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Educational 

Opportunities 

for Veterans 



INTRODUCTION.— The educational opportunities offered to the per- 
sonnel of the military forces of the United States during and following 
the present war provide the greatest program of education ever 
planned by any nation. Never before have so many individuals beyond 
high-school age been given the privilege of securing training in any 
field they desire, with little or no expense and with compensation to 
pay all or nearly all of their personal living expenses. No matter what 
job, trade, or profession a serviceman may have been engaged in prior 
to the war, he will have a good chance to improve his knowledge and 
skills in that field or some other occupation. 

Every serviceman should consider, carefully and seriously, how he 
can use this oportunity to the best advantage. Many should not enter 
college, but nearly everyone will find some opportunity for self- 
improvement through additional organized training. 

The information given regarding educational advantages for vet- 
erans has been gathered from a study of the laws, from interpreta- 
tions made by the Veterans Bureau, and from other reliable sources. 
The information has been prepared in question-answer style to be of 
most help to servicemen. This information may be used as a guide, 
but each veteran should procure definite information concerning his 
status from the Veterans Administration. 

Brief information is also given concerning the college program for 
returning servicemen, and certain suggestions are offered regarding 
educational training while in military service for those planning to 
enter college. 

We trust that this material will be helpful to servicemen and women 
in taking advantage of their educational opportunities. We will be 
glad to forward a copy of Form 1950 or answer any specific inquiry. 
For a copy of the Application Form 1950 or for further information 
write 

W. L. MAYER, Director of Registration 
North Carolina State College 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Federal Assistance 



TWO TYPES OF EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE. — On March 24, 
1943, the 78th Congress approved a bill providing for the education 
or retraining of servicemen (or women) who are discharged with a 
service-incurred disability. This law is commonly referred to as 
P. L. 16. 

Veterans eligible for assistance under this law are those who meet 
the four following requirements. 

1. The person must have been in the active military or naval 
service any time after September 16, 1940, and during the 
present war; 

2. He or she has been discharged or released from the active service 
under conditions other than dishonorable; 

3. He or she must have a disability incurred in or aggravated by 
such service for which pension is payable under law administered 
by the Veterans Administration, or would be but for the receipt 
of retirement pay ; and 

4. He or she must be in need of vocational rehabilitation to over- 
come the handicap of such disability. 

The filing of application for Pension, Veterans Administration, 
Form 526, will initiate a determination as to the presence or absence 
of a pensionable disability producing a vocational handicap. Any 
veteran discharged because of service-connected disability should first 
determine whether he is eligible for training under this act. The 
advantages under this act are usually more liberal, and more careful 
direction and supervision are given to veterans under this act. 

The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (Public Law 346), 
commonly referred to as the "G. I. Bill of Rights," and hereafter re- 
ferred to in this bulletin as P. L. 346, contains the educational pro- 
visions for veterans not eligible for aid under P. L. 16. The informa- 
tion which follows pertains only to P. L. 3Jf6 unless otherwise noted. 

Who Is Eligible? — Any veteran of the Armed Forces (including 
Waves, Wacs, Spars, et al.) who served on or after September 16, 
1940, who was under twenty-five years of age at the time of enlist- 
ment, who was in service at least ninety days, and whose dismissal 
was other than dishonorable is eligible for educational training. Vet- 
erans who were over twenty-five at the time of enlistment and are 
otherwise eligible are entitled to twelve months of refresher or re- 
training courses, but must prove that their education was interrupted 
before receiving additional educational training. 



What Kind of Education Can Be Procured? — The veteran may choose 
any type of education for which schools are organized — High School, 
Business School, Trade School, College, University, Professional 
School, or Graduate School. The veteran is free to choose his major 
field of study. 

Where Can This Education Be Procured? — The veteran is free to 
select the school he desires to attend without reference to the state 
in which he resides. The school attended must be approved by the 
Veterans Administration, but this list is secured from the official 
accrediting agency in each state, and therefore will include all schools 
normally approved by a state's Educational Accrediting Agency. 

How Much Education Can Be Procured? — The maximum time allowed 
any veteran will be forty-eight months. Each qualified veteran is en- 
titled to twelve months plus as many months as time of service since 
September 16, 1940. The time spent in organized college programs 
such as ASTP and Navy V-12 may be deducted from the total time. 
Not more than twelve months may be devoted to refresher courses. 
A veteran will receive additional assistance to complete the term in 
progress when his allotted time expires. 

How Can This Education Be Procured? — The educational training is 
figured in months and may be taken in any time sequence desired by 
the veterans and provided by the school — continuous school attend- 
ance, normal school attendance (college year) , broken attendance, or 
part-time attendance. Part-time attendance provides for pro rata 
financial assistance. 

When Can a Veteran Begin Training? — A veteran may begin his 
training immediately after his discharge. He must begin his training 
within two years after his discharge or the termination of the war, 
whichever is later. Educational opportunities must be completed with- 
in seven years after the termination of the war. 

What Compensation Is Received While Attending School?— A veteran 
receives $50.00 per month, or $75.00 per month if married (or having 
dependents) , during the months he attends school. Payments are not 
made during long vacation periods, but such periods do not count in 
the time allowance. This payment is for room, board, and other per- 
sonal expenses. The Government pays the school for all educational 
expenses including tuition, fees, books, supplies, etc., not to exceed 
$500.00 for the college year (September to June). Any excess above 
the $500.00 must be paid by the veteran. Pro rata educational costs 
are allowed for summer school attendance. 



How Should a Veteran Apply for Educational Benefits? — Application 
should be made on Veterans Administration Form 1950 which can be 
secured from any regional office of the Veterans Administration or 
from many educational institutions. This form should not be filed until 
the serviceman has received his discharge from military service. 

Disabled veterans should first write a letter to the Veterans Ad- 
ministration, giving full information concerning their previous service 
connections and requesting educational assistance under P. L. 16. If 
this is denied, they should then file form 1950. 

The veteran will receive a communication (in duplicate) from the 
office of the Veterans Administration, indicating approval (or dis- 
approval) of his application and stating the number of months of edu- 
cation to which he is entitled. The veteran should retain these letters 
until a copy is requested by the school. The letter is used in lieu of 
regular payments of tuition, fees, and other educational costs. 

Where Should a Veteran Write? — If a veteran knows the school he 
will attend, he should write to the Veterans Administration's regional 
office which has jurisdiction where the school is located. If a school 
has not been selected, the veteran may apply to the office nearest his 
home or point of discharge. A list of the Regional Offices will be found 
elsewhere in this publication. 

How Should a Veteran Enroll In School? — A veteran enrolls in exactly 
the same manner as any other student. A school may have a special 
organization for veterans and may have special regulations concerning 
the admission of veterans, but so far as the Veterans Administration 
is concerned, he applies in a normal manner. 

Is a Veteran Given Special Supervision? — Veterans attending school 
under P. L. 346 are regularly enrolled students subject to the normal 
rules and regulations of the institution and no special supervision is 
provided by the Veterans Administration. Individual schools may have 
special administrative or supervisory regulations to assist veterans 
in their readjustment to school life. 

Veterans attending under P. L. 16 are supervised by an educational 
officer of the Veterans Administration as well as by the college ad- 
ministration. 

When Do Monthly Allotments Begin? — The institution notifies the 
Veterans Administration of the date the veteran enrolls. Allotments 
begin as of that date and continue until the institution notifies the 
Veterans Administration of the withdrawal of the student or the 
closing of a school session. However, allotments are paid at the close 



of each month, and some time may elapse in getting allotments 
started. Therefore, veterans should make financial arrangements with 
the institution, or otherwise, for room, board, and other personal 
expenses until allotments are received. Payments for subsistence 
allowances are based on calendar months and a veteran is paid for the 
exact period he is in attendance. 



Regional Offices of the Veterans Administration Are Located At 



Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Batavia, New York 
Bay Pines, Florida 
Boise, Idaho 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Brecksville, Ohio 
Cheyenne, Wyoming 
Columbia, South Carolina 
Dayton, Ohio 
Dearborn, Michigan 
Denver, Colorado 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Fargo, North Dakota 
Fayetteville, North Carolina 
Ft. Harrison, Montana 
Hines, Illinois 
Huntington, West Virginia 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Jackson, Mississippi 
Jefferson Barracks, Missouri 
Kansas City, Missouri 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Lincoln, Nebraska 
Little Rock, Arkansas 



Los Angeles, California 
Lyons, New Jersey 
Manchester, New Hampshire 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Montgomery, Alabama 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 
Muskogee, Oklahoma 
Newington, Connecticut 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
New York, New York 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Portland, Oregon 
Providence, Rhode Island 
Reno, Nevada 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
San Francisco, California 
Seattle, Washington 
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 
Togus, Maine 
Tucson, Arizona 
Waco, Texas 
Washington, D. C. 
White River Junction, Vermont 
Wichita, Kansas 
Wood, Wisconsin 



College Program For Veterans 



Scope of Training Available. — The North Carolina State College of 
Agriculture and Engineering of the University of North Carolina is 
the State's technological institution giving instruction in Agriculture 
and Forestry, Engineering, Vocational Teacher Training, and Textiles. 
Detailed information concerning the majors in these general fields is 
given in the regular college publications, which will be furnished on 
request. All qualified veterans are eligible to enroll in any major 
offered by the college. 

In addition, the college will permit a veteran to enroll as a special 
student to take such specialized work as may be arranged between 
the student and the Dean of the School. Special students are not 
granted degrees. 

Admission and Guidance. — All veterans will apply for admission and 
have their credentials approved in the same manner as other stu- 
dents. Special guidance assistance will be available whenever needed. 

Special Admission. — In addition to the admission of veterans in the 
customary manner, the North Carolina College Conference with the 
approval of the State Department of Public Instruction has approved 
the admission of veterans at any college in the state under the regular 
procedure governing the admission of mature students. Under this 
provision a veteran not qualified for admission based on high school 
graduation may be admitted through special examinations. 

Refresher Courses. — Realizing that veterans who had been in college 
prior to military service would, in most cases, need to spend some time 
in review before beginning advanced work, the government has pro- 
vided a maximum of twelve months of refresher work under Public 
Law 346. In keeping with the policy, the college is planning refresher 
work in basic courses to aid veterans in their readjustment to student 
life. 

Credit for Military Service. — It is not the policy of colleges to allow 
credit for military service in lieu of regular academic courses. At this 
institution the credits required for graduation include thirty-six term 
credits which may be earned in military science and physicial educa- 
tion. The college will allow this amount of credit toward graduation 
to any veteran who has been in active military service as much as 
one year. Whenever this maximum is allowed, no credits previously 
or thereafter earned in military science or physical education can be 
used toward fulfilling graduation requirements. (The War Department 



has ruled that any veteran desiring to compete for a reserve com- 
mission under the organized college ROTC program must take the 
basic course prescribed in the freshman and sophomore years. Military 
service will not be accepted as a substitute.) Veterans who have been 
in service as much as six months are excused from all requirements in 
Physical Education and Military Science but receive credit allowance 
toward graduation. 

Credits for Service Courses of Instruction. — The American Council on 
Education with the co-operation and support of most of the national 
educational organizations has selected a national committee to evalu- 
ate and make recommendations concerning credit for the various 
types of instruction provided by the Armed Forces. This institution 
will be guided by the recommendations made by this committee. 

Credit for USAFI Courses. — This institution will consider for credit 
courses of college level taken through the United States Armed Forces 
Institute. Those taking courses for college credit should be careful in 
their selection of courses and should secure information from the 
college they wish to attend relative to the use of each course in the 
major they have selected. The major question is not related to college 
credit, but whether or not the course may be used in the major se- 
lected. The answer to this question will also depend upon an indi- 
vidual's previous college training. All college curricula allow for some 
elective courses and usually almost any subject may be elected. How- 
ever, when a student has earned this amount of credit, no additional 
elective work can be accepted toward graduation ; thus, no additional 
work can be taken in the USAFI unless it can be accepted as a sub- 
stitute for a required course. 

Individuals interested in technical or specialized training should 
also avoid taking courses of a general nature which are inadequate 
for their specialty. For example, a general introductory course in 
physics may be accepted for credit in Liberal Arts, Law, Medicine, 
Agriculture and most other fields but may not be accepted in Engi- 
neering where the physics course is highly specialized and is based 
on a good knowledge of college mathematics. Furthermore, such a 
course may not be used as an elective in Engineering because the 
content to a great extent would have been repeated in the Engineering 
physics course. Whenever possible, it is recommended that approval 
be procured from the college to be attended. In writing for informa- 
tion, one should state what college credits have already been earned, 
as well as a statement about the major field of study. 

Proper Preparation. — The most important item to consider is proper 
preparation to enter college. More time will be gained by proper prepa- 
ration than by taking college courses. The two major considerations 



for students interested in technical education are English and mathe- 
matics. We suggest such courses under the USAFI as H83, H84, H85, 
H87, H88, H89, H90, H95, H96, H134, H148, H136, H137, H138, 
H139, H140, H141, H142, H143, H144, and H145. Each individual with 
the aid of any available educational adviser should select those courses 
which best coincide with his previous training. The courses listed 
above do not give college credit. After proper preparation by the 
student, attention may be given to college courses under the USAFI 
or regular college extension courses. 

The college, through its extension division, offers a correspondence 
course in the review of high school English Grammar and Composition 
and another course in the review of high school algebra. These are 
excellent courses to enable a student to judge his preparation. If he 
has little difficulty with the content of these courses, he can consider 
his preparation satisfactory for admission to college. These courses 
are not for college credit. 

The College Extension Division. — The College Extension Division is 
co-operating with the USAFI and is endeavoring to provide courses 
which will be of special benefit to those who plan to enter technological 
colleges after their release from military service. The courses offered 
by the College Extension Division, which have already been approved, 
are listed in the USAFI catalog. Other courses will be approved for 
publication in the next catalog. 

The courses outlined below are for students who desire to begin 
their college work before entering this institution, who believe their 
preparation is satisfactory, and who are not presenting advanced 
standing in the subjects they desire to take. 

For all students: 

English Composition Eng. 101 (Fall term) 3 term credits 

English Composition Eng. 102 (Winter term) 3 term credits 

English Composition Eng. 103 (Spring term) 3 term credits 

(Xot more than two terms can be taken by correspondence and final 
credit "will not be allowed until one term has been passed in resi- 
dence with at least a "C" grade.) 
For Engineering students: 

Algebra Math. 101 6 term credits 

Trigonometry Math. 102 6 term credits 

Analytical Geometry Math. 103 6 term credits 

For other than engineering students: 

Algebra Math. Ill 4 term credits 

Trigonometry Math. 112 4 term credits 

Mathematics of Finance Math. 113 4 term credits 

For information regarding any extension courses, or for an extension 
course catalog, write Mr. E. W. Ruggles, Director, College Extension Divi- 
sion, North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



State College Record 



Vol. 44 



DECEMBER, 1944 



No. 4 



The North Carolina State College 



of 



Agriculture and Engineering 



of 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 




CATALOG ISSUE 

1944-45 

Announcements for the Session 10)45-10)46 



STATE COLLEGE STATION 
RALEIGH 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



College Calendar 
Calendar ::r :S4:-4-: 



Officers 

The Consolidated University of North 

Carolina 5 

;:;:: ::" - t. osoees _ ' 
Executive Committee of the Trustees 

>.:-:•;=::;::•■"= Too::: 

The N:rth Carolina State College S 

Officers of Administration 8 

Other A dm lolstratlve Orrliers 5 

Special Officers 8 

Otficers of Instruction: Faculty . ... 9 

n 

General Information 

The College 20 

Information for Applicants 22 

I. Admission 22 

EL Expenses 24 

m. Registration ..... 26 

IT. Grades and Honor Points ... 27 

V. Scholarship '-■ 

VL Classification of Students 29 

VTL Degrees . .30 
YTTT. Financial Aids and Scholar- 
ships 31 

Student Activities 33 

Medals and Prizes 36 

?::al Education and Athletics 87 

Music 39 

College Publications 40 

Health of Students 40 

General Alumni Association 40 

D. H. Bill Library 42 

Young Men's Christian Association ... 43 

Military .raining 44 



Schr 



Di 



ni 

■ ions, and Departments 



The Has:: Dlvi=::n 46 

Orgarlnariir art 0':;e:ts 4-1 

Programs :f Stody 4S 

Ihe S:h ■". : Af:.:::.:-^ an i : :restr" 6 : 

:.--ar.::a-.::r. a:.: :::e:t= 60 

Genera'. Agriculture 62 

. r : i See Index) 63 

Agricultural Engineering €5 

Agr::ultura: Ihemlstrv '6 

Forestry 77 

I— anusoate .~i.7cr. .teoture -i 
"■"..:. :- ' : nser". a:. : n and Manage- 
ment 90 

Agricultural Experiment Station 93 

Cooperative Agricultural Extension 

Work 93 



Page 

The School of Engineering 94 

Organization and Objects 94 

Engineering War Training 99 

Service Departments 100 

Engineering Experiment Station . . . 102 

Cooperative Plan 105 

Zn?:reer:tz ClUlkjlb 1 ' " 

Aeronautical 107 

Architectural Engineering and 

Architecture 109 

Ceramic 112 

Chemical 114 

Civil 117 

C : - ;tru :::: n sad routing 

Materials 118 

Sanitary 119 

Transportation 119 

Electrical 124 

General 129 

Geological 131 

Industrial 133 

Mechanical 135 

Furniture 139 

Heating and Air-Conditioning . . . 140 

Metals 140 

I si on of Teacher Education 142 

Organization, Objects, Requirements 142 

Agricultural Education 143 

tm 1 atrial Arts Education 146 

Occupational Information and 

Guidance 148 

Industrial Education 150 

The School of Textiles 152 

Organization, Objects B e : uirements 152 
Yarn Mar 

Knitting 154, 159 

Weaving and Designing 155, 161 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing . 156, 158 

Textile Research 157 

Textile Manufacturing 157 

ft tile Management 160 

Division of Graduate Instruction 162 

Organization and Facilities 164 

Degrees 165 

Fees . 169 

Division of College Extension 171 

TV 

Description of Courses, in alphabetical 

order by Departments 173 

V 

Scholastic Records 

Summarv of Enrollment, 1944-45 327 

Degrees, Conferred, May 29, 1944 ... 329 
Medals and Prizes, Scholarship Day, 
1944 334 



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1946 



JANUARY 






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JULY 






OCTOBER 


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FEBRUARY 






MAY 


AUGUST 






NGVEMEZF. 


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MARCH 






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I. OFFICERS 
The Consolidated University of North Carolina 

The State College of Agriculture and Engineering, Raleigh 

The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro 

Board of Trustees 

Governor Robert Gregg Cherry, Chairman Ex-Officio 

Alexander B. Andrews, Secretary 

Clyde A. Erwin, State Supt. of Public Instruction, Member Ex-Officio 

James Melville Broughton, Life Trustee 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Life Trustee 

O. Max Gardner, Life Trustee 

Clyde R. Hoey, Life Trustee 

Cameron Morrison, Life Trustee 

Term Expiring April 1, 1947 

Name 

Mrs. Katherine P. Arrington 

H. D. Bateman 

J. B. Fearing 

Battle A. Hocutt 

Ira T. Johnston 

John H. Kerr, Sr. 

J. Heath Kluttz 

M. C. Lassiter 

W. L. Lumpkin 

G. L. Lyerly 

H. B. Marrow 

L. P. McLendon 

William D. Merritt 

Walter Murphy 

Haywood Parker 

Clarence Poe 

J. T. Pritchett 

Carl A. Rudisill 

George Stephens 

W. H. Sullivan 

Fred I. Sutton 

H. P. Taylor 

John W. Umstead, Jr. 

Lionel Weil 

Charles Whedbee 



Term 



Emily Austin 
Annie Moore Cherry 
David Clark 
James H. Clark 
K. Clyde Council 
Josephus Daniels 
B. B. Everett 
Mrs. R. S. Ferguson 
James S. Ficklin 
James Alexander Gray 
R. L. Harris 



Address 


County 


Warrenton 


Warren 


Wilson 


Wilson 


Windsor 


Bertie 


Clayton 


Johnston 


Jefferson 


Ashe 


Warrenton 


Warren 


Albemarle 


Stanly 


Snow Hill 


Greene 


Louisburg 


Franklin 


Hickory 


Catawba 


Smithfield 


Johnston 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


Roxboro 


Person 


Salisbury 


Rowan 


Asheville 


Buncombe 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Lenoir 


Caldwell 


Cherryville 


Gaston 


Asheville 


Buncombe 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Wadesboro 


Anson 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 


Hertford 


Perquimans 


iring April 1, 1949 




Tarboro 


Edgecombe 


Enfield 


Halifax 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


Elizabethtown 


Bladen 


Wananish 


Columbus 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Palmyra 


Halifax 


Taylorsville 


Alexander 


Greenville 


Pitt 


Winston-Salem 


Forsyth 


Roxboro 


Person 



State College Catalog 



Name 


Address 


County 


W. E. Horner 


Sanford 


Lee 


Hugh Horton 


Williamston 


Martin 


Robert Eugene Little 


Wadesboro 


Anson 


Dan K. Moore 


Sylva 


Jackson 


Thomas J. Pearsall 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


J. Hawley Poole 


West End 


Moore 


J. A. Pritchett 


Windsor 


Bertie 


Claude W. Rankin 


Fayetteville 


Cumberland 


Foy Roberson 


Durham 


Durham 


T. Clarence Stone 


Stoneville 


Rockingham 


W. Frank Taylor 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 


Mrs. May L. Tomlinson 


High Point 


Guilford 


F. E. Wallace 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Graham Woodard 


Wilson 


Wilson 


Term 


Expiring April 1, 1951 




Arch Turner Allen 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Alexander B. Andrews 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Edward Stephenson Askew 


Oriental 


Pamlico 


Kemp Davis Battle 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


James Albert Bridger 


Bladenboro 


Bladen 


Charles Albert Cannon 


Concord 


Cabarrus 


Thurmond Chatham 


Winston-Salem 


Forsyth 


William Grimes Clark 


Tarboro 


Edgecombe 


Arthur Mills Dixon 


Gastonia 


Gaston 


Rufus Alexander Doughton 


Sparta 


Alleghany 


Frank Wills Hancock, Jr. 


Oxford 


Granville 


Charles Andrew Jonas 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


Arthur Hill London 


Pittsboro 


Chatham 


Mrs. Sadie McBrayer McCain 


Sanatorium 


Hoke 


Mrs. Gertrude Dills McKee 


Sylva 


Jackson 


Reid Atwater Maynard 


Burlington 


Alamance 


Raymond Maxwell 


New Bern 


Craven 


Andrew Lee Monroe 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Kemp Battle Nixon 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


John J. Parker 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


Robert Wright Proctor 


Marion 


McDowell 


Richard Joshua Reynolds 


Winston-Salem 


Forsyth 


Benjamin K. Royal 


Morehead City 


Carteret 


William B. Shuford 


Hickory 


Catawba 


Grace Pemberton Taylor 


Danbury 


Stokes 


Term Expiring April 1, 1953 




Wade Barber 


Pittsboro 


Chatham 


Samuel M. Blount 


Washington 


Beaufort 


Victor S. Bryant 


Durham 


Durham 


Gertrude Carraway 


New Bern 


Craven 


John W. Clark 


Franklinville 


Randolph 


Collier Cobb, Jr. 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


George S. Coble 


Lexington 


Davidson 


Mrs. Laura Weil Cone 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


John G. Dawson 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Joseph C. Eagles 


Wilson 


Wilson 


Samuel J. Ervin 


Morganton 


Burke 


W. Roy Hampton 


Plymouth 


Washington 


John Sprunt Hill 


Durham 


Durham 



Name 

Benjamin Kittrell Lassiter 

John Q. LeGrand 

Henry A. Lineberger 

Mrs. Frances N. Miller 

Glenn C. Palmer 

Edwin Pate 

James C. Pittman 

J. E. Ramsay 

Roy Rowe 

J. Benton Stacy 

Kenneth S. Tanner 

William B. Umstead 



'ACULTY 
Address 


County 


Oxford 


Granville 


Wilmington 


New Hanover 


Gastonia 


Gaston 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Waynesville 


Haywood 


Laurinburg 


Scotland 


Sanford 


Lee 


Salisbury 


Rowan 


Burgaw 


Pender 


Ruffin 


Rockingham 


Spindale 


Rutherford 


Durham 


Durham 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

Governor Robert Gregg Cherry, Chairman Ex-Officio 
Alexander B. Andrews, Secretary 
John W. Clark Haywood Parker 

Mrs. Laura W. Cone John J. Parker 

Josephus Daniels Clarence Poe 

O. Max Gardner Richard J. Reynolds 

John Sprunt Hill Mrs. M. L. Tomlinson 

Walter Murphy Charles Whedbee 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

The Consolidated University of North Carolina 

Frank Porter Graham, President 

William Donald Carmichael, Jr., Controller 



The North Carolina State College, 
Raleigh 

J. W. Harrelson, 

Chancellor 
William Hand Browne, Jr., 

Professor of Electrical 
Engineering 
M. E. Gardner, 

Professor of Horticulture 
Thomas Nelson, 

Dean Emeritus of Textile School 
A. J. Wilson, 

Professor of Chemistry 



The Woman's College, 

Greensboro 
W. C. Jackson, 

Chancellor 
Meta H. Miller, 

Professor of Romance 
Languages 
Guy R. Lyle, 
Librarian 
Helen Ingraham, 
Associate Professor of 
Chemistry 
Marc Friedlaender, 
Associate Professor of 
English 



The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

R. B. House, Chancellor 

A. R. Newsome, Professor of History 

Herman Glenn Baity, Professor of Sanitary and Municipal Engineering 

William F. Prouty, Professor of Stratigraphic Geology 

W. S. Wells, Associate Professor of English 



5 



State College Catalog 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Porter Graham, President of the Consolidated University 

William Donald Cannichael, Jr., Controller of the Consolidated University 

John William Harrelson, Chancellor 

Eugene Clyde Brooks, President Emeritus 

Faculty Council 

John William Harrelson, Chairman 
Chancellor 



Leonard D. Baver, Director, 

Agricultural Experiment Station 
aad Associate Dean of the School 
of Agriculture. 

B. F. Brown, 

Dean of the Basic Division. 

T. E. Browne. Director, 

Division of Teacher Education. 

William Hand Browne, Jr., 

Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing. 

Malcolm E. Campbell, Dean of the 
School of Textiles. 

E. L. Cloyd, Dean of Students. 



^J. H. Lampe, Dean of the 

School of Engineering. 
W. L. Mayer, 

Director of Registration, and 

Purchasing Agent. 
Z. P. Metcalf, 

Associate Dean of the Graduate 

School. 
I. 0. Schaub, Dean, 

School of Agriculture and 

Forestry. 
L. L. Vaughan, Acting Dean, School 

of Engineering and Professor of 

Mechanical Engineering. 
Arthur J. Wilson, 

Professor of Chemistry. 



Other Administrative Officers 



A. C. Campbell, Physician. 
Mrs. Reba D. Clevenger, 

Acting Librarian. 
Henry Fitzhugh Dade, Assistant 

Dean of Students. 
F. H. Jeter. Director of Publicity. 
K. S. King, Secretary, Y.M.C.A. 
F. E. Miller, Director 

of Station Farms. 
W. F. Morris. Manager 

of Service Departments. 



E. W. Ruggles, Director, 

College Extension. 
Juanita Stott, 

Assistant Registrar. 
Baye Sumner, 

Assistant Purchasing Agent. 
H. W. Taylor, Alumni Secretary 
John Graves Vann, 

Assistant Controller. 



W. L. Godwin, 

Superintendent of the Laundry. 
T. M. Hamby, Steward. 
CD. Kutschinski, 

Director of Music. 
A. A. Riddle. Superintendent, 

the Power Plant. 



Special Officers 



Ross Shumaker, College Architect. 
L. L. Vaughan, College Engineer. 
T. T. Wellons, 

Superintendent of Dormitories. 
Roy L. Williamson, Property Officer. 
L. L. Ivey. Manager 

Students Supply Store. 



1 Appointed April 1, 1S4-6. 



Faculty 9 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., President of the 
University. 

John William Harrelson, Chancellor. 

B.E., M.E., N. C. State College ; L.L.D., Wake Forest College. 

Eugene Clyde Brooks, President Emeritus and Research Professor of 
Education. 

A.B., L.L.D., Trinity College; L.L.D., University of North Carolina; Litt.D., Davidson 
College. 

William Elton Adams, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., Ohio University. 

Donald Benton Anderson, Professor of Botany. 

B.A., B.Sc. in Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

fRiCHARD L. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics and 
Agricultural Economics. 

A.B., DePauw University ; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Lindsey Otis Armstrong, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

fLEONARD James Arrington, Instructor in Economics. 

B.A., University of Idaho. 

WlLLARD Farrington Babcock, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Stanley Thomas Ballenger, Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Luther Wesley Barnhardt, Associate Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

B.A., Trinity College; A.M., University of Wisconsin. 

IGrady Wilton Bartlett, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.S.. M.S., N. C. State College. 

**GEORGE Bauerlein, Jr., Assistant Professor of History. 

B.S., Wake Forest College ; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

William Ludwig Baumgarten, Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

A.A., Imperial Academy of Fine Arts of Vienna, Austria. 

Leonard Davh) Baver, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station; Asso- 
ciate Dean, School of Agriculture and Director of Instruction. 

B.S., M.S., Ohio State University ; Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

* Joseph R. Bentert, Professor of Knitting. 

B.S., M.E., Marquette University. 

Samuel Clark Boone, Mess Officer, Army Specialized Training Program. 

Captain, Infantry-Reserve ; B.S., Clemson College. 

Edward William Boshart, Professor of Education (Industrial Arts and 
Vocational Guidance) . 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

Carey Hoyt Bostian, Professor of Zoology; Assistant Director of Instruc- 
tion, School of Agriculture. 

A.B., Catawba College ; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Danhol Ellsworth Brady, Associate Professor of Animal Industry. 

B.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

JFrancis Coolddge Bragg, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., Worcester Polytechnic Institute ; M.S., Syracuse University. 

t On leave. 
f On military leave. 
• Resigned. 
** Resigned March 1, 1945. 



10 State College Catalog 

Charles Raymond Bramer, Associate Professor of Structural Engineering. 

B.S., E.M., Michigan College of Mining and Technology. 

WILLIAM Staley Bridges. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Hermon BURKE BRIGGS, Professor of Engineering Drawing and Descriptive 
Geometry. 

B.E.. M.E., N. C. State College. 

Richard Bright, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., M.S., State University of Iowa. 

Benjamin Franklin Brown, Dean of the Basic Division. 

B.S., Northwestern Dnh ersity. 

Edmond Joseph Brown, Assistayit Professor of Physics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

JRobert Roderick Brown, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S. in E.E., University of Texas ; M.S. in E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Theodore Cecil Brown, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., M.E., University of Kentucky; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Thomas Everette Browne, Director of the Division of Teacher Education. 

A.B., Wake Forest College; M.A., Columbia University. 

WILLLA.M Hand Browne, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

A.B., P.A.E., B.E., Extra Ordinem, Johns Hopkins University. 

Murray F. Buell, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

A.B., Cornell University: M.A., Ph.D., L'niversity of Minnesota. 

Roberts C. Bullock, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Leland Burkhart, Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.S., University of Ne-w Hampshire; Ph-D., University 
of Chicago. 

Malcolm Eugene Campbell, Dean of the School of Textiles. 

B.S., Clemson College. 

Whlla.m Sutton Carley, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., L'niversity of Kentucky. 

tHUGH Lynn Cayeness, Assista-nt Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B.. Trinity College; M.A., D\:ke University. 

tJohn Wesley Cell. Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

tJesse Wayne Chalfant. Associa+o Professor of Forestry. 

E.S., Pennsylvania State College; M.F., Yale University. 

tGeorge William Charles, Instructor in Physics. 

B.A., Ohio State University. 

Eugene Bowen Chase, Battalion Commander, Army Specialized Training 
Program. 
Major, Infantry-Reserve. AUS ; Graduate, British Machine Gun School ; Graduate, 
Third Corps School ; Graduate, Infantry School, Company Officers Course. 

Joseph Deadrick Clark, Professor of English. 

B.A., Columbia University ; M.A., Harvard University. 

John Montgomery Clarkson, Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Experimental-Statistics. 
A.B., Wofford College ; A.M., Duke University ; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

WILLIAM Leander Cleyenger, Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

B.S. in Agriculture, Ohio State University ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

JAMES Kirk Coggin, Professor of Agricultural Education. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.S., Cornell University. 

f On military leave. 
* On leave. 



Faculty 11 

Emerson R. Collins, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College ; Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Norval White Conner, Associate Professor of Fluid Mechanics. 

B.S., M.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute ; M.S., Iowa State College. 

Leon Emory Cook, Professor of Agricultural Education. 

A.B., B.S. in Agriculture, M.S., Cornell University. 

Henry Charles Cooke, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Ralph Leland Cope, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S. in M.E., B.S. in Ind. Educ, M. Ed., Pennsylvania State College. 

Gertrude Mary Cox, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

B.S., M.S., Iowa State College. 

fGEORGE Redin Culberson, Assistant Professor of Yarn Manufacture. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Charles Edgeworth Cummings, Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Captain, Infantry Reserve, AUS ; B.S., Clemson College. 

Ralph Waldo Cummings, Professor of Agronomy; Assistant Director, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

B.S., N. C. State College ; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

fPHiLiP Harvey Davis, Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., A.M., Miami University. 

Roy Styring Dearstyne, Professor of Poultry Science. 

B.S., University of Maryland : M.S., N. C. State College. 

John Bewley Derdsux, Professor of Theoretical Physics. 

B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee ; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Charles Glenn Doak, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
Thomas Clare Doody, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of California. 

Justus Carlyle Drake, Instructor in English. 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest College. 

George Heyward Dunlap, Technologist, School of Textiles. 

B.S., Clemson College. 

fJosEPH Newton Farlow, Instructor in Engineering Mechanics. 

B.C.E., N. C. State College. 

tCharles Edward Feltner, Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; S.M.C.E., University of North Carolina. 

Hilbert Adam Fisher, Professor of Mathematics. 

M.S., N. C. State College ; graduate, United States Naval Academy ; graduate, United 
States Submarine School ; L.L.D., Lenoir Rhyne College. 

fGASTON Graham Fornes, Assistant Professor Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Garnet Wolsey Forster, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

John Erwin Foster, Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying. 

B.S., N. C. State College ; M.S., Kansas State College ; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Alvin Marcus Fountain, Associate Professor of English. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Peabody College. 

Raymond Spivey Fouraker, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., A. & M. College of Texas ; M.S., University of Texas. 



t On military leave. 



12 State College Catalog 

William George Friedrich, Visiting Professor of Industry. 

M.M.E., Dr. of Technical Sciences, Polytechnical University of Prague; M.Ae.E., Ecole 
Nationale Aeronautique (Paris). 

Bentley Ball Fulton, Professor of Entomology. 

B.A., Ohio State University ; M.S., Chicago University ; Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Monroe Evans Gardner, Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Herman Christian Gauger, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

B.S., Connecticut State College ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

George Wallace Giles, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

B.S., University of Nebraska ; M.S., University of Missouri. 

Karl B. Glenn, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State College. 

James Henry Grady, Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

B. Arch., Ohio State University. 

Richard Elliott Greaves, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

B.S., Wake Forest College ; B.S., N. C. State College. 

f Arthur Frederick Greaves-Walker, Professor of Ceramic Engineering. 

Cer.E., Ohio State University ; D.Sc, Alfred University. 

Ralph Waldo Green, Associate Professor of Marketing. 

B.S., Cornell University ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Robert Edward Lee Greene, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economic* 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

fDAvro Wolter Gregory, Instructor in Poultry Science. 

B.S., Kansas State College; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Walton Carlyle Gregory, Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

B.A., Lynchburg College, M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Albert Harvey Grimshaw, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Graduate of the New Bedford Textile School : B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Claude Delbert Grinnells, Professor of Veterinary Science. 

B.S., M.S., University of Minnesota ; D.V.M., Cornell University. 

fFRANK Farrier Groseclose, Professor of Industrial Engineering . 

B.S. in M.E., M.S. in M.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Elliot Brown Grover, Professor of Yarn Manufacturing. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Frederick Morgan Haig, Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying. 

B.S., University of Maryland: M.S., N. C. State College. 

Mrs. Ruth Badger Hall, Instructor in Modern Languages. 

A.B., Oberlin College ; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Charles Horace Hamilton, Professor of Rural Sociology. 

B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.S., Texas A. & M. College; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina. 

fRElNARD Harkema, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

A.B., Calvin College; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Thomas Perrin Harrison, Dean Emeritus of the College; Editor of Official 
College Publications. 

B.S., Citadel; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; LL.D., Citadel. 

Thomas Roy Hart, Professor of Weaving and Designing. 

B.S., T.E., M.S., N. C. State College. 

fLoDWiCK Charles Hartley, Professor of English. 

B.A., Furman University ; M.A., Columbia University ; Ph.D., Princeton University. 



On military leave. 



Faculty 13 

Arthur Courtney Hayes, Assistant Professor of Textile Chemistry and 
Dyeing. 

Ph.B., Brown University ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Charles McGee Heck, Professor of Physics. 

A.B., Wake Forest College; M.A., Columbia University. 

William Norwood Hicks, Professor of Ethics and Religion. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State College; A.B., Duke University; M.A., Oberlin College. 

*James Harold Hilton, Professor of Animal Industry. 

B.S.A., Iowa State College; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 

John Thomas Hilton, Professor of Yarn Manufacturing. 

Diploma Bradford Durfee Textile School ; B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Thomas Ira Hines, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Lawrence Earle Hinkle, Professor of Modern Languages. 

B.A., University of Colorado ; M.A., Columbia University ; D.S.es L., Dijon University. 

Elmer George Hoefer, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., M.E., University of Wisconsin. 

Julius Valentine Hofmann, Director of the Division of Forestry. 

B.S.F., M.F., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Robert Hooke, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina; A.M., Ph.D., Princeton University. 

John Isaac Hopkins, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.S.. A.M., Ph.D., Duke University. 

Earl Henry Hostetler, Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

B.S. in Agr., Kansas State Agricultural College ; M.Agr. M.S., N. C. State College. 

Thomas Edward Hyde, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Herman Brooks James, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

James Herbert Jensen, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

B.S., A.M., University of Nebraska ; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

JTheodore Sedgwick Johnson, Professor of Sanitary Engineering. 

B.S., M.S., Denison University ; C.E., Ohio State University. 

Walter Edward Jordan, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., M.A.. Wake Forest College : M.S., N. C. State College. 

Leroy Monroe Keever, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.E., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Bert Watson Ken yon, Jr., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

•{•Henderson Grady Kincheloe, Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., University of Richmond ; A.M., Harvard University. 

IWilliam Wurth Kriegel, Associate Professor of Ceramic Engineering. 

B.S. in Civil and Ceramic Engineering. University of Washington ; M.S., Montana 
School of Mines ; Dr.Ing., Technische Hochschule, Hanover, Germany. 

f Arthur Newman Kruger, Instructor in English. 

A.B., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

Walter Michael Kulash, Instructor in Zoology. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts State College. 

Arthur I. Ladu, Professor of English. 

A.B., Syracuse University ; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Claude Milton Lambe, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B.E., N. C. State College. 



X On leave. 

f On military leave. 

* Appointed February 1, 1945. 



14 State College Catalog 

*John Harold Lampe, Dean of the School of Engineering. 

B.S., M.E., D.E.E., Johns Hopkins University. 

Forrest Wesley Lancaster, Associate Professor of Physics. 

B.S. in Ch.E., Purdue University. 

fBRYON Elmer Lauer, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., Oregon State College ; M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

JMarc C. Leager, Professor of Statistics and Accounting. 

B.S., M.S., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

John EMERY Lear, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; E.E., Texas A. & M. College. 

William Daniel Lee, Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

fCHARLES Romeo Lefort, Assistant Dean of Students. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Samuel George Lehman, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

B.S., Ohio University; M.S., N. C. State College; Ph.D., Washington University. 

John Anthony Leopold, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Master Sergeant, DEML, U. S. Army. 

Paul Bonar Leonard, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., Ohio State University. 

fjACK Levine, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., University of California at Los Angeles ; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

JJames Eads Levings, Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

A.B., M.S., Harvard College. 

John Gary Lewis, Associate Professor of Knitting. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Richard Henry Loeppert, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Northwestern University ; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Walter Loewensberg, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.M.E., N. C. State College. 

Roy Lee Loworn, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S.. Alabama Polytechnic Institute ; M.S., University of Missouri ; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin. 

John Robert Ludington, Professor of Industrial Arts Education. 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College ; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

JAMES FULTON Lutz, Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

fFRANK Hallam Lyell, Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., University of Virginia ; M.A., Columbia University ; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Joseph Thomas Lynn, Instructor in Physics. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University: M.S., Ohio State University. 

Charles Walker Maddison, Foreman of Foundry. 

Vahan Krikor Magarian, Classification and Personnel Officer, Army Spe- 
cialized Training Program. 

First Lieutenant. AGD, AUS ; A.B., Morehead State Teachers College ; M.A., Stetson 
University ; Graduate, Adjutant General's School, Classification and Personnel Con- 
sultant Course. 

Carroll Lamb Mann, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B.S., C.E., N. C. State College. 

Roger Powell Marshall, Professor of English. 

B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., Columbia University; M.S., N. C. State College. 

t On military leave. 

X On leave. 

• Appointed April 1, 1945. 



Faculty 15 

Frederick Harold McCutcheon, Professor of Zoologoy. 

B.S., M.S., North Dakota State College ; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Douglass Newman McMillin, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Colonel, Infantry, U. S. Army ; Graduate, Infantry School, Company Commander's 
Course. 

fWlLLlAM McGehee, Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody College. 

Jefferson Sullivan Meares, Associate Professor of Physics. 

B.S., University of South Carolina ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

**Walter Guy Mendenhall, Sr., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Zeno Payne Metcalf, Professor of Zoology, and Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

B.A., Ohio State University ; D.Sc, Harvard University. 

Gordon Kennedy Middleton, Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Edwin Lawrence Miller, Jr., Instructor in Geology. 

B.S., E.M., Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. 

John Fletcher Miller, Professor of Physical Education and Athletics. 

B.Pd., Central Missouri Teachers' College; B.P.E., Springfield College of Physical 
Education. 

William Dykstra Miller, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

B.A., Reed College; M.F., Ph.D., Yale University. 

Adolphus Mitchell, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina. 

Theodore Bertis Mitchell, Professor of Zoology and Entomology. 

B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural'College ; M.S., N. C. State College; D.Sc, Harvard 
University. 

Reuben 0. Moen, Professor of Business Administration. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

JDannie Joseph Moffie, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

|Perry Earl Moose, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.S. in C.E., Purdue University. 

John Wesley Morgan, Instructor in Chemistry. 

A.B., A.M., Duke University. 
-William Edwin Moser, Instructor in Textiles. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Carey Gardner Mumford, Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Wake Forest College; A.M., Ph.D., Duke University. 

-Howard M. Nahikian, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

William McCormick Neale, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.E., M.E., N. C. State College. 

Thomas Nelson, Dean Emeritus of the School of Textiles. 

D.Sc, N. C. State College. 

John Hervey Nichols, Laboratory Technician, Department of Electrical 
Engineering. 

B.S.. M.E.E., N. C. State College. 

John Paul Nickell, Instructor in English. 

A.B., Morehead (Ky), State Teachers College; A.M., University of North Carolina. 



t On military leave. 
** Resigned Feb. 1, 1945. 



16 State College Catalog 

JRay Leonard Overcash, Instructor i?i Chemical Engineering. 

B.Ch.E.. N. C. State College; M.S., Michigan State College. 

Edwin Hugh Paget, Associate Professor of English. 

B.L., Northwestern ; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

*Charles Benjamin Park, Instructor Emeritus in Machine Shop. 
Hubert Vern Park, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College ; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

fJOHN Mason Parker, III, Assistant Professor of Geology. 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University. 

tLeslie Rendall Parkinson, Associate Professor of Aeronautical 
Engineering. 
B.S., Guggenheim School of Aeronautics, New York University. 

James Welch Patton, Professor of History and Political Science. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University ; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Jehu DeWitt Paulson, Professor of Architecture. 

B.F.A., Yale University. 

Robert James Pearsall, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.E., N. C. State College. 

James Rodney Piland, Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., Wake Forest College ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

Joshua Plummer Pillsbury, Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College. 

tJosEPH Alexander Porter, Jr., Assistant Professor of Weaving and 
Designing. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Edmund Wesley Price. Jr., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

B.C.E., N. C. State College. 

Glenn Orvice Randall, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S.. University of Arkansas ; M.S., Iowa State College. 

Edgar Eugene Randolph, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

IRobert Franklin Rautenstrauch, Assistant Professor of Aeronautical 

Engineering. 

B.S., Princeton University ; M.S., New York University. 

Marl Ellis Ray, Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

B.S.. N. C. State College. 

Wdllis Alton Reid, Associate Professo-r of Chemistry. 

B.S., Wake Forest College; Ph.D., Wisconsin University. 

Robert Barton Rice, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., Tufts College; A.M., Columbia University. 

Iackson Ashcraft Rigney, Associate Professor of Agronomy and Experi- 
mental-Statistics. 

B.S., New Mexico State College; M.S., Iowa State College. 

Macon Rogers Rowland, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., M.S., N. C State College. 

Robert Henry Ruffner, Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying. 

B.S., University of Maryland ; M.S., N. C. State College. 

George Howard Satterfdzld, Professor of Biochemistry. 

A.B., A.M., Duke University; B.S., N. C. State College. 



t On leave. 

t On military leave. 

* Deceased. 



Faculty 17 

Ira Obed Schaub, Dean of the School of Agriculture and Forestry and 
Director of Agricultural Extension. 

B.S., N. C. State College; D.Sc, Clemson College. 

fRoBERT Schmidt, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

B.Sc, Rutgers University. 

fHERBERT Frederick Schoof, Instructor in Zoology and Entomology. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College; Ph.D., University of Dlinois. 

Wayland Pritchard Seagraves, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Louis Walter Seegers, Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania. 

JJohn Frank Seely, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Walter Eugene Selkinghaus, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

B.S., Newark College of Engineering ; M.M.E., N. C. State College. 

fjAMES Atkins Shackford, Instructor in English. 

B.A., Emory and Henry College ; M.A., Peabody College. 

Alfred Bernard Rowland Shelley, Assistant Professor of English. 

B.S., Tufts College; A.M., Harvard University. 

f Marshall LeRoyce Shepherd. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.A., Cornell University. 

William Edward Shinn, Professor in Charge of Knitting Section. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Merle Franklin Showalter, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Indiana University ; M.S., Purdue University. 

Clarence B. Shulenberger, Professor of Accounting. 

A.B., Roanoke College ; A.M., Columbia University. 

Ross Edward Shumaker, Professor of Architecture. 

B.Arch., Ohio State University ; Registered Architect. 

Ivan Vaughan Detweiler Shunk, Professor of Botany. 

A.B., A.M., University of West Virginia ; Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

George Kellogg Slocum, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Benjamin Warfield Smith, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

B.A., M.A., University of Virginia ; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Clyde Fuhriman Smith, Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

B.S., M.S., Utah State Agricultural College ; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

George Wallace Smith, Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

B.S.E.E., University of North Carolina ; M.S.E. in C.E., D.Sc, University of Michigan. 

John Warren Smith, Professor of Industrial Education. 

B.S., Miami University, Oxford, Ohio ; M.S., Columbia University. 

f Raymond Franklin Stainback, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

S.B., M.S., University of North Carolina. 

Ross Oliver Stevens, Professor of Zoology. 

B.S., M.S., University of Michigan. • 

f Robert Edward Stiemke, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B.S. in C.E., M.S. in C.E., University of Wisconsin. 

Edward Hoyle Stinson, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Robert LeGrande Stone, Associate Professor of Ceramic Engineering. 

B.S. in Cer.E., Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy; M.S., N. C. State College. 



t On leave. 

t On military leave. 



18 State College Catalog 

Charles Frederick Strobel, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., A.M., University of Buffalo ; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Archie David Stuart, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Jasper Leonidas Stuckey, Professor of Geology. 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina ; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Paul Porter Sutton, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Horace Carter Thomas, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Master Sergeant, DEML, U. S. Army. 

Eugene Sanford Towery, Jr., Assistayit Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Captain, Infantry-Reserve ; B.S., N. C. State College; Graduate, Infantry School, 
Company Officers Course. 

fROBERT Wesley Truitt, Instructor in Aeronautical Engineering. 

A.B., Elon College. 

William Gardner Van Note, Professor of Metallurgy. 

Ch.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.S., University of Vermont; Ph.D., Pennsyl- 
vania State College. 

Lillian Lee Vaughan, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Acting 
Dean of the School of Enaineering. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.E., Columbia University. 

Herman Husband Vestal, Assistant Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Major, Infantry-Reserve ; B.S., N. C. State College; Graduate, Infantry School, Com- 
pany Officers Course. 

fEDMUND Meredith Waller, Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 
and Assistant Coach. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University ; M.A., Peabody College. 

fROBERT Sullivan Warren, Assistayit Professor of Physical Education and 
Head Coach of Basketball. 

D.O., American School of Osteopathy; B.S., N. C. State College; M.A., University of 
North Carolina. 

Davh) Stathem Weaver, Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.S., N. C. State College. 

James Gray Weaver, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Bertram Whittier Wells, Professor of Botany. 

A.B., M.A., Ohio State University ; Ph-D., University of Chicago. 

Fred Barnett Wheeler, Professor of Practical Mechanics and Superin- 
tendent of Shops. 

B.S., M.E., N. C. State College. 

Raymond Cyrus White, Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.S., Davis Elkins College ; M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia University. 

fLARRY Alston Whitford, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Charles Burgess Williams, Professor Emeritus of Agronomy. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

fFRED Carter Williams, Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering. 

B.S., N. C. State College ; B.S., University of Dlinois ; Registered Architect. 

Harvey Page WILLIAMS, Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., William and Mary College ; M.A., Duke University. 

Leon Franklin Williams, Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

A.B., A.M., Trinity College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
t On military leave. 



Faculty 19 

Norwood Wade Williams, Assistant Professor of Poultry. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College. 

Arthur John Wilson, Professor of Analytical Chemistry'. 

B.S., M.S., N. C. State College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Thomas Leslie Wilson, Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., Catawba College; A.M., Wofford College. 

Merle Wesley Wing, Instructor in Zoology. 

B.S., University of Maine. 

Edwin Weems Winkler, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

S.B., Montana State College ; M.S., University of North Carolina. 

Sanford Richard Winston, Professor of Sociology. 

A.B., Western Reserve University ; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

fLowELL Sheridan Winton, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S., Grove City College; M.A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Thomas Wilmont Wood, Associate Professor of Industry and Personnel 
Management. 

B.S., A.M., University of Alabama ; Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 

Frederick Scott Woodruff, Assistant Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

First Lieutenant, CAC, AUS ; Graduate, Antiaircraft Artillery School, Officer Candi- 
date School. 

f Lenthall Wyman, Professor of Forestry. 

A.B., M.F., Harvard University. 

Willard Kendall Wynn, Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., Wofford College; M.A., Emory University; M.A., Columbia University. 

f Robert Baker Wynne, Instructor in English. 

A.B., William and Mary. 



t On military leave. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College 

Establishment. — Tie North Carolina State College of Agriculture and 
Engineering is one of the Land-Grant Colleges established under the pro- 
visions of the Morrill Act. passed by the CongTess of the United States. June 
2, 1862. The first session of the College was that of 1889-1890. Prior to that 
date, the fur. is reoe er the Land-Grant Act had been 

used by the Universi t y of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill. 

The name. The N - lir.a College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 

used in the establishment of the College, was changed by the General 
Assembly — the Legislature of the State — in 1917 to its present form. 

In its session of 1931. the General Assembly passed an Act, of which the 
following' is the first section: "That the University of North Carolina, the 
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering, and the 
North Carolina College for Women are hereby consolidated and merged 
into 'The University of North Carolina'." 

This Act 7 laced the three institutions under one Board of Trustees and 
one President, the separate affairs of each institution being in charge of its 
own Administrative lean. The effect of the Act, by correcting unnecessary 
duplication and focalizing the work of each of its members, has tended to 
create a strong, unified State University. 

Location.— State College Campus of one hundred twenty-five acres, lies 
within the limits of Raleigh, a mile and a quarter west of the State Capitol, 
on United States Highway, Route 1. Adjoining the Campus westward, 
occupying four hundred forty-five additional acres, are the College poultry 
yards, and the Central State Experiment Farms. A mile still farther west- 
ward, the College has acquired a tract of thirteen hundred acres, which is 
maintained as livestock farms by the Department of Animal Husbandry 
and Dairying. The part of this tract — about 500 acres — not adapted for 
these farms is being used by the Department of Forestry for demonstrations 
and levdopment 

Organization. — The :rgani;ati:n :f State College has as its objectives 
Campus Teaching, Extension Teaching, and Research. 

Car. -.pus Teaching occupies the School of Agriculture and Forestry, the 
School of Engineering, the Division of Teacher Education, the Textile 
School, the Graduate Division, the Basic Division, and the Summer Session. 
The Schools and the Basic Division are organized for teaching by Depart- 
ments. The details of the organization, the equipment, and the work of each 
School and Department are give:: under the various headings in the later 
pages of this Catalog'. The work of the Summer Session is set forth in a 
special issue of State Colli:-! Record published each year in December, a 
copy of which is sent : //.est. 

The Department of Military Training, including as the Reserve Officers 
Training Corps stu cents of all classes in all Schools, is placed immediately 
under the College Administration. 



Information for Applicants 21 

Extension Teaching is directed under the Division of College Extension. 
The work is closely coordinated with the work in the regular Departments 
of the College. In certain short courses, most of them in Agriculture and in 
Engineering, Extension overlaps with Campus Teaching. The whole State 
is covered in the activities of the Agricultural Extension Service. 

Research is conducted, by individuals or by Departments, very generally 
at State College. Specially organized work is done through the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, the Engineering Experiment Station, and the 
Textile Research Department. 

The Campus. — The Campus of State College presents an agreeably roll- 
ing terrain with adequate space west and south for expansion. Located on 
the eastern edge of the Piedmont Region of the State, within twenty-five 
miles of the Coastal Plain, opportunity is afforded for a pleasing variety of 
trees and shrubs in the landscaping. Fortunately, in the early years of the 
College a long-range plan for growth was made. This plan is now being 
intelligently followed. 

Under the sections of the Catalog devoted to Schools and their Depart- 
ments and to Divisions, are placed descriptions of buildings, laboratories, 
and facilities of each of these. 

General Service Buildings. — Holladay Hall, named for Colonel Alexander 
Quarles Holladay, first President of the College, 1889-1899, contains the 
general administrative offices of the College, and the offices and classrooms 
of the Military Department. 

The D. H. Hill Library, named for Doctor Daniel Harvey Hill, President 
of the College, 1908-1916, was dedicated in 1926. It contains now over 
62,000 volumes, exclusive of Government documents, and pamphlets. 

The Y. M. C. A. building, the erection of which was made possible by a 
donation from the Rockefeller Foundation, serves the religious and social 
life of the College. 

The Dining Hall, an H-shaped building, with kitchens, storage rooms, 
pantries, refrigerators, and other mechanical devices in the center and 
basement, has at each side, front and rear, a spacious dining hall. The 
service is on the cafeteria plan. 

The Frank Thompson Gymnasium, named in honor of Frank Martin 
Thompson, distinguished athlete, graduate of State College, Class of 1910, 
killed in service during the World War, is thoroughly equipped and modern 
in all its appointments. 

The Infirmary, recently enlarged and renovated, is a model of a small, 
special hospital. 

Pullen Hall, named in honor of R. Stanhope Pullen, donor of first sixty 
acres of the College land, has classrooms on the first and basement floors, 
on the second floor, the College auditorium. 

The Power Plant, recently erected, centrally located, furnishes heat, 
electric power, and hot water to all buildings on the Campus using these 
services. 



22 State College Catalog 

Eleven College Dormitories now in use accommodate approximately 1400 
students. Other students will room, as at present, in homes in the vicinity of 
the Campus and in fraternity houses. Full information in regard to dormi- 
tories is sent by the Registrar to applicants accepted for admission to the 
College, or by the Superintendent of Dormitories. 

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS 
I. Admission 

1. The first step toward admission to State College is to get from the 
Registrar, who is to be addressed at State College Station, Raleigh, a cer- 
tificate blank. After the blank has been filled out and signed by the prin- 
cipal or the superintendent of the high school or other preparatory school, 
the certificate is sent to the Registrar for his decision on admission, notice 
of which will be given promptly. 

The certificate must contain a statement from the school last attended 
of the good moral character of the applicant. 

2. Undergraduate students may be admitted as regular or special. 

(1) A regular student is one who is registered in a four-year curricu- 
lum. 

(2) Women may be admitted as regular students provided they reg- 
ister in one of the regular curricula. 

(3) A special student is a person of mature age already engaged in 
some vocation in which instruction is desired. Such person may, 
upon presenting a satisfactory record of education and upon 
recommendation of the Dean of the School concerned, be admitted 
without the usual entrance requirements. 

Special students are not eligible for a degree, nor does work done 
as a special student have value for credit toward a degree. A 
special student cannot represent the College in any intercollegiate 
contest nor become a member of a fraternity. 

3. Requirements for admission of regular students. 

(1) Sixteen years is the minimum age for admission. 

(2) Graduation from a State accredited high school, or an approved 
preparatory school, and fifteen units of credit, specified and 
elective as indicated below, are required for admission to the 
freshman class of four-year courses. 

*(3) Nongraduates who have completed the eleventh grade may be 
admitted under the following conditions: 

(a) If they have the specified subject requirements and units of 
credit indicated below. 

(b) If they are in the upper third of their class scholastically. 

(c) If they have the principal's recommendation. 

(d) If they pass successfully the College entrance examination. 



* This method of admission is experimental and its continuance will depend upon the 

results obtained. 



Information for Applicants 23 

(4) Applicants graduated by nonaccredited four-year high schools may 
be admitted by passing successfully an entrance examination such 
as that prepared by the Examination Committee of the North 
Carolina College Conference. 

(6) In exceptional instances a person of mature age may be admitted 
by the Dean of a School on the basis of his ability to carry the 
regular work of a curriculum in that School. 

(6) Subjects and units of credit (a unit is allowed for a subject pur- 
sued for a year, five periods a week, each period being at least 
forty minutes, and successfully passed in a high school accredited 
by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction or 
other preparatory school accredited by competent authority). 

Units of Credit 

English: Grammar, Composition, Literature 4 

t History: United States or equivalent 1 

Algebra 1.5 

Plane Geometry 1 

*Solid Geometry 5 

Science 1 

The remainder of the required fifteen units will be accepted from the 
academic record presented except that not more than a total of one unit 
will be accepted for activity courses such as physical education, music, band, 
and military science. 

(7) Students admitted from other countries who do not have a satis- 
factory command of the English language will be required to 
attend a non-credit English course until they acquire a mastery 
of English. This course will include vocabulary training in the 
student's major field of study. 

4. Advanced standing is allowed on work done in approved colleges upon 
presentation of a certificate or transcript, duly signed and sealed, to the 
Director of Registration. The transcript is evaluated in the Registration 
Office to determine the maximum amount of credit and is then sent to the 
Dean of the School concerned for a detailed evaluation of credits which can 
be used in the curriculum selected. 

Each applicant for admission to N. C. State College as a transfer from 
another college or a university must send with her or his application for 
admission a remittance of five dollars, to be known as the application fee. 
This remittance must be drawn in favor of N. C. State College, Raleigh, and 
should be in the form of a check or money order. No transcript of record 
sent in support of an application for admission will be examined and 
evaluated until the remittance is received. If the record received is not 
satisfactory for the applicant's admission, the remittance will be returned; 

* Solid Geometry is required only in the School of Engineering and in Agricultural Engi- 
neering. A special course is offered in college for applicants who do not present this credit for 
entrance. No college credit is allowed for the course. 

t A student not offering for credit History of the United States is required to take the 
subject in his College course. 



24 State College Catalog 

if the record is satisfactory and the application is approved, the remittance 
will be deposited with the Cashier and will be applied as a credit at the time 
of the applicant's first registration. If the record is satisfactory and the 
application is approved and the applicant fails to matriculate at N. C. 
State College, the deposit is forfeited by the applicant. 

Because of the scholastic requirements imposed upon resident students, 
advanced standing credit cannot be allowed for courses passed at other 
institutions with the lowest passing letter grade, or corresponding numerical 
grades. At least one year in residence is required for a degree. 

II. Expenses 
Undergraduate 

1. The total College expenses of a student resident of North Carolina 
need not for the regular College year exceed $600.00, for a nonresident of 
this State, $770. These amounts include the cost of room and board, heat 
and lights, tuition, fees and deposits, books, drawing instruments, laundry, 
and necessary incidentals. They do not include clothing, pocket money, or 
other incidentals. 

2. Nonresidents of North Carolina pay an additional tuition charge. The 
College Administration has defined a nonresident student as a person who 
comes into North Carolina from another state for the purpose of attending 
college. 

In order to draw a clear line between resident and nonresident students, 
the Administration has ruled that all students whose parents have not been 
domiciled in North Carolina for more than six months immediately preced- 
ing the day of their first enrollment in the institution shall be termed non- 
resident students, with the following exceptions: 

(1) Students twenty-one years of age at the time of their first 
matriculation who have resided in North Carolina for more than 
one year preceding the day of their first enrollment. 

(2) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government stationed 
in the State of North Carolina. 

(3) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government who are 
employed outside of the State, but who through law are permitted 
to retain their North Carolina citizenship. 

Students acnnot claim a change in their resident status after matricu- 
lating. Students furnishing incomplete or incorrect information in order to 
obtain the special State-resident status shall be liable for dishonorable 
dismissal. 

3. Applications for credit must be made to the Business Office of the 
College, prior to registration day. Applications made later, if granted, will 
require a special fee of $2 and possibly also the fee for late registration. 

4. For each failure to meet deferred payments as scheduled, a fee of $5 
is charged. 



Information for Applicants 25 

5. Tuition and fees for residents of North Carolina as regular under- 
graduates or as special students scheduled for twelve or more credit hours 
are as follows: 

Fall Winter Spring 

Quarter Quarter Quarter 

Tuition $30 $30 $30 

College Fees 25 25 25 

Student Activities 4 3 2 

Athletic Fee 8 5 2 

Agricultural, and Agricultural 

Education Students Fees 2 2 



Engineering Students Fees* 2 1 

Textile Students Fees 2 1 

General Deposit 20 

Special Student Fees include subscription to student publications of the 
school in which registered. 

Note. — Tuition and Fees are subject to change by the Board of Trustees 
without advance notice. 

6. The general deposit, in case of first year men, will be charged with cost 
of necessary expendable Military Supplies, such as shoes, books, etc. The 
balance of this deposit, in case of all students, is refundable at the end of 
the year, after covering loss of, or excessive breakage of College property, 
or other indebtedness to the College. 

7. Nonresidents of North Carolina registered in Forestry or Textiles will 
pay an additional $38.00 Tuition per quarter. Nonresident students reg- 
istered in other curricula will pay an additional $55.00 Tuition per quarter. 

8. Expenses include also the following: 

Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter 

Room Rent $18.00 to $30.00. . $18.00 to $30.00. . $18.00 to $30.00 

Books and Supplies 20.00 to 35.00 . . 8.00 
Drawing Equipment 

for those taking 

Drawing 17.50 to 35.00 

9. College fees include those for registration, for hospital and medical 
attention, for library and lectures, for laboratories and classrooms, and for 
physical education. 

10. Student-activities fees include those for student government, student 
publications, and general student activities. 



* Of the Engineering fee of $3. the students pay $1 for a year's subscription to "The 
Southern Engineer." 



26 State College Catalog 

11. Freshmen, unless living at home with their parents, are required to 
room in specified College dormitories. Students are not permitted to live in 
fraternity chapter houses during their freshman year. 

12. Reservation of a room and the first payment of rent must be made 
before August 15 to obtain the most desirable room available. A reserva- 
tion may be canceled and the payment therefore refunded upon notice before 
September 1, not later. Information about rooms may be had by writing 
Superintendent of Dormitories. 

13. Dormitory rooms have necessary furniture, but each student must 
bring his own blankets, bed linen, and towels. 

14. Board at the College Cafeteria may be paid in cash for each meal, 
or in tickets sold at the Cafeteria in books of $5.00 value for the convenience 
of students. 

15. Applicants who desire information regarding part-time employment 
should address their inquiries to the Self-Help Secretary. The Self-Help 
Secretary will, upon request, write of possible employment to those wish- 
ing to earn, while in College, money to help in paying expenses. 

16. A refund of the amount paid the College, less the registration fee and 
a reasonable charge for lodging and services, is made to a student with- 
drawing within ten days from the date of registration; on withdrawal later, 
no refund will be made except of the general deposit. 

Graduate and Special Students 

1. Graduate students in residence will pay a $2.00 registration fee for 
each registration, $3.00 per credit hour for all courses scheduled, and $10.00 
for the diploma. 

2. Special students will pay a $2.00 registration fee for each registration 
and $3.00 ($5.00 for non-residents) per credit hour for all courses scheduled 
totaling less than twelve hours. Those scheduling 12 hours or more will pay 
regular fees. Special students do not receive academic credit. 

3. The candidate for a professional degree will pay $10.00 when he 
registers and $15.00 for his diploma. 

III. Registration 

1. A program of exercises during the first week is given each applicant 
for admission to the freshman class on his arrival upon the Campus. 

2. The Certificate of Admission approved beforehand by the Registrar 
for the School and the Department in which the applicant wishes to register 
must be ready for presentation. 

3. The dates indicated in the College Calendar for the registration of 
freshmen, of those applying for advanced credit, and of sophomores, juniors, 
seniors, and graduate students, must be strictly observed. 

4. For registration after the scheduled date, an extra fee of $2 is required 
for the first day and $1 for each additional day until a maximum of $10 is 
reached. 



Information for Applicants 27 

Special Note to Freshmen and Transfer Students 

Because of the testing program given during freshman week to all new 
students (except those with forty-five or more term credits of advanced 
standing), it is essential that all new students report on time. Late admis- 
sions cause a great deal of extra labor and expense. Therefore, beginning 
with the fall term registration in September, 1945, all new students (except 
transfer students with forty-five or more term credits of advanced standing) 
will be charged a $2 fee for each test missed during freshman week. This 
charge is made because of the extra time which must be given to late indi- 
viduals. The regular late fee regulations will apply to transfer students 
having forty-five or more term credits of advanced standing, who do not 
begin their registration on the date indicated. New students should plan to 
arrive on the campus on the day preceding the registration date in order to 
be available at 8:00 a.m. on registration day. 

6. Directions in detail for registration are furnished each student on 
entering the registration room — the Gymnasium. 

6. Vaccination against smallpox is required at the time of registration 
unless the applicant furnishes a doctor's certificate indicating he has been 
successfully vaccinated within two years preceding his registration. 

7. Inoculation against typhoid fever, though not compulsory, is urgently 
suggested for those entering the College. Free inoculation is offered by 
the College to all students. 

8. All new students will be given the Tuberculin Skin Test unless they 
present a statement from their family physician indicating that such a test 
has been taken during the past year. 

9. Admission to classes is permitted only after complete registration 
certified on the official card of the Registrar. All instructors will enforce 
this rule. 

10. Students may drop and add courses during a specified period at the 
beginning of each term by filing in the Office of Registration a roster 
change slip signed by their Dean, Adviser, and the instructors concerned. 
There is a charge of fifty cents for such changes made after registration 
day. Credit is not allowed for changes unless made in this manner. 

11. Students may change from one curriculum to another by filing in the 
Office of Registration a curriculum change card signed by the Dean or 
Deans concerned. Such changes are effective at the beginning of the follow- 
ing term. 

IV. Grades and Honor Points 
1. Grading System: 
A— Excellent, 90-100. 
B— Good, 80-89. 
C— Passing, 70-79. 

D — Passing (without credit points), 60-69. 
F— Failure, below 60. 
Abs. — Absent from examination. 
Inc. — Incomplete. 



28 State College Catalog 

2. Honor or quality points are determined by the grade: 
A — 3 points for each credit hour. 

B — 2 points for each credit hour. 
C — 1 point for each credit hour. 
D — No points. 

3. Mid-term reports for students who are failing any subject enable 
advisers and deans so to adjust the work of these students that they 
make, if possible, passing grades by the end of the term. 

4. Seniors who fail a course within three terms (summer school counts 
as one term) of their graduation, may, if they have failed only one 
course, apply to the Office of Registration for permission to remove 
the failure by taking a re-examination on that course. 

a. If, however, a senior fails more than one course during one term 
and removes all but one of these deficiencies by repeating the 
course or courses and if he has had no other re-examination that 
year, he may apply at the end of his last term in residence for 
permission to take a re-examination to remove that failure. 

b. Permission to take any re-examination must be obtained from the 
Office of Registration, and a fee of $3.00 must be paid to the Busi- 
ness Office for each re-examination. 

V. Scholarship 

1. To register for a new term, a freshman must have passed during the 
preceding term at least fifty per cent of his credit hours; a sopho- 
more, a junior, a senior, sixty per cent. However, a student who has 
failed to make the required percentage may be permitted to register 
upon recommendation of the Scholarship Committee and the approval 
of the Faculty Council. 

2. The re-entrance, after the interval of at least one term, of a student 
who has failed, or the entrance, after the lapse of at least one term, 
of a student who has failed at another college, shall be determined by 
the Dean or Director of Instruction of his school upon the basis of 
maximum scholastic advantage to the student. 

3. "C" Average Rule. Before allowing students to enter the third or 
fourth year, they shall have earned net credit points equal to or 
greater than the term credits earned. In case of repeated courses, the 
repeated grade only shall be considered. This rule is applied before 
the fall term registration only, thus giving students ample time to 
earn the required points. Any student may attend the summer session 
at this institution to make up any shortage in points, but may not 
earn such points through correspondence courses or attendance at 
other institutions. 

4. Honors in Scholarship: 

a. Honors in scholarship for the year are awarded those students who 
earn twice as many credit points as credit hours during the first 
two terms. 



Information for Applicants 29 

b. High honors in scholarship for the year are awarded those stu- 
dents who earn two and one-half times as many credit points as 
credit hours during the first two terms. 

c. Honors in scholarship at graduation are awarded those students 
who have earned during their entire residence at this institution 
twice as many credit points as credit hours. 

d. High honors in scholarship at graduation are awarded those stu- 
dents who have earned during their entire residence at this insti- 
tution two and one-half times as many credit points as credit hours. 

e. Public announcement of honors and high honors for the year is 
made on Scholarship Day; of graduation with honors or high honors 
at Commencement. Graduation with honors or high honors is also 
published in the College Catalog and engrossed upon diplomas. 

f . Dean's List. Any junior or senior having a cumulative average of 
"B" or better shall be exempt from the college rule which places 
a student on probation for excessive absences, and his name shall 
be placed on a preferred list. Once placed on such preferred list 
a student must maintain an average of "B" or better during each 
term he remains in college thereafter, or his name shall be removed 
from such preferred list and not entered thereon again. 

g. Class Attendance Regulations. A student is expected to attend 
every meeting of each class. Any student who is absent from class 
three (3) times without a satisfactory reason will lose one (1) 
quality point. A student who is absent ten (10) times in any term 
without a satisfactory reason will be placed on probation. 

Copies of attendance regulations in detail are available to all 
students in the Office of Dean of Students. 

VI. Classification of Students 

1. For the convenience of the college administration and in keeping with 
custom, regular students are classified as Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, 
Seniors, and Graduates. This classification is made only at the opening of 
the fall term, or when a student enters for the first time. The following 
system of classification is used: 

Freshman — Less than 45 term credits. 
Sophomore — 45 credits through 104 credits. 
Junior — 105 credits through 159 credits. 
Senior — 160 or more credits. 

Graduate — A student who has already received a baccalaureate 
degree from a recognized college. 

This system permits students to skip classifications and graduate as soon 
as scholastic requirements have been satisfied. 

2. Students are promoted from the Basic Division to technical schools 
when they have earned 105 or more credits, including credit for all fresh- 
man requirements, and have a "C" average. Students who have earned as 



30 State College Catalog 

many as 140 credits without completing all freshman requirements are 
promoted to technical schools but must complete the remaining freshman 
courses without credit toward graduation. Transfer students are allowed 
at least four terms in which to make up freshman deficiencies and still 
receive credit toward graduation. 

VII. Degrees 

1. Upon the undergraduate student who successfully completes in regular 
order any of the prescribed curricula the College awards a Bachelor's degree 

in the student's major field. 

2. Upon the student who has previously obtained the Bachelor's degree 
and who successfully completes in regular order at least one year of pre- 
scribed graduate work in residence, the College awards a Masters degree 
in that student's major field. 

3. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy in certain specified departments is 
offered in cooperation with the University at Chapel Hill under supervision 
of the Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North Carolina. 

4. Upon graduates of State College, after five years of professional prac- 
tice and significant accomplishn.er.:. a professional degree in the school con- 
cerned may be conferred upon presentation of an acceptable thesis. 

5. Since in conferring a degree and awarding a diploma, the College 
recognizes a student's character as well as his scholarship, the College 
reserves the right to withhold the degree and diploma for reasons other 
than unsatisfactory scholarship. 

6. No student may earn more than one baccalaureate degree at any one 
commencement. In order to be eligible for a second Bachelor's degree, a 
student must complete a minimum of 36 term credits above the require- 
raenta for the first degree. There is, however, no additional residence 
requirements. 

7. Undergraduate students who transfer from some other institution 
must spend one year in residence at this institution before being eligible 
for a degree. 

8. An undergraduate student while not in residence may earn towards 
a degree not more than fifty term credits by correspondence and not more 
than sixty by correspondence and extension. Not more than six credit hours 
may be earned towards graduation after a student's last residence at this 
institution. Correspondence courses cannot be taken by a resident student 
unless they are a part of his official schedule approved by his dean. 

9. The honorary degree, Doctor of Science, may be conferred upon not 
more than three men a year, one each recommended by the schools and 
in the fields of Agriculture and Forestry, of Engineering, and of Textiles. 

10. A certificate of Meritorious Service in Agriculture may be awarded 
at Commencement to a bona-fide farmer who has rendered notable service 
in the advancement of agriculture in his community. 



Information for Applicants 31 

VIII. Financial Aids and Scholarships 

1. The Self-Help Secretary of the College Y. M. C. A. (see page 43) will 
assist those desiring employment to help pay expenses. 

2. A Student Loan Fund, first established by the State College Alumni 
Association, amounting now to $34,000, renders assistance to needy students 
of talent and high character. The Fund includes the Finley Loan Fund of 
$1,000 (see below), the Masonic Loan Fund, $4,500, the Frank M. Harper 
Loan Fund. $200, and the Escheats Loan Fund of $15,000. 

At present, loans, restricted largely to juniors and seniors, are made at 6 
percent on good security. Since the fund is comparatively small, new loans 
are usually made only as old ones are repaid. 

The Finley Loan Fund is a memorial to William Wilson Finley by the 
Southern Railway Company, of which Mr. Finley was, at the time of his 
death, president. It is designated for needy students in Agriculture. 

3. The John Gray Blount Scholarships were endowed by Colonel W. B. 
Rodman, of Norfolk, Virginia, in memory of his great-grandfather. The 
maximum value of each of the two scholarships is $195. 

4. The Champion Paper and Fibre Company provides a fund for a Fellow- 
ship to encourage graduate study and research in Chemical Engineering. 

5. The Syd Alexander Scholarship was endowed by Mrs. Mary R. Alex- 
ander of Charlotte, North Carolina, in memory of her husband, the late 
Sydenham B. Alexander, alumnus and trustee of State College. The returns 
from the endowment — $5,000 — are awarded to a student native and resident 
of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, who is pursuing a course in the 
School of Textiles of State College. 

6. The Barrett Company, Distributors of Arcadian American Nitrate of 
Soda, offers to 4-H Club members the following one-year scholarships: 

(1) To the member with the most distinguished record with a Corn- 
Club project. 

(2) To the member with the most distinguished record in Cotton-Club 
work. 

(3) To the member with the best Tobacco-Club record. 

(4) To the member with the best record in Horticulture. 

7. The North Carolina Cottonseed-Crushers Association offers to 4-H Club 
members the following one-year scholarships: 

(1) To the member making the best record in the Baby-Beef contest. 

(2) To the member making the best record in a dairy project. 

(3) To the member making the best Pig-Club record. 

8. (1) The Chilean Nitrate Educational Bureau offers a four-year scholar- 
ship to the 4-H Club member in North Carolina making the best record for 
three or more years in 4-H Club work. 



32 State College Catalog 

(2) The Chilean Nitrate Educational Bureau also offers a hundred 
scholarships of $5 each: one to the most distinguished Club boy from each 
of the hundred counties of North Carolina attending the 4-H Summer Short 
Course at State College. 

9. The Luther W. Cartwright, Jr., Memorial Scholarship. Memorializing 
the late Luther W. Cartwright, Jr., who gave his life in the service of his 
country, his father, Lieutenant Commander Luther W. Cartwright, has 
established a trust fund at the North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
and Engineering to provide for the annual award of a scholarship to be 
awarded to a senior in the school of engineering. 

10. The Abraham and Charles Erlanger Textile Scholarships. Memorial- 
izing the late Abraham and Charles Erlanger, members of their family 
have established a trust fund at North Carolina State College of Agricul- 
ture and Engineering to provide for the annual award of a four-year 
scholarship in textiles. 

Any son or daughter of an employee of the Erlanger Mills, Inc., in 
Lexington, N. C, the North Carolina Finishing Company in Salisbury, N. C, 
the North Carolina Fabrics Company in Salisbury, N. C, and the Alexander 
Manufacturing Company in Forest City, N. C, on graduation from high 
school, is eligible to compete for the Erlanger Scholarship. 

11. The Pieters Memorial Graduate Scholarship commemorates the life 
and work of Dr. Adrian J. Pieters, long a leader in agriculture and a pioneer 
in the development of lespedeza. It was initiated by his wife, Mary Burr 
Pieters, to carry forward through graduate study his work with lespedeza 
and other acid-tolerant legumes. The annual stipend is $200. 

12. The L. Reade Powers Scholarship Fund. Established by his brother, 
Dr. F. P. Powers, for the aid of needy students, primarily orphan boys or 
girls. This is in the nature of a loan fund to needy boys or girls. 

13. Sperry Gyroscope Scholarships. The Sperry Gyroscope Company, 
Inc., has granted the College $1,250 per school year for four years, begin- 
ning in September, 1945, for two scholarships each school year, or one 
fellowship each school year. A committee composed of the Dean of Engi- 
neering, the Dean of Students, and the Head of the Department of Aero- 
nautical Engineering will select the persons to receive the awards. The 
selections will be made from students having junior class, or senior class, 
or graduate standing. 

14. Graduate Fellowships are offered each year by State College, during 
the current year, thirty-three teaching, twenty-four research fellowships. 
As the number of these scholarships is limited, application should be made 
early to the Head of the Department concerned. 

15. As need arises, assistants in various Departments are selected from 
upperclass or graduate students. 



Student Activities 33 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student Government 

Student Government, in accordance with an agreement between the 
students and the Board of Trustees of the College, undertakes "to handle 
all matters of student conduct, honor, and general student interest, and to 
promote in Campus life self-control, personal responsibility, and loyalty to 
the College and the student body." 

The Student Council, the legislative-executive body for Student Govern- 
ment, is composed of one senior, one junior, and one sophomore from each 
of the Schools — Agriculture and Forestry, Engineering, and Textile, and 
the Division of Teacher Education — and one member chosen at large from 
the freshman class at the beginning of the second term. 

For guidance in its operation, the Constitution and By-Laws for Student 
Government has been adopted. 

Student Publications 

The Publications Board is composed of the editors and business managers 
of all student publications, the president and the past president of the junior 
class, the president of the Student Council, and five faculty members. The 
Board seeks to promote the interests of the College and of the publications, 
to insure cooperation among the publications, and to hold the loyal support 
of the faculty, the students, and the public. 

The Technician, the student newspaper, is delivered to each student's mail 
box every Friday morning of the regular College session. The charge for 
the paper is included in the student's publications fee. 

The Agromeck is the official annual published at the end of each scholastic 
year of the College. A copy of The Agromeck is also paid for by each stu- 
dent in his publications fee. 

The Agriculturist, a monthly magazine in its field, was begun by the 
activities of the Alpha Zeta fraternity and the "Ag" Club. All students of 
the School of Agriculture and Forestry are concerned in this enterprise. 

The Southern Engineer, the organ of the School of Engineering, is man- 
aged by the Board of Directors of the Southern Engineer. They plan to 
issue four numbers during the regular College session. 

Pi-ne-tum is the annual of the Division of Forestry. Its contents consti- 
tute a record of persons, especially the graduating class, and of events of 
the year interesting to students of the Division and their friends. 

The Textile Forum is published quarterly by the students in the Textile 
School. 

Clubs and Societies 

All clubs and societies endeavor to bring together students (some clubs 
include members of the faculty), with the same interests or professional 
objective, in order to cultivate close personal relations and fellowship. Their 



34 State College Catalog 

chief purpose is to inculcate high professional consciousness and esprit de 
corps; and, with a view toward the accomplishment of these ends, they 
afford to members an opportunity to hear and to participate in discussions 
of professional problems, and themselves to present papers on current 
technical topics. 

The Agricultural Club, besides the usual activities, sponsors an annual 
dance. 

The Forestry Club, having the usual program through the year, publishes 
its own annual, Pi-ne-tum (described under "Student Publications," above). 

La Societe des Beaux Arts includes students in Architectural Engineering 
and those in Landscape Architecture. 

The Agricultural Engineering Club is a student branch of the national 
organization, The American Society of Agricultural Engineers, and brings 
together students of this department to discuss all phases of their specialty. 

The Agricultural Education Society devotes its attention to matters of 
interest to students who are preparing to become teachers of agriculture. 

Student Chapters in Engineering at State College represent the following 
national organizations: 

The American Ceramic Society 
The American Institute of Chemical Engineers 
The American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
The American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers 
The American Society of Civil Engineers 
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
The Associated General Contractors of America 
The Institute of Aeronautical Sciences 

The National Society for the Advancement of Management 
Theta Tau, Rho Chapter (National Professional Engineering 
Fraternity). 

The Engineers' Council, composed of three students and a professor from 
each Department of the School of Engineering, publishes quarterly The 
Southern Engineer and sponsors the Engineers' Fair and Exposition. 

The Tompkins Textile Society endeavors to keep abreast of whatever 
affects the textile industry, state, national, or foreign. 

The Pan American Club cultivates friendship among students of all 
nationalities and has regular addresses and discussions of international 
events and relationships. 

The Monogram Club has as its purpose to develop the highest order of 
sportsmanship in all athletics. 

Honor Fraternities and Societies 

Honor Fraternities and Societies strive to encourage and reward high 
attainment in scholarship and character, and to instill lofty professional 



Faculty and Student Activities 35 

ideals, with leadership in contribution to existing knowledge and in service 
as prime objectives. The following national fraternities and societies have 
chapters or other organizations at State College: 

Alpha Zeta: Agricultural 

Eta Kappa Nu: Electrical Engineering 

Gamma Sigma Epsilon: Chemical 

Kappa Phi Kappa: Teaching 

Keramos: Ceramic Engineering 

Lambda Gamma Delta: Agricultural Judging 

Mu Beta Psi : Musical 

Phi Eta Sigma: Freshman, Scholarship 

Phi Kappa Phi : Scholarship 

Phi Psi: Textile 

Pi Kappa Delta: Public Speaking 

Pi Tau Sigma: Mechanical Engineering 

Sigma Pi Alpha: Language 

Tau Beta Pi: Engineering 

Blue Key: Scholarship, Leadership, Student Activities 

Xi Sigma Pi: Forestry, Honorary. 

The following are organizations peculiar to State College: 
The Golden Chain: Senior Citizenship 

The Order of St. Patrick: Senior Engineering; Collegiate and Per- 
sonal Distinction 
The Order of 30 and 3 : Sophomore Leadership 
The Pine Burr Society: Scholarship and Extracurricular Activity 
Sigma Tau Sigma: Textile, Scholarship 

Social Fraternities 

Following are the national Greek-Letter Fraternities having chapters at 
State College. Each chapter occupies a chapter house in the vicinity of the 
campus. 

Alpha Gamma Eho* Phi Kappa Tau* 

Alpha Kappa Pi* Pi Kappa Alpha 

Alpha Lambda Tau Pi Kappa Phi 

Delta Sigma Phi Sigma Alpha Mu 

Kappa Alpha* Sigma Nu 

Kappa Sigma* Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Lambda Chi Alpha Sigma Pi 

Sigma Chi 

The Interfraternity Council, composed of two representatives from each 
chapter, has as its purposes to advance the interests of North Carolina 
State College; to promote the general interests and welfare of the associated 
fraternities as a body; and to insure cooperation between them in their 
relations with the faculty, the student body, and the public in general. 

* Inactive for the duration. 



36 State College Catalog 

MEDALS AND PRIZES** 

1. The Alpha Zeta Cup is awarded to the sophomore in Agriculture who 
during his freshman year made the highest scholastic average. 

2. The General Alumni Association of the College presents annually a 
trophy to the member of the graduating class who during his College course 
has most distinguished himself in athletics. 

3. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers presents annually its 
award to the sophomore who during his freshman year made the highest 
scholastic record. 

4. The Associated General Contractors of America Prize is awarded each 
year by the Carolina Branch of this organization to the member of the 
graduating class in Construction Engineering who during his sophomore, 
junior, and senior years has made the highest scholastic record. 

5. The Elder P. D. Gold Citizenship Medal, founded by the late C. W. Gold 
in memory of his father, and continued by his son, C. W. Gold, Jr., of 
Greensboro, North Carolina, is awarded annually to the member of the 
graduating class who during his sophomore, junior, and senior years has 
most distinguished himself in Student Citizenship. The qualities determining 
the award — scholarship, student leadership, athletics, and public speaking 
— are to be attested by the College Registrar, the Student Council, the 
Faculty Athletic Committee, and a committee composed of the Dean of 
Administration and Dean of Students. 

6. The Moland-Drysdale Corporation Scholarship Cup, presented by Mr. 
George N. Moland, of Hendersonville, North Carolina, President of the Cor- 
poration, is awarded annually to the freshman in Ceramic Engineering who, 
during the two terms preceding Scholarship Day, has the highest scholastic 
record together with interest shown in the activities of the Department. 

7. The J. C. Steele Scholarship Cup, presented by J. C. Steele and Sons, of 
Statesville, North Carolina, to commemorate the establishment by Mr. 
Steele of the first plant for the manufacture in the South of ceramic 
machinery, is awarded annually to the student of the three upper classes in 
the Department of Ceramic Engineering who has made during the three 
terms preceding Scholarship Day the highest scholastic record. In making 
the award, personality and interest in the activities of the Department are 
considered. 

8. The Sigma Tau Sigma Cup is awarded annually to the senior in Tex- 
tiles who has the highest scholastic record. 

9. The Textile Colorist Medal is awarded annually to the senior who pre- 
sents the best thesis on some subject in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

10. The National Association of Textile Manufacturers Medal is awarded 
annually to a senior in the State College Textile School. The award is based 
upon conditions outlined by the National Association. 



** Several of the above medals and prizes have been discontinued temporarily due to war 
conditions but it is expected that they will be resumed after the war is over. 



Faculty and Student Activities 37 

11. Phi Kappa Phi, Honarary Scholarship Society, awards each year a gold 
medal to the senior who as a junior, a silver medal to the junior who as a 
sophomore, and a bronze medal to the sophomore who as a freshman, made 
respectively, the highest scholastic record. 

12. The Mu Beta Psi Cup is awarded annually to the senior having 
rendered the most service to the State College musical organizations during 
his college career. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

Professor J. F. Miller, Head 

Assistant Professor C. G. Doak, Physical Education and Intramurals. 
Assistant Professor T. I. Hines, Physical Education Track and Swimming 

Coach. 
J. L. VonGlahn, Business Manager Athletics. 
Rudolph Pate, Director Athletic Publicity. 

W. B. Feathers, Head Coach Football, Baseball and ASTP Instructor. 
Starr Wood, Assist. Football Coach and ASTP Instructor. 
A. W. Thomas, Assist. Football Coach and ASTP Instructor. 
E. M. Johnson, Custodian Gymnasium and Athletic Equipment. 
Helen C. Croom, Secretary. 

Aims. — In general, the Department aims are: (a) to promote a higher 
standard of physical fitness through "big muscle" activities; (b) to develop 
habits, knowledge, appreciation, and skills in desirable sports, and athletic 
and gymnastic procedures; (c) to develop habits of safe recreative activities 
to continue after graduation. 

Organization. — The Department of Physical Education and Athletics is 
in the Basic Division of the College. The program of service has three 
sections: Physical Education, offered in various curricula, for which college 
credit is given; Intramural Activities, for every interested student in the 
College; Intercollegiate Athletics, representative of the College. 

Control. — All activities of the Department are controlled by the College. 
Physical Education and Intramural Activities are under the supervision of 
the Dean of the Basic Division. Intercollegiate Athletic Activities are under 
the supervision of the Athletic Council. The Head of the Department seeks 
balance and coordination in the work of the three sections. He delegates 
the work of the staff and sees that policies of the Department are carried 
out by them. To the Business Manager of Athletics is delegated the respon- 
sibility for business, financial, and all other details connected with inter- 
collegiate contests. The members of the staff are expected to give reasonable 
and capable assistance in any work of the Department insofar as it does 
not interfere with their main specialization. They are responsible to the 
Head of the Department for carrying out their duties. 

Buildings and Fields. — The Department of Physical Education and Ath- 
letics is quartered in the Frank Thompson Gymnasium. An attractive 
feature of the gymnasium is a white-tiled swimming pool and natatorium, 



38 State College Catalog 

with modern filter and chlorinating systems. The new Field House, located 
at the south end of Riddick Stadium, is the headquarters of the football 
squad. Offices of the football coaching staff are located in this building. 
Riddick Stadium, with new concrete bleachers, seats 15,000 spectators. 
Freshman Field, adjacent to the Gymnasium, is used for freshman foot- 
ball, intramural games, physical-training classes, and varsity baseball. The 
new quarter-mile track, with its 220-yard straightaways is located south of 
the Freshman Field. It has concrete stands seating about 3,000 spectators. 
"Red Diamond" and "1911 Parade Field" are available for intramural con- 
tests. The College has ten excellent clay tennis courts, with some additional 
contemplated. 

Activities. — The College requires all students to enroll in some type of 
physical activity for two years, or six full terms. The classes meet twice 
a week, one term credit being given for each term's work. All students are 
required to take a physical and a medical examination at registration and 
a physical fitness test. Those who are subnormal in any way are placed on 
the recall list. Students may receive free medical advice at any time. All 
freshmen are required to take the course in Health Education which meets 
once a week for one term. Instruction in personal hygiene is given by mem- 
bers of the Physical Education Staff. A swimming requirement is also made 
for all freshmen, which must be met before graduation. 

The required physical training courses are so standardized that they are 
presented, instruction given, and examination required of each student on 
the same basis as all other college courses. 

All freshmen are required to take Fundamental Activities during the fall 
term. At the close of this term an examination is given which, together with 
a physical fitness test and the student's medical examination, determines 
the future activities of the student. The better students will be permitted 
to elect controlled sports throughout the remainder of their physical educa- 
tion requirements. The normal group will remain in the required Funda- 
mental Activities until such time as they qualify to enter the elective 
Sports Activities. A restrictive group composed of those students who have 
physical defects of a permanent nature will be given selected activities. In 
general the physical training activities fall into one of three groups: 
(a) Those developing condition and physical skills, (b) Those occupying 
recreative or leisure time, (c) Those of a corrective nature. 

Intercollegiate Athletics. — North Carolina State College is a member of 
the Southern Conference, and subscribes to its rules of eligibility for all 
intercollegiate contests. The program consists of the organization and 
training of representative varsity and freshman teams in the following 
sports : football, basketball, baseball, track, cross-country, wrestling, boxing, 
swimming, tennis, golf, and rifle competition. 

Intramural Athletics. — Activities are fostered and promoted in many lines 
of athletic sports for the student body. Meets, tournaments, and leagues 
are seasonably organized in twelve separate sports. Participation in these 
activities is purely voluntary; it does not receive College credit. Sports used 
in this program are correlated with those used in the required class work in 



Music 39 

Physical Education. Instruction in the sports is given in the class work, and 
opportunity for competition is provided in the intramural program. Cups, 
shields, and trophies are awarded winners in these competitions. 

MUSIC 

Christian D. Kutschinski, Director 
Students with previous musical experience are encouraged to continue 
their musical activities in campus musical organizations for which they can 
qualify. Qualified musicians may enroll in the R.O.T.C. Band for their 
required military drill. 

The 80-piece R. O. T. C. Band and 50-piece Drum-and-Bugle Corps furnish 
martial music for all military parades by the R. 0. T. C. Regiment. Their 
R. 0. T. C. drill periods are devoted to both military and musical instruction. 
The 90-piece Red-Coat Band plays and marches at football games, and at 
other campus and civic affairs. Its membership comprises select R. 0. T. C. 
and non-R. 0. T. C. bandsmen, who rehearse three hours a week inde- 
pendently of the R. 0. T. C. Band. 

At the conclusion of the football season the personnel is reduced to a 72- 
piece symphonic or concert band. 

The band is also subdivided into smaller units which alternate in furnish- 
ing music at pep meetings, basketball games, and on other such occasions. 

The Concert Band, composed of 72 of the most proficient musicians on the 
campus, concentrates on the study and performance of the finest in concert 
music. Its activities have greatly increased the cultural growth of those 
participating, and have done much toward increasing appreciation of music 
on the campus and in the community, in addition to providing wholesome 
entertainment. 

The Drum-and-Bugle Corps, besides functioning as a separate unit, is 
also combined with the band on certain occasions, giving State College a 
marching musical unit of 140 men, in red-and-white uniforms, acquired by 
contributions from students and faculty, and from interested citizens of 
Raleigh through the efforts of The American Legion and the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Credit.— Juniors and seniors in the band who are not enrolled in the 
R. 0. T. C. may obtain three term credits per year for Band when approved 
by the Director before registration. 

The Concert Orchestra is augmented by a number of the best musicians in 
Raleigh to round out a symphonic instrumentation. Besides preparing con- 
cert programs, the orchestra is divided into smaller units to provide music 
of a lighter nature for numerous College functions. 

The Men's Glee Club rehearses three times a week, and alternates with 
the orchestra and bands in giving concerts throughout the year. It has 
proved to be a very popular extracurricular activity, and the group is in 
demand for concerts out of town and at civic functions in addition to those 
on the campus. 
A Male Quartet and small Chamber Music ensembles are encouraged. 



40 State College Catalog 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

State College Record carries results of research and special studies by 
members of the faculty and, in the March issue, the annual Catalog with 
announcements for the following year. 

Agricultural Experiment Station publishes many bulletins of research 
conducted by the staff. These are sent on request, free to anyone in the 
State. 

Agricultural Extension Service issues circulars of practical information 
on various home and farm problems. A list of those available or any circu- 
lar available is sent on request, free to citizens of the State. 

The College publishes the results of experimental and research projects 
made by the Engineering Experiment Station and Engineering Departments 
of State College. Information concerning these publications may be ob- 
tained from the Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

HEALTH OF STUDENTS 

The authorities of the College strive to protect the health of students in 
every way. Each student is given a thorough physical examination when 
he enters the College. If remedial defects are discovered, such as defective 
tonsils or eyes, he is advised to have these defects corrected. If the defect 
is such that it may be corrected by exercise, the student is placed in a 
special class under the supervision of the Director in the Physical Education 
Department of the College. 

The infirmary, maintained by the College, has accommodations for 76 
patients. There is a staff of eight: the College Physician, a Supervising 
Nurse, a Night Supervisor, four general duty nurses, and one full-time 
Laboratory and X-ray Technician. 

A modernly equipped First-Aid Department, and a Laboratory and X-Ray 
Department are valuable features of the Infirmary. 

The College Physician visits the Infirmary regularly once daily and more 
often when necessary. The Infirmary is never closed. A graduate nurse 
is on duty day and night. Students have free access to the Infirmary at 
all times. 

Parents or guardians will be notified immediately by the Dean of Students 
in case of accident or serious illness of their sons, and no surgical operation 
will be performed, except in cases of extreme emergency, without full 
consent of parents. 

The medical fee provides for students' infirmary service, general medical 
treatment, and the services of nurses. It does not provide for surgical opera- 
tions, outside hospital care, or the services of dentists or any other specialist. 

THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

H. W. Taylor, Alumni Secretary 

Purpose. — The purposes of this organization are: to promote the growth, 
progress, and general welfare of State College; to foster among its former 



General Alumni Association 41 

students a sentiment of regard for one another and continuing attachment 
to their Alma Mater; and, to interest prospective students in attending 
State College. 

Membership. — Student Associate membership is available to every student 
for the nominal sum of $2.00, which covers membership for 12 months from 
date of payment and also includes subscription to State College News. 

Active membership is available to all former students, regardless of 
length of stay at the college. The annual dues for active members is $3.00, 
which covers membership for 12 months from date of payment and also 
includes subscription to State College News. 

Associate membership includes those members of the College Faculty, 
Staff, Extension Service, Teachers of Agriculture in high schools, Experi- 
ment Station workers, and others who are elected to such membership by 
the Association. The annual dues are $2.00 and include subscription to State 
College News. 

Honorary members include such distinguished persons as are duly elected 
to honorary membership at the commencement meeting of the association. 

Meetings. — The Association meets annually on Alumni Day in connection 
with commencement exercises. 

Reunions. — Class reunions are held each year in connection with the 
annual meeting of the Association. They are scheduled so that each class 
has a reunion the first year, and subsequently, every five years after 
graduation. 

Elections. — Officers of the association are elected by the active members 
between April 1 and May 15 each year. Ballots are printed in State Col- 
lege News. 

State College Clubs. — Local clubs are organized in most of the counties 
in North Carolina and in a number of cities in other states, such as New 
York, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Washington, Norfolk, Newport News, Charles- 
ton, Richmond, and Atlanta. Most of them hold quarterly meeting and 
student associate members are invited to attend. 

State College News. — State College News is published every month in 
the year by the General Alumni Association and is sent to all dues paying 
members. The purpose of this magazine is to keep Association members in 
touch with the college and with each other. It carries news about former 
and present students and about the college, and is well illustrated with 
pictures. 

The Alumni Office. — Records of both graduates and nongraduates are 
kept by the Alumni Office. The master file includes information on all 
former students; other files are arranged geographically and by classes. 
Biographical files are also kept. 

Serving as a medium of communication between alumni and the College, 
the Alumni Offices, located on the second floor of Holladay Hall, are official 
headquarters for alumni when they visit the campus. 



42 State College Catalog 

THE D. H. HILL LIBRARY 

Harlan Craig Brown, Librarian, on military leave of absence. 

A.B., B.S. in L.S., University of Minnesota; A.M. in L.S., University 

of Michigan. 
Mrs. Reba Davis Clevenger, Acting Librarian. 

B.L.S., University of Illinois. 
Miss Christine Coffey, Circulation Librarian. 

A.B., University of North Carolina; A.B. in L.S., University of Michigan. 
Cloyd Dake Gull. On military leave of absence. 

A.B., Alleghany College; A.B., A.M. in L.S., University of Michigan. 
Miss Rachel Penn Lane, Librarian- Abstracter in charge of Textile Depart- 
ment Library. 

A.B., University of North Carolina. 
Robert Mitchell Lightfoot, Jr. On military leave of absence. 

B.S., N. C. State College; M.S., University of Virginia; B.S. in L.S., 

Syracuse University. 
Miss Foy Lineberry, Catalog Librarian. 

A.B., Meredith College; B.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina. 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Poole, Reference and Document Librarian. 

A.B., Duke University; B.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina. 
Miss Anne Leach Turner, Order Librarian. 

A.B., University of North Carolina; B.S. in L.S., Columbia University. 
Miss Anna Elizabeth Valentine, Periodicals Librarian. 

B.S., N. C. State College; A.B. in L.S., University of North Carolina. 

The D. H. Hill Library building was erected in 1926, and named in honor 
of a former president of North Carolina State College. It houses the main 
part of the book collection and provides a reading room for study and a 
recreational reading room where books of general interest are readily 
available. 

This is a reference and circulating library open to students in all depart- 
ments of the college. There is no limit to the number of books that a 
student may borrow at one time. Its resources are available, through 
interlibrary loan, to individuals and to other educational institutions of the 
city and state. 

