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State College Record 

Vol. 39 APRIL, 1940 No. 8 

The North Carolina State College 

of 

Agriculture and Engineering 

of 
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 




THE CATALOG 

1939-1940 
CAnnouncements for the Session 1940-1941 



STATE COLLEGE STATION 
RALEIGH 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



College Calendar 3 

Calendar for 1940-41 4 

I 

Officers 

The Consolidated University of North 

Carolina ^ 

Board of Trustees 5-6 

Executive Committee of the Trustees . 6 

Administrative Council ^ 

The North Carolina State College 8 

Officers of Administration 8 

Other Administrative Officers 8 

Special Officers 8 

Officers of Instruction : Faculty 9 

Fellows and Assistants 20 



II 

General Information 

The College 21 

Information for Applicants 23 

I. Admission 23 

II. Expenses 25 

III. Registration 27 

IV. Financial Aids and Scholarships.. 28 

Student Activities 29 

Medals and Prizes 33 

Physical Education and Athletics 34 

Music 36 

College Publications 37 

Health of Students 37 

General Alumni Association 38 

D. H. Hill Library 38 

Young Men's Christian Association 40 

Military Training 41 



III 

School, Divisions, and Departments 

The Basic Division 43 

Organization and Objects 43 

Program of Study 45 

The School of Agriculture and Forestry.. 51 

Organization and Objects 51 

General Agriculture 53 

Curricula (See Index) 55 

Agricultural Engineering 58 

Agricultural Chemistry 65 

Forestry 66 

Landscape Architecture 73 

Wildlife Conservation and Manage- 
ment 80 

Agricultural Experiment Station 82 

Agricultural Extension Service 83 



PAGE 

The School of Engineering 84 

Organization and Objects 84 

Sei-vice Departments 89 

Pilots' Training School 91 

Engineering Experiment Station 92 

Engineering Curricula 94 

Aeronautical (Mechanical Depart- 
ment) 91, 126 

Architectural Engineering and 

Architecture 95 

Ceramic 99 

Chemical 102 

Civil 105 

Construction 106 

Highway 107 

Sanitary 107 

Electrical Ill 

General 115 

Geological 117 

Industrial 120 

Mechanical 122, 125 

Aeronautical 126 

Furniture 127 

Heating and Air-Conditioning... 127 

Division of Teacher Training 128 

Organization, Objects, Requirements.. 128 

Agricultural Education 130 

Industrial- Arts Education 132 

Occupational Information and 

Guidance 134 

Industrial Education 135 

The Textile School 137 

Organization, Objects, Requirements.. 137 
Yarn Manufacturing and 

Knitting 139, 143 

Weaving and Designing 140, 144 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing ...141. 143 

Textile Research 141 

Textile Manufacturing 142 

Textile Management 144 

Division of Graduate Instruction 145 

Division of College Extension 149 

The Summer Session 150 



IV 
Description of Courses, in alphabetic 

order by Departments 151 

V 

Scholastic Records 

Summary of Enrollment, 1939-40 294 

Degrees, Conferred, 1939 296 

Medals and Prizes, Scholarship 

Day, 1939 307 

VI 

Program, Fiftieth Anniversary Cele- 
bration 311 

Index 314 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1940 
Sept. 9, Monday, 3 P. M. 
Sept, 10, Tuesday 
Sept. 11, 12, Wednesday 

and Thursday 
Sept. 13, Friday 
Sept. 16, Monday 
Sept. 21, Saturday, 

12 Noon 
Oct. 21, Monday 
Nov. 2, Saturday 
Nov. 11, Monday 

(not a holiday) 
Nov. 28, Thursday 
Dec. 11, Wednesday 

1941 
Jan. 2, Thursday 
Jan. 3, Friday 
Jan. 7, Tuesday 

Feb. 3, Monday 
Feb. 12, Wednesday 
March 19, Wednesday 

March 25, Tuesday 
March 26, Wednesday 
March 31, Monday, 

5 P. M. 
April 28, Monday 
April28-May 3, 

Monday-Saturday 
May 7, Wednesday 
May 8, Thursday 

(not a holiday) 
June 5, Thursday 
June 8, 9, 

Sunday, Monday 



First Term 

College Faculty Meeting 
*Registration of Freshmen 
Admission with advance standing 

*Registration of Soph., Jr., Sr., and Grad. Students 

Class work begins 

Last day in the first tenn for registration or change 

in registration 
Mid-term reports due 

Final date for dropping a course without a grade of F 
Observance of Armistice Day 

Thanksgiving holiday 
First term ends 

Second Term 

* Second term registration of all students 

Class work begins 

Last day in the second term for registration or change 

in registration 
Mid-term reports due 

Final date for dropping a course without a grade of F 
Second term ends 

Third Term 
*Third term registration of all students 
Class work begins 
Last day in the third term for registration or change 

in registration 
Mid-term reports due *^ i/ » 

Inspection trips for seniors <^*j^^ tj— jt^ttyj 

Final date for dropping a course without a grade of F 
Obsei-vance of Scholarship Day 

Third term ends 
Commencement Exercises 



Summer School 

*Registration for summer school 
Class work begins 

Final date for registration for credit 
Summer term ends 
Final examinations are held on the six recitation days preceding the end 
of each term. 



June 16, Monday 
June 17, Tuesday 
June 17, Tuesday 
July 25, Friday 



* An extra fee is charged for registration after the day designated for registration. 











1940 












JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 








S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 






12 3 4 5 

7 S 9 10 11 12 

14 15 16 17 IS 19 

21 22 23 24 25 26 

28 29 30 31 


6 
13 
20 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 IS 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

2S 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

7 S 9 10 11 12 

14 15 16 17 18 19 

21 22 23 24 25 26 

2S 29 30 31 


6 
13 
20 
27 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 S 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 IS 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 2S 29 30 31 






FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NO\-EMBER 






3 M T W T F 


s 


s ^f T w 1 


F S 


S M T W T F 


s 


3 M T W T F S 






1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 IS 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

IS 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 IS 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 






MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 






S M T W T F 


s 


S M T W T 


F S 


3 M T W T F 


R 


S M T W T F S 






1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 2S 29 30 
31 


2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 IS 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 


1 

7 S 

14 15 

21 22 

2S 29 


12 3 4 5 6 
8 9 10 11 12 13 
15 16 17 18 19 20 
22 23 24 25 26 27 
29 30 


14 

21 
2S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 IS 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 












1941 












JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 








S M T W T F 


s 


S M T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T \V T F S 






1 2 3 
5 6 7 8 9 10 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 2S 29 30 31 


4 
11 
IS 
25 


1 2 3 

6 7 8 9 10 

13 14 15 13 17 

20 21 22 23 24 

27 28 29 30 


4 5 

11 12 
IS 19 
25 26 


12 3 4 

5 7 8 9 10 11 
13 14 15 16 17 IS 
20 21 22 23 24 25 
27 28 29 30 31 


5 
12 
19 
26 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 IS 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 






FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 






S M T W T F 


5 


S M T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F 


s 


S M T W T F S 






2 3 4 5 6 7 
9 10 11 12 13 14 
16 17 IS 19 20 21 
23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 
8 
15 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 2S 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 IS 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 IS 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 2S 29 

30 






MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 






S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F 


s 


S M T W T F S 






2 3 4 5 6 7 
9 10 11 12 13 14 
16 17 IS 19 20 21 
23 24 25 25 27 28 
30 31 


1 
8 

15 
22 

29 


12 3 4 5 
8 9 10 11 12 
15 16 17 IS 1" 
22 23 24 25 26 
29 30 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 

27 2S 


12 3 4 5 

7 8 9 10 11 12 

14 15 16 17 18 19 

21 22 23 24 25 26 

2S 29 30 


6 
13 

20 
27 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 






— 
















I. OFFICERS 

The Consolidated University of North Carolina 

The State College of Agriculture and Engineering, Raleigh 

The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

The Woman's College of North Carolina, Greensboro 

Board of Trustees 

Governor Clyde R. Hoey, President Ex Officio 

Clyde A. Erwin, State Supt. of Public Instruction, Member Ex Officio 

* Henry M. London, Secretary 

Robert B. House, Acting Secretary 

Term Expiring April 1, 1941 



J. E. Butler Morganton 

Miss Annie M. Cherry Raleigh 

Hayden Clement Salisbury 

Josephus Daniels Raleigh 

C. C. Efird Albemarle 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus Raleigh 

R. 0. Everett Durham 

Richard T. Fountain Rocky Mount 

Jones Fuller Durham 

J. A. Gray Winston-Salem 

J. D. Grimes Washington 

R. L. Harris Roxboro 

R. E. Little Wadesboro 



Mrs. Lillie C. Mebane Spray 

Cameron Morrison Charlotte 

Harriss Newman Wilmington 

Clarence Poe Raleigh 

J. H. Poole West End 

M. L. Ritch Charlotte 

Miss Easdale Shaw Rockingham 

Mrs. May L. Tomlinson High Point 

I. B. Tucker Whiteville 

G. R. Ward Wallace 

J. K. Wilson Elizabeth City 

Graham Woodard Wilson 



Term Expiring April 1. 1943 



A. B. Andrews Raleigh 

Dudley Bagley Moyock 

W. D. Barbee Seaboard 

K. P. Battle Rocky Mount 

J, A. Bridger Bladenboro 

Mrs. Minnie M. Brown Chadbourn 

C. F. Gates Faison 

Thurmond Chatham Winston-Salem 

W. G. Clark Tarboro 

A. M. Dixon Gastonia 

R. A. Doughton Sparta 

T. C. Hoyle, Jr Greensboro 

R. G. Johnson Burgaw 



A. H. Johnston Asheville 

C. A. Jonas Lincolnton 

K. P. Lewis Durham 

A. H. London Pittsboro 

Mrs. E. L. McKee Sylva 

J. E. Millis High Point 

A. L. Monroe Raleigh 

K. B. Nixon Lincolnton 

J. J. Parker Charlotte 

R. J. Reynolds Winston-Salem 

Miss Lelia Styron New Bern 

S. F. Teague Goldsboro 



Deceased. 



State College Catalog 



Term Expiring April 1, 1945 



S. M. Blount -...._ - Washington 

V. S. Bryant _ Durham 

J. W. Clark Franklinville 

Mrs. Laura W. Cone Greensboro 

H. G. Connor Wilson 

I. P. Davis ~ Manteo 

J. G. Dawson „ Kinston 

C. T. Durham _ Chapel Hill 

R. R. Eagle _ New Bern 

J, B. Fearing Windsor 

A. D. Folger „. _ Mount Airy 

G. C. Green .„ - Weldon 

E. C. Gregory ^...._ Salisbury 



J. S. Hill Durham 

H. L. Ingram Asheboro 

B. K. Lassiter _ Oxford 

Mrs. D. H. Lassiter _ Charlotte 

*H. M. London Raleigh 

G. B. Mason Gastonia 

Edwin Pate „ Laurel Hill 

J. C. Pittman _ Sanford 

J. B. Stacy Ruffin 

K. S. Tanner _.._ „ Spindale 

Leslie Weil Goldsboro 

F. D. Winston Windsor 



Term Expiring April 1, 1947 



Mrs. Kate P. Arrington Warrenton 

H. D. Bateman Wilson 

E. H. Bellamy Wilmington 

Burton Craigre _ Winston-Salem 

W. E. Fenner Rocky Mount 

0. Max Gardner ..._ Shelby 

H. P. Grier, Jr Statesville 

J. H. Kerr, Sr Warrenton 

Ira T. Johnston ...._ Jefferson 

M. C. Lassiter Snow Hill 

W. L. Lumpkin Louisburg 

G. L. Lyerly Hickory 

H. B. Marrow „ _ Smithfield 



L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

W. D. Merritt Roxboro 

Walter Murphy Salisbury 

C. B. Park, Jr _ _. Raleigh 

Haj-wood Parker _ Asheville 

J. T. Pritchett _ Lenoir 

C. A. Rudisill Cherr\'\-ille 

George Stephens Asheville 

F. I. Sutton - - Kinston 

H. P. Taylor _...Wadesboro 

J. W. Umstead Chapel Hill 

Charles Whedbee Hertford 



EXECUTIVE COxMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

Governor Clyde R. Hoey, Chairman Ex Officio 

*Henry M. London, Secretary 

Robert B. House, Actiyig Secretary 



Mrs. Laura W. Cone Greensboro 

Josephus Daniels _.._ Raleigh 

J. S. Hill _ Durham 

Walter Murphy _.._ „ Salisbury 

Ha>-wood Parker Asheville 

J. i. Parker Charlotte 



Clarence Poe Raleigh 

Miss Easdale Shaw ......Rockingham 

I. B. Tucker _ - Whiteville 

Leslie Weil Goldsboro 

Charles Whedbee _..._ Hertford 



Deceased. 



Faculty 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

The Consolidated University of North Carolina 
Frank Porter Graham, President 



The North Carolina State College, 
Raleigh 

J. W. Harrelson, 

Dean of Administration 
William Hand Browne, Jr., 

Professor of Electrical 
Engineering 
M, E. Gardner, 

Professor of Horticulture 
Thomas Nelson, 

Dean of the Textile School 
J. L. Stuckey, 

Professor of Geolog^y 



The Woman's College, 
Greensboro 

W. C. Jackson, 

Dean of Administration 
Cornelia Strong, 

Professor of Mathematics 
Meta H. Miller, 

Professor of Romance 
Languages 
J. A. Highsmith, 

Professor of Psychology 
B. B. Kendrick, 

Professor of History 



The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

R, B. House, Dean of Administration 
A. R. Newsome, Professor of History 
R. E. Coker, Kenan Professor of Zoology 
Herman Glenn Baity, Professor of Sanitary and 

Municipal Engineering 
William F. Prouty, Professor of Stratigraphic Geology 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Porter Graham, President of the Consolidated University 

John William Harrelson, Dean of Administration 

Eugene Clyde Brooks, President Emeritus 



Faculty Council 

John William Harrelson, Chairman 
Dean of Administration 



B. F. Brown, 

Dean of the Basic Division 
T. E. Browne, Director, 

Division of Teacher Training 
William Hand Browne, Jr., Head 

Electrical Engineering 
Department 
E. L. Cloyd, 

Dean of Students 
W. L. Mayer, 

Director of Registration 
Z. P. Metcalf , Director of Instruction, 

School of Agriculture 



Thomas Nelson, Dean, 

Textile School 
R. F. Poole, Chairman, 

Graduate Studies Committee 
I. 0. Schaub, Dean, 

School of Agriculture and 
Forestry 
J. L. Stuckey, 

Professor of Geology 
B. R. Van Leer, Dean, 

School of Engineering 



Other Administrative OCficers 



A. F. Bowen, 

Treasurer and Budget OfiBcer 
A. C. Campbell, Physician 
F. H. Jeter, Director of Publicity 

E. S. King, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
C. R. Lefort, Assistant 

to Dean of Students 

F. E. Miller, Director 

of Station Farms 



W 



D 



F. Morris, Manager 
of Ser%ice Department 
M. Paul, Acting 
Alumni Secretary 
E. W. Ruggles, Director, 

College Extension 
John Graves Vann, 

Assistant Controller 
N. B. Watts, Self -Help Secretary 



Special Officers 



W. L. Godwin, 

Superintendent of the Laundry 
L. H. Harris, Steward 
C. D. Kutschinski, 

Director of Music 
J. P. Pillsbury, Landscape Architect 



A. A. Riddle, Superintendent, 

the Power Plant 
Ross Shumaker, College Architect 
L. L. Vaughan, College Engineer 
T. T. Wellons, 

Superintendent of Dormitories 



Faculty 9 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt.. President of the Uni- 
versity. 

John William Harrelsox, Dean of Administration. 

B.E., M.E., N. C. SUte CoUege. 

Eugene Clyde Brooks, President Evneritus and Research Professor of Edu- 
cation. 

A.B. LL.D.. Trinity College; LL.D., University of North Carolina; Litt.D.. Davidson 
College. 

WUXIAM Elton Adams, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
B.S., Ohio University. 

Kenneth George Althaus, Assistant Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Major, Infantry, U. S. Army; Graduate, Infantrj- School, Fort Benning, Ga. ; Graduate. 
Tank School, Fort Meade, Md. ; Graduate. Command and General Staff School, Fort 
Leavenworth, Kan. ; General Staff Eligibility List ; French Croix de Guerre with Palm ; 
Belgian War Cross. 

Donald Benton Anderson, Professor of Botany. 

B.A., B.Sc. in Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

LiNDSEY Otis Armstrong, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. state College. 

Whxiam Allen Bain, Assistunt Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S, N. C State College : MS., University of Wisconsin. 

Stanley Thomas Ballenger, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Luther Wesley Barnhardt, Assistant Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

A.B., Trinity College ; A.M., University of Wisconsin. 

Grady Wilton Bartlett, Instructor in Physics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State CoUege. 

Ge<WGE Bauerlein, Jr., Assistant Professor of History. 

B.S., Wake Forest CoUege ; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Edward William Boshart, Professor of Education (Industrial Arts and 
Vocational Guidance). 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

Carey Hoyt Bostian, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

A.B., Catawba College; M.S.. Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Charles Raymond Bramer, Associate Professor of Geological Engineering. 

B.S., E.M., Michigan College of Mining and Technology. 

William Staley Bridges, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Hermon Burke Briggs, Professor of Engineering Drawing and Descriptive 
Geometry. 
B.E., M.E., N. C. SUte College. 



10 State College Catalog 

Benjamin Franklin Brown, Dean of the Basic Division. 

B.S., Northwestern University. 

Harlan C. Brown, Acting Librarian. 

A.B., B.S. in L.S., University of Minnesota ; A.M. in L.S., University of Michigan. 

Robert Roderick Brown, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S. in E.E., University of Texas ; M.S. in E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Theodore Cecil Brown, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., M.E., University of Kentucky. 

Thomas Watson Brown, Professor of Milit<ii-y Science and Tactics. 

Colonel, Infantry, U. S. Army : Graduate, School of the Line ; Graduate, General Staff 
School ; Graduate, Army War College. 

Thomas Everette Browne, Director of the Division of Teacher Training. 

A.B., Wake Forest College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

William Hand Browne, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

A.B., P.A.E., B.E., Extra Ordinem, Johns Hopkins University. 

Murray F. Buell, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B.A., Cornell University ; M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Roberts C. Bullock, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina ; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Kenneth Walter Cameron, Instructor in English. 

A.B., A.M., West Virginia University ; S.T.B., General Theological Seminary. 

Kenneth Girard Carroll, Instructor in Physics. 

B.S., M.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology- ; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Hugh Lynn Caveness, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Trinity College ; M.A., Duke University. 

John Wesley Cell, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Thornton Chase, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Graduate, Infantry School, Fort Benning, Ga. ; Major, Infantrj-, U. S. Army. 

Joseph Deadrick Clark, Professor of English. 

B.A., Columbia University ; M.A., Harvard University. 

John Montgomery Clarkson, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Wofford College; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Shexden L. Clement, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

B.S., Mississippi Agricultural College ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Clinton B. Clevenger, Professor of Soils. 

B.S., M.S., Ohio State University ; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

William Leander Clevenger, Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

B.S. in Agriculture. Ohio State University ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Edward Lamar Cloyd, Dean of Students, Secretary of the Faculty. 

B.S. in M.E., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Walter Bingham Cochran, Assistant Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 
Major, Infantry, U. S. Army; Graduate, Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia. 



Faculty 11 

James Kirk Coggin, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.S., Cornell University. 

NORVAL White Conner, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

B.S., M.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Iowa State College. 

Freeman Waldo Cook, Instructor in Poultry Science. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State CoUege. 

Leon Emory Cook, Professor of Agricultural Education. 

A.B., B.S. in Agriculture, M.S., Cornell University. 

Ralph Leland Cope, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., B.S. in Ind. Educ, M.Ed., Pennsylvania State College. 

*J0HN Bee Cotner, Professor of Plant Breeding. 

B.Pd., Missouri State Teachers' College; M.S., N. C. State College; Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 

William Picot Crawley, Instructor in Weaving and Designing. 

B.S., N. C. Stete College. 

George Edward Crouch, Instructor in Physics. 

B.S., Furman University ; M.S., Vanderbilt University ; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina. 

George Redin Culberson, Instructor in Textiles. 

B.S.. N. C. State College. 

Charles Leon Davis, Instructor in Field Crops and Plant Breeding. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Philip Harvey Davis, Instructor in English. 

B.A., M.A., Miami University. 

Roy Styring Dearstyne, Professor of Poultry Science. 

B.S., University of Maryland ; M.S.. N. C. State College. 

John Bewley Derieux, Professor of Theoretical Physics. 

B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee ; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

** Alfred Alexander Dixon, Professor of Physics. 

B.S., Guilford College ; M.A., Haverford College ; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Charles Glenn Doak, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
Thomas Clare Doody, Instructor in Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of California. 

tJAMES Matthew Edwards, Jr., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

B.F.A., Yale University ; Registered Architect. 

Charles Edward Feltner, Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute ; S.M.C.E., University of North Carolina. 

Hilbert Adam Fisher, Professor of Mathematics. 

M.S., N. C. State College; graduate United States Naval Academy; graduate United 
States Submarine School. 

Clifford Auten Flanders, Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.S., Wagner College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

• Resigned. 

•• Deceased. 

t On leave. 



12 State College Catalog 

James Fontaine, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. state CoUege. 

Gaston Graham Fornes, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Draxcing. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. state College. 

Garnet Wolsey Forster, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

B.S., Cornell University ; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Alvin Marcus Fountain, Associate Professor of English. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State CoUege; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Peabody CoUege. 

Raymond Spivey Fouraker, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S. in E.E., A. and M. College of Texas ; M.S., University of Texas. 

Monroe Evans Gardner, Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Irvin 0. G.AilODNiCK, Instructor in Modern Languages. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

*Karl Claude Garrison, Professor of Psychology. 

B.S., Peabody College ; M.S., University of North Carolina ; Ph.D., Peabod>- College 

Herman Christian Gauc-er, Instructor in Potdtry Science. 

B.S., Connecticut State College; M.S., N. C. State College. 

**WlLFRED George Geile, Professor of Structural Engineering. 

Ph.B. in Civil Engineering, Yale University. 

Harvey Taylor Gibson, Instructor in English. 

B.A., Funnan University; M.A., Duke University. 

George Wallace Giles, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

B.S., University of Nebraska ; M.S., University of Missouri. 

Karl B. Glenn, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State CoUege. 

Richard Elliott Greaves, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

B.S., Wake Forest CoUege; B.S., N. C. SUte CoUege. 

Arthur Frederick Greaves- Walker, Professor of Ceramic Engineering. 

Cer.E., Ohio State University ; D.Sc, Alfred Universitj-. 

Ralph Waldo Green, Associate Professor of Marketing. 

B.S., CorneU Univer.sity: M.S., N. C. State College. 

tRoBERT Edward Lee Greene, Acting Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Economics. 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina State CoUege. 

Albert Harvey Grimshaw, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Graduate of the New Bedford Textile School ; B.S., M.S., N. C. State Collegt. 

Claude Delbert Grinnells, Associate Professor of Veterinary Science. 

B.S., University of Minnesota; D.V.M., ComeU University; M.S., University of Minne- 
sota. 

Frank F.^rrier Groseclose, Associate Professor of Industrial Eyigineering. 

BS- in M.E., M.S. in M.E., Virginia Polv-technic Institute. 

* Resigned effective June 30, 1S40. 
I On leave. 
** Deceased. 



Faculty 13 

Martin Allen Hagerstrand, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Sergeant, DEML, U. S. Army ; Graduate, Thomason Act School ; U. S. Army. 

Frederick Morgan Haig, Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry and 
Dairying. 
B.S., University of Maryland ; M.S., N. C. Stete College. 

Reinard Harkema, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

A.B., Calvin College ; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Thomas Perrin Harrison, Dean Emeritus of the College; Editor of Official 
College Publications. 

B.S., Citadel ; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University ; LL.D., Citadel. 

Thomas Roy Hart, Professor of Weaving and Designing. 

B.E.. T.E., M.S., N. C. state CoUege. 

LoDWiCK Charles Hartley, Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., Fui-man University ; M.A., Columbia University ; Ph.D., Princeton UniveRiity. 

Arthur Courtney Hayes, Instmctor in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Ph.B., Brown University; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Charles McGee Heck, Professor of Physics. 

A.B., Wake Forest College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

William Norwood Hicks, Associate Professor of Ethics and Religion. 

B.E., N. C. state College ; A.B., Duke University ; M.A., Oberlin College : M.S., N. C. 
State College. 

John Thomas Hilton, Professor of Yai-^i Maymfacture. 

Diploma Bradford Durfee Textile School ; B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Lawrence Earle Hinkle, Professor of Modern Languages. 

B.A., University of Colorado ; M.A., Columbia University ; D.S.es L., Dijon. 

Elmer George Hoefer, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., M.E., University of Wisconsin. 

Julius Valentine Hofmann, Professor of Forestry. 

B.S.F., M.F., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Earl Henry Hostetler, Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

B.S. in Agr., Kansas State Agricultui-al College ; M.Agr., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Franklin Carlisle Johnson, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., North Carolina State College ; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technologj'. 

Theodore Sedgwick Johnson, Professor of Industry. 

B.S., Denison University ; C.E., Ohio State University ; M.S., Denison University. 

Arthur Dave Jones, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., A.M., University of Cincinnati. 

Robert Edward Jones, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Major, Infantry, U. S. Army ; Graduate, Infantry School, Fort Benning, Ga. 

Walter Edward Jordan, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest College ; M.S., N. C. State CoUege. 

Leroy Monroe Keever, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. state CoUege. 



14 State College Catalog 

Henderson Grady Kincheloe, Instructor in English. 

A.B., University of Richmond ; A.M., Har\'ard University. 

Leonard Marion Knight, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Sergeant, DEML, U. S. Army. 

William Wltith Kriegel, Instructor in Ceramic Engineering. 

B.S. in Civil and Ceramic Engineering, University of Washington ; M.S., Montana School 
of Mines ; D.R.Ing., Technische Hochschule, Hanover, Germany. 

Arthur I, Ladu, Professor of English. 

A.B., Syracuse University ; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Claude Milton Lambe, Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

B.E., N. C. State College. 

Forrest Wesley Lancaster, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.S., Ch.E., Purdue University. 

Gerald Langford, Instructor in English. 

B.A., M.A., University of Virginia. 

Bryon Elmer Lauer, Associate Professar of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S. in Ch.E., Oregon State College ; M.S. in Ch.E., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Marc C. Leager, Professor of Statistics and Accounting. 

B.S., M.S., University of Minnesota i Ph.D., Columbia University. 

John Emery Lelar, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S. in E.E., Virginia Poh-technic Institute; E.E., Te.xas A. & M. College. 

Frank Adolph Lee, Jr., Assistajit Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., Randolph Macon College; M.A., University of Virginia. 

Samuel George Lehman, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

B.S. in Ed., Ohio University: M.S., N. C. State College; Ph.D., Washington University. 

Henry Peterson Leighton, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Staff Sergeant, DEML, U. S. Army. 

Jack Levine, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., University of California at Los Angeles ; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

John Gary Lewis, Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. state College. 

David Alexander Lockmiller, Associate Professor of History and Political 

Science. 

B.Ph., M.A., Emory University; LL.B., Cumberland University; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina. 

James Fulton Lutz, Associate Professor of Soils. 

B.S., N. C. State College ; M.A.. Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Frank Hallam Lyell, Instructor in English. 

A.B., University of Virginia ; M.A., Columbia University ; Ph.D., Princeton University. 



Charles Walker Maddison, Instructor in Foundry. 
tRoBERT James Maddison, Instructor in Foundry. 

B.S. in M.E., Newark College of Engineering. 
t On leave. 



Faculty 15 

Cakroll Lamb Mann, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B.S., C.E.. N. C. state CoUege. 

Roger Powelx, Marshalx,, Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Wake Forest Collegre ; M.A., Columbia University; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Francis Earl Mask, Instructor in Mathemntics. 

B.S.. M.S., N. C. State College. 

Joe Thomas Massey, Instructor in Engineering Mechanics. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Frederick Harold McCutcheon, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

B.S.. M.S., North Dakota State College ; Ph.D., Duke University. 

William McGehee, Assistnyit Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., University of the South ; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody College. 

Herman Russell McLawhorn, Jr., Instructor in Architecture. 

B.S., North Carolina State College; B.F.A., Yale University; Registered Architect. 

Frank Barnard Meacham, Assistant Professor of Zoology and Entomology. 

B.S.. M.S., N. C. state College. 

Jefferson Sullivan Meares, Associate Professor of Physics. 

B.S., University of South Carolina ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Zeno Payne Metcalf, Director of iTistniction, School of Agriculture and 
Forestry and Professor of Zoology. 

A.B., Ohio State University ; D.Sc, Harvard University. 

Gordon Kennedy Middleton, Professor of Plant Breeding. 

B.S.. N. C. State College ; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Marshall William Millar, Instructor in Education. 

B.S., Stout Institute. 

Arthur Stehman Miller, Instructor in Economics. 

B.S., Elizabethtown College ; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

John Fletcher Miller, Head of Department of Physical Education and 

Athletics. 

B.Pd., Central Missouri Teachers' College; B.P.E., Springfield College of Physical 
Education. 

William Dykstra Miller, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

B.A., Reed College ; M.F., Ph.D., Yale University. 

Theodore Bertis Mitchell, Professor of Zoology and Entomology. 

B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College; M.S., N. C. State College; D.Sc, Harvard 
University. 

Reuben 0. Moen, Professor of Business Administration. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Perry Earl Moose, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.S., Purdue University. 

Carey Gardner Mumford, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Wake Forest College; A.M., Duke University. 

Howard M. Nahikian, Insti-uctor in Mathematics. 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 



16 State College Catalog 

Thomas Lewis Nash, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Graduate, United States Naval Academy. 

Thomas Nelson, Dean of the Textile School. 

D-Sc, N. C. State College. 

Edwin Hugh Paget, Associate Professor of English. 

B.L., Northwestern ; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

Charles Benjamin Park, Instructor Emeritus in Machine Shop. 
Hubert Vern Park, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., Lenoir-Rhj-ne College; M.A., Ph.D.. University of North C-arolina. 

John Mason Parker, III, Assistaiit Professor of Geology. 

A.B., .A.M., Ph.D., Cornell Univei^Hy. 

Leslie Rent)ALL Parkinson, Assistant Professor of Aeronautical 
Engineering. 

B.S., Guggenheim School of Aeronautics, New York University. 

Jehu DeWitt Paulson, Associate Professor of Architecture. 

B.F.A., Yale University. 

Robert James Pearsall, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.E.. N. C. State College. 

George Buren Peeler, Instructor in Weainng and Designing. 
B.S., N. C. State College. 

Joshua Plummer Pillsbury, Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College. 

Robert Franklin Poole, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

B.S., Clemson College : M.S., PhJ)., Rutgers University ; D.Sc. Ciemson Cdlege. 

Glenn Orvice Randall, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S., University of Arkansas : M.S.. Iowa State College. 

Edgar Eugene Randolph, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

A.B., A.M., PhJ)., University of North Carolina. 

t Willis Alton Reid, Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.S., Wake Forest College. 

Robert B.arton Rice, Professor of Experimental Engineering. 

B.S., Tufts College ; A.M., Coltimbia University. 

Wallace Carl Riddick, Dean Emeritus of the School of Engineering and 

Professor of Hydraulics. 

A.B., University of North Carolina ; C.E., LL.D.. Lehigh University ; LL.D.. Waie 
Forest College. 

Jackson Ashcraft Rigntty, Instructor in Field Crops and Plant Breeding. 

B.S.. New Mexico State CoDege ; M.S.. Iowa State College. 

Macon Rogers Rowland, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., N. C. Stete CoUege. 

Robert Henry Ruffn-er, Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying. 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., N. C. State College. 
t On leave. 



Faculty 17 

Carl Nichols Sanford, Insfnictor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., Oregon State College. 

George Howard Satterfield, Professor of Biochemistry. 

A.B., Duke University ; B.S., University of North Carolina ; M.A., Duke University. 

Howard Ernest Satterfield, Associate Professor of Experimental 
Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., M.E., Purdue University. 

Ira Obed Sch.^ub, Dean of the School of Agriculture and. Forestry ayid Direc- 
tor of Agricultural Extension. 
B.S., N. C. State College ; D.Sc, Clemson College. 

WAYL.A.ND Pritchard Seagraves, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

L. Walter Seegers, Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania. 

Walter Eugene Selkinghaus, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., Newark College of Engineering. 

^R.w.mond Rollins Sermon, Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

B.P.E., Springfield College of Physical Education ; B.E., D.O., Kirksville School of 
Osteopathy. 

Howard Burton Shaw, Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

A.B., B.C.E., University of North Carolina ; A.M., Harvard University. 

Alfred Bernard Rowland Shelley, Instructor in English. 

B.S., Tufts College : A.M., Har\ard University. 

William Edward Shinn, Associate Professor of Weaving and Designing. 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 

Merle Franklin Show alter, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Indiana University; M.S., Purdue University. 

Clarence B. Shulenberger, Associate Professor of Accounting. 

A.B., Roanoke College ; A.M., Columbia University. 

tRoss Edward Shumaker, Professor of Architecture. 

B.Arch., Ohio State University : Registered Architect. 

Ivan Vaughan Detweiler Shunk, Associate Professor of Botany. 

A.B., A.M., University of West Virginia ; Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

WnxLAM Ernest Singer, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Manchester College ; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

George Kellogg Slocum, Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. state College. 

George Wallace Smith, Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

B.S.E.E., University of North Carolina; M.S.E. in C.E., D.Sc, University of Michigan. 

*Glenn R. Smith, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State CoUege ; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

John Warren Smith, Associate Professor of Industrial Education. 

B.S., Miami University, O.xford, Ohio ; M.S., Columbia University. 

* Resigned effective July 1. 1940. 
t On leave until January 1940. 



18 State College Catalog 

Raymond Franklin Stainback, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

S.B., S.M.E., University of North Carolina. 

Ross Oliver Stevens, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

B.S., M.S., University of Michigran. 

Maurice Alexander Strickland, Instructor in Economics. 

B.S., University of Georgia ; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

Jasper Leonidas Stuckey, Professor of Geology. 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Paul Porter Sutton, Instructor in Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Clarence Dalton Swaffar, Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

B.S., Oklahoma A. and M. College. 

David Boyd Thomas, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. state College. 

Horace Carter Thomas, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Technical Sergeant, DEML, U. S. Army. 

Harry Tucker, Professor of Highway Engineering and Director of the 
Engineering Experiment Station. 

B.A., B.S., C.E., Washington and Lee University. 

Blake Ragsdale Van Leer, Dean of the School of Engineering. 

B.S. in E.E., M.E., Purdue University ; M.S., University of California. 

tWiLLiAM Gardner Van Note, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

C.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute ; M.S., University of Vermont. 

Lillian Lee Vaughan, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.E.. N. C. state College; M.E., Columbia University. 

Edmund M. Waller, Instructor in Physical Education. Freshman Football 
Coach. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University, M.A., Peabody College. 

Robert Sullivan Warren, Assistant Professor of Physical Education and 
Assistant Coach of Football. 
D.O., American School of Osteopathy ; B.S., N. C. SUte College. 

David Stathem Weaver, Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

B.S., Ohio State University : M.S., N. C. State College. 

James Gray Weaver, Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. state College. 

Bertram Whittier Wells, Professor of Botany. 

A.B., M.A., Ohio State University ; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Fred Barnett Wheeler, Professor of Practical Mechanics and Superintend- 
ent of Shops. 

B.E.. M.E.. N. C. SUte College. 

Larry Alston Whitford, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. SUte College. 
t On leave. 



Faculty 19 

Charles Burgess Williams, Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Fred Carter Williams, Instructor in Architecture. 

B.S., N. C. state CoUege ; B.S.. University of Illinois. 

Har\'ey Page Williams, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., William and Mar>- College: M.A., Duke University. 

Leon Franklin Williams, Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

A.B.. A.M., Trinity College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Norwood Wade Williams, Assistant Professor of Poultry. 

B.S.. M.S., N. C. state College. 

Arthur John Wilson, Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

B.S., M.S.. N. C. State CoUege; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Thomas Leslie Wilson, Assista^it Professor of English. 

A.B., Catawba College ; A.M., Wofford College. 

Edwin Weems Winkler, Assistajit Professor of Eiectrical Engineering. 

S.B., Montana State College ; M.S., University of North Carolina. 

Sanford Richard Winston, Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., Western Reserve University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Lowell S. Winton, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S., Grove City CoUege ; M.A., Oberlin CoUege ; Ph.D., Duke University. 
Lenthall Wyman, Professor of Forestry. 

A.B., M.F., Harvard University. 

WiLLARD Kendall Wynn, Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., Wofford CoUege; M.A., Emor>' University; M.A., Columbia University. 

Robert Baker Wynne, Insti-uctor in English and Public Speaking. 

A.B., A.M., WUliam and Mary CoUege. 



20 



State College Catalog 



W. F. Alston, Botany 

J. J. Amero, Ceramic Engineering 

S. E. Bagley, Textile Chemistry 

and Dyeing 
E. A. Bailey, Chemistry 
J. B. Ballentine, Chemistry 
T. A. Bell, ChemistiT 
Leslie C. Brooks, Mathematics 
Frank B. Bro^sTi, Jr., Physics 
W. T. Bumette, Chemistry 
David Colvin, Chemisti-j^^ 
L. R. Crane, Engineering Mechanics 
L. F. Drum, Chemistry 
G. A. Gillenwater, Engineering 

Mechanics 
J. F. Gilmore, Engineering 

Mechanics 
M. S. Hayworth, Civil Engineering 
George P. Jones, Jr., Geological 

Engineering 



Teaching Fellows, 1939-40 

J. L. Katz, Chemistry 

Ray Otis Lackey, Animal Husbandry 

J. P. McMenamin, Botany 

E. S. Millsaps, Jr., Field Crops 

Hubert Lee Morgan, Jr., Electrical 

Engineering 
Charles E. Peters, Mathematics 
J. J. Pratt, Zoology and Entomology 
T. L. Quay, Entomologj' 
M. E. Ray, Civil Engineering 
S. C. Schell, Zoology and Entomology 
J. F. Seely, Chemical Engineering 
D. J. Shaw, Textile Chemistry 

and Dyeing 
W. A. Sherratt, Industrial Arts 
C. B. Shimer, Botany 
R. C. Walter, Mechanical 

Engineering 
R. W. Whitley, Chemistry 
R. W. Wrenn, Chemistry 



Research Fellows, 1939-40 



E. B. Browne, Field Crops and 

Plant Breeding 
C. L Bunn, Wildlife Conservation 

and Management 
Oscar William Deji;on, Animal 

Husbandry 
Albert Doub, Jr., Agricultural 

Economics 
J. W. Farrior, Field Crops and 

Plant Breeding 
G. R. Fowler, Plant Pathologj' 
J. W. Gibert, Field Crops and 

Plant Breeding 
R. M. Gibson, Field Crops and 

Plant Breeding 
R. H. Grady, Civil Engineering 



B. D. Hargrove, Soils 

Student Assistants, 1939-40 



L. W. Herrick, Poulti-y 
W. R. Hodgen, Soils 

C. B. Huffaker, Entomology 
Ralph S. Johnson, Plant Pathology 
R. C. Larkin, Agricultural Economics 
W. J. Majure, Wildlife Conservation 

and Management 
N. R. Page, Soils 
L. F. Remmert, Soils 
H. F. Robinson, Field Crops and 

Plant Breeding 

D. L. Stoddard, Plant Pathology 
H. L. Sv^•eezy, Plant Pathology 

M. H. Taylor, Wildlife Conservation 

and Management 
K. D. Tovey, Soils 
C. W. Turner, Soils 



Arnold C. Aspden, English 

C. C. Chadboum, English 

H. R. Crawford, English 

Macon M. Dalton, Mathematics 

Collins Horaer, English 

T. C. Jones, Zoology 

Robert V. Lamb, Mathematics 

J. McGinnis, Zoologj' 

E. W. McLeod, Yam Manufacture 



John H. Nichols, Electrical 

Engineering 
R. J. Payne, Weaving 
A. W. Pov.ell, Dyeing 
J. E. Rogers, Yarn Manufacture 
G. R. Sedberry, Weaving 
Nathaniel Stetson, English 
H. M. Taylor, Jr., Mathematics 



II. GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College 

Establishment. — The North Carolina State College of Agriculture and 
Engineering is one of the Land-Grant Colleges established under the provi- 
sions of the Morrill Act, passed by the Congress of the United States, June 
2, 1862. The first session of the College was that of 1889-1890. Prior to 
that date, the funds received by the State under the Land-Grant Act had 
been used by the University of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill. 

The name. The North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 
used in the establishment of the College, was changed by the General As- 
sembly — the Legislature of the State — in 1917 to its present form. 

In its session of 1931, the General Assembly passed an Act, of which the 
following is the first section: "That the University of North Carolina, the 
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering, and the 
North Carolina College for Women are hereby consolidated and merged 
into 'The University of North Carolina'." 

This Act placed the three institutions under one Board of Trustees and 
one President, the separate affairs of each institution being in charge of its 
own Administrative Dean. The effect of the Act, by correcting unnecessary 
duplication and focalizing the work of each of its members, has tended to 
create a strong, unified State University. 

Location, — State College Campus of thirty acres lies within the limits of 
Raleigh, a mile and a quarter west of the State Capitol, on United States 
Highway, Route 1. Adjoining the Campus westward, occupying four hun- 
dred fifty-six additional aci-es, are the College orchards, gardens, poultry 
yards, and the Central State Experiment Farms. 

A mile from the Campus, still farther westward, the College has recently 
acquired a tract of thirteen hundred acres, which is already being developed 
foi- experiment and research, and for demonstration, in Animal Husbandry. 
In the plans, special provision is being made for work in Dairy Industry in 
all its branches. Ample funds are available for suitable buildings and 
laboratories. 

The portion of this tract not at present adapted for its special use will be 
taken in charge for development by the Forestry Department of the Col- 
lege, 

Organization. — The organization of State College has as its objectives 
Campus Teaching, Extension Teaching, and Research. 

Campus Teaching occupies the School of Agriculture and Forestry, the 
School of Engineering, the Textile School; the Division of Teacher Training, 
the Graduate Division, the Basic Division, and the Summer Session. The 
Schools and the Basic Division are organized for teaching by Departments. 
The details of the organization, the equipment, and the work of each School, 
and of each Department are given under the various headings in the later 
pages of this Catalog. The work of the Summer Session is set forth in a 



22 State College Catalog 

special issue of State College Record published each year in December, a 
copy of which is sent on request. 

The Division of Military Training, includino: as the Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps, students of all classes in all Schools, is placed immediately under 
the College Administration. 

Extension Teaching is directed under the Division of College Extension. 
The work is closely coordinated with the work in the regular Departments 
of the College. In certain short courses, most of them in Agriculture and 
in Engineering, Extension overlaps with Campus Teaching. The whole 
State is covered in the activities of the Agricultural Extension Service. 

Research is conducted, by individuals or by Departments, very generally 
at State College. Specially organized work is done through the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, the Engineering Experiment Station, and the 
Textile Research Department. 

The Campus. — The Campus of State College presents an agreeably roll- 
ing terrain with adequate space west and south for expansion. Located on 
the eastern edge of the Piedmont Region of the State, within twenty-five 
miles of the Coastal Plain, opportunity is afforded for a pleasing variety of 
trees and shrubs in the landscaping. Fortunately, in the early years of the 
College a long-range plan for growth was made. This plan is now being 
intelligently followed. 

Under the sections of the Catalog devoted to Schools and their Depart- 
ments and to Di\nsions. are placed descriptions of buildings, laboratories, 
and facilities of each of these. 

General Service Buildings. — Holladay Hall, named for Colonel Alexander 
Quarles Holladay. first President of the College, 1889-1899, contains the 
general administrative offices of the College, and the offices and classrooms 
of the Military DiTision and of the Division of Teacher Training. 

The D. H. Hill Library, named for Doctor Daniel Har\'ey Hill, President 
of the College, 1908-1916, was dedicated in 1926. It contains now about 
55,000 volumes, exclusive of Government documents, and pamphlets. 

The Y. M. C. A. building, the erection of which was made possible by a 
donation from the Rockefeller Foundation, serves the religious and social 
life of the College. 

The Dining Hall, an H-shaped building, with kitchens, storage rooms, 
pantries, and refrigerators and other mechanical devices in the center and 
basement, has at each side, front and rear, a spacious dining hall. The 
ser\ice is on the cafeteria plan. 

The Frank Thompson Gymnasium, named in honor of Frank Martin 
Thompson, distinguished athlete, graduate of State College, Class of 1910, 
killed in service during the World War, is thoroughly equipped and modern 
in all its appointments. 

The Infirmarj-, recently enlarged and renovated, is a model of a small, 
special hospital. 

Pullen Hall, named in honor of R. Stanhope Pullen, donor of first sixty 



Information for Application 23 

acres of the College land, has classrooms on the first and basement floors. 
on the second floor, the College auditorium. 

The Power Plant, recently erected, centrally located, furnishes heat, elec- 
tric power, and hot water to all buildings on the Campus using these serv- 
ices. 

Twelve College Dormitories now in use accommodate approximately 1600 
students. Other students will room, as at present, in homes in the vicinity of 
the Campus and in fraternity houses. Full information in regard to dormi- 
tories is sent by the Registrar to applicants accepted for admission to the 
College, or by the Superintendent of Dormitories. 

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS 

I. Admission 

1. The first step toward admission to State College is to get from the 
Registrar, who is to be addressed at State College Station, Raleigh, a cer- 
tificate blank. After the blank has been filled out and signed by the prin- 
cipal or the superintendent of the high school or other preparatory school, 
the certificate is sent to the Registrar for his decision on admission, notice 
of which will be given promptly. 

The certificate must contain a statement from the school last attended of 
the good moral character of the applicant. 

2. Undergraduate students may be admitted as regular or special. 

(1) A regular students is one who is registered in a four-year curricu- 
lum. 

(2) Women may be admitted as regular students provided they present 
a minimum of forty-eight semester-hours credit of advanced col- 
lege standing and register in one of the regular curricula. 

(3) A special student is a person of mature age already engaged in 
some vocation in which instruction is desired. Such person may, 
upon presenting a satisfactory record of education and upon recom- 
mendation of the Dean of the School concerned, be admitted with- 
out the usual entrance requirements. 

Special students are not eligible for a degree, nor does work done 
as a special student have value for credit toward a degree. A spe- 
cial student cannot represent the College in any intercollegiate 
contest nor become a member of a fraternity. 

3. Requirements for admission of regular students. 

(1) Sixteen years is the minimum age for admission. 

(2) Fifteen units of credit, specified and elective as indicated below, 
are required for admission to the freshman class of four-year 
courses. 



24 State College Catalog 

(3) In exceptional instances a person of mature age may be admitted 
by the Dean of the School on the basis of his ability to carry the 
regular work of a curriculum in that school. 

(4) A unit is allowed for a subject pursued for a year, five periods a 
week, each period being at least forty minutes, and successfully 
passed in a high school accredited by the North Carolina State 
Department of Public Instruction or other preparatory school ac- 
credited by competent authority. 

(5) Applicants graduated by non-accredited four-year high schools 
may be admitted by passing successfully an entrance examination 
such as that prepared by the Examination Committee of the North 

Carolina College Conference. 

4. Subjects required for admission. 

(1) Specified Subjects. — 

Units of Credit 

English: Grammar, Composition, Literature 3 

History: United States or equivalent 1 

Algebra to Quadratics 1 

Algebra, Quadratics through Progressions 5 

Plane Geometry 1 

*Solid Geometry 5 

Any Science listed under Elective Subjects 1 

A student not offering for credit History of the United States is required 
to take the subject in his College course. 

(2) Elective Subjects. — The figure following each subject represents the 
maximum number of credits which will be accepted, including those in re- 
quired subjects. Fewer than that number may be accepted. 

Science — Units of History and Social Science — Units of 

Credit Credit 

Biology 1 United States or Equivalent 1 

Botany 1 English 1 

Chemistry 1 General 1 

General Science 1 Medieval and Modern 1 

Geography 1 Ancient 1 

Physics 1 North Carolina 5 

Physiology and Hygiene 1 Civics 1 

Zoology 1 Sociology 1 

Economics 1 



* Solid Geometry is required only in the School of Engineering. A special course is offered 
in college for applicants who do not present this credit for entrance. No college credit i« allowed 
for the course. 



Information for Application 25 

Language — Mathematics — 

English 4 Algebra 2.5 

French 2 Business Arithmetic 1 

German 2 Plane Geometry 1 

Latin 4 Solid Geometry 5 

Spanish 2 Trigonometry 5 

Miscellaneous Subjects (a total of not over 4 credits allowed) 

Agriculture 4 Drawing 1 

Bookkeeping 1 Mechanic Arts 2 

Stenography and Typewriting 1 Mill Practice 1 

Any other high school subject 1 

5. Advanced standing is allowed on work done in approved colleges upon 
presentation of a certificate or transcript, duly signed and sealed, to the 
Director of Registration. The transcript is evaluated in the Registration 
Office to determine the maximum amount of credit and is then sent to the 
Dean of the School concerned for a detailed evaluation of credits which can 
be used in the curriculum selected. 

Because of the scholastic requirements imposed upon resident students, 
advanced standing credit cannot be allowed for courses passed at other 
institutions with the lowest passing letter grade, or corresponding numerical 
grades. At least one year in residence is required for a degree. 

IL Expenses 

1. The total College expenses of a student resident of North Carolina 
need not for the regular College year exceed $450, for a non-resident of 
this State, $620. These amounts include the cost of room and board, heat 
and lights, tuition, fees and deposits, books, drawing instruments, laundry, 
and necessary incidentals. They do not include clothing, pocket money, or 
other incidentals. 

2. Non-residents of North Carolina pay an additional tuition charge. 
The College Administration has defined a non-resident student as a person 
who comes into North Carolina from another state for the purpose of at- 
tending college. 

In order to draw a clear line between resident and non-resident students, 
the Administration has ruled that all students whose parents have not been 
domiciled in North Carolina for more than six months immediately preced- 
ing the day of their first enrollment in the institution shall be termed non- 
resident students, with the following exceptions: 

(1) Students, twenty-one years of age at the time of their first 
matriculation, who have resided in North Carolina for more than 
one year preceding the day of their first enrollment. 

(2) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government sta- 
tioned in the State of North Carolina. 



26 State College Catalog 

(3) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government who 
are employed outside of the state, but who through law are per- 
mitted to retain their North Carolina citizenship. 

(4) Students in summer sessions. 

Students cannot claim a change in their resident status after matriculat- 
ing. Students furnishing incomplete or incorrect information in order to 
secure an in-state resident status shall be liable for dishonorable dismissal. 

3. The State law requires the prepajTiient of College accounts: the time 
and the amount of paj-ments must conform to this law. For the convenience 
of students, charges for tuition and fees may be made in two installments, 
one in September, one in January. Six per cent is charged on payments 
deferred beyond these dates. 

4. Applications for credit must be made to Mr. A. F. Bowen, Treasurer 
of the College, prior to registration day. Applications made later, if grant- 
ed, will require a special fee of $5 and possibly also the fee for late regis- 
tration. 

5. For each failure to meet deferred pajTnents as scheduled, a fee of $5 
is charged. 

6. Tuition and fees for residents of North Carolina as regular under- 
graduates or as special students scheduled for twelve or more credit hours 
are as follows: 

September Payment January Payment 

Tuition _ ._ $40 $40 

College Fees _ 37 _ _ „.... 37 

Student- Activities Fee _ - 4 _. 4 

Athletic Fee - „. 8 - _ 7 

Agricultural, and Agricultural- 
Education Students Fee 2 _ - _. 2 

* Engineering Students Fee 2 _ _ 1 

Textile Students Fee _ „ _ -..-. 1 

Military Deposit _..._ _ _ 10....f 0.3»„_ ^ %- 

Note. — Tuition and Fees are subject to change by the Board of Trustees 
without advance notice, 

7. Any part of the military deposit left after paying for lost or damaged 
equipment is returned. 

8. Non-residents of North Carolina registered in Forestry and Textiles 
will pay an additional S60 in September and S60 in January. Non-resident 
students registered in other curricula will pay an additional $85 in Septem- 
ber and $85 in January. 

9. Expenses include also the following: 



* The Engineering f.^ paid by students includes $1 for a subscription to "The Southern 
Engineer." 



-2? 



Inf(MImation for Application " 27 

September January 

Room Rent, if not already paid $16.50 to $27.00 $16.50 to $27.00 

Books and Supplies 20.00 to 35.00 8.00 

Drawing Equipment for those taking 

drawing 7.50 to 17.50 

Military Shoes and Supplies 6.50 

10. Room rent for the rest of the College year is the only regular pay- 
ment at the March registration. 

11. For graduate students and for special students taking fewer than 
twelve credit hours, tuition and fees are: 

(1) For each credit hour per term, $3, not including student-activities 

or athletic fees, which are optional. 

(2) Matriculation fee, $5, payable only once. 

12. College fees include those for registration, for hospital and medical 
attention, for library and lectures, for laboratories and classrooms, and for 
physical education. 

13. Student-activities fees include those for student government, student 
publications, and general student activities. 

14. Freshmen, unless living at home with their parents are required to 
room in specified College dormitories. 

15. Reservation of a room and the first payment of rent must be made 
before August 15 to obtain the most desirable room available. A reserva- 
tion m.ay be canceled and the payment therefore refunded upon notice be- 
fore September 1, not later. Information about rooms may be had by writ- 
ing Mr. T. T. Wellons, Superintendent of Dormitories. 

16. Dormitory rooms have necessary furniture, but each student must 
brmg own blankets, bed linen, and towels. 

17. Board at the College Cafeteria may be paid in cash for each meal, 
or in tickets bought at ten per cent discount from the cash price. 

18. The Self-Help Secretary, N. B. Watts, will, upon request, write of 
possible empIojTnent to those wishing to earn, while in College, money to 
help in paying expenses. 

19. A refund of the amount paid the College, less the registration fee and 
a reasonable charge for lodging and services, is made to a student with- 
drawing within ten days from the date of registration; on withdrawal later 
no refund will be made except of the military deposit. 

III. Registration 

1. A program of exercises during the first week is given each applicant 
for admission to the freshman class on his arrival upon the Campus. 

2. The Certificate of Admission approved beforehand by the Registrar 
for the School and the Department in which the applicant wishes to register 
must be ready for presentation. 

3. The dates indicated in the College Calendar for the registration of 



28 State College Catalog 

freshmen, of those applying for advanced credit, and of sophomores, juniors, 
seniors, and graduate students must be strictly observed. 

4. For registration after the scheduled date, an extra fee of $2 is required 
for the first day and $1 for each additional day until a maximum of $10 is 
reached. 

5. Directions in detail for registration are furnished each student on 
entering the registration room, the Gymnasium. 

6. Vaccination against smallpox is required at the time of registration 
unless the applicant furnishes a doctor's certificate indicating he has been 
successfully vaccinated Avithin two years preceding his registration. 

7. Inoculation against typhoid fever, though not compulsory, is urgently 
suggested for those entering the College. Free inoculation is offered by 
the College to all students. 

8. All new students will be given the Tuberculin Skin Test unless they 
present a statement from their family physician indicating that such a test 
has been taken during the past year. 

9. Admission to classes is permitted only after complete registration 
certified on the official card of the Registrar. All instructors will enforce 
this rule. 

IV. Financial Aids and Scholarships 

1. The Self -Help Secretary of the College Y. M. C. A. (see page 38) will 
assist those desiring employment to help pay expenses. 

2. A Student Loan Fund, first established by the State College Alumni 
Association, amounting now to $34,000, renders assistance to needy students 
of talent and high character. The Fund includes the Finley Loan Fund of 
$1,000 (see below), the Masonic Loan Fund, $4,500, the Frank M. Harper 
Loan Fund, $200, and the Escheats Loan Fund of $15,000. Contributions 
have also been made by the Sixth Masonic District and by the New Bern 
Masonic Theatre. 

At present, loans, restricted to juniors and seniors, are made at 6 per cent 
on good security. The fund being small and kept loaned out, new loans can 
be made only as old ones are repaid. 

The Finley Loan Fund is a memorial of William Wilson Finley by the 
Southern Railway Company, of which Mr. Finley was, at the time of his 
death, president. It is designated for needy students in Agriculture. 

3. The John Gray Blount Scholarships were endowed by Colonel W. B. 
Rodman, of Norfolk, Virginia, in memory of his great-grandfather. The 
maximum value of each of the two scholarships is $195. 

4. The Champion Paper and Fibre Company pro\'ides a fund for a Fellow- 
ship to encourage graduate study and research in Chemical Engineering. 

5. The Syd Alexander Scholarship was endowed by Mrs. Mary R. Alex- 



Student Activities 29 

ander of Charlotte, North Carolina, in memory of her husband, the late 
Sydenham B. Alexander, alumnus and trustee of State College. The returns 
from the endowment — $5,000 — are awarded to a student native and resident 
of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, who is pursuing a course in the 
School of Textiles of State College. 

6. The Barrett Company, Distributors of Arcadian American Nitrate of 
Soda, offer to 4-H Club members the following one-year scholarships: 

(1) To the member with the most distinguished record with a Corn- 

Club project. 

(2) To the member with the most distinguished record in Cotton-Club 

work. 

(3) To the member with the best Tobacco-Club record. 

(4) To the member with the best record in Horticulture. 

7. The North Carolina Cottonseed-Crushers Association offer to 4-H Club 
members the following one-year scholarships: 

(1) To the member making the best record in the Baby-Beef contest. 

(2) To the member making the best record in a dairy project. 

(3) To the member making the best Pig-Club record. 

8. (1) The Chilean Nitrate Educational Bureau offers a four-year scholar- 
ship to the 4-H Club member in North Carolina making the best record for 
three or more years in 4-H Club work. 

(2) The Chilean Nitrate Educational Bureau also offers a hundred 
scholarships of $5 each: one to the most distinguished Club boy from each 
of the hundred counties of North Carolina attending the 4-H Summer Short 
Course at State College. 

9. Graduate Fellowships are offered each year by State College, during 
the current year, thirty-four teaching, twelve research fellowships. As the 
number of these scholarships is limited, application should be made early 
to the Head of the Department concerned. 

10. As need arises, assistants in various departments are selected from 
upperclass or graduate students. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
Student Government 

Student Government, in accordance with an agreement between the stu- 
dents and the Board of Trustees of the College, undertakes "to handle all 
matters of student conduct, honor, and general student interest, and to pro- 
mote in Campus life self-control, personal responsibility, and loyalty to the 
College and the student body." 

The Student Council, the legislative-executive body for Student Govern- 
ment, is composed of one senior, one junior, and one sophomore from each 
of the Schools — Agriculture and Forestry, Engineering, and Textile — and 



30 State College Catalog 

one member chosen at large from the freshman class at the beginning of 
the second term. 

For guidance in its operation, the Constitution and Bylaws for Student 
Government has been adopted. 

Student Publications 

The Publications Board is composed of the editors and business managers 
of all student publications, the president and the past president of the junior 
class, the president of the Student Council, and five faculty members. The 
Board seeks to promote the interests of the College and of the publications, 
to insure cooperation between the publications, and to hold the loyal support 
of the faculty, the students, and the public. 

The Technician, the student newspaper, is delivered to each student's mail 
box every Friday morning of the regular College session. The charge for 
the paper is included in the student's publications fee. 

The Agromeck is the official annual published at the end of each scholastic 
year of the College. A copy of The Agromeck is also paid for by each stu- 
dent in his publications fee. 

The Wataugan. issued twice each term, is "a strictly humor magazine." 
The student's publications fee covers his charge for it. 

The Agriculturist, a monthly magazine in its field, was begun by the ac- 
tivities of the Alpha Zeta fraternity and the "Ag" Club. All students of 
the School of Agriculture and Forestry are concerned in this enterprise. 

The Southern Engineer, the organ of the School of Engineering, is man- 
aged by the Engineers' Council. They plan to issue four numbers during 
the regular College session. 

Pi-ne-tum is the annual of the Di\ision of Forestrj'. Its contents consti- 
tute a record of persons, specially the graduating class, and of events of the 
year interesting to students of the Di\ision and their friends. 

Clubs and Societies 

All clubs and societies endeavor to bring together students, several in- 
cluding members of the faculty, with the same interests or professional ob- 
jective in order to cultivate close personal relations and fellowship. Their 
chief purpose is to inculcate high professional consciousness and esprit de 
corps; and, with a \iew toward the accomplishment of these ends, they af- 
ford to members an opportunity to hear and to participate in discussions of 
professional problems and themselves to present papers on current technical 
topics. 

The Agricultural Club besides the usual activities, sponsors the Agricul- 
tural Fair and an annual "Barn-Warming." 



Student Activities 31 

The Forestry Club, having the usual program through the year, publishes 
its own annual, Pi-ne-tum. 

La Societe des Beaux Arts includes students in Architectural Engineering 
and those in Landscape Architecture. 

The Agricultural Engineering Club brings together students of this de- 
partment to discuss all phases of their specialty. 

The Agricultural Education Society devotes its attention to matters of in- 
terest to students who are preparing to become teachers of agriculture. 

Student Chapters in Engineering at State College represent the follow- 
ing national organizations: 

The American Ceramic Society 

The American Institute of Chemical Engineers 

The American Society of Civil Engineers 

The Associated General Contractors of America 

The American Institute of Electrical Engineers 

The National Society for the Advancement of Management 

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers 

The Institute of Aeronautical Sciences 

Theta Tau. National Professional Engineering Fraternity, Rho Chapter, 
at State College, has a membership exceeding two hundred. 

The Engineers' Council, composed of three students and a professor from 
each Department of the School of Engineering, publishes quarterly The 
Southern Engineer and sponsors the Engineers' Fair and Exposition 

The Tompkms Textile Society endeavors to keep abreast of whatever af- 
fects the textile industry, state, national, or foreign. For this society, the 
event of the year is the Textile Style Show and Exposition 

The International Relations Club, including faculty and student members, 
seeks to arouse intelligent and active interest in national and foreign affairs 

The Monogram Club has as its purpose to develop the highest order of 
sportsmanship in all athletics. 

State College Life-Saving Corps, affiliated with the Red Cross, is interest- 
ed m ways to accomplish the worthy ends indicated by its name. 

Honor Fraternities and Societies 

Honor Fraternities and Societies strive to encourage and reward high 
attamment m scholarship and character, and to instill lofty professional 
Ideals, with leadership in contribution to existing knowledge and in service 
as prime objectives. The following national fraternities and societies have 
Chapters or other organizations at State College: 

Alpha Zeta: Agricultural 

Eta Kappa Nu: Electrical Engineering 

Gamma Sigma Epsilon: Chemical 

Kappa Phi Kappa: Teaching 

Keramos: Ceramic Engineering 



32 State College Catalog 

Lambda Gamir.a Delta: Agricultural Judging 

Mu Beta Psi: Musical 

Phi Eta Sigma: Freshman, Scholarship 

Phi Kappa Phi: Scholarship; Character 

Phi Psi: Textile 

Pi Kappa Delta: Public Speaking 

Sigma Pi Alpha: Language 

Tau Beta Pi: Engineering 

Upsilon Sigma Alpha: Army 

Blue Key: Scholarship, Leadership. Student Activities 

Scabbard and Blade: Militarj,-; Pvcserve Officers Training Corps 

The following are organizations peculiar to State College: 
The Golden Chain: Citizenship, Senior 
The Order of St. Patrick: Engineer; Senior; Collegiate and Personal 

Distinction 
The Order of 30 and 3: Leadership; Sophom.ore 
The Pine Burr Society: Scholarship and Extracurricular Activity 
Sigrna Tau Sigma: Scholarship; Textile 



Social Fraternities 

Following are the national Greek-Letter Fraternities ha\'ing chapters at 
State College. Each chapter has in the ^-icinitj' of the Campus its own 
house. 

Alpha Gamma Rho Phi Kappa Tau 

Alpha Kappa Pi Pi Kappa Alpha 

Alpha Lambda Tau Pi Kappa Phi 

Delta Sigma Phi Sigma Alpha Mu 

Kappa Alpha Sigma Nu 

Kappa Sigma .Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Lambda Chi Alpiia Sigma Pi 

The Interfraternity Council, composed of two representatives from each 
chapter, has as its purpose to advance the interests of North Carolina State 
College; to promote the general interests and welfare of the associated fra- 
ternities as a body; and to insure cooperation between them in their rela- 
tions with the faculty, the student body, and the public in general. 



Faculty and Student Activities 33 



MEDALS AND PRIZES 



1. The Alpha Zeta Cup is awarded to the sophomore in Agriculture who 
during his freshman year made the highest scholastic average. 

2. The General Alumni Association of the College presents annually a 
trophy to the member of the graduating class who during his College course 
has most distinguished himself in athletics. 

3. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers presents annually its 
award to the sophomore who during his freshman year made the highest 
scholastic record. 

4. The Associated General Contractors of America Prize of a year's spe- 
cial training in construction in the field with pay, is awarded each year by 
the Carolina Branch of organization to the member of the graduating class 
in Construction Engineering who during his sophomore, junior, and senior 
years has made the highest scholastic record. 

5. The Elder P. D. Gold Citizenship Medal, founded by the late C. W. Gold 
in memory of his father and continued by his son, C. W. Gold, Jr., of Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, is awarded annually to the member of the graduating 
class who during his sophomore, junior, and senior years has most distin- 
guished himself in Student Citizenship. The qualities determining the award 
— scholarship, student leadership, athletics, and public speaking — are to be 
attested by the College Registrar, the Student Council, the Faculty Athletic 
Committee, and a committee composed of the ranking junior officer in each 
of the college societies in which public speaking is practiced. 

6. The Moland-Drysdale Corporation Scholarship. Cup, presented by Mr. 
George N. Moland, of Hendersonville, North Carolina, President of the Cor- 
poration, is awarded annually to the freshman in Ceramic Engineering who 
during the two terms preceding Scholai-ship Day, has the highest scholastic 
record together with interest shown in the activities of the department. 

7. The J. C. Steele Scholarship Cup, presented by J. C. Steele and Sons, of 
Statesville, North Carolina, to commemorate the establishment by Mr, 
Steele of the first plant for the manufacture in the South of ceramic ma- 
chinery, is awarded annually to the student of the three upper classes in the 
Department of Ceramic Engineering who has made during the three terms 
preceding Scholarship Day the highest scholastic record. In making the 
award, personality and interest in the activities of the Department are con- 
sidered. 

8. The Sigma Tau Sigma Cup is awarded annually to the senior in Tex- 
tiles who has the highest scholastic record. 

9. The Textile Colorist Medal is awarded annually to the senior who pre- 
sents the best thesis on some subject in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

10. Phi Kappa Phi, Honor Scholarship Society, awards each year a gold 
medal to the senior who as a junior, a silver medal to the junior who as a 
sophomore, and a bronze medal to the sophomore who as a freshman, made, 
respectively, the highest scholastic records. 



34 State Cou_£GX Cat.*log 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

Professor J. F. Miller, Head 
Associate Professor Pw. P.. Senron, Physical Education, Head Coach of 

Basketball and Track, Trainer. 
Assistant Professor C. G. Doak, Physical Education and Inrramurals. 
Assistant Professor R. S. Warren, Physical Education, Assistant Coach Fo-ot- 

ball and Basketball. 
Instructor E. M, Waller, Physical Education, Assistant Coach Football, 

Supervisory Coach Boxing. 
J. L. VonGlahn, Business Manager Athletics. 
Wade Ison, Director Athletic Publicity. 
Williams Newton, Head Cc£:h F:::':a".'. and Baseball. 
Herman Hickman, Assistar.: C:a:r. Fiotbaii and Track and Head Coach of 

Wrestling. 
W. A. Weeds, Assistant C'ach Football. 
R. W. Green. Head C':a:h Trr.-:s. 
L. W. Seegars, Assiitar.: il'-.ifr. Tenn:;. 
C. R. Lefort, Head Coacr. .--.vin-.rr.in?, 

Aims. — In general, the Ie;ar:r;.er: a;r.-s are: Cat to promote a hi^ier 
standard of physical fitne;; :hr:u^'h "big muscle" activities; (b) to de- 
velop habits, knowledge, ajtreiation, and skills in desirable sports, and 
athletic and gymnastic pr'-ceiur-s; (c) to develop the habit of safe rec- 
reative activities to be induigei :n after graduation. 

Organization. — The Department of Physical Education and Athletics is 
in the Basic Dinsion of the College. The program of service has three 
sections: Physical Education, offered in various curricula, for which college 
credit is given; Intramural Activities, for every interested student in the 
College; Intercollegiate Athletics, representative of the College. 

Control. — Ail activities of the Department are controlled by the College. 
Physical Education and Intramural Activities are under the supervision of 
the Dean of the Basic Divisioru Intercollegiate atbktic activities are under 
the supervision of the Athletic CounciL The Head of the Dqtartment seeks 
balance and coordination in the work of the three sections. He delegrates 
the work of the staff and sees that policies of the Department are carried 
out by them. To the Business Manager of Athletics is delegated the re- 
sponsibility for business, financial, and other and all details connected -s-th 
intercoHe^te contests. The members of the staflF are expected to give rea- 
sonable and capable assistance in any work of the Departrr^r'. r = far as :t 
does not interfere with their main speeializatkni. ^ley are re = r :r. = ;r.".e to 
the Head of the Dep artm e nt for carrying: out their duties. 

Buildings and Field ^.—t?.-^ Department of Physical Education and Ath- 
letics is quartered in the Frank Thompson GTrr.nasium. It is among the 
largest and best-equipped c: T.-oasia in the Sou-"r.. An attractive feature is 
a white-riled s-sdnoming r::l and natatorium. ^.-.'r. n-.o^em filter and chlori- 
nating systems. T>.e ne"v F:eld House, lo-oated at the south end of Rid dick 
Stadium, is the headquarters of the football squad. Offices of the football- 



Faculty and Student Activitiis 



35 



coaching staff are located in this building. Riddick Stadium, with new con- 
crete bleachers, seats 15,000 spectators. Freshman Field, adjacent to the 
Gj-mnasium, serves many purposes, such as freshman football, intramural 
games, physical-training classes, and varsiry baseball. The new quarter- 
mile track, vnth its 220-yard straightaways, is located just south of the 
Freshman Field. It has concrete stands seating about 3,000 spectator*! 
"Red Diamond" and "1911 Parade Field" are available for intramural con- 
tests. The College has ten excellent clay tennis courts, with some addi- 
tional contemplated. Upon the completion of the new dairy bams the site 
of the old bams will be used as a varsity baseball field and an intramural 
field. 

Activities.— The College requires all students to eni-oll in some tvpe of 
physical activity for two years, or six full terms. The classes meet twice 
a week and one term credit is given for each term's work. All students are 
required to take a physical and a medical examination at the time of regis- 
tering m college. Those who have subnormal conditions of any =ort are 
placed on the recall list. Students may receive free medical advice at any 
time All freshmen are required to take a course in Health Education which 
meets once a week for one term. This course consists of instruction in 
personal hygiene by members of the Physical Education Staff. A swimming 
requirement is also made for all freshmen, which must be met before grad- 
uation. ^ 

The required physical training courses are so standardized that thev are 
presented, instruction given, and examination required of each indi^idual 
student on the same basis as all other college courses. Students having 
physical defects which would interfere with their meeting the regular class 
requirements are placed in a restricted group activity. In general, the phy- 
ndivir^'^f activities fall in one of three groups: (a) those developing 
ndnidual physical efficiency, (b) those affording combative contests, (c) 
hose occupymg recreative or leisure time. Work for the most part is pre- 
scribed for freshmen, while election of activities is permitted sophomores 

the SouThirn ? t''''''"-?°''' "^^^'""^ ^'^'^ ^^"^^^ ^« - ---ber of 

InLl^l . Conference, and subscribes to its rules of eligibility for all 

ZlT2l'T ""''?•• '''^ ^'°^^"" ^°"^'^^^ °^ ^^^ organization and 
trainmg of representative varsity and freshman teams in the following 
sports: football, basketball, baseball, track, cross-countrv, .-restlL. boTg 
swimming, tennis, golf, and rifle competition. ^' 

Intramural Athletics.-Activities are fostered and promoted in manv lines 
athletic sports for the student body. Meets, tournaments, and leagues 
a e seasonally organized in twelve separate sports. Participation in tSe 
u d fth" '" ' "'""'^'^'^ '' '""'^ "°^ ^-^^- College 'credit. Spori 

work fn P^vsITfT V '^T'^^'^' "^'^ ^"^^^ "^^^ ^ ^^« -^--<^ '^-^ 
work in Physical Education. Instruction in the sports is given in the class 

^m "cu n?T if ' '7 ^^-^^^^^^^on is provided in the' intramural pro! 
gram. Cups, shields, and trophies are awarded winners in these com^ti- 



36 State College Catalog 

MUSIC 

Christian D. Kutschinski, Director 

Students with previous musical experience are encouraged to continue 
their musical activities in campus musical organizations for which they can 
qualify. 

The 80-piece R. O. T. C. band and 50-piece Drum and Bugle Corps furnish 
martial music for all military parades by the R. O. T. C. Regiment. 

The 80-piece Red-Coat Band plays and marches at all the football games, 
and at other campus and civic functions. Its membership comprises select 
R. O. T. C. and non-R. 0. T. C. bandsmen, who receive training in the funda- 
mentals of a marching band together with the R. O. T. C. Band, but devote 
some additional time in preparation for special programs. 

The band is also subdivided into smaller units which alternate in fur- 
nishing music at pep meetings, basketball games, and other such occasions. 

The Concert Band, composed of 60 of the most proficient musicians on the 
campus, concentrates on the study and performance of the finest in band- 
concert music. Its activities have greatly increased the cultural growth of 
those participating, and have done much toward increasing appreciation of 
music on the campus and in the community, in addition to providing whole- 
some entertainment. 

The Drum and Bugle Corps, besides functioning as a separate unit, is 
also combined with the band on certain occasions, giving State College a 
marching musical unit of 130 men, clad in flashy new red-and-white uni- 
forms, acquired in 1938 by contributions from students and faculty, and 
from interested citizens of Raleigh through the untiring efforts of The 
Junior Chamber of Commerce and the American Legion. 

Credit. — Juniors and seniors in the band who are not enrolled in the ad- 
vanced course R. 0. T. C. may obtain three term credits per year for Band 
when approved by the Director before registration. 

The Concert Orchestra is augmented by a number of the best musicians in 
Raleigh to round out the instrumentation to that of symphonic balance. Be- 
sides preparing concert programs, the orchestra is divided into smaller 
units to provide music of a lighter nature for numerous College functions. 

The Men's Glee Club rehearses three times a week, and alternates with 
the orchestra and bands in giving concerts throughout the year. It has 
proved to be a very popular extracurricular activity, and the group is in 
demand for concerts out of town and at civic functions in addition to those 
on the campus. 

A Male Quartet and small Chamber Music ensembles are encouraged. 



Health of Students 37 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

State College Record carries results of research and special studies by 
members of the Faculty and, in the April issue, the annual Catalog with 
announcements for the following year. 

Agricultural Experiment Station publishes many bulletins of research 
conducted by the staff. These are sent on request free to anyone in the 
State. 

Agricultural Extension Service issues circulars of practically useful in- 
formation on various home and farm problems. A list of those available or 
any circular is sent on request free to citizens of the State, 

The College publishes the results of experimental and research projects 
made by the Engineering Experiment Station and Engineering Departments 
of State College. Information concerning these publications may be ob- 
tained from the Director of the Station, Professor Harry Tucker. 

HEALTH OF STUDENTS 

The authorities of the College strive to protect the health of students in 
every way. Each student is given a thorough physical examination when 
he enters the College. If remedial defects are discovered, such as defec- 
tive tonsils or eyes, he is advised to have these defects corrected. If the 
defect is such that it may be corrected by exercise, the student is placed in 
a special class under the supervision of the Phj'sical Education Director in 
the Physical Education Department of the College. 

The Infirmary, maintained by the College, has accommodations for thirty- 
five bed patients. There is a staff of five: the College Physician, a Super- 
vising Nurse, an Assistant Nurse, a Night Nurse — all graduates of Class-A 
Hospitals — and a Laboratory and X-Ray Technician. 

A modernly equipped First-Aid Department, and a Laboratory and X-Ray 
Department are valuable features of the Infirmary. 

The College Physician visits the Infirmary regularly once daily and more 
often when necessary. The Infirmary is never closed. A graduate nurse 
is on duty day and night. Students have free access to the Infirmary at all 
times. 

Parents or guardians will be notified immediately by the Dean of Stu- 
dents in case of accident or serious illness of their sons, and no surgical 
operation will be performed, except in cases of extreme emergency, without 
full consent of parents. 

Please note: "The hospital and medical fee provides for students' hospi- 
tal service, general medical treatment, and the services of the nurses. 

"It does not provide for surgical operations nor private nursing; neither 
does it include the services of dentists, or any other specialist." 



38 State College Catalog 

THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Organizations. — The purpose of this organization is to promote 
the interests of State College and to foster among its former students a 
sentiment of regard for one another, an attachment to their Alma Mater, 
and the ideals of service to their fellow men; to interest prospective college 
students in the kind of training given at State College and the advantages 
which young men who are graduates of schools of science and technology 
have in the fields of useful employment. 

The annual business meeting of the General Alumni Association is held 
during the Commencement each year. OflBcers of the General Alumni Asso- 
ciation, members of the Alumni Executive Committee, members of the 
Alumni Loyalty Fund Council, and alumni representatives on the Athletic 
Council are elected at the annual meeting. 

Class reunions are held each year in connection with the annual meeting 
of the Association. These reunions are scheduled so that each class has a 
reunion the first year and subsequently, every five years after graduation. 

State College Club. — Local Chapters of the General Alumni Association 
may be organized wherever there is sufficient interest to justify a chapter. 
At present, there are nineteen chapters in North Carolina and eleven chap- 
ters outside the State. These organizations are called State College Clubs. 

The Alumni Office. — Records of both graduates and non-graduates are 
kept by the Alumni Office. The master file includes information on all 
former students; other files are arranged geographically and by classes. 
Biographical files are also kept on each graduate. 

The Alumni Office serves as a medium of communication between alumni 
and the College. The office is located on the main floor of Holladay Hall and 
is official headquarters for alumni when they visit the Campus. 

The Alumni News. — The ALUMNI NEWS is published monthly except 
July, August, and September by the General Alumni Association. The 
purpose of this publication is to keep alumni in touch with the College and 
with each other. The magazine is edited by the College News Bureau and 
the Alumni Office. Special items of news addressed to the Alumni Secre- 
tary about alumni or about State College are solicited. 

THE D. H. HILL LIBRARY 

Harlan Craig Brown, Acting Librarian. 

A.B., B.S. in L.S., University of Minnesota ; A.M. in L.S., Uni%-ersity of Michigan 

CLYr>E H. Cantrell, Circulcution Librarian. 

A.B., A.M.. A.B. in L.S., University of North Carolina 

Mrs. Reba Davis Cletvengeb, Reference Librarian. 

B.L.S., University of Illinois 

Miss Christine Coffey, Catalog Librarian. 

A.B., University of North Carolina : A.B. in L.S.. University of Michigan 



D. H. Hill Library 



39 



Cloyd Dake Gull, Periodicals Librarian. 

A.B.. Allegheny CoUege ; A.B.. A.M. in L.S., University of Michigan 

Miss Anne Leach Turner, Order Librarian. 

A.B.. University of North Carolina ; B.S. in L.S., Colombia University 

Miss Anna Elizabeth Valentine, Assistant in Cataloging. 

B.S.. N. C. state College ; A.B. in L.S., University of North Carolina 

Beginning.— The library dates from December, 1889, when $500 was ap- 
propriated for the purchase of books as the nucleus of a library. From 
1889 to 1903, the library was housed on the second floor of the Administra- 
tion Building. Upon the completion of Pullen Hall, larger quarters on the 
first floor of that building were occupied. The library remained in Pullen 
Hall until 1926, when it was moved into its present building. 

Technical, First— Realizing that experience in the use of books is an es- 
sential part of the training of agriculturist, engineer, industrialist, and 
scientist, the College is striving to build strong, well-balanced collections in 
the degree-giving Departments, supported by adequate material in sup- 
plementary fields. To this end, the library is planned primarily to supply 
the study and research needs of the staflf and students of the College Its 
facilities, however, are available to all residents of the State for reference; 
and books on agricultural, scientific and technical subjects which are not 
available from the North Carolina Library Commission may be borrowed by 
any citizen of North Carolina, the borrower paying the transportation 
charges. 

Inclusive.-The library collection includes all books and periodicals be- 
longing to the College. The total number of cataloged volumes is approxi- 
mately 55,000, exclusive of a large number of publications of the Federal 
Government, the State Agricultural Experiment Stations, the State Exten- 
sion Division, the Engineering Experiment Station, and the agricultural de- 
partments of many foreign countries. Slightly more than 700 periodicals 
and newspapers are received currently. 

Facilities,-The library contains two reading rooms with a minimum seat- 
ng capacity of 164. The larger room is used for study. It contains a col- 
lection of encyclopedias, dictionaries, standard reference books in the dif- 
ferent fields of study, and the current issues of periodicals and newspapers. 
The Reference Desk, where all general and technical reference questions 
are answered, is conveniently located here. The smaller room, with a seat- 
ing capacity of about twenty, is used for general reading. It is comfort- 
ably furnished and has a collection of the best fiction and non-fiction of gen- 

^^l^T'T. ^" '^" ^"'^°'' "^ '^'' ^^^"^ ^^ <^ P^°^«>t« reading for 
pleasure, studying is not permitted in it. 

inst"r^*^'!o!!''"TJ^'°''^'"/r "^ '^" Freshman English classes, elementary 
mstruction in the use of the library is given during the fall quarter to aU 
new students. This instruction includes lectures, and problems in the use 

Sso offprf ?!, ^^u ™^^f"^"« ^"d«^e«' ^"d reference books. The librarian 
a^so oflTers a three-hour elective course in the use of the library durin<. the 
winter and spring quarters. uurin„ me 



40 State College Catalog 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Board of Directors 

F. B. Wheeler, Chairman 

E. L. Cloyd H. E. Satterfield 

David A. Worth E. W. Boshart 

L. L. Vaughan Thomas Nelson 

M. E. Gardner E. H. Hostetler 

B. F. Brown 

Employed Staff 

Edward S. King, General Secretary 
N. B. Watts, Self-Help Secretary 
Mrs. L. W. Bishop, Office Secretary 

Student Organizations 

The Student Cabinet 
The Freshman Cabinet 

The objective of the Young Men's Christian Association is to contribute 
whatever is lacking in the total educational situation to make the principles 
and spirit of the Christian religion effective in personal life and all social 
relationships. 

The Y. M. C. A. Building is the social and religious center of the cam- 
pus. On the basement floor there is a recreation room, a guest room, a 
barber shop, and the Student Supply Store. There is a spacious lobby, an 
auditorium, a reception room, a dining room, the self-help office, and the 
ser\-ice office on the first floor. The second floor provides space for the 
Faculty Club, Council of Student Government, a committee room, the Y. 
M. C. A. Cabinet Room, and the office of the General Secretary. 

The student-employment service is directed by the Self-Help Secretary 
of the Association. Approximately five hundred and fifty students obtain 
part-time work through the Y. M. C. A. 

Student and faculty organizations of all kinds use the facilities of the 
building for meetings and social gatherings, entertainments and lectures. 

The Y. M. C. A. program, directed by the Student Cabinet, includes, with 
other features not mentioned, work for new students; organizing a Fresh- 
man Cabinet; planning socials with the students from nearby women's col- 
leges; bringing to the campus eminent men to speak on such topics as men- 
and-women relationships and present-day international, racial, and economic 
questions; conducting an annual religious-emphasis week under the leader- 
ship of Christian ministers or laymen who understand student life; send- 
ing delegates to state, regional, and national Christian Student Confer- 
ences; issuing annually State College Handbook, a compendium of extra- 
curricular activities on the Campus, specially those of students, with per- 
sonnel for each organization for the year. 



Military Training 41 

MILITARY TRAINING 
The Military Department: The Reserve Officers Training Corps 

The Reserve OflScers Training Corps, the official designation of the mili- 
tary organization at State College, conducts the work in two courses of two 
years each: 

The Basic Course.— A required course for all physically fit freshmen and 
sophomores. 

The Advanced Course — Elective and selective for juniors and seniors who 
have successfully completed the Basic Course. Satisfactory completion of the 
Advanced Course leads to a commission as Second Lieutenant of Infantry 
in the Officers Reserve Corps. Students holding such a commission are as- 
signed, after graduation, to an Army Reserve Unit, usually in their own 
localities. 

Military Science I discusses in class such subjects as: the National De- 
fense Act, Military Courtesy and Discipline, Hygiene and First Aid, Mili- 
tary Organization, Current International Situation, and Military History, 
One hour per week is devoted to classroom instruction. 

Military Science II discusses Leadership, Scouting and Patrolling, Combat 
Principles of small units, Interior Guard Duty, and Military History. One 
hour per week is devoted to classroom instruction. 

Military Science III discusses Leadership, Aerial Photography, Supply and 
Mess Management, Care of Animals, Operation of Motor Vehicles, Defense 
against Chemical Agents, Combat Principles and Defensive Tactics. Three 
one-hour classroom periods are required. 

Military Science IV discusses Leadership, Military Law, Military History, 
Anti-Aircraft Defense, Infantry Weapons and Unit Organization, Combat 
Intelligence and Signal Communications. Three one-hour classroom periods 
are required. 

Drill.— All ROTC students are required to attend three one-hour drill 
periods per week. 

Uniforms, Equipment, Fees 
Army Officers.— The Federal Government details officers of the Regular 
Army as Instructors in the ROTC. The senior instructor is designated by 
the War Department as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. The 
Regular Army officers conduct all classroom instruction and supervise the 
instruction of the corps on the drill fields. 

Uniforms.— Uniforms for Basic Course students, and all instructional 
equipment are provided by the Federal Government. This is loaned to the 
Institution which is accountable to the Federal Government for its proper 
care and use. 

Financial Aid.— Members of the Advanced Course are paid a specified 
amount by the Federal Government toward the purchase of their uniforms. 
These uniforms are made in the pattern of the Army Officer uniform and 



42 State College Catalog 

can be used by the student for several years after he has received his com- 
mission in the Reserve Corps. In addition, the Advance Course student re- 
ceives from the Federal Government a daily pay amounting to approximate- 
ly twenty-five cents per day. An Advance Course student who withdraws 
from College prior to graduation must adjust his uniform account with the 
Military Department prior to departure from the campus. 

Deposit. — A deposit of ten dollars is required of each student member of 
the ROTC, as insurance against loss of equipment or damage thereto. A 
refund is made upon the return of the equipment in good condition. 

Expenses. — Approximately $7.50 is required by each student in the ROTC 
for the purchase of uniform shoes and other special articles not issued by 
the Government. 

Organization. — The ROTC at State College is organized into the following 
units: 

An Infantry Regiment of three battalions, organized for training pur- 
poses. 

A Military Band, supervised and trained by the Director of Music of 
the College. Instruments are provided by the Federal Government. Member- 
ship is open to all student musicians who can qualify. Time is given for 
instruction in concert music in addition to military-band music. 

A Military Drum and Bugle Corps, supervised and trained by cadet officers. 
Instruments are provided by the Military Department. 

Credits. — Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an ROTC 
Unit established in accordance with the provisions of the National Defense 
Act and Array Regulations. Record of a student's prior training in ROTC 
is obtained by the Military Department from the institution concerned. 

Educational Value. — The immediate purpose of the ROTC is to train of- 
ficers for service in defense of the country in an emergency. This is clearly 
stated in the National Defense Act of Congress. The ROTC at State Col- 
lege is in no sense militaristic. As a by-product, the general educational 
value of the training for any profession in civil life is of incalculable great- 
ness. Military discipline best instills the principle that to be a leader or to 
command one must first learn to obey. The training gives the advanced 
course student ample opportunity to practice the leadership of men result- 
ing in self-confidence, initiative, and courage. Habits of regularity, of 
punctuality, of thoroughness in every duty, of respect for one's seniors are 
inculcated, along with neatness in dress and cleanliness in person. The 
importance of correct posture and bearing in social and business intercourse, 
as well as for health, is implanted. 

The standard of discipline desired by the Military Department is exactly 
the same as the standard most helpful to fit college graduates to become 
honorable and outstanding members of their communities, in whatever pro- 
fession or calling they may engage. 



III. SCHOOLS, DIVISIONS, AND DEPARTMENTS 

THE BASIC DIVISION 

Benjamin Franklin Brown, Dean 

Organization.— Upon recommendation by President Graham, the Basic 
Division of the College was created by action of the Board of Trustees at 
its annual meeting on June 11, 1935. After considerable preliminary prep- 
aration, the organization of the Division became effective July 1, 1937, the 
first students being registered in the Division in September, 1938. For the 
first year it seemed advisable to include only the incoming freshmen. Be- 
ginning with the college year 1939-40 and thereafter, all freshmen and 
sophomores in the College will be registered in the Basic Division. 

Administratively, the Basic Division includes the Departments of Eco- 
nomics, English, Ethics and Religion, History and Government, Modem 
Languages, Physical Education, and Sociology. The Heads of the Depart- 
ments, or representatives from them, constituting the Administrative Board 
of the Division, together with the members of the several departments 
follow: 

Economics 

Associate Professor C. B. Shulenberger, Administrative Board 
Representative 
Professors B. F. Brown, R. O. Moen, M. C. Leager; Associate Professor R. 
W. Green; Instructors A. S. Miller, M. A. Strickland. 

English 

Associate Professor Lodwick C. Hartley, Acting Chairman 
Professors J. D. Clark, T. P. Harrison, A. I. Ladu; Associate Professors 
A. M. Fountain, E. H. Paget; Assistant Professors R. P. Marshall, 
T. L. Wilson, W. K. Wynn; Instructors K. W. Cameron, Philip H. Davis, 
H. T. Gibson, H. G. Kincheloe, Gerald Langford, F. H. Lyell A B R 
Shelley, R. B. Wynne, 

Ethics and Religion 

Associate Professor W. N. Hicks, Head of Department 

History and Political Science 

Associate Professor David A. Lockmiller, Acting Chairman 

Assistant Professors L. W. Earnhardt, George Bauerlein, Jr., 

L. Walter Seegers. 

Modern Languages 

Professor L. E. Hinkle, Head of Department 

Assistant Professor S. T. Ballenger; Instructor I. O. Garodnick 



44 State College Catalog 

Physical Education and Athletics 

Professor J. F. Miller, Head of Department 
For names of Physical Education staff and athletic coaches see page 34. 

Sociology 
Professor Sanford R. Winston, Head of Department 

The faculty is composed of the staff members of the Departments named 
above and in addition, the teachers of freshmen and sophomores from the 
Departments of Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Psy- 
chology, and Zoology. 

Purposes. — Broadly speaking, the purposes of the Basic Di\'ision are (a) 
to provide the best possible preliminary training during the first two years 
of the student's college career so that he can during the last two years 
successfully pursue his professional education in agriculture and forestry^ 
engineering, textiles, or vocational education; and (b) to provide effective 
guidance during the first two years, so that those students with well-chosen 
and fixed purposes can be well-advised in their educational careers and also 
so that those students who have made an unsatisfactory choice of curricu- 
lum or who have become uncertain of their careers, may receive helpful 
guidance and advice in finding themselves. 

More specifically it is the function of the Basic Division: 

First, to provide "two years of basic courses in the humanities, natural 
and exact sciences, and the social sciences as the foundation of the schools 
of agriculture and forestry, textiles and engineering;" ^ 

Second, "to provide in the curricula of the upper years of each technolo- 
gical school for a minimum of the more genei-al cultural courses in the 
humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences." - 

Student Guidance. — In carrying out its guidance program, the Basic 
Division avails itself of numerous tests which indicate the past achieve- 
ments and the present rate of progress of its students. Upon entering, all 
freshmen take the placement tests in Mathematics and in English, and the 
psychological examination. In addition to these, the advisers have the use 
of mid-term reports on all students, the final examination record, the dor- 
mitory reports, and the record from the Dean of Students. 

Each student is assigned to a technical adviser in the curriculum in which 
he is registered, to assist him in planning for his professional career. Stu- 
dents whose records come to indicate that they are not qualified for the 
curriculum they have chosen, or who become dissatisfied with their course, 
are assigned to guidance counselors for special assistance. 

Special Testing Service is provided by the Department of Psychology in 
order to assist advisers and counselors in the guidance of students. In 
addition to the tests given to all freshmen already referred to, provisions 
are made for testing individual students who present special problems for 

1 President Graham's Report to the Board oj Trustees, June 11, 1935, page 11. 
*Ibid. 



The Basic Division 



45 



study. The "testing service" rendered by the staff in Psychology admin- 
isters tests of aptitudes, personality, interests, and educational achieve- 
ment. Efforts are being made to provide a clinical approach to a study of 
the educational, vocational, and personality problems of individual students. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 
Programs of Study. — The Basic Division grants no degrees. It provides 
two years of fundamental training in preparation for the special training 
of the last two years in the other divisions of the college: 
The School of Agriculture and Foresti-y 
The Division of Teacher Training 
School of Engineering 
The Textile School 

Its programs of study are as follows : 

1. In Agriculture and Forestry. (For complete curricula see pages 51-81.) 
(a) Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture in one of 
the following fields — Agricultural Economics, Animal Production, 
Dairy Manufacturing, Entomology, Field Crops and Plant Breeding, 
Floriculture, Plant Pathology, Pomology, Poultry Science, Soils, and 
Vegetable Gardening. 



Freshman Year 



First 
Courses Term 

'Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

Chem. 101, 102. 103 4 

Zool. 101 4 

Bot. 102 

Geol. 120 

Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Math. Ill, 112 



Credits 
Second Third 
Term Term 
3 3 



MU. 101, 102, 103 or alt. 
Phy.s. Ed. 101, 102, 103 



Sophomore Year 

Credits 
First 
Courses Term 

Agr. Enff. 202 

Soils, 201 

Econ. 201. 202 3 

Agr. Econ. 202 

Phys. 115 5 

Zool. 202 or Bot. 221 

Zool. 102 

Bot. 101 4 

Chem. 221 

A. H. 202 

Poul. 201 3 

For. Ill 3 

Hort. 203 

F. C. 202 

Mil. 201, 202. 203 or alt. ... 2 
Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 ... 1 



Second 


Third 


Term 


Term 


3 








4 


3 








3 











5 


4 











4 





3 




















3 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



21 20 21 

(b) Agricultural Chemistry, — leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Agriculture. 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Zool. 101 4 

Bot. 102 

Geol. 120 

Hist. 101, 102. 103 3 

Math. Ill, 112 

Mil. 101, 102, 103 or alt. ... 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103 ... 1 

20 



4 


4 








4 








4 










4 


4 


2 


2 


1 


1 



20 



20 



Sophomore Year 

Bot. 101 4 

Zool. 102 

Zool. 202 or Bot. 221 

Chem. 211, 212, 213 4 

SoUs, 201 4 

Bot. 402 

A. H. 202 

Econ. 201. 202 3 

Agr. Econ. 202 

Mil. 201. 202, 203 or alt. ... 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 . 1 

18 









4 








5 


4 


4 








4 








3 


3 








3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



18 



46 



State College Catalog 



(c) Agricultural Engineering, — leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Agriculture. 



Freshman Year 

Math. 101, 102, 103 « 6 

Eng. 101, 102. 103 3 3 

Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 

M. E. 105, 106, 107 3 3 

Mil. 101, 102. 103 or alt 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103... 1 1 

19 19 



Summer requirement: — C. E. s200. 



Sophomore Year 

6 Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

3 Eng. 211, 231 3 3 

4 AgT. Eng. 202 3 

3 Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

2 Geol. 220 3 

1 Agr. Eng. 212 3 

— Soils, 201 4 

19 Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 8 8 

Mil. 201. 202, 203 or alt 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 ... Ill 

20 20 21 



(d) Forestry, — leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry. 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

C. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 

Math. Ill, 112 

Zool. 101, 102, 213 4 

For. 101, 102, 103 1 

Soc. 202 3 

Mil. 101, 102, 103 or Soc. 

101, 102, 103 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103 ... 1 

19 



Summer Camp, see p. 69. 



Sophomore Year 

3 Math. 113 

1 Econ. 205 3 

3 Agr. Econ 212 

4 Bot. 221 5 

4 Bot. 211, 213 3 

1 Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Geol. 120 

For. 202 

2 C. E. 221, 222 

1 C. E. 225-224 

— Psych. 200 

19 Mil. 201, 202, 203, or Hist. 

104 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 .. 1 

18 






4 








3 














3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 





3 


3 


1 


1 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



(e) Landscape Architecture, — leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Agriculture. 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 4 3 

M. E. 105, 106, 107 3 3 3 

L. A. 101, 102. 103 112 

C. E. 101, 102, 103 Ill 

Mil. 101, 102, 103 or Soc. 

101, 102. 103 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103... Ill 

21 21 21 



Surveying, C. E. s310, 3 cr. 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 211, 231 3 

Bot. 221 

Hort. 301 3 

Geol. 120 

Econ. 205 9 

Psych. 200 3 

Arch. 201, 202, 203 3 

C. E. 221-2 3 

C. E. 225-227 1 

L. A. 201, 202, 203 2 

L. A. 212. 213 

Mil 201, 202, 203 or Hist. 

104 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 ... 1 

21 






S 





5 








4 





3 











3 


8 


3 











2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



21 



20 



The Basic Division 



47 



(f) Wildlife Conservation and Management, — leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Math. Ill, 112 4 4 

Zool. 101, 102 4 4 

Geol. 120 4 

Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Zool. Ill 10 

Mil. 101, 102, 103 or alt 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103 .1 1 1 

17 21 21 



Sophomore Year 

Phys. 115 

Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 

Chem. 221 

Econ. 205 3 

Agr. Econ. 212 

Eng. 231 3 

Zool. 222, 223 

F. C. 202 

Zool. 251, 252, 253 2 

C. E. 221, 222 3 

C. E. 225 1 

For. Ill 3 

Mil. 201, 202, 203 or alt 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 ... 1 

22 






5 


4 


3 





4 








3 











4 


4 


3 





2 


? 


3 

















2 


2 


1 


1 



22 



21 



2. In Teacher Training. (For complete curricula see pages 131-136.) 

(a) Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Bot. 102 4 

Zool. 101 4 

Math. Ill, 112 4 4 

Hist. 101, 102. 103 3 3 3 

Geol. 120 4 

Mil. 101, 102, 103 or alt. ... 2 2 2 
Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103 ... Ill 

20 20 20 



Sophomore Year 

Agr. Eng. 202 

Soils 201 

Econ. 201, 202 3 

Agr. Econ. 202 

Phys. 115 5 

Zool. 202 or Bot. 221 

Zool. 102 

Bot. 101 4 

Chem. 221 

A. H. 202 

Poul. 201 3 

For. Ill 3 

Hort. 203 

F. C. 202 

Mil. 201, 202, 203 or alt 2 

Phys. Ed. 201. 202, 203 ... 1 

21 



3 








4 


3 








3 











5 


4 











4 





3 




















i 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



20 



(b) Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Ai-ts 
Education, 

also 

(c) Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education. 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 101, 102. 103 3 3 3 

Math. Ill, 112. 113 4 4 4 

Chem. 101, 102. 103 or 

optional science 4 4 4 

M. E. 105, 106, 107 3 3 3 

Ed. 106 3 3 3 

Mil. 101, 102, 103 or alt 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103 .1 1 1 

20 20 20 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 211, 222, 231 S 3 

Phys. 105, 106, 107 4 4 

Hist. 101, 102. 103 3 3 

Arch. 101, 102, 100 2 2 

Soc. 202. 203 3 3 

M. E. 124, 125. 126 2 2 

Mil. 201. 202, 203 or Elect. 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 ... 1 1 

Elective 

20 20 



21 



48 



State College Catalog 



(d) Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Vocational Guidance. 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 101. 102, 103 3 3 3 

Math. Ill, 112. 113 4 4 4 

Science 4 4 4 

Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Ed. 103 3 

GeoL 222 _ 3 

GeoL 120 4 

Ma. 101, 102, 103 or Hist. 

104 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 103 .1 1 1 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 211, 222, 231 3 3 3 

Science 4 4 4 

Soc. 202. 203 3 3 

Psychol. 200 3 

Psychol. 290 8 

Psychol. 291 „ 3 

Geol. 303 3 

MU. 201, 202. 203 or Elect. 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202. 203 .1 1 1 

•Electives 3 3 3 



21 20 20 19 

3. In Engrineering. (For complete curricula see pages 94-125.) 
Freshman Year (for all Engineering Curricula) 



Freshman Year 

(for all Engineering cnrricTila) 



Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

Math. 101. 102, 103 6 

Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

M. E. 105, 106. 107 3 

MU. 101, 102, 103 or Hist. 

104 2 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102. 103 ... 1 

19 

Summer — C. E. s200, 3 credits. 



(a) Leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Architectural En- 
gineering. 



(b) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
lor of Ceramic Engineering. 



Sophomore Year 

Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

•Eng. 211. 231. and one of 

the following : Eng. 261. 

262. 263, 265. 266. 267 .. 3 3 3 

Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

E. M. 311. 312 3 3 

Arch. 201. 202, 203 3 3 3 

Arch. 100 _ Ill 

Arch. 205 2 

Arch. 206 10 

Ma. 201, 202. 203 or alt. ... 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202. 203 ... Ill 

20 20 20 

(c) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Chemical Engineering. 



Sophomore Year 

Math. 201, 202. 303 4 

•Eng. 211. 231 and any 

one of Eng. 261-267 ... 3 

Chem. E. 201. 202, 203 .. 1 

Phys. 201. 202. 203 4 

Chem. 211. 212, 213 4 

M. E. 122, 123 

Ma. 201. 202. 203 or alt 2 

Phys. Ed. 201. 202, 203 .. 1 



19 



Sophomore Year 

Math. 201. 202, 303 4 4 4 

Chem. 211. 212 4 4 

Phys. 201. 202. 203 4 4 4 

Geol. 220. 230 3 3 

•Eng. 211. 231. 261 3 3 8 

Cer. Eng. 102, 103 3 3 

MU. 201, 202. 203 or alt. ... 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202. 203 ... 1 1 1 

21 21 20 



(d) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Civil Engineering. 



Sophomore Year 

Math. 201. 202. 303 4 

•Eng. 211. 231 and one of 

Eng. 261-267 3 

Phys. 201. 202. 203 4 

C. E. 221, 222. 223 3 

C. E. 225, 226, 227 1 

Geol. 220 3 

E. M. 311. 312 

MU. 201. 202. 203 or alt 2 

Phys. Ed. 201. 202. 203 ... 1 



21 



3 
4 

3 
1 

3 
2 
1 

21 



• Electives to be selected with aid of adviser to meet special needs of individnal students. 



The Basic Division 



49 



(e) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Electrical Engineering. 

Sophomore Year 

Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Phys. 201, 202, 203 .... 4 4 4 
*Eng. 21T. 231 and one of 

Eng. 261, 221 or 337 3 3 3 

Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

E. E. 201, 202 3 3 

M. E. 128 3 

Mil. 201, 202, 203 or alt. ..2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203... Ill 

20 20 20 



(f) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Geological Engineering, 

Sophomore Year 

Math. 201, 202, 303 444 

•Eng. 211, 231 and one of 

Eng. 261-267 3 3 3 

Chem. 211, 212 4 4 

Phj-s. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Geol. 220, 222, 230 3 3 3 

Geol. 223 3 

Mil. 201, 202. 203 or alt. 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203... 1 1 1 

21 21 29 



(g) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Industrial Engineering. 

Sophomore Year 

Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

•Eng. 211, 231, and one of 

Eng. 261- 267 3 3 3 

Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

M. E. 124, 125, 126 2 2 2 

I. E. 101, 102, 103 333 

Mil. 201. 202, 203 or alt. ... 2 2 "^ 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 ... Ill 

22 22 '*'' 



(h) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Sophomore Year 

Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Eng. 211, 231 3 3 

Phys. 201, 202, 203 .. . 4 4 a 

M. E. 211, 212. 213 2 2 2 

M. E. 221, 222, 223 2 2 2 

M. E. 124. 125, 126 2 2 2 

E. M. 311 ^ 

Mil. 201, 202, 203 or alt. 2 •> % 
Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203... Ill 

20 20 20 



(i) Leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in Engineering. 

Sophomore Year 

Math. 201, 202. 303 ... 4 4 4 

Phys. 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

•English or Modem Lan- 
guage 333 

tElective 4 4 4 

Mil. 201, 202, 203 or alt. 2 9 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202. 203 ... Ill 

19 19 19 



rea:iStTonT;'n^.e'°En\1is'?l!l^th\%^oXTory^L°^ ^ °^ ^^*^^ '^ ^^^^^ ^-'^^ ^ ^ 



50 



State College Catalog 



4. In Textiles. (For complete curricula see pages 142-144.) 

(a) Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Textiles in one of 
the following: Textile Manufacturing, Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing, Textile Management, Weaving and Designing, and Yarn Manu- 
facturing. 



Freshman 

Eng. 101, 102, 103 

Phys. Ill, 112, 113 


Year 

3 
4 
4 
1 
2 
2 

2 

1 

19 


3 
4 
4 
1 
2 
2 

2 

1 

19 


3 
4 


Math. 111. 112, 113 




4 


M. E. 121, 122, 123 
M. E. 101, 102, 103 
Tex. 101, 102, 103 . 
Mil. 101, 102, 103 or 

104 

Phys. Ed. 101, 102, 


Hisit! 
103." 


1 
2 
2 

2 
1 

19 



Sophomore Year 

Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Arch. 106 or Phys. 311 ... 3 

Phys. 311 or Arch. 106 ... 3 

Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

F. C. 201, 212 3 3 

Tex. 201. 203, 205 10 4 

Tex. 231, 232, 234 13 

Tex. 236, 237 2 2 

Tex. 207, 208, 209, 211 ... 3 11 

Mil. 201, 202, 203 or alt 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 201, 202, 203 .. Ill 

21 19 20 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 51 

THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 

Ira Obed Schaub, Dean and Director of Extension 
Zeno Payne Metcalf, Director of Instruction 

Organization. — North Carolina is one of the foremost States in the Union 
in the value of farm crops. The scientific investigations, demonstrations, 
and instruction of State College, in cooperation with the State Department 
of Agriculture, have been particularly effective in promoting better methods 
of farming, and in adopting scientific agriculture. The majority of the 
people of the State employed in gainful occupations are devoting their 
energies to some form of agriculture, and the greater part of their wealth 
and prosperity is derived from this great vocation. 

The art of cultivating the soil properly and living well at home, the value 
of selecting that form of agriculture which is in greatest demand, and the 
best method of turning the surplus products into commercial channels that 
will be most profitable to the producer, are matters of the greatest concern 
to the people of the State. The School of Agriculture has been reorganized 
for the purpose of rendering a much larger service to the State along these 
and other lines. The Experiment Station and the Extension Service have 
been more closely united with College instruction, and the courses of study 
have been so organized and the instruction so broadened as to offer much 
larger opportunities to young men entering the College, and to farmers and 
other agricultural workei-s throughout the State. 

Growth. — Beginning a generation ago on a very small scale, the School 
of Agriculture and Forestry has grown until today it embraces the follow- 
ing important divisions: (a) Agricultural Economics, including Farm Mar- 
keting, Farm Management, and Rural Sociology; (b) Agronomy, including 
Field Crops, Soils, Plant Breeding, and Agricultural Engineering; (c) Ani- 
mal Industry, including Animal Production, Animal Nutrition, Dairy Pro- 
duction, and Dairy Manufacturing; (d) Botany, including Bacteriology, 
Plant Physiology, and Plant Diseases; (e) Chemistry; (f) Horticulture, in- 
cluding Pomology, Small-Fruit Culture, Floriculture, Truck Farming, and 
Landscape Architecture; (g) Forestry; (h) Poultry Science, including 
Poultry Diseases, Poultry Breeding, Poultry Feeding, and Poultry Manage- 
ment; (i) Zoology, including Genetics, Entomology, Animal Physiology, and 
Wild Life Management. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the School of Agriculture and Forestry is 
threefold: (1) To secure through scientific research, experimentation, and 
demonstration accurate and reliable information relating to soils, plants, 
and animals, and to secure from every available source reliable statistical, 
technical, and scientific data relating to every phase of agriculture that 
might be of advantage to the State; (2) to provide instruction in the College 
for young men who desire to enter the field of genral agriculture, or wish 
to become professionals in agricultural education or specialists in any field 
of science related to agriculture; (3) to disseminate reliable information 



52 State College Catalog 

through publications and through extension agents, and by a wise use of 
this information to give instruction to agricultural workers in the scientific, 
experimental, and practical progress in the various lines of agriculture. 

All effective instruction in agriculture is based on research and investiga- 
tion; and the curricula are so organized that not only the subject matter for 
classroom instruction and extension work may be drawn from research, ex- 
perimentation, and demonstration, but that the students themselves shall 
have the opportunity to work under the direction of research specialists. 

The vocations open to young men well trained in agriculture and the 
opportunities afforded for distinct service t-o the State are now greater than 
ever before. In order that the more important vocations in agriculture may 
be presented to the youth of the State, the courses of study are so organ- 
ized as t-o give specific training for the following major vocations: 

General Farming Specialists in the Manufacture 

Agricultural Extension Agents of Dairy Products 

Agricultural Specialists Foresters 

in State or Federal Departments Fruit Growers 

Stock Raising and Dairying Truck Farming 

PoultrjTnen 

Agricultural Specialists in Foreign Lands 

In addition to these major vocations, the School of Agriculture gives in- 
struction in Beekeeping, Floriculture, and the basic instruction for teachers 
of Agriculture. 

Admission: Advanced Standing. — Regulations for admission and for ad- 
vanced standing are stated under Information for Applicants. 

Graduates in Liberal Arts. — Selected courses leading to the degree Bache- 
lor of Science in Agriculture are offered to graduates of universities and 
standard colleges. These are arranged in accordance -with the vocational 
aim of the individual student, and in the light of credits presented from the 
institution from which the student has been graduated, subject to the ap- 
proval of his adviser and the Director of Instruction. In cases where the 
student presents enough credits which may be used for courses required in 
his curriculum he may be graduated with a B.S. degree in one year. In no 
case should it take more than two years to complete the work for this de- 
gree. 

Graduation. — The requirement for graduation is the satisfactory com- 
plotion 01 one of the curricula outlined below. 

A minimum of 230 term credits with at least 230 honor points is required 
for graduation from the School of Agriculture. The term credits should be 
distributed as follows: A maximum of 60 in the major Department, and 
a minimum of 18 in Language, 24 in Physical Science, 18 in Social Science, 
12 in Military Science or alternative, and 6 in Physical Education. 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 53 

Students entering with advanced standing are required, in the remainder 
of their course, to earn at least as many points as the number of term 
credits remaining necessary for graduation. 

Degrees.— The degrees of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and Bachelor 
of Science in Forestry are conferred upon the satisfactory completion of 
one of the curricula in this School. 

The degree of Master of Science in Agriculture is offered for the satis- 
factory completion of one year of graduate study in residence. Candidates 
for this degree are enrolled as students in the Graduate School. 

The professional degree of Master of Agriculture may be conferred upon 
graduates of State College after five years of service in Agriculture, and 
upon the acceptance of a satisfactory thesis. 

Curricula. — The curricula in Agriculture offer a combination of prac- 
tical and theoretical work. About half of the time is devoted to lectures 
and recitations, the other half to work in shops, laboratories, greenhouses, 
dairy, poultry j^ards, and on the College farm. 

In order that every graduate of the School of Agriculture shall acquire a 
liberal education in lieu of specializing too narrowly, and shall become a 
leader having breadth of vision, the curricula in Agriculture contain broad- 
ening subjects such as language, literature, history, and the social sciences. 

The School of Agriculture and Forestry offers the following curricula: 

A. In General Agriculture with opportunities to specialize during junior 
and senior years in any of the following: 

1. Farm Business Administration 8. Floriculture 

2. Farm Marketing and Farm Finance 9. Plant Pathology 

3. Rural Sociology 10. Pomology 

4. Animal Production H. Poultry Science 

5. Dairy Manufacturing 12. Soils 

6. Entomology I3. Vegetable Gardening 

7. Field Crops and Plant Breeding 14. Agricultural Chemistry 

B. In Agricultural Engineering 

C. In Forestry 

D. In Landscape Architecture 

E. In Wildlife Management 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

First Two Years.— The freshman and sophomore years for all courses are 
outlined on a following page. This curriculum is intended to train students 
in broad basic fields of agriculture. For junior and senior years the cur- 
riculum of each student is to be arranged in accordance with his vocational 
aims subject to the approval of his adviser and the Director of Instruction. 



54 State College Catalog 

Professional Opportunities. — Students who specialize in General Agricul- 
ture may look forward to any of the following professions. 

Specialists in State or Federal Departments, or in Agricultural Colleges. — 

The School of Apiculture is equipped to train men as specialists in the 
various fields as indicated by the curricula outlined below. 

Inspectors. — Most States now maintain inspection of fertilizers, seeds, 
nurseries, and insecticides. Most cities have special inspectors for their 
milk supplies. Students seeking vocational opportunities in these fields 
may elect appropriate subjects in their junior and senior years. 

Extension Specialists. — Students in this group will find employment as 
agricultural agents for railroads, and for commercial firms dealing in agri- 
cultural products; as specialists in the various fields of agriculture in the 
extension departments of agricultural colleges, and as county agricultural 
agents. 

County Agents. — The growing impoi-tance of marketing agricultural 
products and the need for better organization of farms has ^ven rise to a 
strong demand for county agents who have had special training in Agricul- 
tural Economics. 

Specialists and Commercial Agricultural Agents. — The School of Agricul- 
ture is well equipped to train men for agricultural industries, such as manu- 
facturing fertilizers, livestock and poultry feeds, farm machinery, and dairy 
and horticultural products. These concerns are usually anxious to obtain 
men who have had actual agricultural experience, and who, in addition, 
have had special training in agricultural economics, accounting, and sta- 
tistics. This field is developing rapidly and offers a fine opportunity for 
students who wish to enter the purely commercial field. 

Agricultural Specialists in Foreign Lands. — The School of Agriculture 
is well equipped to train men as experts in cotton and tobacco production 
in foreign lands. 

Junior Agricultural Economist. — A position as a Junior Agricultural 

Economist involves research in Agricultural Economics. Such positions are 
usually available in the goveramental departments such as United States 
Department of Agriculture and in various State institutions. 

Farm Manager. — There is a growing demand for men who have had prac- 
tical farm experience and who have special training in farm organization 
and management. This field is practically a new one, and there have been 
many requests for men with special training in farm management. 

Marketing Specialists. — There is a growing demand for men who can 
manage cooperative marketing and other farmers' business associations. 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 55 

FOR ALL CURRICULA IN GENERAL AGRICULTURE 
Freshman Year 

Credits 
Courses First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

General Botany, Bot. 102 4 

General Zoology. Zool. 101 4 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Mathematical Analysis, Math. 111-112 4 4 

Military Science I, Mil. 101-2-3, or alternate 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 ... Ill 

17 21 21 

Sophomore Year 

Farm Equipment, Agr. Eng. 202 

Soils, Soils 201 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202 3 

Agricultural Economics, Agr. Econ. 202 

Physics for Agricultural Students, Phys. 115 6 

Animal Physiology, Zool. 202, or 

Plant Physiology, Bot. 221 

Economix: Zoology, Zool. 102 

General Botany. Bot. 101 4 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Chem. 221 

Animal Nutrition I, A. H. 202 

General Poultry, Poul. 201 3 

Principles of Forestry, For. Ill 3 

General Horticulture, Hort. 203 

General Field Crops. F.C. 202 

Military Science II, Mil. 201-2-3, or alternate 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

21 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Professor G. W. Forster, Head of the Department 

Professor Marc C. Leager; Associate Professors S. L. Clement, Glenn R. 
Smith; Assistant Professor R. E. L. Greene. 

Facilities. — The Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Soci- 
ology has available for its use 15 offices, a seminar room, a document room, 
a workshop, and a Departmental classroom. The Department is supplied 
with calculating devices of all kinds. In addition, by special arrangement of 
one of the large calculating-machine companies a supply of calculators and 
tabulating devices is adjusted to the need for them. Charts on practically 
every phase of agricultural economics are at hand or are available through 
the courtesy of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. A large number of 
maps of farms located in various parts of the state are used as a basis for 
studying and for illustrating the principles and practices of farm manage- 
ment. The results of research in marketing, agricultural finance, taxation, 
insurance, and soil conservation practices have made available a large 
volume of statistical information which is constantly available for under- 
graduate and graduate students. Maintained for reference is an up-to-date 



3 








4 


3 








3 











5 


4 











4 





3 




















3 





3 


2 


2 


1 


I 



56 State College Catalog 

file of bulletins and documents covering all phases of agricultural economics 
and rural sociology. 

The State a laboratory. — The State of North Carolina is a laboratory for 
the Department. Studies are in progress on all phases of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics and Rural Sociology: marketing of cotton, tobacco, fruits and vege- 
tables; farm credit, taxation of agriculture, farm prices, farm organiza- 
tion and management, land classification and land use, rural standards of 
living, rural housing, rural organization, rural community life. It is signi- 
ficant to the student in Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology that 
much of the research is done in cooperation with the various agencies of 
the Federal Government. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Farm Business Administration 

For Frtshmari and Sophcmore years refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 

Credits 

Courses First Term Second Term Third Term 

English 3 3 3 

Farm Manag-ement I, Agr. Eoob. 303 3 

Principles of Accounting, Econ. 301, 302, 303 _ 3 3 3 

Smvi^ <rf Statistical Methods. Econ. 408 3 

Statistieal Theorj-, Econ. 409 3 

Woodworking, M.E. 127 3 

Technics] Agri cultural Courses 3 3 3 

Electives 6 3 6 



18 



Senior Year 



Statistical Analysis of Agricultural Data, Agr. Econ. 

