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BULLETIN OF 



Northwestern University 




GENERAL CATALOGUE 
I905-I906 



EVANSTON— CHICAGO 
PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 

CAUOfDAM, 9-16 

DiPAimcKNTS or the Univkbsitt, 16 

AoicnnBTiULTiyB Qetigebs, 17 

Thb Cobpobation, 19 

Uhiyebsitt Council, 22 

QmCIBS OF iNSTBUCnON Ain) GoVEBNBfENT, - 23-43 

The Univebsitt, 44-74 

Organization and Goyemment, .... 44 

Uniyersity Statutes, 50 

History and Deyelopment, 54 

Grounds and Buildings, 66 

Libraries, 68 

Museums, - - 65 

The Uniyersity Settlement, 67 

The Uniyersity Guild, 68 

Public Lectures, Concerts, Byening Courses, Etc., 69 

Athletics, 72 

The Coixbqe of LxBEKiO. Abts, 75-188 

Faculty. 75 

Standing Committees, 78 

Requirements for Admission, 79-86 

Admission to Adyanced Standing, ... - 88 

Accredited Schools, 88 

Residence, 90 

Programs of Study, 91 

Schedules of Required Studies, .... 91 

Cnectiye Studies, 92 

.Faculty Adyisers, 93 

Schedule of liajors and Minors, .... 94.96 

Courses of Instruction, 96-157 

Professional Studies, 157-162 

Regulations Affecting Undergraduates, 163 

Bzaminatlons, 164 

Grades of Scholarship, 166 

Graduate Studies, 166 

Degrees, 168-172 

The Library, 172 

Grounds and Buildings, 173-176 

Goyemment, 176 

Religious Worship, 177 

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6 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Student Organizations, 178 

Fellowships, 179 

Scholarships, 179-181 

Prizes, 181-183 

Fees and Expenses, 184-18G 

Board and Lodging, 186 

Loan Funds, 187 

Christian Associations, 187 

Thb Medical School, 189-241 

Faculty, 189 

Location and Buildings, 194 

Requirements for Admission, .... 195 

Admission to Advanced Standing, .... 196 

Methods of Instruction, 197 

Synopsis of the Medical Course, .... 199 

Departments of Instruction, 200-222 

Requirements for Graduation, 226 

Final Examinations, 225 

Honors, 225 

The Alumni Library, 226 

The Hospital Quiz Class, 227 

The Summer School, 227 

Young Men's Christian Association, ... 228 

Fees and Expenses, 229 

Hcspitels, 231-241 

The Law School, 242-261 

Faculty, * 242 

Location, 243 

Requirements for Admission, 244 

Courses of Instruction, 246-254 

The Library, 257 

Prizes, 258 

Requirements for Degrees, 259 

Scholarships, 260 

Fees and Expenses, 261 

The School of Phabmacy, 262-268 

Faculty. 262 

Location and Equipment, 263 

Requirements for Admission, .... 264 

Courses of Instruction, 265 

Graduation, 266 

Advanced Credits, - 266 

Sessions and Vacations, 267 

Fees and Expenses, 267 

The Dental School, 269-295 

Faculty, 269 

Location and Equipment, 270 

Requirements for Admission, 271 



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TABLE OP CONTHSNTS. 7 

Schedule of Courses, 272 

Departments of Instruction, 273-291 

Requirements for Graduation, .... 292 

The Museum, 293 

Fees and Expenses, 294 

Poet Graduate and Practitioners* Course, 296 

The School or Music, 296-308 

Faculty, 296 

Iiocation and Purpose, 297 

Requirements for Admission, 297 

Courses of Instruction, 298-308 

Certificate of Performance, 303 

Diplomas and Certificates, 304 

Fees and Expenses 306 

Preparatory Deparunent, 308 

Thc Acadeuibs, - 309-314 

E^ranston Academy of Northwestern University, 309 

Grand Prairie Seminary, 311 

Elgin Academy. 313 

The Tkbological Schools, 316 

Garreit Biblical Institute, ..... 315 

Faculty, 316 

Requirements for Admission, .... 31$ 

Courses of Study, - . . . ^ . . 318 

Expenses, 322 

Norwegian-Danish Theological School, ... 323 

Swedish Theological Seminary, .... 324 

Catalogue of Students, 326 

Degsees, Phizes, and Honors of the Teas 1904-06 - 406 

Genebal Alumni Associations, 421 

Summary of Students in Attendance, - 428 

Inmx. 430 



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CALENDAR FOR 1906-1907. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ART& 
1906. 
Jannaiy 25, Thursday, Day of Prayer for CoUegee. 

Jaavanr 28, Sunday, Founders' Day. 

NxmaryT. Wednesday, Regular Mid-year Bzaminationa 

begin. 
FMnriarylB* Thursday, Additional Bxaminations. 

Fehniaryl6, Friday, Second Semester begins. 

FMnriary 19, Monday, Second Bxaminations. 

Febmary 20, Tuesday, Class-work resumed, 8 o'clock, a. m. 

FMvuary 20, 21, 22, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Registrar 

tion Days. 
Fsbmary 22, Thursday, Washington's Birthday. 

February 28, Friday, Sargent Prise Contest 

March 2, Friday, Kirk Prize Oratorical Contest 

BUana Recess, isom Fbidat, Apbil 13, to Mohdat, Afbel 16, 

nroLusivE. 

Avrfllf, Monday, Second Bxaminations. 

April 2^ Saturday, Last day for the presentation of 

theses for Advanced Degre es . 
Msy 7, Monday, Presentation of Harris Prise theses. 

Msy 19, Saturday, Bxamination of candidates for 

Advanced Degrees. 
May SO. Wednesday, Memorial Day. 

June 6» Wednesday, Regular examinations begin. 

June 16» Friday, Additional Bxaminations. 

June 17, Sunday, Baccalaureate Address. 

June 18, Monday, Class Day. 

June 19, Tuesday, Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Annual Meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa 

Society. 
June 20, Wednesday, Alumni Day. 

June 21, Thursday, Forty-Eighth Commencement 



9 

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10 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

SuMMEB Vacatioi?, fbom Fbiday, June 22, TO Sunday, Septbmbes 

23, INCLUSIVB. 

September 24, Monday, Academic Year 1906-07 begins. 

September 24, 26, Monday and Tuesday, Examinations for Ad- 
mission. 

September 26, 26, 27, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Registration 
Days. 

September 26, Wednesday, Second Examinations. 

September 27, Thursday, Class-work begins, 8 o'clock, a. m. 

Thankbgivino Recess, fbom Thubbday, Notembeb 29, to Sunday, 

DbCEMBEB 2, IlfCLUSIVE. 

Chsistmas Recess, from Friday, Decbmbeb 21, to Wbditesday, 

JAITUABY 2, INCLUSIVE. 

1907. 

Janiuury 4, Last day for the presentation of orations 

for Kirk Prize. 

January 28, Monday, Founders' Day. 

January 81, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

February 6, Wednesday, Regular Mid-year Examinations 

begin. 

February 14, Thursday, Additional Examinations. 

February 16, Friday, Second Semester begins. 

February 18, Monday, Second Examinations. 

February 19, Tuesday, Class-work resumed, 8 o'clock, a. m. 

February 19, 20, 21, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Registra- 
tion Days. 

February 22, Friday, Washington's Birthday. Sargent 

Prize Contest 

March 1, Friday, Kirk Prize Oratorical Contest. 

Easteb Recess, from Fbtoay, March 29, to Monday, Apbil 1, 

INCLUSIVE. 

April 1, Monday, Second Examinations. 

April 27, Saturday, Last day for the presentation of 

theses for Adyanced Degrees. 
May 6, Monday, Presentation of Harris Prize theses. 

May 18, Saturday, Examination of candidates foi 

AdYanced Degrees. 
May 80, Thursday, Memorial Day. 

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CALENDAR. 



11 



June 6, 
June 14, 
June 16, 
June 17, 
June 18, 



June 19, 
June 20, 



Wednesday, Regular Examinations begin. 
Friday, Additional Examinations. 
Sunday, Baccalaureate Address. 
Monday, Class Day. 
Tuesday, Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Annual Meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa 

Society. 
Wednesday, Alumni Day. 
Thursday, Forty-Ninth Commencement.. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 
1906. 
January 1, Monday, Christmas Vacation ends. 

January 28, Sunday, Founders' Day. 

January 29, Monday, First Semester Examinations begin. 

February 5, Monday, Second Semester begins. 

February 22, Thursday, Washington's Birthday. 

Mtay 28, Monday, Second Semester Examinations 

begin. 
June 20, Wednesday, Meeting of the Alumni Asso- 

ciation. 
June 21, Thursday, Commencement Day. 

SUMMXB VAOATIOir, FROM FsmAY, JUNE 22, TO MONDAT, OCTOBEB 

1, INGLT7SIVE. 

September 28, Friday, Examinations for Conditioned Stu- 

dents begin. 
October 1, Monday, Examinations for Admission. 

October 2, Tuesday, Academic Year 190M7 begins. 

NoTember 29, Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. 

Cheistmas Rbcess, from Satubday, December 22, to Wednesday, 



1907. 
January 28, 
February 4, 
February 11, 
February 22, 
May 27, 



JAIHTABY 2, TNCLUSTVE. 

Monday, Founders' Day. 
Monday, First Semester Examinations begin. 
Monday, Second Semester begins. 
Friday, Washington's Birthday. 
Monday, Second Semester Ehcaminatlons 
begin. 



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12 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

June 19, Wednesday, Meeting of the Alumni Associa- 

tion. 
June 20, Thursday, Commencement Day. 

THE LAW SCHOOL. 

1906. 

January 3, Wednesday, Lectures resumed after Christ- 

mas recess. 

January 25, Thursday, Lectures for the First Semester 

dose. 

January 28, Sunday, Founders' Day. 

January 29, Monday, First Semester Examinations hegtn. 

February 3, Saturday, First Semester ends. 

February 5, Monday, Second Semester begins. 

February 12, Monday, Lincoln's Birthday. 

February 22, Thursday, Washington's Birthday. 

May 26, Saturday, Lectures close. 

May 81, Thursday, Second Semester Examinations 

begin. 

June 14, Thursday, Alumni Banquet. 

June 21, Thursday, Commencement Day. 

SUMMEB VaCATIOIT, FROM FbIDAT, JUNE 22, TO SUNDAY, SSPTEMBEB 
23, INCLUSIVE. 

September 24, Monday, Registration Day for new students. 

September 25, Tuesday, Registration Day for applicants for 

Advanced Standing. 
September 26, Wednesday, Registration Day for other 

Students. 
September 27, Thursday, First Semester begins. 



Thanksoivino Recess, fbom Thubsdat, NovsiiSEB 29, to Suin>AT, 
December 2, inclusive. 

Chbibtmas Recess, fbom Fbiday, Decembeb 21, to Wednesday, 

JaNUABT 2, INCLUSIVE. 

1907. 
January 24, Thursday, Lectures for the First Semester 

close. 
January 28, Monday, Founders' Day. First Semester Ex- 

aminations begin. 



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CALENDAR. 



18 



February 11, Monday, Second Semester begins. 

February 12, Tuesday, Lincoln's Birthday. 

February 22, Friday, Washington's Birthday. 

May 80, Thursday, Memorial Day. 

June 8, Monday, Second Semester Bxaminations 

begin. 

June 13, Thursday, Alumni Banquet 

June 20, Thursday, Commencement Day. 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 
1906. 

January 3, Wednesday, Class-work resumed after Christ- 

mas recess. 

January 28, Sunday, Founders' Day. 

February 8, Thursday, Mid-year Graduation Bxerelses. 

February 9, Friday, Registration Day (or the Second 

Semester. 

February 12, Monday, Class-work resumed. 

June 18, Monday, Summer School opens. 

June 21, Thursday, Annual Commencement. 

SuMicKB Vaoatior, isom Fbidat, Jum 22, TO Snin>AT, Skptbmbeb 
23, nroLusiVB. 

Seiitember 24, Monday, Academic Year 1906-07 begins. 

8q;itember 26, Tuesday, Registration Day for the First 

Semester. 
September 27, Thursday, Class-work for the year 1906-07 

begins. 



THAHKSOIVINO RbOESS, isom ThUSSDAT, NoTEMBEB 29, TO SUHDAT, 

DncEHHKB 2, nrcLUsiys. 
Chubtmas Rbobss, isom Fbidat, Dbckmbeb 21, TO Wednisdat, 

JAITUABT 2, XNOLUBIYE. 

1907. 
January 28, 
February 7, 
February 8, 

Jane 17, 
June 20, 



Monday, Founders' Day. 

Thursday, Mid-year Graduation Exercises. 

Friday, Registration Day for the Second 

Semester. 
Monday, Summer School opens. 
Thursday, Annual Commencement. 



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14 



1906. 
January %, 
January 28. 
January 30, 
February 7, 
February 22, 
May 15, 
May 22, 
May 81, 



NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVERSITY. 

THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 

Wednesday, Christmas Vacation ends. 
Sunday, Founders' Day. 
Tuesday, Mid-term Examinations begin. 
Wednesday, Second Semester begins. 
Thursday, Washington's Birthday. 
Tuesday, Senior Examinations begin. 
Tuesday, Lower Class Examinations begin. 
Thursday, Graduating Exercises. 



SuMMiB Vacation, feom Fbidat, June 1, to Mondat, Octobbb 1, 

INCLUSIVB. 

October 1, Monday, Examination of Credentials (or Ad- 

mission begins. 

October 2, Tuesday, Academic year 190M7 begins* 

Examinations for Advanced Standing 
begin. 

November 29, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day. 

Chsibtmas Regbss, fbom Friday, Deoeubeb 21, to Wednbsdat, 

JaKUABY 2, INCLUSIVE. 

1907. 
January 3, Thursday, Class-work resumed. 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

1906. 

January 25, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

January 28, Sunday, Founders' Day. 

February 7, Wednesday, Regular Examinations begin. 

February 14, Wednesday, Second Term ends. 

February 16, Thursday, Third Term begins. 

April 18, Wednesday, Third Term ends. 

April 19, Thursday, Fourth Term begins. 

June 7, Thursday, Regular Examinations begin. 

June 14, Thursday, Annual Concert and Graduating 

Exercises. 

June 20, Wednesday, Fourth Term ends. 

June 21, Thursday, Commencement Day. 



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CALENDAR. 



15 



SUMMEB VaOATION, FBOM FbIDAT, JUlfE 22, TO BfOKDAT, 



flfptomber 26, 26, 

September 27, 
NoTember 28, 



24, INGLUSIVX. 

Tuesday, Wednesday, BxaminatioiiB for 

mission to Regular Courses. 
Thursday, First Term begins. 
Wednesday, First Term ends. 



Thahksqiviho Rsoess, isom Thubsdat, Novsmbbb 29, to Sunday, 

DeCEMBEB 2, INGLUSIVB. 

Deeember 3, Monday, Second Term begins. 



Chxistmab Rbcess, 

1907. 
January 28, 
January 31, 
February 6, 
February 13, 
February 14, 
April 17, 
AprU 18, 
June 6, 
June 13, 

June 13, 
June 20, 



waou Fbidat, Diobmbbb 21, to Thdbbdat, 

JaNXJABT 3, INGLUSIVB. 

Monday, Founders' Day. 
Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Wednesday, Regular Bxaminations begin. 
Wednesday, Second Term ends. 
Thursday, Third Term begins. 
Wednesday, Third Term ends. 
Thursday, Fourth Term begins. 
Thursday, Regular Bxaminations begin. 
Thursday, Annual Concert and Graduating 

Exercises. 
Wednesday, Fourth Term ends. 
Thursday, Commencement Day. 



1306. 
January 8, 
January 9, 
May 9, 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 

Monday, Christmas Recess doses. 
Tuesday, Second Term begins. 
Wednesday, Commencement Day. 



Sum MSB Vacatiok, wbou Thitbsdat, BIat 10, to TniSDAT» Skptbm- 
BEE 11, nroLnsivB. 

September 12, Wednesday, Registration Day. 

September 13, Thursday, First Term begins. 

CHsmTMAS Recess, from Fbidat, Dbobmbbb 21, to Monday, Jak« 

UABT 7, INOLITSrrE. 



1907. 



January 8, 



Tuesday, Second Term begins. 



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DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 



The Univendly comprises the following departmentSy 
each having a distinct Faculty of Instruction : 

The Coludgb of Libebal Abts. 

The BIbdical School 

Thb Law School. 

Thi School of Phabmact. 

Thb Dbittal School. 

Thb School of Music. 

The C!ollege of Liberal Arts and the School of Music 
are in Evanston; the professional schools are in Chicago. 

The Universily maintains the following non-degree-con- 
ferring departments: 

Thb Bvahston Aoadbmt, at Byanston. 

Obaitd Peaibib SsMmABT, at Onarga, lUinois. 

Thb Elgin Aoademt, at Elgin, Illinois. 



Garrett Biblical Institute, a theological school of the Metho- 
dist BplscoiMd Church, Is established on Its own foundation and 
under separate management on the Unlyerslty Campus in Byans- 
ton. It is authorized by its charter to confer degrees in dlTinity. 
and is in dose cooperation with the Unlyerslty. The Norwegian- 
Danish Theological School in Eyanston is afflllated with Garrett 
Biblical InsUtute. 

The Swedish Theological Seminary occupies its own building 
on the Campus in Eyanston. 

The Cunmock School of Oratory Is conducted on the Unl- 
yerslty Campus, under a separate administration. 



Evanston is the suburb of Chicago adjoining it on the 
north and stretching along the shore of Lake Michigan. 
It has a population of about twenty thousand. The Uni- 
versity Campus lies directly on the lake shore, about two 
miles from the northern limits of Chicago. The charter of 
the Universily prohibits the sale of intoxicating liquors 
within four miles of the University. 



16 



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ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS. 



THS XJWPfKBSJTT, 

AeHng Pregidei^t, Thomas FftAiiKUN Holoatb, Ph.D., IjL.D., 
Office, Univeralty Hall, Byanston. 

Chicago Office, Northwestern University Building, Lake and 
Dearborn Streets, Chicago. 
Bii«liief« Manager^ Wiluam AinxBEW Dtohs, A.M., 
Office, 61S Davis Street, Bnuiston. 

Chicago Office, Northwestern Uniyersity Building, Lake and 
Dearborn Streets, Chicago. 



OOLLUB or TjmAT. aSTS. 

DeMi, Thomas Fbankun Holgatk, Ph.D., LL.D., 
RepMror, Wiluam Abbott OuxrATma, A.1C., 
Offices, UniTerslty Hall, Bvanston. 

MBDIOAI. SOHOOI. 

Dem^ li^hXBAK Smfth Davis, A.M., M.D., 
Jtmiar Deanf Wnrnsu) Soott Hall, AM., M.D., Ph.D., 
Seereiarw, Chablbs Lottis Mix, A.1C., ILD., 
Offices, 2481 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

LAW SCHOOL. 

Dmm, JOHH Hbbbt Wiomobe, AM., LL3., 
ge c relonr, Fbbdbbio Bbbbs Cbobslbt, LLJB., 

Offices, Northwestern University Bnildlng, Lake and Dear- 
bom Streets, Chicago. 

SCHOOL or phabmact. 
Deofiy OscAB Oldbebg, Phabm.D., 
ge c relonr, David Chablbs Eoclbs, A.M., 

Offices, Northwestern University Building, Lake and Dear- 
bom Streets, Chicago. 

DENTAL SCHOOL. 

Beam, QmBom Vamdimax Black, M.D., LL.D., 
Bearetanff Chablbs R. IL KbOHt D.D.a, 

Offices, Northwestern University BuUdlng, Lake and Dear' 
bom StreetB, Chicago. 

17 



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18 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

80H00L OF MUSIC. 

Dean, Pbteb Chbistiait Lutkin, Mus.D., 
Secretary, Ibyiitg Hamun, 

Offices, Music Hall, Bvanston. 



fCVAlTSTON ACADEMY. 

Principal, Abthxtb Hebbebt Wilde, Ph.D., 
Office, Flsk Hall, ETanston. 

GBAND PBAIBIB SEMINABT. 

Principal, Henby Hoaq Fbost, A.B., 
Address, Onarga, Illinois. 

BLQIir aoadbmt. 
Principal, Geobge Newton Sleioht, A.B., 
Address, Elgin, Illinois. 



OARBETT biblical INSTITUTE. 

President, Chablbs Joseph Littlb, Ph.D., LL.D., S.T.D., 
Registrar, Solon Cabt Bbonson, D.D., 
Offices, Memorial Hall, Evanston. 



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THE CORPORATION. 



OFFICERS. 

William Deebutq President 

Oliveb Habyet Hobton, LiL.D. First Vice-President 

HuMFHBTS Henbt Clay Milleb, A.M Second Vice-President 

Fbakk Phiup Cbanoon, A.M. Secretary. 

JoHH RtnTTAMi LiNDeBBN Treasurer. 

WiLUAM Ahdbbw Dtohb, A.M Business Manager. 

TRUSTEES. 

TIBM BXPIBSS Uf 1906. 

HmBT Sabobrt Towlb, LL3 Chicago. 

Hablow NnjEs HionnKyrHAM Chicago. 

Chabexb BowBir Cobqdon Bvanston. 

Jamkb a. Pattkn Evanston. 

Chabexb T. Bothtob Bvanston. 

WnxjAM Hbbbt Hbnklb Chicago. 

QiobqbPeox Mkbuck, LL.B Bvanston. 

a i'iBPiiBi i Joseph Hebbeh, D.D Bvanston. 

TEBM EXFIBE8 IN 1907. 

Oliveb Habvbt HoBToif, LL.D Chicago. 

William ]>ebbino Bvanston. 

Meuitt Caldwell Bbaodon, A.M., TAJD Bvanston. 

James Babtubtt Hobbs Chicago. 

Feahk Philip CBAinwif, A.M. Bvanston. 

LoBHf Coke Coiuifs, A.M Chicago. 

WnxxAM AinxBEW Dtohe, A.M. Bvanston. 

Pbblet Lowe Chicago. 

lAJCT Davis Rowe Bvanston. 

TEBM BXPIBES IN 1908. 

RoBEBT DioKoreoN Sheppabd, A.M. D.D Bvanston. 

JoeiAH J. Pabkhubst Bvanston. 

David MoWiluams Dwlght. 

19 

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20 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Charues Piitgknbt Whkict.br, A.M BYauton. 

Cornelia Oret Lunt BrmnstoiL 

Hkhrt Howard Oaob EvaastoiL 

Edward Fostkr Swm Chloaco. 

WnxjAM Eraser McDowell, D.D Chloaco. 

term etftrbb in 1909. 

Norman Wattb Harbeb GhlCRflo. 

Nathan Smith Davis, AM., M.D Chicago. 

*Harvet Bostwigk Hurd, LL.D EvRiiston. 

John Richard Lindoren EvRiistoiL 

HUMPHRTB Henrt Clat Mn.T,ER, A.M BYanBton. 

Elbebt Henrt Oart New York. 

BilLTON Holltdat Whjbon BTRnstoiL 

Alexander Hamilton Retell Chicago. 

Henrt Sherman Boutell, A.M Chicago. 

ELECTED BY CONFERENCES. 
rock ritee. 

Thomas Ransom Strobridge, A.M., D.D Rodkford. 

Joseph Thino Ladd, A.M., D.D Elgin. 

DETROIT. 

William Dawe, D.D Detroit 

CENTRAL ILLINOIS. 

Qbobge Rutledoe Palmer, A.M., D.D. Onarga. 

Jaoob Wellington Frizzelle, A.1C., B.D Wata^ka. 

MICHIGAN. 

Wilbur Israel Cooshall, D.D Ionia. 

Lambert Edgar Lennox, D.D Benton Harbor. 

GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

William Debring. John Richard Lotdoren. 

Oliver H. Horton. Josiah J. Parxhurst. 

FftANK Phujp Crandon. ICiLTON Holltdat Wilson. 

H. H. C. Mn.T.ER. James B. Hobbs. 

Nathan S. Davis. Whjjam A. Dtchb. 

R<»ebt Dickinson Sheppard. Henrt Howard Gage. 

James A. Patten. Charles P. Wheeler. 

Charles T. Botnton. George P. Merrick. 

•Deeeaaed. January 20, 1906. 

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THE CORPORATION. 21 

8TANDINQ COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF TRU8TEE8. 

OomwUttee on the Report of the PreaiderU of the UniverMity— 
MeaerB, HfunoK, Boitebix^ MoDowezx, CkxwHAix, and Pal- 



Committee on the Treaewrer^e Report and Finances, and on the 

Bneineu Manager'e Aapori— Messrs. Haeris, Wilsoit, Hiq- 

nraoTHAic, Luidoben, and Heuklb. 
Committee on the OoXlege of IAJ>eral Art»— Messrs. Milueb, Davis, 

LiADD, WtasBLB, and Swm. 
Committee on the Medical School— 'NLeesrs. Davis, Habbis, Dtohs, 

and Bothton. 
Committee on the Law School— UeeBTS. Towlb, .Coixiirs, Oabt, 

MiiiJB» and Hubd. 
Committee on the School of PAcimuicy— Messrs. Revxix, Towle, 

Pabkhubbt, and F&izzkllb. ' 
Committee on the Dental School— MeesTS. Shxfpabd, Dtohe, 

MDonoK, and Lows. 
Committee on the School of IfiMio— Messrs. Patten, Milleb, Conq- 

DOK, and Miss Luht. 
Committee on University Dormitories and Willard Hall—Ur, 

Gbandok, Miss LuiTTy Mr. PArnor, and Mrs. Rows. 
Committee on the Bvanston Academy— Meean. Pabxhxtbst, Shbp- 

FABD, Bbaodon, Whbelxb, and Conooon. 
Committee on the Library-— MoBars. Palmeb and 1£ebbiok. 
Committee on Reat Bstate—MeBsrs, Gaob, Pabkhubst, BonrroN, 

Lo¥nB, and MoWnxiAiiS. 
Committee on the Nomination of Trustees and Officers — Messrs. 

HoBBS, WHiSOK, Hobtor, Cbaitdor, and Shbppabd. 
Committee on Miscellaneous Matters — ^Messrs. Hbbbbn, MoWil- 

LiAMB, and C068HALL. 



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UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

Thomas Fbanklin Holoate, Ph.D., LL.D., Acting President. 
Dazhel Bonbright, tiJjJD. 

MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

Nathan Smith Davib, A.M., M.D. 
John Habfkb Long, M.S., So.D. 

LAW SCHOOL. 



John Hknbt Wiomobe, A.M., LL.B. 
Hknbt Sohofield, A.M., LL.B. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

OSCAB Oldbebo, Phabm.D. 
Habbt Mann Gobdin, Ph.D. 

DENTAL SCHOOL. 

Greene Vabdiman Black, M.D., D.D.S./ LL.D. 
Chables Rudolph Eowabd Koch, D.D.S. 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

Peter Chribtian Lutein, Mub.D. 
Harold EvnABD Knafp. 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND 
GOVERNMENT. 



Tbomab Fbaitklut Holoate, Ph.D., LL.D., - Acting PreHdent 
*Abbam Wineoasdneb Habris, Sc.D., LL.D., President-^Ject. 

PROFESSORS AND ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 

Samitel Adams, A.B., LX1.B., - Monadnock Bldg., Chicago. 
Profe$8or in the Law of Procedure and Practice^ Law 
Bchoot 

FiAHK AiifOBT, M.D., ' ' • 12 Madison St, Chicago. 
Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology, Medical 
Bchool, 

Bdwabd WnxTS Andrews, A.M., M.D., 100 State St, Chicago. 
Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 

FmuTK Tatix>b Andrews, A.M., M.D., 100 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Gynecology, Medical School, 
Chabus Bxaoh Atwell, Ph.M., 1938 Sherman Ave., Bvanston. 

Professor of Botany, College of Liberal Arts. 
EkwuABD Paul Baillot, L.H.D., 714 Foster St.'Evanston. 

Professor of Romance Languages, College of Liberal Arts. 
OuN Hanson Basquin, Ph.D., - - 325 Hill St, Wilmette. 

Associate Professor of Physics, College of Liberal Arts. 

Abthub Datenfort Black, B.S., M.D., D.D.S., 

31 Washington St, Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and Assistant 
in Oral Surgery, Dental School. 

Gbbene Vabdiman Black, M.D., D.D.S., So.D., LL.D., 

4467 Oakenwald Ave., Chicago. 
Professor of Operative Dentistry, Pathology, and Bacieri- 
ology, Dean of the Dental School. 



^Elected Ffelnriiary 1* 1^06. Administration to begin July 1, IMM. 

23 

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24 NORTHWESTSEIN UNIVBRSITY. 

Daiobl Bohbbight, A.lf ., JAiD., 2040 Sheridan Road» BvaiiBtoii. 
John Bvan$ ProfeMor of Latin Language and LUemiure, 
Dean Bmeritue of the College of Liberdi Arts. 
Solon Cast Bbonson, A.M., D.D., 2026 Orrington Aye., Bvanston. 
Oomelia MilJer Professor of Practical Theologiff Registrar 
in Garrett BihHcal Institute, 
Pbteb Thomab BuBiTS, M.D., 581 S. Learitt St, Chica^. 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Director of the Anat- 
omical Ijaboratory, Medical School. 
William Btans Casbklbbbbt, M.D.» 34 Washington St, Chica^. 
Professor of Laryngology and Rhinology, Medical School. 
Abchibald Chuboh, M.D., - 804 Pullman Bldg., Chicago. 

Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases and Medical 
Jurisprudence, Medical School. 
J. Scx>TT Clabk, LttJ)., - - 2114 Sheridan Rd., Byanston. 

Professor of BngUsh Language, College of Liberia Arts. 
Oboboe ALBnarr Cko, Ph.D., 620 University Place, Evanston. 

John Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy, 
College of Liberal Arts. 
Hbnbt Cbew, Ph.D., - - - 620 Ubrary St, Bvanston. 
Fayerweather Professor of Physics, College of Liberal Arts. 
Alja Robiitson Cbook, Ph.D., • 726 Bmerson St, Bvanston. 
Professor of Mineralogy and Economic Geology, College of 
Liberal Arts. 
RoBEBT McLean Cumnock, A.M., L.H.D., 

1804 Hinman Ava, Bvanston. 
Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution in the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and in Garrett Biblical Institute, 
Gboboe Oliveb Cubme, A.M., 2237 Sherman Ave., Bvanston. 

Professor of Germanic Philology, College of Liberdi Arts. 
David Raymond Cubtisb, Ph.D., 1939 Sherman Ave., Bvanston. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics^ College of Liberdi Arts. 
Nathan Smith Davis, A.Bf., M.D., 72 Madison St, Chicago. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and of 
Clinical Medicine, Dean of the Medical School. 
Joseph Bouvab DeLee, M.D., - 3632 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 

Professor of Obstetrics, Medical School. 
Gbobge Amos Dobset, Ph.D., Field Columbian Mnsenm, Chicago. 
Professor of Comparative Anatomy, Dental School. 



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0FFICBR8 OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 25 

BiOLiuB Clabx Dudley, A.M., M.D., 1617 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Profeuar of OynecoJogy^ Medical Bchool. 
Daytd Chabejs Bccles, B.S., A.M., 827 Simpson St., Byanston. 
A»9itta$U Prof€B»ar of Chemistry, Becretary of the Faculty, 
Bthool of Pharmacy. 
AxrnvR Roanr Bdwabdb, A.M., M.D., 100 State St, Chicago. 

PtofetMor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and of 
OHnieaJ Medicine, Medical School, 
FkEDBBiOK Cabl Bibelbn, A.M., B.D., 

2340 Orrlngton Ave., Evanston. 
Professor of Bemitic Languages and Old Testament Exe- 
gesis, Churett Biblical Institute. 

AuBST EuoBON, A.M., 2118 Orrlngton Ave., Evanston. 

President of the Swedish Theological Seminary. 
Hbbbbt Fbaitkun Fibk, D.D., LL.D., 1625 Judson Ave., Byanston. 

Professor of Pedagogy, College of Liberal Arts, 
MaoBEUL Datib Follanbbeb, A.B., LL.B., 205 LASalle St, Chicago. 

Professor in tTie Law of Procedure and Practice, Lecturer 
on Legal Bthics, Law School, 
iMgnat Bmaiiitxl Fbanksnthal, M.D., 103 Randolph St, Chicago 

Professor of Clinical Gynecology, Medical School, 
iMwi 'Rasper Fuixeb, B.S., LXi.B., 115 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Professor in the Law of Procedure and Practice, Law 
Bchool 
Fbbd WnxiAM Oethbo, D.D.S., 31 Washington St, Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and Dental An- 
atomy, Dental Bchool, 
Tbomab liBWiB Gilmer, M.D., D.D.S., 31 Washington St, Chicago. 

Professor of Oral Surgery, Dental School, 
Habb¥ Mahk GoBDiir, Ph.D., 380 Chestnut St, Chicago. 

Professor of Chemistry, Bchool of Pharmacy, 
Henst Qbaixlb, M.D., - - - - 100 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology, Medical Bchool. 
Ultbsbb Sheeman Grant, Ph.D., 2320 Orrlngton Ave., Evanston. 

Winiam Deering Professor of Geology, Curator of the Mu- 
seum^ College of Liberal Arts, 
JoHH Hehet Gray, Ph.D., 1827 Orrlngton Ave., BvanBton. 

Professor of Political and Social Science, College of Liberal 
Arts. 



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26 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSITT. 

LouiB Mat Gbeblet, A.B., - - - 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Prof€89or in the Lcwo of Ocnveyandng, Mortgages, Oarriere, 
and Commercial Papery Law Bchooh 
EusHA Hall Gbbgobt, Jb., M.D., - 2431 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Robert L. Rea Professor of Anatomy, Medical Bohool, . 
JuiJUB GBmEXB» M.D., - - - - 100 State St, Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, Medical Bchooh 
YSBNON James Hall, Ph.D., 624 Noyes St, Eranston. 

Professor of Chef(iistry, Dental Bchool, 
WiioiELD SooTT Hall, Ph.D., M.D., 2431 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Nathan Bmith Davis Professor of Physiology, Junior Dean 
of the Medical Bchool. 
Jahbs Tatt Hatfdeld, Ph.D., - 617 Foster St, Evanston. 

Professor of German Language and Literature, College of 
Liberal Arts, 

DOBEMUS AucT Hatbs, S.T.D., Ph.D., 620 Foster St, Evanston. 
Professor of New Testament Exegesis, Librarian in Oarrett 
Biblical InstUute. 
Ckables Hill, Ph.D., M.D., - 6330 Kimbark Ave., Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology, Medical 
Bchooh 
Thomas Fbankliit Holgate, Ph.D., LL.D., 

617 Library St, Evanston. 
Henry B. Noyes Professor of Mathematics, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts. 
John HamhiGAB Hollisteb, A.Bf., M.D., 103 State St, Chicago. 
Professor Emeritus of Clinical Medicine, Medical Bchooh 
WwLASD Eugene Hotohkibb, Ph.D., 2130 Sherman Ave., Evanston. 
Assistant Professor of Economics, College of Liberal Arts. 
Gboboe Washington Hough, LL.D., 2237 Sheridan Rd., Evanston. 
Professor of Astronomy, Director of Dearborn Observatory, 
College of Liberal Arts. 
^Habvey Bostwiok Hubd, LL.D., - Borden Block, Chicago. 

Professor Emeritus of Law, Law Bchool. 
Chablbs Cheney Htde, A.M., LL.B., 135 Adams St, Chicago. 

Associate Professor of Law, Law Bchooh 
James Alton Jambs, Ph.D., - 2127 Orrlngton Ave., Evanston. 
Professor of History, College of Liberal Arts. 



*DeeeaMd January 20, 1906. 

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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 27 

FB4KK Sewasd JoHifsoiT, A.M., M.D., 2521 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 
ProtCBBcr Emeritus of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Dean 
Emeritue of the Medical School. 

Habbt Kahn» PHABM.M., M.D., - 4705 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 
AMietant Professor of Physiology and Materia Medica, 
School of Pharmacy, 

Albbbt MABmr Kales, A.B., LL.B., - 135 Adams St, Chicago. 

Associate Professor of Lano, Law School. 
GusTAV B. Kabsten, Ph.D., - - 562 Cook St., Bvanston. 

Acting Professor of Germany College of Liberal Arts. 
Habold Everabd Knafp, - - 218 Lunt Ave., Chicago. 

Professor of Tiolin and Ensemble Playing, School of Music. 

JoHH HsiTBT Sheldon Ljce, A.B., LiL.B., 164 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Professor in the Law of Crimes and Criminal Procedure, 
Law School. 
Waltbb Libbt, Ph.D., 1707 Ridge Ave., Evanston. 

Assistant Professor of Education, College of Liberal Arts. 
CHABLE8 CLABB17CE LiNTHicuM, LL.B., Monadnock Bldg., Chicago. 

Professor in the Law of Patents, Law School. 

Chables Geobge Little, B.S., LL.B., 1418 Forest Ave., Evanston. 
Associate Professor of Law, Law School. 

Charles Joseph Littue, LL.D., S.T.D., 

2016 Sheridan Rd., Evanston. 
Professor of Historical Theology, President of Oarrett Bib- 
lical Institute. 
Wxluam Albebt Loct, Ph.D., 1823 Hinman Ave., Evanston. 

Professor of Zoology, College of Liberal Arts. 
John Haspeb Long, M.S., So.D., - 7748 Sangamon St, Chicago. 
Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Chemical Lab- 
oratories, Medical School. 

Omsba Flotd Long, Ph.D., 1741 Hinman Ave., Evanston. 

Assistant Professor of Latin, College of Liberal Arts. 
Pnn Chbistian Lutkin, Mus.D., 1724 Asbury Ave., Evanston. 

Professor of Organ, Theory, and Composition, Dean of the 
School of Music. 

WnxiAM Altbed Mann. M.D., - - - 70 State St. Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology, 
Medical School. 



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28 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Elgut MaWhinney, D.D.S., - 34 Washington St, Chicago. 

Professor of Special Pathology, Materia Medioa, and Thera- 
peutics, Dental School. 

Frbdebiok Mekoe, M.D., 34 Washington St, Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Laryngology and Rhinology, Medi- 
cal School, 

Charles Hendebsoit Miller, Ph.O., M.D., 

6349 Jackson Aye., Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School, 
Maurice Ashbel Miner, Pharm.M., 6446 Lexington Ave., Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, Curator School of Phar^ 
m^icy, 

Charles Louis Mix, A.M., M.D., - 103 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Secretary of the 

Faculty, Medical School, Professor of Anatomy, Dental 

School, 

William Edward Morgak, M.D., • Heyworth Bldg., Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, Medical School, 

Edmund Notes, D.D.S., - - 716 Michigan Ave., Evanston. 
Professor of Dental Jurisprudence and Ethics, Dental 
School, 

Frederick Bogue Noyes, A.B., D.D.S., - 96 Stajte St, Chicago. 

Professor of Histology, Dental School, 
Arne Oldbero, .... 1805 Wesley Ave., Evanston. 

Professor of Piano and Composition, School of Music. 

Oscar Oldbebg, Pharm.D., - 7808 Union Ave., Chicago. 

Professor of Pharmacy and Director of the Pharmaceutical 
Laboratories, Dean of the School of Pharmacy, 

John Edwin Owens, M.D., • Lexington Hotel, Chicago. 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Medical School, 

Lucius Crocker Pardee, M.D., - 34 Washington St, Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Medical 

School, 

Hugh Talbot Patrick, M.D., - 463 LaSalle Ave., Chicago. 

Clinical Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Medical 

School, 

Amos Williams Patten. A.M., D.D., ■ 616 Poster St., Evanston. 
Professor of Biblical Instruction, College of Liberal Arts. 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 29 

Ckablbb WAoesiiKB Pattbbson, B.S., Ph.C., 

3700 LAke Ave., Chicago. 
AMMUtant Professor of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chem- 
istry, Registrar Bchool of Pharmacy, 
Samuel Ckaiq Plummkb, A.M., M.D., 34 Washington St, Chicago. 
Professor of Surgical Anatomy and Operative Surgery, Med- 
ioal Bchool. 
Ratmond Haikes Pond, Ph.D., - 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Professor of Botany, Pharmacognosy , and Bacteriology, 
Bchool of Pharmacy. 
Mast Ross Potteb, A.M., Wlllard Hall, Evanston. 

Dean of Women. 
Robkbt Bbucb Psbblb, A.B., M.D., • 103 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Medicine, Medical Bchool. 
Jamxs Habbisoit Pbothebo, D.D.S., - 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Professor of Prosthetic Technics, Prosthetic Dentistry, and 
Metallography, Dental Bchool. 
WnxiAM Bdwabd Quim, M.D., 3160 Indiana Aye., Chicago. 

Professor Emeritus of Physiology, Therapeutics, and Toxi- 
cology, Bchool of PTutrmacy. 
Chabus Bebt Reed, M.D., - - - 103 State St, Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Medical Bchool. 
JoHK RmLON, AM., M.D., - - - - 92 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Orthopedic Burgery, Medical Bchool. 
Bdwabd Obcab F. Roleb, A.M., lif.D., 2330 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Professor Bmeritus of Obstetrics, Medical Bchool 
hovia Ebnst Schmidt, M.S., M.D., 800 Schiller Bldg., Chicago. 
Professor of Clinical Cenito-Urinary Burgery, Medical 
School. 
HEifBT ScHOFDELD, A.M., LL.B., - - - 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Professor of Law, Law Bchool. 
William Bdwabd Sohboedeb, M.D., 103 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Burgery and Clinical Burgery, Medical Bchool. 
JoHK Adams Soott, Ph.D., 2038 Orrlngton Ave., Byanston. 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature, Secretary of 
the Faculty, College of Liberal Arts. 
Walteb Dnx Soott, Ph.D., 2036 Orrlngton Aye., Eyanston. 

Associate Professor of Psychology and Education, College 
of Liberal Arts. 



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80 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSITT. 

Ira. Bxnbon Sellebt, D.D.S., 34 Washington St, Chicago. 

Astodate Professor of Orthodontia, Dental School. 

Robert Dickinson Shefpabd, A.M., D.D., 

225 Greenwood Blvd., Branston. 
Professor of American and English History, College of Lib- 
eral Arts. 

Nelb Eowabd Simonsen, A.M.» D.D., 2243 Orrington Ave., Evanston. 
Principal of t?ie Norwegian-Danish Theological Bchooh 

Chablbs Maoauult Stuabt, A.M., D.D., 726 Emerson St, Evanston. 
Professor of Bacred Rhetoric, Secretary of the Faculty in 
Garrett Biblical InsHtute. 

Robebt Richabdson Tatnall, Ph.D., 1103 Ayars Place, Evanston. 
Assistant Professor of Physics, College of Liberal Arts, 

Milton Sfbnbeb Tebbt, A.M., D.D., LXi.D., 

1812 Hinman Ave., Evanston. 
Professor of Christian Doctrine, Oarrett Biblical Institute. 

AsHUBT Horace Thobndibjc, Ph.D., - 726 Nate St, Evanston. 

Professor of English Literature, College of Liberal Arts. 
Welleb Van Hook, A.B., M.D., - 103 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Fbank Xavieb Walls, M.D., - - - 103 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
Thomas James Watkins, M.D., - 103 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Gynecology, Medical School. 

Gbobqe Washington Websteb, M.D., - 70 State St, Chicago. 
Professor of Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 

Theodobe Whittelset, Ph.D., - - 1003 Orove St, Evanston. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts. 

TwiNO Bbooks Wiqgin, M.D., - - - 100 State St, Chicago. 
Professor of Physiology and Pathology, Dental School. 

John Henbt Wigmobb, A.M., IAmB., 207 Lake St, Evanston. 

Professor of Law, Dean of the Law School. 
Abthub Hebbebt Wilde, Ph.D., 2316 Orrington Ave., Evanston. 

Professor of History, College of Liber€a Arts. 
Eugene Shaw Willabd, D.D.S., - - 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and Bacteriol- 
ogy, Dental School. 

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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVBRNMBNT. 81 

FBdbbig Campbell Woodwabd, A.M., LL.M., 

716 Foster St, Evanston. 

Professor of Law, Law Bchooh 
Abbax Yah Bps Toimo, Ph.B., 622 Church St, Byantton. 

Professor of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts. 
Joseph Zetbleb, M.D., - - - - 100 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of 8Mn and Venereal Diseases, Medical School, 
FkBDEBic RoBEBT Zett, M.D., 2431 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology, Medioai Bchool 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Wauieb Steeix Babneb, M.D., 3000 Michigan Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Gynecology, Medical School. 
Bebtha Althea Bebman, - - - 725 Foster St, Bvanston. 

Instructor in Voice Culture, School of Music. 
FkEDEBicx Atwood Bbslet, M.D., - 6027 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Medioai Softool. 
Lewis Raiowlph Blackhan, Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

Instructor in Violin, School of Music. 
Joseph BBSNifEMAN, Ph3., Bf.D., 8857 Wentworth Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
Ahdbew Jaokson Bbiblek, M.D., - 4656 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Orthopedic Surgery, Medical School. 
CoLEHAic Gbaves Butobd, M.D., 100 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery^ Medical School. 
Walteb Hebman Btjhliq, B.S., M.D., 5533 Union Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Bacteriology, Medical School. 
Paul Qubtav Adolp Bubbe, A.lf., - 720 Clark St, Byanston. 

Instructor in Cferman, College of Liberal Arts. 
Haboabet Caheboh, .... 1447 Dakin St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 
JoHH Qaily Campbell, A.M., M.D., 6857 Wentworth Aysl, Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
PkJJL Chesteb, B.S., M.D., - - 4707 Lake Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Physical Diagnosis, Medical School. 
HEBMAir CuuBouiLL, A.M., - 1506 Wesley Aye., Branston. 

Instructor in English Language, College of lAherql As^. 

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82 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBR8ITT. 

Hablan JoHir Ck>ziNE, - - • 278 LaSalle Ave., Ghieaso. 

InMtructor in Sight Reading and Choral Mu$io, Sthool of 
Music, 
WnxiAM RoBEBT CuBBiRS, B.S., M.D., 3430 Rhodes Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
AoHiiXBS Datib, Ph.B., M.D., 1206 Garfield Blvd., Chicago. 

Instructor in Medicine, Medical School. 
Fbkdebick Shifp Deibucb, A.M., 839 Milbum St, EYanstoii. 

Instructor in Economics, College of Liberal Arts. 
Louis NoBTON Dodgb, - - 1724 Asbury Ave., Evanston. 

Instructor in Piano and Theory, School of Music. 
Gbobob Botd Dtohx, AJB., M.D., 5345 WashiDgton Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Medicine, Medical School. 
GflOBO Bdwabd» 4142 North Ashland Aye., Chicago. 

Instructor in Oerman, College of Liberal Arts. 
Fbkdebick Charlbs Eggkbt, M.D., 5262 a Halsted Qt, Chicago. 

Instructor in Operative Surgery, Medical School. 
Chabubs Fbankun Biksnbabt, M.D., 92 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery, Medical ScJu>ol. 
Chablbs Btbd Eldeb, LL.B., 135 Adams St, Chicago. 

Instructor in the Law of Extraordinary Legal Remedies 
and Judgments, Law School. 
Chabubs Addison Elliott, B.S., M.D., 2900 Indiana Ava, Chicago. 

Instructor in Medicine, Medical School. 
Bbbnabd Cafbn Eweb, Ph.D., - 2036 Orrington Ave., Eranston. 

Instructor in Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts. 
Rot Caston Fliokingeb, Ph.D., 718 Clark St, Evanston. 

Instructor in Oreek and Latin, College of Liberal Arts. 
Edson Bbadt Fowleb, A.B., M.D., - 3359 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 
VioiOB Oabwood, - • - • 604 E. Diyision St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Piano and History of Music, School of Music. 
R<»BBT Tbaot OnxMOBB, M.D., 103 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Gynecology, Medical School. 
Habold Clabkb Goddabo, A.B., - 2034 Orrington Aye., Eyanston. 

Instructor in English Literature, College of Liberal Arts. 
Alexandeb Aabon Goldsmith, M.D., 4428 Prairie Aya, Chicago. 

Instructor in Histopathology, Medical School 

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0FFICBSR8 OP INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 33 

Jamxs WAI.TBB GoLDTHWAiT, A.M., 2006 Sherman Ave., Byanston. 

Instructor in Geology, College of Liberal Art9. 
Kaxlktoic Haouttt, 6482 East End Ave., Chicago. 

Inttrudor in Voice Culture, SOmoI of Mueic. 
HnrBT Clat Hall, B.S., LL.B., - lianhattan Bldg., Chicac^o. 

Instructor in the Law of Ineuranoe, Lwio School, 
Lm^ MABCHAirr Haxlow, 680 Uniyereity Place, Eyanston. 

Iiutructor in Public Bchool Music Methods, Bthool of Music, 
BuoBNB Howard HabreBi Ph.D., - 1916 Asbnry Ave., Bvanston. 

Instructor in Zodlogyt College of Liberal Arts. 
jyOmsAY Hboht, M.D., 4804 Grand BlYd.» Chicago. 

Instructor in Iffiwrology and ClinieaJ Neurology, Medical 
Bchoot 
JoBV Chamboklain Holubtib, A.B., M.D., 100 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Gynecology, Medical Schooh 
Chabubb Stephen Hobn, 3631 Cottage Groye Aye., Chicago. 

Instructor in Cornet; School of Music. 
Chabubb Matob Jaoobb, M.D., 103 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Orthopedic Surgery, Medical School. 
Gbbhabd H. Jebsek, B.a, 6006 Ellis Aye., Chicago. 

Instructor in Botany and Pharmacognosy, School of Phar- 
macy. 
WnuAM Johnson, Ph.C., 2431 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Chemistry, Medical School. 
JkUMK BtJOKNBB KANAyEL^ PelB., M.D., 6027 Prairie Aye., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Gun Clat Kkllogo, Ph.D., Park Apartments, Main St, BIyanston. 

Instructor in English Language, College of Liberal Arts. 

Hbbbbbt GoyxBT Keffbl, Ph.D., 616 Foster St, BIyanston. 

Instructor in MatheTwUics, College of Liberal Arts. 

Blub Kibk Kkbb^ A.M., ILD., 214 N. Elmwood Aye., Oak Park. 
Instnuior in Medicine, Medical School. 

Chablbb Joseph Kino, - - - 928 Sheffield Aye., Chicago. 
Instructor in Clarinet, Oboe, and Bassoon, School of Music. 

Nina Shuicwat Knapp, 1010 Ayars Place, BIyanston. 

Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 
WnuAM Hbnbt Knafp, 1010 Ayars Place, Eyanston. 

Instructor in Voice Culture, School of Music. 



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84 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

GoTmuED KoEHiBBy Ph.G., MJD., 2601 Wentworth Aye., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Pathology and Clinical Medicine, 
Medicai School. 
JiTLiUB William Adoiphb Kxthns, AM., 2019 Maple Aye., Byanston. 

Instrtustor in French, College of Liberal Arts. 

Chables J. KUBTZ, A.M., M.D., • - 633 E. 46tli PL, Chicago. 

Instructor in Physiology, Medical ScJiool. 
E2DGAB Nelson Iulytov, AM., M.D., - 1100 W. 5l8t St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Neurology, Medioal School. 
ViCTOB Daewin Lbsfinabbe, M.D., • 280 La Salle St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Cfenito-Urinary Surgery, Medical School. 
Thomas Henbt Lewis, M.D., - 261 Dearborn Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Gynecology, Medical School. 
OusTAYE Ebnst Fbedebigk Lundell^ B.S., 75 Maple St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, 

Qeobob Pauix Mabquis, M.D., - - 103 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Laryngology and Rhinology, Medical School. 
David Falkneb Monabh, M.D., 3601 Vincennes Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Obstetrics, Medical School. 
James Caddell Mobehead, Ph.D., 725 Emerson St, Evanston. 

Instructor in Mathematics, College of Liberal Arts. 
Paitl Fbedebigk Mobf, M.D., - 318 Webster Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
John Pbioe Odell, A.B., - • 820 Hamlin St, Evanston. 

Instructor in English Language, College of Liberal Arts. 
Oeoboe Daioel Oolesbt, Ph.G., - 5603 Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, 
William Abbott Oldfatheb, A.M., - 839 Milburn St, Evanston. 

Instructor in Latin and Chreek, Registrar College of Liberal 
Arts. 
Riohabd Stabb Pattillo, M.D., - 34 Washington St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology, Medical School. 
James Wiluam Putnam, A.M., - 2029 Maple Ave., Evanston. 

Instructor in Economics, College of Liberal Arts. 
John Josiah Rapp, B.D., - - 6130 Ingleside Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Greek and Hebrew, Oarrett Biblical Institute. 
ISAAO Donaldson Rawunos, M.D., - 100 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Contagious Diseases at the IsoUUion Hospital, 

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OFFICBR8 OF INSTRUCTION AND QOVBRNMBNT. 85 

liOUAN Fbbnoh Rxad, - - • 607 W. 62d St» Chicago. 

In$trMctor in Voice Culture, School of Music, 
Habbt IfoBmfKB RiGHiCB, M.D., 6569 Cottage Qrove Aye., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
AtFHONBB DB Salyio, Ph.D., 1928 Sherman Ave., Branston. 

Instructor in Romance Languages, College of lAberdl Arts, 
Camul FntN Sabobnt, A.M., • Pearsons Hall, Bvanston. 

Instructor in History, College of Liberal Arts. 
Herbt Bdwasd Saitib, B.S., M.D.» 100 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Gynecology, Medical School. 
GmoB CuBTiCB SH0GKE7, M.D., .... Melrose Park. 

Instructor in Clinical Neurology, Medical School. 
Wausded SnfOBB, - - - 595 W. Harrison St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Harp, School of Music. 
Gabl Gidboh Waixekius, 750 Ainslie Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Swedish Language, Literature, and History, 
Swedish Theological Seminary. 
RoTAL BixnfsoK Wat, A.lf., - 1633 Oak Ave., Bvanston. 

Instructor in History, College of Liberal Arts. 
Dat Whjjamb, .... 3010 Lakewood Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in yioloncello^ School of Music. 
RoBBT Bdwabd Wilbon, PH.M., 1939 Sherman Ave., Bvanston. 

Instructor in Mathematics, College of Liberal Arts. 
BuzABRK Rathoitd Woodwabd, 716 Foster St, Bvanston. 

Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 

SPECIAL LECTURERS. 

AuPBiD William Bats, A.B., LL.B., 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on General Practice, Law School. 
DwioHT St. Johk Bobb, A.M., LXi.B., 107 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Public Service Corporations, Law School. 
William Cuthbebtson, BID., 171 B. 47th St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Clinical Gynecology, Medical School. 
E au t MKZU t Wabhinqton Bngstboh, A.B., 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Voice Training and Forensics, Law School. 
Chablbb Tqb Fbbbmak, A.B., LL.B., The Rookery, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Corporation Practice, Law School. 

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36 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Hebbebt Jaoob Friedman, A.B.» LL.B., 164 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Liens, Law Bchool, 
Joseph Ignatius Kellt, Ph.D., C.B., LX1.B., 81 Clark St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Rofnan Law, Law School, 
Chablbs Rudolph Bdwabd Kooh, D.D.S., 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Dental EconomicB, Dental School. 
Hebman Duband Petebson, M.D., 1800 Michigan Ave., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Anaesthesia and Assistant in Oral Surgery, 
Dental School. 
Chablbs Ebnbst Pickabd, A.B., Monadnock Bldg., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Trade-Mark and Copyright, Law School, 
Hbnbt Lee Pbbsoott, A.B., LL-B., 89 Madison St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Forensics, Lata School, 
Joseph Thomas Robebt, - - - 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Parliamentary Law, Law School, 
Hbnbt Bascom Thomas, M.D., - 4705 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Physiology and Materia Medioa, School of 
Pharmacy, 
John Maxct Zane, A.B., - - - - 502 Lee St, Bvanston. 

Lecturer on Legal History and Biography, Law School, 

TUTORS, ASSISTANTS, AND DEMONSTRATORS. 

Chablbs Reedeb Bakeb, D.D.S., 34 Washington St, Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School 
CuBTis Abel Babbt, - - - 353 Winthrop Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant Instructor in Organ, School of Music. 
Dudley Dean Batless, D.D.S., - 3519 Indiana Aye., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
Louis Beck, M.D., • - - - 449 E. 68rd St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
James William Bibkland, D.D.S., 2231 Prairie Aye., Chicaga 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
Robebt Altbed Black, M.D., 498 E. 29th St., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
William Shebman Bbackbn, M.D., 514 B. 47th St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Cliniodl Laryngology and Rhinology, Medieai 
School. 



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OFPICBRS OP INSTRUCTION AND GOVBRNMBNT. 37 

WUAMZ HsxniT BsiLNDT, M.D., - 326 W. Oarfield Blvd., Chicago. 

AaMiatant in OUnicaJ Medicine, Medical School. 
JoosPH BBEzriTKiiAJf, Ph.B., M.D., 6857 Wentworth Ave., Chicago. 

Aasittant in OHnioca Pediatrics, Medical School, 
WwudAM Blmsb BBBifi?EMAN, M.D., 281 BX 43rd St., Chicago. 

AsaiMtant in Clinical Neurology, Medical School, 

FtaD Hugh Bbosnihaii, D.D.a, 312 B. Gist Place, Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
DODBICK Adam Bbumund, M.D., • 1634 W. 63rd St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology, Medical 
School. 
GnaoB Bassxtt Butt, M.D., 5860 State St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 

Jamk Qbat Cabb» A.B., M.D., - - 989 W. 22nd St, Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 

HuTBT Baknibtkb Clark, D.D.8., 1026 Jackson Blvd., Chicago. 
Demonstrator, Dental Schooh 

Cbammms Rolakd Clothieb, PH.C., • 360 B. Brie St, Chicago. 
Assistant in Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy. 

Chabus Hbitbt Cokvebse, D.D.S., 2481 N. 4l8t Ct, Irving Park. 
Demonstrator, Dental School. 

Bexjah Rockhold Cbossley, B.S., M.D., 

34th and State Sts., Chicago. 
Demonstrator, Dental School. Assistant in Clinical Oph- 
thahnology and Otology, Medical School. 

NoBMAN DnoN Cubby, B.S., M.D., 70 State St, Chicago. 

Demonstrator of Operative Surgery, Medical School. 
WnxiAM Clabk Danfobth, M.D., - • 70 State St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
GmnnB Jambs Dennis, M.D., 96 State St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Laryngology and Rhinology, Medical 
School. 

WiLUAM Thomas Babton, D.D.S., 1219 Masonic Temple, Chicago 
Demonstrator, Dental School. 

Crabubs August Bbicksoh, Ph.O., M.D., 

25th and Wentworth Ave., Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 



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88 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

John Flint, M.D., .... 3866 Grand Blvd., Chicago. 
Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, Medical School, 

Nellie Beulah Flodin, - 628 Unlyerslty Place, Eyanaton. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, Behoof of Music. 

Edwabd Auiebt Foley, M.D., - 60S S. Kedzle Ave., Chicago. 
Assistant in OHnical Neurology, Medical Bchooh 

Chables Marvin Fox, M.D., - 924 E. 6lBt 8t, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical Bchool, 

Frank Doig Francis, A.B., M.D., 606 Wells St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical Bchool, 

Frederick Franklin Garrison, M.D., 616 E. 43d St, Chicago. 
Demonstrator of Operative Surgery, Medical School. Dem- 
onstrator, Dental Bchool, 

Harold Kenneth Gibson, M.D., - - 228 E. 63d St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 
Cldttord Gbosselle Grulee, A.m., M.D., 1077 E. 6l8t St, Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical Bchool. 

Charles John Haake, - 2636 N. Hermitage Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, School of Music 

Loms Grason Harniey, M.D., - 6258 S. Halsted St, Chicago. 
Dem^onstrator of Operative Surgery, Medical Bchool. 

WnxiAM Henry Harrison, Ph.C., 87 Lake sC Chicago. 

Assistant in Chemistry, School of Pharm^icy. 
David Sweeney Hnxis, M.D., - 6050 Woodlawn Ave., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
Albert Triflett Horn, M.D., - - - 476 31st St, Chicago. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, Medical Bchool. 
Alexander Philip Horwitz, M.D., 2441 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Ctinical OphtTialmology and Otology, Medical 
School. 

Grbtohen Hueoin, .... Wlllard Hall, Evanston. 

Assistant in the Gymnasium, College of Liberal Arts. 
Walter Bayard Huey, M.D., 3301 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery, Medical 
School. 
Winifred Hull, .... 1422 Hlnman Ave., Bvanston. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 89 

Ahhub Chakuss Kixutgbn, 11.D.» 6620 Stewart Ave., Chicago. 

AsHatawt in OUnical Medicine, Medical School. 
Bill Ybrbeck Knafp - - - - 218 Lunt Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 
Tbomab Albert Knott, A.B., - 1116 Columbia Ave., Chicago. 

Tutor in English Language, College of Liberal Arts. 
William Kocheb, D.D.S., - - 5618 Halsted St., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
AflTHUB Chables Lafount, D.D.S., 1116 Masonic Temple, Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
Chakleb Herman LnsTZMAim, D.D.S., Pullman. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
AvDBEW Vachel Loitdebbaok, M.S., D.D.S., 

6624 Stewart Ave., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
Gboboe Buchanan Macfaslane, D.D.S., 70 State St, Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
Otis Habdt Maclay, B.S., M.D., 6412 Greenwood Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Laryngology and Rhinology, Medical 
School. 
Maude Juliet Mabceau, Manteno. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 
Chasles Mabtin Matteb, M.D., 3137 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
QmmsE Henbt Maxwell, D.D.S., 6239 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
Thomas Chables McGonagle, M.D., 5504 S. Halsted St., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
Huston Fbench Methven, D.D.S., 4944 Washington Ave., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
FiEDEEicK Richabd Moessneb, M.D., 24 E. 22d St., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 

Sabah Moobe, 1300 Main St, Evanston. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 
Albebt Eabl Mowbt, M.D., 3505 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 

LuTHEB Jambs Osgood, M.D., - - 446 W. 65th St, Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 



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40 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

RuFBBT Mebrill Pabkeb, B.S., M.D., 3603 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School, 

Albebt Pbch, M.D., 8905 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 

FEkKK Ellis Piebcb, M.D., 4801 Forrestville Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 

Ernest Ray Reynolds, M.D., 553 W. 63d St., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinicca Dermatology and Syphilology, Medical 
School, 

Hbnby Dbdeigk Robhleb, M.D., 6302 S. Halsted St, Chicago. 

Demonstrator of Operative Obstetrics, Medical School, 

Ebnbst Charles Riebbl» M.D., - 711 W. 43d St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School 

John Mawabd Rosbobough, - 40 T. M. C. A. Bldg., E^anston. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, School of Music. 
Jambs Geobob Robs, M.D., - - 6801 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Cfenito-Urinary Surgery, Medical 
School. 
Datid Salinoeb, M.D., - - • • 103 State St, Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology, Medical 
School, 

Fbank Dbnslow Shebwood, 257 Eranston Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in the Gymnasium, College of Liberal Arts. 

Etoilb Bessie Simons, Ph.D., 720 Clark St, Evanston. 

Assistant in the Botanical Laboratory, College of Liberal 
Arts. 
Fbank Edwabd Simpson, M.D., - 42 Madison St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Dermatology and Syphilology, Medi- 
cal School. 

MoBTON Snow, A.B., M.D., - - 3914 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 
Assistant in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 

WiBT Allen Stevens, D.D.S., - 2631 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 
Demonstrator, Dental School. 

Hebbebt Mabion Stowe, M.D., - - 4433 Lake Ave., Chicago. 
Demonstrator of Operative Obstetrics, Medical School. 

Chables Abbaham Stbebt, D.D.S., 734 W. Adams St., Chicago. 
Demonstrator, Dental School. 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 41 

FiBD Bbown Swift, B.S., BLD. 100 State St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery, Medical 
School. 
Gboboe Pattebson Thompson, D.D.S., 4633 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School 

Hakbt Isaac Van Tutl, B.S., M.D., D.D.S., 

6249 Kimbark Ave., Chicago. 
Demonstrator and Quiz Master in Anatomy, Dental School 

Benjamin Waldbebo, D.D.S., 51 Lincoln Park Blvd., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School 
Habbt AI.EXANDEB Wabe, M.D., - 204 Cass St, Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School 
Chables Benjamin Youngeb, M.D., 3859 State St, Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Laryngology and Rhinology, Medical 
School 



LIBRARIANS AND LIBRARY ASSISTANTS. 

LoDiLLA Ambbose, Ph.M., - 2001 Orrington Ave., Evanston. 

Assistant Librarian, College of Liberal Arts, 
Adeline Maitland Bakeb, B.L.S., 1325 Judson Ave., Evanston. 

Cataloguer, College of Liberal Arts. 
Claba A0ELINA Davis, • - 4047 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant, School of Pharmacy, 
Blbanob Wobthinoton Fallet, B.S., 829 Forest Ave., Evanston. 

Cataloguer, College of Liberal Arts, 
Mat Thebesa Hillan, 2962 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Librarian, Medical School 
Plobknce Cathebine Johnson, 12232 Emerald Ave., W. Pullman. 

Librarian, Dental School 
Bleanob Fbances Lewis, A.B., - 522 Church St, Evanston. 

Assistant, College of Liberal Arts, 
Olinia Mat Mattison, A.M., - 2355 Prairie Ave., Evanston. 

Ccttaloguer, College of Liberal Arts. 
Robebt McNeil, 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Assistant, Law School 
Fbances Cubbet Piebce, Ph.B., - Chapin Hall, Evanston. 

Assistant, College of Liberal Arts. 



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42 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Sadib Asia Thompson, Ph.B., 2135 Orrlngton Ave., Bvanston. 

Aaaistant, College of Liberal Arts, 
Walter Hugh Whitlook, - - 2126 Maple Ave., Evanston. 

AssUtatU, Gnrrett Bihlical Institute, 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

Jameb Caskt, PH.G., M.D., - - 2431 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Registrar in the Medical School, 
HsmiT Alfred Ebnest Chandler, B.S., 

T. M. C. A. Bids., Evanston. 

Secretary to the President, 
Frederic Beers Crosslby, LL.B., 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Secretary of the Law School, 
Robert Berry Ennis, A.B., - - • 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Renting Agent of Northwestern University Building, Chir 
oago, 
Charles Rudolph Edward Koch, D.D.S., 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Secretary of the Dental School, 
IRVINO Hamlin, - - - 1612 Chicago Ave., Evanston. 

Secretary of the School of Music, 
EiTiB Isabel Raitt, .... Wlllard Hall, Evanston. 

House Director, Willard Hall, 
Gleason Fillmore Starkweather, 722 Emerson St., Evanston. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, 

CLERICAL ASSISTANTS. 

Marion Bbarup, • - - 1126 Benson Ave., Evanston. 

' Stenographer in the Business Manager's Office. 
Lottie Garrett Harris, - • - 403 E. 62d St, Chicago. 

Stenographer in the President's Office. 
Agnes Hatden, B.L., - - - 1028 Judson Ave., Evanston. 

Assistant in the Registrar's Office, College of Liberal Arts. 
Marguerite Hilton, - - 1329 Benson Ave., Evanston. 

Stenographer in the Registrar's Office, College of Liberal 
Arts, 
Jannettb Elizabeth Lee, - 910 Lake St., Evanston. 

Clerk in the Dean's Office, College of Liberal Arts. 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 4S 

Alma Olive Madsen, - 936 Fargo Ave., Rogers Park. 

Stenographer in the bean's Ofj^e, Law School, 
Mabgabbt Irene Maloney, 3735 Rhodes Ave., Chicago. 

Clerk, Medical School. 
Majudit Vaughn Merrill, - 2626 N. Ashland Ave., Ravenswood. 

Distrilmtion Clerk in the Business Manager's Office, 
Myrtme Matilda Merritt, • 6338 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 

Stenographer in the Dean's Office, Dental School. 
Prances May Pass, • 6551 Monroe Ave., Chicago. 

Cleric in the Dental School. 
Selma Schlneider, - 2431 Dearborn St, Chicago. 

Stenographer in the Registrar's Office, Medical School. 
Montgomery Beatty Stewart, - 927 Wesley Ave., Evanston. 

Cashier and Bookkeeper in the Business Manager's OfUce. 
MiNETTA TuoKEE, 4049 ElHs Ave., Chicago. 

Cashier, Northwestern University Building. 
Mabel Frances Turner, A.B., 1414 Benson Ave., Evanston. 

0/[lce Secretary in the Dean's Office, College of Liberal Arts. 
Ernest Woollett, .... 37 Lake St., Chicago. 

Clerk, School of Pharmacy. 



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THE UNIVERSITY. 



ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNMENT. 

A meeting to consider the project to found a university 
in the vicinity of Chicago was held in that city on May 
31, 1850, and was attended by the following named persons : 
R. H. Blanchard, J. K. Botsfoi^, Andrew J. Brown, Henry 
W. Clark, John Evans, Grant Goodrich, Zadoc Hall, Rich- 
ard Haney, and Orrington Lunt. It was unanimously 
agreed that **the interests of Christian learning demand 
the immediate establishment of a University in the North- 
west." A Committee was accordingly appointed to secure 
a charter from the General Assembly of Illinois, which 
charter was approved by the Governor of the State on Jan- 
uary 28, 1851, and reads as follows : 

AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITT. 

Section I. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: That Richard Haney, Philo 
Judson; S. P. Keyes, and A. E. Phelps, and such persons as shall 
be appointed by the Rock River Annual Conference of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church to succeed them in the said office; Henry 
Summers, Elihu Springer, David Brooks, and Elmore Yocum, and 
such persons as shall be appointed by the Wisconsin Annual 
Conference of said church to succeed them; four individuals, if 
chosen, and such persons as shall be appointed to succeed them 
by the Michigan Annual Conference of said church; four individ- 
uals, if chosen, and such persons as shall be appointed to suc- 
ceed them by the North Indiana Annual Conference of said 
church; H. W. Reed, I. I. Stewart, D. N. Smith, and George M. 
Teas, and such persons as shall be appointed to succeed them 
by the Iowa Annual Conference of said church; four individuals, 
and if chosen, such persons as shall be appointed to succeed 
them by the Illinois Annual Conference of said church; A. S. 
Sherman, Grant Goodrich, Andrew J. Brown, John Evans, Orring- 
ton Lunt, J. K. Botsford, Joseph Kettlestrings, George F. Foster, 
Eri Reynolds, John M. Arnold, Absalom Funk, and E. B. Kings- 
ley, and such persons, citizens of Chicago or ita vicinity, as shall 
be appointed by the Board of Trustees hereby constituted to 

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ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNMENT. 45 

succeed them, be, and they are hereby created and constituted 
a body politic and corporate, under the name and title of the 
Cnutees of the Northwestern University, and henceforth shall 
be styled and known by that name, and by that name and style 
to remain and have perpetual succession, with power to sue and 
be sued, plead and be impleaded, to acquire, hold, and convey 
property, real, personal, or mixed, in all lawful ways; to have 
and use a common seal and to alter the same at pleasure; to 
make and alter from time to time such by-laws as they may deem 
necessary for the government of said institution, its officers and 
servants, provided such by-laws are not inconsistent with the 
constitution and laws of this State and of the United States, 
and to confer on such persons as may be considered worthy 
such academical or honorary degrees as are usually conferred 
by similar institutions. 

Section II. The term of office of said Trustees shall be four 
years, but that of one member of the Board for each conference 
enjoying: the appointing power by this act, and the term of three 
of the members whose successors are to be appointed by the 
Board hereby constituted, shall expire annually; the term of each 
member of the Board herein named to be fixed by lot at the first 
meeting of said Board, which Board shall, in manner above spec- 
ified, have perpetual succession, and shall hold the property of 
said institution solely for the purposes of education, and not 
as a stock for the individual benefit of themselves or any con- 
tributor to the endowment of the same; and no particular relig- 
ious faith shall be required of those who become students at the 
institution. Nine members shall constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of any business of the Board, except the appointment 
of President or Professor, or the establishment of chairs in said 
institution, and the enactment of by-laws for its government, 
for which the presence of a majority of the Board shall be nec- 
essary. 

Section III. Said Annual Conferences of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, under whose control and patronage said University 
Is placed, shall each also have the right to appoint annually two 
suitable persons, members of their own body, visitors to said 
University, who shall attend the examination of students, and be 
entitled to participate in the deliberations of the Board of Trus- 
tees, and enjoy all the privileges of members of said Board 
except the right to vote. 

Section IV. Said institution shall remain located in or near 
the City of Chicago, Cook County, and the corporators and their 
successors shall be competent in law or equity to take to them- 
selves, in their said corporate name, real, personal, or mixed 
estate, by gift, grant, bargain and sale, conveyance, will, devise, 
or bequest of any person or persons whosoever; and the same 
estate, whether real, personal, or mixed, to grant, bargain, sell, 
convey, devise, let, place out at interest, or otherwise dispose of 
the same for the use of said institution in such manner as to 
tbem shall seem most beneficial to said institution. Said cor- 



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46 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

poration shall faithfully apply all the funds collected or the pro- 
ceeds of the property belonging to the said institution, according 
to their best judgment, in erecting and completing suitable build- 
ings, supporting necessary officers, instructors, and servants, 
and procuring books, maps, charts, globes, and philosophical, 
chemical, and other apparatus necessary to the success of the 
institution, and do all other acts usually performed by similar 
institutions that may be deemed necessary or useful to the suc- 
cess of said Institution, under the restrictions herein imposed: 
Provided, nevertheless, that in case any donation, devise, or be- 
quest shall be made for particular purposes accordant with the 
design of the institution, and the corporation shall accept the 
same, every such donation, devise, or bequest shall be applied 
in conformity with the express conditions of the donor or de- 
visor: Provided, further, that said corporation shall not be al- 
lowed to hold more than two thousand acres of land at any one 
time unless the said corporation shall have received the same 
by gift, grant, or devise; and in such case they shall be required 
to sell or dispose of the same within ten years from the time 
they shall acquire such title; and on failure to do so, such lands 
over and above the before-named two thousand acres shall revert 
to the original donor, devisor, or their heirs. 

Section V. The treasurer of the Institution and all other 
agents when required, before entering upon the duties of their 
appointment, shall give bond for the security of the corporation 
in such penal sums and with such securities as the corporation 
shall approve, and all process against the corporation shall be by 
summons, and the service of the same shall be by leaving an 
attested copy thereof with the treasurer at least sixty days before 
the return day thereof. 

Section VI. The corporation shall have power to employ and 
appoint a President or Principal for said institution, and all such 
professors or teachers and all such servants as may be necessary, 
and shall have power to displace any or such of them as the 
interest of the institution may require, to fill vacancies which 
may happen by death, resignation, or otherwise, among said offi- 
cers and servants, and to prescribe and direct the course of 
studies to be pursued in said institution. 

Section VII. The corporation shall have power to establish 
departments for the study of any and all the learned and liberal 
professions in the same, to confer the degree of doctor In the 
learned arts and sciences and belles-letters, and to confer such 
other academical degrees as are usually conferred by the most 
learned institutions. 

Section VIII. Said corporation shall have power to institute 
a board of competent persons, always including the faculty, who 
shall examine such individuals as may apply, and if such appli- 
cants are found to possess such knowledge pursued in said insti- 
tution as in the Judgment of said board renders them worthy, 
they may be considered graduates in course, and shall be entitled 
to diplomas accordingly on paying such fee as the corporation 



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ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNMENT. 47 

•hall afltx, which fee, however, shall in no case exceed the tuition 
bills of the full course of studies in said institution; said exam- 
ination board may not exceed the number of ten, three of whom 
may transact business, provided one be of the faculty. 

BEonom IX. Should the corporation at any time act contrary 
to the provisions of this charter, or fail to comply with the same, 
upon complaint being made to the Circuit Court of Cook County, 
a $cire facias shall issue, and the circuit attorney shall prosecute 
in bdialf of the people of this State for forfeiture of this charter. 

This act shall be a public act, and shall be construed liberally 
in all courts, for the purposes herein expressed. 

SIDNEY BREESB, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, 

WILLIAM McMURTRY, 
President of the Senate, 
Approved, January 28, 1851. 
A. C. FRENCH, Governor. 



The charter thus granted was amended by an act ap- 
proved February 14, 1855, which reads as follows : 

AX ACT TO AlCEND AN ACT KNUTUED "AN ACT TO INCOBPOBATB THE 
NOBTHWBSTCRN UNIVEBSITT," AFPBOTBD JANTTABT 28, 1861. 

Section I. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: That John L. Smith, Aaron 
Wood, Lather Taylor, and Wm. Graham, and such other persons 
as shall be elected to succeed them by the Northwestern Indiana 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, be, and they are 
hereby, constituted members of the Board of Trustees of the 
Northwestern University. 

Section II. No spirituous, vinous, or fermented liquors shall 
be sold, under license or otherwise, within four miles of the loca- 
tion of said University, except for medicinal, mechanical, and 
sacramental purposes, under penalty of twenty-five dollars for 
each offense, to be recovered before any Justice of the Peace of 
said County of Cook: Provided, That so much of this act as 
relates to the sale of Intoxicating drinks within four miles may 
be repealed by the General Assembly whenever they may think 
proper. 

Sbction III. The said Incorporation shall have power to take, 
hold, use and manage, lease and dispose of all such property as 
may in any manner come to said corporation charged with any 
trost or trusts, in conformity with such trusts and directions, 
and to execute all such trusts as may be confided to it. 

Sbction IV. That all property of whatever kind or descrip- 
tion, belonging to or owned by said corporation, shall be forever 
free from taxation for any and all purposes. 



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48 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Section V. This act shall be public, and take effect from and 
after its passage. 

THOMAS J. TURNER. 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

G. KOERNER, 
President of the Senate. 
Approved, February i^, 1855. 
J. A. MATTESON, Governor. 

The charter was amended a second time by an act ap- 
proved February 16, 1861, which reads as follows : 

AN ACT TO AMEND AN ACT ENTITLED "AN ACT TO INCOBPORATE THE 
NOBTH WESTERN UNIVEB8ITY." 

Section I. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: That the Annual Confer- 
ences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which now are or may 
hereafter be authorized to elect or appoint Trustees of said Uni- 
versity, shall hereafter elect only two Trustees each, who shall 
also be and perform the duties of the visitors to said institution, 
and the place of the two Trustees last appointed by each con- 
ference is hereby vacated. The Trustees elected by such confer- 
ences shall hereafter hold their office for two years, and until 
their successors are chosen, the term of one elected by each of 
them expiring annually. In case any conference having authority 
to elect Trustees shall now or hereafter be divided into two or 
more annual conferences, they shall each have authority to elect 
Trustees. On the request of the Board of Trustees, made at a 
regular meeting, any such Annual Conference may elect Trustees 
as herein provided. 

Section II. Any annual conference electing Trustees as 
herein provided, having at any time refused to elect successors 
thereto, or resolving to discontinue or refuse its patronage to 
said institution, shall authorize the Board of Trustees, by a vote 
of the majority thereof at any regular meeting, to declare vacant 
the place of all Trustees appointed by such conference, and its 
right to appoint Trustees shall thereupon cease. 

Section III. Any chartered institution of learning may be- 
come a department of this University by agreement between the 
Boards of Trustees of the two institutions. 

Section IV. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

SHELBY M. CULLOM, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

FRANCIS A. HOFFMAN, 

President of the Senate. 
Approved, February 16, 1861. 

RICHARD YAtES, Governor. 



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ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNMENT. 49 

A third amendment was made by an act approved Feb- 
ruary 19, 1867, which reads as follows : 

AS ACT TO AMEND AN ACT ENTITLED "AN ACT TO INCOBPORATE THE 

N0BTHWE8TEBN UNrrEBSITT,'* AND THE 8EVEBAL 

ACTS AMENDATOBT THEBBTO. 

StecnoN I. Be it enacted by the People of the 8t<tte of IlHnoia, 
represented in the General Assembly: That the name of that Cor- 
poration created by act of the General Assembly of the State of 
Illinois, approved on the 28th day of January, A. D., 1861, under 
the name of the "Trustees of the Northwestern University," be 
and the same is hereby changed to "Northwestern University," 
and by that name shall hereafter be known, and in and by such 
name shall have and exercise all the powers and immunities 
conferred on said corporation by said act of incorporation, and 
all acts amendatory thereof. 

Section II. In addition to the number of Trustees heretofore 
provided for by law, the Board may elect any number, not exceed- 
ing twenty-four, and without reference to their several places of 
residence; and a majority of the whole Board shall be members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Section III. No greater number shall be required to consti- 
tute a quorum than has been heretofore required by law: 
Provided^ That in all called meetings of the Board the object of 
the meeting shall be particularly specified in the notice to be 
previously given to each Trustee. 

Section IV. This act shall be a public act, and in force from 
and after its passage. 

F. CORWIN, 
Speaker of the House of Representaiives. 
WM. BROSS, 
President of the Senate. 

Approved, February 19, 1867, 
R. J. OGLESBT, Governor. 

By its charter and the several amendments thereto the 
frovemment of the University thus founded is vested in a 
Board of thirty-six Trustees elected by the Board, with 
whom are associated Trustees elected by certain Annual 
Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, two from 
each conference. Four conferences avail themselves of the 
privilege of electing Trustees, thus increasing the total 
number to forty-four. The Board elects professors and in- 
structors, manages the property of the corporation, and de- 
termines the general policy of the institution. 

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50 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

UNIVERSITY STATUTES. 

The following statutes of the University have been 
adopted by the Trustees, and are operative : 

I. The PBBsroBNT. The President of the University shall be 
the head of the educational departments of the University, and of 
each of them. He shall see that all the rules and regulations 
prescribed by the Board of Trustees or the Executive Committee 
for the government of the University are faithfully observed. He 
shall exercise such general executive powers as are necessary to 
the good government of the University and the protection of its 
Interests, and are not otherwise provided for. It shall be his duty 
to nominate to the Board, officers of Instruction, except as other- 
wise provided, and to see that all officers of instruction are doing 
a proper amount and a satisfactory quality of work. He shall 
prepare an annual report on the condition and needs of the 
University, shall cause the same to be printed, and shall send a 
copy to each member of the Board prior to its annual meeting. 

He shall be, whenever present, the presiding officer of the 
Faculty of any College or School in the University and shall have 
the right of a deciding vote In case of a tie. He shall appoint all 
committees provided for by the Faculty, unless otherwise ordered, 
and shall call extra meetings of any Faculty, whenever, in his 
Judgment, such meetings may be required by the welfare of the 
University. 

II. Officers of Instbuction. The officers of instruction in 
the University shall have designation and precedence as follows: 

1. Professors. 

2. Acting Professors. 

3. Associate Professors. 

4. Assistant Professors. 
6. Instructors. 

6. Tutors. 

7. Lecturers. 

8. Such other subordinate officers as may be from time to 
time appointed. 

III. Faculties. The Faculty of any College or School shall 
be constituted of officers of Instruction who are above the rank of 
Tutor. 

Each department of study shall be under the supervision of a 
Professor or Acting Professor, who shall be the head of the de- 
partment, and who, subject to the direction of the Faculty, shall 
have final decision in all matters relating to the work of the 
department In case there shall be two or more officers having 
the rank of Professor in any department, the one first api)olnted 
shall have precedence. 

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STATUTES. 51 

ISach Faculty shall have power to determine the requirements 
for the admission of students to such departments of the Uni- 
Torslty as are under its jurisdiction; to prescribe and define the 
Tarious courses of study for undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents; to determine, subject to revision by the Board of Trustees, 
the requirements for such degrees as are offered to students 
under its jurisdiction; to enact and enforce such rules for the 
guidance and government of its own students as it may deem 
best adapted to the interests of the University. 

There shall be elected by the Board of Trustees, or the Ex- 
ecutive Committee, a Dean of each School or College, whose duty 
it shall be to preside at all meetings of the Faculty of such 
School or College in the absence of the President of the Uni- 
versity. He shall annually submit to the President of the Uni- 
versity, not later than the first day of June, a report of the work 
of the School or College to which he belongs, with such recom- 
mendations as he may deem advisable. The report so submitted 
may be made a part of the President's annual report to the 
Board of Trustees. 

Each Faculty may present at any meeting of the Board, or of 
the Executive Committee, a report on any matters concerning the 
interests of its School or College, which report shall be trans- 
mitted through the President of the University. 

No ofllcer in the University shall absent himself from the 
discharge of his proper duties in the University longer than 
three college days at any one time without securing the previous 
consent of the President of the University, or the Dean of 
the School to which said officer of instruction belongs; but this 
rule shall not be applied in case of absence occasioned by sick- 
ness or by death of relatives. 

A Committee for the Regulation of Athletic Sports shall here- 
after be annually appointed and chosen as follows: Three mem- 
bers of the University Faculties and three alumni of the Uni- 
versity, these six to be appointed by the Executive Committee; 
and also three undergraduates to be chosen during the first week 
of the College of Liberal Arts year by the Athletic Association. 
This committee shall have entire supervision and control of all 
athletic exercises within and without the precincts of the Uni- 
versity, subject to the authority of the Faculty of Liberal Arts. 

IV. Duties and Disciplinb or Students. All students are 
required to obey the rules of the University, to comply with the 
rules and regulations made by the Faculty of the School or Col- 
lege to which they belong, and to conduct thenuselves at all times 
with decorum and propriety. 

Any student who is sent for by the President or any officer of 
instruction of the Faculty under which he Is enrolled shall com- 
ply with the call without delay, and students must at all^ times 

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52 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

obey the directions of the President or any officer of instruction 
in the School or College to which they belong, pertaining to good 
order In the institution. 

A student may be suspended, dismissed, or expelled by a vote 
of two-thirds of the Professors of the Faculty of the School or 
College in which he is a member, provided always that, prior to 
such contemplated suspension, dismission, or expulsion, he be 
granted the right to a full and impartial hearing before the 
Faculty, and in all cases of discipline contemplating suspension, 
dismission, or expulsion the vote shall be by ballot. In the 
Academy this power of discipline shall belong to the Faculty of 
Liberal Arts. 

Concerted absence from any appointed duty by a class, or by 
any number of students together, will be regarded as a violation 
of good order, and will be followed by suspension, dismission, or 
expulsion, at the discretion of the Faculty., 

When any Faculty shall become satisfied that a student is 
not fulfilling the purpose of his residence at the University, or 
is for any cause an unfit member thereof, the President shall 
notify his parents or guardians, that they may have an oppor- 
tunity to withdraw him, and if he is not withdrawn within a 
reasonable time he shall be dismissed. 

Students of societies in the University are forbidden to invite 
any lecturer to address them in public until the name of the 
proposed lecturer shall have been presented to the President of 
the University, or to the Dean of the School to which such stu- 
dents or societies belong, and his permission to extend the invi- 
tation has been obtained. 

Publication by any student or students of any paper or pro- 
duction bearing the name of the University, or purporting to 
issue from it, is forbidden, unless the publication is previously 
approved by the President. 

Women students in the College of Liberal Arts or in the 
Academy, who are not residents of Evanston, are required to 
live in Woman's Hall or in the College Cottage, unless special 
permission shall be granted them to live elsewhere. Application 
for such permission shall be made to a committee which shall 
consist of the President of the University, the Principal of the 
Academy, the Dean of Women, and the Business Manager of the 
University. 

Excursions upon Lake Michigan in steamers or other vessels 
by bodies of students in departments of the University situated 
in Evanston, shall not be planned or carried out without the con- 
sent of the President, or the Executive Committee, which con- 
sent shall not be given until all possible precautions for the 
safety of the excursion party have been taken under the direction 
of a competent University representative. 

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STATUTES. 58 

The Oxford cap and gown shall be worn as an official dress 
at Commencement 

V. Graduation. All d^reee In this institution, except hon- 
orary degrees, shall be conferred by the Board of Trustees on 
the recommendation of the proper Faculty; honorary degrees 
may be conferred 4ipon the recommendation of the University 
Council. 

Prior to the Commencement of any School or College, the 
Faculty thereof shall report to the Board of Trustees, if that 
Board is in session, the names in full and the places of residence 
of all students whom they shall recommend for degrees, where- 
upon the Board shall, in its discretion, pass a resolution to 
confer the same. In case the Board shall not be in session, the 
Faculty shall report the names of the aforesaid to the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees, who shall recommend that 
the President confer the degrees and report the same to the 
Board of Trustees for its approval. 

For the recommendation of students to degrees by the dif- 
ferent Faculties, all votes shall be by ballot. All candidates 
for degrees, except honorary degrees, shall be personally present 
at Commencement exercises, unless the Board or Executive Com- 
mittee, on the recommendation of the appropriate Faculty, shall 
deem it proper to confer the degree in the absence of the candi- 
date; and the candidate shall perform such public duties on Com- 
mencement day as the Faculty may designate. 

The name of no person shall be presented for a degree till 
all his dues to the University are paid. No fee shall be charged 
for an honorary degree. All degrees shall be conferred by the 
President on the authority of the Board of Trustees. 

No duplicate diplomas shall be granted to graduates of the 
University without such proof of the loss of the original by 
affidavit or otherwise as shall be satisfactory to the Executive 
Committee. 

VI. The University Council. The President of the Uni- 
versity, together with the Dean of each Faculty, and another 
member thereof elected annually by the Faculty, shall constitute 
the University Council. 

The University Council shall meet on the day preceding the 
annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, and at such other 
times as the President of the University may designate. 

The University Council may consider such matters as per- 
tain to the interests of the University as a whole, and may make 
recommendations concerning the same to the Board of Trustees. 

The University Council may recommend to the Board of 
Tmstaes the person or persons upon whom they may think it 
fitting that honorary degrees should be conferred. ^ j 

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54 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT. 

The College of Liberal Arts was the first department 
of the University to be organized. It was opened to stu- 
dents on November the 5th, 1855. It is situated in the city 
of Evanston, on the University Campus, with dormitories 
for women on Willard Hall Campus conveniently near. 
The courses of study offered in the College are designed to 
afford a broad and liberal culture without direct refer- 
ence to a professional career. They constitute a valuable 
preliminary to the study of Law, Medicine, Theology, and 
other professions, and also equip young men and women for 
the work of teaching in secondary schools and colleges. The 
curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor, or Master, of 
Arts, or Science. Courses are also offered leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The Medical School was first organized in 1859 as a 
department of the Lind University of Chicago, but was 
reorganized in 1864, as an independent school, under the 
name of the Chicago Medical College. In 1869 it became 
affiliated with Northwestern University, retaining, however, 
its old name until 1891, when that name was changed to 
Northwestern University Medical School. It was the first 
Medical School in the United States to enforce a standard 
of preliminary education, to adopt the longer annual 
courses of instruction, and to follow a graded curriculum. 

The Medical School is in Chicago, on Dearborn street, 
between Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth streets. Its prox- 
imity to various hospitals and its immediate connection 
with Wesley and Mercy Hospitals afford facilities for 
clinical teaching of high order. The course of study lead- 
ing to the degree of Doctor of Medicine covers a period of 
four years. 

The Law School was founded in 1859 as a department 
of the old University of Chicago. In 1873 it was placed 
under the joint patronage of Northwestern University and 



HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT. 55 

the XJiiiyersily of Chicago and assumed the name of Union 
College of Law. From 1886 to 1891 the School had a sep- 
arate corporate existence, but in the latter year it was 
reorganized as a regular department of Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 

The Law School is in Northwestern University Building 
at Lake and Dearborn streets, Chicago, and has commodious 
and handsomely equipped quarters. The course of study 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws covers a period 
of three years. 

Thb School of Pharmacy was incorporated in 1886 
uider the name of the Illinois College of Pharmacy. It 
was made a department of the University during the same 
year; in 1891 the name was changed to Northwestern 
University School of Pharmacy. The work of the school 
18 carried on in the University Building at Lake and Dear- 
bom streets, Chicago. 

The course of study in the School of Pharmacy leading 
to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy extends through 
three half-year terms, and that leading to the degree of 
Pharmaceutical Chemist, through four half-year terms. 

The Dental School was organized in 1887 and three 
years later became a department of the University. In 
1896 it absorbed the American Dental College and for some 
years occupied the building on Franklin and Madison 
streets, Chicago, formerly occupied by that school. It is 
now accommodated in the University Building on Lake and 
Dearborn streets, where it has ample provision for leetores, 
laboratories, and clinics. The course of study leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of 
three years. 

The School of Music was organized in 1895, and two 
years later was established in a substantial building erected 
for its use on the Willard Hall Campus in Evanston. It 

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56 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

offers extensive courses in the practical and theoretical 
study of music as a part of general culture and in prepara- 
tion for a professional career. 

The Evanston Academy of the University, situated on 
the campus at Evanston, was organized in 1860. Orand 
Prairie Seminary at Onarga, Illinois, established in 1863, 
was aflaiiated with the University in 1901. The Elgin 
Academy at Elgin, Illinois, chartered in 1839 and opened in 
1856, was affiliated with the University in 1903. These 
offer courses of study in preparation for admission to Col- 
lege or to a professional school, or for a business or domestic 
career. 

Garrett Bibucal Institute, chartered in 1855 as a 
Theological School of the Methodist Episcopal Church, is 
situated on the University Campus. It is on a separate 
foundation and under independent management, but has 
always been recognized as meeting the needs for a theolog- 
ical school in the University. It offers courses of study 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. With the 
Institute is affiliated the Norwegian-Danish Theological 
Seminary in Evanston. 

The Swedish Theological Seminary, situated on the 
University Campus, offers a four years' course of study in 
Theology. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The University Campus in Evanston has an area of 
about seventy-five acres and is beautifully situated on the 
shore of Lake Michigan, about two miles from the north- 
em limits of the city of Chicago. On it are placed the 
buildings of the College of Liberal Arts, Garrett Biblical 
Institute, the Academy, and the Cumnock School of Ora- 
tory. The School of Music and the women's dormitories — 



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GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 57 

Willard Hall, Pearsons Hall, and Chapin Hall — are on 
Willard Hall Campus, distant from the University Campus 
about three minutes' walk. 

A detailed statement of the University buildings is 
given below. 

THE GOLLEQE OF UBEBAL ABTB. 

Univeriity Hall, a capacious stone structure of attractive 
architecture, was erected in 1869. It contains tlie President's 
office, the administrative offices of the College, the botanical, 
geological, and zodlogical laboratories, lecture and recitation 
rooms, and the private offices of professors. 

Fayertoeather Hall of Science, erected in 1886, was the gift of 
the late Mr. D. B. Fayerweather, of New York. It is constructed 
of stone and red pressed brick, with terra-cotta trimmings. The 
front la 130 feet, and the depth 60 feet At the rear are two 
wings, extending 64 feet, enclosing a court in which the power 
house for the building is located. The building is divided into 
two sections, for chemistry and physics, separated by a fireproof 
wall. The mineralogy section of the museum and the miner- 
alogical laboratories are on the chemistry side of this building. 

OrringUm hunt Library Building was erected in 1893. Its 
erection was made possible by a gift from the late Mr. Orrington 
Lunt, of Evanston, one of the charter members of the Board of 
Trustees and for some time its president, . supplemented by the 
gifts of other generous donors. The building is constructed of 
Bedford limestone and presents a noble and pleasing appearance. 
Its dimensions are 162 by 73 feet. The main floor contains a 
room for book storage (directly connected with a second book- 
room in the basement), the reading room, and the offices of 
administration. On the second floor there is an auditorium of 
handsome flnlsh, with seating capacity for flve hundred persons, 
also a large lecture-room now occupied by the Art Collection of 
the University Guild, recently donated to the University, and 
other apartments for class, seminary, and office use. In the 
third story, which extends over the central section of the build- 
ing, and in the well-lighted basement, there are rooms used for 
recitations and also for general University purposes. 

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58 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Dearborn Observatory, a substantial stone structure, was 
erected In 1888 through the generosity of Mr. James B. Hobbs, of 
Chicago. Its length from north to south is 81 feet, and its great- 
est breadth is 71 feet. It includes a dome for the great Equa- 
torial, a Meridian Circle room, a Library, and eight additional 
rooms, the whole being arranged especially for convenience In 
carrying on astronomical work. 

The great equatorial refracting telescope was made by Alvan 
Clark ft Sons, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1861. It is fitted 
with driving clock, micrometer, and other appliances necessary 
for first-class work. The dimensions of the Equatorial are: 

Diameter of declination circle, 30 inches, reading by vernier 
to five minutes, and by two microscopes to ten seconds of arc; 
diameter of hour circle, 22 inches, reading by vernier to single 
minutes, and by microscopes to single seconds of time; focal 
length of telescope, 23 feet; aperture to object glass, 18 V6 inches. 

The meridian circle is of the first class, and was constructed 
in 1867, by Messrs. A. Repsold ft Sons, of Hamburg. This in- 
strument has an object glass of six French inches aperture, and 
a divided circle of forty inches diameter, reading by four micro- 
scopes. In plan of construction it is like Bessel's celebrated 
K5nigsberg circle by the same makers, but has some recent im- 
provements in the mode of illuminating the field of view, to- 
gether with apparatus for registering declinations. Hough's 
printing and recording chronographs are used for recording 
meridian observations and other phenomena. 

The Observatory has a chronometer (William Bond ft Son, 
No. 279), and three mercurial pendulum clocks. 

Old College, — ^This building, which was the first to be erected 
by the University, originally stood on the corner of Hinman 
Avenue and Davis Street, and for many years was the only build- 
ing which the University used for educational purposes. It was 
moved to the Campus in 1871, and was enlarged for the use of 
the Academy. In 1899, when the Academy was transferred to 
Fisk Hall, it was moved to its present position south of the 
gymnasium. It has been thoroughly refitted and is used at 
present for college class-room purposes. 

The Cfymnasium is a well-lighted, two-story brick building. 
The basement contains dressing-rooms, lockers, baths for men 
and for women, and a room for ball-throwing. The exercising- 
room is 40 by 80 feet, with a height of ceiling of 20 feet, unob- 

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GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 59 

Btructed by pillars, leaving ample space for the practice of indoor 
athletics. It is supplied with light and heavy apparatus for gen- 
eral gymnastic and athletic exercise. 

The Central Heating Plant is situated on the lake shore at 
the rear of the Gymnasium. It has capacity for all the build- 
ings on the lower campus and is adjustable in such a way as to 
care for new buildings under consideration. 

THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

The Laboratory Building of the Medical School is situated on 
Dearborn street, between Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth streets. 
It has a frontage of 110 feet, and a depth of 105 feet; is five 
stories above the basement, and is constructed of cut stone and 
brick, with terra-cotta trimmings and interior finishing of the 
best materials and workmanship. 

On the first floor are the amphitheater, pathological museum, 
and the laboratory of physiology and biology. On the second 
floor are the laboratories of pathology, bacteriology, hygiene, and 
clinical pathology. On the third floor are large laboratories of 
histology and embryology with three smaller rooms for original 
research, equipped with all necessary apparatus. A large lecture- 
room, room for chemical and physical apparatus, and the private 
laboratory of the professor of chemistry are on the same floor. 
On the fourth floor one-half of the entire space is occupied by 
chemical laboratories for students* practical work, and the other 
half by the laboratory of physiological chemistry and of pharma- 
cology, with smaller rooms for advanced or original work. On 
the fifth floor is a large dissecting-room, a room for demonstrat- 
ing surgical operations, and three smaller rooms for special dis- 
sections. 

The Museum of the school, located in this building, is fur- 
nished with preparations and specimens illustrative of normal, 
pathological, and comparative anatomy. 

Davis Hall stands beside the Laboratory Building. It was 
erected in the summer of 1893. On the first fioor are offices and 
faculty rooms, a large amphitheater, an apothecary's room, an 
examination room for the director of the dispensary, and suites 
of rooms for the dispensary departments of medicine, surgery, 
orthopedics, and geni to-urinary surgery. On the second and 
third floors there are smaller amphitheaters, and suites of rooms 



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60 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

especially arranged and equipped for tlie departments of 
laryngology, gynecology, neurology, pediatrics, otology, ophthal- 
mology, and dermatology. On the fourth floor are the library 
and reading-room and the suite assigned to the Toung Men's 
Christian Association, comprising an assembly-room and a gym- 
nasium with shower-baths and dressing-rooms. 

Wesley Hoapital, a modem, well equipped hospital contain- 
ing two hundred and twenty-five beds, under the patronage of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church and controlled by a local board, 
is connected by corridors with Davis Hall. With 'its labora- 
tories for sterilizing and preparing dressings and instruments, 
Its amphitheaters, its clinical and pathological laboratories, drug 
room, and morgue; with its sunbaths and suites of private rooms, 
and with Its commodious, light, and well ventilated wards, this 
institution has reached a high mark in hospital construction and 
equipment 

LAW, PHABMAOT, AND DEITTAL SCHOOLS. 

Northwestern University Building, in which are located the 
Law School, School of Pharmacy, and the Dental School, stands 
at the south-east comer of Lake and Dearborn streets, Chicago. 
This property was recently acquired by the University at large 
cost and has been remodeled for the uses of the three schools 
which are housed in it The Chicago offices of the President 
and the Business Manager are on the second floor of the build- 
ing. The Law School occupies the entire third floor, containing 
a floor space of some twenty-three thousand square feet The 
quarters are commodious and handsomely equipped and include 
two lecture rooms, a court room, an alumni room, a students' 
assembly room, several private studies for the school law clubs 
for similar purposes; also a set of two hundred lockers and the 
usual office rooms and professors' rooms. The library and read- 
ing-room occupy flve thousand square feet of floor spaca The 
students' assembly room is spacious and well equipped as a place 
for rest and conversation. 

The School of Pharmacy occupies the whole of the fourth 
floor and a part of the second floor. 

The Dental School occupies the fifth and sixth fioors, with 
chemical laboratories on the second floor, and the great clinic 
room and the anatomical laboratories on the seventh floor. 

This building, situated as it is in the heart of Chicago, afPords 
to the schools located in it unexcelled advantages. 

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GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 61 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

MuMic Hall is situated on Willard Hall Campus, a short dis- 
tance west of the University Campus. It was orisinally designed 
as a home for the School of Music, and Was completed in 1897. 
It is substantially built of stone and brick, surmounted with a 
tile roof, and finished in pine. The first fioor is divided into 
fourteen teaching and practice rooms, including an office. The 
second floor contains three additional class-rooms and a well- 
arranged concert-hall, seating over three hundred. The hall is 
provided with a large stage, dressing-rooms, a grand piano, and 
a two-manual pipe-organ with pedals. 

THE ACADEMIES. 

Fisk Hall, erected in 1898, and dedicated January 28, 1899, 
is devoted to the work of the University Academy. It is named 
in honor of Professor Herbert P. Fisk, who was connected with 
the Academy as Principal from 1873 until 1904. This building, 
which was the gift of Mr. William Deering, is Romanesque in 
style, and is a three-story structure of brick and terra-cotta, with 
stone trimmings and a tile roof. It stands at the south end of 
the Campus, and has a frontage of 180 feet on Sheridan Road. 
The woodwork throughout is of quartered oak, and the heating, 
lighting, and ventilating appointments are excellent. 

Grand Prairie Seminary, at Onarga, Illinois, has three build- 
ings, an Auditorium seating six hundred persons, a Recitation 
Hall, and a Dormitory for women. The campus on which these 
buildings are situated consists of about six acres of beautifully 
shaded ground. 

Elgin Academy has two well constructed buildings, situated 
in the most elevated portion of the city of Elgin. The Main 
Building is a three-story brick structure used for general class- 
rooms purposes. Lovell Science Hall was erected in 1888 through 
the generosity of Mrs. Vincent S. Lovell, and is used for the 
science work of the Academy. 

DOBMITOaiES. 

The Men*8 Dormitory, erected in 1890, is designed to accom- 
modate twenty-eight young men, at a moderate charge for rental. 
The rooms are, for the most part, in suites, consisting of a study 
and two well-lighted bedrooms with wardrobes. 

Willard Hall is a large edifice of pleasing architecture. Be- 
sides a chapel and other public rooms, it contains private apart- 
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62 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

ments for young women, accommodating one hundred and 
twenty. The rooms are of good size, well lighted and ventilated, 
and are cheerful and attractive. The building is provided with 
fire escapes, and is heated by hot water. 

Pearsons Hall and Chapin Holly substantial buildings of brick 
and stone, are convenient and well furnished homes for women. 
Each of these halls affords accommodations for about sixty young 
women, and is under the control of the Woman's Educational 
Aid Association of Evanston. 

OAKBETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 

Memorial Halh a handsome structure of pressed brick, was 
erected on the campus for Garrett Biblical Institute and dedicated 
in May, 1887. It contains the library and lecture rooms of the 
Institute. The most attractive part of the Interior is the chapel, 
which has a seating capacity for about five hundred. The win- 
dows are adorned with elaborate designs in rich cathedral glass, 
in harmony with the ideal of the hall, which was erected as a 
memorial to deceased professors of the Institute and of others 
well known for interest in theological studies. 

Heck Halh erected in 1867, is a dormitory for theological stu- 
dents. It is a brick building, five stories In height, heated by 
steam and lighted by electricity. The rooms are in suites con- 
sisting of study, bed-room, and wardrobe, and afford very com- 
fortable quarters. 

CUMNOCK SCHOOL OF OBATOBY. 

Annie May Swift Hall. — This building was erected during the 
year 1895, for work in elocution and oratory. The style of archi- 
tecture is Venetian. The lower part of the building is of rock- 
faced Lemont limestone, and the upper stories of buff-colored 
Roman brick and terra-cotta. The floor is of red tile. The build- 
ing is heated by steam and lighted by both gas and electricity. It 
is named in memory of a deceased daughter of the late Mr. Gus- 
tavus F. Swift of Chicago, one of the trustees of the University 
and the largest contributor for the erection of the building. On 
the flrst floor are an auditorium, reading-room, and reception 
rooms. The second story is divided into fifteen rooms for private 
instruction. The fioors and partitions are deadened by an im- 
proved system of construction. 



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LIBRARIES. 



LIBRARIES. 



The libraries of the University are placed with due 
regard to the convenience of the several departments using 
them. The largest collection is that of the College of Lib- 
eral Abts, which is housed in the Orrington Lunt Library 
building on the University campus. While designed 
especially to meet the needs of the various departments of 
instruction in the college, this library is at the service of 
all members of the University, subject to the regulations 
which apply to students and officers of the college. Persons 
not connected with the University and desiring to use the 
library for purposes of study, may be granted -library priv- 
ileges if responsibly introduced. Besides the general col- 
lection, which is increasing at the rate of about three thou- 
sand volumes a year, the college library includes special 
collections known as the Greenleaf Collection and the 
Schneider Collection. 

The Greenleaf Collection, the gift In 1870 of the late Mr. 
Luther L. Greenleaf of Evanston, contains 11,246 volumes, also a 
large and valuable assortment of unbound dissertations and 
monographs, chiefly publications of foreign universities and 
learned societies. It is unusually complete in Greek and Latin 
classics, every author being represented by the best editions from 
the earliest to a recent date. It contains also a choice selection 
of standard works in German and other modern languages. In 
the subjects of history, philosophy, theology, and the fine arts, 
there are many works of unique value. 

The Schneider Collection, added to the German section of the 
library in 1898 through the generosity of German citizens of Chi- 
cago, numbers 2,533 volumes. It includes many first editions of 
standard authors. Among its rarities are original prints from 
the period of the Reformation, and a large collection of annuals 
{Musenalmanache and TaachenMcher) of the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. 

Thz Libbabt of the Medical School, known as the Alumni 
Library, is on the fourth fioor of Davis Hall. It has been ac- 
quired by purchase, and by donations from students, alumni, and 
members of the faculty. It contains a large number of reference 
books and dictionaries, and all of the larger systems of Medicine 
and Surgery are at the command of the student. Each depart- 
ment of instruction in the School is well represented. All of the 



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64 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

more important recent works In the various departments of in- 
struction are added to the Library as soon as they appear. 

The Law School Libbabt is centrally located in the rooms of 
the school. The space devoted to it is divided into large, well 
ventilated, and well lighted alcoves, each alcove containing a 
tahle and comfortable chairs. The library is well stocked with 
reports and necessary works of reference, and is being gradually 
increased. Its equipment makes it pre-eminently adapted to 
work of investigation. 

The Libbabt or the School of Phabmact is well supplied 
with carefully selected reference books and the principal current 
chemical and pharmaceutical Journals. 

The Libbabt or Gabbett Biblical Institutb Is in Memorial 
Hall on the University Campus. It has been collected to meet 
the needs of theological students, and is well selected and con- 
veniently arranged. A rare collection of Methodist literature, 
the largest and richest collection in existence, was recently given 
to this library by Mr. William Deering. 

The number of bound volumes and pamphlets in the 
several libraries of the University (January, 1906) is as 

follows : 

Bound Volumes. Pamphlets 

College of Liberal Arts 60,350 39,500 

Dearborn Observatory 1,000 1,000 

Medical School 4,900 5,000 

Law School 16,000 

School of Pharmacy 1,000 1,000 

Dental School 2,600 15,000 

85,850 61,500 

Garrett Biblical Institute 19,349 4,150 

ToUl 105,199 65,650 

In Addition to the above library facilities, students re- 
siding in Evanston have free use of the Evanston Free Pub- 
lic Library, containing 37,339 volumes. In Chicago stu- 
dents have access to the Chicago Public Library, 312,000 
volumes; the John Crerar Library, 150,000 volumes; the 
Newberry Library, 208,844 volumes ; and the Library of the 
Chicago Historical Society, 50,000 volumes. 

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MXTSEUMS. 65 

MU8EUM8. 

The Museum of the College of Liberal Arts was for 
many years the object of special attention on the part of 
the late Professor Oliver Marcy. It contains many thou- 
sands of rare and valuable specimens, and is divided into 
sections as follows: Anthropology, Botany, Geology, Min- 
eralogy, and Zoology. The section of Mineralogy is placed 
in Fayerweather Hall of Science; the remainder of the 
museum is lodged on the fourth floor of University Hall, 
and in the rooms of the departments of Botany, Geology, 
and Zoology. 

The Section of Anthropology comprises specimens in aborig- 
inal archaeology, and has been developed largely through the in- 
terest of Dr. WUliam A. Phillips of Bvanston. Primitive ceramic 
art In the United States is well represented by several hundred 
specimens from the mounds of Illinois, Wisconsin, Kentucky, 
and Missouri. Primitive work in stone and copper is represented 
by large collections from various parts of the United States and 
from Ehisland. The Section contains about 8,000 specimens 
neatly arranged In cases in a department by themselves. During 
recent years a collection of material from the cliff-dwellings of 
the pueblos of New Mexico has been added to the Museum. 

The Section of Botany is made up chiefly of gifts receive<^ 
from alumni and friends of the college and of collections made 
by students and instructors. It now contains about five thousand 
species. It includes collections made by Robert Kennicott from 
the Red River of the North; by Vasey from the Rocky Moun- 
tains; by Thomas and Bentley, and by I. A. lApham, from 
Southern Illinois; also collections from New England and New 
York, the Lake Superior region, and Cook County, Illinois. The 
Henry H. Babcock Herbarium, donated in 1887 by Mrs. Mary 
Keyes Babcock, of Kenll worth, is systematically arranged, hand- 
wmely provided with substantial cases, and contains ten thou- 
sand species from all quarters of the globe. 

The Section of Oeology contains typical rocks from this coun- 
try and from Europe. These exhibit the variations In structure 
and texture of the large groups of sedimentary, metamorphic, 
and Igneous rocks, and also show the rock formations In the 
geological column from the more ancient to the recent rocks. 

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66 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

The series of fossils, both of plants and of animals, are quite 
extensive, containing characteristic fossils of the different geo- 
logic periods. The collections which are especially valuable are: 
1, Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils, the gift of the Smithsonian 
Institution; 2» Fossils and rocks from Illinois (Geological Survey; 
3, Niagara fossils from Chicago and Racine, some of which are 
type specimens; 4, Illinois Carboniferous flora, largely from 
Grundy County; 5, miscellaneous, containing specimens from 
many parts of the world. 

The Section of Mineralogy contains specimens of most of the 
mineral and rock species in such numbers as to illustrate fully 
their characteristics and occurrence. Besides these specimens, 
which have been accumulating to the museum for several years, 
are to be mentioned the Ayers loan-collection; additions from 
the Columbian Exposition, consisting chiefly of mass specimens 
and illustrations of economic ores; the Tyler collection, contain- 
ing many crystals, notably good calcites; and a fine collection of 
azurites and malachites. 

The Section of Zoology contains (1) with few exceptions all 
the mammals, birds, reptiles, and batrachians indigenous to Illi- 
nois; (2) all the mammals and birds of the New South Wales 
exhibit at the Columbian Exposition. The kangaroos and lemurs, 
the platypus and the echidna, the emu and the cassowary, the 
rifle-bird, the regent and the lyre-bird, and the apteryx from 
New Zealand, in all four hundred and fifty specimens, make a 
very complete presentation of that strange fauna; (3) a series of 
birds and a series of corals from the Philippine Islands (it is 
thought that the species of cuckoos and parrots are complete for 
the locality) ; (4) a series of skeletons, mostly prepared by Ward, 
including the elephant, the whale, the American crocodile, and 
skeletons of birds and fishes; (5) miscellaneous (among the 
larger animals are the moose, the buffalo, the Virginia deer, the 
white bear, and the reindeer). In this section there are birds 
from India, Central America, Brazil, British Guiana, Norway, and 
Russia; a collection of fifteen thousand marine and fresh-water 
shells; a large collection of fishes donated by the Smithsonian 
Institution, also fishes from Lake Michigan, prepared by Dr. W. 
A. Phillips; and a multitude of low forms of marine life, col- 
lected by Professor William North Rice of Middletown, Connecti- 
cut. The 'section contains about 30,000 specimens. 



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MUSEUMS. 67 

The Museum of the Medical School is arranged in 
the Laboratory Building and contains preparations and 
specimens illustrative of normal, pathological, and compara- 
tive anatomy. 

The Museum op the School op Pharmacy is excep- 
tionally complete in exhibits of drugs, chemicals, prepara- 
tions, and apparatus. It is situated on the fourth floor of 
the University Building in Chicago. 

The Museum of the Dental School includes speci- 
mens of comparative anatomy showing heads with the teeth 
of fishes, reptiles, saurians, and the several orders of mam- 
mals; an exceptionally complete and valuable set. of speci- 
mens of the human skull, with dissections in a series show- 
ing the development of the teeth and their roots from their 
first appearance to the full development of the adult ; also a 
large collection of abnormal formations of the human 
teeth, collected largely in the school by students and alumni, 
and through donations by members of the dental profession. 

THE UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT. 

An association composed of alumni and friends of the 
University maintains, at the corner of Augusta and Noble 
streets, Chicago, a social settlement known as the North- 
western University Settlement. The building in which the 
work is carried on is held in trust by the University for the 
use of the Settlement. It is a four story brick structure, 
60x78 feet, looking south upon two small gardens and hav- 
ing a space 30x78 fyet on the north for an auditorium, 
gymnasium, and baths. On the ground floor are the kinder- 
garten, men's club rooms, and boiler room. The main floor 
contains the kitchen, coffee house, reception room, office 
and library. Five larpre connected club rooms, one of which 
is the house dining room, and the domestic science and 
serving rooms occupy the second floor. The third floor 
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68 NORTHWESTERN UNISTBRSITY. 

The object, like that of Oxford House and Toynbee Hall 
in London, the Andover House in Boston, and similar 
institutions, is the intelleetual, social, and religious Im- 
provement of the neglected city population. The settlement 
is located on the edge of the large Polish quarter of the 
city, and in the heart of the most densely populated district 
in Chicago. The resident group is composed of men and 
women engaged in educational, professional, and -public 
service who wish to live among the people bearing the 
heaviest burden of the industrial world. Opportunity is 
also offered to undergraduates for philanthropic work and 
practical acquaintance with sociological problems. The 
plan includes classes for instruction, clubs for social im- 
provement, lectures, concerts, house-to-house visitation, 
legal and medical dispensaries, and the maintenance of an 
open reading room. The expenses are met by membership 
subscriptions and voluntary contributions. 

THE UNIVERSITY GUILD. 

The University Guild is an association of women, for 
the most part residents of Evanston, who seek to secure for 
the University valuable works of art and to cultivate, by 
means of frequent lectures and discussions, artistic taste 
and sentiment in matters of common life. The Guild holds 
monthly meetings in its rooms in Orrington Lunt Library, 
and in many ways renders material service to the Univer- 
sity. The Guild rooms are open to the public every Wed- 
nesday afternoon throughout the year. 

The Art Conection already secured b^ the Guild is valued at 
!;everal thousands of dollars. It contains a fine collection of pot- 
tery and porcelain, including handsome specimens of Doulton, 
Royal Worcester, Wedgewood, Coalport, Elton, Royal Berlin. 
Royal Copenhagen, Royal Vienna, Hungarian, Russian, Spanish, 
Royal Sevres, Limoges, Italian, Chinese, Delft, Rookwood, and 
Bulgarian ware. There are fifteen specimens of Doulton ware, 
including the famous Lambeth Faience Vase, which attracted so 

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PUBLIC LECTURES, CONCERTS, ETC. 69 

mnch attrition at the Columbian Exposition. The vase is six 
feet three inches in height, and two feet six inches in diameter. 
The duplicate of it was sold in England for $6,000. There are 
handsome specimens of French bronze and of Venetian and Bo- 
hemian glass. The collection also includes some fine plaster casts 
presented by the French Government, as well as twenty busts of 
eminent scholars, and Thorwaldsen's Mercury, Venus, Hebe, and 
the Shepherdess. 



PUBLIC LECTURES, CONCERTS, EVENING COURSES, ETC. 

In addition to the regular courses of instruction an- 
nounced in subsequent pages of this catalogue, there are 
many lectures and evening courses and concerts given 
under the auspices of the University and its various or- 
ganizations, open to students and to the general public. 

The N. W. Harris Lectures — These lectures are given annually 
under an endowment established by Mr. N. W. Harris of Chicago, 
during the current year, 1906-06. In his letter of gift the donor 
expressed the desire "that the fund should be used to stimulate 
scientific research of the highest type and to bring the result of 
such research before the students and friends of Northwestern 
University, and through them before the world. By the term 
'seientific research' is meant scholarly investigation into any 
department of human thought or effort, without limitation to re- 
search in the so-called natural sciences, but with a desire that 
such investigation should be extended to cover the whole field of 
human knowledge." 

The lectures given on this foundation are to be published by 
the University or otherwise, and shall bear the name of the foun. 
dation. 

Lectures an Legal Tactics — ^A series of lectures delivered an- 
nnaUy on Monday evenings in Hurd Hall of the Law School 
Rooms, and open to all persons interested in the practice of the 
law. The lectures are given by prominent members of the Chi- 
cago Bar who have made a special study of the subjects of which 
they speak. The series for 1905-06 is as follows: 
Acquisition and Retention of a Clientage. Mr. Frank L. Loesch. 
The Practice Acts of Illinois. Mr. Keene H. Addington. 
Municipal Contracts and Securities. Mr. Chester B. Masslich. 

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70 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Criminal Practice. Mr. Frederick L. Fake. 

Railroad Litigation. Mr. Robert J. Gary. 

Personal Injury Practice. Mr. Andrew J. Hirschl. 

Appellate Court Practice. Mr. Edwin W. Moore. 

Drawing Judicial Decrees. Mr. Qeorge A. Carpenter. 

Practice Under Board of Trade and Stock Exchange Rules. Mr. 

George P. Merrick. 
Preparation of a Case for Trial. Mr. Edwin M. Ashcraft. 
Life and Benefit Insurance. Mr. Theodore K. Long. 
The Work of a General Attorney for a Corporation or Business 

House. Mr. James C. McMath. 
Banking and Trust Company Practice. Mr. William S. Miller. 
The Torrens System. Professor Charles G. Little. 
Ways and Manners of Judges. Mr. Edward M. Winston. 
Federal Practice. Mr. Charles B. Keeler. 
Practice Before Masters in Chancery. Mr. Victor M. Eltlng. 
Practice Before Police Magistrates. Mr. John R. Caverly. 
Practice Under Federal Customs Laws. Mr. William Brace. 
Bankruptcy Practice. Mr. Frank L. Wean. 

Prosecution Under Municipal Ordinances. Mr. George H. Kriete. 
The Revised City Code of Chicago. Mr. Roswell B. Mason. 
Practice Under the New Municipal Court Act. Mr. Hiram T. 

Gilbert. 

Artists* Series of Concerts in the School of Music — These con- 
certs are given under the auspices of the School of Music and are 
open to the public at a small fee. The series for the past year 
included the following: 

Two Chamber Music Recitals by the Kneisel Quartette of Boston. 
Six Chamber Music Recitals by the University String Quartette. 
Song Recital by Miss Muriel Foster. 
Concert by the Pittsburgh Orchestra, Emil Paur, Director and 

Piano Soloist. 
Indian Songs, and the Melodrama of Hiawatha. Mrs. Saldee 

Knowland Coe, pianist; Mrs. Eleanor Kirkham, contralto; 

and Mrs. Llda Scott Brown, reader. 
Music of the Olden Time upon the instruments for which it was 

written; exhibit of old time instruments, by Arnold 

Dolmetsch, Mrs. Arnold Dolmetsch, and Miss Kathleen 

Salmon. 
Song Recital by Mr. George Hamlin, tenor. 



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PUBLIC LECTURES, CONCERTS, ETC. 71 

Baccalaureate Bermcn. (1905). Reverend John H. Boyd, D.D., of 
B>vanston. 

Ccmmencement Address, (1905). Reverend William Fraser Mc- 
Dowell, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Address on the Day of Prayer for Colleges, (1906). Reverend 
William E. Barton, D.D., of Oak Park, Illinois. 

Address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society. (1905). Reverend 
Jenkin Lloyd Jones, D.D., of Chicago. Subject: Walt 
Whitman as a Prophet of Democracy. 

Lectures before the University Ouild — ^A series of lectures on 
art topics is delivered annually before the members of the Uni- 
versity Guild and their invited friends. 

Sigma Xi Society and the Benjamin Franklin Anniversary — 
Two lectures on the occasion of the two hundredth anniversary of 
the birth of Benjamin Franklin. 

Franklin as a Diplomat Professor James A. James. 
Is Investigation Worth While? Professor Edward L. 
Nichols, Cornell University. 

Student Lecture Course— A series of five lectures and concerts 
given annually under the auspices of the College Young Men's 
Christian Association. 

Lectures before the Medical Faculty and Students — 
Smallpox and Vaccination, an illustrated lecture. Dr. J. T. Scham- 

berg, of Philadelphia. 
The Practice of Medicine in the Orient. Dr. William J. Wanless, 

of MiraJ, India. 
Blastomycosis, an illustrated lecture. Dr. F. H. Montgomery. 
Hydrotherapy. Professor Simon Baruch, of New York. 
Smallpox, an Illustrated lecture. Dr. Heman Spaulding, Chief 

Medical Inspector of the Health Department, Chicago. 
Special Clinic during Alumni Week. Dr. Morris Richardson, 

Professor of Surgery in Harvard University. 
Alumni Clinic at the Dental School — An annual clinic is given 
under the auspices of the Alumni Association of the Dental 
School which Is open to all members of the dental profession. 
This Is participated in by members of the Dental School faculty 
and alumni and is intended to present the most recent results of 
dental Investigation. 