The library comprises over 70,000 volumes of books and journals, 8,000 
volumes of bound federal, state and foreign documents, and a large number 
of unbound items. More than 900 periodicals and newspapers are received 
currently. The library's holdings are particularly well developed in the 
special fields of science and technology which are covered in the curriculum 
and in the research programs of the graduate school and the Agricultural 
Experiment Station and the Engineering Experiment Station. In addition, 
the library offers inspirational, recreational and general informational 
reading. 



Y. M. C. A. 43 

An Architecture Department Library, located in Daniels Hall, was estab- 
lished in 1941, and a Textile Department Library, located in the Textile 
Building, was established in 1945. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Board of Directors 

M. E. Gardner, Chairman 
W. G. Van Note, Vice-Chairman 
E. L. Cloyd F. B. Wheeler 

David A. Worth A. D. Stuart 

L. L. Vaughan B. F. Brown 

John A. Park Ralph W. Cummings 

T. C. Brown W. N. Hicks 

J. M. Clarkson Thomas Nelson 

Employed Staff 
Edward S. King, General Secretary 
Mrs. L. W. Bishop, Office Secretary 

Student Organization 

The Student Cabinet 

The cabinet is composed of the four officers of the association, President, 
Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer and the chairmen of all standing 
committees. The officers are elected annually by ballot. The committee 
chairmen are appointed by the President. The cabinet is in charge of the 
program of the association. The President and Treasurer are ex-officio 
members of the Board of Directors. 

The objective of the Young Men's Christian Association is to help con- 
tribute whatever is lacking in the total educational situation to make the 
principles and the spirit of the Christian religion effective in personal life 
and in all social relations. 

The Y. M. C. A. Building is the social and religious center of the campus. 
On the basement floor are a recreation room, a guest room, and the Student 
Supply Store. There is a spacious lobby, an auditorium, a reception room, 
a dining room, the self-help office, and the service office on the first floor. 
The second floor provides space for the Faculty Club, a Conference Room, 
a committee room, the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet Room, and the office of the 
General Secretary. 

The student-employment service is directed by the Assistant Secretary 
of the Association. Approximately five hundred and fifty students obtain 
part-time work through the Y. M. C. A. in the course of a year. 

Student and faculty organizations of all kinds use the facilities of the 
building for meetings and social gatherings, entertainments and lectures. 



44 State College Catalog 

The Y. M. C. A. program, directed by the Student Cabinet, includes, with 
other features not mentioned, work for new students; organizing a Fresh- 
man Cabinet; planning socials with the students from nearby women's col- 
leges; bringing to the campus eminent men to speak on such topics as men- 
and-women relations, and present-day international, racial, and economic 
questions; conducting an annual religious-emphasis week under the leader- 
ship of Christian ministers or laymen who understand student life; sending 
delegates to State, regional, and National Christian Student Conferences. 

MILITARY TRAINING 

The Military Department: The Reserve Officers Training Corps 
The Reserve Officers Training Corps, the official designation of the mili- 
tary organization at State College, conducts the work in two courses of two 
years each: 

The Infantry Basic Course. — A required course for all physically fit 
freshmen and sophomores. 

The Signal Corps Basic Course. — A required course for all physically fit 
freshmen and sophomores in the School of Electrical Engineering. 

The Advanced Course. — Elective and selective for juniors and seniors who 
have successfully completed the Basic Course in Infantry and /or the Signal 
Corps. Satisfactory completion of the Advanced Course and attendance of 
Officers Candidate School leads to a commission as a Second Lieutenant of 
Infantry or Signal Corps in the Officers Reserve Corps. 

For detailed description of courses, see the courses listed under Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Drill. — All ROTC students are required to attend three one-hour drill 
periods per week. 

For the school year 1945-46 the only courses offered by the Military 
Department are Military 101, 102, 103, and Military 201, 202, 203. 

Uniforms and Equipment 

Army Officers. — The Federal Government details officers of the Army 
as Instructors in the R. O. T. C. The senior instructor is designated by 
the War Department as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. Regular 
Army and /or Reserve officers conduct all classroom instruction and super- 
vise the instruction of the corps on the drill fields. 

Uniforms. — Uniforms for Basic Course students, and all instructional 
equipment are provided by the Federal Government. These are loaned to the 
Institution, which is accountable to the Federal Government for their proper 
care and use. 

Financial .Aid. — Members of the Advanced Course are paid a specific 
amount by the Federal Government. Each member is required to purchase 
necessary uniforms, textbooks, military shoes, and other pertinent items. 



Military Training 45 

Payment for these items should be made in advance at the Treasurer's 
Office and credited to Military Stores. If credit is desired, a charge of 20% 
must be made to meet carrying charges and forfeitures of dealers' 
discounts. 

The uniforms are made in the pattern of the Army Officers' uniform and 
can be used by the student for several years after he has received his com- 
mission in the Reserve Corps. In addition, the Advanced Course student 
receives from the Federal Government a daily pay amounting to approxi- 
mately twenty-five cents per day. An Advanced Course student who with- 
draws from College prior to graduation must adjust his uniform account 
with the Military Department prior to departure from the Campus. 

Organization. — The R.O.T.C. at State College is organized into the fol- 
lowing units: 

The First Infantry Regiment of three battalions, and First Battalion, 
Second Regiment, Signal Corps. 

A Military Band, supervised by Military Staff and trained by the Director 
of Music of the College. Instruments are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment. Membership is open to all student musicians who can qualify. Time is 
given for instruction in concert music in addition to military-band music. 

A Military Drum-and-Bugle Corps is trained by cadet officers. Instruments 
are provided by the Military Department. 

Credit. — Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an R. O. 
T. C. Unit established in accordance with the provisions of the National 
Defense Act and Army Regulations. Record of a student's prior training in 
R. O. T. C. is obtained by the Military Department from the institution 
concerned. 

Educational Value. — The mission of the R. 0. T. C. is to qualify the 
student as a leader whether in peace or in war, to help prepare him to 
discharge his duties as a citizen and to awaken him to an appreciation of 
the obligations of citizenship. Primarily, it is an agency for the production 
of Reserve Officers for those arms which are restricted as to their sources 
of production, and it should produce for those arms the number of Reserve 
Officers required in the initial periods of general mobilization. 

Students who complete the course, according to their own abundant testi- 
mony, secure personal benefits which are valuable to them in their occupa- 
tions. They are better citizens because they have had inculcated an under- 
standing of the responsibilities of citizenship. They realize more fully that 
the benefits their own generation enjoys were secured by sacrifices made by 
their predecessors. They learn the necessity for discipline, the responsibility 
of an individual to the group as a whole, and the methods by which discipline 
is developed and enforced. Finally, they learn the principles of leadership 
and have an opportunity to exercise this art to a greater extent than that 
which is available to them in any other phase of their scholastic instruction. 



III. SCHOOLS, DIVISIONS AND DEPARTMENTS 
THE BASIC DIVISION 

Benjamin Franklin Brown, Dean 

Organization. — Upon recommendation by President Graham, the Basic 
Division of the College was created by action of the Board of Trustees at 
its annual meeting on June 11, 1935. After considerable preliminary prepa- 
ration, the organization of the Division became effective July 1, 1937, the 
first students being registered in the Division in September, 1938. For the 
first year it seemed advisable to include only the incoming freshmen. Be- 
ginning with the College year 1939-40, all freshmen and sophomores in the 
College are registered in the Basic Division. 

Within its administration, the Basic Division includes the Departments of 
Economics, English, Ethics and Religion, History and Political Science, Mod- 
ern Languages, Physical Education, and Sociology. The Heads of the De- 
partments, or representatives from them, constituting the Administrative 
Board of the Division, together with the members of the several Depart- 
ments are as follows: 

Economics 

Professor C. B. Shulenberger. Administrative Board Representative 

Professors B. F. Brown. R. 0. Moen, fM. C. Leager; Associate Professors 

R. W. Green, T. W. Wood; Instructors **L. J. Arrington, 

tR. L. McMillan 

English 
♦Professor Lodwick C. Hartley, Head of the Department 
Professor Roger P. Marshall, Acting Head of the Department 
Professors J. D. Clark, T. P. Harrison, A. I. Ladu; Associate Professors 
A. M. Fountain, E. H. Paget; Assistant Professors *P. H. Davis, **H. G. 
Kincheloe, **F. H. Lyell, A. B. R. Shelley, T. L. Wilson, W. K. Wynn; 
Instructors J. C. Drake, **A. N. Kruger, J. P. Nickell, **J. A. Shack- 
ford, **R. B. Wynne. 

Ethics and Religion 

Professor W. N. Hicks, Head of the Department 

History and Political Science 

Professor James W. Patton, Acting Head of the Department 

Associate Professor, L. W. Barnhardt 

Assistant Professors George Bauerlein, Jr., L. Walter Seegers 

Modern Languages 

Professor L. E. Hinkle. Head of the Department 

Associate Professor S. T. Ballenger; Instructors tl. 0. Garodnick, 

Mrs. Ruth B. Hall 



f On leave. 

* On leave with United States Navy. 

••On leave with United States Army. 



The Basic Division 47 

Physical Education and Athletics 

Professor J. F. Miller, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professors C. G. Doak, T. I. Hines 

For names of Physical Education staff and athletic coaches see page 37. 

Sociology 

Professor Sanford R. Winston, Head of the Department 

The Faculty of the Division 

The faculty is composed of the staff members of the Departments named 
above and, in addition, the teachers of freshmen and sophomores from the 
Departments of Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Psy- 
chology, and Zoology. 

Purposes. — Broadly speaking, the purposes of the Basic Division are (a) 
to provide the best possible preliminary training during the first two years 
of the student's college career so that he can during the last two years 
successfully pursue his professional education in agriculture and forestry, 
engineering, textiles, or vocational education; and (b) to provide effective 
guidance during the first two years, so that those students with well-chosen 
and fixed purposes can be well-advised in their educational careers, and also 
so that those students who have made an unsatisfactory choice of curriculum 
or who have become uncertain of their careers, may receive helpful guidance 
and advice in finding themselves. 

More specifically it is the function of the Basic Division: 

First, to provide "two years of basic courses in the humanities, natural 
and exact sciences, and the social sciences as the foundation of the schools 
of agriculture and forestry, textiles, and engineering;" 1 

Second, "to provide in the curricula of the upper years of each technological 
school for a minimum of the more general cultural courses in the humanities, 
natural sciences, and social sciences." 2 

Student Guidance. — In carrying out its guidance program, the Basic 
Division avails itself of numerous tests which indicate the past achieve- 
ments and the present rate of progress of its students. Upon entering, all 
freshmen take the placement tests in Mathematics and in English, and the 
psychological examination. In addition to these, the advisers have the use 
of mid-term reports on all students, the final examination record, the dor- 
mitory reports, and the record from the Dean of Students. 

Each student is assigned to a technical adviser in the curriculum in which 
he is registered, to assist him in planning for his professional career. Stu- 
dents whose records indicate that they are not qualified for the curriculum 
they have chosen, or who become dissatisfied with their course, are assigned 
to guidance counselors for special assistance. 

1 President Graham's Report to the Board of Trustees, June 11, 1935, page 11. 

2 Ibid. 

t On leave. 



48 State College Catalog 

Promotion. — A student is promoted from the Basic Division upon earning 
with an average grade of at least C not fewer than 105 credits, including all 
of the work prescribed in his freshman year. 

Those promoted may procure Certificates of Promotion upon application 
to the Dean of the Basic Division. 

Student Loads. — It is the policy of the Basic Division and the purpose of 
its scholarship rules to encourage students to take such a number of credit 
hours each term as they can carry well, depending upon previous preparation, 
ability, self-help duties, health, etc. With few exceptions, each student starts 
the first term of his first year with a normal average load; those who do 
exceptionally well are encouraged to make as good progress as possible by 
adding hours up to their capacity, while those whose records indicate lack 
of ability from any cause are urged to reduce their loads to a point where 
they can do work of a creditable quality. Judgment as to the load that a 
student should take in any term is based upon previous demonstration of 
scholarship. 

Special Testing Service is provided by the Department of Psychology in 
order to assist advisers and counselors in the guidance of students. In 
addition to the tests given to all freshmen already referred to, provisions 
are made for testing individual students who present special problems for 
study. The "testing service" rendered by the staff in Psychology admin- 
isters tests for aptitudes, personality, interests, and educational achieve- 
ment. Efforts are being made to provide a clinical approach to a study of 
the educational, vocational, and personality problems of individual students. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Programs of Study. — The Basic Division grants no degrees. It provides 
two years of fundamental training in preparation for the special training 
of the last two years in the other divisions of the College: 

The School of Agriculture and Forestry 
The School of Engineering 
The Division of Teacher Education 
The School of Textiles 

Its programs of study are as follows: 



The Basic Division 
AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 



49 



Animal Production 
Dairy Manufacturing 
Entomology 
Farm Business 
Administration 



Majors in: 

Farm Marketing and 

Farm Finance 
Field Crops 
Floriculture 
Plant Pathology 



Pomology 

Poultry Science 

Rural Sociology 

Soils 

Vegetable Gardening 



Terms and Credits 

Courses F w S 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 8 8 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry, Math. Ill, 112 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Gen. Zoology, Gen. Botany, Phys. Geology, Zool. 101, Bot. 102, Geol. 120 4 4 4 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene. P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Gen. Poultry, Anim. Nutrition, Gen. Horticulture, PouL 201, A. H. 202, 

Hort. 203 3 3 8 

Prin. of Forestry, Farm Equipment, Gen. Field Crops, For. Ill, Agr. 

Eng. 202, F. C. 202 3 3 3 

Gen. Botany, Econ. Zoology, Soils, Bot. 101, Zool. 102, Soils 201 4 4 5 

Physics for Ag. Students, Int. to Org. Chemistry, Animal or Plant 

Physiology, Phys. 115, Chem. 221, Zool. 202 or Bot. 221 5 4 5 

General and Agr. Economics, Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202 3 3 8 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



Major in Agricultural Chemistry 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 8 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry, Math. Ill, 112 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Gen. Zoology, Gen. Botany, Phys. Geology, Zool. 101, Bot 102, Geol. 120 4 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 211, 212, 233 4 

Gen. Botany, Econ. Zoology, Animal or Plant Physiology, Bot. 101, 

Zool. 102, Zool. 202, or Bot. 221 4 

Soils, Bacteriology, Anim. Nutrition, Soils 201, Bot. 402, A. H. 202 5 

General and Agr. Economics, Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202 8 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 



3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 


2 


2 


1 


1 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


3 


3 


8 


2 


2 


1 


1 



t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics. Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 



30 



State College Catalog 



Major in Agricultural Engineering 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F W 8 

Composition, Eng. 101. 102, 103 3 3 3 

Or it ill Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry. Analytics. Hath. 101. 102, 103 6 6 6 

^-r:-^i7:-r _ . '.: _ esir.-rive S&:— erry. H. -. '.'.'. '.'."., '.'.' S 3 3 

fMilitary Science L MB. 101, 102. 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Bosiness English. Public Speaking, Eng. 211. 231 3 3 

.- a^m z. A rr . z. - z . '. ':2 3 

Caleuros L H HL Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Keono—ir. History. Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

,i- Z:..:~ Z-i- l-.,-. z-r.z :-e :.:=-/ Z:-:~. ll. Z : -_ 111 C-e:l. '.'..-. 4 J 

-::.:. -.1— 5: .--.-. :: v .. :;::;:; 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. K. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



Major in Forestry 



Composition, Eng. 101, 102. 103 3 

Algebra, Trigonometry, and Math, of Finance, Math. 111. 112, 113 4 

Drawing, C. E- 101. 102, 103 1 

General Botany, Systematic Botany. Bat 101, 102. 203 4 

General and Ecmwnir. Zoology, Eeon. Entomology, Zool. 101, 102, 213 . 4 

Elementary Forestry, For. 101, 102, 103 1 

fMilitary Science L Mfl. 101, 102. 103 or Human Bel.. Soc. 101. 2. 3 . 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene. P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

In tro du ction to Economies, Land Economies. Eeon. 205, Agr. Econ. 212 3 

I-rr:.;_::::r. :.: ? = v:z-l : gy Z = y:"-:- -'■'■ - 

?^-t ?'-n ::"-:— ? : '-■---. ~~. ~ ': :: ll". '-:' :'.' I 

Dendrology, Wood Technology. Bot. 211, For. 202, Bot- 213 3 

Theoretical Surveying, C. E. 221, 222 

Field Surveying, Topographical Drawing, C. E. 225, 224 

Intro. Soc, Soc 202 

tMflttary Science II. MO. 201. 202, 203, or World Hist., Hist. 104 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 
Savveying and Mapping, Dendrology, Mensuration, Silviculture, C. E. 



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" 1 1 six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
?.:- ELs::7y izz ? .r.-.i.. £:.ir.:i M:ic~ L&rgu.agee Psychology, Sociology. 



The Basic Division 51 
Major in Landscape Architecture 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F w s 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 8 8 8 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

General Botany, Systematic Botany, Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 4 8 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .3 3 8 

Arboriculture, L. A. 101, 102, 103 1 1 

Drawing, C. E. 101, 102, 103 1 l 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 or Human Rel., Soc. 101, 2, 3 . . 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 l 

Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231 8 8 

Physical Geology, Plant Physiology, Geol. 120, Bot. 221 4 6 

Introduction to Psychology, Introduction to Economics, Psych. 200, 

Econ. 205 3 3 

Introduction to Architecture, Elements of Architecture, Arch. 201, 

202, 203 8 3 8 

Pencil Sketching, Arch. 100 3 

Theory of Landscape Design, L. A. 212, 213 3 3 

Theoretical Surveying, C. E. 221, 222 3 3 

Field Surveying, C. E. 225, 227 1 1 

Plant Materials ; Woody Plants, L. A. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203, or World Hist., Hist. 104 .... 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

Surveying, C. E. s310, 3 credits Summer 



Major in Wildlife Conservation and Management 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 8 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102. 103 4 4 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry, Math. Ill, 112 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General and Economic Zoology, Phys. Geology, Zool. 101, 102, Geol. 120 4 4 4 

Elementary Wildlife Management, Zool. Ill 1 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Ornithology, Zool. 251, 252, 253 2 2 2 

General Botany, Systematic Botany, Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 4 8 

Principles of Forestry, General Field Crops, Introduction to Organic 

Chemistry, For. Ill, F. C. 202, Chem. 221 3 3 4 

Introduction to Economics, Land Economics, Econ. 205, Agr. Econ. 212 3 3 

Physics for Agricultural Students, Phys. 115 6 

Theoretical Surveying, C. E. 221, 222 3 3 

Field Surveying, C. E. 225 1 

Comparative Anatomy, Zool. 222, 223 4 4 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202. 203 1 1 1 



t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, S< ciology. 



52 



State College Catalog 



ENGINEERING 

Major in Aeronautical Engineering 

Terms &c i Credits 

Courses F w s 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 10S 3 S S 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 108 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 108 6 6 6 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 . . . . S 8 8 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 i, 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 108 1 1 1 

Surveying, C. E. b200, 8 credits Summer 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and elective English 8 S S 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 208 4 4 4 

Mechanical Drawing, M. E. 211, 212, 218 2 2 2 

Shopwork, M. E. 121, 122, 123 1 1 1 

Metallurgy, Engineering Mechanics, M. E. 822, 323, E. M. 811 8 3 ; 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



Major in Architectural Engineering 



Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 8 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 108 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .... 3 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 108 1 

Surveying, C. E. s200, 3 credits Summer 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 281, and elective English 8 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

PhyBics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 208 4 

Pen«il Sketching, Arch. 100 1 

Elements of Architecture I, H, HI, Arch. 201. 202, 208 8 

Shades and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 

Perspective Drawing, Arch. 206 1 

Engineering Mechanics, E. M. 311, 812 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201. 202, 208 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 



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t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 

• Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 



The Basic Division 53 
Major in Architecture 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F w s 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 8 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

French or Modern Language, M. L. 101, 102, 201 or equivalent 3 3 8 

Pencil Sketching, Arch. 100 1 1 1 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Architectura lor Mechanical Drawing, Arch. 107 or M. E. 105, 106 .... 3 3 

Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 107 8 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Surveying, C. E. s200, 3 credits Summer 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Background for Modern Thought or Elective 3 3 8 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202 4 4 

History of Sculpture, Arch. 325 2 

Working Drawings, Arch. 305 2 

Shades and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 

Perspective Drawing, Arch. 206 1 

Engineering Mechanics, E. M. 301, 302 3 8 

Elements of Architecture. Arch. 201, 202, 203 3 3 8 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



Major in Ceramic Engineering 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry. Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 

Engineering Drawing H, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .... 3 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

Surveying, C. E. s200, 3 credits Summer 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and elective English 3 3 8 

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Mineralogy, Chem. 211, 212, 

Geol. 230 4 4 8 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 . 4 4 4 

Engineering Geology, Ceramic Materials, Ceramic and Mining Processes, 

Geol. 220, Cer. E. 202, 203 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



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t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 

* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in EngliBh 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 



54 State College Catalog 

Major in Chemical Engineering 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F w S 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .... 3 3 

tMilitary Science L Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and elective English 3 3 

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 211, 212, 213 4 4 

Calculus I, H, HI, Math. 201. 202, 303 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 

Introduction to Chemical Engineering, Chem. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 

Shopwork, M. E. 122, 123 1 1 

tMilitary Science II, MiL 201, 202, 203 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 



Major in Civil Engineering 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .... 3 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

••Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and elective English 3 

Calculus I, H, HI, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

Engineering Geology, Engineering Mechanics, GeoL 220, E. M. 311, 312 3 

Theoretical Surveying, C. E. 221, 222, 223 3 

Field Surveying, C. E. 225, 227 1 

Mapping, C. E. 226 

tMilitary Science II, MiL 201, 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 

Surveying, C. E. s310, 3 credits Summer 



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t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 

• Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the courses listed Elementary German, M. L. 103, 104, 203 or equivalent. 

•* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the courses listed Elementary French, M. L. 101, 102, 201 or equivalent. 



The Basic Division 



55 



Major in Electrical Engineering 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F w s 

Composition, Eng. 101. 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .... 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science I, MiL 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Surveying, C. E. s200, 3 credits Summer 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and elective English 3 3 3 

Calculus I, II, m, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Electrical Engineering Fundamentals, Forge and Welding, E. E. 201, 

202, M. E. 128 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science H, MiL 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



Major in General Engineering 



Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .... 3 

tMilitary Science I, MiL 101. 102, 103 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

Surveying, C. E. s200, 3 credits Summer 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and elective English 3 

Calculus I, n, IH, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

JElectives 6 

tMilitary Science II, MiL 201. 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities. P. E. 201. 202, 203 1 



t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 

• Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 

t Free electives, except that not more than 39 term credits may be chosen from the 
technical or special technical courses in the School of Engineering. 



56 State College Catalog 

Major in Geological Engineering 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F w s 

H— IHwilinn Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry. Chan. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry. Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 C 

z-'S'.'i^r - . ^s::-.;::v= _-; r .-.:.- M j_ 1 r :: : : 3 3 

tMilitary Science L Mil 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

■3_=:-=s = Z-r'.-.i'r. P.: . ; Zr.r Ill :31 a-i e'.e-:::ve Z-glLsh S 3 3 
Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Geomorphology, Chem. 211, 212, 

GeoL 223 . ... 4 4 3 

Calculus L H, m, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Engineering and Historical Geology, Mineralogy, GeoL 220, 222, 230 ... 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science TL MiL 201. 202. 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 Ill 



Major in Industrial Engineering 

101. 102, 103 . . 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101. 102, 103 . 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry. Analytics. Math. 101. 102, 103 6 6 6 

Z's.-iri7:-g Drawing 11. Dnilfrliie Ge-rmetry. M Z. ..:. ..-.. 11T 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science L MiL 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

"B^ir.es-s English ?.'::.: ; - -- "j ..; ; ; I:;'!'': S 3 I 

Calculus L TL HL Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201. 202, 243 4 4 4 

General Economics, Scan. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Shopwork. M. E. 124, 125, 126 2 2 2 

Industrial Organisation, L E. 101, 102, 103 3 S 3 

-v : ; ; ^r7 S: .-.- :::..;:::;■; . 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201. 202, 203 1 1 1 



f Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
r.e..z.:- Z\.i::—r an: r:.::::h. 5:.er.:i Miiirn- Li:.r:=ji:. ?;;:h:l:g7. 5::::!:g7. 

" Sn: dents ■=■-: : i - :-.-.-. :;::.:;: : : -..-.; Z ■: _ ..:-.r..-.r : : :' English 3-5 pre icier, t in Znglish 
may substitute for the courses listed Elementary French, M. L. 101, 102, 201. 

** Snie- j who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
nay substitute M:-derr. I^ang-i&ge for the courses listed. 



The Basic Division 



57 



Major in Mechanical Engineering 



Terms and Credits 

Courses F w s 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 8 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytics, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

Engineering Drawing II, Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 105, 106, 107 .... 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Surveying, C. E. s200, 3 credits Summer 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and elective English 3 3 3 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Mechanical Drawing, M. E. 211, 212, 213 2 2 2 

Shopwork, M. E. 124, 125, 126 2 2 2 

Engineering Mechanics, E. M. 311, 312 3 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



TEACHER EDUCATION 



For Teachers of Agriculture 



Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry, Math. Ill, 112 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Gen. Zoology, Gen. Botany, Phys. Geology, Zool. 101, Bot. 102, Geol. 120 4 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

Gen. Poultry, Anim. Nutrition, Gen. Horticulture, Poul. 201, A. H. 202, 

Hort. 203 3 

Prin. of Forestry, Farm Equipment, Gen. Field Crops, For. Ill, Agr. 

Eng. 202, F. C. 202 3 

Gen. Botany, Econ. Zoology, Soils, Bot. 101, Zool. 102, Soils 201 4 

Physics for Ag. Students, Int. to Org. Chemistry, Animal or Plant 

Physiology, Phys. 115, Chem. 221, Zool. 202 or Bot. 221 5 

General and Agr. Economics, Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 



t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 

* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 



58 State College Catalog 

For Teachers of Industrial Arts and Teachers of Industrial Education 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F W s 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Mathematics of Finance, Math. Ill, 112, 113 . . 4 4 4 

Industrial Arts Drawing, Ed. (I. A.) 105a, b, c 3 3 3 

Industrial Arts, Ed. (I. A.) 106a, b, c 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Business English, Public Speaking, English Elective, Eng. 211, 231 ... 3 3 3 

General Physics, Phys. 105, 106, 107 4 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 3 

Industrial Arts Design, Ed. (I. A.) 205 3 

Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts, Ed. (I. A.) 206a, b, c 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



For Teachers of Occupational Information and Guidance 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Mathematics of Finance, Math. Ill, 1112, 113 . 4 

Science, elective 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 

Occupations, Ed. 103 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 

Business English, Public Speaking, English Elective, Eng. 211, 231 ... 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

History of the United States, Hist. 200, 201, 202 3 

Science elective 4 

♦Electives 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 



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t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 

* To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science III and IV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, Social Science. 



The Basic Division 69 

TEXTILES 

Majors in Textile Manufacturing, Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, Yarn 
Manufacturing, Textile Management, Weaving and Designing. 

Terms and Credits 

Courses F w s 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 8 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Mathematics of Finance, Math. Ill, 112, 113 . . 4 4 4 

Physics for Textile Students, Phys. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Shopwork, M. E. 121, 122, 123 1 1 1 

Engineering Drawing I, M. E. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Textile Principles Laboratory, Tex. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Yarn Calculations, Cloth Calculations, Tex. 104, 131 1 2 

tMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Cotton, Cotton Classing II, F. C. 201, 212 3 3 

Decorative Drawing, Light in Industry. Arch. 106, Phys. 311 3 8 

Knitting Laboratory, Tex. 207, 208, 209 1 1 1 

Knitting I, Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 211, 236, 237 2 2 2 

Power Weaving, Tex. 234 2 

Power Weaving Laboratory, Tex. 231, 232 1 1 

Yarn Manufacturing, Tex. 205 3 

Yarn Manufacturing Laboratory, Tex. 201, 203 1 1 

tMilitary Science II, MiL 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Ethics and 
Religion, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Psychology, Sociology. 



60 State College Catalog 

THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 

Ira Obed Schaub, Dean and Director of Extension 

Leonard David Baver, Associate Dean and Director of Instruction and 
Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 

Organization. — The School of Agriculture and Forestry is organized in 
three divisions — Resident Instruction, Agricultural Extension and the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station — to carry on the functions of instruction, 
extension and research. These divisions are organized as departments as fol- 
lows: (a) Agricultural Economics, including Farm Marketing and Farm 
Management; (b) Agricultural Engineering, including Farm Structures and 
Farm Machinery; (c) Agronomy, including Field Crops, Soils, and Plant 
Breeding ;(d) Animal Industry, including Animal Production, Animal Nu- 
trition, Dairy Production, and Dairy Manufacturing; (e) Botany, including 
Bacteriology, Plant Physiology, and Plant Diseases; (f) Chemistry; (g) 
Experimental-Statistics; (h) Forestry, including Silviculture, Utilization, 
and Management; (i) Horticulture, including Pomology, Small-Fruit Cul- 
ture, Floriculture, Truck Farming, and Landscape Architecture; (j) Poultry 
Science, including Poultry Diseases, Poultry Breeding, Poultry Feeding, 
and Poultry Management; (k) Rural Sociology; (1) Zoology, including 
Genetics, Entomology, Animal Physiology, and Wild Life Management. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the School of Agriculture and Forestry is 
threefold: (1) To obtain through scientific research, experimentation, and 
demonstration accurate and reliable information relating to soils, plants, 
and animals, and to obtain from every available source reliable statistical, 
technical, and scientific data relating to every phase of agriculture that 
might be of advantage to the State; (2) to provide instruction in the College 
for young men who desire to enter the field of general agriculture, or wish 
to become professionals in agricultural education or specialists in any field 
of science related to agriculture; (3) to disseminate reliable information 
through publications and through extension agents, and by a wise use of 
this information to give instruction to agricultural workers in the scientific, 
experimental, and practical progress in the various lines of agriculture. 

All effective instruction in agriculture is based on research and investiga- 
tion; and the curricula are so organized that not only the subject matter for 
classroom instruction and extension work may be drawn from research, ex- 
perimentation, and demonstration, but also that the students themselves shall 
have the opportunity to work under the direction of research specialists. 

The vocations open to young men well trained in agriculture and the 
opportunities afforded for distinct service to the State are now greater than 
ever before. In order that the more important vocations in agriculture may 
be presented to the youth of the State, the courses of study are so organized 
as to give specific training for the following major vocations. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 61 

General Farming Poultry Raising 

Agricultural Extension Work Manufacturing of Dairy Products 

Agricultural Service in State or Forestry 

Federal Departments Fruit Growing 

Stock Raising and Dairying Truck Farming 

Agricultural Service in Foreign Lands 

In addition to these major vocations, the School of Agriculture gives 
instruction in Beekeeping, Floriculture, and the basic instruction for 
teachers of Agriculture. 

Admission; Advanced Standing. — Regulations for admission and for ad- 
vanced standing are stated under Information for Applicants. (See pages 
25, 26.) 

Graduates in Liberal Arts. — Selected courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture are offered to graduates of universities 
and standard colleges. These are arranged in accordance with the vocational 
aim of the individual student, and in the light of credits presented from the 
institution by which the student has been graduated, subject to the approval 
of his adviser and the Director of Instruction. In cases where the student 
presents enough credits which may be used for courses required in his 
curriculum, he may be graduated with a B.S. degree in one year. In no case 
should it take more than two years to complete the work for this degree. 

Graduation. — The requirement for graduation is the satisfactory com- 
pletion of one of the curricula outlined below. 

A minimum of 230 term credits with at least 230 honor points is required 
for graduation by the School of Agriculture. The term credits should be 
distributed as follows: A maximum of 60 in the major Department, and 
a minimum of 18 in Language, 24 in Physical Science, 18 in Social Science, 
12 in Military Science or alternative, and 6 in Physical Education. 

Students entering with advanced standing are required, in the remainder 
of their course, to earn at least as many points as the number of term 
credits remaining necessary for graduation. 

Degrees. — The degrees of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and Bachelor 
of Science in Forestry are conferred upon the satisfactory completion of 
one of the curricula in this School. 

The degree of Master of Science in Agriculture is offered for the satis- 
factory completion of one year of graduate study in residence. Candidates 
for this degree are enrolled as students in the Graduate School. 

The professional degree of Master of Agriculture may be conferred upon 
graduates of State College after five years of service in agriculture, and 
upon the acceptance of a satisfactory thesis. 



62 State College Catalog 

Curricula. — The curricula in Agriculture offer a combination of practical 
and theoretical work. About half of the time is devoted to lectures and 
recitations, the other half to work in shops, laboratories, greenhouses, 
dairies, poultry yards, and on the College farm. 

In order that every graduate of the School of Agriculture shall acquire 
a liberal education rather than specializing too narrowly, and shall become 
a leader having breadth of vision, the curricula in Agriculture contain broad- 
ening subjects: language, literature, history, and the social sciences. 

The School of Agriculture and Forestry offers the following curricula: 

A. In General Agriculture with opportunities to specialize during junior 
and senior years in any of the following: 

1. Farm Business Administration 8. Floriculture 

2. Farm Marketing and Farm Finance 9. Plant Pathology 

3. Rural Sociology 10. Pomology 

4. Animal Production 11. Poultry Science 

5. Dairy Manufacturing 12. Soils 

6. Entomology 13. Vegetable Gardening 

7. Field Crops and Plant Breeding 14. Agricultural Chemistry 

B. In Agricultural Engineering 

C. In Forestry 

D. In Landscape Architecture 

E. In Wildlife Management 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

First Two Years. — The freshman and sophomore years for all courses are 
outlined on a following page. This curriculum is intended to train students 
in broad basic fields of agriculture. For junior and senior years, the cur- 
riculum of each student is arranged in accordance with his vocational aims, 
subject to the approval of his adviser and the Director of Instruction. 

Professional Opportunities. — Students who specialize in some department 
of the School of Agriculture may look forward to one of the following 
professions: 

Specialists in State or Federal Departments, or in Agriculture Colleges. — 
The School of Agriculture is equipped to train men as specialists in the 
various fields as indicated by the curricula outlined below. 

Inspectors. — Most States now maintain inspection of fertilizers, seeds, 
nurseries, and insecticides. Most cities have special inspectors for their 
milk supplies. Students seeking vocational opportunities in these fields may 
elect appropriate subjects in their junior and senior years. 

Extension Specialists. — Students in this group will find employment as 
agricultural agents for railroads, and for commercial firms dealing in agri- 
cultural products; as specialists in the various fields of agriculture in the 
extension departments of agricultural colleges, and as county agricultural 
agents. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 63 

County Agents. — The growing importance of marketing agricultural 
products and the need for better organization of farms has given rise to a 
strong demand for county agents who have had special training in Agri- 
cultural Economics. 

Specialists and Commercial Agricultural Agents. — The School of Agricul- 
ture is well equipped to train men for agricultural industries, such as manu- 
facturing fertilizers, livestock and poultry feeds, farm machinery, and dairy 
and horticultural products. These concerns are usually anxious to obtain 
men who have had actual agricultural experience, and who, in addition, 
have had special training in agricultural economics, accounting, and statis- 
tics. This field is developing rapidly and offers an attractive opportunity for 
students who wish to enter the purely commercial field. 

Agricultural Specialists in Foreign Lands. — The School of Agriculture 
is well equipped to train men as experts in cotton and tobacco production 
in foreign lands. 

Junior Agriculture Economist. — A position as a junior agricultural 
economist involves research in Agricultural Economics. Such positions are 
usually available in the governmental departments, such as United States 
Department of Agriculture and in various State institutions. 

Farm Manager. — There is a growing demand for men who have had prac- 
tical farm experience and who have special training in farm organization 
and management. Though this field is practically a new one, there have been 
many requests for men with special training in farm management. 

Marketing Specialists. — There is a growing demand for men who can 
manage cooperative marketing and other farmers' business associations. 



FOR ALL CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

(Except Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Engineering, Forestry, Land- 
scape Architecture, and Wildlife Conservation and Management.) 

Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

General Botany, Bot. 102 4 

General Zoology, Zool. 101 4 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 

Mathematical Analysis, Math. Ill, 112 4 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 2, 3, or alternate 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P. E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 

17 21 SI 



64 State College Catalog 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Farm Equipment, Agr. Eng. 202 3 

Soils, Soils 201 5 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202 3 3 

Agricultural Economics, Agr. Econ. 202 3 

Physics for Agricultural Students, Phys. 115 5 

Animal Physiology, Zool. 202, or 

Plant Physiology, Bot. 221 6 

Economic Zoology, Zool. 102 4 

General Botany, Bot. 101 4 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Chem. 221 4 

Animal Nutrition I, A. H. 202 3 

General Poultry, Poul. 201 3 

Principles of Forestry, For. Ill 3 

General Horticulture, Hort. 203 3 

General Field Crops, F. C. 202 3 

Military Science II, Mil. 201, 2, 3, or alternate 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

21 21 21 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professor G. W. Forster, Head of the Department 
Professors C. Horace Hamilton, Marc C. Leager;* Associate Professor 
R. E. L. Greene; Assistant Professor B. W. Kenyon, Jr.; Instructor, 
Richard L. Anderson.* 

Facilities. — The Department of Agricultural Economics has available for 
its use 15 offices, a seminar room, a document room, a workshop, and a 
Departmental classroom. The Department is supplied with various cal- 
culating devices. In addition, by special arrangement of one of the large 
calculating-machine companies, a supply of calculators and tabulating de- 
vices is adjusted to the need for them. Charts on practically every phase 
of agricultural economics are at hand or are available through the courtesy 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. A large number of maps of farms 
located in various parts of the state is used as a basis for studying and 
for illustrating the principles and practices of farm management. The 
results of research in marketing, agricultural finance, taxation, insurance, 
and soil conservation practices have made a large volume of statistical 
information constantly available for undergraduate and graduate students. 
Maintained for reference is an up-to-date file of bulletins and documents 
covering all phases of agricultural economics. 

The State a Laboratory. — The State of North Carolina is a laboratory 
for the Department. Studies are in progress on all important phases of 
agricultural economics: marketing of cotton, tobacco, fruits, and vegetables; 
farm credit, taxation of agriculture, farm prices, farm organization and 
management, land classification and land use. It is significant to the student 
in agricultural economics that much of the research is done in cooperation 
with the various agencies of the Federal Government. 

Statistical Laboratory. — All students in the department will have access 
to the facilities and personnel of the new Statistical Laboratory established 
at State College in cooperation with the IT. S. Department of Agriculture, 
through formal courses and informal conferences. 

* On leave. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 65 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Farm Business Administration 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

English 3 3 3 

Farm Management I, Agr. Econ. 303 3 

Principles of Accounting, Econ. 301, 302, 303 3 3 3 

Farm Shop Work, Agr. Eng. 331, 32 3 3 

Economics 3 3 3 

Technical Agricultural Courses 3 3 3 

•♦Electives 3 3 3 

18 18 18 

Senior Year 

Agricultural Finance, Agr. Econ. 432 

Farm Management II, Agr. Econ. 423 

Farm Buildings, Agr. Eng. 322 

Farm Cost Accounting, Agr. Econ. 402, 403 

Agr. Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

Social Aspects of Land Tenure, Rur. Soc. 422 or 

Land Economics, Agr. Econ. 412 

Agr. Drawing, Agr. Eng. 222 

Survey of Statistical Methods, Econ. 408 3 

Statistics 

Technical Agricultural Courses 6 

Electives 3 

♦♦Electives 3 

18 21 18 

Farm Marketing and Farm Finance 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

English 3 3 3 

Marketing Methods, Econ. 311, 312 3 3 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc. 302 3 

Farm Management I, Agr. Econ. 303 3 

Agr. Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Principles of Accounting, Econ. 301, 302, 303 3 3 3 

Economics '. 3 3 3 

Electives 4 

♦♦Electives 3 3 3 

18 18 19 

Senior Year 

Marketing Methods and Problems, Agr. Econ. 421 3 

Cotton and Tobacco Marketing, Agr. Econ. 442 

Agricultural Finance, Agr. Econ. 432 

Agricultural Cooperation. Agr. Econ. 422 

Rural Population Problems, Rur. Soc. 411 3 

Community Organization, Rur. Soc. 413 

Survey of Statistical Methods, Econ. 408 3 

Statistics 

Economics 3 

Technical Agricultural Courses 3 

Electives 

♦♦Electives 3 

18 18 18 



3 








3 


3 





3 


3 











3 


3 





3 











3 








3 





3 


3 


3 









3 





3 





3 














3 








3 





3 


3 





6 





3 


3 


3 



♦* To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science III and TV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



66 State College Catalog 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor D. S. Weaver, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor G. W. Giles 

Purpose. — This curriculum has been arranged to give its graduates funda- 
mental training in engineering, basic training in the agricultural sciences, 
and a specialized study in courses involving the application of engineering 
knowledge to agricultural problems. 

Breadth of Training. — Because of the great variety of work required of 
agricultural engineers, a number of subjects peculiar to other curricula are 
included, so that the student receives a considerable breadth of training. 
Engineering principles applied to agriculture have played an important 
part in the advancement and development of agricultural practices. Agricul- 
tural engineering as a profession, although of comparatively recent develop- 
ment, is rapidly becoming recognized as one of the more important of the 
engineering professions, since it is identified with the most important of 
industries — agriculture. This course is especially suited to the boy brought 
up on the farm, as it prepares him for professional business, or farming 
career, and enables him to capitalize on his farm experience. 

Divisions. — Subdivided on the basis of engineering technique, Agricultural 
Engineering embraces three general fields: (1) Power and Machinery, 
including Rural Electrification; (2) Rural Structures, including Sanitation, 
Materials of Construction and Equipment; (3) Land Improvement, which 
includes Irrigation, Drainage, Soil-Erosion Control, and other forms of 
mechanical improvement of agricultural lands. 

Occupations Open to Graduates. — Teaching, experiment station and ex- 
tension-service positions with colleges and the Government; engineers in 
land reclamation, drainage, or irrigation enterprises; designing, advertising, 
sales and production work with manufacturers of farm machinery, equip- 
ment, and building materials; rural electrification work; editorial work 
with publishers; appraisal, and agricultural-engineering consultant service. 

Equipment. — The offices, classrooms, and shops used in Agricultural En- 
gineering are in the Agricultural Engineering Building. The laboratories 
have the latest labor-saving farm equipment for seedbed preparation, 
planting, cultivating, harvesting, and crop preparation. These machines 
are furnished by the leading farm-machinery manufacturers, and are 
replaced from time to time as improvements are developed. Special effort is 
made to have on hand all types of equipment for use in the best practices 
in the production of farm crops. 

The Farm Buildings Laboratory is equipped with drawing tables, supply 
cabinets, and models of various types of farm-buildings construction. 

Laboratory Equipment for Soil Conservation, such as that for terracing 
and gully control, consists of sets of surveying and leveling instruments. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 



67 



Practice. — Field areas in crops, vineyards, orchards, and pastures are 
available for practice in the use of farm equipment, and in drainage and 

erosion control. 

A Bulletin Library of Agricultural Engineering is maintained for student 
reference. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Algebra, Trigonometry, and 

Analytical Geometry, Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Engineering Drawing II, M.E. 105, 106 3 3 

Descriptive Geometry, M.E. 107 3 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 2, 3, or alternate 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 .. 1 1 1 

19 19 19 

Summer requirement : — Surveying, C. E. s.200. 

Sophomore Year 



Engineering Geology, Geol. 220 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 

Farm Equipment, Agr. Eng. 202 

General Botany, Bot. 102 

General Zoology, Zool. 101 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Military Science II, Mil. 201, 2, 3, or alternate 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

21 




4 
U 
4 
3 
4 

3 
2 
1 

21 



3 
4 
3 
4 



3 
2 
1 

20 



Junior Year 
Required for All Options 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202 3 

Agricultural Econ., Ag. Econ. 202 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

Farm Shop, Agr. Eng. 331, 332 3 

General Field Crops, F.C. 202 

General Horticulture, Hort. 203 6 

Farm Buildings, Agr. Eng. 322 

6 



Choice must be made of one of the following options: 
General Option 



Animal Nutrition I, A. H. 202 

Extension Methods, Ag. Econ. 450 3 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 

Soils, Soils 201 5 

••Electives 3 

14 



3 











3 


3 





3 








3 


3 



•* Three credits per term to be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military 
Science HI and TV, Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and 
Social Science. 



65 



State College Catalog 



courses 



Rural Structures Option 

CREDITS 
First Term Second Term Third Term 



Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 3 

Engineering Thermodynamics H, MX. 307-8-9 3 

Perespective Drawing Arch. 206 1 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311-12-13 

Strength of Materials, E-M. 321 

••Electives 3 

13 



I 

£ 
I 
I 
I 

S 

:: 



Land Improvement Option 



Soils, Soils 201 5 

Fertiliiers, Soils 302 

Int. to Organic Chemistry, Chem. 221 4 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 812, 313 3 

Pastures and Forage Crops, F.C. 448 

••Electives 3 

15 



Power and Machinery Option 

Mechanical Drawing, MX. 211-12-13 2 

Foundry, M.E. 122 1 

Forging and Welding, M.E. 126 2 

Elementary Mechanism, M.E. 215-16-17 1 

Metallurgy, M.E. 222, 223 

••Electives 6 

12 



Senior Tear 
Required for all Options. 



Rural Electrification, Agr. Eng. 482 

Special Problems in Agr. Eng.. Agr. Eng. 451 

Senior Seminar, Agr. Eng. 491, 492, 493 

Farm Management I, Ag. Econ. 808 

Technical Writing L Eng. 821 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc. 802 



:: 



Choice must be made of one of the following Options 
General Option 



Dairy Machinery, A-H. 862 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production, A.H- 821 
Farm Machinery and Tractors, Agr. Eng. 818 

Erosion Prevention, Ag. Eng. 403 

Farm Structures, Agr. Eng. 423 

Soil Conservation and Land L'se, Soils, 433 . . 

Principles of Forestry, For. Ill 

Cereal Crops, F.C. 802 

General Poultry, Poul. 201 

••Electives 



1: 



:: 



1: 



•• Three credits per term to be selected from the follow™* fields: Humanities. Military 
Science m and IV, Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and 
Social Science. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 



69 



Rural Structures Option 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Graphic Statics, C.E. 423 1 ■ 

Electrical Equipment for Building, E.E. 343 3 

Construction Engineering I, C.E. 361, 362, 363 3 3 3 

General Poultry, Poul. 201 3 

Farm Structures, Agr. Eng. 423 . U 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production, A.H. 321 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning I, M.E. 404 

Refrigeration, M.E. 405 6 

**Electives J* _• J» 

13 9 16 



Land Improvement Option 



Hydraulic Structures, C.E. 443 

Soil Conservation and Land Use, Soils 433 

Erosion Prevention, Agr. Eng. 403 

Soils of North Carolina, Soils 312 

Farm Machinery and Tractors, Agr. Eng. 313 

Land Economics, Ag. Econ. 212 

Principles of Forestry, For. Ill 3 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 3 

•♦Electives _= 

15 






8 





3 





3 


3 








3 


3 


















15 



Power and Machinery Option 



Farm Machinery and Tractors, Agr. Eng. 313 

Dairy Machinery, A.H. 362 

Special Problems, Agr. Eng. 481, 483 3 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 

Elements of Electrical Eng. I, E.E. 320, 321 3 

Electrical Equipment of Buildings, E.E. 343 

**Electives •- 6 

16 






3 


1 








3 


3 


3 


3 








3 


3 


8 


LI 


16 



AGRONOMY 

Professor R. W. Cummings, Head of the Department 
Professor Emeritus C. B. Williams 

The teaching in this department is divided into two sections: Field 
Crops Section and Soils Section. Its objective is to provide a well-rounded 
practical as well as technical training for students in field crops, plant breed- 
ing, soils, fertilizers and other closely related subjects. 

The combined facilities of the Consolidated University and of the Experi- 
ment Station provide excellent opportunities for advanced training leading 
to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Agronomy. 

The advanced courses offered fulfill the needs of graduate work in all 
phases of Agronomy. 



•* Three credits per term to be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military 
Science IH and IV, Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, ana 
Social Science. 



70 State College Catalog 

FIELD CROPS SECTION* 

Professor G. K. Middleton, Head of Section 

Associate Professors R. L. Lovrorr.. J. A. Rigney. A. D. Smart; Assistant 
Professors B. W. Smith. W. C. Gregory. 

Approximately eighty rer cent of the farm income in North Carolina is 
from field crops, and their annual value is such that the State ranks third 
in the Nation in cash income from this source. The curriculum in this Section 
is set up to give definite instruction on the crops produced in the State 

and in plant breeding. 

This curriculum is flexible, making it possible for students to elect 
sufficient courses in other departments for a general training in Agricul- 
ture, or for specialization in preparation for graduate "work in Agronomy. 
The more general training will equip them for work with the Agricultural 
Extension Service or in one of the several agencies administered by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture; or as better farmers. 

Advanced training is provided for those who desire to go into the more 
technical phases of crop production or plant breeding., such as teaching 
or research in State or Federal institutions. 

CURRICULUM IN FIELD CROPS 
For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 



Junior Year 


CP.EI ~S 




COURSES Firs: T&rrx 


5r::- i Tern 


- "17 Z - iTTl. 


English 3 


3 
3 
3 

: 

c 


3 

4 




Soils of K, " Soils 312 




Fertilizers, Soils S02 • 

5:-;: M:-:;;-e-: S:i'= :'.'- 




Cereal Crops, F.C. 302 




Pastures and Forage Crops, F.C 443 




Diseases of Field Crops, Bot. 301 3 




Major Options . C 

Electrres 6 









:s 


19 


1: 


Senior Year 







411 

Plant Breeding, F.C. Ml 
Major Option 

TecL. Agr. 



•: 
•: 
•: 

:: 



:• -a ;\ 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 71 

SOILS SECTION 

Professor J. F. Lutz, Head of Section 

Professor R. W. Cummings; Associate Professor E. R. Collins 

Assistant Professors, W. D. Lee, J. R. Piland 

The soil is a natural body composed of mineral and organic matter, air, 
water, and living micro-organisms. The reactions of and changes in these 
components extend into the fields of chemistry, geology, physics and biology, 
which sciences are fundamentals to soils. No state in the Union offers better 
opportunities for soil and fertilizer studies than North Carolina for within 
her borders are soils derived from a large variety of parent materials and 
developed under climatic conditions varying from a subtropical climate in 
the southeastern part of the state to the cooler climates of the mountains. 
This state has been one of the few which has steadily pushed forward her 
soil-survey work so that now county soil-survey reports and maps are avail- 
able for practically all the counties of the entire state. 

The importance of soils in North Carolina agriculture is evidenced by the 
fact (1) that more fertilizer is used in North Carolina than in any other 
state in the Union and (2) that North Carolina ranks third among the 
states in cash income derived from farm crops. 

Students are given practical training in the properties and management 
of soils which equips them for general agricultural work, such as farmers, 
county agents, and vocational teachers. Advanced training is provided for 
those who desire to go into the more technical phases of soils, such as 
teaching or research in State or Federal institutions. The flexibility of the 
curriculum in soils, through a sufficient number of optional courses, permits 
the student to choose the type of training he desires. 

CURRICULUM IN SOILS 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

English or Modern Language 3 3 3 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 3 

Soil Management. Soils 303 

Cereal Crops, F.C. 302 3 

Pasture and Forage Crops, F.C. 443 4 

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 211, 212, 213 4 4 

Major Options 6 

Electives 6 6 

19 19 17 

Senior Year 

Genetics. Zool. 411 4 

♦Plant Breeding, F.C. 463 

Major Options 6 

Technical Agriculture 6 6 

Electives 3 3 

19 18 18 

* F.C. 312, Tobacco Production or F.C. 323. Cotton Production or F.C. 461, Taxonomy of 
Field Crops, may be substituted for Plant Breeding. 



72 State College Catalog 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING 

Professor J. H. Hilton, Head of the Department 

Professors R. H. Ruffner, E. H. Hostetler, W. J. Peterson, W. L. Clevenger, 
J. E. Foster, F. M. Haig; Associate Professors C. D. Grinnells, D. E. Brady. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying is housed in Polk 
Hall, a three-story building which -was designed to meet the needs of college 
instruction, research, and extension work in Animal Production and Dairy 
Manufacturing. 

In the basement of Polk Hall are two wings, one of which is devoted to 
Dairy Manufacturing and the other to Farm Meats. The Dairy wing has 
recently been equipped with new dairy machinery, including direct-expan- 
sion ice cream freezer, churn, pasteurizer, milk bottler, and milk-cooling 
and storage equipment. This equipment is used daily by students who bottle 
milk, and manufacture ice cream and other dairy products used in the Col- 
lege Cafeteria. The other wing is used for slaughtering beef cattle, sheep, 
and swine, and for the aging and curing of the meats produced from these 
animals. Sufficient equipment is provided in the Meat Laboratory to do the 
necessary work in the time allotted, yet the courses are so adapted that the 
students can apply both theory and practice to conditions on the farm. Both 
the dairy and the meat wings have their own individual mechanical refriger- 
ation units so that the courses can be taught at any season of the year. 

The upper floors of the building contain offices, classrooms, library, milk- 
testing laboratory, farm-dairy laboratory, animal-nutrition laboratories, and 
beef cattle, sheep, and swine research laboratories. Extension specialists in 
swine, dairy, beef, and sheep have offices in this building. 

In addition, the Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying main- 
tains three livestock farms located a few miles from the College. 

The Dairy Farm contains 400 acres. Two fire-proof completely equipped 
dairy barns house 140 registered Jerseys, Guernseys and Holsteins. A herd 
of registered Ayrshires is maintained at the College Experiment Station 
nearby. A milk house, designed for convenience in handling milk in the most 
efficient and sanitary manner, connects the two barns. Other buildings located 
on the dairy farm are horse and calf barns. 

The Animal Husbandry Farm adjoining the Dairy Farm contains 500 
acres. Here registered breeds of swine, sheep, horses, and beef cattle are 
maintained for research and college teaching. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying is equipped to 
instruct students in the feeding, breeding, and management of farm ani- 
mals. Students feed and milk cows; conduct research; manufacture dairy 
products; feed and prepare animals for exhibition and the block, actually 
doing the slaughtering, and the cutting of the meat for market and home 
use. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 



73 



Well-trained young men in the various fields of Animal Husbandry and 
Dairying have greater opportunities for service and success than ever 
before. This fact is demonstrated by the following responsible positions 
held by graduates in Animal Husbandry and Dairying: 

1. Livestock and dairy farmers. 

2. County agents and extension specialists in livestock. 

3. Livestock research investigators. 

4. Superintendents and owners of dairy manufacturing plants. 

5. Teachers in agricultural colleges. 

6. Managers and salesmen in commercial livestock and feed companies. 

7. Milk inspectors. 

8. Workers for livestock breed associations. 

9. Workers for banks and corporations in livestock industries. 
10. Supervisors of dairy herd improvement associations. 

CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL PRODUCTION 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 

Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Dairying, A.H. 341 3 

Swine Production, A.H. 331 3 

Farm Meats I, A.H. 301 8 

Animal Nutrition II, A.H. 361 3 

History of Breeds, A.H. 322 8 

Market Types of Livestock, A.H. 323 8 

Herd Improvement, A.H. 413 3 

Business English, Eng. 211 3 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Elective English 3 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Pastures and Forage Crops, F.C. 443 4 

Chemistry of Vitamins, Chem. 462 3 

Market Grading of Field Crops, F.C. 451 3 

Animal Hygiene and Sanitation, A.H. 353 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

19 18 19 

Senior Year 



Animal Breeding, A.H. 421 4 

Sheep Production, A.H. 313 

Beef Cattle, A.H. 372 

Pure Bred Livestock Production, A.H. 432 

Stock Farm Management, A.H. 433 

Horse and Mule Production, A.H. 351 3 

or Dairy Cattle and Milk Production, A.H. 321 

Senior Seminar, A.H. 391-392-393 1 

Incubation and Brooding, Poul. 303 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 

Fruit Growing, Hort. 331 4 

Agricultural Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Testing of Milk Products, A.H. 332 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Electives 3 












3 


3 





3 








3 








1 


1 





8 





8 


4 

















4 








8 


3 


3 



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74 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Creamery Buttermaking, A.H. 371 4 

Testing of Milk Products, A.H. 332 4 

Ice Cream Making. A.H. 381 4 

Cheese Making, A.H. 333 3 

Dairy Manufacturing Practice, A.H. 342 3 

City Milk Supply, A.H. 343 4 

Business English, Eng. 211 3 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Elective English 3 

Chemistry of Vitamins, Chem. 462 S 

Animal Breeding, A.H. 421 4 

Food and Nutrition, Chem. 482 3 

Animal Hygiene and Sanitation, A.H. 353 3 

Farm Engines, Agr. Eng. 212 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

18 19 19 

Senior Year 



Dairy Manufacturing, A.H. 362 

Dairy Products Judging. A.H. 394 

Dairy Manufactures, A.H. 401, 402, 403 3 

Senior Seminar, A.H. 391, 392, 393 1 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 

Swine Production, A.H. 331 3 

Animal Nutrition II, A.H. 361 3 

Farm Meats I, A.H. 301 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Herd Improvement, A.H. 413 

Food Products and Adulterants, Chem. 441 3 

Stock Farm Management, A.H. 433 

Agricultural Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Farm Accounting, Agr. Econ. 313 

Pure Bred Livestock Production, A.H. 432 

Electives 3 

19 



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BOTANY 

Professor B. W. Wells, Head of the Department 

Professors D. B. Anderson, S. G. Lehman, L. Shaw 

Associate Professor I. V. Shunk 

Assistant Professors M. F. Buell, L. A. Whitford 



Equipment and Facilities 

Location. — The Department of Botany occupies the second floor of Winston 
Hall. 

Laboratories. — The laboratories are all equipped with projection lanterns. 
A well-organized herbarium supports the work in systematic botany and 
dendrology. 

Greenhouses. — Ample greenhouse facilities are available for work in 
physiology and pathology. 

Purpose. — The Department emphasizes those phases of plant science which 
are foundational for the work in Agriculture and Forestry. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 



75 



CURRICULUM IN PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Business English, Eng. 211 3 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 3 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Diseases of Field Crops, Bot. 301 3 

Diseases of Fruit and Vegetable Crops, Bot. 303 3 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 4 

Plant Morphology, Bot. 411, 412 3 3 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Electives 6 8 6 

19 18 18 



Senior Year 

Plant Microtechnique, Bot. 451 3 

Principles of Plant Pathology, Bot. 491 

Pathogenic Fungi, Bot. 481, 2, 3 3 

Soil Microbiology, Bot. 443 

Plant Breeding, F.C. 463 

Microanalysis of Plant Tissue, Bot. 442 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 233 

Electives 8 

18 









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3 


3 





3 





3 


3 














4 


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18 



CHEMISTRY 



Professor A. J. Wilson, Head of the Department 

Professors L. F. Williams, G. H. Satterfield 

Associate Professors W. E. Jordan, M. F. Showalter, W. A. Reid 

Assistant Professors H. L. Caveness, P. P. Sutton, R. H. Loeppert 

Instructors R. C. White, J. W. Morgan 

Curriculum. — The Department of Chemistry does not offer a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Chemistry. However, a student may register in the School 
of Agriculture with a major in Agricultural Chemistry. This curriculum 
affords extended courses of chemical training which will fit a graduate for 
positions such as those in State Experiment Stations, and in State and Fed- 
eral laboratories for the inspection and control of fertilizers, feeds, foods, 
and other commodities, and as chemist in industrial plants. 

Instruction. — Instruction in the Department of Chemistry embraces the 
courses of lectures and the related courses of laboratory work which are 
described in detail under the appropriate heading of each individual course 
included in the curricula of the Department. 



76 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 



pages 63, 64, 



fophomore Year 

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Orgs-:: C''e= ; = :-j. Che—. 42".. 422. 42: 
Physio for Textile StniiHrta. Phys. Ill, 112, 113 



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EXPERIMENTAL-STATISTICS 

Professor Gertrude M. Cox, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor- R. E. Comstock, J. A. Rigney, J. M. Clarkson 

Instructors R. J. Monroe, R. L. Anderson 

Bureau of Agricultural Economies Resident Collaborators 

W. A. Hendricks, Glen F. Vogel 

As = :s:ir.:= ir. S:.a:: = ::: = Yirrir.is. I-l" league. Margare: E". erring 

Technical Assistants Sarah Porter, A Tine Castleman 

ganization. — T:.~ I'ejar: . ental-Statistics provide; ir- 

rtion, consultation and computational service for all other departments 
wis of the college. The Experiment Stations of North Caro- 
states look to the Department for assistance in design of 
alysis of data and interpxetxtaon of results. Many govern- 
and other institutions also use the facilities. The range and 
:eria'. rarile-d :.y :r.e De: ar:rrer: rrrrrYre; ar. esc ell en: 
training students in the use of statistical procedures in 



ir all ::' :re 
lira ari ::! 
ex: er:r'.er:s 
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Laboratoi 



itains a laboratory which is equipped 
culating machines, comptometers and 
: r;e: ::r.s:.ar.:'.y. 5:rier: = have ar 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 77 

excellent opportunity to get actual experience in the use of these machines 
and to learn the types of data for which each is best suited. 

Curriculum. — The Department does not offer a Bachelor of Science degree 
in Experimental-Statistics, but it does offer advanced degrees and oppor- 
tunities for research. Undergraduate courses are given in fundamental and 
applied phases of statistics. 

FORESTRY 

Professor J. V. Hofmann, Director of the Division 

Professor L. Wyman 

Associate Professors W. D. Miller, G. K. Slocum, C. M. Kaufman 

Areas for Field Work. — Some of the field work of the Department of 
Forestry is now carried on at the Camp Polk Prison Farm, near the State 
Fair Grounds, which has a thousand acres of timber land. 

The George Watts Hill Demonstration Forest, near Durham, is a tract 
of 1,400 acres. It contains stands of short-leaf and loblolly pine, oaks, gum, 
tulip, dogwood, and all of these species in different associations. A rolling 
terrain, it serves admirably for the study of forest problems in the Pied- 
mont Section. 

The Hofmann Forest. — A large tract of land in Jones and Onslow Counties, 
in the southeastern part of the State, consists of more than 80,000 acres 
and has the various types of timber found in this region. The large areas 
of virgin timber make a very complete laboratory for studying forest 
development and succession. 

Total Areas. — In all, the Forestry Department has available about 82,000 
acres on which to do field work, demonstration, and research. These areas 
include the various types found in North Carolina except those of the 
Mountain Region. 

The Arboretum area of seventy acres near Raleigh is being developed 
to contain all of the tree species and associated shrubs that grow in this 
climatic condition. It contains swamp and upland which adapts it for 
this use. More than a hundred species have been planted in this area. 

The Wood Technology Laboratory contains a representative collection of 
the more common woods and will be gradually extended. 

The Timber-Testing Laboratory, in connection with the Engineering Ex- 
periment Station, contains the machines for its work. 

Greenhouse space is available for special problems in forest research. 

Purposes of the Curriculum. — The aims of the curriculum in Forestry are: 
(1) to train young men for work in the technical and applied fields of 
forestry on public or private forest land; (2) to give special training in 
fields of research; (3) to advance the knowledge of the entire profession. 

Forestry as a Profession. — The profession of forestry is comparatively 
young in North Carolina. It began some thirty years ago and has made 
remarkable progress during its first quarter century of existence. The next 
decade promises more advancement and achievement than all the past, as 
the foundation has been laid; the building of the superstructure will depend 



78 State College Catalog 

upon the expertness of the builders. In the ranks of the builders are 
included the United States Forest Service; State Forest Departments in a 
large number of States; corporations and lumber companies; individual 
land-owners; last but by no means least, the farm woodlands. 

Occupations. — Students completing the Forestry course may look to the 
following fields of employment: United States Forest Service, the State 
Service, including not only North Carolina but especially the Southern 
States, and other State organizations; the lumber companies, timber -holding 
companies, corporations, and individuals. The forestry program in the State 
of North Carolina is very materially strengthened by the presence of the 
National Forests and the Appalachian Forest Experiment Station. These 
will be of direct aid in the study of forest-research problems, management 
problems and the organization and work of the National Forest Service. 

Forest Management aims to make a forest property a permanent produc- 
ing unit. All forestry is now being built on this basis. 

Forest Utilization requires special courses dealing with the value and 
various uses of the products of the forest. During the third term of the 
senior year, field studies of woodworking industries, logging operations, 
paper and pulp mills, and problems in forest management take up most 
of the time. 

Silviculture deals with the problems of producing a forest, such as selec- 
tion of species, methods of reproduction, cutting systems. The work is 
becoming increasingly important as our virgin timber supply is depleted. 

Research in Forestry is being recognized as important by all agencies in 
the fields of forestry. Men trained in research methods are needed in the 
Government Experiment Stations, State Experiment Stations, and private 
laboratories. 

Graduation. — A minimum of 237 term credits with at least 237 honor 
points are required for graduation in Forestry. 

A Field Trip through the Southeastern and the Gulf States is required for 
the senior class to study Applied Forestry under field and factory condi- 
tions. Local field trips are also required of other classes. A nominal fee is 
charged to cover the expense of these trips. 

Summer Instruction in Forestry. — The regular summer instruction in 
forestry for sophomores is given during the ten weeks immediately following 
the Commencement. 

The expenses for the entire period are as follows: 

Registration fee S 5.00 

For each credit scheduled 3.00 

Room and board (estimated) 50.00 

Bus fee 22.00 

Camp fee 5.00 

The courses listed below for summer camp are required and carry the 
regular college credit as indicated. The work is carried on entirely in the 
field and the class is responsible for its own program of camp routine. The 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 79 

students furnish their own board and any facilities other than the beds and 
housing. The registration in these courses is restricted to regularly enrolled 
students, unless a student is admitted as a special student under the same 
conditions that a special student would be allowed to take work in the 
regular courses. 

CURRICULUM IN FORESTRY 

Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Drawing, C.E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Botany, General and Systematic Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 4 3 

Mathematical Analysis, Math. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General and Economic Zoology, Zool. 101, 102 4 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 4 

Elementary Forestry, For. 101, 102, 103 1 1 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or 

Human Relations, Soc 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 111 



20 20 19 



Sophomore Year 



Introduction to Economics, Econ. 205 3 

Land Economics, Agr. Econ. 212 3 

Plant Physiology, Bot 221 5 

Dendrology, Bot. 211, 213 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Wood Technology, For. 202 3 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 4 

Surveying, Theoretical, C.E. 221, 222 8 3 

Field Surveying, C.E. 225 1 

Topographical Drawing, C.E. 224 1 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

Military Science II, MiL 201, 202, 203, or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

Introduction Sociology, Soc. 202 3 



18 21 20 



Summer Camp 



Surveying and Mapping, C.E. s300 

Dendrology, For. s214 

Mensuration, For. s304 

Silviculture, For. s204 



Junior Year 

Forest Protection and Improvement, For. 342 

Nursery Practice, For. 313 

Soils, Soils 201 

Mensuration I, n, For. 402, 403 3 

Silviculture I, II, For. 311, 312 3 

English or Modern Language 

Forest Entomology, Zool. 302 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Meteorology, Phys. 322 

Forest Finance, For. 442 3 

Survey of Statistical Methods, Econ. 408 3 

Elective in Social Science Group 

Electives 3 






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3 





3 





8 



12 



3 








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5 


3 





3 





3 


3 


3 











3 




















6 


3 


6 



18 21 21 



80 State College Catalog 



courses 

Logging, For. 421 

Diseases of Forest Trees, Bot- 311 
Silviculture EH, IV, For. 411, 412 . 
Forest Management, For. 431, 432 . 

Seminar, For. 452 

Forest Products, For. 821 

Forest Utilization, For. 328 

Timber Appraisal, For. 443 

English or Modern Language 

Senior Field Trip, For. 453 

Electives 



Senior Year 

First Term 
3 


CREDITS 
Second Term 


3 
3 
2 



3 

6 


Third Term 



3 





3 





3 











3 








2 





2 











3 


3 


5 



18 17 12 



HORTICULTURE 

Professor M. E. Gardner, Head of the Department 
Associate Professors G. 0. Randall, Robert Schmidt, J. G. Weaver 

Equipment. — The Department of Horticulture is well prepared in class- 
rooms and in laboratory and field equipment to offer instruction in its several 
important and diverse fields. 

Pomology and Small-Fruit Culture. — The College orchards and vineyards, 
the laboratories, a nursery plot, and other facilities are available to treat 
every phase of fruit growing from the selection and propagation of varieties 
to the details of orchard management. 

Olericulture and Floriculture. — Four modern greenhouses, forming an 
important part of the equipment of the Department, are used primarily 
for experimental and instructional work in these two important and grow- 
ing fields of horticulture. Potting rooms, propagation benches, and other 
more specialized equipment are used for both undergraduate and graduate 
instruction. Land and equipment to demonstrate and study details of com- 
mercial olericulture are convenient to the greenhouses. 

Special Study and Research. — A Physiological and a Cytological Labora- 
tory, calculating machines, library, greenhouses, and land are available to 
graduate and undergraduate students to carry on special studies. Projects 
conducted by the Experiment Station Staff are also available for study and 
observation. 

Library. — The Departmental library contains approximately twenty 
thousand technical and popular bulletins covering all phases of horticulture, 
and complete bound volumes of the Proceedings of the American Society for 
Horticultural Science and many other periodicals pertaining to horticultural 
subjects. 















4 








8 





8 











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3 





3 





3 





2 


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The School of Agriculture and Forestry 81 

CURRICULUM IN FLORICULTURE 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Business English, Eng. 211 3 

Bacteriology. Bot 402 

Systematic Botany, Bot. 203 

Disease of Fruit and Vegetable Crops, Bot. 303 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 

Plant Propagation, Hort 301 

Soils of North Carolina, Soils 312 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 

Plant Materials : Woody Plants, L.A. 201, 202, 203 2 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

Plant Materials : Herbaceous Plants, L.A. 303 

Electives 6 

18 18 ' 20 



Senior Year 

Plant Ecology, Bot 441 8 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 

Commercial Floriculture, Hort 341 4 

Horticultural Problems, Hort 421, 422, 423 2 

Seminar, Hort 431, 432, 433 1 

Experimental Horticulture, Hort. 412 

Agricultural Cooperation, Agr. Econ. 422 

Rural Sociology, Rural Soc. 302 

Agricultural Chemistry, Chem. 481 3 

Plant Breeding, F.C. 463 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 337 

Landscape Gardening, L.A. 403 

Floral Design, Hort 312 

Electives 6 

18 19 18 

CURRICULUM IN POMOLOGY 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 8 

Business English, Eng. 211 

Systematic Botany, Bot. 203 

Plant Ecology, Bot 441 8 

Small Fruits and Grapes, Hort 811 3 

Plant Propagation, Hort. 301 

Vegetable Gardening, Hort. 803 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 803 

Ornamental Plants, L.A. 402 

Landscape Gardening, L.A. 403 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 887 

Electives 3 

19 17 20 












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S2 



State College Catalog 
lior Year 



COURSES 



CREDITS 
First Term Second Term Third Teno 



Bacteriology, Be*. 402 

.i-zL-.-jL'. VTr:t:-r. —z.z '.l\ ... .. 

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CURRICULUM IN VEGETABLE GARDENING 



For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 



Junior Year 

ai s 

211 

Pi:: : '-:•- 441 J 

Bat 402 • 

OymUamalM. Botany, Bot. 203 

Diseases of Fndt and Vegetable Oops. Bot. 303 

TtzI: Gr:-;-£ E:- Ml ...... 4 

Plan: ?r".£rari:z. E:r*_ ctl 

Vfe S e.£: « 7:r: -g, Hort. 302 

Vegeaile Garde-:::?. E:r-_ Ill 
Fertilisers 5::1= i:i .0 

Gere:: a Z:.:L 4i: 4 

Z:.---:- Z-.. - : — . ZooL 213 

Terrs.:-? a:.: Zr^.w^zi, Agr Zr? !'.: 

Z>rr.ves ~ 6 

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Senior Year 



It; 



II, 323 

HI 

and Grapes, Hort. 311 

Z-z-.izzz- E:- 4;i. 4::, 411 

rt. 431. 432, 433 

1 Hortiealtare, Hort. 412 

ihare, Hort. S18 

481 .... 



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The School of Agriculture and Forestry 83 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Professor J. P. Pillsbury, Head of the Division 
Associate Professors G. 0. Randall, J. G. Weaver 

A comparative study of Landscape Architecture with architecture, the 
oldest art of design, will disclose the fact that distinct parallelism exists 
between these two fields of human endeavor. Not only in the character and 
extent of the training required in each case is this shown, but also in the 
division of work which takes place, and in the relations existing among 
those responsible for various parts of the work in the practice of these two 
closely associated professional fields. 

Training in Landscape Architecture is a composite derived from the fine 
arts, certain branches of engineering, and ornamental horticulture. Properly, 
it is dominated by the principles of design, and therefore may be correctly 
classified as a fine art. Its province is the design of landscapes, the prepara- 
tion of plans and specifications for them, and supervision during con- 
struction. 

The Curriculum in Landscape Architecture is strictly undergraduate. Its 
purpose is to provide a broad and thorough foundation for the additional 
postgraduate training which the profession requires of those desiring to 
enter its ranks. It also presents an open door to the professional fields of 
city or regional planning as the student may elect when undertaking grad- 
uate work. The soundness of the curriculum here presented is attested 
not only by the fact that at no time has the demand for the services of its 
graduates been fully satisfied, but also by the successes of those who have 
pursued graduate training and attained to full rank in the professional field 
of Landscape Design. 

Training in Landscape Construction is similar to that in Landscape Archi- 
tecture, but with emphasis upon materials and methods of construction 
employed in engineering and ornamental horticulture. 

Training in Landscape Gardening is essentially ornamental horticulture. 
In neither case is graduate work required, since their provinces will not 
include the design of landscape, but only the execution of plans under super- 
vision in the one case, and the maintenance of the constructed landscape in 
the other. Students electing either of these two lines of study will, during 
their first two years, pursue the Basic Curriculum in General Agriculture, 
with two or three substitutions from other curricula, as indicated. 

General Equipment and Special Facilities for instruction are ample in 
the combined resources of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Horticul- 
ture, and Landscape Architecture. 

Plant Materials in extensive collections on the College grounds and at 
various points elsewhere within a short distance, furnish an ample supply 
of all kinds for both study and use. In addition, several notable collections 
are available for occasional visits and study. 



84 



State College Catalog 



The Material for Landscape Design and Construction available on College 
grounds, private properties, and numerous public and semipublic areas and 
institutions in and about Raleigh, provide a wide range of subjects for 
study and practice. The City of Raleigh itself is a most interesting city- 
planning study, since it is one of the very few existing examples of a 
capital city which was planned in advance of its building. 



CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Freshman Year 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry, 

Math. 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 

Botany, General and Systematic, Bot 101, 102, 203 .... 4 4 8 
Engineering Drawing II, and 

Descriptive Geometry, M.E. 105, 106, 107 8 3 

Arboriculture, L.A. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Drawing, C.E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or 

Human Relations, Soc. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 108 1 1 1 

21 21 20 



Sophomore Year 

Business English and Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 281 ... 8 

Plant Physiology, Bot 221 

Pencil Sketching, Arch. 100 3 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 

Introduction to Economics, Econ. 205 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 8 

Introduction to Architecture, Arch 201 8 

Elements of Architecture, Arch. 202, 203 

Surveying, Theoretical, C.E. 221, 222 3 

Field Surveying, C.E. 225, 227 1 

Plant Materials : Woody Plants, L.A. 201, 202, 203 2 

Theory of Landscape Design, L.A. 212, 213 

Military Science H, Mil. 201, 202, 203, or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

21 
Surveying, C.E. s310, concurrent with Summer School, 8 creditB, or 
Surveying, C.E. bSIO, a, b, c. Junior Year, 3 credits. 






8 





i 








4 





3 

















8 


8 


3 








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2 


2 


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Junior Year 



Plant Materials : Herbaceous Plants, L.A. 803 

Plant Ecology, Bot 441 3 

History of Landscape Design, L.A. 311, 812 8 

Landscape Design I, L.A. 321, 322, 323 4 

Technical Writing, Eng. 321 

Shade and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 

Freehand Drawing I, Pen and Pencil Drawing, Arch. 102 

Freehand Drawing H, Water Color, Arch. 101 2 

Freehand Drawing III, Charcoal, Arch. 103 

Surveying, C.E. s310 a, b, c 1 

Economic Zoology and Entomology, Zool. 102, 218 

History of Architecture, Arch. 821, 322 3 

•Electives 8 

21 



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4 
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4 
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• Elective credit must include 12 credits in Social Science. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 85 

Senior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Planting Design, L.A. 411, 412, 413 3 3 8 

Landscape Design H, L.A. 421, 422, 423 4 4 4 

City Planning, L.A. 432 3 

Landscape Construction, L.A. 451, 452, 453 2 2 2 

Perspective Drawing, Arch. 206 1 

Accounting for Engineers, Econ. 212 3 

Appreciation of Fine Arts, Arch. Ill, 112, 113 3 3 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

•Electives 3 3 8 

19 18 18 

POULTRY SCIENCE 

Professor R. H. Dearstyne, Head of the Department 
Assistant Professors N. W. Williams, H. C. Gauger, R. E. Greaves; Instruc- 
tor D, W. Gregory. 

Research Cooperators: Zoology Department, Associate Professors 
C. H. Bostian, R. Harkema 

Laboratories: The Poultry Department is housed on the second floor of 
Ricks Hall. It embraces the Disease Diagnostic, the Anatomy-Hematology, 
and the Disease Research Laboratories, the Incubator Room, and two Live 
Bird Laboratories. The laboratories are well equipped for teaching and 
research. 

The Seminar Room: Affording access to technical and to popular publica- 
tions, to preserved pathological specimens, is open to the students at all 
times. 

Purpose and Scope: The Poultry Department, as a major division of the 
School of Agriculture and Forestry, serves North Carolina through teach- 
ing, research, and extension. Its research personnel embraces the field of 
avian genetics, parasitology, sero-bacteriology, histology, pathology and 
hematology. It has two poultry farms (chickens and turkeys) near the 
campus and two Experiment Station farms in the eastern and the western 
parts of the state. The staff devotes its full time to poultry problems of 
the student, the poultryman and the industry. It serves a chicken and 
turkey farm industry of nearly 10,000,000 birds in North Carolina valued 
at approximately $30,000,000. It cooperates with the commercial concerns 
allied with poultry. 

Central Poultry Plant: Consists of forty buildings located on seventeen 
acres. Six laying houses and sixteen mating pens house approximately 250 
breeders and 1,500 layers. All layers of three breeds of chickens are pedi- 
greed and trap-nested. About 4,000 chicks are produced each year, all of 
these being pedigreed. An 18,000-capacity incubator is used for teaching 
commercial incubation. 

Central Turkey Plant: Consists of five new buildings located on twenty- 
five acres. One laying house and six mating pens house approximately 250 
large bronze turkeys, all pedigreed and trap-nested. One 1,500-capacity 
incubator is used. 



86 State College Catalog 

These two Plants provide abundant material for teaching and demon- 
strating principles of poultry management, breeding, judging and sani- 
tation. 

Disease Diagnostic Laboratory: Serves directly and indirectly the poultry- 
men of the State. Approximately 25,000 birds have been autopsied since 
• 1923; 1,500 to 2,000 are now autopsied annually. One thousand or more 
poultrymen are reached each year by correspondence and 250 receive per- 
sonal attention in the laboratory. The birds received serve as excellent 
material for teaching, for laboratory material in the courses in anatomy and 
poultry diseases, and for investigational work in avian bacteriology, sero- 
bacteriology, anatomy, histology, pathology, hematology and parasitology. 

Curriculum: Is designed to broaden and to balance the training of under- 
graduate and graduate students in poultry husbandry. Emphasis is placed 
on those phases of biology, production, management, and sanitation which 
will enable the student to enter the fields of plant management, extension, 
or graduate research. 

Research: A substantial research program is pursued in genetics, sero- 
bacteriology, histology, pathology, hematology and parasitology. 

CURRICULUM IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

COURSES First Term 

English Elective 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 

Poultry Anatomy, PouL 311, 312 3 

Poultry Judging, Poul. 301 4 

Poultry Nutrition, Poul. 333 

Preparation and Grading of Poultry Products, Poul. 332 

Incubation and Brooding, Poul. 303 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 

Vertebrate Embryology, Zool. 461 5 

Cereal Crops, F.C. 302 

Farm Management I, Agr. Econ. 303 

Electives 3 



CREDITS 




Second Term 


Third Term 


3 








3 





3 


3 














4 


3 








3 


4 

















3 








3 


3 


3 



19 19 19 



Senior Year 



Poultry Diseases, Poul. 401, 402 4 

Sero-Diagnosis in Poultry Diseases, Poul. 403 

Commercial Plant Management, PouL 412 

Selecting and Mating Poultry, PouL 413 

Senior Seminar, Poul. 423 

Swine Production, A.H. 331 3 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production, A.H. 321 3 

Fruit Growing, Hort. 331 4 

Turkey Production, Poul. 342 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc. 302 

Agr. Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Terracing and Drainage, Agr. Eng. 303 

Chemistry of Vitamins, Chem. 462 

Electives 3 



4 








3 


3 








3 





3 




















3 





3 














8 


3 





3 


6 



20 19 18 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 87 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Professor C. Horace Hamilton, Head of the Department 

Professors G. W. Forster, Sanford Winston 

Assistant Professors Selz C. Mayo, L. Walter Seegers, William McGehee 

Objectives. — The principal objectives of this department are: (1) to give 
all students an appreciation of the human and social values in agriculture 
and rural life; (2) to give the future farmer and rural citizens an under- 
standing of the social problems of the rural community; (3) to train rural 
leaders in methods of group organization and social control; (4) to train 
a few exceptional young men in rural sociological research and extension 
methods. 

Relation to Other Departments. — The Department of Rural Sociology is 
closely related to and dependent upon other Social Science Departments in 
the College and in the Consolidated University. Students specializing in 
rural sociology will be expected to take courses in such departments as: 
Sociology, Psychology, Statistics, Agricultural Economics, History, and 
Political Science. The Department of Rural Sociology functions also in a 
service capacity to Agricultural Departments. Students taking courses in 
technical agriculture may take one or more courses in Rural Sociology as 
an elective Social Science. 

Laboratory and Research Facilities. — The Department of Rural Sociology 
is constantly engaged in statistical and sociological studies of rural popu- 
lation, rural standards of living, rural communities, and related problems. 
Funds, laboratory equipment and other facilities for this work are provided 
by the Agricultural Experiment Station and are available for the use of 
advanced students specializing in the field of Rural Sociology. 

In a broader sense, the entire State is a laboratory for the study of rural 
social problems. Field trips and extended surveys may be carried out by 
advanced students during the summer months. 

New Opportunities. The field of rural social work offers new opportunities 
for agricultural graduates who have specialized in rural sociology. There is 
a great need now for men particularly, to fill administrative positions in all 
kinds of social security and welfare organizations, public and private. The 
rural sociology curriculum is designed to prepare agricultural college gradu- 
ates for advanced professional training in social work and administration. 



88 State College Catalog 

CURRICULA IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 

Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

English (to be selected) 3 3 8 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 3 

Rural Sociology, Rur. Soc 302 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psy. 200 3 

Psychology of Personality, Psy. 291 3 

History of American Agriculture, Hist. 319 3 

American Political Parties, PoL Sc 203 or 

American Gov't. Pol. Sc. 200 3 

State Government and Administration, PoL Sc. 201 .... 3 

Electives 6 6 9 



18 18 18 



Senior Year 



The American Family 

Rural Leadership, Rur. Soc. 401 3 

Rural Poverty and Relief, Rur. Soc. 432 

Community Organization, Rur. Soc 413 

Rural Population Problems, Rur. Soc. 411 3 

Social Aspects of Land Tenure, Rur. Soc. 422 

or Problems of Land Economics, Agr. Econ. 412 ... 

Farm Management I, Agr. Econ. 303 

Agricultural Cooperation, Agr. Econ. 422 

Agricultural Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

Social Pathology, Soc 401 

Survey of Statistical Methods, Econ. 408 3 

Experimental Statistics. Stat. 412 

Statistical Analysis of Social Data, Stat. 451 

Technical Agriculture S 

Electives 8 



3 











3 








3 








3 








3 


3 














8 








3 








8 


3 


3 





3 



18 18 18 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 89 

ZOOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor Z. P. Metcalf, Head of the Department 
Professors C. H. Bostian, T. B. Mitchell, B. B. Fulton, F. H. McCutcheon, 
R. 0. Stevens; Associate Professor R. Harkema; Assistant Professors C. F. 
Smith. Instructors W. M. Kulash, M. W. Wing. 

Teaching and Research.— The space devoted to Zoology is equipped to 
present the various subjects and to carry on research in its own and related 
fields. The Entomology Laboratory has a large Insectary with the usual 
equipment, and has an especially large collection of breeding animals for 
research and instruction in the field. 

Beekeeping.— The Beekeeping Laboratory is well provided with appara- 
tus to illustrate all phases of beekeeping. A small apiary is maintained on 
the College grounds. 

Graduate Work.— The Technique and Graduate Laboratories are espe- 
cially well equipped for the teaching of graduate work. The Museum con- 
tains a synoptic collection illustrating most groups of animals. 

Curricula. — The Department of Zoology offers curricula in Entomology 
and in Wildlife Conservation and Management set forth as follows. 



CURRICULUM IN ENTOMOLOGY 

For Freshman and Sophomore Years refer to pages 63, 64. 
Junior Year 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Systematic Zoology, Zool. 421, 422, 423 3 3 3 

Genetics, Zool. 411 4 q a 

Comparative Anatomy, Zool. 222, 223 4 4 

Modern Language 3 3 

Systematic Botany, Bot. 203 

Physiological Chemistry, Chem. 451, 462 3 3 n 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 3 

Electives 6 3 



19 19 19 



Senior Year 



Vertebrate Embryology, Zool. 461 5 

Field Zoology, Zool. 433 4 

Applied Entomology, Zool. 401, 402, 403 3 3 3 

Modern Language 3 3 8 

Beekeeping, Zool. 243 8 

Plant Ecology, Bot 441 3 

Histology, Zool. 442 3 

Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Electives 4 4 4 

18 17 17 



90 State College Catalog 

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION" AND MANAGEMENT 

Principles. — The Wildlife Management Curriculum is based on the fol- 
lowing fundamental principles: (1) All forms of wild animal life must be 
considered in any extensive system of wildlife management; (2) the animal 
life of any given area is in close relationship to the vegetation existing in 
that area; (3) in favorable environment, the species of wildlife will normally 
produce a surplus, a part of which can be harvested each year in a manner 
similar to the harvesting of other crops. 

Conservative Approach. — Since wildlife management is just getting under 
way in this country, it would not seem advisable to encourage too rapid 
expansion of this profession at the present time, although there is a dis- 
tinct need for a moderate number of well-trained men to promote and super- 
vise wildlife management in the many sections of the country. 

Positions. — The curriculum is designed to furnish a technical and prac- 
tical background for the following types of positions: (1) Wildlife-Manage- 
ment Technicians in State Game and Fish Departments; (2) Biologists in 
the United States Biological Survey, Forest Service, Soil Conservation 
Service, National Park Service, and other Federal Land-Use Departments; 
(3) Game Managers on private preserves or leased areas, State game 
refuges, and on other land areas which are being developed primarily for 
wildlife. 

Research. — Because of the great need for research and experimental work 
in this field, the required courses in the curriculum are also designed to give 
the basic technique necessary to students who may desire to enter this 
phase of wildlife management. Several elective courses will be available 
for junior and senior students to enable them to specialize in some particular 
phase of the work. 

State Advantages. — Unusual advantages are offered to competent stu- 
dents by the wide range of natural environments in the North Carolina 
Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountain Regions. Further advantages are 
available by reason of close cooperation with the State Division of Game 
and Inland Fisheries, and the opportunity to observe developments in wild- 
life management on the following areas: Mount Mitchell Game Preserve, 
Sandhill Land-Use Project, Soil Conservation Service Projects, Mattamuskeet 
Water Fowl Preserve, The Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests, The 
Great Smoky Mountain National Park, and private preserves in the Pied- 
mont and on the Coastal Plain. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 91 

CURRICULUM IN WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT 

Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Mathematical Analysis, Math. Ill, 112 4 4 

General Zoology, Zool. 101 4 

Economic Zoology, Zool. 102 4 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Elementary Wildlife Management, Zool. Ill 1 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103, or alternate 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

18 21 21 



Sophomore Year 

Agricultural Physics, Phys. 115 6 

Botany, General and Systematic, Bot. 101, 102, 203 4 4 3 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Chem. 221 4 

Introduction to Economics, Econ. 206 3 

Land Economics, Agr. Econ. 212 3 

Public Speaking, Eng. 231 3 

Comparative Anatomy, Zool. 222, 223 4 4 

General Field Crops, F.C. 202 3 

Ornithology, Zool. 251, 252, 253 2 2 2 

Surveying, Theoretical, C.E. 221, 222 3 8 

Surveying, Field, C.E. 225 1 

Principles of Forestry, For. Ill 3 

Military Science n, Mil. 201, 202, 203, or alternate 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

22 22 21 



Junior Year 

Plant Propagation and Nursery Practice, Hort. 301 .... 3 

Dendrology, Bot 211, 213 3 8 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 441 3 

Field Zoology, Zool. 433 4 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 4 

Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 4 

Animal Physiology, Zool. 202 5 

Wildlife Conservation, Zool. 321, 322, 323 3 3 3 

Technical Writing II, Eng. 323 8 

Soils, Soils 201 5 

Electivee 3 6 3 

20 18 20 



Senior Year 

Aquatic Biology, Bot. 473 2 

Elective Social Science 3 

Elective English v 3 

Wildlife Management, ZooL 451, 452, 453 3 3 

The Soils of North Carolina, Soils 312 3 

Advanced Animal Ecology, Zool. 462, 463 

Parasitology, Zool. 492, 493 3 

Electives 9 6 J_ 

18 18 18 



92 State College Catalog 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

L. D. Baver, Director 

Establishment. — The Agricultural Experiment Station was established in 
accordance with an Act of the General Assembly of 1877. Its progress has 
been enhanced by different Acts of Congress giving to the Station addi- 
tional funds in 1887, 1906, 1925, and 1935. These are known as the Hatch, 
the Adams, the Purnell, and the Bankhead-Jones acts, respectively. The 
General Assembly has allocated to the Station annually certain funds from 
the general fund. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the Agricultural Experiment Station is to study 
methods for economic production of the highest grades of livestock, poultry, 
and plants on the many soil types and varied conditions existing throughout 
the commonwealth; to study methods for the control of parasitic insects 
and organisms that cause serious economic losses of animals, poultry, and 
plants; to find and develop varieties of animals, poultry, and plants, new, 
and resistant to diseases and the changeable conditions prevailing in this 
State; and to perfect better marketing for all agricultural products. 

Work. — The staff of the Agricultural Experiment Station conducts ex- 
periments throughout the State on areas owned by farmers, on six strate- 
gically located test farms, on farms rented for short periods, and in the 
greenhouses and laboratories of the College. 

Research. — The agricultural research aims, through the discovery of new 
facts, to improve the well-being of farmers throughout the State; to 
strengthen the regulatory work of the State Department of Agriculture; to 
develop new and necessary facts for the teaching of sound agricultural 
principles by vocational agricultural instructors, agricultural extension 
agents, and agricultural instructors in the College. 

Experts. — The Agricultural Experiment Station staff brings to the College 
many experts, whose teachings in many specialized fields of agriculture 
assure the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes much 
to the advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, 
teachers, and investigators so necessary in the maintenance of agriculture 
on sound and economic planes. 

Publications. — The Agricultural Experiment Station publishes many bul- 
letins and scientific papers on results of research conducted by the staff. 
These are free and sent upon request of anyone in the State. 

Problems. — The staff diagnoses and interprets many problems for the 
farmers of this State; holds council with farmers and others interested in 
the agricultural industry; discusses farming procedures over the radio, and 
writes many letters on the more specific problems of agriculture at the 
request of farmers, members of garden clubs, and of fertilizer, fungicide, and 
insecticide manufacturers. It takes part in many of the administrative 
functions of the College. 



The School of Agriculture and Forestry 93 

COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORK 

Dr. I. 0. Schaub, Director 

John W. Goodman, Assistant Director 

Dr. Jane S. McKimmon, Assistant Director 

Ruth Current, State Home Demonstration Agent 

Support. — The Agricultural Extension Service of State College is con- 
ducted cooperatively with the United States Department of Agriculture and 
the one hundred counties of the State. The work is supported by Federal 
funds derived from the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, the Capper-Ketcham Act 
of 1928, and the Bankhead-Jones Act of 1935, from State appropriations 
and county appropriations. The Federal and State appropriations are used 
to maintain an administrative and specialist staff, and to supplement 
salaries and travel expenses of county Extension agents. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the Extension Service is to teach by demonstra- 
tion. In carrying out this purpose, the College maintains a staff of trained 
specialists, a system of county agents and assistant agents, and a corps of 
home-demonstration agents. Instruction is given at group meetings by 
method and result demonstrations, and by the written word, by training 
leaders, and through organized effort with clubs of men, women, and 
young people. In all of these activities, the plan is to carry the rural people 
of North Carolina the latest and best information obtainable for building 
a more prosperous and satisfying life on the farm. The Extension Service 
holds a number of short courses, both on the College campus and elsewhere 
over the State, that the greatest number of rural leaders may be trained 
for building better homes and better farms, in the use of more efficient 
practices, thus creating a more satisfying way of life. 



94 State College Catalog 

THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

fJohn Harold Lampe, Dean of the School of Engineering 
L. L. Vaughan, M.E., Acting Dean of Engineering 

Organization 

The School of Engineering of the North Carolina State College of Agri- 
culture and Engineering of the University of North Carolina is organized 
for purposes of administration into the following Departments: 

Line Departments 

Administrative Officer 

Aeronautical Engineering Professor W. G. Friedrich 

Architectural Engineering Professor Ross Shumaker 

Ceramic Engineering Professor A. F. Greaves-Walker* 

Chemical Engineering Professor E. E. Randolph 

Civil Engineering Professor C. L. Mann 

Electrical Engineering Professor R. S. Fouraker 

General Engineering Professor G. Wallace Smith 

Geological Engineering Professor J. L. Stuckey 

Industrial Engineering Professor F. F. Groseclose** 

Mechanical Engineering Professor R. B. Rice 

Service Departments 

Engineering Experiment Station Assoc. Prof. R. E. Stiemke** 

Engineering Mechanics Professor G. Wallace Smith 

Mathematics Professor H. A. Fisher 

Physics Professor C. M. Heck 

The School of Engineering is organized to offer technical and professional 
engineering instruction on the higher levels, undergraduate and graduate, 
vocational and professional, to meet the needs of the people of North 
Carolina. It is also organized and equipped to conduct research in the 
fundamentals of Engineering, and it cooperates with the College Extension 
Division in offering extension courses in Engineering and its allied fields. 

Effective July 1, 1938, the consolidation of Engineering instruction at the 
University Unit in Raleigh was consummated, and the instructional staff 
and laboratory facilities were enhanced by additions from the Engineering 
College formerly maintained by the Unit at Chapel Hill. This gives the 
School of Engineering in Raleigh the largest and most extensive engineering 
staff and equipment in this section of the country, and offers to the young 
men of North Carolina excellent facilities for securing an undergraduate 
education in Engineering. 



• On leave. 

*• On military leave. 

t Appointed April 1, 1945. 



The School op Engineering 95 

The excellence of the instruction in the School of Engineering is attested 
by the fact that the Engineers' Council for Professional Development has 
accredited its curricula in Ceramic, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical En- 
gineering. It is the policy of the School of Engineering to have all of its 
curricula meet the standards of this nationally recognized accrediting 
agency. Engineering education requires extensive laboratory facilities, and 
as rapidly as funds are available all of its laboratories are being brought into 
shape to meet the highest standards attained in any technological institution 
of higher learning. 

Location and Facilities 

Raleigh is a particularly favorable place for the study of Engineering. 
It is not only the State Capital where are located many State Departments 
of interest to engineers, such as the State Highway Commission, State 
Board of Health, State Geologist, Department of Conservation and Develop- 
ment, and important State institutions, but it is a rapidly growing city 
marked by modern developments in residential, commercial, and municipal 
construction. The local building and engineering go on the year round 
and afford excellent opportunities for observation and study. Raleigh is 
so situated geographically that it is within easy distance for inspection 
trips to commercial chemical works, woodworking mills, railway shops, 
machine shops, airports, and manufacturing industries. 

Raleigh is also a center from which electric power is distributed to a large 
section of the State. A transformer and meter substation adjoins the cam- 
pus, and from it high-tension lines radiate in four directions. Hydro-electric 
and steam-electric plants on the Cape Fear River are within easy reach. 
The important systems of highways centering in Raleigh are exceptionally 
valuable for the observation and study of the construction, use, and main- 
tenance of roads. 

On the State College campus are six large buildings devoted exclusively 
to engineering instruction and research. These buildings contain much 
laboratory equipment which can be inspected at any time, but is best seen 
during the Engineers' Fair, which is held each year in March or April. 

Purposes of the School 

The purposes of the School of Engineering are: to educate men for pro- 
fessional service in Aeronautical, Architectural, Ceramic, Chemical, Civil, 
Construction and Building Materials, Electrical, Geological, Industrial, 
Mechanical, Sanitary, and Transportation Engineering; to equip them to 
participate in commercial and public affairs; to develop their capacities for 
intelligent leadership; to aid in the development of commerce and industry 
through research and experimentation; to investigate natural resources and 
demonstrate their value to the people of the State; to cooperate with private 
companies, municipalities, public authorities, and commercial and industrial 
organizations through scientific research, thus increasing technical skill, 
improving the value of manufactured products, and eliminating waste. 



96 State College Catalog 

Occupations Open to Graduates 

Those who graduate and receive a bachelor's degree in some specialised 
branch of engineering are equipped to assume at once the duties and 
responsibilities usually given Junior Engineers. The graduates of the School 
of Engineering are found in many technical fields, but most of them find 
employment in some one of the following: Aeronautical, Architectural and 
Structural Engineering; the Ceramic, the Chemical industries; and P rivate 
Professional Practice, Consulting Engineers; Hydro-electric Engineering, 
Electrical Manufacturing, Contracting, Central Steam-Electric Station De- 
sign and Construction, Telephone Service, Maintenance and Operation of 
Electrically-driven Mill Equipment, lighting, Illumination, and Railway 
Signaling ; Construction, Maintenance, and Operation of Steam and Electric 
Railways; the Design and Manufacture of Machinery, the Operation of 
Shops, and the Furniture Industry; Geological Engineering, Highway Engi- 
neering. Industrial Engineering, and the Management of Industries, Munic- 
ipal Engineering, Sanitary Engineering; as City Managers, Public-Utility 
and Health-Service Officials; Sales Engineering, Research and Development. 

Curricula 

Besides a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in General 
Engineering, the School of Engineering offers curricula which lead to the 
Bachelor's degree in the following specialized fields of Engineering: 

Aeronautical Engineering 

Architectural Engineering 

Architecture 

Cenunic Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

? vil Engineering, with options in: 

(a) Construction ar.i Bui'.iir.g Materia,"-: 

(b) General Civil 

(c) Sanitary 

(d) Transportation 

Electrical Engineering, with options in: 

(a) Power Generation and Distribution 

(b) Electrical Communication 
Geological Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering, with options in: 

(a) General 

(b) Furniture Manufacturing 

(c) Heating and Air Conditioning 

(d) Metals 

All of the curricula contain courses of general educational value which 

prepare students for the duties of citizenship in a democracy. However, the 



The School of Engineering 97 

curricula are primarily technical and practical, and designed to prepare 
young men for professional practice and for definite vocations as well as 
for leadership in the industrial advancement of the State. 

The instruction is such as will foster the individual talent, imagination, 
and initiative of students, and instill in them ideals of accomplishment, serv- 
ice, and good citizenship, while assuring to them that scientific education 
and practical training which will prepare them for professional service and 
leadership in engineering and in industry. In this way the School of En- 
gineering aids in the advancement of commerce and industry and furthers 
the development and economic utilization of the State's resources for the 
general welfare. 