461. 462, 463 2 2 2 

Agricultural Finance, Agr. Econ. 432 . 3 

Farm Management II, Agr. Econ, 423 ® 3 

Farm Buildings, Agr. Eng. S22 3 

Farm Cost Accounting, Agr. Econ. 402, 403 3 3 

Business Law, Econ, 307 3 

Agr. Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

SoOs of North Carolina, Soils 312 3 6 

Dnwing. C.E. 101, 102, 103 111 

Tetraaag and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 3 

Tedmieal Agricultural Courses 3 3 3 

Hectives 6 3 3 

18 21 IS 

Farm Marketing and Farm Finance 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 



Junior Year 

COTJBSES First Term 

Bw&h _ „. .„ 3 

M«ifcpHi^ llrthods, Econ. 311, 312 3 


Credits 
Second Term 
3 
3 
3 


3 
3 
3 


Third Term 
3 





Surrey of Statistical Methods, Econ. 408 3 

Statistical Theory-, Econ. 409 _ .„ ._ 

Prindples of Accounting, Econ. 301. 302, 303 3 

£3eetives 3 




3 

12 



18 IS 18 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 



67 



Senior Year 



Courses First Term 

statistical Analysis of Agricultural Economic Data, 

Agr. Econ. 461, 462, 463 2 

Marketing Methods and Problems, Agr. Econ. 421 3 

Cotton and Tobacco Marketing, Agr. Econ. 442 

Agricxiltural Finance, Agr. Econ. 432 

Agricultural Cooperation, Agr. Econ. 422 

Farm Cost Accounting, Agr. Econ. 402, 403 

Farm Management I, Agr Econ. 303 

Community Organization, Rur. Soc. 413 

Money, Credit, and Banking, Econ. 321, 322 3 

Business Finance, Econ. 323 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Technical Agriculture 3 

Electives 3 

17 



Credits 
Second Term 



Third Term 



20 



Rural Sociology 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 

English 3 3 

General Sociology, Soc. 202. 203 3 3 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc. 302 

History of Agriculture, Hist. 318 

Survey of Statistical Methods. Econ. 408 3 

Statistical Theory, Econ. 409 3 

American Political Parties, Gov. 203, or 

American National Government, Gov. 200 3 

State Government and Administration, Gov. 201 6 3 

Municipal Government and Administration, Gov. 202 

Principles of Accounting, Econ. 301, 302, 303 3 3 

Electives 3 3 

18 18 



18 



Senior Year 



statistical Analysis of Agricultural Economic Data, 

Agr. Econ. 461, 462. 463 2 

Social Psychology, Psychol. 290 

Social Pathology, Soc. 401 

Farmers Movements, Rur. Soc. 403 

The Family Organization, Soc. 406 3 

Community Organization, Rur. Soc. 413 

Population Problems, Soc. 411 

Farm Management I, Agr. Econ. 303 

Agr. Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Agricultural Cooperation, Agr. Econ. 422 

Technical Agriculture 6 

Electives '..... 3 



17 



20 



58 State College Catalog 

AGRONOMY 

Professor C. B. Williams, Head of the Department 

The teaching work of this Department is grouped into three Divisions, 

viz: (1) Agricultural Engineering, see pages 58-60; (2) Field Crops and 
Plant Breeding, see pages 65-66; and (3) Soils, see pages 77-78. 

Its broad objective is to carefully train earnest young men in a^cul- 
tural engineering and in procedures that will qualify them for beginner 
positions in which a well-rounded or specialized knowledge of field crops, 
plant breeding, soils, fertilizers, soil fertility and closely related subjects 
is required. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor: D. S. Weaver, Head of the Division, 
Assistant Professor: G. W. Giles. 

Purpose. — This curriculum has been arranged to give its graduates sound 
and fundamental training in engineering, basic training in the agricultural 
sciences, and a specialized study in courses involving the application of en- 
gineering knowledge to agricultural problems. 

Breadth of Training. — Because of the great variety of work required of 

agricultural engineers, a number of subjects peculiar to other curricula are 
included, so that the student receives a considerable breadth of training. 
Engineering principles applied to agriculture have played an important part 
in the advancement and development of agricultural practices. Agricul- 
tural engineering as a profession, however, is of comparatively recent de- 
velopment, but it is rapidly becoming recognized as one of the more im- 
portant of the engineering professions, since it is identified with the most 
important of industries — agriculture. This course is especially suited to the 
boy brought up on the farm, as it prepares him for a professional business, 
or farming career, and enables him to capitalize on his farm training. 

Divisions. — Subdi%ided on the basis of engineering technique. Agricultural 
Engineering embraces three general fields: (1) Power and Machinery, in- 
cluding Rural Electrification; (2) Farm Structures, including Sanitation, 
Materials of Construction and Equipment; (3) Land Reclamation, which in- 
cludes Irrigation, Drainage, Soil-Erosion Control, and other forms of 
mechanical improvement of agricultural lands. 

Occupations Open to Graduates. — Teaching, experiment station and ex- 
tension-service positions with colleges and the Government; engineers in 
land reclamation, drainage, or irrigation enterprises; designing, advertising, 
sales and production work with manufacturers of farm machinery, equip- 
ment, and building materials; rural electrification work; editorial work 
with publishers; appraisal, and agricultural-engineering consultant service. 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 59 

Eqaipment. — The offices, classrooms, and shops used in Agricultural En- 
gineering are in Patterson Hall and the Shops Building. The laboratories are 
equipped with the latest labor-saving farm equipment for seedbed prepara- 
tion, planting, cultivating, harvesting, and crop preparation. These machines 
are furnished by the leading farm-machinery manufacturers, and are re- 
placed from time to time as improvements are developed. Special effort is 
made to have on hand all types of equipment for use in the best practices 
in the production of farm crops. 

Farm Conveniences, such as water systems for the home and the farm, 
individual electric-light plants, gas engines, tractors, septic tanks, are well 
represented. 

The Farm Buildings Laboratory is equipped with drawing tables, supply 
cabinets, and models of various types of farm buildings construction. 

Laboratory Equipment for Soil Conservation, such as that for terracing 
and gully control, consists of sets of surveying and leveling instruments. 

Practice. — Field areas in crops, vineyards, orchards, and pastures are 
available for practice in the use of farm equipment, and in drainage and 
erosion control. 

A Bulletin Library of Agricultural Engineering is maintained for student 
reference. 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
Freshman Year 

Courses First Term 

Algebra, Trigonometry, and 

Analytical Geometry, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Engineering Drawing II, M.E. 105, 106 3 

Descriptive Geometry, M.E. 107 

Military Science I, Mil. 101-2-3, or alternate 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 .. 1 

19 19 19 

Summer requirement: — Surveying, C.E. s200. 

Sophomore Year 

Engineering Geology. Geol. 220 3 

Calculus I. II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Business English, •Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231 3 3 

Physics for Engineers. Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 . 4 

Farm Equipment, Agr. Eng. 202 3 

Farm Engines, Agr. Eng. 212 3 

Soils, Soils 201 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Military Science II, Mil. 201-2-3. or alternate 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 Ill 

SO 20 21 



Credits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


6 


6 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 








3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



State College Catalog 



Janior Year 



Courses 
Farm Buildingrs, A^r. Eng. 322 

General Zoology, Zool. 101 _ 

General Botany, Hot. 102 



General Economics, Econ. 201, 202 

Agricultural Economics, Agr. Econ. 202 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

Farm Conveniences, Agr. Eng. 233 

Teaching of Farm Shop Work, Agr. Eng. 331. 

Animal Nutrition I, A.H. 202 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 301, 302 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 220 __ 

General Field Crops, F.C. 202 

General Horticulture, HorL 203 „. 

Electives „ 



532 



First Term 

4 

3 
• 
• 

3 

3 



6 



19 



CSKDITS 
Second Term^ 
3 


4 
3 
• 

• 

3 
3 
3 

• 



19 



Third Term 




3 
3 
3 



3 



Senior Year 



303 



Dairy Machinery, A.H. 362 

Farm Management I, Agr. Econ. 

Technical Writing I. Eng. 321 „. 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production, A.H. 321 .... 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc. 302 

Rural Sanitation, Hot. 202 

Farm Machinery and Tractors. Agr. Eng. 313 

Problems in Agr. Eng., Agr. Eng. 481 

Erosion Prevention, Agr. Eng. 403 

Farm Structures, Agr. Eng. 423 

Rural Electrification, Agr. Eng. 432 

Soil Fertility, Soils 221 

Soil Conservation and Land Use, Soils 433 
Senior Seminar, Agr. Eng. 491, 492, 493 .... 
Electives 



« 

3 
3 



3 

• 
• 
S 


1 

6 
19 



• Either Principles of Journalism, Eng. 150. or sonne term of a course in American or Enfflish 
Literature may be elected in place of Public Speaking. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING 

Professor R. H. Ruffner, Head of the Department 

Professors: E. H. Hostetler, W. L. Cleveng-er, F. M. Haig; Associate Pro- 
fessors C. D. Grinnells, J. E. Foster; Instructor C. D. Swaffar. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying is housed in Polk 
Hall, a three story building which was designed to meet the needs of college 
instruction, research, and extension work in Animal Husbandry and Dairy- 
ing. 

In the basement of Polk Hall are two wings, one of which is devoted to 
Dairy Manufacturing and the other to Farm Meats. The Dairy wing has 
recently been equipped with new dairy machinery, including direct-expan- 
sion ice cream freezer, churn, pasteurizer, milk bottler, and milk-cooling 
and storage equipment This equipment is used daily by students who bottle 
milk, and manufacture ice cream and other dairy products used in the Col- 
lege Cafeteria. The other wing is used for slaughtering beef cattle, sheep 
and swine, and for the aging and curing of the meats produced from these 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 61 

animals. Sufficient equipment is provided in the Meat Laboratory to do the 
necessary work in the time allotted yet the courses are so adapted that the 
students can apply both theory and practice to conditions on the farm. Both 
the dairy and the meat wings have their own individual mechanical refri- 
geration units so that the courses can be taught at any season of the year. 

The upper floors of the building contain offices, classrooms, library, milk- 
testing laboratory, farm-dairy laboratory, animal-nutrition laboratories, 
and beef cattle, sheep, and swine research laboratories. Extension special- 
ists in swine, dairy, beef and sheep have offices in this building. 

In addition the Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying main- 
tains two livestock farms located a few miles from the College. 

The Dairy Farm, recently acquired, contains 400 acres. Two large fire- 
proof, completely equipped dairy bams house 100 registered Jerseys, Guern- 
seys and Holsteins. A herd of registered Ayrshires is maintained at the 
College Experiment Station near by. A milk house, designed for conveni- 
ence in handling milk in the most efficient and sanitary manner, connects 
the two barns. Other buildings located on the dairy farm are horse and 
calf bams. 

The Animal Husbandry farm adjoins the Dairy farm and consists of 500 
acres. Here registered breeds of swine, sheep and beef cattle are main- 
tained for research work and college teaching. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying is equipped to in- 
struct students in the feeding, breeding and management of farm animals. 
Students feed and milk cows; conduct research; manufacure dairy products; 
feed and prepare animals for exhibition and the block, actually doing the 
slaughtering, and the cutting of the meat for market and home use. 

Well-trained young men in the various fields of Animal Husbandry and 
Dairying have greater opportunities for service and success than ever be- 
fore. This fact is demonstrated by the following responsible positions held 
by graduates in Animal Husbandry and Dairying: — 

1. Livestock and dairy farmers 

2. County Agents and Extension Specialists in livestock 

3. Livestock research investigators 

4. Superintendents and owners of dairy manufacturing plants 

5. Teachers in agricultural colleges 

6. Managers and salesmen in commercial livestock and feed companies 

7. Milk Inspectors 

8. Livestock breed association work 

9. Advisory work for banks and corporations in livestock industries 
10. Supervisors of Dairy Herd Improvement Associations, 



€2 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL PRODUCTION 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 



CouBSBS Fint Term 

Dairying, A.H. 341 

Swine Production, A.H. 331 3 

Farm Meats I, A.H. 301 

Animal Nutrition II, A.H. 361 3 

History of Breeds, A.H. 322-323 

Herd Improvement, A.H. 413 

Business English, Eng. 211 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 _ 

Southern Writers, Eng. 275 3 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Pastures and Forage Crops, F.C. 443 

Chemistrj" of Vitamins, Chem. 462 

Farm Engines, Agr. Eng. 212 „ 

Market Grading of Field Crops, F.C. 451 3 

Animal Hygiene and Sanitation, A.H. 353 

SUectives 3 

19 



Credits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


S 











3 


e 








3 


3 





3 





3 


3 




















4 


3 





3 














3 





3 



Senior Year 



Animal Breeding, A.H. 421 4 

Sheep Production, A.H. 313 

Beef Cattle, A.H. 372 

Pure Bred Livestock Production, A.H. 432 

Stock Farm Management, A.H. 433 

Horse and Mule Production, A.H. 351 3 

or Dairy Cattle and Milk Production, AJL 321 

Senior Seminar, A.H. 391-392-393 1 

Incubation and Brooding, Poul. 303 Q 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 6 

Fruit Growing, Hort. 331 „.,.. 4 

Agricultural Marketing, Agr. Eoon. 411 3 

Testing of Milk Products, A.H. 332 

Business Law, Econ. 307 „ 

Electives 3 

18 



18 





3 


1 
3 
3 




3 
3 

19 



CURRICULUM IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 



Junior Year 

Courses pjrst Term 

Creamery Buttermaking. A.H. 371 4 

Testing of Milk Products, A.H. 332 

Ice Cream Making, A.H. 381 4 

Cheese Making, A.H. 333 

Dairy Manufacturing Practice, AJH. 342 

City Milk Supply, A.H. 343 

Business English, Eng. 211 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 !..!!!!!!!! 

Southern Writers, Eng. 275 3 

Chemistry of Vitamins, Chem. 462 !"!!!" 

Animal Breeding, A.H. 421 4 

Food and Nutrition. Chem. 482 !...!..".." 

Animal Hygiene and Sanitation, A^. 353 

Farm Engines, Agr. Eng. 212 

Electivee g 

18 



Credits 
Second Term 

4 


3 


3 



3 

3 
3 

It 



TJiird Term 



3 

4 
3 

e 


3 



3 

3 

19 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 63 

Senior Year 

Cbbdits 

COUBSBS First Term Second Term Third Term 

Dairy Machinery, A.H. 362 10 

Dairy Products Judging, A.H. 394 1 

Dairy Manufactures, A.H. 401-402-403 3 3 3 

Senior Seminar, A.H. 391-392-393 Ill 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Swine Production, A.H. 331 3 

Animal Nutrition II, A.H. 361 3 

Farm Meats I, A.H. 301 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Herd Improvement, A.H. 413 3 

Food Products and Adulterants, Chem. 441 3 

Stock Farm Management. A.H. 433 3 

Agricultural Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Farm Accounting, Agr. Econ. 313 3 

Pure Bred Livestock Production, A.H. 432 3 

Eleetives 3 3 3 

19 18 20 

BOTANY 

Professor B. W. Wells, Head of Department 
Professors D. B. Anderson, S. G. Lehman, R. F. Poole; Associate Professor 
I. V. Shunk; Assistant Professors M. F. Buell, L. A. Whitford. 

Equipment and Facilities 

Location. — The Department of Botany occupies the second floor of Pat- 
terson Hall and the east end of the basement floor, where an adjoining 
greenhouse is available for the work in plant physiology. 

Laboratories. — The laboratories are all equipped with projection lanterns. 
A well-organized herbarium supports the work in systematic botany and 
dendrology. 

Purpose. — The Department emphasizes those phases of plant science which 
are foundational for the work in Agriculture and Forestry. 

CURRICULUM IN PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 

Courses first Term 

Business English, Eng. 211 3 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 

Technical Writing 11, Eng. 323 "1!"!!"!! 

Bacteriologry, Bot. 402 

Diseases of Field Crops, Bot. 301 ''"'''''''"'"""!r.""I!!!''" 3 

Diseases of Fruit and Vegetable Crops, Bot. 303 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 !.."!!!!" 

Plant Morphology, Bot. 411, 412 . .. S 

Plant Breeding, F.C. 463 .'. o 

Eleetives ''''"''"'^'. 6 

18 18 18 



Credits 




Second Term 


Th ird Term. 








3 








3 


4 














3 











4 


3 








3 


8 


6 



CBa>rTs 




cond Term 


Third Term 








5 





3 


3 





3 








3 














4 


7 


8 



64 State College Catalog 

Senior Year 

Courses First Term 

Plant Microtechnique. Bot. 451 3 

Advanced Plant Pathology, Bot. 401 _ 

Pathogenic Fungi, Bot. 481-2-3 3 

Soil Microbiology, Bot. 443 — 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Microanalysis of Plant Tissue, Bot. 442 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 233 

Electives 4 

18 18 18 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor A. J. Wilson, Head of Department 

Professors L. F, Williams, G. H. Satterfield; Associate Professors W. E. 
Jordan, M. F. Showalter; Assistant Professors H. L. Caveness, A. D. 
Jones, W. E. Singer; Instructors W. A. Reid, C. A. Flanders, P. P. 
Sutton. 

Curriculum. — The Department of Chemistry does not offer a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Chemistrj'. However, a student may register in the School 
of Agriculture vrith a major in Agricultural Chemistry. This curriculum 
affords extended courses of chemical training which will fit a graduate for 
positions such as those in State Experiment Stations, and in State and Fed- 
eral laboratories, for the inspection and control of fertilizers, feeds, foods, 
and other commodities, and as chemist in industrial plants. 

Instruction. — Instruction in the Department of Chemistry embraces the 
courses of lectures and the related courses of laboratory work which are 
described in detail under the appropriate heading of each individual course 
included in the curricula of the Department. 

New Building. — The Chemistry Department is now housed in a new four- 
story brick building. This building provides adequate and modem labora- 
tories for general chemistry and qualitative and quantitative analysis, and 
for organic, physical, and biological chemistry. Numerous recitation rooms 
are provided, besides the large main lecture room. 

Library. — Part of one wing of the building has been set aside for the Gen- 
eral Science Library, supervised by a full-time trained librarian. 

Fnture. — The building is planned to fulfill the needs of the Chemistry De- 
partment for the next ten years, and also with a view to later expansion to 
approximately twice the present size. 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 65 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

For Freshman year refer to page 55. 

Sophomore Year 

Credits 
Courses First Term Secand Term Third Term 

General Botany, Bot. 101 4 

Economic Zoology, Zool. 102 4 

Animal Physiology, Zool. 202, or 

Plant Physiology, Bot. 221 5 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 212. 213 4 4 

SoUs. Soils 201 4 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Animal Nutrition I, A.H. 202 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202 3 3 

Agricultural Economics, Agr. Econ. 202 3 

Military Science H, Mil. 201, 202. 203, or alternate 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 Ill 



18 18 18 



Janior Year 



Organic Chemistry, Chem. 421, 422, 423 4 4 4 

Physics for Te.xtile Students, Phys. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

French or German 3 3 3 

Elective Chemistry 3 3 3 

Elective AgricTjlture 3 3 3 

Electives ..'.....:. 3 3 3 

20 20 20 

Senior Year 

Chemistry Major 7 7 7 

French or German 3 3 3 

Electives 9 9 9 

19 19 19 

FIELD CROPS AND PLANT BREEDING 

Professor G. K. Middleton, Head of the Division 

Assistant Professors J. A. Rigney, P. H. Harvey, R. L. Loworn; Instructor 
C. L. Davis. 

North Carolina ranks among the five leading states of the nation in the 
value of farm crops produced. Approximately eighty per cent of its total 
farm income is from crops. This Division was set up to give definite in- 
struction on the crops of the State and in plant breeding. 

The curriculum is flexible and permits the student to choose the type of 
training he needs. A sufficient number of optional courses is provided to 
allow for a general training in agriculture or for specialization in any of 
the many phases of agronomy. 

Available Equipment for Teaching field crops consists of standard ap- 
paratus, and of official types for the study and deteraiination of the mar- 
ket grades of cotton, tobacco, corn, small grain, peanuts and hay. 

Advanced Students are afforded an opportunity of closely observing the 
field crop research work being carried on in greenhouses and in the field 
by the Division. A greenhouse, nursery and specimen garden provide facili- 
ties for practice work in plant hybridization and in other phases of research 
on field crops. 



Cbedits 




Second Term 


Third Term 








3 


3 








3 




3 









5 




4 





6 


6 


fi 


6 


6 


6 



66 State College Catalog 

CURRICULUM IN FIELD CROPS AND PLANT BREEDING 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 

Courses First Term 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

English 3 

SoU Fertility, Soils 221 3 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 

Cereal Crops, F.C. 302 

Pastures and Forage Crops, F.C. 443 

Major Options 5 

Electives 3 

18 18 

Senior Tear 

Major Options 6 

Technical Agriciiltare 6 

Electives 6 

18 18 



FORESTRY 

Professor J. V. Hofmann, Director of the Division. 

Professor L. Wyman; Associate Professor W. D. Miller; Assistant Pro- 
fessor G. K. Slocum. 

Areas for Field Work. — Some of the field work of the Department of 
Forestry is now carried on at the Camp Polk Prison Farm, near the State 
Fair Grounds, which has a thousand acres of timber land. The supervision 
of the timber is handled by class projects. 

The Poole Woods, six miles east of Raleigh, is a virgin tract containing 
stands of short-leaf and loblolly pine. This is an area of seventy-five acres 
that has been acquired for a laboratory and is a last remnant of the virgin 
stand of timber in this locality. 

The George Watts Hill Demonstration Forest, near Durham, is a tract 
of 1,400 acres which has been given to the College. It contains stands 
of short-leaf, loblolly pine, oaks, gum, tulip, dog^'ood, and all of these 
species in different associations. It is rolling country and serves admir- 
ably for the study of forest problems in the Piedmont section. 

The MacLean Forest located in Hyde County, in the eastern part of the 
State, is in the typical Coastal Plain region. It contains 1,554 acres and is 
used for demonstration work in the east-coast type. 

Jones and Onslow. — A large tract of land has recently been acquired in 
Jones and Onslow Counties in the southeastern part of the State, which con- 
sists of more than 84,000 acres and has the various types of timber found 
in this region. The large areas of virgin timber make a very complete 
laboratory for studying forest development and succession. 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 67 

Total Areas. — In all, the Forestry Department has available about 87,000 
acres on which to do field work, demonstration, and research. These areas 
include the various types found in North Carolina except those of the Moun- 
tain Region. 

The Arboretum area of seventy acres near Raleigh is being developed 
to contain all of the tree species and associated shrubs that grow in this cli- 
matic condition. It contains swamp land and upland which adapts it for 
this use. More than a hundred species have already been planted in this 
area. 

The Wood Technology Laboratory contains a representative collection of 

the more common woods and will be gradually extended. 

The Timber-Testing Laboratory, in connection with the Engineering Ex- 
periment Station, contains the machines for the various timber tests. 

Greenhouse space is available for special problems in forest research. 

FORESTRY 

Purposes. — The aims of the curriculum in Forestry are: (1) to train 
young men for work in the technical and applied fields of forestry on public 
or private forest land; (2) to give special training in fields of research; 
(3) to advance the knowledge of the entire profession. 

Growth. — The profession of forestry is comparatively young in North 
Carolina. It began some thirty years ago and has made remarkable prog- 
ress during its first quarter century of existence. The next decade promises 
more advancement and achievement than all of the past, because the foun- 
dation has been laid and the building of the superstructure will depend upon 
the expertness of the builders. In the ranks of the builders are included the 
United States Forest Service; State Forest Departments in a large number 
of States; corporations and lumber companies; individual landowners; last, 
but by no means least, the farm woodlands. 

Occupations. — Students completing the Forestry course may look to the 
following fields of employment: United States Forest Service, the State 
Service, including not only North Carolina, but especially the Southern 
States and any other State organizations, the lumber companies, timber- 
holding companies, corporations, and individuals. The forestry program in 
the State of North Carolina is very materially strengthened by the presence 
of the national forests and the Appalachian Forest Experiment Station. 
These will be of direct aid in the study of forest research problems, manage- 
ment problems and the organization and work of the National Forest 
Service. 

Forest Management aims to make a forest properly a permanent produc- 
ing unit. All forestry is now being built on this basis. 



68 State College Catalog 

Forest Utilization requires special courses dealing with the utilization of 
the products of the forest. During the third term of the senior year field 
studies of woodworking industries, logging operations, paper and pulp 
mills and problems in forest management take up most of the time. 

Silviculture deals with the problems of producing a forest, such as selec- 
tion of species, methods of reproduction, cutting systems, etc. The work 
is becoming increasingly important as our virgin timber supply is depleted. 

Research in Forestry Problems is being recognized by all agencies in the 
fields of Forestry-. Men trained in research methods are needed in the 
government experiment stations, state experiment stations, and private 
laboratories. 

Graduation. — A minimum of 236 term credits with at least 236 honor 
points are required for graduation in Forestry. 

A Field Trip through the Southeastern and the Gulf States is required for 
the senior class to study Applied Forestry under field and factory condi- 
tions. Local field trips ax*e also required of other classes. A nominal fee is 
charged to cover the expense of these trips. 



CURRICULUM IN FORESTRY 

Freshman Year 

Crbdits 

Courses First Term Second Term Third Term 

Drawing, C.E. 101, 102, 103 Ill 

Boteny, General and Systematic Bot. 101, 102. 203 4 4 3 

Mathematical Analysis, Math. Ill, 112 4 4 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General and Economic Zoology, Zool. 101, 102 4 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 4 

Elementary Forestry, For. 101, 102, 103 Ill 

Introductory Sociology, Soc. 202 3 

MUitary Science I, Mil. 201, 202, 203, or 

Human Relations, Soc. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 ... Ill 

19 20 19 



Sophomore Year 



Math of Finance, Math. 113 

Introduction to Economics, Econ. 205 3 

Land Economics, Agr. Econ. 212 

Plant Physiology, Bot. 221 5 

Dendrology. Bot. 211, 213 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Wood Technology, For. 202 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 

Surveying, Theoretical, C.E. 221, 222 

Field Surveying. C.E. 225 

Topographical Drawing, C.E. 224 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 

Military Science II, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 






4 








8 














3 


4 


4 


3 





4 





3 


3 


1 








1 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



^h 



18 21 21 



6" 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 



69 



Summer Camp 



Courses First Term 

Surveying and Mapping, C.E. s300 

Dendrology, For. s214 

Mensuration, For. s304 

Silviculture, For. 8204 



Crhdits 
Second Term 







Third Term 
3 



Junior Year 

Forest Protection and Improvements, For. 342 

Nursery Practice, For. 313 

Soils, Soils 201 4 

Mensuration I, II, For. 402, 403 

Silviculture I, 11, For. 311, 312 3 

English 3 

Forest Entomology, Zool. 302 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Meteorology, Phys. 322 

Forest Finance, For. 442 

Sur\-ey of Statistical Methods, Econ. 408 3 

Elective in Social Science Group 

Electives 3 

19 



3 








1 








3 


3 


3 








3 


3 











3 





3 














6 


S 


6 



21 



Senior Year 

Logging, For. 421 3 

Diseases of Forest Trees, Bot. 811 3 

Silviculture IIL IV, For. 411, 412 3 

Forest Management, For. 431, 432 3 

Seminar, For. 452 

Forest Products, For. 321 3 

Forest Utilization, For. 323 

Timber Appraisal, For. 443 

English 

Senior Field Trip, For. 453 

Electives 3 



HORTICULTURE 



18 





3 
3 
2 



3 

6 

17 



12 



Professor M. E. Gardner, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor G. O. Randall; Assistant Professor J. G. Weaver. 

Equipment. — The Department of Horticulture is well prepared in class- 
rooms and in laboratory and field equipment to offer instruction in its sev- 
eral important and diverse fields. 

Pomology and Small-Fruit Culture. — The College orchards and vineyards, 
the laboratories, a nursery plot, and other facilities are available to treat 

every phase of fruit-growing from the selection and propagation of va- 
rieties to the details of orchard management. 

Olericulture and Floriculture. — Four modem greenhouses are an im- 
portant part of the equipment of the Department, and are used primarily 
for experimental and instructional work in these two important and growing 
fields of horticulture. Potting rooms, propagation benches, and other more 
specialized equipment are used for both undergraduate and graduate in- 



70 State College Catal.ck3 

struction. Land and equipment to demonstrate and study details of com- 
mercial olericulture are convenient to the greenhouses. 

Special Study and Research. — A Physiological and a Cytological Labora- 
tory, calculating machines, library, greenhouses, and land are available to 
graduate and undergraduate students to carry on special studies. Projects 
conducted by the Experiment Station Sta3" are also available for study and 
observation. 

Library. — The departmental library contains approximately twenty thou- 

5s:. i : :'"r.:;:^" a .' rrpular bulletins covering all phases of Horticulture, 
av-i ;:r.; . :. :; :_;:. i . /jmes of the Proceedings of the American Society for 
Horticulroral Science and many other periodicals pertaining to horticultural 
rubjects. 

CURRICULUM IN" FLORICULTURE 

For F-eshman and Scphctncre years refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 

Credits 

CoOBsas First Term Second Term Third Term 

PoWe Sptmhaam. Bbc »1 3 

Flut Beoloer. Hot 441 3 

ButexkOoey. Bat 402 4 

Sjrstoaatie Botany. BoC 203 .-- _ 3 

Diseases at Fndt aisd Vegetable Cnve. Bo*. 3«3 3 

Genetics. ZooL 411 4 

Beonaaie Entmnoifoey. ZooL 213 

Fluit Pn^agation. Hoit. 301 3 

Soa FeifilHy. Soik 221 3 

SoOb of Noitii Carolina. Soils 312 3 

Fertfliiers. Soils 302 3 

W^.iy ? .-:= LA. 201. 202. 203 2 2 2 

Terrs::- i": I — i-age. Agr. Bng. 303 „ 3 

Plar: ?U:fr:^i : Herbaeeoos Plants. L.A. 303 2 

Elecires, 8 3 3 



Senior Year 



Basice&5 English, Erag. 211 

Technical Writing H, Eng. 323 

Commerdal Florienltnre, Hon, 341 

Hordcaltttral Problems, Hort. 421, 428, 423 

Seminar, Hort. 431. 432, 4SS 

Experimental Horticaltnre, Hort. 412 

Agricnltaral Cooperation, Agr. Eeon. 422 

Bntal Soeiolaey. Boial Soc 302 

Agrienltiiral Ch umistiy . Chan. 481 

Plant Bree^ng. F.C. 4£3 

Apidied PsydMlogy. VsjthoL 302 _. 
I<aadscape G»z6auag, T. A 403 



18 18 20 



3 














3 


4 








2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 





3 








3 











3 


3 














3 





3 











3 


6 


6 


3 



19 18 18 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 



71 



CURRICULUM IN POMOLOGY 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 



Junior Year 



Courses . First Term 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Business English, Eng. 211 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Small Fruits and Grapes, Hort. 311 3 

Plant Propagation, Hort. 301 

Vegetable Gardening, Hort. 303 

Soil Fertility, Soils 221 3 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

Ornamental Plants, L.A. 402 

Landscape Gardening, L.A. 403 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 302 

Electives 3 

19 



Credits 
Second Term 

3 



3 


3 

2 



3 



17 



Third Term 




20 



Senior Year 



Bacteriology, Bot. 402 

Diseases of Fruit and Vegetable Crops, Bot. 303 

Systematic Botany, Bot. 203 

Systematic Pomology, Hort. 401 2 

Fruit Growing, Hort. 331 4 

Horticulture Problems, Hort. 421, 422, 423 2 

Seminar, Hort. 431, 432, 433 1 

Experimental Horticulture, Hort. 412 

Farm Management I, Agr. Econ. 303 

Plant Breeding, F.C. 463 

Farm Meats I, A.H. 301 

Agricultural Chemistry, Chem. 481 3 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc. 302 

Poultry Elective 3 

Electives 3 



4 








3 





3 














2 


2 


1 


1 


3 








3 





3 


3 











3 












18 



19 



18 



72 State College Catalog 

CURRICULUM IX VEGETABLE GARDENING 

For Freshman and Sophomore yecrs refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 

Ckkdits 

Courses Firet Term Second Term Third Term 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Btisiness English, Eng. 211 3 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Systematic Botany, Bot. 203 3 

Diseases of Fruit and Vegetable Crops. Bot. 303 3 

Fruit Growing, Hort. 331 4 

Plant Propagation, Hort. 301 3 

Vegetable Forcing, Hort. 302 3 

Vegetable Gardening, Hort. 303 4 

Soil Fertility, Soils 221 3 

Fertilizers. Soils 302 3 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 4 

Terracing and Drainage, .\gr. Eng. 303 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 19 20 



Senior Year 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 3 

Systematic Olericulture, Hort. 411 2 

Small Fruits and Grapes, Hort. 311 3 

Horticultural Problems, Hort. 421, 422, 423 2 2 2 

Seminar, Hort. 431, 432, 433 Ill 

Experimental Horticxiltore, Hort. 412 3 

Home Floriculture, Hort. 313 3 

Agricultural Chemistry, Chem. 481 3 

Plant Breeding, F.C. 453 „ 3 

Ornamental Plants, L.A. 402 2 

Landscai>e Gardening, L.A. 403 3 

Agriculture Cooperation, A^r. Econ. 422 3 

Dairying, A.H. 341 3 

Soils of North Carolina, Soils 312 3 

Bural Sociology, Rnr. Soc. 302 3 

Electives 6 3 S 

20 20 18 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 73 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Professor J. P. Pillsbury, Head of the Division 
Associate Professor G. 0. Randall; Assistant Professor J. G. Weaver. 

A comparative study of Landscape Architecture, with Architecture, the 
oldest art of design, will disclose the fact that distinct parallelism exists 
between these two fields of human endeavor. Not only in the character 
and extent of the training required in each case is this shown, but also in 
the division of work which takes place, and in the relationships existing 
among those responsible for various parts of the work in the practice of 
these two closely associated professional fields. 

Training in Landscape Architecture is a composite derived from the fine 

arts, certain branches of engineering, and ornamental horticulture. Proper- 
ly it is dominated by the principle of desig:n, and therefore may be correctly 
classified as a fine art. Similarly as in architecture, its province is the de- 
sign of landscapes, the preparation of plans and specifications for them, 
and supervision during construction. 

The Curriculum in Landscape Architecture is strictly undergraduate. Its 
purpose is to provide a broad and thorough foundation for the additional 
postgraduate training which the profession requires of those desiring to 
enter its ranks. It also presents an open door to the professional fields of 
city or regional planning as the student may elect when undertaking gra- 
duate work. The soundness of the curriculum here presented is attested not 
only by the fact that at no time has the services of its graduates been fully 
satisfied, but also by the successes of those who have pursued graduate 
training and attained to full rank in the professional field of Landscape 
Design. 

Training in Landscape Construction is similar, but with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of construction employed in engineering and orna- 
mental horticulture. 

Training in Landscape Gardening is essentially ornamental horticulture. 
In neither case is graduate work required, since their provinces will not in- 
clude the design of landscape, but only the execution of plans under super- 
vision, in the one case, and maintenance of the constructed landscape, in the 
other. Students electing either of these two lines of study will for their 
first two years pursue the Basic Curriculum in General Agriculture, with 
two or three appropriate substitutions from other curricula, as indicated. 

General Equipment and Special Facilities for instruction are ample in 
the combined resources of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Horticul- 
ture, and Landscape Architecture. 

Plant Materials in extensive collections on the College grounds and at 
various points elsewhere within a short distance, furnish an ample supply 



74 State College Catalog 

of all kinds for both study and use. In addition several notable collections 
are available for occasional visits, and study. 

The Material for Landscape Design and Construction available on Col- 
lege grounds, private properties, and numerous public and semipublic areas 
and institutions in and about Raleigh, provide a wide range of subjects for 
study and practice. The City of Raleigh itself is a most interesting city 
planning study, since it is one of the very few existing examples of a 
capital city which was planned in advance of its building. 

CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Freshman Year 

Credits 

CoCKSES First Term Second Term Third Term 
Algebra, Trigonometry. Analytical Geometry. 

Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102. 103 3 3 3 

Botany, General and Systematic, Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 4 8 

Engineering Drawing 11, and 

Descriptive Geometry, M.E. 105, 106, 107 3 3 3 

Arboriculture, L.A. 101, 102, 103 112 

Drawing, C.E. 101, 102, 103 Ill 

Military Science I, Mil. 101. 102, 103, or 

Human Relations, Soc. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 .1 1 1 

21 21 21 

Sophomore Year 

Business English and Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231 3 

Plant Physiology, Bot. 221 

Plant Propagation and Nursery Practice, Hort. 301 3 

Physical Geology. Geol. 120 

Introduction to Economics, Econ. 205 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

Introduction to Architecture, Arch. 201 3 

Elements of Architecture, .4rch. 202, 203 

Sun,-ej-ing. Theoretical. C.E. 221, 222 3 

Field Sun-eying, C.E. 22-5. 227 1 

Plant Materials, Woody Plants, LJ\.. 201, 202, 203 2 

Theory of Landscape Design, L.A. 212, 213 

MUitary Science II. Mil. 201, 202. 203, or 

World Historv. Hist. 104 2 

Sport Acti\-ities. P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

21 21 20 

Surveying, C.E. s310, concurrent with Summer School, 3 credits. 

Junior Year 

Plant Materials : Herbaceous Plants. L.A. SOS 2 

Plant Ecology: Bot. 441 3 

Histor>- of Landscape Design, L.A. 311, 312 3 3 o 

Landscape Design I. L.A. 321, 322, 323 4 4 4 

Technical Writing, Eng. .?21 3 

Shade and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 9 

Freehand Drawing I, Pen and Pencil Drawing, Arch. 101 2 

Freehand Drawing IT. Water Color, Arch. 102 2 

Freehand Drawing HI, Charcoal. Arch. 103 2 

Perspective Drawing, Arch. 206 2 

Economic Zoology and Entomology, ZooL 102, 213 4 4 

History of Architecture, Arch. 321, 322 3 3 

Electives 3 6 

20 18 20 


















4 




3 














3 


3 


3 








1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 75 

Senior Year 

Credits 

Courses First Term Secoiid Term Third Term 

Planting Desigm, L.A. 411, 412. 413 3 3 3 

Landscape Design II, L.A. 421, 422, 423 4 4 4 

City Planning, L.A. 432 3 

Landscape Construction, L.A. 451, 452, 453 2 2 2 

Pencil Sketching. Arch. 100 3 

Accounting for Engineers, Econ. 212 3 

Appreciation of Fine Arts, Arch. Ill, 112, 113 3 3 3 

Electives 3 6 

18 18 18 



POULTRY SCIENCE 

Professor R. S. Dearstyne, Head of the Department. 

Assistant Professor N. W. Williams; Instructors H. C. Gauger, R. E. 
Greaves, F. W. Cook. 

Laboratories. — The Poultry Department is housed on the second floor 
of Ricks Hall. It embraces the Disease-Diagnostic, the Anatomy, and the 
Disease-Research Laboratories, the Incubator Room, and two Live-Bird 
Laboratories. 

The Seminar Room, affording access to technical and to popular poultry 
publications, is open to the students at all times. The Disease and the 
Anatomy Laboratories are well equipped for teaching. 

The Poultry Plant consists of forty buildings located on seventeen acres 
of land. An 18,000 capacity Smith incubator is used for teaching commer- 
cial incubation. 

Research. — A substantial research program is in operation at this plant. 
Three breeds of birds are kept and approximately 2000 layers are main- 
tained. All birds are pedigreed and trapnested. About 4000 chicks are pro- 
duced each year, all of these being pedigreed. 



76 State College Catalog 

CURRICULUM IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 

Junior Year 

Credits 
CouRSBS First Term Second Term Third Term 

English Elective 3 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 3 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Poultry Anatomy, Poul. 311, 312 3 3 

Poultry Judging, Poul. 301 4 

Poultry Nutrition, Poul. 333 4 

Preparation and Grading of Poultry Products, PouL 332 ... 3 

Incubation and Brooding, Poul. 303 3 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Vertebrate Embryology, Zool. 461 5 

Cereal Crops, F.C. 302 3 

Farm Management I. Agr. Econ. 303 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

19 19 19 



Senior Year 

Poultry Diseases, Poul. 401, 402 4 

Sero-Diagnosis in Poultry Diseases, Poul. 403 

Commercial Plant Management, Poul. 412 

Selecting and Mating Poultry. Poul. 413 

Senior Seminar, Poul. 423 

Swine Production. A.H. 331 3 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production, A.H. 321 3 

Fruit Growing, Hort. 331 4 

Turkey Production, Poul. 342 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc. 302 

Agr. Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

Chemistry of Vitamins, Chem. 462 

Electives 3 

20 



4 








3 


3 








3 





3 




















3 





3 














3 


3 





3 


6 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 77 

SOILS DIVISION 

Professor: C. B. Clevenger, Head of Division 
Associate Professor: J. P. Lutz 

Purpose and Scope. — The objectives in Soils instruction are twofold: (1) 
to give a large number of students information on soils basic to agricul- 
ture and land use; (2) to give instruction and traiinng to a few who wish 
a more thorough knowledge and understanding of the soil in connection 
with its formation, classification, productiveness, fertilization, use, and re- 
lation to social welfare. To provide for this technical training the Soils 
curriculum is offered. 

Problems of the soil are becoming more numerous and more complex, 
for no longer can farmers solve them by migrating to more productive 
soils. While soil difficulties have been in the past largely of individual con- 
cern, they are now of state and national importance since soil problems are 
becoming too much the rule rather than the exception. The soil is not 
static in character; it is constantly being modified by its environment and 
management. 

The soil is a natural body composed of mineral and organic matter, air, 
water, and living micro-organisms. The reactions of and changes in these 
components extend into the fields of chemistry, geology, physics and biology, 
which sciences are fundamental to soils. The electives in the Soils curri- 
culum provide for cultural and other subjects contributing to the student's 
training and aims. During the advanced undergraduate years, the student 
comes in contact with the research men of the Experiment Station and 
learns the nature and technique of the investigational work in progress. 

Research in soils may take direction in one of two directions: (1) the 
soil as a medium for crop production; (2) the study of the constitution of 
the soil itself. The former leads directly to practical considerations, the 
latter to the more fundamental knowledge which supports the former. 
These types of work go hand in hand. No state in the Union offers better 
opportunities for soil and fertilizer studies than North Carolina for within 
her borders are soils derived from a large variety of parent materials and 
developed under climatic conditions varying from a subtropical climate in 
the southeastern part of the state to the cooler climates of the mountains. 
This state has been one of the few which has steadily pushed forward her 
soil survey-work so that now county soil-survey reports and maps are avail- 
able for practically all the counties of the entire state. 

Equipment. — The Division is provided with laboratories and laboratory 
apparatus and equipment especially adapted to teaching and research work 
on soils and soil problems. 



78 



State College Catalog 



Opportunities for Graduates in Soils. — The number of graduates in soils 
throughout the country has never been large. In the past, graduates with 
soils training have taken positions with agricultural colleges and experi- 
ment stations in teaching, research, and extension work; with state and fed- 
eral agencies in soil survey, soil-conservation and investigational work; 
with private companies and railroads as agronomists; with banks and in- 
surance companies as land appraisers. In all agricultural work, there exists 
potential opportunities for the graduate trained in Soil Science. 



CURRICULUM IN SOILS 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 5o. 



Junior Year 



Courses First Term 

English Elective or Modem Laoeruage 3 

SoU Fertility, Soils 221 3 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 „ 

Soils of North Carolina, Soils 312 

Qualitative and Quantitative Analsrsia, Chem. 211, 212. 213 4 

Pastures and Forage Crops, F.C. 443 

Electives 9 

19 



Ckedits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


3 


3 








3 





3 





4 


4 





4 


6 


6 



19 



17 



Senior Year 

Son Technology, Soils 411. 412. 413 3 

Pedology, Soils 401 3 

Soil Conservation and Land Use, Soils 433 

Soils Seminar. Soils 451, 452, 453 1 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 

Organic Chemistry. Chem. 422, 423 

Drawing. C.E. 101, 102. 103 1 

Electives 10 



18 



17 



18 



School of Agriculture and Forestry 



79 



ZOOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor Z. P. Metcalf, Head of the Department. 

Professor T. B. Mitchell; Associate Professors, C. H. Bostian, R. 0. Stevens; 
Assistant Professors, F. B. Meacham, F. H. McCutcheon, R. Harkema. 

Teaching and Research. — The space devoted to Zoology is equipped to 
present the various subjects and to carry on research in its own and related 
fields. The Entomology Laboratory has a large Insectary with the usual 
equipment, and has an especially large collection of breeding animals for 
research and instruction in their field. 

Beekeeping. — The Beekeeping Laboratory is well provided with appara- 
tus to illustrate all phases of beekeeping. A small Apiary is maintained on 
the College grounds. 

Graduate Work. — The Technique and Graduate Laboratories are especial- 
ly well equipped for the teaching of graduate work. The Museum contains 
a synoptic collection illustrating most groups of animals. 

Curricula. — The Department of Zoology oflFers curricula in Entomology 
and in Wildlife Conservation and Management set forth as follow. 



CURRICULUM IN ENTOMOLOGY 

For Freshman and Sophomore years refer to page 55. 



Courses 
Systematic Zoologry, Zool. 421, 422, 423 

Genetics, Zool. 411 

Comparative Anatomy, Zool. 222, 223 

Modem Language 

Systematic Botany, Bot. 203 

Physiological Chemistry. Chem. 451, 462 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 

Technical Writing U, Eng. 323 .... 
Electives 

19 

Senior Year 

Vertebrate Embryology, Zool. 461 6 

Field Zoology, Zool. 433 

Applied Entomology, Zool. 401, 402, 403 3 

Modem Language 3 

Beekeeping, Zool. 243 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Histology. Zool. 442 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 

Electives 3 

17 



Junior Year 

First Term 
3 


Credits 
Second Term 
3 

4 
3 

3 
3 

3 


Third Term 
3 


4 








4 


3 


3 





s 


! 3 














3 


6 


3 



19 



19 





4 
3 
3 
3 



4 

17 



80 State College Catalog 

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT 

Principles. — The Wildlife Management Curriculum is based on the fol- 
lowing fundamental principles: (1) All forms of wild animal life must be 
considered in any extensive system of wildlife management; (2) the animal 
life of any given area is in close relationship to the vegetation existing in 
that area; (3) in favorable environment, the species of wildlife will normally 
produce a surplus, a part of which can be harvested each year in a manner 
similar to the harvesting of other crops. 

Conservative Approach. — Since wildlife management is just getting under 
way in this country, it would not seem advisable to encourage too rapid an 
expansion of this profession at the present time, although there is a dis- 
tinct need for a moderate number of well-trained men to promote and super- 
vise wildlife management in the many sections of the country. 

Positions. — The curriculum is designed to furnish a technical and prac- 
tical background for the following types of positions: (1) Wildlife-Manage- 
ment technicians in State Game and Fish Departments; (2) Biologists in 
the United States Biological Survey, Forest Service, Soil Conservation 
Ser^ice, National Park Service, and other Federal Land-Use Departments; 
(3) Game Managers on private preserves or leased areas, State game 
refuges, and on other land areas which are being developed primarily for 
wildlife. 

Research. — Because of the great need for research and experimental work 
in this field, the required courses in the curriculum are also designed to give 
the basic technique necessary to students who may desire to enter this 
phase of wildlife management. Several elective courses will be available 
for junior and senior students to enable them to specialize in some particular 
phase of the work. 

State Advantages. — Unusual advantages are offered to competent stu- 
dents by the wide range of natural environments in the North Carolina 
Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountain Region. Further advantages are 
available by reason of close cooperation vrith the State Division of Game 
and Inland Fisheries and the opportunity to observe developments in wild- 
life management on the following areas: Mount Mitchell Game Preserve, 
Resettlement Sandhill Project, Soil Conservation Service projects, Matta- 
muskeet Water Fowl Preser\'e, and preserves in the Piedmont and on the 
Coastal Plain. 



Credits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 








4 








4 


3 


3 








2 


2 


1 


1 



School of Agriculture axd Forestry 81 

CURRICULUM IN WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT 

Freshman Year 

Courses First Term 

Composition, Eng. 10!, 102, 103 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Mathematical Analysis, Math. Ill, 112 

General Zoology, Zool. 101 4 

Economic Zoology, Zool. 102 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Elementary Wildlife Management, 2k>ol. Ill 1 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or alternate 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 ... 1 

18 21 21 



Sophomore Year 

Agricultural Physics, Phys. 115 

Botany, General and Systematic, Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Chem. 221 

Introduction to Economics, Econ. 205 3 

Land Economics, Agr. Econ. 212 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Comparative Anatomy, Zool. 222, 223 

General Field Crops, F.C. 202 

Ornithology, Zool. 251, 252, 253 2 

Sur\eying, Theoretical, C.E. 221, 222 3 

Surveying, Field, C.E. 225 1 

Principles of Forestrj-, For. Ill 3 

MUitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203, or alternate 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201. 202. 203 1 






5 


4 


3 





4 








3 











4 


4 


3 





2 


2 


3 

















2 


2 


1 


1 



22 22 21 



Junior Year 

Plant Propagation and Nursery Practice. Hort. 301 3 

Dendrology, Bot. 211, 213 3 3 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Field Zoology. Zool. 433 4 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 4 

Animal Physiology, Zool. 202 5 

Wildlife Conservation, Zool. 321, 322, 323 3 3 3 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 1 

Soils, Soils 201 " " ' 4 

Electives 6 6 

19 18 20 



Senior Year 

Elective Social Science "inn 

Elective English ■.;;;■.; 3 8 

Wildlife Management, Zool 451. 452. 453 .... 3 

Advanced Plant Ecology, Bot. 453 

The Soils of North Carolina, Soils 312 ."!!..'!!!.".7 

Advanced Animal Ecolog>-, Zool. 462, 463 

Parasitology, Zool. 492, 493 „ 1!"."."".'^ 



Electives 



3 3 

3 

3 

3 3 

3 3 



9 6 6 

18 18 18 



82 State College Catalog 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

I. O. SCHAUB, Acting Director 

Establishment. — The Agricultural Experiment Station was established in 
accordance with an Act of the General Assembly of 1877. Its progress has 
been enhanced by different Acts of Congress giving to the Station addi- 
tional funds in 1877, 1906, 1925, and 1935. These Acts are known as Hatch, 
Adams, Purnell, and Bankhead-Jones, respectively. The General Assembly 
has allocated to the Station annually certain funds from revenue collected 
by the State Department of Agriculture from taxes on fertilizers and feeds. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the Agricultural Experiment Station is to study 
methods for economic production of the highest grades of livestock, poultry, 
and plants on the many soil types and varied conditions existing throughout 
the commonwealth; to study methods for the control of parasitic insects 
and organisms that cause serious economic losses of animals, poultry, and 
plants; to find and develop varieties of animals, poultry, and plants, new, 
and resistant to diseases and the changeable conditions prevailing in this 
State; and to perfect better marketing for all agricultural products. 

Work. — The staff of the Agricultural Experiment Station conducts ex- 
periments throughout the State on areas owned by farmers, on six strate- 
gically located test farms, on farms rented for short periods, and in the 
greenhouses and laboratories of the College. 

Research. — The agricultural research aims, through the discovery of new 
facts, to improve the well-being of farmers throughout the State; to 
strengthen the regulatory work of the State Department of Agriculture; to 
develop new and necessary facts for the teaching of sound agricultural 
principles by vocational agricultural instructors, agricultural extension 
agents, and agricultural instructors in the College. 

Experts. — The Agricultural Experiment Station staff brings to the College 
many experts, whose teachings in many specialized fields of agriculture as- 
sure the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes much 
to the advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, 
teachers, and investigators so necessary in the maintenance of agriculture 
on sound and economic planes. 

Publications. — The Agricultural Experiment Station publishes many bul- 
letins and scientific papers on results of research conducted by the staff. 
These are free and sent upon request of anyone in the State. 

Problems. — The staff diagnoses and interprets many problems for the 
farmers of this State; holds council with farmers and others interested in 
the agricultural industry; discusses farming procedures over the radio, and 
writes many letters on the more specific problems of agriculture at the re- 
quest of farmers, members of garden clubs, and of fertilizer fungicide, and 
insecticide manufacturers. It takes part in many of the administrative 
functions of the College. 



Agricultural Extension 83 

COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORK 

Dr. I. O. SCHAUB, Director 

John W. Goodman, Assistant Director 
Dr. Jane S. McKimmon, Assistant Director 
Ruth Current, State Home Demonstration Agent 

Support. — The Agricultural Extension Service of State College is con- 
ducted cooperatively with the United States Department of Agriculture and 
the one hundred counties of the State. The work is supported by Federal 
funds derived from the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, the Capper-Ketcham Act 
of 1928, and the Bankhead-Jones Act of 1935, from State appropriations 
and county appropriations. The Federal and State appropriations are used 
to maintain an administrative and specialist staff, and to supplement sal- 
aries and travel expenses of county Extension agents. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the Extension Service is to teach by demonstra- 
tion. In carrying out this purpose, the College maintains a staff of trained 
specialists, a system of county agents and assistant agents, and a corps of 
home-demonstration agents. Instruction is given at group meetings by 
method and result demonstrations and by the written word by training 
leaders, and through organized effort with clubs of men, women, and young 
people. In all of these activities, the plan is to carry to the rural people of 
North Carolina the latest and best information obtainable for the building 
of a more prosperous and satisfjnng life on the farm. The Extension Serv- 
ice holds a number of short courses, both on the College campus and else- 
where over the State, that the greatest number of rural leaders may be 
trained for building better homes and better farms, in the use of more 
eflBcient practices, thus creating a more satisfying way of life. 



84 State College Catalog 

THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Blake R. Van Leer, M.E., Dean of Engineering 

Wat.la.ce C. Riddick, C.E., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of Engineering 
WILLLA.M L. Mayer, M.S., Director of Registration 

Organization 

The School of Engineering of the North Carolina State College of Agri- 
ctilture and Engineering of the University of North Carolina is organized 
for purposes of administration into the following Departments: 

Line Departments 

Administrative Officer 

Architectural Engineering Professor Ross Shumaker 

Ceramic Engineering Professor A. F. Grea%t:s-Walker 

Chemical Engineering Professor E. E. Randolph 

Civil Engineering Professor C. L. Mann 

Electrical Engineering Professor William Hand Browne, Jr. 

General Engineering Professor G. Wallace Smith 

Geological Engineering _ Professor J. L. Stuckey 

Industrial Engineering Professor H. B. Shaw 

Mechanical Engineering Professor L. L. Vaughan 

Service Departments 

Engineering Experiment Station _ Professor Harry Tucker 

Engineering Mechanics Professor G. Wallace Smith 

Mathematics Professor H. A. Fisher 

Physics Professor C. M. Heck 

Pilots Training Dept Director L. R. Parkinson 

The School of Engineering is organized to offer technical and professional 
engineering instruction on the higher levels, graduate and undergraduate, 
vocational and professional, to meet the needs of the people of North Caro- 
lina. It is also organized and equipped to conduct research in the basic funda- 
mentals of Engineering, and it cooperates with the College Extension Division 
in offering extension courses in Engineering and its allied fields. 

Effective July 1, 1938, the consolidation of Engineering instruction at the 
University Unit in Raleigh was consummated, and the instructional staff 
and laboratory facilities were enhanced by additions from the Engineering 
College formerly maintained by the Unit at Chapel Hill. This gives the 
School of Engineering in Raleigh the largest and most extensive engineer- 
ing staff and equipment in this section of the country, and offers to the 
young men of North Carolina excellent facilities for securing an under- 
graduate education in Engineering. 



The School of Engineering 85 

The excellence of the instruction in the School of Engineering is attested 
by the fact that the Engineers' Council for Professional Development has 
accredited its curricula in Ceramic, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical En- 
gineering. It is the policy of the School of Engineering to have all of its 
curricula meet the standards of this nationally recognized accrediting agency 
Engineering education requires extensive laboratory facilities, and as rapid- 
ly as funds are available all of its laboratories are being brought into shape 
to meet the highest standards attained in any technological institution of 
higher learning. 

Location and Facilities 

Raleigh is a particularly favorable place for the study of Engineering 
It is not only the State Capital where are located many State Departments 
of interest to engineers, such as the State Highway Commission, State 
iioard of Health, State Geologist, Department of Conservation and Develop- 
ment, and other important State institutions, but it is a rapidly growing 
city marked by modern developments in residential, commercial, and munic- 
ipal construction. The local building and engineering go on the year round 
and afford excellent opportunities for observation and study. Raleigh is 
also so situated geographically that it is within easy distance for inspection 
trips to commercial chemical works, woodworking mills, railway shops 
machine shops, airports, and manufacturing industries. 

Raleigh is also a center from which electric power is distributed to a large 
section of the State. A transformer and meter substation adjoins the cam- 
pus, and from it high-tension lines radiate in four directions. Hydro-electric 
and steam-electric plants on the Cape Fear River are within easy reach 
Tne important systems of highways centering in Raleigh are exceptionally 
valuable for the observation and study of the construction, use, and main- 
tenance of roads. 

On the State College campus are five large buildings devoted exclusively 
to engineering instruction and research. These buildings contain much 
laboratory equipment which can be inspected at any time, but is best seen 
during the Engineers' Fair, which is held each year in March or April. 

Purposes of the School 

The purposes of the School of Engineering are: to educate men for pro- 
fessional service in Aeronautical, Architectural, Ceramic, Chemical Civil 
Construction, Electrical, Geological, Highway, Industrial, Mechanical and 
Sanitary Engineering; to equip them to participate in commercial and public 
affairs; to develop their capacities for intelligent leadership; to aid in the 
development of commerce and industry through research and experimenta- 
tion, to investigate natural resources and demonstrate their value to the 
people of the State; to cooperate with private companies, municipalities, 
public authorities, and commercial and industrial organizations through 
scientific research, thus increasing technical skill, improving the value of 
manufactured products, and eliminating waste. 



86 State College Catalog 

Occupations Open to Graduates 

Those who graduate and receive a bachelor's degree in some specialized 
branch of engineering are equipped to assume at once the duties and re- 
sponsibilities usually given Junior Engineers. The graduates of the School 
of Engineering are found in many technical fields, but most of them find 
employment in some one of the following: Aviation, Architectural and 
Structural Engineering, the Ceramic Industries, the Chemical Industries, 
Private Professional Practice, Consulting Engineers, Hydroelectric En- 
gineering, Electrical Manufacturing, Contracting, Central Electric Station 
Design and Construction, Telephone Service, Maintenance and Operation of 
Electrically-driven Mill Equipment, Lighting, Illumination, and Railway 
Signaling; Construction, Maintenance, and Operation of Steam and Electri- 
cal Railways, the Design and Manufacture of Machinery, the Operation of 
Shops, and the Furniture Industry; Geological Engineering, Highway En- 
gineering, Industrial Engineering, and the Management of Industries, Munic- 
ipal Engineering, Sanitary Engineering, and as City Managers, Public 
Utility and Health Service OflBcials; Sales Engineering, Research Engi- 
neering. 

Curricula 

Besides a curriculum leading to the Bachelor's degree in General Engineer- 
ing the School of Engineering offers curricula which lead to the Bachelor's 
degree in the following specialized fields of Engineering: 

Architectural Engineering 

Architecture 

Ceramic Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering, with options in: 

(a) Construction 

(b) General Civil 

(c) Highway 

(d) Sanitary 

Electrical Engineering, with options in: 

(a) Power Generation and Distribution 

(b) Electrical Communication 
Geological Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering, with options in: 

(a) Aeronautical Engineering 

(b) Furniture Manufacturing 

(c) Heating and Air Conditioning 

All of the curricula contain courses of general educational value which 
prepare students for the duties of citizenship in a democracy. However, the 
curricula are primarily technical and practical, and designed to prepare 
young men for professional practice and for definite vocations as well as 
for leadership in the industrial advancement of the State. 



The School of Engineering 87 

The instruction is such as will foster the individual talent, imagination, 
and initiative of students, and instill in them ideals of accomplishment, serv- 
ice, and good citizenship, while assuring to them that scientific education 
and practical training which will prepare them for professional service and 
leadership in engineering and in industry. In this way the School of En- 
gineering aids in the advancement of commerce and industry and furthers 
the development and economic utilization of the State's resources for the 
general welfare. 

All the engineering curricula emphasize thoroughness in the study of 
English and of the sciences — Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry — with 
a thorough drill in the application of fundamental principles to engineering 
and industrial problems. Engineering is taught as a profession, and the 
students come to realize that it is both honorable and learned, and that it 
offers exceptional opportunities for service. 

The several engineering curricula have a common freshman year and 
differ only slightly in the sophomore year, in which years the students study 
English, Mathematics, Drawing, Shopwork, Physics, and Chemistry. In 
the junior and senior years the students are directed definitely to the pro- 
fessional aims in carefully considered and well-balanced curricula. 

Summer Work. — At least six weeks of summer employment, approved by 
the Head of the Department in which the student is enrolled, preferably in 
the summer following the junior year, is a specific requirement for gradua- 
tion in Engineering. 

The purpose of this is to have every student before graduation acquire 
the valuable experience of actual work with responsibility and pay in the 
field of his vocation. Departmental advisers will aid students in getting 
summer employment. 

Inspection Trips. — In order to familiarize himself with the practice of his 
profession, each senior in Engineering is required as a part of his curriculum 
to take the departmental inspection trips. None will be excused except for 
grave reasons. 

These inspection trips are arranged by the Head of the Department in 
which the student takes his major work. The cost of such trips vary from 
$25.00 to $60.00 per student, depending on the time and distance traveled. 

Degrees. — Six different types of degrees may be secured through the School 
of Engineering. These are: 

1. Bachelor of Science (B.S.). This degree can be obtained only through 
completion of the curriculum in General Engineering. This is a course 
of study founded upon the basic fundamentals of engineering with no 
specialized courses but with liberal allowances for electives in the cultural 
courses. It is an earned undergraduate degree and can be secured by four 
years of undergraduate work. 



88 State College Catalog 

2. Bachelor of a Specialized Branch of Engineering, for example, (B.C.E.) 
Bachelor of Civil Engineering. This is an earned undergraduate degree which 
includes in the last two years some specialized courses in the particular 
branch of engineering in which the student is studying. This course is planned 
for four years of study but due to the fact that it is very heavy and difficult 
only the very best prepared and most diligent students can successfully com- 
plete it in four years. 

3. Master of Science (M.S.) in a specialized branch of engineering. This is 
an earned graduate degree which can be obtained only after the Bachelor's 
degree. It requires at least one year of graduate work, a reading knowledge 
of at least one foreign language, and a thesis showing ability to pursue in- 
dependent research. The core of graduate courses taken must emphasize a 
scientific objective. Further information concerning the requirements for this 
degree may be obtained by addressing Dr. R. F. Poole, Chairman, Graduate 
Committee, State College, Raleigh. 

4. Master of a Specialized Branch of Engineering, for example, (M.C.E.) 
Master of Civil Engineering. This is an earned graduate degree which can 
be obtained only after the specialized Bachelor's degree and requires one year 
of graduate work which emphasizes the technical and specialized profession- 
al engineering courses, and a thesis along professional engineering lines in- 
dicating ability to carry on independent professional investigations. For 
further information concerning this degree address Dr. R. F. Poole, Chair- 
man, Graduate Committee, State College, Raleigh, N. C. 

5. The Professional degree, for example, Architectural Engineer, Ceramic 
Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Mechanical 
Engineer, etc. 

This is an earned professional degree which is conferred only upon the 
graduates of some branch of the University of North Carolina, after five 
years of professional engineering practice in responsible charge of important 
work, the acceptance of a thesis on a subject related to the professional en- 
gineering practice in which the applicant is engaged, and the passing of an 
examination upon the candidate's professional experience. For further in- 
formation concerning this degree address Dr. R. F. Poole, Chairman, Graduate 
Committee, State College, Raleigh. 

6. The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Engineering, (D.Eng.) This degree 
is purely an honorary degree conferred upon men of extraordinary high pro- 
fessional engineering attainments who are graduates of one of the branches 
of the University of North Carolina or professional engineers who have ren- 
dered distinguished services to the State of North Carolina. 

Graduation, — The requirements for graduation in a specialized branch of 
Engineering are the satisfactory completion of all the courses in one of the 
prescribed curricula (see tabulations of curricula on the pages following), 
a total of not less than 240 term credits, with not less than 240 honor points. 



The School of Engineering 89 

Of the minimum of 240 term credits required for graduation in Engi- 
neering, 117 are common to all curricula: 30 term credits in Mathematics, 18 
in Language, 9 in Economics, 12 in Chemistry, 12 in Physics, 9 in Mechanics, 
9 in Drawing and Descriptive Geometry, 12 in Military Training and 6 in 
Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Each of the curricula permits election of at least 18 term credits and con- 
tains not more than 72 special technical term credits. 

Graduates in Liberal Arts. — An increasing number of graduates of liberal- 
arts colleges and universities are seeking an engineering degree. The policy 
of the School of Engineering is to allow as liberal an arrangement of courses 
as possible to suit the individual student's needs so that the degree in en- 
gineering may be obtained in the briefest time possible. However, the liberal- 
arts courses are distinctly different from those offered in an engineering school 
even when they have the same name and deal with the same subject matter. 
Students are therefore advised that the best economy of their time and money 
will be attained if they enroll at the beginning of their college careers as 
freshmen in an engineering curriculum. 

A graduate with an A.B. degree will normally require two years additional 
work to secure a Bachelor's degree in engineering. 

A graduate with a B.S. degree may secure a degree in engineering with 
from one to two years of additional study. A final decision in each case can 
be made only after an evaluation of the transcript of the student's record in 
the college from which he has received his degree. 

Short Courses: Institutes. — The School of Engineering cooperates with 
the College Extension Division in offering short courses and institutes for 
adults and graduate engineers. These courses vary in length from one day 
to one week, and each year the courses covered are different and vary ac- 
cording to the public demand. The faculty of the School of Engineering 
usually furnishes a large portion of the instruction offered in these courses, 
which in the past have been for Electrical Metermen, Gas Plant Operators, 
Waterworks Operators, Heating and Plumbing Contractors, Surveyors, En- 
gineers. These short courses are usually held at Raleigh because the School 
of Engineering has unusual laboratory and classroom facilities which offer a 
decided advantage to those who desire to "brush up on" their specialty and 
bring themselves abreast of the times by attending such short courses. For 
information concerning any short course in which a reader may be interested, 
he is requested to address his inquiry to Mr. Edward Ruggles, Director, Ex- 
tension Division, State College, Raleigh, N. C. 

Admission: Advanced Standing.— Regulations for admission and advanced 
standing are stated under Information for Applicants. 

SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

An explanation of the purposes, and a listing of the personnel engaged in 
the five Service Departments in the School of Engineering follows. 



90 State College Catalog 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

Professor G. Wallace Smith, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor N. W. Conner; Assistant Professor C. E. Feltner; In- 
structor J. T. Massey; Teaching Fellows L. R. Crane, G. A. Gillenwater, 
J. F. Gilmore. 

The Department of Engineering Mechanics which is housed in the Civil 
Engineering Building, teaches and administers the courses in theoretical and 
applied mechanics, strength of materials and fluid mechanics. These courses 
have been grouped under an independent department, which is the custom in 
most large engineering schools, for two reasons: first, to economize by pre- 
venting duplications and overlapping; second, because the mechanics courses 
are basic, required courses in all the engineering curricula, and here all en- 
gineering students meet on an equal footing of competition for survival. The 
best and most uniform results are thus obtained when such courses are taught 
in a department completely separated from the bias of any particular tj'pe 
of specialization. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
Professor H. A, Fisher, Head of the Department 

Associate Professors H. P. Williams, C. G. Mumford, J. M. Clarkson, J. W. 
Cell, R. C. Bullock, J. Levine; Assistant Professors F. A. Lee, L. S. Win- 
ton, H. V. Park; Instructors H, M. Nahikian, D. B. Thomas, W. P. Sea- 
graves, F. E. Mask. 

Mathematics is one of the basic sciences in Engineering. At State College 
the large and competent Mathematics department teaches the subject not 
only as a science and cultural subject but gives also a large amount of drill 
and practice to the students so that upon completion of the courses the stu- 
dents not only know the subject matter but are skilled and rapid in its use 
when applied to the problems of technology. 

After July 1, 1940, the Mathematics Department will be adequately housed 
in one building (Tompkins Hall) for the first time in its history. 

THE PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 

Professor C. M. Heck, Head of the Department 

Professor J. B. Derieux; Associate Professor J. S. Meares; Assistant Pro- 
fessors F. W. Lancaster, R. F. Stainback; Instructors G. W. Bartlett, G. 
E. Crouch, K. G. Carroll. 

Physics is another of the basic sciences upon which Engineering is founded. 

Facilities. — The Department of Physics occupies the northern half of Dan- 
iels Hall — three floors, with six laboratories and six lecture rooms. The base- 
ment is devoted to research laboratories, shops, dark rooms, battery room, 



The School of Engineering 91 

and power center. The two floors above comprise laboratories, lecture rooms, 
oflBces, and apparatus rooms. 

Equipment.— The Department is equipped with laboratory apparatus in a 
sufficient number of sets to permit all students in a laboratory to work dur- 
mg the same period on the same experiment. All lectures are demonstrated 
with a large assortment of equipment and apparatus collected through many 
years. 

On the roof of the building is located the astronomical observatory and the 
research radio laboratory. The five-inch telescope is equatorially mounted 
and driven by clock work. 

The Department is equipped for research so that engineering students de- 
sirous of using Physics as a minor in their work for an advanced degree may 
do so. "^ 



PILOTS TRAINING SCHOOL 

In coopei^tion with the Civil Aeronautics Authority, the National Youth 
Administration, and Serv-Air Inc., the School of Engineering is offering to 
young men between the ages of 18 and 25 an opportunity to become licensed 
pilots and mechanics. 

Students wishing to receive flying instruction must pass a physical exam- 
ination comparable to the standards required by the U S. Army Air Co^s. 

h2^\ZZT"S '^'\-^" ^^"^ '^^'^'^ ^"^"^ *^^ ground-school course 
being offered. Na^^gatlon, meterology, and the Civil Air Regulations are 
the subjects which must be mastered before the student may obtain a pr'! 
hour in Z" Approximately 2^ hours of ground instruction to ev'er^ 
hour m the air is required. The instruction during the 35 hours of flying^ 
of prime importance; and to insure the best results, each student who has 
SOW W.11 receive 30 minutes of check instruction' for each hour of sob 

secure'! SvIt'%'I^° '^^'f'"'^'' '^^^^'^^ '^^ «^^^* ^^^^'^^ 'bourse and 
secure a Private Pilot's Certificate may apply for advanced instruction The 

ground instruction required for the advanced course includes NaX^^^^^^ 

and Tadfo" Fort'v tf fi^^t^r'^'?^". '^' ^''^''''' ^"^--' Ins3e"t^; 
h1 J^ . ^*^ ^°''''' °^ advanced flight instruction is given in 

high powered aircraft. It includes advanced maneuvers and aerobat^work 

For detailed information, inquiries should be addressed to Professor L R 
Parkinson. Page Hall. North Carolina State College, Raleigh 



92 State College Catalog 

THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

Professor Harry Tucker, B.A., B.S., C.E., Director 

Room 207, Civil Engineering Building, State College 

Station, Raleigh. 

Establishment. — The Engineering Experiment Station of State College 
was established in 1923, as provided by the General Assembly of that year. 
It is an int-egral part of the School of Engineering, and is engaged in an 
organized program of research consisting of individual projects carefully 
defined and approved, which are carried on by engineering teachers. The 
Station fits uniquely into the program of instruction, research, and exten- 
sion of State College. 

Purpose. — The efforts of the Engineering Experiment Station are directed 
along the following lines : 

(a) The investigation of resources and processes, through experimenta- 
tion and tests, with the object of opening and developing wider fields for the 
use of the natural resources of the State. 

(b) Cooperation with industrial organizations in the solution of technical 
problems, which require such facilities and equipment as are available at 
State College. 

(c) The coordination of research undertaken by the Engineering School. 

(d) The publication of the results of experimental and research projects 
made by the Engineering Experiment Station and the several Engineering 
Departments of State College. 

Publications. — The Experiment Station has, since its organization, co- 
operated with various organizations and industries in the State in the in- 
vestigation of problems peculiar to North Carolina. The results of such in- 
vestigations have, from time to time, been issued in the form of Bulletins. 
The following is at present a complete list of the publications of the Station. 

Bulletin No. 1. "County Roads: Organization, Construction and Maintenance" 
by Harry Tucker, James Fontaine, and L. D. Bell. 

Bulletin No. 2. "Tests of Face and Common Brick Manufactured in North 
Carolina" by A. F. Greaves-Walker and James Fontaine. 

Bulletin No. 3. "Poles from North Carolina Forests" by Wm. Hand Browne, 
Jr., and James Fontaine. 

Bulletin No. 4. "Motor Vehicle Accidents in North Carolina" by Harry Tucker. 

Bulletin No. 5. "Occurrence and Physical Properties of North Carolina 

Marble" by Jasper L. Stuckey and James Fontaine. Price twenty cents. 
Bulletin No. 6. "The Occurrence, Properties, and Uses of the Commercial 

Clays and Shales of North Carolina" by A. F. Greaves-Walker, N. H. 

Stolte, and W, L. Fabianic. Price fifty cents. 
Bulletin No. 7. "Highway Grades and Motor Vehicle Costs" by Howard 

Burton Shaw and James Fontaine. Price twenty cents. 



The School of Engineering 93 

Bulletin No. 8. "Financial Management for Highways" by Marc C. Leager. 
Price one dollar. 

Bulletin No. 9. "Highway Accidents in North Carolina and Guides to Safety" 
by Harry Tucker. Price fifty cents. 

Bulletin No. 10. "North Carolina Building Code" by the North Carolina 
Building Code Council. Price one dollar. 

Bulletin No. 11. "The Production of an Insulating Brick Using North Caro- 
lina Shales" by A. F. Greaves-Walker, W. C. Cole, Jr., and S. C. Davis. 
Price twenty cents. 

Bulletin No. 12. "The Development of Pyrophyllite Refractories and Refrac- 
tory Cements" by A. F. Greaves-Walker, C. W. Owens, Jr., T. L. Hurst, 
and R. L. Stone. Price fifty cents. 

Bulletin No. 13. "The Preparation of Concrete Using North Carolina Mate- 
rials" by Harry Tucker and W. G. Geile. 

Bulletin No. 14. "The Location and Distribution of the Ceramic Mineral 
Deposits of North Carolina" by A. F. Greaves-Walker and S. G. Riggs, 
Jr. Price twenty-five cents. 

Bulletin No. 15. "A Study of Courses in Technical Writing" by A. M. Foun- 
tain. Price one dollar. 

Bulletin No. 16. "The Production of Unfired and Fired Forsterite Refrac- 
tories from North Carolina Dunites" by A. F. Greaves-Walker and R. 
L. Stone. Price fifty cents. 

Bulletin No. 17. "Papers Presented at School for Street Superintendents" 
compiled by Harry Tucker. 

Bulletin No. 18. "Net Revenue Method of Comparing Distribution Trans- 
formers" by R. R. Brown. 

Bulletin No. 19. "The Origin, Mineralogy and Distribution of the Refrac- 
tory Clays of the United States" by A. F. Greaves-Walker. 

Current Activities. — The Experiment Station is now assisting in the fol- 
lowing investigations that are being conducted by the several Departments 
of the Engineering School: 

1. The development of an unfired aluminous refractory from pyrophyllite. 

2. In cooperation with the North Carolina State Highway and Public 
Works Commission: The load distribution on highway bridge floors. 

3. In cooperation with the Rural Electrification Administration: Per- 
missible motor loads on rural lines. 

4. The geology of Wake County, North Carolina, 'nith particular refer- 
ence to the extent and value of the soapstone deposits. 

5. Drafting-room practices in North Carolina, with the objective of stand- 
ardizing the preparation of drawings. 

6. In cooperation with the Department of Chemistry of the College: The 
relation of Vitamin A to night blindness. 

7. In cooperation with the North Carolina State Board of Health: Investi- 
gations in the Efficiency of Filters For Small Sewage Treatment Plants. 



94 State College Catalog 

CURRICULA OFFERED IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Each of the following curricula is not only well balanced, but offers a liberal 
course of study in a technical and professional field. They conform to what 
is regarded by engineering educators as the best modem practice. 

Also offered in the School of Engineering is a curriculum leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering (see page 114). This curriculum 
has no specialization and requires but 231 term credits with at least 231 honor 
points. It is recommended to those who desire a broad general training in the 
basic principles of Engineering but who do not have the time or desire to 
specialize in some particular branch. 



FRESHMAN YEAR of ALL CURRICULA in ENGINEERING 

Credits 

Courses Firat Term Second Term Third Term 
Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry, 

Math. 101. 102, 103 6 6 6 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102. 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Engineering Drawing II, M.E. 105, 106 3 3 

Descriptive Geometry, M.E. 107 3 

MDitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 ... 1 1 1 

19 19 19 

Summer requirement following the freshman year in Architectural, Ceramic, and 
Electrical Engineering: — Surveying, C.E. s200, 3 credits. 



The School of Engineering 95 

ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Ross Shumaker, Head of Department 
Associate Professor J. D. Paulson; Assistant Professor J. M. Edwards, Jr.; 
Instructors: H. R. McLawhorn, Jr., F. C. Williams. 

The courses in Architecture and Architectural Engineering have been ar- 
ranged after careful study of the best curricula offered by the finest educa- 
tional institutions in the United States. These studies and many years of 
practical experience on the part of the faculty, both in the profession and in 
teaching, enable this department to offer two allied courses of merit, proved 
by the very high proportion of graduates of this department who successfully 
follow the profession of Architect. 

The first three years of study in Architecture and in Architectural En- 
gineering are very similar — so arranged that a student may transfer from 
one curriculum to the other up t-o the end of the junior year, with a minimum 
loss of credits. After the third year, however, there is a wide divergence in 
the courses. 

Architecture is one of the most valuable and constructive professions in 
modern civilization. While an art, it must be firmly rooted in science, and the 
g^reater the project, the more positively this is true. Consequently, a student 
who is ambitious to be a great architect must master the artistic scope of 
architecture and also such science as is pertinent. To compress such a course 
into four years would necessarily eliminate some essential studies, or reduce 
the content of all. Therefore the curriculum in Architecture is presented as 
a five year course of study. 

Architectural Engineering is designed to prepare students for the pursuit 
of engineering as allied with architecture. Modern architecture has so many 
engineering aspects, in the way of construction, fabrication and use of ma- 
terials, pro\'ision of conveniences, and so forth, that a student may well plan 
to specialize in some one of these many fields. This four year course provides 
a thorough training in the theoretical engineering of architecture and a suf- 
ficient knowledge of architecture as an art to enable the graduate to pursue 
any specialized branch he may select. Also it is possible for him to continue 
in the field of architecture and eventually secure registration as a licensed 
architect. 

Equipment. — The Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineer- 
ing occupies the third floor of Daniels Hall, an excellent location providing 
adequate space in well-lighted and comfortable rooms. Large drawing rooms, 
library, lecture rooms, photographic dark room, offices, and so forth, over- 
looking the entire State College Campus constitute an ideal physical layout for 
the department. Drawing tables, stools, lockers, and essential furniture are 
all provided. 

Alumni. — Graduates of this department have little difficulty in normal times 
in finding emplojTnent and experience such that in a few years they can obtain 
registration as licensed architects. Many graduates have been conspicuously 
successful and it is worthy of note that a very large proportion remain in 
the state of North Carolina or adjacent territory. 



96 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE 



Freshman or First Year 

Courses First Term 

Mathematics 101, 102, 103 6 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

French, or Modern Language, M. L. 

101, 102, 201, or Equiv 3 

PencU Sketching, Arch. 100 1 

World History, Hist. 104 2 

Architectural Drawing, Arch. 107 

(or M. E. Equivalent) 3 

Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 107 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 (or elective!) 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

Freshman or First Year 21 

Summer Requirement : Surveying, C. E. s200, 3 credits. 



Crkdits 
Second Term 
6 
3 

3 
1 
2 



r;isVd Term 
6 



21 



Sophomore or Second Year 

Calculus I, II, and III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

Background for Modern Thought (or Elective) 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

Shades and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 

Engineering Mechanics, E. M. 301, 302 

Elements of Architecture I. II, III, Arch. 201, 202, 203... 3 

History of Sculpture and Mural Decoration, Arch. 325 

Working Drawings, Arch. 305 

Perspective Di-awing, Arch. 206 1 

Military Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 (or electivet) 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 

Sophomore or Second Year 20 



4 
3 

4 

3 
3 



2 
1 

20 






3 
3 
2 
2 

2 
1 

20 



Junior or Third Year 

Business English, Pub. Speaking, 

Literature (or M. L.) 3 

Strength of Materials, E. M. 321, 322 

Materials Testing Laboratory, H. E. 322 

Materials of Construction, C. E. 321 3 

Sanitary and Mech. Equip, of Buildings, C. E. 364 3 

Freehand Drawing 1, 2, 3, Arch. 101, 102. 103 2 

Architectural Office Practice, Arch. 411, 412 

Intermediate Design, B-1, B-2, B-3, 

Arch. 301, 302, 303 3 

History of Architecture 1, 2, 3, Arch. 321, 322, 323 3 

♦•Electives 3 

Junior or Third Year 20 

Summer Requirement: Six Weeks Industrial Employment. 



21 



8 
S 



2 
S 

3 

3 
3 

20 



Senior or Fourth Year 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 8 

Reinforced Concrete, C. E. 421, 422 3 3 

Graphic Statics, C. E. 423, 424, 425 Ill 

Electric Equipment of Buildings, E. E. 343 8 

Architectural Design B-4, B-5, B-6, 

Arch. 363, 354, 355 6 6 6 

History of Architecture 4, Arch. 421 3 

Building Materials, Arch. 409 3 

Professional Practice, Arch. 414 1 

Clay Modeling, Arch. 114 Ill 

Photographic Practice, Arch. 304 1 

••Electives 3 8 3 

Senior or Fourth Year 20 20 19 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History, Modem Language, Sociology. 

•* To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, military science III and IV, 
language and literature, pure mathematics, pure natural science, and social science. 



The School of Engineering 97 

Professional or Fifth Year 

Credits 
CoimsES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Specifications, Arch. 416 3 

Theory of Structures, C. E. 431a, 432a 3 3 

Architectural Design A-1, A-2, A-3, 

Arch. 401, 402, 403 6 6 6 

Freehand Drawing: 4, 5, 6, Arch. 211, 212, 213 3 3 3 

Architectural Composition, Arch. 407 2 

City Planning:, Arch. 415 2 

Architectural Estimates, Arch. 408 2 

•*Elective8 3 6 6 



Fifth Year 20 20 20 

Total Credits : 306. Completion of the course to be recognized by granting the dej 
Bachelor of Architecture. 
All seniors will be required to go on the inspection ti-ip as part of their curriculum. 



••To be selected from the following fields: Humanities, military science III and FV, 
language and literature, pure mathematics, pure natural science, and social science. 



98 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 
Freshman Year 

For the freshman year, refer to page 94. 

Surveying, C.E. s200, 3 credits, is required in the summer immediately foDowing the 
freshman year. 



Sophomore Year 



Courses First Term 

Calculus I. n. III. Math. 201, 202. 203 4 

•Business English. Public Speaking and English or 
American Literature, Eng. 211, 231, (261 or 262 or 

263) or (265 or 266 or 267) 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312 

Elements of Architecture I, II, III, Arch. 201, 202, 203 .. 3 

Shades and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 

Pencil Sketching, Arch. 100 1 

Perspective Drawing, Arch. 206 1 

MUitary Science H, Mil. 201, 202, 203 (or dectivet) 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 

Sophomore Year 21 



Crhdits 




cond Term 


Third Term 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 




8 




8 









1 










2 


2 


1 


1 



21 



21 



Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics, E. M. 313 3 

Strength of Materials, E. M. 321, 322 

Materials Testing Laboratory, H. E. 322 

Materials of Construction, C. E. 321 

Sanitary and Mech. Equipment of Buildings, 

C. E. 365. 366 8 

(Jeneral Economics 201, 202, 203 3 

Freehand Drawing 1, 2, 3, Arch. 101, 102, 108 2 

Photographic Practice, Arch. 304 

Intermediate Design B-1. B-2, B-3, 

Arch. 301, 302. 303 3 

History of Architecture 1, 2, 3, Arch. 821, 322, 323 3 

••Electives 3 

Junior Year 20 

Summer Requirement: Six weeks industrial employment. 









3 


3 


1 








8 


8 





8 


8 


2 


2 





1 


3 


8 


3 


8 


8 


8 


21 


21 



Senior Year 

Reinforced Concrete, C. E. 421, 422 3 8 

Graphic Statics, C. E. 423, 424, 425 Ill 

Theory of Structures, C. E. 431a, 432a 3 8 

Specifications. Arch. 416 3 

Building Materials I, Arch. 409 8 

Electrical Equipment of Buildings. E. E. 343 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Architectural Design, E-1. E-2, Arch. 351, 352 8 3 

Architectural Office Practice. Arch. 411, 412 2 2 2 

Structural Design, C. E. 426, 427 3 3 

History of Sculpture and Mural Decoration, Arch. 325 .... 2 

••Electives 8 3 3 

Senior Year 18 21 19 

Total credits required for completion of course: 243. Degree: Bachelor of Architectural 
Engineering. 

All seniors will be required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 



• Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the course listed French, M. L. 101. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History, Modem Language, Sociology. 

•• To be selected from the following fields : Himianities. military science rn and IV, 
language and literature, pure mathematics, pure natural science, and social science. 



The School of Engineering 99 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

Professor A, F. Greaves-Walker, Head of the Department 
Instructor W. W. Kriegel; Teaching Fellow J. J. Amero. 

The Department of Ceramic Engineering occupies its own building, which 
contains classrooms, a design room, a chemical laboratory, an equipment 
laboratory, and a kiln laboratory. 

The Equipment Laboratory contains an adequate variety of machines for 
preparing and processing ceramic bodies of all kinds and making ceramic 
products on a laboratory scale. It also contains the necessary equipment 
for carrying on ceramic research and the testing of materials and products. 

The Kiln Laboratory contains eleven kilns and furnaces of different types 
which provide for the firing or testing of all ceramic materials and products. 

Ceramic Engineering includes the different phases of engineering which 
have to do with the study of the non-metallic minerals, except fuels and 
ores as such, and the manufacture of products therefrom. The non-metal- 
lic minerals compose over 90 per cent of the earth's surface, and the industries 
based on them rank above the automobile, and the iron and steel industries 
in value of product. Principal among these products are those made of clay 
and associated minerals, such as building brick, hollow tile, sewer pipe, re- 
fractories, wall and floor tile, tableware, pottery, electrical porcelain, chemical 
and sanitary stoneware, flat glass, chemical and table glassware, enameled 
iron and steel, Portland and hydraulic cements, and limes. 

North Carolina has enormous deposits of shale, clay, kaolin, feldspar, 
sand, limestone, and other ceramic minerals, equal in quality to any others 
in the United States, and with the introduction of modern processes and 
methods will produce in future quantities of ceramic products and adequately 
develop its ceramic industries. 

The demand for ceramic engineers has far exceeded the supply for a num- 
ber of years past, there being fewer than 100 ceramic engineers graduated 
in the United States each year. It is with the idea of supplying this demand 
and developing the latent resources of North Carolina that a four-year cur- 
riculum in Ceramic Engineering, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Ceramic 
Engineering, is offered. 

The instruction in Ceramic Engineering is enriched by the intensive in- 
vestigation of ceramic resources and manufactures constantly under way 
in connection with the Engineering Experiment Station. Students will have 
the great advantage of these investigations along with their other instruction. 

Courses in advanced subjects for graduate students are offered in Ad- 
vanced Refractories and Furnaces, Industrial Adaptability of Clays, Design- 
ing of Ceramic Equipment and Plants, Advanced Silicate Technology, Glass 
Technology, and Ceramic Research. 



100 State College Catalog 

The curriculum in Ceramic Engineering, which has been accredited by the 
Engineers Council for Professional Development, contains fundamental 
courses, and courses in Ceramic, Geological, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical 
Engineering, as well as in Economics, to provide for the general training in 
engineering with the particular study of Ceramic Engineering. The Ceramic 
Engineering courses consist of the theoretical and practical study of the 
mining, manufacturing, and testing of ceramic materials and products as 
well as the design of ceramic equipment and plants. 

Graduates in Ceramic Engineering are employed in the ceramic industries 
as plant executives, research engineers, plant-control engineers, sales en- 
gineers, product-control engineers, plant designers and constructors, equip- 
ment manufacturers, consulting engineers and ceramic chemists and tech- 
nologists. Graduates of the Department at State College, which now ranks 
fourth in registration in the United States, are successfully holding posi- 
tions in all of these branches. 



The School of Engineering 



lOX 



CURRICULUM IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 
Freshman Year 

For the freshman year, refer to page 94. j. ^ , . „ • ^u , u 

Suneying, C.E. s200. 3 credits, is required in the summer immediately following the fresh- 
man year. 

Sophomore Year 



Courses Pirat Term 

Calculus I, II. Ill, Math. 201. 202, 303 4 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis. Chem. 212 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

Engineering Geology. Geol. 220 3 

Minerology, Geol. 230 

♦Business English, Public Speaking, and English 

Literature. Eng. 211. 231, 261 3 

Ceramic Materials, Cer.E. 102 

Ceramic and Mining Procesaes, Cer.E. 103 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201. 202. 203 ^ 

21 



Crbdits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


4 


4 








4 





4 


4 











3 


3 


3 


3 








3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics. E.M. 301, 302 3 

Strength of Materials. E.M. 321 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Mechanical Drawing, M.E. 211, 212 

Drying Fundamentals and Practice, Cer.E. 201 3 

Firing Fundamentals and Practice. Cer. E. 252 

Ceramic Calculations, Cer.E. 253 

Ceramic Products. Cer.E. 203 

Engineering Thermodynamics I. M.E. 305. 306 3 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I. M.E. 311, 312 1 

Materials Testing Laboratory, H.E. 332 

Thermal Mineralogy, Geol. 338 

Physical Chemistry, Chem. 231 ° 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Electives _^ 

21 
Summer requirements : six weeks industrial employment. 




3 
2 

3 


3 
1 

3 


3 

21 




3 
3 
2 


3 
3 


1 


3 
3 

21 



Senior Year 



Refractories, Cer.E. 403 * 

Silicates, I and II, Cer.E. 303, 304 3 d 

Ceramic Laboratory, Cer.E. 311, 312, 313 3 3 

Ceramic Designing, Cer.E. 314, 315 4 

Pyrometry, Cer.E. 305 J " 

Technical Writing I. Eng. 321 . .. .^ 3 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, B.E. 321, 322 6 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 322 3 

Optical Mineralogy, Geol. 431. 432. 433 3 3 

Electives _£ _f 

19 19 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 



• Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English may 
substitute for the courses listed Elementary German. M.L. 102. „ u i ti- * „, 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics. Psychology. Hi.story, 
Modem Language, Sociology. 



102 State College Catalog 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor E, E. Randolph, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor B. E. Lauer; Assistant Professors F. C. Johnson, W. A. 
Bain; Instructor T. C. Doody; Teaching Fellows L, F. Drum, J. F. Seely. 

Facilities. — The laboratories of the Department of Chemical Engineering 
are located in Winston Hall. The available space has been di\'ided into an ex- 
hibit room; Water and Engineering-Materials Laboratory; Electrochemical 
Engineering Laboratory; Fuel- and Gas-Technology Room; Oil and Hydro- 
genation Laboratory; Experimental Rayon Plant; Destructive Distillation 
Installation; Dark Room for metallographic and micro-photographic study; 
the Graduate Research Laboratory; Unit-Processes Laboratory; Plant- and 
Equipment-Design Laboratory; Cellulose Laboratory. 

The Chemical Engineering laboratories have suitable equipment, much 
of it specially designed, for the study of the main processes and plant prob- 
lems of the chemical engineering industries. They are supplied with direct 
and alternating current, gas, water, steam, compressed air, electric motors, 
generators, and storage batteries. They are equipped with precision and 
control instruments, such as refractometer, surface-tension apparatus, po- 
lariscope, potentiometer, microscope, colorimeter, calorimeters, tint-photo- 
meter, thermocouples, and optical pyrometer. They are equipped also with 
filter presses, centrifuges, crushers, grinders and pulverizers, vacuum pan, 
stills, autoclave, jacketed kettle, gas, water, and electrical meters, equip- 
ment designed and built, such as double-effect evaporators, heat exchangers, 
flow-of -fluid experimental equipment for orifice, venturi, pitot, weir gauges, 
column still, absorption tower, crystallizer, rotary and tunnel driers, gas 
furnace, resistance and arc electric furnace, and humidifier. An experi- 
mental refinery and hydrogenation plant for vegetable and other oils has 
been installed. A complete permutit water-softening equipment forms a unit 
of an experimental water-purification and -treatment system. In addition, 
the nearby industrial plants offer opportunity for study of plant operation 
and problems. 

There has been recently added to the Department of Chemical Engineer- 
ing a valuable exhibit room, where products of many of the Chemical En- 
gineering industries are exhibited. These exhibits, used for instruction, serve 
to give the student very valuable training. They are arranged in the form 
of flow sheets showing the various steps in manufacturing processes. 

The Department Shop is supplied with machines and tools for building 
and repairing equipment. 

Curriculum. — This curriculum provides thorough training in unit opera- 
tions and unit processes, and in the methods of manufacturing industrial 
chemical products on a large scale. It includes basic courses in Chemistry, 
Physics, Mathematics, and fundamental Engineering as a background for 
the professional Chemical Engineering training of this department, so that 



The School of Engineering 103 

the grraduate is prepared to enter any field of applied chemical work as a 
junior engineer. 

The Chemical Engineer is expected to determine the process, the mate- 
rial, the design, and the economic capacity of the equipment needed. Ef- 
ficient production requires exact control in every stage of the process. He 
must de\*ise eflScient and economical methods, discover sources of loss and 
the remedy, recover by-products, convert waste products and make industrial 
calculations of input, output, efficiency, quality, and cost. 

North Carolina is a center of chemical industries in the South, with an 
annual output estimated at approximately one-fourth billion dollars. Some 
of the largest chemical industries of the country are located in this State, 
manufacturing such products as paper, fertilizers, vegetable oils, food pro- 
ducts, leather, bromine, aluminum, metallurgical products, paints and 
varnishes. Such industries require properly trained Chemical Engineers. 
Chemical Engineering offers therefore inviting opportunities in this profes- 
sion which renders a distinct service to the welfare and comfort of the people. 

Graduates find employment in such fields as control work and industrial 
research; as technologists, superintendents of chemical industries, municipal 
engineers, engineers in the State and Federal health service, consulting 
chemical engineers, manufacturers of chemicals and of chemical equipment, 
chemical salesmen and representatives, developers of new chemical industries. 

Ninety-three per cent of the graduates of this Department are success- 
fxilly engaged in Chemical Engineering work. Because chemical problems 
are intricate, and scientific chemical-control work in industries is required, 
salaries for Chemical Engineering graduates are inviting. Many grraduates 
of this Department now hold very responsible positions. 

The Department cooperates with the State Departments in their chemical 
problems. Facilities are available for graduate work, upon which emphasis 
is placed. Prospective candidates for the Master's degree should address in- 
quiries to Dr. R. F. Poole, Chairman of the Graduate Committee, North Caro- 
lina State College, Raleigh. 



104 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Freshman Year 

For the f reihrnan yesr, refer to page 94. 



Sophomore Year 



Courses Fir^ Term 

Calculus I, II, m, Math. 201, 202. 303 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking, and English or Ameri- 
can Literature, Eng. 211, 231, any one of (261-267) .. 3 
Introduction to Chemic&l Engineering, 

Chem.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202. 203 4 

Quxditative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Anal>-sis, Chem. 212. 218 

Sbopwork, M.E. 122, 123 1 

tMilitary Science II, MU. 201, 202. 203 2 

Sport Actirities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

20 



Cbedfts 
Second Term 

4 



Third Term 

4 



20 



20 



Junior Year 



Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 301, 302 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 320 

Organic Chemistry, Chem. 421, 422, 423 4 

Chemical Engineering I. Chem.E. 311, 312, 313 3 

Industrial Stoichiometry, Chem.E. S31 

Chemical Engineering Laboratory I. Chem.E. 821, 322. 323 1 

Ph>-sical Chemistry, Chem. 431, 432 4 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, E.E. 321. 322 3 

Machine Shop I, M.E. 225, 226 1 

Elective 3 



SomiDer reoxurenicnt : six weeks industrial employment. 



Senior Year 



Principles of Chemical Engineering, Chem.E. 411, 412, 413 3 

Water Treatment, Chem.E. 421 3 

Chemistry of Engineering Materials, Chem.E. 422 

Electrochemical Engineering, Chem.E. 423 

Chemical Engineering Lab. and Design H. 

Chem.E. 431. 432. 433 2 

Heat Engineering II. M.E. 301, 302 3 

Mineralogy, Geol. 230 

General Economics. Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Elementary Modem Physics, Phys. 807 3 

JTechnical Writing I. Eng. 321 

JBusiness Law, Econ. SOT 

Electives 3 

20 20 

All senior? are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 



3 


3 








3 








3 


2 


2 


3 








3 


3 


3 








3 








3 


3 


3 



20 



• Students who have beer, certified by the Department of English as proficient in English may 
substitute for the courses listed German. M.L. 102. 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departmeiits : Economics, Psychology, History, 
Modem Language, Sociology. 

+ With the approval of the adviser, courses in Education, English, History, German, Advanced 
Mathematics. Botany, and Library Methods may be substituted for Technical Writing, and 
Btisiness Law. 



The School of Engineering 105 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor C. L. Mann, Head of the Department 
Professors B. R. Van Leer, W. C. Riddick, Harry Tucker, *W. G. Geile, T. S. 
Johnson; Associate Professor C. R. Bramer; Assistant Professor James 
Fontaine; Instructor C. M. Lambe. 

The Department of Civil Engineering is located in the Civil Engineering 
Building in which the offices, classrooms, laboratories, and instrument rooms 
were designed and built to provide suitable facilities for efficient teaching 
and laboratory demonstrations. 

The equipment common to general civil engineering includes surveying 

instruments, transits, levels, plane tables, current meters, sextants, plani- 
meters, calculating machines, blueprint apparatus, lantern slides, and mov- 
ing-picture machine. Special equipment includes precise surveying instru- 
ments, etc., and such equipment as Beggs deformeter and others of this class. 

The equipment in the Materials-Testing Laboratory, in the Cement- and 
Bituminous-Materials-Testing Laboratory, and in the Sanitary Laboratory, 
fully meet the present-day requirements for laboratory instruction. 

Soil Mechanics is a new course in the curriculum. A laboratory for this 
course is being furnished and equipped with the newest apparatus now in 
use by laboratories engaged in the study of the action of soils relative to 
engineering problems dealing with structures, foundations, and highway 
subgrades. 

Civil Engineering is the oldest and most general of all the branches of 
modern engineering; in fact, from it all of the others have developed. The 
usefulness of Civil Engineering is so well recognized that a student who 
does not have a strong predilection for some other special branch may be 
safely advised to study Civil Engineering. 

The CiNil Engineering curriculum in the School of Engineering has been 
accredited by the Engineers' Council for Professional Development and is a 
well-balanced course of study, upon the completion of which a young man 
is equipped to assume the duties of junior engineer in any of the following 
important fields: Design, construction, operation, or testing of water-power 
developments, railroads, highways, water supplies, sewerage systems. 

The Civil Engineering department offers a student the choice of the fol- 
lowing four options : 

(a) General Civil 

(b) Highway 

(c) Construction 

(d) Sanitary 

The first two years of these curricula are the same. They begin to dif- 
ferentiate slightly in the junior year and more so in the senior year, but 

• Deceased. 



106 State College Catalog 

essentially they are the same and are designed to develop in the student 
engineer a well-trained mind, one which reasons logically, accurately, quick- 
ly. This is accomplished by a thorough training in applied mathematics 
and physics, which is supplemented with practical work in the field, draft- 
ing rooms, and laboratories. 

More men are practicing Civil Engineering in North Carolina than all the 
other branches of engineering put together, and it is to train young men to 
serve under those already in the profession and subsequently to follow in 
their footsteps that the Civil Engineering curricula are offered. 

The reasons for the various options in Civil Engineering are stated under 
the head of each, 

CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERLNG 

*Professor W. G. Geile, Faculty Adviser 
Professor C. L. Mann, Acting Faculty Adviser 

North Carolina's progress indicates great increase in building and gen- 
eral construction. Construction needs more and better trained men to meet 
the immediate demands as well as to anticipate the increased demands of 
the future. Builders, as few others, need to know at all times exactly where 
they stand on the projects they undertake. The contractor, to be success- 
ful, must conduct his business systematically and economically. Therefore 
he must learn not only general engineering technique, but also something 
of Architecture and business methods and practices; he must delve further 
into construction and learn the principles involved, the methods, practices, 
and successful policies in use. 

Combined into this curriculum are the fundamental courses in the Civil 
Engineering curriculum, courses in Architecture, courses dealing with busi- 
ness, and special courses in Construction Engineering in the junior and 
senior years. 

The theory in the Construction Engineering courses is supplemented by 
frequent inspection trips to projects under construction; particular em- 
phasis is placed upon estimating, modern methods, and management of 
operations. 

This curriculum is designed to prepare the student to enter the work of 
actual construction of modern structures and to lay a foundation for future 
work as owners, managers, or executives in the construction industry. 

The equipment available for instruction in Construction Engineering con- 
sists of a large file of complete plans and specifications for various types of 
structures, many samples of different building materials, lantern slides 
illustrating methods of construction, and a comprehensive file of trade litera- 
ture and publications. The equipment of the entire Department of Civil 
Engineering is available for instruction. 

• Dee«as«<L 



The School of Engineering 107 

HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 

Professor Harry Tucker, Faculty Adviser 

North Carolina has, during the past twenty years, made remarkable prog- 
ress in the building of good roads. Most of the counties and cities in the 
State have also spent large sums in road construction and maintenance. 

The building of roads and their proper maintenance are engineering prob- 
lems to be handled by technically trained men. Since Highway Engineering 
is, fundamentally, a special division of the broad field of Civil Engineering, 
the curriculum for the first three years is identical with the regular Civil 
Engineering curriculum. In the fourth year, however, the student who 
specializes in Highway Engineering is given more specific instruction in 
those subjects pertaining to Highway Engineering. 

State College offers unusual opportunities to young men to study High- 
way Engineering. Not only are the necessary facilities available for theo- 
retical instruction, but there are in and near Raleigh many opportunities 
for studying the practical application of the principles of highway con- 
struction. Raleigh and Wake County have built most of the different types 
of road surfaces; the laboratories of the State Highway and Public Works 
Commission are available for inspection, and numerous experimental sec- 
tions of road periodically being constructed by the Commission near Raleigh 
can be examined. 

The equipment at the College for instruction in Highway Engineering is 
fairly complete, and is constantly being added to and enlarged. The Mate- 
rials Testing Laboratory in the Civil Engineering Building is well-equipped 
for testing all materials used in road building; there is full field equip- 
ment for surveys, and modem drawing rooms provided with the necessary 
furniture and instruments. There is also a large lecture room fitted for 
the use of lantern slides and motion pictures. 



SANITARY ENGINEERING 

Professor T. S. Johnson, Faculty Adviser 

Because Sanitary Engineering so vitally concerns the health of the peo- 
ple, and because of the progress in North Carolina in this field, the demand 
for men trained in Sanitary Engineering has increased. 

The Sanitary Engineering option is offered to meet this need. In the 
main it is the curriculum in General Civil Engineering with selected courses 
in Bacteriology, Chemical Engineering, and Sanitary Engineering. 

As there is a large demand in this State for men familiar with the de- 
sign and operation of water and sewage plants, special attention is given 
to the actual design and practical operation of water-purification and sew- 
age-disposal plants. 



108 State College Catalog 

The Sanitary Engineering Laboratory equipment is similar to that used 
in water- and sewage-plant laboratories; the student makes the same tests, 
using standard methods, as are made in water- and sewage-plant labora- 
tories. 

The City of Raleigh water-purification plant and the College gymnasium 
swimming-pool filter plant are available for practical demonstration and in- 
struction. Through the cooperation of the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering, 
State Board of Health, located in Raleigh, the student has an opportunity 
to study all phases of its work, not only in Sanitary Engineering, but also 
in the broad field of public health. 

Upon graduation, students are prepared to hold positions as water- and 
sewage-plant operators, assistant resident eng:ineers with private consult- 
ing engineers, junior engineers with State boards of health, and with the 
United States Public Health Service. After a few years of experience, 
graduates may be expected to advance to positions as superintendents of 
waterworks, city engineers and city managers, consultant engineers. State 
sanitary engineers, and senior engineers with the United States Public Health 
Service. 



CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

General Civil Engineering Construction Engineering 

Highway Engineering Sanitary Engineering 

Freshman Year 

For tb« freshman year, refer to page 94. 

Sophomore Year 

Cbedits 

Courses First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, II, and III. Math. 201. 202, 303 444 

'Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 2il, 231, and one 

term English or American Literature 3 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Engineering Geology, Geol. 220 3 

Theoretical Surveying, C.E. 221, 222, 223 3 :J 3 

Field Survej-ing, C.E. 225, 227 10 1 

Mapping, C.E. 226 10 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312 3 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201. 202. 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 Ill 

21 21 21 

Surveying, C.E. s310, concurrent with Summer School, 3 credits. 

Junior Year 

Required 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, E.E. 321, 322 3 3 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 313 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 821, 322 3 3 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 821 3 

Highway Engineering I, H.E. 322, 323 3 3 



• Students who have been certified by the Department of Englbh as proficient in English may 
substitute for the courses listed French, M.L. 101. 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, P^-ychology, History, 
Modem Language, Sociology. 



The School of Engineering 109 

Choice must be made of one of the following : 
GENERAL CIVIL OPTION 



Courses First Term 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Hydraulics, C.E. 443 

General Economics, Econ, 201. 202, 208 3 

Heat Engineering III, M.E. 303 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 3 

Electives 3 



Credits 






Second Term 


Th: 


ird Term 


3 












3 


3 




3 







3 










6 




3 



18 21 18 

HIGHWAY OPTION 



Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Hydraulics, C.E. 443 

General Economics, Econ, 201, 202. 203 3 

Heat Engineering III, M.E. 303 

Electives 6 



3 








3 


3 


3 





3 


6 


3 



3 


3 








1 


1 


3 


3 





3 


3 


3 



18 21 18 
CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 3 

General Economics, Econ, 201, 202, 203 3 

Sanitary and Mechanical Equipment of Buildings, C.E. 365 3 

Materials Testing Laboratory, H.E. 332, 333 

Construction Engineering I, C.E. 361, 362, 363 3 

Electrical Equipment of Buildings, E.E. 343 

Electives 3 

21 10 22 

SANITARY OPTION 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 8 

Hydraulics, C.E. 443 8 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Aquatic Biology, Bot. 473 2 

Sanitary Engineering, C.E. 383 3 

Treatment of Water and Sewage. Chem. E. 303 8 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 » 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

18 19 20 

Senior Year 

Required 

Credits 
Courses Firzt Term Second Term Third Term 

Reinforced Concrete, C.E. 421, 422 3 3 

Soil Mechanics, C.E. 435 3 

Theory of Structures, C.E. 431, 432 3 3 

Structural Design, C.E. 426, 427 3 3 

Graphic Statics, C.E. 423 10 

10 9 3 
Choice must be made of one of the following options : 

GENERAL CIVIL OPTION 

Railroad Economics, C.E. 442 3 

Transportation, H.E. 423 3 

Applied Astronomy, C.E. 453 4 

Materials Testing Laboratory, H.E. 332, 333 Oil 

Waterworks, C.E. 485 3 

Sanitary Engineering Laboratory, C.E. 481, 482 110 

Sewerage, C.E. 486 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Electives 6 3 6 

20 20 20 



110 



State College Catalog 



HIGHWAY OPTION 



COXJRSES First Term 

Transportation, H.E. 423 

Applied Astronomy, C.E. 453 

Materials Testing Laboratory, H.E. 332, 333 

Highway Engineering II, H.E. 421, 422 3 

Highway Office Practice and Design, H.E. 425, 426 1 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Electives 6 

20 



Crbdits 




eond Term 


Third Term 





3 





4 


1 


1 


3 





1 








3 


6 


6 



20 



20 



CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

Construction Engineering 11, C.E. 461, 462, 463 8 

Construction Equipment, C.E. 468 

Accident Prevention in Construction, C.E. 469 

Specifications, C.E. 467 

Economics or Social Sciences 3 

Architectural Drawing, Arch. 306 

Electives 3 

19 



3 


3 


3 








3 





3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


3 


!1 


21 



SANITARY OPTION 

Materials Testing Laboratory, H.E. 332, 333 

Sanitary Engineering Laboratory, C.E. 481, 482 1 

Waterworks, C.E. 485 3 

Water Purification, C.E. 488 

Sewerage, C.E. 486 

Sewage Disposal, C.E. 489 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Financing of Sanitary Utilities, C.E. 483 

Electives 3 

20 23 

AU seniors are required to make the official engineering inspection trip. 



1 


1 


1 











3 





3 








3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


6 



19 



The School of Engineering 111 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor William Hand Browne, Jr., Head of the Department 

Professors J. E. Lear, R. S. Fouraker; Associate Professors R, R. Brown, 
L. M. Keever; Assistant Professors R. J. Pearsall, K. B. Glenn, E. W. 
Winkler; Laboratory Assistant J. H. Nichols; Teaching Fellow H. L. 
Morgan, Jr. 

Buildings and Equipment. — The Department is housed in Daniels Hall. 
This is an L-shaped building, the main part of which is four stories of brick, 
stone and steel construction, with a two-story wing of shop construction, 
the sides of which are almost entirely of glass. 

Laboratories. — The laboratories can be classified as follows: Dynamo, 
Communications and Transmission; Photometric, Measurements, Standards, 
High Tension, and Electronics. The Dynamo, High-Tension, and Electronics 
Laboratories are located in the wing; all the others are in the basement of 
Daniels Hall. 

The Dynamo Laboratory. — This room is sixty by eighty feet in area. Here 

the characteristics and operating conditions of representative types of ma- 
chines are studied. This laboratory has a total of approximately 300 kva 
of motors and generators (about 50 in all). There are about 150 kilowatts 
available in motor-generator sets, and rotary converters. 

There are also available approximately 150 kva of transformers for tests. 

The laboratory is well supplied with accessory equipment, such as load 
units, field rheostats, starting boxes, prony brakes, inductances, capacitors, 
and other devices. 

The Communications and Transmission Laboratory. — The Communications 
and Transmission laboratory is equipped for measurements and tests on 
communication and power-transmission circuits. It contains an outstanding 
artificial power-transmission line on which power-transmission line charac- 
teristics can be duplicated for study and testing. A complete long-line tele- 
phone system, with two two-way repeaters and associated apparatus, ar- 
ranged for all usual and several special tests, is another feature of this 
laboratory. Other equipment for study and test includes an artificial line 
for the study of corona effects, artificial telephone lines, telephone central- 
station equipment, telegraph equipment, teletypewriter equipment, and a 
complete 100-line private automatic exchange with its associated appliances. 
Test equipment includes standard oscillators, transmission-measuring sets, 
noise-measuring sets, power-level instruments, audibility meters, attenuators, 
and apparatus for measuring distortion. 

Photometric Laboratory. — This laboratory is housed in a room especially 
fitted up for the purpose. The equipment includes photometric standard 
lamps, two 300-cm. Leeds & Northrup photometer bars, a 36" Ulbrecht 



112 State College Catalog 

spherical photometer, two Macbeth-Evans Illuminometers, several Weston 
foot-candle meters, and other portable photometers. There is also the usual 
list of accessories, such as sight boxes of the Lummer-Brodhun and flicker 
types, rotating disks, and screens. 

Measurements Laboratory. — The Measurements Laboratory is arranged 
for making standard and special tests and measurements on the funda- 
mental electrical units. The apparatus includes standards of resistance, in- 
ductance and capacitance, with special bridges for the measurement of 
each, Fahy permeameter and Epstein core-loss test sets for magnetic meas- 
urements on iron and steel, a special double-bridge and oil-bath arrange- 
ment for conducti\ity measurements, and other special test appliances. 

The Standards Laboratory. — The Standards Laboratory is arranged for 
making accurate calibration tests on all types of electrical instruments. 
There are two specially designed test tables equipped with convenient means 
of controlling current and voltage, A large number of high quality instru- 
ments of all tj-pes is provided. These include standard cells, a Leeds-Northrup 
Type-K and a Queen-Gray Potentiometer, standard voltmeters, ammeters, 
wattmeters, watt-hour meters, transfonners, resistances, condensers and in- 
ductances. Certificates of accuracy from the National Bureau of Standards 
in Washington, D. C. have been secured for many of these instruments. Spec- 
ial equipment used includes a sine-wave generator, a constant-speed fre- 
quency set, Silsbee current and potential transformer test sets, and others. 

High-Tension Laboratory. — The High-Tension Laboratory has a 7%-kva 
50,000-volt, and a 10-k\'a, 100,000-volt transformer. The induction regrula- 
tors which go with these transformers make it possible to vary the voltage 
from zero to 150,000 volts. There is also standard oil-testing equipment for 
testing transformer oil, a standard spark gap, and numerous insulators of 
various types for carrying on routine tests. Frequent use is made of the 
cathode-ray oscillograph in studying surges and other disturbances. 

The Electronics Laboratory. — The Electronics Laboratory is arranged for 

testing electronic devices and their associated equipment and circuits. It 
is supplied with the various types of electron tubes, including vacuum tubes, 
gaseous tubes, phototubes, mercury-vapor tubes, cathode-ray tubes, and ap- 
paratus for operating and testing them. The test equipment includes vacuum- 
tube bridge and test sets, oscilloscopes, and the various sensitive instruments 
required for electronic measurements. Television equipment is being pro- 
vided through a recent gift to the Department. 

Instrument Room and Shop. — A centrally located Instrument Room serves 
all of the laboratories. Instruments are issued upon requisition, and re- 
turned at the end of the laboratory period. They are kept in repair by a 
competent man who divides his time between the care of the instruments 
and the Departmental Shop, which adjoins the Instrument Room. The Shop 
is fitted up with sufiicient tools for making all minor repairs to laboratory 
equipment as well as apparatus for special research. 



The School of Engineering 113 

Storage-Battery Room. — This room contains two 120-volt, 100-ampere- 
hour batteries; two 12-volt, 200-ampere-hour batteries, the complete battery 
and counter emf cells for operating the automatic telephone station, and 
portable cells of various types. Motor-generator sets, and mercury-vapor 
and tungar rectifiers are provided for charging the batteries. 

Purposes of the Curriculum. — The training of young men for active work 
in a field as wide and diversified as the Electrical Industry demands, above 
all else, a thorough preparation in the sciences underlying all branches of 
engineering, a broad foundation in fundamental electrical theory, and a 
clear understanding of the characteristics of electrical machinery and sys- 
tems. These factors are essential for success, whether it be in the design 
and manufacture of electrical equipment, in power production and utiliza- 
tion, or the fields of communication and signaling, as in all these branches 
of the industry technical advances are being made with increasing rapidity. 
With this object in view the curriculum in Electrical Engineering includes 
comprehensive training in mathematics, physics, and chemistry — the funda- 
mental sciences — and adequate training in allied branches of engineering. 
All courses are accompanied by coordinated work in the laboratory and in- 
tensive drill in the applications of theory by means of carefully planned 
problems. In the senior year the student is offered two options, one in the 
fundamentals of communication, the other in the field of industrial applica- 
tions. 

The curriculum includes a thorough drill in the preparation of technical 
reports. There is a decided trend in industry to select for high administra- 
tive positions men who have had good technical training and have in addition 
developed executive ability. The electives included in the curriculum in 
Electrical Engineering enable a student inclined toward executive work to 
take non-professional courses which deal with the economic and sociological 
problems of the day. On the other hand, those students who prefer the more 
technical phases of engineering can select scientific electives specially helpful 
in that particular branch of the profession into which they wish to go. Stu- 
dents are urged to plan as early as possible a worthwhile group of elective 
courses so chosen as to round out their curriculum. 

Each student is also required to spend at least six weeks in satisfactory 
industrial employment before receiving his degree, and during the senior 
year to make an inspection trip to a number of modern electric installations 
and submit a report upon these. 

Close coordination in the work of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers is secured through a student branch at the College, which meets 
twice a month, through the State Section of the Institute, which meets sev- 
eral times during the year, and through the regional meetings of the In- 
stitute, one section of which is organized as a student-activities conference. 



114 State CoiiBGE Catai>og 

CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Freshman Year 

nor tte fml^iB ymr. nrfer to — ee •*. 

C«i > tjiBt , G-K. iitW . t c reate' , is reqtrired is rhe s-::j=:3.er iiEji>edis.te!v foDowing the Iresb- 

Sophomore Tear 

Ceedits 
r*— — J'*J»t r«nii Second 7rr7n Tfcird Term 
I, H, m. MiliL tn. 2t^ 3M 4 4 4 

rw Fmwim. rvii Tin, tit, m 444 

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GeeerBJ Swrexnci;?. EeoM. Ztl, M^ 2n 3 S 3 

iLi'\£l Wirij^ HI 128 • • 3 

: uL'-l^S :"- l':^ i:,' 'Mi. »!. 2B«, 2M 1*2 

£;•—. A::;-v:e5, P-E. »l,2tta« 111 

2« 2« 20 



Z^.-'^r.-zg vt:^r 



Junior Year 




3 




-.x.^ Ill if .K. 313, 114. SIS 




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: : : JOS 

^ 3tf;.SK.3«7 
.;r>. £.K. ni. nt, SIS 


3 
3 

1 
2 
3 



20 26 20 

Senior Year 

• • 3 

9 3 

SCO 

S • 

9 3 

KJf.SS«,SSl 3 3 

. KS. 431 • • 3 

TiBiwwiiiiw FIT in • • 4 

EJB. 433 • • S 

HMlneiy. KXL 4W. 4tt 4 4 

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££. 4Z1. 4ZZ. 4a 3 3 3 

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• Srrde^s vbc hi^e r-r-e- !Trt;f.ed "^7 "-be Departnie-: cf Zngiitb as proSdect ic Eng-lish may 
i'::.i«r''rr:<'f:"r --i.e K-^rse: :._-.^i Frerth.' M.I.. 201. 

