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Full text of "Catalog 1998-2000"

Catalog 1998-2000 

Los Angeles, California 



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1998-2000 General Catalog 



2 ACCREDITATION 



MOUNT ST. MARY'S 
COLLEGE CATALOG 

1998-2000 



This Catalog is published to aid the student in making decisions leading to accomplish- 
ment of academic goals. Each student is responsible for becoming acquainted with 
academic requirements. The rules and regulations stated herein are for information 
only and in no way constitute a contract between the student and Mount St. Mary's 
College. The College reserves the right to make program changes, policy revisions, and 
fee adjustments at any time and without prior notice. Every effort has been made to 
ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this Catalog. The student should 
consult the appropriate departments, offices or the published Schedule of Classes 
forcurrent information. 

Accreditations 

Chartered by the State of California in 1925, Mount St. Mary's College is accredited 
by: 

The Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western 

Association of Schools and Colleges 
The California State Board of Education Commission on Teacher Credentialing 
The California Board of Registered Nursing 
The National League for Nursing 
The National Association of Schools of Music 
American Physical Therapy Association 
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education 

Information regarding these accreditations is located in the Office of the President, 
12001 Chalon Road, Los Angeles, California 90049. 

Nondiscrimination Policy 

Mount St. Mary's College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, 
national origin, age or handicap in the administration of its admission policies, schol- 
arship and loan programs, or in its educational programs. 

The College offers equal opportunity to all members of its faculty and staff and to 
applicants for employment without discrimination as to race, color, creed, sex, age, 
handicap or national origin. 

The older facilities of Mount St. Mary's College provide limited wheelchair access. 

Mount St. Mary's College complies with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974. 

In conformance with College Policy, Mount St. Mary's College is an Affirmative Action/ 
Equal Opportunity Employer. 

Inquiries regarding the College's equal opportunity policies may be directed to the 
Director of Human Resources, Affirmative Action Coordinator at (310) 471-9870. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Introduction 


The Academic Calendar 


4 




The College 


5 




The Campuses 


12,15 




Maps 


13,16 


General Information 


Admission 


17 




Financial Aid 


23 




Expenses 


27 


Academic Information 


Academic Policies 


31 




The Associate Degree 


42 




The Baccalaureate Degree 


49 




Graduate Degree Programs 


67 


Student Affairs 


Associate 


46 




Baccalaureate 


62 


Courses of Instruction 


Course Numbering 
Listing of Courses by 


75 




Department 


76 


Faculty and Administration 


The Board of Trustees 


295 




The Administrative Officers 


295 




Academic and Student 






Affairs Staff 


296 




Business Management and 






Administrative Services 






Staff 


298 




The Faculty 


298 




Cooperating Agencies and 






Clinical Centers 


310 


Index 




320 



4 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



Academic Calendar 

1998-1999 ACADEMIC YEAR 

Fall Semester 

Business Office Clearance Deadline July 17 

Chalon Orientation August 28,29,30 

Doheny Orientation August 29,30 

Fall Semester begins August 31 

Mid-Semester Break October 23 

Finals December 11-17 

Spring Semester 

Chalon Orientation January 19 

Doheny Orientation January 19 

Spring Semester begins January 20 

Martin Luther King Day January 18 

Spring Break March 15-19 

Good Friday April 2 

Finals May 7-13 

Graduation May 17 

Summer Semester 

The Weekend College, HOPE Programs, Accelerated Nursing, and all Graduate 
Programs offer summer sessions with differing dates. Please consult the Registrar's 
Office or the specific program for more information regarding the summer calendar. 

1999 - 2000 ACADEMIC YEAR 

Fall Semester 

Business Office Clearance Deadline July 16 

Chalon Orientation August 27-29 

Doheny Orientation August 28-29 

Fall Semester Begins August 30 

Mid-Semester Break October 22 

Finals December 10-16 

Spring Semester 

Chalon Orientation January 18 

Doheny Orientation January 18 

Spring Semester Begins : January 19 

Martin Luther King Day January 17 

Spring Break March 13-17 

Good Friday April 21 

Finals May 5-11 

Graduation May 15 

Summer Semester 

The Weekend College, HOPE, Programs, Accelerated Nursing, and all Graduate 
Programs offer summer sessions with differing dates. Please consult the Registrar's 
Office or the specific program for more information regarding the summer calendar. 



THE COLLEGE 5 



THE COLLEGE 

History 

Mount St. Mary's College offers a values-based liberal arts education for women, as 
well as innovative programs for professional men and women on two historical Los 
Angeles campuses. 

Founded in 1925 by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, the original campus was 
housed at St. Mary's Academy, at Slauson and Crenshaw Boulevards in Los Angeles. 
Property was purchased in the Santa Monica Mountains in 1927 and that site in 
Brentwood became the Chalon Campus which is home to the baccalaureate degree 
programs, a master's program in physical therapy and a Weekend College which gives 
working men and women an opportunity to earn a bachelor's degree by attending school 
every third weekend. 

The Doheny Campus near Downtown Los Angeles, once the historic Doheny estate, 
opened in 1962. It offers graduate, educational credential and associate degree pro- 
grams, many in an evening and weekend format. 

Since its start, the College has granted more than 12,800 degrees. 

While tradition remains a key component of the Mount St. Mary's College experience, 
educating new generations of women for the next millennium is a major College prior- 
ity. 

The new Sister Magdalen Coughlin Learning Complex on the Doheny Campus serves 
as one example of the efforts the College is taking to provide facilities to meet the 
growing needs of its students. Named for the prominent Los Angeles leader who served 
as the Mount St. Mary's College president from 1976-1989 and chancellor from 1989 
until her death in 1994, the complex houses a library, the Cultural Fluency Center, an 
academic building and a learning resource center. 

Mission Statement 

Mount St. Mary's College is an academic community committed to continuing explo- 
ration of relationship to God, other persons, and nature. This exploration takes the 
form of programs devoted to excellence in the liberal arts and sciences and career 
preparation at the associate, baccalaureate, and master's degree levels, with a special 
focus on education of women for participation and leadership in our society and our 
times. The Catholic tradition of the College offers a value orientation for the student's 
personal and professional life, giving the motivation for a Christian commitment that 
views professional life as service. 

The College encourages its students to actualize their gifts and talents, and to develop 
the intellectual and professional competence necessary for intelligent and concerned 
citizenship. The purpose of a Mount St. Mary's education, therefore, encompasses the 
development of a disciplined and continuing curiosity, a receptivity to new ideas, and 
the acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and values, both personal and communal, 
necessary to evaluate these ideas and live them in society. 



6 THE COLLEGE 



The Religious Commitment 

The Catholic commitment of the College manifests itself in many ways. It is found in 
opportunities for worship. It is found in academic programs. It is found in the way the 
College functions. Above all, it is found in the whole environment in which inquiry and 
learning take place. Thus, the College embodies Christian convictions supportive of 
lives of commitment and Christian concern in a secular society. 

Student Affairs 

On both campuses, the Student Affairs area sponsors a wide variety of activities and 
services ranging from opportunities for participation in religious, social and leadership 
programs to heath services, career counseling, on-campus living and student govern- 
ment. Details of these services and activities are contained within the Student Affairs 
section of the baccalaureate program and the Student Affairs section of the associate 
program. 



The Alumnae Association 

The Alumnae Association supports the mission and goals of the College by strength- 
ening the bond of loyalty between the College and its former students. This relationship 
is maintained by communications, continuing education, social events, and fundrais- 
ing. 

The Alumnae Association is a member of the Council for Advancement and Support of 
Education. Its members qualify for membership in the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women; the International Federation of Catholic Alumnae; Kappa Gamma Pi, 
the honor society for outstanding graduates from Catholic colleges; and Delta Epsilon 
Sigma, honor society for graduates of Catholic universities and colleges. 



Degree Programs 

Associate Degree Program 

Through the Associate in Arts Program students have the opportunity to develop 
academic competencies and enhance their self-development through involvement on 
and off campus. Faculty and staff offer excellence in their specialized fields and show 
concern for the individual student. 

Courses of study are offered which lead to degrees in Business Administration, Early 
Childhood Education, Graphic Design, Liberal Arts, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, 
Physical Therapist Assistant, or Pre-Health Sciences. 

All students entering the Associate Degree Program are required to complete a battery 
of tests which include reading, writing, and math prior to registering for classes. Four 
semesters are usually required to complete the A.A. degree, students with deficiencies 
in mathematics or English skills may need one or two additional semesters. 



THE COLLEGE 7 



This program is designed to prepare students for direct entry into a career after grad- 
uation or for transfer to a baccalaureate program on the Chalon Campus or another 
institution. 

Bachelors Degree Programs 

Mount St. Mary's College offers courses of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Science. Primarily these are offered at the 
Chalon Campus. 

Within the liberal arts tradition, the curriculum provides the student with a broad and 
liberating background in the arts and sciences, and aims at developing his/her ability 
to communicate knowledge and to apply appropriate principles and techniques to par- 
ticular problems. During the junior and senior years, the students pursue deeper study 
in their major areas of concentration and take related elective courses. 

Weekend College 

The Weekend College on the Chalon Campus of Mount St. Mary's College is an inno- 
vative approach to learning that provides working adults with the opportunity to earn 
a Bachelor of Arts degree in Liberal Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree in Business 
Administration in four years while continuing to fulfill their full-time obligations to 
their careers and families. 

The Weekend College is not an accelerated program. It is instead a complete college 
experience, based on a traditional curriculum whose content has been organized in new 
ways and then redistributed so that classes which would traditionally be spread out 
evenly over a fifteen-week semester are concentrated into six intensive weekends. 
These weekends are non-consecutive and are scheduled in such a way that there is a 
space of at least two weeks, and usually three weeks, between each class weekend. 
Adult students, even if they work full-time during the week and have, in addition, 
family and personal obligations, are nevertheless able to perform comfortably and 
successfully if they have developed a reasonable degree of maturity and motivation. 
Those who take the full-time load of three courses per semester spend the whole day 
in classes on both Saturday and Sunday on each of the six weekend sessions. 

The program is designed for both men and women, part-time or full-time students, and 
for those who bring with them transfer credits from other colleges as well as students 
who are just beginning their college education. Small classes are taught by the same 
teachers who exemplify Mount St. Mary's academic excellence. Students who receive 
a four-year bachelor's degree from the Weekend College spend comparable hours in 
the classroom, receive the same outstanding quality of instruction, and are certified as 
possessing the same high level of knowledge and skills as the graduates of Mount St. 
Mary's renowned daytime college. 

For additional information please call the Weekend College Office at the Chalon Cam- 
pus. 

HOPE Program 

The HOPE Program, located on the Doheny Campus, offers educational programs for 
working adult women and men leading to an associate degree in Occupational Therapy 
Assistant and Nursing. For more information call the ADMISSIONS office. 



8 THE COLLEGE 



Masters Degree Programs/ Teacher Credential 
Programs 

Since 1931, the graduate division of Mount St. Mary's College has extended and deep- 
ened the work of the undergraduate departments by offering to qualified men and 
women the opportunity to pursue advanced courses and to obtain professional prepa- 
ration. 

Students may earn the degrees of Master of Science in Counseling Psychology, Master 
of Physical Therapy, Master of Arts in Religious Studies, and Master of Science in 
Education with specializations in Administrative Studies, and Special Education 
(Learning Handicapped). Individually Designed Master of Science degrees in Educa- 
tion may also be developed. 

The graduate division also offers courses which qualify the student for California 
Teaching Credentials and for California Services and Specialist Credentials. 

Certificate Programs 

Physical Therapist Assistant Certificate 

Students selecting this option must: 

hold an Associate or Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university 
have a 2 . 5 overall GPA for the most recent 30 units of college academic coursework 

• demonstrate successful completion of at least one semester of full time study 

have completed a 4 semester unit Human Anatomy course with a laboratory and 
a 4 semester unit Human or Medical Physiology course with a laboratory with a 
minimum grade of C (2.0). 

Students apply for acceptance into the PTA program at the first of the year before the 
fall semester of enrollment. (See Requirements for Admission above.) MSMC graduates 
will be given preference in the selection process. Acceptance is determined by the 
program admission committee (department chair, program director, faculty, PTA cli- 
nicians, and a MSMC admissions representative) and is contingent upon verification 
of degree, completion of prerequisites and other requirements for admission to the 
program. 

Gerontology 

Gerontology is the scientific study of aging. The aging processes are studied mainly 
from the aspects of biology, psychology and sociology, but there are added ethical, 
religious, and humanistic dimensions as well. 

The Certificate Program in Gerontology at Mount St. Mary's College is designed for 
women to learn about the aging process, the elders in our society, and ways of adapting 
to the changes that we all go through. This is a multidisciplinary approach which offers 
a solid base for those who work with the elderly in service, health, church, or political 
organizations - or who are interested in their own successful aging. 

Requirements for the Certificate are listed in the Gerontology section of this catalog. 



THE COLLEGE 9 



Graduate Religious Studies Certificate Programs 

The units taken for certification in Pastoral Care/Counseling, Hispanic Pastoral Min- 
istry or Youth and Young Adult Ministry may be applied towards completion of the 
Masters degree in Religious Studies or the Certificate of Advanced Religious Studies. 
The certificate programs are as follows: 

Advanced Religious Studies 

A 30 unit program of directed course work in theology and ministry for those interested 
in further religious studies, but not a graduate degree. No comprehensives or final 
research are required. 

Hispanic Pastoral Ministry 

This 18 unit program is designed for Hispanic leaders wishing a deeper theological 
background as it relates to ministry. All courses are taught in Spanish for graduate or 
undergraduate credit. 

Pastoral Care/Counseling and Ministry 

A 21 unit program in both theoretical and practical studies. Persons in helping min- 
istries are enabled to bring to their ministry a deeper insight into those areas and 
issues which rely on the insights of theology and psychology. Course work may lead to 
either the M. A. in Religious Studies or to the M. S. in Counseling Psychology. 

Youth and Young Adult Ministry 

A 12 unit program conducted in cooperation with the Center for Youth Ministry De- 
velopment as preparation for those in youth ministry. The program is presently con- 
ducted in as many as five dioceses in California. Entrance into the program is dependent 
on acceptance by both the diocesan office and Mount St. Mary's College. 

Further information about these certificate programs can be found under the graduate 
religious studies section of this catalog. 



Library Facilities 



The Charles Willard Coe Memorial Library, located on the Chalon Campus, is the 
principal library of Mount St. Mary's College. Constructed in 1947, the Coe Library 
houses the majority of library materials for both campuses and also houses the Instruc- 
tional Media Center. 

Established with National Science Foundation funding under their Comprehensive 
Assistance to Undergraduate Science Education (CAUSE) program, the Instructional 
Media Center provides a learning support system designed to respond to students' 
needs for individualized self-paced instructional modules for remediation, when nec- 
essary, for reinforcement of classroom content, and for enrichment. Faculty and stu- 
dents are assisted by the media center staff in the selection, utilization, and production 



10 THE COLLEGE 



of non-book materials such as videocassettes, super-eight films, and sound slide pro- 
grams. 

The J. Thomas McCarthy Library on the Doheny Campus is housed in the Sr. Magdalen 
Coughlin Learning Complex. The Mayer Grant Special Education collection is a part 
of the Doheny holdings. Mount St. Mary's students may use the library on either 
campus. 

The libraries serving both the Chalon and Doheny campuses currently hold over 
130,000 volumes, including bound periodicals, and subscribe to more than 600 peri- 
odicals. Moreover, the libraries contain over 5500 titles of media material. Books and 
audiovisual materials are lent from one library to the other to accommodate the chang- 
ing curriculum and to meet the needs of faculty and students. 

Students, actively encouraged to use the libraries of Mount St. Mary's College, are also 
eligible to use the library facilities of other local colleges and universities. 

Center for Cultural Fluency 

Housed within the J. Thomas McCarthy Library on the Doheny Campus is the Center 
for Cultural Fluency. Established by the Education Department in 1995, the Center 
provides education students and teachers in Los Angeles with instructional materials 
for K-12 classrooms that portray the experiences and perspectives of the diverse cul- 
tures of Los Angeles. In addition to fiction and nonfiction books, the instructional 
materials collection includes videos, audio cassettes, pictures, posters, and software. 
Through the use of these materials, teachers expand their cultural fluency and provide 
more inclusive classroom environments and curricula. 



Archives 



The Archives holds college records, both administrative and academic, and other types 
of evidences, written and pictorial, associated with the history of the college. The Special 
Collections comprise notable holdings of the works of Cardinal Newman, Frank Spear- 
man, as well as the Estelle Doheny Collection. These are complemented by rare books 
and early editions of the Bible, St. Augustine, missals, theology, lives of the saints, 
devotional treatises as well as the classics, European and American history and liter- 
ature. The Archives and Special Collections, located on the first floor of the Library, 
are open each weekday morning 8:00am to 11:00am and in the afternoon by appoint- 
ment. 



Calendar 



Mount St. Mary's College operates on a semester calendar with Fall classes beginning 
at the end of August and ending before Christmas. Spring semester begins in mid 
January and ends in mid-May. 

The college offers courses, workshops, and seminars during the summer. A separate 
schedule of summer offerings is published during the spring. 



THE COLLEGE 11 



HOPE Program offers courses for working adults in 4 ten week sessions throughout 
the year. Schedules are available through the offices of Occupational Therapy Program 
and the Associate Degree Nursing Program offices on the Doheny Campus. 

Schedules for Weekend College classes are available from the Weekend College Office 
on the Chalon campus. 

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act 

In order to safeguard student educational records, Congress passed the Buckley 
Amendment in 1976. The Buckley Amendment is the basis of the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act in which schools are charged with upholding the safety of 
student information. The primary focus of FERPA is to ensure that a student has 
reasonable access to his/her educational records and along with this openness must 
come the assurance of the privacy of the record. All information belongs to the student 
and can not be released without written permission. The only exception to this written 
permission clause pertains to what the institution defines as directory information. 
Directory information is information the institution may publish and distribute without 
written consent. Mount St. Mary's College considers the following items directory 
information: 

Name 

Address 

Phone Number 

Class 

Major 

Campus of attendance 

Degree program 

Degree(s) and awards received 

Enrollment status/Dates of attendance 

Student's have the right to withhold all information, directory and non-directory, and 
can do this by filing an Information Hold Request with the Registrar's Office. See 
current Student Handbook for more information. 

Legal Responsibility of the College 

The college endeavors to safeguard students in the use of physical facilities, labora- 
tories, and athletic equipment. It is clearly understood that students who use college 
facilities do so entirely at their own risk. The college has no legal responsibility for 
injury or other damages suffered by students on or off campus, or in travel to and from 
such activities or for any expenses in connection therewith. 



12 THE COLLEGE 



The Chalon Campus 

The Chalon Campus is an impressive multi-level complex of buildings and gardens on 
a thousand-foot ridge overlooking the new Getty Center and close to cultural enrich- 
ment and recreation. The architecture is white Spanish colonial, with arched walkways 
connecting many of the buildings. Mary Chapel occupies the central position on campus 
with wide stone stairways approaching it on two sides. 

In the Charles Willard Coe Library, students have free access to library stacks and to 
special collections of art, music, and literature. The rare book treasury contains, among 
other rare editions, a fine collection of documents and manuscripts relating to the 
Oxford Movement and to John Henry Newman. Also housed in the library is the 
Instructional Media Center. 

The Administration Building accommodates the offices of the President, Academic Vice 
President, Registrar, Director of Human Resources, Chief Financial Officer, and 
science classrooms and laboratories. Off the patio linking the Administration and 
Humanities Buildings, is the Weekend College Office. 

The five-story Humanities Building contains classrooms, conference rooms, the Com- 
puter Center, the Admissions Office, the Financial Aid Office, the Academic Advise- 
ment Center, special facilities for the Music Department, faculty, student, and admin- 
istrative offices, and the Health Services Center. The Campus Center which comprises 
nearly the entire first floor of the Humanities Building is used for social and academic 
functions. 

Jose Drudis-Biada Hall, the art building, contains the college bookstore, art galleries, 
faculty offices, classrooms, studios, and the office of the Da Camera Society which 
presents Chamber Music in historic sites. 

The three residence halls, Brady, Carondelet, and Rossiter, provide living accommo- 
dations and dining facilities for 400 students. Students may choose singles, doubles, 
triples and private rooms. Lounge areas, kitchenettes and laundry facilities are con- 
veniently arranged. The Women's Leadership Center is located near the Brady Hall 
Patio. The Office of Institutional Advancement, the Alumnae Office and the Public 
Relations Office are located in Rossiter Hall. 

An outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, and a fitness center are located at the north 
end of the campus. 

Residences for the Sisters of St. Joseph are located north of the swimming pool and 
tennis courts. 

Parking is available in various areas on campus and in the parking structure which is 
located south of the Drudis-Biada Hall. 



THE COLLEGE 13 






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14 THE COLLEGE 




THE COLLEGE 15 



The Doheny Campus 

The College expanded to a second campus in 1962. The Doheny Campus at Chester 
Place, near the intersection of the Harbor and Santa Monica Freeways, is located on 
property formerly owned by Edward L. Doheny and his wife, the Countess Estelle 
Doheny. The campus has been named for them. 

The two city blocks of Victorian residences in their setting of exotic trees and flowers 
have been converted to educational purposes. In 1965, a classroom building containing 
an auditorium, lecture rooms, and laboratories was erected. Since that date, Our Lady 
of Mercy Chapel, Ahmanson Commons, containing the food service and seminar facil- 
ities, and Mclntyre Hall, a student residence and activity center, have been added to 
the campus. With the addition of the Sr. Magdalen Coughlin Learning Complex many 
of the offices will be moved from previous locations to new locations. At this moment 
in time the location of many offices is not known. Please consult the Office of the Doheny 
Dean for information regarding the location of offices on the Doheny Campus. 
The Doheny Campus supplements and extends the educational opportunities which 
Mount St. Mary's College offers. This location, close to the commercial center of Los 
Angeles, is an ideal location for associate degree programs; for graduate degree pro- 
grams; and for California Teacher Credential programs. 

Building Number Ten is the administration building; it houses offices of the Vice 
President of Doheny Campus, Admissions, Financial Aid, Registrar, Business, Human 
Resources, Graduate Division, as well as faculty offices. 

Building Number Ten 1/2 (behind Building 10) houses the Occupational Therapy As- 
sistant Program offices, classrooms and laboratory. 

Building Number Eleven, Ahmanson Commons, provides the Food service, dining 
areas, seminar rooms. 

Building Number Fifteen, Mclntyre Hall, houses the majority of resident students, and 
in addition, contains a large student center/meeting facility. 

Between Ahmanson Commons and Mclntyre Hall is located the Chapel of Our Lady of 
Mercy, the spiritual center of the campus. 

Building Number Seventeen houses the Child Development Center, a state-funded day 
care center for young children. This center serves students of diverse ethnic, linguistic, 
and social backgrounds from the surrounding area. Mount St. Mary's students in the 
Early Childhood program fulfill assignments in child observation at the Center. 
Building Number Twenty houses the Education department and the Center for Cul- 
tural Fluency. 

The tennis court and pool areas are in back of Number Eight. Parking areas are on the 
Mall. 



16 THE COLLEGE 




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ADMISSION 17 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Admission/Financial Aid/Tuition and Fees 

Admission To the Undergraduate 
Degree Programs 

Admission to the Associate Degree Program 

The Associate Degree Program at Mount St. Mary's College is offered on the Doheny 
Campus. Students may seek a traditional Associate of Arts degree or a specialized A. A. 
degree in a professional program. All programs are open to women; men are admitted 
only to the Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant and Physical Therapist Assistant 
programs. 

Specializations within the Associate Degree programs in Nursing, Occupational Ther- 
apy Assistant and Physical Therapist Assistant have specific requirements for admis- 
sion. Please refer to the appropriate section of the catalog for these requirements. In 
all cases students must be admitted to Mount St. Mary's College prior to admission to 
any specialized program. A student may be admitted to the associate degree program 
and begin to take the prerequisites required for these specializations. 

Candidates for admission to the Associate Degree Program are evaluated on the basis 
of their high school coursework and record (or GED), other college coursework and 
record (for transfers), test scores, academic reference, and the essay. Interviews are 
strongly recommended for serious candidates. A profile of the academic qualifications 
of the most recent entering class is available from the Admissions Office. The require- 
ments and procedures are detailed in the next section of this catalog. 

Admission to the Baccalaureate Degree Programs 

The Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Music, and the Bachelor of Science degree pro- 
grams are offered on the Chalon campus. All undergraduate majors are open to women; 
men may be admitted only to the Music and Nursing programs. Transfer students 
interested in the nursing program must meet additional requirements for admission 
to that program. Please see the appropriate section of this catalog for those require- 
ments. 

Candidates for admission to the baccalaureate programs are evaluated on the basis of 
their high school coursework and record (or GED), other college coursework and record 
(for transfers), test scores, academic reference, and the essay. Interviews are strongly 
recommended for serious candidates. A profile of the academic qualifications of the 
most recent entering class is available from the Admissions Office. The requirements 
and procedures are detailed in the next section of this catalog. 



18 ADMISSION 



Undergraduate Admission 
Procedures 

All documents should be sent to the Admissions Office, Mount St. Mary's College, 12001 
Chalon Road, Los Angeles, CA 90049. 

Freshman Admission Procedures to the Associate or 
Bachelor Degree Programs 

Candidates' files for admission will be evaluated when the following documents have 
been received. Please note: the priority date for freshman admission for the Fall se- 
mester is March 1, for Spring admission is November 1. Applications and all supporting 
documents should be received in the Admission Office by the priority date. Applicants 
completing files after the priority date will be considered if space in the class remains. 

1. A completed and signed Mount St. Mary's College application form and $35 appli- 
cation fee or fee waiver (from the high school counselor). Information on awards, 
honors, employment, etc., should be included in the proper places on the applica- 
tion. The application fee is not refundable nor is it applicable toward tuition. 

2. Official transcripts of high school work should be sent directly to the Admission 
Office from the high school. Transcripts should show coursework through the 
junior year in high school. Senior year grades may be required of some candidates. 
Transcripts become the property of Mount St. Mary's College and cannot be re- 
turned to the applicant or sent to another institution. A final high school transcript 
showing evidence of graduation is required of enrolling students. A student may 
replace the high school transcript with an official record of the GED. 

3. Scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Test (ACT) are 
required. These may be sent directly from the testing service or may be included 
on the official transcript from the high school. 

4. A complete essay of 200 words or more responding to one of the three questions 
listed on the back page of the application for admission. 

5. An academic reference from a high school teacher, counselor, principal or school 
head is required. This may be sent from the reference to the Admission Office on 
the form provided with the application or it may be sent on school letterhead. 

6. A personal statement describing a special situation may be included with the 
application if the statement includes information supporting the applicant that 
would help the Admission Committee reach a decision. 

7. The record of a personal interview will be included in the application file. Serious 
candidates are encouraged to schedule an interview with an admission counselor 
to discuss goals, the high school record, and other matters that will assist the 
Admission Committee. 

Once the documents have been received, the file will be evaluated and a decision made 
by the Admission Committee. The student will be notified within two weeks of the 
Committee's decision. Several decisions may be made: 

1 . The student is admitted and if she is applying for financial aid, the Office of Student 
Financing is notified. 



ADMISSION 19 



2. The student applied for admission to the Baccalaureate Program at Chalon and 
the Committee believes that her record shows the need for further preparation; 
the student may be admitted under the Alternative Access Program to the Doheny 
Associate of Arts Degree Program. 

3. The student may be denied and directed to another college to fulfill requirements 
before reapplying for admission to Mount St. Mary's College. 

Admitted students will be required to submit a $100 tuition deposit to hold their places 
in the entering classes. For students entering the Fall semester, this tuition deposit is 
due by May 1 or within two weeks of the receipt of a financial aid package, whichever 
is later. For Spring semester, this deposit is due in early January. The tuition deposit 
is not refundable under any circumstances and will be credited directly to the student's 
account in the Business Office. 

Transfer Admission Procedures to the Associate or 
Bachelor Degree Programs 

Candidates' files for admission will be evaluated when the following documents have 
been received. Please note the following dates: 

The transfer admission applicants for the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing 
are due by February 1. 

The transfer admission applicants to the Associate of Arts degree in Physical 
Therapist Assistant are due by February 1. 

The transfer admission applicants to the Associate of Arts degree in Nursing or 
Occupational Therapy follow the deadlines provided by the HOPE Program 

The transfer admission applicants to all other Associate and Baccalaureate Degree 
Programs are due by the April 1 priority date. 

Applications and all supporting documents should be received in the Admission Office 
by the priority date or deadline. Programs with deadlines will adhere to these dates 
and applications received after these dates will not be considered. Applicants complet- 
ing files after the priority date will be considered on a space-available basis. 

The documents required for application as a transfer are: 

1. A completed and signed Mount St. Mary's College application form and $35 appli- 
cation fee or fee waiver. Information on awards, honors, employment, etc., should 
be included in the proper places on the application. The application fee is not 
refundable nor is it applicable toward tuition. 

2. Official transcripts of all college work attempted from each college attended. Stu- 
dents who have been academically disqualified from the most recent college or 
university attended are not eligible for admission to Mount St. Mary's College. 
Transcripts should be sent directly from the college(s) to the Admission Office at 
Mount St. Mary's College. Transcripts become the property of Mount St. Mary's 
College and cannot be returned to the applicant or sent to another institution. 

3. Official high school transcripts or the GED, and official SAT or ACT scores will be 
required if the student is under 25 years of age and: 

- is applying for admission to the Baccalaureate program and has completed 
fewer than 24 transferable units at the time of application 



20 ADMISSION 



- is applying for admission to the Associate program and has completed fewer 
than 15 transferable units at the time of application. 

Transcripts become the property of Mount St. Mary's College and cannot bere- 
turned to the applicant or sent to another institution. 

4. If the student is 25 years or older, the requirements for SAT or ACT scores and 
the high school transcript do not apply. However, the student must furnish proof 
of high school graduation or the GED. 

5. A complete essay of 200 words or more responding to one of the three questions 
listed on the back page of the application for admission. 

6. An academic reference from a professor or counselor. This may be sent from the 
reference to the Admission Office on the form provided with the application or it 
may be sent on school letterhead. 

7. A personal statement describing a special situation may be included with the 
application if the statement includes information supporting the applicant that 
would help the Admission Committee reach a decision. 

Once the documents have been received, the file will be evaluated and a decision made 
by the Admission Committee. The student will be notified within two weeks of the 
Committee's decision if applying for a program other than nursing, occupational ther- 
apist assistant or physical therapy assistant. In those cases, the faculty of the programs 
will reach a decision based on the special requirements and prerequisites necessary 
for the program, notifying the students according to the stated timelines. Several 
decisions may be made: 

1 . The student is admitted and if she is applying for financial aid, the Office of Student 
Financing is notified. A preliminary evaluation of transferable credits will be sent 
with the letter of admission or shortly thereafter. 

2. The student has applied for nursing, occupational therapist assistant or physical 
therapy assistant and is not admitted directly to the program. The student may 
take prerequisite courses for those programs and reapply for the appropriate term. 

3. The student may be denied and directed to another college to fulfill requirements 
before reapplying for admission to Mount St. Mary's College. Admitted students 
will be required to submit a $100 ($300 for BS Nursing) tuition deposit to hold 
their places in the entering classes, according to the deadlines included in the 
letter of admission. The tuition deposit is not refundable under any circumstances 
and will be credited directly to the student's account in the Business Office. 

Admission to the Weekend College 

Adults interested in the Weekend College may apply at any time during the year for 
admission to any one of the trimesters (Summer, Fall, or Spring). Information on 
application deadlines and starting dates can be obtained from the Weekend College 
Office. 

Applicants to the Weekend College should complete the admission application and 
submit it to the Weekend College Office with the $30.00 application fee. 

Acceptance into the Weekend College is based upon the following: 

• receipt of a completed admissions application and fee, 

• receipt and evaluation of transcripts for any previous college courses at- 
tempted, 



ADMISSION 21 



• an official high school transcript if the applicant has completed fewer than 24 
units of transferable college courses, 

• a personal interview, and 

• an evaluation of all admission information by the Weekend College Admis- 
sions Committee. 

In selecting potential candidates for the Weekend College, Mount St. Mary's College is 
principally interested in those adults who are committed to completing their degree, 
who have the requisite time-management skills and motivation to function successfully 
within the unusual weekend format, and who are comfortable with the level of maturity 
that prevails among the student body at the Weekend College. 

Procedures for International Students 

Students applying for admission who are not permanent residents or U.S. citizens 
should refer to the freshman or transfer sections for general instructions. In addition 
to the requirements stated in those sections: 

1. Certified original copies of all transcripts must be submitted accompanied by 
official translations. 

2. English as a Second Language (TOEFL) is required of all applicants for whom 
English was not the language spoken in the schools they attended. An official score 
must be sent directly from the testing agency or the school to the Admission Office. 
Note: the score required for admission to the Associate and Baccalaureate pro- 
grams is 550. 

3. A financial statement describing the resources available to the student must ac- 
company the application for admission. Official verification of bank funds must 
also be submitted along with an English translation. 

4. Students transferring from an ESL program or another US college or university 
must comply with all immigration regulations necessary for transfer. 

If the student is admitted to Mount St. Mary's College, she will be required to submit 
a US $300 non-refundable tuition deposit by June 15. If the student has coursework 
on the college level completed in another country, she will also have to submit a $175 
fee which will cover the official evaluation of the student's record. A copy of the evalu- 
ation will be sent to the student. The 1-20 form will be sent to the student upon receipt 
of the tuition deposit and it is the student's responsibility to obtain the proper student 
visa to enter the United States. 

Intercampus Transfers 

Mount St. Mary's College offers students who begin their studies in the associate degree 
program the opportunity to transfer to the baccalaureate program. Students wishing 
to transfer must have completed 24 transferable units with at least a 2.25 grade point 
average, have passing scores on the proficiency tests, and complete the following steps: 

1 . Fill out a Program Change Application obtaining verification of transferable units 
and cumulative GPA from the Doheny Registrar, the signature of an academic 
advisor, and the signature of the Testing Coordinator. 

2. Submit the completed form to the Academic Advisement Center, Doheny Campus. 



22 ADMISSION 



3. If the student is requesting to transfer to the Nursing or Liberal Studies majors, 
the transfer must also be approved by the chairperson of that department. 

4. The student is informed by the Coordinator of the Academic Advisement Center, 
Chalon Campus, when the application process is completed. 

5. Completion of ENG 6B or eligible for enrollment into ENG IB. 

Change of Program Applications can be obtained at the Advisement Center, Doheny 
Campus. 

Students who began their studies in the Baccalaureate program and are interested in 
transferring to the Associate degree program should contact the Coordinator of Aca- 
demic Advisement on the Chalon Campus. 

Advanced Placement 

Students who earn scores of 3, 4, or 5 on Advanced Placement Examinations, or pass 
the higher level International Baccalaureate Exams with scores of 4, 5, 6, or 7 receive 
college credits for equivalent course provided they are accepted and enrolled at Mount 
St. Mary's College. 

Credit award for the AP exam is as follows: 

• Students who earn scores of 3 will only receive 3 units of elective credit in the 
discipline tested. 

• Students who earn scores of 4 or 5 will receive credit as currently awarded. 

• There will be no limit placed on the number of AP units awarded to a student. 

For Students attending the Chalon campus, test results should be sent directly to the 
Office of the Assistant Academic Vice President. Students attending the Doheny Cam- 
pus should send test results to the Office of the Vice President, Doheny. 



FINANCIAL AID 23 



Financial Aid 



Mount St. Mary's College is committed to making a college education accessible to as 
many qualified students as possible, regardless of their financial means. Students and 
their parents are encouraged first to consider all possible resources when planning to 
meet the expenses of a college education. Through various financial aid programs, the 
Student Financing Office will help in the best possible way to provide students with 
the difference between the family contribution and the cost of education. 

Mount St. Mary's College administers financial aid in accordance with Federal Gov- 
ernment guidelines. These guidelines are based on the principle that students and 
their parents have the primary responsibility in meeting educational expenses to the 
extent they are able. Financial aid funds are then used to fill the gap between what the 
family is expected to contribute (including the student's own earnings) and the annual 
cost of education. 

To apply for Financial Aid, all students must follow the instructions and requirements 
sent to them by the Admission or Office of Student Financing. Financial Aid brochures 
giving complete application and program information may be obtained by writing to or 
calling the Office of Student Financing Office on the Chalon or Doheny campuses. 

Types of Financial Aid 
Grants and Scholarships 

Grants and Scholarships are gift monies that do not require repayment. They are based 
on financial need and/or academic merit. Grants and scholarships are provided to 
students from one or more of the following sources: the Federal Government; the State 
of California; outside organizations; and Mount St. Mary's College. Below is a listing 
of institutional talent and achievement scholarships. 

Alumnae Scholarship 

Awards valued at $1000 per year are made to undergraduate students in the traditional 
program who are daughters of alumnae. 

Dean's Transfer Scholarship 

The Dean's Transfer Scholarship is valued between $2,000 and $5,000 per year. The 
scholarship is renewable for as long as the student maintains a 3.0 grade point average 
in her college work at Mount St. Mary's College. Requirement for the Dean's Transfer 
Scholarship is the maintenance of a minimum gpa of 3.40 of all academically transfer- 
able courses from all colleges previously attended with a minimum of 24 academically 
transferable units. Deadline of March 15 for receipt of completed admission applica- 
tions and supporting documents. 

Future Teacher Scholarship 

The Future Teacher Scholarship is awarded to incoming freshmen who desire to pursue 
teaching as a career. Awards are made up to half-tuition, renewable for four years. 
Recipients must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. 



24 FINANCIAL AID 



Candidates are considered on the basis of outstanding academic preparation, SAT or 
ACT test results, course load and extra-curricular achievement. Supporting letters 
and/or other formal documentation of outstanding achievements are encouraged. 

Music Scholarship 

Awards are made to full-time students who are enrolled as Music majors and who 
demonstrate exceptional talent in music. Award amounts vary and are based on finan- 
cial need and merit. Contact the chairperson of the Music Department for further 
details. 



President's Scholarship 

The President's scholarship is awarded to incoming freshmen who demonstrate excep- 
tional academic abilities. The award is renewable for up to four years. Recipients must 
maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. 

Candidates are considered on the basis of outstanding academic preparation, SAT or 
ACT test results, courseload, and extra-curricular achievement. Supporting letters 
and/or other formal documentation of outstanding achievements are encouraged. 

Intercampus Transfer Scholarship 

Awards of up to half of tuition are made to students who begin their academic career 
on the Doheny Campus and transfer to the Chalon Campus to complete their bacca- 
laureate degrees. Awards are based on academic achievement. Students transferring 
must see their advisors for an application. 

Tuition Discounts for MSMC Graduate Students 

Members of religious communities receive a 35% tuition discount. Students enrolled 
in Graduate Programs who are full-time employees of Los Angeles Archdiocesan 
or Diocese of Orange institutions as listed in their respective directories, upon written 
verification of employment, receive a 35% tuition discount. Hospital employees are not 
eligible for this discount. 

Mount St. Mary's College has a policy regarding the granting of tuition discounts to 
students enrolled in graduate degree programs. 

A tuition discount of an amount specified by the College each year will be awarded to 
those persons who fulfill the requirements: 

1. Student MUST BE EMPLOYED FULL-TIME (40 hour work-week) in Roman 
Catholic Church Ministry in the Los Angeles Archdiocese or the Diocese of Orange. 
Those working in Catholic hospitals are not eligible for these monies, UNLESS 
they are paid a stipend rather than a salary. 

2. This employment must be the major source of income for the student. 

3. Student must have a Tuition Discount Application form completed and submitted 
at least three weeks prior to registration. This must be done each year. The dis- 
count is not automatically renewed each year. It is the responsibility of the student 



FINANCIAL AID 25 



to secure a copy of the form to be completed each year, to complete it, and return 
it as directed. 

4. Student must maintain good academic standing in the graduate program to qual- 
ify. 

5. Workshops and Continuing Education courses are excluded from these funds. 

Scholarships through the Independent Colleges of Southern 
California 

The Independent Colleges of Southern California (ICSC) is a nonprofit organization 
which provides, through a unified annual appeal, financial contributions from corpo- 
rations, foundations and other friends to help Southern California's smaller private 
colleges and universities meet the rising costs of quality higher education. 

Loans 

Loans are money that must be repaid, usually with interest. The interest rates and 
terms of the loan vary by program. Some of the loan programs require a separate 
application in addition to the free application for federal student aid. The Office of 
Student Financing is unable to replace loan funds with grant funds, but students may 
replace loan funds with private scholarships received from outside organizations not 
affiliated with MSMC. 

Federal Stafford Loan 

All students are eligible to receive Federal Stafford Loans. Need-based Federal Stafford 
Loans are called "subsidized" because the federal government pays the interest while 
in school and during deferment periods. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans are not 
based on financial need, and students are responsible for paying the interest while in 
school and during periods deferment. A student may have a Federal Stafford loan 
partly based on financial need and partly not on need up to the annual maximum. The 
maximum loan is $2,625 per year for freshmen; $3,500 per year for sophomores; $5,500 
per year for juniors and seniors and $8,500 per year for graduate students. Independent 
students and dependent students whose parents do not qualify for FPLUS loans (see 
below) may also apply for additional unsubsidized Stafford Loans in the following 
amounts: $4,000.00 for Freshmen/Sophomores; $5,000.00 for Juniors/Seniors; and 
$10,000.00 for graduate students. Repayment begins six (6) months after graduating 
or ceasing to maintain at least half-time enrollment. The interest rate varies depending 
on when the first loan was borrowed. 



Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS) 

Federal PLUS Loans are not based on financial need, but must be coordinated with 
other financial aid where need is established. 

Federal PLUS loans are available for parents of dependent undergraduate students 
who are enrolled at least half-time. Parents may borrow up to their student's cost of 
education. The interest rate is variable, not to exceed 10%. Interest and repayment 
begin within 60 days. 



26 FINANCIAL AID 



Institutional Loans 

Through the generosity of several foundations, Mount St. Mary's College has several 
institutional loan programs with varying interest rates; interest rates for these loans 
vary between zero and seven percent. In addition, eligibility requirements vary by 
program. Contact the Office of Student Financing for more information regarding these 
loans. 

Short-term Loans 

Two short-term loans are available to students: First Interstate Bank Emergency Loans 
($250 maximum) and the Nancy Manning Loan ($50 maximum; for Chalon students 
Only). For information on both short-term loans, contact the Student Affairs office. 

Student Employment 
On-Campus Student Employment 

Work study is money earned from employment on campus. Students receive a paycheck 
every two weeks for the hours worked and may use the earnings to make tuition 
payments, pay for books and supplies or pay for personal expenses. 

Both Federal College Work Study and Mount Work Study (institutionally funded) 
provide excellent opportunities outside the classroom. Students who participate in 
either program may choose to work in a variety of on-campus sites. These include: the 
Office of Student Financing, the Admission Office, Campus Ministry, the Library, 
departmental offices and laboratories. Through "hands on" experiences in these offices, 
students develop valuable skills which may be later translated to professional settings. 

Off-Campus Student Employment 

The Student Placement Office at Chalon and the Career Center at Doheny have job 
boards which list a wide variety of off-campus employment opportunities. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements 

All financial aid recipients must be regularly admitted students with degree or in some 
cases credential or certificate objectives. While receiving financial aid, students must 
be advancing toward their educational objectives at a reasonable rate and must main- 
tain a minimum 2.0 grade point average. 



EXPENSES 27 



Expenses for 1998-1999 
Academic Year 

All tuition and fees are subject to change without notice. 
Tuition (Due by Business Office clearance deadline set for each term.) 

Undergraduate Students 

Full-time (12-18 units/semester) $15,452.00/year 

Full-time (units in excess of 18/semester) $ 588.00/unit 

Part-time (less than 12 units/semester) $ 588.00/unit 

Tuition Deposit - required of all incoming full-time undergraduate students as 
stipulated in student's acceptance packet. Not refundable. Applicable only to 
tuition. $ 100.00 

Housing Deposit - Required of all incoming full-time undergraduate students who are 
requesting on-campus college housing. The housing deposit is honored when the 
required tuition deposit has also been received (total deposit $200.00). (See Residence 
section of the catalog for further details). $ 100.00 

Graduate Students 

Tuition (per unit) $ 415.00 



HOPE Programs 

Tuition (per unit) 
ADN Associate Degree in Nursing $ 383.00 

OTA Occupational Therapy Assistant $ 383.00 

Weekend College 

Tuition (per unit) $ 415.00 

Auditing Courses (Recorded on Transcript) 

Students register for audit in the same manner as for 
credit and pay the same fees. 



COMPREHENSIVE STUDENT FEE 

Applies to all undergraduates and Masters of Physical Therapy students registering 
for 7 or more units per semester. The Comprehensive Student Fee includes the 
student body fee for full time students, health services (not health insurance), 
orientation, and graduation. $ 262.00/semester 

All other students registering for six or less units $ 53.00/semester 



28 EXPENSES 



Baccalaureate Nursing Fee $ 70/semester 

(sophomores, juniors, and seniors) 

Parking Permit 

(Including LA City Tax) $ 99.00/year 

Graduate and HOPE Program $ 49.50/year 

Student Health and Accident Insurance 

Undergraduate Students 

All full-time undergraduate students who are not covered by personal health insurance 
must carry the Student Health and Accident Insurance. The coverage will be auto- 
matically included on the Student's invoice. Students who are already covered by 
personal insurance may elect not to participate in this plan. However, a Waiver Form 
must be submitted no later than the published deadline for the Fall Semester 
in order to have the charge removed from the invoice. 

The estimated insurance premium is $350.00 for both graduate and undergraduates. 
A graduate may elect to purchase Student Heath and Accident Insurance if the student 
is carrying six or more units. Undergraduate Students first enrolling in the Spring 
Semester will be charged a prorated amount for coverage which may be waived provided 
a Waiver Card is submitted to the Business Office by the clearance deadline. Student 
Health and Accident Insurance Premiums are not determined by the College and actual 
premiums are subject to insurance market conditions. 

International students are required by law to carry a minimum of $50,000.00 in heath 
and accident insurance. Proof of adequate insurance must be provided prior to admis- 
sion. 

General 

Application for Admission $ 30.00 

Application Fee for International Students $ 75.00 
Late Registration 

(after published dates and time of registration) $ 40.00 
Dropping Courses after published deadline 

(per transaction) $ 10.00 
Graduation Fee - Graduate, Weekend 

College, and HOPE Students $ 100.00 

Transcripts $ 5.00/copy 

Administrative Fee for handling returned checks $ 20.00 



Credit for Course by Exam 

Waiver fee per course with no academic credit $ 100.00 

Fee per course for academic credit $ 300.00 



EXPENSES 29 



Course 

EDU 33 The Visual and Performing Arts for the Young Child 

(Lab fee for Materials) $ 20.00/course 

EDU 116/316ABC and EDU 164/364 P,T $ 25.00/unit 

Applied Music - in addition to tuition fees, extra fee is charged for Applied Music 
instruction. This fee varies with the instructor. For further information inquire in 
the Music Department. $ 115.00/unit 

Enrichment Course 

For 1 unit course $ 105.00 

For 2 unit course $ 180.00 

Comprehensive Exam Fee for Clinical Course 

Credit (HOPE Programs) $ 480.00/course 

Residence (Chalon and Doheny) 

Board and quadruple room $5,2 19.00/year 

Board and triple room $ 5,605.00/year 

Board and small double room $ 6,035. 00/year 

Board and large double room $ 6,318.00/year 

Board and single suite $ 6,739.00/year 

Board, single room, and half-bath $ 7,696.00/year 

Board, single room with private bath $ 7,808. 00/year 

A housing deposit of $100.00 is required to activate the housing application. 

New students should send the housing deposit to the Admissions Office of Mount St. 
Mary's College. Currently enrolled students should send the deposit to the Residence 
Life Office. 

This deposit may be refunded upon permanent termination of the Residence Living 
License Agreement subject to deductions for any loss, damage, excessive room cleaning, 
or failure to meet the deadlines described below: 

Prior to Fall occupancy, the $100 room deposit will be refunded if the Residence 
Life Office has been notified in writing by June 1 that the student has opted not to 
live in the residence halls for that semester. $50 will be refunded if the Residence Life 
Office is notified by July 1. After July 1, no deposit will be refunded. 

Prior to Spring occupancy, the $100 room deposit will be refunded if the Residence 
Life Office has been notified in writing by December 1 that the student has opted not 
to five in the residence halls for that semester. After December 1, no deposits will be 
refunded. This policy is applicable to students currently in residence and new appli- 
cants to residence for Spring semester. 

Each resident student is required to sign a Residence Living License Agreement which 
begins 2 days prior to the first day of cases for the Fall term and extends through the 
day immediately following the last day of Final exams for Spring. 

The Chalon Residence Halls are open during Thanksgiving and Spring Break. The 
cafeteria may be closed during these times and meals are not provided. The Residence 
halls are closed for the Winter Break. 



30 EXPENSES 



TUITION REFUND POLICY 

The following schedule will be used to calculate the tuition that will be credited to your 
student account. Refunds will be issued when there is a credit balance on your student 
account. 

Withdrawal/drop on or before first day 100% 

After first day, through first 10% of period of enrollment 90% 

Between end of first 10% and 25% of period of enrollment 50% 

Between end of first 25% and 50% of period of enrollment 25% 

The date on which notice of withdrawal is filed with the Registrar's Office and is used 
to calculate reduction of charges for tuition. Reductions will first be credited against a 
student's financial aid, if any, before a balance accrues to the student. Refunds will not 
be made in cases of suspension or dismissal. 

Tuition for all students, including those whose tuition payments have been deferred, 
becomes an obligation in accordance with the provisions of the reduced charges. 

When outside agencies, grants, scholarships or loans do not cover the withdrawal or 
change of unit charge, the individual will be responsible for the amount due. 

Obligation for Payment 

Failure to make payments for tuition, fees, or other amounts owed the College when 
due, or to arrange for such payments before their due dates, is considered sufficient 
cause to 1) bar the student from registering for classes or examinations, 2) drop the 
student from pre-registered classes, with subsequent registration subject to late fees, 
3) withhold diploma, scholastic certificate, or transcript of record, and/or 4) suspend 
the student. 

All tuition and fees are subject to change without notice. 
Tuition Payment Options 

Methods for paying tuition, room and board and/or fees for Mount St. Mary's College. 

1 . Payment in full by mail or in person must be made to Mount St. Mary's College 
in the Business Office no later than the financial clearance deadline as indi- 
cated in the registration packet. Methods of payment include check, cash, 
money order, and some major credit cards. 

2. A tuition payment plan is available through American Tuition Plan which 
allows for budgeting payments over a longer period for a minimal fee. Ar- 
rangements can be made by calling the Business Office. 

3. Deferred payment plans with Mount St. Mary's College can be arranged at a 
cost of $100 per semester. Upon signing the deferred payment arrangement, 
a 25% minimum payment of all charges must be made. Remaining payments 
are made in installments. Students must complete a deferred payment plan 
agreement with the Business Office prior to the clearance deadline for each 
semester. 



UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 31 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Academic Policies: All 
Undergraduate Programs 

Grades 

At the end of each term, the student receives a grade in every class. All grades, with 
the exception of I, IP, and RD are final when reported to the registrar at the end of the 
term. Once submitted, grades may not be changed unless the result of clerical or 
procedural error. The grade indicates results of examinations, term reports, and gen- 
eral scholastic standing in the entire course, and becomes a part of the student's 
permanent college record. 

The student's grade point average is computed according to this scale: 

Student performance is clearly outstanding. 
Performance indicates sharp insights and an ability to 
integrate and generalize material beyond the context 
of the course. 



Student performance is above average, demonstrating 
a knowledge of facts and an ability to integrate and 
apply material within the context of the course. 

Student performance is average, demonstrating 
knowledge of course content and exhibiting an ability 
to apply basic concepts within the context of the 
course. 

D 1.0 Student performance is below average, partially 

fulfilling minimum course requirements. This level of 
performance may not prepare the student to progress 
to a more advanced level of study within the subject 
content or the major. 

F 0.0 Student performance is unacceptable and does not 

meet minimum course requirements. 



A 


4.0 


A- 


3.7 


B + 


3.3 


B 


3.0 


B- 


2.7 


C + 


2.3 


C 


2.0 


c- 


1.7 



32 UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 



The following are not computed in the GPA: 

AU audit 

CR credit given; work C- or better (for field experience and supervised teaching 

offered by the Education and Psychology Departments, CR signifies B or 
better in quality) 

I Incomplete 

IP in progress; deferred grading for graduate thesis, senior project, or under- 

graduate research work in progress 

NC no credit given; work of D or F in quality 

• course was repeated at a later date 
U unauthorized withdrawal 

W withdrawn 

RD report delayed 

X courses taken for Associate degree credit only; not computed in the Baccalau- 

reate degree 

Grading Policies 

All lower division courses required by the major must be completed with no grade lower 
than a "C-" and an overall departmental GPA of 2.0 or above. An exception to this 
college policy occurs when a grade of C (2.0) for departmental pre-requisites/require- 
ments is mandated by an outside licensing board, e.g. California Board of Registered 
Nursing. 

All upper division courses required by the major must be completed with a grade of C 
(2.0) or above. 

Audit 

The grading selection of Audit should be requested when a student wishes to preview 
a course for which he/she will be enrolled at a later date for a grade or to review a 
course that has already been successfully completed as preparation for farther study, 
or for intellectual curiosity and enrichment. Auditors attend class sessions regularly 
but are not obligated to take examinations. They receive no credit for courses audited. 
Tuition is charged for courses taken as audit. 

Procedures/Requirements for an Audit: 

Students must register for an Audit by the end of the second week of the semester on 
a space-available basis. 

• Once requested the Audit status cannot be reversed. 

• Students must attend a reasonable number of classes in order to receive an "AU" 
on their transcript. 

• Faculty have the option of requesting other requirements in addition to reasonable 
attendance such as class participation of students requesting to audit. A space will 
be provided on the Audit Request Form where faculty can stipulate the conditions 
agreed upon for the Audit. 

If the conditions of the Audit are not met, the instructor may use the grading option of 
"IT (Unauthorized Withdrawal). 



UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 33 



Credit/No Credit 

To encourage a wider choice of courses by lessening the student's concern for the grade 
point average, selected courses may be taken for CR/NC. The following regulations 
apply to this option: 

• Courses used to fulfill General Studies requirements may not be taken CR/NC. 

• No more than six (6) elective units taken on a CR/NC basis can be applied to the 
124 units required for the baccalaureate degree. 

• Courses which are only offered on a CR/NC basis are not counted as part of the six 
units. 

• The deadline for changing the grading in a course to CR/NC is the tenth (10th) 
week of the semester. Consult the academic calendar or the Registrar's Office for 
the specific date. 

• Courses taken on a CR/NC basis may not be applied to requirements for the 
student's major except at the discretion of the major department. 

• Once requested and approved the request for CR/NC cannot be reversed. 

Incomplete 

An Incomplete in a course can be granted only when a student: 

1. has fulfilled the majority of the course requirements, 

2. has a passing grade in course work, 

3. is prevented from completing the assigned work for serious medical/personal rea- 
sons, 

4. can, in the opinion of the instructor, complete the work within one semester. 

Procedures/Requirements for requesting an Incomplete: 

• A student requesting an incomplete must obtain the signature and consent of the 
instructor and the department chairperson by the last day of class and prior to the 
day of the final exam. 

• Faculty must assign a default grade when approving an incomplete. This default 
grade will be recorded on the student's transcript when a completed grade is not 
assigned by the instructor and/or an extension of the incomplete is not processed. 



• 



An incomplete may only be extended for one additional semester with the approval 
of the instructor, the department chairperson, and the appropriate academic dean. 



Repetition of Courses With C-/D/F/NC Grades 

Only courses for which C-, D, F, and NC were assigned may be repeated for a higher 
grade/CR. In cases of repeated courses the units are counted once and the higher grade 
is computed in the GPA. 



34 UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 



Unauthorized Withdrawal 

Failure to officially withdraw from a class(es) will result in the grade of "F" or "U". The 
grade "U" indicates unauthorized withdrawal, and is used in the circumstance of a 
student who neither withdrew nor completed course requirements. It may be used 
when, in the opinion of the instructor, completed assignments or course activities or 
both are insufficient to make normal evaluation of academic performance possible. A 
grade of "IT is not computed in the student's GPA. 

Withdrawal From Courses 

The grade "W" indicates withdrawal from a course. Students wishing to withdraw from 
a class must meet the following requirements: 

The deadline for withdrawing from a class with a grade of T is the tenth (10th) week 
of the semester. The withdrawal deadline for the Weekend College is the fifth weekend 
and for the HOPE Programs it is the seventh week. In cases where a class is offered on 
a split-semester basis, the deadline for withdrawing is one week after the midpoint of 
the course. Consult the academic calendar or the Registrar's Office for the specific date. 
See Business Office for reduced charges which apply when withdrawing from the 
college. 

After the tenth week deadline for withdrawal, a student may request permission to be 
allowed to withdraw from all of her/his classes because of a medical emergency or 
extraordinary circumstance by submitting an Academic Petition to the appropriate 
Academic Dean. 

The "W" designation carries no connotation of quality of student performance and is 
not calculated in the grade point average. 

Honors 
Dean's List 

To give public recognition to academic achievement, the Dean posts a list each term 
with the names of full-time students who have obtained a grade point average of 3.5 or 
higher for the preceding semester. 

To qualify for the Dean's List, a student must have completed at least 12 letter-graded 
units in the preceding semester or 9 units per semester for Weekend College. 

Commencement 

In order to participate in commencement exercises, a student must be registered for 
all the remaining courses required for graduation. 

If a student is granted permission to enroll in a course prior to graduation, at an 
institution other than Mount St. Mary's College, the transcript must be received by 
June 30. 



UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 35 






Honor Societies: 

Alpha Mu Gamma 

National Foreign Language Honor Society 

Alpha Tau Delta 

National Honor Fraternity in Nursing 

Delta Epsilon Sigma 

National Scholastic Honor Society 

Kappa Gamma Pi 

National Catholic College Graduate Honor Society 

Lambda Iota Tau 

National Literature Honor Society 

Phi Alpha Theta 

International History Honor Society 

Pi Delta Phi 

' National French Honor Society 

Pi Theta Mu 

Service Honor Society 

PsiChi 

National Honor Society in Psychology 

Sigma Delta Pi 

National Spanish Honor Society 

Attendance 

Since attendance and punctuality are important for the successful pursuit of study, 
the number of a student's absences may be taken into account in determining academic 
grades. The student may be expected to explain to the instructor the reason for any 
absences from class and in some cases may be asked to provide appropriate documen- 
tation. 

There is no provision for a system of allowed cuts and absences. Students may be 
dropped from a class for excessive absences when, in the opinion of the instructor, 
further enrollment in the class would be of little value to the student. 

Occasionally a student is excused from class attendance by the Academic Vice President 
for the purpose of representing the college. In such cases, the student is responsible for 
securing and completing any assignments. 

Placement Examinations 

All incoming freshman and some transfer students are required to complete placement 
tests in order to assist them in selecting appropriate courses. Information regarding 
placement testing will be sent to incoming students prior to the beginning of each 
semester. 

Examinations used to place a student at a level of study may result in lower levels of 
study being waived. No credit will be awarded as a result of these placement exami- 
nations. See Credit by Exam. 



36 UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 



Academic Internship 

The academic internship provides the student with an educational, hands-on experi- 
ence outside the classroom setting. This experience provides an opportunity to apply 
classroom theory and sharpen skills in problem-solving. Ordinarily, interns do not get 
compensated, but they do earn academic credit while participating, Ordinarily, a max- 
imum of six units may be earned through internships. Each academic internship unit 
is equivalent to 40 hours of supervised time spent in the professional setting. Criteria 
for evaluation are determined by the faculty sponsor prior to the student's internship. 
These may include an experience journal, oral reports, and written reports. All intern- 
ships are graded on a credit/no credit basis. 

Independent Study 

Opportunity for independent study is available to qualified students. In an Independent 
Study, the student has responsibility for planning, implementing, and presenting the 
project; the faculty member approves the project, meets with the student several times 
in the term, and evaluates the final results. Students must submit all paperwork for 
independent study by the end of the add/drop deadline. 

Directed Study 

Directed study offers the student an opportunity to work with a faculty member who 
shares the responsibility with the student, generally planning the readings and/or 
projects and meeting with the student regularly. The student and faculty member must 
meet a minimum of three times throughout the term. Students must submit all paper- 
work for directed study by the end of the add/drop deadline. 

Guidelines for Independent Study/Directed Study 

1. Introductory courses to a discipline will not be taken in this mode. 

2. Freshmen will take neither independent study nor directed study. 

3. No more than two independent studies or directed studies will be taken in any one 
semester. 

4. Ordinarily, regularly scheduled courses will not be taken in this mode. 

5. In extraordinary circumstances, the above guidelines may be waived by petition. 

Prior to registering for independent or directed study, the student discusses plans with 
the faculty sponsor, prepares a proposal including goals, a summary of content and 
evaluative criteria, and files an approved form for the projected study in the office of 
the registrar. 

Academic Integrity 

The academic environment is predicated on truth and integrity. Acts of dishonesty 
constitute a serious offense to the Mount Community. Acts of academic dishonesty 
include but are not limited to the following: 

1 . Cheating: Cheating of any kind is dishonest. This includes copying other's essays 
or exams, stealing exams, buying or otherwise procuring new or used exams, 
having someone else take an exam or write an essay for which you take credit, and 
any other way you might receive credit for work that is not your own. 



UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 37 



2. Failing to hand in original work: Using one essay for two different classes is 
also dishonest. If you have a topic appropriate for two classes, original and separate 
work must be done for each class, unless approval of both instructors has been 
obtained. Moreover, co-writing an essay without both obtaining the instructor's 
permission and acknowledging the other person's help is dishonest. 

3. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is an act of academic dishonesty. It is a serious academic 
offense. Plagiarism is using anyone else's ideas and representing them as your 
own (i.e. not giving appropriate credit). Acts of plagiarism include the following: 

— failure to document and give credit to an original source, 

— paraphrasing another person's ideas without giving credit, 

— using direct quotes without proper recognition of the source, 

— using statistics, facts, or information from a source other than your own 
original research without giving credit. 

4. Falsification or misrepresentation: Falsification of lab or clinical data, clan- 
destine collaboration with others in class presentations or laboratory experiments, 
alteration of College documents, alteration of instructor's grade sheets/books, mis- 
representation on admissions materials, falsification of academic records, forgery, 
entering computer accounts not one's own without prior consent of the owner, 
entering or deleting information without permission are all academic offenses. 

5. Theft: Theft or mutilation of library or media materials, computer or media equip- 
ment, records or other College documents (such as examinations, assignments, 
gradebooks or other course materials), or theft from any member of the academic 
community are all acts of academic dishonesty. 

Consequences: Actions such as these should incur, in proportion to the gravity of the 
offense, appropriate action on the part of the instructor or College representative. The 
penalty for an act of dishonesty could range from a grade of F on an examination or 
assignment, a reduced or failing grade for the course in question, probation, suspension 
or expulsion from the College. Repeated acts of academic dishonesty will be treated 
more gravely. 

Appeal Procedure: Any student of the College has the right to appeal any decision 
resulting from a perceived act of academic dishonesty. The Academic Integrity Board 
should be consulted in the case of an appeal or whenever a case involving academic 
dishonesty has not been resolved at a lower level. 

Probation and Dismissal 
Probation 



A student is placed on probation for failing to maintain a 2.0 GPA for all courses 
undertaken in a term. A student must achieve a GPA of 2.0 or higher, based on a 
minimum of 12 letter-graded units, during the following term in order to continue in 
the college. 



38 UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 



Dismissal 

A student is subject to dismissal for the following reasons: 

1. Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 1.0 during any term. 

2. Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 during a probationary term. 

Students are notified by the appropriate Academic Dean of their dismissal. When 
extenuating circumstances, such as prolonged illness, account for the disqualification, 
the student may be permitted, on petition to the appropriate academic dean, to continue 
on probation for the next term. 

Enrollment in the College implies willingness on the part of the student to comply with 
the requirements and regulations of the College. If the student fails to comply with 
these requirements and regulations, or if it is determined by the dean that the student 
is not able to benefit from the opportunities offered by the College, withdrawal may be 
requested even though no specific breach of discipline is charged. 

Withdrawal From College 

Students thinking of withdrawing from the College should schedule an interview with 
the Director of the Advisement Center in order to explore their options. Students who 
must withdraw from the college at any time must file a withdrawal notice in the Office 
of the Registrar. Forms are available from the Advisement Center on both campuses. 
Students who leave the college for two consecutive semesters without filing appropriate 
forms are considered withdrawn. Students wishing to re-enter must file an application 
for re-admission with the Admissions Office. See page 29 for reduced charges which 
apply when withdrawing from the college. 

Leave of Absence 

Students in good academic standing may request a leave of absence from the college 
for one semester. However, after the deadline to withdraw with a V a Leave of 
Absence cannot be granted for the current term. Students on a leave of absence may 
not enroll in another institution during the period of leave of absence. 

Upon request, a Leave of Absence can be extended for one additional semester by the 
appropriate Academic Dean. Students on a Leave of Absence are considered continuing 
students and may preregister for the next semester at the allotted time and must 
contact their advisor. 

Transcripts 

Transcripts are issued at the written request of students or graduates to the Office of 
the Registrar. At the close of each term, transcripts for registered students must be 
held for inclusion of grades for the term, and therefore will not be available for approx- 
imately three (3) weeks. Partial transcripts will not be issued. At times other than the 
close of the term, the normal period required for processing transcripts is 5 working 
days. No transcript will be released unless all indebtedness to the college has been 
satisfied. All transcripts are $5.00 each. Upon completion of degree, students are en- 
titled to a complimentary transcript at the students request. 



UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 39 



Academic Petitions 

Students may petition the waiver or the modification of any academic policy or regu- 
lation, for good reason, which must be documented. The petition must be approved by 
the Academic Vice-President. The student files the approved petition in the office of 
the registrar for placement in the student's permanent file. 

Students with Disabilities 

Qualified students with documented disabilities are eligible for reasonable accommo- 
dations so that they may fully participate in the College's academic programs and 
activities. Students with known or suspected disabilities are encouraged to visit the 
learning center for more information. 

Grievance Procedure 

Copies of Mount St. Mary's College Grievance Procedure, in the Student Handbook, 
are available upon request at the Student Affairs Office. 



Transfer Students 



Students transferring into the college bring different backgrounds, goals, education, 
and experiences. In recognizing this, special efforts are made to provide academic 
advisement and program planning that build on the learning the student has already 
acquired. Careful attention is paid to provide assistance in the scheduling of classes so 
that major requirements as well as college general education requirements are fulfilled. 

Transfer students are assigned an academic adviser in the area of their major; the 
services of the Academic Advisement Center are available to all students. 

Appeals of academic regulations and curriculum requirements are possible where such 
action seems warranted. Students seeking to appeal regulations other than course 
requirements in their major should obtain a petition from the Academic Advisement 
Center. The completed form should be taken to the appropriate dean for approval. 
Students seeking a substitution or waiver of requirements in their major should obtain 
the written approval of the departmental chairperson. Copies of this approval should 
be in the student's permanent file. 

Credit by Exam 

In selected departments, course credit by examination is available on a limited basis 
and at the discretion of the department chairperson. The student must file the approved 
form in the Office of the Registrar. Only units of CREDIT will be awarded for these 
examinations (No record of failures will appear on a student's transcript.). All credit 
awarded in this manner will be so noted the student's transcript. 

Students may also take externally administered standard proficiency exams such as 
CLEP (College-Level Examination Program from CEEB) and PEP (Professional Equiv- 
alency Program from ACT) in those areas approved by the college. Information about 



40 UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 



these exams and a current list of approved exams are available from the Academic 
Advisement Center. Credit for CLEP or PEP exams taken prior to enrolling at Mount 
St. Mary's College and which appear on the transcript of record from another college 
or university will be accepted according to the transfer of credit procedure. If there has 
been no official awarding of credit, an original transcript from ACT or CEEB must be 
presented. 

Students who have taken courses sponsored by the armed forces or other non-collegiate 
agencies may apply for an evaluation of these learning experiences. 

For the baccalaureate degree, a maximum of 30 units may be secured through credit 
by departmental exam and/or CLEP/PEP exams in areas approved by the college. All 
units earned in this manner are held in escrow until the student has successfully 
completed 30 units of course work at Mount St. Mary's College. 

For the Associate Degree, a maximum of 24 units of credit may be secured through 
credit by departmental exam and/or CLEP/PEP exams in areas approved by the college. 
All units earned in this manner are held in escrow until the student has successfully 
completed 24 units of course work at Mount St. Mary's College. 

Advanced Standing 

The extent of the transfer student's advanced standing is determined on an individual 
basis and is not decided until an evaluation of all previous academic work has been 
completed. 

Credit for courses taken in other accredited colleges or universities is transferable 
provided that the transferred courses satisfy curriculum requirements at Mount St. 
Mary's College. A maximum of 36 semester units for course work taken in an accredited 
college is transferable toward the associate degree. No more than 66 transferable 
community college units may be applied toward the units required for a baccalaureate 
degree. 

Credit for extension courses is not automatically transferable. Courses identified as 
"non-transferable" by the sponsoring institution may not be accepted. The following 
courses ordinarily do not transfer: pre-college level math; pre-college level writing; pre- 
college level reading; English as a Second Language; such business skills courses as 
typing, shorthand, business machines; and vocational or technical courses and corre- 
spondence courses. 

Original transcripts must be submitted for all proficiency or advanced placement credit 
awards (CLEP, PEP, AP). No more than 2.0 units in physical education may be trans- 
ferred from any college or university. No more than 6 units of coursework taken without 
grade (CR/NC; P/NP) may be accepted towards degree. In the case of courses in which 
grades of C-, D, or F are repeated, only the better grade will be transferred. In cases 
where a course in which a grade of C or better has been repeated, only the C will be 
accepted. 

Transferable courses "C-" or better are counted toward the associate and baccalaureate 
degree. Transfer courses are not calculated in the cumulative GPA. The determination 
of whether courses transferred into the college may serve as fulfillment of major re- 
quirements is made by the major department. Those courses not accepted in the major 
may count as general electives. 

Students transferring from foreign schools, colleges, and universities must submit 
original copies of their academic records and translations from an approved translating 
service; a list of approved agencies is available from the Admission Office. 



UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES 41 



A final credit summary and determination of advanced standing will be prepared by 
the Advisement Center after the applicant is accepted for admission and all final 
transcripts have been submitted. Failure to submit required transcripts may prevent 
the student from enrolling in classes. Students who wish to challenge this transfer 
credit summary must do so by the end of their first semester at Mount St. Mary's 
College. 

Transfer of Credit 

Once admitted to and enrolled in the college, the student is normally expected to pursue 
study only at Mount St. Mary's College. 

A student seeking an exception to this concurrent enrollment policy must file a Transfer 
of Credit Clearance with all approvals in the Office of the Registrar prior to registration 
in the course for which approval has been obtained. 

Classification of Students 

To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have satisfactorily completed 30 se- 
mester units, and have 1-2 more semesters of work to complete before fulfilling asso- 
ciate degree requirements or 5-6 more semesters of work to complete before fulfilling 
baccalaureate degree requirements or the unit equivalent; as a junior, a minimum of 
60 semester units and 3-4 semesters of work; as a senior, 90 semester units and 1-2 
semesters of work. 

A student with full-time status must carry 12-18 units per semester. Part-time students 
carry less than 12 units per semester. Foreign students (with non-immigrant "F-l" 
student status) enrolled in beginning ESL (on or off campus) plus nine semester units 
may be considered as students with full-time status. 

Non-matriculating students may take a course or courses for academic credit without 
following a prescribed curriculum toward a degree. 

Ordinarily a student should be a sophomore before enrolling in upper division courses. 
It is the student's responsibility to be aware of prerequisites or requirements for en- 
rolling in upper division courses. 

Degree Application 

A student applying for graduation must file a graduation application in the Registrar's 
Office by the end of the term prior to the student's graduating semester. (Example: if 
you are graduating in Spring 2000, the term prior to your graduating semester would 
be Fall 1999.) See the Registrar's Office for specific dates and forms. 



42 ASSOCIATE DEGREE 



THE ASSOCIATE DEGREE 

Through the Associate in Arts Program students have the opportunity to develop 
academic competencies. Faculty and staff offer excellence in their specialized fields 
and show concern for the individual student. The fundamental goal of this program is 
to provide knowledge and skills for an enriched life and the possibility for further 
education. Students in the A.A. Program also are able to explore various options in 
determining a career and the skills necessary for employment. 

All courses are transferable to the Mount St. Mary's College baccalaureate degree 
program unless otherwise stated. Students wishing to transfer to other four year cam- 
puses should consult with their advisors about the transfer ability of courses. 

All students who enter the Associate Degree Program are required to complete a battery 
of tests including reading, writing and math prior to registering for classes. 

The specializations are designed to prepare the student either for employment imme- 
diately after graduation or transfer to a baccalaureate program. Four semesters are 
usually required to complete the A.A. degree. Students with deficiencies in mathemat- 
ics or English skills may need one or two additional semesters. 



Majors Offered 



Mount St. Mary's College confers the Associate in Arts degree with the following majors: 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Graphic Design 
Human Services 
Liberal Arts 
Nursing 

Pre-Health Science 
Physical Therapist Assistant 
Occupational Therapy Assistant 

A complete description of the requirements for each major as well as course descriptions 
may be found in the Courses of Instruction section of this catalog. 



Academic Policies: Associate Degree 

Degree Requirements 

1. Completion of at least 60 semester units with a grade point average of 2.0 (a C 
average) for all college work undertaken at Mount St. Mary's College. 

2. Required courses: 

a. Communication Skills (minimum of 6 units): 
ENG6ABorENGlAB 
ENG 10AB (for HOPE Program only) 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE 43 



b. Arts and Sciences (minimum of 9 units): 

(at least one course must be taken from three of the following categories) 

1. Art, Music, Literature 

2. History, Contemporary Economics, Politics 

3. Natural, Physical Sciences 

4. Social, Behavioral Sciences 

c. Philosophy (3 units) 

d. Religious Studies (3 units) 

e. Freshmen Orientation (1 unit) 

f. One semester of off-campus Outreach by participation in one of the following: 
(minimum 1 unit) 

1. Social Action 

2. Fieldwork or clinical experience associated with specialization 

g. Multicultural (3 units) 

h. Strongly recommend Physical Fitness/Wellness 

3. Completion of program requirements. (Listed under departments.) 

4. For the associate degree 24 semester units must be completed during the last two 
semesters at Mount St. Mary's College. Of these, a minimum of 12 semester units 
must be in the student's major and earned in regular course work. 

5. In order to participate in commencement exercises students must have completed 
all requirements for graduation. 

6. Skill in writing, reading, basic math, notetaking, and computers evidenced by 
passing scores in proficiency tests. 

7. Must file a graduation application in the Registrar's Office by the end of the term 
prior to the term of completion. 

Credit Load 

A full-time student is defined as a student who is enrolled in a minimum of 12 units 
and a maximum of 18 units per semester. 

Graduation With Honors (Associate in Arts Degree) 

With honors shall be granted to a student who has earned the Associate in Arts degree 
while maintaining a cumulative 3.5 grade point average prior to the final semester. 

The overall GPA at the end of the fall semester of the academic year is used in deter- 
mining honors. The student's grade point average will be calculated on the basis of 
grades earned at Mount St. Mary's College, as well as grades transferred into the 
College at time of matriculation. 

Courses at another institution after matriculation are not counted into the cumulative 
grade point average with the exception of approved exchange programs. 

Integration of Theory and Practice 

Experience endeavors to relate personal growth and learning to the more practical 
aspects of life. Opportunities for experience can occur both inside and outside the 
college. 



44 ASSOCIATE DEGREE 



The Freshmen Orientation course facilitates the incoming student's adjustment to the 
demands of college life by teaching tools for personal effectiveness and presenting 
strong female role models in various careers. Students work in small groups with staff 
and peer counselors to discuss concerns, explore values and goals, and practice com- 
munication skills. 

Social Action/Fieldwork extends the learning process beyond campus limits. The stu- 
dent becomes aware of important issues in society by dealing with them. Opportunities 
are offered for career-related experiences and the blending of theory and practice. In 
Social Action the student performs supervised volunteer services such as tutoring, 
hospital, volunteer work, child care, home visiting, and the like. In Field Work the 
student engages in supervised fieldwork or practicum as determined by the major. 



Academic Support Services 

Academic Advisement 

The advisement program is coordinated through the Academic Advisement Center. All 
students are assigned an advisor with whom they plan their academic programs. The 
advisor assists in clarifying program requirements and in coordinating the students' 
schedules. 

To further serve the student's advisement needs, the Academic Advisement Center 
functions as a drop-in office for on-going guidance and referral services. 

Although the individual faculty advisors and the Advisement Center staff make every 
effort to provide advisement for the student, it is ultimately the student's responsibility 
to see that all procedures are followed and all requirements are fulfilled. 

Learning Resource Center 

The Learning Resource Center oversees the Communication Skills Lab, supervises 
students still working for reading, writing, and math proficiencies, and provides tutors 
for most areas of the curriculum. Students in developmental English classes spend an 
assigned hour a week receiving instruction in diagnosed grammatical and composi- 
tional skills not yet mastered. With tutors, computer or AV aids, students also work to 
acquire a certain proficiency in reading, writing, and basic math. Students may also 
request a tutor or organize a study group for other areas of the curriculum, e.g. psy- 
chology, sociology, geography, etc. Students are encouraged to make appointments for 
any extra time they may need, but occasionally drop-ins can also be accommodated. 

Skills Programs 

The ability to communicate is one of the basic tools of learning. A student must be able 
to receive and to transmit information accurately. This process involves reading, writ- 
ing, speaking, and listening, as well as understanding non-verbal messages. A student 
must be able to think logically and apply knowledge to problems and situations at hand. 
In order to facilitate the acquisition of these tools, the following programs are offered: 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE 45 



College Skills (Learning Skills) Specialized courses in areas such as study skills, 
reading, math, and English are provided for students whose previous performance 
and/or test results indicate they might experience academic difficulty. These 
courses are required for students who are academically underprepared. 

Summer Skills The Summer Skills Workshop enables interested students to get 
a better start in their college careers. Students receive a unit of AA credit for 
successfully completing a class in study skills and two other classes chosen from 
classes in writing, math, reading, and notetaking. 

The J. Thomas McCarthy Library 

Doheny Campus as a branch of the Mount St. Mary's College Libraries, provides on- 
line access to a union catalog of nearly 130,000 volumes, 800 periodicals titles and 3000 
non-print media programs. The Library also provides access to the World Wide Web, 
modem access to non-Web based catalogs of local libraries, subscription access to the 
OCLC FirstSearch databases, Electric Library and on-line encyclopedias, and local 
.access to a variety of CD/ROM databases. Library staff provide assistance and instruc- 
tion to patrons conducting library research. 

Computer Labs 

The Doheny Campus has two complete computer labs including laser printers. 

• The Macintosh Computer Lab, located in room 108 in building 4, has Power Mac 
GlOO's and Macintosh LCs. The lab is open daily for student and faculty use. 

• The Riordan-Ahmanson Computer Lab, located in the Learning Center, has 25 
networked IBM compatible personal computers. The lab is open daily for student 
and faculty use. 

AjV. Student Enrollment at Chalon 

Associate of Arts students may take a limited number of units at Chalon. Ordinarily 
students admitted to the A. A. Program do not take classes at Chalon during their first 
semester. However, if there is need for a sequence course such as biology, chemistry, 
math, or music, a maximum of eight units may be taken during the first two semesters. 
(Chalon students have priority registration for Chalon classes; Doheny students for 
Doheny classes.) 

After two (2) semesters in the A. A. Program, a student may take a maximum of seven 
(7) units her third semester and as many as nine (9) units during her fourth semester. 

Student Support Services Project (ISAE - Institute for Student 
Academic Enrichment) 

This federally funded project is designed to assist students in achieving the maximum 
potential in higher education. On both campuses the Student Support Services Project 
(ISAE Program) provides to eligible students academic advisement, peer tutoring, 
career and personal counseling, financial aid information, workshops, leadership and 
cultural enrichment activities. 



46 ASSOCIATE DEGREE 



Student Affairs 

Activities 

College involvement gives the student the opportunity to become a vital part of the 
institution. Students are encouraged to serve on college committees and to initiate 
religious, cultural, and social activities on the Doheny Campus. The small college 
atmosphere offers many chances for participation in student government and campus 
organizations. In fact, a priority of the college is to provide its women with distinctive 
leadership opportunities. 

Many organizations are open to the Mount students in an effort to broaden their 
experiences. Among these, the Associated Students sponsor a wide range of social, 
cultural, recreational, volunteer, and religious activities. The Student Board meets 
regularly to discuss student issues and to promote student involvement. Several oc- 
casions arise each year for interaction with baccalaureate students at Chalon as well 
as with students of surrounding colleges. Special interests are represented in various 
clubs and organizations on the Doheny Campus. 

In addition to the on-campus activities, students are invited to take part in the many 
opportunities available to them in the greater Los Angeles area. 

Leadership Program 

The Leadership program, a non-degree program open to all students, is designed to 
foster the development of leadership potential. Students may create a Leadership 
Portfolio which tracks their college activities while evaluating competencies in various 
skills necessary for a leader. Students may also become involved in courses, workshops, 
and internships through the Leadership program, which enable them to put leadership 
theory into practice. The Introduction to Leadership course provides a foundation for 
elective seminars in which students learn how and why effective leadership works. 
Leading in small groups allows students to test theories in practice and to develop 
confidence and assertiveness. Advanced students plan and carry out their own lead- 
ership projects on and off campus. 

Counseling and Counseling Services 

Counseling and psychological services are available to all students at Mount St. Mary's 
College. The services include crisis intervention, brief therapy, and referrals to appro- 
priate community-based professional. The Counseling Services exist to help students 
make the most of their education by fostering personal growth and emotional well- 
being. Students bring many types of concerns to the Counseling Center. Some examples 
include: 1) interpersonal problems with friends or families; 2) stressful life events such 
as living away from home for the first time, academic pressures, or the death of a loved 
one; 3) troublesome feelings such as anxiety, depression or guilt; and 4) concerns such 
as drug or alcohol use, low self-esteem, or an eating disorder. Students on the Doheny 
campus have access to a professional psychologist to discuss their concerns and work 
though their troubling issues. All sessions are confidential in keeping with professional 
ethics and state laws. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE 47 



Campus Ministry 

The goal of the Campus Ministry Office is to facilitate a sense of community and service 
on the Doheny Campus. Students have opportunities for prayer through Eucharistic 
liturgies, Scripture sharing, and weekend retreats. The Campus Ministry Office plans 
activities that link the students with the needs of the neighborhood and the community 
at large. Students are involved in a variety of volunteer services. 

The Doheny campus has the Our Lady of Mercy Chapel and is located next to St. 
Vincent's Church. The Doheny campus is just a few blocks from the Newman Center 
of the University of Southern California. All are available to the Mount community. 

Career Planning Center 

The Career Center offers a variety of resources to assist students in finding the college 
majors and careers best suited to their values, interests, and abilities. Students are 
encouraged to make use of the self-evaluative tools, especially the computers available 
in the center, and to meet with the counselor for individual consultation. Students may 
also take a course in career planning exploration and complete an internship for aca- 
demic credit. 

The Career Center job board lists current off-campus work opportunities. 
Residence Life 

The Residence Life area at the Doheny Campus is a learning/living experience where 
students are encouraged to develop their relationship — to God, other persons, and 
nature — by exploring these through various programs and opportunities. 

The programs, both formal and informal, are meant to enhance the education of these 
young people. We seek to provide an atmosphere where the individual can explore her/ 
his own ideas, values and potentials, and develop an attitude of personal responsibility 
for one's actions. With students of many cultural backgrounds and experiences, we 
provide the atmosphere and opportunities for interaction and celebration to enable 
students to establish their own spirit of community. 

Housing choices include a large residence hall, Mclntyre, and three smaller living 
arrangements in campus mansions. Student life is largely self-regulated under the 
guidance of the Director of Residence Life, the Residence Life Program Assistant, and 
the Resident Assistants, as well as a Residence Hall Council. 

Residence Staff gives time and attention to assigning rooms and roommates, making 
every effort to provide an environment which will allow the student both privacy and 
freedom to grow — socially, emotionally, academically and religiously. 

Student Health Services 

The Mount St. Mary's College Student Health Services Department offer a broad range 
of services to both resident and commuter students. These services include diagnosis 
and treatment of illness and minor injuries, physical examinations, health teaching, 
and laboratory testing. The Health Clinic on the Chalon campus is staffed by physi- 
cians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and specially trained students. 



48 ASSOCIATE DEGREE 



Emphasis is placed on preventive medicine and on positive health practices which will 
become a part of each student's lifestyle. Programs designed to assist students in 
developing values and skills related to achieving a high level of health are presented 
each semester. 

Incoming Freshman and transfer students, both resident and commuters, must submit 
a current health history and physical examination prior to entrance. Proof of current 
immunizations and TB skin testing are also required for admission. Additional health 
requirements exist for students enrolled in programs with clinical affiliations. 

Doheny students are eligible to use the Chalon Health Clinic for their primary health 
care needs. In addition, Doheny students have access to the Doheny Health Center, 
where a registered nurse is available for the treatment of minor illness and injuries, 
giving vaccinations and providing health information. 

All full-time students are required to carry Health and Accident Insurance. Please see 
expense listings at the beginning of this catalog for additional information regarding 
health insurance available through Mount St. Mary's College. 

Fitness Education 

Mount St. Mary's College is committed to graduating well-balanced women with a 
strong sense of self and physical well being. The Fitness Education Department offers 
two programs that compliment the academic program: the physical education courses 
offered for academic credit, and a wellness and fitness program, including nutrition. 
The two programs together provide students with the opportunity to attain, improve 
and/or maintain their physical fitness, attend informative workshops on wellness and 
fitness, participate in recreational activities on or off the campus, and participate in 
intramural volleyball, basketball, and tennis programs. Facilities include a pool, fitness 
center equipped with cardiovascular and weight training equipment, and a tennis/ 
basketball/volleyball court. 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 49 



I THE BACCALAUREATE 






DEGREE 



Mount St. Mary's College confers the following baccalaureate degrees: 

The Bachelor of Arts with majors in 
American Studies 
Art 

Biological Sciences 
Business Administration 
Chemistry 
Child Development 
Liberal Arts (Weekend College only) 
Liberal Studies (for elementary 
teaching credential students) 
English 
French 
Gerontology 
History 

Mathematics (Computer Science emphasis) 
Music 
Philosophy 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Religious Studies 
Social Science 
Sociology 
Spanish 

The Bachelor of Science with majors in 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Business (Weekend College only) 

Chemistry 

Nursing 

The Bachelor of Music with a major in Music 
Individually Designed Major 

The Individually Designed Major is available to students interested in giving further 
creative direction to their own education. This student is encouraged to utilize alter- 
native modes of education and to assume leadership in initiating educational and 
cultural experiences. Admission to the Individually Designed Major presumes the 
ability on the part of the student to engage in independent study. Freshmen are eligible 
to pursue an IDM after the successful completion of their first semester at Mount St. 
Mary's College. 

Information is available in the Advisement Center and from the Assistant Academic 
Vice President. 



50 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



Baccalaureate Degree Requirements 

Degree Requirements 

1. Completion of at least 124 semester units with a grade point average of 2.0 (C 
average) for all college work undertaken at Mount St. Mary's College. A minimum 
of 45 semester units must be in upper division work. 

2. Completion of a major, as designated by the major department. 

3. Satisfaction of the senior residence requirement. Residence is defined as 30 of the 
last 39 units before graduation must be taken at Mount St. Mary's College. A 
minimum of 12 upper division units must be in the student's major and earned in 
regular course work at Mount St. Mary's College. 

4. Completion of a Mount St. Mary's College general studies program. 

5. Required Course: Introduction to College Studies (SPR 85) is required of all fresh- 
men entering college with fewer than 24 units. 

6. Must file a graduation application in the Registrar's Office by the end of the term 
prior to the term of completion. 

In order to participate in commencement exercises students must be registered for all 
courses needed to complete degree and college requirements. 

If a student is granted permission to enroll in a course prior to graduation, at an 
institution other than Mount St. Mary's College, the transcript must be received by 
June 30. 

The General Studies Curriculum 

An educated person is one who is not only academically prepared in an area of special- 
ization but also one who has knowledge and appreciation of the diverse fields of human 
endeavor. To achieve this, a student is expected to explore areas of learning outside 
the major through the General Studies curriculum. The college has adopted the follow- 
ing components of a liberal education as fundamental in developing excellence of mind 
and spirit. The components are integrated into the educational program, and into the 
General Studies Curriculum, in a way that enables the growth of students as free, 
imaginative, and responsible human beings, sensitive and responsive to the needs of 
the human person and human society. These components are: 

1 . effective written expression of ideas ; 

2. effective oral communication; 

3. analysis of assumptions, methods of argumentation, values; 

4. problem-solving: defining problems, identifying issues; organizing, analyzing, 
synthesizing ideas; comparing, contrasting ideas; decision-making; 

5. understanding of personal and group behavior; 

6. effective participation in a group or organization; 

7. sense of history as providing perspective for interpreting human events; 

8. sense of literature as reflecting and interpreting human experience; 

9. understanding of and appreciation for music and the visual arts; 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 51 



10. curiosity about and a spirit for investigating the natural universe; 

11. ability to recognize patterns of thought used in science and mathematics; 

12. understanding of the impact of advancing technology on human society and 
culture; 

13. understanding of social classes and social structures in diverse societies; 

14. understanding of contemporary economic, social, and political issues; 

15. understanding of criteria and standards to assess personal moral values and 
ethical judgments; 

16. openness to understanding of, and respect for philosophical, religious, and 
ethnic diversity; 

17. awareness of the religious and spiritual dimensions of human existence. 

General Studies Requirements 

The following structure and content for the General Studies Curriculum applies to 
bachelor degrees except that there is no language requirement for the Bachelor of 
Music and the Bachelor of Science degrees. 

Students may not take general studies courses on a credit/no-credit basis. 

The college policy on challenge examinations will prevail in the General Studies Cur- 
riculum. 