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72 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Evening Course*— Beginning with the year 1905-06. courses of 
lectures are given in Northwestern University Building. Chicago, 
by members of the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts. The 
following were the courses given during the current year: 
Ten lectures on American History. Professor James A. James. 
Ten lectures on Economic and Social Problems. Professor John 

H. Gray. 
Ten lectures on General and Economic Geology. Professor Ulysses 

S. Grant. 
Twenty lessons in Elementary French. Mr. J. W. A. Kuhne. 
Twenty lessons in Elementary Spanish. Dr. Alphonse de Salylo. 

ATHLETICS. 

All athletic interests are under the supervision and con- 
trol of a committee of fifteen members representing the 
faculty, alumni, and students, of the College, the Medical 
School, the Law School, the School of Pharmacy, and the 
Dental School. As at present constituted the committee 
consists of the following members : 

Faculty Representatives — Professors O. F. Long, Chairman; 
W. S. Hall, F. C. Woodward. D. C. Bccles, and E. S. WlUard. 

Alunml Representatives — ^Messrs. Frank E. Lord, George W. 
Webster, Wirt E. Humphrey, L. R, Glrton, and F. W. Gethro. 

Student Representatives — ^Messrs. J. F. Rommell, David T. 
Hanson, Chauncey C. Colton, R. H. Bryce, and E. F. Crowley. 

This committee has adopted the following regulations, 
based on the Intercollegiate Conference Rules : 

1. No one shall participate in any intercollegiate sport unless 
he he a bona fide student doing full work in a regular or special 
course as defined in the curriculum of his college, and no person 
who has participated as a college student in any intercollegiate 
game as a member of any college team, shall be permitted to 
participate in any game as a member of any other college team 
until he has become a matriculate in such college under the 
above conditions for a period of one year and until after the 
close of the succeeding season devoted to the sport in which he 
last participated; no student shall participate In any Inter- 
collegiate contest who shall not have been In residence one 
semester and who shall not have full credit for a semester's 

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ATHLETICS. 78 

work prerlous to the term or semeeter in which the sport is 
held; and in the institutions represented in this conference, 
preparatory students shall not he eligihle to memhership on 
the college teams. 

2. No person shall he admitted to any intercollegiate contest 
who recelTes any gi^ remuneration, or pay for his services on 
the college teams. 

3. No student shall participate in base-ball, foot-ball, and 
track athletics upon the team of any college or colleges for more 
than four years in the aggregate, and any member of a college 
team who plays during any part of an intercollegiate foot-ball 
(or base-hall) game, does hereby participate in that sport for 
the year, proTided always that the first three games of intercol- 
legiate foot-ball in each season shall not count as participation. 

4. No student shall participate in any intercollegiate contest 
who has ever used or is using his knowledge of athletics or his 
athletic skill for gain, or who has taken part in any athletic 
contest in which a money prize is offered, regardless of the dis- 
position to be made of the same. No person who receives any 
compensation from the Uniyersity for services rendered by way 
of regular instruction shall be allowed to play on any team. 

6. No student shall play in any game under an assumed 



6. No student shall be permitted to participate in any inter- 
collegiate contest who is found by the faculty to be delinquent 
in his studies. 

7. All intercollegiate games shall be played on grounds 
either owned by or under the immediate control of one or both 
of the oollegBS participating in the contest, and all intercollegiate 
games shall be played under student or college management, 
and not under the control of any corporation, or association, or 
prlTate individual. 

8. The elections of managers and captains of teams in each 
coUege shall be subject to the approval of its committee on 
athletics. 

9. College foot-ball teams shall play only with teams repre- 
senting educational Institutions. 

10. Before every intercollegiate contest the respective chair- 
men of the athletic committees of the institutions concerned shall 
submit to each other a certified list of the players eligible, under 
the rules adopted, to participate in said contest. It shall be 



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74 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

the duty of the captains of the respective teams to exclude all 
players from the contest except those certified. 

11. Athletic committees shall require each candidate for a 
team representing the university in intercollegiate contests to 
subscribe to a statement that he is eligible under the letter and 
spirit of the rules adopted. 

12. No person having been a member of any college athletic 
team during any year, and having been in attendance less than 
one college half-year, shall be permitted to play in any inter- 
collegiate contest thereafter until he shall have been in attend- 
ance six consecutive calendar months. 

13. A student shall be ineligible to represent his college in 
athletic contests, who engages in such contests as a representative 
of any athletic organization not connected with his college, 
whether in term time or vacation, except by special written per- 
mission previously obtained of the proper athletic authorities. 

Occasional games during vacation on teams which have no 
permanent organization are not prohibited, provided written 
permission has been first secured, and further provided that 
such permission be granted for one team only during any single 
vacation, it being expressly understood that no permission will 
be given to play on a professional or semi-professional team. 

14. No schedule of games shall be fixed without the approval 
of the Committee for the Regulation of Athletic Sports. No addi- 
tional dates for games shall be accepted without the approval of 
the chairman of the said committee. 

15. The selection of players for any team shall be subject to 
the approval of the committee for the Regulation of Athletic 
Sports. In order to provide proper information on which to act, 
every student desiring to play on any team shall fill out a blank 
prepared by the committee. To this certificate shall be appended 
a certificate signed by the physical director, attesting the appli- 
cant's physical fitness for membership in the team proposed. 

16. No student of the departments situated in Evanston and 
no member of any University foot-ball or base-ball team shall, 
during term time, without the permission of the Committee for 
the Regulation of Athletic Sports, play on any like team not con- 
nected with the University. 



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THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

Byanbton. 



FACULTY. 



Thomas Fea^nklin Holoate, Ph.D., LL.D., Dean, Henry 8. Noyet 

Profeesar of Mathematice, 
Dakikl BoHBBieHT, AM,, LL.D., Dean Emeritus^ John Evans 

Profeeeor of Latin Language and Literature. 

Fbaitklen Fisk, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Pedagogy. 
McLbah Cumnock, A.M., LuH.D., Professor of Rhetoric 

and Elocution, 
*B0BiaT DiOKizfBON Sheppabd, A.M., D.D., Professor of English 

and American History. 
Abbak Yak Bfps Yottng, Ph.B., Professor of Chemistry. 
GBOBfflB Washikqtok Houoh, A.M., LLuD., Professor of Astronomy 

and Director of Dearborn Observatory. 
^Jamss Taft Hatiixld, Ph.D., Professor of (German Language 

and Literature. 
Chaxexs Bkach Atwkll, PhJIC., Professor of Botany. 
HDfBT CsEw, Ph.D., Fayerweather Professor of Physics. 
V. SooTT Clabk, Lit.D., Professor of English Language. 
John Hsnbt Gbat, Ph.D., Professor of Political and Social 

Science. 
Peteb Chsistian Lutkik, MUS.D., Professor of Music. 
*Gbdbob Albebt Cob» Ph.D., John Evans Professor of Moral and 

Intellectual Philosophy. 
Alja Robihbok Cbook, Ph.D., Professor of Mineralogy and Econ- 
omic Geology. 
WnxjAM Albebt Loot, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 
Gbobqe OxivEB Cubme, A.M., Professor of Germanic Philology. 
James Alton James, Ph.D., Professor of History. 



*On leare of absence. 

75 



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76 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

EoouABD Paul Baiixot. L.H.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Amos Williams Patten, A.M., D.D., Professor of Biblical In 
strudion, 

Ultsses Sherman Qrant, Ph.D., William Deering Professor of 
Geology. 

John Adams Scott, Ph.D., Secretary, Professor of Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature, 

Ashlet Horace Thorndike, Ph.D., Professor of English Litera 
ture. 

Arthur Herbert Wilde, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

GusTAV E. Karstbn, Ph.D., Acting Professor of German, 

Olin Hanson Basquin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Walter Dnx Scott, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
and Education. 

Mart Ross Potter, A.M., Dean of Wom^en. 

Theodore Whittelset, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Omera Floyd Long, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 

Robert Richardson Tatnall, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Physics. 

WiLLARD Eugene Hotchkiss, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Econ- 
omics. 

Walter Libby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

David Raymond Curtiss, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Herbert Govebt Keppel, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Olin Clat Kellogg, Ph.D., Instructor in English Language. 

Georg Edward, Instructor in German. 

John Price Odell, A.B., Instructor in English Language. 

Robert Edward Wilson, Ph.M.. Instructor in Mathematics. 

William Abbott Oldfatheb. A.M., Registrar, Instructor in Latin 
and Greek. 

Herman Churchill, A.M., Instructor in English Language. 

Paul Gustave Adolf Busse, A.M., Instructor in German. 

Harold Clark Goddard, A.B., Instructor in English Literature. 

Eugene Howard Harper, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 

Royal Brunson Way, A.M., Instructor in History. 

Julius William Adolphe Kuhne, A.M., Instructor in French. 

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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 77 

Jamu William Putnam, A.M., Instructor in Economics. 
Alphohsb de Salvio, Ph.D., Instructor in Romance Languages, 
Jamkb Walter Ooldthwait, A.M., Instructor in Geology. 
FiBaMoacK Shipp Deibleb, A.M., Instructor in Economics, 
Rot Caston Flickinqbb, Ph.D., Instructor in Greek and Latin. 
Bebhakd Cafbn Eweb, Ph.D., Instructor in Philosophy. 
James Cai>dbll Mobehbad, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Cabla Febn Sabgent, A.M., Instructor in History. 



Glkason Fillm<nie Stabkweatheb, Assistant in Shopwork. 

Enns E^XEN Thateb, M.S., Assistant in Zoology. 

Thomas Albebt Knott, A.B., Tutor in English Language. 

Gbbtchxn Hubqin, Assistant in the Gymnasium. 

FRAXfK Denslow Shebwood, Assistant in the Gymnasium. 

Emma Jane Thomas, B.S., Assistant in Botany, 

Aaaam Grace Reithabd, B.S., Assistant in Botany. 

Gbahyillb Howabd Twining, B.S., Demonstrator in Zoology. 

WiLHKLMiNE Mathilde Sommeb, B.S., Assistant in Zoology. 

Elizabeth Oatlobd Hillman, B.S., Reader in English Literature. 

Bions Bsssnc Simons, Ph.D., Assistant in Botany. 

LIBRARY STAFF. 

LoDiLi^ Ambbose, Ph.M., Assistant Librarian. 
Oloiia Mat Mathson, A.M., CcUaloguer. 
Fbakces Cubbet Piebce, Ph.B., Assistant. 
Aimxikb Maitland Baksb, B.L.&, Cataloguer. 
Blbakob Fbances Lewis, A.B., Assistant. 
RuEAH<» Wobthingtoh Fallbt, B.S., Cataloguer. 
Sadie Abla Thompson, Ph.B., Assistant. 



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78 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 

Administration,'— ProteBaoTB Holoatk, BoNBSia^T, Chew, Jambs, 
Loot, Pattbw, Young; ex^ffldo, Profeasor Wilde, Miss 

POTTEB. 

Board of BxaminerM^—FroteBBors Thobndikb, Bauxot, Cubme, 

CuBTiBS, Lona, Tathaix. 
Underaraduate iSftiMly^— Professors Young, Obant, J. A. Scx>Tr. 
Advanced Standing. ^—FroteBaoTS Loot, Atwkll, Baillot. 
Oraduate Btudy .'^—Proteaaors Cbew, Gbat, Loot, J. A. Scott, 

Thosndikb. 
Admission Requirements.'— Froteaaors Atwell, Basquin, Oubmb, 

HoTCHKiss, and Mr. Odell. 
Delinquent Students.'— Proteaaora Holgatb, Long, Whittelskt. 
Registration and Special Students: — ^Professors Holgate, Orant, 

and Mr. Oldfatheb. 
Accredited Schools: — Professors W. D. Soott, Atwell, Lxbbt, 

Long, Wilde. 
Academy: — ^Professors Wilde, Atwell, Baillot, Gray, Lduit, 

Tatnalu 
Library: — ^Professors Bonbbight, Orat, James, Loot, Thobndikx, 

Young. 
Chapel: — ^Professors Cbook, Patten, Dr. Keppbl. 
Fello^Dships and Scholarships: — Professors Thobndike, Grant, 

James. 
Loans and 0?Mritdble Fundtf."^— Professors Fisk, Hough, Patten. 
Musical Organizations: — ^Professors Lutkin, Hotchkiss, Mr. 

GOLDTHWAIT. 

Social Life of Students.'— "ProteaBora W. D. Soott, WHiTTELSBr; 

ex-oficio, Professors Lutkin, Wilde, Miss Potter. 
Gymnasium and Physical Trainings— Proteaaor Long, Mr. God- 

dard, Mr. Wilson. 

Willard Hall.'— Proteeaora Grant, Patten, W. D. Scott. 
Appointment^."— Professors James, Atwell, Curtisb, W. D. Soott, 
Thorndike, Dr. Kellogg, 



*Name8 arranged alphabetically except the cbatrman. 



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COLLBOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 79 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission to the College of Liberal Arts 
must be at least sixteen years of age, and must present 
satisf actoiy evidence of good moral character, together with 
credentials as to scholarship and honorable standing in the 
last institution which they attended. These credentials 
should show in detail the studies pursued by the candidate 
in preparation for College,- and should bear the recom- 
mendation of the Principal for admission to this College. 

Blank forms for credentials may be had on application 
to the Begistrar, and should be returned to him, properly 
filled out, at least one week before the opening of the col- 
lege year. 

Either by examination or by certificate from an accred- 
ited school, all candidates must give satisfactory evidence 
of preparation in the following subjects : 

(1) All the xmits described under Group A. 

(2) Pour units from Group B. 

(3) Three additional units from Groups B and C. 
The items in the groups indicate both the amount of 

work to be covered and the time to be devoted to each sub- 
ject in a good secondaiy school, in order to secure a unit of 
credit. 

Oboup a 

1. Mnglish, The character and amount of preiMiration re- 
qnlred la Indicated In the program which follows, although the 
arrangement of the work may vary considerably from this. 

(a) Language — Spelling, punctuation, grammar, paragraph- 
ing, the fundamental principles of rhetoric, reading, practice In 
writing compositions based on the student's personal experience. 

Certificates firom accredited schools are expected to contain a 
statement from the Instructor In English that each student, be- 
fore entering college, has imitten at least eight exercises of at 
least three hundred words each. Descriptions of scenes or objects 
actually witnessed by the writers, narrations based on personal 
experiences, and arguments on specific questions will be accepted; 



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80 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

rambling expository essayB on broad general themee are not 
acoeptable. Students without certificates may present these exer- 
cises for inspection by the examiner. 

(&) Literature— The following books are to be read. The 
student should acquire a knowledge of their subject-matter and 
of the main facts in the lives of their authors, and should practice 
writing short compositions on subjects drawn from their reading. 

1906-1911:— 

I. (Two to be selected): Shakespeare's As Tou Like It, 
Henry V, Julius Cssar, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night 

II. (One to be selected): Bacon's Essays; Bunyan's The 
Pilgrim's Progress, Part I; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in 
the Spectator; Franklin's Autobiography. 

III. (One to be selected): Chaucer's Prologue; Selections 
from Spenser's Faerie Queene; Pope's The Rape of the Lock; 
Goldsmith's The Deserted Village; Palgrave's Golden Treasury 
(First Series), Books II and III, with especial attention to Dry- 
den, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Bums. 

IV. (Two to be selected) : Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wake- 
field; Scott's lyanhoe and Quentin Durward; Hawthorne's The 
House of the Seven Gables; Thackeray's Henry Esmond; Mrs. 
Gaskell's Cranford; Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities; George Eliot's 
Silas Marner; Blackmore's Loma Doone. 

V. (Two to be selected): Irving's Sketch Book; Irvlng's 
Life of Goldsmith; Lamb's Essays of Ella; DeQuincey's Joan of 
Arc and The English Mail Coach; Carlyle's Heroes and Hero 
Worship; Emerson's Essays (selected); Ruskin's Sesame and 
Lilies. 

VI. (Two to be selected) : Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner; 
Scott's The Lady of the Lake; Byron's Mazeppa and The Prisoner 
of ChiUon; Palgrave's (^Iden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, 
with special attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley; Ma- 
caulay's Lays of Ancient Rome; Poe's Poems; LoweH's The 
Vision of Sir LAunfal; Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; Longfel- 
low's The Courtship of Miles Standish; Tennyson's Gareth 
and Lynette, LAncelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; 
Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought 
the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Evelyn Hope, Home Thoughts 
from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the 
French Camp, The Boy and the Angel, One Word More, Herv6 
Riel, Pheidippldes. 



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COLLBGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 81 

(c) Ldterature — ^The Btudent Is expected to make a thorough 
study of each of the works named below, accompanied by prac- 
tice in compoBltlon: 

1906-1911:— 

Shakespeare's Macbeth (or Julius Caesar) ; Milton's Lycidas, 
Comns, L' Allegro, and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Con- 
ciliation with America (or Washington's Farewell Address 
and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration); Macaulay's Life of 
Johnson (or Biacaulay's Bssay on Milton, or Carlyle's Essay on 
Bums). 

Time retirements iTie eqiUvcUent of four hours a week 
through three years. It is expected that the English work toill he 
distributed over all four years of the secondary school course, 

3. Mathewiatics — (a) Algebra, including factoring, common 
dlTiaors and multiples, fractions, simple equations of one or more 
unknown quantities, Inyolution, evolution, theory of exponents, 
radicals. Special attention should be given to the statement of 
problems in the form of equations. - Time requirement, four or 
five hours a week throughout one year. 

(5) Algebra, including a review of the previous work and a 
thorough study of radicals, equations involving radicals, quad- 
ratic equations with one or two unknown quantities, and equa- 
tions solved like quadratics. Time requirement, the equivalent 
of four or five hours a week throughout one-half year. 

(c) Plane Geometry, including a course equivalent to that 
contained in Holgate's or in Beman and Smith's (Geometry, to- 
gether with the solution of a large number of exercises and 
numerical problems. Tims requirement, four or five hours a week 
throughout one year. 

(d) Solid Geometry, a course equivalent to that contained in 
Holgate's or in Beman and Smith's Ctoometry, including numerous 
exercises and problems. Time requirement, the equivalent of four 
or five hours a week throughout one-half year. 

It is recommended that the work in Mathematics in prepara- 
tion for college be extended over at least three years of the high 
school ooaise, and especially that work be given in this subject 
In the last year. A good arrangement is as follows: First year, 
four honrs a week, algebra; second year, four hours a week, 
geometry; fourth year, four hours a week for first half-year, solid 
geometry; second half year, algebra; reviewing and making a 
thorough study of quadratic equations and radicals. 

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82 NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVBRSITT. 

4. Hittory— Ancient History with special reference to Greece 
and Rom^ West's Ancient History, or Botsford's Greece and 
Rom^ or an equivalent, with supplementary reading. Time ra- 
quirement, four or five Jioure a week throughout one year. 

Nora. — ^If a candidate cannot present a year of Andent History, he 
may Bubstitute for it either No* 27, 28, or 29, as deeoribed under Group 
C, or a year of General History, Myers's, or an equivalent. 

6. iSctofico— Physics, a course equiyalent to that contained In 
Hall and Bergen's Text-book of Physics. The candidate must 
present evidence of familiarity with the general principles of 
physical science especially the simpler principles and phenomena 
which are constantly illustrated in daily lif^ such as the pendu- 
lum, hydrostatics, water waves, pitch and intensity of sound, heat 
conduction, boiling, freezing, simple lenses, mirrors, prisms, mag- 
nets, lines of force, voltaic cells, galvanometers, etc It is also 
required that a course of laboratory work shall have been pur- 
sued in connection with the text-book, equivalent to at least forty 
exercises from the Harvard list, or from Crew and Tatnall'a 
LAboratory Manual of Physics, and that accurate notes descriptive 
of the experiments shall have been kept Time requiremeiUt fifoe 
hour9 a toeek throughout one year. 

NoTB. — ^If a candidate cannot present a year of Physics, he may 
substitute for it either a year of Physiography (No. 22), a year of 
Biology (No. 28, 24, or 26), or a year of Chemistry (No. 26). 

Gboup B. 

NoxB. — ^A single unit of a foreign language wlU be aooepted for 
entrance credit only on condition that the candidate shaU continue the 
study of that language through a second year. 

8. Greek— ia) Grammar, White's First Greek Book, or an 
equivalent Time requirement, four or five hours a week through- 
out one year. 

9. Cfreek—ih) Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, and III; 
Jones's Greek Prose Composition, or an equivalent, thirty lessons. 
Time requirement, four or five houre a week throughout one year. 

10. Chreek—ic) Anabasis, Book IV. Prose Composition* lea- 
sons thirty to forty. Homer, lUiad or Odyssey, 1,800 lines. Time 
requirement, four or five hours a week throughout one year. 

11. Latin— (a) Grammar; Ccesar's Gkillic War, ten pages, or 
twenty pages of Viri Rome, with retranslatlon of Bnglish into 
Latin. Time requirement, five hours a week throughout one year. 



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CX>LLDGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 88 

12. Lot^M — (ft) Cnsar's Gallio War, four books, oompletad; 
Latin Gomposition. Time reQuirement, five houre a v)eek through- 
out one year, 

13. Latin — (c) Cicero, six orations, including the Manilian 
Law; Latin CSomposition. Time requirement, fl/oe houre a %oeek 
throughout one year, 

14. Latin^id) Vergil, six books of the Aeneid. Time require- 
ment four or fi/ve hours a u>eeh throughout one year. 

It is to be desired that the student's acquaintance with Vergil 
be not limited to the foregoing requirement By private reading, 
as well as by sight reading in dass, the Bucolics and a considera- 
ble portion of the Aeneid may with much advantage be added to 
the amount prescribed. 

An examination in Latin is appointed about six weeks after 
the beginning of the year, as a test of the sufficiency of the stu- 
dent's preparation to advance with his class. 

15. rrench — (a) Correct pronunciation; elementary gram- 
mar, with exercises, including the irregular verbs; the reading of 
from one hundred and fifty to two hundred pages of easy French 
proseu Tisie revuiremeiU, five hours a week throughout one year, 

16. French — (&) Elementary grammar completed; easy com- 
position, based upon one of the works read; the reading of two 
hundred and fifty to three hundred pages of French prosa Time 
requirementf five hours a week throughout one year. 

17. French — (c) Study of the difficulties of French syntax 
and idioms; translation into French from text-book and easy 
original compositions; the reading of not less than six hundred 
pages of at least five standard authors; ability to take grammati- 
cal dictations and to understand and answer questions in French. 
Time requirement, four or five hours a week throughout one year, 

18. Oerman — (a) Pronunciation; the memorizing and use of 
easy colloquial sentences; the rudiments of grammar (inflection 
of the articles, ordinary nouns, adjectives, pronouns, weak verbs, 
and the more usual strong verbs; the use of the more common 
prepositions; the simpler uses of modal auxiliaries and the ele- 
mentary rules of syntax and word-order); abundant easy exer- 
cises; the reading of seventy-five to one hundred pages of grad- 
uated texts. Time requirement, four or five hours a week through- 
out one year. 

19. Oerman — (h) The reading of from one hundred and fifty 
to two hundred pages of literature in the form of easy stories and 

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84 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

plays; translation into German of matter based upon works read; 
continued drill upon rudiments of grammar. Time requirement, 
four or five Hours a week throughout one year. 

20. Oerman — (c) The reading of about four hundred pages 
of moderately difficult prose and poetry; retranslation into Ger- 
man; grammatical drill upon the less usual strong verbs; the use 
of articles, cases, auxiliaries, tenses and modes, word-order and 
word-formation. Time requirement, four or five hour$ a week 
throughout one year. 

Gboup C. 

NoTB. — ^For courses extending through less than a full year credit 
may b3 allowed at the discretion of the Board of Examiners, but in 
all such cases a unit of credit wiU require a total of one-third more 
work than that represented in the ordinary unit. 

21. Mathematics — ^Algebra, Including ratio and proportion, 
variation, progressions, permutations and combinations, binomial 
theorem, logarithms and their application to interest and annu- 
ities, introduction to determinants, theory of equations and series, 
as in Fisher and Schwatt's College Algebra, or Hall and Knight's 
Elementary Algebra, or a full equivalent 

Plane trigonometry. Including the solution of oblique trian- 
gles. Consistent employment of ratio definitions of the trigonome- 
tric functions is expected, also the ability to verify numerical com- 
putations. Time requirement, five hours a week throughout one 
year. 

22. Physiography — ^A study of the subjects usually given In 
courses in physical geography — ^the earth as a planet, the atmos- 
phere, the climate, the ocean, and the land. Emphasis is to be 
placed upon the land, especially upon the topographic features, 
their origin and their significance. Some recent text-book should 
form the basis for the course, and the text-book should be sup- 
plemented by the study of maps, models, and the features of the 
earth's surface in the vicinity of the school. Time requirement, 
four or five hours a week throughout one year. 

23. General Biology— The study of typical animals and plants 
by laboratory methods covering the facts of morphology and 
physiology. This requirement may be met by a course such as 
that laid down in Beyer's Elementary Biology, or in Colton's 
Practical Zodlogy and Atkinson's Lessons in Botany. In all cases 
special provision should be made for laboratory work, and accu- 
rate notes and drawings should be made by the student Teachers 



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OOLiLEGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 85 

in accredited schools reporting to the Unlrersity should designate 
the quality of the laboratory work as a separate Item, In addition 
to that of the class-room work. Time requirement, five hours a 
week throuffh<mt one year, including not leas than one hundred 
a$^d forty Tiours of laboratory toork and two clas8-room periods a 
veek. 

24. Botanic— The study of plants as living organisms, with 
special regard to function, structure, and relation to environment 
Each recitation or quiz period should be preceded by four hours of 
laboratory work. Atkinson's Lessons in Botany and Bergen's 
Foundations of Botany are satisfactory texts. Each pupil should 
individually perform the experiments and demonstrations, and 
should keep a neat and accurate notebook showing the work done 
by himself and the conclusions reached. Time requirement, not 
lent than one hundred and forty hours of laboratory work besides 
two class-room periods a week throughout one year, 

25. Zoology-^ne year's study of animal structure, habits, 
and general life history will be accepted as a full item of credit 
for entrance, provided it has been done by the laboratory method. 
Conditions for undertaking this work vary too widely to make it 
desirable to designate either an outline or text-books. Teachers 
competent to carry on such a course for a full year will have their 
own method, and the material used will also vary. Colton's Prac- 
tical Zoology, and Parker and Haswell's Manual of Zoology (the 
latter for supplementary reading) will be suggestive. Emphasis 
should be placed on training in observation and accuracy in 
drawing and expression In the notebooks. Time requirement, 
not less than one hundred and forty hours of laboratory work, be- 
sides two class-room periods a week throughout one year, 

26. Chemistry — ^Laboratory work should be made an essential 
feature of the study, and this may well take one-half of the total 
time assignment Careful and systematic notes of his individual 
work should be made by the student. Some work in quantitative 
experiments is recommended as extremely desirable both for 
training and in order to illustrate the fundamental laws. Purely 
descriptive work may better be limited to comparatively few 
elements and compounds rather than be extended to -a larger list 
with resulting confusion to the student Time requirement, not 
less than four periods a week covering eight hours a week of the 
studenVs time throughout one year, 

27. Mediaeval and Modem European History — ^Myers's Me- 



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86 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

diaeval and Modem History* or an equivalenl; with sapplementary 
reading. Time requirement, four or five Koure a toeeh through- 
out one year, 

28. English History— X study of the political and constitu- 
tional derelopment of England. Lamed's English History or an 
equivalent Tim^ requirement, four or five hours a toeek through- 
out one year. 

29. American History and Civil Govemmen^-^-Ohanning's Stu- 
dents' History of the United States, or an equivalent James and 
Sanford's Government in State and Nation, or an equivalent 
Tim^ requirement, four or five hours a week throughout one year. 

Nom. — Candidates are recommended to offer one or more of the 
units of History as described above, as it is believed that better edu* 
eatlonal results are obtained by devoting a full year to one of these 
periods than by scattering it over two or more periods. But imtil 
further notice a unit of credit will be given for a year's work devoted 
to any two of these divisions, or a unit of credit will be erlven for a 
year devoted to General History. 

80. Political JTconomy-— Macvane's Political Economy, or its 
equivalent Time requirement, four or five hours a toeek through- 
out one year. 

31. Manual Training — ^Joinery, practice in making the more 
common Joints in wood with hand* tools; wood-turning, the use of 
the ordinary turning tools In making various curved forms, cups, 
balls, etc. Pattern making, practice in making wood patterns 
from which castings may be made, Involving the study of shrink- 
age, distribution of metal, and various methods of molding; 
forging, practice in forming iron into various shapes when heated 
to the plastic condition, welding, and tempering. Woodward's 
The Manual Training School describes the usual exercises. If a 
laboratory manual is not used the student should write up each 
exercise carefully, as In other laboratory work. Time require- 
ment, six hours a toeek in the shop throughout ttoo years. 

In special cases, where candidates are nnable to meet the 
requirements relating to specific subjects, but can present 
the full equivalent of the total requirement for admission, 
they may by the vote of the faculty or of the Board of Ex- 
aminers be admitted as regular students; but this regula- 
tion wiU not release a candidate for a degree from any of 
the specified studies required for a degree, as described on 
pages 91 and 92. 

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COLLESGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 87 

EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION. 

The regular days of examination for admission to the 
College of liberal Arts are the first Monday and Tuesday 
of the college year, the dates for the year 1906 being Sep- 
tember 24 and 25. Candidates may be examined and ad- 
mitted at other times if prepared to enter classes at an ad- 
yanced point in the regular courses, but they are advised 
to enter at the beginning of the college year. 

The Board of Blamlners of this College will accept. In lieu 
of Its own examinations, those conducted in June by the College 
Bntrmnce Bzamlnation Board. This Board* which holds its ezami- 
nations in Chicago in Northwestern University Building, is com- 
posed of remresentatiyes of a large number of educational institu- 
tions, and its findings are accepted as a basis for admission to 
colleges generally throughout the country. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE. 

Stadents from an accredited academy or high school 
may be admitted to college on certificate, without examina- 
tion, provided they present themselves for admission not 
later than a year and three months after graduation from 
their schools. The certificate must show that the candidate 
has met all the entrance requirements as described on page 
79 and must bear the Principal's signature recommending 
the candidate for admission. In case the preparation of a 
student admitted on certificate is found in the first semester 
to be unsatisfactory, he will be required to complete his 
preparation in a fitting-school or in such other way as may 
be designated. 

ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

On the recommendation of a standing committee of the 
Faeolty, persona of serious purpose and mature years may 
be admitted to college as special students to pursue selected 
studies. The work taken by such students is under the 



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88 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

supervision and control of the committee on Begistration 
and Special Students. Applications for admission as spe- 
cial students must be accompanied by evidence of sufficient 
qualification to carry on the proposed work to advantage, 
and in general such students will be expected to meet the 
full entrance requirements. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students from other colleges seeking admission to this 
college must present evidence of honorable dismissal from 
the institution last attended. Official certificates must be 
presented showing the grades of credit for the subjects 
pursued elsewhere, also the number of weeks and the num- 
ber of hours a week the respective studies were followed. 
All students from other colleges must meet the regular 
entrance requirements to this college. The amount of ad- 
vanced credit to be obtained by certificate from another 
institution is determined by a committee of the Faculty, 
but no advanced credit will be given without examination 
except for work done in an approved college. All claims 
for advanced credit must be made during the first year of 
residence. Candidates for advanced standing are not ad- 
mitted later than September of the collegiate year in 
which they expect to graduate. 

ACCREDITED SCHOOLS. 

High schools and academies may be placed on the ac- 
credited list of the University by action of the Faculty, 
upon the recommendation of the Committee on Accredited 
Schools. This relation implies that the certificates of the 
school properly attested will be accepted at their face value 
toward meeting the requirements for admission. 

Superintendents or principals desiring to have their 
schools placed on the accredited list should make applica- 
tion to the Chairman of the Committee on Accredited 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 89 

Sehoolfl, who will provide for a proper inspection. The fol- 
lowing information will be expected in the letter of appli- 
cation: 

<k The names of all teachers, with a statement both of their 
preparation for teaching and of their experience in that work. 

ft. The latest printed catalogue or annual report of the school, 
containing an outline of the course of study and a list of the text- 
books used. 

c. A careful statement of the methods pursued in teaching 
Mathematics, Languages, and Sciences. 

(f. The amount and kind of scientific apparatus and the ex- 
tent of library facilities accessible to students. 

The schools which are placed on the accredited list will 
continue to be accredited for three years, unless the Faculty 
within this period becomes satisfied that such changes have 
occurred as make further inspection desirable. 

Certificates of the School of Correspondence. 

Certificates of the Interstate School of Correspondence, 
affiliated with the University, will be accepted for admission 
to college at their face value in the subjects covered by its 
academic courses as follows : English Language, one unit ; 
English Literature, two units; Mathematics, three units; 
Latin, one unit; Botany, one unit; Physics, one unit. 



Inquiries concerning Correspondence Work should be ad- 
to the interstate School of Correspondence, 37S-388 Wa- 
bash Avenue, Chicago. 



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W NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

RESIDENCE. 

The University maintains but one dormitory for men, 
accommodating about thirty students. A few students find 
lodgings in Heck Hall, the dormitory of Qarrett Biblical 
Institute, and about twenty men room in the College Young 
Men's Christian Association House. Aside from these lim- 
ited accommodations the University makes no provision at 
present for the residence of men, but such students find 
little difficulty in providing for themselves comfortable 
homes in private families within easy reach of the College. 

Unless special exemption from the rule is granted, 
women students are required to room in one or other of 
the Halls provided for them. Willard Hall, the largest of 
the three women's dormitories, is under the immediate 
oversight of the Dean of Women, who lives in the building 
and associates with the residents as a friend and adviser. 
Pearsons Hall and Chapin Hall are in charge of an associa- 
tion of women resident in Evanston, incorporated as the 
Woman's Educational Aid Association. This association 
considers the claims of all applicants for admission and 
has a friendly supervision over the residents of these halls. 
The lighter housework of Pearsons and Chapin Halls is 
done by the young women residing in them, under the di- 
rection of a competent matron. In this way the expenses 
of living are materially reduced. 

All women students, wherever they reside, are under 
the supervision of the Dean of Women and are expected 
to conform to the general regulations prescribed for the 
conduct of those living in the Halls. 

Note. — For Information respecting Willard Hall, letters of inquiry 
should be addressed to Willard Hall. Evanston, nilnois; and for in- 
formation respecting Pearsons or Chapin Hall, letters should be ad- 
dressed to the Corresponding Secretary of the Woman's Educational 
Aid Association, Evanston, Illinois. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



91 



. PROGRAMS OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDY. 

The courses of study oflfered in the College of Liberal 
Arts are listed under the several departments of instruc- 
tion in a subsequent section of this Catalogue. Much of 
the work there announced is elective, but certain courses 
are required of all candidates for a degree. These are 
shown in the schedules below. The amount of credit as- 
signed to a course is expressed as one hour, two hours, etc., 
an hour of credit being given for the satisfactory comple- 
tion of work equivalent to one class-exercise a week during 
one semester. 

As a condition of graduation, a student is required to 
complete one hundred and twenty semester hours of work, 
including the prescribed courses for either the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. Four years will 
usually be necessary for the satisfactory accomplishment 
of this work. 

Schedules of Required Studies. 
Pbescbibed Coubses fob the Dbgbee of Bachelob of Abts. 



I. 
IL 

in. 



IV. 
V. 

VI. 

vn. 



Mathematics A or AB, • 
E!ngll8h Language A, 
Two of the following. 



of 



4 or 5 hours 
3 hours 






which one must be chosen 
from the first two named: 
Latin A, Greek A, French 

A, German A, - - - • 4 hours each 

English Literature A, - • 2 hours 

One of the following: Latin 

B, Greek B, French B, Ger- 
man B, 8 hours 

One of the following: 

Physics A, Chemistry A, 
Zodlogy A, Botany A, Geol- 
ogy A, Mineralogy A, - - 4 hours 

One of the following: His 
tory A or BC» Economics i 
A or G, Philosophy A. - 's hours 



1st year 
1st year 



1st year 
2nd year 

2nd year 



2nd or 3rd year 
2nd or 3rd year 

2nd or 8rd year 



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82 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Pbescbibed Coubses fob the Degree of Bachelor of Sciefge. 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 



VII. 



Mathematics A or AB, • - 

English Language A, • • 

French A (see note below), 

German A (see note below), 

English Literature A, • - 

Two of the following, of 
which one must be chosen 
from the first three named: 
Physics A, Chemistry A, 
Zo51ogy A, Botany A, Ge- 
ology A, Mineralogy A, 
Mathematics B or BB, 

One of the following: His- 
tory A or BC, Economics 
A or G, Philosophy A, - 



4 or 5 hours 

3 hours 

4 hours 
4 hours 
2 hours 



4 hours 
(Math. 3 hrs.) 



3 hours 



1st year 
1st year 
1st or 2nd year 
1st or 2nd year 
2nd year 



let, 2nd, or 
3rd year 



2nd or 3rd year 



NoTB. — If a candidate has presented for admission to college, Latin 
(a), (b), and (c), or Greek (a), (b), and (c). either French A or Ger- 
man A may be omitted from this schedule, but the work preparatory 
to the course thus omitted must be taken. 

ELECTIVE STUDIES. 

In making up a student's program of studies for any 
year precedence must be given to prescribed courses and in 
the order designated in the above schedules. Except by 
special permission of the Committee on Registration, a stu- 
dent must take, in addition to the prescribed studies for 
which he is due, elective work sufficient to make a total of 
fifteen hours a week. The choice of elective courses is sub- 
ject always to the special regulations of the several depart- 
ments. 

At a date not later than the registration at the begin- 
ning of the third year of residence, every candidate for a 
Bachelor's degree must announce a department in which 
he proposes to do major work, and also a department in 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 08 

flrhich he proposes to do minor work. These may be selected 
at the student's discretion, except that if the major work is 
chosen in a department of foreign language, the minor must 
be chosen in a department other than a foreign language. 
The specific courses constituting the major and the minor 
in each department will be found listed in the schedule on 
pages 94 and 95, and are also stated at the end of the lists 
of courses in the several departments of instruction. 

Students are advised to give careful thought to the 
plan of their elective work as early as the beginning of the 
second year. They may find it to their advantage to devote 
the whole, or a large part, of their elective time in the 
second year to the major subject. Elective work will be 
made more profitable by adhering consistently to a plan 
adopted for each year, and a course once selected should be 
continued through the year. 

FACULTY ADVISERS. 

Every undergraduate student on entering college is as- 
signed to some member of the Faculty, who is to act as his 
adviser and give him helpful counsel relating to his college 
life. As soon as the student makes choice of the depart- 
ment in which he is to do his major work, the senior pro- 
fessor in that department becomes his adviser and should 
be consulted freely on aU matters relating to subsequent 
work. The student is required to submit his choice of 
studies for each year to his adviser and obtain approval of 
the same before completing his registration, and all changes 
in registration during the year must likewise receive the 
adviser's approval. 



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94 



NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVB»SITY. 



SCHEDULE OF MAJORS AND MINORS. 



DEPABTMXNT 



Biblical Liter- 
atureu 

Biology. 



Botany. 



Chemistry. 
Boonomica. 



Education. 



I 



BngliBh Lan- 
guage 



Bnglish Liter- 
ature. 



Geology. 



German Lan- 
guage and 
Literatureu 



MAJOB 



Ten year-hours. 



Botany A and Zodlogy A, and 
either Botany B or C, or 
Zodlogy C or D. 

Courses A, B, and C. 



Courses A, B, and C. 

Ten year-hours, including 
Course A. 

Ten year-hours, including 
Courses A or B, and C or 
D, Philosophy A, and two 
additional year-hours in 
Education or Psychology. 

Courses A and B, and six ad- 
ditional year-hours, which 
may include English Liter- 
ature D. 

Course A and eight additional 
year-hours, which may in- 
clude English Language D. 

Course A and six additional 
year-hours, which may in- 
clude Mineralogy A. 

Courses A (or BB) and B, 
and six additional year- 
hours. 



MINOB 



Six year-hours. 



Course A and either 
B or C. 

Courses A and B. 

Six year-hours, in- 
cluding Course A 



Six year-hours 
Education. 



in 



Courses A and B 
and two addition- 
al year-hours. 



Course A and four 
additional year- 
hours. 

Course A and two 
additional year- 
hours. 

Courses A (or BB) 
and B. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



95 



DKPASTMSNT 



Greek Lan- 
goBLse and 
Literature. 

History. 



Latin Lan- 
guage and 
Literatare. 

Mathematics. 



Mineralogy and 
Economic 
Geology. 

Philosophy, 
Psychology, 
and Logic 



PhysioB. 



Romance 
Languages. 



Semitic Lan- 
guages. 

Zo51ogy. 



Courses A and B, and five ad- 
ditional year-hours, not in- 
cluding Course N. 

Course A or EC, and seven 
additional year-hours. 



Courses A and B, with C or 
D, and E or F, or their 
equivalents. 

Fourteen year-hours, includ- 
ing Courses A or AB, and 
B or BB. 

Course A and six additional 
year-hours, which may in- 
clude Geology A. 

Either Courses A, B, G, and 
three additional year-hours; 
or Courses A, C, and four 
additional year-hours. 

Courses A and B. and three 
additional year-hours. 



Courses A and B in French, 
and six additional year- 
hours. 



Course A and six additional 
year-hours. 



MINOB 



Courses A and B. 



Course A or BC, 
and three addi- 
tional year-hours. 

Courses A and B. 



Courses A or AB, 
and B or BB. 



Course A and two 
additional year- 
hours. 

Course A or E and 
three additional 
year-hours. 



Course A and two 
additional year- 
hours. 

Courses A and B in 
French. 



Courses A and B. 

Course A and two 
additional year- 
hours. 



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96 NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVERSITY. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of instruction offered in the College of 
Liberal Arts are subject to change from year to year. Those 
given during the year 1905-06 are described below. 

For the general regulations affecting a student's choice 
of studies reference should be made to pages 91 and 92. 
Special regulations, if any, governing the order in which 
courses in the same department should be taken will be 
found under the department heading. 

The Faculty reserves the right at the beginning of a 
semester to withdraw the offer of any elective study not 
chosen by at least five persons. 

ASTRONOMY. 

A — Astronomy; Meteorology. 2 houra. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2. 
Professor Hough. 

A general course in Astronomy and Meteorology adapted 
to the needs of students with no previous knowledge of the 
suhject. Open to students who have completed loathe- 
matics A. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE. 

A — Introduction to the English Bible, 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. 
Professor Patten. 

First Semester. — How the Bible came to ba The evolu- 
tion of the English Bible. The English of the Bible. The 
Bible and English Literature. 

One hour a week is devoted to the careful reading of 
selected books of the Bible. 

Second Semester.— The Bible as literature. Lectures and 
required readings, with papers on the various topics con- 
sidered. 

Text used: The American Standard Revised Version, 
Moulton's Modern Readers' Bible. 



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COLLBGB OF LIBSRAL ARTS. 97 

B — The Oospel of Matthew. 2 hours 

Tuesdays, Thursdays* 2. 
Professor Patten. 

First Semester. — A study of the Synoptic Gospels* with 
Matthew as a basis. 

Second Semester. — The Christ of the Gospels as the cen- 
tral point of the Christian Bvidences. A study of the say- 
ings of Jesus. 
Text: Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. 

C — Biblical History. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 8. 
Professor Patten. 

First Semester. — History of the Hebrews, from the Con- 
quest to the Bxile. 

Second Semester. — History of the Jews, from the Bxile to 
the Christian era. 

Text: Lectures, and required readings. Kent's Histor- 
ical Series. 

D — Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11. 
Professor Patten. 

First Semester. — The Acts of the Apostles. An inductive 
study of the era of Apostolic Christianity. 
Second Semester. — Selected Pauline Bpistles. 
Text: Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges, with 
lectures and required readings. 

E — History of Beligion. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3. 
Professor Patten. 

First Semester. — ^An inquiry into the origin of religion, 
with a surrey of the principal religions of the world in 
their rise and development 

Text: Menzies' History of Religion, with required read- 
ings and papers. 

Second Semester. — The History and Development of 
Christian Missions. 

The main text in this course is Wameck's History of 
Protestant Missions, which is accompanied by lectures and 
required readings in selected mission history and literature. 

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98 NORTHWBSTSRN UNIVBRSITT. 

F — Comparative Religions. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Tebby. 

This coarse is given in Garrett Biblical Institute, and sta- 

dents electing it are subject to the regalations of that 

schooL 

For Greek New Testament, see under Greek (Course N). 

For Hebrew Old Testament, see under Semitic Languages 

(Courses AandB). 

For History of the Christian Church, see under History 
(Course L). 
Major: Ten year-hours. 
Minor: Six year-hours. 

BOTANY. 

A — Biology of Plants. 4 hours 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2-5. 
Professor Atwell, Dr. Simons, Miss Thomas, and Miss 

RErrHABD. 

The course covers the biology and morphology of typical 
plants selected from the more important natural groups. 
Boology and classification receive special attention during 
the months of October and May. Laboratory and field 
work, with quizzes and informal lectures. Atkinson's Col- 
lege Botany. Caldwell's Plant Morphology. 

B — Seed Plants. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays, 8-10; Wednesdays, 9. 
Professor Atwell and Miss Thomas. 

Field-work. Cteneral morphology of the more common 
orders of seed plants. Histological methods as applied to 
structure and development During the second semester 
attention is given to the general principles of forestry 
and to the study of the trees and forests of the locality. 

Assistance and instruction will be given to students de- 
sirous of preparing an herbarium or a collection of illustra- 
tive permanent microscopical slides. 

Open to those who have had an elementary course in 
Botany. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 99 

C — Phyfiology of Plants. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays, 10-12; Wednesdays, 11. 
Professor Atwell and Miss Seffhabd. 

This course is experimental, and should be preceded by 
one course in Botany or in general Biology. An elementary 
course in Chemistry Is also desirable. Books of reference 
are provided. 

Courses A, B, and C constitute a good preparation for 
teaching Botany in secondary schools. 

D — Crypiogamic Botany. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10-12. 
Professor Atwell. 

Comparative morphology of ferns, mosses, alg», and 
mushrooms. The cultiyation in artificial media of bacteria 
of air, water, milk, and ice; the study of their physiology, 
morphology, and relation to fermentation and putrefaction. 
The study of yeast in relation to fermentation; and of such 
lower fungi as slime-moulds, fruit-moulds, mildews, and 
rusts as to their life-histories and morphology. Laboratory 
work, lectures, and field work. Books of reference are pro- 
vided. 

Open to those who have had an elementary course in 
Botany. 

PIIIMABII.T FOB GEAOUATES. 

F — Advanced Physiology of Plants. 2-5 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Atwell^ 

Bxtoided experimental work upon definite physiological 
problems. 

Open to students who have completed Courses A, B, and 
C, and an elementary course in Chemistry. 

G — Special Problems in Plant Life. 3-5 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Atvtell. 

Problems involving original investigation will be assigned 
to suit the needs of individual students. 

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100 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Open to those who have completed the major require- 
ments in Botany or Biology. 

Major: Courses A, B, and O. 

Minor: Courses A and either B or C. 

A major in Biology is allotoed to consist of Botany A and 
Zodlogy A, and either Botany B or C, or Zo6lOffy C or D. 

CHEMISTRY. 

A — General Chemistry. 4 hours. 

Section I. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 1:3(M. 
Section II. Mondays, Fridays, 1:30-4, and Tuesdays, 

Thursdays, 1:30-2:80. 
Section III. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:80-6, and 
one forenoon hour Tuesdays or Wednesdays. 
Professor Young. 

Text and laboratory work, including in the last of the 
course an introduction to Qualitative Analysis. 

B — Qualitative Analyeis and Organic Chemistry. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays, 1:30-4; Wednesdays, 1:30-4:30. 
Associate Professor WHiTTELSBy. 

Lectures, text, and laboratory work; the Organic Chem- 
istry begins in January after the Christmas recess. 
Open to those who have completed Course A. 

C — Qiiantitative Analysis. 4 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 1:80-4:80; Wednesdays, 10-12. 
Associate Professor Whtttelsby. 

First Semester. — Gravimetric Analysis. 
Second Semester.— Volumetric Analysis. 
Open to those who have completed Courses A and B; but 
Courses B and C may be taken concurrently upon approval 
by the instructor. 

BC — Advanced QuaUiaiive and Quantitative Analysis: 
Ores and Other Minerals. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Associate Professor WniTTEiiEY. 

Open to students who have completed Courses A, B, and C. 

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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 101 

D— Examination of water, mainly from the sanitary stand- 
point; and of milk, butter, and others fats and oUs. 
Iron and steel analysis. 3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9-12. 
Associate Professor WHrrrELSEY. 

Course D is open to those who have completed Courses A» 
B, and C. 

G — Topics of Investigation. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 
Associate Professor Whittelsey. 

E — Advanced Course in Oeneral Chemistry. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Young. 

A course of reading on somewhat advanced topics. The 
work has been based on Ostwald's Outlines of General 
Chemistry. 
Open to those who have completed Courses A. B, and C. 
Major: Courses A, B, and C. 
Minor: Courses A and B. 

ECONOMIC8. FINANCE. AND ADMINISTRATION. 

NoTB. — Courses A and C of the following schedule require no in- 
troductory course, and may be taken together. Those who desire to 
take advanced courses in the department should take Course A as a 
first course. After the year 1906-06 Course A will be required as an 
Introduction to other courses in the department except Course C, which 
o cegp t — an Independent position. 

Those wishing to make a major In this department (ten year- 
hours) should begin the work in their second year in college, but no 
student will be admitted without the special consent of the instructor 
In charge to any of the courses except Course C until he has thirty 
boors of college credit. Those wishing to specialise in economics 
should have a good knowledge of general history. 

A — (1) The Elements of Economics; (2) The Financial 
History of the United States. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays. 
First semester, 9, 10, 10. 
Second semester, 10, 11. 



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102 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Professor Gray, Assistant Professor Hotchkiss, and Mr. 
Putnam. 

First Semester. — ^An introductory and elementary coarse 
in Economic theory. Fetter's "The Principles of Econom- 
ics." 

Second Semester. — The financial history of the United 
States from 1789 to the present time. Dewey's "Financial 
History of the United States." Also, a repetition of the 
work of the first semester. 

B — Administration. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8. 
Assistant Professor Hotchkiss. 

A course in administrative law and the comparative 
theory and history of administration of the leading modern 
nations, including both central and local governments. The 
civil service reform movement in the United States and 
Great Britain receives special attention. 

C — Modem Indtistrial and Commercial History. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 11. 
Professor Gray. 

The industrial and commercial history of Western Europe 
and America since the middle of the eighteenth century. 
The effects of modem inventions and political changes on 
trade and industry. The course is conducted by lectures, 
with prescribed topical readings. 

Course C requires no previous training in Economics, and 
may well be taken before Course A. 

D — Finance; Money and Banking. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 
Mr. Putnam. 

First Semester. — Public Finance, with special reference 
to modem systems of taxation. A comparative study is 
made of the various systems of taxation in the leading 
countries; the relation between existing methods of taxa- 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 108 

tlon and the present Industrial organization is given spe- 
cial attention* 

Second Semester. — Money and Banking. The evolution 
of money and the standards of various countries; banking 
functioiiB; clearing houses, and systems of credit During 
the first semester Adams's Science of Finance is used, and 
during the second semester Kinley's Money, and Fiske's 
The Modem Bank. 

E— Seminary. 3 to 6 hours. 

Tuesdays, 2:30-4:30. (October 1 to May 1.) 
Professor Gray, Assistant Professor Hotchkiss, and Mr. 
Putnam. 

The Seminary is open to graduates and to a limited num- 
ber of undergraduates who seem to the instructors prepared 
to make orlcrinal Investigations. No one will be allowed to 
register for less than three hours a week throughout the 
year. An undergraduate may not register for more than 
three hours except by permission of the faculty. 

Subjects for Investigation can be definitely announced 
only after consultation with those who expect to take the 
work, the greatest liberty of choice being allowed each 
student. 

It is suggested that the Seminary take up for a number 
of years difterent phases of the general subject of Public 
Servioe Corporations, thus enabling the material gathered 
for one year to be more largely utilized in successive years. 

The subjects for 1905-06 are: (1) Various Phases of 
Municipal Public Service Corporations; (2) The Position 
of the City Historically Considered; (3) Labor on the 
Street Railways of Chicago; and (4) Recent Development 
and Prospects of the Sugar Industry in the United States. 

F — Commercial and Economic Geography. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. 
Assistant Professor Hotchkiss. 

A general survey of modern commerce as infiuenced by 
the resources and leading industries of different parts of 
the world. The effect of economic and trade conditions 
upon international relations. Lectures and reports. Text- 
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104 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

books to be announced. This course alternates with 
Course M. 

G — The Labor Question in Europe and America. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 8. 
Assistant Professor Hotghkiss. 

A study of the economic and social conditions of the 
working classes In Europe and the United States. Factory 
legislation. Growth of labor organizations; strikes and 
lockouts; the open and closed shop; collective bargaining, 
State regulation of labor disputes, recent laws and Judicial 
decisions. 
Lectures, discussions, special Investigations and reports. 

H — Tariff History of the United States. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. (First Semester only.) 
Mr. Putnam. 

A study of the tariff in Its relation to the industrial and 
commercial development of the United States. 

This course may well be followed by Course L In the 
Second Semester. 

I — Sociology; Socialism and Social Reform. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11. 
Mr. Putnam. 

First Semester. — Sociology, An elementary study of the 
nature, functions, and mutual relations of the social ele- 
ments, with an investigation of contemporary social condi- 
tions. 

Fairbank's Introduction to Sociology and Wright's Out- 
lines of Practical Sociology serve as guides. 

Second Semester. — Socialism and Social Reform. Social- 
ism is considered in its economic, social, and political 
bearings; the programs of different leaders of socialistic 
thought are examined; and various socialistic and com- 
munistic experiments receive consideration. 

J — Transportation. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 
(Second Semester only.) 
Prof esBor Gbay. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 105 

A general course In the theory and history of Transporta- 
tion. The development of the railroad. Including organ- 
ization, management, and consolidations; the question of 
rates, and public control. State and Federal. The chief 
guides used in the course will be Johnson's American 
Railway Transportation, Meyer's Railway Legislation, and 
the publications of the Inter-State Commerce Commission. 

L — Oavemment Regulation of Trusts and Industrial Comr 
hinations. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 
(Second Semester only.) 
Assistant Professor Hotchkiss. 

Development of the Trust Problem. Relation between 
Federal and State power to regulate; Federal powers under 
the Inter-State and Foreign Commerce Clause; regulation 
through taxing power; contracts In restraint of trade. 
State corporation laws; legislation with reference to indus- 
trial and commercial combinations and consolidations. 

M — Colonial Ooverntnents (or Colonies, Dependencies, and 
Spheres of Influence,) 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. (Not given in 1905-06) 
Assistant Professor Hotchkiss. 

A study of the economic, social, and political conditions 
in the English and Dutch colonies and the outlying dis- 
tricts of the United States. Relation of European nations 
to the so-called less progressive peoples. Interests of the 
United States In the Orient. 

This course alternates with Course F. 

Major: Ten year-hours including the first half of 
Course A, 

Minor: Six year-hours including the first half of 
Course A, 

Those making a major in Economics are recommended 
to make a minor in History. 



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106 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

EDUCATION. 

A — Oeneral History of Education. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 4. 
(Not given in 1906-06.) 
Professor Fisk. 

Lectures, readings, and discussions. Text-books: Com* 
payrd's History of Pedagogy, Quick's Essays on Educa* 
tional Reformers, Munroe's The Educational Ideal, Boone's 
Education in the United States. 

NoTiL — ^Thls course may be taken as a three-hour course, or as a 
two-hour course (Mondays and Wednesdays), or as a one-hour course 
(Fridays). 

B — Principles of Education, 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 4. 
(Given in 1905-06 and in alternate years.) 
Professor Fisk. 

Lectures, readings, and discussions. Text-books: Ck)m- 
payr6's Lectures on Pedagogy, Payne's Contributions to the 
Science of Education, Eliot's Educational Reform, Tomp- 
kins's Philosophy of School Management, Lange's Apper- 
ception. 

Nora. — ^Thls course may be taken as a three-hour oourse, or as a 
two-hour course (Mondays and Wednesdays), or as a one-hour oourse 
(Fridays). 

G—The Oreat Educators. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. (Not given In 1905-06.) 
Associate Professor Scott. 

Lectures, readings, and discussions. 
First Semester. — English Educators: Locke, Spencer. 
Second Semester. — Continental Educators: Ck>m6niuB, 
Herbart. 

D — The Oreat Educators. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. 
Associate Professor Scott. 

First Semester. — Continental Educators: Rousseau, Pea- 
talozzi, Froebel. 
Second Semester. — ^The more recent Educators. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL AHTS. lO*? 

E—Oeneral and Special Methods. 1-3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 9. 
Professors W. D. Scott, Fisk, Lbbby, and professors in the 
several departments. 

Lectures, readings, discussions, written reports, high 
school visitations, demonstrations, examination of text- 
hooks and apparatus, etc 

This course may be elected as a one, two, or three-hour 
course In each semester, one hour of credit being given for 
the completion of a semester's work in any one of the fol- 
lowing subjects: 

First Semester. — ^English; Mathematics; Natural and 
Physical sciences. 

Second Semester. — ^History; Latin and Greek; French 
and German. 

F— History of Modem Education. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, fYidays, 3. 
Assistant Professor Libbt. 

A history of education from the Renaissance to the 
present time, including an account of the German, French, 
Bhiglish, and American school systems. 

Q—A Study of Adolescence. 1 hour. 

Saturdays, 10. 
AsBistant Professor Libby. 

Open to all students who have taken one course in 
Psychology. 

•H — Pedagogical Psychology. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 
(Second Semester only.) 
Assistant Professor Libby. 

Open to students who have taken or are taking General 
Psychology. 

Major: Ten year-houra, including Cour$es A or B, and 
O or D, Philosophy A, and ttoo additional year-hours in 
Wduoation or Psychology. 
Minor: Six year-hours in Education. 
*Tkte eonne has been heretofore listed nnder the department of Phlloeopli j. 

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108 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

ELOCUTION. 

A — First Course, 2 hours. 

Section I. Mondays, Wednesdays, 4. 

Section II. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 4. 
Proifessor Cumnock. 

Russell's Manual of Elocution and Cumnock's Choice 
Readings are used. Instruction is given in the management 
and regulation of the breath; the proper use of the body in 
the development of vocal energy; the most advanced knowl- 
edge of English Phonation; the most approved methods of 
acquiring distinct articulation; the function of the natural 
and orotund voices; the application of force, stress, pitch, 
rate, quantity, and emphasis, and their importance as the 
dynamics of expressive speech; the use of inflection for the 
purpose of emphasis and melodious effect; the fundamental 
principles of gesture and their application. 

B — Study of Masterpieces of English Eloquence. 2 hours. 
Section I. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8. 
Section II. Wednesdays, Fridays, 8. 
Professor Cumnock. 

The chief object in Course B is to establish the student in 
the best literary and elocutionary form, by bringing him in 
contact with the most perfect models. 

C — Principles of Vocal Expression. 2 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays, 9. 
Professor Cumnock. 

Course C is designed especially for the year of gradua- 
tion. Great stress is laid upon the acquisition of perfect 
form in common reading and oratorical address. The writ- 
ten productions are carefully examined, and the class in- 
struction is supplemented by personal advice and criticism. 

D — BihUf Hymn, and Liturgic Beading. 2 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays, 11. 
Professor Cumnock. 

As a result of the work in Course D, it Is expected that 
the student will have the skill to read with melodious effect 
and expressive power, the Bible, hymn book, and liturgy. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 109 

ENGLI6H LANGUAGE. 

X— Rhetoric; Synonyms. Eight Essays. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 8, 9, 10, 10, 11, 11, 2. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 8, 9, 10, 11. 
Dr. Kellogg, Mr. Odell, Mr. Chubchill, and Mr. Knott. 
First Semester. — ^A practical drill in the avoidance of the 
common violations of good style. 
Second Semester. — ^Rhetorical imagery and synonyms. 
All students, unless excused by the registration commit- 
tee, take this course during the first year of residence. 
Students who show, early in the first semester, that they 
are seriously deficient in elementary English, will be re- 
quired to take additional work in this subject for such time 
as may be found necessary. No credit will be given for 
any part of Course A, till the whole course, including the 
additional work already mentioned, shall have been com- 
* pleted. 

B — Prose Masterpieces; Paragraphing. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9, 10. 
Professor Clare and Dr. Kellogg. 

First Semester. — ^A study of the diction and the distinc- 
tive characteristics of the great writers of prose. This 
work is continued till about April 1, in each year. 

Second Semester. — Paragraphing. Every member of the 
class writes two themes a week. 
Open to those who have completed Course A. 

C— Versification; Poetic Masterpieces. 2 hours. 

Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 
Prof esBor Clabk and Mr. Odell. 

First Semester. — ^A study of the mechanics of English 
versification. 

Second Semester. — A study of the diction and the distinc- 
tive characteristics of the great poets. This work begins 
about November 1, in the first semester. 
Open to those who have completed Course A. 

T>--History of the English Language; Anglo-Saxon; Early 
English. 2 hours 

Tuesdays. Thursdays, 3. r^ T 

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110 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Professor Clark and Mr. Churchill. 

After reviewing the history of the English language, the 
class takes up, briefly, the outlines of Anglo-Saxon gram- 
mar. The larger part of the year is devoted to the reading 
of selections from flfteen pre-Chaucerian authors, from 
Beeda to Gower, inclusive. 

Open to students who have completed Course A and at 
least one course in German. 

E — Forensics. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. (Not given in 1905-06.) 
Professor Clark. 

The class meets in small sections, and each member de- 
bates once a week on questions previously assigned. Read- 
ing references are given and briefs required. 
Open to those who have completed Course A. 

F — Editorial Writing, 2 hours. 

Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 
Professor Clark and Mr. Odell. 

Every member of the class writes two short articles every 
week during the college year. 
Open to all who have had Courses A and B. 

Q — BibUcdl English. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. (Not given in 1905-06.) 
Professor Clark. 

A course in the diction, imagery, and idiom of the English 
Bible. For graduates only. 

H — The Longer Forms of Narration, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 4. 
Mr. Odell. 

Students are required to analyse short story masterpieces 
as models, and, later, to construct original stories. 

I — Expository and Oratorical Composition. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Dr. Kellogg. 

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GOLLEGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. HI 

A oourae in the longer forms of composition commonly 
used in public speaking. 
Open to students who have completed Course A. 

J-— English Syntax, 2 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, 11. 
Miss POTTIEB. 

The work in syntax is preceded by tests of the ability to 
form clear mental images and to interpret written language. 
The larger part of the semester will be devoted to a search 
after the reasons for the sentence structure of present-day 
English, as revealed through a study of the relation of 
the sentence and its parts to the thought and ideas ex- 
pressed. 

Open to students who have completed one semester's 
work in Psychology. 

Major: Oourseg A and B and six additional year-hours, 
which may include English Literature D. 

Minor: Courses A and B and two additional year^hours. 

ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

A — The History of English Literature. 2 hours. 

Lecture, Monday, 9. 

Seven sections, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 9, 
10. 
Professor Thobndike, Mr. Qoddard, and Mr. Chubchill. 
This course is intended to supply the student with the 
general outline and important facts of the history of liter- 
ature and to serve as an introduction to the other courses 
in the department Lectures, recitations, and a consider- 
able amount of reading. 

Required of all students in regular courses. Students are 
expected .to take this course as early as the second year. 

B — The History of American Literature. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8. 
Mr. GODDABD. 

First Semester. — ^American Literature from 1607 to 1887. 

Second Semester. — ^American Literature from 1837 to 

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112 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

C — Chaucer. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. 
Professor Thorndike and Mr. Goddard. 

First Semester. — ^A detailed study of a large number of 
the Canterbury Tales. 

Second Semester. — ^The representative types of mediaeval 
literature, in connection with a continued study of Chaucer. 

D — Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Drama. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 11. 
Professor Thorndike. 

First Semester. — Lectures on Pre-Shakespearian Drama 
and the reading of a number of plays. A careful and de- 
tailed study of three of Shakespeare's plays; for 1905-06, 
Richard II, King Lear, the Tempest. 

Second Semester. — ^AU of Shakespeare's plays are read in 
chronological order. Lectures on the development of Shakes- 
peare's art, with special attention to his relations to con- 
temporary dramatists. 

E — Non-dramatic Poetry in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 3. 
(Given in 1906-07 and in alternate years.) 
Mr. Goddard. 

First Semester. — Spenser and his contemporaries. 
Second Semester. — Milton and his contemporaries. 

F— Classicism 1^60-1789. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 3. 
(Given In 1905-06 and in alternate years.) 
Mr. Goddard. 

First Semester. — From the Restoration to the death of 
Pope, 1660-1745; Classicism in Poetry; the rise of the 
Essay; the development of Prose; the development of the 
Novel. 

Second Semester. — From the death of Pope to the French 
Revolution, 1745-1789; the decline of Classicism; the begin- 
nings of Romanticism. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. US 

G—Tke Romantic Movement 1789-1830. 2 hours. 

TuesdaTS, Thuradays, 10. 
Professor Thorndike. 

First Semester. — ^Wordswortli, Coleridge, Southey, Lamb, 
Jeffrey, Scott 

Second Semester.—Byron, Keats, Shelley, Leigh Hunt, 
De Quincey, Hazlitt 

H— English Poetry from 1830 to 1880. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11. 
Mr. OODDABD. 

First Semester. — ^Tennyson, Mrs. Browning. 
Second Semester. — ^Browning, Matthew Arnold, Clough, 
the Rossettis, and other poets of the period. 

I— English Prose from 1830 to 1880. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. 
(Given in 1906-07 and in alternate years.) 

Professor Thorndike. 

First Semester. — Carlyle, Newman, Emerson, John Stuart 
MiU. 

Second Semester. — Matthew Arnold, Ruskin. Pater, 
Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, Meredith. 

These writers are studied as representatives of the 
thought and life of the period. A large amount of reading 
and papers on topics suggested hy the course are required. 

J — The Development of the Novel in English. 2 hours. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. (Not given in 1906-06.) 
First Semester. — ^Mediaeval and Elizabethan prose narra- 
tives; the classic novelists. 

Second Semester. — Study of selected nineteenth-century 
novels; the short story. 

K — Seminary. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Thorndike. 

Open to graduate students and to undergraduates whom 
the instructor in charge considers qualified. 

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114 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

In 1905-06 the subject is the Development of English 
Tragedy after 1600. 

Major: Course A and eight additional year-hours, which 
may include English Language D. 

Minor: Course A and four additional year-hours. 

GEOLOGY. 

NOTB. — ^The Department of Geology. In addition to offering courses 
for general education (i. e.. Courses A and AB), offers courses espe- 
cially intended to aid in preparing students <1) to teaxsh physical 
geography and geology in secondary schools, (2) to enter mining 
schools or to engage in mining, and (8) to become professional geolo- 
gists in connection with State or National geological surveys or in 
connection with teaching or economic geology. For (1) Courses A, 
C, D, and the first semester of AB are recommended; for (2) Courses 
A* B. C, and E; and for (8) all courses are recommended. 

In most of the courses in geology part of the work consists of 
excursions taken into the adjacent country for the study of geological 
phenomena in the field. A knowledge of the elements of chemistry 
and physics will be advantageous to those taking courses In geology 
and will be necessary for those who take a major in this subject. 
Students intending to take more than one' course in geology should 
begin with Course A and follow this by Courses C and D, if possible 
taking both of these courses the second year. The first semester of 
course AB, and the second semester of Course C or D may be taken 
in connection with Course A. 

A — General Oeology. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 
Laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Professor Grant and Mr. Goldthwatt. 

First Semester. — ^A general introduction to geology. 
Second Semester. — Systematic and regional physiography, 
mineral resources of the United States, geology of Illinois 
and adjoining states. 
Open to all. 

AB — Physical Geography, 2 hours. 

Taasdays, Thursdays, 2. 
Mr. Q<M[J)THWAIT. 

First Semester. — ^The earth as a planet, the atmosphere, 
the ocean, maps; including laboratory ezerdsee and ob- 
servations of weather conditions. 



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<:X)LLEGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 115 

Second Semester. — ^Physiography of the land; relations of 
plants and animals (especially man) to their geographic 
surroundings. 

This course is intended (1) as a general educational 
ooarse, (2) as a foundation course for those taking work in 
economics and history, (8) as a course for those expecting 
to teach geography in secondary schools, and (4) as a 
brief course in earth study for those who cannot spend the 
time required by Course A. 

Open to all. The second semester may be taken without 
the first Students taking Course A will receive no credit 
for the second semester of Course AB. 

B — Economic Oeology. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11. 
Professor Orant. 

First Semester. — ^The non-metallic useful materials ob- 
tained from the earth's crust — such as water, building ma- 
terials, fuels, etc. 

Second Semester.— The metallic useful materials obtained 
from the earth's crust — such as iron, copper, lead, zinc, 
gold, silver — and the study of ore deposits in general. 

Open to those who have completed Geology A. Students 
taking this course should have some knowledge of chem- 
istry. The second semester of Course B may be taken 
without the first 

C— Practical Geology. 3 hoars. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays. 10. 
Laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Professor Grant. 

First Semester. — ^A more advanced study of structural 
and dynamical geology than is given in Course A. 

Second Semester.— Methods of geological work, prepara- 
tion of maps and sections, geological surveys, history of 
geology. A considerable part of this semester's work will 
be devoted to the actual mapping (geographically, topo- 
graphically, and geologically) of a small area and the prep- 
aration of a report on the same. 

The first semester is open to those who have completed 
Course A and who have some knowledge of diemistry. 



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116 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

The second semester is open to those who are taking, or 
who have completed. Course A. 

D — Regional Physiography and Geology of the United 
States; Oladal Geology. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. QOLDTHWATT. 

First Semester. — The country is divided into physio- 
graphic provinces, and the peculiar features of geological 
structure, relief and drainage in each are studied; natural 
resources and industries are briefly considered. 

Second Semester. — Primarily a study of the North Amer- 
ican ice-sheet, its nature, its history, and its work. The 
extinct ice-sheet is studied in the light of existing glaciers 
of the Alps, Alaska, and Greenland. The physiographic 
features of different parts of the glaciated area in the 
United States are studied and discussed. 

The first semester is open to those who have completed 
Course A. The second semester is open to those who are 
taking, or who have completed. Course A. 

E — Petrology. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 2-4. 
Professor Grant. 

The first part of the course is devoted to the study and 
determination of the common rock-forming minerals by 
means of the petrographical miscroscope, and the second 
part is devoted to the study of the more important rocks. 

Open to those who have completed Geology A or Miner- 
alogy A. 

NoTB. — ^It is expected that of Courses B, C, and E not more than 
two will be given in any one year. 

F — Paleontology ; Historical Geology. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. GOLDTHWAIT. 

First Semester. — Paleontology. A discussion of the prin- 
ciples of paleontological geology and a study of the more 
important groups of fossils. 

Second Semester. — ^Historical Geology. A study of his- 
torical geology, with special reference to the stratigraphy 

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COLLESGB OP LIBERAL ARTS. 117 

of the United States, the development of the North Ameri- 
can continent, and the life characteristics of the different 
periods. 
Open to those who have completed Ck>urse A. 

(i — Primarily for Graduates. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 
Professor Qrant. 

Graduate work is offered along the following lines: (a) 
Advanced Petrology, (b) Pre-Camhrian Oeology. A study 
of the principles and methods used in Investigating the 
non-fossiliferous rocks, followed by a study of the geology 
of the Lake Superior region with special reference to the 
formations which contain the extensive deposits of copper 
and iron ores, (c) Research Work. Investigating along 
certain lines, especially the geology of some particular 
district 

It is expected that work along both (a) and (&) above 
will not be given ih one semester, while work under (c) 
may be carried on at any time. 

Major: Course A and six addiiUmal year-hours^ which 
may include Mineralogy A, 

Minor: Course A and two additional year-hours. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

A A — Elementary German. 5 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fri- 
days, 10. 
Mr. Edward. 

Pronunciation, grammar, selections in prose and verse, 
Grerman composition. Open to those who have less than 
fifteen year-hours of college credit. 

This course may not be taken to remove language re- 
quirements for admission, and credit will not be given 
unless the full course is completed. 

.B — Elementary German. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 8. 2. 
Professor Curme and Mr. Busse. 



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118 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Pronunciation, grammar, selections in prose and yerae, 
German composition. 

This course may not be taken to remove language re- 
quirements for admission, and credit will not be glYen 
unless the full course is completed. 

(b) — Elementary Oerman, Second Unit. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 8. 10. 
Miss Caraway. 

Grammar, reading, German composition. Open to stu- 
dents who have presented but one unit of German for 
admission to college. 
This course is given in the Academy. 

A — Intermediate Oerman. 4 honrs. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 9, 9, 10, 
11,2. 

Professor Karsten, Mr. Edward, Mr. BussB, and Mr. 

HOHN. 

First Semester. — Lessing's Minna von Bamhelm and 
Emilia Galotti; German lyrics and ballads; Schiller's 
Wilhelm Tell; German composition once a week. 

Second Semester.— Lyrics and ballads; Schiller's ICaria 
Stuart; Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea; German Compo- 
sition. 

Open to students who have presented two units of Ger- 
man for admission to college and to those who have com- 
pleted either Course AA or AB.- 

BB — Classical Prose and Poetry; Composition. 4 hourB. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 11. 
Mr. BussE. 

Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Heine, and Grillparzw. 
This course is planned especially for those students who 
have had three years' secondary work in German. 

G — Colloquial German. 1 hour. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. 
Mr. Edward. 



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COLLBOB OP LIBERAL ARTS. 119 

Melssner's Qerman Ck>nyersatloii, Kron'g Qerman Daily 
Life, and other material. Open to all who have had one 
year of Qerman, and to others by special permission. 

B^Goethe's Life and Works, 1749-1790. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 8, 11, 8. 
Professors Hatfield, Cubme, and Kabsten. 

First Semester.— Dichtung nnd Wahrheit, Goetz von Ber- 
lichingen, Werther, and the earlier lyrics. Study of the 
life of Goethe, for which purpose the possession of Heine- 
mann*s Goethe is yery desirable. 

Second Semester. — ^Lyrics, Bgmont, Iphigenie, Tasso, Ita- 
lienische Reise. 

Ck>urse H may suitably be combined with this coarse. 

Open to those who have taken Course A or BB. Course B 
may be taken a second time, with new subject matter, for a 
credit of two hours. 

In 1906^7 the work of Course B is centered about the 
period of the Thirty Tears' War as treated in literature. 

Br—Advanced Oerman Composition, 2 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8. 
Mr. Edward. 

Von Jagemann's Syntax and Prose Composition; White's 
Selections for German Prose Composition with specially 
assigned original work. International correspondence with 
students liying in Germany. Open to those who have had 
Course A, or its equivalent. 

J— Modem Oerman Drama. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 4. 
Professor Cubme. 

Two courses in Modem German Drama are given under 
this heading in alternate years. They present an outline of 
German life in the nineteenth century as reflected in the 
drama, exclusive of the classical works of Goethe and 
Schiller. 

(a) 1906-07. First Half of the Century. Heinrich von 
Kleist, Grillparzer, Raimund, Gutzkow, Hebbel, Otto Lud- 
wig. 



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120 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

(b) 1905-06. Second Half of the Century. Anzengru- 
ber» Wildenbruch, Sudermann, Hauptmann, Fulda» Lien- 
hard, Otto Ernst 

Open to those who have completed Course B. 

P — Oerman Novel and Short Story, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays* Thursdays, 3. 
Mr. Edward. 

Two courses In the modern German Novel and Short 
Story are given in alternate years. They present an out- 
line of German life in the nineteenth century as reflected 
in this form of literature. 

(a) 1906-07. First Half of the Century. H. von Klelst, 
Hauff, Tieck, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Immermann, Stifter, 
Grillparzer, Ludwlg. 

(b) 1905-06. Second Half of the Century. C. F. Meyer, 
Spielhagen, Morike, Storm, Heyse, Keller, Raabe, Fontane, 
Wildenbruch, Sudermann, Frenssen. 

Open to those who have completed Course B. 
Courses J and F may be suitably combined. 

D — The History of Oerman Literature; Ooethe's Faust, 

3 hours. 
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 3. 
Professor Hatfield, Professor Karsten. 

A systematic study of German literature from the earliest 
times. Scherer's History of German Literature and Max 
Mflller's German Classics will be used. 
Open to those who have completed Course B. 

E — Adn)anced Literary Group, 2 hours. 

Saturdays, 8:30-10, (subject to change). 
Professor Hatfield, Professor Karsten. 

First Semester. — Goethe's life and works. 
Second Semester. — Schiller's life and works. 
This course, which is given on the seminary plan, is in- 
tended chiefly for graduate students, and in all cases enroll- 
ment will be at the discretion of the instructor. Suitable 
original work will be brought to publication as far as 
opportunity allows. 



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COLLEGE OP LIBERAL ARTS. 121 

M — The History of German Culture, 2 hours. 

Wednesdays, Fridays, 4. 
Mr. BussB. 

Biedermann's Geschichte der deutschen Kultur is used as 
a guide for the systematic study of the "Germanic type" 
and for tracing its organic development under the cultural 
influences to which it has heen subjected. 

Open to those who have completed Course B. Courses D 
and M may be suitably combined. 

K — Historical Grammar of the German Language. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays. Fridays, 4. 
Profefffior Curme. 

This course consists of a study of the forms and syntax 
of the German language in their historical development in 
connection with the reading of Important literary works of 
the different periods. The following texts are used: 
Braune's Althochdeutsche Grammatik and Althoch- 
deutches Lesebuch, Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik, 
Hartmann von Aue's Der arme Heinrich, Curme's Grammar 
of the German Language as spoken and written today. 
Open to seniors and graduate students. 

L — Middle High German Masterpieces, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3. 
Professor Gubme. 

This course consists of the reading of different master- 
pieces of the Middle High German period without a formal 
study of the grammar. In 1906-07 the following works will 
be taken up: Zarncke's edition of the Nibelungenlied and 
Martin's Wolframs von Eschenbach Parzival und Titurel. 

Open to those who can read modern High German flu- 
ently. 

N — East and North Germanic, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3. (Not given in 1906-07.) 
Professor Cubme. 

This course consists of the study of Gothic and Icelandic 
and the relations of these languages to other members of 

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122 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

the Germanic group. Texts: Stamm-Heyne-Wrede's Ulfl- 
las and Kahle's AltlBl&ndisches Elementarbuch. 

Open to seniors and graduate students. 

Major: Courses A (or BB) and B and six additional 
year-hours. 

Minor: Courses A or (BB) and B. 



GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

A A— White's First Greek Book Complete and Oleason's 
Story of Cyrus. Greek Composition. 5 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fri- 
days, 10. 
Professor Scott. 

This course may not be taken to remove language re- 
quirements for admission, and credit will not be given 
unless the full course is completed. 

AB — Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III, IV. Thirty 
lessons in Greek Composition, Homer's lUad, three 
books. 5 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fri- 
days, 9. 
Dr. Plickinger. 

Courses AA and AB are designed for students who enter 
college without Greek. 

A — Lysias, Select Orations. Plato's Apology. Homer. 
Greek Composition based on the text. 4 hoars. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 11. 
Professor Scott and Dr. Plickinger. 

B — Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates. Plato's Gorgias. 
Sophocles' Antigone. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 
Mr. Oldpather. 



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COLLBOB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 128 

C — SeUciiana from Lyric Poets. Hesiod, Herodotus, Demos- 
thenes, and I/ucian. 4 hours. 
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 9. 
Professor Scott. 

Q— Dramatic Poetry. 4 hoars. 

Hours to be arranged. 

(Given In 1906^.) 
Professor Soott. 

H — Homer and Epic Poetry. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. 

(Not given in 1906-07.) 
Professor Soott. 

K — Greek and Roman Archaeology, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2. 
Dr. Flickingeb. 

A general Introduction to the artistic remains of the 
Greeks and Romans from the Mycenaean age to the time 
of Hadrian. The course will deal with architecture, sculp- 
ture, vases, and coins. 
May be counted as one year-hour towards a Greek major. 

N — The Gospels according to Luke and John. The Acts of 
the Apostles. 4 hours. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 10. 
Professor Hates. 

This course is given in Garrett Biblical Institute, and 
. students electing it are subject to the regulations of that 
school. 

Major: Courses A and B and five additional year-hours, 
not including Course N. 
Minor: Courses A and B. 



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124 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



HISTORY. 

NoTB. — ^The alphabetical arrangement of courses in this depart- 
ment does not signify the order In which they shall be taken. Course 
A, C, BC, or D may be chosen as a first course. Ck>urse8 D, B, and 
F may be taken most profitably in the order named. 

A — English History. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 3. 
Mr. Way. 

English political history from the Anglo-Saxon period to 
the present day. In addition to the strictly political his- 
tory of England, the development of goyemmental institn- 
tions and the condition of the church will receive some 
attention. 

B — English Constitutional History, 2 hours. 

Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. (Not given in 1905-06.) 
Mr. Way. 

The constitutional history of England from the Anglo- 
Saxon period to the present day. The course is designed 
to show the historical development of the modem English 
government, with especial reference to Parliament. In- 
tended especially for those students who expect to study 
law. 

Open to all who have sixty semester-hours of credit, after 
consultation with the instructor in charge. 

C — Colonial History of the United States to 1783. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3. 
Professor Sheppabd. 

Given in 1905-06 by Mr. Way. 

BC — American History. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10, 11. 
Professor Jambs. 

^ The Political History of the United States from the Revo- 
lution. The formation of the Union, the rise and growth of 
parties, the influence of westward expansion and of slavery 
on the political life. 
This course is given in two sections, the 11 o'clock sec- 



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COLLBOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 125 

tion being reserved for students having over fifty hours of 
credit 

CD — Modem Constitutional Government. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. (Not given In 1905-06.) 
Mr. Wat. 

A study of the Governments of Bngland, France, Ger- 
many, Switzerland, Austria, Russia, and the United States 
An attempt to make a thorough examination of the actual 
working of modem governments and the activity of parties 
with a view to a comparison of the European Governments 
with that of the United States. 

Open to students who have thirty semester-hours of 
credit, after consultation with the instructor In charge. 

D — Greek and Roman History. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8. 
Professor Wildb. 

First Semester. — History of Greece from the earliest 
times to the Roman Conquest Constant use of the library 
for the literature of the subject; reports on reading. 

Second Semester. — ^History of Rome from the earliest 
times to the fall of the Empire In the West. Assigned read- 
ing with reports on the same, submission of a thesis. 

Either semester of this course may be taken without the 
other. 

E — Continental Europe during the Middle Ageg. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 
Mr. Way. 

This course Is Intended to furnish an outline of the his- 
tory of Europe from the fall of Rome to about the middle 
of the thirteenth century. It deals with the political, re- 
ligious, and Intellectual development of the period. One 
thesis is required. 
Open to those who have thirty semester-hours of credit 

P — The Renaissance and the Reformation, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. 
MissSabqent. 

First Semester. — ^The Political History of Europe from 

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128 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

the middle of the thirteenth century to the close of the 
fifteenth century; the Renaissance, especially in Italy, — ^the 
intellectual deyelopment, its contacts with antiquity and 
the Middle Ages* and its influence on modem life. 

Second Semester. — ^The Reformation, especially in Ger- 
many, France, and England; reforming movements before 
the Reformation; ecclesiastical, political, and social effects 
of the Reformation. 

Open to those who have thirty semester-hours of credit. 

G — European History since the Outbreak of the French 
Revohiiion. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 
Professor James. 

Political history showing the progress of Democracy 
and aiming to give an understanding of the present condi- 
tion of European politics. 

First Semester. — Causes and events connected with the 
period of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars. 

Second Semester. — The evolution of Constitutional Qov- 
emment in the European States; unification of Germany 
and of Italy; the Eastern Question and present political 
conditions. 

Open to those who have sixty semester-hours of credit 
Other students desiring to take the course must receive 
special permission from the instructor in charge. 

H — Diplomatic History of the United States. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11. 
Mr. Way. 

History of the foreign relations of the United States from 
the beginning of the Revolution to our own time. Special 
attention is given to the commercial treaties following the 
Revolution, annexation of territory, the relations with 
Spanish America, and the period of the Civil War. 

I — Methods of Teaching History unth special reference to 
the work of Secondary Schools. 1 hour. 

Hour to be arranged. 
Professor James and Professor Wildb. 

Open to those who make History their major subject and 



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<:X)LLBGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 127 

to others of Baitable preparation, after consultation with 
one of the instructors in charge. 

J — Teachers' Course, 1 hour. 

Hour to be arranged. 
(Not given in 1906-06.) 
Professor James. 

This course is intended primarily for the teachers of His- 
tory in the schools of ETanston and vicinity. During the 
year 1904-05 the work was in American History. 

College credits may be secured if arranged for at the 
time of registration. 

L — Church History. 3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 
Professor Little. 

Post-Nicene History of the Christian Church. Chris- 
tianity within the Roman Empire; the struggle of the 
Church with Paganism, with Barbarism, and with Moham- 
medanism; the Development of the Hierarchy; the rival- 
ries of the Patriarchates; the upbuilding of the Papacy 
and the growth of Monachism; the relations of the Popes 
to the Byzantine, Frankish, and German Emperors; the 
Crusades; the growth and decay of Papal power; the 
Monastic Schools; the Universities; the Mendicants and 
Mediaeval Heretics; Scholasticism and Superstition; the 
Church and Medieval Society; History of the Reformation 
and of the modem church. 

Open to those who have had a course in general history, 
and have sixty semester-hours of credit 

This course is given in Garrett Biblical Institute, and 
students electing it are subject to the regulations of that 
school. 

PKIMABILT VOB GRADUATES. 

K — The FaU of Rome and the Rise of New Nations. 

2 hours. 
Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Wilde. 

A study of the last years of the Roman Empire, the 



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128 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

causes of its fall, contacts of Romans and Germans, in- 
vasions of the Germans, foundation of the Germanic states 
on the soil of the empire, early developments in the Frank- 
ish kingdom. 

Some facility in reading Latin, French, and German is 
required for this course. 

M — Seminary in American History, 3 hours. 

Thursdays, 3-6. 
Professor James. 

Open only to those whom the professor in charge con- 
siders qualified. One meeting of two hours each week; but 
each student must give sufficient time in preparation to 
entitle him to three hours of credit Additional credit may 
be acquired if arranged for at the time of registration. 

In 1905-06, the subject for consideration is the Diplo- 
matic History of the United States during the administra- 
tions of WEishington and Adams. Material secured from 
the French archives forms a basis for the work. 

Major: Course A or BO, and seven additional year-hours. 

Minor: A or BG, and three additional year-hours. 

Those making a major in History are recommended to 
make a minor in Economics. 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

A — Livy, Cicero, Terence, 4 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays. 

Four sections, 9, 10, 11, 2. 
Assistant Professor Long, Mr. Oldpather, and Dr. Plick- 

INGER. 

First Semester. — Livy, selections amounting to two 
books. 

Second Semester. — Cicero, de Senectute and selected Let- 
ters; Terence, Phormio. 

Latin composition throughout the year, with grammatical 
reyiews. 



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COLLEOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 129 

B— First Semester. — Horace, Odes and Epodes. 3 hours. 
Second Semester. — Horace, Satires; Taoittis, Agricola 
and Oermania. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9, 11. 
Professor Bonbright and Assistant Professor Long. 

With course B it is advised that Greek and Roman 
History be included as an elective; see History D, page 125. 

C— First Semester. — QuintUian; Pliny's Letters. 

Second Semester. — Horace, Epistles, including Art of 
Poetry. 3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 11. 
Professor Bonbright. 

D— First Semester. — Catullus and the Latin Elegists. 
Second Semester. — Tacitus, Annals, — Reign of Tiberius. 

3 hours. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 11. 
(Not given in 1906-07.) 
Professor Bonbright. 

E— First Semester. — Lucretius, — readings with interpreta- 
tion. 2 hours. 
Second Semester. — Cicero, philosophical selections. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. 
(Not given in 1906-07.) 
Professor Bonbright. 

F— latin Comedy and Satire. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. 
Professor Bonbright. 

First Semester.— The Roman drama— its history and 
social position, lectures; Plautus, two or three plays. 

Second Semester.— Satiric Poetry and Epigram— Juvenal: 
IfarUaL 



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130 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

G — Greek iScliools of Philosophy at Rome, 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Bonbbight. 

An advanced course in extension of Course E and of 
Course F in alternate years. 

H — Vergil. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3. 
(Not given in 1906-07.) 
Assistant Professor Long. 

First Semester. — ^Bucolics and Georgics; lectures intro- 
ductory to the study of Vergil and the Roman epic. 

Second Semester. — ^Aeneid entire; preparation of papers 
on assigned topics with lectures. 

J — Latin Comporition. 1 hour. 

. Fridays, 3. 
Assistant Professor Long. 

This course presupposes Course A, or its equivalent, and 
will involve more advanced study of ^Syntax throughout the 
year. 

K — Cicero, Orations; Advanced Latin Composition, 2 hours. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3. 
(Not given in 1906-06.) 
Assistant Professor Long. 

First Semester. — Selections from the early Orations of 
Cicero; study of rhetorical method and development of 
style, together with readings from the rhetorical works. 

Second Semester. — ^Practice in writing Latin,' based in 
part on standard prose selections. Problems of Syntax are 
discussed and special attention given to the study of Latin 
prose style. 
Greek and Roman Archaeology. 

See the course designated Greek K, page 123. 

Major: Courses A and B, vAth C or D, and B or F, or an 
approved equivcUent. 
Minor: Courses A and B. 



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COLLEGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 181 

MATHEMATICS. 

X— Algebra and Plane Trigonometry. 4 hours. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays. 

Eight sections at 8, 8, 9, 9, 10, 11, 11, 2. 
Assistant Professor Cubtiss, Dr. Keppbl, Mr. Wilson, and 

Dr. MOBEHEAD. 

First Semester. — ^Algebra, including the theory of quad- 
ratic equations, ratio and proportion, progressions, binom- 
ial theorem, with an introduction to the general theory of 
equations and determinants. Emphasis is laid upon the 
use of graphs. 

Second Semester. — Plane Trigonometry, including logar- 
ithms and the solution of oblique triangles. 

Required of all candidates for a degree, except those who 
elect Course AB. 

XB— Trigonometry, Algebra, and Analytical Geometry. 

5 hours. 
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fri- 
days, 10. 
Dr. MOBEHEAD. 

First Semester. — Plane Trigonometry and Algebra; a 
briefer course than is given in Course A. 

Second Semester. — Plane Analytical Geometry. An ele- 
mentary course on the straight line and conic sections. 

Course AB may be taken by any student who has met the 
entrance requirements in Algebra. 

^A-'Advanced Algebra, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. 
Dr. Bleppel, 

Second Semester. — A continuation of the work in Algebra 
of Courses A and AB, covering the elements of the theory 
of equations, determinants, and irrational numbers. 

Open to students who have completed the first semester 
of either Course A or Course AB, and recommended to all 
who expect to teach mathematics in secondary schools. 



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182 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

B — Plane and Solid Analytical Oeometry, 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 8. 
Mr. Wilson. 

First Semester. — Plane Analytical Geometry; an elemen- 
tary course on the straight line and conic sections. 

Second Semester. — Cartesian coordinates in three dimen- 
sions; the geometry of the plane and quadrlc surfaces. 
' Open to students who have completed Course A or its 
equivalent 

BB — Differential and Integral Calculus. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 
Assistant Professor Curtiss. 

First Semester. — Theory of limits, differentiation of com- 
mon functions, maxima and minima. 

Second Semester. — Indefinite and definite integrals, 
change of variahle, areas and volumes, average values of 
fimctions. 

Open to students who have completed Course AB or its 
equivalent. 

D — Theory of Equations. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. 
Assistant Professor Curtiss. 

H — Modern Synthetic Geometry. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 
Dr. Keppel. 

Introduction of infinitely distant elements Into geometry; 
central projection; perspectivity and projectivity; genera- 
tion of conies from projective forms; properties of ruled 
quadric surfaces; involution; poles and polars; systems of 
conies. The analytic method is developed side hy side with 
the synthetic. 

Open to students who have completed Course B or its 
equivalent. 

J — Advanced Calculus. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 11. 
Assistant Professor Cubtiss. 

Infinite series; Taylor's Theorem; partial differentiation; 

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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 183 

maxima and minima; definite Integrals over curves, sur- 
faces, and volumes; the Eulerian functions; Fourier's 
series; differential equations. 
Open to students who have completed Course BB. 

K — Analytical Mechanics. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8. 
ifr. Wilson. 

A course in Theoretical Mechanics, open to students who 
have taken Course BB or its equivalent It includes a study 
of vectors, uniformly accelerated motions, simple harmonic 
motions and their composition, elliptic motion, central or- 
bits, force, energy, work, etc. 

L — Surveying; theory and practice, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2. 
Dr. Keppel. 

The use and adjustments of the compass, engineer's 
transit, solar compass and Y level; the keeping of records 
and platting of observations; calculation of heights, dis- 
tances, and areas; elements of the theory of errors. Field 
work with the instruments will be carried on in small divi- 
sions In the fall and spring. 

PBnCABILY FOB GRADUATES. 

F — The Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical 
Physics. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 11. 
(Not given in 1905^)6.) 
Assistant Professor Cubtiss. 

A course based on Weber's Partielle Differential-gleichun- 
gen and including the solution of problems in Heat, Elec- 
tricity, Elasticity, etc. 

Open to the students who have completed Course J or its 
equivalent 

M — Theory of Functions. 3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 8. 
Mr. Welbon. 



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134 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

N — Transformation Oroups. 2 hours. 

TueBdays, Thursdays, 11. 
Assistant Professor Curtiss. 

An introduction to Lie's theory of continuous groups. 

P — Algebraic Equations and Algebraic Oeometry. 2 hours. 

Fridays. 2-4. (Not given in 1906-06.) 
Dr. Keppel. 

Major: Fourteen year-hours includinff Courseg A or AB, 
and B or BB. 
Minor: Courses A or AB, and B or BB. 

MINERALOGY AND ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. 

A — Mineralogy; Blowpipe Analysis. 4 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11. 

Laboratory hours to be arranged between 8 and 12. 
Professor Crook. 

First Semester. — Mineralogy; elements of crystallog- 
raphy; Descriptive Mineralogy, including physical proper- 
ties, chemical composition, occurrence, and association of 
minerals; determination of minerals by physical charac- 
teristics. Dana's "Text-Book of Mineralogy." 

Second Semester. — Blowpipe analysis; wet and dry 
methods of Investigation to confirm physical determina- 
tions. Brush's "Determinative Mineralogy and Blowpipe 
Analysis." 

C — Economic Geology. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 
Professor Crook. 

First Semester. — A study of soils, fertilizers, abrasives, 
and lubricants, refractory and fictile materials, building 
stone, coal, mineral oil, and natural gas — substancee em- 
braced under the designation of non-metallic mineral re- 
sources. 

Second Semester. — Metallic mineral products — gold, sil- 
ver, platinum, copper, iron, lead, zinc, mercury, and some 
metals of minor Importance — studied in regard to their 



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COLLSOS OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 135 

origin, geological relations, geographical distribution and 



D — Physical Crystallography. 2 hours. 

Hoars to be arranged. 
Professor Cbook. 

Optical, thermal, magnetic, and molecular properties of 
crystals. Wooden and glass models, reflecting goniometer 
and microscope used. 

Williams' "Elements of Crystallography" and Groth's 
"Physikalische Krystallographle." 

E — Assaying. 2 hours. 

Thursdays, 2-6. 
Professor Cbook. 

First Semester. — Fire assay for base metals; and scorifl* 
cation, cupellation, parting, and weighing of gold and sil- 
ver. 

Second Semester. — Crucible process for assay of precious 
metals, and general methods for copper, lead, and zinc. 

Open to those students who have completed Chemistry 
A and Mineralogy A. 

P — Advanced Course. 2 to 5 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Cbook. 

A continuation of the work begun in any one of the 
courses in Qeneral Mineralogy, blowpipe analysis, optical 
Mineralogy or Economic Geology, for the purpose of pre- 
paring the student to enter upon work of special inyestiga- 
tion. 

Q — Research Course. 5 to 15 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Cbook. 

For graduate students who have completed the require- 
ments for major work in the department Special investi- 
gation of the physical and chemical properties of some 
mineral or group of minerals, or particular study of a 
region of importance from the point of view of Economic 



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136 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Geology. A full knowledge of the literature of the subject 
iB involyed, and ability to use French and German is nec- 
eesary. 

Major: Course A and Hx additional year-hours, iofc<c% 
may include Otology A, 

Minor: Course A and two additional year-hours, 

MUSIC. 

NonB.— The maximum credit which will be allowed for oouraeB tn 
Music l8 twenty semester-hours. 

Courses A, B, and C are introductory courses In Harmony, Form 
and Analysis, and Sight Reading, open to college students, but bear- 
ing no college credit. Their equivalents, however, must be satisfy- 
torily completed before subsequent courses in the same subjects can 
be taken. 

D — Harmony. 2 hours. 

Mondays, Thursdays, 11. 
Professor Lutkin. 

Text-book: Chadwlck's Harmony. 

The equlTalent of Course A, Introductory Harmony, muat 
be completed before registering for this course. 

E — Form and Analysis. 1 hour. 

Wednesdays, 11. 
Professor Lutein. 

First Semester. — Bach's Inventions. Song Forms (prin- 
cipally Mendelssohn and Chopin). 

Second Semester.— Preludes and Fugues (Bach's Well- 
tempered Clavichord). Sonatas (Mozart, Haydn, and Bee- 
thoven). 

P — History of Music. 2 hours. 

Mondays, Thursdays, 2. 
Mr. Gabwood. 

First Semester. — ^Primitive music, the Greek music sys- 
tem, early ecclesiastical styles; polyphonic music of the 
Middle Ages, history of notation; development of the ora- 
torio, opera camerata; Caccini, Lully, Purcell; comparison 
of opera of Italy, France, and (Germany. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 187 

Text-book, Lessons in Musical History, by Fillmore. Sup- 
plemented by lectures. 

Second Semester. — ^Biographical work, including required 
reading covering the classic and modem periods, and an es- 
say on an assigned subject from each member of the class. 

Text-book, Erolution of the Art of Music, by Parry. 

Lectures on Wagner's Nibelungen Tetralogy, including 
the Rheingold, Walkjrrie, Siegfried, and Gdtterd&mmerung. 

Q — Sight Reading and Choral Practice. 1 hour. 

Mondays, Thursdays, 4:46. 
Mr. C!oziNE. 

H — Caunierpaint. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Fridays, 11. 
Professor Lutkin. 

First Semester. — Counterpoint in the various species in 
two and three parts. 
Seoond Semester. — Counterpoint in three and four parts. 

I — Harmonization of Chorales. 1 hour. 

Mondays, 2. 
Professor Lutein. 

J — Composition, Homophonic Forms. 1 hour. 

Tuesdays, 2. 
Professor Lutkin. 

K — Advanced History of Music. 1 hour. 

Thursdays, 3. 

Mr« Garwood. 

L — Analysis. 1 hour. 

Wednesdays, 2. 
Professor Lutkin. 

Sonatas, Fugues, Chamber Music. 

M — Counterpoint 1 hour. 

Wednesdays, 10. 
Professor Lutkdc. 



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138 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

First Semester.— Counterpoint in five or more parts. 
Second Semester. — Double and Triple Counterpoint. 

N — Canon and Fugue, 1 hour. 

Tuesdays, 10. 
Professor Lutkin. 

First Semester. — Canons in various intervals. Two-part 
Fugues. 
Second Semester. — ^Three and four part Fugues. 

P — Analysis, 1 hour. 

Thursdays, 10. 
Prof esBor Lutein. 

First Semester. — ^Bach's Preludes and Fugues; Beetho- 
ven's Sonatas. 

Second Semester. — Chamber Music, Oratorios, Sym- 
phonies and Orchestral Music from full score. 

NoTB 1. — ^Members of the Glee Club who have served for one year 
and who can qualify for Course O (siffht reading) may obtain a total 
credit of two semester-hours on the recommendation of the instructor. 

Nora 2. — Students who have fair ability as players of band in- 
struments may obtain a total credit of four semester-hours for serv- 
ices rendered In the University Band, upon recommendation of the 
band instructor, their period of service to cover two years. 

NoTB 8. — ^For detaUed information in regard to the various courses 
offered In music, see the catalogue nimiber of the School of Music 
Bulletin, published in July of each year, also special buUetins issued 
quarterly. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE AND HYGIENE. 

B — Gymnastic Exercise. 1 hour. 

Four sections, Tuesdays, Wednesdays. Thursdays, 
Fridays, 2, 3, 4, 5. 
Miss HuEGiN and Mr. Sherwood. 

Regular classes for dumb-bell, Indian-dub, and other 
gymnastic exercises are formed for men and women. Care- 
ful physical examinations are made. Credit of one hour is 
given each semester for four hours a week of gymnasium 
practice. 



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COUJEQB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 189 



PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND LOGIC. 

NoTB. — ^The alphabetical arrangement of courses exists for oon- 
Tsnlence of reference— not to Indicate the order In which courses 
■boold be chosen. It Is generally best to elect Course A, or Courses A 
tad B conjointly, before the others, but this Is not required except as 
It Is speclllcally Indicated In the following description of the courses. 

A — Oenerdl Psychology; Logic. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. 
Anociate Professor Scott and Dr. Ewbb. 

First Semester. — ^Psychology. Thomdike's Elements of 
Psychology; class-room demonstrations and guidance to prl- 
▼ate observation; demonstration of apparatus and methods 
of experimental psychology; written exercises and experi- 
ments from members of the class ; lectures and collateral 
reading on various topics. 

Second Semester. — ^Logic. An outline of both deductive 
and inductive logic Special stress is laid upon the methods 
of the sciences. Written exercises in the detection of falla- 
cies and the criticism of arguments. 

Ab— Psychology. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. 
(Second semester only.) 
Associate Professor Soott. 

A continuation of the work of the first semester of Course 
A and may be taken instead of Logic as the completion of 
Course A. 

^^— Elementary Experimental Psychology, 2 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3-6. 
Associate Professor Scott. 

Laboratory work in connection with Course A. Intended 
for students of General Psychology who desire to become 
acquainted with laboratory methods, and for those who ex- 
pect to pursue advanced laboratory courses. Two consecu- 
tive hours of laboratory work for one hour of credit 

Course B is open only to those who have taken or who 
are taUnc Coarse A. 



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1*0 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

C — History of Philosophy. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 11. 
Dr. EwEB. 

Text-book, lectures, dissertations, the reading of selected 
writings of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Locke, Berkeley, 
Hume, and Kant 

Open to students who have completed or are taking 
Course A. 

D — General Introduction to Philosophy, 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdasrs, Fridays, 4. 
(First semester only.) 
Dr. Ewer. 

General introduction to philosophy. Lectures, papers, 
and discussions. Intended for all who desire to learn about 
the nature of philosophy, its divisions, and the character- 
istic attempts to solve its problems. 
Open to students who have completed Course A. 

E — Introduction to Ethics and to the Philosophy of 
Religion. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 3. 
Professor Cob and Dr. Ewbb. 

First Semester. — ^An introduction to ethical theory and 
to practical ethics based upon Mackenzie's "Manual of 
Ethics." Assigned reading upon the history and the cur- 
rent problems of ethics, with class-room reports. 

Second Semester. — ^An introduction to the philosophy of 
religion. Lectures, discussions, and library work. 

F — Seminary in the Psychology and Philosophy of Re- 
ligion. 3-5 hours. 
Tuesdays, 2-4. (Not given in 1905-06.) 
Professor Coe. 

Reading of the chief literature on the psychology of re- 
ligion; collection and analysis of new data; psychological 
prolegomena to the philosophy of religion. An intioduc- 
tion to research in the psychology of religion. 

Primarily for graduates, but open to properly prepared 
undergraduates. 



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COLLBOE OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 141 

G — Advanced Experimental Psychology. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Aflsoeiate Professor Scott. 

This course extends the work begun in Course B Into 
some of the more difficult problems, and introduces a lim- 
ited amount of research. Two consecutive hours of labora- 
tory work will be required for one hour's credit 
Open to students who have completed Course B. 

J — The Philosophy of Nature. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. (Not given in 1905-06.) 
Professor C!oe. 

An analysis of the chief notions of the natural and physi- 
cal sciences (such as law, matter, energy, life, mind), with 
especial reference to the theory of evolution and man's 
place in nature. Text-book, lectures, papers, discussions. 

Open to students who have had a course in G(eneral 
Psychology, and who have taken or are taking Blementary 
History of Philosophy. 

K — Advanced History of Philosophy. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. (Not given in 1905-06.) 
Prof easor Coe. 

Rapid reading of philosophical literature. In addition to 
the reading required of the whole class, each member will 
make a critical study of some problem or piece of litera- 
ture and present the results in the form of a thesis. 

For graduates, and undergraduates who have completed 
Courses A and C. 

L — Education in Religion and Morals. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8. (Not given in 1905-06.) 
Professor Coe. 

This course includes the philosophy of education, with 
special reference to religion and morals, a study of the 
religious development of the child, and a study of the 
various Institutions for the training of character, such as 
the family, the Sunday school, associations of children and 
youth, the public schools, and academies and colleges. 

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142 NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVERSITY. 

Coe'B "Education In Religion and Morals/' with assigned 

reading and class-room reports. 
Major: Either Courses A, B, G, and three additiondl 

year-hours; or Courses A, C, and four addUionai year-hours. 
Minor: Course A or B, and three additional year-hours. 
Students who select Philosophy as their major subject 

win do well to take Course A In their second year. 

PHY8IC8. 

A — Oeneral Physics. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 11. 
Assistant Professor Tatnauj. 

First Semester. — General properties of Matter, Sound, 
Heat 

Second Semester. — ^Electricity, Magnetism, Light 

Each week's work consists of two experimental lectures, 
one recitation, and one laboratory exercise. The laboratory 
will be open every afternoon In the week except Saturday. 

Ames' Text-book of Oeneral Physics is used. The labora- 
tory work is guided by a set of instructions prepared and 
printed especially for this laboratory. 

A beginning course requiring no mathematics b^ond 
that necessary for entrance to college. It is recommended 
as a first-year or second-year study to those contemplating 
the pursuit of any pure science, engineering, or medicine. 

B — Mechanics. 3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11. 
Professors Crew and Tatnauj. 

An experimental study of forces, moments of force» mo- 
ments of Inertia, elasticity, etc., forming an introduction to 
advanced physics. This is a course in pure Dynamics, and 
serves as an introduction to Applied Mechanics. 

Mimeographed notes are placed in the hands of the stu- 
dent as the course proceeds. 

Two lectures and one laboratory exercise a week. The 
laboratory work is guided by a set of instructions prepared 
and printed especially for this laboratory, which is open. 



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C0I4LBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 148 

for this course, every afternoon in the week except Wednes- 
day and Saturday. 

Open to students who have completed Course A, or its 
equivalent 

C — Electricity and Magnetiavn. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays. 8. 
ProfesBor Gbew. 

Blectricity and Magnetism. Two lectures and two laborar 
tory exercises a week. In the lectures the more general 
laws of electricity and magnetism are discussed; the prac- 
tical equations employed in the laboratory are also derived 
and discussed. J. J. Thomson's Elements of the Biathe- 
matlcal Theory of Electricity and Magnetism is employed 
as a t«ct-book. 

The laboratory is open every afternoon except on Wednes- 
day and Saturday. 

Henderson's Practical Electricity and Magnetism repre- 
sents the direct current work covered in the laboratory. 
This course also includes some alternate current* experi- 
ments and forms a solid foundation for all work in elec- 
trical engineering. 

Open to students who have completed Course A, or its 
equivalent 

D — AJUemate Currents. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. (Not given in 1906-06.) 
Assistant Professor Tatnall. 

First Semester. — ^The general theory of alternate cur- 
rents as set forth in Franklin and Williamson's treatise on 
that subject 

Second Semester. — Laboratory practice with electr<>4y- 
namometer, oscillograph, etc, measurements of inductance, 
capacity, impedance; class-room practice with numerous 
examples. 
For advanced students and graduates. 

H—Maikematical Physics; Electricity. 2 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays, 9. 
Professor Cbew. 

Webster's Theory of Electricity and M^«netism r^re- 

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144 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

sents the ground covered. The subject is believed to be es- 
sential to all advanced students of pure physics and to 
those contemplating electrical engineering of high grade. 
It is also recommended to students interested in applied 
mathematics. 
The course is intended primarily for graduates. 

P — Mathematical Physics. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10. 
Assistant Professor Tatnall. 

Dynamics of a Particle, Rigid Dynamics, Elasticity and 
Fluid Motion. Webster's Dynamics will be used as a text. 
For advanced stud^its and graduates. 

S — Mathematical Physics; Spectroscopy. 2 hours. 

Mondays, Fridays, 9. (Not given in 1906-06.) 
Professor Cbew. 

A course in the general theory of physical optics, spec- 
trum analysis, and astrophysics, including the theory of 
optical instruments. 

For advanced students and graduates. Given in alter- 
nate years with Course E. This course is intended to be 
accompanied by laboratory work along the same line, the 
hours of credit for which are to be separately determined 
in each particular case. 

6 — Mechanical Drawing. 2 hours. 

Saturdays, 9-12, and one afternoon a week. 
Associate Professor Basquix. 

An introductory course taking up projection, sketching; 
use of instruments, blue printing, lettering, shop drawings, 
isometric projection, isometric sketching, and the more use- 
ful problems of Descriptive Geometry, followed by appli- 
cations in Machine Drawing. 

The work is guided by blue-printed instructions, in addi- 
tion to which the student needs a text such as Jamison's 
Elements of Mechanical Drawings. 



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COLLBOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 145 

H — Applied Mechanics. 4 hours. 

Tuesday, Thursdays, Saturdays, 8, and one afternoon 
each week. 
Associate Professor Basquin. 

First Semester. — Hydromechanics, taking up hydrostat- 
ics, theoretical hydraulics, flow through orifices, tubes, and 
pipes, over weirs and in conduits and rivers, water wheels, 
turbines, pumps, and flow of gases. Text-book: Boyey's 
Hydraulics. 

Second Semester. — Mechanics of Materials. A study of 
the behayior of iron, steel, cement, etc., under the action 
of stresses, leading to a discussion of the strength, de- 
formation under load, and proper design of pipes, beams, 
columns, shafting. Joints, etc. Bzperimental work with a 
Riehl6 Testing Machine. Text-book: Merriman's Mechan- 
ics of Materials. 

A knowledge of calculus is necessary, also a general 
knowledge of mechanics such as may be obtained from 
Physics B. 

J — ThefTnodynamics, Heat Engines. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Associate Professor Basquin. 

First Semester. — General theory of heat and thermody- 
namics. Poynting and Thomson's Heat 

Second Semester. — General application of thermodjmam- 
ics to steam, gas, and air engines as set forth in Swing's 
Steam Engines and Other Heat Bngines. 

K— Metal Working. 2 hours. 

Two afternoons a week. 
Associate Professor Basquin and Mr. Starkweather. 

The mechanics of metal working is emphasized through- 
out this course. The use of a tool, such as a file or cold 
chisel, is flrst taught, after which the student performs a 
quantitatlTe experiment determining the forces brought 
into play by its use. The regular set of exercises inyolyes 
chipping, filing, scraping, drilling, planing, turning, thread- 
cutting, and grinding. 
The shop will be open each afternoon of the week except 

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146 NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVBR8ITT. 

on Saturday. Studonta may select their own afternoons for 
work; bat a selection once made must be strictly adhered 
to throughout the semester. 

For students who have completed Ck>urse A or its equiya* 
lent 

L — Descriptive Oeametry. 2 hours. 

Mondays, 2-5, and one afternoon a week. 
Associate Professor Basqxtin. 

The study of the standard method of representing geo- 
metric forms by projections on plane surfaces and the 
graphical solution of geometric problems. Shades, shad- 
ows, and perspective will be taken up in the latter part of 
the year. Lectures, readings, sketches, and problems. Text: 
Church's Descriptive Qeometry. 

Major: 0<Hir$e$ A and B and threa additional year-haun. 
Minor: Course A and iico additional year-hours. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATUREa 
French. 

AA — Elementary French. 5 honrs. 

Daily, ezc^t Saturdays, 8, 9, 11, 2. 
Mr. EuHNB and Dr. db Salvio. 

DeBordes' Grammar. Whitney's Reader. Labich^s La 
Grammaire. M6rim6e's Colomba, Sicard's Basy French 
History. BaillotrBrugnot's Composition. Lablche-Martin's 
Voyage de M. Perrichon. Papot-Williamson's Basy French 
Stories. Sand's La Petite Fadette. Simple dictation, pri- 
vate reading, and composition. 

This course may not be taken to remove language re- 
quirements for admission, and credit will not be given 
unless the full course is completed. 

A — Modem French. 4 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 10, 11. U. 
Professor Baillot and Mr. Etjhnb. 

Baillot-Brugnot's Ck>mposition. Advanced Grammar. 
Reading. Madame de Girardin's La Joie fUt Pear. Hugdne 



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COLLBGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. U7 

Scribe's Les Doigts de F«e. Coppde's On rend TArgeat 
Freeborn's Contes de Daudet Pallleron's Le Monde on Ton 
s'Bnnule. 

White's Contes de Manpassant Victor Hugo's Qnatre- 
VingtTrelze. Canfield's French Lyrics. Coppde's Le Pater. 
Victor Hugo's Hemani. Private reading: Cameron's Se- 
lections from Loti. Henneqain's Lessons in Idiomatic 
French. Bssays. 

Open to those who have completed Course AA or its 
equivalent 

B-— Classic French Literature of the 17th and 18th Cen- 
turies. 3 hours. 
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 8, 9. 
Professor Baillot. 

First Semester. — ^17th Century. Comellle's Le Cld, Poly- 
eucte. Racine's Athalie. Molidre's Le Misanthrope, 
L'Avare. Warren's Prose Writers of the 17th Century. 
Composition. History of the French Theater, in dictations. 

Collateral reading: Crane's La Soci6t6 Francaise au 17e 
Sidcle. Dictations and short lectures on the history of the 
theater in France. 

Seoond Semester. — 18th Century. Lesage's Gil Bias. Vol* 
taire's Zaire and letters. Beaumarchais' Le Barbier de 
S^yille and letters. A study, with collateral reading, is 
also made of other authors of the eighteenth century. Bz- 
ercises on French Syntax. 

C--Generai Survey of French Literature, 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 1. 
Professor Baillot. 

Demogeot's French Literature and Darmesteter and 
Hatsfeld's Le Selzidme SiMe en France wUl be used as 
text-books, and collateral reading is assigned by the In- 
structor. Dictations. Papers on collateral reading. 

D— Recent French Literature. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. 
Professor Baillot. 

study of the literature of the Nineteenth Century, taking 

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148 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

as a basis George Pelllssier's Le Monvement Litt6raire an 
XIXe Sidcle. Collateral reading. This course is given in 
French. 
Open to students who have had Course B. 

E — Advanced French. 2 hours. 

Wednesdays, 3. 
Professor Babllot. 

The topics considered will be closely related to those of 
Courses C and D; but students will be expected to carry on 
special studies with prepared papers. 

P — Old French and Early French Literature. 1 hour. 

Hour to be arranged. 
Mr. KuHNB. 

Reading of old French literature in its original form. 
Phonology and Morphology will be slightly touched upon, 
serving as an introduction to the study of historical gram- 
mar. 

Texts: La Chanson de Roland; Aucassin et Nicolette; 
le Myst^re d'Adam. 
Open to students who have had Courses B and C or D. 

G — Scientific French. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Baillot. 

Second Semester. — Herdler's Scientific French. Articles 
from scientific periodicals. 

H — French Conversation tuith Private Beading. 1 hour. 

Wednesdays, 2-4. 
Professor Baillot and Mr. Kuhnb. 

An advanced course open to those who have had Course 
AA, but registration to be subject to the approval of the 
instructors. 

J — French, Spanish, and Italian Civilization. 1 hour. 

Professor Baillot, Mr. Kuhne, and Dr. db Salvio. 

Hour to be arranged. (Not given in 1906-07) 
A series of lectures designed to give to advanced stn- 

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COLXAGB OF LIBERAL. ARTS. 149 

dents a better knowledge of the origin and growth of 
France, Spain, and Italy. The natural resources, the in- 
stitutions, the arts, the customs peculiar to each country 
will be studied. 
Le Cercle Fran^^is meets on alternate Thursdays at 7:30 

o'elock p. m., and is open to all students who have completed 

Courses AA and A. 

Italian. 

A— Elementary Course. 3 hours. 

Mondays. Wednesdays, Fridays, 8. 
Dr. DE Salvio. 

Qrandgent's Grammar and Composition. Bowen's Read- 
er; Goldoni's La Locandiera; Pellico's Le Mie Prigioni; 
lianzoni's I Promessi Sposl, Selections from Dante's In- 
ferno. 

Credit will not be given for this course unless the full 
course is completed. 

B — Advanced Course. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Dr. DE Salvio. 

General view of Italian Literature. Advanced Compo- 
sition. Selections from Dante's Divina Commedia; D'An- 
oona e Bacci's Manuale della Letteratura Italiana, Vol. V; 
Verga's Cavalleria rusticana ed altre novelle; Fogazzari's 
Fedele; Alflerl's Oreste. 

G— Early Italian. 2 hours. 

(Not given in 1906-07.) 
Dr. IS Salvio. 

Lectures on Italian Phonology and Morphology. The 
Literature of the Trecento. Monad's Crestomazia dei primi 
seooli; D'Ancona e Bacci's Manuale della Letteratura Ital- 
iana, Vol. I. 

Open to advanced students and to those who satisfy the 
Instructor of their fitness to take the course. 



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150 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Spanish. 

A'—Elementary Course. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. 
Dr. DB Salvio. 

Hills and Ford's Grammar; Composition; Matzke's First 
Si;»anlsh Readings; Valdes' Jos6; Gald6s' Dona Perfecta; 
Moratln's El si de las Nifias; Ford's Spanish Anthology. 

Credit will not be given for this course unless the full 
course is completed. 

B — Advanced Course. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Dr. DE Salvio. 

Lectures on Spanish Literature with special emphasis 
on the modem period. Advanced composition. The fol- 
lowing list will show approximately the range of reading: 
Selections from Cervantes' Don Quixote; at least one of 
Lope de Vega's and Calderdn's selected plays; Ram6n de 
Campoamor's Doloras; Oaldds' Marianela; Fem&n Cabal- 
lero's La Oaviota; Echegaray's El Qran Galeoto; Valera's 
Pepita Jim6nez; Tamayo y Bans' Un drama nuevo; Ford's 
Spanish Anthology. 

C — Early Spanish. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Dp. de Salvio. 

Lectures on Spanish Phonology and Morphology. Span- 
ish Literature to the fifteenth century. 

'lexts to be used are: El Poema del Cid, edited by R. 
Men6ndez Pidal; Adolph Keller's Altspanisches Lesebuch 
mit Grammatik und Glossar. 

Open to advanced students and to those who satisfy the 
instructor of their fitness to take the course. 

Major: Courses A and B (French) and six additional 
year-hours. 
Minor: Courses A and B (French). 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTa 151 

SCANDINAVIAN LANGUAGES. 

Nonwegian-Danish. 

NoiB. — These eonrsee are given in the Norwegian-Danish Theo- 
logleal School and atudenta electing them are euhject to the regula- 
tJooa of that echooL 

A— Norwegian-Danish Language. 4 hours. 

Taeadayg, WedneadayB, Thundays, Fridays, 10. 
Dr. SncoNBBK. 

For atndeotB with a reading and apeaking knowledge of 
the language. After a thorough study of Hofgaard's larger 
Orammar the student Is required to write essays and make 
translations from Norwegian-Danish into Bnglish and from 
Bnglish into Norwegian-Danish. 

B — Norwegian-Danish Literature. 3 hours. 

Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 11. 
Second semester only. 
Dr. SncoNBEN. 

For students who have a reading and speaking knowl- 
edge of the language. Text-book: Broch and Seip's His- 
tory of LIteratnre. 

C^Elementary Study of Norwegian-Danish Language and 
Literature. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 9. 
Dr. SiMONBEN. 

Text-books: Hofgaard's Blementary Grammar and Broch 
and Seip's History of Literature. 

Open to students who have no knowledge of the language, 
but will not be given unless elected by as many as six stu- 
dents. 

Swedish. 

Nonk — These courses are glren In the Swedish Theological Sem- 
inary, and are open to students who have a reading and speaking 
knowledge of the Swedish language. Students electing them are sub- 
leet to the regulations of that school. 



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1B2 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

A — Elementary Swedish. 3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 11. 

Mr. Wallbnius. 

After a thorough study of Sund^n's Grammar the student 
is required to make translations from Swedish into English 
and from English into Swedish. 

B — Swedish Literature. 3 hours. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 1. 

Mp. Wallbnius. 

Text-book: Karl Warburg's History of Swedish Litera- 
ture. Select reading from Tegn6r and Runeberg. Students 
are also required to write essays. 

SEMITIC LANGUAGES. 

NoTB. — ^These courses are given in Garrett BibUcal Institute, and 
students electing them are subject to the regulations of that school. 

Hebrew. 

A — Elements of Hebrew Language. 4 hours. 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 9. 
Mp. Rapp. 

B — Introduction to Hebrew Literature. 2 hours. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8. 
Professor Eiselbn. 

£2xegetical and critical reading of selections from the 
prophetic and from the poetic literature of the Hebrews. 

C — Historical Literature. 1 hour 

Hour to be arranged. 
Professor Eiselen. 

Rapid reading of historical books with more extensive 
study of Hebrew grammar, especially sjmtax. 

D — Graduate Courses. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 
Professor Eiselen. 



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COLLBOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 153 

(a) Studies in Isaiah; (b) Studies in Genesis; (c) The 
Messianid ideas and ideals in the Old Testament; (d) Rapid 
reading of the Minor Prophets; (e) Seminary Course — ^the 
religious life and beliefs of the Hebrews, as shown in the 
actiyity and the teaching of their inspired leaders. 

Assyrian. 

E — Elementary Course. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Eiselen. 

Grammar and reading of easy historical texts. 

Aramaic. 

P — Elementary Course. 1 hour. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Eiselen. 

Study of the Aramaic language and portions of the Old 
Testament 

Courses E and F are open only to those who have com- 
pleted at least the equivalent of Course A. 

Minor: Courses A and B. 

ZOOLOGY. 

A — Structure, Development, and Evolution of Animal Life. 