All the engineering curricula emphasizes thoroughness in the study of 
English and of the sciences — Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry — with 
a thorough drill in the application of fundamental principles to engineering 
and industrial problems. Engineering is a profession, and the students come 
to realize that it is both honorable and learned, and that it offers excep- 
tional opportunities for service. 

The several engineering curricula have a common freshman year and 
differ only slightly in the sophomore year, in which years the students study 
English, Mathematics, Drawing, Shopwork, Physics, and Chemistry. In the 
junior and senior years the students are directed definitely to the profes- 
sional aims in carefully considered and well-balanced curricula. 

* Summer Work. — At least six weeks of summer employment, approved by 
the Head of the Department in which the student is enrolled, preferably in 
the summer following the junior year, is a specific requirement for gradua- 
tion in Engineering. 

The purpose of this is to have every student, before graduation, acquire 
the valuable experience of actual work with responsibility and pay in the 
field of his vocation. Departmental advisers will aid students in getting 
summer employment. 

* Inspection Trips. — In order to familiarize himself with the practice of his 
profession, each senior in Engineering is required as a part of his curriculum 
to take the departmental inspection trips. None will be excused except for 
grave reasons. 

These inspection trips are arranged by the Head of the Department 
in which the student takes his major work. The cost of such trips vary from 
$25.00 to $60.00 per student, depending on the time and distance traveled. 

Degrees. — Six different types of degrees may be secured through the 
School of Engineering. These are: 

1. Bachelor of Science (B.S.). This degree can be obtained only through 
completion of the curriculum in General Engineering. This is a course of 
study founded upon the fundamentals of engineering with no specialized 
courses but with liberal allowances for electives in the cultural courses. 
It is an earned undergraduate degree and can be obtained by four years of 
undergraduate work. 



* Waived for the duration of the war. 



98 State College Catalog 

2. Bachelor of a Specialized Branch of Engineering, for example, B.C.E. 
Bachelor of Civil Engineering. This is an earned undergraduate degree which 
includes in the last two years some specialized courses in the particular 
branch of engineering in which the student is studying. This course is 
planned for four years of study; but due to the fact that it is very difficult, 
only the very best prepared and most diligent students can successfully 
complete it in the time allotted. 

3. Master of Science (M.S.) in a specialized branch of engineering. This 
is an earned graduate degree which can be obtained only after the Bachelor's 
degree. It requires at least one year of graduate work, a reading knowledge 
of at least one foreign language, and a thesis showing ability to pursue in- 
dependent research. The core of graduate courses taken must emphasize £ 
scientific objective. Further information concerning the requirements for 
this degree may be obtained by addressing Dr. Z. P. Metealf, Director of 
Graduate Studies, State College, Raleigh, N. C. 

4. Master of a Specialized Branch of Engineering, for example, (M.CE.t 
Master of Civil Engineering. This is an earned graduate degree which can 
be obtained only after the specialized Bachelor's degree and requires one 
year of graduate work which emphasizes the technical and specialized pro- 
fessional engineering courses, and a thesis along professional engineering 
lines indicating ability to carry on independent professional investigations. 
For further information concerning this degree address Dr. Z. P. Metealf, 
Director of Graduate Studies. State College. Raleigh. N. C. 

5. The Professional degree, for example, Architectural Engineer. Ceramic 
Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Mechani- 
cal Engineer. 

This is an earned degree which is conferred only upon the graduates of 
some branch of the University of North Carolina, after five years of pro- 
fessional engineering practice in responsible charge of important work, the 
acceptance of a thesis on a subject related to the professional engineering 
practice in which the applicant is engaged, and the passing of an examina- 
tion upon the candidate's professional experience. For further information 
concerning this degree address Dr. Z. P. Metealf, Director of Graduate 
Studies, State College, Raleigh. N. C. 

6. The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Engineering (DEng.^. This degree 
is purely an honorary degree conferred upon men of extraordinarily high 
professional engineering attainments who are graduates of one of the 
branches of the University of North Carolina, or upon professional engineers 
who have rendered distinguished services to the State of North Carolina. 

Graduation. — The requirements for graduation in a specialized branch of 
Engineering are the satisfactory completion of all the courses in one of the 
prescribed curricula (see tabulation of curricula on the pages follow-. r.z . 
a total of not less than 240 term credits, with not less than 240 honor points. 

Of the minimum of 240 term credits required for graduation in Engi- 
neering, 117 are common to all curricula: 30 term credits in Mathematics. 18 



The School op Engineering 99 

in Language, 9 in Economics, 12 in Chemistry, 12 in Physics, 9 in Me- 
chanics, 9 in Drawing and Descriptive Geometry, 12 in Military Training, 
and 6 in Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Each of the curricula permits election of at least 18 term credits and 
contains not more than 72 special technical term credits. 

Graduates in Liberal Arts. — An increasing number of graduates of liberal- 
arts colleges and universities are seeking an engineering degree. The policy 
of the School of Engineering is to allow as liberal an arrangement of courses 
as possible to suit the individual student's needs so that the degree in en- 
gineering may be obtained in the briefest time possible. However, the 
liberal-arts courses are distinctly different from those offered in an engineer- 
ing school even when they have the same name and deal with the same 
subject matter. Students are therefore advised that the best economy of 
their time and money will be attained if they enroll at the beginning of their 
college careers as freshmen in an engineering curriculum. 

A graduate with an A.B. degree will normally require two years additional 
work to obtain a Bachelor's degree in engineering. 

A graduate with a B.S. degree may obtain a degree in engineering with 
from one to two years of additional study. A final decision in each case can 
be made only after an evaluation of the transcript of the student's record in 
the college from which he has received his degree. 

Short Courses; Institutes. — The School of Engineering cooperates with 
the College Extension Division in offering short courses and institutes for 
adults and graduate engineers. These courses vary in length from one day 
to one week; each year the courses covered are different and vary according 
to the public demand. The faculty of the School of Engineering usually 
furnishes a large portion of the instruction offered in these courses, which 
in the past have been for Electrical Metermen, Gas Plant Operators, Water- 
works Operators, Heating and Plumbing Contractors, Surveyors and Engi- 
neers. These short courses are usually held in Raleigh because the School of 
Engineering has unusual laboratory and classroom facilities which offer a 
decided advantage to those who desire to "brush up" on their specialty and 
bring themselves abreast of the times by attending such short courses. For 
information concerning any short course, address inquiry to Mr. Edward 
Ruggles, Director, Extension Division, State College, Raleigh. 

ENGINEERING WAR TRAINING 

Since July, 1940, the School of Engineering has been cooperating with the 
Office of Education of the Federal Government in offering Engineering 
War Training courses on a college level, designed to train men and women 
as rapidly as possible to enter the war industries. The following courses have 
been offered: Aircraft Inspection; Chemical Testing and Inspection; Diesel 
Engineering; Engineering Drawing; Experimental Electronics; Instrument 
Men and Topographers; Materials Inspection and Testing; Production 
Engineering; Production Supervision; Spectroscopy in Industry; Archi- 
tectural Drafting; Radio Communication; Power System Calculation; Indus- 



100 State College Catalog 

trial Safety Engineering; Fabric Testing and Inspection; Electrical Distri- 
bution. Those who desire further information concerning these courses, 
please address their inquiries to: Edward W. Ruggles, Director, College 
Extension Division, N. C. State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. While 
college credit may not be earned by taking these courses, they do train 
men and women for specific tasks in which the salaries are attractive. 
Normally there is no cost to the student except room and board while 
attending. The average length of these courses is from ten to twelve weeks. 
The School of Engineering has also cooperated during the past year with 
the U. S. Office of Education through the State Department of Public 
Instruction, Division of Vocational Education, to offer courses in such 
vocational fields as acetylene and electric welding, aircraft sheet metal, and 
machine shop practice. 

Admission: Advanced Standing. — Regulations for admission and advanced 
standing are stated under Information for Applicants. 

SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

An explanation of the purposes, and a listing of the personnel engaged in 
the three Service Departments in the School of Engineering follow: 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

Professor G. Wallace Smith, Head of the Department 

Professor N. W. Conner; Associate Professor A. Mitchell; 

Assistant Professor C. E. Feltner* 

Instructors J. T. Massey,* J. N. Farlow* 

The Department of Engineering Mechanics, which is housed in the Civil 
Engineering Building, teaches and administers the courses in theoretical and 
applied mechanics, strength of materials, and fluid mechanics. These courses 
have been grouped under an independent Department, which is the custom in 
most large engineering schools, for two reasons: first, to economize by 
preventing duplications and overlapping; second, because the mechanics 
courses are basic, required courses in all the engineering curricula, and 
here all engineering students meet on an equal footing. The best and most 
uniform results are thus obtained when such courses are taught in a Depart- 
ment completely separated from the bias of any particular type of 
specialization. 



• On leave to U. S. Army. 



The School of Engineering 101 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professor H. A. Fisher, Head of the Department 

Professors H. P. Williams, C. G. Mumford; Associate Professors J. M. 
Clarkson, J. W. Cell,** R. C. Bullock, J. Levine,* L. S. Winton,* H. V. 
Park; Assistant Professors H. M. Nahikian,* Robert Hooke, C. F. Strobel, 
W. P. Seagraves; Instructor H. C. Cooke. 

Mathematics is one of the basic sciences in Engineering. At State College 
the large and competent Mathematics Department not only teaches the 
subject as a science but gives also a large amount of drill and practice to 
the students so that, upon completion of the courses, the students not only 
know the subject matter but are skilled and rapid in its use when applied 
to the problems of technology. 

THE PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 

Professor C. M. Heck, Head of the Department 

Professor J. B. Derieux; Associate Professors J. S. Meares, F. W. Lancaster; 
Assistant Professors J. I. Hopkins, R. F. Stainback,* E. J. Brown; In- 
structorsG. W. Bartlett,* G. W. Charles,** J. T. Lynn. 

Physics is another of the basic sciences upon which Engineering and 
Agriculture are founded. 

Facilities. — The Department of Physics occupies the northern half of 
Daniels Hall— three floors, with six laboratories and six lecture rooms. The 
basement is devoted to research laboratories, shops, dark rooms, battery 
room, and power center. The two floors above comprise laboratories, lecture 
rooms, offices, and apparatus rooms. 

Equipment. — The Department is equipped with laboratory apparatus in a 
sufficient number of sets to permit all students in a laboratory to work 
during the same period on the same experiment. All lectures are demon- 
strated with a large assortment of equipment and apparatus collected 
through many years. 

On the roof of the building is located the astronomical observatory and 
the radio-research laboratory. The five-inch telescope is equatorially mounted 
and driven by clock work. 

The Department is equipped for research and engineering students 
desirous of using Physics as a minor in their work for an advanced degree 
may use these facilities. 



* On military leave. 
** On leave. 



- - State College Catalog 

THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

Associate Professor R. E. Stiemke,* Assistant Director 

Room 112, Civoi I: \ gir.eering Building, State College Station, Raleigh. 

Establishment. — Tie Engineering Experiment Station of State College 
vras established in 1923, as provided Ly the Genoa! Assembly of that year. 
It is ar. integral tart of the School of Engineering, and is engaged in an 
organize: program :f :tHs::: insisting of ir.diTic-j.al projects carefully 
defined and approved, which are carried on by engineering teachers. The 
Station fits uniquely into the program of instruction, research, and exten- 
sior. ::" State College. 

Purpose. — The efrts ::" the Engineering Experiment Station are directed 

aior.g the following lines: 

(a) The investigation of resources and processes, through experimenta- 
tion and tests, with the object of opening and developing wider fields for the 
use of the natural resources of the State. 

(b) Cooperation with industrial organizations in the solution of technical 
tr : Hems. ~hi:h reouire such facilities ant equipment as are available at 
State College. 

(c) The coordination of research undertaken by the Engineering School. 

(d) The publication of the results of experimental and research projects 
made by the Engineering Experiment Station and the several Engineering 

artments of State College. 

Publications. — The Experiment Station has, since its organization, co- 
operated with various organizations and industries in the State in the 
investigation of problems peculiar to North Carolina. The results of such 

investigations have, from time t: time, teen issued in the form of Bulletins. 
The following is at present a complete list of the publications of the Station: 

Bulletin Not 1. "County Roads: Organization, Construction and Mainte- 
nance by Barry Tucker, James Fontaine, and L. D. Bell. 

Bulletin No. 2. "Tests of Face and Common Brick Manufactured in North 
Carolina," by A. F. Greaves-Walker and James Fontaine. 

Bulletin N: ?:'.•:• :V:t 1' ml. a: '..:-.: 7 : rests." ly Wm. Hand Browne. 

Jr., and James Fontaine. 

Bulletin No. 4. "Motor Vehicle Accidents in North Carolina," by Harry 
Tucker. 

Bulletin No. ' "Occurrence art Physical Properties of North Carolina 

hrtle.*' :;•• Jasper 1 5ru:l:ey ant James Fontaine. Price mver.ty cents. 



" " i — :l:--a— '.-.■---.. 



The School of Engineering 103 

Bulletin No. 6. "The Occurrence, Properties, and Uses of the Commercial 

Clays and Shales of North Carolina," by A. F. Greaves-Walker, N. H. 

Stolte, and W. L. Fabianic. Price fifty cents. 
Bulletin No. 7. "Highway Grades and Motor Vehicle Costs," by Howard 

Burton Shaw and James Fontaine. Price twenty cents. 
Bulletin No. 8. "Financial Management for Highways," by Marc C. Leager. 

Price one dollar. 
Bulletin No. 9. "Highway Accidents in North Carolina and Guides to 

Safety," by Harry Tucker. Price fifty cents. 
Bulletin No. 10. "North Carolina Building Code," by the North Carolina 

Building Code Council. Price one dollar. 

Bulletin No. 11. "The Production of an Insulating Brick Using North Caro- 
lina Shales," by A. F. Greaves-Walker, W. C. Cole, Jr., and S. C. Davis. 
Price twenty cents. 

Bulletin No. 12. "The Development of Pyrophyllite Refractories and Refrac- 
tory Cements," by A. F. Greaves-Walker, C. W. Owens, Jr., T. L. Hurst, 
and R. L. Stone. Price fifty cents. 

Bulletin No. 13. "The Preparation of Concrete Using North Carolina 
Materials," by Harry Tucker and W. G. Geile. 

Bulletin No. 14. "The Location and Distribution of the Ceramic Mineral 
Deposits of North Carolina," by A. F. Greaves-Walker and S. G. Riggs, 
Jr. Price twenty-five cents. 

Bulletin No. 15. "A Study of Courses in Technical Writing," by A. M. 
Fountain. Price one dollar. 

Bulletin No. 16. "The Production of Unfired and Fired Forsterite Refrac- 
tories from North Carolina Dunites," by A. F. Greaves- Walker and R. L. 
Stone. Price fifty cents. 

Bulletin No. 17. "Papers Presented at School for Street Superintendents, 
1939," compiled by Harry Tucker. 

Bulletin No. 18. "Net Revenue Method of Comparing Distribution Trans- 
formers," by R. R. Brown. 

Bulletin No. 19. "The Origin, Mineralogy and Distribution of the Refrac- 
tory Clays of the United States," by A. F. Greaves-Walker. 

Bulletin No. 20. "Papers Presented at School for Street Superintendents, 
1940," compiled by Harry Tucker. 

Bulletin No. 21. "Drafting Room Practices," by T. C. Brown and P. E. 
Moose. Price twenty-five cents. 

Bulletin No. 22. '"The Development of an Unfired Pyrophyllite Refractory," 
by A. F. Greaves-Walker and J. J. Amero. Price fifty cents. 



104 State College Catalog 

Bulletin No. 23. "The Suitability of North Carolina Shales and Clays for 
Mortar Mixes," by A. F. Greaves -Walker and W. A. Lambertson. Price 
twenty-five cents. 

Bulletin No. 24. "The Development of Light Weight Concretes from North 
Carolina Vermiculites," by William A. Scholes, A. F. Greaves-Walker, 
E. E. Todd, and D. F. Cox. Price fifty cents. 

Bulletin No. 25. "Ceramic Dielectric and Insulator Materials for Radio and 
Radar Instruments," by R. L. Stone. Price fifty cents. 

Bulletin No. 26. "Suitability of North Carolina Trees for Chemical Conver- 
sion Products and for Certain Other Uses," by E. E. Randolph. Price 
fifty cents. 

Current Activities. — The Experiment Station is now assisting in the 
following investigations that are being conducted by the several Depart- 
ments of the Engineering School: 

1. In cooperation with the Department of Chemistry of State College and 
the Medical School of Duke University: A study of night blindness in 
relation to automobile accidents. 

2. In cooperation with the United States Geological Survey: The geology 
of Wake County, North Carolina. 

3. In cooperation with the North Carolina State Highway and Public 
Works Commission: Investigation of steel-beam bridges with concrete 
floors. 

4. In cooperation with the North Carolina State Board of Health: The 
efficiency of small, sewage-treatment plants. 

5. In cooperation with the Rural Electrification Administration: The effects 
of varying voltages on single-phase motors. 

6. In cooperation with the Testing Division of the North Carolina De- 
partment of Revenue: The testing of motor fuels. 

7. In cooperation with the City of Raleigh, North Carolina: An investiga- 
tion of the design and capacity of gutter intakes. 

8. A Photoelectric Integraph for Load-Temperature Studies. 

9. The Development of Improved Low-Loss Radio and Radar Insulators. 

10. Determination of the Maximum Safe Drying Rates of Clays and the 
Subsequent Control of Their Drying. 

11. Study of Foam Formation and Prevention in Boiler Water. 

12. Corrosion of Gas Jets and Formation of Deposits on Burners as Related 
to the Composition of Commercial Gas. 

13. Determination of the Effects of Scale and Water Temperature on the 
Water Quenching of Steel Castings. 



The School of Engineering 105 

THE N. C. STATE COOPERATIVE PLAN OF ENGINEERING 
EDUCATION 

*Frank F. Groseclose, Director; T. C. Brown, Acting Director 

The N. C. State Cooperative Plan of Engineering Education was started 
at North Carolina State College in the spring of 1940. It offers candidates 
for engineering degrees the combination of practical experience in indus- 
try and theoretical instruction in the required technical courses. During 
the first year 40 students cooperated with 12 industries in three states . 

The N. C. State Cooperative Plan divides the cooperative students in two 
sections. One section attends college the Fall and Spring terms each year, 
then works with a cooperating industry the Winter and Summer terms. The 
alternate section attends college the Winter and Summer terms and works in 
industry the Fall and Spring terms. For the average student this will mean 
one additional year or a total of five years for graduation in engineering. 
The student's participation in this five-year program is as follows: The full 
Freshman year is spent in residence at the college. The regular Sophomore 
and Junior years are divided into alternate periods of college attendance 
and work of three months duration each. The student spends his entire 
Senior year in residence at college. 

During the Freshman year, students following the Cooperative Plan will 
pursue the same schedule of full time attendance in the Basic Division as 
students of the regular four-year curricula. The cooperative students nor- 
mally take exactly the same academic work as non-cooperative students. 
Liberal substitutions may be allowed in preparing students for specific jobs 
in industry. 

In order to provide for worthy persons now employed in industry, whose 
employers are willing to cooperate, arrangements are available which allow 
these men to enter as Freshmen in the Basic Division, provided, of course, 
they meet the entrance requirements of N. C. State College. For those in 
industry who have already completed some college work, a transcript of 
college credits must be submitted to the Registration Office for evaluation. 
Such persons would complete at State College only the necessary addi- 
tional credits required for an engineering degree. Those already employed 
in industry may be recommended to the college by their employers as 
suitable persons for pursuing or continuing college grade work. 

Only Freshmen who can meet the scholastic requirement of a better than 
"C" average are eligible for participation in the Cooperative Plan. The 
maintenance of this policy avoids college recommendation to the industry of 
a student who would have to be suspended on account of poor scholarship, 
with consequent interruption of his employment with industry. 

Employment under the cooperative plan is not guaranteed, but every 
effort is made to place all worthy students whose scholarship, character, 
and abilities indicate that they will be successful in pursuing the coopera- 
tive plan. 



* On leave to U. S. Army. 



106 State College Catalog 

~':~en are becoming more and more in demand by various industries, 
and the cooperative plan offers them the advantages of a technical educa- 
tion combined with actual industrial experience. 

Placement in industry is generally made by furnishing to the industry 
concerned a few applications of the students selected by the Director as 
likely to fit the particular needs of the industry. In some cases the 
have authorized the Director to make assignment of students 
to them baaed on specification submitted by the particular industry. 

College fees, under the cooperative plan, are the same as those listed in 
the catalog for other students, with the exception that payments are 
axxauged on a three months basis rather than twice a year. 

A: plications for admittance to the cooperative plan may be made at any 
time, preferably before April 1 of the Freshman year. 

Those in t e re ste d should communicate directly with the Acting-Director, 
N. C. State Cooperative Plan of Engineering Education, Box 5518, State 
College Station, Raleigh, N. C. 

CURRICULA OFFERED IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Each of the following curricula is not only well balanced, but offers a 
liberal course of study in a technical and professional field. Each conforms 
to what is regarded by engineering educators as the best modern practice. 

Also offered in the School of Engineering is a curriculum leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering (see page 114). This curriculum 
has no specialization and requires but 238 term credits with at least 238 
honor points. It is recommended to those who desire a broad general training 
in the basic principles of Engineering. 

FRESHMAN YEAR of ALL CURRICULA in ENGINEERING 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 
A^t-:-i Trr:::r;~ A-i'.;- :i. ~-r:~ err 

Math. 101. 102, 104 6 6 6 

101, 102. 103 8 S 8 

Chemistry. Chem. 101, 102, 108 4 4 4 

Drawing D, M.-E. 105. 106 .8 8 

' metry, M-E. 107 8 
L MS. 101. 102, 108. or 

104 2 2 2 

>d Hj-giene, P.E. 101, 102, 108 . 1 1 1 

19 19 19 

rear in Aeronautical, Architectural, Ceramic, 
Electrical, n*— »*j and Mechanical Engineering: Surveying, C.E. 6200, 8 credits. 

* Citizenship Requirement for All Curricula in Engineering 

In order that every graduate of the School of Engineering may have a 

■s-orkdr.g kn:~'.edre of the fundamentals of American Government, all 
students in the S -r. :■:! :f Er.rir.eeriu:; are required t: take prior to the 
end ::' :heir s-othouo:re :-"ear a citizenship test, and in the event a student 
fails :■: tass this ::mtrehen5i"e examination, he wii". be required to take 

• Waived f:r :':; i^r=.r: -.- :'. tbe war. 



The School of Engineering 107 

American Government (Political Science 211) 3 or 3 or 3. Students may 
elect to take the course in lieu of the examination, and students taking the 
course will be permitted to apply the credit earned in partial satisfaction 
of their social science electives. A student must pass the comprehensive 
examination or the course in American Government before he can graduate 
from the School of Engineering. 



AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

W. G. Friedrich, Visiting Professor of Industry; Associate Professors L. R. 
Parkinson,* R. F. Rautenstrauch;** Instructor R. W. Truitt.* 

Building and Equipment — 

The Department of Aeronautical Engineering has a new building cen- 
trally located on the campus. It contains the offices of the aeronautical 
engineering faculty and the aeronautical laboratory. The Aeronautical 
Engineering Department also operates the University-owned Horace Wil- 
liams airport at Chapel Hill. This airport, one of the largest in the south 
and the finest college airport in the country is capable of handling aircraft 
of any size. The University owns and maintains a fleet of airplanes for the 
purpose of training prospective pilots for both military and commercial 
needs. Licensed personnel maintain the equipment in an airworthy condition. 

The Aeronautical Laboratory provides for the testing of component parts 
of aircraft. The latest machines and instruments are available for use in 
this connection. A Luscombe monoplane of all metal construction, com- 
pletely equipped with instruments, is used for purposes of study and flight 
testing. 



Curriculum — 

Since the trend of airplane design changes quite rapidly, no attempt is 
made to produce specialists in any phase of aeronautical engineering. The 
course of study is intended to give the student a well rounded knowledge of 
fundamentals. Upon graduation most students find positions in aircraft 
industry or the aviation services where they may receive further training 
of more specialized nature. Thus a student may prepare himself for any 
one of the many ground and flying positions available in the aviation 
industry today. In view of the present war requirements more time is 
being devoted to aircraft production subjects. Courses in Air Transportation 
are normally offered. 



• On military leave. 
** On leave. 



108 State College Catalog 

CURRICULUM IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Summer requirement following the freshman year: Surveying, C.E. s200, 
3 credits. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I. II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

tBusiness English, Pub. Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Mechanical Drawing, M.E. 211, 212, 213 2 2 2 

Shopwork, M.E. 121, 122, 123 1 1 1 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311 3 

Metallurgy, M.E. 322, 323 3 3 

♦Military Science, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Physical Education, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



20 20 20 



Junior Year 



Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 312, 313 3 3 

Thermo., M.E. 307, 308, 309 3 3 8 

Thermo. Lab., M.E. 313, 314, 315 1 1 1 

Elem. Mechanism, M.E. 215, 216, 217 1 1 1 

General Aeronautics, Aero. E. 300 3 

Elem. Aeronautics, Aero. E. 310 3 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 3 

Str. of Materials, E.M. 321, 322 3 3 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 3 

Tech. Writing, Eng. 321 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Elements of E.E., E.E. 320, 321 3 3 

**Electives 3 3 3 



20 20 20 



Senior Year 



General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Internal Comb. Engines, M.E. 421, 422, 423 3 3 3 

Airplane Design, Aero. E. 421, 422, 423 3 3 3 

Aerodynamics, Aero. E. 431, 432, 433 3 3 3 

Aero. Lab., Aero. E. 441, 442, 443 1 1 1 

Aircraft Engines, Aero. E. 451, 452 3 3 

Aircraft Manufacturing, Aero. E. 411, 412 3 3 

**Electives 3 3 3 

19 22 19 



t Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 

* Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 

** To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science IH and TV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science, 



The School of Engineering 109 

ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Ross Shumaker, Head of Department 

Professor J. D. Paulson 

Assistant Professors F. Carter Williams*, W. L. Baumgarten, 

James H. Grady 

The courses in Architecture and Architectural Engineering have been 
arranged after careful study of the best curricula offered by the leading 
educational institutions in the United States. These studies and many years 
of practical experience on the part of the faculty — both in the profession 
and in teaching, enable this Department to offer two allied courses of merit, 
proved by the very high proportion of graduates of this Department who 
successfully follow the profession of architect. 

The first three years of study in Architecture and in Architectural 
Engineering are very similar — so arranged that a student may transfer 
from one curriculum to the other until the end of the junior year — with 
a minimum loss of credits. After the third year, however, there is a wide 
divergence in the courses. 

Architecture is one of the most valuable and constructive professions in 
modern civilization. While an art, it must be firmly rooted in science; and 
the greater the project, the more positively this is true. Consequently, a 
student who is ambitious to be a great architect must master the artistic 
scope of architecture and also such science as is pertinent. To compress such 
a course into four years would necessarily eliminate some essential studies 
or reduce the content of all. Therefore the curriculum in Architecture is 
presented as a five-year course of study. 

Architectural Engineering is designed to prepare students for the pursuit 
of engineering as allied with architecture. Modern architecture has so many 
engineering aspects as in construction, fabrication and use of materials, 
provision of conveniences, that a student may well plan to specialize in 
some one of these fields. This four-year course provides a thorough training 
in the theoretical engineering of architecture and a sufficient knowledge 
of architecture as an art to enable the graduate to pursue any specialized 
branch he may select. Also it is possible for him to continue in the field of 
architecture and eventually obtain registration as a licensed architect. 

Equipment. — The Department of Architecture and Architectural Engi- 
neering occupies the third floor of Daniels Hall, an excellent location provid- 
ing adequate space in well-lighted and comfortable rooms. Large drawing 
rooms, library, lecture rooms, photographic dark room, and offices, over- 
looking the entire State College Campus, constitute an ideal physical lay- 
out for the Department. Drawing tables, stools, lockers, and essential 
furniture are all provided. 

Alumni. — Graduates of this department have little difficulty in normal 
times in finding employment and experience such that in a few years they 
can obtain registration as licensed architects. Many graduates have been 
conspicuously successful, and it is worthy of note that a very large propor- 
tion remain in the State of North Carolina or adjacent territory. 



• On military leave. 



110 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Surveying, C.E. s200, 3 credits, is required in the summer immediately following the 
freshman year. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, n, m, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312 3 3 

Elements of Architecture I, II, III, Arch. 201, 202, 203 . . 3 3 3 

Shades and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 

Pencil Sketching, Arch. 100 1 1 1 

Perspective Drawing, Arch. 206 1 

Military Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 (or electivet) 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

Sophomore Year 21 21 21 



Junior Year 



Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 313 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321, 322 

Materials Testing Laboratory, C.E. 322 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 

Sanitary and Mech. Equipment of Buildings, 

C.E. 865, 366 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Freehand Drawing 1, 2, 8, Arch. 101, 102, 103 2 

Intermediate Design B-l, B-2, B-3, 

Arch. 301, 302, 303 3 

History of Architecture 1, 2, 3, Arch. 321, 322, 323 3 

**Electtves 8 

Junior Year 20 

Summer Requirements : Six Weeks Industrial Employment. 









3 


3 


1 








8 


3 





3 


8 


2 


2 


3 


8 


3 


8 


3 


3 



21 



20 



Senior Year 



Reinforced Concrete, C.E. 421, 422 3 

Graphic Statics, C.E. 423, 424, 425 1 

Theory of Structures, C.E. 431a, 432a 3 

Photographic Practice, Arch. 804 

Specifications, Arch. 416 

Building Materials I, Arch. 409 3 

Electrical Equipment of Buildings, E.E. 843 

Business Law, Econ. 807 3 

Architectural Design, E-l, E-2, Arch. 851, 852 8 

Architectural Office Practice, Arch. 411, 412 

Architectural Estimates, Arch. 408 

Structural Design, C.E. 426, 427 

**Electives 8 

Senior Year 19 




1 

1 
8 

3 


3 
2 
S 
8 

19 



Total credits required for completion of course: 241. Degree: Bachelor of Architectural 
Engineering. 

All seniors will be required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 

* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the course listed French, M.L. 101. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 

** To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science in and TV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



The School of Engineering 



111 



CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE 



Freshman or First Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Mathematics 101, 102, 103 6 6 6 

Composition. Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

French, or Modern Language, M.L. 

101, 102, 201, or Equiv 3 

Pencil Sketching. Arch- 100 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 

Architectural Drawing, Arch. 107 

(or M.E. Equivalents 

Descriptive Geometry. M.E. 107 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 lor elective^ 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102. 103 1 1 

Freshman or First Year 21 21 21 

Summer Requirements: Surveying, C.E. s200, 3 credits. 



Sophomore or Second Year 



Calculus L IL HI, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 

Background for Modern Thought (or Elective) 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202 4 

Shades and Shadows, Arch. 205 2 

Engineering Mechanics. E.M. 301. 302 

Elements of Architecture L n. HI. Arch. 201. 202, 203 3 

History of Sculpture and Mural Decoration, Arch. 325 

Working Drawings, Arch. 305 

Perspective Drawing. Arch. 206 1 

Military Science H. Mil. 201. 202, 203 (or electivet) 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

Sophomore or Second Year 20 

Junior or Third Year 

Business English, Pub. Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English for M.L.I 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321, 322 

Materials Testing Laboratory, C.E. 322 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 3 

Sanitary and Mech. Equip, of Buildings, C.E. 364 3 

Freehand Drawing 1. 2, 3. Arch. 101, 102, 103 2 

Architectural Office Practice, Arch. 411, 412 

Intermediate Design B-l, B-2, B-3, 

Arch. 301, 302. 303 3 

History of Architecture 1, 2, 3, Arch. 321, 322, 323 3 

••Electives 3 

Junior or Third Year 20 

Summer Requirements : Six WeekB Industrial Employment. 



20 



3 
SI 



4 
3 


3 
3 
2 
2 

2 
1 

20 



3 
3 




s 

3 

3 

S 

3 

M 



Senior or Fourth Year 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Reinforced Concrete, C.E. 421, 422 3 

Graphic Statics, C.E. 423. 424. 425 1 

Electrical Equipment of Buildings. E.E. 343 

Architectural Design B-4, B-o, B-6, 

Arch. 353, 854, 355 * 

History of Architecture 4, Arch. 421 

Building Materials I, Arch. 409 3 

Professional Practice, Arch. 414 

Clay Modeling. Arch. 114 1 

Photographic Practice, Arch. 304 

••Electives 3 

Senior or Fourth Year 20 



3 
3 

1 


6 

3 



1 



3 

20 



3 

1 

3 

6 




1 
1 
1 

3 

19 



Economics, Psychology, 



t Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 

•• To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science HI and IV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



112 State College Catalog 

Professional or Fifth Year 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Specifications, Arch. 416 3 

Theory of Structures, C.E. 431a, 432a 3 8 

Architectural Design A-l, A-2, A-3, 

Arch. 401, 402, 403 6 6 6 

Freehand Drawing 4, 5, 6, Arch. 211. 212, 213 3 3 S 

Architectural Composition, Arch. 407 2 

City Planning, Arch. 415 2 

Architectural Estimates, Arch. 408 2 

••Electives S 6 6 

Fifth Year 20 20 20 

Total Credits : 306. Completion of the course to be recognized by granting the degree of 
Bachelor of Architecture. 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

Professor A. F. Greaves-Walker*, Head of the Department; Associate 
Professor R. L. Stone, Acting Head of the Department. 

The Department of Ceramic Engineering occupies its own building, which 
contains classrooms, a design room, a chemical laboratory, an equipment 
laboratory, and a kiln laboratory. 

The Equipment Laboratory contains an adequate variety of machines for 
preparing and processing ceramic bodies of all kinds and making ceramic 
products on a laboratory scale. It also contains the necessary equipment 
for carrying on ceramic research, and the testing of materials and products. 

The Kiln Laboratory contains twelve kilns and furnaces of different types, 
which provide for the firing or testing of all ceramic materials and products. 

Ceramic Engineering includes those phases of engineering which have to 
do with the study of the nonmetallic, inorganic minerals, except fuels and 
ores as such, and the manufacture of products therefrom. The nonmetallic 
minerals compose over 90 per cent of the earth's surface, and the industries 
based on them rank above the automobile, and the iron and steel industries, 
in value of product. Principal among these products are those made of clay 
and associated minerals, such as building brick, hollow tile, sewer pipe, 
refractories, wall and floor tile, tableware, pottery, electrical porcelain, 
chemical and sanitary stoneware, fiat glass, chemical and table glassware, 
enameled iron and steel, portland and hydraulic cements, and limes. 

North Carolina has enormous deposits of shale, clay, kaolin, feldspar, 
sand, limestone, and other ceramic minerals, equal in quality to any others 
in the United States; with the introduction of modern processes and 
methods will produce in future quantities of ceramic products and ade- 
quately develop its ceramic industries. 



* On leave to the WPB. 

** To be selected from the following fields : Humanities. Military Science m and IV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social 



The School of Engineering 113 

The demand for ceramic engineers has far exceeded the supply for a 
number of years past, there being fewer than 100 ceramic engineers grad- 
uated in the United States each year. It is with the idea of supplying this 
demand and developing the latent resources of North Carolina that a four- 
year curriculum in Ceramic Engineering, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Ceramic Engineering, is offered. 

The instruction in Ceramic Engineering is enriched by the intensive 
investigation of ceramic resources and manufactures constantly under way 
in connection with the Engineering Experiment Station. Students will have 
the great advantage of these investigations along with other instruction. 

Courses in advanced subjects for graduate students are offered in Ad- 
vanced Refractories and Furnaces, Industrial Adaptability of Clays, Design- 
ing of Ceramic Equipment and Plants, Advanced Silicate Technology, Glass 
Technology, and Ceramic Research. 

The curriculum in Ceramic Engineering, which has been accredited by the 
Engineers Council for Professional Development, contains fundamental 
courses, and courses in Ceramic, Geological, Civil, Electrical, and Mechan- 
ical Engineering, as well as in Economics, to provide for the general train- 
ing in engineering with the particular study of Ceramic Engineering. The 
Ceramic Engineering courses consist of the theoretical and practical study 
of the mining, manufacturing, and testing of ceramic materials and 
products as well as the design of ceramic equipment and plants. 

Graduates in Ceramic Engineering are employed in the ceramic industries 
as plant executives, research engineers, plant-control engineers, sales 
engineers, product-control engineers, plant designers and constructors, 
equipment manufacturers, consulting engineers, and ceramic chemists and 
technologists. Graduates of the Department at State College, which ranks 
fourth in registration in the United States, are successfully holding 
positions in all of these branches. 

CURRICULUM IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Surveying, C.E. s200, 3 credits, is required in the summer immediately following the 
freshman j ear. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, H, m, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 212 4 

Physics for Engineers. Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Engineering Geology, Geol. 220 3 

Mineralogy, Geol. 230 3 

♦Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

Ceramic Materials, Cer. E. 202 3 

Ceramic and Mining Processes, Cer. E. 203 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

21 21 20 

* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may^substitute for the courses listed Elementary German, M.L. 102. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 



114 State College Catalog 

Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 3 8 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 8 

Drying Fundamentals and Practice, Cer. E. 301 3 

Firing Fundamentals and Practice, Cer. E. 302 3 

Ceramic Calculations, Cer. E. 303 3 

Ceramic Products, Cer. E. 305 3 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307, 308 3 3 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I, M.E. 313, 314 .... 1 1 

Materials Testing Laboratory, C.E. 322 1 

Thermal Mineralogy, Geol. 338 3 

Physical Chemistry, Chem. 331 5 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

**Electives 3 3 3 

21 20 21 
Summer requirements : Six weeks industrial employment. 

Senior Year 

Refractories, Cer. E. 405 3 

Silicates, I and II, Cer. E. 403, 404 3 3 

Ceramic Laboratory, Cer. E. 411, 412, 413 3 3 3 

Ceramic Designing, Cer. E. 414, 415 4 4 

Pyrometry, Cer. E. .401 1 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 3 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, E.E. 320, 321 .... 3 3 

Strength of Materials. E.M. 322 3 

Optical Mineralogy, Geol. 431, 432, 433 3 3 3 

••Electives 3 3 3 

19 19 19 
All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor E. E. Randolph, Head of the Department 

Professors B. E. Lauer*, T. C. Doody; Assistant Professors R. Bright, 

J. F. Seelyf; Instructor R. L. Overcash.f 

Facilities. — The laboratories of the Department of Chemical Engineering 
are in Winston Hall. They consist of a Unit Operations laboratory; an 
exhibit study room; Water and Engineering-Materials Laboratory; Electro- 
chemical Engineering Laboratory; Fuel- and Gas-Technology Room; Ex- 
perimental Rayon outfit; Destructive Distillation Installation; Dark Room 
for metallographic and micro-photographic study; the Graduate Research 
Laboratory; Unit-Processes Laboratory; Plant- and Equipment-Design 
Laboratory; Cellulose Laboratory. 

The Chemical Engineering laboratories have suitable equipment, much 
of it specially designed, for the study of the main processes and plant prob- 



f On leave. 

* On leave to U. S. Army. 
** To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science UI and TV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



The School of Engineering 115 

lems of the chemical engineering industries. They are supplied with direct 
and alternating current, gas, water, steam, compressed air, electric motors, 
generators, and storage batteries. They are equipped with precision and 
control instruments, such as refractometer, surface-tension apparatus, 
polariscope, potentiometer, microscopes, colorimeter, calorimeters, tint- 
photometer, thermocouples, and optical pyrometer. They are equipped also 
with filter presses, centrifuges, crushers, grinders and pulverizers, vacuum 
pan, stills, autoclave, jacketed kettle, gas, water, and electrical meters, 
equipment designed end built, such as double-effect evaporators, heat ex- 
changers, flow-of-fluid experimental equipment for orifices, venturi meters, 
pitot tubes, weir, and gauges, column still, absorption tower, crystallizer, 
rotary, vacuum and tunnel driers, gas furnace, resistance and arc electric 
furnace, rotary vacuum filter, and humidifier. An experimental refinery and 
hydrogenation plant for vegetable and other oils has been installed. A 
complete permutit softening equipment forms a unit of an experimental 
water-purification and -treatment system. In addition the nearby industrial 
plants offer opportunity for study of plant operation and problems. 

Recently added to the Department of Chemical Engineering is a valuable 
exhibit room, where products of many chemical engineering industries are 
exhibited and used for instruction. They are arranged in the form of flow 
sheets showing the various steps in manufacturing processes. 

The Department Shop is supplied with machines and tools for building 
and repairing equipment. 

Curriculum. — This curriculum provides thorough training in unit opera- 
tions and unit processes, and in the methods of manufacturing industrial 
chemical products on a large scale. It includes basic courses in Chemistry, 
Physics, Mathematics, and fundamental Engineering as a background for 
the professional Chemical Engineering training of this Department, so that 
the graduate is prepared to enter any field of applied chemical work as a 
junior engineer. 

The Chemical Engineer is expected to determine the process, the material, 
the design, and the economic capacity of the equipment needed. Efficient 
production requires exact control in every stage of the process. He must 
devise efficient and economical methods, discover sources of loss and the 
remedy, recover by-products, convert waste products, and make industrial 
calculations of input, output, efficiency, quality, and cost. 

North Carolina is a center of chemical industries in the South, with an 
annual output estimated at approximately one-fourth billion dollars. Some 
of the largest chemical industries of the country are located in this State, 
manufacturing such products as paper, fertilizers, vegetable oils, food 
products, leather, bromine, aluminum, metallurgical products, paints and 
varnishes. Such industries require properly trained Chemical Engineers. 
Chemical Engineering offers therefore inviting opportunities to render 
distinct service to the welfare and comfort of the people. 



116 State College Catalog 

Graduates find employment in such fields as control work and industrial 
research; as plant operators, superintendents of chemical industries, 
municipal engineers, engineers in the State and Federal health service, 
consulting chemical engineers, manufacturers of chemicals and of chemical 
equipment, chemical salesmen and representatives, developers of new 
chemical industries. 

Ninety-three percent of the graduates of this Department are success- 
fully engaged in Chemical Engineering work. Because chemical problems 
are intricate, and scientific chemical-control work in industries is required, 
salaries for Chemical Engineering graduates are inviting. Many graduates 
of this Department now hold very responsible positions. 

The Department cooperates with the State Departments in their chemical 
problems. Facilities are available for graduate work, upon which emphasis 
is placed. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 
Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I. II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English . 3 8 3 

Introduction to Chemical Engineering, 

Chem. E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 2 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 212, 213 4 4 

Shopwork, M.E. 122, 123 1 1 

fMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

20 20 20 

Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 3 8 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 3 

Organic Chemistry, Chem. 421, 422, 423 4 4 4 

Chemical Engineering I, Chem. E. 311, 312, 313 3 3 8 

Industrial Stoichiometry, Chem. E. 331 3 

Chemical Engineering Laboratory I, 

Chem. E. 321, 322, 323 1 1 1 

Physical Chemistry, Chem. 431, 432 4 4 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, E.E. 320, 321 3 3 

Machine Shop I, M.E. 225, 226 1 1 

Electives 3 3 3 

22 22 20 

Summer requirements : Six weeks industrial employment 
••Pilot Plant Practice — 3 credits. 

* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the courses listed German, M.L. 102, 103, 104, 203 or equivalent. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History, Modern Language, Sociology. 
** Elective Summer of 1946. 



The School of Engineering 117 

Senior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Principles of Chemical Engineering, 

Chem. E. 411, 412, 413 3 

Water Treatment, Chem. E. 421 3 

Chemistry of Engineering Materials, Chem. E. 422 3 

Electrochemical Engineering, Chem. E. 423 3 

Chemical Engineering Lab. and Design II, 

Chem. E. 431, 432, 433 2 . 2 2 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307, 308 3 

Mineralogy, Geol. 230 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 

Elementary Modern Physics, Phys. 407 3 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 20 20 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor C. L. Mann, Head of the Department 

Professor T. S. Johnson* 

Associate Professors C. R. Bramer, R. E. Stiemke* 

Assistant Professors C. M. Lambe, W. F. Babcock 

Instructors E. W. Price, Jr., M. E. Ray 

The Department of Civil Engineering is located in the Civil Engineering 
Building in which the offices, classrooms, laboratories, and instrument rooms 
were designed and built to provide suitable facilities for efficient teaching 
and laboratory demonstrations. 

The equipment common to general civil engineering includes surveying 
instruments, transits, levels, plane tables, current meters, sextants, plani- 
meters, calculating machines, blueprint apparatus, lantern slides, and mov- 
ing-picture machine. Special equipment includes precise surveying instru- 
ments and such equipment as Beggs deformeter and other of this class. 

The equipment in the Materials-Testing Laboratory, in the Cement- and 
Bituminous-Materials-Testing Laboratory, and in the Sanitary Laboratory, 
fully meets the present-day requirements for laboratory instruction. 

The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has been furnished and equipped with 
the newest apparatus now used in laboratories engaged in the study of the 
action of soils relative to engineering problems dealing with structures, 
foundations, and highway subgrades. 

Civil Engineering is the oldest and most general of all the branches of 
modern engineering; in fact, from it all of the others have developed. The 
usefulness of Civil Engineering is so well recognized that a student who 
does not have a strong predilection for some other special branch may be 
safely advised to study Civil Engineering. 

The Civil Engineering curriculum in the School of Engineering has been 
accredited by the Engineers' Council for Professional Development. It is a 

* On leave. 



118 State College Catalog 

well-balanced course of study, upon the completion of which the graduate 
is equipped to assume the duties of junior engineer in any of the following 
important fields : design, construction, operation, or testing of water-power 
developments, railroads, highways, water supplies, sewerage systems. 

The Civil Engineering Department offers a student the choice of the 
following options: 

General Civil 

Construction and Building Materials 

Sanitary 

Transportation 

The first two years of these curricula are the same. They begin to dif- 
ferentiate slightly in the junior year and more decidedly in the senior year; 
essentially, however, they are the same and are designed to develop in the 
student engineer a well-trained mind, one which reasons logically, ac- 
curately, quickly. This is accomplished by a thorough training in applied 
mathematics and physics, which is supplemented with practical work in the 
field, drafting rooms, and laboratories. 

More men are practicing Civil Engineering in North Carolina than any 
other branch of engineering, and it is to train young men to serve under 
those already in the profession and subsequently to follow in their footsteps 
that the Civil Engineering curricula are offered. 

City Management. — Students in Civil Engineering may by proper selec- 
tion of their electives during the junior and senior years prepare themselves 
for work eventually leading to the position of City Manager. 



CONSTRUCTION & BUILDING MATERIALS ENGINEERING 

Professor C. R. Bramer, Faculty Adviser 

North Carolina's progress indicates great increase in building and general 
construction. Construction needs more and better-trained men to meet the 
immediate demands as well as to anticipate the increased demands of the 
future. The contractor, to be successful, must conduct his business sys- 
tematically and economically. Therefore, he must learn not only general 
engineering technique, but also something of architecture and business 
methods and practices; he must delve further into construction and learn 
the principles involved, the methods, practices, and successful policies in 
use. 

The contents of the curriculum in this option represent a thorough study 
of the needs of the industries operating in this field. This curriculum, 
combining construction with building materials, has been adopted to re- 
place the former option in Construction Engineering given in the Depart- 
ment of Civil Engineering. It is believed that this will result in improving 
the training for men entering the field of contracting and construction and 
it also has the advantage of including subjects essential to those entering 
the building materials industry. 



The School of Engineering 119 

Combined into this curriculum are the fundamental courses in the Civil 
Engineering curriculum, courses in Architecture, courses dealing with 
business, and special courses covering construction and building materials 
in the junior and senior years. 

The classroom work in this option is supplemented by frequent inspection 
trips to projects under construction; particular emphasis is placed upon 
estimating, modern methods, and management of operations. 

SANITARY ENGINEERING 

Professor R. E. Stiemke, Faculty Adviser 

Because Sanitary Engineering so vitally concerns the health of the 
people, and because of the progress in North Carolina in this field, the 
demand for men trained in Sanitary Engineering has increased. 

The Sanitary Engineering option is offered to meet this need. In the 
main it is the curriculum in General Civil Engineering with selected courses 
in Bacteriology, Chemical Engineering, and Sanitary Engineering. 

As there is a large demand in this State for men familiar with the design 
and operation of water and sewage plants, special attention is given to the 
actual design and practical operation of water-purification and sewage- 
disposal plants. 

The Sanitary Engineering Laboratory equipment is similar to that used 
in water- and sewage-plant laboratories; the student makes the same tests, 
using standard methods, as are made in water- and sewage-plant lab- 
oratories. 

The City of Raleigh water-purification plant and the College gymnasium 
swimming-pool filter plant are available for practical demonstration and 
instruction. Through the cooperation of the Bureau of Sanitary Engineer- 
ing, State Board of Health, located in Raleigh, the student has an oppor- 
tunity to study all phases of its works, not only in Sanitary Engineering, 
but also in the broad field of public health. 

Upon graduation, students are prepared to hold positions as water- and 
sewage-plant operators, assistant resident engineers with private consulting 
engineers, junior engineers with state boards of health, and with the 
United States Public Health Service. After a few years of experience, 
graduates may be expected to advance to positions as superintendents of 
waterworks, city engineers and city managers, consulting engineers, state 
sanitary engineers, and senior engineers with the United States Public 
Health Service. 

The curriculum of the Sanitary Engineering Option has been reviewed 
and the Laboratory and equipment inspected by the Engineers' Council 
for Professional Development. The Council has indicated its approval by 
accrediting this option. 

TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING 

Professor W. F. Babcock, Faculty Adviser 

Advancement in study and improvements in construction in the ways and 
means of modern-day travel have progessed so rapidly in the last decade 



120 State College Catalog 

that each division presents a field of study and investigation of its own. 
The railways, the highways, the inland waterways, and the airways, each 
performing to some extent a specific purpose, have covered our country 
with a transportation system far superior to any other in the world. 

In order that young engineers may be trained to carry on and continue 
this expansion, specialized training in colleges must be available to students 
who wish to follow in this field. 

Among the first college curriculum subdivision in the civil engineering 
profession was railroad engineering; this was followed by highway engi- 
neering; now that airplane travel has become so essential, it is found 
necessary to associate this means of travel with railroads and highways. 
With this in mind, the Department of Civil Engineering is offering the 
option Transportation Engineering, which includes a study of railroad 
maintenance of way, highway location and pavement design, economics of 
locations, waterways, airports, public relations and regulations, coordina- 
tion of the different forms of transportation. 

The curriculum of this option replaces the option formerly offered in 
Highway Engineering and follows along the same lines, broadening the 
scope of study to cover the field of transportation. The curriculum for the 
first two years is identical with and for the third year is practically the 
same as the regular Civil Engineering curriculum. In the fourth year, 
however, the student who specializes in Transportation Engineering is 
given more specific instructions in those subjects pertaining to the various 
means of transportation. 

CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

General Civil Engineering Construction and Building 

Sanitary Engineering Materials Engineering 

Transportation Engineering 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 
Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Engineering Geology, Geol. 220 3 

Theoretical Surveying, C.E. 221, 222, 223 3 3 3 

Field Surveying, C.E. 225, 227 1 1 

Mapping, C.E. 226 1 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312 3 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

21 21 21 

Surveying, C.E. s310, concurrent with Summer School, 3 credits. 



* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the courses listed Elementary French, M.L. 101, 102, 201, or equivalent. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 



The School of Engineering 



121 



Junior Year 



Required 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 313 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321, 322 3 3 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 



9 6 

Choice must be made of one of the following: 



6 



GENERAL CIVIL OPTION 



Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321 3 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 3 

Transportation Engineering I, C.E. 372, 373 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Hydraulics, C.E. 343 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307 

,Electives 3 

18 



3 

S 
3 



6 

21 



3 
18 



CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS OPTION 



Construction Engineering I, C.E. 362, 363 

Sanitary and Mechanical Equipment of Buildings, 

C.E. 365 3 

Specifications, C.E. 367 

Architectural Details, Arch. 306 

Building Materials, Arch. 409, 410 

Principles of Accounting, Econ. 301, 302 3 

Applied Psychology for Engineers, Psychol. 335, 336 ... 3 

1 Electives 3 

21 






3 
3 
3 
3 

21 




8 
2 
8 


3 

20 



SANITARY OPTION 



Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321 3 

Transportation Engineering I, C.E. 372, 373 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Hydraulics, C.E. 343 

General Bacteriology, Bot. 402 

Aquatic Biology, Bot. 473 

Sanitary Engineering, C.E. 383 

Treatment of Water and Sewage, Chem. E. 308 3 

Electives 3 

18 



o 
3 

2 
3 

3 

20 



TRANSPORTATION OPTION 



Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321 3 

Transportation Engineering I, C.E. 372, 373 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Hydraulics, C.E. 343 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307 

Accounting for Engineers, Econ. 212 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 

Electives 6 

21 



3 





3 


3 


3 








3 





3 








3 








8 


3 


3 


21 


21 



1 To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science ni and IV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



122 



State College Catalog 



Senior Year 

Required 

credits 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Reinforced Concrete, C.E. 421, 422 3 3 

Graphic Statics, C.E. 423 1 

Theory of Structures, C.E. 431, 432 3 3 

Structural Design, C.E. 426, 427 3 3 

7 9 8 

Choice must be made of one of the following: 



GENERAL CIVIL OPTION 

Materials Testing Laboratory, C.E. 322, 323 

Applied Astronomy, C.E. 453 4 

Transportation Engineering IL C.E. 471, 472 3 

Sanitary Engineering Laboratory, C.E. 481, 482 1 

Waterworks, C.E. 485 3 

Sewerage, C.E. 486 

Soil Mechanics, C.E. 435 

Aerial Surveying, C.E. 455 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Electives 3 

21 



20 



CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS OPTION 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321 3 

Electrical Equipment of Buildings, E.E. 343 

Construction Engineering II, C.E. 461, 462, 463 3 

Marketing Methods and Sales Management, Econ. 311, 

312, or Corporation Finance, Econ. 320, and Labor 

Problems, Econ. 331 3 

Personnel Management, Econ. 333 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Electives 3 

19 21 



3 








3 


3 


8 


3 








3 





3 


3 


3 



18 



SANITARY OPTION 

Materials Testing Laboratory, C.E. 322, 323 

Soil Mechanics, C.E. 435 

Sanitary Engineering Laboratory, C.E. 481, 482 1 

Waterworks, C.E. 485 3 

Sewerage, C.E. 486 

Water Purification, C.E. 488 

Sewage Disposal, C.E. 489 

Financing of Sanitary Utilities, C.E. 483 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Technical Writing L Eng. 321 

Electives 6 

20 



20 



1 
8 

I 



I 

3 
S 
I 

s 

3 

19 



TRANSPORTATION OPTION 

Materials Testing Laboratory, C.E. 322, 323 

Applied Astronomy, C.E. 453 4 

Transportation Engineering II, C.E. 471, 472 3 

Transportation Design. C.E. 473 2 

Highway Engineering, C.E. 474, 475 

Soil Mechanics, C.E. 435 

Business Organization. Econ. 305 

Electives 3 

19 



1 


1 








3 











3 


8 





8 





8 


3 


6 



19 



19 



NOTE : For the duration of the war, the above junior and senior curricula will be superseded 
by the consolidated curriculum shown on the following page. 



The School of Engineering 



123 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR CONSOLIDATED CURRICULUM IN CIVIL 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TO BE EFFECTIVE FOR THE 

DURATION OF THE WAR 



Junior Year 



COURSES First Term 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 313 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321, 322 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321 3 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 3 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Hydraulics, C.E. 343 

Transportation Engineering I, C.E. 372, 373 3 

Transportation Engineering II, C.E. 471 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Surveying, C.E. s310 A, B, C 1 

Electives 3 

19 



CREDITS 




Second Term 


Third Term 








3 


3 


3 











3 








3 


3 








3 


3 








3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 



22 



19 



Senior Year 

Reinforced Concrete, C.E. 421, 422 3 

Graphic Statics, C.E. 423 1 

Structural Design, C.E. 426, 427 

Theory of Structures, C.E. 431, 432 3 

Soil Mechanics, C.E. 435 3 

Applied Astronomy, C.E. 453 

Aerial Surveying, C.E. 455 3 

Sanitary Engineering Laboratory, C.E. 481, 482 

Waterworks C.E., 485 

Sewerage, C.E. 486 

Materials Testing Laboratory, C.E. 322, 323 1 

Construction Engineering I, C.E. 362, 363 

Specifications, C.E. 367 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Electives 3 

20 



3 











3 


3 


3 














4 








1 


1 


3 








3 


1 





3 


3 





3 








3 


3 



20 



20 



DIESEL ENGINEERING 

In co-operation with the Navy Department, the college recently has com- 
pleted a new Diesel Engineering Laboratory Building. The building cost 
approximately $200,000 and the naval equipment installations are complete 
and modern. 

The facilities of the Diesel Laboratory are now being devoted entirely to 
the war program through the training of officers for Diesel propelled ships 
in the United States Navy. 

It is anticipated at the termination of the war that the building and equip- 
ment will be available for regular college instruction including both basic 
fundamental courses for undergraduate students and special courses in 
design, production, and research for graduate students. 

Beginning students interested in this field, for the present, register in 
Mechanical Engineering. Diesel Engineering is a specialty within this field 
and the facilities for Diesel instruction will undoubtedly be available for 
civilian students by the time they have received their fundamental training 
in Mechanical Engineering. 



124 State College Catalog 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor R. S. Fouraker, Acting Chairman 

Professors William Hand Browne, Jr., J. E. Lear; Associate Professors 
K. B. Glenn. L. M. Keever; Assistant Professors R. J. Pearsall, E. W. 
Winkler; Laboratory Technician J. H. Nichols. 

Buildings and Equipment, — The Department is housed in Daniels Hall. 
This is an L-shaped building, the main part of which is four stories of brick, 
stone and steel construction, with a two-story wing of shop construction. 

Laboratories. — The laboratories can be classified as follows: Dynamo, 
Communications and Transmission; Photometric, Measurements, Standards, 
High-Tension, and Electronics. The Dynamo, High-Tension, and Electronics 
Laboratories are located in the wing; all the others are in the basement of 

Daniels Hall. 

The Dynamo Laboratory is sixty by eighty feet in area. Here the charac- 
teristics and operating conditions of representative types of machines are 
studied. This laboratory has a total of approximately 300 kva of motors 
and generators (about 50 in all). There are about 150 kilowatts available 
in motor-generator sets, and rotary converters. 

There are also available approximately 150 kva of transformers for tests. 

The laboratory is well supplied with accessory equipment, such as load 
mate, field rheostats, starting boxes, prony brakes, inductances, capacitors, 
and other devices. 

The Communications and Transmission Laboratory is equipped for 
measurements and tests on communication and power-transmission circuits. 
It contains an outstanding artifical power-transmission line on which 
power-transmission-line characteristics can be duplicated for study and 
tasting. A complete long-line telephone system, with two two-way repeaters 
and associated apparatus, arranged for all usual and several special tests, 
is another feature of this laboratory. Other equipment for study and test 
includes an artificial line for the study of corona effects, artificial telephone 
lines, telephone central-station equipment, telegraph equipment, teletype- 
writer equipment, and a complete 100-line private automatic exchange with 
its associated appliances. Test equipment includes standard oscillators, 
transmission-measuring sets, noise-measuring sets, power-level instruments, 
audibility meters, attenuators, and apparatus for measuring distortion. 

The Photometric Laboratory is housed in a room especially fitted up for 
the purpose. The equipment includes photometric standard lamps, two 
300-cm. Leeds & Northrup photometer bars, a 36" LTbrecht spherical 
photometer, two Macbeth-Evans Illuminometers, several Weston foot- 
candle meters, and other portable photometers. There is also the usual 
list of accessories, such as sight boxes of the Lummer-Brodhun and flicker 
types, rotating disks, and screens. 



The School of Engineering 125 

The Measurements Laboratory is arranged for making standard and 
special tests and measurements on the fundamental electrical units. The 
apparatus includes standards of resistance, inductance and capacitance, 
with special bridges for the measurement of each, Fahy permeameter and 
Epstein core-loss test sets for magnetic measurements on iron and steel, 
a double-bridge and oil-bath arrangement for conductivity measurements, 
and other special test appliances. 

The Standards Laboratory is arranged for making accurate calibration 
tests on all types of electrical instruments. There are two specially designed 
test tables equipped with convenient means of controlling current and 
voltage. A large number of high-quality instruments of all types is pro- 
vided. These include standard cells, a Leeds-Northrup Type-K and a Queen- . 
Gray Potentiometer, standard voltmeters, ammeters, wattmeters, watt-hour 
meters, transformers, resistances, condensers and inductances. Certificates 
of accuracy from the National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D. C, 
have been obtained for many of these instruments. Special equipment used 
includes a sine-wave generator, a constant-speed frequency set, Silsbee 
current- and potential-transformer test sets, and others. 

The High-Tension Laboratory has a 7%-kva, 50,000-volt, and a 10-kva, 
100,000-volt transformer. The induction regulators, which go with these 
transformers make it possible to vary the voltage from zero to 150,000 
volts. There is also standard oil-testing equipment for testing transformer 
oil, a standard spark gap, and numerous insulators of various types for 
carrying on routine tests. Frequent use is made of the cathode-ray oscillo- 
graph in studying surges and other disturbances. 

The Electronics Laboratory. — The Electronics Laboratory is arranged for 
testing electronic devices and their associated equipment and circuits. It 
is supplied with the various types of electron tubes, including vacuum 
tubes, gaseous tubes, phototubes, mercury-vapor tubes, cathode-ray tubes, 
and apparatus for operating and testing them. The test equipment includes 
vacuum-tube bridge and test sets, oscilloscopes, television equipment, and 
the various sensitive instruments required for electronic measurements. 

Instrument Room and Shop. — A centrally located Instrument Room serves 
all of the laboratories. Instruments are issued upon requisition and re- 
turned at the end of the laboratory period. They are kept in repair by a 
competent man, who divides his time between the care of the instruments 
and the Departmental Shop, which adjoins the Instrument Room. The Shop 
is fitted up with sufficient tools for making all minor repairs to laboratory 
equipment, as well as apparatus for special research. 

The Storage-Battery Room contains two 120-volt, 100-ampere-hour bat- 
teries; two 12-volt, 200-ampere-hour batteries, the complete battery and 
counter emf cells for operating the automatic telephone station, and port- 
table cells of various types. Motor-generator sets, and mercury-vapor and 
tungar rectifiers are provided for charging the batteries. 



126 State College Catalog 

The Purpose of the Curriculum is to train young men for active 
work in a wide and diversified field. The electrical industry demands, 
above all else, a thorough preparation in the sciences underlying all 
branches of engineering, a broad foundation in fundamental electrical 
theory, and a clear understanding of the characteristics of electrical ma- 
chinery and systems. These factors are essential for success, whether it be 
in the design and manufacture of electrical equipment, in power production 
and utilization, or the fields of communication and signaling, since in all 
these branches of the industry technical advances are being made with 
increasing rapidity. With this object in view, the curriculum in Electrical 
Engineering includes comprehensive training in mathematics, physics, and 
chemistry — the fundamental sciences — and adequate training in allied 
branches of engineering. All courses are accompanied by coordinated work 
in the laboratory and intensive drill in the applications of theory by means 
of carefully planned problems. In the senior year, the student is offered two 
options, one in the fundamentals of communication, the other in the field of 
industrial applications. 

The curriculum includes a thorough drill in the preparation of technical 
reports. There is a decided trend in industry to select for high administra- 
tive positions men who have had good technical training and have in 
addition developed executive ability. The electives included in the curriculum 
in Electrical Engineering enable a student inclined toward executive work 
to take nonprofessional courses which deal with the economic and sociolog- 
ical problems of the day. On the other hand, those students who prefer the 
more technical phases of engineering can select electives specially helpful in 
that particular branch of the profession into which they wish to go. Stu- 
dents are urged to plan as early as possible a worth-while group of elective 
courses so chosen as to round out their curriculum. 

Each student is also required to spend at least six weeks in satisfactory 
industrial employment before receiving his degree. 

Close coordination in the work of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers is effected through a student branch at the College, which meets 
twice a month, through the State Section of the Institute, which meets 
several times during the year, and through the regional meetings of the 
Institute, one section of which is organized as a student-activities con- 
ference. 



The School of Engineering 127 

CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Surveying, C.E. s200, 3 credits, is required in the summer immediately following the 
freshman year. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Forge and Welding Practice, M.E. 128 3 

tElectrical Engineering Fundamentals, E.E. 201, 202 .. 3 3 

^Military Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

20 20 20 

Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 3 3 

Elementary Mechanism, M.E. 215, 216, 217 1 1 1 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307, 308, 309 3 3 3 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I, M.E. 313, 314, 315 111 

Fundamentals of Electronics, E.E. 315 3 

Differential Equations, Math. 431a 3 

Elementary Modern Physics, Phys. 407 3 

Electrical Engineering, E.E. 301, 302, 303 4 4 4 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory I, E.E. 311, 312, 313 2 2 2 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 20 20 

Summer requirements : Six weeks industrial employment 

Senior Year 

Engineering Economics, I.E. 301 3 

Accounting for Engineers, Econ. 212 

Business Law, Econ. 307 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 320 3 

Electrical Industry, I.E. 402 

Fluid Mechanics, Hydraulic Machinery, E.M. 330, 331 . . 3 

Illumination, E.E. 437 

Technical Writing, Eng. 321 

Alternating Current Machinery, E.E. 401, 402 4 

Electric Transmission, E.E. 403 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory, E.E. 411, 412, 413 ... 2 

First Option 

Electric Power Applications, E.E. 421, 422, 423 3 

Electric Communication, E.E. 425, 426, 427 3 

Second Option 

Electives 3 3 3 

21 21 21 

NOTE: For the duration of the war the above curriculum will be superseded by the modified 
curriculum shown on the following page. 









3 








3 








3 





3 








3 





3 


4 








4 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 



* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the courses listed a Modern Language. 

t Sophomore class is divided into two sections, one half taking Fundamentals and Metal 
Work as scheduled, the other half taking the Metal Shop during the Fall Term and the 
Electrical Engineering Fundamentals the second and third terms. 

t Or 6 credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 



128 State College Catalog 

CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

(Modified curriculum as now offered for the duration of the war) 
For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Surveying, C.E. b200, 3 credits, is required in the summer immediately following the 
freshman year. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus L II, m, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

•Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

Genera] Economics, Econ. 201, 202 3 3 

Forge and Welding Practice, M.E. 128 3 

Electrical Engineering Fundamentals, E.E. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

JMilitary Science TL Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

20 20 20 

Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 

Elementary Mechanism, M.E. 215, 216, 217 1 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307, 308, 309 3 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I, M.E. 313 1 

Differential Equations, Math. 431a 3 

Electrical Engineering, E.E. 301, 302, 303 4 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory I, E.E. 311, 312, 313 . 2 

Fundamentals of Electronics, E.E. 315, 316 

Electives 3 

20 : 20 

Summer requirements : Six weeks industrial employment 

Senior Year 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 3 

Engineering Economics, I.E. 301 3 

Technical Writing, Eng. 321 3 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 3 

Alternating Current Machinery, E.E. 401, 402 4 4 

Electric Transmission, E.E. 403 4 

E.E. Laboratory, E.E. 411, 412, 413 2 2 2 

Electric Communications E.E. 425, 426, 427 3 3 3 

Ultra High Frequency Techniques, E.E. 445, 446, 447 .. 4 4 4 

Electives 3 3 3 

22 19 19 



3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


8 














4 


4 


2 


2 


4 


4 


3 


3 



• Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the courses listed a Modern Language. 

+ Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Language, Sociology. 



The School of Engineering 129 

GENERAL ENGINEERING 

The Curriculum in Engineering Leading to the Degree, 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering 

Professor G. Wallace Smith, Administrative Officer 

We live in a world of applied science; for that reason, the cultured 
gentleman of the twentieth century must know something of Engineering. 

Engineering is not only a means of earning a livelihood; it is also a 
culture, a manner of thinking and living. It is founded upon the pure 
sciences of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry. It deals largely with 
Materials, Methods, Men, and Money. There appears to be an increasing 
demand for a curriculum which will offer to young men the opportunity to 
study Engineering as a field of culture, with no specific purpose of speciali- 
zation but solely with the idea of obtaining a well-balanced thoroughly 
rigorous training and discipline in the basic principles of Engineering. 
Largely for this reason this curriculum is offered, and it omits no essential 
foundation stone in the present recognized Engineering curricula. The 
freshman year is identical with the other Engineering curricula. The 
sophomore, junior, and senior years maintain the basic fundamental 
courses, but the special technical courses as required in the other Engineer- 
ing curricula are replaced by electives, which may be chosen according to 
the major interest of the student. However, a number of these electives 
must be chosen from courses that are outside of the technical and special 
technical fields. 

The advantages of this curriculum are: 

The student acquires a broad training in the basic principles of 
Engineering. 

He has more electives and more freedom in the choice of these electives 
than in the specialized curricula. 

If the student upon entering college is in doubt as to what particular field 
of specialization he desires, this curriculum will enable him to start his 
academic training and complete his first full year without losing time or 
credits required in any of the specialized curricula. 

In his second year the student will receive the basic training required of 
all the engineering curricula and have an opportunity to elect courses that 
will prepare him for future study in some particular field of specialization 
in which he might be interested. 

The proper use of electives throughout the last three years will, therefore, 
enable the student to complete the requirements for a degree in this cur- 
riculum and at the same time obtain a considerable number of credits for 
use in some specialized curricula, so that he can return to school for not 
more than one year and receive a degree in the particular field of study in 
which he has become interested. 



130 State College Catalog 

CURRICULUM IN GENERAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 
Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, II, III, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

Physics, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

2 Military Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 or Alternate 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

*Electives 6 6 6 

20 20 20 

Junior Year 6 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 8 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 8 

Engineering Geology, Geol. 220 3 

Theimodynamics, M.E. 307, 308 3 8 

Mechanical Engr. Lab. I, M.E. 313, 314 1 1 

Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203, or other Social Science.. 3 3 3 

3 Military Science III, Mil. 301, 302, 303 or Alternate ... 3 3 3 

••Electives 6 6 6 

19 19 21 

Senior Year 

Elements of Elect. Engr. I, E.E. 320, 321 3 3 

Elements of Elect. Engr. Lab. II, E.E. 325, 326 1 1 

Theory of Structures, C.E. 431, 432 3 3 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 3 

Accounting I, Econ. 301, 302, 303 3 3 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 822 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

s Military Science IV, Mil. 401, 402, 403 or Alternate ... 3 3 3 

4 Electives 6 6 6 

21 19 19 



1 Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute for the courses listed a Modern Language. 

2 Or 6 credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 

3 To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science III and rv, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 

4 Free electives, except that not more than 39 term credits may be chosen from the 
technical or special technical courses in the School of Engineering. 

5 Students who contemplate the addition of a fifth year in Engineering for the purpose of 
obtaining a professional degree will consult the head of the department in which he intends 
to major and make such substitutions for the Engineering courses offered in this curriculum 
as are necessary for the satisfactory completion of the technical requirements of the degree 
sought. 



The School of Engineering 131 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Jasper L. Stuckey, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor John M. Parker* 

Instructor E. L. Miller, Jr. 

Function and Facilities. — The function of the Department of Geology is 
twofold: first, to offer service courses required as prerequisites in the 
Agricultural, Educational, and Engineering curricula; second, to administer 
the curriculum in Geological Engineering. 

The classrooms, laboratories, and offices of the Department are in Prim- 
rose Hall. The equipment includes a varied collection of minerals, rocks, 
and fossils, illustrating the materials of different parts of the earth's crust; 
laboratory equipment for carrying on qualitative chemical and blowpipe 
examination of minerals and rocks; microscopes and other optical equip- 
ment; facilities for making thin sections of rocks and minerals; geological 
models; a collection of topographic maps and geologic folios illustrating 
important and typical areas in the United States; laboratory testing equip- 
ment for mineral preparation and concentration; equipment for geo- 
physical exploration. 

The Curriculum is designed to train young men in the fundamentals 
of engineering with its special application of geology. Many engineering 
undertakings, especially major construction projects, such as large dams 
and reservoirs, tunnels, large buildings, depend for success on exact knowl- 
edge of their geological setting. On the other hand, such geological problems 
as the economical development of mineral resources require the use of the 
precise methods of engineering. The curriculum combines these two sorts 
of information and training so necessary to success in this important spe- 
cialized field. 

Professional Outlook. — Geological engineering is a new and rapidly grow- 
ing field of engineering. Geological engineers are unique in that a number 
of varied fields are open to them. They are in demand by State and Federal 
Surveys, by oil and mining companies for service here and abroad, by cities 
and municipalities, by engineering construction companies, by technical 
schools as teachers, and by many others. 

For the young man who wants to live and practice his profession in the 
South this curriculum offers excellent training in the application of 
geological science to engineering construction, especially in foundations. 
The importance of this relationship has been emphasized in recent years by 
failures of engineering works such as dams, bridges, buildings, and high- 
ways, caused by the lack of thorough geological investigations. 

The problem of supplying water to our growing cities and to the thou- 
sands of small communities and farms in the South is one that the geological 
engineer is well-trained to solve. 

Many large cities have become aware of the importance of geological 
knowledge in subway construction, water distribution, building and bridge 

• On leave. 



132 State College Catalog 

foundations, etc., and have geological engineers to handle problems which 
arise from such work. In the future, more of this kind of underground 
exploration will be performed in the interests of safety and economy. 

The greatly increased transportation of the world in the next few years 
will tax heavily all of our transportation facilities, and harbors, rivers, 
coastal erosion, inland waterways, highways, railroads, and airports will 
demand many geological engineers. 

The Southeast offers tremendous possibilities to geological engineers who 
are interested in the mineral industries. Here in this region are deposits of 
iron, coal, phosphates, mica, feldspar, spodumene, copper, nickle, kaolin, 
cyanite, barite, limestone, pyrophyllite, marls, and other minerals. 

A graduate of this curriculum is trained to follow two broad fields of 
engineering either in the United States or in foreign countries: one, the 
application of geology to engineering work, and the other, the application 
of geology in the mineral industries. 

CURRICULUM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, II, m, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

•Business English and Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, 

and Elective English 3 3 8 

Qualitative Analysis, Chem. 211 4 

Quantitative Analysis, Chem. 212 4 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Engineering Geology, Geol. 220 3 

Historical Geology, GeoL 222 3 

Mineralogy, Geol. 230 8 

Geomorphology, GeoL 223 8 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 



21 21 20 



Junior Year 



Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 8 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321 8 

Physical Chemistry, Chem. 331 5 

Theoretical Surveying, C.E. 221, 222 3 

Field Surveying, C.E. 225 1 

Mapping, C.E. 226 

Stratigraphy and Index Fossils, Geol. 361 3 

Petrology, Geol. 443 

Advanced Mineralogy, Geol. 332 

Structural Geology, Geol. 352 

Geophysics, GeoL 353 

Electives 3 



8 


S 





8 





8 


8 











3 











1 














4 


3 





4 








4 


3 


8 



21 20 20 



* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 



The School of Engineering 133 
Senior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Optical Mineralogy, Geol. 431, 432, 433 3 3 3 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307 3 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 3 

Economic Geology, Geol. 411, 412, 413 3 8 3 

Advanced Engineering Geology, Geol. 462 8 

Geological Surveying, Geol. 463 4 

Mining Engineering, Mine Design, and Ore Dressing, 

Geol. 471, 472, 473 3 3 3 

Electives 3 3 8 

21 21 19 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

♦Professor F. F. Groseclose 

North Carolina has an abundance of natural resources, and its industries 
are progressing steadily, which facts mean that there are increasing needs 
for educated personnel and informed leaders to deal with the complexities 
of modern industries. 

Engineers have had a surprisingly large share in America's amazing in- 
dustrial progress through their engineering knowledge and the adaptation 
of engineering methods and approach to the solution of industrial prob- 
lems. To be even more effective in industry and modern life, engineers should, 
to their study of engineering, add knowledge of the economic and social 
sciences since they must deal, not only with the materials and forces of 
nature, but also with men, money, and affairs, in their industrial relations. 

The aim of the curriculum in Industrial Engineering is to prepare students 
to enter the employ of industries as engineering graduates, then through 
experience, to develop into positions of responsibility and service, and thus 
to meet the demands of industries for men educated as engineers with special 
preparation for the activities of industries. 

The curriculum provides thorough education in the fundamentals of 
engineering, with a three term course in each Mechanical and Electrical 
Engineering. Accounting, Economics, and Psychology are emphasized. The 
special technical courses apply engineering methods in the studies of indus- 
try, to the end that students may learn to make engineering, economic, and 
social analyses concurrently, and to apply them to the conduct of enter- 
prises. 

Electives from engineering and other courses, approved by the adviser, 
offer opportunity for the development of individual aptitudes. Students in 
Industrial Engineering get class and laboratory instruction from other 



* On military leave. 



134 State College Catalog 

Engineering Departments and from other courses, which are correlated and 
extended by the Industrial Engineering courses. 

The classrooms and offices of Industrial Engineering are in rooms 125 
to 132, on the first floor of 1911 Building. 

Attention is directed to the course in Motion and Time Study (I. E. 322) 
which is required of Industrial Engineering juniors and is elective for 
others. 



CURRICULUM IX INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, II, in, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

♦Business English, Pubfic Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Shopwork, M.E. 124, 125, 126 2 2 2 

Industrial Organization, LE. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

22 22 22 

Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312, 313 3 3 3 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321 8 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307, 308, 309 3 3 8 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I, M.E. 313, 314, 315 111 

Machine Shop II, M.E. 227, 228, 229 1 1 1 

Factory Equipment, M.E. 224 3 

Principles Accounting, Econ. 301, 302, 303 3 3 3 

Management Engineering, LE. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Motion and Time Study, LE. 322 3 

Electives 3 3 3 

20 20 20 
Summer requirement : Six weeks industrial employment. 

Senior Year 

Technical Writing I, Eng. 321 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338 3 

Materials of Cnstruction, C.E. 321 3 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321, 322 . . 3 3 3 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory, n, E.E. 325, 326, 327 111 

Engineering Economics, I.E. 301 3 

Electrical Industry, I.E. 402 3 

Industrial Engineering Problems, I.E. 312, 313 3 3 

Investigation and Report, LE. 433 3 

Electives 6 6 6 

19 19 19 



* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology, Ethics and Religion, 



The School of Engineering 135 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor R. B. Rice, Executive Officer of the Department 
Professors H. B. Briggs, E. G. Hoefer, W. G. Van Note, F. B. Wheeler; 
Associate Professors W. S. Bridges, T. C. Brown, W. E. Selkinghaus; 
Assistant Professors W. E. Adams, R. L. Cope, M. R. Rowland; Instruc- 
tors F. C. Bragg, T. E. Hyde, P. B. Leonard, W. Loewensberg, C. W. 
Maddison, W. G. Mendenhall, W. M. Neale, E. H. Stinson. 

Purposes. — The Mechanical Engineer is primarily a designer and builder 
of machines and other equipment for use in manufacturing processes, trans- 
portation, and the generation of power. He is responsible for the conserva- 
tion and economical use of the power-producing resources of the world 
through the application of the proper equipment in each field of production. 
He is called upon to take charge of the executive management of the 
manufacturing, transportation, and power industries. For the Mechanical 
Engineer to be well grounded in his profession, he must be thoroughly 
familiar with both the science and the art of engineering. 

The curriculum in Mechanical Engineering begins with a thorough train- 
ing in Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry, as a foundation for the technical 
work which is later developed along several parallel lines. The student 
is taught how these fundamental sciences are applied to the physical 
properties of the materials of construction, and to the transformation of 
heat energy into work and power. This is accomplished by means of courses 
in Drafting, Metallurgy, Mechanics, and Thermodynamics; through the 
work in the wood shop, forge and welding shop, foundry, and machine shop; 
by the tests performed in the mechanical laboratories. 

Through the training offered in this curriculum it is hoped that the young 
graduate, after gaining some experience in industry, will be qualified to 
accept the responsibilities which will be imposed upon him in the professional 
field of Mechanical Engineering. 

Buildings and Equipment. — The Department of Mechanical Engineering 
occupies both Page Hall and the Park Building. In Page Hall are the 
offices of the Department, offices for the Drawing Division and the Lab- 
oratory Division, classrooms, drafting rooms, the Internal-Combustion- 
Engine Laboratory, and Hydraulics and Fluid Flow Laboratory. The Park 
Building contains the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, the Metallurgy 
Laboratory, the Heating and Air-Conditioning Laboratory, the Wood Shop, 
the Foundry, the Forge and Welding Shop, and the Machine Shop. It also 
contains the offices of the Faculty in the several Shops and one classroom. 

Drafting Rooms. — The drafting rooms are equipped with tables, stools, 
cases for boards, reference files, and models. The drafting rooms have two 
Universal Drafting Machines in addition to other necessary equipment. The 
blueprint room contains an electric blueprint machine, a sheet washer, and 



136 State College Catalog 

an ozalid printing machine, besides the usual sun frames. Fluorescent lights 
are used in the drafting rooms. 

Shops. — The Wood Shop is equipped with a variety of woodworking ma- 
chines: lathes, combination saw, dado saw, cut-off saw, jointer, mortdser, 
sanders, moulder, sticker, trimmer, shaper, boring machines, band saws, jig 
saw, various types of clamps, a glue room, and other essentials that go to 
make an up-to-date shop. Tbe machines are motor driven with either indi- 
vidual or group drive. The shop includes work benches, hand tools and 
necessary auxiliary equipment and a modern spray-gun for finishing 
surfaces. 

The Foundry Equipment consists of a 36" cupola, a 22" cupola, brass 
furnace, core oven, core machine, moulding machines, cleaning mill, motor- 
driven elevator, emery wheel and buffer, and the necessary tools and patterns 
for practical moulding. Sand-testing equipment is available for experimental 
work. 

The Forge and Welding Shop is equipped with thirty anvils and forges, 
the blast for the forges being produced by a large powder blower and regu- 
lated by individual controls on each forge. The shop is also equipped with a 
modern down-draft-type exhaust system. Other equipment consists of iron 
shears, vises, emery wheels, and other necessary forging equipment. A 300- 
ampere direct-current electric welder and a ten-station oxy-acetylene weld- 
ing-manifold system completes this equipment. 

The Machine Shop, well heated, lighted, and ventilated, is equipped with 
work benches, machinist's vises, and a variety of machine tools: engine 
lathes, bench lathes, shapers, planers, milling machines, vertical and hori- 
zontal boring mills, drill presses, slotting machines, grinders, arbor presses, 
and a variety of hand tools, cutters, clamps, jigs, and other equipment 
necessary to modern machine-shop practice. Some of the machines are group 
driven, others are individually driven. 

Laboratories. — The Heat-Power, Heating and Air- Conditioning, and Metal- 
lurgical Laboratories are located in the Park Building. The Heat-Power 
Laboratory is equipped with plain slide-valve, automatic cut-off, multiple- 
expansion, and unifiow engines arranged for condensing and noncondensing 
operation. It is provided with a turbo-generator set complete with a high- 
vacuum condenser. A two-stage air compressor driven by a unifiow engine 
supplies air for experimentation. Weighing tanks and steam pumps make 
possible tests in this field. This division of the laboratory is equipped with 
instruments and apparatus for making coal and gas analyses and tests, 
lubrication tests, calibration tests, heat-transfer tests, nozzle tests, and 
general efficiency and thermodynamic tests. 

The Heating and Air-Conditioning division of the laboratory contains 
several heating boilers with appropriate oil-burning equipment, weighing 
tanks and instruments for complete tests. The laboratory is also equipped 
with an air conditioner, unit heaters, radiator-testing equipment, a half- 
ton refrigeration machine, insulation -testing equipment and a fan-and- 
duct testing unit. 



The School of Engineering 137 

The Metallurgical Laboratory is equipped for work dealing with the 
structure and the physical and mechanical properties of metals and alloys. 
The equipment includes electric and gas heat-treating furnaces with con- 
trols; indicating and recording pyrometers; apparatus for polishing and 
etching specimens; metallurgical microscopes with complete lens combina- 
tions; dark rooms for photographic; and, photoelastic equipment. The 
laboratory is equipped with 15,000-lb. and 50,000-lb. material-testing 
machines. 

The Hydraulic-Machinery, and Internal-Combustion-Engine Laboratories 
are housed in the basement of Page Hall. The Laboratories are equipped 
with a new twenty-inch wind tunnel capable of speeds in excess of 100 miles 
per hour. The tunnel is equipped with automatic balances. A smokebox is 
provided for flow-analysis work. Photographic equipment is provided for 
flow study. 

The Hydraulic Testing Laboratory contains a ten-inch Francis-Type 
Hydraulic Turbine, of the most modern design, directly connected to an 
electric dynamometer, together with weir, Venturi, flume, and instruments 
for complete test. The laboratory has high-speed and low-speed centrifugal 
pumps arranged for tests, also Venturi tubes, weirs, nozzles, meters, and 
a hydraulic channel for the study of flow. 

The Internal-Combustion-Engine Laboratory is equipped with high-speed 
and low-speed compression-ignition engines, automotive and stationary 
spark-ignition engines, air-cooled and liquid-cooled aircraft engines, all of 
modern design. Each of the test engines, of which there are ten at present, 
is equipped with its power-absorbing device, such as club-propellers in the 
case of areo engines and water brakes, calibrated electric generators and 
electric cradle-dynamometers for the other engines. A B-hp. electric dynamo- 
meter is provided for accessory testing and a 125-hp. dynamometer for 
high-speed-engine testing. Engines, carburetors, ignition equipment and 
accessories are provided for study. C.F.R.-A.S.T.M. units are available for 
gasoline and diesel fuel research. 

Recent additions to the Internal Combustion Laboratory consist of a 500 
H.P. twelve cylinder Vee-type marine diesel engine; two 150 H.P. 6 cylinder 
high-speed marine diesel engines; a high-speed automotive type 85 H.P. 
diesel; a 60 H.P. stationary diesel engine with direct connected generators; 
a complete iteniary of diesel fuel-.pumps, nozzles, governors, transfer pumps, 
and allied equipment together with a fuel-pump testing and calibrating unit, 
nozzle testors, and spray analyzers. The laboratory is also equipped with 
high-speed indicators of the cathode ray type and vibration analyzers for 
the study of motion and vibration of engine parts; and a centrifugal super- 
charging testing unit with a high-speed dynamometer. 

All of the laboratories are designed around the unit system for instruc- 
tion, whereby units in or whole divisions of the laboratory may be operated 
without depending on or interfering with other units or divisions. 



138 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

For the Freshman Year, refer to page 106. 

Surveying, C.E. s200, 3 credits, is required in the summer immediately following the 
freshman year. 

Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Calculus I, II, in, Math. 201, 202, 303 4 4 4 

♦Business English, Public Speaking, Eng. 211, 231, and 

Elective English 3 3 3 

Physics for Engineers, Phys. 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Mechanical Drawing, M.E. 211, 212, 213 2 2 2 

Shopwork, M.E. 124, 125, 126 2 2 2 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 311, 312 3 S 

tMilitary Science, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Physical Education, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

18 21 21 



Junior Year 

Engineering Mechanics, E.M. 313 3 

Machine Shop IL M.E. 227, 228, 229 1 

Engineering Thermodynamics, M.E. 307, 308, 309 3 

Mech. Eng. Lab. I, M.E. 313, 314, 315 1 

tKinematics, M.E. 317, 318, 319 3 

Materials of Construction, C.E. 321 

Metallurgy, M.E. 322, 323 

Strength of Materials, E.M. 321, 322 

Fluid Mechanics, E.M. 330 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

Technical Writing, Eng. 321 3 

**Electives 3 

20 

Summer requirement : Six weeks of industrial employment. 









1 


1 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


3 


3 





3 














3 


3 



20 



20 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING I— GENERAL OPTION 

Professor R. B. Rice, Faculty Adviser 
Senior Year 



General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Power Plants, M.E. 401, 402, 403 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning. M.E. 404 

Machine Design, M.E. 411, 412, 413 3 

Refrigeration, M.E. 405 

Mechanical Engineering Lab. II, M.E. 407, 408, 409 .. . 1 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, E.E. 320, 321, 322.. 3 

Electrical Eng. Lab. D.. E.E. 325, 326, 327 1 

Hydraulic Machinery, E.M. 331 3 

•♦Elecrives 3 

20 



3 


3 


3 


3 


8 





3 


3 





3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 


1 








3 


3 



20 



M 



* Students who have been certified by the Department of English as proficient in English 
may substitute Modern Language for the courses listed. 

t Or sLs credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History, Modern Language, Sociology. 

t Furniture Option, M.E. 341, 342, 343. 
** To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science m and TV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



The School of Engineering 139 

(For the duration of this war the following optional curricula will be 
superseded by the General Option.) 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING II— FURNITURE OPTION 

Assistant Professor M. R. Rowland, Faculty Adviser 

The purpose of this course is to train young men, who are interested in 
wood industries and want a practical and scientific insight into the art of 
designing and production of furniture, to enter the field of actual produc- 
tion of modern furniture and to lay a foundation for future work as man- 
agers, or executives in the wood products industries. 

The equipment of the entire Mechanical Engineering Department is avail- 
able for instruction. A comprehensive file of useful data on woods, material 
on period design, and trade literature are also available. 

The fundamental courses in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum are 
required in this option, with particular emphasis placed on modern manu- 
facturing methods, management of operation, costs of production, mainte- 
nance of plant, and practical design of wood products. A thorough drill in 
the preparation of technical drawings and reports is required. Each student 
will make one or more field trips to inspect typical wood industries and 
submit a report of his observations. 

Each student will be required to spend at least six weeks in industrial 
employment before receiving his degree. This aids him in securing and 
satisfactorily holding a position upon graduation. 



Senior Year 

Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years identical with the General Mechanical Engi- 
neering Curriculum. 
Summer requirement: Six weeks of industrial employment. 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Power Plants, M.E. 401, 402, 403 a 

Mech. Eng. Lab. Ill, M.E. 407, 408, 409 1 

Furniture Construction, M.E. 445, 446, 447 3 

Lumbering, For. 422 

Lumber Seasoning, For. 423 

Engineering Economics, LE. 301 3 

Elements of Electrical Engineering II, E.E. 331, 332, 333 4 
••Electives _8 

20 20 20 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 

»* To be selected from the following fields. Humanities, Military Science III and IV. 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



Second Term 


Third Term 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


4 


3 








2 








4 


4 


3 


3 



140 State College Catalog 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING III— HEATING AND 
AIR-CONDITIONING OPTION 

Professor E. G. Hoefer, Faculty Adviser 

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers this option because of the 
increasing interest in heating and air conditioning for comfort; and 
furthermore because the engineering profession is largely responsible for 
the health and well-being of society through the effective construction and 
operation of heating and air-conditioning systems. Emphasis is placed on 
this phase of engineering through the application of fundamental principles 
to design, laboratory investigations and research. Through this means the 
student is given an opportunity to become familiar with standard practice 
in this field. 

Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years identical with the General Mechanical Engi- 
neering: Curriculum. 

Summer requirement: Six weeks of industrial employment. 

Senior Year 

CREDITS 

COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Power Plants, M.E. 401, 402, 403 3 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning Lab., M.E. 455, 456, 457 . . 1 1 1 

Hydraulics Machinery, E.M. 331 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning II, M.E. 451, 452, 453 ... 3 3 3 

Heating and Air Conditioning Design, M.E. 458, 459 . . 3 3 

Elements of Elec. Engr. II, E.E. 331, 332, 333 4 4 4 

•♦Electives 8 3 g 

20 20 20 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IV— METALS OPTION 

Professor W. G. VanNote, Faculty Adviser 

The Mechanical Engineer is becoming steadily more dependent upon 
metals and alloys for the efficient construction, operation, and maintenance 
of the varied engineering units under his supervision. Similarly in the design 
of improved and new units he is making increased demands upon the metal 
industry for materials of superior properties. Because of this close inter- 
dependence of mechanical engineering and metallurgy the Metals Option is 
offered. Emphasis is given to the control which may be exercised over the 
properties of metals through methods of manufacture and subsequent 
physical and thermal treatments. Since welding design and practice has a 
prominent place in the metallurgical applications made by the mechanical 
engineer, substantial instruction in this field is included in the option. 

"To be selected from the following fields: Humanities, Military Science III and IV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science, and Social Science. 



Division of Teacher Education 



141 



Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years identical -with the General Mechanical Engi- 
neering Curriculum. 
Summer requirement : Six weeks of industrial employment. 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 

Elements of Elec Eng., E.E. 320, 321, 322 

Electrical Engineering Lab., E.E. 325, 326, 327 

Machine Design, M.E. 411, 412, 413 

Power Plants, M.E. 401, 402 

M. E. Lab., Ill, M.E. 407, 408, 409 

Theory of Welding, M.E. 431, 432, 433 

Welding Practice, M.E. 435, 436, 437 

Physical Metallurgy, M.E. 441, 442, 443 

••Electives 



8 




1 


3 




3 


1 




1 


S 




3 


3 







1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 



21 21 18 

All seniors are required to go on the inspection trip as part of their curriculum. 



*• To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science III and IV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science and Social Science. 



142 State College Catalog 

DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 
Professors : 

T. E. Browne, M.A., Director of the Division 

Leon E. Cook, M.S., Agricultural Education 

Edward W. Boshart, M.A., Industrial Arts Education, and Guidance 

J. R. Ludington, Ph.D., Industrial Arts Education 

J. K. Coggin, M.S., Agricultural Education 

J. Warren Smith, M.S., Industrial Education 

*William McGehee, Ph.D., Psychology 

Associate Professors: 

L. 0. Armstrong, M.S., Agricultural Education 
D. J. Moffie, Ph.D., Psychology 

Supervisor of Student Teachers in Industrial Arts 

C. Merrill Hamilton, M.A., Industrial Arts Education 

Purposes. — The Division of Teacher Education at North Carolina State 
College is organized and equipped for the purpose of carrying out a specific 
function allocated to the College by the trustees of the Greater University. 
The particular objective of this Division is to provide professional training, 
to organize curricula, and to give direction to those students who indicate 
an interest in becoming teachers of Vocational Agriculture, Trade and 
Industrial Education, Industrial Arts Education, and preparing themselves 
for the field of Guidance and Counseling. The technical subject matter in- 
struction for such teachers is provided by the technical schools on the 
Campus. 

The State Board for Vocational Education has designated State College 
as the training center for vocational teachers in the fields of Agriculture 
and Industrial Education, and federal funds are used to aid in the main- 
tenance of teacher training in these two fields. 

Organization. — The Division offers curricula for preparing teachers of 
Agriculture, of Industrial Arts, of Industrial Education, and of Occupational 
Information and Guidance. The training includes four definite objectives. 
The first embraces the fundamentals of general education: English, mathe- 
matics, sociology, history, and the natural sciences — biology, geology, chemis- 
try, and physics. Next are the technical subjects selected according to the 
professional course of the student: for Agricultural Teaching, in the School 
of Agriculture; for Industrial Arts and Industrial Education, in the School 
of Engineering. In the third group are the principles and methods of teach- 
ing and of vocational guidance. Educational Psychology here is obviously 
essential. The last objective is practical experience. To meet the require- 
ments of the State Department of Public Instruction for teaching certifi- 
cates, students, before graduation, observe and teach under the direction of 



• On military leave. 



Division of Teacher Education 143 

the faculty of the Division in selected high schools. Moreover, experience 
in the respective occupations is required for those preparing to teach agri- 
culture, and the trades and industries. 

Psychology. — General Psychology, giving an understanding of man's re- 
actions to individual and social forces, constitutes one of the fundamentals 
of liberal education. Educational Psychology, applying the general prin- 
ciples to the problems of instruction, learning, and character building, 
becomes obviously essential in the equipment of teachers. Courses in 
Applied, Industrial, and Social Psychology of specialized nature meet the 
needs of the various technological curricula. The Department of Psychology, 
in view of its intimate relation to the problems of teacher education, is 
incorporated administratively in the Division of Teacher Education; at the 
same time it functions instructionally throughout the Basic Division and 
the Professional Schools. 

Requirements for Graduation. — For graduation in the Division of Teacher 
Education, the scholastic requirement in all curricula is the satisfactory 
attainment of at least 230 term credits with not fewer than an equal number 
of honor points. 

Of the term credits required for graduation, a student must have at least 
27 in Education, 18 in Language, 18 in the Natural Sciences, 18 in Social 
Science, 12 in Military Training or alternatives, 6 in Physical Education. 
Subjects must be taken as indicated in the several curricula. 

Students who enter with advanced standing are allowed one point for 
each term credit accepted. 

Further requirements consist of practice teaching in the subject and 
practical experience in the work to be taught as indicated above or under 
the several Departments. 

Degrees. — Upon the satisfactory completion of one of the curricula in 
Education, a student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science with the 
name of his special curriculum appended: in Agricultural Education, in 
Industrial Arts Education, in Industrial Education, in Occupational In- 
formation and Guidance. 

The Graduate Division of State College offers the Master's Degree to 
mature students of superior ability upon successful completion of its 
requirements. For the details, see the statement of the Graduate Division 
in this Catalog. 

Agricultural Education 

Leon E. Cook 

Object. — Agricultural Education is designed to prepare students for posi- 
tions as teachers of vocational agriculture in the high schools of the State, 
and to qualify as such under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes and the 
George-Deen Acts of Congress. 

The curriculum is comprehensive in nature. It is, of course, essential that 
teachers have a good foundation in English and in the sciences basic to an 



144 State College Catalog 

understanding of agriculture. They should also have a sufficient under- 
standing of the social sciences to appreciate the development of contem- 
porary life, with the emphasis on those having to do with agriculture and 
the rural community. Manifestly they should have a grasp of agriculture in 
all phases of importance in the State, including the improvement of the 
farm home and of the social as well as of the economic development of the 
rural community. Proficiency in teaching vocational agriculture depends 
upon comprehensive and thorough preparation in the professional field with 
emphasis on personal relations and guidance, procedure in teaching both 
youth and adults, and in handling the various responsibilities of community 
service. 

An adequate background of farm experience is essential for students 
looking forward to agricultural teaching, and experience in fields related 
to farming is desirable. A student should be farm-reared or should have 
several years of farm experience as a part of his preparation for teaching 
vocational agriculture. 

Placement of Graduates. — There has been a strong demand for teachers of 
vocational agriculture with little difficulty in placing students who are quali- 
fied from the standpoint of personality, character, training, and farm expe- 
rience. A cooperative arrangement with the supervisory staff in agricul- 
tural education of the State Department of Public Instruction facilitates the 
placement of students in situations adapted to their experience and training. 

Successful teachers of agriculture are in demand for higher positions in 
the educational service and by other agencies for positions offering higher 
salaries than those paid in the teaching profession. 

Graduate Study. — The Department provides opportunities for students, 
fully qualified, to do graduate work in Agricultural Education. Graduate 
students taking majors in this field should have completed the undergrad- 
uate work in Agricultural Education or the equivalent. Transfer students, 
or graduates in general agriculture who did not take the work in education, 
are required to complete 15 credits in education including Principles of 
Teaching and Methods of Teaching Agriculture, as prerequisites to graduate 
study. 

CURRICULUM FOR TEACHERS OF AGRICULTURE 
Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

General Botany, Bot. 102 4 

General Zoology, Zool. 101 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry, Math. Ill, 112 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Physical Geology, Geol. 120 4 

JMilitary Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 111 

17 21 21 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology, and Ethics and Religion. 



Division of Teacher Education 145 
Sophomore Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Farm Equipment, Agr. Eng. 202 3 

Soils. Soils 201 5 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202 3 3 

Agricultural Economics, Agr. Econ. 202 3 

Physics for Agr. Students, Phys. 115 6 

Animal Physiology, Zool. 202, or 

Plant Physiology, Bot. 221 5 

Economic Zoology, Zool. 102 4 

General Botany, Bot. 101 4 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Chem. 221 4 

Animal Nutrition I, A.H. 202 3 

General Poultry, Poul. 201 3 

Principles of Forestry, For. Ill 3 

General Horticulture, Hort. 203 3 

General Field Crops, F.C. 202 3 

{Military Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sport Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

21 21 21 

Junior Year 

English, elective 3 3 

Educational Psychology, Ed. 303, 304 3 3 

Visual Aids, Ed. 308 3 

Teaching Farm Shop Work, Agr. Eng. 331, 332 3 3 

Farm Management, Agr. Econ. 303 3 

Farm Accounting, Agr. Econ. 313 S 

Fertilizers, Soils 302 3 

Rural Sociology, Rural Soc. 302 8 

•Diseases of Field Crops, Bot. 301 3 

♦♦Economic Entomology, Zool. 213 4 

•♦♦Electives 8 8 3 

20 20 19 

Senior Year 

English, elective 8 

Materials and Methods in Teaching Agriculture, Ed. 412 5 

Secondary Education in Agriculture, Ed. 426 3 

Principles of Teaching, Ed. 406 3 6 

Observations and Directed Teaching, Ed. 408 5 

Methods of Teaching Agriculture, Ed. 407 5 

Evening Classes and Directed Teaching, Ed. 411 5 

♦•••Animal Hygiene and Sanitation, A.H. 353 8 

Agricultural Marketing, Agr. Econ. 411 3 

•••Electives 4 8 7 

15 18 16 



• Diseases of Fruits and Vegetable Crops, Bot 303, may be substituted for Bot. 801. 
** General Bacteriology, Bot. 402, or Genetics, Zool. 411, may be substituted for Economic 
Entomology, Zool. 213. 