. z.- -'z'-~'-'n t_£j.5 :5 i;-~.:ei ;-:.: fwc £.er';c::.=., cue htil takiiig Funda-raeEtals and Metal Shop 
£_: =:.-^di--Vf ■.■* ::-:- -;_- -^^..-g ^r:•e Me*.£l Sbic-p d-iiiiig tiie Fall Term and the EaectricaJ Ed- 

* ~;"r. -; irViTii":- -.zi :z v=r; tf the folic ■witg deparCinentE : Beo&omi^, PFycboloey, History, 



The School of Engineering 115 



GENERAL ENGINEERING 



The Curriculum in Engineering Leading to the 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering 

Professor G. Wallace Smith, Administrative Officer 

Today we live in a world of applied science, and for that reason the cul- 
tured gentleman of the twentieth century must know something of Engineer- 
ing; otherwise, he is not well informed. 

Engineering is not only a means of earning a livelihood; it is also a cul- 
ture, a manner of thinking and living. It is founded upon the pure sciences 
of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry. It deals largely with Materials, 
Methods, Men, and Money. There appears to be an increasing demand for 
a curriculum which will offer to young men the opportunity to study Engi- 
neering as a field of culture, with no specific purpose of specialization but 
solely with the idea of securing a well balanced, thoroughly rigorous train- 
ing and discipline in the basic principles of Engineering. Largely for this 
reason this curriculum is here offered. It is not an easy one; it omits no 
essential foundation stone in the present recogfnized engineering curricula. 
The freshman year is identical with that of all other Engineering curricula. 
The sophomore, junior, and senior years differ from the specialized curricula 
only in that specialized technical courses are omitted and to some extent re- 
placed by electives which must be taken more largely in the social sciences. 

The advantages of this curriculum are several: 

The student acquires a better, broader training in the basic principles of 

all Engineering curricula. 

He has more electives and more freedom in the choice of these electives 
than in the specialized curricula. 

The total length of the curriculum is 9 term credits shorter than any of 
the specialized curricula. This permits a student more time for extracur- 
ricular activities which are an essential part of the lives of all college stu- 
dents, yet because of the heavily loaded condition of the specialized cur- 
ricula are frequently crowded out for all but the very best and most ener- 
getic students. 

This curriculum will be administered the first two years by B. F. Brown 
the Dean of the Basic Division, the last two years by B. R. Van Leer the 
Dean of the School of Engineering. 

The curriculum leads to the B.S. in Engineering and is as follows: 



116 State (College Catalog 

CURRICULUM IN GENERAL ENGINEERING 

Freshman Year 

Credits 
Courses First Term Second Term Th ird Term 

Same as now required for all Bn^neering students 19 19 19 

See paffe 9-4. 



Sophomore Year 

C^culus I, II, III. Math. 201. 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics. Phys. 201. 202. 203 5 5 5 

English or Modern Language^ 3 3 3 

Military Science II. Mil. 201. 202. 203, or Elective 2 2 2 

Sports Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 Ill 

EleeUve2 4 4^ 

19 19 19 

Summer School Surveying. C.E. 1023 3 



Junior Year^ 

Engr. Mechanics. E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 3 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 3 

Engr. Geology. Geol. 220 3 

Thermodynamics and Lab.. M.E. 307, 308. 309 3 3 3 

and M.E. 318, 314. 316 Ill 

Economics. Econ. 201, 202, 203, or other Social Science ... 3 3 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 ^ ^ 2 

Elective^ * _ _ 

19 19 10 



Senior Year 

Elements of Elect. Eng. II. E.E. 331. 332, 333 4 4 4 

Elements of Structures. C.E. 438, 439 - 3 3 

Fluid Mechanics. E.M. 330 3 

Strength of Materials. E.M. 322 3 

Chem. of Eng. Materials, Chem.E. 212, 213 3 3 

Accounting I. Econ. 212 ^ ^ 'i 

Elective^ * _ _ 

19 19 19 



1 Students who do not make an average grade of B or better in Freshman English will be 
required to continue English in the Sophomore year. 

2 Free electives. except that not more than 15 term credits may be chosen from the technical 
or special technical courses in the School of Enginering. 

' Students who contemplate the addition of a fifth year in Engineering for the purpose of 
obtaining a professional degree will consult the head of the department in which he intends to 
major and make such substitutions for the Engineering courses offered in this curriculum as are 
necessary for the 8atisfactor>- completion of the technical requirements of the degree sought. 



The School of Engineering 117 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Jasper L. Stuckey, Head of the Department 
Assistant Professor John M. Parker; Teaching Fellow George P, Jones, Jr. 

Facilities. — The function of the Department of Geology is twofold: first, 
to offer service courses required as prerequisites in the Agricultural Educa- 
tion, and Engineering curricula; second, to administer the curriculum in 
Geological Engineering. 

The classrooms, laboratories, and offices of the Department are in Prim- 
rose Hall. The equipment includes a varied collection of minerals, rocks, 
and fossils, illustrating the materials of different parts of the earth's crust; 
laboratory equipment for carrjnng on qualitative chemical and blowpipe 
examination of minerals and rocks; microscopes and other optical equip- 
ment; facilities for making thin sections of rocks and minerals; geological 
models; a collection of topographic maps and geologic folios illustrating 
important and t3rpical areas in the United States. 

Curriculum. — This curriculum is designed to train young men in the 
fundamentals of engineering with its special application to geology. Many 
engineering undertakings, especially major construction projects, such as 
large dams and reservoirs, tunnels, and large buildings, depend for success 
on exact knowledge of their geological setting. On the other hand, such 
geological problems as the economical development of mineral resources 
require the use of the precise methods of engineering. The curriculum com- 
bines these two sorts of information and training so necessary to success 
in this important specialized field. 

Well-trained geological engineers are in demand by mining and oil com- 
panies, by State and Federal Geological Surveys, in the larger industries 
using mineral raw materials, by leading railways, by hydro-power concerns, 
and as teachers of geology in technical schools. Openings in this field have 
been on the increase because of the recent recognition that the geological 
aspects of engineering and industry have been neglected. Consequently, men 
with the specialized training required have been difficult to find. 

The mineral resources of the State offer important possibilities for large 
future developments. In Western North Carolina there exist valuable de- 
posits of copper, nickel, iron, feldspar, mica, kaolin, cyanite, barite, granite, 
limestone, and other minerals; in Central North Carolina are coal deposits of 
promising quantity and quality, and large areas of pyrophyllite, granite 
and other building stone; and on the Coastal Plain are deposits of phos- 
phate and marls. The production and use of these materials will undoubt- 
edly be expanded as their availability becomes better known. Their profit- 
able development will require more and more skill in geology and engineer- 
ing, not merely in the extraction of the ore, but more especially in con- 
trolling the direction of the work. 



118 State College Catalog 

New discoveries are sure to be made in such a richly mineralized area, 
but no longer by chance or superficial hunting. The day of the old-time, 
untrained prospector is gone; every resource of science must now be util- 
ized in this increasingly difficult search. The successful prospector of the 
future must understand the physical and chemical processes and conditions 
responsible for each kind of mineral deposit, as well as the secondary al- 
terations they may undergo. He must be capable of using the complex and 
sensitive instruments devised for investigating the earth's crust far below 
the surface. 

In these related fields of major engineering projects and the economical 
extraction of the mineral raw materials of industry, men well trained in 
the fundamentals of the physical sciences and in engineering technology will 
occupy key positions. In a civilization such as ours this must be an in- 
creasingly large field. 



The School of Engineering 



119 



CURRICULUM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 



Freshman Year 

For the freshman year, refer to page 94. 

Sophomore Tear 

Courses First Term 

Calculus I, 11, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking and English or Ameri- 
can Literature, Eng. 211, 231, or any one of 261-267... 3 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 212 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

Engrineering Geology, Geol. 220 3 

Historical Geology, Geol. 222 

Mineralogy, Geol. 230 

Geomorphology, Geol. 223 

tMUitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

21 



Credits 
Second Term 
4 

3 

4 
4 

3 


2 
1 

21 



Third Term 

4 

3 


4 


3 
3 
2 
1 

20 



Junior Tear 



Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 301, 302 3 

Fluid Mechanics. E.M. 330 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 320 

Heat Engineering III, M.E. 303 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, E.E. 320, 321 3 

Physical Chemistry, Chem. 331 5 

Theoretical Surveying, C.E. 221, 222 3 

Field Surveying, C.E. 225 1 

Mapping, C.E. 226 

Stratigraphy and Index Fossils, Geol. 361 3 

Petrology, Geol. 443 

Advanced Mineralogy, Geol. 332 

Structural Geology, Geol. 362 

Geophysics, Geol. 363 

Electives 3 

21 



20 



20 



Senior Tear 



General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Optical Mineralogy. Geol. 431, 432, 433 3 

Soil Mechanics, C.E. 435 3 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 3 

Economic Geology, Geol. 411, 412, 413 3 

Advanced Engrineering Geology, Geol. 462 

Field Methods, Geol. 463 

Mining Engineering, Mine Design, and Ore Dressing, 

Geol. 471, 472, 473 3 

Electives 3 

21 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum 



3 


3 


3 





3 


3 














3 


3 


3 








4 


3 


3 


8 


3 


SI 


19 



• students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English may 
substitute, for the courses listed, French, M.L. 101. 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, History, 
Modem Language, Sociology. 



120 State College Catalog 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Professor H. B. Shaw, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor F. F. Groseclose. 

North Carolina has an abundance of natural resources and its industries 
are progressing steadily, which mean that there are increasing needs for 
educated personnel and informed leaders to deal with the complexities of 
modern industries. 

Engineers have had a surprisingly large share in America's amazing in- 
dustrial progress through their engineering knowledge and the adaptation 
of engineering methods and approach to the solution of industrial prob- 
lems. To be even more effective in industry and modern life, engineers should, 
to their study of engineering, add knowledge of the economic and social 
sciences, because they have to deal not only with the materials and forces of 
nature but also with men, money, and affairs, and particularly with in- 
dustrial relations. 

The aim of the curriculum in Industrial Engineering is to prepare students 
to enter the employ of industries as engineering graduates, and, through 
experience, to develop into positions of responsibility and service; and thus 
to meet the demands of industries for men educated as engineers with special 
preparation for the activities of industries. 

The curriculum provides thorough education in the subjects fundamental 
to engineering — basic engineering courses, courses in Psychology, Econom- 
ics, and Accounting — and, besides. Industrial Engineering courses which 
apply engineering methods and principles to the study of industries; so that 
students may learn to make engineering, economic, and social analyses con- 
currently, and to apply them to the conduct of enterprises. 

Electives, to be selected from engineering and other College courses, with 
the approval of the adviser, offer opportunity for the development of indi- 
vidual aptitudes. 

Students in Industrial Engineering get class and laboratory instruction 
from other engineering departments and from other college courses and 
these are correlated and extended by the Industrial Engrineering courses. 

At present the classrooms and offices are in the Civil Engineering Building 
but other quarters are to be provided in the near future. 



The School of Engineering 
CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 



121 



Freshman Year 

For tb« freshman year, refer to page 94. 

Sophomore Year 



CoxmsES First Term 

Calculus I, II, and III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

'Business English, Public Speaking, and English or Ameri- 
can Literature, Eng. 211, 231 and any one of courses 

261 to 267 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Shopwork, M.E. 124, 125. 126 2 

Industrial Organization, I.E. 101, 102, 103 8 

tMUitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202. 203 1 

22 



CaiBJiTS 






See</ad Term. 


Th 


ird Term 


4 




4 


3 




3 


4 




4 


3 




3 


2 




2 


3 




3 


2 




2 


1 




1 



22 



Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics. E.M. 301, 302 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 320 

Engineering Thermodynamics. M.E. 307. 308, 309 3 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II, M.E. 313, 314, 315 1 

Machine Shop II. M.E. 227, 228, 229 1 

Factory Equipment, M.E. 224 

Accounting I, Econ. 301, 302, 303 3 

Management Engineering I. E. 201, 202, 203 3 

Electives 6 



20 



3 

3 
1 
1 

3 
3 
6 

20 



Summer requirement : six weeks industrial employment. 



Senior Year 

Technical Writing I. Eng. 321 

Business Law. Econ. 307 3 

Industrial Psychology. Psychol. 338 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 3 

Elements of Electrical Engineering II, E.E. 331, 832. 333 ... 4 

Engineering Economics. I.E. 301 3 

Electrical Industry. I.E. 402 

Industrial Engineering Problems. I.E. 312, 313 

Investigation and Report, I.E. 433 

Electives 6 



19 19 

All seniors are requii-ed to go on the inspection trip as part of their eui-ricxilum. 



* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English may 
substitute for the courses listed. French. M.L. 101. These students are required to take two years 
of French. 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departments: Economics. Psychology, History. 
Modem Language, Sociology. 



122 State College Catalog 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor L. L. Vaughan, Head of Department 

Professors E. G. Hoefer, H. B. Brigg-s, F. B. Wheeler, R. B. Rice; Associate 

Professors H. E. Satterfield, F. F. Groseclose; Assistant Professors W. 
S. Bridges. G. G. Fornes, L. R. Parkinson, P. E. Moose; Instructors M. R. 
Rowland, W. E. Selkinghaus, C. N. Sanf ord, R. J. Maddison, T. C. Brown, 
T. L. Nash, R. L. Cope, W. E. Adams; Instructor Emeritus C. B. Park. 

Buildings and Equipment, — The Department of Mechanical Engineering 
occupies both Page Hall and the Shops Building. In Page Hall are the 
office of the Head of the Department, offices for the drawing division and 
the laboratory division, classrooms, drafting rooms, the Intemal-Combus- 
tion-Engine Laboratory, Hydraulics Laboratory, and Aeronautical Labora- 
tories. It contains also the offices of the instructors in the several shops and 
Machine Shop, and provides space for the Mechanical Engrineering Labora- 
tory. It contains also the offices of the instructors in the several shops and 
one clas-sroom. 

Drafting Rooms. — The drafting rooms are equipped with tables, stools, 
cases for beards, reference files, and models. The drafting rooms have two 
Universal Drafting Machines in addition to other necessary equipment. The 
blueprint room contains an electric blueprint machine, a sheet washer, and 
an ozalid printing machine, besides the usual sun frames. 

Shops. — The Wood Shop is equipped vrith a variety of modem machines: 
lathes, combination saw, dado saw, cut-off saw, jointer, mortisers, sanders, 
moulder, sticker, trimmer, shaper, boring machines, band saws, jig saw, 
various types of clamps, a glue room, and other essentials that go to make an 
up-to-date shop. The machines are motor driven with either individual or 
group drive. The shop includes work benches, hand tools and necessary auxi- 
liary equipment and a modem spray-gun for finishing surfaces. 

The Foundry Equipment consists of a 36" cupola, a 14" cupola, brass 
furnace, core oven, core machine, moidding machines, cleaning mill, motor- 
driven elevator, emery wheel and buffer, and the necessary tools and patterns 
for practical moulding. Complete sand-testing equipment has been recently 

added. 

The Forge Shop is equipped with thirty anvils and forges, the blast for 
the forges being produced by a large power blower and regulated by an indi- 
vidual control on each forge easily accessible to the operator. The shop is 
also equipped with a modem down-draft-type exhaust system, thereby eli- 
minating all overhead pipes which would interfere with the proper and effi- 
cient lighting of the shop. Other equipment consists of drill press, iron 
shears, vises, emery wheel and other necessary forging equipment. Recent 
additions include a 300 ampere direct current electric welder and a ten station 
oxyacetylene welding manifold system. Both low and medium pressure tyi>es 
of torches are included in the installation. 



The School of Engineering 123 

The Machine Shop, well heated, lighted, and ventilated, is equipped with 
work benches, machinist's vises, and a variety of machine tools: engine 
lathes, bench lathes, shapers, planers, milling machines, vertical and hori- 
zontal boring mills, drill presses, slotting machines, grinders, arbor presses, 
and a variety of hand tools, cutters, clamps, jigs, and other equipment neces- 
sary to modern machine-shop practice. Some of the machines are group 
driven, others are individually driven. 

Laboratories. — The Heat-Power, Heating and Air Conditioning and Metal- 
lurgical laboratories are located in the Shops Building. The Heat-Power 
Laboratory is equipped with plain slide-valve, automatic cut-off, multiple- 
expansion, and uniflow engines arranged for condensing and noncondensing 
operation. It is provided with a modern turbo-generator set complete with a 
high-vacuum condenser. A two-stage air compressor driven by a uniflow 
engine supplies air for experimentation. Weighing tanks and steam pumps 
make possible tests in this field. This division of the laboratory is equipped 
with instruments and apparatus for making coal and gas analyses and tests, 
lubrication tests, calibration tests, heat-transfer tests, nozzle tests, and gen- 
eral efficiency and thermodynamic tests. 

The Heating and Air Conditioning division of the laboratory contains sev- 
eral heating boilers with appropriate oil-burning equipment, weighing tanks 
and instruments for complete tests. The laboratory is also equipped with an 
air conditioner, unit heaters, radiator-testing equipment, a half-ton refri- 
geration machine, insulation-testing equipment and a fan and duct testing 
unit. 

The Metallurgical Laboratory is equipped for work dealing with the struc- 
ture and the physical and mechanical properties of metals and alloys. The 
equipment includes electric and gas heat-treating furnaces with controls, in- 
dicating and recording pyrometers; apparatus for polishing and etching speci- 
mens, metallurgical microscopes with complete lens combinations, and dark 
rooms for photographic and photoelastic equipment. The laboratory is equip- 
ped with 15,000-lb. and 50,000-lb. material testing machines. 

The Aeronautical, Hydraulic Machinery, and Internal Combustion Engine 
Laboratories are housed in the basement of Page Hall. The Aeronautical 
Laboratory is equipped with a new twenty-inch wind tunnel capable of speeds 
in excess of 100 miles per hour. The tunnel is equipped with automatic 
balances. A wing testing unit is provided for wing-load tests. A complete 
set of flight instruments is available for study, experiments and tests. The 
laboratory is equipped with the major component parts of several airplanes 
and a complete monoplane of recent design. A smokebox is provided for flow 
analysis work. 

The Hydraulic Testing Laboratory contains a ten-inch Francis-Type Hy- 
draulic Turbine, of the most modern design, directly connected to an electric 
dynamometer, together with weir, Venturi, flume, and instruments for com- 
plete test. The laboratory has high speed and low speed centrifugal pumps 



124 State College Catalog 

arranged for tests, also Venturi tubes, weirs, nozzles, meters and a hydraulic 
channel for the study of flow. 

The Internal Combustion Engine Laboratory is equipped with high speed 
and low speed compression ignition engines, automotive and stationary spark- 
ignition engines, air cooled and liquid cooled aircraft engines, all of the most 
modem design. Each of the test engines, of which there are ten at present, is 
equipped -wnth its power absorbing device, such as club-propellers in the 
case of Aero Engines and water brakes, calibrated electric generators and 
electric cradle-dj-namometers for the other engines. A 5-hp. electric dynamo- 
meter is pro^^ded for accessory testing and a 125-hp. dynamometer for high- 
speed engine testing. Engines, carburetors, ignition equipment and acces- 
sories are provided for study. 

All of the laboratories are designed around the unit system for instruc- 
tion, whereby units in or whole divisions of the laboratory may be operated 
without depending on or interfering with other units or divisions. 

Purposes. — The Mechanical Engineer is primarily a designer and builder 
of machines and other equipment for use in manufacturing processes, trans- 
portation, and the generation of power. He is responsible for the conserva- 
tion and economical use of the power-producing resources of the world 
through the application of the proper kind of equipment in each field of 
production. He is called upon to take charge of the executive management 
of the manufacturing, transportation, and power industries. For the Me- 
chanical Engineer to be well grounded in his profession, he must be thor- 
oughly familiar with both the science and the art of engineering. 

The curriculum in Mechanical Engineering begins with a thorough train- 
ing in Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry as a foundation for the tech- 
nical work which is later developed along several parallel lines. The stu- 
dent is taught how these fundamental sciences are applied to the physical 
properties of the materials of construction, and to the transformation of 
heat energy into work and power. This is accomplished by means of courses 
in Drafting, Metallurgy, Mechanics, and Thermodynamics; by the work in 
the wood shop, forge shop, foundry, and machine shop, and by the tests per- 
formed in the mechanical laboratory. 

Through the training offered in this curriculum it is hoped that the young 
graduate, after gaining some experience in industry, will be qualified to ac- 
cept the responsibilities which will be imposed upon him in the professional 
field of Mechanical Engineering. 



The School of Engineering 126 

CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Freshman Year 

For the freshman year, refer to page 94. 

Sophomore Year 

_ CRBDrra 

OOURSES piret Term Second Term Third Term 



Calculus I, II, and III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231... 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 444 

Mechanical Drawing, M.E. 211, 212, 213 2 2 



Metallurgy, M.E. 221, 222, 223 2 2 2 

Shopwork, M.E. 124, 125, 126 2 2 2 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311 3 

tMilitary Science, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Physical Education, P.E. 201, 202. 203 Ill 

20 20 20 



Junior Year 

Ensrineering Mechanics, E.M 312, 313 3 " 

Machine Shop II, M.E. 227, 228, 229 1 1 j 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307. 308, 309 3 3? 

Mech. Eng. Lab. II, M.E. 313, 314, 315 111 

tKinematics, M.E. 317, 318, 319 3 3 3 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321, 322 3 3 

English or American Literature. Eng. 261, or 265, 266, 267 3 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Technical Writing, Eng. 321 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 20 20 

Summer requirement : Six weeks industrial employment, or ten hours solo flying 
in Aero. Option. 



• Students who have been certified by the Department of English as profieient in English niay 
substitute tor the courses listed French, M.L. 101. 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, History 
Modem Language, Sociologrj'. 

t Furniture Option, M.E. 341, 342, 343, or Aero. Option, M.E. 323, third term. 



126 State College Catalog 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING I— GENERAL OPTION 

Professor L. L. Vaughan, Faculty Adviser. 

Senior Year 

Credits 

Courses First Term Second Term Third Tervt 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Power Plants, M.E. 401, 402, 403 3 3 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning. M.E. 404 3 

Machine Design, M.E. 411, 412, 413 3 3 3 

Refrigeration, M.E. 405 8 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III, M.E. 407, 408, 409 1 1 1 

Elements of Electrical Engineering II, E.E. 331, 332, 333 4 4 4 

Hydraulic Machinery, E.M. 331 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 20 20 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING II— AERONAUTICAL OPTION 

Professor L. R. Parkinson, Faculty Adviser. 

Recent developments in the aeronautic industry has resulted in a demand 
for graduates who are trained in the fundamentals pertaining to this field. 
To meet this demand, the Mechanical Engineering Department offers an 
option to train student.^ in the design, construction and testing of aircraft, 
their power plants and instruments. An airport located on the North-South 
air route and near the college offers the student an opportunity to inspect 
various types of airplanes. 

Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years identical with the General Mechanical Engineering 

Curriculum. 
Summer requirement: Six weeks industrial employment or ten hours solo flying. 

Senior Tear 

Credits 

COURSBS First Term Second Term Third Term 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Aircraft Engines, M.E. 421, 422, 423 3 3 3 

Airplane Design, M.E. 425, 426, 427 3 3 3 

Aerodynamics, M.E. 417, 418, 419 3 3 3 

Aeronautical Laboratory, M.E. 431, 432, 433 Ill 

Elements of Electrical Engineering II, E.E. 331, 332, 333 ... 4 4 4 

Electires 3 3 3 

20 20 20 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 



The School of Engineering 127 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING III— FURNITURE OPTION 

Professor F. B. Wheeler, Faculty Adviser. 
The manufacture of furniture and wood products being one of the leading 
industries in North Carolina, the Mechanical Engineering Department of- 
fers a Furniture Option to prepare young men for this field of endeavor. In 
cooperation with the wood industries in the state and in the well-equipped 
shops, the student is given an aesthetic as well as practical and scientific in- 
sight into the art of designing and manufacturing furniture. 

Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years identical with the General Mechanical En^neerins 

Curriculum. 
Summer requirement : Six weeks industrial employment. 

Senior Year 

Cbbdits 
Courses First Term Second Term. Third Term 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Power Plants, M.E. 401, 402. 403 3 S 3 

Mech. Eng. Lab. IIL M.E. 407, 408. 409 Ill 

Furniture Design and Construction, M.E. 446, 446, 447 3 4 6 

Elements of Elec. Eng. H, E.E. 331, 332, 333 444 

Art Principles in Industry, Arch. 106 3 

Engrg. Econ., I.E. 301 3 

Electives 3 3 8 

20 21 19 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IV— HEATING AND 
AIR CONDITIONING OPTION 

Professor R. B. Rice, Faculty Adviser. 
The Mechanical Engineering Department offers this option because of the 
increasing interest in heating and air conditioning for the purpose of pro- 
ducing comfort, and furthermore because the engineering profession is large- 
ly responsible for the health and well-being of society through the effective 
construction and operation of heating and air-conditioning systems. Empha- 
sis is placed on this phase of engineering through the application of funda- 
mental principles to design, laboratory investigations and research, and 
through this means the student is given an opportunity to become familiar 
with standard practice in this field. 

Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years identical with the General Mechanical En«nneerine 

Curriculum. " 

Summer requirement : Six weeks industrial employment. 

Senior Year 

_ Crkdits 

CouKSBS First Term Second Term Third Term 

General Economics. Econ. 201. 202, 203 Z S -t 

Power Plants, M.E. 401, 402. 403 3 3 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning Lab., M.E. 455, 456, 467 Ill 

Hydraulics Machinery, E.M. 331 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning II. M.E. 451, 452, 453 3 3 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning Design, M.E. 458, 459 3 3 

Elements of Elec. Engrg. H, E.E. 331, 332, 333 4 4 4 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 20 20 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 



128 State Colubge Catalog 

DrV^ISION OF TEACHER TRAINING 

Professors: T. E. Beoah'NE, M.A., Director of the Division. 
Leok E. Cook, M.S., Agricultural Education. 
Edward W. Boshart, M.A., Industrial Arts Educa- 
tion, and Guidance. 
Karl C. Garrison, Ph.D., Psychology. 

Associate Professors: J. K. COGGIN, M.S., Agricultural Education. 

L. 0. Armstrong, M.S., Agricultural Education. 
J. Warren Smith, M.S., Industrial Education. 

Assistant Professor: William McGehee, M.A., Psychology. 

Parposes. — The Di'v'ision of Teacher Training at State College, operating 
as a local Di>'ision of the Division of Teacher Training of the Greater Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, has imposed upon it the responsibility of train- 
ing teachers of Agriculture, of Trades and Industries and of Industrial Arts. 
As further emphasizing the importance of the work, the State Board for 
Vocational Education has designated State College for training men as 
teachers of these subjects in white schools, and as counselors to students in 
choosing their vocations. Following this action. Federal appropriations to 
the State under the Smith-Hughes and the George-Deen Acts of Congress 
for such teacher training are allotted to the College. 

Organization. — The Division offers curricula for training teachers of 
Agriculture, of Industrial Arts Education, of Industrial Education and Oc- 
cupational Information and Guidance. The training includes four definite 
objectives. The first embraces the fundamentals of general education: Eng- 
lish, Mathematics, the natural sciences — Biology, Chendstry, Physics — 
Economics, Sociology, and History. These subjects are given in the Basic 
Division of the College. Next are the technical subjects selected according 
to the professional course of the student: for Agricultural Teaching, in the 
School of Agriculture; for Industrial Arts and Industrial Education, in the 
School of Engineering. In the third group are the principles and methods 
of teaching and of vocational guidance. Educational Psychology here is 
obviously essential. The last objective is practical experience. To meet 
the requirements of the State Department of Public Instruction for teach- 
ing certificates, students, before graduation, observe and teach under the 
direction of the faculty of the Division in selected high schools. More- 
over, experience in the respective occupations is required for those pre- 
paring to teach agriculture and the trades and industries. 

Psychology. — General Psychology, giving an understanding of man's re- 
actions to individual and social forces, constitutes one of the fundamentals 
of liberal education. Educational Psychology, applying the general prin- 
ciples to the problems of instruction, learning, and character building, be- 
comes obviously essential in the equipment of teachers. Courses in Ap- 
plied, Industrial, and Social Psychology of specialized nature meet the 



Division op Teacher Training 129 

needs of the various technological curricula. The Department of Psychology 
m view of its intimate relationship to the problems of teacher training is 
incorporated administratively in the Division of Teacher Training and at 
the same time functions instructionally throughout the Basic Division and 
the Professional Schools. 

Requirements for Graduation.— For graduation in the Division of Teacher 
Trammg, the scholastic requirement in aU curricula is the satisfactory at- 
tainment of at least 225 term credits with not fewer than an equal number 
of honor points. 

Of the term credits required for graduation, a student must have at 
c M ?"" ^<^"catio"' 18 in Language, 18 in the Natural Sciences, 18 in 
bocial Science, 12 in Military Training or alternatives, 6 in Physical Educa- 
tion. Subjects must be taken as indicated in the several curricula. 

Students who enter with advanced standing are allowed one point for 
each term credit accepted. 

Further requirements consist of practice teaching in the subject and prac- 
tical experience in the work to be taught as indicated above, or under the 
several Departments. 

FHn^^'**'*~^?? *^^ satisfactory completion of one of the curricula in 
^.T Tu-^ "l^ '' ^"^^"^"^ *^" ^"^''^^ °f 2^^h^l°r of Science with the 

dnSl?A;! T." """*^^"^"^ appended: in Agricultural Education, in In- 
dustrial Arts Education, in Industrial Education. 

ml^lJ^ltuT^t ^'J'''°'' °^ ^^^^ ^°""^" °^^^^ *^« M^^t^^'s Degree to 
T^W . I' °^ '"P'"^°" ^^'^'^^ "P°" successful completion of its 



130 State College Catalog 

Agricultural Education 

Leon E. Cook 

Object. — Agricultural Education is designed to prepare students for po- 
sitions as teachers of vocational agriculture in the high schools of the 
State, and to qualify as such under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes and 
George-Deen Acts of Congress. 

The curriculum is comprehensive in nature. It is, of course, essential that 
teachers have a good foimdation in English and in the sciences basic to an 
understanding of agriculture. They should also have a sufficient under- 
standing of the social sciences to appreciate the developments of contempo- 
rary life, with the emphasis on those having to do with agriculture and the 
rural community. Manifestly they should have a grasp of agriculture in 
all phases of importance in the State, including the improvement of the 
farm home and of the social as well as of the economic development of the 
rural community. Proficiency in teaching vocational agriculture depends 
upon comprehensive and thorough preparation in the professional field with 
emphasis on personal relationship and guidance, procedure in teaching both 
youth and adults, and in handling the various responsibilities of community 
service. 

An adequate background of farm experience is essential for students 
looking forward to agricultural teaching, and experience in fields related to 
farming is desirable. A student should be farm reared or should have a 
minimum of two years of farm experience as a part of his preparation for 
teaching vocational agriculture. 

Placement of Graduates. — There has been a strong demand for teachers of 
vocational agriculture with little difficulty in placing students who are quali- 
fied from the standpoint of personality, character, training, and farm expe- 
rience. A cooperative arrangement with the supervisory staff in agricul- 
tural education of the State Department of Public Instruction facilitates the 
placement of students in situations adapted to their experience and training. 

Successful teachers of agriculture are in demand for higher positions in 
the educational service and by other agencies for positions offering higher 
salaries than those paid in the teaching profession. 

Graduate Study. — The Department provides opportunities for students, 
fully qualified, to do graduate work in Agricultural Education. Graduate 
students taking majors in this field should have completed the undergraduate 
work in Agricultural Education or the equivalent. Transfer students, or 
graduates in general agriculture who did not take the work in education, 
are required to complete 15 credits in education including Principles of 
Teaching and Methods of Teaching Agriculture, as pre-requisites to grad- 
uate study 



Division of Teacher Training 131 

Curriculum for Teachers of Agriculture 
Freshman Year 

CouBSBS First Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

General Botany, Bot. 102 

General Zoology, Zool. 101 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry, Math. Ill, 112 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or Alt 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 ... 1 



Credits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 











4 


4 


3 


3 





4 


2 


2 


1 


1 



Sophomore Year 



Junior Year 



Senior Year 



17 



Farm Equipment, Agr. Eng. 202 

Soils, Soils 201 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202 3 

Agricultural Economics, Agr. Econ. 202 

Physics for Agr. Students, Phys. 115 6 

Animal Physiology, Zool. 202, or 

Plant Physiology, Bot. 221 

Economic Zoology, Zool. 102 

General BoUny, Bot. 101 4 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Chem. 221 

Animal Nutrition I, A.H. 202 

General Poultry, Poul. 201 3 

Principles of Forestry, For. Ill 3 

General Horticulture, Hort. 202 

General Field Crops, F.C. 202 

Military Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203, or Alt 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 



English, elective 3 

Educational Psychology, Ed. 303ab 3 

Visual Aids, Ed. 308 

Teaching Farm Shop Work, Agr. Eng. 331, 332 3 

Farm Management, Agr. Econ. 303 

Farm Accounting, Agr. Econ. 313 

Soil Fertility, Soils 221 3 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 

Rural Sociology, Rural Soc. 302 

♦Diseases of Field Crops, Bot. 301 3 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 

**Electives 6 



English, elective 

Materials and Methods in Teaching Agriculture, Ed. 412.... 

Secondary Education in Agriculture, Ed. 426 

Principles of Teaching, Ed. 406 3 

Observation and Directed Teaching, Ed. 408 

Methods of Teaching Agriculture, Ed. 407 5 

Evening Classes and Community Work, Ed. 411 

***Animal Hygiene and Sanitation, A.H. 363 

Agricultural Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Community Organization, Rural Soc. 413 

**Electives 4 



3 








4 


3 








3 











6 


4 











4 





3 




















3 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



21 20 21 






3 


3 








3 


3 








3 





3 








3 





3 














4 


6 


3 



21 18 






3 


5 








3 








5 











6 








3 











3 





4 



15 15 



• Diseases of Fruits and Vegetable Crops, Bot. 303, may be substitnted for Bot. 301. 
•* Options and electives must be chosen with the approval of the adviser and the electives must 
include at least 19 credits in Agriculture. 
•*• Common Diseases, A.H. 352, may be substituted for A.H. 353. 



132 State College Catalog 

Industrial Arts Education 

and 

Occupational Information and Guidance 

Edward W. Boshart 

Object. — For nearly half a century North Carolina State College of Agri- 
culture and Engineering has had a large part in the preparations of in- 
dividuals and the development of facilities to meet the problems related to 
the growth of industries throughout the State. As a part of this effort the 
training of teachers qualified to give instruction in the Industrial Arts is 
becoming more important. The emphasis of this Department is on phases 
of practical education which will give clearer meanings to life problems. 

Organization. — The courses in Industrial Arts Education have been for- 
mulated to prepare teachers for the public schools where they will have 
charge of classes in elementary activities, shopwork, and drawing. The suc- 
cessful completion of this curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Industrial Arts Education and to the earning of an A-grade 
certificate for teaching subjects in this field. 

The first two years of this curriculum are in line with the general plan 
of the College which emphasizes work of fundamental value. The last two 
years are given to work of a professional and specialized nature stressing 
analysis of occupations and trades, vocational guidance, and school-shop 
organization and administration. 

Professional Objectives. — The curriculum is intended for those who wish 
to become teachers, heads of departments, supervisors, or directors of indus- 
trial arts in the public schools. Men with this preparation are those who, 
with continued study, become the leaders in their field. 

Vocational Guidance. — One of the causes of failure in education and in 
after life lies in lack of early guidance, based on mental and physical quali- 
ties, personal aptitudes, and background toward the choice of an individual's 
lifework. Though as yet not perfectly developed, much has been learned in 
vocational guidance that is helpful in avoiding a misfit in education and in 
subseqeunt work. Teachers are those upon whom, working as collaborators 
with colleges and families, must fall the burden of these momentous choices. 
Through courses in tests and measurements and the requirements of various 
occupations, trades, and professions. State College is endeavoring to pre- 
pare teachers of high schools to become counselors of students in leading 
them through choice of congenial vocations toward successful and happy 
lives. 



Division of Teacher Training 



133 



Curriculum for Teachers of Industrial Arts 
Fresliman Year 



Courses First Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

Algebra, TriRonometry and Mathematics of Finance, 

Math. Ill, 112, 113 4 

General Chemistry, or Optional Science 4 

Engineering Drawing II, M.E. 105, 106 3 

Descriptive Geometry, M.E. 107 

Industrial Arts, Ed. 106 3 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101. 102. 103... 1 

20 



Cbhdits 
Second Term 
3 

4 
4 
3 

3 

2 

1 



Third Term 



20 



Sophomore Year 



Business English, Eng. 211, Advanced Composition, 

Eng. 222, Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

General Physics, Phys. 106, 106, 107 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Freehand Drawing I, Pen and Pencil Drawing, Arch. 101 2 

Freehand Drawing II, Water Color, Arch. 102 

Pencil Sketching, Arch. 100 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 

Forge, Foundry, and Pattern Making. M.E. 124, 125, 126 2 

Military Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203, or Elective 2 

Sports Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 208 1 

Elective 



3 
4 
S 

2 

3 
2 
2 
1 


20 



21 



Junior Year 



Educational Psychology, Ed. 303a,b 3 

Problems in Secondary Education, Ed. 344 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Business Law, Econ. 807 

Labor Problems, Econ. 331 

Project Design, Ed. 332 3 

Visual Aids, Ed. 308 

Machine Shop, M.E. 235, 236 3 

Sheet Metal Shop, Ind. Ed. 206a,b 3 

Carpentry, Ind. Ed. 208a,b 3 

Electric Shop, E.E. 113 

18 



3 








3 


S 


3 





3 





3 


3 








8 


3 





3 





3 








3 



18 



18 



Senior Year 



Field Work in Secondary Education, Ed. 433 

Vocational Guidance. Ed. 420 

Methods in Teaching Industrial Arts, Ed. 422 3 

Observation and Directed Teaching, Ed. 444 

Industrial Relations 3 

Occupational Studies, Ed. 424 

Printing, Ind. Ed. 210a,b,c 3 

Furniture Design, M.E. 237, 238, 239 3 

Organization of Teaching Materials. Ed. 361 3 

Electives 3 



3 








3 








3 


3 











3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 





3 


3 



18 



18 



18 



134 State College Catalog 

Curriculum for Teachers of Occupational Information and Guidance 
Freshman Year 

Credits 
COURSBS First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102. 103 3 S 3 

Algebra, Trigonometry, and Mathematics of Finance, 

Math. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Science _ 4 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 S 

Occupations, Ed. 103 S 

Historical Geology, Geol. 222 - 3 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 4 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or 

Worid History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Fundamental Actirities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 . Ill 

21 20 20 

Sophomore Year 

Business English, Eng. 211, Advanced Composition, 

Eng. 222, PubUc Speaking, Eng. 231 3 3 3 

Science 4 4 4 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 3 

Psychologs-, Psychol. 200 3 

Social Psychology, Psychol. 290 3 

Psychology of Personality, Psychol. 291 3 

Phj'siography, Geol. 303 3 

Military Science 11, Mil. 201, 202. 203, or Elective 2 2 2 

Sport; Activities, P^. 201, 202, 203 Ill 

*Electives 3 3 3 

19 19 19 

Junior Year 

English or Modem Language 3 3 3 

Educational Psychology, Ed. 303a,b 3 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Problems in Secondary Education, Ed. 344 3 

Visual Aids, Ed. 308 3 

•♦American Government, Gov. 200, 201, 202 3 3 3 

Occupational Studies, Ed. 424 3 

•Electives 4 4 4 

19 19 19 

Senior Year 

Field Work in Secondary Education, Ed. 433 3 

Vocational Guidance, Ed. 420 3 

Obser%'ation and Directed Teaching, Ed. 444 3 3 

Methods of Teaching Occupations, Ed. 423 3 

Measurements in Educational Psychology, PsychoL 468 3 

Social Recreation, P.E. 401 3 

♦Electives 12 12 9 

IS IS IS 



• Electives to be selected with aid of adviser to meet special needs of individual students. 
•• Gov. 203 may alternate with Gov. 200. 



Division of Teacher Training 135 

Industrial Education 

J. Warren Smith 

Object. — In a greater degree than at any previous time, thought is now 
directed toward an extended program of trade-shop courses in Industrial 
Education for North Carolina high schools. Some of the factors which have 
contributed to this focus of attention are: unemployment, rising age for 
entrance to work, increasing school enrollment, and an extended school 
term. It is to prepare teachers for this field of service that this program is 
designed. A four-year course is outlined with the first two years running 
parallel with that of industrial arts, then specializing by following the out- 
lined course during the last two years. 

Positions For Graduates. — The student who completes this course will be 
prepared to teach in the all-day schools or the part-time or the evening 
classes, such as are supported by State and Federal funds for vocational 
education. At the present time, little difficulty should be encountered by the 
successful candidates in securing positions after graduation. 

Journeyman Experience Required. — Candidates for degrees must have had 
at least two years of successful journeyman experience in the trade they 
wish to teach. Successful completion of this course leads to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education. Men with journeyman experi- 
ence who desire to take only professional courses, may enter as special stu- 
dents with the object of completing one or two years of training as outlined 
for the junior and senior years. For this work, no degree would be granted. 

This Department is recognized as the official training Department of In- 
dustrial Education for the State Department of Education. The head of the 
Department serves as itinerant teacher-trainer for part-time, day-trade, and 
evening classes, and for the preparation of prospective teachers. 

For the time being, the services of the Head of this Department will be 
devoted largely to itinerant-teacher training. However, as the demand for 
resident courses at State College designed to prepare shop teachers develops, 
the schedule can be adjusted to meet this demand. 



136 State College Catalog 

Curriculum for Teachers of Industrial Education 

For freshman and sophomore years, see Industrial Arts Education 

Junior Year 



Courses First Term 

Principles of Industrial Education, Ed. 327 

•Shopwork (selected) 3 

Educational Psychologry, Ed. 303 a,b 3 

Vocational Guidance, Ed. 420 

Organization of Teaching Materials, Ed. 361 3 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338 

Problems in Secondary Education, Ed. 344 

Labor Problems, Econ. 331 3 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 

Visual Aids, Ed. 308 

Mechanical Drawing, M.E. 211, 212, 213 2 

(Special students who have not had M.E. 105, 106, 107, 
should substitute those courses for 211, 212, 213.) 

tElectives 3 



Credits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


3 





3 


3 


3 








3 


3 


3 





3 





3 








3 








3 


2 


2 



20 20 20 



Senior Year 

Local Survey; Planning a Program, Ed. 416 

•Shopwork (selected) 

Methods of Teaching Industrial Education, Ed. 422 3 

Observation and Teaching, Ed. 444 

Occupational Studies. Ed. 424 

Shop Planning and Equipment, Ed. 326 3 

Furniture Designs and Rod-Making, M.E. 237, 238, 239, or 

Machine Design, M.E. 411. 412, 413 3 

tElectives 9 



3 





3 











3 


3 





3 









18 18 18 



• Elective shopwork should be taken in fields available as Textiles, Woodshop, Machine Shop, 
Foundry, and Electricity. 

T Elective courses must be approved by the faculty adviser. 



The Textile School 137 

THE TEXTILE SCHOOL 

Thomas Nelson, Dean and Director of Textile Research 

Organization. — The Textile School of North Carolina State College is or- 
ganized for the purposes of administration into four departments: Yam 
Manufacturing and Knitting, Weaving and Designing, Textile Chemistry 
and Dyeing, Textile Research. 

The Textile School is organized to offer technical instruction, both grad- 
uate and undergraduate, in the production and finishing of textile products. 
It is also organized and equipped to conduct fundamental textile research 
and cooperates with the School of Agriculture, the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture in efforts to improve and develop new uses for the 
cotton fiber, and with the United States Institute for Textile Research. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the Textile School is to educate men for pro- 
fessional service in Textile Manufacturing, Textile Management, Textile 
Chemistry and Dyeing, Yam Manufacturing, Knitting, Weaving and De- 
signing; to develop their capacities for intelligent leadership; to equip 
them to participate in commercial and public affairs; to aid in the develop- 
ment of the textile industry and its commerce through research and experi- 
mentation; to cooperate with the textile mills of the State in gaining, through 
scientific research, information that will improve the quality and value of 
manufactured products and increase technical skill. 

Occupations. — Never before in America have more opportunities been 
offered to young men of North Carolina and the South than are available 
today to graduates of the Textile School. 

North Carolina is the largest textile manufacturing State in the South 
and has more mills than any other State in America. It has the largest 
towel, damask, denim, and underwear mills in America; and it has more 
mills that dye and finish their own products than any other Southern State. 
A great diversification of manufactured textile products is being made in 
cotton, rayon, silk, wool, and worsted. 

The courses of instruction are arranged and grouped so that students 
may get the best results from their work, and accumulate the necessary 
knowledge, which together with actual experience after graduation, enables 
them to fill such positions as the following: 

Owners of mills 

Presidents and vice presidents of mills and other textile establishments 

Secretaries and treasurers of mills 

Managers, superintendents, and department foremen in cotton, rayon, 
woolen, silk, and hosiery mills 

Superintendents and foremen in mercerizing, bleaching, dyeing, and finish- 
ing plants 



138 State College Catalog 

Designers and analysts of fabrics 
Technical demonstrators in the dyestiiff industry 
Textile chemists 

Textile cost accountants in mills 
Purchasing agents for mills 

Salesmen of machinery, yarn, cloth, rayon, dyestuffs, and chemicals 
Positions in yarn and fabric commission houses and with fabric converters 
Specialists in Government service 

Representatives for manufacturers of machinery, rayon, dyestuffs, and 
mill supplies. 

Degrees. — Upon the completion of any one of the curricula in Textiles the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Textiles is conferred. 

The degree of Master of Science in Textiles is offered for the satisfactory 
completion of one year of graduate study in residence. Candidates for the 
degree of Master of Science in Textiles enter and are enrolled in the Grad- 
uate Department of the College. 

The professional degree of Master of Textiles may be conferred upon 
graduates of the Textile School after five years of professional practice in 
charge of important work and upon the acceptance of a satisfactory thesis. 

Requirements. — The requirements for graduation in the Textile School are 
the satisfactory completion of all the courses in one of the prescribed 
curricula (see tabulations of curricula on the pages following), a total of 
not fewer than 230 term credits, with not fewer than 230 honor points. 

Of the minimum of 230 term credits required for graduation in the Tex- 
tile School, 144 are common to all curricula; that is, 12 term credits in 
Mathematics, 18 in Language, 27 in Economics and Psychology, 12 in Chem- 
istry, 15 in Physics, 12 in Engineering, 6 in Agriculture, 24 in General 
Textile, 12 in Military Training or Social Science alternatives, and 6 in 
Physical Education. Each of the curricula permits election of 18 term 
credits. 

Inspection Trip. — Each student is required to make an inspection trip 
during his senior year to mills making various classes of fabrics, also to 
bleaching, dyeing, finishing, and hosiery plants. The trips are made in 
chartered busses. 

Curricula. — The freshman and sophomore work is the same for all stu- 
dents in the Textile School. The training is general, and gives the student 
a good opportunity to make a wise choice in the selection of the particular 
field in which he desires to specialize. Five curricula are offered: 

1. Textile Manufacturing 3. Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

2. Textile Management 4. Weaving and Designing 

5. Yam Manufacturing 



The Textile School 139 

Textile Manufacturing and Textile Management offer work in all Depart- 
ments of the Textile School; these are therefore general curricula with one 
placing more emphasis on manufacturing, the other, more emphasis on 
economics. 

Students who select Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, Weaving and Design- 
ing, or Yam Manufacturing devote a larger percentage of their time to 
specialization in one Department of the Textile School. 

Textile Curricula for University and College Graduates. — Selected courses 
leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Textiles are offered to grad- 
uates of universities and standard colleges. These are arranged in accord- 
ance with the vocational aim of the individual student and in the light of 
credits presented from the institution from which the student has been 
graduated, subject to the approval of his adviser and the director of in- 
struction. In cases where the student presents enough credits which may 
be used for courses required in his curriculum, he may be graduated B.S. in 
Textiles within one year. In no case should it take more than two years 
to complete the work for the degree. 

Short Course for Textile Mill Men. — Instruction in yam manufacturing, 
weaving, designing, fabric analysis and dyeing, lasting two weeks in the 
second term, is offered for textile mill men who wish to make a short and 
intensive study of any of these subjects. The subject matter will be selected 
to suit the requirements of each individual. 

Yarn Manufacturing and Knitting 

Professor J. T. Hilton, Head of Department 
Assistant Professor J. G. Lewis; Instructor G. R. Culbertson 

Purpose. — The purpose of this Department is to instruct students in tli« 
theory and practice of producing yarns and hosiery; to cooperate with mills 
in solving manufacturing problems through research and experimentation; 
and to manufacture the yarns used in the weave room. This Department 
is located on the top floor of the Textile Building. 

Opening and Picking. — The opening and picking equipment is placed in a 
separate room and consists of bale breaker, vertical opener, C.O.B. and 
condenser, break picker, and finisher lapper. 

Carding and Spinning. — This equipment occupies two rooms. The larger 
one is used for instruction. The machinery consists of cards, regular and 
controUed-draft drawing frames, fly frames, spinning frames, warper, 
spooler, winders, regular and fancy twisters, and a complete unit of combing 
machinery for the production of fine yarns. The smaller room contains a 
complete unit of carding and spinning machinery, including several types 
of long-draft spinning; it is used as an experimental laboratory. Thus 
student instruction and experimental work do not conflict. Both rooms are 
equipped with Parks-Cramer humidifiers. 



140 State College Catalog 

Woolen- — This equipment, placed in a separate room on the basement 
floor, consists of a complete woolen unit made by Davis and Furber, and 
a Universal winder. 

Knitting. — This department is equipped with a variety of circular knitting 
machines for making children's hose, ladies' hose, and men's plain and fancy 
half -hose. It is also equipped with a Wildman single head, single unit full- 
fashioned hosiery machine, Merrow sewing machine, loopers, bottle bobbin 
winder. Universal winder, balances, etc. 

Research Laboratory. — This laboratory contains a single strand tester^ 
Mullen tester, yam and cloth testing machines with autographic recorder, 
twist counter, crimp tester, conditioning oven, and other necessary ap- 
paratus to test cotton and rayon yams and fabrics for moisture content^ 
twist and tensile strength. 

The curriculum in Yam Manufacture is listed with the other Textile 
curricula. 

Weaving and Designing 

Professor T. R. Hart, Head of Department 

Associate Professor W. E. Shinx; Instructors G. B. Peeler, W. P. Crawley 

Purpose. — The purpose of this department is to instruct students in the 
theory and practice of weaving and designing fabrics ranging from simple 
print cloths to elaborate leno and jacquard creations, to cooperate with the 
home economics departments of North Carolina colleges in creating con- 
sumer interest in textile products, to cooperate with mills in solving manu- 
facturing problems through research and experimentation. This department 
is located on the second floor of the Textile Building. 

Weave Room. — This room contains a larger varietj' of looms than can be 
found in any textile mill. These have been carefully selected so that the 
students may obtain a knowledge of the different cotton, rayon, and silk 
looms made in the United States. It also contains looms to produce such 
fabrics as print cloths, sheetings, denims and twill fabrics, ginghams, fancy' 
shirtings, dress goods, and plush, as well as fancy leno and jacquard fabrics. 
The weave room has been modernized so that the students can be trained 
in the technique of manufacturing fancy cotton, rayon, and combination 
fabrics on automatic, dobby and jacquard looms. Other equipment in the 
weave room includes Universal filling veinders, braiders and Bahnson hu- 
midifiers. 

Warp Preparation.— Short warps in the Textile School are made on the 
silk and rayon equipment in this department which consists of a silk and 
rayon skein winder and a combination warper and beamer. Other equip- 
ment includes a slasher and cotton beaming frame. 

Designing and Fabric Analysis.— A full equipment of design boards for 
single and double cloths is provided in the classrooms. Dies for cutting: 



The Textile School 141 

samples and different makes of balances and microscopes are provided for 
the analysis of fabrics. Other desig^ning equipment includes an enlarging 
camera, card cutting pianos and card lacing equipment. 

The curriculum in Weaving and Designing is listed with the other Textile 
curricula. 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Professor A. H. Grimshaw, Head of Department 
Instructor A. C. Hayes 

Purpose. — The purpose of this department is to instruct students in the 
theory and practice of dyeing, printing and finishing yams and fabrics; to 
conduct experiments; to cooperate with the mills of the State in solving 
problems relating to the dyeing and finishing of textile products; to dye the 
yarns used in the weave room to produce fabrics. This department is located 
on the basement floor of the building. 

Equipment. — The Dye Laboratory is fitted up with work tables, balances, 
steam baths, drying oven, and other apparatus for experimental dyeing, dye 
testing, color matching, and the testing of dyed samples by acids and al- 
kalies. It also contains roller, spray and screen printing apparatus. 

The Dye House is equipped with kier; raw stock, package, skein and 
hosiery dyeing machines, a cloth dyeing machine of the creel type; hydro- 
extractor; raw stock dryer and other equipment needed in the dyeing of 
larger quantities of material and in giving instruction in boiling out, bleach- 
ing and dyeing raw stock, skeins, warps, hosiery, and piece goods. 

The Research Laboratory contains microscopes, photo-micrographic cameras 
and projector, fadeometer, pH apparatus, viscosimeters, extractors, sepa- 
rator, analytical balances, electric oven, equipment for testing oil and finish- 
ing compounds, as well as the analytical equipment generally used by 
textile chemists. It also contains a dark room fully equipped for photo- 
graphic work. 

The curriculum in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing is listed with the other 
Textile curricula. 

Textile Research 

Thomas Nelson, Director 

For a number of years the Division of Cotton Marketing, United States 
Department of Agriculture, has stationed a representative at the Textile 
School to cooperate in producing new uses for cotton. Consumer packages 
for farm products, cotton fabrics for road making, cotton bagging, founda- 
tion fabrics for hooked rugs, and cotton bagging for sugar are some of the 
products of this cooperative arrangement. 

The United States Institute for Textile Research has selected the Textile 
School as the location for its research project on warp sizing of spun rayon 
and cotton-spun rayon combination yams. 

The Textile School staff devotes considerable time each year to problems 
submitted to the School by mills. 

The equipment available for research is listed under the Departments. 



142 State College Catalog 

Cnrricnlam in Textile Manufacturing 

•Freshman Year 

Credits 

COUBSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Physics for Textile Students. Phys. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Mathematics of Finance, 

Math. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Shopwork, M.E. 121, 122, 123 Ill 

Engineering Drawing I. M.E. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Textile Principles, Tex. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

MQitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 .. 1 1 1 

19 19 19 

•Sophomore Year 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Decorative Drawing, Arch. 106, or 

Light in Industry, Phys. 311 3 « 

Light in Industry, Phys. 311. or 

Decorative Drawing, Arch. 106 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Cotton, Cotton Classing II, F.C. 201. 212 3 3 

Yam Manufacture I, Tex. 201, 203, 205 10 4 

Power Weaving, Tex. 231, 232, 234 13 

Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 236, 237 2 2 

Knitting I, Tex. 207, 20S, 209, 211 3 11 

tMilitary Science H, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 Ill 

31 19 20 

Junior Year 

EngUsh, or Modem Language S S 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Textile Calculations I, Tex. 345 3 

Yam Manufacture II, Tex. 301, 302, 303, 304 1 4 

Dobby Weaving, Tex. 331, 332, 333, 335 „ 1 1 

Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342 S 3 

Dyeing L Tex. 371, 372, 373. 375 4 1 

Fabric Testing. Tex. 343 

Electives * 3 

18 Ig 19 

Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325A, 326A, 333 3 3 3 

Introduction to Psychology, PsychoL 200 3 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 302 3 

Industrial Psychology, PsychoL 338 3 

Yam Manufacture IV, Tex. 401, 402, 403, 405 4 11 

Leno Design. Tex. 441 S 

Dobby Design, Tex. 443 3 

Jacquard Design, Tex. 445 3 

Cotton and Ravon Weaving, Tex. 431, 432, 433, 435 114 

Cotton and Rayon Dyeing I, Tex. 471, 472, 473, 474 14 1 

Fabric Analysis, Tex. 451, 452 2 2 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 20 18 



• Freshman and sophomore years for all Textile curricula. 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, History, 
Modem Language, Sociology. 



Crehjits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


3 


3 


3 


3 





3 


4 


4 


5 


2 





1 


3 


8 



The Textile School 143 

Curriculum in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manufacturiner. 

Junior Year 

CouKSES First Term 

English or German 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200, or 

TextUe course 

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 211, 212, 223 4 

Dyeing II, Tex. 377, 378, 379, 381, 382 5 

Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 

Electives 3 

18 18 19 

Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 32BA, 326A, 333 3 3 3 

Organic Chemistry, Chem. 421, 422, 423 4 4 4 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 302, or 

Textile course 3 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338, or 

Textile Course 3 

Textile Microscopy, Tex. 489, 490 110 

Textile Printing, Tex. 483, 484, 485. 487 4 11 

Cotton and Rayon Dyeing II, Tex. 477, 478, 479, 480, 481... 2 6 5 

HecUTes 6 3 3 

20 20 19 



Curriculum in Yarn Manufacturing 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manufacturing. 

Junior Year 

Courses First Term 

English or Modem Language 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202. 203 3 

Accounting I, Econ. 301, 302 3 

Yam Manufacturing III. Tex. 310, 311 

Yam Manufacturing Lab. III. Tex. 307, 308, 309 2 

Dobby Weaving. Tex. 331. 332. 333, 335 1 

Dyeing I, Tex. 371, 372, 373, 375 4 

Electives 3 

19 19 19 

Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 32BA, 326A, 333 3 3 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 302 3 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338 3 

Machine Shop II, M.E. 227, 228, 229 Ill 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, EE. 321, 322 3 3 

Textile Calculations II, Tex. 413 3 

Yam Manufacturing V, Tex. 407, 408, 409, 411, 412 6 6 2 

Manufacturing Problems, Tex, 416 3 

Electives 6 3 3 

21 18 18 



Credits 




Second Term 


Third Term 


3 


S 


3 


8 


3 





3 


8 


2 


2 


1 


4 


1 


1 


3 


8 



144 



State College Catalog 



Junior Year 

First Term 
3 


Credits 
Second Term 
3 
3 
3 
4 
2 
3 


Third Term 

s 


3 


3 


3 


s 


. 304 1 

5 


1 
5 


3 


3 



Curriculum in Textile Management 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manofaetoringr. 



COUBSKS 

English or Modem Languagre , 

Accounting I, Econ. 301, 302, 303 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 
Yam Manufacture II, Tex. 301, 302, 303, 304 

Textile courses 

Electives 

18 18 18 

Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325A, 326A, 333 S S S 

Marketing Methods and Sales Management, 

Econ. 311, 312, 313 3 8 S 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 302 8 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338 8 

Textile courses 8 8 7 

Electives 3 3 8 

£0 20 19 

Textile courses to be selected from : 

Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342 3 3 

Dobby Wea\-ing, Tex. 331, 332. 333, 335 114 

Dyeing, Tex. 371, 372, 373, 375 4 11 

TextUe Calculations, 345 or 413 3 or 3 

Yam Manufacture IV. Tex. 401, 402, 403, 405 4 11 

Leno Design, Tex. 441 3 

Dobby Design, Tex. 443 3 

Jacquard Design, Tex. 445 8 

Calculating Fabric Costs, Tex. 344 3 

Cotton and Rayon Weaving, Tex. 431, 432, 433, 435 114 

Cotton and Rayon Dyeing, Tex. 471, 472, 473, 474 14 1 

Fabric Analysis, Fabric Testing, Tex. 451, 452. 343 2 2 1 

Manufacturing Problems, Tex. 415 3 

Color in Woven Design, Tex. 455, 456 3 3 

Wool Manufacture, Tex. 416, 417, 418 14 

Curriculum in Weaving and Designing 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manufacturing. 

Junior Year 

English or Modem Language 3 8 8 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 8 8 

Appreciation of Fine Arts, Arch. Ill, 112, or 

Textile courses 3 8 

Textile Calculations I, Tex. 345 8 

Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342 3 8 

Jacquard Design, Tex. 445 8 

Dobby Weaving, Tex. 335. 337, 338, 339 2 2 5 

Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 1 

Electives 3 3^ 

17 17 21 

Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325A, 326A, 333 8 8 8 

Introduction to Psychology, PsychoL 200 3 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 302 8 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338 8 

Leno Design, Tex. 441 '22 

Dobby Design, Tex. 443 ® 2 2 

Fabric Design and Analysis U. Tex. 463 ® ? i 

Jacquard Design Laboratory, Tex. 447, 448, 449 Ill 

Color tn Woven Design, Tex. 455, 456 '52 

Cotton and Rayon Weaving, Tex. 435, 437. 438, 439 ^22 

Fabric Analysis, Tex. 451, 452 ^22 

Electives _ __ 

20 20 18 



The Graduate School of the University of 
North Carolina 

STATE COLLEGE DIVISION 

William Whatley Pierson, Jr., Dean, Chapel Hill 

R. F. Poole, Chairman of Committee on Graduate 
Instruction at State College 

Organization 

Purposes. — Graduate Instruction in this institution is organized to formu- 
late and develop graduate study and research in the fields primarily of 
Agriculture, Engineering, and Textile Manufacturing, and the training of 
teachers of these subjects. The urgent need for graduate instruction lead- 
ing to research in these fields is recognized by the leaders in the occupations 
which depend upon the development of these branches of industry. State 
College, therefore, offers training for teachers, investigators, and leaders in 
Agricultxire, Engineering, and Manufacturing. Moreover, unless graduate 
study and research in the technological and related fields are provided, the 
institutions of higher learning in this section of the country will look else- 
where for trained men, whereas there should be a fair balance of such men 
from every section of the country. 

Administration. — Subject to the final approval of the Faculty Council, 
graduate work is directed by a Committee on Graduate Instruction. All sub- 
jects to be taken by graduate students are passed upon by the College Com- 
mittee on Courses of Study. Actual instruction is given by the regular 
members of the faculty under the super\ision of the Director of Instruc- 
tion, the Head of the Department, or the Dean of the School in which the 
student is working. 

Facilities. — State College offers exceptional facilities and opportunities 
for research. The Agricultural Experiment Station of North Carolina, the 
Engineering Experiment Station, and the Research Laboratories of the 
Textile School are integral parts of the College. In the Textile School, be- 
sides the research carried on by regular members of the staff, the Bureau of 
Agricultural Economics and other Bureaus at Washington have, for some 
years, used the facilities of the School for special research. Graduate stu- 
dents have the advantages offered by all these agencies in addition to the 
regular laboratories used for instruction. 

In its undeveloped resources and raw materials, as well as in its going 
concerns in business and industry, in its varied topography and products, 
North Carolina is a rich field for research. The State is already imbued with 
a spirit of progress stimulating to intellectual growth. 

Scholarships and Fellowships. — The College offers annually graduate fel- 
lowships and a number of teaching and research fellowships. Besides these, 
special fellowships ars supported by large business organizations. 



146 State College Catalog 

College Fellowships give tuition and a stipend of $450 an academic year, 
paid in nine equal installments, a month apart, beginning October 25. The 
holder of a fellowship may be required to render a maximum of ten hours 
a week of service to the department in which he is specializing. 

Teaching and Research Fellowships give $600 or more an academic year. 
The holder of one of these fellowships may not carry more than half a full 
schedule of graduate studies. The rest of his time must be given to teach- 
ing in classroom or laboratory, or to research in one of the Experiment 
Stations. 

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship, State College Chapter, 
offers $50 annually, preferably to a member of the Society, to assist in pro- 
moting research, and advanced training of worthy students. 

Special Fellowships have for some years been maintained by business or 
manufacturing organizations desirous of ha%'ing research made on certain 
problems pertaining to their interest. Some organizations maintaining 
these scholarships have been the National Fertilizer Association, the N. V. 
Potash Export My., the American Cyanamids Company, the Superphosphate 
Institute, E, I, DuPont de Nemours and Company, the Niagara Sprayer and 
Chemical Company, Eli Lilly and Company, the American Potash Institute, 
and the Northwestern Yeast Company, The stipends afforded by these 
fellowships have varied from $720 to $1,500 for twelve months. It is hoped 
that some of these may be available every year. 

ADMISSION AND DEGREES 

Degrees in Residence 
Master of Science in Agriculture Master of Science in Education 
Master of Science in Engineering Master of Science in Textiles 
Master of Science (pure, not applied) Master of Science (in specialized field) 

Admission. — 1. A candidate for admission to graduate study must present 
an authorized transcript of his collegiate record as evidence that the can- 
didate holds a bachelor's degree for a four years' undergraduate course from 
a college whose standards are equivalent to those of State College. 

2. Admission to courses of graduate work does not necessarily mean that 
a student may immediately become a candidate for an advanced degree. 
If the student is not prepared to do graduate work at once, he may pursue 
undergraduate courses which will best fit him for advanced work. 

3. A member of the senior class of State College may, upon the approval 
of the Committee on Graduate Instruction, register for graduate courses to 
fill a roster of studies not to exceed eighteen credits for any term. 

Regulations 

Credits. — 1. For all Masters' degrees, forty-five term credits are required, 
a credit being given for each hour of class work successfully completed 



Graduate School 147 

through a term. Besides the term credits, for all Masters' degrees a thesis 
must be written and approved. 

2. Not more than ten of the academic credits required for a graduate de- 
gree will be accepted from other institutions. 

3. No graduate credit will be allowed for excess undergraduate credit 
from any other institution. 

Courses of Study. — As designated in the College Catalog under Descrip- 
tion of Courses, the courses numbered 500 to 599 are for graduate students 
only, and those numbered 400 to 499 are for graduates and advanced under- 
graduates. 

The program of the student shall contain at least twelve credits in courses 
of the 500 group. Nine credits in this group may be obtained in approved 
research courses. A maximum of 33 credits may be gained in the 400 group. 
A minimum grade of "B" must be made on all courses to obtain graduate 
credit. 

The student's program of studies, made under the supervision of the stu- 
dent's adviser, must be approved by the Dean of the School in which the 
student is specializing and finally by the Committee on Graduate Instruction. 

Language Requirements. — A reading knowledge of at least one modem 
foreign language is required of candidates for the Master of Science de- 
grees. The knowledge will be tested by a special examination by the lan- 
guage department. For the Master's degree in a special department, as 
Master in Agronomy, no foreign language is required. 

Thesis. — A graduate student, candidate for the Master's degree, must pre- 
pare under the supervision of the student's adviser a thesis upon a subject, 
approved by the ad\-iser, in the field of the student's special work. Two 
copies, the original and the first carbon, of the completed thesis must be 
presented to the Committee on Graduate Instruction at least one month 
before the degree is awarded. 

Residence. — A candidate for a Master's degree is required to be in resi- 
dence at the College, pursuing graduate work, one full academic year of 
three terms. The candidate is not permitted to take course leading to forty- 
five credits in a shorter time. 

Six summer schools of six weeks in residence at the College are reckoned 
sufiicient to fulfill the residence requirement. By specific approval of the 
Committee on Graduate Instruction, one summer period may be spent away 
from the College if devoted to the preparation of the thesis required for 
graduation. 

In special cases it is possible for graduate students to do twelve weeks 
work during a summer session, provided instructors will remain at the Col- 
lege throughout the summer. Under these provisions a minimum of four 
summer sessions, two of twelve weeks and two of six weeks, are required 
for residence. 



148 State College Catalog 

Class Work and Examinations. — As a mature student admitted to grad- 
uate study only after ability and earnestness are established, the graduate 
student is expected to assume greater individual responsibility, and since 
specializing, to work in a more comprehensive manner than the undergrad- 
uate. However, in preparation, in attendance, and in all the routine of class 
work, the graduate student is subject to the regulations observed in other 
divisions of the College. 

Besides the examination in class, the graduate student, at least two 
weeks prior to graduation, has a general examination on his work. 

Professional Degrees 

Master of Agriculture Chemical Engineer 

Master of Textiles Civil Engineer 

Ceramic Engineer Electrical Engineer 

Mechanical Engineer 

Significance. — The professional degrees are not honorary; they are tests 
of ability and testimonials of accomplishment. To merit the professional 
degree, a candidate must, in his thesis, demonstrate his ability to attack and 
to solve a new problem of suflBcient complexity to require distinctly original 
processes of thought, and the solution of which shall make, however small, 
■yez a real contribution to his profession. The record of his work must 
demonstrate his power to conceive, to plan, to organize, to caiTy through to 
completion a project of considerable magnitude. The candidate should 
quite obviously have grown professionally since his graduation and evince 
intellectual vitality to guarantee the continuance of his growth. 

Requirements. — 1. A professional degree may be conferred upon a grad- 
uate of State College in the School in which the candidate received the 
Bachelor's degree; the degree of Master of Agriculture may be conferred 
upon graduates of other institutions who have performed outstanding pro- 
fessional service in agriculture for the State of North Carolina for a con- 
tinuous period of not less than five years. 

2. The degree of Master of Agriculture may be conferred upon gradu- 
ates of State College after five years of service in agriculture, upon the ac- 
ceptance of a thesis. 

The degree in Engineering or in Textiles may be conferred upon gradu- 
ates of State College after five years' professional practice in responsible 
charge of important work, upon the acceptance of a thesis on a subject re- 
lated to the practice in which the applicant has been engaged. 

3. Application for the degree must be presented to the Committee on 
Graduate Instruction not less than nine months before the degree may be 
conferred. 

4. With the application for a degree, the candidate must present, as 
preliminary basis for the degree, (1) the subject of a thesis he purposes 



Graduate School 149 

to write, and (2) a statement in outline of his professional work since 
graduation, both of which must be approved by the Committee. 

5. The completed thesis must be submitted, on or before April 1, to the 
committee for consideration, and with it a detailed statement, duly cer- 
tified, of the candidate's professional work since graduation, upon which, 
in addition to the thesis, the degree is to be awarded. 

6. Upon notification that thesis and work have been approved by the 
Committee as worthy basis for the degree, the candidate shall, upon a 
specified date, appear before the Committee for oral or written examina- 
tion on his work and his thesis. Upon the recommendation of the candi- 
date's committee, the examination may be given through correspondence. 

Fees 

The Graduate student will pay $5.00 when he matriculates and $3.00 a 
credit hour for all courses. 

The Professional candidate will pay $10.00 when he matriculates and 
$15.00 for his diploma. 

Correspondence about graduate work should preferably be addressed to 
the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Instruction. 

DIVISION OF COLLEGE EXTENSION 

Edward W. Ruggles, Director 

Purpose. — The College Extension Division is organized to carry the prac- 
tical and cultural advantage of college studies to persons who cannot at- 
tend classes on the campus, and to groups and commxmities that may profit 
by the service offered through the following means. 

Extension Classes are organized where at least fifteen persons are inter- 
ested and willing to take up the same subject. Such matters as the distance 
from the college, the nature of the subject, and the availability of instruc- 
tors must be taken into consideration. 

Correspondence Courses for college credit are offered in Agronomy, Ani- 
mal Husbandry, Horticulture, Soils, Poultry, Agricultural Economics, Rural 
Sociology, Chemistry, Education, Economics, English, Geology, History, 
Architectural Engineering, Ceramic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 
Mathematics, Modem Languages, Sociology, Safety and Zoology. The list of 
these courses is being added to as rapidly as possible. Complete informa- 
tion concerning them is included in the Bulletin of Correspondence Courses. 

Correspondence Courses of a practical nature are offered in Business 
English, Mathematics, Industrial Electricity, Land Surveying, Plumbing, 
Engineering Drawing, Air Conditioning, Heating and Ventilation, Building 
and Estimating, Sheet-metal Pattern Drafting, Municipal Administration, 
Poultry, Business Law, Diesel Engines, and Vegetable Gardening. In ad- 
dition, the courses in Ceramic Engineering may be taken as practical 
where no credit is desired. 



150 State College Catalog 

Short Courses are offered by the College Extension Division to tie up the 
facilities of the several Schools of State College with the trades and indus- 
tries of North Carolina into a permanent educational program. In carrying 
out this program, short courses of a practical nature are offered every year 
which are increasing in popularity. During the present school year (1939- 
40), the following short courses and institutes are scheduled: Air Condi- 
tioning, Electrical Meters and Relays, Engineers, Surveyors, Pliunbing 
and Heating Contractors, Gas-Plant Operators, Water-Works Men, Retail 
Coal Merchants, Electrical Contractors, Street Superintendents, Amateur 
Photographers, Sanitarians, Building Inspectors, and a Safety School 
for Truck Operators. Additional courses are being added as the demand 
arises. 

College Extension Lectures by members of the faculty and concerts by 
the College musical organizations are available to any high school, civic 
club, woman's club, science club, agricultural or engineering meeting or 
organization, desiring to put on a good lecture or musical program. 

Reading Courses are offered to graduates and undergraduates who desire 
to continue their intellectual grov%-th and to keep abreast of the advances 
made both in their specific field and in relating fields. 

Bulletins describing the various functions of the Di%ision will be gladly 
supplied on request. Write to Edward W. Ruggles, Director, College Ex- 
tension Division, North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Full Information. — Any person interested in extension classes or corres- 
pondence courses should write to the College Extension Division, requesting 
the Extension Bulletin, which contains complete information concerning 
methods of instruction, fees, and the conditions upon which College credit 
will be granted. 

THE SUMMER SESSION 

Time; Work. — Beginning June 10, 1940, the Summer Session will continue 
six weeks. The work, directed by the regular College OflBcers of Adminis- 
tration and conducted largely by the Faculty, maintains the College stand- 
ards and warrants College credit toward degrees. 

Advantages. — Special advantages are offered those desiring to get teach- 
ers' certificates, or to renew or raise the grade of a certificate; also to 
teachers with ambition to advance culturally and professionally. College 
students may remove conditions or gain additional credits. Applicants for 
admission to College may add needed credits for entrance. 

Cultural Courses. — Although the Summer Session at State College con- 
ducts courses specifically technical in Agriculture, Engineering, and Textile, 
and confines its Teacher Training to these departments, general courses of 
"broad cultural value are offered in English, Modem Languages, Mathe- 
matics, Chemistry, Physics, Botany, Zoology, and the Social Sciences. 

Full Information regarding the Summer Session is given in the Summer 
Session issue of State College Record, which may be obtained from W. L. 
Mayer, Registrar, State College Station, Raleigh. 



IV. DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Agricultural Economics 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Econ. 202. Agricultural Economics. 0-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. Prerequisite: Econ. 205 or Econ. 
201-202-203. 

A study of the economics of agricultural production, the marketing of farm 
products, farm credit, land tenure and other major economic problems of 
the farmer. Messrs. Clement, Forster, Leaguer. 

Agr. Econ. 212. Land Economics. 0-3-0 

Required of sophomores in Forestry and Wildlife Conservation and Man- 
agement. Prerequisite: Econ 205 or 201-202-203. 

The problems of land economics including land classification and land use 
with special emphasis on forest land, land ownership and control, the prin- 
ciples of land valuation, policies of land settlement and development, the 
taxation of forest lands. Mr. Forster. 

Agr. Econ. 303. Farm Management I. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Agricultural Economics, Agriculture and Voca- 
tional Education. Prerequisite: Econ. 205 or 201-202-203. 

The principles involved in the successful operation of the farm, farm plan- 
ning, management of labor, farm work programs, use of machinery, and 
farm administration. Mr. Forster. 

Agr. Econ. 313. Farm Accounting. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Vocational Agriculture. Prerequisite : Econ 205. 

The practical aspects of farm accounting, preparation of inventories of 
farm property, simple financial statements, method of keeping farm records, 
analysis and the interpretation of results obtained from farm business trans- 
actions. Mr. Leager. 

Agr. Econ. 322, 323. Grades, Standards, and Inspection 0-3-3 

Elective for seniors in Agricultural Economics. Prerequisite: Econ. 205 
or 201-202-203. 

History of the grades and standards of important agricultural products, 
together with the technic of inspection. Mr 



152 [Agricultural Economics] 

Agr. Econ. 332. History of the Agricultural Adjustment Program 

1935-1938, Inclusive. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A comprehensive study of the economics of the Agricultural Adjustment 
Acts of 1933-1935 and 1938, and of the Agricultural Conservation Program 
in 1936, 1937, and 1938. Time will be devoted to a study of the effect of the 
program on production and prices of cotton, tobacco, wheat, corn, and hogs 
according to their relative importance in North Carolina. Mr. 

Agr. Econ. 333. The Agricultural Adjustment Program for 1939. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Econ. 332, Elective for juniors and seniors in Agri- 
culture. 

A comprehensive study of the methods and routine for administration of 
the 1939 Agricultural Conservation Program and the crop control measures 
in effect for 1939. Laboratory work will include field and office work with 
aerial photographs and with the forms prescribed for use with the 1939 
Program with a view to preparing students for work in the counties during 
the summer of 1939. Messrs 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Agr. Econ. 402, 403. Farm Cost Accounting. 0-3-3 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. Prerequisite: Econ. 205 
or 201-202-203, and 301-302-303. 

The principles of accounting applied to farm transactions, the prepara- 
tion of financial statements, the methods of keeping farm records, analysis 
of an individual farm record, and the interpretation of cost accounting re- 
sults. Mr. Greene. 

Agr. Econ. 411. Agricultural Marketing. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics, Agriculture, and Voca- 
tional Education. Prerequisite: Econ. 205 or 201-202-203. 

The economic principles underlying successful marketing of farm products, 
market organization and control, price-making forces; critical examination 
of the present system of marketing farm products. Mr. Leager. 

Agr. Econ. 421. Marketing Methods and Problems. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-202-203, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 additional term 
credits in Economics. 

A careful study of the problems and methods involved in the marketing 
of farm products. Suggestions for improvement stressed. Mr. Clement. 



[Agricultural Economics] 153 
Agr. Econ. 422. Agricaltural Cooperation. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics, Prerequisite: Econ 205 
or 201-202-203. 

Specific consideration of local community cooperation, both economic and 
social ; farmers' buying, selling, and service organizations. Mr. Clement. 

Agr. Econ. 423. Farm Management II. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. Prerequisite: Act. Econ 
303. 

Application of farm management principles to the management and organ- 
ization of farms in typical regions of the State. Mr. Green, Mr. Forster. 

Agr. Econ. 432. Agricultural Finance. 0-3-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Econ. 205, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 additional term 
credits in Economics. 

Principles involved in financing the production and marketing of agricul- 
tural products. Consideration of farm mortgage credit, personal and inter- 
mediate credit, and agricultural taxation. Mr. Leager. 

Agr. Econ. 433. Land Economics. 0-0-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: Econ. 201-202-203, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 addition- 
al term credits in Economics. 

The economic problems of land classification, ownership and acquisition of 
land, tenancy and land ownership, the functions of the landlord and the 
tenant, land valuation and land speculation. Mr. Forster. 

Agr. Eton. 442. Cotton and Tobacco Marketing. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. Prerequisite- Econ 205 
Agr. Econ. 202, Agr. Econ. 411, and 3 additional credits in Economics. ' 

Particular attention is given to the problems, methods, and practices used 
m the marketing of tobacco and cotton. Mr. Forster, Mr. Clement. 

Agr. Econ. 450. Agricultural Extension Methods. 3 credits 

A study of office record systems, office management, program determination, 
program development, reports and their use; and the obtaining, preparation 
and use of material in Extension teaching. ^P^rauon, 

Dean of the School of Agriculture and his staff. 



154 [Agricultural Economics] 

Agr. Econ. 461, 462, 463. The Statistical Analysis of Agricultural 

Economic Data. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. Prerequisite: Econ. 408- 
409. 

This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the 
statistical methods and techniques which are used in the analysis of agricul- 
tural data, more particularly relationships which exist between acreage, pro- 
duction data, and farm prices. Messrs. Greene, Smith, Forster. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Agr. Eton. 501. Economics of Agricultural Production. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-202-203, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 additional term 
credits in Economics. 

Economic theories applicable to agricultural production. The nature and 
characteristics of the factors of production, the law of variable proportion, the 
law of diminishing return, and the theory of least cost. Mr. Forster. 



Agr. Econ. 502. Farm Organization and Management. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 205, Agr. Econ. 303, 423, 501, and 6 additional term 
credits in Economics. 

The extension of the economic principles discussed in Agr. Econ. 501 and 
the application of these principles to the problems of farm organization and 
management. Mr. Forster. 



Agr. Econ. 503. Agricultural Finance. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-202-203, Agr. Econ. 432, and 6 additional term 
credits in Economics. 

Problems in financing agricultural production and marketing. A history 
of the development of financial institutions designed to serve agriculture, 

Mr. Leager. 

Agr. Econ. 513. Cooperative Marketing Methods and Practices. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-202-203, Agr. Econ. 411, and 6 additional term 
credits in Economics. 

A critical study of the methods and practices used by large agricultural 
cooperatives. ' Mr. Clement. 



[Agricultural Economics] 155 

Agr. Econ. 521, 522, 523. Research Method and Procedure in 

Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202-203; 408-409, and 6 additional term credits 
in Economics. 

A consideration of the research method and procedure now being employed 
by research workers in the field of Agricultural Economics, including qualita- 
tive, quantitative, inductive, and deductive methods of research procedure, 
choice of projects, planning, and execution of the research project. 

Mr. Forster and Mr. Smith. 

Agr. Econ. 532. National Economic Policies Aflfecting Agriculture. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-202-203, Agr. Econ. 202, Agr. Econ. 411. 

A critical analysis of the various farm relief proposals with special refer- 
ence to those made to control production, assist in the marketing of farm prod- 
uts and to supply farmers with various kinds of credit. Mr. Forster. 



Rural Sociology 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Rural Soc. 302. Rural Sociology. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites : Soc. 202, 203 or Econ. 201-202-203. Required of juniors in 
Rural Sociology, seniors in Agricultural Economics, and juniors in certain 
Education curricula. 

The culture, social organization, and social problems of rural people with 
special reference to Southern rural life and proposed programs of develop- 
ment. Mr 

Rural Soc. 403. Farmers' Movements. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Rural Soc. 302. Required of seniors in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics and Rural Sociology. 

The origin, growth, and the present status of such national farmers' organ- 
izations and movements as : the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Populist 
Revolt, the Agricultural Wheel, the Farmers' Union, the Society of the Equity, 
the Non-Partisan League, the Farm Bureau, the Farm-Labor Union, the 
Cooperative Marketing Movement. Mr 

Rural Soc. 412. Rural Social Traits and Attitudes. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite : Rural Soc. 302. Required of seniors in Rural Sociology. 
The characteristic social trends and attitudes of rural people in relation to 
rural social organizations and rural institutions. Mr 



156 [Agriculttr-U- EcoyoMics] 

Rural Soc. 413. C-ommanitv Or^amz-atiotts, 0-0-3 

Prere:-:^;:^ : F.ura! S:<:. S02. Pvequired of seniors in Rural Sociolo^ and 

in Agricu'.r-ral Tea'^hir.g. 

C:n:rr.ur.i:7 :rgar.iza:::r. :r. North Carolina and other states. Community 
structure ar.d =:ze. :;— .— .ur.::v institutions and service agencies, community 
c:s:rg-arii£rlcr.. r-.et'r. :-;5 :: : immunity organization, leadership and the rela- 
tion of c:rr.rr.\:r.:t7 crg^r.:z.a:::r.s :: 5:a:e ar.d r.ational agencies. 

Mr 

Courses for Graduates Only 
Rural So^r. 512. 513. Advanced Rural Sociology. 0-3-3 

Prere;-:5;:-es : Rural S::i:'.:^y 302, and 6 additional term credits in either 
Rura: 5::::::iT :r Agr:cu::ura: E-ncmics. 

H;5t:r;'a. :;rrr.= c: rura. ;:•;:;:;••; c:f erer.:;a:::r. ar.d mobility of farmer 
S.T.-L ;ea;ar.: c'.as£t5 : ::i:'.y, v::a'., rr.rr.:al, and moral characteristics of 
r-ra'. as cirr.Tart-i -rti:- urcar. gri-z; ; rela::on of farm people to other social 
grcup;; ;:ar.:ar:= a:.: rlanes of living; rural institutions and culture; na- 
ticr.ai agrarian piiicv; and a critical review of current research in rural 
sc-cicicg:.-. Mr. 

Rural Soc 521. 522, 523. Research in Agricultural Economies and 

Rural Sociology. 3-3-3 

Resear':-. rr:'-;err.= :r. agTicu'turai rrc-iuction, marketing, finance, taxation, 
P'op-LiIa::.r.. c.n.rr.ur.::y :rgar.iza:::n, fan-n^y Life, standards of living and social 
attitudes. Staff. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERLNG 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Agr. Eng. 202. Farm Equipment. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Math. 100 or Pr.ys::; 115 or 201. Required of sophomores 
in AgTiou'.vjre. 

A sr-cy c: md^rrr. eoy-i^n-.eni and buildings for the farm. 

Mr. Weaver, Mr. Giles. 

Agr. Eng. 212. Farm Engines. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Physics 115 or 201. Required of sopboOMies in Agr. Eng. 
and juniors in Ar.i— a i Pri-fucri.r. anf ;r. Dairy Manufacturing. 

A study of the rrincioles :: i-.^s -ir.jrir.e iz.raoi-.n and their application to 
farm uses. ?e:e-:-::n, loera-.iir.. arc r-irair of engines is stres.sed. Mr. Giles. 



[Agricultural Engineering] 157 

Agr. Eng. 222. Agricultural Drawing. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Drawing-board work covering both freehand sketching and elementary 
mechanical drawing. Working and pictorial drawing, lettering, maps, graphs, 
tracing, and blueprinting. Mr. Weaver. 

Agr. Eng. 233. Farm Conveniences. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Agr. Eng. 202. Required of juniors in Agr. Eng. 
A study of farm water supply systems, electric lighting plants, heating and 
sewage disposal systems as regards installation, adjustment, and repair. 

Mr. Giles. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 
Agr. Eng. 303. Terracing and Drainage. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 201 and Agr. Eng. 202. Required of juniors in Agr. Eng., 
juniors in Floriculture, Pomology and Vegetable Gardening, and of seniors 
in Animal Production, Poultry Science, and Farm Business. 

A study of the different methods of disposing of surplus water and the 
prevention of erosion. Mr. Weaver, Mr. Giles. 

Agr. Eng. 313. Farm Machinery and Tractors. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 202. Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. and in 
Poultry Science. 

A study of the design, construction and operation of modern labor-saving 
machinery for the farm. Mr. Giles. 

Agr. Eng. 322. Farm Buildings. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites : Agr. Eng. 202. Required of juniors in Agr. Eng. and seniors 
in Agr. Economics. 

A study of the design, construction, and materials used in modern farm 
buildings. Mr. Weaver. 

Agr. Eng. 331, 332. Teaching of Farm Shop Work. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 202. Required of juniors in Agr. Eng. and in 
Vocational Agriculture. 

This course is designed for men intending to teach Vocational Agriculture 
in the high schools of this State. Methods of presenting the subject matter 
to students as well as the manipulation of woodworking, forging, soldering, 
and pipe fitting tools. jyjr^ Giles. 



158 [Animal Husbaxdry] 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
AgT. Eng. 403. Erosion Prevention. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 303. Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. 

The purpose of this course is to go into the causes and effects of erosion 
and the methods of conser\nng our greatest national resource — our fertile 
soil. Mr. Weaver. 

Agr. Eng. 423. Farm Structures. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 322. Required of seniors in Agi'. Eng. 

An advanced study of modern building methods as applied to farm struc- 
tures. The use of labor-saving barn equipment and methods of reducing laboi 
to minimum is stressed. The placing of the farm group in relation to topog- 
raphy and farm activities, from the standpoint of economy, appearance, and 
utility, is an important phase of the course, Mr, Weaver. 

Agr. Eng. 432. Rural Electrification. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 322. Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. 
A study of problems involved in the distribution, uses and costs of elec- 
tricity on the farm. Mr. Weaver. 

Agr. Eng. 481, 482, 483. Special Problems in Agricultural 

Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Agr. Eng. 303 or 313 or 332 or 331-332. Only one term 
required of seniors in Agr, Eng., other two elective. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who desire advanced 
work in one of the following branches of Agr. Eng. : Farm Engines, Tractors, 
Farm Mach., Buildings, Conveniences, Rural Electrification, Erosion Control 
and Drainage. Mr. Weaver, Mr. Giles, 

Agr. Eng, 491, 492, 493. Senior Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Agr. Eng. Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. 
Students will be assigned special problems the results of which are to be 
presented to the class. Mr. Weaver, Mr. Giles. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING 

Courses for Undergraduates 

A. H. 202. Animal Nutrition I. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. Prerequisite: Chem. 101-102-103. 
A study of animal nutrition; composition of animal body; digestion; 
nutrients; feeding standards; calculating rations. :Mr. Ruffner, Mr. Haig. 



[Animal Husbandry] 159 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 
A. H. 301. Farm Meats I. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Req.: juniors A. H. 
and seniors in Pomology and Poultry Science. 

A study of the composition and value of meat, with practice work in 
slaughtering and cutting. Mr. Swaffar. 

A. H. 302. Farm Meats II. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Prerequisite: A. H. 301. 

Special study and practice in making retail cuts and in curing pork, beef, 
and lamb. Mr. Swaffar. 

A. H. 303. Advanced Stock Judging. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of market and show-ring requirements in the selection of horses 
and mules, beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, and swine. Breed characteristics 
of these animals are studied in detail, and practice judging brings out the re- 
lationship of form to function in livestock production. Mr. Haig, Mr. Swaffar. 

A. H. 311. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic 

Animals. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 102. Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A course dealing with the structure and functions of the animal body. 
Laboratory, lectures, and recitations. Mr. Grinnells. 

A. H. 313. Sheep Production. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. 

A study of the establishment, care, and management of the farm flock. 

Mr. Swaffar. 

A. H. 321. Dairy Cattle and Milk Production. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Poultry Science and Agricultural Engineering. 

A study of management of dairy cattle for economical milk production, 
including dairy breed characteristics, adaptation, selection, management, feed- 
ing, calf raising and dairy barn equipment. Mr. Haig. 



160 [Animal Husbandry] 

A- H. 322-323. History of Breeds. 0-3-3 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod. Elective for juniors and seniors in 
Agriculture. 

A study of types, characteristics, and history of the leading strains and fam- 
ilies of the different breeds of animals. Mr. Ruffner, Mr. Haig, Mr. Swaffar. 

A. H. 331. Swine Production. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in Animal Production and seniors in Poultry Science. 
Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of adaptability of swine, with emphasis on feeding, judging, and 
management. Mr. Hostetler. 

A. H. 332. Testing of Milk Products. 0-4-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry and juniors in Dairy Manufacturing. 

Lectures and laboratory practice on the testing of milk and milk products 
for butterfat, acidity, adulteration, preservatives, sediment, etc., that are 
ordinarily used by dairy manufacturing plants or in milk inspection work. 

Mr, Clevenger. 

A. H. 333. Cheesemaking. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Lectures and laboratory practice in making various soft and hard cheeses 
usually made on a farm or in a cheese factory. Mr. Clevenger. 

A. H. 341. Dairying. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod, and seniors in Vegetable Gardening. 
Elective for students in Agriculture. 

Fundamentals of dairy herd management in the production of milk and 
cream on the farm. The use of the Babcock Tests, buttermaking on the farm, 
operation of cream separators, constitute the laboratory work. Mr, Haig. 

A. H. 342. Dairy Manufacture Practice. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Lectures and laboratory practice on the business and factory management 
methods used in dairy plants. Mr, Clevenger. 



[Animal Husbandry] 161 
A. H. 343. City Milk Supply. 0-0-4 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Lectures and laboratory practice ; the phases of the city milk supply from 
the standpoint of the Milk Inspector and Board of Health; the methods and 
processes used in a central pasteurizing milk distribution plant and the 
dairymen supplying milk to same; the raw retail milk distributor and his 
problems. Mr. Clevenger. 

A. H. 351. Horse and Mule Production. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of practical methods in production and management of horses and 
mules for work on farms under Southern conditions. Special study of home- 
grown feeds for horses and mules at work or idle. Mr. Haig. 

A. H. 352. Common Diseases. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of contagious, non-contagious, and parasitic diseases of farm ani- 
mals. Laboratory, lectures, recitations. Mr. Grinnells. 

A. H. 353. Animal Hygiene and Sanitation. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 402. Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 
Required of juniors in A. H. and of senior Teachers of Agriculture. 

Animal health and prevention of disease as affected by environment. Lec- 
tures, reference reading, recitations. Mr. Grinnells. 

A. H. 361. Animal Nutrition II. 3.O.0 or O-Q-S 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod. Elective for juniors and seniors in 
Agriculture. Prerequisite : A. H. 202. 

A study of all feeding stuffs used in America; laws controlling feeding 
stuffs; preparation of feeds; home mixed and commercial feeds. 

Mr. Ruffner, Mr. Haig. 

A. H. 362. Dairy Machinery. ^ 

in 

Lecture and demonstration on the instaUation, kind, care, and handling 
slldering.eic ''"'""'' '"'"'"^ ''^ -^ri^erating unit, pipe fitting! 



Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors 
Dairy Manufacturing and Agr. Engineering, 



Mr. Clevenger. 



162 [Akimal Husb-ajndky] 

A. BL 371. Creamery Buttermaking. 4-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

This course deals with the principles and practices of factory buttermak- 
ing, from the care of the cream on the farm through the different processes 
until ready for marketing. Mr. Clevenger. 

A. H. 372. Beef Cattle Production. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. 

A study of the feeding, care, and adaptation of beef cattle to North Carolina 
conditions. Mr. Swaffar. 

A. H. 381. Ice Cream Making. 4-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Standardizing of mixing and freezing ice cream, sherbet-s, and other 
frozen products, and the physical principles involved; types of freezers, 
flavoring materials, fillers and binders; ice cream standards. Theory and 
practice of refrigeration; its use in the ice-cream plant. Mr. Clevenger. 

A. H. 391, 392, 393. Senior Seminar. 1-1-1 

Required of seniors in A. H. Prerequisite: A. H. 202. 

A discussion of livestock problems by extension and research workers, 
together with special assignments to students with regard to various phases 
of the industry. Animal Husbandry Staff. 

A. H. 394. Dairy Products Judging. O-O-l 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture, Required of seniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

A course of training for students in judging all dairy products according 
to official standards and commercial grades. Mr. Clevenger. 

A. H. 395. Summer Practicum. 3 credits 

Required of all students in Animal Production and Dairy Manufacturing. 
Prerequisites: 18 credits in Animal Husbandry. 

This course requires a minimum of six weeks practical work on an approved 
livestock farm or in a creamery, for which remuneration may be obtained. 
If the work is done at the College farms or College Creamery, no remunera- 
tion other than specified credit will be allowed. Each student will be required 
to submit an outline of his proposed work during the spring term and a final 
report of the work done during the fall term. Staff. 



[Animal Husbandry] 163 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 401, 402, 403. Dairy Manufactures. 3-3-3 

Requir&d of seniors in Dairy Manufacturing. Prerequisite: A. H. 202 and 
12 hours of the dairy manufacturing courses. 

Special problems dealing with the manufacture and marketing of dairy 
products. ^ Mr. Clevenger. 

A. H. 412. Animal Nutrition III. 0-3-0 

Elective for seniors in Agriculture. Prerequisite: A. H. 202, A. H. 361. 
A study of the chemistry and physiology of nutrition and the processes of 
animal life; recent scientific publications are studied. Mr. Ruffner. 

A. H. 413. Herd Improvement, 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: A. H. 202, 341, 361. Elective for juniors and seniors in Agri- 
culture. Required of juniors in A. H. 

This course is designed for training students as supervisors of Herd Im- 
provement Associations in North Carolina. Rules for Advanced Registry are 
studied, and practical work in keeping feed costs, the Babcock Test, and 
bookkeeping necessary for dairy associations. Mr. Haig. 

A. H. 421. Animal Breeding. 4-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. 

A study of breeding and improvement of our domestic animals; a first-hand 
study of successful breeding establishments and their problems. Mr. Rufi^ner. 

A. H. 432. Pure-bred Livestock Production. 0-3-0 

Elective for seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in Animal Hus- 
bandry. Prerequisite: A. H. 202, 331. 

A study of the pure-bred livestock industry. Lectures and discussion sup- 
plemented by assignments from current periodicals and breed papers Special 
study of the selection of livestock best suited to different localities. 

Mr. RuflPner. 

A. H. 433. Stock Farm Management. n n "i 

Prerequisite: A. H. 202. El^tive for juniors and seniors in Agriculture, 
Required of seniors m Animal Husbandry. 

A study of successful methods of operating farms devoted chiefly to live- 

^^^rtli'nltn^^d^trs'"'^^ '''''''''' '' "^^'^ '' '-' ^>'^^- ^Z''^ to North 

Mr. Ruffner. 



164 [Architectube] 

A. H. 441, 442, 443. Problems in Advanced Animal Breeding. 

3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: A. H. 421. Elective for seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of the physiology of reproduction. Methods and problems of 
breeders; influence of pedigree, herd books, and Mendelism in animal breed- 
ing. Mr. Ruffner. 

Courses for Graduates Only 
A. H. 501, 502, 503. Research Studies in Animal Husbandry. 

3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 
Prerequisite : Eighteen credits in Animal Husbandry. 
An intensive study of experimental data. Staff. 

A. H. 511, 512, 513. Advanced Nutrition, 3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: A. H. 202, 361. 

A survey of experimental feeding, together with a study of the fundamental 
and practical feeding problems of the various sections of the country. A 
study is made of the effects of various feeds on growth and development. 
Animals are used in demonstrating the effects of these various nutrients and 
rations. Mr. Ruffner. 

A. H. 521, 522, 523. Special Problems in Dairy Manufacturing 

Practice. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Dairy Manufacturing. 
Available for graduate students interested in special dairy manufacturing 
problems under definite supervision and approval. Mr. Clevenger. 

A. H. 531, 532, 533. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Members of the seminar will be assigned subjects which will be reviewed 
and discussed. Review of literature, scientific reports and Experiment Sta- 
tion bulletins. Oral and written reports. Staff. 

ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Arch. 100. Pencil Sketching. 3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

or 1-1-1 

Required of seniors in L. A. ; elective for Engineering and Textile students. 

Quick sketching of objects as seen and imagined in perspective. Elementary 

principle of perspective, especially as applied to the visualization of imagined 

objects. Mimeographed Notes and Problem Sheets. Mr. Paulson, 



[Architecture] 165 
Arch. 101, 102, 103. Freehand Drawing 1, 2, and 3. 2-2-2 

1. Required of juniors in Arch., Arch. Eng., and L. A. 2-0-0 

Sketching in pencil and pen and ink from models, casts and nature. Em- 
phasis upon tonal value, pattern of darks, character and variety of line, and 
accenting. Lettering. Watson, Pencil Sketching. 

2. Required of juniors in Arch., and Arch. Eng. 0-2-0 

Water color rendering. Nature and qualities of pigments; theory of color 
and of tone; presentation of decorative and of pictorial subjects in mono- 
chrome and in full color. Guptill, Reference to Color. 

3. Required of juniors in Arch., Arch, Eng., and L. A. 0-0-2 

Charcoal Drawing from architectural casts and models. Emphasis upon 
delicacy and gradation of shade and shadow. Value sketches of composition 
projects. Mr. Paulson. 

Arch- 104. Art Appreciation for Teachers. 0-0-3 

Picture study of the list suggested by the State Board of Education for 
grade-school use, including paintings, architecture, and sculpture. Paulson, 
Art Appreciation for Teachers. Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 105. Art Principles in Industry. 3-0-0 

Elective for Engineering and Textile students. 

Line, form, color and aesthetic principles of practical art applicable to the 
design of articles for manufacture. Mimeographed Notes. Mr. Paulsor 

Arch. 106. Decorative Drawing 3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in the Textile School. 

Freehand drawing and creative designing of decorative motives adaptable 
to weaving and cloth printing. Mimeographed Problem Sheets. Mr, Paulson. 

Arch. 107. Architectural Drawing. 3-3-0 

Required of freshmen in Architecture, (M, E, 105 and 106 may be substi- 
tuted for Arch. 107) 

Drafting Practice. Use of instruments in drawing plans, elevations, sec- 
tions ; projections ; architectural lettering and conventions ; tracing and blue- 
printing; elements of architecture and introduction to design. Pickering, 
Architectural Design. Mr. Williams. 



166 [Architecture] 

Arch. Ill, 112, 113. Appreciation of Fine Arts, Architecture, 

Painting, Sculpture 3-3-3 

Elective for students of junior standing. 

Principles of art. Study of those qualities which constitute great art. First 
term, architecture ; second term, painting ; third term, sculpture and the minor 
arts. Reinach, Apollo; University Prints; Mimeographed Notes. Robb and 
Garrison, Art in the Western World. Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 114. Clay Modeling. 1-1-1 

Required of seniors in Arch. Prerequisite : Arch. 100. 

Modeling of ornament, reliefs, and full round projects in clay or wax. 
Moulds and plaster casting. Small scale building detail models. Lectures, 
laboratory, and critiques. Mr. Paulson. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Arch- 201, 202, 203. Elements of Architecture I, II, and III. 3 3-3 

Required of sophomores in Arch., Arch. Eng., and L. A. Prerequisite: 
M. E. 105, 106, or Arch. 107. 

Exercises and studies of architectural elements and details, walls, openings, 
etc. A study of the orders of Architecture and their application to simple 
problems in composition and design. Turner, Fundamentals of Architectural 
Design; Ramsey and Sleeper, Graphic Standards. 

Mr. Edwards, Mr. Williams, Mr. McLawhorn. 

Arch. 205. Shades and Shadows. 2-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Arch, and juniors in L. A. Prerequisite: M. E. 
107. 

The determination of conventional shades and shadows as they occur on 
rendered drawings. Buck, Ronan and Oman, Shades and Shadows. 

Mr. Williams, Mr. McLawhorn. 

Arch. 206. Perspective Drawing. 1-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Arch., Arch. Eng., and of juniors in L. A. Pre- 
requisite: M. E. 107. 

Study of the theory of perspective with special applications to illustration 
and design. Lectures and drawing. Turner, Fundamentals of Architectural 
Design. Mr. Williams, Mr. McLawhorn. 



[Architecture] 167 

Arch. 207. Historic Motives in Textiles. 3-0-0 

Elective for students of junior standing. 

Chronologic development of ornament motives, and the adaptation of his- 
toric motives to modern textile design. Hamlin, History of Ornament. 

Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 211, 212, 213. Freehand Drawing 4, 5, and 6. 3-3-3 

Required of fifth year Arch., elective for others. Prerequisite: Arch, 103. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student a mastery of presentation 
in his own chosen medium. The first term (Arch. 211) will be devoted prin- 
cipally to still life; the second (Arch. 212) to landscape; and the third (Arch. 
213) to figure drawing. Personal technique will be encouraged while sound 
principles of drawing will be insisted upon. Mr. Paulson. 

Arcli. 301, 302, 303. Intermediate Design, B-1, B-2, B-3. 3-3-3 

Required of juniors in Arch., and Arch. Eng. Prerequisite: Arch. 201, 
202, 203. 

Problems in elementary composition, design, planning and rendering. 
Library research. Registration with the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design may 
be required. Beauz-Arts Institute Problems. 

Mr. Edwards, Mr. Williams, Mr. MeLawhom. 

Arch. 304. Photographic Practice 0-0-1 

Required of juniors in Arch., and Arch. Eng. 

The practical use of photography as an aid in architectural rendition. 
Lectures, Notes, and Assignments. Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 305. Working Drawings. 0-0-2 

Required of juniors in Arch. Prerequisite: Arch. 201, 202, 203. 

The preparation of working drawings of sections and details of construction. 
Ramsey and Sleeper, Graphic Standards; Knoblock, Good Practice in Con- 
struction. Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Edwards, Mr. MeLawhom. 

Arch. 306. Architectural Drawing. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Constr. Engr. Prerequisite: C. E. 311. 

Introduction to methods generally employed in architectural offices. Lec- 
tures and drawing. Purpose: to give the student sufficient training that he 
may read and interpret working drawings. Ramsey and Sleeper, Graphic 
Standards; N. C. State Building Code. Mr. Edwards, Mr. MeLawhom. 



168 [Architecture] 

Arch- 321, 322, 323. History of Architecture 1, 2, and 3. 3-3-3 

Required of juniors in Arch., Arch. Eng., and L. A. Prerequisite: Arch. 
203. 

The origin and development of historic styles of architecture from antiquity 
to the nineteenth century. Illustrated lectures, library references, sketches. 
Fletcher, History of Architecture; Hamlin, History of Architecture. 

Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Williams. 

Arch. 325, History of Sculpture and Mural Decoration- 0-0-2 

Required of seniors in Arch. Eng. and of juniors in Arch. Prerequisite: 
Arch. 203. 

The development of sculptural and mural art as adjiincts to architecture, 
ancient to modem. Critique of modern decoration supplementary to architec- 
ture. Mimeogrraphed notes, library reference and illustrated lectures. 

Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 351, 352. Architectural Design E-1, E-2. 3-3-0 

Required of seniors in Arch. Eng. Prerequisite : Arch. 303. 

Advanced Architectural Design studied especially from the viewpoint of 
structure. Projects developed with wall and spanning sections. Rendered 
presentation of practical constructive programs. 

Mr. Edwards, Mr. McLawhom. 

Arch. 353, 354, 355. Architectural Design B-4, B-5, and B-6. 6-6-6 

Required of seniors in Arch. Prerequisite : Arch. 303. 

Advanced programs in architectural design. Registration with the Beaiix 
Arts Institute of Design may be required. Complete presentation drawings 
of projects such as Class B — Beaux Arts Institute Problems. 

Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Edwards, Mr. Williams. 

Arch. 401, 402, 403. Architectural Design A-I, A-II, A-IIL 6-6-6 

Required of fifth year in Arch. Prerequisite : Arch. 355. 

Major problems in advanced planning and research. Registration with 
the Beaux- Arts Institute of Design may be required. Beaux- Arts Institute 
Problems. Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Edwards, Mr. „ __ 

Arch. 405. History of the Decorative Arts. 0-3-0 

Elective for students of junior standing. Prerequisite: Arch. 321, or 322. 

Lectures and library research on the history of the decorative arts, includ- 
ing interior architecture, furniture, stained glass, etc. McClure, E., Period 
Furniture. Mr. Shumaker. 



[Architecture] 169 

Arch. 407. Architectural Composition. 2-0-0 

Required of fifth year in Arch. Prerequisite : Arch. 323. 

Principles of planning and composition as related to buildings. Archi- 
tectural motives, group planning. Library research and sketches. Curtis, 
Architectural Composition. Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Williams. 

Arch. 408. Architectural Estimates. 0-0-2 

Required of fifth year in Arch. Prerequisite: Arch. 305. 
Lectures and problems in taking off quantities and in estimating materials 
and labor cost in building construction. Mimeographed Notes. 

Mr. Shumaker, Mr. McLawhorn. 

Arch. 409. Building Materials L 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Arch, and Arch. Eng. Prerequisite : Arch. 303. 

Nature and qualities of building materials, especially fabricated materials, 
and their use in interior and exterior finish and in construction. Sample ex- 
hibits, lectures, and demonstrations. Manufacturers' Data Sheets. 

Mr. Edwards. 

Arch. 411, 412, 413. Architectural Office Practice. 2-2-2 or 0-3-3 

Required of juniors in Arch., seniors in Arch. Eng. Prerequisite: Arch. 
305. 

The preparation of working drawings from sketches, following office rou- 
tine. Knoblock, Good Practice in Construction; Ramsey and Sleeper, Graphic 
Standards. Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Edwards, Mr 

Arch. 414. Professional Practice. 0-0-1 

Required of fifth year in Arch. Prerequisite : Econ. 307. 
Ethics and procedure in the profession of architecture. Relation of patron 
and commissionee. Mimeographed Notes. Mr. Shumaker. 

Arch. 415. City Planning. 0-2-0 

Required in fifth year in Arch. Prerequisite: Arch. 323. 
Origin and development of urban communities. Aesthetic, economic, and 
circulatory problems in city and town planning. Zoning and restraining 
legislation. Mr. Shumaker. 

Arch. 416. Architectural Specifications. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Arch, and Arch. Eng. Prerequisite: Econ. 307. 
Execution of specifications for architectural building contracts, identifi- 
cation of material, clarification of terms, and protection of patron, contractor, 
and architect. Mimeographed Notes. Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Edwards. 



170 [Botany] 

Arch. 421. History of Architecture 4. 3-0-0 

Required of fifth year Arch. Prerequisite : Arch. 323. 

Nineteenth century and contemporary architectural styles, with special 
attention to trends resulting from the use of modern materials. Illustrated 
lectures, discussion assignments, and reports. Fletcher, History of Archi- 
tecture. Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Williams. 

Arch. 501, 502, 503. Graduate Design I, II, III. 4-4-4 

Prerequisite: Arch. 323, 403 (or 352). 

Class A. — Project. Advanced problems in design. Archaeology. Measured 
Drawings. Registration with the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design is required. 
Beaux-Arts Institute Problems. Mr. Shumaker, Mr. Edwards, Mr. Williams. 

Arch. 511, 512, 513. Historic Research I, II, III. 4-4-4 

Prerequisite: Arch. 323, 403 (or 352). 

Research in Architecture and Art in some important phase of its derelop- 
ment. Library work with sketches. Library References. 

Mr. Paulson, Mr. Edwards, Mr. Williaaui. 



BOTANY 

Courses for Undergraduates 
Bot. 101, 102. General Botany. 4-4-0 

Required of freshmen and sophomores in Agriculture. 

The first term deals with the nature of the higher (crop type) plants; the 
second involves a survey of the major lower plant groups with the emphasis 
upon the economic forms (bacteria and fungi). 

Mr. Wells, Mr. Shunk, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Whitford, Mr. Buell. 

Bot. 202. Rural Sanitation. 0-3-0 

A combination course on the relation of bacteria and insects to rural public 
health; meat and other food, and water inspection; health laws. 

Mr. Shunk, Mr. Grinnells, Mr. Weaver. 

Bot. 203. Systematic Botany. 0-0-3 

Elective in Agriculture and Science. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102. 

An introduction to the local flora and the classification of the plants in- 
cluded therein. Mr. Wells, Mr. Shunk, Mr. Whitford, Mr. Buell. 



[Botany] 171 

Bot. 211-213. Dendrology. 3-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Forestry. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 203. 
A study of the principal trees of North America. Mr. Buell. 

Bot 221. Plant Physiology. 5-0-0 or 0-0-5 

Required of sophomores in Forestry. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102. 
A study of the activities of living plants with special emphasis upon the 
fundamental principles concerned. Mr. Anderson. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 301. Diseases of Field Crops. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 

A study of the more important diseases of field crops, such as cotton, to- 
bacco, corn, small grains, legumes, and grasses. Emphasis is placed on 
symptoms, cause, and control. Mr. Lehman. 

Bot 303. Diseases of Fruit and Vegetable Crops. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 
Lectures and laboratory studies of importance, causes, symptoms, and 
control of diseases affecting these crops. Mr. Poole. 

Bot 311. Diseases of Forest Trees. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite : Bot. 101, 102, 221. 

Lectures and laboratory studies of importance, causes, symptoms, and 
control of diseases aflfecting trees and their products. Mr. Poole, 

Bot 401. Advanced Plant Pathology. 5 or 5 or 5 

Elective. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 221, 301, 303. 

A course designed to give the student training in those methods of in- 
vestigation which are most useful in the study of plant pathological prob- 
lems. Mr. Lehman. 

Bot. 402. General Bacteriology. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, or Zool. 101. 
Required of juniors or seniors in Agriculture. 

An introduction to the principles of bacteriology. Laboratory work on 
modern cultural methods of handling and studying bacteria. Mr, Shunk. 



172 [Botany] 

Bot. 411-412. Plant Morphology. 3-3-0 

Elective in Agriculture and Forestry. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 203. 
An advanced survey of plants; the lower groups are given the first term, 
the higher (land plants) the second. Mr. Wells, Mr. Shunk. 

Bot. 432. Advanced Plant Physiology. 0-3-0 or 0-5-0 

Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102. 221. 

A critical and comprehensive treatment of the various aspects of plant 
physiology. Particular attention is given to basic principles and to recent 
developments. Mr. Anderson. 

Bot. 441. Plant Ecology. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 
Environmental control of plant distribution with emphasis upon the habitats 
and vegetation of North Carolina. Mr. Wells, Mr. Shunk. 

Bot. 442. Microanalysis of Plant Tissue. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 

The identification in plant tissues of mineral elements and organic com- 
pounds, the physiological significance of these materials. Mr. Anderson, 

Bot. 443. Soil Microbiology. 0-0-3 

Elective Agriculture and Forestry. Prerequisite : Bot 101, 102, 221, 402. 

A study of the more important microbiological processes that occur in 
soils: decomposition of organic materials, ammonification, nitrification, and 
nitrog^en fixation. Mr. Shunk. 

Bot. 451. Plant Microtechnique. 3-0-0 

Elective in Agriculture and Forestry. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102. 
Materials and processes involved in the preparation of plant structures 
for microscopic examination. Mr. Anderson. 

Bot. 452. Advanced Bacteriology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Bot. 101. 102. 221, 402. 

A study of the methods used in the bacteriological analysis of wa'er and 
milk. Mr. Shunk. 

Bot. 453. Advanced Plant Ecology. 0-0-3 

Elective in Agriculture and Forestry. Prerequisite: Bot. 221, 441. 
Practice in the use of the instruments necessary in the study of environ- 
mental factors. Advanced readings and conferences on plant distribution in 
relation to these factors. Mr. Wells. 



[Botany] 173 

Bot. 463. Advanced Systematic Botany. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 203. 

A continuation of the elementary course 203 in the identification of the 
local flora plants together with a survey of the plant families from the 
modern phylogenetic point of view. Mr. Wells, Mr. Buelh 

Bot. 473. Aquatic Biology. 0-0-2 

Required of Sanitary Engineers. Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102, 
Identification and control of the aquatic algae and protozoa which give 
trouble in reservoirs. A survey of the higher water and marsh plants is 
also included. Mr. Whitford. 

Bot. 481, 482, 483. Pathogenic Fungi 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102. 

A course on the structure, identification, and classification of fungi. Spec- 
ial attention is given to species parasitic on crop plants. Mr. Lehman. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Bot. 501, 502, 503. Pathology of Special Crops. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 301 or 401, 402. 

A comprehensive study of the etiology, symptoms, and control of specific 
diseases. Mr. Lehman or Mr. Poole. 

Bot. 511, 512, 513. Bacteriology: Special Studies. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 402, 452. 

Special work on restricted groups of bacteria, such as nitrogen bacteria of 
the soil, milk organisms, and special groups of bacteria in water. 

Mr. Shunk. 

Bot. 521. Advanced Systematic Botany. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 203, 411, 412, 

An advanced survey of restricted groups of plants involving organization 
and distribution problems. Mr. Wells, Mr. Buell. 

Bot. 531, 532, 533. Plant Physiology. 3.3.3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 221, 432. 

Critical study of some particular problem, involving original investigation 
together with a survey of pertinent literature. Mr. Anderson. 



174 [CZ31AMIC Engikeeeikg] 

Bot. 541. Plant Ecology. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 203, 441. 

Minor investigations in vegetation-habitat problems accompanied by ad- 
vanced reference reading. Mr. Wells. 

Bot 551. 552, 553. Research in Botany. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: 30 hours in 100-300 courses in Botany. Staff. 

Bot 561. 562, 563. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Attendance by the student upon the weekly seminar together with the 
presentation of a paper in his major field of research. Mr. Wells. 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

C«r. E. 102. Ceramic Materials. 0-3-0 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic Engineering. Prerequisite: (Jeol. 220. 

The origin and occurrence of ceramic raw materials, their chemical and 
ph^ical properties and system of measuring them. Ries, Clays, Occurrenc* 
Properties and Uses. Mr. Kriegel. 

C«r. E. 103. Ceramic and Mining Processes. 0-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Cer. E. and Geol. E. Prerequisite : Geol. 220. 

The winning and preparation of ceramic materials and the equipment and 
processes used in manufacturing ceramic products. Garve, FaetoTy D«aiffn 
and Equipment. Mr. Greaves-Walker. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Cer. E. 201. Drying Fundamentals and Practice, 3-O-0 

Required of juniors in Cer. E, Prerequisite: Cer. E. 102. 
The theory and practice of drying ceramic products. Problems. Greaves- 
Walker, Drying Ceramic Products. Mr. Greaves-Walker. 

Cer. E. 203. Ceramic Products. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Cer E. Prerequisite: Cer. E. 103. 
A study of the physical, chemical, and artistic requirement of ceramic 
products. Laboratory practice. Mr. Greaves- Walker, Mr. Kriegel. 



[Ceramic Engineering] 175 
Cer, E. 252. Firing Fundamentals and Practice. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Cer. E. Prerequisite: Cer. E. 102 and 201. 
The theory and practice of firing ceramic products. Problems. Wilson, 
Ceramics, Clay Technology. Mr. Greaves- Walker. 

Cer. E. 253. Ceramic Calculations. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Cer. E. Prerequisite: Chem. 212, Cer. E. 102, 201, 
252. Solution of chemical and physical problems of the ceramic industries. 
Andrews, Ceramic Tests and Calculations. Mr. Kriegel. 

Cer. E. 303. Silicates I. S.q.q 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. Prerequisites: Chem. 231, Cer. E. 253 and 
Geol. 338. 

The fundamental principles underlying the composition and production of 
whitewares, glazes, glasses, terra cotta and abrasives. Hall and Insley, 
A Compilation of Phase Rule Diagrams. Mr. Kriegel. 

Cer. E. 804. Silicates II. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. Prerequisites: Chem. 231, Cer. E. 803 and 
Geol. 338. 

The fundamental principles underlying the composition and production of 
refractories, cements, plasters and metal enamels. Hall and Insley, A Com- 
pilation of Phase Rule Diagrams; Andrews, Enamels. Mr. Kriegel. 

Cer. E- 305. Pyrometry. 1-0-0 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. Prerequisite : Cer. E. 252. 
The theory and use of temperature measuring instruments in industry. 

Wood and Cork, Pyrometry. jjj.. Kriegel. 

Cer. E. 311, 312, 313. Ceramic Laboratory. 3.3.3 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. Prerequisite: Cer. E. 201, 203, 252, 253, 304. 
Advanced practice in producing and determining the chemical and physical 
properties of ceramic materials and products. 

Mr. Greaves- Walker, Mr. Kriegel. 



0-4-4 



Cer. E. 314, 315. Ceramic Designing. 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. Prerequisite: M. E. 212 Cer E 10*? 201 
252, and 253. ' • • . ^^^, 

Designing of ceramic equipment and structures. Garve, Factory Design 
and Equipment. Mr. Greaves-Walker, Mr. Kriegel. 