4 hours. 
Lecture: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9. Laboratory hours 
to be arranged between 9 and 12, daily except Sat- 
urday. 
Professor Looy, Dr. Harper, Mr. Twining, and assistants. 
A course of instruction adapted to fill a place in general 
education. It embraces a comparative study of living or- 
ganisms as a whole in which the physiological side re- 
ceives much attention. Observations on the properties of 
living matter are followed by a few selected types of in- 
vertebrated animals, beginning with the simplest and pro- 
ceeding to the more complex. 

The course is open to those who have had no previous 
instruction in zo51ogy or biology, and is also advisable for 
students who have had a year's work in the high school. A 



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154 NORTHWBSTERN UNIVERSITY. 

special section for the latter will be formed in the labora- 
tory, so that acceptable work already done need not be 
duplicated. 

In the second semester, the basis of the doctrine of or- 
ganic evolution is set forth and its present status indicated. 
A large part of the time of this semester is devoted to ob- 
servations on the development of animals, using eggs of 
fishes, amphibia, and the chick. 

B — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Vertehratsi. 

4 hOUTB. 

Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. Laboratory work to be ar- 
ranged on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fri- 
days, 9-12. 
Professop Locy and Mr. Wilkinson. 

First Semester. — Comparative Anatomy. Study of Se- 
lected Vertebrate Types, continuing the work of Zodlogy A 
into the group of Vertebrates. The recitations and lectures 
will be based on Weidersheim's "Comparative Anatomy of 
Vertebrates." 

Second Semester. — ^Vertebrate Embryology, with a discus- 
sion of the broader problems opened by a study of the devel- 
opment of animals. Lectures and laboratory work. 

AB» — Physiology. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. (Given in 1906-06 
and in alternate years.) 
Dr. Habfbb. 

Open to students who have had Zodlogy A or its equiva- 
lent The first semester is given to general Physiology. 
Reproduction, irritability, and metabolism are treated from 
the standpoint of the cell and the lower animals. Experi- 
ments upon the Protozoa and lower forms are included in 
the laboratory work. Verwom's Physiology is used with 
frequent references to other authors. The second semester 
will be given to special Physiology. 

An adaptation of the work in Physiology is permitted 
as follows: Students who have not had previous training 
in Zo51ogy will be admitted to a section in which the Es- 
sentials of Physiology are covered in a course of four 
hours extending through one semester. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 155 

ASP— Invertebrate Zoology. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 2. (Given In 1906-07 
and in alternate years.) 
Dr. Habpeb. 

This coarse supplements Course A, and extends the series 
of types studied in that course with reference to structure 
and development Attention is given largely to the animals 
of this region in respect to their life-histories, habits, disr 
tribntion, and adaptation to their environment. Some di- 
versity is permitted in the work of different students. 

C — Cytology and Histology. 3 hours. 

Mondays, 9. Laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Dr. Habpeb. 

First SemeiBter. — Cell-life and Elementary Histology. 
Anatomy and physiology of the cell, microscopical struc- 
tare of the elementary animal tissues, and principles and 
practice of the general methods of microscopical technique. 
Second Semester. — ^Microscopical Structure of the Animal 
Organs. Principles and practice of the important special 
methods of microscopical technique. Wilson's "The Cell in 
Development and Inheritance" and Stohr's "Textbook of 
Histology" are used. 

J^^— Physiology. 3 hours. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 3. 
Dr. Habpbb. 

Intended for students preparing for medicine. Based on 
Hall's text-book and laboratory manual. It includes all 
the first year of Physiology in the Medical School, and is 
accepted in full for that course. 

E*-—TA« Central Nervous System and its Terminal Organs. 

1 hour. 
Tuesdays, 4. 

(Given in 1906-07 and in alternate years.) 
Prof esBor Locr. 

Two hours of credit may be secured in this course by 
adding to the lecture three hours of laboratory work. 



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156 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

First Semester. — The Central Nervous System. Compara- 
tive Structure of the Central Nervous System, with discus- 
sions on some of its physiological activities. 

Lectures and demonstrations, adapted to those taking or 
contemplating the study of Psychology, and to others who 
wish to become acquainted with the structure and general 
physiology of the nervous system. 

Second Semester. — The Structure and Evolution of Sense 
Organs. 

E** — Rise and Development of General Biology and Zool- 
ogy. 1 hour. 
Tuesdays, 4. (Given in 1907-08 and in alternate 
years.) 
Professor Locy. 

Historical lectures in which the rise and development of 
General Biology and Zoology is traced from the renascence 
of science to the present. Particular attention is given to 
the beginning, the growth, and the modification of funda- 
mental doctrines and principles that have become fruitful 
* in the nineteenth century. Intended primarily for students 
taking Zoology A or other work in the department The 
course is also open to students who have pursued elemen- 
tary work in General Biology. 

P — Topics of Investigation, 

May be elected as (a) five hours or (&) ten hours. 
Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Locy. 

Open to students who have completed two years of work 
in Zodlogy. Problems of limited extent are assigned after 
consultation with the professor in charge, and worked out 
under his direction with such help as is required. This 
forms an introduction to the work of original research. 
The completion of the course involves the consultation of 
the literature bearing on the problem in hand, and the 
preparation of a thesis embodying the results of the inves- 
tigation. A reading familiarity with French and German 
is essential for entering this course. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 167 

G — Research Work. 

Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Locy. 

For graduate students who have completed the equivalent 
of the courses prescribed above; may be elected either 
for ten hours or for fifteen hours of credit 

Similar to Course F, but with broader scope and more 
rigid requirements as to the thesis, which must embody a 
critical review of the principal literature and substantial 
conclusions based upon the personal work of the student 
Means of publication will be found for all papers which 
are worthy of It 

Major: Course A and six additional year-Tiours. 

Minor: Course A and two additional year-hours. 

A Major in Biology is allowed to consist of Botany A and 
Zoology A. and either Botany B or O, or Zoology or D. 



PROFESSIONAL STUDIES. 

The following detailed statements indicate in a general 
way how a student in college may arrange his program 
of studies to advantage in preparation for a professional 
career, and how, under some conditions, he may shorten 
the time necessary to secure degrees in both the College 
of Liberal Arts and a professional or technical school. 

College credit for studies pursued in professional 
Bchools is in all cases restricted to work done in the schools 
of this University. 

Students Preparing for Medicine. 

Students Intending to enter the Medical School, and desiring 
to shorten the time required for degrees In both Arts and Medi- 
cine, may be released from further work In the College of Liberal 
Arts when they have secured ninety semester-hours of credit 
This credit must Include all the required studies for the degree 
sought, as shown on pp. 91 and 92, and must fulfill the require- 
ments as to major and minor. If the student's work Is properly 
planned this necessary credit can be secured In three years. 



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158 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSIIY. 

Such students, while continuing registration for the fourth 
year in College, may during that year give their full time to work 
in the Medical School. The certificate from the Medical Faculty 
that the equivalent of a full year's work has been satisfactorily 
accomplished will be accepted in the College as completing the 
one hundred and twenty hours required for the bachelor's degree. 

Credit from the Medical School cannot be accepted in subjects 
for which credit has already been given in the College of Liberal 
Arts, nor can time spent in the Medical School be counted toward 
the year of residence in the College of Liberal Arts required of 
all candidates for the bachelor's degree. 

This plan of combined courses makes it possible to secure 
both degrees in seven years, three in the College and four in the 
Medical School. For all work done in the Medical School the full 
fees of that school must be paid. 

On the other hand, some courses offered in the College of Lib- 
eral Arts are the equivalents of corresponding courses in the Med- 
ical School, and may be taken for credit in that school. Students 
who complete Chemistry A and B, Physics A, and the second sem- 
ester of Chemistry C (Volumetric Analysis) in the College labora- 
tories will be given credit for Chemistry a, b, c, d, e, f, that Is. 
first year Chemistry in the Medical School. Those who complete 
Zodlogy A, B, C, D, and Ba will receive credit for Histology and 
Embryology a, b, c, d, e, and Physiology a, b, c, d, e, in the Med- 
ical School. Students who include these courses in their college 
program may transfer to the Medical School at graduation and 
enter that school with approximately a year of advanced credit 
They will thus be able to complete the Medical course in three 
years, securing both degrees in seven years, four in College and 
three in the Medical School. 

If further, by careful planning from the first, the student is 
able to include the courses mentioned in Chemistry, Physics, and 
Zodlogy in his first ninety hours of credit, the requirements as to 
specified subjects and as to major and minor being at the same 
time met, he may enter the Medical School for his fourth year, 
and by extra work in summer courses he may complete the re- 
quirements for both degrees in six years, three in College and 
three In the Medical School, but this can only be accomplished 
under the most favorable conditions. 

Students who intend to spend but three years in actual at- 
tendance upon lectures in the Medical School should fbrmally reg- 
ister in that school a year earlier. 



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GOLLOOB OF LIBBRAL ARTa 159 

For Btttdento who plan to secure both degrees 1b six years, 
the following order of studies In College is recommended: 
FWst Tear.— Physics A» Zo51ogy A. 
Second Tear.— Chemistry A, Zoology B and C. 
Third Tear.— Chemistry B, Chemistry 0, second semester, 
Zo51ogy D, Zoology Ba. 

Students Preparing for Law. 

Thirty semester-hours of work done in the Law School will be 
accepted by the College of Liberal Arts to apply toward meeting 
the requirements for a bachelor's degree. Consequently a student 
In College who has secured ninety hours of credit, including all 
the required studies for his degree as described on pages 91 and 
92, and who has met the requirements as to major and minor, 
may transfer to the Law School and complete there the work for 
the collegiate bachelor's degree. 

Students so transferring, howeyer, must continue their formal 
registration In college, though doing all their work in the Law 
School, and they will be required to pay the Law School fees while 
pursuing studies In that school. 

The satisftustory completion of the first year of the Law School 
course^ as certified by the Faculty of that School, will be deemed 
sufficient to make good the remaining hours of the one hundred 
and twenty hours required for the collegiate degree. 

Time spent In the Law School cannot be counted toward the 
year of residence required of all candidates for a collegiate degree. 

Students Contemplating the Study of Theology. 

Students In the College of Liberal Arts who have completed 
sixty semester-hours of credit and who wish to shorten the time 
for securing degrees in Arts and Theology, may elect certain 
eouTBCB In Garrett Biblical Institute to the amount of thirty sem- 
ester-hours, thereby reducing the time for the combined programs 
by one year. Work done in Oarrett Biblical Institute cannot, 
how«Ter, be applied toward meeting the requirement of one year 
of residence for a degree in the College of Liberal Arts. 

For conyenience the courses in the Institute open to College 
students are listed among those offered in the College of Liberal 
Arts, and are repeated here as they appear in the Institute catar 
logoei The names in parentheses are the College designations of 
the courses. 



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160 NORTHWBJSTpiN UNIVBRSITY. 

Hebrew of the Junior and Middle years (Hebrew A and B). 

Greek of the Junior year in the degree course (Greek N). 

History of the Christian Church, mediaeyal, reformation, and 
modem periods (History L). 

Comparative Religions (Bible F). 

Since exegesis plays so large a part In a theological course, 
students contemplating the study of Theology should secure 
while in college a ready command of the Greek and Hebrew lan- 
guajges. They will also find that a knowledge of German will 
prove serviceable in reading modern theological literature. 

Students Contemplating the Study of Pharmacy. 

Students who have secured ninety semester-hours of credit at 
the end of their third year in the College of Liberal Arts, includ- 
ing therein all the prescribed courses for their degree, and have 
met the requirements as to major and minor, may enter the 
School of Pharmacy, and by satisfactorily completing the work 
of two half-year terms in that school may meet the total require- 
ments for the bachelor's degree. 

The degree of Master of Pharmacy may then be obtained by 
completing the third and fourth terms of the Pharmacy program. 

The credit to be allowed In the College for work done in the 
School of Pharmacy may not exceed thirty semester-hours* and 
it may not include any items for which credit in the College of 
Liberal Arts has already been secured. Neither can time spent 
in the School of Pharmacy be counted toward the year of resi- 
dence required of all candidates for a collegiate degree. 

Students taking any work in the School of Pharmacy must 
pay the fees of that school. 

Students Contemplating Engineering. 

Professional courses of an advanced character in the different 
branches of Engineering presuppose a liberal training equivalent 
at least to two full years of a college course, and a student who 
expects to become a professional engineer will find it greatly to 
his advantage to complete a full course for a bachelor's degree 
before entering on such professional studies. In meeting the 
requirements for a bachelor's degree he may elect a large number 
of engineering courses, or courses which are in direct preparation 
for subsequent technical studies, and so lay a broad and substan- 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 161 

tial foundation for a professional career. He may register as a 
candidate for either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science, but as a rule will have most ^ective time at his 
disposal by following the program for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Of the prescribed courses for this degree, as described 
on page 92, he is advised to take Mathematics AB in the first 
year; also to take Physics A and Chemistry A as the two required 
sciences. His elective work and the department in which he 
makes a major will depend upon the special branch of Engineer- 
ing for which he is planning. 

If he contemplates Mechanical, Electrical, or Civil Engineer- 
ing, he will find it to his advantage to da his major work in 
Physics or in Mathematics, and he should include in his program 
as many of the following courses as possible: 
Fir$t Year. — Mathematics AB or A. 

Chemistry A (General Chemistry). 
Second Year. — ^Mathematics BB or B. 

" L (Surveying). 

Physics A (Introductory Course). 
" G (Mechanical Drawing). 
Third Year. —Physics B (Mechanics, Light). 
K (Metal Working). 
Mathematics J (Calculus and Differential Equa- 
Uons). 
Fourth Year. — ^Physics C (Electricity and Blagnetlsm). 
H (Applied Mechanics). 
J (Thermodynamics and Heat Engines). 
L (Descriptive Geometry). 
If the student contemplates Mining Engineering, he will do 
well to make his major in Geology or Mineralogy and devote a 
large part of his elective time to work in those two departments, 
with auxiliary electives in Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics. 
If he plans for Chemical or Sanitary Engineering, he should 
make his major in Chemistry, taking all courses there offered 
with others in Botany and ZoOlogy. 

Where a definite end is sought and an engineering career has 
been fully detomined upon, the selection of elective studies 
should be made in close consultation with the student's adviser, 
and always with the end clearly in view. A proper choice of 
stndies will make it possible for a student to complete a technical 
course in two years after graduation from College. If, on the 



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162 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

other hand, the student prefers after graduation to enter directly 
upon practical engineering work, he will find that a program such 
as is outlined ahove, or such as may be arranged in College with 
his adviser, will enable him to do so with advantage. 

Courses Preparing for Business and the Public Service. 

Students who are preparing for a business career or for the 
public service will find ample opportunities for study along lines 
helpful to them in the departm^ts of Economics and History. 
The program of required studies for the Bachelor's degree is 
euch that the student may devote nearly the whole of the third 
and fourth years of the course to special study in these depart- 
ments, and he may also give some time to work in these depart- 
ments in the second year. 

If the student is registered for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science, the required studies will include both French and Ger- 
man, but in any case persons proposing to enter business or the 
public service are advised to secure a good reading knowledge of 
both of these languages. An acquaintance with the elements of 
at least two sciences should also be secured. 

After the introductory courses in the two departments of Eco- 
nomics and History, in which he will best make his major and 
minor, the student will find Courses F, J, and L in Economics 
more intensive, offering special advantages to those preparing for 
a business or commercial career; while Course B in Economics 
and Course H in History are especially valuable for those who 
wish to prepare for the public service. The Seminary Course in 
either department offers to advanced students opportunity for 
original and detailed investigation of special subjects. 



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COLUDGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 168 

REGULATIONS AFFECTING UNDERGRADUATES. 
Registration. 

Every undergraduate student is required to present 
himself at the oflSice of the Registrar for the registration of 
his studies before entering upon College work. The fol- 
lowing are the rules governing such registration : 

1. Registration days are the first Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday of each semester, and students not registered at the 
dose of this period are subject to a fee of two dollars for later 
registration. 

2. On the registration days of the first semester the student 
must record the work of the whole year. He is expected to con- 
tinue throughout the year the work for which he then registers 
and may not change it without special permission from the Regis- 
tration Committee. 

3. Before completing registration, students are required to 
consult their Faculty advisers as to their college work. 

4. No college credit can be obtained for work not regularly 
registered. 

5. Prescribed studies take precedence in registration over 
elective studies and in the order in which they are prescribed. 

6. Bvery student must register for fifteen hours of work a 
week, unless permission has been obtained from the Registration 
Committee to register for less or more. Two hours of laboratory 
work are credited as one hour. 

NoTB. — ^PermlBsloo to register for more than fifteen hours Is a prlyi- 
1«S«, and win not be granted nnless the committee Is satisfied that the 
student can carry the whole work creditably. No student may register 
for more than twelye hours If he Is engaged In such outside work as will 
make a serious drain on his time or energy. 

7. No student will be registered as a candidate for a degree 
who has deficiencies in entrance work amounting to more than 
five hours a week through one year; and no student will be cred- 
ited with college work in the published lists of the catalogue until 
all entrance deficiencies are made up. 

8. All entrance conditions must be removed before the begin- 
ning of the second year of residence; otherwise the work neces^ 
sary to fulfill the entrance requirements must appear as a part of 



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164 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

the regular registration for that year* the total registration to be 
limited to sixteen hours. 

9. All undergraduates must state upon their registration 
papers the full amount of work which they propose to undertake 
each semester, whether in the College of Liberal Arts or else- 
where, indicating the number of hours to be devoted to each 
subject, and the school or department in which it is proposed to 
do such work. 

10. All students of the College of Liberal Arts desiring to 
take work in any other department of the University must first 
obtain formal consent from the faculty of the College of Liberal 
Arts and also from the Faculty of the department in which such 
work is to be taken, and must file such consent with the Registrar 
before beginning the work. Failure to comply with this regula- 
tion will be deemed sufficient cause for the cancellation of the 
student's entire registration. 

11. On the registration days of each semester the student 
must obtain from the Registrar a statement of his tuition bill for 
the semester. This must be presented at once at the Business 
Manager's Office for settlement 

Examinations. 

Rbgulab Examinations are held at the close of each semester 
in the studies of that semester. Any student whose daily work 
has not been satisfactory may be excluded from examination. 

Second EjXaminations are set for studmits who have been 
absent from a regular examination, or who have failed to reoelye 
a passing grade at a regular examination. Such second examina- 
tions are held on the first Wednesday in the first semester, on the 
first Monday and on the Monday following Easter in the second 
semester. 

No student may take more than one second examination for 
the same item of credit, and such second examination must be 
taken within nine months from the date of the regular examinnh 
Hon at which credit should have been obtained. 

Students absent from the regular examinations of the first 
semester will not be admitted to the second examinations held In 
February, except by permission of the instructor in charge, and 
such permission will be limited to cases of illness or other urgmit 
necessity. 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 165 

Additional Bxaminations, to make up work which has been 
l08t bjr exoeBS of absences from class work, are appointed for the 
last Thursday of the first semester and the last Friday of the 
second semester. 

Students absent from a required additional examination are 
held to take that examination at the next date set, and no credit 
can be given for the course until this examination is passed. 

Spsciax. Bxaminations at times other than those specified 
abore can be given only by special permission of the faculty. 

Grades of Scholarship. 

At the end of each semester the standing of a student in each 
of his courses is reported by the instructor to the Registrar and 
la entered of record. The student's standing is expressed, accord- 
ing to his proficiency, by one of five grades, designated A, B, 
C, F. R. 

Grade A denotes excellent scholarship; grade B, good scholar- 
ship; grade C, poor scholarship; grade F, failure, making neces- 
sary a second examination; grade R, failure so serious that the 
work must be repeated in the class-room if credit is desired. 

Grades A, B, and C count toward a degree; but not more than 
one-sixth of the work done under this Faculty offered to meet the 
requirements for graduation may be of grade C, and no work of 
grade C may be counted toward a major. 

Work marked grade C may be accorded a higher grade by 
examination under the same regulations as apply to work marked 
F; the original marking, however, will remain in the record as a 
matter of history. 

Work reported as of grade F must be made good at a second 
examination within nine months, or the work must be taken again 
ID the class-room in order that credit may be obtained. 

Work reported incomplete, not made good before the close of 
the next' succeeding semester, can thereafter be given credit only 
under the conditions which apply to work reported failed. 

Students who do not take the regular examination in any 
subject at the close of the semester will be reported absent, and 
credit for that subject can only be obtained by passing a second 
examination at a proper time. 

Undergraduates are not allowed credit for work done in 
absentia. Only those who have duly registered and have regularly 
pursued their studies in classes are admitted to examinations. 



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166 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

The semester record of each undergradoate is sent by the 
Registrar to the student's father or guardian. 

Absences from Class Exercises. 

Students are expected to attend all of the regular exercises in 
the courses for which they are registered. 

It, in any semester, the absences of a student in a single 
course exceed one-eighth of the total number of assigned exercises 
in that course, he will be required to take, besides the regular 
examination at the close of the semester, an addUionai examinar 
tlon in that subject The dates fixed for additional examinations 
are the last Thursday of the first semester and the last Friday of 
the second semester. 

When a student's absences in any study exceed one-sixth of the 
total requirements in that study, his registration in that subject 
is cancelled, and the priyilege of examination is denied. This 
rule is administered by the Committee on Registration, which has 
power to restore the cancelled registration at its discretion. 

GRADUATE STUDIES. 

Advanced courses of study adapted to the needs of 
fipraduate students are offered in most of the departments 
of instruction. These are in excess of the amount required 
for an undergraduate major, and may be pursued either 
with or without reference to an advanced degree. They 
are open to properly qualified candidates from this and 
from other universities. The conditions under which stu- 
dents may register for graduate work are given below, and 
the regulations affecting advanced degrees may be found 
on pages 169, 170, and 171. 

The work of graduate students is under the supervision 
of a standing committee of the Faculty, but in general a 
graduate student may pursue any study for which, in the 
judgment of the instructor in charge, he is prepared. 

Every graduate student proposing to pursue advanced 
work as a candidate for a degree or otherwise, is required 
to register for such work before it is undertaken. 



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COLLOOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 167 

The following are the rules governing graduate regis- 
tration: 

1. The registration of resident candidates for a Blaster's 
degree must be effected not later than the first Monday in October 
next preceding the date of the final examination. The registra- 
tion of non-resident candidates must be effected one year earlier 
than this date. 

NoTB. — The proTision "In rerfdence" requires regular attendance upon 
all preaerlbed lectures or other exercises In the courses which the candi- 
date pursoes. Such prescribed lectures and exercises will occur at least 
ones a wee^ In each course of Instruction. 

2. A student desiring to become a candidate for a Master's 
degree while enrolled in one of the professional schools of this 
UnlTersity, under Rule 4, page 169, must register as a graduate 
student in the College of Liberal Arts, and upon such registration 
will be regarded as a resident candidate. 

8. A student who desires to become a candidate for a Mas- 
ter's degree after graduation from one of the professional schools 
of this Uniyersity, under Rule 4, page 169, must register for the 
same in the College of Liberal Arts as early as the first Monday 
in October next following the completion of the professional 
course. 

4. The registration of a candidate for the Doctor's degree 
must be effected not later than the first Monday in October next 
preceding the date of the final examination. 

6. A candidate for an advanced degree, prior to his registrar 
tion, must furnish to the Registrar all data required for due 
record of his application, together with a statement of the courses 
of study which he proposes to pursue. 

6. The above application and statement of courses must be 
approved by the Committee on Graduate Study and by the heads 
of the departments in which the work is to be taken. Such ap- 
proval must be filed with the Registrar as a condition preliminary 
to registration. 

7, Graduates of this, or of any other college, who are not 
candidates for an advanced degree, may, with the consent of the 
departments concerned, register as resident students in such 
advanced studies as they are found prepared to pursue. 



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168 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

DEGREES. 
The Bachelor's Degree. 

The programs of study described on pages 91 and 92 
lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Science. The following regulations have been prescribed 
affecting the attainment of such degrees: 

1. In order to be recognized as a candidate for a Bachelor's 
degree a student must file a petition with the Registrar, using 
for the purpose a form provided by the University, on or before 
the last Saturday in May of the year next preceding the year in 
which he expects to obtain the degree. 

2. He must have pursued studies in residence in the Ck)llege 
of Liberal Arts of this University for at least one college year 
before the degree can be conferred. 

3. He must have completed all the courses prescribed for the 
degree sought, and in addition elective courses sufficient to have 
secured a total credit of one hundred and twenty semester-hours. 
The total credit obtained must include the major work of at 
least one department, and the minor work of at least one other 
department 

4. In making up the total number of hours required for 
graduation, not more than one-sixth of the work done under this 
Faculty may be of grade C. 

5. No student will be recognized as a candidate for a degree 
at the close of any academic year who has not by the first of 
October in that year removed all entrance conditions and secured 
on record a total of at least eighty-four hours of credit, including 
all required studies of the first year. 

The Master's Degree. 

A Master's degree may be conferred upon Bachelors of 
this University, or of any other institution of accepted 
grade, under the following regulations : 

1. Before being recommended for a Master's degree the can- 
didate must have pursued studies in residence in the Ck)llege of 
Liberal Arts of this University for at least one year, except as 
stated below. 



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COIAJBOB OF LIBBRAL ABTS. 169 

2. Any Bachelor of this Unlyerslty may become a non-resi- 
dent candidate for the corresponding Master's degree, but such 
candidates cannot receive the degree earlier than two years after 
graduation. Graduates of other institutions will not be admitted 
as non-resident candidates for a degree. 

8. Any Bachelor of this Uniyersity, or of another institution 
of accepted grade, may become a candidate for a Master's degree 
while pursuing studies In the Medical School or Law School of 
thlB Uniyersity, or in Oarrett Biblical Institute, or on the com- 
pletion of the professional course in either of these schools, sub- 
ject to the provisions of Rule 3 on page 167. 

4. Bach candidate for a Master's degree must present credit 
in approved courses of study amounting to thirty semester-hours. 
If he is enrolled in one of the professional schools above enum- 
erated, or has graduated therefrom, his credit must amount to 
twelve semester-hours of advanced work in an approved field of 
study, in addition to the completion of the maximum prescribed 
professional course. 

This advanced work, in the case of students in the professional 
schools, may be taken either under the Faculty of the College of 
Liberal Arts or the Faculty of the professional school, but in any 
case It must be approved by the Committee on Graduate Study 
of the College of Liberal Arts. 

5. At least one-half of the work offered for a Master's degree 
must be chosen from one or, at most, from two departments of 
stndy in which the candidate has previously taken the under- 
graduate major work or its full equivalent. 

6. The candidate must present a thesis on an approved topic 
pertaining to the primary subject. The subject of this thesis 
must be filed with the Registrar not later than the first Wednes- 
day in December; the thesis itself must be filed with the Registrar 
as early as the Saturday next preceding the last Monday in April. 
It shall be printed or typewritten in prescribed form and a copy 
shall be furnished to the library of the College of Liberal Arts. 

7. Candidates for a Bachelor's degree who during their under- 
graduate course devote their excess of time to the continuation of 
their major subject, or to such other advanced topics as may be 
approved by the Registration X>>mmittee, may have such work, 
if satisfactorily completed, credited toward a Master's degree; 
but in no case will the Master's degree be conferred in less than 
one year after the conferring of the Bachelor's degree. 



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170 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

8. A non-resident candidate for a Master's degree will be 
required to make written report from time to time as to the 
progress of his work. 

9. The final examination of candidates for the Master's degree 
will take place at the Uniyerslty at an appointed date, about May 
20th. The examination is conducted by a committee composed of 
the head of the department in which the student has done his 
primary work and at least two other members of the Faculty 
chosen from the same or from related departments. In the case 
of candidates doing work in the professional schools, two mem- 
bers of the Faculty of the College of Liberal Arts shall be on the 
examining committee. 

The Doctor's Degree. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred under 
the following regulations: 

1. A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must 
have received the Bachelor's degree from this University, or from 
some other institution of accepted standing. 

2. The degree may be conferred on successful candidates after 
three years of graduate study, of which at least two must be in 
residence. The last year, or the first two years, of the three 
required must be spent in residence at this University. The 
period of three years may, however, be shortened in the case of 
students who, as undergraduates, have pursued special studies 
beyond the requirement for major work in the direction of their 
proposed graduate work. Study for any specified time will not 
be regarded as sufficient ground for conferring the degree. High 
attainments in scholarship and evidence of original investigation 
will be expected. 

3. Two-thirds of the candidate's time must be given to ad- 
vanced work in some one department which shall constitute his 
primary subject The remaining time must be given to either 
one or two secondary subjects. The requirement, "advanced 
work," will imply an amount of preliminary study in the given 
subject equivalent to at least the undergraduate "m^Jor work" 
of the department concerned. 

4. A reading knowledge of French and German will be re- 
quired as a preliminary qualification. In exceptional cases an 
equivalent in Latin, Greek, or Hebrew may be accepted Instead 
of French. 



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COLLEGE OP LIBERAL ARTS. 171 

6. Every candidate must present a thesis upon an approved 
topic pertaining to his primary subject. The thesis must give 
evidence of original investigation. A revised typewritten copy 
In prescribed form must be filed with the Registrar as early as 
the Saturday next preceding the last Monday in April. If the 
thesis is approved the candidate must, within such time as shall 
be designated, present twenty-five printed copies of it to the 
University Library. The final examination, which will be held 
about May 20th, will be both written and oral, and will cover the 
entire primary subject. Including the topic of the thesis. 

The secondary subject, or subjects, may be discontinued when 
the candidate has fulfilled all requirements as to attendance at 
lectures and has passed a written examination upon such subjects. 

Students in Garrett Biblical Institute may become can- 
didates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy under the 
following special regulations, the general regulations affect- 
ing examinations, thesis, and a knowledge of foreign lan- 
guages applying to these candidates as well as to others : 

1. The candidate must have completed a Bachelor's course, 
the sufficiency of which has been accepted by a joint committee 
of the Faculty of the Institute and the Faculty of the College of 
Liberal Arts. 

2. He must have completed two full years of theological 
study, either In Garrett Biblical Institute or in another theological 
school of recognized high standing. 

3. He must be accepted as a candidate for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy by a vote of the Faculty of the Institute, 
and must be registered as a candidate for such degree with the 
Registrar of the College of Liberal Arts; after this he must con- 
tinue in residence at least two years, and must complete the work 
of two full years. Of this work two thirds must be taken In one 
department of the Institute; the remaining one-third may be 
taken in not more than two departments of the Institute or of 
the College of Liberal Arts. The whole course of study selected 
will be subject to the approval of the faculty of the College of 
Liberal Arts, through its Committee on Graduate Study. During 
the two years of his residence the candidate will be subject to 
the direction of the head of the department in which his primary 
work is taken. 

4. Of the four years thus required as a minimum for the 



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172 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

degree of Doctor of Philosophy, three at least must be spent In 
residence at a theological school of high standing, and the last 
two at Garrett Biblical Institute. 



THE LIBRARY. 

The Library of the College of Liberal Arts is housed in 
a commodious building erected in 1894 through the gener- 
osity of the late Orrington Lunt, who was identified with 
the University from its foundation and for several years 
was president of the Board of Trustees. A description of 
the Library building is given on page 57. The Library 
contains 60,350 bound volumes and approximately 39,500 
pamphlets. It is open to all ofScers of the University, and 
to students upon the pa3anent of their regular semester 
bills, under the following regulations: 

1. During the college year the library is open daily, except 
on Sunday* from eight o'clock, a. m., to nine o'clock, p. m. In the 
summer vacation, except on Saturday afternoon and Sunday, the 
hours are from eight to twelve o'clock, a. m., and from half-past 
one to five o'clock, p. m. The library is closed all day on the 
following legal holidays: New Tear's Day, the Fourth of July, 
Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 

2. All officers of the University have direct access to the 
shelves, and may at any time draw books for use outside of the 
library. 

3. students may draw for home use as many as three books 
at a time, which may be kept for two weeks and be once renewed 
for a like period. 

4. Advanced students are allowed access to the shelves upon 
the recommendation of their instructors. 

5. All students have direct access to the current periodicals, 
books of reference, and such other books as are placed on the 
reserved shelves in the reading-room at the instance of the in- 
structors in the several departments. 

6. Persons not connected with the University, desiring to use 
the library for purposes of study, may be allowed library privi- 
leges if responsibly introduced. 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 173 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The University Campus has an area of about seventy- 
five acres, and is beautifully situated on the shore of Lake 
Michigan. University Hall, Fayerweather Hall of Science, 
Dearborn Observatory, Pisk Hall, Memorial Hall, Swift 
Hall, Orrington Lunt Library, Old College, the Gym- 
nasium, the Dormitory, and Heck Hall are all on the 
Campus. Willard Hall, Pearsons Hall, and Chapin Hall 
are situated on Willard Hall Campus, distant from Uni- 
versity Hall about three minutes' walk. 

Large athletic grounds suitably prepared for use are 
provided near the University Campus. These are liberally 
equipped for the various sports, and furnish ample accom- 
modation for athletic teams. The seating capacity of the 
grand stand is about ten thousand. 

THE ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY. 

The Dearborn Observatory is provided with a substan- 
tial building on the upper Campus, the gift of James B. 
Hobbs, Esq., of Chicago, a trustee of the University (see 
page 58). Its plan of work includes original researches in 
astronomical science, the application of astronomy to geog- 
raphy, the communication of exact time, and instruction in 
astronomy to the students of the College. 

The Observatory is open to visitors on Thursday even- 
ing of each week. Visitors may also be admitted at other 
times by making special arrangements with the Director. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The Museum of the College of Liberal Arts contains 
large collections illustrative of anthropology, botany, geol- 
ogy, mineralogy, and zoology. Many of these are of rare 
value in the work of instruction in the natural sciences. 

The mineralogical collection is in Fayerweather Hall of 
Sdenee; the other sections are on the fourth floor of Uni- 
venily Hall. 

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174 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

THE GYMNASIUM. 

The gymnasium is open at suitable hours to students of 
both sexes, and is under the supervision of competent in- 
structors. Each student upon entering gymnasium classes 
is given a physical examination, and his health, strength, 
muscular development, physical defects, etc., are carefully 
noted. From these data a special course of exercises, based 
on scientific principles, is prescribed to meet his individual 
needs. 

It is the purpose of the instructors to oflfer to each stu- 
dent such advice and to prescribe such exercises as will give 
increased health, strength, and symmetry of body. 

THE LABORATORIES. 

In the several laboratories of the College, opportunities 
are provided for practical instruction in the various scien- 
tific departments. 

The Botanical Laboratoby is on the third floor of University 
Hall, where tahles, compound and dissecting microscopes, glass- 
ware, reagents and lockers are provided for each student. Micro- 
tomes, incubators, and sterilizing apparatus are available for the 
advanced courses. 

The Chemical Labobatobt is situated in Fayerweather Hall 
of Science, and includes on the main floor, a lecture-room, seating 
sixty; a reading-room, a laboratory for general chemistry and 
qualitative analysis, with forty-six tables; a laboratory for quan- 
titative analysis, with twelve tables; a balance-room, the pro- 
fessor's office and private laboratory, and an assistant's room; 
in the basement, a general store-room, and a room with four 
tables equipped with special conveniences for water analysis. 

The Geological Laboratory is in University Hall and con- 
sists of one room on the third floor and four rooms on the fourth 
floor. In these rooms are; study collections of typical rocks, 
minerals, and fossils; photographs; geological maps; a large 
series of topographical maps; topographical and geological mod- 
els; a geological library; petrographical microscopes; thin sec- 
tions of rocks and minerals; several outfits (each consisting of 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 175 

a plane table, alidade, aneroid barometer, hand level and com- 
IMUBS) for topographical and geological mapping. In addition 
to the above is an extensive collection, belonging to the Wiscon- 
sin Geological and Natural History Survey, of rocks and ores 
from the copper-bearing rocks of the Lake Superior region and 
the Upper Mississippi Valley lead and zinc district. 

The MuvxBALOoiCAL Labobatost is in Fayerweather Hall of 
Science and is supplied with a collection of one thousand labelled 
and several hundred unlabelled minerals for the use of students. 
Glass and wooden crystal models, goniometers, microscopes, 
electrical slicing and grinding machines, aid in practical work 
and investigation of the crystallography of minerals. The assay 
laboratory is well supplied with gas and coal furnaces, tools, 
balances, and reagents. 

The Physical Labobatoby and Shops occupy fourteen rooms 
in Fayerweather Hall of Science excellently adapted to their 
purposes. They are equipped with modem instruments, especial- 
ly in the departments of acoustics, electricity, and light. Among 
rooms for special purposes may be mentioned a work-shop in the 
basement, a room for work in spectroscopy, fitted with a curved 
grating, a drawing room, rooms for electric and magnetic work, 
a room for general optics, a photometric-room, a room for testing 
the strength of materials with a Rtehl6 testing machine, and sev- 
eral small rooms for individual work. In the court is a power- 
house with an outfit of two engines, two motors, two dynamos, 
and a large storage battery. These furnish power to the Observa- 
tory and Physical Laboratory. This building is also equipped 
with a machine shop to furnish practice for students who are 
preparing to be engineers. 

The principal wood-working shop is in Fisk Hall. It contains 
twenty benches for Joinery work and ten lathes for wood-turn- 
ing, and is well fitted up with small tools. The metal-working 
shop is in the court of Science Hall. The equipment consists 
of six benches and vises, four engine lathes, shaper, drill-press, 
and drill-grinder, with the necessary small tools. 

The PsTCHOLOoiCAL Labobatoby, which was opened in 1900, 
has quarters in Old College, consisting of a general laboratory 
and apparatus room, dark room, research rooms, and an c^ce 
and reading room. The reading room is supplied with the most 
helpful books and periodicals on experimental psychology. The 
equipment includes everything necessary for purposes of dem- 



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176 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

onstration in the course In general psychology, also for an ele- 
mentary laboratory course, and for a few typical researches. 
Additions are made from time to time, as the work demands. 

The Zo5looioal Labobatobt comprises a large general work- 
room, a laboratory for vertebrate zoQlogy, a seminary room, which 
is also used as a department library, a room for advanced stu- 
dents, and a preparator's room. The equipment consists of forty- 
seven excellent compound microscopes, several microtomes of the 
most recent make, dissecting microscopes and instruments, incu- 
bators, aquaria, glassware, reagents, and other apparatus neces- 
sary for elementary and advanced work in Zodlogy. The de- 
partment is also supplied with a full set of Leuckart's Zoological 
charts and several sets of Ziegler's wax models. 

GOVERNMENT. 

Students are temporary residents of the city of Evans- 
ton, and as such are amenable to the laws of the state and 
to the ordinances of the city. They are also subject to the 
rules and regulations made by the Faculty. They are held 
to have a knowledge of the Statutes of the University and 
of all faculty requirements published in the catalogue, or 
otherwise brought to their attention. 

Students may be separated from the institution when- 
ever in the opinion of the faculty they are pursuing a 
course of conduct seriously detrimental to themselves or to 
the University. The University will not tolerate either 
idleness or dissolute habits. 

Social Entertainments, — In the interest of the college com- 
munity the faculty has adopted the following regulation: 

Previous permlBsion for holding any party or social entei^ 
tainment by any organization or group of students, at which 
both men and women are present, must be obtained from the 
Committee on the Social Life of Students. The conditions under 
which such party or entertainment is held must be satisfactory 
to the committee. 

Musical Oluhs. — Student musical organizations, such as the 
glee, banjo, or mandolin clubs, and the University Band, are 
under the supervision of a standing committee of the faculty. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 177 

The chairman of the committee must be Informed of the intended 
organisation of any such association, and must be furnished 
with a statement of its plans, purposes, and membership. No 
formal organization is permitted without the knowledge and 
sanction of the committee. It is especially necessary that the 
business managers of such organizations make no final arrange- 
ments for public appearances of the clubs without the consent 
of the committee. Under no circumstances wilt concert dates be 
permitted to interfere with examinations, or to interrupt study 
routine. Students with defective standing are not allowed to 
retain connection with such organizations. 



RELIGIOUS WORSHIP. 

The charter of the University provides that **no par- 
ticular religious faith shall be required of those who becsome 
students of this institution." The University was not estab- 
lished with a view of forcing on the attention of students 
the creed of any particular church, but for the promotion 
of learning under influences conducive to the formation of 
a manly Christian character. This continues to be its aim 
and purpose. 

Students of the College of Liberal Arts are expected to 
attend public worship on Sunday in the church of their 
choice. 

Chapel service is held at noon on each week day except 
Saturday, throughout the college year. Attendance upon 
at least three-fifths of these services is required under the 
following regulations: 

1. When a stud^t's record of chapel credits is deficient as 
many credits as he is expected to secure in one-half of a semester, 
his registration in all studies is cancelled, and it may be restored 
only on the recommendation of the faculty committee on chapel 
attendance. 

2. Surplus chapel credits in excess of the three-fifths re- 
quired in any semester are carried forward to the chapel record 
of the following semester. 



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178 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 

Through the agency of voluntary student associations 
an active interest is maintained in matters which relate to 
the intellectual and social life of the student community. 

NoBTHEBN Obatorioal Leaque. — ^The oratorical associations of 
Northwestern University* the University of Michigan, the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, the University of Iowa, the University of 
Chicago, the University of Minnesota, and Oberlin College com- 
pose the Northern Oratorical League. The purpose of this or- 
ganization is to promote an interest in public speaking, and to 
elevate the standard of oratory, by holding annual contests. The 
contests of the League are open only to undergraduates. 

LiTEBABY Societies. — ^The following societies are maintained 
by students for purposes of literary culture or debate: 

The Hinman Literabt Sogiett meets regularly on Tuesday 
evenings throughout the year. It was organized in 1855, during 
the first year of the work of the college, and has had a con- 
tinuous existence. It was named in honor of the first President 
of the University, Reverend Clark T. Hinman. Two prizes of 
twenty and ten dollars, respectively, the gift of Mr. James H. 
Raymond of the class of 1871, are offered annually for competi- 
tion among its members. 

The Adelphic Lttebast Societt was first organized prior to 
1867. After a prosperous existence of over twenty years it ceased 
to be active, but was reorganized in 1897. It meets regularly on 
Thursday evenings. Two prizes of twenty and fifteen dollars, 
respectively, the gift of Dr. M. C. Bragdon of the class of 1870, 
are competed for annually by its members. 

The Rogebs Debating Club was organized in 1897, and was 
named in honor of Henry Wade Rogers, then President of the 
University. It meets on Thursday evenings. Three prizes, the 
gift of Mr. William Deering, are offered annually for competi- 
tion among its members. 

The Cleosophic Literary Societt for men was organized 
in 1905. 

Five literary societies for women, Alethenai and Eulexia. 
organized in 1903, Anoihan, Calethea, and Laubean, in 1906, 
are in active operation. 



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COLLEQB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 179 

FELLOWSHIPS. 

For the promotion of graduate study and research the 
University has established six fellowships of three hundred 
dollars each. These are assigned from year to year by the 
President of the University to various departments of study 
according to the merits of the applicants and the needs of 
the departments. 

They are open alike to men and women, whether gradu- 
ates of this University or of other institutions. All ap- 
pointments to fellowships are made for one year. 

Fellows are not required to pay tuition fees, but may be 
called upon to give a limited amount of assistance in the 
work of the department. Fellows entering from other insti- 
tntions must pay the matriculation fee. 

Applications for appointment as Fellow should be made 
to the President of the University ; and such applications, 
together with credentials, must be in his hands not later 
than the first of April in each year. The fellowships will 
be assigned not later than the first of May. Blank forms 
for application may be had from the Registrar. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The following scholarships are awarded annually to 
meritorious undergraduates in the College of Liberal Arts. 
Applications for appointment should be made to the Dean 
of the College not later than the first day of May in each 
year. 

Catherine M, White Scholarships. — From a bequest of nine 
thousand dollars received under the will of Catherine M. White, 
of Eranston, there have been established three scholarships pay- 
ina full undergraduate tuition fees. The recipients must hold 
themselves responsible for a limited amount of clerical service. 

Miesionary SchoJarships. — ^The University, in June, 1899, es- 
tablished two scholarships in the College of Liberal Arts, to 
which the Northwestern Branch of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 



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180 NORTHWBSTBaiN UNIVBRSITY. 

slonary Society of the Methodist Bplsoopal Church may nominate 
persons intending to enter upon mission work in the foreign 
ileld. These entitle the holders to free tuition. In m^^i^^iTig nomi- 
nations preference is given to students from foreign lands. 

MetTiodUt EpiacopaZ Church SchoJarship,— Founded by the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church of Bvanston for the benefit of 
meritorious students, and yielding annually the interest on seven 
hundred and fifty dollars. This scholarship is awarded by the 
church oflicials. 

Chicago Record-Herald 8cholarship.-^A scholarship, the gift 
of the Chicago Record-Herdldf which affords free tuition and 
incidental expenses for one student 

Tully Bcholarship.—Foxmded in 1903 by Mr. B. F. Tully of 
Chicago, available for a properly accredited candidate for For- 
eign Missionary service, and paying the full tuition fees of the 
recipient In awarding this scholarship promise of usefulness, 
scholastic attainment, and pecuniary need will be considered in 
the order named. 

University Ouild Scholarship, — ^Founded by the University 
Ouild of Evanston and affording to a young woman student an 
income equal to the tuition fee in college. The holder is respon- 
sible for certain duties in the care of the Guild Rooms. 

High Bchool Scholarships, — ^A number of scholarships are 
awarded annually to select members of the incoming class, upon 
applications endorsed by the principal and faculty of the sec- 
ondary school from which the applicant graduates. Every appli- 
cant for such scholarships must meet the full entrance require- 
ments to college and must present certificates from the corps 
of teachers in his secondary school as to the excellence of his 
character, physical vigor, manliness, and promise of usefulness 
as a citizen. The award is made at the University by a commit- 
tee of the College faculty. 

Maroy Scholarship in Biology.—ThB University has secured a 
table at the Marine Biological lAboratory, Wood's Holl, Massa- 
chusetts, for the sole use of advanced students from the biological 
departments of the College of Liberal Arts. The occupants of 
this table are entitled each season to all the privileges of the 
laboratory, including instruction, lectures, and the use of appli- 
ances and apparatus. 



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COLLBSGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 181 

The American Bchool of Classical Studies at Rome.— The Unl- 
Tersity Is a contributor to the support of the American School of 
Classical Studies at Rome, and is represented by a member of the 
Faculty on its Board of Managers. The school affords facilities 
far arehsologlcal and classical investigation and study in Rome, 
and graduates of the Uniyersity are entitled to all of its ad- 
vantages without expense for tuition. 

PRIZES. 

The following prizes are offered to students in the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts who are candidates for a degree. No 
successful contestant can become a second time a competitor 
for the same prize. No person will be allowed to compete 
for any prize against whom, at the time for appointing 
contestants, unredeemed failures are recorded in more than 
one department of study. 

The Kirk Prize in Oratory. — ^A prize of one hundred 
dollars, established in 1877 by Mr. James Kirk, of Evans- 
ton, and now the gift of Mrs. John B. Kirk, of Evanston, 
IB awarded each year to the student of the College of Lib- 
eral Arts who excels in original oratory. The winner of 
this prize will represent the University in the intercol- 
legiate contest of the Northern Oratorical League. The 
regulations affecting the award are as follows: 

1. Orations submitted in competition must not exceed two 
thousand words in length, and must be typewritten in good 
form. 

2. They must be deposited with the Secretary of the Faculty 
not latar than noon of Friday next following the close of the 
Christmas recess. 

8. From the orations submitted a committee of the faculty 
will select the best five to be presented at a public contest 

4. The award will be made on the basis of both thought and 
defivery at a public contest held on the evening of the first Fri- 
day in March. 

6. The successful contestant must present to the donor of 
the prise a typewritten copy of his oration. 

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182 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

The Harris Prize in Political and Social Science, — ^A 
prize of one hundred dollars, the gift of Mr. Norman W. 
Harris, of Chicago, is awarded to the writer of the best 
essay on an assigned topic in the department of Economics, 
Finance, and Administration. 

The conditions on which the Harris prize will be 
awarded are as follows : 

1. No undergraduate student will be allowed to compete for 
this prize unless he shall have completed at the time of making 
the award the equivalent of Courses A and C in Economics. 

2. Essays offered in competition for this prize must contain 
not less than 10,000 words, and must be either printed or type- 
written. If typewritten, they must be on letter paper of a good 
quality, of the quarto size, with a margin of not less than one 
inch at the top, at the bottom, and on each side, so that they may 
be bound without injury to the writing. On the title-page of 
each essay must be written an assumed name, and under cover 
with the essay must be sent a sealed letter containing the true 
name of the writer and superscribed with his assumed name. 

3. The copies of all essays submitted for this prize become 
the property of the University, and the essay receiving the prize 
shall have endorsed upon it a certificate of that fact 

4. Each year the essay submitted in competition for this 
prize must be deposited with the Registrar of the College before 
twelve o'clock noon on May 1st 

5. The Faculty will appoint three judges of the essays 
offered and the prize shall be awarded to the essay declared by at 
least two of the judges to be the best; provided, that the Univer- 
sity expressly reserves the right to make no award of the prize 
in any year in which the best essay offered shall, in the opinion 
of the majority of the judges, not be of sufficient merit to de- 
serve a prize. 

The Oage Debate Prizes. — Three prizes, aggregating one 
hundred dollars, are given annually by the Honorable Ly- 
man J. Gage for excellence in debating. 

The recipients of these prizes are selected through a series of 
debates, held in the autumn of each year, to which students from 
all departments of the University are eligible. The three men 
receiving the highest ranks in this series of debates receive the 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 188 

Qflfi[e prizes and they also become the representatiyes of the Uni- 
▼ersity in the annual contest of the Central Debating League. 

The Sargent Prizes in Public Speaking, — Two prizes of 
fifty and twenty-five dollars, respectively, endowed by Mr. 
George M. Sargent, of Evanston, will be given to the two 
students who shall excel in public speaking. 

1. Bight candidates will be appointed by the Faculty, the 
selection being confined to students who have completed not less 
than fifty hours of college work including Elocution B. 

2. In the competition, at least one of the prizes must be 
given for an oratorical effort In no case may a declamation 
exceed twelve hundred words. 

3. At this contest no prompting of the speakers will be 
allowed, and a failure of memory will exclude a competitor from 
consideration in the assignment of the prizes. 

4. The award will be made by a committee appointed by the 
Faculty, but composed of persons who are not members of that 
body. 



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184 NORTHWESTBRN UNIVBRSITY. 



FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Matriculation Fee. — Every student, on first entering the 
College of Liberal Arts, is required to pay a matriculation 
fee of five dollars. This fee is paid but once and is not 
returnable. 

Fees for Undergraduates. — ^At the beginning of each 
semester undergraduate students are required to pay fees 
for instruction and incidentals as shown in the following 
table. Upon payment of his semester bill a student is en- 
titled to all the general privileges of membership in the 
(College. He may take any course for which he is qualified 
under the regulations affecting registration, but in certain 
laboratory courses he is required to pay additional fees as 
shown below. 

Schedule of Undergraduate Fees. 

Regular full tuition and incidentals.. $40.00 a semester. 
For sons and daughters of ministers 

and candidates for the ministry. . . . 25.00 " 

For students pursuing a single study 

i. e., work not exceeding five hours 

a week 25.00 

For sons and daughters of ministers 

pursuing a single study 18.00 " 

Under this schedule, holders of old-time perpetual or trans- 
ferable scholarships will pay eighteen dollars a semester for in- 
cidentals. 

Fees for Graduate Students. — The tuition fees for grad- 
uate students, whether resident or non-resident, are deter- 
mined by the number of hours of instruction taken. The 
fee for a lecture, or seminary, or laboratory courae is five 
dollars a year for each year-hour of credit which the course 
bears ; but the total amount of tuition fees in any one year 
shall not exceed forty dollars. 

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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 185 

Laboratory Fees. — Students pursuing laboratory courses 
are chai^^ additional fees varying with the department. 

In the Chemical Laboratory the fee Is In the nature of a de- 
posit, an account being kept of material used and unexpended 
balances being returned to the student at the end of the year. 

In all departments, students are chargeable for unnecessary 
breakages. 

The laboratory fees are as follows : 

CHEMISTBT. 

Course A $7.50 a semester. 

Other courses except Course B, each. . 9.00 " 

Two courses taken concurrently 16.00 

Subject to a refund. 

PHYSICS. 

Course A or B 2.00 

Course C or K 3.00 

zoOlogt. 

Course A S.OO 

Course AB, B, C, or D 2.00 

BOTANY. 

All courses, each 2.00 

QBOLOOY. 

Course A, C, or E 2.00 

lOimULOGY. 

Course A 2.00 

Course B 5.00 

MATHEMATICS. 

Course L 2.00 

Oraduation Fee. — A fee of ten dollars is charged all 
peraoDB taking any degree in the College of Liberal Arts. 
This fee is payable on the first day of May of the year of 
graduation. 

Refunds. — Ho fees for instruction or incidentals will be 
refunded except in cases of sickness. 

If on account of serious Illness a student withdraws before 
the middle of a semester, one-half of his tuition fee will be re- 



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186 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

funded, provided he secures from the Dean a statement of honor- 
able standing, and from a physician a certificate that his health 
will not permit him to remain in attendance. 

Alt bills for fees are made out at the Registrar's office in 
University Halt. Payment is made at the Business Manager's 
Office, 518 Davis Street, Evanston. Checks should be made 
payable to ''Northwestern University," and all payments should 
be made in currency or in Chicago exchange. 

BOARD AND LODGING. 

Students living in Willard Hall pay for board and room 
from $6.50 to $7.00 a week, half yearly in advance, accord- 
ing to the desirability of the room. 

All applicants for rooms must sign a contract to occupy the 
room assigned for the full College year or secure a suitable sub- 
stitute, the contract to be guaranteed by some responsible person 
other than a college officer. 

A deposit of 15.00 is required when a room is reserved. 

Room and board bills are payable strictly in advance, and no 
deduction is made for absence in any part of the term, except in 
cases of protracted illness. 

Pearsons Hall and Chapin Hall are residences for 
women students of limited means, and applications for ad- 
mission to them must be made to the Corresponding Secre- 
tary of the Woman's Educational Aid Association, Evans- 
ton. In these halls students pay for board and room $55.00 
a semester, in quarterly installments, at the beginning and 
at the middle of each semester, and are required to assist 
in the lighter housework. 

The University does not provide dormitories for young 
men, beyond the limited accommodations described on page 
90. They obtain board and lodging in private families at 
reasonable rates. Clubs are formed in which the cost of 
board is reduced to a minimum. 



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COLLBOE OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 187 

The following table exhibits the scale of annual expen- 
diture: 

Low. Average. Liberal. 

Tuition and Incidental fees |80 |80 |80 

Board (36 weeks) 108 136 162 

Room 40 72 100 

Washing 18 26 36 

Text-books and stationery 10 18 36 

1266 1330 1412 

LOAN FUNDS. 

The University receives annually a considerable sum of 
money to be loaned without interest to needy and deserving 
students who are preparing for the ministry, or for other 
forms of Christian work. Loans from this fund are avail- 
able to students without distinction of sex, and are made 
upon the recommendation of the Committee on Loans and 
Charitable Funds. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 

A Toung Men's Christian Association and a Young 
Women's Christian Association are maintained in active 
operation in the College, and exert a helpful influence upon 
the religious life of the students. The headquarters for the 
Men's Association are at the Association House, 2023 Or- 
rington Avenue, and for the Woman's Association, at Wil- 
lard Hall. Each Association employs a general secretary 
and maintains a bureau of self-help for students seeking 
emplo3rment. Under the direction of these organizations, 
religious meetings are held each week, and daily study of 
the Bible is promoted. 



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188 NO&THWaSTBftN UNlVldRSlTt. 

SELF-SUPPORT OF STUDENTS. 

To students entering college without sufScient means to 
defray all their expenses it is proper to say that the Uni- 
versity does not undertake to furnish employment to any 
student, and it does not encourage students to enter who 
are entirely without resources. It happens every year that 
not a few students are able to help themselves very ma- 
terially by their own labor while carrying on their studies, 
but the student is obliged to rely on his own ability, in- 
dustry, and economy in all such cases. The Young Men's 
Christian Association conducts a bureau of self-help which 
is of great assistance in securing work for those desiring 
it, and any inquiries sent to the Secretary of that Associa- 
tion will receive careful attention. 



For further information In regard to the College of Liberal 
Arts, address the Dean of the College, Evanston, Illinois. 



For blank forms of admission and for particulars as to en- 
trance requirements and all matters of record, address the Reg- 
istrar of the College of Liberal Arts, Evanston, Illinois. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



FACULTY. 

Nathait Smith Davis, A.M., M.D., Dean, Professor of the Prinr 
ciples and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical Medicine. 

Bdwabd O0OAB FrrzAUkN Roleb, A.M., M.D.» Professor Emeritus 
of Obstetrics, 

JoHK HAinr^AB H01XJ8TEB, A.M., M.D., Professor Bmeritus of 
Clinical Medicine, 

Fraitk Sewabd Johnson, A.M., M.D., Dean Emeritus and Pro- 
fessor Bmeritus of Medicine and of ClinUxa Medicine. 

JoHir Habfkb Long, M.S., So.D., Professor of Chemistry and Di- 
rector of the Chemicdl Laboratories. 

Emiuub Clabk Dudley, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

John Edwin Owxns, M.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical 
Surgery. 

WiLUAM Btanb Cabselbebbt, M.D., Professor of Laryngology and 
Rhinology. 

Edwabd Wtllts Andrews, A.M., M.D., Professor of Surgery and 
Clinical Surgery. 

Fbank Tatlob Andrews, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Qyne- 
oology. 

GvmoK Wabhinoton Webster, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medi- 
cine. 

Jobbph Zeibler, M.D., Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

William Bdward Morgan, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Henst Gradlb, M.D., Professor of Ophthcamology and Otology. 

Abghibalo Church, M.D., Professor of Nervous and Mental Dis- 
eases and Medical Jurisprudence. 

John Ridlon, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

189 

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190 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

WiNFiELD SooTT Haix, A.M., M.D., Ph.D., Junior Dean, Nathau 
Smith Davis Professor of Physiology, 

Arthur Robin Edwards, A.M., M.D., Professor of the Principles 
and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical Medicine. 

Weller Van Hook, A.B., M.D., Professor of Burgery and Clinical 
Burgery. 

Joseph Bolivar De Lee, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics, 

Robert Bruce Preble, A.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine, 

Frank Xayier Walls, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Frederick Robert Zeit, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteri- 
ology. 

Samuel Craig Plummer, Jr., A.M., M.D., Professor of Surgical 
Anatomy and Operative Surgery. 

William Edward Schroeder, M.D., Professor of Surgery and of 
Clinical Surgery. 

Thomas James Watkins, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Lester Emanuel Frankenthal, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gyne- 
cology. 

Hugh Talbot Patrick, M.D., Clinical Professor of Nervous and 
Mental Diseases. 

Charles Louis Mix, A.M., M.D., Secretary of the Faculty, Pro- 
fessor of Physical Diagnosis. 

Frank Allport, M.D., Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and 
Otology. 

Elisha Hall Gregory, Jr., M.D., Robert Laughlin Rea Professor 
of Anatomy, 

Charles Bert Reed, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, 
Charles Hill, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 

Embryology, 
Lucius Crocker Pardee, M.D., Assistant Professor of Skin and 

Venereal Diseases, 
Charles Henderson Miller, Ph.O., M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacology, 
Peter Thomas Burns, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and 

. Director of the Anatomical Laboratory. 
Frederick Menoe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Laryngology and 

Jlhinology. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 191 

Louis Ebnst Schmidt, M.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical Genito- 
urinary Surgelry, 

William Alfred Mann, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical 
Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Julius Gbinkeb, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, 

William Citthbebtson, M.D., Lecturer on Clinical Gynecology, 

INSTRUCTORS. 

Walteb Steele Babnes, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology, 
FkBDEUCK Atwood Beblet, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Clin- 
ical Surgery, 
Andbbw Jackson Bbiblen, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Orthopedic 

Surgery, 
Coleman Graves Bx71X>bd, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Surgery, 
Walter Herman Buhlig, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology, 
John Oailt Camfbeix, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Clinical Pedi- 
atrics, 
Paul Chester, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis, 
William Robert Cubbins, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Clinical 

Surgery, 
Achilles Datis, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, 
Gboboe Botd Dtche, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, 
Frederick Chables Bgoebt, M.D., Instructor in Operative Surgery, 
Charles Fbanklin Bikenbabt, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic 

Surgery, 
Chables Addison Elliott, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, 
Edson Bbady Fowleb, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Clinical Medicine, 
Robert Tbact Ghxmobe, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology, 
Alexandee Aabon Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Histopathology. 
I^Obsat Hecht, M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Clinical Neu- 
rology, 
John Chamberlain Hollisteb, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gyne- 
cology, 
Charles Mayor Jacobs, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Orthopedic 

Surgery, 
William Johnson, Ph.C., Instructor in Chemistry, 



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192 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Allen Bugkzteb Kanavel, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Olinioai Sur- 
gery. 

Ellis Kibk Kseb, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Gottfried Koeuleb, Ph.G., M.D., Instructor in Clinical Pathology 
and Clinical Medicine. 

Chables J. KuBTz, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

Edoab Nelson Latton, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Clinical Neu- 
rology. 

ViGTOB Dabwin Lespinasse, M.D., Instructor in Qenito-Urinoiry 
Surgery. 

Thomas Henby Lewis, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

George Paull Mabquis, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology and 
Rhinology. 

Datid Falkneb Monash, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Paul Fbederick Mobf, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Surgery. 

Richard Starr Patthxo, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology and 
Otology. 

Isaac Donaldson Rawlings, M.D., Instructor in Contagious Die- 
eases at the Isolation Hospital. 

Harrt Mortimer Richteb, M.D., Instructor in Clkiioal Surgery. 

Henbt Edwabd Saueb, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology, 

Geobge Curtice Shocket, M.D., Instructor in Clinical NeuiroJogy. 

CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 

Louis Beck, M.D., Clinical Pediatrics. 

Robert Alfred Black, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 

William Sherman Bracken, M.D., Clinical Laryngology and 

Rhinology. 
Franz Henry Brandt, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 
Joseph Brenneman, Ph.B., M.D., Clinical Pedifitrics. 
William Elmer Brenneman, M.D., Clinical Neurology. 
DiEDERicK Adam Brumund, M.D., Clinical Ophthalmology and 

Otology. 
George Bassett Butt, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 
James Gray Carr, A.B., M.D., Clinical Surgery. 
Elijah Rockhold Crossley, M.D., Clinical OphtJiatmology and 

Otology. 



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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 198 

WoLLiAM Clark Danfobth, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 

Gbqmb Jamss DnrNiB, M.D., Clinical Laryngology and Rhinology. 

Chabubs August Bbigkson, Ph.O.» M.D., Clinical Medicine. 

BiywABD AiAKBT FoLST, M.D., Clinical Neurology. 

Charles IAarvin Fox, M.D.» Clinical Surgery. 

Fraitk Doio Frahgis, A.B., M.D., Clinical Medicine. 

Harold Kenneth Gibson, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 

Clifford Gbobbelle Grulbe, A.M., M.D., Clinical Pediatrica. 

Alexander Philip Horwitz, M.D., Clinical Ophthalmology and 

Otology. 
Walter Batard Huet, M.D.. Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Arthur Charles Kleutgen, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 
Otis Hardt Maolat, B.S., M.D., Clinical Laryngology and Rhin- 

ology. 
Charles Martin Mattes, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 
Thomas Charles MoGonaqle, M.D., Clinical Pediatrics. 
Frederick Riohard Moebsneb, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 
Albert Barl Mowbt, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 
LuTHEB James Osgood, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 
Rufebt MERRnj. Pabker, B.S., M.D., Clinical Surgery. 
Albert Peoh, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 
Frank Blub Pieboe, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 
Bbnest Rat Rxtnolds, M.D., CHnical Dermatology and Syphil- 

ology. 
Ebnest Charles Riebel, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 
James Gbobob Ross, M.D., Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Datid Saunoeb, M.D., Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Fbank Bdward Simpson, M.D., Clinical Derm^Uology and Syphil- 

ology. 
Morton Snow, A.B., M.D., Clinical Pediatrica. 
Pbed Brown Swdt, B.S., M.D., Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Charles Benjamin Younger, M.D., Clinical Laryngology and 

Rhinology. 



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194 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

DEMONSTRATORS. 

NoBMAN Dixon Curbt, B.S., M.D., Demonstrator of Operative 
Surgery. 

John Flint, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 

Fbedebigk Fbankun Gasbison, M.D., Demonstrator of Operative 
Surgery. 

Louis Obason Habney, M.D., Demonstrator of Operative Surgery, 

Albebt Tbiplett Hobn, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Henbt Dedbick Roehleb, M.D., Demonstrator of Operative Ob- 
stetrics, 

Hebbebt Mabion Stowe, M.D., Demonstrator of Operative Ob- 
stetrics. 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS. 

Mabinvs L. Holm, Ph.C, Chemistry. 
Claude Hem an Bablow, Histology. 
Otis Obion Stanley, M.S., Physiology. 
Habley Ellswobth Fbengh, A.B., Physiology. 
Allison Temple Wanamakeb, Ph.G., Histology. 
Walteb Klinoeman Long, B.Sc., Chemistry. 
Clabeld Edison Dobland, Ph.C., Pharmacology. 
Fbeo Oattueb Thayeb, Chemistry. 
Fbancis Joseph Powebs, M.S., Physiology. 
John Habvet Mubphy, B.S., Physiology. 



James Casey, Ph.G., M.D., Registrar. 

LOCATION AND BUILDINGS. 

The Medical School is in Chicago, on Dearborn Street 
between Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Streets. It is in 
close proximity to Wesley Hospital, with which it is con- 
nected by a covered corridor; also to Mercy Hospital and 
St. Luke's Hospital, in a district of the city which furnishes 
an almost ezhaustless supply of clinical material. 

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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 195 

The buildings, Davis Hall and the Laboratory Building, 
are comparatively new and were erected for the purposes 
of the School. For a description of the buildings see pages 
59 and 60, and for the history of the School see page 54. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Candidates may qualify for admission to the Medical 
School under the following regulations : 

(a) Graduates of recognized colleges will be admitted with- 
out examination upon the presentation of their diplomas. 
ib) Graduates of approved high schools and academies 
which ofFer courses of study equivalent to the require- 
ments for admission to the College of Liberal Arts of 
this University, will be admitted without examination 
upon the presentation of satisfactory certificates, 
(c) Graduates of State Normal Schools or of similar insti- 
tutions whose courses of study are fully equivalent to 
those of public high schools with a four-year curriculum 
will be admitted without examination upon the pre- 
sentation of their diplomas. 
id) Students not holding certificates or diplomas similar to 
those indicated above may be admitted provided they 
present satisfactory credentials for having completed a 
course of study equal to that required for admission to 
the College of Liberal Arts, as set forth on pages 79 to 
86 of this Bulletin. Otherwise they will be required to 
pass examinations for admission upon these subjects. 
In such examination, substitutes for the prescribed sub- 
jects will be accepted in so far as they are fully equiva- 
lent to those Indicated. 
Examinations for admission to the Medical School are held 
at the Medical School on the first Monday in October. By special 
arrangement examinations may also be held at St. Paul, Minne- 
sota; Denver, Colorado; Omaha, Nebraska; St. Louis, Missouri; 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Detroit, Michigan; Portland, Oregon; and San 
Francisco, California. For all such examinations application 
must be made to the Secretary of the Medical School prior to 
June Ist 

BtudenU conditioned in entrance requirements must make up 
thoee condiiion$ before the beginning of the second yeac^ else. 

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196 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

they cannot be registered as regular students in the second-year 
course. 

Special students not candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine will be admitted at the discretion of the Faculty with- 
out reference to their preliminary training. 

PREPARATION FOR THE STUDY OF MEDICINE. 

Students contemplating the study of medicine are urged 
to take at least two years of work in a college of arts or 
science before entering the Medical School. The following 
should be among the studies pursued in this preliminary 
training : 

Modem Languages: German or French, two years. 

OhemUtry: General, organic, inorganic, qualitatiye analysis. 

Physics: Mechanics, hydraulics, sound, light, electricity. 

Biology: Biology of plants, general biology, comparative 
anatomy, physiology of vertebrates, histology and embryology. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students who have pursued in other medical schools 
the following first year medical courses may be admitted to 
advanced standing in the subjects covered by their official 
credentials if found satisfactory: 

Anatomy, recitations (64 hours) and laboratory work (320 
hours), covering Osteology, and Dissection of two parts of the 
human body. (Four parts: arm, leg, thorax and abdomen, head 
and neck.) 

Physiology, recitations (96 hours) and laboratory work (96 
hours), covering General Physiology of ceUs and tissues, and the 
Special Physiology of the circulatory and respiratory systems, In- 
cluding Normal Hematology. 

Chemistry, lectures and demonstrations (96 hours) and labor- 
atory work (196 hours), covering General Chemistry and Qualita- 
tive Analysis, with Organic Chemistry. 

Histology and Embryology, recitations (48 hours) and labora- 
tory work (192 hours), covering the microscopical anatomy of 
human tissues and organs and the development of vertebrate 
embryos. 

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tHB MtDDICAL SCHOOL. Id7 

Students from other medical schools who apply for ad- 
vanced standing must present to the Committee on Creden- 
tials satisfactory records for all work in which credit is 
asked, or must pass examinations in aU of the branches for 
which they desire credit. Certificates from other reputable 
medical schools covering the same number of hours in class 
and laboratory work as are given in this school are accepted, 
when properly signed by the Dean or Secretary of the 
school from which the candidate in medicine comes. 

Undei^aduate students from other medical colleges 
will not be admitted to the senior class. Graduates in 
medicine will be admitted to the senior class only upon 
special action by the faculty. 

COMBINED COURSES. 

Medical students who hold a Bachelor's degree in Arts 
or Science from an institution of accepted grade can obtain 
from this University a Master's degree upon graduation in 
Medicine, by complying with the requirements as stated on 
page 168 of this catalogue. 

The University offers combined courses of study which 
enable a student to obtain both a collegiate and a medical 
d^ree with economy of time. A description of these com- 
bined courses will be found on pages 157 and 158. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

This Medical School was the first in the United States 
to grade its courses in such a way that fundamental sub- 
jects are studied first, and superstructural subjects follow. 
The advantage of such a gradation of subjects can only be 
secured by a student attending the school for the full 
aead^nic year, and by beginning with the fundamental sub- 
jects in the fall semester of each year. 

iNSTBUcnoN is given by Recitations, for which the student 
prepares himself by the study of an assigned chapter of a text- 

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198 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

book; by LaborcUory ExerdseSj In whicb the student performs 
for himself various experiments under the supervision of pro- 
fessors and laboratory assistants; by Demonstrations, In which 
the professor performs for the whole class or for a section of 
the class some experiment not well fitted for laboratory exercise, 
lecturing during the progress of the demonstration; by IlhMtrated 
Lectures with the stereoptlcon, supplementing the standard text- 
books; by CoUoquia or Conferences, In which students and pro- 
fessor informally discuss announced topics. 

The greatest care has been taken so to arrange the course 
of study that the first year shall prepare the student for the 
studies of the second year, and that the first two years, which 
comprise the laboratory courses, shall make a broad and sub- 
stantial foundation for the clinical courses and hospital practice 
of the last two years. 

The studies of the whole course are grouped Into departments, 
In each of which the work is carefully graded and is under the 
supervision of a single head, the work being thus unified. 

The classes are limited in size, a matter of very great ad- 
vantage to the student, giving him the privilege of personal in- 
struction. The sections of classes are sufliciently small to give 
to each student an opportunity to perform for himself every step 
in the technique of laboratory and clinical courses. 

CumcAL Instbuction occupies most of the student's time 
during the last two years of the course and a part of the time 
during the second year. Clinical material in great abundance is 
furnished by the South Side Dispensary, Wesley Hospital, Mercy 
Hospital, St Luke's Hospital, Provident Hospital, Cook County 
Hospital, and the Chicago Lying-in-Dispensary. Some of the 
hospital and college clinics are attended by whole classes of one 
hundred or more, but the greater number of clinics are open only 
to small sections at a time, where twelve or sixteen students 
receive individual instruction and practice in all phases of physi- 
cal examination, diagnosis, and treatment An Important feature 
of the clinical instruction is the bedside hospital clinics In which 
a small group of students accompanies the professor through the 
ward, and has an opportunity to study the details of symptoms, 
diagnosis, and treatment, and to follow the cases throughout the 
progress of disease. The course of bedside clinical instruction 
is so arranged that each student has at least two periods a week. 
The hospital beds to which the students have access number In 
the aggregate over five hundred. 



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THB MEDICAL. SCHOOL. 



199 



8YNOP8I8 OF THE MEDICAL COURSE. 

The following schedule gives the course of study leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. In the left hand 
column are given by title the courses required of all stu- 
dents. These are described in detail under the several de- 
partments of instruction. 

In the right hand column there are listed optional 
courses offered to small classes of students, to whom special 
laboratory and clinical instruction will be given. In some 
of these courses an additional fee is charged for material 



The subjects of the first year, with the exception of 
Anatomy and Sui^ery, may be studied either at the Medical 
School or in the laboratories of the College of Liberal Arts 
at Evanston. The work in Anatomy and Surgery may be 
completed during the summer term of the Medical School. 



Required Courses. 
First Year. 
I. Chemistry, a, &, c, d, e, f, 
II. Anatomy, a, b, c, d. 
II. Histology and Bmbry el- 
egy, a> 6, c. 
III. Physiology, o, &, c, d, e, 
XIV. Surgery, a. 



Second Year. 
I. Chemistry, g, h, i- 
II. Anatomy, d, 6, /, g, 
II. Histology, d. 
III. Physiology, A g, h, i /, *. 
lY. Pharmacology, a, 5, c, d. 
V. Bacteriology and Pathol- 
ogy, a» ft, c, d, e, A i, j. 
VI. Physical Diagnosis, a, &. 

X. Ophthalmology and Otol- 
ogy, o. 
XIV. Surgery, h. 



Optional Courses, 



Second Year. 
I. Chemistry, j, 
II. Anatomy, h. 
II. Histology, e. 
III. Physiology, I, m. 
V. Bacteriology and Pathol- 
ogy, fc, h m. 



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200 



NORTHWBSTBRN UN IVBRSITT. 



V. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XIL 

XIII. 

XIV. 

XIV. 

XIV. 

XV. 



Third Year. 

Pathology, at ^> i- 

Obstetrics, a> e. 

Dermatology and Syphil- 
ology, a, h. 

Laryngology and Rhin* 
ology a, hf c. 

Ophthalmology and Otol- 
ogy, h. 

Gynecology, a. 

NenrooB Diseases, a. 

Pediatrics, a, b, e, d. 

Surgery, c, d. e, A g, h, i. 

Genlto-Urinary Surgery, 
a, b. 

Orthopedic Surgery, a, b. 

0. 

Medicine, e, /, g, h. 



Fourth Year. 
V. Pathology, /. 
VII. Obstetrics, 5, c, d, e. 
VIII. Dermatology and Syphil- 
ology, c 
X. Ophthalmology and Otol- 
ogy, 0, d , e, f. 
XI. Gynecology, b, c, d, e, /. 
XII. Neurology, b, c, d, e, /, g. 
XII. Mental Diseases and Med- 
ical Jurisprudence, a, 
b, c. 
XIV. Surgery, j, k, I, m, n, o, p. 
XV. Medicine, i, y, fc, I, m, n, 
0, p. 



Third Year. 
I. Chmnistry, /. 
II. Histology, 0. 

III. Physiology, I, m. 

IV. Pharmacology, e. 

V. Bacteriology and Path- 
ology, jb, I, m. 
IX. Laryngology and Rhin- 
ology, d. 
XIV. Orthopedic Surgery, d. 



Fourth Year. 
II. Histology, e. 

III. Physiology, I, m. 

IV. Pharmacology, e. 
V. Bacteriology and 

ology, k, 2, m. 
XIII. PedUtrics, c. 



Path- 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The work in each department of instraction is ^aded, 
beginning with the fundamental and passing to the more 
advanced or special, and the student should take the courses 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 201 

in the order enumerated. Some deviation from this order 
may, how-ever, be made, if approved by the Faeulty. 

I. Department of Chemistry 

The work in this department extends through the first 
and second years and is required of all students. 
First Year. 

(a) General and Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and 
demonstrations. Three times a week with frequent 
additional quizzes. One and a third semesters. 
Professor Long and assistant. 

(b) Organic Chemistry. Lectures and demonstrations. 
Three times a week. Two-thirds of a semester. . 

(c) Elementary Electricity, or the Physics of Medical 
Electricity. Lectures and demonstrations. Twice a 
week. One-half of a semester. 

Professor Long. 

(d) General Experiments. Laboratory course. Three 
times a week. Three-fourths of a semester. 
Professor Long, Mr. Johnson, and assistants. 

(e) Qualitatiye Analysis. Laboratory course. Three 
times a week. Three-fourths of a semester. 
Professor Long, Mr. Johnson, and assistants. 

(f) Volumetric Analysis. Laboratory course. Three 
times a week. One-half of a semester. 
Professor Long, Mr. Johnson, and assistants. 

Second Year. 

(g) Physiological Chemistry. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions. Three times a week, first semester. 
Professor Long. 

(h) Physiological Chemistry. Laboratory course. Twice 

a week. One semester. 

Professor Long and Mr. Johnson. 
(i) Urine Analysis. Laboratory course. Twice a week. 

One semester. 

Professor Long and Mr. Johnson. 
(J) Laboratory courses. Opportunity is given to second 

and third year students to carry on investigations 



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202 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

in special lines of Physiological Chemistry, and to 
become familiar with the application of the spectro- 
scope, polarlscope, and other instruments, as aids in 
original study. The more advanced work for the 
coming year will be in the direction of investiga- 
tions on new methods of urine and feces analysis. 

The courses of the first year, (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f),may 
be completed in the laboratories of the College of Liberal Arts at 
Evanston. Students wishing so to finish this work should register 
in College as follows: 
Chemistry A. General Chemistry. Four hours a week throughout 

the year. 

Professor Young. 
Chemistry B. Qualitative Analysis and Organic Chemistry. Four 

hours a week throughout the year. 

Associate Professor WHrrrELSET. 
Chemistry C. Volumetric Analysis. Four hours a week, second 

semester. 

Associate Professor Whittelsey. 

Physics A. Introductory course treating of the general proper- 
ties of Matter, Sound, Heat, Electricity, Magnetism, 
and Light Four hours a week throughout the year. 
Assistant Professor Tatnaix. 

II. Department of Anatomy. 

The anatomical laboratory is a large, well ventilated 
and well lighted room on the fifth floor of the Laboratory 
Building, provided with every help in the way of skeletons, 
models, and charts, ordinarily used in such a laboratory. 
There is also a well furnished osteological laboratory and 
museum, and an embalming room with complete appliances 
for injecting and preserving anatomical material, also a 
large refrigerator room with a capacity of several hundred 
cadavers. 

The course in Anatomy is chiefly a laboratory course 
with the human subject and with models and charts always 
before the student. 



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THE MEDICAL. SCHOOL 208 

First Year. 

(a) Introductory course In General Anatomy. Lectures 
and demonstrations. Three times a week. One- 
elghth of a semester. 

Pour three-hour laboratory periods a week. One- 
eighth of a semester. 

(b) Human Osteology. Laboratory work accompanied 
by quizzes. Two three-hour periods a week. One- 
half of a semester. Recitations, twice a week. One- 
half of a semester. 

(c) Human Dissections. The upper and the lower ex- 
tremity, with laboratory recitations on the parts 
dissected. Four three-hour periods a week. One 
semester. 

Professors Gbboobt, Bubns, and assistants. 

(d) Recitations on laboratory work. Twice a week. One 
semester. 

Professors Gregobt and Bubns. 

Second Year. 

(e) Neurology (A). Laboratory work, demonstrations, 
and lectures on the gross anatomy of the brain and 
spinal cord. Twice a week. One-half of a semester. 
Professors Gbegobt and Hill. 

(f) Neurology (B). Microscopical anatomy of the spinal 
cord and brain. Two one-hour laboratory periods a 
week. One-half of a semester. 

Professors Gbegoby and Hnx. 
(g) Human Dissections. The head and neck, and the 

viscera, with laboratory recitations on the points 

dissected. Pour three-hour periods a week. One 

semester. 

Professors Gbegoby, Bubns, and assistants, 
(h) Research work. October and June. 

Professor Gbbgobt. 

Sub-Department of Histology and Embryology. 

The laboratories for this department are situated so as 
to secnre the best possible light, and are fitted np with 
tables, lockers, and modem apparatus both for the indi- 



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204 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

vidual student and for general class work. The depart- 
ment has a large general laboratory, a preparation room, 
and two private rooms for the instructor and his assistants. 
Instruction is offered both in splanchnology and in the 
normal histology of tissue and organs. Each student has 
the use of a compound microscope, dissecting microscopes, 
and all necessary apparatus for the manipulation and prep- 
aration of histological material. The courses embrace in- 
struction in preparation, section cutting, staining, and 
mounting of normal specimens, and their subsequent study 
under the microscope. 
First Year. 

(a) General and Special Histology and Embryology. 
Recitations. Twice a week first half -semester, once 
a week thereafter. 

Professor Hill. 

(b) Histology, General and Special. LAboratory. A 
study of the normal histology of tissues and organs, 
not including the brain and spinal cord. Two pe- 
riods a week of three hours each. One and a half 
semesters. 

Professor Hill. 

(c) Embryology. Laboratory work, two periods a week 
of three hours each. One-third of a semester. 
Professor Hnx. 

Courses in Histology and Embryology are given daily dur- 
ing the summer vacation by Professor Hnx and Mr. Bablow. 
These are equivalent to Courses (a), (b), (c). 

Second Year. 

(d) Microscopical Anatomy of the Spinal Cord and 
Brain. Two laboratory periods a week. One-fourth 
of a semester. 

Professor Hnx. 

Second, Third, and Fourth Years. 

(e) Special Problems in Histology and Embryology. 
Professor Hill. 



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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 205 

The courses of the first year, (a), (b), (c),may be completed 
In the laboratories of the College of Liberal Arts at Evanston. 
Stadents wishing so to finish this work should register in College 
as follows: 
ZoOlogjrA. General Biology. Two lectures and four hours* 
laboratory work each week throughout the year. 
Professor Loot. 

This course includes introductory work in embryol- 
ogy and much attention is given to general physi- 
ology. It Is recommended as a general introduction 
to Histology and Physiology. 
ZodlogyB. Vertebrate Embryology. Two lectures and four 
hours' laboratory work each week, second semester. 
Professor Loot. 
Zodlogy C. Cytology and Histology. One lecture and four hours' 
laboratory work each week throughout the year. 
Dr. Habpcb. 

III. Department of Physiology. 

The equipment of this department comprises a general 
laboratory, two special laboratories, an instroment room, a 
library, shop, preparation room, and an animal house. The 
instniction is based upon laboratory work and demonstra- 
tions. In the laboratory each student demonstrates for 
MTUBftlf fundamental laws of physiology, and observes for 
hiTHBAlf the phenomena upon which these laws are based. 
The demonstrations usually present experiments too 'difiK- 
eolt for the student to perform alone. The laboratory work 
with the demonstrations forms an experimental basis for 
the science of Physiology, which is presented systematically 
in the recitation course accompanying the experimental 
courses. 
First Year. 

(a) General Physiology, Cellular Biology, and the Phys- 
iology of Muscle and Nerye-tissue, and of the Muscu- 
lar System. Lectures and demonstrations, three 
times a week, and laboratory work one period a 
week. One semester. 
Professor Hall and assistants. 



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206 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

(b) Special Physiology. The Physiology of Circulation 
and Respiration. Recitations and demonstrations, 
three periods a week. One-half of a semester. 
Professor Hall and assistants. 

(b, b) Summer course, dally for four weeks. 
Equivalent to Course (b). 
Dr. Kttbtz. 

(c) Hsematology. The Physiology of the Blood. Reci- 
tations and demonstrations, three times a week. 
Liaboratory work, two periods a week. One-fourth 
of a semester. 

Professor Hall and Dr. Kubtz. 
(c, c) Summer course, dally for four weeks. 
Equivalent to Course (c). 
Dr. KiTBTZ. 

(d) The Physiology of Reproduction. Lectures and 
demonstrations, three times a week. One-eighth of 
a semester. 

Professor Hall. 

(e) Nutrition, Chemistry of the Animal Body, and Chem- 
istry of Food and Food Stuffs. Recitations and 
demonstrations, three times a week. One-eighth of 
a semester. 

Professor Hall. 

Second Year. 

(f) Physiology of the Spinal Senses. Recitations, dem- 
onstrations, and laboratory six hours a week. One- 
half of a semester. 

(g) The Chemistry of Digestion. Demonstrations, twice 
a week. One-fourth of a semester. 

Professor Hall. 

(h) Metabolism, Animal Heat, and Excretion. Twice a 
week. One-fourth of a semester. 
Professor Hall. 

(1) Physiology of the Central Nervous System. Lec- 
tures, demonstrations, and recitations. Twice a 
week. One-fourth of a semester. 
ProfeBBor Miz. 



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THE MEDICAL. SCHOOL. 207 

(]) Normal Ophthalmoscopy and Skiascopy. Labora- 
tory work for three periods. 

Dr. Pattiixo. 
(k) Pharmacology. The physiological action of drugs. 

Laboratory work. Two periods a week. One-half of 

a semester. (See lY. b.) 

Professor Milleb. 
(1) Experimental Physiology of the Central Nervous 

System. Laboratory work. One period a week. 

One-half of a semester. 

Professor Gbinkeb. 

Third and Fourth Years. 

(m) Research Problems. Medical Anthropometry. 
Professor Hall. 

The courses of the first year, (a), (b), (c), (d), (e),may be 
completed in the laboratories of the College of Liberal Arts at 
Branston. Students wishing so to finish the work should register 
in College as follows: 
ZodlogyD. Physiology for Medical Students. Three hours a 
week throughout the year. 
Dr. Habpeb. 

IV. Department of Pharmacology. 

This department has a complete laboratory equipment, 
furnishing every aid toward the acquirement of a systema- 
tic knowledge of medicines, including: (1) natural and 
laboratory products; (2) their actual manufacture; (3) 
the demonstration by modem scientific methods and appa- 
ratus of their physiological actions on the lower animals; 
(4) thorough didactic instruction covering the physiological 
action in detail of the more important remedies on the 
various i?ystems of the human body; and (5) carefully rec- 
ognized therapeutic indications governing their employ- 
ment in disease. 

The laboratory cabinets contain all drugs and chemicals 
with their preparations. 



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208 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Second Year. 

(a) Pharmacognosy and Pharmacy (operative). Labora- 
tory work, four hours a week. One semester. 
Professor Miller. 

(a, a) Summer coursa Two two-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Equivalent to Course (a). 

(b) Pharmacology. Experimental. LAboratory work 
four hours a week. One-half of a semester. 
Professor Mn.LKB. 

(c) Pharmacology. Recitations. Twice a week. One 
semester. 

Professor Mn.LKB. 

(d) Pharmacy. Dispensing. Forty-eight hours of ser- 
vice in Pharmacy at The South Side Dispensary, 
under the supervision of Professor Millbb and Mr. 
Thatoheb. 

Third and Fourth Years. 

(e) Research work on Physiological Action of Drugs. 

V. Department of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Four spacious and well lighted laboratories, occupying 
the whole second floor of the main College building, are in 
use by this department. They have been equipped liberally 
with new microscopes, microtomes, and all modem appa- 
ratus and appliances for general class-work and for indi- 
vidual research. On the third floor of the main College 
building a number of small rooms have been set apart in 
which physicians or advanced students may find excellent 
facilities for research work. 

The Pathological Museum of the School is on the first 
floor, and contains a very complete and excellent collection 
of pathological specimens, preserved in natural colors, for 
instruction and practical exercises in Pathological Anat- 
omy. The department is supplied with a valuable reference 
library. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 209 

Second Year. 

(a) Bacteriology. Lectures and demonstrations. Two 
hours a week. First semester. 

Professor Zeit. 

(b) Bacteriology. Laboratory work. Three three-hour 
periods a week. First semester. 

Professor Zeit and Dr. Buhlio. 
(b,b) Summer Course. Three times a week. Equivalent 
to Courses (a) and (b). 
Professor Zeit and Dr. Buhuo. 

(c) General Pathology. Laboratory work. Three two- 
hour periods a week. Second semester. 
Professor Zeit and Dr. Goldsmith. 

(C c) Summer Course, daily. Equivalent to Course (c). 
Professor Zett and assistants. 

(d) Recitations on principles of General Pathology. 
Two hours a week. The recitations cover the sub- 
jects studied in the laboratory. Second semester. 

Dr. GOLDSICITH. 

(e) Etiology. Two lectures a week during February and 
March. 

Professor Zett. 

(f) Hygiene. Recitation course of two hours a week 
for three months (March, April, and May). Two 
lectures a week. 

Dr. Buhuo. 

Third Year. 

(g) Special Pathology. Practical exercises in diagnosis 

of morbid anatomy and histology of special organs. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Professor Zett and assistants, 
(h) Clinical Pathology. Daily conferences and labora- 
tory work. One period daily. One-half of a semester. 

Professor Zeit and Dr. Koehleb. 
(h,h) Summer Course. Daily. Equivalent to Course (h). 

Professor Zett and Dr. Koehleb. 
(i) Theory and Practice of Laboratory Diagnosis. The 

clinical significance of the various laboratory flnd- 



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210 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

IngB are considered in didactic lectures. One period 
a week one semester. 

Dr. KOKHLEB. 

In the cliniccLl laboratory the vast material from various 
hospitals, the college clinics, and the dispensary clinics Is exam- 
ined and the findings are reported to the department sending 
specimens or patients. The student is made to apply his re- 
sources and knowledge gained in the physiological, chemical, 
pathological, and bacteriological laboratories to actual cases 
which the various college and dispensary clinics furnish. 

The laboratory work includes the following subjects: 
I. Pathological Laboratory Technique. 
II. Urine Analysis. 

III. Sputum Examination. 

IV. Clinical Bacteriology. 
v. Hematology. 

VI. Examination of Stomach Contents and Feces. 
VII. Examination of Exudates and Transudates. 

Second, Third, and Fourth Years. 

(j) Public autopsies with practical instruction In tech- 
nique and diagnosis in the large amphitheatre of 
the main building, as may be announced from time 
to time. Students of the third and fourth years are 
excused from conflicting college duties. 
Professor Zeit and assistants. 

(k) Special advanced work in Pathology. 
Professor Zkit and Dr. Goldsmith. 

(1) Special advanced work in Bacteriology. 
Professor Zeit and Dr. Buhlig. 
(m) Advanced work in Clinical Pathology. 
Professor Zeit and Dr. Kobhleb. 

VI. Department of Physicai Diagnosis. 

The work of this department comprises didactic lec- 
tures, practice in physical examinations of the normal body, 
physical diagnosis clinics, and special clinical work in the 
Dispensary, the class being divided into eight sections, each 
of which spends one-half of a semester in learning to recog- 
nize physical signs of disease shown by actual pal^enta. 

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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 211 

Second Year. 

(a) Physical Bxamination of the normal body. LAbora- 
tory work. Bight periods. First semester. 

Dr. Chbstbb, Dr. Bujott, Dr. Kerb, Dr. Brandt. 
(a, a) Summer course. Bquiyalent to Course (a). 
Dr. Chester. 

(b) Theory and Practice of Physical Diagnosis. Lec- 
tures. Twice a week. Two semesters. 
Professor Mix. 

(b, b) Summer course. Bquiyalent to Course (b). 
Dr. Chester. 

(c) Physical Diagnosis Clinic 
Professor Mtx. 

Cases chosen from the large Dispensary Clinics are 
brought before the class, and are presented with 
especial reference to diagnosis, 
(d) Laboratory work. E2xamination of the diseased 
body in the Dispensary. Two periods a week. One- 
half of a semester. This work is done in small 
sections of the Class. 

Professor Mix, Dr. Chester, Dr. Brandt, Dr. Kleut- 
OEN, Dr. Blijott, Dr. Kerr. 

Vil. Department of Obstetrics. 

The teaching in this department is clinical, didactic, by 
demongtrations, hy individual exercises on the manikin, and 
by recitations and conferences in large and small classes. 

Obstetric cases of Mercy, Provident, and Wesley Hos- 
pitals are nsed for teaching. The senior students are re- 
quired to take a two weeks' service in the Chicago Lying-in 
Hospital and Dispensary. Each student therefore sees and 
personally conducts from six to ten labors in the homes of 
the patients, or in the Chicago Lying-in Hospital under the 
guidance of the assistant physicians. The pathological 
material is abundant. 

Third Year. 

(a) The Physiology of Pregnancy, Labor, and the Puer- 
perium. Two recitations a week through the year. 
Professor Reed and Dr. Monash. 

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212 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Fourth Year. 

(b) The Pathology of Pregnancy, Labor, and the Puer- 
perium. Two lecture recitations a week through 
the year. 

Professor Db Leb. 

(c) Individual Practice on the Manikin. Sixteen exer- 
cises for each group of six students. 

Dr. Stowb, Dr. Robhleb, and Dr. Cabb. 

(d) Practical Obstetrics. Bach member of the senior 
class is required to spend two weeks at the Chicago 
Lying-in Hospital, during which time he is excused 
from all college work. Experience shows that he 
will personally conduct during this time from six 
to ten cases of labor upon which careful instruction 
is giyen. 

Professor Db Leb and assistants. 

(e) Students of both the third and fourth years attend 
obstetric demonstrations and labors conducted by 
Professor Db Leb and assistants in the amphitheater 
of Wesley Hospital. Attendance on six labors is 
necessary for graduation. 

Vill. Department of Dermatolo0y and 8yphlloiogy. 

The clinical material in this class of diseases is exceed- 
ingly abundant and opportunity is given to every student 
to examine each case personally. The most instructive cases 
are carefully selected for the general weekly clinics, at 
which they are demonstrated and exhaustively discussed. 

Special attention is paid to the differential diagnosis, 
histopathology, and treatment of the more common derma- 
toses usually met with by the general practitioner. 

Third Year. 

(a) Dermatology, Syphilology, and Qonorrhosa. Recita- 
tions and demonstrations. Once a week through 
the year. 

Professor Pabdeb. 

(b) Dispensary clinic daily for four weeks. 
Professor Pabdee. 

(b,b) Summer course. Equiyalent to Ck>ur8e (c). 

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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 213 

Fourth Year. 

(c) Clinical lectures. One period a week. 
Profeesor ZinflLTO. 

IX. Department of Laryngology and Rhinology. 

This department is furnished with specially constructed 
indiYidual stalls and electric lights for the training of di- 
vided classes of students in the technique of examination 
and treatment of the nose and throat, following the method 
of arrangement in vogue at Vienna. A dark-room for trans- 
lumination tests and a dressing-room are attached. 

Preparation for work in this department is afforded by 
the work in the Physiological Department on the larynx, in 
which a careful dissection of this organ is made, as is also a 
study of its cartilages, muscles, and mucous membrane. 

Third Year. 

(a) Laryngology and Rhinology. Lecture one hour a 
week. One semester. 

Professor Casselbebbt. 

(b) Clinical Lecture. One hour a week throughout the 
year. 

Professors Casselbebbt and Mengb. 

(c) Dispensary Clinics. Individual instruction in tech- 
nique. Six periods a week for four weeks. 
Professor Casselbebbt and Professor Menob, assist- 
ed by Dr. DEinns, Dr. Toxtnoeb, Dr. Bbaoken, and 
Dr. Maolat. 

(c,c) Summer course. Bquivalent to Course (c). 

(d) Clinical Lecture. One hour a week at Mercy Hos- 
pital, and one hour a week at Wesley Hospital. 
Professor Mevge. 

X. Department of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The space allotted to this department includes a com- 
modiotis waiting room, two large clinic rooms, and dark 
rooms; these with cases well stocked with instruments and 



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214 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

appliances afford ample equipment. The abundant material 
of the Dispensary enables the teaching staff to demonstrate 
practically the whole field of clinical eye and ear practice. 
Preparation for the special work of this department is 
provided by the courses which the second-year students 
receive in the gross and minute Anatomy and the Physiol- 
ogy of the Eye and Ear. 

Second Year. 

(a) Normal Ophthalmoscopy and Skiascopy. One lab- 
oratory period a week. One-fourth of a semester. 
Dr. Pathllo. 

Third Year. 

(b) Clinical Lectures and Demonstrations. St Luke's 
Hospital. One period a week. 

Professor Allpobt and Dr. Wood. 

Fourth Year. 

(c) Ophthalmology and Otology. The pathology, ther- 
apy, surgery, and hygiene of the eye and ear. One 
lecture a week. Two semesters. 

Professor Gbadle. 

(d) Clinical Lecture at the College. Once a week. Two 
semesters. 

Professor Gkadle. 

(e) Clinical Lecture to sections of the class at Mercy 
Hospital. Twice a week. 

Dr. Patttllo. 

(f) Dispensary Clinics, in which small classes of stu- 
dents receive Individual Instruction In examination, 
diagnosis, and treatment of cases. Six periods a 
week for four weeks. 

Professor Mann, Dr. Salinoeb, Dr. Pattillo. Dr. 
HoBwrrz, Dr. Cbosslet, and Dr. Bbumund. 
(f, f) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (f). 

XI. Department of Gynecology. 

Instruction in this department comprises recitations, 
dispensary clinics, conferences, and surgical clinics. The 



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THE BiBDItJAL SCHOOL. 215 

clinics are given in Wesley Hospital, Mercy Hospital, St. 
Luke's Hospital, and to divided classes in the Dispensary. 
All students are required to make themselves proficient in 
general gynecological diagnosis and treatment, and with 
this object in view, are brought into close personal relation 
with a lai^e number and variety of cases in the Dispensary. 
Not less than an average of three operative clinics a week 
are given in different hospitals in the immediate vicinity 
of the College. These clinics afford the student abundant 
opportunity to familiarize himself with all the major and 
minor operations of gynecology. Not only a theoretical 
appreciation, but a practical working knowledge of gyne- 
cology is a prerequisite for graduation. 

Third Year. 

(a) Operative Clinics and Lectures at St Luke's Hos- 
pital. One two-hour period a week. 

Professor Dudley, October to April; Professor 
Frankenthai^ April to July; Dr. Cuthbebtbon, 
July to October. 

Fourth Year. 

(b) Qeneral Gynecology. Recitations. Twice a week, 
from October to April. 

Dr. GnxMOBE, Dr. Saueb, Dr. Babnes, Dr. Lewis, 
and Dr. Hollisteb. 

(c) Operative Clinics and Lectures at Wesley Hospital. 
One two-hour period a week throughout the year. 
Professor Watkins. 

(d) Operative Clinics and Lectures at Mercy Hospital. 
Once a week throughout the year. 

Professor F. T. Andbews. 

(e) Dispensary Clinics. Daily to divided classes. Every 
fourth-year student is required to attend for four 
weeaJB. 

Professors Watkins and F. T. Andbews, Dr. Gill- 
MOBE, Dr. Saxteb, and Dr. Babnes. 
(e, e) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (e). 



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216 NORTHWBSTBRi} UNIVERSITY. 

(f ) Gynecological Clinics to sections of the senldr class. 
Once a week. Wesley Hospital. 
Professor Watkins. 

XII. Department of Neurology. 

The teaching in this department is done by lectures, reci- 
tations, and clinics in the College and Dispensary, and by 
clinics in the hospitals. 

Third Year. 

(a) Nervous Diseases. Recitations. Once a week. 
Dr. Hecht. 

Fourth Year. 

(b) Diseases of the Nervous System. One lecture a 
week. One semester. 

Professor Chitbch. 

(c) Recitations. Text-book and reviews of clinical and 
didactic lectures. One hour a week. One semester. 
Dr. Hecht. 

(d) Clinical Lecture. Once a week. First semester. 
Professor Patbick. 

(e) Clinical Lecture, with special reference to hospital 
cases. Once a week. Second semester. 
Professor Chubch. 

(f) Dispensary Clinics. Six periods a week for four 
weeks. 

Professors Patrick and Gbinkek, Dr. Hecht, Dr. 
Shocket, Dr. W. B. Bbenneman, Dr. Foley, and Dr. 
Latton. 
(f, f) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (f). 
(g) A weekly ward visit at Wesley Hospital. 
Professor Gkinkeb and Dr. Hecht. 

Sub-Department of Mental Diseases and Medical Jurisprudence. 

(a) Mental Diseases. One lecture a week. One-half of 
a semester. 
Professor Chubch. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 217 

(b) Medical Jurisprudence. One lecture a week. One- 
half of a semester. 

Professor Chttbch. 

(c) Recitations. Reyiews of clinical and didactic lec- 
tures. Once a week. One semester. 

Dr. Hkcht. 

Xili. Department of Pediatrics. 

It is the plan of this department to make its instruction 
chiefly clinical and personal. 

Third Year. 

(a) Recitations. One period a week. One semester. 
Professor Walls. 

(b) Dispensary. Children's Clinic. Six periods a week 
for four weeks. 

Professor Walls, Professor Hill, Dr. McGonaolb, 
Dr. J. Brennsman, Dr. Sirow, Dr. Hobwitz, Dr. 
Campbell, Dr. Bbck, and Dr. Gbulee. 
(b,b) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (b). 

(c) Clinical Lecture. One period a week. 
Professor Walls. 

The most interesting cases of patients attending the dis- 
pensary clinics are reserved for the weekly college clinics. This 
course is required of juniors and is open to all seniors. 

(d) Diet Kitchen. Examination and preparation of in- 
fant foods. 

Professor Walls. 

XIV. Department of Surgery. 

The course offered in Surgery is systematically graded, 
beginning in the first year with a course in the application 
upon plaster models and cadavers, of roller bandages, casts, 
splints, extensions, etc., the last half of the time being de- 
voted to a study of surface landmarks. 

Junior students are given the privilege of attending at 
St Luke's Hospital the surgical clinics of Professor Owens 
and his associates, at Mercy Hospital the surgical clinics 

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218 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

giveii by Professor B. Wyllys Andrews, and at Wesley Hos- 
pital the clinics given by Professors Schroeder and Plum- 
mer. 

Sections of the senior class attend the surgical clinics at 
People's Hospital given by Professor Schroeder; and those 
given at Mercy Hospital by Professors Andrews and Mor- 
gan. The whole class attends Professor Van Hook's clinics 
at Wesley Hospital, also the clinics at Mercy Hospital. 

First Year. 

(a) Preliminary Surgery. Surface Landmarks and 
Bandaging. Once a week. First semester. 

Dr. Kanayel and Dr. Ross. 

Second Year. 

(b) Recitations on Surgery. Three times a week during 
March, April, and May. 

Dr. Besley and Dr. Richteb. 

Third Year. 

(c) Dispensary Clinics in General Surgery. Individual 
instruction in divided classes. Six times a week for 
four weeks. 

Dr. Richteb, Dr. Matter, Dr. Kaitavel, Dr. Cubbins. 
(c, c) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (c). 

(d) Operative Surgery on cadaver. Laboratory. Three 
periods a week for four weeks. First semester. 
Professor Flummeb. 

(d, d) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (d). 

(e) Experimental Operative Surgery upon Dogs. Three 
periods a week for four weeks. Second semester. 
Dr. Richteb and Dr. Kanavel. 

(f) Lectures and Recitations on Surgery. Twice a 

week. 

Professors Flummeb and Sghboeoeb. 
(h) Clinical Lectures in Wesley Hospital Amphitheater. 

One two-hour period a week. 

Professors PtuiiMEB and Schboedeb. 
(h) Clinical Lecture in Mercy Hospital Amphitheater. 

Two two-hour periods a week. 

Professor E. Wtixts Andbews and assistants. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 219 

(I) Clinical Lecture at St. Luke's Hospital. Once a 
week. 
Professor Owens, Dr. Allfobt, and Dr. MoAbthub. 

Fourth Year. 

(j) Clinical Lecture on General Surgery. Twice a week. 

Professor Vaw Hook. 
(k) Surgical Clinic in Wesley Hospital Amphitheater. 

One three-hour period a week. 

Professor Van Hook, Dr. Richteb, Dr. Beslet, Dr. 

MoET, Dr. Mattes, and Dr. Kanavel. 
(1) Clinical Lecture in Mercy Hospital Amphitheater. 

Two two-hour periods a week. 

Professor E. Wtllts Andeews and assistants, 
(m) Clinical Lecture in Mercy Hospital Amphitheater. 

Once a week. 

Professor Mobgan and assistants, 
(n) Clinical Lecture to sections of the class at Mercy 

Hospital. Once a week. 

Dr. BiTTOBD. 

(o) Surgical Clinic to sections of the class at People's 

Hospital. Once a week. 

Professor Schboedeb. 
(p) Weekly ward visits at Wesley. Mercy, and People's 

Hospitals. Twice a week. 

Professors Van Hook, Andbews, Moboan, Plummer, 

Schboedeb, and Dr. Bttfobo. 
(p, p) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (p). 

Qenito-Urfnary Surgery. 

Third Year. 

(a) Dispensary Clinics in Oenito-Urinary Surgery. In- 
dividual instruction in divided classes. Six times 
a week for four weeks. 

• Professor Schmidt, Dr. Lespinasse, Dr. Ross, Dr. 
HuET, and Dr. Swift. 
(a, a) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (a). 

(b) Clinical Lecture in Genito-Urlnary Surgery. Once a 
week. 

Professor Schmidt. 

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220 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 

The instruction in Orthopedic Surgery is based upon the clin- 
ical material at hand. The abundant material of the dispensary 
clinic furnishes a sufficient range of cases to permit a fairly com- 
plete presentation of the whole subject of Orthopedics, with the 
greater advantage of illustrating each subject with one or more 
cases. 

Third Year. 

(a) Recitation or Clinical Lecture in Orthopedics. Once 
a week. 

Professor Ridlon. 

(b) Dispensary Orthopedic Clinics before small classes. 
Three times a week for four weeks. 

Dr. Jacobs, Dr. Bbiblbn, and Dr. Bikenbaby. 
(b, b) Summer course. Equivalent to Course (b). 

(c) Hospital Clinics and Operative Clinics at Mercy Hos- 
pital and Wesley Hospital as the material allows. 
Professor Ridlon. 

(d) Selected students may receive personal training at 
the Home for Destitute Crippled Children In opera- 
tive technique, ordering and adjustment of braces, 
application of plaster of paris dressings, and in the 
selection of materials and details of manufacture of 
orthopedic appliances. 

Professor Ridlon. 



XV. Department of Medicine. 

The extensive second year course in Physical and Clin- 
ical Diagnosis, illustrated hy the large college clinics, lays a 
broad foundation for the medical courses which are to 
follow. It is accompanied by a thorough course in the 
technique of Physical Diagnosis, beginning with laboratory 
work upon the normal subject and illustrated by typical 
cases from the clinics. 

An important feature in the medical instruction in the 
junior year is the work in the medical department of the 
South Side Dispensary. Small sections of eight or ten stu- 

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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 221 

dents are aEsigned to a service of five weeks. During this 
service each student has an opportunity to receive personal 
instruction in the application of his previous year's work in 
physical diagnosis, in the methods of differential diagnosis, 
in symptomatology, in therapeutics, and in prescription 
writing. This personal contact with patients and individ- 
ual opportunity to put into practice the didactic and clinical 
instruction of the various departments has always been a 
leading feature in this instruction. 

The medical teaching of the senior year is chiefly clin- 
ical. The study of medicines and their mode of action is 
begun before clinical teaching is taken up, as those subjects 
must be understood before prescriptions for the sick can be 
comprehended. For this reason also general pathology is 
taken in the second year; and in the third, special pathol- 
ogy, while the recitation course in medicine is being pur- 
sued. 

The object of the department is to introduce first the 
most fundamental subjects which are tributary to medicine, 
and finish the course with as many practical clinical demon- 
strations as posible. 
Second Year. 

See Courses (a), (b), (c), (d), announced under the Depart- 
ment of Physical Diagnosis. 

Third Year. 

(e) Recitations firom text-books. Three hours a week. 
Professor Pkdub, Dr. Dtchb, Dr. AeHnxBS Datis, 
Dr. KxBB, and Dr. Bizjott. 

(f) Dispensary Clinic to small classes. Four weeks. 
Dr. FowLKB, Dr. Chester, Dr. Movtbt, Dr. Omsoii, 
Dr. Bluott, Dr. Datis, Dr. Butt, Di. Kkbb, Dr. 
BsicKSOK, Dr. FSAKcis, Dr. Pboh, Dr. Osqood, Dr. 
KLEUTGXif , and Dr. Bsandt. 

(f, f ) Summer Course. Equivalent to Course (f). 

(g) Clinical Lectures at the College. Once a week. 
Professor Pbsble. 



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222 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSITT. 

(h) ' Clinical Lectures at St. Luke's Hospital. Once a 
week. 
Professor Walls and Dr. Favill. 

Fourth Year. 

(i) Lectures on Diseases of the Stomach, Intestines 

Liver, and Pancreas. One hour a week. 

Professor Davis. 
(J) Lectures on Infectious Diseases, and Chronic Gen- 
eral Diseases. One hour a week. 

Professor Edwabds. 
(k) Clinical Lectures at Mercy Hospital. Once a week, 

first semester; twice a week, second semester. 

Professor Davis. 

Twice a week throughout the year. 

Professor Edwasds. 

Once a week, first semester. 

Professor Websteb. 
(1) Clinical Lectures at the College. Once a week. 

Professor Edwabds. 
(m) Clinical Lectures at Wesley Hospital. 

Once a week, first semester. 

Professor Davis. 
(n) Clinical Lectures at Wesley Hospital. 

Once a week, second semester. 

Professor Websteb. 
(o) Clinical Lectures at Wesley Hospital. 

Once a week throughout the year. 

Professor Pbeblb. 
(p) Weekly visits to the wards of Wesley, Mercy, and 

St Luke's Hospitals under the guidance of Profes- 
sors Davis, Edwabds, Websteb, Walls, and Pbeblb, 

and Dr. Dtchs, Dr. Chbsteb, Dr. Gibson, Dr. Kebb, 

and Dr. Elliott. 
(p, p) Summer Course. Equivalent to Course (p). 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 228 



TEXT-BOOKS AND REFERENCE BOOKS FOR 1905-06. 

(The names of Text-Books used are printed in Italics.) 

Dlctionariee: Gould, Century, American Illustrated Medical. 

Anatomy: Cunningliam, Gray, Morris, Quain, Gerrish, Joessel, 
Edinger on Brain and Spinal Cord, Spalteholtz, Howell 
on Dissection of the Dog, Treves' Applied Anatomy, 
Holden's Osteology, Hayne's Manual of Anatomy, Bisen- 
drath, Woolsey. 

Histology: Btohr, Quain, Bohm, Davidoff, Huber, Piersol, 
Schaefer. 

fimbryology: Heisler, Hertwig, Quain, Marshall, Minot 

Physiology: HaJVs Text-Book of Physiology, HaJVs Manual of 
Experimental Physiology, American Text-Book of Physi- 
ology. 

Chemistry: Long's General Chemistry, Long's Analytioal Ohemr 
istry. Long's Urine Analysis and Notes, Remsen's Organic 
Chemistry, Physiologic and Pathologic Chemistry hy 
Bunge, 

Materia Medica: White and Wilcox, Sollman, Wood, Hare, Amer- 
ican Text-Book of Applied Therapeutics. 

Pathology: Am^erican Text-Book of Pathology, Delafleld and 
Prudden, Mallory and Wright PatJiological Technique, 
Zeigler's General and Special Pathology, Thoma, Stengel, 
McFftrland, Coplin. 

Clinical Pathology: Cahot on Examination of the Blood, Mallory 
and Wright Pathological Technique; Simon, Clinical . 
Diagnosis; Boas, Magenkrankheiten, Vol. I.; Lenhartz, 
Purdy, Ewing, Sahli, v. Jaksch, Hensel. 

Operative Surgery: Bickham, Allingham, Stimson, Zuckerkandl; 
McGrath, Surgical Anatomy and Operative Surgery. 

Medical Jurisprudence: Reese, Taylor. 

Nervous Diseases: Church and Peterson, Dana, Gowers, Dercum, 
Gray, Mills. 

Practioe of Medicine: Osier, Strtlmpell, Tyson, Twentieth Cen- 
tury, Allbutt, Loomis and Thompson, Davis' Heart, Lungs, 
and Kidneys. 

Surgery: International Text-Book of Surgery, Tlllmanns, Dennis, 
Da Costa, American Text-Book of Surgery, Park. 

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224 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Obstetrics: Be Le&s Notes, Hirst, Williams, Jewett, American 
Text-Book of Obstetrics, Lusk, Parvin. 

Physical Diagnosis : Vierordt, Da Costa, Musser, Bntler, Le Fevre, 
Cabot, Lenbe, Sabli. 

Diseases of Children: Holt, Hatfield, American Text-Book of 
Children* 

Diseases of the Bye: Fuchs, De Schweinitz, May, American Text- 
Book of Bye, Bar, Nose, and Throat 

Diseases of the Ear: Chradle, DUeaaes of th€ Nose, Pharynx, and 
Eye, Bacon, Politzer, American Text-Book of the Bye, 
Bar, Nose, and Throat 

Oyneoology: Dudley, Byford, Webster, Kelly, Emmet, Montgom- 
ery, Reed. 

Laryngology: Wright, Kyle, Bosworth, McBfide, American Text- 
Book of Bye, Biar, Nose, and Throat 

Dermatology: Stelivagon, Morris, Crocker, Walker, American 
Text-Book of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

Etiology and Hygiene: Bergey, Rohe, Abbott, Egbert 

Bacteriology: McFarland, Muir and Ritchie, Abbott, Crookshank, 
Sternberg. 

Orthopedic Surgery: RidUm and Jones, Bradford and I^oyett 
Whitman. 

Syphilis and Venereal Diseases: Bchmidt, Taylor, Keyes, Ameri- 
can Text-Book of Skin and Venereal Diseasee. 



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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 225 

REQUIREMENTS FOR QRADUATiON. 

To obtain the degree of Doctor of Medicine, a candidate 
must fulfill the following requirements : 

1. He must have satlsftictorily completed four full annual 
conraes of lectures of eight months each, including all the topics 
listed as required subjects on page 199. 

2. He must be at least twenty-one years of age. 

3. He must be of good moral character and must have main- 
tained an irreproachable moral standing while at the school. 

4. He must have dissected the median half of the human 
body. 

6. He must have been in attendance upon clinics for three 
years. 

6. He must have secured satisfactory standing in all final 
examinations. 

7. He must have completed payment in full of all fees. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Final examinations are held in required courses at the 
end of each semester. 

Examinations for those who need a second test are given 
in October and in Febmary. 

Students def ective in two or more branches after the 
October examinations must take those branches a second 
time, and may elect no studies that conflict with them. 
Such students will be classed as irregulars. 

HONORS. 

To a few students deemed by the Faculty worthy, be- 
cause of their uniformly good standing, honors will be 
granted, and such students may be graduated Cum Laude 
or Magna Cum Laude. 

To students who have uniformly good standing in re- 
quired subjects and who do special work of an excellent 
character in any department, speeial honors will be granted. 

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226 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

THE ALUMNI LIBRARY. 

The Alumni Library of nearly three thousand bound 
volumes, besides several thousand unbound journals and 
pamphlets, is situated on the fourth floor of Davis Hall. A 
description of the equipment will be found on page 63. 
The library is open from 9 to 5 o'clock daily. 

The net profits on the sale of all college text-books at the 
library are devoted to its increase and care. 

The alumni committee in charge of the library includes Pro- 
fessors Webster, Hall, and Edwards, with one member of the 
class graduating the preceding yeav. An advisory committee of one 
student from each class assists the alumni committee in the 
administration of the library. This method of administration 
makes the library a co-operative institution, controlled by students 
and alumni, rather than by the University. 

Each department of instruction is well represented in the 
library. There is a large number of reference books and dic- 
tionaries. 

All of the larger systems of Medicine and Surgery are at the 
command of the student, and the important recent works in all 
departments are added to the library as soon as they appear. 

GYMNASIUM. 

A room on the fourth floor of Davis Hall has been set 
apart for a Gymnasium, and is equipped for most of the 
lighter floor work usually given and for hand-ball. The 
hand-ball court is especially popular, and is in almost con- 
stant use. The brisk gymnasium exercise, followed by a 
shower-bath, has had a marked effect upon the health and 
good spirits of the student community. Besides hand-ball 
and regular classes in various exercises there have been 
organized classes in fencing. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 227 

THE HOSPITAL QUIZ CLASS. 

Experience has shown that students who have made a 
careful review of the branches of the medical course are 
more successful in the competitive hospital examinations 
than are students who have not had such a review. 

The Hospital Quiz Class is under Faculty supervision 
and is so arranged that the students get a thorough review 
during the last twelve or eighteen months before the ex- 
aminations without sacrificing any of their required senior 
work. 

Only the best one-fourth of the graduating class are eli- 
gible to the quiz class. Since 1900 every member of the 
quiz class has secured a good hospital appointment. The 
list of such appointments made from graduates during the 
year 1905 may be found on page 417. 

THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

There is an increasing demand for summer work in 
medicine on the part of students from institutions whose 
clinical facilities are not as good as those enjoyed in Chi- 
cago, and on the part of students of this Medical School 
who are making special preparation for the competitive 
hospital examinations which occur at the end of the course, 
and of those who have entered from other medical colleges 
and have work to make up. 

The courses of the summer school are well adapted to 
the needs of practitioners, there being extended opportunity 
for practice in the newer and more scientific methods of 
clinical diagnosis and pathology, as well as for experimental 
work in physiology, therapeutics, and surgery. The com- 
paratively small number of students in summer courses 
makes the clinical opportunity especially good. 

The highest quality of work is insisted upon and full 
credit is given for the summer courses as far as fhey cover 
the groumd of the regular course of the college year. 



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228 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Summer courses begin June 7th and extend to August 
1st, thus covering the period of one-half of a semester. 
Registration for such courses must be made with the Regis- 
trar at the Medical School. 

Courses will not be given unless a sufficient number of 
students register for them. 

The courses of the summer school will be found listed in 
the regular work of the several departments. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

The Association of Northwestern University Medical 
School was organized in 1892. It aims to aid in the develop- 
ment of the highest moral and religious character in young 
men. It is connected with the Intercollegiate Department 
of the Chicago Association. By this arrangement members 
can obtain full privileges, at sixty per cent of the regular 
rates, at any of the Association buildings in this city. 
These privileges include gymnasia, baths, natatoria, res- 
taurants, barber shops, bicycle storage, receptions, clubs of 
various kinds, libraries, evening instruction in Latin^ Ger- 
man, mathematics, etc., courses of lectures and other enter- 
tainments. 

Religious meetings are held once a week during the col- 
lege year and classes in Bible-study, with weekly meetings, 
are maintained. Committees of the Association will cheer- 
fully aid students in obtaining board and rooms. Con- 
nected with the Association of Northwestern University 
Medical School is a very efficient employment bureau, con- 
ducted under the supervision of Mr. H. S. Hollenbeok. 
During the summer a canvass is made and places found for 
students wishing to earn money during their medical course. 
These positions are assigned in October to those in need 
of them. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 229 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Matriculation Fee, — A student is required to pay at the 
time of his first registration a matriculation fee of five dol- 
lars. This fee is paid but once, and is charged all students 
alike. 

Annual Fee. — ^A fee of one hundred and seventy-five 
dollars is paid annually by all students. 

The auiaal fee may be paid in instaUments as follows: Before 
Octotier 4th, $60.00; before January 4th, $60.00; before April 4th, 
$55.00. A discount of $15.00 is made when all fees and deposits 
for the year are paid before October 4th. 

Bach student who uses a college microscope will be charged 
a rental therefor as follows: In Histology and in Pathology, $2.00 
a semester; in Bacteriology, for microscope having oil-immersion 
lens, $3.00 a semester. 

The right is reserved to alter existing fees and to levy new 
fees without notice, as conditions may demand. 

Practitioners who are making brief yisits to the city are 
always welcome to attend lectures and clinics. Those wishing to 
attend single lecture or laboratory courses through the year will 
be charged from fifteen to twenty-five dollars for each course. 
Those wishing to take all of the work of any one year will pay 
the same fee as regular students. 

All fees are payable in currency or Chicago exchange. 

Hospital Fees. — For the various Hospitals, fees ranging 
from five to twenty dollars a year are paid by the students. 
These are announced under the several Hospitals for which 
they are due. 

Examination Fee. — A fee of five dollars is charged for 
every special examination taken by a student out of course. 

Deposits. — A deposit fee of ten dollars is required of all 
students as a precaution against breakage or injury to appa- 
ratus in the laboratories, unnecessary damage to buildings, 
or loss of instruments in laboratories and clinics. This fee 
must be paid on or before the first Monday in October and 
IS refunded in case no injury or loss occurs. 

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230 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Deductions to cover the loss will be made from the de- 
posit of individual students, v^hen it can be determined who 
has caused breakage or loss of apparatus or defacement of 
buildings. When it cannot be so determined the value of 
the loss or injury will be deducted pro rata from the de- 
posits of all students. 

Refunds, — No refund of tuition fees is allowed except 
in case of serious illness. If on that account a student 
withdraws before the middle of a semester, one-half of his 
tuition fee for that semester will be refunded, provided he 
secures from the Dean a statement of honorable standing 
and from a physician a certificate of inability to remain in 
attendance. The matriculation fee is in no case refunded. 

Assignment of Seats. — Students of the three upper 
classes may register and secure seats in the amphitheaters 
at the opening of the session, or by sending five dollars at 
an earlier date to the Clerk of the School. 

BOARD AND LODGING. 

Board and lodging vary in price from three and a half 
to six dollars a week. Rooms for those who desire to board 
and lodge themselves will cost from six to ten dollars a 
month. Students sometimes form boarding clubs in which 
the cost of board can be reduced to two dollars and a half 
a week. A reliable list of desirable rooms and boarding 
places recommended by the boarding-house committee of 
the Young Men's Christian Association can be obtained at 
the Association rooms or at the Registrar's office. 

How to Reach the College, — Students who desire to go 
directly to the College from the trains should take the South 
Side Elevated Railroad and get oflf at Twenty-sixth Street; 
or they may take the State Street cars and ride south to 
Twenty-fourth Street. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 281 



HOSPITALS. 

The following Hospitals are open to students in this 
Medical School at fees commensurate with the privileges 
afforded. The names of those members of the staffs of the 
several Hospitals who are connected with this school are 
marked with an asterisk. 

WESLEY HOSPITAL. 
Medical Staff. 
Weller Van Hook, M.D., Cfiairman. 
Attending Phyficians. Attending Burgeons, 

*Nathan S. Dayls, M.D. ^Weller Van Hook, M.D. 

^Arthur R. Edwards, M.D. *Samuel C. Plummer, M.D. 

•Robert B. Preble, M.D. •WlUiam E. Schroeder, M.D. 

•George W. Webster, M.D. 

Attending Gynecologists, Attending Obstetricians. 

•Thomas J. Watklns, M.D. •Joseph B. De Lee, M.D. 

•B. C. Dudley, M.D. ♦Charles B. Reed, M.D. 
•Prank T. Andrews, M.D. 