•** Options and electives except Mil. Science III and IV must be chosen with the approval 
of the adviser. 

*•*• Common Diseases, A.H. 352, may be substituted for A.H. 353. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following Departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology, and Ethics and Religion. 



146 State College Catalog 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

John R. Ludington 

Industrial Arts comprises that area of study and experience which deals 
with industry as a unit of society and the manner in which industry and 
its related materials, processes, and problems affects and has affected other 
units of society. For many years North Carolina State College has had an 
important part in aiding individuals and groups of individuals to cope with 
the increasingly complex problems of living in an industrial society 
through its program of teacher education. 

The demand for competent teachers of Industrial Arts has increased 
year after year and the need for Industrial Arts as an essential phase of 
general education at the elementary and secondary school levels is being 
realized by progressive school communities and leaders in education. 

Purposes. — The Department of Industrial Arts is organized to aid in the 
education of teachers and supervisors of Industrial Arts, and to provide 
experiences for those individuals who desire to deal more appreciatively and 
effectively with problems of living in a democratic-industrial society. The 
successful completion of this curriculum leads to the granting of the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts Education and the fulfillment of 
requirements for an A-grade certificate for teaching in this field. 

The first two years of work in this curriculum are in line with the Basic 
Division of the College, which emphasizes work of a general and founda- 
tional nature. The junior and senior years are planned to include expe- 
riences of a specialized-professional nature. 

In addition to added faculty personnel, new facilities have been provided 
in the Department which include: laboratories, machines, tools, benches, 
classrooms, and library resources. Further increases in physical setting and 
equipment have been planned which will make North Carolina State College 
one of the leading Industrial Arts teacher-education centers in the South- 
east. 

Graduate Program. — Opportunities are provided for students of demon- 
strated interest and ability to do graduate work leading to the Master's 
Degree. The faculty personnel and resources of the Greater University of 
North Carolina are used in planning a sequence of experiences on the 
graduate level to meet the individual interests and needs of persons inter- 
ested in Industrial Arts Education. Persons interested in graduate work in 
this field are invited to write for detailed information and courses offered. 



Division of Teacher Education 147 

DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 
CURRICULUM FOR TEACHERS OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Algebra, Trigonometry, and Mathematics of Finance 

Math. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

General Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Industrial Arts Drawing, Ed. (I. A.) 105a, b, c 3 3 3 

Industrial Arts, Ed. (L A.) 106 a, b, c 3 3 3 

Military Science I, MiL 101, 102, 103 or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 



20 20 20 



Sophomore Year 



Business English, Eng. 211, Public Speaking, Eng. 231, 

Elective English 3 3 3 

General Physics, Phys. 105, 106, 107 4 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Industrial Arts Design, Ed. (I. A.) 205 3 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 3 

Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts, 

Ed. 206 (I. A.) a, b, c 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 , 2 2 2 

Sports Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

19 19 19 

Junior Year 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200, Educational 

Psychology, Ed. 304, Psychology of Adolescence, 

Ed. 476 3 3 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Problems in Secondary Education, Ed. 344, Field Work 

in Secondary Education, Ed. 433, Visual Aids, Ed. 

308 3 3 3 

Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts, 

Ed. 306 (I. A.) a, b, c 3 3 3 

Business Law, Econ. 307 3 

**Electives 3 3 3 

•Electives in Related Technical and Shop Courses 3 5 3 

21 20 18 

Senior Year 

Methods of Teaching Industrial Ed. 422, Observation 

and Directed Teaching, Ed. 444 3 

Labor Problems, Econ. 331, Vocational Guidance, Ed. 420 3 

Occupational Studies, Ed. 424 

Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts, Ed. 482, In- 
structional Aids and Devices, Ed. 483, Laboratory 

Planning and Equipment Selection, Ed. 484 3 

••Electives 3 

•Electives in Related Technical and Shop Courses 6 

18 18 18 



3 
3 



8 


3 


3 
3 
6 


3 
6 



• Electives to be selected with aid of adviser to meet special needs of individual students. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology, and Ethics and Religion. 

•• To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science in and TV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science and Social Science. 



148 State College Catalog 

OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 

Edward W. Boshart 

Objective. — Guidance is becoming a more important part of the prepara- 
tion for the high office of teaching. Pupils of all ages are in need of assist- 
ance in meeting all sorts of life problems, such as those of education, voca- 
tion, health, and emotional stability. Each level of school development — 
elementary, junior high, senior high, and college — requires particular atten- 
tion in which the teacher's advice is essential. In addition to the work of the 
classroom teacher, there is need of continued service in the form of general 
direction in supplying needed materials, suitable programs, general over- 
sight of plans, and care of special cases requiring the attention of one with 
wide experience. 

Through subject matter courses, including exploration, tests and measure- 
ments, the requirements of various trades, occupations, and professions, 
State College is endeavoring to prepare individuals to become teachers of 
occupational information and to serve as counselors of students in leading 
them through their choice of studies and vocational interests toward suc- 
cessful and happy living. It is essential that counselors have an adequate 
background of teaching experience, as well as acquaintance with occupa- 
tional problems; therefore, it is essential to the preparation of individuals 
for this work that they qualify to teach classes in occupations as related to 
the world about them, and thereby develop themselves for the position of 
counselors and directors of this work. 

Organization. — The courses selected for this curriculum have as their 
objective the broadening of experience and acquaintance with the whole 
field of education and will lead toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Occupational Information and Guidance. Throughout this period of prepara- 
tion the emphasis will be on a thorough acquaintance with the work out- 
lined, together with a selected minor in social sciences or natural sciences. 

The first two years of this curriculum are in line with the general plan 
of the College which emphasizes work of fundamental value. The last two 
years are given to work of a professional and specialized nature stressing 
analysis of occupations and trades, guidance programs, organization and 
administration. 

Placement of Graduates. — There is a growing demand for teachers of 
occupational information and guidance. In a few instances the full time of 
one or more instructors will be taken up in giving occupational information 
and performing other guidance functions. In the smaller schools where 
the full time is not thus used, the teacher will be required to hold other 
classes and should be prepared in some related field. 

Graduate Study. — This Department offers opportunity for those who have 
had experience in teaching to prepare for a position as counselor or 
director of guidance. This study leads toward the earning of the degree of 



The Division of Teacher Education 149 

Master of Science in Education and may be accomplished through a year or 
more in residence or through the offerings of our Summer School Sessions. 
A prerequisite for work in the graduate field should be one or more years 
of teaching experience, a particular interest in the field, and a rather wide 
acquaintance with social and economic problems. 

CURRICULUM FOR TEACHERS OF OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 

Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Mathematics of Finance, 

Math. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Science (selected with aid of adviser) 4 4 4 

Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 

Occupations, Ed. 103 3 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 3 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 



20 20 20 



Sophomore Year 



Business English, Eng. 211, Public Speaking, Eng. 231, 

Elective English _ 3 

Science (selected with aid of adviser) 4 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

History of United States. Hist. 201, 202, 203 3 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202. 203 2 

Sports Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 

**Electives 3 



3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


3 



19 19 19 



Junior Year 



English or Modern Language 3 3 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200, Educational 

Psychology, Ed. 304, Psychology of Adolescence, 

Ed. 476 3 3 8 

Problems in Secondary Education, Ed. 344, Field Work 

in Secondary Education, Ed. 433, Visual Aids, Ed. 

308 3 3 3 

{American Government, Pol. Sci. 200, 201, 202 3 3 3 

**Electives 3 3 3 

•Electives 6 5 3 

21 20 18 

Senior Year 

Methods of Teaching Occupations, Ed. 423 3 

Observation and Directed Teaching, Ed. 444 

Philosophy of Guidance, Ed. 420 3 

Social Recreation, P.E. 401 

Psycho-diagnostic Techniques, Psy. 470, 471, 472 3 

Occupational Studies, Ed. 424 

"Electives 3 

•Electives in related courses 6 

18 18 18 









3 


3 











3 


3 


8 





4 


3 


8 


9 


3 



* Electives to be selected with aid of adviser to meet special needs of individual student. 

I Political Science 203 may alternate with Political Science 200. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology, and Ethics and Religion. 

** To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science III and TV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science and Social Soience. 



150 State College Catalog 

Industrial Education 

J. Warren Smith 

Object. — In a greater degree than at any previous time, thought is now 
directed toward an extended program of trade-shop courses in Industrial 
Education for North Carolina high schools. Some of the causes of this focus 
of attention are: increased production for War purposes, rising age for 
entrance to work, increasing school enrollment, and an extended school term. 
It is to prepare teachers for this field of service that this program is de- 
signed. A four -year course is outlined with the first two years running 
parallel with that of Industrial Arts, then specializing by following the 
outlined course during the last two years. 

Positions for Graduates. — The student who completes this course will be 
prepared to teach in the all-day schools or the part-time or the evening 
classes, such as are supported by State and Federal funds for vocational 
education. At the present time, little difficulty should be encountered by the 
successful candidates in attaining positions after graduation. 

Journeyman Experience Required. — Candidates for degrees must have had 
at least two years of successful journeyman experience in the trade they 
wish to teach. Successful completion of this course leads to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education. Men with journeymen experi- 
ence who desire to take only professional courses, may enter as special stu- 
dents with the object of completing one or two years of training as outlined 
for the junior and senior years. For this work, no degree would be granted. 

This Department is recognized as the official Training Department of 
Industrial Education for the State Department of Education. The head of 
the Department serves as itinerant teacher-trainer for part-time, day-trade, 
and evening classes, and for the preparation of prospective teachers. 

For the time being, the services of the Head of this Department will be 
devoted largely to itinerant-teacher training. However, as the demand for 
resident courses at State College designed to prepare shop teachers develops, 
the schedule can be adjusted to meet this demand. 



The Division of Teacher Education 151 
CURRICULUM FOR TEACHERS OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

For freshman and sophomore years, see Industrial Arts Education 

Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Philosophy of Industrial Education, Ed. 427 3 

•Shopwork (selected) 3 3 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200, Educational 

Psychology, Ed. 304, Psychology of Adolescence, 

Ed. 476 3 3 3 

Philosophy of Guidance, Ed. 420 3 

Problems in Secondary Education, Ed. 344 3 

Labor Problems, Econ. 331 3 

General Sociology, Soc. 202, 203 3 3 

Visual Aids, Ed. 308 3 

Mechanical Drawing, M.E. 211, 212, 213 2 2 2 

••Electives 3 3 3 

Electives 3 2 

20 20 19 

Senior Year 

Local Survey : Planning a Program, Ed. 416 3 

•Shopwork (selected) 3 

Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects, Ed. 422 3 

Observation and Directed Teaching, Ed. 444 3 3 

Occupational Studies, Ed. 424 3 

Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts, Ed. 482, In- 
structional Aids and Devices, Ed. 483, Laboratory 

Planning and Equipment Selection, Ed. 484 3 3 3 

♦••Elective courses in Design 3 3 3 

••Electives 8 3 3 

Electives 6 3 

17 18 18 



• Elective shopwork should be taken in fields available as Textiles, Woodshop, Machine 
Shop, Foundry, and Electricity. 

•* To be selected from the following fields : Humanities, Military Science III and IV, 
Language and Literature, Pure Mathematics, Pure Natural Science and Social Science. 
••• Elective courses must be approved by the faculty adviser. 



152 State College Catalog 

THE SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Malcolm E. Campbell, Dean and Director of Textile Research 
Thomas Nelson, Dean Emeritus 

Organization. — The School of Textiles of North Carolina State College is 
organized for the purpose of administration into four departments: Yarn 
Manufacturing and Knitting, Weaving and Designing, Textile Chemistry 
and Dyeing, Textile Research. 

The School of Textiles is organized to offer technical instruction, both 
undergraduate and graduate, in the production and finishing of textile 
products. It is also organized and equipped to conduct fundamental textile 
research and cooperates with other Schools of the College and with research 
organizations throughout the country. 

Purpose. — The purpose of the School of Textiles is to educate men for pro- 
fessional service in Textile Manufacturing, Textile Management, Textile 
Chemistry and Dyeing, Yarn Manufacturing, Knitting, Weaving and 
Designing; to develop their capacities for intelligent leadership; to equip 
them to participate in commercial and public affairs; to aid in the develop- 
ment of the textile industry and its commerce through research and experi- 
mentation; to cooperate with the textile mills of the State in gaining, 
through scientific research, information that will improve the quality and 
value of manufactured products and increase technical skill. 

Occupations. — Never before in America have more opportunities in textiles 
been offered to young people of North Carolina and the South generally than 
are available today to graduates of the School of Textiles. 

North Carolina is the largest textile manufacturing State in the South; 
it has more mills than any other State in America. It has the largest towel, 
damask, denim, and underwear mills in America; and it has more mills that 
dye and finish their own products than any other Southern State, also a 
large printing industry. These plants produce a diversified line of cotton, 
rayon, silk, wool, and worsted textile products. 

The courses of instruction are arranged and grouped so that students 
may get the best results from their work, and accumulate the necessary 
knowledge, which, together with actual experience after graduation, enables 
them to fill such positions as the following: 

Owners of mills. 

Presidents and vice-presidents of mills and other textile establishments. 

Secretaries and treasurers of mills. 

Managers, superintendents, and department foremen in cotton, rayon, 
woolen, silk, and hosiery mills. 

Superintendents and foremen in mercerizing, bleaching, dyeing, and finish- 
ing plants. 



The School op Textiles 153 

Designers and analysts of fabrics. 
Technical demonstrators in the dyestuff industry. 
Textile chemists. 
Textile cost accountants in mills. 
Purchasing agents for mills. 

Salesmen of machinery, yarn, cloth, rayon, dyestuffs, and chemicals. 
Positions in yarn and fabric commission houses, with fabric converters 
and with research organizations. 
Specialists in Government service. 

Representatives for manufacturers of machinery, rayon, dyestuffs, and 
mill supplies. 

Degrees. — Upon the completion of any one of the curricula in Textiles the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Textiles is conferred. 

The degree of Master of Science in Textiles is offered for the satisfactory 
completion of one year of graduate study in residence. Candidates for the 
degree of Master of Science in Textiles enter and are enrolled in the 
Graduate Division of the College. 

The professional degree of Master of Textiles may be conferred upon 
graduates of the School of Textiles after five years of professional practice 
in charge of important work and upon the acceptance of a satisfactory 
thesis. 

Requirements. — The requirements for graduation in the School of Tex- 
tiles are the satisfactory completion of all the courses in one of the 
prescribed curricula on the pages following, a total of not fewer than 230 
term credits, with not fewer than 230 honor points. 

Of the minimum of 230 term credits required for graduation in the 
School of Textiles, 144 are common to all curricula; that is, 12 term credits 
in Mathematics, 18 in Language, 27 in Economics and history, 12 in Chem- 
istry, 15 in Physics, 12 in Engineering, 6 in Agriculture, 24 in General 
Textiles, 12 in Military Training or Social Science alternatives, and 6 in 
Physical Education. Each of the curricula permits election of 18 term 
credits. 

Inspection Trip. — Each student is required to make an inspection trip 
during his senior year to mills making various classes of fabrics, also to 
bleaching, dyeing, finishing, and hosiery plants. The trips are made in 
chartered busses. 

Curricula. — The freshman and sophomore work is the same for all stu- 
dents in the School of Textiles. The training is general, and gives the student 
a good opportunity to make a wise choice in the selection of the particular 
field in which he desires to specialize. Five curricula are offered. 

1. Textile Manufacturing 3. Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

2. Textile Management 4. Weaving and Designing 

5. Yarn Manufacturing 



154 State College Catalog 

Textile Manufacturing and Textile Management offer work in all Depart- 
ments of the School of Textiles; these are therefore general curricula with 
one placing more emphasis on manufacturing, the other, more emphasis on 
economics. 

Students who select Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, Weaving and Design- 
ing, or Yarn Manufacturing devote a larger percentage of their time to 
specialization in one Department of the School of Textiles. 

Textile Curricula for University and College Graduates. Selected courses 
leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Textiles are offered to grad- 
uates of universities and standard colleges. These are arranged in accord- 
ance with the vocational aim of the individual student and in the light of 
credits presented from the institution by which the student has been 
graduated, subject to the approval of his adviser and the director of in- 
struction. In cases where the student presents enough credits which may 
be used for courses required in a curriculum, he or she may be graduated 
with a Bachelor of Science degree in Textiles within one year. In no case 
should it take more than two years to complete the work for the degree. 

Short Course for Textile Mill Men. — Instruction in yarn manufacturing, 
weaving, designing, fabric analysis, and dyeing, lasting two weeks in the 
second term, is offered for textile mill men who wish to make a short and 
intensive study of any of these subjects. The subject matter will be selected 
to suit the requirements of each individual. 

Yarn Manufacturing and Knitting 

Professor Elliot B. Grover, Head of the Department 

Professor J. T. Hilton 

Associate Professor J. G. Lewis;* Assistant Professor G. R. Culberson 

Purpose. — The purpose of this Department is to instruct students in the 
theory and practice of producing yarns and hosiery; to cooperate with mills 
in solving manufacturing problems through research and experimentation; 
and to manufacture the yarns used in the weave room. This Department is 
located on the top of the Textile Building. 

Opening and Picking. — The opening and picking equipment is placed in a 
separate room and consists of bale breaker, vertical opener, C.O.B. and 
condenser, breaker picker, and finisher lapper. 

Carding and Spinning. — This equipment occupies two rooms. The larger 
one is used for instruction. The machinery consists of cards, regular and 
controlled-draft drawing frames, fly frames, spinning frames, warper, 
spooler, winders, regular and fancy twisters, and a complete unit of combing 
machinery for the production of fine yarns. The smaller room contains a 
complete unit of carding and spinning machinery, including several types 
of long-draft spinning; it is used as an experimental laboratory. Thus 
student instruction and experimental work do not conflict. Both rooms are 
equipped with Parks-Cramer humidifiers. 



* On military leave. 



The School of Textiles 155 

Woolen. — This equipment, placed in a separate room on the basement 
floor, consists of a complete woolen unit made by Davis and Furber, and 
a Universal winder. 

Knitting. — This department is equipped with a variety of circular knitting 
machines for making children's hose, ladies' hose, and men's plain and 
fancy half hose. It is also equipped with a Wildman single head, single unit 
full-fashioned hosiery machine, Merrow sewing machine, loopers, bottle 
bobbin winder, Universal winder and balances. 

Research Laboratory. — This laboratory is set up and equipped for the 
performance of physical tests on fibers, yarns, and fabrics. It has the most 
modern type of air conditioning designed specifically for the control of the 
dry bulb temperature and relative humidity within close tolerances and over 
a wide range of conditions. 

This laboratory is used for teaching, physical testing and research. 

Included in the laboratory equipment are the following: Suter-Webb 
fiber sorter, Pressley fiber strength instrument, several tension and other 
types of balances, several combination skein and cloth breaking machines, 
inclined plane testers, single strand testers, Moscrop multiple and single 
strand tester, Mullen bursting strength tester, dry-ovens, abrasion ma- 
chines, twist testers, densometers, hydrostatic pressure tester, microscopic 
equipment, automatic reels, yarn quadrants, and many other types of 
laboratory equipment. 

The curriculum in Yarn Manufacture is listed with the other Textile 
curricula. 

Weaving and Designing 

Professor T. R. Hart, Head of the Department 

Professors Thomas Nelson, W. E. Shinn 

* Assistant Professor J. A. Porter, Jr. 

♦Instructor, W. E. Moser 

Purpose. — The purpose of this Department is to instruct students in the 
theory and practice of weaving and designing fabrics ranging from simple 
print cloths to elaborate leno and jacquard creations, to cooperate with the 
home economics department of North Carolina colleges in creating con- 
sumer interest in textile products, to cooperate with mills in solving manu- 
facturing problems through research and experimentation. This Department 
is located on the second floor of the Textile Building. 

Weave Room. — This room contains a larger variety of looms than can be 
found in any textile mill. These have been carefully selected so that the 
students may obtain a knowledge of the different cotton, rayon, and silk 
looms made in the United States. It also contains looms to produce such 
fabrics as print cloths, sheetings, denims and twill fabrics, ginghams, fancy 
shirtings, dress goods, and plush, as well as fancy leno and jacquard fabrics. 
The weave room has been modernized so that the students can be trained in 

• On military leave. 



156 State College Catalog 

the technique of manufacturing fancy cotton, rayon, and combination 
fabrics on automatic, dobby, and jacquard looms. Other equipment in the 
weave room includes Universal filling winders, braiders and Bahnson 
humidifiers. 

Warp Preparation. — Short warps in the School of Textiles are made on the 
silk and rayon equipment in this department, which consists of a silk and 
rayon skein winder, and a combination warper and beamer. Other equip- 
ment includes a slasher and cotton beaming frame. 

Designing and Fabric Analysis. — A full equipment of design boards for 
single and double cloths is provided in the classrooms. Dies for cutting 
samples and different makes of balances, and microscopes are provided for 
the analysis of fabrics. Other designing equipment includes an enlarging 
camera, card cutting pianos and card lacing equipment. 

The curriculum in Weaving and Designing is listed with the other Textile 
curricula. 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Professor A. H. Grimshaw, Head of the Department 
Assistant Professor A. C. Hayes 

Purpose. — The purpose of this Department is to instruct students in the 
theory and practice of dyeing, printing, and finishing yarns and fabrics; to 
conduct experiments; to cooperate with the mills of the State in solving 
problems relating to the dyeing and finishing of textile products ; to dye the 
yarns used in the weave room to produce fabrics. This Department is located 
on the basement floor of the building. 

Equipment. — The Dye Laboratory is fitted up with work tables, balances, 
steam baths, drying oven, and other apparatus for experimental dyeing, dye 
testing, color matching, and the testing of dyed samples by acids and 
alkalies. It also contains roller, spray, and screen printing apparatus. 

The Dye House is equipped with kier; raw stock, package, skein, and 
hosiery dyeing machines; a cloth dyeing machine of the creel type; hydro- 
extractor; raw stock dryer and other equipment needed in the dyeing of 
larger quantities of material and in giving instruction in boiling out, 
bleaching, and dyeing raw stock, skeins, warps, hosiery, and piece goods. 

The Research Laboratory contains microscopes, photo-micrographic 
cameras and projector, fade-ometer, launder-ometer, pH apparatus, vis- 
cosimeters, extractors, separator, analytical balances, electric oven, equip- 
ment for testing oil and finishing compounds, as well as the analytical 
equipment generally used by textile chemists. It also contains a dark room 
fully equipped for photographic work. 

The curriculum in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing is listed with the other 
Textile curricula. 



The School of Textiles 157 

Textile Research 

Malcolm E. Campbell, Director 
George H. Dunlap, Technologist 

Members of the School of Textiles staff devote a considerable portion of 
their time each year to problems of applied research submitted to the 
School by mills. Emphasis is given to the practical aspects of such work, in 
order that the results may be of immediate value to the mills. 

It is the function of the Technologist to visit as many mills as possible 
during the year, to discuss their technical problems and whenever possible 
to assist them in planning and setting up research projects in the mills. 
Also, he frequently brings back to the School technical problems which can 
be answered either through consultation with the staff or through special 
work in the laboratories of the School. 

Under terms of a special agreement with the Textile Research Institute, 
Inc., and the War Production Board, a research project is now under way, 
the purpose of which is to investigate and recommend ways and means of 
increasing the production of cotton carding machines with a minimum of 
damage to the product. 

The equipment available for research is listed under the Departments. 

CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE MANUFACTURING 

*Freshman Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

Composition, Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Physics for Textile Students, Phys. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Mathematics of Finance, 

Math. Ill, 112, 113 4 4 4 

Shopwork, M.E. 121, 122, 123 1 1 1 

Engineering Drawing I, M.E. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Textile Principles Lab., Tex. 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Yarn Calculations, Tex. 105 1 o 

Cloth Calculations, Tex. 131 2 

Military Science I, Mil. 101, 102, 103 or 

World History, Hist. 104 2 2 2 

Fundamental Activities and Hygiene, P.E. 101, 102, 103 111 



19 18 20 



^Sophomore Year 



Economic History, Hist. 101, 102, 103 3 3 8 

Decorative Drawing, Arch. 106, or 

Light in Industry, Phys. 311 3 

Light in Industry, Phys. 311, or 

Decorative Drawing, Arch. 106 3 

General Inorganic Chemistry, Chem. 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

English or Modern Language 3 3 

Yarn Manufacture I, Tex. 201, 202, 205 1 1 3 

Power Weaving, Tex. 231, 232, 234 1 3 

Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 235, 236 2 2 

Knitting I, Tex. 207, 208, 209, 211 3 1 1 

tMilitary Science II, Mil. 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Sports Activities, P.E. 201, 202, 203 1 1 1 

20 20 20 

* Freshman and sophomore years for all Textile curricula. 

t Or six credits in one or two of the following departments : Economics, Psychology, 
History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Sociology. 



158 



State College Catalog 



Junior Year 



COURSES 



CREDITS 
First Term Second Term Third Term 



English or Modern Language 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Textile Calculations I, Tex. 345 

Yarn Manufacture II, Tex. 301, 302, 303, 304 1 

Dobby Weaving, Tex. 331, 332, 333, 335 1 

Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342 3 

Dyeing I, Tex. 371, 372, 373, 375 4 

Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 

Cotton Quality I & II, Tex. 420, 421 

Electives 3 

18 



18 



Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325, 326, 333 3 

•♦Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

♦♦Applied Psychology, Psychol. 337 

♦♦Industrial Psychology. Psychol. 338 

Yarn Manufacture IV, Tex. 401, 402, 403, 405 4 

Leno Design, Tex. 441 3 

Dobby Design, Tex. 443 

Jacquard Design, Tex. 445 

Cotton and Ravon Weaving, Tex. 431, 432, 435 1 

Cotton and Rayon Dyeing I, Tex. 471, 472, 473, 474 1 

Fabric Analysis, Tex. 451, 452 2 

Textile Microscopy I, Tex. 475 

Electives 3 

20 



3 


3 








3 








3 


1 


1 








3 








3 


1 


3 


4 


1 


2 








1 


3 


3 



20 



18 



♦♦ Principles of Accounting, Econ. 301, 302, 303, may be substituted for Psychology 200, 
337, 338. 



CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY AND DYEING 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manufacturing. 



Junior Year 



English or German 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200, or 

Textile course 

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, 

Chem. 211, 212, 223 4 

Dyeing II, Tex. 377, 378, 379, 381, 382 5 

Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 

Cotton Quality I & II, Tex. 420, 421 

Electives 3 

18 



18 



19 



Senior Year 



Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325, 326, 333 3 

Organic Chemistry, Chem. 421, 422, 423 4 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 337, or Textile course .... 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338, or Textile course . . 

Textile Miscroscopy II, Tex. 489, 490 1 

Textile Printing, Tex. 483, 484. 485, 487 4 

Cotton and Rayon Dyeing II, Tex. 477, 478, 479, 480, 481 2 

Electives 6 

20 




1 
1 
6 
3 

20 



3 
4 

3 

1 
5 
3 

19 



The School of Textiles 159 

CURRICULUM IN YARN MANUFACTURING 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manufacturing. 

Junior Year 

COURSES First Term 

English or Modern Language 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 

Accounting I, Econ. 301, 302 3 

Yarn Manufacturing III, Tex. 310, 311 

Yarn Manufacturing Lab. Ill, Tex. 307, 308, 309 2 

Dobby Weaving, Tex. 331, 332, 333, 335 1 

Dyeing I, Tex. 371, 372, 373, 375 4 

Cotton Quality I & II, Tex. 420, 421 

Electives 3 

19 19 19 



Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325, 326, 333 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 337 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338 

Machine Shop II, M.E. 227, 228, 229 . 1 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I, E.E. 320, 321 .. . 3 

Textile Calculations II, Tex. 413 3 

Yarn Manufacturing V, Tex. 407, 408, 409, 411, 412 5 

Manufacturing Problems, Tex. 415 

Electives 3 



CREDITS 




Second Term 


Third Term 








3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


4 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 



3 


3 








3 








3 


1 


1 


3 











5 


2 





3 


3 


6 



21 18 18 



160 



State College Catalog 



CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE MANAGEMENT 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manufacturing. 



Junior Year 



COURSES 



CREDITS 
First Term Second Term Third Term 



English or Modern Language 

Accounting I, Econ. 301, 302, 303 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 802, 203 

Yarn Manufacture II, Tex. 301. 802. 803, 304 

Cotton Quality I & II, Tex. 420, 421 

Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 

Textile courses 

Electives 



I 

c 

3 

1 

: 
o 

5 

I 



c< 
I 
I 

4 

£ 

•: 

2 

I 



lr 



Senior Year 

Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325, 326, 333 3 

Marketing Methods and Sales Management, 

Econ. 311, 312, 313 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 337 

Industrial Psychology, PsychoL 338 

Textile courses 8 

Electives 8 



3 


1 








3 








8 


8 


7 


8 


3 



Textile courses to be selected from: 

Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 842 

Dobby Weaving, Tex. 331, 832, 333, 835 

Dyeing, Tex. 371, 372, 373, 875 

Textile Calculations, 845 or 413 

Yarn Manufacture TV, Tex. 401. 402, 403, 405 

Leno Design, Tex. 441 

Dobby Design. Tex. 443 

Jacquard Design, Tex. 445 

Calculating Fabric Costs, Tex. 344 

Cotton and Rayon Weaving, Tex. 431, 432, 435 
Cotton and Rayon Dyeing, Tex. 471, 472, 473, 474 

Fabric Analysis, Tex. 451, 452 

Manufacturing Problems, Tex. 415 

Color in Woven Design, Tex. 455, 456 

Wool Manufacture, Tex. 416, 417, 418 

Textile Microscopy I, Tex. 475 

Textile Testing, Tex. 457, 8, 9 



:: 



:. 



The School of Textiles 161 

CURRICULUM IN WEAVING AND DESIGNING 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same as for Textile Manufacturing. 

Junior Year 

CREDITS 
COURSES First Term Second Term Third Term 

English or Modern Language 3 

General Economics, Econ. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Appreciation of Fine Arts, Arch. Ill, 112, or 

Textile courses 3 3 

Textile Calculations I, Tex. 345 

Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342 3 3 

Jacquard Design, Tex. 445 3 

Dobby Weaving, Tex. 335, 337, 338, 339 2 2 5 

Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 

Cotton Quality I & II, Tex. 420, 421 3 3 

Electivea 3 3 3 



17 17 21 



Senior Year 



Industrial Management, Personnel Management, 

Econ. 325, 326, 333 3 

Introduction to Psychology, Psychol. 200 3 

Applied Psychology, Psychol. 337 

Industrial Psychology, Psychol. 338 

Leno Design, Tex. 441 3 

Dobby Design, Tex. 443 

Textile Testing, Tex. 457, 8, 9 1 

Jacquard Design Laboratory, Tex. 447, 448, 449 1 

Cotton Rayon Weaving, Tex. 435, 437, 438, 439 2 

Color in Woven Design, Tex. 455, 456 3 

Fabric Analysis. Tex. 451, 452 2 

Textile Microscopy I, Tex. 475 

Electives 3 



3 


3 








3 








3 








3 





1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


4 


3 





2 








1 


3 


3 



21 21 16 



The Graduate School of the University of 
North Carolina 

STATE COLLEGE DIVISION 

William Whatley Pierson, Jr., Dean, Chapel Hill 
Zeno Payne Metcalf, Associate Dean of the Graduate School, Raleigh 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors 

D. B. Anderson, PhD Botany 

L. D. Baver, Ph.D. Agronomy 

E. W. Boshart, M.A Teacher Education 

C. H. Bostian, Ph.D Zoology 

T. E. Browne, M.A. Teacher Education 

W. H. Browne, Jr., B.E. Electrical Engineering 

*J. D. Clark, M.A English 

J. K. Coggin, M.S Teacher Education 

N. W. Conner, M.S. Engineering Mechanics 

L. E. Cook, M.S Teacher Education 

Gertrude M. Cox, M.S. Experimental Statistics 

R. W. Cummin gs, Ph.D. Agrommy 

R. S. Dearstyne, M.S Poultry 

J. B. Derieux, Ph.D. Physics 

T. C. Doody, PhJ) Chemical Engineering 

*H. A. Fisher, LL.D Mathematics 

G. W. Forster, Ph.D Agricultural Economics 

R. S. Fouraker, M.S. Electrical Engineering 

B. B. Fulton, Ph.D Entomology 

M. E. Gardner, B.S Horticulture 

fA. F. Greaves- Walker, D.Sc Ceramic Engineering 

A. H. Grimshaw, M.S. Textile Chemistry 

F. M. Haig, M.S Animal Industry 

C. H. Hamilton, Ph.D. Rural Sociology 

*T. P. Harrison, Ph.D., LL.D English 

T. R. Hart, M.S. Textiles 

t*L. C. Hartley, Ph.D English 

C. M. Heck, M.A Physics 

J. T. Hilton, M.S Textiles 

*L. E. Hinkle, D.S. es L. Modern Language 

E. G. Hoef er, M.E Mechanical Engineering 

J. V. Hofmann, Ph.D Forestry 

E. H. Hostetler, M.S A-;;:. 2.'. Iri^stry 

*A. I. Ladu, Ph.D English 

fB. E. Lauer, Ph.D Chemical Engineering 



* Humanities gTonp advisory and minors only. 



J. 


R. 


J. 


F. 


c. 


L. 


F. 


H. 


G. 


K. 


T. 


B. 


C. 


G. 



Graduate School 163 

JM. C. Leager, Ph.D. Accounting and Statistics 

J. E. Lear, E.E Electrical Engineering 

S. G. Lehman, Ph.D Botany 

Ludington, Ph.D. Industrial Arts Education 

Lutz, Ph.D Soils 

Mann, C.E Civil Engineering 

. McCutcheon, Ph.D Zoology 

Middleton, Ph.D Agronomy 

Mitchell, D.Sc. Zoology 

Mumf ord, Ph.D. Mathematics 

Thomas Nelson, D.Sc. Textiles 

E. E. Randolph, Ph.D Chemical Engineering 

R. B. Rice, A.M . Experimental Engineering 

R. H. Ruffner, M.S Animal Husbandry 

G. H. Satterfield, M. A Chemistry 

W. E. Shinn, M.S Textiles 

I. V. Shunk, Ph.D Botany 

G. W. Smith, D.Sc Engineering Mechanics 

J. W. Smith, M.S Teacher Education 

R. 0. Stevens, M.S Zoology 

J. L. Stuckey, Ph.D Geology 

W. G. Van Note, M.S Mechanical Engineering 

L. L. Vaughan, M.E Mechanical Engineering 

B. W. Wells, Ph.D Botany 

L. F. Williams, Ph.D Chemistry 

A. J. Wilson, Ph.D. Chemistry 

Sanf ord Winston, Ph.D Sociology 

f L. Wyman, M.F Forestry 

Associate Professors 

*S. T. Ballenger, A.M Modern Language 

C. R. Bramer, E.M. Civil Engineering 

JR. R. Brown, M.S. in E.E Electrical Engineering 

*R. C. Bullock, Ph.D Mathematics 

f*J. W. Cell, Ph.D Mathematics 

J. M. Clarkson, Ph.D Experimental Statistics 

E. R. Collins, Ph.D Agronomy 

* A. M. Fountain, Ph.D English 

H. C. Gauger, M.S Poultry 

R. E. L. Greene, Ph.D Agricultural Economics 

fR. Harkema, Ph.D Zoology 

F. W. Lancaster, B.S. in Ch.E Physics 

f * J. Levine, Ph.D Mathematics 

|W. McGehee, Ph.D Psychology 

W. D. Miller, Ph.D Forestry 

* Humanities group advisory and minors only. 
t On military leave. 
t On leave. 



164 State College Catalog 

*E. H. Paget, M.A English 

W. A. Reid, Ph.D Chemistry 

J. A. Rigney, M.S Agronomy 

B. W. Smith, M.S Agronomy 

Assistant Professors 

M. F. Buell, Ph.D Botany 

fj. M. Parker, III, Ph.D Geology 

C. F. Smith, Ph.D Entomology 

fL. A. Whitf ord, Ph.D Botany 

Organization 

Purposes. — Graduate Instruction at State College is organized to formu- 
late and develop graduate study and research in the fields primarily of 
Agriculture, Engineering, and Textile Manufacturing, and in the training of 
teachers of these subjects. The urgent need for graduate instruction lead- 
ing to research in these fields is recognized by the leaders in the occupations 
which depend upon the development of these branches of industry. State 
College, therefore, offers training for teachers, investigators, and leaders in 
Agriculture, Engineering, and Manufacturing. Moreover, unless graduate 
study and research in the technological and related fields are provided, the 
institutions of higher learning in this section of the country will look else- 
where for trained men, whereas there should be a fair balance of such men 
from every section of the country. 

Facilities. — State College offers exceptional facilities and opportunities 
for research. The Agricultural Experiment Station of North Carolina, the 
Engineering Experiment Station, and the Research Laboratories of the 
Textile School are integral parts of the College. In the Textile School, be- 
sides the research carried on by regular members of the staff, the Bureau 
of Agricultural Economics and other Bureaus at Washington have, for some 
years, used the facilities of the School for special research. Graduate stu- 
dents have the advantages offered by all these agencies in addition to the 
regular laboratories used for instruction. 

In its undeveloped resources and raw materials, as well as in its going 
concerns in business and industry, in its varied topography and products, 
North Carolina is a rich field for research. The State is already imbued with 
a spirit of progress stimulating to intellectual growth. 

Scholarships and Fellowships. — The College offers annually graduate fel- 
lowships and a number of teaching and research fellowships. Besides these, 
special fellowships are supported by various commercial organizations. 

College Fellowships give tuition and a stipend of $450 an academic year, 
paid in nine equal installments, a month apart, beginning October 25. The 
holder of a fellowship may be required to render a maximum of ten hours 
a week of service to the Department in which he is specializing. 

* Humanities group advisory and minors only. 
t On military leave. 



Graduate School 165 

Teaching and Research Fellowships give $>t>00 or more an academic year. 
The holder of one of these fellowships may not carry more than half of a full 
schedule of graduate studies. The rest of his time must be given to teach- 
ing in classroom or laboratory, or to research in one of the Experiment 
Stations. 

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship, State College Chapter, 
offers $50 annually, preferably to a member of the Society, to assist in 
promoting research, and advanced training of worthy students. 

Special Fellowships have for some years been maintained by business or 
manufacturing organizations desirous of having research made on certain 
problems pertaining to their interest. Some organizations maintaining these 
scholarships have been the National Fertilizer Association, the N. V. Potash 
Export My., the American Cyanamids Company, the Superphosphate Insti- 
tute, E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Company, the Niagara Sprayer and 
Chemical Company, Eli Lilly and Company, the American Potash Institute, 
and the Northwestern Yeast Company. The stipends afforded by these 
fellowships have varied from $720 to $1,500 for twelve months. It is hoped 
that some of these may be available every year. 

DEGREES 

The degrees awarded by the Graduate Division of State College are 
either degrees in residence: Master of Science in some specialized branch 
of Agriculture, Education, Engineering, and Textiles; and the Master's 
degree in some profession related to the undergraduate work at State 
College; or Professional degrees in the fields of Agriculture, Engineering 
and Textiles. 

A graduate student is expected to familiarize himself with the require- 
ments for the degree for which he is a candidate and is held responsible for 
the fulfillment of these requirements. This applies to the last dates on 
which theses may be accepted, the dates for examination, the proper form 
for theses and all other matters regarding requirements for degrees. 

Degrees in Residence 
Admission 

1. A candidate for admission to graduate study must present an authorized 
transcript of his collegiate record as evidence that he holds a bachelor's 
degree for a four years' undergraduate course from a college whose stand- 
ards are equivalent to those of State College. 

2. All new graduate students must present to the Office of Registration 
written authorization from the Associate Dean of the Graduate School to 
enter the graduate school before permits to register can be given them. 

3. Graduate students must file in the Office of Registration an application 
for admission before permits to register can be given them. 

4. Official transcripts of undergraduate and graduate work taken at other 
institutions must be filed in the Office of Registration before the period of 
registration closes. 



166 State College Catalog 

5. It should be clearly understood that admission to the Graduate Division 
does not necessarily admit a student to full graduate status. A student at- 
tains full graduate status only when he has fulfilled all the preliminary re- 
quirements of the degTee which he seeks and the prerequisites of the depart- 
ment under whose direction he is pursuing graduate work. 

Department prerequisites are determined jointly by the Administrative 
Board of the Graduate Division and the heads of the respective depart- 
ments. In brief, it may be stated that such prerequisites usually consist 
of the equivalent of an undergraduate major. 

6. A member of the senior class of State College may. upon the approval 
of the Associate Dean of the Graduate School, register for graduate umiiiwii 
to fill a roster of studies not to exceed eighteen credits for any term. 

7. Members of the faculty of State College having a rank higher than that 
of instructor may not be considered as candidates for advanced degrees at 

this institution. 

Master of Science Degree 

The Master of Science Degree is awarded at State College after comple- 
tion of a course of study in a specialized field related to Agriculture, Educa- 
tion, Engineering, or Textiles; demonstration of ability to read a modern 
foreign language; and completion of a satisfactory thesis and of compre- 
hensive examinations in the chosen field of study. 

The rules and requirements governing the degree of Master of Science 
are set forth in some detail in the following paragraphs. 

In addition to complying with these purely mechanical requirements, the 
candidate for the Master of Science degree should understand something 
of the philosophy of graduate study. He is entering the field of research 
since he is engaged in a technical study of a single field of learning, and 
this study culminates in work upon a single problem, the subject of his 
thesis, in the solution of which he is required to give evidence of the mastery 
of graduate methods of investigations. He is concerned with the material? 
of learning, and with the organization and interpretation of these materials. 
Since the training is thought of as liberal, as great a latitude is permitted 
in the selection of course; as .; : :mpatible with the idea of a sharply defined 
field of major interest and wiHi the requirement of interrelationship in the 
whole plan of study. The object is to make possible for the student a rela- 
tive mastery of one of the applied sciences and to give him an introduction 
to critical scholarship and research methods. A beginning is made in the 
training of the specialist; h en c e the correlation of courses, the oral and 
written examinations, and the thesis. Since there are many possible com- 
binations of courses, the method of administration provides for personal 
supervision of a student's work by a special committee. 

Development of precision and method in investigation and the cultivation 
of power of criticism and evaluation of evidence, together with the enlarged 
mastery of the subject matter of a denned field, constitute a training of 



Graduate School 167 

indisputable value to the students who plan to enter the so-called learned 
professions or industry. Research is the way of progress in each activity. 

Credits. — 1. For the Master of Science degree forty -five term credits 
are required. 

2. Not more than ten of the academic credits required for a graduate 
degree will be accepted from other institutions. 

3. No graduate credit will be allowed for excess undergraduate credit 
from any other institution. 

4. All work credited toward a degree in residence must be completed 
within six years. 

Residence. — A candidate for a Master of Science degree is required to be 
in residence at the College, pursuing graduate work, one full academic year 
of three terms. The candidate is not permitted to take courses leading to 
forty-five credits in a shorter time. 

Six summer schools of six weeks in residence at the College are sufficient 
to fulfill the residence requirement. By specific approval of the Associate 
Dean of the Graduate School one summer period may be spent away from 
the College if devoted to the preparation of the thesis required for gradua- 
tion. 

In special cases, it is possible for graduate students to secure permission 
from the Associate Dean of the Graduate School to do twelve weeks work 
during a summer session. Under these provisions a minimum of four 
summer sessions, two of twelve weeks and two of six weeks, are required 
for residence. 

This does not mean that the work prescribed for each individual can 
always be completed in the minimum length of time. Inadequate preparation 
very frequently makes a longer period necessary. Part-time work during 
a regular term is evaluated on the basis of the amount of work carried. 

Courses of Study. — As designated in the College Catalog under Descrip- 
tion of Courses, the courses numbered 500 to 599 are for graduate students 
only, and those numbered 400 to 499 are for graduates and advanced 
undergraduates. 

The program of the student shall contain at least twelve credits in courses 
of the 500 group. A maximum of 33 credits may be gained in the 400 group. 

During the first term in residence the student's program will be made 
up by his adviser with the approval of the chief adviser of his School 
and the Associate Dean of the Graduate School. Thereafter, the selection of 
courses shall be made by the graduate student's Advisory Committee. These 
advisory committees shall be appointed by the Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School not later than the student's second term of residence. 

All study plans are subject to the approval of the Administrative Board 
of the Graduate Division. 

The advanced courses taken by a graduate student shall constitute a 
unified plan of study. The greater percentage of courses on a graduate 
student's program shall be in his major field and the electives shall have 
graduate relationship to the major field. 



168 State College Catalog 

Class Work. — Since a graduate student is mature and has demonstrated 
his ability and earnestness, he is expected to assume greater individual 
responsibility and to work in a more comprehensive manner than the under- 
graduate student. However, in preparation, in attendance, and in all the 
routine of class work, the graduate student is subject to the regulations 
observed in other divisions of the College. 

Grades. — A minimum grade of B must be made on all courses to obtain 
graduate credit. 

Language Requirements. — 1. A reading knowledge of at least one modern 
foreign language is required of candidates for the Master of Science degree. 
The knowledge will be tested by a special examination by the Modern Lan- 
guage Department. 

2. A candidate for a Master of Science degree is presumed to have 
a mastery of technical writing. Students will be required to demonstrate 
this proficiency before they are admitted to candidacy for a degree. 

Thesis. — 1. A candidate for the Master of Science degree must prepare 
a thesis upon a subject, approved by his adviser, in the field of the student's 
special work. Two copies of the completed thesis must be presented to the 
Associate Dean of the Graduate School at least one month before the degree 
is awarded. 

2. Detailed instruction in the writing of the thesis will be given to the 
student when he is admitted as a candidate for the degree. 

3. In order to be approved, a thesis must be written in correct English 
and scholarly form. It must demonstrate the student's ability to handle 
original problems and the method of development must conform to the prin- 
ciples of the scientific method. 

Examinations. — Candidates for the Master of Science degree must pass 
all required examinations in courses. In addition, two special examinations 
are required. The first of these, a written examination to determine the 
student's comprehension of his field, is to be set by the student's Advisory 
Committee and must be taken not earlier than the first month of the last 
quarter of residence. The second examination is oral and is especially de- 
signed for the defense of the thesis. These examinations are to be conducted 
by special committees appointed by the Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School and will be held after each committee member has examined the 
completed thesis. 

These examinations must satisfy the committee which has charge of them 
that the candidate possesses such knowledge of his major and minor fields as 
may reasonably be expected, that he can draw upon his knowledge with 
promptness and accuracy, and that his thinking is not limited to the separate 
units represented by his courses. 

The special committees on theses and on the examinations will report their 
recommendations to the Associate Dean of the Graduate School at least one 
week before the end of the last quarter of residence. If the candidate's record 
in these respects is satisfactory, and if he has complied with all of the 



Graduate School 169 

requirements for the degree, the Associate Dean of the Graduate School will 
report the student to the faculty for approval and recommendation to the 
Board of Trustees. 

Fees 

The graduate student in residence will pay a $2.00 registration fee for 
each registration, $3.00 per credit hour for all courses scheduled and $10.00 
for his diploma. 

Master's Degree in a Professional Field 

The Master's degree was established to meet the needs of those students 
who expect to terminate their graduate work at the end of one year of 
residence or its equivalent and whose needs are not fulfilled by the require- 
ments of the Master of Science degree. 

The candidate for this Master's degree must meet all the regulations 
of the Graduate Division for students in residence. In addition he must 
fulfill the following requirements: 

Course of Study. — The program of study for the Master's degree in a 
professional field is to be composed of those courses which best fit the pro- 
fessional aims of the student. At least 9 term credits are to be chosen 
from the group of courses numbered 500 for graduates only and the re- 
mainder from the group numbered 400 for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates. 

Degrees. — Examples of the types of degree that may be awarded upon 
the completion of the course of study in a professional field are: 

Master of Dairying 
Master of Civil Engineering 
Master of Vocational Education 
Master of Yarn Manufacturing 

The chief characteristic of these degrees is that the changes made in 
requirements permit, in greater measure, the satisfaction of what are 
represented as professional needs than do the requirements for the con- 
ventional Master of Science degree. The most important modification in 
the requirements and principles is the granting of relatively greater dis- 
persion in programs of study than is permissible under a strict application 
of the principle of interrelation of subjects in a specialized field. 

Language Requirements. — The candidate for a Master's degree in a pro- 
fessional field is exempt from the requirement of a reading knowledge of 
a modern foreign language. 

Other Requirements. — The other requirements for the Master's degree 
in a professional field, especially those concerning the thesis, residence and 
examination are the same as for the Master of Science degree. 



170 State College Catalog 

Professional Degrees 

Master of Agriculture Chemical Engineer 

Master of Textiles Civil Engineer 

Ceramic Engineer Electrical Engineer 
Mechanical Engineer 

Significance. — The professional degrees are not honorary; they are tests 
of ability and testimonials of accomplishment. To merit the professional 
degree, a candidate must write a thesis, which demonstrates his ability to 
attack and to solve a new problem of sufficient complexity to require dis- 
tinctly original processes, and the solution of which shall make, however 
small, a real contribution to his profession. The record of his work must 
demonstrate his power to conceive, to plan, to organize, to carry through to 
completion a project of considerable magnitude. The candidate should quite 
obviously have grown professionally since his graduation and evince intel- 
lectual vitality to guarantee the continuance of his growth. 

Requirements 

1. The degree of Master of Agriculture may be conferred upon graduates 
of State College after five years of service in agriculture, or upon graduates 
of similar institutions who have performed outstanding professional service 
in agriculture for the State of North Carolina for a continuous period of 
not less than five years. The candidate for the degree of Master of Agri- 
culture must submit a satisfactory thesis which demonstrates his ability 
to handle an original problem related to his professional service in agri- 
culture. 

2. The degrees in Engineering or the Master of Textiles may be conferred 
upon graduates of State College after five years' professional practice in 
responsible charge of important work, upon the acceptance of a thesis on 
a subject related to the practice in which the applicant has been engaged. 

3. Applications for the degree must be presented to the Associate Dean of 
the Graduate School not less than nine months before the degree is 
conferred. 

4. With the application for a degree, the candidate must present for 
approval the subject and outline of a thesis and a detailed statement of his 
professional work since graduation. 

5. The preliminary copy of the thesis must be submitted to the Associate 
Dean of the Graduate School at least four months before the commencement 
at which the degree is to be conferred. The completed thesis in approved 
form must be submitted at least two months before the degree is awarded. 

6. When his thesis and detailed statement of his professional work have 
been approved, the candidate shall appear before his Advisory Committee 
for oral or written examination on his professional work and thesis. 

Fees 

The candidate for a Professional Degree will pay $10.00 when he matricu- 
lates and S15.00 for his diploma. 



Division of College Extension 171 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in cooperation with The 
University at Chapel Hill under supervision of the Graduate School of 
the Consolidated University of North Carolina. 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in certain specified depart- 
ments. Graduate students who expect to become candidates for the degree 
are already registered in the Departments of: 

Agricultural Economics Entomology 

Agronomy Plant Pathology 

Rural Sociology 

Offerings will be provided in other departments as rapidly as personnel 
and facilities can be developed. 

Information 

Further information about graduate work at State College may be secured 
from Z. P. Metcalf, Associate Dean of the Graduate School, N. C. State 
College, Raleigh, N. C. 



DIVISION OF COLLEGE EXTENSION 

Edward W. Ruggles, Director 

Purpose. — The College Extension Division is organized to carry the prac- 
tical and cultural advantage of college studies to persons who cannot at- 
tend classes on the campus, and to groups and communities that may profit 
by the service offered through the following means. 

Extension Classes are organized where at least fifteen persons are inter- 
ested and willing to take up the same subject. Such matters as the distance 
from the college, the nature of the subject, and the availability of instruc- 
tors must be taken into consideration. 

Correspondence Courses for college credit are offered in Agronomy, Ani- 
mal Husbandry, Horticulture, Soils, Poultry, Agricultural Economics, Rural 
Sociology, Chemistry, Education, Economics, English, Geology, History, 
Architectural Engineering, Ceramic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 
Mathematics, Modern Languages, Sociology, Safety, and Zoology. The list of 
these courses is being added to as rapidly as possible. Complete information 
concerning them is included in the Bulletin of Correspondence Courses. 

Correspondence Courses of a practical nature are offered in Business 
English, Mathematics, Industrial Electricity, Land Surveying, Plumbing, 
Engineering Drawing, Building and Estimating, Sheet-metal Pattern Draft- 
ing, Municipal Administration, Poultry, Business Law, and Vegetable Gar- 
dening. In addition, the courses in Ceramic Engineering may be taken as 
practical where no credit is desired. 



172 State College Catalog 

Short Courses are offered by the College Extension Division to tie up the 
facilities of the several Schools of State College with the trades and indus- 
tries of North Carolina into a permanent educational program. In carrying 
out this program, short courses of a practical nature are offered every year 
which are increasing in popularity. During the present school year the fol- 
lowing short courses and institutes are scheduled: Electrical Meters and 
Relays, Engineers, Surveyors, Gas-Plant Operators, Water-Works Men, 
Retail Coal Merchants, Electrical Contractors, Building Inspectors, and a 
Safety School for Truck Operators. Additional courses are being added as 
the demand arises. 

College Extension Lectures by members of the faculty and concerts by 
the college musical organizations are available to any high school, civic 
club, woman's club, science club, agricultural or engineering meeting or 
organization, desiring to put on a good lecture or musical program. 

Engineering, Science, and Management War Training. — Under the aus- 
pices of the United States Office of Education, and in cooperation with the 
School of Engineering, the College Extension Division offers Engineering, 
Science, and Management War Training courses designed to meet the 
shortage of engineers, scientists, and production supervisors with specialized 
training in fields essential to war industries. Courses offered include: Aerial 
Bombardment Protection, Aircraft Inspection, Aircraft Instruments, Archi- 
tectural and Marine Drafting, Chemical Testing and Inspection, Diesel Engi- 
neering, Engineering Drawing, Fabric Inspection and Testing, Production 
Supervision, Radio Communication, and Surveying. Courses offered are 
divided into two groups: (1) Courses primarily directed toward employment 
in new fields. These will generally be given as full-time courses, either on 
or off North Carolina State College campus, and will involve at least 40 
hours a week in class and preparation. (2) Courses primarily directed 
toward training those now employed for increased responsibility or improved 
technique. These will generally be part-time evening courses, either on or 
off campus. They will involve about 15 hours a week in class and preparation. 

Bulletins describing the various functions of the Division will be gladly 
supplied on request. Write to Edward W. Ruggles, Director, College Ex- 
tension Division, North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Full Information. — Any person interested in extension classes or corre- 
spondence courses should write to the College Extension Division, requesting 
the Extension Bulletin, which contains complete information concerning 
methods of instruction, fees, and the conditions upon which College credit 
will be granted. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Aero. E. 300. General Aeronautics 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Math. 101, 2, 3. 

Required of juniors taking Aeronautical Engineering. A study of simple 
aerodynamics and the airplane. 

Text: Carter, Simple Aerodynamics. Mr. Truitt. 



Aero. E. 310. Elementary Aeronautics 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 201, 202, 203. 

Required of juniors taking Aeronautical Engineering. A study of the 
design of simple component parts of the airplane. 

Text: Anderson, Aircraft Layout and Detail Design. Staff. 



Aero. E. 332, 333. Air Transportation* 0-3-3 or 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: Aero. E. 310. 

The various phases of airport design, air transportation and airline 
operation are studied in this course. This includes a survey of existing con- 
ditions, factors governing development, topographic survey, runway layout, 
methods of aircraft operations, personnel organization and aviation law. 
Practical examples are studied at the University-owned and operated airport. 

Text: Lecturer's Notes. Dr. Friedrich. 



Aero. E. 351, 352. Advanced General Aeronautics* 6-6-0 or 0-6-6 

Elective. 

Ground school course for those students wishing to receive flight training 
under the Civil Aeronautics Administration Program. The scope of the 
course embraces Navigation, Meterology and the prescribed ground school 
subjects. 

Text: C.A.A. Manuals. Staff. 

Aero. E. 411, 412. Aircraft Manufacturing 0-3-3 or 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Aero. E. 310. 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Engineering. 
A study of airplane manufacturing principles, methods and processes. 
Text: Lecturer's Notes. Dr. Friedrich. 

* Will not be given in 1945-46. 



174 [Aeronautical Engineering] 

Aero. E. 421, 422, 423. Airplane Design 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: E.M. 313, 322, C.E. 321 and Aero. E. 310. 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Engineering. 

A study of the design and construction of airplanes. 

Text: Niles & Newell, Vol. I, Airplane Structures ; Teichmann, Airplane 
Design Manual. Mr. Rautenstrauch. 



Aero. E. 431, 432, 433. Aerodynamics 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Math. 303, Aero. E. 310. 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Engineering. 

A study of engineering aerodynamics, airplane performance and stability, 
and airworthiness specifications. 

Text: Diehl, Engineering Aerodynamics; Jones, Elements of Practical 
Aerodynamics. Mr. Rautenstrauch. 



Aero. E. 441, 442, 443. Aeronautical Laboratory 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: M.E. 313, 314, 315. 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Engineering. 

Laboratory testing and study of practical aspects of modern airplane 
construction, operation and maintenance. Staff. 



Aero. E. 451, 452. Aircraft Engines 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: M.E. 307, 308, 309. 

Required of seniors taking Aeronautical Engineering. 

The practical aspect of aircraft engine operation and design including 
carburetors, magnetos, super-chargers, fuel and oil systems, engine installa- 
tions and accessories. 

Text: Lecturer's Notes. Dr. Friedrich. 



Aero. E. 461. Aircraft Instruments and Navigation* 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Aero. E. 310 or 351 and 352. 

Elective. 

This course deals with the instruments used in aircraft engine operation, 
flight indication, and in navigation. The use, principle of operation, and 
calibration is studied in detail. The fundamentals of navigation include 
problems in navigation such as course plotting, radius of action from fixed 
and moving bases and interception. 

Text: Lecturer's Notes. Staff. 



* Will not be given in 1946-46. 



[Agricultural Economics] 175 

Aero. E. 471. Aircraft Propeller Design* 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Aero. E. 310. 

Elective. 

The various theories are discussed in this design course. This embraces 
effect of blade shape, tip speed, and gearing on propeller performance. The 
various types of propellers are studied in detail. 

Text: Wieck, Aircraft Propeller Design. Mr. Rautenstrauch. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Aero. E. 531, 532, 533. Advanced Aerodynamics 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Aero. E. 431, 432, 433. 
Advanced performance calculations and tests. Mr. Rautenstrauch. 



Aero. E. 541, 542, 543. Aeronautics Research 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Aero. E. 441, 442, 443. 
Research and thesis in connection with an aeronautical project. 

Dr. Friedrich. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Econ. 202. Agricultural Economics. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 205 or Econ. 201, 202. 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

The economics of agricultural production, the marketing of farm products, 
farm credit, land tenure, and other major economic problems of the farmer. 

Staff. 



Agr. Econ. 212. Land Economics. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 205 or 201, 202. 

Required of sophomores in Forestry, and in Wildlife Conservation and 
Management. 

Land economics including land classification and land use with special 
emphasis on forest land; land ownership and control; the principles of land 
valuation; policies of land settlement and development; the taxation of for- 
est lands. Staff. 



176 [A(SICULTURAL ECONOMICS] 

Agr. E<:on. 303. Farm Management I. 0-0-3 

Pr-rocuisioes : Ec:r.. 215 or 2:1. 202. 

Required of juniors in Agricultural Economics, Agriculture and Agricul- 
cural E iucar.:r.. 

Successful operation of the farm, farm planning, management of labor, 
farm work programs, uc of machinery, and farm administration. 

Messrs. Forster, Greene. 



Agr. Econ. 313. Farm Accounting. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 205 or 201, 202. 

Required of juniors in Vocational Agriculture. 

Earm accounting, preparation of inventories of farm property, simple 
fiwaiwHnl statements, methods of keeping farm records, analysis and the 
interpretation of results obtained from farm business transactions. 

Mr. Greene. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Econ. 402. 403. Farm Cost Accounting. 0-3-3 

Prereu.uisices : E::r.. 205 :: 201, 80S, and 301. 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. 

Accounting applied to farm transactions, the preparation of financial 
statements. cue ruerhods of keeping farm records, analysis of an individual 
farm record, the interpretation of the results from cost-accounting. 

Mr. Greene. 



Agr. Econ. 411. Agricultural Marketing. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 205 or 201, 202. 

r.e:o::-: :: sor.::rs :r. Agrir.il rural Economics. Agriculture, ar.i Voca- 
tional Education. 

Successful marketing of farm products, market organization and control, 
price-making forces; critical o::amination of the present system of market- 
i r. g : a rrr. p r o ducts , Mr. Leager. 



Agr. Econ. 412. Problems of Land Economics. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 additional term 

credits in Economics. 
E 1 ocrlve 
Land classification; ownership and acquisition of land; tenancy and land 

ownership ; the functions of the landlord and the tenant ; land valuation and 

land speculation. Messrs. Forster, Hamilton. 



[Agricultural Economics] 177 

Agr. Econ. 421. Marketing Methods and Problems. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 additional term 
credits in Economics. 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. 

The problems and methods involved in the marketing of farm products; 
suggestions for improvement. Mr. Kenyon. 

Agr. Econ. 422. Agricultural Cooperation. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 205 or 201, 202. 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. 

Local community cooperation, both economic and social; farmers' buying, 
selling, and service organizations. Mr. Kenyon. 

Agr. Econ. 423. Farm Management II. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Econ. 303. 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. 

The factors involved in the management and organization of typical 
farms in the State. Messrs. Greene, Forster. 

Agr. Econ. 431. Agricultural Prices. 3_0-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202, 303. 
Elective. 

Behavior of agricultural prices; their relation to consumption, production 
of farm products, and marketing practices; methods of price analysis 
applied to agricultural products. Mr. Anderson. 

Agr. Econ. 432. Agricultural Finance. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 205 or 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 additional 
term credits in Economics. 
Elective. 

Financing the production and marketing of agricultural products. Con- 
sideration of farm mortgage credit, personal and intermediate credit, and 
agricultural taxation. Mr. Leager. 

Agr. Econ. 442. Cotton and Tobacco Marketing. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 205 or 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202, Agr. Econ. 411, and 

3 additional credits in Economics. 

Required of seniors in Agricultural Economics. 

The problems, methods, and practices used in the marketing of tobacco 

and cotton. Mr. Forster. 



178 [Agricultural Economics] 

Agr. Econ. 452. History of the Agricultural Adjustment Program. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Economics of the Agricultural Adjustment Acts, and of the Agricultural 
Conservation Programs; the effect of the programs on production and 
prices of cotton, tobacco, wheat, corn, and hogs. Mr. Forster. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

Agr. Econ. 501. Economics of Agricultural Production. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202, and 6 additional term 

credits in Economics. 
Economic theories and methods of analyses applicable to agricultural 

production. Mr. Forster. 

Agr. Econ. 502. Farm Organization and Management. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Agr. Econ. 303, 423, 501, and 6 additional term credits in 

Economics. 

The extension of the economic principles discussed in Agr. Econ. 501, and 

their application to the problems of farm organization and management. 

Mr. Forster. 



Agr. Econ. 503. Agricultural Finance. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 432, and 6 additional term 

credits in Economics. 

Problems in financing agricultural production and marketing. A history 

of the development of financial institutions designed to serve agriculture. 

Mr. Leager. 

Agr. Econ. 513. Cooperative Marketing Methods and Practices. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 432, and 6 additional term 

credits in Economics. 

A critical study of the methods and practices used by large agricultural 

cooperatives. Mr 



Agr. Econ. 521, 522, 523. Research in Agricultural Economics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Economics 201, 202, and 6 additional term credits in 
Economics. 

A consideration of the research method and procedure now being em- 
ployed by research workers in the field of Agricultural Economics, including 
qualitative and quantitative, inductive and deductive methods of research 
procedure; choice of projects, planning, and execution of the research 
project. Messrs. Forster, Greene. 



[Agricultural Engineering] 179 

Agr. Econ. 531, 532, 533. Analysis of National Policies and 

Agricultural Action Programs. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, Agr. Econ. 202 and six additional term 
credits in Economics or Agricultural Economics. 

Critical discussion of modern methods of economic analysis from the 
viewpoint of their applicability to problems of economic policy : an examina- 
tion of the major agricultural action programs in the United States; the 
analysis of principles of economic policy with regard to their effect upon 
national and farm income and income distribution. Mr. Forster. 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Agr. Eng. 202. Farm Equipment. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Math. 100 or Physics 115 or 201. Required of sophomores 

in Agriculture. 

Modern equipment and buildings for the farm. Mr. Weaver. 



Agr. Eng. 212. Farm Engines. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Physics 115 or 201. Required of sophomores in Agr. Eng. 
and juniors in Animal Production and in Dairy Manufacturing. 

The principles of gas-engine operation and their application to farm uses ; 
selection, operation, and repair of engines. Mr. Giles. 



Agr. Eng. 222. Agricultural Drawing. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Drawing-board work covering both freehand sketching and elementary 
mechanical drawing; working and pictorial drawing, lettering, maps, 
graphs, tracing, and blueprinting. Mr. Weaver. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Eng. 303. Terracing and Drainage. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Soils 201 and Agr. Eng. 202. 

Required of juniors in Agr. Eng., juniors in Floriculture, Pomology and 
Vegetable Gardening, and of seniors in Animal Production, Poultry Science, 
and Farm Business. 

The different methods of disposing of surplus water and the prevention 
of erosion. Mr. Weaver. 



180 [Agricultural Engineering] 

Agr. Eng. 313. Farm Machinery and Tractors. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 202. 

Required of seniors in Agr. Eng., and in Poultry Science. 

The design, construction, and operation of modern labor-saving machinery 
for the farm. Mr. Giles. 

Agr. Eng. 322. Farm Buildings. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 202. 

Required of juniors in Agr. Eng., and seniors in Agr. Economics. 
The design, construction, and materials used in modern farm buildings. 

Mr. Weaver. 

Agr. Eng. 331, 332. Farm-Shop Work. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 202. 

Required of juniors in Agr. Eng., and in Vocational Agriculture. 

Lecture and laboratory practice, in drafting, sharpening farm tools, 
making concrete, woodworking, cold-metal working, forging, soldering, and 
pipe fitting. Mr. Giles. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Eng. 403. Erosion Prevention. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 303. 

Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. 

The causes and effects of erosion, and the methods of conserving our 
greatest national resource — our fertile soil. Mr. Weaver. 



Agr. Eng. 423. Farm Structures. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 322. 

Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. 

Modern building methods as applied to farm structures; the use of labor- 
saving barn equipment and methods of reducing labor to a minimum; 
the placing of the farm group in relation to topography and farm activities, 
for economy, appearance, and utility. Mr. Weaver. 



Agr. Eng. 432. Rural Electrification. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Agr. Eng. 322. 

Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. 

Problems involved in the distribution, uses, and costs of electricity on 
the farm. Mr. Weaver. 



[Animal Husbandry and Dairying] 181 

Agr. Eng. 433. Teaching Farm-Shop Work. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Agr. Eng. 331 and 332. 
Elective for juniors and seniors in Vocational Agriculture. 
The use and care of power tools; shop management and methods of 
presenting the subject matter. Messrs. Giles, Coggins. 



Agr. Eng. 481, 482, 483. Special Problems in Agricultural 

Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Agr. Eng. Three credits in 300 courses. 

Only one term required of seniors in Agr. Eng., other two elective. 

For students who desire advanced work in one of the following subjects: 

Farm Engines, Tractors, Farm Mach., Buildings, Conveniences, Rural 

Electrification, Erosion Control and Drainage. 

Messrs. Weaver, Giles. 



Agr. Eng. 491, 492, 493. Senior Seminar. 1-1.1 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Agr. Eng. 
Required of seniors in Agr. Eng. 

Students will be assigned special problems the results of which are to be 
presented to the class. Messrs. Weaver, Giles. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

A. H. 202. Animal Nutrition I. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

Animal nutrition; composition of the animal body; digestion; nutrients; 
feeding standards; calculating rations. Messrs. Haig, Ruffner. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 301. Farm Meats I. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in A. 

H. and seniors in Pomology and Poultry Science. 

Composition and value of meat, with practice in slaughtering and cutting. 

Mr. Brady. 



182 [Animal Husbandry and Dairying] 

A. H. 302. Farm Meats II. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: A. H. 301. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Study and practice in making retail cuts and curing pork, beef, and lamb. 

Mr. Brady. 



A. H. 303. Judging Block Animals. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Market and show-ring requirements for horses and mules, beef cattle, 
sheep, and swine. Breed characteristics of these animals in detail; practice 
judging of the relation of form to function in livestock. Mr. Brady. 



A. H. 311. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic 

Animals. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 102. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

The structure and functions of the animal body. Laboratory, lectures 
and recitations. Mr. Grinnells. 



A. H. 312. Judging Dairy Cattle. 0-3-0 

Show-ring requirements for the five major breeds of dairy cattle. Breed 
characteristics of these animals in detail; practice judging of the relation 
of form to function in dairy cattle. Mr. Haig. 



A. H. 313. Sheep Production. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. 

Establishment, care, and management of the farm flock. Mr. Foster. 



A. H. 321. Dairy Cattle and Milk Production. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Poultry Science and Agricultural Engineering. 

Management of dairy cattle for economical milk production, including 
dairy-breed characteristics, adaptation, selection, management, feeding, calf 
raising, dairy barn equipment. Mr. Haig. 



[Animal Husbandry and Dairying] 183 

A. H. 322. History of Breeds of Farm Animals. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod. Elective for juniors and seniors in 

Agriculture. 

Types, characteristics, and history of the leading strains and families of 

the different breeds of farm animals. Messrs. Ruffner, Haig. 



A. H. 323. Market Types of Livestock. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod. Elective for juniors and seniors in 

Agriculture. 

A study of block animals from both the market and feed lot standpoint. 

Mr. Hostetler. 



A. H. 331. Swine Production. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in Animal Production and seniors in Poultry Science. 
Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Adaptability of swine, with emphasis on feeding, judging, and manage- 
ment. Mr - Hostetler. 



A. H. 332. Testing of Milk Products. 0-4-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 

Animal Husbandry and juniors in Dairy Manufacturing. 

Testing of milk and milk products for butterfat, acidity, adulteration, 

preservatives, and sediment. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 333. Cheese Making. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 

Dairy Manufacturing. 

Lectures and laboratory practice in making various soft and hard cheeses 

usually made on a farm or in a cheese factory. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 341. Dairying. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod, and seniors in Vegetable Gardening. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Fundamentals of dairy-herd management in the production of milk and 

cream on the farm. Laboratory work: the use of the Babcock Test, butter 

making on the farm, operation of cream separators. Mr. Haig. 



184 [Animal Husbandry and Dairying] 

A. H. 342. Dairy Manufacture Practice. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Lectures and laboratory practice on the business and factory management 
used in dairy plants. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 343. City Milk Supply. 0-0-4 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Lectures and laboratory practice ; the phases of the city milk supply from 
the standpoint of the Milk Inspector and Board of Health; the methods and 
processes used in a central pasteurizing milk distribution plant and by 
the dairymen supplying the milk; the problems of the retail distributor of 
raw milk. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 351. Horse and Mule Production. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Methods in production and management of horses and mules for work 
on farms under Southern conditions. Special study of home-grown feeds for 
horses and mules at work or idle. Mr. Haig. 



A. H. 352. Common Diseases. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Contagious, non-contagious, and parasitic diseases of farm animals. 
Laboratory, lectures, recitations. Mr. Grinnells. 



A. H. 353. Animal Hygiene and Sanitation. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 

A. H. and of senior Teachers of Agriculture. 

Animal health and prevention of disease as affected by environment. 

Lectures, reference reading, recitations. Mr. Grinnells. 



A. H. 361. Animal Nutrition II . 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: A. H. 202. 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod. Elective for juniors and seniors in 
Agriculture. 

Feeding stuffs used in America; laws controlling feeding stuffs; prepara- 
tion of feeds; home-mixed and commercial feeds. Mr. Peterson. 



[Animal Husbandry and Dairying] 185 

A. H. 362. Dairy Machinery. 0-1-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing and Agr. Engineering. 

Lecture and demonstration on the installation, kind, care, and handling 
of dairy-plant equipment, including the refrigerating unit, pipe fitting, 
soldering. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 371. Creamery Butter Making. 4-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Principles and practices of factory butter making, from the care of the 
cream on the farm through the different processes until ready for market- 
ing. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 372. Beef Cattle Production. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. 

A study of the feeding, care, and adaptation of beef cattle to North 
Carolina conditions. Mr. Foster. 



A. H. 381. Ice-cream Making. 4-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

Standardizing of mixing and freezing ice-cream, sherbets, and other 
frozen products, and the physical principles involved; types of freezers, 
flavoring materials, fillers and binders; ice-cream standards. Theory and 
practice of refrigeration; its use in the ice-cream plant. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 391, 392, 393. Senior Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: A. H. 202. 

Required of seniors in A. H. 

A discussion of livestock problems by extension and research workers, 
together with special assignments to students with regard to various phases 
of the industry. Animal Husbandry Staff. 



A. H. 394. Judging Dairy Products. 0-0-1 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

A course of training for students in judging all dairy products according 
to official standards and commercial grades. Mr. Clevenger. 



186 [Animal Husbandry and Dad^ying] 

A. H. 395. Summer Practicum. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: 18 credits in Animal Husbandry. 

Required of all students in Animal Production and Dairy Manufacturing. 

This course requires a minimum of six weeks practical work on an 
approved livestock farm or in a creamery. If the work is done at the College 
farms or College creamery, no remuneration other than specified credit 
will be allowed. Each student will be required to submit an outline of his 
proposed work during the spring term and a final report of the work done 
during the fall term. Staff. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 401, 402, 403. Dairy Manufactures. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: A. H. 202 and 12 hours of the dairy manufacturing courses. 
Required of seniors in Dairy Manufacturing. 

Special problems dealing with the manufacture and marketing of dairy 
products. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 412. Animal Nutrition III. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: A. H. 202, A. H. 361. 

Elective for seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of the chemistry and physiology of nutrition and the processes of 
animal life; recent scientific publications studied. Mr. Peterson. 



A. H. 413. Herd Improvement. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: A. H. 202, 341, 361. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of juniors in 
A. H. 

This course is designed for training students as supervisors of Herd Im- 
provement Associations in North Carolina. Rules for Advanced Registry are 
studied; practical work in keeping feed costs, the Babcock Test, and book- 
keeping necessary for dairy associations. Mr. Haig. 



A. H. 421. Animal Breeding. 4-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. 

A study of breeding and improvement of domestic animals; a first-hand 
study of successful breeding establishments and their problems. 

Mr. Ruffner. 



[Animal Husbandry and Dairying] 187 

A. H. 432. Pure-Bred Livestock Production. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: A. H. 202, 331. 

Elective for seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

A study of the pure-bred livestock industry. Lectures and discussion 
supplemented by assignments from current periodicals and breed papers. 
Special study of the selection of livestock best suited to different localities. 

Mr. Ruffner. 



A. H. 433. Stock Farm Management. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: A. H. 202. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. Required of seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. 

A study of successful methods of operating farms devoted chiefly to live- 
stock production; special reference is made to best systems applied to North 
Carolina conditions. Mr. Ruffner. 



A. H. 441, 442, 443. Problems in Advanced Animal Breeding. 

3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: A. H. 421. 

Elective for seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of the physiology of reproduction. Methods and problems of 
breeders; influence of pedigree, herd books, and Mendelism in animal breed- 
ing. Staff. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

A. H. 501, 502, 503. Research Studies in Animal Husbandry. 

3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 
Prerequisite: Eighteen credits in Animal Husbandry. 
An intensive study of experimental data. Staff. 



A. H. 511, 512, 513. Advanced Nutrition. 3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: A. H. 202, 361. 

A survey of experimental feeding, together with a study of the funda- 
mental and practical feeding problems of the various sections of the country. 
A study is made of the effects of various feeds on growth and development. 
Animals are used in demonstrating the effects of these various nutrients 
and rations. Mr. Peterson. 



188 [Architecture] 

A. H. 521, 522, 523. Special Problems in Dairy Manufacturing 

Practice. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Dairy Manufacturing. 
Available for graduate students interested in special dairy manufacturing 
problems under definite supervision and approval. Mr. Clevenger. 



A. H. 531, 532, 533. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Subjects assigned to be reviewed and discussed. Review of literature, 
scientific reports and Experiment Station bulletins. Oral and vrr.—.-r. 
reports. 



ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Arch. 100. Pencil Sketching. 3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

or 1-1-1 
Required of seniors in L. A., and sophomores in Ind. Arts. Elective for 
Engineering and Textile students. 

Quick sketching of objects as seen and imagined in perspective; elemen- 
tary principles of perspective, especially as applied to the visualisation of 
imagined objects. Mimeographed Notes and Problems Sheets. 

Messrs. Paulson, Baumgarten. 

Arch. 101, 102, 103. Freehand Drawing 1, 2. and 3. 2-2-2 

1. Required of juniors in Arch., and Arch. Eng. 2-0-0 
Water color rendering. Nature and qualities of pigments; theory of color 

and of tone; presentation of decorative and of pictorial subjects in mono- 
chrome and in full color. Guptill: Reference to Color. 

2. Required of juniors in Arch., Arch. Eng., and L. A. 0-2-0 
Sketching in pencil, and pen and ink from models, casts and nature. Em- 
phasis upon tonal value, pattern of darks, character and variety of line, and 
accenting. Lettering. Watson: Pencil Sketching. 

3. Required of juniors in Arch.. Arch. Eng., and L. A. '.-'.-2 
Charcoal Drawing from architectural casts and models; emphasis upon 

delicacy and gradation of shade and shadow; value sketches of composi- 
tion projects. Mr. Paulson. 



Arch. 104s. Art Appreciation for Teachers. 0-0-3 

Picture study of the list suggested by the State Board of Education for 
grade-school use, including paintings, architecture, and sculpture. Paulson: 
Art Appreciation for Teachers. Mr. Paulson. 



[Architecture] 189 

Arch. 105. Art Principles in Industry. 3-0-0 

Elective for Engineering and Textile students, required of sophomores in 
Industrial Arts. 

Line, form, color, and aesthetic principles of practical art applicable to 
the design of articles for manufacture. Mimeographed Notes. Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 106. Decorative Drawing. 3-0-0, 0-3-0, 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in the Textile School. 

Freehand drawing and creative designing of decorative motives adaptable 
to weaving and cloth printing. Mimeographed Problem Sheets. 

Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 107. Architectural Drawing. 3-3-0 

Required of freshmen in Architecture. M. E. 105 and 106 may be substi- 
tuted for Arch. 107. 

[Drafting Practice.] Use of instruments in drawing plans, elevations, sec- 
tions; projections; architectural lettering and conventions; tracing and blue- 
printing; elements of architecture and introduction to design. Pickering: 
Architectural Design. Mr. Grady. 

Arch. Ill, 112, 113. Appreciation of Fine Arts, Architecture, 

Painting, Sculpture. 3-3-3 

Elective for students of junior standing. 

Principles of art. Study of those qualities which constitute great art. First 
term, architecture; second term, painting; third term, sculpture and the 
minor arts. Reinach: Apollo; University Prints; Mimeographed Notes. 
Gardner: Art Through the Ages. Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 114. Clay Modeling. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: Arch. 100. 

Required of seniors in Arch. 

Modeling of ornament, reliefs, and full round projects in clay or wax; 
moulds and plaster casting; small scale building detail models. Lectures, 
laboratory, and critiques. Mr. Grady. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Arch. 201, 202, 203. Elements of Architecture I, II, and HI. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 105, 106, or Arch. 107. 

Required of sophomores in Arch., Arch. Eng., and L. A. 

Exercises and studies of architectural elements and details, walls, open- 
ings, etc. The orders of architecture and their application to simple prob- 
lems in composition and design. Pickering: Architectural Design; Ramsey 
and Sleeper: Graphic Standards. Messrs. Shumaker, Grady. 



190 [Architecture] 

Arch. 205. Shades and Shadows. 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: M. E. 107. 

Required of sophomores in Arch., Arch. Eng., and juniors in L. A. 

The determination of conventional shades and shadows as they occur on 
rendered drawings. Shelton: Architectural Shades and Shadows. 

Messrs. Shumaker, Grady. 

Arch. 206. Perspective Drawing. 1-0-0 

Prerequisite: M. E. 107. 

Required of sophomores in Arch., Arch. Eng., and of juniors in L. A. and 
Agr. Engr. 

Theory of perspective with special applications to illustration and design. 
Lectures and drawing. Turner: Fundamentals of Architectural Design. 

Mr. Baumgarten. 

Arch. 207. Historic Motives in Textiles. 0-3-0 

Elective for students of junior standing. 

Chronologic development of ornament motives; the adaptation of his- 
toric motives to modern textile design. Hamlin: History of Ornament. 

Mr. Paulson. 



Arch. 211, 212, 213. Freehand Drawing 4, 5, and 6. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Arch. 103. 

Required of fifth year Arch., elective for others. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student a mastery of presentation 
in his own chosen medium. The first term (Arch. 211) will be devoted prin- 
cipally to still life; the second (Arch. 212) to landscape; the third (Arch. 
213) to figure drawing. Personal technique encouraged; sound principles 
of drawing insisted upon. Mr. Paulson. 

Arch. 301, 302, 303. Intermediate Design, B-l, B-2, B-3. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Arch. 201, 202, 203. 

Required of juniors in Arch., and Arch. Eng. 

Problems in elementary composition, design, planning and rendering. 
Library research. Registration with the Beaux Arts Institute of Design may 
be required. Beaux Arts Institute Problems. Messrs. Baumgarten, Grady. 



Arch. 304. Photographic Practice. 0-0-1 

Required of juniors in Arch., and Arch. Eng. 

The practical use of photography as an aid in architectural rendition. 
Lectures, Notes and Assignments. Mr. Paulson. 



[Architecture] 191 

Arch. 305. Working Drawings. 0-0-2 

Prerequisites: Arch. 201, 202, 203. 

Required of sophomores in Arch. 

The preparation of working drawings of sections and details of construc- 
tion. Ramsey and Sleeper: Graphic Standards; Knoblock: Good Practice in 
Construction. Messrs. Shumaker, Grady. 



Arch. 321, 322, 323. History of Architecture 1, 2, and 3. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Arch. 203. 

Required of juniors in Arch., Arch. Eng., and L. A. 

The origin and development of historic styles of architecture from anti- 
quity to the nineteenth century. Illustrated lectures, library references, 
sketches. Fletcher: History of Architecture; Hamlin: History of Archi- 
tecture. Mr - Baumgarten. 



Arch. 325. History of Sculpture and Mural Decoration. 0-0-2 

Prerequisite: Arch. 203. 

Required of juniors in Arch. 

The development of sculptural and mural art as adjuncts to architecture, 
ancient to modern; critique of modern decoration supplementary to archi- 
tecture. Mimeographed notes, library reference and illustrated lectures. 

Mr. Grady. 



Arch. 351, 352. Architectural Design E-l, E-2. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Arch. 303. 

Required of seniors in Arch. Eng. 

Advanced Architectural Design studied especially from the viewpoint of 
structure; projects developed with wall and spanning sections; rendered 
presentation of practical constructive programs. 

Messrs. Baumgarten, Grady. 



Arch. 353, 354, 355. Architectural Design B-4, B-5, and B-6. 6-6-6 

Prerequisite: Arch. 303. 

Required of seniors in Arch. 

Advanced programs in architectural design. Registration with the Beaux 
Arts Institute of Design may be required. Complete presentation drawings 
of projects such as Class B — Beaux Arts Institute Problems. 

Messrs. Baumgarten, Grady. 



192 [Architecture] 

Arch. 401, 402, 403. Architectural Design A-I, A-II, A-III. 6-6-6 

Prerequisite: Arch. 355. 

Required of fifth year in Arch. 

Major problems in advanced planning and research. Registration with 
the Beaux Arts Institute of Design may be required. Beaux Arts Institute 
Problems. Messrs. Shumaker, Baumgarten, Grady. 

Arch. 407. Architectural Composition. 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: Arch. 323. 

Required of fifth year in Arch. 

Principles of planning and composition as related to buildings; archi- 
tectural motives, group planning; library research and sketches. Curtis: 
Architectural Composition. Mr. Shumaker. 

Arch. 40 S. Architectural Estimates. 0-0-2 

Prerequisite: Arch. 305. 

Required of fifth year in Arch, and seniors in Arch. Engr. 

Lectures and problems in taking off quantities and in estimating materials 
and labor cost in building construction. Mimeographed Notes. 

Mr. Shumaker. 

Arch. 409. Building Materials I. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Arch. 303. 

Required of seniors in Arch, and Arch. Eng. 

Nature and qualities of building materials, especially fabricated materials, 
and their use in interior and exterior finish and in construction. Sample 
exhibits, lectures and demonstrations. Manufacturers' Data Sheets. 

Mr. Grady. 

Arch. 411, 412. Architectural Office Practice. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Arch. 305. 

Required of juniors in Arch., seniors in Arch. Eng. 

The preparation of working drawings from sketches, following office 
routine."' Knoblock: Good Practice in Construction; Ramsey and Sleeper: 
Graphic Standards. Messrs. Baumgarten, Grady. 

Arch. 414. Professional Practice. 0-0-1 

Prerequisite: Econ. 307. 

Required of fifth year in Arch. 

Ethics and procedure in the profession of architecture. Relation of patron 
and commissionee. Mimeographed Notes. Mr. Shumaker. 



[Architecture] 193 

Arch. 415. City Planning. 0-2-0 

Prerequisite: Arch. 323. 

Required in fifth year in Arch. 

Origin and development of urban communities; aesthetic, economic, and 
circulatory problems in city and town planning; zoning and restraining 
legislation. Messrs. Shumaker, Baumgarten. 



Arch. 416. Architectural Specifications. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 307. 

Required of seniors in Arch, and Arch. Eng. 

Execution of specifications for architectural building contracts; identifi- 
cation of material, clarification of terms; protection of patron, contractor, 
and architect. Mimeographed Notes. Mr. Shumaker. 



Arch. 421. History of Architecture 4. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Arch. 323. 

Required in fourth year in Arch. 

Nineteenth century and contemporary architectural styles, with special 
attention to trends resulting from the use of modern materials; illustrated 
lectures, discussion assignments, and reports. Fletcher: History of Archi- 
tecture. Mr. Baumgarten. 



Arch. 501, 502, 503. Graduate Design I, II, III. 4-4-4 

Prerequisites: Arch. 323, 403 (or 352). 

Class A. — Project. Advanced problems in design. Archaeology. Measured 
Drawings. Registration with the Beaux Arts Institute of Design is required. 
Beaux Arts Institute Problems. Messrs. Shumaker, Baumgarten, Grady. 



Arch. 511, 512, 513. Historic Research I, II, III. 4-4-4 

Prerequisites: Arch. 323, 403 (or 352). 

Research in Architecture and Art in some important phase of its develop- 
ment. Library work with sketches. Library References. 

Messrs. Paulson, Baumgarten, Grady. 



194 [Botany] 

BOTANY 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Bot. 101, 102. General Botany. 4-4-0 

Required of freshmen and sophomores in Agriculture. 

The first term: the structure and physiology of the higher plants; the 
second: a survey of the major lower plant groups with the emphasis upon 
the economic forms, bacteria and fungi. 

Messrs. Wells, Shunk, Anderson, Whitford, Buell. 

Bot. 203. Systematic Botany. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102. 

Elective in Agriculture and Science. 

An introduction to the local flora and the classification of the plants 
included therein. Messrs. Wells, Shunk, Whitford, Buell. 

Bot. 211-213. Dendrology. 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 203. 
Required of sophomores in Forestry. 
The principal trees of North America. Mr. Buell. 

Bot. 221. Plant Physiology. 0-0-5 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 202. 

Required of sophomores in Forestry. 

The activities of living plants with special emphasis upon the funda- 
mental principles concerned. Mr. Anderson. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 301. Diseases of Field Crops. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

The more important diseases of field crops, such as cotton, tobacco, corn, 
small grains, legumes, and grasses; emphasis on symptoms, cause, and 
: : r.trol. Mr. Lehman. 

Bot. 303. Diseases of Fruit and Vegetable Crops. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Lectures and laboratory studies of importance, causes, symptoms, and 
control of diseases affecting these crops. Mr. Jensen. 



[Botany] 195 

Bot. 311. Diseases of Forest Trees. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

Lectures and laboratory studies of importance, causes, symptoms, and 
control of diseases affecting trees and their products. Mr. Ellis. 

Bot. 401. Methods in Plant Pathology. 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221, 301 or 303. 
Elective. 

A detailed survey of essential methods in the study of plant pathological 
problems. Mr. Jensen. 

Bot. 402. General Bacteriology. 0-4-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, or Zool. 101. 
Required of juniors or seniors in Agriculture. 

An introduction to the principles of bacteriology; laboratory work on 
modern cultural methods of handling and studying bacteria. Mr. Shunk. 

Bot. 411-412. Plant Morphology. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 203. 
Elective in Agriculture and Forestry. 

An advanced survey of plants; the lower groups are given the first term, 
the higher (land plants) the second. Messrs. Wells, Shunk, Whitford. 

Bot. 432. Advanced Plant Physiology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 

A critical and comprehensive treatment of the various aspects of plant 
physiology; particular attention given to basic principles and to recent 
developments. Mr. Anderson. 

Bot. 441. Plant Ecology. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 
Required of juniors in Forestry. 

Environmental control of plant distribution with emphasis upon the 
habitats and vegetation of North Carolina. Mr. Wells. 

Bot. 442. Microanalysis of Plant Tissue. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221. 

The identification in plant tissues of mineral elements and organic con- 
pounds and the physiological significance of these materials. Mr. Anderson. 



196 [Botany] 

Bot. 443. Soil Microbiology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221, 402. 

Elective in Agriculture and Forestry. 

The more important microbiological processes that occur in soils: 
decomposition of organic materials, ammonification, nitrification, and 
nitrogen fixation. Mr. Shunk. 

Bot. 451. Plant Microtechnique. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102. 

Elective in Agriculture and Forestry. 

Materials and processes involved in the preparation of plant structures 
for microscopic examination. Mr. Anderson. 

Bot. 452. Advanced Bacteriology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221, 402. 
Methods used in the bacteriological analysis of water and milk. 

Mr. Shunk. 

Bot 453. Advanced Plant Ecology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 221, 441. 

Elective in Agriculture and Forestry. 

Practice in the use of the instruments necessary in the study of environ- 
mental factors; advanced readings and conferences on plant distribution in 
relation to these factors. Mr. Wells. 



Bot. 462. Research Methods in Plant Physiology. 0-3-0 

Experience in the use of techniques important in physiological research. 

Bot. 463. Advanced Systematic Botany. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 203. 

A continuation of the elementary course 203 in the identification of the 
local flora plants together with a survey of the plant families from the 
modern phylogenetic point of view. Mr. Buell. 



Bot. 473. Aquatic Biology. 0-0-2 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102. 

Required of Sanitary Engineers. 

Identification and control of the aquatic algae and protozoa which give 
trouble in reservoirs. A survey of the higher water and marsh plants is 
also included. Mr. Whitford. 



[Botany] 197 

Bot. 481, 482, 483. Pathogenic Fungi. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102. 
Elective. 

Required of seniors in Plant Pathology. 

A study of the structure, identification, and classification of fungi 
pathogenic on plants. Mr. Lehman. 



Bot. 491. Principles of Plant Pathology. 0-5-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221, 301 or 303 or equivalent. 
Elective. 

Required of seniors in Plant Pathology. 

An advanced study of the epiphytology and etiology of diseases of plants. 

Mr. Lehman. 



Bot. 492. Principles of Plant Disease Control. 0-5-0 

Prerequisites: Bot. 101, 102, 221, 301 or 303. 

Elective. 

A critical study of the major principles involved in the control of causa- 
tive agents of diseases of plants, including exclusion, eradication, protec- 
tion, and immunization. Mr. Jensen. 



Bot. 501, 502, 503. Pathology of Special Crops. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: 301 or 303, 491. 

A comprehensive survey of the literature dealing with diseases of specific 
crops. 

Diseases of Field Crops. 3-0-0, Mr. Lehman. 

Diseases of Fruit Crops. 0-3-0, Mr. Jensen. 

Diseases of Vegetable Crops. 0-0-3, Mr. Ellis. 

Bot. 511, 512, 513. Bacteriology: Special Studies. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 402, 452. 

Special work on restricted groups of bacteria, such as nitrogen bacteria 
of the soil, milk organisms, and special groups of bacteria in water. 

Mr. Shunk. 



Bot. 521. Advanced Systematic Botany. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 203. 

An advanced survey of restricted groups of plants involving organization 
and distribution problems. Messrs. Wells, Buell. 



198 [Ceramic Engineering] 

Bot. 523. Cytogenetics. See F. C. 523. 



Bot. 531, 532, 533. Plant Physiology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Bot. 221, 432. 

Critical study of some particular problem, involving original investigation 
together with a survey of pertinent literature. Mr. Anderson. 



Bot. 541. Plant Ecology. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Bot. 203, 441. 

Minor investigations in vegetation-habitat problems accompanied by ad- 
vanced reference reading. Mr. Wells. 



Bot. 551, 552, 553. Research in Botany. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: 30 hours in 100-300 courses in Botany. Staff. 



Bot. 561, 562, 563. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Attendance by the student upon the weekly seminar together with the 
presentation of a paper in his major field of research. Mr. Wells. 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Cer. E. 202. Ceramic Materials. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 220. 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic Engineering. 

The origin and occurrence of ceramic raw materials, their chemical and 
physical properties and system of measuring these. Ries: Clays Occurrence, 
Properties, and Uses. Mr. Stone. 



Cer. E. 203. Ceramic and Mining Processes. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Geol. 220. 

Required of sophomores in Cer. E. and Geol. E. 

The winning and preparation of ceramic materials; the equipment and 
processes used in manufacturing ceramic products. Garve: Factory Design 
and Equipment. Mr. Greaves-Walker. 



[Ceramic Engineering] 199 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Cer. E. 301. Drying Fundamentals and Practice. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Phy. 203, Cer. E. 202. 

Required of Juniors in Cer. E. 

Theory and practice of drying ceramic products; problems. Greaves- 
Walker: Drying Ceramic Products. Mr. Greaves-Walker. 

Cer. E. 302. Firing Fundamentals and Practice. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Cer. E. 301. 

Required of juniors in Cer. E. 

The theory and practice of firing ceramic products. Problems. Wilson: 
Ceramics; Clay Technology. Mr. Greaves- Walker. 

Cer. E. 303. Ceramic Calculations. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 212, Cer. E. 302. 

Required of juniors in Cer. E. 

Solution of chemical and physical problems of the ceramic industries. 
Andrews: Ceramic Tests and Calculations. Mr. Stone. 

Cer. E. 305. Ceramic Products. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 202. 

Required of juniors in Cer. E. 

Physical, chemical, and artistic requirement of ceramic products. Labora- 
tory practice. Messrs. Greaves-Walker, Stone. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Cer. E. 401. Pyrometry. 1-0-0 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 302. 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. 

The theory and use of temperature measuring instruments in industry. 
Wood and Cork: Pyrometry. Mr. Stone. 

Cer. E. 403. Silicates I. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 331, Cer. E. 303 and Geol. 338. 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. 

The fundamental principles underlying the composition and production of 
whitewares, glazes, terra cotta, and abrasives. Hall and Insley: A Compila- 
tion of Phase Rule Diagrams. Mr. Stone. 



200 [Ceramic Engineering] 

Cer. E. 404. Silicates II. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 331, Cer. E. 403 and Geol. 338. 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. 

The fundamental principles underlying the composition and production of 
refractories, cements, plasters, glasses, and metal enamels. Hall and Insley: 
A Compilation of Phase Rule Diagrams; Andrews: Enamels; Scholes : 
Modern Glass Practice. Mr. Stone. 



Cer. E. 405. Refractories. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Cer. E. 404. 

Required of seniors in Cer. E. 

Refractor materials and manufacture of refractory products; use of 
refractory products in industrial furnaces. Norton: Refractories. 

Mr. Greaves-Walker. 



Cer. E. 411, 412, 413. Ceramic Laboratory. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Cer. E. 303, 305, Corequisite: Cer. E. 403, 404. 
Required of seniors in Cer. E. 
Advanced practice in producing and determining the chemical and physical 

properties of ceramic materials and products; thesis. 

Mr. Stone. 



Cer. E. 414, 415. Ceramic Designing. 0-4-4 

Prerequisites: M. E. 213, E. M. 322, Cer. E. 203 and 302. 
Required of seniors in Cer. E. 
Designing of ceramic equipment and structures. Garve: Factory Design 
and Equipment. Messrs. Greaves-Walker, Stone. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Cer. E. 501, 502, 503. Designing of Ceramic Equipment and Plants. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 415. 

Advanced study and designing of ceramic machinery, dryers, kilns, and 
plant structures. Mr. Greaves-Walker. 



Cer. E. 505. 506, 507. Advanced Refractories and Furnaces. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 413, 405. 
Advanced study of refractory materials and products, and their use. 

Mr. Greaves-Walker. 



[Chemical Engineering] 201 

Cer. E. 509, 510, 511. Industrial Adaptability of Ceramic Materials. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 413. 

Laboratory investigations to determine the industrial uses to which 
various North Carolina ceramic materials can be put. 

Messrs. Greaves-Walker, Stone. 



Cer. E. 513, 514, 515. Ceramic Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 404, 413. 

Research problems in ceramics will be assigned to meet the desire of the 
student for specialization. Messrs. Greaves-Walker, Stone. 



Cer. E. 517, 518, 519. Glass Technology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites : Chem. 331, Geol. 338, Cer. E. 405. 
Advanced study of the manufacture and physical properties of glass. 

Mr. Greaves-Walker. 



Cer. E. 521, 522, 523. Advanced Silicate Technology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Cer. E. 404, 413. 
Advanced laboratory practice in bodies, glazes, glasses and colors. 

Mr. Stone. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Chem. E. 201, 202, 203. Introduction to Chemical Engineering. 1-1-2 

Prerequisites: Chem. 103; Math. 102. 

Required of sophomores in Chem. E. 

Reactions in chemical processes, illustrative problems, and control meth- 
ods ; elements of unit processes and unit operation ; visits to chemical plants, 
elementary chemical engineering calculations. Randolph: Introduction to 
Chemical Engineering. Mr. Randolph. 



Chem. E. 212, 213. Chemical Nature of Engineering Materials. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 103; Math. 103. 

Required of seniors in General Engineering; elective for others. 

Study of the fundamental facts about the chemical nature of engineering 
materials as an aid in the proper choice of materials for various engineering 
purposes under working conditions. Teachers' Manual Mr. Randolph. 



202 [Chemical Engineering] 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. E. 311, 312, 313. Chemical Engineering I. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 213; Chem. E. 201 or Tex. 212. 

Required of juniors in Chem. E. and elective for seniors in Textile 
Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Unit processes; inorganic and organic technology; chemical manufactur- 
ing processes; introductory unit operations. Reigel: Industrial Chemistry; 
Scroggins: Organic Unit Processes; Badger and McCabe: Elements of 
Chejnical Engineering; Teachers' Manual; and Library References. 

Mr. Bright. 



Chem. E. 321, 322, 323. Chemical Engineering Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 311, 312, 313. 

Required of juniors in Chem. E. 

A laboratory study of industrial control methods; visits to industrial 
plant; problems and processes solved and presented in technical reports; 
preparation of products on pilot plant scale; cost studies. Xotes. 

Mr. Bright. 



Chem. E. 330. Treatment of Water and Sewage. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 313 or C. E. 215. 

Required of juniors in San. E. 

Principles involved in the control of municipal water supplies and in 
sewage treatment; reactions involved; chemical nature of water and sewage 
treatment; methods for removal of the more objectionable materials in 
industrial waters. Xotes. Messrs. Randolph. Doody. 



