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THE ALL ILLINOIS SOCIETY 

oftheVllSlE ARTS - - Incorporated 

CENTURY of PROGRESS EXHIBITION 

Third Floor Galleries .... THE STEVENS 



I 

^MllMViii,. 





COVER DESIGN by Charles H. Kellner 

JUNE FIRST to NOVEMBER FIRST 1933 



CATALOG • CENTURY of 
PROGRESS EXHIBITION 

Bj ARTISTS OF ILLINOIS 

w 

V V HEN we step into the world of Art we 
enter a world as old as life itself and yet into a 
realm unknown by many and understood by 
few, but the understanding of which would 
make life richer and happier beyond measure 
for art's achievement has given to us the record 
of history, the record of progress since the dawn 
of time. And all who enter in, benefit by taking, 
and benefit by giving. Art is simply a question 
of doing all things well. Art has a great pur- 
pose and that you have an appreciation for Art 
or are trying to gain one, proves that you are 
grasping for a better understanding of life, of 
nature, and of the human race. It is a vast field 
and when you read the lives of the great masters, 
of their love and sacrifice for Art, you will read 
a story so thrilling that to you it will endure. 

Mrs. Charles R. Dalrymple, 
President and Founder. 



Third Floor Galleries • THE STEVENS 
JUNE ist TO NOVEMBER ist, 1933 



THE ALL-ILLINOIS SOCIETY 
of the FINE ARTS, Incorporated 



Mrs. Charles R. Dalrymple 
President and Founder 



The idea of an All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts came to 
me while acting in the past year as Art Chairman of the 
First District of the State. 

There were many local groups doing vital things in the 
Art of Illinois, but there was no impartial State organiza- 
tion to promote it. 

Realizing the civic need of such an organization, I called 
together a group of interested women and the All-Illinois 
Society of the Fine Arts, Inc., was formed and incor- 
porated March 23, 1926. 

Illinois is the heart of the Middle West and Chicago is 
one of the finest, fairest and richest cities in the world. 

We believe that the World is looking to America to pro- 
duce the best Art of this century. Why not Illinois and 
Chicago the Art Center and clearing house in the World 
today and tomorrow.^ 

We are doing our bit to make Chicago the Art Center of 
the World. 

The object of the society is to create a better appreciation 
of Art in Illinois, to encourage the production and pro- 
mote the sale of the work of living Illinois artists, that the 
artists and their work may become better known within 
their own State. 

We sponsor an exhibit annually and have permanent Gal- 
leries at the Stevens and the Florentine Parlors, Congress 
Hotel. 



Our Slogan: An original work of art by an artist of Illinois in every school 
and home of Illinois. 

MRS. CHARLES R. DALRYMPLE, 
President, All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. 

[2} 



OFFICERS • LIFE MEMBERS, PATRONS and 
PATRONESSES ami AFFILIATED SOCIETIES 



OFFICERS 
Mrs. Charijs R. DALR-iMPLi:, PyesiJent aiiJ I'uuiider 
Mrs. Edwin N. Johnson, Vhst Viie-Pres/Jent. Director 

of Exhibitions and Treasurer 
Mrs. Hayes H. Irwin . . . Second Vice-President 
Mrs. Charlhs T. Phavhy . . Third Vice-President 
Mrs. Alice Newton Johnson To/nth Vice-President 
Mrs. J. Weldon Slick . . . Tifth Vice-President 
Mrs. Robert P. Kilbi:rt . . . Recordini^ Secretary 
Mrs. Ja( X Benson Schonincer . , Cor. Secretary 



Patrons and Patronesses 



Charles S. Deneen 
Louis L. Emmerson 



Honorable and Mrs 

Honorable and Mrs. 

Honorable and Mrs. Frank O. Lowden 

Colonel and Mrs. T. A. Siqueland 

Mr. and Mrs. Salem N. Baskin 

Mrs. Jacob Bauer 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Brackett Bishop 

Mrs. Ira B. Blackstock, Springfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Boltenstern, 

Cambridge 
Rev. and Mrs. Preston Bradley 
Mrs. James R. Bremmer 
Mrs. Charles Clinton Buell 
Mr. and Mrs. Justus Chancellor 
Mrs. Sophia Delavan Cowles 
Mr. George W. Di.xon 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Doyle 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto K. Eitel 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Marc Fowler 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Harsch, 

Peoria, 111. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Harshe 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar H. Haugan 
Judge and Mrs. Oscar Hebel 
Dr. and Mrs. H. Close Hesseltine 
Mr. H. E. Hewitt, Peoria 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Hinrichsen, 

Davenport, Iowa 



.Mr. and Mrs. Daniel F. Keller 

Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Kenyon, Peoria 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Linn 

Mrs. Parmalee McFadden 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Montgomery 

Mr. and Mrs. George Thomas Palmer, 

Springfield 
Colonel and Mrs. William Nelson 

Pelouze 
Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Peterson 
Mrs. Charles G. Powers, Decatur 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Reeves, 