Attending Neurologists. Attending Oculists and Aurists. 
•Archibald Church, M.D. •Henry Gradle, M.D. 

•Hugh T. Patrick. M.D. ♦Frank Allport, M.D. 

Attending Orthopedic Surgeon. Attending Dermatologists. 

•John Rldlon, M.D. •Joseph Zelsler, M.D. 

•Lucius Pardee, M.D. 

Attending Laryngolo gists. Attending Pathologist. 

•William B. Casselberry, M.D. ♦Robert F. Zeit, M. D. 
♦Frederick Menge, M.D. 

The most notable recent addition to the equipment of the 
Medical School is to be found in the operating rooms, wards, and 
laboratories of Wesley Hospital. Neither expense nor time has 
been spared to make this one of the best equipped hospitals in 
the world. 

With its laboratories for sterilizing and preparing dressings 
and Instruments, Its amphitheaters, its clinical and pathological 
laboratories, drug-room and morgue, its sunbaths and suites of 



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232 N0RTHWB8TBRN UNIVERSITY. 

private rooms, and its commodious, light, and well yentilated 
wards, this institution has reached a high mark in hospital con- 
struction and equipment. The personnel of its staff youchsafes 
to the public a high ideal in medical science in the treatment of 
disease, and guarantees to the medical undergraduates unexcelled 
opportunities to obsenre and to participate in the most advanced 
medical and surgical treatment of caaea. 

The wards and private rooms contain together two hundred 
and twenty-five beds. 

One of the largest and best training schools for nurses In 
Chicago is connected with Wesley Hospital. 

The instruction given to the students in Wesley Hospital 
makes a very important part of their clinical course. This is 
consequent upon the close relation of the two institutions — ^the 
hospital standing beside the College building and connected with 
it by corridors. 

The annual fee for the Wesley Hospital ticket for seniors is 
five dollars. 

The course of Clinics given during the year 1905-06 is as 
follows: 

XIV. (g) Clinical Lectures in Surgery. One two-hour period 

a week. 

Professors Plummeb and Schboedsb. 
XIV. (J) (k) Clinical Lectures in Surgery. Twice a week. 

Professor Vaw Hook, assisted by Dr. Rtohteb, Dr. 
Bbslbt, Dr. MoBF, Dr. Mattkb, and Dr. Kanavel. 

XV. (m) Clinical Lectures in Medicine. Once a week. First 

semester. 
Professor Davis. 

(n) Clinical Lectures in Medicine. Once a week. Sec- 
ond semester. 
Professor Webster. 
(o) Clinical Lectures in Medicine. Once a week 
through the year. 
Professor Pbeble. 
XI. (c) Clinical Lectures in Gynecology. Once a week 
through the year. 

Professor Watkins and assistants. 
XV. (p) Ward Visits In Medicine. 

Dr. Gibson, Dr. Elliott, Dr. A. Davis, and Dr. 
Kebb. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 288 

XIV. (p) Ward Visits In Surgery. 

Professors Van Hook, Plummeb, and Sghboedeb, 
Dr. RicHTEB» Dr. Pabkeb, and Dr. Kubtz. 

XII. (g) Ward Visits in Neurology. Weekly. 

Assistant Professor Gbinkeb and Dr. Hecht. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 
Attending StafT. 
Consulting Physician. Department of Obstetrics, 

•John H. Hollister, M.D. ♦Joseph Bolivar De Lee, M.D. 

♦David F. Monash, M.D. 

Department of Surgery. Department of Gynecology . 

•E. Wyllys Andrews, M.D. ♦Frank T. Andrews, M.D. 

•William B. Morgan, M.D. ♦Thomas J. Watkins, M.D. 

Department of Orthopedic Department of Eye and Ear, 

Surgery. ♦Richard S. Pattillo, M.D. 

•John Ridlon, M.D. 

Department of Medicine. Department of Dermatology. 

♦Nathan Smith Davis, M.D. ♦Joseph Zeisler, M.D. 

•Arthur R, Edwards, M.D. 
•George W. Webster, M.D. 

Department of Neurology. Department of Pathology. 

•Archibald Church, M.D. * Frederick R. Zeit. 

This hospital is at the corner of Calumet Avenue and Twenty- 
sixth Street, and is under the exclusive care of the Faculty of this 
School. It is conducted by the Sisters of Mercy, and receives a 
large number of patients annually, both from the city and the 
country. It has recently been rebuilt and enlarged so that its 
capacity Is about four hundred beds. The operating rooms are 
equipped with every modem facility. The dressing and anaes- 
thetizing rooms have been fitted up in a manner as near perfec- 
tion as science and skill can make them. 

Daily clinics are held in the hospital amphitheater, or at the 
bedside In the wards, according to the nature of the individual 
cases. The members of the Clinical Class are allowed to examine 
the cases for themselves, and thus acquire a personal familiarity 
with the clinical aspect of a large variety of diseases. 



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284 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

In classes of two or three, students of the senior year are al- 
lowed to watch the progress of obstetrical cases under the direc- 
tion of the House Physician. E«ach member of the graduating 
class may serve as Surgical Dresser in Mercy Hospital, and 
receive a certificate for efldcient and faithful seryices. 

A laboratory has been equipped for Clinical Bacteriology and 
microscopical work, which will be utilized for teaching purposes 
as well as for clinical examinations. 

The fee for the annual Mercy Hospital ticket is six dollars, 
and is paid by both Junior and senior students. 

The training school for nurses is one of the best in America, 
requiring a high school diploma for admission, and three years 
of twelve months each devoted to the theory and practice of 
trained nursing in every phase of the subject 

To students of the fourth year of the Medical School the 
following program of courses is provided: 

XV. (k) Clinical Lecture in Medicine in the new amphi- 
theater. Once a week, first semester; twice a week, 
second semester. 
Professor Davis. 

XV. (k) Clinical Liecture in Medicine. Once a week, first 
semester. 
Professor Webstbb. 

XV. (k) Clinical Lectures in Medicine. Twice a week 
throughout the year. 
Professor Edwabob. 

XV. (p) Ward Visits in Medicine. Three times a week. 

Professors Davis, Edwabds, and Websteb, Dr. 
Dtche and Dr. Chester. 

XIV. (1) Clinical Lecture in Surgery. Two two-hour periods 

a week In the new operating amphitheater for both 

third and fourth year classes. 

Professor E. W. Andrews and assistants. 
XIV. (m) Clinical Lecture in Surgery. Once a week. 

Professor Moboan and assistants. 
XIV. (n) Clinical Lecture in Surgery to sections of the class. 

Once a week. 

Dr. BuFOBD. 

XIV. (p) Ward Visits in Surgery. Twice a week. 

Professors Andrews, Morgan, and Dr. Bufoed. 



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THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 



235 



XL (d) Clinical Lecture in Gynecology. Once a week. 

Professor F. T. Andbews. 
X. (e) Clinical Lectures in Ophthalmology and Otology to 
sections of the class. Twice a week. 
Dr. Pattillo. 
X. (d) Clinical Lecture in Larnygology and Rhinology 
Once a week. 
Assistant Professor Menge. 



ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL. 

Attending Staff. 

Pretident, *John E. Owens, M.D. 

Vice-President, Fkank Billings, M.D. 

Secretary^ Junius C. Hoao, M.D. 



Attending Surgeons. 
*John E. Owens, M.D. 
Lewis L. McArthur, M.D. 
W. H. Allport, M.D. 
A. B. Halsted, M.D. 

Attending Cfynecologista, 
•E. C. Dudley, M.D. 
•T. J. Watklns. M.D. 
*L. E. Frankenthal, M.D. 
*Wm. Cuthbertson, M.D. 

Attending Oculiate and Aurists. 
*Frank Allport, M.D. 

Casey Wood, M.D. 

Thomas A. Woodruff, M.D. 

Paul Guilford, M.D. 

Attending Orthopedic Surgeons. 
A. B. Hosmer, M.D. 
Frederick Mueller, M.D. 
J. U Porter, M.D. 

Attending Neurologists. 
•Archibald Church, M.D. 
Sanger Brown, M.D. 



Attending Physicians, 

Frank Billings, M.D. 

Henry B. Favill, M.D. 
•Francte X. Walls, M.D. 
•Robert B. Preble, M.D. 

Attending Obstetricians. 
Frank Carey, M.D. 
Junius C. Hoag, M.D. 

Attending Oral Surgeon. 
Thomas L. Gilmer, M.D. 

Pathologist. 
•F. Robert Zeit, M.D. 
Ludwig Hektoen, M.D. 

Attending Pathologist. 
F. L. Dagg, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists and 

Rhinologists. 
•William Casselberry, M.D. 

T. Melville Hardie, M.D. 

Noryal H. Pierce, M.D. 

Dermatologist and PcuHothe- 

rapist 
W. A. Pusey, M.D. 



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236 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



This hospital Is situated on Indiana Avenue, near Fourteenth 
Street Owing to its central situation, it receives a large number 
of accident cases, and its surgical clinic Is consequently an ex- 
tensive one. Clinics are given regularly In Medicine, Nervout 
Diseases, Surgery, Gynecology, and Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 
The autdpsies, held by the Pathologists in the amphitheater of 
the hospital morgue, constitute an Important part of the clinical 
instruction. 

The St Luke's Training School for Nurses is one of the oldest 
and best In the West Its students, now numbering fifty, must 
have a thorough preliminary education, and they spend three 
years In theoretical and practical training. 

The clinics and autopsies of St. Luke's Hospital are attended 
principally by the third-year students. The annual fee Is five 
dollars. The following courses are given at this hospital: 
XV. (h) Clinical Lectures in Medicine. Once a week. 

Professor Walls and Dr. Favill. 
XIV. (i) Clinical Lectures In Surgery. Once a week. 

Professor Owens. Dr. Allport, and Dr. McAbthur. 
X. (b) Clinical Lectures in Ophthalmology. Once a week. 

Dr. Allpobt and Dr. Wood. 
XI. (a) Clinical Lectures in Gynecology. Once a week. 

Professors Dttdley and FBANKEirrHAL. 
XV. (p) Ward Visits in Medicine. Once a week. 
Professor Walls. 



PROVIDENT HOSPITAL. 



Attending Staff. 



Department of Surgery, 
Daniel H. Williams, M.D. 
*W. E. Morgan, M.D. 
A. A. Wesley, M.D. 
J. Charles Hepburn, M.D. 

Department of Gynecology, 
G. C. Hall, M.D. 
Eugene O. Chrlstoph, M.D. 
Frank M. Clement, M.D. 
R A. Letoumeau, M.D. 



Departm^ent of Pathology. 
Joseph L. Miller, M.D. 
♦Frank H. Brandt, M.D. 

Department of Medicine. 
A. W. Williams, M.D. 
Edward S. Stewart, M.D. 
J. W. White, M.D. 
•A. E. Mowry, M.D. 

Department of Obstetrics. 
•.Toseph B. De Lee, M.D. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 2Ti 

Department of Dermatology. Department of Pediatrics. 

Samuel L. Weber, M.D. Edward S. Miller, M.D. 

Department of Eye and Ear. Andrew L. Smith, M.D. 

W. C. WilllamB, M.D. 



J. R. White, M.D. 



^WUllam A. Mann, M.D. 
Clark W. Hawley, M.D. 

Department of Noee and Department of Oral 8wrgery. 

Throat. C, E. BenUey, M.D. 

J. Frank McKlnley, M.D. C. P. Pruyn, M.D. 

This hospital, located at the corner of Thirty-Sixth and Dear- 
bom Streets, has been recently much enlarged. Besides Its 100 
beds, which can accommodate 800* to 1,000 patients annually.. 
there is a large dispensary in which about 6,000 ambulatory 
patients receive treatment each year. 

A large and well conducted training school for nurses not 
only has charge of the hospital and dispensary patients, but 
supplies nurses to a large number of families in their "out- 
service." 

PEOPLE'8 HOSPITAL. 

This hospital has been recently opened to Northwestern 
University Medical School for clinical teaching. It is conven- 
iently situated within a short walking distance of the school, 
at the comer of Archer Avenue and Twenty-Second Street, and 
it affords a variety of clinical material that is thoroughly ap- 
preciated by the students. 

The People's Hospital is a private Institution, organized in 
1897 by Dr. I. C. Gary ( North westem, '89), whose desire was 
to establish an ideal wage-earners' hospital, especially fitted to 
meet the wants of people in moderate circumstances. 

It is located in the center of a densely populated, largely 
foreign section of the city, from which it draws its clinical 
material. 

There is a training school for nurses in connection with the 
hospital, which provides efficient nursing. One interne is ap- 
pointed each year from the graduating class at the college, and 
two senior students live at the hospital and serve as assistants. 
The hospital is well supplied with operating rooms and a com- 
plete laboratory. 



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288 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

The consulting staff consists of the following members of 
the Medical School faculty: Professor W. E. Morgan, consulting 
surgeon; Professor G. W. Webster, consulting physician: Pro- 
fessor H. T. Patrick, consulting neurologist; Professor F. T. 
Andrews, consulting gynecologist; Professor W. E. Schroeder. 
surgeon. 

The clinical course given at the People's Hospital is as fol- 
lows: 

XIV. (o) Surgical Clinic to sections of the senior class. 
Once a week. 
Professor Schboedeb and Dr. Riebel. 



THE SOUTH SIDE DISPENSARY. 
Dispensary Staff. 

All members of the Dispensary Staff are members of the 
faculty of the Medical School. 

Chief of Dispensary Staff, Frank X. Walls, M.D. 
Medical Department, 
Professor A. R. Edwards. Dr. A. Davis. 

Professor R. B. Preble. Dr. G. B. Butt 

Professor C. L. Mix. Dr. A. Koehler. 

Dr. B. B. Fowler. Dr. F. D. Francis. 

Dr. P. Chester. Dr. L. J. Osgood. 

Dr. A. B. Mowry. Dr. A Pech. 

Dr. H. K. Gibson. Dr. A. C. Kleutgen. 

Dr. C. A. Elliott. Dr. C. A. Erickson. 

Dr. F. H. Brandt. Dr. E. E. Kerr. 

Surgical Department. 
Professor W. Van Hook. Dr. E. C. Riebel. 

Dr. W. R. Cubbins. Dr. F. R. Moessner. 

Dr. F. E. Pierce. Dr. R. A. Black. 

Dp. C. M. Bfetter. Dr. C. M. Fox. 

Dr. A. B. Kanavel. 

Neurological Department, 
Professor A. Church. Dr. D'Orsay Hecht. 

Professor H. T. Patrick. Dr. G. C. Shockey. 

Professor Grinker. Dr. Wm. E. Brenneman. 

Dr. B. N. Layton. Dr. E. A. Foley. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 239 

Orthopedic Surgical Department, 
Professor John Ridlon. Dr. C. M. Jacobs. 

Dr. A. J. BrlslexL Dr. C. F. Elkenbary. 

Department of Ophthalmology and Otology, 
Professor Henry Gradle. Dr. R. S. Pattillo. 

Professor W. A. Bfann. Dr. D. Salinger. 

Dr. A. P. Horwltz. Dr. B. R. Crossley. 

Dr. D. A. Bmmund. 

Cfynecological Department, 
Professor B. C. Dudley. Dr. H. E. Sauer. 

Professor T. J. Watkins. Dr. R. T. GiUmore. 

Professor P. T. Andrews. Dr. J. C. Hollister. 

Dr. W. S. Barnes. Dr. T. H Lewis. 

Department of Pediatrics, 
Professor F. X. Walls. Dr. M. Snow. 

Dr. T. C. McGonagle. Dr. C. G. Grulee. 

Dr. J. C. Brennemann. Dr. G. Koehler. 

Dr. L. Beck. Dr. J. G. Campbell. 

Department of Laryngology and Rhinology, 
Professor Wm. E. Casselberry. Dr. G. J. Dennis. 
Professor F. Menge. Dr. O. H. Maclay. 

Dr. C. B. Tottnger. Dr. W. S. Bracken. 

Dr. 6. P. Marquis. 

Department of Dermatology and Byphilology. 
Professor J. Zeisler. Professor L. C. Pardee. 

Dr. E. R. Reynolds. Dr. F. E. Simpson. 

Oenito-Urinary Surgery. 
Professor L. E. Schmidt Dr. W. B. Huey. 

Dr. J. G. Ross. Dr. F. B. Swift 

Dr. V. D. Lesplnasse. 

The Dispensary Is In Davis Hall, which was constructed 
especially for an out-patient hospital, and contains accommoda- 
tions as complete as any other Institution of Its kind In the 
country. Between twenty-three and twenty-five thousand patients 
are treated In this dispensary annually. 

Small classes of students are trained by the physicians In 
charge of the respective departments, in the details of physical 
diagnosis. A record of the attendance of each student at these 



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240 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

clinics is preserved and is used in estimating his clinical record. 
For dispensary courses, see the several departments of In- 
struction. 



CHICAGO LYING-IN HOSPITAL AND DISPENSARY. 

The course of instruction offered by this institution Is both 
clinical and didactic. Each senior student of this Medical School 
is required to take a course of two weeks' duration, which affords 
him an opportunity personally to conduct from six to ten labors, 
under the supervision of the resident staff. He is also required 
to give personal attention to the mother and child during the 
puerperium. 

The fee for the course is fifteen dollars, which is payable in 
advance to the Chicago Lying-in Hospital. 

The work is both in- and out-door, students caring for cases 
in the Hospital at 294 Ashland Boulevard, and in the Dispensary 
service, which is carried on from 298 Maxwell Street. The Dis- 
pensary is situated in the most thickly populated district of 
Chicago, and its work is done in the homes of the patients. 

Over 1,100 patients are confined in this service yearly — 150 in 
the Hospital and 950 in the Dispensary. Only students from the 
Northwestern University Medical School are permitted to take 
this service, students from other medical schools in Chicago not 
being eligible. 



COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is situated at the corner of Wood and Harrison 
Streets. The daily average number of patients is between nine 
hundred and a thousand. 

The Cook County Hospital, being a public institution, is open 
to all medical schools for clinical instruction. A number of medi- 
cal schools have been located in its vicinity, and the number of 
students attending clinics at this hospital aggregates about two 
thousand, there frequently being three hundred at one clinic. 

The representatives of the Faculty of Northwestern University 
Medical School on the Cook County Hospital Staff are: 

In Medicine— Professors Mix, Preble, and Dr. W. S. Harpola 

In Children's Diseases — Professor F. X. Walls. 

In Nervous and Mental Diseases — Professor Julius Qrlnker. 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 241 

In Obstetrics — ^Professor Reed. 

In Surgery — Professor Andrews, Schroeder, and Dr. F. A. 
Besley. 

In Ear, Nose, and Throat— Professor Allport and Dr. Marquis. 

The Cook County Hospital Clinics by members of this faculty 
are given every Friday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. to the students 
In the Junior Class. The annual ticket is five dollars. 



HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS. 

There are four interneshlps at Wesley Hospital each year, 
twelve at Mercy Hospital, four at St. Luke's Hospital, twenty- 
seven at Cook County Hospital, five at Alexian Brothers' Hos- 
pital, three at the Michael Reese Hospital, two at St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, two at Chicago Hospital, two at Provident Hospital. 
one at the Passavant Hospital, one at the Chicago Policlinic, one 
at the Postgraduate Medical School, and six at the Chicago 
Lying-in Hospital. For hospital appointments secured in 1905 
see page 417. 



For further information relating to the Medical School, ad- 
dresa the Secretary of the Northwestern University Medical 
School, 2431 Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



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THE LAW SCHOOL 

Chicago. 



FACULTY.* 



John Henrt Wiomobe, A.M., LL*.B., Dean, Professor of Law. 

fHABVKT BosTWicK HuBD, LL.D., Profcssor Emeritus of Law. 

Chables Cheney Htde, A.M., LKB., Associate Professor of Law. 

Albebt Mabtin Kales, A.B., LL.B., Associate Professor of Law. 

Samuel Adams, A.B., LKB., Professor in the Law of Procedure 
and Practice. 

John Henbt Sheldon Lee, A.B., LL.B., Professor in the Law of 
Crimes and Criminal Procedure. 

Chables Geoboe Little, B.S., LKB., Associate Professor of Law. 

Henbt Sohofield, A.M., LLkB., Professor of Law. 

LoTTiB May Gbeelet, A.B., Professor in the Law of Conveyancing, 
Mortgages, Carriers, and Commercial Paper. 

Levi Habfeb Fulleb, B.S., LL.B., Professor in the Law of Proce 
dure and Practice. 

Fbbdebio Campbell Woodward, A.M., LL.M., Professor of Law. 

Chables Clabence Linthicum, LL.B., Professor in the Law of 
Patents. 

Mitchell Davis Follansbee, A.B., LL.B., Professor in the Law of 
Procedure and Practice, Lecturer on Legal Bthics. 

Chables Btbd Bldeb, LL.B., Instructor in the Law of Extraor- 
dinary Legal Remedies and Judgments. 

Henbt Clat Hall, B.S., LL.B., Instructor in the Law of Insur- 
ance, 



Ebenezer Washington Engstbom, A.B., Lecturer on Voice Train- 
ing and Forensics. 



*With the exception of the Dean, arranged in each croup In the 
order of seniority of appointment. 
fDeceased. 

242 



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THB LAW SCHOOL. 243 

Henrt Lee Pbescott, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on ForenMics. 

Joseph Thomas Robebt, Lecturer on Parliamentary Law. 

Chaujbs Bbnbst Pickabd, A.B., Lecturer on Trade-Mark and 
Copyright, 

Chables Toe Fbeeman, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Corporation 
Practice, 

Hebbebt Jacob Fbiedman, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Liens. 

DwioHT St. John Bobb, A.M., LL.B., Lecturer on Public Service 
Corporations, 

Joseph Igkatius Keixt, Ph.D., C.E., JAmB.,, Lecturer on Roman 
Law, 

JoHif Mazot Zane, A.B., Lecturer on Legal History and Biog- 
raphy, 

AuBED William Bats, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on General Practice, 



Fbedebic Beebs Cbossley, LL.B., Secretary of the School and of 
the Faculty, 



LOCATION. 

The Law School is in the Northwestern University 
Building, on the southeast comer of Dearborn and Lake 
Streets, Chicago, within a short distance from all State and 
Federal Courts. It occupies the entire third floor of the 
building, having a floor space of about twenty-three thou- 
sand square feet, approximately the equivalent of a three- 
story building seventy-five feet by one hundred feet in 
dimensions. The quarters are commodious and handsomely 
equipped, and include two lecture rooms, a court room, an 
alumni room, a students' assembly room, several private 
studies for the school law clubs and for similar purposes, 
the usual office rooms and professors' rooms, and a library 
and reading room occupying five thousand square feet of 
floor space. A description of Northwestern University 
Building will be found on page 60. 



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244 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

FOUNDING AND PURPOSE OF THE LAW SCHOOL. 

The Law School was founded in 1859, there being at the 
time but three similar schools west of the Allegheny Moun- 
tains. For many years it was known as the Union College 
of Law, and was under the joint control of the old Univer- 
sity of Chicago and Northwestern University, but upon 
being taken over wholly by Northwestern University in 
1891 it assumed its present name. 

The School offers to students coming from all parts of 
the country a thorough training in the various subjects of 
tlie law. The course of study is arranged so as to give 
students that knowledge of the law which will be indispen- 
sable to them wherever they may practice. Special oppor- 
tunities, however, are afforded for acquiring a knowledge 
of the law of Illinois, the peculiarities of which are pointed 
out in every course. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission to the Law School as regular 
students must meet the following requirements : 

1. They must be not less than eighteen years of age. 
*2. They must present evidence of a preliminary general 
education equivalent to that of a graduate of a high school in 
Illinois. 

*3. Where the applicant does not possess a diploma showing 
graduation from an approved high school, certificates showing the 
completion of satisfactory courses in the following subjects will 
be accepted for admission: 

Algebra, geometry, ancient history, physiology, rhetoric, 
physics, and physical geography, each one year; botany and 
bookkeeping, one year: medirTval and modern history, with spe- 
cial reference to English and American history, one year; English 
and American literature, one year; and English composition, one 
year. 

' In case the applicant has failed to complete any one or more 
of the studies enumerated abore, he may substitute for it an 

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THE LAW SCHOOL. 245 

equivalent amount of any science or any ancient or modem lan- 
guage, Latin being especially recommended. This does not apply, 
however, to English and American history or literature, for 
which subjects no substitutes will be accepted. 

4. A certificate showing that the applicant has passed the 
examinations for admission as a regular student to the College 
of Liberal Arts of this University, or to any college in good 
standing, will be accepted as sufficient proof of the required pre- 
liminary education. 

^Commencinff September 1, 1907, the requirement will be elianged 
as follows: All candidates for a degree shall at the time of their ad- 
mission to the school present proof of the completion of a four years' 
hlgli school course, or such an equivalent as would be accepted for ad- 
mission to the CoUegre of Liberal Arts of this University. 

Students are advised, whenever it is possible, to pursue at 
least a partial college course before commencing the study of law. 
Nearly forty per cent of the students in the law school hold 
academic degrees, and about seventy-five per cent of the total 
number have spent one or more years in college before entering 
the law school. 



TIME FOR ENTRANCE. 

Unless coming from another law school, no applicant 
will be admitted to the first-year class after the second week 
in January, and all students are strongly urged to enter at 
the beginning of the year. The disadvantages of late regis- 
tration are especially embarrassing to students who intend 
to practice law in Illinois. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

The regulations affecting admission to advanced stand- 
ing are given under the requirements for degrees on page 
259. 



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246 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Persons not desiring to become candidates for a degree 
may pursue one or more courses as special students, pro- 
vided they are qualified to pursue such courses to advan- 
tage. They will receive a certificate of all work done, and 
may at any time enter as candidates for a degree, provided 
they are qualified under the above requirements. No special 
student may take more than twenty-five term-hours of work 
in one year without special permission from the Dean. 

COMBINED COURSES. 

The conditions on which a student may combine a course 
in the College of Liberal Arts with a course in Law, and 
receive both degrees in six years, are stated on page 159. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 
First Year — First Term. 

Contracts — Keener*s Cases on Ck>ntract8. Three hours a week. 

Professor Woodwahd. 
Tort8 — ^Ames's and Smith's Cases on Torts. Thre« hours a 
week. 

Professor V(^igmobe. 
Property (I) — Gray's Cases on Property, Vols. I, II. (Per- 
sonal property; tenures and estates in real property; fixtures, 
profits, easements, covenants, running with land, rents.) Two 
hours a week. 

Professor Kales. 
Common Law Pleading and Procedure — ^Ames's Cases on 
Pleading; Martin's Civil Procedure. Two hours a week. 
Professor Adams. 
Crimes and Criminal Procedure — Beale's Cases on Criminal 
F^aw. Two hours a week. 
Professor Lkk. 



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THB LAW SCHOOLu 247 

First Year — Second Term. 

Contracti (continued) — ^Three hours a week. 

Professor Woodwabd. 
Torts (continued)— Two hours a week. 

Professor Wigmobe. 
Property (I) (continued)— Two hours a week. 

Professor Kales. 
Common Law Pleading and Procedure (continued)— Lectures 
and practical exercises. One hour a week. 

Professor Adams. 

Master and Servant in Tor*— Wambaugh's Cases on Agency. 
One hour a week. 

Professor Wigmobe. 
Damages — ^Beale's Cases on Damages. One hour a week. 
Professor Schofield. 

Second Year — FIrtt Term. 

Evidence — ^Wigmore's Clases on Evidence. Two hours a week. 

Professor Wigmobe. 
Trusts — ^Amee'B Cases on Trusts. Three hours a week. 

Professor Woodwabd. 
J.aeiicy— Wambaugh's Cases on Agency. Two hours a week. 

Professor Littlb. 

Commercial Paper — ^Ames's Cases on Bills and Notes. Three 
hours a week. 

Professor Gbxelet. 
Bquity Jurisdiction — Ames's Cases on Equity Jurisdiction. 
Three hours a week. 

Professor Sohofikld. 
Property (II) — Gray's Cases on Property, Vols. Ill, IV. (Ac- 
quisitlon of real property inter Tives, including deeds, covenants, 
etc.; devolution of property at death, including descent, wills, 
administration, etc.) Two hours a week. 
Professor Kales. 
Persons (Domestic Relations) — Smith's Cases on Persons. 
Two hours a week. 

Professor Kales. 



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248 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Second Year — Second Term. 

Evidence (continued) — Two hours a week. 

Professor Wigmobe. 
Property (11) (continued) — Two hours a week. 

Professor Kales. 
Equity Jurisdiction (continued) — Ames's Gases on Equity 
Jurisdiction. Three hours a week. 
Professor Schofield. 
Quaai-Oontracts — Keeners's Cases on Quasi-Contracts. Three 
hours a week. [Given in 1906-07, and in alternate years.] 
Professor Woodwaed. 
Sales of Personalty — Willlston's Cases on Sales. Three hours 
a week. [Given in 1905-06, and In alternate years.] 
Professor Woodwaed. 
Insurance (Fire and Life) — Wambaugh's Cases on Insurance. 
Two hours a week. 
Mr. Hall. 
Equity Pleading and Procedure — Thompson's Cases on Equity 
Pleading; and practical exercises. Two hours a week. 
Professor Adams. 
Public Service Corporations— '{R&ilTO&d, Gas, Telegraph, 
Water, Warehouse, and similar services.) One hour a week. 
Beale's and Wy man's Cases on Public Service Corporations. 
Mr. BoBB. 
Liens — One hour a week. Selected cases. 
Mr. Friedman. 

Third Yeai^-First Term. 

Corporations — Smith's Cases on Corporations. Two hours a 
week. 

Professor Little. 
Procedure and Practice in Illinois — Two hours a week. 

Professor Follansbee. 
International Law (I) — Scott's Cases on International Law. 
Two hours a week. 

Professor Htdk. 
International Law (II) — American Treaties and Diplomacy; 
topics for research. Two hours a week. 
Professor Htdb. 



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THB LAW SCHOOL. 249 

iSnretysMp— -Ames's Cases on Suretyship. Two hours a week. 

Professor Lfitle. 
Judgments and Auxiliary Legal Remedies (Attachments, Gar- 
nishment, Execution, etc.) — Rood's Cases on Attachments and 
Judgments. One hour a week. 
Mr. Elder. 
Oonstitutional Law — Thayer's Cases on Constitutional Law. 
Three hours a week. 

Professor Schofield. 
Property (III) — Gray's Cases on Property, Vols. V, VI. (Con- 
ditional and future Interests; restraints on alienation; fraudu- 
lent transfers; registration of deeds; conversion and election; 
joint ownership; curtesy and dower; homestead.) Two hours 
a week. 

Professor Kaixs. 
Conveyancing — Drafting exercises, study of selected abstracts, 
and lectures on practice. One hour a week. 
Professor Gbeelet. 
Conflict of Laws — Beale's Cases on Conflict of Laws. Three 
hours a week. 

Professor Htdb. 
Code Pleading and Procedure — Cases on Code Pleading. One 
hour a week. 

Professor Woodwabd. 
Roman Law — One hour a week. Kelly's Select Letters from 
Justinian's Pandects, 
lir. KsLLT. 
Practice Court — Otuses prepared and conducted through all 
details of litigation, by students as attorneys and counselors, 
under the direction of a professor as Judge. Two hours a week, 
at a single session. 

Professor Pulleb. 
Patents of Invention: 

(I) — General Survey. Five lectures. 

Professor LnrrHicuM. 
(II) — ^Patent Soliciting. Twenty lectures, with practical 
exercises. 
Professor Dybenfobth. 
(Ill) — ^Patent Law and Practice. Forty lectures. 
Professor Babnett. 



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260 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Pftrts II and III will not be given, unless at least twenty spe- 
cial students apply for them before October 16. 

Th«te three form a single course. Part I Is open to all students; 
Parts II and III are open to students of the second and third years, and 
to special students, but cannot be taken separately. The number of lec- 
tures is equlyalent to two hours a week through the year, and work In 
the course will be credited as four term hours. 

Third Year — Second Term. 

OorporationM (continued) — Two hours a week. 

Professor Little. 
Corporation Practice — (Exercises in conducting corporate 
legal business, drafting Instruments, etc.) One hour a week. 

Bir. Fbeeman. 
BanXtruptcy— Williston's Cases on Bankruptcy. Two hours a 
week. 

Professor Woodwabd. 
Oon^titutional Law (continued) — Two hours a week. 

Professor Schofield. 
Carriers — ^McClain's Cases on Carriers. Two hours a week. 

Professor Gbeelet. 
Conveyancing (continued) — One hour a week. 

Professor Gbeelet. 

Mortgages — Kirchwey's Cases on Mortgages. Two hours a 
week. 

Professor Gbeelet. 
Puhlic Officers — One hour a week. [Given in 1906-06, and in 
alternate years.] 

Professor Schofield. 
Practice Court (continued) — Two hours a week, at a single 
session. 

Professor Fulleb. 
Property (III) (continued) — Two hours a week. 

Professor Kales. 
Municipal Corporations — Smith's Cases on Municipal Corpora- 
tions. One hour a week. 

Professor Schofield. 
Partnership — ^Ames's Cases x)n Partnership. Two hours a 
week. 

Professor Little. 



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THE LAW SCHOOL. 251 

Extraordinary Legal Remedies (Mandamus, Quo Warranto, 
Habeaa Corpus, etc.) — One hour a week. 

lir. Elder. 
JwrUdiction of Federal Courts — One hour a week. 

Professor Schofield. 

Tlie total number of term hours offered in this curriculum is 
one hundred and flye, the equivalent of nearly flfty-three hours 
a week through the year. 

The courses being graded as carefully as possible between the 
three year-groups, no first-year student may take courses in the 
second or third year-groups without special permission; and no 
second year student may take courses in the third year-group 
(exeept Constitutional Law and Patents of Invention) without 
special permission. A third-year student taking the courses of 
ConTeyancing and Property III must already have taken the 
courses of Property I and II. 

Any regular student may take any course offered in the group 
of \he year for which he is entered, or any course not already 
taken by him in a preceding year. 

O0UBSB8 OF LECTUBXS NOT COUNTING TOWARD A DEOREC 

Trade-MarkM and Copyrights — Six lectures. 

MR.PICKARD. 

General Review — Given twice, in September and April, prior 
to the State examination for admission to the bar. Five hours a 
week for a month. 
Mr. Batb. 
Legal JV^T^Ict— Five lectures. 
Professor Foij[.anbree. 

SPBOIAL TRAIlfINO IN LBQAL WRITING AND SPEAKING AND IN THE PRAC- 
TICE OF THE LAW. 

In addition to the systematic instruction in the body of the 
law, as represented in the foregoing curriculum, an effort is made 
to provide adequate training in the practical use of legal knowl- 
edge and discipline, as well as in certain important details of 
legal writing and speaking, which help materially to equip the 
aooomplished lawyer. The various branches of work directed to 
this end are as follows: 

L ^leadings and Other Instruments — In the courses on Com- 
mon Law Pleading, Code Pleading, and Equity Pleading, Jn addi-^ 

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252 NORTHWBSTBJRN UNIVERSITY. 

tion to the systematic coarse of study, the student is given exer- 
cises In the drafting of the various kinds of pleadings. In Ck>r- 
porations, the class is formed, during the second term, into two 
corporations, which organize, elect officers, issue stock, enlarge 
capital, keep books, consolidate, and do various other acts of cor- 
porate business which call for the drafting of instruments and 
otherwise familiarize the student with the modes of using the 
legal knowledge acquired. In the other courses, particular atten- 
tion is paid to the study of forms of instruments in common use. 

2. Conveyancina — In the course of conveyancing the chief 
material of the work consists in a series of selected abstracts of 
title, some fifteen in all, representing the greatest variety of 
documents and proceedings involving property rights. A separate 
copy of each abstract is placed in the hands of every member of 
the class, and a detailed study is made of the various matters of 
form and substance from the conveyancer's point of view, and 
with r^ard to the laws of the difPerent States. Thorough work 
in this course ought to equip the student as a practical convey- 
ancer at the time of his entering upon his profession. No one 
may take this course who has not already taken the courses 
Property I and II. 

3. Practice Court — In the several courses of lectures on Pro- 
cedure and Practice a systematic and detailed survey is taken of 
the rules of law. In the Practice Court an opportunity is given to 
the third-year students to become practically familiar with these 
rules by the personal application of them in litigation managed by 
the student himself. The Court's sessions are held weekly, on 
Thursday evenings, for two hours. During each session from one 
to three cases are tried, with and without a jury; and other cases 
are disposed of in various aspects. In the meantime, between the 
sessions, numbers of causes are being prepared and advanced 
from stage to stage by the student-attorneys in charge. While 
the proceedings are dispatched, at the hearings, by the respective 
attorneys, all other member of the class are required to attend 
and make notes and reports of the work being done, so that each 
one obtains some benefit also from what is done in his presence 
by others. A faithful observance of the work of this course ought 
to give the graduate such an experience in using his legal knowl- 
edge as will assist him materially to start in his profession with 
greater readiness and practical facility. The systematic pursuit 



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THE LAW SCHOOL. 253 

of such work under an experienced instructor obtains for the stu- 
dent the same results as a period of desultory service in a law 
office, and is more economical in time and more thorough and ac- 
curate in quality. A copy of the printed Rules of the Practice 
Court will be mailed to any one upon request. 

4. Legal Tactics — On every Monday evening until April, an 
address Is given, by some well-known member of the Bar, upon 
some topic of practice in which he has had special experience, 
and in which the communication of personal experience is of spe- 
cial value as a guide to others. This course has been of particular 
value to young practitioners already at the Bar and Is repeated 
year by year with numerous variations of topics and of speakers. 
A list of the addresses for each year is printed in the August 
Bulletin of the School. 

6. Thesis — It is the desire of the Faculty to encourage orig- 
inal research by students. Any member of the third-year class 
may therefore obtain credit to an amount not exceeding two term 
hours by presenting a satisfactory thesis upon some legal topic 
approved by a member of the Faculty before December 1st. The 
thesis must be presented on or before May 15th of the year in 
which the student expects to graduate; it must be printed on the 
typewriter or otherwise, and is to be kept permanently in the 
school. The work should be begun not later than December. 

6. Legal Forensics — The function of a lawyer, as the per- 
suasive adviser and leader of men, needs for its development some 
training in oral argument and debate, use of the voice, conduct of 
meetings, and the like. A course of training in Forensic Writing 
and Speaking is offered in this school and the work of the course 
is required for graduation. Persons entering the school with ad- 
vanced standing who have not taken equivalent work elsewhere 
are subject to the remaining requirements, applicable to the class 
which they enter, except that a candidate for a degree in one year 
may be exempted from specified parts of the work, or may be re- 
quired to substitute the second year for the third year work. 

Credit of one term-hour is given for work done, and the course 
is as follows: 

FiBST Yeab. 

a. Parliamentary Practice; November; (1) Elementary 
course, followed by examination; (2) advanced course, followed 
by an examination or thesis; this to be open only to not more 



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264 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSITT. 

than twenty students passing the best examination in the ele- 
mentary course, and not to be a required part of the work. 

h. Voice Training; October and November; exercises in sec- 
tions of twelve or fifteen, once a week. 

c. Legal Argumentation and Briefs; November to April, in- 
clusive, once a week; not more than twenty lectures on Argu- 
mentation, accompanied by individual exercises In Brief-writing, 
subject to private correction and public criticism by the in- 
structor. 

d. Oral Forensics; May; the last two weeks before the final 
examinations; all first year regular lecture courses ceasing, the 
corresponding hours are to be occupied by Oral Forsenics in each 
course. 

SEOoxn> Yeab. 

a. Moot Courts. For second year students a Moot Court is 
held every Friday from November 1 to May 1, the class being 
divided Into two sections, A and B, each section to meet in alter- 
nate weeks. The work consists of the preparation and delivery 
of arguments and opinions of law on statements of facts assigned 
beforehand. Special regulations for the conduct of the court are 
found in the Bulletin of the Law School. 

h. Public Debate. A student entering the preliminary con- 
tests for the Towle Prizes for Public Speaking who is selected for 
the second preliminary and takes part in this contest, may receive 
a credit of one term hour. No student shall be eligible for this 
contest who has not taken the work of the first year a, h, and c« 
or the equivalent in another School. 

Thibo Teab. 

Legal Advice Clubs. All third year students enter Legal 
Advice Clubs, formed by voluntary selection on or before October 
10, supplemented by assignments to vacancies by the Secretary 
of the School; each club contains not less than four nor more 
than six members. Difllcult cases arising in actual practice, sent 
in for advice by alumni or other practitioners, will be submltte<l 
to the clubs In rotation as the cases come in. 



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THE LAW SCHOOL. 265 

Pr««cribed Course of Reading in Legal History, Biograpiiy, and 
Jurisprudence. 

Ooune A. (First Year). Introduction to Legal History and 
tbe Study of tlie Law. Materials for prescribed reading: 

(a) Blackstone's Commentaries (any edition) ; Introduc- 
tion, Sections 1-4; Book I, Chapters 1, 2, 5, 9; Book III, Chapters 
3, 4, 5, 6, 7; Book I, Chapters 11,. 12; Book III, Chapters 17-19, 
20-24, 26, 26, 27; Book IV, Chapters 19-24, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32; Book 
II, Chapters 4, 6; Book IV, Chapter 33. 

(b) WoodrufTs Introduction to the Study of Law. 

(c) Wambaugh's Study of Cases. 

Course B, (Second Year). History of the Bench and Bar. 
Materials for prescribed reading: 

(a) Campbell's Lives of the Chancellors (beginning with the 
life of Lord Hardwicke), and (b) of the following biographies, 
any one of the English and any two of the American works: 
Campbell's Lives of the Chief Justices (beginning with Lord 
Holt); Amould's Life of Lord Denman; Autobiography of Lord 
Campbell; O'Brien's Life of Lord Russell; Life and Letters of 
Joseph Story; Harvey's Reminiscences (or Lodge's Life) of Dan- 
iel Webster; Brown's Life (or Neilson's Memories) of Rufus 
Choate; Memoirs and Letters of James Kent; Memoirs of S. S. 
Prentiss; Caton's Bench and Bar of Illinois; Carson's History of 
the Federal Supreme Court; Magruder's Life of John Marshall. 

Course BB. (Second Year; Optional). History of the Eng- 
lish Legal System, Materials for reading: (a) Pollock and Mait- 
land's History of the English Law, Volume 1; and (b) any one of 
the following works: Pollock and Maitland's History, Volume 2; 
Holmes's Common Law; Stephen's History of the Criminal Law; 
Selected Essays on Legal History (as contained in the list on file 
in the office of the School.) 

Course C. (Third Year.) 1. Jurisprudence. Materials: any 
one work under each of the following two divisions: (a) Analyti- 
cal Jurisprudence: Austin's Jurisprudence; Holland's Jurispru- 
dence; Terry's Principles of Anglo- American Law. (b) Histori- 
cal Jurisprudence: Maine's Ancient Law; Fustel de Coulange's 
Ancient City; Lee's Historical Jurisprudence; or 

2. International Law. Materials as prescribed in the regular 
course of lectures. International Law 1; or 

3. Roman Law. Materials: Any one of the following texts: ^ 



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256 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Gaius* Institutes, edited by Poste; Justinian's Institutes, 
edited and translated by Moyle; Selected Titles from Justinian's 
Pandects, edited and translated by Kelly (this being the text used 
in Mr. Kelly's course of lectures given in the school) ; or 

4. History of Germanic Lavo, Materials: Any one of the 
following works: Heusler's Instltutionen des deutschen Reehts; 
Brunner's Deutsche Rechtsgescfaichte; Brissaud's Manuel d'his- 
toire du droit francais. 

Regulations for the foregoing work: 

(1) For graduation, a credit of not less than Grade C, aver- 
aged for the whole three courses, must have been obtained in 
Course A, Course B, and Course C, 1, or 2, or 3, or 4. 

(2) A credit of one term hour will be given on passing the 
examination in each one of the above courses of reading, as well 
as in the optional Course BB. A student may cumulate these 
credits, by passing in Course BB or Course C, 2, 3, or 4, or all, in 
addition to the required minimum of three courses prescribed 
under Rule 1, above. 

(3) An examination will be held at the beginning of the first 
term of the year and at the end of the second term in all of the 
courses, and, for Course A, also at the end of the first term, but 
notice must be filed in the Secretary's Office at least two days be- 
fore the announced date of examination by each student intending 
to take it 

(4) Students are urged to do the required reading during 
the summer vacation, and thus avoid carrying the work in con- 
nection with the regular curriculum. 

A student failing at any examination may take the next regu- 
lar examination, if he has reviewed the work. 

A student may take any of these examinations at any time 
after entering the School, no matter to what class he belongs. 

A student entering with advanced standing need not take 
Course A. 

(5) A student who, at a college or a Law School, has already 
obtained credit for work equivalent to Course C, 1, 2, 3, or 4, will 
be given credit for that Course as required in this School; but 
may also obtain credit by doing the work of any remaining 
Courses not elsewhere taken. 

(6) No lectures are given in any of these Courses (except 
C, 2 and 4, the lecture courses of International Law and Roman 
Law). The work is done by private study, but the courses are 



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THE LAW SCHOOL. 267 

under the supervision of the Dean, who will give any desired ad- 
vice on the subjects of study. 

(7) The credit in any of the Courses C will count as one of 
the required ten term hours of the third year. 

(8) Students are recommended to own the boolcs named, if 
they can afford to purchase them. But the School Will provide a 
sufficient number of duplicate copies of the books named for the 
prescribed reading. 

(9) The requirement of the above Courses for graduation ap- 
plies to students entering the School after June i, 1D05, and to no 
others. 



THE LIBRARY. 

The library is well equipped for study and research. 
It at present comprises the United States Reports, all of the 
official State Reports to the Reporter System and the official 
Reports of the leading states complete, the complete Na- 
tional Reporter System, the Lawyers' Reports Annotated, 
all of the official Illinois Reports in duplicate, statutes of all 
the States in the Union, a large collection of digests, en- 
cyclopedias and text-hooks; and, in addition, the Chicago 
Law Institute collection of works on Jurisprudence, So- 
ciology, and Legal Biography, consisting of some 4.000 vol- 
umes, is stored in the School's Library. Of the English 
R«I>ort8 it possesses the complete Law Reports since 1865, 
substantially all the remaining Reports since the beginning 
of the Year Books (except those appearing in law jour- 
nals), and the complete Statutes. It has also begun a collec- 
tion of early historical legal literature, which is planned to 
include all such material not now elsewhere accessible in the 
libraries of the West. The Gary Collection of Treatises, 
Reports, and Statutes of Continental Law, now installed, 
includes the jurisprudence of the twenty-one European 
countries, as contained in statutes, decisions, journals, and 
treatises, and is not paralleled in scope by any other col- 
lection in the United States. As a source of investigation 



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268 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

for Continental Law it will provide facilities hitherto 
wholly unavailable. 

GRADES OF SCHOLARSHIP AND RECORD. 

Pour grades of record are given for work done. These 
are as follows: A, excellent; B, satisfactory; C, unsatis- 
factory; D, failure. A student may not count, toward 
meeting the requirements for a degree, a course in which he 
obtains grade C, except he obtain grade A in another 
course or courses of equivalent amount; and except that 
he may count courses in which he obtains grade C to the 
extent of one-sixth of the total work required for a degree. 

SCHEDULE OF HOURS. 

The schedule of hours is so arranged that the courses 
are given in general as follows : 

First year courses, between two and five o'clock in the after- 
noon; second year courses, between nine and twelve o'clock in the 
morning; third year courses, between three and seven o'clock in 
the afternoon. The Practice Court is held in the evening at half 
past seven. 

PRIZES. 

1. The Toiole Prizes, — A first prize of one hundred dollars, 
and a second prize of fifty dollars, the gift of Henry Sargent 
Towle, Bsq., Chairman of the Law School Committee of the Board 
of Trustees, will be awarded to the students who have taken the 
course in Forensic Writing and Speaking (first year a, b, c, and 
d), who shall, in public competition at the completion of the 
course, be adjudged most proficient in the work of the course. 

2. The Callaghan Prize. — A prize of fifty dollars in books, to 
be selected from their own publications, the gift of Messrs. Cal- 
laghan and Company, of Chicago, will be awarded annually to 
the member of the graduating class having the best record in 
scholarship for the entire course. 



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THE LAW SCHOOL. 269 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES. 

Bachelor of Laws. 

The following are the requirements for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws : 

1. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws must be 
recommended for that degree by the Faculty of the Law School. 
Only candidates of good moral character, who have fulfilled all 
the requirements, will be recommended. 

2. Candidates must have been in regular attendance at this 
Law School for three years, except that (a) Students who have 
studied law for one year, either in a college, or in a law school, 
may obtain a degree in two years; (b) Students who have satis- 
factorily completed two years' study in a law school of good 
standing may obtain a degree in one year; and (c) Students who 
hare satisfactorily completed one year's study in a law school of 
good standing, and who have also studied law for one year either 
in a college or a law school, may become candidates for a degree 
in one year by obtaining special permission from the Dean. 

8. Candidates for a degree must register for work amounting 
to at least eleven hours a week for each year, except in the third 
year, when at least ten hours a week is required. 

4. All candidates for a degree must pass examinations in 
courses of study amounting to sixty-six term-hours (the equivar 
lent of eleven hours a week for three years) ; provided that in 
reckoning the required number of term-hours for graduation, 
there must be included at least ten hours of work in each term 
of the third year. 

Persons who have satisfactorily completed a two-years' course 
of study in a law school in good standing will be excused from 
one-half of the examinations above required. 

Persons who have satisfactorily completed less than two 
years' study of law in a college or law school in good standing, 
may be given credit for this work and be excused from these ex- 
aminations to such extent as shall be determined in each case by 
the Dean. The specific subjects in which such credit may be 
given will be stated by the Secretary at the time of admission. 



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260 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Master's Degree in Arts or Sciences. 

A graduate of the College of Liberal Arts of this University, 
or of some other in which the requirements for the Bachelor's 
degrees are equivalent to the requirements for the same degree at 
this University, may obtain the Master's degree at the same time 
as the degree of Bachelor of Laws by pursuing advanced work in 
subjects approved by the Faculty of the College of Liberal Arts, 
and obtaining credit therefor to the amount of twelve semester- 
hours, and presenting a satisfactory thesis on an approved topic. 

The courses of study may, in whole or in part, deal with legal 
subjects; but courses of legal study, in order to count for the de- 
gree, must be (a) of an advanced nature; (b) not counted for the 
degree of^Bachelor of Laws; (c) pursued under the direction of a 
member of the Faculty of the Law School. 

Students in law, intending to become candidates for the Mas- 
ter's degree, must register for the same in the College of Liberal 
Arts and in the Law School on or before the first Monday in 
October of the year in which they expect to graduate, and must 
pay the diploma fee of ten dollars. The Master's degree is open 
upon the same terms to graduates of the Law School who register 
before the October next following the completion of their profes- 
sional course. 

The following subjects have been approved by the Faculty of 
Liberal Arts, and work therein may be counted for the Master's 
degree: Constitutional Law, International Law, Administrative 
Law, Roman Law, Jurisprudence. Legal History. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Eight scholarships of the annual value of one hundred 
dollars are assigned each year to worthy candidates. The 
holders are held responsible for certain duties in the library 
or offices of the school, under the direction of the faculty. 
Applications for appointment should be addressed to the 
Secretary of the Law School. 



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THE LAW SCHOOL. 261 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Matriculation Fee — In all cases of first registracion a 
matriculation fee of five dollars is charged. This fee is 
paid but once and is not returnable under any circum- 
stances. 

Regular Students — The tuition fee for regular students 
is one hundred and five dollars a year. 

This fee is payable In three Installments of thirty-five dollars 
each, October Ist, January 10th, and April Ist. A rebate of flye 
dollars is allowed to students who pay the entire tuition in ad- 
vance on October Ist. 

Special Students — Special students are charged at the 
rate of five dollars for each hour of class-room work for a 
half year. The fee for the course in Patent Law is twenty- 
five dollars; for the course in General Review the fee is 
ten dollars to members or graduates of this School, to all 
others, fifteen dollars. 

To students entering the Law School for the first time In 
September, 1907, the tuition fee for regular students will be one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars, and for special students the 
tuition fee will be six dollars for each hour of class room woric 
for a half-year. 

Oraduation Fee — A fee of ten dollars is charged all 
persons taking the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

Refunds — No refimd of tuition fees can be made ex- 
T'cpt in cases of serious illness. In that event, tuition fees 
paid in excess of those for the half-semester on which the 
student has entered will be refunded on the certificate of 
the Dean that the student is in good standing, and of a 
]>hysician that he is unable to remain in attendance. 



All fees should be paid in currency or in Chicago exchange. 



For further Information concerning the Law School, address 
Northwestern University Law School, Lake and Dearborn 
Streets, Chicago. 

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THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

Chicago. 



FACULTY. 



OsoAB Oldbebq, Phabm. D., Dean, Professor of Pharmacy, 

William Edwabd Quine, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Physiology, 
Therapeutics, and Toxicology, 

Habbt Mann Gobdin, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, 

Raymond Haines Pond, Ph.D., Professor of Botany, Pharmacog- 
nosy, and Bacteriology, 

Maubicb Asubel J^ineb, Phabm. M.» Curator, Assistant Professor 
of Pharmacy, 

Charles Waooeneb Pattebson, B.S., Ph.C., Registrar, Assistant 
Professor of Analytical Pharm^KCutical Chemistry, 

*Habbt Kahn, Phabm. M., M.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology 
and Materia Medica. 

Davh) Charles Eccijes, B.S., A.M., Secretary, Assistant Professor 
of Chemistry, 

Henbt Baboom Thomas. M.D., Lecturer on Physiology and 
Materia Medica, 

GuBTAYE Ernst Fbedebick Lundell, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Gerhard H. Jensen, B.S., Instructor in Botany and Pharmacog- 
nosy, 

Gborob Daniel Oglesby, Ph.G., Instructor in Pharmacy, 

William Henry Harbison, Ph.C, Assistant in Chemistry, 

Charles Roland Clothier, Ph.C, Assistant in Pharm^acy, 



Ernest Woollett, Clerk, Tutor in Business Methods, 
Clara Adelina Davis, Library Assistant. 



•On toare of absence. 



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THE SCHOOL OP PHARMACY. 268 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT. 

The School of Pharmacy was established in 1886. Its 
rooms are in Northwestern University Building, at the 
comer of Lake and Dearborn Streets, Chicago, occupying 
the whole of the fourth floor and a part of the fifth floor of 
that building. 

It is a member of the American Conference of Pharma- 
ceutical Faculties, and its graduates are given recognition 
under the pharmacy laws of New York and Pennsylvania, 
the only States in which graduation from formally recog- 
nized schools of pharmacy is demanded by law as a pre- 
requisite for license to practice pharmacy. 

The twenty-one rooms occupied by the School include 
seven large laboratories, two lecture rooms, balance rooms, 
library and museum, and two students' rooms, all newly 
furnished. The laboratories are : the qualitative laboratory 
with accommodations for three classes of seventy students 
each ; the quantitative laboratory accommodating three sec- 
tions of thirty-six students each ; the laboratory for botany, 
microscopy, and pharmacognosy, the capacity of which is 
sufficient for six sections of forty-eight students each; the 
manufacturing laboratory, where four sections of seventy 
students each are provided for ; the laboratory for organic 
chemistry, having facilities for four sections of twenty- 
eight students each ; the dispensing laboratory, in which six 
sections, each of from twenty-four to thirty-six students, 
may be taught; and the bacteriological laboratory, having 
acconunodations for two sections, each consisting of twenty- 
four students. 

The Museum contains over two thousand specimens of 
drags and other plant substances of industrial importance. 

The Library' occupies two rooms with a floor space of 
six hundred and forty-three square feet. It contains nearly 
one thousand bound volumes, all of permanent value, in- 



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264 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

eluding complete sets of the Archiv der Pharmacie, the 
Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
and the British Pharmaceutical Journal. It also contains 
the Centralblatt from 1870 to date, and Berichte der Chem- 
ischen Gesellschaft from 1868 to date. It also contains, 
complete from 1893 to date, the Berichte der Pharmaceut- 
ischen Gesellschaft Zeitschrift fiir anorganische Chemie, 
Zeitschrift fiir analytische Chemie, the Journal of the 
London Chemical Society, the Archiv fiir Hygiene, Neuste 
Erfindungen und Erfahrungen, Pharmaceutische Central- 
haUe, Repertoire de Pharmacie, etc. Also the pharma- 
copoeias of the world, and the dispensatories and com- 
mentaries on the pharmacopoeias ; dictionaries and encydo- 
pcedias, general and special; pharmaceutical and technical 
formularies; the most valuable reference works upon chem- 
istry, pharmacy, and other related subjects; all of the 
American pharmaceutical journals, etc. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

All candidates for the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy 
must present evidence of having satisfactorily completed 
one year's work in a properly accredited high school, or its 
full educational equivalent. 

Special students not candidates for graduation may be 
admitted by special action of the Faculty. 

Candidates for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chem- 
ist or Master of Pharmacy must be graduates of high 
schools of the best grade or must possess a general education 
equivalent to that required for such graduation. 

Students entering the school with but one year's high 
school work to their credit must be at least eighteen years 
of age ; those having completed two or more years of high 
school work are admitted at an age of not less than seven- 
teen years. 



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THE SCHOOL OP PHARMACY. 265 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 
For the Degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. 

Pharmacy. Materials, methods, and products of pharmacy. 
Pharmacy laws. The Pharmacopceia. Pharmaceutical nomencla- 
ture. The prescription and the art of dispensing. Lectures, text, 
and laboratory work. 

Metrology. Principles. The Metric System. Weighing and 
measuring. Specific Weight. Determinations of mass and volume 
and their relations; study of the instruments employed. 

Microscopy. Construction and use of the microscope. 

Botany. Histology, organography, and taxonomy. Lectures 
and laboratory work. 

Pharmacography, and the study of plant substances employed 
in the industrial arts. Lectures and laboratory work. 

Inorganic ChemxBtry, general, theoretical, and descriptive. 
Lectures, text, and laboratory work. 

Analytical Chemistry. Lectures, text, and laboratory work In 
qualitative and quantitative analysis. 

Organic Chemistry. Lectures, text, and laboratory work. 

Manufacturing. General principles. Materials and products. 
Methods. Lectures and laboratory work. 

Human Anatomy and Physiology. Lectures and text. 

Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and Toxicology. Lectures and 
text 

For the Degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

All of the work included in the course for the degree of Gradu- 
ate in Pharmacy, and in addition: 

Analytical Chemistry. Laboratory work in plant and drug 
analysis, sanitary food and water analysis, valuation of digestive 
preparations, examinations of fats, oils, soaps, etc. 

Urine Analysis. Laboratory work. 

Organic Chemistry. Lectures and text, including a special 
course on alkaloids, glucosides, etc. 



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266 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

PARTIAL COURSES. 

A student may take one or more of the separate courses 
given in the school at proportional fees, and will receive 
full credit for aU such work when satisfactorily done. This 
applies both to the didactic courses and to laboratory work. 
No student will be received into the school for a less period 
than one term. 

ADVANCED CREDITS. 

A student presenting proper evidence of having satis- 
factorily completed in an approved school one or more of 
the courses of study or laboratory work included in the 
curriculum of this school may receive such credit therefor 
as is consistent with the prescribed requirements. 

Students of pharmacy who have completed the first 
year's work in any other pharmaceutical school may, at the 
discretion of the faculty, be admitted to the senior class 
in the course for the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy, but 
no student will be graduated who has not been in regular 
attendance at this school for one full year of thirty-six 
weeks, or two semesters of eighteen weeks each. 

GRADUATION. 

The courses for the degree of Graduate in Phabmagy 
are so arranged that they may be completed in three terms 
of eighteen weeks each. The student may begin his study 
either in September or in February, and take the courses 
in proper logical sequence, graduating in February or in 
June at the end of the term in which his work shall have 
been satisfactorily completed. 

The courses for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chebhst 
are arranged to occupy four terms, or two full years. 

The degree of Master in Pharmacy requires three full 
years' work in the College of Liberal Arts and two years' 



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THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 267 

work in the School of Pharmacy. Students having com- 
pleted the work of three full years of the course leading 
to the Bachelor's degree in the CJollege of Liberal Arts, 
including all required subjects and the work for a major 
and a minor, may obtain the degree of Bachelor of Science 
upon the completion of the work of one year in the School 
of Pharmacy; and the degree of Master of Pharmacy fol- 
lows upon the completion of all of the work for the degree 
of Pharmaceutical Chemist. 



SESSIONS AND VACATIONS. 

The School of Pharmacy is open about ten months in 
each year, that period being divided into two terms, or 
semesters, of eighteen weeks each and one summer term of 
seven weeks. 

The Pall Term begins about the third week of Septem- 
ber and ends early in February. 

The Winter Term begins about the middle of February 
and ends about the middle of June. 

The Summer School opens on the Monday immediately 
preceding the third Thursday in June. 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

The matriculation fee, payable only once and before 
registration, is five dollars. It is not returnable. 

The tuition fee, including drugs and chemicals con- 
sumed in the laboratories, is sixty-five dollars for each 
term of eighteen weeks. 

A charge of two dollars is made for the use of micro- 
8C0i>e8, balances, and other apparatus and for their main- 
tenance and replacement. 

To cover the cost of apparatus lost, destroyed, or dam- 
aged, and damage to building, furniture, or other property. 



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268 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

wilfully or needlessly inflicted, each student is required 
to make a deposit of eight dollars before being assigned 
tables in the laboratories. 

The diploma fee, payable not later than two weeks be- 
fore graduation, is ten dollars. 
All fees should be paid in currency or Chicago exchange. 

BOARD AND ROOMS. 

Board and rooms can be secured near the school at from 
four dollars to six dollars a week. Students may also se- 
cure rooms and board separately. Information in regard to 
these matters and addresses of reliable and satisfactory 
private boarding places and furnished rooms will be sup- 
plied at the college. Good accommodations are plentiful, 
and satisfactory arrangements can be quickly made by each 
student immediately upon his arrival. It is wholly unneces- 
sary and rarely advantageous to secure board and room in 
advance. 

The Young Men's Christian Association of Chicago has 
a department office in the building for the Northwestern 
University professional schools. The Association assists 
students in securing desirable boarding-places, and the De- 
partment Secretary will be glad to furnish information in 
regard to the work of the Association, and render whatever 
assistance he can to new students. 



For further information address the Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, Northwestern University Buiiding, 87 Lake Street, 
Chicago, lii. 



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THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 

CmoAQo. 



FACULTY. 



GsBBHB Vabdiman Blaok, M.D., D.D.Sv So.D., LL.D., Dean, Pro- 

fe$$or of Operative Dentistryt Pathology^ and Bacteriology. 
Thomas Lbwis Gilmkb, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Oral Surgery. 
Elgin MaWhinnet, D.D.S., Professor of Special Pathology, 

Materia Medica, and Therapeutics. 
BDicimD NoTX8» D.D.S., Professor of Dental Jurisprudence and 

Ethics. 
James Habbison Pbothebo, D.D.S., Professor of Prosthetic Tech- 

' nice. Prosthetic Dentistry, and Metallography. 
Fbxdkbick Bogue Notes, A.B., D.D.S., Professor of Histology. 
Twnfo Bbooks Wigoin, M.D., Professor of Physiology and 

Pathology. 
Vebnon Jambs Hall, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Qbobob Amos Dobset, Ph.D., Professor of Comparative Anatomy, 
Ghablbs Louis Bfix, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
IBA Benson Sellebt, D.D.a, Associate Professor of Orthodontia. 
Abthub Datenfobt Black, B.S., M.Dv D.D.S., Assistant Professor 

of Operative Dentistry and Assistant in Oral Surgery. 
Eugene Shaw Willabd, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Operative 

Dentistry and Bacteriology. 
Fred William Gethbo, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Operative 

Dentistry and Dental Anatomy. 
Hdocan Dxtband Petebson, M.D., Lecturer on Anaesthesia and 

Assistant in Oral Surgery. 
Chabibs Rudolph Bdwabd Koch, D.D.S., Lecturer on Dental 

Economics and Secretary of the School and of the Faculty. 



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270 NORTHWBSTEIRN UNIVERSITY. 



DEMONSTRATORS. 

Charles Reeder Baker, D.D.S. Andrew Vachel Louderback, 
Dudley Dean Bayless, D.D.S. M.S., D.D.S. 

James William Birkland, D.D.S. George Buchanan Macfarlane. 
Fred Hugh Brosnlhan, D.D.S. T>.D.S. „ ^ ^ « 

Charles Henry Converse, D.D.S. ?,«^^«^ ?^.^™"'^™ 



Huston French Methven, D.D.S. 
Wirt Allen Stevens, D.D.& 
Charles Abraham Street, D.D.S. 



Elijah Rockhold Crossley, B.S., 

M.D. 

William Thomas Easton, D.D.S. ^^ge' Patterson Thomison, 
Frederick Franklin Garrison, D.D.S. 

M.D. Harry Isaac VanTuyl, B.S., M.D.. 
David Sweeney Hlllis, M.D. D.D.S. 

William Kocher, D.D.S. Benjamin Waldberg, D.D.S. 

Arthur Charles Lafount, D.D.S. Harry Alexander Ware, M.D. 

Charles Herman Lletzmann, D.D.S. 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT. 

The Dental School, located in Northwestern Univer- 
sity Building at the comer of Lake and Dearborn Streets, 
Chicago, was founded and is maintained for the purpose 
of preparing young men and women in the most thorough 
manner for the practice of dentistry, and for the promotion 
of dental science and literature. No expense has been spared 
in its equipment or in the employment of an adequate fac- 
ulty of skilled teachers, with a large force of demonstrators 
and assistants. The school occupies the three upper floors 
of the University Building, except that the chemical labora- 
tories are on the second floor, and has over 60,000 square 
feet of floor space. This space is arranged especially for 
the purposes of teaching dentistry, and is supplied with 
modem equipment for that end. 

The Clinic Boom, sufficient in extent to accommodate 
the great clinic and the offices connected with it, is of the 
best design and construction, consisting of a single room 
with arched ceiling. It is on the sixth floor, with free light 



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THB DENTAL SCHOOL. 271 

on two sides and abundant skylight It may be reached by 
elevators from the principal entrance on Lake Street and 
from a smaller entrance on Dearborn Street. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Persons desiring to enter this school must bring with 
them credentials signed by a city saperiutendent of schools, 
a principal of a high school, or a state saperintendent of 
instruction or equivalent ofScer, or his deputy, which must 
show that the applicant has completed the curriculum of 
an accredited high school or its equivalent. 

Persons not having these credentials will be admitted 
upon examination and approval of the State Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction or his deputy. 

This school will receive no student who is not present 
within ten days after the opening day of the session in each 
year, or in case of necessary delay, by reason of illness 
properly certified by the attending physician, within twenty 
days after the opening day. 

Students matriculating agree thereby to accept the dis- 
cipline imi>osed by the faculty. 

It is desirable that students should register early, since 
the order of assignment of seats in the lecture halls is based 
upon the order of time of registration. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students who present certificates of having taken courses 
in other recognized schools which cover subjects required 
lA this school will be accredited with such studies if satis- 
factory to the professors in the respective departments. 
Graduates in medicine will be credited with one year of 
time. 

Students coming from high schools and colleges, who 
wish credit for courses parallel to courses required in this 

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272 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

school, should bring credentials showing specifically the 
time spent on these subjects and should present their note 
books of work done. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The studies of the whole course are grouped into depart- 
ments, the work of each department being graded from the 
more general and fundamental to the more specialized and 
advanced. 

The work in the several departments is planned with 
reference to that done in other departments, and the 
greatest care is taken that the whole shall be so correlated 
that the student in taking up a new subject will find himself 
prepared by work done in other departments. 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES. 
First Year. 

I. Anatomy, a, b, c, d. 
II. Physiology, a, b, c, d. 
III. Histology, a, b, c 
y. Chemistry, a, b, c, d. 
VIII. Prosthetic Dentistry, 

(Technic Course) , a, b, c, d, e. 
X. Operative Dentistry, 

(Dental Anatomy and Technic Courses), a, b, c, d, e, f, 
Rh. 

Second Year. 

I. Anatomy, e, f, g. 

II. Physiology, e, f. 

III. Histology, d, e, f, g. 

IV. General Pathology, a, b. 
V. Chemistry, e, f, g, h. 

VI. Comparative Anatomy, a. 

VII. Materia Medica and Therapeutics, a, b, c. 

VIIL Prosthetic Dentistry, f, g, h, 1. 

X. Operative Dentistry, i, ]. 



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THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 278 

Third Year. 

VIIL ProBthetic Dentistry, J, k, 1. 

IX. Orthodontia, a, b, c. 

X. Operative Dentistry, k, 1, m, n, o, p. 

XI. Special Pathology and Therapeutics, a, b, c, d, e. 

XII. Oral Surgery, a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i. 

XIII. Dental Bthics and Jurisprudence, a, b. 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The student is expected to take the courses in the order 
enumerated, though some deviation from this rule may be allowed 
in certain cases approved by the Faculty. 

I. Department of Anatomy. 

The equipment of the Department of Anatomy is very 
complete and is entirely new. The large Anatomical Lab- 
oratory, located on the top floor of the building, is beauti- 
fully lighted on the east and south sides by numerous win- 
dows, and in the center of the room by a large skylight^ 
and the ventilation is perfect. The Laboratory is equipped 
with thirty-siz dissecting tables of the latest pattern, en- 
tirely of metal, except the plate-glass tops. Skeletons are 
provided for the use of the students, and by the payment of 
a small deposit bones may be taken from the building for 
home study. 

First Year. 

(a) Introductory course in Visceral Anatomy. 

Two lectures and demonstrations a week. One- 
third of a Semester. 
Professor Mn:. 

(b) Human Dissections. 

Two three-hour periods a week through the year. 
Professor Btec, Dr. Van Tutl, Dr. Cbosslbt, and 
assistants. 

(c) Anatomy of the Extremities. 

Two lectures a week through the year. 
Professor Mix. 

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274 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

(d) Recitations on lectures and dissections. 
Two hours a week through the year. 
Dr. Van Tuyl and assistants. 

Second Year. 

(e) Anatomy of the Head and Neck. 

Two lectures a week through the year. 
Professor Mix. 

(f) Human Dissections. 

Two three-hour periods a week. First Semester. 
Professor Mix, Dr. Vaw Tuyl, Dr. Cbosbley, and 
assistants. 

(g) Recitations on dissections. 

Two hours a week through the year. 
Dr. Van Tun* 

11. Department of Physiology. 

The work in Physiology includes a course of two lectures 
a week and text-book study with quizzes in the freshman 
year. In the junior year the subject is continued in one 
lecture a week, devoted mainly to the brain, nervous system, 
and the functions of reproduction. 

First Year. 

(a) Qeneral Physiology. The structure of the elemen- 
tary tissues. The chemical composition of the body 
The blood. The circulation of the blood. 

Two lectures a week. First Semester. 
Professor Wioom. 

(b) Quiz and class work in sections. 
Two hours a week. First Semester. 

(c) Respiration. Secretion. Food digestion. Meta- 
bolism. Nutrition and diet Animal heat Excre- 
tion. Muscle. Nerve Physiology. Production of 
voice. 

Two lectures a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Wiggiw. 

(d) Quiz class work in two sections. 
Two hours a week. Second Semester. 



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THB DBNTAL SCHOOL. 275 

Second Year, 

(e) The central nervous system. Brain. Spinal cord. 
Reproductive organs. Development Lectures and 
Recitations. 

One hour a week through the year. 
Professor Wigoin. 
(f) Quiz class work in sections. 

Two hours a week through the year. 

III. Department of Histology. 

This department is provided with a large student's lab- 
oratory, fitted with seventy-one hardwood student's desks, 
each furnished with reagents, lockers^ compound micro- 
scope with lenses and condensers, electric lights for dark 
days, and all of the conveniences for preparation work and 
microscopic study. It is also provided with a stereopticon 
and projecting microscope for demonstration purposes. In 
addition to this large laboratory, there is an adjoining pro- 
fessor's study and a well appointed preparation laboratory. 

In the laboratory work the classes are usually divided 
into sections of not more than fifty students. This work 
has been greatly aided by a very large collection of lantern 
slides from photo-micrographs and framed photographic 
prints; a large histological museum containing sets of mi- 
croscopic slides sufficient in number on any given subject 
for a fuU section, not only of all the ordinary soft tissues, 
but also of the peridental membranes, dental pulp, perios- 
team, and ground sections of the teeth. These are used by 
the dasses for purposes of study in addition to the sections 
the students stain and mount for themselves. 

First Year. 

(a) Ck>n8truction and use of the microscope, a study of 
cell structure and functions, studies of the elemen- 
tary tissues, histology of the organs; circulatory, 
lymphatic, alimentary tract, and accessory glands, 
respiratory system, urinary organs, and skin. 

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276 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, 

One lectare a week through the year. 
Professor F. B. Notes. 

(b) LAboratory course covering the subjects of the lec- 
ture course (a). 

Two three-hour periods a week through the year. 
Professor F. B. Notes, Dr. Lottdebback, and assist- 
ants. 

(c) Quizzes and recitations. 

One hour a week through the year. 

Dr. LOTTDEBBiLCK. 

Second Year. 

(d) The Dental Tissues. Enamel. The Peridental Mem- 
branes. Periosteum. Bone. Mucous membranes 
and other soft tissues of the mouth. 

One lecture a week. Two-thirds of a Semester. 
Professor F. B. Notes. 

(e) A short course in Embryology. 

One lecture a week. One-third of a Semester. 
Professor F. B. Notes. 

(f) Laboratory course covering the subjects of lecture 
courses (d) and (e). 

Two three-hour periods a week through the year. 
Professor F. B. Notes, Dr. Loudebbaok, and assist- 
ants, 
(g) Quizzes and recitations. 

One hour a week through the year. 
Dr. Loudebback. 

IV. Department of Qeneral Pathology. 

This course, while essential to the student's understand- 
ing of general pathological conditions, forms at the same 
time the basis of his studies of the special pathology of the 
tissues of the teeth, their membranes and correlated tissues, 
and the organs of the mouth. 

Second Year. 

(a) Etiolog^ of disease. Disorders of Nutrition and 
Metabolism. Diabetes. Fever. General circulatory 
disturbances. Local Hyperemia. Local AhawiIi^ 

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THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 277 

Hemorrhage. Bmbollsm. Infraction. Thromboais. 
Retrogressive processes. Atrophy. Infiltrations 
and degenerations. Necrosis. Inflammation. Pro- 
gressive tissue changes. Neoplasms. Infections. 
Granulomata. Bacteria, and diseases caused by 
them. Lectures and recitations. 
One hour a week through the year. 
Professor Wiooiir. 
(b) Quiz class in sections. 

Two hours a week. Second Semester. 

V. Department of Chemistry. 

The Chemical Laboratories, which are used exclusively 
for dental students, are large, well ventilated, and complete 
in every respect. One laboratory is devoted to the Gteneral 
Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis of the first year, an- 
other is arranged with special reference to the experimental 
teaching of Metallurgy and other practical work of interest 
to dental students. 

In addition to the main laboratories, there are large dis- 
pensing rooms, a balance room well equipped with balances 
and apparatus for testing the physical properties of metals, 
amalgams, etc., and a room covered with a hood for carry- 
ing off the fumes. In this are found the furnaces employed 
in alloying, assaying, and refining. 

Flrrt Year. 

(a) General and Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and 
recitations. 

Two hours a week. First Semester. 
Professor Hall. 

(b) Chemical LAboratory. Work in illustrative experi- 
ments in General and Inorganic Chemistry. 
Three hours a week. First Semester. 
Professor Hall and assistants. 

(c) General and Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and 
recitations. 

Three hours a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Hall. 

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278 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

(d) Laboratory. Stndy of the metals before the blow- 
pipe, and with reagents. 

Three hours a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Hall and assistants. 

Second Year. 

(e) Practical problems in Dental Chemistry. Lectures 
and quizzes. 

One hour a week through the year. 
Professor Hall. 

(f) Laboratory. Qualitative chemical analysis of un- 
known mixtures, particularly bases and alloys. Re- 
fining gold, silyer, and other metals. Making dental 
alloys, gold and silver solders, amalgam alloys, eta 
Laboratory study of fusible alloys, and cements. 
Assay of dental alloys for gold, silver, platinum, 
tin, copper, etc. 

Three hours a week. First Semester. 
Professor Hall and assistants. 

(g) Organic and Physiological Chemistry. Lectures and 
Demonstrations. 

Two hours a week through the year. 
Professor Hall. 
(h) Laboratory work in Dental Chemistry. 
Three hours a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Hall and assistants. 

VI. Department of Comparative Dental Anatomy. 

This course is designed to give the 'student in a concise 
form an intelligent view of the animal kingdom and its 
classifications, especially of the vertebrates, the forms of 
teeth in relation to food habits and as weapons of offense 
and defense ; also a study of the extinct species of animals 
of the several classes, the variations in tooth forms that have 
occurred, illustrating development through the geological 
ages; the history of the changes from the simple to the 
complex forms as they now exist. The Museum of the 
Dental School is especially rich in skulls of the several 
orders of the animal kingdom, furnishing illustrations for 

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THE DBNTAL SCHOOL. 279 

the study of all of the known tooth forms. The great col- 
lection of the Field Columbian Museum is available and is 
made use of for purposes of illustration and study. 

Second Year. 

(a) Evolution. The meaning of similarity of structura 
Natnral selection. Changes In organs. Correlation 
of growth between various parts. Principles of 
heredity and fixity of species. Tooth forms. Defi- 
nitions and descriptions of the varieties of forms. 
The typical mammalian dentition. Classification of 
the animal kingdom, with concise descriptions of 
the typical characteristics of each. 
Two lectures a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Dobset. 

VII. Department of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Materia Medica is taught in a series of lectures, quizzes, 
and recitations, with demonstrations and experimental 
studies. There is also a laboratory study of the most useful 
methods of preparing drugs for medicinal purposes, with 
experimental studies of their therapeutic or toxic action. 
The eourse is richly illustrated throughout. Abundant 
practice is given in prescription writing. The great clinic. 
to which students have access all the year, gives abundant 
opportunity to witness the application and therapeutic ef- 
fects of drugs, and for clinical practice. 

Second Year.- 

(a) The sources and various forms of drugs. General 
and local action of drugs. Agencies that modify 
the action of drugs. The art of prescribing medi- 
cines. A critical study of about one hundred drugs, 
classified as to their therapeutic and toxic action, 
with a special laboratory study of escharotics. 
germicides, antiseptics* deodorizers, etc. System- 
atic medication for dental purposes. Dental prophy- 
laxis. The use of germicides, antiseptics, eschar- 
otics, and astringents in dentistry. 

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280 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

One lecture a week. First Semester. 
Two lectures a week. Second Semester. 
Professor MaWhinney. 
Quizzes and Recitations. 

(b) Theses. In addition to the above outline, each stu- 
dent is required to write ten theses, of not less than 
three hundred words each, on subjects assigned. 

(c) Clinical Practice. The Infirmary is open to Junior 
students four hours a day for the observation of 
conditions requiring the use of drugs and for clin- 
ical practice in treatments, and each student is re- 
quired to make fifty points in clinical experience. 
See also Department of Special Pathology and 
Therapeutics. 

Professor MaWhinnst and assistants. 

VIII. Department of Prosthetic Dentistry. 

The Prosthetic Technic Laboratory and the Junior 
Prosthetic Laboratory are situated on the fifth floor, while 
the Senior Prosthetic Laboratory is situated on the sixth 
floor, adjacent to the Crown and Bridge Boom. All are 
well supplied with outside light, as well as a complete elec- 
trical equipment for light on dark days. 

Each of these laboratories is furnished with electric 
lathes for grinding and polishing, and in the Junior Lab- 
oratory there is a complete equipment of the heavier labora- 
tory appliances, such as vulcanizers, celluloid presses., ap- 
paratus for casting aluminum plates, etc. The Senior 
Laboratory and the Crown and Bridge Room are equipped 
with a number of electric and gasoline furnaces for porce- 
lain work, and swaging devices of various kinds for inlay 
and seamless crown work. The Crown and Bridge Room, 
where practical prosthetic operations are carried on, is 
equipped with thirty modern chairs. 

First Year. 

(a) Prosthetic Technics. This course covers in detail 
the fundamental principles of denture construction 



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THB DENTAL SCHOOL. 281 

and crown and bridge work, and accompanies the 

laboratory coarse. 

One lecture a week. First Semester. 

Professor Pbothebo. 

.One honr quiz or recitation a week. First Semester. 

Dr. Mjlthvjbn. 

(b) Laboratory course. Impression taking, model con- 
structlng» occluding, waxing, flasklng, packing, yuI- 
canlzlng, and finishing partial and full artificial 
dentures. 

Nine hours a week. First Semester. 

Professor Pbothebo, Dr. Methykn, and assistants. 

(c) Metallography. A descriptive course on the nature 
and physical properties of metals, especially those 
used in dentistry, with fundamental principles of 
their usee. It Includes also the manipulation of 
metals, swaging, annealing, solders and soldering, 
welding, tempering. 

One lecture a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Pbothebo. 

(d) Quiz or recitation on the work of Courses (a), (b), 
and (c). 

One hour a week. Second Semester. 
Dr. Methven. 

(e) Laboratory course. Construction of dies and coun- 
ter dies. Swaging metal bases of German silver. 
Attaching teeth by soldering and by vulcanite. Con- 
struction of crowns and dummies, all metal and 
metal and porcelain. Assembling individual crowns 
and dummies to form bridges. Constructing and 
tempering taps and dies of steel. Drawing wire 
and tubing suitable for the construction of ortho- 
dontia appliances. 

Nine hours a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Pbothebo, Dr. Methvext, and assistants. 

Second Year. 

(f) Review of Technic principles outlined in first year. 
Application of these to the practical operations in 
the Infirmary. A study of the physical properties 
of plaster of paris, and other materials employed In 
prosthesis. Muscles of mastication. Force of the 



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382 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

bite. Movements of the lower Jaw. Natural ar- 
rangement and occlusion of artificial teeth. 
One lecture a week through the year. 
Professor Pbothbbo. 

(g) Quiz or recitation. 

One hour a week through the year. 
Dr. Mbthten. 

(h) Laboratory course. Construction of full and partial 
metal base dentures, with teeth attached by solder- 
ing and by vulcanite. Ck)nstruction and application 
of clasps to partial dentures. Advanced work in 
crowns and bridges. 
Nine hours a week through the year. 
Professor Pbothicro, Dr. Waldbebo, and Dr. Meth- 

VEN. 

(i) Prosthetic Clinic. Each student is required to un- 
dertake and carry to completion a number of prac- 
tical cases for patients representing each of the 
various classes of prosthesis, the minimum repre- 
senting fifty points. 
Professor Pbothebo, Dr. Bbosnihan, and assistants. 

Third Year. 

(j) A critical review. Summary of recent methods and 
appliances. Application of porcelain in prosthesis. 
Baked porcelain crowns. Porcelain bridges, full 
porcelain dentures. Methods of cavity preparation 
for porcelain inlays; forming, baking, and setting 
porcelain inlays. During this course the student is 
assigned a series of articles for reading, and is 
required to present a thesis covering the subject 
named. 

One lecture a week through the year. 
Professor Pbothebo. 

(k) Laboratory course. Cast aluminum base dentures. 
Celluloid dentures. Banded Logan crowns. Baked 
porcelain crowns. Porcelain bridges. Continuous 
gum dentures. 

Six hours a week. First Semester. 
Dr. Waldbebo, Dr. Methveit, and assistants. 

(1) Prosthetic Clinic Practical pieces of prosthetic 
work of all varieties made and fitted for patients In 

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THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 283 

the Inflnnary* with studies of the conditions of the 
mucous membranes. The preparation of roots for 
crowns and the abutments of bridges. Making and 
setting crowns and bridges. Preparation of cayities 
and setting porcelain inlays, etc. The minimum 
requirement is one hundred points. 
Professor Pbothxbo, Dr. BsosinHAN, and assistants. 

The inflrmary la open to students from 10:30 to 6:80 o'clock 
each day during term time. This period is dlyided between the 
Prosthetic and the Operatiye Departments, and text-book work 
and general reading: 

IX. Department of Orthodontia. 

Orthodontia is taught both didactically and clinically. 
Proceding from the normal occlusion, derangements of 
alignment of the teeth and malformations of the dental 
arch are (Systematically classified, and mechanical arrange- 
ments of fixtures to bring the several classes of irregulari- 
ties into normal form are carefully studied. 

Text-books: Angle, Guilford, Enapp. 

Lantern slides from photographs, X-ray pictures, and 
models of cases are used. 

Third Year. 

(a) Occlusion and facial art, etiology, classification, 
diagnosis of mal-ocdusion. The alyeolus and al- 
yeolar processes, the peridental membranes, use of 
models, etc 

One lecture a week. First Semester. 
Professor Seixkbt. 

(b) Regulating appliances (Angle, Guilford, ISnapp), 
anchorages, jack screws, levers, traction screws, ex- 
tension arch and combinations, split plates, recip- 
rocal anchorages, retention. Illustrated with mod- 
els, with movable teeth and enlarged appliances. 
Stereopticon views, illustrating progressive regula- 
tion and final fixation. 

One lecture a week. Second Semester. 
Professor Sixxibt. 

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284 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

(c) Clinic or Infirmary course open to students during 
first and second semesters for practical work in the 
correction of practical cases. 
Professor Sblusbt, Dr. Bakeb, and assistants. 

X. Department of Operative Dentistry and Bacteriology. 

Operative Dentistry in some of its forms of presentation 
is before the student from the time he enters the school to 
his graduation. In the first year it is presented in the form 
of a study of the human teeth, or dental anatomy, the forms 
and nomenclature of the instruments used in operations on 
the teeth, of the preparation of cavities for filling, of filling 
materials and their manipulation. 

In the second year, there is a lecture course with demon- 
strations on the technical procedures in filling teeth, and the 
student begins practical operations in the clinic room. 

In the third year, there is a review of the technical pro- 
cedures in filling operations, followed by a careful study of 
the pathology of dental caries, and the adaptation of means 
to its amelioration and cure. 

The Clinic Rooms, built especially for the purpose, are 
well eqpiipped with Columbia operating chairs in ample 
number for the classes, and have abundant room with the 
best of light. 
First Year. — (Operative Technic Course.) 

(a) Nomenclature. Descriptive Anatomy of the Human 
Teeth. 

One lecture or recitation a week. First Semester. 
Professor Gethbo. 

(b) Laboratory Course. Studies of the forms of indi- 
vidual teeth. Carving the tooth forms in bone or 
ivory. ^Dissections and studies of the internal parts, 
— pulp chambers and root canals. 

Nine hours a week. First semester. 

Professor Gbthbo. Dr. Convebse. and assistants. 

(c) Instruments and Instrumentation. A study of in- 
strument forms, instrument construction, and th« 

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THB DHNTALr SCHOOL. 285 

adaptation of inBtniments to the excavation of 

cayities. 

One lecture a week. One-third of a Semester. 

Professor Gbthbo. 

(d) Laboratory Course. 

Nine hours a week. One-third of a Semester. 
Professor Gsthbo, Dr. Convebse, and assistants. 

(e) Cavity Nomenclature. A study of the location of 
cavities in extracted teeth» of the forms of prepared 
cavities* of the naming of internal parts of cavities, 
and of the use of instruments in their preparation. 
One lecture a week. One-third of a Semester. 
Professor Gethbo. 

(f) Laboratory Course. 

Nine hours a week. One-third of a Semester. 
Professor Gsthbo, Dr. Converse, and assistants. 

(g) Filling Materials and Filling Teeth. 

One lecture a week. One-third of a Semester, 
(h) Laboratory practice with filling materials and fill- 
ing prepared cavities in extracted teeth, ivory, or 
bone. 

Nine hours a week. One-third of a Semester. 
Professor Gethbo, Dr. Converse, and assistants. 

8econd Year. 

(1) Technical Procedures in Filling Teeth. Cavity 
NomMiclature. Cavity preparation. Principles, in- 
struments and appliances, and instrumentation. 
Cavity preparation, by classes of cavities. Filling 
materials. Instruments and instrumentation, phys- 
ics of filling operations, and finishing fillings. Por- 
celain inlays; preparation of cavities; formation 
of matrix; making and inserting inlays; gold in- 
lays. Filling with amalgam, cements, gutta-percha, 
etc Exposure and removal of dental pulp. Prepar- 
ation and filling of root canals. 
Two lectures and recitations a week through the 
year. 
Professor Abthub D. Black. 

(J) Operative Clinic. Open to junior students four 
hours a day during entire session. Operations 



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286 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

amounting to one hundred and sixty points re- 
quired. 
Professor of Operative Dentistry and assistants. 

Third Year. 

(k) Review of Technical Procedures in Filling Teeth. 
Two lectures a week. First .Semester. 
Professor Black. 

(1) Pathology of dental caries. Bacteriology of human 
mouth. Causative relation of bacteria to dental 
caries. Caries of enamel. Caries of dentin. Incep- 
tion and progress of dental caries. Conditions ot 
the beginnings of caries. Systemic causes of caries. 
Susceptibility and immunity to caries. Vital phe- 
nomena in caries. Hyperaesthesia of dentin. Treat- 
ment of dental caries. Curative eftect of fillings. 
Selection of filling materials. 
Two lectures a week. One-half of a Semester. 
Professor Black. 
(m) liCanagement of patients. Cleanliness. Evil habits 
in chewing food, and their correction. Management 
of special conditions. Caries of children's teeth 
and its treatment; shedding of the deciduous teeth. 
Management of children. Erosion. Management of 
cases of erosion. Management of cavities by classes. 
Extension for prevention and its limitations. Man- 
agement in special conditions. Esthetic considera- 
tions. 

Two lectures a week. One-half of a Semester. 
Professor Blaok. 

(n) Quizzes and recitations. 

One hour a week through the year. 
Professor Willabd. 

(o) Operative Clinic. Open to senior students from 
10:30 to 6:30 o'clock daily during term time. Oper- 
ations amounting to three hundred and fifty points 
are required. 
Professor of Operative Dentistry and assistants. 

(p) Special Fillings. In this course fillings are made 
under the instruction and immediate observation of 
the special demonstrators, and later full written de- 



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THE DBNTALr SCHOOL. 287 

scriptionB of the conditions Indicating the operation, 
the Instrumentation and instruments used» are sub- 
mitted for grading as to excellence. 
Dr. Macfablanb and Dr. Bibkland. 

The Operative Infibmabt Clinic is under the direct super- 
vision of the Professor of Operatiye Dentistry. The student be- 
gins this work with the beginning of his Junior year, and con- 
tinues it to the end of the senior year, the time given to it being 
much greater in the senior year than in the junior. It is the 
Intention that this infirmary practice shall be as much like an 
actual dental practice as possible. The development of the ability 
to obtain and hold a practice, or that professional comity be- 
tweea an operator and his patient essential to personal success, is 
regarded as parallel in its importance to the future of the stu- 
dent with the development of manipulative ability. 

BA0TEBIOU)GT. 

This is a combined lecture, recitation, and laboratory course. 
The equipment includes culture ovens, sterilizers, oonyenienoes 
for handling test tubes and for making culture media. 

Third Year. 

(a) Principles of Bacteriology. The preparation of cul* 
ture media. liCanagement of laboratory cultures. 
Distinguishing of laboratory cultures. Physiology 
of microorganism. Poisons produced. Diseases 
caused by micro-organisms, particularly those of 
the teeth and mouth. Susceptibility and immunity. 
One lecture or recitation a week through the year. 
Professor Wiliabd. 

(b) Laboratory. Preparation of culture media. Plant- 
ing and management of cultures. Separation of 
species in mixed cultures. Deriving pure cultures 
from infected animals. Cultures from saliva, from 
mucous membranes, and from carious teeth. Stain- 
ing, mounting, and microscopic studies. Diagnosis 
of unknowns. 

Six hours a week through the year. 
Professor Willabd and Dr. Laudebbaok. 

SuMMEB Clinics. — The clinic rooms will be open all the year 
for the benefit of students who may wish to hare greater experi- 



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288 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

ence in clinical practice under competent Buperyiaion. Tbe num- 
ber of demonstrators during the summer will be ample for the 
class that may choose to remain with the school. The clinical 
material is abundant and a most excellent opportunity is afforded 
for clinical practice. 

Xi. Department of Special Pathology and Therapeutics. 

In this department the diseases and conditions of the 
soft tissues of the teeth and the immediate surrounding 
tissues and mucous membranes of the mouth, are given 
especial attention and study. 

Third Year. 

(a) A reyiew of the structure and functions of the 
dental pulp. Hyperemia and inflammation of the 
pulp. Capping exposed pulps. Obtunding sensitive 
dentin. Pulp devitalization. Pulp removal. Treat- 
ment of canals. Root filling. Suppuration. The 
healing process. Immunity and susceptibility. 
Suppuration of the dental pulp. Alveolar abscess. 
Absorption of roots of teeth and of bone. Caries 
of bone. Necrosis. A study of germicides and anti- 
septics with laboratory tests. Bleaching teeth. 
Two lectures a week. First Semester. 
Professor ILlWhikitet. 

(b) Quizses and recitations. 

One hour a week. First Semester. 

(c) Peridental membranes. Review of histological 
structures. Simple gingivitis. Calcic inflammation. 
Phagedenic pericemenitis. Replantation and trans- 
plantation of teeth. Functions of the mucous mem- 
branes of the mouth. Stomatitis. Prophylaxis. 
Mouth hygiene. 

Two lectures a week. Second Semester. 
Professor MAWniNincT. 

(d) Quizzes and recitations. 

One hour a week. Second Semester. 

(e) Clinical Practice. In addition to the above courses, 
senior students are required to make one hundred 
and fifty points in practical treatments in the In- 



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THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 289 

flrmary clinic, and to send in for examination and 
criticism a complete history and treatment record 
of each of ten cases. Professor MaWhinnet is in 
the Infirmary one-half day each week to superintend 
this work. 

Xil. Department of Oral Surgery. 

The course embraces instruction in the general prin- 
ciples of surgery and their practical application to patho- 
logical conditions occurring about the mouth and face, 
giving special attention to diagnosis and recognition of con- 
ditions requiring surgical interference. 

Third Year. 

(a) Surgical Bacteriology. Inflammation. Suppuration. 
Wounds. Hemorrhage. Necrosis. Caries of bones. 
Diseases of the Maxillary Sinus. Resection of roots. 
Tetanus. Ankylosis. Arthritis. Facial Neuralgia. 
Fractures. Dislocations. Extraction of teeth. Mal- 
position of third molars. Impacted teeth. Replanta- 
tion, transplantation, and implantation of teeth. 
Cleft palate and harelip. Affections of the lips, 
tongue, and mouth. Tumors. Odontomes. Ranula. 
Cysts. Aneurisms. 

One lecture a week through the year. 
Professor Gilmeb. 

(b) Recitations and quizzes. 

One and a half hours a week through the year. 
Dr. Abthxtb D. Black. 

(c) Surgical Clinic. 

Two hours a week through the year. 

Professor Gn^MEB and assistants (nurses from St 

Luke's Hospital). 

(d) Special Clinical Instruction. Diagnosis and case 
histories. 

One hour a week through the year. 
Dr. Abthijb D. Black. 

(e) After treatment of surgical cases by students, under 
direction of Professor Gilmeb. 



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890 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

(f) Clinic in the extraction of teeth, daily. Open to 
juniors and seniors. 

Dr. Eabtok. 
AnaesthetiCM and Anaesthesia.— This subject is presented in 
detail in lectures* experimentally on animals and clinically in the 
oral surgery clinic, and daily in the extracting clinic. Nitrous 
oxide is used generally in the extracting clinic, and ether and 
chloroform in the oral surgery dinic. Local anaesthesia is ex- 
hibited frequently in clinic in cases to which it is adapted. 

(g) The evolution of general surgical anaesthesia. State 
of the patient Nature of operation. Choice of 
anaesthetic. Prolonged dental operations. Circum- 
stances of administration. Inspection and exam- 
ination of patients. Consideration of general anaes- 
thetic agents. Local and regional anaesthetics. 
Dangers of anaesthesia. 

One hour a week. Second Semester. 

Dr. PsTEBSoir. 
(h) Clinical administration of anaesthetics in oral sur- 
gery clinic 

Two hours a week through the year. 

Dr. Petebson. 
(i) Clinical exhibition of nitrous oxid anaesthesia in 

extracting clinic daily during term. 

Dr. Bastok. 



XIII. Department of Professional Ethics and Dental Jurispru- 
dence. 

This work coxisists of a brief statement of the important 
principles of morals, an exposition of the special dutieeTand 
moral obligations of professional men in respect to their 
patients, toward their fellow practitioners, and toward the 
public, the more important differences between the profes- 
sions and businesses or manufacturing pursuits, with refer- 
ence to the ethical standards that are right and appropriate 
in each. 

The lectures on Jurisprudence, will, in the main, follow 
the text-book by Dr. Behfuss. It will include qualifications 



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THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 291 

and duties of expert witnesses, the importanee of dental 
reoordSy the limitations of dental practiee, the qualifications 
required and the liabilities incurred, the penalties that may 
be suffered, and the defense to be made in case of real or 
supposed malpractice; the laws respecting the practice of 
dentistry, the steps necessary to become legal practitioners, 
the duties and liabilities of dentists with reference to the 
law, etc. 

Third Year. 

(a) Blemeatary principles of ethics. Professional 
ethics. State laws relating to dentistry. Illinois 
Dental Law. Dental Jurisprudence. General re- 
view. 

One lecture a week. First Semester. 
Professor Bdmuhd Notss. 

As the greater number of 'students now enter dental 
schools without previous private preceptorship in a dental 
office or a knowledge of the business side of dental practice, 
a lecture course on Dental Bconomics has been instituted as 
an adjunct to this department This will embrace practice 
buUding, methods of obtaining and retaining patients, busi- 
ness relations between dentist and patients, fees for dental 
services, keeping of books of accounts and of records of 
operations, presentation and collection of accounts, methods 
of economy in the conduct of an office, and so forth. 

(b) Dental Bconomics. 

One lecture a week. Second Semester. 
Dr. Chablbs R. B. Kooh. 



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292 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION. 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred on 
such students as complete the course of instruction. Candi- 
dates must have attended the required courses of lectures, 
the last year at least in this school, and must pass satisfac- 
tory examinations in all the subjects of study. 

The monthly reports of the quizzes and the infirmary 
practice of the students will bear very materially upon their 
standing at all examinations. 

To be admitted to a degree, a candidate must be twenty- 
one years of age, and must be of good moral character. 

No student will be recommended for a degree who has 
not discharged his financial obligations to the school, and 
to the University, in full. 

THE LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

The Library and Reading Boom, named in honor of the 
late Dr. Theodore Menges, occupies, with the attached Jour- 
nal and Professors' Reading Room, three thousand feet of 
floor space, with reading tables and chairs for the accom- 
modation of about one hundred students at one time. The 
Library contains 2,600 volumes of books on dental and col- 
lateral subjects, with a rich supply of dictionaries and en- 
cyclopedias conveniently placed in the Reading Room for 
easy consultation, and nearly all of the dental journal liter- 
ature in the English language, with about 10,000 duplicate 
numbers. Many of the books most used by students are 
duplicated up to twelve, and a few to fifteen copies. The 
books and journals may be used by students in the Reading 
Room without restriction, other than that necessary for the 
proper care of the books, and also, when the duplication of 
volumes will allow, may be used as a circulating library. 



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THB DBNTAL SCHOOL. 298 

THE MUSEUM. 

The Musemn of the Dental School is in the Reading 
Boom and is open to inspection and study at all reasonable 
times. The cases are arranged to show the specimens to the 
best advantage. 

The comparative anatomy specimens are, with the excep- 
tion of full skeletons of the gorilla and chimpanzee, heads 
with the teeth. There are a sufficient number of varieties of 
each of the several orders to give specimens of every kind 
of tooth form and variety of placement known in mammals, 
saurians, and snakes, with a very rich variety of fishes. 

The principal specimens of the human skull are, first 
a most excellent mounting of the separated bones of the 
adult; second, a fine set of dissections in a series showing 
the development of the teeth and their roots from their first 
appearance in the fetus to the full adult development, and 
illustrating the absorption of the roots of the deciduous 
teeth, the shedding process, and the replacement by perma- 
nent teeth; also the absorption of the alveolar processes 
after the loss of teeth, with the changes that occur in the 
form of the bones of the jaws from childhood to old age. 
This is an exceptionally complete, handsome, and valuable 
set of specimens. There is also a considerable number of 
ordinary human skulls. 

The Museum also contains a valuable collection of ab- 
normal forms of human teeth; a very full and complete 
collection of specimens illustrating interproximate wear and 
flattening of interproximate contact; some illustrations of 
the very early forms of artificial teeth, of manufactured 
porcelain teeth, and of dental instruments, illustrating the 
development in these lines. These parts of the Museum 
have been collected largely in the school by its students, its 
alumni, and through donations of specimens by members of 
the dental profession. 



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204 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSITT. 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

The fees paid by students in the Dental Sehool are as follows: 

First Year. 

Matriculation Fee $6.00 

General Tuition 160.00 

Second Year. 

Registration Fee $6.00 

General Ticket 150.00 

Third Year. 

Registration Fee $6.00 

General Ticket 150.00 

A general breakage fee of one dollar is paid by each 
student. 

All fees are payable in advance on or before October 20, 
of each year. Variations from this condition of payment 
can only be made upon written agreement of the proper 
ofBcial. Whenever a deferred payment is acceded to by the 
school, the accommodation and extra trouble it involves will 
be charged for. 

There will be no return of fees by reason of suspension 
or expulsion, and no refund can be made for any cause 
except serious illness. In such case, upon the recommenda- 
tion of the proper officer of the school and the statement 
that the student is in good standing, a proper proportion of 
the fees already paid may be returned by the University. 



Good board and rooms convenient to the school can be 
obtained at prices varying from $4.00 to $6.00 a week, 
according to the accommodations ; also vacant rooms, with- 
out board, furnished or unfurnished, can be obtained at 
from $6.00 to $10.00 a month. 



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THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 295 

POST GRADUATE AND PRACTITIONERS' COURSE. 

A Post Graduate and Practitioners' Course will be in- 
stituted on June 4th, 1906, to continue for four weeks. It 
will comprise the following subjects : 

Operatlye Dentistry. 

Oral Surgery. 

Special Pathology, Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Prosthetic Dentistry. 

Orthodontia. 

The lectures and practical teaching in these subjects 
will be given by the regular teaching staff of the school. 
Porcelain and gold inlays, crown and bridge work of all 
descriptions, treatment of pyorrhea, and the more recent 
methods in operative dentistry and oral surgery will re- 
ceive special attention. Upon satisfactory completion of 
the course, a certificate setting forth this fact will be issued 
by the school. The registration fee for the course is five 
dollars, which will be credited against the regular fees. 



Fees. 

For the course* embracing the five subjects $75.00 

For any one subject alone 50.00 

For two or three subjects 65.00 



All remittances or payments for this or the regular 
course should be made in Chicago exchange or currency 
to the order of the Secretary of Northwestern University 
Dental School. 



For further Information relating to the Dental School, addreee, 
The Secretary, Northwestern University Dental School, North- 
western University Building, Lake and Dearborn Streets* Chicago, 
Illinois. 



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THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

BVANSTON. 



FACULTY. 



Peteb Chbistian Lutkin, Mus.D., Dean, Professor of Organ, 
Theory, and Composition, 

Habold Byesabd Knapp, Director of the Violin Department, Pro- 
fessor of Violin and Ensemble Playing. 

AxNE Oldbebo, Professor of Piano and Composition, 

Kableton Haokett, Director of the Vooal Department, Instructor 
in Voice Culture. 

VicTOB Gabwood, Instructor in Piano and History of Music. 

William Henbt Knapp, Instructor in Voice Culture, 

Lillian Fbench Rkad, Instructor in Voice Culture. 

Mabgabet Camebon, Instructor in Piano. 

Elizabeth Raymond Woodwabd, Instructor in Piano, 

Nina Shumway Knapp, Instructor in Piano, 

Louis Nobton Dodos, Director of the Preparatory Department, 
Instructor in Piano and Theory. 

Hablan John Ck>ziNE, Instructor in Sight Reading and Choral 
Music. 

Bebtha Althea Beeman, Irutructor in Voice Culture. 

Leila Mabchant Haxlow, Instructor in Public ScJiool Methods, 

Lewis Randolph Blackman, Instructor in Violin. 

Day Williams, Instructor in Violoncello. 

Walfbied Sinoeb, Instructor in Harp. 

Chablbs Joseph King, Instructor in Clarinet, Oboe, and Bassoon 

Chables Stephen Hobn, Instructor in Comet. 

Winitbed Hull, Assistant Instructor in Piano. 

Chables John Haake, Assistant Instructor in Piano 

HiLA Vebbeck Knapp, Assistant Instructor in Piano 

296 

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THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 297 

Maudk Juliet Masceau, Assistant Instructor in Piano. 
CuBTis Abel Babby, Assistant Instructor in Organ. 
Nelldb Beulah Flodin, Assistant Instructor in Piano. 
Sabah Moobb, Assistant Instructor in Piano. 
John Mahabd Robbobough, Assistant Instructor in 'Piano. 
Irving Hamlin, Secretary. 

LOCATION AND PURPOSE. 

The School of Music was established in 1895. It offers 
extensive courses in the practical and theoretical study of 
music, and is designed to fit students for the profession as 
composers, theorists, artists, teachers, or critics. It also 
makes provision for the study of music as a part of general 
culture or as an accomplishment. 

The school occupies its own building on Willard Hall 
Campus immediately to the north of Willard Hall. This 
building was erected during the year 1897 for the especial 
needs of the Music School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Students entering the School of Music do so either as 
regular or as special students. In the former case, they 
pursue prescribed courses of study, and become candidates 
for a certificate or diploma. As special students, they 
pursue such work as they may elect ; but, in the case of non- 
resident students, it is required that they take a sufficient 
amount of work to keep their time reasonably occupied. In 
any case, students come under the discipline and general 
social regulations of the University. 

For the course in Applied Music moderate attainments 
representing on an average one year's systematic trainin^r 
in singing and two or three years' in instrumental music 
are necessary to enter to advantage. 

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298 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The following courses of study are offered : 
I. Course in Applied Music, leading to the Degree of 

Gi'aduate in Music. 
II. Course in Theory and History of Music, leading to 
the Degree of Bachelor of Music. 
III. Post-Graduate Course. 
IV. Literary Musical Course. 
V. Course in Public School Music Methods. 

I. COURSE IN APPLIED MUSIC. 

This course includes the practical study of piano, organ, 
violin, or voice, and certain other subjects specified below. 
Candidates of decided ability can complete the course in 
four years, and it is designed to equip them for professional 
work. Candidates who can meet the entrance requirements 
to the College of Liberal Arts will receive the degree of 
Graduate in Music upon the satisfactory completion of this 
course. Opportunity is given in the Evanston Academy of 
the University, without extra expense, to make up any 
reasonable deficiency in College entrance requirements. 
Matriculation once effected permits the candidate to pursue 
each year one College subject during the music course with- 
out extra fee. Candidates registering for such subjects, 
however, will not be permitted to discontinue them except 
at the end of a semester. 

Candidates not desiring or unable to complete the 
studies necessary for matriculation in the College of Liberal 
Arts, may confine their work to the purely musical studies 
scheduled below, and upon the satisfactory completion of 
them will be granted the School of Music diploma of Musi- 
cal Proficiency. Such students may carry one literary 
study in the Academy during the course without extra fee. 



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THE SCHOOL OP MUSIC. 299 

A suitable certificate will also be given at the end of the 
second year of the course, for which an additional require- 
ment is the performance of a program as outlined on papre 
303 under the heading ** Certificate of Performance." 

All candidates are required to pursue their work accord- 
ing to the following schedule : 

SCHEDULE OF STUDIES. 

First Year. 

Introductory Harmony A. 
Introductory Form and Analysis B. 
Duet Playing and Sight-Reading. 
Sight-Reading (vocal) C. 
Applied Music. 
(College or Academy Study.) 

Second Year. 

Harmony (Chad wick) D. 
Form and Analysis B. 
History of Music F. 
Bnsemble and Accompaniment. 
Sight-Reading (vocal) 6. 
Applied Music. 
(College or Academy Study.) 

Third Year. 

Counterpoint (Bridge) H. 
Harmony (Chad wick continued) I. 
Composition, Homophonic Forms J. 
E^nsemble and Accompaniment. 
History of Music (lectures) K. 
Analysis U 
Applied Music. 
(College or Academy Study.) 



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300 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Fourth Year. 

Counterpart M. 

Canon and Fugue N. 

Composition, Sonata Form, O. 

Analysis P. 

Ensemble, Chamber Music. 

Score Reading. 

Applied Music. 

(College or Academy Study.) 

Nora. — ^By "applied music" is meant the study of piano, organ, 
violin, or voice, to which, in the case of instrumentalists, two lessons 
a week are given, and four hours a day are spent In preparation. 
Voice students may substitute piano playing of medium grade and 
choir and choral practice (Svanston Musical Club) for Instrumental 
Sight-reading, Ensemble Playingr. and Reading from Score. The 
amount of vocal practice will be decided by the instructor. Ordinarily 
organ students divide their time between the organ and the piano. If 
they are sufficiently advanced technically and in Sight-reading abiUty, 
the piano requirements may be waived, in which case one lesson a 
week is given upon the organ, and a special tuition rate is allowed 
(see page 806). In the case of students of stringed instruments, or- 
chestra practice is considered an equivalent for ensemble playing. 

In addition, candidates must satisfactorily perform pro- 
grams conforming to the following requirements : 

For Piano Students : 

A concerto of advanced difficulty. 

One of the later Beethoven sonatas. 

A prelude and fugue (five-voiced) from Bach's Well-tempered 

Clavichord. 
Two Chopin etudes. 

Selections from the more important works of Schumann and 
Brahms. 

Fob Organ Students : 

One of the great preludes and fugues of Bach. 

A sonata of Guilmant or Rheinberger. 

r.< 1, (lions from the works of Thiele, Wider, Merkel, or Pranck. 



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THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 301 

Fob Vioun Students : 
A Bach sonata. 

A concerto of advanced difficulty. 
A modem sonata for piano and violin. 

Selections from the more important works of Vieuxtemps and 
Wieniawski. 

For Vocal Students : 
An operatic aria. 

An aria from Handel's Messiah or Haydn's Creation. 
An aria from a modern oratorio. 

Group of songs from Brahms, Jensen, Schumann, Schubert, 
or Franz, 



ii. COURSE IN THEORY AND HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

This course is intended for composers and theorists. If 
the candidate be not fairly experienced at' the keyboard, 
and familiar with all the major and minor keys togethei 
with the simpler harmonies therein, he will be obliged to 
take introductory studies before entering the first year, 
which corresponds to the freshman year in the College of 
Liberal Arts. 

The course requires all the subjects enumerated under 
the head of Music on pages 136 to 138, and in addition the 
study of General Physics for one year. As in the course 
in Applied Music, the candidate will be obliged to prove 
his ability to matriculate in the College of Liberal Arts 
before receiving his degree. 

The course covers four years' work and leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Music. The candidate at the close 
of the required studies must compose a work of consider- 
able length for chorus and orchestra, introducing solos and 
a tonal fugue in at least four parts. In both its technical 
and artistic aspects this work must be satisfactory to the 
faculty. 



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302 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

III. POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

This course gives further opportunity to performers for 
l)ur8uiDg their studies either in preparation for artistic 
concert performance or to extend their knowledge of the 
classical literature of applied music. To composers it offers 
valuable experience in the larger forms, such as cantatas, 
oratorios, chamber music, symphonies, etc. In its broadest 
sonse music presents an almost limitless field for study, and 
i^raduates can enter this course with profit. 

IV. LITERARY MUSICAL COURSE. 

This course is intended for students of high school age, 
and includes the more essential subjects necessary for gen- 
eral culture, and permits the study of music for two hours 
a day. It consists of the four-year course in the Evanston 
Academy of this University, the study of Music being sub- 
stituted for one-fourth of the required work. The studies 
include Latin, Physiography, Algebra, English, Grecian 
and Roman History, Greek, Biology, Plane Geometry, 
Physics, German and French. Music is to be continuously 
and satisfactorily pursued during the entire course, two 
lessons a week to be taken, and at least two hours a day 
devoted to its study. The student will come under the 
jurisdiction of the Academy, and will receive its diploma 
upon passing the necessary examinations. For particulars, 
other than musical, see circular of the Evanston Academy. 

Students in this course pay the full Academy tuition f eo 
of $60.00 a year, and for their music, tuition according to 
the ** Special Student Fees" on page 306 of this catalogue, 
less a rebate of $20.00 a year. 



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THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 303 

V. COURSE IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS. 

In the current year a course in public school music 
methods has been established. It is in charge of an experi- 
enced specialist who is also Supervisor of Music in the 
public schools of Evanston. The course embraces the studies 
of Introductory Harmony, Form, and Analysis, Musical 
History; also classes in Vocal Sight Reading, and special 
lectures bearing upon the study of the child voice, methods 
of teaching, chorus conducting, etc. Students are permitted 
to observe the actual work of music instruction as it is 
given in the Evanston public schools. A special circular 
gives full particulars. 

CERTIFICATE OF PERFORMANCE. 

To students who have studied at least two years in the 
school and can creditably perform a program in their 
specialty, a Certificate of Performance stating the degree 
t)f proficiency will be given. The minimum requirements 
are as follows: 

I'o Piano Students : 

Beethoven, a complete Bonata. 

Bach, a fugue or three-voiced invention. 

Mendelssohn, Schumann, and Chopin, characteristic pieces of 

average difficulty. 
Two selections from more modem composers. 

To Organ Students : 

Bach, prelude and fugue. 
Mendelssohn, sonata complete. 

Two groups of pieces drawn from the modern English and 
French schools. 

To Violin Students : 

A sonata for piano and violin from Haydn, Mozart, or Bee- 
thoven. 
One of the easier Viotti Concertos. 
Two groups of solo pieces of average difficulty. 



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304 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBR8ITY. 

To Vocal Students: 
An oratorio aria. 

A group of songs from the classic composers. 
A group of songs from modern composers. 



METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Attention is called to the fact that instruction in instru- 
mental and vocal music is based upon private lessons, and 
not upon the so-called ** conservatory" or ** class" system. 
Artistic results are entirely dependent upon a close adapta- 
tion to the individual needs of the pupil, and cannot be 
satisfactorily accomplished in classes. No two students 
have the same mental, physical, or artistic capacity, and 
their individual capabilities can be neither properly nor 
fully developed without painstaking personal attention. 
The only real advantages of the class system — those of 
emulation and observation — are fully provided for by the 
system of weekly solo classes. 



MUSICAL PEDAGOGY. 

During the last term of each year a series of lectures, 
more especially intended for the graduating class, is given 
by the Director of the Preparatory Department. These 
lectures are designed to give young teachers an orderly 
survey of the materials of music education with special 
reference to piano playing from the smallest beginnings to 
an advanced stage of attainment. 

DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES. 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty, diplomas will 
be given to students completing the courses in Applied 
Music and Theory and History of Music; and certijQeatea 



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THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 305 

to those completing the second year of the course in Applied 
Music and the third year of the course in Theory and 
History of Music. 

Certificates of Performance will also be granted on the 
conditions mentioned under that heading on page 303. 

The fee for the diploma is $10.00, and for the certifi- 
cate, $5.00. 

FREE ADVANTAGES. 

The classes in Sight-reading, the Chamber Music and 
Faculty Concerts (except the Artists' Series), numerous 
recitals, and lectures in the School of Music and other de- 
partments of the University, are free to the students of the 
School of Music. 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Matriculation Fee — A matriculation fee of five dollars 
is charged on entering the regular courses or theoretical 
classes. It is paid but once. 

Incidental Fee — A fee of fifty cents a term is charged 
each student entering the School. This fee covers admission 
to the Artists' Series of concerts. 

All students in the regular courses are charged fifty cents 
additional in the second, third, and fourth terms, which sum en- 
titles them to a reserved seat ticket for the concerts of the 
Evanston Musical Cluh. Students who are memhers of the Club 
are exempt from this charge. 

The school year is divided into two semesters of eighteen 
weeks each, the semesters being subdivided into two terms 
of nine weeks each, thus making four terms of nine weeks 
each in the school year. 



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306 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Regular Course Fees. 

Course No. 1. Theory Fee, which includes classes 
in Harmony, Musical History, Analysis, Coun- 
terpoint, Vocal and Instrumental Sight-Read- 
ing, Ensemble, and Literary Studies |20.00 a term 

Course No. II 20.00 

Course No. III. According to Special Student Fees. 

Course No. IV. See page 302. 

iTerm Fee 30.00 " 
To Students registered in Course 
I or II 10.00 " 

The following reduced fees for private lessons in vocal or 
instrumental music are granted to students in Course No. I paying 
the "theory fee" of twenty dollars, or in Course No. V, paying the 
"term fee" of thirty dollars. They Include two half-hour lessons 
a week. 

Professor Lutkin (Piano or Organ) $35.00 a term 

Professor Lutkin (Special Organ rate — see 

page 300) 20.00 

Professor Harold E. Knapp (Violin) 25.00 

Professor Arne Oldherg (Piano) 30.00 

Victor Garwood (Piano) 30.00 

Karleton Hackett (Voice) 40.00 

W. H. Knapp (Voice) 20.00 

Lillian French Read (Voice) 30.00 

Margaret Cameron (Piano) 20.00 

Special Student Fees. 
Private Lessons for a Term of Nine Weeks. 

Two half- One half- 
hour lessons hour lesson 
a week. a week. 
Professor Lutkin (Piano or Organ).... $45.00 $25.00 

Karleton Hackett (Voice) 54.00 30.00 

Professor Arne Oldberg (Piano) 40.00 22.00 

Victor Garwood (Piano) 40.00 22.00 

Professor H. B. Knapp (Violin) 31.50 17.00 

W. H. Knapp (Voice) 27.00 15.00 

Lillian French Read (Voice) 40.00 22.00 



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THB SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 307 

Two half- One half- 
hour lessons hour lesson 
a week. a week. 

Day Williams (Violoncello) 27.00 15.00 

Margaret Cameron (Piano) 27.00 15.00 

Elizabeth Raymond Woodward (Piano) 22.50 12.00 

Nina S. Knapp (Piano) 20.00 11.00 

L. N. Dodge (Piano or Theory) 20.00 11.00 

Bertha A. Beeman (Voice) 20.00 11.00 

L. R. Blackman (Violin) 18.00 10.00 

C. J. King (Clarinet) 18.00 10.00 

Charles S. Horn (Cornet) 18.00 10.00 

Class Lessons. 

Pull Theoretical Course 120.00 a term 

Partial Course 11.00 " 

Adyanced History, K 5.00 " 

Pedagogy (free to graduating class in Diploma 

Course) 5.00 

Vocal Sight-Reading Class (to students taking no 

other work) 1.50 " 

Piano Practice. 

One hour daily $ 3.00 a term 

Two hours daily 5.50 

Three hours daily 8.00 " 

Four hours daily 10.00 " 

Organ Practice. 

Each hour of daily practice, including blowing... . $10.00 a term 
Pedal Piano, each hour of daily practice 5.00 

Note. — A discount of twenty-five per cent. Is allowed to the Imme- 
diate members of a minister's family for private lessons. It Is not 
allowed for class Instruction or practice. 

Private lessons falling upon legal holidays are made up 
only at the convenience of the teacher. No deductions will 
be made to pupils for absence from lessons due to occasional 
illness or other causes. In cases of protracted illness, when 
due notice is given, private lessons missed will be trans- 
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308 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

ferred to a subsequent term, or the loss will be divided with 
the student. No rebates are allowed for class lessons. 

Tuition is payable strictly in advance at the University office, 
518 Davis street. Checlcs may be drawn payable to Northwest- 
ern University, and all fees should be paid In currency or In 
Chicago exchange. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

A Preparatory Department is maintained by the School 
of Music in which excellent instruction may be obtained in 
piano, organ, voice, or theory. Instruction is given for the 
most part by graduates and under-graduates of the school, 
classified respectively as Assistant Instructors and Student 
Instructors. The terms coincide with those of the regular 
school, being nine weeks in length. Tuition rates are from 
ten dollars to fifteen dollars a term of eighteen half -hour 
lessons. 



For further information and special circulars relating to the 
School of Music, address Northwestern University School of 
Music, Evanston, Illinois. 



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THE ACADEMIES 



EVANSTON ACADEMY OP NORTHWESTERN 
UNIVERSITY. 

BVAIYSTON. 



FACULTY. 
Abthub Hehbebt Wilde, S.T.B., Ph.D., Principal. 
Hesbebt FBANKLnr FiBK, D.D., LL.D., Principca Emeritus. 
Ada Townsknd, A. M., Instructor in Latin. 
Julia Babbgkson Feboubon, Instructor in DravHng. 
Claba Qbant, Ph.B., Instructor in English. 
Cabla Febk Saboent, AM., Instructor in History. 
Ann Bstelle Cabawat, Ph.B., Instructor in German. 
Jane Nkhx Soott, A.M., Instructor in Greek and Latin. 
Flotd Field, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Habold Stiles, A.M., Instructor in Physics and Manual Training. 
John Hubebt Soott, A.B., Instructor in English. 
Lewis Habt Weld, A.M., Instructor in Biology. 
Petteb a. Claassen, A.B., Instructor in French and German. 
Geoboe Benjamin Woods, A.B., Instructor in English. 
Fbedebick William Owens, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Mybtle Laminta Johnston, A.B., Instructor in History. 
Elizabeth Bbaodon, Ph.B., Instructor in Latin, 
Shelbt Mnj.ABD Habbison, Instructor in Penmanship and Book- 
keeping. 
Henbt Augustus Gilbuth, Instructor in Arithmetic. 
Simon Bablow, Instructor in Stenography and Typewriting. 
Saba Juur Bbown, B.S., Office Secretary. 

The Academy is situated on the University Campus in 
Evanston, and occupies Fisk Hall, which was erected for 

309 



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310 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

its purposes in 1898. The special work of the school is to 
prepare students for college and technical schools. Besides 
this special work a general academic education is offered to 
those who cannot take a regular course, but who wish to 
prepare themselves for the study of law or of medicine, or 
for teaching in the public schools, or for business. 

The course of study extends through four years. Stu- 
dents who give satisfactory evidence of having done thor- 
oughly a part of the course before entering will be credited 
with that work. Students completing the course are ad- 
mitted to the College of Liberal Arts on the certificate of 
the Principal. 

The Academy provides instruction adequate for admis- 
sion to college in the English, French, German, Latin, and 
Greek languages, in Mathematics, History, and Civics. It 
has a well-equipped Manual Training plant, and ample 
rooms completely furnished with apparatus for laboratory 
instruction in Mechanical and Electrical Physics, Zoology, 
Botany, and Physiography. 

It also affords convenient facilities for college students 
to make up entrance conditions. 