Chem. E. 331. Industrial Stoichiometry. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 311. 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Industrial calculations and measurements; heat balances; material bal- 
ances, fuels and combustion processes; principles of chemical engineering 
calculations. Hougen and Watson: Industrial Chemical Calculations. 

Messrs. Doody, Bright. 



[Chemical Engineering] 203 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. E. s401. Pilot Plant Practice. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Chem. E. 312, Chem. E. 323, Chem. 213. 

Required of Junior Chemical Engineering students and elective for others. 
To be given during two weeks immediately preceding the opening of the 
fall term in September. 

Practical application of chemical machinery and chemical testing methods. 
Pilot plant examination of chemical processes. Cost estimation and process 
development through pilot plant studies. Reference: current technical 
journals, lectures and notes. Messrs. Doody, Randolph. 

Chem. E. 411, 412, 413. Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 313; concurrent with Chem. 431. 

Fundamental principles of Chemical Engineering; unit operations; Chem- 
ical Engineering calculations; design and efficiency of chemical machinery 
and equipment. Walker, Lewis, McAdams, and Gilliland: Principles of 
Chemical Engineering; Badger and McCabe: Elements of Chemical Engi- 
neering, Messrs. Doody, Bright. 

Chem. E. 421. Water Treatment. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. Elective for others. 

Water supplies; equipment and practice in filter plants; water purifica- 
tion and softening; filters; water examination; treatment of water for 
domestic and industrial uses. Notes. Mr. Randolph. 



Chem. E. 422. Chemistry of Engineering Materials. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. 

Technical study of engineering materials for engineering and industrial 
uses; effects of conditions of extraction, production, and consequent treat- 
ment to their suitability for required uses. Leighou: Chemistry of Engi- 
neering Materials; White: Engineering Materials. Mr. Bright. 

Chem. E. 423. Electrochemical Engineering. 3-3-3 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. 

Theory and practice of electrochemical industries; principles of elec- 
trolysis and other electrochemical processes; electric furnace; electro- 
thermal operations, electrometallurgy. Mantell : Industrial Electrochemistry. 

Mr. Doody. 



204 [Chemical Engineering] 

Chem. E. 425. Gas Engineering. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Elective for seniors or graduates in Chem. E. 

Gas engineering; manufacture of industrial fuel gases and their distri- 
bution; apparatus and equipment; plant design; general practice in gas 
plants; by-products, pipe lines, service connections, gas meters. 

Mr. Randolph. 



Chem. E. 426. Sanitation Processes. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311, or C. E. 383. 

Technical study of the methods of sanitation in industrial plants; equip- 
ment and practice in the disposal and treatment of waste materials and 
sewage; measures necessary in eliminating occupational disease hazards. 
Notes. Mr. Randolph. 



Chem. E. 427. Industrial Application of Physical Chemistry. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311, or Chem. 331. 

Special phases of physical chemistry studied technically with reference to 
the practical application of these principles in the chemical industries such 
as industrial catalysis, evaporation principles, absorption, equilibrium, 
applications of phase rule, physical metallurgy, colloids. Notes. 

Mr. Doody. 



Chem. E. 428. Fuel and Combustion Engineering. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 311. 

Principles and mechanism of the combustion reactions; quantitative ap- 
plication to problems of design or use of equipment for fuel processing and 
utilization; solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels, with complete methods of 
analysis. Haslam and Russell: Fuels and Their Combustion. Mr. Bright. 



Chem. E. 431, 432, 433. Chemical Engineering Laboratory and 
Design II. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 411, 412, 413. 

Required of seniors in Chem. E. 

A laboratory study of measurement of flow of fluids and heat; crushing 
and grinding, distillation; evaporation; drying; humidity; nitration and 
mechanical separation; absorption and extraction; calculations; design and 
construction of equipment for these fundamental unit operations in chemical 
industry. Messrs. Doody, Bright. 



[Chemical Engineering] 205 

Chem. E. 434. Chemical Engineering Design. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 411, 412. 

Location, layout, and complete design of the chemical plant and its process 
equipment; materials of construction; economic factors controlling the 
chemical industry, and optimum design from the standpoint of economic 
return, process development, pilot-plant production studies. Notes. 

Mr. Doody. 



Chem. E. 435. Industrial Oil, Fats and Waxes. 0-0-3 or 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 313. 

Elective for juniors or seniors in Chem. E. 

Petroleum engineering; manufacture, refining, and conversion of animal 
and vegetable oils and their by-products; lubricants. Mr. Randolph. 



Chem. E. 441. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 411, 412, 413. 

A study of the thermal properties of matter and energy relationships 
underlying chemical processes. Fundamental laws of energy as applied to 
Chemical Engineering problems and processes in industry. Mr. Doody. 



Chem. E. 436. Cellulose and Allied Industries. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 311 or Forestry 206, 207. 
Elective. 

Chemical nature of Cellulose and its compounds. Methods and processes 
and engineering design for pulp and paper. 



Chem. E. 437. Cellulose and Allied Industries. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite or concurrent: Chem. E. 311 or Forestry 206, 207. 
Elective. 

Cellulose chemical conversion products. Methods and processes and engi- 
neering design for plastics, rayon, cellophane, explosives, paints, and 
varnishes. 



Chem. E. 438. Corrosion: Causes and Prevention. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 313. 

Theories of corrosion; influences of metal composition and manufacture; 
chemical corrosion; prevention of corrosion; comparison of corrosive resist- 
ing materials for chemical and industrial uses. Speller: Corrosion; Causes 
and Prevention. Mr. Bright. 



206 [Chemical Engineering] 

Chem. E. 439. Chemical Principles. 3 or 3 or 3 

Pr-""-"""-!''-'''- t " " ~. "urrer. - : : Cher.".. Z. 313. 

Fundamental principles in rkemt*! manufacture and correlation of these 
principles in unit processes and operation. Hougen and Watson: Industrial 
Chemical Calculations. Notes. Mr. Doody. 



Chem. E. 440. Metals and Alloys. 0-3-0 

Prerer-iisi-e : Che-. Z -ill :r v. E. 131. 

Relation of chemical composition and crystalline structure to the proper- 
ties of metal* and alloys; te+hmral study of the composition and structure 

of Tw*»1ff for chemical and industrial uses. Teacher's Manual. Mr. Bright. 



Courses for Graduates Only 
Chem. E. 501. Chemical Technology — Advanced. 3-3-3 

Ar. advanced course in problems, processes, and methods of chemical 
manufacture ar.d production; special study in applied inorganic, applied 
organic chemistry, and research in applied chemistry. Staff. 



Chem. E. 302. Industrial Chemical Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. E. 413. 

Chemical research on some industrial problem relating to North Carolina 
resources; practice in industrial plants, control analyses, estimate of losses, 
costs, data «**»*■*»■ technical report. Staff. 



Chem. E. 503. Chemical Engineering Research. 3-3-3 



rely by making investigations at the 

err erirr.er.:.s and research in the 

graphs, calculation of some actual 

-. r : ':. '. e .v. - Staff. 



Chem. E. 504. Advanced Chemical Engineering. 3-3-3 

A i -. anced study of process equipment, theory, and practice in operation 
ar.d design for unit operari::.s: Chemical Engineering thermodynamics; 
coefficients of heat transfer; heat of reactions; evaporators; stills; con- 
densers, and heat exchangers; interrelations between heat transfer and 
fluid friction. MeAdams: Heat Transmission and other texts. Staff. 



[Chemistry] 207 

CHEMISTRY 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Chem. 101, 102, 103. General Inorganic Chemistry. 4-4-4 

Recitations and laboratory work; theories of laws, history, occurrence, 
preparation, properties, and uses of the more important elements and their 
compounds; formulae, valence, equations and calculations. 

Messrs. Reid, Jordan, Morgan, Satterfield, Showalter, Loeppert, White, 
Wilson. 



Chem. 211. Qualitative Analysis. 4-0-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic, Chemical, and Mining Engineering 
and those majoring in chemistry and of juniors in Textile Chemistry and 
Dyeing. 

Identification and separation of more common ions and analysis of mix- 
ture of salts of commercial products. 

Messrs. Wilson, Reid, Loeppert. 



Chem. 212. Quantitative Analysis. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 211. 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic Engineering, Chemistry, Chemical 
Engineering, and of juniors in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Volumetric Analysis: Alkalinity, acidimetry, oxidation, and iodometric 
titrations. Messrs. Wilson, Reid, Loeppert. 



Chem. 213. Quantitative Analysis. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Chem. 211. 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering. 

A continuation of Chem. 212. Gravimetric methods. Substances of more 
difficult nature are analyzed, as minerals, steel, alloys, limestone, Paris 
green, etc. Messrs. Wilson, Reid, Loeppert. 



Chem. 221. Introduction to Organic Chemistry. 4-0-0 or 0-4-0 or 0-0-4 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. Elective for others. 

Hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, ethers, esters, amino- 
acids, and bezene derivates; carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and related 
compounds. Mr. Reid. 



208 [Chemistry] 

Chem. 223. Quantitative Analysis. 0-0-4 

Required of students in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 
A continuation of Chem. 212. Substances of more difficult nature are 
analyzed, as sulphites, sulphides, bleaching powder, Turkey-red oil, soaps. 

Messrs. Wilson, Reid, Loeppert. 



Chem. 233. Quantitative Analysis. 0-0-4 

Continuation of Course 212, along with gravimetric methods used in the 
analysis of magnesium, phosphate rock, fertilizer and insecticide. 

Messrs. Wilson, Reid, Loeppert. 



Chem. 242. Chemical Calculations. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Chemical problems, especially in analytical work; lectures on principles, 

theories, laws, upon which the problems are based; assigned problems for 
discussion. Mr. White. 



Chem. 331. Physical Chemistry. 5-0-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Required of Cer. E.; elective to others. 

Fundamental chemical principles from a physiochemical viewpoint; spe- 
cial attention to silicate analysis, colloids, and phase rule. Mr. Sutton. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 401. Historical Chemistry. 2-0-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Development of Chemistry and the history of men instrumental in the 
progress of Chemistry. Mr. Williams. 



Chem. 402, 403. Theoretical Chemistry. 0-2-2 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Atoms and molecules; chemical reactions and conditions influencing them; 
electronic conception of valence, radio activity. Mr. Jordan. 



Chem. 411. Advanced Qualitative Analysis. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 211 or its equivalent. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with the analysis of alloys and 

complex mixture. Mr. Wilson. 



[Chemistry] 209 

Chem. 412. Advanced Quantitative Methods. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 213 or its equivalent. 

Methods and apparatus in advanced quantitative analysis; heat of com- 
bustion, colorimetry, complete analysis of ores, special steels, paint pig- 
ments and alloys. Mr. Wilson. 



Chem. 421, 422, 423. Organic Chemistry. 4-4-4 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and seniors in 
Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. Elective for others. 

Aliphatic and aromatic compounds; practical applications; methods of 
preparation and purification of compounds, and their structures. 

Mr. Williams. 



Chem. 424. The Chemistry of Hydrocarbons and Their 

Derivatives. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 421, 422, 423. 

New developments in solvents, resins, detergents, synthetic rubber, motor 
fuels. Mr. Reid. 



Chem. 431, 432, 433. Physical Chemistry. 4-4-4 or 4-4-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 213. 

The first two terms only required of Chemical Engineers; elective for 
Agricultural Chemistry students. 

Principles of Physical Chemistry; laws and theories, application to vari- 
ous branches of chemistry and to industrial processes. Mr. Sutton. 



Chem. 441. Food Products and Adulterants. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 221 or 421, 422, 423. 

Designed for students in all schools. 

Food principles; cereals, starches, sugars, fats; milk and milk products; 
the packing house; food preservation; beverages, spices and condiments; 
food legislation, food advertising. Mr. Satterfield. 



Chem. 442. Chemistry of Colloids. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 221 or 421, 422, 423. 

Colloidal behavior, osmotic pressures, dialysis, sols and gels, membranes 
and membrane equilibria, proteins, and Donnan equilibrium. Mr. White. 



210 [Chemistry] 

Chem. 451, 452. Physiological Chemistry. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 221 or 421, 422, 423. 

Essential chemical facts pertaining to life processes; digestion, absorp- 
tion, metabolism, secretions, and excretions; lectures, laboratory. 

Mr. Satterfield. 



Chem. 462. Chemistry of Vitamins. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 221 or 421, 422, 423. 

Required of juniors in Animal Prod. 

Application of vitamin hypothesis to human nutrition; history, nomencla- 
ture, properties, distribution, effects of deficiencies, vitamin values. 

Mr. Satterfield. 



Chem. 472. Blood Analysis. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 212 and 421, 422, 423. 

Hemoglobin, sugar, urea, uric acid, cholesterol, creatine, creatinine, non- 
protein, nitrogen, amino-acid nitrogen, calcium. Folin-Wu system is em- 
phasized; lectures and laboratory. Mr. Satterfield. 



Chem. 481. Agricultural Chemistry. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103, and 221 or 421, 422, 423. 
Feeding the plant; insecticides and fungicides; transforming the plant 
into human food and animal food; composition of plants; relation between 
composition and uses. Mr. Satterfield. 



Chem. 482, 483. Food and Nutrition. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 221 or 421, 422, 423. 

Open to all students desiring a practical knowledge of the subject. 

Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, amino-acids, minerals, fiber, vitamins, 
enzymes; nutritive value of food materials; digestion, food idiosyncrasy; 
acidosis and alkalosis. Mr. Satterfield. 



Chem. 491, 492, 493. Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 431, 432, 433. 
An advanced problem course designed for chemical engineers. 

Mr. Sutton. 



[Chemistry] 211 

Courses for Graduates Only 

Chem. 501, 502, 503. Organic Chemistry, Advanced. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 421, 422, 423. 

Principles of organic chemistry; current literature; laboratory work and 
preparation in quantity. Mr. Williams. 

Chem. 511. Organic Qualitative Analysis. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 421, 422, 423. 
Detection of elements and radicals, group characteristics. 

Mr. Williams. 



Chem. 512. Organic Quantitative Analysis. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Chem. 212, 421, 422, 423. 

Analysis of organic compounds for carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, the halo- 
gens, sulfur. Mr. Williams. 



Chem. 513. Micro-Analysis. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 421, 422, 423. 

Tests for compounds, and impurities in quantities too small to be detected 
by ordinary methods. Mr. Williams. 



Chem. 523. Micro-Chemical Analysis. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 213. 
Inorganic micro qualitative analysis; fibers, starches, etc. Mr. Wilson. 

Chem. 531, 532, 533. Chemical Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: 54 term credits in Chemistry. Open to all graduates. 
Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. Staff. 



Chem. 541, 542, 543. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Required of graduate students specializing in Chemistry. 
Preparation and presentation of abstracts of current publications in the 
field of Chemistry. 



Chem. 552, 553. Biochemistry. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 421, 422, 423, 482, 483. 

Special topics in Biochemistry. Mr. Satterfield. 



212 [Civil Engineering] 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

C. E. 101, 102, 103. Drawing. 1-1-1 

Required for freshmen in Forestry and Landscape Architecture. 

Plain lettering, common symbols, platting of areas from compass-survey 
notes furnished, filling in contours from notes furnished, tracing, calcula- 
tion of areas by planimeter; finished maps. Sloane and Montz: Elementary 
Topographic Drawing. Mr. Lambe. 



C. E. s200. Surveying.* 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Math. 102. 

Required in the summer immediately following the freshman year in 
Aero. E., Agr. Eng., A. E., Cer. E., E. E., Gen. E., and M. E. 

The use, care and adjustment of surveying instruments; elementary land 
surveying, traverse lines, leveling, topographical surveying and stadia 
measurements. Tracy: Plane Surveying. Staff. 



C. E. 221, 222, 223. Theoretical Surveying. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Math. 102. 

Required of all sophomores in Civil Engineering. C. E. 221, 222 required 
in Forestry (0-3-3), in Geol. Eng., Landscape Architecture, and Wildlife 
Conservation and Management (3-3-0). 

Use, care and adjustment of surveying instruments, land surveying, topo- 
graphical surveying, leveling and theory of stadia measures, plane table, 
etc. 

Third term, railroad surveys, including simple, compound, reverse, and 
spiral curves, turnouts, etc. Davis and Foote: Surveying. Rubey: Route 
Surveys. Staff. 



C. E. 224. Topographic Drawing. 0-0-1 

Prerequisites: C. E. 101, 102, 103. 
Required of sophomores in Forestry. 
Plotting by coordinates; contours and general topography. Notes. 

Staff. 



* Note. — Two sessions : (a) Full time, 3 weeks immediately following close of College 
third term ; (b) half time, 6 weeks concurrently with College Summer School term in order 
to allow students to schedule summer school work. 



[Civil Engineering] 213 

C. E. 225, 227. Field Surveying. 1_0-1 

To be taken concurrently with C. E. 221, 223. 

Required of all sophomores in Civil Engineering and Landscape Archi- 
tecture. C. E. 225 required in Geol. E. and Wildlife Conservation and 
Management (1-0-0), and in Forestry (0-1-0). 

Surveying field practice, topographical surveys, railroad and highway 
curves. Profiles, cross-sections. Staff. 

C. E. 226. Mapping. 0-1-0 

Prerequisites: M. E. 105, 106. To be taken concurrently with C. E. 222. 
Required of all sophomores in Civil Engineering, and juniors in Geolog- 
ical Engineering. 

Practice in conventional signs and lettering. A complete topographical 
map and tracing is to be made involving the use of three methods of con- 
tour location. Field notes to be furnished. Mr. Lambe. 

C. E. 281. Mill and Mill Village Sanitation. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Chem. 103. 

Mill and mill village water supply and sewage disposal, mosquito and fly 
control, sanitary milk supply, industrial hygiene. Course for textile students. 
Ehlers and Steele: Municipal and Rural Sanitation. Mr. Stiemke. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. s300. Surveying and Mapping. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: C. E. 221, 222; C. E. 224. 

Required in summer immediately following sophomore year in Forestry. 

Boundary; topographical surveys, and calculations of sections of College 
Experimental Forestry Lands. Finished section maps. Davis and Foote: 
Surveying. Staff. 

C. E. s310. Advanced Surveying.* 3 cre dits 

Prerequisites: C. E. 221, 222, 223; C. E. 226. 

Required in the summer immediately following the sophomore year in 
Civil Engineering and Landscape Architecture. 

Plane table practice, special problems in surveying practice; triangula- 
tion, railroad and highway spirals; hydrographic surveying with sextant; 
plane table problems; the use and rating of current meters; measurement 
of stream flow; drainage problems. 

Laying out proposed construction work. Topographic details and special 
problems. Davis and Foote: Surveying. Staff. 

+ht„A ^^!"~/TT u a ?S B % aa : „ (a) Ful1 time > 3 weeks immediately following close of College 
third term ; (b) half time. 6 weeks concurrently with College Summer School term in order 
to allow students to schedule summer school work. 



214 [Civil Engineering] 

C. E. 321. Materials of Construction. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

Required of all juniors in Civil Engineering, M. E., Aero. E. and A. E., 
and of seniors in I. E. 

The study of materials used in buildings and other engineering struc- 
tures, with particular reference to their methods of manufacture and physi- 
cal properties. Two periods lecture and recitation; one period laboratory. 
Tucker: Laboratory Manual in the Testing of Materials. Mills: Materials 
of Construction. Messrs. Babcock, Ray. 



C. E. 322, 323. Materials Testing Laboratory. 0-1-1 

Prerequisite: C. E. 321. 

Required of seniors in General Civil, Sanitary, and Transportation En- 
gineering, arid one term only for juniors in Architectural and Ceramic 
Engineering. 

The testing of materials used in construction. Tucker: Manual in the 
Testing of Materials. Mr. Ray. 



C. E. 343. Hydraulic Structures. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

Required of juniors in General Civil, Sanitary, and Transportation 
Engineering. 

Application of the fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics to problems in 
Hydraulic Engineering; flow in pipes, in canals and natural water courses; 
design of locks and dams for navigation; flood control and power develop- 
ment; theory of design, installation and operation of pumps and hydraulic 
motors. Mr. Stiemke. 



C. E. 362, 363. Construction Engineering I. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 311. 

Required of juniors in Construction and Building Materials Engineering. 

Building codes, zoning ordinances; quantity surveys; timber properties, 
grading, identification, use, and preservation; frame construction; timber 
design. Huntington: Building Construction; Notes and Trade Literature. 

Mr. Bramer. 



[Civil Engineering] 215 

C. E. 365, 366. Sanitary and Mechanical Equipment of Buildings. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 311, 312. 

First term required of juniors in Construction and Building Materials 
Engineering. First and second terms required of juniors in Arch. E. 

A study of water supply, soil, waste, and vent-pipe systems, principles 
and practice of heating and ventilating and a discussion of various other 
mechanical equipment of a building, such as elevators, dust-collecting sys- 
tems, etc. Gay and Fawcett: Mechanical and Electrical Equipment of 
Buildings. Mr. Stiemke. 



C. E. 367. Specifications. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 321. 

Required of juniors in Construction and Building Materials Engineering. 

Preparation of specifications and legal documents for building operations. 
Kirby: Elements of Specification Writing. Mr. Bramer. 



C. E. 372, 373. Transportation Engineering I. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 221, 222, 223. 

Required of juniors in General Civil, Sanitary, and Transportation En- 
gineering. 

General design, construction, and maintenance of highways, railroads, 
and airports. Mr. Babcock. 



C. E. 383. Sanitary Engineering. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 103. 

Required of juniors in San. E. 

Water supply and sewage disposal; ventilation; mosquito and fly control; 
refuse disposal; public health laws and organization. Ehlers and Steele: 
Municipal and Rural Sanitation. Mr. Stiemke. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. 421, 422. Reinforced Concrete. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 313, 322. 

Required of all seniors in Civil Engineering and Architectural Engi- 
neering. 

Derivation of formulas used in reinforced concrete design, use of dia- 
grams and curves. Illustrative problems in design. Turneaure and Maurer: 
Principles of Reinforced Concrete Construction. Messrs. Mann, Bramer. 



216 [Civil Engineering] 

C. E. 423, 424, 425. Graphic Statics. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: E. M. 313. 

First term required of all seniors in Civil Engineering. First, second, and 
third terms required of all seniors in Architectural Engineering. 

Principles involved in the solution of problems by graphical methods. 
Moments, shears. Resultant pressure on retaining walls. Stress diagrams. 
Fairman and Cutshall: Graphic Statics and assigned references. 

Mr. Mann. 



C. E. 426, 427. Structural Design. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: E. M. 322, C. E. 431. 

Required of all seniors in Civil Engineering and Architectural Engi- 
neering. 

Design of beams, columns, tension members, plate girders, trusses and 
structures. Bishop : Structural Design. Mr. Mann. 



C. E. 431, 432. Theory of Structures. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 322. 

Required of all seniors in Civil Engineering and General Engineering. 

Roof trusses; bridge trusses; three hinged arch, lateral bracing and 
portals; rigid frame, wind stresses in tall buildings, indeterminate trusses, 
secondary stresses. Spoff ord : Theory of Structures. Mr. Bramer. 



C. E. 431a, 432a. Theory of Structures (abridged). 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 322. 

Required in Architectural Engineering, C. E. 431, 432, to be required if 
less than five students enroll for C. E. 431a, 432a. 

Stress analyses and designs of wooden and steel roof trusses; wood, steel, 
and reinforced concrete floor systems. Theory and design of columns, foot- 
ings, retaining walls. Theories for wind stress design in tall buildings. 
Shedd and Vawter: Theory of Simple Structures. Mr. Bramer. 



C. E. 435. Soil Mechanics. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: E. M. 321, 322. 

Required of seniors in General, Civil, Sanitary, and Transportation 
Engineering. 

The classification of soils, their physical characteristics and tests; the 
suitability of certain types of soils for foundations; methods of stabilizing 
soils; general principles involved in selection of soils for foundations. 

Messrs. Babcock, Bramer. 



[Civil Engineering] 217 

C. E. 449. Hydrology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite : E. M. 330. 

Elective for seniors in Engineering, 

The study of the science of the occurrence, distribution and use of water 
upon the earth with particular reference to North Carolina, including pre- 
cipitation, evaporation, transpiration, seepage, runoff and stream flow. 
Myer: Elements of Hydrology. Mr. Stiemke. 



C. E. 453. Applied Astronomy. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: C. E. s310. 

Required of seniors in General Civil and Transportation Engineering. 

The application of astronomy in determining latitude, azimuth, longi- 
tude and time; astronomical observations with transit and sextant; reduc- 
tion of observations. One credit given for observations. Hosmer: Applied 
Astronomy. Messrs. Babcock, Bramer. 



C. E. 455. Aerial Surveying. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. s310. 

Required of seniors in General Civil. 

A study of various methods of constructing topographical maps from 
horizontal, vertical, and oblique photographs, and different methods of con- 
trol of Aerial Surveys. The work covered is confined to the methods of 
producing maps from photographs and does not take up the technical work 
of photography or piloting. Bagley: Aerophotography and Aerosurveying. 

Mr. Babcock. 



C. E. 461, 462, 463. Construction Engineering II. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 362, 363. 

Required of seniors in Construction and Building Materials Engineering. 

Estimating frame, masonry, and reinforced concrete buildings; design 
and construction of concrete formwork; study of reinforced concrete and 
steel-framed structures; cost analysis, organization, and management of 
construction plants; prefabricated construction. Huntington: Building Con- 
struction; Notes and Trade Literature. Mr. Bramer. 



C. E. 471, 472. Transportation Engineering II. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: C. E. 372, 373. 

Required of seniors in General Civil and Transportation Engineering. 
Transportation systems — their development, operation, control, and use. 

Mr. Babcock. 



218 [Civil Engineering] 

C. E. 473. Transportation Design. 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: C. E. 372, 373. 

Required of seniors in Transportation Engineering. 

Design of highways, highway intersections, airports, and allied trans- 
portation facilities. Mr. Babcock. 



C. E. 474. 475. Highway Engineering. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: C. I. $72, 173. 

Required of seniors in Transportation Engineering. 

EEjgbway administration and finance; economic location of highways; 
tiie motor vehicle and its operation; traffic regulation and control. 

Mr. Babcock. 



C. E. 4*1. 4*2. Sanitary Engineering Laboratory. 1-1-0 



sd of seniors in General Civil and Sanitary Engineering. 

::ry a.r.^; .; = '-'- =e~-age and sludge. Inspection trips to sewage 
tlants. Laboratory analysis for determining quality and safety of 
speetion of waterworks in various cities. Notes. Mr. Stiemke. 



C. E. 4*3. Financing of Sanitary Utilities. 0-0-3 

?rere:-^i£i:es: Math. 803. C. E. 383. 

Required of seniors in Sanitary Engineering. 

Rates and service charges, collections, operating cost control, bond issues, 
an : :u:g^:5. Mr. Stiemke. 



C. E. 4S5. Waterworks. 3-0-0 

?r=re:u:s-::.= : E. M. 330. 
Required of seniors in General Civil and Sanitary Engineering. 

---".:.;i. ' ::t"-:::::: :uar.rlTy: s:ur:e£ ::' suitly: ::LIe:-r::r. : rur:f.:a- 
tion; distribution. Babbitt and Doland: Water Supply Engineering. 

Mr. Stiemke. 



C. E. 4*6. Sewerage. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

Required of seniors in General Civil and Sanitary Engineering. 

Separate and combined sewer system; principles of design and construc- 
tion; sewer appurtenances; disposal plants. Metcalf and Eddy: Sewerage 
and Sewage Disposal. Mr. Stiemke. 



[Civil Engineering] 219 

C. E. 488. Water Purification. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 330, C. E. 485. 

Required of seniors in Sanitary Engineering. 

Design and operation of water purification plants; sedimentation, coagu- 
lation, filtration, and sterilization of water. Recent treatment processes. 
Inspection trips to various plants. Babbitt and Doland: Water Supply 
Engineering. Mr. Stiemke. 

C. E. 489. Sewage Disposal. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: C. E. 486. 

Required of seniors in Sanitary Engineering. 

Design and operation of sewage disposal plants ;treatment processes and 
devices; efficiencies and costs of plants; public health, legal and economic 
problems involved. Inspection trips to disposal plants. Metcalf and Eddy: 
Sewerage and Sewage Disposal. Mr. Stiemke. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

C. E. 525, 526, 527. Advanced Structural Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites : C. E. 426, 427. 

Analysis and design of fixed, hinged and multispan arches. Complete 
designs of steel and reinforced concrete structures. MacCullough and 
Thayer: Elastic Arch Bridges. Mr. Bramer. 

C. E. 531, 532, 533. Advanced Structural Theory. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 431, 432. 

Stress analysis in continuous frames and arches; secondary stresses; 
wind stresses and space frame-work. Analyses by use of Beggs' Defor- 
meter. Sutherland and Bowman: Advanced Structural Theory. 

Mr. Bramer. 



C. E. 561, 562, 563. Construction Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 461, 462, 463. 

Study of recent advancement and developments in Construction. Original 
research. Mr. Bramer. 

C. E. 573, 574, 575. Transportation Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Transportation Engineering. 
A study of the recent developments and advancements in the fields of 
railway, highway, and air transportation. At least one term is devoted to 
original research. , Mr. Babcock. 



220 [Economics] 

C. E. 577. 57*. 579. Advanced Transportation Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Transportation Engineering. 
A continuation of the undergraduate subjects in Transportation Engi- 
neering with particular emphasis on the operation and regulation of the 
transportation systems of the United States. Mr. Babcock. 

C. E. 551, 552. 583. Sanitary Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: C. E. 353, 4S3, 489. 

In the first term, a study of recent developments and research in Sanitary 
Engineering is made from current literature. In the second term, a research 
problem is selected and data on the problem are compiled from literature. 
In the third term, individual research is done. Mr. Stiemke. 



C. E. 585, 5S6. Advanced Sewage Disposal. 3-3-0 

C. E. 588, 589. Advanced Water Purification. 0-3-3 

ECONOMICS 

Courses 

Econ. 201, 202. 203. General Economics. 3-3-3 

Required of sophomores in E. E.. Ind. E.. Occ. Inf. & Guid., juniors in 
Arch. E.. Cer. E.. C. E.. Ger.. E.. Ind. Arts Educ, Tex., seniors in Aero. E., 
Arch., Chem. E.. Geol. E., M. E. Econ. 201.2 required of sophomores in 
Agr., and Teachers of Agr. 

A study of economic institutions and general principles governing pro- 
duction and distribution of wealth under the existing economic organization. 
Messrs. Brown. Green. Leager, Moen, Shulenberger, and Wood. 



Econ. 205. Introduction to Economics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required :: students ir. Forestry. Lar.i. A::'r... ar.i Ir.d. Arts. 
The business aspects and economic organization of society; production, 
distribution, and value of economic goods. Mr. Green. 



Econ. 212. Accounting for Engineers. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

R equired of juniors in Transportation Option of C. E., and seniors in 
L. A., and E. E. 

A survey of accounting principles; f.r.ar.cial statements, their construc- 
tion, use, and interpretation. Mr. Shulenberger. 



[Economics] 221 

Econ. 301, 302, 303. Principles of Accounting. 3.3.3 

Required of juniors in Ag. Econ., Ind. E., Tex. Mgt., and seniors in Gen. E. 
Econ. 301, 302 required of juniors in Const, and Bldg. Materials Option of 
C. E., and in Yarn Mfg. 

Fundamental principles of theory and practice; interpretation of the struc- 
ture, form, and use of business statements. Mr. Shulenberger. 

Econ. 305. Business Organization. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 
Required of seniors in Transportation Option of C. E. 
Forms of business enterprises; single enterprises, partnerships, joint-stock 
companies and corporations; principles of business management. 

Mr. Green. 



Econ. 307. Business Law. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

Required of juniors in Aero. E., Arch. E., Cer. E., Transportation Option 
of C. E., M. E., Ind. Arts Educ, seniors in An. Prod., Ind. E., and fifth year 
in Arch. Messrs. Green and McMillan. 

Sources of law; fields of law; contracts, agency, sales; negotiable docu- 
ments; the law as it controls business transactions. 

Messrs. Green and McMillan. 



Econ. 308. Advanced Business Law. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 307. 

A continuation of Economics 307, including bailments, suretyship, real 
property; corporations; recent developments in State and Federal Law. 

Mr. Green. 



Econ. 311, 312, 313. Marketing Methods and Sales Management. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

Required of seniors in Tex. Mgt.; Econ. 311, 312 required of juniors in 
Farm Mkt, and Farm Fin.; Econ. 311, 312 or Econ. 320 and Econ. 331 
required of seniors in Const, and Bldg. Materials Option of C. E. 

Marketing functions, agencies, systems; retailing; marketing analysis; 
problems in marketing; elements of sales management. Mr. Moen. 



Econ. 315. Advertising. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 
Principles of advertising. Mr. Moen. 



222 [Economics] 

Econ. 318. Money and Credit. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

The functions, history, and development of money and credit; contempor- 
ary policies and relation to prices; interrelations of money and credit in 
banks and financial institutions. Mr. Moen. 



Ecom 319. Modern Banking. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

Origin and development of banking in the United States; functions and 
operations of the modern bank; banking laws; Federal Reserve System. 

Mr. Moen. 



Econ. 320. Corporation Finance. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

Alternate requirement in Const, and Bldg. Materials Option of C. E. 

Raising and spending of funds and standards of control. Mr. Moen. 



Econ. 325, 326. Industrial Management. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

Required of seniors in Textiles, elective for all others. 

Principles and techniques of modern scientific management; relationship 

of finance, marketing, industrial relations, accounting, and statistics to 

production; techniques regarding specific problems; analysis of economic, 

political, and social influences on production. Mr. Wood. 



Econ. 331. Labor Problems. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

Required of juniors in Ind. Educ, and seniors in Ind. Arts Educ. Alternate 
requirement in Const, and Bldg. Materials Option of C. E. 

An economic approach to labor problems, including such topics as insecur- 
ity, wages, hours, working conditions, substandard workers, legislation 
aimed at correcting existing evils. Mr. Wood. 



Econ. 332. Industrial Relations. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

History, organization, activities, and policies of organized labor; legal 
aspects, recent developments. Mr. Wood. 



[Economics] 223 

Econ. 333. Personnel Management. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

Required of seniors in Const, and Bldg. Materials Option of C. E., and Tex. 

Emphasis on the human problems of industry. A review of the scientific 
techniques and results of research regarding the problems of employment; 
training, promotion, transfer; health and safety; service and welfare; and 
joint relations. Mr. Wood. 



Econ. 335. Time Study. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

Analysis of shop operation into elements, and the determination of the 
time for each element; emphasis on factors affecting job specification, and 
wage-rate setting. Mr. Wood. 



Econ. 340. Transportation Problems. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

The economic aspects of transportation facilities provided by the rail- 
roads, highways, and air- and water-transportation agencies; principles 
and problems of rate making, operation, management, valuation, coordina- 
tion and government regulation. Mr 



Econ. 401. Advanced Accounting. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 301, 302, 303. 

Problems of asset valuation, such as depreciation, replacements, amortiza- 
tion, etc., found in all types of business organizations. Mr. Shulenberger. 



Econ. 404, 405. Principles of Cost Accounting. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 301, 302, 303. 
Cost finding, material costs, labor costs, overhead costs, etc. 

Mr. Shulenberger. 



Econ. 408. Survey of Statistical Methods. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

Required of juniors in Forestry and Agricultural Economics, and of 
seniors in Rural Sociology. 

Elective for all others. 

Methods of describing quantitative data; collection and methods of 
analysis of statistical materials; charts and graphs for presenting numerical 
facts. Mr. Leager. 



224 [Economics] 

Econ. 409. Statistical Technique. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Econ. 408. 

Required of juniors in Agricultural Economics. 

The problem of estimation, correlation; simple linear and nonlinear 
forms; normal curve and probable error; methods of sampling. 

Mr. Leager. 

Econ. 414. International Economic Relations. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

Backgrounds and some newer developments in international economics, 
with special emphasis on the position of the United States in world trade. 

Mr. Green. 

Econ. 415. Investment Problems and Policies. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203 or 205. 

Different types of investments and methods of judging them. Managing 
personal finances. Mr. Moen. 



Econ. 416. Public Finance and Taxation. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

Classes of income and expenditure; incidence of different classes of taxes. 

Mr. Moen. 

Econ. 418. Principles of Insurance. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

Elective. 

Risk as an element of all agri(?ultural and industrial activity; discussion 
of such risks as can be covered by insurance with the appropriate form of 
insurance, e.g., employer's liability, workmen's compensation, fire, life, and 
other forms. Mr. Shulenberger. 

Econ. 501. Advanced Economic Theory. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eighteen (18) term credits in Economics. 

Recent and current economic theory; principal schools of economists; 
theory of prices under the system of free enterprise. Staff. 

Econ. 502. History of Economic Doctrines. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 501. 

History of economic doctrines from the Mercantilists to the period of 

Ricardo. Staff. 



[Education] 225 
EDUCATION: TEACHER EDUCATION 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Ed. 308. Visual Aids. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

Required of students in Education. 

Methods and technique of visual instruction; lettering; statistical illus- 
trating; chart, graph, and poster-making; photography; projector opera- 
tion, care, and use. Designed for teachers and extension workers. 

Mr. Armstrong. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 406. Principles of Teaching. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 303 or 304. 

Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. 

Principles of teaching with applications to vocational agriculture; per- 
sonal requisites of a teacher; responsibilities; objectives of teaching; school 
control; motivation; directing study. Mr. Cook. 



Ed. 407. Methods of Teaching Agriculture. 5-0-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 303, 308, or equivalents, and at least 12 credits in 
Agriculture. 

Required of students in Agricultural Education. 

Organization of subject matter; teaching techniques; supervised practice; 
textbooks and reference material; Future Farmers of America; organization 
of departments of vocational agriculture; agricultural guidance. 

Mr. Cook. 



Ed. 408. Observation and Directed Teaching. 0-5-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 406, 407, and at least 12 credits in Agriculture. 
Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. 

Observation and teaching vocational agriculture under supervision; par- 
ticipation in the varied activities of the teacher of vocational agriculture. 

Staff in Agricultural Education. 

Ed. 411. Evening: Classes and Directed Teaching. 0-5-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 406, 407, and at least 12 credits in Agriculture. 
Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. 
Community activities of teachers of vocational agriculture; organization, 

method, and directed teaching of evening and part-time classes. Mr. Cook. 



226 [Education] 

Ed. 412. Materials and Methods in Teaching Agriculture. 0-5-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 406, 407, and 12 credits in Agriculture. 
Required of seniors in Agr. Ed. 

Use of illustrative and actual materials in teaching vocational agriculture; 
collection and preservation of specimens; chart making; practice in use of 
materials in directed teaching. Mr. Armstrong. 



Ed. 426. Secondary Education in Agriculture. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Ed. 303 or 304, and 6 other credits in Education. 
Agricultural education in the United States; school organization; agri- 
cultural occupations. Mr. Cook. 



Ed. 460. Special Problems in Teaching Agriculture. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Ed. 406, 407, or equivalent. 

Planning programs of work and courses of study; collecting and preparing 
materials for teaching; making teaching plans. Mr. Cook and Staff. 



Ed. 461 (a-b). Trends in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 3 or 6 credits 
Prerequisites: 18 credits in Education, including 5 in Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Procedures in teaching vocational agriculture; out-of -school farm youth; 
evening-class instruction and the F. F. A. 

Staff in Agricultural Education. 



Ed. 462 (a-b). Course of Study Problems. 3 or 6 credits 

Prerequisites: 18 credits in Education, including 5 in Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Selection and organization of subject matter in vocational agriculture; 
supervised practice. Staff in Agricultural Education. 



Ed. 463 (a-b). Guidance and Individual Instruction. 3 or 6 credits 

Prerequisites: 18 credits in Education, including 5 in Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Individualized instruction applied to vocational agriculture; agricultural 
occupations, guidance, and counseling with special reference to pupils in 
vocational agriculture. Staff in Agricultural Education. 



[Education] 227 

Courses for Graduates Only 

Ed. 516. Problems in Agricultural Teaching. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Ed. 407, and at least 12 other credits in Education and 
Agriculture. Experience in Agricultural Teaching will be accepted in lieu 
of Ed. 407. 

Investigations, reports, and a critical evaluation of present practices; 
course adapted to individual interests and needs. 

Staff in Agricultural Education. 

Ed. 517. Principles of Agricultural Education. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credits in Education and Agriculture. Permission 
to register. 

Principles and practices in agricultural education in the light of educa- 
tional research and of changing rural conditions. Mr. Cook. 

Ed. 520. Agricultural Education Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credits in Education. 

A critical review of current articles and books of interest to students of 
agricultural education. Staff. 

Ed. 521. Research in Education. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen hours in Education and permission to register. 
One or more research problems under the guidance of a member of the 
staff. Staff. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

AND 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Ed. (LA.) 105 a, b, c. Industrial Arts Drawing. 3-3-3 

Required of freshmen in Industrial Arts Education. 
Fundamentals of pictorial representation, such as layout work, machine, 
and architectural drawing. Mr. Boshart. 

Ed. (LA.) 106 a, b, c. Orientation in Industrial Arts. 3-3-3 

Required of freshmen in Industrial Arts Education. 

Provides initial experiences for students interested in teaching Industrial 
Arts in the secondary school; emphasizes the importance and relation of 
Industrial Arts to other areas in the school and to individual development. 

Mr. Ludington. 



228 [Education] 

Ed. (LA.) 205. Industrial Arts Design. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Ed. (I. A.) 105, a, b, c. 

Required of sophomores in Industrial Arts Education. 

Design and construction in a variety of industrial materials; stressing 
individual expression and appreciation of well designed industrial products. 

Mr. Boshart. 



Ed. (I. A.) 206a, b, c. Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Ed. (I. A.) 105 a, b, c, and I. A. 106 a, b, c. 
Required of sophomores in Industrial Arts Education. 
Explorations in drawing, planning, woodwork, metal work, and electricity. 

Messrs. Ludington and Boshart. 



Ed. (LA.) 306 a, b, c. Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Ed. (I. A.) 105 a, b, c; Ed. (I. A.) 106 a, b, c, and Ed. 
(LA.) 206 a, b, c. 

Required of all juniors in Industrial Arts Education. 

Advanced hand and machine tool techniques in printing, electricity, and 
metal work; stressing the development of master craftsmanship and an 
understanding of related social-economic problems. Mr. Ludington. 



Ed. 344. Problems in Secondary Education. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 303, and 6 other credits in Education. 
Required of juniors preparing to teach industrial subjects. 
Problems of secondary education, with special reference to the relation- 
ships of industrial subjects with the other elements of the school program. 

Mr. Boshart. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 416. Local Survey; Planning a Program. 0-3-0 

Methods of surveying local occupations; use of the findings to plan a 
program of Industrial Education. Mr. Smith. 



[Education] 229 

Ed. 422. Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 304, 344. 

Required of seniors in Industrial Arts Education and those preparing to 
teach vocational classes in trades and industries. 

Principles of teaching in the classroom or shop; intended for those who 
are teaching or preparing to teach shop and drawing courses. 

Mr. Boshart or Mr. Ludington. 

Ed. 427. Philosophy of Industrial Education. 0-3-0 

The philosophy of industrial education, a review of Federal and State 
legislation pertaining to industrial education; part-time, all-day trade, 
general industrial, and evening schools. Mr. Smith. 

Ed. 433. Field Work in Secondary Education. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites : Ed. 344, and 6 credits in Education. 
Required of juniors in Industrial Arts Education. 

A study of pupil-teacher-community relationships at the secondary school 
level involving observations, visits, reports, readings, and conferences. 

Staff. 

Ed. 440. Vocational Education. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Ed. 303, 344, and 6 additional credits in Education. 

Elective for students in Industrial Arts and Industrial Education. 

Problems of vocational education; underlying philosophy; its place in 
our system of education; the laws governing prevailing practices and 
administration; agricultural, homemaking, industrial, and commercial voca- 
tions; deals with all-day, evening, part-time, and general continuation class 
work. Staff. 

Ed. 444. Observation and Directed Teaching of Industrial Subjects. 

3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Prerequisites : Ed. 422, 433. 

Required of students who desire an "A" grade certificate to teach indus- 
trial subjects. 

Observation of and active participation in phases of teacher activity; 
students will work in actual situations under supervision. Staff. 

Ed. S., Ex. 452. Industrial Arts in the Elementary School. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: 12 credits in education and the consent of the instructor. 
For advanced undergraduate and graduate students; organized to help 
students gain insights into the materials, processes, and products of indus- 
try fundamental to an understanding of major problems of living. Staff. 



230 [Education] 

Ed. (LA.) 470 a. b, c. Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. 3 or 3 or 3 
An elective course for undergraduates and graduates with consent of the 
instructor. 

Advanced laboratory conducted on general shop or laboratory of indus- 
tries basis. Mr. Ludington. 



Ed. S.. Ex. 480. Modern Industries. 3 credits 

Prerequisite : 12 credits in education and consent of the instructor. 
Elective course for advanced undergraduate and gTaduate students in 
industrial arts. Designed to assist teachers in guiding students to sources 
of information relative to various modern industries. Staff. 



Ed. 482. Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts. 3-0-0 

A course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in Industrial 
Arts Education. 

Planning and organizing of learning experiences in the Industrial Arts 
area. Mr. Ludington. 



Ed. 4S3. Instructional Aids and Devices. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Ed. 304, and 6 other credits in Education. 
Required of those intending to teach Industrial Arts or Industrial Edu- 
cation, and those who because of trade experience desire to teach trade 
subjects. 

Analysis of learning units, and the preparation of instructional aids and 
devices. Mr. Ludington. 



Ed. 484. Laboratory Planning and Equipment Selection. 0-0-3 

A course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. 

The physical planning of school shops and laboratories; selection of tools 
and equipment. Whenever possible, actual or contemplated school buildings 
will be used for class work. Mr. Ludington. 



Ed. 492. Individual Problems in Education. 3 credits 

An elective course for graduate students in Industrial Arts Education 
and Industrial Education, with consent of instructor. 

Individual and group studies of one or more major problems in Industrial 
Arts and Industrial Education. Problems will be approached through the 
application of research techniques with final reports prepared in a form 
suitable for publication as a magazine article, technical or professional 
bulletin. Staff. 



[Education] 231 
Courses for Graduates Only 

Ed. 510. Administration and Supervision of Vocational Education. 

Prerequisites : Ed. 304, 344, 420, 440, or equivalent. 3 or 3 or 3 

For graduate students majoring in Education. 

Administrative and supervisory problems of vocational education; prac- 
tices and policies of Federal and State offices; organization and administra- 
tion of city and consolidated systems. Staff. 



Ed. 514. Modern Principles and Practices in Secondary Education. 

3 or 3 or 3 

Required of graduate students in Guidance, Industrial Arts, and Indus- 
tial Education. 

Foundations of modern programs of secondary education; purposes, cur- 
riculum, organization, administration, and the place and importance of the 
high school in the community in relation to contemporary social forces. 

Mr. Ludington. 



Ed. 521. Research in Education. 3 or 3 or 3 

The student will make a study of one or more research problems under 
the supervision of some member of the staff of the Department of Teacher 
Education. The course will be selected on the recommendation of the mem- 
ber of the faculty with whom the student plans to carry on the study. 

Staff. 



Ed. 530. Philosophy of Industrial Arts. 3 or 3 or 3 

Required of all graduate students in Industrial Arts Education; elective 
for others with consent of the instructor. 

Current and historical developments in Industrial Arts; philosophical 
concepts, functions, scope, criteria for the selection and evaluation of learn- 
ing experiences, laboratory organization, student personnel programs, com- 
munity relationships, teacher qualifications, and problems confronting the 
Industrial Arts profession. Mr. Ludington. 



Occupational Information and Guidance 

Ed. 103. Occupations. 3 or 3 or 3 

Required in Occupational Information and Guidance. Elective for others. 
A view of the field of occupations, supplying facts which young persons 
are entitled to have in deciding upon their life work. Mr. Boshart. 



232 [Education*] 

Cours-es for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 420. Philosophy of Guidance. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite 1- :red::.s ir. education. 

Bie place of guidance in the school program covering the elementary, 
junior high, and senior high divisions. It will treat of the development of 
educational and vocational guidance, the relation of personnel work, prin- 
ciples and practices of guidance in employment, and child legislation. 

Ifr. Boshart. 



Ed. 423. Methods of Teaching Occupations. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: I:. EC 4. £4-4. 

Required of seniors expecting to teach occupational information and 
guidance and elective for others who are interested. 

Principles of teaching occupational information and guidance; the selec- 
tion and preparation of materials: the literature available, and methods of 
presentation. Messrs. Boshart and Smith. 



Ed. 424. Occupational Studies. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: 12 credits in Education. 

Intended to acquaint teachers with the field of occupations; selection of 
suitable instructional materials and its presentation to pupils ; analyses of 
leading groups of occupations. Mr. Boshart. 



Ed. 433. Field Work in Secondary Education. See page 224 



Ed. 4*1. Character Education. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: ll midili ia Education. 

Factors influencing character development; opportunities and responsi- 
bilities of the school for the conception and attitudes fundamental to good 
::r.duct. treris. ru ate rials. ar.d tr:-:e:ures. Mr. Cook. 



: iividual Problems in Guidance. 3 or 3 or 3 

Elective for advanced undergraduate and graduate students interested in 
the guidance field. 

Intended for individual m grtup studies of one or more of the major 
problems in guidance and rersir.rel work Problems will be selected to meet 
the in t er e sts of individuals of the class and approached through research 
techniques with the idea of preparing suitable material for distribution in 
mimeographed or bulletin form. Staff. 



[Electrical Engineering] 233 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Ed. 512. Problems in Counseling. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Ed. 420, 432, or equivalent. 

Intended for teachers of experience and those interested in the problems 
of guidance in school and industry; attention to group and individual 
counseling as applied to the junior and senior high schools, colleges, or 
placement offices; procedures of conducting interviews and conferences. 

Mr. Boshart. 



Ed. 521. Research in Education. see page 226 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Ed. 303, 304. Educational Psychology. 3-3-0 

(For description of course see Psychology 303, 304) Mr. Moffie. 



Ed. 476. Psychology of Adolescence. 0-0-3 

(For description of course see Psychology 476) Mr. Moffie. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

E. E. 201, 202, 203. Electrical Engineering Fundamentals. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Math. 102. 

Required of sophomores in E. E. Concurrent with Phys. 201, 202, 203. 

Fundamental laws of electric, magnetic and dielectric circuits; problem 
drill. Timbie and Bush: Principles of Electrical Engineering. 

Messrs. Fouraker and Browne. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 301, 302, 303. Electrical Engineering. 4-4-4 

Prerequisite: E. E. 202. 

Required of juniors in E. E. 

Principles, performances and characteristics of direct-current apparatus; 
theory of periodic currents, alternating-current circuits and systems. Kloef- 
fler, Brennenman and Kerchner: Direct Current Machinery. Bryant and 
Correll: A. C. Circuits. Messrs. Fouraker and Pearsall. 



234 [Electrical Engineering] 

E. E. 311. 312. 313. Electrical Engineering Laboratory, I. 2-2-2 

Required of juniors in E. E. Concurrent with E. E. 301, 302, 303. 
A laboratory course coordinated with E. E. 301. Ricker and Tucker, 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory Experiments. 

Messrs. Lear, Pearsall, Keever, Glenn, and Nichols. 

E. E. 315. 316. Fundamentals of Electronics. 0-4-4 

Prerequisite: E. E. 301. 

Required of Juniors in E. E. 

The fundamental principles of electron tubes and their associated circuits. 
Eastman: Fundamentals of Vacuum Tubes. Messrs. Glenn and Carley. 

E. E. 320. 321. 322. Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3-3-0 or 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Math. 202, Phys. 203. 

Required of juniors in Aero E., Chem. E., C. E., and Geol. E., and of 
seniors in Cer. E.. Gen. E., I. E., and M. E. 

Theory and problems in applied electricity; motor characteristics and 
industrial applications. 

Messrs. Lear, Keever, Pearsall, Glenn, and Winkler. 

E. E. 325. 326. 327. Electrical Engineering Laboratory, II. 1-1-1 

Required of Seniors in Gen. E., I. E., and M. E. 

A laboratory course coordinated and concurrent with E. E. 321, 322, 323. 
Messrs. Lear, Keever, Pearsall, Glenn, Winkler, Nichols. 

E. E. 343. Electrical Equipment of Buildings. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Phys. 203. 

Required of seniors in C. E. in Construction and Building Materials 
Options and Architectural Engineering. 

Wiring of buildings for light and power; selection of motors and lighting 
equipment. Moyer and Wostrel: Industrial Electricity and Wiring. 

Messrs. Lear and Winkler. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 401. 402. Alternating-Current Machinery. 4-4-0 

Prerequisite: E. E. 303. 

Required of seniors in E. E. 

Principles and characteristics of alternating current-machinery. Bryant 
and Johnson: Alternating-Current Machinery. 

Messrs. Fouraker and Keever. 



[Electrical Engineering] 235 

E. E. 403. Electric Transmission. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: E. E. 402. 

Theory and characteristics of electric circuits for transmission of power. 
Bryant and Correll: Alternating Current Machinery. 

Messrs. Fouraker and Keever. 



E. E. 411, 412, 413. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in E. E. Concurrent with E. E. 401, 402, 403. 
A laboratory course coordinated with classroom work. Ricker and Tucker, 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory Experiments. 

Messrs. Keever, Pearsall, Glenn, and Winkler. 



E. E. 421, 422, 423. Electric Power Applications (Optional with 

E. E. 425, 426, 427). 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: E. E. 303. 

Selection of electric equipment for industrial applications, control equip- 
ment; electric traction; electric power plants. Mr. Browne. 



E. E. 425, 426, 427. Electric Communications (Optional with 

E. E. 421, 422, 423). Concurrent with E. E. 445, 446, 447. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: E. E. 303. 

Circuits and equipment for wire communication; radio and carrier current 

systems. Everitt: Communication Engineering. 

Messrs. Fouraker and Glenn. 



E. E. 437. Illumination. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: E. E. 303. 

Required of seniors in E. E. 

Characteristics of electric lamps; electric lighting systems. Kunerth: 
Textbook of Illumination. Mr. Lear. 



E. E. 441, 442, 443. Electrical Measurements in Industry. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. E. 303 or E. E. 322 or E. E. 333. 

Theory and practice of electrical measurements in industry, including 
electrical methods applied to measurement of nonelectric values. 

Mr. Brown. 



E. E. 443. 446. 44". Ultra Hirh Frequency Techniques. 4-4-4 

Pr-er^: ::h::^s : E. Z -=11 411. ~ _ .:"- Z. Z. 425. 41-:. 42" c:r.currer.:37. 
fne production, control and use of ultra high frequency radio signals for 

:::..-■. -7_ :i:: :r. ar.: ie:-e:7. :r.. Zra:r.eri. t" :.' V - -Z~ ; -. F"-::/ ■ ? f 
7-:'-" : -:. Mr. Carley. 



E. E. 433. Po^er Network Calculations. 0-0-3 



The r.e:r. :d ::' syrrrreTrical ::r:-.7. :r.er.^s applied to fault calculation in 

r :~rr system r.e~ :r£.s. Mr. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

E. E. 501. 5 02. 50 3. Fur.camer.tal Principles in Electrical 

Er.el-eerir.z. 3-3-3 



the more complex problems encoun- 
Mr. Fouraker. 



E. E. : : i ' ' ". Electrical Er.rLr.eerir.z Seminar. 1-1-1 

? r e r ~z - : s : t e : Sra i u.at~. : r : r. z- E . 

A series of papers and conferences of junior instructional staff and stu- 
dents vr'-; ^re :.amdidat.~s ::r ii' ;.- .^: ; err res in electrical engineering. 

Messrs. Fouraker, Browne. 



E. E. 521. 322. 523. Er.rir.eerir.r Electronics. 4-4-4 



ing studies of various types of tubes 

Mr. Carley. 



E E. 531, 532, 533. Illanunation Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prere: ::5::e : Grad-aTitr. ir. Z. Z. 

Advanced principles of Illumination Engineering. Mr. Browne. 



E. E. 550. Electrical Engineering Research. 3-3-3 



sld of Electrical Engineering. 

Mr. Fouraker. 



[Engineering Mechanics] 237 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

E. M. 311. Engineering Mechanics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Math. 201. 

Co-requisites: Math. 202 and Phys. 201. 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

Statics and Friction: Study of concurrent, parallel and nonconcurrent 
systems of both coplaner and noncoplaner forces ; the application of statics 
to the solution of fundamental engineering problems, including statical 
friction. Seely and Ensign: Analytical Mechanics for Engineers. 

Messrs. Smith, Conner, Mitchell, and Farlow. 



E. M. 312. Engineering Mechanics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: E. M. 311 and Math. 202. 

Co-requisites: Math. 303. 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

Kinematics; centroids moments of inertia. Seely and Ensign: Analytical 
Mechanics for Engineers. Messrs. Smith, Conner, Mitchell, Farlow. 



E. M .313. Engineering Mechanics. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Preriquisites : E. M. 312 and Math. 303. 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

Kinetics: The motions of particles of rigid bodies as they are affected by 
the action of unbalanced forces. The Newtonian laws of motion; work and 
energy; power, impulse and momentum; applications to special engineering 
problems: Seely and Ensign: Analytical Mechanics for Engineers. 

Messrs. Smith, Conner, Mitchell, and Farlow. 



E. M. 321. Strength of Materials. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: E. M. 302 or E. M. 312, and Math. 303. 

Co-requisite: E. M. 313. 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

Stresses and strains in engineering materials ; tension, compression, shear, 
and torsion; emphasis on the applications to engineering structures; bending 
moments and shear in simple beams; fibre stresses in beams and their dis- 
tribution throughout the cross section. Timoshenko and McCullough: Ele- 
ments of Strength of Materials. 

Messrs. Smith, Conner, Mitchell, and Farlow. 



238 [Engineering Mechanics] 

E. M. 322. Strength of Materials. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 321. 

Required of all students in Engineering except Chem. E., E. E., Geol. E., 
and Ind. E. 

A continuation of E. M. 321. Various methods for finding the deflection 
of beams; determination of stresses in statically indeterminate beams; the 
study of columns; combined stresse. Timoshenko and McCullough: Ele- 
ments of Strength of Materials. Messrs. Smith, Conner, and Mitchell. 



E. M. 330. Fluid Mechanics. 3-0-0, 0-3-0, or 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: E. M. 302 or E. M. 313. 
Required of students in Aero. E., Ch. E., C. E., E. E., Geol. E., M. E. 

A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics of fluids; properties 
of fluids; intensity of pressure; hydrostatic pressure on areas; applications 
of hydrostatics; kinematics of fluid flow; dynamics of fluid flow; applica- 
tions of hydrokinetics; friction losses in pipes; flow through pipes; dynamic 
forces. Daugherty: Hydraulics. Messrs. Conner, and Mitchell. 



E. M. 331. Hydraulic Machinery. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

Required of students in E. E. and M. E. 

The application of the principles of fluid mechanics to hydraulic pumping 
and power machinery; impulse and reaction type turbines; turbine laws and 
factors; water power plants; pumping and machinery, reciprocating and 
centrifugal pumps; efficiency, capacity, and selection of pumps. Daugherty: 
Hydraulics, and Notes. Messrs. Conner, and Mitchell. 



E. M. 332. Hydraulic Structures. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

The application of the principles of fluid mechanics to various hydraulic 
structures and measuring devices; buoyant force and flotation; weirs, 
orifices, gates; forces exerted by fluids; flow in open channels; models of 
open channel flow, flow in pipe lines. Daugherty: Hydraulics, and Notes. 

Messrs. Conner and Mitchell. 



[Engineering Mechanics] 239 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. M. 401. Advanced Strength of Materials. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 320 or E. M. 322. 
Elective for Engineering seniors and graduate students. 
Detailed study of the deflections of beams; special types of beams; 
statically indeterminate systems. Timoshenko: Strength of Materials. 

Mr. Smith. 



E. M. 402. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: E. M. 330. 

Elective for Engineering seniors and graduates. 

A study of more advanced problems than taken up in E. M. 330; kine- 
matics of fluid flow; conformal mapping; laminar and turbulent flow; the 
boundary layer; flow around immersed bodies; closed conduits. Instructor's 
notes and selected references. Mr. Conner. 



E. M. 404. Vibration Problems. 0-0-3 

*Prerequisites : E. M. 320 and 322, Math. 431a, or 431b. 
Elective for Engineering seniors and graduate students. 
Fundamental vibratory systems of one degree of freedom; balancing of 
rotating systems ; calculation of critical speeds of rotating shafts ; vibrating 
instruments; systems of several degrees of freedom. Den Hartog: Mechan- 
ical Vibrations. Mr. Conner. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

E. M. 501. Advanced Strength of Materials. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: E. M. 401, Math. 431a or 431b. 

A study of more advanced problems than taken up in E. M. 320 or E. M. 
322; energy of strain; Castigliano's Theorem; impact; Maxwell's Theorem; 
Mohr's circle. Timoshenko: Strength of Materials. Mr. Smith. 



E. M. 502. Applied Elasticity. 0-3-0 

♦Prerequisites: E. M. 401, Math. 431a or 431b. 

Stress analysis of machine parts; stress concentration; stress in curved 
bars; torsion and bending in prismatical bars; stress in thick-walled 
cylinders; fly wheels; shrink fits. Timoshenko: Strength of Materials. 

Mr. Smith. 



* Math. 411, 412 are desirable. 



240 [English] 

E. M. 503. Applied Elasticity. 0-0-3 

* Prerequisites : E. M. 502, Math. 431a or 431b. 

Thin bars, plates and slabs in compression, tension, or combined compres- 
sion and tension; built-up columns. Timoshenko: Strength of Materials. 

Mr. Smith. 



E. M. 505. Research in Strength of Materials. 3-3-3 

Special problems and investigations. Mr. Smith. 



*E. M. 506. Research in Mechanical Vibrations. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 404. 

Special problems and investigations. Mr. Conner. 



*E. M. 507. Research in Fluid Mechanics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: E. M. 402. 

Special problems and investigations. Mr. Conner. 



ENGLISH 
Freshman English 

Eng. 101, 102, 103. Composition. 3-3-3 

Required of all freshmen. 

Grammar review and intensive practice in composition; reading and 
analysis of literary types, with emphasis upon both composition and appre- 
ciation; directed supplementary reading collateral with class study; ex- 
ercises and reports; conferences. 

Messrs. Clark, Drake, Fountain, Ladu, Marshall, Nickell, Paget, Shelley, 
Wilson, Wynn. 



Writing 

Eng. 211. Business English. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Practical application of the principles of composition; types of letters; 
form, style, and tone of effective correspondence; intensive word study; 
conferences. Messrs. Wilson and Shelley. 



[English] 241 

Eng. 215. Principles of News and Article Writing. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. (Class limited to twenty students.) 
Introduction to the writing of simple news articles; class criticism of 
non-technical newspaper and magazine articles. Vocabulary building; col- 
lateral reading. Mr. Wynn. 



*Eng. 216. Advanced Article Writing. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103, and 215 or equivalent. 
A continuation of Eng. 215, with intensive practice in writing and crit- 
icizing nontechnical articles. Subjects determined by student's interest. 
Vocabulary building; collateral reading. Mr. Wynn. 



Eng. 222. Advanced Composition. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

An analysis of the techniques and aesthetics of prose style plus a study 
of exposition, the short-story, and other forms of creative writing. Original 
compositions; conferences. Mr. Shelley. 



Eng. 321. Technical Writing I. (For students in Engineering.) 3 or 3 or 3 
Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103, 211, 231, and one term of literature. 
Intensive practice in writing engineering reports, articles, and papers for 
public delivery; readings in essays and in technical periodicals. Term papers 
in library research and technical-report writing. Mr. Fountain. 



Eng. 323. Technical Writing II. (For students in Agriculture 

and Forestry.) 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103, and required sophomore English 

courses. 

Fundamentals of style in professional writing. Reports, articles, papers. 

Term papers in library research and in professional reports. 

Mr. Fountain. 



Speech 

Eng. 231. Public Speaking. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Speech organization and effective delivery; extempore speeches; audience 
motivation and use of motivating process; acquisition of ease before 
audience. Messrs. Paget, Fountain. 

* Not offered in 1945-46. 



242 [English] 

Eng. 236. Parliamentary Practice. 0-2-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Not to be counted toward the fulfillment of any requirement in English. 

Rules and customs of assemblies, including organization, motions; par- 
ticipation in and conduct of meetings; parliamentary strategy. 

Mr. Paget. 



Eng. 237. Speech Adjustment. 0-0-2 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Poise and pleasing communicative habits in all group contacts; habits of 
speech, posture, action, and language. Mr. Paget. 



Eng. 331. Persuasion. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 231 or equivalent. 

Psychological forces, methods of conciliation, securing and holding atten- 
tion, and winning response; extempore speeches and discussions. 

Mr. Paget. 



Eng. 332. Argumentation and Extemporaneous Speaking. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Eng. 231 or equivalent. 

Analysis, brief-drawing and evidence, and methods of proof and refuta- 
tion; fundamentals of conviction; naturalness and f orcef ulness ; extempore 
speeches, debates, and discussions. Mr. Paget. 



Eng. 333. Public Address. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Eng. 231 or equivalent. 

Public speaking for special occasions, including speech of introduction, 
committee-room speech, after-dinner speech, speech at professional conven- 
tion, political speech, formal sales talk. Mr. Paget. 



Eng. 334. Radio Speaking. 0-0-2 

Not to be counted toward the fulfillment of any requirement in English. 
Prerequisites: English 231, or equivalent; approved admittance by the 
instructor. 

A laboratory practice in the skills of radio speech; the physical prop- 
erties of voice; diction; tempo; emotion. Mr. Wynne. 



[English] 243 



Literature 



Eng. 261. English Literature I. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Chief masterpieces of English literature from Beowulf through Shake- 
speare, with emphasis on social and historical backgrounds. Parallel read- 
ings and papers. Mr. Clark. 

Eng. 262. English Literature II. 3 or 3 - 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Significant prose and poetry of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, 
with emphasis on the contribution of the two centuries to modern thought. 
Parallel readings and papers. Messrs. Clark, Shelley. 

Eng. 263. English Literature HI. - 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Masterpieces of the nineteenth century, with emphasis on changing liter- 
ary tastes and ideas; the impact of scientific development on thought and 
literature. Parallel readings and papers. Messrs. Clark, Shelley. 

Eng. 265. American Literature I. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of chief American literary productions in their historical setting, 
from the early colonial period to 1840. Mr. Ladu. 

Eng. 266. American Literature II. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of chief American literary productions in their historical setting, 
from 1840 to 1900. Mr. Ladu. 

Eng. 267. American Literature III. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of the leading American writers of the present century, with 
a relation of their works to the social background of the period. 

Mr. Ladu. 



*Eng. 271. The English Novel. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Analysis of representative novels of England and America, chosen to 

illustrate the development of the form and to provide a background for 

appreciating the modern novel. Mr. Drake. 



* Not offered in 1945-46. 



244 [English] 

Eng. 272. Modern Drama 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Modern plays, beginning with Ibsen; contemporary English and American 
productions. Mr. Clark. 



*Eng. 273. The Development of the Drama. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Origin, progress, and influence; plot, characterization, and interpreta- 
tion of certain readings. Staff. 



Eng. 275. Southern Writers. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

An introduction to Southern culture as revealed in poetry from Poe to 
John Crowe Ransom and in the regional novel and short story; readings 
in the contemporary Southern essay dealing with social, political, and 
literary problems. Staff. 



*Eng. 276. English Poetry, 1830-1900. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of major poets writing in an age of scientific progress and social 
change. Emphasis on Browning, Tennyson, and Arnold. Parallel readings 
and papers. Staff. 



*Eng. 281. Literary Masterpieces. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A background for the enjoyment of literature; an introduction to its 
appreciation and criteria. Mr. Harrison. 



Eng. 282. The Short-Story. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

An appreciation of the present-day short-story through examination of 

development, structure, type, and style; a comprehensive term paper, or 

its equivalent in original short fiction. Mr. Wynne. 



Eng. 283. The Bible as Literature. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Selected books of the Old and New Testaments (King James Version) 
as literary and historical documents. Staff. 



* Not offered in 1945-46. 



[Ethics and Religion] 245 

Eng. 285. Shakespeare. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 
An analysis of principal plays. Reports on parallel readings. 

Mr. Clark. 

Eng. 286. The Romantic Period. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

English literature from 1790 to 1830, with special emphasis on Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; collateral reading; reports. 

Mr. Clark. 

*Eng. 287. Modern Biography. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of short modern biographies by representative American and 
British writers; collateral reading in longer biographical works; reports 
and assignments for investigation. Mr. Shelley. 

*Eng. 291. The Eighteenth Century. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

Chief masterpieces of English literature from Alexander Pope to nine- 
teenth century; collateral reading; reports. Staff. 

Eng. 292. Contemporary British Literature. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Eng. 101, 102, 103. 

An introduction to chief figures in contemporary British literature; Kip- 
ling, Galsworthy, Wells, Bennett, Conrad. Collateral readings ; term paper. 

Mr. Ladu. 



ETHICS AND RELIGION 

Courses 

Rel. 301. Introduction to Religion. 3-0-0 

Characteristics of the major religious sects of America and brief survey 
of recent trends in religious thought. Mr. Hicks. 

Rel. 302. The Life of Jesus. 3-0-0 

The career of Jesus of Nazareth as recorded in the Synoptic Gospels and 
interpreted against the religious, economic, and political background of the 
age in which Jesus lived. Mr. Hicks. 

• Not offered in 1945-46. 



246 [Ethics and Religion] 

R-el. 303. The Teachings of Jesus. 0-3-0 

The ethical and religious teachings of Jesus as recorded in the Synoptic 
Gospels, with special emphasis on the contrast between the teachings of 
Jesus and his contemporaries. Mr. Hicks. 



Rel. 304. Comparative Religion. 0-3-0 

Brief history, general characteristics, and social significance of living 
religions of the world. Mr. Hicks. 



Ethics 405. Social Ethics. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite : Six term credits in Religion or related fields. 
Review of the ethical codes of the larger professional groups, with 

analysis of the nature, evolution, and significance of moral values. 

Mr. Hicks. 



Rel. 406. Problems of Religion. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite : Six term credits in Religion or related fields. 
Religious verities in an age of science and the problems of the church in 

modern times. Mr. Hicks. 



Ethics 407. Ethical Problems of Adolescence. 3 credits 

Prerequisite : Six term credits in Religion or related fields. 
Typical adjustment problems of modern youth, with special consideration 

to adolescent and pre-adolescent sex instruction and guidance. 

Mr. Hicks. 



Rel. 40S. Christian Personality in Its Psychological Aspects. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in Religion or related fields. 
An analysis of the psychological validity of the principal ethical teachings 
of the Sermon on the Mount with emphasis on the relationship of religious 
attitudes and practices to mental and emotional stability and maturity. 

Mr. Hicks. 



Ethics 409. Problems of Marital Adjustment. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in biological or social science. Sections 

limited to 25 students. 

The practical application of pertinent findings of biological and social 

science to personal problems of premarriage and postmarriage adjustment. 

Lectures, discussions, and personal conferences. Mr. Hicks. 



[Experimental Statistics] 247 
EXPERIMENTAL-STATISTICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Stat. 401, 402. Statistical Laboratory. 1-1-0 

To accompany Stat. 412, 413 or Ec. 408, 409. 

Use of calculating machines and of punched-card tabulation equipment; 
short-cut machine methods ; experience in handling large sets of data. 

Mr. Anderson. 



Stat. 411. Introduction to Experimental-Statistics. 3-0-0 

Collection, tabulation, presentation, and interpretation of experimental 
data. A course designed for advanced students in applied sciences who have 
had no theoretical background in statistics. Miss Fleming. 

Stat. 412, 413. Experimental-Statistics. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Sta. 411 or Ec: 409. 

The application of statistical techniques such as sampling, regression and 
analysis of variance and covariance to experimental data. Mr. Rigney. 

Stat. 421, 422, 423. Mathematical Statistics. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: Math. 303. 

Averages, moments, correlation, probability; the binomial, normal and 
Poisson laws; distribution of statistics, sampling of population, Sheppard's 
corrections and curve fitting. Mr. Clarkson. 



Stat. 431. Design of Experiments. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Stat. 412. 

Fundamental principles of designs; randomized blocks, Latin squares, 
split-plot and factorial designs; individual comparisons, components of 
error and confounding. Application to problems in applied fields. 

Miss Cox. 



Stat. 441, 442, 443. Methods of Analysis of Economic Data. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Math. 112. 

Review of algebra and trigonometry and the development of the funda- 
mentals of calculus appropriate to problems in the fields of economics. 
Statistical analysis of economic data— distributions, averages, dispersion, 
correlation and regression, index numbers and tests of significance. 

Mr. Anderson. 



24S [Experimental Statistics] 

Stat. 451. Statistical Analysis of Social Data. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Stat. 412. 

Sampling social data, rural surveys and testing methods; analysis of 
variance and relationships; population studies. Application to problems in 
the fields of sociology, psychology and education. Mr. Hamilton. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Stat 511, 512, 513. Special Problems. 1 to 3-1 to 3-1 to 3 

Development of techniques for specialized cases, particularly in connec- 
tion with thesis problems. Staff. 



Stat. 531. Design and Analysis of Samplings. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Stat. 412. 

Sampling from a homogeneous population; size of sample; structure of 
sampling investigations. Mr. Hendricks. 

Stat. 532, 533. Crop Forecasting and Estimation. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Stat. 531. 

Methods used to select variables related to crop forecasting and esti- 
mating; selection techniques. 

Stat. 542, 543. Experimental Designs. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites : Stat. 413, 431. 

Confounding, quasi-factorial designs, incomplete blocks and lattice 
squares. Pasture, field, greenhouse, animal, human and long-time experi- 
ments. Survey of type of designs available. Experimental results with 
appropriate methods of analysis and valid interpretations. Miss Cox. 



Stat. 552, 553. Econometric Methods. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Stat. 413, 441. 

Mathematical formulation and exposition of demand, laws of production, 
monopoly and taxation; random element, seasonal and cyclical variations; 
trend, orthogonal polynomials and correlation of time series. 

Mr. Anderson. 



Stat. 562. Psychometric Methods. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Stat. 413, 451. 

Rating scales; mental-test methods; item and factor analysis; standard 
partial regression coefficients and functional relationships. 



[Field Crops] 249 

Stat. 571, 572, 573. Advanced Mathematical Statistics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Stat. 423. 

Theory of errors, maximum likelihood, estimation, least squares and dis- 
tribution theory. 



Stat. 581, 582, 583. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Staff. 



Stat. 591, 592, 593. Research. 3-3-3 

Staff. 



FIELD CROPS (AGRONOMY) 
Courses for Undergraduates 

F. C. 202. General Field Crops. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

A standard introductory course, with emphasis given to the economic 
production of field crops as used in well-balanced cropping systems. 

Mr. Stuart. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

F. C. 302. Cereal Crops. 0-3-0 

Required of Field-Crops majors. 

Advanced study of the various factors to be considered in the economic 
production of corn and small grains. Mr. Middleton. 



F. C. 312. Tobacco Production. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

History, production, adaptation, type, and varieties of tobacco; its culti- 
vation, harvesting, grading, and marketing. Laboratory consists of variety 
studies, and the grading of tobacco. Mr. Lutz. 



F. C. 323. Cotton Production. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

History, production, adaptation, type, and varieties of cotton; its culti- 
vation, harvesting, grading, and marketing. Laboratory consists of variety 
studies, and the classing of cotton lint. Mr. Stuart. 



250 [Field Cropsj 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

F. C. 441. Seed Judging. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Advanced study of quality in crop seeds and the standards for seed certifi- 
cation; arranging and judging crop exhibits. Mr. Stuart. 



F. C. 443. Pastures and Forage Crops. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: F. C. 202. 

Required of Field Crop, Soil, and Animal Production majors. 

An advanced study of the production and preservation of the principal 
forage crops. Special attention is given to the production and maintenance 
of pastures. Mr. Loworn. 



F. C. 451. Market Grading of Field Crops. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Required of students in Animal Production. 

A study and application of the Federal Standards for Market grades as 
applied to field crops. Mr. Stuart. 



F. C. 461. Taxonomy of Field Crops. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Origin, botanical classification, identification, and adaptation of the com- 
mercially important crops and their varieties grown in America. 

Mr. Stuart. 



F. C. 463. Plant Breeding. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 411. 

Required of students in Field Crops, Floriculture, Plant Pathology, Pom- 
ology and Vegetable Gardening. 

Lectures, field and laboratory exercises, including methods and principles 
of plant breeding. Mr. Gregory. 



F. C. 491, 492, 493. Special Problems. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Admittance only with consent of instructor. 
Special problems in various phases of crop investigation. Problems 
selected or assigned; emphasis on review of recent and current research. 

Staff. 



[Forestry] 251 

Courses for Graduates Only 
F. C. 503. Research Methods in Agronomy. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Stat. 412. 

Planning and conducting research and interpretations of the data in 
agronomic fields. Mr - *&**. 



F. C. 523. Cytogenetics. ° -0 " 4 

Prerequisite: Zool. 411, 412, and Bot. 451 or Zool. 441. 

Given cooperatively by Agronomy and Botany Departments. 

The principles and techniques of cytology as they are related to the 
genetics of economic plants; a survey of the major cytogenetic contributions 
to plant improvement and to theories of phylogeny. Mr. Smith. 



F. C. 531, 532, 533. Seminar. 1 - 1_1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Field Crops. 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of 
interest to agronomists will be assigned, reviewed, and discussed by stu- 
dents and members of the Agronomy Staff. 



F. C. 541, 542, 545. Research. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Field Crops. 

A study of special problems and methods of investigation. A student may 
select a problem in any phase of crop production or breeding. By arrange- 
ment. 

Research in specialized phases of Field Crops. 



FORESTRY 
Courses for Undergraduates 

For. 101, 102, 103. Elementary Forestry. i' 1-1 

Required of freshmen in Forestry. 

The nature and development of forests of the world, with special study 
of the forests of the United States; a correlation of all sciences required 
in forestry; field trips included. Mr - Hofmann. 



252 [Forestry] 

For. 111. Principles of Farm Forestry. 3-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

Elective for junior and senior students not in Forestry. 

The theory and practice of forestry with special reference to the handling 
of farm woodlands and the utilization of their products; the place of 
forestry in farm management and the agricultural economy. 

Mr. Kaufman. 

For. 202. Wood Technology. 0-3-0 

Required of sophomores in Forestry. 

Microscopic slides of the conifers and broad-leaved trees are studied in 
order to determine the occurrence, form, and structure of the wood elements. 
Identification by means of the hand lens is especially emphasized. 

Mr. Slocum. 



For. s204. Silviculture. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Bot. 211, 213. 

Sophomore summer camp. 

Growth and development of forest stands: establishment and measure- 
ment of sample plots. Messrs. Miller, Slocum. 

For. s214. Dendrology. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Bot. 211, 213. 

Sophomore summer camp. 

Identification and study of trees in Piedmont, Coastal, and Mountain 
sections of North Carolina. Messrs. Slocum, Miller. 

For. 301. Timber Preservation. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: For. 202. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Forestry. 

Lumber and timber preservatives and their use; methods of preservation; 
relation of preservation to forestry and industry. Mr. Slocum. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

For. s304. Mensuration. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: C. E. 221, 222. 

Sophomore summer camp. 

Collection of field data for stand and yield tables, stem analysis, and 
timber surveys. Messrs. Slocum, Miller. 



[Forestry] 253 

For. 311. Silviculture I. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry. 

Factors affecting tree growth and distribution; forest regions, sites, 
stands, and types; silvical requirements of important tree species. 

Mr. Miller. 



For. 312. Silviculture II. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry. 

Production, collection, extraction, storage, and planting of forest-tree 
seeds. Mr. Slocum. 



For. 313. Nursery Practice. 1 or 1 or 1 

Preparation, seeding, watering, and weeding of seed beds in school 
nursery. Mr. Slocum. 



For. 321. Forest Products. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: For. 202. 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

The source and method of obtaining derived and manufactured forest 
products other than lumber. Mr. Wyman. 



For. 322. Naval Stores. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors. 

Methods of turpentining woods practices; factors influencing oleoresin 
yields; distilling practices; integration with other forest products utilization. 

Mr. Wyman. 



For. 323. Forest Utilization. 0-0-2 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

The problems of more complete utilization of forest resources; utiliza- 
tion of present waste in commercial practice. Mr. Wyman. 



For. 332. Forest Policy. 0-3-0 

Elective for juniors in Forestry. 

State and federal forest legislation; timber law, illustrated by court cases. 

Mr. Miller. 



254 [Forestry] 

For. 333. Methods of Research in Forestry. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: For. s204. 

Elective for juniors in Forestry. 

Methods of research used by the United States Forest Service, experi- 
ment stations, the Madison Laboratory, and State and private research or- 
ganizations; sample plot technique. Mr. Miller. 



For. 342. Forest Protection and Improvements. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: For. s204. 

Required of juniors in Forestry. 

Organization and operation of forest fire prevention and control methods. 
Forest road and telephone line construction and maintenance. Staff. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

For. 402, 403. Mensuration I, II. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: For. s304. 

Required of juniors in Forestry. 

The measurement of timber, both standing and felled; log rules, form 
factors, stem analysis, and growth. 

Methods of making volume, growth, and stand tables; increment and 
yield studies; development of stand and yield tables from field data. 

Mr. Slocum. 



For. 411. Silviculture III. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: For. 312. 
Required of seniors in Forestry. 

Methods of cutting to secure natural regeneration; intermediate cuttings, 
and their effect on the stand; slash disposal. Mr. Miller. 



For. 412. Silviculture IV. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: For. 411. 
Required of seniors in Forestry. 

The application of silvicultural methods in the forests of the United 
States. Mr. Miller. 



[Forestry] 255 

For. 421. Logging. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: For. 311. 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

The logging industry and transportation methods; logging costs; applica- 
tion of methods to specific conditions; all forest regions are covered, discuss- 
ing the problems of each. Mr.Wyman. 



For. 422. Lumbering. 0-3-0 

Elective for seniors. 

The manufacture and re-manufacture, transportation and handling of 

lumber; grades and grading of lumber. Mr. Wyman. 



For. 423. Lumber Seasoning. 0-0-2 

Elective for seniors. 

Air-seasoning and kiln-drying of lumber; kiln construction and opera- 
tion; defects and their control. Mr. Wyman. 



For. 431, 432. Forest Management. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: For. 311. 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

Management of timber lands for economic returns; the normal forest 
taken as the ideal; the application of regulation methods to the forest; a 
typical working circle as developed by the United States Forest Service 
studied for each forest region. Mr. Hofmann. 



For. 433. Advanced Wood Technology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: For. 202. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Forestry. 

Advanced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the United 
States; microscopic work in anatomy and identification. Mr. Slocum. 



For. 442. Forest Finance. 3-0-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry. 

Forests as investments: interest, carrying charges, financial maturity; 
relation of intermediate to final and net incomes; forest taxation, hazards 
in forest investments, and forest insurance. Staff. 



256 [Forestry] 

For. 443. Timber Appraisal. 0-0-2 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

Field and office methods of valuing timber lands, with special reference 
to stumpage appraisal; the evaluation of damages to timber and forest 
property. Mr. Wyman. 



For. 452. Seminar. 0-2-0 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

A round-table discussion of forestry problems; trends of development in 
forestry and related sciences. Staff. 



For. 453. Senior Field Trip. 0-0-3 

Required of seniors in Forestry. 

An extensive survey of logging, lumbering and utilization of forest 
production throughout the Southeast; a complete series of reports covering 
all plants and operations visited required. Mr. Wyman. 



For. 461, 462, 463. Forestry Problems. 3-3-3 

Elective for seniors in Forestry. 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lumber 
manufacturing, or forest management. Staff. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

For. 501, 502, 503. Advanced Forest Management Problems. 3-3-3 

Complete management program for a specific forest area. Mr. Hofmann. 



For. 511, 512, 513. Advanced Silviculture Problems. 3-3-3 

Advanced problems or experiments in silviculture. Mr. Miller. 



For. 521, 522, 523. Advanced Logging Problems. 3-3-3 

Selected research logging problems of an advanced nature. Mr. Wyman. 



[Geology] 257 

For. 531, 532, 533. Advanced Lumber Manufacturing. 3-3-3 

Selected advanced problems dealing with the manufacture and seasoning 
of lumber. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 541, 542, 543. Advanced Utilization Problems. 3-3-3 

Problems of an advanced grade in some phase of forest utilization. 

Mr. Wyman. 

For. 551, 552, 553. Forest Valuation. 3-3-3 

Planning, organizing, and conducting, under general supervision, an im- 
portant research project in one of the fields of valuation. Mr. Wyman. 

For. 561, 562, 563. Problems in Research. 3-3-3 

Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Mr. Miller. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Geog. 201,2. Geography. 3-3-0 

Elective. 

A course covering the principal elements of physical and human 
geography. Mr. Shulenberger. 



GEOLOGY 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Geol. 101. Earth History. 0-3-0 

Elective. Not to be taken after Geol. 120, 220, and 222. 
Introductory course in General Geology: changes in the earth, and under- 
lying physical and life processes. Bradley: The Earth and Its History. 

Mr. Stuckey. 

Geol. 120. Physical Geology. 4 or 4 or 4 

Required of freshmen in Basic Agriculture and Agricultural Education, 
and of sophomores in Forestry and Landscape Architecture. 

Dynamic processes acting on and within the earth ; materials and make-up 
of the earth's crust. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. Longwell, Knopf, 
and Flint: Outlines of Physical Geology, 2nd edition. 

Messrs. Stuckey, Miller. 



258 [Geology] 

Geol. 207. Ex. Physical Geography. 3-3-0 

A. The processes and forces involved in the development of land forms. 

B. The physiographic provinces of the United States and their import- 
ance; physical geography of North Carolina. Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 220. Engineering Geology. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 101. 

Required of sophomores in Agricultural, Ceramic, Civil, Geological, High- 
way, and Sanitary Engineering. 

The principles of general geology and their application to engineering 
problems. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. Ries and Watson: Elements 
of Engineering Geology, 2nd edition. Messrs. Stuckey, Miller. 



Geol. 222. Historical Geology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 120 or 220. 

Required of sophomores in Geological Engineering. 

Major events in the history of North America; rise and development of 
main animal and plant groups. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 
Schuchert: Outlines of Historical Geology. Mr. Miller. 



Geol. 223. Geomorphology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Geol. 120 or 220. 

Required of sophomores in Geological Engineering. 

A systematic study of land forms and their relations to processes and 
stages of development and adjustment of topography to structure. Lec- 
tures, map interpretations, and field trips. Lobeck, Geomorphology. 

Mr. Miller. 



Geol. 230. Mineralogy. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 103. 

Required of sophomores in Ceramic and Geological Engineering, and of 
seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Crystallography, and physical and chemical mineralogy. Lectures and 
laboratory work. Kraus, Hunt & Ramsdell, 3rd Edition: Mineralogy. 

Messrs. Stuckey, Miller. 



[Geology] 259 

Geol. 325. Geology and Mineral Resources of North Carolina. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 222. 

Physical geography, general geology, common rocks and minerals, and 
mines and quarry products of the State. Lectures, laboratories, and field 
trips. Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 332. Advanced Mineralogy. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 230. Required in Geological Engineering. 
A continuation of Geol. 230. Special attention to chemical and blowpipe 
properties of a larger group of important minerals. Lectures and labora- 
tory work. Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 338. Thermal Mineralogy. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Geol. 230 and Chem. 331. 

Required of juniors in Cer. E. 

A study of the behavior of ceramic materials as controlled by variations 
in composition, temperature, and pressure. Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 352. Structural Geology. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 120 or 220. 

Required in Geological Engineering. 

The arrangement and deformation of the different rock masses composing 
the earth's crust. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. Nevin: Principles 
of Structural Geology. Mr. Miller. 



Geol. 353. Geophysics. 0-0-4 

Prerequisites : Geol. 352, Phys. 203, C. E. 226. 

Required of juniors in Geological Engineering. 

Discussion of the fundamental principles underlying all geophysical 
methods; procedure and instruments involved in gravitational, magnetic 
seismic and electrical methods; study of applications and interpretation of 
results. Mr. Miller. 



Geol. 361. Stratigraphy and Index Fossils. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 222. 

Required of juniors in Geological Engineering. 

Distribution and conditions of origin of principal geologic formations in 
Southeastern United States; key fossils characteristic of each period. 

Mr. Miller. 



260 [Geology] 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Geol. 411, 412, 413. Economic Geology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Geol. 120 or 220; Geol. 230; Chemistry 103. 
Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Mode of occurrence, association, origin, distribution, and uses of eco- 
nomically valuable minerals. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. Ries: 
Economic Geology, 7th Edition. Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 431, 432, 433. Optical Mineralogy. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites : Geol. 230, and Phys. 203. 

Required of seniors in Ceramic and Geological Engineering. 

Theory of light as applied to the polarizing microscope; practice in de- 
termining minerals in thin sections and by immersion methods. Lectures and 
laboratory work. Rogers and Kerr: Optical Minerology. Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 443. Petrology. 0-0-4 

Prerequisites: Geol. 120 or 220; Geol. 230; and Chemistry 103. 
Required of juniors in Geological Engineering. 

Materials of the earth's crust; composition, texture, classification, identi- 
fication, and alterations of the principal igneous, sedimentary, and meta- 
morphic rocks. Lectures, laboratories, and field trip. Grout: Kemp's Hand- 
book of Rocks. Mr. Stuckey. 



GeoL 462. Advanced Engineering Geology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Geol. 220. 

Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

The application of geologic principles to civil engineering practice; 
analysis of geologic factors and processes affecting specific engineering 
projects. Legget: Geology and Engineering. Mr. Miller. 



Geol. 463. Geological Surveying. 0-0-4 

Prerequisites: Geol. 352 and 443. 

Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Methods of field observation and the use of geologic surveying instru- 
ments; construction of a complete geologic map of a specific area. Lectures, 
laboratories, and field trips. Mr. Miller. 



[History] 261 

Geol. 471, 472, 473. Mining Engineering, Mine Design, Ore Dressing. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Geol. 230 and 352; C. E. 222 and 225. 

Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Mining methods, both open pit and underground; mine examination and 
valuation; principles of ore dressing; problems in mine design. Young: 
Elements of Mining. Mr. Miller. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Geol. 511, 512. Advanced Economic Geology. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: Geol. 411, 412, 413. 

Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. 

Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 543. Advanced Petrography. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites : Geol. 433, 443. 

Application of the petrographic microscope to the systematic and descrip- 
tive study of rocks. Mr. Stuckey. 



Geol. 591, 592, 593. Geological Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite : Permission of the Instructor. 

Lectures, reading assignments, and reports; special work in Geology to 
meet the needs and interests of the students. 

Mr. Stuckey. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Courses in History 

Hist. 101, 102, 103. Economic History. 3-3-3 

An examination of the important changes in European society and the 
forces which produced these changes during the periods of expansion and 
industrialization, as a background for a general treatment of the agricul- 
tural, industrial, and commercial development of the United States. 

Messrs. Barnhardt, Bauerlein, Patton, Seegers. 



262 [History] 

Hist. Ill, 112, 113. World History. 2-2-2 

Required of freshmen or sophomores who do not take Military Science. 
A general survey of Western civilization from its beginning to the present 
day. Mr. Barnhardt. 



Hist. 211, 212, 213. History of the United States. 3-3-3 

Elective for one, two, or three terms. 

A chronological treatment of the political, diplomatic, and constitutional 
history of the United States in the light of its economic and social 
significance. Mr. Bauerlein. 



Hist. Ex. 216. Medieval History. 3 credits 

A survey of the political, social, economic, ecclesiastical, and cultural 
history of Europe from the fourth century to the close of the fifteenth 
century. Mr. Barnhardt. 



Hist. 221. History of Modern Europe. 3-0-0 

Elective. 

A survey of the economic, political, and social developments in Europe 
from the age of the great discoveries to the close of the eighteenth century. 

Mr. Barnhardt. 



Hist. 222. History of Modern Europe. 0-3-0 

Elective. 

A survey of European history during the nineteenth century, political, 
economic, and social movements being emphasized in proportion to their 
international or European importance. Mr. Barnhardt. 



Hist. 223. Contemporary Europe. 0-0-3 

Elective. 

A survey of the contemporary history of the principal European states 
and their international relations in the twentieth century. Mr. Barnhardt. 



Hist. 306. North Carolina History. 0-3-0 

Elective. 

A general survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural develop- 
ments in North Carolina, with special emphasis on the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. Mr. Barnhardt. 



[Political Science] 263 

Hist. Ex. 310, 311, 312. Economic and Social History of the South. 9 credits 
A study of the economic and social history of the Southern States. 
Lectures, readings, and reports. Mr. Patton. 



Hist. Ex. 320. American Biography. 3 credits 

Representative men and women in American politics, law, religion, agri- 
culture, industry, commerce, science, literature, and art. Mr. Barnhardt. 



Hist. 333. History of American Agriculture. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Rural Sociology; elective for others. 
Main trends in agriculture in the United States, and the place of agricul- 
ture in the economic life of the nation; special emphasis on the period since 
the Civil War. Mr. Seegers. 



Hist. 340. History of Modern England. 3 credits 

Survey of English political, social, economic, and diplomatic history, with 
emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Mr. Barnhardt. 



Hist. Ex. 350. Hispanic American History. 3 credits 

A brief account of the colonial period and wars for indpendence, followed 
by more or less detailed study of the various Hispanic American republics, 
with emphasis upon their relations with the United States. Mr. Patton. 



Hist. Ex. 360. Contemporary History of the United States. 3 credits 

Significant developments in the United States since 1914, with particular 
emphasis on post-war problems, foreign affairs, and the New Deal. 

Mr. Patton. 



Courses in Political Science 

Pol. Sc. 211. American Government. 3 or 3 or 3 

Meets School of Engineering Citizenship Requirement; required of juniors 
in Rural Sociology and Occupational Information and Guidance; elective 
for others. 

A survey of the origins, structure, and functions of government in the 
United States, including foreign relations, constitutional decisions, and the 
New Deal. Mr. Patton. 



264 [Horticulture] 

Pol. Sc. 212. State Government and Administration. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Rural Sociology and Occupational Information and 
Guidance; elective for others. 

A study of Federal-State relations, and the organization and administra- 
tion of state and county governments. Special attention will be given to 
problems of government in North Carolina. Mr. Patton. 



Pol. Sc. 213. Municipal Government and Administration. 0-0-3 

Required of juniors in Rural Sociology and Occupational Information and 

Guidance; elective for others. 

A study of the history, organization, and administration of American 

municipal corporations. Lectures, readings, and reports. Mr. Patton. 



Pol. Sc. 221. American Political Parties. 3-0-0 

Elective. 

The origin and development of political parties in the United States: 
their functions, organization, regulation, campaign methods, and elections. 

Mr. Patton. 



Pol. Sc. 231. European Governments. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Elective. 

A study of the governments of England, France, Germany, Italy, and 
Russia. Mr. Bamhardt. 



HORTICULTURE 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Hort. 203. General Horticulture. 0-0-3 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

A course designed to give a general insight into the field of horticulture, 
including geographic centers of production, and the elements of the culture 
of fruit, vegetable, and flower crops. Messrs. Gardner, Randall, Weaver. 



Hort. 301. Plant Propagation and Nursery Practice. 3 or 3 or 3 

Required of students majoring in Horticulture; elective for other juniors 
and seniors in Agriculture and Forestry. 

Study of methods and practice in seedage, cuttage, division, budding, and 
grafting; cultural principles and practices in growing nursery stock. 

Messrs. Randall, Weaver. 



[Horticulture] 265 

Hort. 302. Vegetable Forcing. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. 

Required of students majoring in vegetable growing; elective for other 
juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Production and management of vegetable crops under glass; practice in 
growing vegetables under protection. Mr. Randall. 



Hort. 303. Vegetable Gardening. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. 

Required of students majoring in vegetable growing and fruit growing; 
elective for other juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Location, soil preparation, fertilization, irrigation, and general culture 
applicable to vegetable production. Messrs. Randall, Weaver. 



Hort. 311. Small Fruits and Grapes. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. 

Required of students majoring in fruit growing and vegetable growing; 
elective for other juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

A course in the culture and production of small fruits, including straw- 
berries, dewberries, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, and grapes. 

Messrs. Gardner, Weaver. 



Hort. 312. Floral Design. 0-1-0 

Required of students majoring in floriculture; elective for other juniors 
and seniors in Agriculture. 

Principles and practices in the art of floral design; corsages, wreaths, 
sprays, baskets, and special arrangements. Mr. Weaver. 



Hort. 313. Home Floriculture. 0-0-3 

Required of students majoring in vegetable growing; elective for other 
juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Principles and methods of growing garden flowers and house plants, in- 
cluding varieties and their adaptability. 



Hort. 321. Fruit and Vegetable Judging. 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Practice in variety identification, and in judging plates, collections, boxes, 
and commercial exhibits of fruits and vegetables. Messrs. Gardner, Randall. 



266 [Horticulture] 

Hort. 323. Ornamental Horticulture. 0-0-2 

Prerequisites: Hort. 301 and L. A. 402. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in the School of Agriculture. 

The planting, transplanting, pruning, feeding, and protection of orna- 
mental plants used in the construction and maintenance of rural home 
grounds. Lawn grasses and lawn-making. Mr. Harris. 



Hort. 331. Fruit Growing. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 203. 

Required of students majoring in fruit growing, vegetable growing, 
poultry, and animal husbandry; elective for other juniors and seniors in 
Agriculture. 

A study of factors underlying fruit production; temperature and moisture 
relations; culture, fertilization, pruning, fruit setting, yield, and storage. 

Messrs. Gardner, Schmidt, Weaver. 



Hort. 341. Commercial Floriculture. 4-0-0 

Prerequisites: Hort. 203, 301. 

Required of students majoring in floriculture; elective for other juniors 
and seniors in Agriculture. 

A study of the commercial production of the principal floral crops under 
protection and in the open, including actual planting and care of the crops. 

Mr. Randall. 



Hort. 351. Fruit and Vegetable Utilization. 3-0-0 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agriculture. 

Principles and methods involved in the commercial utilization of surplus 
and off -grade products; extraction and preservation of juices; quick-freez- 
ing methods; sweet-potato starch production; dehydration; other manufac- 
tured products and by-products. Staff. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hort. 401. Systematic Pomology (offered in alternate years). 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 331. 

Required of students majoring in pomology. 

Fruit varieties: their description, identification, nomenclature, and classi- 
fication; their relationships and adaptations; judging methods and stand- 
ards. Mr. Gardner. 



[Horticulture] 267 

Hort. 411. Systematic Olericulture (offered in alternate years). 2-0-0 

Prerequisite: Hort. 303. 

Required of students majoring in vegetable growing. 

Vegetable varieties: their description, identification, nomenclature, and 
classification; their relationships and adaptations. Mr. Randall. 

Hort. 412. Experimental Horticulture. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Hort. 331, 303, 341. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and results of experi- 
ments in fruit growing, vegetable growing, and floriculture. 

Messrs. Gardner, Randall, Weaver. 



Hort. 421, 422, 423. Horticultural Problems. 2-2-? 

Prerequisite: twelve credit hours in Horticulture. 

Required of all students majoring in Horticulture. 

Systematic investigation of some phase of horticulture, each student 
choosing his own subject of study and pursuing it under direction of the 
instructor. Messrs. Gardner, Randall, Weaver. 

Hort. 431, 432, 433. Senior Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: twelve credit hours in Horticulture. 
Required of all students majoring in Horticulture. 

A discussion of problems of interest to horticulturists. Discussion topics 
are assigned to students and members of the Horticultural staff. 

Staff. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Hort. 501, 502, 503. Methods of Horticultural Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: eighteen credit hours in Horticulture. 

A study of methods and procedure, outlining problems, assembling and 
analyzing data, and presenting results; critical review of experiment-station 
work. Staff. 



Hort. 511, 512, 513. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: eighteen credit hours in Horticulture. 

Required of graduate students only. 

Assignment of scientific articles of interest to norticulturists for review 
and discussion; student papers and research problems for discussion. 

Staff. 



268 [Industrial Engineering] 

Hort. 521, 522, 523. Research. 3-5, 3-5, 3-5 

Prerequisite: eighteen credit hours in Horticulture. 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original research 
in fruit growing, vegetable growing, or floriculture. The work and presenta- 
tion of results should be of such merit as to be worthy of publication. 

Staff. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Courses for Undergraduates 

I. E. 101, 102, 103. Industrial Organization. 3-3-3 

Required of sophomores in I. E. 
Engineering methods in studies of industrial enterprises. 