Jacksonville 
Mrs. Minna Schmidt 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Schuth 
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Snook, Aurora 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Stevens 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl D. Stevenson 
Mr. and Mrs. Carol Sudler 
Cyrena Van Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Trewyn, Peoria, III. 
Mr. and Mrs. James H. White, 

Geneseo, III. 
Mr. Herbert A. Witherspoon 
General and Mrs. Robert Elkington 

Wood 
Mrs. Charles L. Zaneis, Clinton 



Life Members 

Honorable and Mrs. Frank O. Lowden Mrs. Minna Schmidt 

Mrs. Sophia Delavan Cowles Tuesday Art and Travel Club 



Affiliated Societies 



Chicago Literary Score 

Miriam Chapter No. 1, Order Eastern 

Star 
Ninth District, Illinois Federation of 

Women's Clubs 



Perboyre Children's National Art 

Federation 
Rt)gers Park Woman's Club 
Tue^day Art and Travel Club 



[3] 



THE AWARDS 



OILS 

GOLD MEDAL 
Edward T. Gregware . . . Lower Town, Quebec 

SILVER MEDAL 
Gerald A. Frank Song of Spring 

BRONZE MEDAL 
Edith Jane Cossady White Roses 

HONORABLE MENTION 
Beauford Floyd Jones . Portrait, William D. Plenjey 



WATER COLORS 

GOLD MEDAL 
George "Pop" Hart . . . Arabs Assembling for Fete 

SILVER MEDAL 
Louis Weiner Old Adobe 

HONORABLE MENTION 
Frederic Dalrymple Old Willotu 



SCULPTURE 

GOLD MEDAL 
Oscar Mortens Dream of Freedom 

HONORABLE MENTION 
Alfred Lenzi Portrait Btcst, My Mother 

[4] 



JURY OF SELECTION 



ADAM EMOR^' AIJSRICIIT 
C. J. BLILLIET 
EDWARD T. C.REGWARE 
ELENOR JEWETT 
ROBERT P. KILBERT 



JURY OF AWARDS 



LUCIE HARTRATH 
ROBERT P. KILBERT 
JOHN STACY 



DOWN STATE ORGANIZATION (H AIRMEN 

MRS rRi;i) J. KENYON 1 35 Hi^h St., Peoria, III. 

MISS ADA M. C. ANDERSON Osco, III. 

MISS DOROTHY M. M( HENRY Uloomington, 111. 

MISS JUANITA ENGSTRAND Dc Kalb, 111. 

[5] 




Mrs. Charles R. Dalrymple 

President and Founder 




Mrs. Edwin N. Johnson 

First Vice-President, Treasurer and Director 

of Exhibitions 





Mrs. Hayes H. Irwin Mrs. Charles T. Peavey 

Second Vice-President, Program Chairman Third Vice-President, Social Chairman 

[6] 





..:.. .V. .. . .\. wTON Johnson 

Fourth Vice-President. Membership jiiJ 

Printing Chairman 



Mrs, J. \Vi:LnoN Si.k k 

/•"////' Vice-President, Co-Chairman of 

Printing 




Mrs. Robi:rt F. Kilbert 

Recording Secretary 



Corresponding Strcn-tar) 

Mrs. Jack Bi:nson Schoninoir 



[7} 




BAlTi-Nu IHh HOUK 



By Adam Emory Albright 



ADAM EMORY ALBRIGHT 

© Adam Emory Albright. . . Studio, Warrenville, Illinois. . . 
Painter, born Monroe, Wisconsin, August IJ, 1862. . . Pupil of 
Art Institucc, Chicago; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 
Philadelphia. . . Studied in Munich and Paris. . . Member A.W.C.S., 
Chicago S.A., Chicago W.C.C., Fellowship P.A.F.A., A.I.C. Alumnae, 
Chicago A.D., Chicago A.C., Salmagundi C, N.Y.W.C.C. (Life). 
. . Awarded Grower prize A.I.C, 1907 and 1914; Cohn prize 
A.I.C, 1908. . . '^'ork in City Art Museum, St. Louis Museum 
of Art, Toledo, Municipal Art League, Public Libraries, Clubs, 
Schools. . . Specialty, Child Life, and is a member of The All- 
Illinois Society of The Fine Arts. . . Home, Warrenville, Illinois. 

[8] 




M;.v 



;^i: Nl.>XTON JOHNSON 



By I. EniiSt Britrl) 



9 J. Ern.'St Briefly is originally from the' East, having studied in 
Worcester and Boston, Massachusetts; New York City and Phila- 
delphia; has exhibited portraits at various exhibitions at thj Stevens 
and Congress Hotels under the auspices of the All-Illinois Society 
of the Fine Arts, of which he is a member, also at the O'Brien Art 
Galleries, the Art Galleries of Carson Piric Scott & Co., and at the 
Art Institute of Chicago. . . Studio, 16? Ease Ontario Street, 
Chicago. 