176 [Ceramic Engineering] 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Cer. E. 403. Refractories. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. and Geol. E. Prerequisite: Chem. 331, GeoL 
338, Cer. E. 102. 

Refractory materials and manufacture of refractory products. 
Use of refractory products in industrial furnaces. Norton, Refractories. 

Mr. Greaves-Walker. 

Courses for Graduates Only 
Cer. K 501, 502, 503. Desigrning of Ceramic Equipment and Plants. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 315. 

Advanced study and desigrning of ceramic machinery, dryers, kilns, and 
plant structures. Mr, Greaves-Walker. 

Cer. E. 505, 506, 507. Advanced Refractories and Furnaces. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 313, 403. 
Advanced study of refractory materials and products and their use. 

Mr. Greaves-Walker. 

Cer. E. 509, 510, 511. Industrial Adaptability of Ceramic Materials. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 313. 

Laboratory investigations to determine the industrial uses to which various 
North Carolina ceramic materials can be put. 

Mr. Greaves- Walker, Mr. Kriegel. 

Cer. E. 513, 514, 515. Ceramic Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 313. 

Research problems in ceramics will be assigned to meet the desire of the 
student for specialization. Mr. Greaves- Walker, Mr. Kriegel. 

Cer. E. 517, 518, 519. Glass Technology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 231, Geol. 338, Cer. E. 253, 303, 403. 
Advanced study of the manufacture and physical properties of glass. 

Mr. Greaves-Walker. 

Cer. E. 521, 522, 523. Advanced Silicate Technology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 303. 
Advanced laboratory practice in bodies, glazes, glasses, and colors. 

Mr. KriegeL 



[Chemical Engineering] 177 
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Chem. E. 201, 202, 203. Introduction to Chemical Engineering. 1-1-2 

Required of sophomores in Chem. E. Prerequisites: Chem. 103; Math. 102. 

Reactions in chemical processes, illustrative problems, and control methods; 
elements of unit processes and unit operation ; plant visits, elementary chemi- 
cal engineering calculations. Randolph, Introduction to Chemical Engineer- 
ing. Mr. Randolph, Mr. Johnson. 

Chem. K 212, 213. Chemical Nature of Engineering Materials. 0-3-3 

Required of Seniors in General Engineering; elective for others. Pre- 
requisites: Chem. 103; Math. 103. 

Study of the fundamental facts about the chemical nature of engineering 
materials as an aid in the proper choice of materials for various types of 
engineering purposes under working conditions. Teachers' Manual. 

Mr. Randolph, Mr. Johnson. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. E. 311, 312, 313. Chemical Engineering I. 3-S-3 

Required of juniors in Chem. E. and of seniors in Textile Chemistry and 
Dyeing. Prerequisite: Chem. 213; Chem. E. 201 or Tex. 212. 

Unit processes, inorganic and organic technology; industrial chemistry; 
equipment, materials, methods, and processes employed in chemical manufac- 
ture; water, fuels, and power, studied on the quantitative and mathematical 
basis; conversion of raw materials into such necessary products as sugar, 
paper, gas, paint, leather, glass; by-products and waste products. Read's 
Industrial Chemistry; Scroggins, Organic Unit Processes; Teachers' Man- 
ual; Badger and McCabe, Elements of Chemical Engineering; and Library 
References. Mr. Lauer, Mr. Doody. 

Chem. E. 321, 322, 323. Chemical Engineering Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in Chem. E. Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 311. 

A laboratory study of industrial control methods; industrial plant visits; 
problems and processes solved and presented in technical reports; prepara- 
tion of products on pilot plant scale; costs studies. Notes. 

Mr. Lauer, Mr. Doody, Mr. Drum. 



178 [Chemical Engineering] 

Chem. E. 330. Treatment of Water and Sewage. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in San. E. Prerequisite: Ch. E. 311 or C. E. 215. 
Principles involved in the control of municipal water supplies and in sewage 
treatment; reactions involved; chemical nature of water and sewage treat- 
ment; methods for removal of the more objectionable materials in industrial 
waters. Notes. Mr. Randolph, Mr. Doody. 

Chem. K 331. Industrial Stoichiometry. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering. Prerequisite or concurrent: 
Chem. E. 311. 

Industrial calculations and measurements; heat balances; material bal- 
ances; fuels and combustion processes; principles of chemical engineering 
calculations. Haugen and Watson, Industrial Chemical Calculations. 

Mr. Lauer. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chea. K 411, 412, 413. Principles of Chemical Engineering. S-3-S 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311; concurrent 
mtk Ckem. 431. 

Smrrey of field of Chemical Engineering; control in industrial manufac- 
ture; »nit operations; flow of fluids and of heat; equipment for and principles 
involved in such operations as crushing and grinding, separation, evapora- 
tion, distillation, filtration; humidification ; drying, absorption, and extrac- 
tion; chemical engineering calculations; design and efiiciency of chemical 
machinery. Walker, Lewis, McAdams and Gilliland, Principles of Chemical 
Engineering ; Badger and McCabe, Elements of Chemical Engineering. 

Mr. Bain, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Lauer. 

Chem. E. 421. Water Treatment. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 
Supplies of water; filter plant machinery, equipment and practice; water 
purification and softening ; types of filters ; requirements of waters for muni- 
cipal and manufacturing purposes ; water analysis ; research on water purifi- 
cation and industrial waste treatment. Notes. Mr. Randolph, Mr. Doody. 

Chem. E. 422. Chemistry of Engineering Materials. 3 or 3 or 3 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 
Technical study of engineering materials, suitable materials for manu- 
facturing plants, machines, and special uses; corrosion and chemical action; 
paints and protective coatings; metallurgy; strength, toughness, and elas- 
ticity of metals; chemical, metallographic, and microphotographic examina- 
tions of metals and alloys, and other materials; fire assaying. Leighou, 
Chemistry of Engineering Materials; White, Engineering Materials. 

Mr. Randolph, Mr. Van Note, Mr. Bain. 



[Chemical Engineering] 179 

Chem. E. 423. Electrochemical Engineering. 3-3-3 or 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Theory and practice of electrochemical industries ; principles of electrolysis 
and other electrochemical processes ; electric furnace ; electro-thermal opera- 
tions, electrometallurgy. Mantell, Industrial Electrochemistry. 

Mr. Randolph, Mr. Doody, Mr. Lauer. 

Chem. E. 425. Gas Engineering. 3 or 3 or 3 

Elective for seniors or graduates in Chem. E. Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

A gas engineering course; manufacture of industrial fuel gases and their 
distribution; advances made in the industry; apparatus and equipment; plant 
design; general practice in gas plants; application and use of gas and the 
by-products of its manufacture; pipe lines, service connections, gas meters. 

Mr. Randolph. 

Chem. E. 426. Sanitation Processes. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Technical study of the methods of sanitation in industrial plants; equip- 
ment and practice in the disposal and treatment of waste materials and 
sewage; measures necessary in eliminating occupational disease hazards. 
Notes. Mr. Randolph, Mr. Lauer. 

Chem. E. 427. Industrial Application of Physical Chemistry. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Special phases of physical chemistry studied technically with reference to 
the practical application of these principles in the chemical industries Buch as 
industrial catalysis, evaporation principles, absorption, equilibrium, applica- 
tions of phase rule, physical metallurgy, colloids. Notes. Mr. Doody. 

Chem. E. 428. Fuel and Combustion Engineering. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Fundamental principles and mechanism of the combustion i*eaetions ; quan- 
titative application to problems of design or use of equipment for fuel pro- 
cessing and utilization; and a thorough study of solid, liquid, and gaseous 
fuels, with complete methods of analysis. Haslam and Russell, Fuels and 
Their Combustion. Mr. Lauer, Mr. Randolph. 

Chem. £L 431, 432, 433. Chemical Engineering Laboratory and 

Design IL 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 411. 

A laboratory study of measurement of flow of fluids and heat; crushing 
and grinding, distillation; evaporation; drying; humidity; filtration and 
mechanical separation; absorption, and extraction, calculations, design and 
construction of equipment for these fundamental unit operations in chemical 
industry. Mr. Johnson, Mr. Bain, Mr. Seely, Mr. Drum. 



180 [Chemical Engineering] 

Chem. E. 434. Chemical Engineering Design. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 411. 

Location, layout, and complete design of the chemical plant and its process 
equipment. Materials of construction. Economic factors controlling the 
chemical industry, and optimum design from the standpoint of economic re- 
turn, process development, pilot plant production studies. Notes. 

Mr. Lauer, Mr. Johnson. 

Chem. E. 435. Industrial Oils, Fats and Waxes. 0-0-3 or 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors or seniors in Chem. E. Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Commercial practice in the manufacture, refining, and conversion of animal 
and vegetable oils and their by-products; analyses, tests, and methods of 
preparation for foods and feeds; drying, semi-drying, and essential oils; 
industrial fats and waxes. Technical study of petroleum refining and prod- 
ucts; lubricants. Mr. Lauer. 

Chem. E. 436. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 411. 

A study of the thermal properties of matter and energy relationships 
underlying chemical processes. A thorough consideration of fundamental 
laws of energy as applied to Chemical Engineering problems and processes in 
industry. Mr. Doody, Mr. Johnson. 

Chem. K 437. Cellulose and Allied Industries. 3-3-0 or 3-3-8 

Required of seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 311 
or Forestry 206, 207. 

Cellulose and its compounds; forest raw material for chemical industries; 
methods and processes; control conditions; machinery; equipment; water 
requirements; processes for manufacture of paper; rayon; tannin; tar; 
pitch; turpentine; creosote; wood alcohol; acetic acid; acetone; rubber, and 
cellulose conversion products; distillation, and extract industries. Notes. 

Mr. Lauer. 

Chem. E. 438. Corrosion: Causes and Prevention. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Theories of corrosion; influences of metal composition and methods of 
manufacture; external influences; corrosion testing; preventive measures 
against atmospheric, underground, underwater, closed water system, chemical 
corrosion. Good practices; comparison of corrosive resisting materials; suit- 
ability of materials for corrosion resistance in various chemical and indus- 
trial uses. Speller, Corrosion : Causes and Prevention. Notes. Mr. Johnson. 



[Chemical Engineering] 181 

Chem. E. 439. Chemical Principles. 3or 3 or 3 

Prerequiste or concurrent: Chem. E. 311. 

Fundamental principles in chemical manufacture and correlation of these 
principles in unit processes and operation. Hougen and Watson, Industrial 
Chemical Calculations. Notes. Mr. Doody. 

Chem. E. 440. Metals and Alloys. 3 or 3 or 3 

Elective for seniors. Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311 and 422 or M. E. 131. 

Metals and alloys studied through chemical, thermal, and microscopic 
analysis; intermetallic compounds, solid solutions, eutectics; internal mech- 
anisms and their effect in ageing, heat treating, mechanical working; modem 
physical metallurgical problems and practices. Doan, Principles of Physical 
Metallurgy. Mr. Bain. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Chem. E. 501. Chemical Technology — Advanced. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 411. 

An advanced course in problems, processes, and methods of chemical 
manufacture and production; special problems of local manufacturing plants 
worked out under plant conditions; optimum production conditions; special 
study in applied inorganic, applied organic chemistry, and research in applied 
chemistry. Mr. Randolph, Mr. Lauer. 

Chem. K 502. Indostrial Chemical Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 411. 

Chemical research on some industrial problem relating to North Carolina 
resources; practice in industrial plants, control analyses, estimate of losses, 
costs, data sheets, technical report. Staff. 

Chem. E. 503. Chemical Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 411. 

Some plant problem studied exhaustively by making investigations at the 
chemical plant, and by supplementary- experiments and research in the 
laboratory; measurements, tabulation, graphs, and calculation of some ac- 
tual plant problem. Staff. 



182 [Chemistry] 

Chem. E. 504. Advanced Chemical Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. E. 411, Chem. E. 431. 

Advanced study of process equipment, theory, and practice in operation and 
design for the unit operations, evaporation, distillation, absorption, filtration, 
drjang, crystallization, and air conditioning; Chemical Engineering thermo- 
dynamics ; coeflBcients of heat transfer ; heat of reactions ; evaporators ; stills ; 
condensers, and heat exchangers; interrelationships between heat transfer 
and fluid friction. McAdam, Heat Transmission and other texts. 

Mr. Bain, Mr. Randolph. 

CHEMISTRY 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Chem. 101, 102, 103. General Inorganic Chemistrj. 4-4-4 

Recitations and laboratory work; theories and laws, history, oeeurrence, 
preparation, properties, and uses of the more important elements and their 
compounds; formulae, valence, equations and calculations. 
Messrs. Caveness, Reid, Jones, Jordan, Satterfield, Singer, Showalter, Sut- 
ton, Wilson, and Williams. 

Chem. 211. Qualitative Analysis. 4-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic, Chemical, and Mining Engineering and 
those majoring in chemistry and of juniors in Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing. Prerequisite: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Chemical analysis : identification and separation of more common ions and 
analysis of mixture of salts of commercial products. 

Messrs. Wilson, Caveness, Reid. 

Chem. 212. Quantitative Analysis. 0-4-0 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic Engineering, Chemistry, Chemical 
Engineering, and juniors in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 211. 

Chem. 213. Quantitative Analysis. 0-0-4 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering and those majoring in 
Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem. 211. 

A continuation of Chem. 212. Gravimetric methods. Substances of more 
difficult nature are analyzed, as minerals, steel, alloys, limestone, Paris green, 
etc Messrs. Wilson, Caveness, Reid. 



[Chemistry] 183 
Chem. 221. Introduction to Organic Chemistry. 4-0-0 or 0-4-0 or 0-0-4 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. Elective for others. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, ethers, esters, amino 
acids, and bezine derivatives; carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and related 
compounds. Mr. Williams. 

Chem. 223. Quantitative Analysis. 0-0-4 

Required of students in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 
A continuation of Chem. 212. Substances of more difficult nature are 
analyzed, as sulphites, sulphides, bleaching powder, Turkey-red oil, soaps. 

Messrs. Wilson, Caveness, Reid. 

Chem. 233. Quantitative Analysis. 0-0-4 

Required of Agr. Chemistry students. Prerequisites: Chem. 212. 
Course allows students to choose field of analysis, such as soil analysis, fer- 
tilizers, feedstuffs, insecticides, and fungicides. Mr. Wilson. 

dieat. 242. Chemical Calculations. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Chemical problems, especially in analytical work. Lectures are given in 
principles, theories, laws, etc., upon which the problems are based; assigned 
problems for discussion. Mr. Caveness. 

Chem. 331. Physical Chemistry. 5-0-0 

Required of Cer. E.; elective to others. Prerequisite: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 
Fundamental chemical principles from a hysiochemical viewpoint; special 
attention to silicate analysis, colloids, and phase rule. Mr. Singer. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 401. Historical Chemistry. 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Development of Chemistry and the history of men instrumental in the 
progress of Chemistry. Mr. Williams. 

Chem. 402, 403. Theoretical Chemistry. 0-2-2 

Prerequisite: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and conditions influencing them, 
electronic conception of valence, radio activity. Mr. Jordan. 



184 [Chemistry] 

Chem. 411. Advanced Qualitative Analysis. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 211 or its equivalent. 

Theorj* and reactions in analysis of more complex compounds. Mr. Wilson. 

Chem. 412. Advanced Quantitative Methods. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 213 or its equivalent. 

Methods and apparatus in advanced quantitative analysis; heat of combus- 
tion, colorimetry, hydrog-en ion concentration, electric combustion of steel, etc. 

Mr. Wilson. 

Chem. 421, 422, 423. Organic Chemistry. A-4-4 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and seniors in Tex- 
tile Chemistry and Dyeing. Elective for others. Prerequisite: Chem. 101, 102, 
103. 

Aliphatic and aromatic compounds; practical applications; methods of prep- 
aration and purification of compounds, and their structures. Mr. Williams. 

Chem. 431. 432. 433. Physical Chemistry. 4-4-4 or 4-4-0 

The first two tenns only required of Chemical Engineers; elective for 
Agricultural Chemistry students. Prerequisite: Chem. 213. 

Principles of Physical Chemistry; laws and theories, application to various 
branches of chemistry and to industrial processes. Mr. Singer. 

Chem. 441. Food Products and Adulterants. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Designed for students in all schools. Prerequisite: Chem. 221 or 421-22-23. 

Food principles, cereals, starches, sugars, fats, milk and milk products, the 
packing house, food preservation, beverages, spices and condiments; food 
legislation, food advertising. Mr. Satterfield. 

Chem. 442. Chemistry of Colloids. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 221 or 421-22-23. 

Colloidal behavior, osmotic pressures, dialysis, sols and gels, membranes 
and membrane equilibria, proteins, and Donnan equilibrium. Mr. Jones. 

Chem. 451, 452. Physiological Chemistry. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 221 or 421-22-23. 

Essential chemical facts pertaining to life processes; digestion, absorption, 
metabolism, secretions, and excretions; lectures, laboratory. Mr. Satterfield. 



[Chemistry] 185 

Chem. 462. Chemistry of Vitamins. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod. Prerequisite : Chem. 221 or 421-22-23. 
Application of vitamin hypothesis to human nutrition; history, nomencla- 
ture, properties, distribution, effects of deficiencies, vitamin values. 

Mr. Satterfield. 

Chem.472. Blood Analysis. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 212 and 421-22-23. 

Hemoglobin, sugar, urea, uric acid, cholesterol, creatine, creatinine, non- 
protein, nitrogen, amino acid nitrogen, calcium, etc.; Folin-Wu system is 
emphasized; lectures and laboratory. Mr. Satterfield. 

Chem. 481. Agricultural Chemistry. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 101, 102, 103, and 221 or 421-22-23. 

Feeding the plant; insecticides and fungicides; transforming the plant into 
human food and animal food. Composition of plants; relation between com- 
position and uses. Mr. Satterfield. 

Chem. 482, 483. Food and Nntrition. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 221 or 421-22-23. 

Open to all students desiring a practical knowledge of the subject. 

Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, amino acids, minerals, fiber, vitamins and 
enzymes; nutritive value of food materials; digestion, food idiosyncrasy; 
acidosis and alkalosis. Mr. Satterfield. 

Chem. 491, 492, 493. Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 431-32-33. 

An advanced problem course designed for chemical engineers. Mr. Singer. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Chem. 501, 502, 503. Organic Chemistry, Advanced. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 421-22-23. 

Principles of Organic Chemistry, current literature; laboratory work and 
preparation in quantity. Mr. Williams. 

Chem. 511. Organic Qualitative Analysis. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite : Chem. 421-22-23. 

Detection of elements and radicals, group characteristics. Mr. Williams. 



186 [CrviL Engineering] 

Chem. 512. Organic Quantitative Analysis. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 212, 421-22-23. 

Analysis of organic compounds for carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, the halo- 
gens, sulfur, etc. Mr. Williams. 

Chem. 513, Organic Micro-Analysis. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite : Chem. 421-22-23. 

Tests for compounds, and impurities in quantities too small to be detected 
by ordinary methods. Mr. Williams. 

Chem. 523. Micro-chemical Analysis. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 213. 

Inorganic micro qualitative analysis ; fibres, starches, etc. Mr. Wilson. 

Chem. 531, 532, 533. Chemical Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite : 54 term credits in Chemistry. Open to all graduates. 
Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Mr. Jordan, Mr. Satterfield, Mr. Williams, Mr. Wilson. 

Che*. 541, 542, 54S. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Required of graduate students specializing in Chemistry. 
Preparation and presentation of abstracts of current publications in the 
field of Chemistry'. 

Chem. 552, 553. Biochemistry. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 421-22-23, 482-83. 

Special topics in Biochemistry. Advanced study in the fields of Bio- 
chemistry. Mr. Satterfield. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Courses for Undergraduates 

C. E. 101, 102, 103. Drawing. LLl 

Required for freshmen in Forestry. 

Plain lettering, common symbols, platting of areas from compass survey 
notes furnished, filling in contours from notes furnished, tracing, calcula- 
tion of areas— by planimeter. Finished maps. Sloane and Montz, Element<iry 
Topographic Drawing. Mr. Fontaine 



[CrviL Engineering] 187 
C.E.8200. Surveying.* 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Math. 102. 

Required in the summer immediately following the freshman year in Agr. 
Eng., A. E., Cer. E., and E. E. and M. E. following the sophomore year. 

The use, care and adjustment of surveying instruments; elementary land 
surveying, traverse lines, leveling, topographical surveying and stadia mea- 
surements. Tracy, Plane Surveying. Mr. Mann and StaflF. 

C. K 221, 222, 223. Surveying, Theoretical, 3.3.3 

Prerequisite: Math. 102. 

Required of sophomores in Civil, Construction, Highway and Sanitary 
Engmeering. C. E. 221-22 required in Forestry (0-3-3), of Geol. Eng., and 
Landscape Architecture (3-3-0). 

Use, care and adjustment of surveying instruments. Land Surveying Topo- 
graphical Surveying, Leveling and Theory of stadia measures, plane table 
etc. ' 

Third term, railroad surveys, including simple, compound, reverse and 
spiral curves, turnouts, etc. Davis, Foote, Rayner, Surveying. Rubey, Route 
^"*'^^^^- Staff. 

C. E. 224. Topographic Drawing. 0-0-1 

Prerequisite: C. E. 101-2-3. 

Required in Forestry, Landscape Architecture. 

Plotting by coordinates; contours and general topography. Notes. Staff. 

C. E. 225, 227. Field Surveying. ^q^ 

To be taken concurrently with C. E. 221-3. 

Required in C. E., Constx^ E., San. E., H. E., and Landscape Architecture. 
C. E. 225 required m Geol. E. (1-0-0), and in Forestry (0-1-0). 

Surveying field practice, topographical surveys, railroad and highwav 
curves. Profiles, cross-sections. g^^ ^ 

C. E. 226. Mapping. ^^^ 

Prerequisite: M. E. 105-6. To be taken concurrently with C. E. 222. 

Required of all students in the Department of Civil Engineering, Geological 
Engineering, and Landscape Architecture. 

Practice in conventional signs and lettering. A complete topographical 
map and tracing is to be made involving the use of three methods of contour 
location. Fie ld notes to be furnished. Mr. Fontaine, Mr. Lambe. 

ten^MbO^H^MSfe'we^ ^^c„*^^tl? Z^C^t^^"^ '^^^r^? «='-« «* CoUe«e third 
students to schedule smm^sS S? ^ Summer School term in order to allow 



188 [CrviL Engineering] 

C. E. 281. Mill and Mill Village Sanitation. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 103. 

Mill and mill villag-e water supply and sewage disposal, mosquito and fly 
control, sanitary milk supply, industrial hygiene. This course given for 
textile students. Ehlers and Steele, Municipal and Rural Sanit-ation. 

Mr. Johnson 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 
C. E. s300. Surveying and Mapping. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: C. E. 221-2-3; C. E. 224. 

Required in summer immediately following sophomore year in Forestry. 

Boundary; topographical surveys, and calculations of sections of College 
Experimental Forestry Lands. Finished section maps. Davis, Foote, Rayner, 
Surveying. Sta3. 

C. K s310. Advanced Surveying.* 3 credits 

Required in the summer immediately following the sophomore year in Civil 
Engineering. 

Prerequisite: C. E. 221-2-3; C. E. 226. 

Plane table practice, special problems in surveying practice; triangulation, 
railroad and highway spirals; hydrographic surveying with sextant; plane 
table problems ; the use and rating of current meters ; measurement of stream 
flow; drainage problems. 

Laying out proposed construction work. Topograph, details, special prob- 
lems. Da-^-is, Foote, Rayner, Surveying. Mr. Mann and Staff. 

C. E. 321. Materials of Construction. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in C. E., H. E., and Constr. E., San. E., M. E. and A. E. 
and of seniors in I. E. 

The study of materials used in buildings and other engineering struc- 
tures, with particular reference to their methods of manufacture and phys- 
ical properties. Two periods lecture and recitation; one period laboratory. 
Tucker, Laboratory Manual in the Testing of MateriaU. Lectures and Xot-es. 

Messrs. Tucker, Bramer, Fontaine. 

C E. 361, 362, 363. Construction Engineering I. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 311. 

Required of juniors in Constr. E. 

Study of working drawings, good practice in masonry and frame construc- 
tion, estimating quantities. Huntington, Building Construction Notes and 
Trade Liter ature. Mr. G^ile. 

t»™^?lf^' JT* .^^^*°i^- <?' ^^^ time, 3 weeks immediately foUowing close of C-cUege third 
n,^' i i Haif time. 6 weeks ooncurrently with C-oUege Slimmer School term in order to allow 
students to schedule summer school work. 



[CrviL Engineering] 189 

C. E. 365, 366. Sanitary and Mechanical Equipment of Buildings. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 311-12. 

First term required of juniors in Constr. E. First and second terms re- 
quired of juniors in Arch. E. 

A study of water supply, soil, waste, and vent-pipe systems, principles 
and practice of heating and ventilating and a discussion of various other 
mechanical equipment of a building, such as elevators, dust-collecting sys- 
tems, etc. Gay and Fawcett, Mechanical and Electrical Equipment of Build- 
ings. Mr 

C. K 383. Sanitary Engineering. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in San. E. Prerequisite: Chem. 103. 

This course covers, in a general way, the field of Sanitary Engineerings, 
including: water supply and sewage disposal; ventilation; mosquito and fly 
control; refuse disposal; public health laws and organization. Ehlers and 
Steele, Municipal and Rural Sanitation. Mr. Johnson. 

Coarses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. 421, 422. Reinforced Concrete. 3-S-O 

Required of all seniors in Department of Civil Eng^ineering and Architec- 
tural Engineering. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 313, 322. 

Derivation of formulas used in reinforced concrete design, use of diagrams 
and curves. Illustrative problems in design. Tumeaure and Maurer, Prin- 
ciples of Reinforced Concrete Construction. Mr. Mann, Mr. Bramer. 

C. E. 423, 424, 425. Graphic Statics. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: E. M. 313. 

First term required of all seniors in Depai-tment of Civil Engineering. 
First, second, and third terms required of all seniors in Architectural En- 
gineering. 

Principles involved in the solution of problems by graphical methods. 
Moments, shears. Resultant pressure on retaining walls. Stress diagrams. 
Fairman and Cutshall, Graphic Statics and assigned references. Mr. Mann. 

C. E. 426, 427. Structural Design. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 322, C. E. 431. 
Required of seniors in C. E., H. E., Constr. E., San. E. 

Design of beams, columns, tension members, plate girders, trusses and 
structures. Bishop, Structural Design. Mr. Mann. 



190 [Civil Engineering] 

C. E. 431, 432. Theory of Structures. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 322. 

Required of seniors in C. E., H. E., Constr. E., San. E. 

Roof trusses ; bridge trusses ; three hinged arch, lateral bracing and portals ; 
rigid frame, wind stresses in tall buildings, indeterminate trusses, secondary- 
stresses. Sutherland and Bowman, Structural Theory. Mr. 

C. K 431a, 432a. Theory of Structures (abridged). 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 322. 

Required in Architectural Engineering. C. E. 431, 432, to be required if 
less than five students enroll for C. E. 431a, 432a. 

Stress analyses and designs of wooden and steel roof trusses; wood, steel, 
and reinforced concrete floor systems. Theory and design of columns, foot- 
ings, retaining walls. Theories for wind stress design in tall buildings. 

Mr 

C. E. 435. Soil Mechanics. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 321-22. 

Required of all seniors in Civil Engineering. 

The classification of soils; their physical characteristics and tests. The 
suitability of certain types of soils for foundations. Methods of stabilizing 
soils. General principles involved in selection of soils for foundations. 

Mr. Bramer. 

C. E. 438, 439. Elements of Structures. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 322. 

Required of seniors in General Engineering, elective for others. 

Stress analyses and designs of footings, columns, beams, floor systems and 
roof trusses. Estimating quantities and costs of comparative designs. Lrec- 
ture Notes. Mr. 

C. E. 442. Railroad Economics. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite: C. E. 223, E. M. 
311. 

Economics of railroad location; construction, maintenance and operation; 
betterment and valuation surveys. Raymond, Elements of Railroad Engi- 
neering. Mr. Mann. 



[Civil Engineering] 191 

C. E. 443. Hydraulic Structures. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Application of the fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics to problems in Hydrau- 
lic Engineering; flow in pipes, in canals and natural water courses; design 
of locks and dams for navigation; flood control and power development; 
theory of design, installation and operation of pumps and hydraulic motors. 

Mr. Riddick. 

C. E. 449. Hydrology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

Elective for seniors in Engineering. 

The study of the science of the occurrence, distribution and use of water 
upon the earth with particular reference to North Carolina, including pre- 
cipitation, evaporation, transpiration, seepage, ninofl? and stream floir. 
Meyer, Elements of Hydrology. Mr. Van Leer. 

C. E. 453. Applied Astronomy. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: C. E. 310. 

Required of seniors in C. E. and H. E. 

The application of astronomy in determining latitude, azimuth, longitude 
and time; astronomical observations with transit and sextant; reduction of 
observations. One credit given for observations. Hosmer, Applied As- 
tronomy. Mr. Bramer. 

C. E. 461, 462, 463. Construction Engineering II. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 361-2-3. 
Required of seniors in Constr. E. 

Study of construction of reinforced concrete and steel framed structures. 
Estimation, cost analysis, organization, management of construction plants, 
field methods, proposals and contracts. Huntington, Building Consti-uction 
Notes and Trade Literature. Mr. 

C. E. 467. Specifications. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 321. 

Required of seniors in Constr. E. and Areh. E. 

Preparation of specifications and legal documents for building operations, 
Kirby, Elements of Specification Writing. Mr _ 



192 [CiYiL Engineering] 

C. R 468. Construction Equipment 0-3-0 

Prerequisite : E. M. 322. 
Required in Construction Engineering. 

A study of hoists, concrete mixers, excavators, tools, and general equip- 
ment used on construction. Lecture Notes. Mr. 

C. E. 469. Accident Prevention in Construction. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 322. 
Required in Construction Engineering. 

Causes and costs of accidents in construction. A study of methods used in 
accident prevention work. A. G. C. Accident Prevention Manual. 

Mr 

C. E. 481, 4S2. Sanitary Engineering Laboratory. 1-1-0 

Concurrent with C. E. 485, 486. 

Required in Civil Eng^ineering and Sanitary Engineering. 

Laboratory analysis of sewage and sludge. Inspection trips to sewage 
disposal plants. Laboratory analysis for determining quality and safety of 
water. Inspection of waterworks in various cities. Notes. Mr. Johnson. 

C. E. 483. Financing of Sanitary Utilities, 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Math. 303, C. E. 383. 

Required in Sanitary Engineering. 

Rates and service charges, collections, operating cost control, bond issues, 
and budgets. . Mr. Johnson. 

C. E. 485. Waterworks. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 330. C. E. 443. 
Required of seniors in C. E. and San. E. 

Municipal waterworks; quantity; sources of supply, collection; purifica- 
tion, distribution. Babbitt and Doland, Water Supply Engineering. 

Mr. Johnson. 

C. E.486. Sewerage. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites : E. M. 330. C. E. 443. 

Required in C. E. and San. E. 

Separate and combined sewer system; principles of design and construc- 
tion; sewer appurtenances; disposal plants. Metcalf and Eddy, Sewerage 
and Setcage Disposal. Mr. Johnson. 



[Civil Engineering] 193 

C. E. 488. Water Purification. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 330, C. E. 485. 

Required of seniors in San. E. 

Design and operation of water purification plants: sedimentation, coagu- 
lation, filtration, and sterilization of water. Recent treatment processes. 
Inspection trips to various plants. Babbitt and Doland, Water Supply Engi- 
neering. Mr. Johnson. 

C. E. 489. Sewage Disposal. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 486. 

Required of seniors in San. E. 

Design and operation of sewage disposal plants; treatment processes and 
devices; efficiencies and costs of plants; public health, legal and economic 
problems involved. Inspection trips to disposal plants. Metcalf and Eddy, 
Sewerage and Sewage Disposal. Mr. Johnson. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

C. E. 525, 526, 527. Advanced Structural Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 426, 427. 

Analysis and design of fixed, hinged and multispan arches. Complete 
designs of steel and reinforced concrete structures. MacCullough and Thayer, 
Elastic Arch Bridges. Mr. 

C. E. 531, 532, 533. Advanced Structural Theory. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 431-2. 

Stress analysis in continuous frames and arches ; secondary stresses ; wind 
stresses and space frame-work. Analyses by use of Beggs' Deformeter. Suth- 
erland and Bowman, Advanced Structural Theory. Mr. 

C. E, 561, 562, 563. Construction Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 461-2-3. 

Study of recent advancement and developments in Construction. Original 
research. Mr 



C. E. 581, 582, 583. Sanitary Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 383, 488, 489. 

In the first term a study of recent developments and reseai'ch in Sanitary 
Engineering is made from current literature. In the second term a research 
problem is selected and data on the problem is compiled from literature. In 
the third term individual research work is done. Mr. Johnson. 



194 [Economics] 

C. E. 585, 586. Advanced Sewage Disposal. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: C. E. 489. 

Study of sewage, sludge, and industrial wastes, efficiencies obtained by 
different types of disposal plants, treatment processes and their results, 
sludge conditioning, digestion and disposal. Mr. Johnson. 

C. E. 588, 589. Advanced Water Purification. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 488. 

Study of water purification processes, primary and secondary treatments, 
control of tastes and odors, and treatment of colored waters. 

Mr. Johnson. 



ECONOMICS 

Courses 
Econ. 201-2-3. General Economics. 3-3-3 

Required of sophomores in Constr. E., I. E., juniors in Agricultural Teach- 
ing, Cer. E., C. E., E. E., Geol. E., H. E., M. E. and Textile curricula, and of 
seniors in A. E., Chem. E. and San. E. 

A study of economic institutions and general principles governing produc- 
tion and distribution of wealth under the existing economic organization. 
Messrs. Brown, Green, Leager, Moen, Shulenberger, and Strickland. 

Econ. 205. Introduction to Economics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of students in Forestry, Land. Arch., and Ind. Arts. 
It treats of the business aspects and economic organization of society; 
production, distribution, and value of economic goods. Mr. Green. 

Econ. 212. Accounting for Engineers. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

A survey of accounting principles; financial statements, their construc- 
tion, use, and interpretation. Mr. Shulenberger. 

Econ. 301-2-3. Principles of Accounting. 3-3-3 

Required of juniors in Agricultural Economics, Industrial Engineering, 
Textile Manufacturing, and Yam Manufacturing. 

Fundamental principles of theory and practice; interpretation of the struc- 
ture, form, and use of business statements. Mr. Shulenberger. 



[Economics] 195 
E^on. 305. Business Organization. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Highway Engineering. Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 
or 205. 

Forms of business enterprises ; single enterprises, partnerships, joint-stock 
companies and corporations, and principles of business management. 

Mr. Green. 

Econ. 307. Business Law. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Engineering. 

Sources of law, fields of law, contracts, agency, sales, negotiable docu- 
ments, and the law as it controls business transactions. 

Messrs. Green and Strickland. 

Econ. 308. Advanced Business Law. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 307. 

A continuation of Economics 307, including bailments, suretyship, real 
property and corporations, with some attention to recent developments in 
State and Federal Law. Mr. Green. 

Econ. 311-2-3. Marketing Methods and Sales Management. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

Marketing functions, agencies, systems, retailing, and marketing analysis; 
problems in marketing; elements of sales management. Mr. Moen. 

Econ. 315. Advertising. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

Principles of advertising. Mr. Moen. 

Econ. 318. Money and Credit. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

The functions, history and development of money and credit; contemporary 
policies and relation to prices; interrelations of money and credit in banks 
and financial institutions. Mr. Moen. 

£^on. 319. Modern Banking. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

Origin and development of banking in the United States; functions and 
operations of the modern bank; banking laws; Federal Reserve System. 

Mr. Moen. 



196 [Economics] 

Econ. 320. Corporation Finance. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

Raising and spending of funds and standards of control. Mr. Moen. 

Econ. 325-6, Industrial Management. 3-3-0 

Required of seniors in Textile Engineering; elective for all others. 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

General principles and techniques of modem scientific management. The 
organization, plant design, industrial equipment, purchasing, inventories, 
production planning, motion and time study, wage incentive, budgets. Prac- 
tical application to the textile industry. Mr. Miller. 

Econ. 331. Labor Problems. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

An economic approach to labor problems, covering such topics as insecurity, 
wages, hours, working conditions, substandard workers, and legislation aim- 
ed at correcting existing evils. Mr. Strickland. 

Econ. 332. Industrial Relations. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

History, organization, activities, and policies of organized labor. Legral 
aspects, recent developments. Mr. Miller. 

Econ. 333. Personnel Management. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of Textile seniors ; elective for all others. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

Executive development, adjustment to superiors and subordinates; em- 
ployee selection, training, working conditions, morale, conference technique, 
research, public relations ; cases involving practical situations. Mr. Miller. 

Econ. 335. Time Study. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

Analysis of shop operation into elements, and the determination of the 
time for each element; emphasis on factors affecting job specification, and 
wage rate setting. Mr. Miller. 



[Economics] 197 

Econ. Ex. 337. Personal and Executive Development. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201- or 205 or Psych. 200. 

Self management — physical surroundings, work habits, psychological and 
physiological factors. Mental efficiency — desirable thought habits, emotions 
and attitudes toward work, associates. Leadership — necessary qualifications 
for the executive and how to develop them. Mr. Miller. 



Econ. 340. Transportation Problems. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

The economic aspects of transportation facilities provided by the rail- 
roads, highways, and air and water transportation agencies. Special atten- 
tion to principles and problems of rate making, operation, management, 
valuation, coordination and government regulation. Mr. Strickland. 

Econ. 401. Advanced Accounting. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 301-2-3. 

Problems of asset valuation such as depreciation, replacements, amortiza- 
tion, etc. found in all types of business organizations. Mr. Shulenberger. 

Econ. 404-5. Principles of Cost Accounting. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite : Econ. 301-2-3. 
Cost finding, materials costs, labor costs, overhead costs, etc. 

Mr. Shulenberger. 

Econ. 408. Survey of Statistical Methods. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry and Agricultural Economics. 

Elective for all others. 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

Methods of describing quantitative data ; collection and methods of analysis 
of statistical material ; use of charts and graphs for presenting numeral facts 
ex. production data, ratio charts, etc. Mr. Leager 

Econ. 409. Statistical Technique. 0-3-0 

Required of Juniors in Agricultural Economics. 

Prerequisite: Econ. 408. 

The problem of estimation, correlation (i. e., the measurement of relation- 
ship between variables) simple linear and non-linear forms; normal curve 
and probable error; methods of compiling. Mr. Leager. 



198 [Economics] 

Econ. 414. International Economic Relations. 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

Backgrounds and some newer developments in international economics, with 
special emphasis on the position of the United States in world trade. 

Mr, Green. 

Econ. 415. Investment Problems and Policies. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3 or 205. 

Different types of investments and methods of judging them. Managing 
personal finances. Mr. Moen. 

Econ. 416. Public Finance and Taxation. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

Classes of income and expenditure; incidence of different classes of taxes. 

Mr. Moen. 

Econ. 418. Principles of Insurance. 0-0-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

Risk as an element of all agricultural and industrial actiNnty. Such risks as 
can be covered by insurance are discussed, with the appropriate form of in- 
surance, e.g., employer's liability, w^orkmen's compensation, fire, life, and 
other forms. Mr. Shulenberger. 

Econ. 420. Public Utility Regulation. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 201-2-3. 

A critical examination of the problem of public utility regulation, includ- 
ing the problems of valuation, rate making, the holding company, public vs. 
private ownership, security regulations, and related issues. Emphasis is 
placed upon recent developments. Does not include the railroads. 

Mr. Strickland. 

Econ. 501. Advanced Economic Theory. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eighteen (18) term credits in Economics. 
Recent and current economic theory; principal schools of economists; 
theory of prices under the system of free enterprise. Mr. 

Econ. 502. History of Economic Doctrines. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 501. 

History of economic doctrines from the Mercantilists to the period of 
Ricardo. Mr 



[Education] 199 

EDUCATION: TEACHER TRAINING 

For description of summer school (s) courses see Summer School Bulletin. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Ed. 103. Occupations. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Elective. Required in Occupational Information and Guidance. Elective for 
others. 

A comprehensive view of the field of occupations, supplying facts which 
young men are entitled to have in deciding upon their life work. The work 
will consist of readings, reports, discussions, and lectures by the instructors 
of the course and representatives of various occupations. Mr. Boshart. 

Ed. 106. Industrial Arts. 3-3-3 

Required in Industrial Arts. 

Lectures, laboratory work, and visitations. Emphasis on wood, metal, elec- 
trical, and printing shop work as meeting needs of general shop teaching. 
Required as major or minor in Industrial Arts Education. Mr. Boshart. 

Ind. Ed. 206 (a-b). Elements of Sheet Metal Work. 3-3-0 

Required in Industrial Arts, elective for others. 

The work of this course deals with the fundamentals of sheet metal con- 
struction in its more general forms. The first division deals with the more 
elementary work as taught in the junior high school shops. The second 
division is a continuation of the first dealing with the development of patterns 
for hand and machine operations. Mr. 

Ind. Ed. 208 (a-b). Elements of Carpentry. 3-3-0 

Required in Industrial Arts, elective for others. 

A course giving the principles and practices of wood construction as used 
in the various forms of wooden structures. The work will consist of lajring out 
of elements for floors, walls, doors, and windows, stairways, and roofs to- 
gether with the more general types of finished work. Mr 

Ind. Ed. 210 (a-b-c). Elements of Printing. 3-3-3 

Required in Industrial Arts, elective for others. 

This course deals with the elementary problems of printing and has as a 
purpose the acquainting of individuals with a better understanding of fine 
printing and its uses. Projects illustrating the principles will be suitable for 
junior and senior high school pupils. 



200 [Education] 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 303 (a-b). Educational Psychology. 3-3-0 

Required of students in Education; elective for others. 

The meaning of education, child development, problems of adjustment and 
educational guidance; problems of learning, motivation, interests, and the 
measurement of educational efficiency, Mr. — 

Ed. 308. Visual Aids. 0-0-3 

Required of students in Education. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

Methods and technique of visual instruction; lettering; statistical illus- 
trating; chart, graph, and poster-making; photography; lantern-slide mak- 
ing; projector operation, care and use. Designed for teachers and extension 
workers. Mr. Armstrong. 

Ed. 326. Shop Planning and Equipment. 3-0-0 

Making plans for a convenient shop, methods of checking tools, shop layouts, 
safety devices, and the selection of tools and machinery. Mr. Smith. 

Ed. 332. Project Design, A, B. 3-3-0 

Required in Industrial Arts. Prerequisite: M. E. 105, 106, and 107. 

The designing of projects suitable for the general industrial arts labora- 
tory of the junior and senior high school or specialized class work. Suitable 
materials, types of construction, and utility of projects v?ill be considered. 

Mr. Boshart. 

Ed. 344. Problems in Secondary Education. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors preparing to teach industrial subjects. 

Prerequisite: Ed. 303 and six other credits in Education. 

Deals with the problems of secondary education, with special reference to 
the relationships of industrial subjects with the other elements of the pro- 
gram.; basic principles, historical perspective; and types of teaching. 

Mr. Boshart. 

Ed. 361. Organization of Teaching 3Iaterials. 3-3-3 

Required of those intending to teach industrial subjects and those who 
because of trade experience desire to teach trade subjects. Prerequisite: 
Ed. 303, and six other credits in Education. 

This course deals with analysis of trades and jobs to determine teaching 
units. These are to be arranged in teaching sequence with related subject 
matter, thus developing experience in analysis, course making and lesson 
planning. Mr. Boshart, Mr. Smith. 



[Education] 201 

Ed. 406. Principles of Teaching. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. Prerequisite: Ed. 303. 
Principles of teaching related to job of teaching vocational agriculture; 
motivation, directing study, teaching technique, lesson planning. Mr. Cook. 

Ed. 407. Methods of Teaching Agriculture. 5-0-0 

Required of students in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 
308, or equivalents, and at least 12 credits in Agriculture. 

Organization of subject matter; teaching techniques; supervised practice; 
textbooks and reference material; Future Farmers of America; room arrange- 
ment and equipment. Mr. Cook. 

Ed. 408. Observation and Directed Teaching. 0-5-0 

Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 406, 407, and at least 
12 credits in Agriculture. 

Observation and teaching vocational agriculture under supervision, par- 
ticipation in the varied activities of the teacher of vactional agriculture. 

Staff in Agricultural Education. 

Ed. 411. Evening Classes and Community Work. 0-5-0 

Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. Prerequisite: Ed. 308, 406, 407, and at least 
12 credits in Agriculture. 

Community activities of teachers of vocational agriculture, organization 
and teaching evening and part-time classes. Mr. Cook. 

Ed. 412. Materials and Methods in Teaching Agriculture. 0-5-0 

Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 406, 407, and 12 
credits in Agriculture. 

Use of illustrative and actual materials in teaching vocational agriculture; 
collection and preservation of specimens; chart making; practice in use of 
materials in directed teaching. Mr. Armstrong. 

Ed. 416. Local Survey; Planning a Program. 0-3-0 

A course designed to teach methods of surveys of local occupations, and upon 
the findings plan a suitable program of Industrial Education. Mr. Smith. 

Ed. 420. Vocational Guidance. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of students in Industrial Arts and Occupational Information; 
elective for others. Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 344, or equivalent. 

The course in vocational guidance is intended to give emphasis to the place 
of guidance in the school program. It treats of the development of educational 
and vocational g^uidance, its relation to personnel work, principles and prac- 
tices of guidance and emplojmient, child-labor legislation, and forms and 
records for school use. Mr. Boshart. 



202 [Education] 

Ed. s421. Organization of Related Study Materials. 

Ed. 422. Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in Industrial Arts and those preparing to teach voca- 
tional classes in trades and industries. Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 344, and 326. 

The basic principles of teaching in the classroom or shop. Intended for 
those who are teaching or preparing to teach shop and drawing courses. 
Emphasis will be placed on arrangement of materials, lesson planning, and 
conduct of class work. Mr. Boshart and Mr. Smith. 

Ed. 423. Methods of Teaching Occupations. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors expecting to teach occupational information and guid- 
ance and elective for others who are interested. Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 
344, and 326. 

The basic principles of teaching occupational information and g^uidance. 
Emphasis will be placed on the selection and preparation of materials, the 
literature available, and methods of presentation. 

Mr. Boshart and Mr. Smith. 

Ed. 424. Occupational Studies. 0-0-3 

Required of students of Industrial Arts and elective for others. Pre- 
requisite: Ed. 420 and 6 additional hours in Education. 

A comprehensive study of the field of occupations. The work will consist 
of readings, reports, discussions, lectures, and visitations. Analysis of leading 
occupations will be made with the idea of selecting and preparing teaching 
units for related subject matter courses. Mr. Boshart. 

Ed. 426. Secondary Education in Agriculture. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Ed. 303 and 6 other credits in Education. 

School organization in the United States with special reference to agricul- 
tural education, curricula; elimination; movements in guidance and char- 
acter education, with particular reference to agricultural teaching. 

Mr. Cook. 

Ed. 427. Principles of Industrial Education. 0-3-0 

The philosophy of industrial education, a review of Federal and State legis- 
lation pertaining to industrial education. The different kinds of schools, such 
as part-time, all-day trade, general industrial, and evening school. Mr. Smith. 

Ed. s428. Diversified Occupations. 3 credits 



[Education] 203 

Ed. 433. Field Work in Secondary Education. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors preparing to teach Industrial subjects. Prerequisite: 
Ed. 326, Ed. 344. 

A study of the physical equipment types of instruction, and character of 
work being observed. Work will consist of visits, reports, and conferences. 

Mr. Boshart. 

Ed. 440. Vocational Education. 0-3-0 

Required of students in Industrial Arts. Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 344, and 
6 additional credits in Education. 

This course dealing with the problems of vocational education is intended 
to give acquaintance with its underlying philosophy, its place in our education, 
the laws governing it, and the prevailing practices and administration. It is 
of particular interest to administrators and teachers who have or expect to 
have to do with the direction of educational work in Agriculture, Homemak- 
ing, Industry, and Commerce. It deals with all-day, evening, part-time, and 
general continuation class work. Mr. Boshart, Mr. Smith. 

Ed. 444. Observation and Directed Teaching of Industrial 

Subjects. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Required of students who desire an "A" grade certificate to teach in North 
Carolina high schools. Prerequisite: Ed. 326, 422, 433. 

Observation of and active participation in phases of teacher activity; em- 
phasis on development of systematic procedure and ability to work independ- 
ently with students. Students will work in actual situations under super- 
vision. Mr. Boshart, Mr. Smith. 

Ed. sEx. 452. Theory of Industrial Arts. 3 credits 

Ed. sEx. 454. Practical Arts Problems. 3 credits 

Ed. sEx. 455. Art Studies in Industrial Art Problems. 1 \^ or 3 credits 

Ed. 457. The Problems of the General and Unit Shops. 3-0-0 

Intended for those who are teaching or expect to teach shop work and 
drawing. Its purpose is to acquaint students with the possibilities of the 
general shop as compared with those of the unit shop and to aid in setting 
up procedures for each type of shop under conditions where they can best 
function. Those taking this course should take parallel courses in shop 
instruction unless they have had considerable experience. Problems of organ- 
ization, equipment, instruction sheets and their uses, and courses of study will 
be considered. Mr. Boshart. 



204 [Education] 

Ed. 460. Special Problems in Teaching Agriculture. 0-3-0 

A critical survey of the program of teaching vocational agriculture with 
emphasis on the course of study. It will include the individual problem of the 
students in the preparation of a course of study and teaching plans for a 
specific situation. Mr. Cook and Staff. 

Ed.461(a-b). Trends in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 3 or 6 credits 

Prerequisites: 18 credits in Education, including 5 in Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Newer procedures in Teaching Vocational Agrriculture, the problems of the 
out-of-school farm youth, evening class instruction and the F. F. A. 

Staff in Agricultural Education. 

Ed. 462 (a-b). Coarse of Study Problems. 3 or 6 credits 

Prerequisites: 18 credits in Education, including 5 in Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Selection and organization of subject matter in Vocational Apiculture, 
supervised practice. Staff in Agricultural Education. 

Ed. 463 (a-b). Guidance and Individual Instruction. 3 or 6 credits 

Prerequisites: 18 credits in Education, including 5 in A^icultural Edu- 
cation. 

Individualized instruction applied to Vocational Agrriculture. Study of the 
agricultural occupations, gfuidance and counseling with special reference to 
pupils in Vocational Agriculture. Staff in Agricultural Education. 

Ed. 46S. Measurements in Educational Psychology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Six credits in Psychologj-, supplemented by credits in related 
fields. 

An introduction to mental and educational testing. A study will be made of 
the various types of mental and educational tests now in use. A critical 
analysis is made of the methods of devising such tests and the application 
of the results to the various educational activities. Mr. McGehee. 

Ed. 469. Psychological Techniques in Student Counceling. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite : 9 credits in psychology or education. 

Diagnostic and remedial techniques used in counseling students with edu- 
cational, vocational, and personal-emotional problems are presented and a 
careful analysis of these techniques made. Mr. McGehee. 



[Education] 205 

Ed. 476. Psychologry of Adolescence. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite : Ed. 303 and 6 credits in Education or Psychology. 

A study of the nature, growth, social development, and interests of adoles- 
cent boys and girls. Especially designed for those concerned with the organ- 
ization and direction of group activities for boys and g^irls in rural and 
industrial centers. Mr 

Ed, 481. Character Education. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Twelve credits in Education. 

Nature of the problem, needs for character training, present development, 
agencies responsible, theories of character development, results of investiga- 
tions, materials, and methods for teachers. Mr. Cook. 

Ed. 503. Problems in Educational Psychology. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credits in Education and Psychology. 

The nature, causes, and measurements of individual differences in relation 
to problems of education; the principles of learning, motivation and condi- 
tions of educational improvement; the application of psychological principles 
to mental and educational measurements. Mr 



Ed. 510. Administration and Supervision of Vocational Eklucation. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 420, 508, and 344. 

Administration and supervisory problems of vocational work. Considers 
the practices and policies of Federal and State officers, organizations and 
administration of city and consolidated systems, and individual school depart- 
ments for Vocational Education. For graduate students majoring in Educa- 
tion. Mr. Boshart. 



Ed. 512. Occupational Counseling. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Ed. 420, 508, or equivalent. 

This course is intended for teachers of experience and those interested in 
the problems of guidance in school and life. Attention is given to group and 
individual counseling as it may be applied to the junior and senior high 
schools, colleges or placement offices, and to the procedures of conducting 
interviews and conferences. Information concerning occupational material 
vdll be organized, evaluated, and applied to type cases. The relation to 
personnel work will be considered as the functions of school and industry are 
studied. Mr. Boshart. 



206 [Electrical Engineering] 

Ed. 516. Problems in Agricultural Teaching. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Ed. 303, 407, and at least 12 other credits in Education and 
Agriculture. Experience in Agricultural Teaching will be accepted in lieu 
of Ed, 407. 

Investigations, reports, and a critical evaluation of present practices with 
constructive remedies; course adapted to individual interests and needs. 

Staff in Agricultural Education. 

Ed. 517. Principles of Agricultural Education. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credits in Education and Agriculture. Permission 
to register. 

Principles and practices in Agricultural Education in the light of educa- 
tional research and of changring rural conditions. Mr. Cook. 

Ed. 520. Agricultural Education Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credits in Education. 

A critical review of current articles and books of interest to students of 
Agricultural Education. Staff. 



Ed. 521. Research in Education. 3-3-3 

The student will make a study of one or more research problems under 
the supervision of some member of the staff of the School of Education. The 
course will be selected on the recommendation of the member of the faculty 
with whom the student plans to carry on the study. Staff. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

E. E. 113. Electric Shop. 0-0-3 

A course offered for students in Vocational Education. Practical electrical 
problems suitable for secondary school; electrical shop equipment. 
Credit is allowed only for students in the Department of Education. 

Mr. Winkler. 

E. E. 201, 202. Electrical Engineering Fundamentals. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Required of sophomores in E. E. Concurrent with Phys. 201, 202, 203. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 102. 

Fundamental laws of electric, magnetic and dielectric circuits; problem 
drill. Timbie and Bush, Principles of Electrical Engineering. Mr. Browne. 



[Electrical Engineering] 207 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 
E. E. 301, 302, 303. Electrical Engineering. 3-3-3 

Required of juniors in E. E. Prerequisite: E. E. 202. 

Principles, performances and characteristics of direct current apparatus, 
electronics, theory of periodic currents, alternating current circuits and sys- 
tems. Timbie and Bush, Principles of Electrical Engineering. Kloeflfler, 
Brenneman and Kerchner, Direct Current Machinery. Bryant and Correll, 
A. C. Circuits. Mr. Fouraker, Mr. Pearsall. 

E. K 305, 306, 307. Electrical Engineering Problems. 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in E. E. Concurrent with E. E. 301, 302, 303. 
Supervised problem drill. Mr. Fouraker. 

E. K 311, 312, 313. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. 2-2-2 

Required of juniors in E. E. Concurrent with E. E. 301, 302, 303. 

A laboratory course coordinated with E. E. 301. Ricker and Tucker, 
Electrical Engineering Laboratory Experitnents. 
Mr. Lear, Mr. Pearsall, Mr. Keever, Mr. Brown, Mr. Glenn, Mr. Winkler. 

E. E. 320, 321. Elements of Electrical Engineering I. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Required of juniors in Chem E., C. E., H. E., Constr. E., and San E., and 
of seniors in Cer. E., Geol. E., and Min. E., and in Industrial Management. 
Prerequisites: Math. 202, Phys. 203. 

Principles, characteristics and operation of electric equipment and systems. 
Daws, Industrial Electricity. 

Mr. Lear, Mr. Pearsall, Mr. Glenn, Mr. Winkler. 

E. E. 331, 332, 333. Elements of Electrical Engineering II. 4-4-4 

Required of seniors in M. E., and Gen. E. and of juniors in Industrial 
Engineering. Prerequisites: Math. 202, Phys. 203. 

Principles, characteristics, and operation of electric equipment. Loew, 
Direct and Alternating currents. 

Mr, Keever, Mr. Pearsall, Mr. Glenn, Mr. Winkler. 

E. E. 343. Electrical Equipment of Buildings. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Construction Engineering and seniors in Architec- 
tural Engineering. Prerequisite: Phys. 203. 

Wiring of buildings for light and power; selection of motors and lighting 
equipment Moyer and Wostrel, Industrial Electricity and Wiring. 

Mr. Lear, Mr. Winkler. 



208 [Electrical Engineering] 

Coarses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 433. Electric Distribution. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in E. E. Prerequisite: E. E. 401. 

Low voltage distribution systems. Mr. Keever. 

E. E. 401, 402. Alternating Current Machinery. 4-4-0 

Required of seniors in E. E. Prerequisite: E. E. 303. 

Principles and characteristics of alternating current machinery. Bryant 
and Johnson, Alternating Current Machinery. ... Mr. Fouraker, Mr. Keever. 

E. E. 411, 412, 413. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in E. E. Concurrent with E. E. 401, 402, 403. 
A laboratory course coordinated with classroom work. Ricker and Tucker, 
Electrical Engineering Laboratory Experiments. 

Mr. Keever, Mr. Pearsall, Mr. Glenn, Mr. Winkler. 

E. E. 403. Electric Transmission. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: E. E. 402. 

Theory and characteristics of electric circuits for high tension transmission 
of power. Bryant and Correll, Alternating Current Machinery. 

Mr. Fouraker, Mr. Keever. 

E. K 421, 422, 423. Electric Power Applications (Optional with 

E. E. 425, 426, 427). 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: E. E. 303, 307. 

Selection of electrical equipment for industrial applications, control equip- 
ment; electric traction, electric power plants. Mr. Browne. 

E. E. 425, 426, 427. Electric Communication (Optional with 

E. E. 421, 422, 423). 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: E. E. 303, 307. 

Circuits and equipment for wire communication ; radio and carrier current 
systems. Everitt, Comnninication Engineering. Mr. Fouraker, Mr. Glenn. 

E. E. 437. Illumination. 0-0-8 

Required of seniors in E. E. Prerequisite: E. E. 303, 307, 
Characteristics of electric lamps; electric lighting systems. Kunerth, 
Textbook of Illumination. Mr. Lear. 



[Electrical Engineering] 209 
E, E. 453. Power Network Calculations. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. E. 402. 

The method of symmetrical components applied to fault calculation in 
power system networks. Equivalent impedances of short and long lines with 
and without terminal grounding and for ground wires, transformer banks, 
synchronous machines, asynchronous machines. Syntheses of complete sys- 
tems, with calculations of fault currents for different types of faults. 

Mr. Brown. 

E. E. 441, 442, 443. Electrical Measurements in Industry. 3.3.3 

Prerequisite; E. E. 303 or E. E. 322 or E. E. 333. 

Theory and practice of electrical measurements in industry. Instruments 
and meters, indicating, recording, and integrating types; bridges; poten- 
tiometers; thermo-couples; resistance pyrometers; electro-optical pyrometers; 
photo-electric cells and tubes; amplifiers; relays; strobo-scopes; humidity 
meters; electrical pressure gauges. A discussion of industrial applications 
and methods. n, t, 

Mr. Brown. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

E. E. 501, 502, 503. Fundamental Principles in Electrical 

Engineering. g g ^ 

Prerequisite: E. E. 433, 402. 

Review of fundamentals in electrical circuit theory; operational calculus 
methods, transients in electrical, mechanical, and thermal circuits; transients 

in non-linear circuits ; point-by-point solutions ; power transmission ; stability : 
control problems and design of control equipment; special applications. 

Mr. Fouraker and Mr. Brown. 
E. E. 505, 506. 507. Electrical Engineering Seminar. LM 

Prerequisite: Graduation in E. E. 

A series of papers and conferences of junior instruction staff and students 
who are candidates for advanced degrees in electrical engineering, held for 
the purpose of reviewing the developments in electrical engineering fields of 
practice and research. Special attention to be given to the methods of col- 
lecting, analyzing, and presenting data in a comprehensive manner. 

Mr, Browne, Mr. Brown. 

E. R 521, 522, 523. Engineering Electronics. 4.4.4 

Prerequisite: Graduation in E. E. 

r J!r*''" *"^r« '"^ industry, including studies of various types of tubes as 
rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators, control devices, photo-electric devices, oscil- 



210 [Engineering Mechanics] 

loscopes, etc. Electro-kinetic theory of g-ases, potential distribution, and 
characteristics of different types of conduction studied in detail. Associated 
circuits. This course includes coordinated laboratory experiments. 

Mr. Brown. 



E. E. 531, 532, 533. Illumination Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Graduation in E. E. 

Fundamental theory combined with broad survey of field, followed by 
detailed treatment of point sources, surface radiation, symmetric and asym- 
metric distribution ; applications. The photo-chemical theory of vision, visual 
measurements, applications to design. Mr. Brown. 



K E. 550. Electrical Engineering Research. 9 credits 

Acceptance as candidate for Master's Degree. 

Indi\-idual research in field of Electrical Engineering for the purpose of 
extending knowledge. Students may elect to conduct their research along 
technical electrical engineering lines, or in some allied field such as economics 
of engineering, mathematical methods, etc. Report shall be in form of 
Master's thesis. Mr. Browne, Mr. Brown. 



ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

E. M. 301. Engineering Mechanics (Abridged). 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of students in Cer. E., Ch. E., Geol. E., and I. E. Also required of 
students in A^. Eng. Prerequisite: Math. 202. Co-requisites: Math 303 
and Phys. 201. 

Statics: Concurrent, parallel and non-concurrent force systems; the de- 
termination of their resultants and conditions of equilibrium. Friction, cen- 
troids and moments of inertia. Poorman, Applied Mechanics. 

Messrs, Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 

E. M. 302. Engineering Mechanics (Abridged). 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of students in Cer. E., Ch. E., Geol. E., and I. E. Also required of 
students in Agr. Eng. Prerequisites: E. M. 301 and Math. 303. 

Kinematics : The motion of bodies without considering the manner in which 
influencing factors affect the motion. Kinetics: The motion of bodies as 
affected by unbalanced forces. Poorman, Applied Mechanics. 

Messrs. Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 



[Engineering Mechanics] 211 

E. M. 311. Engineering Mechanics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of all students in Engineering except Cer. E., Ch. E., Geol. E., and 
I. E, Prerequisite: Math. 201. Co-requisites: Math. 202 and Phys. 201. 

Statics and Friction: Study of concurrent, parallel and non-concurrent 
systems of both coplaner and non-coplaner forces. The application of statics 
to the solution of fundamental engineering problems, including statical fric- 
tion. Seely and Ensign, Analytical Mechanics for Engineers. 

Messrs. Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 

E. M. 312. Engineering Mechanics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of all students in Engineering except Cer. E., Ch. E., Geol. E., and 
I. E. Prerequisites: E. M. 311 and Math. 202. Co-requisites: Math. 303. 

Kinematics, centroids and moments of inertia. Seely and Ensign, Analytical 
Mechnnics for Engineers. Messrs. Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 

E. M. 313. Engineering Mechanics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of all students in Engineering except Cer. E., Ch. E., Geol. E., and 
I. E. Prerequisites: E. M. 312 and Math. 303. 

Kinetics: The motions of particles of rigid bodies as they are affected by 
the action of unbalanced forces. The Newtonian laws of motion, work and 
energj', power, impulse and momentum are studied and their applications to 
special engineering problems are illustrated. Seely and Ensign, Anulytical 
Mechanics for Engineers. Messrs. Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 

E. M. 320. Strength of Materials (Abridged). 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of Engineering students in Chem. E., E. E., and Ind. E. Also 
required of students in Agr. Eng. Prerequisites: E. M. 302 or E. M. 312, 
Math. 303. 

A study of the stresses and strains in engineering materials. The study 
includes tension, compression, shear and torsion; also bending moments and 
shear in beams. The fibre stresses in simple beams and their distribution 
throughout the cross section are analyzed. An elementary conception of the 
deflection of beams and working principles for the design of columns are 
discussed. Seely, Resistance of Materials. 

Messrs. Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 

E. M. 321. Strength of Materials. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of all students in Engineering except Chem. E., E. E., Geol. E., 
and Ind. E. Prerequisites: E. M. 302 or E. M. 312, and Math. 303, Co- 
requisite: E. M. 313. 

A study of the stresses and strains in engineering materials. The study 
includes tension, compression, shear, and torsion, with emphasis on the appli- 



212 [Engineering Mechanics] 

cations to engineering structures. Bending moments and shear in simple 
beams. The fibre stresses in beams and their distribution throughout the 
cross section are studied in detail. Timoshenko and McCullough, Elements of 
Strength of Materials. Messrs. Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 

E. M. 322. Strength of Materials. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of all students in Engineering except Chem. E., E. E., Geol. E., 
and Ind. E. Prerequisite: E. M. 321. 

A continuation of E. M. 321. Various methods are studied for finding the 
deflection of beams. The determination of stresses in statically indeterminate 
beams; the study of columns. Combined stresses. Timoshenko and McCul- 
lough, Elements of Strength of Materials. 

Messrs. Smith, Conner, Feltner, and Massey. 

E. M. 330. Fluid Mechanics. 3-0-0, 0-3-0, or 0-0-3 

Required of students in Ch. E., C. E., E. E., Geo. E., M. E. Prerequisites: 
E. M. 302 or E. M. 313. 

A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics of fluids. The course 
includes properties of fluids; intensity of pressure; hydrostatic pressure on 
areas; applications of hydrostatics; kinematics of fluid flow; dynamics of 
fluid flow; applications of hydrokinetics ; friction losses in pipes; flow through 
pipes; dynamic forces. Daugherty: Hydraulics. 

Messrs. Conner, Riddick, and Massey. 

E. M. 331. Hydraulics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of students in E. E. and M. E. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

The application of the principles of fluid mechanics to hydraulic pumping 
and power machinery. The study includes impulse and reaction type turbines; 
turbine laws and factors ; water power plants ; pumping machinery, recipro- 
cating and centrifugal pumps; efficiency, capacity, and selection of pumps. 
Daugherty: Hydraulics, and Notes. 

Messrs. Conner, Riddick, and Massey. 

E. M. 332. Hydraulics. 0-8-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

The application of the principles of fluid mechanics to various hydraulic 
structures and measuring devices. The study includes dams, bouyant force 
and flotation; weirs, orifices, gates; forces exerted by fluids, flow in open 
channels; models of open channel flow; flow in pipe lines. Daugherty: 
Hydraulics, and Notes. 

Messrs, Conner, Riddick, and Massey. 



[Engineering Mechanics] 213 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. M. 401. Advanced Strength of Materials. 3-0-0 

Elective for Engineering seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: 
E. M. 320 or E. M. 322. 

Detailed study of the deflections of beams, special types of beams, and 
statically indeterminate systems. Various methods of studying the topics 
will be discussed and compared. Timoshenko, Strength of Materials. 

Mr. Smith. 

E. M. 402. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. 0-3-0 

Elective for Engineering seniors and graduates. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

A study of more advanced problems than taken up in E. M. 330. Kine- 
matics of fluid flow, conformal mapping, laminar and turbulent flow, the 
boundary layer, flow around immersed bodies, closed conduits. Instructor's 
notes and selected references. Mr. Conner. 

E. M. 404. Vibration Problems. 0-0-3 

Elective for Engineering seniors and graduate students. 

♦Prerequisites: E. M. 320 or 322, Math. 431a or 431b. 

Fundamental vibratory systems of one degree of freedom. Balancing of 
rotating systems, calculation of critical speeds of rotating shafts ; vibrating 
instruments. Systems of several degrees of freedom. Den Hartog, Mechani- 
cal Vibrations. Mr. Conner. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

E. M. 501. Advanced Strength of Materials. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 401, Math. 431a or 431b. 

A study of more advanced problems than taken up in E. M. 320 or E. M. 
322. Energy of strain, Castigliano's Theorem, impact, Maxwell's Theorem, 
Mohrs circle. Timoshenko, Strength of Materials. Mr, Smith. 

E. M. 502. Applied Elasticity. 0-3-0 

*Prerequisites: E. M. 401, Math. 431a or 431b. 

Stress analysis of machine parts, stress concentration, stress in curved bars, 
torsion and bending in prismatical bars. Stress in thick-walled cylinders! 
fly wheels, shrink fits. Timoshenko, Streiigth of Materials. Mr. Smith. 

• Math. 411, 412 are desirable. 



214 [English] 

K M. 503. Applied Elasticity. 0-0-3 

♦Prerequisites: E. M. 502, Math, 431a or 431b. 

Thin bars, plates and slabs in compression, tension, or combined compres- 
sion and tension. Built-up columns. Timoshenko, Strength of Materials. 

Mr. Smith. 



E. M. 505. Research in Strength of Materials. 
Special problems and investigations. 



3-3-3 
Mr. Smith. 



•E. M. 506. Research in Mechanical Vibrations. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 404. 

Special problems and investigrations. 



3-3-3 



Mr. Conner. 



*E. M. 507. Research in Fluid Mechanics. 

Prerequisites: E. M. 402. 

Special problems and investigations. 



3-3-3 



Mr. Conner. 



ENGLISH 

Freshman English 
Eng. 101, 102, 103. Composition. 



3-3-3 



Required of all freshmen. 

The course is designed to eliminate defects in composition and to develop 
such proficiencj' as the student has already attained. Reading and analysis 
of literary types, with emphasis upon both composition and appreciation; 
directed supplementary reading collateral with class study; frequent themes, 
exercises, and reports; conferences. Staff. 



Writing: 



Eng. 211. Business English. 



3 or 3 or 3 



Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Practical application of the principles of composition; types of letters; 
form, style, and tone of effective correspondence; intensive word study. Con- 
ferences. Messrs. Wilson and Shelley. 



• Math. 411, 412 &re desirable. 



[English] 215 

Eng. 216. Advanced Article Writing. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103, and 215 or equivalent. 

A continuation of Eng. 215, with intensive practice in writing and criticiz- 
ing non-technical articles. Subjects determined by student's interest. Vo- 
cabulary building; collateral reading. Mr. Wynn. 

Eng. 215. Principles of News and Article Writing. 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Introduction to, and some practice in writing, simple news articles. Empha- 
sis is placed on writing and class criticism of non-technical newspaper and 
magazine articles. Vocabulary building; collateral reading. (Class limited 
to twenty students.) Mr. Wynn. 

Eng. 222. Advanced Composition. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A comprehensive study and practice in original and imaginative composi- 
tion, with emphasis upon the essay, verse, short-story, and the one-act play. 
Class criticism; conferences. Mr. Shelley. 

Eng. 321. Technical Writing I. (For students in Engineering). 3 or 3 or 3 
Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103, 211, 231, and one term of literature. 

Principles of writing engineering reports, articles, and papers for public 
delivery. Readings in essays and technical periodicals. Term papers in library 
research and technical report writing, Mr. Fountain. 

Eng. 323. Technical Writing II. (For students in Agriculture 

and Forestry). 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103, and required sophomore English courses. 
Fundamentals of style in professional writing. Reports, articles, papers. 
Term papers in library research and in professional reports. Mr. Fountain. 

Speech 

Eng. 231. Public Speaking. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Speech organization and effective delivery; extempore speeches; audience 
motivation and use of motivating process ; acquisition of ease before audience. 

Messrs. Paget, Fountain, Wynne. 



216 [English] 

Eng. 236. Parliamentary Practice. 0-2-0 

Not to be counted toward the fulfillment of any requirement in English. 
Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Rules and customs of assemblies, including organization, motions; partici- 
pation in and conduct of meetings; parliamentary strategy. Mr. Paget. 

Eng. 237. Speech Adjustment. 0-0-2 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Poise and pleasing communicative habits in all group contacts; habits of 
speech, posture, action, and language. Mr. Paget. 

Eng. 331. Persuasion. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite : Eng. 231 or equivalent. 

Psychological forces, methods of conciliation, securing and holding atten- 
tion, and winning response; extempore speeches and discussions. 

Mr. Paget. 

Eng. 332. Argumentation and Extemporaneous Speaking. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 231 or equivalent. 

Analysis, brief-drawing and evidence, and methods of proof and refutation; 
fundamentals of conviction ; humanness and f orcef ulness ; extempore speeches, 
debates, and discussions. Mr. Paget. 

Eng. 333. Public Address. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 231 or equivalent. 

Public addresses for special occasions, including announcement, speech of 
introduction, committee-room speech, personal conferences, after-dinner 
speech, speech at professional convention, political speech, college oration, 
formal sales talk. Mr. Paget. 

Literature 
Eng. 261. English Literature I. 3-0-G 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Chief masterpieces of English literature from Beowulf through Shake- 
speare, -with emphasis on social and historical backgrounds. Parallel read- 
ings and papers. Mr. Hartley and Staff. 



[English] 217 

Eng. 262. English Literature II. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102. 103. 

Significant prose and poetry of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries 
with emphasis on the contribution of the two centuries to modern thought' 
Parallel readings and papers. Mr. Hartley and Staff. * 

Eng. 263. English Literature IIL Q.Q_g 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Masterpieces of the nineteenth century, with emphasis on changing liter- 
ary tastes and ideas; the impact of scientific development on thought and 
literature. Parallel readings and papers. Mr. Hartley and Staff. 

Eng. 265. American Literature I. 3 q q 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of outstanding American literary productions in their historical 
setting, from the early colonial period to 1840. Mr. Ladu 

Eng. 266. American Literature II. q o q 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of outstanding American literary productions in their historical 
setting, from 1840 to 1890. ti, j"'""^'** 

Mr. Ladu. 

Eng. 267. American Literature III. ^ ^ o 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of the leading American writers of the present century, with a 
relation of their works to the social background of the period. Mr. Ladu. 

Eng. 271. The English Novel. 3 ^ ^ 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Analysis of representative novels of England and America, chosen to iUus- 
rate the development of the form and to provide a background for appreciat- 
ing the modern novel. ,, ^ „ 

Mr. Lyell. 

Eng. 272. Modern Drama. ^ ^ ^ 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

pr^^ct^onf '^'' ^'^'""'""^ ^'''' '^''"' ^^"^^'"P^'^-^ry English and American 

Mr. Clark. 

Eng. 273. The Development of the Drama. O.Q.g 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

of c^iSh; «XS ""' '"*"""• '"°'' '''^™'-'-='«-. -« interpretation 

Mr. Clark. 



218 [English] 

Eng. 275. Southern Writers. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Important writers, vrith intensive study of Poe, W. G. Simms, Sidney 
Lanier, Joel Chandler Harris, George W. Cable, O. Henry, Ellen Glasgow, 
James Branch Cabell. Mr. Marshall. 

*Eng. 276. English Poetry, 1830-1900. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of major poets writing in an age of scientific progress and social 
change. Emphasis on Browning, Tennyson, and Arnold. Parallel reading 
and papers, Mr. Hartley. 

Eng. 281. Literary Masterpieces. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A background for the enjoyment of literature; an introduction to its appre- 
ciation and criteria. Mr. Harrison. 

Eng. 282. The Short Story. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

An appreciation of the present-day short story through examination of 
development, structure, type, and style; a comprehensive term paper, or its 
equivalent in original short fiction. Mr. Wynne. 

Eng. 283. The Bible as Literature. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102. 103. 

Selected books of the Old and New Testaments (King James Version.) 
as literary and historical documents. Staff. 

Eng. 285. Shakespeare. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

An analysis of principal plays. Reports on parallel readings. Mr. Clark. 

Eng, 286, The Romantic Period. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Representative poems of Gray, Blake, Bums, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, 
Southey, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Mr. Clark. 



• Not offered in 1940-41. 



[Ethics and Religion] 219 

Eng. 287. Modern Biography. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of short modern biographies by representative American and 
British writers; collateral reading in longer biographical works; reports and 
assignments for investigation. Mr. Shelley. 

Eng. 291. The Eighteenth C«ntary. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Chief masterpieces of English literature from Alexander Pope to nine- 
teenth century; collateral reading; reports. Mr. Hartley. 

Eng. 292. Contemporary British Literature, 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

An introduction to chief figures in contemporary British literature: Kip- 
ling, Galsworthy, Wells, Bennett, Conrad. Collateral reading; term paper. 

Mr. Ladu. 

ETHICS AND RELIGION 

Courses 
ReL 301. Introdaction to Religion. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite : Junior or Senior standing. 

Characteristics of the major religious sects of America and brief survey 
of recent trends in religious thought. Mr. Hicks. 

ReL 302. The Life of Jesus. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite : Junior or Senior standing. 

The career of Jesus of Nazareth as recorded in the Sjnoptic Gospels 
and interpreted against the religious, economic, and political background 
of the age in which Jesus lived. Mr. Hicks. 

ReL 303. The Teachings of Jesus. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. 

The ethical and religious teachings of Jesus as recorded in the Synoptic 

Gospels, with special emphasis on the contrast between the teachings of 

Jesus and his contemporaries. Mr. Hicks. 

ReL 304. Comparative Religion. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. 

Brief history, general characteristics, and social significance of the greater 
living religions of the world. Mr. Hicks. 



220 [Field Crops akd Plant Breeding] 

Ethics 405. Social Ethics. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in Religion, Psychology, or Sociology. 
Preview of the ethical codes of the larger professional groups, with analysis 
of the nature, evolution, and significance of moral values. Mr. Hicks. 

Rel. 406. Problems of Religion. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in Religion, Psychology, or Sociology. 
Religious verities in an age of science and the perplexing problems of 
the church in modem times. Mr. Hicks. 

Ethics 407. Ethical Problems of Adolescence. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in Religion, Psychology, or Sociology. 

A study of typical adjustment problems of modem youth, with special 
consideration to changing sex standards and the evolution of new values 
in this connection. Mr. Hicks. 

Rel, 408. Christian Personality in Its Psychological Aspects. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in Religion, Psychology, or Sociologry. 

An analysis of the psychological validity of the principal ethical teaching:s 
of the Sermon on the Mount with emphasis on the relationship of religious 
attitudes and practices to mental and emotional stability and maturity. 

Mr. Hicks. 

Ethics 409. Problems of Marital Adjustment. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite : Six term credits in biologfical or social science. Sections limit- 
ed to 25 students. 

The practical application of pertinent findings of biological and social 
science to personal problems of premarriage and postmarriage adjustment. 
Lectures, discussions, and personal conferences. Mr. Hicks. 

FIELD CROPS AND PLANT BREEDING 

Courses for Undergraduates 
F. C. 201. Cotton. 3-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Textiles. 

Lectures and recitations on the history, botany, and physiology of the cotton 
plant; comparative study of varieties; microscopic studies of the fiber, and a 
study of the physical properties of the fiber as it affects milling quality. 

Mr. Davis. 



[Field Crops and Plant Breeding] 221 

F. C. 202. General Field Crops. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

A standard introductory course. Emphasis is given to the economic produc- 
tion of field crops as used in well-balanced cropping systems. 

Mr. Davis, Mr. Rigney. 

F. C. 212. Cotton Classing I. 0-3-0 

Required of sophomores in Textile Manufacturing, Chemistry and Dyeing, 
and Designing. 

A study of the universal standards of American upland cotton for grade 
and staple. Factors that determine grade, and their relative value. Practice 
consists of classing and stapling from three to five thousand samples of cotton. 

Mr _ 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

F. C. 302. Cereal Crops. 0-3-0 

Required for Field-Crop majors. 

Advanced study of the various factors that should be considered in the 
economic production of corn and small grains. Mr. Middleton, Mr. Rigney. 

F. C. 312. Tobacco Production. 0-3-0 

This course, or F. C. 323, required of students in General Agriculture. 

Lectures and recitations on the history, production, adaptation, type, and 
varieties of tobacco; its cultivation, harvesting, g^rading, and marketing. 
Laboratory consists of variety studies and the grading of tobacco. Mr. Davis. 

F. C. 323. Cotton Production. 0-0-3 

This course, or F. C. 312, required of students in General Agriculture. 

Lectures and recitations on the history, production, adaptation, type, and 
varieties of cotton; its cultivation, harvesting, grading, and marketing. 
Laboratory consists of variety studies, and the classing of cotton lint. 

Mr. Davis. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

F. C. 402. Cotton Classing IL 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors or seniors. 

A study of the universal standards of American upland cotton for grade 
and staple. Factors that determine grade and how to improve them. Prac- 
tice consists of classing from three to five thousand samples of North Caro- 
lina cotton. Mr 



222 [Field Crops and Plant Breeding] 

F. C. 411. Advanced Cotton Classing. 3 or 3 or 8 

Prerequisite: F. C. 212 or 402. For men who expect to become specialists 
in cotton classing. 

This course will prepare men to take the U. S. Civil Service examination 
for cotton classing. Mr 

F. C.441. Seed Judging. 3-0-0 

Advanced study of quality in crop seeds and the standards for seed certifi- 
cation. Arranging and judging of crop exhibits. Mr. Davis, Mr. Rigney. 

F. C. 443. Pastures and Forage Crops. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: F. C. 202. Required of Field Crops, Soils, and Animal Pro- 
duction majors. 

An advanced study of the production and preservation of the principal 
forage crops. Special attention is given to the production and maintenance 
of pastures. Mr. Loworn, Mr. Rigney. 

F. C. 451. Market Grading of Field Crops. 3-0-0 

Required of students in Animal Production. 

A study and application of the Federal Standards for Market grades as 
applied to field crops. Mr. Davis, Mr. Rigney. 

F. C. 461. Taxonomy of Field Crops. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

A study of the origrin, botanical classification, identification, and adaptation 
of the commercially important crops and their varieties ^own in America. 

Mr. Davis, Mr. Rigney. 

F. C. 463. Plant Breeding. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Zool. 411. Required of students in Floriculture, Plant Path- 
ology, Pomologj^ and Vegetable Gardening. 

Lectures, field and laboratory exercises, including methods and principles 
of plant breeding. Mr. Harvey. 

F. C. 472-473. Experimental Methods. 0-3-3 

A study of the development in agricultural experimental work and the 
experimental technique as developed to date by soil-fertility, crop and crop- 
breeding tests and demonstrations. Mr. Rigrney. 



[Forestry] 223 

F. C. 481-482-483. Senior Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite : Twelve credit hours in Field Crops. 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of 
interest to agronomists will be assigned, and reviewed with discussion by 
students and members of the Agronomy Staflf. Staff. 

F. C. 491-492-493. Crop Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite : Twelve credit hours in Field Crops. 

Special problems in various phases of crop investigation. Problems may 
be selected or will be assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent 
and current research. Staflf. 

Courses for Graduates Only 
F. C. 501-502-503. Advanced Cotton Production. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: F. C. 323. 

Advanced study of cotton production problems. Staflf. 

F. C. 511-512-513. Advanced Tobacco Production. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: F. C. 312 and ten additional credit hours in Field Crops. 
Advanced study of tobacco production problems. Staflf. 

F. C. 521-522-523. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite : Fifteen credit hours in Field Crops. 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of 
interest to Agronomists will be assig^ned, reviewed, and discussed by students 
and members of the Agronomy Staflf. Staflf. 

F. C. 531-532-533. Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Fifteen credit hours in Field Crops. 

A study of special problems and methods of investigation. A student may 
select a problem in any phase of crop production or breeding. Staflf. 

FORESTRY 

Courses for Undergraduates 
For. 101, 102, 103. Elementary Forestry. 1-1-1 

Required of freshmen in Forestry. 

Study of the nature and development of forests of the world, with special 
study of the forests of the United States. A correlation of all sciences re- 
quired in forestry. Field trips are included. Mr. Hofmann. 



224 [Forestry] 

For. 111. Principles of Forestry. 3-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

Elective for junior and senior students not in Forestry. 

Forest conditions in the United States and the relation of the forest prob- 
lems to other fields of industry. World forests as related to local and na- 
tional problems. Mr. Slocum and Mr. Miller. 

For. 202. Wood Technology. 0-3-0 

Required of sophomores in Forestry. Prerequisite: Bot. 203. 

Microscopic slides of the conifers and broad-leaved trees are studied in or- 
der to determine the occurrence, form, and structure of the wood elements. 
Identification by means of the hand lens is especially emphasized. 

Mr. Slocum. 

For. s204. Silviculture. 3 credits 

Sophomore summer camp. Prerequisites: Bot. 211, 213. 
Study of gn"owth and development of forest stands. Establishment and 
measurement of sample plots. Mr. Miller, Mr. Slocum. 

For. s214. Dendrology. 3 credits 

Sophomore summer camp. Prerequisite: Bot. 211, 213. 
Identification and study of trees in Piedmont, Coastal, and Mountain 
sections of North Carolina, Mr. Slocum, Mr. Miller. 

For. 301. Timber Preservation. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. 202. 

Lumber and timber preservatives and their use. Methods of preservation. 
Relation of preservation to forestry and industry. Field trip to industrial 
plant, Mr. Slocum. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

For. s304. Mensuration III. 3 credits 

Sophomore summer camp. Prerequisite: C. E. 221, 222. 
Field data for stand and jneld tables, stem analysis, and timber surreys. 

Mr. Slocum, Mr. Miller. 

For. 311. Silviculture I. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. s204. 
Factors aff'ecting tree growth and distribution. Forest regions, sites, 
stands, and types. Sihacal requirements of important tree species. 

Mr. Miller. 



[Forestry] 225 

For. 312. Silviculture II. q.3_q 

Required of juniors in Forestry. 

Production, collection, extraction, storage, an^ planting of forest-tree 
^^^^' Mr. Slocum. 

For. 313. Nursery Practice. 1 or 1 or 1 

Preparation, seeding, watering, and weeding of seed beds in school 
""^^'"y- Mr. Slocum. 

For. 321. Forest Products. 3.q_q 

Required of seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. 202. 
A study of the source and method of obtaining derived and manufactured 
forest products other than lumber. jyjj.. Wyman 

For. 322. Naval Stores. q3q 

Elective for juniors in Forestry. 

Methods of turpentining woods practices. Factors influencing oleoresin 
yields. Stilhng practices. Integration with other forest products utUization. 

Mr. Wyman. 

For. 323. Forest UtiUzation. q q 2 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

The problems of more complete utilization of forest resources. Utiliza- 
tion of present waste in commercial practice. Mr, Wyman. 

For. 332. Forest Policy. ^3^ 

Elective for juniors in Forestry. 

The forest as a natural resource. Economic services of the forest His- 
tory and present condition of American forests. Forests from the stand- 
pomt of land use. Public forests and their place in a national program of 
forestry. Problems of private forestry. Cooperation by public agencies 
with private forest owners. "^ Mr. Mmer. 

For. 333. Methods of Research in Forestry. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. s204. 
Methods of research used by the United States Forest Service experi- 
ment stations, the Madison Laboratory, and State and private research or- 
ganizations. Sample plot technique. Mr. Miller 



226 [Forestry] 

For. 342. Forest Protection and Improvements. 0-3-0 

Req-Liired of juniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. s204. 
Organization and operation of fire prevention and control methods. 
Forest road and telephone construction and maintenance. Mr. Hofmann. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergradaates 
For. 402, 403. Mensuration I, II. 0-3-3 

Required of juniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. s304. 

The measurement of timber, both standing and felled; log rules, form 
factors, stem analysis and growth. 

Methods of making volume, growth, and stand tables. Increment and 
yield studies. 

Development of s:and and yield tables from field data. Timber surreys. 

Mr. Slocum. 

For. 411. Silviculture III. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. 312. 
Methods of cutting to secure natural regeneration. Intermediate cuttings 
and their effect on the stand. Forest protection. Mr. Miller. 

For. 412. Silviculture IV. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

The application of silvicultural methods in the forests of the United 
States. Mr. Miller. 

For. 421. Logging. 3-O-0 

Required of seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. 311. 

The logging industry- and transportation methods. Logging costs. Appli- 
cation of methods to specific conditions. All forest regions are covered, dis- 
cussing the problems of each. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 422. Lumbering. 0-3-0 

Elective for seniors in Forestry-. 

The manufacture and re-mantifacture, transportation and handling of 
lumber. Grades and grading of lumber. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 423. Lumber Seasoning. 0-0-2 

Elective for seniors in Forestry. 

Air-seasoning and kiln-drying of lumber. Kiln construction and opera- 
tion. Defects and their control. Mr. Wvman. 



[Forestry] 227 

For. 431, 432. Forest Management. 3-3-0 

Required of seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. 311. 

The principles of management of timber lands for economic returns. The 
normal forest is taken as the ideal. The application of regulation methods 
to the forest. A typical working circle as developed by the United States 
Forest Service is studied for each forest region, Mr. Hofmann. 

For. 433. Advanced Wood Technology. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. 202. 
Advanced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the United 
States. Microscopic work in anatomy and identification. Mr. Slocum. 

For. 442. Forest Finance. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry. Prerequisite: For. 311. 

Forests as investments: interest, carrying charges, financial maturity, 
and relation of intermediate to final and net incomes. Forest taxation, 
hazards in forest investments, and forest insurance. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 443. Timber Appraisal. 0-0-2 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

Field and oflBce methods of valuing timber lands, with special reference 
to stumpage appraisal; the evaluation of damages to timber and forest 
property. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 452. Seminar. 0-2-0 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

A round-table discussion of forestry problems, trends of development in 
forestry and related sciences. Forestry Faculty. 

For. 453. Senior Field Trip. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

An extensive survey of logging, lumbering and utilization of forest pro- 
ducts throughout the Southeast. A complete series of reports covering all 
plants and operations visited is required. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 461, 462, 463. Forestry Problems. 3-3-3 

Elective for seniors in Forestry. 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lum- 
ber manufacturing, or forest management. StaflF. 



228 [Geology] 

Courses for Graduates Only 

For. 501, 502, 503. Advanced Forest Management Problems. 3-3-3 

Complete management program for a specific forest area. Mr. Hofmann. 

For. 511, 512, 513. Advanced Silviculture Problems. 3-3-3 

Assigned or selected problems or experiments in silviculture. A written 
report required for credit. Mr. Miller. 

For. 521, 522, 523. Advanced Logging Problems. 3-3-3 

Selected research loggfing problems of an advanced nature. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 531, 532, 533. Advanced Lumber Manufacturing. 3-3-3 

Selected advanced problems dealing -with the manufacture and seasoning 
of lumber. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 541, 542, 543. Advanced Utilization Problems. 3-3-3 

Problems of an advanced grade in some phase of forest utilization. 

Mr. Wyman. 

For. 551, 552, 553. Forest Valuation. 3-3-3 

Planning, organizing, and conducting, under general supervision, an im- 
portant research project in one of the fields of valuation. Mr. Wyman. 
For. 561, 562, 563. Problems in Research. 3-3-3 

Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis, 

Mr. Miller. 



GEOLOGY 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Geol. 101. Earth History. 0-3-0 

Elective. Not to be taken after Geol. 120, 220 and 222. 
Introductory course in General Geology: changes in the earth, and under- 
lying physical and life processes. Bradley, The Earth and Its History. 

Mr. Stuckey. 



[Geology] 229 
Geol. 120. Physical Geology. 4 or 4 or 4 

Required of freshmen in Basic Agriculture and Agricultural Education, 
and of sophomores in Forestry and Landscape Architecture. 

Dynamic processes acting on and within the earth; materials and make- 
up of the earth's crust. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. Longwell, 
Knopf and Flint, Outlines of Physical Geology. 

Mr. Stuckey, Mr. Parker, Mr. Jones. 

(Jeol. 207. Ex. Physical Geography. 3.3.O 

A. The processes and forces involved in the development of land forms. 

B. The physiographic provinces of the United States and their import- 
ance. Some special study of the physical geography of North Carolina. 

Mr. Stuckey. 

G€ol. 220. Engineering Geology. 3^.0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 101. 

Required of sophomores in Agricultural, Ceramic, Civil, Geological, High- 
way and Sanitary Engineering. 

The principles of general geology and their application to engineering 
problems. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. Ries and Watson, Elements 
of Engineering Geology. Mr. Stuckey, Mr. Parker, Mr. Jones. 

Geol. 222. Historical Geology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 120 or 220. 

Required of sophomores in Geological Engineering. 

Major events in the history of North America; rise and development of 
main animal and plant groups. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 
Schuchert, Outlines of Historical Geology. Mr. Parker. 

Geol. 223. Geomorphology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Geol. 120 or 220. 

Required of sophomores in Geological Engineering. 

A systematic study of land forms and their relations to processes and 
stages of development and adjustment of topography to structure. Lec- 
tures, map interpretations and field trips. Lobeck, Geomorphology. 

Mr. Stuckey. 

Geol. 230. Mineralogy. 3.O.0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 101-103-105. 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic and Geological Engineering, and of 
seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Crystallography, and Physical and Chemical Mineralogy. Lectures and 
laboratory work. Kraus and Hunt, Mineralogy. Mr. Stuckey. 



230 [Geology] 

GeoL 325. Geology and Mineral Resources of North Carolina. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 222. 

Physical geography, general geology, common rocks and minerals, and 
mines and quarry products of the State. Lectures, laboratories and field 
trips. Mr. Stuckey. 

GeoL 332. Advanced Mineralogy. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 230. Required in Geological Engineering. 

A continuation of Geol. 230. Special attention to chemical and blowpipe 
properties of a larger group of important minerals. Lectures and labora- 
tory work. Mr. Stuckey. 

Geol. 338. Thermal Mineralogy. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Cer E. Prerequisite: Geol. 230 and Chem. 231. 

A study of the behavior of ceramic materials as controlled by variations 
in composition, temperature and pressure. Mr. Stuckey. 

Geol. 352. Structural Geology. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 120 or 220. Required in Geological Engineering. 

The arrangement and deformation of the different rock masses compos- 
ing the earth's crust. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. Nevin, Principles 
of Structural Geology. Mr. Parker. 

GeoL 353. GeopJjysics. 0-0-4 

Prerequisites: GeoL 352, Pys. 203, C. E. 226. 

Required of Juniors in Geological Engineering. 

Discussion of the fundamental principles underljdng all geophysical 
methods. Procedure and instruments involved in gravitational, magnetic 
seismic and electrical methods. Study of applications and interpretation 
of results. Text: Mimeographed notes. Mr. Bramer. 

GeoL 361. Stratigraphy and Index Fossils. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 222. Required of juniors in Geological Engineering. 
Distribution and conditions of origin of principal geologic formations in 
Southeastern United States. Key fossils characteristic of each period. 

Mr. Stuckey and Mr. Parker. 



[Geology] 231 
GeoL 411, 412, 413. Economic Geology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Geol. 120 or 220; Geol. 230; Chemistry 103. 

Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Mode of occurrence, association, origin, distribution and uses of econo- 
mically valuable minerals. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. Ries, 
Economic Geology, 7th Edition. Mr. Stuckey. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

GeoL 431, 432, 433. Optical Mineralogy. 3.3.3 

Prerequisites: Geol. 230, and Physics. 

Required of seniors in Ceramic and Geological Engineering. 

Theory of light as applied to the polarizing microscope, practice in deter- 
mining minerals in thin sections and by immersion methods. Lectures and 
laboratory work. Rogers and Kerr, Thin-Section Mineralogy. 

Mr. Stuckey, Mr. Parker, 

Geol. 443. Petrology. q_q.4 

Prerequisites: Geol. 120 or 220; Geol. 230; and Chemistry 103. 

Required of juniors in Geological Engineering. 

Materials of the earth's crust; composition, texture, classification, identi- 
fication and alterations of the principal igneous, sedimentary and meta- 
morphic rocks. Lectures, laboratories and field trip. Tyrrell, Principles 
of Petrology. Mr. Parker. 

Geol. 462. Advanced Engineering Geology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 352. Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 
Analysis of geologic factors relating to specific engineering projects. 

Mr. Bramer. 

Geol. 463. Field Methods. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Geol. 352 and 441. Required of seniors in Geological Engi- 
neering. 

Methods of field observation and the use of geologic surveying instru- 
ments. Construction of a complete geologic map of a specific area. Lec- 
tures, laboratories and field trips. Mr. Parker. 

GeoL 471, 472, 473. Mining Engineering, Mine Design, Ore Dressing. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Geol. 230, and 352; C. E. 222 and 225. 

Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Mining methods, both open pit and underground. Mine examination and 
valuation. Principles of ore dressing. Problems in mine design. Young, 
Elements of Mining. Mr. Bramer. 



232 [Highway EsGiN'EERrNG] 

Coorses for Graduates Only 

&eoL 311. 512- Adranced Economic Geology. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: Geol. 412 and 413. 

Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. 

Mr. Stuckey. 

GeoL 543. Advanced Petrography. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Geol. 433 and 441. 

Appiication of the petrographic microscope to the systematic and descrip- 
tive study of rocks. Mr. Stuckey and Mr. Parker. 

Geol. 591, 592, 593. Geological Researdi. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. 

Lectures, reading assignments, and reports. Special work in Geology to 
meet the needs and interests of the students. 

Mr. Stuckey, Mr. Parker, Mr. Bramer. 



HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 

Caorses for Advanced Undergradnates 

H. E. Ex. 101. Accidents and Their Prevention. 3 credits 

A general sr-cy c: tie tr:blem cf accidents and their prevention, includ- 
ing accidents in the honie. in industry, in transportation and public acci- 
dents. 

H. E. 322, 323. Highway Engineering L 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 221-2-3. 

Require-d of all juniors in Civil Engineering, 

History, economics, and administration of highways; construction and 
maintenance of highvrays; field and office methods; grading and drainagre. 
Brjce. H-gr.if-zy Design and Construction. Mr. Tucker. 

H. E. 332. 333. Materials Testing Laboratory. 0-1-1 

Prerequisite: C. E. 321. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and one term only for jtmiors 
in A. E. and Cer. E. 

The testing of materials used in construction. For the students in Civil 
and Highway Engineering, emphasis is placed on those materials used in 



[Highway Engineering] 233 

road construction; for the students in Architectural and Construction Engi- 
neering, emphasis is placed on those materials used in the building indus- 
try. Tucker, Manual in the Testing of Materials. Mr. Tucker. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. R 421, 422. Highway Engineering II. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: H. E, 322-3. 

Rec[uired of seniors in H. E. 

The economic location of highways; design and construction of high-type 
pavements; administration of city streets. Lectures and notes, 

Mr. Tucker. 

H. K 423. Transportation. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: H. E. 322-3. 

Required of seniors in C. E. and H. E. 

The transportation systems; development and uses; operation and main- 
tenance; control and methods of taxation. Lectures and notes. Mr. Tucker. 

H. K 425, 426. Highway Office Practice and Design. 1-1-0 

Prerequisite: H. E. 322-3. 

Required of seniors in H. E. 

The preparation of road plans, the calculation of yardage and balancing 
of quantities; the design of sections; plans for drainage structures and 
short-span bridges. Lectures and notes. Mr. Tucker. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

H. E. 511, 512, 513. Highway Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in H. E. 

A study of the important research projects in the field of highway trans- 
port or that of highway engineering. The first term is usually given to the 
preparation of a bibliography of highway research projects; the second 
term is devoted to the preparation of papers on the results of specified re- 
search projects; while the third term is devoted to original research and 
investigation. Mr. Tucker. 



234 [HiSTOKY] 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Courses in History 

Hist. 101, 102, 103. Economic History. 3-3-3 

An examination of the important changes in European society and the 
forces which produced these changes during the periods of expansion and 
industrialization, as a background for a general treatment of the agricul- 
tural, industrial, and commercial development of the United States. 

Messrs. Earnhardt, Bauerlein, Lockmiller, Seegers. 

Hist. 104. World History. 2-2-2 

Required of freshmen or sophomores who do not take Military Science. 
A general survey of Western civilization from its beginning to the present 
day. Mr. Earnhardt. 

ffist. 200, 201. 202. History of the United States. 3-3-3 

Elective for one, two, or three terms. 

A chronological treatment of the political, diplomatic, and constitutional 
history of the United States in the light of its economic and social signif- 
icance. Mr. Bauerlein. 

Hist. Ex. 203. Medieval History. 3 credits 

A survey of the political, social, economic, ecclesiastical, and cultural 
history of Europe from the fourth century to the close of the fifteenth cen- 
tury. Mr. Earnhardt. 

Hist, 204. History of Modem Europe. 3-0-0 

Elective. 

A survey of the economic, political, and social developments in Europe 
from the age of the great discoveries to the close of the eighteenth century. 
(Not offered in 1940-41.) Mr. Earnhardt. 

Hist, 205. History of Modern Europe. 0-3-0 

Elective. 

A survey of European history during the nineteenth century. Political, 
economic, and social movements emphasized in proportion to their interna- 
tional or European importance. (Not offered in 1940-41.) Mr. Earnhardt. 



[History] 235 

Hist. 206. Contemporary Europe. 0-0-3 

Elective. 

A survey of the contemporary history of the principal European states 
and their international relations in the twentieth century. Mr. Earnhardt. 

Hist 303. North Carolina History. 0-3-0 

Elective. 

A general survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural develop- 
ments in North Carolina, with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twen- 
tieth centuries. Mr. Earnhardt. 

Hist Ex. 307, 308, 309. Economic and Social History of the South. 9 credits 

A study of the economic and social history of the Southern States. Lec- 
tures, readings, and reports. Mr. Lockmiller. 

Hist Ex. 310. American Biography. 3 credits 

Representative men and women in American politics, law, religion, agri- 
culture, industry, commerce, science, literature, and art. Mr. Lockmiller. 

Hist 319. History of American Agriculture. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Rural Sociolog^y; elective for others. 

Main trends in agriculture in the United States, and the place of agri- 
culture in the economic life of the nation; special emphasis on the period 
since the Civil War. Mr. Seegers. 

Hist Ex. 320. History of Modern England. 3 credits 

Survey of English political, social, economic, and diplomatic history, with 
emphasis on the last century. Mr. Earnhardt. 

Hist Ex. 321. The Latin American Republics. 3 credits 

Social, economic, and political development of Latin America since 1810. 

Mr. Lockmiller. 

Hist Ex. 322. Contemporary History of the United States. 3 credits 

Significant developments in the United States since 1914, with particular 
emphasis on post-war problems, foreign affairs, and the New Deal. 

Mr. Lockmiller. 



236 [Horticulture] 

Courses in Political Science 

*Pol. Sc. 200. American National Government. 3-0-0 

Elective. 

A study of the origins, organization, and functions of the government of 
the United States, including constitutional decisions and the New Deal. 

Mr. Lockmiller. 

PoL Sc. 201. State Government and Administration. 0-3-0 

Elective. 

A study of Federal-State relations, and the organization and administra- 
tion of state and county governments. Special attention will be given to 
problems of government in North Carolina. Mr. Lockmiller. 

Pol. Sc. 202. Municipal Government and Administration. 0-0-3 

Elective. 

A study of the history, organization, and administration of American 
municipal corporations. Lectures, readings, and reports. Mr. Lockmiller. 

PoL Sc. 203. American Political Parties. 3-0-0 

Elective. 

The origin and development of political parties in the United States, their 
functions, organization, regulation, campaign methods, and elections. 

Mr. Lockmiller. 

Pol. Sc. 206. European Governments. 3-0-0 

Elective. 

A study of the government of England, France, Germany, Italy, and 
Russia. Mr. Barnhaixit. 

HORTICULTURE 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Hort. 203. General Horticulture. 0-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

A course designed to give a general insight into the field of horticulture, 
including geographic centers of production and elements of culture of fruit, 
vegetable, and floriculture crops. Mr. Gardner, Mr. Randall, Mr. Weaver. 

* Not offered in 1940-41. 



[Horticulture] 237 

Hort. 301. Plant Propagation and Nursery Practice. 3 or 3 or 3 

Required of majors in Horticulture; elective for other juniors and seniors 
in Agriculture and Forestry. 

Study of methods and practice in seedage, cuttage, separation and division, 
budding and grafting. Cultural principles and practices in growing nur- 
sery stock. Mr. Randall, Mr. Weaver. 

Hort. 302. Vegetable Forcing. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203: Required of majors in vegetable growing; elec- 
tive for other juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Production and management of vegetable crops under glass. Practice in 
growing vegetables under protection. Mr. Randall. 

Hort. 303. Vegetable Gardening. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. Required of majors in vegetable grovring and 
fruit growing; elective for other juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Location, soil preparation, fertilization, irrigation, and general culture 
applicable to vegetable production. Mr. Randall. 

Hort. 311. Small Fruits and Grapes. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. Required of majors in fruit growing and vege- 
table growing; elective for other juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A course in the culture and production of small fruits, including straw- 
berries, dewberries, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, currants, and 
grapes. Mr. Gardner. 

Hort. 313. Home Floriculture. 0-0-3 

Required of majors in vegetable growing; elective for other juniors and 
seniors in Agriculture. 

Principles and methods of growing garden flowers and house plants, in- 
cluding varieties and their adaptability. Mr. Randall. 

Hort. 321. Fruit and Vegetable Judging. 2-0-0 

Prerequisite : Hort. 203. Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Practice in variety identification, and in judging plates, collections, boxes, 
and commercial exhibits of fruits and vegetables. Mr. Gardner, Mr. Randall. 



238 [Horticulture] 

Hort.331. Fruit Growing. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. Required of majors in fruit growing, vegetable 
growing, poultry and animal husbandry; elective for other juniors and 
seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of factors underlying fruit production; temperature and moisture 
relations; culture, fertilization, pruning, fruit setting, yield, and storage. 

Mr. Gardner. 

Hort. 341. Commercial Floriculture. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203, 301. Required of majors in floriculture; elective 
for other juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of the commercial production of the principal floral crops under 
protection and in the open, including actual planting and care of the crops. 

Mr. Randall. 

Hort. 351. Fruit and Vegetable Utilization. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Principles and methods involved in the commercial utilization of surplus 
and off grade products. Extraction and preservation of juices, quick 
freezing methods, sweet potato starch production and other manufactured 
products and by-products. Mr. Jones. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hort. 401. Systematic Pomology (offered in alternate years). 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 331. Required of majors in pomology. 

Fruit varieties: their description, identification, nomenclature, and classi- 
fication; their relationships and adaptations. Judging methods and stand- 
ards. Mr. Gardner. 

Hort. 411. Systematic Olericulture (offered in alternate years). 2-0-0 

Prerequsite: Hort. 303. Required of majors in vegetable growing. 
Vegetable varieties; their description, identification, nomenclature and 
classification; their relationships and adaptations. Mr. Randall. 

Hort. 412. Experimental Horticulture. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 331, 303, 341. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and results of experi- 
ments in fruit growing, vegetable growing, and floriculture. 

Mr. Gardner, Mr. RandalL 



[Horticulture] 239 

Hort. 421-422-423. Horticnltural Problems. 2-2-2 

Required of all majors in Horticulture. Prerequisite: Twelve credit hours 
in Horticulture. 

Systematic investigation of some phase of horticulture. Each student 
chooses his own subject of study and pursues it independently, under direc- 
tion of the instructor. Mr. Gardner, Mr. Randall. 

Hort. 431, 432, 433. Senior Seminar. 1-1-1 

Required of all majors in Horticulture. Prerequisite: Twelve credit hours 
in Horticulture. 

A discussion of problems of interest to horticulturists. Discussion topics 
are assigned to students and members of the Horticultural staff. 

Mr. Gardner. 

Conrses for Graduates Only 

Hort. 501, 502, 503. Methods of Horticultural Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credit hours in Horticulture. 

A study of methods and procedure, outlining problems, assembling and 
analyzing data, and presenting results; critical review of experiment-sta- 
tion work. Staff. 

Hort. 511, 512, 513. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Required of graduate students only. Prerequisite: Eighteen credit hours 
in Horticulture. 

Assignment of scientific articles of interest to horticulturists for review 
and discussion; student papers and research problems for discussion. 

Mr. Gardner. 

Hort 521, 522, 523. Research. 3-5, 3-5, 3-5 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credit hours in Horticulture. 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original re- 
search in fruit growing, vegetable growing or floriculture. The work and 
presentation of results should be of such merit as to be worthy of pub- 
lication. Staff. 



240 [Industrial Engineering] 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Courses for Undergraduates 
I. E. 101, 102, 103. Industrial Organization. 3-3-3 

Required of sophomores in I. E. 

Engineering methods in studies of industrial enterprises. Kimball, Indxis- 
trial Organization. Mr. Groseclose. 

I. K 201, 202, 203. Management Engineering. 3-3-8 

Required of juniors in I. E. Prerequisite: I. E. 103. 

Principles of management, administration, production, and sales. Execu- 
tive control, industrial relations, incentives, normal capacities, standard 
costs, and pricing. Budgeting and planning. Gilman, Analyzing Fincncial 
Statements. Mr. Shaw. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

I. K 301. Engineering Economics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in E. E., I. E., and in M, E., Furniture Option, elec- 
tive for others. Prerequisite: Econ. 203 or 205. 

Principles of investments, costs and utility with applications to engineer- 
ing practice. Choice of investments and replacements. Grant, Principles 
of Engineering Economy. Mr. Groseclose. 

I. R 312, 313. Industrial Engineering Problems. 0-3-3 

Required of seniors in I. E. Prerequisite or concurrent: I. E. 201, 202, 

203. 

Detailed study of problems of moment in this rapidly developing field. 

Mr. Shaw. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

I. E. 402, The Electrical Industry. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in E. E. and I. E. Prerequisite: I. E. 301. 

The operation, practices, management, and performance of electric light 
and power companies and other electrical industries. Factors, indexes, and 
comparisons. SerN-ices and prices. Cost analyses and pre-determinations. 
Uniform System of Accounts for Electrical Utilities. Mr. Shaw. 



[Landscape Architecture] 241 

I. E. 412, 413. Engineering Economics Advanced. 0-3-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: I. E. 301. 

Comprehensive study of the application of economics to the practice of 
engineering. Mr. Shaw. 

I. K 421, 422, 423. Public Utilities. 3-3-3 

Elective for seniors or graduate students. Prerequisite or concurrent: 
I. E. 301 or senior standing. 

Public utilities and their regulation from all points of view. Services, 
rates, rate bases, and returns. Leading cases. Current problems. Mosher 
and Crawford, Public Utility Regulation. Mr. Shaw. 

I. E. 433. Investigation and Report. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in I. E. Prerequisite: I. E. 312. 

Investigation of a selected and approved problem. Mr, Shaw. 

Courses for Graduates Only 
I. E. 501, 502, 503. Industrial Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Graduation in Engineering. 

Investigation of problems of major importance in the field of Industrial 
Engineering. Mr. Shaw. 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Courses for Undergraduates 

L. A. 101, 102, 103. Arboriculture. 1-1-2 

Required of freshmen in Landscape Architecture; elective for other stu- 
dents in Agriculture. 

Culture of plant materials: their planting, transplanting, training, fer- 
tilization, protection from pests; tree surgery, lawn making. 

Mr. Pillsbury, Mr. Weaver. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 
L. A. 201, 202, 203. Plant Materials: Woody Plants. 2-2-2 

Required of sophomores in Landscape Architecture and juniors in Flori- 
culture; elective for students in other curricula. Prerequisite: Bot. 203. 

Trees, shrubs, and vines: their distribution, form and habits of growth, 
size, texture, color, and other characteristics determining use in planting 
design. Mr. Randall. 



242 [Landscape Architecture] 

L. A. 212, 213. Theory of Landscape Design. 0-3-3 

Required of sophomores in Landscape Architecture; elective for students 
in other curricula. 

Introduction to the study of landscape design; its theoretical basis; the 
meaning of taste; historic styles; elements, and landscape composition; 
planting design, and analyses of typical problems in landscape design. 

Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 303. Plant Materials : Herbaceous Plants. 0-0-2 

Required of juniors in Landscape Architecture; elective for students in 
other curricula. Prerequisite: Bot, 203. 

Ornamental perennial and annual plants: height, habit of growth, tex- 
ture, color, and other characteristics determining use in planting design. 

Mr. Randall. 

L. A. 311. 312. History of Landscape Design. 3-3-0 

Required of juniors in Landscape Architecture. Prerequisite: L. A. 212, 
213. 

History of the art of landscape design from the ages of antiquity to mod- 
ern times; sketching from illustrations of design in important periods. 

Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 321, 322, 323. Landscape Design L 4-4-4 

Required of juniors in Landscape Architecture. Prerequisite: L. A. 311, 
312. 

Problems in presentation, and in consecutive design of small properties, 
gardens, and other special areas and suburban estates. Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 402. Ornamental Plants. 0-2-0 

Required of seniors in Vegetable Gardening and Pomology; elective for 
juniors or seniors in other curricula. Prerequisite: Bot. 203. 

Ornamental trees, shrubs, and vines; their characteristics of use in plant- 
ing design for home, school, church, and community-center grounds, and 
farmstead landscapes. Mr. Randall. 

L. A. 403. Landscape Gardening. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture, and Pomology. 
Elective for seniors in all other curricula. Prerequisite: L. A. 402, or 201, 
202, 203. 

Landscape planning and planting design applied to the improvement of 
home, school, church, community-center grounds, and farmsteads. Practice 
in methods of making measured surveys, mapping, and designing improve- 
ments and planting. Mr. Pillsbury. 



[Landscape Architecture] 243 

L. A. 411, 412, 413. Planting Design. 3-3-3 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture. Prerequisite: L. A. 201, 
202, 203, and 303. 

Problems in composition with plant materials, presentation, the prepara- 
tion of planting plans, and cost data. Mr. PUlsbury. 



L. A. 421, 422, 423. Landscape Design IL 4-4-4 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture. Prerequisite: L. A. 321, 
322, 323. 

Problems in presentation, and in the design of small parks, and other 
public grounds, and institutional g^roups. Mr. Pillsbury. 



L. A. 432. City Planning. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture; elective for seniors in 
all schools. 

Origins and types of urban communities; modern city and town planning; 
legal, economic, social, and aesthetic phases and their inter-relationships; 
fundamental data required; methods of planning and financing; zoning; 
city and regional planning legislation. Mr. Pillsbury. 



L.A. 442. Suburban Design. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: L. A. 321, 322, 323, and 432. 

The subdivision of land as related to suburban development and urban 
growth. Mr. Pillsbury. 



L. A. 451, 452, 453. Landscape Construction. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture. Prerequisite: C. E. 224, 
225, 226, and 227; and L. A. 321, 322, 323. 

Problems in design of ground surface, walks, and drives; preparation of 
plans for grading and drainage; estimates of materials and costs, and 
methods of execution of landscape designs. Mr. Pillsbury. 



L. A. 463. Office Practice. 0-0-1 

Prerequisite: L. A. 451, 452, 453. 

Arrangement of equipment, supplies, data, illustrative and other material 
in landscape offices; methods of professional procedure, and professional 
ethics. Mr. Pillsbury. 



244 [Mathematics] 

MATHEMATICS 

Courses for Undergraduates 
*Math. 111. Algebra. 4-0-0 

Review of elementary topics, such as Factoring, Fractions, Simple Equa- 
tions, Exponents, and Radicals. Topics then taken up are Quadratic Equa- 
tions, Solution of Higher Degree Equations, Simultaneous Quadratic Equa- 
tions, Logarithms, the Binomial Theorem, Arithmetic and Geometric Pro- 
gressions, Permutations, Combination, and the Elementary Theory of Prob- 
ability. Fisher, College Algebra. 

•Math. 112. Trigonometry. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 111. 

The study of the Trigonometric Functions with their applications to the 
solution of the right and oblique triangles, with numerous problems. Also 
a brief study of Trigonometric Equations and Identities and Inverse Func- 
tions. Practical Mensurations of Solids is taken up. Clarkson and Bullock, 
Trigonometry. 

♦Math. 113. Mathematics of Finance. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Math. 112. 

The principal topics are Simple and Compound Interest, Annuities, Sink- 
ing Funds and Amortization, and the Valuation of Bonds and other applica- 
tions. Lee, Mathematics of Finance. Staff. 

*Math. 101. Algebra for Engineers. 6-0-0 

Required of freshmen in the Schools of Engineering, and in the depart- 
ments of Industrial Management, Industrial Arts, and Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

This course includes quadratic equations, the progressions, the binomial 
theorem, permutations and combinations, logarithms, the general theory of 
equations, the solution of higher equations, determinants and partial frac- 
tions. Fisher, College Algebra. Staff. 

*Math. 102. Trigonometry for Engineers. 0-6-0 

Required of freshmen in the Schools of Engineering, and in the depart- 
ments of Industrial Management, Industrial Arts, and Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

Prerequisite: Math. 101. 

The trigonometric functions, derivation of formulae, the solution of plane 



• This course will be repeated the following: term. 



[Mathematics] 245 

and spherical triangles, with practical applications, slide rule, complex num- 
bers and hyperbolic functions. Clarkson and Bullock, Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry. Staff, 

*Math, 103. Analytical Geometry. 0-0-6 

Required of freshmen in the School of Engineering and in the Depart- 
ments of Industrial Management, Industrial Arts, and Landscape Architec- 
ture. 

Prerequisite: Math. 101, 102. 

Loci of equations, the straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, 
the general equation of the second degree, polar coordinates, transcendental 
curves, parametric equations, coordinates in space, planes and surfaces. 
Smith, Gale and Neelley, Elements of Analytical Geometry. Staff. 

*Math. 201. Calculus I. 4.0-0 

Required of sophomores in Engineering. Prerequisite: Math. 103. 

A course in the fundamental principles of the Calculus, including the for- 
mulas for differentiation and for integration of polynomial functions, with 
applications to Geometry and to problems in rates, maxima and minima, 
curve tracing, curvature, areas, volumes, work, pressure, velocity and ac- 
celeration. Smith, Salkover, Justice, Calculzis. Staff. 

*Math. 202. Calculus XL 0-4-0 

Required of all sophomores in Engineering. Prerequisite: Math. 201. 

A continuation of Calculus I. Methods of integration, and the study of the 
definite integral, with applications to problems in areas, volumes, lengths 
of arcs, surfaces, centroids, moments of inertia, radii of gyration, approxi- 
mate integration. Smith, Salkover, Justice, Calculus. Staff. 

*Math. 303. Calculus IIL 0-0-4 

Required of all sophomores in Engineering. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 

A continuation of Calculus II. Indeterminate forms, infinite series, ex- 
pansion of functions, hyperbolic functions, partial differentiation, double 
and triple integrals, and differential equations. Smith, Salkover, Justice, 
Calculus. Staff 

Coarses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Math. 431-a. Differential Equations. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering and elective for others. 
Prerequisite : Math. 303. 

A short course to include the solution of standard types of equations. 
Numerous examples in the field of Electrical Engineering will be studied. 
Kells, Differential Equutions. Mj.^ Bullock. 

• This course will be repeated the following: term. 



246 [Mathematics] 

Math. 431-b. Differential Equations. 3-0-0 

Elective. Principally for students in Chemical Engineering. Prerequisite : 
Math. 303. 