I. E. 201, 202. 203. Management Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: I. E. 103. 
Required of juniors in I. E. 

Principles of management, administration, production, and sales; exec- 
utive control, industrial relations, incentives, normal capacities, standard 
costs, and pricing; budgeting and planning. Gilman: Analyzing Financial 
Statements. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

I. E. 301. Engineering Economics. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Econ. 202 or 205. 

Required of seniors in E. E., I. E., and in M. E., Furniture Option, elec- 
tive for others. 

Principles of investments, costs, and utility, with applications to engineer- 
ing practice; choice of investments and replacements. Grant: Principles of 
Engineering Economy, and Probleyns. 



I. E, 312, 313. Industrial Engineering Problems. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites or concurrent: I. E. 201, 202, 203. 
Required of seniors in I. E. 
Detailed study of problems of moment in this rapidly developing field. 



[Industrial Engineering] 269 

I. E. 322. Motion and Time Study. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in I. E., elective for others. 

Prerequisite: I. E. 201 or junior standing. 

Fundamentals of methods, involving motion and time, to reduce costs by 
finding "the one best way." Laboratory: Methods analysis, process and 
other charts, micromotion and timer techniques. Barnes: Motion and Time 
Study. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

I. E. 402. The Electrical Industry. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: I. E. 301. 

Required of seniors in E. E. and I. E. 

The operation, practices, management, and performance of electric light 
and power companies and other electrical industries. Factors, indexes, and 
comparisons; services and prices; cost analyses and predeterminations. 



I. E. 421, 422, 423. Public Utilities. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite or concurrent: I. E. 301 or senior standing. 
Elective for seniors or graduate students. 

Public utilities and their regulation; services, rates, rate bases, returns, 
leading cases; current problems. Thompson and Smith: Public Utility Eco- 
nomics. 



I. E. 433. Investigation and Report. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: I. E. 312. 
Required of seniors in I. E. 
Investigation of a selected and approved problem. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

I. E. 501, 502, 503. Industrial Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Graduation in Engineering. 

Investigation of a problem of major importance in the field of Industrial 
Engineering. 



270 [Landscape Architecture] 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Courses for Undergraduates 

L. A. 101, 102, 103. Arboriculture. 1-1-1 

Required of freshmen in Landscape Architecture; elective for other 
students in Agriculture. 

Culture of plant materials: their planting, transplanting, training, fer- 
tilization, protection from pests; tree surgery, lawn making. 

Messrs. Pillsbury, Weaver. 



Courses for Advanced L T ndergraduates 

L. A. 201, 202, 203. Plant Materials: Woody Plants. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: Bot. 203. 

Required of sophomores in Landscape Architecture and juniors in Flori- 
culture; elective for students in other curricula. 

Trees, shrubs, and vines: their distribution, form and habits of growth, 
size, texture, color, and other characteristics determining use in planting 
design. Mr. Randall. 



L. A. 212, 213. Theory of Landscape Design. 0-3-3 

Required of sophomores in Landscape Architecture; elective for students 

in other curricula. 

Introduction to the study of landscape design; its theoretical basis; the 

meaning of taste; historic styles; elements, and landscape composition; 

planting design, and analyses of typical problems in landscape design. 

Mr. Pillsbury. 



L. A. 303. Plant Materials: Herbaceous Plants. 0-0-2 

Required of juniors in Landscape Architecture; elective for students in 
other curricula. Prerequisite: Bot. 203. 

Ornamental perennial and annual plants: height, habit of growth, texture, 
color, and other characteristics determining use in planting design. 

Mr. Randall. 



L. A. 311, 312. History of Landscape Design. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: L. A. 212, 213. 

Required of juniors in Landscape Architecture. 

History of the art of landscape design from antiquity to modern times; 
sketching from illustrations of design in important periods. Mr. Pillsbury. 



[Landscape Architecture] 271 

L. A. 321, 322, 323. Landscape Design I. 4-4-4 

Prerequisites: L. A. 311, 312. 

Required of juniors in Landscape Architecture. 

Problems in presentation, and in constructive design of small properties, 
gardens, and other special areas and suburban estates. Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 402. Ornamental Plants. 0-2-0 

Prerequisite: Bot. 203. 

Required of seniors in Vegetable Gardening and Pomology; elective for 
juniors or seniors in other curricula. 

Ornamental trees, shrubs, and vines: their characteristics used in the 
design of planting for home, school, church, and community-center grounds, 
and farmstead landscapes. Mr. Randall. 

L. A. 403. Landscape Gardening. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: L. A. 402, or 201, 202, 203. 

Required of seniors in Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture, and Pomology; 
elective for seniors in all other curricula. 

Landscape planning and planting design applied to the improvement of 
home, school, church, community-center grounds, and farmsteads; practice 
in methods of making measured surveys, mapping, and designing improve- 
ments and planting. Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 411, 412, 413. Planting Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: L. A. 201, 202, 203, and 303. 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture. 

Problems in composition with plant materials, presentation details, the 
preparation of planting plans, and cost data. Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 421, 422, 423. Landscape Design II. 4-4-4 

Prerequisites: L. A. 321, 322, 323. 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture. 

Problems in presentation, and in the design of small parks and other 
public grounds, and institutional groups. Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 432. City Planning. 0-3-0 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture; elective for seniors in 
all schools. 

Origins and types of urban communities; modern city and town planning; 
legal, economic, social, and aesthetic phases and their interrelationships; 
fundamental data required; methods of planning and financing; zoning; 
city and regional planning legislation. Mr. Pillsbury. 



272 [Mathematics] 

L. A. 442. Suburban Design. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: L. A. 321, 322, 323, and 432. 

The subdivision of land as related to suburban development and urban 
growth. Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 451, 452, 453. Landscape Construction. 2-2-2 

Required of seniors in Landscape Architecture. Prerequisite: C. E. 224, 
225, 226, and 227; and L. A. 321, 322, 323. 

Problems in design of ground surface, walks, and drives; preparation of 
plans for grading and drainage; estimates of materials and costs, and 
methods of execution of landscape designs. Mr. Pillsbury. 

L. A. 463. Office Practice. 0-0-1 

Prerequisite: L. A. 451, 452, 453. 

Arrangement of equipment, supplies, data, and illustrative and other 
material in landscape offices; methods of professional procedure, and pro- 
fessional ethics. Mr. Pillsbury. 



MATHEMATICS 

Courses for Undergraduates 

•Math. 101. Algebra for Engineers. 6-0-0 

Required of freshmen in the School of Engineering, and in the Depart- 
ments of Industrial Management, Industrial Arts, and Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

Quadratic equations, the progressions, the binomial theorem, permuta- 
tions and combinations, logarithms, the general theory of equations, the 
solution of higher equations, determinants and partial fractions. Fisher: 
College Algebra. Staff. 



*Math. 102. Trigonometry for Engineers. 0-6-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 101. 

Required of freshmen in the School of Engineering, and in the Depart- 
ments of Industrial Management, Industrial Arts, and Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

The trigonometric functions, derivation of formulae, the solution of plane 
and spherical triangles, with practical applications, slide rule, complex num- 
bers, and hyperbolic functions. Clarkson and Bullock: Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry. Staff. 



* This course will be repeated the following term. 



[Mathematics] 273 

♦Math. 103. Analytical Geometry. 0-0-6 

Prerequisites: Math. 101, 102. 

Required of freshmen in the School of Engineering, and in the Depart- 
ments of Industrial Management, Industrial Arts, and Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

Loci of equations, the straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, 
the general equation of the second degree, polar coordinates, transcendental 
curves, parametric equations, coordinates in space, planes and surfaces. 
Smith, Gale and Neelley: Elements of Analytical Geometry. Staff. 



♦Math. 111. Algebra. 4-0-0 

Review of elementary topics, such as Factoring, Fractions, Simple Equa- 
tions, Exponents, and Radicals. Topics then taken up are Quadratic 
Equations, Solution of Higher-Degree Equations, Simultaneous Quadratic 
Equations, Logarithms, the Binomial Theorem, Arithmetic and Geometric 
Progressions, Permutations, Combination, and the Elementary Theory of 
Probability. Fisher: College Algebra. Staff. 



*Math. 112. Trigonometry. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 111. 

The study of the Trigonometric Functions with their applications to the 
solution of the right and oblique triangles, with numerous problems. Also 
a brief study of Trigonometric Equations, and Identities and Inverse Func- 
tions. Practical Mensurations of Solids is taken up. Clarkson and Bullock: 
Trigonometry. Staff. 



*Math. 113. Mathematics of Finance. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Math. 112. 

Simple and compound interest, annuities, sinking funds and amortization, 
and the valuation of bonds and other applications. Smail: Mathematics of 
Finance. Staff. 



♦Math. 201. Calculus I. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 103. 

Required of sophomores in Engineering. 

A course in the fundamental principles of the calculus, including the 
formulas for differentiation, and for integration of polynomial functions, 
with applications to geometry and to problems in rates, maxima and minima, 
curve tracing, curvature, areas, volumes, work, pressure, velocity and 
acceleration. Smith, Salkover, Justice: Calculus. Staff. 



* This course will be repeated the following term. 



274 [Mathematics] 

"Math. 202. Calculus II. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 201. 

uired of sophomores in Engineering. 

A continuation of Calculus I. Methods of integration, and the study of the 
definite integral, with applications to problems in areas, volumes, lengths 
of arcs, surfaces, centroids, moments of inertia, radii of gyration, approxi- 
mate integration. Smith, Salkover, Justice: Calculus. Staff. 



'Math. 303. Calculus III. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Math. 202. 

Required of sophomores in Engineering. 

A continuation of Calculus II. Indeterminate forms, infinite series, ex- 
pansion of functions, hyperbolic functions, partial differentiation, double 
and triple integrals, and differential equations. Smith, Salkover, Justice: 
Calculus. Staff. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 431-a. Differential Equations. 3-0-0 

P rerequi site: Math. 303. 

Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering and elective for others. 

S:'.urlon of standard types of equations; numerous examples in the field 
of Electrical Engineering. Kells : Differential Equations. Mr. Bullock. 



Math. 431 -b. Differential Equations. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 303. 

Elective. Principally for students in Chemical Engineering. 

A study of the equations that occur in Applied Chemistry. Much emphasis 
on graphic methods and numerical work. Phillips: Differential Equations. 

Mr. Winton. 



Math. 432. Advanced Differential Equations for Electrical Engineers. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 431-a. 

Elective. 

A continuation of the work given in Math. 431-a. Series solutions, ap- 
proximate methods, partial differentiatial equations, hyperbolic functions, 
and other topics will be studied with special emphasis on applications to 
problems in Electrical Engineering. Students not taking Electrical Engi- 
neering may register for the course and will be assigned individual problems 
in their particular field. Lecture notes. Mr. Bullock. 



* This course will be repeated the following term. 



[Mathematics] 275 

Math. 402. Graphical and Numerical Methods. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 303. 

Elective. 

Graphical and numerical approximate methods in differentiation, integra- 
tion and the solution of both ordinary and differential equations. Theory 
of least squares and empirical curve fitting. Numerous examples in the 
fields of physics, electricity, mechanics, and engineering will be solved. 
Mackey: Graphical Solutions. Mr. Cell. 



Math. 403. Vector Analysis I. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a or b). 
Elective. 

Different vector products; the calculus of vectors with applications to 
geometry and mechanics. Phillips: Vector Analysis. Mr. Clarkson. 



**Math. 411. Advanced Calculus for Engineers. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a or b). 

Elective. 

Hyperbolic functions, elliptic integrals and functions, partial differentia- 
tion of composite functions, differentiation of integrals, implicit functions. 
Applications to problems in engineering will be emphasized. Reddick and 
Miller: Advanced Mathematics for Engineers. Mr. Mumford. 



**Math. 412. Advanced Calculus for Engineers. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a or b). 

Elective. 

Power series, Gamma and Bessel functions, functions of a complex 
variable, line integrals. Applications to problems in engineering will be 
emphasized. Reddick and Miller: Advanced Mathematics for Engineers. 

Mr. Mumford. 



**Math. 413. Series for Engineers. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Math. 431 (a or b). 

Elective. 

Fourier series, partial differential equations, with applications to prob- 
lems in physics and engineering. Reddick and Miller: Advanced Mathe- 
matics for Engineers. Mr. Mumford. 



** Math. 411, 412, 413, may be taken in any order. 



276 [Mathematics] 

Math. 421. Advanced Analytic Geometry. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 303. 

Elective. 

The elements of higher plane curves and the geometry of space. Snyder 
and Sisam : Analytic Geometry. Mr. Bullock. 



Math. 422. Theory of Equations. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 303. 
Elective. 

The usual topics in the theory of equations, the solution of higher equa- 
tions, exponential equations, logarithmic equations, and determinants. Dick- 
son: First Course in Theory of Equations. Mr. Mumford. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Math. 501. Applied Mathematics I. 3-0-0 

Elective for graduate students only. Prerequisite: Math. 413 or the 

consent of the instructor. 

The course will be arranged to fit the engineering interests of the students 

enrolled. 

Catenary cables, straight-and-curved-beam problems, theory of curve 
fitting, probability and applications, problems in the theory of elasticity, 
ballistics, vibration theory and problems, electrical circuits, Heaviside 
operational calculus and applications to electrical engineering and to other 
engineering problems, calculus of finite differences and applications. Lecture 
notes. Mr. Cell. 



Math. 502. Applied Mathematics II. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Math. 501. 
Elective. For graduate students only. 
A continuation of Math. 501. Lecture notes. Mr. Cell. 



Math. 503. Applied Mathematics III. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Math. 502. 
Elective. For graduate students only. 
A continuation of Math. 502. Lecture notes. Mr. Cell. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 277 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Undergraduates 

M. E. 101, 102, 103. Engineering Drawing I. 2-2-2 

Required of freshmen in Textiles. 

Drawing-board work on lettering, projections, sections, pictorial draw- 
ings, with working drawings related to textile machinery; tracing and blue- 
printing. French and Svensen: Mechanical Drawing. Leonard: Lettering 
Exercises for Engineers and Draftsmen. 

Messrs. Briggs, Brown, Adams, Hyde, Leonard, Stinson. 



M. E. 105, 106. Engineering Drawing II. 3-3-0 

Required of freshmen in Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, and 
Landscape Architecture. 

Drawing-board work on lettering, projections, sections, revolution, auxil- 
iary views, pictorial drawings, intersection, development, working draw- 
ings; tracing and blueprinting. French: Engineering Drawing. Leonard: 
Lettering Exercises for Engineers and Draftsmen. 

Messrs. Briggs, Brown, Adams, Hyde, Leonard, Stinson. 



M. E. 107. Descriptive Geometry. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: M. E. 105, 106. 

Required of freshmen in Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, and 
Landscape Architecture. 

Representation of geometrical magnitudes with points, lines, planes, and 
solids; the solutions of problems. Warner: Applied Descriptive Geometry. 
Messrs. Briggs, Brown, Adams, Hyde, Leonard, Stinson. 



M. E. 121. Woodwork. 1 or 1 or 1 

Required of sophomores in A. E., and freshmen in Textiles. 

Use of bench tools, making cabinet joints, operation and care of wood- 
working machinery; correct methods of staining, varnishing, filling, and 
gluing various kinds of wood. Mr. Rowland. 



M. E. 122. Foundry. 1 or 1 or 1 

Required of sophomores in A. E. and Ch. E., and freshmen in Textiles. 
Demonstration and practice in molding and core making; cupola practice. 
Stimpson, Grey and Grennan : Foundry Work. Mr. Maddison. 



278 [Mechanical Engineering] 

M. E. 123. Forge Work. 1 or 1 or 1 

Required of sophomores in A. E. and Ch. E., and freshmen in Textiles. 

Hand forging of simple exercises, in mild steel, representative of indus- 
trial practice; the origin, purification and fabrication of ferrous metals; the 
identification and uses of these metals. Coleman: Forge Note Book. 

Mr. Cope. 



M. E. 124. Pattern Making. 2 or 2 or 2 

Required of sophomores in M. E. and I. E. 

Elementary joinery, finishing, theory of dry-kilning, wood-turning; lec- 
tures, demonstrations, and practice in hand work and machine methods; 
typical patterns and core boxes constructed, such as solid, split, and loose 
piece. Turner and Town: Pattern Making. Mr. Rowland. 



M. E. 125. Foundry Practice. 2 or 2 or 2 

Required of sophomores in I. E., and M. E. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and practice in molding and core making, cupola 
operations; melting and casting of ferrous and nonferrous metals and their 
alloys; instructions and practice in the testing of molding sands. Wendt: 
Foundry Work. Mr. Maddison. 



M. E. 126. Forging and Welding. 2 or 2 or 2 

Required of sophomores in I. E., and M. E. 

A study of the principles and practices of forging: hand forging as cor- 
related with the industrial processes of hammering, rolling, and pressing. 
Lectures, demonstrations, and practice in forge, oxy-acetylene, and electric 
welding. Johnson: Forging Practice. Mr. Cope. 



M. E. 128. Forge and Welding Practice. 3 or or 3 

Required of sophomores in E. E. 

Hand forging of exercises in mild and tool steel correlated with the in- 
dustrial methods of hammering, rolling and pressing ; principles and modern 
practices; identification of ferrous metals; practice in forge, oxy-acetylene 
and electric welding. Campbell: The Working, Heat Treating and Welding 
of Steel. Mr. Cope. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 279 

M. E. 211, 212, 213. Mechanical Drawing. 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: M. E. 105, 106, 107. 

Required of sophomores in M. E., A. E., and juniors in Ind. Ed. 

Drawing-board work on machine fastenings, pipe fittings, cam design; 
technical sketching, applied descriptive geometry, and working drawings; 
tracing and blueprinting. French: Engineering Drawing. 

Mr. Brown. 



M. E. 215, 216, 217. Elementary Mechanism. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites : M. E. 105, 106, 107. 

Required of juniors in E. E. and A. E. 

The study of linkages, cams, gears, belting, gear trains, and other simple 
mechanisms; design and drawings of simple machine parts. Keown and 
Faires: Mechanism. Messrs. Briggs, Adams, and Brown. 



M. E. 224. Factory Equipment. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 124, 125, 126. 

Required of juniors in I. E. 

To summarize and coordinate all previous shop courses and show their 
relation to manufacturing processes; the essential principles of machine-tool 
operation; machine-tool selection and application for economic production. 
Roe and Lytle: Factory Equipment. Mr. Wheeler. 



M. E. 225, 226. Machine Shop I. 1-1-0 

Prerequisites: M. E. 121, 122, 123. 

Required of juniors in Chem. Eng. 

Practice in chipping, filing, scraping, and babbitting: general machine 
work, including straight and taper turning, drilling, shaper work, and gear 
cutting. Mr. Wheeler. 



M. E. 227, 228, 229. Machine Shop II. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: M. E. 121, 122, 123, or M. E. 124, 125, 126. 
Required of juniors in I. E. and M. E., and Yarn manufacturing. 
Practice in laying out work, grinding tools, chipping, drilling, tapping, 
babbitting bearings, and scraping; machine work, including centering, 
straight and taper turning, chucking, screw cutting, shaper work, planer 
work, index milling and gear cutting. Turner: Machine Tool Work. 

Mr. Wheeler. 



280 [Mechanical Engineering] 

M. E. 235, 236. Metal Shop. 3-3-8 

Prerequisite: Ed. 106. 

Required in Industrial Arts. 

Use of hand and machine tools in problems for secondary schools. Kaup : 
Machine Shop Practice. Mr. Wheeler. 



M. E. 241, 242, 243. Oxy-Acetylene and Electric Welding. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: ML E. 123 or equivalent. 
Elective. 

Fundamental methods and principles of fusion welding: welding sym- 
bols, economic and metallurgical considerations, selection of method and 
type of welding. Welding Handbook of the American Welding Society. 

Mr. Cope. 



ML E. 307, 308, 309. Engineering Thermodynamics I. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 201, 202, 203, Math. 303. 

Required of juniors in E. E., ML EL, I. EL, A. EL, C. E., Cer. EL, and 
Geol. Eng. 

The study of heat as an engineering medium; combustion, heat transfer, 
and the laws governing energy transformations; use of the general energy 
equation dealing with gases, vapors, and mixtures; application of funda- 
mental principles to design and performance of nozzles, steam engines and 
turbines, internal-combustion engines, refrigerating machines, and air com- 
pressors. Faires: Applied Thermodynamics. Messrs. Hoefer and Rice. 



M. E. 313, 314, 315. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Concurrent with M. E. 307, 308, 309. 

Required of juniors in E. E., I. E., Cer. E., and M. E. 

Calibrating pressure, temperature, speed, and power-measuring instru- 
ments; the testing of fuels, lubricants, pumps, compressors, steam engines 
and turbines, heating and ventilating equipment, hydraulic machinery, and 
internal-combustion engines. Rice: Experimental Engineering. 

Messrs. Bridges, Van Note, and Loewensberg. 



M. E. 317, 318, 319. Kinematics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 211, 212, 213. 

Required of juniors in M. E. 

A study of the science of the motion of machine parts, with emphasis on 
belts, pulleys, cams, gears, chain drives, shafts, and links. Sloane: Engi- 
neering Kinematics. Mr. Brown. 



[Mechanical Engineering] 281 

M. E. 322, 323. Metallurgy. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Required of juniors in M. E. and A. E. 

The constitution, structure and properties of engineering ferrous and non- 
ferrous metals and alloys; influences of mechanical working and heat treat- 
ment; physical testing; corrosion and its prevention. Sisco: Modern Met- 
allurgy for Engineers. Mr. Van Note. 



M. E. 341, 342, 343. Furniture Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 124, 125, 126 and M. E. 211, 212, 213. 
Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering II. 

Principles of elementary freehand design; methods of dry-kilning, finish- 
ing, filling and staining. Dean: Modern American Period Furniture. 

Mr. Rowland. 



M. E. 350. Advanced Engineering Drawing. 0-3 or 3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 105, 106, 107 and E. M. 302 or 313 or M. E. 101, 102, 
103 and one of the following: Tex. 304, 310, 339, 381. 

Elective: For advanced undergraduates. 

Drawing-board work as related to special problems in the various engi- 
neering and textile fields. The course will also include^lectures, recitations, 
and individual conferences. 

Mimeographed problem sheets and handbooks will be used. 

Messrs. Briggs and Brown. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 401, 402, 403. Power Plants. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309 and M. E. 313, 314, 315. 
Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering I. 

Fuels and combustion; heat balance, steam boilers, prime movers, and 
auxiliaries, as applied to power generation. Morse: Power Plant Engineer- 
ing and Design. Mr. Vaughan. 



M. E. 404. Heating and Air-Conditioning I. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering I. 

Principles of heating and ventilation; warm air, steam, and hot-water 
heating systems; air-conditioning. Severns: Heating, Ventilating, and Air- 
Conditioning Fundamentals. Messrs. Hoefer and Rice. 



282 [Mechanical Engineering] 

M. E. 405. Refrigeration. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering I. 

Theory of refrigeration; types of ice-making and refrigerating ma- 
chinery; cooling for air conditioning; installation, management, and cost of 
operation. Sparks : Mechanical Refrigeration. Messrs. Rice and Hoefer. 



M. E. 407, 408, 409. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: M. E. 313, 314, 315. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering I. 

Advanced study and tests in the fields of power plants, air-cooled and 
liquid-cooled internal-combustion engines, heating and ventilation, metal- 
lurgy, fluid flow, compressed air, fuels and combustion, and lubrication. 
Rice: Experimental Engineering. 

Messrs. Bridges, Van Note, Loewensberg and Mendenhall. 



M. E. 411, 412, 413. Machine Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 317, 318, 319, E. M. 313, E. M. 322. 
Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering I. 

Application of mechanics, kinematics, strength of materials, and metal- 
lurgy to the design of machinery; determination of proper materials, shape, 
size, and strength of various machine parts. Vallance: Design of Machine 
Members. Mr. Hoefer. 



M. E. 421, 422, 423. Internal-Combustion Engines. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309. 

Required of seniors in Aeronautical Engineering. 

Thermal and mechanical characteristics of internal-combustion engines; 
with special reference to the design, construction, operation and per- 
formance of automotive, aircraft and Diesel engines and their accessories. 
Lichty, Internal Combustion Engines; current periodicals. 

Messrs. Rice and Loewensberg. 



M. E. 425, 426, 427. Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309. 

Concurrent with M. E. 401, 402, 403 or M. E. 421, 422, 423. 

Advanced study and testing of internal-combustion engines; their auxil- 
iaries, and the materials used in their construction; fuels and lubricants. 
Rice: Ex-peHmental Engineering. Messrs. Bridges and Rice. 



tMECHANICAL ENGINEERING] 283 

M. E. 431, 432, 433. Theory of Welding. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: M. E. 123 or equivalent. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering IV. 

A study of the fundamental gas and electric welding processes including 
equipment, materials and procedure. Special attention will be paid to the 
factors affecting welding and welds such as control of residual stresses, 
shrinkage and warpage, and weldability of metals, joint design, etc. Hand- 
book of the American Welding Society. Mr. Cope. 



M. E. 435, 436, 437. Welding Practice. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: M. E. 123 or equivalent. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering IV. 

Fundamentals in the techniques of gas, D. C. and A. C. Welding. 

Mr. Cope. 



M. E. 441, 442, 443. Physical Metallurgy. 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: M. E. 322, 323. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering IV. 

Phase rule and its industrial applications; hardenability, carburizing; 
grain size control; reactions in the solid state; surface reaction processes; 
significance and inter-relation of static and dynamic properties; effects of 
temperature upon physical properties; current technical literature. 

Mr. Van Note. 



M. E. 445, 446, 447. Furniture Construction. 3-4-5 

Prerequisites: M. E. 341, 342, 343. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering II. 

Theory and practice in construction and finishing; factory processes and 
layout for quantity production. Dean: Modern American Period Furniture. 

Mr. Rowland. 



M. E. 451, 452, 453. Heating and Air-Conditioning II. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309 and M. E. 313, 314, 315. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering III. 

Principles of heating, ventilation, and refrigeration as applied to air-con- 
ditioning; design and operation of air-conditioning systems. Allen and 
Walker: Heating and Air-Conditioning. Messrs. Rice and Vaughan. 



284 [Mechanical Engineering] 

M. E. 455, 456, 457. Heating and Air-Conditioning Lab. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: M. E. 313, 314, 315. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering III. 

Testing heating and air-conditioning units, systems and controls; testing 
refrigerating equipment, ducts, methods of air-distribution, fuel-burning 
equipment, dust-control equipment, heat-resisting materials. American 
Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers' Guide. Mr. Rice. 

M. E. 458, 459. Heating and Air-Conditioning Design. 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309 and M. E. 313, 314, 315. 
Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering III. 
Design calculations from given conditions for a heating plant and an 

air-conditioning system; materials listed and cost of installation estimated. 

American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers' Guide. 

Messrs. Rice and Vaughan. 

M. E. 461, 462, 463. Experimental Engineering. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: ML E. 313, 314, 315 or equivalent as approved by faculty 
group. 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific project dealing with 
heat, power, hydraulic machinery, metallography, aerodynamics, or general 
experimental work. A seminar period provided, and a written report re- 
quired. Messrs. Rice, Vaughan, and Wheeler. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

M. E. 501, 502, 503. Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 307, 308, 309 and M. E. 407, 408, 409. 
Development of the thermodynamic equations and their application to 

advanced engineering problems. Messrs. Hoefer and Rice. 

ML E. 505, 506, 507. Internal- Combustion Engine Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 421, 422, 423 and 407, 408, 409. 

A thorough study of the field of internal-combustion engines; design of 
an engine to meet specific requirements. Pye: Internal-Combustion Engines 
Vol. I and II. Mr. Rice. 

*M. E. 513, 514, 515. Power Plant Design. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites : M. E. 401, 402, 403 and ML E. 307, 308, 309. 
The design of a plant to fulfill conditions obtained by investigation and 

research; specifications for design and installation. 

Messrs. Hoefer and Vaughan. 



* Only one of these courses to be offered daring any College year. 



[Military Science] 285 

*M. E. 517, 518, 519. Design of Heating and Ventilating System. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 404 or M. E. 451, 452, 453 and M. E. 407, 408, 409. 
The design of a heating system for specific conditions; specifications for 

installation; performance tests of heating equipment. 

Messrs. Rice and Vaughan. 

M. E. 521, 522, 523. Mechanical Engineering Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: M. E. 401, 402, 403 and M. E. 404. 

Research and thesis in connection with M. E. 5?.3, 514, 515 or M. E. 517, 
518, 519 or M. E. 505, 506, 507. Messrs. Rice, Vaughan. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

(For the duration of the war only Military 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, and 203 
will be offered.) 

Military 101, 102, 103. 2-2-2 

Military Science I (Branch immaterial). 

This, the first-year basic course, is required of all physically fit freshmen. 

Concealment and Camouflage, Cover and Movement, Dismounted Drill, 
Equipment and Clothing, Extended Order, Field Sanitation, First Aid, In- 
terior Guard Duty, Map and Photograph Reading, Marches and Bivouacs, 
Military Courtesy and Discipline, Organization of the Army, Patrol Opera- 
tions, Personal and Sex Hygiene, Protection against Carelessness, Rifle, 
Scouts Observers and Messengers, Tent Pitching. 
Military 201, 202, 203. 

Mil. Ill, 112, 113. Military Science I (Signal Corps) 2-2-2 

This, the first-year basic course, is required of all physically fit freshmen 
enrolled in the Electrical Engineering School. Freshmen from other Engi- 
neering Schools may be selected for the Signal Corps course in order to fill 
the allotted War Department quota. 

The National Defense Act and the R.O.T.C, Military Courtesy and Disci- 
pline; Military Hygiene and First Aid; Leadership; Rifle Marksmanship; 
Map Reading; Military Organization, General; Signal Corps Organization; 
Military History and Policy; Obligations of Citizenship; Signal Communica- 
tion; Field Wire Systems and Material of Wire Communication. 

Mil. 201, 202, 203. 2-2-2 

Military Science II (Branch immaterial). 

This, the second-year basic course, is required of all physically fit sopho- 
mores who have completed Military Science 101. 

Training Management, Dismounted Drill, Administration, Extended Order 
Drill, Application of Military Law, Rifle Marksmanship, Tactical Training 
and Combat Organization, Defense against Chemical Attack, Unit Supply, 
Map and Photograph Reading. 



* Only one of these courses to be offered during any College year. 



286 [Military Science] 

Mil. 211, 212, 213. Military Science II (Signal Corps). 2-2-2 

This, the second-year basic Signal Corps course, is required of all 
physically fit sophomores who have successfully completed Military Science 
I (Signal Corps). 

Leadership; Signal Communication; Radio Communication, Radio Code 
Practice, Field Radio Systems; Organization of the Signal Corps, Interior 
Guard Duty, Automatic Rifle. 



Mil. 301, 302, 303. Military Science III. (Infantry). 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. S. II. 

This, the first-year advanced course, is elective for selected juniors. 

Aerial Photograph Reading; Leadership; Machine Gun, 37 MM. Gun, 
Three-inch Trench Mortar; Combat Principles; Supply and Mess Manage- 
ment; Field Fortifications; Care and Operation of Motor Vehicles; De- 
fense Against Chemical Warfare. 



Mil. 311, 312, 313. Military Science III (Signal Corps). 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M.S. II (Signal Corps). 

This, the first-year advanced Signal Corps course, is elective for selected 
juniors. 

Aerial Photograph Reading; Defense Against Chemical Warfare; Military 
Administration, Supply and Mess Management; Organization of the Army, 
Organization of the Signal Corps; Leadership; Automatic Rifle; Signal Com- 
munications, Homing Pigeons, Military Cryptography, Message Centers, 
Wire Communications, Field Wire Systems; Radio Communication, Code 
Practice, Field Radio Systems; Signal Communication Tactics, Combat 
Orders, General and Signal Orders, Combat Principles; Tactical Signal 
Communications. 



Mil. 401, 402, 403. Military Science IV. (Infantry). 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. S. III. 

This, the second year advanced course, is required of all seniors who have 
completed the first-year advanced course. 

Military Law; Officers Reserve Corps Regulations; Military History and 
Policy; Anti-Aircraft Defense; Leadership; Combat Principles of the Rifle 
Company; Heavy Weapons Company; Tanks and Mechanization; Combat 
Intelligence; and Signal Communications. 

Credit will be given for work at other institutions maintaining a 
Senior unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps as shown by the student's 
record, Form 131 A. G. O., evaluated and kept by the Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 



[Modern Languages] 287 

Mil. 411, 412, 413. Military Science IV (Signal Corps). 

Prerequisite: M. S. Ill (Signal Corps). 

Military Law; Officers Reserve Corps Regulations; Methods of Instruc- 
tion and Training; Motor Transportation; Signal Supply; Property Procure- 
ment and Funds; Combat Orders; Tactics; Leadership; Signal Communica- 
tion; Military Cryptography; Message Center Procedure; Radio Communica- 
tion; Code Practice; Field Radio Systems; Wire Communication; Material of 
Wire Communication; Field Wire Systems; Organization of the Signal 
Corps; Organization of Military Signal Communications. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Basic Courses 

French 

*M. L. 101, 102. Elementary French. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Lectures on the structure, diction, pronunciation; and other matters of 
technique of the language, supplemented by easy readings and translations. 
Individual reports and conferences. No previous training in the language 
necessary. Mrs. Hall. 

*M. L. 201. Elementary French Prose. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: M. L. 101, 102 or equivalent. 

Military French. For the duration, the object of this course will be the 
development of ability in written and spoken French dealing with army, 
navy, and aeronautical affairs. Mr. Ballenger and Mrs. Hall. 

M. L. 202. Intermediate French Prose. 3 -°-° 

Prerequisite: M. L. 201 or equivalent. 

A study of prose reading material, largely historical in nature. Attention 
given to the acquisition and extension of the student's basic vocabulary. 
Individual translation, parallel readings, and reports. Mr. Ballenger. 



German 

*M. L. 103, 104. Elementary German. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Lectures on the structure and technique of the language, supplemented 

by easy readings and translations. Individual reports and conferences. 

Mr. Hinkle. 



♦Two years of high-school work will ordinarily be considered the equivalent of M. L. 
101, 102, and 201 ; and of 108, 104, and 208. 



288 [Modern Languages] 

*M. L. 203. Elementary German Prose. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: M. L. 103, 104 or equivalent. 

Military German. For the duration, the object of this course will be the 
development of ability in written and spoken German dealing with army, 
navy, and aeronautical affairs. Mr. Hinkle and Mrs. Hall. 



M. L. 204. Intermediate German Prose. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: ML L. 203 or equivalent. 

A study of prose reading material, largely historical in nature. Attention 
given to the acquisition and extension of the student's basic vocabulary. 
Individual translations, parallel readings and reports. Mr. Hinkle. 



Spanish 

*M. L. 105, 106. Elementary Spanish. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Lectures on the structure, diction, pronunciation, and other matters of 
technique of the language, supplemented by easy readings and translations. 
Individual reports and conferences. No previous training in the language 
necessary. Messrs. Ballenger and Hinkle. 

*M. L. 205. Elementary Spanish Prose. 3 or 3 or 3 

Military Spanish. For the duration, the object of this course will be the 
development of ability in written and spoken Spanish dealing with army, 
navy, and aeronautical affairs. Messrs. Ballenger and Hinkle. 

M. L. 206. Intermediate Spanish Prose. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: M. L. 205 or equivalent. 

A study of prose reading material, largely historical in nature. Atten- 
tion given to the acquisition and extension of the student's basic vocabulary. 
Individual translations, parallel readings, and reports. Mr. Ballenger. 



**Technical and Scientific Courses 

Translation Service. — A special feature of the work of the Modern 
Language department is that of the Translation Service. This work is con- 
ducted as an aid to research, on the one hand, and a means to the acquisi- 



* T-wo years of high-school work will ordinarily be considered the equivalent of M. L. 
105, 106, and 205. 

** Students registered in advanced technical and scientific courses are given the oppor- 
tunity of doing a translation project in connection with the Translation Service of the 
department When such prospect is satisfactorily completed and accepted, it may be substi- 
tuted in lieu of an examination as evidence of reading ability. This procedure is recommended 
aa the preferable method of preparation for the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the 
language concerned. 



[Modern Languages] 289 

tion of a reading knowledge of the respective language, on the other. 
Through this service advanced undergraduate students and graduate stu- 
dents registered in technical and scientific courses are given the oppor- 
tunity of working a translation project in connection with their field of 
major interest. When such project is satisfactorily completed, it is accepted 
in lieu of an examination as evidence of reading ability. This procedure is 
recommended as the preferable method of preparation for the acquisition 
of a reading knowledge of the language concerned. Revised copies of these 
projects are deposited in our local library and made available to investi- 
gators in other institutions through the medium of the American Docu- 
mentation Institute. 

M. L. 301. Technical French. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: M. L. 202 or equivalent. 

Readings and translations of relatively simple technical material, supple- 
mented by lectures on terminology, vocabulary analysis, and other lin- 
guistic technique. Designed to meet the needs of students whose interest 
in the language is primarily that of reading ability. Choice of reading 
material adjusted to individual needs; may be taken by students of vary- 
ing degrees of previous linguistic training. Mr. Ballenger. 

M. L. 302. Introductory Scientific French. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 202 or equivalent. 

A study of scientific French of intermediate difficulty, supplemented with 
lectures on terminology and other linguistic technique. The needs of stu- 
dents whose interest is that of the acquisition of a reading knowledge of 
the language, constantly kept in view. Basic technique of translation 
explained and demonstrated by means of personal conferences. 

Mr. Ballenger and Mrs. Hall. 

M. L. 303. Technical German. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: M. L. 204 or equivalent. 

Reading and translations of relatively simple technical German, supple- 
mented by lectures on terminology, word order, vocabulary analysis and 
other linguistic technique. Designed to meet the needs of students whose 
interest in the language is primarily that of reading ability. Choice of read- 
ing material adjusted to individual needs; may be taken by students of 
varying degrees of previous linguistic training. Mr. Hinkle. 

M. L. 304. Introductory Scientific German. 0-0-3 

A study of scientific German of intermediate difficulty supplemented with 
lectures on terminology and other linguistic technique. The needs of stu- 
dents whose interest is that of the acquisition of a reading knowledge of 
the language, constantly kept in view. Basic technique of translation ex- 
plained and demonstrated by means of personal conferences. 

Mr. Hinkle and Mrs. Hall. 



290 [Modern Languages] 

M. L. 305. Technical and Industrial Spanish. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: M. L. 206 or equivalent. 

A study of technical and industrial literature. Particular attention given 
to the special terminology characteristic of such literature with a view to 
the acquisition of a practical vocabulary. Individual conferences and re- 
ports. Mr. Ballenger. 



M. L. 306. Introductory Scientific Spanish. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 206 or equivalent. 

Readings and translations of relatively simple scientific Spanish, supple- 
mented by lectures on terminology, vocabulary analysis, and other linguistic 
technique. Designed to meet the needs of students whose interest in the 
language is primarily that of reading ability. Choice of reading material 
adjusted to individual needs; may be taken by students of varying degrees 
of previous linguistic training. Mr. Ballenger. 



M. L. 401, 402, 403. Advanced Scientific French. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 301 or 302 or equivalent. 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines 
and technical journals. Students given the opportunity of working a trans- 
lation project in connection with their subject of major interest. Special 
attention given to the comprehension of the thought of the article under 
consideration and its accurate rendition into English. Parallel readings, 
reports and conferences. Messrs. Hinkle and Ballenger. 



M. L. 404, 405, 406. Advanced Scientific German. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 303 or 304 or equivalent. 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines, 
and technical journals. Students given the opportunity of working a trans- 
lation project in connection with their subject of major interest. Special 
attention given to the comprehension of the thought of the article under 
consideration and its accurate rendition into English. Parallel readings, 
reports, and conferences. Mr. Hinkle and Mrs. Hall. 



M. L. 407, 408, 409. Advanced Scientific Spanish. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: M. L. 305 or 306 or equivalent. 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines, 
and technical journals. Students given the opportunity of working a trans- 
lation project in connection with their subject of major interest. Special 
attention given to the comprehension of the thought of the article under 
consideration and its accurate rendition into English. Parallel readings, 
reports, and conferences. Mr. Ballenger and Mrs. Hall. 



[Modern Languages] 291 
General Courses 

M. L. 410. Masterpieces of French Literature. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

The study of outstanding masterpieces of French literature. A brief 
outline of French literary development. Parallel reading either in trans- 
lation or in French. An open elective. No language prerequisites. 

Mr. Hinkle. 



M. L. 411. Masterpieces of German Literature. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

The study of outstanding masterpieces of German literature. A brief 
outline of German literary development. Parallel readings either in trans- 
lation or in German. An open elective. No language prerequisites. 

Mr. Hinkle. 



M. L. 412, 413. Masterpieces of Spanish Literature. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

The study of outstanding masterpieces of Spanish literature. A brief 
outline of Spanish literary development. Parallel readings either in trans- 
lation or in Spanish. An open elective. No language prerequisites. 

Mr. Hinkle. 



M. L. 414, 415. French, German and Spanish Civilization. 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

Lectures and reports on the manners and customs of the respective cul- 
tures under consideration. Fall Term devoted to their development in 
Europe; Spring Term devoted to Latin America. Topics, such as racial 
stocks, people, social classes, governments, politics and education given 
special consideration. Parallel readings, reports, and conferences. An 
open elective. No language prerequisites. Mr. Hinkle. 



M. L. 416. The Development of Language. 0-3-0 or 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

The various phases of linguistic growth as a basis for intelligent language 
appreciation. Origin of language, linguistic change, grammatical cate- 
gories, dialects, standard language, word order, inflection, isolation, agglu- 
tination, etymology, and other linguistic processes given special considera- 
tion. Parallel readings, reports, and conferences. An open elective. No 
language prerequisites. Mr. Hinkle. 



292 [Physical Education] 

M. L. 417. Masterpieces of Foreign Literature. 0-0-3 or 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

A study of outstanding literary productions in each of the various types 
of literature, and l e c ture s on their cultural background. Designed primarily 
to meet the needs of students who wish to supplement their knowledge of 
their own literature with a survey of the literature of other civilizations. 
Special attention is giver, to the literary monuments of France, Germany, 
Spain, and Italy. No foreign language prerequisites are necessary. Daily 
reports and conferences. Mr. Hinkle. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

Courses and Activities 

P. E. 101, 102, 103. Fundamental Activities and Hygiene. 1-1-1 

Required of all freshmen except those excused on the recommendation of 
the College physician. 

Individual health and physical efficiency of each student based on stand- 
ardized athletic, gymnastic, and efficiency tests. Lectures on personal hygiene 
required in one term only. Mr. Miller and Staff. 



P. E. 201, 202, 203. Sports Activities. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: P. E. 101. 102. 103. 

Required of all sophomores except those excused upon recommendation 

of the College physician- 
Election is permitted in popular sports for healthful exercise and a fair 

degree of skill in them. Mr. Miller and Staff. 



P. E. Ill, 112, 113. Restricted Activities. 1-1-1 

Required of all freshmen excused from P. E. 101, 102, 103. 

Special activities for those students who cannot meet the requirements of 
the regular course because of physical handicap. Mr. Miller and Staff. 



P. E. 211, 212, 213. Restricted Activities. 1-1-1 

Required of all sophomores excused from P. E. 201, 202, 203. 
Special activities for those students who cannot meet the requirements of 

the regular course because of physical handicap. Mr. Miller and Staff. 



[Physics] 293 

P. E. 301, 302, 303. Theory and Practice of First Aid. 1 or 1 or 1 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Hours by arrangement. 

Anatomy and physiology sufficiently to proceed with bandages, dressings, 
wounds, shock, injuries to bones, joints, muscles, poisons, unconsciousness, 
artificial respiration, and common emergencies. Students completing the 
course are awarded the American Red Cross Certificate. Staff. 



P. E. 401. Social Recreation. 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Agr. Educ. 

Purpose: To prepare teachers of agriculture to assume leadership in social 
and recreational activities. The organization, supervision, and practice 
work in athletic and social activities for parties, picnics, campus banquets, 
and similar occasions. Mr. Miller. 



PHYSICS 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Phys. Ill, 112, 113. Physics for Textile Students. 4-4-4 

Required of freshmen in Textiles. 

Industrial Physics, with emphasis on practical applications to the textile 
industry. Black: College Physics. Messrs. Hopkins, and Lancaster. 



Phys. 115. Physics for Agricultural Students. 5 or 5 or 5 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 

Elements of machines; physics of heat and weather; applications of light 
and electricity on the farm. Henderson : The New Physics of Everyday Life. 

Messrs. Heck, Brown. 



Phys. 123. Descriptive Astronomy. 0-0-3 

Elective. 

An elementary nonmathematical survey of the sun, planets, and stars; 
observations with telescope. Baker: Introduction to Astronomy. 

Mr. Heck. 



294 [Physics] 

Phys. 201, 202, 203. Physics for Engineers. 4-4-4 

Prerequisite: Math. 103. 

Required of sophomores in Engineering. 

Genend ?:.;=::; vrith emphasis on problems and engineering applications. 
Hangman and Slack: Physics. 

Messrs. Heck, Derieux, Meares. Lancaster, Hopkins, Brown, Fowler, Lynn. 



Phys. 306. Electron Tubes and Their Application to Industry. 

Prerequisites : Phys. 113 or 203. Math. 103. 

Elective. 

Properties of electrons and electron emitters; gaseous conduction; ther- 
mionic and photoelectric tubes, theory and applications. Mr. Hopkins. 



Phys 311. Light in Industry. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Phys. 113 or Equivalent. 

Required of Textile students: elective for other students. 

Fundamentals of light, illumination, and color; psychology of color; 
standardized color theory; pigments, contrast, and harmony. 

Feat: Light and Color in Industry. Mr. Lancaster. 



Phys. 322. Meterology. 0-3-0 

Required of juniors in Forestry; elective for other students. 
Causes of weather change; methods of forecasting; peculiarities of the 

weather of North Carolina. Blair: Weather Elements. Mr. Heck. 



Phys. 332. Photography. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Phys. 113 or equivalent. 

Elect: re 

A general study of cameras, lenses, exposure, development, printing, 
types of emulsion, color sensitivity and color niters. Boucher: Fundamentals 
of Photography. Mr. Meares. 



Pays. 4#2, 403. Mechanics. 0-3-3 or 0-4-4 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203. Math. 303. 

Elective. 

The physical principles of mechir :s Eiser: Physics for Students. 

Mr. Meares. 



[Physics] 295 

Phys. 405, 406. Electricity and Magnetism. 3-3-0 or 4-4-0 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203. Math. 303. 

Elective. 

Fundamental principles in a more specialized but intermediate manner. 
Laboratory, if taken, increases the course to 4 credits. Gilbert: Electricity 
and Magnetism. Mr. Lancaster. 

Phys. 407. Elementary Modern Physics. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203, Math. 303, Chem. 211. 

Required of juniors in E. E. and seniors in Ch. E. 

New theories and discoveries in Physics, such as: the electron, atomic 
structure, spectra, X-rays, crystal structure, quantum theory, radiation, 
radio-activity, isotopes and cosmic rays. Brown: Foundations of Modern 
Physics. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 413. Acoustics. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203. Math. 303. 

Elective. 

Production, propagation, transmission, and reception of sound, with spe- 
cial applications to architectural and electrical transmission problems. 
Olson: Elements of Acoustical Engineering. Staff. 

Phys. 415, 416. Light. 0-3-3 or 0-4-4 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203 or 207. Math. 303. 

Elective. 

Introduction to principles of geometrical and physical optics. Edser: 
Light for Students. Mr. Derieux. 

Phys. 417. Heat. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites : Phys. 203 or 207. Math. 303. 

Elective. 

Temperature measurement, specific heats, thermal expansion, conduc- 
tion, radiation, kinetic theory, change of state, thermodynamics, low tem- 
peratures, high temperatures. Cork: Heat. Mr. Lynn. 

Phys. 426. Spectroscopy in Industry. 0-3-0 or 0-4-0 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203. Chem. 212. 

Fundamental principles of light; spectroscopic equipment; spectra; qual- 
itative analysis of composition by emission spectra; detection of impurities; 
quantitative analysis; absorption spectra; industrial applications, lectures, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. Lewis: Spectroscopy in Science and Indus- 
try ; Brode: Chemical Spectroscopy. Mr. Derieux. 



296 [Physics] 

Phys. 427, 428, 429. Optics. 3-3-3 or 4-4-4 

Prerequisite: Phys. 203, Math. 303. 

Lenses and lens system, optical instruments, gratings, interferometers, 
spectra. Laboratory if taken gives 4 credits. Mr. Derieux. 



Phys. 443. History of Physics. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: One course in College Physics. 
Elective. 

Development of Physics from its beginnings to the present time. Crew: 
Rise of Modern Physics. Mr. Heck. 



Phys. 445, 446, 447. Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Phys. 203 or 207 or 213. 

Elective. 

Undergraduate research given according to the student's ability. 

Mr. Heck. 



Phys. 451, 452, 453. Physics Colloquium. 3-3-3 

Current research reviewed by department and advanced students; meets 
weekly at night throughout the year. Mr. Heck. 



Phys. 463. Industrial X-Rays. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203, Math. 303. 

Theory and practice of X-rays in industry; X-ray equipment; photo- 
graphic procedure; detection of defects in welds, castings, assemblies, 
stresses in members and fibers and crystal analysis demonstrations and stu- 
dent manipulation in each phase. Clark: Applied X-rays. St. John: Indus- 
trial Radiography. Staff. 



Phys. 514, 515, 517. Advanced Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 203, Math. 301. 

Theorem of Gauss, energy in media, boundary conditions, condensers, elec- 
trometers, dielectric constants, migration of ions, thermodynamics of rever- 
sible cells, thermoelectricity, magnetic circuits, growth and decay of cur- 
rents, oscillatory discharge. Starling: Advanced Theory of Electricity and 
Magnetism. Staff. 



[Poultry] 297 

Phys. 522. Discharge of Electricity in Gases. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Phys. 213, Math. 203. 

Production of ions in gases, motion of ions, velocity in an electric field, 
diffusion, recombination, determination of atomic charge, ionization by col- 
lision, discharge tubes, cathode rays, positive rays, and X-rays. Crowther: 
Ions, Electrons, and Ionizing Radiations. Mr. Derieux. 



Phys. 525. Atomic Structures. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Phys. 312. 

Elective. 

Bohr's model, spectral formula, elliptical orbits, fine structure of spectral 
lines, Stark effect, Zeeman effect, Roentgen rays, Moseley's law, periodic 
system, isotopes, radioactivity, atomic nuclei, ionization, spectra and atomic 
structure, fluoroscence, atomic magnetism. White: Atomic Spectra. Haas: 
Atomic Structures. Staff. 



Phys. 531, 532, 533. Research. 3-3-3 

Graduate students sufficiently prepared may undertake research in some 
particular field of Physics. At least six laboratory hours a week must be 
devoted to such research. Messrs. Heck and Derieux. 



POULTRY 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Poul. 201. General Poultry. 3-0-0 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture. 
Fundamental principles of poultry production. 

Messrs. Williams and Dearstyne. 



Poul. 301. Poultry Judging. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Poul. 201. 
Required of juniors in Poultry Production; elective for others. 

Mr. Williams. 



Poul. 303. Incubation and Brooding. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Phys. 115, Poul. 201. 

Required of juniors in Poultry Production; elective for others. 

Principles of incubation and brooding; feeding, housing, and rearing baby 
chicks. Mr. Williams. 



298 [Poultry] 

Poul. 311, 312. Poultry Anatomy and Physiology. 3-3-0 

Required of juniors in Poultry Science; elective for others. 
A foundation for courses in poultry diseases and nutrition. 

Mr. Gregory. 



Poul. 322. Poultry Production. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Poul. 201. 

Developed for vocational teachers of agriculture. Elective for others. 
Poultry disease problems; nutritional problems; judging methods. 

Messrs. Dearstyne and Williams. 



Poul. 332. Preparation and Grading of Poultry Products. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Poul. 201. 

Required of juniors in Poultry; elective for others. 

Commercial fattening; grading and marketing eggs; refrigerating and 
storage; markets. Mr. Williams. 



Poul. 333. Poultry Nutrition. 0-0-4 

Prerequisites: Chem. 101, Zool. 101 and 102, Poul. 201. 
Required of juniors in Poultry Production; elective for juniors in Agri- 
culture. 

Feeds and feeding: Physiology' of digestion, absorption, and elimination; 
mineral and vitamin requirements. Messrs. Dearstyne and Gregory. 



Poul. 342. Turkey Production. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Poul. 101, Zool. 411. 

Required of seniors in Poultry Science; elective for others. 
Selection and mating; incubation: brooding poults; nutrition; grading 
and marketing. Mr. Nesbit 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Poul. 401, 402. Poultry Diseases. 4-4-U 

Prerequisites: Poul. 201, Zool. 102, Poul. 401 prerequisite to Poul. 402. 
Required of seniors in Poultry Science; elective for others. 
Sanitation, parasite infestations and control, contagious and noncon- 
tagious diseases. Mr. Gauger. 



[Poultry] 299 

Poul. 403. Sero-Diagnosis in Poultry Diseases. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Poul. 401, 402, Bot. 402. 

Required of seniors in Poultry Science. 

Basic immunological theory and technique; its application in the therapy 
and diagnosis of poultry disease. Mr. Greaves. 



Poul. 412. Commercial Poultry Plant Management. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Poul. 201. 

Required of seniors in Poultry Science; elective for others. 

Development and maintenance of a commercial plant; custom hatching, 
and commercial incubation; cost of production. Mr. Williams. 



Poul. 413. Selection and Mating of Poultry. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Poul. 201, Genetics, Zool. 411. 

Required of seniors in Poultry Production, elective for juniors in Agri- 
culture. 

Methods of recognition and selection for mating from both standard and 
utility standpoints; study of progeny performance. Mr. Dearstyne. 



Poul. 423. Senior Seminar. 

Required of seniors in Poultry. 



0-0-3 
Mr. Dearstyne. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Poul. 501, 502, 503. Poultry Histology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Poul. 311, 312, 401, 402, Zool. 461. 

General histology of the tissues, special histology of the various systems 
of the body. Mr. Gregory. 



Poul. 511, 512, 513. Poultry Pathology. 

Prerequisites: Poul. 311, 312, 401, 501, 502, 503. 
Various disease processes. 



3-3-3 



Mr. Gregory. 



Poul. 521. Poultry Physiology. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Poul. 311, 312, 401, 402, 501, 502. 

Histology and pathology, emphasizing the effects of diseases on normal 
physiology. Mr. Gregory. 



300 [Psychology] 

Poul. 531, 532, 533. Poultry Research. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen term credits in Poultry. 

Problems in Poultry nutrition, diseases, marketing, and breeding to be 
conducted as definitely outlined by the Department. Poultry Staff. 



Poul. 541, 542, 543. Seminar. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Eighteen credit hours in Poultry. Mr. Dearstyne. 



Poul. 551, 552, 553. Production Studies and Experiments. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Poul. 201, 333, 401, 402. 

Problems in poultry nutrition, and breeding, and in commercial poultry 
production and marketing. Mr. Dearstyne. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Psychol. 200. Introduction to Psychology. 3 or 3 or 3 

A study of the general characteristics and development of human be- 
havior, emphasizing the problems of motivation, emotion, learning, and 
thinking. Mr. Moffie. 



Psychol. 201. Elementary Experimental Psychology. 3-0-0 

Introduction to experimental psychology. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods per week. Mr. Moffie. 



Psychol. 202. Psychology of Personality and Adjustment. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

A study of the factors involved in the development of the normal 
personality. Mr. Moffie. 



Psychol. 303, 304. Educational Psychology. 3-3-0 

Required of students in Education; elective for others. 
Applications of psychology to education; problems of learning, motiva- 
tion, interests; the measurement of educational efficiency; mental hygiene. 

Mr. Moffie. 



[Psychology] 301 

Psychol. 337. Applied Psychology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

The practical application of psychological principles in special fields: 
analysis of problems arising in business, professional, and everyday life; 
the psychological aspects of personnel selection. Mr. McGehee. 



Psychol. 338. Industrial Psychology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern 
industry; factors involved in industrial learning, methods of work, monot- 
ony, fatigue, illumination, accidents, morale of workers. Mr. McGehee. 



Psychol. 390. Social Psychology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200. 

Social applications of psychology: social stimulation, response, and atti- 
tudes - Mr. McGehee. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Psychol. 411. Rural Social Psychology. 3_0-0 

For description of this course, see Rural Sociology 411. Mr. McGehee. 



Psychol. 470, 471, 472. Psychodiagnostic Techniques. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology. 

Techniques of measuring intelligence, personality, aptitudes, and achieve- 
ment. Practice in administration and interpretation of psychological tests. 

Messrs. McGehee, Moffie. 



Psychol. 476. Psychology of Adolescence. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Ed. 303, 304, or six credits in Psychology. 
Mental growth, social development, and interests of adolescent boys and 

girls - Mr. Moffie. 



Psychol. 478. Individual Differences. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology. 

Nature, extent, and practical implications of individual differences and 
individual variation. Mr< McGehee. 



302 [Rural Sociology] 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PsychoL 512. 513. 514. Problems in Applied Psychology. 3-3-3 

Prereo_uis:t.e : Twelve hours ir. Psychology. 
Individual and group research problems in educational, industrial, and 

s : rial p sych : 1 : gy. Messrs. McGehee, Moffie. 

RELIGION 

(See Ethios. rage 24:1 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Rural Soc. 302. Rural Sociology. 3 or 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Soc. 202, 203 or Econ. 201, 202, 203. 

Required of juniors in Rand Sociology, seniors in Agricultural Economics, 
and juniors in certain Education curricula. 

The culture, social organization, and social problems of rural people with 

special reference to Southern rural life and proposed programs of develop- 
ment. Staff. 

Rural Soc. 401. Rural Leadership. 3-0-0 

Social role of leadership; types and numbers of leaders; sources and 
baehgrror. ds : rr.orivarior. and per=:r.al traits : experience, training, and 
edoocarltr.: h:~ leaders gain and hold pc-*-er: adjustment of leadership to 
the chanrcnoo environment; biographies of different types of leaders; and 
r.e- ;::;::;:;:;;: for rural leadership. Mr. Winston. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced L'ndergraduates 

Rural Soc. 402. Farmers* Movements. 0-3-0 

The :rigor.. gro~h, and the o resent status of such National farmers' 
irooanioar :ns ana m:-remer.t,s as: ode Grar.ge. the Farmers' Alliance, the 
Populist P.evclt. the Arrloulrural Wr.eel. the Farr.rrs Vr.::r. :':.-. r. :. ~ :: 
the I:;:r/. the Hor.t arc.san League, the Farm Bureau, the Farm-Labor 
Union, the C : iterative liarhet.r.or Movement. Mr. Seegers. 



Rural Soc. 411. Rural Population Problems. 3-0-0 

The number and distribution in relation to natural resources; physical 
ar.o deurgrarhi: characteristics: marriage rates: natural increase; migra- 
tion; morbidity; mortality; o c cupati ons; rural-urban comparisons; trends; 
and national policies. Mr. Hamilton. 



[Rural Sociology] 303 

Rural Soc. 413. Community Organization. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Rural Soc. 302. 

Required of seniors in Rural Sociology. 

Community organization in North Carolina and other States: structure 
and size; institutions and service agencies; disorganization techniques and 
methods of organization; leadership and the relation of organizations to 
State and National agencies. Mr. Mayo. 

Rural Soc. 421. Rural Social Psychology. 3-0-0 

Characteristic mental traits and attitudes of rural people in relation to 
social organization and social change. Mr. McGehee. 

Rural Soc. 422. Social Aspects of Land Tenure. 0-3-0 

Character and history of different types of land tenure; origins and 
growth of farm tenancy in the United States; social correlatives of land 
tenure; landlord-tenant relationships; the farm leases; problems of owner- 
ship; farm mortgages; reform programs. Mr. Hamilton. 

Rural Soc. 432. Rural Poverty and Relief. 0-3-0 

Origin, extent, and character of rural poverty; types and extent of relief; 
problems of prevention ; public policies and programs. Mr. Mayo. 

Rur. Soc. 451. Statistical Analysis of Social Data. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

Sampling social data, rural surveys and testing methods; analysis of 
variance and relationships; population studies. Application to problems in 
the fields of sociology, psychology and education. Mr. Hamilton. 

Rural Soc. 453. Agricultural Extension and Education. 0-0-3 

History, objectives, and methods of agricultural extension and education 
in the United States. Mr. Hamilton and Extension Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 
Rural Soc. 531. Rural Standards of Living. 3-0-0 

Theories and surveys of rural standards of living. Forces and programs 
affecting present-day standards. Mr. Hamilton. 

Rural Soc. 532. The Rural Family. 0-3-0 

Historical forms and functions of rural family life ; family activities and 
relationships; stages of family growth; the family-sized farm; effects of 
technical and economic changes on the rural family; national policies. 

Messrs. Hamilton, Winston. 



304 [Sociology] 

Rural Soc 533. The Rural Community. 0-0-3 

Human ecology; types of communities; historical trends; economic, cul- 
tural, and psychological factors; solidarity and disorganization; special 
interest groups; service agencies; state and national relations; "Utopian" 
experiments; planning. Mr. Mayo. 



Rural Soc. 541, 542, 543. Research in Rural Sociology. 3-3-3 

Objectives of research; the scientific method; planning, organization, and 
direction of rural studies; preparation of schedules, interviewing, editing, 
tabulation, and analysis; field experience; preparation of research reports. 
Credit for 543 involves at least 6 weeks' field and laboratory experience. 

Staff. 



SOCIOLOGY 

(For Courses in Rural Sociology see page 299) 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Soc. 101, 102, 103. Human Relations. 2-2-2 

Required of students in the School of Agriculture who do not take 
Military Science. Elective for others. 

An orientation course to introduce the student to the social problems of 
our time. Staff. 



Soc. 201. Introductory Sociology. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Required of students in Forestry; elective for others. 

The basic principles underlying social life and the factors connected with 
it. (Identical with the first term of General Sociology.) 

Mr. Winston. 



Soc. 202, 203. General Sociology. 3-3-0 

First term: an analysis of the fundamental factors affecting life in 
modern society; second term: practical social problems, using the tools 
developed in the first term. Mr. Winston. 



Soc. 210. General Anthropology. 3 credits 

An introduction to the study of man: a consideration of his development 
from earliest forms to the present. Mr. Winston. 



[Sociology] 305 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Soc. Ex. 400. Criminology. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Causes and conditions leading to crime; methods of handling criminals; 

various factors producing criminal behavior. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 401. Social Pathology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Pathological problems arising from social life; social and individual ad- 
justments. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. Ex. 402. Sociology of City Life. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Elective. 

Problems arising from growth of modern town and city life; city plan- 
ning in regard to social and industrial progress. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 403. Leadership. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: nine term credits in Sociology, including Sociology 202. 
A study of leadership in various fields of American life: analysis of the 
various factors, inherent or acquired, that are associated with leadership, 
past and present. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. Ex. 404. Educational Sociology. 3 credits 

Prerequisite: nine term credits in the Social Sciences. 

Application of the principles of Sociology to the practical problems of 
education with emphasis placed on the relation between adjustment processes 
in the school and in the larger social world. Mr. Winston. 

Soc. 406. The American Family. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Premarital, marital, and family relations; effects of present-day social 
changes; various efforts to stabilize the family. Messrs. Winston, Hamilton. 

Soc. 407. Race Relations. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Elective. 
Race problems in America and in other countries; social, economic, and 

educational status of racial groups; international relations. 

Mr. Winston. 



306 [Soils] 

Soc 408. Social Anthropology. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Soc 202 or Soc. 210, supplemented by credits in related 

frlis. 

.^r.aJysis of present-day eulture, with particular reference to the United 
States and its regional variations. Mr. Winston. 

Soc 410. Industrial Sociology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soc 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 
Tnflnfwe of industrial life; occupations as social and industrial factors; 

problems ■rating from our industrial era. Mr. Winston. 

= 11. Population Problems. 3-0-0 

Prerequisite: Soc. 202, supplemented by credits in related fields. 

Analyses of crucial problems connected with the growth and decline of 

populations in the United States; factors connected with birth and death 

rates; marriage rates; discussion of the changing quality of population 

st : ur s. Mr. Winston. 

Soc 415. Research in Applied Sociology. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: nine hours of Sociology, and permission of the instructor. 
Individual research problems in applied fields of sociology, such as prob- 
lems of the family, of population, of social work; rural-urban relations; 
student success; American leadership. Mr. Winston. 

SOILS (AGRONOMY) 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Soils -vl. Soils. 5-0-0 or 0-0-5 

Prerequisites: GeoL 120 and Chem. 101, 102, 103. 

Required of sophomores in Agriculture and Agricultural Chemistry, and 
of juniors in Forestry and Wildlife Conservation and Management. 

The makeup, origin and classification of soils; the soil as a medium for 
plant growth. Messrs. Lutz, Colwell. 

- . Fertilizers. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Soils 201. 

Required of juniors in Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Field Crops, 
Floriculture, and Vocational Agricul: 

Sources, manufacture and characteristics of fertilizer materials; manufac- 
ture and evaluation of mixed fertilizers; factors affecting the choice and 
utilisation of fertilizers; time and methods of application. Mr. Collins. 



[Soils] 307 

Soils 303. Soil Management. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 302. 

Rotations, fertilizer recommendations, and other practical soil manage- 
ment problems for North Carolina soils and cropping systems. 

Mr. Lutz. 



Soils 312. The Soils of North Carolina. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Soils 201. Required of juniors in Soils and Floriculture 
and of seniors in Wildlife Conservation, Vegetable Gardening, and Agricul- 
tural Economics (Farm Business Option). 

The origin, characteristics, and classification of North Carolina soils; 
field trips. Mr. Lee. 



Courses for Graduates aftid Advanced Undergraduates 

Soils 401. Soil Development. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Soils 303, 312. 

Genesis, morphology, and development of the great soil groups of the 
world. Mr. Lutz. 



Soils 421. Soil Fertility Evaluating Methods. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites: Soils 302 and Chem. 213. 

Analysis for total and available elements in the soil; the use of soil and 
plant analyses in soil diagnosis. Mr. Piland. 

Soils 433. Soil Conservation and Land Use. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 201. 

Required of seniors in Soils and in Agricultural Engineering. 
Factors affecting soil deterioration; soil conservation and land use. 

Mr. Lutz. 



Soils 443. Soil Microbiology. 0-0-3 

See Botany 443. 

Staff. 



Soils 463. Advanced Soil Fertility. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Soils 302. 

Soil conditions affecting crop growth; the chemistry of soil and plant 
interrelationships; theoretical and applied aspects of fertilizer usage in 
relation to plant nutrition. Mr. Cummings. 



308 [Soils] 

Soils 491, 492, 493. Special Problems. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Admitted only with consent of the instructor. 
Problems involving special library, laboratory or field studies of soils. 

Staff. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Soils 502. Advanced Fertilizers. 0-2-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Recent trends in the manufacture, characteristics and utilization of 
fertilizers; new developments in fertilizer experimentation. Offered in alter- 
nate years. Mr. Collins. 



Soils 512. Physical and Colloidal Chemistry of Soils. 0-5-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

The origin and nature of inorganic and organic soil colloids; their be- 
havior with respect to soil acidity, base exchange, absorption; and plant 
nutrition. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Colwell. 



Soils 522. Soil Physics. 0-5-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Physical constitution of soils, mechanical analysis, consistency and plas- 
ticity, structure, water relations, soil air and temperature. Offered in alter- 
nate years. Messrs. Cummings, Lutz. 



Soils 531, 532, 533. Seminar. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 
Reports and discussions of problems in Soil Science. Staff. 



Soils 541, 542, 543. Soil Research- 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 
Research in specialized phases of Soil Science. By arrangement. Staff. 



[Textiles] 309 
TEXTILES 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Tex. 101, 102, 103. Textile Principles Laboratory. 1-1-1 

Required of freshmen in all Textile curricula. 

Operation of plain and automatic looms, and carding and spinning 
machines. Messrs. Moser, Culberson. 



Tex. 105. Yarn Calculations. 1-0-0 

Required of freshmen in all Textile curricula. 

Calculations for gears, pulleys, and machine speeds; systems of numbering 
yarns, and elementary yarn calculations. Mr. Grover. 



Tex. 131. Cloth Calculations. 0-0-2 

Required of freshmen in all Textile curricula. 
Harness, reed and fabric calculations; loom production problems. 

Mr. Moser. 



Tex. 205. Yarn Manufacture I. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

and 

Tex. 201, 202. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory I. 1-1-0 or 0-1-1 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Mixing of cotton; description and setting of openers, pickers, cards and 
draw frames; production, speed and draft calculations; operation and 
fixing of machines; grinding and setting of cards; setting of draw frame 
rolls and construction of draw frames; weighting of rolls and types of roll 
covering. Messrs. Hilton, Culberson. 



Tex. 211. Knitting I. 2-0-0 or 0-0-2 

and 

Tex. 207, 208, 209. Knitting Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Selection and preparation of knitting yarns, knitting mechanisms, plain 
and rib knitting machines, circular ribbers, and circular automatic ma- 
chines; operation of machines, practical experiments, hosiery analysis, 
topping, transferring, and looping. Mr. Lewis. 



310 [Textiles] 

Tex. 234. Power Weaving. 0-2-0 

and 

Tex. 231, 232. Power Weaving Laboratory. 1-1-0 or 0-1-1 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Construction of auxiliary motions on plain looms; cams and their con- 
struction; drop-box loom construction; methods of pattern chain building; 
construction and value of pattern multipliers; timing of drop-box motion, 
and other motions. 

Operation and fixing of plain, automatic and drop-box looms; pattern 
chain building for drop-box looms. Messrs. Nelson, Moser. 



Tex. 235, 236. Fabric Structure and Analysis. 2-2-0 or 0-2-2 

Required of sophomores in all Textile curricula. 

Systems of numbering woolen, worsted, silk, linen, rayon, and cotton 
yarn; plain, twill, and sateen weaves; ornamentation of plain weaves; 
wave designs; pointed twills; diamond effects; plain and fancy basket 
weaves; warp and filling rib weaves. 

Analyzing plain, twill, sateen, and other fabrics made from simple 
weaves, ascertaining the number of ends and picks per inch in sample; 
fabric analvsis calculations. Messrs. Lewis, Moser. 



Tex. 239. Principles of Textile Manufacturing I. 3-0-0 

A study of the processes and machines used in textile manufacture, 
planned as an overview course for those preparing to be teachers of indus- 
trial arts in junior and senior high schools or in vocational schools. 

Messrs. Nelson, Hilton. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Tex. 304. Yarn Manufacture II. 0-3-0 

and 

Tex. 301, 302, 303. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory II. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture I, Tex. 201, 202, 205. 
Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. 



[Textiles] 311 

Tex. 310, 311. Yarn Manufacture III. 0-8-3 

and 

Tex. 307, 308, 309. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory III. 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture I, Tex. 201, 202, 205. 

Required of juniors in Yarn Manufacture. 

Construction of sliver lappers; ribbon lappers; combers; mechanical and 
electrical stop motions; description and setting of the different parts; care 
of machines; fly-frame builder and differential motions. 

Operation and fixing of sliver lappers; ribbon lappers; combers and fly- 
frames; changing of hank roving, draft and twist; setting of drafting 
and speeder motions. Messrs. Hilton, Culberson. 



Tex. 316. Knitting II. 0-3-0 

and 

Tex. 313, 314, 315. Knitting Laboratory II. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Knitting I, Tex. 207, 208, 209, 211. 

Elective for Textile Students. 

Advanced circular mechanisms; hosiery design; auxiliary knitting ma- 
chinery; warp and spring needle knitting; knitting machinery lay-out and 
organization. Production control and costs. Laboratory experiments. 

Mr. Lewis. 



Tex. 335. Dobby Weaving. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

and 

Tex. 331, 332, 333. Dobby Weaving Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing and Yarn Manufacturing. 
Elective for others. 

Mr. Hart. 



Tex. 337, 338, 339. Dobby Weaving Laboratory II. 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: Power Weaving, Tex. 231, 232, 234. 

Required of juniors in Weaving and Designing. 

Methods of drawing in and starting up cotton and rayon warps; setting 
of harness shafts; selection of springs or spring jacks. Construction and 
methods of fixing single and double index dobbies; methods of pattern- 
chain building. 

Preparation of warps for weaving cotton and rayon fabrics on dobby 
looms; starting up warps in looms; fixing single and double index dobbies; 
pattern-chain building; operation of dobby looms. Messrs. Nelson, Hart. 



312 [Textiles] 

Tex. 341, 342. Fabric Design and Analysis I. 3-3-0 or 0-3-3 

Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 235, 236. 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing and Weaving and Design- 
ing. Elective for others. 

Construction of fancy weaves, such as broken twills, curved twills, en- 
twining twills; granite weaves; imitation leno; honeycomb weaves; fabrics 
backed with warp or filling; fabrics ornamented with extra warp or filling; 
combining weaves together to produce new patterns. 

Analyzing samples of fancy fabrics for design, drawing in draft, reed, 
and chain plan; calculating particulars to reproduce fabrics from data 
obtained from sample. Mr. Shinn. 



Tex. 343. Fabric Testing. 0-0-1 

Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 235, 236. 
Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing, Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing, and Weaving and Designing. 

Testing fabrics for strength; effect of heat upon fabrics; effect of regain 

upon tensile strength, elasticity of fabrics; micrometer and calculated tests 

for fabric thickness. Mr. Grover. 



Tex. 344. Calculating Fabric Costs. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 235, 236. 
Elective for Textile students. 

Special attention is given to distribution of costs to various productive 
processes, summarizing costs, the determination and use of unit costs, and 
the making of cost reports. Mr. Shinn. 



Tex. 345. Textile Calculations I. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 235, 236. 
Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing and Weaving and Design- 
ing. Elective for others. 

An intensive course in calculations for designing, weaving, and analyzing 
cotton, rayon, silk, wool, worsted and linen yarns and fabrics; weight of 
fabrics, ends and picks per inch; costing of fabrics; reed and harness 
calculations; loom speed and production. Mr. Hart. 



Tex. 347. Principles of Textile Manufacturing II. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Principles of Textile Manufacturing I, Tex. 239. 
A study of the operation and care of textile machines, planned for those 
who are preparing to be teachers in vocational schools. 

Messrs. Nelson, Hilton. 



[Textiles] 313 

Tex. 375. Dyeing I. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

and 
Tex. 371, 372, 373. Dyeing Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 103. 

Required of juniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. 

Physical and chemical properties of textile fibres; chemicals used in pre- 
paring fibres for dyeing; methods of applying substantive, sulphur, basic, 
developed, acid, acid chrome, mordant and vat dyes; effect of changes in 
temperature and volume of the dye bath; theory of dyeing mixed fabrics 
theory of mercerizing; tests for the chemical constituents of the fibres; 
dyeing experiments using all the different classes of dyes on the various 
fibres ; tests showing effect of varying such factors as bath, temperature and 
time; test for fastness to light, washing, cross-dyeing, and so forth; mer- 
cerizing experiment. Messrs. Grimshaw, Hayes. 



Tex. 381, 382. Dyeing II. 3-3-0 

and 
Tex. 377, 378, 379. Dyeing Laboratory II. 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 103. 

Required of juniors in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Physical and chemical properties of textile fibres; lectures on wool, silk, 
rayon, and cotton; hydrometers and chemicals used in dyeing and finishing; 
application of dyestuff s to different fibres ; effect of changing bath, tempera- 
ture, or time factor; money value and strength tests of dyes; theory of 
dyeing mixed fabrics; mercerizing. 

Microscopic examination of textile fibres ; dyeing experiments using differ- 
ent classes of dyes on textile fibres; tests showing the effects of varying 
such factors as bath, temperature, and time; fastness to light, washing, 
and cross dyeing; money value and strength of various dyes; mercerizing. 

Messrs. Grimshaw, Hayes. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Tex. 405. Yarn Manufacture IV. 3-0-0 or 0-0-3 

and 

Tex. 401, 402, 403. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory IV. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture, Tex. 301, 302, 303, 304. 
Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. 

Messrs. Hilton and Culberson. 



314 [Textiles] 

Tex. 411, 412. Yarn Manufacture V. 3-3-0 

and 

Tex. 407, 40S. 409. Yarn Manufacture Laboratory V. 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture, Tex. 307, 308, 309, 310, 311. 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing. 

Spinning; spooling; warping; twisting; description and setting of dif- 
ferent parts; builder motions for warp and filling; bobbin holders, thread 
guides, traverse motions; ply yarns; calculations for twist, speed, and 
production. 

Practical methods of spinning, warping, spooling, winding and twisting; 
setting of spinning rolls, spinning frame builder motions for warp, filling, 
and combination build; the practical application of all machines in Yarn 
Manufacture. Messrs. Hilton, Culberson. 

Tex. 413. Textile Calculations II. 3-0-0 

Prerequisites : Yarn Manufacture II or III, Tex. 304 or 310, 311. 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing. Elective for others. 

Principles underlying the calculation of draft, twist, speed, and produc- 
tion; systems of numbering yarns; doubling and twisting yarns; lay, tension, 
differential, and cone drum calculations; practice in solving practical mill 
problems. Mr. Hilton. 

Tex. 415. Manufacturing Problems. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture II or III, Tex. 304 or 310, 311. 
Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing. Elective for others. 
Mill organization and administration; machine layout for long and regu- 
lar draft spinning; production control and costs; making of novelty yarns; 
making of daily and weekly reports ; breaking of single and ply yarns ; regu- 
lar and reverse twisted yarns. Mr. Hilton. 

Tex. 416. Wool Manufacture I. 0-3-0 

and 

Tex. 417. 418. Wool Manufacture Laboratory I. 1-1-0 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture II or III, Tex. 304, or Tex. 310, 311. 
Elective for seniors in Textile School. 

Physical and chemical properties; reclaimed wool and secondary raw 
materials; grading; sorting; mixing and blending; oiling and garnetting; 
description of feeders; cards; tape condensers; card setting; stripping and 
grinding; wcolen spinning; twister head; mechanical details and produc- 
tion; the practical application of machines in Woolen Yarn Manufacture. 

Mr. Hilton. 



[Textiles] 315 

Tex. 420. Cotton Quality I. 3-0-0 

History, development, production, ginning, and handling of cotton. World 
crops; marketing methods; classification; relation of grade and staple to 
value of cotton. Mr. Campbell. 



Tex. 421. Cotton Quality II. 0-3-0 

Laboratory measurement of the physical properties of cotton fibers; dif- 
ferences among varieties; relation of fiber properties to spinning quality; 
relation of grade and staple to waste, spinning behavior, and yarn quality. 
Selection of cotton for different types of yarns and fabrics. 

Mr. Campbell. 



Tex. 435. Cotton, Wool and Rayon Weaving. 0-0-3 

and 

Tex. 431, 432. Cotton, Wool and Rayon Weaving Laboratory I. 1-1-0 

Prerequisites : Dobby Weaving, Tex. 331, 332, 333, 335. 
Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. 

Messrs. Nelson, Hart. 



Tex. 437, 438, 439. Cotton, Wool and Rayon Weaving Laboratory II. 2-2-1 

Prerequisites: Dobby Weaving, Tex. 335, 337, 338, 339. 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing. 

Principles of loom construction to weave rayon and fine cotton fabrics; 
pick and pick looms; box and multiplier chain-building; arrangement of 
colors in boxes to give easy running loom; extra appliances for weaving 
leno, towel, and other pile fabrics; construction and operation of single, 
double lift, and rise and fall jacquards; tie-up of harness for dress goods, 
table napkins, damask, and other jacquard fabrics, such as leno; relative 
speed of looms; production calculations and fabric costs. 

Operation and fixing of dobby, pick and pick, and jacquard looms; 
preparation of warps to weave rayon, wool and fine cotton fabrics; building 
of box, dobby, and multiplier chains. Messrs. Nelson, Hart. 



Tex. 441. Leno Design. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342. 
Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and in Weaving and 

Designing. Elective for others. 

Leno weaves with one, two, or more sets of doups; combination of plain 

and fancy weaves with leno; methods of obtaining leno patterns; methods 

of making original designs for dress goods, draperies. 

Messrs. Nelson, Shinn. 



316 [Textiles] 

Tex. 443. Dobby Design. 3-0-0 or 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342. 
Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and in Weaving and 

Designing. Elective for others. 

Designing fabrics, such as fancy crepes, figured double plain, matelasse, 

velvets, corduroys, pique, lines of samples. Mr. Nelson. 



Tex. 445. Jacquard Design. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342. 
Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and juniors in Weaving and 

Designing. Elective for others. 

Designing fancy and jacquard fabrics; methods of making original 

designs for table napkins, table covers, dress goods, draperies. 

Messrs. Nelson, Shinn. 



Tex. 447, 448, 449. Jacquard Design Laboratory. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Jacquard Design, Tex. 445. 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing. 

Designing fancy and jacquard fabrics; methods of making original de- 
signs by combinations of color, weave, and sketches; designs for table 
napkins, table covers, dress goods, draperies. Messrs. Nelson, Shinn. 



Tex. 451, 452. Fabric Analysis. 2-2-0 

Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Analysis, Tex. 341, 342. 
Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing and Weaving and Design- 
ing. Elective for others. 

Analyzing samples of cotton, wool, worsted, linen, rayon, and silk fabrics 
for size of yarns, ends and picks per inch, weight of warp and filling, so as 
to accurately reproduce samples analyzed; obtaining design, drawing in 
draft, chain, and reed plan for fancy fabrics, such as stripes, checks, extra 
warp and extra filling figures, leno fabrics, jacquard fabrics, draperies. 

Messrs. Nelson, Shinn. 



Tex. 453. Fabric Design and Analysis II. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Fabric Design and Analysis I, Tex. 341, 342. 
Design and analysis of fancy fabrics ; making fabrics from sketches and 

specifications. Mr. Shinn. 



[Textiles] 317 

Tex. 455, 456. Color in Woven Design. 3-3-0 

Prerequisites: Fabric Structure and Analysis, Tex. 236, 237. 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing. Elective for others. 

Pigment and light theories of color; contrast and harmony of color; 
factors which influence quality, style, and color; methods of applying 
weaves and color to fabrics for wearing apparel and home decorations. 

Mr. Hart. 



Tex. 457, 458, 459. Textile Testing. 1-1-1 

Prerequisite: Fabric Testing, Tex. 343 or equivalent. 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing. 

Tests for moisture content, regain, twist, and tensile strength; description 
and operation of testing equipment; solution and written reports of assigned 
textile problems. Mr. Grover. 



Tex. 474. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing I. 0-3-0 

and 

Tex. 471, 472, 473. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing Laboratory I. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Dyeing I, Tex. 371, 372, 373, 375. 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. 

Lectures on color mixing, money value of dyes; testing of dyes, water, 
starch, and materials used in sizing; lubricating oils and oil compounds; 
processes and machinery used in dyeing and finishing; textile printing; 
apparatus used in research laboratory. 

Color matching; testing dyes for strength and money value; physical 
and chemical examination and application of starches, sizing materials and 
finishing compounds; examination of textile oils, soap, and all the different 
rayons; analysis of mixed fabrics. Messrs. Grimshaw, Hayes. 



Tex. 475. Textile Microscopy I. 0-0-1 

Prerequisites: Dyeing I or II, Tex. 375 or 381, 382. 

Required of seniors in Textile Manufacturing. Elective for others. 

Instruction in the use of the microscope; examination of fibres; prepara- 
tion of permanent slides. Messrs. Grimshaw, Hayes. 



318 [Textiles] 

Tex. 480, 481. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing II. 0-3-3 

and 

Tex. 477. 475. 479. Cotton and Rayon Dyeing Laboratory II. 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: Dyeing II. Tex. 377, 378, 279, 381. 382. 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry ar.d Dyeing. 

Theories of color matching; lectures on color mixing, water and mold, 
standi, materials used in sizing; lubricating oils, textile oils and oil com- 
pounds; processes and machinery used in dyeing and finishing; method 
of analyzing textile fabrics; laboratory equipment used in textile research 
and testing laboratories. 

Color matching; physical ar.d chemical examination and application of 
textile oils, soaps, and finishing compounds; microscopic and chemical 
tests on rayons; dyeing various types of rayon; operation of dyeing and 
finishing equipment in the dye house and research laboratories. 

Mr. Grimshaw. 



Tex. 457. Textile Printing. 3-0-0 

and 

Tex. 453. 454. 453. Textile Printing Laboratory. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Dyeing II, Tex. 381, 382. 

The history of printing and the development of machinery used; calico 
printing and the mordant, basic, and vat colors, analine black, indigo, and 
insoluble azo colors; resist ar.d discharge styles. 

Paste mixi ng; practical experiments. Messrs. Grimshaw, Hayes. 

Tex. 459. 490. Textile Microscopy II. 1-1-0 

Prerequisites: Dyeing I or II. Tex. 375 or 381, 352. 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. Elective for others. 
Instruction in the use of the microscope: examination of fibres; prepara- 
tion of permanent slides. Messrs. Grimshaw. Hayes. 

Tex. 493. Principles of Fabric Finishing. 0-0-3 

and 

Tex. 491. 492. 493. Principles of Fabric Finishing Laboratory. 1-1-1 

Prerequisites: Dyeing II, Tex. 371. 372. 

Elective for Textile students. 

A study of machinery used in finishing of textile fabrics and in textile 
printing, with lectures and pictures; lectures on materials used in the 
textile finishing and printing industry and experiments. Mr. Grimshaw. 



[Textiles] 319 
Courses for Graduates Only 
Tex. 501, 502, 503. Yarn Manufacture. 3.3.3 

Prerequisites: Yarn Manufacture IV, Tex. 405 or equivalent. 

A study of breaking strength and related properties of cotton yarns 
made under various atmospheric conditions; comparison of yarns produced 
from long and short-staple cotton with regular and special carding pro- 
cesses; efficiency of various roller covering materials at the drawing pro- 
cesses; elimination of roving processes by special methods of preparation; 
comparison of regular and long-draft spinning. Messrs. Grover, Hilton. 



Tex. 505, 506, 507. Textile Research. 3.3.3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

A study of the moisture content of cotton yarns and fabrics; the con- 
volutions in cotton fibres and their relation to spinning, weaving, and 
dyeing; the effect of mercerization on cotton yarns and fabrics; testing 
yarns and fabrics under variable conditions for breaking strength and 
elasticity. Textile Staff. 



Tex. 531, 532, 533. Textile Design and Weaving. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Leno, Dobby and Jacquard Design, Tex. 441, 443, 445 or 
equivalent. 

Study and practice in more advanced designing and analysis of fabrics, 
such as lenos made with twine and wire doups, lappits, and other fancy 
fabrics; designing for jacquard dress goods, table covers, reversibles, and 
other fabrics; making original designs for dobby and jacquard fabrics; 
fabric costs; weaving fancy and jacquard fabrics. 

Messrs. Nelson, Hart, Shinn. 



Tex. 535, 536, 537. Seminar. !_!_! 

Discussion of scientific articles of interest to textile industry; review 
and discussion of student papers and research problems. Textile Staff. 



Tex. 571, 572, 573. Textile Dyeing. 3.3.3 

Prerequisites: C. & R. Dyeing I, Tex. 474 or equivalent. 

The course consists of matching shades from standard and season color 
cards upon classes of materials which require skill in their dyeing, such as 
three-fibre, cotton-wool, and half-silk hosiery, woolens and worsteds with 
effect stripes, and cotton fabrics with woven figures or stripes of the dif- 
ferent varieties of rayon; advanced work on chemical and microscopical 
examination of materials used in dyeing and finishing. Mr. Grimshaw. 



320' [Zoology] 

Tex. 575. Advanced Textile Microscopy. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Textile Microscopy, Tex. 489, 490. 

Microscopic study of textile starches, fibres, fabrics, oils, etc.; study of 
mounting media for above; methods of mounting textile materials; methods 
of cross -sectioning textile materials; photomicrography. Mr. Grimshaw. 



ZOOLOGY 
Courses for Undergraduates 

Zool. 101. General Zoology. 4-0-0 

Required of freshmen in General Agriculture, Agricultural Education, 

Forestry, Wildlife Conservation, and of juniors in Agricultural Engineering. 
Animals with special reference to the morphology and physiology of 

vertebrates. Messrs. Kulash, Mitchell, McCutcheon, Stevens, Wing. 



Zool. 102. Economic Zoology. 0-4-0 

Required of freshmen in Forestry and Wildlife Conservation; of sopho- 
mores in General Agriculture, Agricultural Education, and in Agricultural 
Chemistry; of juniors in Landscape Architecture. 

Animals with special reference to the more important economic groups; 
designed to give the student a general knowledge of the animal kingdom. 

Messrs. Kulash, Mitchell, Stevens. 



Zool. 111. Elementary Wildlife Management. 1-0-0 

Required of freshmen in Wildlife Conservation. 

An introductory survey of the field of wildlife management. 

Mr. Stevens. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 202. Animal Physiology. 0-5-0 or 0-0-5 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, Phys. 115, Chem. 101, 102, and 103. Alternate 
for sophomores in General Agriculture, Agricultural Education and Agri- 
cultural Chemistry; required of juniors in Wildlife Conservation. 

Comparative physiology of vertebrates, with particular reference to 
mammals and man. Detailed studies of various functions, with metabolism 
emphasized. Mr. McCutcheon. 



[Zoology] 321 

Zool. 213. Economic Entomology. 0-0-4 

Prerequisite: Zool. 102. 

Required of freshmen in Forestry; juniors in Wildlife Conservation, 
Landscape Architecture, Agricultural Education, Vegetable Gardening, 
Pomology, Plant Pathology and Floriculture. 

The insects, including their economic importance and the principles 
of control. Messrs. Mitchell, Wing, Kulash. 



*Zool. 222, 223. Comparative Anatomy. 0-4-4 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, 102. 

Required of sophomores in Wildlife Conservation; of juniors in Ento- 
mology. 

Comparative morphology of vertebrates. Interrelations of organ systems 
studied for the various groups. Mr. Harkema. 



Zool. 241, 243. Beekeeping. 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 102. 

Required of seniors in Entomology. 

Scientific beekeeping and honey marketing. Mr. Stevens. 



Zool. 251, 252, 253. Ornithology. 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, 102. 

Required of sophomores in Wildlife Conservation. 
Biology and morphology of North American birds. Mr. Metcalf. 



Zool. 302. Forest Entomology. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 213. 

Required of juniors in Forestry. 

Forest insects, including the factors governing abundance, and the appli- 
cation of this knowledge in control. Mr. Kulash. 



Zool. 312. Principles of Game Management. 0-3-0 or 0-0-3 

Elective for juniors and seniors not in Game Management. 
Brief survey of the field, study of the major principles involved, and the 

correlation of wildlife management with other land uses. Mr. Stevens. 



* Not offered in 1945-46. 



322 [Zoology] 

Zool. 321, 322, 323. Wildlife Conservation. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Zool. 251, 252, 253, F. C. 202, Bot. 101, 102, 203. 

Required of juniors in Wildlife Conservation and Management. 

History of game and wildlife management; relation of wildlife conser- 
vation to soil and forest conservation; national and state parks; general 
farming operations. Mr. Stevens. 



Zool. 332. Fur Resources. 0-3-0 

Prerequisites: Zool. 321, 322, 323. 

Elective for juniors and seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 

Life history and management of the important fur -bearing animals; 
skinning, drying, marketing pelts; fur farming. Mr. Stevens. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 401, 402, 403. Applied Entomology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Zool. 213. 

Required of seniors in Entomology. 

Crop and animal pests with emphasis on their identification; general 
principles of insect control and special study of contact insecticides, stomach 
poisons and fumigants; insecticide research methods. Mr. Fulton. 



Zool. 411. Genetics. 4-0-0 

Prerequisite: Bot. 102 or Zool. 101. 

Required of juniors in Animal Production, Entomology, Field Crops, 
Floriculture, Pomology, Poultry Science, and Vegetable Gardening; of 
seniors in Plant Pathology. 

Basic principles of heredity and variation. Students conduct breeding 
experiments and study inheritance in various animals and plants. 

Mr. Bostian. 



Zool. 412. Advanced Genetics. 0-4-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 411. 

Elective for juniors, seniors, and graduates. 

Intended for students desiring more thorough and detailed training in 
fundamental genetics than provided by Zool. 411, with some attention to 
recent advances. Mr. Bostian. 



[Zoology] 323 

Zool. 413. Advanced Physiology. 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, 102, 202. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Special studies in animal physiology with emphasis on fundamental pro- 
cesses involved. Lectures, reports, and conferences to promote an acquaint- 
ance with general literature and recent advances; selected exercises and 
demonstrations to develop experimental technique. Mr. McCutcheon. 



Zool. 421, 422, 423. Systematic Zoology. 3.3.3 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, 102. 
Required of juniors in Entomology. 
The classification of insects or other groups of animals. 

Messrs. Metcalf, Mitchell. 

Zool. 433. Field Zoology. 0-0-4 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101 and 213, or 222, 223. 

Required of juniors in Wildlife Conservation and seniors iu Entomology. 

The relation between animals and their environment. Frequent excursions 
to the field will be taken. Messrs. Bostian, Wing. 

*Zool. 441, 442, 443. Microtechnic and Histology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, 102, 202, 222, 223. 
Required of seniors in Entomology. 
Animal tissues and their preparation. Mr. Harkema. 



Zool. 451, 452, 453. Wildlife Management. 3.3.3 

Prerequisites: Zool. 321, 322, 323. 

Required of seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 

Foods and feeding habits of the more important groups of wild animals; 
field and laboratory studies of wildlife management and research; the 
economic relations of game, predatory, and fur-bearing animals. 

Mr. Stevens. 

Zool. 461. Vertebrate Embryology. 5-0-0 

Prerequisites: Zool. 101, 102. 

Required of juniors in Poultry Science, and seniors in Entomology. 

The comparative embryology of the principal groups of vertebrates, with 
special emphasis on the chick. Mr. Harkema. 

• Will not be given in 1945-46. 



324 [Zoology] 

ZooL 462, 463. Advanced Animal Ecology. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 433. 

Required of seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 

Animal geography and the factors which influence the distribution of 
animals. Mr. Metcalf. 



Zool. 471, 472, 473. Advanced Wildlife Management. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Concurrently with or preceded by Zool. 321, 322, 323. 
Elective for seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 
An assigned problem to be planned and worked out by the student. A 

term paper covering the procedure. Mr. Stevens. 



Zool. 481, 482, 483. Advanced Food Habits Problems. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Concurrently with or preceded by Zool. 451, 452, 453. 
Elective for seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 
Assigned or selected problem dealing with the foods and feeding habits 

of one species of wild animal or a group of similar wild animals. 

Mr. Stevens. 



*Zool. 492, 493. Parasitology. 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 101, 102, 222, 223. 
Required of seniors in Wildlife Conservation. 
Structures, life-cycles, pathogenicity and control of animal parasites. 

Mr. Harkema. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Zool. 501, 502, 503. Systematic Entomology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 421, 422, 423. 

Codes of nomenclature, methods of writing descriptions, constructing 
keys, determining priority, selecting and preserving types, and making 
bibliographies and indexes. Messrs. Metcalf, Mitchell. 



Zool. 511, 512, 513, and ZooL 551, 552, 553. Research in Zoology. 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: eighteen term credits in Zoology. 

Problems in development, life history, morphology, physiology, ecology, 
genetics, game management, taxonomy, or parasitology. 

Messrs. Metcalf, Mitchell, Bostian, McCutcheon, Harkema, Stevens. 



• Will not be tfven in 1&45-46. 



[Zoology] 325 

Zool. 521, 522, 523. Seminar. 1_1_1 

Prerequisite: eighteen term credits in Zoology. Mr. Metcalf . 



Zool. 531, 532. Biological Control of Insects. 3-0-0 

Diseases, predators and parasites of insects; methods of rearing and dis- 
seminating for biological control. Messrs. Fulton, Smith. 



Zool. 533. Advanced Genetics. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 411, 412. 

Special topics and recent advances, accomplished by lectures, references, 
conferences, and reports by students, each selecting one or more topics for 
special study. Mr. Bostian. 



Zool. 541, 542. Insect Physiology. 3-3-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 202. 

Mechanisms involved in the life processes of insects. Mr. McCutcheon. 



Zool. 543. Fruit Insects. 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: Zool. 213 or equivalent. 

The economic importance of insects attacking fruit or fruit trees; their 
characteristics, habits, ecology, and biology; with most practical control 
measures. Mr. Smith. 



Zool. 551, 552, 553. Research in Zoology. 3-3-3 

See Zool. 511, 512, 513. Staff. 



Zool. 561, 562, 563. Insect Biology. 3-3-3 

Life histories, including modes of reproduction, embryology, growth, met- 
amorphosis, protection, food relations, hibernation, social relations, and 
adaptations. Mr. Mitchell, 



326 [Zoology] 

ZooL 571, 572, 573. Insect Ecology and BehaYior. 3-3-3 

Natural activities of insects: feeding, protection, reproduction, reaction 
to environmental factors, interrelations, and distribution. Mr. Fulton. 



Zool. 581, 582, 583. Insect Morphology. 3-3-3 

The external and internal anatomy of insects and their near relatives. 

Mr. Metcalf . 



Zool. 591. Immature Insects. 0-3-0 

Prerequisite: Zool. 102 and 213 or equivalent. 
Methods of collecting, preserving and determining immature insects. 

Mr. Smith. 



V. SUMMARY OP ENROLLMENT 

1944-45* 

1. Resident Students 

A. Candidates for Degrees 

1. Freshmen 614 

2. Sophomores 141 

3. Juniors 47 

4. Seniors 45 

6. Graduates 46 

Total 893 

B. Irregular Students 

f 1. Extension Classes in Raleigh and Cary 100 

2. Special Students and Auditors 5 

3. Pratt and Whitney Fellows 9 

Total 114 1,007 

f 2. Nonresident Students 

A. Correspondence Students for College Credit 379 

B. Correspondence Students in Practical Courses, 

no credit 28 

Total 407 1,414 

3. Summer School Students, 1944 

A. Regular Students (twelve weeks term) 258 

B. Pratt & Whitney Fellows 9 

C. Special Students and Auditors 4 

Total 271 1,685 

4. Short Courses and Special Conferences 

1. Engineering, Science and Management War 
Training Courses 1,480 

2. Vocational Training for War Production 

Workers 321 

3. Institute for Surveyors 53 

4. Waterworks School 41 

5. Mid-Southeastern Gas Association 100 

Total 1,995 

Grand Total 3,680 

* Does not include Spring Term, 1944-45. 

t Data from January 1, 1944, to January 1, 1945. 



328 



State College Catalog 



ENROLLMENT 
Basic Division 

(Freshmen and Sophomores) 

Agriculture 105 

Engineering 528 

Teacher Education 39 

Textiles 83 



BY CURRICULA 

Division of Teacher Education 

(Juniors, Seniors, Graduates) 

Agricultural Education 1 

Industrial Arts Education ... 1 
Occup. Inf. and Guidance ... 6 

Total 8 



Total 755 

School of 
Agriculture and Forestry 

(Juniors, Seniors, Graduates) 

Agricultural Options 37 

Agricultural Chemistry 13 

Forestry 1 



Total 



51 



School of Engineering 

(Juniors, Seniors, Graduates) 

Aeronautical 9 

Architectural 1 

Architecture 1 

Chemical 12 



Civil .... 

Electrical 

General 

Geological 

Industrial 



School of Textiles 

(Juniors, Seniors, Graduates) 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 3 

Textile Management 5 

Textile Manufacturing 8 

Weaving and Designing 7 



Total 



Nonclassified Auditors and 

Special Students 

Pratt and Whitney Fellows 



23 



Distribution of Graduate students 
by schools (included in above de- 
partmental classifications. 



Mechanical 16 



Agriculture 

Engineering 

Teacher Education 
Textiles 



37 
3 
4 
2 



Total 56 



Total 



46 



FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 

MAY 29, 1944 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 

Bachelor of Science 

In Agricultural Chemistry 

Henry Frederick Grady Seven Springs 

In Agronomy (Field Crops) 

*Douglas Scales Chamblee Zebulon 

James Arthur Grose, Jr Forest City 

Joseph Linward Perry Cofield 

Herbert Norris Robertson Knightdale 

Robert Boyd Robinson, Jr Littleton 

In Animal Production 

Bruce Bernard Blackmon Buies Creek 

In Farm Marketing and Farm Finance 

Eustace Ovid Coor, Jr Selma 

In Floriculture 

Alpheus Myron Pratt Draper 

In Forestry 

Morris Green New York, N. Y. 