Five literary societies, three for young men and two for 
young women, have their homes in well furnished parlors in 
Fisk Hall and all of them are zealously active. The two 
Christian Associations maintain weekly meetings and in 
many ways serve the interests of the body of students. They 
welcome all students to membership. 

The departments of instruction are immediately super- 
vised by the corresponding departments of instruction in 
the College of Liberal Arts. Those who wish to add courses 
in Music or in Elocution to Academy studies, have con- 
venient access to those departments, in which unsurpassed 
advantages are offered. 



For further information, address Evanston Academy, Evans 
ton, Illinois. 



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THB ACADEMIBS. 311 

GRAND PRAIRIE SEMINARY. 
Onabga, Illinois. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Georqe Rutledqe Palmer, A.M., D.D., 
President of the Board of Trustees. 

Elmes Hull, Chairman. William Alexander Rankin. 

George Booth, Ph.M. ^/'lmam Durham Rankin. 

Benjamin Harris Durham. Amos Jesse Newell, M.D. 

John Kirkbride Egley. Henry Hoag Frost, A.B., ex-of- 

WnxiAM Harry Eoley. ficio. 

Edwin Lewis Wheeler, Secretary. 



FACULTY. 



Henry Hoag Frost, A.B., Principal. 

Frances Christine Rawlins, A.B., Instructor in Oreek and Latin. 

Martha Rogers Eoley, A.B., Instructor in (German and History. 

Grace Margaret Gilbert, Instructor in Oratory and Physical Cul- 
ture. 

Stephen Decatur van Benthuysen, M. Accts., Instructor in Busi- 
ness Science, Shorthand, Commercial Geography, and Polit- 
ical Economy. 

Bkbtha Andrews Perry, Instructor in Piano and Harmony. 

Clara Katherine Sheean, Instructor in Vocal Culture and Musi- 
cal History. 

Gwendolin Mary Watkin, Instructor in Drawing and Painting. 

Margaret Valentine Wax, A.B., Instructor in English Language 
and Literature, 

Edgar Packard, Instructor in Psychology, Pedagogy, and Methods. 

George Conway Raune, B.S., Instructor in Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics. 

Henry Ferdinand Staehling, Instructor in Military Drill and 
Assistant in Business Department. 

George Edward Spra, Instructor in Typewriting. 



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312 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Grand Prairie Seminary is a preparatory school of the 
University. It was founded in 1863 and was affiliated with 
Northwestern University in 1901. It is well endowed and 
maintains a high standard of scholarship. 

It is situated in Onarga, Illinois, on the main line of the 
Illinois Central Railway, eighty-four miles south of Chi- 
cago. The town is an ideal place for a school, having no 
saloons and the conununily being noted for its high moral 
tone. It has good churches and a Public Library, which is 
at the service of the members of the school. 

The equipment of the Seminary consists of three build- 
ings, a Recitation Hall for class instruction, an Auditorium 
for public exercises, musical, oratory, and art instruction, 
and a Women's Dormitory and Boarding Hall. The school 
has a library of a thousand carefully chosen volumes of 
standard works of reference on science, history, biography, 
and literature. It has laboratory facilities for instruction 
in physics, zoology, botany, and chemistry. 

The Seminary offers courses in the Academic Depart- 
ment, Normal Department, School of Business, School of 
Music, Department of Oratory, and the Art Department. 



For further information and full particulars, address Grand 
Prairie Seminary, Onarga, lilinols. 



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THB ACADBMIBS. 813 

ELGIN ACADEMY. 
Elgin, Illinois. 



TRUSTEES. 
Geobge p. Lord, President of the Board. 
WnuAM Qbote, Vice-President of the Board, 
Chables Riflet Hopson, Acting Treasurer, 

Mbs. Mat Labkin Hoobnbeck. Ora Levant Pelton, M.D. 

John A. Waterman. Joseph Thing Ladd, D.D. 

WnxiAM Dean Ktmrall. George Ezra Cook. 

Andrew Rovelstad. John Martin Blackburn. 

John Schuler Wilcox. 



FACULTY. 



George Newton Sleight, A.B., B.Pd., Principal, Instructor in 
Greek. 

Florence Sarah Raymond, B.S., Instructor in Mathematics, 

Sarah Anna Pbatt, A.B., Instructor in English. 

Laura Fosteb Ullbigk, A.B., Librarian, Instructor in History. 

Robebt Abchibald Campbell, B.S., Instructor in Physics, Chem- 
istry, and Botany, 

Feed Maichele, A.B., Instructor in German and Latin. 

Agnes B. Oliveb, Instructor in Elocution. 

Peabl a. Dunbab, Principal of the Preparatory Department. 

Oliveb Joel Penrose, Instructor in the Commercial Branches. 

LoTTA H. James, Instructor in Shorthand and Typewriting. 

Bessie M. Costello, Instructor in ShortJiand, 

Mart Louise Prindle, Assistant Librarian, 

E!tvon Schetlow, A.B., Instructor in Mechanical Dratoing. 

Elgin Academy was first opened for students December 
1st, 1856y in a commodious building erected the year pre- 
vious. Its charter, originally granted in 1839, was revised 
in 1855, and in this amended form is still in force. In 1903 
the Academy was affiliated with Northwestern University. 

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314 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

The Academy is situated in the most elevated and 
healthful portion of the City of Elgin, a town of 22,500 
inhabitants, on the main line of the Chicago and Northwest- 
em Railway, about forty miles northwest of Chicago. The 
campus, covering an area of four acres, is delightfully 
shaded, and presents an attractive view. 

The main building for the regular academic work is an 
imposing three-story brick structure. It is heated by steam 
throughout, lighted by electricity, and has the city water 
on two floors. The rooms are large, airy, and well lighted. 

A large three-story building of brick, which was erected 
in 1888 through the generosity of Mrs. Vincent S. Lovell, 
for manual training purposes, is now used for science work 
and is known as the Lovell Science Hall. 

This Academy offers to the youth of both sexes the best 
possible opportimities for a scholarly and practical educa- 
tion. 

Its students are prepared for the leading colleges or for 
business. The surroundings are refining and Christian. 
Open and frank relations are maintained between teachers 
and students. Instructors, whose interest in young people 
eictends further than class-room duties, are alone secured. 
At no time will the Academy seek for a larger attendance 
than is consistent with thorough and personal work. 



For further information, address Elgin Academy, Elgin, 
Illinois. 



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THE THEOLOGICA.L SCHOOLS. 



The University has never established a theological school 
under its own control, but has from the beginning recog- 
nized Oarrett Biblical Institute as meeting all the needs of 
a theological department. There is a liberal interchange of 
work between the College of Liberal Arts and the Institute, 
and properly qualified students .in either school are ad- 
mitted to classes in the other without tuition fees upon the 
recommendation of their respective faculties. 

GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 

EVANSTON. 



FACULTY. 

Chablbs Joseph Littlb, Ph.D., LL.D., S.T.D., President, Professor 
of Historical Theoloffy. 

Milton Sfenseb Tbbbt, A.M., D.D., LL.D., Professor of Christian 
Doctrine. 

SouDif Cakt Bbonson, A.M., D.D., Registrar, Professor of Practical 
Theology. 

Chablbs Macaulat Stuabt, A.M., D.D., Secretary, Professor of 
Bacred Rhetoric. 

DoBBMua AiMY Hayes, 8.T.D., Ph.D., Librarian, Professor of New 
Testament Exegesis. 

Fbbdebick Cabl Bisblen, A.M., B.D., Professor of Semitic Lan- 
guages and Old Testament Exegesis. 

Robbbt McLban Cumnock, A.M., L.H.D., Professor of Rhetoric and - 
Elocution. 

John Josiah Raff, B.D., Insirudor in Greek and Hebrew. 

NcLS Edwabo Simonsbn, A.M., D.D., Principal of the Norwegian- 
Danish Theological School. 

Walter Hugh Whhxock, Assistant Librarian, 

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316 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Garrett Biblical Institute^ chartered in 1855, is a 
theological seminary which has, since 1856, been in close 
cooperation with Northwestern University. It is situated 
in Evanston, upon the University campus, and is open to 
young men from any evangelical church who are properly 
recommended as candidates for the Christian Ministry. It 
was established especially as a seminary where young men 
of this class from the Methodist Episcopal Church might 
be educated. It is supported by income from property in 
the city of Chicago, bequeathed in 1853 as a perpetual foun- 
dation, by Mrs. Eliza Garrett. It invites to its* care and 
instruction young men in the Church whom God has called 
to be His ministers. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Students not licensed to preach are received on the rec- 
ommendation of their respective quarterly conferences, or 
temporarily, in failure of this, on a note from their pastor, 
promising the recommendation in due time. The form of 
recommendation authorized by the General Conference of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church is as follows : 

We, the members of the Quarterly Conference of 

hereby express our 

Judgment that is called of God to 

the work of the ministry, and we recommend him to the care and 
instruction, of Garrett Biblical Institute. 

Applicants from other churches will need to bring such 
certificates as are usually given by the denominations to 
which they belong. Students from other theological semi- 
naries may be admitted ad eundem on presenting satisfac- 
tory testimonials of equivalent work and honorable dis- 
missal. 



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THE SCHOOLS OF THEOLOGY. 317 

INSTRUCTION. 

Those who enter the courses of instruction should have 
a thorough preparation. The College of Liberal Arts offers 
its advantages to those who require this preparation. 

The aim is to embrace all departments of Theological 
Encyclopedia, as indicated in the following scheme : 

A. Exegetical Theology. 

1. Biblical Philology — Hebrew and Greek Languages^ and 
their cognates. 

2. Biblical Introduction — Canonics, Criticism (higher and 
lower), Sacred Literature. 

3. Biblical Archeology — Chronology, Ethnology, Geography, 
Antiquities. 

4. Hermenevtic9 — (1) General: Study of words. Grammatical 
Forms, Styles, etc. (2) Special: Study of Figurative Language, 
Parables, Allegories, Types, Symbols, Prophecy, Apocalyptics. 

5. ExegeHs — Critical and expository study of the several 
books of the Bible. 

6. Biblical Theology — Development of Biblical Doctrine as 
distinct from Historical and Systematic Theology. 

B. Historical Theology. 

1. Sources — Canonical and Apocryphal books of the Bible, 
Pseudepigraphal books, Sacred books of all nations. Archseologi- 
cal Monuments, Patristics, Symbolics, Liturgies, and Hymnology. 

2. External Development of the Kingdom of God — ^Pre-Chris- 
tian History of Israel and the Nations. Patriarchal period, Mo- 
saic, Priestly, Regal, and Prophetic development, and Post-exil- 
ian Judaism, life and work of Christ, the Apostolic Age, and 
ancient, mediseval, and modern periods of the Christian Church. 

3. Internal Development — ^Rellglous life and thought of the 
Church, its progress through the centuries, History of Doctrines. 
Comparative Religion and Theology, and Sociology. 



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818 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

C. Systematic Theology. 

1. Metaphysics — Psychology, Ontology. 

2. Apologetics — Evidences and defenses of Revelation. 

3. Dogmatics — Doctrine of God and Chrlstology, Anthropol- 
ogy, Soteriology, Eschatology. 

4. Polemics — ^The great issues of theological controversy. 

5. Irenics — Methods of conciliating theological differences. 

6. Ethics — Theoretical, Practical. 

D. Practical Theology. 

1. The Ministry as an Institution — Its calls, functions, qualifi- 
cations, preparation, maintenance, perils, safeguards. 

2. Homiletics — History, science, and art of preaching, praxis, 
homiletical study of great preachers. 

3. Liturgies — ^Forms of worship, conduct of services, adminis- 
tration of the Sacraments. 

4. Ecclesiastical Polity and Law — Forms of church govern- 
ment. Judicial administration, discipline. 

5. Pastoral Theology— {1) Catechetics: Training of children 
and probationers, educational functions of the church, Sunday- 
schools, etc. (2) Poimenics: Pastoral care, shepherding the 
flock, details of the pastoral office. (3) Church Activities: Adap- 
tation of the machinery of the church to the existing needs, benev- 
olent work and social life of the church, employment of lay agen 
cies, study of other religious institutions in their relations to our 
own. 

6. Halieutics — Eivangelistic methods, the work of extending 
the Kingdom within the Christian community, missions — domestic 
and foreign. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Two main courses of study are offered, as shown in the 
schedule below: 

1. Degree Courses. 
There are two Degree Courses : one leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Divinity, the other to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. 



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THE SCHOOLS OF THEOLOGY. 319 

1. The B,D, Course, — ^Thls Is a three years' course arranged 
for classical graduates of approved colleges. Applicants, upon 
registration, are required to present their diplomas. Students, 
not graduates of colleges, may be admitted to this course, if, by 
examination not later than the close of the first term, they satisfy 
the Faculty of their classical and literary fitness to complete it 
The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred upon all who com- 
plete the course to the satisfaction of the Faculty. 

2. The PhJ). Course. — ^By an arrangement with the College 
of Liberal Arts of this University, the Institute is now able to 
offer to college graduates a resident course of study leading to the 
Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Students are admitted to this 
course upon terms stated on page 171. 

Of the four years required as a minimum for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy, three at least must be spent in residence at 
a theological school of high standing, and the last two at Garrett 
Biblical InsUtute. 

II. Diploma Courses. 

1. The Oreek and Hebrew Course, — This course is intended 
for those who desire to read and understand the Scriptures in the 
original, and yet are not prepared to do the work of the Degree 
Course. Greek is taught during three years, beginning with the 
elements. Hebrew is taught during the second and third years, 
beginning with the elements. The Greek class in exegesis read 
the Synoptic Gospels and the Acts in the Senior year. The He- 
brew dass read the poetical books of the Old Testament In the 
other departments the work of this course is nearly the same as 
that for the Degree students. 

2. The Oreek and English Course, — In this course English ex- 
egesis is substituted for Hebrew. It is in other respects the same 
as the Greek and Hebrew Course. 

3. The English Course. — In this course training in the Eng- 
lish Language, in Rhetoric, Logic, and Psychology takes the place 
of the study of elementary Greek and Hebrew, and English exege- 
sis of the Scriptures is given instead of the study of the poetical 
books In Hebrew and of the Synoptic Gospels and Acts in Greek. 
The characteristic work of this course is in charge of Professors 
Stuart Hayes, and Eiselen. In the departments of Systematle, 
Historical, and Practical Theology, Elocution, and Sociology, the 

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820 N0RTHWB8TEIRN UNIVERSITY. 

studies of the English Course are the same as in the other 
diploma courses. 

Students who complete either of these courses receive 
the diploma of the Institute. Three years are required for 
any one of them. Applicants for admission must present 
certificates from approved high schools or academies, other- 
wise they must pass a satisfactory examination in the 
studies prescribed by the Bishops for those who seek admis- 
sion to an annual conference. [See Discipline of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, 1904, page 430.] 

College Graduates enjoy here exceptional advantages. 
In several departments, conspicuously in the Exegetical and 
Historical, they are formed into separate classes. They are 
encouraged and helped to special investigation, and receive 
from their professors continued personal attention in their 
chosen line of study. They have access, also, by the cour- 
tesy of the University, to any classes of the College of 
Liberal Arts for which they have time and aptitude, upon 
the recommendation of the Institute Faculty. 

Diploma Students are accorded the largest privilege of 
election. They may devote their energies to the studies for 
which they are best adapted, assured that in either of the 
three Diploma Courses they will receive thorough instruc- 
tion, be held firmly to high standards, and be trained care- 
fully for the work of the ministry. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The method of instruction is by recitation and lectures 
and by free discussion. Great emphasis. is laid upon in- 
struction in elocution. Hence a course of training extend- 
ing through three years is required of those who graduate. 
It is confidently proposed that every student who completes 
this work shall acquire a correct, forcible, and graceful 
Btyle. 



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THE SCHOOLS OF THEOLOGY. 821 

In addition to the instruction by recitation, lectures, and 
free discussions in the classrooms, public lectures and ad- 
dresses by distinguished persons are also given before the 
Faculty and students, covering all the topics which relate 
to the work of Christian scholars and pastors. 

LIBRARIES. 

The number of volumes in the Institute and University 
Libraries — the one for daily working use and the other for 
free reference — is about seventy-five thousand. 

Reading-rooms are connected with both libraries, and 
are supplied with the important dailies, weeklies, monthlies, 
and quarterlies in general and theological literature. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

The Literary Department of the Christian ABsociatlon of the 
Institute aims to stimulate theological and literary studies by ex- 
ercises in composition, criticism, and extemporaneous speaking. 

The Missionary Department of the Christian Association of 
the Institute seeks, by its weekly meetings and by occasional 
public meetings and lectures by returned missionaries and others, 
to promote information on Home and Foreign Missions, and to 
keep alive the missionary spirit among the students. 

BUILDINGS. 

Heck Hall, — ^The rooms in Heck Hall are in suites, consisting 
of study, bed-room, and wardrobe, and are furnished with tables, 
book-cases, bureaus, stands, chairs, bedsteads, and mattresses. 
Students supply their own pillows, pillow-cases, sheets, bed- 
coverings, towels, crockery, and small articles. 

Memorial Hall, — ^Memorial Hall contains a large chapel, 
library, and reading-room, six lecture-rooms, with private rooms 
for professors, and a fire-proof vault for valuable books and 
papers. Both halls are heated by steam. 



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322 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

FINANCIAL AID. 

Young men who have learned to earn and save money 
often work their way unaided through college and the theo- 
logical school. The means of self-help in and around Evana- 
ton are but casual ; yet a truly earnest and persevering stu- 
dent, with tact and helpfulness, many times finds, and even 
creates, opportunities for himself. To these help is ren- 
dered as far as practicable. Some sixty or seventy appoint- 
ments for preaching have been made available to competent 
preachers among the students. Circumstances require that 
promises of aid shall be made with caution, and to the ex- 
tent only of the ability to meet them. The institution covets 
consecrated young men who never quail in the presence of 
difSculties, and in every practical and useful way its aim 
is to aid them. The Board of Education of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, with headquarters in New York, renders 
very eflBcient help by its judicious system of loans. 

The Sarah Stewart Fund, yielding four hundred dollars 
a year, is for the benefit of approved candidates for mis- 
sionary fields. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition and room-rent are free of charge to regularly 
entered theological students. When occupying a room in 
Heck Hall, each student is charged an incidental fee of 
twenty dollars a year, payable half-yearly in advance, for 
curator's service, fuel for public rooms, and general re- 
pairs. When not occupants of Heck Hall, students pay 
(half-yearly in advance) a fee of five dollars a year. 

Note. — ^Rooms in Heck Hall not occupied by regularly entered 
theological students can be used (subject to rules for conduct and 
residence) by students recommended for the ministry, who are 
connected with any of the departments of the University, and who 
intend to take the theological course in this institution, on con- 

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THE SCHOOLS OF THEOLOGY. 823 

ditlon that each occupant of a room shall pay thirty dollars a 
year, half-yearly in advance. 



For further information and special circulars relating to the 
Institiitey address Garrett Biblical institute, Evanston, Illinois. 



NORWEGIAN-DANISH THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL. 

EVANSTON. 



RkverenD Nels E. Simonsen, A.M., D.D., Frindjml. 

This department is established to prepare men for the 
ministry among the Norwegian and Danish people, and 
offers its students an opportunity to pursue their theological 
studies in the English and Norwegian-Danish languages. 
The course of study extends through three years. Oral and 
written examinations are held at the close of each year, and 
those who complete the entire course in the Norwegian- 
Danish language are granted a certificate. 

A close relation exists between Garrett Biblical Institute 
and the Norwegian-Danish Theological School. By an ar- 
rangement formally entered into the students of the latter 
school may take the entire course of study of the Institute, 
substituting instruction in one or more branches in their 
own tongue under Principal Simonsen. Upon the satisfac- 
tory completion of the course thus pursued, they will be 
graduated from the Institute. 

Students are received on the reconmiendation of their 
respective conferences. A commodious and substantial 
building, containing dormitories and a dining-hall, has been 
erected by the Norwegian and Danish people for the use of 
students of this department. 



For Information respecting the Norwegian-Danish Department, 
address Norwegian-Danish Theological School, Evanston, Illinois, 

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324 NORTHWBSTBIRN UNIVBRSITT. 

SWEDISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

EVANSTON. 



This school of theology began its work in 1870 at Gales- 
burg, Illinois. In 1882 it attained a permanent home in 
Evanston, where it is now established in a commodious 
building, and where facilities exist for obtaining access to 
the different departments of the University. It is under the 
supervision of the four Swedish Conferences of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church in the United States. 

It is the only school of its kind in the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, and from its ranks of students preachers are 
sent out to nearly every state in the Union. More than one 
hundred ministers have been educated in the school since 
its beginning, and are laboring faithfully in different parts 
of the country. 

The aim of the school is to do practical work in helping 
men toward success in the ministry. It was called into 
existence to meet the urgent and increasing demands for 
educated pastors and missionaries among the Swedish popu- 
lation in the United States, which numbers more than a 
million. Its course of study is broad and practical. 

The Seminary is supported by the income from an edu- 
cational fund, collected mainly among the Swedish Meth- 
odist churches in the Northwest. 

The regular course of study in the seminary requires 
four years. The students* progress in their studies is deter- 
mined by examination, both written and oral ; and after a 
satisfactory completion of the full course they receive the 
Seminary diploma. There is no charge for tuition. 

Students are received on the recommendation of their 
respective Quarterly Conferences. 



For further information, address Swedish Theoioglcal Semi- 
nary, Evanstonp liilnois. 



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CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

1905-1906. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES AND OTHER 
GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



Fellows. 

Blair, Charles Scofleld, Geology, 

A.B., Northwestern University, 1905. 
Cox, Jessie Uretta, HUtory, 

A.B., Northwestern UniTersity, 1905. 
Fulcber, Gordon Scott, Physics, 

B.8., Northwestern University, 1905. 
Hohn, Gottlieb Christian, (German, 

A.B., Central Wesleyan College, 1902. 
Hogue, Clara M., English Literature, 

Ph.B., Greenville College, 1904. 



Clifton, 

Fort Dodge, la, 

Evanston, 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 



Resident Graduate Students. 

Allen, Joseph Randolph, Neurology, 8t, Ausgar, la, 

B.S., Iowa State Agricultural College, 1899. 
Clapper, Grin L#evi, English Literature, Mt, Morris, 

A.B., Mount Morris College, 1905. 
Cline, Justice H., Geology, Bridgewater, Va, 

A.B., Bridgewater College, 1809. 
Corbln, Charles E., Mathematics, Utica. 

A.B., Doane College, 1905. 
Crown, Frank Anton, Biblical Literature, North Prairie, Wis. 

A.B., Lawrence University, 1905. 
DuBois, Walter Lynn, Pathology, 

B.S., University of Iowa, 1902. 
Edgar, Thomas Oscar, Bacteriology, 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1901. 
Ellis, Cora, German, 

Ph.B., Northwestern University, 1897. 
Ely, Harriott Belle, English Literature, 

Ph.B., Northwestern University, 1902. 
Freeark, Frederick A., Lato, 

A.B., Harvard University, 1893. 



Rocktoell City, la, 

Chicago. 

Evanston, 

Bertoyn, 

Chicago, 



325 



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S26 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Foudrey, Blbertle, Physics, 

B.S., North weBtern UniTeraity, 1008. 
Gallup, Henry Victor, Greek, 

A.B., Northwestern University, 1904. 
George, James William, History, 

A.B., Northwestern University, 1005. 
Gilbert, Newell Clark, Pathology, 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1003. 
Gilpin, Margaretta, History, 

A.B., University of South Wales, 1896. 
Haman, John William, Sociology, 

A.M., Northwestern College, 1001. 
Harper, James Robb, Botany, 

A.B., Cedarville College, 1000. 
Harris, Alfred Ernest, English, 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1005. 
Hirsch, Arthur Henry, History, 

A.B., Cornell Collefire. 1901. 
Hogue, Emma Grace, Oreek, 

A.B., Greenville College, 1800 ; 

A.M., Northwestern University, 1904. 

Int Hout, Cornell, Philosophy, 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1004. 
Jampolis, Mark, Physiology, 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1903. 
Jeffrey, Alexander Balfour, Physiology, 

Ph.B., Simpson College, 1002. 
Johnston, Myrtle Laminta, History, 

A.B., Northwestern University, 1004. 
Keith, Gertrude, Economics, 

A.B., Yassar College, 1004. 
Kinugawa, Taro, Economics, 

A.B., Kelo College. Tokyo, Japan, 1893 ; 
Ph.B., Hiram College. 1903. 

Klemme, Edward J., Philosophy and 
Education, 

A.B., Central Normal College, 1893. 
Little, Helen Marina, French, 

A.B., Woman's College, Baltimore, 1899. 
Lundburg, Frank Anthony, Chemistry, 

A.B., Fort Worth University, 1905. 
McLennan, William Etridge, Sociology, 



Evanston, 

Chicago, 

Fulton, 



De Kalh. 



Barry, South Wales. 
Chicago. 
Wilmette. 
Melrose Park. 
Arlington Heights, 
Evanston. 



Oak Glen. 

Chicago, 

Chicago. 

Joliet. 

Glencoe, 

Nagrya, Japan, 



Butler. 



Evanston. 
Georgetovm, Texas. 
Chicago. 



A.B., Northwestern University. 1887; A.M., 1890. 
Merubia, Molses, Zoology, Iquique, Chili. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1005. 
Parkinson, George Howard, Semitic Evanston. 

Languages, 

Ph.B., Northwestern University, 1002. 
Parks, Albert H., Physiology, Chicago. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1004. 
Patterson, Charles Waggoner, Chemistry, Chicago, 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1001. 



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COLLBOE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



327 



Pearson, Lucy Helen, English Language, Cincinnati, 0. 

AB., TTniyeralty of Cincinnati, 1905. 
Pickard, Rawson Joseph, Physiology, Chicago, 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1903. 
Pierce, Frances Curry, English Liteny Malta, 
ture. 

Ph.B., Northwestern Uniyersity, 1900. 
Pollard, Mary Orenda, Zodlogy, * Evanston, 

A.B., Mlddlebury Colle^, 1896. 
Ream, Albert Louis, Chemistry, Hampshire. 

B.8., Nortbwestem University, 1905. 
Reithard, Abbie Grace, Botany, Evanston. 

A.B., Northwestern University, 1905. 
Schreiber, Charles Henry, Economics, Potter, So. Dak. 

AB., Northwestern University, 1904. 
Seller, William E. W., New Testament, Evanston. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1896. 
Smith, Horace Greeley, Economics, Ransom. 

A.B., Northwestern University, 1905. 
Sommer, Wllhelmine, Zoology, Chicago. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1905. 
Stansell, George Gilbert, History, Grove Oak, Ala. 

A.B., Grant University, 1903. 
Stowe, Herman Wilmer, Law, Fort Dodge, la. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1903. 
Thomas, Emma Jane, Botany, Chicago. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1905. 
Twining, Granville Howard, Zodlogy, Des Moines, la. 

B.8., Northwestern University, 1906. 
Walton, Pauline, English Literature, Eugene^ Ore. 

AB., UnlTersity of Oregon, 1904. 
Williams, Elizabeth, Geology, Chicago. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1905. 
Williams, Seymour, History, Evanston. 

A.B.. University of Illinois, 1901. 



Non-Resident Graduate Students. 



Frizzelle, Jacob Wellington, History, 



Watseka. 



AB., Northwestern University, 1888 ; A.M., 1893 ; 
B.D., Drew Theological Seminary. 



Kleinsmid, Rufus Bemhard, Pedagogy, 
A.B., Northwestern University, 1905. 

Rummell, Owen William, Greek, 
A.B., De Pauw University, 1902. 



Greencastle, Ind. 
Bradley. 



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828 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



CANDIDATES FOR A BACHELOR'S DEGREE. 



Abemethy, Flossie, 
Aishton, Edith, 
Albritton, Elmer Sanford, 
Allott, Elizabeth Ruth, 
Amidon, Amy, 
Anderson Anna Olivia, 
Anderson, Daniel, 
Anderson, Ernest Emil, 
Anderson, Lilian Antonia, 
Apfelbach, George, 
Armitage, Clyde Foster, 
Armstrong, Christopher 

Lawrence, 
Armstrong, Lucy May, 
Arnold, Frazer, 
Aspegren, Oliver Richard, 
Asthalter, Edward Jacob, 
Auten, Mildred Garvin, 
Ayling, John Alford, 
Balrd. Winfleld Earl, 
Baker, Clara Belle, 
Baker, Elsie Margaret, 
Baldwin, Alura, 
Ballard, Nellie Alferetta, 
Banister, Joseph Ray, 
Barker, Elizabeth Groat, 
Barnes. Myrtle Adella, 
Barr, Olive Emison, 
Barrow, Lillian Adelaide, 
Bartlett, Edward Clayton, 
' Bartlett, Lydla Anne, 
Beaton, Eleanor, 
Beaver, Mabel Adeline, 
Beck, Marshall, 
Becker, Agnes Elizabeth, 
Becker, Gertrude, 
Beckington, Lulu Belle, 
Beers, Alice Nathalia, 
Beers, Berthadell, 
Beggs, Mary Gertrude, 



B.S. 


77 


Spokane, Wash. 


A.B. 


12 


Evanston, 


B.S. 


71 


Letoishurg, Pa. 


B.S. 


16 


Wilmington. 


B.S. 


12 


YandaliOy Mo. 


A.B. 


85 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


17 


Wahoo, Neb. 


B.S. 




Donovan. 


A.B. 


120 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


66 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Elizabeth. 


B.S. 


91 


Milan. 


A.B. 


111 


Ottawa. 


A.B. 




Warsaw, Ind. 


A.B. 


35 


Saronville, Neh. 


B.S. 


110 


Muscatine, la. 


B.S. 


102 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Byron, Ont. 


A.B. 


8 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 


111 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


7 


Kankakee. 


B.S. 


91 


Morrisville, Vt. 


B.S. 


69 


Ironton, Mich. 


A.B. 


15 


Frankfort. 


B.S. 


10 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Princeton, Ind. 


A.B. 


11 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


68 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


16 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


55 


Galena. 


A.B. 


113 


Shermerville. 


A.B. 




Huntington, Ind. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


14 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Belvidere. 


B.S. 


78 


Holly, Colo. 


A.B. 


52 


Holly, Colo. 


B.S. 


39 


Ashland. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



329 



Bell, Herbert Teomans, 
Bell, Lewis Barclay, 
Bell, Milton Ernest, 
Bendix, Earnest Oliver, 
Beyer, Albert Ralph, 
Bickell, Ralph Thomas, 
Biddle, Elyertus Franklin, 
Bierer, Idah, 
Bigelow, Stella Imogene, 
Blair, Arthur John, 
Bishop, lya May, 
Blake, Guy Minnlch, 
Bock, Edna Wilhelmine, 
Bogardus, Emory Stephen, 
Bohling, Bernard Stanton, 
Bondurant, Flint, 
Bonthius, Andrew, 
Boren, John William, 
Boring, Ruth Mary, 
Bovard, Edna Louise, 
Bowdle, Frances Burl in. 
Bowman, Ray Prentice, 
Brackett, Robert D., 
Braden, Edwin Stuart, 
Bradley, Ella Harriet, 
Bragdon, Sara Frances, 
Bragg, E^verett Eugene, 
Bragg, Helen May, 
Brawthen, Clara Marie, 
Brlggs, Charles Alfred, 
Brockway, Hermon Lyman, 
Brodby. Martha Edna, 
Bronson. Earle Avaun, 
Bronson, Ruth, 
Bronson, Walter Teed, 
Brown, Edith Grace, 
Brown, Elsie Mary, 
Brown, Gretta Mariel, 
Brown, Gus Scott, 
Brown, Josephine Charlotte, 
Brown, Vergil Kenneth, 
Bryant, Ethel Frank, 



A.B. 


66 


Holly, Col, 


A.B. 


41 


Holly, Ool. 


B.S. 


39 


Channahon, 


A.B. 


68 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


75 


Edgetooodf la. 


B.S. 


21 


Helena, Mont, 


B.S. 


109 


Middleton, Mich, 


A.B. 




Hiawatha, Kan, 


A.B. 


17 


Joliet. 


B.S. 


103 


Clifton, 


A.B. 


49 


Toledo, 0. 


A.B. 


70 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


56 


8t, Joseph, Mo, 


A.B. 


56 


Belvidere. 


B.S. 


15 


Lewis, la. 


B.S. 


79 


Cairo, 


B.S. 


77 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


13 


MaHnette, Wis. 


A.B. 


127 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


103 


Marseilles, 


A.B. 


101 


Piqua, 0, 


B.S. 


18 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


17 


Sheridan, Mhh 


B.S/ 


54 


Preemption 


B.S. 


74 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


46 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


79 


Evanston. 


B.a 


15 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


120 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


110 


Rockford. 


A.B. 


108 


Rawson, N, Y, 


B.S. 


79 


Red Oak, la. 


A.B. 


82 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


108 


Luveme, Minn. 


B.S. 




Btreator. 


B.S. 




Kankakee. 


A.B. 


50 


Mankato, Minn. 


A.B. 


18 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


81 


Clearfield, la. 


A.B. 


63 


mies Center. 


A.B. 


42 


Mankato, Minn. 


B.S. 


70 


Malta. 

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330 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Buchbinder, Jacob Richter, 
Buckley, Horace Mann, 
Bullock, Isabel Clifton, 
Bunker, Alice Martha, 
Burdette, James Calvin, 
Burdick, Anna Layinia, 
Burg, John Charles, 
Burgess, Lucy Rich, 
Burnett, Rebecca Grace, 
Burr, Harriet Kendall, 
Busse, Florence Ethel, 
Bussey, Susie, 
Butterfleld, Mary Edith, 
Butz, Florence Julia, 
Cady, Ella Leone, 
Campbell, Gilbert Lewis, 
Campbell, Jessie, 
Campbell, Marie Louise, 
Cannon, Lucile Follett, 
Carpenter, Cora Virginia, 
Caulkins, Flora Lucy, 
Chamberlain, Mildred, 
Chapin, Gertrude Frances, 
Chase, Martin Rlcft, 
CheuTront, John Richard, 
Childs, Mary Louise, 
Clark, Estelle Osbom, 
Clay, Nolle Edith, 
Clement, Laura, 
Clement, Grin Clark, 
Glutton, Fred Homer, 
Cocayne, Jesse Peryl, 
Cockeram, Alfred Normal, 
Cochran, Edith Virginia, 
Coddington, William, 
Colby, Guy Irving, 
Collyer, Frank Peter, 
Colthurst, Claire, 
Colvin, Ernest Elmer, 
Cook, Adele, 
Cook, Jennie Maine, 
Cook, William Robertson, 



A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


18 


Wilmington. 


A.B. 


78 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Woodstock. 


B.S. 


16 


Danvers. 


B.S. 


85 


Assumption. 


B.S. 


16 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Wenona. 


A.B. 


112 


Knoxville, la. 


A.B. 


88 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


49 


Porter, Ind. 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 


11 


Keokuk, la. 


A.B. 


92 


Wilmette. 


A.B. 


104 


Oeneseo. 


B.S. 


14 


Monica. 


A.B. 




Coal City. 


A.B. 


36 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


112 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


12 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Duluth, Minn. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


34 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


75 


Toulon. 


A.B. 


98 


Buckhannon, W. Va. 


B.S. 


113 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


16 


Highland Park. 


A.B. 


8 


Quincy, 0. 


B.S. 


65 


Joliet. 


A.B. 


9 


LaBelle, Mo. 


A.B. 


90 


New Castle, Pa. 


A.B. 


92 


Mediapolis, la. 


A.B. 




Menomonie, Wis. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


B.S. 


112 


Princeton. 


A.B. 




Bpringfleld. 


B.S. 


23 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


116 


Morris. 


B.S. 


103 


Wichita, Kan. 


B.S. 




Evanston. 


B.S. 


15 


Ottumwa, la. 


A.B. 


41 


Evanston. 

Digitized by VjOOQ 



COLLEGE OF LlBBltA^L ARTS. 



331 



Gorrie* Carl Milford, 
Cowlee, Ethel Mary* 
Cowlee, Biinlce, 
Cowles, Helen, 
Oox, Edith, 
Croaier, Gertrude. 
Croaaman, Lyman Teele, 
Culyer, Mary Alma, 
Cnmnock, Claude, 
Cnrme^ George, 
Carme; Gertrude, 
Cortlaa, George Chester. 
Dahm, Thomas Matthew, 
Dalhey, Louise Jeannette, 
Dale, Ruth Geraldine, 
Daniels, Lucretia Ellen, 
DaTid, Charles Wendell, 
Dayidson, Marie Dorothy, 
Dayla, Mahel Clare, 
DeBra, Blanche Katharine, 
Decker, Charles Elijah, 
DePue, Earl Bixhy, 
Dewey, Perdita Irene, 
Dickson, Clilford Guy, 
Dildine, Florence May, 
Dine8» Charles Ross, 
Dinea, Lloyd Lyne, 
Dixon, WUlard Jerome, 
Dolan, Basse, 
Dolbeer, Loyeme Ann, 
Dolby, Elizabeth Sarah, 
Donaldson, Catharine Laura, 
Donn, Clara Belle, 
Doremus, Paul Harrison, 
Domer, Pierre Lionel, 
Drew, Ruth Elizabeth, 
Duncan, Anna, 
Dyaart, Ruth Helen, 
Early, Benjamin Blakeman, 
Bbrly, Francis Horn, 
Eastman, Helen Darling, 
Bbert, John Adam, 



A.B. 




Isabel, Kan. 


A.B. 




Burlington, la. 


A.B. 


52 


Hinsdale, 


A.B. 


42 


Des Moines, la. 


A.B. 


SO 


Fort Dodge, la. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


21 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


12 


Fort Collins, Colo. 


B.S. 


90 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


17 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


36 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


59 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


60 


McGregor, la. 


B.S. 


16 


Taylorville. 


A.B. 


111 


Winnetka. 


B.S. 


98 


Danville. 


A.B. 


18 


Onarga. 


A.B. 


IC 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Harrisburg, 0. 


A.B. 


17 


Epworth, la. 


A.B. 


lOG 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Manston, Wis. 


B.S. 


IG 


Kenosha, Wis. 


A.B. 


10 


Pasadena, Cal. 


A.B. 


11 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


49 


Quincy. 


A.B. 


116 


Quincy. 


B.S. 




Kankakee. 


A.B. 


74 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


121 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


107 


Chicago. 


B.S. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 


77 


Canton. 


B.S. 




Chicago. 


B.S. 


44 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


102 


Hobart. Ind. 


B.S. 


40 


Lintner. 


A.B. 


50 


Nachusa. 


A.B. 




Rockford. 


B.S. 




Oak Park. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 




Lowell, Ind. 

Digitized by V. 



Google 



882 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Eckert, Florence, 
Eddy, Harriet Barton, 
Eddy, Milton Walker, 
Eilert, Edward Franklin, 
Eizin^^er, Alma Catherine, 
Eldred, Alice Stanley, 
Eldred, Bertha Marguerite, 
Ellis, Cora Belle, 
English, Arthur Floyd, 
Eyana, Donald Winslow, 
Evans, Earle Wesley, 
Evans, Julia Farwell, 
Falley, George Frederick, 
Fansler, Dean Spruill, 
Fehrman, Manie Eva, 
Feipel, Louis Nicholas, 
Field, Edward Lewis, 
Fisher, Arthur Haberlin, 
Fisk, Ellen Green, 
Fixen, Effie Jennie, 
Focht, Carl Francis, 
Fonda, Edith Lois, 
Forrey, LaJeune Churcher, 
Foster, Clyde Dewight, 
Foster, Jessie Lillian, 
Fowler, Grace Mary, 
Freisen, Henry Jacob, 
Fritze, Margery, 
Fry, Alpheus Leland, 
Fulmer, June, 
Fulton, Alice Anette, 
Gage, Matilda Jewell, 
Gardiner, Jennie Tryphena, 
Gascoigne, Mabel Mortimer, 
Gates, Lloyd Roland, 
Gates, Ruth Helen, 
Gibson, Earle Stewart, 
Gibson, Francis Martin 
Gilbert, Samuel Harvey, 
Gilbreth, John Paul, 
Gilchriese, Louise Mary, 
Gillan, Fannie Eva, 



A.B. 


16 


Mendota. 


A.B. 




Medina, 0. 


B.S. 




Medina, 0. 


B.S. 


112 


Baraboo, Wis. 


A.B. 


78 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


108 


Joliet. 


A.B. 


107 


Joliet. 


A.B. 


108 


Lexington. 


B.S. 




Evanaton. 


B.S. 




Peoria, 


A.B. 




Sidney, 0, 


A.B. 


61 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


17 


Evanston 


A.B. 


130 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


120 


Evan$ton. 


A.B. 


44 


Chicago, 


B.S. 




DesPlaines. 


A.B. 




Ottawa. 


A.B. 


115 


Evanston, 


B.S. 


84 


Chicago. 


B.S. 




Lockport, 


A.B. 


74 


Berwyn, 


A.B. 


56 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Lowell, Ind. 


A.B. 


12 


Piano. 


A.B. 


11 


Kankakee. 


B.S. 


78 


Mt, Lake, Minn, 


B.S. 


14 


8t. Joseph, Mich. 


B.S. 




Jordan, Ont. 


B.S. 


11 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


43 


Bluffton, Ind, 


A.B. 


15 


Aberdeen. Bo. Da) 


B.S. 


16 


Harvey. 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


B.S. 


66 


Elgin, Minn. 


A.B. 


45 


Wilmette. 


A.B. 


15 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


61 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Armstrong, 


B.S. 


71 


Normal. 


B.S. 


87 


Cheboygan, Mich. 


B.S. 


74 


Wellington. 

Digitized by CjOO^ 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



388 



Gillett, Onral Trimble, 
Gilmth, Henry Augustus, 
GUson, James Harold, 
Glover, Benjamin Curtis, 
Goble, Luther Elmer, 
Good, Violette Amy, 
Goodsmith, Abbie Gertrude, 
Gorsuch, Edith Irene, 
Graeser, Charles Frederick, 
Graves, Charles Arthur, 
Graves, Jeanne Frances, 
Green, Albert Baker, 
Green, Colce Fremis, 
Greene, Pearl Stuart, 
Greenfield, George Henry, 
Greenough, Frances Pearl, 
Griffin, Alice Julia, 
Griffin, Erma Alwilda, 
Grigson, Blanche Lenora, 
Grimes, Bernard Cromwell, 
Gruner, Mabel Rose, 
Guffln, Alice Idell, 
Gustine, Clifford Clyde, 
Guthier, Cora, 
Haas, Felix Harold, 
Hackley, Lillian Parmella, 
Halle, Charles Harry. 
Haines, Mary, 
Haines, Sarah Elizabeth, 
Hall, Eleanor Jean, 
Hall, Frances Alys,. 
Hall, Rufus Clifford, 
Hall, Victor Curtis, 
HamUton, Rub^y James, 
Hammond, Edith, 
Hammond, Margaret, 
Hammond, Marie, 
Handy, Rena Marshall, 
Haana, Forest Walker, 
Hanns, William Harrison, 
Hardy, Albert Irving, 
Hardy, Walter Edmund, 



B.S. 


61 


Coming, la. 


A.B. 


74 


West Plains, Mo, 


A.B. 


42 


Netoton, la. 


B.S. 


13 


Farmington, Mo, 


B.S. 


11 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


88 


Chicago, 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


B.S. 


78 


Pekin. 


B.S. 


122 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Harlan, la. 


A.B. 


103 


Hinckley, 


A.B. 


46 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




'Newton, Ind, 


A.B. 


15 


Chicago 


B.S. 




Athens, Mich. 


A.B. 


15 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


72 


Stockton, 


A.B. 




8t, Joseph, Mo. 


A.B. 


110 


Augusta. 


B.S. 




Manteno. 


A.B 


11 


Speer, 


A.B. 


15 


Geneseo. 


B.S. 


12 


Canton, 


A.B. 


11 


Dunning. 


B.S. 




Butler. 


B.S. 


9 


Newton, la. 


A.B. 


28 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


110 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


15 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


75 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Chicago. 


B.S. 


108 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Tuscola. 


B.S. 




Atlanta, Mo. 


B.S. 


16 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


112 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


110 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


81 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


15 


Maryville, Mo. 


B.S. 


67 


Palatine. 


A.B. 


38 


Sheldon. 


B.S. 


36 


Sheldon. 

Digitized by v 



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334 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Harris, Charles Malachl, 
Harris, Bmily, 
Harris, Grace Margaret, 
Harrison, Daisy Alberetta, 
Harrison, Shelby Millard, 
Harter, Olga Helene, 
Hartman, Emery Abram. 
Hartman, Raymond Francis, 
Harwood, Annie Laird, 
Harwood, Corabel Kate. 
Harwood, Francis Laird, 
Hauck, Frederick August, 
Hawley, Melvin Moses, 
Hazleton, Mabel Anna, 
Head, Cloyd Simmons, 
Heaps, Claude William, 
Heist, Allen Aaron, 
Hem, Estella Lilia» 
Hennessey, Lora, 
Heren, Hubert Edmund, 
Hermann, Louis Francis, 
Herstein, Lillian, 
Hibberd, Helen L., 
Hickman, Jesse Dilby, 
Hill, Mabelle Gertrude, 
Hinds, Mildred Adele, 
Hitch, Lola Seyilla, 
Hobart, Chauncey Goodrich, 
Hobart, Louise, 
Hochbaum, Lili Emilie, 
Hofmann, Amalia Ida, 
Hogue, Edith, 
Hojo, Rikinosuke, 
HoUis, Bessie Mae, 
Holton, Helen Liddell, 
Honnold, Charles Edgar, 
Hood, Grace Gordon, 
Hood, Winifred, 
Horn, Elsie Gertrude, 
Horn, Thomas Paul, 
Homing, Dorothy, 
HpmlBg, Sibyl Eunice, 



A.B. 




Leipaic, 0. 


B.S. 


120 


East Mechias, Me. 


A.B. 


105 


Fort ColUnSt Coh 


A.B. 




Winimac, Ind, 


A.B. 


97 


Leaf River, 


A.B. 


99 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


104 


Aahley, Ind, 


B.S. 


18 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


49 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


16 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


84 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


90 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


73 


KingavUle, 0. 


B.S. 


80 


Morrison. 


A.B. 


46 


Oak Park. 


B.S. 




Kewanee. 


A.B. 


39 


MiddleviUe, Mich. 


A.B. 


61 


Oswego. 


B.S. 


102 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


15 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Marengo, la. 


A.B. 


78 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


50 


South Bend, Ind. 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


B.S. 


108 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


4 


Lena. 


B.S. 


84 


Seaford, Del. 


B.S. 


15 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


76 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


63 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


B.S. 


16 


Lodus, Mich. 


A.B. 


137 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


59 


Milbrook. 


A.B. 


52 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


A.B. 


51 


Kansas. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


41 


Washington, /<?, 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 




Ogden, Utah, 


A.B. 


17 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


75 


Evanston. 

Digitized by CjOO^ 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



335 



Horton, Lewis Ray, 
HoBtetter, John Hull, 
Howard, George Parkinson, 
Howard, Horace Lee, 
Hubbard, Edna Amanda, 
^Hubbart, Dwight Conkling, 
Hufford, Clarence Valentine, 
Hughes, May, 
Hull, Isaac Harvey, 
Hunt, Ava, 

Hunter, William Olin, 
Hurford, EHeanor, 
Imus, Mabel Lola, 
Ingels, Gertrude, 
Ingham, Helen, 
Isaacson, Caroline Christine, 
Isaacson, Vema Leone, 
Isom, Nettie, 
Jacob, Qotlieb Frederick, 
Jacobson, Edmund, 
Jahnke, John Henry, 
James, George Edgar, 
Jenkins, Florence, 
Jockisch, Albert Julius, 
Johnson, Carl David, 
Johnson, Charles John, 
Johnson, Edith Ingebore, 
Johnson, James Richard, 
Johnson, Nelson Holden, 
Johnson, William Arthur, 
Johnston, Leila Melissa, 
Jolley, Arthur Thompson, 
Jones, E^velyn, 
Jones, Nellie Rosemond. 
Joslyn, Leslie Burrltt, 
Judkins, Marcia Orilla, 
Julian, Arthur Nelson, 
Kean, Gilbert Paul, 
Keith, Alice, 
Kelley, Walter Denman, 
Kercher, Cora Ellen, 



B.S. 


109 


Littleton, 


B.S. 




Oolo, Iowa, 


A.B. 


44 


Montevideo, Uruguay. 


A.B. 




Qarfleld, WoMh. 


B.S. 




Rockford, 


B.S. 


91 


Monticello. 


B.S. 




Monon, Ind, 


A.B. 


81 


Elhurn. 


B.S. 


16 


Baunemin. 


A.B. 


11 


Bvan$ton, 


A.B. 


28 


MUchelh Kan, 


A.B. 


41 


Olencoe, 


B.S. 


88 


Mendota. 


A.B. 


105 


Lafayette. 


A.B. 


36 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


82 


Kankakee, 


A.B. 


66 


Princeton. 


A.B. 


11 


KeniltDorth. 


A.B. 




Coshocton, 0. 


B.S. 


18 


Chicago. 


B.S. 




Eyota, Minn. 


B.S. 


114 


Rochester, 


B.S. 


108 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


67 


Decatur, 


A.B. 


64 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


96 


Bvanston, 


B.S. 


12 


Clinton^ Wis. 


B.S. 




Chicago, 


B.S. 


62 


Box Grove, Ont, 


B.S. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


11 


Bardboo, Wis, 


A.B. 


43 


Sodus, N. Y. 


A.B. 


46 


Red Wing, Minn, 


A.B. 


8 


Milford. 


B.S. 


18 


Marengo. 


B.S. 




Bamesville, 0. 


A.B. 


78 


Elgin. 


B.S. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 


76 


Olencoe. 


A.B. 


98 


Cheyenne, Wyo. 


A.B, 


19 


Qoshen, Ind, 



•Peceaned. Jaquary 7, IW. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



336 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Kercber, John Wesley, 
Keyes, Marien Musgrave, 
Kimber, Mabel Anna, 
King, Ida Harriet, 
Kingsley, Margaret Appleton, 
Kiningbam, Robert Baird, 
Kirk, Ruby Mabel, 
Kittleman, Earle Buxton, 
Klatt, Helen Otilda, 
Kietzlng, Florence Amy^ 
Kletzing, Kathryn Allegra, 
Knapp, Warren Emerson, 
Knox, Edith Orilla, 
Knox, Ruth, 

Konsberg, Edna Matilde, 
Kotz, Raymond Castle, 
Krueger, Frances Doris, 
Kueffner, Marye Frances, 
Kuehl, Celia Pauline, 
Laird, Allie Luella, 
LApham, Martha, 
Larson, Albertine Marie 

Elizabeth, 
Larson, Nellie Eugenia, 
Lasecki, Thomas Thad. 
Lasher, Grace Bstelle, 
Latham, Jean, 
Law, John Granville, 
Leach, Imagarde B., 
Leathers, Ward Gibson, 
LeBaron, Mabel Ruth, 
LeBaron, Paul Keith, 
LeCron, James DeFrees, 
Lee, Edwin Ferdinand, 
Lennox, Edith Alice, 
Lennox, Olive Beatrice, 
Leonard, Howard George, 
Leonard, Lura Etta, 
Leslie, William Robert, 
Linn, Lena May, 
Linnell, Carrie Edna, 
Little, Edith Regina, 



A.B. 




Ooahen, Ind. 


A.B. 


8 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


130 


Springfield, 


A.B. 


105 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


48 


Evanaton, 


A.B. 


9 


Danville, 


B.S. 


86 


Kenosha, Wis, 


B.S. 


71 


Berwpn, 


A.B. 


81 


Lincoln, 


A.B. 


115 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


15 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


47 


Evanston, 


B.S. 


15 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


73 


Evanston, 


B.S. 


11 


Evanston, 


B.S. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 




Chicago, 


B.S. 


8 


Chatstoorth, 


A.B. 


103 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


110 


Evanston, 


B.S. 


12 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


18 


Kankakee, 


A.B. 


11 


Kankakee. 


A.B. 


44 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


126 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


12 


Flathush, N, Y, 


B.S. 


124 


Milton, Kan, 


A.B. 


67 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


13 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


15 


Evanston, 


B.S. 


11 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


55 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Ossian, la. 


A.B. 


14 


Benton Harbor, Mich, 


A.B. 


16 


Benton Harbor, Mich 


A.B. 




Wheaton, 


A.B. 




South Bend. 


A.B. 




Tolono. 


A.B. 


76 


Shawnee, Okla. 


a:b. 




Belvidere, 


A.B. 


70 


Evanston, 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



387 



Little, Polly Brevoort, 
Lloyd, Nellie Evelyn, 
Lockey, John Edgar, 
Lomdlno, Grace Eva, 
Long, Carl Samuel, 
Long, Mayme Dee, 
Long, Walter Eugene, 
Long, William Henry, 
Loncks, Vernon Reece, 
Lovejoy, Eunice Stephens, 
Lowe, Charlotte, 
Lowe, Max Foster, 
Luocock, Edward Halford, 
Luce^ Ayice lona, 
Lundahl, Mahel Adeline, 
Lutkin, Harris Carman, 
Lyon, Edward Rose, 
Lyons, Alice Belle, 
Lyons, Charles, 
McCabe, Ruth, 
McCarthy, June, 
McCarty, Laura Frost, 
McCauley, George Vest, 
McClure, Charles Sherman, 
McCoid, Lora Frances, 
McConoughy, Edward Marsh, 
McCool, Bessie, 
McCormick, William Grover, 
McCulIoch, Victor, 
McDonald, Eleanor, 
McDonald, Ernest William, 
McDonnell, Simon John, 
McGoTem, Kathryn, 
McGrew, David Randolph, 
MacGregor, Margaret, 
Maodonald, George Buchan, 
BCacgaffey, Christine, 
Mclntoeh, Eunice May, 
McJohnston, Harrison, 
McKee, Benlah Clare, 
McNamer, Bruce Ross, 
McPherrin, Howard Chesney, 



B.a 


117 


Kankakee. 


A.B. 


58 


Evanston. 


B.a 




Helena, MonU 


A.B. 


84 


Springfield. 


A.B. 


74 


Netoman. 


A.B. 


78 


Oifnthiana, Ky. 


B.S. 




Marengo, la. 


B.S. 


95 


Marshalltoton, la. 


A.B. 


58 


Chicago, 


B.S. 




Princeton, 


A.B. 


31 


Winamac, Ind, 


B.8. 


17 


Ketoanee, 


A.B. 


106 


8t, Louis, Mo. 


A.B. 




Belvidere, 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


48 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Joliet. 


A.B. 


109 


Ludington, Mich. 


B.S. 




Alton. 


A.B. 




Crawfordsville, Ind. 


B.S. 


51 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


61 


Tuscola. 


B.S. 


43 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




WabasK Ind. 


A.B. 


39 


Logan, la. 


A.B. 


71 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


37 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Tuscola. 


B.S. 


79 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


69 


Topeka, Kan. 


A.B. 


50 


Severy, Kan. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


52 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


81 


Williams. 


A.B. 


16 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


51 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


119 


Chicago. 


B.S. 




Clear Lake, la. 


A,B. 


77 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


93 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 


112 


Kansas City, Mo. 

Digitized by VjC 



338 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



McPherrin, Ruth, 
MacWilliams, Jennie Eliza- 
beth, 
Mamer, Jacob, 
Manley, Ethel Gertrude, 
Manson, Egbert Frank, 
Marsden, Roger Dearborn, 
Marsh, Clarence Stephen, 
Mars^, Daniel Lash, 
Marsh, Haven Walrath, 
Martin, Joshua Blaire, 
Martin, May, 
Massey, Zeta Luclnda, 
Mattison, Robert Spencer, 
Mayo, Myrtle, 
Mertz, Maud Louise, 
Mettler, Florence Eliza, 
Meyer, Fred Clifford, 
Miller, Donald Crandon, 
Miller, Floyd Cleveland. 
Miller, James Wilson, 
Miller, Mabel Elizabeth, 
Miller, Newton Orville, 
Miller, Robert Ernest, 
Minium, Ruth Bower, 
Miranda, Max Garver, 
Mock, Roy D., 
Monagon, Edith Shurtleff, 
Montague, Pearl, 
Montgomery, Edward Gar- 
field, 
Moore, Blanche Baldwin, 
Moore, Gerard Grattan, 
Moore, Vernette Belle, 
Morford, Raymond Sparks, 
Morgan, Lydia, 
Morris, Mate Loduska, 
Moss. Joseph Lincoln, 
Mueller, Josephine Mary, 
Mulder, Rltz, 
Murdock, Mora, 
Murphy, Walter Waugh, 



A.B. 


15 


Kansas City, Mo. 


A.B. 


16 


St. Charles. 


B.S. 


31 


Odell. 


B.S. 




Grand Ridge. 


B.S. 


104 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


61 


St. Charles. 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 


105 


Fitz Henry, Pa. 


B.S. 


9 


Evaiiston. 


A.B. 


72 


Oifford. 


A.B. 


111 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


53 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


106 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Chicago. 


A.B. 




Downer^s Grove. 


A.B. 




Tiskilwa. 


A.B. 




Fargo, No. Dak. 


B.S. 


15 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Marva. 


A.B. 




Winnipeg, Manitoba. 


B.S. 




Ivesdale. 


B.S. 




DeviVs Lake, No. Dak. 


B.S. 


109 


Forest City. 


A.B. 


71 


Kankakee. 


B.S. 




Walkerton, Ind. 


B.S. 


13 


Kendallville, Ind. 


A.B. 


7 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Chicago, 


B.S. 




Ireton, la. 


A.B. 


39 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


11 


Winnetka. 


B.S. 




Gray slake. 


A.B. 


106 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Elwood. 


A.B. 




Oskaloosa, la. 


B.S. 


108 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


51 


Wilmette. 


B.S. 




Rose baton, Ind, 


A.D. 


33 


Streator. 


A.B, 




Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



COLLBOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



339 



Nagley, Frank Alvin, 
Neeld, Alice, 
Neely» Clara Grace, 
Neely, Ruth, 
Nelson, Lulu Irene, 
Nelson, Sophie May, 
Nelson, Victor Emanuel, 
Nesbitt, Orpha Ellen, 
Nichol, Roscoe Everett 
Nickell, Clarence Oliver, 
Niehoff, Hattie Antonla. 
Norrls, John Hiram, 
Northrop, Frances M., 
Northrop, James Whitney, 
Norton, Julia Ellen, 
Norton, Louise Werneburg, 
Nortrup, Mabel Bemice, 
Nuttall, ETverett Franklin, 
Nye, John Aaron. 
Nysewander, Bertha Eliza- 
beth, 
Ode, Ella, 

OTftrrell, Thomas Arch, 
O'Grady, Agnes Jane, 
Oleson, Chris Jacob, 
Olson, Jeanne Emilie, 
Onken, Amy Bumham, 
Orem, Bemadette Rose, 
Orem, Leonora Mary, 
Osborne, Maude, 
Paddock, Oladys, 
Page, Laura Gertrude, 
Pancoast, Carrie Lind, 
Parkinson, Jane Bradford, 
Parks, Charles Gilbert, 
Parks, Sarah Rush, 
Patten, Emma Theodosia, 
Patton, Ambler Baxter, 
Payer, Josephine, 
Payne, Mabelle Agnes, 
Pease, Hallie Anna, 
Peck, Caro Beth, 



A.B. 


73 


Bheldon. 


A.B. 


45 


Evanston, 


A.B. 


29 


Evanaton, 


A.B. 


75 


Evaiuton. 


A.B. 


67 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


106 


Chicago, 


B.8. 


52 


Evantton. 


B.S. 


99 


Pawnee City, Neb. 


B.S. 




Kirkman, la. 


B.S. 


32 


Beatrice, Neb, 


A.B. 


82 


Chicago, 


B.S. 


48 


Fairchild, Wis. 


B.S. 


102 


Woodstock, 


B.S. 


39 


Woodstock, 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 


107 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


12 


Havana, 


as. 




Flat Rotk. 


A.B. 


106 


Essex, la. 


B.S. 


66 


Des MoineSj la. 


A.B. 


101 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Pana, 


B.S. 


76 


Manitowoc, Wis. 


'B.S. 


104 


Buncombe, la. 


A.B. 




Chicago, 


A.B. 


41 


Chapin. 


A.B. 


50 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


107 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


107 


Scranton, la. 


A.B. 


37 


Prophetstown, 


A.B. 


102 


Correctionville, la. 


A.B. 


16 


Trenton, Mo. 


A.B. 


89 


Evanston, 


B.S. 




Chicago, 


B.S. 


97 


SUoam Springs, Afk. 


A.B. 


107 


Evanston. 


B.8. 


62 


Ogden, Utah, 


B.S. 


70 


River Forest. 


B.S. 




Mount Pteasqnt, |c, 


A.B. 


14 


Chicago,, 


A.B. 


56 


Evanston, 

Digitized by CjOO) 



340 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Pennington, Hortense Evelyn, 
Peterson, Abe Rudolph, 
Peterson, George Turner, 
Peterson, Hildur Eveline, 
Pierce, John Alexander, 
Pierson, Grace l/ou Ella, 
Pietsch, Dorothea Johanna, 

Sophie, 
Piper, Carolyn, 
Plagge, Herbert John, 
Pollock, Elizabeth Mae, 
Pollock, Samuel Edgar, 
Pool, Lloyd Herbert, 
Pope, Arthur Wellington, 
Pope, Edwina Lydia, 
Porter, Thomas Lansing, 
Post, Clara May, 
Potter, Frank Ohr, 
Potter, Katharine Aline, 
Poutra, Elmer Harry, 
Powers, Myra, 
Prindle, Catherine Sarah, 
Proctor, Georgia, 
Purcell, Daisy, 
Rader, Allen Ferguson, 
Rader, Lucile, 
Rainbow, Elizabeth, 
Ramsey, Edna May, 
Randall, Helen Grace, 
Rape, Chester Bertram, 
Raymond, Miner, 
Redelings, Leslie Hall, 
Rech, Gilbert Henry An- 
drew, 
Reed, Frank Nelson, 
Reisner, Lewis Alpheus, 
Reiter, Edward Field, 
Richmond, Gertrude Marion, 
RiddeU, Earle Stewart, 
Ritter, Paschal Stone, 
Roberts, Charles Samuel, 
Roberts, Edward Brown, 



A.B. 




MediapoliB, la. 


^B.S. 


10 


North Judatm, Ind. 


B.S. 


80 


Oeneteo. 


A. B. 


102 


Chicago. 


B.S. 




Elkhom, Wis. 


A.B. 


71 


Princeton, 


A.B. 


46 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


47 


Bertoyn. 


B.S. 


110 


Barrington. 


A.B. 


91 


Dallas, Ore. 


A.B. 


63 


Bvantton. 


A.B. 




EarMlle. 


B.S. 




Morton Park. 


A.B. 


60 


Bvanston. 


B.a 


73 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


18 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


43 


Evanston, 


A.B. 




Los Angeles, Cal. 


B.S. 


66 


8t. Anne. 


A.B. 


107 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


107 


Bon Air, Va. 


A.B. 


65 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


41 


Polo. 


A.B. 


63 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


69 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Murphyshoro. 


A.B. 


80 


La Salle. 


A.B. 


39 


Huntley. 


A.B. 


43 


Taylorsville 


B.S. 


79 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


14 


Marinette, Wis. 


A.B. 


109 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


122 


Reed. 


B.S. 


69 


Sterling. 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


B.S. 


60 


Glencoe, 


B.S. 


103 


Salem, Ore. 


B.S. 


7 


St. LouU, Mo. 


B.S. 


66 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


10 


CosJiOcton, 0. 

Digitized by V^jOO 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



841 



Roberts, Lloyd Ruby, B.S. 
Rochelean, George Alexander, B.S. 

Rodgers, Adellna Patti, A.B. 

Roessler, Elise ETugonia, A.B. 

Roeesler, Elsa Augusta, A.B. 

Rogers, Mary, A.B. 

Rogers, Myrtle Hoover, A.B. 

Romans, John Brown, B.S. 

Rommel, Jasper Frederick, B.S. 

Roome, Blsie Charlotte, A.B. 

Root, Ralph Waldo, B.S. 

Roeine, Howard Myron, B.S. 

Royal, Clifton DeBeVoise, A.B. 

Russell, Josephine Sleight, A.B. 

Rutledge, Lucy Askins, B.S. 

Rutt, Albert Benjamin, A.B. 

Rutt, Eli Jacob, A.B. 

Ryden, Gertrude Gibbs, B.S. 

Sanders, Amy, B.S. 

Sanders, Isabella, A.B. 
Sarglsson, IZaccheus Eugene, B.S. 

Schafer, Elmer John, A.B. 

Schaff, Emily, B.S. 

Scheftel, Tetta Molly, 'a.B. 

Schell, Louise Elizabeth, A.B. 

Schendel, Chrissie Mabel, A.B. 

Schroeder, Helen Theresa, B.S. 

Scott, Harold Holmes, A.B. 

Scott, Isaac Irving, B.S. 

Scott, Rae Emma, A.B. 

Scott, Thomas, B.S. 

Scoggan, Berenice, B.S. 

Seaton, N. Fay, A.B. 

Seebach, Marie, B.S. 

Seeberger, Hugh Alexander, A.B. 

Seed, Emily Rhoda, B.S. 

Seineke, Agnes, A.B. 

Shannon, Ethel Estelle, B.S. 

Shannon, Mabel, B.S. 

Shannon, Wiley James, B.S. 

Shanver, Fred Ferdinand, B.S. 

Shedd, Alice Emeline, A.B. 



67 Adeh la. 
Chicago. 

109 Oharleroi, Pa. 

59 Chicago. 

120 Chicago. 

69 Chicago. 

41 Oak Park. 
92 Deniaon,' la. 
87 Bloomington. 

104 Berwyn. 

53 Oclva. 

104 Evanston. 

116 De» Moines, la. 

103 Chicago. 
13 Chicago. 

104 Goshen, Ind. 

103 Goshen, Ind. 
120 Evanston. 

11 Evanston. 

16 Ottatoa. 

116 Berwyn. 

80 Melvin. 

30 Chicago. 

119 Chicago. 

11 Crawfordsville, Ind. 

104 Princeton. 
19 Joliet. 

24 Chicago. 

68 Waipukuran, New Zeal. 

105 Evanston. 
109 Onarga. 

9 Wellington. 

51 Jewell, Kan. 

Peru. 

4 Newton, la. 

112 Mount Vernon. 

16 Reedslmrg, Wis. 

103 Minneapolis, Minn. 

42 Minneapolis, Minn 
39 Minneapolis, Minn. 
67 Nettleton, Ark. 

78 Rensselaer, Ind^ 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



W2 



KORTHWBSTBRK UNIVERSITY. 



Shepard, William Odell, 
Shepard, Queen Lois, 
Shibley, Alfred Erie, 
Shirky, Samuel Mohler, 
Shumway, John Magann, 
Shute, Sarah Carlton, 
Siberts, Winifred, 
Simpson, Nelle Eunice, 
Singleton, James Herbert, 
Skelsey, Albert Wesley, 
Slocum, John Ainslie, 
Smart, Gertrude Mills, 
Smart, Willard C, 
Smith, Arthur Bunker, 
Smith, Dennis Vincent. 
Smith, Florence Lillian, 
Smith, Frank Earl, 
Smith, Hazel May, 
Smith, Robert Jason, 
Smith, Sarita Priscilla, 
Smoot, Harold Lyman, 
Smoot, William Clay, 
Smothers, Arthur Elton. 
Smothers, Edgar Raymond, 
Snell, Lila Henrietta, 
Snell, Roy Waldo, 
Snell, Thaddeus Stevens, 
Snyder, Helen Louise, 
Sohrbeck, Henrietta, 
Sowers, Alva Boyd, 
Sparks, Mary Madge, 
Sparling, James Russell, 
Sparling, Sylvester, 
Speck, Florence, 
Sproul, Frederic Good, 
Stahl, Floyd, 
Standiford, Lucille D., 
Stanton, Alvord Cooper, 
Sterling, Georglna Rae, 
Sterrett, Marion, 
Stockley, Florence Alberta, 
Stoll, Rhea Effie, 



A.B. 


61 


Chicaoo. 


A.B. 


79 


Pueblo, Colo, 


B.S. 


102 


8t. Charles. 


A.B. 




Narhome, Mo. 


B.S. 


15 


Evanston. 


B.8. 


77 


Coon Rapids, la. 


A.B. 


37 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Evanston. 


B.S. 




Buckley. 


B.S. 


110 


Fargo, No. Dak. 


A.B. 


98 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


102 


Payson. 


B.S. 




Fort Smith, Ark. 


B.S. 




Evanston. 


A.B. 




Petoskey, Mich. 


A.B. 


17 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


4 


Seneca, Kan. 


A.B. 




Stevensville, Mich 


B.S. 


61 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Wooster, 0. 


A.B. 


12 


Petersburg. 


B.S. 


87 


Petersburg. 


B.S. 


106 


Rossville. 


A.B. 


15 


Rossville. 


B.S. 


105 


Chicago. 


B.S. 


103 


Ida Cfrove, la. 


B.S. 


63 


Ida Orove, la. 


A.B. 


46 


Freeport. 


A.B. 


107 


Moline, 


B.S. 




Genoa. 


A.B. 


16 


Marshalltown. la. 


B.S. 




Henry. 


B.S. 


87 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


77 


Oak Park. 


B.S. 


34 


Warren, Ind. 


A.B. 


54 


Fowler. 


B.S. 


65 


Onarga. 


B.S. 


51 


RichvietD. 


A.B. 


47 


Red Wing, Minn. 


A.B. 


106 


Washington, Pa. 


A.B. 


101 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


54 


Chicago. 

Digitized by V^jOC 



COLLfiGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



343 



Stonier, Bess Olive, 
Stout, Winifred Luella, 
Stoutmeyer, Margaret, 
Stowe, Ethlyn Bemice, 
Strattan, Chauncey, 
Strawson, Arthur Joseph, 
Sutter, Jessie Veronica, 
Swaney, Bertram Garfield, 
Swift, George Hamilton, 
Switzer, Bertha Katherine, 
Sylvester, Donald Bernard, 
Tanquary, Helen G., 
Taylor, Helen Carolyne. 
Taylor, Myron Eugeno, 
Taylor, Paul Moore, 
Taylor, Ralph Clarence. 
Taylor, William James. 
Thlstlewood, Leila, 
Thompson, George Franklin, 
Thompson, Mahel Warner, 
Timberlake, Jeanette Emma, 
Tink, Edmund Walter, 
Tomlinson, Jay Talmage, 
Townsend, Lowell Lrslle, 
Traak, Helene Bates, 
Traxler, Bina Mae, 
Trelease, Ella, 
Tubbe, Eston Valentine, 
Tucker, James Dustin, 
Turner, Jay Boyd, 
Turner, Mary Maurino, 
Uhe, Louis August, 
Umble, John Sylvanus, 
Vest, Nina Eleanor. 
Virden, Harry Lee, 
Vivian, Hilda Mary, 
Voight, Mary Sophia. 
Walker, Flora Gel, 
Wallace, Florence Victoria, 
Wallace, Ralph C. J., 
Walraven. Vera Fae, 
Watkins, Axle Dell, 



A.B. 


22 


Toulon. 


A.B. 


90 


Hurley, 8o. Dak. 


A.B. 


112 


. Onarga. 


A.B. 




Belvidere. 


B.S. 


74 


Mount Vernon. 


A.R 




Evanston, 


A.B. 


80 


Chicago, 


A.B. 


57 


Marengo, la. 


A.B. 


11 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Otterbein, Ind. 


A.B. 


9 


Mediapolis, la. 


A.B. 


15 


Pontiac. 


A.B. 


13 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


103 


Barrow, Wis. 


A.B. 




Huntington, Tnrl. 


B.S. 




Evanston. 


BS. 




Evanston. 


B.S. 


110 


Cairo. 


B.S. 




Jacksonville, Fla. 


B.S. 


74 


Ottatoa. 


B.S. 


9 


Chicago. 


A.B. 




Columbus Grove. Ont, 


B.S. 


43 


Box QrovCj Out. 


A.B. 




Remington, 7ud. 


B.S. 


12 


Ottawa. 


A.B. 


83 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


102 


Bheldon. 


B.S. 


11 


Rossville. 


A.B. 


8 


Harvey. 


A.B. 




Le Roy, Ind. 


A.B. 




Winona. 


B.S. 


46 


Winnetka, 


A.B. 


15 


West Liberty, 0. 


A.B. 


108 


Montezuma, la. 


A.B. 


25 


Pecatonica. 


A.B. 


72 


Bradford. 


A.B. 


104 


Kankakee. 


B.S. 


16 


Clyde. 


B.S. 


83 


Chicago Heights. 


A.B. 




Homer. 


A.B. 


57 


Lyons, la. 


B.S. 


79 


Petersburg. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



344 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Watson, Charles Hamilton, 
Watson, Georgle Louisa, 
Watson, Lewis Martin, 
Welch, Helen Wikel, 
Wells, Alfred Burman, 
Wermuth, William Charles, 
West, Sidney Walton, 
Weston, Frederick Albert, 
Wheeler, Lulu Agnes, 
Wheelock, Grace, 
White, Annie Lucile, 
White, Esther Lucy, 
Whiteside, Loring James, 
Whitmore, Maude Decelle, 
Whitney, Charles Edward, 
Whitson, Thomas Merrick, 
Wilberton, Laura, 
Wilcox, Lottie B., 
Wilcox, Muriel Estelle, 
Wilkinson, James Garfield, 
Wilkinson, Nellie, 
Willett, George Henry, 
Williams, Delia A., 
Williams, Henry Dwight, 
Williams, John Corkhlll, , 
Williams, Laura, 
Wilson, Leon Theodore, 
Wilson, Nelle Mae, 
Wilson, William Cleveland, 
Wishard, Glen Porter. 
Witter, John H., 
Woltman, Josephine R., 
Wood, Cassius Hiram, 
Wood, Louise Farrow, 
Woodmansee, Ada Leigh, 
Wright, Frederick Thomas, 
Wulff, Virginia Jeannette, 
Young, Arthur Edwin, 
Youngs, Lucille Maude, 
Yount, Sarah, 
Zachman, Martha Mae, 
Zimmerman, Grace Blanche, 



A.B. 




Monon, Ind. 


A.B. 


12 


Wilmette. 


A.B. 




Monon, Ind, 


A.B. 


42 


Olarinda, la. 


A.B. 


18 


Maryville, Mo. 


B.S. 


37 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


50 


Hydraulic, Va. 


A.B. 


19 


Evanston. 


B.S. 


47 


Detroit, Mich. 


B.S. 


60 


Wilmette. 


A.B. 


92 


Effingham. 


A.B. 


41 


Hebron, la. 


A.B. 


17 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


10 


Ottatoa. 


B.S. 




Independence, la. 


A.B. 


50 


Evanston. 


A.B. 


106 


Winona, Minn. 


B.S. 




Minonk. 


A.B. 


11 


Hammond. Ind. 


B.S. 


100 


Toulon. 


B.S. 


72 


Toulon. 


A.B. 




Evanston. 


B.S. 




Augusta, Wis. 


B.S. 




Raymond Neh. 


B.S. 


16 


Chicago. 


A.B. 


106 


N. Yakima, Wash. 


03.8. 




Chili, Ind. 


A.B. 


9 


Macomb. 


.B.S. 




Belfast, 0. 


B.S. 


78 


Rensselaer, Ind.* 


B.S. 


108 


Oreenview. 


A.B. 




Quincy. 


B.S. 


102 


Cass City, Mich. 


A.B. 




Hammond, Ind. 


B.S. 


45 


Evanston. 


B.S. 




Oak Park. 


A.B. 


121 


Kenosha, Wis. 


A.B. 


116 


Evanston. 


A.B. 




Rockford. 


A.B. 


79 


Crawfordsville. 


A.B. 


75 


Oregon, Mo. 


A.B. 


16 


Elgin. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



COLLBGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



345 



NOT CANDIDATES FOR A DEGREE. 



Special Students. 



Adams, Elizabeth Ervlng, 
Anable, Anna Marie, 
Andrus, Martha Louise, 
Arthur, Lois, 
Baker, George Cornelius, 
Bigelow, Marguerite Ogden» 
Brown, Ethel Elta, 
Brown, Clara Gertrude, 
Brown, John Roscoe, 
Brown, Helen Dunham, 
Brown, Mary Louise, 
Butler, Lulu Elizabeth, 
Butterfield, Charles Edwin, 
Callagan, Rilla May, 
Campbell, Helen Gertrude, 
Childs, Janet Innes, 
Coffey, Roy Calhoun, 
Coggeshall, Ruth, 
Cooley, Reba Louise, 
Culver, Anna EiValine, 
Daniel, Charles Gillian, 
DeLang, Jessie, 
DeVine, Owen Crippen. 
Dickinson, Frank Leroy, 
Diven, Thomas Carlyle, 
DoUiver, Margaret, 
Dondanville, Lydia Beatrice, 
Doolittle, Aimee, 
Ellis, John Howard, 
Embree, Mary Hannah, 
Essig, Alice, 
Finley, Faye, 

Gallagher, Marguerite Sterling, 
Goldberg, Minnie, 
Griffin, Una Genevieve, 
Hansen, George C, 
Hardy, John Elmer, 
Harry, Bdythe Bstella, 



Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Batavia, 

Chicago. 

West Pullman. 

Evanston. 

Canton, 

Trinidad, Col. 

Grant, Mich. 

Evanston. 

Emmettiburg, la. 

Evanston. 

Belvidere. 

Sheridan. 

Cleveland, O. 

Evanston, 

Netoman. 

Chicago. 

Evanston, 

Chicago. 

Vandalia, Mo. 

Glencoe. 

Evanston, 

Boston, Mass. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Sheridan. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Elkhart, Ind. 

Hoopeston, 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Kenosha, Wis. 

Chicago. 

Sheldon, 

Watseka. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



846 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Hickman, Pearl, 
Holland, Leila, 
Hopkins, Emma Berdette, 
Howe, Halbert Howard, 
Huttner, Ruby Leon, 
Jones, Rhys Price, 
Josepk, John Phillip, 
Kandlik, George, 
Lawson, Blanche Belle, 
Light, Herbert Walter, 
Linder, Bess, 
Loomis, Grace May, 
Lothrop, Laura Tates, 
McWilliams, Edward, 
Maddux, Delia May, 
Maunders, Joseph Ernest, 
Meiswlnkel, Leola, 
Mercer, IdH Emogene, 
Miller, Helen Mary Adelyne, 
Morheiser, William Matthew, 
Morten, Alexander Robert, 
Murphy, Leonard J., 
Nickerson, ETva Waters, 
Nickerson, Ralph Brown, 
Odell, Frank Iglehart, 
Parisoe, George Edward, 
Potter, Harry Rice, 
Prudden, Gladys George, 
Raitt, Bffle Isabel, 
Read, Edna Pearl, 
Richards, Frances Rebecca, 
Robertson, Genevieve Adele, 
Rood, Dwlght Alpheus, 
Sharp, Thomas Sweeney, 
Shepardson, Elizabeth Saggett, 
Sherer, Katherine May, 
Six, RoUo, 
Smith, Vema Ethel, 
Solverson, Hilda, 
Somerville, Esther, 
Springer, William Mason, 



Hoapeston, 

Pontiao. 

Independence, /a. 

Bvantton, 

Chicago, 

Chicago, 

Moline, 

Chicago. 

Chicago, 

Bvanston, 

Mattoon. 

08home, Kan. 

Wichita, Kan, 

Chicago. 

Roaedale, Kan, 

Bruasells, Ont, 

Chicago. 

La Moille. 

Evanston. 

Chicago, 

Cambridge, Wis. 

Fairland, 

Onarga* 

Everett, Mass. 

Evanaville, Ind. 

Danville. 

Leaf River, 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Piper City. 

Evanston. 

Sheridan. 

Lapeer, Mich. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Perry. 

Monteguma, la. 

Oconomowoc, Wis. 

Evanston. 

Palmyra, Mo. 



Digitized by 



Google 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



34'; 



Steams, Marion Landers, 
Steele, Ethel Dnisilla, 
Summer, Florence, 
Thompson, Thomas Eugene, 
Todoroff, Alexander, 
Tracy, Howard VanLinderen, 
Turner, James Andrew, 
Utsunomija, Jo Ishltaro, 
Vawter, Cora Catherine, 
Wendland, Charles John, 
Wilson, Catherine Viola, 
Woodmansee, Cicero McGown, 



Chicago. 
TuUa, Ind. Ter, 
Chicago. 
WUmette. 
• Chicago. 
Evanston. 
Chicago, 
TokyOt Japan. 
Evanaton. 
Chicago. 
Evanston. 
Evaiuton, 



Academy Students Doing Some Work in College. 



Bankson, John Harvey, 
Bucher, Claude Earl, 
Burke, William Warren, 
Davis, Sissilla Amy, 
DeLacy, John Hannan, 
Erickson, Chester, 
Foster, Melissa Elmore, 
Gessner, Fred William, 
Glogauer, Paula Marie, 
Gray, Herhert Weir, 
Hardin, Floyd Barnes, 
Harknesa, Cornelia, 
Jefferson, Matthew Moore, 
Johnson, Ruth Ethel, 
Langdon, Earnest Heber, 
Lyford, Edna Clarissa, 
Mahon, Robert James, 
Mayfleld, Otto, 
McConoughey, Artha May, 
Patten, Helen Prindle, 
Pooley, Eleanor Gertrude, 
Ralston, Florence, 
Schwab, Elizabeth, 
Smith, Roland Earl, 
Spencer, William Anson, 
Tallefson, Theodore Maurice, 
Wiggin, Albert Howard, 



Evanston. 

Winaloic. 

Cairo, 

Evanston, 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston, 

Macomb, 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Rockford. 

Chicago. 

Bristol, Tenn. 

Chicago. 

Monticello. 

Pt, Byron. 

Mt, CarmeJ. 

Potomac. 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Chicago. 

Evanston, 

Brooklyn, K. Y. 

Sandwich. 

Philadelphia. Pa. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Piano, 



Digitized by 



Google 



848 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Wise, Ben Elliott, 
Works, Samuel Dwight, 



Little Rock. 
Evanston, 



Music Students Doing Some Work In College. 



Ahlers, Helene Adele, 
Andrews, Rolla M., 
Barlow, Harriet, 
Beebe, Florence Dier, 
Benson, Stella Lyda, 
Bralnard, Adeline, 
Coale, Helen Rossiter, 
DeGroff, Hazel Lorune, 
Eckert, LiUie, 
Girton, Edith, 
Hopwood, Grace Bell, 
Kennedy, Alice Lucile. 
Kuhn, Ethel Laura, 
LeCompte, Myrtle Eugenl<? 
Marsh, Alice Emily, 
Mercer, Ida Emogene. 
Newell, Sadie Marie, 
Parsons, Hannah Bertha, 
Reynolds, Eva Jane, 
Smith, Elva, 
Smith, Pearl Estella, 
Squire, Walter Edmund, 
Stults, Walter Allen, 
Sutton, Eva Nagle, 
Thiers, Christine, 
Thom. Elizabeth, 
Vernon, Edith Phelps, 
Watkins, Anna Marie, 



Bellevue, la, 

Woodstock. 

Dixon. 

Hampton, la. 

Ottawa. 

Harvard. 

Highland Park. 

Spring Valley. 

Woodstock. 

Madison, 80. Dak, 

Evanston, 

Woodstock. 

Audubon, la. 

Ottumtoa, la. 

Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

La Moille. 

Kanawha, la. 

Tipton, la. 

Bolivar, N, Y. 

Correctionville, la. 

Montezuma, la. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

West Lafayette, Ind. 

Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Correctionville, la. 

Sandwich. 

Princeton. 



Students from Qarrett Biblical Institute. 



Gates, John R., 
Le Baron, Ira, 



Evanston. 
Evanston. 



Digitized by 



Google 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



349 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



8ENI0R CLA88. 

Allen, Joseph Randolph, Iowa. 

B.S., Iowa State College of Agriculture. 

All^n, Robert Aurand, Iowa. 

A.B., Belolt College. 

Baker, Carl, IlHnoU. 

Barlow, Claude Heman, Michigan, 

Barrett, James Dennis, Minnesota, 

A.B., Indiana State Uniyerslty. 

Barry, Joseph David, J^ehraska. 

B.S., University of Nebraska. 

Beardsley, John Wallace, Indiana. 

Black, Andrew E., Illinois. 

Blood, Roscoe Paramore, Illinois. 

Booker, Arthur John, Texas. 

Boyden, Prank Edson, South Dakota. 



B.S., Ph.G., So. Dakota Agricultural College. 



Brooks, Overton, 

Bruins, Dirk, Jr., 

A.B., Ripon College. 
Burke, Charles B., 
Barton, Edgar Curtis, 
Cammack, William, 
Chapline, Frank Le Roy, 

Cohn, Eugene, 

M.D., Barnes Medical College. 
Conover, John Lindsay, 
Coole, Thomas Henry, 

A.B., Baker UnlTcrslty. 
Corwin, Charles T., 
Crist, Otto H., 
Culbertson, Fred David, 
Dailey, Ulysses Grant, 

DeKleine, William. 

A.B., Hope College. 
Dietrich, Lewis Samuel, 

Ph.B., Simpson College. 
Donohue, Eugene Joseph, 
Drisooll, James Patrick, 

DuBcrfs, Walter Lynn, 

B.8., State UnlrerBity of Iowa. 
Duntley, Qeorge Silas, 

Ph.O., Northwestern University. 
Baston, Milo Tripp, 



Kentucky, 
Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 

Illinois, 

Iowa, 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 
Kansas. 

Indiana. 

Indiana. 

Iowa. 

Texas. 

Michigan. 

Iowa, 

Wisconsin, 
Wisconsin. 
Iowa. 

IlHnoU. 



Illinois, 



Digitized by 



Google 



350 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSITY. 



Fenton, Ralph Albert, 


Oregon. 


A.B., nnlvensity of Oregon. 




Foster, Bdwln Tobias Henry, 


Ohio. 


FruBh, Henry Lincoln, 


Iowa. 


B.S., Parsons College. 




Gill, George Patrick, 


IllinoU. 


Grant, William Robert, 


Illinois. 


Green, John Albert, 


Illinois. 


Haas, Raoul Robert, 


Illinois. 


M.D., Chicago Homeopathic Medical College. 


Hall, Herbert Bdward, 


Ohio, 


A.B., Otterbeln University. 




Hand, William Cory, 


Iowa. 


Haugen, Hans, 


North Dakota. 


Haury, Samuel David, 


Kansas. 


Hayes, Richard, 


Ireland. 


Heath, Clifford Jackson, 


Wisconsin. 


Hendricks, Hiram Porter, 


Illinois. 


Hershfield, Alexander Sander, 


Illinois. 


Hoagland, Charles Clinton, 


South Dakota. 


A.B., University of South Dakota. 




Hochrein, George Walter, 


Wisconsin. 


Hohf, Julius Amos, 


South Dakota. 


Holliday, Oliver Morton, 


Kansas. 


M.D., University of KanHns. 




Hettinger, Erwin Stauer, 


Illinois. 


Hubbard, John Hyrum, 


Utah. 


Hughes, John Eflmer, 


MissouH. 


Hutcheson, Bellenden Seymour, 


Illinois. 


Iddings, John Warren, 


Indiana. 


Ingham, Cecil, 


Indiana. 


Ingraham, Bben Russell, 


Pennsylvania. 


James, Lora Douglas, 


lotoa. 


JampoliB, Mark, 


Illinois. 


A.B., University of Michigan. 




Jeffrey, Alexander Balfour, 


lotoa. 


Ph.B., Simpson College. 




Jeffries, Willard Guy, 


Iowa. 


Jones, EJdward William, 


Iowa, 


Keyser, Ralph Emmert, 


Illinois. 


Lehrbach, Lester Martin, 


Wisconsin. 


Lister, William Weaver, 


Illinois. 


Lewison, Maurice, 


Illinois. 


Long, Walter Kllngeman, 


Nebraska. 


B.S. University of Nebraska. 




Lynch, Robert James, 


Iowa. 




Digitized by VjC 



Google 



THB MBDICAL SCHOOL. 



851 



McOoyem, John, 


WUconsin, 


MelBter, William, 


WUcoMin. 


Merrill, Preston Reynolds, 


Utah. 


Meyers, Harry Louis, 


IllinoU. 


Miller, George Aleuuider, 


Washington, 


Moeller, Frederick William, 


Illinois. 


Moes, Mathias Joseph, 


Iowa. 


Moore, Leroy Soott 


South Dakota. 


Moreland, WUber, 


Illinois. 


Munn, Wayne Alonso, 


Illinois. 


Mnrphy, John Harvey, 


Illinois. 


B.8., Knox College. 




Napheys, William Davison, 


Illinois. 


Nanth, Daniel Fredericke, 


Wisconsin, 


Nelson, Nels Christian, 


Oregon. 


Noble, Frederick William, 


Michigan. 


M.D.. Saginaw Valley Medical College. 






Utah. 


Parks, Albert H.. 


Michigan. 


A.B., UniverBity of Michigan. 




Pascoe, Henry Roscoe, 


Iowa. 


PIlB., Simpaon College. 




Pengelly, Edward John, 


Wisconsin. 


Penney, Warren Bert, 


Iowa. 


Pickard, Rawson Joseph, 


Illinois. 


B.&, UnlTendty of WIsconain. 




Piper, Lawrence Philip, 


Illinois. 


Rahllns, Leo Henry, 


Illinois. 


Reineck, Charles, 


Wisconsin. 


R«yher, Chris Michael, 


Indiana. 


Roach, Richard Aloysius, 


Illinois. 


Roberts, Marcus Claude, 


Iowa. 


Roberts, Philip F., 


Illinois. 


Rohlflng, Rudolf Frederick, 


Colorado. 


Roth, Charles Rudolph, 


Wisconsin. 


Ph.O., Valparaiao College. 




Salyers, John Oswell, 


Illinois. 


Schaefer, Rudolf A., 


Nebraska. 


Seyfarth, Clarence Alexander, 


Illinois. 


Sharps, Walter Stokes, 


Illinois. 


Sidley, John Streeter, 


Illinois. 


SilTerthom, Frank Ross. 


Wisconsin. 


Slater, Bmest William, 


Illinois. 


Snowden, Robert Hurst, 


Iowa. / 




Digitized by 



Google 



852 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Spitz, Eugene Aaron, 


Illinois. 


Stanley, Otis Orion, 


Illinois. 


M.S., University of Illinois. 




Stevenson, Robert Guy, 


Minnesota. 


Stoll, Arthur Hugh, 


Wisconsin. 


Storer, Neile Spooner, 


Ohio. 


Streuter, Albert Frank, 


Illinois. 


Swank, Judge Robert, 


Illinois. 


Thompson, John Godfrey, 


Minnesota. 


Toner, Thomas Joseph, 


Illinois. 


Tucker, Walter 0., 


England. 


Tullar, Arthur G., 


Illinois. 


Van Demark, Guy Ernest. 


South Dakota. 


Walker, George Stanberry, 


Illinois. 


Wallace, James Wilson, 


Illinois. 


West, Archillous A., 


lOWiU 


M.D., Sioux City College of Medicine. 




White, Hugh James, 


Illinois. 


Whiteside, Jesse Dubois, 


South Dakota, 


Williams, Everett B., 


Illinois. 


B.S.. Northwestern University. 




Woodward, Clayton Emory, 


Illinois. 


Yudelson, Albert Bernard, 


IllinoU. 


THIRD YEAR. 




Abbott, Charles Noble, 


Wisconsin. 


Ackerman, David, 


Illinois. 


Andrews, Henry James, 


Kansas, 


Antoine, Felix Carpentier, Jr., 


Louisiana. 


Asher, Harvey Combs, 


Indiana. 


Bailey, Arthur Jay, 


Illinois. 


Barnard, David Luther, 


Wisconsin. 


B.S., rnlverelty of WIsconRlu. 




Beach, William Henry, 


Nebraska. 


Blglp*-, Sherman Edwin, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Austin College. 




Blachley, Tracy Wentworth, 


Iowa. 


Bohan, John Michael, 


Illinois. 


Brandon, Palmer Edwin, 


Illinois. 


A.B., University of South Dakota. 




Bronson, F. Lloyd, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Unlyerslty of Illinois. 




Buckley, Fred Watson, 


lotoa. 


Burger, Harry Ernest, 


Wisconsin. 




Digitized by VJ 



Google 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



353 



Castle, Thomas Ralph, 


Iowa. 


Chase, Warren W., 


IlHnoit, 


Clyne, Meade, 


lUinoia. 


Coats, Alhert James. 


Michigan. 


B.S., University of Nebraska. 




Cohenour, Elmer Ledley, 


Illinoii. 


Conner, William Henry, 


Illinoia. 


A.B., NorthwesterD University. 




Corcoran, Louis Leonard, 


lOUHL 


Craig, Alexander Crawford, 


Colorado. 


Crall, Franklin Harold, 


New Mexico. 


Croft, Edward Woolley, 


Idaho. 


Dakln, Wirt B.. 


Michigan. 


Dale, Ernest A., 


Illinois. 


Desparois, Guy Bernard, 


Iowa. 


Dewey, Lorenzo Simeon, 


Missouri. 


A.B., University of Missouri. 




Dorland, Clareld Edison, 


Wisconsin. • 


Ph-C, Nortliwestem University. 




Doupe, Joseph Harry, 


Michigan. 


Dwan, Leo Garnet, 


Illinois. 


B.8., Notre Dame University. 




Edgar, Thomas Oscar, 


Illinois. 


B.8., Northwestern University. 




Ekistace, Arthur Barnett, 


Illinois. 


Farrell, Edward Joseph, 


Illinois. 


Fdrbnsh, Sanford W., 


Wisconsin. 


French, Harley Ellsworth, 


Idaho. 


A3.. State College of Waslilngton. 




Frey, Phillip Georg, 


Wisconsin. 


Frost, John Garfield, 


Illinois. 


Garberson. J. Howard, 


Iowa. 


B.8., Iowa State ColIoRr. 




Frledemann, Paul, 


Illinois. 


Gamer, Robert William Thomas, 


North Carolina 


Gelsslnger, John Dewalt, 


loiva. 


Gilbert, Newell Clash, 


Illinois. 


B.8.. University of Wisconsin. 




Gleason, Bert Fuller, 


Iowa. 


GoBsard, Jesse Earle, 


Ohio. 


M.8., Ohio Northern University. 




Grahek, Joseph, 


Michigan. 


Gray, George Lester, 


Texas, 


Green, Austin Lenhart, 


Illinois. 


A.B.. Illinois Wesleyan University. 




Hamilton, Oliver Prescott, 


Illinois. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



854 



NORTHWBSSTBRN UNIVBRSITT. 



Handelman, Louis, 


nUnoU. 


Harding, Jacob Dwlght, 


UUOi. 


Hatch, Walter Edmund, 


WiBOonsin. 


Hill, Chalmers Alexander, 


Colorado. 


A.B., University of Colora^lo. 




Hofer, Michael Martin, 


South Dakota. 


Holberg, Edmond Arthur, 


IllinoU. 


Hollenbeck, Henry Stanley, 


Iowa. 


A.B., Iowa State UnlFeralty. 




Holm, Marinus Larsen, 


South Dakota. 


Ph.C., Northwestern University. 




Homan, Carl A., 


Illinois. 


Hoover, Frank B., 


Illinois. 


Hopkins, Nelson Kingsley, 


Illinois. 


Hoy, Carl Da Costa, 


Ohio. 




Nebraska. 


PIlG., Highland Park College of Pbarmacy. 


Jager, Thor J., 


Sweden. 


Johnston, Robert Currie, 


Illinois. 


Ph.G., Northwestern University. 




Kappelman,' John Adam, 


Illinois. 


B.S., Northwestern University. 




Karney, Roy Poster, 


Wisconsin. 


Keeler, Elon Theodore, 


Illinois. 


Kelley, Laurence Blam, 


Wisconsin. 


B.8., Beloit College. 




Kelsheimer, Ira D., 


Illinois. 


Keltner, Joseph Edward, 


Illinois. 


Kershaw, Robert B., 


Illinois. 


Ph.G., Highland Park ColleRe of 


Pliarmscy, 


Kirby, Alfred Darwin, 


Illinois. 


Lambert, Oscar Bernhardt, 


Michigan. 


Levinson, Jacob Gotland, 


Illinois. 


Little, George Reed, 


Kansas. 


Lounsbury, Benjamin Franklin, 


Wisconsin. 


B.L., University of Wisconsin. 




McClelland, Clarence Edgar, 


Illinois. 


McComb, Earl Vinton, 


Wisconsin. 


A.B., University of Wisconsin. 




Mclntyre, Louis Learoy, 


Illinois. 


Miller, William H., 


Illinois. 


Mills, Ralph Garfield, 


Illinois. 


A.B.. University of Illinois. 




Mitchell, Clairemont Hogue, 


Iowa. 


A.B., Simpson College. 




Mitchell, Edward Clay, 


Illinois. 


Moell, Joseph Franklin, 


Vehraska. 




Digitized by Vji 



Google 



THE BfBDICAL SCHOOL. 



355 



Morgan, John Richard, 


Idaho. 


Morse* Rasrmond Clark, 


Washington, 


MueUer, Albert Nicholas, 


Illinois. 


Munch, Fred Blmer, 


Illinois. 


Nay, Karl W.. 


Illinois. 


NUes, Sidney Cleveland, 

A.B., UnlTenlty of Michigan. 
Oppenheim, Joseph Julius, 


Illinois. 
Illinois. 


Parker, Gerald Campbell, 


Illinois. 




Illinois. 


Perlstein, Samuel, 


Illinois. 


Peterson, Charles Frederick, 


Wisconsin. 


Porter, Ward Kendrlck, 


Wisconsin. 


Ray, Herbert A., 


Indiana. 


Redman, Fred Ell, 


North Dakota. 


Relihan, Frank Henry, 


Kansas. 


Rlbbeck, Will Augustus, 


Michigan. 


Roehrig, K|trl Franklin, 


Colorado. 


Rogers, Elton Banes, 

AB., SlmpsoD College. 
Ross, Ley! Gilbert, 


lotoa. 
Oregon. 


Sabin, Charles Gilbert, 

B.8., Northwestern University. 
Sanford, Arthur Hawley, 

A.B., Northwestern Unlversltj. 
Schaefer, John Ferdinand. 


Illinois. 
Illinois. 
Illinois. 


Schoch, Andrew Clarence, 


Missouri. 


Sharpe, Howard Addison, 

Fh.C., Northwestern University. 

Shidler, George Porter, 

AB., Nebraska State University. 

Shoemaker, Amzi Bedell, 


Wisconsin. 
Nel>raska. 
New Jersey. 


Siebel, Jobn Bwald, Jr., 

Ph.G., Northwentern University. 


Illinois. 


Skebelsky, James W., 


Illinois. 


Sorgatz, Frank, 


Kansas. 


Stanton, John William, 


Illinois. 


Stames, Brand, 


North Carolina, 


Stewart, James Golden, 


Illinois. 


Swaatz, Thomas Jobson, 

B.S., Notre Dame University. 

Swift, George Wilkins, 

Fli.0., University of Washington. 

Teitgen, Arthur, 


Indiana. 

Washington. 

Wisconsin. 


Thayer, Fred Gaither, 

A.B., UotTerstty of Oregon. 


Oregon. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



856 



NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVERSITY. 



Thomas, James Stanley, 


Ohio. 


Told, Henry J., 


Indiana. 


Torell, Emu Ernest, 

A.B., Augustana College. 
Twyman, Elmer Davis, 


ruinois. 
Missouri, 


Uhrich, John Michael, 


Canada. 


Valenzuela, Gonzola, 

H.a, Costa Blca College. 

Vaughan, John George, 

B.8., NorthwcBtem University. 

Wanamaker, Allison Temple, 

Ph.O., University of Washington. 

Weldner, Max C, 


Costa Rica. 
Illinois. 
Washington. 
Wisconsin. 


Weil, Harry, 


Illinois. 


Wilson, William Charles, 


North Dakota. 


Witkowski, Leo Joseph, 


Illinois. 


Zimmerman, Samuel Alvin, 
Ph.D., Hamline University. 


Minnesota. 


SECOND YEAR 


i. 


Anderson, Albin Garfield, 

B.8., Northwestern University. 
Arends, Archabald Louis, 


Illinois. 
Iowa. 


Bambenek, John Damascus, 


Wisconsin. 


Bannen, William Edward, 


Wisconsin. 


Baum, Earl Lucas, 


Illinois. 


Bernstein, Maurice, 


Illinois. 


Bird, John Ten Broeck, 


. Illinois. 


Boler, Thomas Daniel, 


Nebraska. 


Booze, John Buchanan, 


West Virginia. 


Bradley, Stephen Campbell, 

B.L., Ohio Wesleyan Vnlveralty. 
Broberg, Alb«rt William, 


Illinois. 
Minnesota. 


Campbell, James Edward, 


Illinois. 


Christophel, Walter B., 


Indiana. 


Condon, Joseph Redmond, 


loioa. 


Cooper. Paul Burke, 

Ph.G., Washington Agricultural College. 
Courtenay, Gordon Trevor, 


Oregon. 
Illinois. 


Dahl. Peter I., 


North Dakota. 


Dowsett, Horace, 


Wisconsin 


Edwards, Hubert Clarence, 


Illinois. 


Elsenstaedt, Joseph Spiro, 


Illinois. 


Foley, Thomas Patrick, 


Illinois. 




Digitized by Vj( 



Google 



THE MBDICAL SCHOOL- 



SSI 



Gibson, Paul White. 


Illinois, 


Gowland, Harry Edmund, 


North Dakota. 


Greer, Alvls Eugene, 


Illinois. 


Griffin, George Daniel, 


Illinois. 


Grosvenor, Thomas Howard, 

B.U, University of WIbcodsId. 
Hagar, Charles Edward, 


Illinois. 
Illinois. 


Hale. Raleigh Peter. 


Indiana. 


Hallenbeck, Dorr Foster, 


Minnesota. 


Hanson, David Thomas, 

B.S., Northwestern University. 

Harlan, Lee Henry, 

A.B., Roger Williams UnlverRlty. 

Hartsook, Francis Marion, 


Illinois. 

Mississippi. 

Wisconsin. 


Hertzler, Ralph Harold, 


Iowa. 


Hewson, Wilfred John, 


Michigan. 


Hogan, John Hughes, 


Wisconsin. 


Hooker, Henry Frost, ^outh Dakota. 

Ph.O., South Dakota Agricultural College. 
Hudson. Frederick Auld, Kansas, 


Hutr, Fred Charles, 


South Dakota. 


Huntley. Howard Benjamin, 

B.S., Fargo College. 
Ingebretsen, Paul, 


North Dakota. 
Utah. 


Johnson, William Garfield, 


Illinois. 


Kelly, Paul Edward, 


Illinois. 


Kerwin, John Joseph, 


Illinois. 


Kimball, Joseph Carl. 


IllinoU. 


Krlechbaum, Horace Theodore, 


Iowa. 


Lukens, Ralph E., 


Illinois. 


Lundahl, Paul Gustaf. 


Illinois. 


Lynch, H. Meyer. 


Wisconsin. 


Lyons, Paul D., 

A.B.. St. Ignatius College. 
McNevin, Charles Francis. 

B.8.. Upper Iowa University. 
Maclean. William Archibald, 


Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Michigan. 


Maurer, Franklin. 


Illinois. 


Mee. Lester Edwin, 


Illinois. 


Meyer, William Frederick, 


WUconsin. 


Mills, James Frederick, 


Illinois. 


Morrill, Frank Gillingham, 


Illinois. 


Kuzum, Walter Franklin, 


Wisconsin. 


Owen, Ncrrls Tillman, 


North Dakota. 


Perry, William Hlllhouse, 


IllinoU. 




Digitized by V 



Google 



858 



NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVBRSITT. 



Peterson, Carl Oecar, 


WUconsin. 


Pierce, Chauncey Merrill, 


Indiana, 


Poley, Clarence Leighton, 


Oregon. 


Pollard, Walter Shaver, 


Indiana, 


Powers, Francis Joseph, 


New Jersey, 


B.a, Notre Dame University. 




Rasper, Felix H., 


ininois. 


Ravn, Bjame, 


Wisconsin, 


Redman, John Edward, 


Illinois, 


Ross, Wilbur Wesley, 


Illinois. 


PIlG., Northwestern University. 




Rowe, Bert Roger, 


Illinois. 


Ruggles, Clarence Eli, 


California, 


Ryan, Fred Short, 


California, 


B.S., University of California. 




Salmon, Charles Sigmond, 


Illinois, 


Schutz. Milton H., 


Illinois, 


Smith, Frank Leroy, 


Illinois. 


Solomon, Charles Henry, 


IllinoU, 


Stacy, George Herbert, 


Illinois, 


Steer, Charles Lindley, 


Ohio. 


Stevens, Burt S., 


North Dakota. 


Ph.OM University of Buffalo. 




Sturdivant, B. Frank, 


Iowa. 


Sykes, E^verett William, 


Illinois. 


Thompson, Nathaniel Alexander, 


Illinois. - 


Tilson, Roswell Elliott, 


Illinois, 


Traub, Hugo William, 


Illinois, 


Turner, John Wakeman, 


Wisconsin. 


A.B., University of Chicago. 




Verdenius, John Jacob, 


Illinois, 


Watson, Wallace Archibald, 


Illinois. 


Waugh, Fred Duvall, 


Illinois, 


Welch, Fred Benjamin, 


Wisconsin. 


White, Perry Eugene, 


Illinois. 


Wiles, George Berkmans, 


New York. 


Wilson, George Arthur, 


Wisconsin. 


Wolfer, John Adam, 


IllinoU. 


Woodard, Otto Willis, 


Iowa. 


Wright, George Irving, 


Oregon. 


Ph.O., Northwestern University. 





Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOU 



850 



FIRST YEAR. 




Ackermann, Harry W., 


IlHnois. 


Ayllng, Gilbert Haven, 


Illinois. 


Barth, Henry N., 


IlHnois. 


Bernard, Emll K, 


Illinois. 


Bernhardt, Harry Bernard, 


Illinois. 


Bond, Edwin E., 


IlHnois. 


Budge, Ben Garfield, 

B.8., Iowa State College. 
Budge, Edwin Stratford, 


loioa. 
Idaho. 


Bundesen, Herman Niels, 


Illinois. 


Buster, Harry C, 

A.B., Flak University. 
Callahan, Albert R., 


Tennessee. 
Wisconsin. 


Carlin, Hayes William, 


IlHnois. 


Carson, Harry Ray, 

B.S., Valparaiso College. 
Cheatham, Anderson William Peter, 

A.B., risk University. 
Childs, Colvln Burr, 


Indiana. 

Tennessee. 

IlHnois. 


Clarldge, Ralph A., 


Wisconsin. 


Connrardy, Jack W., 


Iowa. 


Copps, William O'Keefe, 


North Dakota. 


Crowley, William Simon, 


Illinois. 


Danskln, Melville G., 


Iowa. 


Davis, Colbert Smith, 

AB., Flak University. 
Devany, Andrew Joseph, 


Texas. 
Indiana. 


Dunnington, Ruel Norman, 


Michigan. 


Elsenstaedt, Joseph, 


Illinois. 


Firebaugh, William Charles, 


Illinois. 


Frederich, Cleveland, 


Minnesota. 


Gerhardt, August E., 

Fh.G., University of Illinois. 
Goodwin, Aurel, 


Illinois. 
Indiana. 


Greenbaum, George B., 


Illinois. 


Harlan, N. Robert, 


Iowa. 


Healy, Michael Edward, 


Illinois. 


Hedberg, David Leonard, 


Illinois. 


Heffron, Edward Lancaster, 


Illinois. 


Henderson, John Thomas, 


Louisiana. 


Hess, Emory Le Roy, 


Illinois. 


Heston, Edward Calder, 

Ph.G.. South Dakota Agricultural College 


South Dakota. 




Digitized by 



Google 



860 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVBR8ITT. 



Higgs, Walter, 


Indiana. 


A.B., University of WlRconsin. 




Hills, Lester Harper, 


' Illinois. 


Holgate, Ralph Carlton, 


Montana. 


Holmes, Ralph, 


Illinois. 


Howg, Edwin Marius, 


South Dakota. 


Jones, Harold B., 


Illinois. 


JuYinall, James Matthew, 


Illinois. 


Kanzler, Reinhold, 


Nebraska. 


Kern, Henry William, 


Illinois. 


Kienzle, Francis Constantine, 


Illinois. 


Krusemarck, OrvlUe Layman, 


Illinois. 


Krzysko, Stanley Leon, 


Wisconsin. 


Landgraf, John William, 


Illinois. 


Lang, Oscar Frederick, 


Minnesota. 


B.S., Valparaiso Unlvei-slty. 




Lepak, Frank John, 


Minnesota. 


B.S., ValpiiraUo College. 




Lindsay, Arthur Robert, 


Illinois. 


Linn, Hugh Harrison, 


Iowa. 


B.S., Slmpsou College. 




McClure, William Leander, 


Washington. 


Magee, Emery Ernest, 


Iowa. 


Marshall, George Lyman, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Miami University. 




Martin, Dale L., 


North Dakota. 


Melzer, Simon W., Jr., 


Wisconsin. 


Merrill, Orland Paul, 


Illinois. 


Minter, John Mills, 


Illinois. 


Mix, Harry Collin, 


Illinois. 


Moore, William Nelson, 


Wisconsin. 


Newman, John Henry, 


Iowa. 


Pelton, Ora Levant, Jr., 


Illinois. 


Plummer, William Albert, 


Minnesota. 


Pond, Casper Whittle, 


Idaho. 


Prince, George Washington, 


Illinois. 


R&be, Otto John, 


Iowa. 


B.S., Valparaiso University. 




Richman, Samuel Herbert, 


Illinois. 


Schwartz, John Frederick, 


Wisconsin. 


Shackleton, William E., 


Michigan. 


Slinde, Arthur Christian, 


Wisconsin. 


Smith, Sydney Henry, 


Iowa. 


Spurck, Peter Thomas, 


Illinois. 


Supple, Arthur Blaise. 


Illinois. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



861 



Thomas, William Allen, Michigan. 

Thompson, Elmer Gibson, IUinai$, 

Trace, Isidore, lUinoit. 

Trimmer, Frank M., Ohio. 

Wade, Benjamin Newton, Minnesota. 

Wall, Cornelius Walter, Kansat. 

Wanninger, Wenzel Joseph, Wisconsin. 

Williams, Herbert Lewis, Illinois. 

Winter, George Victor, Minnesota. 

Woolley, Hyrum Smith, Jr., Idaho. 

Worrell, Ralph Eugene, Illinois. 

Weickert, Johann Moritz Stephan, Oermany. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS. 



Boyd, William Fletcher, 




Canada. 


Brlggs, Walter Roscoe, 




Illinois. 


Clayton, George Raymond, 




Indiana. 


Cross, James Hamilton, 




West Virginia. 


Diller, Adam Elmer, 




Illinois. 


B.8., Northwestern College. 






Gibbons, James Minor, 




lOtDO. 


Ludwig, Otto P.. 




Minnesota. 


McCullough, Gilbert F., 




Iowa. 


B.S., Notre Dame University. 






Miller, Peter Hendrickson, 




Michigan. 


Morton, Edward Earl, 




NetD York. 


Nelson, David Roy, 




Illinois. 


O'Brleh, Stephen J., 




Michigan. 


Simms, Leslie Bennet, 




Nebraska. 


Sowerby, James Herbert, 




Michigan. 


SPECIAL STUDENTS. 


Allen, H. I., 


Boyd, 


Ew, 


Anderson, H., 


Buchanan, R., 


Armstrong, C, 


Burke 


1, J. R., 


Barney, Reuben, 


Cleary, A., 


Benesh, E., 


Close, M., 


Bolton, R. M., 


Clouthier, B.. 


Booth, A. M., 


Cohn, 


Emmanuel, 


Bomheim, E. S., 


Cohn, 


Harry, 


Bothwdl. C. D.. 


Coles, F., 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



S62 



NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVERSITY. 



Crooks, M., 

Crowley, A., 

Culp, L. 11, 

Dickens, B., 

DizBon, K., 

Doran, M., 

Downey, G., 

Fannoff, F. L., 

Faust. M. v.. 

Fay, B. L., 

Fitzsimmons, M., 

Fordyce, W. B., 

Frank, Bernhardt, 

Frazier, C, 

Fuller, B., 

Gavin, A., 

Glover, J. E., 

Grady, N., 

Gregory, D., 

Hagenbuch, C. H., 

Hamnett, Harold, 

Hanley, M., 

Hannon, G., 

Hefty, C, 

Heltman, Diedrick William, 

Hill, E., 

Hurley, G. I., 

Hutt, M., 

Iverson, I., 

James, E., 

Jordan, Bert A., 

A.B., Unlverwlt.r of South Dak 
Joslyn, A. E., 
Keefe, M., 
Kler, N., 
Kinnaird, B., 
Koempel, O., 
Koenlg, A. C, 
Kundart, A., 
Laird. D. H., 
Larsen, A. M., 
Lashbrook, Elam Eugene, 
Lau, M., 



Leach, J. M., 

Lee, M., 

Llnd, O., 

Logan, E. C, 

Lonergan, M., 

Long, A., 

Lowe, M., 

Lowther, W. C, 

McKaig, H. C, 

McNulty, J., 

Marsden, M., 

Mason, W. C. 

Maxted, M. A., 

Merkel, S., 

Meyer, M. I., 

Mills, G., 

Mitchell, H. C. 

Mitten, C. L., 

Moler, C. C, 

Monahan, K., 

Neary, A., 

Nickerson, F., 

Norris, E. L., 

Nuckles, B. M., 

0*Donnell, Charles Peter, 

Oldham, I., 

Olmstead, F., 

Page, A., 

Panker, E. J., 

Peregrine, M., 



[ota' 



Porter, E. W., 
Prouty, F., 
Ray, D., 

Reinhardt, H. L., 
Roudebush, E., 
Rush, F. M., 
Ryan, A., 

Ryan, Frank Albert, 
Sax, A. O., 
Sayre, L. M., 
Schoch, R., 
Scobey, A. W., 



Digitized by 



Google 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 363 

Scott, F. P., Van Aken, M., 

Shannon, B., Ward, E., 

ShUton, C. N., Ward, K., 

Smith, A., Welch, M., 

Smith, M. J., White, E. W., 

Smith, v.. White, H., 

Stawart, Walter J., White, M., 

M.D., Denrborn Medical Collegre. Whieldon W. L., 

fj^^^-' Willis, E.! 

^°*^ *• ^" Winthrope, P. W., 

Thompson, O. A., Zschach, Waldemar Karl, 
Tiemey, M., 



Digitized by 



Google 



364 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 



THIRD YEAR. 



Adams, Cyrus H., Jr., 

A.B., Princeton Unlrerslty. 
Anderson, George Fridolf, 

Asher, Walter SimiNSon, 

A.B., Northwestern Univeraltj. 
*Atlierton, Leslie Campbell. 
Becker, John Richard, 
Bell, Benjamin S., 
Brink, Hal L., 
Brothers, William Vincent, 
Browne, John Maxwell, 
Bugee, John Arthur, 
Bums, William Cullen, 

Candee, Robert, 

A.B., Princeton University. 
Capron, William, Jr., 

Unlveralty of IlllnolR. 
Cohan, Benjamin Edward, 
Collins, Kenneth Prentice, 

Colton, Chauncey Corey, 

B.S., Dartmouth College. 
Cutting, Robert Myron, 

A.B., University of Mlchisan. 
Davis, Warren Marcus, 

University of California. 
Diddnson, Francis Reynolds, 

A.B., Harvard University. 
Eastman, Charles John, 

Eddy, Morton Holt, 

AB., Williams College. 
£<ngstrom, Ebenezer Washington, 

A.B., Northweptern T'nlverslty. 
Finerty, John F., Jr., 
Finley, George Alvin, 

Gamett, Elmer Logan, 

AB., University of Illinois. 

Goldstlne, Isaac Oscar, 

Haight, William Harrison, 

B.L., University of Wisconsin. 

Hinckley, Francis Eklward, 
A.B., Cornell University. 



lUinoU. 

Illinois. 
Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

New York. 

Illinois. 

Kansas. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

niinoU. 
Illinois. 
Massachusetts. 

Illinois. 

California. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 
Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 
Illinois. 
Illinois. 

Illinois. 
Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 



•Deceased, March 12, 1906. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 



365 



Hunt, Anthony, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Harvard University. 




Johnaton, William Walter, 


Illinois, 


Kolb, Theodore Augustus, 


Illinois. 


Concordia College. 




Krause, Hugo Foster, 


Illinois. 


Ph.B., Milwaukee SUte Normal School. 




Libonati, Michael Ernest, 


Illinois. 


Lucius, Albert Edward, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Unlveralty of Michigan. 




Martin, Andrew Aloysius, 


IllinoU. 


Mies, Frank Peter, 


Illinois. 


B.8., Northwestern University. 




Milchrist, Frank Thomas, 


Illinois. 


Moore, Willis Samuel, 


Illinois. 


McCord, Downer, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Yale University. 




McKinney, Fred Landin, 


Ohio. 


B.8., Northwestern University. 




McNeil, Robert Lincoln, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Illinois College. 




Nordhold, Robert J., 


Illinois. 


Peacock, Ernest, 


Illinois. 


AB., Wheaton College. 




Pirosh, Qeorge, 


Illinois. 


Pitte, Hugo Lewis, 


Illinois, 


Rich, Ernest Paul, 


Illinois. 


Newtoo Normal College. 




Ridgely, Claude V., 


Illinois. 


Romans, Harold Albon, 


Iowa. 


Romans, John Brown, 


lotoa. 


Rundall, Charles Owen, 


Illinois. 


Northwestern University. 




Secord, Frederick, 


Illinois. 




Illinois. 


Steinbrecher, Paul, 


Illinois. 


StrauB, Ira E.. 


Illinois. 


University of Chicago. 




Taylor, David W., 


Illinois. 


Thomason, Samuel Emory, 


Illinois. 


AB., University of Michigan. 




VlaohoB, Andrew John. 


Illinois. 


LLB., University of Greece. 




Von Ammon, Ernest Carl, 


Illinois. 


Warner, Qeorge Raymond, 


Illinois. 


Wengierski, Julius Francis, 


Illinois. 


Whitfield, Garland Quinche, 


Mississippi. 


Winnen, Victor Charles, 


Illinois. 




Digitized by 



Google 



366 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 


Wilcox, Jesse Franklin, 


IllinoU. 


Winston, Garrard Bigelow, 


ininois. 


A.B., Yale UnlverBlty. 




Tates, Robert Mortimer, 


Illinois, 


SECOND YEAF 


t. 


Adams, Francis, Jr., 


Illinois. 


A.B., Amherst College. 




Allely. George Joseph, 


Illinois, 


Allen, Harry Irwin, 


Indiana, 


B.8., Northwestern University. 




Ballard, Howard Thompson, 


Massachusetts. 


A.B., Amherst College. 




Barry, Arthur Joseph, 


Illinois, 


Bennett, Robert F., 


Illinois, 


B.8., Valparaiso College. 




Beverldge, Glen LeRoy, 


Illinois. 


Bieszkl, Henry Albert, 


Illinois. 


Bin, Elmer Ftancls, 


minois. 


B.8., Northwestern University. 




Bogheas, Demetrius, 


IllinoU. 


University of Greece. 




Brown, Earle Wesley, 


Illinois. 


Callahan, James Edwin, 


Illinois, 


Carmody, Michael Lawrence, 


Illinois, 


Cohen, Lawrence Alfred, 


Illinois, 


Grossman, George William, 


Illinois, 


Davenport, Kenneth Howard, 


Iowa, 


A.B., Northwestern University. 




Dodson, Harry Lea, 


Illinois. 


Dvorak, Henry, 


Illinois, 


Forstall, James Jackson, 


Illinois. 


B.8.. Princeton University. 




Fox, George Arthur, 


Michiffan. 


AB., University of Michigan. 




BYake, Allen. 


Illinois. 


AB., University of Chicago. 




Frantz, Brza Jacob, 


Illinois. 


Fuller, Earl Delos, 


Illinois. 


Gillson. Charles Burton, 


Illinois. 


S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 




Grandberg, Oscar Emil, 


Illinois. 


Gregory, Frederick LaRue, 


Illinois, 


B.8.. Illinois College. 




Griffin, John Joseph, 


Illinois, 


Grow, Oscar, 


Iowa, 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 



367 



Hansen, Edwin Carsten, Illinois, 

Hausser. Arthur H. W., Illinaia. 

Northwestern UnlTerslty. 

Henn, William Eugene, Illinois, 

Hill, Roy Wilson, Illinois. 

B. 8., Rose Polytechnic Institute, 

Houghteling, James Lawrence, Jr., Illinois. 

A.B., Yale University. 

Howison, Hugh Alexander, Illinois. 

Armour Institute. 

Huszagh, Harold, Illinois 

Lewis Institute. 

Jarrell, James Thomas, Jr., Delaware. 

A.B., Dickinson College. 

Kaufman, Baling I., Illinois. 

Krusemark, Albert. Illinois. 

Lllienstein, Arthur Webster, Illinois. 

Lindskog, Thomas, Illinois. 

Marshall, Robert Ferguson, Illinois. 

Morgan, George Gumea, Illinois 

B.8., Wheaton College. 

Morrissey, Michael Patrick, jawa. 

Murphy, John Gushing, Illinois. 

Myers, Earl Luclan, Illinois. 

McCaughan, Philip N., IlUnois. 

McNeil. Oswell Laurie, Illinois 

B.S.. lUtnols College. 

Nash, Albert Henry, Illinois 

Northwestern University. 

Nichols, George Richmond, Jr., Montana 

Leland Stanford, Jr.. University. 

Rathje, Frank Carl, IllinoU. 

Rawson, William Dixon, Illinois. 

Rich Stanley, Illinois. 

B.S.. Hohart College. 

Richter, Edward Lewis, Illinois. 

Rueber, Charles Arthur, Minnesota. 

Shaver, Harry Lloyd, Illinois. 

Smith. FVank O., IlHnois. 

B.S.. Northwestern University. 

Smoot, Harry Edward, IllinoU. 

A.B., Northwestern University. 

Starke, Charles Henry, Illinois. 

Stevens, Ernest James, Illinois. 

Ph.B.. University of Chicago. 

Stevens, George Marsden, IlUnois. 

B.8.. Northwestern University. 

Strauss, Samuel Arthur, Illinois. 



Digitized by 



Google 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Snnderbruch, Jens Frederick, 


lotoa. 


Cornell University. 




Swanson, Gliarles Edward, 


lOVXL 


A.B., Knox College. 




Tanigoshi, Katautaro, 


Japan, 


University of Wisconsin. 




Townsend, Barry Eyre, 


Illinois, 


Princeton University. 




Van Ryper, James Reynolds, 


Indiana, 


Welles, Harry Norton, 


Illinois. 


Willson, Royal Andrew, 


Illinois. 