I. Communication Skills (minimum 7 units) 

A. Written (6 units) 

ENG 1AB Freshman English (3,3) 

ENG 5H Freshman Honors English (3) 

ENG 10AB Written and Oral Communication (3,3) 
(for HOPE Program Only) 

B. Oral (1-3 units) 

SPE 10 Introduction to Communication (2) 

SPE 12 Business and Professional Communication (1) 

POL 134 International Organization-MUN (3) 
POL 135 Selected Problems in International 

Organization (3) 

II. Critical Thinking (minimum 3 units) 

PHI 5 Logic (3) 

PHI 10 Critical Thinking (3) 

III. Arts and Sciences (minimum 21 units) 

At least one course must be taken in each of the following categories (A - G): 

A. Art or Music 



ART 3 


Visual Thinking 


(3) 


ART 5 


Fundamentals of Art 


(3) 


ART 170 


History of Art: Ancient thru Medieval 


(3) 


ART 171 


History of Art: Renaissance thru 






Romanticism 


(3) 


ART 172 


History of Art: Modern World 


(3) 


ART 173 


Multiculturalism and the Visual Arts 


(3) 



52 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



ART 174 Women in Contemporary Art 

MUS 6/106 The Fine Arts: Music 

MUS 125 Music Masterpieces 

INT 93AB/193AB Guided Experiences in the Arts 
INT 95/195 Study/Travel: European History 

and Culture 

B. Literature 



(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(1.5,1.5) 

(1-6) 



ENG12 


Literary Analysis 


(3) 


ENG15 


Literature and Society 


(3) 


ENG16 


Literature and the Human Experience 


(3) 


ENG17 


Literary Focus 


(3) 


ENG18 


Great Works in World Literature 


(3) 


ENG19 


Great Works in English Literature 


(3) 


ENG20 


Great Works in American Literature 


(3) 


ENG21 


Classical Epic and Drama 


(3) 


ENG25 


Mythmaking: The Quest for Meaning 


(3) 


ENG26 


Literature of the American West 


(3) 


ENG27 


Women in Quest 


(3) 


ENG28 


Contemporary Issues in World Literature 


(3) 


ENG73 


Shakespeare 


(3) 


ENG92 


Special Studies 


(3) 


ENG 118 


Great Works in World Literature 


(3) 


ENG 119 


Great Works in English Literature 


(3) 


ENG 120 


Great Works in American Literature 


(3) 


ENG 121 


Classical Epic and Drama 


(3) 


ENG 122 


Love in World Literature 


(3) 


ENG 123 


Women's Voices in Literature 


(3) 


ENG 124 


Fiction to Film 


(3) 


ENG 125 


Faith and Fiction 


(3) 


ENG 126 


The American Experience 


(3) 


ENG 127 


Russian Literature 


(3) 


ENG 129 


Ethnic Lit. in America 


(3) 


ENG 156H 


The Modern Temper 


(3) 


ENG 173 


Shakespeare 


(3) 


ENG 192 


Special Studies 

C. History 


(3) 


fflSlAB 


Western Civilization 


(3,3) 


HIS 2 


World Political History 


(3) 


HIS5H 


European Leaders 


(3) 


HIS 25 


Cultural and Historical Geography 


(3) 


HIS 27 


U.S. History and Institutions for Foreign 






Students 


(3) 


HIS 75 


Contemporary America 


(3) 


HIS 93ABCD 


Studies in Selected Historical 






Problems/Topics 


(3,3,3) 


HIS 112/112H 


Economic History of Europe 


(3) 


HIS 115AB 


History of Political Theory 


(3,3) 


HIS 116 


Classical Civilization 


(3) 


HIS 118 


Popes, Councils, Dogma, Dissent 


(3) 


HIS 142 


Europe: Politics and Theology in the Age 






of Reformation 


(3) 


HIS 143 


European Enlightenment 


(3) 


HIS 147 


Europe: 1871-1945 


(3) 


HIS 150 


Introduction to Asian History 


(3) 


HIS 151 


History of Modern Japan 


(3) 


HIS 152 


China: People and Personality 


(3) 


HIS 171 


U. S.: Revolutionaries and Constitutionalists 


(3) 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 53 



HIS 173 


U. S.: Civil War and Reconstruction Era 


(3) 


HIS 179 


American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


HIS 180 


Contemporary Constitutional Law 


(3) 


HIS 181 


Modern Presidential History 


(3) 


HIS 191 


Major Issues in U.S. Women's History 


(3) 


HIS 193 


ABCD Studies in Selected Historical 






Problems/Topics 


(3,3,3,3) 


POL 108 


American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


POL 109 


Individual Rights 


(3) 


POL 117AB 


History of Political Theory 


(3,3) 


POL 152A 


History of Modern Japan 


(3) 


POL 152B 


History of Modern China 

D. Natural and Physical Sciences 


(3) 


BIOIAB 


Biological Dynamics 


(4,4) 


BIO 3 


General Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 5 


Life Science 


(3) 


BIO 7 


Introduction to the Human Body 


(3) 


BIO 10 


Health Science 


(3) 


BIO 31 


Human Sexuality 


(3) 


BIO 40A 


Human Anatomy 


(4) 


BIO 50A 


Human Anatomy 


(4) 


BIO 50B 


Human Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 67/167 


Environmental Science 


(3) 


BIO 87 


Fundamental Concepts 


(1-3) 


CHE1A/1AL 


General Chemistry/Laboratory 


(3,1) 


CHE 3 


Foundations of Chemistry 


(3) 


PHS1 


Scientific Concepts 


(3) 


PHS2 


General Physical Science 


(3) 


PHS4 


Elementary Environmental Studies 


(3) 


PHY1A 


Introductory Physics 


(4) 


PHY 5 


Selected Topics in Physics 


(1-3) 


PHY11A 


Mechanics 

E. Mathematics 


(3) 


MTH1 


College Algebra and Trigonometry 


(4) 


MTH3AB 


Calculus I 


(4,4) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MTH9H 


Introduction to Computer Processes: 






Honors Section 


(3) 


MTH10 


Mathematical Ideas 


(3) 


MTH20 


Programming 


(3) 


MTH28 


Mathematical Analysis for Business 




MTH38 


Elements of Probability and Stow 


(3) 


MTH50 


Elementary Number Systems 


(3) 


MTH51 


Elements of Geometry and Statistics 
F. Social and Behavioral Sciences 


(3) 


ECOl 


Microeconomics 


(3) 


ECO 112H 


Economic History of Europe 


(3) 


HSP10 


Basic Concepts in Human Physiology, 






Psychology and Sociology 


(1, 1, 1) 


PHI 57H 


History & Philosophy of the 






Behavioral Sciences 


(3) 


POL 2 


Comparative Government 


(3) 


POLIO 


Political Concepts 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


PSY2 


Psychology of Communication 


(2-3) 


PSY12 


Child/Human Development 


(3) 



54 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



PSY 52 Biological Psychology 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives 

SOC 6 Family Relationships and Child Development 

SOC 104 The Family 

SOC 117 Methods of Research 

SOC 166 Sociological Theory 

SOC 195 Sociology of Religion 

WST 100 Women, Culture, and Society 

G. Contemporary Economics or Politics 

BUS 133/133H Government and Business 

BUS 140 Women's Issues, in Business and Economics 

ECO 2 Macroeconomics 

ECO 195 International Economics 

HIS 75 Contemporary America 

HIS 178 Diplomatic History of the United States 

HIS 179 Constitutional History of the United States 

HIS 180 Current Constitutional History 

HIS 188 California History 

POL 1 American Government 

POL 108 American Constitutional Law 

POL 109 Individual Rights 

POL 125 Foreign Relations of the U. S. 

POL 131 International Relations 

POL 134 International Organizations-MUN 

POL 135 Selected Problems in International Organizations 

POL 17 1H Presidents and Personality 

POL 175AB Selected Topics in the American 

Political Structure 

POL 179 California Politics 

POL 180 State and Local Government 

POL 192 Plays and Politics 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3,3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 



IV. Foreign Language 



Required for B. A. degree only. 

FRE 1 Elementary French I (or equivalent) 

FRE 2 Elementary French II (or equivalent) 

FRE 8 Oral Comprehension and Conversation 

FRE 9 Intermediate French Readings 

FRE 25 Writing, Composition and Grammar 

FRE 33AB French Culture and Civilization 

FRE 112 History and Civilization of France 

SPA 1 Elementary Spanish I (or equivalent) 

SPA 2 Elementary Spanish II (or equivalent) 

SPA 8 Oral Comprehension and Conversation 

SPA 9 Intermediate Spanish Readings 

SPA 25 Writing: Composition and Grammar 

SPA 33A Civilization and Culture of Spain 

SPA 33B Civilization and Culture of Hisp America 

SPA 42 History and Civilization of Spain 

SPA 44 Hispanic Civilization and Cultures 

SPA 145 Cultures of the Spanish Speaking Peoples 
of the Americas 



(4) 
(4) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(4) 
(4) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 



B.S. degree programs do not require a foreign language because of the additional science 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 55 



courses and/or arts and science courses required by the related departments or outside profes- 
sional accrediting agencies. 

However, all students are strongly encouraged to take a second modern language to enhance 
their personal and professional communication in our current multilingual society. 



V. Philosophy and Religious Studies 
(minimum 15 units* - must include 3 units of Ethics and 3 units of 

Philosophical Ideas.) 

A. RELIGIOUS STUDIES (6-9 units) 

Ordinarily courses must be taken in at least two of the following areas: 

1. Scripture 



RST11 


Introduction to Old Testament 


(3) 


RST15 


Introduction to New Testament 


(3) 


RST90S 


Special Studies in Christian Scriptures 


(1-3) 


RST 190S 


Advanced Studies in Christian Scriptures 
2. Christian Thought 


(1-3) 


RST21 


Catholicism 


(3) 


RST 25/125 


Marriage Issues: Catholic Perspectives 


(3) 


RST 70 


Faith and Human Development 


(3) 


RST90T 


Special Studies in Christian Thought 


(1-3) 


RST 131 


Jesus 


(3) 


RST 190T 


Advanced Studies in Christian Thought 


(1-3) 


PHI 125 


Aquinas 

3. Christian Ethics 


(3) 


RST 41 


Introduction to Christian Ethics 


(3) 


RST 45/145 


Contemporary Issues in Christian Ethics 


(3) 


RST 50 


Social Issues in Christian Ethics 


(3) 


RST 90E 


Special Studies in Christian Ethics 


(1-3) 


RST 49/149 


Biomedical Issues in Christian Ethics 


(3) 


RST 190E 


Advanced Studies in Christian Ethics 
4. Religion and Religions 


(1-3) 


RST 61 


Introduction to World Religions 


(3) 


RST90R/190R 


Special Studies in Religions 


(3) 


PHI 160 


Philosophy of Religion 


(3) 


RST 78/178 


Death and Afterlife 


(3) 


RST 190R 


Advanced Studies in Religion(s) 


(3) 


SOC 195 


Sociology of Religion 


(3) 


ving will be offered for General Studies credit on a course-by-course 


basis: 


RST 90 


Special Studies 


(1-3) 


RST 190 


Advanced Studies 


(1-3) 


RST 191 


Seminar 


(3) 



Please see schedule of classes for details. 

B. PHILOSOPHY (6-9 units) 

At least one course from among those listed under Philosophical Ideas must be taken. 



1. Philosophical Ideas 

PHI 15 Challenges in Philosophy 

PHI 24 Socrates, Plato, Aristotle 

PHI 56H History of Scientific Ideas 

PHI 57H Philosophy of the Behavioral Sciences 

PHI 95 Special Problems 



(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(1-3) 



56 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

*Students transferring into the college who will graduate in two years or less will fulfill General 
Studies V., A and B, by completing two courses in each area, a total of twelve (12) units. 

VI. Multicultural (6) 

ART 5 Fundamentals of Art (3) 

ART 173 Multiculturalism and the Visual Arts (3) 

BUS 140/140H Women's Issues in Business 

and Economics (3) 

BUS 189 International Management (3) 

EDU 150/250 Elementary Instruction: Theory and Practice (3) 

ENG 26 Literature of the American West (3) 

ENG 27 Women in Quest (3) 

ENG 28 Contemporary Issues in World Literature (3) 

ENG 123 Women's Voices in Literature (3) 

ENG 126 The American Experience (3) 

ENG 129 Ethnic Literatures of America (3) 

FRE 9 Intermediate French Readings (3) 

FRE128 Twentieth Century Literary Trends (3) 

HIS 25 Cultural and Historical Geography (3) 

HIS 26/POL 2 Comparative Government (3) 

HIS 153/POL Modern India (3) 

152C 

HIS 162 A History and Civilization of Latin America: 

Latin American Civilization (3) 

MUS 6/106 The Fine Arts: Music (3) 

NUR 160 Adaptation Nursing: Childbearing Family (2.5) 

NUR 184 Community Health Nursing II (1.5) 

PHI 15 Challenges in Philosophy (3) 



PHI 125 
PHI 126 


Aquinas 
Descartes to Kant 


PHI 130 
PHI 134 
PHI 150 
PHI 152 
PHI 158 


Existentialism and Phenomenology 
American Philosophy 
Metaphysics 
Theory of Knowledge 
The Scientific Method 


PHI 160 
PHI 162 
PHI 170 
PHI 172 


Philosophy of Religion 
Philosophy & Native Cultures 
Social and Political Philosophy 
Marxism 


PHI 174 


Aesthetics 


PHI 175 
PHI 176 
PHI 178 
PHI179 


Philosophy of Film 
Philosophy in Literature 
Philosophy of Woman 
Women and Values 




2. Ethics 


PHI 21 


Moral Values 


PHI 92 


Business Ethics 


PHI 168A 
PHI 168B 


Contemporary Moral Problems 
Bioethics 


PHI 179 


Women and Values 




3. Other 


PHI 5 
PHI 10 
PHI 155 
PHI 158 


Logic 

Critical Thinking 

Symbolic Logic 

The Scientific Method 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 57 



PHI 21 


Moral Values 


(3) 


PHI 160 


Philosophy of Religion 


(3) 


PHI 162 


Philosophy and Native Cultures 


(3) 


PHI 168A 


Contemporary Moral Problems 


(3) 


PHI 174 


Aesthetics 


(3) 


PHI 175 


Philosophy of Film 


(3) 


PHI 176 


Philosophy in Literature 


(3) 


PHI 178 


Philosophy of Woman 


(3) 


PHI 179 


Women and Values 


(3) 


POL 2 


Comparative Government 


(3) 


POL 152C 


Modern India 


(3) 


POL 192 


Plays and Politics 


(3) 


PSY 113 


Child and Adolescent Development and Learning 






Across Cultures 


(3) 


PSY144 


Psychology of Prejudice 


(3) 


RST61 


Introduction to World Religions 


(3) 


RST 78/178 


Death and Afterlife 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


SOC 125 


Comparative Social Structure 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SPA 9 


Intermediate Spanish Readings 


(3) 


SPA33B 


Civilization and Cultures of Hispanic America 


(3) 


SPA 140 


Contemporary Literature of Hispanic America 


(3) 


SPA 146 


Women in Hispanic Literature 


(3) 


WST 100 


Women, Culture and Society 


(3) 



The following are restrictions on double counting courses: 

(i) courses may be double counted only if they are listed under the area within which 
the student wishes to have them counted; 

(ii) no double counting is allowed across categories in area III; At most six units of the 
21-unit minimum in area III may involve double counting with other areas; 

(iv) no course from areas I-IV may double count to satisfy a requirement in area V. 

Modern Language Fulfillment Alternative 

This requirement may be satisfied by any of the following alternatives: 

1 . A student who begins a language must complete French 1 and French 2 , or Spanish 
1 and 2, or their equivalent. For other languages, student must complete the 
equivalent of the second semester or third quarter. 

2. Re-entry students may choose to complete the requirement by taking two courses 
in either Spanish or French culture (The courses are only offered in Weekend 
College). 

3. Students whose native language is not English may demonstrate academic profi- 
ciency in English as a second language by passing the TOEFL examination with 
scores above 550. 

4. Students may take placement exams offered by MSMC's Modern Language De- 
partment in Spanish or French to fulfill the requirement. Successful completion 
will waive the Modern Language Requirement with no credit awarded. The place- 
ment exam may not count towards units for graduation. 



58 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



Graduating With a Double Major 

Students who wish to earn a degree with a double major must observe the following 
requirements: 

1. The two majors may be in the same or different degree programs. The student 
must determine the primary major and satisfy the general studies requirement 
for the degree of that major. The other major is considered the secondary major. 

2. All requirements for both majors must be met, including all upper division work, 
foreign language, and any additional requirements. 

3. The department chairpersons of both major areas must approve the student's 
completion of the requirements for the major. 

4. A second major may be earned in the same academic area, but no more than 9 
upper division units may satisfy requirements in both majors. 

Second Baccalaureate 

In order to receive a second baccalaureate degree, a student must fulfill the following 
requirements: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester units in residence beyond the require- 
ments for the first baccalaureate degree. 

2. Completion of all departmental requirements, including a modern language if 
necessary, in the area of the major for the second degree. 

3. Completion of all other institutional requirements if the first degree has been 
earned elsewhere. 

Graduation With Honors 

Summa cum laude shall be granted to a student who has received a cumulative grade 
point average of 3.85 or higher. 

Magna cum laude shall be granted to a student who has received a cumulative grade 
point average of 3.7 or higher. 

Cum laude shall be granted to a student who has received a cumulative grade point 
average of 3.5 or higher. 

The College's criteria for eligibility to graduate with honors will be determined by a 
student's overall GPA at the end of the term prior to the last term of attendance. To be 
eligible, the student must have completed 45 letter-graded units at Mount St. Mary's 
College. The student's grade point average will be calculated on the basis of grades 
earned at Mount St. Mary's College and grades earned at transfer institutions. Courses 
at another institution after matriculation are not counted into the cumulative grade 
point average, with the exception of approved junior year abroad and exchange pro- 
grams. 

The Honors Program 

The Honors Program at Mount St. Mary's College is designed to give special challenges 
to students who have an outstanding high school GPA and SAT scores and/or who 
maintain a 3.4 or better cumulative college GPA. 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 59 



The Honors Program enables students to explore in greater depth and breadth various 
areas of study, with possibilities of completing their college work with alternative modes 
and approaches to learning. Students may select among courses specially designed for 
the Honors Program, honors sections of regularly offered courses, and courses or course 
components designed by contract with an instructor. All honors courses are designated 
with an H following the course number. 

Honors students may take as many honors courses as they choose. An honors certificate 
is awarded at graduation to students who have completed a minimum of 18 units of 
honors work, including at least two regularly scheduled honors courses, and repre- 
senting at least three disciplines. Included in the 18 units of honors work required for 
the certificate is a senior thesis which is a major research project of the student's 
choosing, involving at least two disciplines. The thesis work is supervised by two faculty 
sponsors. Presentation of the senior thesis is open to the college community. 



Special Academic Services 

Academic Advisement Center and Services 

The Chalon campus advisement program is coordinated through the Academic Advise- 
ment Center. All students are assigned a Faculty Advisor with whom they plan their 
academic programs. The advisor assists in clarifying the requirements in the general 
studies program and major department. Students meet with their advisor at least once 
each semester to register for classes. Entering students meet with a Faculty Advisor, 
are advised, and are registered at Pre-Orientation sessions for their first semester at 
the Mount. Pre-Orientation sessions are held on various dates over the summer months 
and include placement testing for all new freshmen and transfers. Out-of-area students 
are advised by the Advisement Center using mail, e-mail, phone and/or fax to complete 
the process. Information regarding Pre-Orientation is sent to new students after tuition 
deposits have been made. Students entering in the Spring semester should contact the 
Advisement Center for registration and placement testing information. 

To further serve the student's advisement needs, the Academic Advisement Center 
functions as a drop-in office for on-going guidance and referral services. Help in un- 
derstanding and following college policies is always available. The staff, along with 
student assistants, provides information on many aspects of college life and can clarify 
many academic procedures. 

Although the individual faculty advisors and the Advisement Center staff make every 
effort to provide advisement for the student, it is ultimately the student's responsibility 
to see that all procedures are followed and requirements fulfilled. 



Study Away 



As a traditional liberal arts college, Mount St. Mary's recognizes the value of the study 
away experience. Students who participate are given the opportunity to gain knowledge 
and cultural awareness as an integral part of their liberal arts education. The Mount 
allows qualified students to participate in three approved programs. These programs 
are the Washington Internship Semester, Study Abroad, and the Sisters of St. Joseph 



60 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



College Consortium Exchange. Each program provides students with unique and val- 
uable experiences at other institutions while earning Mount credit. 

Qualified students may study on one of these programs for one semester in their junior 
year. The minimum GPA requirement to participate is a cumulative 3.0. Students may 
pick up applications and course information in the Advisement Center. There are 
deadlines to file applications, and a Transfer of Credit form must also be completed. 
Finally, students who participate on one of these programs must attend an orientation 
session prior to enrolling. 

Mount St. Mary's College will fund students for one semester of study away. Students 
must complete the appropriate academic year Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) and have the information sent to Mount St. Mary's College as well as the 
Aid Renewal Request Form. Study Away students must follow the same deadlines as 
students not participating in the program. Students must provide the Office of Student 
Financing with a breakdown of costs for their semester. They will be reviewed as a 
"resident" student and their cost of housing will be taken into consideration during the 
analysis of their file. Study Away students do not qualify for Federal Work Study or 
Mount Work funds while away, but may be awarded work moneys when they return 
to campus. If a student receives any type of outside award, including a scholarship or 
stipend from their Study Away program, they must report it to the Office of Student 
Financing so it can be considered in the evaluation of their aid. Any questions regarding 
funding of Study Away programs should be directed to the Office of Student Financing. 

The GPA earned by a student on these programs is included in determining the stu- 
dent's overall GPA for the conferral of honors at graduation. Each program may have 
additional requirements, please consult the Advisement Center for more information. 

Washington Semester 

Mount St. Mary's College is affiliated with the American University in Washington, 
DC, so that Mount students can spend a semester in the nation's capitol and pursue 
study in one often areas: Economic Policy, Foreign Policy, International Business and 
Trade, International Environment and Development, Journalism, Justice, Museum 
Studies and the Arts, National Government, Peace and Conflict Resolution, and Public 
Law. To participate in the program students must be nominated by a full-time faculty 
member in their major department. 

Since a major portion of a Washington semester consists of internship experience, 
students who study in Washington are not normally permitted to enroll in additional 
internship units. 

Study Abroad 

Mount St. Mary's College offers students the opportunity to study abroad with the 
American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS). AIFS has programs in the following 
countries: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Czech Republic, England, France, Italy, Ja- 
pan, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, and Spain. Most countries provide students with 
intensive language classes and each has specific requirements regarding language 
fluency. 

There are a variety of courses offered on this program. Most courses are in the human- 
ities and social science areas. Biology, Biochemistry, and Chemistry majors will find 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 61 



an assortment of science and math courses offered in London, England. England also 
offers a variety of internships for qualified students. 

Sister of St. Joseph College Consortium Exchange 

Mount St. Mary's college is one of twelve Sisters of St. Joseph colleges. The consortium 
agreement allows students from the Mount to attend any of the other schools for one 
semester. The member schools are: Aquinas Junior College at Milton (MA), Avila 
College (MO), Chestnut Hill College (PA), Elms College (MA), Fontbonne College (MO), 
Mater Dei College (NY), Nazareth College (NY), Regis College (MA), The College of St. 
Catherine (MN), The College of St. Joseph (VT), and The College of Saint Rose (NY). 

The SSJCC Student Exchange Program allows students to take advantage of the rich 
learning experience of being with students from a different part of the country on a 
campus with unique academic resources. Each school offers students an enriching 
learning opportunity as well as increased exposure to faculty specialists and curricula. 

UCLA Cross-Registration Agreement 

Mount St. Mary's College has a Cross-Registration agreement with the University of 
California at Los Angeles (UCLA), the purpose of which is to supplement and enrich 
the MSMC academic program and to provide an opportunity for UCLA students to take 
Mount courses. Full-time Mount baccalaureate students who have sophomore, junior, 
or senior standing and a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or better may, with the 
permission of the college Registrar, take one undergraduate course at UCLA per se- 
mester, but no more than four courses toward the degree. No more than two such 
courses will count toward the MSMC residency requirement; courses taken at UCLA 
must not be among those available at MSMC. Courses taken at UCLA under this 
arrangement will be included in the student's load at the college, and except for specific 
course laboratory or studio fees, no additional tuition or fees will be charged. Trans- 
portation to such courses and parking fees are the responsibility of the student enrolled. 
For information and procedures, consult the Office of the Registrar on the Chalon 
campus. 

University of Judaism Cross-Registration Agreement 

Mount St. Mary's College has a Cross-Registration agreement with the University of 
Judaism, the purpose of which is to supplement and enrich the MSMC academic pro- 
gram and to provide an opportunity for U of J students to take Mount courses. The 
following conditions and requirements must be met: 

• The student must meet all prerequisites/criteria required for courses. 

• No visiting student may displace a student from the registration of a course at the 
student's home institution. 

• The student is responsible for obtaining all appropriate signatures and returning 
the completed form to the student's home institution. 

• The student is responsible for meeting all registration deadlines, regulations, and 
penalties of MSMC. 

• A student who wishes to withdraw from a course(s) must notify the Registrar at 
both MSMC and U of J. Students who do not formally withdraw will receive a 
grade of U or F. 



62 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



Student Affairs 



Mount St. Mary's College provides students with programs and experiences conducive 
to personal, cultural, ethical, social, physical, spiritual, and intellectual growth. Stu- 
dent initiative and responsibility are encouraged in an atmosphere of close interrelation 
among students, faculty, administration and staff. 

Orientation 

The Orientation program is designed to assist entering students with their transition 
to Mount St. Mary's College and to enhance their success at college. Typically scheduled 
for the weekend before classes begin, fall orientation provides students with opportun- 
ities to become more familiar with college services, policies and procedures. Orientation 
includes an introduction to both the academic and student life aspects of the college 
and provides for the interaction of new students with faculty, staff, and continuing 
students. Special meetings for commuter, international, re-entry, and transfer students 
are a part of the program. Separate activities for parents are included. During the 
weekend, placement testing, advisement, and course registration are available. Social 
activities such as an Associated Student Body (ASB) Coffee House, and an all-college 
barbecue will complement the weekend experience. Students entering for the spring 
semester are provided a one day orientation program. 

A one unit class, Introduction to College Studies, is taught in the fall and is required 
for students entering with 24 units or less. 

Student Activities 

The Student Activities Office provides students of Mount St. Mary's College with 
distinctive leadership opportunities for personal growth outside the classroom through 
participation in student government and numerous student clubs. 

The Associated Student Body (ASB) serves as the umbrella organization for all student 
clubs and organizations of the college. The ASB is comprised of the Executive Board, 
the Student Senate, the Student Activities Council (SAC), and the Inter-Club Council 
(ICC). 

The Executive Board oversees all student government bodies. The Student Senate 
provides students with the opportunity to participate in various college committees 
and to play an important role in the college's decision process. The Student Activities 
Council is responsible for ensuring a balanced calendar of activities as well as for 
sponsoring annual events such as Winter Formal, Multicultural Night-Spring Sing, 
Spring Formal, and Family Day. The Inter-Club Council facilitates information ex- 
change between the ASB and the formally recognized clubs and organizations. 

Leadership Program 

The Leadership program is designed to provide groups of students with opportunities 
to develop their potential leadership skills. It offers workshops and seminars on how 
to delegate authority, how to motivate groups of people, and how to provide constructive 
criticism and support. Leadership students not only study leadership techniques but 
have the opportunity to put them into practice. Students in the Leadership program 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 63 



are encouraged to enroll for internships related to their career goals. The Women's 
Leadership Program is a non-degree program, supplemental and open to all majors. 
See Social Sciences for course listings. 

Counseling and Psychological Services 

Counseling and psychological services are available to all students at Mount St. Mary's 
College. The services include crisis intervention, brief therapy, and referrals to appro- 
priate community-based professional. The Counseling Services exist to help students 
make the most of their education by fostering persona growth and emotional well- 
being. Students bring many types of concerns to the Counseling Center. Some examples 
include: 1) interpersonal problems with friends or families; 2) stressful life events such 
as living away from home for the first time, academic pressures, or the death of a loved 
one; 3) troublesome feelings such as anxiety, depression or guilt; and 4) concerns such 
as drug or alcohol use, low self-esteem, or an eating disorder. 

Students on the Chalon campus have access to a professional psychologist and coun- 
seling interns to discuss their concerns and work though their troubling issues. All 
sessions are confidential in keeping with professional ethics and state laws. 

Campus Ministry 

Campus Ministry Office seeks to develop and sustain awareness of the spiritual di- 
mension of life which is at the heart of the college's mission, assisting students, faculty, 
and staff to grow spiritually in accordance with their own religious traditions. Catholic 
in our roots and vision, we welcome the opportunity to be of service to persons of every 
religious persuasion of none at all, and commit ourselves to respect for the freedom of 
each person's conscience and unique path. 

The Campus Ministry team consists of a director, student program coordinators and 
office staff. Together, they are responsible for a number of areas: Liturgy (including 
Sunday Mass, reconciliation services and other prayer services); the Rite of Christian 
Initiation for Adults (for those who wish to become Catholic); preparation for Confir- 
mation, Eucharist and other sacraments; Bible Study and other educational efforts; 
retreats; campus festivities and observances (such as Hanukkah night, Advent dinners, 
Holocaust Remembrance Week); and community service opportunities, including ac- 
tion for social justice. Individual counseling and conversations are also available to any 
member of the campus community. 

The Student Placement Office 

The Student Placement Office offers a variety of services and employment opportunities 
for enrolled students. Job opportunities on campus are available in the library, the food 
service, the switchboard, faculty offices, and other places. Jobs are filled according to 
students' financial need and skill. Students interested in on-campus employment are 
encouraged to file applications early in the Financial Aid Office and in the Student 
Placement Office. Off-campus jobs, including seasonal and summer employment op- 
portunities, are posted on the Student Placement Office bulletin 



64 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



Career Center 

The Career Center provides the opportunity for students to find the major and career 
best suited for them by learning how to identity their unique skills, interests, values, 
and personality traits, and how to research the world of work. Students are encouraged 
to enroll in the one unit career planning course offered each fall semester. The Career 
Center includes a career library, job and internship listings and "Choices," a comput- 
erized career planning too. "Choices" is designed to help students explore career op- 
portunities, interests and skills. FANS (Friends and Alumnae Networking Systems), 
a computerized database consisting of over 400 alumnae in various careers who have 
offered to talk to students individually is also available in the Career Center. 

An annual career fair promoting volunteer and career opportunities is sponsored by 
the Career Center in addition to Alumnae Career Dinner Panels. Special services to 
students considering graduate school are also offered through the Career Center. 
Professional and graduate school catalogs, college fairs, and a faculty panel addressing 
graduate studies are offered. 

The Career Center staff consists of the Director of Career Planning and the Internship 
Coordinator. The Director is available for individual counseling appointments to assist 
students with skills assessment, resume writing, interviewing techniques, and job 
search methods. The Internship Coordinator fosters on-going relationships with a 
variety of organizations and corporations in order to develop internship opportunities 
for students. In addition, the Coordinator meets with students to provide them with 
information on available internships. 

Residence Life 

Primary emphasis in the residence halls is on a close interrelationship of full time 
students and staff to create a social situation which fosters the formation of personal 
values and integrity. On-campus living affords increased opportunities to develop per- 
sonal relationships and to participate in the many enriching programs which Mount 
St. Mary's College offers. Student resident life is largely self-regulated, under the 
direction of the Residence Life Staff which is composed of resident assistants, program 
assistants, and professional staff. 

The residence staff gives much time and attention to assigning rooms and roommates. 
They make every effort to provide a living/learning environment which will allow the 
student both privacy and the freedom to develop relationships conducive to social and 
educational growth. 

An off-campus housing referral listing is available through the Residence Life Office. 

Commuter Services 

A number of services are available designed specifically to meet commuter student 
needs. These services include: an off-campus housing referral service, lockers in the 
Humanities building, and a Commuter Club. For more information regarding these 
services please refer to the Student Handbook or contact the Student Activities office 
on the first floor of the Humanities Building. 

The Associated Student Body (ASB) provides a variety of opportunities for commuter 
students to become involved in student governing bodies and student clubs and organ- 
izations. ASB positions are open to all commuter students. There are two Commuter 






BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 65 



Senator positions on the Student Senate. These positions provide a communication 
channel through which commuters are able to give input and suggestions to the college 
in order to improve commuter student life. 

Student Health Services 

The Mount St. Mary's College Student Health Services Department offers a broad 
range of services to both resident and commuter students. These services include 
diagnosis and treatment of illness and minor injuries, physical examinations, health 
teaching, and laboratory testing. The Heath clinic on the chalon campus is staffed by 
physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and specially trained students. 

Emphasis is placed on preventive medicine and on positive health practices which will 
become a part of each student's lifestyle. Programs designed to assist students in 
developing values and skills related to achieving a high level of health are presented 
each semester. 

Incoming Freshman and transfer students, both resident and commuters, must submit 
a current health history and physical examination prior to entrance. Proof of current 
immunizations and TB skin testing are also required for admission. Additional health 
requirements exist for students enrolled in programs with clinical affiliations. 

Chalon students are eligible to use the student Health Clinic on the Chalon campus. 
Appointments may be made with physicians or nurses throughout the week. There is 
no cost to student for provider visits, however, supplemental fees for laboratory testing 
and medications may be assessed. Referrals for specialty services and emergency serv- 
ices will be made through the Chalon Health Clinic. 

All Full-time students are required to carry Health and Accident Insurance. Please see 
expense listings at the beginning of this catalog for additional information regarding 
health insurance available through Mount St. Mary's College. 

Learning Center 

In order to enable each student to achieve maximum benefit from the Academic pro- 
grams at the College, a Learning Center is available on the Chalon campus. The center 
provides tutoring, writing consultation, and structured study groups. Services are 
provided through the Institute for Student Academic Enrichment (ISAE) and the 
Learning Assistance Program. 

Learning Assistance Program 

The Learning Assistance Program seeks to promote curiosity, encourage receptivity to 
new ideas and promote the philosophy that learning is a life long process. To that end, 
the following services are offered: peer tutoring in all subject areas; workshops in study 
skills; books and computer tutorials to assist in developing skills; writing consultation; 
individual appointments; and a study skills class in "Becoming a Master Student" (SPR 
22). 



66 BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 



Scholar Mentor Program 

President's Scholars and Dean's List students and others recommended by their pro- 
fessor, may participate in the Scholar Mentor Program. Through this program students 
are trained as peer tutors and provide tutoring to other Mount student in a variety of 
subjects. Scholar Mentors may receive academic credit by enrolling in the Scholar 
Mentor Seminar (SPR 25). In addition, they may earn a bookstore stipend for training 
and tutoring hours. 

Student Support Services Project (ISAE - Institute 
for Student Academic Enrichment) 

This federally funded project is designed to assist students in achieving the maximum 
potential in higher education. On both campuses, the Student Support Services Project 
(ISAE Program) provides to eligible students academic advisement, peer tutoring, 
career and personal counseling, financial aid information, workshops, leadership, and 
cultural enrichment activities. 

Fitness Education 

Mount St. Mary's College is committed to graduating well-balanced women with a 
strong sense of self and physical well being. The Fitness Education Department offers 
two programs that compliment the academic program: the physical education courses, 
offered for academic credit; and the Smart Bodies wellness and fitness program. The 
two programs together provide students with the opportunity to attain, improve, and/ 
or maintain their physical fitness, attend informative workshops on wellness and fit- 
ness, acquire skills in lifetime sports, recreation, dance, martial arts, wellness and 
fitness, participate in recreational activities on or off the campus, and participate in 
intramural volleyball, basketball, and tennis programs. Facilities include a pool, fitness 
center equipped with cardiovascular and weight training equipment, and a tennis/ 
basketball/volleyball court. 

Re-entry Program 

The Re-entry Program provides support services to re-entering undergraduate student 
who have had a significant break in the education, or are just beginning their studies. 
Re-entry students are 25 years or older, and therefore, they are somewhat more mature 
than the average traditional student. They may have children and/or be working full- 
time while attending school. 

The Re-entry Program offers social and academic support. Services include a special 
one-day orientation geared to the returning student's lifestyle, study skills seminars, 
information and referral services, informal luncheon meetings, and on-going personal 
support from the Re-entry Coordinator. 

The Re-entry Program is housed in the Learning Center, on the second floor of the 
Humanities Building. 



GRADUATE DEGREE 67 



GRADUATE DEGREE 
PROGRAMS 

The liberal arts tradition and the Catholic nature of the college give direction to Mount 
St. Mary's College and, as it is an integral part of the college, to the graduate division. 
Graduate programs flow from the college mission statement and presuppose the com- 
ponents of a liberal arts education, as is evident in the following objectives, developed 
by the Graduate Council for the teaching and preparation of students at the graduate 
level. 

Women and men at the graduate level are prepared as leaders for society and are given 
the means as well as the confidence to: 

a. create and contribute to a society in which respect for individuals permeates 
all professional structures and personal interactions; 

b. assist those with whom they work to recognize and use their own talents, 
skills, and resources; 

c. envision and facilitate personal responsibility for the direction of society as it 
grows toward a greater global interaction, culturally, socially, and politically; 

d. expand one's own knowledge of and contribution to a field through the tools 
of research and academic development. 

Each graduate program, in ways appropriate to the preparation for a particular profes- 
sion, strives to attain these objectives by: 

a. individualized and personal advisement; 

b. careful curriculum planning and scheduling; 

c. selection of competent, caring faculty who are well prepared in their fields 
and sensitive to the needs of the adult student population; 

d. challenging students to investigate a wide range of related resources beyond 
those presented in classes; 

e. providing a welcoming environment that suggests harmony, peace and con- 
cern for the well-being of all persons. 

Programs in the graduate division include both the disciplinary and the professional 
masters degrees. Degree nomenclature appropriately reflects the type of degree. The 
degrees currently offered are: 

The Master of Arts in Religious Studies with Certificate 
Programs in: 

Advanced Religious Studies 
Hispanic Pastoral Ministry 
Pastoral Care/Counseling 
Youth and Young Adult Ministry 

(See Graduate Religious Studies section.) 



68 GRADUATE DEGREE 



The Master of Science in Education with concentrations in: 

Administrative Services 

Special Education: Mild/Moderate Disabilities 

Individually Designed Program 

Graduate Degree in Conjunction with Preliminary Multiple and 
Single Subject CLAD Emphasis Teaching Credential 

BCLAD Emphasis Credential 
CLAD Certificate 

(See Graduate Education section.) 

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology with 
concentrations in: 

Marriage, Family and Child Counseling 
Human Services 

(See Graduate Psychology section.) 
The Master of Physical Therapy 

The M.P.T. degree entry level program is 27 months in length and requires full-time 
study throughout the program. The curriculum is an integrated design which provides 
early clinical experiences to foster maximum development of the student's clinical 
reasoning skills. 

(See Physical Therapy section.) 



Admission Policies 



A student who holds a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, is 
eligible to apply for admission. The student's previous academic record must give 
evidence of the ability and the preparation necessary for successfully pursuing graduate 
study. The Admission decision will be based on an evaluation of the applicant's potential 
for success in the profession. 

Application 

Application procedures must be completed before or during the first semester of en- 
rollment. (For application procedures for Master of Physical Therapy admission see p. 
225). The applicant forwards the following, where applicable, to: 

The Graduate Division 
Mount St. Mary's College 
10 Chester Place 
Los Angeles, CA 90007-2598 



GRADUATE DEGREE 69 



1. Application and application fee. 

2 . Two official transcripts of all previous college work, both undergraduate and grad- 
uate, sent directly from each institution to the Graduate Office. These records 
should show, for upper division work, a minimum GPA of 3.0 for applicants to the 
Master of Arts in Religious Studies, and Master of Science in Education, and 2.75 
for applicants to Master of Science in Psychology programs. 

3. Two letters of recommendation from persons who have had ample opportunity to 
judge the applicant's academic ability, achievement and professional potential. 

a) For applicants for the M. A. in Religious Studies: Potential for graduate study 
in theology and potential in counseling or religious leadership in parish or 
school; or ministry in the Hispanic community. 

b) For applicants for the M. S. in Education: Appropriate professional potential 
in education, counseling, administration, or teaching in special education. 

c) For applicants for the M.S. in Counseling Psychology: Appropriate profes- 
sional potential as a counseling psychologist. 

4. Results of the Miller Analogies Test. 

5. An Admission interview with graduate faculty. 

6. Two copies of all teaching credentials held. (For all programs in education.) 

7. Results of the California Basic Educational Skills Test (for applicants for the M.S. 
in Education who are also 

applying for a credential). 

8. Tuberculosis (TB) clearance (for applicants for the M.S. in Education who are also 
applying for a teaching credential). 

9. Results of the TOEFL test, for applicants whose first language is other than 
English. A minimum score of 550 is required. 

Applicants from countries other than the United States: 

10. Must submit results of the TOEFL test (for applicants whose first language is 
other than English). A minimum score of 550 is required. 

1 1 . Must have their transcripts sent to a credential evaluation service for equivalency 
evaluation. (Special application forms are provided.) 

12. Must submit a notarized statement guaranteeing financial support during the 
period of study at Mount St. Mary's College. 

13. May obtain further details published in "Information for Prospective Graduate 
Students From Other Countries," included with the application forms. 

Admission and Acceptance 

Upon final approval by the Graduate Dean, an applicant is admitted into a graduate 
department. 

An applicant may take course work for one semester before official acceptance into the 
graduate division, but may not register for a second semester if all application proce- 
dures have not been completed. No more than nine units taken at Mount St. Mary's 
College before acceptance into a program may be applied to the degree program. 

After all requirements for admission have been fulfilled, an official departmental ac- 
ceptance notice is sent directly to the applicant. Acceptance is determined by the action 



70 GRADUATE DEGREE 



of the Graduate Dean and the Departmental Advisor or when appropriate, the Grad- 
uate Council. 

In the event that the applicant's undergraduate record does not include all of the 
required courses or a satisfactory grade point average, supplementary undergraduate 
work may be required to fulfill the prerequisites of the major department. 

After official acceptance into a graduate degree program, masters degree students may 
apply for financial aid from the Financial Aid Office of Mount St. Mary's College. 



Academic Policies 

Residence and Time Limit 

After acceptance into a degree program the student is expected to remain continuously 
enrolled in each regular semester up to and including the semester in which the degree 
is awarded. The degree must be earned within seven years. 

A graduate student who is eligible but who chooses not to enroll continuously may 
petition for a leave of absence for a specified period of time (no more than three con- 
secutive semesters.) At the end of the period of leave the student may enroll without 
filing an application for re-admission. After a lapse of time extending beyond the leave, 
the student will follow the same procedures as those for new applicants. An exception 
to this policy is made for the student who has completed all required courses and units 
except the final research project or thesis, if the course is not being offered during the 
final semester. 

Unit Load 

The number of semester units of work taken in the respective semesters or summer 
sessions is determined in consultation with departmental advisors. The number of 
semester units for a full time load is six (6) semester units, with the exception of Physical 
Therapy which requires sixteen and a half (16 1/2) semester units. 

Student Responsibility 

Students are held individually responsible for information contained in the College 
catalog. Failure to read and understand these policies and regulations will not excuse 
students from their observance. In addition they are responsible for the information 
contained in the official Class Schedules and other data sent from the Graduate Office. 
College catalogs are available in the Graduate Office, and students are advised to obtain 
and keep their catalogs. 

Graduation 

Application for Graduation: Candidates for the Masters degree file a formal degree 
application and pay the required fee at the beginning of their final semester. The specific 
date for this application is published in the current Graduate College calendar. 

It is the responsibility of the student to apply for graduation. Forms are available in 
the Doheny Registrar's Office and include the application. The application must be 



GRADUATE DEGREE 71 



signed by the advisor. The graduation fee is required, in order for the degree to be 
awarded, regardless of attendance at the graduation ceremonies. The candidate should 
check with the advisor to see if all requirements have been met. 

Education Credential candidates are responsible for submitting Credential applica- 
tions to MSMC Department of Education for processing. 

Graduation Exercises: Candidates receiving degrees are invited to participate in the 
Graduation Exercises. These ceremonies are held each year at the end of the spring 
semester. All graduates who have completed their programs since the previous spring 
are included in the exercises of Hooding and Commencement. 

Readmission of Students Who Have Already 
Completed a Graduate Degree 

Graduates who wish to enroll for another credential or degree will follow the same 
procedure as new applicants. New recommendations and other records may be re- 
quired, depending upon changed circumstances. An application fee is not charged 
unless a period of five or more years has elapsed since the completion of the previous 
program. 

Non Degree-Seeking Graduate Students (Unclassified 
Status) 

Students who hold bachelors' degrees from accredited colleges or universities are eli- 
gible to take courses for unit credit at the college without the intention of pursuing a 
graduate degree or credential. They may take either undergraduate courses in subjects 
of special interest or graduate courses for which they are qualified. 

Students complete registration forms, complete an application form, and may be re- 
quired to provide evidence of possessing a baccalaureate degree at the time of registra- 
tion. Their registration is approved by the departmental advisor. They are expected to 
observe the prevailing standards of scholarship and attendance. 

If, after taking courses at the college, a student should become an applicant for a degree, 
a limited number of graduate credit courses (no more than nine units) may be applied 
to the individual degree program, after the student has been admitted to the Graduate 
Division. These courses must satisfy the requirements of the program and meet the 
approval of the program advisor and the Graduate Dean. 

Course Numbers 

Although all of the work counted toward the masters degree is of a distinctly advanced 
character, not all of the courses need be taken from the 200-level. With the approval of 
the graduate advisor in the major field, upper division courses suitable for a well- 
rounded program may be included, provided that the student earns at least a grade of 
"B". A maximum of upper division units that may be included are nine semester units 
for the Master of Science in Education degree. 



72 GRADUATE DEGREE 



Grading Policies 
Grades 

The grade point average for all work presented for an advanced degree or credential 
must be at least 3.0 or B average. A required course in which a grade of D or F has been 
received must be repeated. See specific program requirements for exceptions 

The student's grade point average is computed according to this scale: 

A 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C 2.0 

C- 1.7 

D 1.0 

F 0.0 

The following grades are not computed in the GPA: 

AU audit 

CR credit given (see below) 

I incomplete (see below) 

IP in progress: deferred grading for graduate thesis or field experience 

NC no credit given (see below) 

R course was repeated at later date 

U unauthorized withdrawal 

W withdrawn 

Credit/No Credit 

CR/NC ordinarily applies only to the Supervised Field Experience in graduate pro- 
grams. For field experience and supervised teaching offered by the Education, Coun- 
seling Psychology, and Physical Therapy Departments, CR signifies "B" or better work. 

Incomplete 

An Incomplete is given only when a student: 

1. has fulfilled the majority of the course requirements; 

o 

2. has a passing grade in the classwork; 

3. is prevented from completing the assigned work for serious reasons; 

4. has consulted the instructor prior to the grading period; 

5 . has been assessed by the instructor that he/she can realistically complete the work 
within one semester. 

A student requesting an incomplete must file a petition for incomplete with the sig- 
nature of the instructor and the department chairperson prior to the day of the final 



GRADUATE DEGREE 73 



exam. The instructor will assign a default grade when approving an incomplete. This 
default grade will be recorded on the student's transcript when a completed grade is 
not assigned by the instructor and/or an extension of the incomplete is not processed. 
An incomplete may only be extended for one additional semester with the approval of 
the instructor, the department chairperson, and the appropriate academic dean. (Stu- 
dents may not be given more than two semesters to complete any course.) 

In Progress (IP) 

When an In Progress (IP) is given in the Masters Seminar or final project, the candidate 
shall have one semester after the time of registration for the course within which to 
complete the course or project. 

Repetition of courses with C-/D/F/NC grades 

Only courses for which unacceptable grades specified by the different programs were 
assigned may be repeated for a higher grade or CR. Courses may only be repeated once. 
In cases of repeated courses, the units are counted once and the higher grade computed 
in the GPA. Required courses for which unacceptable grades are assigned must be 
repeated, if the student is eligible to remain in the program. 

Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six semester units of graduate work taken in an accredited graduate 
program is transferable to Mount St. Mary's College, provided that: 

1. the transfer courses satisfy curriculum requirements at Mount St. Mary's College 
and a grade of "B" or better was earned; 

2. the courses are transferred after the student has been accepted into the program 
and prior to the last semester of graduate study; transfer credit forms are available 
in the Graduate Office; 

3. correspondence and extension courses are not transferable; 

4. courses must have been taken within seven years of the date on which the student 
was accepted in a Mount St. Mary's College graduate program. 

Once admitted to a graduate program students are expected to pursue study only at 
Mount St. Mary's College. (For credential students, the Ryan Act requires residency in 
one college program.) 

Unauthorized Withdrawal 



The grade "U" indicates that an enrolled student neither withdrew nor completed 
course requirements, thus making normal evaluation of academic performance impos- 
sible. A grade of "U" is not computed in the student's GPA. 



74 GRADUATE DEGREE 



Withdrawal From Courses 

The grade "W" indicates withdrawal from a course, according to the following policy: 

Withdrawal (W) indicates that the student was permitted to withdraw from a class 
during the period scheduled on the college calendar with the approval of the instructor 
and advisor. After the scheduled date, petition to the Graduate Dean is required. The 
"W" carries no connotation of quality of student performance and is not calculated in 
the grade point average. 

Withdrawal from Programs 

When students withdraw from a graduate program they must file a withdrawal notice 
in the Graduate Office. 

Probation 

Failure of a graduate degree or credential student to maintain a 3.0 GPA (2.50 for 
Master of Physical Therapy students) places the student on probation. The student 
will be notified in writing from the Office of the Dean regarding the probation. A student 
on probation must achieve a GPA of 3.0 or higher (except for MPT students) during the 
next two semesters in order to be reinstated to regular standing and may be required 
to take fewer units of work while on probation. See individual departments for specific 
probation policies. 

Dismissal 

A student is subject to dismissal for failure to maintain a 3.0 GPA (2.50 for Master of 
Physical Therapy students) during the probationary period. The Graduate Dean and/ 
or the Graduate Council has the authority to dismiss students and to suspend dismissal. 

Petitions 

A petition may be submitted to cover certain exceptions to stated policies. A petition 
may not be retroactive, but must be submitted before the exception is to be considered. 

Grievance Procedure 

Copies of Mount St. Mary's College Graduate Student Bill of Rights and Grievance 
Procedure are available upon request at the Graduate Office. 



The Graduate Council 

The Graduate Council is an advisory body, composed of the graduate program directors 
and the Graduate Dean, whose function is to recommend modifications or changes in 
graduate policy to the Academic Vice President. The main objectives of the Graduate 
Council are to promote excellence in research and scholarship beyond the undergrad- 
uate level and to strengthen existing graduate programs. Among their concerns are 
admission standards, degree requirements, faculty appointments, and program review 
and approval. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 75 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Designation of Credits and Courses 

Courses numbered 1-99 are lower division courses, generally taken by freshmen and 
sophomores; those numbered 100-199 are upper division courses, generally taken by 
juniors and seniors, or majors. In order to enroll in any upper division course a student 
must first successfully complete English 1A and IB, or English 5H. Lower division 
courses may be taken for upper division credit with the permission of the instructor 
and appropriate adjustment in course requirements. Credit for courses whose course 
numbers include the letter X may not be applied to the baccalaureate degree. 

Courses numbered 200-299 are graduate level; those numbered 300-399 are profes- 
sional courses and those between 340-349 are professional credit courses which may 
be submitted for equivalency evaluation to be applied to a credential or masters pro- 
gram. 

Courses listed as upper division/graduate (100/200) may be taken for either. 

Courses approved for fulfillment of the General Studies Curriculum requirements are 
identified after the course description in each department: 

GS-IA Written Communication Skills 

GS-IB Oral Communication Skills 

GS-II Critical Thinking 

GS-IIIA Art or Music 

GS-IIIB Literature 

GS-IIIC History 

GS-IHD Natural and Physical Sciences 

GS-IIIE Mathematics 

GS-IIIF Social and Behavioral Sciences 

GS-IIIG Contemporary Economics or Politics 

GS-IV Foreign Language 

GS-VA1 Religious Studies: Scripture 

GS-VA2 Religious Studies: Christian Thought 

GS-VA3 Religious Studies: Christian Ethics 

GS-VA4 Religious Studies: Religion and Religions 

GS-VB1 Philosophy: Philosophical Ideas 

GS-VB2 Philosophy: Ethics 

GS-VB3 Philosophy: Other 

GS-VI Multicultural Perspectives 

After the last day to add a course as published in the schedule of classes, no 
changes may be made respective to the level of study. 

The college also offers workshops, seminars, and classes for CEU's (Continuing Edu- 
cational Units). All records of study and transcripts will be processed through the 
National Registry for Continuing Education with the American College Testing pro- 
gram. 



76 AMERICAN STUDIES 



American Studies 

Interdepartmental 

What is distinctive about American culture? What are the developing trends in Amer- 
ican society, in public policy, in consumer-behavior? What values do Americans treas- 
ure? The major in American Studies provides opportunity to focus on the influences of 
the past and present which affect American character, experience, and institutions. 

This major, comprising courses from several disciplines, especially History, English, 
Political Science, Sociology, Business, and Art, is particularly valuable to students 
considering careers in government service, business, finance, management, politics, 
writing, teaching, and law. 

Double majors that combine American Studies with English, History, or Political Sci- 
ence are possible and encouraged. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in American 
Studies 

The principal criterion for determining whether a course is applicable to an American 
Studies major is that it gives insight into American thought and culture: the nation's 
history, social structure, politics, commerce, all that comprises "The American Expe- 
rience," including its reflection in literature, art, and music. 

Many regularly offered courses clearly fulfill this requirement and are listed as Inter- 
disciplinary Electives in the following sections. Other courses that a department may 
occasionally offer will also apply, with approval of the American Studies Program 
Director. 

A minimum of thirty-six units in American Studies is required. To ensure a wide 
exploration of the American Experience, at least three upper division courses must be 
taken in the humanities (literature, philosophy, art) and three in the social sciences 
(history, political science, sociology, economics). 



Interdisciplinary Electives 



Business Foundations & Analysis (3,3) 
Intro to Business Ethics (3) 
Money, Politics and Business (3) 
Women's Issues in Business & Economics (3) 
Marketing Management (3) 
Principles of Advertising (3) 
Issues of Corporate Responsibility (3) 
Women at Work: Multicultural Management- 
Legal Issues (3) 
BUS 185 Managing Organizations (3) 



iness 

BUS4AB 


BUS 92 


BUS 133 


BUS 140 


BUS 160 


BUS 161 


BUS 169 


BUS 178 



AMERICAN STUDIES 77 



English 



ENG26 


Literature of the American West 


(3) 


ENG 126 


The American Experience 


(3) 


ENG 145 


American Literature: Beginnings to 1914 


(3) 


ENG 146 


American Literature: 1914 to Present 


(3) 


History 

HIS 171 


U.S.: Revolutionaries and Constitutionalists 


(3) 


HIS 173 


U. S. Civil War and Reconstruction 


(3) 


HIS 178 


Diplomatic History of the U. S. 


(3) 


HIS 179 


Constitutional History of the U. S. 


(3) 


HIS 180 


Current Constitutional History 


(3) 


HIS 181 


Modern Presidential History 


(3) 


HIS 188 


California History 


(3) 


HIS 190 


History of Women in the Americas 


(3) 


Philosophy 

PHI 92 


Introduction to Business Ethics 


(3) 


PHI 134 


American Philosophy 


(3) 


PHI 168A 


Contemporary Moral Problems 


(3) 


PHI 168B 


Bioethics 


(3) 


PHI 170 


Social and Political Philosophy 


(3) 


PHI 174 


Aesthetics 


(3) 


PHI 175 


Philosophy of Film 


(3) 


PHI 179 


Women and Values 


(3) 


Political Science 






POL1 


American Government & Institutions 


(3) 


POL 5 


Business Law 


(3) 


POL 108 


American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


POL 109 


Individual Rights 


(3) 


POL 116 


Democracy and Democratic Theory 


(3) 


POL 125 


Foreign Relations of the U. S. 


(3) 


POL 170 


American Party Politics 


(3) 


POL 171H 


Presidents and Personalities 


(3) 


POL 180 


State and Local Government 


(3) 


POL 186 


Intro to Public Administration 


(3) 


POL 191 


Internship in Government Service 


(3) 


Sociology 






SOC 104 


The Family 


(3) 


SOC 110 


Deviant Behavior: Juvenile Delinquency 




SOC 112 


Contemporary Medical Issues in Society 


(3) 


SOC 125 


Comparative Social Structures 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 175 


Urban Sociology 


(3) 



78 AMERICAN STUDIES 



SOC 180 Social Stratification (3) 

SOC189 Sociology of Aging (3) 

SOC 190 Social Change (3) 

SOC 195 Sociology of Religion (3) 

Total Units in American Studies: 36 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 

The Minor in American Studies 

A minimum of six courses that meet the American Studies criteria described above. 
Courses are described in the respective departmental listings. 



ART 79 



Art 



The art major is directed toward several goals. It provides the undergraduate student 
with a thorough and comprehensive understanding of art as an essential human activ- 
ity. It prepares students who wish to continue as professional artists, teachers, or in a 
related field. 

The BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ART offers the students thorough course 
experiences which include drawing, design, painting, photography, printmaking, sculp- 
ture, ceramics, computer graphics, and art history. 

Art courses are offered on both campuses which enrich the liberal arts experience for 
the student and expand the general studies offerings. 

Courses Required for a BA Degree in Art 

Lower Division Prerequisites: 

ART1 Drawing I (3) 

ART 2 Design I (3) 

ART 4 Painting I (3) 

ART 11 Printmaking (3) 

ART 12 Ceramics I (3) 

ART 14 Computer Graphics (3) 

One course from the following: 

ART 170 History of Art: Ancient thru Medieval (3) 

ART 171 History of Art: Renaissance thru Romanticism (3) 

ART 172 History of Art: The Modern World (3) 

ART 1 73 History of Art: Multiculturalism and 

the Visual Arts (3) 

ART 174 History of Art: Woman in Contemporary Art (3) 

Upper Division Required Courses: 

ART 106 Design II (3) 

ART 122 Drawing II (Figure) (3) 

Four additional upper division courses in Art: (12) 

All majors must complete ART 193 (3) Senior Projects and 
Exhibitions in their final semester. 

Total units in Art: 42 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirements. 



80 ART 

The Minor in Art 

A minimum of six courses (18 units) in Art: 

Required Courses: 

ART1 Drawing I (3) 

ART 2 Design I (3) 

ART 4 Painting I (3) 

One course from the following: 

ART 170 History of Art: Ancient thru Medieval (3) 

ART 171 History of Art: Renaissance thru Romanticism (3) 

ART 172 History of Art: The Modern World (3) 

ART 173 History of Art: Multiculturalism and the 

Visual Arts (3) 

ART 174 History of Art: Woman in Contemporary Art (3) 

Any two additional courses (6 units) in Art: 
Total units in Art: 18 



The Minor in Art History 



A minimum of six courses (18 units) from the following including one 
Art course: 

ART 5 Fundamentals of Art (3) 

ART 170 History of Art: Ancient thru Medieval (3) 

ART 171 History of Art: Renaissance thru Romanticism (3) 

ART 172 History of Art: Modern World (3) 

ART 173 Multiculturalism and the Visual Arts (3) 

ART 174 Woman in Contemporary Art (3) 

ART 175 Critical Theories in the Visual Arts (3) 

ART 199 Independent Study: Research 

Paper in Art History (3) 

One additional course in Studio Art 
Total units in Art: 18 

The Minor in Graphic Design 

A minimum of six courses (18 units) from the following: 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



ART1 


Drawing I 


ART 2 


Design I 


ART 10 


Photography I 


ART 15 


Computer Graphics I 


ART 102 


Design II 


ART 115 


Computer Graphics II 



ART 81 



ART 130 
ART 131 
ART 135 
BUS 160 

Total units in Art: 18 



Graphic Communication 
Graphic Production 
Graphic Arts Internship 
Marketing Management 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



Mount St. Mary's College Associate Arts program in Graphic Design will prepare the 
diligent student for a career in the contemporary Graphic Design world. At the end of 
the two year program students will be prepared to present a portfolio for presentation 
that will show competence which will include desk top publishing, graphic production, 
visual communication, all with an emphasis in visual literacy. Competence with com- 
puter literacy will be central to the program. 

The A.A, Degree Program in Graphic Design 

Adherence to the sequential listing below is strongly advised for timely completion of 
the A.A. degree. Slight variations may be made for individual needs with permission 
of the advisor. 

Degree Requirements: 
First Year Fall 

Drawing I Art I (3) 
Design I Art 2 (3) 
Art Fundamentals Art 5 (3) 
Second Year Fall 

Design II Art 102 (3) 

Illustration Art 133 (3) 

Graphic Communication Art 130 (3) 

Total Units 34-36 



First Year Spring 

Drawing II Art 164 (3) 
Computer Graphics I Art 15 (3) 
Photography I Art 10 (3) 
Second Year Spring 
Computer Graphics II Art 115 (3) 
Graphic Production ART 131 (3) 
Graphic Art Internship* Art 135 (1-3) 



*Graphic Arts Internship may be taken either Fall and/or Spring of second year. Plus 
additional General Studies requirements and electives totaling 60 semester units. 

ALL ART COURSE MARKED WITH A * (lab) WILL HAVE A $25.00 LAB FEE 



*ART1 Drawing I (3) 

Development of basic drawing skills. Em- 
phasis on fundamentals of form, structure, 
and composition. Various black and white 
media are explored. 

♦ART 2 Design I (3) 

An investigation of the elements and prin- 
ciples of design through specific visual 
problems. Color theories are explored and 
subsequent interaction of color is studied 
through application. 

*ART3 Visual Thinking (3) 

Exploring the use of visual imagery as a 
form of communication and problem solv- 
ing. Right brain thinking and the creative 
process will be considered. Understanding 



the language of vision and developing skills 
pertaining to the use of these visual ele- 
ments and principles of design will be em- 
phasized. The course seeks to develop a 
broader sense of self and the potential for 
using visual thinking as an alternate mode 
of knowing. It complements analytical 
skills and is applicable to creative problem 
solving in all disciplines. 
In addition to completing the requirements 
for ART 3, students taking Visual Thinking 
for upper division credit will be assigned 
additional readings and will be required to 
submit a specific project reflecting the ap- 
plication of course concepts to a particular 
situation. GS-IDA. 



82 ART 



*ART4 Painting I (3) 

The development of skills relative to com- 
position, color and other structural ele- 
ments of painting. Primarily acrylic paint 
will be used although various materials can 
be considered. Building a stretcher bar and 
stretching canvas will be included. 

♦ART 5 Fundamentals of Art (3) 

Illustrated lecture through the use of slides 
and videos on the development of art forms 
from around the world. History from earli- 
est time periods through to contemporary 
life. Various modes of painting, sculpture, 
architecture, and crafts will be studied. A 
few of the classes will be devoted to a hands 
on exploration of some of these art forms. 
GS-IHA,VI 

*ART10 Photography I (3) 

A laboratory and theory course introducing 
techniques of shooting, developing, and 
printing. The art department will loan 
35mm camera's to students with a need. 

*ART11 Printmaking I (Intaglio) (3) 

A laboratory course involving intaglio, col- 
lagraph, and relief printing processes. His- 
torical development and the aesthetic value 
of the print image will be considered. Cre- 
ative experimentation with materials and 
technique is emphasized. 

*ART12 Ceramics I (3) 

Beginning course with emphasis on gaining 
skills through manipulation and facility of 
the material clay. Students will be intro- 
duced to and complete projects with glaze. 
Personal development of visual concepts 
through given projects will be encouraged. 

*ART15 Computer Graphics (3) 

Computer Graphics I will introduce the stu- 
dent to the Macintosh computer as both a 
tool and a medium. As with other media, 
design concepts and theories will be taught 
simultaneously with technical proficiency. 
The course encourages the investigation of 
graphic problems as they pertain to stu- 
dent's individual field of study. Differing 
philosophical and ideological perspectives 
will be integrated. 



ART 94 Study/Travel 



(1-6) 



♦ART 99 Special Experience (3) 

An individually designed course combining 
field experience with studio projects. May 
be repeated for credit. 



♦ART 102 Design II (3) 

The application of the elements and prin- 
ciples of design to further the development 
of creative ideas. Includes graphic proc- 
esses and techniques. Introduction to ty- 
pography and 3D design along with a fur- 
ther understanding of color. Prerequisite: 
ART2 

♦ART 115 Computer Graphics II 

Advanced skill using Quark, Illustrator, 
Photoshop. Emphasis will be on develop- 
ment of concept related to the combination 
of image and text along with production 
output. Prerequisite: ART 15 

♦ART130AB Graphic 

Co mmuni cation (3,3) 

The development of visual ideas for the pur- 
pose of communication. A variety of tech- 
niques and graphic processes will be ex- 
plored. Students will develop visual images 
relative to social, industrial, and institu- 
tional concerns. Prerequisite: ART 2 

♦ART 131 Graphic Production 

Portfolio development stressing the indi- 
vidual students direction in the field of 
graphics. Emphasis will be on output that 
is of professional quality for presentation in 
the current marketplace. Prerequisite: en- 
rollment in Graphics AA or permission of 
advisor. 

♦ART 133AB Illustration (3,3) 

The study of contemporary illustrators and 
their work for both content and style in pub- 
lications and media. Emphasis is placed on 
developing skills applicable to illustrations 
and communicating your ideas with a con- 
vincing message and technique. Assign- 
ments may cover such things as CD covers, 
book jackets, and stories or magazine arti- 
cles. Prerequisite: ART 1 and ART 164. 

ART 135 Graphic Art 

Internship (1-3) 

Development of skills in the graphic arts as 
used in contemporary electronic printing, 
or Other modes of printing as interest dic- 
tates. Emphasis will be on design, layout, 
and copy production and the step-by-step 
preparation of artwork from design to 
press. Prerequisite: ART 2. 

♦ART 136 Visual Thinking II (3) 

The further development of skills and un- 
derstanding pertaining to the use of visual 
thinking as a method of creative problem 



ART 83 



solving. Emphasis will be placed on concep- 
tual development, presentation and verbal 
analysis. The application of the visual ele- 
ments and principles of all art will continue. 
Prerequisite: ART 3. 

*ART 139ABC Media: Practices and 
Possibilities II (3,3,3) 

In depth projects in one or more audio vis- 
ual mediums. 

*ART145 Arts and Crafts in the 

Classroom (1-3) 

A variety of skills for elementary and sec- 
ondary grades to demonstrate arts or crafts 
activities to the group. Students become ac- 
quainted with classroom methods. They 
will use art education processes as a 
method to enhance reading, writing, arith- 
metic, and social studies. Students inves- 
tigate problems such as group and individ- 
ual motivation, self-motivation, and 
attitudes of self expression typical of differ- 
ent ages and temperaments. Requirement 
for single subject credential in Art. 

*ART 146 Three-Dimensional 

Design (3) 

An introduction into basic design vocabu- 
lary and concepts through the use of excit- 
ing use of basic materials to explore three- 
dimensional form and space. A variety of 
materials will be explored that are directly 
applicable to this exploration. 

*ART149 Sculpture I (3) 

An introduction into basic sculpture pro- 
cesses and techniques. Emphasis on the 
creative development of three-dimensional 
form in space. A variety of materials includ- 
ing industrial and alternative will be ex- 
plored. 

*ART 150 ABC Photography n (3,3,3) 

The further development of camera and 
dark-room techniques. Emphasis will be 
placed on the study and creative use of con- 
trolled lighting. Advanced students will ex- 
plore contemporary photo processes. Per- 
sonal direction and the development of 
photography as an art form will be empha- 
sized. Prerequisite: ART 10. 

*ART 151 ABC Printmaking II (3,3,3) 

Further development of printmaking skills 
including etching, photoetching, lithogra- 
phy, and color printing. Personal direction 
will be encouraged. Prerequisite: ART 11. 



*ART159ABC Sculpture II (3,3,3) 

Advanced problems which encourage con- 
ceptual development and technical control. 
Individual direction and choice of materials 
are encouraged. Prerequisite: ART 149. 

*ART162ABC Ceramics II (3,3,3) 

Development of personal vocabulary will be 
emphasized. Sequential addition of new 
skills coupled with refinement of existing 
skills. Emphasis will be on learning the pot- 
ters wheel. Glaze formulation and kiln op- 
eration will be introduced. Individual direc- 
tion through selective problems will be 
encouraged. Prerequisite: ART 12. 

♦ART 164 ABC Drawing II (Figure) 

(3,3,3) 

Drawing from life in various media, pre- 
ceded by introductory anatomical studies. 
The accurate and creative use of the figure 
in composition will be an objective of the 
course. Advanced students will concentrate 
on composition and individual development 
using the figure. Prerequisite: ART 1. 

*ART166ABC Painting H (3,3,3) 

Contemporary modes of painting will be ex- 
plored and traditional approaches re-ex- 
amined. Emphasis will be on the further 
development of skills and techniques. Var- 
ious painting materials will be investi- 
gated. Individual problems in painting will 
be coordinated. Prerequisite: ART 4. 

ART 170 History of Art: Ancient thru 
Medieval (3) 

Illustrated lecture. Art from the prehistor- 
ical period to 1400 A.D., including Egypt, 
Greece, Rome, and the late middle ages. Re- 
lationships of painting, sculpture, and ar- 
chitecture to the social and cultural envi- 
ronment. GS-IIIA 

ART 171 History of Art: Renaissance 
thru Romanticism (3) 

Illustrated lecture. The arts in Europe from 
1400 to 1850. Study of major styles and art- 
ists including Michelangelo, Rubens, Rem- 
brandt, Delacroix, and their relationship to 
their culture. GS-IIIA 

ART 172 History of Art: Modern 

World (3) 

Illustrated lecture. Major art movements 
and personalities from 1850 to the present, 
including Impressionism, Cubism, Surre- 
alism, the Mexican muralists, Abstract 
Expressionism, and current trends. Em- 
phasis on the cultural trends which provide 



84 ART 



the visual and theoretical background of 
contemporary art. GS-IIIA 

ART 173 Multiculturalism and the 

Visual Arts (3) 

Illustrated lecture and discussion. A study 
of art from the diverse cultures which make 
up the pluralistic character of the United 
States. African American, Asian, Hispanic 
and Native American art will be examined 
along with the contemporary social and cul- 
tural implications. GS-IIIA,VI 

ART 174 Women in Contemporary 

Art (3) 

Illustrated lecture and discussion. An art 
history course that will include woman as 
artist and also the position of the female 
vis-a-vis the art world. It is a study of 
woman in the arts that considers the his- 
tory of woman artist in a social, political 
and economic context. This course can ful- 
fill a Women's Studies minor requirement. 
GS-IIIA 

ART 175 Critical Theories in the 

Visual Arts: Seminar (3) 

A systematic approach to art theory, criti- 
cism, and evaluation. Includes visits to mu- 
seums, galleries, and exhibits. Lecture and 



discussion. Prerequisite: Major or minor in 
art (upper division) 

*ART 90/190 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

ART 191 Directed Readings (1-3) 

*ART 193 Senior Project and 

Exhibition (3) 

Open to all graduating seniors majoring 
and minoringin art. Students will complete 
and coordinate a holding of work to be ex- 
hibited and documented in a slide portfolio. 
The course includes the installation and all 
organization aspects of the exhibition to be 
held in Jose Drudis-Biada Art Gallery. Pre- 
requisite: Major in Art. 



ART 195 Internship 



(1-3) 



ART196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

*ART199 Independent Study (1-3) 
Advanced individual problems. May be re- 
peated for credit. 



BIOCHEMISTRY 85 



Biochemistry 

Departmental Affiliation: Physical Sciences and Mathematics 

The major in biochemistry offers the student an interdisciplinary study of chemistry, 
biology, mathematics and physics. It provides excellent preparation for all graduate 
work/research in biochemistry and the molecular sciences, and professional areas lead- 
ing into the health sciences. 

Courses Required for a B.S. Degree in Biochemistry 



Lower Division: 

BIOIAB 

CHE1AB 

CHE 1AL/1BL 

CHE6AB 

CHE 6AL/6BL 

MTH3AB 

PHY11AB 

orPHYlAB 

PHY1BL 



Biological Dynamics (4,4) 

General Chemistry (3,3) 

General Chemistry Laboratory (1,1) 

Organic Chemistry (3,3) 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1,1) 

Calculus IA/IB (4,4) 
Mechanics/Electricity, Magnetism and Optics (4,3) 
Introductory Physics IA/IB 

Physics Laboratory (1) 



(MTH 38, Probability and Statistics, and MTH 9 or 9H, Introduction 
to Computer Processes, are recommended courses.) 



Division: 






BIO 130 


Genetics 


(4) 


BIO 152 


Cell and Molecular Physiology 


(4) 


CHE 107 


Biochemistry 


(3) 


CHE 107L 


Biochemistry Laboratory 


(1) 


CHE 109 


Advanced Biochemistry 


(3) 


CHE 110AB 


Physical Chemistry 


(4,3) 


CHE 111 


Physical Chemistry Laboratory 


(2) 


CHE 120 


Instrumental Methods 


(3) 


or CHE 130 


Biochemical Methods 


(3) 


CHE 199 


Research 


(3) 



Plus one course from the following: BIO 105, BIO 125, BIO 135, BIO 
151, BIO 180. 

Total units in chemistry, biology, mathematics, and physics: 73 



Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units. An overall 
grade point average of 2.0 in major courses is required for the degree. Courses are 
described in the respective department listings. 



86 BIOCHEMISTRY 



Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Preparation 
Biochemistry Major with a B.S. Degree 

Medical schools accept students from any degree program. A strong background in 
science, including chemistry, biology and mathematics, is recommended for successful 
performance on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) and for admission to 
medical programs. Successful completion of the B.S. degree with a major in biochem- 
istry provides excellent preparation for medical, dental or pharmaceutical studies. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 87 



Biological Sciences 



Students in the Department of Biological Sciences may elect to major in one or more of 
the following options: Biology, Pre-medical, Pre-dental, Pre-veterinary Programs, and 
Pre-Physical Therapy. 

A molecular biology tract will be offered in each of the emphasis areas under the B.S. 
degree in Biological Sciences. This tract will increase in depth of knowledge and labo- 
ratory experiences throughout all four years of the program. All courses within the 
B.S. degree programs will address molecular biology but specific classes such as Bio- 
logical Dynamics, Genetics, Molecular Techniques, Cell Molecular Biology and Devel- 
opmental Biology will focus more intensely on molecular level theory and technology. 
Some classes in the tract will teach molecular theory and practice while other courses 
will employ the use of this technology. 

The options listed above prepare the student to enter medical school, dental school, 
physical therapy masters programs, graduate degree programs, clinical and research 
laboratories, allied health professions, industry, teaching at the elementary or second- 
ary levels and various other science or health-related professions. 

Students may earn a B.A. degree or a B.S. degree. For the B.A. degree it is necessary 
to complete the foreign language requirement. 

Grades of "C -" or above must be received in all classes for the major. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in Biological 
Sciences 



(4,4) 

(4,4) 

(4,4) 

(4) 

(4) 

(4) 

Upper Division: 

Seven to nine upper division courses including: 

BIO 125 Developmental Biology (4) 

BIO 130 Genetics (4) 

BIO 135 Molecular Techniques (4) 

BIO 151 Medical Physiology (4) 

BIO 195 Senior Seminar in New Biology (3) 

Total units in biological sciences: 33-36 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 



Core Courses: 




BIOIAB 


Biological Dynamics 


CHE1AB 


General Chemistry 


CHE6AB 


Organic Chemistry 


CHE 107 


Biochemistry 


MTH3A 


Calculus I 


PHY1A 


Physics 



88 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



Courses Required for a B.S. Degree in Biological 
Sciences 



Core Courses: 






BIOIAB 


Biological Dynamics 


(4,4) 


CHE1AB 


General Chemistry 


(4,4) 


CHE6AB 


Organic Chemistry 


(4,4) 


CHE 107 


Biochemistry 


(4) 


MTH3AB 


Calculus 1 


(4,4) 


PHY1AB 


Physics 


(4,4) 


Upper Division: 






Nine to ten upper division courses including: 




BIO 125 


Developmental Biology 


(4) 


BIO 130 


Genetics 


(4) 


BIO 135 


Molecular Techniques 


(4) 


BIO 151 


Medical Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 152 


Cell Molecular Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 180 


Endocrinology 


(4) 


BIO 195 


Senior Seminar in New Biology 


(3) 


BIO 197 


Research Readings 


(1) 


BIO 198 


Biological Research 


(3) 


Recommendations 






BIO 50A 


Human Anatomy 


(4) 


BIO 105 


Immunology 


(4) 


BIO 150 


Biology of Aging 


(3) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 



MTH 38 Elements of Probability and Statistics (4) 

Total units in Biological Sciences: 39-44 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units. 

PRE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL EMPHASES, PRE- 
VETERINARY, PRE-PHARMACY EMPHASES: 
Biological Sciences Major with a B.S. Degree: 

Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental Emphases, 

Pre-Veterinary, Pre-Pharmacy 

Emphases 

Students in the Department of Biological Sciences may elect to take their major in the 
Pre-medical, Pre-dental, Pre-pharmacy, or Pre-veterinary Programs. These programs 
offer a strong science preparation balanced with a well rounded Liberal Arts program 
required for successful entrance into Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and 
Veterinary Medicine. Such program emphases prepare students for study in a wide 



PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY EMPHASIS 89 



variety of graduate school programs, assistantships in biomedical research laborato- 
ries, molecular biology, industry or other health-related professions. It is recommended 
that the student select a minor in one of the humanities. 

Courses Required for a B.S. Degree in Biological 
Sciences 



(4,4) 
(4,4) 
(4,4) 
(4) 
(4,4) 
(4,4) 



Core Courses: 




BIOIAB 


Biological Dynamics 


CHE LAB 


General Chemistry 


CHE6AB 


Organic Chemistry 


CHE 107 


Biochemistry 


MTH3AB 


Calculus I 


PHY LAB 


Physics 



Upper Division: 

Eleven or Twelve upper division courses including: 



BIO 120 


MCAT Workshop 


(1) 


BIO 121 


GRE Workshop 


(1) 


BIO 125 


Developmental Biology 


(4) 


BIO 130 


Genetics 


(4) 


BIO 135 


Molecular Techniques 


(4) 


BIO 151 


Medical Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 152 


Cell Molecular Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 180 


Endocrinology 


(4) 


BIO 195 


Senior Seminar in New Biology 


(3) 


BIO 197 


Research Readings 


(1) 


BIO 198 


Biological Research 


(3) 


mendatio 

BIO 50A 


ns: 

Human Anatomy 


(4) 


BIO 105 


Immunology 


(4) 


BIO 150 


Biology of Aging 


(3) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MTH38 


Elements of Probability and Statistics 


(3) 



Total units in Biological Sciences: 40-44 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units. 
Course descriptions can be found in the catalog under Biological Sciences. 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY EMPHASIS: Biological 
Sciences Major with a B.S. Degree 

The establishment of an undergraduate Pre-Physical Therapy Program will meet the 
needs of MSMC undergraduate students interested in pursuing post-baccalaureate 
professional education in Physical Therapy or other health-science related fields. 



90 PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY EMPHASIS 



Students selecting this major will complete the required general education coursework 
(45 units), as well as a core of major requirements (50 units) as outlined below. Grades 
of C or above must be received in core courses. 



Core requirements: 



BIOIAB 


Biological Dynamics 


(4,4) 


CHE1AB 


General Chemistry 


(4,4) 


PHY1AB 


Physics 


(4,4) 


BIO 50A 


Human Anatomy 


(4) 


BIO 115 


A, B, C, D Research 


(4) 


BIO 151 


Medical Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 152 


Cell Molecular Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 195 


Senior Seminar in New Biology 


(3) 


BIO 198 


Biological Research 


(3) 


MTH 38/PSY 40 Statistics 


(3) 


MTH9 


Computer Literacy 


(3) 


; MUST CHOOSE one of the following: 




'BIO 103 


Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 105 


Immunology 


(4) 


BIO 125 


Developmental Biology 


(4) 


BIO 130 


Genetics 


(4) 



* It is recommended that students take microbiology and 1 semester of organic chem- 
istry in order to qualify for admission to specific graduate programs. 

Additionally, students will have 3 core required courses in both psychology and ger- 
ontology. They will need an additional 2 courses of their own choosing from either a 
psychology or a gerontology emphasis. 

Psychology core requirements: 

PSY 1 General Psychology (3) 

PSY 12 Developmental Psychology (3) 

PSY 168 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Gerontology core requirements: 

SOC 5 Sociology Perspectives (3) 

SOC 189 Sociology of Aging (3) 

GER 192 Thanatology Seminar (3) 

Psychology emphasis: (Choose any 2 courses) 

PSY 102 Theories & Issues in Development (3) 

PSY 106 Experimental Psychology (3) 

PSY 132 Personality (3) 

PSY 133 Disability/Adjustment (3) 

PSY 134 Learning (3) 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 91 



PSY 145 


Social Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 152 


Physiological Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 170 


Human Neuropsychology 


(3) 


Gerontology emph 


asis: (Choose any 2 courses) 




GER 197 


Gerontology Internship 


(3) 


GER 192 


Thanatology Seminar 


(3) 


PSY 128 


Psychology of Aging 


(3) 


SOC 104 


The Family 


(3) 


SOC 161B 


Dynamics of Majority/Minority Relations 


(3) 


PHI 168B 


Bioethics 


(3) 


RST149 


or 
Biomedical Issues/Christian Ethics 


(3) 



The Minor in Biological Sciences 

A minimum of 24 units in the biological sciences including: 



BIO 1AB Biological Dynamics 

BIO 130 Genetics 



(4,4) 
(4) 



At least four additional upper division courses in the Biological 
Sciences are required; at least one of these must be an upper division 
physiology. Students majoring in one of the department's major 
options cannot receive a minor in the department. 



BIO 1 A Biological Dynamics (4) 

An introduction to the science of biology and 
the variety of organisms in the biosphere. 
Topics presented include theories relative 
to the origin of life, molecular biology, cel- 
lular structure and function, evolution as a 
unifying principle in biology, and processes 
of inheritance. Laboratory experiences give 
students an opportunity to understand sci- 
entific methods of investigation. Lecture 3 
hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. GS-IIID 

BIO IB Biological Dynamics (4) 

An introduction to the study of biology and 
the variety of organisms at the organismic, 
population, and environmental levels. In- 
cluded are topics dealing with the struc- 
tures and coordination of functions of com- 
plex multicellular organisms, biological 
factors that support community life sys- 
tems, ecological interrelationships of 
plants and animals, and human impact 
upon the environment. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab- 
oratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1A. GS- 
IIID 

BIO 1AH Freshman Honors 

Biology (1) 

Exploration of a single topic through labo- 
ratory exercises, journal and textbook read- 
ings and classroom discussion. Topics are 



chosen to present basic concepts in biology 
and vary from year to year. Lecture/discus- 
sion 1 hr., Laboratory 3 hrs. Substitutes for 
BIO 1A Laboratory and has one additional 
unit of credit. Student must be eligible for 
honors courses. Departmental approval re- 
quired. GS-IIID 

BIOIBH Freshman Honors 

Biology (1) 

Exploration of the scientific research enter- 
prise with reflection on ethics in research 
and misconduct in science. Topics pre- 
sented include values in science, conflict of 
interest, plagiarism, allocation of credit, 
authorship, error and negligence, data se- 
lection. Critical thinking and problem solv- 
ing will be emphasized throughout the 
course. Laboratory: Students will rotate 
through 3 research laboratories of their 
choice spending 3 weeks in each laboratory. 
Substitutes for BIO IB Laboratory and has 
one additional unit of credit. Lecture/dis- 
cussion 1 hr., Laboratory 3 hrs. Students 
must be eligible for honors courses or be rec- 
ommended by the department. GS-IHD 



92 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



BIO 3/103 General Microbiology (4) 

Basic principles of microbial growth and 
metabolism, morphology, taxonomy, path- 
ogenicity, immunity, and control. Microor- 
ganisms as agents of disease and normal 
inhabitants of man's environment. Tech- 
niques of isolation, cultivation and identi- 
fication of these organisms. Lecture 3 hrs., 
Laboratory 3 hrs. May be taken for upper 
division credit if approved by instructor. 
GS-IIID 

BIO 5 Life Sciences (3) 

This course is an introduction to biology for 
the non-biology major that emphasizes both 
the unity and the diversity that is evident 
throughout all living organisms at the dif- 
ferent levels of structure and function: mo- 
lecular, cellular, organismal and popula- 
tion. This course emphasizes major 
organizing concepts of biology such as the 
fundamental importance of DNA and the 
genetic code, the role of natural selection, 
and genetics in the evolution of organismal 
adaptation over time. The laboratory por- 
tion of this course affords the student an 
opportunity to learn about living organisms 
through direct observation, experimenta- 
tion and basic field studies wherein they 
play direct participative roles. Lecture: 2 
hrs., Laboratory: 2 hrs. GS-IIID 

BIO 7 Introduction to the Human 

Body (3) 

Introductory course designed for students 
preparing for entry level health care occu- 
pations. Organization of the body from cells 
to tissues to organ systems will be included. 
Homeostasis, musculoskeletal and nervous 
systems will be emphasized. GS-IIID 

BIO 10 Health Science (3) 

An introductory course designed to provide 
the student with a basic understanding of 
the functioning of the human body as it re- 
lates to health problems. Included are such 
topics as nutrition, infectious disease, can- 
cer, cardiovascular disease, reproduction, 
and the effects of alcohol, drugs, and to- 
bacco. Lecture 3 hrs. (Meets Health Edu- 
cation requirement for California clear 
teaching credentials.) GS-IIID 

BIO 40A Human Anatomy (4) 

The study of the structure of the human 
body. A systemic approach is used begin- 
ning with the molecular level and progress- 
ing to the organism as a whole to demon- 
strate the interrelationships at each level 



of organization, Emphasis is placed on the 
skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. 
Laboratory exercises are used to expand 
and clarify the concepts presented in lec- 
ture. These include microscopic reviews, 
dissections and other multiple teaching/ 
learning media. This course is required for 
Physical Therapy Assistant and Pre- 
Health majors. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 
3 hrs. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 
a high school General Biology course. GS- 
IHD 

BIO50A Human Anatomy (4) 

The study of the structure of the human 
body. A systemic approach is used begin- 
ning with the molecular level and progress- 
ing to the organism as a whole to demon- 
strate the interrelationships at each level 
of organization. Laboratory exercises are 
used to expand and clarify the concepts pre- 
sented in lecture. These include micro- 
scopic reviews, dissections and other mul- 
tiple teaching/learning media. Lecture 3 
hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Suc- 
cessful completion of a high school General 
Biology course. GS-IIID 

BIO50B Human Physiology (4) 

An introduction to physiological principles 
with emphasis on organ systems. An inte- 
grative approach is used beginning with the 
molecular and progressing to the organism 
as a whole to demonstrate the interrela- 
tionships at each level of organization. Lab- 
oratory exercises include measurements of 
physiological activities from the molecular 
to the organismic levels. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding of human func- 
tions with the use of medical instrumenta- 
tion, computer simulations and data acqui- 
sition systems. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 
3 hrs. Prerequisites: A grade of C or above 
in BIO 50A or BIO 40A. GS-HID 

BIO 67/167 Environmental Science 

(3) 
An introduction to the multidisciplinary 
field of environmental science. Topics in- 
clude human population dynamics, ecosys- 
tem structure and function, laws of matter 
and energy, biodiversity, wildlife and hab- 
itat conservation, renewable and non-re- 
newable resources, types of pollution and 
effects of pollutants on human health. Em- 
phasis is placed on the interrelationship of 
population growth, resource use, and pol- 
lution. GS-IIID 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 93 



*BIO 87 Fundamental Concepts (1-3) 
An acyclic series of basic concepts in the 
field of biological sciences which present an 
introductory understanding of living sys- 
tems. GS-IIID 

BIO 105 Immunology (4) 

Basic principles and theories of immune 
mechanisms. Topics include innate immu- 
nity, antibody stimulation and production, 
cellular immunity and cell interactions, au- 
toimmunity, tissue transplantation, im- 
mune deficiency, diagnostic and technolog- 
ical applications of immunological 
techniques. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 
hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 3 or 1AB or 50AB 

BIO 112 Human Nutrition (3) 

A study of different nutrients with empha- 
sis on nutritional requirements for health 
arid prevention of chronic diseases which 
are major causes of death in the United 
States today. Topics include healthy life- 
style including daily meal planning, weight 
control and exercise, harmful effects of al- 
cohol and drugs. Special needs during preg- 
nancy and lactation, infancy and childhood, 
adulthood, and old age will also be consid- 
ered. Lecture 3 hrs. 

BIOH5A Research Methods (1) 

Introduction to the philosophy and princi- 
ples of scientific methods of inquiry used in 
research and problem solving. Includes 
identification of problems, construction of 
hypotheses and initial development of re- 
search questions and proposal. 

BIOH5B Research Methods (1) 

A directed study in which the student ap- 
plies the principles learned in 115A. This 
independent study course is concerned with 
the research design, methodology and data 
collection components of the research en- 
deavor. 

BIO 115C Independent Study (1) 

The initiation or continuation of a project 
under the physical therapy departmental 
faculty direction. Work should culminate in 
a research paper, report or successful com- 
pletion of oral and/or written examinations. 

BIOH5D Directed Research (1) 

An independent study course concentrating 
on the data collection component, and the 
writing and finalization of the research en- 
deavor. Hours are arranged between the 
student and the research advisor. 



BIO 120 MCAT Workshop (1) 

This workshop will provide the needed in- 
formation, strategies, and practice to do 
well on the MCAT. The MCAT is a test of 
reading comprehension, reasoning, and ap- 
plication of science to problem solving. 
Emphasis will be placed on speed reading 
and comprehension, passage-solving skills, 
skills for answering questions, timing and 
other important strategies. MCAT sample 
exams will be given. 

BIO 121 GRE Workshop (1) 

This workshop will provide the needed in- 
formation, strategies, and practice to do 
well on the GRE. The GRE measures cer- 
tain developed verbal, quantitative, and an- 
alytical abilities that are important for ac- 
ademic achievement. Emphasis will be 
placed on vocabulary building, math re- 
view, and analytical reasoning tactics. GRE 
sample tests will be given with a focus on 
computer testing. 

BIO 125 Developmental Biology (4) 

This course presents a comprehensive 
study of the patterns and processes that un- 
derlie animal development from conception 
through old age. The overall approach to 
this discipline is to address each of the ma- 
jor topical areas from both conceptual and 
comparative viewpoints so that students 
develop broad based and in-depth under- 
standing of developmental process and the 
results of each process. Topics will include 
the molecular level control of gene expres- 
sion during development, the cellular basis 
of morphogenesis and pattern formation, 
molecular and cellular level bases of differ- 
entiation, induction and growth of the em- 
bryo. Also, the course will examine the phe- 
nomena of regeneration and remodeling as 
they pertain to the development of appro- 
priate organisms. Laboratory studies will 
include the examination of selected devel- 
opmental systems such as ciliated proto- 
zoans, flatworms, sea urchins, chicks and 
humans. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. 
Prerequisite: BIO 1AB or BIO 50AB. 