Harold Woodrow Hinshaw Winston-Salem 

*Robert Allan Holcombe Teaneck, N. J. 

In Poultry Science 

Benjamin Earl Britt Garner 

In Vegetable Gardening 

Ervin Trowbridge Bullard Central VaUey, N. Y. 

In Wildlife Conservation and Management 

William Madison Lewis Faison 

Charles Scott Sullivan Asheville 



• With Honors. 



330 State College Catalog 

school of engineering 

Bachelor of Aeronautical Engineering 

Edward Andrew Adams Raleigh 

Roderick Mclver Allen, Jr Raleigh 

William Whitehead Avera Rocky Mount 

* Joshua Reese Bailey Rocky Mount 

*Joseph Williams Bazemore Mount Olive 

Kenneth Wayland Goodson Salisbury 

**Benjamin Wayne Greene Elizabethtown 

Henry Joseph Jaworski Rochester, N. Y. 

George Nevitt Jones, Jr Raleigh 

Charles Haywood McLemore Godwin 

Charles John Paulus, III Yeadon, Pa. 

Samuel Gordon West, Jr Greensboro 

Bachelor of Architectural Engineering 

Robert Anderson Atkinson, Jr Winston-Salem 

Bachelor of Ceramic Engineering 

Emory Huston Creasman, Jr. Swannanoa 

Augusto Lopez Sevilla Manila, Philippines 

Edward Lester Woodall, Jr Smithfield 

Bachelor of Chemical Engineering 

William Wilton Barnhardt Winston-Salem 

**John Knox Beasley Louisburg 

Raul Carvalho Swannanoa 

Harvey Darrell Davis Marshallberg 

Albert Edgar Gibson, Jr Greenville 

William Jackson Goodrum Greenville 

Fred Edward Gorter Enka 

Hartwell Lamar Graham, Jr. Goldsboro 

John Lovell Hall Cary 

William John Hecht. Jr Norlina 

Henry Russell Jobe Burlington 

Joseph Henry Jones, Jr. Jersey City, N. J. 

Brian Franklin Lewis Hickory 

William Marcellino New Bedford, Mass. 

Stanley Hancock Patten Louisburg 

Buford Wright Penland Asheville 

Thomas Bernard Pratt, Jr Winston-Salem 

John Nicholson Rennie Whitakers 



• With Honors. 
•• With High Honors. 



Degrees Conferred 331 

**Beverly Leak Rose Wadesboro 

James Wilson Setzer Maiden 

Abner Thomas Stewart Washington 

♦Harold Lee Trentham Mars Hill 

♦Samuel Clyde Vaughn, Jr Charlotte 

Robert Edward Weaver Asheville 

Bachelor of Civil Engineering 

Floyd Powell Barnes Henderson 

James Aloysius Heffernan New York, N. Y. 

Frederick Byron Hendricks, Jr Charlotte 

James Brantley Lambeth High Point 

Bachelor of Civil Engineering, 
Sanitary Option 

James Fredrick Kelly Rowland 

Bachelor of Electrical Engineering 

Theodore Bloom Bridgeport, Conn. 

Everett Litchfield Carty Durham 

William Thomas Dickinson Wilson 

Archibald Bernard Goodson Mount Olive 

Charles Query Lemmond Monroe 

*Linwood Dawson Lewis Macclesfield 

Walter Asbury Miller Concord 

Charles Wyche Parker Salisbury 

L. E. Paysour, Jr Mooresville 

George Richard Steele Charlotte 

William Dawes Van Arsdale East Orange, N. J. 

Bachelor of Science in General Engineering 

**Edwin Dexter Cox Charlotte 

Paul Felix Hilton New York, N. Y. 

Archie Knight Robertson, Jr Goldsboro 

Henry Jerome Stockard, Jr Raleigh 

Bachelor of Industrial Engineering 

William Donaldson Barksdale Bluefield, W. Va. 

Edward Peter Breuer Greensboro 

George Thomas Dixon Elm City 

Jesse Wyatt Ethridge Goldsboro 

William Blanton Noyes Marion 



• With Honors. 
•• With High Honors. 



332 State College Catalog 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering 

William Royce Allen Badin 

Charles Burgess Brame Lucama 

*Eugene Leroy Briggs, Jr. High Point 

Thomas Leech Briggs, Jr Raleigh 

Leo Turrell Brinson, Jr Arapahoe 

**Ray Lentz Lyerly Thomasville 

William McCormick Neale, Jr Greensboro 

*John Mann Simmons Greensboro 

Jack Louis Singer New York, N. Y. 

♦Charles Henry Steele Charlotte 

*Richard Miller Weatherly Greensboro 

Carlyle Aubrey Wiggins, Jr Kinston 

DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

Bachelor of Science 

In Agricultural Education 

James Aubrey Duncan Trinity 

Otto Robert Hecht Norlina 

William Patton Allen Jobe Rutherfordton 

Terrell Amley Jones Polkton 

Arnold Warren Lingle Salisbury 

**William Arthur Nesbitt Etowah 

***Horace A. Silver Raleigh 

George Milton Thomas, Jr Cameron 

Sam Arthur Tuten, Jr Edward 

In Occupational Information and Guddance 

**Margaret Krider Fleming Raleigh 

SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Bachelor op Science 
In Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Arthur Louis Fried New York, N. Y. 

In Textile Management 

James Alvin Allen Raleigh 

In Textile Manufacturing 

Robert Renfrow Doak Raleigh 

John Douglas Ferguson West Englewood, N. J. 

Charles Urquhart Hill, Jr Charlotte 

Donald Franklin Sapp Concord 

* With Honors. 
** With High Honors. 
*•* As of June 11, 1934. 



Degrees Conferred 333 

In Weaving and Designing 

*Mary Elizabeth Goforth Charlotte 

Mary Laura McArthur Lumberton 

Rebecca Emily Joyce Shelden Camp Forest, Tenn. 

advanced degrees 

Master of Agricultural Education 

Ernest Franklin Hubbard Mamers 

Master of Science 
In Agricultural Economics 

Francis Edward McVay Peace Dale, R. I. 

Harry Alton White Raleigh 

In Animal Production 

David Wiggs Harris Newell 

In Plant Pathology 

Albert William Feldman Chicago, 111. 

HONORARY DEGREES 
1944 

Doctor of Textile Science 

David Clark Charlotte 

Doctor of Engineering 

Louis Valvelle Sutton Raleigh 

1943 

Doctor of Textile Science 

Wilbert James Carter Greensboro 

Doctor of Science 

Benjamin Wesley Kilgore Raleigh 

Doctor of Engineering 

Thomas Alfred Morgan New York 



• With Honors. 



11-i State College Catalog 

MEDALS AND PRIZES 

SCHOLARSHIP DAY AND COMMENCEMENT, 1944 

Gamma Sigma Efsilcn Scholarship Cup 
Chantey) 

Edgar Riley C:le. Juni:r ir. Chemical Engineering, 
Phoebus. Va. 

American Institute :? Ihimical Engineers' Award 

Edgar Riley Cole, Junior in Chemical Engineering, 

Phiebus. Va. 

J. C. Steele Scholarship Cup 

7"er:la = 5"-.on Ceramic Award.) 

? ..chard Dammann, Senior in Ceramic Engineering, 

Molaxd-Dbysdale Scholarship Cup 

I Freshman Ceramic Award) 

Clarence Rogers Westlake, Freshman in Ceramic Engineering, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Nati : v al Assoc la. ti : n : f C c : : n Manufacturers' Medal 

Donald Franklin Sapo. Senior in Textile Manufacturing, 

Concord, N. C. 

Phi Kappa Phi Metal.; and Prizes 

Senior Award 

Eer.;arr.in Wayne Greene. 5er.;:r in Aeronautical Engineering. 

Juni:r A --art 
Edgar Riley Cole, Junior in Chemical Engineering, 

Phiebus. Va. 

i S:th:~.:re Award i 

Joe Floyd Briggs, Sophomore in Architecture, 

Lexington. N. C. 

Xi Sigma Pi Award 

Forestry 

E::ert Allan H:l:omhe, 5eni:r in Forestry. 

Teaneck, N. J. 

Forensic Award 

(National Individual RanVng in Direct Clash Debating) 

Newton W. Mar.de!. Freshman in Textiles, 

New York. N. Y. 



INDEX 



Page 

Administration, Officers of, State 

College g 

Administrative Council of the 

Consolidated University 7 

Admission 22 

Advanced Standing 23 

Aeronautical Engineering 107, 173 

Agricultural Chemistry 76, 207 

Agricultural Economics 64^ 175 

Agricultural Education i43, 225 

Agricultural Engineering 66, 179 

Agriculture and Forestry, School of 60 

Agricultural Engineering . . . .66, 179 

Experiment Station 92 

Extension Work .... 93 

Forestry ' 77, 251 

tieneral Agriculture 62 

Agricultural Chemistry 76, 207 

Agricultural Economics 64, 175 

Agronomy 69, 249, 306 

Animal Husbandry 72 181 

Botany 74> 194 

Dairy Manufacturing 74, 181 

Entomology 89, 320 

Experimental Statistics 76, 247 

Farm Business Administration 65, 175 
Farm Marketing and Farm 

Finance 65, 175 

Field Crops 70, 249 

Floriculture gi, 264 

Freshman and Sophomore 

Curricula 63, 64 

Horticulture 80, 264 

Plant Pathology ...IB', 194 

Pomology 8l] 264 

Poultry Science 85' 297 

Rural Sociology 87] 302 

Soils 11 3Qg 

Vegetable Gardening 82! 264 

Landscape Architecture 83, 270 

Wildlife Conservation and 

Management 90, 320 

Zoology 89J 320 

Agronomy 69, 249, 306 

Alumni Association 40 

Animal Husbandry and Dairying. . .72, 181 

Animal Production 73, 181 

Applicants, Information for . ...... . .' 22 

Admission 22 

Expenses .24/ 169', 170 

1 ellowships 32 

Financial Aids and Scholarships 31 

Registration 26 

a S t 1 - f / H f lp , « '.'.'.'.26'. 43 

Architectural Engineering and 

Architecture 109, 188 

Athletics and Physical 

Education 37 47 292 

Awards, 1944 334 

Basic Division 46 

Organization and Objects 46 

Programs of Study 48 

Freshman and Sophomore Curricula 
of Schools, Divisions, and 

Departments 49 

Board 26 

Board of Trustees of the Consolidated 

University of North Carolina 5 

Botany 74 194 

Buildings, General Service ' 21 



Page 
Calendar, College ... 3 

Calendar, 1945-46 4 

Ceramic Engineering 112, 198 

Chemical Engineering 114, 201 

Chemistry 75, 207 

Civil Engineering (General) . .117, 120, 212 

Construction 118, 120, 212 

Sanitary 119, 120, 212 

Transportation 119, 120, 212 

Classification of Students 29 

Clubs and Societies 33 

College, The 20 

College Extension 171 

Commencement, 1944, Degrees 

Conferred 329 

Construction Engineering ...118, 120, 212 
Cooperative Plan of Engineering 

Education 105 

Curricula: See School, Department^ or 
Division Concerned. 

Dairying, Animal Husbandry and. .72, 181 

Dairy Manufacturing 74, 181 

Degrees ' 30 

Conferred, 1944 329 

Division of Teacher Education .'.'.'. 143 

Graduate j65 

School of Agriculture and Forestry . . 61 

School of Engineering 97 

School of Textiles 153 

Description of Courses (Alphabetical 

Order by Departments ) 173 

Diesel Engineering 123 

Division of Graduate Studies 162 

Division of Teacher Education ... 142, 225 
Dormitories 22, 26 

Economics 46, 220 

Agricultural 64] 175 

Education 142, 225 

(See Teacher Education, Division of) 

Electrical Engineering 124, 233 

Engineering Mechanics 100, 237 

Engineering, School of 94 

Organization, Objects, Requirements 94 

Aeronautical 107, 173 

Architectural Engineering and 

Architecture 109, 188 

Ceramic 112, 198 

Chemical 114, 201 

Civil 117, 120, 123, 212 

Construction 118, 120, 212 

Cooperative Plan of Education 105 

Diesel 123 

Electrical " 124^ 233 

Experiment Station 102 

Furniture 139, 277 

General j29 

Geological 131, 257 

Heating and Air-Conditioning . .140, 277 

Mechanical 135, 277 

Metals 140, 277 

Sanitary 119, 120, 212 

Service Departments 100 

Transportation 119, 120, 212 

English 46, 240 

Enrollment, Summary of 327 

Entomology, Zoology 89, 320 

Equipment and Facilities (See each 
School Department, Division.) 



336 



INDEX— (Continued) 



Page 

Ethics and Religion 46, 245 

Executive Committee of the Board of 

Trustees 7 

Expenses 24, 26, 169, 170 

Experiment Station, Agricultural .... 92 

Engineering 102 

Experimental Statistics 76, 247 

Extension, Agricultural 93 

Extension, College 171 

Faculty Council 8 

Faculty. Officers of Instruction 9 

Farm Business Administration . . . .65, 175 
Farm Marketing and Farm Finance 65, 175 

Fees 24, 169, 170 

Fellowships 32, 165 

Field Crops 70, 249 

Financial Aids and Scholarships .... 31 

Floriculture 81, 264 

Forestry 77, 251 

Fraternities, Honor 34 

Social 35 

Furniture 139, 277 

Gardening, Vegetable 82, 264 

General Engineering 129 

General Information 20 

Geography 257 

Geological Engineering 131, 257 

Geology 257 

Grades and Honor Points 27 

Graduate Division. Fee, Organization, 
Fellowships, Admission, Degrees, 

Regulations 26, 162 

Graduates, 1944 329 

Graduation Requirements for 

Division of Teacher Education 143 

Graduate Division 165, 170 

School of Agriculture and Forestry . 61 

School of Engineering 97 

School of Textiles 153 

Health of Students 40 

Heating and Air-Conditioning 140, 277 

History and Political Science 46,261 

Honor Fraternities and Societies 34 

Honor Points 27 

Horticulture 80, 264 

Industrial Arts Education 146, 227 

Industrial Education 150, 227 

Industrial Engineering 133, 268 

Information for Applicants 22 

Inspection Trips : 

Engineering 97 

Forestry 78 

Textiles 153 

Laboratories : See Special Departments 
in Agriculture, Engineering, and 
Textiles. 

Landscape Architecture 83, 271 

Library 42 

Loan Fund, Students' 31 

Mathematics 101, 272 

Mechanical Engineering (General) 135, 277 

Furniture Option 139, 277 

Heating and Air-Conditioning 

Option 140, 277 

Metals Option 140, 277 

Medals and Prizes 86 

Scholarship Day, 1944 334 

Metals 140, 277 

Military Science and Tactics 44, 285 

Military Training 44 

Modern Languages 46, 287 

Music 39 



Page 
Nonresident Students 25 

Occupational Information and 

Guidance 148, 231 

Officers 

Administration of State College .... 8 
Administrative Council of the 

Consolidated University 7 

Instruction : Faculty of State College 9 

Other Administrative Officers 8 

Special Officers 8 

Trustees 5 

Physical Education and 

Athletics 37, 47, 292 

Physics 101, 293 

Plant Pathology 75, 194 

Political Science, History and 46, 261 

Pomology 81, 264 

Poultry Science 85, 297 

Professional Degrees 169 

Psychology 300 

Publications 

College 40 

Engineering Experiment Station . . . 102 
Student 33 

Refunds 26 

Religion, Ethics and 46, 245 

Registration 26 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 44 

Rooms, Dormitory 22 ,26 

Room Rent 26 

Rural Sociology 87, 302 

Sanitary Engineering 119, 121, 212 

Scholarship and Awards 28, 334 

Scholarships, Financial Aids and .... 31 
School of Agriculture and Forestry . . 60 

School of Engineering 94 

School of Textiles 152 

Schools. Divisions, and Departments 46 

Self -Help for Students 26, 43 

Short Courses : 

Engineering 99 

Extension 172 

Textile, for mill men 154 

Societies, Clubs, Fraternities .33, 34, 35 

Sociology 47, 304 

Soils 71, 306 

Special Student Fees 26 

Student Activities 33 

Clubs and Societies S3 

Fraternities, Honor S4 

Social 35 

Government 33 

Publications 33 

Summer Work for Engineering 

Students 97 

Teacher Education : Organization, 

Objects, Requirements 142 

Agricultural Education 143, 225 

Industrial Arts Education 146, 227 

Industrial Education 150, 227 

Occupational Information and 

Guidance 148, 231 

Textiles, School of: Organization, 

Objects, Requirements 152 

Chemistry and Dyeing ... 156, 158, 309 
Curricula for Graduates with 

Arts Degrees 154 

Management 160, 309 

Manufacturing 157, 809 

Mill Men, Short Course 154 

Research 167 

Weaving and Designing 156. 161, 309 



INDEX— (Continued) 



337 



Page 

Yarn Manufacturing and 

Knitting 164, 169, 309 

Transfer Students 23, 27 

Transportation 119, 121, 212 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Executive Committee 7 

Tuition and Fees 26, 169, 170 

Vaccination 27 

Vegetable Gardening 82, 264 



Page 

War Training 99, 172 

Weaving and Designing .... 155, 161, 309 
Wildlife Conservation and 
Management 90, 320 

Yarn Manufacturing and 

Knitting 154, 159, 309 

Young Men's Christian Association . . 43 

Zoology 89, 320 



DIRECTORY 

FACULTY, STAFF, and STUDENTS 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF 

AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING 

OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 




1944-1945 



State College Station 
Raleigh 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

For the Academic Year 1944-45 

THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY 

President of the Greater University Frank Porter Graham 

Controller W. D. Carmichael, Jr. 

N. C. STATE COLLEGE 

Dean of Administration Colonel J. W. Harrelson 

Dean of Students E. L. Cloyd 

Director of Registration W. L. Mayer 

Assistant Controller & Business Manager J. G. Vann 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Colonel J. W. Harrelson, Chairman Dean of Administration 

L. D. Baver Associate Dean, School of Agriculture and 

Forestry; Director, Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. F. Brown Dean, Basic Division of the College 

T. E. Browne Director, Division of Teacher Training 

Wm. Hand Browne, Jr Head, Department of Electrical Engineering 

Malcolm E. Campbell Dean, School of Textiles 

E. L. Cloyd, Secretary Dean of Students 

W. L. Mayer Director of Registration and Purchasing Agent 

Z. P. Metcalf Associate Dean, Graduate School; 

Head, Department of Zoology and Entomology 

I. O. Schaub Dean, School of Agriculture and Forestry; 

Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

J. G. Vann Assistant Controller & Business Manager 

L. L. Vaughan Acting Dean, School of Engineering 

A. J. Wilson Head, Department of Chemistry 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Alumni Secretary H. W. Taylor 

Architects : Landscape J. P. Pillsbury 

College Ross Shumaker 

Athletics : Director J. F. Miller 

Business Manager J. L. Von Glahn 

Dining Hall, Steward T. M. Hamby 

Dormitories : Superintendent T. T. Wellons 

Chief Assistant James E. Hobbs 

Engineer, College L. L. Vaughan 

College Extension, Director Edward W. Ruggles 

Gymnasium, Custodian Ervin M. Johnson 

Laundry, Superintendent W. L. Godwin 

Librarian, Acting Mrs. Reba Davis Clevenger 

Military, P. M. S. & T Col. Douglass N. McMillin 

Music, Director Major C. D. Kutschinski 

Nurse, Head Miss I. Trollinger 

Physician A. C. Campbell, M.D. 

Power Plant, Superintendent A. A. Riddle 

College Publicity, Director Rudolph Pate 

Self-Help, Director Mrs. L. W. Bishop 

Service Department, Manager W. F. Morris 

Station Farms, Director F. E. Miller 

Y.M.C.A., General Secretary Edward S. King 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



For the School Year 1944-45 



Athletics: 

H. A. Fisher, Chairman 
A. J. Wilson, Secretary 
J. W. Patton 
I. 0. Schaub 
J. L. Stuckey 

Buildings and Grounds: 

M. E. Gardner, Chairman 

J. P. Pillsbury, Secretary 

C. H. Bostian 

J. K. Coggin 

L. E. Cook 

R. L. Cummings 

T. R. Hart 

W. N. Hicks 

W. H. Hoffman 

C. L. Mann 

J. F. Miller 

W. F. Morris 

W. E. Shinn 

Ross Shumaker 

J. G. Vann 

College Extension: 

H. B. Briggs, Chairman 

E.- W. Ruggles, Secretary 

C. H. Bostian 

J. K. Coggin 

R. S. Dearstyne 

T. R. Hart 

A. I. Ladu 

Roger Marshall 

C. G. Mumford 

J. D. Paulson 

S. R. Winston 

Disciplinary: 

F. W. Lancaster, Chairman 
E. L. Cloyd, Secretary 
R. S. Fouraker 
Roger Marshall 
J. A. Rigney 

Fraternity Life: 

R. L. Stone, Chairman 

E. L. Cloyd, Secretary 

F. M. Haig 
J. S. Meares 
J. F. Miller 

C. B. Shulenberger 
H. Page Williams 

Freshman Housing: 

J. S. Meares, Chairman 

E. L. Cloyd 
H. F. Dade 

F. M. Haig 
W. N. Hicks 



W. F. Morris 
C. G. Mumford 

History : 

J. W. Patton, Chairman 
J. K. Coggin 

A. M. Fountain 
F. M. Haig 

T. R. Hart 

C. L. Mann 
H. W. Taylor 
H. H. Vestal 

Honorary Degrees : 

Z. P. Metcalf, Chairman 
L. D. Baver 

B. F. Brown 
T. E. Browne 
Malcolm E. Campbell 
H. A. Fisher 

E. G. Hoefer 
I. 0. Schaub 
L. L. Vaughan 

Jobs and Self-Help: 

F. B. Wheeler, Chairman 
J. D. Clark 

E. L. Cloyd 
T. M. Hamby 
E. S. King 
W. F. Morris 
R. H. Ruffner 

Library: 

A. I. Ladu, Chairman 

Mrs. Reba D. Clevenger, Secretary 

D. B. Anderson 

C. R. Bramer 
J. M. Clarkson 
R. W. Cummings 
A. H. Grimshaw 
J. R. Ludington 
T. B. Mitchell 

G. H. Satterfield 
J. L. Stuckev 
W. G. Van Note 
L. L. Vaughan 

Loans : 

E. L. Cloyd, Chairman 
W. L. Mayer, Secretary 
C. B. Shulenberger 

J. G. Vann 

Public Lectures: 

L. E. Hinkle, Chairman 
L. 0. Armstrong 
L. D. Baver 
R. C. Bullock 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



E. L. Clovd 
C. H. Hamilton 
E. G. Hoefer 
E. S. King 
CD. Kutschh 
Roger Marshall 
Rudolph Pate 
R. B. Rice 
G. E r.eld 

G. Wallace Smith 
B. W. Wells 



J. F. Miller 

R. H. Ruffner 
G. Wallace Smith 
R. L. Stone 

tats, Social] 

oors: 
tors 

A. N. Perry 
W. M. Nicholson 
T. B. Whitehurst 



Student Members, Public Lectuf.es ./ 



IMITTEE: 

To be appointed 

Refund of Fees : 

E. L. Clovd, Chairman 
W. L. Mayer 
J. G. Vann 

Research: 

Z. P. Metcalf, Chairman 

L. D. Bayer 

Wm. Hand Browne. Jr. 

Malcolm E. Campbell 

J. K. Coggin 

E. R. Collins 

Gertrude M. Cox 

J. B. Derieux 

A. H. Grirnshaw 
C. D. Grinnells 
C. H. Hamilton 
J. F. Lutz 

R. 0. Moen 
R. B. Rice 
G. H. Satterfield 
R. L. Stone 
J. L. Stuckev 

B. W. Wells 

Scholarships. Award of: 
L. D. Baver. Chairman 
E. L. Clovd. Secretary 
J. G. Vann, Treasurer 
H. B. Briggs 
H. A. Fisher 
T. R. E 
E. S. King 
J. R. Ludir.grton 
E. W. Ruggles 

C. B. Shulenberger 
H. W. Taylor 

D. S. Weaver 

Functi ns: 

E. M. Haig. Chairman 
E. L. Clovd, Secretary 



R. E. Wooten 

R. W. Kenniaon, Jr. 

C. A. Fisler 

res 

B. E. . 
E. K. Coi 

Stoi knt: 

..airman 

E. I 

F. W. Lancaster 
J. R. Ludington 

I 

C. E. Shulenberger 

G. K. Slocum 

F. EL man 

H. F. Dade 
Rogei . .all 

W. L. Mayer 

IDENH 

To be apt h^.ted 

Stoi e 

C. R. Bramer. Chairman 

T. C. B: 

.-. C. amnbell 

J. I 

C. G. Mumford 

J. L. 

Weaver 

! 

To be appoi:. 

.an 
J. P. Pfflsbn 

J. W. Goodman 
W. H. Hoffman 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 7 

DORMITORY ASSISTANTS 

1944-1945 

James E. Hobbs, Chief Assistant 
203 Watauga, Box 3021 

Note : Dormitory telephones are pay-stations. They should be dialed directly, 
not through the College exchange. 

Room Name of Counselor 

114 Chester Fisler 

Bagwell: 125 H. B. Bell 

Tel. 211 Jimmy E. Deas 

311 T. B. Whitehurst 

325 Victor B. Shelburne 

Berry: 107 L. W. Gatlin 

Tel. 

Fourth : 207 Bruce B. Blackmon 

Tel. 306 E. E. Wright 

Gold : 104 D. S. Chamblee 

Tel. 201 Adrian N. Stuart 

Watauga : 108 James G. Francis 

Tel. 9132 203 James E. Hobbs 

303 W. Stuart Wood 

Welch: 110 Wm. C. Thomas 

Tel. 5119 201 Merrimond B. Mizelle 

COLLEGE TELEPHONES 

Agromeck 9909 

Dining Hall 2-0243 

Fieldhouse 6934 

Infirmary 7615 

Military Department Ext. 233 

A.S.T.P. (Nights and Sundays) 6834 

Naval Training School 3-3781 

Power Plant (Nights and Sundays) 2-1340 

Student Government 8738 

Technician 4732 

Von Glahn, J. L 2-2407 

Y. M. C. A 7184 



FRATERNITY ROSTER 
1944-1945 

Organization Address Telephone 

Alpha Lambda Tau 10 Enterprise Street 7016 

Delta Sigma Phi 2412 Hillsboro Street 2-1873 

Lambda Chi Alpha 2407 Clark Avenue 8218 

Pi Kappa Alpha 1720 Hillsboro Street 4215 

Pi Kappa Phi 1720 Hillsboro Street 4215 

Sigma Alpha Mu 109 Oberlin Road 7638 

Sigma Chi 12 Home Street 3-1934 

Sigma Nu 2412 Hillsboro Street 9531 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 103 Chamberlain Street 4843 

Sigma Pi 2513 Clark Avenue 2-0268 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 
1944-1945 

Ext. 

*Adams, A. Harvey — Clerk, Central Stores. Warehouse 272 

Residence: Clayton. Tel. 333-1. 

Adams, Hazel C— Sec, Dept. of Hort. 304 Polk 318 & 275 

Residence: 2602 Clark Ave. Tel. 8221. 

♦Adams, W. E.— Asst. Prof., M.E. 206 Page 247 

Residence: 3413% Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-1393. 

Agricultural Adjustment Agency — AAA Building Tel. 2-0544 

H. A. Patten, Sec. of State Committee. 

♦Alford, A. 0.— Mgr., College Print Shop. 13 Tompkins 281 

Residence: 1904% Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-1422. 

♦Allen, Mrs. John E.. Jr.— Stem. Program Planning Dept. 309-1911 . . 292 
Residence: 307 W. Park Dr. Tel. 9961. 

♦Altaian, L. B.— Dist. Agt., Ag. Ext. Service. 101 Ricks 212 

Residence: 1210 Cowper Dr. Tel. 2-3204. 

♦Ammerman, James P., Jr. — Asst. in A. H.. A. I. Dept. A. H. Farm. 
Residence: Cary, N. C, Rt. 1. Tel. 2-0354. 

Anderson, Charlotte — Stem, Agron. Dept. 113 Ricks 262 

Residence: 2715 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6694. 

♦Anderson, Donald B.— Prof, of Bot., Bot. Dept. 212 Winston 267 

Residence: 906 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-3061. 

Anderson, R. L.— Asst. Prof., Exp. Stat., Exp. Stat. Dept. 340-1911 313 
Residence : 

Andrews, Noreen — Stem, Dean of Students' Office. 

103 Holladay (A.M.) 215 

Sec, Psvch. Dept. 123 Tompkins (P.M.) 286 

Residence: 910 W. South St. Tel. 4553. 

Arant, Anamerle— N. W. Dist. Agt., Ag. Ext. Service. 201-1911. . . 285 
Residence: 1821 Glenwood Ave. Tel. 8089. 

Arey, J. A.— In Charge, Office of Dairy Ext. 102 Polk 277 

Residence: 5 Maiden Lane. Tel. 2-3535. 
♦Armstrong, Lindsey Otis — Assoc. Prof, of Ed., Div. of Teacher Ed. 

116 Tompkins 256 

Residence: 308 Dixie Trail. Tel. 2-0063. 
♦Atkins, Mrs. Rupert E.— Ext. Auditor, Ag. Ext. Service. 105 Ricks. 271 
Residence: 3021 Eton Rd. Tel. 2-0989. 

♦Austin, Nan B.— Sec, M. L. Dept. 205 Peele 231 

Residence: 409 Calvin Rd. Tel. 2-1826. 

♦Babcock, Mrs. Jane S. — Clerk, N. C. State Board of Registration for 

Engrs. and Land Survevors. 207 C. E. Building 303 

Residence: 1702 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6825. 

♦Babcock, W. F.— Asst. Prof., C. E. Dept. 202 C. E. Building 303 

Residence: 1702 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6825. 

Bachemin, J. Martin— Grad. Asst., Agr. Econ. 103-1911 309 

Residence: 23 Logan Court. Tel. 3-1180. 

♦Badders, Hal— Asst. Supt, Power Plant. Power Plant 234 

Residence: 117 Cox Ave. Tel. 2-2452. 

Bailey, Alene — Stem, Div. of Voc Ed. 106 Tompkins 282 

Residence: 701 N. Blount St. 

Bailev, Janie R.— Sec, School of Engr. 122 C. E. Building 216 

Residence : 854 W T . Morgan St. Tel. 2-3840. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 9 

Ext. 
*Baker, Mrs. A. L. — PBX Operator, College Tel. Exchange. 

117 Winston 

Residence: 537 E. Jones St. Tel. 4143. 

*Ballenger, S. T— Assoc. Prof., M. L. Dept. 213 Peele 231 

Residence: 2714 Rosedale Ave. Tel. 9570. 

Barker, Nell— Cashier, Business Office. "B" Holladay 278 

Residence: Grosvenor Gardens Apt. C-4. Tel. 5902. 
*Barnes, Mamie L. — Warp Drawer, School of Textiles. 2nd Floor, 

Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 1904% Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-2567. 
♦Barnhardt, Luther W.— Assoc. Prof., Hist. & Polit. Sc. 102 Peele . . 200 
Residence: 2502 Stafford Ave. Tel. 8796. 

*Bauerlein, George— Asst. Prof., Hist. 107 Peele 200 

Residence: 310 Pogue St. Tel. 2-0633. 

*Baumgarten, W. L. — Asst. Prof., Arch. 309 Daniels 250 

Residence: 2509 Country Club Rd. Tel. 7486. 
*Baver, L. D. — Assoc. Dean, School of Ag. & For., & Dir., Ag. Exp. 

Sta. 109 Ricks 211 

Residence: 1810 St. Mary's St. Tel. 2-3741. 

Baxley, Hartlee Mae — Lab. Technician, Dept. of A. I. (Nutr. Section) 

314 Polk 241 

Residence: E-l Grosvenor Gardens. Tel. 3-1851. 

*Beamon, Mrs. Naomi F. — Sec, Library 259 

Residence: College Court Apt. 5. Tel. 5673. 

*Beasley, Mary Carter— Sten., Hort. Dept. 303 Polk 318 & 275 

Residence: 327 Oakwood Ave. Tel. 2-3305. 
*Bennett, L. S. — Assoc. Agronomist, Agron. Dept. (Seed Improve- 
ment) . 315 Ricks 207 

Residence: 213 Park Ave. Tel. 5303. 

*Best, Mrs. Wilfrid— Sec, Farm Management. 303-1911 291 

Residence : Apt. B-l Wilmont Apts. 

*Biggs, Mrs. V. L. — Clark, Publications. 5 Ricks 279 

Residence: 3208 Merriman Ave. Tel. 5689. 

*Bishop, Mrs. L. W.— Office Sec, Self-Help Dir., Y.M.C.A Tel. 7184 

Residence: 8 Bagwell Ave. Tel. 2-0672. 
*Biswell, H. H. — Plant Ecologist, In Charge, Range Research, A. I. 

Dept., A. H. Section. 218 Polk 276 

Residence: 1225 Wake Forest Rd. Tel. 2-2139. 
Blackmon, Bruce B. — Research Fel., A. I. Dept., A. H. Section. 

216 Polk 276 

Residence: 207 Fourth. Tel. 

Blair, E. C— Specialist, Agron. Ext. 204 Ricks 294 

Residence: 125 Glenwood Ave. Tel. 2-1388. 
Bledsoe, M. C. M. (Miss) — Sec, A. I. Dept., A. H. and Dairying 

Section. 115 Polk 268 

Residence: 1103 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-0688. 
*Boone, Samuel C— Capt., Inf., Mess Officer, ASTP. Mil. Dept., 

4 Holladay ) 202 

Residence : 304 Forest Rd. Tel. 6518. 
Boshart. Edward W.— Prof, of Ed. & Guid., Div. of Teacher Ed. 

101 Tompkins 258 

Residence: F-l-B Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 2-2745. 
*Bostian, C. H. — Assoc, in Poul. Genetics & Prof, of Zool. Poul. & 

Zool. Dept. 213 Ricks , , 280 

Residence: Dixie Trail, Tel. 2-3600, 



10 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

♦Bradv. D. E.— Prof.. A. H.. A. I. Dept. 217 Polk 276 

Residence: Falls Road, Route 1. Tel. 3-3659. 

Bramer. C. R.— Assoc. Prof.. C. E. Dept. 209 C. E. Bldg 303 

Residence: 311 W. Park Dr. 

♦Brav, Grover D. — S 'Sgt.. DEML-ASTP. Mil. Dept. Armory 232 

Residence: 202 Groveland Ave. Tel. 8012. 

Bretsch. Gertrude — Jr. Stat. Clerk, Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence: 117 S. Boylan Ave. Tel. 2-3193. 

♦Brickhouse. C. M.— Dist. Aeent, Ag. Ext. Service. 101 Ricks 212 

Residence: 1013 Harvey St. Tel. 9585. 

♦Bridges. W. S.— Assoc. Prof.. M. E., M. E. Dept. 103 Page 246 

Residence: 125 Chamberlain St. Tel. 4159. 

♦Brip-e-s. Bettv E. — Sec. Ag. Ext. Service. Home Demonstration. 

222-1911 242 

Residence: 226 E. Park Dr. Tel. 6076. 

♦Briefs. Hermon B. — Prof.. Engr. Draw. & Des. Geom. M. E. Dept. 

206 Paee 247 

Residence: 128 Groveland Ave. Tel. 2-1030. 

♦Bright. Richard— Asst. Prof.. Ch. E. Dept. 106 Winston 301 

Residence: 215 Hillcrest Rd. Tel. 2-0804. 

♦Brigman. Anne R.— Chart Clerk. Ag. Econ. 114-1911 308 

Residence: 213 N. Bloodworth St. Tel. 5940. 

♦Brigman. H. P. — Clerk. Poul. 214 Ricks 280 

Residence: 213 N. Bloodworth St. Tel. 5940. 

*Brooks. Dr. E. C. — Pres. Emeritus of the College. 

Residence: 630 N. Blount St. 
♦Brooks. Mrs. J. ML — Nieht Supervisor. Clark Infirmary Tel. 7615 

7 esidenee: 1306 Mordecai Dr. Tel. 2-1169. 
♦Brown. B. F.— Dean. Basic Division. 103 Peele 223 

Residence: 202 Hillcrest Rd. Tel. 2-0692. 
♦Brown. Edmond J. — Asst. Prof.. Phvsics. 110 Daniels 229 

Residence: 2710 Kittrell Dr. Tel. 2-1168. 
♦Brown. Mrs. Evelvn— Pten.. Agron. 314-1911 324 & 262 

Residence: 1-4 Raleigh Apts. Tel. 8985. 
♦Brown. Mrs. Grace S.— Sec. Eng-r. Exp. Sta. 112 C. E. Bldg 307 

Residence: 3220 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-2091. 
Brown. Jean — Sec. Ext. Studies. Ae. Ext. Service. 108 Ricks 255 

Residence: 1313 Hillsboro St. Tel. 4142. 
♦Brown. T. C. — Assoc. Prof., M. E. Dept. 106 Pasre 246 

Residence: 910 Canterbury Rd. Tel. 2-3277. 
♦Brown, T. T. — Specialist. Poul. Ext. 210 Ricks 321 

Residence: 1709 Bickett Boulevard. Tel. 9731. 
♦Browne. T. E. — Director. Div. of Teacher Ed. 120 Tompkins 256 

Residence: 1715 Park Dr. Tel. 6151. 
♦Browne. Wm. Hand. Jr.— Prof. & Head. E. E. Dept. 203 Daniels . . 236 

Residence: Dixie Trail-Extended. Tel. 5201. 
Brvan. Marv — Sec. M. E. Dept. 109 Pasre 246 & 323 

Residence: 9 Pogue St. Tel. 3-3530. 
Buddin. Laura Olivia — Lab. & X-Ray Tech. Clark Infirmary . . Tel. 7615 

Residence: Carroll House. Tel. 3-1010. 
♦Buell, Murray F.— Asst. Prof., Bot. Dept. 201 Winston 267 

Residence: 911 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-2112. 
Buffaloe. Minnie M.— Clerk. Poul. Ext. 208 Ricks 321 

Residence: 7 E. North St. Tel. 7109. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 11 

Ext. 
*Bullard, A. G.— Asst. Supv., FPWT. Voc. Ed. Dept. 104 Tompkins 257 

Residence: Cary, N. C. Tel. 2602. 
♦Bullock, Roberts C— Assoc. Prof., Math. 218 Tompkins 228 

Residence: Dixie Trail. Tel. 7127. 

*Burkhart, Leland — Asst. Agronomist., Agron. Dept. 6 Withers .... 209 
Residence: 214 Taylor St. Tel. 3-2320. 

Busbee, D. Frances— Ediphone Dept. 213-1911 221 

Residence: 907 W. Lenoir St. Tel. 2-0763. 
*Cahoon, J. A.— Kitchen Supervisor, Cafeteria. Steward's Office. Tel. 2-0243 

Residence: 134 New Bern Ave. Tel. 3-2752. 
♦Callahan, Esta S.— Stem, College Ext.-ESMWT. 201-4 Library ... 260 
Residence: 1600 Fairview Rd. Tel. 8067. 

♦Campbell, A. C, M.D.— College Physician. Clark Infirmary Tel. 7615 

Residence: 302 Hawthorne Rd. Tel. 6849. 

♦Campbell, Malcolm E.— Dean, School of Tex. 108 Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 1315 Williamson Dr. Tel. 3-3971. 

*Carley, William Sutton— Asst. Prof., E. E. Dept. 104 Daniels 235 

Residence: 1816 W. Park Dr. Tel. 8075. 
*Carmichael, W. D., Jr. — Controller, Consol. Univ. 105 Holladay . . . 295 
Residence: Chapel Hill, N. C. Tel. 4141. 

♦Case, L. I.— In Charge, A. H. Ext. 203 Polk 269 

Residence: 2703 Kilgore Ave. Tel. 2-0198. 

Castleman, Ann— Tech. Asst., Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence: 1611 Park Dr. Tel. 2-3789. 
♦Caudle, J. E. — Soil Scientist, Soil Conservation Service. 

231-1911 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence : 511 Harding St. Tel. 3-2806. 

♦Chambers, Martin R.— Research Asst., Rural Sociol. 140-1911 312 

Residence: 2220 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-1104. 
Chamblee, D. S. — Asst. Agronomist, Forage Crops. Agron. Dept. 

320-1911 324 

Residence: 23 Logan Court. Tel. 3-1180. 
♦Chase, Eugene B. — Major, Inf., Commanding Officer, 1st Bn. ASTP. 

Mil. Dept. 108 Syme 203 

Residence: 322% Shepherd St. Tel. 3-3983. 

♦Clark, Joseph Deadrick— Prof., Eng. Dept. 108 Pullen 237 

Residence: 15 Furches St. Tel. 7385. 

♦Clarkson, J. M.— Assoc. Prof., Math. Dept. 206 Tompkins 226 

Assoc. Prof., Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence: 2605 Clark Ave. Tel. 8762. 

♦Clevenger, Mrs. Reba Davis — Acting Librarian. Library 259 

Residence: 305 Calvin Rd. Tel. 8141. 
Clevenger, Wm. L. — Prof., Dairv Manufacturing. A. I. Dept., A. H. 

& Dairying Section. 211 Polk 305 

Residence: 5 Maiden Lane. Tel. 2-3535. 

♦Cloyd, Edward Lamar— Dean of Students. 108-109 Holladay 215 

Residence: 2224 Hillsboro St. Tel. 5983. 

Coffey, Christine — Circulation Librarian. Library 259 

Residence: Apt. 1-1, Grosvenor Gardens. Tel. 3-3986. 

Coffey, Thelma W. (Mrs.)— Sec, Farm Mgt. Dept. 306-1911 291 

Residence: 304 Duncan St. Tel. 3-1824. 
♦Coggin, J. K.— Prof., Ag. Ed., Div. of Teacher Ed. 104 Tompkins . . 257 
Residence: Cary, N. C. Tel. 2482. 

Cole, Margaret Mclver— Research Asst., Rural Sociol. 133-1911 312 

Residence: C-301 Boylan Apts. Tel. 3-1458. 



12 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

*Cole, L. B.— Meat Cutter, Boarding Dept. Leazar Hall Tel. 2-0243 

Residence: 119 Cox Ave. Tel. 5227. 

*Collins. E. R.— In Charge, Agron. Ext., Agron. Dept. 203 Ricks . . 294 
Residence: 2713 Rosedale Ave. Tel. 9715. 

*Comstock, R. E.— Assoc, An. Sci. Stat., Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Assoc, A. I., A. I. Dept. A. H. Section. 337-1911 

& 216 Polk 276 

Residence: 2726 Everett Ave. Tel. 3-1885. 

Cone, A. A. — Asst. State Conservationist, Soil Conservation Service. 

234-1911 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: 

Conlev, Mabel C— Sec, Div. of For. 301 Ricks 270 

Residence: 15 Enterprise St. Tel. 8433. 

*Conner, N. W.— Prof., E. M. Dept. 101 C. E. Bldg 317 

Residence: 2719 Bedford Ave. Tel. 4924. 
-Cook, Leon E.— Prof., Ag. Ed., Div. of Teacher Ed. 118 Tompkins . 256 

Residence: 111 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-1234. 
*Cooke, Henry C— Instr., Math. Dept. 221 Tompkins 228 

Residence: 3217 Merriman Ave. 
*Cooper, T. W.— Asst. Architect. Arch. Dept. 315 Daniels 250 

Residence: 2718 Canterbury Rd. Tel. 2-2675. 
*Cope, R. L.— Asst. Prof., M. E. Dept. Shop 245 

Residence: 2 Logan Court. Tel. 2-2673. 
*Coplev, T. L. — Project Supervisor, Research Div., Soil Conservation 

Service. 228-1911 Tel. 2-3579 

Residence: 108 Home St. Tel. 5956. 
*Cothran, Mrs. Alice B.— Ediphone Dept. 214-1911 221 

Residence: 1416 Park Dr. Tel. 2-1144. 
Cox, Gertrude M.— Head, Dept. of Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence: 1324 Brooks Ave. Tel. 4731. 
Cox, Gladys— Sec, Dean of Students' Office. 108-109 Holladay 215 

Residence: 220 N. East St. Tel. 2-2533. 
*Cox, Paul M.— Mechanic, School of Tex. Tex. Bldg 287 

Residence: 13 W. Dixie Dr. Tel. 2-1940. 
Craddock, Anne — Sec, Arch. Dept. 315 Daniels 250 

Residence: 2608 V 2 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel. 2-3745. 
*Crawford. John W. — Program Planning Specialist, Program Plan- 
ning Dept. 313-1911 292 

Residence: 3204 Clark Ave. Tel. 5050. 
*Croom, Mrs. H. C— Sec. Dept. of Phvs. Ed. & Ath. Gvm Tel. 2-2407 

Residence: 204 E. Park Dr. Tel. 3-1043. 
*Croom, Martha C— Clerk, Ext. Studies, Agr. Ext. .Service. 108 

Ricks 255 

Residence: 417 Cutler St. Tel. 7154. 
*Croom, Mrs. Milton Macon— Stem, Alumni Office. 202 Holladay ... 252 

Residence: 211 Groveland Ave. Tel. 6347. 
*Croom, Mrs. W. P.— Sec, Entom. Ext. 105 Zoology 201 

Residence: 28 Dixie Trail. Tel. 2-2780. 
Crump, Ila Mae — Assoc. Nurse, Clark Infirmary Tel. 7615 

Residence: Carroll House. Tel. 3-1010. 
*Crumpler, Mrs. B. F.— Stem, M. E. Dept. 206 Page 247 

Residence: 2307 Byrd St. Tel. 6796. 
*Cummings, Charles E.— Capt., Inf. Supplv Officers & Asst. PMS&T. 

Mil. Dept. 11 Holladav * 314 

Residence: 2601 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel, 9887. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 13 

Ext. 

*Cummings, Ralph W.— Head, Agron. Dept. 118 Ricks 217 & 262 

Residence: 612 Rosemont Ave. Tel. 6468. 
Current, Ruth — State Home Dem. Agent. Agr. Ext. Service. 

206-1911 244 

Residence: 1425% Park Dr. Tel. 8715. 

Cutchin, Frances J.— Clerk, Students Supply Store, YMCA. . . Tel. 2-3674 

Residence: 2502 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel. 6572. 
Dade, Henrv Fitzhugh— Asst. Dean of Students. 102 Holladay 215 

Residence: 2212 Hope St. Tel. 4972. 
::: Dean, Mrs. W. E., Jr. — Service Dept. (Dorm.) Warehouse 272 

Residence: Wendell, N. C. Tel. 2572. 

-Dearstyne, R. S.— Prof. & Head, Poul. Dept. 216 Ricks 280 

Residence: 2509 Fairview Rd. Tel. 2-2764. 

*Derieux, J. B. — Prof., Theoretical Physics. Physics Dept. 

110 Daniels 229 

Residence: 2802 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-0916. 

*Doak, C. G.— Asst. Prof., Dept. of Phys. Ed. & Ath. Gym 218 

Residence: 120 Woodburn Rd. Tel. 2-3701. 

*Doodv, Thomas C— Prof., Ch. E. Dept. 107 Winston 301 

Residence : 2510 Clark Ave. Tel. 5884. 
Dorsett, Harry K. — Acting Assoc. Prof., Psych. Dept. 124 Tompkins 286 
Residence: 13 Furches St. Tel. 6452. 

Dosher, Mrs. Doris A.— Clerk, Ext. Agr. Engr. 320 Ricks 274 

Residence: 127 Woodburn Rd. Tel. 8827. 

*Drake, J. C. — Instr., Eng. Dept. 4 Pullen 237 

Residence: Route 4, Western Boulevard. Tel. 2-3543. 
Dudlev, Inez— Sec, Ext. For. 307 Ricks 270 

Residence: 1218 Glenwood Ave. Tel. 8898. 
*Dunlap, G. H.— Technologist, School of Textiles. 103 Tex. Bldg. ... 289 

Residence : 605 Lake Boone Trail. Tel. 2-2349. 
Dunn. R. M.— Clerk, Soil Conservation Service. 237-1911 .... Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: 222 Park Ave. Tel. 5016. 
Dupree, Elsie— Jr. Stat. Clerk, Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence : 617 W. Jones St. Tel. 6963. 

Ellen, Melba — Asst., Circulation Dept. Library 259 

Residence: 6 Seaboard Ave. Tel. 7410.. 

Eller, Emily M.— Clerk-Sten., U.S.D.A. 312 Polk 206 

Residence: 969 Peace Terrace. 
Ellington, Mary Oliver — Lab. Asst., Zool. & Entom. 107 Zoology 

Bldg 239 

Residence: 303 New Bern Ave. Tel. 2-2001. 
*Ellis, D. E.— Assoc. Plant Pathologist, Bot. Dept. 217 Winston ... 267 

Residence : 324 Shepherd St. Tel. 2-2239. 
*Ellis, H. M.— Agr. Eng. Ext. Spec, Ext. Agr. Engr. 318 Ricks ... 274 
Residence: 2706 Hazelwood Dr. Tel. 5887. 
Ellison, Bernard— Research Fel., Bot. Dept. 205 & 215 Winston . . 267 
Residence: 2302 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-2741. 

*Etchells, John L.— Bacteriologist, U.S.D.A. 312 Polk 206 

Residence: 122 Faircloth St. Tel. 2-2270. 

*Fahrer, Carolvn Moore — Stem, Agron. Dept. 311 Ricks 207 

Residence: 204 Woodburn Rd. Tel. 6868. 

Farm Security Administration — Patterson Hall Tel. 2-2811 

J. B. Slack, Director. 



14 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

*Farrington, Mrs. Doris— Cafeteria. Steward's Office Tel. 2-0243 

Residence: 18 Horne St. Tel. 7273. 
*Farrington, William C— Corporal, DEML-ASTP. Truck Driver & 

Asst. Sup. Sgt. Mil. Dept. Armory 232 

Residence: 18 Horne St. Tel. 7273. 
♦Feathers, W. B.— Head Football & Baseball Coach, Instr. ASTP. 

Dept. of Phys. Ed. & Ath. Fieldhouse Tel. 6934 

Residence: 3109 Hillsboro St., Fincastle Apts. Tel. 3-2252. 

♦Ferguson, B. Troy— Dist. Agt., Agr. Ext. Service. 101 Ricks 212 

Residence: 2405 White Oak Dr. Tel. 2-0617. 
*Filicky, John J. — Assoc. Chem., Dairy Manufacturing Sect., Dept. 

of A. I. 211 Polk 305 

Residence: 517 S. Salisbury St. Tel. 2-1712. 
*Fisher, H. A. — Prof. & Head, Dept. of Math.; Armed Services, 

Coordinator. 201 Tompkins 227 

Residence: 125 Brooks Ave. Tel. 4138. 

Fleming, Leah — Lab. Technician, Agron. Dept. 9 Withers 209 

Residence: 515 Daughtridge St. Tel. 2-1196. 
Fleming, Margaret K.— Asst., Exp. Stat. & Agr. Econ. 335-1911 . . 313 
Residence: C-301 Boylan Apts. Tel. 3-1458. 

*Forster, G. W.— Head, Agr. Econ. 119-1911 308 

Residence: 1924 Sunset Dr. Tel. 2-1361. 

Fort, Nellie— Sec. & Clerk, A. I. Dept. 117 Polk 320 

Residence: 315 N. Boundary St. Tel. 6108. 
♦Foster, John E.— Prof., A. H., A. I. Dept., A. H. Section. 218 Polk . 276 
Residence: 2706 Rosedale Ave. Tel. 9881. 

♦Fountain, A. M.— Assoc. Prof., Eng. Dept. 101 Pullen 237 

Residence: 900 Canterbury Rd. Tel. 3-1055. 
♦Fouraker, R. S.— Acting Chairman & Prof., E. E. Dept. 203 Daniels 236 

Residence: 601 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-3094. 
♦Fox, Abraham L. — Engr., In Charge, U. S. Bureau of Mines. 112 

C. E. Bldg 307 

Residence: 1718 Hillsboro St. Tel. 8285. 

Freeman, Doris — Sten., Basic Division. 105 Peele 223 

Residence: D-201 Boylan Apts. Tel. 2-1438. 
♦Friedrich, William G. — Acting Head, Aero. Engr. Dept. Aero. Lab. 248 
Residence: 123 Woodburn Rd. Tel. 3-1078. 

♦Fulton, B. B.— Prof., Zool. & Entom. Dept. 208 Zool. Bldg 261 

Residence: 600 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-1868. 

♦Gaither, E. W.— Subj. Matter Analyst, Ag. Ext. Serv. 301-1911 ... 291 
Residence: "Carova" Route 4, Western Blvd. Tel. 8616. 

♦Gardner, M. E.— Head, Hort. Dept. 304 Polk 275 & 318 

Residence: 2708 Bedford Ave. Tel. 4178. 
♦Garrett, Earl B. — State Conservationist, Soil Conservation Service. 

235-1911 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: 223 Hawthorn St. Tel. 4328. 
♦Garriss, Howard R. — Ext. Plant Pathologist, Bot. Dept. 

202 Winston 267 

Residence: 602 Dixie Trail. Tel. 2-2528. 

♦Gauger, H. C— Assoc. Prof., Poul. Sc. Poul. Dept. 218 Ricks 280 

Residence : 2724 Van Dyke. 

Geile, Mrs. W. G.— Sec, School of Textiles. 110 Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 2509 Country Club Rd. Tel. 7486. 

Gibbs, Eleanor — Lab. Technician, Hort. Dept. Greenhouse 240 

Residence: F-102 Boylan Apts. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 15 

Ext. 

Gilbert, Clara L.— Sec, Agr. Econ. Dept. 117-1911 308 

Residence: 17 Dixie Trail. Tel. 5933. 

*Giles, G. W.— Assoc. Prof., Agr. Engr. Dept. 314 Ricks 274 

Residence: 2618 Van Dyke. Tel. 2-1052. 

*Glenn, Karl B.— Asst. Prof., E. E. Dept. 102 Daniels 235 

Residence: 309 N. Bloodworth St. Tel. 2-1207. 

*Godwin, W. L.— Supt., Laundry 283 

Residence: 2720 Kilgore Ave. Tel. 2-2079. 

*Goldston, E. F.— Soil Survey, Agron. Dept. 206 Ricks 294 

Residence: Balm, N. C. 

* Goodman, J. W.— Asst. Dir., Agr. Ext. Service Tel. 3-3882 

104 Ricks & 213 

Residence: 2118 Woodland Ave. Tel. 2-2079. 
Gordon, Pauline E. — Ext. Specialist, Home Mgt. & House Furnish- 
ings. Agr. Ext. Service, Home Demonstration Dept. 221-1911 . . 242 
Residence: 825 Holt Dr. Tel. 8430. 

Grady, James Henry — Asst. Prof., Arch. Dept. 309 Daniels 250 

Residence: 224 Hawthorn St. Tel. 5428. 

*Graeber, R. W.— In Charge, For. Ext. 307 Ricks 270 

Residence: 303 Hillcrest Rd. Tel. 8126. 
Graham, Mary A. — Sec, Marketing Ext. Agr. Ext. Service. 

124-1911 306 

Residence: 1509 Hillsboro St. Tel. 3-1577. 

*Grant, M. C. — Plumber, Service Dept. Warehouse 272 

Residence: State College. Tel. 9927. 

*Gray, Mrs. Margaret G. — Clerk, Clark Infirmary Tel. 7615 

Residence: 914y 2 W. Johnson St. Tel. 4758. 

Greaves, R. E.— Asst. Prof., Poul. Sc Poul. Dept. 202 Ricks 280 

Residence : 2512 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-0019. 

*Green, R. W.— Assoc. Prof., Econ. Dept. 113 Peele 223 

Residence: 3328 White Oak Rd. Tel. 8460. 

Greene, Minda — Sec, Dean's Office, Basic Div. 103 Peele 223 

Residence: 2303 Clark Ave. Tel. 8083. 
*Greene, R. E. L. — Assoc. Agr. Economist, Agr. Econ. Dept. 102-1911 309 

Residence: 2811 Barmettler St. Tel. 8700. 
*Gregory, Walton C. — Assoc. Agronomist, Plant Breeding. Agron. 

Dept. 315*1911 324 

Residence: Cary, Route 1. Tel. 3-3222. 

*Grimshaw, A. H.— Prof, of Tex. Chem. 1 Tex. Bldg 288 

Residence: Mansion Park Hotel. Tel. 7541. 
*Grinnells, C. D. — Head, Dairy Research Sect., A. I. Dept. 211 Polk 305 
Residence: 409 Dixie Trail. Tel. 2-1305. 

*Grover, Elliot B.— Prof, of Tex. Ill Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 804 Lake Boone Trail. Tel. 8226. 

*Guyot, Mrs. H. M.— Stem, Farm Mgt. Dept. 302-1911 291 

Residence: 18 Home St. Tel. 3-3970. 

*Haig, Frederick M. — Prof., A. H. & Dairying Sect., Dept. of A. I. 

114 Polk 268 

Residence: 1803 Fairview Rd. Tel. 2-0217. 
*Hall, Ruth B.— Instr., M. L. Dept. 205 Peele 231 

Residence: 1804 Sunset Dr. Tel. 5026. 
*Halverson, John O.— Assoc, Nutr. Sect., A. I. Dept. 315 Polk 241 

Residence: 2813 Mayview Rd. Tel. 2-1488. 
*Hamby, T. M.— Steward, Cafeteria. Steward's Office Tel. 2-0243 

Residence: 119 Chamberlain St. 



16 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

^Hamilton. C. Horace — Head. Rural Sociol. Dept. 135-1911 312 

Residence: 3207 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-3383. 

*Hamilton, C. Merrill — Supt., Stud. Teaching, Ind. A. Dept., Div. of 

Teacher Ed. 122 Tompkins 258 

Residence: V-2-A Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 7759. 

*Hancock. Elizabeth 0.— Sec. Soil Conservation Ser. 229-1911. Tel. 3-2531 
Residence: 1605 N. Blount St. Tel. 3-1730. 

Hand, Douglas — Sec. Agr. Ext. Ser.. Home Demonstration Dept. 

203-1911 285 

Residence: B-102 Boylan Apts. Tel. 9535. 

Harden. Kath — Transcript Clerk. Registration Office. 206 Holladav 219 
Residence: 1615 Hillsboro St. Tel. 7502. 

Hardison. Winifred — Lab. Technician, Dairv Research Sect., A. I. 

Dept. 210 Polk 305 

Residence: 2206 Fairview Rd. Tel. 3-2394. 

*Hare. W. H. — Carpenter, Agr. Engr. Dept. Agr. Engr. Bldg 204 

Residence: Cary, N. C. 

*Harrelson. John William — Dean of Administration. "A" Holladav . . 210 
Residence: 1903 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6810. 

*Harrill. L. R.— State 4-H Club Leader. 201 Ricks 214 

Residence: 1607 Iredell Dr. Tel. 7628. 

*Harris. John H.— Specialist. Hort. Dept. 302 Polk 275 & 318 

Residence: 701 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-2900. 

*Harris. Mrs. M. W. C— Instr., Phvsics Dept. 110 Daniels 229 

Residence: 1203 Filmore St. Tel. 2-1469. 

"Harris. R. J.— Asst. Dir.. Exp. Sta Tel. 8901 

Residence: Western Blvd. Tel. 8901. 

Harrison. Helen K. — Sec. Nutrition Sect.. A. I. Dept. 116 Polk .... 320 
Residence: 1616 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-2420. 

Harrison. Thomas Perrin — Dean Emeritus of the College. Eng. 

Dept. 106 Peele 223 

Residence: 2316 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6709. 

*Hart. T. R.— Prof, of Tex. 107 Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 501 W. Whitaker Mill Rd. Tel. 2-1653. 

*Hartsock. Georgia C— Clerk. Business Office. "B" Holladay 316 

Residence: 205 Chamberlain St. Tel. 2-3882. 

*Hartwig. E. E. — Asst. Agronomist. Plant Breeding. Agron. Dept. 

315-1911 324 & 262 

Residence: 2824 Bedford Ave. Tel. 3-3063. 

*Harvev. Paul H. — Assoc Agronomist. Plant Breeding. Agron. Dept. 

Ill Withers 263 

Residence: 2706 Everett Ave. Tel. 2-0475. 

♦Haves. A. C— Asst. Prof, of Tex. Chem. School of Tex. 2 Tex. Bldg. 287 
Residence: 3008 Ruffin St. Tel. 2-3851. 

Havwood. Miss Nettie D.— Sec. Agr. Exp. Sta. 109 Ricks 211 

Residence: 821 Wake Forest Rd. Tel. 4206. 

*Heartt. Mrs. Charles I.— Sec. College Ext. Div. 201-4 Librarv 260 

Residence: 128 S. Dawson St. Tel. 4057. 

*Heck. C. M.— Prof. & Head. Phvsics Dept. 112 Daniels 229 

Residence: 200 Hawthorn St. Tel. 9829. 

*Hendricks. Walter A. — Sen. Agr. Statistician. Bur. of Agr. Engr., 

USDA (Exp. Stat.) 333-1911 Tel. 3-2454 

Residence: 2604 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 5570. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 17 

Ext. 
♦Hendrix, J. Max — State Admin. Asst., Soil Conservation Ser. 

232-1911 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: 18 Maiden Lane. Tel. 3-1548. 

Henson, Ruth S. — Bookkeeper, Business Office. 106 Holladay 298 

Residence: 116% Home St. Tel. 7449. 

♦Hicks, Mrs. Dolly D. — Sec, Aero. Engr. Dept. Aero. Lab 248 

Residence: G-2 Grosvenor Gardens Apts. Tel. 6272. 

Hicks, Madie Belle — Sec, Chem. Dept. 108 Withers 265 

Residence : 926 N. Boylan Ave. Tel. 5781. 
*Hicks, William Norwood — Prof. & Head, Ethics & Religion Dept. 

204 Peele 231 

Residence: 2505 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel. 7750. 

Hill, Randolph (Miss) — Stem, Agron. Dept. 120 Ricks 262 

Residence: 2200 Hope St. Tel. 2-3466. 

♦Hilton, John T.— Prof, of Tex., School of Tex. 301 Tex. Bldg 287 

Residence: 1610 Ambleside Dr. Tel. 6936. 
*Hiner, Foy Pate ( Mrs. J— Cashier, Cafeteria. Steward's Office Tel. 2-0243 

Residence: Route 1, Cary, N. C. 
♦Hines, T. I.— Asst. Prof., Swim. & Track Coach. Phys. Ed. & Ath. 

Dept. Gym 218 

Residence: 5Y 2 Dixie Trail. Tel. 2-1139. 
♦Hinkle, L. E.— Head, M. L. Dept., & Dir., Transl. Ser. 

203 Peele 231 

Residence : 1714 Park Dr. Tel. 2-0380. 

♦Hinson, Zona G. — Bookkeeper, Business Office. 103 Holladay 316 

Residence: 3314 Pollock Place. Tel. 5195. 
Hobbs, James E. — Farm Forester, For. Ext. ; Chief Dorm. Asst. 

307 Ricks 270 

Residence: 203 Watauga, Box 3021. Tel. 9132. 

♦Hobby, Arlene B. — Mail Clerk, Publications. 15 Ricks 254 

Residence: 919 W. South St. Tel. 2-2702. 

♦Hoefer, E. G.— Prof., M. E. Dept. 205 Page 302 

Residence: 1-2 Grosvenor Apts. Tel. 7072. 

♦Hoffman, Mrs. F. B.— Stem, Agr. Ext. Ser Tel. 3-3882 

104 Ricks & 213 

Residence: Andrew Johnson Hotel. Tel. 4466. 

♦Hoffman, W. H. — Ser. Dept. Warehouse 272 

Residence: 217 Hawthorn St. 

Hofmann, Julius V. — Dir., Div. of For. 301 Ricks 270 

Residence: 2800 Fairview Rd. Tel. 2-2993. 
♦Holler, Dan F. — Ext. Cotton Marketing Specialist, Agr. Ext. Service. 

122-1911 306 

Residence: 2807 Mayview Rd. Tel. 3-1343. 
Holloway, Mary Elizabeth — Research Asst., Rural Sociol. Dept. 

137-1911 312 

Residence: 123 Forest Rd. Tel. 2-3131. 
♦Holmes, Mrs. Evelyn S. — Sec, United Nations Council. 202 Peele . 231 
Residence: 1508 Canterbury Rd. Tel. 3-3705. 

♦Holmes, Horace C. — Farm Management Specialist. 308-1911 291 

Residence: 1508 Canterbury Rd. Tel. 3-3705. 

♦Hooke, Robert — Asst. Prof., Math. Dept. 209 Tompkins 226 

Residence: 402 Home St. Tel. 2-2751. 

♦Hopkins, John I. — Asst. Prof., Physics. 208 Daniels 229 

Residence: 2502 Rosedale Ave. Tel. 8995. 

♦Horan, Mrs. Helen B.— Sec, E. E. Dept. 201 Daniels 236 

Residence: 2202 Hillsboro St. Tel. 4509. 



18 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 
•Hostetler, Earl H.— Prof. & Head. A. H. Sect.: Assoc in A. I. A. I. 

I ept 215 Polk 276 

7 esidenee: 2524 White Oak Rd. Tel. 5794. 
Hudgins. Madge — Sten., Seed Improvement. Agron. Dept. 311 Ricks 207 
dence: 402 Horne St. Tel. 2-211 

Hughes. Grace — Sec.. Chem. EngT. Dept. Ill Winston 301 

Residence 124 Cotter St TeL 2-2451. 

*Hunt. C. Lindsev — Soil Scientist. Soil Conservation Ser. 

226-1911 * Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: Country Club Homes. Tel. 3-1428. 
Hunter. Willie (Miss) — Ext. Specialist in Clothing. Agr. Ext. 

Service. Home Demonstration Dent. 220-1911 242 

Residence: 825 Holt Dr. Tel. 8430. 

Hyde, Thomas E.— Ir.str.. M. E. Deot. 207 Page 302 

Residence: 311 Forest Rd. Teh 7889. 

*Ivev. L. L. — Manager, Students Supply Stores Tel. 2-3674 

YMCA ft 285 

Residence: 202 E. Park Dr. Teh S210. 

*James. H. Brooks — Assoc Agr. Economist. Agr. Econ. 106-1911 309 

Re;:-:-:-: 2 = :: :ia-~- ?.h Teh i-ii-h:. 
*Jerniean. E. C — Asst. State Conservationist. Soil Conservation 

Service. 14-1 11 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: 2809 Kittrell Dr. Tel. 2-1267. 
*Jeter. Frank H. — Dir.. College New; Bureau; Editor. Publications 

i ? ■--"■'-■'—.-. 1 ?.-';■'--= 279 

Reshe :e : f : 4F:re = : Rd. Tel. 6518. 
*Johnsor. E. 1L— Custodian Gym. & Supplies. Deot. of Phys. Ed. & 

Residence 9 I ■::•:: e Trail. Tel. 3-1506. 

Johnson. Robbie Mian —Sec, Business Office. 105 Holladav 295 

Residence: 230 E. Park Dr. Tel. 2-1686. 

Jones, ABce— Clerk, Voc Ed. Deot. 105 Tompkins Hall 311 

Residence: Car-.-. N. C he. 2—h 
*Jones. Ivan D.— Biochemist. Hort. Dept. 305 Polk 275 & 318 

Residence: 2710 Rosedale Ave. Tel. 2-3091. 

Jones, Louise — Sten.. Deot. of Voc. Ed. 105 Tompkins 311 

Residence: CaryhN. C. Tel. 2521. 
Jones, Mabel — Clerk-Sten.. Sofl Conservation Ser. 239-1911 Tel. 3-2531 
Residence: 944 Harp Terrace. Tel. 8178. 

Jones, Marearet — See . Pool Deot. 216 Ricks 280 

Residence: B-301 Boylan Apt*. Tel. 3-1129. 

\~-r.e; : r r;. W. Brvce — Clerk Busfaiess Office. B Holladav 278 

Re;iderce: Cary. N. C. 

Jcrdar.. Be-rr W. — Sec. Div. of Teacher Ed. 103 Tompkins 257 

Residence Oniy. N. C. Tel 2871. 

'Jordan, W. E — A = - m T : . '"hem. Dept. 106 Withers 265 

Residence: 2?'0 P.:sedaU Ave. Tel 2-3574. 
' r -= Lillv B.— r ".erh Office :f Dir. of Asrr. Exp. Sta. 

Ill Rick; ' . 315 

Residence: 309 E. Morgan St. Tel. 89" 

"Is-:::.-.?'. <".—■: .er.s Y — ' = = : E:r. lee '/.'. R.:V.; 270 



*Keever. Lerov Monroe— Assoc Prof.. E. E. Dept. 106 Daniels 235 

Residence: 2200 Carroll Dr. Tel. 9818. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 19 

Ext. 

Kendrick, Alma— Sec, Graduate School. 104 Zool. Bldg 239 

Residence: 105 Harrison Ave. Tel. 7652. 

*Kenyon, Bert W., Jr. — Asst. Agr. Economist, Agr. Econ. Dept. 

113-1911 : 308 

Residence: J-2 Raleigh Apts. Tel. 2-1098. 

*Kenyon, Mrs. B. W., Jr.— Sec, Zool. & Entom. Dept. 104 Zool. Bldg. 239 
Residence: J-2 Raleigh Apts. Tel. 2-1098. 

*Kerr, E. G.— Supt. of Dairy, A. I. Dept Tel. 2-1429 

Residence: Dairy Farm Cottage. Tel. 2-1429. 

*Kerr, Thomas — Cytologist, Cotton Fiber Investigations. 105 Polk . . 300 
Residence: 3401 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-2101. 

*Kime, P. H. — Assoc. Agronomist, Plant Breeding. Agron. Dept. 

112 Ricks 262 

Residence: 2717 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel. 2-2126. 

*Kimrey, A. C— Ext. Dairyman, Dairy Ext. Div. 104 Polk 277 

Residence: 220 E. Park Dr. Tel. 2-0856. 

*Kincheloe, Chester— Sgt., DEML-ASTP. Personnel Clerk, Mil. Dept. 

11 Holladay 314 

Residence: 422 Cutler St. Tel. 9982. 

*King, E. S.— Gen. Sec, YMCA. 2nd Floor Tel. 7184 

Residence: 121 Chamberlain St. Tel. 4511. 

King, Nora Lillington — Sec. to Dean of Administration. 

"A" Holladay 210 

Residence: 205 Woodburn Rd. Tel. 2-1698. 

Klapp, Ruth— Clerk-Sten., Soil Conservation Ser. 240-1911 . . Tel. 3-2531 
Residence: 114 E. Park Dr. Tel. 8682. 

*Kovac, Theodora— Sen. Stat. Clerk, Exp. Stat. Dept. 114-1911 308 

Residence: D-l-A Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 4445. 

*Krantz, B. A.— Asst. Soil Scientist, Agron. Dept. 310 Withers 222 

Residence: 114 Park Ave. Tel. 3-3846. 

*Kulash, Walter M. — Instr. & Asst. Entomologist, Zool. & Entomol. 

Dept. 106 Zool. Bldg 239 

Residence: 28 Bagwell Ave. Tel. 7407. 

*Kutschinski, C. D.— Dir. of Music. 10 Holladay 251 

Residence: 1500 Hillsboro St. Tel. 5427. 

*Ladu, Arthur I.— Prof., Eng. Dept. 105 Pullen 237 

Residence: 705 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-0709. 

*Lambe, C. M.— Asst. Prof., C. E. Dept. 219 C. E. Bldg 303 

Residence: 413 Calvin Rd. Tel. 6565. 
♦Lancaster, Elizabeth D. (Mrs.) — Jun. Accountant, Dept. of Voc 

Ed. 105 Tompkins 311 

Residence: 407 N. Person St. Tel. 5896. 
♦Lancaster, Forrest W. — Assoc. Prof., Physics Dept. 206 Daniels . . 229 
Residence: 2403 Everett Ave. Tel. 6316. 
Lane, Rachel Penn (Miss) — Librarian- Abstracter, Textile Library. 

Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 110 Cox Ave. Tel. 8212. 

♦Lassiter, J. Y.— Ext. Specialist, Hort. Dept. 301 Polk 275 & 318 

Residence: 2811 Bedford Ave. Tel. 3-2675. 
♦Leagans, J. P. — Program Planning Specialist, Program Planning 

Dept. 310-1911 292 

Residence: 24 Shepherd St. Tel. 7866. 

*Lear, John Emery— Prof., E. E. Dept. "A" Daniels 235 

Residence: 1812 Park Dr. Tel. 7701. 



20 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

Lee, Melva C. — Sten.. Phvsics Dept. 112 Daniels 229 

Residence: 2230 Hillsboro St. 

*Lee, W. D.— Specialist, Agron. Ext. 206 Ricks 294 

Residence: 318 Furches St. Tel. 2-3930. 
"Lehman, S. G.— Prof.. Plant Pathology. Bot. Dept. 206 Winston . 267 

Residence: 123 Brooks Ave. Tel. 8764. 
"Leipold. John A.— M/Sgt., DEML-ROTC, Post Sgt. Major, Mil. 

Dept. 3 Holladay 233 

Residence: D-2-A Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 3-1524. 

"Leonard. Paul B.— Instr., M. E. Dept. 207 Page 302 

Residence: 2804 Bannettler St. Tel. 9692. 

"Lewis. J. G. — Assoc. Prof, of Tex. 220 Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 518 Dixie Trail. Tel. 7783. 

Lineberry. Foy — Catalog Librarian. Library 259 

Residence: State School for the Blind. Tel. 4601. 
"Lineberrv, R. A.— Asst. Chemist, Agron. Dept. & USDA. 112 Ricks 262 

Residence: 3006 Ruffin St. Tel. 3-1125. 
"Living-stone, Mrs. John A. — Sec, A. I. Dept. A. H. Section. 

215 Polk 276 

Residence: 903 W. Johnson St. Tel. 6997. 

"Loeppert, Richard H.— Asst. Prof.. Chem. Dept. 20 Withers 265 

Residence: 301 Forest Rd. Tel. 2-1414. 

"Loevrensberg. Walter — Instr.. M. E. Dept. 105 Page 246 

Residence: 2707 Bedford Ave. Tel. 6466. 
"Loewensber?. Mrs. Walter — Lab. Tech., Dairv Research Sect., A. I. 

Dept. 210 Polk 305 

Residence: 2707 Bedford Ave. Tel. 6466. 
"Loworn. R. L. — Assoc. Agronomist, Forage Crops. Agron. Dept. 

320-1911 324 & 262 

Residence: 2627 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 6579. 
"Ludington. John R. — Prof, of Ed., Head, Ind. Arts Dept. Div. of 

Teacher Ed. 122 Tompkins 258 

Residence: 2620 Churchill Rd. Tel. 5288. 

Lutz. J. R.— Prof., Soils. Agron. Dept. 115 Ricks 262 

Residence: Dixie Trail Extended. Tel. 2-2460. 

"Lynn. Mrs. D. E. — Sec. Agron. Ext. 208 Ricks 294 

Residence: 7 Dixie Trail. Tel. 3-1777. 
"Lvnn. Hazel — Sen. Stat. Clerk. Exp. Stat. Dept. 3rd Floor-1911 ... 313 
Residence : 201 W. Park Dr. Tel. 5396. 

"Lvnn. J. T.— Instr.. Phvsics Dept. 108 Daniels 229 

Residence: 112 Cox Ave. Tel. 2-3798. 

"McAllister. Mary L. — Ext. Economist in Food Conservation & 

Marketing'. Agr. Ext. Service. Home Demonstration. 215-1911 243 

Residence: 1425 V 2 Park Drive. Tel. 8715. 
"McCaslan. C. L. — Agr. Engr. Ext. Specialist, Agr. Engr. Ext. 

312 Ricks . 274 

Residence: 3310 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-3809. 
"McCrarv. O. F.— Dist. Agt.. Ag-r. Ext. Service. 101 Ricks 212 

Residence: 127 Brooks Ave. Tel. 9922. 
"McCutcheon. F. H.— Prof.. Zool. Dent. 209 Zool. Bldg 239 

Residence: 2721 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 6453. 
"McDonald. Mrs. F. P.— Clerk. Dean of Students' Office. 101 Holladay 215 

Residence: Box 83, Route 2. 
"McDonald. Mrs. Mable P. — Clerk. Agr. Ext. Auditing. 105 Ricks . . 271 

Residence: 1905 McDonald Lane. Tel. 9920. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 21 

Ext. 

*McDuffie, Mrs. Arlesia D. — Asst. Supt. & Cashier, Laundry 283 

Residence: 202 Ashe Ave. Tel. 7754. 
Mclver, Julia — Asst. Ext. Spec, in Clothing. Agr. Ext. Ser., Home 

Demon. Dept. 217-1911 242 

Residence: 2202 Ridgecrest Rd. Tel. 2-1904. 
*McKimmon, Mrs. Jane S.— Asst. Dir., Agr. Ext. Ser. 116 Ricks ... 262 
Residence: 123 New Bern Ave. Tel. 8619. 

*McKimmon, Katharine C— Clerk, Agron. Dept. 120 Ricks 262 

Residence: E-4, Raleigh Apts. Tel. 6753. 

McLean, Grayce— Clerk, Business Office. "B" Holladay 316 

Residence: 1508 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6153. 
*McLean, L. G.— Assoc. Horticulturist, Hort. Dept. 307 Polk ... 275 & 318 

Residence: Route 6. Tel. 116 Co. 6214. 
*McMillen, R. W. — Asst. Agronomist, Plant Breeding. Agron. Dept. 

Ill Withers 263 

Residence: 2704 North Dr. 

*McMillin, Douglass N.— Col., Infantry, PMS&T, ROTC, & Com- 
mandant, ASTP. 1 Holladay 233 

Residence: 209 Woodburn Rd. Tel. 5323. 

McVay, Francis E.— Asst., Agr. Econ. 104-1911 309 

Residence: 2716 Rosedale Tel. 2-3396. 

*Maddison, C. W. — Foreman, Foundry. M. E. Dept. Shop 245 

Residence: 301 Furches St. Tel. 2-3775. 

Maddrev, Ellen — Lab. Technician, Agron. Dept. 9 Withers 209 

'Residence : The Elms, 220 Hillsboro St. Tel. 9317. 

Maddrv, Linda— Sec, Math. Dept. 201 Tompkins 227 

'Residence: Avent Ferry Road. Tel. 5797. 

*Maddux, Henry— Asst. Ext. Editor. 9 Ricks 279 

Residence : 2404 Everett Ave. Tel. 2-1032. 
*Magarian, Vahan K. — 1st Lt., AGD. Classification Officer, Mil. Dept. 

2 Holladay 233 

Residence: 203 E. Boylan Apts. Tel. 9898. 

*Mancari, Sebastian A.— Sgt., DEML-ASTP. Personnel Clerk. Mil. 

Dept. 3 Holladay 233 

Residence: 11 Dixie Trail. Tel. 2-3206. 

*Mann, C. L.— Prof. & Head, C. E. Dept. 211 C. E. Bldg 303 

Residence: 1702 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6825. 
*Mann, Julian E. — In Charge, Ext. Studies. Agr. Ext. Ser. 

108-110 Ricks 255 

Residence: 2505 Country Club Rd. Tel. 2-3415. 

♦Marshall, Roger Powell — Acting Head, Eng. Dept. 104 Pullen .... 237 
Residence: 1512 Park Dr. Tel. 5297. 
Martin, A. M. — Jun. Admin. Asst., Soil Conservation Ser. 

238-1911 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: 2 Logan Court. Tel. 2-2673. 

Mason, Edna Belle— Sec, C. E. Dept. 210 C. E. Bldg 303 

Residence: 113% Chamberlain St. 
Mason, Eleanor H. — Sec, Agr. Ext. Ser. Home Demonstration Dept. 

207-1911 244 

Residence: 302 N. Blount St. Tel. 2-2938. 

*Maupin, C. J.— Ext. Poultrv Specialist, Poul. Ext. 210 Ricks 321 

Residence: 2806 Hillsboro St. Tel. 3-3671. 

*Maupin, Mrs. T. K. — Sec, Ceramic Engr. Dept. Ceramic Bldg 249 

Residence: 2725 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-3003. 



22 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

♦Maxwell. J. Myron — In Charge. Entoniologv Ext. 105 Zool. Bldg. . . 201 
Residence: 16 Dixie Trail. Tel. 5964. 

♦Maver, W. L. — Dir. of Registration. 208 Holladav 219 

Residence: 20 Bagwell Ave. Tel. 2-0027. 

♦Maynard. Mrs. M. B. — Sec. Food Prod. War Training Program. 

Dept. of Voc. Ed. 108 Tompkins 311 

Residence: 220 Chamberlain St. Tel. 2-0222. 

♦Mayo, Selz C— Rural Sociologist, Rural Sociol. Dept. 139-1911 312 

Residence: D-3 Country Club Homes. 

♦Mavton. R. W. — Carpenter Foreman. Service Dept. Warehouse 272 

Residence: Cary, N. C. Tel. 2S63. 

♦Meacham. H. L. — In Charge, Marketing Ext. Agr. Ext. Ser. 

123-1911 306 

Residence: 1718 Park Dr. Tel. 2-0713. 

'Means, J. S.— Assoc. Prof., Phvsics Dept. 206 Daniels 229 

Residence: 2408 Everett Ave. Tel. 4594. 

*Meekins, E. N. — Dist. Supervisor. Dept. of Voc. Ed. 106 Tompkins . 282 
Residence: Cary, N. C. Tel. 2591. 

♦Mehlich, Adolf— Assoc. Soil Chemist, Agron. Dept. Ill Polk 220 

Residence: 2717 Barmettler St. Tel. 2-1S-53. 

*Mendenhall, W. C— Instr.. Diesel Engines, M. E. Dept. 105 Page . 246 
Residence: 104 Logan Court. 

*MendenhaU, W. G.— Instr., M. E. Dept. Shop 245 

Residence: Cary Road. Tel. 3-3417. 

♦Merritt. Mrs. Emilv W.— Bookkeeper. Business Office. 103 Holladav 316 
Residence: C-2 Wilmont Apts. Tel. 2-1002. 

♦Metcalf, Z. P. — Assoc. Dean of Grad. School. Head, Zool. & Entom. 

Dept. 101 Zool. Bldg 239 

Residence: 315 Forest Rd. Tel. 2-3788. 

♦Michelsen. Gerald L.— 1. Sgt.. DEML-ASTP. Sgt. Majo., 1st Bn. 

ASTP. Mil. Dept. 106 Svnie 203 

Residence: 101 E. Park Dr. Tel. 3-2100. 

♦Middleton. Gordon K. — Head. Field Crops Sect.. Agron. Dept. 

119 Ricks 262 

Residence: 2830 Barmettler St. Tel. 2-2313. 

♦Miller, E. L.. Jr.— Instr., Geology Dept. 2 Primrose 304 

Residence: 2402 Clark Ave. Tel. 3-1749. 

♦Miller. F. E.— Dir. of Station Farms. N. C. Dept. of Agr. 

Agr. Bldg Tel. 6611 or 560 

Residence: 1628 Park Dr. 

♦Miller, J. F.— Prof. & Head, Phys. Ed. & Ath. Dept. Gym 218 

Residence: 191 Chamberlain St. Tel. 5823. 

♦Miller, William D.— Assoc. Prof.. For. Dept. 303 Ricks 270 

Residence: 1907 Victoria Rd. Tel. 2-1066. 

♦Minshew. Mrs. Emma L. — Operator, College Telephone Exchange. 

117 Winston 

Residence: 311 Shepherd St. Tel. 6519. 
♦Mitchell. Adolphus — Assoc. Prof., Engr. Mechanics Dept. 204 C. E. 

Bldg 303 

Residence: 1614 Ambleside Dr. Tel. 2-2412. 

Mitchell. Marv Frances — Mail Clerk. Publications. 15 Ricks 254 

Residence: 2015 Fairview Rd. Tel. 2-1026. 

♦Mitchell. T. B.— Prof.. Zool. Dept. 103 Zool 239 

Residence: 1007 W. Peace St. Tel. 6967. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 23 

Ext. 
*Moen, R. 0. — Prof., Business Admin. Economics Dept. 113 Peele . 223 

Residence : 3202 Clark Ave. Tel. 5051. 
Monk, Martha M.— Sec, News Bureau, Pub. Dept. 13 Ricks 253 

Residence: 1719 Park Dr. Tel. 2-1245. 
*Montague, Virginia M.— Asst. in Stat., Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence: 905 W. Lenoir St. Tel. 2-3855. 
*Montgomery, Ruth Green — Lab. Technician, Agron. Dept. 317 Ricks 207 

Residence: 11 S. Boylan Ave., Apt. 5. 
*Moore, J. H. — Assoc. Agronomist, Cotton Technology. Agron. Dept. 

317 Ricks 207 

Residence: 2713 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-3638. 
*Moore, James L.— Asst., A. I., Dairy Sect. A. I. Dept. 213 Polk ... 305 

Residence: 3208 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-0821. 
*Moore, Mrs. James L.— Sec, Dairy Ext. 103 Polk 277 

Residence: 3208 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-0821. 

* Moore, R. P. — Assoc. Agronomist, In Charge, Variety Tests. Agron. 

Dept. 315 Ricks 207 

Residence: 216 Chamberlain St. Tel. 6881. 

*Morgan, John W.— Instr., Chem. Dept. 115 Withers 265 

Residence: 2614 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 8608. 

Morris, James E. — Lab. Asst., Aero. Engr. Dept. Aero. Lab 248 

Residence: 502 W. Maywood Ave. 
*Morris, W. F. — Director of Services, Service Dept. Warehouse .... 272 

Residence: 2509 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel. 5319. 
*Morrow, E. B.— Assoc. Horticulturist. Hort. Dept. 309 Polk. . 275 & 318 
Residence: 2712 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel. 2-1952. 

*Mumford, C. G.— Prof., Math. Dept. 224 Tompkins 228 

Residence: 712 Brooks Ave. Tel. 5315. 
Murakishi, Harry — Research Fel., Plant Pathology. Bot. Dept. 

215 Winston 267 

Residence: 11 Enterprise St. Tel. 5449. 

* Murray, W. M.— Auditor, Business Office. "B" Holladay 298 

Residence: T-3-B Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 2-3525. 

*Neale, W. M.— Instr., M. E. Dept. 103 Page 246 

Residence: 308 Pogue St. Tel. 6177. 
*Neely, John K. — Clerk, Students Supply Stores. 

YMCA Tel. 2-3674 or 225 

Residence: 2406y 2 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-1268. 

*Nelson, Mrs. E. R.— Sec, Engr. Mech. Dept. 101 C. E. Bldg 317 

Sec. Geol. Dept. 1 Primrose 304 

Residence: 3413 Hillsboro St. Tel. 3-2080. 
Nelson, Thomas— Dean Emeritus, School of Textiles. 105 Tex. Bldg. 273 
Residence: 16 Enterprise St. Tel. 2-2247. 
*Nelson, W. L. — Assoc. Agronomist, Soil Fertility. Agron. Dept. 

310 Withers 222 

Residence: 2710 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 3-3748. 
*Nesbit, W. B. — Turkey Research, Turkey Plant. Poul. Dept. 

Residence: Marcom Ave. Tel. 3-1587. 
*Nespeco, Mary Nelson — Sec, Agr. Ext. Ser., Home Demonstration 

Dept. 209-1911 243 

Residence: 16 Enterprise St. Tel. 3-3748. 
♦Newman, Mrs. C. L.— Sec, Dept. of A. I., A. H. Sect. 215 Polk .... 276 
Residence: 1618 Oberlin Rd. Tel. 2-0912. 

Newton, Foy— Stem, Agr. Ext. Ser. 101 Ricks 212 

Residence: 319 New Bern Ave. Tel. 2-2096. 



24 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

♦Nichols, J. Hervey — Lab. Technician, E. E. Dept. 9 Daniels 235 

Residence: 2820 Mayview Rd. Tel. 9776. 

*Nickell, J. Paul— Instr., Eng. Dept. 6 Pullen 237 

Residence: 705 W. Morgan St. Tel. 3-1729. 

*Niswonger, H. R. — In Charge, Hort. Ext., Hort. Dept. 

301 Polk 275 & 318 

Residence: A-2-A Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 2-3297. 

*Nowell, Eloise— Sten., Mil. Dept. 3 Holladay 233 

Residence: 425 N. Blount St. Tel. 2-3407. 

*Paget, Edwin H. — Assoc. Prof, of Speech, Dept. of Eng 237 

Residence : 2733 Everett Ave. Tel. 2-3495. 

*Park, C. B— Instr. Emeritus, M. E. Dept. 

Residence: 125 Hawthorn St. Tel. 6957. 

*Park, Hubert V.— Assoc. Prof., Math. Dept. 222 Tompkins 228 

Residence: 404 Chamberlain St. Tel. 2-3589. 

Parker, Ruth G.— Sec, Poul. Ext. 208 Ricks 321 

Residence: 3017 Banbury Rd. Tel. 9693. 

Parks, Mary Louise — Sec, Ext. Plant Path., Botany Dept 267 

Residence: 1710 Park Dr. Tel. 2-1387. 

*Parrish, C. F.— In Charge, Poul. Ext. 208 Ricks 321 

Residence: Western Blvd. Tel. 2-2888. 

Pate, Rudolph — News Editor, News Bureau. 13 Ricks 253 

Residence: 2206 Hope St. Tel. 8963. 

Patten, Elizabeth — Admissions Clerk, Registration Office. 

207 Holladay 219 

Residence: 13 Furches St. Tel. 6452. 

*Patton, James W.— Head, Hist. & Polit. Sc Dept. 102 Peele 200 

Residence: 2612 Clark Ave. Tel. 3-2317. 

♦Paulson, Jehu D. — Prof., Arch. 315 Daniels 250 

Residence: 2705 Everett Ave. Tel. 8823. 
*Pearsall, Robert James — Asst. Prof., E. E. Dept. Temporarily with 

Diesel Training Program. 106 Daniels 235 

Residence : 2232 Hillsboro St. Tel. 3-2404. 
♦Peeler, R. H. — Asst. Supervisor, Div. of Voc Agr. 107 Tompkins . . 282 

Residence: 2812 Kilgore St. Tel. 2-3649. 
♦Pennington, Mildred C— Sen. Stat. Clerk, Bureau of Ag. Ec, USDA. 

340-1911 313 

Residence: 611 Gaston St. Tel. 7611. 
♦Peterson, Walter J. — Assoc, A. I. ; Head, Animal Nutrition Sect. 

116 and 314 Polk 320 & 241 

Residence: 1121 Harvey St. Tel. 3-1651. 

*Phelps, Elizabeth B.— Lab. Tech., Agron. Dept. 5 Withers 209 

Residence: 2701 Kilgore St. Tel. 3-3901. 

Phelps, W. R.— Clerk, Serv. Dept. Warehouse 272 

Residence: 217% N. Bloodworth St. Tel. 6688. 
♦Phillips, Llewellyn B.— In Charge, Print. & Suppl., Pub. Ext. 

21 Ricks 254 

Residence: 2809 O'Berry St. Tel. 8437. 

Pierce, Lelia Ruth— Clerk, Dept. of Voc. Ed. 105 Tompkins 311 

Residence: 1509 Hillsboro St. Tel. 3-1577. 

*Piland, J. R. — Assoc. Soil Chemist, Agron. Dept. 5 Withers 209 

Residence: 2406 Stafford Ave. Tel. 9511. 

Pillsbury, J. P.— Prof., Land Arch. Dept. 204 Polk 296 

Residence: 2715 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6694. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 25 

Ext. 
Pleasant, Maythorne (Miss) — Clerk-Sten., Soil Con. Serv. 

239-1911 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: 704 N. East St. Tel. 9522. 
Poole, Mary Elizabeth — Reference & Document Librarian. Library 259 
Residence: 221 Hawthorn St. Tel. 2-3742. 

Porter, Sarah— Tech. Asst., Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence: 700 N. East St. Tel. 7408. 
Powell, Geo. B.— Athl. Trainer, P. E. & Athl. Dept. Field House Tel. 6934 
Residence: Field House. Tel. 6934. 

♦Price, E. W., Jr.— Instr., C. E. Dept. 208 C. E. Bldg 303 

Residence: 2707 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 8283. 

Proctor, Lucile — Ext. Art., Publications. 21 Ricks 254 

Residence: 1616 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-2420. 

*Pugh, Ed. S. — Asst. Arch., Arch. Dept. 315 Daniels 250 

Residence: Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 3-1772. 

♦Randall, Glenn O.— Assoc. Prof., Hort. Dept. 305 Polk 275 & 318 

Residence: Rt. 6, Raleigh. Tel. 116 Co. 6211. 
♦Randolph, E. E.— Head, Ch. E. Dept. Ill Winston 301 

Residence : 212 Groveland Ave. Tel. 8992. 
*Rankin, W. H. — Assoc. Agronomist, Agron. 114 Ricks 262 

Residence: 2408 Stafford Ave. Tel. 8057. 
*Ray, M. E.— Instr., C. E. Dept. 208 C. E. Bldg 303 

Residence: 317 Calvin Rd. Tel. 4749. 
♦Reed, J. F. — Assoc. Agron., Soil Fertility, Agron. Dept. 114 Ricks . . 262 

Residence: 118 Home St. Tel. 2-1962. 
♦Reid, W. A.— Assoc. Prof., Chem. Dept. 311 Withers 265 

Residence: Dixie Trail. Tel. 2-3157. 
Rice, Robert B.— Prof., M. E.; Exec. Officer, M. E. Dept.; Director, 

Diesel Engr.; P&W Coordinator. 107 Page 323 

Residence: 2712 Cambridge Rd. Tel. 2-1195. 
♦Riddle, A. A.— Supt., Power Plant 234 

Residence: 2805 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-2706. 
♦Rigney, J. A.— Assoc. Prof., Exp. Stat, and Agron. 338-1911 313 

Residence: 712 Brooks Ave. Tel. 5047. 
♦Riley, Mrs. Phyllis— Clerk, Agr. Ext. Studies. 108 Ricks 255 

Residence: 20 Ferndell Lane. Tel. 5-0334. 
♦Ritchey, Wilbert S.— Corporal, DEML-ASTP. Truck Driver & Asst. 

Sup. Sg., Mil. Dept. Armory 232 

Residence: 1806 Hillsboro St. Tel. 2-2565. 
♦Ritchie, Mrs. J. I.— Stem, Hist. & Pol. Sci. Dept. 104 Peele 200 

Residence: 1719 Park Dr. Tel. 2-1245. 
Rives, Sarah Leigh — Asst. Bookkeeper, Students Supply Stores Tel. 2-3674 
YMCA or 225 

Residence: 2230 Hillsboro St. 
♦Roberts, William M. — Assoc, Dairy Mfg. Sect. A. I. Dept. 

211 Polk 305 

Residence: 20 Bagwell Ave. Tel. 9814. 
Robinson, Emma Mae — Asst. in Circulation Dept. Library 259 

Residence: Rt. 1, Cary, N. C. Tel. Raleigh 7355. 
♦Robinson, Glenn H. — Soil Surveyor, Agron. Dept. 206 Ricks 294 

Residence : 
♦Rondeau, H. C. — Kitchen Mgr., Boarding Dept. Leazar Hall . Tel. 2-0243 

Residence: 115 Oberlin Rd. 
♦Rooney, Mrs. Arthur E. — Sec, Zoology Dept. 104 Zoology 239 

Residence: C5 Raleigh Apts. Tel. 3-2041. 



26 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

Rowe, Beatrice — Sec, Dept. of English. 104 Pullen 237 

Residence: 1709 Hillsboro St. Tel. 9802. 

Rowland, M. R.— Asst. Prof., M. E. Dept. Shop 245 

Residence: 2518 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-3475. 

*Ruffner, R. H.— Prof., A. H. & Dairying, A. I. Dept. 115 Polk 268 

Residence: 1910 Park Dr. Tel. 2-0746. 
*Ruggles, Edward W.— Director, College Ext. Div., E.S.M.W.T. 

201-4 Library 238 

Residence: 2411 Everett Ave. Tel. 2-1812. 
*Rushton, Mrs. Muriel L. — Chief Clerk, U. S. Bureau of Mines. 

129-1911 208 

Residence: 228 Woodburn Rd. 

*Satterfield, G. Howard— Prof, of Biochem., Chem. Dept. 201 Withers 864 

Residence: 207 W. Park Dr. Tel. 2-2963. 
*Schaub, I. O. — Dean, School of Agr. & For.; Director, Agr. Ext. 

Service. 104 Ricks Tel. 3-38S2 or 213 

Residence : Western Blvd. Tel. 8610. 
Scholz, Rubv — Asst. Ext. Economist in Food Conserv. and Mktg.. Ag. 

Ext. Serv., Home Dem. Dept. 216-1911 243 

Residence: 15 Henderson St. Tel. 4281. 
Scott, D. J.— Bookkeeper, College Ext. Div., E.S.M.W.T. 201 Library 260 

Residence: 1418 Park Dr. Tel. 2-0040. 
*Scott, Mrs. J. K.— Sec, Agr. Ext. 104 Ricks Tel. 3-3882 or 213 

Residence: 1505 Caswell St. Tel. 7931. 
Scott, Nancy — Multilith Operator, Publications. 21 Ricks 254 

Residence: 116 St. Mary's St., No. 3. Tel. 2-0885. 
*Seagraves, W. P.— Asst. Prof., Math. 224 Tompkins 228 

Residence: 406 Chamberlain St. Tel. 8357. 
*Seegers. L. Walter— Asst. Prof., History. 107 Peele 200 

Residence: 2701 North Drive. Tel. 6238. 
*Selkinghaus, W. E.— Assoc. Prof., M. E. 103 Page 246 

Residence: 801 Chamberlain St. Tel. 2-2778. 
*Senter, C. T. — Chief Clerk, Students Supply Stores. 

YMCA Tel. 2-3674 or 225 

Residence: 907 W. Lenoir St. Tel. 4034. 
*Shanklin, J. A. — Agron. Ext. Specialist, Agron. Dept. 204 Ricks . . . 294 

Residence : 406 Brooks Ave. Tel. 3-1058. 
*Shelley, A. Bernard R.— Asst. Prof.. Dept. of English. 106 Pullen . 237 

Residence : 810 Chamberlain St. Tel. 6235. 
*Sherwood, F. W.— Assoc, in An. Nutr., A. I. Dept. 317 Polk 241 

Residence: 318 N. Boundary St. Tel. 2-0128. 
*Shinn, W. E.— Prof, of Tex. 103 Tex. Bldg 289 

Residence: 2709 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-0387. 
♦Shirley, Mrs. L. M.— Sec, F.F.A., Div. of Voc Agr. 106 Tompkins 282 

Residence: 2515 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-3906. 
*Shoffner, R. W.— In Charge, Farm Mgt. Ext. 307-1911 291 

Residence: 2402 Clark Ave. Tel. 7977. 
*Showalter, Merle F.— Assoc. Prof., Chem. Dept. 220 Withers 265 

Residence: 2820 Barmettler St. Tel. 8858. 
*Shulenberger, C. B. — Prof, of Accounting, Econ. Dept. 115 Peele . . 224 

Residence: 2501 Stafford Ave. Tel. 7165. 
*Shumaker, Ross — Head, Arch. Dept.; College Architect. 315 Daniels 250 

Residence: 1744 Rosedale Ave. Tel. 2-1706. 
*Shunk, Ivan V.— Prof., Bot. Dept. 211 Winston 267 

Residence: 1809 Park Dr. Tel. 7810. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 27 

Ext. 

Simmons, Inez — Sec, U. S. Bureau of Mines. 129-1911 307 

Residence: 3220 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-2091. 

*Sloan, Fred S. — State Program Leader, Prog. Plan. Dept. 311-1911 292 
Residence: 1407 Canterbury Rd. Tel. 3-3388. 

*Slocum, George K. — Assoc. Prof., For. Dept. 306 Ricks 270 

Residence: 226 Woodburn Rd. Tel. 5508. 

*Smith, B. W. — Assoc. Agron., Cytogenetics. Agron. Dept. 

336-1911 324 & 262 

Residence: 2707 North Dr. Tel. 9962. 

*Smith, Clyed F. — Assoc. Entomologist. Entom. Dept. F5 Zool. Bldg. 239 
Residence: 2716 Rosedale St. Tel. 2-3396. 

Smith, Miss Elsie Lee — Photographic Asst., Pub. 12 Ricks 279 

Residence: 2404 y 2 Stafford Ave. 