Winterbottom, Joseph Brastus, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Illinois College. 




Woodbury, Homer Whallon, 


Illinois. 


FIRST YEAR. 




Arthur, WilUam Reed, 


Kans€U. 


A.a, Washburn College. 




Barnes, Cecil, 


Illinois. 


A.M., Harvard University. 




Bauer, Lester Louis, 


Illinois. 


Boyd, Gordon, 


Illinois, 


Brown, Edward E3a«:le, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Harvard University. 




Browne, John Maxwell, 


Illinois. 


Butler, LeRoy Dawson, 


Wisconsin. 


Butz, Robert Otto, 


Illinois. 


Carlson, Julius Goodwin, 


Wisconsin. 


B.S., Northwestern University. 




Carroll, John Charles, Jr., 


Illinois. 


Clapp, Gardie, 


Illinois. 


Cooper, Bernhard, 


Illinois, 


Cumnock, Claude Buchanan, 


Illinois. 


Northwestern University. 




Dean, WllUam Dwight, 


Illinois. 


A.R., Tale University. 




DeLany, Clarence Martin, 


Illinois. 


Didier, Gustavo Philip, 


Illinois. 


St. Gregory's College. 




Dunham, H. Munroe, 


Michigan. 


Farrell, Harry Michael, 


Iowa. 


Fehrman, Henry J., 


Illinois. 


Felgar, Harry Hardy, 


Illinois. 


Flinn, Edward Bernard, 


Iowa. 


Firestone, Milton P., 


Minnesota. 


University of Minnesota. 




Powler, Gleaner, 


Missouri. 




Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 



369 



Frederick, Wilson David, 


niinois. 


Freundlich, Alexander, 


Illinois. 


Gardner, Harry Newton, 


'Nehraaka, 


Oamett, Cyrus Logan, 


Illinois. 


Univenlty of Chicago. 




Greenberg, Samuel, 


Illinois. 


Harlev, Arthur George, 


Illinois. 


Harris, Amos Leroy, 


Illinois. 


Hoover, Loring, 


Indiana. 


Jarecki, Edmund Kasper, 


Illinois. 


Johnson, Clyde Philip, 


Illinois. 


Johnson. James Richard, 


Illinois. 


Jordan, Carl Francis, 


Iowa. 


Jordan, Frank, 


Illinois. 


Kandlik, George, 


Illinois. 


Karr, Richard Freeman, 


Illinois. 


Katz, Sidney Morris, 


Illinois. 


Kendall, Rufus, 


Illinois. 


Knight, Homer Stone, 


Illinois. 


Kryda, John Fennymore, 


Illinois. 


Lindsay, Alexander Pitcalrn, 


Pennsylvania. 


A.B., College of the Academy of the New Church. 


Love, Stephen Wentzel, 


Illinois. 


Lowe, Sylvester Tucker, 


Idaho. 


Long, William Henry, 


lotoa. 


Llabres, Louis, 


Puerto Rico. 


Martin, Isaac Crouse, 


Pennsylvania. 


MeWhirter, David Clifford, 


Illinois. 


Mount, Earl Burner, 


Iowa. 


Morris, Eugene Percivall, 


Illinois. 


Morawski, Sigismond Albert, 


Illinois. 


Imperial Vienna University. 




McCarthy, Justin Francis, 


Illinois. 


A.B., St. Ignatius College. 




McKenna, John Edward, 


Illinois. 


O'Donnell, Joseph Dugan, 


Illinois. 


AB., St Ignatius College. 




Oleson, George Arthur, 


Illinois. 


Lewis Institute. 




Olson, Olaf Adolph, 


Illinois. 


Oughton, John Richard, Jr., 


Illinois. 


Philp, Leonard Hacker, 


IllinoU. 


Ransom, Albert Richardson, 


Illinois. 


Reubens, Harry, Jr., 


nUnois. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



370 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Rickords, Francis Stanley, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Yale UnlverBlty. 




Rablnoff, Samuel Randolph, 


Illinois. 


Rothwell, Henry Phillip, 


Illinois. 


Schftdel, Robert Lyman, 


Illinois, 


A.B., Belolt College. 




Schmaus, Edward Thomas, 


Ohio. 


Simmons, Forrest Dale, 


Michigan. 


SlOBBon, Frank Steele, 


Illinois. 


Snapp, Dorrance Dibell, 


Illinois. 


Spengler, Walter J., 


Illinois. 


Stafford, James Henry, 


Illinois. 


Staub, Casper, Jr., 


Illinois. 


Steinbrecher, George, 


Illinois. 


Stylinski, Stanislaw, 


Illinois. 


Taylor, Orville James, Jr., 


Iowa. 


Tyrrell, Joseph Thomas, 


Illinois. 


A.B., St. Ignatius College. 




Vail, Karl V., 


Illinois. 


Verde, Vincenzo, 


IllinoU. 


Whipple, Merrick Ames, 


Illinois. 


Wiebotdt, Werner Augustus, 


IllinoU. 


Zelensky, Mitchell Abraham, 


Illinois. 


SPECIAL STUDENTS. 


Barry, David Henry, 


Illinois. 


Barstow, Alfred, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 




Bates, Jeanette, 


Illinois. 


Ph.B., Uaiyerslty of Chicago. 




Bums, James Francis, 


Illinois. 


Chandler, H. A. Ernest, 


Wisconsin. 



B.S., Northwestern University. 

Colwell, Clyde, 

LL.B., University of Chicago. 

Coman, Warren Eugene, 

LL.B., Northwestern University. 
Fisher, Hart Ellis, 

Hall, John Calvin, 

A.B., University of Illinois. 
Hyman, Robert William, 
Jacobsen, Henry, 
Jenkins, Bert Jay, 
Johns, George Andrew, 
King, John Crane, Jr., 



IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 
IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 

Michigan, 

IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE! LAW SCHOOL. 



371 



Mand, Frank John, 


niinoia. 


hUK, IIlinolB College of Law. 




McCabe» James, 


Minnesota, 


Maylgato, Joseph, 


IlUnoU, 


Raymond, Bdward Franklin, 


Illinois. 


A.B., Yale Unlvenlty. 




Reed, Nelson Franklin, 


lllinoU. 


Northwestern Uniyeraity. 




Scheiner, Frank Henry, 


Illinois. 


Ph. R, LL.B., Northweatem Unlveralty. 




Waltmlre, George, 


Ohio. 


LL.B., Northwestern University. 




Ward, Charles Ambrose, 


Illinois. 


LL.B.. Northwestern Unlyerslty. 




Wooster, Lizzie B., 


Illinois. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



372 



NORTHWESTERN UNIYBRSITT. 



theI school of pharmacy. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF PHAR- 
MACY. 



Gsell, Earl Wilson, 
Watkins, Axle Dell» 



IlHnoU, 
Illinois. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF PHARMACEUTICAL 
CHEMIST. 



Balcom, Vernon Edward, 


Indiana. 


Beall, Pearl Mayson, 


Mi89i98ippi. 


Ghawgo, Harry Eugene, 


Illinois. 


Clay, James Lewis, 


Illinois. 


Cooper, William Cortlandt, 


Illinois. 


Doggett, James Leslie, 


Illinois. 


Elliott, Robert, 


IllinoU. 


Elm, Bvor Emanuel, 


Illinois. 


Fahmer, Alphonse Anthony, 


Illinois. 


Foster, Frank Homer, 


Iowa. 


Hanson, George Conrad, 


Illinois. 


Hitchcock, Francis Elliott, 


Michigan. 


Hughes, Herbert Henry, 


Montana. 


Huss, Franklin Christ, 


Illinois. 


John, Clinton Walter, 


Nehr€Uka. 


Klatt, Albert, 


Illinois. 


Leischner, Eric Paul, 


Illinois. 


Levy, Milton Daniel, 


Illinois. 


Lindstatt, August William, 


Montana. 


Lord, Frederic William, 


IllinoU. 


McDonald, Mary Angela, 


Illinois. 


Metzger, Arthur Schuh, 


Illinois. 


Minnick, Fred, 


Nebraska. 


Ohming, Harry William, 


Indiana. 


Payne, Wyndham Randolph, 


Iowa. 


Relsl, Edwin G., 


Wisconsin. 


Ricard, Arthur Thomas, 


South Dakota. 


Ridd, Arthur Frederick, 


IllinoU. 


Rink, Lester Lee, 


IllinoU. 




Digitized by V 



Google 



THE SCHOOL OP PHARMACY. 



373 



Rushton, George Lord, 
Seyfert, Carl Reber, 
Stewart, Fred Henry, 
Timson, Charles Eldred, 
Timson, Samuel George, 
Turner, €teorge Bllsworth, 
Virchow, John Bmil, 
Wallace, William Bmmon, 



Illinois. 
Ohio. 

IOW€L. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Minnesota. 

IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF QRAUDATE IN PHAR- 
MACY. 



Alexander, Oscar Henry, 
Arganbright, George, 
Arado, John Grigorio August, 
Arduser, (George, 
Askew, Joseph William, 
Bachelle, Percy, 
Baker, Hillier Locke, 
Baughman, Leo Melzer, 
Benensohn, Samuel, 
Bensend, Floren Benwill, 
Berezniak, Fannie, 
Bergstreser, Bbos Ray, 
Bernstein, Bmest B., 
Blake, Charles William, 
Blettner, Arthur William, 
Bloom, Ross Albert, 
Bock, William, 
Bolz, Bruno August, 
Boyle, James Matthew, 
Brann, William Alexander, 
Brearton, Martin Redmond, 
Brice, Robert Hale, 
Brown, Arthur Bdmund, 
Brown, Howard Cresswell, 
Cavitt, Rivers Caldwell, 
Claussen, Rudolph Henry, 
Collins, John Stephen, 
Conrad, Maurice, 
Czosek, Robert Bugene, 
Danielson, Carl Rudolph, 
Dare, Harry G., 



Indiana. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

Illifiois. 

Utah. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Utah. 

Colorado. 

Illinois. 

South Carolina. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Kentucky. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



374 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Davis, Mark Albert, 
Druehl, Hugo W., 
Dunn, Francis James, 
Bnglehardt, Charles Francis, 
Feyder, Charles, 
Fosselman, William Chris, 
Frank, William, 
Freeman, Elmer Jonathan, 
Freidholdt, Fritz William. 
Fuerstenberg, Saul, 
Oehrke, William, 
Gemmell, D. J., 
Qilkey, Signa E.. 
Graham, Harry Day, 
Greer, Thomas J., 
Grover, Alfred Henry, 
Guhin, John James, 
Hall, Clarence Edwin, 
Hanson, Paul Sidney, 
Hauth, Henry Frederick, 
Heitman, Fred William, 
Hershey, Guy Floyd, 
Hess, Joseph Earl, 
Hodson, Daniel Francis, 
Holmes, C. J., 
Huard, George Napoleon, 
Hynes, William Henry, 
Jacobs, Asahel Eugene, 
Jacobshagen, Robert Eldred, 
Jenkins, William Cook, 
Jericho, Warren B.. 
Johnson, Magnus Godfred, 
Jordan, William Francis, 
Joms, Gustavo Carl, 
Kaczkowski, Joseph, 
Kaempfer, Robert, 
Keller, Neal B., 
Kelting, William John, 
Kempf, Fred, 
Kile, Ray Porter, 
Kimmel, Fred Joseph, 
Koehler, Cornelius Frederick, 



Washington. 

Utah. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

South Dakota. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Wyoming. 

Wisconsin. 

Iowa. 

Minnesota. 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota. 

Jfehraska. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

IllinoU. 

Iowa. 

Michigan. 

Iowa. 

IllinoU. 

Iowa. 

IllinoU. 

South Dakota 

Kentucky. 

Iowa. 

Minnesota. 

IllinoU. 

WUconsin. 

IllinoU. 

Vehraska. 

IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 

Iowa. 

IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 

IllinoU. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THB SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 



375 



KrauB, Arthur Schilk, 


Wisconsin. 


Lamm, Albert H., 


Minnesota. 


Lees, Robert Fay, 


IJlinois, 


Leinlnger, Otto William, 


IllinoU. 


Leisten, Anthony William, 


OoJorado, 


Leonard, Guy Raymond, 


Wisconsin. 


Linder, Walter Henry, 


Illinois. 


Lucas, Edward Charles, 


Missouri. 


Maisch, Charles Adam, 


Illinois. 


Martin, Frank W., 


Illinois. 


Matthaei, Paul Charles. 


Illinois. 


McBvoy, Stephen Edward, 


Illinois. 


McKibben, John Leslie, 


Illinois. 


Middleton, Bert Lomax, 


Illinois. 


Morris, Roy Harry, 


Wisconsin. 


Nelson, Arthur James, 


Iowa, 


Nitardy, Ferdinand, 


Minnesota. 


Nordling, Albert Josephus, 


Illinois. 


Norling, Roy Arthur, 


Illinois. 


Paesler, Gus Charles, 


Illinois. 


Parker, Delson J., 


Illinois. 


Parker, Lloyd Warren, 


Nebraska. 


Parrott, M. C, 


Illinois. 


Petry, Herbert Arthur, 


Illinois. 


Petterson, Ella Henrietta, 


Illinois. 


Potter, Herschel Edward, 


Arkans€LS. 


Raeth, Joseph Philip. 


Illinois. 


Ramsey, Paul Houston, 


Ohio. 


Ranger, Carl Lee, 


Illinois. 


Reid, Arthur Peter, 


Illinois. 


Reifert. J. Fred. 


Nebraska. 


Rex, Clarence, 


Ohio. 


Rice, Ivan Snyder, 


Idaho. 


Rigney, Charles, 


South Dakota. 


Robertson, Forrest Raymond, 


Texas. 


Rozanski. Bolesaus Joseph, 


Illinois. 


Ruggles, Frederic Gllwarth, 


Illinois. 


Russel, Adelbert W., 


Wisconsin. 


Schlmelfenig, Clarence. 


Illinois. 


Schmitt, George John A., 


Illinois. 


Schmitz, Herbert George, 


Iowa. 


Schneider, Carl Henry, 


Illinois. 




Digitized by 



Google 



876 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Schneider, Joseph, 
Seaney, Elmer Francifl, 
Seaver, Herbert Kuth, 
Seeley, William Hansel, 
Shimerda, Edward F., 
Smith, Eugene, 
Smith, Rex 6., 
Snyder, Frank Henry, 
Soward, James, 
Spater, Will Charles, 
Stach, Charles Albert, 
Staib, Herman Frederick, 
Steinel, Edwin George Henry, 
Stone, Richard, 
Strickland, Frank Cecil, 
Stryker, Henry Leroy, 
Stukenberg, E. G., 
Sundine, August, 
Sutton, Robert Henderson, 
Sweet, Earl Edmund, 
Syverud, Luther, 
Thompson, John Edward, 
Tomashek, Frank Edmund, 
Toomey, James Andrew, 
Uhlmann, Elwood Henry, 
Van Cise, Howard Garrettson, 
Veach, Oscar Lloyd, 
Veaco, Sidney Harold, 
Wagner, Harold Harvey, 
Walker, George Henry, 
Weinberger, Albert Walter, 
Wilkinson, Barclay, 
Wilson, Charles F., 
Woods, Rolland Graham, 
Woolf, Jacob Charles, 
Wray, Daniel D., 
Zea, John William, 



Iowa, 

Illinois. 

North Dakota, 

Indiana. 

South D<ikota. 

IlUnoia, 

Illinoia. 

Utah, 

Illinois, 

Iowa, 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Indiana. 

Wisconsin, 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Idaho. 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

North Dakota. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

IllinoU. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

California. 

Ohio. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Alabama. 

IndiancL 

North Dakota. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

IllinoU. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THB SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 



877 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Brennan, William J., 
Buchholz, Edwin Alfred, 
Converse, Earl Mosher, 
Hahn, Frank N.. 
HuzBOl, Alfred William, 
Kassulke, August Erich Hugo, 
Kenton, Henry T., 
Kirk, Milton B., 
Lipschulch, Lewis, 
Malsner, J. W., 
McDiU, Herbert Samuel, 
McQuillan, Henry Patrick, 
Obermann, Abraham Max, 
Paris, Archie Russell, 
Robertshaw, Conrad C., 
Trevillian, William J., 
Wilson, Albert John, 



Iowa. 

North DiOeoia. 

lUinoiM, 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 

Indiana, 

Illinois. 

Illinois, 

Illinois, 

Illinois. 

Texas, 

Illinois. 

IllinoU. 

Indiana, 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois, 

South Dakota. 



Digitized by 



Google 



378 



N0RTHWB8TBRN UNIVBRBITT. 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 



SENIOR CLASS. 


Agern, Arthur Cornelius, 


Minnesota, 


Aim, Gustav Theodore, 


Michigan. 


Anderson, Bert Oolbem. 


Iowa, 


Ashley, Edward Holbrook, 


niinoia. 


Barke, Owen Seward, 


Minnesota. 


Bamett, Charles Lisle, 


Washington, 


Bamett, Torrence Dawson, 


Ohio. 


Baumgartner, Walter John, 


Iowa. 


Best, Herbert Floyd, 


Montana. 


Bible, Walter Lee, 


Wisconsin. 


Blair, (George Montgomery, Jr., 


Illinois. 


BoYlk, Roley, 


Illinois. 


Cardy, Charles Arthur, 


Illinois. 


Case, Charles Milton, 


Illinois. 


Christiansen, John Frederick, 


Utah. 


Christopher, James William, 


Australia. 


Close, Ira Bnis, 


Illinois. 


Conklin, Wilber Rosco, 


Illinois. 


Crary, Elisha John, 


Iowa. 


Crook, Walter Forest, 


Iowa. 


Davis, William Henry, 


IlHnois. 


Donahue, Edward Joseph, 


Michigan. 


Du Chane, Warren Newton, 


Iowa. 


Eisenstaedt, Joseph, 


Illinois. 


Erickson, Alfred, 


Illinois. 


Erwin, Clarence Walter, 


Oregon. 


Fell, Fred Ward. L.D.S., 


Manitoba. 


Ford, Zach Daniel, 


Tennessee. 


Fox, Thomas Wesley, 


Missouri. 


Frey, Joseph Peter, 


Iowa. 


Fuchs, Hans, M.D., 


Austria. 


Furby, Howard John, 


Illinois. 


Galbraith, Henry Levant, 


Minnesota. 


Gatewood, Robert H., 


Nel>raska. 


Geary, Harry Logan, 


California. 


Giffen, Bert Bennett, 


Wisconsin, 




Digitized by V 



Google 



THB DENTAL SCHOOL. 



879 



Qilbert, William Franklin, 
Oruenblatt, Richard, M.D., 
Hanson, Oscar Walter, 
Haynie, George Bdward, 
Holmes, Harry Lowell, 
Humber, Frank Russell, 
Hunt, Winford Aldricb, 
Joannidi, George D., 
Kadel, Leroy L., 
Kerr, Charles Henry, 
Kiel, Frederick William, 
Koller, Robert P., M.D., 
Lamley, William Dayld, 
Lawson, Frederick S., 
Lehrbach, Leslie Nickalos, 
Leisman, Harry Robert, 
Lieberthal, Charles Philip, 
Ught, William, 
Lowe, John Osmer, 
Lyons, Henry Bdward, 
McCracken, Thomas Jefferson, 
McKenna, Charles Wermor, 
McKibben, William Harrey, 
McNerthney, Thomas R., 
Mahony, Peter, 
Biann, Agnes, 
Mercer, Robert J., 
Miller, Verne Agassis, 
Mohan, Joseph Francis, 
Moore, Osmond Stanley, 
Murray, James Edward, 
Nelson, Arthur Glen, 
Ogilvle, Robert Adam, 
Olson, William Andrew, 
Park, Blsworth S., 
Partridge, Benjamin Sherwin, 
Peach, Lyulph, 
Peisley, William Shirley, 
Pelton, Lewis Arthur, 
Plew, Clifford, 
Puffer, George Robert, 
Puryear, Carl, 



Minnesota, 

Austria. 

South Dakota. 

Missouri. 

Iowa. 

British Columbia. 

Illinois. 

Turkey. 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

Australia. 

Austria. 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota. 

Ohio. 

Illinois. 

Idaho. 

Canada. 

Kansas. 

Nebraska. 

Illinois. 

Washington. 

Australia. 

Germany. 

South Dakota. 

Indiana. 

Illinois. 

Australia. 

Colorado. 

Minnesota. 

North Dakota. 

Minnesota. 

Texas. 

Illinois. 

Austratlia. 

Australia. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Kentucky. 



Digitized by 



Google 



380 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Rathbone, Don Quincy, 

Redeman, B. Henry, 

Reynolds, George Ford, 

Richards, Colonel Melzar, 

Russell, Frank Leo, 

Sawyer, Joy Clarence, 

Schmuck, Emll Albert, 

Schroeder, George M.. 

Scobee, Ernest Linwood, 

Seabert, Charles Pierce, 

Searl, Charles Luther, 

Sengpiel, William John, 

Sheffield, John Edgar, 

Shuford, Thomas Eaton, B.S., 

Shuttleworth, Thomas, 

Spicer, Samuel Sherman, A.B., 

Stephens, Earl Glennwood, 

Strauss, Arlon Vernon, 

Teitgen, Walter E., 

Thompson, John Lamb, 

Timmis, Joseph Frank, 

Tolhurst, Edwin Willis, 

Topliff, Ray Frank, 

Trager, Frank A., D.D.S., 

Tyler, Earl Carlton, 

Unger, Isador, 

Vlnje, Eivin, 

Walther, Arthur Frederick William, 

Weeks, Fred Theodore, 

Weyer, Charles Nicholas, 

White, David Nichol, 

Whitney, Glenn Benard, 

Wilbur, A. Francis, 

Williams, Grant W., 

Wilson, John Joseph, 

Wood, Eugene Vernon, 

Wood, Nathaniel Clark, B.S., 

Wright, Weston Wilmot, 

Tule, Morgan Alexander, 



Montana. 

Wisconsin, 

Indiana, 

New York. 

Illinois, 

Michiffan, 

Minnesota. 

Missouri. 

Illinois. 

Iowa, 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

Ohio. 

Mississippi, 

Attstralia, 

Iowa, 

Illinois. 

Iowa, 

Wisconsin. 

Oregon, 

Illinois. 

California, 

Iowa, 

Wisconsin. 

Michigan. 

Illinois. 

Minnesota. 

Illinois, 

Wisconsin, 

Minnesota. 

Utah. 

Michigan. 

Washington. 

Nehraska, 

Nebraska, 

Indian Territory. 

Indian Territory. 

Canada. 

Nebraska. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 



881 



JUNIOR CLASS. 


Allender, Lafe Carl, 


Missouri. 


Baker, Frederick P., 


Wisconsin. 


Bast, Edward John, 


Minnesota, 


Baur, Armin Peter, 


Illinois. 


Bell, Charles Edgar, . 


Indiana. 


Bersing, Arthur E., 


Wisconsin. 


Bloom, Abraham, 


Illinois. 


Bolton, Richard Mark, 


Canada. 


Bolzell, Charles B., 


Wisconsin. 


BresslOT, Arthur Malcolm, 


Alabama. 


Brockman, Marion Cline, 


Illinois. 


BuBhnell, Archie Dennis, 


Wisconsin. 


Carroll, William Preston, 


Illinois. 


easier, John Maynard, 


Ohio. 


Cassell, Moses Anthony, 


Ohio. 


Chappuie, Gordon, 


Minnesota. 


Concklin, Lewis Knapp, 


Wisconsin. 


Conley, Willard Thomas, 


Iowa. 


Cook, Orra Ivan, 


Iowa. 


Courtice, Oliver J., 


Canada. 


Cox, Nicholas W., 


Illinois. 


Danforth, Edward Roscoe, 




Davis, William James, 


Wisconsin. 


Donovan, John M., 


Iowa. 


Downs, George Almond, 


lotoa. 


Drake, Don Delbert, 


Iowa. 


Earley, William F., 


Illinois. 


Fisher, Dorsey D., 


Ohio. 


Forsyth, John Elder, 


Australia. 


Foster, Ota F., 


Illinois. 


Frankel, James D., 


Illinois. 


Fry, William Thomas, 


Illinois. 


Gordon, David J., 


ininois. 




Illinois. 


Heap, George Roy, 


Illinois. 


Heisler, William F., 


South Dakota. 


Hess, Albert C, 


Illinois. 


Holmquest, David Elven, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, Alvin Fabian, 


Illinois. 


Johnson, James Edward, 


Wisconsin. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



882 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Johnson, Lawrence Raymond, 


IllinoU. 


Jones, Orlando Van Deusen, 


Illinois. 


Jones, Ramon, 


Illinois. 


Kauffman, John Calvin, Jr., 


Wisconsin. 


Kelley, Boyd Longwell, 


Michigan. 


Kennedy, William Small, 


Oregon. 


Keyes, John August, 


IllinoU. 


Keyser, Dixon Baker, 


Ohio. 


Kimball, George G., 


Illinois. 


Kindt, Herbert Paul, 


Illinois. 


Kingsley, Austin Cain, 


Illinois. 


Koenig, August C, 


Illinois. 


Landee, Guy Arthur, 


lotoa. 


Lawver, Harry Edward, 


Illinois. 


Lee, Arthur Brush, 


Michigan. 


Linne, Alvin Barton, 


Washington. 


Long, J. Harding, 


Illinois. 


Longwell, Ralph Elliott, 


Pennsylvania, 


McBroom, Samuel, 


Minnesota. 


McKenna, Daniel W., 


IllinoU. 


MoTjaren, Arthur Charles, 


IllinoU. 


Mason, William Charles, 


IllinoU. 


Metcalfe, Prank, 


WUconsin. 


Miller, Jacob, 


IllinoU. 


Miller, Theodore, 


WUconsin. 


Mills, Henry Louis, 


Montana. 


Mitchell, Harry Chandler, 


IllinoU. 


Mitten, Charles Louis, 


Indiana. 


Myers, Cyrus A., 


Indiana. 


Myles, Andrew Watson, 


Canad€^ 


Norrls, Luke Leo, 


Iowa. 


Olson, Axel Frank, 


Minnesota. 


Owens, Richard E., 


Idaho. 


Pailthorp, Arthur Wescott, 


Michigan. 


Pfeiffer, Carl Elmer, 


Minnesota. 


Pfouts, Royal Edgar, 


Ohio. 


Phillips, Arthur Abraham, 


IllinoU. 


Power, William Bernard, 


Washington. 


Rasch, Christian Albert, Ph.G., 


IllinoU. 


Reid, William Edmund, 


Michigan. 


Rice, Ora Ray, 


WUconsin. 


Rich, Albert Clarence, 


IllinoU. 




Digitized by VJ 



Google 



THB DENTAL SCHOOL. 



888 



Rlgfatman, Simon M., 
Itodgers, Frank, 
R088, Albert Taylor, 
Savage, Charles Sumner, 
Schmook, Theodore, Jr., 
Schulz, Louis, 
Scranton, Harmon Stuart, 
Sedwick, Harry L., 
Smith, Harry Alexander, 
Snyder, Harry Dale, 
Sommeryille, George B., 
Spearman, Kelly R., 
Squires, William Alonzo, 
Thompson, George Augustus, 
Van Sant, Leport Richard, 
Wehrhelm, John Lawrence, 
Winthrope^ Paul W., 
Wipf, Jacob H., 



minais. 

MUaouri. 

niinoia. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Michigan, 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Michigan. 

Arkansas. 

Utah. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Canada. 

South Dakota. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Adams, John Melvin, 

Alexander, Howard, 

Babcock, Clarence S., 

Ball, Charles Joseph, 

Bamsback, Chalmer Truman, 

Beck, James Edwin, 

Berkshire, Edward, 

Bemhard, Axel, 

Blgler, Chester Arthur, 

Blake, Robert J., 

Boman, Anton LeRoy, 

Bow, John M., 

Bremner, Maurice David, 

Brown, Fred, 

Buckley, Michael J., 

Burke, Harry John, 

Burton, Jesse Francis, 

Calvert, James Rex, 

Campbell, Albert William, Ph. G., 

Carlstein, Aaron, 

Case, Claude Edmund, 



Illinois. 

New York, 

Illinois. 

Missouri. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

IlHnois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Montana. 

Canada. 

UHnois. 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

Illinois. 

Utah. 

Indiana. 

ininois. 

South Dakota. 

Digitized by 



Google 



884 



N0RTHWB8TBRN UNIVKRSITT. 



Chady, Roy J., 

Clement, Benjamin Franklin, 
ClOBBon, Arthur D., 
Cole, Alvie Sylvester, 
Crane, Edward R., 
Crowley, Edward Timothy, 
Cummins, Harry Ray, 
Dawson, William Thomas, 
Dedon, Victor W., 
Diehl, Fred S., 
Dohrmann, August, 
Donovan, Michael David, 
Dooley, Chase Creel, 
Dunn, Ernest Luclen, 
Egan, Thomas Francis, 
Elsnau, Theodore, 
Evans, Ernest I., 
Exon. George Edward, 
Field, William Sydney, 
Fietsch, John Fred, 
Findley, Harry M., 
Fine, Bessie E., 
Flath, Milford Qarbutt, 
Follett, Walter Carious, 
Foster, Roy Allen, 
Freel, Floyd Wheatley, 
Galbraith, Logan Blaine, 
Oaley, James C, 
Goldstein, Oscar, 
Graves, Idella Elnora, 
Gulstine, Herman P., 
Hamel, Carl William, 
Harris, Joseph G., 
Harrison, Charles Lewis, 
Hartt, Alice Constance, 
Hauser, Edward John, 
^Henderson, Olive Myrtle, 
Hirschfleld, Saul, 
Hixon, Clyde LeRoy, 
Hogan, Mark F., 
Hollister, Claude Reavis, 
Hoover, Chester W., 



Wisconsin, 

Canada. 

IlHnois. 

Wisconsin. 

Michiffon. 

IlHnois. 

Illinois, 

South Dakota, 

Minnesota. 

Illinois. 

IlHnoU, 

South Dakota. 

IlHnois. 

Iowa, 

Wisconsin. 

IlHnoU. 

Utah. 

Kansas. 

England, 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

North Dakota. 

North Dakota, 

Illinois. 

New York. 

Minnesota. 

Louisiana. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin, 

South Dakota. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

IllinoU. 

Illinois. 

North Dakota. 

Arkansas. 

IlHnoU. 

Idaho. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 



385 



Jenkins, Charles WiUard, 
Johnson, Sidney H., 
Jones, Roy C, 
Keyes, John, 
Knoff, Raymond O., 
Krembs, Franz J., 
Krembs, Moritz, 
Lacaze, Charles Andre, 
Langton, Seth Alma, Jr., 
Lazier, Harry Austin, 
Leavltt, Samuel H., 
LegTold, Gerhard Ferdinand, 
Leininger, Arthur Aaron, 
Lelth, John Foster, 
Lemmon, Walter F., 
Long, Roy Foster, 
Love, Jesse J., 
Luce, Allen Edwin, 
Luttizmann, Carl Augustus. 
Lyding, John Daniel, 
Lyding, Joseph Benjamin, 
Lynch, Oliver Edward, 
McKay, Grover C, 
McKay, N. Bruce., 
Macdonald, David Colin, 
Mead, Roy Eugene, 
Meisel, Harry Benjamin, 
Mertz, Arthur Edgar, 
Meyers, George Edward, 
Morange, Roderick M., 
Morgan, Walter A., 
Mott, Walter, 

Mulford, Thomas Tlllinghast, 
Obey, J. Victor, 
Parker, Clement B., 
Pasternachi, Leon P., 
Paulson, Paul Gerhard, 
Potts, Laurence Loraine, 
Rakow, William J., 
Rice, Joseph Bliven, 
Richter, Louis Charles, 
Roberts, Edward Raymond, 



Illinois. 

Illinois, 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin. 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin, 

Australia. 

Utah. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Minnesota. 

Oregon, 

Pennsylvania. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Michigan. 

Illinois, 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

lofoa. 

Iowa. 

lotoa. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Michigan, 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

Wisconsin. 

Kansas. 

Indiana. 

IlHnoU. 

Michigan, 

Kansas. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



886 



NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVERSITY. 



Rosensteln, Oilbert, 
Salisbury, ZoUe Blmor«, 
Salvail, Arthur P., 
Savage, Samuel Robert, 
SaxtOB, Leigh L., 
Scheffer, Bernhardt, 
Schlesinger, Leo, 
Schoenbrod, Abraham Morris, 
Schoonover, Ned W., 
Schumacher, Frank Paul, 
Schwartz, Milton D., 
Scott, Albert Blbridge, 
Seaman, George Grant, 
Sebellus, Carl, 
Shaddle, 'Charles Gilbert, 
Sherman, Oryille M., 
Sherwood, Frank Russell, B.S., 
Smith, Roy Orval, 
Snow, William Edward, 
South, William Henry, 
Stam, Russell Zeigler, 
Starry, Thomas Edward, 
Stephens, George B., 
Stiehm, Paul Edward, 
Stinson, Guy Donald, 
Stirling, George Guy, 
Sutcliffe, Frank W., 
Swisher, Fred J., 
Taylor, Guy Everett, 
Tharp, Horace John, 
Thomason, Albert Robert, 
Thompson, Ellis Howard, 
Toraason, Goodwin, 
Uebele, Harvey M., 
Unger, Arthur, 

Walbridge, Ernest Lucien, Ph.G., 
Walston, Leroy, 
Watts, William Henry, 
Webster. Clarence R., 
Welch, James R., 
Wilcox, Strafford Bdmond, 
Wilen, Arthur Nelson, 



Texas. 

Indiana. 

Illinois. 

British Columbia. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Kansas. 

Illinois. 

lUinois. 

Iowa. 

IllinoU. 

Kansas. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

South Dakota. 

Montana, 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Vermont. 

Illinois: 

Wisconsin. 

Kansas. 

Minnesota. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Montana. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Pennsylvania. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Indiana. 

Illinois. 

Australia. 

Wisconsin. 



Digitized by 



Google 



THB DENTAL. SCHOOL. 



387 



Wittenbrook, Fred H., 
WolBon» Abraham, 
Woodruff, Silas, 
Toung, Charles William, 
2iane, Edgar Carey, 
Zeigler, Lyman Fumer, 
Zemke, Arthur Wilbert, 



Ohio. 

Illifk^U. 

Kansas. 

Colorado. 

Michigan, 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Allen, Harvey Irwin. 
Apple, Wilbur Martin. 
Baier, John G., M.D. 
Baird, Perry C, D.D.S. 
Brown, Franklin Hartwell. 
Burke, Jerry Robert. 
Beebe, Neil Heart 
Balskey, Harry Albert 
Fen, F. W., L.D.S. 
Fuchs, Hans, M.D. 
Gruenblatt, Robert, D.D.S. 
Hall, Charles S. 
Harrison, Charles Butler. 
Horton, Roy James. 
Hoffer, John George. 
Jonas, I., D.D.S. 



Roller, Robert P., M.D. 
Lewis, Paul Augustus. 
Linxweiller, Arno Charles. 
Lyon, G. W., D.D.S. 
Miller, Clare James. 
Morgan, Charles Doyle. 
Reinhardt, Homer Lewis. 
Reisner, Joseph Frederick. 
Slie, Herbert Seymour. 
Swan, Alfred Helmer. 
Sherwood, FYancis Denslow. 
Stotz, Herman Adolph. 
Tapp, Ralph Charles. 
White, Edward WilllanL 
Weiffenbach, Clarence Gerlugh. 
Young, Griffin Darwin. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



888 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



STUDENTS IN REGULAR COURSES. 



Ahem, Gertrude Adele, 
Ahlers, Helen Adele, 
Alvord, Anna Helen, 
Andrews, Rolla M., 
Anguish, Maude Darling, 
Bailey, Lura Mary, 
Bartholomew, Laura Ann, 
Beebe, Florence Dier, 
Benson, Stella Lyda, 
Berger, Grace Ella, 
Boorman, Genevieve Marie, 
Beede, Mary Etta, 
Bralnard, Adeline, 
Brenneman, Hedwig, 
Brlggs, Florence Bernice, 
Briggs, Rose Anna, 
Brown, Clara Gertrude, 
Burrell, Edith Marian, 
Butz, Theodore Charles, 
Campbell, Marvene Goldie, 
Cardlnell, Mary Olive, 
Carson, Theresa Irene, 
Coale, Helen Rossi ter, 
Colladay, Jennie Frances, 
Congdon, Elizabeth, 
Constant, Luther Martin, 
Couffer, Minette Westby, 
Crawford, Nellie Florence, 
Crawford, Kathryn Savage, 
De Groff, Hazel Lorune, 
Dennis, Myrta McKean, 
Du Bois, Daisy, 
Du Mars, Cecile Ainsworth, 
Eckert, LiUle, 
Eilert, Edward Franklin, 
Enscoe, Leonora May, 



Dwight, 

BellevuBt la. 

Rantouh Kan, 

Woodstock, 

Evanston. 

Richland Center, Wis. 

Michigan City, Ind. 

Hampton, la. 

OttaiDO. 

Osage, la. 

Evanston. 

Polo. 

Harvard. 

Peru, 

Delta, la. 

Frazee, Minn. 

Trinidad, Col.. 

Freeport, 

Winnetka. 

Bethany. 

Evanston. 

Valparaiso, Ind. 

Highland Park. 

Hutchinson, Kan, 

Evanston. 

IlliopolU, 

Arlington, Neh. 

Bondville, 

Chicago. 

Spring Valley, 

Evanston. 

Rockvyell City, la. 

Hanna City. 

Woodstock. 

Barahoo, Wis. 

Loyalton, Cal, . 



\ 



Digitized by 



Google 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



Ford, Ethel Mundt, 
Forkner, Mabel Grace, 
Frost, Florence Virtlne, 
Qarrett, Grace, 
Gillan, Jennie Isabel, 
Girton, Edith Alice, 
Haake, Charles John, 
Hall, Eleanor Jean, 
Handy, Rena Marshall, 
Hanmer, Agnes Jane, 
Hanson, Etta Davidson, 
Harl, Ruth, 
Hazelton, Jessie Lucia, 
Hinman, Esther Christine, 
Hop wood, Grace Belle, 
Howes, Mamie, 
Hummel, Rose Meta, 
Jermundson, Hannah Marion, 
Jones, Blanche Pearl, 
Jones, Ida Guinivere, 
Keeton, William Elmer, 
Kelsey, Herbert Clement, 
Kennedy* Alice Lucile, 
Kneeland, Lura, 
Kuhn, Ethel Laura, 
LatU, Lillian, 
Le Compte, Myrtle Eugenie, 
Lennox, Olive Beatrice, 
Lillie, Maude Sophia, 
Loomis, Grace May, 
Looney, Charlotte May, 
Lund, Florence May, 
Marsh, AUie Emily, 
Marshall, Julia Sheldon, 
Marshall, Mary Stevenson, 
Mauer, Otilie, 
Mercer, Ida Emogene, 
Mitani, Shumzo, 
Moffat, Edna, 

Morehart, Nellie Hortense, 
Murdock, Mora, 
McCord, Bertha Clendenen, 



Chicago, 

Wahpeton. N, Dak. 

Evanston. 

Evanston, 

Wellington. 

Madison^ 8. Dak. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Council BluffSt la. 

Chicago. 

Bellaire, Mich. 

Evanston. 

Lawrence, Mich. 

Chicago. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Canton. 

Luveme, Minn. 

8t. Louis, Mo. 

Cameron, Mo. 

Woodstock. 

Hillsboro, No. Dak. 

Audubon. la. 

Clinton, Wis. 

Ottumwa, la. 

Benton Harbor, Mich. 

Marion, la. 

Osborne, Kan. 

Knoxville, la. 

Ida Orove, la. 

Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Fennimore, Wis. 

La Moille. 

Tokyo, Japan. 

Chicago. 

Chanute, Kan. 

Streator. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



890 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRSITT. 



Neely, Clara Grace, 
Newell, Sadie Marie, 
Newgard, Alice Bertina, 
Noble, Pam, 
Norton, Julia Efllen, 
Ott, Aureola Marie, 
Parsons, Hannah Bertha, 
Paulus, Viola Emma, 
Porter, Bertha Belle, 
Pratt, Gertrude May, 
Reynolds, Eva Jane, 
Sarlls, Mary Emily, 
Seerley, Hazel Virginia, 
Shaw, Maude Eva, 
Slajrton, Clara Bfoe, 
Smith, Artie Vema, 
Smith, Elya, 
Smith, Bfae Isabel, 
Smith, Pearl Estella, 
Smothers, Edgar Raymond, 
Snyder, Helen Louise, 
Songer, Carl Anson, 
Squire, Walter Edmund, 
Stark, Grace Florence, 
Sterrett, Marion, 
Stults, Walter Allen, 
Sutton, Eva Nagle, 
Swanson, Effle Aurora, 
Thiers, Christine, 
Thom, Elizabeth, 
Thompson, Pearl May, 
Townsend, Lowell Leslie, 
Vemor, Edith Phelps, 
Wall, Lottie Eva, 
Ward, Elizabeth Hester, 
Ward, Lena, 

Waterbury, Mary Louise, 
Watkins, Anna Marie, 
Webster, Josephine Haviland, 
Weis, Ezra Franklin, 
Williams, Nona Evelyn, 
Williams, Rachel Getty, 



EwMBton. 

KanatDha, la, 

Chicago, 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Chioaffo. 

Tipton, la. 

Chicago. 

Apple River. 

Evanston. 

Bolivar, N. Y. 

Mt. Vernon, Ind. 

Burlington. la. 

Amboy. 

Evaneton. 

Loyalton, Cal. 

Correctionville, la. 

Keioanee. 

Montezuma, la, 

Rosaville. 

Freeport. 

Trenton, Mo. 

Chicago. 

Thompson, 

Washington, Pa. 

Evanston. 

W. Lafayette, Ind. 

Aurora, Neh. 

Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Correctionville, la. 

Wyanet. 

Remington, Ind. 

Sandtoich. 

Fargo, No. Dak. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Princeton. 

Evanston. 

Reddick. 

Mason City, la. 

Seneca, Kan, 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THB SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



391 



Woodruff, Nina May, 
Works* Florence Ethel, 



Belvidere. 
Evanston, 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Adair, Gertrude, 
Abbott, Clarence Cleland, 
Alrheart, Walter Lee, 
Albritton, Elmer Sanford, 
Anderson, Daniel, 
Avery, Clyde, 
Baker, Clara Belle, 
Baker, Edna Dean, 
Baird, Winfield Earl, 
Barck, Kersten Marie, 
Barkle, Thomas John, 
Barlow, Harriett, 
Bartlett, Mrs. E. C, 
Bell, Herbert Yeomans, 
Bendlx, Ernest Oliver, 
Bennett, Charlotte Louise, 
Bent, David F., 
Bock, Edna Wilhelmina, 
Bondurant, Flint, 
Bowen, Clara Florence, 
Bradley, Gertrude, 
^Breckon, Albert Wulber, 
Brewer, Beatrice, 
Brewer, Jonathan, 
Bronson, Eugene Victor, 
Brown, Helen Dunham, 
Brown, John Roscoe, 
Brown, Mary Louise, 
Brown, Nellie Alva, 
Burger, Mrs. Horace D., 
Busse, Florence Ethel, 
Bussey, Lewis Mortimer, 
Butler, Faith, 
Campbell, Alice Birdine, 
Chaffee, Lura Josephine, 
Clark, Arthur Gerald, 
Clark, Bstelle, 



Glencoe, 

Hill8horo, Okla. 

McAlester, Ind. Ter, 

Letoishurg, Pa, 

Wahoo, Neh, 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Trade Lake, Wis. 

England. 

Dixon. 

Evanston. 

Holly, Col. 

Chicago. 

WaterviUe, Kan. 

Plattsville. 

8t. Joseph, Mo. 

Cairo. 

Phillipshurg, Mont. 

Evanston, 

Earlville, la. 

Chicago. 

Yincennes, Ind. 

Urhana. 

Evanston. 

Orant, Mich. 

Emmetsburg, la. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Porter, Ind. 

Crete. 

Chicago. 

Wichita, Kan. 

8h€ll>yville. 

Middleville, Mich. 

Highland Park. 



^Deeeased. 



Digitized by 



Google 



392 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Clement, Laura, 
Glutton, Fred Homer, 
Cocayne, Jesse Peryl, 
Colby, Guy Irving, 
Colthurst, Claire, 
Cornelius, Martha Dorris, 
Cowles, Eunice, 
Crandon, Ruth, 
Curran, Jessie Anna, 
Daniels, Lucretia Ellen, 
Decker, Mrs. H. E., 
Dewey, Perdita, 
Dillon, Flossie, 
Dimmick, John F., 
Dolbeer, Loveme Ann, 
Dixon, Willard Jerome, 
Eldred, Alice Stanley, 
Eldred, Bertha Marguerite, 
Ellis, John Howard, 
Elmore, Florence C, 
Erb, George William, 
Erwine, Samuel Dawson, 
Finley, Faye, 
Fisher, Esther, 
Foote, Edna Bigelow, 
Ford, Julia C, 
Forster, Elolse, 
Francis, Clara Alice, 
Fulcher, Gordon Scott, 
Fuller, John McElroy, 
Gamble, John Elmer, 
Gibson, Earl Stewart, 
Gillet, Orval Trimble, 
Gilmer, Karl Rex, 
Gilson, James Harold, 
Glassburn, Hugh Damron, 
Goddard, Odile Marie, 
Goldberg, Minnie, 
Gray, Ruth Rowena, 
Greening, Harry E., 
Grigson, Blanche Lenore, 
Guyer, Ruby Virginia, 



Joliet 

New Castle, Pa, 

Mediapolis, la. 

Springfield, 

Morris. 

Nashvitte, Tenn, 

Hinsdale. 

Evanston. 

Denver, Colo. 

Danville. 

Evanston. 

Kenosha, Wis. 

Estherville, la. 

New Chicago, Mont. 

Chicago. 

Kankakee. 

Joliet. 

Joliet. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Saunemin. 

Hoopeston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Coming, la. 

Omaha, Neh. 

Evanston. 

Coming, la. 

Braceville. 

Newton, la. 

Oak Park. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Augusta. 

Freeport. 



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Google 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



893 



Hackley, Lillian Parmella, 
Hall, Sarah Maria, 
Hamilton, Josephine C, 
HarknesB, Cornelia Virginia, 
Harper, Mae Elizabeth, 
Harper, William Fletcher, 
Harris, Emily, 
Harrison, W. H., 
Harry, Edythe Estella, 
Hartman, Raymond Francis, 
Hebblethwaite, Anna, 
Heiss» William C, 
Henke, William Arthur, 
Hillary, George J., 
Hixon, Clyde Le Roy, 
Hoffman, Rudolph, 
Howard, Horace Lee, 
Hull, Ray Le Roy, 
Hutt, George B., 
Hyde, Herbert Samuel, 
Hyden, Bertha Freda, 
Jacobson, Edmund, 
Jaggers, Abram, 
Jaggers, Lizzie Rebecca, 
Jeglum, Selma Roshilda, 
Jericho, Warren B., 
Jockisch, Albert Julius, 
John, Clinton Winfleld, 
Johnson, Anna Raymond, 
Johnston, Leila Melissa, 
Jones, Nellie Hannah, 
Jones, Ralph Cotton, 
Justice, Eva Loraine, 
Justice, William Arthur, 
Kincaid, William Asbury, 
Knapp, Warren Emecson, 
Knott, Jessie Mae, 
Konsberg, Laura Sophia, 
Le Baron, Mabel Ruth, 
Letherman, Ida Bi., 
Lott, Cora Belle, 
LoYeJoy, Eunice Stephens, 



Netoton^ la, 

Evanston, 

Chicago, 

Chicago. 

Sidney, Neb, 

Evanston. 

East Mechias, Me. 

Evanston. 

Watseka. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Aurora. 

Charles City, la. 

PlattevilJe, Wis, 

Weiser, Idaho. 

Chicago, 

Qarfleld, Wash. 

Hanna, So, Dak. 

Jacksonville. 

Chicago, 

Evanston, 

Chicago, 

Evanston, 

Evanston. 

Blanchardville, Wis. 

Mt, Pleasant, la. 

Decatur, 

Camffridge, Neb. 

Chicago. 

Baraboo, Wis, 

Mulford. 

Cincinnati, 0, 

Walla Walla, Wash, 

Evanston. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Evanston. 

Princeton. 



Digitized by 



Google 



894 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Macdonald, Mary Edna, 
Maddux, Delia May, 
Madsen, Alma Olive, 
Magee, David B., 
Mason, Olive Yale, 
Melsel, Harry Benjamin, 
Merrell, Dwlght Livingstone, 
Merrill, Morton William, 
Merrltt, J. Wesley, 
Merubla, Molses, 
Middlekauff, Marjorle, 
Miller, Benlah Emma, 
Mlnott, Annette Eleanor, 
Mitchell, Ruth, 
Moore, Irene Hunt, 
Morrison, Myrtle, 
McCk>noughey, Edward Marsh, 
McDonnell, Marie Josephine, 
McGrew, David Randolph, 
McKlm, Robert, 
Nelson, Alice, 
Nevitt, Autta Quatlerra, 
Nickell, Clarence Oliver, 
Nlelson, Mrs. Edwin, 
Nord, Agnes, 

Nysewander, Bertha Elizabeth, 
0*ConneU, Jerome Franklin, 
Ofstie, Joseph Bernard, 
Orr, Eunice Elizabeth, 
Orr, Irma Jean, 
Otjen, Anna Mae, 
Parisoe, George Edward. 
Parks, Julia Hollister, 
Parkinson, Ora R, 
Patten, Helen Prindle, 
Paullin, Frances Anne, 
Peache, Alfred, 
Pease, Halley Anna, 
Pellage, Hugo William, 
Peterson, Abe Rudolph, 
Plsgge, Herbert John, 
PoHock, Samuel Edgar, 



EvanaUm. 

Rosedale, Kan. 

Chicago. 

CarroUion, 0. 

Evanaton. 

Bay City, Mich. 

Evanstcn. 

Evanston. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Bolivia, 80. Am. 

Chicago. 

HiauDOtha, Kan. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Appleton, Wis. 

Chicago. 

Olathe, Kan. 

Beatrice, 2f«&. 

Chicago. 

Ottumtoa, la. 

Des Moines, la. 

Chicago. 

Spring Valley, Wis. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Harvey. 

Danville. 

Grand Forks, No. Dak. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

y. Judson, Ind. 

Barrington. 

Evanston. 



Digitized by 



Google 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



895 



Pool, Uoyd Herbert, 
Pope^ Mary Howe, 
Potter, Frank Ohr, 
Pratt, Francis M., 
Pmdden, Gladys. 
Redfem, Alfred Sylvan, 
Reed, Charles Mortimer, 
Raymond, Miner, 
Rech, Gilbert Henry Andrew, 
Redelings, Leslie Hall, 
Rice, Arthur L., 
Rise, Joseph Bliven, 
Ripl«y, L. E., 
Roberts, Lloyd Ruby, 
Roslne, Howard Myron, 
Sanderson, William Martin, 
Schell, Viola Gertrude, 
Schntz, Herman Jacob, 
Scoggin, Berenice, 
Scoggln, Mary, 
Scoggin, Ruby, 
Scrippe, Earl H., 
Seebach, Marie, 
Seeberger, Hugh Alexander, 
Sellard, Earl J., 
Semans, Nellie Maude, 
Shannon, Mabel, 
Sheppard, Margarethe, 
Sheppard, Virginia Cornelia, 
Sherman, Louise, 
Sholty, Ethel Anna, 
Shnmway, John M., 
Simpson, Agnes Grace, 
Singleton, James Herbert, 
Six, Rollo, 
Smart, Willard C, 
Smith, Dennis Vincent, 
Smith, Vema Ethel, 
Snell, Roy Waldo, 
Sparling, James Russell, 
Stafford, Wesley, 
Stanbery, Edward, 
Stanton, Alyord Cooper, 



Earlville. 
Evanaton, 
Leaf River, 
' Walnut, 
Chicago, 
Autumt Nef>. 
Lyont, Kan. 
Evanaton. 
Chicago. 
Marinette, Wia, 
Wilmette, 
Lake Geneva, Wia. 
Fort Wayne. Col. 
Adel la. 
Evanaton. 
Miltoaukee, Wia. 
New Ulm, Minn. 
Evanaton. 
Millington. 
MiUington. 
Millington. 
Evanaton. 
Peru. 

Newton, la. 
Belvidere. 
Evanaton, 
Minneapolia, Minn. 
Evanaton. 
Evanaton. 
Evanaton. 
WabaaK Ind, 
Evanaton. 
Waukegan. 
Buckley. 
Perry- 
Fort Smith, Ark. 
Petoakey, Mich. 
Montezuma. la, 
Ida Orove, la. 
Henry. 
Carterville. 
Evanaton. 
Richville. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



396 



NORTHWESTBRN UNIVERSITY. 



Starck, Gladys Muriel, 

Steele, Ethel Drusilla, 

Stevens, Maude Eva, 

Strattan, Chauncey, 

Summerrllle, Ralph Waldo Etaierson, 

Swaney, Bertram Garfield, 

Swenson, John W., 

Teare, Alfred J., 

Thompson, Gena Sophia, 

Thompson, Gertrude CecUe, 

Todoroff, Alexander, 

Tomllnson, Jay Thomas, 

Trulson, Laura Emllle, 

Turner, Mary Maurlne, 

Veach, Oscar Lloyd, 

Volght, Mary Sophia, 

Wahl, Mabel Elliot, 

Walter, Mrs. William, 

Ward, Esther, 

Watson, Margaret, 

Weaver, Martin W., 

Welch, Helen Wlkel, 

Welch, Ray D., 

West, Mabel Pearl, 

Wheelock, Grace, 

White, Annie Lucile, 

White, Lillian, 

Whitfield, Josledell, 

Wilcox, Muriel Bstella, 

Williams, Jennie May, 

Williams, Seymour, 

Willis, Martha B., 

Wood, Allen H., 

Wood, Cassius Hiram, 

Woodmansee, Cicero McGown, 



Chicago, 

Tulaa, Ind. Ter. 

Evanstan, 

Mt, Vernon. 

Evanston, 

Marengo, la. 

Evanston. 

Chicago, 

Hollandale, Wis, 

Evanston. 

Chicago, 

Box Orove, Ont. 

Orfordville, Wis, 

Wenona, 

Cedar Rapids, la. 

Kankakee. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Clarinda, la, 

Ada, 0, 

Chicago. 

Wilmette. 

Effingham. 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Hammond, Ind. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Titonka, la, 

Cass City, Mich, 

Evanston, 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



397 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



POST GRADUATES. 



Cheuvront, John Richard, 
Northwestern University. 



Shethyvitle, W, To. 



DEGREE COURSE. 



Senior Class. 

Harrop, Charles Wesley, B. L., 

Wheaton College. 
Morrison, Charles Henry, A.B., 

Depauw University. 
Nakagawa, Kunisahuro, 

Doshisha College ; 
United Theological School of Tokyo. 

Northrop, Albert Clinton, A.B., 

Kansas Wesleyan University. 
Parkinson, George H., Ph.B., 

Northwestern University. 
Perrlll, Fred Maeson, A.B., 

Baker University. 
Qulrin, Aquotns Jacob, A.B., 

Momingside College. 
Schutz, Herman Jacob, A.B., 

Central Wesleyan College. 
Simpson, David M., Ph.B., 

Momingside College. 
Stansell, George Gilbert, A.M., 

U. S. Grant University. 
Terrlll, W. C. 

Denver University. 
Tink, Samuel James, A.B., 

Albert College ; 

Lawrence University. 

Troxel, John S.. Ph.B., 

Mlssonri Wesleyan College. 
Welch, Arthur D., A.B., 

Upper Iowa University. 
Whittock Walter Hugh, 
Wilcox, Charles B., A.B., 

Hnron College. 
Williams, Seymour, A.B., 

University of Illinois. 



Arena, Wis. 
Cooperstoum, No. Dak. 
Tokyo, Japan. 

Belleville, Kan. 
Wichita, Kan. 
Salina, Kan. 
Eptoorth, Iowa. 
8t. Louis, Mo. 
Sioux City, la. 
Orove Oak, Ala. 
Denver, Col. 
Brooklyn, Ont. 

Breckenridge, Mo. 

Dyersville, la. 

Dim. 

Huron, Bo. Dak. 

Monticello. 



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Google 



398 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Middle Class. 

Campbell, Marshall, A.6., 

McKendree College. 
Ganster, Howard E., A.B., 

Northwestern University. 
Gilmer, Karl Rex, A.B., 

Monmouth College. 
Gosling, Alfred T., A.B., 

Alhion College. 
Hasse, August F., B.L., 

Uniyersity of Wisconsin. 
Lott, Lewis BuUard, A.B., 

Northwestern iThiyersity. 
Mason, George B., Ph.B., 

Depauw University. 
McKnight, Burr R., A.B. 

Washington and Jefferson College. 
Moore, Homer H., A.B., 

Mocmt Union College. 
Redfem, Alfred S., A.B., 

Nebraska State Uniyersity. 
Rumohr, Melvin, A.B., 

Montana Wesleyan Uniyersity. 
Semans, Adelbert L., A. B., 

Kansas Wesleyan University. 
Stephenson, Arthur T., A.M., 

Depanw University. 
Terrill, William Charles, 

Denver University. 



McLeoMboro, 
Evanaton. 
Chroveland. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 
Geneva, 
Evanston, 
Pittshurffy Pa, 
Cleveland, 0. 
Auburn, Neb. 
Forsyth, Mont, 
Russell, Kan. 
Chicago. 
Denver, Colo. 



Junior Class. 

Clapper, Orin Levi, A. B., 

jif t. Morris CoUege. 
Henke, Arthur W., A.B., 

Charles aty College. 
'Hewitt, Wilbur X, A-B.. 

Allegheny College. 
Hoff, Lewis Ross., Ph.B., 

Southwest Kansas Conference College. 
Johnson, Joseph O., A.M., M.D., Ph.B., 

Iowa State University: 
Uniyersity of Chicago. 

Kracher, F. W., A.B., 

Central Wesleyan College. 
Law, John G., 

Merrell, Morton W., A.B., 

Missouri Wesleyan College. 

Pennewell, Aimer M., A.B., 
Central Wesleyan College. 



Mt Morris. 
Charles City, la. 
Meadville, Pa. 
Evanston. 
Cedar Falls, la. 

Chicago. 

Milton, Kan. 
Evanston. 

VandaUa, Mo. 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



399 



RaUaon, George Ledrew, A.B., 

Baker Unlyersity. 
SUckney, J. E., B.8., 

Carlton College. 
Thompson, Charles J., 

Mount Union College. 
Thrall, Charles H., A.B., 

McKendree College. 
Wood, Harley J., A3., 

Allegheny College. 



lold, Kan. 
Eldon, Mo. 
New Oasile, Pa. 
Flora. 
Waterford, Pa. 



DIPLOMA COURSE. 



Senior CI 

Barkle, Thomas J., 
•BrecbOQ, Alhert W., 

Upper Iowa Uniyerelty. 
Carswell, George C, 

Corrie, Ezra S., 

Baker Unlyersity. 
Doenges, Rudolph, 

Iowa Wesleyan Unlyersity. 
Frid, James W., 

Albert CoUege, Belleyllle, Ont. 
Ichihashi, Tomoyuki, 

Unlyersity of the Paeiflc. 
Jaggers, Abram, 

Taylor University. 
Kelley, Frederick Octavious, 

Bible Christian College, Bngland. 
KetUe, John A., 

Langdoc Saul S., 

Northwestern Unlyersity. 
LumsdeQ, Ernest C, 

Perdue, Mentor J., B.8., 

Northwestern Unlyersity. 
Pollock, Samuel J., 

Potter, Robert A., 

Nlckerson College. 
Schreiber, Charles Henry, 

Huron College; , ^_ 
Northwestern Uniyerrfty. 

Steinlnger, James 8., 

Walker, J. Harvey, 

Kentucky Unlyersity. 
Wood, Caius M., 



HaUey, Idaho. 
BarMlle, la. 

Hotoara Lake, Minn. 
Isabel, Kan. 

PapiUion, Neb. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Tokyo, Japan. 

Plymouth, Oal. 

Kent, England. 

Fort Dodge, la. 
8t. Anne. 

Garden Prairie. 
Opolia, Kan. 

Flint, Mich. 
Stafford, Kan. 

Potter, 80. DaK. 

Manchester, Mich. 
LaBelle, Mo. 

Wichita, Kan. 



'Deceased. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



400 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Middle Class. 
Bamhart, Paul, 

Blake, Frank A., 

Albion College. 
Boyce, Orien E., 

Queen's Unlyersity. 
Brewer, Jonathan, 

Bronfion, EMgene Victor, 

UniyerMty of Illinois. 
Buell, Albert S., 

Nebraska Wesleyan University. 
Carlin, George Wyle, B.S., 

Hedding College. 
Carver, George R., 
Crumbaker, Victor A. 

Depauw University. 
DeLong, John E.. 
Gamble, John Elmer, 
Hendee, Vivian P., 

Horton, Angelo B., 

tJniverslty of Wisconsin. 
Houchens, Walter O., 
Hutt, George B., 

Johnson, Charles Powell, 

Iowa State College. 
Johnson, Neal, 

Western Collesre. 
Kendall, Nelson H., 
Kroneman, Albert F., 
Lindenmeyer, Arthur C, 
Listen, William W., 

Merrill, Ora Fulton, A.B., 

D^panw University. 
Moe, Rex Rogers, A.B., 

Cornell College. 
Parlsoe, Greorge Edward, 

Pruitt, Edward, 

Simpson College. 
Torregrosa, Samuel, 
Tyler, George A., 
Upp, Frank Marshall, 
Vassileff, Petko D., 

Watson, Joseph E., 

Muskingum College. 
Witter, John H.. 

Lincoln College; 

Northwestern University. 



Sparta, Mich. 
Flint, Mich. 

Big Stone City, So. Dak. 

Vincennes, Ind. 
Vrhana. 

Holt, Mont, 

Orion. 

Skaneateles, N. T. 
Fairbury. 

Bellefontaine, O. 
Omaha, Neh. 
Toledo, O. 
Oregon^ Wis. 

Chicago. 
Jacksonville. 
Des Moines, la. 

Red Oak, la. 

Traverse City, Mich. 
Marshall, Wis. 
Peotone. 
Hooper, Neh. 
Denver, Col. 

Fremont, Neb. 

Danville. 
Cromwell, la. 

Iquique, Chile, So. Am. 
Evanston. 
Taylorville. 
Lovtcha, Bulgaria. 
Hamlet, Ind. 

Oreenvieto. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



GARRBTT BIBLICAL INSTITUTB. 



401 



Junior Class. 

Abbott, Clarence C, 

Airheort, Walter L., 

Avery, Clyde, 

BoQt, Dayid F., 

Bussey, Lewis Mortimer, 
Northwestern University; 
Momlngslde College. 

Colbert, Waldo R., 

Oregon Btate Collegre. 
Dimmick, John F., 
Dreech, William, 

Edmonson, Stewart B., 
McKendree College. 
Brb, George W. 
Glassbum, Hugh D., 
Goodwin, Walter S., 

Granger, Gordon L., 

Temple College. 
Greening, Harry S., 

Chaddock College. 
Grimes, Biaggie, 

Harris, Alfred B., B.S., 

Northwestern University. 
Hillary, George J., 

JoneS) Lucian B., B.8., 

Parsons College. 
Jones, Ralph Colton, A.B., 

University of Cincinnati. 
Kmghoff, Karl F., 

Central Wesleyan College 
Leak, Francis A., B.S., 
Lee, Otto, 
Linger, Fl-eeman O., B.8., B.Pd., A.B., 

Valparaiso University. 
Magee, Davis B., 

Mount Union College. 
Matthews, Austin J., 

Chicago Theological Seminary. 
Maunders, Joseph E., 

Albert College. 
McComb, Alfred H., 

Alma College. 
McKim, Robert* 

Lawrence University. 
McMahan, Percy Reid, B.S., 

Valparaiso University. 
Merritt, J. Wesley, 



HUl8horo, Okla. 

McAlUter, Ind. Ter. 

Chicago. 

PUUtvUle, 

Crete. 

Ooivallis, Ore. 

New Chicago, Mont. 

Chicago. 

Evanaton. 

Chicago. 
Oak Park. 
Philadelphia. 
Qrossdale. 

Loraine. 

DecatuTf 0. 
Kentishury Ford, Eng. 

Platteville, WU. 
Fairfield, la. 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Tinleg Park. 

Essex, Ont. 
Cairo. 
Flatioood, W. To. 

CarroUton, 0. 

Dee Moines, la. 

Brussels, Ont. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Appleton, Wis. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



402 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Meyer, John H., 
Pardun, W. B., 

Parks, J. W., 

MlAsouri Wesleyan College. 
Peache, Alfred, 
Pratt, Francis M., 

Prell, Hwbert, 

Wallace Baldwin College. 
Reed, Charles M., 
Rhoades, Dwight Earl, 

Heidelberg University. 
Ripley, Louis E., 
Sanderson, John, 
Sebring, Frank K., 
Sellard, Earl J., 
Stafford, Wesley, 
Swandson, John, 
Thurstin, George F., 
Weaver, Martin W., 

Welch, Ray D., B.S., 

Ohio Northern Unlyersity. 
Witherbee, Hiram S.. 
Wood, Allen H., 
Wyant, Richard M., 



Chamheraburg. 
Clarion, la, 
Oabom, Mo, 

Chicago, 
Walnut. 
Batesville, Ind. 

Lyons, Kan. 
Toledo, 0. 

Fort Morgan, Col. 

Seneca. 

Evanaton. 

Belvidere, 

CartenHlle. 

Seneca. 

Orion, Mich. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Ada, 0. 

Belmont, Wis. 
Emmetsburg, la. 
Lansing, la. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Ankron, Pearl ^., 


Austin, 0. 


Ohio Northern Univeraity. 




Barber, Benjamin R, 


Calcutta, India. 


Northwestern University. 




Bartlett, Edward C, 


Guttenburg. la. 


Breckon, Mrs. A. W. 


Lima, la. 


Upper Iowa University. 




Cnimbaker, Mrs. V. A., 


Fairbury. 


Deuel, George Edmund, 


Montgomery, Vt. 


Deuel, Elma H., 


Montgomery, Vt. 


Gates, John R., 


EvansUm. 


Northwestern University. 




George, James W., 


Fulton. 


Northwestern University. 




Greening, Mrs. H. B., 


Loraine. 


Haman, J. W., Ph.M., B.D., 


Chicago. 


Northwestern University. 




Union Biblical Institute. 




Harper, W. F., 


Sidney, Neb. 




Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



QARRBTT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



408 



Hirsch, Arttiar H., 

Charles City Collesre. 
James, George B., 

Northwesteni University. 
Johnson, Ada Ellis, 

LeBaroQ, Ira, 

Fort Wayne CoUege. 
Luccock, E. H., 

Mardi, Daniel L., 
Beaver CoUege; 
Northwestern University. 

Merubia, Moises, B.S., 

Northwestern University. 
Morrison, Mrs. C. H., 

Nlnde, Qeorge F., A.B., 

University of Michigan. 
Potter, Florence M., 

Nlckerson OoUesre. 
Seller, William B. W.. A.B., 

Harvard University. 
Swenson, John W., 

Swedish Seminary. 
Trainum, William Henry, A.B., 

Witherbee, Lizzie May, 

University of Chicago. 
Wood, Grace H., 
Woodmansee, Fannie, 



Bvanston, 

Rochester. 

Dei Moines, la. 
Evanston, 

8t. LouU, Mo. 
Fitz Henry, Pa. 

Cochabamba, 80. Am. 

CMlHcothe, 0. 
Evanston. 

Stafford, Kan. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Evanston. 

Manor, Tex. 
West AlUs, WU. 

Waterford, Pa. 
Evanston. 



Students of the College of Liberal Arts Taking Work in the 

institute. 



Briggs, Charles R., 
Gibson, Francis M., 
Goldberg, Minnie, 
Int Hout, Cornell, B. 
Pollock, Samuel B., 
Rntt, A. B., 
Scott, Thomas, 
Stent, W. Lu, 
Tink, Bdmund W., 
Voight, Mary S., 



S., 



Rockford. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Oak Olen. 

Shirland. 

Cfoshen, Ind. 

Onarga. 

Huriey, So. Dak. 

Columbus, Ont. 

Kankakee. 



Digitized by 



Google 



404 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



StudenU of the Swedish Theological Seminary Taking Work in 
the Inetitute. 



Akerman, Nathaniel, 
Challberg, Otto, 
HiUman, Axel E., 
Lundberg, Oscar J., 
Malmqulst, Carl H., 



Moberg, Theodore, 
Nordberg, Gustaf K., 
Peterson, Arthur, 
Rylander, Andrew C, 
Sandell, Richard, 



Wermine, CJarl W. R. 



Students of the Norwegian-Danish School Taking Work In 
the Institute. 



Levin, Richard, 



Oakland, Blrt, 
Ofstle, Hans A. 



SWEDISH THEOLOGICAL SEIMINARY. 



Adrian, Theodore J., 
Lundberg, Oscar J., 
Nordberg, Oustaf K., 

Akerman, Nathaniel, 
Englund, Kaleb D., 
Malmqnlst, Carl H., 
Peterson, Arthur, 
Sandell, Richard, 



Fourth Class. 



Third Class. 



Second Class. 



Cederholm, William E., 
Challberg, Otto, 
Edlund, Skold, 
Hillman, Axel &, 
Holmgren, Carl August, 
Lawrence, Brynolph, 
Lindstrum, Adolph, 
Lundin, Nathanael, 
Moberg, Theodore, 
Swanson, Arthur, 
Wermine, Carl W. R., 



Scandia, Kan. 
West Hill, Neh. 
Kingsbury, Oal. 

Marquette, Mich. 
Jersey City, N. J, 
Nevoport, N. T. 
Straford, la. 
West Pullman. 



Brooklyn, N. T. 
Scandia, Kan. 
Brooklyn, N. T. 
Wayne, Kan. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Rockford. 
New York. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn. 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



405 



First Class. 



Anderson, Robert, 
Benson, Bemliard, 
Challman, Oscar F., 
Larson, John B., 
Lund, Elmer, 
Olson, John, 
Olson, Olof B., 
Pearson, Axel, 
Stone, John, 
Strdmbom, Oscar W., 
Wells, Carl, 
Westman, Gnst O., 



Chicago. 

Geneva, 

Chicago, 

Rockford. 

Geneva. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

New York. 

Geneva. 

Manda, Tex. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

8t. Paul, Minn. 



NORWEGIAN-DANISH THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL. 



Andersen, Arent M., 
Clansen, John H., 
Brlckson, Bdward, 
Folkestad, Halwood, 
Hermansen, Andrew, 
Johnson, Charles J., 
Levin, Richard, 
Lindwald, Carl J., 
Nelson, Gottfred, 
Oakland, Birt, 
O&tle, Hans A., 
Petersen, August M., 
Rolland, Haldor O., 
SjOl, John M., 
Staff, O. Rdhr, 
Wang, John J., 



Eau Claire, Wis. 
Christiania, Norway. 
Chicago. 

Perth Am1>oy, N. J. 
Los Angeles, Col. 
Evanston. 
Neendh, Wis. 
Laurvik, Norway. 
Hamlin, No. Dak. 
North Cape, Wis. 
Spring Vattey, Wis, 
Chicago. 
Everett, Wash. 
Sonde, Norway. 
Evanston. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



DEGREES, PRIZES, AND HONORS FOR 
THE YEAR 1904-05. 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN JUNE, 1906. 



HONORARY DEGREES. 

Doctor of Laws. 

William Fraser McDowell, a BUhop of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, 

Doctor of Sacred Theology. 
Charles Joseph Little, President of Garrett Biblical Institute. 

DEGREES IN COURSE. 
Master of Arts. 

Ahram Laurel Baker, — Thesis: A study of religious literature 

for the young. 
John Barnes, — Thesis: The biblical diction, imagery, and illusion 

of Shakespeare. 
Hester Eliza Benn,— Thesis: Why Balzac is considered the "chef" 

of the realistic school in spite of his numerous romantic 

tendencies. 
Martin John Berg, — Thesis: Assets Currency. 
William Aaron Bessesen,— Thesis: Variations in the ratio of 

diameters of the normal chest at different ages. The 

form of the phthisical chest 
Axel Louis Elmquist, — ^Thesis: Prohibition in Greek dramatic 

poetry. 
Caroline Elizabeth Jaycoz, — Thesis: A histological study of the 

nasal epithelium in mammals. 
Tare Kinugawa, — Thesis: The sugar industry in America. 

,406 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 407 

Ollnia May Mattison,— Thesis: Influence of the Bible upon Schil- 
ler's R&uber. 

Frank Miller Rarig, — Thesis: Biblical diction and religious be- 
lief in the novels of George Eliot 

Walter Edward Rolpff,— Thesis: Beginnings of German influence 
on English tragedy. 

Otto Gustay Ryden, — Thesis: Dedication in Illinois. 

Laura Belle Sampson, — Thesis: The treaty of paace between 
France and the United States, 1801. 

Matthew Lyle Spencer, — Thesis: The stage and the theater. 

Horace Blake Williams, — Thesis: The psychology of religious 
authority. 

Master of Science. 

Gnj Galllard Becknell, — Thesis: On the residual electromotive 
force of the carbon arc. 

George Weston Brlggs, — Thesis: Geometry of spheres and cy- 
dides. 

Ellen Fatima Clemens, — ^Thesis: The origin and development of 
the pulmonary artery in birds. 

Edith Dennett, — Thesis: Development of the embyro of a dicoty- 
ledon. 

Mabel Leininger, — Thesis: Dramatic criticism. 

Charles Gilbert Sabin,-— Thesis: The origin of the subclavian 

artery in the chicken. 
Florlan Edward Schmidt, — Thesis: On the freezing points of 

blood and urine in pneumonia; with a description of the 

hematocrit method for blood. 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Sigurd Edward Anderson, Gilbert Haven Cady, 

Florence Winifred Arnold, Fannie Campbell, 

Robert Wilson Baird, Hannah Louise Cater, 

Julia Elizabeth Bams, Jessie Uretta Cox, 

George Erie Beggs, Edward Stanley Craven, 

Charles Scofleld Blair, Ora Belle Davenport, 

Charles Ridgaway Bragdon, Eva Jane Derby, 

Arthur DeLyons Butler, Harriet Mae Doney, 



, Digitized by 



Google 



408 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



James William Gteorge, 
Daisy Myrtle Oirton, 
Henry Ouy Goodsell, 
Bbima Josephine Hafl, 
Margaret Sidney Hall, 
Lelia Woodbury Harwood, 
Cornelia Louise Hauser, 
Frances Diantha Hulbert, 
Rebecca Jane Hum, 
Dora Ellen Jones, 
James Cal«b Justice, 
Rufus Bemhard Kleinsmld, 
Edith Louise Long, 
Herbert McDougal, 
Grant Gay McChesney, 
Morton William Merrell, 
Mabel Kathryn IMQehle, 
Alice Maude Montgomery, 
Kathleen Mary Moore, 



Max Murdock, 
Albert H«nry Nash, 
Lyman Hull North, 
Scott Strickle Nortrup, 
Ethlyn Amelia Partridge, 
Naomi Willie Pollard, 
Abbie Grace Relthard, 
Thekla Rompel, 
Hazel Marie Schn&bele, 
Edith Blmira Shedd, 
Alice Ethloine Shurtleff, 
Helen Goudy Slocum, 
Harriet Evalyn Smith, 
Horace Greeley Smith, 
Frank Edwin Spencer, 
George Marsden Stevens, 
Lillian Maude Summers, 
Sarah Delia Ulmer, 
Margaret Valentine Wax. 



Bachelor of Science. 



Wentworth Prescott Ayer, 
Elmer Francis Blu, 
Veva May Brower, 
Frank Brown, 
Sara Juliet Brown, 
Ina Lillian Buswell, 
Julius Goodwin Carlson, 
Henry Alfred Ernest Chandler, 
Perry Harrison Cleveland, 
Isabel Cook, 
Guy Henry Cox, 
Bertha Creek, 
Oliver Atwood English, 
Eleanor Worthington Falley, 
John PorduB Faulkner, 
Charles Edwin Fletcher, 
Gordon Scott Fulcher, 
Webster Bber Gray, 
Almon Ansel Greenmao, 
Earl Wilson Gsell, 



David Thomas Hanson, 
Alfred Ernest Harris, 
Mary Elizabeth Hill, 
Oliver Sherman Hubbart, 
William Richard Johnson, 
fiimon M«nno Kanagy, 
Joseph Edward Keltner, 
Julia Inez Kipp, 
Lelia Pearl McKenney, 
Fred Landin McKinney, 
John Massen, 
Daisy May Mathis, 
Moises Merubia, 
Clarence Joseph Miller, 
Faye Arnold Moon, 
John Tllden NuttaU, 
George Tbomas Palmer, 
Bessie Gertrude Pearce, 
Daisy Irene Pearce, 
Merritt Nichol Pope, 



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Google 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 



409 



Albert Louis Ream, 
William John Reed, 
Charles Nelson Segar, 
Ohre Ruth Sibens, 
Frank Oscar Smith, 
Wilhelmine Matilde Sommer, 
Bartholomew John Spence, 
Harriet Salome Strong, 
Emma Jane Thomas, 
Estella May Tniby, 
QranviUe Howard Twining, 



Louis Caulton West, 
Jennie Gross Whipple, 
Clin Alonzo Wakeman, 
Henry James Whitney, 
Elizabeth Williams, 
Royal Andrew Wilson, 
Amelia Thompson Window 
Florence Janr Wbodworth, 
Bemice Works, 
Florence Ethel Works, 
John Frederick Wulff. 



Bachelor of Letters. 
Florence Louise Mitchell, 



Doctor of Medicine. 

Axel Walfrid Anderson, o.S., Harry D. Cartmell, 
George Washington Anglin, A.B.,Bzra Dwight Chase, 



Albert Andrew Ankenhrandt, 
Walter Gelvin Bain, A.B., 
Shirley De Vere Barry, 
Arthur Earl Beach, LL.6., 
Charles Edwin Beecher, 
James Calvert Belsan, A.6., 
Charles Russell Benner, 
William Aaron Bessesen, A.B., 
Harry C. Blankmeyer, Ph.G., 
Martin T. Blewett. 
Walter May Blowers, 



Hubert Barton Clapp, M.D., 
Robert Clements, 
Clifford M. Cline, 
Burr Combs, 
George ColviUe Croston, 
John Baker Crouch, 
Chester Blaine Crumpacker, 
Robert Alexander Cunliffe, 
George Hardin Curfman, Ph.D., 
Bert L. Doane, B. S., 
George Aiken Dowllng, 
Harold Duckett, 



James Henry Boswell, B.S., 

Frank Edson Boyden, Ph.G., B.S., James Todd Duncan, 

Byerett Haworth Bradway, A.B., John Sidney Dyer, 



George Carl Brandt, D.D.S., 
Earl Brisbin Brooks, B.S., 
Thomas Budge, D.D.S., 
William Martin Burbach, 
George Herman Burflend, 



George Eugene Egloff, 
Frederick Ferdinand Eblers. 

D.D.S., 
John Elarl Else, Ph.G., B.S., 
Albert H. Fabrique, M.D., 



Benjamin Wade Burleigh, A.M., Walter Jewett Fahmer, 
Henry Benjamin Carey, B.S., Frederick Ferdinand F^ir, 
Walter Austin Carr, Herman Gustavus Franzen, 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



410 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Adam John Gates, 
John Ernest Gelow, Ph.G., 
John Joseph Gill, Ph.G., 
Alfred William Goebel, 
William Vemer Gooder, 
Joseph Albert Goodrich, 

B.S., 
Oliver Perry Grant, 
J. T. Stewart Hamilton, 



Daniel Webster Lynch, 
Thomas James McCrory, 
Lee McElroy, B.S., 
John Singer McBwan, 
Francis Martin McGauley, 
Ph.G.,John Jerome Mcintosh, 
George Arthur McQuilkin, 
William George Magee, M.D., 
Martin Hiram Marken, 



Bertrand Maynard Hart, Ph.G., George Henry Martin, 



B.S., 
John Paul Hiebert, 
Emil J. Hoglund, 
Oscar William Holcomb, 
William Arthur Howard, 
Jam^s Roland Howell, 
John B. Hoyt, 



David Oscar Mead, 
Clyde Avery Medlar, 
Heber Kimball Merrill, 
Ph.G., Harry Herwin Meusel, 
Isadore Leon Meyers, 
Clarence Minnick, 
John Morey, 



A.B., 



Abraham Turner Hubbell, M.D., James Joseph Moran, 



Ray Orvln Hummel, B.S., 
Edward Staton Hymer, 
Alfred Frederick Jacobson, 
Ralph Ward James, 
George Thomas Jordon, B.S., 
Hugo Victor Kahler, 
Milton Kay, 

William Dennis Keating, 
John Edward Kelley, 
Frank Otho Kershner, A.B., 
John Elmer Kllllan, 
Hiram Irving King, 
Charles Edward Klontz, 
William Alb-ert Knoop, 
Frederick Karl Kolb, 
Alexander Kremers, 



Ralph Welty Nauss, B.S., 
George Warren Newell, 
Herman Christian Newton, 

D.D.S.. 
George Henry Niemann, Ph.C, 
Charles Pnillp Norby. M.S., 
Joseph Eugene O'Brien, 
David Billings Peck, B.S., 
Frederick William Peterson, 

A.B.. 
Harry Earl Pfelffer, 
John Gilbert Phillips, 
Thomas Pollock Ranney, 
Roy Charlton Richards, 
John Francis Rlordan, 
Ford B. Rogers, 



William Otterbein Krohn, A.M., Charl-es Edgar Rowe, Ph.G., 
Ph.D., Edward Wlnfleld Rowe, B.S., 

Robert Agedius Krost, B.S., Solomon Francis Rudolf, 

Wesley W. Kuntz, Florian Edward Schmidt, B.S., 

Quy Wayne Larimer, A.B., George Fred Carl Schroeder, 

Raymond Claude Llbberton, B.S., Ph.G., 
John Mathew Lilly, A.B., John Qulncy Adams Scroggy, 

Wilhelm Loser, Ph.G., 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 



411 



Edward Michael Sheehan, 
Van Archibald Smelker, 
Charles Gtottlleb Stegmayer, 

Ph.G.. 
James Wiley Stribling, 
Richard Samuel Thompson, 
Willis Guetner Tobey, A.B., 
James Trewhella, 
William Thomas Trewyn, 
Jake Van Houten, 
Harry Albert Vedder, 



James Blaine Vedder, 
William Jacob Waldschmidt. 
Sigismund Franklin Waterman. 
Frank Spencer Whitman, M.D.. 
Fred S. Williams, M.D., 
Julius Henry Wilson, 
Anthony George Wittman, 
George Augustus Wood, 
Edward Christian Wrightsman, 

M.D., 
Charles Francis Yerger, Ph.G. 



Bachelor of Laws. 



Walker Banning, 
Josiah Calef Bartlett, A.B., 
George Cuyer Barnes, 
Eugene Whitman Bell, B.S., 
Richard Lee Boggs, 
Frederic Burnham, A.B., 
Clyde Capron, A.B., 
Arthur Josiah Casebeer, 
Robert Bums Clark, 
Norris Burt Cline, 
Warren Eugene Coman, 
Ben Combs, 

Jesse Richard DiUard, A.B., 
David Cleyeland Dobbin, 
Alfred Robert £)ggert, 
Aaron Rudolph Bppstein, 
William R. T. Ewen, 
Ernest Reynolds Flfer, B.S., 
Frederick Aaron FYeeark, A.B., 
Howard Preston French, 
Louis Reginald Fulton, A.B., 
Charles Jacob Herman, 
Roy Elrod Howser, 
David Dudley Kagy, A.B.. 
Harry Chester Lewis, 
Henry Schuyler Lighthall, 
Myer Linker, 
Clarence A. Ludolph, 



Cornelius Lynde, A.B., 
Rex MacKenzie, A.B., 
Harry Alvin Martin, 
Oscar Moretz Meusel, 
Bernard Peter Mueller, LL.B.. 
Max Murdock, A.B„ 
William A. Oldfield, Ph.B., 
William John Otjen, 
Harold Sayre Osborn, A.B., 
John Nash Ott, A.B., 
Arthur Lincoln Penhallow, A.B., 
George Andrew Perrlll, B.S., 
Delos Demont Potter, 
Walter Quitman, 
Charles Henry Robinson, 
Harry Moses Rosenblum, 
Otto Gustaf Ryden. Ph.B., 
Monte Hanauer Sadler, 
Jean Feni Sargent, 
Frank Qenry Schelner, Ph.B., 
Felix Harold Schmitt, 
Charles Rooney Shultis, A.B., 
Herman Wilmer Stowe, B.S., 
Frank Stephen Stratton, 
Amos Aaron Strickland, 
George Waltmire, 
Charles Ambrose Ward, 
Samuel Edwin Webb. 



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412 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Pharmaceutical CHamlat. 



Walter Thomas Brean, 
wmiam Henry Harrison, 
Oustay Stanley Kolar, 
George A. McCtiUen, 
Harmon K. Morgan, 



Claude J. Musselman, 
Samuel R. Robin, 
Edward Spear. 
Henley Lb Thorp. 



Graduate in Pharmacy. 



Otto Elwood Ayers, 
John Snyder Barbee, 
Thomas Allen Beans, 
Walter Thomas Brean, 
Albert Frederick Burhop, 
Quy Fred Burket, 
Hugh Valentine Burt, 
Harry B. Chawgo, 
Jay G. Clark, 
Rali^ C. Crosby, 
George M. Dayton, 
T. Curry Dedman, 
Jetta Byrne Dougherty, 
Frank Dubsky, 
Delmar Cliftord Elliott, 
Lee Elrick Ennis, 
William Blaine Evemdcn, 
Oran Luther F^rrell, 
Albert John Fred Feuerbacher, 
Frank Homer Foster, 
George Paris Francy, 
Roy CUfton Fritts, 
James Thomas Fullerton, 
Menzis Eli Gilbert, 
Max Martin Gordon, 
Arthur William Gregg, 
Charles Albert Gunning, 
William W. Guthrie, 
Chartes H. Hallett, 
Joseph H. Harvey, 
William Henry Holke, 
William Warren Holliday, 
Ira M. Horton, 



Henry W. Howe, 
Roy Huntley, 
Louis William Jaderstrom, 
Ernest Jericho, 
Ever Johnson, 
Carl Cecil Kay, 
George T. Keller, 
Marcella Geneva Kelly, 
John Eugene Kennedy, 
Lewis Richard Klerland, 
William Kuehn, 
Ame E. Lee, 
Eric Paul LeLshner, 
Arthur H. Lewis, 
Wayne Foster Locke, 
Charles L Long, 
John Drayton Lyons, 
Elmil Rudolph Felix Maag, 
Edmund Mauro, 
John Arthur Mayer, 
George A. McCuUen, 
John Murdock McLean, 
Lee Nichos Merz, 
Bertram M. Meyer, 
John H. Mooney, 
Claude W. Moors, 
Harmon K. Morgan, 
Sampson Morris, 
Claude J. Musselman, 
Fred Winthrop Neill. 
Thomas James Nolan, 
Mary O'Conner, 
Grover Thorpe Pace, 



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DBQRBES CONFBRRBP. 



418 



CharleB Earl Palmer, 
Louis Arthur Pepin, 
CharleB S. Phalen, 
Adolph Puhl, 
John Lindsay Pyles, 
John Qarfleld Reay, 
James W. Redmond, 
Bdwin O. Reisl» 
Clarence Bdward Reister, 
John Stephen Roach, 
Arthur John Roberts, 
Samuel R. Robin, 
J. Leonard Ross, 
Roger Rugg, 
Biichael Saccar, 
Albert L. Schenk, 
William Adolph Schmidt, 
Hyman Sime, 



Gustav Speetzen, 
ShulEri Tannus, 
James Bradley Taylor, 
Walter H. Thompson, 
Henley L. Thorp, 
Lester Guy Toble, 
James Toynton, 
Bert R. Van de Bogart, 
H. Russell Vause, 
Carl G. Wallbaum, 
Charles A. Walz, 
Anton Lotharius Wangler, 
William Warrington, 
Joseph Waterloo, 
Virgil D. Weisenberger, 
John H. Woelke, 
Donald Prazer Wright 



Doctor of Dental Surgery. 



John August Adamson, 
Samuel Arthur Allen, 
George Benoni Amiot, 
Clayton Lyman Beach, 
Bniis Jay Baikie, 
John Willis Beardslee, 
Robert Stewart Bettis, 
Bdwin John Blass, 
Albert Herman Adam Blome, 
John Hamilton Bowe, 
L. Roy Bower, 
Charles Barker Boyington, 
Clarence Edwin Briggs, 
Edgar Hall Briscoe, 
RoBOoe Bristow, 
Jease Lyman Bronson, 
Hilles TAlley Brown, 
Leonard Granville Brown, 
Thomas Wilson Brown, 
aaronce Roy Buckley, 
Frank Donald Bums, 
Walter Rainey Carrington, 



Carlos Leonardo Cassell, 

Owen Elmer Cassill, 

Claude Cecil Chadwick, 

Harry Sigfrid Chinberg, 

Robert Lane Clark, 

Robert R. Clendenen, 

Winfleld Horace Colby, 

Joseph Hickman Collins, 

Bishop Albert Conklin, 

Alice Corey, 

Scott Covalt, 

William Nathan Crawford, 

Alphonso Charles Crose, 

Roy Morton Crouse, 

Everett Lodowick Crume, 

John James Curran, 

James William Daly, 

David Hill Danek, 

Ernest John Hitt Diffenbacher, 

Roy Vance Dillingham, 

Prank Leslie Dixon, ^ 

Ifobel Dlzon, ^ . 

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414 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



John Joseph Donoyan, 
Joseph Murray Downey, 
Harold Wallace William Duffell, 
Chester Silas Dunkle, 
Loren Starke Eastman, 
Carson El wood Ellis, 
John McDonald Eveleth, 
Herbert Macon Fay, 
Albert Frederick Fellman, 
William Frederick Fiebig, 
Willard Harry Fox, 
Frederick Sanderson Fritz, 
John Joseph Gatons, 
Will Warren Gibson, 
Percy Osborne Giles, 
Thomas Edward Gilmore, 
H. LeRoy Gowdy, 
James Clinton Grant, 
Frederick George Gurley, 
Henry Howard Hamman, 
Alfred James Harper, 
Arthur Otto Haury, 
Oscar Edward Heins, 
Charles A. Hendrickson, D.V.M., 
Francis Marion Higby, 
Carl Asa Hinckley, 
Elmer Hugo "Hollem, 
Warren Kendall Hull, 
Leonard Emanuel Hutchinson, 
William Wallace Irwin, 
Bertram Jackson, 
Edward Watkins James, 
Raleigh Arthur Jennings, 
Ole Jorgen Jensen, 
Albert Nellon Johnson, 
Harvey Vllelle Jones 
Axel Joab Juul, 
Joseph Rodney Kagy, 
David Kallander, 
Rebecca Kallner, 
Abraham Harry Kalman, 
William Thomas Kane, 



Christian Wilhelm Keppler, 
Kent Kerch, 

Frederick Cassius Knecht, 
William Kocher, 
Walter William Kohler, 
Emll Frederick Kriebel, 
Cornelius A. Kuyper, 
Forest Palmer LaBounta, 
Arthur Charles Lafount, 
Hugo Charles Lambach, 
Jesse Pitzer Lane, 
William Francis Larkin, 
David Garnet Leckie, 
Gilbert O. Lee, 
Elmer Richard Leverton, 
Olaf Lohnbakken, 
Andrew Vachel Louderback, M.S., 
George Geoffrey Lowes, 
Hallett Emmett Lowry, 
George Benjamin Luetcher, 
Leslie Arthur Lupton, 
George Christopher McCann, 
Archibald Lewis McCulloch, 
Thomas Herbert McCulloch, 
Harry LeRoy McDonald, 
Thomas Henry McGovem, 
Vincent Alexis McGuigan, 
Daniel Herbert McKechney, 
Archibald Angus McRae, 
Leonard Milton Maas, 
Philip Frederick Macdonald, 
William James Mahaffy, 
Harry Orlady Mailer, 
Louis Ernest Malkin, 
LeRoy B. Manchester, 
William Tanner Mann, 
Clarence Lee Mason, 
George Henry Maxwell, 
Ora Levertia Merdker, 
William Gardner Meek, 
Frank Cary Mendenhall, 
Milfred Isaac Merritt, 



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DEGREES CONFERRED. 



415 



John B. Miller, 
Rollin Virgil Mills, 
William James Moe, 
Ernest Bedford Monteith, 
Francis Asbury Beall Moore, 
Virgil Moore, 
William Garnet Moore, 
John Francis Morrison, 
Charles Lawrence Morse, 
William Wallace Muir, 
Artemus Ward Murphy, 
William Lindley Myer, 
William Garfield Mylroie, 
Eltios Clifton Nally, 
George Albin Nelson, 
John Joseph O'Connell, 
Matthew Martin 0*Hara, 
Olaf J. Olafsson, 
Charles Slrenes Omsberg, 
John Walter Parker, B.S., 
James Franklin Parks, 
Karl B. Paschal, 
Franklin Robert Percival, 
John Wenzel Peroutky, 
Ava Carl Persinger, 
Edgar Bums Phelps, 
Lee Albert Phillips, 
William Henry Plaxton, 
Perry Haskell Plummer, 
Harley Jay Porter, 
Helen Kerns Porter, 
S. Birney Powers, 
Oscar Charles Prldeaux, 
Edward A. Prouty, 
William Glenn Redmond, 
Henry John Andrew Renno, 
Thomas Francis Reynolds. 
Thomas Lester Rice, D.V.M.. 
Daniel Howard Riley, 
Harbin Septer Riley, 
Ira Henry Rislnger, 
Mila Charles Roberts, 



Fred Mac Robinson, 
William Roy Samson, 
William Enoch Sargent, 
Frank Lyman Sawyers, 
Ferdinand Hulbert Scharff, 
Edward J. Schnaldt, 
Robert Morris Scovel, 
Leigh Watts Sherman, 
George Earl Siverling, 
Frank William Small, 
Charles Edgar Smith, 
Harold Slayton Smith, 
Harry Oscar Smith, 
David MacCoil Somervllle, 
Joseph Edward Soukup, 
Harry Albert Sprague, 
Walter Stark, 
Nels Ludvig Stenberg, 
William Henry Stentz, 
William Curtis Stewart, 
Henry Symes Stimson, 
Melvln Menroe Stiner, 
Charles Abraham Street, 
Earl Glenn Swain, 
George Wesley Taylor, 
August Hubert Teitgen, 
Garrett Henry Tellman, 
Rees Lewis Thomas, 
Gilbert Clemence Thorsness, 
Teel Dow Traveller, 
John Trythall, 
Charles Malcolm Uglow, 
Elmer C. Unbehaun, 
Theodore Howard Unland, 
Otto Christian Uttech, 
Leo Andrew Vlersen, 
Thomas John Walsh, 
Harvey Benson Washburn, 
Clarence Klnne Weaver, 
Charles Joseph Webster, 
Robert Andrew Weir, 
Rolland DeWltt Wesley, 



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416 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Arthur West, 
Frederick Victor West, 
Carl Edward Whiting, 
Holland Ernest Wight, 
Thomas E!arl Williams, 
Clarke Mills Wellson, 



John Thurman Wilson, B.M., 
Charles Raphfield Woodworth, 
Walter John Wriglesworth, 
Mattie Kam Wyman, 
Edward Wilson Tackel, 



Ellas Arnold Bredin, 
Bertha Rae Hardin, 
Amelia Anna Hoff, 



Graduate In Music 



John Mahard Rosborough, 
John Gordon Seely. 



Erratum — In the catalogue of 1904-05 the name of Charles 
SuMNXB Mayo was given in the list of persons receiving the 
honorary degree of Master of Arts. This name should have read 
Chables Horace Mato. 



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PRIZES AND HONORS. 417 

PRIZES AND HONORS FOR THE YEAR 1904-05. 



IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

The Kirk Prize, for writing and pronouncing the best English 
oration: George Parkinson Howard. 

The Sargent Prizes, for ezcellence in Declamation: First 
prize, Charles Alfred Briggs; second prize, Frederick Leighton 
Bindhammer. 

The Qoge Prizes, for excellence in Debate: First prize, John 
H. Holland; second prize, Fred M. Perrill; third prize, J. H. 
Walker. 

The Harris Prize, in Political and Social Science: George 
Thomas Palmer. 

IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 
Special Honors at Graduation. 

George Hardin Curfman, Cum Laude. 
John Baker Crouch, Oum Laude. 
Guy Wayne Larimer, Oum Laude, 
Charles Francis Yerger, Oum Laude, 
George Aiken Dowling, Oum Laude. 
Oscar William Holcomb, Oum Laude. 
John Jerome Mcintosh, Oum Laude. 
Henry Benjamin Carey, Oum Laude. 
Oliver Perry Grant, Oum Laude. 
Ralph Ward James, Oum Laude. 
John Singer McEwan, Oum Laude, 

Hospital Appointments, 1905.* 
Cook Oounty Hospital. 

Ralph Ward James, George Aiken Dowllng, 

George Hardin Curfman, Charles Francis Yerger, 

John Jerome Mcintosh, Robert Agedius Krost, 

Guy Wayne Larimer, John ESarl Else. 



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418 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Mercy Hospital. 

John Edward Kelley, John Mathew Lilly. 

Oscar William Holcomb, Frederick Ferdinand Fair, 

Harry Earl Pfeiffer, William Otterbein Krohn, 

Walter Jewett Fahrner, Edward Michael Sheehan, 

Martin T. Blewett, William Verner Gooder, 

George Warren Newell. 

Wesley Hospital. 
Van Archibald Smelker, John Quincy Adams Scroggy» 

Frank Otho Kershner, William George Magee. 

8t. Luke's Hospital. 
William Thomas Trewyn, John Sidney Dyer, 

Thomas Pollock Ranney. 

Dunning Hospital, Dunning, Illinois. 
Isadore Leon Meyers. 

Alexian Brothers' Hospital. 
Hiram Irving King, George Eugene Egloif. 

City Hospital, BlackwelVs Island, Neto York. 
John Singer McEwan. 

Wabash Employes' Hospital Association. 
James S. Trewhella. 

Emergency Hospital, Buffalo, New York. 
Robert Alexander Cunliffe. 

8t. Mary's Hospital, Evansville, Indiana. 
Florian Edward Schmidt. 

Colorado Fuel and Iron Company's Hospital, Pueblo, Colorado. 
Bert Lee Doane. 

8t. John's Hospital, Fargo, North Dakota. 
William Aaron Bessesen. 

Alexian Brothers' Hospital, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 
Lee McElroy, John Paul Hiebert. 

Augustana Hospital, Chicago. 
Emil J. Hoglund, Sigismund Franklin Waterman. 



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PRIZES AND HONORS. 419 

St. Joseph's Hospital, 8an Francisco, California. 
George Augustus Wood. 

Baptist Hospital, Chicago. 
Hugo Victor Kahler. 

8t. Mary's Hospital, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 
Solomon Francis Rudolf. 

Lucas Hospital, Toledo, Ohio. 
James Todd Duncan. 

Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. 
J. T. Stewart Hamilton. 

St. Francis* Hospital, Wichita, Kansas 
ETdward Staton Hymer. 

St. Anthony's Hospital, Rockford, Illinois. 
Charles Edward Klontz. 

Chicago Policlinic, Chicago. 
Clifford M. Cline. 

Provident Hospital, Chicago. 
Harry Cartmell. 

St. Joseph's Hospital, Joliet, Illinois. 
Ray Orvin Hummel. 

Passavant Hospital. 
Earl Brisbin Brooks, George Henry Martin. 

State Board of Health, Springfield, Illinois. 
Harry C. Blankmeyer. 

Oerman Hospital, Chicago. 
William Martin Burbach. 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Chicago. 
Francis Martin McGauley, Alfred William Goebel. 

Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary. 
George Thomas Jordan. 

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420 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

St Francis' Hospital, Blue Island, Illinois. 
Anthony George Wittman. 

Milwaukee County Hospital. 
Alexander Kremers. 

8t. VincenVs Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Albert Andrew Ankenbrandt 

8t. Mary*s Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota. 
Frank Edson Boyden. 

Ravn's Hospital, MerHll, Wis. 
Charles Edgar Rowa 

Peoples Hospxial, Chicago. 
Ralph Welty Nauaa. 

Chicago Lying-in Dispensary. 
Joseph Albert Goodrich, Charles Philip Norby, 

Frederick Karl Kolb, Roy Charlton Richards, 

John Gilbert Phillips, Thomas James McCrory, 

George Herman Burflend, Oliver Perry Grant 

Ashury Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Ftord B. Rogers. 

8t. Anthony's Hospital, Carroll, Iowa. 
Arthur Earl Beach. 

St. Augustine Hospital, Minocqua, Wisconsin. 
John Francis Riordan. 

State Hospital, St. Peter, Minnesota. 
John B. Hoyt 

IN THE LAW SCHOOL. 

The Callaghan Prize, for the highest scholarship throughout 
the entire course: Rex MacKenzie. 

The Henry Sargent Towle Prize, for proficiency in Public 
Speaking: First prize, William Harrison Haight; second prize, 
Charles Edward Swanson. 

The Mitchell Davis Follanshee Prize, for the best thesis on 
Legal Ethics: Norris Burt Cline. 



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GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 

0FFICEB8 FOB THE TEAS 1906-06. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

President — Chables William Spoffobd, *96. 
V<ce-i*re»i<len<— Cabletow Hsnet Pendleton, *98. 
Recording Secretary — Elizabeth Bbagdon, '00. 
Corresponding Secretary — James Fbanklin Oatib, '93. 
Treasurer — Mebbitt C. Bbaodon, 70. 

Executive Committee. 

Chablbb W. Spoffobd, '96. James F. Gates, '93. 

Buzabkth Bbagdon, '00. John L. Alababteb, '92. 

Walteb D. Scott, '96. 

Directors. 
tebm exfibes 1906. 
Chablbb W. Spofiobd, '96. Habby H. Bbown, '03. 

QaoBOB A. Fosteb, '81. Blizabbth Bbaqdon, '00. 

TEBM exfibes 1907. 

Jambs F. Oatbb, '98. John L. Alabasteb, '92. 

BbEN P. Clafp, '81. Pabkb Bbown, '04. 

tebm bxfibbs 1908. 
FkANX B. LoBD, '88. John A. Bellows, '92. 

Walteb D. 8oott, "96. Edwabd S. Cbayen, '06. 

All graduates of the College of Liberal Arts are eligible to 
membership in this Association. 

The dues of the Association are one dollar a year, and there 
is no initiation fee. Any member, if he so elects, may pay ten 
dollars at one time in lieu of all annual dues. 

Applications for membership should be made to the Treasurer. 

421 

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422 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

Preaident — ^Henbt B. Hemenwat, '89. 
First Yice-Preaident — Samuel C. Plummeb, '86. 
Second Vice-President— H. W. James, *05. 
Secretary — ^Robebt T. Gillmobe, '92. 
Treasurer — ^William A. Mann, '83. 
Necrologist — D'Obsay Hecht, *98. 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 

President — ^Thomas J. Holmes, '85. 
First Vice-President — ^Robebt E. Pendabvis, '87. 
Second Vice-President — ^James R. Mann, '81. 
Third Vice-President — ^James B. Rockafellow, '75. 
Fourth Vice-President — ^Alvin H. Culveb, '95. 
Secretary — Mabion Hates McKinney, '03. 
Treasurer — Otto R. Babnett, '88. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

PreaWetU— Thomas V. Wooten, '89. 

First Vice-President — Gustave H. Adamick, '90. 

Second Vice-President — ^Jesse E. Elliott, '95. 

Third Vice-President — ^Willla^m L. Babnum, Jb., '01. 

Secretary — ^Judson W. Hooveb, '99. 

TrccMttrer— Maubice A. Mineb. 

Trustees — Habbt Kahn, '89; J. J. Gill, '93; J. H. Montoomebt, '91 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 

President — Fbedebick B. Noyes. 
First Vice-President — Thomas Reid. 
Second Vice-President — ^W. W. Johnson. 
Treasurer — ^Abthub C. LaTouche. 
Secretary— CH.ARLEa R. Bakeb. 

Executive Committee — ^Abthub D. Black, C. A. Young. Pbed W. 
Pabkeb. 



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GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 428 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 

President — William Dawe. 
First Vice-President — Stephen J. Hebben. 
Second Vice-President — H. Olin Cady. 
Secretary-Treasurer— K, B. Kesteb. 
Assistant Secretary — A. B. Saunders. 
Annalist — W. B. Norton. 

Executive Committee — S. C. Bbonson. T. R. Stbobbidge, N. H 
Axtell. 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY CLUB OF 
NEW ENGLAND. 

President — ^J. Ebnest Smiley, 458 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Walteb D. Nash. 

Executive Committee — Nathan Babnett, Willis H. Lowe, 
Samuel D. Gloss. 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY CLUB OF 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

President — Isaac R. Hitt, Jb., '88. 
Vice-President — Fbank M. Bbistol, '87. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Ruteb W. Spbingeb, '87. 

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

President — James S. Gbaham. 
Vice-President — ^Anna Robinson Ridgway, '91. 
Treasurer — ^Fbank A. Reynolds, '91. 
Secretary — Abthub James Elliott, '02. 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF NORTHWESTERN UNI- 
VERSITY AND GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE 
FOR southern' ASIA. 

President — F. W. Wabne, Lucknow. 
Vice-President — Habbt Reeve Calkins, Cawnpore. 
Secretary-Treasurer — ^B. R. Babbeb, Calcutta. 



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STUDENT (CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 



YOUNQ MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

President — Shelby Millabd Harrison. 
Vice-President — Elmer John Sghafer. 
Recording Secretary — Charles Edgar Honnold. 
Corresponding Secretary — ^Arthur Elton Smothers. 
Treasurer — Olenn Porter Wishard. 
General Secretary — Horace Greelet Smith. 

YOUNQ WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

President — Catherine Prindle. 
Vice-President — Nina Vest. 
Treasurer — ^Mabel Thompson. 
Recording Secretary — ^Amy Onken. 
Oeneral Secretary — Amy Hedwio Olqbn. 

YOUNQ MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOLS 
OF LAW, PHARMACY, AND DENTISTRY. 

President — C. P. Johnson. 
Vice-President — H. C. Mitchell. 
Treasurer— C, R. Rex 
Recording Secretary — C. R. Hallister. 

YOUNQ MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE 
MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

President — John S^meb Hughes. 

Vice-President — ^Ralph Garfield Mills. 

Treasurer — Albin Garfield Anderson. 

Recording Secretary — Otto H. Crist. 

Department Secretary— He^ry Stanley Hollbnbbck. 

424 

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PHI BETA KAPPA 



OFFICERS. 

President — John H. Gray. 
Vice-President — Stephen J. Heeben. 
Recording Secretary — Cabla Pebn Sarqent 
Corresponding Secretary — Omera F. Long. 
Treasurer — Frank E. Lord. 

MEMBERS INITIATED JUNE 13, 1906. 

Jenkin Lloyd Jones, 
William Abbott Oldfather. 



Robert Wilson Baird, 
Elizabeth Barns, 
George Earle Beggs, 
Charles Ridgaway Bragdon. 
Benjamin Franklin Brown. 
Gilbert Haven Cady, 
Jessie Uretta Cax« 
Eleanor Worthington Failey, 
Gordon Scott Fulcher, 
Frances Diantha Hulbert, 
Rebecca Jane Hum, 
Edith Louise Long, 
John Massen, 
Mabel Kathryn Miehle, 
Alice Maude Montgomery, 
Faye Arnold Moon, 
Kathleen Mary Moore, 
George Thomas Calmer, 
Hazel Marie Schn&bele, 
Alice Ethlolne Shurtleff, 
Olive Ruth Siberts, 
Horace Greeley Smith, 
Jennie Gross Whipple, 
Florence Jane Woodworth. 

426 



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iNORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY SET- 
TLEMENT ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 19054)6. 

President — WillulM A. Habd. 
FHrtt Vice-President— TowwA K. Webstbb. 
Becond Vice-President — ^William Deebino. 
Secretary— Ajllce M. Houston. 
Treasurer — Nobman W. Habbis. 



MEMBERS OP THE COUNCIL. 

Term Expires 1906. 

Chablbb M. Stuabt. William A. Habd. 

Fbbdebiok H. Dbxitatel. Philip R. Shumwat. 

Fbank E. Lobd. Mabt T. Wilson. 

Term Expires 1907. 

Raymond Robins. Elmxb K Scott. 

James Alton James. Towneb K. Websteb. 

Elizabeth Whitelt. Mbs. Albebt R. Mabtin. 

William F. McDowell. 

Term Expires 1908. 

J. Scott Clabk. Mbs. Thomas Balmeb. 

Claba C. Oeiswold. Mbs. S. Cecil Stanton. 

Mbs. Raymond Robins. Edwabd W. Blatohix>bd. 

Executive Committee. 

WnxjAM A. Habd, •Ohairman Bx-of/UHo. 
Towneb K. Webstkb. Fbank B. Lobd. 

Elmeb Ifc Scott. Alice M. Houston. 

Raymond Robins. 



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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY. 

WlLUAlC ARDBKW DtOHB, HElfBT SHKBMAN IfATKABD. 

A.M., PH.O. Thbodobb Henbt Patibbson, 

wllbklm bodsicann. m.d. 

Chablbb H. Atkbt. 



CHICAGO ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY. 



Oflleera for the Year 19054)6. 

President — ^E^uab Colbebt, A.M. 

Vice-Pretident—ISi W. Blatohfobd. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Chablbb H. Taylob. 

Life Directors — ^Fbakk Stdbobb, B. B. McCago, C. H. S. Mddeb, 
W. W. Fabnum, J. B. Hobbb, Euas Colbebt, Henbt C. Ranivet. 

Directors — Henbt C. Rew, E. W. Blatchfobd, C. W. Pabkeb, 
Gbobgb W. Hough, C. F. W. Junge, R. L. Davis, Mttbbt Nel- 
son, P. W. Peck, C. H. Tatlob. 



UNIVERSITY GUILD. 



Officers for the Year 190M6. 

President — ^BiBS. C. A. Qoodnow. 

First Vice-President — ^Mbs. Thomas F. Holgate. 

Second T ice-President — Mbs. Amos W. Patten. 

Third Vice-President— IAbs, R. R. MoCabe. 

Treasurer— Maa. J. A Gbitfin. 

Corresponding Secretaru — ^Mbs. Geobge G. Calkins. 

Recording Becretaru — ^Mbs. Chables S. Raddin 



427 

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SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 



College or TjIRKbal Abts 913 

Graduate Students 69 

Fellows and Resident Graduates • 66 
Non-Resident Graduates ... 3 

Undergraduate Students 854 

Candidates for a Bachelor's Degree 704 
Not Candidates for a Degree - 91 

Registered In other departments • 69 

Medical School 679 

Fourth Tear (Senior Class) - - - - 126 

Third Year 134 

Second Year 94 

First Year 87 

Unclassified 14 

Special Students 124 

Law School 239 

Third Year 66 

Second Year 70 

First Year 81 

Special Students 23 

School or Phabmact 208 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Pharmacy 2 
Candidates for the Degree of Pharmaceutical 

Chemist 37 

Candidates for the Degree of Graduate In Phar- 
macy 162 

Special Students 17 

Dental School 403 

Third Year (Senior Class) 117 

Second Year 100 

First Year 164 

Special Students 32 

School of Music 363 

Students In Regular Courses • - - • 122 
Special Students 241 

2.706 
Deduct names counted twice 145 



Total In Degree-Conferring Departments - 2,660 

428 

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SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 429 

Forward 2,560 

NoN-DfxsBEE Conferring Departments .... 1 820 

The Evanston Academy 512 

School of Music, Preparatory Department - - 111 
School of Oratory (omitting names entered else- 
where) 187 

Grand Prairie Seminary 310 

Elgin Academy 200 



8,880 
Deduct names counted elsewhere - - . . 212 



Total in all departments of the University 

(exclusive of Theological Schools) - • • 3,668 

Theological Schools Co-operating with the University: 
Garrett Biblical iNSTrruTE - - - - 174 

Post Graduates 1 

Degree Course - 45 

Diploma Course 100 

Special Students 28 

Swedish Theological Seminary - - - - 31 

Norwegian-Danish Theological School - - - 16 

221 

Deduct names counted twice ... 14 

Total in Theological Schools 207 

3,875 
Deduct duplicates between Theological Schools 
and other departments 12 

Total for the year 1905-06 3,863 

For the Year 1904-05. 

Degree-Conferring Departments (exclusive of the 

Theological Schools and of duplicates) - 2,682 

Non-Degree Conferring Departments 1,259 

Theological Schools (exclusive of duplicates) - 175 

4,116 
Deduct names counted twice 273 

Total for the year 1904-05 3,843 



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INDEX. 



Abflencee, 166. 

Academies, 809. 

Accredited Schools, 88. 

Adelphic Literary Society, 178. 

Administratlye Officers, 17. 

Admission, Bxamlnations for, 87, 
19S. 
As Special Students, 87, 246. 
By Certificate, 87, 195, 24S, 

271. 
To Adyanced Standing, 88, 196, 
246, 266, 271. 

Admission Requirements, 79, 195, 
244, 264, 271, 297, 316. 

Advanced Standing, 88, 196, 245, 
266, 271. 

Advisers, Faculty, 93. 

Aletlienai Literary Society, 178. 

Alumni Associations, 421. 

American School of Classical Stu- 
dies, 181. 

Anatomy, 164, 202, 273, 278. 

Anonlan Literary Society, 178. 

Aramaic, 158. 

Assaying, 135. 

Assyrian, 168. 

Astronomical Observatory, 68, 178. 

Astronomy, 96. 

Athletics, 72. 



Bacteriology, 208, 284, 287. 

Biblical Uterature, 96. 

Board and Lorlgins, 186, 230, 268, 

294 
Botany, 98. 
Bragdon, M. C, 178. 
Buildings, 66. 
Business, Preparation for, 162. 



Calendar, 9. 

Calethea Literary Society, 178. 

Callaghan Prize, 258. 

Catherine M, White Scholarships, 
179. 

Certificate of Performance, 308. 

Certificates of the School of Cor- 
respondence, 89. 

Chapel Attendance, 177. 

Chapln Hall, 62, 90, 186. 

Charter, 44. 

Chemistry, 100, 201, 277. 

Chicago Astronomical Society, 427. 



Chicago Lying-in Hospital, 240. 
Christian Associations, 187, 228, 

268, 424. 
Cloosophic literary Society, 178. 
College of Liberal Arts, 75. 
Combined Courses. 

Medicine and College, 167, 

197. 
Law and College, 159, 246, 

260. 
Pharmacy and College, 160, 

266. 
Theology and College, 169, 
171, 319. 
Committees, Standing, 21, 78. 
Cook County Hospital, 240. 
Corporation, 19. 
Correspondence School, Certificates 

of. 89. 
Council, University, 22. 
Courses of Instruction^ 

College of Liberal Arts, 96. 

Medical School. 200. 

Law School, 246. 

School of Pharmacy, 265. 

Dental School, 273. 

School of Music, 298. 

Garrett Biblical Institute, 317. 



Davis Hall, 59. 
Dearborn Observatory, 68, 173. 
Deering, William, 61, 178. 
Degrees, Regulations Affecting, 168. 
Degrees Conferred In the year 

1905, 406. 
Dental School, 269. 
Dermatology, 212. 
Dormitories, 61. 

Economic Geology, 116, 134. 
Economics, 101. 
Education, 106. 
Elective Studies, 92. 
Elgin Academy, 313. 
Elocution, 108. 
Embryology, 203. 
Employment for Students, 188. 
Engineering, 160. 
English Language, 109. 
English Literature, 111. 
Eulexla Literary Society, 178. 
Evanston Academy of Northwest- 
em Univerdty, S09. 



430 



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INDBQL 



481 



BxaminaUons, 87, 164, 195, 225. 
BzecQtlve Committee, 20. 
Bxpenaes — See Fees and BzpensM. 
Faculty Advlsera, 03. 
Facnl^. 

College of Liberal Arts, 75. 

Medical School, 189. 

Law School, 242. 

School of Pharmacy, 262. 

Dental School, 269. 

School of Mnatc, 296. 

Bvanston Academy, 809. 

Grand Prairie Seminary, 811. 

Elg^n Academy, 313. 

Garrett Biblical Institute, 315. 
Fayerweather Hall, 57. 
Fees and Expenses. 

College of Liberal Arts, 184. 

Medical School, 229. 

Law School, 261. 

School of Pharmacy, 267. 

Dental School, 294. 

School of Music, 305. 

Garrett Biblical Institute, 822. 
Fellowships, 179. 
Finance, Instruction in, 101. 
Fisk Hall, 61. 
French, 146. 

Freshman Scholarships, 180. 
Gage, L>man J., 182. 
Gage Prizes, 182. 
Garrett Biblical Institute, 315. 
Geology, 114. 
Germanic Language and Literature, 

117. 
Goyemment, 176. 

QoTemment, Organization and, 44. 
Grades of Scholarship, 165, 258. 
Graduate Student Fees, 184. 
Graduate Students, List of, 825. 
Graduate Studies, 166. 
Graduation Requirements, 91, 225, 

259, 266, 292. 
Grand Prairie Seminary, 311. 
Grounds and Buildings, 56, 178. 
Greek Language and Literature, 

122. 
Greenleaf, Luther L., 68. 
Gymnasiums, 58, 174, 226. 
Gynecology, 214. 



Harris, Norman W., 69, 182. 

Harris Lectures, 69. 

Harris Prize, 182. 

Hebrew, 152. 

Heck Hall, 62, 321. 

High School Scholarships, 180. 

Hlnman, Clark T., 178. 

Hinman Literary Society, 178. 

Histology, 155, 208, 276. 

History, 124. 

Hobbs, James B., 58. 

Honors. 225. 

Hospitals, 231. 

Hospital Appointments, 241, 417. 

Hospital Quiz Class, 227. 



Interstate School of Corre^on- 

dence, 89. 
Italian, 149. 
Jurisprudence, 216, 290. 

Kirk, Mrs. John B., 181. 
Kirk Prize, 181. 

Laboratories, 69, 174. 
laboratory Fees. 185. 
Laryngology, 218. 
Latin Language and Literature, 

128. 
Laurean Literary Society, 178. 
Law School, 242. 
Lectures, Public, 69. 
Librarians, 41, 77. 
Libraries, 68, 172, 226, 257, 26t> 

292, 321. 
Library Regulations, 172. 
Uterary Societies, 178, 821. 
Loan Funds, 187. 
liOglc, 189. 
Lunt, Orrington, 57. 



Majors and Minors, Schedule of, 
94. 

Marcy Scholarship, 180. 

Materia Medica, 279. 

Mathematics, 131. 

Matriculation Fee, 184, 229, 261, 
267. 294, 305. 

Medical School, 189. 

Medicine, Department of, 220. 

Memorial Hall, 62, 821. 

Mengcs, Theodore, 292. 

Mental Diseases, 216. 

Mercy Hospital, 238. 

Meteorology, 96. 

Methodist Episcopal Church Schol- 
arship, 180. 

Mineralogy, 134. 

Minors, 94. 

Missionary Scholarships, 179. 

Museums, 65, 178, 298. 

Music, 186. 

Music, School of, 296. 

Music Hall, 61. 

Musical Clubs, 176. 



Neurology, 216. 

Northern Oratorical League, 178, 

181. 
Northwestern University Building, 

60. 
Norwegian-Danish, 151. 
Norwegian-Danish Theologleal 

School, 828. 



Observatory, Dearborn, 58, 173. 
Obstetrics, 211. 

Officers of Instruction and Govem- 
ment, 28. 



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482 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Old College, 58. 

Operative Dentistry, 284. 

Ophthalmology, 213. 

Oral Surgery* 289. 

Organization and Qoyemment, 44. 

Orrlngton Lunt Library, 57. 

Orthodontia, 283. 

Orthopedic Surgery, 220. 

Otology, 213. 



Paleontology, 116. 

Pathology, 208, 276, 288. 

Pearsons Hall, 62, 00, 186. 

Pediatrics, 217. 

People's Hospital, 237. 

Petrology, 116. 

Pharmacology, 207. 

Pharmacy. School of, 262. 

Phi Beta Kappa, 425. 

Philosophy, Psychology, and Logic, 

139. 
Physical Culture, 138. 
Physical Diagnosis, 210. 
Physics, 142. 

Physiology, 155, 205, 274. 
Prizes, 181, 258. 
Professional Ethics, 200. 
Professional Studies, 157. 
Prosthetic Dentistry, 280. 
Provident Hospital, 236. 
Psychology, 139. 
Public Lectures, etc., 69. 



Quiz Class, HospiUl, 227. 



Raymond, James H., 178. 

Record-Herald Scholarship, 180. 

Refunds, 185, 230, 261, 294. 

Registration, 163, 167. 

Religious Worship, 177. 

Required Studies, 199. 

Requirements for Admission, 79, 
195, 244, 204, 271, 297. 

Residence, 90. 

Rhlnology, 213. 

Rollers, Henry Wade, 178. 

Rogers Debating Club, 178. 

Romance lianguages and Litera- 
tures, 146. 



St. Luke's Hospital, 285. 
Sargent, George M., 183. 
Sargent I'rizes, 183. 
Scandinavian languages, 151. 



Scholarships, 179, 260. 

Self- Support, 198. 

Semitic Languages, 152. 

Social Entertainments, 176. 

South Side Dispensary, 238. 

Spanish, 150. 

Special Students, 87, 246. 

Standing Committees, 21, 78. 

Statutes, 50. 

Students, Catalogue of. 

College of Liberal Arts, 325. 

Medical School. 349 

Law School, 864. 

School of Pharmacy, 372. 

Dental School, 378. 

School of Music, 388. 

Schools of Theology, 897. 
Summary of Students, 428. 
Summer School of Medicine, 227. 
Surgery, 217. 
Swedish Theological Seminary, 

324. 
Swift, Annie May, 62. 
Swift, Oustavus F., 62. 
Swift Hall, 62. 
Syphilology, 212. 



Theology, Schools of. 815. 

Therapeutics, 279, 288. 

Towle, Henry S., 258. 

Towle Prizes, 258. 

Trustees, 19. 

Tuition, See Fees and Expenses. 

Tully Scholarship, 180. 



University, The, 44. 

Organization and Government, 

Statutes, 50. 

History and Development, 54. 

Grounds and Buildings, 56. 
University Council, 22. 
University Guild, 68, 427. 
University Guild Scholarship, 180. 
University Settlement, 67, 426. 

Wesley Hospital, 60, 231. 

White, Catherine M., Scholarships, 
179. 

Willard Hall, Cl, 00. 186. 

Woman's Educational Aid Associa- 
tion, 186. 



Zoaiogy, 153. 