BIO 130 Genetics (4) 

Basic concepts of genetics including classi- 
cal genetics and molecular genetics. 
Examines genetics of prokaryotes and 
eukaryotes. Topics include Mendelian in- 
heritance, gene replication, expression and 



94 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



regulation, mutations, transposable ele- 
ments, population genetics, and introduc- 
tion to biotechnology. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab- 
oratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1AB or BIO 
50AB. 

BIO 135 Techniques in Molecular 

Biology (4) 

An overview of the techniques used in ge- 
netic engineering. Emphasis will be placed 
on the structure, handling and manipula- 
tion of nucleic acids. Current topics in ge- 
netic engineering such as transgenic ani- 
mals and human gene therapy will be 
discussed. Laboratory studies include iso- 
lation and analysis of DNA, cloning genes, 
preparation and screening of genomic li- 
braries, and hybridization techniques such 
as Southern and Northern blotting. Lecture 
3 hrs. Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 
lAIBandCHEMlAlB 

BIO 150 Biology of Aging (3) 

This course begins with an overview of the 
major theories regarding how and why hu- 
man systems undergo aging processes and 
then continues with a system based consid- 
eration of normal aging processes and their 
effects on the structure and function of each 
system. Once the pattern of normal aging 
has been delineated, further consideration 
is given to diseases and disorders that are 
often superimposed upon otherwise normal 
changes relating to human aging. In addi- 
tion to anatomical and physiological 
changes associated with aging, there is an 
emphasis on the appropriate application of 
primary, secondary and tertiary prevention 
strategies and the concept of enhancing the 
quality of life of the aging individual. Pre- 
requisites: BIO 1AB or BIO 50AB or per- 
mission of instructor. 

BIO 151 Medical Physiology (4) 

A detailed study of the functional processes 
of the human body from the molecular to 
the organ system levels; dynamics of fluid 
balance, control mechanisms, transport 
systems, aging, and neuroendocrine and 
neuromuscular integration will be in- 
cluded. References to pathophysiology will 
be made. Laboratory activities include the 
use of multiple monitoring and data acqui- 
sition systems. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 
3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1AB, CHE LAB 



BIO 152 Cell and Molecular 

Physiology (4) 

A study of biology at the molecular and cel- 
lular levels. Topics will include cellular or- 
ganization and specialization, cell cycle, 
protein synthesis, enzymology, membrane 
transport, immunology, genetics, recombi- 
nant DNA technology, regulation of gene 
expression and cellular aspects of cancer. 
Lecture 3 hrs. Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
sites: BIO LAB, CHE 6A. 

BIO 180 Endocrinology (4) 

A study of the molecular synthesis and 
physiological functions of hormones in liv- 
ing systems especially as they are under- 
stood in humans. The course will cover neu- 
roendocrine controls, genetics of hormone 
synthesis, mechanisms of hormone action, 
reproductive physiology, somatic growth 
and development, thyroid and adrenal 
gland physiology, glucose and calcium hom- 
eostases, and the integration and assess- 
ment of endocrine functions with the use of 
clinical examples throughout the course. 
Lecture 3 hrs. Laboratories will be individ- 
ually designed and directed. Prerequisites: 
BIO 135, BIO 151, CHE 6AIB. 

BIO 187 Selected Topics in 

Biology (1-3) 

An acyclic series of topics of current interest 
in the biological sciences which presents re- 
cent developments in the field. GS-IIID 



BIO 192AB Special Studies 



(3,3) 



BIO 195 Senior Seminar in New 

Biology (3) 

In depth literature search on an approved 
topic of current research significance. The 
research study should culminate in a class 
presentation, discussion and research pa- 
per. Topics will focus on the most recent 
research and discoveries in the biological 
sciences. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

BI0 196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

BIO 197 Research Readings (1) 

Directed reading in special interest area for 
the departmental research requirement. 
Faculty research mentor approval re- 
quired. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 95 



BIO 198 Biological Research (1-3) 
Directed research project. Should be taken 
under the guidance of a biology faculty 
member presently engaged in laboratory 
research. The completed project will be pre- 
sented to senior majors and science faculty. 
The research project is usually initiated 



during thejunioryear and completed before 
graduation. Three units are required. 

BIO 199 Independent Study (1-3) 

The initiation or continuation of a project 
under departmental faculty direction. 
Work should culminate in a research paper 
or report. 



96 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Business Administration Department 

The Business Administration Department at Mount St. Mary's College is committed 
to developing leaders who are capable of making complex business decisions and ap- 
preciate the significance of their responsibilities to the companies and communities 
they serve. 

Consistent with the liberal arts tradition of the College, the department emphasizes a 
broad-based, interdisciplinary curriculum which provides the knowledge, skills and 
values necessary to accomplish these goals. 

Four key themes are infused through all department course offerings which nurture a 
continuing curiosity and a receptivity to new ideas: 

• global business 

• management communication 

• business ethics 

• innovative management 

Hallmarks of the program include a high level of interaction with faculty and peers, 
academic rigor and the translation of theory into practice. The Business Administration 
Department offers the following degrees: 

• Bachelor of Arts (in the traditional day program) 

• Bachelor of Science (in the Weekend College program) 

• Associate in Arts 

• Minor in Business 

The Bachelor degree program and minor are offered at the Chalon Campus. The AA 
Degree is available at the Doheny Campus. The business administration department 
is a member of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). 

Each program is described below: 

The Associate Arts Degree (Doheny Campus) 

The Associate in Arts degree in Business Administration is a two year program that 
provides students with a strong business background invaluable in the modern work 
environment. In addition, the Business Administration Program prepares students 
with the foundation necessary to successfully transfer to a four year business program. 
The courses in the A.A. Business Administration Program focus on business funda- 
mentals commensurate with lower division instruction while also stressing the com- 
munication and critical thinking skills necessary to succeed and advance in a business 
career. General studies courses contribute to the broad based education of students 
which not only makes them more attractive to employers, but exposes them to the 
spectrum of knowledge and ideas that are the mark of a liberal arts education. 

Upon completion of an AA. Degree, students may wish to pursue a business baccalau- 
reate degree or they can choose to terminate their education. Given the current business 
environment, students are strongly encouraged to continue their studies for a four year 
degree. Many of the students who complete the two year A.A. program in Business 
chose to transfer to Mount St. Mary's four year B.A. program. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 97 



To be accepted into the A.A. Business Administration Program, students must have a 
cumulative high school GPA of at least 2.5 in all college preparatory courses. SAT or 
ACT scores are required and will be considered during the application process. Students 
who have at least 12 units of previous college course work must have a minimum GPA 
of 2.25 in order to be considered for admission into the program. 



The Bachelor of Arts Program 

The Bachelor of Arts program in business administration prepares students for profes- 
sional careers by stimulating rigorous, imaginative, analytical, and inquisitive atti- 
tudes. An emphasis on teamwork, and problem solving is evident at all levels of edu- 
cation in the business administration major. The department offers five areas of 
emphases. Each emphases is described below: 

1- Accounting. The emphasis in Accounting qualifies students to enter pri- 
vate, public and governmental accounting. Students are prepared in the prac- 
tical areas of tax accounting, cost accounting and auditing as well as the 
application of computer techniques to corporate accounting systems. Gradu- 
ates will be qualified for professional employment in corporate accounting 
departments, public accounting firms, and governmental agencies. 

2. International Business. The emphasis in International Business pre- 
pares the students for the many opportunities available in the fields of inter- 
national management, international finance and government service. The 
International Business emphasis is designed for individuals with an interest 
in business on a global scale. The program concentrates on the social, political, 
and economic aspects of the international marketplace. 

3. Language, Culture and Business. The global business environment de- 
mands a knowledge of business skills, an appreciation of the importance of 
understanding cultural differences and the ability to communicate in another 
language. The Language, Culture and Business emphasis achieves a 
unique balance in preparing students to work effectively in a domestic or 
foreign work assignment. The language component develops vocabulary of 
business and stresses the role of accurate interpretation and translation. 
Culture is viewed from linguistic, historical, social and business perspectives. 

4. Management. The emphasis in Management offers a curriculum based on 
practical, applied courses that qualify students to enter administrative posi- 
tions immediately after graduation. Courses cover the broad spectrum of 
business activity and allow students to choose from a variety of possible career 
opportunities in large, midsize and small organizations. 

5. Marketing. The emphasis in Marketing provides students with a "strategic 
orientation" in the areas of advertising, public relations, designs, sales, re- 
search and marketing management. The program is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for marketing related careers in the public and private sectors. 



98 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Bachelor of Science Program (Weekend College) 

The B.S. in Business Administration, offered in the Weekend College, is designed 
for adult professionals who wish to advance and solidify their careers in business. Built 
on the strong liberal arts foundation provided through general education requirements, 
the business administration major is generalist in scope and covers key functional 
areas in business - management information systems, organizational behavior, busi- 
ness law, accounting, marketing and finance. Courses emphasize discussion, group 
projects, and communication exercises. The programhas been structured to incorporate 
workplace experience into the fabric of the classroom. 



The Minor in Business Administration 

The minor in Business Administration has been specially designed for liberal arts, 
science, health science and other non-business majors. 

A minimum of 21 units selected from business administration offerings are required 
for a minor. A minimum of 12 units must be completed in the Business Administration 
Department at Mount St. Mary's College. 

Students interested in a business administration minor should arrange their total 
program with the department chair. All minors are required to complete the following 
courses: 

• BUS 4 Business Foundations and Analysis (3) 

• ECO 2 Macroeconomics (3) 

• BUS 5 Business Law I (3) 

• BUS 15 A Accounting Principles I (3) 

• BUS 160 Marketing Management (3) 

• BUS 185 Managing Organizations (3) 

Double Major Program 

The department offers a program for students who desire to major in Business Admin- 
istration and another discipline at the College. 

Lower Division Core Requirements: 

BUS 4 Business Foundations & Analysis (3) 

BUS 5 Business Law I (3) 

BUS 15A Accounting Principles I (3) 

BUS 15B Accounting Principles II (3) 

PHI 92 Intro to Business Ethics (3) 

ECO 1 Microeconomics (3) 

ECO 2 Macroeconomics (3) 

BUS 28 Mathematical Analysis for Business (3) 

BUS 38 Elements of Probability and Statistics (3) 

BUS 13 Computer Applications: Spreadsheets and Word 

Processing (1) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 99 



Upper Division Core Requirements: 

BUS 122 Managerial Communications (3) 

BUS 130 Principles of Finance (3) 

BUS 160 Marketing Management (3) 

BUS 177 Management Information Systems (3) 

BUS 185 Managing Organizations (3) 

BUS 192 Business Policy and Strategy (3) 

BA Degree with a Double Major in English and 
Business Administration: (see English Dept.) 

The AJL Degree in Business Administration 

Department Requirements: 





First Year 
Fall 




BUS 4 


Business Foundations & Analysis 
Spring 


(3) 


ECO 2 
BUS 7 


Macroeconomics 

Computer Application in Business I 

Second Year 
Fall 


(3) 
(3) 


ECOl 
BUS 16A 
MTH28 


Microeconomics 
Accounting Principles I 
Math Analysis for Business 


(3) 
(4) 
(3) 


MTH38 


or 
Elements of Probability & Statistics 

Spring 


(3) 


BUS 5 
BUS 16B 
PHI 92 


Business Law I 
Accounting Principles II 
Introduction to Business Ethics 


(3) 
(4) 
(3) 



Total units to graduate: 60 
Overall G.P.A. needed to graduate: 2.0 
Overall G.P.A. needed to transfer to Chalon: 2.25 

The BA Degree in Business Administration 

Lower Division Core Requirements: 

BUS 4 Business Foundations & Analysis (3)** 

BUS 5 Business Law I (3) 

BUS 15A Accounting Principles I (3) 

BUS 15B Accounting Principles II (3) 

PHI 92 Introduction to Business Ethics (3) 

ECO 1 Microeconomics (3) 



100 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



ECO 2 Macroeconomics (3) 

MTH 28 Mathematical Analysis for Business (3) 

MTH38 Elements of Probability & Statistics (3) 

SPE 12 Business & Professional Communications (1) 

SPR 18 Career Planning (1) 

BUS 13 Computer Applications: Spreadsheets and Word 

Processing (1) 



Upper Division Core Requirements: 



BUS 122 


Management Communications 


(3) 


BUS 130 


Principles of Finance 


(3) 


BUS 160 


Principles of Marketing 


(3) 


BUS 177 


Management Information Systems 


(3) 


BUS 185 


Principles of Management 


(3) 


BUS 192 


Business Policy and Strategy 
1. Accounting Emphasis 


(3) 


BUS 137 


Intermediate Accounting I 


(4) 


BUS 138 


Intermediate Accounting II 


(4) 


BUS 141 


Accounting Internship 


(3) 


BUS 131 


Managerial Accounting 


(3) 


BUS 186 


Tax Accounting 


(3) 


BUS 188 


Auditing 


(3) 


BUS 198 


Advanced Accounting 
2. International Business Emphasis 


(3) 


BUS 142 


International Internship 


(3) 


BUS 189 


International Management 


(3) 


BUS 195 


International Marketing 


(3) 


ECO 195 


International Economics 


(3) 


(Plus three 


courses from the following:) 




ECO 112 


Economic History of Europe 


(3) 


SOC 125 


Comparative Social Structures 


(3) 


POL 125 


Foreign Relations of the United States 


(3) 


POL 134 


International Organizations 


(3) 



or 
POL 135 Selected Problems in International 

Organization (3) 

POL 138 International Law (3) 

BUS 183 Management Seminar (3) 

3. Language, Culture and Business Emphasis 

Total of 9 upper division units of Language and lor culture in addition 
to completion of the general studies modern language requirement 

BUS 143 Language, Culture & Bus. Internship (3) 

BUS 189 International Management (3) 

BUS 195 International Marketing (3) 

ECO 195 International Economics (3) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 101 



Recommended Courses: 



ECO 112 


Economic History of Europe 


(3) 


SOC 125 


Comparative Social Structures 


(3) 


POL 125 


Foreign Relations of the United States 


(3) 


POL 134 


International Organizations 


(3) 


POL 135 


Selected Problems in International 






Organization 


(3) 


BUS 183 


Management Seminar 

4. Management Emphasis 


(3) 


BUS 106 


Business Law II 


(3) 


BUS 170 


Real Estate 


(3) 


BUS 171 


or 
Real Estate Law and Management 


(3) 


BUS 144 


Management Internship 


(3) 


BUS 157 


Human Resource Development 


(3) 


BUS 176 


Small Business Management 


(3) 


BUS 184 


Organizational Behavior 


(3) 


BUS 183 


Management Seminar 

5. Marketing Emphasis 


(3) 


BUS 145 


Marketing Internship 


(3) 


BUS 163 


Marketing Research 


(3) 


BUS 161 


Principles of Advertising 


(3) 


BUS 175 


Sales Management 


(3) 


BUS 194 


Consumer Behavior 


(3) 


BUS 195 


International Marketing 


(3) 


BUS 183 


Management Seminar 


(3) 



**This may be waived for transfer students entering with significant business course 
work. See Department Chair. 

Once enrolled at Mount St. Mary's College, all upper division business courses must 
be completed at the College. 

Suggested Sequence of Courses 
Bachelor of Arts 

The following is a model for completing the business administration major in four 
years. Only business administration courses are listed. 





FRESHMAN YEAR 






Fall Semester 




BUS 4 
BUS 15A 
MTH28 


Bus. Foundations & Analysis 
Accounting Principles I 
Mathematical Analysis for Business 

Spring Semester 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 


BUS 15B 
MTH38 
PHI 92 


Accounting Principles II 

Elements of Probability & Statistics 

Intro to Business Ethics 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



102 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester 



ECO 2 


Macroeconomics 


(3) 


SPE12 


Bus. & Professional Communication 


(3) 


SPR18 


Career Planning 

Spring Semester 


(1) 


BUS 13 


Computer Applications: 






Spreadsheets & Word-processing 


(1) 


ECOl 


Microeconomics 


(3) 


BUS 5 


Business Law I 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester 


(3) 


BUS 160 


Principles of Marketing 


(3) 


BUS 122 


Management Communications 


(3) 




Upper Division Emphasis Course 


(3) 




Spring Semester 




BUS 185 


Principles of Management 


(3) 


BUS 177 


Management Info. Systems 


(3) 




Upper Division Emphasis Course 


(3) 




SENIOR YEAR 






Fall Semester 




BUS 130 


Principles of Finance 


(3) 




Internship 


(3) 




Upper Division Emphasis Course 


(3) 




Upper Division Emphasis Course 


(3) 




Spring Semester 




BUS 192 


Business Policy & Strategy 


(3) 




Upper Division Emphasis Course 


(3) 




Upper Division Emphasis Course 


(3) 



B.S. Degree in Business 
(Weekend College) 

Lower Division Core Requirements: 



BUS 5 


Business Law I 


(3) 


BUS 13 


Computer Applications: Spreadsheets 






& Word Processing 


(1) 


BUS 15A 


Accounting Principles I 


(3) 


BUS 15B 


Accounting Principles II 


(3) 


PHI 92 


Introduction to Business Ethics 


(3) 


ECOl 


Microeconomics 


(3) 


ECO 2 


Macroeconomics 


(3) 


MTH28 


Mathematical Analysis for Business 


(3) 


MTH38 


Elements of Probability & Statistics 


(3) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 103 



Upper Division Core Requirements: 

BUS 122 Management Communications (3) 

BUS 130 Principles of Finance (3) 

BUS 160 Principles of Marketing (3) 

BUS 177 Management Information Systems (3) 

BUS 184 Organizational Behavior (3) 

BUS 185 Principles of Management (3) 

BUS 192 Business Policy & Strategy (3) 

In addition, eighteen upper division business units are required for the major. 

Students who wish to pursue a specific business area concentration may do so by 
completing twelve of these eighteen units as follows: 

Marketing Concentration 

BUS 161 Principles of Advertising (3) 

BUS 175 Sales Management (3) 

BUS 195 International Marketing (3) 

BUS 163 Marketing Research (3) 

Management Concentration 

BUS 157 Human Resources Management (3) 

BUS 189 International Management (3) 

BUS 183 Management Seminar (3) 

or 

BUS 176 Small Business Management (3) 

Any one of the following courses: 

BUS 106 Business Law II (3) 

or 
BUS 170 Real Estate (3) 

or 
BUS 171 Real Estate Law & Management (3) 

or 
BUS 133 Money, Politics & Business (3) 

International Business Concentration 

BUS 189 International Management (3) 

BUS 195 International Marketing (3) 

ECO 195 International Economics (3) 

Choose three units from the following: 

ECO 112 Economic History of Europe (3) 

or 
BUS 193 Special Studies in Economic Development (1) 

(One unit in each of the following areas: China, European Union, 
Eastern Europe, Mercusor, Africa and the Four Tigers) or 

BUS 193 Managing Diversity (1) 

Once enrolled at Mount St. Mary's College, all upper division business courses must 
be completed at the College. 



104 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUS 4 Business Foundations & 

Analysis (3) 

An analytical survey of the principles and 
skills necessary for accounting, economics, 
marketing, finance, human resources, 
management, and government policies as 
they apply to business in the United States 
and globally. Through the course students 
develop a framework for analyzing busi- 
ness issues and develop critical thinking 
skills to solve organizational problems. 
This course will include an introduction of 
the case method. 

BUS 5/POL 5 Business Law I (3) 

An introduction to the development of legal 
principles for business activity, as found in 
common law, statutory laws, and the Uni- 
form Commercial Code. Use of case studies 
for practical applications. Introduction to 
legal reasoning and legal writing; concen- 
tration on contracts and their use through- 
out all business negotiations; introduction 
to issues of commercial liability and sales 
transactions. 

BUS 7 Computer Applications in 

Business I (3) 

This course will familiarize students with 
the personal computer and "state of the art" 
computer applications. Students will re- 
ceive instruction in word processing, 
spreadsheet usage, powerpoint presenta- 
tion, data base programming and internet 
access. 

BUS 9 Introduction to Computer 

Processes (3) 

This course includes a description of the 
computer, its logical structure and func- 
tioning, input-output, storage, and periph- 
eral equipment. It also covers an introduc- 
tion to programming using the BASIC 
language and the data processing cycle 
with emphasis on business applications. 
This course is not an acceptable prepara- 
tion for MTH 20. Prerequisite: PHI 5, BUS 
23 or sufficient math proficiency scores, or 
consent of instructor. 

BUS 13 Computer Applications: 
Spreadsheets and Word 
Processing (1) 

This course will familiarize students with 
computers as they are used in the business 
world: word processing, spread sheets, and 
data processing. Students will also become 
familiar with the IBM PC and the DOS sys- 
tems. Examples will be oriented toward the 



needs of students majoring in business 
administration and will provide the skills 
necessary to be competitive in the job mar- 
ket. 

BUS15A Accounting Principles I (3) 

Course emphasis is on the measurement, 
valuation, and the accumulation of ac- 
counting data. Topics include the account- 
ing cycle through financial statements, ac- 
counting for merchandise, internal control, 
notes, bad debts, inventories and account- 
ing for tangible and intangible assets. Fo- 
cus is on the sole proprietorship. 

BUS 15B Accounting Principles II (3) 

Course emphasis is on the measurement, 
valuation and the accumulation of account- 
ing data. Topics include accounting for 
partnerships, corporations, bonds, cash 
flow statements, present value, annuities, 
financial statement and analysis and an in- 
troduction to managerial accounting. 

BUS16A Accounting Principles I (4) 

Course emphasis is on the measurement, 
valuation, and the accumulation of ac- 
counting data. Topics include the account- 
ing cycle through financial statements, ac- 
counting for merchandise, internal control, 
notes, bad debts, inventories and account- 
ing for lived tangible and intangible assets. 
Focus is on the sole proprietorship. Faculty- 
guided lab experiences are provided for ad- 
ditional reinforcement of course concepts. 

BUS 16B Accounting Principles II 

(4) 
Course emphasis is on the measurement, 
valuation and the accumulation of account- 
ing data. Topics include accounting for 
partnerships, corporations, bonds, cash 
flow statements, present value, annuities 
and financial statement analysis. Faculty 
guided experiences are provided for addi- 
tional reinforcement of course concepts. 

BUS 28 Mathematical Analysis for 

Business (3) 

Topics in Algebra including solutions of sys- 
tems of equations and inequalities; expo- 
nential and logarithmic functions; linear 
programming and mathematics of finance. 
Emphasis is placed on the application of 
mathematics to problems in business. (See 
MTH 28.) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 105 



BUS 38 Probability and Statistics: 

Business Applications (3) 

Elementary probability theory, properties 
of distributions, sampling, hypothesis test- 
ing, correlation. Prerequisite: satisfactory 
score on the Mathematics Placement Exam. 
(SeeMTH38). 

BUS 92/PHI 92 Introduction to 

Business Ethics (3) 

A case study approach to business ethics, 
taking into consideration the perspectives 
of management, labor, consumer or public, 
governmental agencies, and environmental 
or other special interest groups. Using a ba- 
sis in ethical theory, the course will cover 
such as areas as public welfare, issues in 
hiring (affirmative action, quotas) and busi- 
ness practices (product liability, honesty, 
business bluffing, advertising, sexual har- 
assment, racism), environmental concerns, 
global issues (apartheid, social injustice, 
exploitation of the third world), corporate 
decision-making and responsibility. Stu- 
dents who take this course may not take PHI 
21 for credit. Honors students should take 
PHI21H, not PHI 92. GS-VB2 

BUS 97 Independent Study (1-6) 

Lower division course, independent study 
or directed readings on business related 
topics. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty 
member and approval of department chair- 
person. 

BUS 103 Advanced Management: 

Visual Thinking (3) 

Management capabilities are developed by 
showing how to use a combined thinking 
process involving visual and graphic appli- 
cations, improving insight and discovery. 

BUS 104 Investment Analysis and 

Management (3) 

Survey of investments including corporate 
and government securities, real property 
and financial intermediaries. Study of fi- 
nancial investments with emphasis on se- 
curity analysis, valuation and portfolio 
management. Prerequisite: BUS 130. 

BUS 106/POL 105 Business LawU (3) 

Upper level study of business law. Appli- 
cations to areas of agency, partnerships, 
corporate law, sales, criminal and civil lia- 
bility, product liability and insurance. Pre- 
requisite: BUS 5. 



BUS 122 Management 

Communications (3) 

This course develops both oral and written 
business communications skills through 
the study of communications theory in con- 
junction with practical communication as- 
signments. Specific content areas include 
management and decision-making case 
studies, internal and external written com- 
munications, business proposals, group dy- 
namics, interviews and business presenta- 
tions. 

BUS 130 Principles of Finance (3) 

This course is designed to provide students 
with a broad based understanding of finan- 
cial concepts and their applications. The 
course will explore: (a) the financial system 
- components, institutions, and functions; 
(b) business finance and management ap- 
plication of financial principles on a micro 
and macro level; (c) financial policy the 
methods and effects of government debt 
and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: BUS 4, 
ECO 1, ECO 2, BUS 15A, BUS 15B, BUS 
28,MTH38. 

BUS 131 Managerial Accounting (3) 

The application of accounting analysis to 
business decision, planning and control. In- 
tegrating information systems with specific 
emphasis on cost concepts and applications, 
budget, cost volume profit relationships 
and decision making from the capital in- 
vestment and pricing viewpoints. Prereq- 
uisites: BUS 15A and BUS 15B. 

BUS 133 Money, Politics, and 

Business (3) 

This course explores the relationship be- 
tween business and government in the 
United States - the influence of environ- 
mental forces on business institutions and 
the impact of corporations on their environ- 
ment. Through this course students de- 
velop an analytic framework for exploring 
political institutions and practices, social 
and ethical responsibilities, regulation and 
the policy making process, environmental 
issues, consumer concerns, workplace mul- 
ticulturalism and diversity, global issues, 
and institutional reform. GS-IIIG 

BUS 137 Intermediate 

Accounting I (4) 

The beginning of the in-depth study of fi- 
nancial accounting. Topics include the con- 
ceptual framework, financial statement 
preparation, concept of future and present 



106 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



value, revenue and expense recognition, ac- 
counting for cash and receivables, inven- 
tory and fixed asset accounting. Prerequi- 
sites: BUS 15A and 15B. 

BUS 138 Intermediate 

Accounting II (4) 

The conceptual and procedural aspects of 
some of the more complex topics of financial 
accounting are studied. Topics include long 
term debt, leases, pensions, error correc- 
tions and the statement of cash flows. Pre- 
requisite: BUS 137. 

BUS 140/BUS 140H Women's Issues 
in Business and 
Economics (3) 

Survey of issues that affect women in busi- 
ness and review of the feminist critique of 
classical economic theory. Topics surveyed 
may include women's labor history, Marx- 
ist feminism, socialist feminism, feminist 
organizational theory, women in manage- 
ment, the wage gap, the glass ceiling, gen- 
dered economic roles, women's issues in 
business law, affirmative action, and sex- 
ual harassment. GS-IIIG, VI 

BUS 141 Accounting Internship (3) 

Qualified juniors and seniors majoring in 
Business with an emphasis in Accounting 
may receive supervised, on-the-job training 
related to the field of Accounting. The stu- 
dent is responsible for setting up the in- 
ternship. Approval and supervision are re- 
quired by the department. 

BUS 142 International Internship (3) 

Qualified juniors and seniors majoring in 
Business with an emphasis in Interna- 
tional Business may receive supervised, on 
the-job training related to the field of Inter- 
national Business. The student is respon- 
sible for setting up the internship. Approval 
and supervision are required by the depart- 
ment chairperson. 

BUS 143 Language, Culture & 

Business Internship (3) 

Qualified juniors and seniors majoring in 
Business with an emphasis in Language, 
Culture and Business may receive super- 
vised, on-the-job training related to the 
field of International Business. The student 
is responsible for setting up the internship. 
Approval and supervision are required by 
the department chairperson. 



BUS 144 Management Internship (3) 

Qualified juniors and seniors majoring in 
Business with an emphasis in Management 
may receive supervised, on-the-job training 
related to the field of Management. The stu- 
dent is responsible for setting up the in- 
ternship. Approval and supervision are re- 
quired by the department chairperson. 

BUS 145 Marketing Internship (3) 

Qualified juniors and seniors majoring in 
Business with an emphasis in Marketing 
may receive supervised, on-the-job training 
related to the field of Marketing. The stu- 
dent is responsible for setting up the in- 
ternship. Approval and supervision are re- 
quired by the department chairperson. 

BUS 148/PSY 148 Industrial 

Organization and 
Consumer 
Psychology (3) 

Study of the psychological principles and 
techniques used in a business setting. Top- 
ics include the psychology of work, person- 
nel selection, appraisal, job analysis, place- 
ment training, production efficiency, and 
consumer behavior. 

BUS 150 Strategic Management of 

Nonprofit Organizations (3) 

This course is designed to study, discuss, 
and debate issues facing managers of non- 
profit organizations. The goal of this course 
is to integrate skills in organizational be- 
havior, marketing, finance, and analytical 
disciplines into strategic decision making 
in the nonprofit context. Topics explored in- 
clude mission definition, competing inter- 
nal and external demands, resource scarc- 
ity and uncertainty, governance systems, 
and managing strategic change. While the 
principal thrust of the course is on non- 
profit organizations, there will be oppor- 
tunities to examine areas where public, for- 
profit, and nonprofit organizations inter- 
act. Prerequisite: BUS 185. 

BUS 154 Cost Accounting (3) 

Budgeting responsibility accounting; in- 
ventory planning; performance measure- 
ment; costing methods; job order and stand- 
ard costs; direct vs. full costing; cost 
allocation; cost-volume profit analysis; an- 
alytic cost reports. Prerequisites: BUS 15 A 
and 15B. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 107 



BUS 155/POL 185 Public Personnel 

Administration (3) 
The process of formulating and administer- 
ing public personnel policies; concepts and 
principles utilized in selected governmen- 
tal personnel systems. Special emphasis on 
collective bargaining in public employ- 
ment. 

BUS 156/POL 186 Introduction to 
Public 
Administration (3) 

The executive function in government; 
principles of administrative organization, 
personnel management, financial admin- 
istration, administrative law, and prob- 
lems and trends in government as a career. 

BUS 157 Human Resources 

Development (3) 

This course explores the contributions 
made by the modern human resource de- 
partment to the success of business organ- 
izations. Particular areas of focus include 
job analysis, recruitment, training, com- 
pensation analysis, performance analysis, 
legal issues and workforce diversity. The 
course content weaves the underlying the- 
ories of human behavior in organizations 
with the practical applications of these the- 
ories pertinent for future managers or hu- 
man resource professionals. 

BUS 158/POL 187 Organizational 
Theory and 
Governmental 
Management (3) 

Organizational structure, human factors in 
organization, dynamics of organizational 
change, internal adaptability to external 
environment, problems, limitations, and 
trends in governmental organization and 
management. 

BUS 160 Principles of Marketing (3) 

This course is designed to introduce stu- 
dents to the fundamentals of marketing. 
Through this course, (a) the foundations of 
marketing will be explored - product issues, 
pricing decisions, distribution channels 
and promotional strategies, (b) the users of 
marketing will be identified, (c) the role of 
marketing in the organization and society 
will be examined, (d) marketing objectives, 
tools and resources will be assessed, and (e) 
components of strong marketing strategy 
will be evaluated. Prerequisite: BUS 4 



BUS 161 Principles of 

Advertising (3) 

This course examines the major compo- 
nents of modern advertising and promo- 
tion. Key areas explored include the social 
and economic role of advertising; controls 
over advertising; planning of the campaign; 
the role of research; media strategy and co- 
ordination with other elements of the mar- 
keting communication mix. Prerequisite: 
BUS 160 or consent of instructor. 

BUS 163 Marketing Research (3) 

Fundamentals of marketing and industrial 
research as an approach to problem solving. 
Business cases are used to develop the stu- 
dent's analytical ability and to demonstrate 
the application of business research fun- 
damentals. Prerequisite: BUS 38, BUS 160. 

BUS 164 Service Sector 

Marketing (3) 

This course is designed to introduce stu- 
dents to applications and theory of market- 
ing in the service sector. Development of 
marketing management, market organiza- 
tion, and strategy will be the core of the 
course. Prerequisite: BUS 160. 

BUS 165 Service Sector 

Management (3) 

This course examines problems and deci- 
sions related to the design, planning, con- 
trol, and improvement of service systems. 
Topics explored include market environ- 
ment for service operations and time-based 
competition, design of service systems, per- 
formance measures of processing systems, 
planning and control, quality management, 
capacity and technology choice, informa- 
tion systems, location and distribution 
management. Prerequisite: BUS 185. 

BUS 169 Issues of Corporate 

Responsibility (3) 

Application of theories developed in Busi- 
ness Ethics to issues arising in the practice 
of modern business. Topics will vary by se- 
mester but the course will focus on news- 
worthy items that reflect the state of cor- 
porate business ethics. These issues may 
include marketing ethics, product liability, 
socially responsible investing, employee 
welfare and concerns of race and gender. 
Extensive case analysis is utilized to apply 
critical thinking skills to real business di- 
lemmas. Introduction to Business Ethics 
(BUS 92) highly recommended. 



108 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUS 170 Real Estate (3) 

Introduction to economics of land owner- 
ship and use; fundamentals of ownership; 
financing; appraisal; management and 
transfer of residential and other real prop- 
erty, including an introduction to real es- 
tate investment issues. 

BUS 171/POL 106 Real Estate 
Law and 

Management (3) 

This course develops those skills necessary 
to purchase, sell or lease real estate in com- 
mercial transactions: Business and legal 
aspects, purchase and sales contracts, con- 
veyances, mortgage and trust deed trans- 
actions, property taxes, landlord and ten- 
ant law, wills and inheritance, and estates 
in land. Prerequisite: BUS 5. 

BUS 173 Real Estate Investment (3) 

Emphasizes problems and methodology for 
making the real estate investment decision. 
Includes real estate versus other invest- 
ments; real estate user and investor re- 
quirements; decision models; tax factors 
and syndication. 

BUS 175 Sales Management (3) 

This course explore the function of sales 
and the relationship to the overall market- 
ing program. Topics considered include set- 
ting sales objectives, formulation of sales 
strategy, development of a sales organiza- 
tion, selecting and working with distribu- 
tors and dealers, measurement of sales- 
men's performance, evaluation of sales 
management performance, control of sales 
operations, and integration of sales and 
other marketing activities. Prerequisite: 
BUS 160 or consent of instructor. 

BUS 176 Small Business 

Management (3) 

This course comprehensively covers all ac- 
tivities required for the formation of new 
enterprises and certain aspects of manag- 
ing growing organizations. The course ex- 
plores the new venture creation process: 
business idea generation and evaluation, 
resource acquisition, customer identifica- 
tion and selling, developing a business plan, 
organization building, networking, and the 
technical issues entrepreneurs face in tax, 
legal, and accounting areas. 



BUS 177 Management Information 
Systems (3) 

This course is designed to familiarize 
the student with the fundamentals of 
information system development and use - 
giving students the competitive edge in the 
workplace of tomorrow. The course ex- 
plores: (a) conceptual foundations, (b) infor- 
mation systems applications, (c) systems 
technology - processing, software, program- 
ming, (d) systems analysis, (e) manage- 
ment and societal issues. Prerequisite: B US 
4 

BUS 178 Women at Work: 

Multicultural Management- 
Legal Issues (3) 

This course will explore legal, ethical, com- 
munication and managerial issues encoun- 
tered by women in a multicultural work- 
place. The course will apply contemporary 
communication and organizational theory 
to specific multicultural and multigender 
legal issues, analyzed within a legal frame- 
work. 

BUS180AB Advanced Advertising 

Seminar (3,3) 

An advanced seminar covering selected top- 
ics in copywriting, graphics, media and buy- 
ing, advertising, budgeting, planning and 
management. Prerequisite: BUS 160 and 
BUS 161. 

BUS 181 Behavioral Science in 

Management (3) 

A study at both the analytical and experien- 
tial level of the interpersonal phenomena 
which affect managerial behavior. Stu- 
dents learn to increase their behavioral 
flexibility as well as their social sensitivity 
to the people-oriented problems in the busi- 
ness environment. Prerequisites: BUS 185, 
160. 

BUS 182 Advanced Finance (3) 

Case studies in financial management and 
capital budgeting. Strategies in debt and 
equity financing. Portfolio management. 
Prerequisites: BUS 130 

BUS 183 Management Seminar (3) 

This course is an in depth seminar in area 
of management and organization. Primary 
activities include the exploration of ad- 
vanced and specialized issues in the field. 
See Department Chair for course topic. Pre- 
requisite: BUS 185. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 109 



BUS 184 Organizational Behavior (3) 

This course brings the insights into human 
behavior in organizations brought forth by 
psychology and sociology and centers them 
on their implications for business organi- 
zations. Issues pursued in this course in- 
clude group dynamics, communications, 
motivation, leadership, and decision mak- 
ing as well as organizational design, cul- 
ture, development and change. The disci- 
pline of Organizational Behavior is unique 
in its combined goals of seeking organiza- 
tional success while advocating employee 
empowerment. 

BUS 185 Principles of 

Management (3) 

This course discusses the four principal 
functions of management: planning, organ- 
ization, leadership and control, including 
quality control, managing cultural diver- 
sity, motivation and other leadership is- 
sues, decision making, group communica- 
tion and organization. Case studies explore 
these topics within the context of business 
ethics and corporate responsibility to the 
community. Prerequisite: BUS 4 

BUS 186 Tax Accounting (3) 

Statutes, regulations, administrative rul- 
ings, and court decisions relating to federal 
and California income taxes. Audit proce- 
dures; partnership and corporate tax re- 
turns. Prerequisites: BUS 15 A and 15B, 
137. 

BUS 188 Auditing (3) 

Audit functions of the CPA. Nature of audit 
evidence, audit procedures, audit work pa- 
pers, audit reports, evaluation of internal 
controls and internal auditing, statistical 
sampling in auditing; problems of auditing 
computer-based accounting records. Pre- 
requisites: Bus 15A and 15B. 

BUS 189 International 

Management (3) 

Application of modern management theory 
to the administration of international busi- 
ness. The course will study the impact of 
multigovernmental policies upon the man- 
agement of international enterprises. Pre- 
requisite: BUS 185. 

BUS 192 Business Policy and 

Strategy (3) 

This course is the "capstone" course for 
business administration majors. It pro- 
vides an opportunity to integrate previous 
studies in functional areas - marketing, 



finance, economics, accounting, and man- 
agement. Organizations are analyzed with 
respect to the effectiveness and appropri- 
ateness of strategies and goals in each of 
the functional areas and the synergies of 
the functional areas for achieving optimal 
results consistent with their respective 
missions. The major topics covered include 
(a) competitive analysis, (b) the strategic 
management process, (c) the role of the 
chief executive officer, (d) strategy formu- 
lation and decision making, and (e) strategy 
implementation and control. Prerequisites: 
Lower Division and Upper Division Core 
Courses. 

BUS 193 Selected Topics (1-3) 

Course, independent study, seminar, or di- 
rected readings in current issues in busi- 
ness administration. 

BUS 194 Consumer Behavior (3) 

This course is designed to explore the com- 
plexities of consumer behavior. Through 
this course students will (a) develop an un- 
derstanding of the key role of consumer 
needs and wants, (b) understand the role of 
marketing information systems, marketing 
research, buyer behavior and competitive 
forces (c) explore target market selection, 
market positioning, and marketing strate- 
gies, and (d) examine the consumer percep- 
tion in the market planning process of prod- 
uct, pricing, promotion and distribution. 
Prerequisites: BUS 160, BUS 185. 

BUS 195 International Marketing (3) 

Changing international marketing condi- 
tions will be studied in conjunction with the 
total global business environment. Topics 
will include foreign market surveys, trade 
promotion, political, legal, economic and 
cultural environments, multi-national 
competition, and integration of physical 
distribution into the marketing systems. 
Prerequisite: BUS 160. 

BUS 196 Directed Study (1-3) 

Opportunity for directed reading is avail- 
able to qualified students. The faculty 
member shares the responsibility with the 
student, generally planning the readings 
and/or projects and meeting with the stu- 
dent regularly. 

BUS 197 Independent Study (1-3) 
Opportunity for independent study is avail- 
able to qualified students. The student has 
responsibility for planning, implementing, 
and presenting the project; the faculty 



110 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



member approves the project, meets with 
the student several times in the term, and 
evaluates the final results. 



BUS 198 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Problems associated with preparation of 
consolidated financial statements, foreign 
currency translation, partnerships, and 
governmental fund accounting. Prerequi- 
site: BUS 137, BUS 138. 



CHEMISTRY 111 



Chemistry 

Departmental Affiliation: Physical Sciences and Mathematics 

A student majoring in chemistry receives a comprehensive view of the principles of this 
science and participates in personalized laboratory instruction and individual research. 

A major in chemistry is excellent preparation for graduate studies, medical studies, 
health science careers, education, scientific writing, and careers in food, petroleum, 
and textiles. The B.A. degree in chemistry is designed for those interested in secondary 
science teaching, chemical technology, and other broadly-based careers requiring a 
science background. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in Chemistry 



Lower Division: 






CHE 1AB 


General Chemistry 


(3,3) 


CHE 1AL/1BL 


General Chemistry Laboratory 


(1,1) 


CHE6AB 


Organic Chemistry 


(3,3) 


CHE 6AL/6BL 


Organic Chemistry Laboratory 


(1,1) 


MTH3AB 


Calculus IA/IB 


(4,4) 


MTH 9 or 9H 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


PHY1AB 


Introductory Physics IA/IB 


(4,3) 


PHY11AB 


or 
Mechanics/Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics 


(4,3) 


PHY1BL 


Physics Laboratory 


(1) 


Upper Division: 






CHE 107 


Biochemistry 


(3) 


CHE 107L 


Biochemistry Laboratory 


(1) 


CHE 110AB 


Physical Chemistry 


(4,3) 



Plus two additional upper division courses in chemistry. An overall grade point average 

of 2.0 in major courses is required for the degree. 

Total units in Chemistry: 33 

Total units in mathematics and physics: 19 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 

Courses Required for a B.S. Degree in Chemistry 



Lower Division: 

CHE1AB 
CHE 1AL/1BL 
CHE6AB 
CHE 6AL/6BL 
MTH3AB 



General Chemistry 

General Chemistry Laboratory 

Organic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Calculus IA/IB 



(3,3) 
(1,1) 
(3,3) 
(1) 
(4,4) 



112 CHEMISTRY 



MTH4AB Calculus II (3,3) 

MTH 9H Introduction to Computer Processes (Honors) (3) 

PHY 11AB Mechanics/Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics (4,3) 

PHY 1BL Physics Laboratory (1) 



Upper Division: 

CHE 107 
CHE 107L 
CHE 110AB 
CHE 111 
CHE 199 



Biochemistry 
Biochemistry Laboratory 
Physical Chemistry 
Physical Chemistry Laboratory 
Research in Chemistry 



Three additional upper division courses in Chemistry 
Total units in Chemistry: 42 
Total units in mathematics and physics: 25 



(3) 
(1) 
(4,3) 
(2) 
(3) 

(9) 



Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units. An overall 
grade point average of 2.0 in major courses is required for the degree. 



Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Preparation 

Chemistry Major 

Medical schools accept students from any degree program. A strong background in 
science, including chemistry, biology and mathematics, is recommended for successful 
performance on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) and for admissions to 
medical programs. Successful completion of the B.S. or B.A. degree with a major in 
chemistry provides excellent preparation for medical, dental or pharmaceutical studies. 



The Minor in Chemistry 

CHE 1AB General Chemistry 

CHE 1AL/1BL General Chemistry Laboratory 

CHE 6AB Organic Chemistry 

CHE 6AL/6BL Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

CHE 107 Biochemistry 

CHE 107L Biochemistry 
Laboratory 



(3,3) 
(1,1) 
(3,3) 
(1,1) 
(3) 

(1) 



Plus one additional upper division course in Chemistry selected from: CHE 110A, 120 

or 190. An overall grade point average of 2.0 in requisite courses is required for the 

minor. 

Total units in Chemistry: 23 



CHE1A General Chemistry (3) 

Atomic theory, atomic structure and the pe- 
riodic table; molecular structure and bond- 
ing; structure and properties of solids, liq- 
uids, and gases; kinetic theory and 
colligative properties. Lecture, three hours. 



Prerequisites: High school chemistry, three 
years of high school mathematics, and sat- 
isfactory score on Chemistry Placement Ex- 
amination, or grade of C or better in CHE 
3. GS-IIID 



CHEMISTRY 113 



CHE 1AL General Chemistry 

Laboratory (1) 

Quantitative techniques including gravi- 
metric and volumetric analyses; qualitative 
techniques including isolation of com- 
pounds and descriptive chemistry of inor- 
ganic compounds. Laboratory, four hours 
per week. Prerequisite: Concurrent enroll- 
ment in CHE 1A (recommended) or comple- 
tion of CHE 1A with a grade ofC or better. 

CHE IB General Chemistry (3) 

Equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, oxi- 
dation-reduction reactions and electro- 
chemistry. Lecture, three hours. Prerequi- 
site: Grade ofC- or better in CHE 1A. 

CHE 1BH General Chemistry: 

Honors Section (1) 

Acid-base behavior, thermodynamics con- 
cepts, transition metal complexes, and ki- 
netics. Emphasis will be on problem solving 
and data analysis using the computer. Lab- 
oratory, four hours per week. Prerequisite: 
CHE 1A and consent of instructor. Open 
only to students admitted to the Honors Pro- 
grams. 

CHE1BL General Chemistry 

Laboratory (1) 

Calorimetry and thermodynamics experi- 
ments, instrumental methods, including 
spectrophotometers and pH meters; tran- 
sition metal chemistry. Laboratory, four 
hours per week. Prerequisite: C- or better in 
CHE 1A and concurrent enrollment in CHE 
IB (recommended) or completion of CHE IB 
with a grade ofC- or better. 

CHE 3 Foundations of Chemistry (3) 

An introduction to the principles and laws 
of chemistry including atomic structure 
and the periodic table, bonding, nomencla- 
ture, stoichiometry, gases, solutions, and 
introductory organic chemistry. Lecture, 
three hours. Note: This course is a prereq- 
uisite to CHE 1A if the student fails to qual- 
ify for CHE 1A on the Chemistry Placement 
Examination. GS-HID 

CHE 4 Foundations of Chemistry in 
the Laboratory (1) 

Application of fundamental concepts in- 
cluding measurements, empirical formu- 
las, energy in reactions, physical states of 
matter, and solution behavior. Laboratory, 
2 hours. Prerequisite: Past or concurrent en- 
rollment in CHE 3. It is highly recom- 
mended that students take this course con- 
currently with CHE 3. 



CHE 6A Organic Chemistry (3) 

Nomenclature, bonding, structure, and 
stereochemistry of organic molecules. In- 
troduction to reactions, reaction mecha- 
nisms, and organic synthesis. Lecture, 
three hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C - or 
better in CHE IB. 

CHE 6AL Organic Chemistry 

Laboratory (1) 

Methods of separations, purification, and 
identification of organic compounds; intro- 
duction to synthesis. Laboratory, four 
hours per week. Prerequisite: Concurrent 
enrollment in CHE 6A (recommended) or 
completion of CHE 6A with a grade ofC-or 
better. 

CHE 6B Organic Chemistry (3) 

Continuation of Chemistry 6A. Reactions of 
functional groups and aromatic com- 
pounds; synthesis. NMR and IR spectros- 
copy. Introduction to chemistry of proteins, 
carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. 
Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: Grade of 
C - or better in CHE 6A. 

CHE 6BL Organic Chemistry 

Laboratory (1) 

Synthesis and reactions of typical organic 
compounds; introduction to organic quali- 
tative analysis. Laboratory, four hours per 
week. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment 
in CHE 6B (recommended) or completion of 
CHE 6A with a grade ofC- or better. 
Except where noted, a grade ofC or better in 
prerequisite courses or consent of the de- 
partment is required for any upper division 
Chemistry course. 

CHE 104 Qualitative Organic 

Analysis (3) 

Microtechniques, separation of mixtures, 
derivatives, identification of unknown or- 
ganic compounds, spectroscopic methods. 
Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. 
Prerequisite: CHE 6B. 

CHE 107 Biochemistry (3) 

The study of the molecular components of 
cells with emphasis on physical and chem- 
ical properties and biological functions. An 
introduction to enzyme kinetics, bioener- 
getics and the central pathways of carbo- 
hydrate metabolism. Lecture 3 hours. Pre- 
requisite: CHE 6B. 



114 CHEMISTRY 



CHE107L Biochemistry 

Laboratory (1) 

Techniques in the isolation and character- 
ization of biomolecules with an emphasis 
on proteins. Introduction to enzyme kinet- 
ics. Laboratory, four hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 
107 (recommended) or completion of CHE 
107 with a grade ofC- or better. 

CHE 109 Advanced Biochemistry (3) 

Gluconeogenesis, photosynthesis, biosyn- 
thesis of nucleic acids and proteins. Topics 
from among the following: biophysical spec- 
troscopy, DNA damage and repair, neuro- 
chemistry, biochemistry of vision, metals in 
biochemistry. Lecture, three hours. Prereq- 
uisite: CHE 107 with a grade ofC- or better. 

CHE 1 10A Physical Chemistry: 

Thermodynamics (4) 

Laws of thermodynamics, chemical equilib- 
ria and cell emf. Mathematical techniques 
for the analysis of chemical problems by 
means of computers. Lecture, four hours. 
Prerequisites: CHE IB, MTH3B, PHY 1 IB 
(or IB), MTH 9 or 9H. 

CHE 1 10B Physical Chemistry: 

Dynamics (3) 

Kinetic theory, transport processes, chem- 
ical kinetics and quantum mechanics. Use 
of the computer for the analysis of problems 
in the preceding areas. Lecture, three 
hours. Prerequisite: CHE 110A. 

CHE 111 Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory (2) 

Chemical and phase equilibria, electro- 
chemistry, kinetics and transport proc- 
esses, conductance, diffusion. Laboratory, 
six hours. Prerequisite: CHE 110A. 



CHE 120 Instrumental Methods of 

Analysis (3) 

Theory and applications of modern instru- 
mental methods including gas chromatog- 
raphy, various spectroscopic methods and 
selected electrochemical methods. Lecture, 
one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Prereq- 
uisite: CHE 6B or consent of instructor. 

CHE 130 Biochemical Methods (3) 

Experimental techniques in biochemistry. 
Chromatography, electrophoresis, and 
spectroscopic methods applied to the prep- 
aration and measurement of biochemical 
substances. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, 
eight hours. Prerequisite: CHE 107 

CHE 190 Inorganic Chemistry (3) 

Chemistry of inorganic systems with em- 
phasis on reaction mechanisms, metal com- 
plexes, bonding and periodic relationships. 
Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: CHE IB. 

CHE195H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the hon- 
ors program. 

CHE 196 Internship (1-3) 

An intensive work study program for qual- 
ified upper division students. The student 
is responsible for setting up the internship 
in conjunction with the appropriate faculty 
and the office of Career Planning and Place- 
ment. The internship must be approved by 
the department chairperson. 

CHE 197 Seminar (1-3) 

CHE 98/198 Topics in Chemistry 

(1-3) 
Prerequisite: Consent of chemistry staff. 

CHE 199 Research in Chemistry 

(1-3) 

Research problems to be arranged with in- 
dividual faculty members. Prerequisite: 
Consent of chemistry staff. 



CHILD DEVELOPMENT 115 



Child Development 

Departmental Affiliation: Psychology 

The Child Development major provides an interdisciplinary approach to the under- 
standing of young children as individuals and as members of society. Courses in this 
major are those specifically relevant to child development in the departments of psy- 
chology, education, sociology, art, music and English. The Child Development Major is 
recommended primarily for individuals who seek careers working with children and 
their families in child care, educational, or social service settings. 

Students who plan this major at the outset of their college careers may elect to take 
courses in their first two years through the Education Department at the Doheny 
Campus to qualify for the Child Development Teacher Permit. (See the Early Childhood 
Education Program under the Education Department listing.) 

Course Requirements for a BA Degree: 

I. Psychology (9 to 21 upper division units, including the following:) 

PSY 1 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSY 12 Child/Human Development (3) 

PSY 113 Child and Adolescent Development 

and Learning Across Cultures (3) 

PSY 192 Practicum (in a child development setting) (3) 

II. Sociology (3 to 9 upper division units, including one of the following:) 

SOC 6 The Family, Child and Community (3) 

SOC 104 The Family (3) 

III. Art (minimum 3 units, chosen from the following:) 

ART 145 Art and Crafts in the Classroom (1) 

ART 3 Visual Thinking (3) 

ART 5 Fundamentals of Art (3) 

ART 173 Multiculturalism and the Visual Arts (3) 

IV. Music (minimum 3 units, chosen from the following:) 

MUS 130 Creative Music Experience (1) 

MUS 116 Music of World Culture (3) 

MUS 6/106 The Fine Arts: Music (3) 

V. Education 

EDU 33 Visual and Performing Arts for 

the Young Child (3) 

VI. English (minimum 6 units, chosen from the following:) 

ENG 105 Advanced Composition (3) 

ENG 34 Literature and the Young Child (3) 

or 

ENG 134 Children's Literature (3) 



116 CHILD DEVELOPMENT 



VII. Biology (minimum 3 units, chosen from the following:) 

BIO 10 Health Science (3) 

BIO 112 Nutrition (3) 

Needs approval of advisor 
VIII. Additional upper division courses, chosen in consultation with an ad- 
visor, from the fields of Psychology, Sociology, Art, Music, Education, 
English, and Biology (Minimum 30 upper division units, including the re- 
quired courses listed above). 

Recommended Courses: 

Especially for Students Interested in Pursuing Graduate Study: 

PSY40 Statistics (3) 

PSY106 Basic Research Methods (3) 

PSY 106L Basic Research Methods Lab (1) 

PSY 134 Learning and Memory (3) 

Especially for Students Interested in Counseling and Social 
Services: 

PSY 155 Psychological Testing (3) 

PSY 168 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

PSY 125 Introduction to Counseling (3) 

PSY 172 Development Psychology (3) 

PSY 139 Child Abuse and Family Violence (3) 

SOC 180 Social Stratification (3) 

SOC 110 Deviant Behavior: Juvenile Delinquency, (3) 

SOC 161 Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations (3) 

SOC 175 Urban Sociology (3) 

Especially for Students Interested in Health Services: 

HSP 111 Management of Health Services (3) 

HSP 49 Multicultural and Multiethnic Issues 

for Urban Health Care Professionals (3) 

Especially for Students Interested in Child Care and Education: 

EDU 3 1 Introduction to Early Childhood Education: 

Profession and Programs (3) 

EDU 32 Early Childhood Education: Observation and 

Curriculum Planning (3) 

EDU 37 Infant and Toddler Development and Care (3) 

EDU 150 Elementary Curriculum: Theory and Practice (3) 



CHILD DEVELOPMENT 117 



EDU 138A Organization and Administration of Early 

Childhood Education Programs: 
Program Development and Curriculum (3) 

EDU 138B Organization and Administration of Early 

Childhood Education Programs: 
Financial and Legal Aspects (3) 

Students may petition the Child Development Program Advisor to substitute other 
relevant courses in the program. 

Total units in the interdisciplinary major areas: 39 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units including 
the foreign language requirement. 

All courses are described in the respective department listings. 

Requirements for the Child Development Minor 

18 units from the following (12 units must be upper division): 

PSY 12 Child/Human Development (3) 

PSY 192 Clinical Practicum (3) 

SOC 6 Family, Child, and Community (3) 

or SOC 104 The Family (3) 

Electives: 

PSY 1 13 Child & Adolescent Development 

and Learning Across Cultures (3) 

MUS 130 Creative Music Experience (1) 

ART 145 Arts & Crafts in the Classrm (1) 

ENG 34 Literature for the Young Child 

or ENG 134 Children's Literature (3) 

Other appropriate courses may be submitted with the permission of the Child Devel- 
opment Program Advisor. 



118 ECONOMICS 



Economics 



Departmental Affiliation: Business Administration 



ECO 1 Microeconomics (3) 

An exploration of the economic affairs of 
industries and the individual business 
firm. This course introduces the price sys- 
tem, the law of supply and demand and eco- 
nomic analysis of individual markets such 
as labor or international trade. GS-IJL1F 

ECO 2 Macroeconomics (3) 

An introductory analysis of the aggregate 
economic system. This course discusses 
methods of recording and determining 
gross national product, employment, price 
stability, fiscal and monetary policy. GS- 

niG 

ECO 44 Personal Finance (3) 

Emphasis on the principles underlying fi- 
nancial security and investment planning; 
the study of credit institutions, the stock 
market, and home buying through special 
projects and experiences in the field. Does 
not count as an upper level business re- 
quirement for Business students. 

ECO 1 12/1 12H Economic History of 
Europe (3) 

This course will offer a unified explanation 
for the growth of Western Europe from AD 
900 to 1900, with particular emphasis on 
the evolution of economic institutions. 
These institutions include property rights, 
banking and credit, public finance, forms of 
business organizations and wage labor. See 
also HIS 112. GS-niF 



ECO 1 13 Economic History of the 

United States (3) 

A study of the economic development of the 
United States, including agriculture, in- 
dustry, labor, commerce, finance, and 
transportation. 

ECO 135 Money and Banking (3) 

The nature and functions of money and 
credit, the banking system, monetary policy 
in the domestic and international econom- 



EC0193 Selected Problems (1-3) 

Courses, workshops, seminars, or directed 
readings. May be repeated for credit. 

ECO 194 Banking Issues (3) 

This course studies the nature and func- 
tions of money and credit, including the 
banking system, the federal reserve struc- 
ture and monetary policy. The course will 
emphasize recent developments in the fi- 
nancial industry. 

ECO 195 International 

Economics (3) 

The general principles of international reg- 
ulations and trade; the problems of devel- 
oping countries and theories of growth and 
development; progress toward economic in- 
tegration and cooperation in Europe, Latin 
America and Africa. Prerequisite: ECOl, 
ECO 2. GS-IIIG 



EDUCATION 119 



Education 



The Education department offers the following undergraduate and graduate programs 
for the preparation of teachers and school administrators: 

Undergraduate 

Early Childhood Education in conjunction with Associate Degree 

Multiple Subject (Elementary CLAD/BCLAD) Teacher Preparation Program in con- 
junction with a Baccalaureate degree and a Liberal Studies major 

Single Subject (Secondary CLAD/BCLAD) Teacher Preparation Program in conjunc- 
tion with a Baccalaureate degree and an academic Subject Matter Preparation Program 

Preliminary Education Specialist (Special Education CLAD/BCLAD): Mild/Moderate 
Disabilities Teacher Preparation Program in conjunction with a Baccalaureate degree 
and a Liberal Studies or academic Subject Matter Preparation Program 

Graduate 

Credentials: 

Preliminary Multiple Subject (Elementary) with a CLAD or BCLAD Emphasis 
Prehminary Single Subject (Secondary) with a CLAD or BCLAD Emphasis 
Professional Clear 

Preliminary Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities (Special Education) 
Preliminary Administrative Services 

CLAD Certificate 

Master of Science in Education 

with concentrations in: 

Administrative Services 

Special Education: Mild/Moderate Disabilities 

Individually Designed Program 

Master of Science in Education in conjunction with: Preliminary Multiple Subject 
Credential with a CLAD or BCLAD Emphasis Preliminary Single Subject Credential 
with a CLAD or BCLAD Emphasis Preliminary Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate 
Disabilities Credential 

Early Childhood Education Program 

A.A. Degree with a Specialization in Early Childhood Education 

The Associate Degree Program with a specialization in Early Childhood Education is 
designed for the student who wishes to enter the field of preschool teaching directly 
upon graduation. At the completion of the two-year program, the student is qualified 
to teach in child development programs (pre-kindergarten) or to transfer to a four-year 
program to complete a Bachelor of Arts degree in Child Development, or to complete 
the requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree with a Liberal Studies Major and to 



120 EDUCATION 



apply for admission to the Preliminary Multiple Subject CLAD or BCLAD Emphasis 
Teaching Credential Program. 

Program Requirements 

Core Courses 

EDU 3 1 Intro, to Early Childhood 

Education: Profession and Programs (3) 

EDU 32 E. C. E.: Observation and Curriculum 

Planning (3) 

EDU 33 The Visual and Performing Arts 

for the Young Child (3) 

EDU 37 Infant and Toddler Development and Care (3) 

EDU 39 Supervised Field Work: Preschool 

(taken during last semester) (6) 

ENG34 Literature for the Young Child (3) 

PSY 12 Child/Human Development (3) 

PSY 35 Language and Concept Development 

of the Young Child (3) 

SOC 6 Family, Child, and Community (3) 



General Requirements 



PSYl 
BIO 10 
PHI 5 


General Psychology 
Health Science 
Intro, to Logic 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 


or 
PHI 10 


Critical Thinking 


(3) 


ogram Requirements 




SPR80 
ENG1AB 


Freshman Orientation 
Written and Oral Communication 
Religious Studies course 
Humanities course 


(1) 

(3,3) 

(3) 

(3) 



Recommended Electives 

Courses in Spanish and Physical Education 

The two-year program at the Doheny Campus fulfills coursework and fieldwork re- 
quirements for a Child Development Teacher Permit. The requirements as estab- 
lished by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing are the following: 

1. Completion of an Associate of Arts degree or higher in early childhood education. 

2. A supervised field experience (EDU 39) in an early childhood education setting. 

3 . The candidate must have earned a "C" or above in each course used for the permit. 

This permit is issued for five years and is renewable for successive five-year periods 
with the completion of 105 hours of professional growth. A Child Development Teacher 



EDUCATION 121 



Permit authorizes the holder to provide service in the care, development, and instruc- 
tion of children in a child development program, and supervise a Child Development 
Permit Associate Teacher, a Child Development Permit Assistant, and an aide. 

As Title 5 California Administrative Code Regulations pertaining to revisions in the 
Child Development Permit are enacted, notification of such revisions are made to 
students who are enrolled in the program, as well as those who make inquiry regarding 
it. It is recommended that those reading this section for the first time inquire as to 
whether the regulations stated here have undergone revision by the state. 

Admission Requirements 

To be accepted as an Early Childhood Education major, a student entering Mount St. 
Mary's College must have a GPA of 2.5. SAT or ACT scores are also considered; an 
interview may be required. Transfer students applying for the Early Childhood Edu- 
cation program after college experience must have a GPA of 2.25 in college-level 
courses, grades of C or better in all Early Childhood Education courses accepted for 
transfer, and a grade of C or better in a college-level (non-remedial) English course. 

Specific Program Requirements 

The student must complete all Early Childhood courses with a grade of C or better. A 
grade of C or better must also be achieved in ENG 6AB. 

Because of a demand in Southern California for preschool teachers who can demon- 
strate speaking and writing ability in the Spanish language, students are encouraged 
to take courses in Spanish in conjunction with the program. 

Students in the Early Childhood Education specialization must be able to establish 
rapport with very young children and their families. They must be able to create an 
environment where children can discover themselves; to do this, they need broad knowl- 
edge of children's physical, social/emotional and cognitive development. Coursework, 
including observation, participation, and supervised teaching of children, is designed 
to enable students to demonstrate expertise in these areas within the two-year period. 

Multiple Subject Teacher Preparation Program 
B.A. Degree with a Liberal Studies Major 

Preparation for certification as an elementary teacher in California consists of two 
components, academic preparation and professional preparation. The undergraduate 
student interested in elementary school teaching completes a Liberal Studies major to 
satisfy the academic preparation requirements and the Multiple Subject Teacher Prep- 
aration Program to satisfy the professional requirements. It is possible to complete 
both the academic and professional preparation as an undergraduate. Units taken in 
the teacher preparation program may count toward the bachelors degree, but are not 
required for the Liberal Studies major or for graduation. Contact with program advisers 
and directors is especially important for undergraduate students planning to complete 
preparation for teacher certification as an undergraduate. 

Students who do not complete the Liberal Studies major may satisfy the academic 
preparation requirements for a credential by achieving a passing score on the state- 
required Multiple Subject Assessment for Teachers (MSAT) exam. 



122 EDUCATION 



Students may fulfill the State of California requirements related to the United States 
Constitution by completing a general studies requirement which includes study of the 
U.S. Constitution. For additional information about the Multiple Subject teaching 
credential requirements contact the Education department. It is particularly important 
to obtain individual advisement because the California Commission on Teacher Cre- 
dentialing regulations are subject to change. 

The Liberal Studies major is described on page 167. The professional preparation 
program for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential with CLAD or BCLAD emphasis 
is described on page 125. 

Single Subject Teacher Preparation Program 

BA Degree with an Academic Subject Matter 

Preparation Program 

Preparation for certification as a secondary school teacher in California consists of two 
components, academic preparation and professional preparation. The undergraduate 
student interested in secondary school teaching majors in the academic subject she 
plans to teach and meets other requirements for subject matter competence as denned 
by the state (see below). The student also completes the Single Subject Teacher Prep- 
aration Program to satisfy the professional requirements. Units taken in the Teacher 
Preparation Program may count toward the bachelors degree but are not required for 
graduation. Contact with program advisers and directors is especially important for 
undergraduate students planning to complete preparation for teacher certification. 

Candidates for the California Single Subject teaching credential must verify compe- 
tence in their teaching field by one of the following methods: 

1- passing appropriate state-approved exams for the selected subject-matter 
area 

or 

2 • completing a state-approved academic program of course work in the selected 
subject-matter area. 

For additional information about the Single Subject teaching credential requirements, 
contact the Education department. 

Students may fulfill the State of California requirements related to the United States 
Constitution by completing a general studies course requirement which includes study 
of the U.S. Constitution. 

Students interested in the Single Subject Credential should contact the Education 
department as early as possible to obtain individual advisement. 

The professional preparation requirements are described on page 125. 



EDUCATION 123 



Preliminary Education Specialist: 

Mild/Moderate Disabilities Teacher Preparation 

Program in Conjunction with a B.A. Degree 

Preparation for certification as a special educator in California consists of two compo- 
nents, academic preparation and professional preparation. The undergraduate student 
interested in teaching students with mild/moderate disabilities selects an elementary 
or secondary emphasis and completes a Liberal Studies major for the elementary 
emphasis or an approved academic Subject Matter Preparation Program for the sec- 
ondary emphasis. Either of these programs satisfies the academic preparation require- 
ments. Students may also satisfy the academic preparation requirements by achieving 
a passing score on an appropriate state-approved exam. 

The student completes the Preliminary Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabil- 
ities Teacher Preparation Program to satisfy the professional preparation require- 
ments. It is possible to complete both the academic and professional preparation as an 
undergraduate. Units taken in the teacher preparation program may count toward the 
bachelors degree, but are not required for the Liberal Studies major or for graduation. 
Contact with the special education program adviser is especially important for students 
planning to complete preparation for special education teacher credentialing as an 
undergraduate. 

The Liberal Studies major is described on page 167. For information about the approved 
academic Subject Matter Preparation Programs for a secondary emphasis, contact the 
Education department. The professional preparation program for the Preliminary Ed- 
ucation Specialist: Mild Moderate Disabilities Credential is described on page 127. 

Teaching Credential Programs 

Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential with a CLAD or a 
BCLAD Emphasis 

Preliminary Single Subject Credential with a CLAD or a BCLAD 
Emphasis 

Preliminary Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
Credential 

California requires a baccalaureate degree, subject matter preparation program or 
passage of the appropriate state-approved exams, and a program of professional prep- 
aration for a preliminary teaching credential. The preliminary credential is valid for 
five years, within which the candidate must meet other requirements. 

Professional Clear Credential 

For Professional Clear Multiple and Single Subject credentials, thirty post-baccalau- 
reate degree units must be completed within five years of the issuance date of the 
preliminary credential. The "fifth" year program must include the California credential 
requirements in special education mainstreaming (EDU 270), health education (BIO 
10), and technology education (EDU 305). A workshop in Adult, Child, and Infant CPR 
with an accredited organization is also required. A Masters degree or a specialist or 



124 EDUCATION 



services credential program may be pursued concurrently with the fifth year require- 
ments. The recommendation of an approved college or university is required in order 
to obtain a professional clear credential. Mount St. Mary's College is approved to grant 
such recommendations. 

Credential legislation and regulations are subject to change. It is the student's respon- 
sibility to contact the Education department about current requirements. 

Admission to Credential Programs 

Undergraduate candidates for a Teacher Preparation Program apply directly to the 
Education department for admission. Consistent contact with program directors and 
advisors is important, as teaching credential requirements are subject to change. 

Individuals who hold baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions may study at 
Mount St. Mary's College to earn the California Multiple Subject Credential with a 
CLAD or BCLAD Emphasis, Single Subject Credential with a CLAD or BCLAD Em- 
phasis, or Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential. Candidates 
holding baccalaureate degrees apply for the Teacher Preparation Program through the 
Graduate Division (see Graduate Degree Admission Policies, p. 68). 

Requirements for admission include: 

1 . completion of the appropriate application form and payment of fee with statements 
affirming the moral character of the candidate according to guidelines provided 
by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing 

2. a pattern of academic competence: a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a four- 
point scale, documented by official transcripts 

3 . two letters of recommendation indicating suitability for teaching and potential for 
success in the Teacher Preparation Program 

4. interview with members of the Education department related to professional at- 
titude, goals, and personal qualifications 

5. a passing score on the California Basic Skills Test (CBEST) 

6. verification of medical clearance for tuberculosis 

7. for graduate students, a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or uni- 
versity. Degrees earned outside the United States must be evaluated for equiva- 
lency by an agency approved by the California Commission on Teacher Creden- 
tialing. The Education department provides a list of approved agencies. 

Applications are accepted at any time. However, students may not enroll in a second 
semester of education courses without having been admitted to the Teacher Prepara- 
tion Program. 

Students who have attempted but not passed the CBEST and who have met all other 
admission requirements may petition for conditional admission into a Teacher Prep- 
aration Program. Conditional admission will allow a student to complete the course 
work required for the credential. Advancement to student teaching is contingent upon 
successful completion of the CBEST, official admission to a Teacher Preparation Pro- 
gram, and other requirements stipulated on the Intent to Student Teach form. 

Admission to a teacher preparation program does not guarantee that a credential will 
be granted. The Committee on Admissions reserves the right to dismiss from a teacher 
preparation program a candidate who does not meet program requirements. 



EDUCATION 125 



Preliminary Multiple Subject and Single Subject 

Credential Programs with a CLAD and 

BCLAD Emphasis 

The California Legislature, through the California Commission on Teacher Creden- 
tialing, has created a credential for teachers who work with the diverse California 
population of students as well as those previously identified as ESL (English as a 
Second Language) students. The Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development 
(CLAD) emphasis credential will replace the ESL and LDS (Language Development 
Specialist) certificates. For teachers working with bilingual students, the new creden- 
tial is the Bilingual Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development (BCLAD) 
emphasis credential; it replaces the Bilingual Certificate of Competence (BCC). 

Coursework for the CLAD and BCLAD emphasis credentials includes teaching ap- 
proaches successful with all students, including second language learners, such as 
Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) techniques; knowledge 
of culture and cultural diversity, particularly of the peoples of California; and under- 
standing of linguistics and language acquisition and development. 

The following programs for the Multiple Subject Credential and Single Subject Cre- 
dential have been carefully planned to meet the new state requirements for the CLAD 
and the BCLAD credentials. Please contact the Education department for more infor- 
mation. 

Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development 
Emphasis Credential (CLAD) Programs 

Prerequisite Language Requirement for both Multiple and Single Subject Programs: 6 
semester units of language (or equivalent or passage of competence test) 

Multiple Subject CLAD Program 

Prerequisite Courses (9 units) 

PSY 1 13 or Child and Adolescent Development 

EDU 251 and Learning Across Cultures (3) 

SOC 161 Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations (3) 

or 

EDU 152/252 Culture and Cultural Diversity (3) 

ENG 102 Structure of Modern English (3) 

or 

EDU 253 Linguistics Applied to Diverse 

Student Populations (3) 

Professional Preparation Courses (12 units) 

EDU 150/250 Elementary Instruction: Theory and Practice (3) 

EDU 154/254 Mathematics and Science: 

Elementary Curriculum (3) 

EDU 155/255 Social Science and the Arts: 

Elementary Curriculum (3) 

EDU 156/256 Language and Literacy: 

Elementary Curriculum (3) 



126 EDUCATION 



Supervised Teaching (7-13 units) 

EDU 1 16/3 16A Supervised Teaching: Elementary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) (12) 

EDU 3 16B Supervised Teaching: Elementary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) (6) 

or 

EDU 3 16C Supervised Teaching: Elementary Fieldwork 

(in own classroom) (6) 

EDU 120/320 Supervised Teaching Seminar (1) 

Note: Credential candidates in private schools must also complete a two-week intensive 
in a Mount St. Mary's College Teacher Center as part of their supervised teaching. 

Single Subject CLAD Program 

Prerequisite Courses (9 units) 

PSY 113 or Child and Adolescent Development 

EDU 251 and Learning Across Cultures (3) 

SOC 161 Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations (3) 

or 

EDU 152/252 Culture and Cultural Diversity (3) 

ENG 102 Structure of Modern English (3) 

or 

EDU 253 Linguistics Applied to Diverse 

Student Populations (3) 

Professional Preparation Courses (9 units) 

EDU 160/260A Secondary Instruction: Theory and Practice (3) 

EDU160/260B Secondary Curriculum (3) 
EDU 162/262 Language and Literacy: 

Secondary Curriculum (3) 

Supervised Teaching (7-13 units) 

EDU 164/364A Supervised Teaching: Secondary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) (12) 

or 
EDU 164/364B Supervised Teaching: Secondary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) (6) 

EDU 364C Supervised Teaching: Secondary Fieldwork 

(in own classroom) (6) 

and 
EDU 120/320 Supervised Teaching Seminar (1) 

Note: Credential candidates in private schools must also complete a two-week intensive 
in a Mount St. Mary's College Teacher Center as part of their supervised teaching. 

Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development 
(CLAD) Certificate Program 

Students may wish to "upgrade" their existing Multiple or Single Subject Credential 
by earning a CLAD Certificate. The candidate meets with an education advisor for 
evaluation of previous coursework and credential qualifications, and an individual plan 
is coordinated for each candidate. 



EDUCATION 127 



For students who have a basic credential and wish to add a CLAD Certificate, the 
following courses are required: 

CLAD Certificate Courses (12 units) 

EDU 251 Child and Adolescent Development and 

Learning Across Cultures (3) 

EDU 252 Culture and Cultural Diversity (3) 

EDU 253 Linguistics Applied to Diverse 

Student Populations (3) 

EDU 257 Methods of Instruction for Bilingual 

and Multilingual Classrooms (3) 

Bilingual Crosscultural, Language, and Academic 
Development (BCLAD) Emphasis Credential Program 

(Spanish) 

In addition to the coursework for the Multiple Subject, Single Subject CLAD Emphasis 
Credential, 9 units of prerequisite courses in the Spanish and Education departments 
are required. Entry level and exit level fluency in Spanish are also required. Please 
contact the Modern Languages department or the Education department for the Lan- 
guage Specification Advisement Tool. 

SPA 115/215 Applied Linguistics (3) 
SPA 145/245 Cultures of the Spanish Speaking 

Peoples of the Americas (3) 

EDU 159/259 Bilingual Methodology (3) 

Preliminary Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
Credential Program 

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing has created a new credentialing 
system for teachers who work with students with disabilities. Under the new structure, 
candidates complete a Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential program 
that includes general and special education course work and field experiences, includ- 
ing supervised teaching. When candidates complete the preliminary program and ob- 
tain a special education teaching position, they begin the Professional Level II Edu- 
cation Specialist Credential program. In the Professional Level II program, candidates 
work with the employer and the college to develop a Professional Induction Plan that 
includes advanced coursework in their area of specialization and one year of mentorship 
under an assigned support provider. 

The Education Specialist Credential program at Mount St. Mary's College will prepare 
teachers to work with students with mild/moderate disabilities which includes students 
with learning disabilities, mental retardation, serious emotional disturbance, and 
health impairments. 

Undergraduate candidates enroll in the 100 level courses; graduate students enroll in 
the 200/300 level courses. For the general education requirements, candidates select 
an elementary or a secondary emphasis depending on the level of students they plan 
to teach. All courses include fieldwork experiences in general or special education public 
school classrooms. 



128 EDUCATION 



General Education Requirements (9 units) 

ENG102or Structure of Modern English (3) 

EDU 253 Linguistics Applied to Diverse 

Student Populations (3) 

EDU 150/250 Elementary Instruction: 

or Theory & Practice (3) 

EDU 160A/260ASecondary Instruction: 

Theory & Practice (3) 

EDU 156/256 Language & Literacy: 

or Elementary Curriculum (3) 

EDU 162/262 Language & Literacy: 

Secondary Curriculum (3) 

Special Education Requirements ( 15 units) 

EDU 170/270 Educating Students 

with Disabilities (3) 

EDU 171/271 Educational Assessment of 

Students with Disabilities (3) 

EDU 172/272 Classroom Management for 

Students with Learning 

& Behavior Problems (3) 

EDU 175/275 Language Arts Instruction for 

Students with Special Needs (3) 

EDU 176/276 Content Area Instruction for 

Students with Special Needs (3) 

Supervised Teaching Requirements (13 units) 

EDU 1 16/3 16 Supervised Teaching: 

or Elementary Fieldwork (6) 

EDU 164/364 Supervised Teaching: 

Secondary Fieldwork (6) 

EDU 178/378 Supervised Teaching: 

Mid/Moderate Disabilities (6) 

EDU 120/320 Supervised Teaching Seminar (1) 

Additional Requirements for CLAD Certificate (6 units) 

PSY 113 or Child & Adolescent Development 

EDU 251 & Learning Across Cultures (3) 

SOC161or Majority/Minority Relations (3) 

EDU 252 Culture & Cultural Diversity (3) 

Credential Course Equivalency 

Candidates who have had previous courses/experience which are equivalent to the 
Mount St. Mary's College credential requirements may petition through the credential 
program advisor to have such courses/experience accepted in lieu of the prescribed 
coursework. Courses for which equivalency is granted must have been completed no 
more than seven years previous to the date of petition, with a grade of "B-" or better. 
Courses must have been taken for a letter grade. Narrative assessment will be consid- 
ered. Pass/Fail or Credit/No Credit courses are not accepted for course equivalency. 
Courses completed seven or more years ago or courses with a grade of "C+" or below 
will not be accepted as equivalent to required courses. It is the candidate's responsibility 



EDUCATION 129 



to obtain, complete, and submit the required petition forms and supporting documents 
to the credential program director. The program director makes a recommendation in 
consultation with the individual who is responsible for the course for which the can- 
didate is seeking equivalency. The department chair reviews this recommendation. No 
grades or unit credits are granted or indicated on the candidate's transcript as a result 
of this process. However, completion of the equivalency is indicated in the candidate's 
advisement file. No more than six units may be fulfilled in this manner to qualify for 
the Mount St. Mary's College recommendation for the credential. 

Policies for Supervised Teaching 

The supervised teaching experience in the Teacher Preparation Programs is structured 
to address the diverse levels of teaching experience of our credential candidates. An 
important part of candidates' initial advisement is the determination of how they will 
fulfill the supervised teaching requirement based on their previous experience and 
present situation. 

Those planning to register for supervised teaching must meet with their ad- 
visor at least one semester before the beginning of the semester in which they 
plan to register for this experience, and complete an Intent to Student Teach 
form. 

Prerequisites for Supervised Teaching 

1- Official admission to the Teacher Preparation Program (includes passage of the 
CBEST) 

2. Verification of subject matter competence by either: 

• (Multiple Subject candidates) completing with a 2.5 GPA at least four-fifths 
of an approved Liberal Studies major or other state-approved academic prep- 
aration program or passing the state-approved subject matter examination 

• (Single Subject candidates) completing with a 2.5 GPA at least four-fifths of 
an approved Subject Matter Preparation Program in the discipline area in 
which they plan to teach or passing the state-required tests 

• (Education Specialist candidates) completing with a 2.5 GPA at least four- 
fifths of an approved Subject Matter Preparation Program or passing the 
appropriate state-required tests. 

3 . Successful completion of the appropriate prerequisite coursework and professional 
preparation coursework with at least a 3.0 GPA. 

4. Application for a Certificate of Clearance. 

5. (Multiple Subject candidates) Beginning on the state-projected date of October 1, 
1998, passage of the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA). 

6. (Inservice Teachers only) Approved Equivalency Petition forms for those request- 
ing waiver of 6 units of supervised teaching. 



130 EDUCATION 



Options to Meet Equivalency for Supervised Teaching 

Option I: Full Time Supervised Teaching 

The full time supervised teaching experience of 12 units occurs over one semester (see 
Edu 116A/316A, 164A/364A, or 178B/378B). Students are placed in Mount St. Mary's 
College Teacher Centers (Mount St. Marys-affiliated local public schools) with coop- 
erating teachers for two six-to-seven week assignments. Students do not make their 
own arrangements for student teaching placement. Students are guided in teaching 
techniques by the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor through two assign- 
ments at varying grade levels and with culturally and linguistically diverse student 
populations. BCLAD candidates will have at least one assignment in a bilingual class- 
room. A bi-weekly seminar supports the supervised teaching experience. 

Option II: Supervised Teaching for In-Service Teachers 

Option II is available only to candidates whose schools are located in Los Angeles 
County. 

Candidates who are full time, contracted teachers may fulfill the supervised teaching 
component in their own classroom (see Edu 316C, Edu 364C, or Edu 378C). Multiple 
Subject candidates must be teaching in a self-contained classroom in grades K-6. Single 
Subject candidates must be teaching in a departmentalized setting, in the subject area 
in which they are pursuing a credential, and in grades 6-12. 

Education Specialist candidates must be teaching in a classroom appropriate to their 
emphasis for their general education supervised teaching. For their special education 
supervised teaching, they must be teaching in a Special Day Class or Resource Spe- 
cialist Program for students with mild/moderate disabilities. 

Teachers who have taught successfully on a full-time, paid basis in the appropriate 
subject area and level for at least two years prior to the supervised teaching semester 
may petition to have six of the required 12 units of supervised teaching waived. For 
those who successfully waive six units of supervised teaching, the remaining six units 
may be fulfilled in their own classroom in one semester. (If waived, units are not 
awarded.) Students must submit documentation that their teaching assignment has 
been and continues to be a full time, paid teaching position and that the subject matter 
and level are congruent with the credential sought. For secondary credential candi- 
dates, other requirements apply; please see the Program Director. Equivalency peti- 
tions are available from the education advisor and must be completed prior to enroll- 
ment in supervised teaching. 

For those teachers with less than two years of teaching experience, supervised teaching 
may be fulfilled by two semesters in their own classroom; candidates register for a total 
of 12 units, 6 units each semester (see EDU 316C or 364C below). 

For candidates who choose Option II and who teach in a private school, an intensive 
two-week fieldwork experience in a public school is also required and arranged on an 
individual basis for each in-service candidate. An additional fee is required for the 
intensive fieldwork (see EDU316L or 364L below). 



EDUCATION 131 



Grading Policies; 

All education program courses, liberal studies courses, and subject matter preparation 
courses must be taken on a letter grade basis, except EDU 39, 100, 101, 102, supervised 
teaching, and administrative field experience, which are CR/NC courses. 

Students completing a Liberal Studies major or one of the approved academic Subject 
Matter Preparation Programs at Mount St. Mary's College must maintain an overall 
grade point average of 2.5. Courses in the major or the Subject Matter Preparation 
Programs in which a D or below is received must be repeated or an equivalent course 
taken. Failure to maintain the 2.5 GPA places a student on probation. (See p. 37 for 
the college probation policy.) 

Candidates for teaching credentials must maintain a GPA of 3.0 in education courses. 
If a student's GPA in education classes drops below 3.0 in any semester, the student is 
placed on probation for the next semester. If the student does not attain a GPA in 
education courses of a 3.0 the following semester, the student will be disqualified from 
the Teacher Preparation Program. Students may repeat education courses in which a 
grade of C- was earned to raise the GPA to 3.0. 

Course credit is not granted for a grade of D or F in an education course. A student may 
repeat the first course in which a grade of D or F is received. Receiving a second D or 
F, either in the repeated course or in another course in the program, results in dis- 
qualification from the Teacher Preparation Program. This policy includes the courses 
required for the professional clear teaching credential. 

For supervised teaching, students will be assigned credit (CR) for the experience if 
their performance in the Supervised Teaching course is evaluated as "C" quality or 
better. If a student's work is evaluated as work of below "C" quality, no credit (NC) will 
be awarded. Students receiving a grade of NC may petition to re-register for 6 to 12 
units of supervised teaching. 

Preliminary Administrative Services Credential 

The Mount St. Mary's College credential program is approved by the California Com- 
mission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) for the preparation of entry-level adminis- 
trators for K-12 schools. Prerequisites for the program include a valid California K-12 
teaching credential, designated subjects teaching credential with a baccalaureate de- 
gree, or services credential with a specialization in pupil personnel, health, librarian, 
or clinical rehabilitative services, and a minimum of three years of successful, full-time 
classroom teaching experience, or three years of experience in one of the service areas, 
as well as other state of California requirements. 

According to current regulations and legislation in California, candidates successfully 
completing a CCTC-approved entry-level (first-tier) program of study in administration 
are recommended for a Certificate of Eligibility for the Preliminary Administrative 
Services Credential. The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential: is issued 
only when one is employed as an administrator in a position requiring the credential, 
is valid for five years and may not be renewed. It may be converted to a Professional 
Administrative Services Credential, which may be renewed in accordance with current 
California regulations, after all requirements are met. Requirements include, but are 
not limited to: two years of service in a position requiring the credential and a minimum 
of 24 semester units of study in a CCTC-approved second-tier program. 



132 EDUCATION 



The program is approved by the CCTC. Contact the Mount St. Mary's College Admin- 
istrative Services Program Director for current information. Mount St. Mary's College 
offers the program of study directed toward the Preliminary Administrative Services 
Credential, but not the Professional (second-tier) Credential. 

Required courses (24 units): 

EDU 220 The Educational Leader's Role in 

Diversity and Multicultural Issues (1) 

EDU 221 Educational Leadership (2) 

EDU 222A Curriculum and Assessment (3) 

EDU 222B Supervision of Instruction and Programs (2) 

EDU 223 Issues in School Management (3) 

EDU 224A Financial Aspects of Education (2) 

EDU 224B Legal and Ethical Aspects of Education (3) 

EDU 225 Educational Governance (1) 

EDU 226 Social and Intellectual Interactions in Schools (2) 

EDU 227 The Administrator's Role in Meeting 

the Needs of All Children (1) 

EDU 228AB Supervised Field Experience: Administration (2, 2-1) 

The entry-level (first tier) administrative services program for the Certificate of Eli- 
gibility may be completed concurrently with a Master of Science Degree. (See below) 

Administrative Leadership Program 

In cooperation with the Los Angeles Unified School District, Mount St. Mary's College 
offers a program of study directed toward the Preliminary 

Administrative Services Credential. 

Requirements for application are the same as for other Mount St. Mary's College 
Administrative Services credential and degree programs, except applicants must be 
recommended by their current principals or appropriate administrators. Accepted can- 
didates move through the program as a cohort. 

Master of Science in Education 

Programs leading to the degree of Master of Science in Education are available with 
the following areas of concentration: 

Administrative Services 

Special Education: Mild/Moderate Disabilities 

Individually Designed 

Students may pursue a Master of Science in Education in conjunction with a credential. 
It is also possible to pursue a masters degree without a credential, but students are 
strongly advised to obtain the appropriate credential in conjunction with the masters 
degree. Thirty semester unit hours of graduate coursework are required for a masters 
degree; additional units are required for a masters in conjunction with a credential. 



EDUCATION 133 



Individuals who hold a bachelors degree from an accredited college or university are 
eligible to apply for admission to a masters degree program. Candidates apply through 
the Graduate Division and must meet all admission requirements within the first 
semester of enrollment (See Graduate Degree Admission Policies, p. 68 for application 
requirements.) 

Program Requirements 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Education must complete six semester 
units of core course requirements and other coursework required for the particular 
area of concentration. 



Core Course Requirements (6 units) 

EDU 200 Research Methods (3) 

EDU296 Masters Project (3) 

Masters Project 

When a minimum of 24 units of graduate credit have been completed or when the last 
semester of coursework has been reached, the candidate may enroll in EDU 296 Masters 
Project. Candidates are required to prepare and obtain approval for the masters project 
proposal before enrolling in EDU 296. 

Administrative Services Degree Requirements 

Prerequisites for the Master of Science in Education with a concentration in Admin- 
istrative Services include: a valid California K-12 teaching or services credential or 12 
upper division or graduate units in education and a minimumof three years of success- 
ful, full-time K-12 classroom teaching or service area experience. 

In addition to the core course requirements, candidates complete the 24 units of course- 
work required for the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential or from other 
course offerings as approved by the program director. Thirty units are required to 
complete both the Master of Science Degree in Education: Administration and the 
Certificate of Eligibility for the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential. 



Special Education: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Degree 
Requirements 

In addition to the core course requirements, candidates select 24 units from the course- 
work required for the Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential Pro- 
gram, (see p. 127). Candidates may pursue a Masters with a Special Education concen- 
tration in conjunction with an Education Specialist credential or as an independent 
Masters. 



134 EDUCATION 



Individually Designed Program 

For those who wish to earn a Masters degree without a credential, this program is 
flexible and permits individual choice. The Individually Designed Program may be 
interdisciplinary or may focus on one area of interest. It may also combine theoretical 
and practical emphases. 

Qualified candidates, under the direction of the program advisor, construct a program 
to meet their special interests and career goals. In addition to the six core course 
requirements, candidates complete 24 units of work selected in consultation with the 
program advisor. Thirty units are required for the degree. 

The Master of Science in Education in Conjunction 

with the Multiple or Single Subject Credential 

with a CLAD or BCLAD Emphasis 

This degree program is designed for individuals who wish to pursue a Masters degree 
in conjunction with a preliminary teaching credential. 

