summed up the many-sided question into 
one great principle — that of right against wrong, and with 
an intense feeling that whatever the issue, their beloved 
homeland was being invaded and desecrated — they marched 
forth determined to defend their principles and rights — even 
unto death ! 

13 



194 Caswell County ijv the Woeld War 

With every odd against them, even the government which 
their forefathers had fought to establish, they knew only that 
an armed foe menaced their homes and loved ones, and with 
an indomitable courage excelled by none, and probably never 
equalled by any men on earth, they went forth to battle. 

Confedeiate Veterans, so long as history shall be written, 
all glory shall be yours, and if it were possible to express to 
you our sentiment in any way, we would have you know that 
we realize that you have done your duty and done it Avell, 
you who were Caswell County soldiers, soldiers of North Caro- 
lina, and therefore first at Bethel and last at Appomattox. 

It must ever be a splendid memory to you that the great 
heritage of bravery and unselfish devotion to country which 
emanated from you, of bravery and unselfish devotion to 
country and to the right, was a potent factor in the splendid 
and heroic response to the call to arms which came to your 
sons and grandsons, during the recent world's Avar struggle. 

'Twas your unflinching courage at Gettysburg and Freder- 
icksburg that enabled the American Marines at the Marne to 
render to civilization as far reaching and splendid a service to 
humanity as was ever rendered by the Athenians at Marathon 
or the Spartans at Thermopylae. 

We recall today that the ''unspeakable Hun" calmly declared 
that since the Americans had no personal issues at stake thej 
would never fight ; but you Caswell boys who are veterans of the 
world's war, are remembering today your part in the establish- 
ment of a pennanent civilization for all nations, you are 
thinking of the Battle of the Argonne, of the heroism of your 
hospital corps, of the long nights when you were hunted by 
the Huns, on land and sea, in the air, and under the water. 

These things are history today, to us, but to you boys, Avho 
so recently stood the storm, they are still stern realities. 

Recently I questioned a young man who underwent the 
storm and horror of a peculiarly dangerous position, if he, 
did not sometimes think as he looked back upon it all that it 
was some great terrible nightmare from which he had awak- 
ened. His answer came quick and fast, "My God, mother, 
No, it was all a stern reality, and no dream from which I 
feel now that I could ever awaken." 

And yet Confederate Veterans, I feel that time will soften 
the horrors, as it has done for you, and that like you, when 
realities have become memories, he and his comrades will be 
able to look backward and be comforted with the thought that 
however stern the realities, they like you, have found compen- 
sation in the great fact of duty well done. 



Caswell County in the "World War 195 

Strewn over the battlefields of Virginia and throughont the 
Southland, you left your beloved comrades and friends, thank- 
ful at least that their bones would bleach in Southern soil, 
while you who have more recently fought the good fight, with 
all the valor of youth and adventure, came back home shad- 
owed with the sorrow that beyond the deep blue seas thousands 
of your companions were left in foreign soil. Of the eight 
thousand boys who went with you from North Carolina, two 
thousand came not again, and today they await, with the many 
thousands Avho wore the gray, the last great call. 

They who sleep "In Flanders Fields where poppies blow," 
call across the seas today with a clarion voice to you who 
wore the gray. 

I would have you feel today, you who are of a younger 
generation, with pride, that no county in J^orth Carolina has 
had a greater history than that of your own — a history of 
which each one of you, with possibly a few exceptions, may 
truly say, this is the history of my own people. And believe 
me, I realize that you should take great pride in this fact. 
But today I would impress upon you, that while I am indeed 
greatly interested in the past history of this country and state, 
I declare to you that I am much more interested in the future 
of this my native county, and beloved state. 

Those who have lived before you have done well, and it 
remains for you to live worthy of such efforts. You must 
realize today that the future of your country and state rests 
with you ; for whatever her past achievements they will pass 
into oblivion, unless you absolutely realize that it is your duty 
to press forward and not only make your state one of the 
greatest in the union of states, but the very greatest, for — and it 
is with sorrow I say it, with all your past achievements, for 
some reasons, in some ways you have fallen short. Of what 
possible good to you could be the conception of the great public 
school system, by one of Caswell's greatest men, if you cease to 
perfect and to bring into fruition his scheme of an education 
for every child by the great Fatherhood of states. Do you know 
today young men and women, that illiteracy, ignorance, is one 
great national disgrace and menace? 