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iBiJletm 

North>ve.sfern 
University 

(Jeneral 
Catalogue 



L 



^: 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



BULLETIN OF 



Northwestern University 




GENERAL CATALOGUE 
I906-I907 



EVANSTON-CHICAGO 

PUBUSHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

J907 



Digitized by VjOOO IC 



Th« Bowmmn PaUiahiiv Co.» Printers 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Calendar, 9-11 

Departments of the University, 12 

Administrative Officers, -13 

The Corporation, 15 

University CouNaL, 18 

Officers of Instruction and Government, .... 19-36 

The Universfty, 37-56 

Organizalioii and Govemincnt, 37 

History and Development, 40 

Grounds and Buildingi, ....-.-- 43 

Libraries, -- --- 46 

Museums, .--..----- 49 

Tlie University Settlement, 52 

Public Lectures, Concerts, Evening Counes, Etc., - - - 53 

Tbe University Guild, 56 

The College of Liberal Arts, 57-159 

Faculty, 57 

Standing Committees, ---60 

Requirements for Admission, - 61-68 

Admission to Advanced Standing, 69 

Accredited Schools, - 69 

Residence, 70 

Programs of Study, -- -71 

Schedule of Required Studies, 71 

Elective Studies, - - 72 

Faculty Advisers, -..----.-73 

Schedule of Majors and Minors, - 74 

Courses of Instruction, - 76-128 

Professional Studies, - - 128 

Regulations Affecting Undergraduates, 135 

Examinations, - 136 

Grades of Scholarship. 137 

Graduate Studies. 138 

Degrees, 139-142 

The Library, 143 

AtUetics, - 144 

Grounds and Buildingi, ..-.-... 145 

Religious Worship. 147 

Government, 147 

5 Digitized by Google 



6 NORTHWBSTERN UNIVBOtSITT. 

• 

Student Orguiizations, 1^ 

Christiui AfsocMtioiis, 149 

Fellowihipt, 150 

Scholanhipt. 151 

Pri«», 152 

Feet and Elzpentet, 155 

Board and Lodging. - 157 

Loan Fundi, 158 

Self Support of Students, 158 

Counet, 159 



The Medical School, 160-212 

Faculty. 160 

Location and Buildingi, 165 

Requircmenti for AdmiMion, ....... 165 

AdnuMion lo Advanced Standing, 166 

Medkodi of Instruction, I67 

Synopais of the Medical GMine, 168 

Departments of Instruction. 170-189 

The Alumni Library, ....... |91 

Requirements for Graduation, 192 

Final Examinations, 192 

Honors, 192 

The Hoqntal Quiz Gass. 193 

The Summer School. 193 

Young Men's Christian Association, 194 

Fees and Expenses, 195 

Hospitals, 197 

Training School for Nurses, 207 

The Law School, 213-233 

Faculty, 213 

Location, 214 

Requirements for Admission, 215 

Courses of Instruction, 216-228 

The Library, 229 

Priiw, 230 

Requirements for Degrees, 231 

Fees and Expenses, 233 

Scholarships, 233 

The School of Pharmacy, 234-239 

Faculty, 234 

Location and Equipment, - - 235 

Requirements for Admission, 236 

Courses of Instruction, 236 

Advanced Credits, 237 

Graduation, 238 

Fees and Expenses, 23S 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS. 7 

The Dental School, 240-263 

Faculty. 240 

LocAtioD and Equipment, 241 

Reqiiirementi for AdmiMion, ...... 242 

Advanced Standing, - 242 

Schedule of Counes. 243 

Departments of Instruction, ...... 244-260 

Requirements for Graduation, ...... 260 

The Museum, 261 

Fees and Expenses, 262 

Post Graduate and Practitioners* Course, .... 262 

The School of Music, 264-277 

Facul^, 264 

Location and Purpose, - 265 

Requirements for Admission, 265 

Courses of Instruction, - 266-272 

Diplomas and Certificates, 272 

Fees and F.Tpensrs, 273 

Preparatory Department, 277 

The Academies, ^78-283 

Evanston Academy of Northwestern University, ... 278 

Grand Prairie Seminaiy, 280 

Elgin Academy, ........ 282 

The Theological Schools, 284-292 

CarreU Biblical Imiiiute, 284 

Faculty, 284 

Requircj^nents for Admission, 285 

Courses of Study, 287 

Expenses, 290 

Norwegtan-Daniah Theological School, ..... 291 

Swediih Theological Seminaty, ...... 292 

Catalogue of Students, 293 

Degrees, Prizes, and Honors for the Year 1905-06, - - 371 

General Alumni Associations, 383 

Summary of Students in Attendance, 390 

Index, 392 



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Digitized by 



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CALENDAR 



FOR THE YEAR 1906-1907 
1906. 
September 24, Monday, Academic Year 1906-1907 begins. Ezamiiia- 
tioiu for AdmiMion and Regittration of Studenti in the G>I- 
lege of Liberal Arts, Law School, School of Phannacy, and 
School of Music begin. 
October 2, Tuesday, Examinations for Admission and Registratioa of 

Students in the Medical School and Dental School. 

Christmas Recess, from Friday, December 2f. to Wednesday, January 2, 

INCLUSIVE. 

1907. 
January 18, Friday, Intercollegiate Debate. 

January 28; Monday, Founders' Day. Mid-year Examinations in the 

Medical School, Law School, and Dental School begin. 
February 6^ Wednesday, Mid-year Examinations in die College of Liberal 

Arts begin. 
February 7, Thursday, Mid-year Graduation Exercises in the School of 

IT'? I Pharmacy. 

February 14, Thursday, Third Quarter in die School of Music begins. 

February 15, Friday, Second Semester in the College of Liberal Arts begins. 

February 18, Monday, Second Examinations in die College of Liberal Arts. 

March 1, Friday, Kirk Prize Oratorical Contest. 

Easter Recess from Friday, March 29, to Monday, April f, inclusive. 
Monday, Second Examinations in the College of Liberal Arts. 
Thursday, Fourth Quarter in die School of Music begins. 

Saturday, Last day for the presentation of dieses for Advanced 

Degrees. 
Monday, Last day for the presentation of Harris Prize dieses. 
Saturday, Examination of candidates for Advanced Degrees. 
Monday, Regular Examinations in die Medical School begin. 
Wednesday, Graduating Exercises in the Dental School. 
Monday, Regular Examinations in the Law School begin. 
9 Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



AptUI. 


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April 27. 


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J— 3. 



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10 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Wednesday, Regular F.iaminariom in die G>Uege of Libenl 

AftB begin. 
Thursday. Banquet of Law School Alumni, Annual Concert 

and Graduating Exercises in the School of Music. 

Friday, Additional Examinations in the G)llege of Liberal Arts. 
Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Monday. Class Day in the College of Liberal Arts. Summer 
School in die School of Pharmacy begins. 
June 18, Tuesday, Meeting of the Board of Trustees. Annual meeting 

of die Phi Beta Kappa Society. Banquet of Medical School 
Alumni. 
June 19, Wednesday, Alumni Day in die College of Liberal Arts. 

June 20. Thursday, Forty-ninth Annual Commencement. 

SuMMEit Vacation from Friday, June 21, to Sunday, September 22, 

INCLUSIVE. 

FOR THE YEAR 1007-1908 

September 23, Monday, Academic Year 1907-1906 begins. Ezaminadons ■ 
for Admission and Regbtradon of Students in die College of 
Liberal Arts, Law School, School of Pharmacy, and School 
of Music begin. 

September 25, Wednesday, Second Examinations in the College of Liberal Arts. 

September 26^ Thursday. Class work in die College of Liberal Arts, Law 
School, School of Pharmacy, and School of Music begins. 

October 1, Tuesday, Examinations for Admission and Registration of stu- 

dents in the Medical School and Dental School begin. Class 
work begins. 

Thanksgiving Recess from Thursday, November 28, to Sunday, Decem- 
ber I, INCLUSIVE. 

December 2, Monday, Second Quarter in the School of Music begins. 

Christmas Recess from Saturday, December 21, to Monday, January 6, 
inclusive. 
1906. 
January 17, Friday, Intercollegiate Debate. 

January 28, Tuesday, Founders' Day. 

February 3, Monday, Mid-year Examinations in die Medical School, Law 

School and Dental School begm. 

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CALENDAR. 11 

Febnuuy 5. Wednesday, Mid-year F.iaminatioiit in the College of Liberal 

Arte begin. 
Febmaiy 10, Monday, Second SemeOer in the Medical School, Law School, 

and Dental School begins. 
Febraary 13, Thunday. Additional Eiaminationi in die College of Liberal 

Arti, Third Quarter in die School of Mink begins. 
Febmaiy 14. Friday, Second Semester in the College of Liberal Arte begins. 
Fcbmaiy 17, Monday, Second Examinations in the College of Liberal Arts. 
Febmaiy 21. Friday. Sargent Prize Contest. 
March 6, Friday, Kirk Prize Oratorical Contest. 

AprO 16^ Thursday, Fourth' Quarter in die School of Music begins. 

Eastex Rccus from Friday. Apwl 17, to Moniiay, April 20, iNa.usivK. 

April 20, Monday, Second Examinations in the College of Liberal Arte. 

April 25, Saturday, Last day for the presentation of dieses for Advanced 

Degrees. 

May 4, Monday, Last day for die presentation of Harris Prize dieses. 

May 23, Saturday, Examination of candidates for Advanced Degrees. 

May 25, Monday, Regular Examinations in die Medical School begin. 

Jane I, Monday, Regular Examinadons in the Law School begin. 

June 3, Wednesday, Regular Examinations in the College of Liberal 

Arte be|^ 

June II, Thursday, Annual Banquet of Law School AlumnL Annual 

Concert and Graduating Exercises of the School of Music. 

June 12, Friday, Additional Examinations in the College of Liberal 

Arts. 

June 14, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 15, Monday, Class Day in die College of Liberal Arte. Annual 

address before die Phi Beta Kappa Society. Annual ban- 
quet of Medical School AlumnL 

June 16b Tuesday, Meeting of die Board of Trustees. Annual meeting 

of die Phi Beta Kappa Society. President's Annual Recep- 
tion at 8 o*clock in die evening. 

June 17, Wednesday. Alumni Day in die College of Liberal Arts. Fif- 

tieth Annual Commencement. 

Summer Vacation from Thursday. Junk 10, to Sunday, SirrtMRUi 27, 

INCLUtlVC. 

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DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The University comprises the following departments, each having 
a distinct Faculty of Instruction: 

The College of Liberal Arts, in Evantton. 

The Medical School, in Chicago. 

The Law School, in Chicago. 

The School of Pharmacy, in Chicago*. 

The Dental School, in Chicago. 

The School of Music, in Evaniton. 

The University maintains the following non-degree-conferring de- 
partments: 

The Evanston Academy, at Evaniton. 
Grand Prairie Seminary, at Onarga, Illinois. 
The EIlcin Academy, at Elgin, Illinois. 



Garrett Biblical Institute, a theological school of the Medkodist EpiscofNil 
Church, is established on its own foundation and under separate management on 
the University Campus in Evanston. It b audkorized by its charter to confer 
degrees in divinity, and is in close co-c^ration with the University. The Nor- 
wegian-Danish llieological School in Evanston is affiliated widi Garrett Biblical 
Institute. 

The Swedish Theological Seminary of the Medkodist Episcopal Church is 
located in Evanston. 

The Cumnock School of Oratory is conducted on the University Campos, 
under a separate administration. ■ 



Evanston is die suburb of Chicago adjoining it on die north and 
stretching along the shore of Lake Michigan. It has a population of 
about twenty thousand. The University Campus lies direcdy on the 
lake shore, about two miles from the northern lunits of Chicago. The 
charter of the University prohibits the sale of intoxicating liquors 
within four miles of the University. 



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ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



THE UNIVEKSmr 

PreaidenU Abram Winegaroner Harris, Sc.D., LX.D., 
Oifice. Uaivenity HalL Evanilon. 

Chictfo Office, Norlkwetlera Univertity Building, Lake and Dearborn 
Stredt, Chicafo. 
BuitncM AfofMfer, William Andrew Dvche, A.M., 
Office, 518 Davis Street, EvantloD. 

Chicafo Office, Noithwettera University Building, Lake and Dearborn 
Streets, Chicafo. 

OOLLECE OF UBERAL ARTS 

Dean, Thomas Frankun Holgate, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Rtgulraf, Robert Edward Wilson, Ph.M., 
Offices, University Hall, Evanston. 

MEDICAL school 

Dean, Nathan Smith Davis, A.M., M.D., 
Junior Dean, Winheld Scott Hall, A^., M.D.. Ph.D., 
5ccrclor3^, Charles Louis Mm, A.M., M-D^ 
Offices, 2431 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

LAW SCHOOL 

Dean, John Henry Wigmore, AlM^ LL.D., 
Seereiary, Frederick Beers Crossley, LL.B., 

Offices, Northvreslem Univeisity Building, Lake and Dearborn Streets, 
Chicago. 

school of pharmacy 
Dean, Oscar Oldberc, Pharm.D., 
Regitirar, Charles W. Patterson, B.S., Ph.C., 

Offices, Northwestern University Building, Lake and Dearborn Streets, 
Chicago. 

DENTAL school 

Dean, Greene Vardiman Black, MD., D.D.S., LL.D., 
Seerelarjf, Charles R. E. Koch, D.D.S., 

Offices, Northwestern University Building, Lake and Dearborn Streets, 
Chicago. 

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14 N0RTHWB8TBRN UNIVBRSIT7. 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Dean, Petek Chbistun Lutkin, Mus.D., 
Seerelao, Imving Hamun, 

OiEcet. Munc HaU. EvusIod. 



EVANSTON ACADEMY 

Principal AiTHUR Herbext Wilde, PhD^ 
OiBce, Fisk HalL ETuistoD. 

GRAND PRAIRIE SEMINARY 

Principal, Henry HoAfi Frost, AB„ 
Address, Omutsb. Iliinots. 

ELGIN ACADEMY 

Principal, George Newton Sleksht, A.B^ 
Address, Elgin, lUnois. 



GARRETT BIBUCAL INSTITUTE 

PretiienU Charles Joseph Little, Ph.D., LX-D^ S.T.D., 
Regittar, Solon Gary Bronson, D.D., 
OAcet, Memorial Hall, Evanston. 



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THE CORPORATION 



OFFICERS 

WlLUAM Deeung rHoaorary Pretideiit. 

WiLUAM Eraser McDowell. D.D.. LL.D.. . . .' Preudcnt. 

Oliver Harvey Horton* LL.D.. Pint Vice-Pniideni. 

Humphreys Henry Clay Miller* A.M Second Vice-President 

Frank Phiup Crandon, A.M Secretary. 

John Richard Lindcren Treasurer. 

William Andrew Dyche, A.M Busineu Manager. 

TRUSTEES 
Term Expires in 1907. 

Oliver Harvey Horton, LL.D Chicago, 

William Deering Evanston. 

MERRrrr Caldwell Bragdon, A.M., M.D Evanston. 

James Barrett Hobbs Qucago. 

Frank Philip Crandon, A.M Evanston. 

Lorin Cone Coluns, A.M Chicago, 

William Andrew Dyche, A.M Evansion. 

Perley Lowe Chicago. 

Lucy Davis Rowe Evanston. 

Term Expires In 1906 

JosiAH J. Parkhurst Evanston. 

David McWiluams Dwi^t. 

Charles PInckney Wheeler, A^ Evanston. 

CoRNELU Grey Lunt Evanston. 

Henry Howard Gage Evanston. 

FiywARD Foster Swift Chicago. 

William Eraser McDowell. DD.. LL.D Chicago. 

Term Expires In 1909 

Norman Wait Harris Chicago. 

Nathan &iith Davu, A.M., M.D Chicago. 

John Richard Lindgren Evanston. 

Humphreys Henry Clay Miller, A.M Evanston. 

Elbert Henry Gary New York. 

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16 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

NflLTON HOLLYDAY WiLSON EvAIMtOB. 

Alexander Hamilton Revell Oncaco. 

Henky Sherman Boutell. A.Mn LL.D Oucafo. 

Term Expires in 1910. 

Harlow Niles Higinbotham Chicmfo. 

William Henry Henkle Chicaao. 

Stephen Joseph Herben, D.D Evaotioa. 

Henry Sargent Towle, LL.B Qucafo. 

James A. Patten « EvantiQii. 

George Peck Merrick. LL.B Evanrton. 

WiLUAM LiSTON Brown Evaattoa. 

Elected by Conferences 

ROCK RIVER 

Thomas Ransom Strobridge. A.M.» D.D Rockford. 

William Orville Shepard, D.D Qiicago. 

DETROIT 

William Dawe, D.D Ann Aitwr. 

Matthew Chantrill Hawks. D.D Sanlt Ste. Marie. 

CENTRAL ILUNOIS 

George Rutledge Palmer. A.M.. D.D Onarga. 

Jacob Wellington Frizzelle, A.M., B.D Galetburg. 

MICHIGAN 

Wilbur Israel Cogshall. D.D Ionia. 

Lambert Edgar Lennox, D.D Grand Rapidt. 

GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

William Deering. Josiah J. Parkhurst. 

William Eraser McDowell. Milton Hollyday Wilson. 

Abram Winegardner Harris. James B. Hobbs. 

Oliver H. Horton. William A. Dyche. 

Frank Philip Crandon. Henry Howard Gage. 

H. H. C Miller. Charles P. Wheeler. 

Nathan S. Davis. George P. Merrick. 

James A. Patten. Wiluam Liston Brown. 

John Richard Lindgren. ' " ~"3! 

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THH CORPORATION. 17 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

CommUie€ on Ui€ Report of the President of the Unhenitj^—fAoun. Horton. 
BouTELL. CoGSHALL, and Palmer. 

Commitiee on ihe Trtamrer's Report and Finances, and on the Busineu MaxuR' 
gers Reporl— Metsn. Harris, Wilson, Higinbotham, Lindgren, and 
Henkle. 

Committee on the College of Liberal Art»—Meun. Miller, Davis, Herben, 
Wheeler, and Swift. 

Committee on the Medical School — Mesin. Davis, Harris, Dyche, and Lowe. 
Committee on the Lavt School — Mettn. TowLE, Revell, Gary, Miller, and 
Merrick. 

Committee on the School of Pharmacif—Moun. Revell. Towle, Parkhurst, 
and Frizzelle. 

Committee on the Dental School — Meun. Dyche, Merrick, Ljowe, and 
Dawe. 

Committee on the School of Muaic — Mcmib. Patten, Miller, Brown, and 
Miss Lunt. 

Committee on Unbfenitif Dormitories and Willard Hall — ^Misi Lunt, Mrs. 
RowE, Mr. Crandon. and Mr. Patten. 

Committee on the Evanston Academy^ — Meun. Parkhurst, Bragoon, 
Wheeler, and Merrick. 

CommiUte on the Lihrary—Meun, Herben, Palmer, and Lennox. 

Committee on Real Estate— Meun, Gage, Parkhurst. Lowe, McWiluams, 
and Harris. 

Committee on the Nomination of Trusteei and Oficers — Meten. HoBBS, WiLSON, 
Horton, Crandon, and Swift. 

Committee on Miscellaneous Matters— Meun, McWlLUAMS, StrobridgE, 
CoGSHALL, and Shepard. 



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UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 



Abram WiNEGARDNER Harris, Sc.D., LL.D., President. 



College of Liberal Arts 

Thomas Frankun Holgate, Ph.D^ LL.D. 
Daniel Bonbright, LL.D. 

Medical School 

Nathan Smith Davis, A.M., M.D. 
John Harper Long. M.S., Sc.D. 

Law School 

John Henry Wigmore» A.M., LL.D. 
Henry Schofield« A.M.« LL.B. 

School of Pharmacy 

Oscar Oldberg, Pharm.D. 
Harry Mann Gordin. Ph.D. 

Dental School 

Greene Vardiman Black, M.D., D.D.S., LL.D. 
Charles Rudolph Edward Koch, D.D^. 

School of Music 

Peter Christian Lutkin, Mus.D. 
Haik>u> Evtrard Knapp. 



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OFnCERS OF INSTRUCTION AND 
GOVERNMENT 



Abram WiNEGAia>NER HARRIS, Sc.D., LL.D., - - - President 
1745 Chicago Ave., Evanston. 

PROFESSORS AND ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Samuel Adams, A.6., LL.B., - - - Monadnock Bldg;, Chicago. 
Profeuor in the Latf of Procedure and Praciice, Lam School. 

Frank Allport, M.D., 72 Madison St., Chicago. 

Professor of Oiolog}^ and of Clinical Ophlhalmologjf and Otolog}^, 
Medical SchooL 
Edward Wyllys Andrews, A.M., M.D., - - 100 State St., Chicago. 

Professor of Surgerp and Clinical Surgery^ Medical School. 
Frank Taylor Andrews, A.M., M.D., - - 100 Stale St., Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Cjyneco/o^, Medical School. 
Charles Beach Atwell. Fh.M., - - 1938 Shennan Ave., Evanston. 

Profeuor of Botany, College of Liberal Arts. 
Edouard Paul Baillot, L.H.D., - - - 714 Foster St.. Evanston. 

Professor of Romance Languages, College of Liheral Arts. 
OuN Hanson Basquin, Ph.D.. - - - 325 Hill St., Wihnette. 

Auociate Professor of Physics, College of Liheral Aris. 
Arthur Davenport Black, BS., M.D., D.D.S., 

31 Washington St., Chicago. 
Auislant Professor of Operathte Dentistry and Auislant in Oral Surgery, 
Dental School. 
Greene Vardiman Black, M.D.. D.D.S.. Sc.D.. LL.D.. 

4467 Oakenwald Ave.. Chicago. 
Professor of Operative Dentistry, Pathology, and Bacteriology, Dean of 
the Dental School. 
Daniel Bonbricht, A.M., LL.D.. - 2040 Sheridan Road. Evanston. 
John £>anj Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Dean Emeritus 
of the College of Liheral Arts. 
Solon Gary Bronson, A.M., DD^ - 2026 Orrington Ave.. Evanston. 
Cornelia Miller Professor of Practical Theology, Registrar in Carrett 
Biblical Institute. ^ 

10 



20 N0RTHWB8TKRN UNIVBRSITY. 

Arthur Charles Lxwis Brown, Ph.D., I74f Huuma Art^ EvsDttoa. 

Profeuor of £ng/tsA LiUralure, College of Liheral ArU, 
Peter Thomas Burns, M.D., - - 531 S. Leayitt St., Chicago. 

Auuiant Profeuor of Anatomjf and Director of the Anatomical Lahora' 
torjf. Medical School. 
WiLUAM Evans Casselberry, M.D., 34 Washinsbn St.. Oucafo. 

Profeuor of Lan^ngologjf and Rhinolog}^, Medical School. 
Archibald Church, M.D., • - - 604 PuUmui BIdg., Chicmgo. 

Profeuor of Ner»ouM and Mental Diseases and Medical Juriipradeaee, 
Medical School. 

J. Scott Clark, Lit.D.. - - - 2114 Skeridan Rd., EvaiutoB 

Profeuor of English Language, College of Liheral Arts. 
George Albert Coe. Ph.D., - - - 620 Clark St.. Evaniton. 

John Eifans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy, College 
of Uheral Arts. 
Henry Crew, Ph.D., .... 620 Library St., Evaniton. 

Fayertfcather Profeuor of Phifsics, College of Liheral Arts. 
Robert McLxan Cumnock, A.M.. L.H.D., 1804 Hinman Ave., EvansloB. 

Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution in the College of Liheral Arts and 
in Carrett Bihlical Institute. 
George Oliver Curme, A.M., - - 2237 Sherman Ave., Evanston. 

Profeuor of Cermanie Philology, College of Liberal Arts. 
David Raymond Curtiss, Ph.D., - 1939 Sherman Ave., Evaniton. 

Auistant Profeuor of Mathematics, College of Liheral Arts. 
Nathan Smfth Davis, A.M.. M.D., - - 72 Madison St. Chicago. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical 
Medicine, Dean of the Medical School. 
Joseph Bouvar DeLee, A.M., M.D., - 3632 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 

Professor of Obstetrics, Medical School. 
George Amos Dorset, Ph.D., - Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

Profeuor of Comparative Aruitomy, Dental School. 
Emiuus Clark Dudley, A.M., M.D.. - 1617 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Professor of Gynecology, Medical School. 
Arthur Robin Edwards, A.M., M.D., - 100 State St., Chicago. 

Profeuor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical 
Medicine, Medical School. 
Frederick Carl Eiselen, A.M., BD., - 2340 Orringlon Ave., Evantlon. 

Professor of SemiUc Languages and Old Testament Exegesis, Carrett 
Bihlical Institute. 



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OFFICBRS OF INSTRUCTION AND OOVBRNMBNT. 21 

Albeit Emcson, A.M., - - 2118 OrrincioD Ave., EvaottoB. 

Prendeni of ihe Swediih Theological Sominarjf. 
Hesbeit Frankun Fisic, D.D., LL.D., - 1625 JudioD Ave., Evaiisloa. 

Professor of Pedagogjf, College of Liberal ArU, 
Mitchell Davis Follansbee, AB., LL.B., - 205 LaSdle St.. Chicago. 

Professor in ihe Lavt of Procedure and Practice, Lecturer on Legal 
EUiicst Lam School, 
Lesteb Emanuel Frankenthal, M.D., - 103 RaiKlolpb St., Giicafo. 

Professor of Clinical Cynecology, Medical School, 
Levi Harper Fuller, B.S., LL.B., - - 115 Deaiboni St., Quctgo. 

Professor in ihe Lam of Procedure and Practice, Lam School, 
Fred William Cethro, D.DJS., - • 31 Wuhingloo St., Chicago. 

Assisiani Professor of Operative Dentisty and Denial Anatomy, Dental 
School. 
Lewis Oscar Gillesby. - - - - 1113 Foster St, EvantioD. 

Asdslant Professor of Physical Culture and Director of Athletics, 
College of Liberal Arts. 
Thomas Lewis Gilmer, M.D., D.D.S.. - 31 Washington St., Chicago. 

Professor of Oral Surgery, Dental School 
Harold Clark Goddard. Ph.D., - - - 843 JndMa Ave., Evanston. 

Asmiani Professor of English Literature, College of Uheral Arts, 
James Walter Golothwait, PhJ>^ - - 815 Gafield PI. Evanttoo. 

Assisiani Professor of Geology, College of Uheral Arts. 
Harry Mann Gordin, Ph.D.. - - - 380 Chestnut St.. Chicago. 

Professor of Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, 
Ulysses Sherman Grant, Ph.D., - 2320 Orringion Ave., Evanston. 

IVUliam Deering Professor of Geology, Curator of Ae Museum, College 
of Uheral Arts. 
John Henry Gray, Ph.D., 1827 Onington Ave.. Evanston. 

Professor of Political and Social Science, College of Liberal Arts. 
Louis May Greeley, A.B.. - - - - 87 Lake St., Chicago. 

Professor in ihe Lam of Conifeyancing, Mortgages, Carriers, and Com- 
mercial Paper, Lam School. 
Juuus Grinker. M.D.. 100 State St., Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, Medical School. 
Vernon James Hall. Ph.D.. .... 87 Lake St.. Chicago. 

Professor of Chemistry, Dental School. 



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22 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

WiNFiELD Scott Hall, M.D., Ph.D., 2431 DeaHwm Su Chicmfo. 

Nathan Smith Da!¥U Professor of Physiology^, Junior Dean of the 
Medical School, 
Albert EIdward Halstead, M.D., - - - 103 State St., Chicago 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
NoRBiAN DwicHT Harbis, Ph.D., - - 1207 Maple Ave., Eva&tlon. 

Professor of European Diplomatic History, College of Liberal Arts, 
James Taft Hatfield, Ph.D.. - - .- 617 Foster St, ETantton. 

Professor of German language and Literature, College of Liberal Arts, 
Doremus Almy Hayes, S.T.D., Ph.D., - 620 Foster St., Evanston. 

Professor of Nett Testament Exegesis, Librarian in Carreit Biblical 
InsUtute, 
D'Orsay Hecht, M.D., .... 4304 Grand Blvd.. Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases and Medical Juris- 
prudence, Medical School, 
Charles Hill, Ph.D.. M.D., - - - 6330 Kimbark Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology, Medical School, 
Thcmas Frankun Holgate, Ph.D., LL.D., - 617 Library St., Evanston. 

Henry S, Noyes Professor of Mathematics, Dean of the College of 
Liberal Arts. 
John Hamilcar Holuster, A.M., M.D., - 103 State St., Chicago. 

Professor Emeritus of Clinical Medicine, Medical School, 
WiLLARD Eugene Hotchkiss, Ph.D., - 626 Simpson St., Evanston. 

Assistant Professor of Economics, College of Liberal Arts. 
CtEORGE Washington Hough, LL.D., - 2237 Sheridan Rd., Evanston. 

Professor of Astonomy, Director of Dearborn Observatory, College 
of Liberal Arts. 

Charles Cheney Hyde, A.M., LL.6.. - - 135 Adams St., Chicago. 

Associate Professor of Lan, Lat> School, 
James Alton James, Ph.D., - - 2127 Orrington Ave., Evanston. 

Professor of History, College of Liberal Arts, 
Frank Seward Johnson, A.M., M.D., - 2521 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 

Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Dean Emeritus 

of the Medical School. 
liARRY Kahn, Pharm.M., M.D., - - 4705 Indiana Ave.. Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Physiology and Materia Medica, School of 
Pharmacy. 
Albert Martin Kales, A.6., LL.6., - - 135 Adams St., Chicago. 

Auociate Professor of Lav, Lav School, 

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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 23 

Hakold Everard Knapp, - - - - 218 Lunt Ave., Chicago. 

Profeuor of Violin and Ememble Placing, School of Music, 
John Henry Sheldon Lee, A.B., LL.B., - 164 Deaibom St, Chicago. 

Professor in the Latt of Crimis and Criminal Procedure, La9 School. 
Walter Libby. Ph.D.. - - - - 1707 Ridge Ave., Evamioii. 

Assisiant Professor of Education, College of Liberal Arts. 
Charles Clarence Linthicum, LL.B., - Monadnock Bldg., Chicago. 

Professor in the Latf of Patents, Latt School, 
Charles George Little, B.S.. LL.B., 1418 Forest Ave., Evaotton. 

Associate Professor of Law, Law School, 
Charles Joseph Ltttle, Ph.D., LL.D., S.T.D., 2016 Sheridan Rd., Evanttoii. 

Professor of Historical Theology, President of Carrett Biblical institute, 
WiLUAM Albert Locy, Ph.D., Sc.D., - 1823 Himnan Ave.,' Evanston. 

Professor of Zoology, College of Liberal Arts. 
John Harper Long, M.S., Sc.D., - - 7748 Sangamon St., Chicago. 

Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Chemical Laboratori^, 
Medical School. 
Omera Floyd Long, Ph.D., - - 1741 Hinman Ave., Evanston. 

Associate Professor of Latin, College of Liberal Arts, 
Peter Christian Lutkin, Mus.D., - - 1703 Ridge Ave., Evanston. 

Professor of Organ, Theory, and Composition, Dean of the School of 
Music, 
Elgin MaWhinney, D.D.S., - - - 34 Washington St., Chicago. 

Professor of Special Pathology, Materia Medica, and Therapeutics, 
Denial School. 
Frederick Menge. M.D., .... 34 Washington St., Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Laryngology and Rhbiology, Medical School. 
Charles Henderson Miller, Ph.G., MJ>., 6349 Jackson Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School. 
Maurice Ashbel Miner, Pharm.M., - 6646 Lexington Ave., Chicago. 

Asustant Professor of Pharmacy, Curator School of Pharmacy, 
Charles Louis Mix, A.M., M.D., - - 103 State St., Chicago. 

Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Secretary of the Faculty, Medical 
School; Professor of Anatomy, Dental School, 
William Edward Morgan, M.D., - Heyworih Bldg., Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, Medical School, 
Edmund Noyes, D.D.S., 92 State St., Chicago. 

Professor of Dental Jurisprudence and Ethics, Dental School, 

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24 NORTHWBSTffiRN UNIVERSITY. 

Frederick Bogue Noyes. A.B.. D.D.S., - - 92 State St. Oucato- 

Protestor of HUlology, Dental School. 
Arne Oldberg. 1605 Wesley Ave^ EtahsIob. 

Profeuor of Piano and CompotiUont School of Muuc 
Oscar Oldberg, Pharm.D., - - - 7806 Union ATe.. Chicafo. 

Professor of Pharmacy and Director of the Pharmaceutkal LahomtorieSt 
Dean of the School of Pharmac}^, 
John Edwin Owens, M.D., ... Lexington Hotel ducnfo. 

Professor of Surger^f and Clinical Swgerjf, Medical School. 
Luaus Crocker Pardee, M.D., - - 34 Wathlngion St, Oucnfo. 

Asmtanl Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Medical School. 
Hugh Taubot Patrick, M.D., - * 463 LnSalle Ave., Qiicago. 

CUnical Professor of Nerpous and Menial Diseases, Medical School. 
Amos Williams Patten, A.M., D.D., - 616 Foster St., ETansion. 

Professor of Biblical Instruction, College of Liberal Arts. 
Charles Waggener Patterson, B.S., Ph.C 3700 Lake Atc^ Qucafo. 

Assistant Professor of Anafytxcal Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Registrar 
School of Phartnacjf. 
Samuel Craig Plummer, A.M., M.D., * 34 Washington St., Qiicago. 

Professor of Surgical Anatomic and Operative Surgenf, Medical School. 
Raymond Haines Pond, PH.Dn - - - 87 Lake St., Qucago. 

Professor of Boianjf, Pharmacognosy, and Bacteriolog}^, School of 
Pharmacy. 
Mary Ross Potter, A.M,. .... Willard Hall. Evanston. 

Dean of Women, 
Robert Bruce Preble, A.B., M.D., - - 103 Sute St., Oiicago. 

Professor of Medicine, Medical School. 
James Harrison Prothero, D.D.S., - - • 87 Lake St., Chicag». 

Professor of Prosthetic Technics, Prosthetic Dentisty, and Metallography, 
Dental School. 
Willum Edward Quine, M.D., - - 3160 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Professor Emeritus of Physiology, Therapeutics, and Toxicology, School 
of Pharmacy. 
Charles Bert Reed, M.D., .... 103 State St., Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Medical School. 
John Ridlon, A.M., M.D., - - - - 72 Madison St., Chicago. 

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical School. 



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OFFICBRS OF INSTRUCTION AND OOVBRNMSNT. 25 

Chakles Moore Robemtson. M*D., 100 Sute St. Chicago. 

AuUittni Prcfeasor of Oiologj^, Medical School. 
Edward Oscar F. Roler. A.M.. M.D., - 218 Sizdeik Sl^ Chicaco. 

Profeuor EmeritoM of O&siefrics, Moikal School, 
Louia Ernst Schmidt. M.S.. M.D.. - - 800 Schiller Bldg^ Oucafo. 

ProfcMsor of CUnical Cemlo'Urinaty Surgery, Medical School, 
Henry Schoheld. A.M.. LL.B.. - - - 87 Lake St^ Oucago. 

Profeuor of Lam, Lam SchooL 
WiLUAM Edward Schroeder, MB., - f03 State St.. Chicaco. 

Profeuor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Medical SchooL 
John Adams Scott. Ph.D.. - - 2038 Onrington Atc.. ETantton. 

Professor of Creek Language and Liieraiare, Secretary of the Faculty, 
College of Liberal ArU. 
Walter Dill Scott. Ph.D.. - - 2036 Orrington Atc.. ETaattoii. 

Auociate Professor of Psychology and Education, College of Uheral 
ArU, 
Ira Benson Sellery. D.D.S., - - - 34 WasUnglon St. Chicago. 

Professor of Orthodontia, Dental School. 
Nels Edward Simonsen, A.M., D.D., 2243 Orrmgloii Ave.. ETantton. 

Principal of the N otmegiat^Danish Theological School. 

Charles Macaulay Stuart, A.M., D.D.. Lrr.D.. 

2001 Onrington Ave., Evantton. 
Professor of Sacred Rhetoric, Secretary of the Faculty in Carrett 
Biblical Institute, 

Robert Richardson Tatnall. Ph.D.. - f1Q3 Ajan Place, Evantton. 
Assistant Professor of Physics, College of Liberal Arts. 

Milton Spenser Terry. AM.. D.D.. iX.D., 1812 Hinman Ave., Evanslon. 

Professor of Christian Doctrine, Carrett Biblical InsAtaU, 
Harry Isaac Van Tuyl. B.S., M.D.. D.D.S.. 6249 Kimbark Ave.. Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Dental School. 
Weller Van Hook. A.B.. M.D.. - - - 103 State St., Oucago. 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Frank Xavier Walls. M.D.. - - - - 103 State St.. Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
Thomas James Watkins. M.D., - - - 103 State St, Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Gynecology, Medical School. 
George Washington Webster, M.D.. - 70 Stale St^ Chicago. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine, Medical SchooL 



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26 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Theodore WHnrELSEY. Ph.D^ - - 807 Gieenleaf St, ETanttim. 

AuociaU Proftuor of Chemuirjf, College of Liberal ArU. 
TwiNG Brooks Wiggin. M.D.. . . . rOO State St^ Chicago. 

Profeuor of Physiology and Pathology, Denlah School 
John Henry Wigmore, A.M.. LL.D^ - - 207 Lake St., ETantloB. 

Profeuor of Lam, Dean of Ae Lam School. 
Arthur Herbert Wilde. Ph.D., - 2316 Omngton Ave., Evaiiiioii. 

Profeuor of History, College of Liberal Arts. 
Eugene Shaw Willard, D.D.S.. ... 87 Lake St., Chicago. 

Auisiani Profeuor of Operative DenUstry and Bacteriology, Dental 
School. 

Casey Albert Wood, CM., M.D., - - 72 Madison St., Chicago. 
Profeuor of Ophthalmology and of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology, 
Medical School. 

Frederic Campbell Woodward, A.M., LL.M.. 716 Foster St., Evanston. 
Professor of Lam, Lam School. 

Abram Van Eps Young, Ph.B., - - 522 Church St., Evaaston. 
Professor of Chemistry, College' of Liberal Arts, 

Joseph Zeisler, M.D., - - - - 100 State St., Chicago. 

Professor of S^in and Venereal Diseases, Medical School. 
Frederic Robert Zeit, M.D., ... 2431 Deaihom St.. Chicago. 

Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology, Medical School. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Walter Steele Barnes. M.D.. - - 3000 Michigan Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Gynecology, Medical School. 
Curtis Abell Barry - - - - 353 Winihrop Are., Chicago. 

Instructor in Organ, School of Music. 
Bertha Althea Beebian. - - - - 725 Foster St., Evanston, 

Instructor in Voice Culture, School of Music. 
Frank Adolf Bernstorff. A.B., - - 2241 Sherman Ave., Evanston, 

Instructor in Cerman, College of Liberal Arts, 
Frederick Atwood Besley, M.D.. - - - 103 State St.. Chicago. 

Instructor in Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Lewis Randolph Blackman, - - 188 Winthrop Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Violin, School of Music. 
Joseph Brennebian, Ph.B., M.D., - 6857 Wentworth Ave., Chicago, 

Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics, Medicai School. 

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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 27 

Coleman Gbaves Buford, M.D., - - - , 100 State St. Chicago. 

Imkwior in Clinical Sorgerp, Medical School. 
Walter Herman Buhug, B-S., M.D., - 5533 Union Ave., Chicago. 

Imtruclor in Bacttriology, Medical School, 
Margaret Cameron, 1447 Dakin St., Chicago. 

Imirucior in Piano, School of Music, 
John Gaily Campbell, A.M.. MJD., - 6657 Wentworth Ave., Chicago. 

InUructor in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School, 
Paul Chester, B.S., M.D., - - - 4707 Lake Ave., Chicago 

Instuctor in Phj^sical Diagnosis, Medical School, 
Herman Churchill, A.M., - - - 1023 Ayan Place, Evansion. 

Instructor in English Language, College of Liberal Arts, 
Frederick Sargeant Crocker, M.D., - - - 103 State St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Otologjf, Medical School, 
WiLUAM Robert Cubbins, B.S., M.D., - 3430 Rhodes Ave., Chicago, 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery, Medical School 
WiLUAM CuTHBERTSON, M.D., - - 171 £. Forty-sevendi St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Cynecologj^, Medical School, 
Achilles Davis, Ph.B., M.D., - - 1206 Carfieia Blvd., Chicago. 

Instructor in Medicine, Medical School. 
Frederick Shipp Deibler. A-M^ - - 2320 Onington Ave., Evaniton. 

Instructor in Economics, College of Liberal Arts, 
Louis Norton Dodge. .... 1707 Ridge Ave., Evaniton. 

Instructor in Piano and TheoVf, School of Musk, 
George Boyd Dyche, A.B., M.D., - 5345 Washington Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Medicine, Medical School. 
Georg Edward, - - - - 4142 North Ashland Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Cerman, College of Liberal Arts. 
Frederick Charles Eggert, M.D., - 5362 S. Halsted St.. Chicago. 

Instructor m Operative Surgery, Medical School, 
Charles Frankun Eikenbary, M.D., - Washington Hei^u, Illinois. 

Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery, Medical School, 
Charles Byrd Elder. LL.B.. - - - 135 Adams St.. Chicago. 

Instructor in the Lam of Extraordinary Legal Remedies and Judgments, 
Lam School, 
Charles Addison Eluott. B.S.. M.D., - 2900 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Medicine, Medical School. 



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28 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Ax£L Louis Elmqitist, A.M., - - 2877 N. Scelqr Ave^ Oucafo. 

Imimcior in Latin and Cree^, CoUege of Liberal Arts. 
Bernard Capen Ewer. Ph.D., - - - 620 Clark St.. ETantloB. 

imbructor in Philosophj^, CoUege of Liberal Arts. 
Roy Caston Fuciunger, Ph.D.. - - 718 Oark St., Evamloa. 

instructor in Cree^ and Latm, CoUege of Liberal Arts. 
Edson Brady Fowler. A.B.. M.D^ - 3359 Indiana Ave^ Chicafo. 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine, h4edical School. 
Victor Garwood. - - - - 604 E. Drntion St.. Chicago, 

Instructor in Piano and Historjf of Music, School of Music. 
Robert Tracy Gillmore. M.D.. - - - 103 State St.. Oucafo. 

Instructor in Cjfnecologjf, Medical School. 
Alexander Aaron GoLDsmrTH.. M.D., - 4428 Prairie Ave.. Ckicago. 

Instructor in Histopatholog}f, Medical School. 
CuFFORD Grosselle Grulee, A.M.. M.D., - 6100 Prairie Ave., Chicafo. 

Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
Karleton Hackett, .... 5482 East End Ave.. Chicago. 

Instructor in Voice Culture, School of Music, 

Henry Clay Hall, A.M., LL.B., - Manhattan Bldg., ducago. 

Instructor in the Law of Insurance, Lam School. 

Leila Marchant Harlow, - - 630 Univeniiy Place, Evanslon. 

Instructor in Sight Reading, Choral Music, and Public School Musk 
Methods, School of Music. 
Eugene Howard Harper, Ph.D., - - 839 Milbum St., Evantton. 

Instructor in Zoologjf, College of Liberal Arts. 
Winfield Scott Harpole, M.D., - - - 103 Stale St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Medicine, Medical School. 
William Henry Harrison, Ph.C, - - 276 E. Superior St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Chemistn^, School of Pharmacy. 
Philip Harry, Ph.D., - - - 1919 Sherman Ave., Evantton. 

Instructor in French, CoUege of Liberal Arts. 

John EImanuel Hillberg, - - - 734 Colfax St., Evaniton. 

Instructor in Swedish Language, Literature, and Histon^, Swedish Theo- 
logical Seminan^. 
John Chamberlain Holuster, A.B., M.D., - 100 State St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Cynecolog}^, Medical School. 
Charles Stephen Horn, - - 3531 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Cornet, School of Music. 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVBRNMBNT. 29 

Charixs Mayor Jacobs. M.D., - - - f03 State St.. Chicaco. 

!nslructor in Clinical Orthopedic Surgetyt Mtdical School. 
Gerhamd H. Jensen. Ph.D., - - - 6619 Ellit Ave.. Cliicato- 

Imtructof in Boianj^ and Pharmacognoi}ft School of Pharmacy, 
William Johnson. Ph.C. - - - 2431 Dearborn St.. Chicago. 

/fuiructor in Chemistry, Medical School. 
Allen Buckner Kanavel. Ph.B.. M.D.. - 103 State St.. Chieafo. 

!mtructor in Clinical Surgery, h4edical School. 
Herbert Covert Keppel. Ph.D.. 616 Foster St.. EvaattoA. 

Intfructor in Maihemalic*, College of Liberal Arts. 
Ellis Kirk Kerr, A.M.. M.D., ... 103 State St., Oiicato. 

Insiruciar in Medicine, Medical School, 
Charles Joseph King. - - - 926 Sliefield Ave.. Oucafo. 

Instructor in Clarinet, Oboe, and Bassoon, School of Music, 
HiLA Verbeck Knapp. - - - - 218 Limt Ave.. Chicago. 

Instructor in Piano, School of Music, 
Nina Shumway Knapp. - - - - 1010 Ayait Place. Evaattott. 

Instructor in Piano, School of Music, 
WiLUAM Henry Knapp. - - - 1010 Ajan Place. EvansloB. 

Instructor in Voice Culture, School of Music. 
Gottfried Koehler. Ph.C. M.D.. - - 93 E. 26lfa St.. Chkago. 

Inslructoi in Clinical Pathology and Clinical Medicine, Medical School, 
Juuus William Adolphe Kuhne. A.M.. 2044 Sherman Ave.. EvaniloB. 

Instructor in French, College of Liberal Arts. 
Charles Joseph Kurtz. A.M.. M.D. - - 633 E. 46di Pl^ Chicago. 

Instructor in Physiology, Medical School. 
WiLUAM Henry Lamborn. M.D., - - 72 Ma<iiion St.. Chicago. 

Instructor in Haematology, Medical School, 
Edgar Nelson Layton. A.M.. M.D.. - 1100 W. 51sl St.. Chicagp. 

Instructor in Clinical Neurology, Medical School. 
Victor Darwin Lespinasse. M.D.. - - 260 LaSalle St.. Chicago. 

Instructor in Cenito-Urinary Surgery, Medical School. 
Thomas Henry Lewis. M.D.. - - - 103 State St.. Chicago. 

Instructor in Cynecology, Medical School. 
George Paull Marquis, M.D., - - - 103 State St.. Chicago. 

Instructor in Laryngology and Rhinology, Medical School, 
David Falkner Monash, M.D., - 3601 Vincennet Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Obstetrics, Medical School, ^^ ^^^^ ^^ GoOglc 



30 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

James Caddell Morehcad, Ph.D.. - - 714 Foster St.. Evanston. 

Imlructof m Maihematict, College of Liberal Arts, 
Paul Frederick Morf. M.D.. - - 316 WeUter Ave Chicago. 

Instracior in Clinical Surgery, Medical School, 
John Price Odell, A.B., - - - - 820 Hamlin St, ETanttoii. 

Instructor in English Language, College of Liberal Arts, 
Edward Russell Ogden, M.D., - - - 100 State St, Oucago. 

Instructor in Otologjf, Medical School. 
George Daniel Oclesby, Ph.G., - - 5603 dove Ave., Oiicago. 

Insbuctor in Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, 
Wiluam Abbott Olofather. A.M., - 639 Milbura St. Evaaston. 

Instructor in Latin and Creei, College of Liberal Arts. 
Henry Martin Parks, B.S.. ... 733 Potter St. Evanston. 

Instructor in Geology and Mineralogy, College of Liberal Arts. 
John Jacob Rapp. B.D.. - - - - 573 £. 6Ut St., diicafo 

Instructor in Creek ^^^ Hebrew, Garrett Biblical Institute, 
Isaac Donaldson Rawungs. MS., M.D.. - 100 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Contagious Disecues at the Isolation Hospital, 
Harry Mortimer Richter. M.D.. - - 103 State St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Henry Dedrick Roehler. M.D.. - 6302 S. Hakted St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Operative Obstetrics, Medical School. 
Alphonse de Salvio, Ph.D., 1928 Sherman Ave.. Evaartoo 

Instructor in Romance Languages, College of Liberal Arts, 
Henry Edward Sauer, B.S.. M.D . - - - 100 State St, Chicago. 

Instructor in Gynecology, Medical School, 
Stuart Pratt Sherman. Ph.D., - 2034 Onington Ave., Evaniton. 

Instructor in English Literature, College of Liberal Arts, 
George Curtice Shockey. M.D.. .... Melrose Park. 

Instructor in Clinical Neurology, Medical School. 
Walfried Singer. - - - - 595 W. Harrison St., Chicago. 

Instructor in Harp, School of Music, 
Morton Snow. A.B.. M.D., .... 3914 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 

Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 

Herbert Marion Stowe, M.D.. - - 4433 Lake A¥e.. Chicago. 
Instructor in Operative Obstetrics, Medical School. 

Arthur Guy Terry. Ph.D.. - - 1812 Hinman Ave., Evanttoa. 

Instructor in History, College of Liberal Arts. (^ A 

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OFPICHRS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT. 31 

HcNmr Basoom Thomas, B.S., M.D., - 4705 Indiana Ave.. Oucago. 

Instractor m Clinical Orthopedic Surgerj^, Medical SchooL 
Royal Brunson Way, Ph.D., • - - 1633 Oak Ave^ Evaniton. 

Imtracior in History, College of Liberal Arts, 
Day Williams, 3010 Lakewood Ave., Chicago. 

Imfruclor in Violoncello, School of Mmic. 
RoBEBT Edward Wilson, Ph.M., - 1939 Sbennan Ave., Evantlon. 

Imtructor in hffaihematic$. Registrar, College of Liberal Arts, 
Elizabeth Raymond Woodward, - - - 716 Foster St., Evantlon. 

Instructor in Piano, School of Music, 

SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Alfred William Bays, A.B., LL.B., - 206 Deaibom St., Chicago. 

Leclarer on General Practice, Lam SchooL 
DwicHT St. John Bobb, A.M., LL.B., - 107 Deaibom St, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Public Service Corporations, Lam School. 
Ebenezer Washington Engstrom. A.B., LL.B., 1322 E. State St., Rockford. 

Lecturer on Voice Training and Forensics, Lam SchooL 
Charles Yoe Freeman, A.B., LL.B., - - The Rookery, Chicago. 

Lecturer on Corporation Practice, Lam SchooL 
Herbert Jacob Friedman, A.B., LL.B., - 164 Deaihom St., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Liens, Lam SchooL 
Charles Rudolph Edward Koch, D.D.S., - 87 Lake St., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Dental Economics, Dental SchooL 
Herman Durand Peterson, M.D., - 1800 Michigan Ave., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Anaesthesia and Auistant in Oral Surgery, Dental SchooL 
Charles Erne.st Pickard, A.B., - - Monadnock Bldg., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Tradc'Mark and Copyright, Lam SchooL 
Joseph Thomas Robert, - - - - 87 Lake St., Chicago. 

Lecturer on Parliamentary Lam, Lam SchooL 

TUTORS, ASSISTANTS, AND DEMONSTRATORS 

Charles Reeder Baker, D.DJS., - - 34 Washington St., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental SchooL 
James William Birkland, D.DS., 403 Willoui^ Bldg., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental SchooL 



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32 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

RoBEKT Alfred Black, M.D^ ... 496 29tk St., Oiicaso. 

Auktant in Clinical Surgery, Medical SchooL 
William Sherman Bracken, M.D., - 514 E. 47ih St.. Oucafo. 

Auiiiant in Clinical Laryngology^ and Rhinology, Medical School, 
WiLUAM Elmer Brenneman, M.D., - 281 E. 43rd St., Chicacr>. 

Aui$Umi in Clinical Neurology, Medical SchooL 
Fred Hugh Brosnihan, D.DS., . - - 515 E. 63rd St.. Oucafo. 

Demomlrator, Denial School, 
George Bassett Butt. M.D., - - - 5860 State St., Oucafo. 

A$si»lant in Clinical Medicine, Medical SchooL 
James Gray Carr, A.B., M.D., - - - 989 W. 22nd St., OiicaiP 

Demomtralor of OperaiiPe Obaleiric*, Medical SchooL 
Henry Wiluam Cheney, M.D., - - - 369 E. 63rd St.. Oucago. 

Asaitlani in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical SchooL 
Charles Roland Clothier, Ph.C. - - 385 E. Ontario St.. Cbicago. 

AutMlanl in Pharmac}^, School of Pharmacy. 
Bishop Albert Conkun. D.D.S.. - - 403 Jackson BlTd., Chicagp. 

Demonttrator, Denial SchooL 
Charles Henry Converse, D.D.S.. - 2481 N. 4fst O., Irving Park 

Demomtaior, Denial SchooL 
EujAH RocKHOLD Crossley, B.S.. M.D., 34th and State Su., Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental SchooL 
Norman Dixon Curry, B.S., M.D., - - 70 Sute St., Chicago. 

Demonstrator of Operative Surgery, Medical SchooL 
Wiluam Clark Danforth, M.D., - - - 70 Sute St., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical SchooL 
Edmiston Darragh, M.D., Winnetka. 

Demonstrator of Operative Surgerif, Medical SchooL 
George James Dennis, M.D., - - - % State St., Chicago 

Assistant in Clinical Laryngology and Rhinolog}^, Medical SchooL 
Myrta McKean Dennis, - - - - 720 Claik St., Evaniton. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano, School of Muiic. 
William Thomas Easton, D.D.S., - 3946 Cottage Gityve Ave., Chicago. 

Demonstrator^ Dental SchooL 

CharleI August Erickson. Ph.G., M.D., 2501 Wentworth Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical SchooL 
Neltje Beulah Flodin, ... 628 Univcnity Place, Evantlon. 

Assistant Instructor in Piano and Ensemble Playing, School of Music, 

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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVlEJRNMBNT. 33 

William Harold Finn, M.D., - - 2600 Wentworth Ave., Chicago. 

Ataklanl m Clinical Medicine, Medical School 
Chakles Marvin Fox, M.D., - - - 924 E. 5 f si St, Qucago. 

Auitkml in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Frank Doic Francu. A.B., M.D., - - 506 Welb St.. Chicago. 

AtiiilanI in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 
Harold Kenneth Gibson, M.D., - 5327 Washmgton Ave.. Chicago. 

Auiilant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 
Guy Aubrie Gowen, M.D.. - - - 2930 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

AuitUmi in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Charles John Haake, .... 604 Wikon Ave., Chicago. 

Auitiant inttrucior in Piano, School of Music. 
Albert Triplett Horn, M.D., - - - 476 31 si St., Chicago. 

AuiaianI Demonstrator of Anatomy, Medical School. 
Alexander Pnrup Horwitz, M.D., - 2441 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology, Medical School. 
Gretchen Huegin, Willard Hall. Evanston. 

Auistant in the Gymnasium, College of Liberal Arts. 
Edwin Janss, M.D., 282 E, 33rd St.. Chicago. 

Auistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School. 
Arthur Charles Kleutgen, M.D., - 6520 Stewart Ave., Chicago. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 
William Otterbein Krohn, Ph.D., M.D., - 42 Madison St., Qucafo 

Assistant in Clinical Pediatrics, Medical School. 
Andrew Vachel Louderback, M.S.. D.D.S.. 6624 Stewart Ave., Chicago, 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 

George Buchanan Macfarlane, D.D.S., - - 70 State St.. Chicago. 
Demonstrator, Dental School. 

Ons Hardy Maclay. B.S., M.D., - 34 Waihingion St.. Chicago 

Auistant in Clinical Laryngology and Rhinology, Medical School. 

Milton Mandel, M.D.. - - - 3104 Calumet Ave., Chicago. 

Auistant in Clinical Medicine, Medical School. 

Charles Martin Matter, M.D., - - 3137 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 
Auistant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School* 

George Henry Maxwell, D.D.S., - 6239 Cottage Grove Ave.. Chicago. 

Demonstrator, Dental School. 
WiLUAM Stewart McDowell, M.D.. - 6300 S. Halsted St.. Chicago. 

Auistant in Clinical Cenito-Urinary Surgery, Medical School. 

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34 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Thomas Charles McGonagle, M.D.. 5504 S. I-UIste<l St, Qucago. 

AtsUlanl in Cliniad Pediairicst MeJkal SchdbL 
Huston French Methven, D.D5^ 4944 Washington Av«., Oiicago. 

Superiniendeni of Prottheiic Technical Procedures, Denial School. 
Herman Gustav Milbradt, - - - 624 Foster St., Eyanston. 

Auitiani in Cerman, College of Liberal ArU, 
Frederick Richard Moessner, M.D., - 566 E. 42nd St., Chicago. 

Auuiant in Clinical Surgery, Medical School, 
Sarah Moore, 1300 Main St., Evanslon. 

Auistant Imiructor in Piano, School of MuMie. 
Albert Earl Mowry, M.D., ... 3505 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Auitiani in Clinical Ceniio-Urinary Surgery, Medical SchooL 
James Edward Murray, D.D.S., - 5016 Calumet Ave Chicago. 

Demonairaior, Denial SchooL 
Joseph Eugene O'Brien, M.D., - 6503 Cottage Grove Ave.. Chicago 

Auisiani in Clinieed Medicine, Medical SchooL 
Luther James Osgood, M.D., - - 6100 Norma! Ave.. Chicafo. 

AuiMiani in Clinical Medicine, Medical SchooL 
Rupert Mcrrull Parker, B.S., M.D., - 3603 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Auiiiani in Clinical Surgery, Medical SchooL 
Albert Fech, M.D., .... 3904 Indiana Ave.. Chicago. 

AuiaUmi in Clinical Medicine, Medical SchooL 
Frank Ellis Pierce, M.D.. - - 4751 Forrestville Ave., Chicago. 

Auitiani in Clinical Surgery, Medical SchooL 
Maynard H. Potter, Ph.C. .... 87 Lake St., Chicago. 

Auisiani in Chemisiry, School of Pharmacy. 
George Corwin Poundstone, D.D.S., 2250 Milwaukee Ave., Chicago. 

Quizmasier, Denial SchooL 
George Robert Puffer. D.D.S., - - 631 FuUerton Blvd., Chicago. 

Demonsirator, Denial SchooL 
Ernest Ray Reynolds, M.D.. - - - 553 W. 63rd St., Chicago. 

Auisiani in Clinical Dermaiology and Syphilology, Medical SchooL 

, Ernest Charles Riebel, M.D., - - 711 W. 43rd St., Chicago- 
Auisiani in Clinical Surgery, Medical SchooL 
Ralph Emerson Riley, ... 561 Willard Place, Evanston. 

Auisiani in (he Gymnasium, College of Liheral Aris. 
James George Ross, M.D., - - - 58di and Prairie Ave., Chicago. 
Auisiani in Clinical Ceniio-Urinary Surgery, Medical School* 



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OFFICBRS OP INSTRUCTION AND OOVBRNMBNT. 35 

Charuu Luther Searl. ... 576 W. Congreit St., Chicago. 

Demofub'aior, Denial School. 
George Wiley Sherburn. A.B.. - - 2114 Sheridan Rd., EvaattoB. 

Tutor in Engluh Language, College of Liberal ArU, 
Frank Eevward Siiopson. M.D., - - - 42 Maditon St., Chicago. 

Auisiant in Clinical Dermatologjf and S}^phUolgJf, Medical School, 
Kellogg Speed. MJ>^ . . . . tOO Suie St. Oucafo. 

AuisUxnt in CUnical Laryngologjf and Rhinolog}^^ Medical School. 
Brown Fred Swift, B3., M.D, - - 100 Sute St., Chicago. 

AstiUant in Clinical Ceniio-Vrinaryf Surgerjf, Medical School. 
Benjamin Waldberc, D.D.S, - - 51 Lincoln Park BM., Chicago. 

Superiniendenl of Proslheiic Lahoratonft Denial School. 
Harry Alexander Ware, M.D., - 204 Can St., Chicago. 

Demomiraior, Denial School. 
Charles Benjamin Younger, M.D.. - - 3659 State St., Chicago. 

AsttMlant in Clinical Laryngologj^ and Rhinologjf, Medical School. 



LIBRARIANS AND LIBRARY ASSISTANTS 

Lodilla Ambrose, Ph.M., - - Orrington Lnnt Libraiy, Evantton. 

AuisUmt Librarian, College of Liberal ArU. 
Adeune Maitland Baker, B.L.S., - - 1325 JudMn Ave., Evanston. 

Head Cataloguer, College of Liberal Arts. 
George Wiluam Grossman, - - - - 87 Lake St, Chicago. 

Auiglant, Lavf School. 
Mary Eleanore Davies, .... 3641 Ellis Park, Chicago. 

AuiMiant, School of Pharmacjf, 
Eleanor Worthincton Falley, B.S., - - 829 Forest Atc., Evanston. 

Cataloguer, College of Liberal ArU. 
Marie Hammond, A.B., - - • - 225 Kedzie St., Evanston. 

AsHiUmi, College of Liberal ArU. 
May Theresa Hillan, - - - - 298 N. State St. Chicago. 

Librarian, Medical School. 
Grace Estelle Lasher. A.B., - - 2422 Oiringlon Ave.. Evanston. 

AssiM'ant, College of Liberal ArU. 
Eleanor Frances Lewis. A.B., - - - 522 Church St.. Evanston. 

Auistani, College of Liberal ArU. 



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36 NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRfllTY. 

Jessie Wyckoff Marks. .... 3640 Lake Ave^ CUcago. 

Lihrarion, Dental School. 
Sadie Abia Thompson, Ph.B., - - 2135 Orringtoa Ave., EvaatloB. 

Auishnl, College of Liberal Arts. 
Ola May Wyeth. A.B., B.L.S., - 1714 Hinman Ave.. Evanslon. 

Cataloguer, College of Liberal Art*. 

OTHER OFFICERS 

James Casey, Ph.G., M.D., - - - 2431 Deaibom St, Chkato 

Registrar in the Medical School. 
Frederick Beers Crossley, LL.B., - - - 87 Lake St., Gucago. 

Secretary of the Lav School. 
Irving Hamlin, * - - Mutic Hall, Evantton 

Secretary of the School of Music. 
Charles Rudolph Edward Koch, D.D.S.. - 87 Lake St., Chicafo. 

Secretary of the Dental School. 
WiLUAM Henry Long, B.S., - - 2122 Sherman Ave., Evantloii. 

Secretary to the President, 
Effie Isabel Raitt. Willard Hall, Evaniton, 

House Director, Willard Hall. 
Gleason Fillmore Starkweather. 722 Emenoii St., Evanstoa. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds* 
Ernest Woollett, 497 Bowen Ave.. Chicago. 

Clerl[ in the Deans Office, School of Pharmacy. 



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THE UNIVERSITY 



ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNMENT 

On the last day of May in the year 1 830, there met in the Gty 
of Chicago* at the office of Grant Goodrich, 109 Lake street, near 
Dearborn, nine men, Richard A. Blanchard, Jabez K. Botsford, 
Andrew J. Brown, Heniy W. Clark, John Evans, Grant Goodrich, 
2Iadoc Hall, Richard Haney, and Onrington Lunt, to consider the 
founding of a university in the vicinity of Chicago. They agreed 
that **the interests of Christian learning demand the inmiediate estab- 
lishment of a University in the North-West,'* and appointed a com- 
mittee to petition the General Assembly for a charter. On the 28th 
day of January, in the next year, 185], Governor French signed 
the act that incorporated Northwestern University under the title of 
**the Trustees of the Northwestern University.'* 

The first Board of Trustees consisted of thirty-siz persons, twenty- 
four of them representing six annual conferences of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, four from each conference, their successors to be 
appointed by the conferences; the remaining twelve were "citizens 
of Chicago or its vicinity,** their successors to be appointed by the 
Board 

The charter provides, among other things, that the Trustees shall 
have authority **to confer upon such persons as may be considered 
worthy such academic degrees .as are usually conferred by similar 
institutions;** that the Trustees **shall hold the property of said insti- 
titution solely for the purposes of education, and not as a stock for 
the individual benefit of themselves or any contributor to the endow- 
ment of the same;" and that "no particular religious faith shall be 
required of those who become students at the institution.** 

The annual conferences electing trustees were given the right to 
appoint aimually two visitors to said University, who should be 
entitled to participate in the deliberations of the Boat^ of Trustees 

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38 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

and enjoy all the privileges of members of said Board* except the 
right to vote. The University was to **remain located in or near the 
City of Chicago, Cook County," and the Trustees and their suc- 
cessors were given authority **to take to themselves in their coiporate 
name, real* personal, or mixed estate, by gift, grant, bargain and 
sale, conveyance, vnll, devise, or bequest of any person or persons 
whatsoever'* and **to di^KMe of the same for the use of said insti- 
tution in such manner as to them shall seem most beneficial to said 
institution.'* The Trustees were restricted from holding at one time 
more than two thousand acres of land unless an excess were caused 
by gift, and in this case the excess must be disposed of within ten 
years. 

The charter provides, further, that the corporation "shall have 
power to employ and appoint a President or Principal for said 
institution, and all such professors or teachers and aU such servants 
as may be necessary, and shaU have power to displace any or such 
of them as the interest of the institution may require, to fill vacancies 
which may happen by death, resignation, or otherwise, among said 
officers and servants, and to prescribe and direct the course of studies 
to be pursued in said institution." 

After considering several kcations in the vicinity of Chicago, the 
Trustees selected for the University a tract of land on the shore of 
Lake Michigan, about twelve miles north from the heart of Chicago, 
and at that time n^oUy unoccupied except by an unbrdcen forest. 
Here the first University building was erected in 1853. About this 
location has grown up the City of Evanston, a beautiful residential 
city of twenty thousand inhabitants. 

The charter of the University was amended by an Act of the 
Legislature, approved February 14, 1835, which provides that "no 
spirituous, vinous, or fermented liquors shall be sold, under license 
or otherwise, within four miles of the location of said Universilv 
....," and that "all property of whatever kind or description, 
bekngmg to or owned by said corporation, shall be forever free from 
taxation for any and all purposes." This amendment also enlarged 
the Board of Trustees by the addition of four members, and removed 



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ORGANIZATION AND QOVBRNMSNT. 39 

all restrictions on the amount and kinds of property which might be 
held by the Board 

A second amendment to the charter, approved February 16, 1 86 1 , 
reduced the number of Trustees to be elected by each Annual G>n- 
ference from four to two, and provided that the Trustees so elected 
should perform all the duties of visitors. Provision was also made by 
which other chartered institutions might become departments of the 
University. 

A third amendment, approved February 19, 1867, changed the 
name of the corporation from "the Trustees of the N(»rthwesterA 
University*' to "Nordiwestem University," and authorized the Board 
to elect an additional number of Trustees, not exceeding twenty-four, 
without reference to their places of residence, but with the provision 
that a majority of the whole Board, including the members elected 
by conferences, should be members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. The corporation as at present constituted consists of thirty- 
six trustees elected by the Board and two elected by each of certain 
annual conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, four con- 
ferences availing themselves of the privilege of so electing, thus 
increasing the total number of Trustees to forty-four. 

The Statutes adopted by the Board of Trustees make the President 
of the University the head of the educational departments of the 
University and of each of them. He is charged with responsibility 
for the observance of all rules and regulations prescribed by th^ 
Board or its Elxecutive Committee, and is required to exercise such 
general executive powdrs as are necessary for the good government 
of the University and the protection of its interests. The President 
nominates to the Board all officers of instruction and requires of them 
a proper amount and a satisfactory quality of worL He is the 
medium of communication between the officers of instruction, either 
individually or collectively, and the Board of Trustees. 

The Faculty of a College or School of the University consists of its 
officers of instruction above the rank of tutor. The Faculty determmes 
the requirements for admission and prescribes the cburses of study, 
subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. It enacts and 

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40 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

enforces such rules for the guidance and government of its students 
as it may deem best adapted to the interests of the University. 

For each College or School, the Board of Trustees elects a Dean» 
who is the chief executive officer of the department, is directly re^ 
sponsible for the administration of his College, and reports to the 
President recommendations for its development. 

The University Council is composed of the President of the Uni- 
versity» the Deans of the several departments, and one member elected 
by each faculty. It considers matters of general University interest 
and questions affecting more than one college or school. 

« Degrees are conferred by the Board of Trustees, on the recom- 
mendation of the proper faculty. Recommendations for honorary 
degrees are made by the University Council. 

The Board of Trustees reserves to itself the determination of the 
general policy of the University, and the management of its property. 
It conducts all financial transactions, fixes the fees of students, deter- 
mines the salaries of officers of instruction and of all persons employed 
by the University, and controls all expenditures. The Business Mana- 
ger of the University is the chief agent of the Board in matters of 
finance. 

HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT 

The College of Liberal Arts was the first department of the Uni- 
versity to be organized. It was opened to students on November 
5th, 1855. It is situated in the city of Evanston, on the University 
Campus, with dormitories for women on Willard Hall Campus, 
conveniently near. The courses of study offered in the College are 
designed to afford a broad and liberal culture without direct reference 
to a professional career. They constitute a valuable preliminary to 
the study of Law, Medicine, Theology, and other professions, 
and also equip young men and women for the work of teaching in 
secondary schools and colleges. The curriculum leads to the degree 
of Bachelor, or Master, of Arts, or Science. Courses are also offered 
leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 



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HISTORY AND DHVBLOPMHNT. 41 

The Medical School was first organized in 1 859 as a departmeoi 
of the Lind University of Chicago, but was reorganized in 1864, as 
an independent school, under the name of the Chicago Medical 
College. In 1 869 it became affiliated with Northwestern University, 
retaining, however, its old name until 1891, when that name was 
changed to Northwestern University Medical School. It was the 
first Medical School in the United States to enforce a standard of 
preliminary education, to adopt the longer annual courses of instruction, 
and to follow a graded curriculum. 

The Medical School is in Chicago, on Dearborn street, between 
Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth streets. Its proximity to various 
hospitals and its immediate connection with Wesley and Mercy 
Hospitals afford facilities for clinical teaching of high order. The 
course of study leading to the degree of Doctor of Medicine coven 
a period of four years. 

The Law School was founded in 1859 as a department of the 
old University of Chicago. In 1873 it was placed under the jomt 
patronage of Nordiwestem University and the University of Chicago 
and assumed the name of Union College of Law. From 1886 tc 
1 89 1 the School had a separate corporate existence, but in the latter 
year it was reorganized as a regular department of Northwestern 
University. 

The Law School is in Northwestern University Building at Lake 
and Dearborn streets, Chicago, and has commodious and handsomely 
eqidpped quarters. The course of study leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws covers a period of three years. 

The School of Pharmacy was incorporated in 1886 under the 
name of the Illinois College of Pharmacy, and was made a department 
of the University during the same year. In 1891 the name was 
changed to Northwestern University School of Pharmacy. The 
work of the school is carried on in the University Building at Lake 
and Dearborn streets, Chicago. 

The course of study in the School of Pharmacy leading to the 
degree of Graduate in Pharmacy extends throu^ three half-year 



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42 NORTHWBSTBSRN UNIVERSITY. 

terms, and that leading to the degree of Pharmaceutical CfaemitI, 
through four half-year terms. 

The Dental School was organized in 1887 and three years later 
became a department of the University. In 1896 it absorbed the 
American Dental College and for some years occupied the building 
on Franklin and Madison streets, Chicago, formerly occupied by that 
school. It is now accommodated in the University Building on Lake 
and Dearborn streets, where it has ample provision for lectures, lab- 
oratories, and clinics. The course of study leading to the degree ot 
Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

The School of Music was organized iii 1 895, and two years later 
was established in a substantial building erected for its use on the 
Willard Hall Campus in Evanston. It offers extensive courses in die 
practical and theoretical study of music as a part of general culture 
and in preparation for a professional career. 

The Evanston Academy of the University, situated on the campus 
at Evanston, was organized in I860. Grand Prairie Seminary at 
Onarga, IlUnois, established in 1 863, was affiliated with the University 
in 1901. The Elgin Academy at Elgin, Illinois, chartered in 1839 
and opened in 1856, was affiliated with the University in 1903. 
These offer courses of study in preparation for admisnon to College 
or to a professional school, or for a business or domestic career. 

Garrett Biblical Institute, chartered in 1855 as a Theological 
School of the Methodist Episcopal Church, is situated on the Univer- 
sity Campus. It is on a separate foundation and under independent 
management, but has from the first been recognized as meeting the 
needs for a theological school in the University. It offers courses of 
study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divmity. With the 
Institute is affiliated the Norwegian-Danish Theological Seminary in 
Evanston. 

The Swedish Theological Seminary of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church is located in Evanston and offers a four years' course of study 
in Theology. 

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GROUNDS AND BUILDINQS. 43 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The University Campus in Evanston has an area of about seventy- 
five acres and is beautifully situated on the shore of Lake Michigan, 
about two miles from the northern limits of the city of Chicago. On it 
are the buildings of the College of Liberal Arts, Garrett Biblical 
Institute* the Academy, and the Cumnock School of Oratory. The 
School of Music and the women's d(»mitories — ^Willard Hall, Pear- 
sons Hall, and Chapin Hall — are on Willard Hall Campus, distant 
from the University Campus about three minutes' walk. 

A detailed statement of the University buildings is given bebw. 

The College of Liberal Arte 

Unhtnify Hall, a capacious stone structure of attractive architecture, was 
erected in 1669. It contains the President's office, the administrative offices of 
the College, the botanical, geological, and zoological laboratories, lecture and 
recitation rooms, and private offices of professors. 

Fajftrmeather Hall of Science, erected in 1886, was the gift of the late Mr. 
D. B. Fayerweadier, of New York. It is constructed of stone and red pressed 
brick, with terra-cotta trimmings. The front is 130 feet, and the depth 60 feet. 
At the rear are two wings, extending 34 feet, enclosing a court in which the 
povrer house for the building u located. It is divided mto two sections, for 
chemistry and physics, separated by a firq>roof wall. The mineralogy section 
of the museum and the mineralogical laboratories are oo the chemistry side of 
this building. 

Oningion Luni Library, a stately structure of Bedford limestone, was erected 
in 1893, largely from a gift by the late Mr. Orrington Lont, of Evanslon, one 
of the charter members of the Board of Trustees and for some time its president 
Its dimensions are 162 by 73 feet. The main floor contains a room for book 
storage (directly connected with a second book-room in the basement), the read- 
ing room, and the offices of administration. On the second floor is an auditorium 
with seating capacity for three hundred, a large lecture-room now occupied by 
the Art G>llection of the University Guild, recently donated to the University, 
and odier apartments for class, seminary, and office use. In die third story, 
which extends over the central section of the building, and in the well-liiJited 
basement, are rooms used for recitations and for general Univenity purposes. 

Dearhom Ohserpaiory, a substantial stone building, was erected in 1888 
through die generosity of Mr. James B. Hobbs, of Chicago, a Trustee of the 
University. Its length from nordi to south is 81 feet, and itsgreatest breaddi 



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44 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

it 71 feet. It incluiies a dome for the great Equatorial, a Meiidian Circle 
room, a Library, and eight additional rooms, the whole being arranged etpeciallj 
for conyenience in carrying on astronomical work. 

The great equatorial refracting telescope was made by Alvan Qaik & Sobs, 
of Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1661. It is fitted with driving clock, microineler, 
and other appliances necessary for first-class work. The dimensions of the 
E.quatorial are: diameter of declination circle, 30 inches, reading by Temier to 
five minutes, and by two microscopes to ten seconds of arc; diameter of hour 
circle, 22 inches, reading by vernier to tingle minutes, and by nucrotcopet to 
tingle tecondt of time; focal length of teletcope, 23 feet; aperture to object 
glast, 16J4 inches. 

The meridian circle is of the first class, and was constructed in 1867, by 
Messrs. A. Reptold & Sons, of Hamburg. This instrument has an object glass 
of six French inches aperture, and a divided circle of forty inches diameter, 
reading by four microscopes. In plan of construction it is like Beasel's cele- 
brated Konigsberg circle by the same makers, but has some recent improvements 
in the mode of illuminating the field of view, together with apparatus for register- 
ing declinations. Hough's printing and recording chronographs are used for 
recording meridian observations and other phenomena. 

The Observatory has a chronometer (William Bond & Son, No. 279), and 
three mercurial pendulum clocks. 

Old College. — ^This building, which was the first to be erected by the Univer- 
sity, originally stood on the comer of Hinman Avenue and Davis Street, and 
for many years was die only building which the University used for educational 
purposes. It was moved to the Campus in 1671, and was enlarged for the use 
of the Academy. Since 1699, when the Academy was transferred to Fisk Hall, 
it has been used for college class-room purposes. 



The Cymnasimn is a well-lighted, two-story brick building. The 
contains dressing-rooms, lockers, baths for men and for women, and a room for 
ball-throwing. The ezercising-room is 40 by 80 feet, with a height of ceiling 
of 20 feet, unobstructed by pillars, leaving ample space for die practice of indoor 
athletics. It is supplied with light and heavy apparatus for general gymnasbc 
and athletic exercise. 

The Central Heating Plants on the lake shore at the rear of the Gymnasium, 
has capacity for all the buildings on the lower campus and equipment soficient 
to provide for new buildings under consideration. 

The Medical School 

The Laboratory Building of the Medical School it on Dearborn ttreel, 
between Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Streett. It hat a frontage of 1 10 feet, 
and a depth of 105 feel; it five ttoriet above the batement, and it contlmctod of 

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GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 45 

cut stone and brick, widi terra-cotta trimmingi and interior finiihing of excellent 
naterial* and workmknship. On the first floor are the amphitheater, padiological 
museum, and the laboratory of physiology and biology; on the second floor, the 
laboratories of pathology, bacteriology, hygiene, and clinical pathology; and on 
the third floor, large laboratories of histology and embryology with three smaller 
rooms for original research, equipped with necessaiy apparatus. A large lecture- 
room, a room for chemical and physical apparatus, and the private laboratory 
of die professor of chemtstiy are ako on ihu floor. On the fourdi floor one-half 
of the entire space is occupied by chemical laboratories, and the other half by 
the laboratory of physiological chemistry and phannacology, with smaller rooms 
for research work. On the fifth floor is a dissecting-room, a room for demon- 
strating surgical operations, and three smaller rooms for special dissections. 

The Museum of the school, located in this building, is furnished with prep- 
arations and specimens illustrative of normal, pathological, and comparative 



DojfU Hall was erected in the sunmier of 1893. On fht first floor are the 
administrative offices and faculty rooms, a large amphitheater, an apothecary's 
room, an examination room for the director of the dispensary, and suites of 
rooms for the dispensary departments of medicine, surgery, orthopedics, and genito- 
urinary surgery. On the second and third floon there are smaller amphitheaten, 
and suites of rooms especially equipped for the departments of laryngology, 
gynecology, neurology, pediatrics, otology, ophthalmology, and dermatology. On 
the fourdi floor are the library and reading-room, and the suite assigned to the 
Young Men*s Christian Association, comprising an assembly-room and a gym- 
nasium with shower-baths and dreMing-rooms. 

Wedt}^ Hospital, a modem, well equipped hospital containing two hundred 
and twenty-five beds, under the patronage of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and controlled by a local board, is connected by corridors with Davis Hall. 
This institution has reached a high mark in hospital construction and is equipped 
with laboratories for sterilizing and preparing dressings and instruments, amphi- 
thealets, clinical and pathological laboratories, sunbaths and suites of private 
rooms, and with commodious, light, and well ventilated wards. 

•Law, Pharmacy, and Dental Schools 

Northwestern University Building, in which are located the Law School, 
School of Pharmacy, and the Dental School, stands at the south-east comer of 
Lake and Dearborn streets. Chicago. This property was acquired by the Uni- 
versity in 1901 at large cost and has been remodeled for the uses of the three 
schools accommodated in it. The Chicago offices of the President and the Busi- 
ness Manager of the Univenity are in this building. The Law School occupies 
the entire third floor, containing a floor space of some twenty-three thousand 

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46 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

square feet The quarters are comiiiodiout and handsomely equipped and inehide 
two lecture rooms, a court room, an alumni room, a students' assembly room, 
and several private studies; also a set of two hundred lockers and the usual office 
rooms and professors* rooms. The library and reading-room occupy five diou- 
sand square feet of floor space. The students* assembly room is spacious and 
well equipped as a place for rest and conversation. 

The School of Pharmacy occupies the whole of the fourth floor. The Dental 
School occupies the fifth and sixth floors, and the great clinic room and the 
anatomical laboratories are on the seventh floor. 

This building, situated as it is in the heart of Chicago, atfords to the schools 
located in it unexcelled advantages. 

The School of Music 

A/tisfc Hall is situated on Willard Hall Campus, a short distance west of the 
University Campus. It was originally designed as a home for the School of 
Music, and was completed in 1897. It is substantially built of stone and brick, 
with a tile roof, and finished in pine. The first floor is divided into fourteen 
teaching and practice rooms, including an office. The second floor contains three 
additional class-rooms and a well -arranged concert-hall, seatmg over three hun- 
dred. The hall is provided with a large stage, dressing-rooms, a grand piano, 
and a two-manual pipe-organ with pedals. 

The Academies 

Fisk Hall, erected in 1898, and dedicated January 28, 1899. is devoted to 
the work of the Evanston Academy. It is named in honor of Professor Herbert 
F. Fisk, who was Principal of the Academy from 1873 until 1904. This build- 
ing, die gift of Mr. William Deering, is Romanesque in style, and is a diree- 
story structure of brick and terra-cotta, widi stone trimmings and a tile roof. It 
stands at the soudi end of die Campus with a frontage of 180 feet on Sheridan 
Road. The woodwork throu{^ut is of quartered oak, and the heating, light- 
ing, and ventilating appointments are excellent. 

Halfidd Hoa3€t a dormitory for Academy bo]rs, was erected in 1890 and is 
situated on the University Campus. It was originally intended for College as 
well as Academy students, but during die summer of 1906, through the generosity 
of Mr. James A. Patten, of Evanston, it was remodeled as a modem and well 
equipped dormitory for twenty-five young boys. The rooms are for die most 
part in suites, consisting of a study and two well-lighted bed-rooms widi ward- 
robes. 

Grand Prairie Seminarp, at Onarga, Illinois, has diree buildings, an Audi- 
torium seating six hundred perrons, a Recitation Hall, and a Domulory lor 
women. The campus on which these buildings are situated consists of about six 
acres of beautifully shaded ground. 

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QROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 47 

Eliin Academy hat two well constniclecl bmldingi, ritualed in the inotl ele- 
▼«ted portioii of die city of Elsiii. The Main Building it a ihree^toiy brick 
sinictiiie wed for general clatt-room purposes. Lovell Science Hall was erected 
in 1888 through Ate generosity of Mrs. Vincent S. LoycIL and is used for the 
science work of the Academy. 

Dormilories 

WUlard Hall is a large edifice of substantial architecture containing, besides 
a chapel and other public rooms, private apartments for one hundred and twenty 
young women. The rooms are of good size, well lighted and ventilated, and are 
cheerful and attractive. The building is provided with fire escapes, and is 
heated by hot water. 

Pearsom Hall and Chapin HalU attractive buildingi of brick and stone, are 
convenient and well furnished homes for women. Each of these halls aifordi 
accommodations for about sixty young women, and is under the control of die 
Woman's Educational Aid Association of Evanston. 

Garrett Biblical Institute 

Memorial Hall, a handsome structure of pressed brick, was erected on die 
campus for Garrett Biblical Institute and was dedicated in May, 1887. It con- 
tains the library and lecture rooms of die Institute and a chapel widi seating 
ci^Mcity for about five hundred. The chapel vrindows are adorned with elab- 
orate designs m rich cathedral glass, in harmony with the ideal of the hall, which 
was erected as a memorial lo deceased professors of the Institute and of others 
well kwMvn for interest in theological studies. During the summer of 1906 a 
fire-proof addition of considerable size was made for the safe housing of the 
Archaeological Museum, which has been recendy endowed. 

Heei Hall, erected in 1867, is a dormitoiy for dieological students. It u a 
brick bmlding, five stories in height, healed by steam and lifted by electricity. 
The rooms are in suites consisting of study, bed-room, and wardrobe, and af ord 
comfortable quarters. 

Cumnock School of Oratory 

Armie Maif Stfifi Hall. — ^This building was erected during die year 1895, 
for vroik in elocution and oratoiy. The style of architecture is Venetian. The 
lower part of the building is of rock-faced Lemont limestone, and the uppex 
stories of buf -colored Roman brick and terra-cotta. The floor is of red tile. 
The building is heated by steam and lighted by bodi gas and electricity. It is 
named in memoiy of a deceased daughter of the late Mr. Gustavus F. Svrift 
of Chicago, one of die trustees of the University and the largest contributor fo» 
die erection of the building. On die first floor are an auditorium, reading-room. 



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48 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

and reccptioo roomt. Tke lecond tlory b dnrided into fifteen roomi for pn- 
vate insliuction. The iloon and partitiom are deadened by an inqproTed system 
of conttnictioo. 

LIBRARIES 

The libraries of the 'University are placed with due regard to the 
convenience of the several departments using them. The largest 
collection is that of the College of Liberal Arts, contained in die 
Orrington Lunt Library building on the Univernty campus. While 
designed especially to meet the needs of the various departments of 
instruction in the college, this library is at the service of all members of 
the University, subject to the regulations which apply to students and 
officers of the college. Persons not connected with the Umversity and 
desiring to use the library for purposes of study, may be granted 
library privileges if responsibly introduced. Besides the general collec- 
tion, which is increasing at the rate of about three thousand volumes 
a year, the college library includes special collections known as the 
Greenleaf G>llection and the Schneider Collection. 

The Greenleaf Collection was ihe gift in 1870 of the late Mr. Lather L. 
Greenleaf of Evamton. It contains 11,246 bound voltunet and a large and 
valuable auortment of unbound dinertations and monographs, chiefly poblica- , 
tions of foreign universities and learned societies. It u unusually complete in 
Greek and Latin classics, every author being represented by die best editioiis 
from die earliest to a recent date. It contains also a choice selection of standard 
works in German and other modem languages. In the subjects of history, 
philosophy, theology, and the fine arts, there are many works of unique value. 

The Schneider G>llection, added to die German section of the library in 
1898 throuflji the generosity of German citizens of Chicago, numbers 2333 
volumes. 'It includes many first editions of standard authors, original prints from 
the period of the Reformation, and a large collection of annuals (MtuenaU 
manache and Taachenhucher) of die eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

The Library of the Medical School, known as the Alvantd Lihrarf, u 
on the fourth floor of Davis Hall. It has been acquired by purchase, and by 
donations from students, alumni, and members of the faculty. It contamt a 
large number of reference books and dictionaries, and all of the larger systemt 
of Medicine and Surgery. Each department of instruction in the School ia 
well represented, and all of the more important recent works in die various de- 
• parlments of instruction are added to the Library as they appear. 



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^ LIBRARIES. 49 

The Law School Library is centrally located in the rooms of the school. 
The space devoted to it is divided into large, well ventilated, and well li|^ted 
alcoves, each alcove containing a table and comfortable chain. The library is 
well stocked with reports and necessary works of reference, and is being gradu- 
ally increased. Its equipment makes it pre-eminently adapted to work of in- 
vestigation. A fuller description of dkis Library is given on page 229. 

The Library of the School of Pharmacy is well supplied with care- 
fully selected reference books and the principal current chemical and pharma- 
ceutical journals. 

The Library of Garrett Bibucal Institute is in Memorial Hall on the 
University Campus. It has been collected to meet die needs of theological stu- 
dents, and is well selected and conveniently arranged. A rare collection of 
Methodist literature, the largest and richest collection in existence, was recently 
given to this library by Mr. William Deering. 

The number of bound volumes and pamphlets in the several 
hbraries of the University (June» 1906) is as follows: 

Bound Volumes. Pamphlets. 
College of Liberal Arts, including 

Dearborn Observatory 65398 4335 

Medical School 4.685 6,790 

Uw School 18.500 

School of Pharmacy 1.000 1,000 

Dental School 2.634 16,000 

Garrett Biblical Institute 19.913 4,150 



112,230 72,175 

In addition to the above hbrary facilities, students residing in 
Evanston have free use of the Evanston Public Library, containing 
39,917 volumes. In Chicago studento have access to the Chicago 
Public Library, 328,520 volumes; the John Crerar Library, 197, 
440 volumes; the Newberry Library, 179,967 volumes; and the 
Library of the Chicago Historical Society, 50,000 volumes. 

MUSEUMS 

The Museum of the College of Liberal Arts was for many years 
the object of q>ecial attention on the part of the late Professor Oliver 
Marcy. It contains many thousand rare and valuable specimens, and 
IS divided into sections as follows: Anthropology, Botany, Geology, 



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50 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Mineralogy, and Zoology. The section of Mineralogy is placed in 
Fayerweather Hall of Science; the other sections, on the fourth floor 
of University Hall, and in the rooms of the departments of Botany, 
Geology, and 2Ioology. 

The Seciion of Anthropology compritet about 8,000 tpecimeiu in aboiig- 
inal archaeology, and has been developed largely duough die interest of Dr. 
William A. Phillips of Evanston. Primitive ceramic art in the United Stales 
is well represented by several hdndred specimens from die monnds of Illinoii, 
Wisconsin, Kentucky, and Missouri. Primitive work in stone and copper is 
represented by large collections from various parts of die United States and 
from England. During recent years a collection of material from the clitf- 
dwellingi of the pueblos of New Mexico has been added to die Museum. 

The Seciion of Botany n made up chiefly of gifts received from ahmmi 
and friends of the college and of collections made by students and instmclors. 
It now contains about five thousand species. It includes collections made by 
Robert Kennicott from the Red River of the North; by Vasey from die Rocky 
Mountains; by Thomas and Bentley, and by I. A. LApham, from Soudiem 
Illinois; also collections from New England and New York, die Lake Superior 
region, and Cook County, Illinois. The Henry H. Babcock Herbarium, do- 
nated in 1867 by Mrs. Mary Keyes Babcock, of Kenilwordi, is systematieall> 
arranged, handsomely provided widi substantial cases, and contains species from 
all quarters of the globe, in number about ten diousand. 

The Seciion of Geology contains typical rocks from this country and Enrope. 
These exhibit die variations in structure and texture of die large groups of sedi- 
mentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks, and also show die rock formations in 
die geological column from the more ancient to the recent rocks. The series 
of fossils, bodi of plants and of animals, are quite extensive, containing char- 
acteristic fossils of the different geologic periods. The collections which ar* 
especially valuable are: 1, Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils, die gift of dm 
Smithsonian Institution; 2, Fossils and rocks from Illmois Geological Survey i 
3, Niagara fossils from Chicago and Racine, some of vdiich are type speci- 
mens; 4, Illinois Carboniferous flora, largely from Grundy County; 5, mis- 
cellaneoos, containing specimens from many parts of die ¥rDrld. 

The Section of Mineralogy contains specimens of most of die mineral and 
rock species in such numbers as to illustrate fully dieir characteristics and 
occurrence. Besides die specimens which have been accumulating in die mnseon 
for several years, are to be mentioned the Ayers loan-collection; additions from 
die Columbian Exposition, consisting chiefly of mass specimens and iDustratioBS 
of economic ores; die Tyler collection, containing many crystals, notably good 
calcites; and a rare collection of azurites and malachites. 



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MUSEUMS. 51 

The Section of Zodlog}^ contains (1) with few exceptions, all die mammals, 
birds, reptiles, and batrachians indigenous to Illinois; (2) all the mammals and 
birds of die New South Wales exhibit at the Columbian Exposition. The 
kangaroos and lemurs, the platypus and the echidna, the emu and the casso- 
warjr, die rifle-bird, the regent and the lyre-bird, and the apteryx from New 
Zealand, in all four hundred and fifty specimens, make a very complete pre* 
sentation of that strange fauna; (3) a series of birds and a series of corals 
from the Philippine Islands (it u diougjit that die species of cuckoos and 
parrots are complete for the locality); (4) a series of skeletons, mosdy pre- 
pared by Ward, including die elephant, the whale, the American crocodile, 
and skeletons of birds and fishes; (5) miscellaneous (among the larger animali 
are. the moose, the buifalo, the Virginia deer, the white bear, and die .rein- 
deer). In this section diere are birds from India, Central America, Brazil, 
Britbh Guiana, Norway, and Russia; a collection of fifteen thousand marine 
and fresh-water shells; a large collection of fishes donated by die Smithsonian 
Institution, also fishes from Lake Michigan, prepared by Dr. W. A. Phillips; 
and a multitude of low forms of marine life, collected by Professor William 
Nordi Rice of Middletown, Connecticut. The section contains about 30,000 



The Museum of the Medical School is arranged in the Laboratory 
Building and contains preparations and spedmens illustrative of normal, 
pathological, and comparative anatomy. 

The Museum of the School of Pharmacy is exceptionally complete 
in exhibits of drugs, chemicals, preparations, and apparatus. It is 
situated on the fourth floor of the Univernty Building in Qiicago. 

The Museum of the Dental School includes specimens of compara- 
tive anatomy showing heads with the teeth of fishes, reptiles, saurian3, 
and the several orders of mammals; an exceptionally complete and 
valuable set of specimens of die human skull, with dissections in a 
series showing the development of die teeth and their roots from their 
first appearance to the fuU development of the adult There is also 
a large collection of abnormal formations of the human teeth, collected 
in the school by students and alumni, or donated by members of the 
dental profession. 



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62 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

THE UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT 

An asiociatioii composed of alimmi and friends of the Univentty 
maintains, in Chicago, a social setdement known as the Northwesteni 
University Setdement. The building in which the work is carried on 
is at the comer of Augusta and Noble streets, and b held in trust by 
the University for the use of the Setdement It is a four-story brick 
structure, 60x78 feet, looking south upon two small gardens and 
having a q>ace 30x78 feet on the north for an auditorium, gynv 
nasium, and baths. On the ground floor are the kindergarten, men's 
club rooms, and boiler room. The main floor contains the kitchoi, 
coffee house, rec^tion room, ofiice and library. Five large connected 
club rooms, one of which is the house dining-room, and the domestic 
science and serving rooms occupy the second floor. The third floor 
contains rooms for thirteen residents. 

The object, like that of Oxford House and Toynbee Hall in Lon- 
don, the Andover House in Boston, and similar institutions in other 
cities, is the intellectual, social, and religious improvement of the 
neglected city population. The settlement is located on the edge of the 
large Polish quarter of the city, and in the heart of the most densely 
populated district in Chicago. Tlie resident group is composed of men 
and women engaged in educational, professional, and public service 
who wish to live among the people bearing die heaviest burden of 
the industrial wodd. Opportimity is here offered to undergraduates 
for philanthropic work and practical acquaintance with sociological 
problems. The plan of work includes classes for instruction, clubs 
for social improvement, lectures, concerts, house-to-house visitation, 
legal and medical dispensaries, and the maintenance of an <^pen read- 
ing room. Ejq>enses are met by membership subscriptions and 
voluntary contributions. 



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THE UNIVERSITY GUILD. 53 

PUBLIC LECTURES, CONCERTS, EVENING COURSES, ETC. 

In addition to the regular courses of instruction announced b 
subsequent pages of this catalogue, there are many lectures and even- 
ing courses and concerts given under the auspices of the University 
and its various organizations, open to students and to the general 
public 

The N, W, Hanu Lecturer — ^Thesc lectures are ^iven aniiually under an 
endowment establiilied by Mr. N. W. Harris of Chicago. In his letter of 
gift the donor expressed the desire "diat the fund should be used to stimulate 
scientific research of the highest Ijrpe and to bring die result of such research 
before the students and friends of Northwestern University, and through them 
before the world.** The term ''scientific research'* was interpreted as meaning 
''scholarly investigation into any department of human diought or effort, with- 
out limitation to research in the so-called natural sciences, but with a desire 
diat such investigation should be extended to cover the Mrhole field of human 
knowledge.** The lectures given on this foundation are published by the Uni- 
versity or otherwise. 

The first course of N. W. Harris lectures will be delivered in May, 1907, 
by Professor Borden P. Boivne, LL.D., of Boston University, on the subject 
"Pertonalism." 

Lecfures on Legal Tactics — ^A series of lectures delivered annually on Mon- 
day evenings in Hurd Hall of the Law School Rooms, and open to all per- 
sons interested in the practice of law. The lectures are given by prominent 
members of die Chicago Bar and others who have made a special study of 
the subjects of which diey speak. The series for 1906-07 is as follows: 
Acquisition and Retention of a Clientage. Mr. John S. Miller. 
Selection and Management of a Jury. Mr. James M. Sheean. 
Examination of Witnesses. Mr. Amos C. Miller. 
Preparation of a Case for Trial, with particular Reference to Chancery. Mr. 

George A. Follansbee. 
The Lawyer's Mistakes as Seen by a Physician. Dr. Archibald Church. 
Methods of Keeping and Using County Records. Mr. Abel Davis. 
Life and Benefit Insurance Practice. Mr. Charles J. Kavanagh. 
Bankruptcy Practice. Mr. W. Tudor ApMadoc. 
Practice in Surety and Indemnity Cases. Mr. Frederic F. Norcross. 
Practice Under the Torrens System of Land Titles. Professor Charles G 

Little. 
Practice and Pleading Under the Illinois Statutes. Mr. Keene H. Addington. 
Ways and Manners of the Legislature in Ite Law-Making. Mr. William H 

CnmJ^t^L MrHanyOlnm. o.^zedbyGoOgle 



54 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Methods of Keeping and Using Judicial Records. Mr. John H. Best. 

Wajrs and Manners of Judges. The Honorable Charles G. Neely. 

Appellate G>urt Practice. Mr. John A. Rose. 

Common Sense in F.xamining Land Titles. Mr. Harrison B. Riley. 

Trial of Assumpsit Suits. Mr. John G. Campbell. 

Practice Before Masters in Chancery. Mr. Thomas Taylor, Jr. 

The Art of Writing Briefs and Making Legal Arguments. Mr. William K 

Lowrey. 
The Trial of a Celebrated Criminal Case. Mr. William S. Forrest. 

Ariuis Series of Concerlt in the School of Music — ^These concerts are 
given under die auspices of the School of Music and are open to die public 
at a small fee. The series for the past year included the following: 
Four Chamber-music Recitals by die University String Quartette. 
One Chamber-music Recital for wood-wind instruments by players from die 

Tlieodore Thomas Orchestra. 
Song Recital by Mr. Glen Hall. 
Song Recital by Mr. Ellison Van Hoose. 
Violoncello Recital by Mr. Bruno Steindel. 

Baccalaureate Sermon. (1906). Reverend Timothy Prescott Frost, D.D., o* 
Evanslon. 

Commencement Address. (1906). Honorable Stewart Lyndon Woodford, 
LL.D., former United States Minister to Spain. 

Address on the Da^ of Prayer for Colleges. (1907). Reverend William F. 
Anderson, LL.D., of New York. 

Address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society^. (1906). Professor Gustav E. Kaf 
sten, Ph.D. Subject: Folklore, a Field for Scholarship and Patriotina. 

IVashingtons Birthday Address — The Fisher-folk of the Labrador Coast. Dr. 
Wilfred T. Grenfell. 

Lectures before the University Guild — A series of lectures on art topics is 
delivered annually before the members of die University Guild and their in- 
vited friends. The lectures for 1906-07 were as follo%irs: 

1. Literature and Liberal Culture. Professor Edward Howard Griggs. 

2. Henrik Ibsen. Dr. William Norman Guthrie. 

3. An Appreciation of Chicago Artists. Mr. Ralph Clarkson. 

4. Tlwmas Hardy and the Realists. Mr. Edwin L. Shuman. 

5. The Early Dramas of Maeterlinck. Professor E. P. Baillot. 

6. The Flag of Nature. Mr. Enos A. Mills. 

7. The Drama as a Social Force. Dr. Richard Burton. 

8. Robert Bums. Dr. William R. CoIIedge. 

9. Hauptmann*s The Sunken Bell. Dr. Nathaniel I. Rubin|jji^(^oOQlc 



PUBLIC LBCTURBS, CONCERTS, BTC. 66 

Leelare9 htfort the Sigma Xi 5ociei>— 

U InvctdgatioE Worth While? Profenor Edward L. Nichob of Comell 
Unhrernty. 

The Solar Obtervatory at Mount Wilsoa. California. Profeisor Georgo £. 
Hale of the Carnegie Institution. 

The Habits of Nest-building Fishes. Professor Jacob Reighard of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Student Lecture Course^A series of five public lectures and concerts given 
annually under the auspices of the College Young Men's Christian Association. 

Lecturet before the CraJuate Club of the College of Liberal ArtM — 
Science and Culture. Professor W. F. Magie of Princeton Univeruty. 
Graduate Study in Geimany Fifty Years Ago. Professor Daniel Boobrif^ 
Graduate Study in Germany and America; a comparison. Professor Gustav 
E. Karsten. 

Lecture on the Juvenile Court of Denver, Co/orado— The Honorable Ben 
B. Undsey. 

Lecture before the Aleph Teth Nun Society — Social Reform. Mr. Abra- 
ham Bisao. 

Abanni Clinic at the Dental School — ^An annual clinic is given under the 
auspices of the Alumni Association of the Dental School tvhich is open to all 
membeis of the dental profession. This is participated in by members of the 
Dental School faculty and alumni and is intended to present the most recent 
resulta of dental investigation. 



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56 NORTHWDSTHRN UNIVERSITY. 

THE U>4IVERSrrY GUILD 

The University Guild is an association of women, for the most 
part residents of Evanston, who seek to secure for the University 
valuable works of art and to cultivate, by means of frequent lectures 
and discussions, artistic taste and sentiment in matters of common 
life. The Guild holds monthly meetings in its rooms in Onington 
Lunt Libhiry, and the Guild rooms are open to the public eveiy 
Wednesday afternoon throughout the year. 

The Art Collection already lecured by the Guild it valued at leveral dioa- 
tand dollan. It containi a fine collection of pottery and porcelain, including 
handtome specimens of Doulton, Royal Worcester, Wedgewood, GMJport, 
Elton, Royal Berlin, Royal G>penhagen, Royal Vienna, Hungarian, Russian, 
Spanish, Royal Sevres, Limoges, Italian, Chinese, Delft, Rookwood, and Bul- 
garian ware. There are fifteen specimens of Doulton ware, including the 
famous Lambedi Faience Vase, six feet three inches in hei^t, and two feel 
six inches in diameter. There are handsome specimens of French bronze and 
of Venetian and Bohemian glass. The collection also includes some fine plaster 
casts presented by the French Government, twenty busts of eminent scholars, 
Thorwaldsen's Mercury, Venus, Hebe, and the Shepherdess. 



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THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

EVANSTON. 



FACULTY 



Abkam Wincgardner Harris, Sc.D^ LL.D., PreaidenL 

Thomas Frankun Holgate, Ph-D^ LL.D., Dean, Henry S. Noyes Pro' 

ftuof o/ MaAematk*. 
Daniel Bonbright» A.M., LL.D^ Dean EmeriUu, John Eiraru Profettar 

of Latin Laniuagt and Literaiure, 
Herrert Frankun Fisk, D.D.. LL.D., Profeuor of Pedagogy. 
Robert McLean Cumnock, A.M., L.H.D., Profeuor of Rhetoric and 

Elocution, 
Abram Van Epps Young, Ph.B^ Profeuor of Chemiilry. 
George Washington Hough, A.M., LL.D., Profeuor of Astronomy and 

Director of Dearborn Observatory, 
James Taft Hatfield. PhD., Profeuor of German Language and Liierature, 
Charles Beach Atwell, Ph.M., Profeuor of Botany, 
Henry Crew, Ph.D.. Fayerwfeather Professor of Physics, 
J. Scott Clark, LiT.Dn Profeuor of English Language, 
John Henry Gray. Ph.D.. Profeuor of Political and Social Science, 
Peter Christian Lutkin, Mus.D., Professor of Music, 
George Albert Coe, Ph.D., John Evans Profeuor of Moral and Intellectual 

Philosophy. 
William Albert Locy, Ph.D., Sc.D., Profeuor of Zoology, 
GlORCl Oliver Curme, A.M., Professor of Germanic Philology, 
James Alton James, Ph.D., Profeuor of History, 
*Edouard Paul Baillot, L.H.D., Professor of Romance Languages, 
Amos Williams Patten, A.M., D.D., Professor of Biblical Instruction, 
Ulysses Sherman Grant, Ph.D., fVUliam Deering Professor of Ceolo0. 
John Adams Scott, Ph.D., Professor of Creek Language and Literature, 
Arthur Herbert Wilde, Ph.D., Professor of History. 



*Oii Imcf of ehomeo. 

67 



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58 NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVERSITY. 

Arthur Charles Lewis Brown, Ph.D., Profeuor of Engluh Uieraiurt. 

Norman Dwight Harris. Ph.D., Professor of European DiplomaUc H'ulmy. 

OuN Hanson Basquin. Ph.D., AssoeiaU Professor of Physks. 

Walter Doll Scott, Ph.D., AssockU Professor of Psj^hology and Edaeation. 

Mary Ross Potter, A.M., Dean of Women* 

Theodore Whtttelsey, Ph.D., AuocmU Professor of Chemistjf, 

Omera Floyd Long, Ph.D., AuocuU Professor of Latin. 

Robert Richardson Tatnall, Ph.D., Assisiani Professor of Physics, 

WiLLARD Eugene Hotchkiss, Ph.D., AssUlant Professor of Economics, 

Walter Libby, Ph.D., Assislant Professor of Education. 

David Raymond Curtiss, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Harold Clark Goddard, PhD., Auistani Professor of English Literature. 

James Walter Goldthwatt, Ph.D., Asnsiant Professor of Geology. 

Lewis Oscar Gillesby, Auistani Profeuor of Phifsical Culture and Director 

of Athletics. 
Herbert Covert Keppel, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Georg Edward, Instructor in German. 
John Price Odell, A.B., Instructor m English Language, 
Robert Edward Wilson, Ph.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 
*WiLLiAM Abbott Olofather, A.M., Instructor in Latin and Creek. 
Herman Churchill, A.M., Instructor in English Language. 
Eugene Howard Harper, Ph.D., Instructor in ZoSlogi^. 
Royal Brunson Way, Ph.D., Instructor in Historic. 
Juuus William Adolphe Kuhne, A.M., Instructor in French. 
Alphonse de Salvk), Ph.D., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
Roy Caston Fuckinger, Ph.D., Instructor in Creek and Latin. 
Bernard Capen Ewer, Ph.D., Instructor in Philosophy. 
James Caddell Morehead, Ph.D.. Instructor in Matiiematics. 
Frederick Shipp Dubler, A.M., Instructor m Economics. 
Arthur Guy Terry, Ph.D., Instructor in Ifistory. 
Stuart Pratt Sherman, Ph.D., Instructor in English Literature. 
Axel Louis Elmquist, A.M., Instructor in Latin and Creek. 
Philip Harry, Ph.D., Instructor in French. 



*0n leave of absence. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 59 

Frank Axx>lf Bernstorff, A-B., Imtructor in German, 

Henry Martin Parks, B.S., Instructor in Ctolog^ and Mineralogy, 



George Wiley Sherburn, A.B., Tutor in English Language. 

Gleason Fillmore Starkweather, Auisiant in Shopmork. 

Gretchen Huegin, Auislani in the CymnoMium. 

Elizabeth Gaylord Hillman. B3., Reader in English Literature, 

Ralph Emerson Riley» Assistanl m the Cymnaaium, 

Gilbert H. A. Rech» A.B^ Auistant in VertehraU Zoology. 

Nathaniel Alcock, Demonstrator in Zoology, 

Elizabeth Willus^. B-S., Laboratory Assistant in Zoology 

Herman Gustav Milbradt. Assistant in Cerman, 



LIBRARY STAFF 

LODILLA Ambrose, Ph.M., Assistant Librarian, 
Adeune Maitland Baker, B.L.S., Head Cataloguer, 
Ola May Wyeth, A.B., B.LJS., Cataloguer, 
Eleanor Frances Lewis, A.B., As$istanL 
Eleanor Worthington Falley, B.S.. Cataloguer, 
Same Abu Thompson, Ph.B.. Auistant, 
Grace Estelle Lasher, A.B.. Auistant, 
Marie Hammond, A.B., Assistant, 



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eo NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY* 

AdmmUlralion : — ProfeMon Holgate, Bonbright, Coe, Crew, James, Locir, 
Patten, Young; ex-oficio, Profeitor Wilde, Mim Potter. 

Board of Examiners: — Profeiton LoNG, CuRME, Curtiss, Goddard, Hotch- 

KISS, LiBBY. WhITTELSEY. 

Undergraduaie Study : — Profeuon YouNG, Clark, Grant, Harris, Hatfield. 

Advanced Slandmg: — ProfeMon Grant, Brown, Curtiss. 

CraduaU Siady :—PTo{etion Crew. Coe, Gray, Locy, J. A. Scott. 

AdmUsion Requirements: — Professors Basquin, Curme, Dr. Keppel. Mr. 
Odell. Dr. Way. 

Delinquent Students: — Professors Holgate, Basquin, Long. 

Registation and Special Students : — Professors Holgate, Tatnall, Mr. WiLSON. 

Accredited Schools: — Professors W. D. ScoTF, Atwell, Libby, Long, Wilde. 

Academy: — Professors WiLDE, Atwell, Goddard, Tatnall, Dr. Way. 

Library: — Professors BoNBRiGHT, Gray, Hatfield, James, Locy, Young. 

Chapel: — Dr. Keppel, Dr. Fuckinger, Professor Patten. 

Fellowships and Scholarships: — Professors James, Brown, Grant, Hatfield, 
Whtttelsey. 

Loan Funds: — Professors FisK, Hough, Patten. 

Musical Organizations: — Professor GoLDTHWAiT, Mr. Edward, Professor 

LUTKIN. 

Social Life of Students: — Professors Clark, W. D. Scott ; ex-oficio. Pro- 
fessors LuTKiN, Wilde, Miss Potter. 

Gymnasium and Physical Training: — ^Mr. Wilson, Mr. Deibler, Professor 
GOLDTHWAIT; eX'oficio, Professor Qllesby. 

IVillard //a//:— Professors HoTCHKiss, Harris, Patten. 

i^ppotnfmenls:— Professors James, Atwell, Brown, Curtiss, J. A. Scott. 

Intercollegiate Debate and Oratory: — Professors HoTCHKiss, Clark, Harris. 



'Names ammced alphabeticaUy except the chairman . ^ 

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COLLEGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 61 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Candidates for admissioii to the G>llege of Liberal Arts must be at 
least sixteen years of age, and must present satufactory evidence of 
good moral character, together with certificates of scholarship and 
honorable standing in the last institution which they attended. These 
certificates must show in detail the studies pursued by the candidate 
m preparation for G>llege, and should bear the recommendation of 
the Princ^>al for admission to this College. 

Blank forms for credentials may be had on application to the Reg- 
istrar, and should be returned to him, properly filled out, at least one 
week before the opening of the college year. 

Either by examination or by certificate from an accredited school, 
aU candidates must give satisfactory evidence of preparation in the 
folk>wing subjects: 

( 1 ) AU the units described under Group A. 

(2) Four units fnmi Group B. 

(3) Three additional units ftom Groups B and C. 

The items in the groups indicate both the amount of work to be 
covered and the time in a good secondary school to be devoted to 
each subject in order to secure a unit of credit 

Qroup A 

I. EnglUh, Ths character and amount of preparation required it indicated 
in the program which follows, although the arrangement of the work may vary 
f ran uUi. 

(a) Language— Spelling, punctuation, grammar, paragraphing, the funda* 
mental principles of ihetoric, reading, practice in writing compositions based on 
the student's' personal eiperience. 

Certificates from accredited schools are expected to contain a statement from 
the instructor in English diat each student, before entering college, has written at 
least eight exercises of at least diree hundred words each. Descriptions of scenes 
or objects actually witnessed by the vrriters, narrations based on personal experi- 
ences, and arguments on specific questions will be accepted; rambling expository 
essays on broad general themes are not acceptable. Studenta without certificates 
nuiy present these exercises for inspection by the examiner. 

(h) Literature — ^The following boob are to be read. The student shmdd 
acquire a knowledge of dieir subject-matter and of the main facts in die lives 



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02 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

of their authors, and should practice writing short compositions on subjecta drawn 
from their reading. 
1907.1911:— 

I. (Two to be selected) : Shakespeare's As You Like It, Henry V, Julius 
Caesar, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Nif^t. 

II. (One to be selected): Bacon's Essays; Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Pro- 
gress, Part I; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Speeiaior; Franklin's 
Autobiography. 

III. (One to be selected): Chaucer's Prologue; Selections from Spenser'i 
Faerie Queene; Pope's The Rape of the Lock; Goldsmith's The Deserted Vil- 
lage; Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Books II and III, with especial 
attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. 

IV. (Two to be selected): Goldsmidi's The Vicar of Wakefield; Scott*« 
Ivanhoe and Quentin Durward; Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables; 
Thackeray's Henry Esmond; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; Dickens* A Tale of Two 
Cities; George Eliot's Silas Marner; Blackmore's Loraa Doone. 

V. (Two to be selected): Irving's Sketch Book; Irving's Life of Gold- 
smidi; Lamb's Essajrs of Elia; DeQuincey's Joan of Arc and The English Mail 
Coach; Carlyle's Heroes and Hero Worship; Emerson's Essays (selected); Ras- 
kin's Sesame and Lilies. 

VI. (Two to be selected) : Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner; Scott's The 
Lady of the Lake; Byron's Mazeppa and The Prisoner of Chillon; Palgrave's 
Golden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, with special attention to Wordsworth, 
Keats, and Shelley; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome; Poe's Poems; LoweU's 
The Vision of Sir Launfal; Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; Longfellow's The 
Courtship of Miles Standish; Tennyson's Garedi and Ljmette, Lancelot and 
Ellaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost 
Leader, How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aiz, Evelyn Hope, 
Home Thou^ts from Abroad, Home Though from the Sea, Incident of the 
French Camp, The Boy and die Angel. One Word More, Herve RieL Phei- 
dippides. 

(c) Literature — ^The student is expected to make a thorou^ study of each 
of the works named below, accompanied by practice in composition: 

1907-1911:— 

Shakespeare's Macbedi (or Julius Caesar); Milton's Lycidas, Comus. 
L' Allegro, and II Penseioso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America (or 
Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's first Bunker Hill oration); 
Macaulay's Life of Johnson (or Macaulay's Essay on Milton, or Carlyle's Essay 
on Burns). 

Time requirement, the equivalent of four hours a 9ee^ through three J^aors. 
it is expected that the English 9or^ will he distrihuted over all four yean of the 
secondary^ school course. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 63 

2. MalhtmaUe9-^a) Algebra, including factoring, common divisors and 
mul6ple8, fractions, simple equations of one or more unknown quantities, involu- 
tion, evolution, theory of e]q;>onents, radicals. Special attention should be given 
to the statement of problems in the form of equations. Time requirement, four or 
fipe houn a 9eek through one jfear. 

(h) Algebra, including a review of the previous work and a thorough study 
of radicals, equations involving radicals, quadratic equations with one or two 
unknown quantities, and equations solved as quadratics. Time reqiurement, the 
equtpalent of four or fcfe hours a week through one-half Jfear. 

(c) Plane Geometiy, including a coune equivalent to that contained in Hol- 
gato*s Geometry, togedier with the solution of a large number of exercises and 
numerical problems. Time requirement, four or /Eve houn a week through 
one Jfoar, 

(d) Solid Geometry, a course equivalent to that contained in Holgate*s 
Geometry, including numerous exercises and problems. Time requirement, the 
equip<dent of four or five hours a week through onchalf jfear. 

It is recommended diat the work in Mathematics in preparation for college be 
extended over at least three years of the high school course, and especially that 
work be given in this subject in the last year. A good arrangement is as follows: 
Fust year, four hours a week, algebra; second year, four hours a week, geometry; 
fourth year, four hours a week for die first half-year, solid geometry; second 
half-year, algebra, reviewing and making a thorough study of quadratic equations 
and radicals. 

3. HistorJf — ^Ancient History with special reference to Greece and Rome, 
West's Ancient History, or Botaford's Greece and Rome, or an equivalent, widi 
supplementary reading. Time requirement, four or five hours a week through 
one year, 

NoTB.— If a candidate eannot present a year of Ancient History, he may aubeti- 
tuto for H either No. 27. 28, or 29, as described under Group C. or a year of General 
History. Myer's or an equivalent 

* 4. Science — Physics, a courM equivalent to that contained in Millikan and 
Gale's First Course in Physics. The candidate must present evidence of familiar- 
ity widi the general prmciples of physical science, especially the simpler principle* 
and phenomena which are constandy illustrated in daily life, such as the pendu- 
lum, hydrostatics, water waves, pitch and intensity of sound, heat conduction, 
boiling, freezing, simple lenses, mirrors, prisms, magnets, lines of force, voltaic 
cells, gahranometers, eto. It n also required that a course of laboratory work 
shall have been pursued in connection with the text-book, equivalent to at least 
forty exercises from the Harvard list, or from Crew and Tatnall's Laboratory 



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64 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

MuuuJ of Pbjtics. and that accurate notes cleicriptive of the experimeati diall 

have been kept Tbn€ requiremenU Ave hoan a »ee( through one yetff, 

NOTB—If a eaadidate cannot present a Fsar of PhTsicai he maj solstitots for 
it eKher a year of Phsraiocraplu (Ma 22). a year of Biology (Na 28, 24, or 28), or a 
year of CiMinistry (Na 28). 

Group B 

NoTB.-nie candidate is advlMd to pxeaeot at least two units of credit in Latin 
A single unit of a foreign language wHI be accepted for enlrance credit only on con- 
dition that the candidate shan continue the study of that language through a aeeond 
year. 

6. Creei^ — (a) Grammar. White's Firrt Greek Book, or an equivaleBL 
Time requhremeni, four or five hours a 9eek through one year. 

7. Cree^^h) Xenophon't Anabasis, Boob I. II, and III; Jones's Gieek 
Prose Composition, or an equivalent, thirty lessons. Time reifuiremenU four or 
five houn a week through one year. 

6. Crcei^ — (c) A n abasis, Book IV. Prose Composition, lesions thirty to 
forty. Homer, IIKad or Odyisey, 1,800 lines. Time requiremenU four or f»e 
houn a 9eek through one year, 

9. Latin — (a) Grammar; Caesar's Gallic War, ten pafes, or turenty pafes 
of Viri Romae, with retranslation of English into Latin. TJine requirement, f»e 
hours a »ee( through one year. 

10. Latin — (b) Caesar's Gallic War, four books, completed; Latin Com- 
position. Ttme requa^emenf, /ivs hours a 9eek through one year, 

11. Latin — (c) Cicero, six orations, including die Manilian Law; Latin 
Composition. Time requirement, five hours a week through one year. 

12. LaUn — (d) Vergil, six books of die Aeneid. Time requtremenU four 
or five hours a week through one year. 

It 11 to be desired that the student's acquaintance with Vergil be not limited 
to die foregoing requirement. By private reading, as well as by sight reading in 
class, the Bucolics and a considerable portion of the Aeneid may with much 
advantage be added to die amount prescribed. An examination in Latin n 
appointed about six weeks after the beginning of die year, as a test of the suf- * 
ficiency of die student's preparation to advance with his class. 

13. French— {a) Correct pronunciation; elementary grammar, with exer- 
cises, including die irregular verbs; die reading of from one hundred and fifty to 
two hundred pages of easy French prose. Time requirement, five hours a week 
through one year. 

14. French — (b) Elementary grammar completed; easy composition, based 
upon one of the worki^ read; die reading of two hundred and fifty to three hun- 
dred pages of French prose. Time requirement, five hours a week through 
one year. 



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COLLEGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 65 

15. French— (c) Sluclf of the difficulties of Frencn fyntax and idioms; 
IransUlioB into French from text-book and easy original compositions; the read- 
ing of not less than six hmidred pages of at least fire standard authors; ability 
lo lake grammatical dictations and to understand and answer questions in French 
7*one requiremenU four or fipe hours a Bree( through one jfoar, 

16. Cermtm — (a) Pronunciation; die memorizing and use of easy colloquial 
se n tences; the rudiments of grammar (inflection of the articles, ordinary nouns, 
adjectires, pronouns, weak verbs, and die more usual strong verbs; the use of die 
more common prepositions; the simpler uses of modal auxiliaries and die ele- 
mentary rules of syntax and word-order); abundant easy exercises; the readmg 
of from seventy-five lo one hundred pages of graduated texts. 7*nne requiromonU 
four or fi»€ hour» a Bree( Uwough one jftar, 

17. Cerman — (h) The reading of from one hundred and fifty lo two bm- 
died pages of literature in dw form of easy stories and plajrs; translatioB into 
German of matter based upon woiks read; continued drill upon radimenii of 
grammar. Time requiremenU four or fiwe hours a »ee( through one year. 

16. Cerman — (c) The reading of about four hundred pages of moderately 
difficult prose and poetiy; retranslation into Geiman; grammatical drill upon the . 
less usual strong veibs; die use of articles, cases, auxiliaries, lenses and modm. 
word-order and word-formation. Time requirement^ four or f»e hours a we^ 
through one year. 

19. Spanish^a) Correct pronunciation; the rudimenis of grammar, inelud* 
ing the conjugation of the regular and die more common irregular veibs; sufficient 
translation from E.nglish into Spanish lo illustrate die principles of grammar; the 
reading of from one hundred and fifty to two hundred duo-decimo pages of 
graduated lexto. rone requirement, four or ftPe hours a week (hrough one year. 

20. Spanish— (h) Continued study of grammar and syntax; mastery of the 
irregular veibs and the use of moods and tenses; advanced oompoMtioB; the read- 
ing of from three hundred to four hundred pages of modem prose from dif- 
ferent authors illustrating the tendencies of modem Spanish literature; a unified 
knowledge of Spanish literature of die nineteendi century. Time requirement, 
four or fcfe hours a wee^ through one year. 

Qroup C 

Nora.— For ooorsas extendinff throoffh leu than a fuO year credit may be al- 
lowed at the discretion of the Board at Examiners, but in all each cases a unit of 
eiedit wHl require a total of one-thizd more work than that represented In the ordi- 
nary unit. 

21. A/alftema(ic»— Algebra, including ratio and proportion, variation, pro gres 
iioBS, pemiulalions and combinations, binomial dieorem, logarithms and tfamr 
appKcatioo to interest and annuities, introduction to delerminanta, theory of equa- 



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66 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

lions and series, as in Fisher and Sckwatt's College Algebra, or Hall and 
Kni^t*s Elementary Algebra, or a full equivalept. 

Plane Trigonometry, including the solution of oblique triangles. Gmsisttnt 
employment of ratio definitions of the trigonometric functions is eipected, also the 
ability to verify numerical computations. Time requirement, five hours a »ee( 
through one }fear. 

22. Phyiiography — ^A study of die subjects usually given in courses in phys- 
ical geograi^y — the earth as a planet, the atmosphere, the climate, the ocean, and 
the land. Emphasis should be placed upon the land, especially upon the topo- 
graphic features, their origin and their significance. Some recent text-book should 
form the basis for the course, but this should be supplemented by the stu<fy of 
maps, models, and the features of the earth's surface in the vicinity of the school. 
Time requirement, four or /Eve hours a wee^ through one }fear. 