Preliminary CLAD Emphasis Credential and 
Master of Science in Education 

Prerequisite Language Requirement 

6 units of language (or equivalent or passage of competence test) 

Core Courses (6 units) 

EDU 200 Research Methods (3) 

EDU 296 Masters Project (3) 

Multiple Subject CLAD Credential/Masters Option 
Prerequisite Courses (9 units) 

EDU 25 1 Child and Adolescent Development 

and Learning Across Cultures (3) 

EDU 252 Culture and Cultural Diversity (3) 

EDU 253 Linguistics Applied to Diverse Student 

Populations (3) 

Professional Preparation Courses (12 units) 

EDU 250 Elementary Instruction: 

Theory and Practice (3) 

EDU 254 Mathematics and Science: Elementary 

Curriculum (3) 

EDU 255 Social Science and the Arts: 

Elementary Curriculum (3) 

EDU 256 Language and Literacy: 

Elementary Curriculum (3) 



EDUCATION 135 



Masters Elective: 3 units 
Supervised Teaching (7-13 units) 

EDU 3 16A Supervised Teaching: Elementary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) (12) 

or 
EDU 3 16B Supervised Teaching: Elementary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) (6) 

EDU 3 16C Supervised Teaching: Elementary Fieldwork 

(in own classroom) (6 + 6) 

and 
EDU 320 Supervised Teaching Seminar (1) 

Single Subject CLAD Credential/Masters Option 
Prerequisite Courses (9 units) 

EDU 251 Child and Adolescent Development 

and Learning Across Cultures (3) 

EDU 252 Culture and Cultural Diversity (3) 

EDU 253 Linguistics Applied to Diverse Student 

Populations (3) 

Professional Preparation Courses (9 units) 

EDU 260A Secondary Instruction: 

Theory and Practice (3) 

EDU 260B Secondary Curriculum (3) 

EDU 262 Language and Literacy: 

Secondary Curriculum (3) 

Masters Electives: 6 units 
Supervised Teaching (7-13 units) 

EDU 364A Supervised Teaching: Secondary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) ( 12) 

or 
EDU 364B Supervised Teaching: Secondary Fieldwork 

(in Teacher Center) (6) 

or 
EDU 364C Supervised Teaching: Seconday Fieldwork 

(in own classroom) (6) 

and 
EDU 320 Supervised Teaching Seminar (1) 

NOTE: 

All post-baccalaureate programs of study offered by the Education department are 
graduate level programs, whether leading to a degree or not (e.g., Multiple Subject and 
Single Subject preliminary and professional clear teaching credential programs). As 
such, these programs are governed by policies and procedures for masters degree 
programs in all applicable areas. 

Since credential regulations and legislation are subject to change, it is important to 
contact the Education department for up-to-date information. 



136 EDUCATION 



EDU 3 1 Introduction to Early 
Childhood Education: 
Profession and 
Programs (3) 

A study of the history, scope, and current 
philosophies of programs for youngchil- 
dren. Observations in a variety of local 
early childhood programs, and exploration 
of the education and licensing require- 
ments for such programs. Ethical and value 
issues in working with children and their 
families, as wellas the importance of be- 
coming an advocate for upgrading the 
profession and improving the quality of 
children's services, are stressed. 

EDU 32 Early Childhood Education: 
Observation and 
Curriculum Planning (3) 

Introduction and use of alternative formats 
for recording observations of children. Use 
of observational data to diagnose children's 
interests, developmental levels, and learn- 
ing needs. Review of basic principles of 
child development and their application in 
the early childhood setting by means of ob- 
servation and curriculum planning. Oppor- 
tunities to create environments that en- 
hance cultural pluralism. Includes 
opportunity for observation and participa- 
tion in an early childhood setting. Prereq- 
uisite: Departmental approval. 

EDU 33 The Visual and Performing 
Arts for the Young Child (3) 

A study of the visual arts (basic concepts, 
theories, and techniques); dance (basic con- 
cepts, and improvisations including philo- 
sophical and practical differences among 
the various disciplines of dance); music 
(singing, listening and improvisational ac- 
tivities); theatre arts (creative drama, role 
playing, improvisation and story enact- 
ment). Lab fee of $20.00 required. 

EDU 37 Infant and Toddler 

Development and Care (3) 

This course presents an in-depth study of 
infant and toddler development. The prin- 
ciples of infant and toddler care-giving with 
an emphasis on the environment and ap- 
propriate learning activities will be ex- 
plored. Health, safety, nutrition, and par- 
ent relations will also be discussed. 
Observation of infants and toddlers and 
programs for them is required. 



EDU 39 Supervised Field Work: 

Preschool (6) 

Instruction of children in an early child- 
hood setting under the direction ofa master 
teacher. Conferences with teachers and su- 
pervisors accompany this work. Weekly 
seminars include methods of child guidance 
and group management, as well as content 
related to children's health, safety, and nu- 
trition. Prerequisite: Departmental ap- 
proval. This course is taken for CR/NC. 

EDU 99 Special Studies (.5-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

EDU 100 Introduction to Liberal 

Studies (1) 

Introduction to the study of the liberal arts 
and sciences and interrelationships among 
subject matter areas. Integrating themes of 
cultural and ethnic perspectives and tech- 
nology will be introduced. Curriculum 
Frameworks used in the elementary 
schools in California are required for can- 
didates planning to enter a teaching cre- 
dential program. 

EDU 101 Introduction to the 

Concentration: Liberal 
Studies Major (.5) 

This seminar provides: 1) an introduction 
to the concentration selected as part of the 
Liberal Studies Major and 2) a continuing 
focus on the core program in relation to the 
California Curriculum Frameworks and 
the topics introduced in EDU 100. In rela- 
tion to the concentration, students focus on: 
a) the coherent relationship among the 
courses selected for the concentration, b) 
the role of technology in society and of eth- 
ical issues surrounding the impact of tech- 
nology on society, especially as related to 
the concentration selected, c) an under- 
standing of the diverse ethnic, gender, cul- 
tural, and handicapped perspectives in re- 
lation to the area of concentration, and d) 
organization of knowledge in the concentra- 
tion, and the various teaching strategies ex- 
perienced in the study of the concentration. 
Prerequisite: successful completion of EDU 
100. 

EDU 102 Integrative Seminar in 

Liberal Studies (.5) 

Culminating course required to complete 
the Liberal Studies Major. Students exam- 
ine the relationships among the disciplines 
included in their program of study, syn- 
thesize the major themes, and compare the 



EDUCATION 137 



forms of inquiry. Requirements for the 
Liberal Studies Portfolio are reviewed. Pre- 
requisite: successful completion of EDU 
101. 

EDU 1 16A/ Supervised Teaching: 
EDU 316A Elementary Fieldwork 

(12) 
Fall or Spring in Teacher Center 

EDU 1 16B/ Supervised Teaching: 
EDU316B Elementary Fieldwork(6) 

Fall or Spring in Teacher Center 

EDU 316C Supervised Teaching: 

Elementary Fieldwork (6) 

Fall or Spring in own classroom 

EDU 316L Intensive Fieldwork: 

Elementary (0) 

In Teacher Center 

This course is designed as the culminating 
experience in the credential program and 
provides opportunities for the candidate to 
integrate and refinethe many competencies 
acquired throughout the program. The goal 
of supervised teaching is to ensure that the 
candidate is prepared to assume the full- 
time responsibilities of a classroom. 

In EDU 116A/316A, the candidate as- 
sumes the responsibilities of the classroom 
teacher and is under the direct supervision 
of an experienced and effective teacher and 
a college supervisor. The supervised teach- 
ing involves two assignments, each span- 
ning one-half of the semester in two schools, 
and at two grade levels (primary and inter- 
mediate). Full-time teaching is required 
along with participation in the bi-weekly 
seminar (EDU 120/320) [see Option I, p. 
130]. 

In EDU 116B/316B, the candidate as- 
sumes the responsibilities of the classroom 
teacher and is under the direct supervision 
of an experienced and effective teacher and 
a college supervisor. The supervised teach- 
ing involves one assignment over one se- 
mester in one school and at one grade level 
(primary or intermediate). Full-time teach- 
ing is required along with participation in 
the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 120/320) [see 
Option I, p. 130]. 

In EDU 316C, candidates teach in their 
own classrooms over one or two semesters 
(6 units per semester) and are supervised 
by an on-site supervisor and a college su- 
pervisor. Full-time teaching is required 
along with participation in the bi-weekly 



seminar (EDU 120/320). For those who 
teach in private schools, EDU 316L, an in- 
tensive two-week fieldwork experience in a 
public school, is also requiredand arranged 
on an individual basis for each in-service 
candidate. An additional fieldwork fee is re- 
quired for EDU 316L. [see Option II, p. 130 
and EDU 3 16L above]. 

Prerequisites: Approval of the Education 
Department Screening Committee and the 
Program Director, completion of an Intent 
to Student Teach form one semester before 
supervised teaching, verification of passing 
scores on CBEST and RICA, successful 
completion of the MSAT or academic prep- 
aration program, and application for a Cer- 
tificate of Clearance. (Additional fieldwork 
fee of $25.00 per unit.) 

EDU 120/320 Supervised Teaching 

Seminar (1) 

Required of all candidates during super- 
vised teaching fieldwork, this seminar 
serves as a capstone experience for the cre- 
dential program. Program competencies 
are revisited, with a focus on instructional 
planning, classroom environment, and di- 
versity and equity issues. Candidates pro- 
vide evidence of their own professional 
skills and attributes by constructing a Cu- 
mulative Performance Portfolio. 

EDU 138A Organization and 

Administration of Early 
Childhood Education 
Programs - Program 
Development and 
Curriculum (3) 

Various program structures and curricula 
will be examined together with administra- 
tive styles relevant to the operation of early 
childhood education programs. Develop- 
ment and implementation of appropriate 
curricula will be stressed as will environ- 
mental planning. Course will partially ful- 
fill administrative requirement for Child 
Development Director Permit or Child De- 
velopment Supervisor Permit. 

EDU138B Organization and 

Administration of Early 
Childhood Education 
Programs: Financial 
and Legal Aspects (3) 

Examination of various funding and legal 
requirements in the operation of early 
childhood programs with special focus on 
budgeting, staffing, licensing and compli- 
ance with Federal and State requirements. 



138 EDUCATION 



Course will partially fulfill administrative 
requirement for Child Development Direc- 
tor Permit or Child Development Supervi- 
sor Permit. 

EDU 150/250 Elementary 

Instruction: Theory 
and Practice (3) 

This course is designed to develop effective 
instructional and management methods 
within the context of a multilingual society 
and is the introductory professional prepa- 
ration course for the Multiple Subject Cre- 
dential Program. Students develop effec- 
tive educational practices through 30 hours 
of observation and participation in an ele- 
mentary school classroom, inquiry-based 
research carried out by the teacher candi- 
dates themselves, and the study of educa- 
tional and language learning theories. 
Course content includes lesson plan for- 
mats, thematic teaching, and an emphasis 
on content instruction for those learning 
English as a new language. Note: On-site 
school observations require a minimum 
commitment of several hours a week during 
the teaching day, as well as travel time to 
and from Teacher Centers. 

EDU 152/252 Culture and Cultural 

Diversity (3) 

This course is designed for credential can- 
didates to explore the role that culture 
plays and has played in our lives, class- 
rooms, city and country. Students analyze 
the nature and manifestations of culture, 
the concepts of cultural contact, and the his- 
tory of cultural diversity in the United 
States and California. The dynamics of 
prejudice are studied, and emphasis is 
placed on delineating curriculum and prac- 
tices that honor, motivate, and empower all 
students. Examination of personal biases 
and identification of areas of deficient 
knowledge is encouraged. Use of the Los 
Angeles community as a powerful resource 
will be explored. 

EDU 154/254 Mathematics and 

Science: Elementary 
Curriculum (3) 

This course examines mathematics and sci- 
ence concepts and theories and their appli- 
cation in teaching. A major focus is on con- 
structivist learning and inquiry and related 
instructional methods and assessment pro- 
cedures. Concrete, manipulative materials 
critical to the learning of mathematics and 
science are used throughout the course. 



Emphasis is placed on both individual and 
group participation. Fifteen hours of obser- 
vation and participation in exemplary 
mathematics and science elementary 
school classrooms plus travel time is re- 
quired in order to learn effective classroom 
practice. 

EDU 155/255 Social Science and The 
Arts: Elementary 
Curriculum (3) 

This course studies curriculum and instruc- 
tional methods for teaching social science 
and the arts in elementary school. Course 
content involves the scope and sequence of 
the social science and arts curricula; the- 
matic teaching and the interconnection of 
content areas; and support for second-lan- 
guage learners. It includes instructional 
approaches that facilitate concept develop- 
ment and problem solving. Fifteen hours of 
observation and participation plus travel 
time are required in exemplary elementary 
school classrooms during social science and 
the arts instructional time. 

EDU 156/256 Language and 

Literacy: Elementary 
Curriculum (3) 

This course encompasses language and lit- 
eracy learning in the elementary grades 
and methods for teaching a balanced liter- 
acy program to multiethnic, multilingual 
student populations. Current theoretical 
and practical aspects of language arts cur- 
riculum will be learned, including explicit 
instruction and strategies for developing a 
balanced literacy program for native Eng- 
lish speakers and English language learn- 
ers; observational skills necessary for help- 
ing individual students; and materials to 
provide a comprehensive program. Meth- 
ods and principles for developing proficient 
readers and writers and for analyzing stu- 
dents' strengths and areas of needed 
growth will be studied and practiced. Fif- 
teen hours of focused observations and par- 
ticipation (plus travel time) are required in 
an exemplary elementary school classroom 
during language arts instruction. Prereq- 
uisite: ENG 102, EDU 253 or department- 
approved equivalent on a transcript. 

EDU 159/259 Bilingual 

Methodology (3) 

This course is designed particularly for stu- 
dents seeking a BCLAD Emphasis Creden- 
tial. It focuses on methodology of primary 
language instruction within a bilingual 



EDUCATION 139 



setting. Placed within a theoretical frame- 
work, course content will focus on charac- 
teristics of bilingual programs, organiza- 
tion of instructional delivery in bilingual 
classrooms, including materials selection. 
Although an emphasis will be placed on 
Spanish instructional materials, those 
seeking a BCLAD credential or certificate 
in other languages may find the course 
helpful. Although it will provide support for 
those preparing for the BCLAD test, this 
course is designed to take the place of the 
exam rather than to specifically prepare a 
candidate for passing the exam. 

EDU 160A/260A Secondary 

Instruction: Theory 
and Practice (3) 

An introduction to secondary school teach- 
ing and the initial professional preparation 
course in the Single Subject Credential Pro- 
gram. Comprehensive in its scope, the 
course includes study of classroom manage- 
ment, instructional strategies, curriculum 
planning, and teaching/learning theory. 
Particular emphases are on SDAIE and 
ELD approaches for linguistically and cul- 
turally diverse students, constructivist pe- 
dagogy, and creating a caring classroom en- 
vironment. 

EDU 160B/260B Secondary 
Instruction: 
Curriculum (3) 

This seminar is a continuation of 160 A, fo- 
cusing on the study of ideologies underlying 
curriculum development, the elements of 
curriculum design, implementation, and 
evaluation. Activities follow six major 
strands: (1) developing a personal philoso- 
phy of curriculum, teaching and learning; 
(2) deepening the understanding of each 
teacher's particular subject area and the 
complexities of teaching it effectively; (3) 
using state and district curriculum docu- 
ments and other professional guidelines; 
(4) building a rich variety of resources for 
use in the classroom; (5) creating inclusive 
curricula that consider the needs of a di- 
verse student population; and, (6) examin- 
ing school reform issues as they relate to 
secondary curriculum and instruction. 

EDU 162/262 Language and 

Literacy: Secondary 
Curriculum (3) 

This course encompasses language and lit- 
eracy development in secondary curricula 
and methods for enhancing that develop- 
ment with multiethnic, multilingual stu- 
dent populations. The interwoven nature of 



speaking, reading, writing, and listening in 
content area instruction will be explored 
with emphasis on the importance of dis- 
course in the development of critical think- 
ing. Course content includes instructional 
and assessment strategies for strengthen- 
ing students' reading and writing skills, in- 
cluding students learning English as a new 
language. 

EDU 164/364 A Supervised Teaching: 
Secondary Fieldwork 

Fall or Spring in 
Teacher Center (12) 

EDU 164/364 B Supervised Teaching: 
Secondary Fieldwork 

Fall or Spring in 
Teacher Center (6) 

EDU 164/364 C Supervised Teaching: 
Secondary Fieldwork 

Fall or Spring in 

own classroom (6) 

EDU364L Intensive Fieldwork: 
Secondary 

In Teacher Center (0) 

This course is designed as the culminating 
experience in the credential program and 
provides opportunities for the candidate to 
integrate and refine the many competen- 
cies acquired throughout the program. The 
goal of supervised teaching is to prepare the 
candidate to assume the full-time respon- 
sibilities of a classroom. 

In EDU 164/364A, the candidate assumes 
the responsibilities of the classroom 
teacher and is under the direct supervision 
of an experienced and effective teacher and 
a college supervisor. The supervised teach- 
ing involves two assignments, each span- 
ning one-half of the semester in two schools, 
and at two grade levels (middle school and 
high school). Full-time teaching is required 
along with participation in the bi-weekly 
seminar (EDU 120/320). . 

In EDU 164B/364B, the candidate assumes 
the responsibilities of the classroom 
teacher and is under the direct supervision 
of an experienced and effective teacher and 
a college supervisor. The supervised teach- 
ing involves one assignment over one se- 
mester in one school and at one grade level 
(middle school or high school). Full-time 
teaching is required along with participa- 
tion in the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 120/ 
320). 



140 EDUCATION 



In EDU 364C, candidates teach in their own 
classrooms over one or two semesters (6 
units per semester) and are supervised by 
an on-site supervisor and a college super- 
visor. Full-time teaching is required along 
with participation in the bi-weekly seminar 
(EDU 120/320). For those who teach in pri- 
vate schools, EDU 316L, an intensive two- 
week fieldwork experience in a public 
school, is also required and arranged on an 
individual basis for each in-service candi- 
date. An additional fieldwork fee is re- 
quired for EDU 316L . 

Prerequisites: Approval of the Education 
Department Screening Committee and the 
Program Director, completion of an Intent 
to Student Teach form one semester before 
supervised teaching, verification of passing 
score on CBEST, and successful completion 
of the appropriate PRAXIS and SSAT tests 
or a Single Subject Preparation Program. 
(Additional fieldwork fee of $25.00 per 
unit.) 

EDU 170/270 Educating Students 

with Disabilities (3) 

This course surveys various aspects of dis- 
abilities and programs designed to meet the 
educational needs of students with disabil- 
ities. A study is made of the historical and 
philosophical significance of special educa- 
tion as well as the legal and administrative 
framework for special education within the 
United States with emphasis on urban 
southern California. The educational, so- 
cio-cultural, and psychological rationale for 
placing students in special education pro- 
grams is explored along with the full range 
of educational options from residential fa- 
cilities to inclusion in the general education 
classroom. Meets California requirement 
for special education for professional clear 
teaching credentials. 

EDU 171/271 Educational 

Assessment of Students 
with Disabilities (3) 

This course examines the educational as- 
sessment of students with disabilities in- 
cluding statistical concepts in measuring 
abilities, principles of assessment, methods 
of administration and interpretation, and 
the relationship of assessment results to 
the determination of eligibility for special 
education services and the development of 
an Individualized Educational Plan. Stand- 
ardized educational assessment instru- 
ments and informal curriculum-based 



measurements are examined. Particular 
emphasis is placed on the appropriateness 
of standardized and informal assessment 
instruments and procedures for culturally 
diverse students. Prerequisites: General 
Education Requirements and EDU 1701 
270. 

EDU 172/272 Classroom 

Management for 
Students with 
Learning and Behavior 
Problems (3) 

This course provides an overview of behav- 
ioral disturbances in the classroom. Medi- 
cal, behavioral and socio-cultural interven- 
tions will be explored with an emphasis on 
creating positive classroom environments 
that enable students with learning and be- 
havior problems to participate productively 
in the classroom learning community. The 
historical, theoretical and legal bases for 
identification and treatment of students 
with behavior disorders and serious emo- 
tional disturbances will be addressed along 
with the current issue of identification and 
treatment of attention deficit disorder. Pre- 
requisites: General Education Require- 
ments and EDU 170 1270. 

EDU 175/275 Language Arts 
Instruction for 
Students with Special 
Needs (3) 

This course is designed to meet the compe- 
tencies required for language arts instruc- 
tion for the Education Specialist: Mid/Mod- 
erate Disabilities credential and to prepare 
general educators to meet the language arts 
instructional needs of general education 
students who experience literacy develop- 
ment problems. Assessment and instruc- 
tional strategies drawn from diverse per- 
spectives (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, social- 
interaction) are presented and examined 
relative to their effectiveness. Emphasis is 
on application of literacy assessment and 
instructional strategies in actual teaching 
settings across the K- 12 curriculum. Pre- 
requisites: General Education Require- 
ments and EDU 170 1270. 

EDU 176/276 Content Area 
Instruction for 
Students with Special 
Needs (3) 

In this course the candidate draws upon the 
knowledge and skills requisite for effective 
content area instruction in the general ed- 
ucation classroom with necessary adapta- 
tions to make the curriculum accessible to 



EDUCATION 141 



students with special needs. Emphasis is 
placed on the creation of curriculum units 
that incorporate learning strategies ap- 
proaches to the instruction of students with 
mild/moderate disabilities and instruc- 
tional modifications for students with lim- 
ited English proficiency (Specially De- 
signed Academic Instruction in English). 
Content area instruction in math, science 
and social studies for students with mild to 
moderate disabilities in grades kindergar- 
ten through twelve is addressed. Prerequi- 
sites: General Education Requirements and 
EDUI70I270. 



EDU 178B/378B Supervised 

Teaching: Mild/ 

Moderate 

Disabilities 

In Teacher Center 



(6) 



EDU 178C/378C Supervised 

Teaching: Mild/ 
Moderate 
Disabilities (6) 

In own classroom 

This course provides experiences in the ma- 
jor aspects of teaching students with mild/ 
moderate disabilities: assessment, pro- 
gramming, instruction, management, rec- 
ord maintenance, evaluation of progress, 
and collaboration with general educators, 
families and community resources. These 
aspects of teaching are explored over the 
course of half of a semester in a supervised 
field placement in a classroom for culturally 
diverse students with mild/moderate disa- 
bilities. The candidate refines and synthes- 
izes the skills and knowledge acquired in 
previous coursework to demonstrate com- 
petency as a teacher of culturally diverse 
students with mild/moderate disabilities. 
Concurrent registration in the Supervised 
Teaching Seminar, EDU 120/320 is re- 
quired. Prerequisites: Satisfactory comple- 
tion (3.0 GPA) of coursework required for 
the Preliminary Education Specialist: 
Mild I Moderate Disabilities credential 
(One course may be taken concurrently with 
Supervised Teaching.), verification of a 
passing score on CBEST, successful com- 
pletion of an appropriate state-approved 
Subject Matter Preparation Program or 
exam, application for a Certificate of Clear- 
ance, and approval of the Education De- 
partment Screening Committee and Pro- 
gram Director. (Additional fieldwork fee of 
$25 per unit.) 



EDU196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program 

EDU 199 AB Special Studies 

(.5-3;.5-3) 

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing or consent of 
department. 

EDU 200 Research Methods (3) 

A study of the various approaches to edu- 
cational research including historical, qual- 
itative, and quantitative. Intended to de- 
velop facility in reading research articles 
and applying knowledge gained through re- 
search. (Administrative students will pre- 
pare a research proposal for the masters 
project.) 

EDU 203 Sociological Foundations 
of Education (3) 

A study of education from a sociological per- 
spective: includes study of the structure of 
society, its institutions and trends, and the 
use of sociological approaches to consider 
professional issues such as cultural and 
ethnic diversity, equal opportunity, 
achievement, and change. 

EDU 204 Philosophical Foundations 
of Education (3) 

This seminar allows students to investigate 
major ideas in the philosophy of education. 
Philosophical inquiry helps build under- 
standing of premises underlying questions 
of educational value. The course empha- 
sizes the diversity of educational experi- 
ence in the United States. 

EDU 214 Historical Foundations of 
Education (3) 

This seminar allows students to investigate 
major events in the history of education. 
Historical analysis provides a way to gain 
perspectives from the past and to look for 
roots of present problems and issues. The 
course emphasizes the diversity of educa- 
tional experiences in the United States. 

EDU 220 The Educational Leader's 
Role in Diversity & 
Multicultural Issues (1) 

A study of the attitudes, approaches, and 
skills needed to implement programs and 
procedures to meet educational needs of the 
diverse student population of California. 
Includes consideration of involving parents 
and other community members from di- 
verse backgrounds in reaching educational 



142 EDUCATION 



goals. (Prerequisite: acceptance into the ad- 
ministrative services program.) 

EDU221 Educational Leadership (2) 

A study of leadership theory, styles of lead- 
ership, and practice as related to the re- 
sponsibilities of educational leaders, espe- 
cially in roles of school administration. The 
interactions of individuals and groups in or- 
ganizational settings are considered. Top- 
ics include group processes, decision-mak- 
ing, climate, communication, and conflict 
management. The significance of self-eval- 
uation and development of a personal phi- 
losophy of leadership and administration is 
introduced. 

EDU 222A Curriculum and 

Assessment (3) 

A study of the curriculum of schools (in- 
cluding the implicit curriculum). Central 
questions of curriculum development (past, 
present, and future) are explored. Topics 
include: principles of curriculum develop- 
ment and evaluation, organization of cur- 
riculum, and implementation of mandated 
programs. Issues studied include: auricu- 
lar articulation (K-12 focus), relationship 
among values and curriculum, the role of 
curriculum in society, and the community's 
role in curriculum development and selec- 
tion. 

EDU 222B Supervision of 
Instruction and 
Programs (2) 

This course is designed to provide oppor- 
tunities to study and apply competencies 
required for effective supervision of in- 
struction and educational programs. Com- 
petencies emphasized are: organization of 
supervisory programs, strategies for super- 
vision, staff development, and the role of 
the supervisor as a change agent for the 
improvement of educational programs and 
of teaching, and effective interpersonal re- 
lations. (Prerequisite: EDU 222A or ap- 
proval of program director) 

EDU 223 Issues in School 

Management (3) 

A study of school management and how to 
translate a shared vision into strategic and 
operational plans. Includes study of person- 
nel issues; school operations, such as facil- 
ities and resource maintenance and school- 
wide systems, policies, and procedures; di- 
rection of student support services. Also ad- 
dressed are current issues, such as school 



safety, the administrator as a project man- 
ager, working with the media, and fun- 
draising. (Prerequisite: EDU 221 or ap- 
proval of program director.) 

EDU 224A Financial Aspects of 

Education (2) 

A study of the history, principles, and prob- 
lems of educational finance, including fed- 
eral, state, and local funding and the devel- 
opment, administration, and evaluation of 
district and site-level budgeting. The rela- 
tionship between goal setting and the budg- 
eting process are explored. Legal and finan- 
cial implications of personnel contracts and 
the bargaining process and of facility use 
and management are studied. (Prerequi- 
site: approval of program director) 

EDU 224B Legal and Ethical Aspects 
of Education (3) 

A study of the legal framework of education 
in the United States, including federal and 
state constitutional provisions, and local 
regulations, and the role of each level in the 
provision of schooling. Significant laws, 
state codes, regulations, court decisions 
with a focus on laws relating to youth, 
schools, and school personnel are consid- 
ered. Attention is given to ethical issues in 
professional practice. 

EDU 225 Educational 

Governance (1) 

A study of the organization and governance 
of schools within the context of the school 
district, the community, and the wider so- 
cial and political contexts. Issues of local 
governance and other reform initiatives re- 
lated to school governance are explored. 
(Prerequisite: approval of program director) 

EDU 226 Social and Intellectual 

Interactions in Schools (2) 

A study of psychological principles espe- 
cially as related to the role of the educa- 
tional administrator. Fundamentals of hu- 
man relations, principles of adult growth 
and development are reviewed. Relation- 
ships and practical applications are drawn 
between psychological principles and ad- 
ministrative roles in areas such as: improv- 
ing the educational program, personnel 
management, school-community relations, 
school management and current research 
in learning theory. (Prerequisites: Three of 
the following— EDU 221, EDU 222AB, 
EDU 223, EDU 227, or approval of the pro- 
gram director) 



EDUCATION 143 



EDU 227 The Administrator's Role 
in Meeting the Needs of 
All Children (1) 

Exploration of the historical background 
and contemporary context for the descrip- 
tion of the administrator's role in meeting 
all children's needs. The concept and ad- 
ministrative implications of the inclusive 
classroom and school are studied. The 
course provides a study of ways to meet the 
needs of all children, as well as a survey of 
the organization, administration, and su- 
pervision of programs designed for this pur- 
pose. Meets California requirement for spe- 
cial education for the Preliminary 
Administrative Services credential. Prereq- 
uisite: Successful completion of a Commis- 
sion on Teacher Credentialing-approved 
course to meet requirements for the profes- 
sional clear Multiple or Single Subject 
Teaching Credential or its equivalent) 

EDU 228AB Supervised Field 
Experience: 
Administration (2, 2-1) 

Guided and supervised experience in edu- 
cational administration in a school setting. 
Includes seminar sessions and conferences 
with college and on-site supervisors. Can- 
didates' programs of field experience are de- 
signed on an individual basis in relation to 
required competency areas. Requires ap- 
proval of program director; prerequisite 
California credential must be on file. 

EDU 25 1 Child and Adolescent 
Development and 
Learning Across 
Cultures (3) 

Analyzes learning and development in chil- 
dren and adolescents across cultures. 
Study explores the complementary and in- 
terdependent relationships of biology and 
culture. Historical and global comparisons 
will be made to contemporary Angelino 
children as well as to the educator's per- 
sonal experience. Emphasis is placed on de- 
veloping a personal philosophy of how we, 
as a society and as individuals, can work to 
give children healthy foundations that sup- 
port growth and learning. 

EDU 253 Linguistics Applied to 
Diverse Student 
Populations (3) 

This course is designed to provide general 
and special educators with a foundational 
background in applied linguistics as it re- 
lates to K-12 instruction with applications 



for students with limited English profi- 
ciency and students with language learning 
disabilities. Topics to be covered include the 
structure of English; linguistic variation; 
language development in first- and second- 
language learners; disorders of language 
development, and implications for creating 
classroom environments that promote lan- 
guage development. 

EDU 257 Methods of Instruction for 
Bilingual and Multilingual 
Classrooms (3) 

Designed for CLAD Certificate candidates, 
this course provides both Multiple Subject 
and Single Subject students with the 
knowledge, research, and instructional 
methodologies necessary to meet the di- 
verse cultural and linguistic need of stu- 
dents in bilingual and multilingual class- 
room settings. The course focuses on all 
aspects of literacy learning and examines 
in depth relevant research and practices in 
bilingual education, ELD, and SDAIE in- 
struction. 

EDU 290 Workshop (.5-3) 

Experiential class focusing on a particular 
area of interest. 

EDU 296 Masters Project (3) 

Designed to provide opportunity for the 
candidate to develop competency in re- 
searching a current issue in education, ana- 
lyzing its operational problem, and prepar- 
ing a research project. Enrollment in EDU 
296 requires approval of a project proposal. 

EDU 299 Special Studies: Teacher 

Research (3) 

Advanced seminar in which students study 
their own classrooms, investigating areas 
of research interest. They will have the op- 
tion of publishing their research paper in 
the Teacher Research Monograph, an an- 
nual publication of the Education Depart- 
ment of Mount St. Mary's College. 

EDU299AB Special Studies (.5-3) 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent 
of department. May be repeated for credit. 

EDU 305 Technologies for Educators 

This course meets the Professional Clear 
Teaching Credential requirement for com- 
puter education. Instruction includes a full 
range of technologies appropriate for use in 
the K-12 classrooms, from basic computer 
applications to interactive CD-ROM, laser 
discs, and hyperstacks. The methodology of 



144 EDUCATION 



the course is individually-paced so that stu- 
dents with basic facility can transition 
quickly to new challenges specifically ap- 
plicable to their classroom situations. It in- 
cludes modeling the integration of on-line 
Internet projects such as bulletin boards, 
pen-pal projects, and access to databases in 
agencies such as the National Science 
Foundation, the Smithsonian Museums, 
and the California Museum of Photogra- 
phy. Use of the multicultural software is an 
emphasis. Also included is instruction in 
ways to use the computer as a resource for 
record keeping. 



Sequencing of courses does not indicate 
courses offered during the Summer Session; 
for these courses, request the Schedule of 
Classes from the office of the Summer Ses- 
sion Director or from the Education depart- 
ment. Sequencing of fall and spring term 
courses are subject to change. For current 
Schedule of Classes, contact the Registrar's 
Office. Courses are ordinarily offered on the 
Doheny Campus. 

Education classes require field observation; 
therefore, transportation for these classes is 
essential. 



ENGLISH 145 



English 



The English major explores the way people communicate and how they reflect on their 
existence. It gives sustained training in critical thinking and writing, creative self- 
expression, and the perceptive reading of literature. Working from a foundation in 
theory and criticism of literature, students select courses in writing and literature, and 
may design their own independent study and directed reading courses in areas of 
special interest. 

Because English majors get extensive experience in analyzing, solving problems, re- 
searching, organizing, studying human behavior, and above all writing and speaking 
with clarity and self-confidence, they have the background for a wide variety of careers. 
These include law, business management, journalism, public relations, teaching, pub- 
lic administration, and many areas of writing. Internships in the field of the student's 
career interest are highly recommended. 

Students are encouraged to combine their English major with a second major or minor, 
in. order to combine the liberal arts emphasis with a professional preparation. English 
and Business offer a combined major (see below). Students interested in law are en- 
couraged to select a second major in American Studies, Philosophy, or Political Science, 
and to complete the Pre-Law Minor. Other desirable minor programs include Business 
and the sequence of core courses in Public Administration (POL 185, 186, and 187). 

English Subject Matter Preparation Program 

The English department also features a special program for those students preparing 
to teach English in secondary schools. This program, called the English Subject Matter 
Preparation Program, has been approved by the California Commission on Teacher 
Credentialing. 

The Program has four central goals: 

1. To prepare teachers who have deeply interacted with significant literary works; 

2. To prepare teachers who can write, read, and speak effectively and transfer those 
skills to their students; 

3. To prepare teachers who know how to conduct an effective language arts classroom, 
providing a rich learning experience based on sound theory and modeled by English 
faculty; 

4. To prepare teachers who are informed and effective citizens. 

Advisors in both the English and the Education departments can provide students with 
a detailed introduction to this program and the appropriate listing of required courses. 

Courses Required for a B.A, Degree in English 



Preparation: 






ENG1AB 


Freshman English 


(3,3) 


ENG5H 
HISIAB 
SPEIO 


or 
Freshman Honors English 
Western Civilization 
Introduction to Communication 


(3) 

(3,3) 

(2) 



146 ENGLISH 



Requirements: 

30 additional units in English, at least 24 of which are upper division, including: 

One course in advanced writing (ENG 106, 107, or 109) (3) 

One upper-division course in American literature (ENG 126, 145, or 146) (3) 

One course in English literature before 1700 (ENG 143, 144, or 172) (3) 

One course in English literature after 1700 (ENG 147, 148, or 156H) (3) 

One genre course (ENG 161,162, or 163) (3) 

One Shakespeare course (ENG 73,173, or 174) (3) 

Theory and Criticism (ENG 181) (3) 

English Seminar (ENG 195) (3) 

Two electives chosen from English offerings (3,3) 

Strongly Recommended: 

PHI 5 Introduction to Logic (3) 

or 

PHI 10 Critical Thinking (3) 

ENG 70/170 Western Literary Heritage (3) 

Total units in English: 36 

Any course completed with a grade of "D" or below is not acceptable toward a major in 
English. 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in English and 
Business Administration 



English 



Preparation: 



ENG 1AB Freshman English (3,3) 

HIS 1AB Western Civilization (3,3) 

SPE 12 Business and Professional Communication (1) 

SPR 18 Career Planning Seminar (1) 

Requirements: 

24 additional units in English, at least 18 of which are upper division, including: 

ENG 181 Theory and Criticism (3) 

ENG 195 English Seminar (3) 

Recommended: 

One course in American literature (3) 



ENGLISH 147 



Business Administration 

Lower Division Core Requirements: 

BUS 4 Business Foundations & Analysis (3) 

BUS 5 Business Law I (3) 

BUS 15A Accounting Principles I (3) 

BUS 15B Accounting Principles II (3) 

ECO 1 Microeconomics (3) 

ECO 2 Macroeconomics (3) 

MTH 28 Mathematical Analysis for Business (3) 

MTH 38 Elements of Probability & Statistics (3) 

BUS 13 Computer Applications: Spreadsheets 

and Word Processing (1) 



Courses Strongly Recommended: 



PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


PHI 5 


Introduction to Logic 


(3) 


Division 


l Core Requirements: 




BUS 122 


Management Communications 


(3) 


BUS 130 


Principles of Finance 


(3) 


BUS 160 


Marketing Management 


(3) 


BUS 177 


Management Information Systems 


(3) 


BUS 185 


Managing Organizations 


(3) 


BUS 192 


Business Policy and Strategy 


(3) 



Total units in English and Business: 61 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 

The Minor in English 
Requirements: 

Satisfactory completion of ENG 1AB or equivalent. Eighteen additional units in Eng- 
lish, at least twelve of which are upper division. 

Strongly recommended: 

ENG 181 Theory and Criticism (3) 

Students interested in an English minor work out their program with a departmental 
advisor. Because of the variety of careers to which an English program may lead, the 
choice of courses is flexible. 

Any course completed with a "D" or below is not acceptable toward a minor in English. 



148 ENGLISH 



ENG1AB Freshman English (3,3) 

Principles and practice of writing, with at- 
tention to critical thinking and analytical 
reading. Includes discussion skills, library 
usage, research techniques, and an intro- 
duction to literature. Prerequisite: Satis- 
factory score on Writing Placement test. 
Completion with a grade ofC or better and 
a score of 4 or better on the Writing Exit test 
fulfills Communication Skills requirement 
in writing for both the associate and bac- 
calaureate degree. GS-IA 

ENG1C Freshman English (3) 

Option to ENG IB, with a strong critical 
thinking emphasis, explores nonfiction, 
drama, and poetry and requires extensive 
writing and discussion, focusing on analy- 
sis, reasoning, and defining problems. Pre- 
requisite: ENG 1A. Completion with a 
grade of C or better and a score of 4 or better 
on the Writing Exit test fulfills Communi- 
cations Skills requirement for both the as- 
sociate and baccalaureate degree. GS-IA, 
GS-II 

ENG3X Basic Writing (3) 

A study of basic elements of writing includ- 
ing sentence structure, paragraph devel- 
opment, and mechanics. Does not fulfill the 
Communication Skills requirement in writ- 
ing, nor does credit apply to the baccalau- 
reate degree. 

ENG4X Essay Writing (3) 

Designed to build on the skills developed in 
ENG 3X Basic Writing, this course focuses 
on the organizational and grammatical 
skills necessary for writing short essays. 
Does not fulfill the communication skills re- 
quirement in writing, nor does credit apply 
toward the baccalaureate degree. 

ENG 5H Freshman Honors 

English (3) 

College writing for students who are ac- 
cepted for Honors at Entrance, and who 
earn a grade of 5 or 6 on the Writing place- 
ment test or who are admitted by the in- 
structor. A study of selected masterpieces 
of world literature with emphasis on writ- 
ten analysis. Includes introduction to col- 
lege-level library and research skills. Com- 
pletion with a grade of B or better fulfills 
Communications Skills requirements in 
writing. GS-IA 



ENG 6AB Written Communication 

and Analytical 

Reading (3,3) 

A two-semester course focusing on standard 
written English. Includes expository and an- 
alytical writing; library and research skills; 
analytical reading. Prerequisite: Placement is 
dependent on scores received in entrance test- 
ing. Completion with a grade ofC or better in 
both ENG 6A and 6B and a score of 4 or better 
on the Writing Exit test fulfills the Communi- 
cation Skills requirement in writing for the 
associate degree. 

ENG10AB Written and Oral 

Communication (3,3) 

Offered only in the HOPE Program. A two- 
term course in college-level reading, writ- 
ing, and oral communication. Includes ex- 
pository and analytical writing, analytical 
reading of fiction and nonfiction works, li- 
brary research, small group and class dis- 
cussion, and intensive review of standard 
written English grammar and punctuation. 
Completion with grade ofC or better in both 
10A and 10B fulfills the associate degree 
Communications Skills requirement in 
writing. 

ENG 11 College Writing (1-3) 

Intensive experience in expository writing 
with special emphasis on continued devel- 
opment of essay skills. Prerequisite: C or 
better in ENG 1AB, 6AB, or equivalent. 
Strongly recommended for students prepar- 
ing for CBESTand/or transferring to a bac- 
calaureate program. 

ENG 12/112 Literary Analysis (3) 

Introduction to college-level literary anal- 
ysis as applied to drama, poetry, and fiction. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1A/6AB, equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 15 Literature and Society (3) 

Examination of society's accomplishments 
and vexations in selected literary works 
that portray human striving in family, na- 
tion, and technological world. May be re- 
peated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 1AI 
6AB, equivalent, or permission of instruc- 
tor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 16 Literature and the Human 

Experience (3) 

Studies in the stages of human develop- 
ment as portrayed in classic works of West- 
ern literature with particular focus on the 
growth of the self and on the individual's 
relationship to others and to God. Themes 



ENGLISH 149 



include adolescence, the female experience, 
love, the family, moral choice, faith, death 
and dying. May be repeated for credit. Pre- 
requisite: ENG 1A/6AB, equivalent, or per- 
mission of instructor. GS-IHB 

ENG 17 Literary Focus (3) 

In-depth study of works selected by author, 
theme, or genre. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1AI6AB, equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 18/1 18 Great Works in World 

Literature (3) 

Study of major works in world literature, 
representing a variety of periods, themes, 
and genres. Prerequisite: ENG 1A/6AB, 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. GS- 
IIIB 

ENG 19/1 19 Great Works in British 
Literature (3) 

Study of major works in British literature, 
representing a variety of periods and gen- 
res. Prerequisite: ENG 1A 1 6AB, equivalent, 
or permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 20/120 Great Works in 

American Literature (3) 

Study of major works in American litera- 
ture, representing a variety of periods and 
genres. Prerequisite: ENG 1A 1 6AB, equiv- 
alent, or permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 21/121 Classical Epic and 

Drama (3) 

Reading of the Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, and 
several Greek tragedies. Study of their 
origins, development, meaning to the an- 
cient world and to the contemporary reader. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1A/6AB, equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 25/125 Mythmaking: the Quest 
for Meaning (3) 

An exploration of mythmaking in literature 
as a reflection and interpretation of human 
experience. Major mythic themes are 
traced and compared in the arts, as well as 
in literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1A/6AB, 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. GS- 
IIIB 

ENG 26 Literature of the American 
West (3) 

Study of values and themes in American 
fiction and nonfiction from the perspective 
of a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: ENG 
1A/6AB, equivalent, or permission of in- 
structor. GS-IIIB, VI 



ENG 27/127 Women in Quest (3) 

Study of women's lives and choices in fiction 
and nonfiction. Emphasis on current liter- 
ature from diverse ethnic groups. Prereq- 
uisite: ENG 1A/ 6AB, equivalent, or permis- 
sion of instructor. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 28/128 Contemporary Issues in 
World Literature (3) 

A sampling of contemporary literature from 
various cultures around the world with em- 
phasis on women authors and their con- 
cerns. Students will encounter issues and 
problems from racism and poverty to do- 
mestic violence, rape, prostitution, and 
war. Course includes relation of students' 
lives to global issues. Prerequisite: ENG 
1A/6AB, equivalent, or permission of in- 
structor. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 34 Literature for the Young 
Child (3) 

A survey of children's literature for lower 
division students interested in working 
with young children and primary grade 
children. Students have experiences in 
sharing stories or poems with children (in- 
cludes use of reading, storytelling, flannel 
board activities, and puppets). Analysis of 
books based on literary characteristics. In- 
cludes study of artist illustrators. 

ENG 70/170 Western Literary 

Heritage (3) 

Selected readings in Greek mythology and 
literature, the Bible, and Dante's Divine 
Comedy. Designed to provide the serious 
reader with literary and cultural back- 
ground to better understand and appreci- 
ate the range of Western literature. 
Strongly recommended for English majors. 

ENG 73 Shakespeare (3) 

A study of selected Shakespearean plays 
and poetry. Because readings vary each se- 
mester, course may be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1A/6AB, equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 90 Internship (1-6) 

Students are placed, supervised and eval- 
uated in a position that makes use of the 
communication skills developed in college 
English classes. May be repeated for credit 
up to six units. 

ENG 91 Directed Study (1-3) 

Study in a field of special interest, under 
the direction of a department member. May 
be repeated for credit. 



150 ENGLISH 



ENG92 Special Studies (3) 

Exploration of special interest areas in the 
study of language and literature. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 1AI 
6AB, equivalent, or permission of instruc- 
tor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 94/194 Special Studies in 

Writing (1-3) 

Study of a selected mode of writing with 
focus on technique and practice. May be re- 
peated for credit. Prerequisite: Completion 
of ENG 1AB/6AB, equivalent, or permis- 
sion of instructor. 



*ENG96 Workshop 

May be repeated for credit. 



(1-3) 



ENG 101 History of the English 

Language (3) 

This course analyzes the prehistoric ante- 
cedents of the English language and traces 
the growth of English from its earliest doc- 
umentation to modern times, paying atten- 
tion to structural changes in phonology, 
morphology and syntax and to the enrich- 
ment of the lexicon. Students are intro- 
duced to the principles of linguistic evolu- 
tion. Special emphasis is also placed on the 
changes in social institutions that affect 
language and the many ethnic sources that 
have enriched the resources of English, es- 
pecially in the United States. 

ENG 102 Structure of Modern 

English (3) 

Introduction to varieties of contemporary 
linguistic theories and their application to 
modern American English. Includes study 
of the structure of the English language and 
the conventions of standard English, basic 
principles of first and second language ac- 
quisition and development, theories of lan- 
guage acquisition in relation to the social 
context, and implications of speaking a pri- 
mary language other than the "main- 
stream" language. 

ENG 104 Expository Writing (3) 

Designed for students wishing to improve 
their writing, this course provides review of 
basic skills and extensive practice in devel- 
oping writing style. May be repeated for 
credit. 

ENG 105 Advanced Composition (3) 

Designed to meet the particular needs of 
the Liberal Studies major. Assignments in- 
clude academic, professional, and personal 
writing that enables the student to increase 



writing confidence and competency by ex- 
ploring the English language, reviewing 
basic skills, and discovering one's style. 
Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 1AB or 
equivalent, and score of 4 or better on the 
Writing Placement test. 

ENG 106 Creative Writing (3) 

Students write fiction, poetry, and personal 
essays from their experiences and obser- 
vations. May be repeated for credit. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

ENG 107 Professional Writing (3) 

An examination of the kinds of writing used 
in the communications media, with practice 
in developing newspaper, magazine, tele- 
vision, or radio material. May be repeated 
for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

ENG 108 The News Media (3) 

A critical examination of the news media, 
showing how print and broadcast news or- 
ganizations operate and giving extensive 
practice in evaluating media reporting of 
current stories. 

ENG 109 Writing: Voice and View (3) 

Nonaction writing as a literary art. De- 
signed for good writers and anyone who en- 
joys the challenge of responding to life 
through the written word. An opportunity 
to develop one's personal style and voice 
while examining the work of great essayists 
past and present. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor. 

ENG 122 Love in World 

Literature (3) 

The idea of love studied in historical per- 
spective through the analysis of literary 
works. Focus on critical enjoyment. Prereq- 
uisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, or permission 
of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 123 Women's Voices in 

Literature (3) 

Major contemporary works by women studied 
in the context of current critical theory. Im- 
pact of women's voices from diverse ethnic 
groups. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. GS-IIIB, VI 



ENGLISH 151 



ENG 124 Fiction to Film (3) 

Examination of how works of fiction become 
motion pictures. The component elements 
of both fiction and film are applied to rep- 
resentative novels to assess their adapta- 
tion from the medium of fiction to the me- 
dium of film. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. GS- 
IIIB 

ENG 126 The American 

Experience (3) 

Study of works of American literature from 
various periods of history and representa- 
tive of the cultures and ethnic identities 
that make up the American heritage. Pre- 
requisite: ENG LAB, equivalent, or permis- 
sion of instructor. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 129 Ethnic Literatures of 

America (3) 

Introduction to major ethnic literatures of 
the United States with emphasis on women 
authors. Comparative study including two 
or more of the following groups: African 
American, Asian American , Latino/a, Na- 
tive American, Jewish. Interdisciplinary 
approach using historical and sociopolitical 
context to address issues of race, class, and 
gender. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, 
or permission of instructor. GS-IIIB, VI. 

ENG 130 Faith and Fiction (3) 

A study of Christian poets, dramatists, and 
novelists in historical perspective. Focus on 
both the changing and the unchanging as- 
pects of Christian faith. Prerequisite: ENG 
1AB, equivalent, or permission of instruc- 
tor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 131 Russian Literature (3) 

Major Russian authors examined in their 
cultural and historical contexts. Writers in- 
clude Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, 
and Solzhenitsyn. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. GS- 
IIIB 

ENG 134 Children's Literature (3) 

Wide reading of children's books, including 
Caldecott and Newbery awards and honor 
books. Multicultural emphasis spans all 
genres covered, Focus on appreciation of lit- 
erature, as well as on literary analysis of 
the selections. Includes study of critics in 
the field and of illustrators. 



ENG 143 English Literature: 

Beowulf to 1500 (3) 

Major works of the medieval period studied 
in their historical and cultural contexts. 
Prerequisite: HIS 1A, ENG LAB, equiva- 
lent, or permission of instructor. 

ENG 144 English Literature: 1500 to 
1700 (3) 

Major works of the Renaissance and Resto- 
ration studied in their historical and cultural 
contexts. Prerequisite: HIS 1A, ENG 1AB, 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. 

ENG 145 American Literature: 

Beginnings to 1914 (3) 

Major works of colonial, early federal, and 
nineteenth-century America studied in the 
light of their historical contexts. Prerequi- 
site: ENG LAB, equivalent, or permission of 
instructor. 

ENG 146 American Literature: 1914 
to Present (3) 

Study of major works of modern America; 
consideration of how the literature reflects 
the condition of society after World War I. 
Prerequisite: ENG LAB, equivalent, or per- 
mission of instructor. 

ENG 147 English Literature: 1700 to 
1900 (3) 

Major works of the 18th Century, Romantic 
and Victorian periods studied in their his- 
torical and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: 
ENG 1AB, equivalent, or permission of in- 
structor. 

ENG 148 Twentieth Century English 
and European 
Literature (3) 

Major contemporary works studied in their 
historical and cultural contexts. Prerequi- 
site: ENG 1AB, equivalent, or permission of 
instructor. 

ENG156H The Modern Temper (3) 

An exploration of the concept of the modern, 
through a study of nineteenth and twen- 
tieth-century literature, with particular at- 
tention to the interfacing of literature with 
history, philosophy, religion, or the behav- 
ioral sciences. Recommended for upper di- 
vision honors students. GS-IIIB 

ENG 161 Study of the Novel (3) 

Chronological reading and study of repre- 
sentative novels from the 18th to the 20th 
centuries. Emphasis on critical enjoyment 
and awareness of the novel's changing 



152 ENGLISH 



form. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, 
or permission of instructor. 

ENG 162 Study of Poetry (3) 

Study of the development of poetry from its 
beginnings to the twentieth century with 
emphasis on critical enjoyment. Prerequi- 
site: ENG 1AB, equivalent, or permission of 
instructor. 

ENG 163 Study of Drama (3) 

Analysis of representative plays from major 
periods of theater history with emphasis on 
works of classical, European, English, and 
American playwrights; theories of interpre- 
tation are applied. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. 

ENG 164 American Drama 

In-depth study of American drama. Plays 
ranging from Eugene O'Neill to the present 
selected to reflect the rich cultural diversity 
that gives American drama its distinctive 
voice. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, 
or permission of instructor. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 172 Chaucer (3) 

Readings in the poetry of Chaucer, princi- 
pally the Canterbury Tales and Troilus and 
Criseyde, with reference to the minor 
works. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, 
or permission of instructor. 

ENG 173 Shakespeare (3) 

Appreciation of Shakespeare's range and 
art as a playwright through study of works 
from different periods of his development; 
combination of in-depth and background 
study. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, 
or permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 174 Shakespeare Seminar (3) 

Advanced study and research in the works 
of Shakespeare, with attention to Renais- 
sance culture and thought. Culminates in a 
written project. Designed for upper-divi- 
sion English majors, but other upper-divi- 
sion students may be admitted with per- 
mission of instructor. 

ENG 181 Theory and Criticism (3) 

Advanced study in methods of examining 
and discussing literature. Practice in liter- 
ary analysis. Consideration of selected ma- 
jor critical theories and documents. 



ENG 184 Studies in British and 

American Literature (3) 

Study of selected authors, literary periods, 
or genres. May be repeated for credit. De- 
signed for upper-division English majors, 
but other upper-division students may be 
admitted with permission of instructor. 

ENG 190 Internship (1-6) 

Students are placed and supervised in busi- 
ness or administrative positions that make 
use of the skills developed in the major 
study. Prerequisites vary and are deter- 
mined in consultation with the coordinator. 
May be repeated for credit up to 6 units. 

ENG 191 Directed Study (1-3) 

Study in a field of special interest under the 
direction of a department member. May be 
repeated for credit. 

ENG 192 Special Studies (1-3) 

Exploration of special interest areas in the 
study of language and literature. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. GS- 
IIIB 

ENG 193 Special Studies in 

Language and Literature 

(3) 
Advanced reading and research in selected 
areas of language and literature. May be 
repeated for credit. Designed for upper-di- 
vision English majors, but other upper-di- 
vision students may be admitted with per- 
mission of instructor. 

ENG 195 English Seminar (3) 

Designed to provide upper-division English 
majors with an opportunity for in-depth in- 
vestigation into literature and ideas; cul- 
minates in a written project. English mi- 
nors and other upper-division students 
admitted with permission of instructor. 

ENG196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 



FRENCH 153 



French 

Departmental Affiliation: Modern Language and Literature 

The Department of Modern Languages and Literature offers majors and minors in 
French and Spanish (for Spanish course description, see alphabetical listing). The 
major in French is a comprehensive program leading to a proficiency in the four basic 
language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding. Incorporated into the 
program are the culture and civilization of France. Students may plan their programs 
with an emphasis on literature or culture and civilization. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in French 



Lower Division: 






FRE 1 & 2 


Elementary French I & II (or equivalent) 


(4,4) 


FRE8 


Oral Comprehension and Conversation 


(3) 


FRE 9 


Intermediate Reading 


(3) 


FRE 25 


Composition, Writing, Grammar 


(3) 


Upper Division: 






FRE 101 


French Writing Lab 


(3) 


FRE 112 


History and Civilization of France 


(3) 


FRE 114 


The Belle Epoque: Before and After 


(3) 


FRE 116 


Contemporary Culture and Politics 


(3) 


FRE 126 


Modern Classics 


(3) 


FRE 191 


Senior Thesis 


(3) 



Three additional upper division courses, for a minimum of 24 upper 
division units. 

A minimum of 24 upper division units must be completed to obtain a B.A. in French. 
(A minimum of 9 upper division units must be completed in the French Program of the 
Department of Modern Languages at Mount St. Mary's College.) 

The Minor in French 

A minimum of 23 units must be completed to obtain a Minor in French. (A minimum 
of 6 units must be completed in the French Program of the Department of Modern 
Languages at Mount St. Mary's College.) There are different courses required depend- 
ing on the emphasis of the Minor, as follows: 

A Literature 

Requirements: 

FRE 1 & 2 Elementary French I & II (or equivalent) (4,4) 

FRE 8 Oral Comprehension and Conversation (3) 

FRE 25/101 French Writing Lab (3) 

FRE 126 Modern Classics (3) 

FRE 128 20th Century Literary Trends (3) 



154 FRENCH 



B. Culture and Civilization Emphasis 



Requirements: 

FRE 1 & 2 
FRE8 
FRE 25/101 
FRE 112 
FRE 114 



Elementary French I & II (4,4) 

Oral Comprehension and Conversation (3) 

French Writing Lab (3) 

History and Civilization of France (3) 

The Belle Epoque: Before and After (3) 



Any course completed with a grade of "D" or below is not acceptable toward a Major or 
Minor in French and must be repeated. 



FRE 1 Elementary French I (4) 

Develops fundamental skills: speaking, 
reading, understanding and writing. Em- 
phasis on speaking and grammar. GS-IV 

FRE 2 Elementary French II (4) 

Further improves all four language skills 
stressing reading and writing, and vocab- 
ulary building. Prerequisite: FRE 1. GS-IV 

FRE 8 Oral Comprehension and 

Conversation (3) 

Intensive practice in oral communication, 
both formal and spontaneous. Emphasis on 
vocabulary building and the acquisition of 
idiomatic speech patterns. Prerequisite: 
FRE 2 or equivalent. GS-IV 

FRE 9 Intermediate French 

Readings (3) 

A variety of texts, literary and journalistic 
from an array of Francophone cultures will 
be read and discussed to improve fluency in 
reading and conversation skills and to 
underline cultural variances. Prerequisite: 
FRE 2 or equivalent. GS-IV, VI 

FRE 25 Writing, Composition and 

Grammar (3) 

The emphasis is on writing and composition 
skills with intensive review of verbs and 
grammatical structures. Prerequisite: FRE 
8 or instructor's consent. GS-IV 

FRE 33AB French Culture and 

Civilization (3,3) 

A comprehensive approach, both historical 
and thematic, to a better understanding of 
French culture today. Highlights of major 
social and historical developments and of 
literary and artistic movements. These 
courses are given in English only through 
the Weekend College. GS-IV 



FRE 101 French Writing Lab (3) 

Intensive training in writing, with empha- 
sis on vocabulary, idiom, structural pat- 
terns and style. Exercises in rhetoric, in cre- 
ative and other forms of writing. 
Prerequisite: FRE 25 or instructor's con- 
sent. 

FRE 1 12 History and Civilization of 
j France (3) 

This course will cover the major trends and 
expressions of French Civilization, includ- 
ing the Age of Cathedrals, the French Ren- 
aissance, the glory of Versaille, and the 
French Revolution. Prerequisite: FRE 25. 

Gs-rv 

FRE 114 The Belle Epoque: Before 

and After (3) 

This post Revolutionary period starts with 
Napoleon and ends with the second World 
War. From Romanticism and Surrealism in 
literature, from Impressionism to Cubism 
in painting, it is the vibrant evolution of 
modern France. Prerequisite: FRE 25 

FRE 116 Contemporary Culture and 
Politics (3) 

The economic recovery of France under the 
leadership of Charles de Gaule, its place 
and role in the European Community, as 
well as the new trends in art, philosophy, 
literature and films are some of the topics 
included in this course. Prerequisite: FRE 
25 

FRE 124 Literary Masterpieces (3) 

Poetry, tragedies, comedies and philosoph- 
ical essays, from the Middle Ages to the end 
of the eighteenth century: the best of 
French literature before the Revolution. 
Prerequisite: FRE 112 or instructor's con- 
sent 



FRENCH 155 



FRE 126 Modern Classics (3) 

The nineteenth century has been called the 
Golden Age of French literature and in- 
cludes Balzac, Victor Hugo, Beaudelaire, 
Flaubert, Emile Zola and many other re- 
markable writers. Prerequisite: FRE 114 or 
instructor's consent 

FRE 128 Twentieth Century 

Literary Trends (3) 

From the Surrealistes to the Roman Nou- 
veau, this course will focus on some of the 
great writers of this century, with special 
emphasis on Albert Camus, Andre Mal- 
raux, Marcel Pagnol et Natalie Sarraute. 
Selected texts from various Francophone 
cultures will be evaluated in terms of cul- 
tural variances and their impact on main- 
stream French Literature. Prerequisite: 
FRE 116 or instructor's consent GS-VI 

FRE 190AB Internship (3,3) 

Internship/cooperative experience pro- 
grams in areas related to French and inter- 
national business. 



FRE 191 Senior Thesis (3) 

French majors must complete a senior the- 
sis in literature under the direction of a de- 
partment member. They enroll in FRE 191, 
Senior Thesis during the term in which 
they complete the work. 

FRE 194 Study/Travel (1-6) 

Pre-travel lectures and readings, as well as 
guided tours in the country, serve as basis 
for a study/travel program, with each par- 
ticipant developing a project highlighting 
the travel experiences. 

FRE196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

FRE198AB Directed Readings (3,3) 
Directed readings selected from authors 
representative of significant literary pe- 
riods. 

FRE199AB Independent Studies 

(1-3,1-3) 

Directed research. For qualified students 
with the approval of the department. 



156 GERONTOLOGY 



Gerontology 



Gerontology consists of an exploration of the biopsychosocial dimensions of life course 
development, with a focus on the rapidly expanding aging population of the United 
States. 

The Gerontology Major is interdisciplinary and grounded in the excellent liberal arts 
tradition of Mount St. Mary's College, with courses residing in Gerontology, Sociology, 
Psychology, Biology, Philosophy, and Religious Studies. It is believed this program 
design greatly benefits professional training in the field, providing a broad base of 
understanding of the complex dynamics of aging in our society today. 

As a gerontologist, an ever-increasing array of career options are available, such as in 
human resources management, public policy, case management, social services deliv- 
ery systems, family services agencies, job retraining, housing, transportation, rehabil- 
itation programs, retirement communities, church-related agencies, government agen- 
cies, and more. 

Along with the Major in Gerontology, a Minor and Certificate Program are also avail- 
able. 

Courses Required for a B .A. Degree in Gerontology: 

Lower Division: 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 



SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


PSY1 


Introduction to Psychology 


BIO 10 


Health Science 


Division: 

SOC 104 


The Family 


SOC 117 


Research Methods 


GER 120 


Case Management 


GER 189 


Sociology of Aging 


GER 192 


Thanatology Seminar 


GER 197 


Gerontology Internship 


PHI 168 


Bioethics 


or 
RST 49/149 


Biomedical Issues 


Plus select two from the following: 


SOC 112 


Medical Sociology 


SOC 125 


Comparative Social 




Structures 


SOC 130 


Social Process 


SOC 190 


Social Change 


PSY 125 


Introduction to Counseling 


PSY 126 


Brief Therapies 


PSY 128 


Adulthood and Aging 


PSY 133 


Psychology of Disability 




and Adjustment 



(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 



GERONTOLOGY 157 



BIO 40 


Human Anatomy 


BIO 50 
BIO 112 
BIO 150 


Human Anatomy 
Human Nutrition 
Biology of Aging 



(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

Plus completion of general studies requirements and the modern language requirement 
for a total of 124 units. If, however, the student's first, or primary major will culminate 
in a B.S. Degree, the foreign language requirement is not applicable. 

Total units in Gerontology: 36 

The Minor in Gerontology 
Required courses: 

A minimum of six courses, which must include: 

SOC 104 The Family (3) 

GER 189 Sociology of Aging (3) 

GER 192 Thanatology Seminar (3) 

Plus select three courses from the Gerontology Major list of 
requirements (above). 

Total units for the Minor in Gerontology: 18 

Certificate in Gerontology 

A Certificate in Gerontology is available to those who have previously earned a Bach- 
elor's Degree, but now wish to receive training in Gerontology in order to prepare for a 
new career in the field. 

Required Courses for Certificate in Gerontology: 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 

Total units in Gerontology: 21 

GER 21 Internship: Gerontology (3) required, along with practicum attendance. 

Off-campus internship experience at the This course cannot count towards Geron- 

lower division level at a site mutually tology Major requirements, but serves as a 

agreed upon by advisor and student. The good introduction to actual work in the 

goal is to gain hands-on experience at a fa- field. Prerequisite: GER 94. 
cility which serves the older population. A 
minimum of 120 hours of on-site work is 



GER 120 


Case Management 


GER 189 


Sociology of Aging 


GER 192 


Thanatology Seminar 


GER 197 


Gerontology Internship 


SOC 117 


Research Methods 


PHI 168 


Bioethics 


or 
RST 49/149 


Biomedical Issues 


BIO 112 


Human Nutrition 



158 GERONTOLOGY 



GER94 Topics in Aging (3) 

An examination of the current issues and 
trends operative in society today with an 
emphasis on their effects on the quality of 
life of the aging American. Previously 
known as HSP 94. See SOC 94. 

GER 120 Case Management in 
Health and Human 
Services (3) 

A study of the methods and practices util- 
ized by health and human services case 
managers working in a variety of social 
service resource settings, such as hospitals, 
daycare centers, senior centers, non-profit 
outreach programs, and convalescent facil- 
ities. Fundamental business, management 
and social interaction skills will be high- 
lighted. See SOC 120. 

GER 189 Sociology of Aging (3) 

A cross-cultural exploration of aging as ex- 
perienced in the United States. Ageism, so- 
cietal attitudes regarding the elderly, and 
responses to the aging process, both from 
the individual and social perspective, are 
examined. Cultural variation and re- 
sponses to aging and the social, political, 
and economic implications of a rapidly ex- 
panding aging population in the U.S. and 
in many regions of the world, will be ana- 
lyzed. Resource and service availability for 
the elderly — locally, regionally, and nation- 
ally — will also be assessed. See SOC 189. 



GER 192 Thanatology Seminar (3) 

A multi-disciplinary and comparative ap- 
proach to death and dying. The course focus 
will consist of historical and literary 
themes, along with cultural responses 
which have provided understanding, cop- 
ing, and meaning for the death and dying 
process. Previously known as HSP 196. 

GER196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

GER 197 Gerontology Internship (3) 

The application of the major's program of 
study through an internship experience. A 
minimum of 120 hours of on-site experience 
is required, along with practicum attend- 
ance and participation. Internship site to 
be selected and mutually agreed upon by 
student and advisor. Open to Gerontology 
Majors only and to be taken in senior year 
of study. Prerequisites: GER 120, GER 189. 
Previously known as HSP 195. 

GER 198 Readings in 

Gerontology (1-6) 

Intensive and independent study in a field 
of special interest at the culmination of 
one's gerontology studies. 

GER 199 Special Studies (1-6) 

A more advanced or specialized treatment 
of an area covered in the regular course list. 






HISTORY 159 



History 

Division Affiliation: Social Science 

The student who majors in history examines and analyzes the heritage of the recorded 
past in an effort to better understand and evaluate events and developments of the 
present. Emphasis is placed on American, European, and non- Western civilizations. 

Other options are offered in the closely-allied area majors offered in Social Science with 
emphasis in history, political science, and public administration. 

It is possible to have history and American Studies as a double major. See American 
Studies. Such a combination is highly desirable and very useful, combining as it does 
with the general major a specialized study of the character and developing trends of 
American society. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in History 

Lower Division: 

HIS 1AB Western Civilization (3,3) 

POL 10 Political Concepts (3) 

Upper Division: 

Nine upper division courses including: 

HIS 101 Research Methodology (3) 

Total units in History: 36 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 

The Minor in History 

A minimum of six courses including: 

HIS 1AB Western Civilization (3,3) 

Total units in History: 18 

To declare a minor in History a student must take at least 5 approved courses from 
Mount St. Mary's College. 

HIS 1AB Western Civilization (3,3) HIS 5 European Leaders and Ideas 

An historical study of the major elements in Ferment and Flux (3) 

in human heritage designed to introduce A study of the major people and forces 

the student to the ideas, attitudes, and in- which shaped European culture and insti- 

stitutions basic to western civilization. GS- tutions from the mid- 19th century to the 

niC present. GS-IIIC 



160 HISTORY 



HIS 25 Cultural and Historical 

Geography (3) 

A survey of the basic cultural elements of 
geography, of their correlation with the 
physical elements, and of the geographic 
factors basic to the study of history and the 
social sciences. GS-IIIC, VI 

♦HIS 93ABCD Studies in Selected 
Historical Problems/ 
Topics (3,3,3,3) 

The course will reflect special areas of re- 
search by various faculty members and vis- 
iting lecturers. The particular areas of 
study will be announced in the semester 
schedules. GS-HIC, VI 

HIS 101 Research Methodology (3) 

An examination of modern research and 
writing methods emphasizing needed skills 
in conducting historical research and pre- 
paring research papers, including working 
with primary documents, using libraries 
and archives, and evaluating, citing, and 
presenting evidence. Required for History 
majors. See POL 101. 

HIS 1 12/1 12H Economic History of 

Europe (3) 

This course will offer a unified explanation 
for the growth of Western Europe from A.D. 
900 to 1900, with particular emphasis on 
the evolution of economic institutions. 
These institutions include property rights 
and wage labor. See also ECO 112H. GS- 
IIIC 

HIS 1 15AB History of Political 

Theory (3,3) 

See POL 117AB. GS-IIIC 

HIS 116 Classical Civilization (3) 

The development of ancient Greece from 
the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic 
Ages. The rise of Rome, its rule of the Med- 
iterranean, and its role as transmitter of 
the Greek heritage. GS-IIIC 

HIS 118 The World of Medieval 

Europe, 500-1300 (3) 

An exploration of the forces, institutions, 
and people of the late Roman Empire, the 
emerging Christian Church, and the Ger- 
manic tribes which fused together to create 
the foundations for Western European civ- 
ilization; topics to be considered include: 
feudalism, national monarchies, recovery 
of town life, medieval universities and ar- 
tistic and literary culture. GS-IIIC 



HIS 124 History of the Middle 

East (3) 

An examination of the development of ma- 
jor Islamic civilizations to the emergence of 
the contemporary nation states. Emphasis 
on the origins of the Turkish-Christian and 
Arab- Jewish conflicts. 

HIS 142 The Age of the Renaissance 
and Reformation, 1300-1648 

A study which combines two seminal eras 
in European history. Students are invited 
to probe the intellectual and artistic flow- 
ering of the Renaissance as well as its po- 
litical and economic foundations; further 
investigation will focus on the intellectual, 
social, religious and political complexities 
of the Reformation era as well as its major 
religious and political personalities. GS- 
IIIC or VA4 

HIS 143 Europe: The Old Regime 
and the Enlightenment, 
1648-1789 (3) 

The European search for security and the 
effort to reconcile the Old Regime with the 
New Science of the Enlightenment. An ex- 
amination of the attempts to maintain the 
political balance and growth offerees lead- 
ing to the modern world. GS-IIIC 

HIS 146 Europe: The Age of 
Revolution and 
Nationalism, 1789-1871 (3) 

A study of class conflicts, culture and na- 
tionalism in the period from the beginning 
of the French revolution to the unification 
of Italy and Germany and the Commune of 
Paris. The intellectual and artistic achieve- 
ments of figures such as Goya, Beethoven, 
Stendhal, Darwin, Marx, and Wagner will 
be treated in relation to the political, social, 
and cultural trends of this period. 

HIS 147 Europe: The Age of 
Imperialism and 
Totalitarianism, 
1871-1945 (3) 

The history of Europe in the German era 
from the establishment of the Second Reich 
to the collapse of the Third. A study of so- 
ciety and culture in nations preparing for 
and conducting total war. The intellectual 
and artistic achievement of figures such as 
Nietzsche, Freud, Mann, Nijinsky, Orwell, 
and Picasso will be treated in relation to the 
political and intellectual currents of the pe- 
riod. GS-IIIC 



HISTORY 161 



HIS 150 An Introduction to Asian 

History (3) 

This course is an introduction to the major 
themes in the social, cultural, religous, and 
political development of Asia, principally 
India, China, and Japan. It examines and 
compares the history of these civilizations 
from pre-history to the early twentieth cen- 
tury. May be taken for lower division credit. 
GS-IIIC 

HIS 151 Advanced Studies in the 

History of Modern Japan (3) 

An examination of the rapid transition of 
the feudal Japan of the Shogun to the mod- 
ern technological state. This course will 
probe the events that brought changes in 
government, family, religion, education, in- 
dustry and foreign relations from 1600 to 
1952. (See POL 152A.) GS-IIIC 

HIS 152 Advanced Studies in the 

History of Modern China (3) 

An emphasis on the development of Modern 
China through a biographical approach. 
Personalities such as the Empress Dowa- 
ger, Sun Yat-sen, Mao Tse Tung and others 
will provide insights into the evolution of 
the Chinese State. (See POL 152B.) GS- 

nic 

HIS 153 Advanced Studies in the 

History of Modern India (3) 

This course on Modern India provides an in 
depth study of the multicultural, social, po- 
litical, religious, and economic realities 
that connect and differentiate indigenous 
Hindus, Muslims, and Europeans in India 
from the establishment of the Mughal Dy- 
nasty (c. 1600) to Indian Independence 
(1947) (See POL 152C) GS-VI 

HIS 162 History and Civilization of 
Latin America (3) 

A survey of pre-Columbian and Latin 
American social and cultural history, with 
stress on the values and institutions which 
have created modern society in the Latin 
American world. GS-VI 

HIS 165 History of the Spanish- 
Speaking Peoples of the 
United States (3) 

A study of the Spanish-speaking peoples in 
the United States today. The history, con- 
temporary status, and emerging future of 
the Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cu- 
bans, and other Latino communities in the 
United States. 



HIS 171 The United States from 
Colony to Republic, 
1607-1800 (3) 

The American colonial period, revolution, 
confederation, union under the Constitu- 
tion, and early national period; the social, 
economic, political, and cultural develop- 
ment of the United States to 1800. GS-IIIC 

HIS 1 73 The United States in the 

19th Century (3) 

United States social, economic, political, 
and cultural development from the early 
national period through the Gilded Age, 
with special emphasis on the civil War, in- 
cluding the underlying causes of the conflict 
and its consequences for American civili- 
zation. GS-IIIC 

HIS 1 75 The United States in the 

20th Century (3) 

United States social, economic, political 
and cultural development from the Pro- 
gressive Era to the present, including 
World Wars I and II, Korea and Vietnam, 
the Great Depression, the Cold War, wom- 
en's sufferage, the Civil Rights Movement, 
and the globalization of American culture 
during "the American Century." GS-IIIC 

HIS 1 78 Diplomatic History of the 

United States (3) 

See POL 125. GS-IIIC 

HIS 179 Constitutional History of 

the United States (3) 

The evolution of the fundamental charac- 
teristics and trends in American Constitu- 
tional development with emphasis on con- 
temporary problems. Consent of instructor 
necessary for non-majors and non-minors. 
See POL 108. GS-IIIC, IIIG 

HIS 180 Current Constitutional 

History (3) 

Emphasis on the Bill of Rights as applied 
to both federal and state jurisdictions. Also 
includes examination of both substantive 
and procedural due process. See POL 109. 
GS-IIIC, IIIG 

HIS 181 Modern Presidential 

History (3) 

A study of 20th Century presidents and 
how their personalities and styles of lead- 
ership influenced political trends. A com- 
parative analysis of crises and leaders will 
be the major emphasis. GS-IIIC 



162 HISTORY 



HIS 185A African American History: 
American Slavery, 
1619-1865 (3) 

Slavery as an economic and social institu- 
tion from its introduction to the English col- 
onies in 1619 to its abolition following the 
civil War in 1865, with emphasis on the Af- 
rican American struggle against the insti- 
tution of slavery and the evolution of the 
African slave to the African American. GS- 
IIIC 

HIS 185B African American History: 
Emancipation to the 
Modern Era (3) 

The social, political, economic, and cultural 
history of African Americans, with empha- 
sis on how African Americans achieved le- 
gal and political equality within the Amer- 
ican system, African American cultural 
expression, Black Nationalism, and chang- 
ing race relations throughout the history of 
the United States. GS-IIIC 

HIS 185C/185CH Race and Racism in 
American Life and 
Thought (3) 

The evolution and role of racial constructs 
in American social and intellectual history, 
including law and politics, art and the me- 
dia, and evolving social mores from Colonia 
American to the late 20th Century. May be 
taken for Honors credit. GS-IIIC 

HIS 186/186H Gender in American 

Life and Thought (3) 

The evolution and role of gender constructs 
in American social and intellectual history, 
including law and politics, art and the me- 
dia, and evolving social mores from Colo- 
nial America to the late 20th Century. May 
be taken for Honors credit. 



HIS 188 California History (3) 

The social, economic, cultural, and institu- 
tional development of California through 
the Spanish, Mexican, and American pe- 
riods. See POL 179. GS-IIIG 

HIS 191 Major Issues in United 

States Women's History (3) 

A topical study of women's struggle, and 
evolving role, in American life throughout 
American history. Among the areas consid- 
ered are politics and public life, economics 
and business, art and culture, family rela- 
tionships, gender roles and expectations, 
and the race/gender nexus. GS-IIIC 

HIS 193ABCD Studies in Selected 
Historical Problems/ 
Topics (3,3,3,3) 

Each course will reflect special areas of re- 
search or interest by various faculty mem- 
bers and visiting lecturers. The particular 
areas of study will be announced in the se- 
mester schedules. GS-IIIC 

HIS196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

HIS 197ABC Readings in Historical 
Literature (1-3) 

Individual programs of reading on signifi- 
cant historical topics or fields. Designed to 
acquaint the student with pertinent books 
of the past and present. Limited to majors 
in history. 






HUMAN SERVICES 163 



Human Services 

A.A. Degree 

Departmental Affiliation: Sociology 

Within the Department of Sociology, an Associate of Arts Degree in Human Services 
is available on the Doheny Campus. This program prepares students for entry level 
careers in the service sector in three areas of emphasis (Gerontology, Criminology, and 
Youth Services), and for advanced studies in the Baccalaureate Program on the Chalon 
Campus. 

In addition to completion of all general studies courses for the Associate of Arts Degree, 
the following are required: 

Core Courses Required for A.A. Degree in Human 
Services: 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives (3) 

PSY 1 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

SPE 10 Intro, to Communication (3) 

BIO 10 Health Science (3) 

SPR 5 Computer Fundamentals (3) 

BUS 4 Business Foundations (3) 

INT 93 Humanities: Los Angeles (1) 

INT 96 Culture, Race and Communication (1) 

Plus one of the following Ethics courses: 

PHI 21, RST 41, RST 45, RST 49, or RST 50 

Plus the following courses in a selected area of emphasis: 

Emphasis in Gerontology: 

GER94 Topics in Aging (3) 

RST 78 Death and Afterlife (3) 

SOC 21 Internship: Gerontology (3) 

Emphasis in Criminology: 

SOC 10 Deviance and Youth (3) 

SOC 11 Crime and Society (3) 

SOC 23 Internship: Criminology (3) 

Emphasis in Youth Services: 

PSY 12 Child/Human Development (3) 

SOC 6 The Family, Child and 

Community (3) 

SOC 22 Internship: Youth Services (3) 



164 JOURNALISM 



Journalism 



Departmental Affiliation: English 

JRN 101 Basic News Writing (3) 

Introduction to the basic skills of reporting 
and news writing. Intensive writing prac- 
tice. Overview of print and broadcast jour- 
nalism. 

JRN 102 Advanced Reporting and 

News Writing (3) 

Reporting techniques and intensive expe- 
rience in identifying news sources, inter- 
viewing, researching, and constructing the 
story. Practice in a variety of types of jour- 
nalistic writing. Emphasis on journalism 



ethics and law. Prerequisite: JRN 101 or 
equivalent. 



JRN 90/190 Internship 

May be repeated for credit. 



(1-3) 



JRN 96/196 Workshop (1-3) 

Guides students through the monthly pro- 
duction of the student newspaper. Ad- 
dresses all aspects of production including 
reporting, writing, editing, layout and ad- 
vertising. May be repeated for credit. 



LIBERAL ARTS 165 






Liberal Arts 

AA. Degree 

The Associate in Arts degree with a specialization in Liberal Arts is designed for the 
student who wishes to explore various disciplines and have a wide variety of experi- 
ences. At the completion of the Associate in Arts program, the student may pursue a 
major leading to a baccalaureate degree in her chosen field and/or she may enter a 
career which utilizes the benefits from her interdisciplinary program. For transfer to 
the baccalaureate program on the Chalon campus, the student should consult her 
advisor regarding General Studies requirements. Requirements for admission into the 
Liberal Arts program are the same as those for admission into the Associate Degree 
program. 

The Liberal Arts Program requirements include: 

English (3,3) 

Outreach (1) 

Freshman Orientation (1) 

Art or Music (3) 

Literature (3) 

Religious Studies (6) 

Modern Language (8) 

Mathematics (3) 

Science (3) 

Psychology (3) 

Sociology (3) 

History/Political Science (3) 

Speech (2) 

P.E./Wellness (1) 

The student must complete all Liberal Arts requirements with a grade of C- or better. 

Total units in the Liberal Arts Program: 46 

Plus additional General Studies requirements and electives totaling 60 semester 
units. 

The B.A. Degree with a Major in Liberal Arts 

(Offered through Weekend College) 

Departmental Affiliation: English 

The liberal arts major allows the study of human beings and societies from the multiple 
perspectives of the humanities and the social sciences. By means of this interdiscipli- 
nary major, a student can explore and combine the varied insights into human art and 
activity that are revealed by the disciplines and methodology of psychology, literature, 
art, history, philosophy, religious studies, music, sociology, economics, and anthropol- 
ogy. 



166 LIBERAL ARTS 



Building on the base of the general studies curriculum, students select courses for their 
major which will further their examination of human beings and societies through the 
lenses of at least two disciplines in the humanities and two in the social sciences. This 
focusing of perspectives allows the student to illuminate chosen themes such as the 
character of American culture or women's issues from a variety of intellectual angles, 
and to do so in depth and with rigor. 

The liberal arts major provides a solid background for graduate work in law, public 
administration, and most fields in the humanities and social sciences. Students who 
wish to develop a strong professional specialization are encouraged to combine the 
major with a minor, such as business administration. 

Requirements: 

A minimum of thirty units in liberal arts offerings, of which twenty-four must be upper 
division. A minimum of four of the upper-division courses must be in the humanities, 
representing at least two of the following disciplines: 

art music 

language philosophy 

literature religious studies 

and a minimum of four upper-division courses must be in the social sciences, repre- 
senting at least two of the following disciplines: 

anthropology political science 

economics psychology 

history sociology 

Total Units in Liberal Arts: 30 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement of two courses in modern language or culture. 






LIBERAL STUDIES 167 



Liberal Studies 



The Liberal Studies major is an integrative program of study designed for, but not 
limited to, students seeking the Multiple Subject Credential authorizing them to teach 
in California elementary schools. This program of academic preparation is approved 
by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Students interested in profes- 
sional careers other than education may also wish to consider this undergraduate 
program. To be eligible for review for acceptance into the Liberal Studies major, appli- 
cants must have achieved a minimum grade point average of 2.5 (C +) in high school 
and in any previous college coursework. Students pursuing the Liberal Studies Major 
may be assigned course credit for Advanced Placement Scores of 3, 4, or 5 in subject 
areas that fulfill requirements for the Major at the discretion of the program advisor. 

At Mount St. Mary's College the Liberal Studies major is offered through the Education 
Department. 

Liberal Studies Major Requirements 

All courses taken as part of the major must be approved by the Liberal Studies advisor 
as indicated by the advisor's signature on the registration form. It is the student's 
responsibility to note whether or not there are prerequisites for courses which are 
major requirements. See departmental listings. 

Language 

9 units in composition (e.g., ENG 1A and IB; ENG 5H and ENG 105) 
One course in speech (e.g., SPE 10) and 3 units in linguistics (e.g., ENG 102) 
Courses in language other than English to meet Mount St. Mary's College 
modern language requirements (See page 57 in this catalog.) Spanish rec- 
ommended. 

One course in children's literature (ENG 34 or 134); 3 units in American 
literature or other advisor-approved course (minimum requirement; addi- 
tional units recommended, e.g., ENG 146) 

Mathematics and Science 

6 units in mathematics (e.g., MTH 50 and 51) (Prerequisite for enrollment: 

completion of high school algebra and geometry with a grade of C or above. 

Students with more math background are encouraged to take MTH 1 and 3A) 

3 units in computer (MTH 9 recommended) 

3 units in biological science (must include a laboratory, e.g., BIO 5) 

3 units in physical science, including space and earth science (e.g., PHS 2) 

3 elective units in science (BIO 10 recommended) 

Social Science and History 

6 units in U.S. history and government (e.g., HIS 75, 78, and POL 1. Candi- 
dates for the California teaching credential must complete 2 units of study of 
the U.S. Constitution) 

3 units in world history (e.g., HIS 1A or IB; HIS 150) 3 units in geography 
(e.g., HIS 25) 



168 LIBERAL STUDIES 



3 units in economics or in a course which focuses on economics (e.g., ECO 1 
or HIS 112) 

6 units in anthropology, psychology and sociology (e.g., PSY 12; SOC 5; PSY 
102 or 146. Courses from two disciplines are required) 

In the area of social sciences and history: 

1) one course must include an international dimension 

2) one course must include a study of country or countries other than the United 
States 

3) at least two courses must be offered by the History department 

4) at least one course must include an introduction to or the study of a culture 
or cultures other than one's own 



Humanities 



15 units are required to meet general studies requirements at Mount St. 
Mary's College. For inclusion in the major, one course in Religious Studies 
must be approved by the Liberal Studies advisor. Acceptable (and recom- 
mended) courses for the major include RST 61, RST 78, and PHI 160. Other 
acceptable courses for the major include PHI 5 (recommended), PHI 134, PHI 
168A, 174, or 176. 

Fine Arts 

4 units in art (ART 3, 5, or ART 173 and 145 or EDU 33) 

4 units in music (MUS 6/106 or 116 and MUS 130 or EDU 33) 

1 unit in the visual and performing arts (e.g., INT 194A) 

Physical and Health Education 

4 units in physical and health education (BIO 10 recommended, or BIO 112 
and PED 100) 

Human Development 

3 to 6 units in human development (PSY 113 or PSY 12 and 134) 

Education 

The following courses in education facilitate an integrative program of study 
and meet the field experience requirements for the Liberal Studies major for 
students planning to apply for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential: 

EDU 100 Introduction to Liberal Studies (1) 
EDU 101 Seminar in the Concentration: 

Liberal Studies Major (.5) 

EDU 102 Integrative Seminar in Liberal Studies (.5) 
EDU 150 Elementary Instruction: 

Theory and Practice (3) 



LIBERAL STUDIES 169 



Concentrations 

Candidates for the Liberal Studies major must also complete a concentration in an area 
such as English, mathematics, social science, or Spanish. Concentrations must be 
completed in subject areas commonly taught in elementary schools, or related areas. 
The concentration consists of 12 units of study which are coherently related to each 
other with an integrative theme and are ordinarily upper division units. Information 
about and examples of concentrations are discussed in EDU 100 and 101. 



170 MATHEMATICS 



Mathematics 

Departmental Affiliation: Physical Sciences and Mathematics 

While offering students an opportunity to study mathematics as part of a liberal edu- 
cation, the mathematics major serves as excellent preparation for work in fields such 
as computer science, statistics, secondary teaching, business, or graduate study. Cou- 
pled with courses in chemistry and biology, a degree in mathematics also provides 
excellent preparation for entrance into schools of medicine, dentistry, or optometry. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in Mathematics 
Computer Science Emphasis 



Lower Division: 

MTH3AB 

MTH4AB 

MTH9H 

MTH20 

MTH25 

PHY11AB 

PHY1BL 



Calculus IA/IB (4,4) 

Calculus II (3,3) 

Introduction to Computer Processes (Honors) (3) 

Programming (3) 

The UNIX Environment (3) 

Mechanics/Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics (4,3) 

Physics Laboratory (1) 



Students who can demonstrate their proficiency in any of the above courses 
may enroll in the next course in the sequence. Students who need further 
preparation in algebra and elementary functions should take MTH 1, College 
Algebra, before MTH 3A. 



Upper Division: 



MTH 101 


Topics in Geometry 


(3) 


MTH 102 


Advanced Calculus 


(3) 


MTH 103 


Linear Algebra 


(3) 


MTH 111 


Abstract Algebra 


(3) 


MTH 113 


Probability and Statistics 


(3) 


MTH 140 


History of Mathematics 


(1) 


Nine units from: 






MTH 120 


Discrete Mathematics 


(3) 


MTH 128AB 


Numerical Analysis 


(3,3) 


MTH 135 


Structure of Programming Languages 


(3) 



Total units in Mathematics: 48 



Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. An overall GPA of 2.0 in major courses is required for 
the degree. 



MATHEMATICS 171 



The Minor in Computer Programming 



Lower Division: 

MTH 3AB Calculus IA/IB (4,4) 

MTH4A Calculus II (3) 

MTH 9H (or 9) Introduction to Computer Processes (3) 

MTH 20 Programming (3) 

MTH 25 The UNIX Environment (3) 

Upper Division: 

Two upper division courses chosen in consultation with the student's adviser from the 

following: 

MTH 113 Probability and Statistics (3) 

MTH 120 Discrete Mathematics (3) 

MTH128AB Numerical Analysis (3,3) 
MTH 135 Structure and Comparison of 

Programming Languages (3) 

The Minor in Mathematics 

A minimum of eight courses including the following: 

MTH 3AB Calculus IA/IB (4,4) 

MTH 4AB Calculus II (3,3) 

and 

MTH 103 Linear Algebra (3) 

MTH 111 Abstract Algebra (3) 

Two additional upper division courses chosen in consultation with the 

department. (6) 

Introduction to Computer Programming 

Students who want an introduction to the computer should take some or all of the 

following courses: 

MTH 9H (or 9) Introduction to Computer Processes (3) 

MTH 20 Programming (3) 

MTH 25 The UNIX Environment (3) 
MTH 135 Structure and Comparison of 

Programming Languages (3) 



172 MATHEMATICS 



MTH 1 College Algebra and 

Trigonometry (4) 

Set language and notation, real and com- 
plex numbers, fundamental operations, in- 
equalities; polynomial, exponential, and 
trigonometric functions, and their graphs; 
De Moivre's theorem. Prerequisite: Satis- 
factory score on the Mathematics Placement 
Examination or completion ofMTH2X. GS- 
IIIE 

MTH2X Fundamentals of 

Algebra (3) 

Real numbers and their properties, expo- 
nents and radicals, fundamental opera- 
tions, polynomials, factoring, rational 
expressions, linear and quadratic equa- 
tions and inequalities, systems of equa- 
tions. Meets four hours per week. Credit 
does not apply to the baccalaureate degree. 

MTH3A Calculus IA (4) 

Differential calculus of elementary and 
transcendental functions with associated 
analytic geometry; techniques and appli- 
cations. Prerequisite: Three to four years of 
high school mathematics including trigo- 
nometry and satisfactory score on Mathe- 
matics Placement Examination or grade of 
C - or better in MTH 1. GS-IIIE 

MTH3B Calculus IB (4) 

Integral calculus of one variable; tech- 
niques and applications. Prerequisite: 
Grade ofC-or better in MTH 3 A. GS-IIIE 

MTH4AB Calculus II (3,3) 

Improper integrals, polar and spherical co- 
ordinates with applications, series, multi- 
variable calculus, elementary vector calcu- 
lus. Prerequisite for MTH4A: Grade ofC or 
higher in MTH 3B or consent of instructor. 
Prerequisite for MTH 4B: Grade of C or 
higher in MTH 4A or consent of instructor. 