North Carolina has progressed in the past few years 'tis 
true, m.oving up from a place next to the bottom in the scale 
of illiteracy to the fifteenth place, but why not have her at 
the head? This is your duty to perform; a child without an 
education in the world today, is an utterly helpless and hope- 
less unit for good to our nation, and somebody has failed in 
the sight of God and of man to perform their duty when such 



196 Caswell County in the World "War 

a child is found. A child's education begins far back of the 
child itself, for the great stalking phantom of ignorance must 
be throttled before the child is born, or else the necessity for 
educating the child cannot be conceived. Do you realize that 
practically all crime is due to ignorance, and that in this 
enlightened country of ours annually $600,000,000 is expended 
to take care of criminals, a sum equal to half of the South's 
cotton crop? Suppose you could turn that immense sum into 
the splendid welfare work of our country what could it not 
lead to? 

Young people of Caswell County, this is your burden. Rest 
not night or day until you know that the schools in your 
county excel the schools elsewhere in your state. Cooperate 
with your school authorities, actively work with them, let 
Parent-Teacher Associations or Civic clubs of some kind look 
after the schools, even finding nourishing food, comfortable 
clothes and books for the ones unable to help themselves. 
Have no teachers who are not the best teachers, make it your 
business to see that Caswell County has the very best system 
of schools, and then see that every child in Caswell County 
has access to these schools. 

This, you must understand is the foundation absolutely of 
the future prosperity of Caswell, and if you who hear me today 
fail to do your duty, then you have failed indeed. 

It seems almost possible that the unprecedented sacrifice 
made for his state by Calvin Graves has through the years 
been forgotten by his native county, for it has not incited you 
to the necessity of railroad facilities and sadder yet, it has not 
until within the past two years caused you to see the absolute 
necessity of good roads. 

HoAv the spirit of Caswell's own statesman nuist rejoice that 
the awakening is begun, and that the great good concomitant 
with the building of good roads will lead on unto all future 
possibilities. 

T shall not feel that I have spoken to you in vain today, if 
I am able to arouse and incite you to greater love for your 
county, your state and your country. 

Have you looked after your helpness blind, and crippled 
children? Your state has recently made possible the opening 
of the splendid Orthopaedic Hospital, where they can be cared 
for, and where thousands of helpless and hopeless little children 
will receive the care that will make of them good citizens. I 
wonder if you know that today, there are tvrenty-five hundred 
children in North Carolina crippled as to their feet, and that 



Caswell County in the World War 197 

an operation lasting twenty minutes with a month's rest and 
care, will make healthy men and women of these unfortunate 
little ones? 

I implore you, that yon preserve the children of your county. 
The great constitution of these United States of America rests 
on one fundamental principle, that every child on American 
soil shall be horn into a heritage of "life, liberty, and the 
pursuit of happiness?" You are violating the greatest princi- 
ples incorporated in your Constitution when you fail to give 
every child of Caswell County a chance to enjoy this heritage. 

Your young people are your assets for future greatness, and 
upon their health, training and education depends absolutely 
the welfare of your homes and states. We are proud of the 
fact that North Carolina has the finest and purest strain of 
Anglo-Saxon blood in the veins of her people on the American 
continent. We here in North Carolina do not have to be taught 
Americanization, thank God, for we are Americans. Today, I 
implore you to remember that in the sight of Almighty God 
you are responsible for the future. Follow the precepts taught 
by the Confederate soldiers here today, these soldiers who are 
living examples of duty well done. 

Love the past history of your state, profit by the lessons 
taught, but live in the present, making each hour of the day 
a step in the construction of a great and glorious future when 
the policies and principles of our state and nation shall be 
shaped by American citizens. 

We, and especially we of the southland are tired of hybrids, 
tired of unprincipled and prejudiced politicians, who Avant to 
be represented at home or abroad by a Sims or a Harvey. (Mrs. 
Spencer here paid her respects to these two gentlemen, in no 
mincing words.) 

Young people of Caswell, I am only voicing to you today the 
sentiment of these Confederate veterans before you, these men 
who faced an eternity of horrors for your sake in the past ; 
who have reconstructed a present that you may live on, these 
men Avho have dipped into the future as far as human e^y-es 
can see, and who desire that when they shall lay aside the 
burden of life they may rest secure in the knowledge that that 
for which they risked all and gave all, shall not fail. And it 
is to the honor and glory of the veterans of Caswell County 
that the exercises of this day are dedicated. 