A study of the equations that occur in Applied Chemistry. Much emphasis 
on graphic methods and numerical work. Phillips, Differential Equations. 

Mr. Winton. 

Math. 432. Advanced Differential Equations for Electrical Engineers, 0-3-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 431-a. 

A continuation of the work given in Math. 431-a. Series solutions, ap- 
proximate methods, partial differential equations, hj-perbolic functions, and 
other topics will be studied with special emphasis on applications to prob- 
lems in Electrical Engineering. Students not taking Electrical Engineering 
may register for the course and will be assigned individual problems in their 
particular field. Lecture notes. Mr. Bullock- 

Math. 402. Graphical and Numerical Methods. 0-3-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 303. 

Graphical and numerical approximate methods in differentiation, integra- 
tion, and the solution of both ordinary and differential equations. Theory 
of least squares and empirical curve fitting. Numerous examples in the 
fields of physics, electricity, mechanics, and engineering will be solved. 
Lipka, Graphical and Mechanical ComputatioTL Mr. Cell. 

Math. 403. Vector Analysis I. 0-0-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a orb). 

A study of the different vector products. The calculus of vectors with 
applications to geometry and mechanics. Phillips, Vector Analysis. 

Mr. Clarkson. 

**Math. 411. Advanced Calculus for Engineers. 3-0-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a or b). 

Hyperbolic functions, elliptic integrals and functions, partial differentia- 
tion of composite functions, differentiation of integrals, implicit functions. 
Applications to problems in engineering will be emphasized. Reddick and 
Miller, Advajiced Mathematics for Engineers. Mr. Levine. 

**Math. 412. Advanced Calculus for Engineers, 0-3-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a orb). 

Power series. Gamma and Bessel functions, functions of a complex variable, 
line integrals. Applications to problems in engineering will be emphasized. 
Reddick and Miller, Advanced Mathematics for Engineers. Mr. Levine. 



•• Math. 411, 412, 413, may be taken in any order. 



[Mathematics] 247 

**Math. 413. Series for Engineers. 0-0-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a orb). 

Fourier series, partial differential equations, with applications to prob- 
lems in physics and engineering. Reddick and Miller, Advanced Mathematixss 
for Engineers. 

Math. 421. Advanced Analytic Geometry. 3-0-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a or b). 

The elements of higher plane curves and the geometry of space. Snyder 
and Sisam, Aruilytic Geometry. Mr. Bullock. 

Math. 422. Theory of Equations. 0-3-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a or b). 

The usual topics in the theory of equations, the solution of higher equa- 
tions, exponential equations, logarithmic equations, and determinants. Dick- 
son, First Course in Theory of Equations. Mr. Mumford. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

Math. 501. Applied Mathematics I. 3-0-0 

Elective for graduate students only. Prerequisite: Math. 413 or the 
consent of the instructor. 

The course will be arranged to fit the engineering interests of the students 
enrolled. 

Catenary cables, straight and curved beam problems, theory of curve 
fitting, probability and applications, problems in the theory of elasticity, 
ballistics, vibration theory and problems, electrical circuits, Heaviside oper- 
ational calculus and applications to electrical engineering and to other engi- 
neering problems, calculus of finite differences and applications. Lecture 
notes. Mr. Cell. 

Math. 502. Applied Mathematics II. 0-3-0 

Elective. For graduate students only. Prerequisite: Math. 501. 

A continuation of Math. 401. Lecture notes. Mr. Cell. 

Math. 503. Applied Mathematics III. 0-0-3 

Elective. For graduate students only. Prerequisite: Math. 502. 

A continuation of Math. 402. Lecture notes. Mr. Cell. 



248 [Mechanical Engineering] 

MECHANICAL ENGmEERING 

Courses for Undergraduates 

M. E. 101, 102, 103. Engineering Drawing I. 2-2-2 

Required of freslimen in Textiles. 

Drawing-board work covering lettering, projections, sections, pictorial 
drawings, working dravr-ings as related to textile machinery, tracing, and 
blueprinting. Mimeographed notes and references. French and Tumbull, 
Lesscms ui Lettering. Messrs. Briggs, Brown, Adams, Moose, and Nash. 

M. E. 105, 106. Engineering Drawing II. 3-3-0 

Required of freshmen in Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Teachers 
of Industrial Arts, and Landscape Architecture. 

Drawing-board work covering lettering, projections, sections, revolution, 
pictorial drawings, intersection, development, working drawings, tracing, and 
blueprinting. French, Engineering Drawing. 

Messrs. Briggs, Brown, Sanford, Moose, Nash, and Adams. 

M. E. 107. Descriptive Geometry. 0-0-S 

Required of freshmen in Engineering, Agrricultural Engineering, Teach- 
ers of Industrial Arts, and Landscape Architecture. Prerequisite: M. E. 
105, 106. 

Representation of geometrical magnitudes by means of points, lines, 
planes, and solids, and the solutions of problems. Warner, Applied Descrip- 
tive Geometry. Messrs. Briggs, Brown, Adams, Moose, and Nash. 

M. E. 121. Woodwork, 1 or 1 or 1 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering and freshmen in Tex- 
tiles, and juniors in Farm Bus. Adm. 

Use of bench tools, making cabinet joints, operation and care of wood- 
working machinery. Correct methods of staining, varnishing, filling, and 
gluing various kinds of wood. Mr. Rowland. 

M. E. 122. Foundry. 1 or 1 or 1 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering and freshmen in Tex- 
tiles, and juniors in Farm Bus. Adm. 

Demonstration, instruction, and practice in molding and core making. 
Cupola practice. Stimpson, Grey and Grennan, Foundry Work. Mr. Maddison. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 249 

M. E. 123. Forge Work. 1 or 1 or 1 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering and Freshmen in Tex- 
tiles. 

A study of the origin, purification, and fabrication of the ferrous metals. 
Various metals are identified and studied in relation to their industrial uses. 
Manipulative work in actual forging of mild steel is emphasized. Coleman, 
Forge Note Book. Mr. Cope. 

M. E. 124. Pattemmaking. 2 or 2 or 2 

Required of sophomores in Mechanical Engineering and in Industrial 
Engineering. 

Deals with elementary joinery, finishing, theory of dry-kilning, wood-turn- 
ing. Lectures, demonstrations, and practice in hand work and machine 
methods. Typical patterns and core boxes are constructed such as solid, 
split, and loose piece. Turner and Town, Pattern Making, Mr. Rowland. 

M. E. 125. Foundry Practice. 2 or 2 or 2 

Required of sophomores in Industrial and Mechanical Engineering. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and practice in molding and core making, cupola 
operations, melting and casting of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and their 
alloys. Instructions and practice in the testing of molding sands. Wendt, 
Foundry Work. Mr. Maddison. 

M. E. 126. Forging and Welding. 2 or 2 or 2 

Required of sophomores in Industrial and Mechanical Engineering. 

A study of the principles and practices in the forging of mild steel. Hand 
forging is correlated with the industrial processes of hammering, rolling, and 
pressing. Lectures, demonstrations and practice in forge, oxy-acetylene, and 
electric welding are given. Johnson, Forging Practice. Mr. Cope. 

M. E. 127. Woodworking. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Architectural Engineering. 

Includes elementary joinery, cabinet joints, reading blueprints, and wood- 
turning. Theory of dry-kilning and wood finishing. Lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and practice in hand and machine methods. Mr. Rowland. 

M. E. 128. Forge and Welding Practice. 3 or or 3 

Required of sophomores in Electrical Engineering. 

A study of the principles and practices in connection with the forging of 
mild and tool steels. Identification of ferrous metals is covered. Actual prac- 
tice in hand forging of pieces of mild and tool steel is stressed. Hand forging 
is correlated with the industrial processes of hammering, rolling, and press- 
ing. Practice is given in forge and electric welding with emphasis on oxy- 
acetylene welding. Johnson, Forging Practice. Mr. Cope. 



250 [Mechanical Engineering] 

M. E. 211, 212, 213. Mechanical Drawing. 2-2-2 or 0-2-2 

Six (6) credits required of sophomores in Mechanical Engineering, jun- 
iors in Teachers of Industrial Ed. and four (4) credits required of juniors 
in Ceramic Engineering. Prerequisite: M. E. 105-6, M. E. 107. 

Drawing-board work covering machine fastenings, pipe fittings, cam de- 
sign, technical sketching, applied descriptive geometry, and working draw- 
ings; tracing and blueprinting. French, Engineering Drawing. 

Messrs. Briggs, Fornes, Satterfield, and Sanford. 

M. E. 215, 216, 217. Elementary Mechanism. 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering. 
Prerequisite: M. E. 105, 6, 7. 

The study of linkages, cams, gears, belting, gear trains and other simple 
mechanisms; design and drawings of simple machine parts. Keown and 
Faires, Mechanism. Mr. Hoefer. 

M. E. 221, 222, 223. Metallurgy. 2-2-2 

Required of sophomores in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite: Chem. 
101-2-3. 

The study of metals and alloys; smelting, refining, shaping, and heat 
treating. Crystallography of metals, their properties and commercial ap- 
plications. Stoughton and Butts, Engineering Metallurgy. Mr. Selkinghaus. 

M. E. 224. Factory Equipment. 0-0-3 

Required of Juniors in Industrial Engineering. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 124, 25, 26. 

To summarize and coordinate all pre%nous shop courses and show their re- 
lation to manufacturing processes. The essential principles of machine tool 
operation ■will be covered; also machine tool selection and application for 
economic production. Roe and Ljrtle, Factory Equipment. Mr. Wheeler. 

M. E. 225, 226. Machine Shop I. 1-1-0 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering. Prerequisite: M. E. 121- 
22-23. 

Instruction is given in chipping, filing, scraping, and babbitting. Gen- 
eral machine work, including straight and taper turning, drilling, shaper 
work, and gear cutting. Mr. Wheeler. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 251 

M. K 227, 228, 229. Machine Shop II. 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in Industrial and Mechanical Engineering and Yam 
Manufacturing, Prerequisite: M. E. 121-22-23, or M. E. 124-25-26. 

Given by lectures and demonstrations. Includes lajring out work, grind- 
ing tools, chipping, drilling, tapping, babbitting bearings and scraping. 
Machine work, including centering, straight and taper turning, chucking, 
screw cutting, shaper work, planer work and index milling, and gear cut- 
ting. Turner, Machine Tool Work. Mr. Wheeler. 

M. E. 235, 236. Metal Shop. 3-3-0 

Required in Industrial Arts. Prerequisite: Ed. 106. 

Use of hand and machine tools in problems for Secondary Schools. Kaup, 
Machine Shop Practice. Mr. Wheeler. 

M. E. 241, 242, 243. Oxy-Acetylene and Electric Welding. 1-1-1 

Elective for Senior Mechanical and Electrical Engineers. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 126 or M. E. 128. 

This course is designed to cover the fundamental methods and principles 
of fusion welding. Welding symbols, economic and metallurgical considera- 
tions, selection of method and type of welding and other practical aspects will 
be studied. Most of the practical aspects will be studied. Most of the prac- 
tical work will deal with oxy-acetylene welding and cutting, with some work 
in electric welding. Plumley, Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting. 

Mr. Cope. 

M. E. 251, 252. General Aeronautics. 3-3-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Math. 101-2-3. 

Ground-School course for those students wishing to receive flight training 
under Civil Aeronautics Authority program. The scope of the course em- 
braces Civil Air Regulations, Navigation, and Meteorology as required for 
a pilot's certificate. Lusk: General Aeronautics. Mr. Parkinson. 

M. E. 301, 302. Heat Engineering I. 3-3-0 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Prerequisite: Phys. 201-2-3, Math. 303, M. E. 105-6. 

Nature and measurement of heat, work, and power. Study of fuels and 
combustion, steam and steam boilers, and boiler-room auxiliaries. Ele- 
mentary thermodynamics of steam and gas engine. Severns & Degler, Heat 
Engineering. Mr. Groseclose. 



252 [Mechanical Engineering] 

M. E. 303. Heat Engineering II. 0-0-8 

Required of juniors in Civil, Geological, and Highway Engineering. 

Prerequisite: Phys. 201-2-3, Math. 101-2-3. 

Nature and measurement of heat, work, and power. Study of fuels and 
combustion, steam and steam boilers, and boiler-room auxiliaries. Potter & 
Calderwood, Elements of Steam and Ga^-Power Engineering. 

Mr. Groseclose. 

M. K 305, 306. Engineering Thermodynamics I. 3-3-0 

Required of juniors in Ceramic Engineering. 

Prerequisite: Phys. 201, 2, 3, Math. 303. 

Nature and measurement of heat, work and power. Study of fuels and 
combustion, heat transfer and insulation. Elementary thermodynamics of 
gas and vapor cycles. Taft, Elementai-y Engineering Thermodynamics. 

Mr. Selkinghaus. 

M. E. 307, 308, 309. Engineering Thermodynamics II. 3-3-3 

Required of juniors in E. E., M. E., and I. E. 

Prerequisite: Phys. 201, 2, 3, Math. 303. 

The study of heat as an engineering medium, including combustion, heat 
transfer, and the laws governing energy transformations; use of the gen- 
eral energj' equation in the solution of problems dealing with gases, vapors, 
and mixtures; application of the principles studied to the design and per- 
formance of nozzles, steam engines and turbines, internal combustion en- 
gines, refrigerating machines, and air compressors. Faires, Applied Thermo- 
dynamics. Messrs. Hoefer, Rice, Satterfield, Vaughan. 

M. E. 311, 312. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I. 1-1-0 

Required of juniors in Cer. Engineering. Concurrent with M. E. 305, 306. 

Calibration of thermometers and gauges, use of planimeters and indica- 
tors; coal and gas analyses; tests of lubricating oils. Testing of steam 
engines, turbines, and pumps. Rice, Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. 

Messrs. Bridges, Rice, and Selkinghaus. 

M. E. 313-314-315. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 11. 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in Electrical, Industrial and Mechanical Engineering. 
Concurrent with M. E. 307, 8, 9. 

Calibrating pressure, temperature, speed, and power-measuring instru- 
ments; the study of steam generating equipment; the testing of fuels, lubri- 
cants, pumps, compressors, steam engines and turbines, heating and ven- 
tilating equipment, hydraulic machinery, and internal combustion engines. 
Rice, Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. 

Messrs. Bridges, Rice, Sanford, Selkinghaus. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 253 

M. E. 317, 318, 319. Kinematics. 3.3.3 

Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite- M E 211- 
12-13. 

A study of the science of the motion of machine parts, or the geometry 
of machinery, with emphasis on bslts, pulleys, cams, gears, chain drives, 
shafts, and links. Schwamb, Merrill, and James, Elements of Mechanism. 

Mr. Fomes. 

M. E. 323. Introduction to Aeronautics. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in M. E., Aeronautical Option. Prerequisite: Phys. 

A study of the airplane and simple aerodynamics. Carter, Simple Aero- 
dynamics and the Airplane. Mr. Parkinson. 

M. E. 341, 342, 343. Furniture Designs and Rod-making. 3.3.3 

Required of juniors in M. E. (Furniture Option). Prerequisite- M E 
124-25-26 and M. E. 211-12-13. equisiie. m. j!,. 

Principles of elementary freehand design. Methods of dry-kilning finish- 
mg, filhng and staining, and rod-making. Dean, Modern American Period 
Furniture. ,, „„ , 

Mr. Wheeler. 

M. R 350. Advanced Engineering Drawing. 0-3 or 3 

Elective: For Advanced Undergraduates. 

Prerequisites: M. E. 105, 6, 7 and E. M. 311, 12 or M. E. 101, 2, 3 and one 
of the following: Tex. 304, 310, 335, 381. 

Drawing board work covering advanced drafting problems as related to 
plant machinery, equipment, schematic drawing, organization charts, and 
special problems m the various engineering and textile fields. The course 
will include laboratory work, lectures, recitations and individual conferences. 

Mimeographed problem sheets, handbooks and reference material will be 
"^ • Messrs. Briggs, Moose and Brown. 

M. E. 352, 353. Advanced General Aeronautics. 0-3-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: M. E. 251, 252. 

Ground school course for those students wishing to receive advanced flight 
training under the Civil Aeronautics Authority Program. The scope of the 
AZrlfr^"^'"' ^,^T^^'°"' Meteorology, Parachutes, Aerodynamics and 
Aircraft Engines, Instruments, and Radio, Navigation Aids as required for 
a Limited Commercial Pilot's Certificate. Lecturer's Notes. Mr. Parkinson 



254 [Mechanical Engineering] 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergrraduates 

M. E. 401, 402, 403. Power Plants. 3-3-3 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite: M. E. 
307-8-9 and M. E. 313-14-15. 

A critical study of fuels and combustion, heat balance, steam boilers, 
prime movers and auxiliaries as applied to power generation. Morse, Power 
Plant Engineering and Design. Mr. Vaughan. 

M. E. 404. Heating and Air-Conditioning I. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering I. Prerequisite: M. E. 
307-8-9. 

Principles of heating and ventilation. Hot air, steam, and hot water heat- 
ing systems; air conditioning. Severns, Heating, Ventilating, and Air Con- 
ditioning Fundamentals. Mr. Vaughan. 

M. E. 405. Refrigeration. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite: M. E. 307- 
8-9. 

Theory of refrigeration ; types of ice-making and refrigerating machinery. 
Special emphasis upon cooling for air conditioning. Installation, manage- 
ment, and cost of operation. Sparks, Mechanical Refrigeration. 

Mr. Vaughan. 

M. E. 407, 408, 409. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III. 1-1-1 

Required of senoirs in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite: M. E. 313- 
14-15. 

Advanced study and testing in the fields of power plants, air-cooled and 
liquid-cooled internal combustion engines, heating and ventilation, metal- 
lurgy, fluid flow, compressed air, fuels and combustion, and lubrication. Rice, 
Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Messrs. Bridges, Rice, Selkinghaus. 

M. E. 411, 412, 413. Machine Design. 3-3-3 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite: M. E. 317- 
18-19, E. M. 213, E. M. 222. 

Application of mechanics, kinematics, strength of materials, and metal- 
lurgy to the design of machinery. Determination of proper materials, shape, 
size, strength, motion, and relationship of various machine parts. Vallance, 
Design of Machine Members. Mr. Fomes. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 255 

M. E. 417, 418, 419. Aerodynamics. 3-3-8 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Option in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. Prerequisite: Math. 303 and M. E. 323. 

A study of forces affecting the airplane under the various conditions of 
flight. Wood, Technical Aerodynamics. Mr. Parkinson. 

M. E- 421, 422, 423. Aircraft Engines. 3-3-8 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Option in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. Prerequisite : M. E. 307-08-09. 

Thermal and mechanical characterictic of high-speed internal combus- 
tion engines; their operation, performance, and design. Lichty, Internal 
Combustion Engines. Mr. Rice. 

M. E. 425, 426, 427. Airplane Design. 3-3-3 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Option in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. Prerequisite: E. M. 213, 222, C. E. 321 and M. E. 323. 

A study of the design and construction of aircraft. Teichmann, Airplane 
Design Manual. Mr. Sanford. 

M. E. 431, 432, 433. Aeronautical Laboratory. 1-1-1 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Option in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. Prerequisite: M. E. 313-14-15. 

Advanced study and testing in the field of air-cooled and liquid-cooled in- 
ternal combustion engines and their auxiliaries. Wind tunnel tests on air 
foils and models; tests of wings and structural members; tests of fuels and 
lubricants, and tests in applied metallurgy. Rice, Mechanical Engineering 
Laboratory. Messrs. Rice and Sanford. 

M. E. 441. Aircraft Instruments and Avigation. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: M. E. 323. 

This course deals with the instruments used in aircraft engine operation, 
flight indication, and in avigation. The uses, principle of operation, and 
calibration is studied in detail. The fundamentals of avigation include prob- 
lems in avigation such as course plotting, radius of action from fixed and mov- 
ing bases and interception. Lecturer's Notes. Mr. Parkinson. 

M. E. 442. Air Transportation. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: M. E. 323. 

The various phases of air transportation and airline operation are studied 
in this course. This includes a brief survey of existing conditions, factors 
governing development, methods of large scale aircraft operation, personnel 
organization and aviation law. Lecturer's Notes. Mr. Parkinson. 



256 [Mechanical Engineering] 

M. E. 443. Aircraft Propeller Design. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: M. E. 323. 

The various theories are discussed in this design course. This embraces 
effect of blade shape, tip speed, and gearing on propeller performance. The 
various types of propellers are studied in detail. Weick, Aircraft Propeller 
Design. Mr. Parkinson. 

M. K 445, 446, 447. Furniture Design and Construction. 3-4-5 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering III. Prerequisite: M. E. 
341-42-43. 

Theory and practice in construction and finishing. Factory processes and 
layout for quantity production. Dean, Modem American Period Furniture. 

Mr. Wheeler. 

M. E. 451-452-453, Heating and Air Conditioning II. 3-3-3 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering IV. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 307-8-9 and M. E. 313-14-15. 

Principles of heating, ventilation and refrigeration as applied to air con- 
ditioning. Study of design and operation of air conditioning systems. Allen 
and Walker, Heating and Air Conditioning. Messrs. Rice and Vaughan. 

M. E, 455, 456, 457. Heating and Air Conditioning Lab. 1-1-1 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering IV. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 313-314-315. 

The work consists of the study and testing of heating and air-conditioning 
units, systems and controls. The testing of refrigerating equipment, ducts, 
methods of air distribution, fuel burning equipment, dust control equipment 
and heat resisting materials. American Society of Heating and Ventilating 
Engineers Guide. Mr. Rice. 

M. E. 458, 459. Heating and Air Conditioning Design. 0-3-3 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering IV. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 307-8-9 and M. E. 313-4-5. 

Desigfn calculations are made from given conditions for a heating plant 
and an air conditioning system, materials listed and cost of installation 
estimated. American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers Guide. 

Messrs. Rice and Vaughan. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 257 

M. E. 461, 462, 463. Experimental Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. E. 313-14-15 or equivalent as approved by faculty group. 

A course in advanced engineering principles applied to a specific project 
dealing with heat power, hydraulic machinery, metallography, aerodynamics, 
or general experimental work. A seminar period is provided and a written 
report required. Messrs. Rice, Vaughan and Wheeler. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

M. E. 501, 502, 503. Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite : M. E. 307-8-9 and M. E. 407-8-9. 

A further development of the thermodynamic equations and their appli- 
cation to advanced engineering problems. Mr. Hoefer, Mr. Rice. 



M. E. 505, 506, 507. Internal Combustion Engine Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. E. 421-22-23 and 407-8-9. 

A thorough study of the field of Internal Combustion Engines together 
with the design of an engine to meet specific requirements. Pye: Internal 
Combustion Engines Vol. I and II. Mr. Rice. 

*M. E. 513, 514, 515. Power Plant Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E, 401-2-3 and M. E. 307-8-9. 

The design of a plant to fulfill conditions obtained by investigation and 
research; specifications for design and installation. 

Mr. Hoefer, Mr. Vaughan. 

*M. E. 517, 518, 519. Design of Heating and Ventilating System. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 404 and M. E. 407-8-9. 

The study and the design of a heating system for specific conditions; 
specifications for installation and performance tests of heating equipment. 

Mr. Rice, Mr. Vaughan. 

M. E. 521, 522, 523. Mechanical Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 401-2-3 and M. E. 404. 

Research and thesis in connection with M. E. 513-14-15 or M. E. 517- 
18-19, or M. E. 505, 6, 7. Mr. Rice, Mr. Vaughan. 



* Only one of these courses to be offered during: any College year. 



258 [Military Science] 

M. E. 525, 526, 527. Advanced Aerodynamics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 417-18-19. 

Wind-tunnel research. First term: a study of tests performed. Second 
term; a series of experiments. Third term: the compilation and interpreta- 
tion of the results. Mr. Parkinson. 

M. E. 531, 532, 533. Aerodynamic Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 431-32-33. 

Research and thesis in connection with M. K. 411-12-13. Mr. Parkinson. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Mil. 101, 102, 103. Military Science L 2-2-2 

This, the first-year basic course, is required of all physically fit freshmen. 

The National Defense Act and the R. 0. T. C, Military Courtesy and 
Discipline, Military Hygiene and First Aid, Leadership, Rifle Marksman- 
ship, Map Reading, Military Organization, Current International Situation, 
Military History and Policy, and Obligations of Citizenship. 

MIL 201, 202, 203. Military Science II. 2-2-2 

This, the second-year basic course, is required of all physically fit sopho- 
mores who have completed Military Science 101. 

Leadership, Musketry, Automatic Rifle, Scouting and Patrolling, Combat 
Principles of the Rifle Squad and Platoon; Interior Guard Duty and Mili- 
tary History. 

Mil. 301, 302, 303. Military Science III. 3 3-3 

Prerequisite: Ms. II. 

This, the first-year advanced course, is elective for selected juniors. 

Aerial Photograph Reading, Leadership, Machine Gun, 37 MM. Gun, 
Three-inch Trench Mortar, Combat Principles, Supply and Mess Manage- 
ment, Field Fortifications, Care and Operation of Motor Vehicles, and 
Defense Against Chemical Warfare. 

Mil. 401, 402, 403. Military Science IV. 3-3-3 

This, the second year advanced course, is required of all seniors who have 
completed the first-year advanced course. Prerequisite: Ms. III. 

Military Law, Ofiicers Reserve Corps Regulations, Military History and 
Policy, Anti-Aircraft Defense, Leadership, Combat Principles of the Rifle 



[Modern Languages] 259 

Company, Heavy Weapons Company, Tanks and Mechanization, Combat In- 
telligence, and Signal Communications. 

Full credit will be given for work at other institutions maintaining a 
Senior unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps as shown by the students' 
record. Form 131 A. G. 0., kept by the Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Basic Courses 

French 

*M. L. 101, 102. Elementary French. 3.3.O 

This course consists of a series of lectures on the structure, diction, pro- 
nunciation, and other matters of technique of the French language, sup- 
plemented by easy readings and translations. No previous training in the 
language is necessary. Individual reports and conferences are required. 

Mr. Ballenger, Mr. Garodnick. 

*M. L. 201. Elementary French Prose. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 101-102 or Equivalent. 

This course consists of reading and translation of easy French, lectures 
on the structure of the French language, diction, and pronunciation. The 
work is conducted in such manner that the student's choice in reading mate- 
rial is a matter of individual need. Individual reports and conferences are 
^e^^^^^d- Mr. Ballenger. 

M. L. 202. Intermediate French Prose. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: M. L. 201 or Equivalent. 

This course is based upon a study of prose reading material which is 
largely historical in nature. Attention is given to the acquisition and ex- 
tension of the student's basic vocabulary. Individual translation, parallel 
readings, and reports are required. Mr. Ballenger. 

German 

M. L. 103, 104. Elementary German. 3-3-0 

This course consists of a series of lectures on the structure and technique 
of the German language, supplemented by a series of easy readings and 
translations. No previous training in the language is necessary. Individual 
reports and conferences are required. Mr. Hinkle, Mr. Garodnick. 

and%'^O^^^n'd'lf1o''3^?ot''a';^i m!" ""'" ^^^^^^^^^ ^e considered the equivalent of M. L. 101-102. 



260 [Momuv Langdacss] 

•M. L. 203. Elementary German Prose. 0-0-3 

7.-/- ::^r = r : r -:; :: roic.rr ^r.; :rar.;.ation of easj' German, supple- 
rr.-zr.-.i- -•:.-. .r.:-,--i5 :r. -.r.i 5::u;:ure and idiom of the German langruage. 
T:.; vr... s ;:r.:-::-: :n such a manner that the student's choice of read- 
ir.,- r.i: : 3.. = i r. i.:^r of individual need. Individual reports and confer- 
er.ies are re:_-.rei. Mr. Hinkle. 

M. L. 204. Intermediate German Prose- 3-0-0 

Prr- ;.;.:- M. L. 203 or Equivalent. (1) 

7:.-- ;;jr;r is bssed upon a study of prose reading material which is 
'.i.-.-T^y -;.= ::r::a] ir. nat-ire. Atter.rlon is given to the acquisition and ex- 
:;-.-:- ; 'r.i :::;:= : - •• -:a:ulary. Individual translations, parallel 

mz.r.zs. ar.- ir- r:; .-re re:u.red. Mr. Hinkle. 



SpamA 

•M. L. 105-106. Elementary Spanish. 3-3-0 

This cturse ::--7:s :f a series of lectures on the structure, diction, pro- 
ar. i ::her r;.a::ers of technique of the Spanish language, sup- 
y ei;v rraI;-.?5. and translations. No previous training in the 
r.-;r — ^.y. I:.r; . . ;ual reports and conferences are required. 

Mr. Balleng^r, Mr. Garodnick. 



■, . a . 



"M. L. 205. Elementary Spanish Prose. 0-0-3 

Pre: ;:::-. :r : li. 1. 105-106 or Equivalent. 

This couisi cir.s-;:; :f rescir.e and translation of easy Spanish, lectures 
on the structure :' tr.r ..r. r.; ee. ir.i.n and pronunciation. The work is 
conducted in su:r. a ":.y :-.a-. :'e =::.:.er.:"s choice of reading material is a 
matter of indivicual r.eei. Ir.i:v.i_a'. rep;::i and conferences are required. 

Mr. Ballengrer. 

>I. L. 206. Intermediate Spanish Prose. 3-0-0 

Pre::; Hi: : v. L. 205 or Equivalent. 

Jr.i ; u.ife :; cased upon a stody of prose reading material which is 
large. y ...-::.: 3.. :r. r.ature. Attenticm is griven to the acquisition and exten- 
sion :; :.-e V-er.t's basic vocabulary. Individual translations, parallel read- 
ings, a-: .r;;r-.i are required. Mr. Ballenger. 

* ~y ■ T^i^ -- 'r^gi-ichcK'. work -srir ordiiiarily be considered the eqniTBlent of M. I^ 105. 106, 



[Modern Languages] 261 
* Technical or Scientific Courses 

M. L. 301. Technical French. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: M. L. 202 or Equivalent. 

This course consists of a series of readings and translations of relatively 
simple technical French, supplemented by lectures on technical terminology, 
vocabulary analysis, and other matters of linguistic technique. The work 
is designed to meet the needs of students whose interest in the language is 
primarily that of the acquisition of a reading ability. Since the choice 
of reading material is adjusted to individual needs, it may be taken by 
students of varying degrees of previous linguistic training. 

Mr. Ballenger. 

M. L. 302. Introductory Scientific French. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 202 or Equivalent. 

This course is based upon a study of scientific French of intermediate 
difficulty, supplemented •with lectures on scientific terminology and other 
matters of linguistic technique. The needs of students whose interest is 
that of the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language is constantly 
kept in view. The basic techniques of translation are explained and demon- 
strated by means of personal conferences. Mr. Ballenger, Mr. Garodnick. 

M. L. 401, 402, 403. Advanced Scientific French. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 301, or 302, or equivalent. 

This course is based upon a study of French scientific literature appearing 
in current bulletins, magazines and technical journals. Students are given 
the opportunity of working a translation project in connection with their 
subject of major interest. Special attention is given to the comprehension 
of the thought of the article under consideration and its accurate rendition 
into English. Parallel readings, reports, and conferences are required. 

Mr. Hinkle, Mr. Ballenger. 

M. L. 303. Technical German. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: M. L. 204, or Equivalent. 

This course consists of a series of readings and translations of relatively 
simple technical German, supplemented by lectures on technical terminology, 
word order, vocabulary analysis and other matters of linguistic technique. 
The work is designed to meet the needs of students whose interest in the 
language is primarily that of the acquisition of a reading ability. Since 
the choice of reading material is adjusted to individual needs, it may be 
taken by students of varying degrees of previous linguistic training. 

Mr. Hinkle. 



• Students registered in advanced technical and scientific courses are given the opportunity 
of doing a translation project in connection with the Translation Service of the department. 
When such project is satisfactorily completed and accepted, it may be substituted in lieu of an 
examination as evidence of reading ability. This procedure is recommended as the preferable 
method of preparation for the ac<iuisition of a reading knowledge of the language concerned. 



262 [Modern Languages] 

M. L. 304. Introductory Scientific German. 0-0-3 

This course is based upon a study of scientific German of intermediate dif- 
ficulty supplement with lectures on scientific terminology and other matters 
of linguistic technique. The needs of students whose interest is that of the 
acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language is constantly kept in view. 
The basic techniques of translation are explained and demonstrated by means 
of personal conferences. Mr. Hinkle, Mr. Garodnick. 

M. L. 404, 405, 406. Advanced Scientific German. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 303, or 304, or Equivalent, 

This course is based upon a study of German scientific literature appear- 
ing in current bulletins, magazines, and technical journals. Students are 
given the opportunity of working a translation project in connection with 
their subject of major interest. Special attention is given to the compre- 
hension of the thought of the article under consideration and its accurate 
rendition into English. Parallel readings, reports, and conferences are 
required. Mr. Hinkle, Mr. Garodnick. 

M. L. 305. Technical and Industrial Spanish. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite : M. L. 206, or Equivalent. 

This course consists of a study of technical and industrial literature. 
Particular attention is given to the special terminology characteristic of 
such literature with a view to the acquisition of a practical vocabulary. In- 
dividual conferences and reports are required. Mr. Ballenger. 

M. L. 306. Introductory Scientific Spanish. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 206, or Equivalent. 

This course consists of a series of readings and translations of relatively 
simple scientific Spanish, supplemented by lectures on scientific terminology, 
vocabulary analysis, and other matters of linguistic technique. The work 
is designed to meet the needs of students whose interest in the language is 
primarily that of the acquisition of a reading ability. Since the choice of 
reading material is adjusted to indiNidual needs, it may be taken by students 
of varying degrees of previous linguistic training. 

Mr. Ballenger. 

M. L. 407, 408, 409. Advanced Scientific Spanish. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 305, or 306, or Equivalent. 

This course is based upon a study of Spanish scientific literature appear- 
ing in current bulletins, magazines, and technical journals. Students are 
given the opportunity of working a translation project in connection with 
their subject of major interest. Special attention is given to the compre- 



[Modern Languages] 263 

hension of the thought of the article under consideration and its accurate 
rendition into English. Parallel readings, reports, and conferences are re- 
quired. Mr. Ballenger, Mr. Garodnick. 



General Courses 

M. L. 410. Masterpieces of French Literature. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

This course consists of a study of outstanding masterpieces of French 
literature. It is conducted in such a manner as to grive a brief outline of 
French literary development. Parallel reading may be done either in trans- 
lation or in French. An open elective. No language prerequisites. 

Mr. Hinkle. 

M. L. 411. Masterpieces of German Literature. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing, 

This course consists of a study of outstanding masterpieces of German 
literature. It is conducted in such a manner as to give a brief outline of 
German literary development. Parallel readings may be done either in 
translation or in German. An open elective. No langruage prerequisites. 

Mr. Hinkle. 

M. L. 412. Masterpieces of Spanish Literature. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

This course consists of a study of outstanding masterpieces of Spanish 
literature. It is conducted in such a manner as to give a brief outline of 
Spanish literary development. Parallel readings may be done either in trans- 
lation or in Spanish. An open elective. No language prerequisites. Mr. Hinkle. 

M. L- 413. French, German and Spanish Civilization. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

This is a course dealing with the development of French, German, and 
Spanish civilizations. The reading material is supplemented by lectures and 
reports on the manners and customs of the respective culture under con- 
sideration. Topics, such as racial stocks, people, social classes, governments, 
politics and education are given special consideration. Parallel readings, re- 
ports, and conferences are required. An open elective. No language pre- 
requisites, Mr, Hinkle, 



264 [Physical Education] 

M. L. 414. The Development of Language. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

This is a course covering the various phases of linguistic growth, with the 
object of providing a basis for intelligent language appreciation. Problems 
as to the origin of langnJage, linguistic change, grammatical categories, dia- 
lects, standard language, word order, inflection, isolation, agglutination, 
etymology, and other linguistic processes are given special consideration. 
Parallel readings, reports, and conferences are required. An open elective. 
No language prerequisites. Mr. Hinkle. 



M. L. 415. Masterpieces of Foreign Literature. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

This course consists of a study of outstanding literary productions in each 
of the various types of literature, and lectures on the cultural background 
out of which they have developed. It is designed primarily to meet the needs 
of students who wish to supplement their knowledge of their own literature 
with a survey of similar contributions in the literature of other civilizations. 
Special attention is given to the literary monuments of France, Germany, 
Spain, and Italy. Since the material studied is done in translation, no foreign 
language prerequisites are necessary. Daily reports and conferences are 
required. Mr. Hinkle. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

Courses and Activities 
P. E. 101, 102, 103. Fundamental Activities and Hygiene. 1-1-1 

Required of all freshmen except those excused on the recommendation of 
the college physician. 

Individual health and physical efficiency of each student based on stand- 
ardized athletic, gymnastic and efficiency tests. Lectures on personal hygiene 
required in one term only. Mr. Miller and Staff, 

P. E. 201, 202, 203. Sports Activities. 1-1-1 

Required of all sophomores except those excused upon recommendation 
of college physician. Prerequisite: P. E. 101-2-3. 

Election is permitted in popular sports for healthful exercise and a fair 
degree of skill in them. Mr. Miller and Staff. 



[Physics] 265 

P. E. Ill, 112, 113. Restricted Activities. 1-1-1 

Required of all freshmen excused from P. E, 101-2-3. 

Special activities for those students who cannot meet the requirements of 
the regular course because of physical handicap. Mr. Miller and Staff. 

P. E. 211, 212, 213. Restricted Activities. 1-1-1 

Required of all sophomores excused from P. E. 201-2-3. 
Special activities for those students who cannot meet the requirements of 
the regular course because of a physical handicap. 

Mr. Miller and Staff. 

P. E. 301-382-303. Theory and Practice First Aid. 1 or 1 or 1 

Elective to Juniors and Seniors. 

Hours by arrangement. 

This course is presented in ten 2 hr. periods. It covers anatomy and 
physiology sufficiently to proceed with bandages, dressings, wounds, shock, 
injuries to bones, joints, muscles, poisons, unconsciousness, artificial respira- 
tion and common emergencies. Students completing the course are awarded 
the American Red Cross Certificate. 

Mr. Sermon, Mr. Winkler, Mr. Bartlett. 

P. E. 401. Social Recreation. 0-0-3 

Elective to teachers of agriculture. 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. 

This course is especially prepared to meet the demands made of teachers 
of agriculture to assume leadership in social and recreational activities. 
The content of the course deals with the organization, supervision and prac- 
tice work in athletic and social activities for parties, picnics, campus, ban- 
quets and similar occasions. Mr. Miller. 

PHYSICS 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Phys. 102. Physics Survey. 0-3-0 

An introductory survey of physical phenomena, with the scientific method 
developed and conclusion drawn therefrom; designed for the enrichment 
of the student's thinking. Mr. Heck. 

Phys. 105, 106, 107. General Physics. 4-4-4 

A general survey of the phenomena, laws, and devices of modern physical 
science. Millikan, Gale, and Edwards, First Course in Physics for College. 

Mr. Stainback, Mr. Bartlett. 



266 [Physics] 

Phys. Ill, 112, 113. Physics for Textile Students. 4-4-4 

Required of freshmen in the Textile School. Prerequisite : Math. 100. 
Industrial Physics, with emphasis on practical applications to textile in- 
dustry. Black, College Physics, 2nd edition. 

Messrs. Meares, Lancaster, Crouch. 

Phys. 115. Physics for Agricultural Students. 5 or 5 or 5 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

Elements of machines, physics of heat and weather, and applications of 
light and electricity on the farm. Henderson, The New Physics of Every- 
day Life. Mr. Heck, Mr. Stainback, Mr. Bartlett. 

Phys. 123. Descriptive Astronomy. 0-0-S 

Elective. 

The sun and planets, the stars and modern research in astronomy; ob- 
servations with telescope. Baker, Introduction to AstronoTny... Mr. Heck. 

Phys. 201, 202, 203. Physics for Engineers. 4-4-4 

Required of sophomores in Engineering. Prerequisite: Math. 102. 

General Physics, with emphasis on problems in engineering applications, 
and the subjects of acoustics and light not otherwise appearing in the cur- 
riculum of most engineers. Smith, Elements of Physics. 

Messrs. Heck, Derieux, Meares, Lancaster, Stainback, Bartlett, Crouch^ 

Carroll. 

Phys. 205, 206, 207. Physics for General Engineering. 5-5-5 

Required of sophomores in general engineering. Prerequisite: Math. 102. 

Similar to Physics for Engineers but including broader development and 
more applications of the subject. Mr. Bartlett, Mr. Carroll. 

Phys. 306. Electron Tubes and Their Application to Industry. 0-0-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: Phys. 113 or 203. Math. 103. 

Thermionic emission, various thermionic emitters, secondary emission, 
space charge, discharge in gases, photoelectricity, photoconductivity, and 
the photovoltaic effect. Laboratory substituted for lectures as needed. 
Koller, Physics of Electron Tubes. Mr. Stainback. 



[Physics] 267 
Phys. 311. Light in Industry. 3.O-O or 0-0-3 

Required for Textile students; elective for all other students. Prere- 
quisite: Phys. 113 or equivalent. 

Fundamentals of light, illumination and color; psychology of color; 
standardized color theory with principles applied to selection, mixing, 
matching, lighting, pigments, contrast, and harmony. Mr. Lancaster. 

Phys. 322. Meteorology. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry. Elective for other students. 
Causes of weather change, methods of forecasting, and peculiarities of 
the weather of North Carolina. Blair, Weather Elements. Mr. Heck. 

Phys. 332. Photography. 0-3 or 3 

Elective. Prerequisite: Phys. 113 or equivalent. 

A general study of cameras and lenses; exposure, development, printing, 
emulsion, sensitivity, and filters. Mack and Martin, The Photographic 
Process, ll^r^ Meares. 

Phys. 402, 403. Mechanics. 0-3-3 or 0-4-4 

Elective. Prerequisite: Phys. 203, Math. 303. 

The Physics principles of mechanics. Edser, Physics for Students. 

Mr. Meares. 

Phys. 405, 406. Electricity and Magnetism. 3-3-0 or 4-4-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Phys. 203 and Math. 303. 

Fundamental principles of the subject in a more specialized but inter- 
mediate manner. Laboratory, if taken, increases the course to 4 credits. 
Gilbert, Electricity and Magnetism. Mr. Lancaster. 

Phys. 407. Elementary Modern Physics. 3 or 3 or 3 

Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering and of seniors in Ch. E. 

Prerequisites: Physics 203. Math. 303. 

Evolution of the electron theory, constitution of matter, conduction in 
gases, conduction in non-metallic liquids, conduction in solids, radiation, 
photoelectric emission, thermionic emission. X-rays, radioactivity, cosmic 
rays, transmutation. Hull, Modem Physics. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 413. Acoustics. 0-0-3 

Elective. Prerequisites: Phys. 203. Math, 303. 

Production, propagation, transmission, and reception of sound with spec- 
ial applications to architectural and electrical transmission problems. 
Watson, Sound. Mr. Bartlett. 



268 [Physics] 

Phys. 415, 416. Light. 0-3-3 or 0-4-4 

Elective. Prerequisite: Phys. 203 or 207 and Math. 303. 
Introduction to principles of geometrical and physical optics. Edser, 
Light for Students. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 417. Heat. 3-0-0 

Elective. Prerequisites: Phys. 203 or 207 and Math. 303. 

Methods of temperature measurement, specific heats, thermal expansion 
in solids, in liquids, and in gases, conduction, radiation, kinetic theory of 
gases, change of state, continuity of state, thermodynamics, low tempera- 
tures, high temperatures. Cork, Heat. Mr. Bartlett. 

Phys. 421, 422, 423. Theoretical Mechanics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203 and Math. 303. 

Gyroscopic motion, spiral orbits, compound pendulum, bifilar suspensions, 
coupled systems, damped and forced oscillations, elasticity, surface tension, 
osmosis, motion of fluids, viscosity, and wave motion. Preston, Mechanics 
of Particles and Rigid Bodies. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 426. Spectroscopy in Industry. 0-3-0 or 0-4-O 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203 and Math. 303. 

Elementary principles, spectroscopic equipment, spectra, spectrum analy- 
sis, quantitative spectroscopy, industrial applications of emission, spectrum 
analysis, spectrophotometry, absorption spectroscopy, application of absorp- 
tion spectroscopy, concluding survey. Judd Lewis, Spectroscopy in Science 
and Industry. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 427. Geometrical Optics. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203 and Math. 303. 

Photometry, intrinsic energy, luminosity, curved mirrors, refraction 
through a prism, refraction at curved surface, thin lens, lenses in system 
of thick lenses, the eye and spectacles, dispersion, aberrations, resolving 
power, achromatic lenses, and optical instruments. Houston, A Treatise on 
Light. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 428, 429. Physical Optics. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203 and Math. 303. 

Velocity of light, composition of wave, velocity of wave transmission, 
wave theory of light, spectra, Doppler effect, absorption, anomalous disper- 
sion, interference, interferometers, color photography, diffraction, and grat- 
ings, polarization, and saccharimetry. Houston, A Treatise on Light. 

Mr. Derieux. 



[Physics] 269 

Phys. 431, 432, 433. Modern Physics. 3-3-3 

Elective, Prerequisites: Phys. 203 or 207 and Math. 301. 

Alternating currents, electromagnetic radiation, moving charge, the elec- 
tron, kinetic theory of gases, thermionics, photoelectric effect, X-rays, spec- 
tra, atomic structure, ionizing potential, radio and television, radioactivity, 
isotopes, geophysics, astrophysics, relativity, specific heats, high frequency 
sound, recent ideas. Ritchmeyer, Modem Physics. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 438, 439. Experimental Optics. 0-2-2 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203 and Math. 303. 

Laboratory work with the photometer, spectrometer, gratings, Fresnel 
byprism and mirrors, polarimeter, saccharimeter, and interferometer. Mann, 
Manual of Optics. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 443. History of Physics. 0-0-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: One course in College Physics. 
Development of Physics from its beginnings to the present time. Crew, 
Rise of Modey-n Physics. Mr. Heck. 

Phys. 445, 446, 447. Research. 3-3-3 

Elective. Prerequisite: Phys. 203 or 207 or 213. 

Undergraduate research given according to the student's ability. 

Mr. Heck. 

Phys. 451, 452, 453. Physics Colloquium. 

Current research reviewed by department and advanced students; meets 
weekly at night throughout the year. Mr. Heck. 

Phys. 514, 515, 517. Advanced Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203 and Math. 301. 

Theorem of Gauss, energy in media, boundary conditions, condensers, elec- 
trometers, dielectric constants, migration of ions, thermodynamics of re- 
versible cells, thermo-electricity, galvanometers, magnetic circuits, growth 
and decay of currents, oscillatory discharge, and alternating currents. 
Starling, Advanced Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. Staff. 

Phys. 522. Discharge of Electricity in Gases. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Phys. 213 and Math. 203. 

Production of ions in gases, motion of ions, velocity in an electric field, 
diffusion, recombination, determination of atomic charge, ionization by col- 
lision, discharge tubes, cathode rays, positive rays, and X-rays. Crowther, 
Ions, Electrons, and Ionizing Radiations. Mr. Derieux. 



270 [Poultry] 

Phys. 525. Atomic Theory. 3-0-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Phys. 312. 

Bohr's model, spectral formula, elliptical orbits, fine structure of spectral 
lines, Stark effect, Zeeman effect, Roentgen rays, Moseley's law, periodic 
system, isotopes, radioactivity, atomic nuclei, ionization, spectra and atomic 
structure, fluoroscence, atomic magnetism. White, Atomic Spectra. Staff. 

Phys. 531, 532, 533. Research. 3-3-3 

Open to all graduates. Every graduate student sufficiently prepared is 
expected to undertake research in some particular field of Physics. At 
least six hours a week must be devoted to such research. 

Mr. Heck, Mr. Derieux. 

POULTRY 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Ponl. 201. General Poultry. 3-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 
Fundamental principles of poultry production. 

Mr. Williams, Mr. Dearstyne. 

Ponl. 301. Poultry Judging. 4-0-0 

Required of juniors in Poultry Production, elective for others. Prere- 
quisite: Poul. 201. 

Poul. 303. Incubation and Brooding. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Poultry Production, elective for others. 
Prerequisites: Phys. 115, Poul. 201. 

Principles of incubation and brooding operation, feeding, housing, and 
rearing baby chicks. Mr. Williams. 

PouL 311, 312. Poultry Anatomy and Physiology. 3-3-0 

Required of juniors in Poultry Science; elective for others. Prerequisite: 
Poul. 201, Zool. 202. 

A foundation for courses in poultry diseases and nutrition. Mr. Cook. 

PouL 322. Poultry Production. 0-4-0 

Elective. Prerequisite: Poul. 201. 

Developed for vocational teachers of agriculture. Poultry disease prob- 
lems; nutritional problems; judging methods, 

Mr. DearstjTie, Mr. Williams. 



[Poultry] 271 

Poul. 332. Preparation and Grading of Poultry Products. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Poultry; elective for others. Prerequisite: Poul. 
201. 

Commercial fattening, grading and marketing eggrs. Refrigerating and 
storage, markets. Mr. Williams. 

Poul. 333. Poultry Nutrition, 0-0-4 

Required of juniors in Poultry Production; elective for juniors in Agri- 
culture. Prerequisites: Chem. 101, Zool. 101 and 102, Poul. 201. 

Feeds and feeding: physiology of digestion, absorption, and elimination; 
mineral and vitamin requirements. Mr. Dearstyne, Mr. Cook. 

Poul. 342. Turkey Production. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Poultry Science, elective for others. Prerequisites: 
Poul. 101, Zool. 411. 

Selection and mating of turkeys, incubation and brooding turkey poults, 
turkey nutrition, grading and marketing turkeys. Mr. Nesbit. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Poul. 401, 402. Poultry Diseases. 4-4-0 

Required of seniors in Poultry Science, elective for others. Prerequisites: 
Poul. 201, Zool. 102, Poul. 401 prerequisite to Poul. 402. 

Sanitation, parasite infestations and control, contagious and non-con- 
tagious diseases of the fowl, Mr. Gauger, 

PouL 403, Sero-Diagnosis in Poultry Diseases. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Poultry Science. Prerequisites: Poul. 201, 401. 
Basic immunological theory and technic. Antigen and serological tests. 

Mr. Greaves. 

Poul. 412, Commercial Poultry Plant Management. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Poultry Science, elective for others. Prerequisite: 
Poul. 201. 

Development and maintenance of a commercial poultry plant, custom 
hatching, and commercial incubation; cost of production. Mr. Williams. 



272 [Poultry] 

Poul. 413. Selection and Mating of Poultry. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Poultry Production; elective for juniors in Agri- 
culture. Prerequisites: Poul. 201, Genetics, Zool. 411. 

Methods of recognition and selection for mating from both standard and 
utility standpoints. Study of progeny performance. Mr. Dearstyne. 

Poul. 423. Senior Seminar. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Poultry. Mr. Dearstyne. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

Poul. 501, 502, 503. Poultry Histology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: 311, 312, 401, 402, Zool. 461. 

General histology of the tissues and special histology of the various sys- 
tems of the body. Mr. Cook. 

Poul. 511, 512, 513. Poultry Pathology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: 311, 312, 401, 501, 502, 503. 

Various disease processes which may take place within the bird's body. 

Mr. Cook. 

Poul. 521. Poultry Physiology. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: 311, 312, 401, 402, 501, 502. 

This course accompanies histology and pathology to emphasize the ef- 
fects of diseases on normal physiology. Mr. Cook. 

PouL 531, 532, 533. Poultry Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Poultry. 

Problems in Poultry nutrition, diseases, marketing, and breeding may be 
undertaken. Such problems shall be conducted on a definitely outlined basis 
acceptable to the department. Poultry Staff. 

Poul. 541, 542, 543. Seminar. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credit hours in Poultry. Mr. Dearstyne. 

Poul. 551, 552, 553. Production Studies and Experiments. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Poul. 201. 333, 401. 402. 

Problems in Poultry nutrition, breeding, and commercial poultry produc- 
tion and marketing. Mr. Dearstyne. 



[Psychology] 273 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychol. 200. Introduction to Psychology. 3 or 3 or 3 

A study of the general characteristics and development of human be- 
havior, emphasizing the problems of motivation, emotion, learning, and 
thinking. Staff. 

Psychol. 200-A. B. C, Introduction to Psychology Laboratory. 1-1-1 

Mr. McGehee. 

Psychol. 290. Social Psychology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

Social applications of Psychology; social stimulation, response, and at- 
titudes. Mr. McGehee. 

Psychol. 291. Psychology of Personality. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

A study of the factors involved in the development of the normal per- 
sonality. Mr. McGehee. 

Psychology 302. Applied Psychology. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

The practical application of psychological principles in special fields. 
Attention will be given to the analysis of problems arising in business, pro- 
fessional, and everyday life. Special reference to the psychological aspects 
of advertising, salesmanship and personnel selection. Mr. McGehee. 

Psychol. 303. Educational Psychology. 3-3-0 

(For description of the course see Ed. 303) Mr 

Psychol. 338. Industrial Psychology. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern in- 
dustry. The factors involved in the employment of men, as well as specific 
matters such as industrial learning, methods of work, monotony, fatigue, 
illumination, accidents, and the morale of workers will be considered. 

Psychol. 468. Measurements in Educational Psychology. 3-0-0 

(For description of the course see Ed. 468.) Mr. McGehee. 

PsychoL 469. Psychological Techniques in Student Counseling. 3-0-0 

(For description of course see Ed. 469) Mr. McGehee. 

Psychol. S. and Ex. 471. Psychology of Exceptional Children. 3 credits 



274 [Sociology] 

PsychoL 476. Psychology of Adolescence. 0-0-3 

(For description of course see Ed. 476.) 

PsychoL Ex. 477. Psychology of Secondary Education. 3 credits 

Psychol. 490. Problems in Industrial Psychology. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Twelve credits in Psychology and related fields. 

Designed for students interested in a study of psychological aspects of 
industrial situations. Collateral reading and individual reports will charac- 
terize the course. Staff. 

PsychoL 503. Problems in Educational Psychology. 3-3-0 

(For description of the course see Ed. 503.) Mr _._ 



SOCIOLOGY 

Courses for Undergraduates 
Soc. 101, 102, 103. Human Relations. 2-2-2 

Required of students in the Schools of Agriculture and Textiles who do 
not take Military Science. Elective for others. Not open to upperclassmen. 

An orientation course, designed to introduce the student to the social 
problems of our time. Staff. 

Soc. 202. Introductory Sociology. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of students in Forestry; elective for others. 
An introduction to the basic principles underlying social life and the 
factors connected with it. Identical with the first term of General Sociology. 

Messrs. Winston and Mayo. 

Soc 202, 203. General Sociology. 3-3-0 

An analysis of the fundamental factors affecting life in modem society. 
The second term of the course deals with practical social problems, using 
the tools developed in the first term. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. Ex. 210. General Anthropology. 3 credits 

An introduction to the study of man; a consideration of his development 
from earliest forms to the present. Mr. Winston. 



[Sociology] 275 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Soc. Ex. 400. Criminology. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Causes and conditions leading to crime, methods of handling criminals, 
and various factors producing criminal behavior. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 401. Social Pathology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Outstanding pathological problems reacting from social life; social and 
individual adjustments. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. Ex. 402. Sociology of City Life. 3 credits 

Elective. Prerequisite : Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Problems arising from growth of modern town and city life; city plan- 
ning in regard to social and industrial progress. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. Ex. 403. Leadership. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Nine term credits in the Social Sciences, including So- 
ciology 202. 

A study of leadership in various fields of American life, together with 
the analysis of the various factors, inherent or acquired, that are asso- 
ciated with leadership, past and present. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. Ex. 404. Educational Sociology. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Nine term credits in the Social Sciences, including So- 
ciology 202. 

Application of the principles of Sociology to the practical problems of 
education with emphasis placed on the relationship between adjustment 
processes in the school and in the larger social world. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 406. The Family Organization. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Premarital, marital, and family relationships; effects of present-day 
social changes; various efforts to stabilize the family. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 407. Race Relations. 3-0-0 

Elective. Prerequisite : Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Race problems in America and in other countries; social, economic, and 
educational status of racial groups; international relationships. 

Mr. Winston. 



276 [Soils] 

Soc. Ex. 408. Social Anthropology. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202 or Soc. 210, supplemented by credits in related 
fields. 

Analysis of present-day culture, with particular reference to the United 
States and its regional variations. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 410. Industrial Sociology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Influence of industrial life; occupations as social and industrial factors j 
problems arising from our industrial era. Mr. Winston. 

Soc 411. Population Problems. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 

Analyses of outstanding problems connected with the growth and de- 
cline of populations in the United States; factors connected with birth and 
death rates; marriage rates; discussion of the changing quality of popu- 
lation groups. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 415. Research in Applied Sociology. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: Nine hours of Sociology, and permission of the instructor. 

Individual research problems in applied fields of sociology, such as prob- 
lems of the family, of population, of social work; rural-urban relationships; 
student success; American leadership. Mr. Winston. 

SOILS 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Soils 201. Soils. 4 or 4 or 4 

Prerequisite: Geol. 120 and Chem. 101-2-3. Required of sophomores in 
Agriculture and Agricultural Chemistry, and of juniors in Forestry and 
Wildlife Conservation and Management. 

A study of the properties of soils and their relation to soil management, 

Mr. Clevenger, Mr. Lutz. 

Soils 221. Soil Fertility. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Soils 201. Required of juniors in Pomology, Vegetable Gar- 
dening, Floriculture, Field Crops, Vocational Agriculture, and of seniors 
in Agricultural Engineering. 

A course dealing with the chemical and biological properties of soils as, 
related to soil productivity. Mr. Lutz. 



[Soils] 277 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Soils 302. Fertilizers. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 201 and Chem. 221. Required of juniors in Pomology, 
Vegetable Gardening, Field Crops, Floriculture, and Vocational Agricul- 
ture. 

Sources, manufacture, and characteristics of fertilizer materials, utiliza- 
tion of fertilizers ; calculation of formulas and analyses of mixed fertilizers. 

Mr. Clevenger. 

Soils 312. The Soils of North Carolina. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Soils 201. Required of juniors in Soils and Floriculture, 
and of seniors in Wildlife Conservation, Vegetable Gardening, and Agri- 
cultural Economics; Farm Business Option. 

The origin, chai-acteristics, and classification of North Carolina soils. 
Field trips. Mr. Lutz. 

Soils 323. Soil Survey. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Ten credit hours in Soils including Soils 312 or equiva- 
lent. Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Making soil maps, and writing soil-survey reports. Mr. Clevenger. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soils 401. Pedology. 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in soils. Prerequisite: Soils 221. 
Soil groups of the world, with special attention to the characteristics 
and development of the soils in the United States. Mr. Clevenger. 

Soils 402. Principles and Use of Fertilizers. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Senior standing. Soils 201, and 24 credit hours in 
Chemistry. 

Early theories of fertilizer practises, fertilizer materials, mixed fertiliz- 
ers, the nitrogen problem, trace elements, and other phases. This course 
treats the subject from a more advanced viewpoint than Soils 302. 

Mr. Clevenger. 

Soils 403. Fertilizer Experimentation. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 402, or 302. 

A study of the methods of determining the fertilizer needs of soils. 

Mr. Clevenger. 



278 [Soils] 

Soils 411, 412, 413. Soil Technology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 221, Chem. 211-212. Pwequired of seniors in Soils. 
A course dealing with the physical and chemical properties of soils. 

Mr. Lutz. 

Soils 421. Soil Fertility Evaluating Methods. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Soils 302 and Chem. 213. 

Analysis for total and available elements in the soil and the use of 
analyses in soil diagnosis. Staff. 

Soils 423. Soil Management. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 302. 

Rotations, fertilizer recommendations, and other practical soil manage- 
ment problems for North Carolina soils and cropping systems. 

Mr. Lutz. 

Soils 432. Physical and Colloidal Properties of Soils. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: 18 credits in soils, and Chem. 213. 

Base exchange, absorption phenomena and other physical and colloidal 
soil properties as related to soil fertility. Offered in alternate years. Of- 
fered in 1940-41. Mr. Lutz. 

Soils 433. Soil Conservation and Land Use. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Soils and in Agricultural Engineering. Prere- 
quisite: Soils 221. 

Factors affecting soil deterioration; soil conservation and land use. 

Mr. Lutz. 

Soils 451, 452, 453. Senior Seminar. 1-1-1 

For seniors in Soils. Prerequisite: 15 credits in Soils. 
Reports on problems and current scientific articles dealing with soil 
science. Staff. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Soils 501. Soil Development. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Genesis, morphology, and development of the great soil groups of the 
world as determined by environmental factors. Mr. Lutz. 



[Textiles] 279 

Soils 513. Advanced Principles and Use of Fertilizers. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Problem studies in the manufacture, characteristics, and utilization of 
fertilizers. Mr. Clevenger. 

* Soils 522. Soil Physics. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Advanced study of soil structure, aeration, water relationships, me- 
chanical analyses, and other physical properties of soils. Offered in al- 
ternate years. Mr. Lutz. 

Soils 531, 532, 533. Seminar. l.^.j 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Reports and discussions of problems in Soil Science. Staff. 

Soils 541, 542, 543. Soil Research. 3.3.3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Research in specialized phases of Soil Science. Staff. 

TEXTILES 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Tex. 101, 102, 103. Textile Principles. 2-2-2 

Required of freshmen in all Textile curricula. 

Operation of plain and automatic looms and carding and spinning ma- 
chines. 

Principles of manufacture involved in the textile industry. Elementary 
calculations for yarns and fabrics; harness and reed calculations; loom 
production calculations. Mr. Peeler, Mr. Culberson, Mr. Crawley. 

Tex. 205. Yam Manufacture I. 3.9.0 or 0-0-3 

Tex. 201, 203. Yam Manufacture Laboratory I. l.O-i or 0-1-1 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Mixing of cotton, description and setting of openers, pickers, cards and 
draw frames. Production, speed and draft calculations. Operation and 
fixing of machines. Grinding and setting of cards; setting of draw frame 
rol s and construction of draw frames; weighting of rolls and types of 
roll covering . Mr. Hilton, Mr. Culberson. 

• Not offered in 1940-41. 



280 [Textiles] 

Tex. 211. Knitting I. 2-0-0 or 0-0-2 

Tex. 207, 208, 209. Knitting Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Selection and preparation of knitting yarns, knitting mechanisms, plain 
and rib knitting machines, circular ribbers, and circular automatic ma- 
chines. Operation of machines, practical experiments, hosiery analysis, 
topping, transferring, and looping. Mr, Lewis. 

Tex. 234. Power Weaving. 0-2-0 

Tex. 231, 232. Power Weaving Laboratory. 1-1-0 or 0-1-1 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Construction of auxiliary motions on plain looms. Cams and their con- 
struction. Drop-box loom construction. Methods of pattern chain build- 
ing. Construction and value of pattern multipliers. Timing of drop-box 
motion, and other motions. 

Operation and fixing of plain, automatic and drop-box looms. Pattern 
chain building for drop-box looms. Mr. Nelson, Mr. Peeler, Mr. Crawley. 

Tex. 236, 237. Fabric Structure and Analysis. 0-2-2 or 4-0-0 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Systems of numbering woolen, worsted, silk, linen, rayon, and cotton 
yarn. Plain, twill, and sateen weaves. Ornamentation of plain weaves; 
wave designs; pointed twills; diamond effects; plain and fancy basket 
weaves; warp and filling rib weaves. 

Analj-zing plain, twill, sateen, and other fabrics made from simple 
weaves, ascertaining the number of ends and picks per inch in sample. 
Fabric analysis calculations. Mr. Peeler, Mr. Crawley. 

Tex, 239. Principles of Textile Manufacturing L 3-0-0 

A study of the processes and machines used in textile manufacture, 
planned as an overview course for those preparing to be teachers of indus- 
trial arts in junior and senior high schools or in vocational schools. 

Mr. Nelson, Mr. Hilton, 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 
Tex, 304. Yarn Manufacture IL 0-3-0 

Tex. 301, 302, 303. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory IL 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisite: Yam Manufacture I, Tex. 201, 3, 5. 



[Textiles] 281 
Tex. 310, 311. Yarn Manufacture III. 0-3-3 

Tex. 307, 308, 309. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory IIL 2-2-2 

Required of juniors in Yarn Manufacture. Prerequisite: Yam Manu- 
facture I, Tex. 201, 3, 5. 

Construction of sliver lappers; ribbon lappers; combers; mechanical and 
electrical stop motions; description and setting of the different parts; care 
of machines; fly-frame builder and differential motions. 

Operation and fixing of sliver lappers; ribbon lappers; combers and fly- 
frames. Changing of hank roving, draft and twist. Setting of drafting 
and speeder motions. Mr. Hilton, Mr. Culberson. 

Tex. 316. Knitting II. p 3 ^ 

Tex. 313, 314, 315. Knitting Laboratory 11. 1.1.1 

Elective for Textile students. Prerequisite: Knitting I, Tex. 207 8 9 11 
Advanced circular mechanisms. Hosiery design. Auxiliary knitting ma- 
chinery. Warp and spring needle knitting. Knitting machinery lay-out 
and organization. Production control and costs. Laboratory experiments. 

Mr. Lewis. 

Tex. 335. Dobby Weaving. g.Q.Q or 0-0-3 

Tex. 331, 332, 333. Dobby Weaving Laboratory I. 1.1.1 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing and Yarn Manufacturing 
Elective for others. 

Tex. 337, 338, 339. Dobby Weaving Laboratory 11. 2-2-2 

Required of juniors in Weaving and Designing. Prerequisites: Power 
Weaving, Tex. 231, 2, 4. 

Methods of drawing in and starting up cotton and rayon warps. Setting 
harness shafts. Selection of springs or spring jacks. Construction and 
methods of fixing single and double index dobbies. Methods of pattern- 
chain building. 

Preparation of warps for weaving cotton and rayon fabrics on dobby 
looms; starting up warps in looms; fixing single and double index dobbies- 
pattern^hain building; operation of dobby looms. Mr. Nelson, Mr. Hart. ' 

Tex. 341, 342. Fabric Design and Analysis L 3.3.O or 0-3-3 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing and Wea^-ing and Design- 
ing. Elective for others. 

Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 236, 7. 

Construction of fancy weaves, such as broken twills, cur'ved twiUs en- 
twining twills; granite weaves. Imitation leno; honevcomb weaves- fabrics 



282 [Textiles] 

backed with warp or filling; fabrics ornamented with extra warp or filling; 
combining weaves together to produce new patterns. 

Analyzing samples of fancy fabrics for design, drawing in draft, reed, 
and chain plan. Calculating particulars to reproduce fabrics from data 
obtained from sample. Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 343. Fabric Testing. 0-0-1 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing, Textile Chemistry and 
Dyeing, and Wea\'ing and Designing. Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and 
Analysis, Tex. 236, 7. 

Testing fabrics for strength. Effect of heat upon fabrics. Effect of re- 
gain upon tensile strength. Elasticity of fabrics. Micrometer and cal- 
culated tests for fabric thickness. Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 344. Calculating Fabric Costs. 0-3-0 

Elective for Textile students. Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Anal- 
ysis, Tex. 236, 7. 

Special attention is given to distribution of costs to various productive 
processes, summarizing costs, the determination and use of unit costs, and 
the making of cost reports. Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 345. TexUle Calculations I. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing and Weaving and Design- 
ing. Elective for others. Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Analysis. 
Tex. 236, 7. 

An intensive course in calculations for designing, weaving, and analyzing 
cotton, rayon, silk, wool, worsted and linen yams and fabrics. Weight of 
fabrics, ends and picks per inch. Costing of fabrics. Reed and harness 
calculations. Loom speed and production, Mr. Hart. 

Tex. 347. Principles of Textile Manufacturing II. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Principles of Textile Manufacturing I, Tex. 239. 
A study cf the operation and care of textile machines, planned for those 
who are preparing to be teachers in vocational schools. 

Mr. Nelson, Mr. Hilton. 

Tex. 375. Dyeing L 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

and 
Tex. 371, 372, 373. Dyeing Laboratory L 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 103. 

Physical and chemical properties of textile fibres. Chemicals used in 
preparing fibres for dyeing. Methods of appljing substantive, sulphur. 



[Textiles] 283 

basic, developed, acid, acid chrome, mordant and vat dyes. Effect of 
changes in temperature and volume of the dye bath. Theory of dyeing 
mixed fabrics. Theory of mercerizing. Tests for the chemical constitu- 
ents of the fibres. Dyeing experiments using all the different classes of 
dyes on the various fibres. Tests showing effect of varying such factors as 
bath, temperature and time. Test for fastness to light, washing, cross- 
dyeing, and so forth. Mercerizing experiment. 

Mr. Grimshaw, Mr. Hayes. 

Tex. 381, 382. Dyeing 11. 3-3-0 

and 
Tex. 377, 378, 379. Dyeing Laboratory II. 2-2-2 

Required of juniors in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 103. 

Physical and chemical properties of textile fibres. Lectures on wool, silk, 
rayon, and cotton; hydrometers and chemicals used in dyeing and finishing. 
Application of dyestuffs to different fibres. Effect of changing bath, tem- 
perature, or time factor. Money value and strength tests of dyes. Theory 
of dyeing mixed fabrics. Mercerizing. 

Microscopic examination of textile fibres. Dyeing experiments using 
different classes of dyes on textile fibres. Tests showing the effects of 
varying such factors as bath, temperature, and time. Fastness to light, 
washing, and cross dyeing. Money value and strength of various dyes. 
Mercerizing. Mr. Grimshaw, Mr. Hayes. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Tex. 405. Yarn Manufacture IV. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Tex. 401, 402, 403. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory IV. 1-1-1 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisites: Yarn Manufacture, Tex. 301, 2, 3, 4. 

Tex. 411, 412. Yarn Manufacture V. 3-3-0 

Tex. 407, 408, 409. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory V. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing. Prerequisites: Yarn Manu- 
facture, Tex. 307, 8, 9, 10, 11. 

Spinning; spooling; warping; twisting. Description and setting of dif- 
ferent parts. Builder motions for warp and filling. Bobbin holders, thread 
gruides, traverse motions. Ply yarns. Calculations for twist, speed, and 
production. 

Practical methods of spinning, warping, spooling, winding and twisting. 
Setting of spinning rolls, spinning frame builder motions for warp, filling, 
and combination build. The practical application of all machines in Yarn 
Manufacture. Mr. Hilton, Mr. Culberson. 



284 [Textiles] 

Tex. 413. Textile Calculations IL 3-0-0 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisites: Yam Manufacture II or III, Tex. 304 or 310, 11. 

Principles underlying the calculation of draft, twist, speed, and produc- 
tion. Systems of numbering yams. Doubling and twisting yarns. Lay, 
tension, differential, and cone drum calculations. Practice in solving prac- 
tical mill problems. Mr. Hilton. 

Tex. 415. Manufacturing Problems. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Yam Manufacturing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisites: Yam Manufacture II or III, Tex. 304 or 310, 11. 

Mill organization and administration. Machine layout for long and 
regular draft spinning; production control and costs; making of novelty 
yarns; making of daily and weekly reports; breaking of single and ply 
yarns. Regular and reverse t^wisted yarns. Mr. Hilton. 

Tex. 416. Wool Manufacture I. 0-3-0 

Tex. 417, 418. Wool Manufacture Laboratory L 1-1-0 

Elective for Seniors in Textile School. Prerequisites: Yam Manufacture 
II or III, Tex. 304, or Tex. 310, 311. 

Physical and chemical properties; reclaimed wool and secondary raw 
materials; grading; sorting; mixing and blending; oiling and gametting. 
Description of feeders; cards; tape condensers; card setting; stripping and 
grinding; woolen spinning; twister head; mechanical details and produc- 
tion. The practical application of machines in Woolen Yam Manufacture. 

Mr. Hilton. 

Tex. 43.5. Cotton, Wool and Rayon Wearing. 0-0-3 

Tex. 431, 432, 433. Cotton, Wool and Rayon Weaving Laboratory L 1-1-1 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisites: Dobby Weaving, Tex. 331, 2, 3, 5. 

Tex. 437, 438, 439. Cotton, Wool and Rayon Weaving Laboratory II. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing. Prerequisites : Dobby 
Weaving, Tex. 335, 7, 8, 9. 

Principles of loom construction to weave rayon and fine cotton fabrics. 
Pick and pick looms. Box and multiplier chain-building. Arrangement of 
colors in boxes to give easy running loom. Extra appliances for we-aving 
leno, towel, and other pile fabrics. Construction and operation of single, 
double lift, and rise and fall jacquards. Tie-up of harness for dress goods, 



[Textiles] 285 

table napkins, damask, and other jacquard fabrics, such as leno. Relative 
speed of looms. Production calculations and fabric costs. 

Operation and fixing of dobby, pick and pick, and jacquard looms. Prep- 
aration of warps to weave rayon, wool and fine cotton fabrics. Building of 
box, dobby, and multiplier chains. Mr. Nelson. Mr. Hart. 

Tex. 441. Leno Design. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and in Weaving and De- 
signing. Elective for others. Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Analysis I, 

Leno weaves with one, two, or more sets of doups. Combination of plain 
and fancy weaves with leno. Methods of obtaining leno patterns. Methods 
01 making original designs for dress goods, draperies. 

Mr. Nelson, Mr, Shinn. 

Tex. 443. Dobby Design. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and in Weaving and De- 

T^'341 ^2^""^'^'^ ^°'' °^^"'^- Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Anal>-sis I, 

Designing fabrics, such as fancy crepes, figured double plain, matelasse, 
velvets, corduroys, pique, lines of samples. Mr. Nelson. 

Tex. 445. Jacquard Design. ^ q „ 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and juniors in Weaving 
and Designing. Elective for others. Prerequisites: Fabric Design and 
Analysis I, Tex. 341. 2. 

Designing fancy and jacquard fabrics. Methods of making original de- 
signs for table napkins, table covers, dress goods, draperies. 

Mr. Nelson, Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 447, 448, 449. Jacquard Design Laboratory. j.^.l 

Design,' t1x'^44T'°" ''^ ^'''''"^ ^"'^ Designing. Prerequisites: Jacquard 

Designing fancy and jacquard fabrics. Methods of making original de- 
signs by combinations of color, weave, and sketches. Designs for table 
napkins, table covers, dress goods, draperies. Mr. Nelson, Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 451, 452. Fabric Analysis. ,2-0 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and Weaving and Design- 
34?; 2 '' Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Analysis, Tex. 

Analyzing samples of cotton, wool, worsted, linen, rayon, and silk fabrics 



286 [Textiles] 

for size of yams, ends and picks per inch, weight of warp and filling, so as 
to accurately reproduce samples analyzed. Obtaining design, drawing in 
draft, chain, and reed plan for fancy fabrics, such as stripes, checks, extra 
warp and extra filling figures, leno fabrics, jacquard fabrics, draperies. 

Mr. Nelson, Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 453. Fabric Design and Analysis II. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing. Prerequisites: Fabric 
Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 2. 

Design and analysis of fancy fabrics. Making fabrics from sketches 
and specifications. Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 455, 456. Color in Woven Design. 3-3-0 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisites : Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 236, 7. 

Pigment and light theories of color. Contrast and harmony of color. 
Factors which influence quality, style, and color. Methods of applying 
weaves and color to fabrics for wearing apparel and home decorations. 

Mr. Hart. 

Tex. 457, 458, 459. Textile Testing. 1-1-1 

Elective for Textile students. Prerequisite: Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 or 
equivalent. 

Tests for moisture content, regain, twist, and tensile strength. Description 
and operation of testing equipment. Solution and written reports of as- 
signed textile problems. Mr. Hart, Mr. Hilton, Mr. Shinn. 

Tex. 474. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing I. 0-3-0 

Tex. 471, 472, 473. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing Laboratory L 1-1-1 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. Pre- 
requisites: Dyeing I, Tex. 371, 2, 3, 5. 

Lectures on color mixing, money value of dyes. Testing of dyes, water 
starch, and materials used in sizing. Lubricating oils and oil compounds. 
Processes and machinery used in dyeing and finishing. Textile printing. 
Apparatus used in research laboratory. 

Color matching. Testing dyes for strength and money value. Physical 
and chemical examination and application of starches, sizing materials and 
finishing compounds. Examination of textile oils, soap, and all the dif- 
ferent rayons. Analysis of mixed fabrics. 

Mr. Grimshaw, Mr. Hayes. 

Tex. 480, 481. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing II. 0-3-3 



[Textiles] 287 
Tex. 477, 478, 479. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing Laboratory II. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. Prerequisites- 
Dyeing II. Tex. 377, 8, 9. 381, 2. 

Theories of color matching. Lectures on color mixing, water and mold, 
starch, materials used in sizing. Lubricating oils, textile oils and oil com- 
pounds. Processes and machinery used in dyeing and finishing. Method 
of analyzing textile fabrics. Laboratory equipment used in textile re- 
search and testing laboratories. 

Color matching. Physical and chemical examination and application of 
textile oils, soaps, and finishing compounds. Microscopial and chemical 
tests on rayons. Dyeing various types of rayon. Operation of dyeing and 
finishing equipment in the dye house and research laboratories. 

Mr. Grimshaw. 

Tex. 487. Textile Printing. 3_q_q 

Tex. 483, 484, 485. Textile Printing Laboratory. 1.1.1 

Prerequisites: Dyeing II. Tex. 381, 2. 

The history of printing and the development of machinery used. Calico 
printing with the mordant, basic, and vat colors, analine black, indigo, and 
insoluble azo colors. Resist and discharge styles. 

Paste mixing. Practical experiments. Mr. Grimshaw, Mr. Hayes. 

Tex. 489, 490. Textile Microscopy. l.j^ 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. Elective for others 
Prerequisites: Dyeing I or II, Tex. 375 or 381, 2. 

Instruction in the use of the microscope. Examination of fibres Prep- 
aration of permanent slides. Mr. Grimshaw, Mr. Hayes. 

Tex. 495. Principles of Fabric Finishing. q_q_^ 

Tex. 491, 492, 493. Principles of Fabric Finishing Laboratory. l-l-l 

Elective for Textile students. Prerequisites: Dyeing II, Tex. 371, 2. 

A study of machinery used in finishing of textile fabrics and in textile 
printing, with lectures and pictures. Lectures on materials used in the 
textile finishing and printing industry and experiments. Mr. Grimshaw 



2S8 [TXXTILES] 

Courses for Graduates Only 
Tex. 501, 502, 503. Yarn Manufacture. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture IV, Tex. 405 or equivalent. 

A study of breaking strength and related properties of cotton yams 
made under various atmospheric conditions; comparison of yams produced 
from long and short-staple cotton with regular and special carding pro- 
cesses; efikiency of various roller covering materials at the drawing pro- 
cesses; elimination of roving processes by special methods of preparation; 
comparison of regular and long-draft spinning. Mr. Hilton. 

Tex. 505, 506, 507. Textile Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

A study of the moisture content of cotton yams and fabrics. The con- 
volutions in cotton fibres and their relation to spinning, wea\-ing, and 
dyeing. The effect of mercerization on cotton yams and fabrics. Testing 
yams and fabrics under variable conditions for breaking strength and 
elasticity. Textile Staff. 

Tex. 531, 532, 533. Textile Design and Weaving. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Leno, Dobby and Jacquard Desig^n, Tex. 441, 3, 5 or equi- 
valent. 

Study and practice in more advanced designing and analyses of fabrics, 
such as lenos made with twine and wire doups, lappits, and other fancy 
fabrics. Designing for jacquard dress goods, table covers, reversibles, and 
other fabrics. Making original designs for dobby and jacquard fabrics. 
Fabric costs. Weaving fancy and jacquard fabrics. 

Messrs. Nelson, Hart, and Shinn. 

Tex. 535, 536, 537. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Discussion of scientific articles of interest to textile industry. Review 
and discussion of student papers and research problems. Textile Staff. 

Tex. 571, 572, 573. Textile Dyeing. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. & R. Dyeing I, Tex. 474 or equivalent. 

The course consists of matching shades from standard and season color 
cards upon classes of materials which require skill in their dyeing, such as 
three-fibre, cotton-wool, and half-silk hosiery, woolens and worsteds with 
effect stripes, and cotton fabrics with woven figures or stripes of the dif- 
ferent varities of artificial silk. Advanced work on chemical and micro- 
scopical examination of materials used in dyeing and finishing. 

Mr. Grimshaw. 



[Zoology] 289 

Tex. 575. Advanced Textile Microscopy. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Textile Microscopy, Tex. 489, 490. 
Microscopic study of textile starches, fibres, fabrics, oils, etc. 
Study of mounting media for above. Methods of mounting textile mate- 
rials. Methods of cross-sectioning textile materials. Photomicrography. 

Mr. Grimshaw. 

ZOOLOGY 

Courses for Undergraduates 
Zool. 101. General Zoology. 4-0-0 

Required of freshmen in General Agriculture, Teachers of Agriculture, 
Forestry, Wildlife Conservation, and of juniors in Agricultural Engineer- 
ing. 

An elementary study of animals, with special reference in the morphology 
and physiology of the vertebrates. 

Messrs. Metcalf, Mitchell, Meacham, Bostian, McCutcheon, Harkema. 

Zool. 102. Economic Zoology. 0-4-0 

Required of freshmen in Forestry and Wildlife Conservation; of sopho- 
mores in General Agriculture, of Teachers of Agriculture, and in Agri- 
cultural Chemistry; of juniors in Landscape Architecture. 

An elementary study of animals with special reference to the more im- 
portant economic groups; designed to give the student a general knowl- 
edge of the animal kingdom. 

Messrs. Metcalf, Mitchell, Meacham, Bostian, McCutcheon, Harkema. 

Zool. 111. Elementary Wildlife Management. 1-0-0 

Required of freshmen in Wildlife Conservation. 

An introductory survey of the various branches in the field of wildlife 
management. Mr. Stevens. 

Courses for Advanced L^ndergraduates 
Zool, 202. Animal Physiology. 0-5-0 or 0-0-5 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, Phys. 115, Chem. 101, 102, and 103. Alternate 
for sophomores in General Agriculture, Teachers of Agriculture and Agri- 
cultural Chemistry; required of juniors in Wildlife Conservation. 

Comparative physiology of vertebrates, with particular reference to 
mammals and man. Detailed studies of various functions, with metabolism 
emphasized. Mr. McCutcheon. 



290 [Zoology] 

Zool. 213. Economic Entomology. 0-0-4 

Prerequisit-e : Zool. 102. Required of freshmen in Forestry; juniors in 
Wildlife Conservation, Landscape Architecture, Teachers of Apiculture, 
Vegetable Gardening, Pomology, Plant Pathology and Floriculture. 

A general study of the insects, including their economic importance and 
the principles of control. Messrs. Mitchell, Meacham, Bostian. 

ZooL 222-223. Comparative Anatomy. 0-4-4 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101, 102. Required of sophomores in Wildlife Con- 
servation; of juniors in Entomology. 

Comparative morphology of vertebrates. Interrelations of organ systems 
studied for the various groups. Mr. Harkema. 

Zool. 241, 243. Beekeeping. 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 102. Required of seniors in Entomology. 
Designed to give the principles of scientific beekeeping and honey mar- 
keting. Mr. Meacham. 

Zool. 251, 252, 253. Ornithology. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101, 102. Required of sophomores in Wildlife Con- 
servation. 

A course dealing with the biology and morphology of North American 
birds. Mr. Metcalf. 

Zool. 302. Forest Entomology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 213. Required of juniors in Forestry. 
A special study of forest insects, including the factors governing abun- 
dance, and the application of this knowledge in control. Mr. Mitchell. 

Zool. 312. Principles of Game Management. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors not in Game Management. 
Brief survey of the field, study of the major principles involved, and the 
correlation of wildlife management with other land uses. Mr. Stevens. 

Zool. 321, 322, 323. WildUfe Conservation. 3-3-3 

Required of juniors in Wildlife Conservation and Management. Prere- 
quisite: Zool 251, 252, 253, F. C. 202, Bot. 101, 102, 203. 

History of game and wildlife management. Relation of wildlife conser- 
vation to soil and forest conservation. National and State park, and gen- 
eral farming operations. Mr. Stevens. 



[Zoology] 291 

Zool. 332. Fur Resources. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 321, 322, 323. Elective for juniors and seniors in 
Wildlife Conservation. 

Study of the fur industry; the life history and management of the im- 
portant fur-bearing animals; skinning, drying, marketing pelts, and fur 
farming. Mr. Stevens. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Zool. 401, 402, 403. Applied Entomology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 213. Required of seniors in Entomology. 

A detailed study of the relation of insects to human welfare and the prin- 
ciples of insect control; the special study of the more important insects 
directly or indirectly affecting man; and a special study of methods of in- 
vestigation. Mr. Mitchell. 

Zool. 411, 412. Genetics. 4-4-0 

Prerequisite: Bot. 101, 102 or Zool. 101. Fall term required of juniors in 
Animal Production, Entomology, Field Crops, Floriculture, Pomology, Poul- 
try Science, and Vegetable Gardening; of seniors in Plant Pathology. 

Basic principles of heredity and variation. Students carry on and analyze 
breeding experiments, analyze inheritance in various animals and plants. 

Mr. Bostian. 

Zool. 421, 422, 423. Systematic Zoology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101, 102. Required of juniors in Entomology. 
The classification of various groups of animals. 

Mr. Metcalf, Mr. Mitchell. 

Zool. 431, 432. Advanced Physiology. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101, 102, 202. Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Special studies in animal physiology with emphasis on fundamental proc- 
esses involved. Lectures, reports, and conferences to promote an ac- 
quaintance with general literature and recent advances; selected exercises 
and demonstrations to develop experimental technique. Mr. McCutcheon. 

Zool. 433. Field Zoology. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101 and 213, or 222, 223. Required of juniors in Wild- 
life Conservation and seniors in Entomology. 

The study of the relation between animals and their environment. Fre- 
quent excursions to the field will be taken. Mr. Metcalf, Mr. Bostian. 



292 [Zoology] 

Zool. 441, 442. Histology. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101-102, 202, 222-223. Required of seniors in Ento- 
mology. 

A study of animal tissues and their preparation. Mr, Harkema. 

Zool. 443. Insect Physiology. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 202. Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Study of the mechanisms involved in the life processes of insects. 

Mr. McCutcheon. 

Zool. 451, 452, 453. Wildlife Management. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 321-322-323. Required of seniors in Wildlife Con- 
servation. 

Study of the foods and feeding habits of the more important groups of 
wild animals. Field and laboratory studies of wildlife management and 
research, and the economic relations of game, predatory, and fur-bearing 
animals. Mr. Stevens. 

ZooL 461. Vertebrate Embryology. 5-0-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101, 102. Required of juniors in Poultry Science, and 
seniors in Entomology. 

The comparative embryology of the principal groups of vertebrates, with 
special emphasis on the chick. Mr. Harkema. 

Zool. 462, 463. Advanced Animal Ecology. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 433. Required of seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 
A course devoted to animal geography and the factors which influence the 
distribution of animals. Mr. Metcalf. 

Zool. 471, 472, 473. Advanced Wildlife Management. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Concurrently with or preceded by Zool. 321, 322, 323. Elec- 
tive for seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 

An assigned problem to be planned and worked out by the student. A 
term paper covering the procedure. Mr. Stevens. 

Zool. 481, 482, 483. Advanced Food Habits Problems. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Concurrently with or preceded by Zool. 451-452-453. Elec- 
tive for seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 

Assigned or selected problem dealing with the foods and feeding habits 
of one species of wild animal or a group of similar wild animals. 

Mr. Stevens. 



[Zoology] 293 

Zool. 492, 493. Parasitology. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101, 102, 222, 223. Required of seniors in Wildlife 
Conservation. 
A study of the structures, life-cycles and control of animal parasites. 

Mr. Harkema. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Zool, 501, 502, 503. Systematic Entomology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 421, 422, 423. 

Codes of nomenclature, methods of writing descriptions, constructing 
keys, determining priority, selecting and preserving types, and making 
bibliographies and indexes. Mr. Metcalf, Mr. Mitchell. 

Zool. 511, 512, 513. Research in Zoology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Zoology. 

Problems in development, life history, morphology, physiology, ecology, 
genetics, game, management, taxonomy, or parasitology. 

Messrs. Metcalf, Meacham, Mitchell, Bostian, McCutcheon, 
Harkema, Stevens. 

ZooL 521, 522, 523. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Zoology. Mr. Metcalf. 

Zool. 533. Advanced Genetics. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 411, 412. 

An advanced study of heredity and variation, including biometry. The 
student will select a problem in breeding to be carried out as a part of the 
course. Mr. Bostian. 



V. SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 
1939-1940* 

Resident Students 

A. Candidates for Degrees 

1. Freshmen _ _ 998 

2. Sophomores _ _...„ „ 595 

3. Juniors _ __ 412 

4. Seniors _ 355 

5. Graduates „ _ _ _ 117 

6. Candidates for Professional Degrees _ 4 



Total „ _ 2,481 

B. Irregnjlar Students 

tl. Extension Classes in Raleigh and Cary _ _ 328 

2. Special Students _ 20 



Total _ „ „ _.... 348 2,829 

t2. Non-resident Students 

A. Correspondence Students for College Credit 1,247 

B. Extension Students (Classes outside Raleigh) 630 

C. Correspondence Students in Practical Courses, 

no credit _ _ 36 



Total 1,913 4,742 

Summer School Students, 1939 

A. Regular Students 

1. Six weeks „ ...„ 704 

2. Three Weeks ...„ _. 68 

3. Ten Weeks _„ 35 

B. C. C. C. Educational Ad%-isers (Two weeks) 22 

C. Cotton Classing Students, no credit „.„ _ __ 10 



Total _.._ _.. 839 5,581 

Short Courses and Special Conferences 

1. Institute for Surveyors (three days) _ „ 21 

2. Institute for Engineers (one day) _ 98 

3. Conference for Plumbing and Heating Contractors 

(two days) 82 

4. Institute for Water Plant Operators (four days) 57 

5. Institute, Electrical Meters and Relays (four days) 83 

6. Institute, Plumbing and Heating Contractors (three 

days) _ _ 91 

7. Institute for Street Superintendents (two days). 38 

8. Short Course for Photographers (five days) 20 



• Does not include Spring Term, 1939-1940. 
t Data from January, 1939 to January, 1940. 



Enrollment, 1939-1940 



295 



9. Coal Dealers Conference (three days) 204 

10. Institute for Electrical Contractors (four days) 84 

11. Institute for Gas Plant Operators (two days) 102 

12. Older Youth Conference (four days) 130 

13. Tobacco Growers Short Course (four days) 50 

14. Agricultural Teachers (one week) 348 

15. Farm Boys and Girls (one week) 980 

16. Farm Men and Women 1,590 

17. Young Tar Heel Farmers (three days) 654 

Total 4,632 

Grand Total 



10,213 



ENROLLMENT BY CURRICULA 



Basic Division 

Agriculture 341 

Engineering 687 

Teacher Training 105 

Textiles 150 



Teacher Training 

Agricultural Education 110 

Industrial Arts Education 30 

Industrial Education 1 

Occup. Inf. and Guidance 9 



Total 1,283 

Agriculture and Forestry 

Agriculture 57 

Agricultural Options 153 

Agricultural Chemistry 20 

Agricultural Engineering 20 

Forestry 66 

Landscape Architecture 7 

Wildlife Management 9 

Total 336 

Engineering 

Architectural 36 

Ceramic 31 

Chemical 156 

CiAdl 36 

Civil-Construction Option 25 

Civil-Highway Option 3 

Civil-Sanitary Option 6 

Electrical 91 

General 3 

Geological 7 

Industrial 37 

Mechanical 75 

Mechanical- Aeronautical 

Option 40 



Total 150 



Textiles 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing.. 33 

Textile Management > 33 

Textile Manufacturing 90 

Weaving and Designing 12 

Yarn Manufacturing 2 

Total 170 

Non-classified Auditors 16 



Distribution of Graduate students 
by schools (included in above de- 
partmental classifications). 

Agriculture 68 

Engineering 29 

Teacher Training 15 

Textiles 5 

Candidates for Professional 

Degrees 4 



Total 546 



Total 121 



VI. FIFTIETH ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 

Monday Evening, June 5, 1939 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 

Bachelor of Science 

In Agricultural Chemistry 

Clarence Earley Rutherfordton 

In Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Farm 
Business Administration Option 

*Bernice Gordon Andrews „..„ Rober3on\'ille 

Lacy Wilson Coats Smithfield 

Claude Banks Faris, Jr. „ „ Raleigh 

Russell Phipps Handy _ _ Grassy Creek 

*Richard Comings Larkin „ Wheeling, 111. 

James Edward McCall _ _ Ellerbe 

**Paul Sink Thompson Cleveland 

Farm Marketing and Farm Finance Option 

♦Albert Doub, Jr _ „ Raleigh 

Rural Sociology Option 

James Woodrow Atkinson Selma 

In Agricultural Engineering 

*Edwin Padgette Barnes Raleigh 

Walter Edward Garrard Durham 

Dan L. McLaurin, Jr. _„ _„. „ Rowland 

In Animal Production 

Isaac Cody Adams „ .Clayton 

Robert Ricks Boseman „ __ Rocky Mount 

John Stewart Boyles „ _._ _ Charlotte 

Price Lentz Brawley „... _ Mooresville 

James Everett Brown _ Rich Square 

Lewis Lee Copley _ „ Rougemont 

Locke Holland „ _. „ _ Charles 

*Roy Otis Lackey „ _ _ „ Lenoir 

*George Davis MacRae _ _ „ „„ Wilmington 

Goethe Wilkins Marsh, Jr. „ _.Bath 

Ewing Stephenson Millsaps, Jr _ Asheboro 

** J. C. Pierce, Jr. Grassy Creek 

John Eldridge Piland _ _ Marg-arettsville 

Leland Eubank Thornton Hampton, Va. 



* Honors. 
** High Honors. 



e 



Degrees Conferred 297 

In Dairy Manufacturing 

Joe Hough Ashcraft Charlotte 

Wmfred Pinkney Seitz Newton 

♦Meredith Lee Shumaker Philadelphia, Pa. 

In Field Crops and Plant Breeding 

Frederick Hughes Bailey Raleigh 

Everett Wade Byrd :i:WhiteviUe 

Samuel Hill Dobson Statesville 

Robert Lee Edwards Spring Hope 

Wajme Ledbetter Franklin Franklin 

James Robert Hurst Franklin 

==■ Wright Fletcher Parker Gibson 

James Dickey Patton Franklin 

Ahmad Faraj Rafik I'isulaimani, Iraq 

^*Harold Frank Robinson Bandana 

James Durwood Thompson Goldsboro 

* Willie Garland Woltz Bullock 

In Forestry 

John Blois Bailey Raleigh 

=^WiIliam McCook Bailey Richmond, Va. 

John Sidney Barker, Jr Fuquay Springs 

**William Lee Beasley, Jr Louisburg 

Alfred Euston Butler, Jr Raleigh 

Carlos Kenny Dale. Portsmouth, Va. 

Donald Cain Dixon Belle Mead, N. J. 

William Grey Evans, II Wilmington 

Joseph Thurman Frye, Jr Wardensville, W. Va. 

Charles Donovan Harris Lexinoion 

Harvey Jackson Hartley Clifton Forge,*'va. 

James Begg Hubbard Williamsburg, Va. 

Duncan Perry Hughes Colerain 

**Ralph Scott Johnson Raleigh 

Ted Marvin Jollay Durham 

♦Julian Vinson Lyon Creedmoor 

Hartwell Cornelius Martin Roanoke Va. 

Cole Livingston Page Fairmont 

James Frederick Reeves, Jr. Weaverville 

Herbert Ralph Rupp Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Richard Wayne Shelley Forksville, Pa. 

*Robert Weston Slocum Raleigh 

Edward Woodson Smith, III Norfolk Va. 

* Honors. ) "Z, 

** High Honors. ^ ^ 



298 State College Catalog 

Joe Jones Steele - -... — Lenoir 

Henry Peters Stoffregen, Jr. „..._ „ — „ Raleigh 

Roy Lynn Westerfield Raleigh 

♦Chester Nicholas Wright _ - Highlands 

Pearson Buckley Yeager Mt. Union, Pa. 

Monte Mervjm Young _ _ Charlotte 



In Pomology 

*Paul Joseph Gibson -..._ Franklin 

Howard Wilson Ledbetter Asheville 



In Poultry Science 

Walter Glenn Andrews _ Graham 

In Wildlife Conservation and Management 

Mark Hughes Taylor _ _ High Point 

DEPART3IENT OF EDUCATION 

Bachelor of Science 

In Agricultural Education 

Ralph Minis Aldridge Yancejn-ille 

Samuel John Andrews, Jr. Roseboro 

Arthur Monroe Benton Chadboum 

W^illiam Cortez Blackmore, Jr _ „ Warsaw 

James Harris Bost _ „ New London 

Luther Owens Crotts Raleigh 

*John Ed Davis, Jr. _ Shelby 

John Hughes Fisher _ _ „ Salisbury 

Travis Edward Hendren _ „ Hiddenite 

Vernon Andrew Huneycutt „ Oakboro 

William Fields Lathan „_ Monroe 

Bearl Floyd Nesbitt „ _„ Fletcher 

William Henry Pruden Margarettsville 

James Paul Raby „ West Mills 

George Bennett Roberts _ Newport 

Tolar Vardell Simmons _. „. Roseboro 

*Harvey Lee Thomas _ Oakboro 



• Honors. 
•• High Honors. 



Degrees Conferred 299 

In Industrial Arts 

Ralph Waldon Britt Severn 

Robert I. Lainof Brooklyn, N. Y. 

William Vaughn Matheney Pulaski, Va. 

school of engineering 
Bachelor of Architectural Engineering 

Louis Humbert Asbury, Jr Charlotte 

Edwin Lee Coble Raleigh 

Owen Franklin Smith Benson 

Herbert Stuart Whitley Williamston 

Bachelor of Ceramic Engineering 

William Cody Cress Mt. Ulla 

Wilson Hamit Ellis Henderson 

James Archie Hedgpeth Rowland 

Claude Milton Lambe, Jr. Raleigh 

John David Langdon Linden 

Gus Palmer, Jr. Raleigh 

John Paul Sawyer, Jr. Elizabeth City 

* William Arthur Scholes Detroit, Mich. 

Bradford Snow Tucker Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

William Witty Adkins Summerfield 

Leonidas Baker Wilmington 

Burnice Clayton Blake Wilmington 

* Vernon Braxton Snow Camp 

Reeder Butterfield Hawthorne, N. J. 

Maurice Odell Caton Ayden 

**Kenneth Victor Chace Acushnet, Mass. 

Robert Coleman, Jr. Birmingham, Ala. 

* ♦David Colvin Raleigh 

Frederick Fritz Crouch, Jr Raleigh 

*Lewis Fischer Drum Catawba 

James Franklin Elrod Hickory 

William Edgar Ford Asheville 

*John Wyatt Foster, Jr. Portsmouth, Va. 

♦Robert John Gottlieb Asheville 

Felix Williamson Graves, Jr Mebane 

Charles Olan Hall Saluda 

♦Donald Charles Helton Hickory 

* Honors. 
•• High Honors. 



300 State College Catalog 

William Dameron Hood, Jr. _ _ Smithfield 

*Ray Lowell Hooper „ Cowarts 

Edwin Courtney Hudson, Jr^ „ _ _ Wilmington 

Nelson Lawrence Hudspeth, Jr. „ Yadkinville 

Reuel Luther Huffman, Jr. _.._ _ _ Brookfield, Mo. 

*Thurman Ralston Jones, Jr. _ _ Fayetteville 

Boyd Francis Joyner „ Spring Hope 

*Virginius Fowlkes Kasey _ _ Greenville 

Paul Fisher Lineberry Raleigh 

Adolph Irwin Losick _ W. New York, N. J. 

William Heston Martin „ _ Winston-Salem 

*Joseph Harte Padgett - „ _ „ Shelby 

James Edward Parkin — _ _ New Bedford, Mass. 

Charles Edward Peters „ Grafton, Mass. 

Thomas Edward Philbeck __ Shelby 

John Gilbert Pickard „_ Wilmington 

Eldred Oscar Randolph, Jr. „ „ Morganton 

*Harold Francis Riley _ _.New Bedford, Mass. 

John Ricksorn Robbins _ _._ Pitman, N. J. 

Henry Allen Ruddock _ „ Charlotte 

** Gordon Janssen Simmons _. — „ New Bedford, Mass. 

Norman Singleton _ _ _ New Bedford, Mass. 

**Alexander Martin Smith, II _ „ _ _ _ Elkin 

**Everet Foy Smith ..Lexington 

Leslie Randolph Spain _ _ Norlina 

*Edgar Duncan Stowell „ New Bedford, Mass, 

*Charles Malcolm Sturkey, Jr....„ _.. _„ Albemarle 

Edward Bruce Tilley „ _ Bahama 

William Keith Whitson, Jr. „ _.„ _ _._ Asheville 

George Higgins Wilson _ _ „ Shelby 

Ralph Wiggins Wrenn Raleigh 

Edward Michael Yacko Bridgeport, Conn. 

Bachelor of Civil Engineering 

William Old Buys Washington 

* Joseph Newton Farlow „ _ Greensboro 

Walter Bas comb Jones Haw River 

Milton Jacob Kluttz, Jr. _ „ Raleigh 

Whitmell Baker Small Washington 

BACHELOR OF CiVIL ENGINEERING, CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

■=Mi!lard Samuel Haj-worth _ „_ „ Asheboro 

Richard Sylvester PajTie „._ _ Hertford 

William Emite Viverette _ Sharpsburg 

Rex Hunter Wheatley „ _ „ _.„ Wilmington 

*Glenn Edward Yount _ „ _ „ Newton 



• Honors. 
*• High Honors. 



Degrees Conferred 301 

Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Sanitary Option 

Robert Bailey Bartlett Swannanoa 

Bachelor of Electrical Engineering 

**Ernest James Angelo, Jr Winston-Salem 

Robert Stuart Blackwood South Portland, Me. 

*Leslie Clifford Brooks Bryson City 

*John Bums Bullock '.IIIIIIZI Henderson 

**John Franklin Gilmore Oxford 

Junius Holt Harden 'lII'II'Graham 

Joseph Virgil Henderson, Jr Monroe 

Paul Marcus Johnson, Jr Greensboro 

Maywood Outland Lawrence, Jr Portsmouth, Va. 

John Clegg Lockhart, Jr. Raleigh 

Dan Hugh McLean Bladenboro 

Richard Norwood Newsom La Grange 

Henry Rothrock Nooe, Jr. Pittsboro 

William Dean Pennington Nathan's Creek 

Ross Herbert Rejmolds, Jr. Raleigh 

Robert Scott Runnion, Jr Raleigh 

Asbury Hilliard Sallenger Florence, S. C. 

James Robert Shearon Bunn 

*Charlton Henry Storey, Jr. Wilmington 

Leroy Smith Taylor Greenville 

*Wilbur Newton Taylor Jonesboro 

*Mallie Curtiss Todd Wendell 

Henry Page Wilder Aberdeen 

Millard William Woodruff Roselle Park, N. J. 

Merton Merrill York Boothbay Harbor, Me. 

Bachelor op Industrial Engineering 

Lawrence Morton Brown Raleigh 

Jeremiah Wayland Cox Raleigh 

Rodolfo A. Diaz Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Elmer Pearce Fleming, Jr. Asheville 

William Blaylock Granger Greensboro 

Bruce Riley Knott Wendell 

Edwin Bentley Owen, Jr Raleigh 

Isaac William Thorn Rahway, N. J. 

Edgar John Wicker Raleigh 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering 

William Oscar Baucom, Jr South Norfolk, Va. 

Grady Justice Bell, Jr Greenville 

• Honors. 
•• High Honors. 



302 



State College Catalog 



Richard Miller Bloodgood . 
Mark Hutchens Crawford . 

Walter Byrum Freeman 

Charles Jonathan Gray 

James Bernard Lasley 

Charles Newberry Moore ... 
James Satterfield Newbold 
Edgar Byron Nichols, Jr. ... 
Sidney Dawson Rogers 



-.Beaufort 
_ Wilson 

..Charlotte 



Wilmington 

Greensboro 

-Washington 

Raleigh 

..Moorestown, N. J. 
Wilmington 



Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Option 



♦Frank Thomas Abbott, Jr... 

Edward Bartfield 

James Arthur Boykin, Jr. 

William Joseph Dusty 

Charles Joseph Fleming, Jr. 

Mellor Alfred Gill 

* Sterling Charles Holmes 

*Robert Alexander Loos 



Cuthbert Li%nngston Moseley, Jr. 

James Lore Murray 

James Thomas Power _ --. 

David Rufl&n Powers „ -_ — 



Raleigh 

Brooklj-n. N. Y. 

..Columbia, S. C. 

. Waterville, Me. 

Henderson 

Hawthorne, N. J. 

Cambridge, N. Y. 

.Haddon Heights, N. J. 

„„ „.._ Raleigh 

Newton 

High Shoals 

St. Pauls 



SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND BUSINESS 

(Degree earned prior to June, 1939) 

Bachelor of Science 
In Industrial Management 



tCarroU Gwinn Conrad.. 
John Lucius McLean, Jr. 



Greensboro 
Raleigh 



SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Bachelor of Science 

In Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 



** William Lester Carter. 
Eugene Patrick Henley ... 

Clyde Thomas Moore 

* H arold Nass 

Abner Durham Potter 



. FranklinviUe 
Durham 



JRutherfordton 

New York, N. Y. 
Barium Springs 



• Honors. 
•• High Honors. 

t As of June, 1938. 



Degrees Conferred 303 

In Textile Management 

John Stevens Aiken Asheville 

*Emilio Arizpe de la Maza Monterey, Mexico 

Peter Bruinooge Hasbrouck Heights, N. J. 

Edward A, Fitzmaurice Mohall, N. Dakota 

Hugh Johnson, Jr. Raleigh 

Robert Schmidt Lake Manhassett, N. Y. 

David Ray McEachern, Jr. Concord 

Samuel Reuben May, Jr. Spring Hope 

Stephen Seymour Sailer E. Orange, N. J. 

**Charles Widlitz Rockville Center,'N. Y. 

Paul Emerson Wood Hawthorne, N. J. 

In Textile Manufacturing 

Herbert Julian Brown, Jr. Ahoskie 

James Russell Burcham Elkin 

Thomas Willard Cates Wendell 

John Wesley Chapman Dover 

Eugene Allen Dees Illlconcord 

** Walter Lee Fanning Shelby 

*George Verner Hanna, Jr Mooresville 

Ernest Vincent Helms Charlotte 

John William Irving, Jr. Wentworth 

Edward Suther Johnson Kannapolis 

James Vernon Kirkman Durham 

Albert Reid Lambert Greensboro 

Albert Glenn Lancaster Henderson 

Edward Jones Lancaster, Jr. Winston-Salem 

Richard MacKenzie Wilmington 

*Horace Robert McSwain Shelby 

Offie William Mann Albemarle 

Percy Durant Merritt Rose Hill 

Alonzo Maddison Moore, Jr. Raleigh 

Gilmer Hughes Newbern Powells Point 

Burleigh Lee Overbey Reidsville 

Oscar Franklin Peatross Raleigh 

Robert Marshall Pully ......Woodsdale 

John Fulton Redding Asheboro 

* Charles Hoge Reynolds Gate City, Va. 

Isaac Rhodes Robinson Southport 

Morris Barnett Sokoloff Raleigh 

Percy Clifton Stott, Jr. Wendell 

Albert Theodore Strupler Fayetteville 

Charles Wayland Stuart, Jr Winston-Salem 

* Honors. 
** High Honors. 



304 



State College Catalog 



Roland Arrin^on Taylor _ _ „ Whitakers 

**Robert Beam Wood _ _ Gastonia 

In Weaving ant) Designing 

Moses Jesse Barber _ „ Charlotte 

Charles Franklin Barringer, Jr. _ _ _ Raleigh 

*George Preston Boswell _ Burlington 

James Burnett Hines _ „ „ Winston-Salem 

Richard Vardry McPhail _ Hamlet 

Marvin Hawley Mason _ _Mebane 

Bernard Joseph Musso _ „ Walsenburg, Colo. 

Sidney Carlyle Summey „ __ „ _._ _ Shelby 

James Alfred Towerv ~~ - ~ Concord 



ADVANCED DEGREES 

Master of Science 

In Agricultural Chemistry 

Robert Edward Clegg _ „ Providence, R. I. 

V. Bradshaw Holland _ _ _ Norfolk, Va. 

Martin Arthur Moseley, Jr. _ Cowpens, S. C. 

Winton Blair Rankin „„ „ _ „ Boone 



In Agricultural Economics 

Thomas Lenoir Stuart 



Mebane 



In Animal Production 



John Stephen Hollamon 



Farmville 



Clarence Howell Hill 



William Luther White 



In Entomology 
In Genetics 



Yadkinville 



Raleigh 



In Plant Pathology 

George Robertson Fowler Raleigh 

Howard Reed Garris _ Elizabeth City 



In Rural Sociology 



Lois Sallie Silver. 



Raleigh 



• Honors. 
** High Honors. 



Degrees Conferred 305 

In Soils 

Jesse Elson Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ross Wilson Learner Pine Castle, Fla. 

In Wildlife Conservation and Management 

James Charles Darsie Raleigh 

In Agricultural Education 

William Beaufort Callihan Wendell 

In Industrial Arts 

Frederick George Walsh Waverly, N. Y. 

In Ceramic Engineering 

Joseph Carol Richmond Alfred, N. Y. 

In Chemical Engineering 

Robert Perry Harris Raleigh 

In Geological Engineering 

D'Arcy Roscoe George White Plains, N. Y. 

In Textiles 

Shin Yuan Daun Shanghai, China 

Kwoh Chang Li Shanghai, China 

Henry Bettis Malone, Jr. Chester, S. C. 

Master of Chemical Engineering 

Rupert Leslie Cox Richmond, Va. 

Thomas Eugene Ramsay Calhoun, S. C. 

Ephriam Lee Sawyer Sanford 

Raymond Worth Stephenson Severn 

Joseph Ernest Yates Stony Point 

Master of Civil Engineering 

Dan Lipschutz Belle Harbor, N. Y. 

Robert Ivey Simkins Goldsboro 



306 State College Catalog 

Master of Electrical Engineering 

RajTnond Charles Snook - Roselle, N. J. 

Master of Mechanical Engineering 

Pierce Toney Angell Richmond, Va. 

professional degrees 
Chemical Engineer 

Francis Tripp New Bedford, Mass. 

Civil Engineer 

Duncan Thomas Memory Chattanooga, Tenn. 

honorary degrees 
Doctor of Agriculture 

Junius Sidney Gates - Arlington, Va 

Doctor of Science 

Stephen Cole Bruner Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba 

Adrianus J. L. Moritz Enka 

Doctor of Textile Science 

Benjamin Brown Gossett Charlotte 



Medals and Prizes 307 

MEDALS AND PRIZES— SCHOLARSHIP DAY, 1939 

Alpha Zeta Scholarship Cup 
J. D. Jones, Sophomore in Agriculture, Brevard, N. C. 

Tau Beta Pi Awards 
W. F. Morris, Jr., Sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, Raleigh, N. C. 
Edward L. Bryant, Freshman in Chemical Engineering, Wilmington, N. C. 

Associated General Contractors' Award 
M. S. Hayworth, Senior in Civil Engineering, Construction Option, Asheboro, 

N. C. 

J. C. Steele Scholarship Cup 
H. H. Thomas, Sophomore in Ceramic Engineering, Hyde, Md. 

Moland-Drysdale Scholarship Cup 
E. G. Gibbs, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Morehead City, N. C. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award 
T. M. Kolarik, Junior, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

National Association of Textile Manufacturers' Medal 
Walter Lee Fanning, Senior, Shelby, N. C. 

Sigma Tau Sigma (Textile) Award 
William L. Carter, Senior, Franklinville, N. C. 

Order of 30 and 3 Award 
Rodger M. Avery, Jr., Freshman in Chemical Engineering, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 
Joel H. Bower, Freshman in M. Engr., Aeronautical Option, Lexington, N. C. 

State College Woman's Club Award 
Miss Sarah Frances Dees, Junior in Landscape Architecture, Greensboro, N. C. 

Interfraternity Council Scholarship Cup 
Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity 

Alumni Athletic Trophy 
J. B. Hines, Senior in Weaving and Designing, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Mu Beta Psi (Musical) Award 
R. L. Huffman, Jr., Senior in Chemical Engineering, Brookfield, Mo. 

Phi Kappa Phi Scholarship Medals 

Senior : W. L. Carter, Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, Franklinville, N. C. 

Junior: H. M. Taylor, Mechanical Engineering, High Point, N. C. 

Sophomore: J. D. Jones, Agriculture, Brevard, N, C. 

Kappa Phi Kappa (Education) Award 
W. J. Reams, Sophomore, Apex, N. C. 



308 State College Catalog 

Elder P. D. Gold Citizenship Medal 
Horace R. McSwain, Senior in Textile Manufacturing, Shelby, N. C. 

Goethe Museum Award in German 
Harold Nass, Senior in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, New York, N. Y. 

Southeastern Debate Championship 
Howard B. Bell, Sophomore in Chemical Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Gary K. Watkins, Junior in Animal Production, Blanche, N. C. 

George H. Lippard, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Fred H. Price, Jr., Junior in Agricultural Economics, Shelby, N. C. 

Dixie Championship in Argumentation 
George H. Lippard, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Appalachian Mountain Championship in Extemporaneous Speaking 
George H. Lippard, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. C 

Grand Eastern Championship in Radio Broadcasting and in Problem 

Solving 
Fred H. Price, Jr., Junior in Agricultural Economics, Shelby, N. C. 

Catawba and Ohio Extemporaneous Speaking Contests 

Grand Eastern Tournament 

George H. Lippard, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Maine and Tennessee Extemporaneous Speaking Contests 

Grand Eastern Tournament 

Fred H. Price, Jr., Junior in Agi-icultural Economics, Shelby, N. C. 

Championship in Duplicate Debating, Southeastern Tournament 
Fred H. Price, Jr., Junior in Agricultural Economics, Shelby, N. C. 

Southeastern Title in Situation Oratory 
George H. Lippard, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

South Atlantic Title in Stimulating Group Discussion 
Fred H. Price, Jr., Junior in Agricultural Economics, Shelby, N. C. 

South Atlantic Title in Impromptu Speaking 
George H. Lippard, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. G 

State Championship in Direct Clash Debating 

Gary K. Watkins, Junior in Animal Production, Blanche, N. C. 

Howard B. Bell, Sophomore in Chemical Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

George H. Lippard, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, Winston-Salem, N. Q 

Fred H. Price, Jr., Junior in Agricultural Economics, Shelby, N. C. 



Degrees Conferred ^^^ 

DEGREES CONFERRED SEPTEMBER 1939 

Bachelor of Science 
In Animal Production 

^.„. „ Cullowhee 

Fred W:lham Brown .^ Turbeville, Va. 

Julian Traine Richardson 

In Field Crops and Plant Breeding 

^ , -TTT 1.1- T Macclesfield 

J. Fred Webb, Jr. 

In Forestry 

George Winfield Arnott ^^""^w^v^ 

Henry Churchill Bragaw ^'^^e^^e 

Harry WalterPluxnmer.Jr I.Raleigh 

Edwin Mims Walker 

In Agricultural Education 

^ ^1 J. r' JA Peachland 

Brutus Calvert Gaddy Broadway 

Ralph Bogan Kel^ ^^.^^^ 

Johnnie Murrell King Brevard 

Robert Jackson Lyday 

William Wilson McClure Warsaw 

David Charles Miller -Rrpvarii 

Edward Jordan Whitmire, Jr Gates 

Daniel Arthur Willey, Jr. ^^^^ 

John Marvin Worrell 

In High School Teaching 

Natalie Elizabeth Hicks Raleigh 

In Industrial Arts 

WUliam Matheson Payne Taylorsville 

BACHELOR OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

WUliam Crawford Anthony Kings Mountain 

John Paul Gilbert - - ; ^^' . 

Herman Alexander Owens Rocky Mount 

Cornelius Charles Stokes, Jr -; f'^^^^" 

Enoch Simmons Vaughan Washington 



310 State College Catalog 

Bachelor of Electrical Engineering 

David Dalton Page Raleigh 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering 

John Fairley Black _ Greensboro 

Walter Charles Xovick Frackville, Pa. 

Bachelor of Science 
In Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Reginald W. Biggers _ Hickory 

James Albert Holder, Jr. „ „ Asheboro 

In Textile Management 

John Colin Shaw _ _ _ _ _ Kerr 

In Textile Manufacturing 

Dawson Francis Bowerman Corbett Montreal, Quebec, Canada 

Alexander Clovis Hattaway, Jr. _ Greensboro 

Charles Selby Jones _ _ Belhaven 

Samuel Pinckney Stowe, Jr „ _ Belmont 

Charles Willard Swan _ „ „ _ „ _ Raleigh 

In Weaving and Designing 

Harry Lewis Cannon Roanoke Rapids 



JfiftietJ) ^nnitierMrj) 
Celebration 



iSortf) Carolina ^tate CoUese of 
iagricultttre anb engineering 

oftfie 
aniberaifp of Mor^ Carolina 




Mullen ^all 

^leben 0'tlotk 

STuefibap, ©ttohtv ^fjirb 

Minttnn l^untireb antr C]birtp=nme 



rogtam 

Music 
Presiding : 

John William Harrelson 

Dean of Administration, State College 

Invocation : 

The Right Re^'erend Edwin Anderson Penick 
Bishop, The Diocese of North Carolina 

Greetings : 

State of North Carolina 

His Excellency, Clyde Roark Hoey, Governor 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent 

North Carolina College Conference 

Dr. William Cornelius Pressly, President 

Prh'ate and Denominational Colleges 

President Thurman Delna Kitchin, Wake Forest College 

The General Alumni Association 

Major George William Gillette, President 

The Student Body 

Mr. Ernest Earl Durham, President 

Institutional Cooperation : 

President William Preston Few, Duke Unii^ersity 

Introduction of Speaker: 

Dr. Frank Porter Graham 

President, The University of North Carolina 



Address 



The Honorable Oliver Max Gardner 
Former Governor of North Carolina 



Presentation of Representatives of Coixeges in 
North Carolina: 

Dr. Zeno Payne Metcalf, Chief Marshal 

Presentation of Honorary Degree of Doctor of 
Engineering to Wallace Carl Riddick 

Benediction : 

Music 



3ln0txtuttonal IRepresentatttoes 

Mentor Colle0e$ 

Institution Year Founded Representati\-e 

Salem College 1772 President Howard Edward Rondthaler 

University of North Carolina 1789 Dean Robert Burton House 

Wake Forest College 1834 President Thnrman Delna Kitchin 

Davidson College 1836 President Walter Lee Lingle 

Guilford College 1837 President Clyde Alonzo Milner 

Duke University 1838 President William Preston Few 

Greensboro College 1838 President Luther Lafayette Gobbel 

Catawba College 1851 Professor George Garfield Ramsey 

Elon College 1889 President Leon Edgar Smith 

Western Carolina Teachers College 1889 President Hiram Tyram Hunter 

Woman's College of the University 

of North Carolina 1891 Dean Walter Clinton Jackson 

Meredith College 1891 President Carlyle Campbell 

Lenoir-Rhyne College 1891 President Pleasant Edgar Monroe 

Flora Macdonald College 1896 President Henry Graybill Bedinger 

Appalachian State Teachers College 1899 President Blanford Barnard Dougherty 

Atlantic Christian College 1902 President Howard Stevens Hilley 

East Carolina Teachers College 1909 President Leon R. Meadows 

High Point College 1924 President Gideon Ireland Humphreys 

Black Mountain College 1932 Rector William Robert Wunsch 



Junior Colleges 

Institution Yeab Founded Representativb 

Lonisbnrg College 1779 President Walter Patten 

Saint Mary's School and Junior College 1842 Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, President 

Oak Ridge Military Institute 1852 Colonel Theodore Oran Wright, Supt. 