MTH 9 Introduction to Computer 

Processes (3) 

Descriptions of the computer and its logical 
structure and functioning; survey of the use 
of computers in society; programming using 
the BASIC language, including loops, sub- 
scripted variables, functions and string ma- 
nipulation. Introduction to text editing, for- 
matting, and spreadsheets using the UNIX 
operating system. Prerequisite: Satisfac- 
tory score on the Mathematics Placement 
Examination or completion ofMTH2X. GS- 
IIIE 



MTH 9H Introduction to Computer 
Processes: Honors 
Section (3) 

An introduction to computer processes: de- 
scription of the computer and its logical 
structure; the data processing cycle in a 
UNIX environment. Word processing and 
spreadsheets; number systems; syntax of 
the FORTRAN 90 language and a brief de- 
scription of the language BASIC; introduc- 
tion to the Internet. Open only to students 
admitted to the Honors Program. GS-IIIE 

MTH 10 Mathematical Ideas (3) 

Ideas in mathematics chosen to illustrate 
the mathematical way of thinking and to 
acquaint liberal arts students with mathe- 
matics as an art and science. Topics include 
inductive reasoning, sequences, functions, 
transformations, probability and statistics. 
This course does not meet minimum teach- 
ing credential requirements, but is highly 
recommended. Prerequisite: Satisfactory 
score on Mathematics Placement Exami- 
nation or completion ofMTH2X. GS-IIIE 

MTH 20 Programming (3) 

Intermediate level programming methods 
including data file manipulations, with spe- 
cial emphasis on application to classical nu- 
merical techniques. Applications in sci- 
ence, mathematics, and business. This 
course is language-free and permits a back- 
ground in any programming language. Pre- 
requisite: MTH 9 and MTH 3A or concur- 
rent enrollment in MTH 3 A or consent of the 
instructor. GS-UIE 

MTH 25 The UNIX Environment (3) 

Basic UNIX commands, the UNIX file sys- 
tem, pipes, filters, shell procedures, read- 
ing of binary files and programming debug- 
ging aids. Prerequisite: MTH 9 or 9H, MTH 
20 and familiarity with a compiled pro- 
gramming language; MTH 3 A is highly rec- 
ommended. 

MTH 28 Mathematical Analysis for 
Business (3) 

Topics in Algebra including solutions of sys- 
tems of equations and inequalities; expo- 
nential and logarithmic functions; linear 
programming and mathematics of finance. 
Emphasis is placed on the application of 
mathematics to problems in business. Pre- 
requisites: Satisfactory score on the Mathe- 
matics Placement Examination or comple- 
tion ofMTH2X. GS-IIIE 



MATHEMATICS 173 



MTH 30 Calculus for Business (3) 

Introduction to the differential and integral 
calculus of elementary functions and ana- 
lytic geometry. Applications of the methods 
of calculus to business and economic prob- 
lems. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on 
Mathematics Placement Examination or a 
grade ofC or better in MTH 1 or a grade of 
B or better in MTH 28. 

MTH 38 Elements of Probability and 
Statistics (3) 

Elementary probability theory, properties 
of distributions, sampling, estimation, hy- 
pothesis testing, correlation. Prerequisite: 
Satisfactory score on the Mathematics 
Placement Examination or completion of 
MTH2X. GS-IIIE 

MTH 38H Elements of Probability 

and Statistics (3) 

Topics in probability and statistics includ- 
ing measures of central tendency and 
spread, elementary probability theory, 
properties of distributions, estimation, con- 
fidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear 
correlations and regression. An algebra 
based course intended primarily for non- 
mathematics majors. Prerequisite: Satis- 
factory score on the Mathematics Placement 
Examination or completion of MTH 2X. 
Open only to students admitted to the hon- 
ors program. GS-IIIE 

MTH 50 Elementary Number 

Systems (3) 

Sets, numeration systems, properties of in- 
tegers, rational and real numbers, elemen- 
tary number theory, modular systems, 
problem-solving processes, ratio, propor- 
tion, percentage, simple examples of the 
use of the computer in elementary schools. 
This course is intended primarily for Lib- 
eral Studies Majors. Can be taken for 
professional credit. Prerequisite: High 
school algebra and geometry with a grade 
of Cor better. GS-IHE 

MTH 51 Elements of Geometry and 
Statistics (3) 

Intuitive geometry of lines, planes, and 
space; congruence, similarity, measure- 
ment, geometric constructions, elements of 
probability and statistics. This course is in- 
tended primarily for Liberal Studies Ma- 
jors. Can be taken for professional credit. 
Prerequisite: High school algebra and ge- 
ometry with a grade of Cor higher. GS-IIIE 



MTH 99/199 Special Studies in 

Mathematics (1-3) 

Independent or group studies in mathe- 
matics. Course may be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite: Approval of the department 
and consent of the instructor. 
Any upper division mathematics course will 
require a minimum grade ofC in Prerequi- 
site courses. 

MTH 101 Topics in Geometry (3) 

A brief treatment of the axiomatic founda- 
tions of Euclidean and non-Euclidean ge- 
ometry. An introduction to differential ge- 
ometry. Prerequisite: MTH 4B. 

MTH 102 Advanced Calculus (3) 

Set theory, real numbers and their topol- 
ogy, limits, continuity, differentiation and 
integration theory. Prerequisite: MTH 4B. 

MTH 103 Linear Algebra (3) 

Vectors and vector spaces, linear transfor- 
mations and matrices, determinants, ei- 
genvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: 
MTH3B. 

MTH 104 Number Theory (3) 

The division algorithm, different bases, 
g.c.d. and l.c.m., the equation ax + by = n, 
the fundamental theorem of arithmetic; 
properties of congruence, reduced residue 
systems, Euler phi-function, simultaneous 
congruences; polynomial congruences, pri- 
mitive roots, indices, the law of quadratic 
reciprocity, finite and infinite continued 
fractions, some computer applications in el- 
ementary number theory. Prerequisite: 
MTH 4A or consent of instructor. 

MTH 105 Complex Analysis (3) 

Complex numbers and functions, analytic 
functions, integration, conformal mapping. 
Prerequisite: MTH 4B. 

MTH 111 Abstract Algebra (3) 

Numbers and number systems, groups, 
rings; fields; homomorphism and isomorph- 
ism theorems. Prerequisite: MTH4B or con- 
sent of instructor. 

MTH 1 13 Probability and 

Statistics (3) 

Probability as a mathematical system, ran- 
dom variables and their distributions, limit 
theorems, statistical applications, hy- 
potheses testing. Prerequisite: MTH 4B or 
consent of instructor. 



174 MATHEMATICS 



MTH119 Differential Equations (3) 

Linear equations, series solutions, Laplace 
transforms, numerical methods, existence 
and uniqueness of solutions. Prerequisite: 
MTH4B. 

MTH 120 Discrete Mathematics (3) 

Set theory, formal languages, relations and 
functions, logical inferences, elementary 
combinatorics, graphs, trees, and digraphs. 
Prerequisite: MTH 4B 

MTH128AB Numerical 

Analysis (3,3) 

Solutions of large systems of linear alge- 
braic equations. Eigenvalues and eigenvec- 
tors of matrices. Interpolation: Lagrange 
and Newton polynomials. Fourier series 
and orthogonal polynomials. Introduction 
to the theory of ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Heun and Runge-Kutta numerical 
techniques. Numerical determination of 
real and complex roots of polynomials; cubic 
splines; numerical treatment of partial dif- 
ferential equations. Prerequisites: MTH 
4B, MTH 20. 



MTH 135 Structure and Comparison 
of Programming 
Languages (3) 

Basic concepts of syntax and semantics. 
Comparison of syntax and semantics of se- 
lected programming languages. Language 
design. Programming projects in various 
languages. Prerequisites: MTH 4A, MTH 
20, or consent of instructor. 

MTH 140 History of Mathematics (1) 

History of mathematics from antiquity to 
the mid 20th century. This is an independ- 
ent studies course. Prerequisites: MTH 4B, 
MTH 103, and demonstrated mathematical 
maturity. 

MTH 190 Internship (1-3) 

An intensive work study program for qual- 
ified upper division students. The student 
is responsible for setting up the internship 
in conjunction with the appropriate faculty 
and the office of Career Planning and Place- 
ment. This must be approved by the de- 
partment chairperson. 

MTH195H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 



MUSIC 175 



Music 



The music major is a program carefully designed to provide a rich and wide range of 
musical learning and experience. It combines classroom study, discussions and lectures 
with individual instruction, solo and ensemble performance, concert attendance and 
internships. 

Two degrees are offered. The B.A. degree offers preparation in music for students 
desiring a broad knowledge of music for teaching, research, performance, personal 
enjoyment, cultural development, or advanced degrees. The total curriculum includes 
two-thirds of the studies in the liberal arts, and one-third in music. 

The B. M. degree is a thorough basic preparation for students intending a career in 
music as well as preparation for advanced degrees. This can include performing as 
soloist or in ensemble, conducting, composing, teaching, or ministering with music. 
The total curriculum includes one-third of the studies in the liberal arts, and two-thirds 
in. music. 

The Music Department offers a Music Ministry Certificate program for persons wishing 
to pursue music leadership roles in parishes. Essentially a two year program, it can 
serve as the basis for a baccalaureate degree in Church Music should the student wish 
to complete such a degree. 

The music minor is available to interested students by completing at least 21 units as 
indicated. Students interested in music as an elective may participate in various offer- 
ings of the Music Department including performance classes, individual instruction, 
or in the study of music as an art. 

In addition the Music Department presents varieties of musical concerts, workshops, 
and other activities which enrich the quality of the educational and cultural life of the 
College and the community. 

The Music Department is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. 

Requirements for Admission as a Music Major or Minor: 

1. Audition showing potential in the field of performance 

2. Theory examination for placement purposes 

3. Interview with designated department personnel 

4. Recommendations which indicate potential for music 

Courses Required for a BA Degree in Music 

Performance Emphasis 

Core Courses: 

MUS1AB Musicianship I (3,1) 

MUS1CD Musicianship I (3,1) 

MUS 2AB Musicianship II (3,1) 

MUS 5 Music Practicum (.5,.5) 



176 MUSIC 



MUS 11 Functional Keyboard Skills (1) 

Every student must pass the piano proficiency 
examination before graduation. Only three units 
may be taken for credit. 

MUS 15 Applied Music (1-2) 

[4 semesters, Total 6 units] 



MUS24AB 
MUS 105 
MUS 133A 
MUS 139 


Surveys of the History and Literature of Music 
Music Practicum 
Music Analysis 
Instrumental Conducting 


3,3) 

C5,.5) 
(2) 
(2) 


MUS 140A 


or 
Choral Techniques 


(2) 


Requirements: 






MUS 115 
MUS 151 


Applied Music 

[4 semesters, 2 units each term] 
Pedagogy 

Half-length recital 


(2) 
(2) 



For the special needs of the individual, the department may substitute other courses 
for these music requirements. See also additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. 
degrees. 

Total units in music: 42 



Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 units, including modern 
language requirement. 



Music Theory Emphasis 



Core Courses: 



MUS1AB 
MUS1CD 
MUS2AB 
MUS 5 
MUSH 



MUS 15 
MUS24AB 
MUS 105 
MUS 133A 
MUS 139 



Musicianship I 
Musicianship I 
Musicianship II 
Music Practicum 
Functional Keyboard Skills 



3,1) 

(3,1) 

(3,1) 

C5,.5) 

(1) 



Every student must pass the piano proficiency 
examination before graduation. Only three units 
may be taken for credit. 
Applied Music (At least one unit each term) 
Surveys of the History and Literature of Music (3,3) 
Music Practicum (.5, .5) 

Music Analysis (2) 

Instrumental Conducting (2) 



MUS 140A Choral Techniques 



(2) 






MUSIC 177 



Requirements: 



MUS2CD 
MUS 115 
MUS 134 
MUS 136 



Musicianship II (3,1) 
Applied Music (At least one unit each term) 

Orchestration (2) 

Technique of Arranging (2) 



For the special needs of the individual, the department may substitute other courses 
for these music requirements. See also additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. 
degrees. 

Total units in music: approximately 42 



Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 units, including modern 
language requirement. 



The Bachelor of Music Degree 



Performance Emphasis 



Core Courses: 






MUS1AB 


Musicianship I 


(3,1) 


MUS1CD 


Musicianship I 


(3,1) 


MUS2AB 


Musicianship II 


(3,1) 


MUS2CD 


Musicianship II 


(3,1) 


MUS 5 


Music Practicum (2 Semesters) 


(.5,.5) 


MUSH 


Functional Keyboard Skills 


(1) 




Every student must pass the piano 


proficiency 




examination before graduation. Only three units 




may be taken for credit. 




MUS 15 


Applied Music - (3 un. Each term) 




MUS24AB 


Surveys of the History 






and Literature of Music 


(3,3) 


MUS 105 


Music Practicum (2 Semesters) 


C5,.5) 


MUS 132 


Counterpoint 


(2) 


MUS 133AB 


Music Analysis 


(2,2) 


MUS 134 


Orchestration 


(2) 


MUS 139 


Instrumental Conducting 


(2) 


MUS 140 


Choral Techniques 


(2) 


MUS 141, 142, 


History and Literature of Music 


(3,3) 


143 


(2 courses) 





178 MUSIC 



Requirements: 

MUS 1 15 Applied Music - (3 units each term) 

MUS 122 Performance Practices (2) 

MUS 146A Special Projects in Music (Vocal) 

or 
MUS 146B Special Projects in Music (Instrumental) (3) 

MUS 151 Pedagogy (2) 

Voice students study two languages. One course in diction is 
recommended. 

Half-length junior recital 

Full-length senior recital 

For the special needs of the individual, the department may substitute other courses 
to fulfill music requirements. See also additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. 
degrees. 

Total units in Music: 81 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units. 

Theory and Composition Emphasis 
Core Courses: 



MUS1AB 


Musicianship I 


(3,1) 


MUS1CD 


Musicianship I 


(3,1) 


MUS2AB 


Musicianship II 


(3,1) 


MUS2CD 


Musicianship II 


(3,1) 


MUS 5 


Music Practicum (2 semesters) 


(.5, .5) 


MUSH 


Functional Keyboard Skills 


(1) 




Every student must pass the piano 


proficiency 




examination before graduation. Only three units 




may be taken for credit. 




MUS 15 


Applied Music - (2 un. each term) 




MUS24AB 


Surveys of the History and Literature of Music (3,3) 


MUS 105 


Music Practicum (2 semesters) 


(.5,.5) 


MUS 132 


Counterpoint 


(2) 


MUS 133AB 


Music Analysis 


(2,2) 


MUS 134 


Orchestration 


(2) 


MUS 139 


Instrumental Conducting 


(2) 


MUS 140 


Choral Techniques 


(2) 


MUS 141, 142, 


History and Literature of Music 


(3,3) 


143 


(2 courses) 




Requirements: 






MUS 26 


Brass Instruments 


(1) 


MUS 27 


Woodwind Instruments 


(1) 


MUS 28 


Percussion Instruments 


(1) 


MUS 29 


String Instruments 


(1) 


MUS 115 


Applied Music - 
[6 un. total] 


(1-2) 


MUS 135 


Composition each term 


(2,2,2,2) 


MUS 136 


Technique of Arranging 


(2) 


MUS 146N 


Special Projects in Music 


(3) 



Composition recital 



MUSIC 179 



For the special needs of the individual, the department may substitute other courses 
to fulfill music requirements. See also additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. 
degrees. 

Total units in music: 81 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units. 

Additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. 
degrees: 

1. Evidence of academic and musical maturity prior to admission to junior standing. 

2. Performance in student recitals, and jury examinations in major instrument. 

3. Participation in an ensemble every semester. 

Certificate Program in Music Ministry 



MUS1AB 


Musicianship I 


(3,1) 


MUS1CD 


Musicianship I 


(3,1) 


MUS2AB 


Musicianship II 


(3,1) 


MUS2CD 


Musicianship II 


(3,1) 


MUSIO 


Music and Worship 


(1-2) 


MUS13 


Applied Music - (Secondary Instrument) 
- two semesters 




MUS15 


Applied Music - (Primary Instrument) 
- four semesters 




MUS24AB 


Surveys of Music History and Literature 


(3,3) 


MUS112 


Music Ministry 


(3) 


MUS 140 


Choral Techniques 
Ensemble: four semesters 


(2) 




Electives in Church Music 


(2-8) 


RST 190T 


Foundations of Liturgy 


(3) 



The Minor in Music 
Requirements: 

A minimum of 21 units including: 



MUS1AB 

MUS1CD 
MUS 3 
MUS 6/106 

MUS24A/B 

or 124A/B 

MUS 13/113 



Musicianship I (3,1) 

[Prerequisite MUS 3 or consent of the instructor] 

Musicianship I (3,1) 

Discovering Music Fundamentals (optional) (1-3) 

The Fine Arts: Music 
or 

Surveys of the History 
and Literature of Music (3 ) 

Applied Music (4 semesters) (1-2) 

Ensemble 

Electives in Music 



180 MUSIC 



MUS 1AB; CD Musicianship I 

(3,1;3,1) 

(Harmony - 3, Solfege - 1 Lecture, three 
hours, and laboratory, two hours each 
week.) A functional study of the theoretical 
aspects of music, including scales, modes, 
intervals, two- and three-part counter- 
point, and elements of harmony up to the 
chord of the seventh. Development of aural, 
visual, singing, writing, playing, improvis- 
atory, and compositional skills in notation, 
scales, modes, rhythm, and melodic and 
harmonic intervals. Prerequisite: MUS 3 or 
consent of instructor. 

MUS 2AB; CD Musicianship II 

(3,1;3,1) 

(Harmony - 3, Solfege - 1 Lecture, three 
hours, and laboratory two hours each 
week.) Continuation of Musicianship I, in- 
cluding ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth 
chords, chromatic harmony and modula- 
tion. Contemporary techniques in har- 
mony, rhythm, melody, counterpoint and 
form, including the 12-tone technique, 
chance and electronic music. Development 
of aural, visual, singing, writing, playing, 
improvisatory, and compositional skills in 
compound intervals, chromatic and atonal 
melodies, chromatic harmonies, modula- 
tion, and more complex meters and 
rhythms to include twentieth century tech- 
niques. 

MUS 3 Discovering Music 

Fundamentals (1-3) 

A functional approach to the theoretical as- 
pects of music for personal enjoyment, 
teaching, or access to more advanced theory 
courses. Emphasis on experiencing the me- 
lodic, rhythmic, harmonic and formal as- 
pects of music. 

MUS 4 Guitar Class (1) 

Class instruction in the basic technique and 
performance of the guitar, development of 
music reading skills and appropriate rep- 
ertoire. Students must provide their own 
instruments. 

MUS 5 Music Practicum (.5) 

Study of music literature of varied times, 
styles, and cultures through performance, 
concert attendance, lectures and reports. 
Discussion and study of selected issues and 
trends impacting the music profession. 



MUS 6/106M The Fine Arts: Music (3) 

Beginning with a brief introduction to the 
world and language of the fine arts, this 
course explores the art of music in order to 
heighten awareness, understanding and 
appreciation of this art. Emphasis on the 
stylistic development of music as it reflects 
the times and world cultures. Both MUS 6/ 
106 may be taken for honors credit. De- 
signed for non-music majors. GS-IIIA, VI 

MUS 7 Voice Class (1) 

Study of fundamental techniques of breath 
control, tone production, diction, and inter- 
pretation. Development of appropriate rep- 
ertoire. Open to both music (other than 
voice major) and non-music majors. May be 
repeated for credit. 

MUS8A Elementary Piano I (1) 

Orientation to the piano, introduction to ru- 
diments of music including note reading, 
basic chords and five finger scales. Simple 
pieces played with both hands in several 
major keys. 

MUS8B Elementary Piano II (1) 

Instruction includes scale structures of ma- 
jor keys and primary chord harmonizations 
in simple major and minor keys. Easy 
pieces making use of extended hand posi- 
tions, and played with attention to good 
rhythm, tone and dynamics. Prerequisite: 
MUS8A 

MUS 8C Intermediate Piano (1) 

The course includes technical studies, ma- 
jor and minor scales, hand over hand ar- 
peggios and chord progressions. Pieces 
from easy classic repertoire played with at- 
tention to basic concepts of piano technique, 
style and interpretation. Prerequisite: MUS 
8B. 

MUS 10 Music and Worship (1-2) 

A survey of the history of ritual, and the 
role music has played in the major liturgies 
throughout the centuries, with emphasis on 
the present. 

MUS 11 Functional Keyboard 

Skills (1) 

A keyboard class to develop practical 
knowledge of chords, chord progressions, 
cadences, simple accompaniment of melo- 
dies, transposition and modulation. In- 
cludes program for progressive develop- 
ment of sight-reading, technical skills, and 
improvisation. Often taken as Directed 
Study. 



MUSIC 181 



*MUS 13/113 Applied Music (1-3) 

Private instruction - instrumental or vocal. 
For non-music majors. May be repeated for 
credit. 

*MUS 15/115 Applied Music (1-3) 

Private instruction - instrumental or vocal. 
For music majors. May be repeated for 
credit. 

*MUS 19/119 Mount Chorus (1) 

Study and performance of masterpieces of 
choral literature from all periods for 
women. Open to all college students, mem- 
bers of the community, and to qualified high 
school students with senior standing. May 
be repeated for credit. 

*MUS 21/121 Mount Singers (1) 

Study and performance of masterpieces of 
choral literature from all periods. Open to 
men and women college students, members 
of the community, and to qualified high 
school students with senior standing by au- 
dition. May be repeated for credit. Partici- 
pating students must enroll in MUS 19/119 
concurrently. 

*MUS 23/123 Chamber Music (1) 

Study and performance of chamber music 
for various instrumental and/or vocal com- 
binations. May be repeated for credit. Pre- 
requisites: Consent of the instructor. 

MUS 24AB Surveys of the History 

and Literature 

of Music (3,3) 

Development of compositional forms and 
styles viewed from the historical perspec- 
tive. A. Antiquity to the year 1750. B. 1750 
to the present. 

MUS 26 Brass Instruments: 

Introductory Techniques (1) 

Elementary instruction and techniques, 
care of instruments, and survey of methods. 
[Generally taken at another institution] 

MUS 27 Woodwind Instruments: 

Introductory Techniques (1) 

Elementary instruction and techniques, 
care of instruments, and survey of methods. 
[Generally taken at another institution] 

MUS 28 Percussion Instruments: 

Introductory Techniques (1) 

Elementary instruction an techniques, care 
of instruments, and survey of methods. 
[Generally taken at another institution] 



MUS 29 String Instruments: 

Introductory Techniques (1) 

Elementary instruction and techniques, 
care of instruments, and survey of methods. 
[Generally taken at another institution] 

MUS 98/198 Directed Studies (1-3) 

MUS 105 Music Practicum (.5) 

Study of music literature of varied times, 
styles and cultures through performance, 
concert attendance, lectures, and reports. 
Discussion and study of selected issues and 
trends impacting the music profession. 
Continuation of Music 5. 

MUS 112 Music Ministry (3) 

An examination of the role and responsibil- 
ity of the music minister within the parish 
structure. Study of legislation governing 
the use of music in the church as well as 
administrative practices conducive to a suc- 
cessful music program. Often taken as Di- 
rected Studies. 

MUS 116 Music of World Cultures (3) 

Introduction to the richness and variety of 
musical expression found in selected world 
cultures. Emphasis on the music of cultures 
well represented in California. 

MUS 122 Performance Practices (2) 

Study and performance of significant in- 
strumental and vocal literature for solo and 
ensembles. 

MUS 124AB Surveys of the History 
and Literature of 
Music (3, 3) 

Development of compositional forms and 
styles viewed from the historical perspec- 
tive. A. Antiquity to the year 1750. B. 1750 
to the present. 

MUS 125 Music Masterpieces (3) 

Study of selected masterpieces of music in 
historical context. For the non-music ma- 
jor. Prerequisite: MUS 6 or consent of in- 
structor GS-IIIA 

MUS 130 Creative Music 

Experience (1) 

An introduction to music and its use in the 
education and development of children. 
Emphasis is placed on rhythm, melody, 
harmony, form, style, notation, and creativ- 
ity. It includes instruction on melodic, per- 
cussion, and fretted instruments, class- 
room observation and participation. This 
course serves as basic preparation for the 



182 MUSIC 



elementary and intermediate school in- 
structor, and for those working in various 
areas of child development. Prerequisite: 
MUS 6 or adequate background. 

MUS 132 Counterpoint (2) 

Writing, analysis and composition of pieces 
in eighteenth-century style for two and 
three voices. 

MUS133AB Music Analysis (2,2) 

A. A study of the forms found in Classical 
period music: motive, phrase, period, 
song form, rondo, theme and variation, 
and sonata. Principles of understanding 
musical structures as they apply to folk, 
pop and music of world cultures. 

B. A study of the forms found in the music 
of the Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic, 
and Contemporary periods. 

MUS 134 Orchestration (2) 

Designed to provide facility in writing for 
various instrumental combinations. Tech- 
niques, analysis and use of the orchestra by 
the composers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th 
centuries. Includes ranges, tonal possibili- 
ties, technical limitations. 

MUS 135 Composition (2) 

Analysis, improvisation and composition of 
music in various styles, forms, and instru- 
mental and/or vocal combinations, and elec- 
tronic sound sources. May be repeated for 
credit. Often taken as Directed Study. 

MUS 136 Technique of Arranging (2) 

Study of arranging techniques for various 
choral, instrumental ensembles, and sound 
sources including accompaniments, des- 
cants, special effects, choral style voicing, 
contrapuntal, and mixed voicing. Prereq- 
uisites: MUS 1ABCD, 132, 133 A. 

MUS 137 Diction for Singers (2-3) 
The fundamentals of phonetics and sound 
production in Italian, French, and German 
as applied to singing. 

MUS 139 Instrumental 

Conducting (2) 

Study of baton technique, score reading, 
and interpretation of orchestral literature. 

MUS 140 Choral Techniques (2) 

Study of baton technique, score reading, 
and interpretation of choral literature of 
various styles. 



MUS 141 Historical Period 

Studies (3) 

Chronological development of musical 
styles and forms in a selected period of mu- 
sic history. Survey of significant composers, 
performance practices, and the history of 
theoretical and notational concepts. Open 
to non-majors with consent of the instruc- 
tor. 

MUS 142 Genre Studies (3) 

Historical survey of a single genre selected 
from sacred (the motet, the oratorio, the 
Mass) or secular (the symphony, chamber 
music, opera, keyboard literature, the con- 
certo) music. Open to non-majors with con- 
sent of the instructor. 

MUS 143 Composer Studies (3) 

Survey of the life and works of a single com- 
poser, viewed within a historical and stylis- 
tic context. Consideration of musical per- 
sonality, of special contributions, and of the 
relationship between biography and crea- 
tivity. Open to non-majors with consent of 
the instructor. 

MUS 146 Special Projects in 

Music (1-3) 

A. Vocal Literature 

B. Instrumental Literature 

C. Music History and Literature 

D. Church Music 

E. Theory and Composition 

F. Music Education 

G. Musicianship 
H. Chamber Music 
I. Choral Music 

J. Music Therapy 
K. Conducting 
L. Special Subject 
N. Electronic Media 

MUS 149 The Business of 

Music (1) 

Setting up a studio; community relations; 
integration of efforts towards the advance- 
ment of the arts; the art of self promotion. 

MUS 150 Accompanying (1) 

Study of the art of accompanying instru- 
mentalists and vocalists as soloists and in 
small and large ensembles. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

MUS151ABC Pedagogy: Principles 
and Methods (2) 

Analysis and comparison of various proce- 
dures for beginning and intermediate in- 
struction. Approaches to the art of teaching. 



MUSIC 183 



Review of materials. Guided teaching in- 
corporated. 

A. Keyboard 

B. Vocal 

C. Instrumental 



MUS190 Workshop 

May be repeated for credit. 



(1-3) 



MUS196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 



184 NURSING 



Nursing 



The college offers Associate and Baccalaureate degree programs with majors in nursing 
that provide options for career mobility. 

Philosophy 

Mount St. Mary's College is an academic community committed to continuing explo- 
ration of our relationship to God, to other persons, and to nature. This exploration 
takes the form of programs devoted to excellence in the liberal arts and career prepa- 
ration with a special focus on educating women for participation and leadership in our 
society and our time. The Catholic tradition of the college offers a value orientation for 
the student's personal and professional life, giving the motivation for a Christian 
commitment that views professional life as service. 

Nursing is a service to humanity. It is a profession committed to: the promotion and 
restoration of health; the prevention of illness of individuals, families, groups, and 
communities; and support for a dignified death. It is the science whose main concern 
involves the life processes that positively affect the health status and integrity of 
persons, families, and groups. These life processes involve physiological, sociological, 
and spiritual life components. A focus on the interaction of these components delineates 
nursing science. 

The Department of Nursing functions within the philosophy of the college and has 
developed a curriculum on the Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing. The Adaptation Model 
recognizes that a person is a bio-psycho-social-spiritual being in constant interaction 
with a dynamic and complex world. Humans possess both innate and acquired mech- 
anisms which, in health, enable coping with the complex internal and external envi- 
ronment. In times of stress, these coping mechanisms may be disrupted. The ability to 
adapt to the internal and external environment at this time affects the person's position 
on the health-illness continuum. The promotion of adaptation in the direction of health 
depends upon an educational program which prepares the student to understand the 
person as a total being, to recognize and respect human values, and to utilize a scientific 
process within the framework of the adaptation model. 

The goal of nursing is directing, maintaining, and reinforcing the adaptation of person, 
families, and groups toward optimal health. 

The process involves: 

1 . assessing the factors that influence the position on the illness continuum, the 
factors that influence the position, and the effectiveness of the coping mech- 
anisms. 

2. determining the actual or potential health problem(s). 

3. establishing mutually acceptable goals. 

4. intervening by promoting adaptation through the modification of influencing 
factors and/or increasing the response in the coping potential. 

5. evaluating the position on the health-illness continuum to reaffirm and/or 
modify interventions. 

Each student enters the nursing program with a unique background for potential 
growth. Students are active learners. Learning progresses from novice to beginning 






NURSING 185 



level practitioner in a variety of settings from simple to complex. Because each student 
is unique with different learning potentials and different critical thinking skills, the 
expectation is that the student will seek assistance and demonstrate growth at all 
stages of learning. The extent to which this distinct potential is achieved is determined 
by behavioral changes which are observed and evaluated in the context of the expected 
outcomes of the learning process. 

The faculty believe the program has different levels of competencies for students to 
achieve their distinct potential. Options to select entry levels to promote career mobility 
are offered. 

The faculty believe providing a supportive environment enhances learning at each level 
of the program. The faculty act as role models and therefore must be clinically compe- 
tent and professionally active. In addition, they assume responsibility for individual 
advisement of nursing majors and provide opportunities for assistance in the event of 
academic difficulties. 

Objectives: Associate in Arts Degree - HOPE Program 

Upon completion of the program, the student will have met the following objectives: 

I . Provider of Care 

A. Utilize Roy Adaptation Model to: 

1 . Recognize, assess and define the factors influencing the person's/family's 
adaptive level, adaptive response, and consequent position of the health- 
illness continuum; 

2. Identify, assess and validate the person's/family's adaptive level and 
response; 

3. Define patient/client goals based upon a clear analysis and synthesis of 
data in collaboration with patient, nursing and other disciplines; 

4 . Define and perform those nursing interventions which affect the patient/ 
client goals; 

5. Evaluate the consequences of nursing interventions in terms of the per- 
son's/family's behavioral change and the achievement of both patient/ 
client and nursing goals, and modify those nursing actions, if desired 
adaptive outcomes are not achieved. 

B. Utilize the nursing process as a scientific method. 

C. Utilize knowledge of health-illness (normal/disruption) as it pertains to pa- 
tient/client care. 

D. Demonstrate competency in common nursing procedures. 

II. Communicator 

A. Utilize effective communication skills with clients and peers. 

B . Use communication skills as a method of data collection, nursing intervention 
and evaluation of care. 

C. Communicate and record assessments, nursing care plans, interventions and 
evaluations within the protocol of the institution. 

III. Client Teacher 

A. Apply principles of the teaching/learning process. 

B. Develop short-range teaching plans based on the learning process. 

IV. Manager of Client Care 

A. Function effectively as a member of health care team. 

B. Utilize basic leadership skills in practice, based on small group patient care 
management and primary nursing. 



186 NURSING 



V. Membership within the profession of Nursing 

A. Make judgments based on moral, ethical, and legal principles. 

B. Continue to evaluate and enhance personal and professional behavior. 

C. Assume responsibility for self-development and use resources for continued 
learning. 

D. Maintain the role of the nurse as a patient advocate. 

Upon completion of the program, the student is eligible to take the California 
State Board examination for registered nurses (R.N.) licensure. 

Associate Degree Majors in Nursing 

Admission Policy 

Admission of adult women and men students is based upon consideration of the com- 
pleted application form, the student's academic achievement, personal statement and 
two satisfactory recommendations from individuals. 

In addition to meeting the general college admission requirements, a candidate must 
meet a GPA of 2.50 in all transferable college work and have completed a prerequisite 
college level chemistry or its equivalent course with a grade of "C" or better. 

LVNs who have met the admission requirements for the ADN program may notify the 
director of the program, in writing, of his/her intent to pursue the Mobility Option by 
the end of their first session in the program. Satisfactory completion of the NLN 
Mobility Exam at a score of 75% and completion of NUR 1 are required for continuation 
in the Mobility Option. A non-degree program is available for LVNs who meet the 
college entrance requirements. After completing 30 units of prescribed courses, the 
student is eligible to take the NCLEX-RN examination for the registered nurse licen- 
sure but is not a graduate of Mount St. Mary's College. 

Academic Policy: ADN 

The faculty of the Department of Nursing has the right and the responsibility for 
judging and evaluating the quality of the student's achievement, both in the mastery 
of theoretical content and in clinical competence. Mid-term warning, probation, or 
dismissal are used when deemed necessary. A grade below "C" (2.0) in a course (Nursing 
or General Education) is considered a failed course and must be repeated. A student 
may have only one failed course during the entire nursing program. A student may 
repeat only one failed course in the entire program. A second failed course or a failed 
repeated course results in dismissal from the program. A failure of more than one 
course in a series of courses (e.g. NUR 2, 3 and 4/4L) taken concurrently, counts as one 
failed course. A failure of a general education course and a nursing course taken 
concurrently counts as two failed courses and results in dismissal from the program. 
If a student's level of clinical practice is unsatisfactory or unsafe, the student may fail 
before the end of the semester. Readmission may be granted by special action of the 
Admission Committee of the ADN Department. Readmission of a student who was 
dismissed from the nursing program due to unsafe practice is not permitted. 

Upon admission to the ADN program, a proficiency examination in English and math 
is administered. Students who score below the passing score in any one of the areas 
tested is advised to attend a "Bridges" course offered by the college. Students are 
retested at the completion of the course. A math score of 80% or better is necessary 
prior to the first clinical nursing course. A student may take the math test a total of 






NURSING 187 



three times. An unsuccessful score of 79% or less, the third time, results in dismissal 
from the nursing program. 

Departmental policy statements regarding grading, dismissal, and readmission to the 
program are in the ADN Program Student Handbook provided to the students at the 
orientation meeting. 

During the clinical portion of the program, students must carry malpractice insurance, 
personal health insurance and have a current CPR card. Certain health requirements 
must be met prior to clinical experience. 

Nursing clinical experiences are held at multiple sites and transportation for these 
experiences is essential. 

Information on all policies and procedures can be obtained by contacting the nursing 
department. 

Objectives: Baccalaureate Program 

At the completion of the baccalaureate nursing program, the graduate will have met 
the following objectives and will: 

1. Utilize the Roy Adaptation Model as a scientific method to deliver nursing 
care to persons, families, and groups. 

2. Utilize knowledge of health/illness continuum to maximize health care of 
persons, families and groups. 

3 . Use critical thinking, knowledge, and skills obtained from nursing and liberal 
arts courses to provide professional nursing care in a variety of settings. 

4. Utilize and apply complex, effective communication skills to persons, families, 
and groups. 

5. Develop and implement individualized teaching/learning plans for persons, 
families, and groups. 

6. Utilize leadership skills based on the principles of management, delegation, 
change process, group process, and systems theory in health care settings. 

7. Utilize research findings to guide practice in health care delivery. 

8. Critically examine and integrate the principles of moral, ethical, and legal 
issues which influence health care. 

9. Create interventions that consider a variety of influencing factors: e.g., cul- 
ture, religion, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. 

10. Establish independent and interdependent roles which will enhance profes- 
sional growth. 

Upon the completion of the baccalaureate program, the student is eligible to take the 
California State Board examination for registered nurse (R.N.) licensure, and is qual- 
ified for the Public Health Nursing Certificate issued by the Board of Registered Nurs- 
ing. 



188 NURSING 



Baccalaureate Majors in Nursing 

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, acceptance into the De- 
partment of Nursing is determined by the Admission Committee of the department. 
Admission is based upon a consideration of the student's academic achievement. There 
is a formal review of the student's high school achievement record, grade point average, 
College Entrance Examination scores, previous college experience (if any). Students 
who intend to major in nursing are advised to take high school chemistry. In order to 
be eligible for review, applicants must be admitted to the college and then fulfill the 
nursing admission requirements. Admission to the Sophomore nursing courses is con- 
sidered for the fall semester only and is based on cumulative GPA, science GPA, suc- 
cessful demonstration of English competency, written essay, and letters of reference. 
Personal interviews may be scheduled for qualified applicants once admission docu- 
ments are received. Priority is given to students who meet the required criteria and 
who have completed two semesters at Mount St. Mary's College. A cumulative GPA of 
2.70 for all transferable college work attempted and a science GPA of 2.50 is required 
for admission to the nursing program. The science GPA will consist of grades received 
from chemistry/physics, anatomy, physiology, and microbiology. 

LVN's who have been accepted by the college and have completed the general studies 
requirements of the first two years may challenge Sophomore nursing courses and 
move directly into Junior nursing courses. NUR 40 must be satisfactorily completed 
prior to acceptance into Junior nursing courses. A non-degree program is available for 
LVN's who meet the college entrance requirements. After completing 30 units of pre- 
scribed courses, the student is eligible to take the California State Board examination 
for the registered nurse licensure but is not a graduate of Mount St. Mary's College. 

California registered nurses accepted by the college may be given transfer credit for 
previous nursing courses equivalent to the Nursing Department lower division courses. 
NUR 40 or its equivalent is to be satisfactorily completed prior to acceptance into Senior 
nursing courses. 

Baccalaureate Nursing Department Policies for Students 

The faculty of the Department of Nursing has the right and the responsibility for 
judging and evaluating the quality of the student's achievement, both in the mastery 
of theoretical content and in clinical competence. Mid-term warning, probation, or 
dismissal are used when deemed necessary. A grade of "C-" or below in a required 
course or a nursing theory course is not accepted. A grade of "C-" or below in a nursing 
clinical course results in dismissal from the nursing program. Failure ("C-" or lower) 
of two required nursing courses (ie., anatomy, microbiology, bioethics) results in non- 
admission or dismissal from the nursing program. A student may repeat a course 
required for the nursing major or a nursing theory course no more than once. A second 
failure will result in non-admission or non-progression. Failure of two nursing courses 
results in dismissal from the department. If a student's level of clinical practice is 
unsatisfactory or unsafe, the student may fail before the end of the semester. Read- 
mission may be granted by special action of the Admission Committee of the Depart- 
ment of Nursing. 

Before admission to nursing courses, a departmental examination in mathematics must 
be successfully completed (84%). The purpose of this examination is twofold: 1) to earn 
credit for the mathematics requirement General Studies HIE; and 2) to determine the 
student's ability to correctly calculate medication dosages in the clinical setting. All 
students (regardless of entry level status) even if they have previously successfully 



NURSING 189 



completed a college mathematics course, are to complete this requirement. Should a 
student fail the departmental math exam (score below 84%), review, tutoring, or a math 
course may be required. Should a student fail the math exam a second time, a 3 credit 
math course must be taken with a minimum grade of "C", along with passing the 
challenge exam at the required passing rate (84%), to fulfill the math requirement. 

Departmental policy statements regarding grading, mathematical competence, clinical 
progression, incompletes, probation, absences, dismissal, and readmission to the pro- 
gram are provided to the student at the beginning of the nursing major. 

During the clinical portion of the program, students must ordinarily be full-time (see 
Tuition and Fees), must carry malpractice insurance, have a current CPR card (Health 
Care Provider BCLS/Professional Rescuer CPR) and fire safety card, and be a member 
of the Student Nurse Association of California. 

Nursing classes are held at multiple sites and transportation for these classes is essen- 
tial. Senior year students are required to have a current driver's license, auto insurance, 
and a documented finger print card. 

Information on all policies and procedures can be obtained from the Department of 
Nursing Admission Officer. 

Certain health requirements must be met prior to clinical experience. 

Department of Nursing Health Policies for all nursing students 

Nursing focuses on prevention and promotion of health. Students admitted to and 
progressing through Mount St. Mary's College Nursing Program are strongly encour- 
aged to engage in health practices which model those they are teaching to patients. 

Prior to enrollment in the first nursing course, students will be informed of the nursing 
department health policies. 

Every student admitted to the nursing courses must have completed the following 
health data. Clinical agencies will not accept a student who has not met all of the 
following health requirements: 

1 ) past medical history on which the student attests that physical and emotional 
health are such as to allow for full participation in both clinical and theoretical 
components of the nursing curriculum; 

2) physical examination must be completed by a licensed physician, certified 
nurse practitioner, or physician's assistant. This completed physical exami- 
nation is to be sent to the Student Health Service Office before May 15 for 
Fall semester enrollment and by December 15 for Spring semester enrollment. 
MSMC health form must be used; 

3) visual screening; 

4) urinalysis; 

5) Complete Blood Count; 

6) PPD or Mantoux for Tuberculosis screening (NOT A TINE). If PPD/Mantoux 
is positive, then the student must have a chest x-ray every year; 

7) demonstrate immunity through serological testing or be immunized for ru- 
bella, rubeola, mumps, hepatitis B, varicella; 



190 NURSING 



8) current immunizations 

a) polio, 

b) tetanus, 

c) diphtheria; 

9) Clinical agencies may have requirements other than those above. If so, stu- 
dents will be instructed to obtain the necessary tests; 

10) If a student's physician would not be able to comply with these health require- 
ments, the physician must submit a written statement to this effect. 

Each student must repeat the process of obtaining the above health data annually. The 
health requirements must be completed by May 15 for enrollment in Fall semester and 
by December 15 for enrollment in Spring. 

A student with a health condition (i.e., pregnancy, seizure disorder, HIV positive, 
diabetes, infectious disease, emotional problems, etc.) that may have a safety consid- 
eration must immediately notify the clinical instructor so that assignment modification 
can be made as necessary. To ensure success in the program, all students with docu- 
mented learning disabilities must inform each nursing instructor at the beginning of 
each course, so that, reasonable accommodations can be made. 

The Department of Nursing has the responsibility to determine those health issues 
that may interfere with the student's progress in the clinical area. 

Associate Degree Curriculum Requirements 
HOPE Program 

First Year 



BIO 40A 


Human Anatomy 


(4) 


BIO 40B 


Human Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 3 


General Microbiology 


(4) 


ENG 10AB 


Written and Oral Communication 


(6) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


PSY12 


Developmental Psychology 


(3) 


NUR 1,2,3,4, 4L, 


(13) 


5, 6, 7, 7L 


Second Year 




PSY 168 


Abnormal Psychology 


(3) 


PHI 10 


Critical Thinking 


(3) 


SOC49 


Multi-cultural and Multi-ethnic Issues 






for Health Care providers 


(3) 


NUR 8,9,10, 




(25) 


10L,11,12,14, 






15,16,17,34 


Third Year 





General Studies Elective IIIA (3) 

RST 49 Ethics of Life and Death (3) 

NUR 18,19,21,22 (12) 

Total Units: 89 

Prerequisites to beginning nursing courses: Anatomy and Physiology, Written and Oral 
Communication, General Psychology and Nursing I. 



NURSING 191 



NUR 1 Adaptation Model Nursing 

Theory (2) 

Introduction of the Roy Adaptation Model 
as a theoretical framework for nursing 
practice. Emphasis is on nursing process 
according to adaptation theory, with inte- 
gration of physiological and psychological 
modes of adaptation in the adult popula- 
tion. 

NUR 2 Adult Adaptation Nursing of 
Protective and Sensory 
Modes (2) 

This course involves an Adaptation Process 
approach to the physiological needs of pro- 
tection in dealing with integumentary, im- 
munological and infectious diseases. In- 
cluded is an Adaptation process approach 
to disorders of the auditory, visual and so- 
mato sensory systems (pain). Prerequisite: 
BIO 40A, BIO 50B, ENG 10A, !0B, PSY 1, 
and NUR 1 

NUR 3 Nursing Practicum (1) 

This is the first clinical course taken by the 
first year student. It is designed to intro- 
duce the student to the care of the adult 
hospitalized patients with common medi- 
cal-surgical problems. Experience is pro- 
vided in a variety of hospital settings and 
with patients who are at various points 
along the health-illness continuum. The fo- 
cus of this course is the application of con- 
cepts from Adaptation Model Theory (NUR 
2) and Principles and Practice of Nursing 
Skills (NUR 3), which are taken concur- 
rently. Emphasis is placed upon the prob- 
lems related to protective and sensory sys- 
tems. 

NUR 4/4L Principles and Practice of 
Nursing Skills (2) 

This course covers the basic nursing meas- 
ures necessary for safe patient care. The 
focus is to provide the theoretical basis for 
selected nursing skills and to develop the 
student's psychomotor ability in the per- 
formance of these skills. Nursing 2,3,4 are 
taken concurrently and must be passed suc- 
cessfully before proceeding. 

NUR 5 Adult Adaptation Nursing in 
Activity and Rest, and 
Oxygenation (3) 

This course involves an adaptation process 
approach to the physiological needs of ac- 
tivity and rest, oxygenation and nutrition. 
Prerequisite: NUR 1-4, 4L. 



NUR 6 Practicum (2) 

This is the second clinical course taken by 
student. It is designed to emphasize the 
nurse's responsibilities in the care of adult 
hospitalized patients with common medi- 
cal-surgical problems. Experience is pro- 
vided in a variety of hospital settings and 
with patients who are at various points 
along the health-illness continuum. The fo- 
cus of this course is the application of the 
concepts from Adaptation Nursing (NUR 
5), and Principles and Practice of Nursing 
Skills (NUR 7L), which are taken concur- 
rently. Emphasis is placed upon the adap- 
tation process approach to the physiological 
needs of activity and rest, oxygenation and 
nutrition. 

NUR 7/7L Principles and Practice of 
Nursing Skills (1) 

Skills lab for integration of intervention re- 
lated to activity and rest, medication, 
administration bowel therapies. Nursing 5, 
6, 7 are taken concurrently and must be 
passed successfully before proceeding. 

NUR 8 Adult Adaptation Nursing in 
the Elimination, Endocrine, 
Reproduction, and Advanced 
Concepts of the Protective 
Mode (3) 

The focus of this course involves an adap- 
tation process approach to the physiological 
and psychosocial needs of ineffective re- 
sponses in elimination, endocrine, sexual 
and reproductive systems and advanced 
concepts of protective modes. Prerequisite: 
NUR 1-7, 7L. 

NUR 9 Practicum: Care of the 

Adult (3) 

This is the third clinical course taken by the 
sophomore student. It is designed to em- 
phasize the nurse's responsibilities in the 
care of adult hospitalized patients with 
common medical-surgical problems. Expe- 
rience is provided in a variety of hospital 
settings and with patients who are at var- 
ious points along the health-illness contin- 
uum. The focus of this course is the appli- 
cation of concepts from Adaptation Nursing 
(NUR 8), and Principles and Practice of 
Nursing Skills (NUR 10 and NUR 10L), 
which are taken concurrently. Continued 
emphasis is placed on the first and second 
level assessment in the physiological mode 
with an introduction to the psychosocial 
mode. Beginning skills in the formulation 



192 NURSING 



of nursing diagnoses and plan of care are 
also stressed. 

NUR 10/10L Principles and Practice 
of Nursing Skills (1) 

Principles and practice of skill related to 
elimination, diabetes, sexuality and AIDS. 
Nursing 8,9,10 are taken concurrently and 
must be passed successfully before proceed- 
ing. 

NUR 1 1 Children: Adaptation 

Nursing in the Physiological 
and Psychosocial Modes(2.5) 

The focus is the bio-psycho-social impact of 
health-illness problems related to children. 
Taken concurrently with NUR 12. Prereq- 
uisite: PSY 12, NUR 1-10 

NUR 12 Practicum: Children (2.5) 
Provides clinical experience in the health- 
illness problems encountered in the care of 
children and their families. Growth and de- 
velopment from infancy through adoles- 
cence in terms of Adaptation Theory of 
Nursing. Taken concurrently with NUR 11. 

NUR 14 Childbearing Family 

Adaptation in Nursing in 
the Physiological and 
Psychosocial Modes (2.5) 
The focus is the bio-psychosocial impact of 
health-illness problems to childbearing 
families. Prerequisite: PSY 12, NUR 1-10 

NUR 15 Adaptation of the 

Childbearing Family 
Practicum (2.5) 

Provides clinical experience in prenatal, de- 
livery, and post-natal care, study of the par- 
enting roles, and health needs of the emerg- 
ing family groups of various ethnic 
diversity. Taken concurrently with NUR 14 

NUR 16 Adult and Adolescent 

Mental Health Adaptation 
Nursing (3) 

Lecture. The focus is the psycho-social im- 
pact of health-illness problems related to 
mental health. Taken concurrently with 
NUR 17. Prerequisite: PSY 168, NUR 1-15 



NUR 17 Mental Health Practicum (3) 

Provides clinical experience in the applica- 
tion of the principles and concepts related 
to psycho-social problems in psychiatric 
settings. Taken concurrently with NUR 16. 

NUR 18 Gerontology/Leadership in 
Nursing (3) 

The focus is on the bio-psycho-social prob- 
lems related to the chronic and multiple 
conditions of older adults with beginning 
concepts of leadership role of RN's. Prereq- 
uisite: NUR 1-15 

NUR 19 Gerontological 

Practicum (3) 

The focus is on the bio-psycho-social impact 
of problems related to the older adult pop- 
ulation in the skilled nursing facility, lead- 
ership, and patient care management. 
Taken concurrently with NUR 18. 

NUR 21 Adult Adaptation in 

Complex Multi-System 
Physiological Alteration (3) 

The focus is the bio-psycho-social impact of 
health-illness problems related to complex 
episodic medical surgical disruptions in the 
adult. Taken concurrently with NUR 22. 
Prerequisite: NUR 1-19 

NUR 22 Adult Complex Multi 

System and Physiological 
Alteration Practicum (3) 

Provides clinical experience in the health- 
illness problems of adult patients with 
more complex medical or surgical disrup- 
tions. Taken concurrently with NUR 21. 

NUR 34 Issues in Health Care (2) 

A course examining issues in Health Care, 
focusing on the role of the professional 
nursing. Topics include historical develop- 
ment in nursing, legislation and profession- 
alism. Taken in the second year of the pro- 
gram. 

NUR 98, 99 Independent Studies(l-3) 



NURSING 193 



Baccalaureate Degree Curriculum Requirements 

Freshman Year 



*CHE 3/PHS 1 


Chemistry/Scientific Concepts 


(3) 


*BIO 50A 


Human Anatomy 


(4) 


*BIO 50B 


Human Physiology 


(4) 


*BI0 3 


General Microbiology 


(4) 


*PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


*S0C5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


*ENG 1A/B 


Freshman English 


(6) 


See Catalog 


Oral Communication 


(2) 


*PSY 12 


Developmental Psychology 


(3) 


SPR85 


Intro to College Studies 




SPR 71X 


Intro to Nursing Studies 




Total units: 32 


Sophomore Year 




*NUR 53A, 54 


Nursing Lecture 


(11) 


60,65 






*NUR51, 


Nursing Practicum 


(10.5) 


53B/C,61 






*BIO 112 


Human Nutrition 


(3) 


*PHI 21 


Moral Values and Ethical Decisions 


(3) 


See Catalog 


Religious Studies General Stud. Req. 


(3) 


See Catalog 


GS-IIIA: Art or Music 


(3) 


Total units: 33.5 


Junior Year 




*NUR 160,162 


Nursing Lecture 


(10) 


164,166 






*NUR 161,163 


Nursing Practicum 


(10) 


165,167 






*PHI 168A 


3 units upper division Ethics 


(3) 


or PHI 168B 






or RST 149 






*PSY 168 


Abnormal Psychology 


(3) 


*NUR 135A/B 


Pharmacology in Nursing 


(2) 


See Catalog 


GS-IIIB: Literature 


(3) 


See Catalog 


GS-IIIC: History 


(3) 


Total units: 34 


Senior Year 




*NUR134 


Nursing Issues 


(2) 


*NUR136 


Abuse: Child to Elder 


(1) 


*NUR138 


Nursing Research 


(3) 


*NUR 180, 184 


Community Health Nursing I, II 


(1.5,1.5) 


*NUR 181, 185 


Community Health Practicum I, II 


(2.5,2.5) 


*NUR182 


Leadership/Management 


(1.5) 


*NUR183 


Leadership/Management Practice 


(2.5) 



194 NURSING 



*NUR 190 Adaptation Nursing: Older Adult (1.5) 

*NUR 191 Practicum: Older Adult (2.5) 

See Catalog Philosophy or Religious Studies (3) 

See Catalog GS-IIIG: Cont. Econ/ Politics (3) 

See Catalog Philosophical Ideas (3) 

Total units: 31 

Total units for Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing 130.5 

*courses required by the Department of Nursing 

Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Program 

The Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing (AccBSN) Program is the same curriculum 
design as the Baccalaureate Nursing Program (BSN), follows the stated philosophy, 
and students meet the terminal objectives as delineated for the Baccalaureate program. 
The AccBSN program offers the BSN program within a one year (May to May) time 
frame and is a vigorous program of study. The Accelerated student completes a three 
semester course of study, beginning with the first Summer session, followed by a Fall 
semester, and ending with a final Spring semester. At the completion of the final 
semester, graduates are eligible to take the Registered Nurse licensure examination 
and to qualify for the California Public Health Nursing Certificate. The AccBSN pro- 
gram is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing. 

AccBSN Application Procedure 

AccBSN applicants must submit the following documents: 

1.) Completed admissions application 

2 . ) Personal statement of intent 

3 . ) Official transcripts of all college work 

4.) Two recommendations by those acquainted with the applicant's ability to succeed 
in an accelerated curriculum. 

Personal interviews are scheduled for qualified applicants. 

AccBSN Program Admission Requirements 

The AccBSN program is open to persons who have previously completed a baccalaureate 
degree and who meet specific admission requirements. Admission to the program is 
open only once a year. The application deadline is November 1 and decisions are mailed 
in February. 

To be considered for admission, students must be graduates of an accredited four year 
college or university with an earned grade point average of at least 3.0. A minimum 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 must have been earned in the following core requirements as 
well as fulfilling the outlined general studies requirements. 






NURSING 195 



Nursing Core Requirements 

Human Anatomy and Physiology with lab (6-8 units) 

Chemistry or Physics (3-4 units) 

Microbiology and Lab (4 units) 

Human Nutrition (3 units) 

General Psychology (3 units) 

Life-span Developmental Psychology (Infant through Adult) (3 units) 

Abnormal Psychology (3 units) 

Sociology or Cultural Anthropology (3 units) 

General Studies Requirements 

An eligible applicant must have also completed the following general studies require- 
ments. 

Written and Oral Communication (7 units) 

Art or Music (History or Appreciation) (3 units) 

Literature (3 units) 

History (3 units) 

Contemporary Economics or Politics (3 units) 

Philosophical Ideas (3 units) 

Moral Values (3 units) 

Any Religious Studies Course (3 units) 

Entrance Requirements 

Before entrance, admitted students must: 

1.) Complete the Department of Nursing Math Test with a minimum score of 84%. 

2.) Complete the necessary health forms and immunizations (see Health Policies, 
Department of Nursing) 

3.) Be current in CPR (Healthcare Provider BCLS/Professional Rescuer CPR). 

4.) Carry malpractice insurance. 

5.) Have fire safety card. 

Costs/Financial Aid/Registration 

Tuition for the AccBSN program is the same as the standard Mount St. Mary's College 
undergraduate tuition and fees. There is a nursing fee for each of the three accelerated 
sessions. Please refer to the Fees and Expenses for exact figures and guidelines. 

While AccBSN students are not eligible for Mount St. Mary's grants or scholarships, 
students may be eligible for federal, state, or private grants or loans. In order to qualify, 
students must send the FAFSA forms to the processor no later than January 15. 
Information on financial aid eligibility will be sent prior to the deposit deadline. A 
deposit fee of $300.00 is due on March 20. 

The registration deadline is April 17, 1998. 



196 NURSING 



AccBSN Degree Curriculum Requirements 

The AccBSN program requires 124 units which includes 56 Nursing Dept. units and 3 
units of Bioethics. Admitted students must complete their total curriculum plan at 
Mount St. Mary's College; they may not take required nursing courses at other insti- 
tutions. A sample program is listed below. 

Summer 

NUR 41 Adaptation Nursing Theory (3) 

NUR42A Fundamentals of Nursing: Theory (2) 

NUR 42B Fundamentals of Nursing: Skills (1) 

NUR 44AB Adaptation Nursing: Adult Med/Surgical (3,3) 

NUR 45AB Practicum: Adult Med/Surgical Nursing (4,4) 



Total units: 20 



Fall 



NUR135AB Pharmacology in Nursing (1,1) 

NUR 140 Adaptation Nursing: Childbearing Family (2.5) 

NUR 141 Practicum: Childbearing Family (1.5) 

NUR 142 Adaptation Nursing: Children (2.5) 

NUR 143 Practicum: Children (1.5) 

NUR 144 Adaptation Nursing: Adv. Med/Surg (2.5) 

NUR 145 Practicum: Adv. Med/Surg Nursing (1.5) 

NUR 146 Adaptation Nursing: Mental Health (2.5) 

NUR 147 Practicum: Mental Health (1.5) 

PHI168Aor Bioethics (3)* 
168B 



Total units: 23 



NUR 134 
NUR 136 
NUR 138 
NUR 150 
NUR 151 
NUR 152 
NUR 153 
NUR 154 
NUR 155 
NUR 156 
NUR 157 



Spring 

Nursing Issues (2) 

Abuse: Child to Elder Adult (1) 

Nursing Research (3) 

Adaptation Nursing: Community Health I (1.5) 

Practicum: Community Health Nursing I (1.5) 

Adaptation Nursing: Leadership and Mgmt (1.5) 

Practicum: Nursing Leadership and Mgmt (1.5) 

Adaptation Nursing: Community Health II (1.5) 

Practicum: Community Health Nursing II (1.5) 

Adaptation Nursing: Older Adult (1.5) 

Practicum: Older Adult ( 1.5) 



Total units: 22 

*May be taken prior to admission 



Total units for an Accelerated B.S. in Nursing: 124 



NURSING 197 



Clinical Agencies/Scheduling 

Multiple agencies are used for clinical practice and include the following: private and 
public acute care facilities, skilled nursing facilities, Los Angeles County public health 
sites, home health agencies, schools, and other community health care facilities. Trans- 
portation for clinical classes is the responsibility of each student. Students in their 
senior session are required to have a current driver's license, auto insurance, and a 
documented finger print card. Schedules for clinical and class times are subject to 
change. Clinical classes may include weekends. 



NUR 40 Introduction to Roy 

Adaptation Model (4) 

A bridge course offered to licensed voca- 
tional nurses and registered nurses trans- 
ferring at advanced placement. An intro- 
duction to the concepts underlying the 
philosophy of nursing, the nursing process 
and the Roy Adaptation Model. Selected ex- 
periences in clinical practice are required. 
Must be satisfactorily completed prior to 
enrollment in other nursing courses. 

NUR 4 1 Adaptation Nursing 

Theory (3) 

Introduces the Roy Adaptation Model of 
Nursing with emphasis on the physiological 
and psychosocial modes as related to adult 
and older adult behaviors. Introduces con- 
cepts of cultural diversity, aging, and sex- 
uality. 

NUR 42A Fundamentals of Nursing: 
Theory (2) 

Covers basic nursing measures necessary 
for safe patient care. The focus is to provide 
the theoretical foundation for selected 
nursing skills. 

NUR 42B Fundamentals of Nursing: 

Skills (1) 

Practice and development of the students 
psychomotor ability in the performance of 
basic nursing skills taught in NUR 42A. De- 
signed to integrate computer assisted 
learning for an independent approach to 
learning. 

NUR 44AB Adaptation Nursing: 

Adult Med/Surg (3,3) 

Lecture. Common disruptions in the body's 
structure, function and regulatory mecha- 
nisms are presented which include: im- 
mune response, inflammation, and temper- 
ature control. Nursing and Medical 
Management will be discussed. 



NUR 45AB Practicum: Adult Med/ 

Surg Nursing (4,4) 

Clinical practice of nursing process and 
skills with application of concepts related 
to basic nursing skills and to common dis- 
ruptions in body systems. Focus on common 
medical-surgical problems affecting adults 
and older adults, stimuli for illness, nursing 
diagnoses, nursing interventions, preven- 
tion, and teaching in an in-patient setting. 

NUR 51 Nursing Practicum: 

Adult (4) 

Clinical practice of nursing process and 
skills with application of concepts related 
to basic nursing skills and to common dis- 
ruptions in body systems. Focus on common 
medical-surgical problems affecting adults 
and older adults, stimuli for illness, nursing 
diagnoses, nursing interventions, preven- 
tion, and teaching in an in-patient setting. 

NUR 53A Fundamentals of Nursing: 
Theory (2) 

NUR 53BC Fundamentals of 

Nursing: Skills (1,15) 

Covers basic nursing measures necessary 
for safe patient care. The focus is to provide 
the theoretical basis for selected nursing 
skills and to develop the student's psychom- 
otor ability in the performance of these 
skills. Designed to integrate computer as- 
sisted learning for an independent ap- 
proach to learning. 

NUR 54 Introduction to 

Pathophysiology (3) 

Common disruptions in the body's struc- 
ture, function and regulatory mechanisms 
are presented which include: immune re- 
sponse, inflammation, and temperature 
control. Nursing and Medical Management 
will be discussed. 



198 NURSING 



NUR 60 Adaptation Nursing 

Theory (3) 

Introduces the Roy Adaptation Model of 
Nursing with emphasis on the physiological 
and psychosocial modes as related to adult 
a older adult behaviors. Introduces con- 
cepts of cultural diversity, aging, and sex- 
uality. 

NUR 6 1 Nursing Pr acticum: 

Adult (4) 

Continuation of the Nursing Skills and 
Process with application of concepts related 
to the physiologic and psychosocial node of 
adaptation. 

NUR 65 Adaptation Nursing: Adult 
Med/Surg (3) 

Common medical-surgical problems affect- 
ing adults, focus on adult and older adult, 
stimuli for illness, nursing diagnoses, nurs- 
ing interventions, prevention, and teach- 
ing. 

NUR 98 Independent Studies (1-3) 
Independent investigation of significant 
problems in nursing. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 

NUR 99 Special Studies in 

Nursing (1-3) 

Selected problems; offered as a course or 
seminar on current issues in nursing. Pre- 
requisite: consent of Instructor. 

NUR 134 Issues in Professional 

Nursing (2) 

The focus is on the profession of Nursing. 
Content includes: the History of Nursing, 
the Nursing Practice Act, Legal Aspects, Li- 
ability, and other current issues affecting 
the Nursing Profession. Prerequisites: Suc- 
cessful completion of the NUR 160 series. 

NUR135AB Pharmacology in 

Nursing (1,1) 

Pharmacology as related to pathological 
processes and various groups of clients is 
presented, major drug classes and mecha- 
nisms of drug actions as well as nursing 
implications are detailed. Prerequisites: 
Successful completion of the NUR 40, 50, 60 



NUR 136 Abuse: Child to Elder 

Adult (1) 

Child, elder and women's abuse will be cov- 
ered. Included will be prevention, early de- 
tection, and intervention techniques. Cali- 
fornia reporting requirements for Child 
Abuse will be covered. 



NUR 138 Research (3) 

Principles of scientific methods, research 
designs appropriate to nursing, ethical con- 
duct in human subject research, and com- 
ponents of theoretical frameworks are pre- 
sented. Emphasis on understanding, 
critiquing, and applying published re- 
search findings to clinical practice. Prereq- 
uisite: Successful completion of NUR 140 
and 160 series. Student must be in Senior 
standing. 

Prerequisites for courses in the NUR 140 
and 160 Series: successful completion of the 
NUR 41, 42AB, 44AB, 45AB, 51, 53ABC,, 
54,60, 61, 65, and Nutrition. The NUR 140 
and 160 courses involve the continued use 
of the Roy Adaptation Model as a basis for 
prevention, rehabilitation, and teaching. 

NUR 140 Adaptation Nursing: 

Childbearing Family (2.5) 
Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health and illness problems re- 
lated to childbearing families. 

NUR 141 Practicum: Childbearing 

Family (1.5) 

Clinical practice in prenatal, delivery and 
postnatal care. Includes the study of par- 
enting roles and health needs of emerging 
family groups. 

NUR 142 Adaptation Nursing: 

Children (2.5) 

Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health and illness problems re- 
lated to children. 

NUR 143 Practicum: Children (1.5) 
Clinical practice in the health-illness prob- 
lems encountered in the care of children, 
from infancy through adolescence and their 
families. 

NUR 144 Adaptation Nursing: 

Advanced Med/Surg (2.5) 
Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health and illness problems re- 
lated to complex episodic medical and sur- 
gical disruptions in the adult. Patient care 
management is included. 

NUR 145 Practicum: Adv. Med/Surg 

Nursing (1.5) 

Clinical practice in the health-illness prob- 
lems encountered in the care of complex ep- 
isodic medical and surgical disruptions in 
the adult. Patient care management is in- 
cluded. 



NURSING 199 



NUR 146 Adaptation Nursing: 

Mental Health (2.5) 

Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health and illness problems re- 
lated to the mental health of individuals 
and groups. 

NUR 147 Practicum: Mental 

Health (1.5) 

Clinical practice in the application of the 
principles and concepts related to psycho- 
social problems in psychiatric settings. 

NUR 150 Adaptation Nursing: 
Community Health 
Nursing I (1.5) 

Lecture. Presents research, theories and 
concepts as applied to aggregates in the 
community. These include environmental 
health, basic concepts of epidemiology, 
communicable disease, preventative health 
and wellness. The theory and management 
of these issues and others are discussed and 
related to a variety of community resources. 

NUR 151 Practicum: 

Community Health 
Nursing I (1.5) 

Clinical practice of the principles of Public 
Health Nursing in an official agency. An 
epidemiological approach is implemented 
to identify and assess problems in high risk 
aggregates in the community. Community 
assessment and exploration of community 
resources are an integral part. 

NUR 152 Adaptation Nursing: 

Leadership and 

Management (1.5) 

Lecture. Principles of leadership and man- 
agement will be explained as they apply to 
various nursing (health) delivery systems. 
Topics include leadership styles, manage- 
ment functions, motivation, group organi- 
zation, budget and staffing. 

NUR 153 Practicum: 

Nursing Leadership and 
Management (1.5) 

Clinical practice applying the principles in 
NUR 152. Each student is assigned a se- 
lected clinical preceptor from a variety of 
agencies. 

NUR 154 Adaptation Nursing: 
Community Health 
Nursing II (1.5) 

Lecture. Principles of nursing utilized in a 

client's home. Emphasis is on family theory 

and culture. 



NUR 155 Practicum: 

Community Health 
Nursing II (1.5) 

Clinical practice in a variety of home health 
agencies providing the opportunity to apply 
the principles of Home Health Nursing. 

NUR 156 Adaptation Nursing: 

Older Adult (1.5) 

Lecture. Current research and medical and 
nursing management of the older adult 
from a bio-psycho-social perspective will be 
presented. Other topics will include demo- 
graphics, political and governmental envi- 
ronments. 

NUR 157 Practicum: Older Adult 

(1.5) 
Clinical practice with older adult clients in 
various settings enabling the student to ap- 
plying the concepts and principles in NUR 
156. 

NUR 160 Adaptation Nursing: 

Childbearing Family (2.5) 
Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health-illness problems related to 
Childbearing Families. Taken concurrently 
with NUR 161. 

NUR 161 Practicum: Childbearing 

Family (2.5) 

Provides clinical experience in prenatal, de- 
livery, and postnatal care, study of the par- 
enting roles, and the health needs of the 
emerging family groups. Taken concur- 
rently with NUR 160. 

NUR 162 Adaptation Nursing: 

Children (2.5) 

Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health-illness problems related to 
children. Taken concurrently with NUR 
163. 

NUR 163 Practicum: Children (2.5) 
Provides clinical experience in the health- 
illness problems encountered in the care of 
children and their families. Growth and de- 
velopment from infancy through adoles- 
cence in terms of the Adaptation Theory of 
Nursing. Taken concurrently with NUR 
162. 



200 NURSING 



NUR 164 Adaptation Nursing: 
Advanced Medical/ 
Surgical (2.5) 

Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health-illness problems related to 
complex episodic medical or surgical dis- 
ruptions in the adult. Leadership and pa- 
tient care management included. Taken 
concurrently with NUR 165. 

NUR 165 Practicum: Advanced 

Medical/Surgical (2.5) 

Provides clinical experience in the health, 
illness problems of adult patients with 
more complex medical or surgical disrup- 
tions. Leadership and patient care manage- 
ment included. Taken concurrently with 
NUR 164. 

NUR 166 Adaptation Nursing: 

Mental Health (2.5) 

Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social 
impact of health-illness problems related to 
mental health of individuals and groups. 
Taken concurrently with NUR 167. 

NUR 167 Practicum: Mental 

Health (2.5) 

Provides clinical experience in the applica- 
tion of the principles and concepts related 
to psycho-social problems in psychiatric 
settings. Taken concurrently with NUR 
166. 

NUR 180 Community Health 

Nursing I (1.5) 

Community Health Nursing presents re- 
search, theories and concepts as applied to 
aggregates in the community. These in- 
clude environmental health, basic concepts 
of epidemiology, communicable disease, 
preventative health and wellness. The the- 
ory and management of these issues and 
others are discussed and related to a vari- 
ety of community resources. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing. Taken concurrently with 
NUR 181. 

NUR 181 Community Health 

Nursing Practice (2.5) 

This course provides the students the op- 
portunity to practice the principles of Com- 
munity Health Nursing in an official 
agency and other community agencies. An 
epidemiological approach is implemented 
to identify and assess problems in high risk 
aggregates in the community. The Roy Ad- 
aptation Model is utilized to promote opti- 
mum health for individuals, families and 



groups. Community assessment and explo- 
ration of community resources are an inte- 
gral part of the practicum. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing. Taken concurrently with 
NUR 180. 

NUR 182 Leadership/ 

Management (1.5) 

Principles of leadership and management 
will be explained as they apply to various 
nursing (health) delivery systems, Topics 
discussed will include leadership styles, 
management functions, motivation, group 
organization budget and staffing. Prereq- 
uisite: Senior standing. Taken concurrently 
with NUR 183. 

NUR 183 Leadership/Management 

Practice (2.5) 

Various clinical agencies are used where 
the student will apply the principles in 
NUR 182. Each student will be assigned a 
selected clinical preceptor from the agency. 
The Roy Adaptation Model is used as an 
assessment tool for the work group. Prereq- 
uisite: Senior standing. Taken concurrently 
with NUR 182. 

NUR 184 Community Health 

Nursing II (1.5) 

This course provides the student the prin- 
ciples of nursing in the client's home. Em- 
phasis is on family theory and culture. 
Other topics include gerontology, chronic 
illness and compliance. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing. Taken concurrently with NUR 
185. GS-VI 

NUR 185 Community Health 

Nursing Practice in the 
Home (2.5) 

A variety of home health agencies are used 
where the student will have the opportu- 
nity to practice the principles of home 
health nursing. The Roy Adaptation Model 
is utilized to promote optimum health for 
individuals, families and groups. Prerequi- 
site: Senior standing. Taken concurrently 
with NUR 184. 

NUR 190 Adaptation Nursing: 

Older Adult (1.5) 

Lecture. Current research and medical and 
nursing management of the older adult 
from a bio-psycho-social perspective will be 
presented. Other topics will include demo- 
graphics, political and governmental envi- 
ronments. 



NURSING 201 



NUR 191 Practicum: Older Adult 

(2.5) 
Clinical practice with older adult clients in 
various settings enabling the student to ap- 
plying the concepts and principles in NUR 
190. 



NUR196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

NUR 198 Independent Studies (1-3) 



202 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 
ASSISTANT PROGRAM 

The Occupational Therapy Assistant Program is an Associate of Arts program situated 
within the HOPE Program and its required courses are offered during evening hours 
in four ten-week sessions a year with occasional Saturday field experiences. Admissions 
requirements for the program are those of the Associate in Arts degree program. 

The Occupational Therapy Profession 

The certified occupational therapy assistant (COTA) works under the supervision of 
registered occupational therapists (OTRs) in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, nursing 
homes, schools, neighborhood centers and many other settings. 

Occupational Therapy (OT) is a health profession that uses "occupation" as an index 
and tool in the evaluation and treatment of individuals who experience challenges or 
difficulties that threaten or impair their ability to perform activities and tasks basic to 
their roles as worker, parent, spouse or partner, sibling and friend to self or others. OT 
involves the therapeutic use of purposeful activities to increase independent function, 
enhance development, and prevent disability. 

Occupation is defined by the American Occupational Therapy Association as ordinary 
and familiar things that people do every day. Occupation for each individual may be 
categorized in three performance areas: Activities of Daily Living (self care such as 
grooming, hygiene, eating and dressing); Work Activities (home management, care of 
others, education and job performance); Play or Leisure Activities(exploration and 
performance). 

When the individual's life is disrupted by illness, injury, or impairment, any or all of 
the above listed performance areas may be affected. It is the role of the occupational 
therapist and the occupational therapy assistant to carefully assess all of these areas 
with the individual so that purposeful activities, equipment and behaviors can be 
utilized and adapted to help the individual become as functional and independent as 
possible, compensate for dysfunction, minimize or prevent debilitation, and/or promote 
health and wellness. 

Philosophy of the Program 

The philosophy of the program reflects the philosophy of Occupational Therapy as a 
service profession that elicits maximum adaptation for those individuals with physical 
or mental dysfunction. The program seeks to develop a student with the knowledge, 
skills and values to assume the role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) in 
service to society. Occupation or purposeful activity is seen as the means by which the 
OTA seeks to positively effect the individual, the individuals daily occupation and the 
society within which the individual exists. The OTA student is guided along a occu- 
pational developmental continuum in professional knowledge. The Catholic nature of 
the college provides a community value orientation that guides development of the 
student to be a service provider in a culturally diverse setting. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM 203 



Mission of the Program 

Through a combination of liberal arts and Occupational Therapy course work, the 
program seeks to graduate OT service providers that are well qualified professionally 
as well as personally. The OT course work seeks to develop knowledge, skills and values 
as an OT practitioner. The program is dedicated to providing excellence in OT educa- 
tion. The liberal arts component seeks to develop the personal skills of the individual. 
The program accepts primarily adult students from the culturally diverse population 
of urban Los Angeles. These students are encouraged to build upon their present 
knowledge and experience to become skillful and committed OT practitioners. 

Objectives of the Program/Graduate Competencies 

Through course work in Occupational Therapy theory and activities, biology, and psy- 
chology; and guided observation and practice in clinical settings the student will ac- 
complish the following objectives of the program: 

1. Identify and describe necessary and required technical knowledge areas as they 
relate to the work of the Occupational Therapy Assistant. 

2 . Use knowledge of the concepts of "occupation" and "adaptation" to deliver therapy 
services to individuals, families and groups. 

3. Demonstrate competency in the basic and social sciences as they relate to the body 
of knowledge and skills of the Occupational Therapy Assistant. 

4. Identify the dynamics of physical, psychosocial and developmental determinants 
of health and illness. 

5. Demonstrate the necessary and required technical practice skills as they relate to 
the work of the Occupational Therapy Assistant. 

6. Describe and interpret the role of Occupational Therapy to individuals, families, 
and groups. 

7. Demonstrate knowledge of the role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant. 

8. Identify and apply effective communication skills to individuals, families and 
groups. 

9. Develop and implement teaching/learning plans for individuals, families, and 
groups. 

10. Identify the cultural, social, economic, and environmental influences on health 
and illness and the practice of Occupational Therapy and create intervention that 
considers a variety of influencing factors. 

11. Critically examine and integrate the principles of moral, ethical, and legal issues 
which influence health care. 

12. Identify the need for continual professional development and involvement in a 
field with an ever-changing body of knowledge. 

Program Description/Curriculum Design 

The program is designed with the liberal arts classes including communication skills, 
critical thinking, psychology, biology, art, biomedical ethics, and multicultural and 
multiethnic issues forming a foundation for the Occupational Therapy courses. These 



204 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM 



courses are taken prior to OT course work. Biomedical Issues and Multicultural/ Mul- 
tiethnic Issues courses may be taken concurrent with the Occupational Therapy cur- 
riculum. 

Occupational Therapy Theory courses must be taken in order from OT Theory I to OT 
Theory IV. The principles of looking at individuals throughout the life span, in relation 
to their daily occupation, and in respect to their culture/society form continuums 
through the program. 

The following sequence of courses is required for completion of the Occupational Ther- 
apy Assistant Associate in Arts degree. A grade of "C" (2.0) or better is necessary to 
satisfy the requirements for the Occupational Therapy Assistant required courses 
(OTH). 

ART 5 Fundamentals of Art (3) 

BIO 7 Introduction to the Human Body (3) 

or BIO 40 Human Anatomy (4) 

ENG 10A/10B Communication Skills (3,3) 

PHI 10 Critical Thinking (3) 

PSY 1 General Psychology (3) 

HSP 49 Multicultural and Multiethnic Issues for the Urban 

Health Care Professional (3) 

SOC 49 Biomedical Issues (3) 

OTH 5 Occupational Therapy Theory I (4) 

OTH 10 Occupational Therapy Theory II (4) 

OTH 15 Therapeutic Activities and Their Analyses I (4) 

OTH 20 Documentation and Terminology for the 

Occupational Therapy Assistant (3) 

OTH 2 1 Practical Anatomy and Principles of Kinesiology for 

the OTA (3) 

OTH 25 Occupational Therapy Theory III (4) 

OTH 30 Therapeutic Activities and Their Analyses II (4) 

OTH 35 Occupational Therapy Theory IV (4) 

OTH 40 Occupational Therapy Clinical Fieldwork I (6) 

OTH 45 Occupational Therapy Clinical Fieldwork II (6) 

Accreditation of the Program 

The Occupational Therapy Assistant Program is accredited by the Accreditation Coun- 
cil for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Ther- 
apy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, 
MD 20824-1220. AOTA's phone number is 301-652-AOTA. 

Upon successful completion of the MSMC OTA program, graduates will be eligible to 
take the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant ad- 
ministered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc. 
(NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified 
Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). Most states require licensure in order to 
practice in addition to national certification. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM 205 



Professional Requirements 



To qualify to practice as a COTA, students must: 

1 . Successfully complete all of the Liberal Arts and Occupational Therapy (OTH) 
academic course work for the AA degree; 

2. Successfully complete a minimum sixteen (16) weeks of OTH clinical fieldwork 
within 18 months of completion of academic course work; and 

3. Successfully complete the national certification examination administered by 
the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc. (NBCOT). 



OTH 5 Occupational Therapy 

Theory I (4) 

Defines the history, development, and def- 
inition of Occupational Therapy as a profes- 
sion. Emphasis on occupation, performance 
areas, theoretical frames of reference, nor- 
mal development, learning and therapeutic 
use of self. Concurrent with Level I field- 
work. Prerequisite: Successful completion 
ofENG 10A/10B, ART 5 and PSY 1. Pre- 
requisite or concurrent: PHI 10 and BIO 7 
(or BIO 40). 

OTH 10 Occupational Therapy 

Theory H (4) 

Explores the theories and applications of 
occupational therapy in the evaluation and 
treatment of psychosocial dysfunction. 
Concurrent with Level I fieldwork. Prereq- 
uisite: Successful completion of OTH 5. 

OTH 15 Therapeutic Activities I and 
Their Analyses (4) 

Introduction to selected crafts and activi- 
ties with emphasis on task analysis and ap- 
plication to occupation. Concurrent with 
Level I fieldwork. Prerequisite: Successful 
completion of OTH 5. 

OTH 20 Documentation and Medical 
Terminology for the 
Occupational Therapy 
Assistant (3) 

Introduction to basic medical documenta- 
tion and terminology appropriate to Occu- 
pational Therapy Assistant practice are- 
nas. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 
OTH 5. 

OTH 2 1 Practical Anatomy and 
Kinesiology for 
Occupational Therapy 
Assistant (3) 

Application of basic anatomy and Kinesiol- 
ogy principles to Occupational Therapy As- 
sistant interventions. Prerequisite: Suc- 
cess ful completion of OTH 5, 10, 15 and 20. 



OTH 25 Occupational Therapy 

Theory HI (4) 

Theory and application of occupational 
therapy in the evaluation and treatment of 
physical dysfunction with emphasis on 
functional limitation and importance of oc- 
cupation. Concurrent with Level I field- 
work. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 
OTH 5, 10, 15 and 20. 

OTH 30 Therapeutic Activities H 

and Their Analyses (4) 

Focus on selected crafts and activities with 
emphasis on task analysis and application 
to occupation. Concurrent with Level I 
fieldwork. Prerequisite: Successful comple- 
tion of OTH 5, 10 and 15. 

OTH 35 Occupational Therapy 

Theory IV (4) 

Explores principles and techniques of man- 
agement and supervision; treatment in spe- 
cialty and nontraditional settings/areas; oc- 
cupational performance and adaptation in 
geriatrics; professional responsibility in 
preparation for clinical fieldwork. Concur- 
rent with Level I fieldwork. Prerequisite: 
Successful completion of OTH 5, 10, 15, 20, 
21 and 25. 

OTH 40 Occupational Therapy 

Fieldwork I (6) 

Supervised clinical experience with empha- 
sis on attaining proficiency in occupational 
therapy assistant skills/psychosocial dys- 
function. Prerequisite: Successful comple- 
tion of all OTA academic course work. 

OTH 45 Occupational Therapy 

Fieldwork II (6) 

Supervised clinical experience with empha- 
sis on attaining proficiency in occupational 
therapy assistant skills/physical dysfunc- 
tion. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 
all OTA academic course work. 



206 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM 



OTH 98 Independent Studies (1-4) 
Independent investigation of significant 
problems in Occupational Therapy. Prereq- 
uisite: Consent of advisor. 

OTH 99 Directed Studies (1-4) 

Directed investigation of significant prob- 
lems in Occupational Therapy. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 



PHILOSOPHY 207 



Philosophy 



Philosophy provides us with the tools discover, examine, and evaluate insights into the 
meaning of knowledge, personal identity, creativity, fundamental concepts, relation- 
ships, nature, the structure of institutions, policies, values, and beliefs. 

This major serves as an excellent preparation for graduate study or a career in college 
teaching, law, bioethics, medicine, computer programming, culture studies, social sci- 
ences, or religious studies. Philosophy provides a strong foundation for careers in 
education, business, research, writing, or counseling. 

The Philosophy department encourages and helps students to arrange double majors, 
especially with the departments of Art, Political Science, Business, English, and Reli- 
gious Studies. Other double majors with philosophy can be arranged. 

Courses Required for a BA. Degree in Philosophy 

Lower Division. One class from each of the following groups: 

A. Analytical Skills: 

Phi 5 Introduction to Logic 

Phi 10 Critical Thinking 

B. Introductory Ethics: 

Phi 21 Moral Values 

Phi 92 Business Ethics 

Upper Division. At least ten are upper division courses in Philosophy. Students 
will select one of the following programs: 

1. Traditional Philosophy: A program of study primarily for those interested in 
pursuing graduate study in Philosophy. Students must take at least: 

a. three courses (9 units) from area A (History of Philosophy) 

b. three courses (9 units) from area C (Logic, Metaphysics, Epistemology) 

c. two courses (6 units) from area B (Value Theory) 

d. one course (3 units) from area D (Interdisciplinary Philosophy). 

e. one elective course (3 units) from any of areas A, B, C, and D. 

2. Applied Philosophy: A program of study primarily for those interested in fields 
where a background in Philosophy is particularly valuable, such as law, bioethics, 
business ethics, medicine, women's studies, or culture studies. Students must take 
at least: 

a. three courses (9 units) from areas B (Value Theory) 

b. three courses (9 units) from area D (Interdisciplinary Philosophy) 

c. one course (3 units) from area A (History of Philosophy ) 

d. one course (3 units) from area C (Logic, Metaphysics, Epistemology) 

e. two elective courses (6 units) from any of areas A, B, C, and D. 
A. History of Philosophy: 

Phi 124 Socrates, Plato, & Aristotle (3) 

Phi 125 Medieval Philosophy (3) 

Phi 126 Descartes to Kant (3) 



208 PHILOSOPHY 



Phi 130 Existentialism (3) 

Phi 134 American Philosophy (3) 

Phi 172 Marxism (3) 

B. Value Theory: 

Phi 168A Contemporary Moral Problems (3) 

Phil68B Bioethics (3) 

Phi 170 Social and Political Philosophy (3) 

Phi 174 Aesthetics (3) 

Phi 179 Women and Values (3) 

C. Logic, Metaphysics, and Epistemology: 

Phi 150 Metaphysics (3) 

Phi 152 Theory of Knowledge (3) 

Phi 155 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Phi 158 Scientific Method (3) 

Phi 160 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

D. Interdisciplinary Philosophy: 

Phi 165 Philosophy and Law (3) 

Phi 162 Philosophy and Native Cultures (3) 

Phi 175 Philosophy of Film (3) 

Phi 176 Philosophy of Literature (3) 

Phi 178 Philosophy of Women (3) 

Total Units in Philosophy: 36. 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 

The Minor in Philosophy 

A minimum of 21 units in philosophy, 15 of which must be upper division, approved by 
the Philosophy department. This includes: 

1. At least one course from either History of Philosophy or Logic, Metaphysics, and 
Epistemology (groups A and C) 

2. At least one course from Value Theory or Interdisciplinary Philosophy (groups B 
and D). Minors who wish to emphasize a particular area (such as Business Ethics, 
Bioethics, Aesthetics, or Social and Political Philosophy) are encouraged to contact 
the Chair of the Philosophy department for assistance. 

Independent Study Policy: Independent studies are open to philosophy majors and 
minors who wish to explore an area of philosophy for advanced or specialized work. 
Any non-major wishing to do an independent study in philosophy must have a clearly 
defined goal and must confer with both the faculty member and the chair of the de- 
partment to see if it is appropriate. Independent studies require independent research. 
Students are expected to meet the faculty member at least one hour per week, under- 
taking an equivalent amount of work that would be expected in a 3 credit course. 
Normally, independent studies are not intended to replace a course taught in the 
department. For details on what must be included in your petition for an independent 
study, please contact the Chair of the Philosophy department. 



PHILOSOPHY 209 



PHI 5 Introduction to Logic (3) 

An introduction to argument structure, in- 
cluding inductive and deductive argu- 
ments, the rules of inference and replace- 
ment, fallacies of reasoning, validity and 
soundness, syllogisms, the use of language, 
diverse frames of reference, analysis, deci- 
sion-making and problem-solving, and 
evaluating arguments. GS-II, VB3 

PHI 10 Critical Thinking (3) 

Students taking this course will learn rea- 
soning techniques so they develop their 
skills at argumentation, spotting fallacious 
reasoning, examining uses of language, 
evaluating reasoning, examining assump- 
tions, weighing evidence, determining 
credibility of witnesses, problem solving, 
decision-making, and applying critical 
thinking skills to moral reasoning, adver- 
tising, the media, and legal reasoning. This 
course carries credit equivalent to PHI 5. 
GS-II, VB3 

PHI 15 Challenges in Philosophy (3) 

An introduction to the nature of philosophy 
and why philosophy is considered the love 
of wisdom. Included are philosophical ques- 
tions, major thinkers, and the methodology 
involved in a philosophical inquiry. Topics 
covered include: Freewill and determinism, 
the existence of God, the problem of evil, 
mind and body, the theory of knowledge, 
and personal identity. Traditional views, as 
well as contemporary ones from diverse 
perspectives (such as women and people of 
color) will be included. Prerequisite: eligible 
for ENG 1A or completion ofENG 10A with 
C or better. GS-VB1, VI. 

PHI 2 1 Moral Values and Ethical 

Decisions (3) 

This course is an introduction to moral rea- 
soning and ethical decision-making, with a 
focus on fundamental ethical theories (such 
as Formalism, Utilitarianism, egoism, rel- 
ativism, virtue theory, the ethic of care). 
Using the different theories, students will 
examine some major moral dilemmas we 
face (such as the death penalty, world hun- 
ger, environmental ethics, abortion, sexual 
morality, censorship). GS-VB2 

PHI 24 Socrates, Plato, and 

Aristotle (3) 

An introduction to the origins of philosoph- 
ical traditions in the West through study of 
the lives and major works of Socrates, 
Plato, and Aristotle. Philosophy majors 



and minors only are to take this course for 
upper division credit as PHI 124. They will 
be assigned an additional critical assign- 
ment appropriate to a more advanced level 
of study. This may be in either written or 
oral form. GS-VB1 

PHI 92 Introduction to Business 

Ethics (3) 

A case study approach to business ethics. 
Using ethical theories, we will cover such 
moral dilemmas as public welfare, issues in 
hiring, affirmative action, and business 
practices (product liability, whistle blow- 
ing, honesty, advertising) environmental 
concerns, global issues, corporate decision- 
making and responsibility. 

Students who take this course may not take 
PHI 21 for credit. Honors students should 
take PHI 2 1H, not PHI 92. GS-VB2 

PHI 95 Special Problems (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. GS-VB1 

PHI 125 Medieval Philosophy (3) 

An introduction to representative medieval 
philosophers, such as Augustine, Abelard, 
Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and Ockham. We ex- 
amine philosophical issues of the medieval 
period (e.g., the relationship between faith 
and reason, human nature, knowledge, the 
nature of language and reference). Prereq- 
uisite: One lower division course in philos- 
ophy. GS-VB1. 