No greater example of patriotism, no truer knights of chiv- 
alry, no more devoted lovers of the great spirit of democracy, 
that democracy for which our country stands pre-eminently the 
greatest exponent among the nations of the earth, today, no 
finer specimens of God's own noblemen have ever lived among 



198 Caswell County in the World War 

men tliaii these heroes whose memory and deeds of devotion 
we have gathered to commemorate in the unveiling of this splen- 
did memorial. 

This is Caswell County's greatest day, for today the Daugh- 
ters of the Confederacy of Caswell County present to you a 
priceless memorial that time cannot affect nor the years obliter- 
ate, a tribute devotedly paid both to those heroes who have 
passed into the great beyond, and who today rest, with their 
beloved leaders Lee and Jackson, under the shade of the trees 
in God's summerland and also to those remaining few, who 
have lived to see the great principles, which they advocated, 
absolutely justified. Confederate soldiers living, we your daugh- 
ters salute you upon this day, which is yours, and we dedicate 
to you this memorial, happy that it is yours to see and know 
that above all others we delight to serve and honor you. Con- 
federate soldiers, gone before, be this our tribute of love for you, 
and our abiding assurance to you, that we have not forgotten. 

Confederate Veterans of Caswell County, this memorial, 
which stands today in all its beauty before you, is a living 
pledge to you that so long as shall live one Daughter of Con- 
federacy on American soil, it shall ever be our peculiar care and 
pleasure to uphold your achievements, firm in the belief that 
your destiny rests secure in God's hands. 

''I know not where God's islands lift 

Their fronded palms in air, 
I only know, you cannot drift 

Beyond His love and care." 

Daughters of the Confederacy and women of Caswell County, 
you have done well. With the same fine spirit of loyalty and 
devotion that prompted your forefathers, you have wrought a 
good work. Strive on in the splendid work which you have 
begun, the care and comfort of every Confederate soldier is 
yours, and southern women such as you are have never failed. 

You did your duty when the war-dogs howled, you have never 
failed in any obligation of life, and today, I implore you, you 
liave been precipitated into the great reconstruction of a new 
era of life, an era that has taken all time to bring into being. 
Let me beseech you today, to press on to higher service. 

Your days are full, I know, and time is short, but remember 
that: 

" 'Tis a mistake times flies. 

It only hovers on the wing, 
Once born, a moment dieth not, 

'Tis an immortal thing." ; 



Caswell County in the World Wae 199 

Today again, I would spur you on to the greatest service, 
for the world is your work-shop and Heaven your reward, and 
you are secure in the knowledge of the peculiar place that is 
yours, in the building up of a united, uplifted womanhood, that 
superstructure which under the Divine guidance of the Master 
Architect the women of America are building today, to the glory 
of God; that structure which through all the years to cpme 
shall stand for all that is good, and all that is pure Anierican 
ideals until this country of ours shall be measured in height by 
high thoughts, in depth by noble aspirations, in breadth by 
world-wide sympathies and in length not by years but by deeds 
of eternal righteousness. 

MARY KERR SPENCER. 
September 10, 1921. 

ADDRESS OF MRS. GEORGE A. ANDERSON 

Presentation address of Mrs. Geo. A. Anderson, delivered at 
the unveiling of the Confederate monument — Yanceyville, N. C, 
September 10, 1921. 
Confederate Soldiers, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

''A king once said of a prince struck down, 

'Taller he seems in death.' 
That speech holds true for now as then 
'Tis after death, we measure men; 
And as the mists of the past are rolled away 
Our heroes who died in the tattered gray. 
Grow taller and greater in all of their parts 
Till they fill our minds as they fill our hearts ; 
Yes they grow taller as the years grow by 
And the world learns how they could do and die." 

The Caswell County Chapter of the United Daughters of the 
Confederacy has conferred upon me the honor of presenting 
this monument which stands upon this historic square to the 
Confederate soldiers of Caswell County I am indeed sensible and 
appreciative of this honor. 

For years the Daughters of the Confederacy have labored with 
woman's patience and with woman's loyalty to honor our soldiers 
by the erection of this monument. 