Mars Hill College 1856 President Hoyt Blackwell 

Mitchell College 1856 Mr. Sam Hill Dodson, Alumnus 

Peace Junior College 1857 President William Cornelius Pressley 

Belmont Abbey College 1878 Vice President Cuthbert E. Allen 

Mr. Edward Cahill 

Campbell College 1887 President Leslie Hartwell Campbell 

Asheville Normal and Teachers College 1887 Dean Frank C. Foster 

Wingate Junior College 1896 President Craven Cullen Burris 

Pineland College 1926 Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Jones, Presidents 

Presbyterian Junior College 1929 President Louis C. LaMotte 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Administration, Oflficers of. State 

College 8 

Administrative Council of the Con- 
solidated University 7 

Admission 23 

Advanced Standing: 25 

Aeronautical Engineering 91, 126, 248 

Agrictiltural Chemistry 64, 182 

Agricultural Education 130, 199 

Agricultural Engineering 58, 156 

AgriciJture and Forestry, School of .... 51 

Agricultural Engineering 58, 156 

Experiment Station 82 

Extension Work 83 

Forestry 66, 223 

General Agriculture 53 

Agricultural Chemistry 64, 182 

Agricultural Economics and Rural 

Sociology 55_ jgl 

Animal Production 62, 158 

Dairy Manufacturing 62, 158 

Entomology 79 289 

Farm Business Administration .56, 151 
Farm Marketing and Farm 

Finance 66, 151 

Field Crops and Plant Breeding 65, 220 

Floriculture 70 236 

Freshman and Sophomore 

Curricula 55 

Plant Pathology 63, 170 

Pomology 7l[ 236 

Poultry Science 76 270 

Rural Sociology 56, 161 

So"» 77,' 276 

Vegetable Gardening 72, 236 

Landscape Architecture 73 241 

Wildlife Conservation and Manage- 

"^"t 80, 289 

Agronomy go 

Alumni Association 00 

Alumni News gg 

Animal Husbandry and Dairying 60, 158 

Animal Production 62* 158 

Applicants, Information for 23 

Admission 03 

Expenses <>•> ,.-, 

fellowships 29 

Financial Aids and Scholarships ..""." 28 

Registration ,7 

S^f-Help '.ZZZIZZZ 40 



PAGE 

Architectural Engineering and 

Architecture 95, gg, 154 

Assistants, Student 20 

Athletics and Physical Education 34, 44, 264 

Basic Division 43 

Organization and Objects 43 

Program of Study 46 

Freshman and Sophomore Curricula 
of Schools, Divisions, and De- 
partments 46 

Board 27 

Board of Trustees of the Consolidated 

University of North Carolina 6 

Botany gS, 170 

Buildings, General Service 22 

Calendar, College 3 

Calendar, 1940-41 4 

Ceramic Engineering 101 174 

Chemical Engineering 102 177 

Chemistry 64,' 182 

Civil Engineering (General) .105, 108, 186 

Construction 106, 108, 186 

Highway 107, log, 232 

Sanitary 107, iQg, igg 

Clubs and Societies 30 

College, The ' 21 

College Extension 149 

Commencement, 1939 : Degrees Con- 
ferred 296 

Construction Engineering 106, 109, 186 

Curricula: See School, Depart- 
ment, or Division Concerned 

Dairying, Animal Husbandry and ...62, 158 
Dairy Manufacturing 62, 158 

Degrees: Conferred, 1939 296 

Division of Teacher Training 129 

Graduate -..f. 

School of Agriculture and Forestry .. 51 

School of Engineering 34 

Textile School .'...''.'..'. 137 

Description of Courses (Alphabetical 

Order by Departments) 151 

Division of Graduate Studies .'. 145 

Division of Teacher Training ..I2i, 199 

Dormitories 23 27 

Economics .g. 

Agricultural 1..........55, 151 



316 



INDEX (Continued) 



PAOB 



Education 199 

(See Teacher Training, Division of) 
Engineering Mechanics 90, 210 

Engineering, School of 

Organization, Objects, Requirements.. 84 

Aei-onautical Option 91, 126, 248 

Architectural Engineering and 

Architecture 95, 98, 164 

Ceramic 99. 174 

Chemical 102, 177 

Civil 104, 108, 186 

Construction 105, 108, 186 

Electrical Ill, 206 

Experiment Station 92 

Furniture Option 127, 248 

General 115 

Geological 117, 228 

Heating and Air-Conditioning 

Option 127, 248 

Highway 106, 108, 232 

Industrial 120, 240 

Mechanical 122, 248 

Sanitary 106, 108, 186 

English 43, 214 

Enrollment, Summary of 294 

Entomology. Zoology 79, 289 

Equipment and Facilities (See each 
School, Department, Division) 

Ethics and Religion 43, 219 

Executive Committee of the Board 

of Trustees 6 

Expenses 25, 149 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 

Engineering 82 

Extension, College 149 

Faculty Council 8 

Faculty: Officers of Instruction 9 

Farm Business Administration 56, 151 

Farm Marketing and Farm Finance .56, 151 
Fees 26, 149 

Fellows, Research, 1939-40 20 

Teaching, 1939-40 20 

Fellowships 29 

Field Crops and Plant Breeding 66, 220 

Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration 311 

Financial Aids and Scholarships 28 

Floriculture 70. 236 

Forestry 66, 223 

Fraternities, Honor 31 

Social 32 

Furniture 127, 248 



Gardening, Vegetable 72, 236 

General Engineering 116 

General Information 21 

Geological Engineering 117 

Geology 228 

Graduate Division : Organization, 
Fellowships, Admission, Degrees, 
Regulations 146 

Graduation Requirements for 

Division of Teacher Training 128 

Graduate Division 146 

School of Agriculture and Forestry .... 62 

School of Engineering 88 

Textile School 138 

Health of Students 37 

Heating and Air-Conditioning 127, 248 

Highway Engineering 107, 109, 232 

History and Political Science 43. 234 

Honor Fraternities and Societies 81 

Horticulture 69. 236 

Floriculture 70. 236 

Pomology 71, 236 

Vegetable Gardening 72. 236 

Induatrial-Arts Education 132, 199 

Indvistrial Education 136, 199 

Industrial Engineering 120, 240 

Information for Applicants 23 

Inspection Trips: Engineering 87 

Forestry 68 

Textile 138 

Laboratories : See special Departments 
in Agriculture, Engineering, and 
Textiles 

Landscape Architecture 73, 241 

Library 38 

Loan Fund, Students' 28 

Mathematics 90, 244 

Mechanical Engineering (General) .122. 248 

Aeronautical Option 91, 126. 248 

Furniture Option 127, 248 

Heating and Air-Conditioning 

Option 127, 248 

Medals and Prizes 33 

Scholarship Day, 1939 307 

Military Science and Tactics 268 

Military Training 41 



INDEX (Continued) 



317 



Modem Languages 43, 259 

Mtisic 36 

Konresident Students 25 

Occapational Information and 

Guidance .134, 199 



Officers 

Administration of State College 

Administrative Council of the 

Consolidated University 

Instruction: Faculty of State CoUege. 

Other Administrative Officers 

Special Officers 

Trustees 



Physical Education and Ath- 
letics 34, 44, 254 

Physics 90, 265 

Plant Pathology 63, 170 

Political Science, History and 43, 234 

Pomology 71, 236 

Poultr>- Science 76, 270 

Professional Degrees 148 

Psychology 273 

Publications 

College 37 

Student 30 



Refunds 27 

Registration 27 

Pweligion, Ethics and 43, 219 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 41 

Rooms, Dormitory 23, 27 

Room Rent 27 

Rural Sociology, Agricnltural 

Economics and 55, 151 

Sanitai-y Engineering 108, 109, 1S6 

Scholarships. Financial Aids and 28 

School of Agriculture and Forestry 51 

School of Engineering 84 

School of Textiles 137 

Schools, Di\-isions, and Departments .... 43 

Self-Help for Students 40 

Shops, Laboratories, Facilities 

Agricultural (See each Department) 5 5 
Engineering (See each Department) .. So 
Textile (See each Department) 139 

Short Courses : Engineering 39 

Summer Session 150 

Textile, for mill men 139 



PAGB 

Societies, Clubs, Fraternities 30 

Sociology 44, 274 

Soils 77, 276 

State College 21 

Student Activities 29 

Clubs and Societies 30 

Fraternities, Honor 31 

Social 32 

Publications 30 

(Government 29 

Summer Session 150 

Summer Work for Engineering 

Students 87 

Teacher Training: Organization, 

Objects, Requirements 128 

Agricultural Education 130, 199 

Ind'jstrial-Arts Education 132, 199 

Industrial Education 135, 199 

Occupational Information and 

Guidance 1S4. 199 

Textile School : Organization. 

Objects, Requirements 137 

Chemistrj- and Dyeing 141, 14:?, 279 

Curricula for Graduates -with 

Arts Degrees 139 

Management 144, 279 

Manufacturing 142, 279 

MiU Men, Short Course 139 

Research „ 141 

Weaving and Designing 140, 144, 279 

Yam Manufacturing and 

Knitting 139, 143, 279 

Trustees, Board of 5 

Executive CJommittee fi 

Tuition and Fees 25. 149 

Vaccination 28 

Vegetable Gardening 72, 236 

Weaving and Designing 140, 144, 279 

Wildlife Conservation and 

Management 80, 2S9 

Yai-n Manufacturing and 

Knitting 139, 143. 279 

Young Men's Christian Association 40 

Zoolcgj- 79. 2S9 



DIRECTORY 

FACULTY and STUDENTS 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF 
AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

1939-1940 



STATE COLLEGE STATION 
RALEIGH 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

For the School Year 1939-1940 



Dean of Administration.:.- Colonel J. W. Harrelson 

Dean of Students E. L. Cloyd 

Director of Registration W. L. Mayer 

Treasurer - A. F. Bowen 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Colonel J. W. Harrelson, Chairman Dean of Administration 

B. F. Brown Dean of the Basic Division of the College 

T. E. Browne... Director of the Department of Education 

E. L. Cloyd, Secretary Dean of Students 

"W. L. Mayer Director of Registration and Purchasing Agent 

Dr. Z. P. Metcalf ..Director of Instruction, School of 

Agriculture and Forestry. 

Thomas Nelson Dean of the Textile School 

Dr. R. F. Poole Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Instruction 

Blake R. Van Leer Dean of the School of Engineering 

and Director of Instruction. 

I. 0. Schaub .....Dean of the School of Agriculture and Director 

of Agricultural Extension. 

J. L. Stuckey Head of the Department of Geology 

Wm*. Hand Browne, Jr. Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Alumni Secretary Dan M. Paul 

Athletics : Director J. F. Miller 

Athletics: Business Manager ....J. L. Von Glahn 

Dining Hall, Steward... L. H. Harris 

Dormitories: Superintendent T. T. Wellons 

Dormitories: Chief Assistant .....R. L. Mayton 

Extension, Director Edward W. Ruggles 

Gymnasium, Custodian .Oscar Glindmeier 

Laundry, Superintendent.. .W. L. Godwin 

Acting Librarian.. ..H. C. Brown 

Military, P. M. S. & T Colonel Thos. W. Brown 

Music, Director Major C. D. Kutschinski 

Nurse, Head Miss Ida E. Trollinger 

Physician Dr. A. C. Campbell 

Power Plant, Superintendent... A. A. Riddle 

Publicity, Director F. H. Jeter 

Self-Help, Director N. B. Watts 

Service Department, Manager W. P. Morris 

Station Farms, Director F. E. Miller 

Y. M. C. A., Secretary Edward S. King 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

For the School Year 1939-1940 



Agricultural Short Courses 


Fraternity Life 


M. E. Gardner, Chairman 


A. F. Greaves-Walker, Chairman 


Dan M. Paul, Secretary 


C. R. Lefort, Secretary 


J. B. Cotner 


K. G. Althaus 


P. M. Haig 


H. B. Briggs 


J. F. Lutz 


R. C. Bullock 


C. F. Parrish 


E. L. Cloyd 




L. E. Cook 


Athletics 


B. E. Lauer 


H. A. Fisher, Chairman 


M. C. Leager 


A. J. Wilson, Secretary 


F. H. Lyell 


R. F. Poole 


J. F. Miller 


I. 0. Schaub 


J. D. Paulson 


J. L. Stuckey 


E. M. Waller 




L. F. Williams 



Buildings and Grounds: 

M. E. Gardner, Chairman 

J. P. Pillsbury, Secretary 

T. R. Hart 

J. V. Hofmann 

C. L. Mann 

W. F. Morris 

R. H. Ruffner 

Ross Shumaker 

I. V. Shunk 

L. L. Vaughan 

J. G. Weaver 

Catalogue 

H. B. Shaw, Chairman 

J. D. Clark 

J. B. Cotner 

T. P. Harrison 

T. R. Hart 

W. L. Mayer 

College Extension 

K. C. Garrison, Chairman 

E. W. Ruggles, Secretary 

C. H. Bostian 

C. B. Clevenger 

R. S. Dearstyne 

W. G. Geile 

T. R. Hart 

A. I. Ladu 

C. G. Mumford 

J. D. Paulson 

S. R. Winston 

Disciplinary 

E. L. Cloyd, Chairman 
R. S. Fouraker 

F. W. Lancaster 
William McGehee 



Freshman Welfare 

W. N. Hicks, Chairman 
P. M. Haig 
Lodwick C. Hartley 
C. R. Lefort 
R. L. Mayton 
J. S. Meares 
C. G. Mumford 
E. M. Waller 

Graduate Studies 

R. F. Poole, Chairman 

Wm. Hand Browne, Jr. 

J. W. Cell 

J. B. Derieux 

G. W. Forster 

A. H. Grimshaw 

T. P. Harrison, Editor 

E. G. Hoefer 
Z. P. Metcalf 
G. K. Middleton 
G. Wallace Smith 
Harry Tucker 

L. L. Vaughan 
L. F. Williams 

Jobs and Self-Help 

F. B. Wheeler, Chairman 
N. B. Watts, Secretary 
E. L. Cloyd 

L. H. Harris 
W. F. Morris 
Williams Newton 
R. H. Ruffner 



North Carolina State College 



LiBRABT 



A. I. Ladu. Chairman 
Harlan C. Brown, Secretary 

C. R. Bramer 
J. W. Cell 

J. M. Clarkson 
K. C. Garrison 
A. H. Grimshaw 
P. H. Harvey 

D. A. Lockmilier 
T. B. Mitchell 

G. H. Sarterfield 
J. L. Stuckey 

LOA>"S 

E. L. Cloyd. Chairman 
A. F. Bowen. Secretary 
W. L. Mayer 

C. B. Shulenberger 

Public Lecttbes 

Wm. Hand Browne, Jr. 

L. 0. Armstrong 

R. C. Bullock 

Thornton Chase 

R. S. Dearstyne 

K. C. Garrison 

A. H. Grimshaw 

Lodwick C. Hartley 

E. G. Hoefer 

E. S. King 

R. B. Rice 

G. H. Satterfield 

Reftxd of Fees 

E. L. Cloyd, Chairman 
A. F. Bo wen 
W. L. Mayer 

Research 

Z. P. Metcalf, Chairman 
Wm. Hand Browne, Jr. 
E. R. Collins 
J. B. Derieux 

A. H. Grimshaw 
C. D. Grinnells 
Jack Levine 

R. O. Moen 
R. F. Poole 
R. B. Rice 
G. H. Satterfield 
J. L. Stuckey 
Harry Tncker 

B. W. Wells 

C. B. Williams 



SociAX Fuzfcnoss 

Faculty MemTjcrs 

Z. P. Metcalf. Chairman 

E. L. Cloyd, Secretary 
Kenneth G. Althaus 

J. W. Goodman 

F. M. Haig 
Lodwick C. Hartley 
J. F. Miller 

R. H. Ruffner 
F. B. Wheeler 

Student Members 

H. W. Branson 
E. L. Bryant 

E. E. Durham 
J. D. Huckabee 
P. D. Kaley 

A. A. Latham 
H. D. Means 
J. A. Mitchiner 

F. A. Paschal 

Sttdext Gontiknmext 

J. L. Stuckey, Chairman 
E. W. Boshart 

E. L. Cloyd 
A. A. Dixon 

A. H. Grimshaw 

W. X. Hicks 

C. B. Shulenberger 

Stttdest P^ttblications Boabd 
Faculty Members 

F. H. Jeter. Chairman 
Gene Knight 

C. R. Lefort 
Roger Marshall 
W. L. Mayer 

Student Members 

J. W. Aldridge 
John Atkins 
T. H. Blount, Jr. 
E. S. Bowers 
Pete Cromartie 
E. P. Davidson 
E. E. Durham 
Z. B. Lane. Jr. 
J. L. Langdon 
L. E. Milks 
J. A. Mitchiner 
Forrest Paschal 
J. Y. Pharr 
M. E. Starnes 
T. D. Williams 



Faculty Directory 

STt-DE>-T WeLFABE TbAFFIC 

Faculty Members Harry Tucker, Chairman 

Lodwick C. Hartley, Chairman ^V. K^ Pillsbury, Secretary 

A. C. Campbell ^^ ^- ^^^"'^ 

F M Hai°^ Arnold Peterson 

e'. S.' KinI B. R. Van Leer 

R. R. Sermon 
C. B. Shulenberger 
J. L. Stuckey 
L. F. Williams 

Studetit Members 
H. W. Branson 
E. P. Davidson 

A. A. DiYeso 
E. E. Durham 
Kenneth Murchison 

B. S. Pace 

H. F. Randolph 
W. H. Retter 



DORMITORY ASSISTANTS 

1939-1940 

Mr. R. L. Mayton, Chief Assistant 
Ninth Dormitory 

Counselor Room 

Clevenger, W. L. .__ - 208 4th 

Regan, P. R. ..._ 201 5th . 

Durham, E. E..... -- 201 6th 

Hunter, C. A __... 125 7th 

Mann, S. N 223 7th 

Frazier, T. R. 309 7th 

Rennie, J. W .___ 13 8th 

Sabol, F. P. -126 8th 

O'Brian, Joseph 220 8th 

Kirkland, C. W., Jr 310 8th 

Knott, L. H. _ 109 10th 

Reams, W. J. 137 1911 

Reeves, T. L 232 1911 

Young, E. O. - - 340 1911 

Bartlett, G. W 117 "A" 

Means, H. D 217 "A" 

Gregg, P. P. 317 "A" 

Thompson, W. F. 122 "C" 

Ireland, C. F 217 "C" 

Rowland, W. T. _ 317 "C" 

Fowles, C. V. 23 South 

Langdon, J. L 116 South 

Jackson, Cecil _. 216 South 

Carey, R. E. 316 South 

Johnson, T. C .._. 103 Watauga 

Randolph, Hal 205 Watauga 

Mitchiner, J. A _ 304 Watauga 



COLLEGE TELEPHONES 



Infirmary 

Y. M. C. A... 

Technician 

Student Government 

Fieldhouse 

Dining Hall 



7615 
7184 
4732 
8738 
6934 
2-0243 



FRATERNITY ROSTER 



1939-1940 



Organization 

Alpha Gamma Rho (Nat'l 

Alpha Kappa Pi (Nat'l 

Alpha Lambda Tau (Nat'l 

Delta Sigma Phi... (Nat'l 

Kappa Alpha (Nat'l 

Kappa Sigma . (Nat'l 

Lambda Chi Alpha (Nat'l 

Phi Kappa Tau (Nat'l 

Pi Kappa Alpha (Nat'l 

Pi Kappa Phi (Nat'l 

Sigma Alpha Mu (Nat'l 

Sigma Nu (Nat'l 

Sigma Phi Epsilon (Nat'l 

Sigma Pi (Nat'l 



Address 



Telephone 



-^008 Hillsboro Street 2-1137 

..6 Ferndell Lane 4035 

.10 Enterprise Street 7016 

.2004 Hillsboro Street 2-1873 

.8. Maiden Lane 2-0737 

.21 Enterprise Street ..-. - 2-0232 

.-2407 Clark Avenue - 8218 

-.2405 Clark Avenue 7422 

1922 Hillsboro Street 5022 

.1720 Hillsboro Street — - 4215 

.2304 Clark Avenue 7638 

.1301 Hillsboro Street... 2-1972 

.103 Chamberlain Street 4843 

-.2513 Clark Avenue 2-0268 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



1939-1940 

*Adams, A. H. — Clerk, Central Stores, Warehouse Building. Extension 
272. 

Residence: Clayton, X. C. Telephone 2751. 
Adams, Hazel C. — Clerk & Stenographer. Horticulture Department. 304 
Polk Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: 2602 Clark Ave. Telephone S221. 
♦Adams. W. E. — Instructor, Mechanical Engineering Department. 206 
Page Hall. Extension 247. 

Residence: 10 E. Dixie Drive. Telephone 2-1393. 
♦Alford. A. O. — Assistant Agricultural Editor, Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice and Experiment Station. 3 Ricks Hall. Extension 279. 
Residence: 1904 1^ Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-1422. 
Allen. Mrs. Leata — Stenographer. Agricultural Extension Service. 208 
Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 2701 Lochmore Drive. Telephone 2-0467. 
♦Alston, W. F. — Teaching Fellow, Botany Department. 249 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 40 6 Brooks Avenue. Telephone 4S0 2. 
♦Althaus, K. G.. Major Infantry — Asst. PMS & T, Military Department. 2 
Holladay Hall (Basement). Extension 233. 

Residence: 1515 Scales St. Telephone 8723. 
♦Altman. L. B. — District Agent. Agricultural Extension. 10 3 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 212. 

Residence: 1210 Cowper Drive. Telephone 2-3204. 
Amero, John J. — Teaching Fellow, Department of Ceramic Engineering. 
Ceramic Building. Extension 249. 

Residence: 2513 Clark Avenue. Telephone 2-0268. 
♦Anderson, D. B. — Professor of Botany, Botany Department. 4 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 906 Brooks Avenue. Telephone 2-3061. 
Andrews. B. G. — Field Agent. Agricultural Economics and Rural Socio- 
logy Department. 115. 1911. Extension 262. 

Residence: 105 Fourth Dormitory. Box 3206. 

♦Andrews, W. G. — Assistant in Poultry Research. Poultry Plant. Tele- 
phone 8686. 

Residence: 202 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3120. 

Arant, Miss Anamerle — District Agent. Home Demonstration Division, 
Agricultural Extension. 312 Ricks Hall. Extension 243. 
Residence: 2402 Clark Ave. Telephone 4076. 

♦Arey. J. A. — In Charge Office of Dairy Extension, Dairy Extension. 118 
Polk Hall. Extension 277. 

Residence: 5 Maiden Lane. Telephone 2-3535. 
♦Armstrong. L. O. — Assoc. Prof., Division of Teacher Training. Holladay 
Hall. Extension 25 6. 

Residence: 400 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-0063. 
Atkins, Mrs. Rupert E. — Statistical Clerk. 1-15 of month. Department 
of Animal Husbandry, Swine Extension. 202 Polk Hall. Extension 
269. 15 to end of month, Extension Studies, 108 Ricks Hall. Exten- 
sion 255, 

Residence: Western Boulevard. Telephone 856 4. 

* — Married. 



12 North Carolina State College 

*Atkins, S. W. — Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 107-1911. Extension 261. 

Residence: 1312 Filmore Street. Telephone 4783. 
Badders, Hal — Power Plant, Assistant Supt. Extension 234. 
Residence: 2402 Everett Avenue. Telephone 6S14. 
Bagley, S. E., Jr. — Teaching Fellow, Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 
Textile Building. Extension. 

Residence: 10 6 Home St. Telephone 2-1887. 
Bailey, E. A. — Teaching Fellow, Chemistry Department. 202 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 2316 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2055. 
Bailey, Janie R. — Stenog., Mechanical Engineering Department. 109 Page 
Building. Extension 246. 

Residence: 11 Maiden Lane. Telephone 8472. 
*Baln, W. A. — Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering Department. 
122A Winston Hall. Extension 301. 

Residence: U-7 Raleigh Apts. Telephone 2-0010. 
♦Baker, Mrs. Allen L. — P. B. X. Operator. 117 Winston Hall. Extension 
"O". 

Residence: 200 E. Edenton St. Telephone 4143. 
*Ballenger. Stanley T. — Ass't Prof., Modern Languages. 20 5 Peele Hall. 
Extension 231. 

Residence: 3134 Stanhope Avenue. Telephone 9570. 
Ballentine. J. B. — Teaching Fellow. Chemistry Department. 210 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 201 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3119. 
Barham, :Mrs. Helen D. — Stenographer, Pilots and Mechanics Training 
Department. 104 Page Hall. Extension 248. 

Residence: 1924 St. Mary's Street. Telephone 2-1615. 
♦Barker, W. J. — Assistant Forester, Extension Forestry. 307 Ricks HalL 
Extension 270. 

Residence: 125 Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-3SS5. 

♦Barnes. Mrs. ]\Iamie L. — Warp Drawer, Textile School. 2nd floor. Textile 
Bldg. Extension. 

Residence: 2220 Hillsboro St. Telephone 605S. 
♦Barnhardt. Luther Wesley — Assistant Professor, History and Govern- 
ment. 106 Peele Hall. Extension 223. 

Residence: 2592 Stafford Avenue. Telephone 8796. 
Bartlett, Grady W. — Instructor, Physics Department. 10 8 Daniels Hall. 
Extension 229. 

Residence: 117 "A" Dormitory, Box 5453. 

Bass. L. I. — Clerk, Agr. Econ. and Rur. Soc. Dept. 110-1911. Extension 
Residence: Mansion Park Hotel. Telephone 7541. 

♦Bauerlein, George, Jr. — Asst. Prof., History Department. 105 Peele Hall. 
Extension 223. 

Residence: 310 Pogue St. 

Bell, T. A. — Laboratory Assistant, Chemistry Department. 210 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 2316 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6709. 
♦Biggs, Mrs. V. L. — Memo. Operator. Agricultural Extension Service. 5 
Ricks Hall. Extension 279. 

Residence: Boylan Apts. C-303. Telephone 5322. 
♦Bishop. Mrs. L. W. — OtRce Secretary, Y. M. C. A. Department. First 
Floor Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Tel. 7184. 

Residence: 2900 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-0402. 
Blair, E. C. — Extension Agronomist. Department of Agronomy. 208 
Ricks Hall. Extension 2 21. 

Residence: 125 Glenwood Avenue. Telephone 2-1388. 



Faculty Directory 13 

^^^"i^n^.^^'^^ ^- B.— stenographer, Electrical Engineering Department 
201 Electrical Enigineering Bldg. Extension 236 i^epartment. 

Residence: Brooks Avenue. Telephone 2-068 8. 
Bledsoe Mordecai—Stenographer. Extension Service (Tobacco Work) 
andTriple-A. Dining Hall Bldg. Tel. 2-0544 and 2-0545 
Residence: 2403 Everette Ave. Telephone 6316 

^^i'r^'d^'nv ^^ M-7?ffi^^Assistant & Stenographer, Animal Husbandry 
and Dairying. 115 Polk Hall. Extension 268 "-^uury 

Residence: Brooks Ave. Telephone 2-0 688 

"""Tb p"o'.? H^alr Sl7p?„^*''^"°^^^--"' =""" ''—"on Service. 
Residence: 226 E. Park Drive. Telephone 2-0 933 

*Boshart, Edward W^— Professor in Division of Teacher Training. 11 
Holladay Hall. Extension 258. "e- j.j. 

Residence: Cameron Court Apt. F-l-B. Telephone 2-2475. 
*Bostian C. H.— Assoc. Prof., Zoology and Entomology Department 109 
Zoology Building. Extension 239. pcii imeni. luy 

Residence: 902 Brooks Ave. Telephone 2-2469. 
^^^Sen'tion'^I'"'''''"""' '^"^^'"''^ Department. 10 5 Holladay Hall. 
Residence: 20 Perndell Lane. Telephone 5334. 

^'Tffq'"'nE^f';J^'-^^^"'^''^";;^''°'- Pi-ofessor, Geological Engineering. 
209 Civil Engineering. Extension 303. 

Residence: 20 Logan Court. Telephone 6219 

Residence: 2807 White Oak Rd. Telephone 2-0617 

'^"■'pal; HaM'-^xSLirjIu"'"'"""^' ^"^"--'"^ Department. 107 

Residence: 125 Chamberlain St. Telephone 4159. 

*^"p?;.^w T,°" ^■T^'^^^^T/' Mechanical Engineering Department. 206 
r'age Hall. Extension 247. 

Residence: 1625 St. Mary's St. Telephone 2-1030 

*Brigman, Mrs H P.— Statistical Clerk, Agricultural Economics. 106- 
1911. Extension 261. 

Residence: 213 N. Bloodworth Street. Telephone 5940 
*Brigman, H. P.— Clerk, Poultry Department. 214 Ricks Hall. Extension 

Residence: 213 N. Bloodworth St. Telephone 5940. 

Britt, Ruth Pai-ham— Clerk & Stenographer, Treasury Dept. 10 5 Holla- 
day Hall. Extension 278. .x y uo nuiid 

Residence: H-4 Grosvenor Apt. Telephone 4930-J 

"^'■''nhon^v^i?- C— Night Nurse, Infirmary. Hospital Building. Tele- 
pnone loio. 

Residence: 1306 Mordecai Drive. Telephone 2-1169. 
*Brooks, Dr. E. C. — President, Emeritus. 

Residence: Sir Walter Hotel. Telephone 7711. 
Brooks, Sallie—Assistant Extension Nutritionist, Agricultural Extension 
Dmsion of Home Demonstration Work. 202 Ricks Hall. Extension 

^g^iy^ence: Sec. A-Apt. 303 Boylan Apartments. Telephone 

*^''''Exten^sion'^3^^"' ^''''' Division of the College. 101 Peele Hall. 

Residence: 801 N. Bloodworth St. Telephone 2-0382. 
Brown, E. B.— Fellow in Agronomy. Patterson Hall. Extension 222 
Residence: 1715 Park Drive. Telephone 6151. 



14 North Carolina State College 

Brown. Frank B.. Jr. — Teaching Fellow, Physics Department. 20 S 
Daniels Hall. Extension 229. 

Residence: 2100 Hillsboro St. Telephone 7471. 
*Brown, Harlan C. — Acting Librarian. Library Building. Extension 259. 

Residence: 2100 Hillsboro St. Telephone 59S5. 
♦Brown, Robert R. — Assoc. Prof, in E. E. Electrical Engineering. 104 
Daniels Hall. Extension 235. 

Residence: 1520 Carr St. Telephone S924. 
♦Brown. T. C.^ — Instructor, Mechanical Engineering Department. 206 
Page Hall. Extension 247. 

Residence: 3133 Stanhope Avenue. Telephone 2-1747. 
♦Brown. T. T. — Extension Poultryman. Poultry Department. 115 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 281. 

Residence: 1709 Bickett Blvd. Telephone 9731. 
♦Brown. Thomas W. — Colonel, Infantry, Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics (PMS&T). Room 1-A, Holladav Hall (Basement). Extension 
233. 

Residence: 115 Hawthorne Rd. Telephone 2-3507. 
♦Browne. Thomas Everett — Director. Division of Teacher Training. 201 
HoUaday Hall. Extension 256. 

Residence: 1715 Park Drive. Telephone 6151. 
♦Browne. Wm. Hand, Jr. — Professor & Head of Dept.. Electrical Engi- 
neering. 203 Daniels Hall. Extension 236. 

Residence: 408 Dixie Trail. Telephone 5201. 
Bryan. Rose Elwood — Home Agent at Large. Home Demonstration Di- 
vision. Agricultural Extension. 312 Ricks Hall. Extension 243. 
Residence: Durham, N. C. Telephone F-9452. 
♦Buell, Murray F. — Asst. Prof, of Botanv. 3 Patterson Hall. Extension 
267. 

Residence: 911 Brooks Ave. Telephone 2-2112. 
♦Bullock. Roberts Cozart — Assoc. Prof., Mathematics Department. 6 Pul- 
len Hall. Extension 226. 

Residence: 402 Home St. Telephone 7127. 
Bunn, Charles I. — Fellow in Game Management. Zoology and Ento- 
mology Department. 203-A Zoology Bldg. Extension 239. 
Residence: 207 Fourth Dormitory. Box 3125. 
Burke. Maude — Tvpist. Office of Registration. Holladav Hall. Extension 
219. 

Residence: 405 Aycock Street. Telephone 2-2503. 
♦Burkhart, Leland F. — Assistant Agronomist. Patterson Hall. Exten- 
sion 222. 

Residence: 303 Hillcrest Road. Telephone 8126. 
Burnette. W. T. — Teaching Fellow, Agricultural Chemistry. 210 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 2232 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4910. 
Cameron. Miss Grizella — Cashier. Boarding Department. Dining Hall 
Bldg. Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 205 Ashe Avenue. Telephone 5147. 
Cameron, Kenneth Walter — Instructor in English. 10 6 Pullen Hall. 
Extension 238. 

Residence: 117 Cox Avenue. Telephone 6496. 
♦Campbell, Alton Cook — College Physician, College Infirmary. Telephone 
7615. 

Residence: 30 2 Hawthorne Road. Telephone 6 849. 
Cantrell, Clyde H. — Circulation Librarian. Library. Extension 259. 

Residence: 410 W. Hargett St. Telephone 7090. 
Carter, Mary Evelyn — Stenographer. Horticulture and Dept. of Cotton 
Fiber Investigations. 304 Polk Hall. Extension 275. 
Residence: 305 S. Person St. Telephone 2-3305. 



Faculty Directory 15 

*Case, L. I. — Animal Husbandry Extension Department. 203 Polk Hall. 
Extension 269. 

Residence: 1425% Park Drive. Telephone 2-0198. 
♦Castlebury, Shelby — Dray Clerk. Warehouse. Extension 272. 

Residence: Clayton, N. C. Telephone 2351. 
♦Caveness, H. L. — Asst. Prof., Chemistry Department. 212 Winston Hall. 
Extension 265. 

Residence: 2607 Vanderbilt Avenue. Telephone 2-1613. 
*Cell, John W. — Assoc. Prof., Mathematics Department. 7 Pullen Hall. 
Extension 228. 

Residence: 602 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-2528. 
Chambers, C. L. — Manager Book Dept., Students Supply Store. Y.M.C.A. 
Extension 225 and Tel. 2-3674. 

Residence: 2302 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-2741. 
Chapman, W. H. — Asst. Agronomist, Agronomy Department. 119 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: 6 Enterprise St. Telephone 4788. 
*Chase, Thornton, Major, Infantry — Asst. PMS&T, Military Department. 
12 Holladay Hall. Extension 233. 

Residence: 1809 Glenn Ave. Telephone 2-2272. 
*Clark, Joseph D. — Professor, English Dept. 109 Peele Hall. Extension 
237. 

Residence: 15 Furches, Wilmont. Telephone 7385. 
*Clarkson, John Montgomery — Assoc. Prof. Mathematics Department. 6 
Pullen Hall. Extension 226. 

Residence: 2701 Barmettler St. Telephone 8762. 
♦Clement, S. L. — Assoc. Prof. Agricultural Economics. 116-1911. Ex- 
tension 262. 

Residence: 2601 Vanderbilt Avenue. Telephone 8061. 
*Clevenger, C. B. — Professor of Soils, Agronomy Department. 18 Pat- 
terson Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: 305 Calvin Rd. Telephone 8141. 
*Clevenger, Reba Davis (Mrs.) — Reference Librarian, Library. Library. 
Extension 259. 

Residence: 305 Calvin Rd. Telephone 8141. 
Clevenger, W. L. — Professor, Animal Husbandry & Dairying. 211 Polk 
Hall. Extension 276. 

Residence: 208 4th. 
*Cloyd. E. L. — Dean of Students, Administration Department. Holladay 
Hall. Extension 215. 

Residence: 2224 Hillsboro St. Telephone 5983. 
♦Cochran, Walter B. — Major, Infantry, Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics, Room 14. Holladav Hall (Basement). Extension 
233. 

Residence: 2226 Hillsboro St. Telephone 5260. 
Coffey, Miss Christine- — Cataloger. Library. Library. Extension 259. 
Residence: 1306 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-0982. 
*Coffey, Mrs. Thelma W. — Secretary to R. W. Shoffuer, Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service. 208 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 304 Duncan Street. Telephone 4918. 
♦Coggin, James Kirk — Assoc. Prof., Division of Teacher Training. Holla- 
day Hall. Extension 259. 

Residence: Cary. Telephone 2482. 
♦Collins, Emerson R. — Agronomist, Agronomy Department. 116 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: 113 Boylan Ave. Telephone 2-0832. 
Colvin, David— Teaching Fellow, Chemistry Department. 210 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 2304 Clark Avenue. Telephone 7638. 



16 North C-4Rolina State College 

Cone, A. A. — Assistant State Coordinator, Soil Conservation Service. 205 
Polk Hall. Telephone. 

Residence: 2410 Everett Avenue. 
Conley, Mabel C. (Miss) — Secretary, Forestry Department. 301 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 270. 

Residence: 2303 % Clark Avenue. Telephone 843 3. 
♦Conner, Nerval White — Assoc. Prof., Engineering Mechanics Dept. 101 
C. E. Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: 222S Hillsboro St. Telephone 4924. 
Cook, F. W. — Instructor, Research worker. Poultry Dept. 213 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 280. 

Residence: 118 Hawthorne Rd. Telephone 2-0880. 
♦Cook, Leon E. — Professor of Education, Education Department. 203 
Holladay Hall. Extension 256. 

Residence: 111 Brooks Ave. Telephone 2-1234. 
*Cope, Ralph L. — Instructor in Forge, Department of Mechanical En- 
gineering. Shop. Extension 245. 

Residence: 2 Logan Court. Telephone 2-2673. 
Copley, T. L. — Research, Soil Conservation Service. 20 5 Polk Hall. 
Telephone. 

Residence: 
*Cotner, J. B. — Professor, Agronomy Department. 26 ^^ Patterson Hall. 
Extension 263. 

Residence: 2718 Clark Avenue. 
Cox. Blanche — Cashier, Boarding Department. Dining Hall. Tel. 2-0243. 

Residence: 2202 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4509. 
Cox, Gladys — Secretary, Office of the Dean of Students, Administration 
Department. Holladay Hall. Extension 215. 

Residence: 123 Woodburn Rd. Telephone 2-1716. 

Cox, Miss Mabel — Cashier, Boarding Department, Dining Hall Bldg. 
Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 215 Park Avenue. Telephone 7619. 
*Cox, Paul M. — Machinist, Yarn Mfg. Dept., Textile School. 3rd floor 
Textile Building. Extension. 

Residence: 13 W. Dixie Drive. 
♦Crane, L. R. — Teaching Fellow. Engineering Mechanics Department. 101 
C. E. Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: Route 1, Raleigh. Telephone 2-2081. 

Creech, W. P. — Cashier and Assistant Superintendent of the Laundry. 
Dining Hall Building. Extension 283. 

Residence: Clayton. X. C. Telephone 2306. 
♦Criswell, Jack Fowler — Ext. Spec, in Land Use Planning. 1911 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 115 Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-2340. 

Crouch, George E. — Instructor, Physics Department. 20 8 Daniels Hall. 
Extension 229. 

Residence: 2412 Everett Avenue. Telephone 6377. 
♦Crowder, W. G. — Ass't at Poultry Plant. Poultry Department. Poultry 
Plant. Telephone 8686. 

Residence: Poultry Plant. 
♦Culberson. Geo. R. — Instructor. Textile School. 3rd Floor Textile Bldg. 
Extension. 

Residence: 219 Oberlin Road. Tel. 7987. 

Current, Miss Ruth — State Agent, Home Demonstration Division. Agri- 
cultural Extension. 201 Ricks Hall. Extension 244. 
Residence: Raleigh Apt. Telephone. 

Davis, C. L. — Instructor in Farm Crops, Patterson Hall. Extension 263. 
Residence: 5 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-0945. 



Faculty Directory 17 

*Davis, Mrs. Gertrude S. — Secretary, Textile School. 1st floor Textile 
Bldg. Extension. 

Residence: 2230 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-1565. 
Davis, Philip H. — Instructor, English Department. 10 4 Pullen Hall. 
Extension 238. 

Residence: 114 Home Street. Telephone. 
*Dearstyne, Roy Styring — Professor, Poultry Department. 216 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 280. 

Residence: 2509 Fairview Road. Telephone 2-2764. 
♦Derieux. John B. — Professor, Physics Department. 110 Daniels Hall. 
Extension 229. 

Residence: 2802 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-0916. 
Deyton, Oscar W. — Research Fellow in Animal Husbandry. 216 Polk 
Hall. Extension 276. 

Residence: 201 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3119. 
*Dixon, A. A. — Professor, Physics Department. 208 Daniels Hall. Ex- 
tension 229. 

Residence: 14 Dixie Trail. Telephone 5468. 
*Doak. Charles Glenn — Asst. Prof, of Physical Education. 1 Gym. Ex- 
tension 218. 

Residence: 120 Woodburn Road. Telephone 2-3701. 
*Doody. T. C. — Instructor, Chemical Engineering Department. 6 Winston 
Hall. Extension 301. 

Residence: 12% Enterprise St. Telephone 5884. 
Doub, Miss Miriam — Stenographer, Ediphone Room, Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service. 203 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 3016 White Oak Road. Telephone 6790. 
Drum, L. F. — Teaching Fellow, Chemical Engineering Department. 112 
Winston Hall. Extension 301. 

Residence: 101 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3111. 
Dudley, Miss Inez S. — Stenographer, Extension Forestry Dept., Ag. Ex- 
tension Service. 307 Ricks Hall. Ext. 270. 

Residence: 1218 Glenwood Avenue. Telephone 8898. 
Dunham, iNIiss Gertrude — Cashier, Boarding Department, Dining Hall 
Bldg. Telephone 2-0234. 

Residence: 214 Park Avenue. 
*Edwards, J. M., Jr. — Asst. Prof. Architectural Engineering. 315 Daniels 
Hall. Extension 250. 

Residence: 104 Montgomery St. Telephone 5824. 
*Ellis, Howard M. — Extension Agricultural Engineer, Extension Agricul- 
tural Engineering. 318 Ricks Hall. Extension 274. 

Residence: 2706 Hazlewood Drive. Telephone 5887. 
Etchells, John L. — Assistant Bacteriologist, U.S.D.A , Food Research 
Division, Hort. Dept. 312 Polk Hall. Extension 275. 
Residence: 126 Forest Road. Telephone. 
*Evans, M. M. — Research Assistant in Plant Pathology, 250 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: Cary, N. C. 
Farmer. Miss iNIartha Ann — Stenographer, Ediphone Room, Agricultural 
Extension Service. 208 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 
Residence: 410 Cutler Street. Telephone 2-2438. 
*Farnham, F. R. — Extension Dairyman, Dairy Extension. 113 Polk Hall. 
Ext. 277. 

Residence: Charlotte, N. C. & State Col. Sta. 
Farrior. Julian — Fellow in Agronomy. Patterson Hall. Extension 222. 
Residence: 2316 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6709. 
*Feltner, Charles E. — Asst. Prof., Engineering, Mechanical. 101 C. E. 
Bldg. Extension 303. 

Residence: 116 St. Mary's Street. Telephone 6756. 



18 North Carolina State College 

♦Ferguson, B. Troy — District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 103 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 212. 

Residence: 2S07 White Oak Road. Telephone 2-0617. 
♦Ferguson, J. C. — Extension Cotton Gin Specialist, Extension Agr. Engr. 
Dept. 316 Ricks Hall. Extension 2 74. 

Residence: Dixie Trail Extension. Telephone 588S. 
♦Fisher, H. A. — Professor, Mathematics Department. 207 Page Hall. Ex- 
tension 227. 

Residence: 125 Brooks Ave. Telephone 4138. 
♦Flanders, C. A. — Instructor. Chemistry Department. 109 Winston Hall. 
Extension 265. 

Residence: 0-7 Raleigh Apts. 
Fleming, Margaret K. — Statistician, Agricultural Economics. 124-1911. 
Extension 262. 

Residence: 2608 Clark Avenue. Telephone 8772. 

♦Floyd, E. y. — Tobacco Specialist. Extension Service, and State Executive 
Officer, Triple-A. Dining Hall Bldg. Telephone 2-0544 and 2-0545. 
Residence: 125 Glenwood Avenue. Telephone 2-1388. 
♦Fontaine, James — Ass't Professor, Civil Engineering Department. 202 
Civil Engineering Bldg. Extension 303. 

Residence: 2712 Everett Ave. Telephone 2-0773. 

♦Forbes, E. H. — Foreman, Animal Husbandry Farm. 215 Polk Hall. Ex- 
tension 276. 

Residence: Western Boulevard. Telephone- M. C. Grant's — 
9927. 
♦Fornes. Gaston G. — Asst. Prof.. Mechanical Engineering Department. 
104 Page Hall. Extension 248. 
Residence: Knightdale. N. C. 
♦Forster, G. W. — Head of Department. Agricultural Economics & Rural 
Sociology. 118-1911. Extension. 

Residence: 1924 Sunset Drive. Telephone 2-1361. 

Fort, Nellie — Secretary and Clerk. Animal Husbandry. 215 Polk HalL 
Extension 276. 

Residence: 315 N. Boundary St. Telephone 6108. 

♦Foster, John Erwin — Assoc, in Animal Husbandry Research. 218 Polk 
Hall. Extension 276. 

Residence: 3209 Hillsboro St. Telephone 9881. 

♦Fountain, Alvin M. — Ass't Prof.. English Department. 101 Pullen Hall. 
Extension 238. 

Residence: 211 Groveland Ave. Telephone 6347. 

♦Fouraker, R. S. — Prof.. Electrical Engineering Department. 102 Daniels 
Hall. Extension 235. 

Residence: 601 Brooks Ave. Telephone 2-3094. 

♦Fowler, George — Research Fellow in Plant Pathology. 231 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 301 Brooks Avenue. Telephone 4807. 
♦Fox, John W. — Assistant Extension Editor. School of Agriculture. Ex- 
tension 279. 

Residence: 113 Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-1381. 

Franks, Ross M. — Assistant Steward, Boarding Department, Dining Hall 
Bldg. Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: Dining Hall. Telephone 2-0243. 

♦Fulghum, J. S., Jr. — Bookkeeper and Clerical Assistant. Department of 

Athletics. 2 Gymnasium. Extension 218 and Telephone 2-2407. 

Residence: 2510 Vanderbilt Avenue. Telephone 5868. 

♦Fulton. B. B. — Research Entomologist, Zoology Department. 20 8 Zo- 
ology Building. Extension 23 9. 

Residence: 600 Brooks Ave. Telephone 2-186S. 



Faculty Directory 19 

♦Gaither, E. W. — Subject Matter Analyst, Agricultural Extension. 21 
Ricks Hall. Extension 254. 

Residence: Carova, Western Boulevard. Telephone S616. 
Gantt, Miss Elizabeth — Stenographer, Poultry Extension Office. 113 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 281. 

Residence: 104 Home St., Apt. 6. Telephone 2-3179. 
♦Gardner, M. E. — Prof. & Head of Department, Horticulture Department. 
304 Polk Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence 2 70S Bedford Ave. Telephone 4178. 
♦Garodnick. Irvin O. — Instructor, Modern Language Department. Peele 
Hall. Extension 231. 

Residence: 3205 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-0689. 
Garrett, E. B. — State Coordinator, Soil Conservation Service. 20 5 Polk 
Hall. Telephone. 

Residence: 223 Hawthorne Road. Telephone 4328. 
♦Garrison, K. C. — Prof. Psychology, H. 3 Holladay Hall. Extension 2S6. 

Residence: Country Club Road. Telephone 2-2691. 
♦Garriss, H. R. — Assistant Ext. Plant Pathologist, Botany Department. 
249 Patterson Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 2305 Clark Ave. Telephone 4594. 
♦Ganger, H. C. — Ass't Professor and Disease Research, Poultry Depart- 
ment. 218 Ricks Hall. Extension 280. 

Residence: 1 ^^ Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-3020. 
♦Geile, W. G. — Prof, of Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering Bldg. 
Extension 303. 

Residence: 2509 Country Club Road. Telephone 7486. 
Gibson, Harvey T. — Instructor in English, Department of English. 104 
Pullen Hall. Extension 238. 

Residence: 1618 Ambleside Drive. Telephone 7836. 

Gibson. Paul — Assistant Agronomist, Agronomy Department. Patterson 
Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: 2408 Stafford Avenue. Telephone 8057. 

Gibson, R. M. — Fellow in Agronomy. Ill Polk Hall. Extension 220. 

Residence: 203 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3120. 
Gilbert, Clara L. — Stenographer, Agricultural Economics & Rural Soci- 
ology. 117-1911. Extension. 

Residence: 1908 Park Drive. Telephone 7433. 
♦Giles, G. Wallace — Asst. Professor, Agricultural Engineering-Agronomy. 
29% Patterson Hall. Extension 263. 

Residence: 304 Home St. Telephone 2-29SS. 

Gillenwater, G. A. — Teaching Fellow, Engineering Mechanics. 101 C. E. 
Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: 2228 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4924. 

Gilmore, J. F. — Teaching Fellow, Engineering Mechanics. 101 C. E. 
Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: 102 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3112. 

Glass, Graham G. — Clerk. Students Supply Store. Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Ex- 
tension 225 and Telephone 2-3674. 

Residence: 202 Groveland Avenue. Telephone 4127. 

♦Glenn, Karl B. — Ass't Prof.. Electrical Engineering Department. 104 
Daniels Hall. Extension 235. 

Residence: 309 X. Bloodworth St. Telephone 2-1207. 

♦Glindmeier, Oscar — Custodian of Gym. & Ath. Equipment. Gymnasium. 
Extension 218. 

Residence: 4 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-3541. 

♦Godwin, W. L. — Superintendent of Laundry. Dining Hall Building. Ex- 
tension 283. 

Residence: 11 Dixie Trail. 



20 North Caeolina State College 

♦Goodman. John W. — Assistant Director of Agricultural Extension. Agri- 
cultural Extension Service. 104 Ricks Hall. Extension 213. 
Residence: 2113 Woodland Ave. Telephone 2-2079. 
Gordon, Miss Pauline E. — Extension Specialist in Home Management. 
Home Demonstration Division. Agr. Extension. 313 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 243. 

Residence: S21 Hope Drive. Telephone S430. 
Grady, Robert H. — Teaching Fellow, Civil Engineering Department. 209 
C. E. Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: Field House. Telephone 6934. 
*Graeber, R. W. — Extension Forester, Extension Forestry Department. 
307 Ricks Hall. Extension 270. 

Residence: 303 Hillcrest Road. Telephone 8126. 
*Grant. M. C. — College Plumber, Service Dept. & Central Stores. Ware- 
house. Extension 272. 

Residence: College Campus. Telephone 9927. 
Greaves, Richard Elliott — Assistant Professor and Disease Research. 317 
Ricks Hall. Extension 280. 

Residence: 2512 Clark Avenue. Telephone 2-0019. 
♦Greaves-Walker. Arthur Frederick — Professor. Ceramic Engineering. 
Ceramic Building. Extension 249. 

Residence: 305 Forest Road. Telephone 6264. 

Green, Miss Bebe — Secretary to W. D. Lee. Agricultural Extension 

Service. 208 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 1304 Hillsboro Street. Telephone. 

Green. Miss Katie Lou — Cashier. Boarding Department. Dining Hall 
Building. Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 713 W. Peace St. Telephone. 

♦Green. R. W. — Assoc. Prof.. Economics. 10 7 Peele Hall. Extension 223. 
Residence: "The Willows," White Oak Road. Telephone 2-3282. 
Greene, Miss Minda — Stenographer, Basic Division of the College. 101 
Peele Hall. Extension 223. 

Residence: 2303 Clark Ave. Telephone 8083. 

Gregory, I. C. — Assistant Agronomist. Patterson Hall. Extension 222. 
Residence: 10 9 Oberlin Road. Telephone 7224. 
♦Grimshaw. Albert H. — Prof., Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. Basement 
Textile Building. Extension. 

Residence: Mansion Park Hotel. Telephone 7541. 

♦Grinnells. C. D. — In Charge Office of Dairy Investigations. Animal 
Husbandry Department. 214 Polk Hall. Extension 305. 
Residence: 409 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-1305. 

♦Groseclose, F. F. — Associate Professor. Industrial Engineering Depart- 
ment. 107 Page Hall. Extension 246. 

Residence: 1011 West Peace Street. Telephone 7287. 

♦Hagerstrand, M. A. — Sergeant, DEML, Assistant Instructor of Military 
Science and Tactics, and Clerk for Military Department. Room 1, 
Holladay Hall. Extension 233. 

Residence: 131 Hawthorne Road. Telephone 6851. 

♦Haig, Frederick Morgan — Assoc. Prof.. Animal Husbandry & Dairying 
Dept. 114 Polk Hall. Extension 268. 

Residence: 1803 Fairview Road. Telephone 2-0217. 
♦Halverson, J. O. — In Charge of Animal Nutrition Research, Agricultural 
Exp. Station, Animal Husbandry Dept, 315 Polk Hall. Extension 
241. 

Residence: 2813 Mayview Road. Telephone 2-148 8. 

Hamaker, Miss Margaret — Secretary, Architectural Department. 31 S 
Daniels Hall. Extension 250. 

Residence: 2402 Clark Avenue. Telephone 2-1830. 



Faculty Directory 21 

^''^'eSone'TeTs/'-^^'^^^^^^^' ^^^ ^^"^^^ Technician. Infinnary. 
Residence: 6 Hope Street. Telephone 8026 

Harde. "^^'^^^^ ^^"^^^ ^°^-^- Apt. Telephone 9535. 
' H:,?iaiS^S^-^,^S^^^^^^^^ Registration Department. 208 

Residence: 1615 Hillsboro Street. Telephone 7502 
?ens?on^22U^-^^^^^^^' ^^"°^' ^ '^^— ^- ^ Polk Hall. Ex- 
Residence: 2306 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-147S 
'''^2^Tloo\7v^Ji^;^L^/^°ijr-',,^,-,l30f and Entomology Department. 

*Harrelsor"oTr .^ilLl-Lr:. ^'''T ""^^• 

Holladay Hall. Extension n? Administration, Administration. 

Residence: 1903 Hillsbo;o St. Telephone 6810 

Ex!en';ionTl'4.^'^ '-"^ ^^^'^ ^^^^^^' ^^^ ^^t" D-- 210 Ricks Hall. 
Residence: 1626 Park Drive. Telephone 7628 

t;"sion'27?.-~'^'^'""'^" ^^^^^-P^ SP--^^^ 302 Polk Hail. Ex- 

_ Residence: 1618 Park Drive. Telephone 9537 
Sic^l'nllf''^^^^^^^^^^ Agronomy Department. 120 

Residence: 607 N. Blount St. Telephone 4406 
Phone°2-02?3~'''"^^'' ^'''^'^^ Department. Dining Hall. Tele- 
Residence: Dining Hall. Telephone 2-0243 

'Ttatio^'n. 'wettSn B^T'" '" '''^^^^ ^^^^^^^ Station. Experiment 
Residence: Western Blvd. Telephone 8901 

Tinsion"27?.- '-''''''''' '^^^^^^"^ ^^P^" ^05 Holladay Hall. Ex- 
*w. • ^!f/'^^°'^^ Western Boulevard. Telephone 8901. 

^^Si Js^^";r2^pirn-H"air iSfo^n ^3^ ^ '' ^^^^^ ^-^-^ ^^h- 
*Hart tV^TV J^^^ P^'-^ I^rive. Telephone 2-0743. 

' Tex'tlle'^BTd^/^'ExfenTr^"" ^ °^^^^^^^°^' ^-"^^ ^^^ool. 1st floor 
Re.sidence: 501 W. Whitaker Mill Road. Telephone 2 16=^^ 

Residence: 205 Woodburn Road. Telephone 2-1698 
Harvey, Paul H.-Associa.e Agrono„„s.. 24 Patterson Ha.,. ' Extension 
Residence: 2716 Barmettler Street. Telephone 2-3503 

Restdence: Raleigh Apartments A-2. TeTeph™e"9572 
'Ssfo""" ^-'-"-'o^. Textile Chem. * Dye. Textile Bldg. Ex- 
Residence: 2404 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-1793 

"'' aa-Bn^lid^r^Stt^slonn'oT- "''" ■^"'^'-"•'"^ °^^""»-' 20' 
Residence: 101 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3lii. 



22 North Carolina State College 

♦HeartT. Mrs. Charts Irvin — Secretary, College ExtenBion Division. 201 
Library- Extension 260. 

Residence; 128 S. Dawson St. Telephone 4070. 

♦Heck, Chas. M. — Professor, Physics Department. 112 Daniels Hall. Ex- 
tension 229. 

Residence: 200 Hawthorne Road. Telephone 9829. 

Henson. Mrs. Rnth S. — Bookkeeper. Treasury Dept. 105 Holladay Hall. 

Extension 27 8. 

Residence: 301 Park Axe. Telephone 2-3997. 

Herrick, L. W. — Research Fellow, Poultry Department. 213 Ricks Hall. 

Extension 280. 

Residence: 2804 Hillshoro St. Telephone 2-2654. 

•Hickman. Herman — Asst. Coach of Football and Track and Head 
Wrestling Coach. Coaches' Office. Field House. Telephone 6934. 
Residence: Fincastle Apts. No. 4. Telephone 2-2618. 

*Hicks, W. N. — Assoc. Professor, Ethics and Religion. 204 Peele Hall. 
Extension 231. 

Residence: 2505 Vanderbilt Ave. Telephone 7750. 
Hill, Miss Randolph — Stenographer. Agronomy Department. 19 Patter- 
son HalL Elxtension 222. 

Residence: 2200 Hope St. Telephone. 

•ffilton, John T. — ^Professor of Yam Manufacturing, Textile School. 3rd 
floor TextOe Bldg. 

Residence: 1610 Ambleside Drive. Telephone 9636. 
•Hinkle, Lu E. — Prof., Modem Language. 205 Peele Hall. Extension 
231. 

Residence: 1714 Park Drive. Telephone 2-0380. 

•Hiner, Mrs. Foye Pate — Cashier, Boarding Department. Dining Hall. 
Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: Cary, Rt. 1. Telephone 71-F-ll. 

♦Hocutt, Mrs. John Irving — Record Clerk, Registration Office. 208 Holla- 
day HalL Ebctension 219. 

Residence: 220 N. East St. Telephone 2-2533. 

Hodgen, W. R. — ^Research Fellow in Agronomy. Patterson Hall. Ex- 
tension 222. 

Residence: 207 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3125. 

♦Hoefer, B. G. — ^Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department. 204 C. 
E. Bnilding. Ebntension 302. 

Residence: 19 Furches Street. Telephone 7072. 

♦Tfn fnmim, JnHns V. — ^Miector of Forestry Dept. and Prof, of Forestry, 
Foresby Department. 301 Ricks Hall. Extension 2 70. 
Residence: 2800 Fairview Rd. Telephone 2-2993. 

l^jlmes. Miss Darcas — Cashier, Boarding Department. Dining Hall Build- 
ing. Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 214 Park Avenue. 

Holt, Mi^ "Virginia — Stenographer, Ceramic Engineering Department. 
Ceramics Bnilding. Extension 249. 

R^dence: 100 Home St., Apt. 3. Telephone 5416. 

Home, Miss Louise — Stenographer, Psychology Department. 3 Holladay 
HalL Extension 286. 

Residence: 2201 Fairview Road. Telephone 2-29 8 9. 

*HostetIer, Earl H. — Prof. Animal Husbandry, In charge of A. H. research. 
215 Polk Hall. Extension 276. 

Residence: 3010 White Oak Road. Telephone 5794. 

House, Miss Mary Hudson — Asst. Teller, Treasury Department. Holla- 
day HalL Extension 278. 

Residence: Cary, N. C. 



Faculty Directory 23 

Howard, Mrs. J. T. — Stenographer, Agricultural Extension Service. Ill 
Ricks Hall. Extension 271. 

Residence: llli/^ Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-2945. 
Hudglns, Madge — Stenographer, Agronomy Department. 24 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 263. 

Residence: 402 Home St. Telephone 2-2129. 
♦Hudson, C. R.— State Agent, Negro Work, Agricultural Extension Service. 
117 Ricks Hall. Extension 281. 

Residence: 2316 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6709. 
♦Huffaker, C. — Research Fellow in Entomology, Zoology and Entomology 
Department. 4 Zoology Building. Extension 239. 
Residence: Garner, N. C. 
Hunter, Miss Willie N. — Extension Specialist in Clothing, Home Demon- 
stration Division, Agr. Extension. 311 Ricks Hall. Extension 243. 
Residence: 1804 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4561. 
♦Hutchinson, H. H. — Auditor, Ag. Experiment Station. 107 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 211. 

Residence: 7 Enterprise St. Telephone 9886. 
♦Hutchinson, J. J. — Asst. in Poultry Disease Investigation, Poultry Plant. 
Telephone 8686. 

Residence: Cutler St. 
*Ison, Wade — Director Athletic Publicity. Holladay Hall. Extension 217. 

Residence: 604 Rosemont Ave. Telephone 2-3092. 
*Ivey, L. L. — Manager, Students Supply Store. Y.M.C.A. Bldg. Extension 
225 and Telephone 2-3674. 

Residence: 202 E. Park Drive. Telephone 8210. 
♦Jeter, Frank H. — Editor, School of Agriculture; Director of State College 
News Bureau. 1 Ricks Hall. Extension 279. 

Residence: 304 Forest Road. Telephone 6518. 
James, H. B. — Assistant in Farm Management, Agricultural Extension 
Service. 206 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 1718 Park Drive. Telephone 2-0713. 
♦Johansen, J. W. — Extension Economist. Farm Organization, Agr. Econ. 
& Rur. Soc. Dept. 119 1911. Extension. 

Residence: 2720 Bedford Avenue. Telephone 2-3553. 
Johnson, F. C. — Asst. Prof., Chemical Engineering Department. 6 
Winston Hall. Extension 301. 

Residence: Cameron Court Apt. W-3-A. Telephone 2-1387. 
Johnson, Miss Janet — Stenographer, Bureau of Biological Survey. 203 
B Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: 2602 Clark Avenue. Telephone 8122. 
Johnson, Ralph S. — Research Fellow in Plant Pathology. 250 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: Route 4, Raleigh. 
Johnson, Miss Robbie — Stenographer, Treasury Department. Holladay 
Hall. Extension 278. 

Residence: 12% Enterprise St. Telephone 2-3830. 
♦Johnson. Theodore Sedgwick — -Professor, Civil Enginering Dept. 202 
C. E. Bldg. Extension 303. 

Residence: 1026 Cowper Drive. Telephone 9682. 
♦Jones, Arthur Dave — Ass't Prof., Chemistry Department. 106 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 270 8 Vandyke Ave., Forest Hills, Raleigh, N. C. 
Jones, D. E. — Extension Rural Electrification Specialist, Extension Agri- 
cultural Engineering Department. 318 Ricks Hall. Extension 274. 
Residence: 1618 Park Drive. Telephone 9537. 
Jones, G. P., Jr. — Teaching Fellow, Department of Geological Engineer- 
ing. 2 Primrose Hall. Extension 304. 

Residence: 2232 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4910. 



24 North Carolina State College 

♦Jones, I. D. — Biochemist in Horticulture. Horticulture Department. 305 
Polk Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: 616 Brooks Are. Telephone 2-3091. 
Jones, Miss Margaret — Stenographer, Poultrr Department. 216 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 280. 

Residence: 8 St. Marys Street. Telephone 2-3 S S3. 
* Jones. Robert E.. Major Infantry — Assistant PMS&T, Military Depart- 
ment. Basement. Holladay Hall. Extension 233. 

Residence: 190 7 Park Drire. Telephone 2-2217. 
♦Jordan. Walter Edward — Assoc. Prof.. Chemistry DeparTnirr:. 2:7 "Win- 
ston Eall. Extension 265. 

STon Hall. Extension 265. 
Joyner, Miss Lucille — Stenographer, Chemical Engineering Dept. 112 
Wins- on Hall Extension 301. 

Residence: 2100 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6165. 
Judd. Mrs. Lilly B. — Stenographer. Agricultural Elxperiment Sta, 107 
Ricks Hall. Extension 211. 

Residence: 309 E. Morgan St. Telephone 8970. 
♦Keever. Leroy M. — Assoc. Prof.. Elec. Engr. Dept. 106 Daniels Hall. 
Extension 235. 

Residence: 2200 Carroll Drive. Telephone 9818. 
Kenyon. Mrs. B. W.. Jr. — Stenographer. Zoology and Entomology De- 
partment. 101 Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: J-2 Raleigh Apts. Telephone 2-l!(l98. 
Kerr, Edward G — Supt. College Dairy Farm, Animal Husbandry & 
Dairying. Extension 268. 

Residence: Dairy Farm Cottage. 
Kerr. Thomas — Cytologist in the U.S.D.A.. Cotton Fiber Investigations. 
104 Polk Hall. Extension 300. 

Residence: 2701 Clark Ave. Telephone 1775. 
*Kime. P. H. — Agronomist. 25 Patterson Hall. Extension 222. 
Residence: 728 W. Cabarrus St. Telephone 2-2126. 
♦Kimrey. A. C — Extension Dairyman. Dairy Extension. 116 Polk Hall. 
Extension 277. 

Residence: 220 E. Park Drive. Telephone 2-0856. 
Kincheloe. Henderson G. — Instructor in English, Departttiezit :: English. 
110 Peele Hall. Extension 237. 

Residence: 1615 Ambleside Drive. Telephone -45i:ii. 
♦King. Edward S. — General Secretary, Y.M.C.A. 2nd floor Y.M.C.A. Bldg. 
Telephone 7184. 

Residence: 121 Chamberlain St. Telephone 4511. 
King. Nora Lillington (Miss) — Secretary to Dean of Administration. Ad- 
ministration Office. Holladay Hall. Extension 210. 

Residence: 205 Woodbum Road. Telephone 2-1698. 
♦King. Mrs. Zoie — Cashier, Boarding Department, Dining Hall. Tele- 
phone 2-0243. 

Residence: Cary. X. C. Route 1. Telephone 71-F-ll. 
Knight, Gene — Extension Radio Editor, Agricultural Extension Service. 
11 Kicks Hall. Extension 279. 

Residence: 1712 Scales Street. Telephone 2-3S01. 
♦Knight. Leonard M. — Sergeant. DEML. Assistant Instructor of Military 
Science and Tactics. Room 1, Holladay Hall. Extension 233. 
Residence: 3527 Neil St. Telephone 2-1029. 
♦Kriegel. W. Wurth — Instructor, Ceramic Engineering. Ceramic Build- 
ing. Extension 249. 

Residence: 100 Home St., Apt. #1. Telephone 8120. 
♦Kutschinski. Christian D. — Musical Director, Music Department. 10 Hol- 
laday Hall. Extension 251. 

Residence: 1500 HUlsboro St. Telephone 5427. 



Faculty Directory 25 

*^^^'^- ■'■"^ l"ourtn Dormitory. Box 3118 
'sioultl' '-''""■• '=-'^"="' I^-^P^tm;,,,. no p,e.e Ha>l. Exten- 

•Lambe ^"''f""'"'- ^-^^ ^^"'l-"""' AP>- Telephone 2-0709. 
i^aniDe, C. M. — Instructor, Civil Ener 2-l<i c t? m^^ -o^ * 

Residence: 413 Calvin Rold. Telephot'^e'fs "^'''""^^ '''■ 
Txtensi^nlS^. ^'^^^^'-^-'^ ^^^t. Physics Dept. 206 Daniels Hall. 
Residence: 2403 Everett Ave. Telephone 6316 

Residence: 208 ^^ Forest Road. Telephone 8 415 
Lan.,„M. GeraU,_:ns...uc.o. in En.Hs.,. lo/pulfen h:„. EUens.on 

Residence: 208% Forp«?t R^ari n-^i u 
*T 1 • ,. ^^^oy2 r uresi Koad. Telephone 8415 

"^^&e;:^on^27'9-^^^^^- ^^^^^^^-^ ^-^^^on Service.% R.^s Hall. 

Residence: Cameron Park Apartments Xo. 15. Telephone 

^'^"Half • Ex;;nsTo°n-30r'- ^'"^^^^^^ Engineering Dept. 112A Winston 
Residence: 1618 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4505 
t'e:sion%^24^-~''^""- ^^°"°^^^^^ 116 Peele Hall. Ex- 

Re.sidence: 16 Maiden Lane. Telephone 6''04 
'tVsionT3';™'"'"' °' ^^^^'^"^^^ Engineering, A-7 Daniels Hall. Ex- 
Tp. 7. fT"""''-" iS12 Park Drive. Telephone 7701. 
^^- " 1^e^^^'^^^^3^^t^^¥ele^^^.^^f^ -"• ^ ^ -- 

^'^"kiTk" H°ir'^SteSn^2n""^^°^^^^- ^^^•^ ^^^^^^^ «---e. 208 
Residence: 318 Furches St. Telephone 

"^ m HX'X3-^rir-Ett%^si?r?l5°^ '^^^^^^^- ^^^-^^^--lon omce. 
Residence: 821 Hillsboro St.' Telephone 7105 

"^^'S \x?;^ron°^26r ^^^" "^^^- °^^^- «^ ^— 232 Patterson 
Residence: 123 Brooks Ave. Telephone 8764 
'Leighton. Henrv P. — Staff Sereeant nTPArr < ■ . 

tary Science and Tactic. frdCh?e^C^;;t''f'^^r-v"'''"''°^ "^ ^^i^i- 
Roon. 1, Holladay Han'cB^asemen; K "Extension- f''^' Department. 
Residence: Route 4, Raleigh. ^^^^lon _oo. 

*Levine, Jack— Assoc. Prof., Math Dept. 20 5 Pase Hall v^.. ■ . 

Residence: 2702 Rosedale ive. Telephon^8 7" ^'""^ "^• 

^'^"Vens^n^-^"^- ^^^^- ^^^"^^ «^^-^- ^^^ ^oor Textile Bldg. Ex- 
Residence: 518 Dixie Trail. Telephone 7783 

"Lockmiller, David A A<;<5nn P7.r,f u- ^ n ^ 

Peele Hall. Extension 223 ' '''''°'-' "^^ ^°^*^^^^' Science. 106 

Residence: 612 Rosemont St. Telephone 6468 
Han.' \x^e;;;^nT22^^'''"°""^- -^^^°^°"^^- department. 112 Ricks 
Residence: 2707 Bedford Ave. Telephone 2-0340 

^"LLLTt2T^an?^1l°^o?k°*^altTxrS°^^^- ^^ ^^^ ^^^'• 
Residence: 113 Vs Chamberlain St. Telephone 8752. 



26 North C.\eolina State College 

LyelL Frank Hallam — Instructor. English Dept. 10 7 Pullen HalL Ex- 
tension 23S. 

Residence: 224 Woodburn Rd. Telephone 4698. 
♦Lynn, Mrs. Virginia F. — Stenographer. Agr. Econ. & Rur. Soc. Dept. 
117-1911. Extension. 

Residence: 511 Cleveland St. Telephone 2-2883. 

*McGrary, O. F. — District Agent, Agr. Extension Dept. 101 Ricks Hall 
Extension 212. 

Residence: 1029 W. South St. Telephone 9922. 
♦McCutcheon. Frederick Harold — Ass't Prof., Zoology & Ent. Dept. 209 
Zoology Dept. Extension 239. 

Residence: 6 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-0779. 

•McGehee. William — Instructor, Psychology Dept. 3 Holladay Hall. Ex- 
tension 2S6. 

Residence: Cameron Court Apts. T-2-A. Telephone 8017. 

♦McGoogan, Mrs. Franklin A. — Stenographer, Ediphone Dept., Agricul- 
tural Extension Service. 203 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 
Residence: 103 Harrison Ave. Telephone 4 5 68. 

MacGregor. Frances — Assistant State 4-H Leader. Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 4-H Club Department. 210 Ricks Hall. Extension 214. 

Residence: Cameron Court Apartments D-3-A. Tel. 2-213 6. 

Mclntyre. Mrs. F. McP. — Secretary, Chemistry Department. 219 Win- 
ston Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 4 Maiden Lane. Telephone 4117. 

Mclver, Miss Julia — Ass't Ext. Spec, in Clothing, Home Demonstration 
Dept.. Agricultural Extension. 311 Ricks Hall. Extension 243. 
Residence: 2202 Ridgecrest Rd. Telephone 2-1904. 
♦McKimmon, Mrs. K. C. — Clerk, Agronomy Dept. 19 Patterson Hall. 
Extension 222. 

Residence: 122 Park Ave. Telephone 675 3. 
McKimmon. Jane S. — Ass't. Director Ext , Agr. Ext.. Div. of Home Dem- 
Work. 1<''5 Ricks Hall. Extension 255. 

Residence: Sec. B-Apt. 10 2 Boylan Apt. Telephone 8 619. 

McLawhom. H. R. — Instructor, Architecture. 315 Daniels Hall. Ex- 
tension 250. 

Residence: 2008 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-1137. 

McLean, Miss Grayce — Clerk. Treasury Dept. 10 5 Holladay Hall. Ex- 
tension 278. 

Residence: 150 8 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6153. 

McLean, Susie — Stenographer, Agr. Ext. Ser. 104 Ricks Hall. Exten- 
sion 213. 

-Residence; 1827 Glen wood Ave. Telephone 8721. 

McMenamin, J. P. — Teaching Fellow, Botany Department. 2 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 1710 Park Drive. Telephone 2-1387. 

McNair, Mary — Secretary to J. F. Criswell, Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice. 3rd floor 1911. Extension 211. 

Residence: 905 W. Cabarrus Street. Telephone 2-1990. 

•MeSwain, C. W. — Research in Cotton Utilization, Textile School. Textile 
Bldg. Extension. 

Residence: 221 N. Salisbury St. Telephone. 

♦Maddison, C. W. — Instructor, Foundry, Department of M. E. Shop. Ex- 
tension 245. 

Residence: 908 W. Johnson St. Telephone 2-2143. 

Maddrv. Linda — Stenographer, Math. Dept. 207 Page Hall. Extension 
227. 

Residence: Avent Ferry Road. 



Faculty Directory 27 

Majure, Wallace J. — Fellow in Game Management, Zoology and Ento- 
mology Department. 203-A Zoology Building. Extension 239. 
Residence: 2306 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-1478. 
*Mann, Carroll Lamb — Prof. & Head of Dept., Civil Engr. Dept. C. E. 
Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: 1702 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6825. 
♦Mann, Julian E.- — In Charge, Ext. Studies, Agr. Ext. Ser. 10 8 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 255. 

Residence: 2505 Country Club Rd. Telephone 2-3415. 
♦Marshall, Roger P. — Ass't Prof., English Department. 113 Peele Hall. 
Extension 23 7. 

Residence: 1512 Park Drive. Telephone 5297. 
♦Mask, P. E. — Instructor, Math. Department. 7 Pullen Hall. Extension 
228. 

Residence: 12 Enterprise St. Telephone 2-3830. 
Mason, Mrs. Edna Belle — Secretary, Civil and Industrial Engineering De- 
partments. 210 Civil Engineering Bldg. Extension 303. 
Residence: 213 W. Jones St. Telephone 4130. 
Mason, Eleanor H. — Secretary, Agr. Ext., Div. of Home Dem. Work. 201 
Ricks Hall. Extension 244. 

Residence: 128 N. Wilmington St. Telephone 4950. 
Massey, J. T. — Instructor, Engineering Mechanics. 101 C. E. Building. 
Extension 303. 

Residence: 605 N. East St. Telephone 2-1075. 
♦Maupin, C. J. — Ext. Poultryman, Poultry Dept. 113 Ricks Hall. Ex- 
tension 281. 

Residence: 2806 Hillsboro St. Telephone 7916. 
♦Mayer, W. L.- — Director of Registration, Purchasing Agent. 20 8 Holla- 
day Hall. Extension 219 and 230. 

Residence: 20 Bagwell Ave. Telephone 2-0027. 
Mayes, Allene — -Assoc. Nurse, Infirmary. Hospital. Telephone 7615. 
Residence: Infirmary. Telephone 7615. 

Mayton, R. L. — ^Chief Dormitory Assistant. 10 7 9th Dormitory. Ex- 
tension 306. 

Residence: 10 7 Ninth Dormitory. 

♦Mayton, R. W. — Carpenter Foreman, Warehouse. Extension 272. 
Residence: Box 129, Cary, N. C. 

♦Meacham, E. H. — Soil Conservation Specialist, Agr. Ext. Ser. Dept. 208 
Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 825 Holt Drive. Telephone 8430. 

♦Meacham, F. B. — Ass't Prof., Zoology & Ent. 10 6 Zoology Bldg. Ex- 
tension 23 9. 

Residence: 2716 Everett Ave. Telephone 2-0606. 

♦Meacham, Mrs. Nelle — Stenographer, Home Demonstration Division, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 315 Ricks Hall. Extension 243. 
Residence: 1508 Hillsboro. Telephone 5163. 

♦Meares, J. S.- — Assoc. Prof., Physics Dept. 20 6 Daniels Hall. Extension 
229. 

Residence: 2408 Everett Ave. Telephone 5917. 

♦Meekins, E. M. — Dept. of Vocational Agriculture. Holladay Hall. Ex- 
tension 282. 

Residence: Cary. Telephone 2591. 

♦Mehlich, Adolf — Associate Soil Chemist. Ill Polk Hall. Extension 220. 
Residence: 17 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-1863. 

Mercer, Susannah (Miss) — Secretary, Engineering Experiment Station, 
207 C. E. Building. Extension 30 7. Geology Department, 1 Prim- 
rose Hall. Extension 304. 

Residence: 1700 Park Drive. Telephone 2-0060. 



28 North Carolina State College 

♦Metcalf. Zeno P. — Prof, of Zoology, Dir. of Instruction, School of Agri- 
culture and Forestry, Zoology and Entomology Department. 101 
Zoology Bldg. Extension 239. 

Residence: 315 Forest Rd. Telephone 2-3 788. 

♦Middleton. G. K. — Agronomist, Dept. of Agronomy. 119 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 222. 

Residence: 2830 Barmettler St. Telephone 2-2313. 

♦Millar, Marshall W. — State College Coordinator of Diversified Occupa- 
tions. Holladay Hall. Extension 258. 

Residence: 302 Home St. Telephone 4395. 
*Miller, Arthur S. — Instructor. Economics. 203 Peele Hall. Extension 
231. 

Residence: 2714 Vanderbilt Ave. Telephone 8011. 

*Miller, J. F. — Prof, and Head of Physical Education Dept. and Athletics. 
1 Gym. Extension 218. 

Residence: 191 Chamberlain St. Telephone 5823. 

*Miller. William D. — Assoc. Prof.. Forestry Department. 303 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 2 70. 

Residence: 8 Dixie Trail. Telephone 4367. 
Millsaps, E. S. — Fellow in Farm Crops. 28 Patterson Hall. Extension 
263. 

Residence: 301 Fourth Dormitory. Box 3127. 

♦Mitchell, Theodore B. — Prof, of Zoology and Entomology. Dept of Zo- 
ology. 103 Zoology Bldg. Extension 239. 

Residence: 1007 W. Peace St. Telephone 6967. 

*Moen. R. O. — Prof., Business Administration. 107 Peele Hall. Exten- 
sion 223. 

Residence: 320 2 Clark Ave. Telephone 5051. 

♦Moore. J. H. — Cotton Technologist, Agronomy Dept. 29 Patterson Hall. 
Extension 222. 

Residence: 2713 Bedford Ave. Telephone 2-3638. 

♦Moore. James L. — Ass't Dairy Research. Animal Husbandry Dept. 213 
Polk Hall. Extension 305. 

Residence: 3208 Clark Ave. Telephone 2-0821. 

♦Moore. Mrs. James L. — Sec, Office of Dairy Extension, Dairy Extension. 
117 Polk Hall. Extension 277. 

Residence: 3208 Clark Ave. Telephone 2-0 821. 
♦Moose. Perry Earl — Asst. Prof., Mech. Engineering. 204 Page Hall. Ex- 
tension 247. 

Residence: 3113 Stanhope Ave. Telephone 9960. 
Morgan, H. L. — Teaching Fellow, Department of Electrical Engineering. 
105 Daniels Hall. Extension 236. 

Residence: 2008 Hillsboro Street. Telephone 2-1137. 

Morris. Cornelia C. — Ext. Economist in Food Conservation & Marketing. 
Agr. Ext., Div. of Home Demonstration Work. 200 Ricks Hall. Ex- 
tension 2"4 2. 

Residence: Sec. -A., Apt. 101, Boylan Apt. Telephone 2-1591. 

♦Morris. H. D. — Assistant Agronomist. 114 Ricks Hall. Extension 222. 
Residence: 204 Park Ave. Telephone 2-2270. 

♦Morris, W. F. — Dir. Service Department. Warehouse. Extension 272. 
Residence: 2509 Vanderbilt Ave. Telephone 5319. 

♦Morrow, E. B. — Assoc. Horticulturist, Horticulture Dept. 30 7 Polk Hall. 
Extension 275. 

Residence: 2712 Vanderbilt Ave. Telephone 2-1952. 

♦Morton. Mrs. Laura B. — Stenographer, 4-H Club Dept.. Agricultural Ext. 
210 Ricks Hall. Extension 214. 

Residence: 1000 Glenwood Ave. Telephone 2-3686. 



Faculty Directory 29 

*Mumford, Carey Gardner — Assoc. Prof.. Math. Dept. 6 Pullen Hall. Ex- 
tension 226. 

Residence: 712 Brooks Ave. Telephone 5315. 

*Xahikian, Howard M. — Instructor. Math. Dept. 7 Pullen Hall. Exten- 
sion 228. 

Residence: 3207 Hillsboro St. Telephone 5772. 

*Nash, Thomas L. — Instructor. Mechanical Engineering. 20 4 Page Hall. 
Extension 247. 

Residence: 30 7 W. Park Drive. Telephone 430 3. 

*Nelson, Thomas — Dean. Textile School. Textile Bldg. Extension. 
Residence: 16 Enterprise St. Telephone 2-2247. 

*Xewman, Mrs. C. L. — Stenographer, Horticulture Department. 304' Polk 
Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: Route 6. Telephone 2-0912. 
Newton. Miss Foy — Stenographer. Agricultural Extension. 101 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 212. 

Residence: 319 New Bern Ave. Telephone 2-2096. 

*Newton. G. L. — Herdsman. Animal Husbandry. 215 Polk Hall. Ex- 
tension 276. 

Residence: An. Husb. Farm. 

♦Newton. Williams — Head Football and Baseball Coach, Physical Edu- 
cation Dept. Coaches' Office. Field House. Telephone 6934. 
Residence: 318 Morrison Ave. Telephone 2-2504. 

♦Nichols. John Hervey — Laboratory Asst.. Electrical Engr. Dept.. 9 Daniels 
Hall. Extension 203. 

Residence: 11 Dixie Oil Drive. 

*Niswonger, H. R — Ext. Horticulturist. Horticulture Dept. 30 2 Polk 
Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: Cameron Court Apts. A-2-A. Telephone 2-3 297. 

Owen. Miss Elizabeth A. — Sec. Division of Teacher Training. 11 Holla- 
day Hall. Extension 258. 

Residence: 131 Hawthorne Road. Telephone 6851. 

*Page, J. M., Jr. — Assistant Architect to Professor Shumaker. 315 
Daniels Hall. Extension 250. 

Residence: 410 Kinsey Street. Telephone 6290. 

Page. Norman — Research Fellow in Agronomy. Patterson Hall. Ex- 
tension 222. 

Residence: 103 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3113. 

♦Paget, Edwin H. — Assoc. Prof., English Department. 10 9 Pullen Hall. 
Extension 238. 

Residence: 2817 Everett Ave. Telephone 2-3741. 

Palmer. Gus — Resident Engineering Inspector. Public Works Adminis- 
tration. Warehouse. Extension 272. 

Residence: 2315 Lake Drive. Telephone 2-1790. 

♦Park, C. B. — Instructor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering. 
Residence: 125 Hawthorne Road. Telephone 6957. 
♦Park. H. V. — Assist. Prof.. Math Dept. 6 Pullen Hall. Extension 226. 
Residence: 404 Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-3589. 
Parker. John :\Iason. Ill — Instructor. Geology. 2 Primrose Hall. Ex- 
tension 304. 

Residence: Raleigh Apts. G-1. Telephone 6754. 

Parkinson, Leslie R. — Asst. Prof.. Mech. Engr. Aero. Dept. 104 Page 
Hall. Extension 248. 

Residence: 2824 Bedford Ave. Telephone 2-3422. 

♦Parrish. Clifton Floyd — Ext. Poultryman, Poultry Department. 115 
Ricks Hall. Extension 281. 

Residence: Route No. 4. Telephone 2-2888. 



30 North Carolina State College 

•Patton, H. A. — Head Field Officer, Agricultural Adjustment Administra- 
tion. West Dining Hall. Telephone 2-0544. 

Residence: 306 E. Park Drive. Telephone 2-3 452. 

Paul, Dan M. — Acting Alumni Secretary & Director of Agr. Short Courses, 
Alumni Office. Holladay Hall. Extension 252. 

Residence: 161S Park Drive. Telephone 9537. 

'Paulson, Jehu D. — Assoc. Prof., Arch. Engr. Dept. 311 Daniels Hall. 
Extension 250. 

Residence: 2705 Everett Ave. Telephone 8823. 
•Pearsall, R. J. — Asst Prof., Electrical Engr. Dept. 106 Daniels Hall. 
Extension 235. 

Residence: Route No. 1. 

Peeler, G. E. — Instructor, Weav. & Des., Textile School. Textile Bldg. 
Extension. 

Residence: 106 Home St. Telephone 2-1887. 
♦Peeler. R. J. — Assistant Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture. Holladay 
Hall. Extension 282. 

Residence: 2S12 Kilgore Street. Telephone 2-3649. 

Perry, Miss Innie — Cashier, Boarding Department, Dining Hall Building. 
Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 215 Park Avenue. Telephone 7619. 

Peters, C. E. — Teaching Fellow, Math. Department. 7 Pullen Hall. Ex- 
tension 228. 

Residence: 23 Shepherd St. Telephone 2-3417. 

♦Peterson, Arnold — Supt. of Grounds, Service Dept. Warehouse. Ex- 
tension 272. 

Residence: R. F. D. Telephone 2-0761. 
Phelps. Miss Clara — Cashier, Boarding Department, Dining Hall Build- 
ing. Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 2202 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4509. 

Phelps, Mrs. L. H. — Secretary to Registrar. 20 8 Holladay Hall. Exten- 
sion 219. 

Residence: 2303% Clark Avenue. Telephone 8433. 

Phelps, W. R. — Clerk, Dormitories & Central Stores, Warehouse. Ex- 
tension 272. 

Residence: 217^4 N. Bloodworth St. Telephone 6688. 

♦Phillips, Llewellyn B. — Clerk, Agr. Ext. Service. 20 Ricks Hall. Ex- 
tension 254. 

Residence: 402 Home St. Telephone 8437. 

Pierce, J. C, Jr. — Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 216 Polk Hall. Ex- 
tension 276. 

Residence: 203 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3121. 

Pierce, Kathryn — Stenographer, Office of Dean of Engineering. 122 C. 
E. Building. Extension 216. 

Residence: 122 Ashe Ave. Telephone 5346. 

♦Piland, J. R. — Ass't Soil Chemist, Dept. of Agronomy. 15 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: 5 Pogue St. Telephone 9511. 

♦Pillsbury, J. P. — Prof. Horticulture Dept. and Landscape Architect. 301 
Polk Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: 2 715 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6694. 

♦Poole. R. F. — Prof, of Plant Path. & Chairman of Committee on Grad. 
Instruction, Botany Dept. 244 Patterson Hall. Extension 267. 
Residence: 1629 St. Marys St. Telephone 8470. 

Pratt, John J., Jr. — Teaching Fellow, Zoology and Entomology Depart- 
ment. 105 Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: Maiden Lane. Telephone 7958. 



Faculty Directory 31 

Quay, Mrs. T. — Laboratory Teclinician, Zoology and Entomology Depart- 
ment. 101 Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: 2805 Bedford Avenue. Telephone 2-2706. 

Quay, T. — Teaching Fellow, Zoology Department. 105 Zoology Building. 
Extension 23 9. 

Residence: 2805 Bedford Ave. Telephone 2-2706. 

♦Randall, Glenn O. — Assoc. Prof.. Horticulture. 305 Polk Hall. Exten- 
sion 275. 

Residence: Route No. 6. 

♦Randolph, E. E. — Prof, of Ch. E. and Head of Chemical Engineering 
Dept. 112 Winston Hall. Extension 301. 
212 Groveland Ave. Telephone 8992. 
♦Rankin, W. H. — Agronomist, Dept. of Agronomy. 114 Ricks Hall. Ex- 
tension 222. 

Residence: 2408 Stafford Ave. Telephone 8057. 

*Raper, Ralph H. — Agent, U. S. D. A., Agr. Econ. & Rur. Soc. 114-1911. 
Extension. 

Residence: Boylan Apt. C. 202. Telephone 2-1981. 

Ray, Marl E. — Teaching Fellow, Civil Engineering Department. 104 
C. E. Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: Route 1, Raleigh, N. C. 

Reddish, Mrs. Paul — Stenographer, Dept. of Vocational Agriculture. 
Holladay Hall. Extension 282. 

Residence: Cary. Telephone 2561. 

♦Reiser, Dr. Raymond — Assistant in Animal Nutrition. 311 Polk Hall. 
Extension 241. 

Residence: 104 Home St., Apt. 7. Telephone 2-0020. 

Remmert, L. F. — Research Fellow in Agronomy. Patterson Hall. Ex- 
tension 222. 

Residence: 106 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3116. 

♦Rice, Robert B. — Professor of Experimental Engineering., Mechanical 
Engineering Department. 107 Page Hall. Extension 246. 
Residence: 2902 White Oak Rd. Telephone 2-1195. 

Richmond, Mrs. Joseph C. — Research Fellow in Agricultural Chemistry. 
210 Polk Hall. Extension 305. 

Residence: 4 West Dixie Drive. Telephone 2-0830. 

♦Riddick, Dr. W. C. — Professor of Hydraulics. 105 Page Hall. Extension 
246. 

Residence: 225 Woodburn Road. Telephone 2-0429. 

♦Riddle, A. A. — Superintendent Power Plant, M. E. Dept. Power Plant. 
Extension 234. 

Residence: 2805 Bedford Ave. Telephone 2-2206. 

Rigney, J. A. — Instructor in Farm Crops and Plant Breeding. Patterson 
Hall. Extension 263. 

Residence: 402 Home St. Telephone 2-2129. 

Robinson, H. F. — Research Fellow in Agronomy. Patterson Hall. Ex- 
tension 222. 

Residence: 108 Fourth Dormitory, Box 3118. 

Rogers, Mary Anne — Stenographer. 9 to 12:30: Physics Department, 
112 Daniels Hall. Extension 229. 1:30 to 5:00: Electrical Engi- 
neering Department, 201 Daniels Hall. Extension 236. 
Residence: 2602 Clark Ave. Telephone 3071. 

♦Rondeau, Henri — Pantry, Boarding Department. Dining Hall. 115 
Oberlin Road. 

Rowe, Anna C. — District Agent, Agr. Ext., Div. of Home Dem. Work, 
204 Ricks Hall. Extension 242. 

Residence: Simpson Apt., Clark Ave. Telephone 4076. 



32 North Carolina State College 

Rowe, Beatrice (Miss) — Secretary. English Department, 104 Pullen Hall, 
A.M., Extension 237 and Modern Language Department. 205 Peele 
Hall, P.M., Extension 231. 

Residence: 2202 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4509. 
♦Rowell. J. O. — Extension Entomologist. Zoology and Entomology Depart- 
ment. 20 4 Zoology Building. Extension 23 9. 

Residence: Fayetteville Rd. Telephone 660 5. 
♦Rowland, Macon Rogers — Instructor, Mechanical Engr. Dept. Wood- 
shop. Extension 24 5. 

Residence: 312 Pogue St. Telephone 2-3011. 
*Ruffner. R. H. — Prof. Animal Husbandry & Dairying Dept. 115 Polk 
Hall. Extension 268. 

Residence: 1910 Park Drive. Telephone 2-0746. 
♦Ruggles. Edward W. — Director, College Extension Division. 204 Library. 
Extension 260. 

Residence: 2411 Everett Ave. Telephone 2-1812. 
*Sams, C. L. — Extension Apiarist. Zoology and Entomology Department. 
204 Zoology Building. Extension 23 9. 

Residence: 2603 Clark Ave. Telephone 2-3079. 

♦Sanford. C. N. — Instructor, Mechanical Engineering Department. 105 
Page Hall. Extension 246. 

Residence: 1812 Park Drive. Telephone 8038. 

*Satterfield, G. Howard — -Professor of Biochemistry, Chemistry Depart- 
ment. Ill Winston Hall. Extension 2 64. 

Residence: 407 West Park Drive. Telephone 2-2963. 

♦Satterfield. Howard E. — Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Department. 105 Page Hall. Extension 246. 

Residence: 201 Groveland Ave. Telephone 7264. 

Schaub. Miss Maude — Land Use Specialist in Mapping. 1911. 
Residence: Western Blvd. Telephone 8610. 

*Schaub, I. O. — Dean. School of Agriculture and Forestry and Director of 
Agricultural Extension. 104 Ricks Hall. Extension 213. 
Residence: Western Boulevard. Telephone 8610. 

Schell, Stewart C. — Teaching Fellow, Zoology and Entomology Depart- 
ment. 105 Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: 2716 Everett Avenue. Telephone 2-060 6. 

♦Schmidt, Robert — Associate Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. Horticulture Department. 307 Polk Hall. Extension 275. 
Residence: 516 Daughtridge St. Telephone 4235. 

♦Schoof. Mrs. H. F. — Stenographer. Botany Department. 3 7 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 2504 Vanderbilt Ave. Telephone 2-1022. 

♦Scott. Mrs. J. K. — Stenographer, Agricultural Extension Department. 
104 Ricks Hall. Extension 213. 

Residence: 1505 Caswell Street. Telephone 7931. 

Seagraves. Wayland Pritchard — Instructor, Mathematics Department. 6 
Pullen Hall. Extension 226. 

Residence: 404 Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-3589. 

Seawell. Elizabeth — Stenographer. Agricultural Extension. Division of 
Home Demonstration Work. 201 Ricks Hall. Extension 244. 
Residence: Wake Forest. N. C. 

♦Seegers. L. Walter — Assistant Professor. History Department. 10 5 Peele 
Hall. Extension 223. 

Residence: 111 Chamberlain Street. Telephone 6238. 
Seely. J. F. — Teaching Fellow. Chemical Engineering Department. 112 
Winston Hall. Extension 301. 

Residence: College Court Apt. 5. Telephone 2-2567. 



Faculty Directory 33 

*Selkinghaus, W. E. — Instructor, Mechanical Engineering Department 
104 Page Hall. Extension 248. 

Residence: 2823 Kilgore St. Telephone 7970. 
*Sermon, Raymond Rollins — Head Basketball and Track Coach and 
Athletic Trainer. 3 Gymnasium. Extension 218. 
Residence: 115 Brooks Ave. Telephone 5224. 

*Shanklin, J. A. — Agent U. S. D. A., Agronomy Department. 25 Patter- 
son Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: SVz Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-0 772. 
Shaw, D. J. — Teaching Fellow, Textile School, Textile Bldg. Extension 
Residence: 2404 Hillsboro St. Telephone 2-1793. 
*Shaw, Howard Burton — Professor, Industrial Engineering Department 
208 Civil Engineering Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: 1507 Ambleside Drive. Telephone 6243. 
*Shaw, K. J. — Agent in U. S. D. A. 246 Patterson Hall. Extension 267 

Residence: 211 Groveland Ave. Telephone 6347. 
*Shaw, Luther — Extension and Assoc. Plant Pathologist, Botany Depart- 
ment. 246 Patterson Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 2720 Kilgore Ave. Telephone 5937. 

Shelley, Alfred Bernard R. — Instructor, English Department. 109 Peele 
Hall. Extension 237. 

Residence: 200 Woodburn Road. Telephone 4710. 
*Sherratt, William A.— Teaching Fellow, Industrial Arts, Division of 
Teacher Training. 11 Holladay Hall. Extension 25S. 

Residence: 202 Groveland Avenue. Telephone 8669. 
*Sherwood, F. W. — Associate in Animal Nutrition, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 317 Polk Hall. Extension 241. 

Residence: 318 N. Boundary Street. Telephone 2-0128. 
Shinier, C. B. — Teaching Fellow, Botany Department. 2 Patterson Hall 
Extension 267. 

Residence: 2207 Hope St. Telephone 2-1502. 
*Shinn, W. E. — Professor, Textile School. Textile Bldg. Extension 
Residence: 2709 Bedford Ave. Telephone 2-0387. 
Shirley, Mrs. L. M. — Secretary, Future Farmers of America. Holladay 
Hall. Extension 28 2. 

Residence: 2515 Clark Avenue. Telephone 2-3906. 
*Shoffner, R. W. — Assistant District Agent, Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice. 206 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 2810 Exeter Circle. Telephone 7977. 

*Showalter, M. F. — Associate Professor, Chemistry. 107 Winston Hall. 
Extension 26 5. 

Residence: 504 Dixie Trail. Telephone 7789. 

*Shulenberger, C. B. — Associate Professor, Economics Department 115 
Peele Hall. Extension 224. 

Residence: 2501 Stafford St. Telephone 7165. 
*Shumaker, Ross — Professor and Head of Department of Architecture 
College Architect. 315 Daniels Hall. Extension 250. 
Residence: 2702 Rosedale Ave. Telephone 2-1706. 
*Shunk, Ivan V. — Associate Professor, Botany Department. 23 9 Patter- 
son Building. Extension 267. 

Residence: 1809 Park Drive. Telephone 7810. 

Singer, William E. — Assist. Prof., Chemistry Department. 105 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 2308 Vandyke Ave., Forest Hills. Tel. 8716. 

*Singsen, E. B. — Research Fellow, Poultry Department. 213 Ricks Hall 
Extension 280. 

Residence: 14 Bagwell Ave. Telephone 2-0731. 



34 North Carolina State College 

Sloan, Miriam K. — Agricultural Extension Artist. 23 Ricks Hall. Ex- 
tension 254. 

Residence: 2610 Vanderbilt Avenue. Telephone 2-1915. 

♦Slocum, Geo. K. — Assistant Professor, Forestry Department. 30 6 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 270. 

Residence: 226 Woodburn Rd. Telephone 5508. 

Smith, B. W. — Assistant Agronomist. 112 Ricks Hall. Extension 222. 
Residence: 206 E. Park Drive. Telephone 4826. 

♦Smith, Clyde F. — Ass't Entomologist, Research. Zoology and Entomo- 
logy Department. 104 Zoology Building. Extension 239. 
Residence: 80 7 McCollock St. 
♦Smith, Mrs. Estelle T.- — -District Home Agent, Agricultural Extension, 
Division of Home Demonstration Work. 204 Ricks Hall. Extension 
242. 

Residence: 128 East Edenton St. Telephone 2-0853. 

♦Smith, F. H. — Assistant, Animal Nutrition, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. 316 Polk Hall. Extension 241. 

Residence: Apt. 1, Woman's Club. Telephone 2-1843. 
Smith, Glenn R.— Associate Agricultural Economist. Agr. Econ. & Rur. 
Soc. Dept. 116 1911. Extension. 

Residence: 5 Dixie Trail. Telephone 2-0461. 

♦Smith, G. Wallace — Professor and Head of Engineering Mechanics. 101 
Civil Engineering Building. Extension 303. 

Residence: 222 Hawthorne Rd. Telephone 5120. 

♦Smith, Hattie C. — Office Secretary, Extension Agricultural Engineering 
Department. 318 Ricks Hall. Extension 274. 

Residence: 2402 Everett Avenue. Telephone 6814. 

♦Smith, J. Warren — Associate Professor of Industrial Education, Division 
of Teacher Training. Holladay Hall. Extension 257. 
Residence: Dover Road. Telephone 2-3654. 

Smith, Miss Anne Pauline — District Agent, Home Demonstration Division, 
Agricultural Extension. 314 Ricks Hall. Extension 243. 
Residence: 214 New Bern Avenue. Telephone 2-0469. 

♦Stainback, Raymond F. — Assist. Prof., Physics Department. 108 Daniels 
Hall. Extension 229. 

Residence: 317 University Drive, Chapel Hill. Tel. 9791. 

Stallings, Miss Verdie— Stenographer, Purchasing Department. Holla- 
day Hall. Extension 230. 

Residence: 212 Forest Rd. Telephone 9507. 

Steele, Miss Nancy H. — Secretary to Alumni Office, Alumni Department. 
Holladay Hall. Extension 252. 

Residence: Cameron Court Apts. N-2-A. Telephone 2-1923. 

♦Stevens, Ross O. — Associate Professor, Zoology and Entomology Depart- 
ment. 203-A Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: Hiland Ridge Rd. Telephone 2-1557. 

Stoddard, David L. — Research Fellow in Plant Pathology. 249 Patter- 
son Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 2316 Hillsboro St. Telephone 6709. 

Stott, Estelle Harold (Miss) — Stenographer, Division of Publications, 
Agricultural Extension Service. 5 Ricks Hall. Extensioh 279. 
Residence: 2208 Hope St. Telephone 7056. 

Stott, Juanita (Miss) — Statistical Clerk, Registration Department. 202 
Holladay Hall. Extension 219. 

Residence: 2208 Hope St. Telephone 7056. 

♦Strickland, M. A. — Instructor, Economics Department. 203 Peele HalL 
Extension 231. 

Residence: 34 Shepherd St. Telephone 2-0951. 



Faculty Directory 35 

♦Stuart, A. D. — Seed Specialist, X. C. Crop ImproTement Association. 

26^4 Patierson Hall. Extension 263. 

Residence: 2504 Yanderbilt Ave. Telephone 2-1022. 
Stuart, X. B. — Paint Foreman, Warehouse. Extension 272. 
Residence: Cary, X. C. R.F.D. 1. 

♦Stuckey, Jasper L. — Professor, Geology Department. 1 Primrose Hall. 
Extension 30 4. 

Residence: 1911 Sunset Drive. Telephone 2-0 IS 7. 
Sumner, Mrs. Baye — Assistant Purchasing Agent, Purchasing Depart- 
ment. Holladay Hall. Extension 230. 

Residence: 100 Home St., Apt. 3. Telephone 5416. 
Sutton, Miss Lenora — Stenographer. Botany Department. 237 Patter- 
son Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 190S Park Drive. Telephone 2903. 
♦Sutton. Paul Porter — Instructor, Chemistrj- Department. 107 Winston 
Building. Extension 265. 

Residence: 304 Oakwood Ave. Telephone 2-2443. 
♦SwafEer, C. Dalton — Instructor. Animal Husbandrv Department -^17 
Polk Hall. Extension 276. 

Residence: 20 4 Park Ave. Telephone 7116. 
Swann, Miss Louise — Cashier, Boarding Department, Dining Hall Build- 
ing. Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 205 Ashe Avenue. Telephone 5147. 
Sweezy. Henry Lee — Research Fellow in Plant Pathology. 250 Patter- 
son Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 414 Chamberlain St. Telephone 7964. 
Swindell. Miss Mazie — Clerk. Basic Division of the College 101 Peele 
Hall. Extension 223. 

Residence:'" 260 2 Clark Avenue. Telephone 8221. 
Taylor. H. W. — Extension Swine Specialist. Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice. 201 Polk Hall. Extension 269. 

Residence: 2820 Bedford Avenue. Telephone 2-3274. 
Taylor, Mark H. — Fellow in Game Management, Zoology and Entomology 
Department. 203-A Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: 90 2 Brooks Avenue. Telephone 2-18 68. 
Thacker, Anne (Miss) — Extension Studies, Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice. 108 Ricks Hall. Extension 255. 

Residence: 1031 West South Street. Telephone 2-3504. 
Thomas, C. D. — Assistant Farm Management Specialist. Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service. 206 Ricks Hall. Extension 221. 

Residence: 107 Chamberlain St. Telephone 7468. 
♦Thomas. David Boyd — Instructor, Mathematics Department. 20 5 Page 
Hall. Extension 227. 

Residence: 224 Chamberlain St. Telephone 2-1973. 
♦Thomas. Horace G. — Technical Sergeant, DEML. Assistant Instructor of 
Military Science and Tactics. Assistant Military Property Custodian, 
and Military Store Keeper. Armory. Frank Thompson Gvmnasium 
Extension 2 32. 

Residence: Sunset Terrace. Western Boulevard. 
Thomas. Mary E. — Extension Xutritionist, Agricultural Exten:=ion. 
Division of Home Demonstration Work. 202 Ricks Hall Extension 
242. 

Residence: 221 Hawthorne Road. Telephone 2-3742. 
Thomas. Roy H. — State Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture. Hollada-r 
Hall. Extension 282. 

Residence: 225 Furches Street. Telephone 4098. 
Thompson. Daisy W. (Miss) — Chief Clerk, Treasury Department. Holla- 
day Hall. 105-A. Extension 278. 

Residence: 1117 Hillsboro St. Telephone 9879. 



36 North Carolina State College 

Thornton. Mrs. Labon — Secretary. Department of Vocational Agriculture. 
Holladay Hall. Extension 2S2. 

Residence: 120 Park Avenue. Telephone S456. 
Tippett, J. R. — Assistant Field OfRcer, Agricultural Adjustment Adminis- 
tration. West Dining Hall. Telephone 2-0 544. 

Residence: 313 7 Stanhope Avenue. Telephone 2-16 5 7. 
Tovey. Keith D. — Fellow in Agronomy. Ill Polk Hall. Extension 220. 

Residence: 6 Enterprise St. Telephone 47SS. 
Trollinger, Ida E. (Miss) — Head Nurse, Infirmary. Hospital Building. 
Telephone 7615. 

Residence: Infirmary. Telephone 7615. 
Tucker. Caroline E. (Miss) — Stenographer. Zoology and Entomology De- 
partment. 101 Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

Residence: St. Mary's School. Telephone 9590. 
Tucker. Harry — Professor of Highway Engineering, and Director of Engi- 
neering Experiment Station. 20 7 Civil Engineering Building. Ex- 
tension 30 7. 

Residence: 20 Logan Court. Telephone 6219. 
Turner. Anne Leach (Miss) — Order Librarian. D. H. Hill Library. D. H. 
Hill Library Building. Extension 259. 

Residence: 903 W. Johnson Street. Telephone 6997. 
Turner, C. W. — Research Fellow in Agronomy. Patterson Hall. Ex- 
tension 222. 

Residence: 220 Cox Avenue. 

♦L'pchurch. C. A.. Jr. — College News Service. 13 Ricks Hall. Extension 
253. 

Residence: 250 5 Everette Avenue. Telephone 9917. 

Valentine. Miss Elizabeth Anna — Assistant in Catalogue Department, 
D. H. Hill Library. Library Building. Extension 259. 
Residence: Route 5. Raleigh. Telephone 6346. 

*Van Leer. Blake R. — Dean, School of Engineering. 122 C. E. Building. 
Extension 216. 

Residence: 7 Exeter Circle, Budleigh. Telephone 2-2767. 

*Vann. J. G. — Assistant Controller, Treasury Department. 105 Holladay 
Hall. Extension 27S. 

Residence: 1606 Scales St. Telephone 6240. 

♦Vaughan. L. L. — Professor and Head of Mechanical Engineering Depart- 
ment. 109 Page Hall. Extension 246. 

Residence: 11 Enterprise Street. Telephone 5449. 
♦Veerhoff. Otto — Horticultural Physicologist. Experiment Station. Horti- 
culture Department. 307 Polk Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: 2812 Mayview Road. Telephone 2-2242. 

Veldhuis. Matthew K. — Assistant Chemist, U. S. D. A.. Food Research 
Division (Horticulture Department). 312 Polk Hall. Extension 
275. 

Residence: 1702 Hillshoro Street. Telephone 6825. 

*Von Glahn. J. L. — Business Manager. Athletics. 2 Gymnasium. Exten- 
sion 21S and Telephone 2-2407. 

Residence: Canterbury Road, Budleigh. Telephone 58 91. 
Wall, Miss Rachel — Clerk-Stenographer. Soil Conservation Service. 205 
Polk Hall. Telephone. 

Residence: Cameron Court Apt. J-3-A. Telephone 2-28 9 5. 

♦Waller. E. M. — Freshman Football and Baseball Coach. Assistant in 
Physical Education. Coaches' Office. Field House. Telephone 6934. 
Residence: 2207 Hope Street. Telephone 2-1502. 

Walsh. James H. — Draftsman. Extension Agricultural Engineering De- 
partment. 3 20 Ricks Hall. Extension 2 74. 

Residence: 127 W. Park Drive. Telephone 6 75 5. 



Faculty Directory 37 

Walter. Robert C. — Teaching Fellow, Mechanical Engineering Depart- 
ment. Extension 246. 

Residence: 2232 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4910. 
*Warren, Robert Sullivan — Assistant Football Coach and Freshman 
Basketball Coach and Assistant in Physical Education. Coaches' 
Office. Field House. Telephone 693 4. 

Residence: 121 Montgomery St. Telephone 9985. 
Watson. Mrs. Emma L. — Clerk. Treasury Department. 10 5 Holladay 
Hall. Extension 278. 

Residence: 316 New Bern Ave. Telephone 2-3588. 
Watson, :\Iiss Geneva — Cashier, Boarding Department, Dining Hall 
Building. Telephone 2-0243. 

Residence: 2202 Hillsboro St. Telephone 4509. 
♦Watson, Lewis P. — Extension Horticulturist. Extension Service Horticul- 
ture Department. 302 Polk Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: 2809 Bedford Ave. Telephone 2-1626. 
♦Watts. N. B. — Self-help Secretary, Y. M. C. A., Y. M. C. A. Building 
Telephone 7184. 

Residence: L-3-B Cameron Court Apts. Telephone 6986. 
Weathers, Rachel — Statistical Clerk, Extension Studies. 108 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 255. 

Residence: 1908 Park Drive. Telephone 7433. 
♦Weaver. David Stathem — Professor and Head of Agricultural Engi- 
neering Department. 316 Ricks Hall. Extension 274 and 29 Patter- 
son Hall. Extension 263. 

Residence: 520 Daughtridge St. Telephone 4110. 
♦Weaver, J. G. — Assistant Professor, Horticulture Department. Green- 
house. Extension 240. 

Residence: 707 N. East St. 

Webber, Cleve — Boarding Department, Dining Hall Building. Telephone 
2-0243. 

Residence: 513 Halifax St. 
♦Weeks. Lloyd T. — Tobacco Specialist, Extension Service. Dining Hall 
Building. Telephone 2-0544 and 2-0545. 
Residence: Varina. Telephone 5121. 
♦Wellons, Turner Tobias — Superintendent of Buildings, Department of 
Central Stores and Dormitories, Warehouse. Extension 272. 
Residence: 3130 Stanhope St. Telephone. 
Wells, B. W. — Professor of Botany, Botanv Department. 23 7 Patterson 
Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 1605 Park Dr. Telephone 8746. 
♦Wheeler, F. B. — Superintendent of Shops. Department of Mechanical 
Engineering. Woodshop. Extension 245. 

Residence: Maiden Lane. Telephone 7958. 
Whisnant, Mamie N. — Assistant Extension Specialist in Home Manage- 
ment. Home Demonstration Division, Agr. Ext. 313 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 243. 

Residence: Raleigh Apts. Telephone. 
♦Whitehead, L. C. — Regional Agent, Bureau of Biological Survey. 20 3-B 
Zoology Building. Extension 239. 

♦Whitford, L. A. — Assistant Professor, Botany Department. 239 Patter- 
son Hall. Extension 267. 

Residence: 4 Kirby St.. Pullen Terrace. Telephone 8189. 
Whitley, R. W. — Teaching Fellow, Chemistry Department. 220 Winston 
Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 2729 Everett Avenue. Telephone 4365. 
Wicker, Lillian (Miss) — Clerk, Treasury Department. 105 Holladay 
Hall. Extension 278. 

Residence: 319 S. Dawson St. Telephone 5459. 



38 North Carolina State College 

Widenhouse, Mrs. M. L. — Stenographer. Mornings: College Extension 
Division. 201 Library Building. Extension 260. Afternoons: N. C. 
Board of Registration for Engineers and Land Surveyors, 112 Civil 
Engineering Department. Extension 303. 

Residence: Hillsboro Apartments 10. Telephone 2-2226. 
♦Williams, C. B. — Head of Department, Agronomy Department. 118 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: 1405 Hillsboro St. Telephone 8893. 
♦Williams, Carlos F. — Associate Horticulturist, Horticulture Department. 
305 Polk Hall. Extension 275. 

Residence: 2711 Everett Ave. Telephone 2-0233. 
Williams, Elizabeth — Assistant Extension Specialist in Home Mgt., Agri- 
cultural Extension, Home Demonstration Department. 313 Ricks 
Hall. Extension 243. 

Residence: 1812 Park Drive. Telephone 8038. 
♦Williams, F. Carter — Instructor, Architectural Department. 315 Daniels 
Hall. Extension 250. 

Residence: 1814% Arlington Street. 
♦Williams, H. Page — Associate Professor, Mathematics Department. 7 
Pullen Hall. Extension 228. 

Residence: 1015 Brooks Avenue. Telephone 2-2191. 
♦Williams. L. F. — Professor of Organic Chemistry, Chemistry Department. 
201 Winston Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 1816 Park Drive. Telephone 8075. 
Williams, Lucie R. (Miss) — Stock Keeper, Chemistry Department. 209 
Winston Hall. Extension 265. 

Residence: 1816 Park Drive. Telephone 8075. 

♦Williams. N. W.- — Assistant Professor and Poultry Plant Manager. Poul- 
try Department. 214 Ricks Hall. Extension 280. 
Residence: Poultry Plant. Telephone 86 86. 

Willis, Mrs. Esther G. — District Agent. Home Demonstration Depart- 
ment. Agricultural Extension. 312 Ricks Hall. Extension 243. 
Residence: 29 02 Fairground Avenue. Telephone 2-1476. 
♦Wilson, Arthur John — Professor and Chairman Chemistry Department. 
221 Winston Hall. Extension 266. 

Residence: 1808 Park Drive. Telephone 7125. 

♦Wilson, T. L. — Assistant Professor, English Department. 113 Peele 
HalL Extension 237. 

Residence: 407 Calvin Road. Telephone 6951. 

♦Winkler, E. W. — ^Assist. Prof., Department of Electrical Engineering. 
105 Daniels HalL Extension 23 5. 

Residence: Corner of Daughtridge and Kilgore Streets. 

Winstead. S. W. — Steam Fitter. Power Plant. Extension 234. 
Residence: Route 4, Raleigh. 

♦Winston, Sanford — Professor, Sociology Department. 20 2 Peele Hall. 
Extension 231. 

Residence: 120 Forest Rd. Telephone 2-1402. 

♦Winton, Lovrell Sheridan — Assistant Professor, Mathematics Department. 
7 Pullen Hall. Extension 228. 

Residence: 712 Brooks Ave. Telephone 5315. 

♦Witmer, S. B. — Loom Fixer. Textile School. Textile Building. Extension 
Residence: Cary, N. C. 

♦Wood, Walter A. — Assistant Coach of Freshman Football. Coaches' 
Office. Field House. Telephone 6934. 

Residence: 115 Brooks Avenue. Telephone 5224. 

♦Woodhouse, W. W., Jr. — Associate Agronomist. Department of Agron- 
omy. 114 Ricks Hall. Extension 222. 

Residence: 113% N. Boylan Ave. Telephone 4544. 



Faculty Directory 39 

♦Wright, J. B. — College Electrician, Service Department and Central 
Stores, Warehouse. Extension 27 2. 

Residence: Western Boulevard. Telephone 4883. 
♦Wyman, Lenthall — Professor, Forestry Department. 305 Ricks Hall. 
Extension 270. 

Residence: 1S37 White Oak Rd. Telephone S953. 
*Wynn, Willard K. — Assistant Professor, English Department. 113 Peele 
Hall. Extension 23 7. 

Residence: 2707 Barmettler St. 
Wynne, Robert B. — Instructor, English Department. lOS Pullen Hall. 
Extension 23S. 

Residence: 2 Logan Court. Telephone 2-2673. 
♦Young, Mrs. C. H. — Stenographer. Department of Animal Husbandry 
Extension. 202 Polk Hall. Extension 269. 

Residence: 2303 Clark Ave. Telephone 8083. 
Young, Mrs. Charles H. — Clerk of Admissions, Registrar's Ofl&ce. 208 
Holladay Hall. Extension 219. 
Residence: 
Young, Elizabeth (Miss) — Secretary, Division of Teacher Training. Hol- 
laday Hall. Extension 256. 

Residence: Smithfield, N. C. Telephone Smithfield, 170-J. 
♦Zehmer, Mrs. Willis K. — Secretary, Office of Dairy Investigations. 213 
Polk Hall. Extension 30 5. 

Residence: 2428 East Lake Drive. Telephone 2-1961. 