PHI 126 Descartes to Kant (3) 

The development of modern views on the 
relationship of reality and knowledge; the 
tension of reason and experience in classi- 
cal modern rationalists and empiricists and 
the synthesis of Kant. Prerequisite: one 
lower division course in philosophy. GS- 
VB1 

PHI 130 Existentialism and 

Phenomenology (3) 

A study of existentialist thinking drawing 
from Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Hei- 
degger, Camus, de Beauvoir. The emphasis 
is on the individual, free-will, choices, de- 
cision-making, authenticity vs. inauthen- 
ticity, and global considerations. Existen- 
tialist literature (Kafka, Beckett, Atwood, 
Shange, etc.) and challenges raised by 
women and people of color may be included. 
Prerequisite: one lower division course in 
philosophy. GS-VB1 



210 PHILOSOPHY 



PHI 134 American Philosophy (3) 

A study of the major philosophical ideas 
that have influenced the development of 
American intellectual life, civilization, and 
culture: Transcendentalism, Idealism, and 
the Pragmatic movement. Prerequisite: one 
lower division course in philosophy. GS- 
VB1 

PHI 150 Metaphysics (3) 

A study of philosophical theories of being. 
Among a cluster of metaphysical concepts 
to be considered are: substance, matter, 
mind, causation, space and time, and the 
transcendent. Prerequisite: one lower divi- 
sion course in philosophy. GS-VB1 

PHI 152 Theory of Knowledge (3) 

An examination of the nature and possibil- 
ity of human knowledge; objectivity, per- 
ception, truth, self-knowledge and the 
knowledge of other minds, the conditions of 
justified belief, Prerequisite: one lower di- 
vision course in philosophy. GS-VB1 

PHI 155 Symbolic Logic (3) 

This course provides the tools to do more 
advanced work in deductive reasoning and 
legal reasoning. This includes propositional 
logic, quantification logic, and examining 
complex argument forms. This course is 
highly recommended for pre-law students, 
as part of the course will look at analytical 
reasoning on LSAT exams. Also recom- 
mended for Computer Science majors. Pre- 
requisite: PHI 5 or PHI 10. GS-VB3 

PHI 158 The Scientific Method (3) 

An historical introduction to the philosophy 
of science from Aristotle to modern times. 
Topics will include: Aristotle's inductive/ 
deductive method; Copernican vs. Ptole- 
maic models of the universe; the Newtonian 
synthesis; Mach's sensationalism; twen- 
tieth century positivism Prerequisite: One 
lower division course in philosophy. Offered 
only on request. GS-VB1 or VB3 

PHI 160 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

A study of the philosophical concerns raised 
in religion, including the existence of god, 
faith, images and concepts of god, the prob- 
lem of evil, along with multi-cultural and 
feminist considerations of religion and my- 
thology. Prerequisite: one lower division 
course in philosophy and one in religious 
studies. See RST 198. GS-VA4 or VB1, VI 



PHI 162 Philosophy and Native 

Cultures (3) 

In this course we explore the philosophy, 
mythology and world views of four major 
groups of Native Americans. The focus is 
usually on the tribes of the Southwest, 
Northwest, Far North, and Mexico (espe- 
cially Huichol). Examination of the philo- 
sophical issues, myths, language, literature 
of these tribes; as well as contemporary is- 
sues (such as casinos and gambling, nuclear 
waste storage on reservations, and cultural 
authenticity). Prerequisite: one lower divi- 
sion course in philosophy. GS-VB1, VI 

PHI 165 Philosophy and Law (3) 

This course examines philosophical issues 
and concerns in law and in the application 
of laws. This includes notions of person- 
hood, freedom of speech, freedom of reli- 
gion, pornography and obscene speech, ma- 
jor Supreme Court decisions affecting a 
particular field (e.g., bioethics, medicine, 
research, biotechnology, business, the me- 
dia). In any given semester, we will exam- 
ine a particular theme (such as laws re- 
garding women and men in the workplace, 
environmental law, the media, or philo- 
sophical issues in international law). GS- 
VB1 

PHI168A Contemporary Moral 

Problems (3) 

A study of contemporary moral and social 
problems; including the death penalty, pub- 
lic policy issues, corporate responsibility, 
environmental ethics, world hunger, ani- 
mal experimentation, advertising and me- 
dia ethics, and individual vs. societal rights. 
At least one third of the course covers 
bioethical issues (such as surrogacy, eu- 
thanasia, abortion, medical experimenta- 
tion, justice and health care). Prerequisite: 
one lower division ethics course. GS-VB2, 
VI 

PHI168B Bioethics (3) 

An examination of moral problems regard- 
ing the moral issues, decision-making proc- 
esses and procedures facing the medical 
profession, presented within a historical 
context. This includes informed consent, 
honesty, patient rights v. paternalism, phy- 
sician assisted death, abortion, surrogate 
parenting, pregnant substance abusers, 
cloning, medical experimentation, biotech- 
nology, and justice issues such as the allo- 
cation of scarce resources. Prerequisite: one 
lower division ethics course. GS-VB2 



PHILOSOPHY 211 



PHI 1 70 Social and Political 

Philosophy (3) 

A study of the traditions of social and polit- 
ical theories, including an examination of 
the nature of persons and of society, the 
nature and justification of government, po- 
litical rights and political obligation, jus- 
tice and equality, the relationship between 
personal morality and social and political 
goals and the inclusion of women and mi- 
norities in society and government. Prereq- 
uisite: one lower division course in philoso- 
phy. GS-VB1 

PHI 172 Marxism (3) 

An examination and comparison of some of 
the central works of Marx, Engels, Lenin, 
Mao, and other writers in the Marxist tra- 
dition with a focus on the criticisms of cap- 
italism, the revolution to establish com- 
munism, the nature of communist society; 
and the relevance to the contemporary 
world and the future of Marxist/ socialist 
societies. Prerequisite: one lower division 
course in philosophy. GS-VB1 

PHI 174 Aesthetics (3) 

A study of the philosophical concerns 
around the creative process, the work of art, 
and aesthetic evaluation. This includes a 
study of the classical thinkers of aesthetics 
(e.g., Aristotle, Plato, Croce, Langer, Tol- 
stoy), as well as contemporary theories. As 
part of this study, we examine multicul- 
tural perspectives (e.g. Chicano murals, Af- 
rican American film directors, women in 
film). Prerequisite: one lower division 
course in philosophy. GS-VB1, VI 

PHI 175 Philosophy of Film (3) 

A study of philosophical ideas and theories 
about film, film theory and various schools 
of film criticism.In a particular semester, 
we may focus on a particular theme, such 
as the hero in American film, or authentic- 
ity and personal integrity, or visions of so- 
ciety. In addition, we will be interested in 
looking at film as an expression of cultural 
values and an instrument for change. As 
part of that goal, we will examine the role 
of race, class, and gender in assessing film. 
Prerequisite: one philosophy course. GS- 
VB1,VI 

PHI 176 Philosophy in Literature (3) 

In this course we study of the literary 
expression of philosophical concerns, such 
as authenticity, freedom and choice, good 



vs. evil, justice vs. injustice. This involves 
one or two philosophical works that inves- 
tigate a philosophical issue (e.g., the ideal 
society) and then we look at various novels 
or plays to see how the issue is treated in 
literature. This course includes multicul- 
tural and non-traditional expressions and 
concerns. Prerequisite: one lower division 
course in philosophy. GS-VB1, VI 

PHI 178 Philosophy of Women (3) 

A critical study of traditional and contem- 
porary conceptions of women and various 
manifestations of the oppression of women 
particularly in Western societies and the 
US, especially for women of color. Various 
strategies of addressing women's issues 
will be studies, including various forms of 
feminism and research on or by women and 
of the women's movement will be explored 
from diverse perspectives, especially those 
of women of color. Prerequisite: one lower 
division course in philosophy. GS-VB1, VI 

PHI 179 Women and Values (3) 

An examination of women's perspectives in 
areas reflecting values, including ethics, 
aesthetics and art, political and social the- 
ory, the law, and religion. The course fo- 
cuses on how women tend to perceive values 
differently than men and the contributions 
women make to value theory as well as the 
problems of interpretation and practice 
that these differences raise, e.g. regarding 
sexual harassment, pornography, or the 
value of attachment. Differences among 
women, especially cultural differences, will 
be explored throughout. Prerequisite: one 
lower division course in philosophy. GS- 
VBlorVB2,VI 

PHI 180 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. Offered only on 
request. 

PHI 195 Directed Reading (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. Offered only on 
request. 



PHI 198 Special Topics 

May be repeated for credit. 



(1-3) 



PHI 199 Senior Thesis (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. Offered only on 
request. 

PHI199H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 



212 PHYSICAL SCIENCE 



Physical Education 



See Special Programs. 



Physical Science 

Departmental Affiliation: Physical Sciences and Mathematics 



PHS 1 Scientific Concepts (3) 

A course in the basic principles of chemistry 
and physics with particular emphasis on 
the application of these principles to con- 
temporary concerns. GS-IIID 

PHS 2 General Physical Science (3) 

This course for the non-science major sur- 
veys the four main fields of physical science: 
physics, chemistry, astronomy, and geol- 
ogy. It explores how things work and how 
we find out. Elementary mathematical con- 
cepts are introduced as required. Recom- 
mended for students planning to become 
teachers. GS-111D 



PHS 4 Elementary Environmental 

Studies (3) 

An introduction to the study of man's phys- 
ical resources and environment leading to 
a consideration of the problems of conser- 
vation and pollution. Prerequisite: PHS 1 or 
PHS 2. GS-IIID 

PHS 5 Selected Topics in Physical 

Science (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the department. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 213 



Physical Therapy 



The Department of Physical Therapy offers entry level physical therapist and physical 
therapist assistant degree programs. The post-baccalaureate Master of Physical Ther- 
apy degree program is designed to prepare the graduate to enter practice as a generalist 
physical therapist. 

The Physical Therapist Assistant program offers an Associate of Arts degree or a 
certificate program for individuals holding an Associate or Baccalaureate degree from 
an accredited institution. 

Department Philosophy 

Physical Therapy is a health profession dedicated to the improvement of the quality of 
life. It is a profession of service to humanity which is holistic in nature and provides 
services to persons of all ages. Physical therapy means the examination, treatment, 
and instruction of persons to detect, assess, prevent, correct, alleviate, and limit acute 
or prolonged movement dysfunction. It includes the administration, interpretation, 
and evaluation of tests and measurements of body functions and structures; the plan- 
ning, administration, evaluation, and modification of treatment and instruction in- 
cluding the use of therapeutic processes; and the provision of consultative, educational 
and other advisory services for the purpose of preventing or reducing the incidence and 
severity of physical disability, movement dysfunction, body malfunction, and pain. In 
performance of these services, the role of the physical therapist assistant is to provide 
patient treatment under the supervision of a qualified physical therapist. 

Physical therapy is a profession which promotes maximum human performance by 
facilitating an individual's responsibility for his or her own health. The profession is 
an autonomous profession, often described as a science applied in an artful manner. 
Because the primary focus of the profession is the diagnosis and treatment of movement 
dysfunction, the practitioner necessarily must possess a thorough understanding of 
the human being: structurally, functionally, psychosocially, and spiritually. As the 
profession is rooted in the humanistic values of compassion, caring, hope and integrity, 
all persons are recognized as unique composites of body, mind, emotion and spirit, 
worthy of respect for their dignity as whole individuals. 

To be a competent and compassionate physical therapy practitioner of the highest 
quality requires being a critically thinking problem solver, being an able communicator 
and being an adept teacher. With these skills relationships of mutual trust and re- 
sponsibility can develop and mature in rehabilitation or recovery, in trauma or disease, 
in illness or healing. The ability to establish relationships with patients potentiates 
results and maximizes the outcomes of care. 

Physical therapists and physical therapist assistants are integral members of the 
health care team. Within this context they impart their knowledge and skills through 
competent and compassionate patient care, enlightened education, scholarly activity 
and research, and quality consultation. 

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program 

The physical therapist assistant program offers an Associate of Arts degree option, or 
a Certificate option for students holding an Associate or Baccalaureate degree. 



214 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Philosophy of the PTA Program 

Physical therapist assistants are integral members of the health care team who work 
in close association with physical therapists to implement and carry out each patient's 
individualized plan of treatment throughout the continuum of care, from onset of 
dysfunction to ultimate discharge. 

To be maximally effective in this capacity, the physical therapist assistant must have 
an educational foundation rooted in both the liberal arts and the sciences. In the liberal 
arts, the student discovers the person and service-oriented aspects of health care, 
including: 

• an understanding of human beings, their inherent dignity and their diverse 
cultures and ethnicity; 

• an ethical value basis for decision making; 

• an appreciation for the holistic nature of health that encompasses body, mind, 
spirit, and emotion; 

• a respect for the role of compassion and communication in health and healing. 

From the sciences, the student develops an understanding of the functions, systems 
and processes that comprise the human body. Students investigate the physical, mental 
and emotional effects of health and wellness, rehabilitation and prevention, illness, 
disease and dysfunction. This knowledge is integrated into each student's foundation 
for learning the professional component of the program. 

The educational, technical and professional aspects of the physical therapist assistant 
program provide the student with learning experiences designed to weave the academic 
and clinical components of learning into an integrated cohesive whole, representative 
of the current state of practice spanning the continuum of care and age span. The 
curriculum is hierarchical in nature, progressing from simple concepts and principles 
to the understanding of complex ideas. It builds on a firm foundation and understanding 
of normal structure and function before proceeding to pathology and dysfunction. The 
problem solving approach to practice is facilitated by providing appropriate clinical 
experiences during each semester. 

Ultimately, students learn to be educators, communicators and competent physical 
therapist assistants through faculty and clinician-based individualized attention; on- 
going opportunities for both directed and independent practical application; opportun- 
ities for experience in a variety of health care settings; and exposure to activities 
available in the professional community. 

General Information 

The Associate in Arts degree and Certificate options for the Physical Therapist Assist- 
ant consist of academic coursework and three 6-week clinical internships during the 
summer following the academic component. 

The educational program focuses on the knowledge and application of biological and 
physical principles/concepts, the development of physical therapy skills, the discovery 
of oneself and one's relationship to the human environment. The student will be pre- 
pared to begin to understand and to respond to the psychological, emotional, physical 
and social needs of patients and their families. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 215 



The program is fully accredited by the American Physical Therapy Association. Upon 
successful completion of the program, the graduate will be eligible to apply for and 
complete the certifying/licensing examination in California and other states. 

Physical Therapist Assistant Program Options 

In order to meet the needs of our student population, as well as the changing health 
care needs of our community and society at large, Mount St. Mary's College has two 
different options for students wishing to pursue a career as a physical therapist as- 
sistant: 

Option I: Associate of Arts Degree/Physical Therapist Assistant Certificate 
Option II: Physical Therapist Assistant Certificate for degree holding applicants. 

Admission Requirements 

Option I: Associate of Arts Degree/ Physical Therapist Assistant 
Certificate 
To apply for Year I, students selecting this option must: 

• complete the college Admissions Application; 

• meet the general admission requirements of the College; 

• show transcript evidence of having successfully completed one year of high 
school biology with a laboratory and one year of algebra; 

During Year I, the student is not enrolled in the physical therapist assistant (PTA) 
program. Students attending Mount St. Mary's College (MSMC) must complete the 
first semester of course work with a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average 
(GPA). MSMC Year I students must also follow the application requirements for Year 
II. Students may complete all general education courses scheduled for Year I and Year 
II of the PTA Program at another college/university and transfer them to Mount St. 
Mary's College. (See Prerequisite Courses) 

To apply for Year II, students selecting this option must: 

• have a 2.5 cumulative GPA for all college academic coursework; 

• have a 2.0 cumulative GPA for all college science coursework; 

• demonstrate successful completion of at least 1 semester of full-time academic 
study (12 -18 units); 

• successfully complete the anatomy and physiology prerequisites with a min- 
imum grade of C; one course must be completed at the time of application, the 
other completed by the end of the Spring semester in which the student 
applies; (See Prerequisite Courses) 

• complete the PTA Program Application including all supporting documents 
by the deadline; 

• complete exposure to/experience in the field of physical therapy and submit a 
completed Verification Form of the exposure/experience; the exposure must 
be in a physical therapy department and supervised by a licensed physical 
therapist; 100 hours minimum as a volunteer/employee; 50 of the 100 hours 
must be in an inpatient acute setting (i.e. hospital, skilled nursing facility, 
rehabilitation center); 50 hours must be completed by the time of application; 



216 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



• submit two recommendations on the Letter of Recommendation Forms pro- 
vided with the PTA application; one from a physical therapist or physical 
therapist assistant who supervised the applicant in a physical therapy setting 
and can attest to his/her potential in the field of physical therapy, and the 
other from someone who can speak to the applicant's character and ability to 
relate to people/patients or academic ability; 

• for applicants whose first language is other than English, a TOEFL score of 
at least 550. 

Preparatory Program for Option I , AA Degree/Physical Therapist Assistant 
Certificate 

This course of study is designed for students whose previous performance or placement 
testing results indicate the need for additional support in academic preparation and 
skill development. It is also designed for those students who are unable to meet the 
admission requirements for Year I of Option I. The Preparatory Program adds an 
additional year to Option I so that students can take the appropriate coursework to 
establish the foundation necessary for successful participation in the AA degree/PTA 
Certificate option. Successful completion of this preparatory course work with a 2.5 
cumulative GPA would enable the student to transition to the first year of Option I. 

Option II: Physical Therapist Assistant Certificate 

Students selecting this option must: 

• hold an Associate or Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or uni- 
versity; the degree must be completed by the end of the Spring semester in 
which the student applies; 

• have a 2.5 overall GPA for the most recent 30 units of academic college 
coursework; 

• have a 2.0 cumulative GPA for all science coursework 

• demonstrate successful completion of at least 1 semester of full-time aca- 
demic study (12-18 units); 

• successfully complete the anatomy and physiology prerequisites with a min- 
imum grade of C; one course must be completed at the time of application, the 
other completed by the end of the Spring semester in which the student 
applies; (See Prerequisite Courses.) 

• complete the PTA Program Application including all supporting documents 
by the deadline; 

• complete exposure to/experience in the field of physical therapy and submit a 
completed Verification Form of the exposure/experience; the exposure must 
be in a physical therapy department and supervised by a licensed physical 
therapist; 100 hours minimum as a volunteer/employee; 50 of the 100 hours 
must be in an inpatient acute setting (i.e. hospital, skilled nursing facility, 
rehabilitation center); 50 hours must be completed by the time of application; 

• submit two recommendations on the Letter of Recommendation Forms pro- 
vided with the PTA application; one from a physical therapist or physical 
therapist assistant who supervised the applicant in a physical therapy setting 
and can attest to his/her potential in the field of physical therapy, and the 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 217 



other from someone who can speak to the applicant's character and ability to 
relate to people/patients or academic ability; 

for applicants whose first language is other than English, a TOEFL score of 
at least 550. 



Important Information for ALL Applicants: 

Applications for Year II of Option I/AA Degree and for Option H/Certificate must be 
submitted to the college Admissions Office and postmarked by or before February 1st 
of the year of intended enrollment. Applications will be processed only when the ap- 
plication fee is paid and all transcripts, verification form, letters of recommendation 
and TOEFL scores (if applicable) are received. Applications incomplete by the February 
1st deadline will not be considered for admission. MSMC current students and grad- 
uates will be the first applicants reviewed and will be selected first, if they meet all the 
criteria. 

Applicants for admission are considered on the basis of the qualifications of each 
students without regard for race, religion, sex, age, national or state origin. Acceptance 
is determined by the PTA Program Admissions Committee and is contingent upon 
maintenance of the program GPA requirements, verification of degree, completion of 
prerequisites and all other requirements for admission to the program. The PTA Pro- 
gram Admissions Committee retains discretionary authority in the application of all 
the criteria for admission and their decision is final. Applicants will be notified of their 
status no later than May 1st. 

Prerequisite Courses: 

To be acceptable, prerequisite courses must be similar in unit value to those offered by 
Mount St. Mary's College and letter grades of C or higher are required. All prerequisite 
courses must be taken on a graded basis. All required science courses must have 
laboratories. The requirements presented are on the semester system. If the applicant 
has attended an institution which is on the quarter system, it must be recognized that 
three quarter units equals two semester units. All prerequisites must be completed 
by the end of the Spring semester of the year of intended enrollment. 

• All applicants for Year II of Option I and for Option II must show successful 
completion of the following specific courses: 

Human Anatomy: 1 semester (4 units) 

Human Physiology: 1 semester (4 units) 

• Prerequisite science courses must have been taken within the last ten (10) 
years at an accredited college or university in the United States. It is highly 
recommended that the courses be taken within the last five (5) years. 

• Transfer students (tbose not attending MSMC for Year I) applying for 
Year II must show successful completion of the following specific 
courses in order to meet MSMC graduation requirements: 

English Composition: 2 semesters (6 units) 

General Psychology: 1 semester (3 units) 

Philosophy Elective: 1 semester (3 units) 

Religious Studies Elective: 1 semester (3 units) 



218 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Gerontology Elective: 1 semester (3 units) 

(e.g. Sociology of Aging, Psychology in Aging) 
General Elective in Art, Music, Lit., History, Economics or Politics: 1 semester 
(3 units) 

Multicultural Elective: 1 semester (3 units) 
Computer Literacy: (See the Associate Degree Requirements) 

• Transfer applicants into Option I, AA degree will be unable to sit for the PTA 
Examination in California or any other state until they have completed all of 
the college AA degree requirements in addition to the PTA Program require- 
ments. (See the Associate Degree Requirements) 

Recommended (not required) courses for All Options: 

Computer Science/Literacy 
Critical Thinking/Logic 
Ethics/Bioethics 
Developmental Psychology 
Medical Terminology 
Motor Learning/Development 
Speech/Oral Presentation 

Financial Arrangements 

Students are responsible for the financing of their education. Information and assis- 
tance is available and should be directly requested from the Financial Aid Office on 
the Doheny or Chalon Campuses. 

For the cost of tuition please see the Tuition and Expenses section of the catalog. These 
fees do not include books, summer clinical fees, PTA Lab fees, or other school and living 
expenses. 

Physical Therapy Department Policies for Students 

To remain in the program, the student must achieve grades of "C" or higher in all 
physical therapist assistant courses. A grade point average of 2.0 is required in each 
semester's course work for continuation in the program. The letter grade of "D" in one 
course results in suspension from the program until the course is repeated and a letter 
grade of "C" or higher is achieved. One repeat of a course is permitted. Letter grades 
of two or more "D's" or one "F" results in dismissal/disqualification from the program. 

A cumulative average of less than 2.0 in any given semester will result in academic 
probation. Two sequential semesters of academic probation will result in dismissal 
from the program. The student must obtain a 2.0 cumulative GPA by the end of the 
semester immediately following the semester that resulted in probation status in order 
to remain in the program. If a student's performance in a clinical setting is unsatisfac- 
tory or unsafe according to standards of the facility, the college, the accrediting agency, 
or the state, the student may be suspended or disqualified from the program. 

Certain health requirements must be met prior to clinical experience. 

During the clinical phase of the program, students are required to carry malpractice 
and health insurance through the college or other source, and have current CPR cer- 
tification. Clinical education for the PTA Program is provided at a wide variety of 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 219 



locations. Clinical sites for the fall and spring academic semesters are within commut- 
ing distance of the campus. The six week clinical internships in summer are scheduled 
at facilities which may be more distant. Students can expect that a minimum of one of 
the three summer affiliations will be located beyond commuting distance from her/his 
home. 

Information on all policies and procedures may be obtained from the PTA Program 
Director. 

Physical Therapist Assistant Program Health Policies 
for Students 

Physical therapy focuses on prevention and promotion of health. Students admitted to 
and progressing through the PTA Program are strongly encouraged to engage in health 
practices which model those they are teaching to patients. 

Every student admitted to the PTA Program must provide the following health infor- 
mation. Clinical agencies will not accept a student who has not met all of the following 
health requirements: 

1 ) past medical history on which the student attests that physical and emotional 
health allow for full participation in both the clinical and the academic com- 
ponents of the PTA curriculum; 

2) physical examination must be completed by a licensed physician, certified 
nurse practitioner, or physician's assistant. This physical examination is to 
be completed between August 1- 20 and sent to the PTA Program Office by 
August 21 for Fall enrollment. The MSMC health form must be used; 

3) visual screening; 

4) urinalysis; 

5) Complete Blood Count; 

6) PPD or Mantoux for Tuberculosis screening (NOT A TINE), if PPD/Mantoux 
is positive then the student must have a chest x-ray; 

7) demonstrate immunity through serological testing or be immunized for ru- 
bella, rubeola, mumps, hepatitis B; 

8) current immunizations 

a) polio, 

b) tetanus, 

c) diphtheria; 

9) clinical agencies may have requirements other than those above. In these 
instances, students will be instructed to obtain the necessary tests/immuni- 
zations; 

10) if a student's physician would not be able to comply with these health require- 
ments, the physician must submit a written statement to this effect. 

A student with a health condition that may pose considerations for safety (i.e., preg- 
nancy, seizure disorder, diabetes, infectious disease, emotional problems, etc.) must 
immediately notify the Academic Coordinator for Clinical Education so that appropri- 
ate modification of clinical assignments may be made. The PTA Program has the 
responsibility for determining those health issues which may interfere with student 
progress in the clinical area or with successful completion of the clinical components. 



220 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Physical Therapist Assistant Program Curriculum 



Option I: Associate of Arts Degree/ Physical Therapist Assistant Certificate 



Coursework Sequence: For students attending MSMC both years. 



Year I 



Fall 

ENG6A 

BIO 40A 

PSY1 

SPR80 

RST 

PTH42 



Written Comm. and Analytical Reading 

Human Anatomy + Lab 

General Psychology 

Freshman Orientation 

Religious Studies Elec. 

Intro, to PT/Role PTA 



(3) 
(4) 
(3) 
(1) 
(3) 
(2) 







(16) 


Spring 






ENG6B 


Written Comm. and Analytical Reading 


(3) 


BIO 50B 


Human Physiology + Lab 


(4) 


HSP94 


Topics in Aging 


(3) 


PHI 


Philosophy Elective 

(Recommended PHI 10 Critical Thinking) 


(3) 


PTH41 


Functional Procedures 


(3) 



(16) 



Year II 



Fall 




GE 


General Elective 


PTH43 


PT Procedures I 


PTH44 


PT Procedures 11 


PTH49A 


Clinical Pathology 1 


PTH48A 


Communications I 


PTH52A 


Clinical Seminar 1 


Spring 




PTH45 


PT Procedures III 


PTH46 


PT Procedures IV 


PTH50 


PT Procedures V 


PTH49B 


Clinical Pathology II 


PTH48B 


Communications II 


PTH52B 


Clinical Seminar II 



(3) 
(3) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(1.5) 

(14.5) 



(3) 
(4) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(1.5) 



(14.5) 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 221 



Summer 

PTH47A 
PTH47B 
PTH47C 



Clinical Internship 1 (6 weeks) 
Clinical Internship II (6 weeks) 
Clinical Internship III (6 weeks) 



(4) 
(4) 
(4) 



(12) 



Students transferring to MSMC for Year II of Option I will not follow the same sequence. 
Year I will consist of completion of all prerequisite general education courses. Year II 
will follow the coursework sequence listed for Option II. 

Option II: Physical Therapist Assistant Certificate 



Coursework Sequence 



Fall 

PTH41 

PTH42 

PTH43 

PTH44 

PTH48A 

PTH49A 

PTH52A 



Spring 

PTH45 

PTH46 

PTH50 

PTH48B 

PTH49B 

PTH52B 



Summer 

PTH47A 
PTH47B 
PTH47C 



Functional Procedures 
Intro. PT/Role PTA 
PT Procedures I 
PT Procedures II 
Communications I 
Clinical Pathology 1 
Clinical Seminar I 



PT Procedures III 
PT Procedures IV 
PT Procedures V 
Communications II 
Clinical Pathology II 
Clinical Seminar II 



Clinical Internship I (6 weeks) 
Clinical Internship II (6 weeks) 
Clinical Internship III (6 weeks) 



Physical Therapist Assistant 
The AjV. Degree 



(3) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1.5) 

(16.5) 



(3) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(3) 
(1.5) 

(14.5) 



(4) 
(4) 
(4) 



(12) 



General Electives: Option I 

The Associate in Arts general education requirements can be met by taking the follow- 
ing required courses: 



ENG 6AB Written Comm. and Analytical Reading 

BIO 40A Human Anatomy 

BIO 50B Human Physiology 

HSP 94 Topics in Aging 

PSY 1 General Psychology 

SPR 80 Freshman Orientation 



(6) 
(4) 
(4) 
(3) 
(3) 
(1) 



222 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



PHI 

RST 
GE 



Philosophy Elective (3) 

(Recommended PHI 10 Critical Thinking) 
Religious Studies Elective (3) 

General Elective (Art, Music, Literature, History, 
Economics, or Politics) (3) 

(30) 



One course (3 units) within the general studies requirements must be a Multicultural 
course. 



Professional Requirements: Options I, and II 

PTH 41 Functional Procedures (3) 
PTH 42 Introduction to Physical Therapy/ 

Role of the Physical Therapist Assistant (2) 

PTH 43 Physical Therapy Procedures I/Modalities (3) 
PTH 44 Physical Therapy Procedures II/Therapeutic 

Exercise (4) 
PTH 45 Physical Therapy Procedures Ill/Advanced 

Modalities (3) 
PTH 46 Physical Therapy Procedures IV/Neurologic 

Therapeutic Exercise (4) 

PTH 48A Communications I (1) 

PTH48B Communications II (1) 

PTH49A Clinical Pathology I (2) 

PTH49B Clinical Pathology II (3) 

PTH 50 Physical Therapy Procedures V (2) 

PTH52A Clinical Seminar I (1.5) 

PTH52B Clinical Seminar II (1.5) 

PTH 47A Clinical Internship I (4) 

PTH47B Clinical Internship II (4) 

PTH47C Clinical Internship III (4) 

(43) 



PTH 41 Functional Procedures (3) 

Development of skills in the areas of obser- 
vation and measurement, emphasizing 
normal posture and gait, goniometry, gross 
manual muscle testing, kinesiology and 
functional anatomy. 2 hours lecture/3 hours 
lab. Prerequisites: successful completion of 
BIO 40A and PTH 42 Options I and II, ad- 
mission to Option HI. 

PTH 42 Introduction to Physical 

Therapy and the Role of the 
Physical Therapist 
Assistant (2) 

Introduction to physical therapy practice 
and the role of the physical therapist as- 
sistant providing direct patient care. In- 
cludes discussion of health care profes- 
sions, the health care system, ethics, the 
law and documentation. 2 hours lecture. 



Prerequisite: PTA declared major Option I 
and current enrollment in BIO 40A; admis- 
sion to Option II. 

PTH 43 Physical Therapy 

Procedures I/Modalities (3) 

Basic physics principles relating to use of 
heat, cold, light and sound. Basic principles 
and techniques of superficial heat, cryoth- 
erapy, ultrasound, infrared, ultraviolet and 
massage, including physiological/thera- 
peutic effects; indications and contraindi- 
cations. Sections on taking vital signs, po- 
sitioning and draping, infection control and 
chest physical therapy. Procedures are co- 
ordinated with course content in PTH 49A. 
2 hours lecture/3 hours lab. Prerequisite: 
successful completion of BIO 40 A and 50B 
for all Options; successful completion of 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 223 



PTH 41 and 42 for Option I; admission to 
Option II. 

PTH 44 Physical Therapy 

Procedures II/Therapeutic 
Exercise (4) 

Basic therapeutic exercise principles and 
procedures for all age groups. Includes: 
body mechanics, patient mobility and 
transfer techniques, range of motion, pro- 
gressive exercise techniques with and with- 
out the use of equipment, basic gait train- 
ing, and wheelchair management. 
Emphasis on orthopedic, cardiopulmonary 
and general medical conditions in coordi- 
nation with course content in PTH 49A. 2.5 
hours lecture/4 hours lab. Prerequisites: 
successful completion of PTH 41 and 42 for 
Option I; admission to Option II. 

PTH 45 Physical Therapy 

Procedures Hi/Advanced 
Modalities (3) 

Basic principles and techniques of hydroth- 
erapy, traction, intermittent compression 
and electrical currents, including physio- 
logical/therapeutic effects, indications and 
contraindications. Procedures are corre- 
lated with clinical pathology for wounds, 
burns and neuromuscular conditions in co- 
ordination with course content in PTH 49B. 
2 hours lecture/3 hours lab. Prerequisite- 
successful completion of all prior PTA 
courses. 

PTH 46 Physical Therapy 

Procedures IV/Neurologic 
Therapeutic Exercise (4) 

Therapeutic exercise with emphasis on pe- 
diatric and adult neurologic conditions. In- 
cludes: motor control theories, develop- 
ment sequence, facilitation/inhibition 
techniques, and gait observation and train- 
ing with neurologic patients. Environmen- 
tal and equipment issues are addressed. 3 
hours lecture/4 hour lab. Prerequisite: suc- 
cessful completion of all prior PTA courses. 

PTH48A Communications I (1) 

Basic principles of communication with 
others. Patient interviewing skills and ele- 
ments of patient/therapist relationships 
(such as distancing and closeness), cultural 
diversity, sexuality, ethics and values. 2 
hours lab. Prerequisite: successful comple- 
tion of BIO 40A and 50B for all Options; 
successful completion of PTH 41 and 42 for 
Option I; admission to Option II. 



PTH48B Communications II (1) 

Continuation of PTH 48A. Emphasis on 
role of PT/PTA as member of health care 
team. Team communication skills. Profes- 
sional effectiveness training, including as- 
sertiveness, support networks and coping 
skills; 2 hour lab. Prerequisite: successful 
completion of all prior PTA courses. 

PTH49A Clinical Pathology I (2) 

Study of disease process across the age span 
with emphasis on pathology of musculos- 
keletal and cardiopulmonary systems, and 
general medical disease processes. 2 hours 
lecture. Prerequisites: successful comple- 
tion of BIO 40A and 50B for all Options; 
successful completion of PTH 41 and 42 for 
Option I; admission to Option II. 

PTH49B Clinical Pathology n (3) 

Study of disease processes across the age 
span with emphasis on wounds, burns, on- 
cology, aging, and neurological and female 
systems. Includes sections on pharmacol- 
ogy and physical therapy. 3 hours lecture. 
Prerequisite: successful completion of all 
prior PTA courses. 

PTH 50 Physical Therapy 

Procedures V (2) 

This course is divided into 2 modules. The 
first portion of the semester will cover basic 
principles of prosthetics and orthotics; gait 
observation and training with prosthetics/ 
orthotics; treatment of oncologic and fe- 
male diseases/disorders. The second por- 
tion of the semester will cover issues such 
as personnel management, quality assur- 
ance, reimbursement issues, and in-depth 
discussions of ethics and the law as it re- 
lates to physical therapy. 1.5 hours lecture/ 
2 hours lab. Prerequisite: successful comple- 
tion of all prior PTA courses. 

PTH52A Clinical Seminar I (1.5) 

Seminar course which meets once a week 
throughout the semester to discuss appli- 
cation of clinical skills learned in PTH 41, 
42, 43 and 44. Students will also be assigned 
to a clinic for 4 hours a week for 10 weeks 
during the semester to practice clinical 
skills learned in courses noted above under 
the direct guidance and supervision of a 
qualified physical therapist/physical ther- 
apist assistant. 1 hour seminar discussions/ 
4 hours clinic lab. Prerequisites: successful 
completion of BIO 40A and 50B for all Op- 
tions; successful completion of PTH 41 and 
42 for Option I; admission to Option II. 



224 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



PTH52B Clinical Seminar II (1.5) 
Seminar course which meets once a week 
throughout the semester to discuss appli- 
cation of clinical skills learned in PTH 41, 
42, 43, 44, 45, 46 and 50. Student will also 
be assigned to a clinic for 4 hours a week for 
10 weeks during the semester to practice 
clinical skills learned in courses noted 
above under the direct guidance and super- 
vision of a qualified physical therapist/ 
physical therapist assistant. 1 hour semi- 
nar discussions/4 hours clinic lab. Prereq- 
uisite: successful completion of all prior 
PTA courses. 

PTH47A Clinical Internship I (4) 

A 6-week clinical experience during the 
summer following the second semester of 
professional coursework. The affiliation ex- 
perience is under the guidance and super- 
vision of qualified physical therapists/ 
physical therapist assistants. Learning ex- 
periences will provide the student with an 



opportunity to identify and assume her/his 
role on the health care team and to apply 
the holistic approach to patient care. 240 
hours. Prerequisite: successful completion 
of previous PTA courses. 

PTH47B Clinical Internship II (4) 

Continuation of PTH 47 A. A second 6-week 
clinical experience. 240 hours. Prerequi- 
site: successful completion of previous PTA 
courses. 

PTH47C Clinical Internship III (4) 

Continuation of PTH 47A and B. Third 6- 
week clinical experience. 240 hours. Pre- 
requisite: successful completion of previous 
PTA courses. 

PTH 93 Special Studies in Physical 

Therapy (1-3) 

Directed study in a field of special interest 
under the direction of a PTA Program pri- 
mary faculty member. (Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of the Program Director) 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 225 



THE MASTER OF PHYSICAL THERAPY DEGREE 



This post-baccalaureate degree program offers professional education based on a foun- 
dation of liberal arts and sciences. It is a twenty-seven month program of academic 
rigor requiring full time study throughout the curriculum. Concentration on the basic 
and clinical sciences is integrated with physical therapy evaluation and treatment/ 
management principles and procedures. 

The total educational experience of the student involves life long learning and the 
physical therapy curriculum facilitates this attitude throughout the student's acqui- 
sition of knowledge, and development of intellectual skills, cognitive abilities, and 
practice competencies. The program design provides early integration of clinical ex- 
periences that foster maximum development of the student's clinical thought processes, 
and provide opportunities for mastery of the personal and skill-based competencies 
that are requisite for entry level practice. 

The Physical Therapy Department is committed to providing an education that enables 
graduates to be generalist practitioners of the highest quality. The learning environ- 
ment nurtures students to become skilled practitioners, critical thinking problem sol- 
vers, able communicators and adept teachers. Students experience and discover the 
person and service oriented aspects of health care including: 

• an understanding of the holistic nature of health, integrating body, mind, 
spirit and emotion 

• an understanding of human beings and their inherent dignity, and their 
diverse cultures and ethnicity 

• a respect for the role of compassion and communication in health and healing 

• a respect for the role of mutual trust and responsibility in patient relationships 

• an ethical basis for decision making 

As integral members of the health care team, graduates impart their knowledge and 
skills through competent and compassionate patient care, enlightened education, schol- 
arly activity and research, and quality consultation. 

The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy 
Education, the official accrediting body for Physical Therapy Education Programs. 
Upon successful completion of all clinical and academic requirements, the degree of 
Master of Physical Therapy is awarded. Graduates are eligible for licensure in all fifty 
states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. 

Admission Requirements: 

* Cumulative Grade Point Average (for the last 30 units of study) of 3.0 on a 4.0 

scale 

* Science Grade Point Average for all science courses of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale 

* Composite Score of 1000 on the Graduate Record Examination. Minimum of 500 

on both verbal and quantitative components. 

* Knowledge of the profession attained preferably by paid or volunteer clinical ex- 

perience, preferably in the hospital setting 

* Demonstration of satisfactory written and oral communication skill (essay and 

interview) 



226 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



* Completion of all prerequisites by the end of the Spring semester of the year of 

intended enrollment (a maximum of three prerequisites may be outstanding at 
the time of application) 

* For applicants whose first language is other than English, a TOEFL score of at 

least 550. 

* Acceptable recommendations: one from an academician with direct knowledge of 

the applicant's academic ability; one from a physical therapist who can address 
the applicant's clinical potential and communication skills; and one from an 
individual who can address the applicant's problem solving skills 

* Submission of completed application with all official transcripts, recommendation 

forms, Graduate Record Examination results, and the $75.00 application fee, 
enclosed in the same envelope, received by January 15th. 

Prerequisite Coursework 

To be acceptable, prerequisite courses must be similar in unit value to those offered by 
Mount St. Mary's College and letter grades of C or higher are required. All prerequisite 
courses must be taken on a graded basis. All science courses must have laboratories. 
The requirements presented are on the semester system. If the applicant has attended 
an institution which is on the quarter system, it must be recognized that three quarter 
units are equivalent to two semester units. 

Prerequisite science courses must have been taken within the last ten (10) years at an 
accredited college or university in the United States. Introductory courses are not 
accepted for credit toward prerequisite course work. 

All applicants must show evidence of satisfactory completion of the following courses: 

Biology (General) 2 semesters (8 units) 

Upper division Biology (Cell Physiology recommended) (3 units) 

Chemistry: 2 semesters (8 units) 

Communication: 1 semester written (3 units), 1 semester speech (3 units) 

Human Anatomy: 1 semester (4 units) 

Human Physiology: 1 semester (4 units) 

Physics: 2 semesters (8 units) 

Psychology: 3 semesters (9 units): general, developmental, elective 

Statistics: 1 semester (3 units) 

Recommended (not required): 

Computer Science/Literacy 

Critical Thinking 

Ethics 

Gerontology 

Kinesiology 

Motor Learning/Development 

Applications must be submitted directly to the Department of Physical Therapy and 
postmarked by or before January 15th of the year of intended enrollment. Applications 
will be processed only when application fee is paid and all transcripts, GRE scores, and 
letter of recommendation forms are received. Incomplete applications will not be con- 
sidered for admission. MSMC graduates will be the first applicants reviewed and will 
be selected first, if they meet all the criteria. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 227 



The Physical Therapy Admissions Committee retains discretionary authority in the 
application of all the criteria for admission and their decision is final. Applicants will 
be notified of their status no later than May 1st. 

Applicants for admission are considered on the basis of the qualifications of each 
student without regard for race, religion, sex, age, national or state origin. Individuals 
who have received their baccalaureate degree outside of the United States must have 
their credentials and transcripts evaluated by a recognized credential evaluation 
agency before the application for admission to the MPT degree program will be consid- 
ered. 

The Department of Physical Therapy is located on the Chalon campus at 12001 Chalon 
Road, Los Angeles, CA. 90049. Clinical facilities are utilized throughout California and 
the United States. 

Financial Arrangements 

Students are responsible for the financing of their education. Information and assis- 
tance is available and should be directly requested from the Financial Aid Office on 
the Chalon Campus. 

For the tuition expenses for the MPT program see the tuition expense section at the 
beginning of this catalog. 

Requirements for the Professional Program 

The Master of Physical Therapy program offers the student an entry level professional 
degree. As such, to remain in the program, the student must achieve grades of "C" or 
higher in all physical therapy course work. A grade point average of 2.5 is required in 
each semester for continuation in the program. The letter grade of "C-" in one course 
results in suspension from the program until the course is repeated and a letter grade 
of C or higher is achieved. One repeat of a course is permitted. Letter grades of two or 
more "C-'s" or "D's" or one F results in dismissal/disqualification from the program. 
The student must receive credit (CR) for each clinical affiliation. A student may not be 
advanced to the next component of the curriculum until a grade of CR is attained. More 
than one failed clinical affiliation results in dismissal from the program. 

A cumulative average of less than 2.5 in any given semester will result in academic 
probation. Two sequential semesters of academic probation will result in dismissal 
from the program. In order to remain in the program, the student must obtain a 2.5 
cumulative GPA by the end of the academic semester immediately following the se- 
mester that resulted in probation status. 

If student performance in a clinical setting is deemed unsatisfactory or unsafe according 
to the standards of the facility, the college, the accrediting agency, or the state, the 
student may be suspended or disqualified from the program. 

Before enrollment and at the beginning of the second and third years, students must 
submit written evidence of a chest x-ray, current immunization and a physical exam- 
ination. 

Students are responsible for their own uniforms, housing, and transportation during 
clinical affiliations. During all clinical aspects of the program, students are required 
to carry health insurance and malpractice insurance. 



228 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



MPT Curriculum: Design 

The first semester of the program emphasizes normal structure and function and the 
fundamentals of the profession and health care system. The second semester is devoted 
to musculoskeletal dysfunction, and the next academic semester concentrates on neu- 
rological dysfunction. Incorporated within these second and third academic semesters 
are two weeks of full time clinical practicum, designed to provide students with direct 
experiences of classroom learning, and to foster the development of clinical problem 
solving skills. The second and third academic semesters are each followed by six week 
clinical affiliations that allow the student to experientially incorporate learning and 
skills from the prior semester. During these affiliation semesters, students also have 
unstructured time which may be used to complete research, or to work and gain more 
clinical experience. The final academic semester culminates with an emphasis on car- 
diopulmonary dysfunction, and is followed by a final clinical internship of three months 
duration. In December, two years following initial enrollment, the program culminates 
with a return to the campus for an assessment workshop, their Research Forum, and 
the hooding ceremony. 



MPT Curriculum: Course Descriptions 



PTH201AB Gross Anatomy (5,4) 

The first semester of a two semester course 
devoted to the study of the regional gross 
structure of the human body. The emphasis 
is on the function of the neuromusculoske- 
letal system. Therefore, traditional kine- 
siology and introductory biomechanics are 
studied along with regional gross structure. 
The student is introduced to clinical prob- 
lem identification through discussion of the 
anatomical and biomechanical bases for so- 
matic dysfunction. Cadaver dissection is 
augmented by lecture, discussion, and pa- 
tient problems. Emphasis on Lower ex- 
tremity and trunk. [3 hours lecture, 7 hours 
lab] 

PTH 201B is a continuation of the regional 
gross structure of the human body. Empha- 
sis is on upper extremity, head, and neck. 
[2 hours lecture, 7 hours lab] 

PTH 202 Human Life Sequences (3) 

This course examines normal growth and 
development. All aspects of development 
are considered including, biological, cogni- 
tive, emotional, moral, social, and spiritual. 
The emphasis of the course is across the age 
span from conception to death. [3 hours lec- 
ture] 

PTH 203 Physical Therapy 

Procedures (2) 

Introduction to principles of patient care, 
evaluation and management that uses 
principles of hypothesis generation and 
critical thinking. Specific evaluation skills 



include history taking, observation, pos- 
ture and balance assessment, gait obser- 
vation, manual muscle testing, and goniom- 
etry of the lower extremity, and pain 
assessment. Also included are principles of 
acute care patient management including 
body mechanics, patient positioning and 
draping, bed mobility and transfers and 
gait training and prescription and meas- 
urement of assistive devices. Also includes 
ADA considerations, wheelchair prescrip- 
tion and introduction to motor control. [1 
hour lecture, 3 hours lab] 

PTH 204 Introduction to Physical 

Therapy (1) 

The history and current structure of the 
health care delivery system in the United 
States is presented as well as a brief history 
of the physical therapy profession, and the 
American Physical Therapy Association. 
Roles of the physical therapists and the as- 
sistant are discussed, as well as supervi- 
sory relationships within ethical and legal 
framework. Current issues facing the 
profession are discussed, including the fu- 
ture of physical therapy. [1 hour lecture] 

PTH 205 Ethics and Law in Physical 
Therapy (2) 

Exploration of ethical and legal considera- 
tions in health care with major focus on 
physical therapy practice. [2 hours lecture] 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 229 



PTH 206 Education Seminar in 

Physical Therapy (2) 

Principles of education applied to clinical 
practice and focused on student experi- 
ences in developing materials and presen- 
tations for patient education, staff devel- 
opment (in-service) and clinical education 
programs. Included are principles of teach- 
ing, and learning, instructional design and 
evaluation. Specific emphasis on documen- 
tation in patient care as preparation of the 
student for future clinical education expe- 
riences. [2 hours lecture] 

PTH 207 

ABCD Interpersonal and 

Interprofessional 

Relationships (.5,.5,.5,.5) 

Interpersonal and interprofessional rela- 
tionships serve as the framework for ex- 
ploring the dynamics of human communi- 
cation. Both the art and science of physical 
therapy are practiced within the context of 
the environment created through commu- 
nication. This laboratory/workshop course 
occurs in four segments over the four aca- 
demic semesters and is an experiential op- 
portunity for the student to develop, prac- 
tice and apply techniques and principles of 
all phases of effective communication. [2 
hours lab] 

PTH210A Pathology and Medical 

Science Orthopaedics (2) 

Study of the general principles of cellular 
and tissue pathology and the inflammation 
process. Following a general introduction, 
the content of the course focuses on ortho- 
paedic pathologies, blood borne pathogens 
and metabolic diseases. Emphasis is on dis- 
ease entities and disorders commonly en- 
countered by physical therapists. [2 hours 
lecture] 

PTH 10B Pathology and Medical 

Science Neurology (2) 

Study of pathology, diagnosis and prognosis 
of clinical disorders of the peripheral and 
central nervous systems. Emphasis is on 
the sensorimotor sequelae of disease or in- 
jury. The course material is integrated with 
neuroanatomical/neurophysiological con- 
cepts and principles as taught in PTH 221 
(Neuroscience) and PTH 222 and PTH 223 
(Assessment and Management of Neuro- 
logical Dysfunction). [2 hours lecture] 



PTH 210C Pathology and Medical 
Science- 

Cardio pulmonary (1) 

Study of pathology, diagnosis and prognosis 
of general medical conditions, cardiovas- 
cular and pulmonary diseases and courses. 
[1 hour lecture] 

PTH 211 Orthopedic Patient 

Management I (3) 

A lecture/laboratory course in evaluation 
techniques for musculoskeletal dysfunction 
presented by regions of the body. Includes 
assessment procedures and problem solv- 
ing in the evaluation of physiological range 
of motion and strength of the trunk and 
upper extremities, including goniometry 
and manual muscle testing. Also includes 
continued and more in depth assessment 
and problem solving in postural dysfunc- 
tion, ergonomics and work retraining, and 
assessment of joint integrity as well as spe- 
cial diagnostic tests. Principles of therapeu- 
tic exercise and motor control are utilized 
along with the assessment procedures 
learned in order to apply clinical reasoning 
to effectively prescribe therapeutic exercise 
programs. PNF principles and practice for 
the trunk, upper and lower extremities is 
included, as is exercise specific to scoliosis, 
pelvic floor dysfunction and for pregnant 
populations. A continuation of practice in 
gait analysis for the orthopaedic population 
is also included. Establishment of treat- 
ment programs including appropriate doc- 
umentation of all components of therapeu- 
tic intervention is practiced. Course is 
closely integrated with PTH 212 in order to 
provide a thorough and unified approach to 
evaluation and management of orthopedic 
disorders. [1.5 hours lecture, 5 hours lab] 

PTH 212 Orthopedic Patient 

Management U (3) 

A lecture/laboratory course closely inte- 
grated with PTH 211 in order to provide a 
thorough and unified approach to evalua- 
tion and management of orthopaedic dys- 
function. Concepts in clinical reasoning and 
differential diagnosis are developed in de- 
tail, and used as the framework for apply- 
ing principles of subjective and physical ex- 
amination. Students are introduced to 
manual therapy as a form of assessment 
and treatment, and apply concepts learned 
throughout the curriculum in the develop- 
ment of sound management decisions. Dif- 
ferential diagnosis is emphasized and stu- 
dents are instructed in performance of 



230 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



diagnostic and treatment procedures for 
contractile, inert and neural tissue dys- 
function. Establishing functional goals and 
justification for patient management deci- 
sions is emphasized. Course employs exten- 
sive use of case studies in application and 
practice of course content. [2 hours lecture, 
3 hours lab] 

PTH214 Therapeutic Modalities (3) 

A combination of lecture and laboratory de- 
signed to prepare students to safely, legally, 
ethically and appropriately apply heat, 
cold, light, sound, water and mechanical 
traction, mechanical compression, massage 
and soft tissue mobilization in the manage- 
ment of pain and physical dysfunction. Lec- 
ture content and interactive case studies 
are designed to assist the student in apply- 
ing concepts of clinical reasoning, stages of 
tissue healing and pain mechanisms while 
making management decisions in the ap- 
propriate use of these procedures. The 
course also includes an introduction to the 
basic principles of taping and wrapping, 
wound care and dressing, and womens' 
health issues specific to soft tissue mobili- 
zation with lymphedema in the post-mas- 
tectomy patient. [2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
lab] 

PTH215A Research Methods (1) 

Introduction to the philosophy and princi- 
ples of scientific methods of inquiry used in 
research and problem solving. Includes 
identification of problems, construction of 
hypotheses, and initial development of re- 
search question and proposal. 

PTH215B Research Methods (1) 

A directed study in which the student ap- 
plies the principles learned in 215A. This 
independent study course is concerned with 
the research design, methodology and data 
collection components of the research en- 
deavor. 

PTH220A Clinical Affiliation I (5) 

This clinical experience integrates aca- 
demic knowledge and skills developed dur- 
ing the first two semesters of the curricu- 
lum with the development of 
comprehensive clinical skills. Opportuni- 
ties for supervised clinical practice with 
clients having musculoskeletal dysfunction 
are provided. [8 weeks/40 hours per week, 
2 weeks occur within semester II] 



PTH220B Clinical Affiliation II (5) 

This clinical experience further integrates 
academic and clinical knowledge and skills 
developed during the previous semesters 
with the development of comprehensive 
clinical skills. Opportunities for supervised 
clinical practice with clients having ortho- 
paedic and/or neurological dysfunction are 
provided. [8 weeks/40 hours per week, 2 
weeks occur within semester III] 

PTH220C Clinical Affiliation III (8) 

This clinical experience further integrates 
academic and clinical knowledge developed 
during the entire professional program 
with the development of comprehensive 
clinical skills. Opportunities for supervised 
clinical practice and comprehensive patient 
care management in general or specialized 
settings are provided. [12 weeks, 40 hours 
per week] 

PTH220D ClinicalAffiliation-IV 

(Special) (Variable) 

This clinical experience is utilized only to 
repeat a clinical experience (PTH 220A, B, 
or C) in which the student received a grade 
of "No Credit". May be utilized one time 
only. 

PTH 221 Neurosciences (4) 

A lecture course devoted to an in-depth 
study of the structure and function of the 
human nervous system. Normal structure 
and function are discussed as a foundation 
to understanding dysfunction. Topics are 
sequenced so that the student can integrate 
this course content with the content of the 
other semester courses on nervous system 
structure, function, dysfunction, evalua- 
tion and treatment. (PTH 210B, 222, 223) 
[4 hours lecture] 

PTH 222 Assessment of Neurological 
Dysfunction (2) 

Evaluation of neurological dysfunctions in 
relation to the foundations of and mecha- 
nisms for normal human movement. 
Course includes central and peripheral 
nervous system dysfunction. Course is 
closely coordinated with neuroanatomical 
and neurophysiological concepts and prin- 
ciples taught in PTH 221 (Neuroscience) 
and integrated with clinical pathologies of 
the nervous system taught in PTH 210B 
(Pathology II), and with PTH 223 course 
content. [1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab] 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 231 



PTH 223 Applied Movement Science 

(4) 
Observational movement analysis, in con- 
junction with motor control and motor 
learning theory are used in the treatment 
planning and implementation of patient 
care procedures. Course requires students 
to integrate their knowledge of anatomy/ 
biomechanics, interpersonal, manual, and 
clinical reasoning skills learned in the first 
year of the curriculum and apply them to 
the neurologically involved patient popu- 
lation. Course is closely coordinated with 
PTH 221 (Neuroscience), PTH 210B (Pa- 
thology II), and with PTH 222 (Assessment 
of Neurological Dysfunction) [2 hours lec- 
ture, 6 hours lab] 

PTH 224 Electrotherapy (2) 

A lecture/laboratory course devoted to the 
therapeutic effects of electrical current on 
human physiology. Principles and proce- 
dures of electrotherapy and electrodi- 
agnosis are discussed, with an emphasis on 
neuromuscular electrical stimulation and 
transcutaneous electrical nerve stimula- 
tion. [1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab] 

PTH 230 Exercise Physiology (2) 

Muscle, nerve and cardiorespiratory phys- 
iology as these relate to exercise perform- 
ance, deconditioning and rehabilitation in 
disorders of the neuromuscular, cardiovas- 
cular, pulmonary, and endocrine systems. 
[2 hours lecture] 

PTH 231 Assessment of 

Cardiopulmonary/General 
Medicine Dysfunction (2) 

Detailed evaluation skills for the physical 
therapist treating the cardiac patient and 
the pulmonary patient and other critically 
ill patients. [1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab] 

PTH 232 Management of 

Cardiopulmonary/General 
Medicine Dysfunction (3) 

Treatment planning and implementation of 
therapeutic procedures for cardiac and pul- 
monary patients and other critically ill pa- 
tients. Includes primary and secondary 
preventive measures and rehabilitation 
concepts. [2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab] 

PTH 233 Management of Physical 

Therapy Services (3) 

An introduction of the management, busi- 
ness and leadership concepts and strate- 
gies utilized in present health care organi- 
zations. The course provides an in-depth 



explanation of current methods for organ- 
izing, designing and delivering high-qual- 
ity, cost-effective healthcare services. Also 
identified are methods by which physical 
therapy practices can relate to their inter- 
nal and external environments while meet- 
ing the healthcare delivery challenges of to- 
day. [3 hours lecture] 

PTH 234 Prosthetics/Orthotics (2) 

Introduction to the principles and uses of 
prosthetics and orthotics, biomechanical 
and kinesiological principles utilized in the 
fitting, construction, and use of these exter- 
nal devices. Gait analysis and training for 
this patient population. [2 hours lecture] 

PTH 235 Assessment and 

Management of Geriatric 
Dysfunction (3) 

A survey of the special needs and concerns 
of the elderly, focusing on physical, psycho- 
logical, and socioeconomic changes. After 
identification of client needs, appropriate 
intervention strategies are identified. [1 
hour lecture, 2 hours lab] 

PTH 236 Assessment and 

Management of Pediatric 
Dysfunction (1.5) 

A lecture/laboratory course to introduce the 
principles of identification, detailed evalu- 
ation and management of the pediatric pa- 
tient. [1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab] 

OPTION: Must Select ONE 

PTH240AB Advanced Physical 
Therapy 
Techniques (3,3) 

A. Orthopedic: A lecture/laboratory class 
designed to assist the student in the appli- 
cation, integration, and expansion of con- 
cepts and skills acquired previously within 
the curriculum. The concepts included 
within the Australian approach to manual 
therapy are integrated with concepts of mo- 
tor control development, functional move- 
ment analysis and therapeutic exercise in 
order to assist the student in development 
of a broad, functionally based approach to 
patient assessment and management. The 
principles of clinical reasoning will be 
strongly emphasized throughout the course 
content, and an extensive use of case stud- 
ies will be included. [2 hours lecture, 4 
hours lab] 

B. Neurological: A lecture/laboratory 
course covering detailed evaluation and 



232 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



management of the neurological patient. 
Building on prior learning, assessment and 
treatment techniques and strategies, doc- 
umentation, and problem solving methods 
are explored and practiced. [2 hours lec- 
ture, 4 hours lab] 

PTH298AB Independent Study (1-4) 
The initiation or continuation of a project 
under departmental faculty direction. 
Work should culminate in a research paper, 



report or successful completion of oral and/ 
or written examinations. 

PTH299AB Directed Research (1,1) 
An independent study course concentrating 
on the data collection component, and the 
writing and finalization of the research en- 
deavor. Hours are arranged between the 
student and the research advisor. 



PHYSICS 233 



Physics 



Departmental Affiliation: Physical Sciences and Mathematics 



PHY1A Introductory Physics IA (4) 

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. 
An algebra-based physics course covering 
statics, dynamics, and an introduction to 
electricity. Prerequisite: Two years of high 
school mathematics and a satisfactory per- 
formance on the Mathematics Placement 
Examination or completion ofMTH 1 with 
a grade ofC- or better. GS-IIID 

PHY IB Introductory Physics IB (3) 

Lecture, three hours. Continuation of PHY 
IA: electricity, magnetism, optics, and an 
introduction to modern physics. Prerequi- 
site: C- or better in PHY IA. 

PHY1BL Introductory Physics 

Laboratory (1) 

Experiments in mechanics, electric fields, 
circuits, optics, radioactivity. Emphasis is 
placed on quantitative analysis of data. Pre- 
requisite: Grade of C- or better in PHY IA 
(or PHY 11 A) and concurrent enrollment in 



PHY IB (or PHY 1 IB) or completion of PHY 
IB (or 11B) with a grade ofC- or better. 

PHY 5 Selected Topics 

in Physics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. 
GS-II,IHD 

PHY11A Mechanics (4) 

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. 
A calculus-based physics course covering 
the statics and dynamics of particles, grav- 
itation, potentials and fields, and fluid me- 
chanics. Prerequisite: A calculus course, 
concurrent enrollment in MTH 3A, or con- 
sent of instructor. 

PHY 1 IB Electricity, Magnetism, 

and Optics (3) 

Lecture, three hours. A calculus-based 
physics course covering electric and mag- 
netic fields, circuit theory, and optics. Pre- 
requisite: PHY 1 IA or consent of instructor. 



234 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Political Science 



Division Affiliation: Social Science 

The student who is majoring in political science investigates political theory, institu- 
tions, international relations, comparative politics, public administration and public 
law as they relate to historical developments and to the political world as it is now. A 
maximum choice is allowed so that the major can be designed according to the dominant 
interests of the student. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in Political 
Science 



Lower Division: 

POL 2 
POLIO 



Comparative Government 
Political Concepts 



(3) 
(3) 



Upper Division: 



Ten upper division courses in political science, 

including POL 101 Research Methodology (30) 



Total units in political science: 36 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
foreign language requirement. 

The Minor in Political Science 

A minimum of six courses in political science including POL 10 and four upper division 
courses approved by the department chairperson. 

To declare a minor in Political Science a student must take at least 5 approved courses 
from Mount St. Mary's College. 



POL 1 American Government and 

Institutions (3) 

An introduction to the principles and prob- 
lems of government, with particular em- 
phasis on the formation and development 
of the national and state administrative, 
legislative, and judicial systems and proc- 
esses. GS-IIIG 

POL 2 Comparative Government (3) 

An investigation of the concepts and tech- 
niques which enable the student to compare 
divergent political systems, focusing upon 
both traditional and innovative concepts 
such as power, ideology, decision making, 



elitism, and the structural-functional ap- 
proach. Particular attention is devoted to 
political systems. See HIS 26. GS-IIIC, 
IIIF,VI 

POL 5 Business Law (3) 

An introduction to the development of legal 
principles for business activity, as found in 
common law, statutory laws, and the Uni- 
form Commercial Code. Use of case studies 
for practical applications. Also see BUS 05. 

POLIO Political Concepts (3) 

The aim of this course is to acquaint stu- 
dents with the scope and techniques of po- 
litical science by relating major concepts in 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 235 



political theory to current problems and is- 
sues. A major emphasis is on the relating 
traditional concepts to the application of 
wisdom and judgment to contemporary po- 
litical problems. GS-IIIF 

POL 93ABCD Selected Problems 
and Projects in 
Political Science (1-3) 

Subject announced in term schedule. May 

be taken for upper division credit. See POL 

193. 

POL 101 Research Methodology 

An examination of modern research and 
writing methods emphasizing needed skills 
in conducting political science research and 
preparing reesearch papers, including 
working with statistical data bases, using 
libraries and archives, and evaluating, cit- 
ing, and presenting evidence. Required for 
political science majors. See HIS 101 

POL 103 Legal Reasoning (3) 

An examination of the methodologies of le- 
gal reasoning. The course studies ration- 
ales and insights to be gained from ap- 
proaching problems with a legal emphasis. 
A major research paper is an important 
component of the class. Required for Pre 
Law Minors. Restricted to juniors and sen- 
iors with a Pre Law Minor. 

POL 105 Advanced Business Law (3) 

Upper level study of business law. Appli- 
cations to areas of agency, partnerships, 
corporate law, sales security transactions, 
and insurance. Also see BUS 106. 

POL 106 Real Estate Law (3) 

Business and legal aspects. Estates in land, 
purchase and sales contract, conveyances, 
mortgage and trust deed transactions, 
property taxes, landlord and tenant, wills 
and inheritance. Prerequisite: BUS 5. Also 
see BUS 171. 

POL 107 Criminal Law (3) 

An examination of the elements of the crim- 
inal law with emphasis on crimes against 
the person as well as crimes against prop- 
erty. The standard defenses will also be con- 
sidered. 

POL 108 American Constitutional 

Law (3) 

See HIS 179. Consent of instructor neces- 
sary for non-majors and non-minors. GS- 
IIIC, IIIG 



POL 109 Individual Rights (3) 

Emphasis on the Bill of Rights as applied 
to both federal and state jurisdictions. Also 
includes examination of both substantive 
and procedural due process. See HIS 180. 
GS-IIIC, IIIG 

POL 116 Democracy and Democratic 
Theory (3) 

A critical examination of the major theo- 
rists of democracy in the twentieth century 
and preconditions of democratic govern- 
ment and society; in particular, insights de- 
rived from psychology and sociology are 
utilized. Consent of instructor necessary for 
non-majors and non-minors. 

POL 1 1 7AB History of Political 

Theory (3,3) 

An examination of the major theorists of 
political theory from antiquity to the mid- 
dle of the nineteenth century. Special em- 
phasis will be placed on the writings of such 
seminal figures as Plato, Aristotle, Machia- 
velli, Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau. (See 
HIS 115 AB) GS-IIIC 

POL 119 Concepts in Political 

Theory (3) 

Selected concepts to be dealt with in-depth. 
Specific concepts noted in term schedule. 

POL 125 Foreign Relations of the 

United States (3) 

A survey of the factors entering into the 
formation and the carrying out of American 
foreign policy, with emphasis on twentieth 
century developments and post Cold War 
adjustments. See HIS 178. GS-IIIG 

POL 131 International Relations (3) 

A general survey of the institutions, consid- 
erations, and ideologies involved in the for- 
mation and execution of foreign policy 
within a world context. Special attention is 
placed upon international agencies, includ- 
ing the United Nations. May be taken for 
lower division credit. GS-IIIG 

POL 134 International 

Organization (0-5) 

An examination of the origins, structure, 
and practices of international agencies with 
special attention to the United Nations. 
GS-IB, IIIG 



236 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



POL 135 Selected Problems in 
International 
Organization (3) 

Particular emphasis is placed on the role of 
international organizations and the main- 
tenance of world peace. GS-IB, IIIG 

POL 138 International Law (3) 

The study of the development of interna- 
tional law through the primary sources. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the de- 
velopment of international law under the 
aegis of international organizations. 

POL 152A Advanced Studies in the 
History of Modern 
Japan (3) 

An examination of the rapid transition of 
the feudal Japan of the Shogun to the mod- 
ern technological state. This course will 
probe the events that brought changes in 
government, family, religion, education, in- 
dustry, and foreign relations from 1600 to 
1952. (See HIS 151.) GS-HIC 

POL 152B Advanced Studies in the 
History of Modern 
China (3) 

An emphasis on the development of Modern 
China through a biographical approach. 
Personalities such as the Empress Dowa- 
ger, Sun Yat-sen, Mao Tse Tung, and others 
will provide insights into the evolution of 
the Chinese State. (See HIS 152.) GS-IIIC 

POL 152C Advanced Studies in the 
History of Modern 
India (3) 

See HIS 153 

POL 170 American Party Politics (3) 

The development, organization, and char- 
acter of the American party system. 

POL171/171H Presidents and 

Personality (3) 

An attempt to illuminate and characterize 
the contributions of American presidents to 
American politics by an examination of the 
writings of psycho-historians and others 
emphasizing psychological insights. Con- 
sent of the instructor required for admis- 
sion to the class. 

POL 1 75AB Selected Topics in the 
American Political 
Structure (3,3) 

Specific area will be announced in the term 
schedules. Consent of instructor necessary 
for non-majors and non-minors. GS-IIIG 



POL 176 Public Policy (3) 

This course considers major public issues 
in American national or state politics 
within a framework that emphasizes the 
political and social forces that shape public 
policy. As part of the course, students par- 
ticipate with delegations from other Cali- 
fornia colleges and universities in an inter- 
active conference in the state capitol. 

POL 178 Sacramento Legislative 

Seminar (1) 

An interactive conference with student del- 
egations from other California colleges and 
universities in the state capitol. The Con- 
ference includes presentations and panel 
discussions by legislators, lobbyists, and 
journalists. The course is normally in- 
cluded within POL 176, but may be taken 
separately with the approval of the instruc- 
tor. May not be repeated. 



POL 1 79 California Politics 
See HIS 188. GS-IIIG 



(3) 



POL 180 State and Local 

Government (3) 

A study of state political systems, including 
their administrative and local sub-systems; 
intergovernmental relationships; policy 
outputs. Consent of instructor necessary 
for non-majors and non-minors. GS-IIIG 

POL 185 Public Personnel 

Administration (3) 

The process of formulating and administer- 
ing public personnel policies; concepts and 
principles utilized in selected governmen- 
tal personnel systems. Special emphasis on 
collective bargaining in public employ- 
ment. 

POL 186 Introduction to Public 

Administration (3) 

The executive function in government; 
principles of administrative organization, 
personnel management, financial admin- 
istration, administrative law, and prob- 
lems and trends in government as a career. 

POL 187 Organizational Theory and 
Governmental 
Management (3) 

Organizational structure, human factors in 
organization, dynamics of organizational 
change, internal adaptability to external 
environment; problems, limitations, and 
trends in governmental organization and 
management. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 237 



POL 188 Administrative Law (3) 

Introduction to administrative law and its 
impact on the American political and bu- 
reaucratic landscape. Regulatory agencies, 
procedural due process and their interface 
with vested and individual rights are the 
focal point for discussion on constitutional 
and legal precedents in a case study con- 
text. 

POL 191 Internship in Government 
Service (3) 

Students in the public administration pro- 
gram serve as interns working in govern- 
ment offices in the Los Angeles area. 



POL 192 Plays and Politics (3) 

A study of selected plays from antiquity to 
contemporary times in which the insights 
of the playwright and the conclusions of the 
political scientist are interrelated. A mul- 
tidimensional and interdisciplinary ap- 
proach is utilized. May be taken for lower 
division credit. GS-IIIG,VI 

POL 193ABCD Selected Topics and 
Projects in Political 
Science (3) 

Subject announced in term schedule. May 
be taken for lower division credit. 

POL196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 



238 PRE-HEALTH SCIENCE 



Pre-Health Science Program 

A.A. Degree 

The Pre-Health Science Program is designed for students who wish to pursue studies 
which prepare them for a health related profession. The Pre-Health Science Program 
provides the student with the opportunity to take general studies requirements and 
preparatory courses for programs in Nursing, Physical Therapy, Optometry, Medical 
Technology, or Pre-Med. It also gives the student the opportunity to consider career 
alternatives. Acceptance into the Health Science Programs is dependent on attaining 
the required GPA and fulfilling the specific requirements of each program. Students 
completing the Pre-Health Science requirements receive an Associate in Arts degree. 

Requirements: 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
(2) 



(4) 
(4) 

(3) 

Allied Health Emphasis 

PSY 12 Developmental Psychology (3) 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives (3) 

Plus all the requirements for the A.A. degree. 

Recommendations: 

BIO 3 General Microbiology (4) 

Students must earn a grade of "C-" or better in all required courses. Students interested 
in transferring to a baccalaureate program must earn a 2.0 "C" or better in prerequisite 
courses. Please consult the department listings for specific prerequisites. 

All courses of the Pre-Health Science Program are described in the listings of the 
respective departments. In order to continue in the Pre-Health Science Program, stu- 
dents must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 at the completion of their first academic year. 





First Year 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


BIO 5 


Life Science 


CHE 3 or PHS 1 Foundations of Chemistry/ 




Scientific Concepts 


SPR70 


Careers in Health 


SPE10 


Speech 




Second Year 


BIO 40A/1A 


Human Anatomy or 




Biological Dynamics 


BIO 50B/1B 


Human Physiology or 




Biological Dynamics 


PHI 21 


Moral Values 


or 


or 


RST41 


Intro to Christian Values 


or 


or 


RST49 


Biomedical Issues 



PRE-LAW 239 



Pre-Law Minor 



An undergraduate major in either the social sciences or the humanities is the preferred 
preparation for legal study. The pre law Minor is designed to supplement the study in 
the major program with additional emphases on analytic and expository skills requisite 
to the study of law. Early identification of an interest in law enables the student to 
approach the rigorous demands of both legal study and that of the legal profession more 
efficiently and effectively. It is essential that the student and the Director of the Pre 
Law Minor collaborate in the process of selecting elective courses within the minor that 
will best prepare the individual student. 

The Minor requires a minimum of six upper division courses. All upper division courses 
must be taken at the College. Aside from the necessity of completing Political Science 
103 (Legal Reasoning) all other courses must be approved in advance in advisement 
with the Director or the Pre Law Minor. 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 

(3) 

Three other upper division courses in the social sciences and/or humanities must also 
be approved in advance from a list published by the Director of the Pre Law Minor at 
the beginning of each advisement period. Note that the student may not count more 
than 9 upper division units toward the minor in classes specifically directed toward the 
law (e.g., Business Law, Constitutional Law, etc.) 

Students complete requirements in their majors, general studies requirements, and 
electives totaling 124 semester units. 



The Preschool Teaching Program 

See listing in Education, now titled A.A. Degree in Early Childhood Education. 



Pre-requisites: 




POLIO 


Political Concepts 


PHI 10 


Critical Thinking 


BUS 5 


Business Law 


BUS 15A 


Accounting Principles I 


Requirements: Six 


upper division classes 


POL 103 


Legal Reasoning 


POL 108 


Constitutional Law 




OR 


POL 109 


Individual Rights 


BUS 106 


Business Law 




OR 


BUS 171 


Real Estate Law 



240 PSYCHOLOGY 



Psychology 



Contemporary psychology is an empirical science actively pursuing both basic research 
and applications in school settings, the workplace, and in the treatment of personal 
problems in private life. The curriculum for the psychology major accordingly consists 
of courses critically examining the basic theories, findings, and applications of psycho- 
logical research. Training is geared toward preparing students for later advanced 
studies. In addition to the major, the College offers a minor in psychology, a certificate 
of specialization in counseling individuals with visual impairments, and a master of 
science in counseling psychology, with specializations in Marriage, Family and Child 
Counseling (MFCC) or Human Services Personnel Counseling (HSPC). 

Core Program Requirements for Psychology Majors 

All psychology majors are required to take the following lower 
division core courses. 

PSY 1* Introduction to Psychology (3) 

BIO 5 Life Science (GS-II, HID) (3) 

or another course in biology, anatomy, physiology, 
or chemistry approved by the department chair. 

PHI 10** Critical Thinking (GS-II, VB3) (3) 

or or 

PHI 5** Introduction to Logic (GS-II, VB3) (3) 

PSY 12 Child/Human Development (GS-IIIF) (3) 

PSY 40 Basic Statistical Methods (3) 

PSY 52 Biological Psychology (3) 

PSY 52L Biological Psychology Lab ( 1 ) 

*PSY 1 is a prerequisite to all other psychology 

courses. 
**PHI 05 or PHI 10 are prerequisite to all upper 
division course work. 

Plus 25 upper division psychology course units including: 

PSY 106 Basic Research Methods (3) 

PSY 106L Basic Research Methods Lab (1) 

PSY 132 Personality Theory (3) 

PSY 134 Learning & Memory (3) 

PSY 145 Social Psychology (3) 

PSY 168 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Majors must earn a grade of "C (2.0) or higher in all Upper division 
psychology courses. Grades of "C -" or lower must be repeated. 

TOTAL UNITS IN MAJOR: 44 



Students must also complete general studies requirements and electives for a total of 
124 semester units, including the modern language requirement. At least 15 upper 
division units must be completed in the MSMC Psychology Program. 



PSYCHOLOGY 241 



Requirements for a Minor in Psychology 

A psychology minor requires a minimum of 18 units selected in consultation with the 
Department Chair. At least four upper division courses with a grade of C or better are 
required. Three courses (9 units) must be completed in the MSMC Psychology program. 

Requirements for a Certificate of Specialization in 
Counseling Individuals with Visual Impairments 
(Hilton/Perkins National Program) 

This certificate requires: 60 hours working with visually handicapped persons 

PSY 192/269 Clinical Practicum/Field Experience (3) 

and three (3) of the following courses: 

PSY 1 14/2 14 Psychological Aspects of Chronic Impairments (3) 

PSY 1 15/2 15 Introduction to Visual Handicaps (3) 

PSY 1 16/2 16 Visual Handicaps and the Young Child (3) 
PSY 118/2 18 Intervention for Children with Multiple 

Impairments (3) 

These 12 units must be completed in the MSMC Psychology program. 

Master of Science in Counseling Psychology 

Admission Requirements 

Those applying for the master's degree in counseling psychology should have all of the 
following: 

A bachelors degree or its equivalent from an accredited institution. 

A grade point average of 2.75 for undergraduate work. 

A minimum of 12 upper division units in the Behavioral Sciences (Psychology, 

Anthropology, Sociology or Education). 

Results of the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). 

See other general requirements of the Graduate Division. 

Required Core Courses 

Students must obtain a grade of "B-" or better from the following courses. 

A total of 9 units are required from: 

PSY 200 Research Methods (3) 

PSY 225 Counseling Theories and Procedures (3) 

PSY 295 Masters Thesis (3) 

or 

PSY 296 Masters Project (Oral or Written) (3) 



or 



No Thesis/No Project Option 



242 PSYCHOLOGY 



No Thesis Option: 

Masters candidates may elect the "No Thesis/No Project" option, which provides the 
opportunity for taking additional elective course work in applied theory or technique 
rather than completing a research thesis or project. Candidates in the No Thesis/No 
Project option must complete a minimum of 39 units, chosen in consultation with an 
academic advisor, and an oral integration interview. The oral integration interview is 
not a comprehensive examination. It consists of practical case studies to which the 
candidate responds using applied counseling theory and clinical skills. 

Program Concentrations 

A. Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling (Minimum of 48 units required) 

Candidates seeking the California Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling Li- 
cense must complete coursework in the following twelve content areas: 

1. Human Biological, Psychological and Social Development 

PSY 202* Psychological Foundations of Growth, 

Development, and Learning (3) 

2. Human Sexuality 

PSY 237* Human Sexuality (1) 

3. Psychopathology 

PSY 268* Psychopathology (3) 

4. Cross-Cultural Mores and Values 

PSY 203 Multicultural Counseling (3) 

5. Theories of Marriage, Family, 

and Child Counseling (Minimum 12 units) 

PSY 225* Counseling Theory and Procedure (3) 

PSY 226 Brief Therapies (2) 

PSY 227 Advanced Counseling: Theory and Practice (3) 

PSY 236* Family Therapy (3) 

PSY 241* Marriage and Relationship Counseling (3) 

PSY 274 Psychological Treatment of Children (3) 

PSY 284 Object Relations: Theory and Practice (1) 

PSY 288 Crisis Intervention (3) 

6. Professional Ethics and Law 

PSY 263* Laws and Ethics in Counseling (2) 

7. Human Communication 

PSY 235* Group Dynamics: Theory and Procedures (3) 

8. Research Methods (Minimum 3 units) 

PSY 200 Research Methods (3) 

PSY 295 Masters Thesis (3) 

PSY 296 Masters Project (Oral or Written) (3) 

9. Theories and Applications of Psychological Testing 

PSY 230* Psychological Testing: Theory and Procedure (3) 



PSYCHOLOGY 243 



10. Supervised Practicum (Minimum of 6 units required) 

PSY 269A* Field Experience in Counseling: Diagnosis (3) 

PSY 269B* Field Experience in Counseling: Treatment (3) 

PSY 269C Field Experience in Counseling: Microskills (3) 



11. 



12. 



(3) 



(3) 



Child Abuse and Family Violence 

PSY 239 Child Abuse and Family Violence 

Alcohol and Substance Abuse 

PSY 238* Alcohol and Substance Abuse 

*Required 

B. Human Services and 

Personnel Counseling (Minimum 36 units required) 

Candidates seeking this concentration are working toward an advanced degree in 
counseling in preparation for employment in an agency, corporation, or other 
setting not requiring a specific license or credential. Candidates must complete 
the nine units of core courses plus 27 units of course work chosen in consultation 
with their program advisor. Courses will be chosen to specifically help the candi- 
date work toward career and personal goals. 



PSY 1 Introduction to 

Psychology (3) 

Introduction to the scientific study of men- 
tal processes and behavior. Surveys major 
concepts, findings, and practical applica- 
tions of contemporary psychological re- 
search. Focuses on basic topics addressed 
in such research: the biological basis of be- 
havior, sensation and perception, develop- 
mental processes, learning and memory 
mechanisms, cognition and intelligence, 
motivation and emotions, social relations, 
personality, and psychopathology. Prereq- 
uisite: None, GS-IUF 

PSY 2 Psychology of 

Communication (2-3) 

Explores the principles of language use, 
verbal and nonverbal communication be- 
tween individuals in a variety of interper- 
sonal and group situations. Prerequisite: 
PSY i. GS-IIIF 

PSY 3 Applied Learning (3) 

This course is designed to bridge the gap 
between college study skills and critical 
thinking through the application of learn- 
ing theory. Thinking is presented as central 
to all levels of learning. Students identify 
individual learning styles and apply course 
materials to other course work both in and 
outside of the classroom. Course is heavily 
geared toward applications. Recommended: 
PSYL 



PSY 12 Child/Human 

Development (3) 

Introduction to human development from 
conception to death. Covers major theories 
of psychological growth, interactions be- 
tween heredity and environment, and the 
physical, cognitive, and social domains of 
development in childhood, adolescence, and 
adulthood. Focuses on concepts and issues 
important in prenatal development, cogni- 
tive and social factors in childhood and ad- 
olescence, effective parenting, and personal 
growth through the lifespan. Prerequisite: 
PSY 1 (waived for Liberal Studies majors) 
GS-IIIF 

PSY 14 Adult Development (1) 

A survey of the major psychological theories 
and milestones related to adult develop- 
ment. Includes discussion, reading and ap- 
propriate observation of the developmental 
stages of adolescence, young adulthood, 
middle age and the process of advancing 
age. In combination with a previously com- 
pleted course in child development, this 
course meets the life span human develop- 
ment requirement of the MSMC Depart- 
ment of Nursing. Prerequisite: PSY 12. 

PSY 35 Language and Concept 

Development of the Young 
Child (3) 

Detailed study of language and concept de- 
velopment of the child from birth through 
eight years. Primary factors in cognitive de- 
velopment are stressed, including the basic 
elements of Piaget's developmental theory. 



244 PSYCHOLOGY 



The acquisition and development of lan- 
guage and its role in cognitive development 
are discussed. Methods and materials that 
enhance language and cognitive growth are 
presented, studied, and developed. Stu- 
dents observe and participate in a preschool 
setting. Prerequisite: PSY 12. 

PSY40 Basic Statistical Methods (3) 

Focus on applied descriptive and inferen- 
tial statistical techniques as used in behav- 
ioral science research. Topics covered in- 
clude properties of distributions, measures 
of central tendency, elementary probability 
theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, cor- 
relation, analysis of variance, and nonpar- 
ametric tests of significance. Prerequisites: 
PSY 1 and satisfactory score on the Mathe- 
matics Placement Examination or comple- 
tion of MTH2X. 

PSY 52 Biological Psychology (3) 

Critical survey of the structure and func- 
tion of the nervous system. Topics include 
the neural control of sensory systems, hor- 
monal systems, motor systems, learning, 
memory, emotions, and sleep. Particular 
emphasis is placed on recent advances in 
our knowledge of brain structure, neuro- 
transmitter systems, neural development 
and plasticity, neuropharmacology, neuro- 
pathology, and psychopathology. Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 5, PSY 1. GS-IIIF 

PSY 52L Biological Psychology 

Lab (1) 

Required concurrent laboratory supple- 
ment to PSY 52. The laboratory provides 
the background in neuroanatomy neces- 
sary to understand basic principles of 
neural function. Emphasis is placed on 
learning to recognize gross and microscopic 
structures of the brain within a functional 
perspective. Activities includes dissection 
of the sheep brain, basic principles of light 
microscopy, and microscopic comparison of 
similar gross anatomic structures in the 
brains of amphibians, rodents, carnivores, 
and primates. Prerequisites: BIO 5, PSY 1. 

PSY 99 Independent Study-Special 

Problems (1-3) 

Individual study of a topic in psychology. 
Prerequisites: PSY 1, and consent of in- 
structor. 



PSY 102 Theories and Issues in 

Development (3) 

Critical reading of major developmental 
theories, including Freud, Erikson, Piaget, 
and Kohlberg. Focuses on issues basic to 
understanding the developmental process, 
e.g. interactions between heredity and en- 
vironment, differentiation of stages, and 
ethical issues in research. Evaluation of 
several social issues and their effects on the 
various levels of development. Prerequisite: 
PSY 12 

PSY 106 Basic Research Methods (3) 

Introduction to the scientific method and its 
use in answering questions about psycho- 
logical phenomena. Covers each of the ma- 
jor steps in the research process, including 
formulation of hypotheses, choice of appro- 
priate research designs, empirical testing 
of hypotheses with proper controls and re- 
gard for ethical issues, systematic analysis 
of data, and reporting of results in a scien- 
tific format. Must be taken concurrently 
with PSY 106L. Prerequisite: PSY 40. 

PSY 106L Basic Research Methods 

Lab (1) 

Required laboratory supplement to PSY 
106, which must be taken concurrently. The 
laboratory sessions provide structured 
practice in conducting psychological re- 
search. Working with a partner, each stu- 
dent performs several simple studies on 
topics in different areas of psychology as- 
signed by the instructor. The final labora- 
tory report should demonstrate competence 
in formulating and testing hypotheses, as 
well as in reporting the results and their 
interpretation in the format specified by the 
American Psychological Association. Pre- 
requisite: PSY 40. 

*PSY 110 Gender Issues in 

Psychology (3) 

Exploration of the psychological theories 
and research findings related to gender is- 
sues. Topics to be covered include gender 
role development, gender differences in 
personality, coping, and moral reasoning, 
and the analysis of social issues of gender 
and sexuality in the realms of society, pol- 
itics, ethics, and culture. Prerequisite: 
PSY1. 



PSYCHOLOGY 245 



PSY 1 13 Learning in Children and 
Adolescents Across 
Cultures (3) 

Systematic comparison of learning as it oc- 
curs in children and adolescents across cul- 
tures. Examines how developmental, bio- 
logical and cultural factors influence the 
ability and motivation to learn, and how 
these factors explain the content and organ- 
ization of school curricula. Emphasizes the 
strong interaction between cognitive per- 
formance and the total sociocultural envi- 
ronment in which the child and adolescent 
lives. Prerequisite: PSY 12 GS-VI 

*PSY 1 14 Psychological Aspects of 
Children with Chronic 

Impairments (3) 

This course examines the psychological 
consequences of chronic disabilities and 
diseases for affected individuals and their 
families. Topics include AIDS, Cancer, Alz- 
heimer's Disease, mental disorders, visual 
and other sensory impairments. Prerequi- 
site: PSY 1. 

*PSY 115 Introduction to Visual 

Impairments (3) 

Introduces visual impairments and blind- 
ness, the issues raised by impairments at 
different stages of development, and inter- 
ventions designed to improve orientation, 
mobility, social and coping skills. Prereq- 
uisite: PSY 1. 

*PSY 1 16 Introduction to 

Children with Visual 
Handicaps (3) 

A comprehensive and critical investigation 
into the impact of visual handicapping con- 
ditions on the psychological, physical, mo- 
tor, intellectual, social, emotional and ed- 
ucational growth of the young child. 
Prerequisite: PSY 1. 

*PSY 118 Intervention of Children 
with Multiple 

Impairments (3) 

This course examines the influence of vis- 
ual impairments upon the handicaps and 
disabilities that often identify children as 
needing special education programming in- 
terventions. It surveys the strategies and 
interventions for effective psycho-social, 
behavioral, developmental, and instruc- 
tional integration of "exceptional" children 
into the mainstream of education. Prereq- 
uisite: PSY 1. 



PSY 125 Introduction to 

Counseling (3) 

Survey of the major methods of psycholog- 
ical counseling with emphasis on the un- 
derlying theoretical framework. Included 
will be consideration of both traditional and 
contemporary individual and group meth- 
ods. Demonstrations and limited practical 
experiences will focus on paraprofessional 
applications. Prerequisite: PSY 132. 

♦PSY126 Brief Therapies (2) 

Course provides an overview of various 
models of brief therapies, including cogni- 
tive-behavioral, brief dynamic, and single 
session. The special tasks, goals, and clini- 
cal guidelines with each phase of treatment 
will be described. Prerequisites: PSY 1. 

*PSY128 Adulthood and Aging (3) 

Exploration of psychological factors of the 
process of aging. Focus will be on attitudes, 
values, motivations, and behavior as they 
are influenced by environmental and bio- 
logical changes associated with aging. This 
course is conducted as a seminar and in- 
cludes a fieldwork component; visiting and 
evaluating various care facilities for the 
senior population. Prerequisite: PSY 12. 

*PSY129 Motivation (3) 

Comparison of the range, strengths and 
limitations of the prominent theories ex- 
plaining high and low motivation. Explores 
common motivation problems and their ef- 
fect on the individual and society. Motiva- 
tion treatments are applied to a variety of 
contexts, including education, work, love 
and others. A critical analysis of the current 
applied motivation literature is empha- 
sized. Prerequisite: PSY 145. 

PSY 132 Personality Theory (3) 

Comprehensive study of the structure and 
dynamics of personality according to con- 
temporary research. Prerequisite: PSY 12. 

PSY 134 Learning and Memory 

Processes (3) 

Explores the major forms of learning and 
memory processes common to human and 
non-human animals. Focuses on the most 
basic learning processes, particularly clas- 
sical and instrumental conditioning, but 
also covers spatial and observational learn- 
ing. Examines the essential features of 
memory processes as explained by infor- 
mation processing models. Particular at- 
tention is paid to applications of learning 
and memory theories in solving practical 



246 PSYCHOLOGY 



problems in normal and clinical situations. 
Prerequisite: PSY 1 

PSY 135 Group Dynamics (3) 

Investigation of group processes for individ- 
uals who have already had experience 
working with groups. Emphasizes the con- 
cepts of group facilitation, productivity, 
evaluation, and the application of group 
methods in teaching, counseling, and ad- 
ministrative work. Prerequisite: PSY 2. 

*PSY139 Child Abuse and 

Family Violence (3) 

A theoretical exploration of the causes, na- 
ture, and physical, social and psychological 
impact of the various forms of family vio- 
lence as well as the methods used by coun- 
seling professionals for intervention, re- 
mediation, and prevention. Prerequisite: 
PSY 12 

PSY 144 Psychology of Prejudice (3) 

Exploration of psychological factors in- 
volved in the development and mainte- 
nance of racism, sexism, ageism, and other 
manifestations of prejudice. Focuses on re- 
search of both individual and group behav- 
ior and includes consideration of tech- 
niques for combating prejudice in 
individuals, organizations, and society as a 
whole. Prerequisite: PSY 1. Recommended: 
PSY 145. GS-VI 

PSY 145 Social Psychology (3) 

Surveys the pervasive and invisible social 
forces acting upon individuals. Explores the 
cultural and familial interaction facilitat- 
ing the socialization of people. Provides a 
critical analysis of the known social influ- 
ences promoting or hindering individual 
development. Prerequisite: PSY 1. 

PSY 146 Multicultural Issues in 

Psychology (3) 

Cross-cultural examination of basic human 
behaviors. Explores the evolution of behav- 
iors such as communication, learning, lan- 
guage, and affect from a multi-cultural and 
cultural historical context. Concludes with 
a cross-cultural assessment of psychiatric 
illnesses and treatment. Prerequisite: PSY 
145. 

*PSY148 Industrial/ 

Organizational 
Psychology (3) 

Introduction to the psychological relation- 
ship between individuals and their work 
places, particularly business settings. Fo- 
cuses on the psychology of work and prac- 
tical techniques in personnel selection, 



placement training, job appraisal, produc- 
tivity enhancement, and assessment of con- 
sumer behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 145. 

PSY 151 Divorce and 

Remarriage (3) 

Examination of the short and long term 
consequences of divorce on family mem- 
bers, focusing on exacerbating factors. Em- 
phasis is on the role of psychologists and 
mediators in minimizing these effects. Pre- 
requisites: PSY 12. 