♦Smith, Estelle T. — Asst. to State Home Agent, Ag. Ext. Serv. Home 

Demon. Dept. 202-1911 243 

Residence: 128 E. Edenton St. Tel. 2-0853. 
♦Smith, F. H.— Asst. in A. I. (Nutr.). 316 Polk 241 

Residence: 2506 Stafford Ave. Tel. 6798. 

♦Smith, G. Wallace— Prof., Head, E. M. Dept. 101 C. E. Bldg. 317 

Residence: 222 Hawthorne Rd. Tel. 5120. 

Smith, Mrs. Hattie C. — Sec, Ext. Agr. Engr. 318 Ricks 274 

Residence: 2402 Everett Ave. Tel. 6814. 

♦Smith, J. Warren — Assoc. Prof., Div. of Teacher Ed. 104 Tompkins 257 
Residence : 2626 Dover Rd. Tel. 2-3654. 

Smith, Pauline — N. E. Dist. Home Agt., Agr. Ext. Serv. 204-1911 285 
' Residence: 105 N. Person St. Tel. 5200. 
*Snow, Mrs. P. L. — Lab. Tech., Hort. Dept. 5 Greenhouse 240 

Residence: 220 N. East St. Tel. 2-2533. 

Spearman, Bess (Miss) — Assoc. Nurse. Clark Infirmary Tel. 7615 

Residence: Carroll House. Tel. 3-1010. 

♦Stamey, H. M. — Specialist, A. H. Ext. 203 Polk 269 

Residence: K-1A Cameron Court Apts. 
Stanton, Verna — S. E. Dist. Home Agt., Agr. Ext. Serv. 208-1911 285 

.*_ Residence: 1526 Glenwood Ave. Tel. 9648. 

♦Stevens, Ross O.— Prof., Zool. Dept. 203 Zool. Bldg 261 

Residence: Creedmoor Highway. 
♦Stevenson, Mrs. Lois A. — Lab. Tech., Agron. Dept. 5 Withers 209 

Residence: Rt. 1, Raleigh. Tel. 116 Co. 5105. 
Stewart, H. E. — Accountant, Cafeteria. Steward's Office .... Tel. 2-0243 
Residence: 104 Harrison Ave. Tel. 3-1342. 
♦Stinnette, Mrs. Nancy Riddle — Asst. in Catalog Dept. Library 259 

Residence: 2805 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-2706. 

♦Stinson, E. H.— Instr., M. E. Dept. 207 Page 302 

Residence: 3411 Hillsboro St. 
♦Stinson, W. E. — Foreman, Service Dept. Warehouse . 272 

Residence: 2226 Hillsboro St. Tel. 3-1539. 
♦Stockstill, Mrs. George L. — Assoc. Nurse. Clark Infirmary .... Tel. 7615 
Residence: Wake Forest Rd. Tel. 5465. 

♦Stone, R. L. — Prof., Acting Head, Ceramic Engr. Dept 249 

Residence: 113 Chamberlain St. Tel. 4959. 

Stott, Estelle Harold— Chief Clerk, Pub. Dept. 3 Ricks 279 

Residence: 2208 Hope St. Tel. 7056. 

Stott, Juanita — Asst. Registrar. 205 Holladay 219 

Residence: 2208 Hope St. Tel. 7056. 



28 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

Stott, Ruth— Ediphone Dept. 213-1911 221 

Residence: 2208 Hope St. Tel. 7056. 

•Strobel, Charles F.— Asst. Prof., Math. Dept. 209 Tompkins 226 

Residence: 3310 Pollock PI. Tel. 2-3255. 
Strum. Peter Doub— Instr. (Temp.), E. E. Dept., ASTP. 106 Daniels 235 
Residence: 6 Enterprise St. Tel. 4788. 

♦Stuart, A. D.— Assoc. Prof., Agron. Dept. 119 Ricks 262 

Residence: 2704 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-1022. 

*Stuckev, J. L.— Prof., Head, Geol. Dept. 1 Primrose 304 

Residence: 1911 Sunset Dr. Tel. 2-0187. 
Sturdivant, Dorothy — Sen. Stat. Clerk, Exp. Stat. 3rd floor, 1911 . . 313 
Residence: 109 N. Boylan Ave. Tel. 3-3432. 

*Sumner, Bave — Asst. Purchasing Agt. "A" Holladav 230 

Residence: B 2-B Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 2-3595. 

Sutton, Lenora — Stem, Bot. Dept. 220 Winston 267 

Residence : 845 Holt Dr. Tel. 4363. 

* Swain, Mrs. Virginia Sloan — Ext. Spec, in Family Relations. Home 

Demon. Dept. 212-1911 285 

Residence: 2268 Circle Dr. 

Tavlor, Ellen— Sec, 4-H Club. 201 Ricks 214 

Residence: 1313 Hillsboro St. Tel. 4142. 

* Tavlor, H. W.— Alumni Secretary. 201 Holladav 252 

Residence : 2820 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-3274. 
Teaehev. A. L. — State Dir., Food Production War Training. Voc. 

Ed. "Dept. 108 Tompkins 311 

Residence : 2404 Clark Ave. Tel. 4393. 
*Thomas. A. W— Asst. Coach, Football; Instr., ASTP. P. E. & Ath. 

Dept. Fieldhouse Tel. 6934 

Residence: 
Thomas, Horace C— M/Sgt., DEML-ROTC; Sup. Sgt., ROTC. 

Military Dept. Armory 232 

Residence: Powell Dr. Tel. 2-2895. 
Thomas. Marv E. (Miss) — Ext. Nutritionist, Home Demon. Dept. 

210-1911 243 

Residence: 221 Hawthorne Rd. Tel. 2-3742. 
*Thomas. Rov H. — State Supervisor, Agr. Ed., Dept. of Voc. Ed. 

106 Tompkins 282 

Residence: Raleigh Apts. Tel. 4098. 

Thompson, Frances — Sec, Alumni Office. 202 Holladay 252 

Residence : 109 E. Whitaker Mill Rd. Tel. 4693. 
Thompson, Grace S. — Sten.-Clerk, Fish & Wildlife Serv. 202 Zool. . 261 
Residence: 915 N. Blount St. 

Thompson, Irene — Sec, Registration Office. 207 Holladay 219 

Residence: 110 Cox Ave. Tel. 8212. 

♦Thompson, Marguerite J.— Sec, Exp. Stat. 340-1911 313 

Residence: 2305 Beechridge Rd. Tel. 9887. 
*Tiddv. Mrs. J. Edwin ( Mildred ) —Clerk, Farm Mgt. Dept. 302-1911 291 

Residence: 102 Logan Court. Tel. 8894. 
*Todd, Furnev A.— Asst. Plant Pathologist, Bot. Dept. 212 Withers 310 

Residence: Zebulon. Tel. 5401. 
*Towerv, E. S., Jr.— Capt.. Inf.. Intell. Officer, Asst. PMS&T, Mil. 

Dept. 11 Holladav 314 

Residence: 23% Shepherd St. Tel. 3-1455. 

Trollinger, Ida E.— Head Nurse. Clark Infirmary Tel. 7615 

Residence: Carroll House. Tel. 3-1010. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 29 

Ext. 
Tucker, Louisa Nelson — Asst. Research Tech., A. H. Sect., A. I. Dept. 

318 Polk 241 

Residence: 2316 Hillsboro St. Tel. 6709. 

Turner, Anne L. — Order Librarian, Library 259 

Residence: 903 W. Johnson St. Tel. 6997. 

*Urquhart, Myra K. (Mrs.)— Clerk, Dept. of Voc. Ed. 105 Tompkins 311 
Residence: 412 Dixie Tr. Tel. 8730. 
U. S. Bureau of Mines— A. L. Fox, Engr. in Charge. 129-1911 ... 208 
U. S. Geological Survey Lab. — W. L. Lamar, Chemist in Charge. 

15 Winston Tel. 3-1022 

Valentine, Elizabeth A. — Periodicals Librarian, Library 259 

Residence: Rt. 5, Raleigh. Tel. 6346. 
*Vann, J. G.— Asst. Controller & Bus. Mgr., Bus. Office. 105 Holladay 295 

Residence: 1606 Scales St. Tel. 6240. 
*Van Note, W. G.— Prof, of Metall., M. E. Dept. 106 Page 246 

Residence: 2214 Whitaker Dr. Tel. 3-1394. 
*Vaughan, L. L.— Acting Dean, School of Engr. 122 C. E. Bldg 216 

Residence: 11 Enterprise St. Tel. 5449. 
*Vaughan, Rosemary— Sec, Rur. Soc. 134-1911 312 

Residence: 1621 Park Dr. Tel. 8307. 
♦Veerhoff, Otto— Assoc. Horticulturist, Hort. Dept. 309 Polk . . 275 & 318 

Residence: 2830 Mayview Rd. Tel. 2-2240. 
♦Vestal, E. V.— Specialist, A. H. Ext. 201 Polk 269 

Residence: 12 Rosemary Ave. (Kenansville after Jan. 1). 
Tel. 2-0236 (327 Kenansville). 
♦Vestal, Herman H.— Maj., Inf.; Adjutant, Mil. Dept. 1 Holladay . . 233 

Residence: 3130 Stanhope Ave. Tel. 8128. 
Vogel, Glen F.— Jun. Agr. Stat., Bur. Agr. Econ., USDA (Exp. 

Stat.) 334-1911 Tel. 3-2454 

Residence: 224 Hillcrest Rd. Tel. 2-2761. 
*Von Glahn, J. L.— Bus. Mgr., P. E. & Ath. Dept. Gym Tel. 2-2407 

Residence: Canterbury Rd. Tel. 3-1828. 

Wade, Virginia — Sec, Agr. Ext. Serv., Home Demon. Dept. 223-1911 242 

Residence: 2310 Hillsboro St. Tel. 4114. 
*Wall, Mrs. Frances MacGregor — Asst. State 4-H Club Leader. 

Agr. Ext. Serv. 201 Ricks 214 

Residence: 2402 Clark Ave. Tel. 2-2136. 

Wall, Rachel— Sec, Soil Conservation Serv. 233-1911 Tel. 3-2531 

Residence: Y-2-A Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 3-1747. 

Watson, Emma L.— Clerk. Bus. Office. 106 Holladay 298 

Residence: Cary, N. C. Tel. 2841. 

* Watson, Lewis P.— Asst. Ext. Ed., Pub. Dept. 9 Ricks 279 

Residence: 2809 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-1626. 

♦Weaver, D. S.— Head, Agr. Engr. Dept. 316 Ricks 274 

Residence: 520 Daughtridge St. Tel. 4110. 

♦Weaver, J. G. — Assoc. Prof., Hort. Dept. Greenhouse 240 

Residence: 707 N. East St. Tel. 2-1440. 
Weeks, Susie B.— Clerk-Sten., Bur. Agr. Econ., USDA (Exp. Stat.) 

333-1911 Tel. 3-2454 

Residence: 112 Polk St. Tel. 7202. 
Weldon, Virginia— Asst. Research Tech., A. I. (Nutr.) 311 Polk ... 241 

Residence : 2602 Clark Ave. Tel. 8221. 
♦Wellons, T. T. — Sutp. of Dormitories. Service Dept. Warehouse . . 272 
Residence: 206 Chamberlain St. Tel. 3-2478. 



30 NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Ext. 

*Wells, B. W.— Prof. & Head, Bot. Dept. 220 Winston 267 

Residence: 1605 Park Dr. Tel. 8746. 

Wells, Helen L.— Sec, Div. of Teacher Ed. 119 Tompkins 256 

Residence: 845 Holt Dr. Tel. 4363. 
West, Gladys F. — Jr. Botanist, Cotton Fiber Investigations. 104 Polk 300 
Residence: 1324 Brooks Ave. Tel. 4731. 
♦Wheeler. F. B.— Prof, of Practical Mechanics, M. E. Dept. Shop . . 245 

Residence: 20 Maiden Lane. Tel. 7958. 
*Wheeler, W. W. — Carpenter, Agr. Engr. Dept. Agr. Engr. Bldg. . . 204 

Residence: 120 W. Morgan St. Tel. 3-3296. 
♦Wheless. M. H.— Office Mgr., Students Supply Store. . Tel. 2-3674 or 225 
Residence: 20 Turner St. Tel. 8053. 

*White, Mrs. Maude B.— Sec, Purchasing Office. "A" Holladay 230 

Residence: P-3 A Cameron Court Apts. Tel. 2-2051. 

♦White, Raymond Cyrus— Instr., Chem. Dept. 103 Withers 265 

Residence: 317 Calvin Rd. Tel. 9582. 
♦Whitehead. Laurence C— Dist. Agt., U. S. Fish & Wildlife Serv. 

202 Zool. Bldg 261 

Residence : 2613 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 4455. 

♦Williams, C. B. — Agronomist. Agron. Dept. 117 Ricks 262 

Residence: 1405 Hillsboro St. Tel. 8893. 
*Williams. C. F.— Assoc. Horticulturist, Hort. Dept. 305 Polk . . 275 & 318 

Residence: 1912 Lewis Circle. Tel. 2-0233. 
Williams. Elizabeth — Asst. Ext. Spec, in Home Mgt. and House 

Furnishings, Home Demon. Dept. 221-1911 242 

Residence: 1614 Park Dr. Tel. 2-0957. 

♦Williams, H. Page — Prof., Math. Dept. 223 Tompins 228 

Residence: 1015 Brooks Ave. Tel. 2-2191. 
♦Williams. L. F.— Prof, of Org. Chem., Chem. Dept. 301 Withers ... 297 
Residence: 1816 Park Dr. Tel. 8075. 

Williams, Lucie R. — Stock Keeper, Chem. Dept. 217 Withers 265 

Residence: 3210 Clark Ave. Tel. 8666. 
♦Williams. N. W.— Asst. Prof.. Poul. Sci.. Poul. Dept. 214 Ricks ... 280 

Residence: Poultry Plant. Tel. 8686. 
♦Williams. Ruth Davis (Mrs.) — Sec, Dept. of Voc Ed. 106 Tompkins 282 
Residence: 219 Ashe Ave. Tel. 2-2545. 

Williamson. Christine — Sec, Pub. Dept. 5 Ricks 279 

Residence: 202 Groveland Ave. Tel. 3-3761. 

♦Williamson. Roy L.— Propertv Officer. "A" Holladay 210 

Residence: 2502 Vanderbilt Ave. Tel. 7709. 
♦Willis. Esther G.— S. W. Dist. Agent, Ag. Ext. Serv., Home Demon. 

Dept. 219-1911 242 

Residence: 2902 Fairground Ave. Tel. 2-1476. 

♦Wilson. Arthur John— Head. Chem. Dent. 107 Withers 266 

Residence: 1808 Park Dr. Tel. 7125. 
Wilson. S. Virginia — Asst. Ext. Nutritionist, Ag. Ext. Serv. Home 

Demon. Dept. 218-1911 242 

Residence: 1119 Harvey St. Tel. 2-3216. 

♦Wilson. T. L.— Asst. Prof.. Dept. of English. 12 Peele 237 

Residence: 407 Calvin Rd. Tel. 6951. 
♦Winchester, R. B.— Asst. Supv., FPWT Program, Div. of Voc. Agr. 

108 Tompkins 311 

Residence: 2505 Everett Ave. 
♦Wing, Merle W.— Instr., Zool. & Entom. Dept. 106 Zool. & 

208 Tompkins 239 & 226 

Residence : 509 N. Person St. Tel. 3-1487. 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 31 

Ext. 
*Winkler, E. W.— Asst. Prof., E. E. Dept. 105-B Daniels 235 

Residence: 509 Daughtridge St. Tel. 2-1370. 
Winstead, Dorothy— Sten., Hort. Dept. 303 Polk 275 & 318 

Residence: 123 N. Bloodworth St. Tel. 2-3792. 
*Winstead, Mary M.— Clerk, Dept. of Voc. Ed. 105 Tompkins 311 

Residence: 219 Ashe Ave. Tel. 2-2545. 
*Winston, Sanford— Prof. & Head, Sociol. Dept. 202 Peele 231 

Residence: 120 Forest Rd. Tel. 2-1402. 
*Witmer, Samuel B. — Mechanic, School of Tex. Tex. Bldg 273 

Residence: 508 Dixie Trail. 
*Witmer, Mrs. S. B.— Sten., Alumni Office. 202 Holladay 252 

Residence: 508 Dixie Trail. 
♦Wood, Star — Asst. Coach, Football; Instr., ASTP. Phys. Ed. & Ath. 

Dept. Fieldhouse Tel. 6934 

Residence: Fieldhouse. Tel. 6934. 
*Wood, T. W. — Assoc. Prof., Ind. & Personnel Management. Econ. 

Dept. 104 Peele 200 

Residence: 2822 Bedford Ave. Tel. 2-3800. 
*Woodhouse, W. W., Jr. — Assoc. Agronomist, Soil Fertility. Agron. 

Dept. 316-1911 324 & 262 

Residence: 3209 Hillsboro St. Tel. 4544. 
♦Woodruff, Frederick S.— 1st Lt. CAC, Personal Affairs Off., Asst. 

PMS&T, Mil. Dept. 11 Holladay 314 

Residence: 130 Hawthorne Rd. Tel. 2-2150. 
♦Wright, J. B. — Electrian, Service Dept. Warehouse 272 

Residence: Western Blvd. Tel. 4883. 
♦Wyatt, Mrs. Candace L.— Sten., Poul. Ext. 210 Ricks 321 

Residence: 2702 Van Dyke Ave. Tel. 4483. 
♦Wynn, Willard K.— Asst. Prof., Dept. of Eng. 107 Pullen 237 

Residence: 2701 Barmettler St. 
*Yarborough, C. E. — Foreman, Hort. Dept. Greenhouse 240 

Residence: 216 Ashe Ave. Tel. 8509. 

Yates, Phyllis J. — Asst. Editor, Exp. Sta. Publications Dept. 

9 Ricks 279 

Residence: 2404% Stafford Ave. 

♦Young, Mrs. C. H.— Sec, A. H. Ext. 202 Polk 269 

Residence: 2303 Clark Ave. Tel. 8083. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



1944-1945 



Name Classification 

Adams, H. M Jun., M. E. 

Adams, J. J Fr., Ae. E. 

Albers, C. H Fr., E. E. 

Albertson, E. V Fr., E. E. 

Albright, G. G Fr., Ag. 

Albright, T. E Fr., Ag. 

Aldridge, W. F Fr., M. E. 

Alexander, B. F Fr., Ag. 

Alexander, S. R Fr., Ch. E. 

Allen, A. D Fr., Ag. E. 

Allen, B. W Fr., C. E. 

Allen, E. L Fr., E. E. 

Allison, R. C., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Anderson, J. E., Jr Ju., Ch. E. 

Andrew, H. T Fr., Cer. E. 

Andrews, J. J Fr., Ae. E. 

Armfield, R. M So., Ch. E. 

Armitage, S. C Fr., Ch. E. 

Arnold, Alex So. Ag. 

Arthur, G. L., Ill Fr., Ch. E. 

Ausley, M. B Fr., E. E. 

Bachemin, J. M Gr., Ag. Ec. 

Badgett, R. G Fr., Ae. E. 

Bailey, E. W Sr., Gen. E. 

Baker, R. S Fr., M. E. 

Ball, M. T Jr., Tex. Mgt. 

Barber, F. M., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Barden, Charles Fr., Gen. E. 

Barker, J. C, Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Barnes, T. S., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Barrosse, B. A., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Bartlett, Alfred Fr., C. E. 

Basinger, L. L Fr., Ae. E. 

Bass, L. B Fr., M. E. 

Bass, T. J Fr. For. 

Bates, F. O So. Geol. E. 

Bautista, A. O. So. Tex. 

Baxley, Hartlee M. (Miss) . Gr., Ag. Ch. 

Beam, A. P. Fr., Ae. E. 

Beaman, J. E Fr., Ag. 

Beaman, W. C, Jr Fr., E. E. 

Beard, G. C, Jr Fr., For. 

Beasley, S. J Fr., Gen. E. 

Bedford, W. B. (Rev.) . . . So., Occ. I. & G. 

Bell, H. P Sr., F. B. Adm. 

Benson, E. D Fr., M. E. 

Benson, G. S Fr., M. E. 

Benton, R. L Fr., M. E. 

Berry, E. D. H Fr., E. E. 

Betts, S. S So., C. E. 

Biggerstaff, D. A So., Ag. 

Bingenheimer, C. G Fr., M. E. 

Bingham, T. J Fr., M. E. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

.18% Home St Winston-Salem, N. C. 

.Greenhouse, Box 5254 . Rocky Mount, N. C. 

.330 Bagwell, 3396 Charleston, S. C. 

.208 Gold, 3220 Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Withdrew Burlington, N. C. 

Withdrew Mebane, N. C. 

. 209 Bagwell, 3341 Albemarle, N. C. 

. 107 Gold, 3207 Matthews, N. C. 

.204 4th, 3122 Lincolnton, N. C. 

.309 Wat., 3045 Shelby, N. C. 

. 7 E. Dixie Drive Newport News, Va. 

Withdrew Fayetteville, N. C. 

.28 Shepherd St Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

.2513 Clark Ave Wake Forest, N. C. 

. 309 Gold, 3233 Siler City, N. C. 

.710 Graham St Raleigh, N. C. 

.305 Wat., 3041 Greensboro, N. C. 

.205 Welch, 3253 Selma, N. C. 

. Withdrew Cullasa ja, N. C. 

. 124 Bagwell, 3324 Morehead City, N. C. 

.11 Y. M. C. A., Box 5276 Micro, N. C. 

23 Logan Court Covington, La. 

. 110 Gold, 3210 Pilot Mountain, N. C. 

.203 Welch, 3251 Goldsboro, N. C. 

. 108 E. North St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 109 Oberlin Rd Rockville Center, N. Y. 

. 304 Bagwell, 3370 Goldston, N. C. 

220 Bagwell, 3352 Clayton, N. C. 

103 Bagwell, 3303 New Bern, N. C. 

.212 Wat., 3030 N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

.301 Welch, 3261 Asheville, N. C. 

. 207 Gold, 3219 La Grange, N. C. 

. 203 4th, 3121 Mooresville, N. C. 

221 Bagwell, 3353 Belmont, N. C. 

.215 Bagwell, 3347 Henderson, N. C. 

107 Chamberlain St Asheville, N. C. 

123 Bagwell, 3323 Puebla, Mexico 

E-l Grosvenor Gardens . Red Springs, N. C. 
. 204 Wat., 3022 Shelby, N. C. 

103 Gold, 3203 Walstonburg, N. C. 

. 218 Wat., 3036 Norfolk, Va. 

.113 Bagwell, 3313 Jamesville, N. C. 

.117 Bagwell, 3317 Louisburg, N. C. 

.2811 Wayland Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

125 Bagwell, 3325 Huntersville, N. C. 

. 310 Wat., 3046 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

. 107 4th, 3117 Reisterstown, Md. 

.302 Gold, 3226 Apex, N. C. 

.331 Bagwell, 3397 Asheville, N. C. 

.1720 Hillsboro St Fayetteville, N. C. 

. Withdrew Bessemer City, N. C. 

. 313 Wat., 3049 Burlington, N. C. 

.6 Berry, 4339 Winston-Salem, N. C. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



33 



Name Classification 

Bird, R. L Fr., Ch. E. 

Black, Betty J. (Miss) Pratt & W. 

Black, H. D., Jr So., M. E. 

Black, M. A., Jr Fr., Tex. 

Blackmon, B. B. Gr., An. Prod. 

Blackstock, C. E., Jr Fr., For. 

Blackwelder, C. R., Jr So., E. E. 

Blackwell, F. N., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Blank, F. L., Jr Fr., Arch. E. 

Blankenship, W. E Fr., E. E. 

Blanks, W. P., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Blow, W. L So., An. Prod. 

Blum, G. B., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Bobbitt, J. E., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Bocook, J. A Fr., Arch. E. 

Boger, G. H., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Bond, Lyn, Jr Fr., Gen. E. 

Boney, W. J Jr., Arch. E. 

Booth, L. P Fr., Gen. Ag. 

Borum, M. L So., C. E. 

Bostian, R. E Fr., Ae. E. 

Bostian, R. L., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Bostic, M. F Sr., Ag. Ed. 

Bowen, D. L Fr., Ag. 

Bowen, E. G Fr., M. E. 

Boyter, J. C Fr., Ae. E. 

Bradley, T. L Fr., Ae. E. 

Bradshaw, B. J Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Brande, E. R Fr., M. E. 

Branscomb, C. E Fr., M. E. 

Brantley, A. C Fr., Tex. 

Brawley, P. S Fr., Ae. E. 

Bridger, H. L Fr., Occ. I. & G. 

Briggs, J. F Jr., Arch. 

Briggs, S. T Fr., Ag. 

Britt, C. L Fr., Ag. 

Brower, R. K Fr., Ae. E. 

Brown, J. E Fr., Ae. E. 

Brown, J. W So., Ae. E. 

Brown, L. S., Jr Fr., Ch. E. 

Brown, T. E Fr., E. E. 

Brown, W. F So., Ae. E. 

Browne, J. W Fr., Ae. E. 

Brummitt, G. F Fr., Ae. E.. 

Bryan, D. O., Jr Fr., Ag. 

Bryan, L. S., Jr Fr., Ag. 

Bryan, M. T Fr., C. E. 

Bryant, W. G Fr., M. E. 

Buckner, C. A., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Bulla, J. R Fr., Cer. E. 

Bunker, Nancy L. (Miss) . . . Jr., Agron. 

Burchette, G. C, Jr Jr., M. E. 

Burge, J. K Fr., Arch. E. 

Burkhead, C. I., Jr So., E. E. 

Burnette, W. M Fr., E. E.. 

Burns, F. N Fr., Cer. E. 

Burns, W. B Fr., C. E. 

Burton, D. R Sr., Ch. E. 

Burwell, G. W. B Fr., E. E. . 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

. 508 Burton St Raleigh, N. C. 

.2717 Vanderbilt Ave Fort Benning, Ga. 

. 10 Enterprise St Concord, N. C. 

.115 Bagwell, 3315 Thomasville, N. C. 

207 4th, 3125 Buies Creek, N. C. 

306 4th, 3132 Asheville, N. C. 

10 Enterprise St Concord, N. C. 

108 Welch, 3244 Lenoir, N. C. 

.114 Wat., 3014 Greenville, N. C. 

116 Bagwell, 3316 Swannanoa, N. C. 

.2621 Leesville Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

.1720 Hillsboro St New Bern, N. C. 

104 Wat., 3004 Middleburg, N. C. 

. 306 Bagwell, 3372 Smithfield, N. C. 

. 301 Welch, 3261 Asheville, N. C. 

102 Bagwell, 3302 Sanf ord, N. C. 

Withdrew Tarboro, N. C. 

103 Chamberlain St Wilmington, N. C. 

234 Bagwell, 3366 Sumter, S. C. 

. 11 Y. M. C. A Greensboro, N. C. 

.306 Gold, 3230 China Grove, N. C. 

.102 Wat., 3002 Wilmington, N. C. 

105 Gold, 3205 Magnolia, N. C. 

.205 Bagwell, 3337 Burgaw, N. C. 

. 10 Y. M. C. A Plymouth, N. C. 

.316 Wat., 3052 Charlotte, N. C. 

. 213 Wat., 3031 Kipling, N. C. 

.108 Wat., 3008 Waynesville, N. C. 

.204 Gold, 3216 Browns Summit, N. C. 

.216 Bagwell, 3348 . . . Winston-Salem, N. C. 

9 Berry, 4342 Bailey, N. C. 

.211 Gold, 3223 Mooresville, N. C. 

. 212 Gold, 3224 Bladenboro, N. C. 

.125 Woodburn Rd Lexington, N. C. 

. 103 Berry, 4303 Pf afftown, N. C. 

.109 Bagwell, 3309 Fairmont, N. C. 

. 112 Gold, 3212 Siler City, N. C. 

.310 Gold, 3234 Greensboro, N. C. 

18V2 Home St Mt. Airy, N. C. 

. 207 Wat., 3025 Hamlet, N. C. 

. Ill Gold, 3211 Rich Square, N. C. 

.2212 Hope St Charlotte, N. C. 

. 321 Bagwell, 3389 Greenville, N. C. 

.231 Bagwell, 3363 . . . Winston-Salem, N. C. 
. 106 Wat., 3006 Mt. Olive, N. C. 

211 Wat., 3029 Oxford, N. C. 

. 207 Bagwell, 3339 Lumberton, N. C. 

219 Bagwell, 3351 Elm City, N. C. 

. 112 Gold, 3212 Siler City, N. C. 

. 208 Welch, 3256 Asheboro, N. C. 

. Ill Brooks Ave Mt. Airy, N. C. 

18y 2 Home St Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Ill Bagwell, 3311 . . . Winston-Salem, N. C. 

2407 Clark Ave Candor, N. C. 

. 303 4th, 3129 Marion, N. C. 

.212 Welch, 3260 E. Spencer, N. C. 

. 305 Bagwell, 3371 Acme, N. C. 

2412 Hillsboro St Mebane, N. C. 

208 Wat., 3026 Goldsboro, N. C. 



34 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Name Classification 

Butler, A. R So., Ag. E. 

Butts, J. T Fr., Ae. E. 

Byrum, G. M., Jr Jr., Tex. Mgt. 

Cain, E. P., Jr Jr., Ch. E. 

Calhoun, R. M So., M. E. 

Campbell, S. I Fr., Ae. E. 

Carlson, Mary (Miss) Fr., Tex. 

Carroll, M. Margaret (Miss) Pratt & W. 

Carson, E. M Fr., C. E. 

Carter, E. R Fr., M. E. 

Carter, H. M So., Gen. E. 

Carter, R. D Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Cashwell, R. B Fr., Ae. E. 

Castleberry, J. L., Jr. So., C. E. 

Castleman, Ann (Miss) . . .Gr., Exp. Stat. 

Chadwick, J. W., Jr So., E. E. 

Chambers, M. R Gr., Ru. Soc. 

Chamblee, D. S Gr., F. C. 

Chason, A. G Fr., Ag. 

Cheatham, G. S Fr., Tex. 

Cheek, I. M., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Cheek, J. N So., Tex. 

Childress, C. S., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Clark, Jean M. (Miss) .Sr., Tex. W. & D. 

Clark, J. N., Jr Fr., Ag. 

Clark, W. E So., E. E. 

Clayton, G. D Fr., Tex. 

Coble, G. W Sr., M. E. 

Coffield, J. B Fr., M. E. 

Cohen, Mario So., M. E. 

Cohen, Maurice Sr., Tex. 

Cohen, S. S Fr., Tex. 

Cole, D. C Fr., Ae. E. 

Cole, M. Mclver (Miss) Gr. Ru. Soc. 

Coleman, R. L Tex. 

Coley, W. L Fr., Ch. E. 

Colhard, CM So., Tex. 

Collins, I. K Sr., Ae. E. 

Collins, J. C Fr., Ag. 

Collins, M. C Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Conley, Mabel C. (Miss) Aud. 

Conner, G. C, Jr Fr., Arch. E. 

Conway, E. R., Ill So., Ch. E. 

Cook, E. R Fr., M. E. 

Cook, H. L Fr., M. E. 

Cooper, Mary F. (Miss) . . . Gr., Ag. Ch. 

Corey, J. L., Jr Fr., Ag. 

Corriher, T. F Fr., M. E. 

Cortina, E. D Fr., Tex. 

Cowart, J. C Fr., C. E. 

Cox, C. H Fr., Ae. E. 

Cox, Gladys E. (Miss) . . Jr., Occ. I. & G. 

Craver, J. A Fr., Ag. 

Crawford, J. R., Jr Fr., Occ. I. & G. 

Creagh, A. H Fr., E. E. 

Crigler, B. R Fr., M. E. 

Critz, W. E Fr., Tex. 

Croker, G. R Fr., E. E. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

. 125 Woodburn Rd Clinton, N. C. 

. 2 Berry, 4335 Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

. 12 Home St Edenton, N. C. 

. 306 Hillcrest Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

.327 Bagwell, 3393 Laurel Hill, N. C. 

.Withdrew Greensboro, N. C. 

. 2202 Hillsboro St Lillington, N. C. 

. 2717 Vanderbilt Ave. . . Wake Forest, N. C. 

.232 Bagwell, 3364 Lenoir, N. C. 

. 326 Bagwell, 3392 Powellsville, N. C. 

.Gym Charlotte, N. C. 

.212 Bagwell, 3344 Zebulon, N. C. 

. 10 Berry, 4343 Hope Mills, N. C. 

. 103 Chamberlain St Apex, N. C. 

. 1611 Park Dr Raleigh, N. C. 

. 6 Enterprise St Rocky Mount, N. C. 

.2220 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 104 Gold, 3204 Zebulon, N. C. 

. 105 Bagwell, 3305 Canton, N. C. 

. 104 Gold, 3204 Bluefield, W. Va. 

. 704 Boylan Dr Raleigh, N. C. 

. Power Plant, Box 5241 Rockwell, N. C. 

.310 Bagwell, 3376 Mt. Airy, N. C. 

.1917 Alexander Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

. 320 Bagwell, 3386 Elkton, N. C. 

. 10 Enterprise St Everetts, N. C. 

. 131 Bagwell, 3331 Apex, N. C. 

.Withdrew Burlington, N. C. 

. 233 Bagwell, 3365 High Point, N. C. 

. 312 Pogue St Miami Beach, Fla. 

. 312 Pogue St Miami Beach, Fla. 

. 205 4th, 3123 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

.313 Wat., 3049 Burlington, N. C. 

. C-301 Boylan Apts Raleigh, N. C. 

.Withdrew Burlington, N. C. 

.101 S. Bloodworth St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 12 Home St Elkin, N. C. 

. 18 Home St Forest City, N. C. 

. 302 Wat., 3038 Francisco, N. C. 

.217 Wat., 3035 Louisburg, N. C. 

. 15 Enterprise St. Raleigh, N. C. 

. 233 Bagwell, 3365 High Point, N. C. 

. 309 Bagwell, 3375 Greenville, N. C. 

. 107 Welch, 3243 Kannapolis, N. C. 

. 6 Berry, 4339 Clemmons, N. C. 

R.F.D. 4 Raleigh, N. C. 

.119 Bagwell, 3319 Robersonville, N. C. 

.308 Wat., 3044 Lincolnton, N. C. 

. 106 4th, 3116 Mexico City, Mex.. 

. 124 Bagwell, 3324 Newport, N. C. 

. Withdrew Jonesboro, N. C. 

. 220 N. East St Raleigh, N. C. 

.329 Bagwell, 3395 Lexington, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Wilmington, N. C. 

104 4th, 3114 Pollocksville, N. C. 

116 Wat., 3016 Atlanta, Ga. 

. 207 Welch, 3255 Kannapolis, N. C. 

. Fieldhouse Wilkinsburg, Pa. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



35 



Name 



Classification 



Crowell, F. P Fr., E. E.. 

Culbreth, C. F Fr., Ch. E. 

Culp, J. M., Jr Sr., Tex. C. & D. . 

Daniel, W. J So., Ch. E. 

Daniels, C. R Fr., Arch. E. . 

Daughety, J. C Fr., M. E. . 

Daughtridge, J. C So., Ag. E.. 

David, C. S., Jr Fr., M. E.. 

Davis, A. C Fr., C. E.. 

Davis, B. H So., Ae. E. . 

Davis, J. A., Jr Fr., Tex. . 

Davis, J. H., Jr Fr., E. E. . 

Davis, Richard Joe Fr., M. E. 

Davis, Robert James Fr., Ag. . 

Dawson, C. G Sr., F. B. Adm. 

Dayvault, J. 0., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Dean, E. W Fr., Ag. E. 

Dean, T. A Fr., C. E. 

Deas, J. E., Jr Jr., Ch. E. 

Denning, N. C Fr., Ag. 

Diamond, Harvey Jr., Tex. 

Dillingham, K. D Fr., Ae. E. 

Dillon, C. A., Jr Jr., M. E. 

Dissel, J. G Fr., Cer. E. 

Dixon, CD So., E. E. 

Dixon, C. W So., Ae. E. 

Dixon, D. B Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Dobbins, W. J Fr., M. E. 

Dowdy, J. Fr., Ch. E. 

Dull, T. E Fr., Ag. 

Easom, Lillie O. (Miss) . . . . Gr., Ag. Ch. 

Eason, J. D., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Eason, R. H Fr., Ch. E. 

Edge, J. L Fr., Ag. 

Edgerton, W. L., Jr So., Ag. Ed. 

Edwards, L. M., Jr Fr., I. Arts Ed. 

Edwards, M. R Fr., Ae. E. 

Eicholtz, A. J Fr., Ch. E. 

Ellington, Mary Oliver (Miss) Gr. Entom. 

Elmore, W. F Sr., F. B. Adm. 

English, W. A Fr., Tex. 

English, W. C, Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Ernest, L. M., Jr Fr., Arch. E. 

Etheredge, R. W., Jr So., Ae. E. 

Eudy, B. L Fr., Tex. 

Evans, J. D Fr., E. E. 

Evans, J. T Fr., M. E. 

Evans, W. J., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Exum, C. R Fr., M. E. 

Ezzell, P. M., Jr Fr., Ch. E. 

Farrell, R. D Fr., Tex. 

Ferrell, P. O Fr., Ag. 

Fields, J. L Fr., C. E. 

Finney, R. C Fr., Tex. 

Fisler, C. A Jr., M. E. 

Fitzgerald, W. C, Jr Fr., C. E. 



School Address Home Address 

Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

109 Gold, 3209 Newell, N. C. 

. 120 Bagwell, 3320 Rutherf ordton, N. C. 

. 1720 Hillsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

. 2407 Clark Ave Henderson, N. C. 

. 305 Welch, 3265 Randleman, N. C. 

. 210 Welch, 3258 Portsmouth, Va. 

. 132 Bagwell, 3332 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

. 108 Gold, 3208 Asheville, N. C. 

. 308 Gold, 3232 Charlotte, N. C. 

. 7 Berry, 4340 Shelby, N. C. 

202 Gold, 3214 Carthage, N. C. 

206 Bagwell, 3338 Newport, N. C. 

. 1123 Harvey St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 103 Welch, 3239 Durham, N. C. 

.2209y 2 Hope St Dunn, N. C. 

.207 Welch. 3255 Kannapolis, N. C. 

. 214 Wat., 3032 Louisburg, N. C. 

. 214 Wat., 3032 Louisburg, N. C. 

.211 Bagwell, 3343 Canton, N. C. 

. 101 Wat., 3001 Four Oaks, N. C. 

. 109 Oberlin Rd New York, N. Y. 

.307 Bagwell, 3373 Weaverville, N. C. 

.1603 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 105 Gold, 3205 New Bern, N. C. 

. 105 Wat., 3005 Belmont, N. C. 

.210 Wat., 3028 Elm City, N. C. 

. 106 Berry, 4306 Mebane, N. C. 

. 304 Welch, 3264 Boonville, N. C. 

. 208 Gold, 3220 Sanf ord, N. C. 

.2212 Hope St Cana, N. C. 

. 118 N. Wilmington St Selma, N. C. 

. Ill Wat., 3011 Goldsboro, N. C. 

.113 Wat., 3013 Gatesville, N. C. 

. 10 Berry, 4343 Fayetteville, N. C. 

. 106 Welch, 3242 Union Mills, N. C. 

. Fieldhouse Big Stone Gap, Va. 

.301 Wat., 3037 Princeton, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Duquesne, Pa. 

. 303 New Bern Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

. 2209y 2 Hope St Dunn, N. C. 

.106 Gold, 3206 Waxhaw, N. C. 

.318 Wat., 3054 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

. 1720 Hillsboro St Greenville, N. C. 

. Withdrew Spring Hill, N. C. 

. 206 Gold, 3218 Albemarle, N. C. 

.230 E. Morgan St Kenly, N. C. 

. 206 Welch, 3254 Sylva, N. C. 

. Withdrew Burlington, N. C. 

209 Gold, 3221 Fremont, N. C. 

. 202 4th, 3120 Oxford, N. C. 

. 211 Welch, 3259 Gastonia, N. C. 

327 Bagwell, 3393 Durham, N. C. 

. 112 Welch, 3248 Siler City, N. C. 

. 326 Bagwell, 3392 Salisbury, N. C. 

. 114 Bagwell, 3314 Ivanhoe, N. C. 

. 104 Bagwell, 3304 Raleigh, N. C. 



36 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Name 



Classification 



Flannagan, S. G Fr., Ae. E. 

Fleming, E. P Fr., E. E. 

Fleming, Margaret K. . . . Gr., Exp. Stat. 

Floyd, B. P Fr., I. E. 

Fogleman, R. L., Jr Fr., Civ. E. 

Francis, J. G Sr., Pom. 

Francis, M. C, Jr Fr., Tex. 

Frazelle, G. C Fr., Chem. E. 

Frazier, E. D Jr., M. E. 

Frazier, Elizabeth J. . Jr., Tex. W. & D. 

Freeman, D. G Fr., Chem. E. 

Freeman, Jeanne (Miss) . Gr., Exp. Stat. 
Freeman, June L. (Miss) . . . Pratt & W. 

Freeman, Robertson, Jr Fr., Agri. 

Freeman, W. F., Jr So., Arch. E. 

Freshwater, W. R., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Fuchs, David So., Tex. 

Fugate, P. T., Jr Jun., Mech. E. 

Fulcher, T. H., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Fuller, G. C Jr., Che. E. 

Fuller, R. E., Jr Fr., Civ. E. 

Furbee, G. W So., Ag. E. 

Furgurson, G. H., Jr Fr., E. E.. 

Gaeta, A. J So., Tex. 

Gale, E. M Fr., Tex. . 

Gant, R. B Fr., Tex. 

Gardner, C. E Fr., Ag. . 

Gatlin, L. W Jr., Gen. E. 

Geddes, R. B Fr., For. 

Geer, P. H Fr., Ae. E. 

Geluso, F. R Sen., Civ. E. . 

Gerrard, CD Fr., For. . 

Geylan, H. M So., Tex. . 

Gibbs, Eleanor (Miss) . Gr., Ag. Chem.. 

Gibson, P. E Fr., Occ. I. & G. 

Gibson, R. M Fr., M. E. 

Gilbert, C. R Sr., Tex. Mgt. 

Gilbert, D. S Fr., Ch. E. 

Gilbert, J. H Fr., Gen. E. . 

Gilmore, G. G., Jr Fr., Ag.. 

Gilmore, R. S Fr., Ae. E. 

Glaser, Melvin Fr., Tex. 

Godfrev, M. R. Fr., Ag. . 

Godwin, S. B Fr., E. E. . 

Goggans, Sarah (Miss) . Jr., Occ. I. & G. 

Goldinger, H. J Jr., W. & D. 

Gouge, W. L., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Graham, T. M Fr., Ag. 

Grant, E. C Fr., E. E. 

Grantham, C. H., Jr Fr., Arch. E. 

Grav, G. A Fr., Arch. E. 

Gravson, F. N Fr., Ae. E. . 

Green, S. L Fr., Ae. E. 

Greene, C. B Fr., Ae. E. 

Greene, G. R So., Ae. E. 

Greene, J. E So., Tex. 

Greeson, H. K Fr., E. E. 

Gresham, A. R., Jr Fr., Gen. E. 

Gresham, S. C Fr., Ae. E.. 



School Address Home Address 

Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

.102 4th, 3112 Henderson, N. C. 

. 131 Bagwell, 3331 Grifton, N. C. 

. C-301 Boylan Apts Raleigh, N. C. 

.313 Bagwell, 3379 Trenton, N. J. 

.219 Bagwell, 3351 Greensboro, X. C. 

.108 Wat., 3008 Wavnesville, N. C. 

. 305 Wat., 3041 Shelbv, N. C. 

.305 4th, 3131 Richlands, N. C. 

.2513 Clark Ave High Point, N. C. 

.232 Glascock St Wake Forest, N. C. 

. 210 Gold, 3222 Greensboro, N. C. 

. 2406 Stafford Ave Providence, R. I. 

. 112 N. Wilmington St Raleigh, N. C. 

.318 Wat., 3054 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

.2513 Clark Ave High Point. N. C. 

317 Wat., 3053 Burlington, N. C. 

. 101 Berrv, 4301 Kinston, N. C. 

. 10 Enterprise St Elm City, N. C. 

Infirmary Leaksville, N. C. 

. 312 Bagwell, 3378 Gastonia, N. C. 

. 104 Bagwell, 3304 Raleigh, N. C. 

. 118 Wat., 3018 Wenona, N. C. 

. 212 Welch, 3260 Durham, N. C. 

. 6 Fieldhouse Staten Island, N. Y. 

.217 Bagwell, 3349 New York, X. Y. 

.2412 Hillsboro St Burlington, N. C. 

.2708 Bedford Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

. 107 Berrv, 4307 Charlotte, N. C. 

.114 Bagwell, 3314 Falls Church, Va. 

. 230 Bagwell, 3362 .... Morehead City, N. C. 

Withdrew Brooklvn, N. Y. 

.332 Bagwell, 3398 Charlotte, N. C. 

. 1715 Park Drive Istanbul, Turkey 

F-102 Boylan Apts Raleigh, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Winston-Salem. X. C. 

3 Berry, 4336 Laurel Hill, X. C. 

. 109 Oberlin Road Boston, Mass. 

.334 Bagwell, 3400 Winston-Salem, X. C. 

. 101 Bagwell, 3301 Catawba, X. C. 

. 701 Brooks Ave. Julian, X\ C. 

.216 Forest Rd Hillsboro, X. C. 

321 Bagwell, 3387 Bronx. X. Y. 

.1 Berrv, 4334 Elizabeth City, X. C. 

. 103 Wat., 3003 Four Oaks, X. C. 

. 705 W. Morgan St Raleigh, X. C. 

.312 Pogue St Los Angeles, Calif. 

222 Bagwell, 3354 Asheville, X. C. 

Fieldhouse Tarboro, N. C. 

. 109 Wat., 3009 Windsor, N. C. 

. 224 Bagwell, 3356 Greensboro, N. C. 

.231 Bagwell, 3363 High Point, X. C. 

. 118 Wat., 3018 Spindale, X. C. 

. 102 4th, 3112 Henderson. X. C. 

.311 Gold, 3235 Crossnore, X. C. 

117 Wat., 3017 Hendersonville, X. C. 

17 Enterprise St Jamaica. X". Y. 

.107 Bagwell, 3307 Greensboro, X. C. 

210 Bagwell, 3342 Mooresville, X. C. 

304 Gold, 3228 Star, X. C. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



37 



Name Classification 

Griffin, C. A Jr., An. Prod. 

Griggs, Cleo C. (Miss) Gr., Occ. I. & G. 

Grigsbv, C. E So., Ae. E. 

Grimstead, A. F Fr., C. E. 

Grissom, R. F., Jr Fr., Tex. 

Gross, L. E Fr., C. E. 

Gupton, B. E Jr., Tex. Mgt. 

Gupton, J. T Fr., Ae. E. 

Gurganus, W. G Fr., E. E. 

Haig, Mary Ruth (Miss) . Jr., Occ. I. & G 

Haislip, T. M Sr., An. Prod. 

Haithcock, W. B Fr., C. E. 

Hale, R. J. Fr., C. E. 

Hales, W. M Fr., E. E. 

Hall, D. A. C, Jr Fr., E. E. 

Hall, T. A., Jr Fr„ E. E. 

Hamilton, N. L Fr., C. E. 

Hamilton, R. D Fr., Gen. E. 

Hansen, H. H., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Hardesty, G. D., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Hardison, N. Winifred (Miss) Gr., Ag. Ch. 

Harper, C. H Fr., Ag. 

Harper, W. W Sr., C. E. 

Harrell, Doris (Miss) Fr., Ch. E. 

Harrell, G. O Fr., Cer. E. 

Harrelson, H. D Fr., Ag. 

Harrelson, W. D Fr., Ag. 

Harris, G. E Fr., Ag. 

Harris, J. L Fr., Tex. 

Harris, J. R., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Harris, K. B Fr., E. E. 

Hart, G. E So., Ae. E. 

Hart, J. R Fr., E. E. 

Hassell, C. C Fr., C. E. 

Hastv, L. C Fr., E. E. 

Hasty, W. H., Jr So., Ae. E. 

Hawkins. J. L Fr., Tex. 

Haves, C. A Fr., Ae. E. 

Haves, E. E., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Hayes, I. R Fr., E. E. 

Havnes, J. L., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Havnie, E. D Fr., E. E. 

Heath, C. F., Jr So., Ag. Ed. 

Hepler, J. S Jr., Ae. E. 

Herring, E. E Fr., Arch. E. 

Hewett, A. N Fr., E. E. 

Hevward, W. B Sr., Tex. 

Hicks, Betty Jane (Miss) Fr., I. Arts Ed. 

Hicks, H. A Fr., M. E. 

Higgins, J. E Fr., Ae. E. 

Highsmith, C. C So., Ag. Ed. 

Hines, J. E Fr., Ch. E. 

Hobbs, J. E Gr., For. 

Hobbs, W. G Fr., Ag. 

Hobgood, T. N., Jr Fr., Ag. 

Hodul, Norman So., For. 

Hoff, F. T Fr., Ch. E. 

Hoffman, Martin Fr., Ag. 

Holcomb, W. L Fr., Ae. E. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

415 Calvin Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

301 N. Blount St Raleigh, N. C. 

105 Wat., 3005 . .Hilton Village, Va. 

109 Welch, 3245 Wilmington, N. C. 

109 Bagwell, 3309 Lowell, N. C. 

Wilmont Apt. B-3 Raleigh, N. C. 

2513 Clark Ave High Point, N. C. 

204 Bagwell, 3336 Durham, N. C. 

125 Hawthorne Rd Greenville, N. C. 

St. Mary's School Lufkin, Texas 

. 2302 Hillsboro St Oak City. N. C. 

. Withdrew Robbins, N. C. 

. 104 4th, 3114 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

.2116 Ridgecrest Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

. 230 Bagwell, 3362 Burlington, N. C. 

. 107 Wat., 3007 Fayetteville, N. C. 

.211 Welch, 3259 Stella, N. C. 

.213 Wat., 3031 Kipling, N. C. 

.304 4th, 3130 Humacao, P. R. 

.308 4th, 3134 New Bern, N. C. 

.2206 Fairview Rd Arapahoe, N. C. 

. 103 Gold, 3203 Snow Hill, N. C. 

.103 Chamberlain St Tarboro, N. C. 

. 1917 Sunset Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

. 1517 Hanover St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 206 Bagwell, 3338 Cherryville, N. C. 

311 Bagwell, 3377 Whiteville, N. C. 

Withdrew Roxboro, N. C. 

. 514 N. East St Raleigh, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Charlotte, N. C. 

203 4th, 3121 Mooresville, N. C. 

. Withdrew Goldsboro, N. C. 

228 Bagwell, 3360 Hickory, N. C. 

304 4th, 3130 Takoma Park, Md. 

Gvmnasium Laurinburg, N. C. 

. 2407 Clark Ave Maxton, N. C. 

. 314 Wat., 3050 Shelby, N. C. 

.128 Bagwell, 3328 Fayetteville, N. C. 

. 202 Bagwell, 3334 Elkin, N. C. 

. 226 Bagwell, 3358 Norlina, N. C. 

. 225 Bagwell, 3357 Salisbury, N. C. 

314 Bagwell, 3380 Swannanoa, N. C. 

10 Y. M. C. A Oxford, N. C. 

. 10 Enterprise St Greensboro, N. C. 

. 127 Bagwell, 3327 Goldsboro, N. C. 

.130 Bagwell, 3330 Wilmington, N. C. 

.1720 Hillsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

. 1539 Iredell Dr Raleigh, N. C. 

. 212 Bagwell, 3344 Asheville, N. C. 

. Route 1, Cary Cary, N. C. 

2412 Hillsboro St Burgaw, N. C. 

120 Baa:well, 3320 Spindale, N. C. 

. 203 Wat., 3021 Edenton, N. C. 

. 12y 2 Home St Roseboro, N. C. 

107 Gold, 3207 Oxford, N. C. 

. 322 Bagwell, 3388 New York, N. Y. 

. 308 E. Park Drive Raleigh, N. C. 

312 Gold, 3236 New York, N. Y. 

.310 Bagwell, 3376 Mt. Airy, N. C. 



38 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Name Classification 

Holmes, Evelyn S. (Mrs.) Aud. 

Honeycutt, C. H Fr., Tex. 

Honeycutt, W. F Fr., Tex. 

Hooker, R. J Fr., C. E. 

Horan, James, Jr Fr., C. E. 

Horton, W. P Fr., Ae. E. 

Hostevedt, H. L Fr., M. E. 

House, G. M So., Ag. 

Hovis, L. S So., Ch. E. 

Howard, J. S Fr., Ae. E. 

Howard, P. N., Jr Sr., C. E. 

Howard, W. S Fr., Ch. E. 

Howell, C. J., Jr Fr., Ch. E. 

Hudgins, R. H Sr., An. Prod. 

Hudson, C. G Fr., E. E. 

Hudson, F. G Fr., Ae. E. 

Hudson, M. W So., E. E. 

Huffman, J. C Fr., Ch. E. 

Huggins, D. W., Jr So., E. E. 

Hughes, C. W Fr., C. E. 

Hughey, R. E Fr., Ch. E. 

Humbert, W. F., Ill So., E. E. 

Hunnicutt, W. H Fr., C. E. 

Hupp, W. N Fr., M. E. 

Jackson, A. L Fr., Tex. 

James, W. E So., Arch. E. 

Jaramillo, H. J Fr., Tex. 

Jarvis, F. W., Jr So., Ae. E. 

Jernigan, R. K Fr., Ag. 

Jerome, Josephine T. (Miss) Pratt & W. 

Johnson, D. P Fr., Ag. Ch. 

Johnson, I. A So., E. E. 

Johnson, W. C Fr., E. E. 

Johnson, W. E., Jr Fr., Gen. E. 

Johnson, W. 0. Fr., Ag. E. 

Jones, H. A., Ill Fr., Arch. E. 

Jones, J. C, Jr Fr., Ch. E. 

Jones, J. T Fr., Ae. E. 

Jones, R. A Fr., Ae. E. 

Jones, R. C, Jr So., C. E. 

Jones, R. H. W., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Jones, W. N Jr., E. E. 

Jordan, C. W., Jr Fr., Ch. E. 

Jordan, C. Y Fr., M. E. 

Jordan, F. B Fr., Ag. 

Jordan, P. R., Jr Fr., Ag. 

Kaden, H. A So., Tex. 

Kako, R. M Fr., E. E. 

Kamatani, Joe So., E. E. 

Kamos, G. G Fr., C. E. 

Kampschmidt, W. F Fr., Ae. E. 

Kaplan, Morton Sr., Tex. W. & D. 

Kay, D. L Fr., C. E. 

Kendrick, G. H Fr., Cer. E. 

Kendrick, R. F Fr., Ae. E. 

Kengla, Olive W. (Mrs.) . . Sp. No Col. Cr. 
Kennison, R. W., Jr Jr., M. E. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

. 1508 Canterbury Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

.318 Bagwell, 3384 Franklinton, N. C. 

. 205 Welch, 3253 Greensboro, N. C. 

.109 Welch, 3245 Wilmington, N. C. 

.304 Wat., 3040 Hamlet, N. C. 

.208 Welch, 3256 Sanford, N. C. 

. 3415 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 2412 Hillsboro St Scotland Neck, N. C. 

.300 Home St Dallas, N. C. 

.107 4th, Box 3117 Lenoir, N. C. 

. 12 Home St Charlotte, N. C. 

.312 Bagwell, 3378 Charlotte, N. C. 

. 217 Wat., 3035 Concord, N. C. 

.119 Hillsboro St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 229 Bagwell, 3361 Grimesland, N. C. 

. 315 Bagwell, 3381 Camp Lejeune, N. C. 

. Withdrew Wilson, N. C. 

. 207 Wat., 3025 Statesville, N. C. 

. 216 Wat., 3034 Clayton, N. C. 

.113 Wat., 3013 Roxboro, N. C. 

. 126 Bagwell, 3326 Statesville, N. C. 

. 312 Wat., 3048 Leaksville, N. C. 

. Route 2 Raleigh, N. C. 

. Fieldhouse Buckhannon, W. Va. 

. 209 Gold, 3221 Kings Mountain, N. C. 

2212 Hope St Farmington, N. C. 

. 312 Gold, 3236 Medellin, Colombia 

. 212 Wat., 3030 Spindale, N. C. 

Withdrew Mt. Olive, N. C. 

. 523 N. East St Raleigh, N. C. 

305 Bagwell, 3371 Delco, N. C. 

. 209 Wat., 3027 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

. 328 Bagwell, 3394 Moncure, N. C. 

.307 Welch, 3267 Asheville, N. C. 

.112 Watauga, 3012 Salisbury, N. C. 

. 102 Wat., 3002 Durham, N. C. 

.122 N. Salisbury St Raleigh, N. C. 

Withdrew Greensboro, N. C. 

Withdrew Southport, N. C. 

. 2412 Hillsboro St Reidsville, N. C. 

. 216 Wat., 3034 Guilford College, N. C. 

2105 White Oak Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

.2412 Hillsboro St., Box 5042 

Wilmington, N. C. 
. Box 54, Cary Cary, N. C. 

Withdrew Mt. Olive, N. C. 

. 112 Wat., 3012 Wilmington, N. C. 

.109 Oberlin Rd New York, N. Y. 

Fieldhouse Peabody, Mass. 

. Withdrew McGehee, Ark. 

. 7 Berry, 4304 Goldsboro, N. C. 

224 Bagwell, 3356 Greensboro, N. C. 

.116 Woodbum Rd. Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. 

. 108 Gold, 3208 Thomasville, N. C. 

.112 Bagwell, 3312 .Monroe,.N. C. 

. 309 Wat., 3045 Shelby, N. C. 

. 203 N. Blount St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 210 Pace St Raleigh, N. C. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



39 



Name Classification 

Killian, R. E Fr., Ae. E. 

Kilpatrick, F. M., Jr Fr., Ag. 

King, A. B So., Ae. E. 

King, A. Merlyn (Miss) Fr., Tex. 

King, G. W., Jr Fr., C. E. 

King, H. W Fr., Ag. 

Kirk, D. D Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Kirkman, R. A Fr., E. E. 

Kistler, C. E Fr., C. E. 

Kluttz, B. E Fr., C. E. 

Klyman, M. Katherine . . Fr., Occ. I. & G. 

Knight, W. A., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Kohler, Stanley So., E. E. 

Lackey, J. M Fr., Ae. E. 

Lail, G. D Fr., Ch. E. 

Lambert, L. W Fr., C. E. 

Lamprinakos, P. J So., M. E. 

Landon, L. M Fr., E. E. 

Lard, Kathleen E. (Miss) . . .Pratt & W. 

Lassiter, M. V., Jr Sr„ M. E. 

Latham, R. Q Fr., Tex. 

Laughlin, R. C Sr., Ch. E. 

Laughridge, K. M Fr., C. E. 

Leach, J. A Fr., M. E. 

Leary, W. C Fr., Ae. E. 

Leatherman, B. H Fr., Tex. 

Leazar, J. D Fr., Ag. 

Lee, A. G Fr., E. E. 

Lee, J. W Fr., Ae. E. 

Leggett, D. W Fr., M. E. 

Lenhart, J. A Fr., Occ. I. & G. 

Leonard, B. T Jr., Hort. 

Leonard, Samuel Edwin .... Gr., Ru. Soc. 

Leonard, Shelley Elbert Fr., M. E. 

Lewis, H. J Fr., Ch. E. 

Linkous, W. H Gr., Ag. Ec. 

Lisak, E. F Fr., I. Arts Ed. 

Little, Zeb Fr., Tex. 

Littlefield, B. E., Jr Fr., Cer. E. 

Livingston, E. M Fr., M. E. 

Lockhart, J. K So., Ch. E. 

Loewensberg, Sylvia (Mrs.) Gr., Ag. Ch. 

Loewensberg, Walter Gr., M. E.. 

Lomax, R. F Fr., C. E.. 

Lovelace, D. F., Jr Fr., Occ. I. & G. . 

Lovill, E. F Fr., M. E. . 

Lovill, R. C Fr., M. E.. 

Lowery, W. S Fr., M. E. . 

Lutz, W. A Fr., Tex. . 

Lynch, E. P., Jr So., Ch. E. . 

Lynch, M. K Fr., Ae. E. . 

Lynn, W. W Fr., For. . 

McCall, J. A So., Tex. . 

McCleney. D. D Fr., M. E. . 

McConnaughey, W. J So., Ae. E. 

McCormick, T. J., Jr Fr., M. E. 

McDaniel, Laura E. (Miss) . . Fr., M. E.. 
McGee, F. F Fr., M. E. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

. 308 Wat., Box 3044 Lincolnton, N. C. 

. 105 Berry, 4305 Ayden, N. C. 

.102 Berry, 4302 St. Pauls, N. C. 

Ill Brooks Ave Wallace, N. C. 

. 309 Bagwell, 3375 Charlotte, N. C. 

Gym Pembroke, Bermuda 

. 106 Welch, 3242 Aberdeen, N. C. 

. Route 5 Raleigh, N. C. 

304 Gold, 3228 Star, N. C. 

. 311 Wat., 3047 Concord, N. C. 

. 1806 Chester Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

.318 Bagwell, 3384 Biltmore, N. C. 

. 125 Woodburn Rd New York, N. Y. 

. Ill Welch, 3247 Hiddenite, N. C. 

. 112 Bagwell, 3312 Monroe, N. C. 

. 308 Welch, 3268 Mullins, S. C. 

. 10 Enterprise St Asheville, N. C. 

.307 Bagwell, 3373 Weaverville, N. C. 

. 601 Hinsdale St St. Joseph, Mo. 

. 103 Chamberlain St Richmond, Va. 

. 205 Wat., 3023 Spray, N. C. 

. 1720 Hillsboro St Tarboro, N. C. 

. 307 Gold, 3231 Marion, N. C. 

Withdrew Franklin, N. C. 

.121 Bagwell, 3321 Edenton, N. C. 

. 211 Bagwell, 3343 Lexington, N. C. 

.101 Welch, 3237 College Park, Ga. 

. 134 Bagwell, 3402 Benson, N. C. 

. 105 Bagwell, 3305 Dunn, N. C. 

203 Bagwell, 3335 Scotland Neck, N. C. 

.Fieldhouse Duquesne, Pa. 

. 126 Forest Rd Norfolk, Va. 

. 1624 Oberlin Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

. 8 Berry, 4341 Ramseur, N. C. 

. 101 Gold, 3201 Louisburg, N. C. 

217 N. Wilmington St Vicker, Va. 

. Fieldhouse Wheeling, W. Va. 

. 2407 Clark Ave Lexington, N. C. 

. 207 Bagwell, 3339 Fairmont, N. C. 

. 229 Bagwell, 3361 Laurel Hill, N. C. 

. 303 Welch, 3263 Hillsboro, N. C. 

. 2707 Bedford Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

. 2707 Bedford Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

. 133 Bagwell, 3401 Lenoir, N. C. 

200 W. Whitaker Mill Rd. . . Raleigh, N. C. 

. 214 Bagwell, 3346 Mt. Airy, N. C. 

. 214 Bagwell, 3346 Mt. Airy, N. C. 

. 334 Bagwell, 3400 Charlotte, N. C. 

. 314 Wat., 3050 Shelby, N. C. 

. 104 Berrv, 4304 Charlotte, N. C. 

. 312 Welch, 3272 Slater, S. C. 

.333 Bagwell, 3399 Greenville, Ala. 

.1720 Hillsboro St Reidsville, N. C. 

.324 Bagwell, 3390 Chadbourn, N. C. 

. 2412 Hillsboro Red Springs, N. C. 

218 Bagwell, 3350 Rowland, N. C. 

. Meredith College Kinston, N. C. 

. 308 Welch, 3268 Mt. Airy, N. C. 



40 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Xame Classification 

McLamb. D. L. Fr., E. E. 

McLamb. Eula P. (Miss) Gr., Ag. Ch. 

McLaughlin. Helen A. (Miss) Gr.. Oc I&G. 

McLean. R. A.. Jr Fr.. E. E. 

McLeod. H. M Fr.. Ae. 

McLeod. J. A., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

MacNeill. J. L So., Ae. E. 

McNeill. R. E Fr.. Ae. E. 

McNeill. R.N Fr.. M. E. 

McRackan. Ada A. (Miss) . Gr.. Ru. Soc. 
McRainey. J. R Fr., For. 

Madden. Lois M. (Miss) . . . Fr., Gen. E. 

Maddock. J. G Fr., E. E. 

Maddry. L. G Gr., PI. Path. 

Maddux. H. T.. Jr Fr.. Gen. E. 

Mahonev. E. J Jr., C. E. 

Mandel. N. W So. Tex. 

Maner, J. E So. Ae. E. 

Mann, J. H. Fr. Ae. 

Mann, L. A.. Jr. So., Ch. E. 

Manning. C. L.. Jr. Fr.. Ag. E. 

Manning. H. L Gr.. Exp. Stat. 

Marine. Z. O Fr., C. E 

Marks, W. H Fr., C. E. 

Marsh. W. B.. Jr Fr.. E. E. 

Marshall. Katharine E. (Miss) Pratt A W. 

Martin. J. R So., Ch. E. 

Martin, W. D Fr.. C. E. 

Massengill. H. K Sr.. Tex. 

Masten. G. M.. Jr Fr.. M. E. 

Matlock. T. L Fr.. M. E. 

Matthews, C. L So.. Ch. E. 

Matthews. G. P So., E. E. 

Matusow. D. M Sr.. Ae. E. 

Maultsby. K. A. So., C. E. 

May. D. C. Jr Fr.. E. E. 

Meares. S. H Fr.. Ae. E. 

Mellon. J. D.. Jr Fr.. Ae. E. . 

Mercer. A. W Fr., Ae. E. . 

Mercer. D. L., Jr Fr.. Ae. Ed. 

Merritt. R. E Fr.. Cer. E. 

Messir.ger. Arnold Fr.. Tex. 

Miller. Mrs. Bregetta M. Sp. No Col. Cr. 

Miller. E. L.. Jr Gr.. Geol. E. 

Miller, H. D Fr.. \e E 

Miller. L. B.. Jr Fr.. Ae. E. 

Miller. L. H Fr.. \e. 

Miller. Mary Elizabeth (Miss) Fr.. Tex. 

Mills. G. A. Fr.. E. E. 

Millsaps. J. C So.. C. E. 

Mitchell. R. E Fr.. Ae. E. 

Mitchell. W. H Fr.. Ae. 

Mizelle. M. B Jr.. C. E. 

Monroe. J. M. So., Ae. E. 

Montgomery. J. R Fr., Ae. E. 

Moore. J. L. Fr.. Ag. Ed. 

Moore. S. I. Fr.. Ae. E. 

Moore. W. C. Jr Fr.. E. E. 

Mooring. R. F Fr.. M. E. 



Dorm. Box Xo. or St. Xo. 

School Address Home Address 

116 Wat., 3016 Clinton, N. C. 

134 New Bern Ave Clinton, N. C. 

301 N. Blount St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 110 Bagwell, 3310 Mt. Olive, N. C. 

205 Gold. 3217 Carthage, N. C. 

110 Wat.. 3010 Jonesboro, N. C. 

.2407 Clark Ave Maxton. N. C. 

311 Gold. 3235 Wade, N. C. 

. 1616 Hillsboro St Marion, N. C. 

123 Montgomery St Raleigh, N. C. 

.Fieldhouse Fayetteville. N. C. 

. 2100 Hillsboro St Bridgeport, Conn. 

Fieldhouse Tarentum, Pa. 

Box 711, Raleigh Nazareth, N. C. 

2404 Everett Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

124 Home St Brooklvn, N. Y. 

. 109 Oberlin Rd New York, N. Y. 

R.F.D. 3. Box 98 Raleigh, N. C. 

. State Col. Dairy Pittsboro, N. C. 

Infirmarv Newport, N. C. 

308 Bagwell, 3374 Robersonville, N. C. 

123 Halifax St London, England 

. 204 Bagwell, 3336 Sneads Ferry, N. C. 

Withdrew Virgilina, Va. 

130 Bagwell, 3332 Marshville, N. C. 

601 Hinsdale Washington, D. C. 

300 Home St Cramerton, N. C. 

.220 Bagwell, 3352 Favetteville, N. C. 

525 N. Bloodworth St Raleigh, N. C. 

304 Wat.. 3040 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

311 Welch, 3271 Hiddenite, N. C. 

302 Bagwell. 3368 East Bend, N. C. 

.103 Chamberlain St Nashville, N. C. 

. 109 Oberlin Rd New York, N. Y. 

2 Berrv. 4335 Jacksonville, N. C. 

103 Welch. 3239 New Bern, N. C. 

2408 Everett Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

304 Baewell. 3370 Winterville, N. C. 

319 Bagwell, 3385 Pink Hill, N. C. 

105 Welch. 3241 Bolivia, N. C. 

218 Wat., 3036 Mt. Airy, N. C. 

201 4th, Box 3119 Roosevelt, N. Y. 

Withdrew Raleigh. N. C. 

.2402 Clark Ave.. Apt. 9 Raleigh, N. C. 

203 Welch. 3251 Greensboro, N. C. 

309 Welch. 3269 Merritt, N. C. 

110 Baewell. 3310 Camp Davis, N. C. 

226 Chamberlain St Raleigh, N. C. 

.133 Bagwell. 3401 Watha. N. C. 

.206 Wat., 3024 Statesville. N. C. 

310 Gold, 3234 Greensboro, N. C. 

. Greenhouse. Box 5254 King, N. C. 

201 Welch, 3249 Bethel, N. C. 

2513 Clark Ave Hamlet, N. C. 

126 Bagwell, 3326 Statesville, N. C. 

113 Bagwell. 3313 Jamesville, N. C. 

203 Gold. 3215 Burlington. N. C. 

109 Wat., 3009 New Bern, N. C. 

101 4th, 3111 Goldsboro, N. C. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



41 



Name Classification 

Morgan, J. F Fr., Ag. 

Morgan, K. D., Jr So., Ch. E. 

Morgan, T.J So., Ag. 

Morgan, W. W Fr., C. E. 

Morrow, R. A Fr., E. E. 

Morton, B. S Fr., M. E. 

Moss, J. T So., Ag. 

Murdoch, A. W Fr., E. E. 

Mussack, W. J., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Myers, F. B Fr., E. E. 

Myers, J. M Fr., Arch. E. 

Nackos, C.J Sr., C. E. 

Nadjar, J. G Sr., Tex. 

Nash, Eugenia (Miss) . So., Occ. I. & G. 

Naugler, A. W Fr., M. E. 

Neal, J. W Fr., Ae. E. 

Negron, Henry Sr., C. E. 

Nelson, Ernestine E. (Miss) Sr., W. & D. 

Nichols, C. H Fr., E. E. 

Nicholson, W. M Sr., Ch. E. 

Noell, E. S., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Noneman, R. L. Fr., For. 

Northcott, Mary E. (Miss) . . Pratt & W. 
Norwood, J. E So., Ch. E. 

Olive, Emily L. (Miss) Fr., M. E, 

O'Neal, G. M Fr., Ae. E. 

O'Neal, R. L Fr., Ae. E. 

O'Neal, W. J., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Orr, E. A So., Ch. E. 

Overing, R. E Fr., Ch. E. 

Ozsoy, F. A Fr., Tex. 

Paaffe, Basil Fr., E. E. 

Page, F. L., Ill So., Ch. E. 

Page, W. F Fr., E. E 

Pair, P. V., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Parker, D. M., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Parker, E. L Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Parker, G. W Jr., Ch. E. 

Parker, P. E., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Parnag, John So., Ch. E. 

Parrish, W. W Fr., M. E. 

Parthemos, C. N Fr., Ch. E. 

Patterson, W. S Fr., M. E. 

Peele, R. E Fr., Ae. E. 

Perez, M. E Gr., Zool. & Ent. 

Perry, A. N Sr., M. E, 

Perry, W. F., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Perryman, J. A Fr., M. E. 

Peterson, W. P Fr., E. E. 

Pfaff, A. M So., E. E 

Phillips, J. R Fr., Tex, 

Phillips, T. K Fr., E. E. 

Pickett, A. E Fr., M. E. 

Pierce, J. W Fr., Ag. 

Pinnix, M. H Fr., Ch. E. 

Pippin, J. L Fr., Ae. E. 

Pittman, R. A Fr., Ag. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

Basement, 1911, Box 5421 Peachland, N. C. 

Gym Tarboro, N. C. 

. 120 Forest Rd Peachland, N. C. 

Withdrew Spring Hope, N. C. 

223 Bagwell, 3355 Albemarle, N. C. 

223 Bagwell, 3355 Albemarle, N. C. 

208 4th, Box 3126 Youngsville, N. C. 

. 202 Welch, 3250 Wildwood, N. C. 

203 Bagwell, 3335 Halifax, N. C. 

.306 Bagwell, 3372 Pinehurst, N. C. 

. 107 Bagwell, 3307 Greensboro, N. C. 

. 10 Enterprise St Wilson, N. C. 

. 12 Home St Santiago, Chile 

. Peace College St. Pauls, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Beverly, Mass. 

.519 Daughtridge Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

. 123 Bagwell, 3323 San Juan, P. R. 

. 4 Maiden Lane Alhambra, Cal. 

. 125 Hawthorne Rd Greenville, N. C. 

. 12 Home St Winston-Salem, N. C. 

. 310 Wat., 3046 Durham, N. C. 

2106 White Oak Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

. 220 E. North St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 204 Wat., 3022 Raleigh, N. C. 

Meredith College Raleigh, N. C. 

. 305 Gold, 3229 Swan Quarter, N. C. 

. Route 1, Neuse Neuse, N. C. 

. 558 New Bern Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

. 315 Wat., 3051 Rocky Mount, N. C. 

. Route 4 Raleigh, N. C. 

. 302 4th, 3128 Ankara, Turkey 

. 301 4th, 3127 New Bern, N. C. 

2407 Clark Ave., Box 5456 Zebulon, N. C. 

.313 Bagwell, 3379 Fairmont, N. C. 

.Route 1, Knightdale Knightdale, N. C. 

. 103 Bagwell, 3303 New Bern, N. C. 

. 310 Welch, 3270 Angier, N. C. 

. 302 Bagwell, 3368 Murf reesboro, N. C. 

. Ill Gold, 3211 Lasker, N. C. 

. 1720 Hillsboro St Durham, N. C. 

. Withdrew Henderson, N. C. 

. 222 Bagwell, 3354 Asheville, N. C. 

. 311 Welch, 3271 Stony Point, N. C. 

. 118 Bagwell, 3318 Roxobel, N. C. 

132 Woodburn Rd San Juan, P. R. 

. 103 Chamberlain St Hamlet, N. C. 

. 9 Berry, 4342 Bailey, N. C. 

. 103 4th, 3113 Thomasville, N. C. 

. 102 Welch, 3238 Clinton, N. C. 

. 103 Berry, 4303 Tobaccoville, N. C. 

. 209 Welch, 3257 Greensboro, N. C. 

. 108 Bagwell, 3308 Greensboro, N. C. 

. Fieldhouse Spencer, N. C. 

. 1 Berry, 4334 Baltimore, Md. 

211 Wat., 3029 Oxford, N. C. 

204 Gold, 3216 Fremont, N. C. 

. 105 Berry, 4305 Biscoe, N. C. 



_;_ 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Name Classification 

Pitts, R. L.. Jr Jr., Ae. E. 

Plvler. R. A.. Jr Ft., Ch. E 

7 ie, H. V St., E. E. 

E ratzss, A. A Sr.. ^ex. C. & D. 

Polk, R. L. Ft.. Ae. E. 

?::•.:=. N. J. Sr.. Ch._E. 

Porter, Sarah H. (Miss) . . Gr.. Ag. Ec. 
I - - "'. A. . Ft.. M. E. 

7 well, R. J. Ft.. Ch. E. 

Pressly, Harriet B. (Miss] Sr.. Ag. Ch. 
j-:—:: ::. L. .'.".. Jr. Fr.. Ch. E. 

Price, :. H Ft.. E. E. 

Price. N. A So., E. E. 

Prunty, R. W Ft.. E. E. 

Ba Ailev. A. E. Ft., Ae. E. 

Ramos. J. A Gr., Zool. <£: Bat 

An, J. R Ft., E. E. 

-. . :elade, J. H., Jr Ft.. Tex. 

Bawls, H. D. Gr., Ru. Soc. 

- Rachel 7. Mrs. Gr.. Oct I. ft G. 

W. T. Ft.. Arch. E. 

?.. R. Ft.. E. E. 

ear, Naftali Sr„ Tex. 

Renfrow. J. A. Ft.. E. E. 

Reyes Spindola P. L So.. Tex. 

raids, D. S.. Jr Ae. K. 

?.h:ies. M. R Ft.. E. E. 

?.':-.: ies. 7. 7. Z. 7:.. Ae. Z. 

Rhue. D. B Ft.. E. E. 

Rhvne, G. W., Jr Ft.. E. E. 

J.hvr.r. 7. S.. Jr. _ Ft.. For. 

Richardson, Eliz. T. (Miss) Gr., Ru. Soc. 
ZAhhus. 7 A - ::.. .ex. 

Riggan, W. H.. Jr Ft.. Ind. E. 

?.i::hie. J. 7. Ft., Ch. Z. 

7.:' ers::-.. 'V. Z. Ft.. E. E. 

Z:::er:;::-.. 7-. A.. Jr. $:•.. C. r.. 

Robertson, W. C Sol, Ae. E. 

Robinson, J. W Ft., Ag. 

Roe, W. C Ft., Ind. E. 

Roebuck, J. W Ft.. Ae. E. 

Rogers, E. H. Ft., Ag. Ed. 

Rogers, Lawrence Ft.. Ag. Ed. 

Rollins. M. D Ft., E. E. 

Rollins, W. H. Ft.. Tex. 

Rose. H. L So., C. E. 

H. D Ft., Arch. E. 

Ross, J. N Ft.. C. E. 

R. G.. Jr Sr., Gen. E. 

F Ft.. Ag. 

:':.. R. F Ft.. Ae. Z. 

?.. Sr.. M. E. 

Rowland, W. B. Ft., Ag. 

Russell. 7. C. $:.. Ar;h. 

Russell. -.. W., Jr. Sou, Ae. K. 

Sakas. G. G. Ft., Tex. 

Saltzman, Cvma M. (Miss- Ft.. Tex. 

Salver, J. W Ft.. Ae. E. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 
School Address 



Home Address 



2407 Clark Ave. Spring Hope 

.10, 1911 Waxhaw 

. 120 Woodburn Rd Apex 

.104 Berrv. 4304 New Bedford, 

111 Gold. 3224 Winston-Salem 

.204 Berry. 4311 Wilmington 

71 : N. East Sr Raleigh 

305 Gold, 3229 Mt. Olive 

. 309 Gold, 3233 Kannapolis 

. 526 Wilmington St. Raleigh 

.Withdrew Wilmington 

. 102 Berrv, 4302 Gastonia 

221 Bagwell, 3353 Rocky Mount 

. 107 Wat., 3007 Charlotte 



N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
Mass. 
N. C, 
N. C, 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N.C. 
N. C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 



105 4th, 3115 Willard, N. C. 

132 Woodburn Rd Mayaguez, P. R. 

108 Bagwell, 3308 Greensboro, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Durham, N. C. 

Apt. G-2. Countrv C. Homes Raleigh, N. C. 
Apt. G-2, Country C. Homes Raleigh. N. C. 

10*2 Gold, 3202 Chapel Hill, N. C. 

311 Wat., 3047 N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

109 Oberlin Rd Lima, Peru 

304 BagweU, 3370 Kenly, N. C. 

122 Bagwell, 3322 Mexico Citv, Mex. 

130 BagweU. 3330 Wilmington. N. C. 

209 Wat., 3027 New Bern. N. C. 

129 BagweU, 3329 StatesviUe, N. C, 

202 Welch, 3250 Newport, N. C. 

101 BagweU, 3301 Catawba, N. C. 

108 4th, 3118 Charlotte, N. C. 

2015 Glenwood Ave Raleigh, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Hillside, N. J. 

3 Berrv, 4336 Macon, N. C. 

307 4th. 3133 Richfield, N. C. 

2513 Clark Ave Stokes, N. C, 

333 BagweU, 3399 Mt. Airy, N. C. 

208 Wat., 3026 Goldsboro, N. C. 

308 Bagwell, 3374 Rose Hill, N. C, 

317 BagweU. 3383 Concord, N. C. 

206 Welch, 3254 Stokes, N. C. 

128 BagweU, 3328 Clvde. N. C. 

306 Wat., 3042 Roxboro, N. C, 

111 Welch, 3247 Grover. N. C. 

210 Welch, 3258 Spindale, N. C. 

218 BagweU, 3350 Kenly, N. C. 

119 BagweU, 3319 KernersviUe, N. C. 

elch, 3244 Monroe, N. C. 

12 Home St Charlotte, N. C, 

2305 Clark Ave. Broadwav, N. C. 

210 Gold, 3222 Asheboro, N. C, 

1 — B : rue S: Aberdeen, N. C. 

117 BagweU, 3317 Kittrell. N. C. 

215 BagweU, S347 Isiamarada, Fla. 

101 Berry, 4301 High Point, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Wilson, N. C. 

gne S: Brooklyn, N. Y. 

. Withdrew WUmington, N. C. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



43 



Name Classification 

Sanders, J. L Ft., Arch. E. 

Sanders, R. F Fr., E. E. 

Sapp, J. D Fr., E. E. . 

Sasser, M. C Sr., Ind. E. 

Savage, R. P Fr., C. E. 

Scarpa, J. J Fr., Tex. 

Schuck, G. I So., Ae. E. . 

Scott, W. L Fr., Ag. . 

Seawell, L. M., Jr Fr., E. E.. 

Seav, F. S., Jr So., C. E. . 

Self, W. C Fr., Ae. E. 

Sellers, E. G So., Gen. E. . 

Senter, M. S Fr., M. E. . 

Sewell, D. W Fr., Cer. E.. 

Sharp, D. R Fr., Tex. 

Sharpe, J. J So., M. E. 

Shaw, R. A Fr., Ae. E. 

Shelburne, V. B., Jr Sr., Ch. E. 

Sherrill, K. A., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Sherrill, Marianna (Miss) . . Pratt & W. 

Shomaker, J. V Fr., M. E. 

Shore, H. F Fr., E. E. 

Sigmon, I. A. Fr., Arch. E. 

Simmons, J. D Fr., Ae. E. 

Sink, C. B So., Tex. 

Sink, H. T Fr., Gen. E. 

Slifka, Philip Fr., Tex. 

Smith, A. C. " Sr., C. E. 

Smith, C. A., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Smith, C. L Fr., Ae. E. 

Smith, G. L., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Smith, G. W So., Ae. E. 

Smith, J. H Fr., Tex. 

Smith, N.J Fr., Cer. E. 

Smithdeal, W. C Fr., Arch. E. 

Smithson, N. D Fr., Ag. 

Snider, H. L Fr., C. E. 

Snipes, O. C Fr., M. E. 

Snow, P. L Fr., E. E. 

Snvder, F. C So.. Arch. E. 

Sox, T. E Fr., E. E. 

Spamer, C. W., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Spencer, J. A Fr., C. E. 

Stanley, J. C, Jr Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Staton, L. E Fr., M. E. 

Stauffer, H. W., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Stavenhagen, M. S So., Ch. E. 

Steinert, Beverly S. (Miss) . Gr., Entom. 

Stevens, H. L Fr., Ag. 

Stevens, Lillian E. (Miss) . Gr., Ag. Ch. 

Stevenson, D. B Fr., Ae. E. 

Stewart, D. E Fr., Tex. 

Stilwell, M. G Fr., Tex. 

Stinson, J. B So., Ag. Ed. 

Stokes, T. A., Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Storey, C. V Fr., E. E. 

Stott, C. W Fr., M. E. 

Straus, J. A So., Tex. 

Strole, J. P Fr., Ag. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. Xo. 

School Address Home Addi'ess 

225 Bagwell, 3357 Four Oaks, N. C. 

317 Wat., 3053 Alamance, N. C. 

.322 Bagwell, 3388 Salisbury, N. C. 

.4 Ferndell Lane Selma, N. C. 

.105 4th, 3115 Willard, N. C. 

.Fieldhouse Ansonia, Conn. 

.17 Enterprise St Lvndhurst, N. J. 

.2408 Stafford Ave "Rosehill, N. C. 

.301 Gold, 3225 Winston-Salem. N. C. 

.2514 Clark Ave., Reidsville. N. C. 

. 1610 St. Mary's St Raleigh, N. C. 

Hillsboro St Charlotte, N. C. 

.303 Welch, 3263 . Chalvbeate Springs, N. C. 

. 109 Gold, 3209 Greensboro, N. C. 

.Withdrew Saugus. Mass. 

. 117 Wat., 3017 Spencer. N. C. 

.312 Wat., 3048 Leaksville. N. C. 

.325 Bagwell, 3391 Washington, N. C. 

.301 4th, 3127 Mooresville, N. C. 

.2717 Vanderbilt Ave. Statesville, N. C. 

.205 Gold, 3217 Banner Elk. N. C. 

.110 Gold, 3210 Boonville. N. C. 

£, Hope St Reidsville. N. C. 

"at., 3043 Ash, N. C. 

3033 Lexineton, N. C. 

.210 Bagwell, 3342 Mooresville. N. C. 

.301 Ba2.-well, 3367 Lawrence, L. I. 

C. A Mooresville. N. C. 

. Box 45. Carv Carv, N C. 

. 303 Eaewell, 3369 Fairmont, N. C. 

.316 Bagwell, 3382 Gibson, N. C. 

Hillsboro St Durham. N. C. 

.205 Wat,, 3023 Fieldale, Va. 

.227 Eaewell, 3359 Durham. N. C. 

. 1802 Fairview Rd Raleisrh. N. C. 

.331 Bagwell, 3397 Asheville. N. C. 

.211 Gold. 3223 Denton. N. C. 

301 Gold, 3225 Varina, N. C. 

220 N. East St Raleisrh. X. C. 

2313 Clark Ave Winston-Salem, N. C. 

. Cary Carv, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Wilkinsburg. Pa. 

202 Gold, 3214 Carthage, N. C. 

. 102 Gold, 3202 Ruffin, X. C. 

"at., 3020 Palmvra. N. C. 

1th, 3129 Marion, N. C. 

17 „::terprise St Fayetteville. N. C. 

Peace College Raleigh. N. C. 

. 204 Welch. 3252 Smithfield, N. C. 

708 W. Jones St Raleieh. N. C. 

129 Bagwell, 3329 Statesville. N. C. 

"at.. 3019 Washington. N. C. 

.115 Baewell. 3315 Thomasville. N. C. 

.304 Welch, 3264 Boonville. N. C. 

234 Bagwell, 3366 Durham. N. C. 

. 110 Wat., 3010 Dunn. N. C. 

. 303 Gold, 3227 Whiteville. N. C. 

. 201 Wat., 3019 New York, N. Y. 

. IS Home St Chadbourn, N. C. 



44 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Same Classification 

Stroup, K. E Fr., Ae. E. 

Stuart, A. N Gr., Tex. C. ft D. 

Stuart, B. J Ft., M. E. 

Stvers, J. D.. Jr Ft., E. E. 

Sutton, F. H Fr., M. E. 

Sutton, H. F Ft., Tex. 

Sutton, J. B Fr., M. E. 

Swartz, D. R Fr., Ae. E. 

Swartz, Marvin So., M. E. 

Swartzberg, F. L So., Ae. E. 

Tart, J. L. . . '. Fr.. Ag. 

Tatum, E. C, Jr Fr., Ag. Ed. 

Tavlor, J. C, Jr Fr.. Ag. 

Tavlor. J. W., Jr Fr., Tex. 

Teabeaut, T. A Fr., M. E. 

Teachev. Remus Fr.. Ae. E. 

Teague. R. J Fr., C. E. 

Terrell, W. B., Jr So., Ae. E. 

Tharrington, G. T So., Ch. E. 

Thaver, F. K., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Thomas, W. C Jr., Ch. E. 

Thomason, J. F Fr., M. E. 

Thompson, A. L Fr.. Ae. E. 

Thompson, A. T Fr., Ag. 

Thompson, Carl, Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Thompson, L. F., Jr Fr.. C. E. 

Tickel, J. J Fr.. M. E. 

Timberlake, J. D Fr., Ch. E. 

Tippett, C. S., Jr Fr., Tex. 

Todd, F. A Gr.. PL Path. 

Towell, R. M Fr., Ae. E. 

Trott. H.N Fr„ For. 

Truitt, J. H Ft., M. E. 

Tucker, J. B., II Fr., E. E. 

Tucker. Louisa N. (Miss) . Gr., Ag. Ch. 

Turbyfill, G. L Fr.. Ag. Ed. 

Turner, H. F Fr., Occ. I. & G. 

Tysinger, T. W Ft., E. E. 

Tyson, M. E, Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Underwood, F. D Fr., Arch. E. 

Underwood, Mary (Miss) Gr., I. Arts Ed. 

Valderrama, L. H So., Tex. 

Valencia, Salvador So., Tex. 

Vance, J. E Fr., Ae. E. 

Van Dresser, W. M., Jr Fr., Tex. 

Varon, Isaac Jr.. W. & D. 

Vinson, S. G Fr., Ch. E. 

Wade, W. E., Jr Sr., Ae. E. 

Waidler, F. P., Jr Jr.. M. E. 

Walden, C. E., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Walker, C. H., Jr So., E. E. 

Walker, H. C Fr.. Ae. E. 

Walker, Jack Fr.. E. E. 

Walker, J. B., Jr Fr.. E. E. 

Wallace, Martha L. (Miss) . Sr.. W. & D. 
Wallner, Siegfried, Jr So., Tex. 



Dorm. Box So. or St. So. 
School Addr; • :- 



Home Address 



.201 Bagwell. 3333 Cherrwille. N. C. 

201 Gold, 3213 Snow Camp 

Fieldhouse Carv. N. C. 

227 Bagwell, 3359 Gastonia. N. C. 

912 Bovlan Drive Raleigh. N. C. 

. 203 Gold, 3215 Burlington. N. C. 

302 Wat., 3038 Goldsboro. N. C. 

. 106 Wat., 3006 Wilmington. N. C. 

.109 Oberlin Rd Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Fieldhouse High Point. N. C. 

101 Wat.. 3001 Four Oaks. N. C. 

306 Wat.. 3042 Cooleemee. N. C. 

.101 Welch. 3237 Durham. N CL 

.314 Bagwell, 3380 Asheville. N. C. 

320 Bagwell. 3386 Favetteville. N. C. 

. 134 Bagwell, 3402 ... Seven Springs. N. C. 

112 Welch. 3248 Siler City. N. C. 

_ I 4th, 3126 Wadesboro. N. C. 

.1720 Hillsboro St Henderson. N. C. 

. 302 Welch, 3262 Robbins. N. C. 

. 110 Welch. 3246 Weldon, N. C. 

.103 4th. 3113 Kannapolis. N. C. 

Withdrew Jacksonville. N. C. 

. 110 Welch, 3246 Whitakers. N. C. 

330 Bagwell. 3396 . .... Cameron. N. C. 

.308 4th, 3134 New Bern. N. C. 

302 Gold. 3226 Roanoke Rapids. N. CL 

202 4th. 3120 Oxford. N. CL 

111 Basrwell, 3311 Henderson. N. C. 

. Zebulon Wendell. N. C. 

302 4th. 3128 Kannapolis. N. C. 

Withdrew Richlands. N. C. 

.201 4th, 3119 Greensboro. N. CL 

.316 Bagwell, 3382 Grimesland. N. C. 

.2316 Hillsboro St Danvil'.r 

Fieldhouse Maiden. N. C. 

. Fieldhouse Rocky Mount. N. C. 

. 215 Wat., 3033 Lexington. N. C, 

.202 Bagwell, 3334 Elkin. N. C. 

308 Gold, 3232 Wilkesboro. N. C. 

. Cary Cary. N. C. 

.205 4th, 3123 Huaral. Peru 

122 Bagwell. 3322 Mexico City. Mex. 

205 Bagwell, 3337 Fair Bluff. N. C. 

204 4th, 3122 Lincolnton. N. C. 

.109 Oberlin Rd Lima. Peru 

127 Bagwell, 3327 Ahoskie. N. C. 

1720 Hillsboro St Union City. Term. 

.131 Hawthorne Rd Raleigh. N. C. 

4 Berrv. 4337 Tabor City. N. C. 

' N. C. 
N. C. 
N.CL 



2504 Van Dvke Ave Raleigh 

107 Welch. 3243 Clayton, 

332 Bagwell, 3398 Marion. 

Fieldhouse Marion. N. C 



1200 Glenwood Ave Raleigh 



N.C 



12 Home St Jacksonville, Texas 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



45 



Name Classification 

Walls, L. J., Jr Fr., M. E. 

Ward, D. L Jr., E. E. 

Ward, J. H Fr., M. E. 

Ward, W. L Fr., Ag. 

Warner, H. P Gr., Tex. 

Watkins, G. S So., E. E. 

Watson, J. L Fr., E. E. 

Wavnick. D. L Sr., Tex. Mgt. 

Weaver, A. F., Ill Fr.. Ag. 

Webster. F. L., Jr So., E. E. 

Wehbie. W. M Fr., Tex. 

Weiss, H. S Fr., Ag. 

West, Gladvs F. (Miss) . Gr., Exp. Stat. 

West. J. J Fr.. Tex. 

Westfall, A. W Fr., M. E. 

Westlake, C. R So., Cer. E. 

Weyne, J. M Jr., M. E. 

White, B. A Fr., C. E. 

White, G. C, Jr Fr., C. E. 

White, G. L Fr., E, E. 

White, Jean E. (Miss) Pratt & W. 

White, N. M., Jr Jr., Ae. E. 

White, R. W Fr., Ag. Ed. 

White, T. F Fr., M. E. 

White, W. H., Jr Fr., For. 

White. W. J. Fr.. Arch. E. 

Whitehead, R. L Fr., Ae. E. 

Whitehurst. T. B., Jr Jr., Ae. E. 

Wiegs, C. W So., E. E. 

Wilber, S. C, Jr So.. Arch. E. 

Wilev, J. M So., Ch. E. 

Willetts, A. L Fr., E. E. 

Williams, B. T., Jr Jr.. Ae. E. 

Williams. C. F., Jr Fr., As:. 

Williams, H. A., Jr So.. M. E. 

Williams, Jack Edward Fr., E. E. 

Williams, John Edgar Fr.. Ch. E. 

Williams, T. B Fr., Tex. 

Williard. C. H., Jr So., Ag. 

Willis, C. Z So., Ag. Ec. 

Wilson, A. W Fr.. Ag. Ed. 

Wilson, D. S., Jr Fr.. C. E. 

Wilson, F. Veronica (Miss) . Fr., Cer. E. 

Wilson, J. A So., Ag. Ed. 

Wilson, J. D Ft., Ag. Ed. 

Wilson. T. E Fr., Ae. 

Wineeoff, C. R Fr.. E. E. 

Winslow, H. B Fr., Ag. 

Witty, R. L., Jr Fr., Ag. 

Wood, C. C Fr., E. E. 

Wood, J. L Fr., Ch. E. 

Wood. R.N Sr., An. Prod. 

Wood, W. H Fr., Tex. 

Wood. W. S So., Ch. E. 

Woodard, D. P., Jr Fr., E. E. 

Woodlev, W. L., Jr Fr., C. E. 

Wooten, D. M Fr., C. E. 

Wooten, R. E Jr., M. E. 



Dorm. Box Xo. or St. Xo. 

School Address Home Address 

. 105 Welch, 3241 Bolivia, N. C. 

. Withdrew Thomas ville, N. C. 

.213 Bagwell. 3345 Edenton, N. C. 

231 Bagwell. 3363 Clinton, N. C. 

. 30 Shepherd St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 6 Enterprise St Charlotte, N. C. 

. Route 4 Raleigh, N. C. 

12 Home St Greensboro. N. C. 

104 Welch. 3240 Asheville, N. C. 

.2513 Clark Ave Winston-Salem, N. C. 

. 425 N. Bloodworth St Raleieh, N. C. 

. 109 Oberlin Rd Brooklvn, N. Y. 

1324 Brooks Ave Columbus, Neb. 

201 Bagwell, 3333 Charlotte. N. C. 

Fieldhouse Los Angeles. Calif. 

119 Hawthorne Rd Sycamore, 111. 

Basement 1911, Box 5241 

Bixschoote, Beleium 

. 206 Wat., 3024 Maxton. N. C. 

. 207 Gold, 3219 Charlotte. N. C. 

210 Wat.. 3028 Raeford. N. C. 

601 Hinsdale St Raleisrh. N. C. 

6 Enterprise St. . . St. Simon's Island. Ga. 

226 Bagwell. 3358 Alexander. N. C. 

. 305 4th. 3131 Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

. 317 Bagwell, 3383 Louisburg, N. C. 

303 Bagwell. 3369 Durham. N. C. 

213 Baewell. 3345 Hobeood. N. C. 

311 Baewell, 3377 Greensboro. N. C. 

• 204 Welch. 3252 Smithfield. N. C. 

125 Woodburn Rd Charlotte, N. C. 

12 Home St Charlotte. N. C. 

323 Baewell, 3389 Winnabow. N. C. 

6 Enterprise St Stedman. N. C. 

1912 Lewis Circle Raleigh, N. C. 

2513 Clark Ave Spencer, N. C. 

307 Gold. 3231 Morganton, N. C. 

303 Gold. 3227 Wilmineton, N. C. 

. 209 Welch. 3257 Asheboro. N. C. 

Withdrew Hieh Point, N. C. 

Y-4 Countrv Club Homes . Raleieh. N. C. 

■ 2609 Clark Ave Hillsboro, N. C. 

. 203 N. Blount St Raleigh, N. C. 

. 2220 Hillsboro St Lakewood. N. J. 

. 106 Berrv. 4306 Scotland Neck, N. C. 

208 Bagwell. 3340 Littleton. N. C. 

329 Bagwell. 3359 Louisburg, N. C. 

232 Baewell. 3364 Albemarle, N. C. 

108 4th. 3118 Robersonville. N. C. 

. 309 Welch, 3269 Summerfield, N. C. 

. 612 Graham St Raleieh. N. C. 

303 Wat.. 3039 Favetteville, N. C. 

. 103 Chamberlain St Graham, N. C. 

102 Baewell. 3302 Washington. N. C. 

303 Wat.. 3039 Favetteville, N. C. 

115 Wat.. 3015 Laurel Hill, N. C. 

. 315 Wat.. 3051 Rockv Mount, N. C. 

. 302 Welch, 3262 Fountain. N. C. 

311 West Park Dr Raleigh, N. C. 



46 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Name Classification 

Wooten, W. A. Ft., Ae. E. 

Workman, J. F Fr., Ch. E. 

Worsley, R. K Fr., Ind. E. 

Worst, R. F Fr., I. Arts Ed. 

Wrerm, Emma L. (Miss) Fr., Tex. 

Wright, E. E Sr., An. Prod. 

Wroten, H. C Jr., Ae. E. 

Wyckoff , R. A., Jr Fr., Tex. 

Yachan, E. D Fr., Tex. 

Yates, E. C, Jr Fr., Ae. E. 

Yates, R. G Fr., Arch. E. 

Yelverton, R. L., Jr So., M. E. 

Young, J. W Fr., E. E. 

Youngblood, J. C So., C. E. 

Younts, B. R So., Ag. Ed. 

Zachary, S. J Fr, E. E. 

Zickefoose, M. S Fr., Occ. I. & G. 



Dorm. Box No. or St. No. 

School Address Home Address 

. 301 Wat., 3037 Princeton, N. C. 

.228 Bagwell, 3360 Thomasville, N. C. 

316 Wat., 3052 Greenville, N. C. 

Fieldhouse Brooklvn, N. Y. 

. 2012 McCarthy St Portsmouth, Va. 

. 306 4th, Box 5565 Tabor City, N. C. 

Carroll House (Infirmary) . . . Norfolk, Va. 
. 106 Bagwell, 3306 Stanley, N. C. 

. 106 4th, 3116 Santiago, Chile 

. 307 Calvin Rd Raleigh, N. C. 

.324 Bagwell, 3390 Chadbourn, N. C. 

.118 Hillcrest Rd Raleigh. N. C. 

. 115 Wat., 3015 Princeton, N. C. 

.Withdrew Fletcher, N. C. 

.2305 Clark Ave Lexington, N. C. 

.101 4th, 3111 Taylorsville. N. C. 

Fieldhouse Buckhannon, W. Va.