'^ 



« 



f • 




Y'^ 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 

1939-1940 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Abell, D. S Auditor Route 2, Raleigh.. Dowagiac, Mich. 

Abernathy, R. P., Jr.... ..Fr. Ag...._ 108 7th, Box 3308 Spring Hope, N. C. 

Abrams, P. D Jr. For .1416 Park Drive.. Hartford, Conn. 

Absher, C. M Jr. Ag. Ed 229 South, Box 3561 StatesviUe, N. C. 

Achorn, G. S Jr. Chem. Engr 117 Forest Road Danielson, Conn. 

Acton, P. A...... Fr. M. E ....308 N. Person St Raleigh, N. C. 

Adair, R. B....__ ...So. Cer. Engr 125 Woodburn Road Beaufort, N. C. 

Adams, E. .\aron Sr. Ag. Ed ...105 Watauga, Box 3005 Taylorsville, N. C. 

Adams, Ed. Andrew..._ Fr. M. E 2220 Circle ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Adams, E. Odell, Jr .Fr. Ag ....22 8th.. Angier, N. C. 

Adams, P. G So. Tex. Mfg 2202 Hillsboro St Greensboro, N. C. 

Adams, Richard C..__ So. Ag. Ed 201 6th, Box 3249 Randleman, N. C. 

Adams, Roderick D So. Ag. Ed..... 2 South, Box 3598 Willow Springs, N. C. 

Adams, Wm. Elton Grad. Ind. Arts ...10 E. Dixie Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Adams, Wm. Ewart So. M. E ..119 South, Box 3519 Charlotte, N. C. 

Adams, W. Jarvis ..Sr. Ch. E 115 Woodburn Road Asheville, N. C. 

Adcock, S. E., Jr Jr. Ind. E 302 A. Stokesdale, N. C. 

Addington, B. A..... Fr. Ag...... 1 8th Franklin, N. C. 

Aiken, B. N Fr. M. E ...305 South, Box 3569 Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Aldridge, J. W Jr. Tex. Mgt ..103 Chamberlain St .....Hamlet, N. C. 

Alexander, J. W..__ Jr. Tex. Mfg ...13 South, Box 3609.... Asheboro, N. C. 

Allen, Blake H Fr. Ag. Ed... ...103 7th, Box 3303 Matthews, N. C. 

Allen, F. C... Fr. Tex. Mfg...... 101 9th Wadesboro, N. C. 

Allen, Howard N Fr. Tex. Mfg 1 Fieldhouse Kannapolis, N. C. 

Allen, John, Jr Fr. For ..303 9th !^..._._.. Bethel, N. C. 

Allen, J. A .Fr. M. E 2112 Woodland Ave.._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Allen, J. Rav So. Ag. Ed ..322 South, Box 3586.... MarshviUe, N. C. 

Allen, Melville H.. Fr. Tex. W. & D.. Route 4 Raleigh, N. C. 

Allen, R. Mc, Jr Fr. Ch. E 116 Hawthorne Road Raleigh, N. C. 

Allen, R. R. _ Fr. Ag 300 E. Whitaker Mill Council, N. C. 

Allen, T. W., Jr....... Fr. Ag....... 318 7th, Box 3384 Creedmoor, N. C. 

AUes, G. J ...Fr. C. E.... 331 8th Wilmington, N. C. 

Allison, A. D Jr. Tex. Mfg 224 A Pine Bluff, N. C. 

Alston, W. F Grad. PI. Path 406 Brooks Ave.... Pitman, N. J. 

Althaus, K. G., Jr ..Fr. Chem. E 1515 Scales Street Raleigh, N. C. 

Altman, L. B., Jr ....Sr. Ag. Engr .....1210 Cowper Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Altsheler, Seymour Fr. Tex. C. & D .2223 Creston Road Newark, N. J. 

Amero, J. J. _ Grad. Cer. E 2513 Clark Avenue ...Gloucester, Mass. 

Anderson, L. B Fr. Gen. Engr 309 8th... Asheville, N. C. 

Anderson, W. T., Jr ......Fr. E. E 101 9th.... .......Charlotte, N. C. 

Anderssen, G. E. __ So. M. E... 333 1911, Box 3813 ....Merchantville, N. J. 

.Andrews, Carlton A Fr. M. E 101 8th, Box 5241 Durham, N. C. 

Andrews, C. H., Jr Fr. Gen. Engr 509 Burton St Raleigh, N. C. 

Andrews, C. R .Jr. Arch. E ..6 Ferndell Lane, Box 5393 Gar^vood, N. J. 

Andrews, Horace P So. Ag. Chem 206 South, Box 3538 ...Lumberton, N. C. 

Andrews, J. M Sr. M. E.._.. 2405 Clark Ave Roseboro, N. C. 

Andrews, J. Ward Jr. C. E 226 South, Box 3558 .......Wilmington, N. C. 

Andrews, John Wm., Jr So. M. E... 1922 Hillsboro St Greensboro, N. C. 

Andrews, R. Clark Jr. M. E.... 126 A ......Mt. Olive, N. C. 

Angelo, W. E. ..So. Cer. E 329 1911, Box 3809 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Ankers, R. E., Jr.._ So. E. E 207 5th, Box 3219 Falls Church, Va. 

Aquilino, J. M Fr. Ag. Ec 113 Logan Court ...Providence, R. L 

Arbuthnot, Duane, Jr Sr. Ind. E 2004 Hillsboro St Leonia, N. J. 

Arey, J. A-, Jr. . ..Fr. Tex. Mfg 5 Maiden Lane Raleigh, N. C. 

Ariail, A. S Soph. Chem. E 18 Home St Charlotte, N. C. 

Armstrong, O. E Fr. Ch. E... 27 8th Greensboro, N. C. 



42 



North Carolisa State College 



Armstrong, R- B^ Jr. 
AnnstTong, T. Fred 



_Sr. Ag. Engr 



School Address 



Anaaz, Manuel, Jr. 
Anington, T. M., Jr. 

.Asbuiy, O. F-, ni 

.\shworth, T. J^ Jr. — 

.\spden, A. C 

Attins, J. D-, Jr. 

.,J.H- 




140 A. 



10 Enterprise Sc, Box 5065. 

306 E. Martin St. 

.Wake Forest 

129 8th 



Aiiir-ion, G. S., Jr 

Ait-i-on, J. D. 

Ati^zion, J. H_ 



Att^r^on, R. A., Jr — 

.\iiir.son, W m. H 

.\uman, F. Earl 

Auman, \^ . R 

Auinsn, R. P 

A^s--. L. H 



A-i-:, R. D., Jr.. 
A-ostin, R- W., Jr.. 

Austin, W. R 

Ave:::.J.S. 



_Sr. Ch. E. 

_Sr. For 

_Fr. Tex. Mgt.. 

-So. C. E 

-Fr. Ag. Ed 

-So. M. E 

-Fr. Arch. E — 

-Fr. M- E 

-So. Ag. Ed. 

-Sr. Arch. E — 

-Fr. M. E 

-So. Ag. Ed 

-Fr. M. E 

-So. M. E 



710 N. Bloodworth 

133 1911, Box 3773 

-Ginnnasium, Box 533S. 

-317 South, Box 3581 

-2316 HiUsboro St. 

-312 7th, Box 3378 

-6 Femdell Lane 

JOS 7th, Box 3374 



-211 10th_. 
-Gymnasium, Box 5404- 

-125 South, Box 3525 

-331 7th, Box 3397 

-216 Wac, Box 303^ 
J27 8th. 



er. . P. S._ 
R. M. 



Jr- 



-So. Ag — 
-Tr. M. E.. 
-So. .\g — 
-So. Ch. E._ 



-2316 HiUsboio St.. 
-211 South, Box 3543. 

-104 5th, Box 3204 

-230 1911, Box 3770_ 
J16.A. 



\vc-ci. Miss Ludk B Grad. Voc Guid. 726 N. Blount Street 

\xtti. A- G So. An. Prod 201 Wat., Box 3019_ 

Ayeis, F. W., Jr Fr. For_^ 206 9th 



Baggett. D. D . 

Bagie?-, S. E., Jr 

rfaben, J. B., Jr 

Bailev, E. .\-, Jr 

Bailed, W. H 

Baker, H. M : 

Baker, P. G 

Baker. R. L 

Ball, E. E. 

Ball, L. E.- 

Ball, T. N. 

Ball, T. W 

Balhnce. H. E. 
- rL_ 



-Fr. Ag.. 



-317 7th, Box 3383. 



-Grad. Tex. C. & D_l06 Home Street. 

_Fr. C. E 220 C 

-Grad. .\g. Chem 2316 HiUsboro St.. 

Fr. .\g 311 7th, Box 3377. 



-Fr. M. E.__ 
-So. M. E.__ 
-Jr. Ch. E 



-131 8th 



-J18 South, Box 3582. 
J14 Wat, Box 3050_ 



-Jr. Tex. C. & D 2209>^ Hope Street. 

-Fr. Gen. Engr 1505 Caswdl St 

-Fr. M. E 114 N. Bloodworth St.. 



-Fr. M. E 

-Jr. Ch. E 

-Fr. M. E 

-Fr. Tex. Mfg. 



lymnajsiuin. Box 5402. 

2304 HiUsboro St. 

.305 9th 

26 8th 



'. B., U ^Giad. kg. Chem 201 4th, Box 3119_ 

A. A So. An- Prod. 327 A, Box 5507 



:5arber, j. C 

Barber, W. V_ 
BarkdoU, J. N.- 
Barker, W. A — 
Barnes, C. B^ — 
Barnes, E. W . — 
Barnes, L. R — 
Bamette, J. R.- 
Bamette, J. T.. 
BamhiU, J. B._ 
Barr, J. M., Jr- 
Barrett, J. W — 
Barrier, G. H. 



jSo. GeoL E. 

-Fr. M. E 

-Fr. .Ag. Ed. 



-2202 HiUsboio St.. 
-11 Fieldhouse. 



-Sr. W. C. fc M.- 

-Fr. .\g. Ed 

-Sr. Ch. E 

-Fr. M. E 

-Jr. .\g- 



-Tr. Ind. .\rts_ 

-Fr. M. E 

-So. Ag.. 



-314 7th, Box 3380 

-6 FemdeU Lane, Box 5393. 

-308 5th, Box 3252 

-1101 Wake Forest Rd 

J19 7th, Box 3385 

-103 5th, Box 3203. 
-202 Wat., Box 3020_ 



Home Address 

^ishe^-iUe, N. C. 

Columbia, N. C 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Wake Forest, N. C. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Raleigh, X. C. 

— Fairhaven, Mass. 

High Point, N. C. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

FayetteviUe, N. C. 

Chadboum, N. C. 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

— Winston-Salem, N. C. 
— Elizabethtown, X. C. 

West End, X. C. 

— Biscoe, X. C. 
Phoenix, X. Y. 

-Oakboro, X. C. 

-Wlnston-Salem, N. C. 

-.\lbemarle, X. C. 

-Peachland, X. C. 

-Sanford, X". C. 

-Morganton, X. C. 

-Winston-Salem, N. C. 

-Raleigh, X.C. 

-Fairmont, X. C. 

-Washington, X. C. 

-Dunn, X. C. 
— .Alpharetta, Ga. 
— Washington, D. C. 
— La Grange, Ga. 
— Apex, X. C. 
—High Point, N. C. 
— Verona. X. J. 
..-.Asheville, X. C. 
— Monroe, X. C. 
—Raleigh, X. C. 
—Raleigh, N. C. 
—Charlotte, X. C. 
— Portsmouth, \ a. 
— Wilmington, X. C. 
Wilmington, X. C. 

-Batesburg. S. C. 

-Burgavr, X. C. 

-Greensboro, X. C. 

-Hamlet, X. C. 



—2242 Circle Diive_ 
_902 Brooks Avenue. 
-233 A 



Barry, J. E., Jr 

Bartholomew, H. C. 
Bartlett, W. D., Jr.. 
Bason, G. R. 



-Fr. Tex C. & D- 

-Fr. For 321 8th 

-So. Tex. Mife. 5 Maiden Lane_ 

-Tr. Tex- C. & D. 6 Femddl Lane. 

-Fr. -M. E 10 N. East St.- 

_Fr. M. E 2407 dark Ave. 

_Jr. E. E. 2513 dark 



-Ammon, \ a. 

-Hagerstown, Md. 

-Fuquav Springs, X*. C. 

-Raleigh, X.C. 

-Pinetops, X. C. 

.Oxford, X. C. _ 

HuntersTiille, X. C. 

Mebane, X. C. 

Scotland Xeck, X. C. 

Charlotte, X. C.^ 

Rock>' Mount, X'. C. 

Mt. Pleasant, X. C. 

^Wilmington, X. C. 

Raleigh, X. C. 

Greensboro, X'. C. 

Charlotte, X. C. 



Student Directory 43 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Batten, C. L., Jr Sr. Ag. Ed 204 6th, Box 3252 Micro, N. C. 

Baucom, G. E., Jr Jr. Tex. Mgt Withdrew Sept. 14. Raleigh, N. C. 

Baucom, T. C So. Ag. Ed 23 South, Box 3619 Polkton, N. C. 

Baum, W. J Fr. M. E 328 8th Kitty Hawk, N. C. 

Beam, F. M So. C. E .2310 Hillsboro St Ellenboro, N. C. 

Beam, J. L., Jr..__ So. Arch. E 305 6th, Box 3265 Cherryville, N. C. 

Beane, W. 0., Jr Fr. M. E 213 8th Norfolk, Va. 

Beasley, J. M.._ So. M. E 50 1911, Box 3821.. Louisburg, N. C. 

Beasley, W. G Fr. Land. Arch 304 7th, Box 3370 Louisburg, N. C. 

Beatty, J. D.._ Fr. Tex. C. & D 301 8th..... Albemarle, N. C. 

Beavans, S. C. __ Fr. Gen. Engr 130 Woodburn Road Enfield, N. C. 

Beaver, W. E., Jr So. Tex. Mgt.._ 224 C Salisbury, N. C. 

Beaver, Y. T So. M. E.. 2508 Vanderbilt Ave Rockwell, N. C. 

Bebo, C. W...._ Fr. Ch. E Route 1, Wake Forest Rd ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Beck, H. V Sr. M. E.._ 2706 Vanderbilt Ave ThomasviUe, N. C. 

Beeman, C. K So. Ag. Engr 124^ Hillcrest Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Beery, C. H., Jr..__. Jr. Ag. Chem...._ 213 A Wilmington, N. C. 

Begg, C. F. H Sr. Tex. C. & D 114 Wat., Box 3014._ Charlotte, N. C. 

Bell, H. B Jr. Ch. E 326 South, Box 3590 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Bell, J. A.._ So. Ind. Arts _ 208 6th, Box 3256 Newport, N. C. 

Bell J. L Sr. For 2209^ Hope Street... Huntersville, N. C. 

Bell, T. A Grad. Ag. Chem 2316 Hillsboro St Spartanburg, S. C. 

Belton, J. A Sr. F. C. & PI. B 306 Wat., Box 3042 Draper, N. C. 

Belvin, D. L Sr. M. E 1609 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

Bendigo, E. J ...Sr. Tex. Mgt 125 Woodburn Road._ ..Greensboro, N. C. 

Bennett, F. M So. Ag...._ 2504 Vanderbilt Ave Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Bennett, M. W., Jr Fr. M. E Route 5 .....Raleigh, N. C. 

Benton, J. H Fr. M. E 108 6th, Box 3244. Apex, N. C. 

Benton, W. T., Jr So. Ch. E 1720 Hillsboro St Wilmington, N. C. 

Bergman, Howard Sr. Tex. Mgt ..2304 Clark Ave Brooklyn, N. Y. C. 

Berkelheimer, Irwin Fr. Tex. Mfg 211 7th, Box 3343 Cedarhurst, N. Y. 

Berkut, M. K.._.. Jr. Ag. Chem 112 N. East Street _ .....Franklinton, N. C. 

Bethea, J. B Fr. Ag 307 8th LiUington, N. C. 

Bethell, G. W Jr. Ch. E 1922 Hillsboro St Wilmington, N. C. 

Betts, D. B..__ Sr. C. E 317 Wat., Box 3053 Greensboro, N. C. 

Betts, J. K Fr. Ch. E 303 8th Woodbury, N. J. 

Bickerstaff, R. B .....So. Cer. E 1301 Hillsboro St.. :. Columbus, Ga. 

Biggers, P. T Sr. Tex. Mgt 12 Maiden Lane... Sanford, Fla. 

Bing, A. J Sr. M. E..__ 1301 Hillsboro St Hickory, N. C. 

Bishop, R. A., Jr Fr. M. E 310 9th Greensboro, N. C. 

Bivens, T. W _ Sr. Ag. Ed 2 South, Box 3598 .....Stanfield, N. C. 

Bivins, T. E Fr. M. E 313 8th .Hillsboro, N. C. 

Black, S. J Sr. Ag. Ed 2609 Clark Ave Concord, N. C. 

Blackwelder, A. L So. Tex. Mfg.... .203 Wat., Box 3021.„ Hickory, N. C. 

Blackwelder, S. D So. E. E Withdrew Sept. 22. Davidson, N. C. 

Blackwood, H. F., Jr Fr. Ch. E 10 Enterprise St Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Blake, L. V..__ Sr. An. Prod Cafeteria, Box 5133 Watha, N. C. 

Blalock, J. E Fr. M. E 132 7th, Box 3332 Stem, N. C. 

Blanchard, W. T Sr. C. E 2203^ Cox Ave Rose Hill, N. C. 

Bland, J. M So. M. E 2514 Clark Ave New Burn, N. C. 

Bland, W. A.._ So. For 328 South, Box 3528 Bovdton, Va. 

BUnd, W. M Jr. An. Ed 15 So itn. Box 3611 Pittsboro, N. C. 

Blanton, C. H Fr. Ch. E 105 8th Ellenboro, N. C. 

Bledsoe, S. B., Jr So. M. E 212 South, Box 3544 New Bern, N. C. 

Blevins, C. E So. Ag. 7 South, Box 5127 Hays, N. C. 

Blevins, G. N So. Ag. Ed 126 1911, Box 3726 Bakersville, N. C. 

Blount, T. H., Jr Sr. M. E. 116 Wat., Box 3016.__ Washington, N. C. 

Blow, J. G So. M. E 307 Wat., Box 3043..._ Vanceboro, N. C. 

Blue, J. F So. Tex. Mfg 314 South, Box 3578 Carthage, N. C. 

Blue, W. H So. E. E 229 1911, Box 3769 Carthage, N. C. 

Bobbitt, R. M Fr. Ag 15 8th Littleton, N. C. 

Bogasse, G. E.. Fr. Ag... _ 1223 Mordecai Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Boger, J. D .__ Jr. Tex. Mfg 103 Chamberlain St Concord, N. C. 



44 



North Carolina State College 



Natm 

BoUek, W . P 

Bolton, S. I 

Boltrek, Henr>" 

Bcltrek, Peter, Jr 

Boney, L. ISi., jr 

Bonner. A. M., Jr. 

Booker, R. M 

Boone, D. L 

Boone, J. B 

Boone, Rov H 

Best, C. M.. 



BoswelL A. W 

Bousheld, C. J.____ 

Bowen. E. R 

Bowen. 1. H., Jr „. 

Bower, j. H. 

Bowers, E. S 

Bowers. F. J 

Bowers, W. H 

Bowles, J. P 

Bowles, W. F 

Bowman. H. I 

Bovce. M. B 

Boyce, R. D 

Bovette. Ray 

Bovlan. W. M 

Bradlev, P. A 

Bradley, R. T 

Bradshaw, T. L 

Bragaw. \\ illiam 

Brake. J. H 

Brake, R. W 

Brame, C. B 

Bramlett, J. E 

Brandon, J. W 

Brandon, S. B 

Brandt, George, Jr 

Branks, Clyde, Jr 

Brannon, G. M., Jr 

Brannon, R. E 

Branscome, J. R 

Branson, H. W., Jr 

Brantley, L. G. 



Brasington, C. F., Jr. 

Brawler, T. A 

Breeze," W. H 

Brett, A. C. 



Brewer, J. E., IL_ 

Brewer, W. P 

Bridges, J. J 

Briggs, T. L., Jr.._. 

Brjnkley, J. W 

Brinson. L. T., Jr.. 

Britt, E. M 

Brittain, J. V., Jr.. 

Brockman, J. S 

Brohm, W. J., IIL 
Brockbank, T. H.__ 

Brooks, L. C 

Brooks. P. A 

Brookshire, J. C..__ 

Brown, A. Wade. 

Brown, E)onald J 



Ciasjificaiion 

Fr. M. E 

Jr. Arch. E 

So. Ch. E 

Fr. M. E .. 

Sr. Arch. E 

Fr. Ag 

Fr. M. E 

Fr. M. E 

I. S. Ag. Ed 

So. Cer. E 

__.So. Ag. Ed 

Fr. M. E 

Fr. For 

So. Ch. E 

.... .Sr. C. E 

So. M. E 

Sr. Ch. E 

— So. Ag 

-„Fr. Ag 

Fr. Ag. Engr 

.._. Jr. Ag 

So. Ch. E 

Fr. Ch. E 

..„.Fr. Ag 

... - Jr. Ind. E 

Fr. M. E 

Sr. Ag. Ed 

Jr. F. C. & PI. B._ 

— Fr. Gen. Engr 

— Fr. For 

_Fr. Ag 

— Sr. For 

Fr. M. E.- 

Jr. Ch. E 

Jr. M. E 

So. Ag. Ed 

— LSo. Tex. Mfg 

So. E. E 

— Jr. Tex. Mgt. 

.-„Jr. Tex. Mfg 

So. Ch. E 

Sr. C. E 

Fr. Ag. Ed 

__Fr. M. E 

-_.Fr. Ag . 

Fr. Ag. Ed 

Fr. M. E 

—Jr. Ag... 

So. Ch. E 

_.Jr. Ag. Ed . 

. Fr. M. E 

_Fr. Tex. C. & D._. 

.._Fr. M. E 

— Sr. Tex. Mgt 

Fr. For 

Fr. Tex. Mfg 

__Fr. Cer. E.. _ 

._-.Jr. .\rch. E 

-_.Grad. E. E 

...-So. Ch. E 

.._Fr. -\n. Prod 

— So. For 

_._Jr. Tex. C. & D..._ 



School Address 



Home Address 



...304 9th. Hickor%-, N. C. 

.. .115 Wat., Box 3013 Rich Square. N. C. 

314 A, Box 5503 Arverne, N. Y. 

...Fieldhouse Arverne, X. Y. 

...103 Chamberlain St._ Wilmington. N. C. 

„.559 New Bern Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

._.320 E. Hargett St Raleigh, N. C. 

_225 7th. Box y:^S7 Rich Square, N. C. 

_2C9 6th. Box 3257 CHnton, N. C. 

-.-316 South, Box 5580. Spruce Pine, N. C. 

...5 Maiden Lane Rockwell, N. C. 

...202 Sth Bailey, N. C. 

...323 8th.. ._ Queens \ illage, N. Y. 

...2405 Clark Avenue... Charlotte, N. C. 

_.200S Hillsboro St Atlanta, Ga. 

...332 1911, Box 3812 Lexington, N. C. 

...2407 Clark .\ venue Jackson, N. C. 

...114 South. Box 3514. Jackson, N. C. 

-203 10th... ....Norwood, N. C. 

...2408 Stafford .\ve Hiddenite, N. C. 

...229 South, Box 3561 Hiddenite, N. C. 

...307 6th, Box 3267 Hickor^-, N. C. 

...308 7th, Box 3374 .....Albemarle, N. C. 

...25 Sth Woodland, N. C. 

.126 South, Box 3526._ _ Kenlv, N. C. 

_.201 A ...New "Bern, N. C. 

_.227 1911, Box 3767 Jackson, N. C. 

_.114 A Rockv Mount, N. C. 

.318 8th.._.. _...Burgaw, N. C. 

..1825 St. Mars's St Washington, N. C. 

..321 7th, Box '3387 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

..21 South, Box 3617 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

.328 Sth ....Lucama, N. C. 

-.132 Woodbum Rd Cove Creek, N. C. 

-.238 \. Cramerton, N. C. 

..303 4th, Box 3129 Yadkinville, N. C. 

.-21 Enterprise St Greensboro, N. C. 

.306 5th, Box 3230 Asheville, N. C. 

-10 Enterprise St Sanford, N. C. 

.224 South. Box 3556. Rockingham, N. C. 

..331 1911, Box 3811..... Galax, Va. 

-2513 Clark Avenue — ..Greensboro. N. C. 

-225 8th-... - Bailev. N. C. 

-510 Cole St Aberdeen, N. C. 

..4 Maiden Lane Mooresville, N. C. 

.220 Chamberlain St - ...Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

.228 h Murfreesboro, N. C. 

..10 Enterprise St Clemmons, N. C. 

-118 C_ ..Greensboro. N. C. 

-19 South, Box 3615 ..Shelbv, N. C. 

-8 9th Raleigh, N. C. 

-125 8th Valdese, N. C. 

-124 7th. Box 3324 ..Arapahoe, N. C. 

-2407 Clark Ave._ Winston-Salem. N. C. 

..214 Sth .-Black .Mountain, N. C. 

-567 N. Person St -Raleigh, N. C. 

-126 Sth Fanwood, N. J. 

-2209 Hope Street Oak Ridge, N. C. 

.105 Chamberlain St Brvson Cirv, N. C. 

-2316 Hillsboro St -...-Albemarle. N. C. 

_2207 Hope Street. Franklin, N. C. 

.120 South, Box 3520 Rockwell, N. C. 

.231 A _ Cramerton, N. C. 



Student Directory 45 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Brown, F. B., Jr Grad. E. E 2100 Hillsboro St Columbia, S. C. 

Brown. Frank P.._ Fr. Cer. E 102 5th, Box 3202... .Hertford, N. C. 

Brown. Frank S ..Fr. Ag 4 Maiden Lane Statesville, N. C. 

B.own. Howard E .......Fr. Ch. E 210 8th Asheboro, N. C. 

Brown, Jeff T.... Jr. Ch. E I2OI2 Groveland Ave...... Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Brown, l^edar B. So. Ch. E 116 iiouth, Bo.\ 3516 Wilmington, N, C, 

Brown, L. W. Fr. Tex. Mfg ......301 8th Chadbourn, N. C. 

Brown, Paul J., Jr So. Ag Brooks Ave., Box 5401 Charlotte, N. C. 

Brown. T. C .Grad. Ind. Arts 3133 Stanhope Ave 

Brown. T. R .......So. Tex. Mfg ..14 Turner St Cramerton, N. C. 

Brown, Wm. A., Jr So. E. E .316 C Wilmington, N. C. 

Brown, Wm. Ashbv...... .Fr. E. E 114 8th.. ...EHzabeth Citv, N. C. 

Browne. E. Broadus Grad. F. C. & P. B...1715 Park Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Browning. R. C .Sr. C. E 1012 Harvey Street.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Browning, W. I., Jr.. ._ ....Fr. Ch. E 8 9th Graham, N. C. 

Brownstein, Edward ....So. Entom ....2304 Clark Ave New Haven, Conn. 

Brovhill. Fred T ..Sr. Tex. Mgt HI 5th, Box 3211 .Statesville, N. C. 

Brvan, D. L Jr. Ch. E 125 Woodburn Road Wilson, N. C. 

Brvan. J. M., Jr Fr. Ch. E 204 9th Burlington, N. C. 

Brvan, R. P.... Jr. An. Prod 17 Enterprise St Marshall, N. C. 

Brvant. Edward L .So. Ch. E ..230 C .Wilmington, N. C. 

Bryant, W. Earl So. Ch. E 316 C Wilmington, N. C. 

Buchingham, D. Y Sr. Tex. Mgt 2004 Hillsboro St.... Jewett Citv, Conn. 

Buffaloe, H. Lacy...... .So. M. E 204 A Garner, N. C. 

Bulger. J. G Fr. Tex. Mfg 224 8th .....Winnetka, 111. 

Bulla, W. W\._ Sr. Ch. E ....330 1911, Box 3810 Asheboro. N. C. 

Bullard, E. T Fr. Ag...._ 209 10th .....Central Valley, N. Y. 

Bullock, D. Doug., Jr Fr. Gen. Engr Withdrew Sept. 26 Rowland, N. C. 

Bundv. Steve A .Jr. Tex. Mfg 1301 Hillsboro St Jamestown, N. C. 

Bunn; Chas. L.... Grad. W. C. & M 207 4th. Box 3125 Spring Hope, N. C. 

Bunn, JuHan W., Jr Jr. M. E .....1501 Iredell Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Bunn, Mark S... Fr. Ag.._.. 125 7th, Box 3325... .....Sprmg Hope, N. C. 

Bunn, R. Marcus ...Sr. Ag. Ed .....238 C Rockv Mount, N. C. 

Burch. J. Phihp Fr. Ag 232 7th, Box 3364 .....Mountain Park. N. C. 

Burch, Warner M Fr. Ag. Ed...... 304 7th, Box 3370 Walstonburg. N. C. 

Burgess. Elva Grad. Ind. Arts 204 Park .\ve ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Burgess. James F .Jr. Ch. E 123 Chamberlain St Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Burke, T. Dick Fr. Arch. E 118 N. Dawson Raleigh, N. C. 

Burnett. W. T.. Jr ...Grad. .A.g. Chem 2232 Hillsboro St Spartanburg, S. C. 

Burnham. Jim M., III.__ Jr. .\rch. E 103 Chamberlain St Charlotte, N. C. 

Burrage. R. L., Jr Jr. Ag 123 A. Concord, N. C. 

Burt, Ralph L .Sr. M. E... 218 N. McDowell St Raleigh, N. C. 

Burton. J. W., Jr Fr. Ag...._ 119 South, Box 3519 New Bern, N. C. 

Butler, Earl G Sr. An. Prod ..2211 Hope St Clinton, N. C. 

Butler, Tom V., Ill Fr. C. E 203 7th. Box 3335 Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Bverlv, O. V..... Jr. Tex. Mfg 227 1911, Box 3767 Lexington, N. C. 

Bvnum, Clarence M ....So. M. E 1709 Hillsboro St.... Bayboro, N. C. 

Bvrd, Hassel A Fr. Ag. __ .....127 8th Burhngton, N. C. 

Bvrd, Hal C Sr. Tex. Mgt 2405 Clark Ave Erwin, N. C. 

Byrd, WiUard C Fr. Land. Arch 340 C, Box 5311 _ Whiteville, N. C. 

Caddell. Wallace W Fr. Ch. E 115 7th. Box 3315..... Charlotte, N. C. 

Cagle, Robert C, Jr So. M. E 313 South. Box 3577 Rockingham, N. C. 

Cain, E. P., Jr Fr. Ch. E ...320 New Bern Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Cain, Robert L Sr. For. 104 South, Box 3504 l... Favetteville, N. C. 

Caldwell. Lewis E... So. Ch. E 208 Wat., Box 3026._ .....Campobello, S. C. 

Caldwell. Oliver T. .. So. E. E. 127 A Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Caldwell. Tom P .......So. Tex. C. & D.......333 A, Box 5306... Charlotte, N. C. 

Calfee, James F.... .So. E. E 237 C... Belhaven, N. C. 

Calhoun. L. G., Jr.._ Fr. Ag. Ed 311 8th ...Rockv Mount, N. C. 

Calhoun. Marvin G _ Sr. E. E. 313 C ...-.Clio, S. C. 

Call. James W Jr. Chem. E ...327 South, Box 3591 ...Wilson, N. C. 

Callis, Henry M...._.. Fr. E. E 320 Swain Willow Springs, N. C. 



46 North Carolina State College 

Naine Classification School Address Home Address 

Cameron, Hugh C.._ So. Ch. E 107 4th, Box 3117 Oxford, N. C. 

Cameron, Herbert L So. Ag. Ed 2820 Everett Ave., Box 5112 Vass, N. C. 

Cameron, Neil C Fr. For 112 Cox Ave Pine View, N. C. 

Campbell, D. M Fr. For .....4 9th Halifax, N. C. 

Campbell, E. R Fr. Poul. Sci 1108 Glenwood Ave Southport, N. C. 

Campbell, John F So. E. E Route 1, Cary Wagram, N. C. 

Campbell, Marvin R.... Jr. M. E.._ 207 A Dunn, N. C. 

Campbell, Wm. N.. Jr. C. E 209 Ashe Ave... Raleigh, N. C. 

Cannady, N. Ellis, Jr So. E. E 337 1911, Box 3817 Oxford, N. C. 

Cannon, Clyde W So. Tex. Mfg 1720 Hillsboro St Ayden, N. C. 

Cannon, J. M..„ Sr. Ch. E 1720 Hillsboro St New Bern, N. C. 

Canup, Luther P Fr. Ag. Ed 306 4th, Box 3132 Salisbury, N. C. 

Capehart, A. A., Jr Fr. C. E ...230 7th, Box 3362 Washington, N. C. 

Carawon, Bruce E..__ So. Ag. E 105 6th, Box 3241 Vanceboro, N. C. 

Carey, Jack P So. Arch. E 8 Maiden Lane Kinston, N. C. 

Carey, Roland E Jr. For 316 South, Box 3580 Baltimore, Md. 

Carney, James F So. C. E 2406 Hillsboro St Bethel, N. C. 

Carpenter, Keith C So. Ag. Ed 120 Cox Ave Lincolnton, N. C. 

Carpenter, Millard N., Jr So. Tex. Mfg 234 1911, Box 3774 Margarettsville, N. C. 

Carroll, S. E., Jr So. Ch. E Box 772 Raleigh, N. C. 

Carter, Mrs. C. C Grad. Voc. Guid Cameron Ct. Apt. P-IB Wilmington, N. C. 

Carter, H. Earl Fr. Ag. Ed.._ 309 7th, Box 3375 Madison, N. C. 

Carter, W. E So. Ind. E 520 Cleveland St Raleigh, N. C. 

Cartwright, Luke W., Jr...._.Jr. M. E..__ 1922 Hillsboro St Baltimore, Md. 

Carry, Litchfield Fr. E. E 212 10th Selma, N. C. 

Carvalho, Raul Fr. Ch. E 6 8th Swannanoa, N. C. 

Carver, Irvin L So. Ag. 112 Cox Ave Durham, N. C. 

Case, C. Edgar So. E. E 218 South, Box 3550 Fountain, N. C. 

Cate, Eugene R Grad. M. E 1304 Hillsboro St Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Cathey, Robert H.._ .So. Tex. C. & D 230 1911, Box 3770 Charlotte, N. C. 

Caton, J. C Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 206 6th, Box 3254 Concord, N. C. 

Cauble, Mark W., Jr So. M. E 1814 Park Drive Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Chaconas, G. Pete Sr. For 105 C Washington, D. C. 

Chaffee, N. Louis jr. M. E 126 A Morganton, N. C. 

Chambers, John W Fr. E. E ...309 8th AsheviUe, N. C. 

Chamblee, Douglas S Fr. Ag. Ed 107 8th Zebulon, N. C. 

Chamblee, Graham V.._ Jr. For 229 C Zebulon, N. C. 

Chamblee, James P..__ Fr. Ch. E 204 9th Greensboro, N. C. 

Chaney, Hubert C..__ So. Ag. Ed 322 South, Box 3586 Monroe, N. C. 

Chapman, W. H Grad. F. C. & P. B...6 Enterprise Street Liberty, S. C. 

Charnock, Howard 0., Jr So. Ch. E 312 South, Box 3576 Asheville, N. C. 

Chase, Charles C.._ Sr. Tex. Mfg 2705 Van Dyke St Salisbury, N. C. 

Chesnutt, Maxwell P So. F. C. & PI. B 209 South, Box 3541 Turkey, N. C. 

Chestnutt, Rayburn L., Jr...Fr. E. E 221 C Snow Hill, N. C. 

Childers, Mrs. L C .Sp. Voc. Guid 130 Hawthorne Rd..__ Raleigh, N. C. 

Childress, Reid W Fr. Ag. _„_ 123 7th, Box 3323 Raeford, N. C. 

Church, H. Edmond, Jr So. E. E 8 Ferndell Lane Franklin, N. C. 

Church, John R.._ Fr. Ag 304 South, Box 3568 N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Clark, David M Fr. M. E 314 8th Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Clark, E. A..__ Fr. Cer. E 21 Enterprise St Danville, Va. 

Clark, Foy Fr. M. E 1 Fieldhouse Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Clark, J. Reid Fr. Ch. E 208 8th Salisbury, N. C. 

Clark, J. Richardson Fr. M. E 234 8th Lilesville, N. C. 

Clark, Norman N Sr. C. E 125 Woodburn Rd Hull, Mass. 

Clark, T. Jack.__ Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 2316 Hillsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

Clark, Wm. C Fr. Ag. __ 21110th West Springfield.Mass. 

Clark, W. Murray, Jr... Jr. Tex. Mgt 2316 Hillsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

Clarke, C. E So. Ch. E 125 Woodburn Rd Kenly, N. C. 

Clay, Marvin J So. Ag..__ 103 5th, Box 3203 Hester, N. C. 

Clee, Gale P Fr. M. E Power Plant Asheville, N. C. 

Clement, Hugh M Fr. M. E 8 8th Stony Point, N. C. 

Clements, Fab M., Jr Jr. Tex. C. & D 210 South, Box 5627 Greensboro, N. C. 

Clemmons, Clifton W Fr. Ag.._ 328 7th, Box 3394 Supply, N. C. 



Student Directory 47 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Clifton, David S Fr. M. E 16 8th Warsaw, N. C. 

Cline, Wm. E.... ...Jr. Ch. E 2004 HiUsboro St Charleston, W. Va. 

Cline, Walter T Sr. Tex. Mfg 205 Chamberlain St Raleigh, N. C. 

Cloyd, Ed. L., Jr..__ Grad. Ind. Arts 2224 Hillsboro St .......Raleigh, N. C. 

Cobb, Herbert H.._ ...Fr. Dairv Mfg..__ 302 4th, Box 3128 .Wadesboro, N. C. 

Cobb, J. D., Jr Fr. Gen. Engr 123 8th Lumber Bridge, N. C. 

Coble, Ed. F.._.._ Fr. Tex. Mfg 228 7th, Box 3360.. Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Coble, George R So. Ag. Ed.._ 225 South, Box 3557.„ Greensboro, N. C. 

Cochran, W. B., Jr .Jr. C. E 2226 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

Coffield, C. C Fr. E. E 105 8th EUenboro, N. C. 

CofFman, Selby E., Jr.._ Jr. An. Prod 1 South, Box 3597._ Wilson, N. C. 

Cole, A. B..„ Fr. For 302 7th, Box 3368 Denton, N. C. 

Cole, Floyd, T Fr. Ag..__ Withdrew Sept. 18 Biscoe, N. C. 

Cole, Roger D Fr. Ag...._ 3 8th Forest City, N. C. 

Coleman, Robert F., Jr Sr. C. E Y. M. C. A., Box 5276 Wilmington, N. C. 

Colenda, Frank._ So. Ch. E 107 4th, Box 3117 Morehead City, N. C. 

CoUier, R. Wade. So. Ch. E 321 South, Box 3585 Fayetteville, N. C. 

Collins, Max, Jr..__ Jr. C. E Carv._ Carv, N. C. 

CoUins, Preston B.._ Fr. C. E 315 7th, Box 3381 MorrisviUe, N. C. 

Collins, Percy E Fr. Gen. Engr 122 8th Newport News, Va. 

Colvin, David Grad. Ch. E..__„ 2304 Clark Avenue Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Connell, G. C, Jr Fr. Ag.._..- ...10 8th Hendersonville, N. C. 

Conrad, Alton B So. Tex. Mgt.._ 103 Chamberlain St Charlotte, N. C. 

Conrad, E. B Jr. Ind. E..__ 205 A, Box 5282.___ Charlotte, N. C. 

Conrad, G. W Fr. Ag. Ed.... 221 8th Lexington, N. C. 

Constant, Leonard A. So. M. E 23 Shepherd Street Grafton, Mass. 

Cook, Bill L So. For 315 South, Box 3579 Kinston, N. C. 

Cook. Charles Jr. Tex. Mfg 103 Chamberlain St Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cook, J Frank Fr. Arch. E 207 8th Clemmons, N. C. 

Cook, J. W., Jr Fr. M. E Withdrew Sept. 18 Belews Creek, N. C. 

Cooke, Henry L..__ Sr. F. C. & PI. B 204 Wat., Box 30_22.__ Littleton, N. C. 

Coon, Ed. Howard, Jr Sr. C. E 117 South, Box 3517 Watertown, Conn. 

Cooper, A. S., Jr Fr. M. E 1209 Cowper Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Cooper, Keith F Fr. M. E 302 7th, Box 3368 Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Cooper, Wm. Bryant._ Fr. M. E 129 1911, Box 3729 Charlotte, N. C. 

Cooper, Wallace G So. E. E 50 1911, Box 3821 CHmax, N. C. 

Coor, E. Ovid, Jr Fr. Ag..__ 234 7th, Box 3366 Selma, N. C. 

Corbin, Wm. Lloyd... Fr. C. E 12 8th Otto, N. C. 

Cornacchione, Antonio So. C. E 227 South, Box 3559 Statesville, N. C. 

Cornelius, WilUs V So. Ag. Ed 223 Forest Road Conover, N. C. 

Cornwell, Roy S So. M. E 335 C Nashville, N. C. 

Correll, Spence M Sr. An. Prod Dairy House, Box 5127 Woodleaf, N. C. 

Correll, W. C Jr. Arch. E. 136 C Albemarle, N. C. 

Couch, L. H., Jr Fr. M. E 114 Home St.._ Monroe, N. C. 

Coughenour, Dick Fr. E. E 212 8th Salisbury, N. C. 

Council, John M., Jr Fr. E. E .....121 8th Wananish, N. C. 

Covington, C. Dewey, Jr Fr. Ag Dairy Barn Mebane, N. C. 

Covington, Frank E., Jr..__.So. Ind. E 239 1911, Box 3779 .....Wadesboro, N. C. 

Covington, M. Cade Fr. Ag. Ed 3135 Stanhope Ave Jonesboro, N. C. 

Covington, Wm. A So. Ag. Ec 302 South, Box 3566 Florence, S. C. 

Coward, E. Graham.__ So. Tex. Mfg 1720 Hillsboro St Ayden, N. C. 

Coward, Wilborn B. Jr. Tex. Mgt 6 Ferndell Lane, Box 5393._ Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Cox, Don F Jr. Cer. E..__ Route 1, Box 1236. Raleigh, N. C. 

Cox, George A So. W. C. & M 2314 Hillsboro St Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Cox, Grover C, Jr So. Ch. E..„ 1922 Hillsboro St Greensboro. N. C. 

Cox, Wm. L Fr. M. E 314 8th Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Cox, W. Thompson Fr. C. E 122 South, Box 3522 Charlotte, N. C. 

Craig, Robert J Jr. Ind. E..__ 2316 Hillsboro St Wilmington, N. C. 

Craig, Thomas W Fr. Ag. Engr 201 9th Concord, N. C. 

Crane, L. R Grad. E. E.._ Route 1 Raleigh, N. C. 

Craven, Doug A Fr. M. E 110 7th, Box 3310 Fayetteville, N. C. 

Craven, Kiffin R Sr. Tex. W. & D.._...l South, Box 3597 Charlotte, N. C. 

Graver, Curtis R., Jr So. Arch. E 110 6th, Box 3246 Winston-Salem, N. C. 



48 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Craver. L. S Fr. Ag. 18 South, Box 3614 ..Lexington, N. C. 

Craver, Wm. Ravmond._ Jr. Ag. Ed .....18 South, Box 3614. .Le.xington, N. C. 

Crawford, Herbert R Jr. M. E.._ 307 4th, Box 3133 Henderson, N. C. 

Crawford, Monte L Sr. Tex. Mfg 122 A 

Mail: 21 Enterprise St Graham, N. C. 

Creech, G. W., Jr So. Tex. Mfg ......104 A, Box 5024 Concord, N. C. 

Cress, Duard F Fr. Ag 203 9th Salisburi', N. C. 

Criner, Donald M Fr. Ind. Arts Dining HalL._ Kissimmee, Fla. 

Croll, Gilbert G Sr. An. Prod ...10 Enterprise St Rideewood, N. T. 

Cromartie, H. LeRoy, Jr So. Arch. E ...222 A, Box 5402 South Orange, N. J. 

Cromartie, Peter M... Tr. For 225 A. Favetteville, N. C' 

Crombie, Wm. A..... So. For 2310 Hillsboro St Delair, N. T. 

Croom, Chas. E Fr. Ch. E 306 7th, Box 3372 Hallsboro, N. C. 

Croom, Holmes M... Fr. Ag ..A-202 Bovlan Apt .......Raleieh, N. C. 

Crowder, Wm. H., Jr.... Fr. Tex. Mfg... ...2405 Clark Ave..__ .Salisbur\-, N. C. 

Culberson, G. R Grad. Tex. Mfg 219 Oberlin Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Culberson, Paul E.._ Sr. An Prod 3107 Hillsboro St .Liberty, N. C. 

Gulp, A. E., Ir.^ Fr. Tex. C. & D.......107 10th ...Gastonia, N. C. 

Culvern, Julian B So. Ag. Chem...... 302 6th, Box 3262 _. Camden, S. C. 

Cummings, H. H.._... .....Fr. C. E ..332 8th Kinston, N. C. 

Cunningham, Francis C .Jr. Ind. E 1615 Fairview Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Cunningham, Wayne._ Fr. M. E 10 Fieldhouse Rich Square, N. C. 

Cunningham, Wm. W., Tr...Fr. Ind. Arts 2 Fieldhouse ...Sanford, N. C. 

Curran, A. L .". Sr. Ag. Ed .....20 South, Box 3616.... Bittinger. Md. 

Currie, David E ...Fr. M. E 14 8th ...Warsaw, N. C. 

Currie, David S., Jr..... So. M. E 203 South, Box 3535 ..Raeford, N. C. 

Curtis, Ernest H .....Fr. M. E 225 1911, Box 3765 ...Greensboro, N. C. 

Curtis, Eugene H So. Gen. Ag.._ _...Carj\__ ...Carv, N. C. 

Curtis, Reilev S., Jr Fr. C. E Carv.___ Carv, N. C. 

Cutler, Millard L .....Fr. E. E 116 8th.. Washington, N. C. 

Dail, Tack I Fr. Ag..__ ......2220 Hillsboro St Winterville, N. C. 

Dailev, Vance C ...Fr. M. E ...304 4th, Box 3131. ...Hatteras, N. C. 

Dalrvmple, R. W ...Fr. Ag..__ 105 7th, Box 3305.. jonesboro, N. C. 

Dalton, Macon M Sr. M. E .....2513 Clark .\ve "Durham, N. C. 

Dalton. Robert I., Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg .233 7th, Box 3365 Charlotte, N. C. 

Dameron, Henry W Fr. Ag. 8 8th.. Bessemer Citv, N. C. 

Daniel, Cecil F ...Fr. M^ E 132 7th, Box 3332 Stem, N. C. 

Daniel, T- M..__ ...Fr. Ag....- Withdrew Sept. 18 Stem, N. C. 

Daniel, S. Y ...Fr. Ag. Ed.._ 234 1911, Box 3774 Pleasant Hill, N. C. 

Darden, Tack C ...Fr. M. E 304 8th FarmviUe, N. C. 

Darden, L. C, Jr Fr. Cer. E 6 9th Stantonsburg, N. C. 

Darst, W. H., Jr.... Sr. E. E 530 E. Tones St..... Raleigh, N. C. 

Davenport, Jewel H... Jr. Ag 329 South, Box 3593._ ...Creswell, N. C. 

Davenport, Wm. H Sr. Ag. Ec ...117 Wat., Box 3017 Kinston, N. C. 

Davidson, Ed. P. Tr. Ind. E.._- ...2004 Hillsboro St.. Murphv, N. C. 

Davidson, M. E., Jr.... ...jr. Ind. E 409 Calvin Road Raleigh, N. C. 

Davis, Charles C, Jr ...Sr. .\rch. E... 125 Chamberlain St Wilmington, N. C. 

Davis, C. L.. Grad. F. C. & P. B. Dixie Trail.. Conway, S. C. 

Davis, C. W^ade. Fr. C. E 113 8th Hickorj-, N. C. 

Davis, George W.._. Sr. Pomology .....2316 Hillsboro St.. ..\rcola, N. C. 

Davis, Harry G .....Sr. .\n. Prod .208 Chamberlain St .....Red Springs, N. C. 

Davis, Tames E.. Fr. Ag. Ed.._ 128 C Waynes^-ille, N. C. 

Davis, j. Harold So. Ag. E 133 1911, Box 3733... Stantonsburg, N. C. 

Davis, Tames W Fr. M. E College .^pt. 3 Ashland, Ky. 

Davis, Lewis B So. E. E.. 128 7th, Box 3328 Shelby, N. C. 

Davis, L. W .......Fr. M. E. 105 7th, Box 3305 YadkinviUe, N. C. 

Davis, Merritt W., Ill Sr. Tex. Mgt.... 116 Groveland Charlotte, N. C. 

Davis, Paul .'\ Fr. Ag. Ec ....8 Maiden Lane ....Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Davis. R. .\rnold Fr. Ag Withdrew Sept. 20. Greensboro, N. C. 

Davis, Richard E... Sr. For Ill A - Greensboro. N. C. 

Dawson, Claud S..__ Fr. Tex. Mfg 233 7th, Box 3365 Cramerton, N. C. 

Dawson, Hilbert H Jr. Ag. Ed 1408 Hillsboro St. Dunn. N. C. 



Student Directory 49 

NatM Classification School Address Home Address 

Dawson, Richard J., Jr So. Ag. Ed 117 Wat.. Box 3017 Kinston, X. C. 

Deal, G. W., Jr .- Fr. Ch. E 251 7th, Box 3363 __KannapoUs, X. C. 

Deaton, J. F..___ — Fr. Ch. E. ._ -.117 X. Person St.. .....Raleigh. X. C. 

Decker, Fred A Sr. Tex. Mfg .115 Woodburn Road Charlotte, X'. C. 

Dees, Miss S. Frances Sr. Land. .\rch 2603 Clark Ave ..Greensboro, N. C. 

DeLaney. John R Fr. An. Prod .217 8th Charlotte, X. C. 

DeUinger, Edgar S., Jr Fr. Gen. Engr 17 8th Laurinburg, X. C. 

Densberger, Richard S.. So. Tex. Mfg.-- 2202 Hillsboro St Kenmore, X'. Y. 

Denton. Eugene C, Jr So. E. E -. 121 C._ Morganton, X. C. 

Derbv, Wm. M., Jr Fr. E. E 621 Brooks Ave ...Raleigh, X. C. 

Derbyshire. Stephen W ..Sr. Cer. E 1408 Hillsboro St.... Raleiah. X. C. 

Derli'n. H. W. A So. M. E 2513 Clark Ave.._ Moorestown. X. J. 

Dewey, Charles Jr. Ch. E ...8 Maiden Lane Goldsboro, X. C. 

Devton, Oscar W Grad. .\n. Prod 201 4th, Box 3119 ...Green Mountain, X. C. 

Dickens, T. S., Jr ...So. For..... 203 6th, Box 3251 Halifax, X. C. 

Dickens. W. J.. Fr. Ag 319 South, Box IS^l).^ Varina, X. C. 

Dickerson. Andy D..__ Fr. E. E....... 202 10th Salisbury. X. C. 

Dickerson. D. F Fr. Ind. Arts 2 Fieldhouse ...Greensboro, X. C. 

Dickerson, E. Xorman, Jr...Jr. Ag 8 Maiden Lane Kinston, X. C. 

Dickinson. Wm. .\.. Jr... .Jr. M. E .....306 South. Box 3570 Fayetteville. X*. C. 

Dickinson. Wm. T Fr. E. E 125 Woodburn Rd Wilson. X'. C. 

Dickson. Miss June A So. Tex. W. & D 1535 Iredell Drive._ ...Raleigh, X. C. 

Dildav. L. Marion .Fr. Ag 319 7th. Box 3385... ...Ahoskie, X. C. 

Dillon, Alonzo K... So. M. E ...215 South. Box 3547._. ......Elkin, X. C. 

Dillon, Robert A ..Fr. Tex! Mfg....... .208 10th Greensboro, X. C. 

Dixon, David L., Jr.... ..Jr. Ag 2405 Clark Ave Kinston, X. C. 

Dixon. E. C So. Ch. E 233 C Crewe, Va. 

Dixon. G. B ...So. Ag. Ed Ill 5th, Box 3211. Kings Mountain, X. C. 

Dixon, Geo. T Jr. Ind. E 311 Wat., Box 3047.__ ..Elm City. X. C. 

Dixon, T. Edwards. Jr Fr. Ch. E Withdrew Sept. 21 Jacksonville. Fla. 

Dixon. Lvman B Fr. Ag 122 South, Box 3522._ Snow Hill, X. C. 

Di Yeso,"A. A. ._. Jr. Ind. Arts._. 202 South, Box 5262._ White Plains, X. Y. 

Doak, C. W.... So. Ag ...120 Woodburn Rd Raleigh, X. C. 

Doak, R. R Fr. Tex. Mgt..__ 120 Woodburn Rd Raleigh, X. C. 

Dobson. J. Adrian Sr. Ag. Ed .204 C. Box 5373._ .....Statesville, X. C. 

Dodge, L David So. C. E 116 Groveland Ave Marion. X. C. 

Donnelh Ralph H ...Jr. M. E..__ 319 .A._ Greensboro. X. C. 

Dorsen, Robert ...So. For .102 5th. Box 3202 .....Xew York City 

Dotger, Fred W., Jr Jr. An. Prod ...10 Enterprise St Charlotte. X. C. 

Dotson. lames C ..Fr. Ind. E ...5 Fieldhouse.. Statesville. X. C. 

Doub. .Albert. Jr.... Grad. Ag. Ec 3016 White Oak Road.. Raleigh. X. C. 

Douglas, Ross S.._ ..So. For.-. ...228 C Hendersonville, X. C. 

Dover, J. Toms, Jr Sr. Tex. Mgt ...2004 Hillsboro St Shelby, N. C. 

Drum, Joe X ...Jr. M. E 112 .A_ Conover, N. C. 

Drum, Lewis F ..Grad. Ch. E 101 4th, Box 3111 Catawba, X. C. 

Drummond, John F... ..So. Ch. E... 222 Park .\ve Prospect Park, Pa. 

Drury, Wm. B Fr. For 312 9th .^.^.... Xorfolk, Va. 

Drve, Lane C Jr. Tex. C. & D 6 Femdell Lane, Box 5393... Landis, X. C. 

Duckworth, G. H ..Jr. Ch. E .....125 C._ Xew Bedford. Mass. 

Dulaney. Robert B... ...Jr. Ind. E....- 128 A.. Zelienople. Pa. 

Duncan. C. Stuart... Jr. E. E.. 114 C._ N. Wilkesboro, X. C. 

Duncan. R. Francis. ...So. C. E 239 1911, Box 3779 Dunn, X. C. 

Duncan. Wm. C Fr. Gen. Engr Forest Citv, X. C. 

Dunlap, Brownlow W... Jr. Ch. E ...11 South, Box 3607 HiUgirt, X^ C. 

Dunn, J. F. So. Ch. E .238 k Charlotte. X. C. 

Dunn, W. Bruce Sr. For .....6 Ferndell Lane, Box 5393 Kennerdell, Pa. 

Durham, Ernest E Sr. .\g. Ed 204 Sixth, Box 3252 Kernersville. X". C. 

Dysart, C. Eugene ...Fr. M. E 231 C Marion. X. C. 

Eagle. Wade P Jr. Ch. E 308 5th, Box 3232...... Salisbury, X. C. 

Lakes, B. A Fr. \g. Ed.._ 302 5th, Box 3226 Oxford, X. C. 

East, Richard E So. Ind. .Arts 114 Wat., Box 3014 White Sulphur 

Springs, \\ .\ a. 



50 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Easterling, Cecil A Jr. For 2008 HiUsboro St Wise, Va. 

Eatman, Frank W., Jr Fr. M. E .....231 7th, Box 3363 HofFman, N. C. 

Eaton, Edwin C _ So. Tex. Mgt 135 A Yadkinville, N. C. 

Echerd, C. Pat...._ Sr. Tex. C. & D 206 Wat., Box 3024._.. Greensboro, N. C. 

Edelen, J. Ruey Fr. M. E 119 Ashe Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Edge, J. Norwood Sr. F. C. & P. B 104 South, Box 3504 Fayetteville, N. C. 

Edge, Malcolm 

Weathersby Fr. Ag. Ed 121 7th, Box 3321 Fayetteville, N. C. 

Edgerton, Herndon R So. C. E 117 Forest Road Buies Creek, N. C. 

Edgerton, I. Walton.__ So. An. Prod 110 5th, Box 3210 Kenly, N. C. 

Edmisten, Dwight M., Jr...Fr. Ag.._ 310 7th, Box 3376 Sugar Grove, N. C. 

Edmiston, John._ Fr. Tex. Mfg .....Ill 8th Mooresville, N. C. 

Edmonds, H. W Jr. Tex. Mfg 127 A, 

Mail: 2220 Hillsboro St.......Garden City, N. Y. 

Edmundson, Ed. S., Jr Fr. Ind. E ....217 E. Lane St ■. Raleigh, N. C. 

Edwards, Don W _ Jr. Tex. Mfg 103 Chamberlain St Ft. Mill, S. C. 

Edwards, Eugene S., Jr Fr. For 328 1911, Box 3808 Hookerton, N. C. 

Edwards, F. N Fr. Ag...._ 104 10th Spring Hope, N. C. 

Edwards, H. V...._ Jr. Tex. Mgt 103 Chamberlain St..... Fort Mill, S. C. 

Edwards, Ross I Sr. Geol. E.. 115 Woodburn Rd..... Charlotte, N. C. 

Egerton, C. Edward D., Jr...Fr. E. E 212 10th Rockingham, N. C. 

Elam, John E...._ So. Ag. Ed 105 5th, Box 3205 Kings Mountain, N. ( 

Elder, Theodore H Soph. M. E 335 A Hampton, Va. 

Eller, Wade R Fr. Ag. Ed .....329 7th, Box 3395 Salisbury, N. C. 

Ellington, Edwin D Sr. Ag. Ed 2512 Clarke Ave...'. Graham, N. C. 

EUiott, Eccles D Jr. F. C. & P. B.......2408 Stafford Ave.... Hiddenite, N. C. 

Elliott, Leighton M Fr. E. E 499 S. Boylan Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Ellis, J. O Fr. C. E 233 8th Henderson, N. C. 

Ellis, Wm. J., Jr Fr. For 231 8th Philadelphia, Pa. 

Elrod, J. Ed., Jr Fr. M. E Withdrew Sept. 15 Charlotte, N. C. 

Ennett, A. D., Jr So. M. E 2306 Hillsboro St Swansboro, N. C. 

Epps, L. Macon, Jr.._ Sr. M. E.._ 213 Wat., Box 3031 Newton, N. C. 

Eppes, Robertson, Jr Fr. Ch. E 104 10th Laurinburg, N. C. 

Epstein, H. L.._ Fr. For 204 7th, Box 3336 Far Rockaway, N. Y 

Ervin, W. Jack Sr. Ch. E 11 South, Box 3607 Mocksville, N. C. 

Etheridge, Harold E Fr. M. E 315 8th Woodleaf, N. C. 

Etheridge, J. N Fr. For 311 6th, Box 3271 Williamsburg, Va. 

Ethridge, J. W.._ Fr. Ind. E 213 9th Goldsboro, N. C. 

Evans, John M Fr. M. E 317 8th Wilmington, N. C. 

Evans, Wm. G Fr. Ind. Arts _ 7 Fieldhouse St. Paul, N. C. 

Everest, Dan G Fr. E. E 212 8th Salisbury, N. C. 

Everett, Fate B So. Ag. ._ 1301 Hillsboro St.-. Palmyra, N. C. 

Everett, Miss Maxilla E.._...Sr. Land. Arch 1814 Park Drive Palmyra, N. C. 

Fagan, Wm. C Fr. Ag. E 1 9th Dardens, N. C. 

Faires, Edwin Fr. M. E 304 Home St Charlotte, N. C. 

Faison, Gaston D Fr. Tex. Mfg 21 Enterprise Greensboro, N. C. 

Falwell, Marshall L _ Sr. Ch. E 707 W. Morgan St Raleigh, N. C. 

Fang, T. K Sr. Tex. C. & D 8 Ferndell Lane Tientsin, China 

Faris, Thomas B So. Arch. E Western Blvd Raleigh, N. C. 

Farmer, J. C...._ Fr. M. E 203 South, Box 3535 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Farrior, David C Fr. E. E 330 8th Goldsboro, N. C. 

Farrior, Julian W Grad. F. C. & P. B...2316 Hillsboro St Burgaw, N. C. 

Farrior, Walter P So. An. Prod 132 1911, Box 3732 Willard, N. C. 

Farthing, E. H. Glenn Fr. E. E 2232 Hillsboro St Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Fearrington, Jesse O Fr. Ag.._ 222 South, Box 3554._ Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Fehley, F. W So. Ind. Arts _ 104 4th, Box 3114 Easton, Pa. 

Feit, Saul Sr. W. C. & Mgt. .. 301 C Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Feldmann, David O... So. Tex. Mfg 103 South, Box 3503 Baltimore. Md. 

Fendt, L. M., Jr So. M. E 203 5th, Box 3215 Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ferebee, H. Clay So. Ag.._ 201 6th, Box 3249 Camden, N. C. 

Ferebee, S. Scott, Jr So. Ch. E 216 C Shawboro, N. C. 

Ferguson, John L., Jr So. Cer. E 2513 Clark Avenue Balboa Heights, C. Z. 



Student Directory 51 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Ferguson, J. T Jr. Ch. E 105 Vance Apts.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Ferguson, Warren S Jr. Ch. E 314 Perry Street Raleigh, N. C. 

Ferree, Hobart G., Jr So. Tex. C. & D 118 C High Point, N. C. 

Ferrell, J. Rudolph. Fr. Ag.. 208 7th, Box 3340 Durham, N. C. 

Fessenden, John R Jr. M. E 2514 Clark Ave Englewood, N. J. 

Fick, Theodore L Fr. Cer. E 325 7th, Box 3391 Passaic, N. J. 

Fields, Alex. P Fr. W. C. & M 115 A Southern Pines, N. C. 

Fields, E. Mc.._ Fr. M. E Y. M. C. A Topia, N. C. 

Filicky, Joseph G Sr. Ch. E 517 S. Salisbury St.._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Finch, Earl A Fr. Ag. Engr 202 8th Bailey, N. C. 

Finch, Eugene B So. Ch. E -.-314 South, Box 3578 Zebulon, N. C. 

Finley, Furman T Fr. Tex. W. & D..__.806 Harp St..___ Raleigh, N. C. 

Finley, Joseph L Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 803 N. Blount St Raleigh, N. C. 

Finn, D. B Fr. Tex. Mfg 9 9th Concord, N. C. 

Fisher, Carl B So. E. E 208 Wat., Box 3026.__ Whittier, N. C. 

Fisher, E. J. _ So. M. E 213 South, Box 3545._ Bolton, N. C. 

Fisher, Ellis W..__ Sr. Tex. C. & D 1922 Hillsboro St Salisbury, N. C. 

Fisher, G. E., Jr So. Ag. Ed.._ 1715 Park Drive Ahoskie, N. C. 

Fisher, Nelson B So. M. E 100 Home St.._ Vanceburg, Ky. 

Flack, Mays H..__ Fr. Tex. Mfg 203 8th Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Flanigan, Walter L So. Ch. E 1922 Hillsboro St Statesville, N. C. 

Fleetwood, Robert W Sr. An. Prod 139 1911, Box 3739 Mars Hill, N. C. 

Fleming, Miss Margaret K.._Auditor —2608 Clark Avenue Woodleaf, N. C. 

Fleming, Wm. E., II Fr. Ag. 202 6th, Box 3250 Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Fleming, Wilton L So. Ag 202 6th, Box 3250 Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Fletcher, Lewis A Sr. Ind. E _ 1413 Scales St - Raleigh, N. C. 

Flowe, John S., Jr Sr. Tex. Mfg 12 S. Boylan Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Flowers, J. Robbin Fr. Arch. E 227 7th, Box 3359 Lumberton, N. C. 

Floyd, Robert G Fr. Tex. Mfg -.307 South, Box 3571 Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Flye, R. B Fr. Ag. 206 10th Battleboro, N. C. 

Flynn, Alvah W., Jr Fr. Ag. - 7 Fieldhouse West Asheville, N. C. 

Flynt, Paul C..___ Fr. Cer. E 323 8th - Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Flythe, Joe S So. E. E 714 Nash Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Flythe, J. W Fr. Ag 5 Fieldhouse Conway, N. C. 

Folley, Jean W..__- So. Tex. Mfg 328 1911, Box 3808.... Aberdeen, N. C. 

Ford, Joseph C, III So. M. E 2232 Hillsboro St Cadillac, Mich. 

Ford, Robert V., II So. M. E 321 C - Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Fore, James D Fr. C. E -128 7th, Box 3328 Whiteville, N. C. 

Fornes, R. L...._ Jr. Ag. Ed 208 1911 - Arapahoe, N. C. 

Forsythe, J. David Fr. Ag. - Withdrew Sept. 20 Greensboro, N. C. 

Foster, Albert W ..Fr. C. E 31 Shepherd St Raleigh, N. C. 

Foster, G. R.._ »..So. Dairy Mfg.._ 107 C Rockville Center, N.Y. 

Foster, John M Sr. Tex. Mfg 31 Shephard St Raleigh, N. C. 

Foster, R. M Fr. M. E 506 Cutler St..___ Raleigh, N. C. 

Fountain, PhiHp R Fr. Ch. E 211 Groveland Ave „ Richlands, N. C. 

Foushee, J. Giles _ Jr. Ch. E 301 4th, Box 3127 Greensboro, N. C. 

Foust, T. B., Jr So. Ch. E 2004 Hillsboro St., Box 5565 Clarksville, Tenn. 

Fowler, George R Auditor 301 Brooks Ave Clinton, Tenn. 

Fowler, T. Jack.___ So. Tex. Mfg 235 1911, Box 3775 Greensboro, N. C. 

Fowles, Charles V Jr. Ind. E..__ 23 South, Box 3619 Tryon, N. C. 

Fox, George P Jr. Arch. E. 207 South, Box 3539 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Fo.x, Harrison W Jr. C. E .....309 Wat., Box 3045.__ St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Frady, R. Glenn Fr. Ch. E Ill 6th, Box 3247 Sylva, N. C. 

Francis, W. Harold So. Ag. Ed 120 C Wavnesville, N. C. 

Franck, Roscoe W. __ Sr. M. E.._ 213 Wat., Box 3031..._ Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Frank, Sidney B Sr. Tex. Mfg 205 South, Box 3537._ Wilson, N. C. 

Franklin, Carl D Jr. Ch. E 102 A Canton, N. C. 

Frazelle, E. L Fr. M. E.... 3 E. Jones St.._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Frazier, T. R., Jr..__ Sr. E. E 309 7th, Box 3375 Warrenton, N. C. 

Freeman, Miss Claire E So. Ag. Chem 907 Glenwood Avenue Raleigh, N. C. 

Freeman, NeiU W., Jr _...Sr. Ag. Ed 104 6th, Box 3240 Star, N. C. 

Frei, Hans W.._ So. Tex. Mfg 8 Ferndell Lane New York, N. Y. 

Friday, W. C _ Jr. Tex. Mfg.. 226 A Dallas, N. C. 



52 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Friddle, C. R Grad. W. C. & M.._.E. C. W. Camp.. _. Ramseur, N. C. 

Frink, E. Ebo_ -_. .Sr. An. Prod 117 South, Bo.x 3517._. .......Bladenboro, N. C. 

Fnsbv. John R., Jr Fr. M. E .....306 4th, Box 3132. Elizabeth Citv, N. C. 

Fntz. C. Joseph Sr. E. E .302 A. Greensboro, X. C. 

Frost, Allen L Sr. Ch. E 233 1911, Box 3773.... New Bedford, Mass. 

Frucht. T. R Fr. .\n. Prod 2232 Hillsboro St .....Newark, N. J. 

Fr^-, C. W Fr. Ind. Arts 8 Fieldhouse... Raleigh, N. C. 

Frj-ar, Hilbert V Fr. Ag 134 8th McLeansville, N. C. 

Fulcher. G. H ...Sr. Tex. Mgt 16 South, Box 3612 Leaksville, N. C. 

Fulcher, Ophus M Fr. An. Prod.. .....10 9th... Leaksville, N. C. 

Fuller, Arthur H., Jr So. Ch. E 8 Maiden Lane .....Gastonia, N. C. 

Fuller, George R., Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg ...217 7th, Box 3349 Raleigh, N. C. 

Fuller, Mack L Fr. Ind. Arts 2302 Beechridge Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Fuller, Wilburn A Jr. Ag. Ed ..Dejarnette, Va. 

Funderburk, G. W., Jr So. Tex. C. & D 8 Maiden Lane LaGrange, Ga. 

Furman. Robert L So. M. E 1714 Park Drive Henderson, N. C. 

Furr. G. C, Jr Jr. Ind. E..__ ......1922 Hillsboro St High Point, N. C. 

Gabriel, W. R So. M. E 129 1911, Box 3729...... Newton, N. C. 

Gagnon, Gilbert W..... _...Fr. M. E 214 7th, Box 3346 ...Bridgeport, Conn. 

Gallowav. A. B., Jr Fr. Gen. Engr 207 9th Brevard, X. C. 

Gambill, Dailv P — ......Jr. Tex. Mfg.... ...318 Wat., Box 3054.__. ..Jndependence, Va. 

Gardner, Fred E jr. Ind. Arts.. .......122 A._.... Smithheld, N. C. 

Gardner, W. S., Jr Auditor ......327 W. Morgan St Columbia, S. C. 

Garfinkel, Stanley Fr. Tex. Mfg.._. 307 8th Flushing, N. Y. 

Garodnick, I. O Auditor.... 3205 Hillsboro St Newark, N. J. 

Garren, Jones Fr. Ag 229 8th Cedar Mountain, N. C. 

Garnson. Robert H So. Ch. E 914 Vance Street Raleigh, N. C. 

Garris. Miss Margerv" B..__.So. Arch. E 916 W. Cabarrus St.... Raleigh, N. C. 

Gaskins, Eugene L.. Jr. Ind. E 140 jA_. .....Grifton, N. C. 

Gaskms, James D So. Tex. Mfg 212 A-_.. .-.-.. New Bern, N. C. 

Gaskins, Walter W.. Jr. Ch. E 212 A. -New Bern. N. C. 

Gatlin, L. William Fr. E. E .14 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Gattis, C. M., Jr Sr. Cer. E 105 South, Box 3505 Louisburg, N. C. 

Gawkowski, Paul So. For. 8 Femdell Lane ...New York, X. Y. 

Gay, Joe L Fr. Ag ...Y. M. C. A ...Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Geil, John W.. Jr ...Fr. Tex. Mfg 209 8th.. - -Lvnbrook, X. Y. 

Geluso, Xick G Fr. M. E 208 9th Brooklvn, X. Y. 

Gentile, Vincent I Jr. C. E 221 A, Box 5576 Brooklvn, N. Y. 

Gentn,-, Gerry M Fr. M. E ......335 C ..-Madison, N. C. 

Gerber, Ted E Sr. For 1408 Hillsboro St.... Brooklvn, N. Y. 

Getsinger. John G Sr. Ch. E...... ..College Ct. Apt. 4.. .....^.....Plvmouth, X. C. 

Gewehr, Ralph P So. Tex. Mfg.._ ...1720 Hillsboro St ...So. Orange, X. J. 

Gibbons, Wm. E.... Sr. Forestry'...—. 2004 Hillsboro St Bogota, N. J. 

Gibbs, E. Gregg So. Cer. E .....115 Woodburn Road._ Morehead Citv, X^. C. 

Gibbs, H. S., Jr Jr. Cer. E 213 Woodburn Rd Morehead Citv, N. C. 

Gibbs, John C So. F. C. & P. B..__.8 Maiden Lane.__. Pelham, X. C. 

Gibbs, Milo L So. Tex. Mfg 103 Chamberlain St...... ..........Bath, X. C. 

Gibbs, Xorfleet M., Jr Fr. Ch. E .301 9th New Bern, X. C. 

Gibbs. Sullivan G Fr. Ag 301 Park Ave ...Engelhard, N. C. 

Gibbs, Sam W Jr. Poul. Sci Route 4, Raleigh Roanoke, Va. 

Gibert, James W Grad. F. C. & P. B...103 4th. Box 3113... Rodman, S. C. 

Gibson. .\. Edgar, Jr Fr. Ch. E.. 201 lOth... .Greenville, N. C. 

Gibson. R. M Grad. F. C. & P. B..J03 4th, Box 3121...... Gower, Missouri 

Gilbert, G. X.. Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg Fieldhouse Mt. Kxvx, X. C. 

Gilbert, Walter L Fr. E. E 2220 Hillsboro St., Box 5361..._.StatesviUe. X. C. 

Gill, C. Edward Jr. Forestr^- 240 1911, Box 3780 Richmond, Va. 

Gillam, Thomas S Fr. Ag '. 222 8th ....-Windsor, N. C. 

Gillenwater, G. A .....Grad. E. E 2228 Hillsboro St Norton, Va. 

Giller, Harold A Sr. Ch. E..... 320 A. Montclair. X. J. 

Gilliam. Chas. L So. Tex. Mfg 8 Maiden Lane ...Franklinton. X. C. 

Gilmore. J. Frank. Grad. E. E 102 4th. Box 3112_ Oxford, X. C. 

Ginn. Don S Fr. M. E .....319 8th Snow Hill, N. C. 



Student Directory 53 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Glass, George H., Jr. Jr. Tex. Mfg 116 C... Greensboro, N. C. 

Glasse, J. T. Grad. F. C 205 4th, Box 3123 South Africa 

Glazener, Chas. W Sr. Ag. Chem 6 Enterprise St Rosman, N. C. 

Glod, Walter J Sr. E. E 128 South, Box 3528 Castle Hayne, N. C. 

Godwin, Julian W Fr. Arch. E 312 9th Wilmington, N. C. 

Goforth, G. Mark, Jr So. Ag 204 5th, Box 3216 Lenoir, N.C. 

Goforth, George M.. Sr. Ag. Ed ._..17 South, Box 3613 Shelby, N. C. 

Goldberg, Nat H ..Sr. Tex. W. & D 2804 Hillsboro St Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Golding, Larry E Fr. Tex. Mgt 210 8th... - New York, N. Y. 

Goldman, Stanley Jr. C. E. 17 Enterprise St..... Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Goldsmith, Woodrow W Fr. C. E....... 222 C Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Goldston, R. Lamonte Fr. E. E 209 10th Kannapolis, N. C. 

Goodall, Wilson Fr. Ind. E 215 8th... Scranton, Pa. 

Goodson, L. A., Jr _.Fr. Ag... 108 8th.... Danville, Va. 

Goral, Michael.. So. For 8 Ferndell Lane New York, N. Y. 

Gordon, Allen Fr. Tex. Mfg ....213 7th, Box 3345 _ New York, N. Y. 

Gordon, Irving So. For ..328 A, Box 5352 Plainfield, N. J. 

Gorham, Wm. T... Fr. Ag ....206 10th Battleboro, N. C. 

Gorrell, L. Robert.. Jr. M. E... _. 237 1911, Box 3777.... Greensboro, N. C. 

Gould, Tom Fr. C. E .....610 Willard Place Raleigh, N. C. 

Grady, Milton W... So. Arch. E 314 C Kinston, N. C. 

Grady, Robert H. Grad. C. E Fieldhouse.... Kinston, N. C. 

Graham, Hartwell L., Jr Fr. Ch. E.._ 102 9th Goldsboro, N. C. 

Graham, James A So. Ag. Ed 309 5th, Box 3233.. Cleveland, N. C. 

Granger, Robert J So. Tex. C. & D Gymnasium, Box 5338 Charlotte, N. C. 

Gravatt, Chas. U.. Fr. Arch. E.... 104 Logan Court Asheville, N. C. 

Graves, G. Wm Fr. E. E 334 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Graves, Wm. G Fr. Ch. E ...7 8th Mebane, N. C. 

Gray, Emerson G Fr. M. E 320 8th High Point, N. C. 

Gray, Joe H., Jr.... Fr. Ch. E .210 10th Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Gray, James S So. E. E ..108 Wat., Box 3008..... Elkin, N. C. 

Gray, Thomas I So. Gen. Engr ..312 A, Box 5363 Washington, D. C. 

Green, Alfred L Fr. Ag Route 1, Durham Durham, N. C. 

Green, Chas. F., Jr... Jr. Ch. E 211 A, Box 5291 Wilmington, N. C. 

Green, Jesse J Fr. An. Prod 216 A Toecane, N. C. 

Green, Morris Fr. For 312 8th New York, N. Y. 

Green, Walter T., Jr Fr. M. E 312 7th, Box 3378 ...Cooleemee, N. C. 

Green, W. V., Jr.... Fr. M. E Route 1 Raleigh, N. C. 

Greene, Ed. M Sr. Ag. Ed 2609 Clark Avenue Peachland, N. C. 

Greenlee, Wm. G..... Jr. Dairy Mfg ......202 C, Box 5373 Marion, N. C. 

Gregg, P. Porcher, II Sr. C. E 317 A... Florence, S. C. 

Gregory, C. F Sr. Ch. E 102 C Richmond, Va. 

Gregson, Jack W Fr. Ch. E ...102 10th Elizabeth City, N. C. 

GrifHn, Chas. E., Jr ..Fr. Ch. E 102 10th Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Griffin, D. Mack Sr. Ag. E Y. M. C. A., Box 5672 Reidsville, N. C. 

Griffin, E. Cul .......Sr. Ch. E, 313 South, Box 3577 Monroe, N. C. 

Griffin, Rav W So. Ag. Ed 15 South, Box 3611 La Grange, N. C. 

Griffin, T. "Jack Sr. Tex. Mfg 106 5th, Box 3206 Neuse, N. C. 

Griffin, Wm. B Jr. Arch. E ....213 A, Box 5543 Goldsboro, N. C. 

Griffin, Wilbur D So. Ch. E 311 A Wilmington, N. C. 

Griffith, Barry T Jr. For 233 C Richmond, Va. 

Grose, J. Arthur, Jr Fr. Ag 3 8th Forest City, N. C. 

Groseclose, Frank F., Jr Fr. Ind. Arts 1011 W. Peace Street Raleigh, N. C. 

Grosse, Ed. H Fr. Tex. Mfg.... 322 8th Greensboro, N. C. 

Grouten, Webster M Fr. Ag. 330 7th, Box 3396 Farmington. Conn. 

Guba, Frank A., Jr Fr. Ind. E 308 4th, Box 3134 Woodbury, N. J. 

Gunn, Ken M ..Fr. Ch. E 215 8th Greensboro, N. C. 

Gunn, Lawrence J So. Ag 208 South, Box 3540 Reidsville, N. C. 

Gupton, Otha B Fr. Ag. Ed 132 South, Box 3532 Castalia, N. C. 

Gustafson, R. A Jr. E. E 103 Chamberlain St. Cranston, R. I. 

Gutherie, Horace C Jr. Ag. E 317 South, Box 3581.. Swan Quarter, N. C. 

Gwyn, Thos. F Fr. C. E 234 8th Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Gyles, Ronald C. So. E. E 132 Woodburn Rd Raleigh, N. C. 



54 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Haene, Walter H. — So. M. E 3 Gvmnasium, Box 5402 Concord, X. C. 

Hagler, Joseph J So. Ch. E.„ 314 C_ Gastonia, X. C. 

Hairr, \ aden B „..So. Ag. Ed.._ 209 South, Box 3541 Faison, X. C. 

Haislip, Robert A., Jr Fr. Ag. Ed.._ „.217 A. Oak Cit^-, X. C. 

HalK Charhe J.._ Sr. E. E 220^ Cox Avenue Rockingham, X. C. 

Hall, Kenneth W Sr. Geol. E 228 1911, Box 3768 Hiwassee Dam, X. C. 

Hall, W. Joseph Fr. Ag. 218 A._ _ _ Woodsdale, X. C. 

Halsted. Bruce C Jr. E. E 1720 Hillsboro St Arhngton, Va. 

Hambv, Edward P .-.So. C. E 107 6th, Box 3243 „Salisbur%-, X. C. 

Hamilton, Chas. F Jr. E. E _„.32S C, Box 5501 Beaufort, X. C. 

Hamilton, Donald E Sr. Tex. Mfg -....2405 Clark Ave.._ Charlotte, X. C. 

Hamilton. J. B., Jr So. Ag „.255 C._ „ _ Atkinson, X. C. 

Hamme. John V ......Sr. Geol. E..___ Ill 6th, Box 3247._._ ^.Oxford, X. C. 

Hamnett, Wm. L Jr. W. C. & M 332 South, Box 3596._ Ednevville, X. C. 

Hampton. R. Chap So. Ag. Ed.._ 309 Wat., Box 3045.__ Stratford, X. C. 

Hamrick. Robert J Fr. E. E _ „..Power Plant, Box 5241._ .....Raleigh. X. C. 

Handley, William, Jr „..Fr. Ag .....108 10th Goldsboro, X. C. 

Handler, Robert S So. Tex. Mfg 2405 Clark Avenue Llanerch, Pa. 

Handv, Russell P Grad. Ag. Ec 202 Groveland .\ve., Apt. 4.__...Grassv Creek, X. C. 

HanfF, I. H.._ So. Ag .....8 Maiden Lane. Scotland Xeck, X. C. 

Hannon. Matthew J Fr. Occ. Guid 226 7th, Box 3358 Manchester, Mass. 

Hanse, David J So. M. E 102 6th, Box 3238 Babvlon, X. Y. 

Hansen, J. Thos Fr. Entom -_..207 10th MillViUe, X. J. 

Harbison. C. Frank So. Tex. Mfg.- 120 .A._ Morganton, X. C. 

Hardee, Joseph F... So. For _..320 C High Point, X. C. 

Hardee, Ravmond E Fr. Ind. E..... Fieldhouse Clavton, X. C. 

Hardm, E. Larr^', Jr Fr. M. E 333 8th Sairsbur\-, X. C. 

Hardin, Joe D Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 118 South, Box 3518._ Hickory-, X. C. 

Hardison. Grady S Fr. M. E.... 234 7th, Box 3366 .\rapahoe, X. C. 

Hardison, T. V., II Sr. F. C. & P. B 133 C._ Mor%en, X. C. 

Hardy, John C. .....Fr. For 329 8th. ...Xharlotte, X. C. 

Hargrove, Beal D Grad. Soils 2306 Hillsboro St _.Trov. Texas 

Harkey, John M Sr. Tex. W. & D..__.217 Wat., Box 3035. East Spencer, X. C. 

Harley, Ben R Sr. For .....10 Enterprise Street .Chadbourn, X. C. 

Harmon, .-\lbert D So. M. E 225 C._ — Kannapolis, X. C. 

Harper, Derward B So. Poul. Sci Gamer._ — Garner, X. C. 

Harper, H. H... Fr. .\n. Prod... Gamer._ ..■.. Garner, X. C. 

Harper, Walter W\.__ .....Fr. C. E 131 \.. ...Tarboro, X. C. 

Harrelson, Edwin C Fr. Ch. E ._ .....Winnabow, N. C. 

Harrelson. F. Ran Sr. E. E .....1720 Hillsboro St.. Elm City, X. C. 

Harrill, Thornton S Sr. E. E 359 C... - Kings Mountain, X". C. 

Harrington. Walter L., Jr...Fr. Ch. E 204 10th.. Goldsboro, X. C. 

Harris, B. Frank, Jr Sr. Ch. E..... 2220 Hillsboro St ...Henderson, X. C. 

Harris, C. I Sr. Ag. Ed 106 6th, Box 3242 Elizabeth City, X. C. 

Harris, Cader P., Jr Sr. Ch. E 207 Wat., 

Mail: 1922 Hillsboro St...-....Elizabeth Citv. X. C. 

Harris, David W Jr. An. Prod 2402 Hillsboro St Xewell, X. C. 

Harris, George V.._ Jr. Ch. E 2004 Hillsboro St „ Hawthorne, X. J. 

Harris, J. Lonnie Fr. .\g. Ch.._ 11 Fieldhouse Henderson, X. C. 

Harris, Thos. G Jr. For 6 Enterprise St Macon, X. C. 

Harris. Thad M..__ Fr. Ag. Ec 1 8th Henderson, X. C. 

Harris, Wade H So. Land. Arch 224 E. Park Dri%-e Siler City, X. C. 

Harris. Wm. S So. Ag 137 A Fayetteville, X. C. 

Harrison, Wm. E So. For 321 A._ .-. Castile, X. Y. 

Hart, Sam B Fr. Ch. E.._ .....226 7th. Box 3358 ....Monroe, X. C. 

Hartenstein, Wm. G.._ So. Ch. E .....1709 Hillsboro St.... ....Akron, Ohio 

Hartman, Fred J.._ Jr. For..... 2310 Hillsboro St _Merchantville, X. J. 

Haselrine, Arthur B Sr. M. E 314 W'at., Box 3050.__ _Asheville. X. C. 

Hash, Lewis J Fr. ^L E.. ......2 8th Pinev Creek, X. C. 

Hash, Wm. A Sr. Ag. Ed 318 Wat., Box 3054.__ Pinev Creek, X. C. 

Hassell. John L.. .....Jr. Ag. Ed... 1408 Hillsboro St Jamesville, X. C. 

Hasrings, T. Ed Jr. Tex. C. & D 106 Wat., Box 3006. ..Camden. X. C. 

Hatch, Robert R.._ So. M. E .-. 100 X. Bloodworth St. Goldsboro, X. C. 



Student Directory 55 

Natne Classification School Address Home Address 

Hatcher, D. Glenn Fr. Occ. Guid 835 W. Morgan St Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Hathaway, J. Burton. So. Ch. E 138 1911, Box 3738 Sunbury, N. C. 

Hawfield, Wm. D Jr. Ch. E 334 1911, Box 3814 ...Willard, N. C. 

Hawkins, Ernest D .Fr. M. E Power Plant Murphy, N. C. 

Hawks, S. Norman.__ So. Ag..__ 106 Home St.._ Norlina, N. C. 

Hawley, Addison, Jr Fr. Cer. E 103 9th - Goldsboro, N. C. 

Hay, Thos. T Jr. Ind. E..__ -105 Glenwood Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Hayes, A. C Auditor.... 2404 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

Hayes, W. Roy, Jr Fr. Ch. E -.130 7th, Box 3330 NorHna, N. C. 

Haynes, Clarence G Fr. Arch. E 312 6th, Box 3272 Burlington, N. C. 

Haynes, Thos. E Jr. M. E.._ 139 A - Burlington, N. C. 

Hays, Bert S -..Sr. For .213 C. - Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Hays, Wm. E. „ Fr. Ch. E 6 Fieldhouse Plymouth, N. C. 

Hay^vorth, M. Samuel Grad. C. E..__ 101 4th, Box 3111 Asheboro, N. C. 

Healy, W. M., Jr...._ Sr. E. E -338 C, Box 5311..._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Hearn, Melvin H..__ Fr. An. Prod 7 South, Box 5127 Laurinburg, N. C. 

Heath, Floyd, Jr Fr. M. E Crabtree Road Pink Hill, N. C. 

Heath, H. Gordon So. C. E 305 Wat., Box 3041._...._ StatesviUe, N. C. 

Hecht, Wm. J Fr. E. E 130 7th, Box 3330 Norlina, N. C. 

Hedler, R. W Fr. M. E 320 7th, Box 3386 .....Jenkintown, Pa. 

Hedrick, Chas. L.._ Fr. Tex. C. & D ..Cary.„ ...Gary, N. C. 

Hege, E. L Fr. Ch. E 203 A Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Heidelbach, Bert A., Jr .Sr. Land. Arch 101 Wat.. Box 3001..._ .......Danville, Va. 

Heilig, Frank A Fr. M. E Left School Sept. 9 SaUsbury, N. C. 

Helms, Ira H Fr. Ag. Ed 7 8th Monroe, N. C. 

Helsabeck, D. K Fr. Ag.._ 618 Hillsboro St Rural Hall, N. C. 

Hemmings, Jim Dan Jr. Ag. Ed 104 6th, Box 3240 Dobson, N. C. 

Hemsley, Thos. J....__ .....Fr. Tex. Mfg Bellaire, Ohio 

Henderson, David B.._ So. M. E 108 Wat., Box 3008._ Norwood, N. C. 

Hendrix, Robert L _ Fr. Ag...._ .....203 9th Salisbury, N. C. 

Henning, Richard T Jr. Tex. Mfg 124 A Albemarle, N. C. 

Henson, Marshal F Fr. Tex. Mfg 3 Gymnasium, Box 5181 Walstonburg, N. C. 

Hepler, Ernest C, Jr So. Cer. E 1709 Hillsboro St Greensboro, N C. 

Heritage, Thos. P... Fr. C. E 214 C... Burlington, N. C. 

Herndon, Marion E., Jr So. Tex. Mfg 1922 Hillsboro St ...Charlotte, N. C. 

Herold, Benjamin C So. Tex. Mfg 305 C New York, N. Y. 

Herrick, L. W., Jr Grad. Poul. Sci 2804 Hillsboro St Northfield, N. J. 

Herrin, Clarence A., Jr.._ So. M. E 305 5th, Box 3229 Durham, N. C. 

Herring, J. W...._ So. Ag... 305 Kinsey Street Warsaw, N. C. 

Herring, Wm. C....„ Fr. Ag. E 306 South, Box 3570 Wilson, N. C. 

Hester, Thos. S .....Fr. M. E 220 7th, Box 3352 Henderson, N. C. 

Hetherington, Irvine J., Jr...Fr. M. E 120 8th Baltimore, Md. 

Heyward, Wm. B Fr. M. E 1922 Hillsboro St., Box 5627 Charlotte, N. C. 

Hickmon, A. Dewitt .Fr. Ag .....226 8th Bladenboro, N. C. 

Hicks, Albert R., Ill So. Ch. E 308 South, Box 3572 Faison, N. C. 

Hicks, A. T.._.._ Jr. Ag. Ed 102 4th, Box 3112 Oxford, N. C. 

Hicks, Hilman C Fr. Ag..„ .....315 7th, Box 3381 Oxford, N. C. 

High, S. C, Jr Fr. Ind. Arts 1033 W. South St Raleigh, N. C. 

Highfill, W. Earl Jr. E. E 138 1911, Box 3738 Coats, N. C. 

Hilburn, Woodie B., Jr Jr. Tex. Mfg Ill C - Bladenboro, N. C. 

Hildebrand, Bruce A..__ Jr. Ch. E 21 South, Box 3617 StatesviUe, N. C. 

Hilditch, Wm. J...._ Fr. Ch. E 216 7th, Box 3348. Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Hill, Bob F.._ Fr. Ch. E 126 7th, Box 3326 Murfreesboro, N. C. 

Hill, D. Harvey So. Tex. Mgt 1922 Hillsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

Hill, P. G., Jr „ Sr. Tex. Mgt 113 A, Box 5402 _.._ Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Hill, Vernon W So. Ag. Ed 212 5th, Box 3224 Youngsville, N. C. 

Hill, Willard B Jr. Ag. Ed 307 Wat., Box 3043._ Winterville, N. C. 

Hilles, Dell L Fr. M. E 209 7th, Box 3341 Upper Darby, Pa. 

Hilton, John W Jr. For .....1610 Ambleside Drive .Raleigh, N. C. 

Himmler, Garrett G Jr. M. E.._ 2804 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

Hines, C. Clement So. Ch. E College Court Apt. 4.__ Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Hines, Ed. E .....Fr. M. E 113 8th Warsaw, N. C. 

Hines, Robert S So. Tex. Mfg 1922 Hillsboro St Greensboro, N. C. 



56 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Hinshaw, Harold W Fr. For .220 South, Box 3552._ Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Hinson, C. Grover So. Ag. Ed.._ ..20b bth. Box .^254 Oakboro, N. C. 

Hinsen. Herbert G Jr. C. E 747 Hillsboro St „ Raleigh. N. C. 

Hinson, P. D Fr. IM. E ......320 8th Lincolnton, N. C. 

Hinson, Robert B... Jr. E. E 210 5th, Box 3222 Monroe, N. C. 

Hinson, \Vm. C, Jr Fr. E. E 302 9th Walstonburg, N. C. 

Hinton, A. A Jr. Ch. E 214 A. Greensboro, N. C. 

Hinton, H. R., Jr So. Ag 327 1911, Box 3807 _.....Sharpsburg, N. C. 

Hobbs, Allen M — So. M. E ...2407 Clark Avenue. Charlotte, N. C. 

Hobbs, Isaac A... So. Ch. E 318 South, Box 3.582 Wilmington, N. C. 

Hobbs, James E So. For 327 1911, Box 3807 Edenton, N. C. 

Hoch, Paul F...-^ Jr. kg. Engr ....102 South, Box 3502 Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Hodge, lra._ Fr. Gen. Engr .....117 8th Roanoke Rapids, N. C- 

Hodgen, Wm. R Grad. Soils.. 207 4th. Box 3125 Clearfield, Pa. 

Hodges, Bruce p., Jr So. Cer. E .....8 Maiden Lane Greensboro, N. C. 

Hodges, Harry G., Jr .....So. Ch. E.._ 8 Maiden Lane Wadesboro, N. C. 

Hodges, Jav M., Jr.._ Fr. Ag 133 8th. .._ ....Washington, N. C. 

Hodnett, bam A So. Ch. E ....2224 Hillsboro St.. Durham, N. C. 

Hottman, Ross B..__ ...Sr. Ch. E 310 Wat., Box 3046. Asheville, N. C. 

Hotiman, W m. F..__ So. Ch. E.._ 223 A._..- Lincolnton, N. C. 

Hofmann, Julian G So. For 2800 FairNaew Road.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Hogue, Robert F.._ Fr. M. E..... 110 Wat., Box 3010 Atkinson, N. C. 

Holadia, W . Garlon Jr. Tex. W'. & D.._...230b Hillsboro St Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Holbrooks. John C Jr. C. E 2513 Clark Ave ..Albemarle, N. C. 

Holcombe, lames H .....Jr. C. E .225 A._ FavetteviUe, N. C. 

Holdcn, John H., Jr Jr. Arch. E 207 A._ ...Supplv, N. C. 

Holding. Lawrence F Fr. Gen. Engr 211 W. Park Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Holland, Chas. M Fr. For 202 Linden Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Holland, H. Harvev.__ Fr. Ag .....208 7th, Box 3340 Charles, N. C. 

Holland, M. Brady Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 116 7th, Box 3316. Conover, N. C. 

HoUiday, 1-rank R., Jr Fr. AL E 3 9th .._... Greensboro, N. C. 

Hollingsworth, S. Lowell Fr. Ag ...Withdrew Sept. 20 Mt. Olive. N. C. 

HoUis, Kemp A Fr. M. E 321 Sth. Hebron, Maine 

Holloman, borden L. Fr. Ag ...-5 Sth Goldsboro, N. C. 

Holloman. R. Pevton-__ Fr. M. E .201 Sth Washington, N. C. 

Hollowav, Carey H., Jr Fr. Arch. E ...2126 Countr\- Club Drive Raleigh. N. C. 

Hollowell, E. Graham ...Jr. Ch. E .^01 South. Box 3565-_ Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Holmes. G. Thos., Jr Sr. Ch. E ..-202 4th, Box 3120 Snow Hill, N. C. 

Holshouser, ]. R., Jr So. E. E _ 337 1911. Box 3817... Greensboro. N. C. 

Holshouser, \ic A So. Tex. Mfg.._ 10b ?th. Box 3206. Rockwell. N. C. 

Holt, Richard D So. M. E 130 1911, Box 3730.... Goldsboro, N. C. 

Honbarrier, Allen N So. Ag. Ed 206 5th, Box 3218 .....Salishun>\ N. C. 

Hondros, Harry A..__ ..Fr. Ag. Ec .134 8th..... .- Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Honeycutt, Earl M..... Jr. Ch. E 120 Forest Road Burns\-ille, N. C. 

Honeycutt, J. Newman Fr. Ag 324 A— — - Varina, N. C. 

Honcyman, Edward R., Jr...Fr. Ch. E..... -...218 7th, Box 3550 Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Hood, B. Robin ....Sr. Ch. E 8 Maiden Lane Kinston, N. C. 

Hood, John R., Jr... .......Jr. Ch. E ......117 Forest Road LiUincton, N. C. 

Hoover, Richard E Fr. E. E..... 331 7th, Box 3397 Phoenix, N. Y. 

Hope, 1-rank F Fr. C. E... 307 A. Washington, N. C. 

Horner, Colhns So. Ch. E..- —.333 1911, Box 3813. Merchantville, N. J. 

Horowitz, Bernard.. Fr. Tex. Mfg 209 Sth Mount Vernon. N. Y. 

Horowitz. Wilbur Fr. Tex. Mfg 209 C New York. N. Y. 

Horton. juUan S... So. Tex. Mgt 1708 F'ark Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Hosea. John R Fr. Ch. E.._ 14 South, Box 3610 PikeviUe. N. C. 

Houck. lames H... Fr. Ag 217 8th.. Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Houghton, J. Edward ..Tr. Ch. E 125 C New Bedford, Mass. 

House, Richard D., Jr So. Ag..__ 1301 Hillsboro St Scotland Neck. N. C. 

Howard. R. Olin Fr. M. E ICb 7th. Box 3.^06 Galveston. Texas 

Howard, T. Herman So. C. E 24 South, Box 3620 ..- Cornehus, N. C. 

Howe, George M.._ So. For 304 A. Elizabeth, N. J. 

Howell, G. \inson, Jr Fr. For 21 Sth Waynef%ille, N. C. 

Howell, Lewis W... .....Fr. Land. .A^rch... 201 10th South Loston. \"a. 



Student Directory 57 

Xame Classification School Address Homf Address 

Howell. O. T., Jr Sr. F. C. & P. B Y. M. C. A., Box 5276_ _ Goldsboro, N. C. 

Hovle, M. H., Jr Sr. E. E 108 South. Box 5252._ „ Cooleemee. N. C. 

Ho'vle. Wm. F Sr. Ag. Ed..._ 239 C._ _ _ Zebuion, X. C. 

Hoyle, Wm. H So. Ag.. 101 6th, Box 3237„ „ Henderson, X. C. 

Huberman, Herman B Jr. Ch. E 205 South, Box 3537._ Long Branch, X. J. 

Huckabee, John D _.So. Ind. E 324 C._ _ _ Charlotte. X. C. 

Hudson. Richard A., Jr Fr. Ag. 205 10th Waxhaw. X. C. 

Huff, Alfred W So. An. Prod 131 South, Box 353 1._ _ Mars HiU, X. C. 

Huff, R. E Jr. For 131 South, Box 3531._ Mars Hill, X. C. 

Huffaker, C. B Grad. Entom Garner._ Monticello. Kv. 

Huggins. Robert H ...Fr. Ag 1709 Hillsboro St... ...Clarkton. XJ. C. 

Huggins. Wm. S Sr. Ag. E i":i^ C.__ _ Clarkton. X. C. 

Hughes, Donald C Jr. E. E 2008 Hillsboro St Hamlet. X. C. 

Hughes. Thos. M So. Ch. E.._... Ill South, Box 3511._ Wilson. X. C. 

Humphrey, Robert P Fr. Ag. Ed.-_ 306 8th Beaufort. X. C. 

Humphreys. Harold W Fr. .Arch. E 305 9th _ Roanoke Rapids, X'. C. 

Hunnicutt. Fab I.. Tr.._ Fr. For 316 8th Durham, X. C. 

Hunnicutt, Rich"ard"L Jr. M. E 104 5th, Box 3204 Monroe, X. C. 

Hunnings, Leon D., Jr So. .\g. E ...2316 Hillsboro St Xewport. X. C. 

Hunt, Toe L., Tr. Fr. Ag. 11 8th Mt. Hollv. X. C. 

Hunt, W. T.. jr Sr. E. E._ 125 South, Box 3525._... Apex. X. C. 

Hunter. Chas. .A^ Sr. .An. Prod ...125 7th. Box 3325 Charlotte. X'. C. 

Hunter, Frederick C So. E. E 525 X". East St Raleish, X. C. 

Hunter. Tames B., Tr Fr. Ch. E ._ 210 9th Charlotte, X. C. 

Hunter. Joseph E., Jr Jr. C. E 139 .A_ Charlotte. X. C. 

Huntlev, James R Jr. M. E 2514 Clark Ave _....Monroe, X. C. 

Hurdle; Joseph H Fr. M. E .202 9th. Mebane, X. C. 

Hurst, H. Carter, Jr So. \g 304 South, Box 3568._ Franklin, X'. C. 

Hurst, Tames R Fr. Ch. E.._ 1 9th-.. Marines, X. C. 

Hurst, J. R.._ ....Grad. F. C. & P. B...105 4th. Box 3115 _. _....Franklin. X. C. 

Hurt, A. Burman, Jr Jr. Ch. E 126 1911. Box 3726 Xathans Creek, X. C. 

Hussey, John W Fr. For 305 7th, Box 3371.. .....Indianapolis. Ind. 

Hutchins. Tom H So. .Arch. E .....130 South, Box 3530 Raleigh. X". C. 

Hurton. Frank R.. Jr.... Fr. Arch. E 131 8th .....Greensboro, X". C. 

Hyman, Edward P., Jr Fr. M. E .301 7th, Box 3367 Roanoke Rapids, X. C. 

Hysinger, C. W Fr. E. E 7 9th .....Spencer, X'. C. 

Iddings, Rav L Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 325 8th SaUsburA-, X. C. 

Idol, V. H.,'jr - So. E. E 110 South, Box 3510._.... Madison. X. C. 

Illo, Frank L., Jr.._.. Fr. M. E...„ 229 7th. Box 3361 .\tlantic Highlands, 

X. J. 

Ingle, R. Samuel So. Geol. E. 305 Wat.. Box 3041 .....Statesville. X\ C. 

Ingram, Lawson J.._ So. Ch. E... 1922 Hillsboro St.... High Point, X. C. 

Ingram, Sidney O.. Jr Sr. For 125 A, Box 5201 .\rden, X". C. 

Ingrisano. Pasquale P So. C. E .....221 A, Box 5576 _ Brooklvn. X'. Y. 

Irbv, P B..__ Sr. Ind. E .1913 McCarthy St Raleish. X. C. 

Ireland, C. F Jr. Ag. Ch 217 C._ Franklinton. X. C. 

Isenhour, Charles W., Tr Sr. Cer. E ...335 1911, Box 3815 Salishur%-, X. C. 

Isenhour, G. M., Jr..__". Fr. Cer. E .325 1911. Box 3805 Xew London, X. C. 

Ives, W. Carlton So. Ch. E.._ 311 5th, Box 3235 Ehzabeth Citv. X. C. 

Ivey, W. R.. Jr Fr. Tex. C. & D 302 8th „.„ „ „ Chariotte, X.'C. 

Ivie, B. Elliott, Jr.._ Fr. Gen. Engr 124 7th, Box 3324 Leaksville, X. C. 

Izmirian, Edward. Sr. Ch. E 340 .\-_ _. Xew Bedford, Mass. 

Jackson. Burwell B Tr. E. E 10 Enterprise St _...Detroit, Mich. 

Jackson, Cecil ^L.__ .....jr. Ag 216 South, Box 3548._ Dunn, X. C. 

Jackson, R. Bruce So. Tex. Mfg 127 C._ Fayetteville, X'. C. 

Jackson. Robert S Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 112 7th, Box 3312 Cornwall, Ontario 

Jackson, Thos. F., Jr Jr. E. E 307 4th, Box 3133 Washington, X. C. 

Tames, .Alex L.. .....So. Tex. Mgt 224 C._ Washington. D. C. 

James, Clifford L. Sr. F. C. Sc P. B 301 Wat., Box 3037 .......Oakboro. X^ C. 

James. H. Brooks Grad. Ag. Ec 1718 Park Drive _ Oakboro. X". C. 

Jard. Lloyd M., Jr Fr. Ag 2208 Fair\-iew Road _...Raleigh, X. C. 



58 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Jarvis, Ray N So. Ch. E 123 A Mars Hill, N. C. 

Jayne, Weston O Fr. M. E .324 7th, Box 3390 Elmira, N. Y. 

lefferson, Jim L.._ Fr. Flori 311 9th Fountain, N. C. 

Jenkins, Frank A..__ Jr. E. E 304 6th, Box 3264 Charlotte, N. C. 

Jennette, Chris. R.._ Sr. Tex. Mfg 226 A...„ _ New Bern, N. C. 

Jennings, Hubert E..__ Sr. C. E 401 S. McDowell St Raleigh, N. C. 

Jewell, Kelly W., Jr Fr. E. E _ 101 5th, Box 3201 Wilmington, N. C. 

Jilcott, C. Poe._ Fr. Ag. Ed Fieldhouse Roxobel, N. C. 

Jobe, Allen P Fr. Ag. Ed..„ 124 8th Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Jobe, H. R Fr. Ch. E 225 7th, Box 3357 BurUngton, N. C. 

Johns, Ben R., Jr Fr. Arch. E 426 N. Person St Raleigh, N. C. 

Johnson, Albert E.._ So. For 301 6th, Box 3261 Cementon, N. Y. 

Johnson, A. M., Jr .So. E. E 309 South, Box 3573 Clayton, N. C. 

Johnson, B. Lee Jr. Ag. Ed 303 5th, Box 3227 Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Johnson, Clarence B., Jr So. E. E - 310 South, Box 3574 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Johnson, Ed. H Sr. C. E - 202 A. - Angier, N. C. 

Johnson, Edwm R..__ Jr. M. E - 115 Wat., Box 5203 _ Paw Creek, N. C. 

Johnson, Hubert M So. Tex. Mgt 133 A --- Statesville, N. C. 

Johnson, J. Chris Fr. Ag..__ —-330 A.. Clayton, N. C. 

Johnson, John E Jr. Ag. Ed 2211 Hope Street.^ Wallace, N. C. 

Johnson, J. G Fr. M. E 205 9th Paw Creek, N. C. 

Johnson, J. Willis Jr. Ag. Ed 19 South, Box 3615 Erwin, N. C. 

Johnson, LeGrand K Jr. C. E 103 Wat., Box 30O3..._ .....Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Johnson, Norwood A Fr. An. Prod 302 Wat., Box 3226._ Smithfield, N. C. 

Johnson, N. I- Sr. F. C. & P. B Crossnore, N. C. 

Johnson, Robert E., Jr..- Fr. Gen. Engr 116 8th Asheboro, N. C. 

Johnson, R. S..__ Grad. PI. Path Route 4 .....Raleigh, N. C. 

Johnson, Thos. A., Jr Jr. Tex. Mfg 8 Maiden Lane.__.. Liberty, N. C. 

Johnson, Ted C Jr. M. E.._ 103 Wat., Box 3003... Paw Creek, N. C. 

Johnson, WiUard B., Jr Jr. Tex. C. & D 240 C Selma, N. C. 

Johnson, Wm. S. So. M. E 227 C .-Charlotte, N. C. 

Joiner, J. N Fr. Ag 216 8th Winter Garden, Fla. 

Jolly, Arthur L., Jr Jr. For 2004 Hillsboro St Holland, Va. 

Jones, C. Ben So. Tex. Mfg ...1806 Hillsboro St..... Apex, N. C._ 

Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 
Jones 



Doug R Fr. Ch. E 320 South, Box 3584.... Farmville, N. C. 

Ed. J Fr. Cer. E ...206 8th Fairmont, N. C. 

Edgar I., Tr Fr. Ch. E 209 9th Charlotte, N. C. 

Frank A., Jr Fr. Ind. E 106 Glenwood Ave....... Raleigh, N. C. 

George N., Jr.._ Fr. M. E 207 Glascock St Raleigh, N. C. 

George P., Jr Grad. Geol. E 2232 Hillsboro St Esmont, Va. 

G. Woodrow Fr. Ag. E 113 A, Box 5523...... Roxboro, N. C. 

Hubert W Fr. E. E ....Fieldhouse._ Marlow, Okla. 

J D Jr. Ag 205 5th, Box 3217 Brevard, N. C. 

James F. _ So. Ch. E 326 South, Box 3590........ Durham, N. C. 

James R., Jr..__ So. Ch. E.._ .320 South, Box 3584... Farmville, N. C. 

John S., Jr Jr. E. E 112 South, Box 3512 New Bern, N. C. 

James W Fr. M. E YanceyviUe, N. C. 

Mel G So. Tex. Mfg 5 9th Toronto, Canada 

M L , Jr Fr. Ag. Ed 106 10th Zirconia, N. C. 

Rohe C Fr. M. E..... 207 Glascock St Raleigh, N. C. 

R L , Jr Sr. Ag. Ed 2202 Hillsboro St Greensboro, N. C. 

Thos. C, Jr Sr. W. C. & Mgt...._.8 South, Box 3604._ AsheviUe, N. C. 

W H Fr. M. E 707 Glenwood Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Wm. R., jr Fr. E. E 122 8th Fremont, N. C. 

Jordan A C Fr. Ch. E 127 7th, Box 3327 Rochester, N. Y. 

Jordan, George H Jr. Ag. Ed 212 Wat., Box 3030 Gary, N. C. 

Jordan, Hugh F.._ Fr. M. E College Ct. Apt. 4 Dardens, N. C. 

Jordan, Henry H..... Fr. M. E 4 Cooper Apt Siler City, N. C. 

Jordan, Wm. E., Jr. __ So. M. E 321 South, Box 3585 Charlotte, N. C. 

Jordan, W. Mills, Jr Fr. For 2230 Hillsboro St Winton, N. C. 

Joslin, J. Devereux..._ Jr. Arch. E.._... 207 W. Park Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Joyner, Alvin L Fr. E. E 109 8th Nashville, N. C. 

Joyner, J. Archie Fr. E. E 311 8th Sharpsburg, N. C. 



Student Directory 59 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Joyner, Roscoe L Fr. Ag 311 6th, Box 3271 Spring Hope, N. C. 

Julian, Howard D..„ Fr. Ag.. 334 7th, Box 3400 Salisbury, N. C. 

Justus, Wm. H Fr. For 14 8th Hendersonville, N. C. 

Kaley, P. Dudley Jr. Tex. Mfg 2407 Clark Ave..__ Scranton, Pa. 

Kane, George W., Jr Fr. C. E ...118 A._ Roxboro, N. C. 

Karesh, Robert L So. Ch. E .228 A .■Vsheboro, N. C. 

Karlman, Max M Sr. For 105 C Newark, N. J. 

Kattermann, A. W., Jr So. Tex. Mfg... 315 C, Box 5562.__.. Paterson, N. J. 

Katz, Hyman S So. For 2304 Clark Ave.._... Middletown, N. Y. 

Katz, J. Leonard Grad. Ch. E..__ .2304 Clark Ave... Morganton, N. C. 

Katz, Morton B..__ Fr. Ch. E 208 9th Morganton, N. C. 

Kaufman, Samuel.__ Sr. An. Prod 101 C Miami Beach, Fla. 

Kearney, Wm. W., Jr.._ So. Ch. E 322 A._ Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Kearns, C. E., Jr Fr. An. Prod 304 5th, Box 3228 Asheboro, N. C. 

Kearns, E. Dale Sr. Tex. W. & D.......231 A. Greensboro, N. C. 

Kearns, Wm. C So. Ag 121 South, Box 3521 Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Keener, Wm. H So. Ch. E 103 Chamberlain St Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Keith, J. Milton Fr. Ag Withdrew Sept. 15 Neuse, N. C. 

Keith, Wm. B Fr. Ag..„ Withdrew Sept. 14 Neuse, N. C. 

Keller, Walter M..__ So. For 2513 Clark .....Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kelly, A. Y., Jr... Fr. Gen. Engr 311 HiUcrest Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Kelly, Chas. L., Jr Fr. For 222 7th, Box 3354. Littleton, N. C. 

Kelly, J. Clyde, Jr... So. Ch. E 208 5th, Box 3220 ....Greensboro, N. C. 

Kelly, Richard B.._ Sr. Tex. C. & D 308 South, Box 3572 .....Rockingham, N. C. 

Kelly, Raymond S..-__ Fr. E. E 114 7th, Box 3314 Laurel Hill, N. C. 

Kemper, E. Hudson...... So. M. E 115 C, 

Mail: 103 Chamberlain St...Shelby, N. C. 

Kendall, Chas. A.._ So. Arch. E 238 1911, Box 3778 Greensboro, N. C. 

Kendall, R. Herndon... So. Ag. Ed .222 Park Ave Norwood. N. C. 

Kennedy, Frank R., Jr Sr. M. E..._ Power Plant, Box 5241 Waynesville, N. C. 

Kennedy, John H Jr. M. E ..Power Plant, Box 5241.... ...Waynesville, N. C. 

Kennedy, Wm. H So. Cer. E 3306 HiUsboro Rd .....Raleigh, N. C. 

Kenyon, B. W., Jr..„ Jr. Ag. Ec..__ Raleigh Apt. U-2 Raleigh, N. C. 

Kermon, Robert M., Jr So. M. E 201 HiUsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

Kester, Robert M Fr. For 305 South, Box 3569 Spruce Pine, N. C. 

Ketchie, G. Moyer, Jr Fr. C. E 232 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Ketchum, H. B., Jr So. Ch. E 123 South, Box 3523 Mt. Holly ,N. C. 

Kiger, Hugh C So. Ag. Ed 223 South, Box 3555._ PfafFtown, N. C. 

Kilgo, G. Douglas Jr. Ch. E 104 C AsheviUe, N. C. 

Killian, Frank A..... So. Ag. Ed 6 Enterprise St Lincolnton, N. C. 

Kimball, Claude N., Jr So. Cer. E 308 6th, Box 3268 Enfield, N. C. 

King, Chas. S..___ Fr. Ch. E 210 9th Charlotte, N. C. 

King, E. Vic Jr. M. E... 217 South, Box 3549 ...Burlington, N. C. 

King, J. Clarence.... Jr. Ag Brooks Ave., Box 5441 Laurinburg, N. C. 

King, R. M., Jr Grad. For 2202 HiUsboro St Concord, N. C. 

King, Thos. H Fr. E. E Withdrew Sept. 20 Hiwassee Dam, N. C. 

King, Vernon A.._ Fr. E. E 13 IK S. Boylan Ave Toptan, N. C. 

Kingsolver, J. Kyle So. Ch. E ...125 1911, Box 3725 Hickory, N. C. 

Kinney, Russell...__ Fr. E. E 232 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Kirkland, C. W., Jr..___ Sr. E. E 310 8th Bellaire, Ohio 

Kirkman, C. H., Jr Jr. Ag 121 South, Box 3521 Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Kiser, D. Webb.__ Sr. Ag. Ed 17 South, Box 3613 Bessemer City, N. C. 

Kiser, Ray A Fr. Ag. Ed 220 8th Kings Mountain, N. C. 

Kitchin, James L. __ . . ..Fr. For 211 Hawthorne Rd.._ Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Kizer, G. Herman.___ Jr. Ind. E..__ 202 A Granite Falls, N. C. 

Kluttz, Henr\' A Fr. M. E 2623 Leesville Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Kluttz, Moses L Fr. Ag. Ed 206 5th, Box 3218 Salisbury, N. C. 

Knight, Wm. R., Jr So. M. E 319 A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Knott, L. Hubert Sr. E. E.... 109 10th Oxford, N. C. 

Knowles, Melvin D.. Fr. Ag 130 Woodburn Road._ Enfield, N. C. 

Knowlton, Negus W.._ Jr. M. E..__ 1922 HiUsboro St.... Charlotte, N. C. 

Knox. Earl L So. Ag. Ed.._ 4 Maiden Lane._ Kelford, N. C. 



60 



North Carolina State College 



Same 
KodHa, Ernest, Jr.. 



Classificaiion 



School Address 



Home Address 



_Sr. Yam Mfg._ 

Kobnk, Theodore M, Sr. Ch. E 

KoHman, Harvey F Fr. For 

Koonoe, F. Jo., Jr Jr. Ag. Ed 

i>eiby D _„_„Fr. Ag. Ed. 



— 21 Enterprise Street Rockford, Tenn. 

6 South, Box 3602 Pittsburg, Pa. 

201 5th, Box 3213 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

137 1911, Box 3737 Trenton, N. C. 



Kovaoevich, Paul D 

Kruno^, Frank K., Jr 

KrajB-Ety Miss Margaret- 

Kreimer, Borah L 

Krider, John B., Jr 

Kiodunal, Arnold 

Koglo^ Frank S. 

Knlms, Clias. D. 

Kulcrrcki, J. S., Jr 

Kurtz, J. \\ m 



KutecluDski, C. D 

LaBeDe, A. O 

Lacey, S. B., Jr.. 
Lackey, R. 
Lahser, Coorad B. 
Lainoi^ Robert I — 
Lamb, Robert V._ 
Lambe, Hauris R_ 
Lambe, T. \^'m — 
Lambert, Hal L. 



-Fr. C. E 

-Jr. M. E 

-Grad. Ag. Chem. 

-Jr. Ind. Arts 

-Fr. Ch. E 

-Jr. Pomolog}'. 

-Sr. Ind. E 

-Jr. For 

-Fr. For 

-Fr. M. E 

-Sr. Ind. Arts_ 

-Fr. For 



-110 8th 

.Jll 5th, Box 3235 

-.215 A 

-Meredith College 

_2304 Clark Ave 

-106 8th 



201 C_. 



.705 W. Morgan 

-1408 Hillsboro St. 

-207 9th 

-2514 Clark Ave 

.1500 Hillsboro St. 



Mt. Ohve, N. C. 

Belmont, N. C. 

EHzabeth Citj-, N. 

Ehzabeth Cit}^ N. 

-..-..Bronx, N. Y. 

Salisbury-, N. C. 

New York, N. Y. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Kutztown, Pa. 

Sag Harbor, N. Y. 

Rochester, X. Y. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



-Jr. Ag. Ed. 

-Grad. Dairy 

-Fr- M. E 

-Jr. C. E 

-Sr. E. E 



—214 7th, Box 3346 Northfield, Mass. 

_3 South, Box 5599 Newland, N. C. 

-...108 4th, Box 5127 Lenoir, X. C. 

1720 Hillsboro St Greensboro, X. C. 

.-2402 Hillsboro St BrookhTi, N. Y. 

-.6 Femdell Lane, Box 5393. 



Lambertson, Wingate A— 

Lamm, J. Elbert 

LaMoite, WiUaid J. 



Lamport, Morton H 

Lanoster, Grover C, Jr.. 

Lancaster, W. R . 

Land, Hunter L. : . 

Landon, Robert H. 

Lane, Roy H . 