PSY 153 Comparative Animal 

Behavior (3) 

Comparative survey of behaviors displayed 
by non-human animals. Examines species- 
specific behaviors from the perspective of 
their likely evolutionary origins, their na- 
ture and functions as revealed by ethologi- 
cal and laboratory studies, and their long- 
term consequences as suggested by socio- 
biological research. Focuses on behaviors 
by which animals adapt to their physical 
and social environments. Considers finally 
the relevance of animal behavior studies to 
understanding human psychology and hu- 
man ecology. Prerequisites: PSY 106 & 
106L,PSY134. 

PSY 155 Psychological 

Assessment (3) 

Introduction to the field of psychological 
testing, including an examination of his- 
tory, theory, and construction of tests as 
well as a survey of principal individual and 
group tests of intelligence, personality, in- 
terest, and ability currently used in clinical 
and research settings. Special attention 
will be placed on the development of skills 
for evaluating the reliability, validity, and 
ethics of psychological tests and their ap- 
plications. Prerequisite: PSY 40. 

PSY 157 Sensation and 

Perception (3) 

Introduction to the study of sensation and 
perception relative to cognition. Course will 
include an overview of theoretical ap- 
proaches to sensation and perception, in- 
cluding the empiricist, Gestalt, behaviorist, 
Gibsonian, information-processing, and 
computational approaches. Basic percep- 
tual phenomena in the visual, auditory and 
somatosensory systems will be examined in 
addition to an introduction to topics in per- 
ceptual development. Prerequisites: PSY 52 
& 52L, PSY 106 & 106L. 



PSYCHOLOGY 247 



PSY160 Cognitive Psychology (3) 

Surveys our current understanding of how 
the human mind acquires information 
about the environment and how it manip- 
ulates that information in both verbal and 
non-verbal form. Specifically examines the 
cognitive processes involved in selective at- 
tention, perception, memory storage and 
retrieval, representation of knowledge, lan- 
guage comprehension and production, 
thought, and decision making. Stress is 
placed on understanding the relevance of 
cognitive research to practical problems in 
normal and clinical situations. Prerequi- 
sites: PSY 106 & 106L, PSY 134. 

PSY 165 Behavioral 

Psychopharmacology (3) 

Introduction to drug influences on mental 
processes and behavior. Covers the rele- 
vant mechanisms of drug action, basic 
methodological problems in behavioral 
pharmacology, and current views on the 
genesis and remediation of drug addiction. 
Special attention is given to the use of drugs 
in treating disturbances in mental health. 
Prerequisites: PSY 52 & 52L 

*PSY 167 Special Topics in 

Psychology (3) 

Seminar on any one of many topics in the 
field of psychology. Format varies with 
topic and instructors). Prerequisites: PSY 
1 and consent of instructor. 

PSY 168 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Explores mental health concepts, princi- 
ples of psychopathology, and related treat- 
ment techniques. Surveys the various 
forms of abnormal behavior, covering their 
features, potential causes, and most effec- 
tive treatments. Entails analysis of case 
studies using the Diagnostic and Statistical 
Manual of the American Psychiatric Asso- 
ciation (DSM IV). Prerequisite: PSY 1. 

PSY 170 Human 

Neuropsychology (3) 

Exploration of the fundamentals of human 
brain function from an empirical perspec- 
tive. Basic principals of human brain organ- 
ization, neurology, and clinical and neurop- 
sychological assessment precede a survey 
of normal brain function and dysfunction. 
Emphasis is placed on neurological disor- 
ders, disconnection syndromes, learning 
disabilities, psychiatric, motor, and percep- 
tual disorders. Issues regarding human 



brain injury and development are also ex- 
amined within the context of functional re- 
covery and therapeutics. Prerequisites: 
PSY52&52L. 

*PSY 172 Developmental 

Psychopathology (3) 

Examination of childhood psychological 
disorders, including disturbances in sleep, 
eating, toileting, speech, mood, and cogni- 
tive functions, drug use, conduct disorders, 
autism, and pervasive developmental dis- 
orders. Addresses issues in diagnosis and 
treatment. Prerequisites: PSY 12, PSY 168. 

*PSY 182 History and Systems of 

Psychology (3) 

Critical examination of the scientific 
origins of contemporary psychology. Em- 
phasizes historical/conceptual develop- 
ment of ideas leading to modern schools of 
psychology. Original papers by Epicurus, 
Kant, Descartes, Molyneux, Flourens, 
Thorndike, and others will be read. Prereq- 
uisites: PSY 52 & 52L, PSY 134, PSY 168, 
and consent of instructor. 

*PSY 184 Object Relations: 

Theory and Practice ( 1 ) 

An overview of psychological development 
as seen through the human need for con- 
nectedness to others. From an infant's first 
experiences with others through adult- 
hood, the class will explore the development 
of the separate and unique individual, with 
special focus on clinical application of the- 
oretical concepts. Readings include Winni- 
cott, Bowlby, Klein, and Mahler. Also in- 
cludes a historical review and comparative 
analysis of family systems and object rela- 
tions family therapy. Explores the applica- 
tion of object relations theories to marital 
and family therapy. Prerequisites: PSY 125, 
PSY 168 

♦PSY 188 Crisis Intervention (3) 

Survey of crisis intervention theories, as- 
sessment, treatment and research. In- 
cludes legal and ethical issues, suicide, de- 
grees of danger, victims of abuse, grief 
reactions and the family in crisis. Clinical 
case presentation will be used for illustra- 
tion. Prerequisite: PSY 125. 

PSY 190 Workshop (1-3) 

Short course on special topics. May be re- 
peated for credit. Prerequisite: PSY 1, and 
consent of instructor. 



248 PSYCHOLOGY 



PSY192 Clinical Practicum (3) 

Applied work enhancing a student's ability 
to use the principles of psychology in real 
life settings. Field work options include 
areas of school psychology, gerontology, 
mental retardation, emotional disturb- 
ances, learning disabilities, or probation 
work. Course includes weekly seminar ori- 
ented towards integrating experiences with 
theory. Prerequisites: PSY 125, PSY 168. 

PSY194. Advanced Research (3) 

Seminar providing direction and supervi- 
sion for students undertaking original psy- 
chological research. Training is given in 
each step of the research process: in devel- 
oping a proposal, selecting a research de- 
sign, collecting and analyzing data, and re- 
porting the results in publishable form. The 



final product should be suitable for pres- 
entation at student sections of regional and 
professional association meetings. Prereq- 
uisites: PSY 40, PSY 106 & 106L. 

PSY196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Advanced study on a special topic chosen by 
the student. Prerequisites: PSY 40, PSY 
106 & 106L, and Honors Student status. 

PSY 199 Directed Research/ 

Independent Study (1-3) 

Independent exploration of a topic in psy- 
chology supervised by department faculty 
member. Prerequisites: PSY 1 and consent 
of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 



Graduate Course Offerings 



PSY 200 Research Methods (3) 

Introduction to the scientific method and its 
use in answering questions about psycho- 
logical phenomena. Provides instruction in 
critical reading of research articles. Ex- 
plores basic issues and techniques in con- 
ducting research studies, analyzing data, 
and interpreting their significance. Class 
projects provide practice in mastering the 
statistical methods needed to perform ac- 
curate data analysis, culminating in a writ- 
ten thesis proposal. 

PSY 202 Psychological Foundations 
of Growth, Development 
and Learning (3) 

Contemporary psychological theory as ap- 
plied to the life-long process of learning, be- 
havioral change, education, and counsel- 
ing. Advanced reading and exploration of 
life span developmental theories, including 
those of Freud, Piaget, Erikson, Kohlberg, 
Sheehy, Kagan, Kubler-Ross, and others. 

PSY 203 Multicultural 

Counseling (3) 

A systematic study of the cross-cultural 
mores, values, and behaviors that are ac- 
tive in the process of counseling. Both the- 
oretical aspects as well as practical consid- 
erations of counseling with various cultural 
groups will be explored. Prerequisite: PSY 
225. 



*PSY 210 Gender Issues in 

Psychology (3) 

Exploration of the psychological theories 
and research findings related to gender is- 
sues. Topics to be covered include gender 
role development, gender differences in 
personality, coping, and moral reasoning, 
and the analysis of social issues of gender 
and sexuality in the realms of society, pol- 
itics, ethics, and culture. Prerequisite: PSY 
289 or consent of instructor. 

*PSY 214 Psychological Aspects of 
Children with Chronic 

Impairments (3) 

This course examines the psychological 
consequences of chronic disabilities and 
diseases for affected individuals and their 
families. Topics include AIDS, Cancer, Alz- 
heimer's Disease, mental disorders, visual 
and other sensory impairments. 

*PSY215 Introduction to Visual 

Impairments (3) 

Introduces visual impairments and blind- 
ness, the issues raised by impairments at 
different stages of development, and inter- 
ventions designed to improve orientation, 
mobility, social and coping skills. 

*PSY 216 Introduction to Children 

with Visual Handicaps (3) 

A comprehensive and critical investigation 
into the impact of visually handicapping 
conditions on the psychological, physical, 



PSYCHOLOGY 249 



motor, intellectual, social, emotional and 
educational growth of the young child. 

*PSY218 Intervention of Children 
with Multiple 
Impairments (3) 

This course examines the influence of vi- 
sion impairment upon the handicaps and 
disabilities that often identify children as 
needing special education programming in- 
terventions. It surveys the strategies and 
interventions for effective psycho-social, 
behavioral, developmental, and instruc- 
tional integration of "exceptional" children 
into the mainstream of education. 

*PSY 225 Counseling Theory and 

Procedures (3) 

Detailed exploration into the theory and 
methodology involved in the process of mar- 
riage, family, and child counseling. In- 
cludes a survey of the psychoanalytic, 
client-centered, Gestalt, behavioristic, Ra- 
tional Emotive, phenomenological, and hu- 
manistic approaches. 

*PSY226 Brief Therapies (2) 

Course provides an overview of various 
methods of brief therapies, including cog- 
nitive-behavioral, brief dynamic, and sin- 
gle-session. The special tasks, goals, and 
clinical guidelines with each phase of treat- 
ment will be described. Prerequisite: PSY 
225 or consent of instructor. 

PSY 227 Advanced Counseling: 

Theory and Practice (3) 

An in-depth focus on major theoretical ori- 
entations in counseling psychology, includ- 
ing psychodynamics, cognitive-behavioral, 
and client oriented therapy and interven- 
tions. Focus will be on the rationale for psy- 
chotherapeutic techniques. Prerequisite: 
PSY 225 or consent of instructor. 

♦PSY228 Adulthood and Aging (3) 

Exploration of psychological factors in the 
process of aging. Focus will be on attitudes, 
values, motivations and behavior as they 
are influenced by environmental and bio- 
logical changes associated with aging. This 
course is conducted as a seminar and in- 
cludes a fieldwork component; visiting and 
evaluating various care facilities for the 
senior population. Prerequisite: PSY 202. 

*PSY229 Motivation (3) 

Comparison of the range, strengths, and 
limitations of the prominent theories ex- 
plaining high and low motivation. Explores 



common motivation problems and their ef- 
fect on the individual and society. Motiva- 
tion treatments are applied to a variety of 
contexts, including education, work, love 
and others. A critical analysis of the current 
applied motivation literature is empha- 
sized. 

PSY 230 Psychological Testing: 

Theory and Procedure (3) 

Advanced study of the theory, administra 
tion and interpretation of individual and 
group psychological tests of intelligence, 
personality, interest, and achievement. 
Provides thorough coverage of the MMPI, 
WAIS-R, WISC-R, WPPSI, Stanford-Binet, 
and other instruments currently in use in 
psychological and counseling practice. Pre- 
requisite: PSY 200 or consent of instructor. 

PSY 235 Group Dynamics: Theory 

and Procedures (3) 

Investigation of group processes for individ- 
uals who have already had experience 
working with groups. Emphasizes the con- 
cepts of group facilitation, productivity, 
evaluation and the application of group 
methods in teaching, counseling, and ad- 
ministrative work. Prerequisite: PSY 225. 

PSY 236 Family Therapy (3) 

Systematic study of family therapy and 
family system theory. This course will allow 
students the opportunity to explore both 
normal and dysfunctional lifestyles in fam- 
ily environments, and will provide a survey 
of the treatment modes which focus on the 
entire family system. 

PSY 237 Human Sexuality (1) 

This course will approach the topic of hu- 
man sexuality as a comprehensive and in- 
tegrated topic by distributing emphasis 
across different areas, and by viewing sex- 
ual behavior in an evolutionary, historical, 
and cross-cultural perspective. The empha- 
sis will be on its role in therapy. 

PSY 238 Alcohol and Substance 

Abuse (3) 

Exploration of the causes, nature, impact, 
and treatment of alcohol and substance 
abuse. Focuses on methods of intervention 
and remediation used in counseling agen- 
cies. Prerequisite: PSY 225 or consent of in- 
structor. 



250 PSYCHOLOGY 



*PSY 239 Child Abuse and Family 

Violence (3) 

A theoretical exploration of the causes, na- 
ture, and physical, social, and psychological 
impact of the various forms of family vio- 
lence as well as the methods used by coun- 
seling professionals for intervention, re- 
mediation, and prevention. Prerequisite 
PSY200 

PSY 241 Marriage and 

Relationships (3) 

This course provides a systematic exami- 
nation of the different theoretical ap- 
proaches to the treatment of couples and a 
critical analysis of the corresponding em- 
pirical data that supports and refutes these 
theories. 

♦PSY248 Psychology and Dynamics 
of Organizations (3) 

Introduction to the psychological relation- 
ship between individuals and their work- 
places, particularly business settings. Fo- 
cuses on the psychology of work and 
practical techniques in personnel selection, 
placement training, job appraisal, enhanc- 
ing productivity, and assessing consumer 
behavior. 

*PSY 25 1 Divorce and 

Remarriage (3) 

Examination of the short and long term 
consequences of divorce on family mem- 
bers, focusing on exacerbating factors. Em- 
phasis is on the role of psychologists and 
mediators in minimizing these effects. 

PSY 263 Laws and Ethics in 

Counseling (3) 

Review of the current legal considerations 
and ethical issues regarding the delivery of 
counseling services. 

*PSY 267 Special Topics in 

Psychology (3) 

Seminar on any one of many topics in the 
field of psychology. Format varies with 
topic and instructor(s). Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. 

PSY 268 Psychopathology (3) 

Systematic study of the nature and classi- 
fication of mental disorders using the Di- 
agnostic and statistical Manual of the 
American Psychiatric Association (DSM 
IV). 



PSY269A Field Experiences in 

Counseling: Diagnosis (3) 

Practicum relating counseling principles to 
a variety of situations, with special empha- 
sis on assessment and differential diagno- 
sis. Prerequisite: PSY 268. 

PSY269B Field Experiences in 

Counseling: Treatment (3) 

Practicum relating counseling principles to 
a variety of situations, with special empha- 
sis on short term and long term psycholog- 
ical interventions. Prerequisite: PSY 225. 

PSY269C Field Experiences in 
Counseling: 
Microskills (3) 

Practicum relating counseling principles to 
a variety of situations with special empha- 
sis on the therapists verbal response. 

*PSY272 Developmental 

Psychopathology (3) 

Examination of childhood psychological 
disorders, including disturbances in sleep, 
eating, toileting, speech, mood, and cogni- 
tive functions, drug use, conduct disorders, 
autism, and pervasive developmental dis- 
orders. Addresses issues in diagnosis and 
treatment. Prerequisite: PSY 268. 

PSY 274 Psychological Treatment of 
Children (3) 

This course will examine the efficacy of 
therapeutic techniques commonly used in 
the assessment and treatment of children, 
including art, play and expressive thera- 
pies. The theoretical foundations and prac- 
tical applications of each technique will be 
explored. Prerequisites: PSY 202, PSY 225. 

*PSY 282 History and Systems of 

Psychology (3) 

Critical examination of the scientific 
origins of contemporary psychology. Em- 
phasizes historical/conceptual develop- 
ment in thought leading to modern schools 
of psychology. Original papers by Epicurus, 
Kant, Descartes, Molyneux, Flourens, 
Thorndike, and others will be read. 

*PSY 284 Object Relations: Theory 

and Practice (1-3) 

An overview of psychological development 
as seen through the human need for con- 
nectedness to others. From an infant's first 
experiences with others through adult- 
hood, the class will explore the development 
of the separate and unique individual, with 



PSYCHOLOGY 251 



special focus on clinical application of the- 
oretical concepts. Readings include Winni- 
cott, Bowlby, Klein, and Mahler. Also in- 
cludes a historical review and comparative 
analysis of family systems and object rela- 
tions family therapy. Explores the applica- 
tion of object relations theories to marital 
and family therapy. Prerequisite: PSY225. 

PSY288 Crisis Intervention (1-3) 
Survey of crisis intervention theories, as- 
sessment, treatment and research. In- 
cludes legal and ethical issues, suicide, de- 
grees of danger, victims of abuse, grief 
reactions and the family in crisis. Clinical 
case presentation will be used for illustra- 
tion. 

PSY 289 Advanced Theories in 

Psychology (3) 

Examination of advanced psychological 
theories currently used in clinical settings. 
Concepts commonly used in psychological 



research, psychopathology, neuropsychol- 
ogy, and social psychology will be investi- 
gated and explored. 

PSY 290 Workshop (1-3) 

Experiential class focusing on particular 
area of interest. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

PSY 295 Masters Thesis (3) 

Individual work on masters thesis. Prereq- 
uisite: PSY 200 and approval of Graduate 
Program Director. 

PSY 296 Masters Thesis Project (3) 

Individual work on masters project. Prereq- 
uisite: PSY 200 and approval of Graduate 
Program Director. 

PSY 299 Special Topics (1-3) 

Individual study of problem of interest. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of instructor. May be re- 
peated for credit. 



*Course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduate students must 
obtain instructor's consent before taking this course. See appropriate listing of course de- 
scription for prerequisites. 



252 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



Religious Studies 



The Religious Studies Department considers the study of religion essential to the liberal 
arts because of the Catholic intellectual tradition of the college. The department offers 
both a major and a minor in religious studies. The major and the minor are designed 
to provide to the student background for graduate study in the field or for a career 
related to religious studies. 

The Religious Studies Department offers courses of study leading to both the baccalau- 
reate (B.A.) and masters (M.A.) degrees. All undergraduate courses are divided accord- 
ing to the five areas listed below: 

I. Scripture 

II. Christian Thought 

III. Christian Ethics 

IV. Religion and Religions 
V. Special Offerings 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in Religious 
Studies 

Lower Division: 

RST 15 Introduction to Christian Scriptures (3) 

RST 41 Introduction to Christian Ethics (3) 

RST 21 Introduction to Catholicism (3) 

Upper Division: 

1. Christian Scriptures: (3) 
RST 190S Advanced Studies in Scripture 

2. Christian Thought: (6) 
RST 13 1 Jesus RST 190T Advanced Studies in Christian 

Thought 
3 units in upper division elective 

3. Christian Ethics: (6) 
RST 190E Advanced Studies in Christian Ethics 

3 units in upper division elective 

4. Electives: (3) 

3 units in upper or lower division 

5. Thesis (3) 
RST 199 Senior Thesis 

Total units in Religious Studies: 30 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units including 
modern language requirement. 

Majors must maintain a "C" or better in each of the courses taken in fulfillment of these 
requirements. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 253 



The Minor in Religious Studies 
Requirements: 

1. Christian Scriptures (3) 

2. Christian Thought (3) 

3. Christian Ethics (3) 

Electives: 9 units (at least 6 of which must be upper division) (9) 

Total units in Religious Studies: 18 



I. Scripture 

RST 11 Introduction to Hebrew 

Scriptures (3) 

A study of the methods of modern biblical 
scholarship building on a consideration of 
revelation and inspiration; a consideration 
of selected themes of the Hebrew Scrip- 
tures. GS-VA1 

RST 15 Introduction to Christian 

Scripture (3) 

An introduction to methods of modern bibl- 
ical scholarship; and an examination of the 
four canonical gospels, selected Pauline let- 
ters, and Acts of the Apostles. GS-VA1 

RST 90S Special Studies in 

Christian Scriptures (1-3) 
A study of special topics or texts. Selected 
themes may vary with each offering. May 
be repeated for credit. GS-VAI 

RST 190S Advanced Studies in 

Christian Scriptures (1-3) 
Advanced study of special topics or texts. 
Selected themes may vary with each offer- 
ing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequi- 
sites: Ordinarily all upper division courses 
in Scripture require one (1) lower division 
course in the same area as a prerequisite. A 
waiver of this prerequisite may be granted 
by the instructor. GS-VAI 

II. Christian Thought 

RST 2 1 Introduction to 

Catholicism (3) 

Study of representative beliefs, rites, eth- 
ics, and community structures in the Cath- 
olic tradition of Christianity. Includes dis- 
cussion of some contemporary concerns and 
issues, in light of Vatican Council II. GS- 
VA2 



RST 25/125 Marriage Issues: 

Catholic Perspectives (3) 

Discussion of a variety of contemporary 
areas of concern: the purpose of marriage, 
interfaith marriages, annulment, marital 
sexuality, marriage and career(s), divorce, 
and remarriage. GS-VA2 

RST 70 Faith and Human 

Development (3) 

A study of the phenomenon of religious be- 
lief and the importance of faith for one's 
further development as a person in relation 
to others and to God. GS-VA2 

RST 90T Special Studies in 

Christian Thought (1-3) 

A study of special topics or figures. Selected 
themes may vary with each offering. May 
be repeated for credit. GS-VA2 

RST 131 Jesus (3) 

A brief survey of the historical development 
of the Christian understandings of Jesus as 
the Christ: from biblical traditions to the 
present. Discussion of key aspects of cur- 
rent interpretations of Jesus. GS-VA2 

RST 135 Women and Christianity (3) 

An introduction to the major themes and 
issues which are engaging women theolo- 
gians in the Catholic church and in the 
wider Christian community. The role of 
women in scripture, Christian history, and 
church life will be examined and critiqued. 
GS-VA2 

RST 190T Advanced Studies in 

Christian Thought (1-3) 
Advanced study of special texts, figures or 
topics such as Church, Church history, sac- 
raments, liturgy, Aquinas, Rahner. Se- 
lected themes may vary with each offering. 
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 



254 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



Ordinarily all upper division courses in 
Christian Thought require one (1) lower di- 
vision course from any area of religious 
studies. A waiver of this prerequisite may be 
granted by approval of the instructor. GS- 
VA2 

III. Christian Ethics 

RST 41 Introduction to Christian 

Ethics (3) 

An introduction to the study of moral deci- 
sion-making from the perspective of Chris- 
tian faith. The sources and nature of moral 
obligation, personal and social responsibil- 
ity, freedom and sinfulness are among the 
topics to be covered. GS-VA3 

RST 45/145 Contemporary Issues in 
Christian Ethics (3) 

A consideration of the positions and views 
of Christian ethicists on selected contem- 
porary issues. Topics may vary. Offered as 
needed. GS-VA3 

RST 49/149 Biomedical Issues in 

Christian Ethics (3) 

An introduction to issues and questions 
concerning the phenomenon of human life 
and the process of dying. Topics include 
abortion, reproductive technologies, ge- 
netic engineering, euthanasia. Prerequisite 
for RST 149: RST 21 or RST 41. GS-VA3 

RST 50 Social Issues in Christian 

Ethics (3) 

A examination of the ethical implications of 
selected social issues, such as, poverty and 
hunger, employment policies, immigration, 
racism, violence, war and peace. Topics 
may vary. GS-VA3 

RST 90E Special Studies in 

Christian Ethics (1-3) 

A study of special topics or figures. Selected 
themes may vary with each offering. May 
be repeated for credit. GS-VA3 

RST 190E Advanced Studies in 

Christian Ethics (1-3) 

Advanced study of special figures or topics 
such as war and peace, liberation theology, 
and racism. Selected themes may vary with 
each offering. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites: Ordinarily all upper division 
courses in Christian Ethics require one (1) 
lower division course from any area of reli- 
gious studies. A waiver of these prerequi- 
sites may be granted on approval of the in- 
structor. GS-VA3 



IV. Religion and the 
Religions 

RST 61 Introduction to the World 

Religions (3) 

Introductory survey of religious thought 
and life in the major Western and Eastern 
traditions. Study emphasizes the history of 
each major religion. GS-VA4, VI 

RST 78/178 Death and Afterlife (3) 

Study of the ways Christianity and other 
world religions understand death and af- 
terlife. Emphasis is on religious under- 
standings, ideals, and religious practices. 
Includes a discussion of religious interpre- 
tations of the way death and afterlife affect 
one's vision of life. GS-VA4, VI 

RST 90R Special Studies in 

Religion(s) (1-3) 

A study of special topics, figures, or texts. 
Selected themes may vary with each offer- 
ing. May be repeated for credit. GS-VA4 

RST 190R Advanced Studies in 

Religion(s) (1-3) 

Advanced study of special topics, figures, or 
texts. Selected themes may vary with each 
offering. May be repeated for credit. Prereq- 
uisites: Ordinarily all upper division 
courses in Religion and the Religions re- 
quire one (1) course from any area of reli- 
gious studies. A waiver of a prerequisite may 
be granted on approval of the instructor. 
GS-VA4 



V. Special Offerings 

RST 191 Seminar (3) 

Advanced study and research in any of the 
four major areas of study. Selected themes, 
figures, issues or texts. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisites: A minimum of one (1) 
lower division course from any area of reli- 
gious studies. Permission of instructor is re- 
quired. 

RST 196 Independent Studies (1-3) 

By special pre-approval of instructor and 
chairperson. 

RST 199 Thesis - RST Majors only (3) 

By pre-arrangement with chairperson and 
faculty advisor; available any semester 
during senior year. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 255 



RST199H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

The following courses also are eligible for 
Religious Studies credit: 

PHI 160/RST 190R Philosophy of 

Religion (3) 

SOC 195/RST 190R Sociology of 

Religion (3) 

ENG 125/RST 190T Faith and 

Fiction (3) 



256 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



The Graduate Program in Religious 

Studies 

The Master of Arts Program reflects a commitment to the pursuit of Catholic schol- 
arship within the broader range of ecumenical Christian thought. The degree program 
is built on the belief that the analysis of theological thought can best be carried out 
when there is a critical search for truth in its varied historical dimensions. The Cer- 
tificate Programs are offered to those desirous of advanced study in theology and/or 
preparation for specific areas of ministry. 

The Graduate Program in Religious Studies consists of two tracks: Studies in The- 
ology and Studies in Ministry. 

The Studies in Theology track is designed to promote the integration of a broad 
theological understanding within one's own personal faith stance. Students are chal- 
lenged to consider the interrelation between theory and its application and in that dual 
consideration to see their personal religious goals and belief systems in new ways. 

The Studies in Ministry track provides academic course work that enables students 
to obtain a background in both theology and ministry. Course work culminates in an 
integration seminar that brings together the theological and practical aspects of min- 
istry. 

Because of the structure of the program, the varying goals of students can be realized. 
Those teaching religion, those wishing further study in ministry, those desirous of 
pursuing doctoral studies, and those interested in enrichment are all served. 

The faculty is composed of a core group and visiting professors who provide both 
continuity for the program and theological competence in specific fields of inquiry. 

The Master of Arts Program 

The Master of Arts Program consists of 30 units. A minimum of six units is required 
in each theological area of scripture, Christian ethics, and systematics. The remaining 
units may be taken from any one of these basic areas or from courses in ministry. In 
some cases, a student may elect to complete both the M.A. and a Certificate Program. 
Because of the required number of units within some Certificate Programs, the com- 
pletion of both the M.A. and a certificate may exceed 30 units. In all cases the choice of 
courses is determined with one's adviser(s). 

Courses are offered on the Doheny Campus throughout the academic year with a 
greater number of courses in the summer term. Courses will vary from 1-3 units each. 

During fall and spring terms, a student is able to take as many as six units. The student 
who takes courses only in the summer and elects the maximum number of units could 
finish the program in four years. By taking course work throughout the year, the 
student could complete the M.A. in two and one-half years. 

Admission Requirements 

Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. (Any exception to this policy is subject 
to the approval of the Graduate Council.) 

Evaluation of academic background. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 257 



Interview with the M.A. Program Director. 

Satisfactory completion of other Graduate Division requirements. 

Degree Completion 

The 30 units of course work culminates in either a 4-unit thesis or a 1-unit research 
essay. Both thesis and research essay must meet the standards of the department for 
final approval. Ordinarily, the topic for either paper is chosen from within the selected 
area of concentration. Consultation with the faculty adviser is required before submit- 
ting the proposed topic and registering. 

A written three-hour comprehensive examination on the three basic areas of scripture, 
Christian ethics and systematics, is required at the end of the program. Questions 
related to elective courses in Studies in Ministry may also be included. 

Transfer of Credit 

Ordinarily, a maximum of six units of "B" work may be transferred into the program. 
Such a transfer must be formally petitioned after the successful completion of 3 units 
in residency. The acceptance of transfer credit is subject to the approval of the director 
and the graduate dean. Ordinarily, credits must have been earned within seven years 
before admission to the graduate division of Mount St. Mary's College. 



Certificate Programs 
Advanced Religious Studies 

A Certificate of Advanced Religious Studies is awarded to those students who 
satisfactorily complete 30 units of selected course work in graduate religious studies 
courses. 

Neither comprehensives or a final research paper are required. 

Those intending to pursue courses in the ministry track or one of the other Certificate 
Programs may obtain the Certificate in Advanced Religious Studies by completion of 
an additional number of units in the required areas of systematics, scripture, and 
Christian ethics as determined with an adviser. 

A student in the M.A. Program who decides not to write the final paper or complete 
comprehensives may choose to make application for the Advanced Religious Studies 
certificate. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 must be maintained to remain in the program. 

Admission Requirements 

Bachelor's degree or demonstrated ability for graduate study. 
Evidence of theological background necessary to begin the program. 
Completion of application materials. 
Interview with the M.A. Program Director. 



258 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



Hispanic Pastoral Ministry 

The Certificate Program in Hispanic Pastoral Ministry is an 18 unit program 
which enables the student to reflect critically on the basic theological and pastoral 
questions emerging from ministry in Hispanic settings. A pastoral perspective on the 
Hispanic reality is present in all courses, especially in scripture, systematic theology, 
and Christian ethics. All the courses are offered in Spanish for either graduate or 
undergraduate credit. 

The program, admission requirements, and courses are described in Spanish in the 
last section under Graduate Religious Studies. 

Admission Requirements 

Bachelor's degree and/or written evidence of study in the field of theology. 

Recent participation in diocesan programs of Religious Education or Hispanic Ministry. 

Two letters of recommendation. 

A description of one's philosophy and objectives in relation to Hispanic ministry. 

Familiarity with Encuentros Nacionales Hispanos de Pastoral. 

Interview with the program coordinator. 

Pastoral Care/Counseling 

The Pastoral Care/Counseling Certificate Program is a 21 unit concentration intended 
to assist pastoral ministers in institutional settings such as hospitals, schools, parishes, 
or prisons. The program also prepares students to provide pastoral services to a wide 
range of persons, such as the disabled, the divorced and separated, immigrants, and 
the bereaved. 

The goal of the program is to provide the student with the means to develop empathic 
relationships, to apply professional skills, and to reflect theologically on the care and 
counseling process. 

Courses in this concentration may be applied towards the M.A. in Religious Studies, 
the M.S. in Counseling Psychology, or the Certificate of Advanced Religious Studies. 
In each case, the student will work with an adviser in ascertaining the courses needed 
to complete the degree/certificate goal. 

A Certificate in Pastoral Care is available to those who seek the M.A. in Religious 
Studies. A Certificate in Pastoral Counseling is available to those in the M.S. in Coun- 
seling Psychology Program. 

Admission Requirements 

Bachelor's degree or demonstrated ability to do graduate work. 

Evidence of adequate theological/psychological background depending on certificate 
desired. 

Two recommendations indicating ability to succeed academically. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 259 



Reflective paper on one's philosophical/theological approach to pastoral counseling and 
ministry. 

College transcripts and/or certificates related to one's ministry. 

Interview with the pastoral counseling adviser. 

Youth and Young Adult Ministry 

The Youth Ministry Certificate Program is a two-year training program for youth and 
young adult ministers. The courses and general sessions are offered by contractual 
arrangement with the Center for Youth Ministry Development, Connecticut, on loca- 
tion in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, the dioceses of Northern California, San Ber- 
nardino, and San Diego, under co-sponsorship with the diocesan offices of youth and 
young adult ministry. Upon satisfactory completion of course work leading to 12 total 
units, a certificate from Mount St. Mary's College is awarded. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicants for the Youth and Young Adult Ministry Certificate Program are 
screened and accepted in accordance with the guidelines of both the Diocesan Youth 
Ministry Office and Mount St. Mary's College. A staff member from each diocesan office 
serves as liaison with the Director of the Graduate Programs in Religious Studies and 
acts as academic adviser for students within each particular diocese. 

Continuing Education for 
Pastoral/Catechetical Ministry 

The Graduate Religious Studies Program offers workshops both in English and Spanish 
for the continuing education of those in pastoral or catechetical ministries. 

Most weekend workshops are non-credit. Occasionally, graduate credit or continuing 
education units (C.E.U.) can be earned. Courses and workshops which provide contin- 
uing education in the fields established by the California Bishops Conference are 
granted recertification credit by the Los Angeles Archdiocesan Department of Catholic 
Schools, the Office of Religious Education, and/or the Office of Worship. Verification of 
attendance is provided upon request. 

Conferences such as the Religious Education Congress (Anaheim) are granted Contin- 
uing Education Units (C.E.U.'s) and filed by Mount St. Mary's College with the National 
Registry of training programs of the American Council of Education, Washington, D.C. 

Courses 

200-level courses will vary in units when offered as acyclic courses (outside the regular 
semester schedule) or during the summer session. 200-level courses are not open to 
undergraduates except with special petition. When a 200-level course is offered in 
Spanish, the course number is followed by an "s." 



260 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



Studies in Theology 



Scripture 



RST 201 The Pentateuch and 

Historical Books (3) 

An introduction to the formation of the his- 
torical books of the Old Testament and to 
their historical, cultural, and theological 
background. 

RST 203 The Prophets (3) 

A study of the major prophetic literature in 
relation to the historical, cultural, and the- 
ological background. 

RST 206 Psalm and Wisdom 

Literature (2-3) 

An examination of the psalter and wisdom 
literature and exegesis of representative 
psalms and passages. 

RST 208 Synoptic Gospels (3) 

The theology and background of the syn- 
optic gospels; special problems, purpose, 
and hermeneutics. 

RST 210 Gospels and Letters of 

John (3) 

The Gospel of John: its theology, themes, 
sources, and problematics. Johannine lit- 
erature: the letters of John, their theology, 
questions, themes, and sources. 

RST 211 The Book of Revelation (1-2) 
The historical, literary and theological ap- 
proaches to the Book of Revelation and its 
relation to the other writings of the New 
Testament. 

RST 212 Pauline Literature (3) 

Theology of Paul with special emphasis on 
such themes as eschatology, community, 
justification, Christ, apostleship. 

RST 219/183 Special Studies in 

Scripture (1-3) 

Special studies in Scripture may include 
topics within those courses already listed 
or other topics in Scripture; Scripture in 
relation to Christian ethics, systematics, or 
ministry. This course may be repeated for 
credit. 



Systematics 

RST 220 Foundations of 

Theology (3) 

An examination of the tools used to reflect 
on Christian doctrine such as method, lan- 
guage, symbol. The course focuses on faith, 
its truth, articulation and meaning for to- 
day. 

RST 222 Images of God (3) 

A study of the historical and contemporary 
understanding of God using both biblical 
and traditional sources. Particular atten- 
tion is given to an understanding of Trinity. 

RST 223 Jesus the Christ (3) 

A contemporary Christology based on bibl- 
ical and traditional sources with emphasis 
on the questions related to Jesus and Chris- 
tological thought, method, and application 
to current issues. 

RST 225 Grace and Christian 

Anthropology (3) 

Classical and contemporary approaches to 
the theology of grace; the person in relation 
to God; religious dimensions of being hu- 
man. 

RST 228 The Church (3) 

A contemporary ecclesiology based on the 
biblical and traditional foundations; the 
documents of the Church; authority; mis- 
sion; current issues. 

RST 229/181 Sacramental 

Theology (3) 

An overview of the sacraments; the history, 
development, and current practice of the 
sacraments. 

RST229B The Rite of Christian 

Initiation (1-2) 

A treatment of the history and theology of 
the rite of Christian Initiation with special 
emphasis on the theology of baptism and 
confirmation. This course may be repeated 
when baptism and confirmation are treated 
separately. 

RST229E The Eucharist (2) 

History and theology of the eucharist; spe- 
cial issues include: sacrifice, real presence; 
intercommunion. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 261 



RST229H Ministry and Orders (2) 

A treatment of ministries in the church as 
well as the history and development of or- 
ders. 

RST229M Marriage (2) 

History and development of marriage; is- 
sues related to fidelity, interreligious con- 
cerns, parenting. 

RST 229R Reconciliation and 

Anointing (1-2) 

History, development, and practice related 
to the sacraments of reconciliation and 
anointing. This course may be repeated 
when reconciliation and anointing are 
treated separately. 

RST 230ABC Survey of the History 

of the Church (3,3,3) 

The beginning of the Church to the Middle 
Ages; the Renaissance to Reformation; 
Post-Reformation to the Modern Church. 

RST 232 Ecumenical and Inter-faith 
Relations (1-3) 

Historical overview of the separation of 
churches; the Decrees on Ecumenism and 
Nostra Aetate, and the search for Christian 
unity today. 

RST 236 Christian Spirituality (1-3) 
This course may include one or all of the 
following topics: an examination of the life 
of faith, kinds and methods of prayer, his- 
tory of spirituality; spirituality and minis- 
try. This course may be repeated for credit. 

RST 237 Foundations of Liturgy (3) 

Historical and theological foundations; lit- 
urgy in the Western church; documents re- 
lated to liturgy; liturgy and inculturation. 

RST 239/182 Special Studies in 

Systematics (1-3) 

Special studies in Systematics may include 
topics within those courses already listed 
or other topics in systematics; Systematics 
in relation to Christian ethics, scripture, or 
ministry. This course may be repeated for 
credit. 

Christian Ethics 

RST 242 Fundamental Christian 

Ethics (3) 

A study of the way in which contemporary 
moral theology treats the fundamental ele- 
ments of Christian moral judgment; for- 
mation of conscience; person as moral 
agent; moral norms and natural law. 



RST 243 Christian Social Ethics (3) 

Theological foundations of Christian social 
ethics as found in the Bible, the history of 
Christian ethics, and modern ethicists. 

RST 244 Theology and the Social 

Sciences (3) 

An approach to theology from reflection on 
experience and analysis of its social dimen- 



RST245 Liberation Theology (3) 

An investigation of the theological litera- 
ture concerned with liberation and a dis- 
cussion of problematics involved in social 
change. 

RST 246 Issues of Life and Death (3) 

This course will consider the ethical anal- 
ysis of biomedical issues surrounding the 
value of human life, such as abortion, eu- 
thanasia, cloning, and reproductive tech- 
nology. 

RST 247 Human Sexuality and 

Marriage (3) 

A study of the questions relating to human 
sexuality and marriage as seen from an eth- 
ico-biblical perspective with attention 
given to the insights from psychology and 
theology. 

RST 248 Ethics in a Pastoral 

Context (1-3) 

An overview of basic ethical concepts in- 
volved in Christian living, e.g., conscience, 
freedom, responsibility, sin, in the context 
of personal and social moral issues. Re- 
quired for Pastoral Counseling. May be 
waived if student demonstrates adequate 
preparation in Christian ethics. 

RST 249/180 Special Studies in 

Christian Ethics (1-3) 
Special Studies in Christian Ethics may in- 
clude topics within those already listed or 
other topics in Christian ethics; Christian 
ethics in relation to scripture, systematics, 
or ministry. This course may be repeated 
for credit. 



262 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



Studies in Ministry 



RST 253 Liturgical Year and 

Planning (2) 

History and theology of the liturgical year 
and Christian calendar; multidisciplinary 
approach to liturgical planning of feasts 
and seasons. 

RST 257AB Liturgical Leadership 

Formation (3,3) 

An Archdiocesan course offered to form the 
participant in faith as well as in under- 
standing the liturgical and practical bases 
of liturgy. 

RST 259 Special Studies in 

Liturgy (1-3) 

This course treats selected topics such as 
liturgy and music, art, liturgical prayer, the 
hours, or cultural adaptation. This course 
may be repeated for credit. 

RLM 259 Special Studies in 

Liturgical Music (1-3) 

Special studies related to liturgical music. 
This may include off-campus offerings such 
as the National Pastoral Musicians Confer- 
ence. This course may be repeated for 
credit. 

RST 260 Foundations of Christian 

Leadership* (1-3) 

Foundations of Christian Leadership in- 
vites Christian leaders to look at those prin- 
ciples and priorities that guide their lives. 
Participants develop a personal mission 
statement and strategies for self care, per- 
sonal renewal, leadership development and 
growth in ministry. 

RST 260A Principles of Youth 

Ministry* (1-2) 

Principles of Youth Ministry proposes 
foundational understandings and princi- 
ples for effective ministry youth, grounded 
in pastoral theology, culture psychology, 
developmental theory, and sociology. 

RST 261 Foundations of 

Catechetics (2-3) 

Survey of the historical, theological, philo- 
sophical foundations of contemporary ca- 
techetics. Current issues and practical ap- 
plications; future directions. 



RST262A Fostering the Faith 

Growth of Youth through 
Evangelization 
and Catechesis* (1-2) 

Evangelization and Catechesis explores the 
foundation of nurturing young and older 
adolescent faith development and Catholic 
identity through an integrated approach to 
faith formation, which incorporates teach- 
ing, prayer and liturgy, community life, and 
justice and service to ministry with adoles- 
cents. 

RST 262B Fostering the Faith 

Growth of Youth through 
Prayer and Worship* (1-2) 
Prayer and Worship investigates the foun- 
dational role that Christian worship and 
sacraments have in fostering the spiritual 
growth of youth. The goal is to develop a 
realistic and integrated approach to wor- 
ship within a comprehensive ministry to 
youth and practical application in the par- 
ticipant's pastoral setting. 

RST 262C Fostering the Faith 

Growth of Youth through 
Justice and Service* (1-2) 
Justice and Service explores the founda- 
tions for fostering a justice and service con- 
sciousness and spirituality in youth drawn 
from: Scripture, Catholic Social Teaching, 
adolescent development, and contempo- 
rary catechetical principles. It develops 
skills for creating integrated, action-learn- 
ing models for the justice and service com- 
ponent of a comprehensive youth ministry. 

RST263ABC Advanced Catechetical 
Ministry (2,2,2) 

A three-phase program which prepares 
Archdiocesan catechetical leaders for min- 
istry to adults. The program consists of 
three areas: theological formation, minis- 
try specialization, and supervised practi- 



RST 266 Leadership in Pastoral 

Ministry (1-3) 

The biblical, theological, ethical founda- 
tions for Christian leadership followed by 
practical management theory with estab- 
lished Christian ministerial themes. Some 
themes are women and men as partners in 
ministry, issues of diversity, conflict reso- 
lution. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 263 



RST266A Developing Youth 

Ministry* (1-3) 

Developing Youth Ministry explores pro- 
cesses and skills for effective leadership in 
youth ministry. Leaders will be prepared to 
empower the parish community for minis- 
try with youth through collaboration and 
leadership development. 

RST266B Skills for Christian 

Leadership* (1-3) 

Skills for Christian Leadership addresses 
the theories and skills that ministers need 
to work with and through people. Partici- 
pants will develop a practical, working un- 
derstanding of leadership process and 
skills and the experiential ability to use the 
skills. The course stresses the application 
of leadership skills to various ministry set- 
tings, problems, and issues. 

RST 267 Fostering the Faith Growth 
of Youth Through Pastoral 
Care* (1-3) 

Pastoral Care explores the principles and 
methods of caring for young people from 
various cultures and their families. The 
course develops an understanding of the 
breadth and depth of pastoral care, of fam- 
ily systems and adolescent development, 
and the role that cultural identity plays in 
the development of adolescents. The goal is 
two-fold: (a) it aims to promote healthy ad- 
olescent development from a pastoral care 
perspective and (b) to develop preventative 
interventions for families with adolescents. 

RST 269 Special Studies in 

Ministry (1-3) 

Special Studies in Ministry may include 
other topics in ministry, catechetics, scrip- 
ture, Christian ethics, or systematics. 

RST 271 Survey of Hispanic Culture 
and Religion (3) 

A survey of the roots of the cultural expres- 
sions of faith as found in the Hispanic com- 
munity. This course is especially shaped for 
those in ministry in Hispanic communities. 

RST 273 Perspectives on Hispanic 

Theology (2) 

Theological Reflection on Hispanic issues 
emerging from the process of the Encuen- 
tros in the United States; its relevance to 
the present and future Church experience 
in the Americas. 



RST 279 Special Studies in Hispanic 
Ministry (1-3) 

Special Studies in Hispanic Ministry may 
include topics in ministry, catechetics, lit- 
urgy, spirituality, scripture, Christian eth- 
ics, or systematics. 

RST280A/PSY225 Theories of 
Pastoral 
Counseling I** (3) 

Introductory course which includes an ov- 
erview of theories of counseling and psy- 
chotherapy which influence contemporary 
pastoral care/counseling. Includes psycho- 
analysis, ego psychology, transactional 
analysis, existential therapy, problem-solv- 
ing, crisis intervention and psychosocial 
theories. Considers what is uniquely pas- 
toral in pastoral care/counseling. 

RST280B/PSY236 Theories of 
Pastoral 
Counseling II** 

(3) 
This course examines the study of family 
therapy and family systems theory. Psycho- 
logical and sociological influences on family 
behavior along with a survey of treatment 
models for the family. 

RST 280C Foundations of Pastoral 

Care** (2-3) 

This course focuses on the nature of pas- 
toral care and the pastoral relationship. It 
explores the convergence and distinction 
between pastoral care and counseling. Par- 
ticular pastoral relationships — including 
grief counseling, short term crisis counsel- 
ing, support in faith, and referral — will be 
addressed. 

RST 281 Counseling/Listening 

Skills** (1) 

An introduction to basic counseling skills. 
Tasks will include learning skills of attend- 
ing, active listening, primary-level empa- 
thy and clarification, as well as discovering 
by experience and feedback, personal 
strengths and weaknesses as a counselor. 
A focus of the course will be on both process 
and problem solving. 

RST 282 Introduction to Spiritual 

Direction (1) 

Introduction to spiritual direction; nature 
of spiritual direction; preparation and role 
of the spiritual director. 



264 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



RST 283 Psychology of 

Religion** (3) 

This course will use psychological methods 
of inquiry to examine traditions of belief 
and religious practice. It will explore devel- 
opmental theories of faith, morality, spir- 
ituality and values. Implications for both 
pastoral and clinical practice will be dis- 
cussed. 

RST 284A Issues in Pastoral 
Counseling: 
Sexuality** (1) 

This course explores the nature of healthy 
sexuality and pathological manifestations 
of sexuality as they concern the minister of 
pastoral care and counseling. 

RST 284B/PSY 203 Issues in Pastoral 
Counseling: 
Cross Cultural 
Issues** (1) 

The aim of this course is to explore the pas- 
toral implications of cultural diversity. 
There will be special emphasis on the Afri- 
can American, Hispanic and Asian cultures 
as they affect persons and families from 
these cultural backgrounds living in the 
U.S. 

RST 284C Issues in Pastoral 

Counseling: Dependency 
Disorders** (1) 

This course explores dependency disorders 
with emphasis on chemical dependencies. 
Possible pastoral responses to those af- 
fected by chemical dependency will be dis- 
cussed. 

RST 285 Disorders of Soul and 

Psyche** (1-2) 

This course poses and explores religious 
questions about dysfunctional attitudes 
and behavior which can also be viewed from 
a purely psychological perspective. These 
religious issues include grace and free will; 
guilt and reconciliation; redemption; and 
mystical phenomena. 

RST 286/PSY 269 Clinical Case 

Studies in Pastoral 
Counseling** (3) 

Analysis of current developments and prob- 
lems met in the practice of pastoral coun- 
seling with focus on the psychodynamics 



and critique of the counseling relationship. 
Field experience is adjunctive to this 
course. This course fulfills the require- 
ments of PSY 269. 

RST 287 Psychological/Theological 
Integration Seminar** (1) 

The goal of this seminar is to assist stu- 
dents in integrating their professional ex- 
pertise in relationship to their Christian vo- 
cation as pastoral counselors. The student 
will be asked to write a reflective paper on 
his/her own theological orientation as it af- 
fects his/her own pastoral practice. Field 
experience is adjunctive to this course. 

RST 289 Special Studies in Pastoral 
Counseling** (1-3) 

This course will examine fields and areas 
in pastoral counseling as related to various 
disciplines, problems and ministries, such 
as detention ministry, ministry to/with the 
aging, and women's issues. One or other of 
these courses may be substituted for part 
of Special Issues in Pastoral Counseling. 

Certificate in Youth and Young Adult Min- 
istry Course 

**Certificate in Pastoral Care I Counseling 
Course 



Research 

RST 290 Thesis 

RST 291 Research Essay 



(4) 



(1) 



RST 295/195 Internship (1-3) 

By special pre-arrangement with the pro- 
gram director; available by request in any 
term. 



RST 298 Comprehensives 



(0) 



ST 299 Independent Study (1-3) 

A student may apply for independent study 
with the approval of a faculty adviser and 
the program director. Ordinarily, no more 
than 6 units of independent study may be 
taken towards the M.A. degree. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 265 



Programa para Certificacion en Ministerio Pastoral 
Hispano (Hispanic Pastoral Ministry Program) 

El Programa para Certificacion en Ministerio Pastoral Hispano ha sido disen- 
ado tanto para personas ya comprometidas en el area de la Pastoral Hispana, como 
para aquellas interesadas en profundizar su formation teologico-pastoral. 

Mount St. Mary's College concede el Certificado en Ministerio Pastoral Hispano a 
quienes completan satisfactoriamente las 18 unidades requeridas por el programa 
general. Los topicos del Programa proporcionan los elementos necesarios para ayudar 
a quienes participan a reflexionar criticamente las cuestiones teologicas y pastorales 
que emergen de las exigencias y necesidades de la Pastoral Hispana. La misma estruc- 
tura del Programa, ademas de presentar una vision pastoral de la realidad hispana, 
desarrolla las tres areas basicas de escritura, teologia sistematica y etica cristiana en 
orden a fortalecer la practica pastoral. 

Para quienes no desean certificacion formal, todos los cursos estan abiertos para enri- 
quecimiento teologico-pastoral. Sin embargo, quienes toman cursos independientes y/ 
o para enriquecimiento, recibiran reconocimiento por su participacion en cada curso. 
Las 18 unidades del Plan General de estudios pueden ser completadas en un periodo 
de 18 meses. 

The Certificate Program in Hispanic Ministry is designed for those persons with 
a commitment to Hispanic Pastoral Ministry, as well as for those interested in deep- 
ening their theological pastoral formation. 

Mount St. Mary's College grants the Certificate in Hispanic Pastoral Ministry to those 
who satisfactorily complete 18 required units. The topics are intended to assist partic- 
ipants to reflect critically on the basic theological and pastoral questions which emerge 
from the needs found in Hispanic Pastoral Ministry. Furthermore, the structure of the 
program presents a pastoral vision of the Hispanic reality throughout the three basic 
areas of scripture, systematic theology and Christian ethics to strengthen pastoral 
ministry. 

For those who do not desire formal certification, all courses are open for theological 
pastoral enrichment. Moreover, participants who take individual courses for enrich- 
ment, will receive recognition for their participation in each course. The 18 units of the 
Certificate Program can be completed in a period of 18 months. 

Requisitos de admision: 

1) Bachillerato Certificado de Preparatoria/Secundaria, y/o constancia de estu- 
dios en el campo teologico. 

2) Reciente participacion acreditada en algun programa como: Master Catechist 
Program, Institutos Pastorales para Ministerio Hispano u otro programa re- 
conocido por las Oficinas Diocesanas. 

3) Dos cartas de recomendacion. 

4) Description de filosofia y objetivos en relation al ministerio Hispano. 

5) Familiaridad con los Encuentros Nacionales Hispanos de Pastoral. 

6) Constancias en el campo de ministerio. 

7) Entrevista con quien dirige el Programa. 

Quienes tiendan a la obtencion del Certificado en Ministerio Pastoral His- 
pano, si lo desean, pueden aplicar hacia la obtencion de la Maestria en 



266 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



Estudios Religiosos. Deberan ser cubiertos satisfactoriamente los requisitos de entrada 
y los cursos previamente consultados y seleccionados con la directora del Graduate 
Program in Religious Studies. 



Admission Requirements 

1) Bachelor's degree, certificates of preparation, and/or written evidence of study 
in the field of theology 

2) Recent participation in program such as: Advanced Cathechetical Ministry 
Program, Pastoral Institute for Hispanic Ministry or other program recog- 
nized by Diocesan Offices. 

3) Two letters of recommendation. 

4) A description of the philosophy and objectives in relations to Hispanic min- 
istry. 

5) Familiarity with Encuentros Nacionales Hispanos de Pastoral. 

6) Written verification of work in ministry 

7) Interview with program director. 



Participants who obtain a Certificate in Hispanic Pastoral Ministry, if they desire, may 
apply to the Masters in Religious Studies. After satisfactorily completing the require- 
ments for entrance into the Graduate Division, students will select courses in consul- 
tation with an advisor from the Graduate Program in Religious Studies. 



RST 200S/100S Introduction al 
Antiguo 
Testamento (1-3) 

Aborda los grandes ejes de lectura del An- 
tiguo Testamento, su contexto historico, 
funcion social del texto, lugar asumido por 
autores, y formas literarias. (An overview 
of the main approaches to Old Testament; 
its historical context; social function of the 
text; positions embraced by authors; and 
literary forms.) 

RST 203S/103S Profetas y su 

Mensaje (1-3) 

Estudio de la literatura profetica mas sig- 
nificativa del Antiguo Testamento, su con- 
texto historico, finalidad y dimension poli- 
tica. (A study of the major prophetic 
literature of the Old Testament; historical 
background; purpose and political dimen- 
sions.) 

RST208S/108S Introduction al 
Nuevo 
Testamento (1-3) 

Introduccion a los fundamentos del Nuevo 
Testamento. Se abordaran particular- 
mente los Evangelios Sinopticos, el con- 
texto historico-social de la primitiva iglesia 



v surgimiento de literatura neo-testamen- 
taria. (An introduction to the New Testa- 
ment foundations; Synoptic Gospels; his- 
torical and social context of early Church 
and the rise of New Testament literature.) 

RST 219S/183S Estudios Especiales 

en Escritura (1-3) 

Temas especificos en Escritura, o concen- 
tration en secciones particulares del An- 
tiguo o Nuevo Testamento; la Escritura en 
relation con la etica, teologia sistematica, 
education religiosa o liturgia. (Specific 
themes in Scripture such as particular sec- 
tions of either the Old or New Testament; 
Scripture in relation to ethics, systematics, 
religious education or liturgy.) 

RST 220S/120S Introduccion a la 

Teologia (1-3) 

Aborda la Teologia Sistematica como disci- 
plina que reflexiona la practica de fe su me- 
todo y los discursos teologicos contempora- 
neos. (An overview of Systematic Theology 
as it reflects the practice of faith; its method 
and contemporary theological discourses. 

RST 223AS/123AS Jesus el 

Cristo (1-3) 

Bosquejo introductorio a la perspectiva 
Cristologica actual, cambios en la Cristolo- 
gia hoy, contribuciones de los metodos his- 
torico-criticos del Nuevo Testamento. Se 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 267 



ubicara la situation de Palestina. (An intro- 
ductory survey to Christological perspec- 
tives; changes in Christology; historical- 
critical methods of New Testament; the sit- 
uation of Palestine. 

RST 223BS/123BS Jesus en los 
Evangelios 
Sinopticos (1-3) 
Estudio sistematico de la obra y palabra de 
Jesus en los Evangelios Sinopticos, partic- 
ularmente la comprension del Reinado de 
Dios y la captation de Jesus como el Cristo. 
(Systematic study of Jesus' mission and 
teaching in Synoptic Gospels, particularly 
the understanding of The Reign of God and 
of Jesus as Christ. 

RST 226S/126S Antropologia 

Cristiana (1-3) 

Bosquejo sobre la comprension biblica de la 
Humanidad y su relation con la Tierra, Ex- 
amen critico del paradigma antropologico 
patriarcal. Enfasis en los nuevos modelos 
para una antropologia transformadora. (A 
survey of the biblical understanding of Hu- 
manity and its relationship to the Earth. 
Critical approach to patriarchal anthropol- 
ogical paradigm. Emphasis on new models 
for transformative anthropology.) 

RST 228AS/100AS La Iglesia y su 

Mision 

(Part 1) (1-3) 

Tratamiento teologico sobre la mision de la 
Iglesia; se enfatiza la relation metodold- 
gica: Reino-Mundo-Iglesia y su desarrollo 
en la historia de la Iglesia. (Theological 
treatment on mission of the Church; em- 
phasis on methodological relation of: Reign 
of God-World-Church and its development 
in the history of the Church.) 

RST 228BS/128BS La Iglesia: 

Sacramento del 

Reinado de 

Dios (1-3) 

Se clarificaran aspectos fundamentales de 
la Iglesia hoy: su dimension sacramental, 
sus notas caracteristicas; se enfatizara la 
tarea de la evangelization, los nuevos min- 
isterios y Comunidades Eclesiales de Base. 
(A study to clarify fundamental aspects of 
the Church today: its sacramental dimen- 
sion, its characteristic notes; emphasis on 
the task of evangelization; new ministries 
and Basic Ecclosia Communities. 



RST 235S/135S Espiritualidad 

Cristiana (1-3) 

Nueva comprension de Espiritualidad 
como reto de una practica liberadora; an- 
alisis de impacto de la vida moderna en la 
Espiritualidad y su dimension politica. Las 
contribuciones de la espiritualidad His- 
pana. (New understanding of spirituality as 
a challenge of liberation practice; analysis 
of the modern culture's impact on spiritu- 
ality and its political dimensions. Contri- 
butions of Hispanic Spirituality.) 

RST 239S/183S Estudios Especiales 
en Teologia 
Sistematica (1-3) 

Estudios especiales in Teologia Sistema- 
tica, incluye cursos sobre periodos especi- 
ficos en la historia de la iglesia, Maria, ecu- 
menismo, creation, etc. (Special studies in 
Systematics includes courses such as spe- 
cific periods in the history of the Church, 
Mary, ecumenism, creation, etc.) 

RST 240S/140S Fundamentos de la 

Etica Cristiana (3) 

Bosquejo de las lineas fundamentales de la 
Etica Cristiana en la historia de la Iglesia; 
los elementos basicos para un juicio moral 
de acuerdo a la teologia moral y la option 
cristiana hoy. (A survey of the major devel- 
opments of Christian Ethics; basic ele- 
ments of Christian moral judgment accord- 
ing to moral theology. Fundamental option 
of Christians today.) 

RST243S/143S Etica Social 

Cristiana (1-3) 

Aspectos fundamentales de Etica Social su 
fundamento biblico; la ensenianza social de 
la Iglesia en relation a: economia, politica 
ideologoias, justicia social y practica cris- 
tiana, (Principles of social ethics; biblical 
foundations; social teaching of the Church 
on: economics, politics, ideologies, social 
justice and Christian praxis. 

RST 244S/144S Teologia y Ciencias 

Sociales (1-3) 

Enfoque en la disciplina de las Ciencias So- 
ciales y su correcta articulation con la me- 
diation hermeneutica y la mediation prac- 
tica; enfasis en el analisis dialectico de la 
realidad social. (An approach to the disci- 
pline of the Social Sciences and its proper 
articulation to hermaneutics and praxis; 
emphasis in dialectic analysis of social real- 
ity.) 



268 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 



RST246S/146S EticayVida 

Humana (1-3) 

Estudio sobre aspectos relacionados con el 
valor de la vida humana hoy: contraception, 
aborto, experimentation con el ser humano, 
eutanasia, pastoral de la salud, etc. (A 
study of the questions relating to the value 
of human life: contraception, abortion, hu- 
man experimentation, euthanasia, health 
care, etc.) 

RST 249S/180S Estudios Especiales 

en Etica 

Cristiana (1-3) 

Estudios especiales in Etica Cristiana in- 
cluye aquellos temas concentrados en al- 
guna area especifica de los cursos anotados. 
De igual modo, se refiere a temas particu- 
lares en los campos de la escritura, Teologia 
Sistematica o education religiosa. (Special 
studies in Christian Ethics includes those 
topics which concentrate on a particular 
area within the courses already listed. Or, 
special studies may relate to scripture or 
systematics or religious education.) 

RST271S/171 Religiosidad 

Popular (1-3) 

Examen de la Religiosidad Popular y su Re- 
levancia para el Ministerio Pastoral His- 
pano. Su dimension cultural, antropologica 



y politica, asi como su contribution a la lib- 
eration de los pobres. (An examination of 
Popular Religiosity and its relevance to the 
Hispanic Pastoral Ministry. Its cultural, 
anthropological and political dimensions 
and its contributions to the liberation of the 
poor.) 

RST 273BS/173BS Perspectivas de la 
Teologia y 
Ministerio 
Hispano (1-3) 

Las grandes lineas de inculturacion y lib- 
eration. (Enfasis en los Encuentros) Min- 
isterio Hispano; realidad socio-polftica, 
economica y cultural. Temas relevantes 
como; proceso pastoral, nuevo ministerios, 
inculturacion, liberation, con enfasis en los 
Encuentros. (An overview of Hispanic Min- 
istry; the socio-political, economic and cul- 
tural reality. Major issues surfaced; pas- 
toral process, new ministries, 

RST278S/178S Seminario de 

Integracion (3) 

Consideration de la relation entre practica 
conocimiento-historia y teoria-practica. 
Metodos para planificar la education reli- 
giosa y supervision. (A consideration of the 
relation between practice-knowledge-his- 
tory and practice-theory. Methods for plan- 
ning religious instruction and supervision.) 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 269 



Social Science 



The Social Science major is an expanded area major with a choice of three emphases: 
history, political science, and public administration. 

The variations within the major make it possible for students to direct their studies 
into particular areas of interest. A core of studies is directed toward fiscal problems, 
employment, technology, societal roles, ecology, and the general strategy of govern- 
ment. 

Courses Required for a BA Degree in Social Science 

History Emphasis 

Lower Division: 

HIS1AB Western Civilization (3,3) 

POL 10 Political Concepts (3) 

Upper Division: 

Nine upper division courses including: 



HIS 101 


Research Methodology 
Two-course sequence in American 


(3) 




history 


(6) 




One course in European 






history 


(3) 




One course in non- Western 






history 


(3) 




Three upper division courses in 






economics, political science and/or 






sociology 


(9) 


mendatic 

ECOl 


>ns: 

Microeconomics 


(3) 


ECO 2 


Macroeconomics 


(3) 


HIS 25 


Cultural Geography 


(3) 



Total units in major courses: 36 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
a foreign language requirement 



Political Science Emphasis 



Lower Division: 



POL 2 Comparative Government (3) 

POL 10 Political Concepts (3) 



270 SOCIAL SCIENCE 



Upper Division 



Seven upper division courses in 

Political Science 
Three upper division courses in 

history, economics, or sociology 



(21) 
(9) 



Total units in major courses: 36 



Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
a foreign language requirement. 

Public Administration Emphasis 



Lower Division: 

POL1 
POLIO 



American Government 
Political Concepts 



(3) 
(3) 



Recommendations: 

BUS 16A 
ECOl 
ECO 2 



Accounting Principles I 

Microeconomics 

Macroeconomics 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



Upper Division: 

POL 180 
POL 185 
POL 186 
POL 187 
POL 191 



State and Local Government 
Public Personnel Administration 
Intro to Public Administration 
Organizational Theory 
Internships in Government Service 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



Fifteen Units from the Following Courses: 



MTH9 


Intro to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MTH38 


Elements of Probability and Stats 


(3) 


POL 2 


Comparative Government 


(3) 


POL 108 


Constitutional Law 


- (3) 


POL 109 


Individual Rights 


(3) 


POL 134 


International Organization 


(3) 


POL 138 


International Law 


(3) 


POL 170 


American Party Politics 


(3) 


POL 175A/B 


Selected Topics in the 






American Political Structure 


(3) 


SOC 


Dynamics of Majority/Minority 






Relations 


(3) 


SOC 


Urban Sociology 


(3) 



Total Units in Public Administration emphasis: 36 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 271 



Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 124 semester units, including 
a foreign language requirement. 

All courses listed above are described in the respective departmental listings. 

Leadership Studies Minor 

The Leadership Studies minor is designed to provide students with an in-depth under- 
standing and practice of leadership as it relates to women. 

The study of leadership includes descriptive, functional, and policy components. The 
descriptive component focuses upon "who is the leader" in a variety of contents; this 
component utilizes history, biographies, self-assessment, literary models, and cross- 
cultural studies. The functional/operational component focuses on "how one leads 
more effectively" this component reviews leadership styles and organizational behavior 
while developing specific personal skills in students. The policy component focuses 
upon social change theories and strategies, values of leadership, and specific analysis 
of policies and issues affecting society. Students with a Leadership Studies minor 
arrange a plan of study with the director of the Leadership Program. 

Recommendations and Preparation: 



ENG18 


Studies in World Literature 


(3) 


ENG25 


Myth Making: The Quest for Meaning 


(3) 


ENG54 


Studies in American Literature 


(3) 


HIS5H 


European Leaders and Ideas 


(3) 


HIS 171 


U.S.: Revolutionaries and Constitutionalists 


(3) 


HIS 173 


U.S.: Civil War and Reconstruction 


(3) 


PHI 21 


Moral Values 


(3) 


POL1 


American Government 


(3) 


POL 171H 


Presidents and Personalities 


(3) 


POL 192 


Plays and Politics 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


Requirements: 







A minimum of 19 units taken from the following areas or approved substitutes: 

Leadership Theory and Skill Building: (10 units) 

SSC 16A Introduction to Leadership (1) 

PSY2 Psychology of Communication (2) 

SSC 16B Leadership Skill Building (1) 

SPE 12 Business and Professional Communication (1) 

SSC 100 Leadership Fieldwork (3) 

SSC 125 Leadership Studies Seminar (3) 



272 SOCIAL SCIENCE 



Policy Analysis: (3 units) 

BUS 192 Business Policy (3) 

PHI 170 Social and Political Philosophy (3) 

POL 135 Selected Problems in International Organization (3) 

SOC 112 Contemporary Social Issues (3) 

PTH 162 Administration and Supervision 

of Physical Therapy (3) 

SOC 161 Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations (3) 



Organizational Behavior I Social Change Theory: (6 units) 



BUS 184 

or 
POL 187 



SOC 190 
NUR182 



Organizational Behavior 

Organizational Theory and 

Governmental Management 
Social Change 
Leadership/Management in Nursing 



(3) 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



SSC 16A Leadership Seminar I (1) 

An introduction to the theory and issues of 
leadership, with particular emphasis on the 
application of these principles to women in 
higher education. 

SSC16B Leadership Seminar II (1) 

An investigation of the concepts and issues 
of leadership, with particular emphasis on 
the application of these principles to women 
in higher education. 

SSC 16C Leadership, Women and 

the Workplace (1) 

This seminar will analyze the role of women 
within the American workplace through re- 
view of demographic and labor statistics, 
current legislation, and case studies. Issues 
affecting women working outside of the 
home will be discussed with guest facilita- 
tors from diverse careers. 

SSC16H Self and Innovative 
Society: Honors 
Leadership (1) 

Seminar exploring interconnections among 
self, creativity, and leadership from devel- 
opmental and political perspectives. Team 
work and decision making skills empha- 
sized through a leadership project. 

SSC 100 Leadership Fieldwork (3) 

Experience-oriented course enabling the 
student's observation and application of the 
principles of leadership. Weekly seminar 



includes integrating fieldwork with theo- 
ries and models of community leadership. 
Enrollment with the consent of the Director 
of Women's Leadership Program. 

SSC 116C Advanced Leadership 

Seminar III (1) 

A seminar focusing upon problem solving 
through case studies with professionals in 
business, public service, law, and medicine. 
Particular attention is devoted to practical 
application of leadership skills. 

SSC 125 Leadership Studies 

Seminar (3) 

A critical examination of four themes of 
leadership: the leadership context, strategy 
for change, emerging styles of leadership, 
and future vision/current values of partic- 
ular leaders. A special focus will be on role 
of women as leader and follower within or- 
ganizations and society. 

SSC 190 Leadership Practicum (1-3) 

Experience-oriented course designed to en- 
able the student to apply the principles of 
leadership in real life settings. Course in- 
cludes a weekly seminar oriented towards 
integrating experiences with theory. Sen- 
iors are required to enroll in the practicum 
concurrently with course(s) in manage- 
ment, public administration, organiza- 
tional behavior, and/or group dynamics. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



SOCIOLOGY 273 



Sociology 



Sociology is the study of people as they live and interact with one another within a 
multitude of contexts, from the family, the community and workplace, to the regional, 
national, and global arenas. Sociology seeks to advance understanding of human be- 
havior and the evolution of societies, both historical and modern. 

The major helps students prepare for professional careers in such areas as human 
services, criminology, urban development, family relations, social science research, 
race/ethnic relations, and employment in a wide range of government agencies as well 
as non-profit organizations. See Mount St. Mary's College Sociology Department Web 
Page for additional examples of professional options in the field. Sociology also provides 
an excellent foundation for graduate studies such as in social work, public and urban 
policy, global studies, counseling, and law. 

The department offers an Associate of Arts Degree in Human Services, a general 
program of sociology, and the option of six specializations within Sociology: Criminol- 
ogy, Global Studies, Medical Sociology, Race/Class/Gender, Communications, and So- 
cial Services. The Gerontology Major is also affiliated with the department. 

B.A. Degree in Sociology 

Core Courses Required for a BA Degree in Sociology: 

(3) 

(3) 
(3) 

(3) 

Plus eight additional courses in Sociology (24 units). A maximum of 12 lower division 
units in Sociology may be counted toward completion of the major. These units to count 
towards the bachelors degree cannot, however, include lower division internship units 
(SOC 21, SOC 22, or SOC 23). 

To fulfill a B .A. Degree in Sociology students must complete the Sociology requirements, 
the general studies requirements, and the modern language requirement for a total of 
124 units. A major program of study may consist of general sociology (as outlined above), 
or a specialization program may be selected (outlined below). Each specialization con- 
tains several interdisciplinary courses. These may be applied toward completion of the 
Sociology Major if the specialization is undertaken. 

Total units in Sociology: 36 

Specialization Option One: Criminology 

Excellent preparation for careers in law enforcement, probation, crime prevention, 
forensic research, law studies, rehabilitation, programs for at-risk populations, or ad- 
vanced studies in sociology and criminology. 



SOC 5 


Sociological Perspectives 


SOC 117 


Research Methods and 




Social Statistics 


SOC 166 


Sociological Theory 


SOC 197 


Applied Sociology: 




Internship and Practicum 



274 SOCIOLOGY 



Required Courses: 



SOC 109 Forensic Studies: 

Criminalistics (3) 

SOC 110 Deviant Behavior: 

Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

SOC 111 Deviant Behavior: 

Criminology (3) 

Plus select two of the following: 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 

Specialization Option Two: Global Studies 

Recognizing the rapid globalization of the world's cultures and their social institutions, 
this specialization addresses the fundamental challenges of population growth and 
migration, cultural diffusion, environmental change, quality of life (e.g., health, hous- 
ing, and food availability), political change, and economic development. The implica- 
tions of globalization for the United States is emphasized. 



SOC 161 


Majority-Minority Relations 


SOC 175 


Urban Sociology 


POL 107 


Criminal Law 


POL 109 


Individual Rights 


POL 180 


State and Local Government 


POL 188 


Administrative Law 


PSY 139 


Child Abuse and 




Family Violence 


PSY 168 


Abnormal Psychology 



Required courses: 



SOC 175 
SOC 185 
SOC 195 


Urban Sociology 
Global Development 
Sociology of Religion 


lect two of the following: 


SOC 190 
BIO 167 


Social Change 
Environmental Science 


POL 131 


International Relations 


POL 134 
POL 138 


International Organizations 
International Law 


BUS 195 
HIS 178 


International Marketing 
Diplomatic History of 
the United States 


PHS4 


Elementary Environmental 
Studies 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 

(3) 



Also highly recommended: a semester of study abroad in the junior year. This requires 
coordination with the Department Chair and the Advisement Office. 



SOCIOLOGY 275 



Specialization Option Three: Medical Sociology 

This specialization is recommended for those interested in careers in the human serv- 
ices specifically related to social work and case management in health care resources. 
Possible work settings include hospitals, health management organizations, rehabili- 
tation centers, hospice, and private or government agencies which are involved in the 
dissemination of health and human services. 



Required courses: 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(2) 

Specialization Option Four: Race, Class, and Gender 

This specialization provides a broad and inclusive examination of the complex dynam- 
ics, life trajectory implications, and interactional effects which exist at the intersection 
of race, class, and gender in social life. This is an appropriate specialization for those 
pursuing careers in such areas as race/ethnic relations, immigration, labor relations, 
human resources, or public policy. It also provides good preparation for graduate stud- 
ies in sociology in the areas of race relations, gender studies, and social stratification. 



SOC 112 


Medical Sociology 


SOC 120/ 


Case Management 


GER 120 




SOC 189/ 


Sociology of Aging 


GER 189 




dect two of the following: 


SOC 124 


Sociobiology 


SOC 192/ 


Thanatology Seminar 


GER 192 




SOC 180 


Social Stratification 


BIO 7 


Introduction to the 




Human Body 


BIO 10 


Health Science 


BIO 40A 


Human Anatomy 


or 
BIO 50A 


Human Anatomy 


BIO 112 


Human Nutrition 


RST 49/149 


Biomedical Issues in 




Christian Ethics 


or 
PHI 168B 


Bioethics 


SPA 27 


Spanish for Health 




Professionals 



Required courses: 



SOC 104 The Family (3) 

SOC 161 Majority-Minority Relations (3) 

SOC 180 Social Stratification (3) 



276 SOCIOLOGY 



Plus select two of the following: 

SOC 60 Race/Ethnic Relations (3) 

SOC185 Global Development (3) 

PSY 144 Psychology of Prejudice (3) 

PSY110 Psychology of Women (3) 

PSY 145 Social Psychology (3) 

PSY 146 Multicultural Issues (3) 

POL 109 Individual Rights (3) 

POL 176 Public Policy (3) 

The Leadership Program is also highly recommended as an addition to one's profes- 
sional development program. Involvement in it can enhance career potential. 

Specialization Option Five: Communications 

The swift advances in communications technology and the globalization of economies 
and cultures has created a demand for professionals highly trained in communication 
skills. A specialization in Communications within the Department of Sociology pro- 
vides a broad foundation through which the student will be introduced to basic theories 
and practice of communication, using a range of tools — written, verbal, sociological, 
psychological and technological. With this foundation, a wide variety of career tracks 
can be pursued, whether in the communications technology fields, or in counseling, 
mediation, and negotiation. 

Required Courses: 

SOC 130 Social Process 

SOC 132 Communication and Technology 

SOC 134 Mediation and Negotiation 

Plus select two of the following: 

ART 15 Computer Graphics I (3) 

ART 1 15 Computer Graphics II (3) 

ART 130 Graphic Communication (3) 

PSY 125 Introduction to Counseling (3) 

PSY 126 Brief Therapies (3) 

PSY 135 Group Dynamics (3) 

JRN 101 Basic News Writing (3) 

PHI 155 Symbolic Logic (3) 

PHI 175 Philosophy of Film (3) 

The Leadership Program is highly recommended for Communications specialists. In 
addition, the semester abroad program would prove beneficial. 

Specialization Option Six: Social Services 

Preparation for careers in social work, non-profit and government social service agen- 
cies, providing a foundation of understanding of development over the life course and 
basic skills necessary for working with people in service settings. Good preparation for 
advanced study in social work. 



SOCIOLOGY 277 



Required Courses: 



BUS 4 


Business Foundations 


SOC 104 
SOC 110 


The Family 

Deviant Behavior: Juvenile 


SOC 112 
SOC 120 
SOC 134 
SOC 180 


Delinquency 
Medical Sociology 
Case Management 
Mediation and Negotiation 
Social Stratification 


SOC 189 


Sociology of Aging 


lect two 


of the following: 


SOC 6 
SOCIO 


Child, Family & Community 
Deviance and Youth 


PSY 12 
PSY 14 
PSY 139 


Child/Human Development 
Adult Development 
Child Abuse and Family 
Violence 


PSY 168 


Abnormal Psychology 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 



The Minor in Sociology 

A minimum of six courses, three of which must include: 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives 

SOC 117 Research Methods and Social Statistics 

SOC 166 Sociological Theory 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



Plus three elective courses in Sociology. 



Total units for the Minor in Sociology: 18 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives (3) 

An introduction to the scientific study of 
human social behavior, including the foun- 
dational theories and the basic elements of 
social research. Viewing human life as in- 
herently social, the social and environmen- 
tal forces which influence and are influ- 
enced by personal experience, culture, and 
social arrangements, are examined. GS- 

hif,vi 

SOC 6 The Family, Child, and 

Community (3) 

The study of the family as a primary group 
and as an institution. Varieties of family 
patterns, pre-marital and marital behav- 
ior, child-parent relationships, and family 
disorganization and reorganization are 
considered. GS-IIIF 



SOCIO Deviance and Youth (3) 

An examination of the combined structural, 
social and psychological elements which 
are manifested as deviance or delinquency 
in the juvenile population. Topics such as 
youth violence, substance abuse, adoles- 
cent sexuality and parenting, gang cul- 
tures, and crime will be studied, not only in 
the context of social conditions, but also 
within the juvenile justice system and so- 
cial resource organizations, with a focus on 
the California Youth Authority system and 
the Los Angeles County Probation Depart- 
ment. 

SOC 11 Crime and Society (3) 

Using the theories of criminology to under- 
stand the interplay of social structure and 
environment as it affects crime and devi- 
ance in American society, the course will 
examine the contemporary criminal justice 



278 SOCIOLOGY 



systems as a means of deterrence, rehabil- 
itation or retribution. The study of crime 
prevention, law enforcement, arrest and 
conviction procedures, court jurisdiction, 
the penal system, probation, and victim's 
assistance programs will be presented. 

SOC 21 Internship: Gerontology (3) 

Required for all A.A. Human Services Ma- 
jors with an emphasis in Gerontology. In- 
ternship site to be selected and mutually 
agreed upon by student and advisor. A min- 
imum of 120 hours of on-site experience 
must be conducted under the supervision of 
the internship advisor. This course is not 
open to those outside the A.A. Human Serv- 
ices Program. Prerequisites: Approval by 
advisor and sophomore standing. 

SOC 22 Internship: Youth 

Services (3) 

Required for all A.A. Human Services Ma- 
jors with an emphasis in Youth Services. 
Internship site to be selected and mutually 
agreed upon by student and advisor. A min- 
imum of 120 hours of on-site experience 
must be conducted under the supervision of 
the internship advisor. This course is not 
open to those outside the A.A. Human Serv- 
ices Program. Prerequisites: Approval by 
advisor and sophomore standing. 

SOC 23 Internship: Criminology (3) 

Required for all A.A. Human Services Ma- 
jors with an emphasis in Criminology. In- 
ternship site to be selected and mutually 
agreed upon by student and advisor. A min- 
imum of 120 hours of on-site experience 
must be conducted under the supervision of 
the internship advisor. This course is not 
open to those outside the A. A. Human Serv- 
ices Program. Prerequisites: Approval by 
advisor and sophomore standing. 

SOC 49 Multicultural Issues for 
Health Care 
Professionals (3) 

A survey of ethnic and cultural factors 
which are likely to impinge on the work of 
a variety of health care professionals. Des- 
ignated for HOPE Program students only. 
Previously known as HSP 49. 

SOC 60 Race/Ethnic Relations and 

Community Identity (3) 

This course is designed to examine the com- 
plexity of personal identity, including the 
individual, familial, cultural, political, eco- 
nomic, educational, religious, and geo- 
graphic dimensions to membership in a 



community. The dynamics of relations be- 
tween race/ethnicities and communities 
will also be explored, with an emphasis on 
regional issues, and in particular, Los An- 
geles and Southern California, both past 
and present. 

SOC 94 Topics in Aging (3) 

An examination of the current issues and 
trends operative in society today with an 
emphasis on their effects on the quality of 
life of the aging American. Previously 
known as HSP 94. See GER 94. 

SOC 104 The Family (3) 

An exploration of the structure, functions, 
and challenges of the institution of the fam- 
ily from a cross-cultural perspective. The 
impact of the multiple forces of social, po- 
litical, religious and economic change on 
the structure of the family will also be ana- 
lyzed. GS-IIIF 

SOC 109 Forensic Studies: 

Criminalistics (3) 

The examination of theories and tech- 
niques associated with the recognition, col- 
lection and analysis of physical evidence 
from the context of a crime scene. The 
course will enable students to use the phys- 
ical and social environment to provide in- 
formation for use by the criminal justice 
system. 

SOC 1 10 Deviant Behavior: Juvenile 
Delinquency (3) 

An examination of the theories and con- 
cepts applied to deviance and social disor- 
ganization as it manifests itself among the 
juvenile population. Topics include contem- 
porary gang culture and other issues of 
youths at risk. 

SOC 111 Deviant Behavior: 

Criminology (3) 

The scientific application of the theories of 
crime and deviance, reflecting the struc- 
tural and environmental influences of con- 
temporary American society. 

SOC 112 Medical Sociology (3) 

An examination of contemporary social 
phenomena associated with health and ill- 
ness and the dissemination of health care, 
both nationally and internationally. Anal- 
ysis of regional, national and international 
data on the health status of a variety of 
populations will be examined. In addition, 
the intersection of health, health care deliv- 
ery, demography, economic trends, and the 



SOCIOLOGY 279 



swift pace of changing technology — both 
medical and non-medical — will be explored. 
Societal implications for the future will be 
discussed. 

SOC 117 Research Methods and 

Social Statistics (3) 

A review of the techniques and methods 
used in sociological research, both qualita- 
tive and quantitative. Study of elementary 
probability theory, estimation, correlation, 
and hypothesis testing will be included, 
along with current computer applications 
used in the field. Prerequisite: SOC 5. GS- 
IIIF 

SOC 120 Case Management in 
Health and Human 
Services (3) 

A study of the methods and practices util- 
ized by health and human services case 
managers working in a variety of social 
service resource settings, such as hospitals, 
daycare centers, senior centers, non-profit 
outreach programs, and convalescent facil- 
ities. Fundamental business, management 
and social interaction skills will be high- 
lighted. See GER 120 

SOC 124 Sociobiology (3) 

The essential inquiry of this course is to 
explore what dimensions of the human con- 
dition are based on our genetic heritage ver- 
sus our cultural heritage. Are phenomena 
such as prejudice, competition, aggression, 
altruism, heroism, and child-parent bond- 
ing an outcome of our biology or socializa- 
tion? A comparative, evolutionary perspec- 
tive will be applied in order to explore the 
intersection of culture and biology. Prereq- 
uisite: SOC 5. 

SOC 125 Comparative Social 

Structures (3) 

An examination of the basic social struc- 
tures of society. A study of the similarities 
among and differences between societies, 
including a comparison of primitive and 
modern cultures. Also known as Cultural 
Anthropology. GS-VI 

SOC 130 Social Process (3) 

An examination of the basic human social 
processes of cooperation, collaboration, 
competition, and conflict. On a macro level, 
students will explore the relationship be- 
tween these processes and types of social 
systems. On the micro level, the theories 
and techniques of interaction which drive 



personal relationships and informal social 
structures will be studied. 

SOC 132 Communication and 

Technology (3) 

The vast expansion of the means of com- 
munication within and between all regions 
of the world necessitates the development 
of a broad range of skills and competencies, 
ranging from a sensitivity to cultural dif- 
ferences to the use of internet technologies. 
This course focuses on the use of technology 
as a way to communicate globally. Web 
page development, international exchange 
via the internet with college students and 
professionals around the world, and prob- 
lem solving exercises using the world wide 
web and video conferencing will be con- 
ducted. 

SOC 134 Mediation and 

Negotiation (3) 

The examination and practice of theory and 
skills required for formal and informal dia- 
logue, understanding, or resolution of dif- 
ferences. Focus will be on student develop- 
ment of mediation and negotiation skills 
through application of techniques to global, 
national, community, and interpersonal is- 
sues. 



SOC 145 Social Psychology 

SeePSY145. 



(3). 



SOC 161 Dynamics of Majority- 
Minority Relations (3) 

A study of the history and contemporary 
interactional dynamics among majority 
and minority groups within the United 
States and California. Analysis of the na- 
ture and manifestations of culture, adap- 
tive strategies of culturally diverse popu- 
lations, and the development of programs 
and practices that honor, motivate, and em- 
power all segments of society will be ex- 
plored. Examination of personal biases and 
identification of deficient knowledge in the 
area of cultural diversity and majority-mi- 
nority relations is encouraged. GS-VI 

SOC 165 Historical and 

Contemporary Social 
Thought (3) 

An overview of the historical roots, evolu- 
tion, and contemporary manifestations of 
such social thoughts as social justice, indi- 
vidualism, social responsibility, universal- 
ism, modernism and post-modernism, ra- 
tionalization, democratization, tribalism, 
globalization, and scientific inquiry. 



280 SOCIOLOGY 



SOC166 Sociological Theory (3) 

A critical evaluation of major contemporary 
sociological theorists as representative of 
various schools of sociological inquiry. An 
analysis of social behavior through the ap- 
plication of sociological theory. Prerequi- 
site: SOC 5. GS-HIF 

SOC 175 Urban Sociology (3) 

An examination of the shift from rural to 
urban communities, the current conditions 
of a metropolitan lifestyle and the emergent 
dynamics of the global community. Apply- 
ing theoretical approaches toward the un- 
derstanding and resolution of urban dilem- 
mas surrounding topics such as poverty, 
housing, multi-ethnic populations, on a 
community and global level. 

SOC 176 Urban Engagement (1) 

An on-site experiential course designed to 
advance the understanding of urban issues 
through participation in a civic project, in 
collaboration with a faculty member and a 
community organization. Prior consent of 
advisor required. Prerequisite: SOC 5. 

SOC 180 Social Stratification (3) 

A study of the class system in the United 
States. This specifically includes an exam- 
ination of stratification as it occurs by ed- 
ucational and occupational attainment, 
prestige, status, income, and power. Vari- 
ations among these variables as mediated 
by race, age and gender will be explored. 

SOC 185 Global Development (3) 

A study of the multiple interrelationships 
between political structure, political move- 
ments, socioeconomic development, envi- 
ronment, and global population change. 
From a global perspective, shifts in popu- 
lation composition, quality of life and re- 
source management and availability, and 
how these societal conditions are influ- 
enced by such forces as political organiza- 
tion, international relations, religion, and 
environmental conditions, will be explored. 
Comparisons among these socioeconomic 
and political dimensions between develop- 
ing and developed nation-states will be dis- 
cussed, along with the possible implications 
of globalization for the United States. 

SOC 189 The Sociology of Aging (3) 

A cross-cultural exploration of aging as ex- 
perienced in the United States. Ageism, so- 
cietal attitudes regarding the elderly, and 
responses to the aging process, both from 
the individual and social perspective, are 



examined. Cultural variation and re- 
sponses to aging and the social, political, 
and economic implications of a rapidly ex- 
panding aging population in the U.S. and 
in many regions of the world, will be ana- 
lyzed. Resource and service availability for 
the elderly — locally, regionally, and nation- 
ally — will also be assessed. See GER 189 

SOC 190 Social Change (3) 

A study of the sociological theories of 
change from an historical and contempo- 
rary perspective. The influence of forces 
such as migration, population increase, ad- 
vances in technology, ecological shifts, so- 
cial movements, and political revolutions 
will be examined. 

SOC 192 Thanatology (3) 

A multi-disciplinary and comparative ex- 
amination of the cultural responses which 
have provided understanding, coping, and 
meaning for the death and dying process. 
The course focus will consist of historical 
and literary themes. Prerequisite: SOC 189 
or GER 189 or GER 94. Previously known 
as HSP 196. See GER 192 

SOC 195 Sociology of Religion (3) 

A national and global study of the apparent 
universal psychosocial functions of the in- 
stitution of religion and of the influence re- 
ligion has played within the other social in- 
stitutions, such as in the family, 
government, education, and economics, in 
the past and present. The contemporary so- 
cietal challenges in which religion is in- 
volved will also be highlighted. GS-IIIF, 
VA4 

SOC196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 

SOC 197 Applied Sociology: 
Internship and 
Practicum (3) 

The application of the major's program of 
study through an internship experience. A 
minimum of 120 hours of on-site experience 
is required, along with practicum attend- 
ance and participation. Internship site to 
be selected and mutually agreed upon by 
student and advisor. Open to Sociology Ma- 
jors only and to be taken in senior year of 
study. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



SOCIOLOGY 281 



SOC 198 Readings in Sociology (1-6) 

Intensive and independent study in a field 
of special interest at the culmination of 
one's sociological work. 

SOC 199 Special Studies (1-6) 

A more advanced or specialized treatment 
of an area covered in the regular course list. 



282 SPANISH 



Spanish 



Departmental Affiliation: Modern Language and Literature 

The Department of Modern Language and Literature offers majors and minors in 
French and Spanish (for French course description, see alphabetical listing). 
The major in Spanish is a comprehensive program leading to a proficiency in the four 
basic language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding. Incorporated into 
the program are the culture and civilization of the Spanish-speaking world. Students 
may plan their programs with an emphasis on literature or international business. 

Courses Required for a B.A. Degree in Spanish 

Lower Division: 

SPA 1 & 2 Elementary Spanish I & II (or equivalent) (4,4) 

SPA 25 Writing, Composition and Grammar (3) 

Upper Division: 

SPA 109 Spanish Writing Lab (3) 

SPA 1 12 History and Civilization of Spain (3) 

SPA 125 Spanish Masterpieces (3) 

SPA 191 Senior Thesis (3) 

Four additional upper division courses for a minimum of 24 upper division units. To 
acquire a B.A. with a major in Spanish, a minimum of 12 units of the required 24 upper 
division units must be taken at MSMC. 

The Minor in Spanish 

A minimum of 23 units must be completed to obtain a Minor in Spanish. (A minimum 
of 9 units must be completed in the Spanish Program of the Department of Modern 
Languages at Mount St. Mary's College.) There are different courses required depend- 
ing on the emphasis of the Minor, as follows: 

A. Literature Emphasis 
Requirements: 

A minimum of 23 units to include: 

SPA 1 & 2 Elementary Spanish I & II (or equivalent) (4,4) 

SPA 25 Advanced Composition (3) 

SPA 125 Spanish Masterpieces (3) 

B. International Business Emphasis 
Requirements: 

A minimum of 23 units to include: 

SPA 1 & 2 Elementary Spanish I & II (or equivalent) (4,4) 
SPA 145 The Cultures of the Spanish Speaking 

Peoples of the Americas (3) 

SPA 109 Spanish Writing Lab (3) 

SPA 149 Spanish for Business (3) 

Any course completed with a grade of "D" or below is not acceptable toward a Major or 
Minor in Spanish and must be repeated. 