On this glad day of our rejoicing we would not forget to 
thank our patriotic County Commissioners and all other friends 
who responded to our appeals, and made possible the realization 
of our dreams and the completion of our labor of love. 

Here stands the memorial — see upon its pedestal the bronze 
figure of a Confederate soldier, whose steady gaze is ever towards 



200 Caswell County in the World Wak 

the North. This is a beautiful allusiou to the fact, that in the 
dark days from 1861 to 1865, days of shot and shell, days when 
the souls of men were tried, facing the enemy, he pressed brave- 
ly on heedless of danger and fearless of death. 

As he stands here, a silent sentinel of the ages, generations yet 
to come will gather about its base, and tell to its children the 
story of the men who charged with Jackson and who fought 
and died with Lee, tell them of their enduring fortitude and 
patriotic valor and tell them that when the Confederacy stag- 
gered to its fall at Appomattox that it fell with its face to the 
enemy, thank God. 

We present this monument in loving memory of those who 
have answered the last roll call and here crossed over the Eiver 
to rest under the shade of the trees. 

We care not whence they came. 

Dear is their lifeless clay, 
Whether known or unknown to fame. 

Their Country's cause is still the same. 
They died — and wore the gray. 

To those brave spirits we would say, 
''Soldier rest, thy warfare o'er. 

Dream of battle fields no more." 

With a heart full of love we present it in honor of the scat- 
tered remnant which remains. 

To you dear old soldiers, comrades of our fathers, let us 
say we thank God He has in mercy and in love lengthened 
your lives to see this good day. We love and honor you for 
your devotion to one of the holiest of causes. 

Your courage, your heroic fortitude, your patience under 
suffering has "surrounded you with a halo of glory which the 
past years have not dimmed." May your last days be your best 
days — untouched by sorrow and unknown to Avant — and when 
comes for you the twilight and the evening star, and the Mas- 
ter's last call, then may you answer "Ready." And now 
in the name of Caswell County Chapter of the United Daugh- 
ters of the Confederacy, I present this monument to Caswell 
County — and with the presentation we dedicate it, we conse- 
crate it in honor and to the memory of the Confederate soldiers 
of Caswell, who wore the gray and fought under the glorious 
banner with its STAES AND BARS. 

To you Mr. Hatchett, as Chairman of the County Board of 
Commissioners and to your succcessors in office, conscious of 
your patriotism, and believing that your successors will be 
filled with the same high spirit, we commit into your care and 
keeping this sacred trust. GUARD IT WELL. 



Caswell County in the World War 201 

ADDRESS OF MR. T. H. HATCHETT 

Address of acceptance of the Monument, on behalf of the 
County Commissioners, by Mr. T. H. Hatchett, Chairman. 

Otir Confederate Soldiers, Daughters of the Confederacy, 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 

Daughters of the Confederacy, in accepting your splendid 
gift, for the people of Caswell, and as chairman of the Board 
of County Commissioners I wish to say that we are conscious 
of the obstacles which you have overcome, how you ha\e toiled 
when, seemingly, the task was impossible and you were laboring 
almost without hope. Still you were true to the old adage that 
time, patience, and perseverance will accomplish all things, 
therefore, Daughters of the Confederacy, Ave accept this gift 
for the people of Caswell as emblematic of the true spirit of 
the Confederate soldier. We hope that all who may look 
upon it, will be thereby reminded of the dignity, patriotism, 
and true regard for duty which always characterized him. 

May we teach our children and our children's children when 
they ask what means this monument? We will answer and 
say to them, that this stone in its beauty, is what may be 
accomplished by the mallet and chisel from the rough stone 
from the quarry, and that it is to remind them if they will 
divest their hearts and consciences from all the vices and super- 
fluities of life they will be fitted, as living stones for that spir- 
itual monument above, that monument not made with hand^i, 
eternal in the heavens. 

When they look upon the figure let it remind them of the 
fidelity and faithfulness of their ancestors and the devotion 
which was there as to their Country and to their God. 

And now in my ofiicial capacity as Chairman of the Board 
of County Commissioners of Caswell County and respecting 
the wishes of my associate members Messrs W. K. Williams 
and D. P. Walker, I wish to say to the Caswell County Chap- 
ter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Ave accept 
this sacred trust from your hands and pledge you that we will 
guard it well and pass it on to our successors in office, feeling 
sure that they will hold it in equal sacredness. We thank you.