Lane, W. Austin 



-So. Tex. Mgt._ 

-Fr. Ag. Ec 

-Fr. E. E 

-Sr. Ind. E 



...Ehzabeth City, N. C. 

^\sheboro, X. C. 

-Raleigh, X. C. 

.„Raleigh, X. C. 

—Rich Square, X. C. 

212 5th, Box 3224 Louisburg, X. C. 

2513 Clark Ave Yonkers, X. Y. 

235 A, Box 5313 Xew York, X. Y. 



-Fr. Arch. E 214 South, Box 3546 

-So. C. E 413 Calvin Rd 

-Fr. M. E 101 7th, Box 3301 

-Jr. Cer. E 1618 Hillsboro St 

-So. Ag. Ed 

-So. C. E 



.105 6th, Box 3241. 
.103 8th 



-2008 Hillsboro St..._. 

-2306 Hillsboro St. 

.303 6th, Box 3263 



Lane, Zeb B., Jr 

Langdoo* J- Eloyd 

Lan^ky, G. E 

LanJ^Kd, M. P. 

laiUn, Richard C 

Lassit^, A. T., Jr 

T-arham, Chas. F. 

Toriiam, H. Vann. Jr.. 

Laurie, Andrew 

Lavin, J<^ N.. 



Lawing, Algie W., Jr._ 
Lawienoe, L. Roper_ 



-Jr. For 

-Jr. \g 

-Fr. Tex. C. & D. 325 8th. 

-Sr. Tex. Mgt. 18 Home St 

-Jr. F. C. & P. B..-- .116 South, Box 3516.. 

_Fr. Gen. Engr 213 8th 

-Jr. E. E 

-Grad. Ag. Ec 

-Fr. An. Prod.... 
-Fr. Ag. Ec 
-So. M. E._ 
-Fr. M. E._ 
-So. Ch. E.- 



-328 C, Box 5301 _. 

-Cameron Park .'\pt. 15 

.301 5th, Box 3225 



212 7th, Box 3344 

237 C 

202 10th 



Jr. Ag. 
-Fr. C. E.. 



Lawrence, M. Wats<ML____Fr. Ag. Ed._ 

Laws, John S Jr. M. E 

Laws, Lester .Jr. \g. Ed- 
Lea, Pete S. Jr. Ind. Arts 

Leach, XormaB E __Fr. E. E 

Leagans, Josepjj E So. Ag. Ed 



Leak, Robert C. 

Leak, Robert P 

Leake, Thos. C, HL 
Lebowitz, Murray H- 
Ledbetter, T. Bensoo- 
Lee, C. E., Jr. 
L«e, J. Lawrmoe 

Lee, John W 

Lee, N. K., Jr.__ 



-So. Tex. Mfg 

-So. E. E 

-Sr. Tex. Mgt 

-Fr. For 

.So. M. E 

-Fr. Ag. Ed 

-So. Tex. C. & D._- 

-Fr. M. E 

-So. M. E 



Vanceboro, X. C. 

Castalia, X. C. 

Hamlet, X. C. 

Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Henderson, X. C. 

Greensboro, X. C. 

Wilson, X. C. 

Selma, X. C. 

Xorfolk, Va. 

Thomasville, X. C. 

Wheeling, 111. 

Clayton, X. C. 

Belhaven, X. C. 

Belhaven, X. C. 

Ransom^^lle, X. C. 

-Bradley Beach, X. J. 

Charlotte, X. C. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Gates, X. C. 

Henderson, N. C. 

Kinston, X. C. 

_„Elkin, X. C. 

-.Haw River, X. C. 

Cana, X. C. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Rockingham, X. C. 

Rockingham, X. C. 

.-_Brookl\-n, X. Y. 

.106 South, Box 3506 Rockingham, X. C. 

-304 9th Xewton Grove, X. C. 

-308 6th, Box 3268 Greensboro, X. C. 

-Box 5523, St. C. S Car^-, X. C. 

.130 1911, Box 3730 Hampton, Va. 



219 C, Box 5363. 

212 C 

102 8th 

_. 103 10th 



-113 South, Box 3513.. 
.225 South, Box 3557- 
-118 Wat., Box 3018- 
-318 8th 



-J09 5th, Box 3233 

-.220914 Hope Sa^t_H 

_334 19ll, Box 3814 

_328A- 



Student Directory 61 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Lee, R. Howard _. . Fr. C. E 219 S. West St Raleigh, N. C. 

Lee, Ralph K.._ Sr. For llWy-z Hope Street Lugotf", S. C. 

Lee, W. D..__ Grad. Soils Route 6 _ Raleigh, X. C. 

Leeper, Br\-an, H So. E. E. _ 304 .\._ „_ _ ^ _Dallas, X. C. 

Leer, Kenneth A Jr. Tex. Mfg 20O4 Hillsboro St _ CUffside Park, X. J. 

Lefler, Harold B... Jr. Arch. E 255 1911, Box 3775 .Albemarle, X. C. 

Lefler, Walter X Sr. Tex. Mfg 217 Wat., Box 3035 ..^Albemarle, X. C. 

Legate, Rav C Fr. M. E 103 7th, Box 3303 ..„ Black Mountain, X. C. 

LeGrand. V\ m. F So. Tex. Mfg 305 4th, Box 313L._ __ ....Shelby, X. C. 

LeGwin, John H...„ Jr. An. Prod... 114 .A _- Wilmington, X. C. 

Lehman, Paul H., Jr .Jr. Ch. E..... 2407 Clark Ave — Winston-Salem, X. C. 

Lehman, R. C. Prof. C. E... .....Xot in residence _Rural Hall, X. C. 

Leloudis, Wm. E So. E. E 1301 Hillsboro St „Rockv Mount, X. C. 

Le.May, Alton T..... Fr. Ag. E...„ 107 10th Henderson, X. C. 

Lemmond, J. Warren Fr. M. E 8 Fieldhouse Monroe, X. C. 

Lentz, Wm. W., Jr So. \g 214 South, Box 3546._ ._High Point, X. C. 

Leonard, Wm. L., Jr So. M. E 412 X. East St Raleigh, X^C. 

LeVasseur, Jo. P Fr. C. E 205 7th, Box 3337 Hartford, Conn. 

Leveen, Irwin A Fr. Tex. Mgt 109 7th, Box 3309 „Xew York City 

Levin, Robert E „ Fr. M. E... 109 7th, Box 3309 ._Woodmere, X. Y. 

Levine, Jesse. „ So. For .....211 6th, Box 3259.._ _New York, X. Y. 

Lewis, Bruce E Jr. M. E..-_ ..-.411 Kmsey St...„ „ „Raleigh, X. C. 

Lewis, B. Franklin Fr. E. E 311 9th Fountain, X. C. 

Lewis, George D Jr. ^L E. 2513 Clark .\ve. _ _Rockv Mount, X. C. 

Lewis, Lmwood D..__ Fr. E. E.„ _ 134 7th. Box 5402 _ ^Macclesfield, X. C. 

Lewis, Max G So. .\g. Ed.._ 131 1911, Box 3731 Fairmont, X. C. 

Lewis, Robert A So. Ch. E 201 South, Box 3533._ Raleigh, X. C. 

Lewis, R. B Fr. M. E _ 105 10th West End, X. C. 

Lewis, Wm. D So. Ag. Ed.._ 131 1911, Box 3731. Fairmont, X. C. 

Lewis, Wm. M Fr. W. C. & M 326 7th, Box 3392.. Faison, X. C. 

Leysath, Elwin F So. For 32S South, Box 3592._ Springfield, \ t. 

Light, CaK-in I Fr. M. E 315 9th _ Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Light, Earl T So. M. E 125 1911, Box 3725 _ Haddonfield, X. J. 

Liles, .A.mon E So. Ag. Ed.._ 310 5th, Box 3234 Littleton. X. C. 

Lim, Luis H Sr. Ch. E _ 1814 Park Drive..... .Manilla, P. I. 

Lineback, Webster E.. Fr. C. E —24 Sth _ Winston-Salem, X*. C. 

Lingle, Arnold W Fr. Ag -334 7th, Box 3400 __ Salisbury-, X. C. 

Linten, L Leonard Fr. C. E.„ 313 9th _ _.. „Brookh-n, X. Y. 

Lippard, George H So. Cer. E 205 C _ „Winston-Salem, X. C. 

Little, Buell L So. Tex. Mfg 24 South, Box 3620._ Moores^^lle, X. C. 

Little, F. L., Jr._ Jr. Land. Arch 116 Groveland .\ve _\yden, X. C. 

Little, Steve M _ Fr. Xg _...207 10th _...„ - Clarkton, X. C. 

Little, Wm. E Fr. Ag. Ed.._ 302 6th, Box 3262 „Grimesland, X. C. 

Liverman. Ernest W Fr. Ind. .Arts 6 Fieldhouse _ _ Columbia, X. C. 

Liverman. L. T., Jr Fr. .A.g 132 Sth Ahoskie, X. C. 

Livermon, Robert H So. C. E „ -303 South, Box 3567 _ „Charlotte, X. C. 

Lockhart, C. H „..Jr. \g. Engr _103 6th, Box 3239 _.. Durham, X. C. 

Loewensberg, Walter Fr. Gen. Engr 323 7th, Box 3389 Baltimore, Md. 

Loftin, W. Dennis Fr. Ag ~ 4 Sth Kinston, X. C. 

Long, Chas. Reade.__ Fr. C. E Wilmont .\pt. 1-C 1 Roxboro, X. C. 

Long, M. R Fr. Ind. E „209 .\._..„ .__ _ „. Statesville, X. C. 

Lopez, Xestor W . Jr. Ind. E 2513 Clark .\ve. Ft. Bragg, X. C. 

Love, J. D. So. Ag. -.-209 6th, Box 3257 „ Stanfield, X. C. 

Low, John G., Jr. _ . Fr. Arch. E 208 6th, Box 3256.. Burnsville, X. C. 

Lowder, J. Paul, Jr. _ Fr. \g 107 8th Xorwood, X. C. 

Lowe^^^ C. C._ Sr. Ag. Ed 101 C.__ CoUettsviUe, X. C. 

Lozier^ Paul J „Jr. For 107 C, Box 5565 _. CUfFside Park, X. J. 

Lubin, Ben „So. Flori.._ „ 330 1911, Box 3810. Xewark, X. J. 

Luck, Samuel L., Jr Sr. Arch. E _....304 C Greensboro, X. C. 

Luke, Edward B.... So. E. E 313 .•\._ _ Goldsboro, X. C. 

Lupton, Flovd J Fr. .Ag. E 116 7th, Box 3316 „ Pantego, X. C. 

Lutz, R. Bruce.... Fr. For 223 7th, Box 3355 Xorwalk, Conn. 

Lj-nch, Joseph A... Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 212 7th, Box 3344 _....Erwin, X. C. 



62 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Mc\dams, Chas. K So. Ag. Ed.._ 220 Chamberlain St Mebane, N. C. 

Ma\rthur. C. S., Jr.„ „Fr. E. E. _ 1507 Ambleside Drive Lumberton, X. C. 

Mc'^ulay, John J So. E. E 224 k. _ Mt. Gilead, N. C. 

McCabe, Richard P.. „.Sr. Cer. E 2608 Lochmoor Drive._ Raleigh, X. C. 

McCain, J. B Fr. Ag 205 10th.........„ „ Waxhaw, X. C. 

McCallum, Covert S Grad. Ag. Ec 17 Enterprise St Brevard, X. C. 

McCaskill, L. P., Jr Fr. E. E _ 224 South, Box 3556 E. Rockmgham, X. C. 

McClurd, John R., Jr Sr. Arch. E 1501 HiUsboro St Shelbv, X. C. 

McCollum, Da\-id L „Jr. Tex. Mfg _ 107 Wat., Box 3007.„ _....Wenr«-orth, X. C. 

McCollum, Robert J Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 129 South, Box 3529_ _..Winston-Salem, X. C. 

McCombs, M. Wm So. C. E —.3 Maiden Lane Statesville, X. C. 

McCormick, C. 

Caldwell, Jr Fr. For._ 221 7th, Box 3353 _ Chev^' Chase, Md. 

McCov. Wm. J., Jr. _Fr. M. E _.....207 8th Charlotte, X. C. 

McCracken, W. R Fr. Ag 318 7th, Box 3384 „. Wavnesville, X. C. 

McCrarA-, O. F., Jr So. M. E .....228 South, Box 3560._ Raleigh, X. C. 

McDaniel, Zeb E Sr. .\n. Prod ....9 South, Box 3605._ Sanford, X. C.^ 

McDevett, F. T., Jr Fr. Gen. Engr 210 7th, Box 3342 _Washington, X. C. 

McDonald, Sam R ._Fr. Ag 5243^ X. Wilmington St. Raleigh, X. C. 

MacDougall, James E., Jr._.So. Tex. Mfg 324 C _ Charlotte, X. C. 

McDowell, M. P Jr. .\rch. E 134 1911, Box 3734 Goldsboro, X. C. 

McDowell, Robert E., Jr.._.So. An. Prod 213 South, Box 3545._ Charlotte, X. C. 

McDuffie, James W .._Fr. Ag. Ed.._ 24 8th ._. Sanford, X. C. 

McGarirv, Gene W So. Tex. Mfg 1922 Hillsboro St.... Charlotte, X. C. 

McGimsev, Xed L Fr. E. E 324 8th _ Xebo, X. C. 

McGinn, Robert L., Jr Fr. For _ 105 9th „ Chariotte, X. C. 

McGinnis, James. Sr. Poul. Sci 301 Wat., Box 3037 Lincolnton, X. C. 

McGoogan, Frank A Sr. Ag. Engr 103 Harrison Ave Raleigh, X. C. 

Mclntoch, Laurence P So. M. E 321 C. : Winston-Salem, X. C. 

Mcintosh, W. O Fr. For 303 A Rockingham, X. C. 

Maclnt>-re, Alan B Fr. E. E _Avents Ferry Road Raleigh, X. C. 

Mclver, John E., Jr _Jr. For 317 A Clearwater, Fla. 

McKay, George P.._ Fr. M. E ...309 A. Dunn, X. C. 

McKav, Richard W So. Soils 127 South, Box 3527_ Warren, Ohio 

McKay, WiUiam A., Jr Sr. Ag. Ed 210 Wat., Box 3028 St. Pauls, X. C. 

McKenzie, John H., Jr Fr. Si. E ...Car>-, Route 1 Wagram, X. C. 

McKimmon, Arthur. Sr. .\rch. E ...519 X. Blount St.. Raleigh, X. C. 

McKinne, ColUn... „Fr. E. E 118 8th Louisburg, X. C. 

McKinnev, Robert H.... Fr. Tex. ^Ifg.._ 212 9th. _ Arlington, Va. 

McLaughlin, Robert L.._ So. Tex. W. & D.._-.219 South, Box 3551.__ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McLaughlin, W. S Sr. Cer. E 308 Wat., Box 3044 Gloucester, Mass. 

McLendon, Hubert F.._ Fr. Tex. Mfg._ 301 5th, Box 3225..... Burlington, X. C. 

McLendon, William E Fr. Ch. E.._ 404 X. Bloodworth St.. Raleigh, X. C. 

McLeod, Eubert W. Jr. Tex. Mfg 124 South, Box 3524_ Carthage, X. C. 

McLeod, WiUiam A., Jr. Fr. \g. Ed. _ 127 8th Sanford, X. C. 

McLeod, W. Arg>-le ..Sr. Ag. Ed 134 C._ _ Tavlorsville, X. C. 

McLeod, W^ Thos., Jr Fr. Tex. Mgt 308 9th _ Greensboro, X. C. 

McMahan, Lemuel V Fr. Ag _ - Forest City, N. C. 

McManus, R. H Fr. Ag. Engr 326 7th, Box 3392 Midland, X. C. 

McMenamin, J. P.._ :„.Grad. PI. Ec 1710 Park Drive Raleigh, X. C. 

McMillan, E. C So. C. E._ 1922 Hillsboro St .Marion, X. C. 

McMillan, James P..__ „Fr. Ag Brooks Ave., Box 5441 Laurinburg, N. C. 

McXeelv, R. Rowe So. Ag 4 Maiden Lane. Cleveland, X. C. 

McXeelv, R. Thurston Sr. Ag. Engr 1720 Hillsboro St „....Moores\-ille, X. C. 

McPhaul, Hugh W „.Sr. F. C. & P. B „131 C Red Springs, X. C. 

McPherson, Harry G „So. Ag 214 A Camden, X. C. 

McRorie, Bill F.._ _Jr. E. E 118 South, Box 3518._ Hickorj-, X. C. 

Macon, John A So. Ch. E.._ 102 Logan Court. Wake Forest, X. C. 

Maddn% Howard B.. Fr. C. E ....Xazareth Xazareth, X. C. 

Madero, J. T _Sr. Tex. Mgt 231 1911. Box 3771 Parras. Mexico 

Maguire, W. Hunter.... _Fr. M. E 230 E. Morgan St _ Elkin, X. C. 

Mahler, George C „Sr. E. E 303 Wat., Box 3039 Wilmington, X. C. 



Student Directory 63 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Main, Earl W Fr. E. E 216 7th, Box 3348 Delanco, N. J. 

Maiwurm, Fred W Jr. Ch. E.. 130 Hawthorne Rd.._ Asheville, N. C. 

Majette, J. B., Jr _ Fr. E. E 1715 Park Drive Como, N. C. 

Majure, W. J Grad. W. C. & M 2306 Hillsboro St Decatur, Miss. 

Malpass, Elton C Fr. Ag. Ed Withdrew Sept. 1L_ Delco, N. C. 

Mangum, Maynard Fr. Ag. Ed Route 1 Raleigh, N. C. 

Mann, Goode P Jr. Ch. E 301 Park Ave Elkton, Va. 

Mann, Sam N Sr. Dairy Mfg 223 7th, Box 3355 _ Asheville, N. C. 

Mann, Thurston J., Jr So. Ag..„ 129 South, Box 3529 Lake Landing, N. C. 

Manooch, Charles S., Jr Fr. Ind. E 1605 Scales Street... Raleigh, N. C. 

Marion, Wm. B Fr. For 307 9th Columbia, S. C. 

Marks, Raymond H Fr. Ch. E 218 8th BronxviUe, N. Y. 

Marlowe, T. Johnson Jr. Ag. Ed 112 5th, Box 3212 Fairview, N. C. 

Marsh, Robert S Sr. F. C 2514 Clark Ave.._ Monroe, N. C. 

Marsh, Wm. B.. So. Ch. E 330 C MarshviUe, N. C. 

Marshall, Charles M Fr. Tex. Mfg 231 1911, Box 3771 Charlotte, N. C. 

Marshburn, Freeman J So. Ag. Ed 2211 Hope St Wallace, N. C. 

Martin, Archie F.._ So. Ag. Ed 114 South, Box 3514 Jackson, N. C. 

Martin, C. Eugene Fr. E. E Route 5 Washington, N. C. 

Martin, Carroll F., Jr Fr. Tex. C. & D .240 A Cramerton, N. C. 

Martin, Charles L., Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg 117 8th Madison, N. C. 

Martin, George D Fr. C. E 309 9th Charlotte, N. C. 

Martin, James D Fr. For 118 8th Roanoke, Va. 

Martin, James F Jr. Soils 2306 Hillsboro St Wadesboro, N. C. 

Martin, Melvin D So. Ch. E 324 A Liberty, N. C. 

Martin, Oscar F., Jr So. For 2514 Clark Ave Utica, N. Y. 

Martin, Travis J Fr. M. E 338 1911, Box 3818 Walkertown, N. C. 

Martin, Wm. D., Jr So. Arch. E 326 Oakwood Ave ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Marton, Marvin L Fr. Tex. Mgt 235 A, Box 5313._ New York, N. Y. 

Mask, F. E Grad. Ch. E 12 Enterprise St Raleigh, N. C. 

Mason, R. P Fr. M. E Greensboro, N. C. 

Massengill, L. E Jr. C. E 339 C Four Oaks, N. C. 

Massey, Joe T Grad. E. E..„ 605 N. East St Raleigh, N. C. 

Matson, Pat Sr. For 2004 Hillsboro St Norfolk, Va. 

Matthews, C. Hamilton Fr. E. E 135 C Kipling, N. C. 

Matthews, Clifton H So. M. E 110 C Stokesdale, N. C. 

Matthews, Hannibal Fr. Ind. Engr Route 1 Apex, N. C. 

Mattocks, Averitte N Jr. C. E 2702 Hillsboro St Greensboro, N. C. 

Mattocks, Ted C Sr. F. C. & P. B 134 C Gillette, N. C. 

Mattocks, Wm. B., Jr ...Sr. Tex. Mgt 16 South, Box 3612 Sanford, N. C. 

Mattox, Dana B Jr. Ch. E 325 South, Box 3589. Pinetops, N. C. 

Mattox, Redfield H Fr. Ind. Arts 138 A Durham, N. C. 

Mattson, Axel T Sr. M. E 2513 Clark Ave.._ East Hampton, N. Y. 

Maultsby, J. D Jr. Arch. E 2405 Clark Ave ...Kernersville, N. C. 

Mauney, Carl E. So. Ag. Ed.._ 2306 Hillsboro St Lincolnton, N. C. 

Mauney, John M..__ Sr. Tex. Mfg 312 Wat., Box 3048 Lincolnton, N. C. 

May, George H Jr. Ag ...227 A North Bergen, N. J. 

May, Jack M Fr. M. E 209 9th Winston-Salem, N. C. 

May, Milton C Fr. Tex. Mfg 204 South, Box 3536 New Bern, N. C. 

May, W. L., Jr Fr. E. E 6 9th Rockingham, N. C. 

May, Wm. N So. M. E 325 C Lenoir, N. C. 

Maynard, G. J. So. Flori... Apex Apex, N. C. 

Maynard, James T Fr. For 308 8th Williamsburg, Va. 

Mayo, Charley H Jr. Ag 17 Enterprise St Greenville, N. C. 

Mayo, Reuben E.._ Fr. Tex. Mfg Fieldhouse, Box 5222 Plymouth, N. C. 

Mayton, R. L..___ Grad. Voc. Guid 107 9th Gary, N. C. 

Mazur, Ernest J Fr. Tex. W. & D...._.221 7th, Box 3353 Pt. Washington, N. Y. 

Means, H. D Sr. Ch. E 217 A Concord, N. C. 

Medford, M. Ned._ Sr. Ch. E 211 Wat., Box 3029..._ WaynesviUe, N. C. 

MehafFey, Glenn W..__ Sr. Ind. Arts._ 301 A, Box 5324 _ Hendersonville, N. C. 

Melton, J. Glenn... So. C. E 201 South, Box 3533 Avondale, N. C. 

Merchant, John L Fr. Ch. E 105 10th Collingswood, N. J. 

Meredith, Wm. B., II Fr. Gen. Engr 806 Cowper Drive Raleigh, N. C. 



64 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Merrell, G. Dewey, Jr ...Fr. E. E 110 8th Beaufort, N. C. 

Messer, Horace R Jr. E. E 8 Ferndell Lane Bryson City, N. C. 

Messersmith, Harry S., Jr..Jr. Tex. Mfg 1301 HiUsboro St Montclair, N. J. 

Messick, Wm. R Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 331 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Metcalf, Frank T Fr. M. E 203 C Washington, D. C. 

Michael, Joe E., Jr Sr. Ag. Chem 128 1911, Box 5155 _ ....Lexington, N. C. 

Michael, R. Lee Jr. Ag. Chem..___ Ill Wat., Box 3011.__ Lexington, N. C. 

Michaels, Abraham.... Fr. M. E ....106 4, Box 3116 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Middleton, W. James.__ Jr. Tex. W. & D.......132 1911, Box 3732 Warsaw, N. C. 

Midgette, H. Boyce Fr. Gen. Engr 306 9th Buxton, N. C. 

Midyette, Allen L., Jr So. Ch. E 330 South, Box 3594 Swan Quarter, N. C. 

Milholland, John L., Jr Sr. Ind. E .331 South, Box 3595._... ...StatesviUe, N. C. 

Milks, Llovd E., Jr Sr. Tex. Mgt 1301 HiUsboro St Asheboro, N. C. 

Millar, M.'W Grad. Ind. Ed 302 Home St..__ Raleigh, N. C. 

Millar, Robert S Fr. M. E 218 A Wheaton, 111. 

Miller, Arnold E ...Jr. Ch. E 123 South, Box 3523 Orbisonia, Pa. 

Miller, A. S.. Auditor .Route 6 Raleigh, N. C. 

Miller, Fred B.. ...Fr. C. E 333 7th, Box 3399 Cynwyd, Pa. 

Miller, Frank P Prof. C. E Not in residence...- Detroit, Mich. 

Miller, Howard L So. Cer. E 312 6th, Box 3272 MooresviUe, N. C. 

Miller, Rufus O Jr. Ch. E 327 South, Box 3591..... Gastonia, N. C. 

Miller, Sam A Fr. Ag..__ 128 8th Laurel Springs, N. C. 

Miller, Walter A Fr. M. E ....211 9th Concord, N. C. 

MiUhouse, Sammy R Jr. Cer. E..__ 211 5th, Box 3223 Wilson, N. C. 

Millichamp, John W.._ So. Tex. Mfg ..123 Brooks Ave Toronto, Canada 

Milliken, James S So. E. E 1301 HiUsboro St Southern Pines, N. C 

Milloway, Wm. H., Jr .Sr. Ind. E ...2513 Clark Ave.._ ...Greensboro, N. C. 

Mills, John A Fr. M. E .114 E. Park Drive.__ Raleigh, N. C. 

Mills, James B. Fr. Ind. Arts 2 Gymnasium, Box 5402 J\pex, N. C. 

Mills, Jo D Fr. Ind. Arts.— ..2 Gymnasium, Box 5402 Apex, N. C. 

MiUsaps, E. Steve, Jr Grad. F. C. & P. B...301 4th, Box 3127 Asheboro, N. C. 

Millsaps, Lewis M.._.. Fr. M. E 228 8th : Asheboro, N. C. 

Mininsohn, Isidore Fr. For .....102 7th, Box 3302 Hightstown, N. J. 

Misenheimer, Fred L ...Sr. Tex. Mfg 112 Wat., Box 3012.__.. „...SaHsbury, N. C. 

Misenheimer, Leo J.. Jr. E. E 215 .A_ Salisbury, N. C. 

Mitchell, David So. E. E .209 C - King. N. C. 

Mitchell, Jerry, Jr.._ Fr. M. E 304 8th Charleston, W. Va. 

Mitchell, Richard H Jr. Arch. £..___ 2901 HiUsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

Mitchem, Winfred E Fr. C. E 204 7th, Box 3336 Lawndale, N. C. 

Mitchiner, James A.. Sr. Ag. Engr 304 Wat., Box 3040.__ FrankUnton, N. C. 

Mitchiner, Simon T., Jr So. M. E Garner._ Garner, N. C. 

Mock, Bernard A Fr. Tex. Mfg Gymnasium, Box 5181..... ...BoonviUe, N. C. 

Monroe, Duncan A Fr. M. E 218 Halifax Street Raleigh, N. C. 

Monroe, T. Guy, Jr...... Fr. M. E ....227 8th Hamlet, N. C. 

Montague, Irvin B So. M. E .8 Maiden Lane._ Goldsboro, N. C. 

Moore, C. E., Jr Jr. An. Prod...... N. Y. A. R. T. C, Box 5477._...Charlotte, N. C. 

Moore, Ed. P. _ Jr. Tex. Mfg 211 5th, Box 3223 Bynum, N. C. 

Moore, Paul M Fr. Tex. Mgt.._ 230 E. Park Drive._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Moore, Wm. B..__ Jr. E. E ...101 A._ Milton, N. C. 

Moran, Thos. F..„ Jr. Ind. E..__ 6 FerndeU Lane Westfield, N. J. 

Mordecai, George W., Jr So. M. E Wake Forest Road Raleigh, N. C. 

Morgan, D. T Fr. Ag. Ed 113 7th, Box 3313 MarshviUe, N. C. 

Morgan, H. L., Jr Grad. E. E...._ 2008 HiUsboro St Canton, N. C. 

Morgan, John L., Jr... Jr. Tex. Mgt 2513 Clark Ave.._ GibsonviUe, N. C. 

Morgan, Pat H So. Tex. Mfg 1922 HiUsboro St Shawboro, N. C. 

Morgan, Reuben T So. Tex. Mgt.._ 2225 White Oak Road Raleigh, N. C. 

Morgan, Wm. M., Ill Fr. M. E 324 8th Goldsboro, N. C. 

Morris, Frank W.._ Fr. M. E ..1720 HiUsboro St Gastonia, N. C. 

Morris, G. Wilbur, Jr Fr. Ag.._. 320 7th, Box 3386 AsheviUe, N. C. 

Morris, Harold D Grad. Soils 204 Park Avenue South Miami, Fla. 

Morris, M. B. . Fr. Ag 103 South, Box 3503..... Apex, N. C. 

Morris, Sam J., Jr.._... Fr. C. E ...137 Gardner St Raleigh, N. C. 

Morris, Wm. F., Jr Jr. M. E.._ 2509 Vanderbilt Ave ....Raleigh, N. C. 



Student Directory 65 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Morrison, Charles T..... Jr. Ch. E 112 C _ Hickory, N. C. 

Morrison, Ed. B Sr. Tex. Mgt 209 Wat., Box 3027 Charlotte, N. C. 

Morrison, Ernest E.._ Sr. Ch. E 21 Enterprise St Meridian, Miss. 

Morrison, Fred D So. Ag 130 A Sewickley, Pa. 

Morrison, R. C So. Ag 4 Maiden Lane.. N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Morrison, Wm. B Jr. Tex. Mfg 2407 Clark Ave Concord, N. C. 

Morton, Chas. L Fr. C. E..... 120 7th, Box 3320 Washington, N. C. 

Moss, Raphael S So. Soils._ 119 C New York, N. Y. 

Mulhall, Joseph H., Jr Fr. For 315 A .....Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mullen, Lester A Sr. F. C. & P. B 304 Wat., Box 3040 Lincolnton, N. C. 

Muller, H. S., Jr So. For .....301 6th, Box 3261 Aberdeen, Md. 

Mullin, Victor F Fr. For 101 10th Aberdeen, Md. 

Mullineaux, J. B., Jr..___ Fr. For 211 A New Bern, N. C. 

Murchison, Ken Sr. An. Prod 218 C Mocksville, N. C. 

Murdoch, Wm. S.._ So. Tex. Mfg 21 Enterprise St Salisbury, N. C. 

Murphy, R. Finla Jr. C. E .....110 Wat., Box 3010 Atkinson, N. C. 

Murray, D. J Sr. An. Prod 226 1911, Box 3766 Kenansville, N. C. 

Murray, J. Darnell Fr. Ch. E 503 N. Wilmington St. Middlesex, N. C. 

Murray, J. Phillip Fr. Ag...._ Poultry Farm Spring Hope, N. C. 

Murrill, Hugh C So. M. E Wake Forest._ Wake Forest, N. C. 

Myers, Fred L., Jr ...So. Ch. E 232 1911, Box 3772 Asheville, N. C. 

Myers, James D.... So. Ag. E... 222 South, Box 3554 Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Myers, Robert F So. Ag 207 C Laurel Springs, N. C. 

Myers, Wm. J Fr. Ag Withdrew Sept. 13 Union Grove, N. C. 

Nahikian, H. M.._ .Auditor 3207 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

Naiman, Richard D Jr. E. E 301 A Asheville, N. C. 

Nakoneczny, Mike W.... Sr. M. E 315 Wat., Box 3051 Burgaw, N. C. 

Nance, J. W So. Cer. E 114 Home St Raleigh, N. C. 

Nash, John F., Jr So. Ag 202 Wat., Box 3020 St. Pauls, N. C. 

Nave, B. C, Jr Jr. Ag. Ed 3 South, Box 3599 Newland, N. C. 

Neale, Wm. M., Jr Fr. M. E ...309 A Greensboro, N. C. 

Needham, J. Frank Sr. For Box 5063 Raleigh, N. C. 

Neelley, James V So. Tex. Mfg.. 2407 Clark Ave Greensboro, N. C. 

Neese, J. M Grad. Ind. Arts Central Prison Raleigh, N. C. 

Nelley, John W ...Jr. Cer. E .310 South, Box 3574 Passaic, N. J. 

Nelms, John K So. M. E .....Ill South, Box 3511 Oxford, N. C. 

Nelson, Howard L Fr. Tex. Mfg 11 Fieldhouse Maryville, Fenn. 

Neuer, Jack J So. M. E .331 1911, Box 3811 Wilmington, N. C. 

Newnam, J. Alvis Sr. Ch. E 22 South, Box 3618 Leaksville, N. C. 

Newsom, Robert W Fr. Ch. E ...125 Woodburn Rd Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Newsome, T. Wilson Fr. Ag 132 8th Ahoskie, N. C. 

Newton, F. Whitaker. So. Ag Brooks Ave., Box 5441 Henderson, N. C. 

Nicholas, Peter N So. C. E 219 C Pennsgrove, N. J. 

Nichols, J. H Grad. E. E 11 Dixie Oil Ave., Box 5572 Raleigh, N. C. 

Nicholson, John F So. Ind. E 2307 Lake Drive, 

Mail: 518 Professional Bldg...Raleigh, N. C. 

Nicks, Robert E Fr. M. E 104 9th Elkin, N. C. 

Nigro, John Sr. For 337 A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Nixon, Hollowell C So. Tex. Mfg 206 South, Box 3538 ...Hertford, N. C. 

Noell, Hugh E., Jr Fr. C. E 104 9th Shelby, N. C. 

Norket, J. W Fr. Ag 303 7th, Box 3369 Huntersville, N. C. 

Norman, Robert B Fr. M. E 333 8th. Bath, N. C. 

Norman, R. Ed Fr. M. E 129 7th, Box 3329 East Bend, N. C. 

Norwood, Evan W., Jr .So. Tex. Mfg 231 South, Box 3563 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Novitzkie, A. Anthony, Jr...Sr. For 1400 Hillsboro St Maspeth, N. Y. 

Nowell, H. H..... Fr. M. E 201 9th Gary, N. C. 

Nowell, Jack L So. M. E 211 C... Charlotte, N. C. 

Nowlan, A. E., Jr..... Fr. Tex. Mfg 115 8th Guilford College, N. C. 

Noyes, Wm. B Fr. E. E ..332 8th...... Marion, N. C. 

O'Brian, Joseph M Sr. F. C. & P. B 220 8th Oxford, N. C. 

O'Briant, R. Wilbur Fr. Ag.._ 208 Chamberlain St Rowland, N. C. 



66 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

O'Daniel, Oris L., Jr Fr. M. E 222 7th, Box 3354 Charlotte, N. C. 

Odegaard, James E Jr. Tex. Mfg 8 Maiden Lane..._ Montclair, N. J. 

Odom, Marshall L., Jr Fr. Ag..__ 127 7th, Box 3327 Fayetteville, N. C. 

Odom, WilHam E., Jr Sr. For 320 C _ Asheville, N. C. 

Oetgen, Walter F., Jr Fr. Ch. E 221 South, Box 3553 Savannah, Ga. 

Oldham, Anderson M So. Ag. Ch 2701 Clark Ave.._ Mebane, N. C. 

Olive, David M So. Ch. E 136 C Mt. Gilead, N. C. 

Oliver, Paul S., Jr Fr. Cer. E 206 8th Fairmont, N. C. 

O'Neill, F. Rudolph Fr. Gen. Engr Withdrew Sept. 18.__ Raleigh, N. C. 

O'Quinn, Albert 0...._ Fr. Ag. Ed 313 Wat., Box 3049.„ Manchester, N. C. 

Oransky, Philip So. PI. P...._ 222 Park Ave New York, N. Y. 

Orland, Joseph E., Jr ...Fr. Ch. E 130 8th Kannapolis, N. C. 

Ormond, John J So. Tex. Mfg 302 4th, Box 3128 Kings Mountain, N. C, 

Orr, Lewis P.._ So. C. E 2220 HiUsboro St Washington, D. C. 

Orrell, Marvin L Fr. M. E .....107 7th, Box 3307 Greensboro, N. C. 

Osborne, Bruce W Fr. Ag 2 8th Sparta, N. C. 

Osborne, W. Frank, Jr Fr. M. E 313 7th, Box 3379 .Sparta, N. C. 

Osburn, Clarke W Fr. An. Prod 209 7th, Box 3341 New York, N. Y. 

Overcash, Johnston R Fr. Tex. Mfg Y. M. C. A Mooresville, N. C. 

Overcash, Ray L Sr. Ch. E 316 Wat., Box 3052._... Kannapolis, N. C. 

Owen, Edwin B Grad. Ind. E 131 Hawthorne Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Owens, Edwin B So. M. E 303 4th, Box 3129 Black Creek, N. C. 

Owens, Frank A., Jr So. Tex. C. & D 233 A Charlotte, N. C. 

Owens, James H Fr. M. E ...118 7th, Box 3318 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Ownley, Robert E .....Jr. E. E 110 South, Box 3510 Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Pace, Ben S Sr. Ch. E 130 Woodburn Rd.... Raleigh, N. C. 

Packard, Henry D Fr. For 212 9th Paoli, Pa. 

Padgett, Chas. B So. Ag. Ed -....127 1911, Box 3727 EUenboro, N. C. 

Page, Norwood R Grad. Ag. Chem 103 4th, Box 3113 .Lake View, S. C. 

Page, Wm. J Sr. F. C. & P. B 1709 HiUsboro St Autryville, N. C. 

Pamter, Carl C So. C. E .....1709 HiUsboro St Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Pallagut, Edward A So. Ch. E 2004 HiUsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

Palmer, G. C, Jr So. Ag..... 128 C Clyde, N. C. 

Panetti, J. Milton, IH.... Fr. Ch. E 2004 HiUsboro St... Charlotte, N. C. 

Parcel, Martin W Jr. Cer. E..__ .....101 A ..Greensboro, N. C. 

Park, H. V Auditor 404 Chamberlain St Raleigh, N. C. 

Park, John E Fr. M. E 204 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Parker, Alfred L., Jr ...Sr. Land. Arch 1301 HiUsboro St.. Charlotte, N. C. 

Parker, David C... Sr. An. Prod 217 C Fountain, N. C. 

Parker, Earl G ....Fr. Ag..__ 2402 HiUsboro St .....Gibson, N. C. 

Parker, George E., in.„ Fr. C. E 119 7th, Box 3319 High Point, N. C. 

Parker, J. D Sr. Ag. Ed 20 South, Box 3616 .....Murfreesboro, N. C. 

Parker, John H Fr. Ag. Ed 132 South, Box 3532.... Clinton, N. C. 

Parker, J. V., Jr..__ Jr. Ch. E 203 6th, Box 3251 AsheviUe, N. C. 

Parker, T. James Fr. E. E 305 8th __ Charlotte, N. C. 

Parker, W. Kermit, H So. M. E 205 C .. Gastonia, N. C. 

Parks, Thos. F Sr. Tex. C. & D 2008 HiUsboro St Lenoir, N. C. 

Parnell, Edward F .So. Ind. E 215 C - Charlotte, N. C. 

Parnsh, Wilbert C _ Fr. Ag. Ed 330 A Angier, N. C. 

Parsons, L. Richard Sr. Ch. E 6 Femdell Lane Burlington, N. J. 

Partlow, James E Fr. Cer. E 223 8th . .Oak Hill, Ohio 

Partridge, Alan L Fr. C. E 1921}^ Reid St Raleigh, N. C. 

Paschal, Ben E., Jr So. Cer. E 103 Chamberlain St Charlotte, N. C. 

Paschal, Forrest A..... Jr. Cer. E...._ 132 Woodburn Rd Siler City, N. C. 

Paschal, Frank J So. Ch. E 304 Home St. Goldston, N. C. 

Passavant, C. R., Jr Fr. M. E 203 7th, Box 3335 Henderson, N. C. 

Pate, James R So. Ag 203 A Rowland, N. C. 

Pate, Rudolph Fr. Ag 317 8th ..Lumberton, N. C. 

Pate, Raiford G Jr. Ag. Ed 109 6th, Box 3245 Gibson, N. C. 

Patterson, A. L.... Sr. M. E...._ 215 Wat., Box 3033 Houstonville, N. C. 

Patterson, Elvin W Fr. Ag. Ed 105 Wat., Box 3005 _ Hiddenite, N. C. 

Patterson, Q. W So. Ag 229 South, Box 3561 Hiddenite, N. C. 



I 



Student Directory 67 

Name Classification School Addresi Home Address 

Patton, Glenn A Jr. Ag. Ed 302 Wat., Box 3038 Franklin, N. C. 

Patton, George E Fr. Land. Arch 23 8th Franklin, N. C. 

Patton, Mack S.._ Fr. Ag. 23 8th FrankUn, N. C. 

Paul, Grayden M., II Fr. M. E 210 10th Beaufort, N. C. 

Paulus, C. J., Ill Fr. M. E 306 9th Parlin, N. J. 

Pavlovsky, Andy J Jr. Ind. Arts .....104 4th, Box 5702 Struthers, Ohio 

Payne, James B..__ Fr. Ag .332 7th, Box 3398 Madison, N. C. 

Payne, Ray J.._ Sr. Tex. Mfg 112 Wat., Box 3012.__ Kannapolis, N. C. 

Peacock, Chas. A..___ Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 2405 Clark Ave.._ Salisbury, N. C. 

Peacock, Lansing C So. Ag. Ed 112 6th, Box 3248 Roper, N. C. 

Peacock, Maurice M Jr. Ag. Ed 112 6th, Box 3248 Roper, N. C. 

Pearce, D. C, Jr Fr. Ind. Arts Fieldhouse Zebulon, N. C. 

Pearce, Thilbert H Fr. For 27 8th Frankhnton, N. C. 

Pearsall, David W.. Sr. M. E. 315 Wat., Box 3051.__ Rocky Point, N. C. 

Pearsall, John S..„_ So. Ch. E.._ 230 C._ Rocky Point, N. C. 

Pearsall, Melzar, Jr..__ Sr. Ag. Ec 210 Wat., Box 3028.__ Wilmington, N. C. 

Pearson, Howard L.._ Sr. M. E. 222 Park Ave Highlands, N. C. 

Pearson, Joe M Fr. M. E .103 9th.... Goldsboro, N. C. 

Pearson, R. W Sr. Poul. Sci Poultry Plant.- Highlands, N. C. 

Pearson, Wm. S.._ .So. Tex. C. & D.. 202 5th, Box 3214 ....Charlotte, N. C. 

Pease, J. Norman, Jr .....Fr. Arch. E 302 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Peel, Garland 0., Jr So. E. E ...211 C Durham, N. C. 

Peele, Joseph H.._ So. Ch. E .18 Home St..__ ...Belhaven, N. C. 

Peele, Wm. B.._ Fr. M. E 224 7th, Box 3356 Charlotte, N. C. 

Peeler, G. B Grad. Tex. Mfg 106 Home St.._ Raleigh, N. C. 

PeUington, E. J., Jr..___ Fr. For 217 7th, Box 3349. Midvale, N. J. 

Pendergrass, Willard R So. Ag.._ Poultry Plant._ Frankhn, N. C. 

Penland, Dennis T Jr. M. E..„ 207 6th, Box 3255 FrankUn, N. C. 

Penney, Miss Lura M Grad. Ind. Arts Route 1 Raleigh, N. C. 

Penny, Russell C.._ Jr. Tex. Mfg 240 C Raleigh, N. C. 

Penny, R. Graham._ Fr. An. Prod Dairy Barn, Box 5217 ...Angier, N. C. 

Peoples, L. Jackson Fr. For ...307 7th, Box 3373 Oxford, N. C. 

Perkins, W. J., Jr Fr. Ag..___ 240 A. Goldsboro, N. C. 

Perks, Leo Sr. For ...103 C... Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Perman, Bernard Fr. Ch. E.._ .218 8th Warrenton. N. C. 

Perry, Kenneth E .Sr. Ch. E Milbrook Milbrook, N. C. 

Perry, Lawrence L Sr. For 102 C Sanford, N. C. 

Perry, Marvin C So. Ch. E 8 Maiden Lane. Hamlet, N. C. 

Perry, Ralph W Jr. Ag. Ch ...6 Ferndell Lane Quantico, Va. 

Perry, Sexton D So. For .101 6th, Box 3237 ...Canton, N. C. 

Perry, T. Edwin.. So. Ind. Arts. 508 E. Whitaker Mill Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Peters, Charles E Grad. Ch. E .23 Shephard St Grafton, Mass. 

PfafF, Harry A Fr. Ag. Engr 233 8th Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Pfluge, W. T Fr. Ch. E Tallahassee, Fla. 

Pharmer, Wm. L Fr. E. E 314 A.„ AsheviUe, N. C. 

Pharr, Jones Y., Jr Sr. Tex. Mfg 21 Enterprise St Concord, N. C. 

Phifer, Horace A Fr. C. E 108 8th Hamlet, N. C. 

PhilHps, C. Alvin Fr. Geol. E 326 C Gary, N. C. 

Phillips, Herman H..__ Fr. Ag..__ .211 8th Warsaw, N. C. 

Phillips, K. Lee So. Ag..__ 311 A. Mavsville, Kv. 

Phrydas, Pete A So. E. E 301 C._ Greensboro, N. C. 

Picket, Wm. C.._ Jr. For Route 6, Dixie Trail .-.Raleigh, N. C. 

Pierce, Al H So. Tex. Mfg ...1611 Park Drive Montreal, Canada 

Pierce, H. J Fr. Tex. Mfg 6 Hope St _ Swarthmore, Pa. 

Pigue, Waldo E So. Tex. Mfg 317 Wat., Box 3053.„ FayetteviUe, N. C. 

Piland, Calvin R So. Ag..__ .....202 Groveland Ave Margarettsville, N. C. 

Pinnell, Sam W So. Chem. E 104 Wat., Box 3004..._ ...Warfenton, N. C. 

Pitt, Edward L., Ill Fr. Ag..__ 332 7th, Box 3398 Pinetops, N. C. 

Pitt, James A..__ Fr. Ag...._ 321 7th, Box 3387 Tarboro. N. C. 

Pittman, A. Rowland, Jr So. Ch. E 329 1911, Box 3809 Lumberton, N. C. 

Pittman, James W Sr. Ag. Ed 201 Wat., Box 3019..._ Fairmont. N. C. 

Pittman, Paul R., Jr...._ Sr. M. E..__ 107 South, Box 3507 Wilmington, N. C. 

Plaster, J. Carrol Sr. Dairy Mfg 301 A._ Hickorf, N. C. 



68 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Piatt, Nathan _ Jr. Tex. Mfg 227 South, Box 3559._ Strasburg, Va. 

Pleasants, Alton B Fr. Ag.._„ 108 7th, Box 3308 Angler, N. C. 

Pleasants, James M Jr. M. E..„ ....237 1911, Box 3777 Durham, N. C. 

Pleasants, Robert J.. So. Ag Gary Gary, N. G. 

Poller, Lewis Fr. M. E .....202^ Linden Ave Raleigh, N. G. 

Pollock, J. H Fr. Ag 315 S-outh, Box 3579 _ Trenton, N. G. 

Pollock, W. Edward Sr. Ag. Ec ...128 1911, Box 3728 Trenton, N. G. 

Pomeranz, Robert .....Fr. M. E 206 7th, Box 3338 Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

Ponder, Zeno H Jr. Soils 204 South, Box 3536 Marshall, N. G. 

Ponos, Nick J.. Fr. Gh. E 106 9th Wilmington, N. C. 

Poole, A. Eugene Fr. Ger. E..... 106 10th Trov, N. G. 

Poole, Glaude T Fr. Ag..__ 112 Gutler St Raleigh, N. G. 

Pop, Pete E Fr. For 206 7th, Box 3338 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pope, J. G Fr. Ag. Ed ....11 8th Gllnton, N. C. 

Porter, Robert E So. G. E ...1710 Park Drive.. Gharlotte, N. G. 

Posten, J. Herbert ...Sr. M. E 339 A .....Atlantic 

Highlands, N. J. 

Pound, Ralston M., Jr. Fr. E. E 103 Ghamberlaln St Gharlotte, N. G. 

Powell, Adln A Fr. Ag 117 7th, Box 3317 Smlthfield, N. G. 

Powell, Arthur W So. Tex. G. & D.......333 A, Box 5306.-_ Gharlotte, N. G. 

Powell, Erwln T Fr. E. E 323 South, Box 3587 Smlthfield, N. G. 

Powell, H. W., Jr Fr. M. E 104 8th Wlnston-Salem, N. G. 

Powell, James F., Jr Jr. G. E 206 Pine St Raleigh, N. G. 

Powers, B. Paul ...Fr. Ag. Ed.. 113 7th, Box 3313 Bennett, N. G. 

Powers, J. W Fr. For 322 7th, Box 3388.. St. Pauls, N. G. 

Powers, L. Reade... Jr. G. E 138 A Raleigh, N. G. 

Pratt, A. Myron Fr. W. G. & Mgt 326 1911, Box 3806 Draper, N. G. 

Pratt, Gordon H.. So. Ind. E 223 A .....ArUngton, Mass. 

Pratt, John J., Jr Grad. Zoology 20 Maiden Lane._ Gohasset, Mass. 

Preddy, J. R Fr ...Oxford, N. G. 

Pressly, Wm. G Fr. Ag 526 Wilmington St Raleigh, N. G. 

Price, Ghas. L., Jr Jr. G. E 2202 Hlllsboro St Whitevllle, N. G. 

Price, E. W., Jr Jr. G. E .309 Galvin Rd.... Raleigh, N. G. 

Price, F. H., Jr Sr. Ag. Ec 218 G .Shelby, N. G. 

Price, T. B Jr. Tex. G. & D.......324 South, Box 3588 West Jefferson, N. G. 

Prim, G. G So. Ag. Ec 210 6th, Box 3258 .Yadklnvllle, N. G. 

Proctor, B. Gray, Jr Fr. M. E 316 8th..... Durham, N. G. 

Proffitt, James W Jr. An. Prod 115 A Bald Greek, N. G. 

Proud, Everett R Jr. Gh. E 130 A, Box 5543 Goldsboro, N. G. 

Prout, G. Herbert So. Gh. E ...229 1911, Box 3769 Owlngs, Md. 

Pruden, Booker V Fr. M. E 102 8th Margarettsvllle, N. G. 

Prue, K. P Fr. M. E 323 South, Box 3587.. West Englewood, N. J. 

Prultt, Austin A .....So. For 332 South, Box 3596 Garteret, N. J. 

Puckett, Herbert L., Jr Fr. Arch. E.... 220 G Gharlotte, N. G. 

Pugh, Edward S. G., Jr Sr. Arch. E 2306 Hlllsboro St Elizabeth Glty, N. G. 

Quay, T. L Grad. Entom.... 2805 Bedford Ave Mt. Holly, N. J. 

Queen, J. B Fr. E. E Withdrew Sept. 25 _ Pomona, N. G. 

Qulckel, Wm. A Fr. Arch. E 220 South, Box 3552 Llncolnton, N. G. 

Qulnn, F. D., Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg 305 4th, Box 3131 Shelby, N. G. 

Rabb, Robert L So. W. G. & M 2316 Hlllsboro St Lenoir, N. G. 

Ralford, J. Phil ....Fr. Tex. Mgt 225 8th Goncord, N. G. 

Ralney, Robert W .......Fr. M. E 201 7th, Box 3333 FayettevlUe, N. G. 

Rains, B. M., Jr Fr. For. 301 9th AlbertvlUe, Ala. 

Rains, M. Vic Fr. Ag. _ 302 5th, Box 3226 Princeton, N. G. 

Ramsey, Albert L., Jr Fr. Ag. _ 12 8th Franklin, N. G. 

Ramsey, G. Alfred Fr. Ind. E 106 8th Salisbury, N. G. 

Ramsey, Gurtls L Fr. E. E 107 6th, Box 3243 Grumpier, W. Va. 

Randall, Fred W., Jr So. M. E 128 A Bristol, Pa. 

Randolph, Hal F ...Sr. Ger. E.._ .205 Wat., Box 3023 Raleigh, N. G. 

Randolph, John L ...So. M. E 212 Groveland Ave Morganton, N. C. 

Rankin, Ben F Fr. Gh. E 211 8th Charlotte, N. G. 



Student Directory 69 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Ratchford, C. Brice So. Ag. Ec 107 5th, Box 3207 Gastonia, N. C. 

Rawls, Horace D.._ Fr. Ag..__ .._ 2209 Circle Drive._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Rav, M. E Grad. C. E..__ Route 1 _ Raleigh, N. C. 

Rav, W. Angus Jr. Ch. E.... 1720 Hillsboro St _ FayetteviUe, N. C. 

Reams, Graham E..__ So. Ag. Ed.._ .....109 6th, Box 3245 Apex, N. C. 

Reams, Wavland J Jr. Ag. Ed ...137 1911, Box 3737 .....Apex, N. C. 

Redding. Joe W.._ Fr. For ..105 9th... Millboro, N. C. 

Redick, James A Fr. Tex. Mfg 339 1911, Box 3819.. Walstonburg, N. C. 

Redmon, Baxter B Sr. M. E..__ 306 6th, Box 3266...... Cleveland, N. C. 

Reed, Joseph W..__ Fr. Land. Arch 238 1911, Box 3778 Roanoke, Va. 

Reed, Roy L. __ So. C. E .3 Gvmnasium._ .....Hertford, N. C. 

Reeves, Ralph B., Jr..__ Sr. Arch. E 228'E. Park Drive... Raleigh, N. C. 

Reeves, T. L..„ Sr. Ag. E 232 1911, Box 3772 Sanford, N. C. 

Regan, Paul R So. Ag. Ed 201 5th, Box 3213 Lexington, N. C. 

Rehder. G. Stanley.___ Fr. Ch. E 330 8th Wilmington, N. C. 

Reid, Chas. A..___ .Jr. Ind Arts 331 C Asheville, N. C. 

Reid, H. A..... Fr. Ag. Ed 133 8th... Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Remmert, LeMar F Grad. Ag. Chem 106 4th, Box 3116... Iowa Falls, Iowa 

Renn, Charlie W Sr. An. Prod..... 204 C, Box 5373...- Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Rennie, J. N...._ So. Ch. E 230 South, Box 3562...... Vv^hitakers, N. C. 

Rennie, fames W..___ Sr. M. E..__ .13 8th Plainfield, N. J. 

Retter, Wm. H Jr. Ind. E..„ 102 South, Box 5173 Easton, Pa. 

Rettew, John W Fr. Tex. C. & D 307 5th, Box 3231 MooresviUe, N. C. 

Reynolds. B. Bradford, Jr...Sr. Ch. E 207 Wat., Box 3025 Wilmington, N. C. 

Reynolds, Francois H. K. So. E. E 331 A, Box 5323 Ancon, C. Z. 

Reynolds, Vernon H Fr. An. Prod 331 A Kinston, N. C. 

Rhyne, Alfred M.._„ So. M. E 304 6th, Box 3264 Stanley, N. C. 

Rhvne, Chas. T., Jr Fr. Arch. E 222 8th Newport, Tenn. 

RhVne, Tohn L..__ So. E. E ...2004 Hillsboro St Gastonia, N. C. 

Rhvne, R. Horace Fr. M. E 109 South, Box 3509 Lincolnton, N. C. 

Rice, Howard S Fr. For..... 231 8th Robbinsville, N. C. 

Rice, Richard L..... Jr. Arch. E.._.... 130 South, Box 3530 Raleigh, N. C. 

Richardson, Woodrow C So. Ag.._ 211 Wat., Box 3029 Sparta. N. C. 

Richardson, W. Street, Jr.._.Fr. Ag. Ed 101 7th, Box 3301 New Bern, N. C. 

Richey, H. L Fr. Ag 315 8th...... Camden, S. C. 

Richmond, Mrs. Martha._...Grad. Ag. Ch 4 W. Dixie Drive._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Riddick, Rowland G So. Ag...... 208 South, Box 3540 Corapeake, N. C. 

Riddick, Wallace W., Jr Sr. Tex. W. & D.......225 Woodburn Rd .....Demopolis. Ala. 

Riddle, Chas. H., Jr .......Fr. Gen. Engr..... 207 7th, Box 3339 Sanford, N. C. 

Rigney, J. A...._ .......Grad. F. C.._ .402 Home St... La Mesa, N. Mex. 

Riley, Brent A.... .Fr. C. E 206 9th FayetteviUe, N. C. 

Rilev, Rupert... Fr. Tex. Mfg 14 Enterprise St Raleigh, N. C. 

Rippy, Wm. G Fr. E. E 2008 Hillsboro St.... Charlotte, N. C. 

Rislev, Robert S... So. E. E 2221 Creston Rd....- Raleigh, N. C. 

Ritter, W. Herman.-. Sr. Tex. C. & D 105 5th, Box 3205 Greensboro, N. C. 

Rivers, Wm. H Jr. E. E 3143 Stanhope Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Robbins, Wm. D So. Ag. . 127 South, Box 3527 .....Burgaw, N. C. 

Roberson, William Jr. M. E..-. 215 South, Box 3547 Durham, N. C. 

Roberts, Clyde W Sr. An. Prod... Dairy Cottage, Box 5127 Weaverville, N. C. 

Roberts, Ernest J.... Sr. For 139 1911, Box 3739 .....Marshall, N. C. 

Roberts, Swanson D...... So. M. E 305 5th, Box 3229. Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Roberts, Winston J..-_ So. Ch. E .230 South, Box 3562.- .FayetteviUe, N. C. 

Robertson, AUie F. _. Fr. Ag. __ 9 8th Hiddenite, N. C. 

Robertson, A. K., Jr.._ Fr. Gen. Engr 312 8th Goldsboro, N. C. 

Robertson, Herbert N So. Ag. F. C 110 6th, Box 3246. Knightdale, N. C. 

Robertson, Richard J Jr. For 104 C Takoma Park, Md. 

Robinson, Gilbert C Sr. Cer. E 105 South. Box 3505 Cooleemee. N. C. 

Robinson, H. F Grad. F. C. & P. B...108 4th, Box 3118 Bandana, N. C. 

Robinson, Harold G., Jr Sr. Ind. E 1301 Hillsboro St Charlotte. N. C. 

Robinson. Thos. E Fr. M. E 306 7th, Box 3372 Cana. N. C. 

Roebuck, R. Bradley Fr. Ag.__ .207 7th, Box 3339 Wilmington, N. C. 

Roediger, Chas. L Fr. Tex. Mgt.._ 2202 Hillsboro St Greensboro, N. C. 

Rogers, F. Woodrow .....So. Ch. E 303 8th Asheville, N. C. 



70 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Rogers, J. Ernest Sr. Tex. Mfg 109 5th, Box 3209 _ Concord, N. C. 

Rollings, Raymond S Jr. E. E 116 C„ Pinewood, S. C. 

Rollins, James E...„ Jr. Poul. Sci 108 6th, Box 3244 Raleigh, N. C. 

Rolston, J. Albert. Jr. Ch. E _ 209 Woodburn Road._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Rooney, Arthur E.._ Sr. Ind. Arts._ 214 Wat., Box 5242. Bellevue, Pa. 

Root, Ben H Fr. Ag. Ch.._ 2220 HiUsboro St East Orange, N. J. 

Rose, George A., Ill Fr. Ch. E 101 10th Henderson, N. C. 

Rose, Harney M Jr. Ch. E 340 1911, Box 3820 Greenville, S. C. 

Rose, James P., Jr Fr. Arch. E 207 South, Box 3539._ Durham, N. C. 

Rose, John T., Jr So. Ch. E.._ 215 C_ _ Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Ross, L. Calvin._ Sr. An. Prod 125 A, Box 5201 Greensboro, N. C. 

Rossi, Chas. L Sr. C. E .320 .A_ Torrington, Conn. 

Rountree, Moses, Jr Fr. Ch. E.._... 135 C._ Goldsboro, N. C. 

Rouse, David W Sr. E. E _ 220^ Cox Ave Rose Hill, N. C. 

Routh, B. Z., Jr. So. Tex. C. & D 301 S. Wilmington St Greensboro, N. C. 

Rowe, Da%-id D., Jr Sr. Ch. E 316 Wat., Box 3052 Hickori^ N. C. 

Rowe, Henrj' B Jr. Ch. E .2407 Gark Ave... Mt. Air>', N. C. 

Rowell, J. O Grad. Entom. Fayetteville Rd., Box 5143 Raleigh, N. C. 

Rowland, W. Thos., Jr Jr. Arch. E 317 C._ Charlotte, N. C. 

Ruark, Chas. S So. Ch. E.._ 107 A. Wilmington, N. C. 

Ruark, Joe C Sr. Tex. Mfg 2407 Clark Ave.._ Southport, N. C. 

RudisiU, B. R.. Sr. Tex. Mgt 2405 Clark Ave Cherrj^-ille, N. C. 

Rudisill, Carl B _ _Fr. Tex. Mfg.-_. Fieldhouse Cherrv^ville, N. C. 

Rudisill, Jake A., Jr..... Fr. E. E 101 South, Box 3S01._ Charlotte, N. C. 

Rudy, D. W.... J^uditor, Ag. Ec 13 S. East St..... ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Rue, C. V Fr. M. E 1507 Mordecai Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Ruft3', James W..... Sr. Tex. Mgt 107 Wat., Box 3007.__ Spencer, N. C. 

Runkle, Chas. D Sr. Ch. E 120 Forest Road Raleigh, N. C. 

Rushing, Chas. H.. Fr. Ag. Ed ...309 9th Monroe, N. C. 

Russell, Richard W..__ Fr. M. E .....1905 Park Drive Kinston, N. C. 

Ryan, John J. Sr. Tex. C. & D 219 A._ New Bedford, Mass. 

•Ryburn, Wm. 0., Jr Grad. For..__ ...130 Hawthorne Rd Salisbury-, N. C. 

Rj-neska, Stephen B..... So. For 416 S. Boylan Ave Amesbur>', Mass. 

Sabol, Frank P Sr. Cer. E..___ 126 8th Campbell, Ohio 

Sabolyk, Robert Jr. Ind. Arts._ 214 Wat., Box 5242.__ Yonkers, N. Y. 

Sadler, Ralph E — Fr. Ag 306 6th, Box 3266 .Burhngton, N. C. 

Sales, Philip N..__ Jr. Ch. E 310 Wat., Box 3046.__ ..Asheville, N. C. 

Sampson, Joe E.._ Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 115 8th Guilford College, N. C. 

Sanders, H. K., Jr Jr. Ag. E 118 A__ Roxboro, N. C. 

Sanders, R. W Fr. Ag. Clayton, N. C. 

Sanders, S. Warren Fr. M. E...... 228 8th Wilmington, N. C. 

Sandridge, Gordon R So. Tex. C. & D 103 Chamberlain St Charlotte, N. C. 

Sanford, Carl N..__ Grad. M. E ...1812 Park Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Santopolo, Frank A So. For 326 A. Box 5507 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Santore, Chas. A Jr. Tex. C. & D 2004 HiUsboro St., Box 5565 Hasbrouck Heights, 

N.J. 
Santore, Gabriel L Fr. Cer. E 310 8th Hasbrouck Heights, 

N.J. 

Santos, Ernest V Sr. Tex. C. & D 1814 Park Drive Pasay, P. I. 

Sapos, James C Fr. E. E 222 Park Ave Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Sarandria, Thos. J. So. Tex. Mfg.._ 326 A. Box 5507 West New York, N. J. 

Sarandria, WiUiam... Jr. Tex. Mfg 2004 HiUsboro St West New York, N. J. 

Sasser, C. Wavman.. So. M. E 218 South, Box 3550._ Wilson, N. C. 

Sasser, Joe N Fr. Ag 124 C._ ..Goldsboro, N. C. 

Satterwhite, C. Johnson Fr. Ch. E.._ Apex. Rutherford College, 

N. C. 

Sauls, H. Austin, Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 119 8th Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Saunders, Chas. L Fr. Ag. Ed Withdrew Sept. 21 Weeksville, N. C. 

Saunders, Clyde W ..Jr. Ag. Ch 4 South, Box 3600._ Ruffin, N. C. 

Sauvain, Ed.' B Sr. Tex. Mgt..... 225 C._ Concord, N. C. 

Savini, John Jr. Geol. E. 231 South, Box 5173.. North Hanover, Mass. 

Savini, Oreste Fr. Tex. Mfg 1 Fieldhouse, Box 5173 ...North Hanover, Mass. 



Student Directory 71 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Sawyer, Frank S., Jr...._ Fr. E. £...._ 108 10th South Mills, N. C. 

Sawyer, James H., Jr Sr. C. E 209 5th, Box 3221 New Bern, N. C. 

Sawyer, W. Ray Fr. Ind. Arts 2 Fieldhouse Greensboro, N. C. 

Sayah, Max Fr. Ch. E 316 7th, Box 3382 AUentown, Pa. 

Sayre, Ed. H So. For .2004 Hillsboro St .Tryon, N. C. 

Schaefer, Robert K So. E. E 330 C N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Schallwig, Frank A Fr. E. E 214 8th Black Mountain, N. C. 

Schandler, Seymour...._ Sr. Tex. C. & D 2304 Clark Ave.._ AsheviUe, N. C. 

Schatzman, Leonard Fr. Ag 129 8th Passaic, N. J. 

Schell, S. C.._ Grad. Entom 2716 Everett Ave York, Pa. 

Schenck, John F., Ill Fr. Tex. Mfg 101 8th Shelby, N. C. 

Schmidt, Fred H So. Flori -516 Daughtridge St Raleigh, N. C. 

Schubart, Chas. S Fr. Ag. Ec 108 5th, Box 3208 .Maplewood, N. J. 

Schubert, George R...._ Fr. For 209 A, Box 5574 Chicago, 111. 

Schworm, Sprague Jr. Geol. E 102 Wat., Box 3002 Charlotte, N. C. 

Scoggins, H. Dwight Fr. Tex. Mfg ...-.304 5th, Box 3228 Wilmington, N. C. 

Scott, C. C, Jr So. Ag. Ed 216 A Mars Hill, N. C. 

Scott, Hubert C.._ So. Ag „ 110 5th, Box 3210 Kenly, N. C. 

Scott, John A Jr. M. E 113 South, Box 3513 Charlotte, N. C. 

Scott, John W., Jr Fr. M. E 106 9th Warrenton, N. C. 

Scott, Wm. L., Jr Fr. Soils._ Goldsboro, N. C. 

Scrivener, J. Ray, Jr...._ Fr. M. E 109 10th Spencer, N. C. 

Seagle, Miss Eleanor R Auditor 1544 Iredell Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Seagraves, W. P.... .Grad. E. M ..404 Chamberlain St Raleigh, N. C. 

Searcy, Henry M Fr. For 13 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Sears, John L., Jr So. Ag .237 A Morrisville, N. C. 

Seawell, Wm. D.._ Fr. Tex. Mfg.... 104 8th.... .Greensboro, N. C. 

Sedberry, G. Reece So. Tex. Mfg 212 6th, Box 3260 Concord, N. C. 

Seegars, Neal W So. Ag .....109 A....... Fairfield, N. C. 

Seely, J. Frank ...Grad. Ch. E College Ct. Apt. 5 Chester, Pa. 

Seitz, Wm. E Fr. Ag. Ed 227 C, Box 5382. Newton, N. C. 

Selkinghaus, W. E Grad. M. E 2823 Kilgore St .Raleigh, N. C. 

Semanik, John M., Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg 215 7th, Box 3347 AveriU Park, N. Y. 

Setser, Chas. E .Fr. Ag 10 Fieldhouse Franklin, N. C. 

Setser, Mack S Jr. Ag 207 6th, Box 3255 Franklin, N. C. 

Setzer, Chas. M., Jr Fr. M. E.... 202 5th, Box 3214 Charlotte, N. C. 

Setzer, J. D Jr. E. E 135 1911, Box 3735 Maiden, N. C. 

Sevier, J. Rollins Jr. Cer. E Gymnasium, Box 5404 Asheville, N. C. 

Seyter, Wm. G ..Soph. E. E 106 Logan Court Union City, N. J. 

Shallington, T. Wm Jr. An. Prod ..10 Enterprise St., Box 5065 .Columbia, N. C. 

Sharp, Walter D.... Sr. E. E 302 C Greensboro, N. C. 

Sharpe, J. Harold ......Fr. Ag 109 8th BurHngton, N. C. 

Shaughnessy, Martin J Fr. Ind. E 307 Hillcrest Rd..... Raleigh, N. C. 

Shaw, A. Turner, Jr .....Fr. Tex. W. & D .Cameron Ct. S-3-C Raleigh, N. C. 

Shaw, D. J Grad. Tex. C. & D...2404 Hillsboro St Hagaman, N. Y. 

Shaw, James T Sr. Tex. Mgt 210 Groveland Ave Macon, N. C. 

Shaw, Warren C Fr. Ag 210 7th, Box 3342 Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Shearin, Dallas C Jr. Ch. E 301 South, Box 3565 Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Shearin, Grover L Fr. Ag. Ed 102 7th, Box 3302.. Littleton, N. C. 

Shearon, Emil C ....Jr. M. E Route 3. Raleigh, N. C. 

Shearon, Kervin B Sr. Ch. E 220 A.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Sheets, C. Herman Fr. Ch. E 230 7th, Box 3362 Salisbury, N. C. 

Sheetz, Glenn M So. M. E 303 C AUentown, Pa. 

Shelburne, Vic B., Jr Fr. Ch. E 2212 Hope St Washington, N. C. 

Shelden, Hugh W., II So. Ag 528 N. Bloodworth St Raleigh, N. C. 

Shelden, Robert E Fr. C. E 528 N. Bloodworth St Raleigh, N. C. 

Shepherd, D. S., Jr ...Fr. M. E 205 Capitol Apts Raleigh, N. C. 

Sherratt, W. A ...Grad. Ind. Arts 202 Groveland Ave Glenolden, Pa. 

Shevchenko, Richard P .Fr. M. E 201 7th, Box 3333 _ ...Port Norris, N. J. 

Shields, Frank P Sr. Soils 1922 Hillsboro St Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Shimer, C. B ...Grad. For....... 2207 Hope St Kinston, N. C. 

Shimer, Ralph B So. Ch. E.._ 2008 Hillsboro St Kinston, N. C. 

Shinn, Kenneth A., Jr So. Tex. Mfg 307 6th, Box 3267 China Grove, N. C 



72 



North Caeolina State College 



Name 

Shoaf, Edwin H. 

Shoe. George W 

Shoffner, J. Emmett 

Short, Robert E 

Shotwell, J. 1 a5'lor 

Shoub, Joseph L 

Showaker, >lerle R 

Shumaker, Richard L 

Shumate, J. A., jr 

Sibert, 1. B 



Classin-ccaion 



_Fr. E. E 

Jr. Aich. E. 
-Fr. ar. E._ 
Jr. C. E. 



-Jr. Tex. Mfg.- 

-Fr. For 

-Fr. E. E 

-Fr. M. E 

-Fr. Ch. E 



School Address 

-220 7th. 5: . ]■]: 

.L^4Wooc:_rr :,; 

-106J-^ E. North St.. 

-215 7th, Box 3347 

-124 South, Box 3524_ 
-19 8th 



-504 Dixie TraiL 



Sickerott, Carl D 

Sides, Burton E. 

Sigmon, Ross M., Jr- 

Sites, Lambert E 

Silver, Chas. H. 
Silver, Miss \ irginia X. 

Simmons, Abj" \N 

Simmons, J. Uempsej"— 

Simmons, J. M 

Simmons, Paul H 

Simmons, R. Troy 

Simpson, S. S.__ 

Simpson, W. C 

Simpson, Wm. V. 
Sims, James G- 



-So. M. E 

-So. Tex. C. & D.- 

-Fr. Tex. Mfg 

-Sr. E. E 



-2702 Rosedale Ave. 
-529 7th, Box 3395_ 
-205 5th, Box 3217_ 
-2407 Cbrk Ave. 

-26 8th 



Home Address 

-Oiailotte, N. C 
-Greenvilk, N. C 

i^, N. C. 
-Prospect Park, Pa. 
-Henderson, N. C. 
-East Orange, N. J. 
-Raleigh, N. C. 



B.. 



Jr. 



Sinback, Christopher N— 

Sinclair, James B 

Singer, Jack L 

Singsen, Edwin P 

Sink, Archie M 

Sink, L. G.. Jr. 

Sisgoreo. Eugene 

Skipper,' W. H 

Skowronek, Lester J 

Slagle, C. Slier, Jr 

Slesinger, M. Leonard. 

Sloop, Albert M 

Small, A. Ray 

Small, J. Eugene- 



-Sr. Tex. Mfg 

-Fr. Gen. Engr — 
-Grad. Ror. i>oc.. 

-Jr. For 

-Jr. F. C. &: P. 

-Fr. ^L E 

-Fr. Ag. Ed 

-Fr. Ch. E 

-Fr. For 

-Sr. E. E._. 

-Jr. Ch. E 

-So. Ch. E 



— 21 Enterprise St.. 
—205 Wat-, Box 5023- 

— Midwav Plantation 

—106 Home St.. Box 5314_ 
—2720 Bedford Ave-_ 
—226 1911, Box 5766- 
—208 10th 



-227 7th, Box 3359- 
-122 7th, Box 3322— 
-205 8th 



.Philadelphia, Pa. 

-Charlotte, N. C. 

-^ instrnj-Salem, X. C 

-Siler City, N. C 

-W insttm-Salem, N. C. 

-Sahsbuiy, X. C 

ibiug, X. C. 
-Rakigh, iV C. 
-Raldgh, X. C. 
-GuUiport, Miss. 
-Seven Spiin^, X. C. 
-Greensboro, N. C. 
-Yadkinville, N. C 



-Jr. Ch. E 

-Fr. Cer. E 

-Fr. M. E.____- 
-Grad. PouL Sd.^ 

-Fr. Ag. Ed. 

-Fr. Ag 

-Fr. M. E 

-Fr. C. E 

-Sr. C. E 

-So. Ag 

-Sr. Tex. C. 
-Fr. M. E._ 



_302 C, Box 553 1 
—115 South, Box 5515- 
— 223 South, Box 3555_ 
—228 1911, Box 5768— 
— 3153 Stanhope Ave_ 

— I'iS C 

—14 Bagwell Ave. 

-221 8th 

-19 8th ; 

— 3 Gymnastum 

-334 8th 

_103 C 

-307 South, Box 5127- 



-Fr. M. E 

-Jr. Tex. C. & D-_ 

-Sr. Yam Mfg 

-Fr. M. E 



& D 2304 Clark Ave. 

130 8th 

205 9th 



Smart, Chas. S., Jr 

Smart, Joseph F 

Smaw, Miss .\nnie E Grad. Voc Guii 

Smith, B. J Fr. Tex. Mfg_ 

Smith, CarroU H., Jr Sr. Ch. E 

Smith, Connor H., UI Fr. E. E 



Smith, Emmett C, Jr._ 

Smith, E. Thos 

Smith, Fred O 

Smith, Gay .\.. 



-So. Ag. Ed-. 
-Jr. Ag. Ed.- 
-So. M. E.- 
-Fr. Ag 



Smith, Gherman R 

Smith, George T., Jr-_ 

Smith, Ivan W 

Smith, John .A 

Smith, J. Ed 

Smith, J. Frank 

Smith, J. McCree_ 
Smith, James X., Jr.- 

Smith, J. Roy, Jr 

Smith, John S 

Smith. Marv-in B 

Smith, Macon S.. 



_Jr. Tex. C. & D- 

-Jr. C- E __ 

—Grad. Occ Guid.. 

-Fr. Ag 

-Fr. Cer. E 

-_So. Ch- E 

-So. C. E.- 

-Sr. 

-Sr. 

-Sr. F. C. & P. B.- 

-Jr. Ag. Ed 

-Jr. .\rch. E 



Smith, Xorbome G., Jr Jr. Ch. E.. 

Smith, Ray Jr. Ag 



Rosebonx, X. C 
Winnetka, IlL 
Xortblk, Va. 
Greensboro, X. C 
Roxboro, X. C 
Tarboro, N. C. 
Raleigh, X. C. 
Xew Vork. X. Y. 
Rumford, R. I. 
.Lexington, X. C 
.Lexington, X. C. 
Far kockaway, X. Y. 
.Wilmingt<Mi, X. C. 
Xew York, X. Y. 
Frankhn, X. C. 
Rakigh, X. C- 
Kannapolis, X. C. 
Albemarle, X.C- 
-2508 \ anderhflt Ave.,Box 5444_Concord, X. C. 

-1922 Hillsboro St. Concord, X. C. 

-123 7th, Box 3323 Concoid, X. C. 

-619 W. Jones St. Raldgfa, N. C. 

-Withdrew Sept. 19 Lexii^on, X. C. 

-209 5th, Box 3221 Bachelor, X. C. 

-117 7th, Box 3317 Sanford, X. C. 

— ^Wagram, X. C. 

Raleigh, X- C. 

McLeansville, X. C. 

Stony Point, X. C. 

— Goldsbmo, X. C. 

Chailotte, X. C. 

Hendeisonville, X. C. 

— Vass, X. C. 
— Raleigh, X. C. 
Avondale, X. C. 

- Raldgh. N- C. 

Xew Bon, X. C. 

Charlotte, X. C. 

Lincdnton, X. C. 

Denttm, X. C. 

—Raleigh, X. C- 

Goldsboro, X- C. 

Xutky, X- J. 



-Route 5 

-325 1911, Box 3805. 

-9 8th 

-124 C 



-218 Wat., Box 3036- 



-2820 Clark Avenue_.. 
-107 South, Box 3507- 

_306 5th, Box 3230 

-2402 Everett -\ve 

J35 1911, Box 3815— 
.101 South, Box 3501_ 

-213 C Box 5322 

-325 South, Box 3589_ 

-708 Florence St 

-1720 Hillsboro St. 



-Gymnasiuin, Box 5404. 



Student Directory 73 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Smith, R. Jack, Jr Fr. Cer. E 102 9th .....Goldsboro, N. C. 

Smith, Raymond L.._ Fr. Ag. Ed.._ 122 7th, Box 3322 Roseboro, N. C. 

Smith, R. Sharp So. Arch. E 305 6th, Box 3265 Asheville, N. C. 

Smith, R. S Sr. F. C. & P. B 3 Maiden Lane. Vanceboro, N. C. 

Smith, Thos. A So. Ag. Ed.._ 6 South, Box 3602._ Atkinson, N. C. 

Smith, Wren -Fr. Ag. Ed.._ 216 South, Box 3548._ Forest Citv, N. C. 

Smith, Walter C... ..-Sr. Poul. Sci 113 Wat.. Box 3013.__- Rich Square, N. C. 

Smith, W. L., Jr ...Sr. Ch. E 4 South, Box 3600._ .......Charlotte, N. C. 

Smith, Wvatt L Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 2405 Clark .\ve.._ .....Wilmington, N. C. 

Smith, Wilton W..__ Sr. E. E 128 South, Box 3528._ Ransomville, N. C. 

Smoyver, Ezio.__ Fr. C. E .232 7th, Box 3364 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snakenberg, Robert L.... Jr. Ch. E 217 Glascock St Raleigh, N. C. 

Snapp, Wm. R., Jr Fr. M. E ...114 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Sneed, Edgar M Fr. M. E 2633 Fairview Road ......^........Raleigh, N. C. 

Snipes, Moses L So. For 10 Enterprise St., Box 5065._ Sanford, N. C. 

Snow, Grover P.._ Fr. M. E ...Route 2 Raleigh, N. C. 

Snyder, George W.._ ....Sr. C. E 1620 Hillsboro St Wadesboro, N. C. 

Soifer, Saul Fr. Tex. Mfg.._ 119 8th... Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Soroka, Jack Jr. Tex. C. & D 329 A Lachine, Canada 

Sorrell, Russell Sr. Arch. E 1405 Wake Forest Road._.... Raleigh, X. C. 

Soufas, Chas. C. Fr. Cer. E Withdrew Sept. 18 Wilson, N. C. 

Souther, Raymond L Sr. Ag. Ed 112 5th, Box 3212 ...Biltmore, N. C. 

Southerland, J. E ...Fr. E. E 305 8th ..Wilmington, N. C. 

Spainhour, Carroll D ...Fr. M. E 21 8th Greensboro, N. C. 

Spargo, Lov H., Jr .....Fr. E. E ......133 1911, Box 3733 ....Charlotte, N. C. 

Spear, Warren H Sr. M. E.. 2407 Clark Ave..„ Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Speas, Herbert M So. Ag 232 South, Box 3564._ Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Spencer, B. Frank .So. Ag .....3208 Clark Ave — Scranton, N. C. 

Spencer, B. Branklin So. E. E 2212 Hope St Goldsboro, N. C. 

Spiker, Theo. F ...Jr. For 129 C Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Spruiell, S. Glenn So. For.... .....2402 Hillsboro St Leeds, .\la. 

Spruill, Wm. H So. M. E 310 6th, Box 3270 Oriental, N. C. 

Squires, Ervin W Jr. Ch. E 326 1911, Box 3806 .......Draper, N. C. 

Stacv, Lucius E., Jr Sr. M. E ...215 Wat., Box 3033._.. Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Staley, Chas. W Fr. Cer. E .316 7th, Box 3382 Greensboro, N. C. 

Stallings, Ernest M.._ .Sr. Ag. Ec. 239 C .....Selma, N. C. 

Stallings, F. C, Jr Fr. Soils 2402 Hillsboro St Jamesville, X. C. 

Stamey, H. M. Jr. F. C 126 C, Box 5635 Canton, X. C. 

Stancil, W. Shirlev— So. Ind. E Garner._ Garner, X. C. 

Stancill, Wm. E.._' Fr. M. E ...2220 Hillsboro St.... Washington, X. C. 

Stansbun,', E. Eugene Sr. Ch. E Box 6, Wake Forest Wake Forest, X. C. 

Stanton, James E Fr. Tex. Mfg.... 104 7th, Box 3304 S. Dartmouth, Mass. 

Starnes, B. Frank, Jr .Fr. Ch. E ...326 8th Monroe, X. C. 

Starnes, M. Eugene Sr. Ag. Ed .....2411 Everett Ave.. Monroe, X'. C. 

Steiner, Walter C Fr. Ch. E 209 Woodburn Rd Merchantville, X. J. 

StephenofF. Macke S., Jr Fr. C. E .......325 7th, Box 3391 Richmond, Va. 

Stephenson, Thos. X Fr. M. E 211 W. Jones St Raleigh, X. C. 

Sternberg, Elia ...Jr. C. E 323 A. Tel .\viv, Palestine 

Stetson, Xathaniel Sr. Ch. E 340 A. ....New Bedford, Mass. 

Stevens, A. Kerr, Jr Fr. Ag. Withdrew Sept. 25 Raeford, X. C. 

Stevens, Rex A., Jr Sr. Ag. Ed 9 South, Box 3605.„ Goldsboro, X. C. 

Stevens, Robert B So. M. E 311 South, Box 3575._ Camden, X. C. 

Stewart, Earl L., Jr Fr. Ind. Arts 326 C Roxboro, X. C. 

Stewart, J. W. Claud, Jr.....Fr. M. E 119 7th, Box 3319 Laurinburg, X. C. 

Stilwell, Marion L..__ So. Tex. C. & D 112 A.... Thomasville, X. C. 

Stimpson, James E., Jr Fr. M. E 202 7th, Box 3334 Mt. .\irA', X. C. 

Stinson, Miss Katharine Jr. M. E 11 Enterprise St ....Varina, X'. C. 

Stockard, H. Jerome, Jr Fr. Gen. Engr 705 Hillsboro St Raleigh, X. C. 

Stoddard, D. L Grad. PI. P ...2316 Hillsboro St Hvattsville, Md. 

Stokes, Eston S.. Jr. Ag. Ed 107 5th, Box 3207 Lenwood. X. C. 

Stone, Carl V Fr. Cer. E 1107 Mordecai Drive Raleigh, X. C. 

Stout, Paul E..__ So. C. E 117 C High Point, X. C. 

Strait, John H Fr. M. E „339 1911, Box 3819 Biddeford, Maine 



74 



North Caeolina State College 



Strawbridge, J. Nelson 

Strayhome, George \ 

Strickland, A. T 

Strickland, Roscoe C. 
Stripling, Sheldon A- 

Strong. Ham- G 

Strong, M. D 

Stroud, Joseph J 

Stroup, Howell W 

Stroupe, Jack... 



Classification, 



School Addrcjs 



.2513 Dark Ave 

21S Wat., Box 5036_ 

Bo.x Li, Car\- 

12 South. Box 36(^_. 
L>1 7th, Box 333L..... 



282. 



Stmthers, Da^•id L., Jr, 
Stuart, Adrian X.. 
Stuart. R. F., T 

Stubbs, Wm. B 

Stuckey, Milton A 

Stuckey, Robert C, Jr 

Sturkey, James M 

Stutts, James I 

Sugg, J. Lloyd 

Sugg, Wm. J 

Suggs, J. Ro\-stoi 
SuUivan. Chas. S 



Sullivan. E. Thos 

SuUivan. J. ^^ 

Summers, L. Neil, Jr 

Sumner, Jesse \\ ._ _ 

Sumpter, Fred P.. Jr 

Surratt, W. Quentin 

Suther, Fred L., Jr 

Suther, George A 

Suther. John H.. Jr 

Suttenneld, W. Harrj-. Jr. 

Sutton. DaNnd A . 

Sutton. Wallace M 

Swaim, B. Clajton 

Swanker, Ralph H. 

Sweeney, Edwin J 
Sweet, Harold M. 
Sweez^-. H. L 



Jr. E. E 

.So. M. E 

.Sr. C. E 

„5o. Tex. Mfg.- 

_Fr. Cer. E 

„Fr. Cer. E 205 Sth 

Jr. Ch. E __-..303 C 

_Sr. C. E 101 C 

_Jr. F. C. & P. B. 122 C Box 

_Fr. Ag Withdrew Sept. 22. 

_.So. C. E 303 Wat., Box 3059. 

Tex. C. & D. ._„117 C 

Ae 10 9th. 

M: E 227 8th „ 

-1911 Sunset Drive 

3109 Hillsboro St._-.. 
332 1911, Box 3812_. 
112 South, Box 5512. 
319 South, Box 3585_ 

1806 HiUsboro St 

118 7th, Box 3318 

221 South, Box 3553. 
315 A 




M. E... 

Tr. Ag. Ed 

-Fr. W. C. & M. 

-So. For 

Jr. Ind. .\rts. 



_202 South, Box 5262. 

-133 7th, Box 3401 

_108th . 

-Withdrew Sept. 11 

-116 Groveland Ave. 



..-Fr. Ag. Ed. 
-Fr. Ag. Ed.. 
...Fr. M. E.„.- 

„Jr. For . 

-Fr. Tex. Mfg.— 324 South, Box 35SS.. 

_Sr. M. E 13 South, Box 3609._. 

_Fr. M. E 204 8th ..._ -_ 

_J"r. Tex. Mgt 1922 Hillsboro St. 

._Sr. Ag. Ed 106 6th. Box 3242 ... 

.„So. Tex. W. & D 537}^ E. Tones St — 

210 6"th. Box 3258-._. 

213 7th, Box 3345.-... 

323 7th, Box 35S9 ... 
112 Sth. 



Swett, James B., Jr 
Swiimey. Grover C, Jr. 

Tager, Sidney 

TaUey, Qaude E..- 

Tarlton, C. W 

Tart, C. Vic 

Tate, Lawrence H. 
Tatum. R. L 




.414 Chamberlain St.. 

107 ,A.__ 

9th. 



-_Jr. Tex. Mfg 2304 Clark .\ve 

__Jr. E. E 102 Wat., Box 5002._. 

„Fr. Ag. Ed. 205 6th, Box 3253 

__So. Ag. Ed 228 C 

.Fr. M. E Cameron Park .\pt. 3 



Taylor, G. Stanley 

Tavlor. Harold G 

Taylor, H. M., Jr 

Taylor, James R., Jr._ 
Tavlor, Lawrence H.. Jr. 
TaVlor. Mark H 



-Jr. Ch. E 

_Fr. Ag. Ed 

_So. Ag _ 

-Sr. M. E 

..Fr. .\rch. E._- 
For 



-2708 Vanderbilt Av. 
-133 7th, Box 3401. 

-109 -A_ __. 

-2513 Clark Ave — 
_3 9th 



Taylor. Roger G __ 

Taylor. T. K 

Taylor. W. Granville, Jr.. 

Teague. Ketton H 

Teague, Norwood 

Teal, Jennings B 

Tedder, John W 

Temple. Grover P 

Terr^-. Herman L 



-Grad. W. C 

.Fr. ^L E 

„Sr. Tex. Mfg.. 

-Sr. M. E 

-Jr. Geol. E 

-Jr. Ind. .\rts_ 

-Fr. M. E 

-Fr. Ch. E 

-Fr. Ag 

-Fr. For 



&M. 



-305 7th, Box 3371. 

-Brooks .\ve 

_-124 Sth. 

118 Wat., Box 3018_. 

203 Wat., Box 3021_ 

120 South, Box 3520_ 

2714 Vanderbilt Ave.. 

16 8th 

.204 10th. 



-313 7th, Box 3379. 
-112 8th 



Home Address 

-Durham, N. C. 

-Spencer. N. C. 

-Car%-, N. C. 

-Nash%-ille, N. C. 

-Raleigh. N. C. 

_Br>-n Mawr, Pa. 

-Br\-n Mawr. Pa. 

-Southern Pines, N. C. 

_Cherr\-ville, N. C. 

-Chenyville, N. C. 

-\S ilmington, N. C. 

.-Snow Camp, N. C. 

-Rowland, N. C. 

Rockingham, N. C. 

Fremont, N. C. 

-..Raleigh, N. C. 

^\lbemarle, N. C. 

..-Black Mountain, N. C. 
.-Varina, N. C. 
—Princeton, N. C. 
-..WTiite\-ille, N. C. 
— \she%-ille, N. C. 
-_Douglaston, N. Y. 
_West Brighton, N. Y. 
„States%-ille, N. C. 
—Conway, N. C. 

Roxboro, N. C. 

_Burlington, N. C. 
-..Charlotte, N. C. 
-Charlotte, N. C. 
—Concord, N. C. 
— States%-ille, N. C. 

-Goldsboro, N. C. 

-Roctv Mount, N. C. 

-Cycle, N. C. 

.-Poughkeepsie. N. Y. 

-Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

-Spencer, N. C. 

-Locust Grove, Okla. 

-Southern Pines, N. C. 

-Draper, N. C. 



-Brookl\Ti, N. Y. 
-Semora, N. C. 
-Ma^sh^-iUe, N. C. 
-Dunn, N. C. 
-Raleigh. N. C. 
.-Raleigh. N. C. 
-Jackson, N. C. 
-Seaboard. N. C. 
-High Point. N. C. 
-Charlotte. N. C. 
-Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 
-High Point, N. C. 
-High Point, N. C. 
-Hanes, N. C. 
_\she>-ille, N. C. 
-Siler Citv. N. C. 
-Raleigh, N. C. 
..McFarlan, N. C. 
-Ellenboro, N. C. 
-Buim Level, N. C. 
-Spencer. N. C. 



Student Directory 75 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Tew, 0. B., Jr Fr. Ag. Ed 22 South, Box 3618 Godwin, N. C. 

Tharp, Edward R So. C. E 327 A, Box 5507. Shamokin, Pa. 

Thau, Harold Jr. Tex. Mfg .....Withdrew Sept. 12._.... Brighton Beach, N Y. 

Thigpen, J. K. __ Grad. C. E...._ 322 New Bern Ave.._.. Rockv Mount, N. C. 

Thomas, Al W., Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg ...333 7th, Box 3399 Scranton, Pa. 

Thomas, Henrv C ..Sr. Ch. E ...106 South, Box 3506 Rockingham, N. C. 

Thomas, HenrV H.._ Jr. Cer. E... 217 South, Box 3549 Durham, N. C. 

Thomas, R. Bradv So. Ag. Ed 216 Wat., Box 3034._.. Oakboro, N. C. 

Thomas, S. LeRoy, Jr Jr. Cer. E..__ Mail: 518 Professional Bldg.._.Westfield, N. J. 

Thomason, James W Fr. M. E .....301 7th, Box 3367 Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Thomason, W. Aldine, Jr Jr. Tex. Mfg .103 Chamberlain St.... Charlotte, N. C. 

Thompson, J. B.._ Jr. Ind. Arts 205 A, Box 5282.__ Mt. Holly, N. C. 

Thompson, J. Wayne._ So. Ch. E 1614 Scales St Raleigh, N. C. 

Thompson, 

Lawrence C, Jr Fr. For..... 129 7th, Box 3329 Charlotte, N. C. 

Thompson, Oswald B Fr. Ag..__ 121 7th, Box 3321 Goldsboro, N. C. 

Thompson, Wm. B., Jr So. Ch. E ...21 Enterprise St Goldsboro, N. C. 

Thompson, Wallace F .....Jr. Ag. Ed 122 C.„ Ehzabeth City, N. C. 

Thornburg, W. Hugh.__ Jr. Ag 102 A Candor, N. C. 

Thornton, James L., Jr Sr. Ch. E 2406 Hillsboro St Spencer, N. C. 

Thrailkill, Wm. J Fr. Ag. Ed.._ .....230 A.... Ape.x, N. C. 

Threlkeld, Polk L., Jr.._ So. Cer. E ...140 1911, Box 3740 Asheville, N. C. 

Thurmond, Roy C.._ Fr. Ind. Arts.__. 306 8th Rockv Mount, N. C. 

Thurner, J. T..__ So. For .....109 C... Greensboro, N. C. 

Tillev, T. Marshall. So. E. E 547 E. Hargett St..__ Bahama, N. C. 

Tillman, J. E Sr. Tex. C. & D Ill Wat., Box 30_11.__ Wadesboro, N. C. 

Tinga, Jacob So. Ag .302 South, Box 3566 Castle Havne, N. C. 

Tipton, W. J So. Ag. Ch 108 Home St.._ Forbes, N. C. 

Todd, Edwin R Jr. Cer. E..__ 2513 Clark Ave.._. Charlotte, N. C. 

Todd, F. A Fr. Ag. Ed 213 9th Wendell, N. C. 

Toffoli, Peter V., Jr Fr. M. E ...HI 8th Charlotte, N. C. 

Tolbert, J. Warren So. E. E 140 1911, Box 3740 .CoUettsville, N. C. 

Tolmie, John A Fr. Tex. Mfg.. 112 7th, Box 3312 Montreal, Canada 

Tommola, Urho Jr. M. E.._ ...229 k Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tovey, Keith D Grad. Soils 6 Enterprise St Pocatello, Idaho 

Towers, R. E Sr. Tex. Mgt 1702 Hillsboro St., Box 5542 Rome, Ga. 

Towery, Eugene S., Jr Jr. Cer. E..__ 203 5th, Box 3215 Concord, N. C. 

Townsend, C. Gordon.... Sr. Ag. Ed .8 South, Box 3604 Hamer, S. C. 

Townsend Elbert T.._ Fr. E. E 302 9th St. Pauls, N. C. 

Travlor, Don F Sr. For ...302 Home St.._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Trescott, Waldo So. Tex. Mfg 219 South, Box 3551 Wollaston, Mass. 

Trevathan, Louis B.. .So. Ag. E 103 6th, Box 3239. Dobson, N. C. 

Trexler, H. Flowe Fr. E. E 230 Sth Wadesboro, N. C. 

Trobaugh, T. R Fr. Flori ...Greenhouse Morristown, Tenn. 

Troute, Guye W So. Ag. Ed .312 Wat., Box 3048..._ Forest City, N. C. 

Troutman, J. M., Jr Fr. Ag _ Infirmary .....Statesville, N. C. 

Troxler, R. T Fr. Ind. Arts.___ 115 7th, Box 3315 Elon College, N. C. 

Truex, A. Crawford So. M. E 2004 Hillsboro St Hendersonville, N. C. 

Truitt, John R. _ So. M. E 115 South, Box 3515 Greensboro, N. C. 

Truslow, Frank O Sr. Ch. E 21 South, Box 3617 .Draper, N. C. 

Tunstall, Shelton Fr. Ag.. 114 7th, Box 3314 Hester, N. C. 

Tunstall, Thos. H Fr. Ag.._ ....20 Logan Court Lovingston, Va. 

Turbeville, James R Fr. E. E 126 7th, Box 3326 Hamlet, N. C. 

TurUngton, Chas. T Fr. E. E 205 6th, Box 3253 ..Coats, N. C. 

Turner, C. W.._ Grad. Soils 220 Cox Ave North Scituate, R. I. 

Turner, Dwight L Jr. Tex. C. & D 14 South, Box 3610 Greensboro, N. C. 

Turner, George H So. Ch. E.._ 407 S. Boylan Ave Clinton, N. C. 

Turner, G. H., Jr.. Fr. Ag.. Route 2 Raleigh, N. C. 

Turner, P. Pickett, Jr. ._ So. Cer. E 307 A Greensboro, N. C. 

Turner, Sam W Sr. M. E..__ 116 Wat., Box 3016 Washington, D. C. 

Turner, Thos. M .Fr. Gen. Engr 229 8th.. Washington, D. C. 

Twittv, W. Conway, Jr Fr. Tex. Mfg 303 7th, Box 3369. Rock Hill, S. C. 

Tyren, Ted T Sr. M. E..__ 313 Wat., Box 3049.__ Durham ,N. C. 



76 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Umberger, C. Dwyer So. Ch. E 115 Wat., Box 3015.„ Mt. UUa, N. C. 

Underwood, V. Harvey Jr. Ag .....Greenhouse, Box 52S4._ St. Paul, N. C. 

Upton, Fred E., Jr .So. C. E 311 South, Box 3575 Camden, N. C. 

Uzzell, A. Thos., Jr Jr. F. Mkt 204 5th, Box 3216 .....Moore Haven, Fla. 

Valaer, E. Paul Jr. Ag 126 Forest Road... Washington, D. C. 

Valentino, John P Fr. For 205 7th, Box 3337 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Van Arsdale, Wm. D., Jr Fr. E. E 211 7th, Box 3343 East Orange, N. J. 

Vance, Frank K So. E. E 216 C Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Vann, A. Roland... Fr. E. E 9 9th Selma, N. C. 

Vann, I. M., Jr Sr. E. E 2004 HiUsboro St., Box 5482......Clinton, N. C. 

Vann, Richard T..... So. Ag. Ed .....2230 HiUsboro St .....Murfreesboro, N. C. 

Vanstory, J. Henry Jr. An. Prod 5 Infirmary, Box 5575 Charles, N. C. 

Vaughan, B. F So. Tex. C. & D 212 6th, Box 3260 ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Vause, Robert C Fr. Ag. Ed 101 5th, Box 3201 La Grange, N. C. 

Venters, Travis R Fr. M. E 107 7th, Box 3307 Badin, N. C. 

Vernon, Herman E Fr. Ag...._ 15 8th ...Blanch, N. C. 

Vestal, Alex F Fr. Ag 515 Cole St Raleigh, N. C. 

Vick, D. B Fr. M. E 414 S. Boylan Ave Sanford, N. C. 

Vining, Heath Fr. Arch. E 310 9th..... Washington, D. C. 

Vinson, Sexton C Sr. Ag. Ed 302 Wat., Box 3038..... ..DiUard, Ga. 

Wackerman, John J Fr. For 108 5th, Box 3208 Sea ClifF, N. Y. 

Wade, Chas. R... Fr. M. E 505 Cleveland St... Raleigh, N. C. 

Wagoner, Holmes, Jr Fr. E. E 308 4th, Box 3134 Sanford, N. C. 

Waidler, F. Paul, Jr So. Ind. E 131 Hawthorne Rd...._ Deposit, N. Y. 

Waldin, E. Laval Sr. C. E.... 331 South, Box 3595 Charlotte, N. C. 

Waldin, Samuel M ....So. Tex. Mfg 1922 HiUsboro St..... Charlotte, N. C. 

Walker, F. Albert._ Sr. Tex. C. & D.. 116 A New Bedford, Mass. 

Walker, Howard J ....Fr. Tex.._ 107 Ashe Ave ...Burlington, N. C. 

Wall, Harold B ....Fr. Ag Knightdale Knightdale, N. C. 

Wall, H. Lewis, Jr.._.. Jr. Ag. E 211 6th, Box 3259 Elams, N. C. 

Wall, J. R Jr. Tex. Mfg 109 5th, Box 3209 East Bend, N. C. 

Wall, Shuford M ....So. Ag. E 212 Wat., Box 3030 Lilesville, N. C. 

Wallace, Percy N ..........Fr. Tex. Mfg Ill 7th, Box 3311 ...Franklinville, N. C. 

Wallace, R. D., Jr Fr. Ch. E 1200 Glenwood Ave ..Raleigh, N. C. 

Wallace, Ralph G ....So. M. E 3 S. Person St..... .Raleigh, N. C. 

Walsh, Francis H., Jr Sr. Ch. E.. 219 A New Bedford, Mass. 

Walter, Robert C Grad. M. E 2232 HiUsboro St ...Chicago, 111. 

Walton, Chas. P Fr. M. E 219 8th Durham, N. C. 

Walton, Wm. E ...Fr. For 415 Calvin Rd...... Raleigh, N. C. 

Ward, Edward H Fr. For 120 8th ...Black^one, Va. 

Ward, Robert E., Jr ....Fr. Ag. Ed 2 9th Rosehill, N. C. 

Ward, Wm. J So. An. Prod 18 Home St Belhaven, N. C. 

Waring, Everett E Fr. For 203 8th Fall River Mass. 

Warlick, Robert D So. Ag. Ed .120 C Bellwood, N. C. 

Warner, H. P Jr. Tex. W. & D 30 Shepherd St Raleigh, N. C. 

Warner, Ottis M Fr. An. Prod 327 7th, Box 3393 Scranton, N. C. 

Warren, Floyd D., Jr ...Fr. Ch. E 219 8th Durham, N. C. 

Warren, J. A Fr. Ag. Ed 328 7th, Box 3394 Roseboro, N. C. 

Warren, Johnnie W So. M. E 222 Park Ave Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Warren, Webb W ....Fr. Dairy Mfg..... 317 7th, Box 3383.. Dunn, N. C. 

Warrick, Woodley C Jr. Ag. E..... 329 South, Box 3593 Clayton, N. C. 

Watkins, Gary K Sr. An. Prod 228 South, Box 3560 Blanch, N. C. 

Watkins, George H ....So. Tex. Mfg Wentworth, N. C. 

Watson, A. Buford Jr. M. E 310 '6th, Box 3270 Fayetteville, N. C. 

Watson, Chas. K Sr. Tex. C. & D 106 Wat., Box 3006 Red Springs, N. C. 

Watson, George F Jr. Tex. Mfg 304 4th, Box 3130 Salisbury, N. C. 

Watson, Malcolm E Jr. E. E 239 A Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Watson, Oliver F Jr. Ag. Engr 239 A .Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Watson, Romulus S Jr. Ag 3208 Clark Ave Swan Quarter, N. C. 

Watson, S. Robert, Jr..__ Grad. E. E 222 Hawthorne Rd...._ Henderson, N. C. 

Watters, Jimmie V So. Ind. Arts 222 A, Box 5351 Bridgeport, Pa. 



Student Directory 77 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Watts, John M... Fr. Ag 4 Maiden Lane Statesville, N. C. 

Watts, Richard H., Jr Jr. Tex. W. & D 2513 Clark Ave.._ _ Baldwin, N. Y. 

Waugh, Clvde M Sr. Pom -.202 C, Box 5373 N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Way, Harry T Fr. M. E 906 W. Johnson St Raleigh, N. C. 

Wayant, Jack E. __ Sr. Tex. Mgt 18 Home St Asheville, N. C. 

Wavne, Lester R., Jr...._ Fr. Ag.. 219 7th, Box 3351_ Baldwin, N. Y. 

Wavnick, Daniel T Sr. M. E.._- 103 A.„ Greensboro, N. C. 

Wavnick, J. Walter Fr. Tex. Mfg 103 A. -.- Greensboro, N. C. 

We'ant, George E., Jr Sr. C. E 2405 Clark Ave..... Salisbury-, N. C. 

Weatherlv, E. R .Fr. Ch. E.._ 112 Halifax. Columbia, N. C. 

Weaver, David S..-_ So. Ch. £.._ .520 Daughtridge St Raleigh, N. C. 

Weaver, Frank D., Jr..__ Jr. Ch. E .....226 South, Box 3558._ Wilmington, N. C. 

Weaver, J. R., Jr..__ So. M. E.... ...307 5th, Box 3231 Hickorv, N. C. 

Weaver, R. E.._„ Fr. E. E ..338 1911, Box 3818 AsheviUe, N. C. 

Webb, Fred A., Jr.._. .Sr. Ind. Arts.__ .310 5th, Box 3234 Raleigh, N. C. 

Webb. J. Alton So. Tex. Mfg.._ ...2407 Clark Ave .....Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Weber, Chas. P Sr. Tex. Mgt 10 Enterprise St Glen Rock, N. J. 

Weeks, Samuel J Sr. F. C. & P. B 2312 Bvrd St.._ Raleigh, N. C. 

Welch, Samuel B..... So. Tex. Mfg.._. 210 South, 

Mail: 1922 Hillsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

Welfare, Wm. F., Jr Jr. Ag... ...103 Chamberlain St Wilson, N. C. 

Wellons, James A ...Jr. C. E .517 Polk St Raleigh, N. C. 

Wells, Sherrod P So. C. £...._ 108 South, Box 3508._.... Rockv Mount, N. C. 

Wenige, Arthur E Fr. C. E 208 5th, Box 3220.... Asheville, N. C. 

Wessell, C. B., Jr....__ Fr. Geol. E..... 106 7th, Box 3306 Wilmington, N. C. 

Wesson, R. H...._ Fr. Ag..__ 4 8th Littleton, N. C. 

Wesson, Wm. T Sr. Ag. Ec... 10 South, Box 3606 Flams, N. C. 

West, S. Gordon, Jr Fr. M. E ..322 8th Greensboro, N. C. 

Westbrook. Wm. G., Jr Fr. M. E.... .....1104 Harp St..-„ .....Raleigh, N. C. 

Wester, Al B., Jr Sr. Ch. E 104 Wat., Box 3004.__ Henderson, N. C. 

Wetmore, Edwin H..__ Sr. Ag. Ed .112 Cox Ave Woodleaf, X. C. 

Wetmore, Paul H ...Jr. Ag. Ed... ...112 Cox Ave Woodleaf, N. C. 

Wheatley, Chas. H... Jr. Arch. E 134 1911, Box 3734 Washington, N. C. 

Wheeler, Molton H.._ Jr. E. E .135 1911, Box 3735 Benson, N. C. 

Whitaker, Jack O So. Ag. 127 1911, Box 3727 Horse Shoe, N. C. 

White, Everett S Fr. Ag.. 25 8th Colerain, N. C. 

White, Frank B So. Tex. Mfg .317 C Lenoir, N. C. 

White, John E..... Fr. For... 311 South, Box 3543 Andrews, N. C. 

White, J. Edward, Jr So. M. E .209 Wat., Box 3027.__. Oak Hill, W. Va. 

White, Julian E., Jr .So. Dairy Mfg. 309 W. Edenton St Raleigh, N. C. 

White, James M., Jr.._... Fr. M. E..... ...1103 Harvey St.. Raleigh, N. C. 

White, N. B So. Ag..__ .303 6th. Box 3263 Manson, N. C. 

White, Robert N., Jr .....Sr. Flori 1720 Hillsboro St ....Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Whitehead, J. D., HI Fr. Ag Withdrew Sept. 18. ...Enfield, N. C. 

Whitehurst, W. Branch._ Fr. Tex. Mfg..... 327 7th, Box 3394 Greensboro, N. C. 

Whiteside, Carl._ So. Ag. Ed 312 5th, Box 3236 Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Whitfield, L. E., Jr Sr. M. E..__ 12 South, Box 3608 Asheboro, N. C. 

Whiting, Jim A Fr. C. E 322 7th, Box 3388 Statesville, N. C. 

Whitlev, M. Ray. Jr. E. E 210 5th, Box 3222 Washington, N. C. 

Whitlev, R. W Grad. Soils 2729 Everett Ave Raeford, N. C. 

Whitlev, Sam D.. Fr. Ag..__ 223 C Matthews, N. C. 

WhitleV, V. J., Jr Fr. Ag..__ 17 8th Marshville, N. C. 

Whitson, Chas Jr. M. E 212 South, Box 3544 .\sheville, N. C. 

Whitted, David Rav So. E. E 129 C, Box 5334. Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Wicker. James R Fr. M. E 121 8th Pinehurst, X. C. 

Wicker, June S Jr. W. C. & M ...5 South, Box 3601 Sanford, X. C. 

Wicker, Robert L Sr. C. E. 1620 Hillsboro St Sanford, X. C. 

Wiggin, Norman K So. Tex. Mfg.._... 102 6th, Box 3238 Manoa, U. D., Pa. 

Wiggins, George T Fr. An. Prod....... 20 8th Mt. Olive, N. C. 

Wiggins, John E., Jr Jr. For Ill A. Sunbury, X. C. 

Wilburn. James M., Jr.... Jr. Ag. Ed. .. . Route 5 Raleigh, N. C. 

Wilder, C. A..__ So. Ag. Ed 225 1911, Box 3765. Carthage, X. C. 

Wilfong, John J So. Ag.. 237 A. Lexington, X. C. 



78 North Carolina State College 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Wilkinson, J. W..__ Sr. E. E 340 C Burnside, Ky. 

Willey, John F.._ Sr. Ag. Ed 204 Wat., Bo.x 3022 Gates, N. C. 

Williamowsky, D. Joe Fr. M. E Ill 7th, Box 3311 Ale.xandria, Va. 

\\illiams, Arthur R., Jr Sr. Tex. C. & D 206 Wat., Box 3024 Greensboro, N. C. 

WilHams, E. Avery, Jr Sr. Cer. E..___ 109 Wat., Box 3009 Swan Quarter, N. C. 

\\ilhams, Frank D So. For 322 A Rockv Mount, N. C. 

\^llHams, J. Ed Jr. Tex. Mfg 103 Chamberlain St Washington, N. C. 

\\ilhams, John F., Jr Fr. For 226 8th Silver Springs, Md. 

Williams, John R Sr. C. E ...115 Woodburn Road Arlington, Va. 

Williams, L. C, Jr So. C. E 211 Hawthorne Rd Salisbury, N. C. 

WiUiams, Leon F., Jr Sr. M. E...._ 1816 Park Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Williams, M. S...._ Fr. Ag..__ 224 8th ...HiUsboro, N. C. 

Williams, P. M., Jr..... Fr. E. E Withdrew Sept. 18 Stokesdale, N. C. 

Williams, Ralph B..___ Jr. Ch. E ...131 A Warrenton. N. C. 

Williams, Ralph O Jr. Ch. E 112 C Granite Falls, N. C. 

Williams, Sidnev R Sr. E. E 313 C Essex, N. C. 

Williams, Troy D Jr. Ch. E 2232 Hillsboro St., Box 5002 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

WilHams, T. Mac Jr. Ch. E 405 Calvin Road.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Williams, Walter P So. M. E ISOO St. Marys St Raleigh, N. C. 

W illiams, Wm. S., Jr.. So. Tex. Mfg....... 120 A .". Middlesex, N. C. 

W illiamson, J. C, Jr..__ Fr. Ag..__ 303 9th Bethel, N. C. 

Williamson, John V., Jr Fr. Ch. E 116 A Lumberton, N. C. 

Willis, F. Harvey Fr. Ind. E .....1301 Hillsboro St Stamford, Conn. 

Willis, Hubert M.._... Jr. F. C. & P. B.......330 South, Box 3594.... Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Willis, Jim W Jr. E. E 309 6th, Box 3269 Memphis, Tenn. 

Willis, R. E .....Fr. Ind. Arts._.._ 223 8th Morehead City, N. C. 

Wilson, Barrett D., Jr Fr. Arch. E 2408 Fairview Road Raleigh, N. C. 

W ilson, George W., Jr Fr. Ag... ...232 South. Box 3564 Danville, Va. 

Wilson, Hollis E... Fr. Ag. Ed 230 8th....; Linwood, N. C. 

Wilson, S. K., Jr Fr. Ag _ 329 8th Guilford College, N. C. 

Wilson, S. Leigh .Jr. For 115 Woodburn Rd Arlington, Va. 

Wilson, T. Edwin So. For 121 Montgomery St., Box 5001 Soonchun, Japan 

Wilson, Wm. M So. C. E _ 125 Woodburn Rd... Hendersonville, N. C. 

Wilson, W. Sid Jr. E. E 2512 Clark Ave.._ YancewiUe, N. C. 

Winbourne, Willard T.. Fr. Ag..___ 203 10th Bailev, N. C. 

Winchester, D. Reece.... Fr. Ch. E 229 7th, Box 3361 Monroe, N. C. 

W inchester, L. Ralph. Fr. Ch. E ...326 8th . .. Monroe, N. C. 

Windley, Wm. D.._ Jr. M. E .......312 5th, Box 3236 Belhaven, N. C. 

Winfrey, L Enos, Jr Fr. C. E 120 7th, Box 3320.. . Winston-Salem, N. C. 

W iniarski, Leopold J ...Sr. Tex. C. & D 114 S. Person St New Bedford, Mass. 

Winn, WendallL So. Land. Arch 201 A Norfolk, Va. 

Winslow, Watt Fr. Cer. E 22 8th Hertford, N. C. 

Winstead, R. C So. Ind. Arts. 126 South, Box 3526.. . Semora, N. C. 

W instead, Ralph W Fr. For 314 7th, Box 3380 . . Macclesfield, N. C. 

Winston, Elliot H Fr. Tex. Mfg 218 7th, Box 3350 New York, N. Y. 

Witherington, R. Haywood..Sr. W. C. & M 2209^ 9 Hope St. _ Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Withrow, E. J ..Sr. Ag. Ed .10 South, Box 3606._ Forest City, N. C. 

Withrow, Joe D.._ Fr. C. E Forest City, N. C. 

Woltz, W. G...._ Grad. F. C. & P. B...22r2 Hope St. __ Bullock, N. C. 

Womble, John W., Jr Sr. Ch. E 311 Wat., Box 3047..... Greensboro, N. C. 

Wommack, Kenneth L So. M. E 121 C . . Wlnston-Salem, N. C. 

Wommack, Wm. W Fr. Ch. E 308 8th . W'inston-Salem, N. C. 

Wood, David B Fr. C. E 125 8th . Spring Hope, N. C. 

Wood, D. L Fr. Tex. C. & D 327 8th Gastonia, N. C. 

Wood, James A., Jr..__ Fr. Ch. E .216 8th . .. . Charlotte, N. C. 

Wood, Robert \\ .._ Fr. For 110 7th, Box 3310 .. .. Port Richmond, N. Y. 

Woodall, Ed. L., Jr.._ Fr. Cer. E 201 8th .. Smithfild, N. C. 

W;oodall, Hubert C, Jr Sr. Tex. W. & D 101 Wat., Box 3CI01._ Smithfield, N. C. 

W oodard, G. Vernon Fr. A.g 5 8th Spring Hope, N. C. 

Woodhouse, Chas. B Jr. W. C. & M 5 South, Box 3601 Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Woodley, Preston S Sr. C. E 10 Enterprise St Creswell, N. C. 

Woodward, J. A Fr. Ind. E 228 7th, Box 3360 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Woody, George S Fr. Ag 2 9th Snow Camp, N. C. 



Student Directory 79 

Name Classification School Address Home Address 

Wooten, Ed. F.._ So. E. E _ 3 Maiden Lane._ ....Greenville, N. C. 

Wooten, Francis L., Jr So. Ch. E .1618 HillsboftD St Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Wooten, J. A., Tr.._„ Fr. E. E 104 7th, Box 3304 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Wooten, Louis E., Jr Sr. C. E.._ 311 W. Park Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

Wooten, S. A., Jr Fr. E. E 134 7th, Box 3402 Macclesfield, N. C. 

Wooten, T. Marshall Jr. Ag. Ch .....227 A Greenville, N. C. 

Worlev, Tracv W., Jr Fr. M. E 433 Halifax St Raleigh, N. C. 

Worrell, Thos. S Fr. Ch. E ...202 7th, Box 3334 Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Worslev, O. Carmer, Jr So. M. E 303 South, Box 3567 Charlotte, N. C. 

Wrenn, Eusene L., Jr.._ Fr. Tex. C. & D 211 9th Kannapolis, N. C. 

Wrenn. R. W Grad. Ch. E. .2201-^ Cox Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Wright, D. R., Jr So. Ch. E..„ 312 A. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Wright, G. Hudson So. M. E ....309 South, Box 3573 Laurinburg, N. C. 

Wright, Lewis C So. Ch. E .....103 Chamberlain St AsheviUe, N. C. 

Wright, Robert H., Ill Fr. C. E .211 Hawthorne Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

Yancev, Sam A Fr. Ag ...311 7th, Box 3377 

Yancey, \N . A Fr. Flori .105 A Raleigh, N. C. 

Yates, Ben F Fr. Ag.. 219 7th, Box 3351 Chadbourn, N. C. 

Yates, Fred B .....Sr. W. C. & M 240 1911, Box 3780 Chadbourn, N. C. 

Yates, Morris E.._ Fr. Ind. E 308 9th Rochester, N. Y. 

Yates, Thos. R..___ Fr. Ch. E .......319 8th .Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Yingling, George L., Jr Sr. E. E..... 229 A. Salisbury, N. C. 

Yoder, Wm. L., Jr..___ Fr. E. E .131 7th, Box 3331 Raleigh, N. C. 

York, T. Lenoir Fr. Ag..__ 6 8th ....Wavnesville, N. C. 

York, Wm. E., Jr Fr. Ch. E .......604 Oakwood Ave. Raleigh, N. C. 

Young, Ed. O Jr. E. E 340 1911, Box 3820 Oxford, N. C. 

Young, George G Jr. E. E 204 4th, Box 3122 Swannanoa, N. C. 

Young, James W.._ Jr. Ch. E .204 4th, Box 3122 .....AsheviUe, N. C. 

Young, Marvin P., Jr Fr. E. E 208 8th Princeton, N. C. 

Zachary, L. P., Jr Fr. Ch. E ...226 C Taylorsville, N. C. 

Zayat, A. D Fr. Ch. E Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Zehner, Richard F So. Ag 2715 Vanderbilt Ave Reading, Pa. 

Zellweger, Ernest R Fr. Gen. Engr ...224 7th, Box 3356 Palisade, N. J. 

Zerilli, Frank J ....Sr. M. E.._ 339 A..._ Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Zuckerman, Jacob H.-__ So. M. E 230 A Durham, N. C.