SPANISH 283 



SPA 1 Elementary Spanish I (4) 

Develops the four fundamental skills of 
reading, writing, understanding, and 
speaking. Emphasis on speaking and gram- 
mar. GS-IV 

SPA 2 Elementary Spanish II (4) 

Further develops the fundamental skills, 
stressing reading and writing as well as vo- 
cabulary building. Prerequisite: SPA 1 or 
Instructor's consent. GS-IV 

SPA 8 Oral Comprehension and 

Conversation (3) 

Intensive practice in oral communication 
both formal and spontaneous. Emphasis on 
vocabulary building and the acquisition of 
idiomatic speech patterns. Prerequisite: 
SPA 2 or instructor's consent. GS-IV 

SPA 9 Intermediate Spanish 

Readings (3) 

Literary and journalistic texts from Spain 
and from Latin America will be read and 
discussed, to improve reading and conver- 
sational skills and underline cultural vari- 
ances. Prerequisite: SPA 2 or instructor's 
consent. GS-IV, VI 

SPA 25 Writing, Composition and 

Grammar (3) 

The emphasis is on writing and composition 
skills with intensive review of verbs and 
grammatical structures. Prerequisite: SPA 
2 or equivalent. GS-IV 

SPA 27 Spanish for Health 
Professionals(2) 

An introduction to medical vocabulary with 
emphasis on the process of communication, 
on practical vocabulary and role playing. 
Prerequisite : elementary knowledge of 
Spanish useful but not required. 

SPA 33A Civilization and Culture of 
Spain (3) 

A general view of historical, social, and cul- 
tural developments in Spain up to today. 
This course is given in English through the 
Weekend College only. GS-IV 

SPA 33B Civilization and Culture of 
Hispanic America (3) 

An introduction to the Civilizations and 
Cultures of Hispanic America, with em- 
phasis on their artistic and literary master- 
pieces. Cultural differences and similari- 
ties will be stressed. This course is given in 
English through the Weekend College only. 

GS-rv,vi 



SPA 42 History and Civilization of 

Spain (3) 

A survey of the history and the civilization 
of Spain as background for the study of Lit- 
erature. Prerequisite: SPA 25 or Instruc- 
tor's consent. (This course is offered at the 
Doheny campus only.) GS-IV 

SPA 44/144 Hispanic Civilizations 

and Cultures (3) 

A background course for the study of the 
arts and literature of Hispanic America, fo- 
cusing on historical, social, and cultural de- 
velopments. Emphasis on cultural differ- 
ences and similarities. (This course is 
offered on the Doheny Campus only.) Pre- 
requisite: SPA 25 or equivalent. GS-IV 

SPA 109 Spanish Writing Lab (3) 

Intensive training in writing, with empha- 
sis on vocabulary, idiom, structural pat- 
terns, and style. Exercises in rhetoric, in 
creative and other forms of writing. Prereq- 
uisite: SPA 25 or instructor's consent. 

SPA 112 History and Civilization of 
Spain (3) 

A historical and cultural analysis of the civ- 
ilization of Spain, of the development of its 
socio-political institutions up to this day. 
Prerequisite: SPA 25 or instructor's consent. 

SPA 114 Translation/ 

Interpretation (3) 

An introduction to the theory and mechan- 
ics for written translation and basic oral 
interpretation. Prerequisite: basic fluency 
in both languages. 

SPA 115/215 Applied Linguistics (3) 

Modern descriptive linguistics and its ap- 
plication to teaching. Attention will be 
given to phonology, morphology, syntax, 
and other structural elements that apply to 
language learning. Appropriate for those 
working toward bilingual Multiple and Sin- 
gle Subject Teaching Credentials. Prereq- 
uisite: SPA 25 or equivalent. 

SPA 125 Spanish Masterpieces (3) 

A study of the Masterpieces of Spanish Lit- 
erature with emphasis on themes and 
styles of works: Cervantes, Calderon, Gal- 
dos, Zorilla, and Blasco Ibanez. Prerequi- 
site: SPA 42 or 112. 



284 SPANISH 



SPA 129 Cervantes (3) 

A study of the most important shorter 
works of Cervantes meant to elucidate his 
thoughts and his continuing relevance for 
our time. Prerequisite: SPA 25 

SPA 132 Studies in the Generation 

of 1898 (3) 

The spirit of the Generation of '98 as re- 
flected in the works of major representative 
authors. Prerequisite: SPA 42 or 112. 

SPA 135 Contemporary Spanish 

Literature (3) 

Major trends of poetry, theater, and prose 
fiction from 1898 to today. Intensive study 
of specific authors and critical analysis of 
selected works. Prerequisite: SPA 42 or 112. 

SPA 140 Contemporary Literature 

of Hispanic America (3) 

A study of the most outstanding works by 
contemporary Hispanic and Spanish- 
American writers, with emphasis on inter- 
cultural variations. Prerequisite: SPA 25 
GS-VI 

SPA 145 Cultures of the Spanish- 
Speaking Peoples of the 
Americas (3) 

Various historical and modern aspects of 
the cultures and their roles within the 
United States and California. Includes 
origins, values, communication and social- 
ization systems, migration and immigra- 
tion patterns, relationships with other cul- 
tures. Appropriate for those working 
toward bilingual Multiple and Single Sub- 
ject Teaching Credentials Prerequisite: 
SPA 25 or equivalent. GS-IV 

SPA 146 Women in Hispanic 

Literature (3) 

Major contemporary women writers in the 
literature of Hispanic America and Spain: 
a women's view of life and culture. Prereq- 
uisite: SPA 25 or instructor's consent. GS- 
VI 



SPA 148 Films and Hispanic 

Literatures (3) 

Analysis of main aesthetic, cultural, and 
philosophical questions in the Hispanic 
world as articulated in literature and films. 
Prerequisite: SPA 25 or instructor's consent 

SPA 149 Spanish for Business (3) 

An introduction to the forms, styles, usages 
and procedures followed in commercial cor- 
respondence and business practices in the 
Spanish speaking world. Prerequisite: SPA 
25 or instructor's consent 

SPA190AB Internship (3,3) 

Internship program in areas related to 
Spanish. 

SPA 191 Senior Thesis (3) 

Spanish majors complete a senior thesis in 
literature, history, or business, under the 
direction of a department member, enroll- 
ing in SPA 191, Senior Thesis, during the 
term in which they complete the work. 

SPA 194 Study/Travel (1-6) 

Pre-travel lectures and readings, as well as 
guided tours in the country, serve as basis 
for a study/travel program, with each par- 
ticipant developing a project highlighting 
the travel experiences. 

SPA196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program, 

SPA198AB Directed Readings (3,3) 
Directed readings selected from authors 
representative of significant literary pe- 
riods. 

SPA 199AB Independent 

Studies (1-3, 1-3) 

Directed readings and research. For quali- 
fied students with the approval of the de- 
partment. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 285 



Special Programs 



A maximum of six non-required units in Special Programs (including Physical Edu- 
cation) may be applied to requirements of the baccalaureate degree. All special program 
classes (except SPR 85) are graded credit/no credit. Courses with an X are non-trans- 
ferable to the baccalaureate program. 



Interdisciplinary Courses 

INT 93/193AB Studies in Humanities 

(1.5,1.5) 

A. Exploring the rich cultural opportuni- 
ties of Los Angeles, and by attendance 
at selected plays, concerts, and special 
art exhibits, including pre- and post- 
event discussion. 

B. Continuation of 93/193A. To satisfy 
General Studies GS-IIIA, both the A 
and B segments must be successfully 
completed. 

INT 194A Introduction to the Visual 
and Performing Arts ( 1 ) 

Study will focus on an introduction to the 
visual and performing arts using the con- 
cepts included in the California State 
Frameworks, at a level appropriate for col- 
lege study. Primary emphases will be 
placed on the study and appreciation of 
drama and dance. 

INT 95/195 Study/Travel: European 

History and Culture (1-6) 
Seminars on the Fine Arts focusing on ma- 
jor European capitals of art, music and the 
theater, culminating in actual travel to at 
least two of these capitals. Open to all stu- 
dents with some background in the arts or 
consent of the instructor. GS-niA 

INT 96 Culture, Race and 

Communication (1) 

Study and interaction focused on culture 
and intercultural conflicts. Topics intro- 
duced include race and racism, stereotyp- 
ing and prejudice, and understanding priv- 
ilege. Emphasis on communication skills. 

Other Courses 

SPR 5 Computer Fundamentals (3) 

Introduction to the computer, its function 
and use in society; word processing, spread- 
sheets, and data bases; introduction to e- 
mail and the internet. 



SPR 11 Seminar 

May be repeated for credit. 



(1-3) 



SPR 12 Studies in Humanities (1-3) 
May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 13 Studies in Contemporary 

Society (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 14 Independent Study (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 15 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 15S American Sign Language 

(1.5) 

I. Students learn basic concepts of sign lan- 
guage and fingerspelling. They begin to un- 
derstand deafness and its impact on com- 
munication. 

II. Students improve sign vocabulary, in- 
crease receptive and expressive skills, de- 
velop story-telling techniques, and learn 
sign language idioms. May be repeated for 
credit. 

SPR 19 Personal Awareness (1) 

An application of Abraham Maslow's theory 
of a hierarchy of needs to the life of the 
student. It will explore what these needs 
are, how the resources of the college can 
help in meeting these needs, and how to be 
more successful and efficient in meeting 
these needs. 

SPR20X Reading and Academic 

Study Techniques (1-3) 

An analytical method to strengthen read- 
ing efficiency: includes theory and practice 
to strengthen habits of systematic listen- 
ing, notetaking, and techniques for han- 
dling related study problems; reference 
books, literary works, textbooks, and cur- 
rent academic readings. 

SPR21X Math Workshop (1) 

A skills course in the fundamental proc- 
esses of arithmetic. Strongly recommended 
for nursing basic math test, recommended 



286 SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



for business, education, and other majors 
who need additional preparation in basic 
math. 

SPR 22X Becoming a Master 

Student (1) 

An opportunity for students to learn and 
adopt concrete techniques and specific 
strategies for success in college. 

SPR 25 Scholar Mentor Seminar (1) 

A survey of the issues and skills needed for 
successful peer tutoring. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding of tutoring prin- 
ciples and practices important for initiating 
a productive tutorial relationship. Permis- 
sion of instructor is required. 

SPR 25A Resident Assistant 

Seminar (1) 

A more advanced course which is designed 
to develop leadership skills. Special atten- 
tion is paid to self-understanding, program 
presentation and problem solving. Permis- 
sion of instructor is required. 

SPR 26 Student Advocate Class (1) 

This class is designed to introduce RC/RHA 
and ASB officers to skills necessary to be 
effective student advocates. Topics of dis- 
cussion include group dynamics, confiden- 
tiality, networking, and interpersonal com- 
munication skills. Special attention is 
focused on the complexities of responding 
to counseling situations encountered in 
their day to day work. Enrollment is limited 
to ASB officers and RC/RHA executives. 

SPR 27/127 Student Health Advocate 

This course is designed to assist the student 
in the development of skills effective in 
health promotion. The student will be 
guided through: selection of a health re- 
lated subject pertinent to the college or 
community population; development of a 
plan to design and deliver the information 
through selected media; and, evaluation of 
the project outcomes. Enrollment is limited 
to members of the Student Health Advo- 
cates Committee. 

SPR 30X Introduction to the 
Humanities 

Course aimed to develop the student's aca- 
demic skills - particularly in the areas of 
reading, writing, critical thinking, problem 
solving and resource utilization - as a basis 
for successful study of the humanities. The 
content and process of the course are de- 
signed to provide the student with exposure 



to college level academic expectations. The 
course is team taught with a variety of 
learning and evaluation methods utilized. 

SPR 18/118 Career Planning 

Seminar (1) 

Assessment of one's needs, interests, skills, 
and values; application to decisions about 
work, leisure time, choice of major, and ac- 
ademic planning. Introduction to sources of 
career information and traditional and non- 
traditional search methods, with special 
emphasis on resume writing and interview- 
ing skills. 

SPR40X Bridges: Making the 

Transition (1-3) 

Individually designed tutorial for adult 
Students returning to academic experi- 
ence. Focus to be on selected skills: basic 
study, note taking, reading, writing, and 
math in the format of assisted self-study. 
This course will be taken as needed based 
on placement testing results. 

SPR50X College Skills (1-3) 

A course designed to address the vocabu- 
lary, listening, notetaking, and summariz- 
ing skills required to meet the demands of 
college classes. Required for AJi. students 
who are academically underprepared. 

SPR 51X College Skills: Reading(l-3) 

A course designed to address the vocabu- 
lary, speech, and comprehension skills re- 
quired to meet the demands of college 
classes. Required for A. A. students who are 
academically underprepared 

SPR55X Reading Development (3) 

This course is designed to strengthen read- 
ing skills with an emphasis on the SQ 3 R 
method. It includes vocabulary develop- 
ment through the study of structural anal- 
ysis and context clues and the reading and 
discussion of selected imaginative and ex- 
pository pieces. Required for A.A. students 
who are academically underprepared. 

SPR56X College Skills: 

Arithmetic (1-3) 

A course designed to address the basic math 
skills in addition, subtraction, multiplica- 
tion and division of whole numbers, frac- 
tions, and decimals. 

SPR 57X Basic Mathematics (3) 

A skills course in fundamental processes of 
arithmetic designed to develop both accu- 
racy and speed in addition, subtraction, 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 287 



multiplication, and division of whole num- 
bers, fractions, and decimals. Required for 
AA students who are academically under- 
prepared. 

SPR58X Diction (1) 

Provides an opportunity for students to im- 
prove pronunciation of the English lan- 
guage. 

SPR60A Social Action (1-3) 

A multi-faceted community action program 
geared to help people in need. Approxi- 
mately twenty-five hours of volunteer work 
under supervision in an approved agency or 
center and a weekly seminar required. May 
be repeated for credit. 

SPR60B Fieldwork (1-3) 

Consists of fieldwork related to a particular 
course or program. It extends the instruc- 
tional process and awareness beyond the 
campus in order to have career-related ex- 
perience, to derive meaning from real-life 
situations, and to give community service. 

SPR 70 Careers in Health (1) 

A course designed to explore selected ca- 
reers in health. Gives the student an oppor- 
tunity to develop career goals related to in- 
dividual interest and skills. Includes an 
introduction to medical terminology. 

SPR 80 Freshmen Orientation (1) 

Intended to assist students in orientation 
to college by providing each student with 
the opportunity to find meaning in her col- 
lege studies and related experiences and 
develop a greater understanding of herself 
and others. 

SPR 85 Introduction to College 

Studies (1) 

This course is designed to assist the new 
student in finding her/his place at Mount 
St. Mary's College and more successfully 



integrating into the college. Students will 
obtain an introduction to the concept, 
meaning and significance of higher educa- 
tion, the liberal arts in general, and Mount 
St. Mary's College in particular. This is a 
graded class. 

SPR 90 Internship in Health 

Care (1-2) 

This internship offers students an experi- 
ence in a health care setting. It is offered in 
conjunction with SPR 70. Students spend 
time at the internship site, and they attend 
some SPR 70 classes assigned by the coor- 
dinator. Students also meet with the coor- 
dinator twice during their internship. They 
are evaluated by their internship supervi- 



SPR 98/198 Special Experience (1-3) 
This course has variable titles, content, and 
credit. It is designed to give students the 
opportunity to obtain credit for an experi- 
ence obtained prior to or concurrently with 
their regular classes. The specific course ti- 
tle and description is prepared when the 
student enrolls in the course. A student 
may enroll in this course no more than 
three times. (SPR 98X is an elective course 
for the Associate degree.) 

SPR 99 Special Experience: 

Independent Study (1-3) 

This course has variable title, content, and 
credit. It is intended to allow a student to 
engage in independent study under the di- 
rection of a faculty member. The specific 
course title and description is prepared 
when the student enrolls in the course. A 
student may enroll in this course no more 
than three times. 



Physical Education 



Physical education courses are offered as electives and are intended to enhance and 
balance the academic course load of students. All courses, with the exception of PED 
100, are Credit/No Credit and may be repeated for credit; however, a maximum of six 
units of SPR and PED combined may be applied to requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree. 



288 SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



Ancient Arts 

PEDIS Women's Self Defense (1) 

An introduction to self defense techniques 
combining practical safety skills, physical 
conditioning, and martial art movements. 

PED1T TaiChi (1) 

An introduction to the Yang style of Tai Chi 
Chuan, an ancient blend of mental concen- 
tration and physical movement, with appli- 
cations to self-defense. 

PED1Y Yoga (1) 

An introduction to yoga, an ancient blend 
of stretching, relaxation, and breathing 
techniques that increase flexibility and 
muscle strength and tone, improve circu- 
lation, and reduce stress. 

Aerobic Conditioning 

PED2A Aerobics (1) 

A high intensity, low impact workout, de- 
signed for all levels, that improves cardio- 
vascular endurance, muscle strength and 
endurance, body composition, and flexibil- 
ity. 

ED2K Kickboxing (1) 

High intensity, multi-level hi/lo workout in- 
corporating moves from kickboxing and 
other martial arts techniques. This class 
emphasizes proper technique, mental dis- 
cipline and self-awareness. 

PED2P Studio Cycling (1) 

A high energy workout utilizing stationary 
racing bikes to improve cardiorespiratory 
and muscular endurance. 

PED2S Step Aerobics (1) 

A high intensity, primarily low impact cross 
training class, utilizing the aerobic step and 
exercise tubing, that improves cardiovas- 
cular endurance, muscle strength and en- 
durance, body composition, and flexibility. 

PED2W Water Aerobics (1) 

An aerobic conditioning class which utilizes 
the resistance of water to enhance cardio- 
vascular endurance and reduce the risk for 
injury. 



PED3B Bun's of Steel (.5) 

Thirty minute high intensity, multi-level 
workout designed to tone, strengthen, and 
define the inner and outer thighs, ham- 
strings, quadriceps, and the gluteus maxi- 



PED3W Weight Training (1) 

An introductory course emphasizing mus- 
cular strength and endurance using resis- 
tance equipment and free weights. Stu- 
dents will develop and implement a 
personal workout based on individual 
goals, fitness level, and ability. 

Dance 

PED 4A African and Latin 

Rhythms (1) 

A dance class which emphasizes basic Af- 
rican and Latin movements to improve car- 
diovascular endurance, muscle strength 
and tone. 

PED4B Ballet (1) 

An introduction to the basic movements 
and choreography of ballet which will in- 
crease flexibility, muscle strength, endur- 
ance, and tone. 

PED 4D Dance Workshop (1) 

Instruction and choreography of various 
dance forms including jazz, modern, and 
street dance with the opportunity for per- 
formance. 

PED4H Hip Hop (1) 

A high intensity free-style street dance 
class that increases cardiovascular endur- 
ance, muscle strength and endurance, and 
improves body composition. 

PED4J Jazz (1) 

A dance class which emphasizes basic jazz 
movements to improve cardiovascular en- 
durance, muscle strength and tone. 

Outdoor Recreation 

PED5H Hiking and Wildflowers (1) 

An introduction to hiking with emphasis on 
wildflower identification. 



Muscle Conditioning 

PED3A Abdominal Blaster (.5) 

Thirty minute high intensity, multi-level, 
abdominal workout designed to define, 
shape, and tone abdominal muscles. 



PED 5S Special Topics in Outdoor 

Recreation (1) 

Primarily off campus activities which could 
include mountain biking, roller blading/ 
skating, beach volleyball, biking, hiking, 
snow and water skiing. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 289 



Sports 

PED6B Basketball (1) 

An introduction to basic basketball skill 
techniques, scoring, rules and game strat- 
egy. 

PED6C COURT SPORTS (1) 

Instruction in the rules, techniques, and 
strategies of basketball and volleyball. 

PED 6S Swimming (1) 

A comprehensive course addressing both 
basic stroke technique and cardiovascular 
conditioning. 

PED6T Tennis I/II (1) 

An introduction to basic tennis skill tech- 
niques, scoring, rules, and game strategy. 

PED6V Volleyball (1) 

An introduction to basic volleyball skill 
techniques, scoring, rules, and game strat- 
egy. 



Certification Courses 

PED7C CPR/FirstAid (1) 

This course teaches basic CPR and First 
Aid methods in preparation for passing the 
American Red Cross Certification. 



Education 



PED 10 Wellness Seminar 



(1) 



PED 100 Physical Education (1) 

Required course for Liberal Studies majors 
emphasizing the State Curriculum Frame- 
work, movement skill and movement 
knowledge, self-image and personal devel- 
opment, and social development of children 
K-12 through the participation in rhythms, 
games, sports, and physical fitness activi- 
ties. Graded Course. 



Women's Leadership Program 

The Women's Leadership Program is a non-degree program. It is a supplemental pro- 
gram open to all majors. A maximum of six non-required units in this area may be 
counted towards the baccalaureate degree without permission of the Dean. See Social 
Science division for Women's Leadership Minor information. 

AA* Women's Leadership Program Curriculum: 

First Year *For course descriptions for SSC 16AB and SSC 116C, see the Social Science 

section of the catalog under Leadership Studies Minor. 
Fall Units Spring Units 

SSC 16A Leadership Seminar I (1) SC 16B Leadership Seminar II (1) 

B AVB.S. Women's Leadership Program Curriculum: 

First Year 

Fall Units Spring Units 

SSC 16A Leadership Seminar I (1) SSC 16B Leadership Seminar II (1) 

Third or Fourth Year 

Spring Units 

SSC 116C Advanced Leadership (1) 

Recommended Courses: *For course descriptions of SPR 18/118, SPE 10, or 
POL 134, see appropriate sections of the catalog. 

SPR 18/118 Career Planning 

Seminar 
SPE 10 Public Speaking 

or 
POL 134 International Organization 

(Model United Nations) 



(2) 
(3) 



(3) 



290 SPEECH 



Speech 



Departmental Affiliation: English 

SPE10 Introduction to 

Communication (2) 

Introduction to basic principles of commu- 
nication theory in both small and large 
groups together with practice in discussion 
and speech delivery. GS-IB 

SPE 12 Business and Professional 

Communication (1) 

Examination of the communication that oc- 
curs in corporations and professional set- 
tings with practice in interviewing, in 
group dynamics, and in public presenta- 
tions typical of the world of work. GS-IB 



*SPE 91 Directed Study (1-3) 

Study in a field of special interest in speech 
or drama, under the direction of a depart- 
ment member. May be repeated for credit. 

SPE 92/192 Special Studies (1-3) 

Exploration of special interests in speech 
communication or drama. May be repeated 
for credit. 



SPE 96/196 Workshop 

May be repeated for credit. 



(1-3) 



SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY 291 



Master of Arts in Applied Spiritual 
Theology 

No new students are admitted to this program which was phased out effective January, 
1995. However, to accommodate those students who are in the process of completing 
their course work, the following courses are available: 

SPT 289 Practicum (1-3) 

Experiential class focusing on a particular 
area of interest. 

or 

SPT 291 Research Essay (1) 

A one unit research project written as a for- 
mal paper under a research director. 

SPT 298 Comprehensives (0) 



292 WOMEN'S STUDIES MINOR 



Women's Studies Minor 

Departmental Affiliation: History 

The Women's Studies Minor provides students with an opportunity to examine gender 
issues in the world today. Besides learning about women's contributions to culture and 
society, students gain theoretical and historical background necessary to understand 
gender differences in the distribution of power and resources. Courses also include 
contact with organizations working for change. Thus the minor gives students both 
background and skills to deal with issues of gender that they will face in their personal 
and work lives. 

Many courses offered at Mount St. Mary's College include women's perspectives and 
sensitivity to women's issues, but those that qualify for the Women's Studies Minor 
elevate the attention to women's perspectives to the center of the course's content. 

The Minor in Women's Studies 

The Minor in Women's Studies requires 18 units of course work from at least 3 academic 
disciplines. A minimum of 12 units must be from upper division courses. 

There is only one required course for the Women's Studies Minor: WST 100 Women, 
Culture and Society. Though it is recommended that WST 100 be taken as the first 
women's studies course, other WS courses may precede it. 

The Women's Studies Minor is interdisciplinary; therefore, most courses are cross- 
listed under other academic departments. Many of the WS-designated courses also 
fulfill General Studies requirements. Students may have a maximum of 6 units transfer 
from other institutions for credit toward the Women's Studies Minor with verification 
and approval by the Women's Studies coordinator. Students may also use up to 6 units 
of independent study toward the Women's Studies Minor with approval in advance. 

If a student is completing two minors, a maximum of 3 courses can be double-counted 
toward both the Women's Studies Minor and the other minor. Example: a minor in 
Women's Studies with WST 100, one WS/English course, one WS/sociology course, and 
3 WS/philosophy courses. 

Students interested in the Women's Studies Minor should contact the Women's Studies 
coordinator to discuss course options. 

Core course (required): 

WST 100 Women, Culture, and Society (3) 

Additional Courses: 

WST 180 Women & Work in the 20th Century (3) 

WST 190 Internship (1-3) 

WST 196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

WST 199 Independent Study (1-3) 



WOMEN'S STUDIES MINOR 293 



Interdisciplinary Electives 

15 units (5 courses) from the following courses with on-going WS designation: 



ART 174 


Women in Contemporary Art 


(3) 


BUS 140 


Women's Issues in 






Business & Economics 


(3) 


BUS 178 


Women at Work: Multicultural Management- 






Legal Issues 


(3) 


ENG27 


Women in Quest 


(3) 


ENG28 


Contemporary Issues in 






World Literature 


(3) 


ENG 123 


Women's Voices in Literature 


(3) 


ENG 129 


Ethnic Lits of America 


(3) 


ENG 192C 


Mother/Daughter/Self in Lit 


(3) 


PHI 178 


Philosophy of Women 


(3) 


PHI 179 


Women and Values 


(3) 


RST 135 


Women and Christianity 


(3) 


SPA 146 


Women in Hispanic Lit. 


(3) 



Or from the following list of interdisciplinary electives that may receive one-time or 
on-going WS designation: 



BUS 169 Issues in Corp. Responsibility 

HIS 93/193 History of Women 

PED 10S Women's Self-Defense 

PHI 170 Social and Political Philosophy 

PSY 1 10 Psychology of Women 

RST 190T Spiritual Journeys of Women 

SSC 16 A Leadership Seminar I 

SSC 16B Leadership Seminar II 

SSC 16C Leadership, Women, and 
the Workplace 



(3) 
(3) 
(1) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(1) 
(1) 

(1) 



Total units in Women's Studies: 18 

WST100 Women, Culture, and 

Society (3) 

An overview of the women's movement and 
feminist theory with special attention to 
historical and social forces involved in wom- 
en's status. Students will apply critical 
thinking techniques to make connections 
between their experiences and the read- 
ings. Emphasis on empowerment of stu- 
dents to take leadership roles locally and in 
the global community. GS III-F 

WST180 Women & Work in the 

20th Century (3) 

In-depth study of social change for women 
in the 20th Century, as rooted in changed 
in women's participation in the workforce. 
Implications for women planning work/ 



home lives today. Seminar format and writ- 
ten project. Prerequisite: WST 100 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

WST 190 Internship (1-3) 

Qualified students are placed and super- 
vise in nonprofit organizations, govern- 
ment offices, or businesses where women's 
needs and concerns are being addressed. 
Selected reading may be required as well 
as written analysis of issues and/or experi- 
ence. Prerequisite: WST 100. Maximum 3 
units may be applied toward minor. 

WST196H Senior Honors Thesis (3) 

Open only to students admitted to the Hon- 
ors Program. 



294 WOMEN'S STUDIES MINOR 



WST199 Independent Study (1-3) 
Study in the field of special interest under 
the direction of a faculty member who has 
taught Women's Studies courses or WS- 
designated courses. Prerequisite: WST 100. 
May be repeated for credit. Maximum 6 
units may be applied toward minor. 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 295 



FACULTY AND 
ADMINISTRATION 



Board of Trustees 



Sister Jill Napier, CSJ 
Chair 

Louis M. Castruccio Sister Mary Frances Johnson 

Sister Imelda D'Agostino Sister Karen M. Kennelly, CSJ 

Sister Kathleen Ann DuRoss Sr. Miriam Therese Larkin 

Michael A. Enright Thomas E. Larkin, Jr. 

John C. Fitzgerald Zelda Ann Marzec 

Mark Foster David L. Mclntyre 

Sister Joyce Marie Gaspardo, CSJ Dr. Virginia B. Smith 

Norma L. Gonzales John P. Sullivan 

The Honorable Terry J. Hatter, Jr. Monsignor Royale M. Vadakin 

Roger K. Hughes The Most Rev. Gabino Zevala 
Jane Luecke Johnson 



Trustees Emeriti 

Sr. Mary Brigid Fitzpatrick 

Sr. Mary Kevin Ford 

Dr. Frank R. Moothart 

Dr. Rosemary Park 

J. Robert Vaughan 

Dr. Marjorie D. Wagner 



Administrative Officers 

Sister Karen M. Kennelly, CSJ, Ph.D 

President 
Jacqueline Powers Doud, Ph.D 

Academic Vice President and Dean of Faculty 
Jane Lingua, Ph.D 

Vice President for Student Affairs 
William Everhart, M.B.A. 

Vice President for Business and Finance 
Rev. George O'Brien, Ed.D 

College Chaplain 
Sister Kathleen Kelly, CSJ, Ph.D. 

Vice President for the Doheny Campus and Dean for the Associate of Arts Programs 
Pamela Hillman, M.S. 

Vice President for Institutional Advacement 



296 FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 



Regents Council 

Mark Foster, Chair 



Jerome C. Byrne Roger K. Hughes 

Esther J. Cabanban Maria D. Hummer 

Barbara Casey Jane Luecke Johnson 

Bertrum M. CeDillos Carl N. Karcher 

James Cole Monica Spillane Luechtefeld 

Sheila Cole William G. McGagh 

Gordon Cooper David C. Mclntyre 

Fiorenza Courtright Sheila Muller 

Genevieve Denault Caroline W. Nahas 

Helen M. Elliot Carol Pierskalla 

William H. Elliot William Pierskalla 

Michael A. Enright Mark Rubin 

Claudia Foster Richard F. Schmid 

John J. Gillin Mary Lou Stack 

Marty Gillin John P. Sullivan 

Norma L. Gonzales Celia Gonzales Torres 

Helen Hawekotte J. Robert Vaughan 

Donald H. Hubbs Dr. Juan Villagomez 

{Catherine Hughes Jack Ybarra 



Academic and Student Affairs Staff 

Sister Margaret Clare Borchard, CSJ, M.Ed. 

Coordinator of Faculty Audio-Visual Services, Doheny Campus 
Sister Carol Brong, CSJ, B.A. 

Director of Learning Resource Center, Doheny Campus 
Michael Brubaker, M.A. 

Assistant Registrar 
Sister Jeanne Anne Cacioppo, CSJ, M.S. 

Director of Student Placement and Associate Director of Financial Aid 
Constance Carlson, M.S. 

Director of Physical Therapist Assistant Program 
Susan Crawford, M.S. 

Director of Career Planning and ISAE Counselor 
Linda Crosby, M.A. 

Director of Child Development Center 
La Royce Dodd, B.A. 

Assistant Director of Financial, Chalon & Doheny Campuses 
Sister Therese Donahue, CSJ, M.A. 

Director of Advisement, Doheny Campus 
Carolyn Douglas, M.A., M.S.L.S. 

Media Librarian 
Sister James Marien Dyer, CSJ, M.A. 

Director of Residence Life, Doheny Campus 
Susan Fread, M.S. 

Director of Academic Advisement, Chalon Campus 
Gail Gresser, Ph.D. (Cand.) 

Director of Campus Ministry, Chalon Campus 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 297 



Mark Heidrich, M.A. 

Registrar 
Dean Kilgour, B.A. 

Director of Admissions 
Mary Krantz, M.L.S. 

Assistant Librarian, Doheny Campus 
Michele Lewis, M.S. 

Director oflSAE Program 
Monica Lond, M.S. 

Director of Career Planning 
Maria Lyons, B.A. 

Director of Student Activities, Doheny Campus 
Sister Marie Angela Mesa, CSJ, B.A. 

Coordinator of Campus Ministry, Doheny Campus 
Karin Middleton, M.Ed 

Director of Residence Life, Chalon Campus 
Jack Millis, B.A. 

Associate Director of Financial Aid 
Katy M. Murphy, B.A. 

Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 
Lisa Nightingale, M.A. 

Director of Learning Assistance 
Ruzica Popovitch-Krekic, M.A, M.L.S. 

Reference Librarian, Chalon Campus 
Carol Povenmire, Ph.D. 

Director of Counseling Services 
Claudia Reed, M.L.S., M.A. 

Director ofMSMC Libraries 
Bernadette Robert, B.A. 

Assistant to the Vice-President, Doheny Campus and Senior Associate Director of 

Admissions 
Merrill Rodin, M.A. 

Director, Weekend College 
Sister Patricia Rose Shanahan, CSJ, M.A.A.S.T. 

Graduate Division Secretary 
Lawrence M. Smith, M.A. 

Assistant Vice President of Information Support Services 
Alexandra Sosa-Amoeda, M.S. 

Director of Residence Life, Doheny Campus 
Jeanette Stone, B.A. 

Senior Associate Director of Transfer and International Admission 
Joan Viery, M.A., M.S. 

Associate Registrar 
Mari Wadsworth, Ed.D 

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs 
Dan Weiss 

Academic Computing Manager 
James Whitaker, M.Ed. 

Associate Director of Enrollment and Director of Financial Aid 
Andrea M. Wilier, M.A. 

Director of Fitness Education, Chalon Campus 
Agnes Zelus, M.Ed. 

Assistant Academic Vice-President 



298 FACULTY 



Business Management and 
Administrative Services Staff 

Christopher Antons, M.S. 

Director of Institutional Research 
Sister Barbara Cotton, CSJ, M.A. 

Research Assistant 
Patty Desmarais 

Director of Alumnae Relations 
Patrick Dull 

Assistant Controller 
Mary Grogan 

Director of Food Services 
Joy Jacobs, B.A. 

Assistant Director of Public Relations 
Frank Juarez 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, Doheny Campus 
Sister Catherine Therese Knoop, CSJ, Ph.D. 

Planned Giving Officer 
Steven Lopez 

Grant and Loan Administrator 
Militza Marin 

Director of Human Resources 
Kathleen O'Neill 

Director of Corporate and Foundation Giving 
Jill Perry, B.A. 

Director of Public Relations 
M. Sue Ott, B.S. 

Gifts Officer 
Janice Reiboldt 

Controller 



Faculty 



Mark S. Alhanat i Peter Antoniou 

Assistant Professor Business Lecturer in Business Administration 

Administration B.S., M.A., International University, Lon- 

B.S., California State University, North- don; Ph.D., U.S. International University, 

ridge; M.B.A., Loyola Marymount Univer- San Diego 

sity 

Sister Mary Frederick Arnold, CSJ 

Associate Professor Emeritus of 

Psychology 

Phyllis Amaral B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., 

Lecturer in Psychology Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago 

B.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Southern California Dale Avers 

Instructor in Physical Therapy 
B.S., University of Kentucky; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Kentucky 






FACULTY 299 



Margaret Avi la-Monge 

Instructor in Associated Nursing Program 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Cali- 
fornia State University, L.A.; M.S.N., Cal- 
ifornia State University, Long Beach 

Jody Baral 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A., California State University, North- 
ridge; M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Carla K. Bartlett 

Associate Professor of Education 
California State University, Northridge; 
M.A., California State University, Los An- 
geles; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School 

E ufemia Bay ani 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
B.S.N., Mount St. Mary's College; M.N., 
University of California, Los Angeles 

Albert Beach 

Lecturer in Art 
B.F.A., University of Arizona; M.F.A., Uni- 
versity of Colorado 

Daphne Nicholson Bennett 

Professor Emeritus of English and Speech 
M.A. (Reg) Diploma in Dramatic, Art, Uni- 
versity of London; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of London; M.A. Ph.D., University of 
Southern California; Postdoctoral study, 
University of Oxford, Shakespeare Insti- 
tute, University of Birmingham. 

Caryl Bloom 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.A., Loyola Marymount University; M.A. 
Loyola Marymount University 

MaryAnn Bonino 

College Professor at Large 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Southern California 

Sister Margaret Clare Borchard, CSJ 

Professor Emeritus of Education Academic 
Resource Personnel II 
B.A, Mount St. Mary's College; M.Ed., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles 

Sister Annette Bower, CSJ 

Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., 
Creighton University; Ph.D., University of 
Arizona, Tucson 



Susan Bowles 

Lecturer in Occupational Therapy 
B.S., University of Puget Sound; M.B.A., 
Pepperdine university 

Dennis Brandon 

Lecturer in Philosophy 
B.A., San Fernando Valley State College; 
M.A., California State University, North- 
ridge 

Jennifer Bright 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College 

Jim Browder 

Lecturer in Philosophy 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
M.A., Northwestern University, Illinois 

Katherine T. Brueck 

Professor of English 
B.A. John Carroll University; M.A., Purdue 
University; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Madeleine Bruning 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
B.S.N., Mount St. Mary's College; MA., 
California State University, Northridge 

Alfred Buchanan 

Lecturer in Biological Sciences 
B.S.C., University of the West Indies; 
M.S.C, PhD., University of Manitoba 

Sandra Bunce 

Instructor in Sociology 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., PhD. 
University of Southern California 

Hallie F. Bundy 

Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Southern California 

Richard Burns 

Lecturer in Pastoral Care Counseling 
BA, University of San Francisco; M.Div., 
Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley; 
M.S.W., University of Southern California, 
L.C.S.W., California 

Cheryl Burton 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College 

Sister Margaret Rose Cafferty, CSJ 

Lecturer in English 



300 FACULTY 



Kate Callaghan 

Lecturer in English 
B.A., Manchester University, England; 
M.S., Guys Hospital Medical School, Lon- 
don, England 

Tori Canillas-Dufau 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
B.A., M.A., California State University, Los 
Angeles 

Anita Candela 

Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Northern Illinois University; M.S., 
University of Oklahoma 

Constance Carlson 

Instructor in Physical Therapy 
B.S.P.T., University of Evansville; M.Ed., 
Mount St. Mary's College 

Lisa Carroll 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., University of Connecticut 

Marie Cash 

Lecturer in Education 
A.A., Citrus College; B.S., California State 
Polytechnic University, Pomona 

Carlos Chavez 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
B.A., California State University, Los An- 
geles 

Joan M. Cho 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., M.S.N., Indiana University 

Sister Rose Catherine Clifford, CSJ 

Associate Professor Emeritus of History 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California, Los Ange- 
les 

Ralph Cioffi 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.A., Pace University; M.Ed., Antioch Col- 
lege; M.A., California State University, Los 
Angeles 

Laura Crandall 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., California State University, Long 
Beach 

Cynthia Crawford 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.A., Washington University, St. Louis; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Kentucky 



Valerie Crooks 

Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A., M.S.W., Wayne State University; 
D.S.W., University of California, Los An- 
geles 

Susan Crowson 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.A., St. Mary's University, San Antonio: 
M.S., Southern Illinois University: Ph.D., 
University of Cincinnati 

Randal Cummings 

Lecturer in Religious Studies 
B.A., California State University, North- 
ridge; M.A., Ph.D., (Candidacy), University 
of California, Los Angeles 

Beverly Dangervil 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S.N., California State University, Los 
Angeles 

James Delahanty 

Professor of Political Science 
B.S., M.A., Rutgers University; Ph.D. Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles; J.D. Loy- 
ola-Marymount University 

Matthew S. Delaney 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 
B.A., Immaculate Heart College; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University 

Paul Delaney 

Lecturer in Biological Sciences 
B.S.C., Loyola-Marymount University; 
M.S.C., Ph.D., University of California, Los 
Angeles; D.C., Los Angeles College of Chi- 
ropractic 

Joan Dickinson-Day 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., Russell SAGE College 

Mary Patricia Disterhoft 

Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., University of Iowa, Iowa City; M.A., 
Pacific Oaks College, Pasadena, California; 
Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School, Clare- 
mont, California 

Arthur Dixon 

Lecturer in Physical Sciences 
B.S., University of Missouri; M.S., Univer- 
sity of California, Santa Barbara 



FACULTY 301 



Elizabeth Dixon 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., University of San Francisco; BA., 
Stanford University 

Sister Rebecca Do an, CSJ 

Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Catholic 
University of America; Ed.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

Marjorie Dobratz 

Professor of Nursing 
Diploma, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of 
Nursing; BSN, MSN, Marquette Univer- 
sity; D.N.Sc, University of San Diego 

Matt Doran 

Professor Emeritus of Music 
B.A., B.M., M.Mus., D.M.A., University of 
Southern California 

Carolyn Douglas 

Media Librarian 
B.A., M.A., University of Southern Califor- 
nia; M.L.S., University of California, Los 
Angles 

Sue Dowden 

Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A., University of Maryland, College 
Park; M.A., University of Maryland, Col- 
lege Park; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
College Park 

Michele Dumont 

Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Cal- 
ifornia State University; Long Beach; 
Ph.D., Boston University 

Sister James Marien Dyer, CSJ 

Instructor in History 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles 

Sister Joseph Adele Edwards, CSJ 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; MA., Uni- 
versity of Southern California 

Marie Egan 

Professor of Religious Studies 
B.A., M.A., Immaculate Heart College; 
S.T.B., S.T.L., S.T.D., Catholic University 
of America 

Anne Eggebroten 

Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 



Terri Eichman 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., California State University Consor- 
tium; M.N., University of California, Los 
Angeles 

Donna Emmanuel 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.M., Webster University; M.A., California 
Family Study Center 

Kayra Emmons 

Lecturer in Occupational Therapy 
B.S., University of Southern California; 
M.A. University of Southern California 

Sister Teresita Espinosa, CSJ 

Professor of Music 
B.M., Mount St. Mary's College; M.M., 
D.M.A., University of Southern California 

Christelle Estrada 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., M.A., Mount St. Mary's College 

Mary Fasani 

Lecturer in Education 
BA, California State University, Long 
Beach; MA., Loyola Marymount Univer- 
sity, Los Angles 

Linda Fazio 

Lecturer in Occupational Therapy 
B.S., Texas Women's University; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of 
North Texas 

Michele Fine 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, 
Los Angeles 

Sister Mary Evelyn Flynn, CSJ 

Assistant Professor of Education 
B A., M.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., 
University of Southern California 

Margaret Frankel 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Uni- 
versity of California, San Francisco 

Andrea French 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Ed.D., Brigham Young Uni- 
versity 



302 FACULTY 



Eugene G. Frick 

Associate Professor of Religious Studies 
B.A., University of Dayton; MA., Ph.D., 
Marquette University 

Kynthia Furgis 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
J.D., Santa Clara University School of Law 

Maureen Gardner 

Lecturer of Nursing 
A. A., Santa Monica College; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Phoenix 

Sister Aline Marie Gerber, CSJ 

Emeritus Professor of Romance Languages 
B.A., University of Southern California; 
M.A., University of California, Berkeley; 
Ph.D., University of California, Los Ange- 
les 

Jean Gima 

Instructor in Nursing 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
B.S.N., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S.N., 
University of California, Los Angeles 

Lance Gist 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
B.A., Holy Names College, Oakland; J.D., 
Gonzaga University, Spokane 

Pamela Gist 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.G.S., Gonzaga University; M.A., PhD., 
University of Michigan 

Debbie Depuy Giunta 

Lecturer in Psychology and Education 
B.A., Stanford University; M.Ed., Boston 
College 

Sharon Golub 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S., M.N., University of California, Los 
Angeles 

Sari Goodman 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
M.A., California State University, Los An- 
geles 

Paul Green 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.S., Biola University, M.A., University of 
California, Irvine; Ph.D., University of Cal- 
ifornia, Irvine 



Lisa Grod 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
A.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; B.S. 
Fairleigh Dickinson University 

Pamela Haldeman 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., PhD., 
University of Southern California 

Susan Hantas 

Lecturer in Associate Nursing Program 
B . S . , Mount St. Mary's College , Los Angeles 

Jacquelyn Herst 

Lecturer in Education 
B A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
M.A., Pepperdine University 

Fehrn Hesse 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
A.A., Pasadena City College; B.S., La Verne 
University; M.S.N. , Azosa Pacific 

Mary Hicks 

Assistant Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.Ph.H., 
University of Michigan 

Lauren Hines 

Lecturer in Physical Education 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles 

Maureen Hirsch 

Instructor in Nursing 
A.A., City College of San Francisco; B.S.N., 
P.H.N, The Consortium of the California 
State University; M.N., University of Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles 

Ruth Hoffman 

Professor Emeritus of Sociology 
B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Ne- 
braska 

Martin Huld 

Lecturer in English 
B.A., California State University, Los An- 
geles; PhD., University of California, Los 
Angeles 

Catherine Ingram 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., Bucknell University; M.S., Boston 
University 



FACULTY 303 



Karen Jensen 

Assistant Vice President, Doheny 
B.S.N., Marquette University; M.N., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., 
University of California, Los Angeles 

Linda Hisako Jensen 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., California State University, Long 
Beach; M.S., University of San Diego 

Doris Johnson 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.A., College of St. Scholastica; M.A., Col- 
lege of St. Scholastica 

Lynn Jones 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., University of Southern California; 
M.S., California State University, Long 
Beach; Ph.D., (Candidacy) University of 
Southern California 

Sheilah Jones 

Lecturer in Religious Studies 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; Ph.D. 
cand., University of Southern California 

Jeffrey Kahn 

Lecture in Business Administration 
B.A., Case Western Reserve University; 
J.D., Cleveland State University 

Millie Kidd 

Associate Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Sister Catherine Therese Knoop, CSJ 

Professor Emeritus of Economics 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Saint 
Louis University; Ph.D., University of Cal- 
ifornia, Berkeley 

Mary Kranz 

Assistant Librarian, Doheny Campus 
B.A., Wittenberg University; M.A., Rosary 
College 

Catherine Kwan 

Professor of Biological Science 
B.S., National Taiwan University; MA., 
State University of South Dakota; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland 

Eric Law 

Lecturer in Associate Nursing Program 
M.A., Episcopal Divinity School, Cam- 
bridge Massachusetts; B.S., Cornell Uni- 
versity 



Sister M. Gerald Leahy, CSJ 

Professor Emeritus of Biological Sciences 
B.A., University of Southern California; 
M.S., Catholic University of America; Ph.D. 

David Leary 

Lecturer in Occupational Therapy 
B.A., Jersy City State College; M.S., Boston 
University 

Cynthia Leavitt 

Lecturer in Psychology 
A.A., West Los Angeles College, Culver 
City, CA; B A., California State University 
Northridge; M.S., California State Univer- 
sity, Los Angeles; PhD, California School of 
Professional Psychology 

Nancy Lee 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., Marquette University, Milwaukee, 
WI; M.S., California State, Northridge 

David Leese 

Professor of English and Business 
Administration 
B.A., Amherst; J.D., Northwestern Univer- 
sity; Member, California Bar; M.A., Ph.D., 
Brandeis University; M.BA, California 
State University, Northridge 

Linda Levin 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
M.A., Imaculate Heart College, Los Ange- 
les; Claremont Graduate School, Clare- 
mont, CA 

Barbara Lewis 

Lecturer in Physical Education 
B.A., University of Vermont, Burlington, 
Vermont 

Eric Lewis 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., California State University, Long 
Beach 

Jane Lingua 

Lecturer in Biological Sciences 
B.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Califor- 



Victoria Loschuk 

Lecturer in Art 
B.F.A., University of Calgary, Calgary, Al- 
berta, Canada; M.F.A., York University, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada 



304 FACULTY 



Verle Lubberden 

Assistant Professor Emeritus of Education 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Califor- 



Cheryl L. Mabey 

Associate Professor of History I Political 

Science 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Pur- 
due University; J.D., 

Corinne Mabry 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville; 
M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville; 
Ed.D., George Peabody College at Vander- 
bilt University 

Carol Mack 

Lecturer in Associate Nursing Program 
B.A., Pomona College, Claremont, CA; 
M.A., California State University, Los An- 
geles; B.S., Consortium of the California 
State University, Long Beach, CA; M.S., 
University of California, Los Angeles 

Mary Madda 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota 

Susan Mais 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., University of California, Los Angeles; 
M.A., New York University, New York 

Margaret Martinello 

Lecturer in English 
B.A., University of Waterloo; M.A., York 
University; PhD, York University, Toronto, 
Canada 

Eileen McArow 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.N., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles 

Meg McCarthy-Marple 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., University of San Francisco; M.S., 
California State University, Dominguez 
Hills 

Susan McDonnell 

Lecturer in Art 
B.A., Art Center College of Design; M.F.A, 
Art Center College of Design 



Sister Mary McKay, CSJ 

Associate Professor of Religious Studies 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Du- 
quesne University; Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame 

Patricia Melnick 

Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., California 
State University, Los Angeles 

Bernadette Mendiondo 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles 

Terri Mendoza 

Lecturer in Education 
BA, Loyola Marymount University, Los 
Angeles; M.A., California State University, 
Long Beach; M.S., Mount St. Mary's Col- 
lege, Los Angeles; PhD, University South- 
ern California 

Sister Eloise Therese Mescal, CSJ 

Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, 
Los Angeles; Graduate Study, Sorbonne, 
Pris; Laval University, Quebec; University 
of Lausanne, Switzerland; Visiting Profes- 
sor, University of Louvain, Belgium 

Susan Meyer 

Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S.N., 
CSU Dominguez Hills 

Reverend Aloysius Michael 

Associate Professor of Religious Studies 
B.S., University of Madras; M.A., College of 
Jesuits (Shenabaganur, India); M.Th., In- 
stitute of Philosophy and Religion (Poona, 
India); M.Ed., Loyola University, Los An- 
geles; S.T.D., Gregorian University, Rome 

Paula Miller 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S.N., Consortium of California State Uni- 
versity; M.S.N., University of California, 
Dominguez Hills 

Veronica Miller 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
B.S., California State University, Hay- 
ward; M.B.A., California State University, 
Northridge 

Miyo Minato 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
B.S., University of California, Los Angeles; 
M.S., University of California, Los Angeles 



FACULTY 305 



Cynthia Moore 

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 
B.S., Certificate, Russell Sage College; 
M.S.P.T., University of Southern Califor- 
nia 

Dennis Morgan 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
A.A., El Camino College; B.S., California 
State University, Dominguez Hills; M.B.A. 
California State University, Long Beach 

Andrea Natker-French 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., MA., University of Illinois; Ph.D., 
Brigham Young University 

Marie Alexis Navarro 

Professor of Religious Studies 
B.A., Immaculate Heart College; M.A., For- 
dham University; Ph.D., St. Michael's Col- 
lege, University of Toronto 

Charlene Neimi 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S.N, M.S., Marymount College, Los An- 
geles 

Craig Newsam 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., Holstra University, Hempteore, NY; 
M.A., University of California, Los Angeles 

Marsha Nickerson 

Lecturer in Associate Nursing Program 
Santa Monica College; B.S.N., Mount St. 
Mary's College, Los Angeles 

Ronald J. Oard 

Professor Emeritus of History and 
Political Sciences 
B.A., Regis College; M.A., Creighton Uni- 
versity; M.P.A., University of California, 
Los Angeles; Ph.D., St. Louis University 

Reverend George O'Brien 

Associate Professor of English 
B.A., St. John's College; M.A., Loyola Mar- 
ymount University; Ed.D., University of 
Southern California 

Sister Leo Francis O'Callaghan, CSJ 

Lecturer in Physical Sciences I Math 
B.S., M.A., Mount St. Mary's College, Los 
Angeles 

Rebecca Otten 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S.U., 
California State University, Dominguez 
Hills, Carson, CA 



Mary Paquette 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
B.S., University of Vermont; M.N., Univer- 
sity of California, Los Angeles 

Stephen Paulseth 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., University of Waterloo, Ontario; M.S. , 
University of Southern California 

Karen Perell 

Research Director in Physical Therapy 
B.S., M.S., PhD., University of California, 
Los Angeles 

Nancy Pine 

Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana; 
M.A., Stanford University, Stanford, Ca; 
PhD., Claremont Graduate School, Clare- 
mont, CA 

Karen Pinson 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
AA., Mount St. Mary's College; B.S., Mount 
St. Mary's College 

Frances Powell 

Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., Mississippi University for Women; 
M.A., California State University, Long 
Beach; Ph.D., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles 

Sister Carol Purzycki, CSJ 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.N., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh 

El via Quijano 

Lecturer in Modern Languages 
B.A., M.A., University of California, Los 
Angeles 

Claudia Reed 

Director of Mount Libraries 
B.A., University of California, Los Angles; 
M.A., San Francisco State University; 
M.L.S., University of California, Los An- 
geles 

Lena Rivken 

Lecturer in Art 
B.F.A., M.F.A., University of California, Ir- 



Deborah Roberts 

Lecturer in Nursing 
AA, Mt. San Antonio College; B.S., Cali- 
fornia State University, Los Angeles; 



306 FACULTY 



Pamela Roberts 

Lecturer in Occupational Therapy 
B.S. Washington University School of Med- 
icine; B.A. Washington University M.S., 
California State University, Northridge 

Josie Rodriguez-Hewitt 

Lecturer in Philosophy 
B.A., , Princeton University 

Dorian Rose 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 

Ann Marie Ross 

Lecturer in English 
B.A., California State University, Los An- 
geles; M.A., California State University, 
Los Angeles; PhD, University of California, 
Los Angeles 

Mary Jane Ross 

Lecturer in English 
B.A., M.A., Pepperdine, Los Angeles 

Sister Calista Roy, CSJ 

Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
B.A, Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California, Los Ange- 
les 

Marsha Sato 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.N., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles 

Karen Schoen 

Lecturer in Psychology 
A. A., West Los Angeles College; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Southern California; PhD., Uni- 
versity of Southern California 

Georgia Scott 

Lecturer in Art 
B.A., Stephens College; M.A., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

Mary Sedgwick 

Academic Resource Personnel III 
B.A., M.A., California State University, 
Long Beach; M.A., in L.S., Immaculate 
Heart College 

Eleanor Siebert 

Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., Duke University; Ph.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 



Ellen Siegmund 

Instructor in Occupational Therapy 
B.S., Towson State University; M.S., Cali- 
fornia State University, Los Angeles 

Frederick Simonelli 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., John Carroll University; M.P.A., Uni- 
versity of San Francisco; M.A., California 
State University, Sacramento; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Nevada 

Kanya Sitanggan 

Assistant Professor of Associate Nursing 

Program 
B.S., Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thai- 
land; M.P.H., Loma Linda University; D. 
P.H., Loma Linda University 

Mary Sloper 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College, Los Ange- 
les; M.N., University of California, Los An- 
geles; M.B.A., California State University, 
Dominguez Hills, Carson 

Karl Snider 

Lecturer in Music 
B.A., Pomona College; MA., University of 
Rochester; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

George E. Snow 

Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.A., Rockhurst College; M.A., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, Boulder 

Victor Staforelli 

Lecturer in Religious Studies 
B.A., Universidad de Chile, Santiago, 
Chile; M.A., Georgetown University, Wash- 
ington D.C; M.S., University of Notre 
Dame, South Bend, Indiana 

Michele A. Starkey 

Instructor in Physical Sciences 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College 

Eric Stemp 

Assistant Professor of Physical Sciences 
B.S., University of Denver; M.S., North- 
western University; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 

Delores Stevens 

Lecturer in Music 
B.M., University of Kansas; Concert artist 






FACULTY 307 



Victoria Stevens 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.A., University of Kansas; M.A., Califor- 
nia Graduate Institute; 

Daniel Stogryn 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 

Victoria Stevens 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.A., University of Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., 
California Graduate Institute 

Betty Tabora 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., University of Southern California, 
Los Angeles; M.A., Loyola Marymount; 
Ph.D., University of California, Los Ange- 
les 

Wanda Teays 

Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., California State University, Fuller- 
ton; M.A., University of Alberta, Edmon- 
ton; M.T.S. Harvard University; Ph.D., 
Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec 

Susan Terrell 

Lecturer in Physical Therapy 
B.S., Simmons College 

Lisa Thomas-Barile 

Lecturer in Nursing 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College 

Helen Tsuda 

Instructor in Physical Therapy 
B.S., University of California, Davis, CA; 
M.A., Stanford University, Stanford, CA 

Sharon A. Vairo 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., Wayne State University; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Colorado; D.N.S., University of 
San Diego 

Sister Kieran Vaughan, CSJ 

Professor of Education 
B.A., M.S., Mount St. Mary's College; 
Ed.D., University of California, Los Ange- 
les 

Susan Vaughn 

Lecturer in Journalism - Freelance writer 

Rita R. Veatch 

Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., 
Teachers College, Columbia University 



Ahmad Vessal 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
B.A., Tehran University; M.S., American 
University of Beruit; PhD., Clark Univer- 
sity 

Richard Vladovic 

Lecturer in Education 
BA., California State University, Long 
Beach; M.S., Pepperdine University; Ed.D., 
University of California, Los Angeles 

Christopher Walker 

Lecturer in Music 
B.A., Bristol University; Certificate in Mu- 
sic Education, Trent Park College, London 

Ming-Fang Wang 

Instructor in Associate Nursing Program 
B A., University of La Verne; M.S., Califor- 
nia State University, Los Angeles 

Cynthia Wederick 

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 
B.A., McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, 
Canada; M.S., University of Southern Cal- 
ifornia, Los Angeles 

Katherine Whitman 

Associate Professor of Business 
Administration 
B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles; Gradu- 
ate Study, Temple University 

Anne Wilcoxen 

Lecturer in Education 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., George 
Washington University; Ph.D., University 
of California, Los Angeles 

Jeanne Willette 

Lecturer in Art 
BA. California State University, Los An- 
geles; M.A., California State University, 
Long Beach; Ph.D. University of California, 
Santa Barbara 

Sister Mary Williams, CSJ 

Professor of English 
B.A., College of St. Catherine; M.A., Ph.D., 
Stanford University; Postdoctoral study, 
Oxford University, Shakespeare Institute, 
Stratford 

Michelle Windmueller 

Lecturer in Education 
BA., California State University, North- 
ridge; M.A., California State University, 
Los Angeles 



308 FACULTY 



Patricia Woodlin 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., California State University, Los An- 
geles; MA., California State University, 
Los Angeles; Ph.D., Union Institute 



Peter Zafares 

Lecturer in Music 
B.F.A., M.F.A., California Institute of the 

Arts 

Marie Zeuthen 

Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Ph.D., 
University of California, Los Angeles 



AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 309 



Teacher Education Program - 
Cooperating Staff 

Early Childhood Education 

and Teacher Preparation Programs 

Cooperating Schools 

Anna Bing Arnold Child Care Center 

Audubon Middle School (LAUSD) 

John Tracy Clinic 

Mount St. Mary's Child Development Center 

Trade Tech Child Development Center 

University of Southern California School for Early Childhood Education 

Camellia Avenue School (LAUSD) 

Coliseum Street School (LAUSD) 

Jefferson High School (LAUSD) 

Logan Street School (LAUSD) 

Los Angeles High School (LAUSD) 

Marengo School (South Pasadena Unified School District) 

Micheltorena Elementary School (LAUSD) 

St. Vincent School 

Belmont High School (LAUSD) 

Mount Vernon Junior High School (LAUSD) 

Santa Monica High School (Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District) 

Whelan School (Lennox School District) 

Jefferson (Lennox) 

Stevenson Middle (LAUSD) 

Leo Politi School (LAUSD) 

Esperanza School (LAUSD) 

Sixth Avenue School (LAUSD) 

Park Ave (LAUSD) 

Cahuenga (LAUSD) 

Dayton Heights (LAUSD) 

Harrison Street (LAUSD) 

Garvanza (LAUSD) 

Bushnell Way (LAUSD) 

Foshay Learning Center (LAUSD) 

Monterey Highland (Alhambra) 

Applied Music Faculty 

Piano: Andrea Anderson, Sister Teresita Espinosa, Sister Nancy Fierro, Ruth Goldin, 
Joanna Graudan, Randal Lawson, Sister Dolores Cecile Schembri, Bernardo Segall, 
Delores Stevens, Chet Swiatkowksi, Hak Soon Harm Swiatkowski, Robert Turner. 
Organ: Elfreda Baum, William C. Beck, Frank Brownstead, Harold Daugherty, Jr., 
Marcia Farmer, Sister Maura Jean Parsons, James Walker. 



310 AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 



Voice: Marie Gibson, Kenneth Knight, LeNore Porter, Florence Riggs-Hellen, Seth 

Riggs, Karl Snider, Joyce Sweeney. 

Harp: Dorothy Remsen, Dorothy Victor. 

Harpsichord: Frederic Hammond, William Neil Roberts. 

Violin: Briana Ackerman. 

Viola: David Stockhammer. 

Cello: Gianna Abondolo, Janice Foy, Victor Sazer. 

Bass: Nico Abondolo. 

Flute: Louise DiTullio, Susan Greenberg, Arthur Hoberman, Sheridan Stokes. 

Oboe: Salvatore Spano, David Sherr. 

Clarinet: Kalman Bloch, Edmund Chassman, David Sasaki. 

Bassoon: Norman Herzberg. 

Saxophone: Milton Hall, David Sherr. 

French Horn: Gale Robinson, Paul Stevens. 

Trumpet: Stewart Rupp. 

Trombone: Miles Anderson. 

Tuba: John Johnson. 

Percussion: Thomas D. Raney, Kenneth Watson. 

Classical Guitar: Anthony Lupica, Vincent Macaluso, Peter Zaferes. 

Folk Guitar: Anthony Lupica, Peter Zaferes. 



Nursing Program 
Cooperating Agencies 



Anheuser-Busch 

Van Nuys, California 

Children's Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

City of Los Angeles Occupational 
Health 

Los Angeles, California 

Clinica Para Los Americas 

Los Angeles, California 

Corrine Seed University Elementary 
School 

Los Angeles, California 

County of Los Angeles 

Department of Health Services 

Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital 

Inglewood, California 

Daniel Freeman Marina Hospital 

Marina Del Rey, California 

Daniel Freeman Home Health 

Culver City, California 



Garfield Medical Center 

Monterey Park, California 

Good Samaritan Hospital Home 
Health Agency 

Los Angeles, California 

Harbor UCLA Medical Center 

Torrance, California 

Hollywood- Wilshire Health Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Holy Cross Medical Center 

Mission Hills, California 

Hospital Home Health Care 

Torrance, California 

Huntington Memorial Hospital 

Pasadena, California 

Jewish Home for the Aged 

Reseda, California 

Kaiser Foundation Hospital 

Hollywood, California 

Kaiser Foundation Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 



AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 311 



Kaiser Foundation Hospital 

Panorama City, California 

Kaiser Foundation Hospital 

West Los Angeles, California 

Little Company of Mary Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Los Angeles Free Clinic 

Los Angeles, California 

Los Angeles Unified School District 

Los Angeles, California 

Loyola Marymount University Health 
Services 

Los Angeles, California 

Motion Pictures and Television Fund 
Hospital 

Woodland Hills, California 

NBC Studios 

Burbank, California 

Olive View Medical Center 

Sylmar, California 

Santa Monica Unified School District 

Santa Monica, California 



St. John's Hospital and Health Center 

Santa Monica, California 

St. Joseph's Medical Center Home 
Health Care Agency 

Burbank, California 

St. Vincent's Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Teradyne, Inc. 

Agoura, California 

UCLA Hospital and Clinic 

Los Angeles, California 

Union Rescue Mission 

Los Angeles, California 

Valley Presbyterian 

Van Nuys, California 

Veterans Medical Center 

West Los Angeles, California 

Visiting Nurse Association of Los 
Angeles 

Los Angeles, California 

West VNA 

Santa Monica, California 



Occupational Therapy Assistant 

Program 

Clinical Affiliates 



Alamitos-Belmont Rehab. Hospital 

Long Beach, California 

Arcadia Methodist Hospital 

Arcadia, California 

Bakersfield Regional Rehab. Hospital 

Bakersfield, California 

Bay Harbor Hospital 

Harbor City, California 

California Children Services 

Los Angeles, California 

California Children Services 

Santa Barbara, California 



California Children Services 

Ventura, California 

California Hand Center 

Sherman Oaks, California 

Casa Colina Hospital for Rehab. 
Medicine 

Pomona, California 

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Center for Sports and Wellness 

Mission Viejo, California 

Chico Community Hospital 

Chico, California 



312 AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 



Children's Hospital of Los Angeles 

Los Angeles, California 

Community Convalescent Center 

Riverside, California 

Dallas Rehab. Institute 

Dallas, Texas 

Daniel Freeman Marina Hospital 

Marina Del Rey, California 

Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital 

Inglewood, California 

Downey Community Hospital 

Downey, California 

Fairview Developmental Hospital 

Costa Mesa, California 

Gateways Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Glendale Adventist Medical Center 

Glendale, California 

Grossmont Hospital 

La Mesa, California 

Hospital of the Good Samaritan 

Los Angeles, California 

Huntington Memorial Hospital 

Pasadena, California 

Ingleside Hospital 

Rosemead, California 

lixtercommunity Hospital 

Covina, California 

Kaiser-Permanente (Sunset) 

Los Angeles, California 

Kaiser-Permanente (West Los 
Angeles) 

Los Angeles, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

Woodland Hills, California 

Loma Linda Behavioral Medical 
Center 

Loma Linda, California 

LA County/USC Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Masada Group Homes 

Lawndale, California 

Motion Picture and Television Fund 

Woodland Hills, California 



Memorial Hospital of Long Beach 

Long Beach, California 

Northridge Hospital 

Northridge, California 

Olive View Medical Center 

Sylmar, California 

Orthopaedic Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Rancho Los Amigos 

Downey, California 

Rehab. Hospital of the Pacific 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

St. Joseph Occupational Health 
Center 

Burbank, California 

St. Francis Hospital 

Lynwood, California 

St. John's Hospital 

Oxnard, California 

St. John's Hospital and Medical 
Center 

Santa Monica, California 

St. Mary's Regional Medical Center 

Long Beach, California 

San Bernardino Community Hospital 

San Bernardino, California 

Santa Monica College 

Santa Monica, California 

The Hand Works 

Los Angeles, California 

Temarish Medical Services 

Lancaster, California 

Torrance Memorial Hospital 

Torrance, California 

Tri-City Hospital 

Oceanside, California 

UCLA Hospital and Clinics 

Los Angeles, California 

UCLA Rehab. 

Los Angeles, California 

UCI Medical Center 

Orange, California 

Valley Hospital Medical Center 

Van Nuys, California 



AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 313 



Valley Presbyterian Medical Center 

Long Beach, California 

VA Medical Center Sepulveda 

Sepulveda, California 



White Memorial Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Wilshire Metropolitan Hand Rehab. 
Center 

Los Angeles, California 



Physical Therapy Programs: 
Clinical Affiliates 



Alamitos-Belmont Rehab. Hospital 

Long Beach, California 

Alaska Native Medical Center 

Anchorage, Alaska 

Atlantis PT 

Torrance, California 

At Work Medical Center 

Whittier, California 

Bakersfield Memorial Hospital 
Bakersfield, California 

Bakersfield Regional Rehabilitation 
Hospital 

Bakersfield, California 

Bay Area Hospital 

Coos Bay, Oregon 

Beach Physical Therapy 

Seal Beach, California 

Beverly Manor Convalescent Hospital 

Canoga Park, California 

Big Island Physical Therapy Care 

Hilo, Hawaii 

Braintree Hospital 

Braintree, Massachuesetts 

Brea Community Hospital 

Brea, California 

Brotman Medical Center 

Culver City, California 

Brunswick Hospital Center 

Amityville, New York 

Buena PT Services, Inc. 

Ventura, California 

Burger PT & Rehabilitation 

Folsom, California 



California Children Services 

Bakersfield, California (Kern Co.) 

California Children Services 

Los Angeles, California 

California Children Services 

Martinez, California 

California Children Services 

San Diego, California 

California Pacific Medical Center 

San Francisco, California 

California Children Services 

San Luis Obispo, California 

California Children Services 

San Rafael, California 

California Children Services 

Santa Ana, California (Orange County) 

California Children Services 

Santa Barbara, California 

California Children Services 

Ventura, California 

CARE Enterprises 

Tustin, California 

CareMark Orthopedic Services 

Chicago, Illinois 

Casa Colina Hospital for Rehab. 
Medicine 

Pomona, California 

Castle Medical Center 

Kailua, Hawaii 

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Centre for Neurological Skills 

Bakersfield, California 



314 AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 



Centinela Hospital Medical Center 

Inglewood, California 

Century City Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Chico Community Hospital 

Chico, California 

Children's Hospital of Los Angeles 

Los Angeles, California 

Children's Hospital of San Diego 

San Diego, California 

Christ Hospital & Medical Center 

Oaklawn, Illinois 

City of Hope National Medical Center 

Duarte, California 

Coast 

Camarillo, California 

Coast Physical Therapy & Sports 
Medical 

La Jolla, California 

Cognitive Rehabilitation Services 

Redondo Beach, California 

Columbus Hospital 

Chicago, Illinois 

Columbus Wellness & Rehabilitation 
Center 

Great Falls, Montana 

Community Convalescent Center 

Riverside, California 

Community Hospital of Monterey 
Peninsula 

Monterey, California 

Community Hospital of Ventura 

Ventura, California 

Community Medical Center 

W. Toms River, New Jersey 

Community Medical Group 

Riverside, California 

Coppersmith Physical Therapy 
Center 

Seattle, Washington 

Cortland Memorial Hospital 

Cortland, New York 

Dakota Rehabilitation 

Fargo, North Dakota 



Daniel Freeman Marina Hospital 

Marina del Rey, California 

Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital 

Inglewood, California 

Da vies Medical Center 

San Francisco, California 

Desert Hospital 

Palm Springs, California 

Donald Sharp Memorial Community 
Hospital 

San Diego, California 

Dos Caminos Physical Therapy 

Camarillo, California 

Downey Community Hospital 

Downey, California 

Doxey-Hatch Medical Center 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Ed Ayub Ortho and Sports PT 

San Diego, California 

Eisenhower Medical Center 

Rancho Mirage, California 

Fortenasce & Association 

Arcadia, California 

Fountain Valley Regional Hospital 
and Medical Center 

Fountain Valley, California 

Fresno Valley Medical Center 

Fresno, California 

Glendale Adventist Medical Center 

Glendale, California 

Glinn & Giordano, Physical Therapy, 
Inc. 

Bakersfield, California 

Golden State Rehabilitation 

San Ramon, California 

Goleta Valley Community Hospital 

Santa Barbara, California 

Good Shepherd Rehabilitation 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Granada Hills Hospital 

Granada Hills, California 

Green Mountain Rehabilitation 

Bremerton, Washington 



AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 315 



Grossmont Hospital 

La Mesa, California 

Hairston and Daley Physical Therapy 

Orange, California 

Harbor View Medical Center 

Seattle, Washington 

Harmarville Rehabilitation Center 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Health South Sports Injury 
Rehabilitation 

San Diego, California 

Health South Sports Medicine and 
Rehabilitation 

Santa Rosa, California 

Heritage Rehabilitation Center 

Denver, Colorado 

HoPT 

Tarzana, California 

Hoag Memorial Hospital 

Newport Beach, California 

Holy Cross Medical Center 

Mission Hills, California 

Huntington Medical Hospital 

Huntington Beach, California 

Huntington Memorial Hospital 

Pasadena, California 

Independent Physical Therapy 

Torrance, California 

Intercommunity Hospital 

Covina, California 

Island Sport Physical Therapy 

E. Northport, New York 

John Muir Hospital 

Walnut Creek, California 

Judy Verbanets, Physical Therapy 

Del Mar, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

Anaheim, California 

Kaiser-Permanente (Sunset) 

Los Angeles, California 

Kaiser-Permanente (West Los 
Angeles) 

Los Angeles, California 



Kaiser-Permanente 

Fresno, California 

Kaiser-Permanente (Northern 
California) 

Oakland, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

Panorama City, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

Redwood City, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

Sacramento, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

San Francisco, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

Santa Clara, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

So. Sacramento, California 

Kaiser-Permanente 

Woodland Hills, California 

Kapiolani Medical Center for Women 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Kaweah Delta Rehabilitation Center 

Visalia, California 

Kentfield Rehabilitation Hospital 

San Rafael, California 

Kerlan-Jobe Orthopedic Clinic 

Inglewood, California 

Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, 
Inc. 

West Orange, New Jersey 

Kona Rehabilitation & Sports 
Medical 

Kailua-Kona, Hawaii 

Kuakini Medical Center 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Lancaster Sports Medicine & Rehab. 
Ctr., Inc. 

Lancaster, California 

Lanterman State Developmental 
Center 

Pomona, California 

La Palma Intercommunity Hospital 

La Palma, California 



316 AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 



LDS Hospital 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Leon S. Peters Rehabilitation Center 

Fresno, California 

Little Company of Mary Hospital 

Torrance, California 

Little Company of Mary-Pavillion 

Torrance, California 

LA County/USC Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Long Beach Community Hospital 

Long Beach, California 

Los Robles Regional Medical Center 

Thousand Oaks, California 

Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Mayo Clinic - Scottsdale 

Scottsdale, Arizona 

McKenzie-Williamette Hospital 

Springfield, Oregon 

Medical Center of Tarzana 

Tarzana, California 

Memorial Hospital of Glendale 

Glendale, California 

Memorial Hospital of Long Beach 

Long Beach, California 

Memorial Hospital 

Modesto, California 

Memorial Medical Center 

Savannah, Georgia 

Mendocino Coast District 

Fort Bragg, California 

Mercy Hospital of Sacramento 

Sacramento, California 

Mercy Hospital Medical Center 

San Diego, California 

Mercy Medical Center 

Redding, California 

Merrithew Memorial Hospital 

Martinez, California 

Methodist Hospital of Southern 
California 

Arcadia, California 



Methodist Hospital 

Sacramento, California 

Mills Memorial Hospital 

San Mateo, California 

Mission Hospital Regional Medical 
Center 

Mission Viejo, California 

Mount Diablo Hospital 

Concord, California 

Nassau County Medical Center 

East Meadow, New York 

North Coast Rehabilitation Center 

Santa Rosa, California 

North County Physical Therapy 

Paco Robles, California 

Northridge Hospital 

Northridge, California 

NT Enloe Memorial Hospital 

Chico, California 

Ocean Park Orthopedic & Sports 

Santa Monica, California 

Olive View Medical Center 

Sylmar, California 

Orthopaedic Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Orthopedic & Neuro Rehabilitation 
(ONR) 

Los Gatos, California 

Orthopedic & Sports P.T., Inc. 

Cupertino, California 

Orthopedic Sport 

Sherman Oaks, California 

Pacific Hospital of Long Beach 

Long Beach, California 

Penisula Hospital 

San Mateo, California 

Penninsula Sports Medical & 
Rehabilitation Center 

Daly City, California 

Performing Arts Physical Therapy 

West Hollywood, California 

Peters and Starkey P.T. Corp. 

Roseville, California 



AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 317 



Physical Therapy Sports Institute 

Hemet, California 



Rosewood Medical Center 

Houston, Texas 



Piedmont Hospital 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Pleasant Valley Hospital 

Camarillo, California 

Pomona Valley Hospital 

Pomona, California 

Porter Memorial Hospital 
Denver, Colorado 

Presbyterian Intercommunity 
Hospital 

Whittier, California 

Professional PT Associates 

Whittier, California 

Progressive PT, Inc. 

Tarzana, California 

Providence Medical Center 

Seattle, Washington 

Queen of the Valley 

Napa, California 

Queen of the Valley Hospital 

W. Covina, California 

Queens Medical Center 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center 

Downey, California 

Redding Hospital 

Redding, California 

Redlands Community Hospital 

Redlands,California 

Rehab. Hospital of the Pacific 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Rehab. Institute of Orange 

Orange, California 

Rehab. Hospital of Nevada-Reno 

Reno, Nevada 

Rehab. Institute of Santa Barbara 

Santa Barbara, California 

Riverside PT 

Riverside, California 

Rose Rehabilitation 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



St. Bernardine Hospital 

San Bernardino, California 

St. Francis Hospital 

Lynwood, California 

St. Francis Hospital of Santa Barbara 

Santa Barbara, California 

St. Francis Medical Center 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

St. Francis Memorial Hospital 

San Francisco, California 

St. John's Hospital 

Oxnard, California 

St. John's Hospital and Medical 
Center 

Santa Monica, California 

St. Joseph Hospital of Orange 

Orange, California 

St. Joseph's Hospital 

Tucson, Arizona 

St. Joseph Medical Center 

Burbank, California 

St. Jude Hospital and Rehab. Center 

Fullerton, California 

St. Luke's Episcopal Medical Towers 

Houston, Texas 

St. Luke's Medical Center 

Pasadena, California 

St. Mary's Hospital 

Reno, Nevada 

St. Mary's Hospital and Medical 
Center 

San Francisco, California 

St. Mary's Hospital 

Tucson, Arizona 

St. Mary's Medical Center 

Tucson, Arizona 

St. Mary's Regional Medical Center 

Long Beach, California 

St. Vincent's Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Sacred Heart General Hospital 

Eugene, Oregon 



318 AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 



Saddleback Community Hospital 

Laguna Hills, California 

San Bernardino Community Hospital 

San Bernardino, California 

San Diego Rehabilitation Institute 

San Diego, California 

San Dimas Community Hospital 

San Dimas, California 

San Gabriel Valley Medical Center 

San Gabriel, California 

San Jose Hospital 

San Jose, California 

San Pedro & Peninsula Hospital 

San Pedro, California 

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital 

Santa Barbara, California 

Santa Clara Valley Medical Center 

San Jose, California 

Santa Monica Hospital & Medical 
Center 

Santa Monica, California 

Scripps Memorial - Encinitas 

Encinitas, California 

Scripps Clinic and Research 
Foundation 

LaJolla, California 

Scripps Clinic - Rancho Bernardo 

San Deigo, California 

Sentara-Leigh Hospital 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Center 

San Diego, California 

Southern Reg. Medical Center 

Riverdale, Georgia 

Sharon Grady 

Fountain Valley, California 

Sherman Oaks Community Hospital 

Sherman Oaks, California 

Shriners Hospital 

San Francisco, California 

Sierra Vista Hospital 

San Luis Obispo, California 

Simi Valley Adventist Hospital 

Simi Valley, California 



South Bay Rehabilitation Center 

National City, California 

Sports and Orthopedic Physical 
Therapy Specialist 

San Diego, California 

Sports Conditioning Ortho. Rehab. 

Denver, Colorado 

Sports Rehabilitation Center 

Anaheim, California 

Stanford Rehabilitation 

Menlo Park, California 

Stanford University Hospital 

Stanford, California 

Stephenson-Holtz & Assoc. 

Watsonville, California 

Stewart Rehabilitation Center 

Ogden, Utah 

Straub Clinic & Hospital 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Sunrise Hospital-Medical Center 

Las Vegas, Nevada 

The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital 

Murray, Utah 

Sutter General Hospital 

Sacramento, California 

Sutter Memorial Hospital 

Sacramento, California 

Therapy West 

Culver City, California 

Thompson Physical Therapy & 
Assoc, Inc. 

Yuba City, California 

Torrance Memorial Hospital 

Torrance, California 

Touro Rehabilitation Center 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

Tri-City Hospital 

Oceanside, California 

Trinity Medical Center- West Campus 

Rock Island, Illinois 

Turlock Diagnostic Center 

Turlock, California 

Tustin Rehabilitation 

Tustin, California 



AGENCIES/AFFILIATES 319 



UCLA - Harbor General Hospital 

Torrance, California 

UCLA Hospital and Clinics 

Los Angeles, California 

Ukiah Valley Medical Center 

Ukiah, California 

University Hospital - UCSD 

San Diego, California 

USC University Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Valley Hospital Medical Center 

Van Nuys, California 

VA Medical Center - Wadsworth 

Los Angeles, California 

VA San Diego 

San Diego, California 

VA Medical Center Long Beach 

Long Beach, California 

Visiting Nurses Association of Orange 

Irvine, California 



Walker PT 

Orange, California 

Washoe Medical Center 

Reno, Nevada 

Western Medical Center 

Santa Ana, California (Orange County) 

Western Rehabilitation Institute 

Sandy, Utah 

West Hills Reg. Medical Center 

West Hills, California 

White Memorial Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 

Wilshire Center Physical Therapy 

Los Angeles, California 

Wolfson Rehabilitation Center 

Wimbledon, England 

Work Right-St. Luke's Hospital 

San Francisco, California 



320 Index 



INDEX 



Academic Advisement 44, 59 

Academic Advisement Center 44 

Academic Calendar 4 

Academic Dishonesty 36 

Academic Information 31 

Academic Integrity 36-37 

Academic Internship 36 

Academic Petitions 39 

Academic Policies 

Associate Degree 42-44 

Baccalaureate Degree 31-41 

Graduate Degree Programs 70-74 

Academic Support Services 

Associate Programs 44 

Baccalaureate Programs 59 

Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing 

Program 194 

Accreditations 2 

Activities 

Associate 46 

Baccalaureate 62 

Administrative Officers 295 

Administrative Services Degree/ 

Credential 131 

Admissions 

Undergraduate 17-22 

Graduate Students 68 

Hope Program 186 

Intercampus Transfers 21 

International Students 21 

Transfer Students 19 

Weekend College 20 

Advanced Placement 22 

Advanced Standing 40 

Affirmative Action 2 

Alumnae Association 6 

Alumnae Scholarship 23 

American Studies 76 

Application for Degree 41 

Applied Music Faculty 309 

Archives 10 

Art 79 

Art/Music Requirement 51 

Arts and Sciences Requirement 51 

Associate Degree Program 42-48 

Athletics 212 

Attendance 35 

Audit 32 

Bachelors Degree Program 

(Baccalaureate) 49-66 

BCLAD Emphasis 125 

Biochemistry 85 

Biological Sciences 87 

Board of Trustees 295 

Buckley Amendment 11 



Business Administration 96 

Calendar 4, 10 

Campus Ministry 

Chalon Campus 63 

Doheny Campus 47 

Career Planning Center 

Chalon Campus 64 

Doheny Campus 47 

Center for Cultural Fluency 10 

Certificate Programs Information 

Advanced Religious Studies 9 

Gerontology 8 

Graduate Religious Studies 9 

Hispanic Pastoral Ministry 9 

Pastoral Care/Counseling 9 

Youth and Young Adult 

Ministry 9 

Physical Therapy Assistant 8 

Chalon Campus Description 12 

Chemistry Ill 

Child Development 115 

Child Development Center 15 

Child Development Teacher Permit . . 120 

CLAD Emphasis 125 

Classification of Students 41 

Class Level 41 

Coe Library 9 

College Skills 45 

Commencement 4 

Communication Skills 51 

Commuter Services 64 

Comprehensive Student Fee 27 

Computer Labs 45 

Contemporary Econ or Politics 

Requirement 54 

Counseling Degree 241 

Counseling Services 

Chalon Campus 63 

Doheny Campus 46 

Course Fees 28 

Course Load 70 

Course Numbers and Designation . . 71, 75 

Courses of Instruction 75 

Credential Course Equivalency 128 

Credential Programs 

See Education, Gerontology, Physical 
Therapy, Religious Studies for 
specific information. 

Credentials 119 

Credit by exam 39 

Credit/No Credit grade 33, 72 

Credit Load 43, 70 

Cross-Registration, UCLA 61 

Dean's List 34 

Deferred Payments 30 



Index 321 



Degree Application 41, 70 

Degree Programs 

Graduate 8 

Undergraduate 6-7 

Degree Requirements 

Associate 42-43 

Baccalaureate 50 

Deposit 

Housing 27 

Tuition 27 

Designation of Credits and Courses 75 

Directed Study/Independent Study 36 

Dismissal 38, 74 

Disqualification 38 

Doheny Campus Description 15 

Double Baccalaureate 58 

Double Major 58 

Early Childhood Education 119 

Economics Courses 118 

Education 119 

Elementary Teaching 121 

Employment, Student 26 

English 145 

Expenses 27-30 

Faculty 295 

Family Education and Privacy Act 11 

Fees 27-30 

Financial Aid 23-26 

Fitness Education 48, 66 

Foreign Language Requirement 54 

French 153 

FPLUS (Federal Parent Loans for 

Undergrad Students) 25 

Future Teacher Scholarship 23 

General Studies Curriculum 50 

Double counting 57 

Requirements 51 

Gerontology 156 

Grades and Grading Policies 

Graduate 72 

Undergraduate 31, 32 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 
Graduation GPA 

Requirement 31, 42, 70 

Graduate Council 74 

Graduate Degree Programs 67-74 

Academic Policies 70-74 

Admission Policies 68-70 

Graduate Program Application 68 

Graduate Program Tuition 24 

Graduate Religious Studies 

Certificates 257 

Graduation 4 

Graduation Application 41, 70 

Graduation/Commencement Date 4 

Graduation with honors 34, 58 

Grants 23 

Grievance Procedure 39, 74 



Health and Accident Insurance 28 

Health Insurance Waiver 28 

Health Service 

Chalon Campus 65 

Doheny Campus 47 

Hispanic Pastoral Ministry 258 

History 159 

History Requirements 52 

History of the College 5 

Honors 

Dean's List 34 

Graduation with 34, 58 

Societies 35 

Honors Program 58 

HOPE Program Information 186 

HOPE Program Tuition 27 

Housing Deposit 27 

Human Services 163 

ICSC Scholarships 25 

Incomplete Grade 33, 72 

Independent Study 36 

Individually Designed Major 

Baccalaureate 49 

Graduate 134 

In Progress 33, 72 

Instructional Media Center 9 

Institute for Student Academic 

Enrichment 44, 65 

Institutional Loans 26 

Insurance, Health and Accident 28 

Journalism 164 

Junior Year Abroad 59 

Leadership Program 

Chalon Campus 62 

Doheny Campus 46 

Leadership Studies Minor 271 

Learning Assistance Program 65 

Learning Disabilities 39 

Learning Handicapped Credential 

Degree 133 

Learning Resource Center 44, 65 

Leave of Absence 38 

Legal Responsibility of College 11 

Liberal Arts Program 

(Associate Degree) 165 

Liberal Arts Degree (Weekend 

College) 165 

Liberal Studies 167 

Library Facilities 9, 45 

Literature 52 

Loans 

Information 25 

FPLUS (Federal Parent Loans for 

Undergrad Students) 25 

Federal Stafford Loan 25 

Institutional Loans 26 

Short-term Loans 26 



322 Index 



Majors Offered 

Associate Degree 42 

Baccalaureate Degree 49 

Marriage, Family, and Child 

Counseling 241 

Master of Arts in Religious Studies . . . 256 

Master of Physical Therapy 225 

Master of Science in Counseling 

Psychology 241 

Master of Science in Education 119 

Mathematics 170 

Mathematics Requirements 53 

Mission Statement 5 

Modern Language Requirement 54 

Multicultural Requirement 56 

Multiple Subject Credential 121 

Music 175 

Music Scholarship 24 

Natural and Physical Sciences 53 

Non Degree Seeking Graduate 

Students 71 

Nondiscrimination Policy 2 

Nursing Fee 28 

Nursing 184 

Occupational Therapy 202 

Off-campus housing 47, 64 

Off-Campus Student Employment 26 

On-Campus Student Employment 26 

Orientation 62 

Parking Fee 28 

Pastoral Care/Counseling 256 

Payment 30 

Petitions 74 

Philosophy 207 

Physical Education (See Fitness 

Education) 212 

Physical Science 212 

Physical Therapy 213 

Physics 233 

Placement Examination 35 

Political Science 234 

Pre-Dental Program 86, 87, 112 

Pre-Health Program 238 

Preliminary Multiple & Single Subject 

Credential 123, 125 

Pre-Law Program 239 

Pre-Medical Program 86, 89, 112 

Pre-Physical Therapy Program 87 

President's Scholarship 24 

Probation 37, 74 

Professional Clear Credential 123 

Psychology 240 

Readmission 

Graduate 71 

Undergraduate 

(See Admissions) 

Reduced Charges 29 

Re-Entry Student Program 66 



Regents Council 296 

Religious Commitment 6 

Religious Studies 252 

Repetition of Courses 33, 73 

Residence Costs 29 

Residence Life 

Chalon 64 

Doheny 47 

Residence Life Office 47, 64 

Residency Requirements 

Associate 43 

Baccalaureate 50 

Graduate Program 70 

Room Deposit 29 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 
Requirement for 

Financial Aid 26 

Scholar-Mentor Program 66 

Scholarships 25 

Second Baccalaureate 58 

Second Major 58 

Secondary Teaching 125 

Single Subject Credential 122 

Sisters of St. Joseph College-Consortium 

Exchange 61 

Skills Program 44 

Social and Behavioral Science 

Requirement 53 

Social Science 269 

Sociology 273 

Spanish 282 

Special Academic Services 59 

Special Education 

(Learning Handicapped) 133 

Special Programs 285 

Speech 290 

Spiritual Theology, Applied 291 

Student Activities 

Associate 46 

Baccalaureate 62 

Student Affairs 

Chalon Campus 62-66 

Doheny Campus 46-48 

Student Counseling Services 46 

Student Employment 26 

Student Health and Accident 

Insurance 28 

Student Health Services 

Chalon Campus 65 

Doheny Campus 47 

Student Placement Office 63 

Student Responsibility 70 

Student Services 

Associate Programs 44 

Baccalaureate Programs 59 

Student Support Services (ISAE). . . 45, 66 
Students with learning disabilities 39 

~ * 



Index 323 



Supervised Teaching 129 

Table of Contents 3 

Testing 35 

Transcripts 38 

Transfer 

Admission procedures 19 

Of credit 41,73 

Students 39 

Transfer Scholarship 23 

Trustees, Board of 295 

Tuition (All Programs) 27 

Deposit 27 

Reduced Charges 29 

Tuition Discount (MSMC Grad 

Students) 24 

Tuition Payment Options 30 

Tuition Refund Policy 29 

Unauthorized Withdrawal 34, 73 

UCLA Cross-Registration 61 

Unclassified Status 41, 71 

Undergraduate Academic Policies 31 



Undergraduate Tuition 27 

Undergraduate Tuition Deposit 27 

Unit Load 70 

University of Judaism 

cross-registration agreement 61 

Washington Semester Program 60 

Weekend College 

Admissions 20 

Information 20 

Weekend College Tuition 27 

Withdrawal 

From college 38, 74 

From courses 34, 74 

Reduced Charges 29 

Women's Leadership Program 271 

Women's Leadership Program 

Minor 271 

Women's Studies Minor 292 

Work/Study Program 26 

Youth Ministry Program 259 



324 Notes 



NOTES