23. General Biolog}^ — ^The study of typical animals and plants by laboratory 
methods covering the facts of morphology and ph3rsiology. This requirement may 
be met by a course such as that laid down in Boyer's Elementary Biology, or in 
Colton*s Practical 21oology and Atkinson's Lessons in Botany. In all cases spe- 
cial provision should be made for laboratory work, and accurate notes and draw- 
ings should be made by the student. Teachers in accredited schools reporting to 
the University should mdicate the quality of the laboratory work as a separate 
item, in addition to that of the class-room work. Time requirement, fcfe hours a 
Vfee\ through one jyear, including not less than one hundred and forijf hours of 
laboratorjf 9or^ and tvo class-room periods a wee^, 

24. Botany — The study of plants as living organisms, with special regard 
to function, structure, and relation to environment. Each recitation or quiz period 
should be preceded by four hours of laboratory work. Atkinson's Lessons in 
Botany and Bergen's Foundations of Botany are satisfactoiy texts. Each pupil 
should individually perform the experiments and demonstrations and should keep 
a neat and accurate notebook showing the work done by himself and the con- 
clusions reached. Time requirement, not less than one hundred and forty hom» 
of laboratory i»or^ besides two class-room periods a r»eeJ^ through one year, 

25. Zoology — One year's study of animal structure, habits, and general life 
hbtory will be accepted as a full item of credit for entrance, provided it has 
been done by the laboratory method. Conditions for undertaking this work vary 
too widely to make it desirable to designate either an outline or text-book. 
Teachers competent to carry on such a course for a full year will have dieir own 
method, and the material used will also vary. Colton's Practical 2^oIogy, and 
Parker and Haswell's Manual of Zoology (the latter for supplementary reading) 
will be suggestive. Emphasis should be placed on training in observation and 
accuracy in drawing and expression in the notebooks. Time requirement, not 
less than one hundred and forty hours of laboratory vori^, besides two class-room 
periods a weel^ through one year. 

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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 67 

26. Chemistnf — ^Laboratory work should be made an essential feature of the 
study, and this may well take one-half of the total time assignment. Careful and 
systematic notes of hii individual work should be made by the student. Some 
work in quantitative experiments is recommended as extremely desirable both for 
training and in order to illustrate the fundamental laws. Purely descriptive work 
may better be limited to comparatively few elements and compounds radier diaa 
be extended to a larger list with resulting confusion to the student. Time require* 
ment, not less than four periods a r»ee^ covering eight hours a wee^ of the slu- 
denCs time through one Tfear, 

27. Mediaeval and Modern European History^ — Myers's Mediaeval and 
Modem History, or an equivalent, with supplementary reading. Time require* 
menU four or five hours a week through one y^ear. 

28. English Histor\f — A study of the political and constitutional development 
of England. Lamed's English History or an equivalent. Time requirement, four 
or five hours a wee^ through one year, 

29. American History and Civil Government — Channing's Students* Histor/ 
of the United States, or an equivalent. James and Sanford*s Government in 
State and Nation, or an equivalent. Time requirement, four or five hours a 9eek 
through one year. 

Note.— It is recommended that candidates offer one or more of the units'of History 
as described above, as it is believed that better educational results are obtained by 
devotinff a full year to one of these periods than by scatterincr it over two or more 
periods. But until further notice a unit of credit will be sriven for a year's work 
devoted to any two of these divisions, or a unit of credit will be flriven for a year de- 
voted to General History. 

30. Political Economy — Macvane*s Political Exonomy, or its equivalent. 
Time requirement, four or five hours a weeJ^ through one year. 

31. Manual Training — ^Joinery, practice in making the more common joints 
in %irood vrith hand tools; wood-turning, die use of the ordinary turning tools in 
making various curved forms, cups, balls, etc. Pattern making, practice in jnak- 
ing wood patterns from which castings may be made, involving the study of shrink- 
age, distribution of metal, and various methods of molding; forging, practice m 
forming iron into various shapes when heated to die plastic condition, welding, 
and tempering. Woodward's The Manual Training School describes die usual 
exercises. If a laboratory manual is not used the student should write up each 
exercise carefully, as in other laboratory work. Time requirement, six hours a 
week I" ^^ *^*^P through ttfo years. 

In special cases, where candidates are unable to meet the require- 
ments relating to q>ecific subjects, but can present the full equivalent 
of the total requirement for admission, they may by vote of the faculty 
or of the Board of Examiners be admitted as regular students; but 

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68 . NORTHWESTERN UNIVBRfllTY. 

diis regulation will not release a candidate for a degree from any of 
the 4>ecified studies required for a degree, as described on pages 
71 and 72. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

The regular examinations for admisison to the G>llege of Liberal 
Arts are held on the first Monday and Tuesday of the college year, 
the dates for the year 1907 being September 23 and 24. Candi- 
dates may be examined and admitted at other times if prepared to 
enter classes at an advanced pomt in the regular courses, but they arc 
advised to enter at the beginning of the college year. 

The Board of Elxaminers of this College will accept, in lieu of its 
own examinations, those conducted in June by the College Entrance 
Examination Board. This Board, which holds examinations in June 
in Northwestern University Building, Chicago, is composed of repre- 
sentatives of a large number of educational institutions, and its find- 
ings are accepted by colleges generally throuc^out the country as a 
basis for admission. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Students from an accredited academy or high school may be ad' 
mitted to college on certificate, without examination, provided they 
present themselves for admission not later than a year and diree months 
after graduation from their schools. The certificate must show that 
the candidate has met all the entrance requirements as described on 
page 61 and must bear the Principal's signature recommending the 
candidate for admission. In case the preparation of a student admitted 
on certificate is found in the first semester to be unsatisfactory, he will 
be required to complete his preparation in a fitting-school or m sucli 
other way as may be designated. 

ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS 

On the recommendation of a standing committee of the Faculty, 
persons of serious purpose and mature years may be admitted to col- 
lege as special students to pursue selected studies. The work taken 

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00I4LBQB or LIBBRAL ARTS. 68 

1^ such students is under the supervision and control of the committee 
on Registration and Special Students. Applications for admission as 
special students must be accompanied by evidence of sufficient quali- 
fication to carry on the proposed woric to advantage, and m general 
special students will be expected to meet the full entrance require- 
ments. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students from other colleges seeking admission to this college must 
present evidence of honorable dismissal from the institution last at- 
tended. Official certificates must be presented showing the grades of 
credit for the subjects pursued elsewhere* also the number of weeks 
and the number of hours a week the req;>ective studies were followed. 
All students from other colleges must meet the regular entrance re- 
quirements to this college. The amount of advanced credit to be 
obtained by certificate from another institution is determined 1^ a 
committee of the Faculty* but no advanced credit will be given with- 
out exammation ezcq>t for woric done m an approved college. All 
claims for advanced credit must be made during the first year of resi- 
dence. Candidates for advanced standing are not admitted later than 
September of the collegiate year m which they expect to graduate. 

ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 

High schools and academies may be placed on the accredited Ksr 
of the University by action of the Faculty, upon the recommendation 
of the Committee on Accredited Schools. This relation implies that 
the certificates of the school properly attested will be accepted at their 
face value toward meeting the requirements for admission. 

Superintendents or principals desiring to have their schools placed 
on the accredited list should make application to the Chairman of die 
Committee on Accredited Schools, who will provide for a proper in- 
!q[>ection. The folkwing information will be expected m the letter of 
application: 

1. The names of all teacben, %nth a tlatement bodi of dieb ptepara- 
tion for teaching and of dieir experience as teachers. 

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70 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. ^ 

2.* The latett printed catalogue or annual report of the ichool, contain- 
ing an outline of the course of study and a list of the textbooks used. 

3. A careful statement of the methods pursued in teaching Mathematics, 
Languages, and Sciences. 

4. The amount and kind of scientific apparatus and die extent of library 
facilities accessible to students. 

The schools which are placed on the accredited list will continue 
to be accredited for three years, unless the Faculty within this period 
becomes satisfied that such changes have occurred as to make further 
inspection desirable. 

RESIDENCE 

The University makes no provision at present for the residence of 
men students, who find little difficulty in providing for themsehres 
comfortable homes in private families within easy reach of the College. 
Women students are required to room in one or other of die Halts 
provided for them, unless q>ecial exemption is granted. Willard 
Hall, the largest of the three women's dormitories, is under the im- 
mediate oversight of the Dean of Women, who lives in the building 
and associates with the residents as a friend and adviser. Pearsons 
Hall and Chapin Hall are in charge of an association of women resi- 
dent in Evanston, incorporated as the Woman's Educational Aid 
Association. This association considers the claims of all applicants 
for admission and has a friendly supervision over the residents of these 
halls. The lighter housework of Pearsons and Chapin HaUs is done 
by the young women residing in them, under the direction of a com* 
petent matron. In this way the expenses of living are materially re- 
duced. 

All women students, wherever they reside, are under die super* 
vision of the Dean of Women and are expected to conform to the 
general regulations prescribed for the conduct of those living m die 
Halls. 

Nora— For information reapectinar Willard Hall, letters of inquiry should be ad- 
dressed to Willard Hall, Evanston, niinois; and for information respecting Peanona 
or Chapin Hall, letters should be addressed to the Gorrespondins Secretary of the 
Woman's Educational Aid Association, Evanston, Illinois. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



71 



PROGRAMS OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDY 

The courses of study offered in the Q>llege of Liberal Arts are 
listed under the several departments of instruction beginning on page 
76. Much of the work there announced is elective, but certain 
courses are required of all candidates for a degree. These are shown 
in the schedule below. The amount of credit assigned to a course 
is expressed as one hour, two hours, etc., an hour of credit being 
given for the satisfactory completion of woric equivalent to one<lass 
exercise a week during one semester. 

As a condition of graduation, a student is required to complete 
one hundred and twenty semester hours of work, including the pre- 
scribed courses for either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science. Four years will usually be necessary for the satisfactory 
accomplishment of this work. 

Schedule of Required Studies 
Prescribed Courses for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



II. 
III. 



IV. 
V. 



VI. 



Mathematics Al, - - - - - 

[Note— Mathematica AS. five hours, may 
be substituted for this course.] 

Englisk Language A, - - - - 

Two of the following, of which on 

be chosen from the first two named: 

Latin A, Greek A, French A, German 

A. each 

[NoTS— If French or German is chosen, at 
least one course as advanced as Course A 
must be taken in College. 

English Literature A. ----- - 

One of the following: Physics A, Qiem- 
istry A, Zoology A, Botany A, Geology 

Al or B3. 

One of the following: History A, E, or 
EC Economics A or C Philosophy A, 



1st year 
1st year 

1st year 

2nd year 

2nd or 3rd year 
2nd or 3rd year 



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72 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



Prescribed Courses for the Decree of Bachelor of Science. 



II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 



VII. 



Mathematict A1, 

(Note— liathematics AS, five hours, may 
be Bubstituted for this course.] 

Eln^ish Language A, ----- - 

French A (see note below), - - - - 

Gennan A (see note below), ... 

Ejiglish Literature A, 

Two of tbe following, of which one muil 
be chosen from the first three named: 
PhTsics A, Chemistry A, Zoology A, 
Botany A, Geology A1 or B3, - each 
One of the foUoMring: History A, E, or 
BC. Economics A or C Philosophy A, 




I St year 



1st year 

1st or 2nd year 
1st or 2nd year 
2nd year 



1st. 2nd. or 3rd 
year 



2nd or 3rd year 



Note.— If a candidate has presented for admission to coUeg<ei Latin (a), (b), and 
(e), or Greek (a), (b), and (c), all work in either FVench or German may be oraittsd 
from this schedule, but in all cases at least one course as advanced as Course A most 
be taken in one of these langwagee in College. 

ELECTIVE STUDIES 

. In maldng up his program of studies for any year the student must 
give precedence to prescribed courses and in the order designated in 
the above schedules. Elxcept by special permission of the Committee 
on Registration, he must take, in addition to the prescribed studies 
for which he is due, elective work sufficient to make a total of fifteen 
hours a week. The choice of elective courses is subject always to 
the special regulations of the several departments. 

At a date not later than the registration at the beginning of the 
third year of residence, every candidate for a Bachelor's degree must 
aimounce a department in which he proposes to do major work, and 
also a department in which he proposes to do minor work. The specific 
courses constituting the major and the minor in die several depart- 
ments are listed in the schedule on the following pages, and they 
are also stated at the beginning of the descriptions of courses under the 
department headings. 

Students are advised to give careful thought to the plan of their 
elective work as early as the beginning of the second year. They 
may find it to their advantage to devote the whole, or a large part. 

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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 73 

of their elective time in the second year to the major subject Elective 
woric will be made most profitable by adhering consistently to a plan 
adopted (or each year* and a course once selected should be con* 
tinued through the year. 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Eveiy undergmduate student on entering college is assigned to a 
member of the Faculty who is to act as his adviser and give him 
helpful counsel relating to his college life. As soon as the student 
makes choice of the department in which he is to do his major work, 
the senior professor in that dq)artment becomes his adviser and should 
be consulted freely on all matters relating to subsequent work. The 
student is required to submit his choice of studies for each year to his 
adviser and obtain approval of the same before completing his regis- 
tration ; all changes in registration during the year must likewise receive 
the adviser's approval 



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74 



NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVBaiSITY. 
SCHEDULE OF MAJORS AND MINORS 



DEPARTMENT 


MAJOR 


MINOR 


Biblical Literaluie. 


year-hourt, which must include 
Course E. 


CourMs A, B. and D. 


Botaoy. 


Course A and six additional year- 


Course A and either 




hours. 


B. C or D. 


Qiemistry. 


Courtet A. B, and C. 


CourMs A and B. 


£coDoiiiict. 


Course A and seven additional 


Course A and three 




year-hours, which must include 


addibonal year-hours 




at least two year-hours chosen 


not taken concur- 




from CourMS D, J. L. and E. 


rently with Course 
A. 
Course A or J, and 


Education. 


Course A or J, and seven addi- 




tional year-hours, which must 


three additional year- 




include either Course F or 


hours not taken con- 




Courses G and K. 


currently widi Course 
A or J. 


English Language. 


Courses A and B, and six addi- 


Courses A and B and 




tional year-hours, which must 


two additional year- 




include one of the Courses C, 


hours. 




D, F, or H; and may in- 






clude English Literature D. 




English Literature. 


Course A and nine additional 


Course A and four 




year-hours, which must include 


additional yeai^ 




Course C or D, and may in- 


hours, of %vhich not 




clude English Language D. 


more than two yea/- 
hours may be taken 
concurrendy with 




^ 


Course A. 


Geology. 


Course A1 and six additional 


Course A! or B3, and 




year-hours, which must include 


two additional year- 




at least two year-hours chosen 


hours not taken con- 




from the C courses. 


currendy ivith Course 
A! or B3. 


Gennan Language 


CourMs A and B, and six addi- 


Courses A and B. 


and Literature. 


tional year-hours. 





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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



75 



DEPARTMENT 



MAJOR 



MINOR 



Greek Language and 


Courses A and B, and five addt- 


Courses A and B. 


Uteraluie. 


tional year-hours, not including 
Course N. 




Hbioiy. 


Course A, £, or BC and seven 


Course A, E, or BC 




additional year-bouxs, which 


and three additional 




must include Course R or S. 


year-hours not taken 
concurrently ividi A, 
E, or BC 


Lalm Language and 


CourMs A and B. %inth C or D. 


Courses A and B. 


Literature. 


and E or F, or their equiva- 
lents. 




MatKematict. 


Courses Al and A2 (or A3). 


Counes Al and A2 




B1, and six additional year- 


(or A3), and Bl. 




hours, which must include at 






least one C course. 




PhiloM>phy and Pty 


Courses Al (or A2). B, and a 


Courses Al (or A2), 


diology. 


and three additional year- 


B, and two semester- 




hours; or CourMs Al, C and 


hours not taken con- 




four additional year-hours. 


cur r e n 1 1 y with 
Course Al (or A2) 
or Courses Al and 
either E. C or L 


Physics. 


Courses A and B. and either C. 


Course A and two ad- 




H. or J. 


ditional year-houit 
not taken concur- 
rently with CottTse 

A. 


Romance Langnages 


CourMS A and B in French, 


Courses A and B in 




and six additional year-hours. 


French. 




which must include at least 






two year-hours in French more 






advanced than Course B. 




Semitic Languages. 




Courses A and B. 


Zoology. 


Course A and six additional 


Course A and two ad- 




year-hours. 


ditional year-hours 
not taken concur- 
rently with Course 
A. 



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76 NORTHWB9TB«N UNIVERSITY. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses of instruction offered in the College of Liberal Arts 
vary slightly from year to year, those listed in the following pages 
being the courses open to students during the year 1906-07. Fcnt 
completeness, courses offered in alternate years are included in this 
announcement, with a note to indicate in what years the courses are 
given. 

For the general regulations affecting a student's choice of studies 
reference should be made to pages 71 and 72. Special regulations, 
if any, governing the order in which courses in the same department 
should be taken will be found under the department heading. 

Any elective study not chosen by at least five persons may be 
withdrawn at the beginning of a semester. 

ASTRONOMY 

A — ^Astronomy; Meteorology. 2 hours. 

Tu., TL, 2. Profetior HouGH. 

A general course in Astronomy and Meteorology adapted to the needs 

of students with no previous knowledge of the subject Open to students 

who have completed Mathematics A I or its equivalent. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

Major: Course A and seven additional year-hours, including Course £. 
Minor: Courses A, B, and D. 

A — Introduction to the English Bible. 3 hourk 

Moun Wed., Fri., 2. Professor Fatten. 

First Semester. — ^How the Bihle came to be. The evolutioii of the 
English Bible. The English of the Bible. The Bible and English 
Literature. 

One hour a week is devoted to the careful reading of selected books 
of the Bible. 

Second Semester. — ^The Bible as literature. Lectures and required 
readings, vnfAi papers on the various topic* considered. 

Text used: The American Standard Revised Version, Moalton*s 
Modem Reader's Bible. 

Open to all students. 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 77 

B — ^The Goq)ei of Matthew. 2 houn. 

Tu., Th- 2. Professor Patten. 

Fint Semester. — ^A study of the Synoptic Gospels, with Mark as a 



Second Semester. — ^The Christ of the Gospels as the central point of 
the Christian Eyidences. A study of the sayings of Jesus. 
Text: Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. 
Open to those who have completed or are taking Course A. 

C — ^Biblical History. 3 houn. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 3. Professor Patten 

First Semester. — History of the Hebrevrs, from the Conquest to the 
Exile. 

Second Semester. — History of the Jews, from the Exile to the Chris- 
tian era. 

Text: Lectures, and required readings. Kent's Historical Series. 
Open to diote who have taken Courses A and B. May be taken con- 
currently with Course B. 

D — ^Acts of the Apostles and the Elpistles. 2 houn. 

Tu., Th., II. Professor Patten. 

First Semester. — ^The Acts of the Apostles. An inductive study of 
the era of Apostolic Christianity. 

Second Semester. — Selected Pauline Epistles. 

Text: Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges, with lectures and 
required readings. 

Open to those who have taken Course A. 

E — ^History of Rdigion. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 3. Professor Patten. 

First Semester. — ^An inquiry into the origin of religion, with a survey 

of the principal religions of the world in their rise and development. 

Text: Menzies* History of Religion, widi required readings and papen. 

Second Semester. — ^The History and Development of Christian, Mis- 



The main text in the second semester is Wameck's History of Pro- 
testant Missions, which is accompanied by lectures and required readings 
in selected mission history and literature. 

Open to dwse who have completed Course C or who have ninety hours* 
credit. 



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78 NORTHWBSTEaiN UNIVERSITY. 

F — ^Christian Doctrine. 3 houn. 

Houn to be arranged. Professor Terry. 

This course is given in Garrett Biblical Institute, and students electing 
it are subject to the regulations of that school. 

For Creei Nei» Testamenit see under Greek (Course N). 

For Hebrem Old Testament, see under Semitic Languages (Courses 
A and B). 

For Hisiofy of the Christian Church, see under History (Course L). 

BOTANY 

Major: Course A and six additional ^ear-hours. 
Minor: Courses A and either B. C, or D. 

AA — Morphology and Life-Historics of Plants. 4 hours. 

Daily, forenoons, six weeks. Professor Atwell. 

A summer course in Elementary Botany equivalent to Botany, 24, of 
Group C, page 66. 

The great groups of algae, fungi, mosses, ferns and seed plants vrill 
be considered in lectures, laboratory, and field work. Emphasis is placed 
upon the relations of plants to environment. The identification of the 
early summer flora will constitute an important part of field and labora- 
tory work on Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

Registration for this course should be made as early as June 20. 
Work begins June 24 and continues until August 3. 

A — Biology of Plants. 4 hours. 

Lectures, Wed., Fri., 2. Professor Atwell. 

Laboratory, Tu.. Th., 8-10. 2-5. 
Tlie course covers the biology and morphology of typical plants selected 
from the more important natural groups. Ecology and classification re- 
ceive attention during the months of October and May. Laboratory and 
field-work, with quizzes and informal lectures. Atkinson's College 
Botany. Caldwell's Plant Morphology. 

B — Seed Plants. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri.. 8-10. Professor AtweLL. 

First semester: Histological methods as applied to structure and de- 
velopment. Second semester: Morphology, distribution and economic 
uses of the more prominent plant families; the general principles of 
forestry*, the study of the trees and forests of the locality. 

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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 79 

Assistance and instruction will be given to students desirous of pre- 
paring an lierbarium or a collection of illustrative permanent microscopical 
slides. 

Open to tiiose who have had a year's course in Botany, or Course AA. 

C — ^Physiology of Plants. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 10-12. Professor Atwell. 

This course is experimental, and should be preceded by Course A or 

its equivalent, An elementary course in Chemistry is also desirable. 

Books of reference are provided. 

D — Cryptogamic Botany. 2-4 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor AtwELL. 

Comparative morphology of ferns, mosses, algae, and fungi. The cul- 
tivation in artificial media of bacteria of water, milk, and ice; the study 
of their physiology, morphology, and relation to fermentation and putre- 
faction. Tlie study of yeast in relation to fermentation; and of such 
lower fungi as slime-moulds, fruit-moulds, mildews, and rusts as to their 
life histories and morphology. Laboratory work, lectures, and field 
work. Books of reference are provided. 

Open to those who have completed or are completing a minor in 
Botany. May be taken concurrendy with Course B or C. 

PRIMARILY FOR GRADUATES. 

F — ^Advanced Physiology of Plants. 2-5 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Atwell. 

Extended experimental work upon definite physiological problems. 
Open to students who have completed Courses A, B, and C, and an 
elementary course in Chemistry. 

G — Special Problems in Plant Life. 3-5 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor AtwELL. 

Problems involving original work will be assigned to suit the needs of 
individual students. 

Open to those who have completed the major requirements in Botany. 



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80 NORTHWHSTBKN UNTVBRSITY. 

CHEMISTRY 

NOTB.— Coune A is introdiietory* and it» or its eauinJent, is prereqalBite to 
other work in the department. Courses B and C f oOow in sequence* but they may be 
taken eoncnzrently. Courses BC, D, and E are open to those who have oompletsd 
A, B, and C, but Course BC (a) may be taken concurrently with Course C For Coarse 
H only Courses A and B are prerequisite. Coarse G is designed for those who have 
completed the other courses in the department, and it is open to others only fay the 
permission of the instructor in charge. 

Major: Counts A, B, ani C. 
Minor: Counes A ani B. 

A — General Chemistry, Elementary. 4 horns. 

Qait work, Tu.. Th., 1 :30-2:30. Professor Young. 

LaboratDiy. SecdoB I, Ta., Th.. 2:30-4; Wed., 1i5(M. 
Sectum II. Mod., Fri., 1 :30-4. 
Section III, Ta., Th., 2:30-5, and one forenoon koui 
on Tuesday or Wednesday. 
Text and laboratory work. Those who have had a oonne in elementaiy 
Giemistiy, but not suficient to qualify for Chemistiy B, may, by taking 
Sectioii II, have the laboratory work modified so as to avoid unneceisary 
repetition of what has already been done. 

Credit is not given unless the full coune is completed. 

B — Qualitative Analysb; Organic Qiemistry. 4 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 1 :30-4:30. Professor WHimLSEY. 

Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. 

C— Quantitative Anabrns. 3 hours. 

Tu., Th., 1:30-4:30. Professor Whittelsey. 

First Semester. — Gravimetric analysis. 
Second Semester. — ^Volumetric analysis. 

BC-— Advanced Analytical Qiemistry. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor WHnTEL»Y. 

Selected topics from the following: 

(a) Qualitative analysis of commercial products and of substances 
more complex than are presented for analysu in Gwrse B. 

(b) Quantitative analysis, special methods for the analysu of tech- 
nical materials, ores, etc. 

D — Sanitary and Food Analysis; Analysis of Iron and SteeL 3 hours. 
Tu., Th., 9-12. Professor WHrrrEUtr 

First Semester. — ^Examination of water, milk, butter, etc. 
Second Semester.— Analysis of iron and steel. ^^.^.^^^ ^^ GoOglc 



COUJBQB OF LIBBRAL ART& 81 

« 

E — ^Advanced GHOse in Geooral Chemistry. 2 hoiin. 

Houfi to be amiited. PiofeMor . YouNa 

A oovne of reading on tomewluit edrenced lopice. The work Las 

been beted on Oitwald't Oatlinet of General Cheaitliy. 

G — ^Topics of Invesdgatioii. 

Credit and houn io be arnuiged. Profeiaor Whitteuey. 

Problems intohring original research in inorganic and organic chemistry. 

H — Organic Chemistry* Advanced Course. 2 hours. 

Hours io be arranged. Professor Whtitelsey. 

Leclnres. A syslematic stadjr of the synthetic rdations of the com- 
pounds of carbon. 

ECONOMICS, FINANCE, AND ADMINISTRATION 

NOTE.— Goonw A (either Al or A2) is an introductory oourse and most precede 
an other connee in the deiMotment except Course C CoorBes D, J, and L are more 
faiteneive and may well be preceded fay at least two courses in the department. 
Cioarse E is open to nndergradnataa only hy epedal permission and must be preceded 
fay Goazse A and at least one other full course of higher rank. It is recommended 
that a major in economics be accompanied by a minor in history. 

Major: Covne A and uc^ttn addilional i^ear'houn trhieh must in- 
elade at Uasi imo jfear-hoan choMtn from Caunes D, /, L, and E. 

Miner: Coarse A and Arta addilional j^ear-Aoan not laken concur- 
r»il^ milk A. 

A I — ^The Elements of Economics; Finandal l;;lktory of the United 

States. 3 howf. 

Mon., Wed., Fri, 10. Mr. DuBLfilt 

First Semester.-^An introducloiy oonrse in Eco n omi c dieoiy. Fetter's 

''Principles of Economics.** 

Second Semester.— The Financial History of die United States from 
1789 to die present time. Dewey's "Finandal History of die United 
States.** 

A2 — ^The Elements of Economics; Money and Banking. 3 hours. 

Monn Wed., Fri., 9. Professor HoTCHKlss and Mr. DsiBLfilt 
First Semester. — ^Tke work of the firrt semester in this coarse is iden- 
tical widk diat of Couse Al. 

Second Semester^— The eyn ln tion of money and die standards of va- 
rioos coimtrim; hanking fondmns, clearing booses, and systems of credit 
Scott s Awney and 



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82 NORTHWBBTBStN nNIVSRSITT. 

B — ^Administration. 3 hours. 

Mon^ Wed^ Fri., II. Piofetior HoTCHKIss. 

A courte in comparative administrative law and practice of the leading 
modem states, designed to familiarize the student with the development 
and actual working of the administrative machinery of government. The 
relations between central and local administration will be studied with 
especial reference to the division between federal and coamumwealth or 
provincial functions in the several federal states. The civil service, con- 
sidered comparatively for the several countries, and the development of 
municipal institutions during the nineteenth centuiy will receive particular 
emphasis. Discussions, assigned readings, and reports. Text-books to be 



C — Modem Industrial and Commercial History. 3 hours. 

Mob.. Wed.. Fri., II. ProfesM>r Gkay. 

The industrial and commercial htstoiy of Western Europe and America 
since the middle of the eighteenth century. The effects of modem in- 
ventions and political changes on trade and industiy. The course is con- 
ducted by lectures, with prescribed topical readings. One written report 
of considerable length will be required each semester. Course C .requires 
no previous training in Economics, and may well be taken before 
Couise A. 

D — PubEc Finance and Taxation. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 9. (First semester only.) Mr. Deibler. 

A comparative study of the Budget systems in the leading countries. 
Special attention will be given to the existing methods of taxation; justice 
and incidence of taxation. Adams* **Science of Finance** and Bul- 
lock's Select Readings in Public Finance will furnish the basis for the 



This course may well be followed by Course L in the second sem- 



E — Seminary. 3 to 6 hows. 

To., 2-4. 

Professor Gray, Professor HoTCHKiss, and Mr. Dedler. 
The Seminary is open to graduates and to a limited number of under- 
graduates prepared to make original investigations. No one will be al- 
lowed to register for less than three hours a week through the year. An 
undergraduate may not register for more than three hours except by per- 
mission of the faculty. 

Subjects for investigation can be definitely announced only after con- 



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COLLBOD OF LIBERAL ARTS. 83 

tttltalioii with diote wlio expect to take the work, the greelest liberty of 
choice being allowed each ttudeot. It is tuggested that the Seminary 
take up for a nuinber of yean different phaics of the general lubject 
of Public Service Coiporations, thui enabling the material gathered for 
one year to be more largely utilized in toccessive yean. 

The tubjecti for 1906-07 are: The Sugar Industry and Trade of 
the United States; and The Street Car Problem m Chicago. 

F — G>iiiinercial and Economic Geography. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th.. 9. : Professor HoTCHKiss. 

A general survey of modem conunerce as influenced by the resources 

and leading industries of different parts of the world. The effect of 

economic and trade conditions upon intemational relations. Lectures and 

reports, text-books to be announced. 

This course is given in alternate yean with Course M. Not given in 
1906-07. 

G — ^The Labor Question in Eun^ and America. 3 hours. 

Tu.. Th., Sat.. 8. Mr. Deiblek. 

A study of the economic and social conditions of the working classes 

in Europe and the United States. Factory legislation. Growth of labor 

organizations; strikes and lockouts; the open and closed shop; collective 

bargaining, and State regulation of labor disputes, recent laws and judicial 



Lectures, discussions, special invcstigatiotts and reports. 

H — ^Taritf History of die United States. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 10. (Pint semester only.) Mr. Deibler. 

The object of this course is to trace the development of the tariff 

system. Special attention will be given to the effect of the tariff upon 

American industries and the attitude of different sections and interests 

toward the tariff. Lectures, discussions, and topics. 

Students in this course may enter Course I in the second semester widi 
the permission of the instructor. 



I — Sociology and Social Reform. 2 hours. 

Tum Th., 10. Professor HonrcHKiss and Mr. Deibleil 

A study of the general principles of social evolution and pr ogress with 

particular roference to practical social problems. The best modem 

mediods of dealing with the dependent, defective, and delinquent classes. 

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84 NORTHWBSrnDRN UNIYBBSriT. 

J — ^Tnuiipoitatioii. 3 houn. 

Mo^ W«L, Fii. 10. Piofanor Gkat. 

A geaeml cooim ib the tbeorj okI haUny of TnasportatioD. Tlw 
development of the nilroad, iadudiiig onaniTarion, BAiiJigemeBt. unA 
oomolidalioiis; the quctlioii of »tet, okI |Mblic coalrol. Stele okI Fed- 
eral. Tke chief guidei tned m die conne will be Jokntoa*! American 
Raihraj Transportatioii, Meyer*t Railway Legislatioii, and die imblica- 
doBt of die Interttete Coaunerce Commtwion. 

L — Government Regulation of Trusts and bduitiial QMnbinationt. 

3 howt. 
Mon.. Wedn Fri.. 9. (Second temertar only.) 

Profcmor HoTCHKiss. 
Development of die Trart ProblcBk Relation between Federal and 
Stele power to regulate; Federal powen nnder ibe Inlerrtate and Foreiga 
Commfuce Clante; regulation tbroii^ taxing power; oontracti in restraint 
of trade. Stete corporation lawi; legislation wilb reference to indntrial 
and commercial combinations and consolidations. 

Stedents wbo expect to take dus coarse may well take Covise D in 
die first I 



M — G>l>nial Govemmente (or Gdoniet* Dependencies, and Spheres 
of Influence). 2 hours. 

To., Th.. 9. Professor HoTCHUSs. 

A study of die economic, social, and political conditions in ibe Enijisk 
and Dutch colonies and die oudying <fistricto of die United Stales. Rela- 
tion of European nations to ibe so-called 1cm progresnve peoples. Inter- 
ests of die United Steles in die Orient 

Given in alternate yean widi Cooise F. Given in 1906^7. 

EDUCATION 

NOTE.— Cooree A b an inteoduetary eoorae and shoold precede all other eoonee 
in the department. Gooieea B and J, however, require no preliminary eouree. Goorsfle 
C and D are alternating ooureee and^are open onlyfto those who'ere taking or have 
oompletadlGoorse A in Education or Philoeophy A. 

Mafor: Coane A or J and seven yeor-Aoars, mhieh mmi indadt 
either Coune F or Cour»e» C and K, 

Minor: Coaree A or J and Uiree addiSmai year-hooTB not fa(fn 
cencsvrenf^ miA A or J, 



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GOLLB}QB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 85 

A — Gcoerel Hntoiy of Educatum. 3 hourt. 

Moil, W«L, Fru 3. Piofcnor Ldby. 

This coniM k intended to lupply tncli knowledge of the relatioii ol 
intlitiitional education to the development of civilization and colture at 
it indispensable to a liberal collcfe training. At ibe same time it will 
serve as an introduction to ibe later coones in ibe dq>aftmeati especially 
to tbose diat deal more minutely wilb ibe bistory of education. 

Monroe's Text-Book in ibe tfistory of Education. Compayr^'s His- 
toiy of Pedagogy, Brown's Tbe Mating of Our Middle Scbools, Zier 
ler*s Gesducbte der Pidagogik are recommended for reference. 

B — ^Principles of Education. I -3 hourt. 

Mon^ Wed.. Fri.. 4. Professor FiSK. 

Lectures, readings, and discussions. Text-books; Compayr^'s Lec- 
tures on Pedagogy, Home's Pbilosopby of Education, De Garmo's Prin- 
ciples of Secondary Education, Tompkins's Pbilosopby of Scbool Man- 
agement, Lange's Appercq>tion. 
Note. — ^Tbis course may be taken as a ibree-bour course, or as a two-bour 
course (Mondays and Wednesdays), or as a one-bour course (Fridays). 

C — ^Thc Great Educators. 2 hours. 

Ttt., Tb.. 10. (Not given m 1907-06.) Professor Scott. 

Lectures, readings, and discussions*. 
First Semester. — ^Englisb Edu c a to rs; Locke, Spencer. 
Second Seme s ter—Continental Educators: Gmienius, Heibart 

D — ^The Great Elducators. 2 hours. 

Tn., TL, 10. Professor Scott 

First Semester. — Continental Educators: Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel. 

Second Semester. — Tbe more recent educators. 

In Courses C and D die best worb of some of die moet mfluential 

educators are read. Tbis material fumisbes tbe bass for lectures, 

papers* (fiscumions, and recitotions. 



E — General and Special Mediods. 1-3 hours. 

Tn., Tb., Sat., 9. Professors Scott, Fisk, Libby, and instncto-s 
in tbe several departments. 
Lectures, reading^ discussions, written reports, bigb school visitations, 
eiamination of text-books and apparatus, ete. 

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g6 NORTHWnSTBRN UNIVDRfllTY. 

Note. — ^Tliit coune may be elected at a one, two, or thiee-bonr coune ia 
each temetler. Credit will be given acooidtng to the amount of work done, bat 
only one semester hour can be secured from each of the sis groups mentioned below. 

Latin and Greek (first semester). To.. 9. 

Botany (first semester). Th., 9. 

English (first semester). Sat.. 9. 

History (second semester), Tu., 9. 

Physiography (second semester). Th., 9. 

English (second semester). Sat, 9. 

F — ^History of Modem E.ducation. 3 houn. 

Mon., Wed.. Fri.. 3. Professor LiBBY. 

Open to students ¥fho have completed Coune A or an equivalent 

G — ^A Study of Adolescence. I hour. 

Sat, 10. Professor LlBBY. 

This courM is intended for teachers and advanced students. Course 
1 is introductory to it. 

H — Pedagogical Psychology. 3 hours. 

Mon.. Wed., Fri., 9. (Second Semester only.) Professor LoBY. 
The aim of this course is to develop the student's knowledge of human 
nature so that later, in the class-room and elsewhere, his natural taci 
may have the support of a Simple but sjrstematic psychology. Among the 
topics to be treated are the impulses, habits, instincts, attention, the 
psychology of learning, the emotions (normal and abnormal), temper- 
ament, and character. Philosophy A ii a prerequisite. 

Audiors for reference — ^Angell, James, Ribot, Baldwin, FM. 

I — ^Introduction to the Psychology and Education of Youth. I hour. 

Sat. 10. Professor LlBBY. 

This course is introductory to CourM G and will consist of a series of 

simple lectures on physical growth, psychic development, conversion, 

adolescent feelings, adolescent diseases, motor education, eto. 

Philosophy A is prerequisite. 

J — Secondary Education in the United States. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 10. Professor LlBBY. 

This course is intended as a direct preparation for high school teaching 

and may be taken in conjunction with Coune E. Among other topics 

will be treated the history of our middle schools, comparison of foreign 

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COLLBGB OF LIBBRAX. ARTS. 87 

qrstems with oun, school organizadon, ducipline, curricula, hygiene, report 
of the Committee of Ten, report of the Coimnittce on College Entrance 
Requirements. 

Arrangements will be made for high school visitations with reports, the 
criticism of tezt-books» etc. Reading of recent educational periodicals 
will be required. 

K — ^Education from the Sociological Point of View. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 9. (Fint Semester only.) Professor LlBBY. 

This course will treat of the school in relation to the family, state, and 
other social forces, the relation of education to philandiropy and to the 
progress of civilization, the function of the industrial school, night school, 
refonnatoiy school, school for defectives, university settlement, along 
with that of special ihstitutions like Tuskegee Institute and the George 
Junior Republic. The seminary and lecture methods will be employed 
and the reading of recent books and periodicals required. 

Course F, H, or I is prerequisite. 

ELOCUTION 
A — First G)iir8e. 2 hours. 

Mon., Tu., Wed., Th.. 4. Professor CuMNOCK. 

Russell's Manual of Elocution and Cumnock's Choice Readingi are 
used. Instruction is given in the management and regulation of the 
breath; the proper use of the body in die development of vocal energy; 
the most advanced knowledge of English Phonation; the most approved 
methods of acquiring distinct articulation; the function of die natural 
and orotund voices; the application of force, stress, pitch, rate, quantity, 
and emphasis, and their importance as the dynamics of expressive speech; 
the use of inflection for the purpose of emphasis and melodious cfect; 
the fundamental principles of gesture and their application. 

B — Study of Masterpieces of Ejiglish Eloquence. 2 hours. 

Tu., Wed.. Th., Fri., 8. Professor CuMNOCK. 

The chief object in Course B is to establish die student in the best 

literary and elocutionary form, by bringing him in contact with the most 

perfect modeb. 

C-^Principles of Vocal Expression. 2 hours. 

Mon., Fri., 9. Professor CuMNOCK. 

Course C is designed especially for the year of graduation. Great 

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88 NORTBWBfiTBBK UKIVSR8ITT. 

ttren u laid upoD the aoquiutioB of perfect foim i 

oraloncal ackbett. TKe written prodnctioiis are earefdly 

the cUm inttnictioii ii mpplcmenled bj pewonal advice and critkna. 

D — -Bible, Hymn, and Liturgic Reading. 2 hocm. 

M<ML. Frin II. Piofenor Cumnock. 

As a retolt of the work in Gwne D, it ii eipe cl ed ihat the student 

wiU have the skill to read with melodioiis etfect and eipresove power. 

the Bible, hymn book, and litorgjr. 

ENGLISH LANQUAQE 

Major: Courses A and B and sue addiUonal j^eoT'hours, wlueh unui 
include eiwer C, D, or //, and maj^ include English LiUratare D. 
Minor: Courses A and B atul tmo addiiional year-hours, 

A — Rhetoric; Synonyms. Elight ^aaajrs. ' 3 hours. 

Mon.. Wed. FrL. 8, 9, 10, 11, 2, 2. 3; Tu., TL, Sat, 8, 9. 
10, 11. Mr. Odell, Mr. Chukchill, and Mr. Sherburn. 
First Semester. — A practical drill in the elements of good style. 
Second Semester. — Rhetorical imagery and synonyms. 
All students, unless excused by the registration commitlee, take diis 
course during die firrt year of residence. Students who ibow. early in 
the fint semester, that diey are seriously deficient in elementary English, 
will be required to take additional work in this subject for such time ai 
may be found necessary. No credit will be given for any part of 
Grane A, till die whole course, including the additional woric already 
mentioned, shall have been complelrd. 

B — ^Prose Masterpieces; Paragraphing. 2 horns. 

Tu.. Th., 9, 10. Professor Clark. 

First Semester. — ^A study of the diction and the distinctive charac- 
teristics of die great writers of prose. This work is continued till about 
April 1. in each year. 

Second Semester. — ^Paragraphing. Every member of the dass writes 
two themes a week. 
Open to those who have completed Course A. 

C — Versification; Poetic Masterpieces. 2 hours. 

Wed.. Fri.. 9. Professor Clark. 

First Semester. — ^A study of the mechanics of English versification. 

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COLLBOB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 89 

Second Scmciter. — ^A ttudy of the <iictioB and the dittinctnw chtnc- 
leriftics of ibe^ great poelt. Tliii woik begbt about Noronber 1, in the 
fint aemetler. 

Open to tfaoM wbo have completed Conne A. 

D — ^History of the English Language; Anglo-Saxon; Early English. 

2 hours. 

To., Th., 3. PiofeMor Clark. 

After revievfing the histoiy of the English language, the cUm takes 

up, briefly, the outlines of Anglo-Saxon grammar. The larger part of 

the year is devoted to the reading of selections from fifteen pre-Giau- 

cerian authors, from Bsda to Gower, inclusive. 

Open to students who have completed Gwrse A and at least one course 
in Geiman. 

F — ^Editorial Writing. 2 hours. 

Wed., Fri., 10. Professor Clark and Mr. Odell. 

Every member of the class writes two short articles eveiy week during 
the college year. 

Open to students who have completed Couites A and B. 

G — ^Biblical English. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Claml 

A course in the diction, imageiy, and idiom of die English Bible. 
For graduates only. 

H — ^The Longer Forms of Narration. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 4. Mr. Odell. 

Students are required to analjrse short stoiy masterpieces as models, 
and, later, to construct original stories. 

Open to graduates and to undergraduates who have completed Couites 
A, B. and F. 

I — G>mposition for Public Speaking. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Clark. 

Open to students ¥fho have completed Couites A and B. 

J — ^English Syntax. 2 hours. 

Mon., Wed.. II. Miss PaiTER. 

The work in syntax is preceded by tests of the ability to form clear 

mental images and to interpret written language. The larger part of die 

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90 NORTHWDSTHRN UNIVEfllSITY. 

time u devoted to a oonsidentioo of the reason for the tcntence 
•tmctnre of present-day English, at revealed durougli a studjy of tbe rela- 
tion of the sentence and its parts to tbe tfaou^t and ideas eipressed. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 

NoTB.— Course A is prerequisite to all other eourses in the department; except that 
Courae B or H may be taken at the same time with Course A. Course J must be pre- 
ceded, or accompanied, by Course C, and Course K by Course D. 

The attention of graduate students is especially invited to Courses J, K, and Z. 
These courses are for advanced students only. Courses K and Z are intended to suggest 
problems of research and to impart some acquaintance with methods of literary investi- 
gation. Courses A* B, and H may not be counted toward advanced dei 



Major: Count A and nine additional j^ear-hours, which mmt include 
Course C or D, and majy include English Language D. 

Minor: Course A and four additional year-hours, of which not more 
than t»o year-hours may he ta^en concurrently with Course A. 

A — The History of English Literature. 2 hours. 

Lecture, Mon.. 9. 
Sections. WeA. 9, 9, 11; Th., 9; Fri. 9. 9. 10. 

Professor Brown, Professor GoDOARO, and Dr. Shkrhan. 
This course is intended to supply the student with the general outline 
and important facts of the histoiy of literature and to serve as an intro- 
duction to the other courts in die department. Lectures, recitations, and 
a considerable amount of reading. 

Required of all students in regular courses. Students are expected to 
take this courM as early as the second year. 

B — ^The History of American Literature. 2 hours. 

Ttt., Th., 8. Professor GoDPAiD. 

First Semester. — Edwards, Franklin, Brockden Brown, Irving, Bryant, 
G>oper, Poe, Ejnenon, Thoreau. 

Second Semester. — ^Whittier, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Lowell, Hofanes, 
Whitman. 

For the most part stress is laid on die works of individual writeis 
rather than on currents of literary development, but die historical aspects 
of the transcendental movement are considered. Particular attention is 
given to the literahire of the nineteenlh centuiy. 



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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 91 

J — English Literature from its Beginning to 1557. 3 hours. 

Mod., Wed., Fri., 2. Dr. Shekiian. 

FinI Semester. — ^Anglo-Saxon Literature. Bright*! Anglo-Saxon Reader 
tL used. 

Second Semester. — Beowulf is read. Middle English Literature. 
Course C b prerequisite to Course J* or must accompany Course J. 

C — Chaucer. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri.. 10. Professor Brown. 

First Semester. — ^A detailed study of a large number of the Canteibury 
Tales. 

Second Semester. — ^The Parlement of Foules, die Legende of Code 
Wommen, and so much of the Troilus and Criseyde as time pennits. 

D — Shakespeare. 3 hours. 

Mottn Wed.. Fri., II. Piofesior Brown. 

First Semester. — A careful and detailed study of three of Shake- 
speare's plays; for 1906-07. Heniy IV. Macbedi. The Tempest. 

Second Semester. — ^All of Shakespeare's playt are fead in chronological 
order. Lectures on the development of Shakespeare's art and on his 
relations to preceding and ccmtemporaiy dramatists. 

K — ^The Elizabethan Drama. 3 hours. 

Mon.. Wed.. Fri.. 8. Professor Goddabd and Dr. Sherman. 

First Semester. — ^From the Miracle Plajrs through the Moralities. 

the Interludes, and the plays of Lyly, Greene. Peele. Kyd. Marlowe lo 

Jonson. 

Second Semester. — Through the plajrs of Jonson, Shakespeare. Dekker, 
Chapman, Hesrwood, Beaumont and Fletcher. Middlelon. Web- 
ster. Ford, Massinger. Shirley, and Davenant to the Restoration. 
Course D is prerequisite lo K. 

El — ^Elnglish Literature of the Sixteendi and Seventeenth Centuries, 
1557-1660. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 3. (Given in 1906-07 and in alternate years.) 
Professor Goddard and Dr. Shemhan. 
First Semester. — ^Wyatt. Surrey, Lyly, Sydney, and Spenser. Among 
the topics discussed are: the influence of foreign literary models; die 
development of blank verse and the sonnet; euphuism, and literaiy crit- 
icism in the sixteenth century. 

Second Semester. — Milton and his contemporaries, 1599-1660. 

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92 NORTHWasrmBN UNIVIORSITT. 

F— Clamcinn. 1 660-1 789. 3 houn. 

Mob., Wed, Fri^ ^. (Gnrca b 1907-06 and in allenMle ycMs.) 

Piofcnor GooDABD. 
Fint SoMrterw— From the RettontioB to the death of Pope. 1660- 
1745; Qawiciwn in poetry; ibe riie of the enay; tbe developneat of 
prate; the deveftopmcnt of the novel. 

Second Senwrter.— Fram the death of Pope to the French Revolution. 
1745-1789; the decline of CUiticinn; the beginntngi of RomantidnB. 

G— The Romantic Movement. 1 789-1 830. 2 houn. 

Tn., TL. 9. ProfeMor BacywN. 

Fint Scmetler.— Wordnvorth. Coleridge. Soudiey. Lamb, Jefrey, 
Landor. Jane Amtan. 

Second Senwrter.— Scolt. Byron, Keati, Shellqr. Lei^ Hnnt. De 
Qnincey, HazlitL 

Among the topics diicmted are: the retain to natnre; the infhwniriw 
of die French Revolution: the revolt against artistic oonventiont; the 
awakening of interest in the middle ages; the revival of die individual 
spirit in English literature. 

H— English Poetry from 1830 to 1880. 2 houn. 

Tu., TL. II. Professor GoDOAKD. 

Fint Semester. — ^Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, Clough. 
Second Semester. — ^Mn. Browning, Browning, Fitzgerald, the Res- 
settis, Swinburne, and other poets of the period. 

In thb couTM die larger part of die time is devoted to die study of 
Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. 

I— English Prose from 1830 to 1880. 2 houn. 

Tu., TL, 10. Dr. SHEtMAN. 

Fint Semester. — Carlyle, Newman. Emerson, John Stuart Mill. 
Second Semester.— Matdiew Arnold, Ruskin, Pater. Thackeray. Dick- 
ens, George Eliot, MereditL 

These writen are studied as representatives of die ihou^t and life of 
the period. A large amount of reading and papen on fbpics suggested 
by dia COUTM are required. 

Z — Seminary. 3 hours. 

Houn to be arranged. Professor Bbown. 

Open only to graduate students, except by special arrangement viridi 
die instructor. 

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COUJOOB OF LIBBQEtAIi ARTS. 93 

Ib 1906^7 the tabjeet u the Eogliili Melried RooMiiMt of the 
Ardrariiui Cycle. 

Each ttudait prcpant and reads before the clan a leriet of repoHt 
wfaieb he afterwank poli into the form of a ihesk Bendes the Meliieal 
Romances, among sobjecls <fisc«sed maj be mentioiied: die lays, die 
ballad^ die Mabinogion tales, die Cuchiilinn and die Finn cycles of Irisb 
lileralure, die legend of die Holy Grail. Among audion toucbed on 
are: Geoffrey of Monmoodi, Layamon, Chrilien de Troyes, Wolfram 
Ton Escbenbacb, die '^Gawain-poet,'* Sir Tbomas Maloiy. 

QEOLOQY 

NOTE.— This department, in addition to offering coimwe for general education 
(Goaisee Al* A2, B2, B8, CI, espedally), preeents c o uinc e intended to aid in preparlnff 
■todentB (1) to teach phyeical seosraphy and gttAogy in secondary schools, (2) to 
enter mining schools, or to engage In mining, and (8) to heoome professional £eolo- 
ffists in connection with State or National geological sorvegns or in connection with teach- 
ing or economic geology. For (1) Goorses Al. A2, Bl, B2, B8, and G2 are r eeuu ii uended; 
for (2) Goorses Al, Bl, B8, B4, BS CI, and G8,; and for (8) all coareeB are recommended. 

In most of the conr se e in geology part of the work consists of excursions taken into 
the adjacent eoontry for the stody of geological phenomena in the field. A knowledge 
of the elements of chemistry and physics will be advantageous to those taking courses in 
geok)gy. Stodents intending to tske more than one coarse in geotogy should begin with 
Course Al. or B8. Of Courses Bl, CI, and C8, not more than two will be given in any 



Major: Couru At and sex additional year'houn^ whkk mosl meladt 
ai Uaii four itmesUr hoart of group C. 

Minor: Couno A I or £5, and f»o additional year-'houn not kikm 
concorrentfjy mA Af or B3. 

Al — General Geology. * 4 houit. 

Monn Wedn Fii., 10. 

Professor GsANT and Professor GoLDTHWAIT. 
Laboratoiy boon to be arranged on Mondays at 11 or on Tnes- 
d^s at 9, 10, or 11. 
First Semester. — ^A general introduction to geology. 
Second Semester. — Systematic and regional physiography, minera] 
resoorces of die United Stales, geology of Illinois and adjoining state*. 
Hus couise l e quir es no preliminaiy courM in die departmenL 

A2 — ^Physical Geography. 
Tn., Tb., 2. 
FntI Semester.— Tbe eardi as 
indndnig laboffnioiy 




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94 NORTHWB8TBRN UNIVBRSITY. 

Second Scmciter. — ^Plqrtiography of die land; relations of planli and 
animalt (especially man) to their geographic sorroandingi. 

This coiuse if intended (1) as a general edocational course, (2) as 
a foondation course for those taking work in economics and history. (3) 
as a course for those expecting to teach geography in secondary schools, 
and (4) as a brief coorte in earth study for those ¥fho cannot spend th? 
time required by Course Al. 

This course requires no preliminary course in the department. The 
second semester may be taken without the first. Students taking Coune 
Al will receive no credit for die second semester of G>urse A2. 

Bl — Practical Geology. 3 hours. 

Tu., Th.. 10. Professor Gbant. 

Laboratory hours to be arranged. 

First Semester. — A more advanced study of structural and <|ynamical 
geology than is given in Grarse Al. 

Second Semester. — Methods of geological work, pr^>aration of maps 
and sections, geological survesrs. history of geology^ A considerable part 
of diis semester's work will be devoted to the actual mapping (geographic- 
ally, topographically, and geologically) of a small area and the prepaim- 
don of a report on the same. 

The first semester is open to students who have completed Course Al 
and ¥fho have some knowledge of elementary chemistry. 

The second semester is open to students who are taking or ¥fho have 
completed Course Al. 

B2 — Regional Physiography and Geology of the United States; 

Glacial Geology. 3 hours. 

Tu., Th., 3. 
Laboratory boors to be arranged. Professor Goldthwait. 

First Semester. — ^The country is divided into physiographic provinces, 
and die peculiar features of geological structure, relief, and drainage in 
each are studied; natural resources and industries are briefly considered. 

Second Semester. — Primarily a study of the North American ice-sheet, 
its nature, its history, and its work. The extinct ice-sheet b studied in 
die light of existing glaciers of the Alps, Alaska, and Greenland. The 
phjTsiographic features of different parts of die glaciated area in the 
United States are studied and discussed. 

The first semester is open to students who have completed Coune Al. 

The second semester is open to students who are taking or who have 
completed Course Al. 

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COLLBQS OF LIBBRAX. ARTS. 85 

B3 — Mineralogy. 4 hours. 

Tu., Til., II. Mr. Parks. 

Laboratory houn to be arranged from 8 to 12 on Mondays, Tuet- 
dayt, Wednetdayt, Thurtdayt. 
This coorte includes eiystallography, blowpipe analysis, and determina- 
tive mineralogy. The first two sobjects occupy about three-fourtlis of 
die first semester, and the last occupies the rest of die year. 

Open to students who have completed Chemistry A or who have pre- 
sented a year of chemistry for entrance. 

B4 — ^Assaying. 2 hours. 

Houn to be arranged. Mr. Parks. 

A course in fire assaying which involves thorough work in the assay 

of rich, medium, and low grade ores of gold, silver, lead, and copper. 

The course is almost entirely laboratory work. 

Open to students who have completed Geology B3 or Chemistry A. 

B5 — Elementary Mining and Metallurgy. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 3. Mr. Parks. 

The object of diis course is to familiarize the student with the various 
(Operations and processes in mining and metallurgy. These subjects are 
taui^t largely by lectures illustrated with photographs, lantern slides, and 
drawings. In addition to the regular class-room instruction, visits ¥rill 
be made to some of die near-by mines and metallurgical plants. 

Fiist Semester. — ^Mining. 

Second S<snes ler . — Metallurgy. 

Open to students who have completed Geology A1, or Geology B3, or 
Chemistry A. 

CI — Economic Geology. 2 houn. 

Tu., Th., 11. Professor Grant. 

First Semester. — The non-metallic useful materials obtained from the 
eardi's crait— such as water, building materials, fuels, etc. 

Second Semester. — ^The metallic useful materials obtained from th^ 
eardi*s crust — such as iron, copper, lead, zinc, gold, silvei^-and the 
study of ore deposits in general. 

Open to students who have completed Courses A I and B3. The sec- 
ond semester may be taken widmut die first 



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96 NORTHWnSTDRN UNIVBXRfiKTT. 

C2 — Advanced Phyviography. 2 boun. 

Hourt to be arranged. (Second Semester only.) 

Piofcmor GotDTHWAIT. 
A critical renew of tyttemalic phytiograplij — ibe study of land foimi 
according to their origin, and with a definite scheme of classification. 
Lectures, assigni>d readingi, and frequent infonnal discussions. 

Open to students who have completed Course A1 and die fiist sem- 
ester of Covise B2. 

C3 — Petrology. 4 houi». 

Mon., Wed., Fri.. 1:3(M. Piofemor Gsant. 

The first part of die course ii devoted to the study and detenninatioo 

of the common rock*fonning minerals by means of die petrographical 

miscroscope, and the second part is devoted to the study of die more 

important rocks. 

Open to students who have completed Grarses A1 and B3, or to diose 
who have completed one of these courses and are taking the other. 

C4 — ^Advanced Mineralogy. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. Mr. PAKKS. 

This courM includes work in mineralogy in advance of die s u b j ecti 
treated in Coutm B3. It may include work in (I) ciystallography, (2) 
the less common minerals, (3) particular groups of minerals, or (4) min- 
erals of a definite locality. 
Open to stadeats who have completed Couise B3. 

D — Primarily for Graduates. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 

Professor Gkant and Professor GoLDTHWArr. 
Graduate woik is offered along the following linest (1) Advanced 
Petrology. (2) Pre'Camhrian Ctol&g^. A study of the principles and 
mediods used in investigating the non-fossiliferous rocks, followed by a 
study of the geology of the Lake Superior region widi special reference 
to the fonnations which contain the extensive deposits of copper and iron 
ores. (3) Qiuifemarp Huioiy of the Creat Lake*, (4) lUttarch 
fVori, Investigating along certain lines, especially the geology of some 
particular district. 

It is expected diat work along bodi (1) and (2) above vr91 not be 



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COLLEGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 07 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Major: Courses A and B and six additional year'hours. 
Minor: Courses A and fi. 

AA — ^Elementary Gennan. 4 hours. 

Mon., Tu., Tk., Fri^ 8, 10. 2. 

Professor CuRME, Mr. Edward, Mr. Bernstorfp. 
ProBuaciation, grammar, selections in prose and Teise, German com- 



This course may not be taken to remove language requirements for 
admission, and credit ¥fill not be given unless the full course is completed. 

(b) — Ellementary German, Second Unit 4 hours. 

Mon., Tu., Wed., Th., 9. 10, 2. Mr. Hohn. 

Grammar, reading, German composition. Open to students who have 
presented but one unit of German for admission to college. 
This course is given in die Academy. 

A — Intermediate German. 4 hours. 

Tu.. Wed., Th.. Fri..9, 10. 11. 

Mr. Edward, Mr. Bernstdrff, and Mr. Milbradt. 
First Semester. — ^Lessing*s Minna von Bamhelm and Emilia Galotti; 
German lyrics and ballads; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; Gennan com- 
position once a week. 

Second Semester. — ^Lyrics and ballads; Schiller's Maria Stuart; 
Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea; German Gmiposition. 

Open to students who have presented two units of German for admis- 
sion to college and to those who have completed Course AA. 

G — Colloquial German. I hour. 

Tu., Th., 9. Mr. Edward. 

Meissner's German Gmversation, Kron's German Daily Life, and 

odier material. Open to all who have had one year of German, and 

to others by special permission. 

B-^oethe*8 Life and Woib. 1 749-1 790. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed.. Fri., S, 11. 3. 

Professor Hatfield and Professor CuRME. 
First Semester. — ^Dichtung und Wahrheit. Goelz von Berlichingen, 
Werther, and the earlier lyrics. Study of the life of Goethe, for which 
purpose the possession of Heinemann's Goethe is very desirable. 



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98 NORTHWBSTBRN UNTVTOSITT. 

Second Semester. — ^Ljiict, Egpioiit, Iphigenie, Tatio, Italienisclie Rette. 

Course H may suitably be combined witb tbis course. 

Open to students ¥fbo have taken Course A. Course B may be takea 
a second time, wilfa new subject matter, for a credit of two hours. 

In 1906-07 the work of CourM B was centered about the period of 
the Thirty Years* War as treated in literature. 

H — ^Advanced German Composition. 2 houn. 

Mon.. Wed.. 8. Mr. Eowakd. 

Von Jagemann*s Ssmtaz and Prose Composition; White's Selections 

for German Prose Composition widi specially assigned original work. 

Open to those who have had Course A, or its equivalent. 

J — ^Modern German Drama. 2 hours. 

Tu., Til., 4. Professor CmtME. 

Two courses in Modem German Drama are given under this heading 
in alternate years. They present an outline of German life in die nine- 
teenth century as reflected in the drama, exclusive of the classical works 
of Goethe and Schiller. 

(a) 1906-07. First Half of the Centuiy. Hemrich von Klebt. 
Grillparzer, Ratmund, Gulkkow, Hebbel, Otio Ludwig. 

(b) 1907-08. Second Half of the Centuiy. Anzengruber, Wilden- 
bruch, Sudermann, Hauptmann, Fulda, Lienhard, Otto Ernst 

Open to students who have completed Coukm B. 

F — German Novel and Short Story. 2 hours. 

Tu., Til., 3. Mr. Edwaib>. 

Two courses in the modem Gennan Novel and Short Story are given 

in alternate years. They present an outline of German life in the nine- 

teenlh century as reflected in this form of literature. 

(a) 1906-07. First Half of the Century. H. von Kleist, Hauff, 
Tieck, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Immermann, Stifter, Grillparzer, Ludwig. C 
F. Meyer. 

(b) 1905-06. Second Half of the Centuiy. Spielhagen, Stoim. 
Hejrse, Keller, Raabe, Fontane, Wildenbruch, Sudermann, Frenssen. 

Open to students who have completed Course B. 
Courses J and F may be suit&bly combined. 

D — ^The History of German Literature; Goethe's Faust. 3 hours. 
Mon., Wed., Fri., 3. Professor Hatfield. 

A SjTstematic study of German literature from the earliest times. Rob- 
ertson's Histoiy of German Literature and Max MuIIer's Gennan Classics. 
Open to students who have completed Course B. 

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COLLBGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 99 

E — Advanced Literaiy Group. 2 hours. 

Sat.. 8:30-10 (rabject to change). Piofessor Hatfield. 

FinI Semetter. — Goethe's life and works. 

Second Semester. — Schiller's life and woiks. 

In 1907-06 the subject treated in the first semester will be "From 
Luther to Goedie**: in the second semester. **Poets of the War of Lib- 
eration, Platen and Heine.** 

This course, which is given on the seminary plan, is intended chiefly 
for graduate students, and in all cases enrollment will be at die discre- 
tion of the instructor. Suitable original work will be brought to publica- 
tion as far as opportunity allows. 

K — Historical Grammar of the German Language. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., FrL. 4. Professor CuMfC. 

This course consbts of a study of die forms and sjmtax of die German 
language in ihdr historical derelopment in connection with die reading 
of important literary works of die different periods. The following texts 
are used: Braune's Althochdeutsche Gnonmatik and Aldiochdeutsches 
Lesebuch, Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik, Hartmann von Aue's 
Der arme Heinrich, Cuime's Grammar of die German Language as 
spoken and written today. 
Open to seniors and graduate students. 
• 
L — Middle High German Masterpieces. 2 hours. 

Tu.. Th.. 3. Professor Curme. 

This course consists of the reading of different masterpieces of die 
Middle High German period ¥rithout a formal study of the grammar. 
In 1907-06 die following works will be taken up: Zamcke's edition of 
die Nibelungenlied and Martin's Wolframs von Eschenbach Parzival 
und Titarel. 

Open to students who can read modem High German fluently. 

N — ^East and North Germanic. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 3. (Not given in 1907-06.) Professor CuRME. 

This course consists of die study of Godiic and Icelandic and die rela- 
tions of diese languages to odier members of die Germanic group. Texts r 
Stamm-Heyne-Wrede's U161as and Kahle's Altblandisches EJementaibnch. 
Open to seniors and graduate students. 



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100 NORTHWOSTBRN UNIVHRSITY. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Major: Counei A and B and f»t additional ytof'hour^ nol mdad' 
ing Course N. 
Minor: CourMCi A and B. 

AA — ^White's First Greek Book Complete and GIea8on*s Story of 
Cyrus. Greek Composition. 5 hours. 

Mod.. Tu., Wed.. Th., Fri.. 10. PiofeMor SooTT. 

Credit will not be gnea unleM the full coune is completed. 

AB— Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III, IV. Thirty lessons 
in Greek Composition, Homer's Iliad, three books. 5 hours. 
Mon., Tu., Wed., Thn Fri., 9. Mr. Elmquist. 

Coiuiet AA and AB are desistned for ttudenti who enter college with- 
out Greek. 

A — ^Lysias, Select Orations. Plato*s Apology. Homer. Greek 

Composition based on the text 4 houis. 

Tu.. Wed., Tk.. Fri., 11. PiofesMr Scorr and Mr. Elmquist. 

B-— Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates. Aeschylus's Prometheus. 

Sophocles' Antigone. 3 hours. 

Mon.. Wed.. Fri.. 10. E)r. Fucungeil 

C — Selections from Lyric Poets. Hesiod, Herodotus, Demosthenes, 

Lucian and Sophocles. 4 hours. 

Tu., Wed., Th., FrL, 9. Profenor Scoir. 

G — Herodotus. 4 hours. 

Mon., Wedn i*ri., 2. Professor ScoTT. 

H — ^Homer and Epic Poetry. 4 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 2. PiofeaMr SooTT. 

K — Greek and Roman Archaeology. 2 hours. 

Tun Th., 2. Dt, FuaoNGEiu 

A general introduction to the aitiitic remains of the Greeks and Roaums 
from die Mycenaean age to the time of Hadrian. The course will deal 
widi architecture, sculpture, vases, and coins. This work is open to non- 
classical students. 
. Maj h^ punted as one ^ear-hour lowf^rds 91 Qreek major. 

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COLLBOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 101 

N — The Goq>ds according to Luke and John. The Acto of the 

Apostles. 4 hours. 

To., Wed.. Th., Fri., 10. Professor HayI3. 

This course is gnren in Garrett Biblical Institule, and students electiaj 

it are subject to the regulations of diat school. 

HISTORY 

NoTB.— Course A or Course E is prerequisite to aU other ooursee in the depart- 
ment, except where .a full equivalent has been completed in a preparatory school. ' 
Course B must be preceded by Course A, and Course F hy Course E; Courses G and N 
must be preceded by either Course A or Course E and can only be taken by studenta 
who have at least fifty hours of credit. 

Students making a BCajor in History must elect either Course R or Course S, these 
courses, as well as Course I, being open only to such students. Course M is open only 
to graduate students except by special permission. Courses B, K, and BC are especially 
recommended for students who expect to study law. 

Major: Course A, E, or BC, and seven addidonal year^houn, which 
must melude Course R or S. 

Minor: Course A, E, or BC, and three additional yfear-houn, not 
ta^en concurrently with A, E, or BC. 

A — ^English Histoiy. 3 hours. 

Mod., Wed.. Fii., 3. Dr. Wat. 

Fnglish political history from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present 
day. hi addition to the strictly political history of England, the develop- 
ment of govenmental institutions and the condition of the church will 



B— -English G>n8titutional History. 2 hours. 

Wed.. Fri., 2. Dr. Wat. 

The constitutional history of England from die Anglo-Saxon period to 
die present day. The course is designed to show die historical develop- 
ment of the modem English government, widi special reference to Parlia- 
ment. Intended especially for students who expect to study law. 

C — Colonial History of the United States to 1 783. 2 hours. 

Tn.. TL, 2. Dr. Wat. 

This course gives die social and economic development of the New 

England and Soudiem G>loiiies. Attention is given to die European in- 

iuenccs, the motives and methods of coloniTation. The beginniafi of 



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102 NORTHWD8TBRN UNIVBRSITY. 



American political i arti tu tioiii are carefully stndied die 

of tke American Rcrolutioa are given, and tke partiealariilic ipiiil of 

die period of die Gmfederacy is explained. 

BC — American Hittoiy. 3 houn. 

Mon^ Wed., Fri., II. Piofeuor James and Dr. Tiinr. 

Tke Political Hitloiy of die Uwted States from die Rerolutioa. Tlw 

fonnation of die Union, die rite and srowlb of parties, the infloenee of 

westward npansimi and of slayery on die poli t i c al life. 



D — Greek and Roman HisUxy. 2 hours. 

Tn., TL, 9. Dr. Wat. 

Fiiit Semester. — Hisloiy of Greece from the earliest times lo die 

Roman Conquests. Constant use of the libraiy for die literature of die 

subject; rsports on reading. 

Second Semester. — History of Rome from die earliest times lo die 
fall of die Empire in die west. Assigned reading widi reports on same, 
siihmissioB of a thesis. 

Elilher semester of this course may be taken without die other. 

E — G>ntinental Europe during the Middle Ages. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 6. Professor WiLDC and Dr. Ttunr. 

This course is intended to furnish an outline of the history of Europe 
from the fall of Rome to die sixteenth century. It deals with die po- 
litical, religious, and intellectual development of the period. 

Attention is gpren to methods of historical study. Considerable library 
work and many vnritten exercises %rill be required. 

F — Renaissance, Reformation, and Age of Louis XIV. 3 hours. 
Mon., Wedn Fri., 2. Dr. Terry. 

The passing from the Renaiisaiice into die Reformation; the Reforma- 
tion, especially in Germany and France; Development of absolutism in 
die several nations. 

G — ^French Revolution, Napoleon, and the Nineteenth Century. 

3 hours. 
Monn Wed., Fri.. 10. Dr. Terry. 

Political History showing the progress of Democracy and aiming to 
give an undentanding of the present condition of European politics. 

First Semester. — Causes and Events connected with die Period of die 
French Revolution and die Napoleonic Wars. 

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COU^EGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 103 

Second Semester. — The Evoludon of G>iiftitutioiial Goveroment in tke 
European Slates; Unification of Germany and of Italy; the Elastem 
Question and present political conditions. 

H — ^Diplomatic History of the United States. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., II. Dr. Wat. 

History of the foreign relations of die United States from the close 
of the Revolution to our own time. Special attention will be giren to 
die commercial treaties following the Revolution, die Monroe Doctrine, 
the diplomacy of rgpansion, the relations with the South American re- 
publics, the period of die Civil War, the mteroceanic transportatian 
routes and die United States in die Far East 

I — ^Methods of Teaching Hutory with special reference to the work 

of Secondary Schools. I hour. 

Hour to be arranged. Professor James and Professor Wni>E. 

K — ^Diplomatic History of Europe durmg the last three Centuries. 

3 hours. 
Tu., TL, Sat, 9 Professor Hamus. 

The rise of Diplomacy; the system of Balance of Power: die growdi 
of the Family of Nations in the Eighteenth Century; die commercial 
and political rivalry; the Diplomatic Revolution of 1756; the contest 
for Colonial and Political Supremacy; the partition of Poland; die 
combinations against Napoleon; the new principles of the Congress of 
Vienna, 1815; the epoch-making treaties of the Nineteenth Century; 
die Dual and Triple Alliances; the Elastem Question; die occupation of 
Africa; die competition in the Orient; the contest for Muichnria and 
China; and the most recent intemationa] agreements. 

The chief purpose of the cowse is to follow die development of In- 
ternational relations, to ascertain the main principles of modem Diplo- 
macy, and to interpret die latest problems in European and World poli- 
tics. Treaties will be studied in detail. A reading knowledge of French 
and German will be found useful. 

L — Church History. 3 hours. 

Tu., Wed., Fri., 10. Professor Lrmx. 

Post-Nicene History of die Christian ChurcL Christianity within die 

Roman Empire; the upbuilding of die Papacy and die growth of Mon- 

achism; the Relations of the Popes lo die Byzantine, Frankish, and 

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104 NORTHWBSTKRN UNIVKRSITT. 

Geraum Emperon; the Church and! Medusyal Society ; History of the 
ReformatioB and of the Modem GiurcL 

This coarse is given in Garrett Biblical Institute and students electing 
it are subject to the regulations of that school. 

N — International Law and G>mparative National Govenunent 

3 hours. 
Tu., Th.. Satn 10. PrefesMir Hamoi. 

A study in die first semester of the Law of Nations dealing especially 
with the questions of Peace, War, Neutrality, and the Settlement of In- 
ternational DiiEcutlies. Scott's Cases on International Law are studied 
in detail. 

In die second semester a comparative study of the Constitution and 
Constitutional Law of the chief European states, as Great Britain, Ger- 
many, France, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, and Russia, will follow. A 
detailed examination of the workings of modem European govemmeDb 
and the activity of parties with a view to a comparison of the same 
vnAk diat of die United States. 

R — ^The Fall of Rome and the Rise of New Nations. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor WiLDC. 

A study of the last years of the Roman Empire, die causes of its fall, 
contacts of Romans and Geraums, invasions of the Geraians, founda- 
tion of die Germanic states on the soil of the empire, early developments 
in the Prankish kingdom. 

S — ^American History 1815 to 1830. 2 hours. 

Tu., TL, 3. PrefesMr James 

Designed to train those who are doing major work in die department 

in the use of sources. Phases of Jeffersonian and Jacksonian Democracy 

and die growth of the West will be emphasized. 

M — Semmary in American History. 3 hours. 

Tu., 4-5; Th., 4-6. ProfesMr James. 

Open only to graduate students, eic^ by special arrangement with 
die instructor. 

In 1906-07, the subject for consideration was the Diplomatic History 

of the United States during the administrations of Washinglon and 
Adam/ 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 106 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

t 
Note.— Students who have presented for admission to CoUeare the full requirement 
of four units of foreisn Isngnsgea. including three units of Latin, may elect Latin (d). 
Yergil, four hours, in the Academy and receiye College credit for it. 

Major: Courtei A and B. »ilh C or D, and E or F, or an appraised 
oqnhalont 
Miner: Course* A and fi. 

A — ^Lhry, Gcero, Horace. 4 hours. 

Mon.. Tun Th, Fri.. 9. 10. II, 2. 

Professor Long. Dr. Fuckingek, and Mr. Elmquist. 
Pint Semester. — ^Lhry, selectioiis, amountiiig to about one book. 
Second Semester. — Cicero» de Senectnle and de Amicitia; Horace, 
Odes, Books MIL 

Latin composition dirou^iout tbe jrear, witb grammatical reviews. 

B— -Fuit Semester. — ^Horace. Odes, Bk. IV and Satires. 3 hours. 
Second Semester. — ^Tacitus, Agricok and Germania; Terence, 
Phormio. 

Mon.. Wed.. Fri.. 9. M. Professor Long. 

C — ^First Semester. — Quintilian; Horace, Epistles. 3 hours. 

Second Semester. — Prose selections. 

(Not civen in 1907-06.) Professor BoNBUGHT. 

D — First Semester. — Catullus and the Latin EJegists. 3 hours. 

Second Semester. — ^Tacitus. Annals, — Reign of Tiberius. 

Mon.. Wed.. Fri., IL Professor BoNBHiGHT. 

El — ^First Semester. — ^Lucretius, — ^readings with interpretation; intro- 
ductory lectures. 2 hours. 
Second Semester. — Philosophical selections; Cicero, Seneca. 

G — ^Tacitus; other writers of the Early Empire. 

Houn to be arranged. Professor BoNBRtGHT. 

The reading u directed to die study of political institutions and social 
conditionf. The courM is intended primarily for y-aduate students. 



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106 NORTHWBSTBRN UNIVBRSITY. 

F — ^Latin Comedy and Satire. 2 houn. 

Tu.. TL, II. (Not giTcn in 1907-08.) Piofenor Bonbmqkt. 
Fint Scmetler. — ^Tlie Romu dranui — ilt hiitoiy, art, and locial posi- 
tion, lectures; Plautm, two or three plajrt. 
Second Semester. — Satiric Poetij and Epigram — Jmrenal; MarliaL 

H — ^Vergil. 2 hours. 

Tttn Tk.. 3. Profenor Long. 

Fint Semester. — Bucolics and Gorgics; lectures introducloiy lo die 
studf of Vergil and die Roman epic. 

Second Semester. — ^Aeneid entire: preparation of papers on assigped 
topics ¥ridi lectures. 

J — ^Latin G>ii4>oution. I hour. 

Frin 3. Professor Long. 

Tbis course presupposes GmiM A, or its equivalent, and will mrohre 
more advanced study of Syntax througliottt the year. 

K — Cicero, Orations; Advanced Latin G>mpo8ition. 2 hours. 

Tu., TL, 3. (Not given in 1907-06.) Professor Long. 

First Semester. — Selections from the early Orations of Qoero; stn4f 

of liieloncal method and development of style, logetlier with rea<fingi 

from the Rkelorical works. 

Second Semester. — Practice in writing Latin, based in part on standard 
prose selections. Problems of Syntax are discussed and special attention 
given to the study of Latin prose style. 

Greek and Roman Archaeokgy. 

See the course designated Greek K page 100. 

MATHEMATICS 

Major: Courses A! and A2 (or AS), BI, and six additional jftar- 
hours, including at least one C course. 
Minor: Courses Al and A2 (or A3), and BL 

At — ^Trigonometiy and Plane Analytical Geometry. 3 houn. 

Mon.. Wed., Fn., 8, 9, 10. II, 2. 
Tu., Th., Sat., 8, 9, 10. 
Professor CuRTiss, Dr. Keppel, Mr. Wilson, Dr. Morehead, and 
Mr. DiNia. 

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COLLBQB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 107 

Fiitt Semettcr. — ^Review of Algebra. Plane Trigonometiy, including 
die lolution of oblique triangles. 

Second Semester. — ^Plane Analytical Geometry; an elementary ooune 
on the straight line and conic sections. 

Required of all candidates for a degree except diose who elect 
Course A3. 

A2 — ^Algebra. 2 hours. 

To., TL, 11. Dr. Kcppel. 

The subjects covered are ratio and proportion; die progressions; the 
graphical treatment of simultaneous quadratic equations; the binomial 
theorem for positive integral exponents; determinanli; the numerical so- 
lution of equations. 

This is a half-year course, given in each semester, and should be taken 
ooBcnrrendy with Cowse A1. 

Eidier Gmrses A1 and A2» or Course A3, must precede all further 
courses in this department. 

A3 — Algebra, Trigonomeby, and Ana^cal Geometry. 5 hours. 
Mon., Tu., Wed., Th.. Fri., 6. Dr. Keppel. 

First Semester. — ^Algebra and Plane Trigonometiy; die equivalent of 
Coarse A2 and the first half of Coune Al. 

Second Semester. — ^Analjrtical Geometiy, an elementary course on die 
strai^ line and conic sections widi an introduction to the Geometry of 
Tnree Dmiensiotts. 

B-— Analytical Geometry. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 9. Mr. WiLaoN. 

An introductory course extending through both semesters, lo supple- 
ment the wo]^ in Analjrtical Geometry of Course A as given in t905<M. 
It will not be offered after die year 1906-07. 

B1 — ^DiCerential and Integral Calculus. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri.. 9. Professor CuRiss. 

First Semester. — ^Theory of limits; rules for differentiation; 
and normals; maadma and minima; theorems of mean value; 
values; partial differentiation; Taylor's Theorem: curvature; evohites; 
envelopes. 

Second Semester. — Indefinite and definite integrals; areas and volumes. 

Open lo students who have completed CourMS Al and A2, or 
Course A3. 

This coune was formerly designated BB. 

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106 NORTHWBSTORN UNIVBRSITT. 

B2 — ^Analytical Ge<»netry and Advanced Algebra. 3 hours. 

(Not given in 1906-07.) Dr. Morehcad. 

Fiitt Semettor. — ^A coune in Analytical Geometiy of Two and Three 



Second Semester. — Topics in Advanced Algebra, including coinplei 
quantities, deteiminants, and the theory of equations. 

Open to students who have completed Gmises A1 and A2. and in 
the second semester to diose who have completed Course A3. While 
Course B2 is not prerequisite to those designated C, it is strongly recom- 
mended that this precede or accompany such courses. 

B3 — The Prmciples of Algebra and Geometry. 2 hours. 

Tu., TL, 10. Dr. Kkppel. 

A critical and historical study of die logical foundations of Second- 
ary Mathematics. 

Open to students who have completed Coutms A1 and A2, or Course 
A3, and who have obtained credit for not lew than fifty hours of col- 
lege worL This course is especially designed for those who intend 
to teach. 

B4 — Surveying; Theory and Practice. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 2. Dr. Morehead. 

The use and adjustments of the compass, engmeer*s transit, solar com- 
pass and Y level; the keeping of records and platting of observations; 
calculations of heif^ts, distances, and areas; elements of the theory of 
errors. Field work with the instruments is carried on under die direc- 
tion of the instructor in small divisions in die fall and spring. Two houn 
of field work count for one recitation hour. 

After 1906-07, this course must be eidier preceded or accompanied by 
the first semester of Physics G. 

CI — Advanced Calculus. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., II. Professor CuRTlss. 

Infinite series; Taylor's Theorem; partial differentiation; maxima and 

minima; definite integrals over curves, surfaces, and volumes; the Eu- 

lerian Functions; Fourier's Series; differential equations. 

Open to students who have completed Course Bl. 

C2 — ^Analytical Mechanics. 3 houn. 

Mon., Wed., Fri.. 8. Mr. WiLSON. 

A course in Theoretical Mechanics, open to students who have taken 

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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. . 109 

Course B1 or ilt equiTalent. It includet « study of Yectors, umformly 
accelerated motions, simple haimonic motions and their composition, 
eUiptic motion, central oibits, force, energy, work, etc. 

C3 — ^Advanced Analytical Geometry. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 9. Dr. Kcppel. 

An introduction to the study of some of the mors important transforma- 
tions, as projection, inversion, and polar reciprocation. .Much use b 
made of abridged notation and of homogeneous point and line co- 



C4 — Modem Synthetic Geometiy. 3 hotin. 

Tu., Th., Sat., 9. ProfesMr Holgate. 

Introduction of infinitely distant elements into geometry; central pro- 
jection; perspectivity and projectivity; generation of conies from projective 
forms; properties of ruled quadric surfaces; involution; poles and polars; 
of 



D1 — ^The Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics. 

3 hours. 

Mon.. Wed., Fri., 10. Professor Cumss. 

This course takes up the solution of problems in Heat, Electricity. 

Acoustics, etc by means of Fourier's Series and allied developments; a 

treatment of these developments; the especial study of ordinary linear 

differential equations whose solutions are connected widi these problems; 

die theory of the Potential Function. 

Open to students who have completed Course CI or Course C2. 

D2 — ^The Theory of Functions. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed.. Fri^ 2. Mr. Wilson. 

Open to students who have completed Course CI. 

D3 — The Theory of Numbers. 3 hours. 

Tu., Th.. 8; Fri.. 3. Dr. MoREHEAD. 

First Semester. — ^An mtroduction to die classical Theory of Numbers. 

D4 — ^Differential Geometiy. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 3. Dr. Morehead. 

Second Semester. — ^The Geometry of space curves and surfaces, in- 
vestigated by means of the Cslcnluf . 

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110 NORTHWBSTSZRN UNIVEIRBITT. 

MUSIC 

NOTB.— The nuudmiim credit whkh will be ftUowed for couraeB in Music is twenty 
semes ter-honrs. 

Courses A and C are introdactory courses in Harmony, Form and Analysis, and 
Sight Reading, open to College students bat bearing no college credit. Their equiy- 
alentSp however, must be satisfactorily completed before subsequent courses in the 
same subjects can be taken. 

A — Introductory Harmony, Form and Ana^sis. 

Mod., Wed.« Fri.. 3. Mr. Dodge. 

Fint Semester. — Scale and melody writiiig: construction of die period: 
intervals and two-part writing; chord-reading; small two-part primaiy 
fonnt; cadences. 

Second Semester. — Triads, inveniont, chord-connection in three and 
four parts, cadences, modulations, dominant sept-chord. 

B — History of Music I hour. 

Th., 3. Mr. Garwood. 

First Semester. — Oriental, ancient, and early Christian music. School 

of die Nedierlands. The beginnings of oratorio, opera, and instrumental 



Second Semester. — Italian, French, and Gennan opera. The develop- 
ment of the song and sacred music. The development of instrumental 
music. Text Book: Lessons in Musical History, Filmore. 

. C — Sight-Reading. Vocal. 

Mon.. Th., 4:15. Min Haklow. 

Drill in scale and interval singing. Time sub-divisions, ear tranung, 
dictation, part-singing. 

D — Harmony. 2 hours. 

Mon., Th., II. Professor LuTKlN. 

First Semester. — Figured basses and hannonization of melodies, em- 
ploying the use of triads, dominant, diminished, and supertonic sept- 
chords, widi inversions, in dispersed harmony. 

Second Semester. — Secondary sept-chords and chords of the ninth. 
Suspensions and tones foreign to the harmony. Organ-point, modula- 
tion, etc. Text Book: Oiadwick*s Harmony. 

E — ^Form and Analysis. 2 hours. 

Tu., Fri., n. Professor LuTKiN. 

First Semester. — Chord-reading. Bach*s inventions. Song fonns, 
principally Mendelssohn and Chopin. 

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COLX.BGB OF LIBERAL ARTS. Ill 

Seooiid Semetter. — Song or aria form. Minuelt, marcliet, tckerzoit 
rondot, dieme and Tariatioiii, tke sonata form. Sonatas as a wbole. 
Preludes and fugues. 

F — ^History of Music I hotir. 

Mon^ 2. Mr. Garwood. 

First Semester. — Biographical study of the great composers in chron- 
ological order. Palestiina, Scarlatti, Purcell, Bach, Gliick, Handel. 
Haydn, Moiart, Beetho?en. 

Second Semester. — Wfher, Schubert, Berlioz, Mendelssohn, Qiopin, 
Schumann, Liszt, Wagner, Verdi, Brahms, Dvorak, Tschaikowskj, Elgar. 
Tezt Book: Henderson — ^How music developed. 

G — QK>ni8 and Choir Training. I faotir. 

Mon., 6; Wed, 5. Professor LuTKiN. 

The Monday evening sessions are the regular rehearsals of the Evans- 

km Musical Qub. The Wednesday sessions are at Music Hall, with 

the following outline of work: 

First Semester. — Hymns, part-songs, anthems. 

Second Semester. — Choral service of the Episcopal church. Cantatas 
and oralorioe. Ensemhle singing in duetts, trios, and quartettes. 



H — O>unterpomt 2 hours. 

Tu., FrL, 10. Professor Lutkin. 

First Semester. — Counterpoint in the various species in t%ro and three 
parts. 

Second Semester. — Counterpoint in three and four parts. 

I — Advanced Harmony. I hotir. 

Mon., 2. Professor LuTKiN. 

Harmonization of chorales. FUmole modulations. Unprepared and 
unresolved dissonance, etc. 

J — GHnpotition. 1 hour. 

TL, 2. Professor LuTKiN 

Homophonic forms. Songs. The simpler vocal forms. 

K — Advanced History of Music 1 hour. 

Mon., 3. Mr. Garwood. 

First Semester. — Primitive music of various countries. Ecclesiastical 

music. Polyphonic music. The early English, Nedierland, and Italian 

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112 NORTH W'ESTJfiUN UNIVERSITY. 

schools. The devclopmeiit of the oratorio and die opera, with analysis 
of typical works. 

Second Semester. — ^The development of instrumental music The pre- 
lude and fugue, sonata, and symphony. Chamber mulic and orchestra. 
The music drama of Richard Wagner. The tone-poems of I^ichard 
Strauss. The oratorios and cantatas of Edward Elgar. 

Text Book: The Evolution of the Art of Music, Parry, supple- 
mented by lectures. 

L — ^Analysis. 1 hour. 

Wed., II. Professor LuTKlN. 

First Semester. — Bach's well-tempered clavichord. 
Second Semester. — Beetfaoven'i sonatas. Brahm's pianoforte works. 

M — Q>unterpoint., 1 hour. 

Tu., 3. Profenor LunciN. 

Pint Semester. — Counteipoint in five or more parts. 
Second Semester. — Double and triple counterpoint. 

N — Canon and Fugue. I hour. 

Th., 4. Professor Lutkin. 

Pint Semester. — Canons in various intervals. Two-part fugues. 
Second Semester. — ^Three and four-part fugues. 

O — Composition. I hour. 

Wed., 3. Professor LuTKiN. 

The sonata form. The cantata. 

P — ^Analysis. I hour. 

Wed., 10. Professor LuTKiN. 

Pint Semester. — Chamber music. Organ compositions. Church can- 



Second Semester. — Oratorios and symphonies. Orchestral music from 
full score. 

Q — Double and Triple Fugues. I hour. 

Houn to be arranged. Professor Oldbckc 

R — ^Free Composition. I hour. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Oldbekg. 

S— Instrumentation. I hour. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Oloberc. 

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COLLEOB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 118 

T — PubKc School Methods. 2 hours. 

Mod.. Th., 5. Mm Harlovt. 

Nora 1.— Members of the Glee Club who haye served for one year and who cmn 
qualify for Coarse G (siffht reading) may obtain a total credit of two semester-homrs 
on the recommendation of the instructor. 

Nora 2.— Students who have fair ability as players of band instruments may ob- 
tain a total credit of four semester>hours for services rendered in the University Band, 
upon recommendation of tiie band instructor, their period of service to cover two years. 

NOTB 8.— For detailed information in regard to the various courses offered in music, 
see the catalogue number of the School of Music Bulletin, published in July of each year, 
also special bulletins issued <iuarterly. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

NoTB.— Students who desire to do extended work in this department should elect 
Course A (either Al or A2). or Coune A concurrently with Course B, as preliminary 
to all other courses in the department. 

Students who desire to take but a single course in the department may elect Course 
A, D, or E. 

Major: CourMes A I (or A2), B, C, and three additional J^ear-hotm: 
or Courses Al, C^ and four additional year'hours. 

Minor: Courses A I (or A2),B, and t9o semester-hours not ta^en 
concurrently with Course A I (or A2); or Course A I and either Course 
£t C, or L* 

Al — General Psychology; Logic 3 hours. 

Mob.. WecL, Fri., 2. Professor ScOTT ancl Dr. EwciL 

Fint Semester. — AngelFs Piychology; clast-room demonttratioiif and 
guidance lo private obienratioB; demonstration of apparatus and melhodt 
of experimental psychology; written exercises and experiment! from mem- 
ben of die class; lectures and collateral reading on various topics. 

Second Semester. — ^An outline of bodi deductive and inductive logic. 
Special stress is laid upon the mediods of die sciences. Written exer- 
cises in die detection of fallacies and die criticism of argumenb. 

The second semester of this courM may be taken widiout die fint. 

A2 — General P^chokgy. 3 hours. 

MoB^ Wedn Fri.. 2. Professor SooTT. 

A full year course in psychology, die firrt semester being identicAl 
widi diat of Course Al. 

B — ^Elementary Experimental Psychology. 2 hours. 

Mob.. Wed.. 3-5. ProfcMor Scott. 

Intended for students of general psychology who dciire te become 

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lU NORTHWOBTIDRN UNlVHttSITY. 



with laboraloij art Ji C Kk , lad for ikote wiio eipect to _ 
advanced labofaloix oooiMt. Two coa K c uti fe hoan of laboraloiy ivoik 
for one hour of crediL 

CouM B k open only lo ttudoili wiio liaTC taken or wiio are takag 
die int icaetler of Courw A1 or A2. 



D — General bboduction to PhilotoiAy. 2 hours. 

Th^TIl. 11. Dr. EwEE. 

LkIiiics, papen, dnoneioiit. lateacied for ttiideali wiio desire to 

lean aboat die aalure of philoeophj, ill relatknif to life and to tdence, 

iti STKlematic divinoas. and the characlerittic aHempli to solve its prob- 



Coune At k a usefol preBniiiary to diis course, but » not iadis- 
peasable. 

Open to students wiio liave maty lionis of credit. ^^ 

El— Hiilotophy of Refigion. 3 houit. 

Monn Wed., Fri.. 4. Professor GoE. 

First Semester. — ^Tke nature of religion, and its place in tiie life of 

kumanitj. A stndjr of early religion and of tiie great religions of ibe 

world from a psychological standpoint. Menzies* Histoiy of Religion, 

lectures, collateral reading. 

Second Semester. — ^Tke idea of God in die li^t of present pbilo- 
sopbical and sdentijfic lliou^t. Lectures and assigned reading. 

C — Histoiy of Philosophy. 3 houn. 

Mon.. Wed^ Fri., II. Dr. Ewnt 

Text-book, lectures, reading of selected writings, especially from mod- 
em philosophy. 

Open to students wiio haTe completed Coutm AI or Couise A2. 

LI — ^Ethics. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 3. (First semester only.) Dr. EwER. 

An introduction to ethical llieoiy and to practical ethics. Text-book, 



Open to students who have completed Couise AI or Course A2. 

L2 — Education in Refigicm and Morals. 3 hours. 

Mon.. Wed.. Fri.. 3. (Second semester only.) Professor CoE. 

A stu4y primarily of principles and secondarily of mediods applicable 

^ the hcpie, die school, and die church. Especially ad^ited to pros- 



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COLLBX^S or LIBSRMi ARTS. 115 

pecthre leachen (in public school or SmidAy tchool), tocUl 
WDikcrt, and paslon. Coe*t Education in Religion and Monk, with 
aiiignnd coUaleral leading. A covite in general pfjchologj it pretop- 



G — Advanced Ejq>erimeDtal Psychology. 2 houn. 

Houn to be arranged. ProfeMor Scorr. 

Thb courM extaidi the work begun in Grane B into tome of the 

more diflicalt proUcmt, and inlrodncet a limited amount of retearch. 

Two contecntiTc hourt of laboraloiy woik will be required for one 

hour t crediL 

Open to ttndentt who have completed Conne B. 

M — ^Theory of Knowledge and Metaphyncs. 2 houn. 

Tn.. Th.. 10. Dr. Ewsa. 

Pint Semetter. — ^Theoiy of Knowledge. 

Second Semetter. — ^Metaphjitct. Lecturet, readings from die principal 
literature of the tubject, reportt and ditcottiont. The aim of dut coune 
it to enable ttudenli who have a tpectal interett in philotophj to do 
independent and progrettive thinking on metapfajtical topict. 
Open to ttudenli who have completed Conne A1. 

N — Advanced Educs. 2 houn. 

Tn., Tk. 11. Profettor CoK. 

A coorte of reading upon telected problemt. Por 1907-06 the topic 
will be the Origm of Moral Sentimentt and of Social Inttitutiont. 

Admittion to thit courte r e quir ct previout contultation with the pro- 
fettor in charge. 
Open to ttudentt who haTo completed Conne LI, or ilt equiralent. 

F — Seminary in the Piyckology and Phiknophy of Religion. 5 houn. 

Tu.. 2-4. Profettor CoE, Profettor Scott, Dr. Ewer. 

Primarily for graduatet. Only in exceptional catet wOl undergradn- 

atot be adnitted. For 1906-07 the papers and ditcottiont bear chiefly 

upon the idea of religkm at it it atfected by the functional view in 

ptychology and the pragmatic view in philotophj. 

For 1907-06 die leacGng topic will be The Nature of Religkm, with 
ctpecial reference to Mytticitm, the Ptychology of Feeling, and die 



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116 NORTHWB8TBRN UNIVflRSITT. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE AND HYGIENE . 
A — Hygiene. 2 houn. 

Tu., Tk., II. (Fint leoMtter only.) Professor GiLLESBY. 

A coune of lectures on the care of the body and the place of ex- 
ercise and athletic sports in the preservation of health. 

B— Gymnastic Elxerdse. I hour. 

Four sections. Tu., Wed.. Th., Fri.. 2, 3. 4. 5. 

Miss HuEGiN and Mr. Rn.EY. 

Regular classes for dumb-bell, Indian-dub. and other gymnastic ex- 

erdses are formed for men and women. Careful physical esaminations 

are made. Credit of one hour is given each semester for four hovis a 

week of g3rmnasium practice. 



PHY8iC8 

Major: Courses A and B. and ^Aer C. H, or /. 
Minor: Coune A and t»o additional y^tar-houn not ttJftn concur' 
rcfitfy with Coune A. 

A — General Phyncs. 4 hours. 

Mon^ Wed.. Fri.. 11. Professors Crew and TxTNiiLL. 

First Semester. — General properties of Matter* Sound, Heat 

Second Semester. — ^Electricity. Magnetism. Light 

This k an introductory courM. intended to acquaint die student vrith 
die elementary facts and the general principles of physical science. It 
requires no mathematics beyond that necessary for entrance to college. 
The difference between this course and die average hi^-school course 
lies not so much in die phenomena studied as in the point of view from 
which diey are regarded. Recommended as a first or second year stqdy 
for diose contemplating die pursuit of any pure science, engineering, or 
medicme. 

This course is distinctly more elementary than as formerly given. 

One laboratory exercise each week. 

B— Mechanics. 3 hours. 

Tu.. Th.. 11. Professors Crew and Tatnall. 

An elementary experimental study of forces, moments of force, mo- 



nlB of inertia, elasticity, hydromechanics, etc., forming an introduction 



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COLLEQB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 117 

to advanced pkytict and engineeruig. This is a couise in pure Dynam- 
ics, and serves as an mtroduction to Applied Mechanics. Mimeographed 
notes are placed in the hands of the student as the course proceeds. 

Two lectures and one laboratory exercise a weeL The laboratory 
work k guided by a set of instructions prepared and printed es})ecially 
for diis laboratory, which is open for this courM every afternoon in the 
week except Wednesday and Saturday. 

Open to students who have completed Course A, or its equivalent. 

C — ^EJectricity and Magnebsm. 3 hours. 

Mon., Fri., 8. Profenor Tatuall. 

Electricity and Magnetism. Two lectures and one laboratory exer^ 
cise a weeL In the lectures the more general lavfs of electricity and 
magnetism are discussed; the practical equations employed in die labora- 
tory are also derived and discussed. J. J. Thomson's Elemenii of die 
Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism is employed as a 
text-booL The laboratory is open every afternoon except on Wednes- 
day and Saturday. 

The laboratory work includes the measurement by one or more 
methods of current, resistance, electromotive force, temperature-coefi- 
cients, capacity; a study of the magnetic properties of iron and stoek 
thermo-electric effects, use of Carey Foster bridge, potentiometer, copper 
voltameter, eto. 

Open to students who have completed Course A, or its equivalent. 

D — ^Alternate Currents. 2 hours. 

Tu., IK 10. Professor TATNiUX. 

First Semester. — ^The general theory of alternate currents as set forth 
in the treatises of Franklin and Williamson, and Steinmetx. 

Second Semester. — Laboratory practice with electro-d]mainometer, os- 
cillograph, eto., measurements of inductance, capacity, inqwdance. ^ 
For advanced students and graduates. 

E — ^Mathematical Physics; Ellectricity. 2 hours. 

Mon., Fri., 9. Professor Crew. 

Abraham and Foppl's Theorie der Elektrixitat k used as a text-book. 

The subject b believed to be essential to all advanced students of pure 

physics and to diose contemplating electrical engineering of high grade. 

It is also recommended to students interested in applied mathematics. 

The course is intended primarily for graduates. ^ j 

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118 NORTHWBBTBaSlN XTNTVI&SITT. 

F — ^Mathematical Physics; Dynamics. 2 hoais. 

Til, TIl, 10. (Not ghroi in 1906-07.) ProfcMor Tatkall. 

Dynamict of a Paiticle, Rigid Djniamici, Elaslicily and Fldd Moboa. 
Webster's Dynamics k used as a text. 
. For advanced slndeals and graduates. 

S — ^Mathematical Physics; Spectroscopy. 2 hours. 

Monn Fri., 9. Professor Crew. 

A course in die general dieoiy of phjsical optics, spfffnim analysM, 

and astropbysics, including the dieory of optical instrumcals. Dmde's 

Theoiy of Optics rep r esents the ground covered in diis course. 

For advanced students and gradnates. Given in alternate years with 
Grarse E. This coune is intencied te be accompanied by laboratoiy 
work along ibe same line, ibe bours of credit for wbicb are te be sep- 
arately determined in eacb particular case. 

G — Mechanical Drawing. 2 hours. 

Sat., 9-12, and one afternoon a week. Professor Basquin. 

An introductory courw taking up projection, skelcbing, use of iastm- 
menls, blue printing lettering, sbop drawings, isometric projection, iso- 
metric sketcbing, and ibe more useful p iobl em s of Descriptive Geometiy, 
followed by applications in Macbine Drawing. 
Jamison's Elements of Mecbanical Drawing is used as text. 

H — ^Applied Mechanics. 3 hours. 

Tu., Tk, 9, and one afternoon eacb weeL Professor Basquin. 
Mecbanics of Materials. A study of die bebavior of iron, steel, 
cement, ete., under ibe action of s t r es s es , leading to a disc u ssion of ibe 
strengtb, defonnation under load, and proper design of pipes, beams, 
columns, sbafting, joints, ete. Eiperimentel work witb a Riebl^ Testing 
Macbine. Tezl-book: Slocum and Hancock's Strengtb of Materials. 

A knowledge of calculus » necessary, also a general knowledge of 
mecbanics sucb as may be obtained from Pbysics B. 

J — ^Thermodynamics, Heat Engmes. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Profenor Basquin. 

First Semester. — General tbeory of beat and tbermodynamics. Poyn- 
ting and Thomson's Heat 

Second Semester.— General application of tbermodjmamics to steam, 
gas, and air engmes as set fortb in Ewing*s Steam Engines and Olber 
Heat Engines. ^ j 

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COLLBOB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 119 

K — Metal Working. 2 houn. 

Two ftftemooiit « weeL 

ProfeMor Basquin and Mr. Starkweather. 
Tlie mechanics of metal working ii cmpjiatized throughout diit course. 
The -regular set of exercises involves chipping, filing, scrapinf^ drilling, 
planing, turnings thread-cutting and grinding. 

The shop will be open each afternoon of the week except on Saturday. 
Students may select their own afternoons for woik; but a selection once 
made must be strictly adhered to throughout die semester. 

For students who have completed Course A or its equivalent^ 

L — Descriptive Geometry. 2 hours. 

Wed., 2-5, and one afternoon a weeL Piofesfor Basquin 

The study of die standard method of representing geometric forms by 
projections on plane surfaces and die graphical solution of geometr.c 
problems. Shades, shadows, and perspective will be taken up in the 
latter part of the year. Lectures, readings sketches, and problems. 
Text: Moyer*s Descriptive Geume tiy . 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Major: Counes A and B (French) and lix additional ytar^houTM, 
»hich must include at leati two year-hour$ in French more advanced 
than CouTMe B. 

Minor: Coune$ A and B (French). 

French 

AA — ^Elementaiy French. 5 hours. 

Daily, except Sat., 8, 9. II. 2. 

Mr. KuHNE. Dr. de Salvio, and Dr. Harry. 
DeBordes* Grammar. Whitney's Reader. Labiche*s La Grammaire. 
M^rimee's Colomba. Sicard*s Easy French History. Baillot-Bmgnot's 
Composition. Labiche-Martin's Voyage de M. Perrichon. Papot- Wil- 
liamson's Easy French Stories. Sand's La Petite Fadette. Simple dicta- 
tion, private reading, and composition. 

This course may not be taken to remove language requirements for 
admission, and crecfit wiO not be given unless the full courM b com- 
pleted. 



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laO NORTHWQSrmtN UMVSXRSITY. 

A — ^Modern French. 4 houn. 

Mon., Tu., Th., Fri.. 10, II, 11. Mr. Kuhne and Dr. Habky. 

Batllot-Bnignot't Composition. Advanced Grammar. Reading. 
Madame de Girardin*s La Joie fait Peur. Eugene Scribe's Les Doigli 
de Fee. Coipp6tt On rend I'Argent. Freeborn's Contes de Dandet 
Pailleron*s Le Monde oii ion s*£nnuie. 

White's G>ntes de Maupassant Victor Hugo's Quatre-Vingt Tretie. 
Canfield's French Lyrics. G>pp6e's Le Pater. Victor Hugo's Henani. 
Private reading: Cameron's Selections from Loti. Hennequin's Lessons 
in Idiomatic FrencL Essays. 

Open to students who bave completed Course AA or its equivalent 

B — Classic French Literature of the 1 7th and 1 8th Centuries. 

3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 6, 9. Professor Baillot and Dr. Harby. 

First Semester. — 17tb Century. Comeille's Le Cid, Polyeucte. Racine's 

Adialie. Moliire's Le Misanthrope. L'Avare. Warren's Prose Writers 

of ibe 17tb Century. Composition. History of tbe French Theater, in 

dictations. 

Collateral reading: Crane's La Soci£t6 Fran^aise au 17e Si^e. 
Dictations and short lectures on the history of the dieater in France. 

Second Semester.— 18th Century. Lesage's Gil Bias. Voltaire's 
Zaire and letters. Beaumarchais* Le Barbier de Seville and letters. A 
study, with collateral reading, is also made of other authon of tbe 
eighteenth centuiy. Exercises on French syntax. 

C — General Survey of French Literature. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., I. Professor Baillot and Mr. Kuhne. 

Demogeot's French Literature and Darmesteter and Hatzf eld's Le 

Seizieme Siecle en France will be used as text-books, and collateral 

reading is assigned by the instructor. Dictations. Papers on collateral 

reading. 

D — ^Recent French Literature. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 9. Professor Baillot and Mr. KuHNC. 

Study of the literature of the Nineteenth Century, taking as a basis 
George Pellissier's Le Mouvement Litt^raire au XlXe Si^e. Col- 
lateral reading. Thu course is given in French. 
Open to students who have completed Course B. 



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COLLBGS OF LIBERAL ARTS. 121 

E — Advanced French. 2 hours. 

Wed^ 3. (Not given in 1906-07.) Professor Baillot. 

The topics considered will be closely related to tliose of G>ttrses C 
end D: but students will be eipected to cany on special studies with 
prepared papers. 

F — Old French and Early French Literature. 1 hour. 

Hour to be arranged. Mr. Kuhne. 

Reading of old French literature in its original form. Phonology and 

Morphology will be slighdy touched upon, serving as an introduction to 

the study of historical grammar. 

Texts: La Chanson de Roland; Aucassin et Nioolette; le Myst^ 
d'Adam. 

Open to students who have completed Courses B and C or D. 

G — Scientific French. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Mr. KuHNE. 

Second Semester. — Herdler*s Scientific French. Articles from scien- 
tific periodicals. 
Le Cercle Fran^ais meets on alternate ThurKlays at 7:30 o'clock p. m.» and 
is open to all students who have completed Courses AA and A. 



Italian 

-Elementary Course. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri.. 6. Dr. de 25alvio. 

Grandgent*s Grammar and Composition. Bowen's Reader; Gold- 

oni*s La Locandiera; PelUco's Le Mie Prigioni; Manzoni's I Promessi 

Sposi, Selections from Dante's Inferno. 

Credit will not be given for diis course unless the full course » com- 



B — Advanced Q>ur8e. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Dr. DE Salvio. 

General view of Italian Literature. Advanced Composition. Selec- 
tions from Dante's Divina Commedia; D'Ancona e Bacci's Manuale 
della Letteratura Italiana, Vol. V; Verga's Cavalleria rusticana ed altre 
novelle; Fogazzari*s Fedele; Alfieri*s Oreste. 



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122 NORTH WUB^rHUiN UNIVBBSITT. 

C — EjBuiy ItaHan. 2 hours. 

Hovn lo be amnted. Dr. DE Salvio. 

LectniCi on Italian Phonology and Moiphology. The Literature of 

the Trecento. Monaci Cretlonazia dei primi ■ecoli; D*Ancona c 

Bacci*f Mannale defla Letteratora Italiana, Vol. I. 

Open lo advanced ttudenli and to diote who satisfy tbe instructor of 
dieir fitness lo lake die 



Spanish 

A — ^Ekmentaiy G>une. 3 hours. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 2. Dr. de Salvio. 

HiUs and Ford's Grammar; Composition; Matzke*s First Spanuh 

Readingi; Valdes* Jos^; Gald6s* Dona PerfecU; Moratin*s El si de las 

Ninas; Ford's Spanish Anthology. 

Credit wiO not be given for this course unless the full courM is com- 
pleted. 

B — Advanced G>une. 3 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Dr. DC Salvio. 

Lectures <m Spanish Literature widi special emphasti on die modem 
period. Advanced composition. The following list will show approxi- 
mately the range of reading: Selections from Cervantes' Don Quixote; 
at least one of Lope de Vega's and Calder6n's selected plays; Ram6n de 
Campoamor's Dolores; Gald6s* Marianela; Feman Caballero's La 
Gaviola; Echegaray's El Gran Galeolo; Valera's Pepita Jim&ez; Tam- 
ayo y Baus' Un drama nuevo; Ford's Spanish Anthology. 

C — ^Early Spanish. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Dr. DC Salvk). 

Lectures on Spanish Phonology and Morphology. Spanish Literature 
to the fifteenth century. 

Teste to be used are: El Poema del Cid, edited by R. Menendez 
Pidal; Adolph Keller's AltH>anisches Lesebuch mit Grammatik und 
Glossar. 

Open to advanced studente and to those who satisfy die instructor 
of dieir fitness to lake the course. 



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COLLBQE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 123 

SCANDINAVIAN LANQUAQES 
Norwanlan-Danlsh 

NOTB.— Hmm ooones are slv«n in tlM Norw«ffian-Danish Theoloffical School and 
atodenta elaetinir tham are anhject to the reenlatkma of that achooL 

A — Norwegian-Danish Language. 4 hours. 

Tu., WecL. TL, Frl, 10. Dr. Simonsen 

For ttodflttls with a readiiig lad tpeakiag Imovrledge of die Ungoaie. 

After a thorough stnd^ of HofgaardTt larger Grammar die ttodflat is 

required to write etaayt and make traaalatioiia from Norwegian-Daiiish 

into Eagliih and from English into Norwegian-Danish. 

B — Norwegian-Danish Literature. 3 hours. 

Wed.. TL. Fri.. II. (Second semester only.) Dr. SmoNSCN. 
For stndeati who hare a reading and speaking knowledge of the lan- 
guage. Text-book: Broch and^Seip^s Histoij of Uteratnre. 

C — EJementary Study of Norwegian-Danish Language and Litera- 
ture. 3 hours. 
Mob.. Tu.. Wed.. 9. Dr. Smonsen. 
Text-books: Hofgaard's Elementary Grammar and Broch and Seip*s 
History of Literature. 

Open to students who have no knowledge of die language, but will not 
be given unless elected by as many as eix students. 

dwediah 

NOTB.—The elenietary coorae is slTan |in the Swediah Theoloirical Seminary and 
ia open to atodente who have a reading and apeaUns knowledge of the Swediah 
lanffuace. 

A — ^Elementary Swedish. 3 hours. 

Tu.. Wed.. Th.. 11. Mr. Huxberc. 

After a thorough study of Sunden*s Grammar the student is required 

to make translations from Swedish into English and from Enfljish into 

Swedish. 

B — Swedish Literature. 3 hours. 

Tu.. Th.. 8; Fri.. I. Mr. Hn.iJir.iw;. 

Text-book: Karl Waiburg's History of Swedish Literature. Select 

reading from foremost Svredish authors. Students are also required to 

write essays. ^^^ ^^^ ^^ GoOglc 



124 NORTHMVOBTBRN XTraVEDElSITT. 

SEMITIC LANGUAGES 

Note.— These courses are ariven in Garrett Biblical Institute, and students electr 
ing them are subject to the regulations of that school. 

Hebrew 

Minor: Counet A and B, 

A — EJements of Hebrew Language. 4 hours. 

Tu.. Wed.. TL. Fri.. 9. Mr. Raff. 

B — Introduction to Hebrew Literature. 2 hours. 

Tu., Th., 8. Professor Eiselcn. 

Ezegetical and critical reading of selections from the prophetic and 
from the poetic literature of the Hebrews. 

C — General Introduction to the Old Testament. 1 hour. 

Fri.. II. Professor EiSELEN. 

Study of the Old Testament Canon, History of the text, translations 
etc. 

D — Graduate Courses. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. Professor ElSELEN. 

(a) Studies in Isaiah; (b) Studies in Genesis; (c) The Messianic 

ideas and ideals in the Old Testament; (d) Rapid reading of the Minor 

Prophets; (e) Seminaiy Course — the religious life and beliefs of die 

Hebrews, as shown in the activity and the teaching of their inspired leaden. 

Assyrian 

El — Ellementary Course. 2 hours. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor ElSELEN. 

Grammar and reading of easy historical texts. 

E2 — ^Advanced Course. I hour. 

Hour to be arranged. Profesor ElSELEN. 

Reading of historical texts. 

Aramaic 

F — Elementary Course. I hour. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor ElSELEN. 

Study of the Aramaic language and portions of the Old Testament. 
Courses E and F are open only to those who have eoinpletedr at 
least the equivalent of Course A. Digitized by LjOOglC 



COLLEGE OP LIBERAL ARTS. 125 

ZOOLOGY 

NOTB.— Zoolosy A is the introductory course for all other work in the department. 
Course C may be taken concurrently with it Courses of the B group and those designated 
C and D may be taken either as second or third year subjects. Zoology F may be taken 
after omnpletinir the major. 

Major' Coune A and six addtiiomd year-houTM, 
Minor: Count A and i9o additional year-houn not taken concur' 
rendif with Coune A. 

A — Structure, Development, and Evolution of Animal Life. 4 hours. 
Lecture: Tu., Th., 9. Professor LocY. 

Laboratory Hours to be arranged between 9 and 12, daily except 
Saturday. ProfesMr LocY, Dr. Harper, Mr. Alcock. and assistants. 

A coune of instruction adapted to fill a place in general education. 
It embraces a comparative study of living organisms as a wbole, in which 
the physiological side receives much attention. Observations on the prop- 
erties of living matter are followed by a few selected types of inverte- 
brated animals, beginning with the simplest and proceeding to die moro 
ooii^>lez« 

The course is open to those who have had no previous instruction in 
zoology or biology, and is also advisable for students who have had a 
year's v/otk in the hi^ school. A special section for the latter wiO be 
formed in the laboratory, so diat acceptable work already done need not 
be duplicated. 

In the second semester, the basis of fht doctrine of organic evolution 
is set forth and its present status indicated. A large part of die time of 
this semester u devoted to observations on the development of animals, 
using eggs of fishes, amphibia, and the chick. 

Credit is not given ibiless the full course is completed. 

B1 — G>mparative Anatomy and Physiology of Vertebrates. 4 hours. 

Wed., Fri., 9. Laboratory work to be arranged on Tu.. Wed., 

Th., Fri.. 9-12. Professor Lcxnr and Mr. Rech. 

First Semester. — Gmiparative Anatomy. Study of Selected Vertebrate 

Types, continuing the work of Zoology A into die group of Vertebrates. 

The recitations and lectures will be based on Weidersheim*s "G>aipara- 

livc Anatomy of Vertebrates.** 

Second Semester. — ^Vertebrate Embryology, with a discussion of die 
broader problems opened by a study of the development of animals. 
Lectures and laboratory work. r^r^r^n]r> 

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126 NORTHWBSTBIRN UNiVUHSITT. 

B2 — ^bvertdiHrate Zoology. 3 

Mon^ Wed.. Fri^ 2. Dr. Haipul 

Tkb coune tnpplemenls Grane A, and eztaadi tbe teriei of Ijrpei 
ttudicd in tbat ccNine with reference to structure and development At- 
tention it given lergely to tke animak of dut region in respect lo llwir 
life-Ustories, habits, distribution, and adaptatbn lo tbeir enTironnwnL 
Some diTeisitj is permitted in die woik of different students. 

B3 — Phyaology. 3 boon. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 2. (Not given in 1906-07.) Dr. HAMPEm. 

Open to students wbo have had Zoology A or its equivaleat The 
first semester is given to general Phjrsiology. Reproduction, irritabilitjr, 
and metabolism are treated from the standpoint of die cell and the lower 
animals. Experiments upon the Protozoa and lower foims are i n cln ded 
in die laboratoij work. Verwom's Physiology is used with frequent 
references to odier audiofs. The second semester will be given to special 
Physiology. 

An adaptation of the work in Physiology is permitted as follows: 
Students who have not had previous training in Zoology will be admittod 
to a section in which die Essentials of Physiology are covered in a oouise 
or four hours e^fBHilmg mrou^ one semester. 

B4 — ^Rise and Development of General Biology and Zoology. I hour. 
Tu., 4. (Given in 1907-06 and in alternate jrears.) 

IVofessor Locr. 
Historical lectures in which the rise and development of Ceneral 
Biology and Zoology b traced from die Renascence of science to die 
present Particular attention is given to the beginning, die growdi. and 
the modification of fundamentel doctrines and princq>les diat have be- 
come fruitful in the nineteenth century. Intended primarily for sta- 
denlB taking odier work in the department The course is also open to 
students who have pursued elementary work in General Biology. 

C — Cytology and HistiJogy. 3 houn. 

Mon., 9. Laboratory hours to be arranged. Dr. Hakpeb. 

First Semester.— Cell-life and Elementary Histology. Anatomy and 

physiology of die cell, microscopical structure of die elemeDtary animal 

tissues, and principles and practice of die general mediods of nucroscop- 

ieal technique. 

Second Semester. — ^Microscopical Structure of the Animal Oiftti. 
Principles and practice of the important special mediods of micro 

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GOLLBQB OF LIBERAL ARTS. 127 

tecliBk|iie. WUmb's ^The Cell in Developiiient and bheritance*' lad 
Slohr't 'Textbook of Histology** m med. 

D — ^Phynology. 3 boon. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 3. Dr. Haver. 

Intended for ttudenli preparing for medicine. Bated on Hall's text- 
book and laboratory manual. It indadei all die first year of Phjtiok>gy 
in die Me<fical Scbool, and ii accepted in full for tbat ooune. 

E — ^The Central Nervous System and its Tenninal Organs. I hour* 
Tun 4. (GiTcn in 1906-09 and in alternate yean.) 

PfofeMor LocY. 
Two bourt of credit may be tecured in dw couim by adding to tbe 
lecture duee hours of laboratory work. 

First Semester. — ^The Central Nervous System. Comparative Stmc- 
ture of the Central Nervous Sjrstem. vritfa discussions on some of its 
physiological activities. 

Lectures and demonstrations, adapted to diose taking or oonlen^ating 
the study of Psychology, and to odiers who wish to become acquainted 
widi the structure and general physiology of the nervous system. 
Second Semester. — The Structure and Evolution of Sense Organs, 

F — ^Topics of bvestigation. 

May be elected as (a) five hours or (h) ten hows. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Locr. 

Open to students who have completed two years of work in ZoSlogy. 
Problems of limited extent are assigned after consultation with die pro- 
fessor in chargCt and worked out under his direction widi such help as 
n required. Tlus foims an mtrodnction to the work or ongpnal researdi* 
The completion of the course involves die consultation of die literature 
bfuring on the problem in hand, and die preparation of a diesis em- 
bodying the results of the investigation. A reading familiarity with 
French and German is essential for entering this course. 

G-— Research WoiL 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Locr. 

For graduate students who have compleled the equivalent of the courses 
prescribed above; may be elected eidier for ten hours or for fifteen 
hours of credit. 

Similar to Course F, but vnni broaoer scop e and more rigid leqyiio- 
as to die diesH, whidi most embody a critical revicfw of die prin- 

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128 NORTHWB6TBRN UNIVERSITT. 

c^mI literature and mUtantkl conclutioiit bated apcm tbe penooal 
work of die student Meant of publicatioa will be fooad for all papen 
which are worthy of it 



PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

Many of the counes announced in the preceding pages have a 
bearing more or less direct on the professional or other career which 
a student may have in contemplation, and elective studies may well be 
chosen with this in mind. The following paragraphs omtain the 
Faculty regulations under which the student may in some cases shorten 
the time for securing both an academic and a professional degree, and 
indicate in a general way how a student in college may arrange his 
program of studies to advantage in preparation for a professional 
career. 

G>llege credit for studies pursued in professional schools is m all 
cases restricted to work done m the schools of this University, but 
time spent in a professional school cannot be counted toward meeting 
the requirement of one year of residence demanded of aU candidates 
for a bachelor's degree. 

Students Preparing for Medicine 

Studentt intending to enter the Medical School, and detiring to thorten the 
time required for degreet in bodi Artt and Medicine, may be released from 
further work in the G>llege of Liberal Artt when they have tecured ninety 
temetter-houn of credit. This credit must, howerer, include all the required 
ttudiet for the degree tou^t, at thown on pp. 71 and 72, and mutt fulfill the 
requirementt for a major and a minor. If die ttudent*t work it properly planned 
thit necettaiy credit can be tecured in three yeart. 

Under diit provision ttudentt may give their full time during the fourth 
year to work in the Medical School, but mutt continue regittration in College 
at if in regular attendance. The certificate from die Medical faculty that the 
equivalent of a full year*t woik hat been tatitfactorily accomplithed will be 
accepted in die G>Ilege at completing the one hundred and twenty hourt re- 
quired for die bachelort degree, but credit from the Medical School cannot be 
accepted in tubjectt for which credit hat already been given in the College of 
Liberal Artt. 



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GOLLBGB OF LIBBRAL ARTS. 129 

Tlus plan of combiiMcl counet makes it poctible to secure both degrees in 
seven jeais, three in the G>lle8e and four in the Medical School For all work 
done in the Medical School the full fees of diat school must be paid. 

On the other hand, some courses offered in the G>IIege of Liberal Aits 
cover the corresponding courses in the Medical School, and may be taken for 
credit in diat school. Students who have had an elementary course m Physics 
and who complete Chemistiy A and B, and the second semester of Giemistry 
C (Volumetric Analysu) in the College laboratories will be given credit for 
dembtry a, b, c, d, e, f , that is, first year Giemistry in the Medical School. 
Those who complete Zoology A, Bl, C and D will receive credit for Histology 
and Embryology a, b, c d, e, and Physiology a, b, c, d, e, in the Medical 
School. Students who include these courses in their college program may trans- 
fer lo die Medical School at graduation and enter that school with i^iprozi- 
mately a year of advanced credit. They will thus be able to complete the 
Medical course in three years, securing both degrees in seven years, four in 
College and three m the Metfical School. 

If further, by careful planning from the first, the student is able to include 
the courses mentioned in Chemistry and Zoology in his first ninety hours of 
crecfit, the requirements as to specified subjects and as lo major and minor being 
at die same time met, he may enter the Medical School for his fourth year, and 
complete the requirements for both degrees in six years, three in College and 
three in die Medical School, but diis can only be accomplished under favorable 
conditions. The courses in Anatomy required in the first year of the Medical 
program may be completed in the laboratories of the Dental School during the 
diird year of residence in die College. 

Students who intend to spend but three years in actual attendance upon 
lectures in die Medical School should formally register in that school a year 
earlier. 

For students who plan lo secure both degrees m six years, die follo¥ring 
order of studies in College is suggested. To better ensure its successful comple- 
tion one of die three-hour studies of die first year mig