CM 




THE CHINA ROOSTER 



By Boijiimiii J. Beck 



• A native of Nebraska. . . Studied at the Chicago Art Institute, 
then making Chicago his home. Adopted Advertising Art as 
his vocation. . . Was an instructor at the Art Institute and Chicago 
Academy of Fine Arts. . . For ten years Mr. Beck has been seriously 
painting in oil, studying under Frederic Grant, Stark Davis, Leon 
Lundmark and Jack Spelman. . . A close observer of nature, versa- 
tile, with keen appreciation of design and clean color in his paint- 
ing of landscape, still life, marine and portrait. . . He has ex- 
hibited at the Art Institute, the All-Illinois Society of the Fine 
Arts, Chicago Academy, Revell's Gallery, under the auspices of 
the All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts (being an early member), the 
Chisler's Club and private exhibits. . . Studio in the Pittsfield 
Building, Chicago. 



[10} 




SF.CLUDI-D SPOT 



By Samuel Bartiiotta 



© Samuel Bartilotta is a native of Italy, where he was born 
August 22, 1900. From an early age he has been an ardent 
follower of the art of painting in all its branches. . . When very 
young, liartiiotta attracted the attention of Signor Giovanni 
Piccinelli, a prominent artist and teacher who took an interest in 
laying a foundation for the development of his talent. Since his 
arrival in this country in 1915, he has continued in his work and 
study, under private instructors and at the Academy of Fine Arts. 
. . Pictures of Mr. Bartilotta have been shown at exhibitions in 
the Art Institute of Chicago, State Museum in Springfield, The 
Marshall Field Galleries, Carson Pirie Scott Galleries and at The 
All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts, Inc., and the Hoosier Salon. He 
is a member of a number of fine arts societies. . . Recently this 
artist presented a one-man show at the Congress Hotel under the 
auspices of the AlJ-Illinois Society of Fine Arts, and his works 
there attracted much noteworthy attention. . . Two of his paint- 
ings are hanging in the collection of Mrs. Frank G. Logan. 



[11] 




THE CHANCELLOR 



By Gracbcnc Nell Brodt 



9 Mrs. Brodt was born in Canton, Illinois. . . Is a member of the 
All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts, Professional Art League of 
America. . . Studied at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts 
Summer School and with Antonin Sterba and Oskar Gross. 



[12] 




MRS. HAYES H. IRWIN 



By Richard A. Chase 



• Studied at Art Institute of Chicago under Buelir, Seyflert, Kroll, 
ObcrtculTcr, and at Cape Cod Scnool of Art under Hawthorne 
and Richard Miller. . . Member All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts 
and Chicago Galleries Association. . . Exhibited in Chicago Artists 
Exhibitions and International ^X'atercol()r Exhibitions at Art Insti- 
tute of Chicago, Arts Club of Vl'ashington, D. C, Taylor Art 
School, Saugatuck, Michigan, University of Illinois, Haish Memorial 
Gallery, DeKalb, Illinois. . . Mrs. Julius Rosenwald Purchase Prize 
at Art Institute of Chicago, 192 8. . . Studio, 1447 North Dear- 
born Street. 



ri3] 




THE JAPANESE LADY 



By Sarah Cameron 



• Sarah Cameron was born in Louisville, Kentucky. Moved to 
Chicago about fifteen years ago. Studied at the Art Institute, 
also with Mary B. Poull and Claude Buck. ... Is a member of the 
All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. 



[14} 




OLD NMLLOW (\C'atcrcolor) 



By Vridcru Dalrymplc 



Trcderic Dalrymplc. Born in Cambridge, Illinois. . . Study with 
John H. X'andcrpoci, Frederick W. Trecr, Antonin Sterba, Ralph 
Clarkson, |. \C'ellinston Reynolds, Alphonse Mucha, Sorolla, Louis 
Betts. . . Foreign Study, Paris, France. With Frnest Piexotto, Solon 
Borglum, Bellevuc, Seine-ct-Oise and Julian Sclux)l. . . Painting 
Tour of Southern France, Alsace Lorraine. Former Instructor, and 
member of Alumni of Art Institute of Chicago. . . Studio, Chicago, 
Michigan Boulevard. Member of the All-Illinois Society of the 
Fine Arts. 



tu] 




MRS. CHARLES R. DALRYMPLE 



By John Doctoroff 



• John Doctoroff was born in New York City, July 19, 1893. 
Studied at Cooper Union Institute in New York and the Chicago 
Art Institute. . Lived in Dallas, Texas, for several years, coming to 
Chicago in 1924 after winning a nation-wide contest for portraits 
of the late Calvin Coolidge and Charles G. Dawes, for the Repub- 
lican National Committee. . . In 192 8 was commissioned to make the 
official portraits of Ex-President Hoover and Vice-President Curtis 
for the same purpose. . . Painted the portrait of the late Julius 
Rosenwald for the Museum of Science and Industry of which he was 
the founder, and has portrayed many prominent persons of Chi- 
cago and of other cities. . . Spent some time abroad painting charac- 
ters and types in Paris, Munich, Florence. . . Exhibited at Chicago 
Art Institute, All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts and many local 
exhibitions. 



[16] 




COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS 



By William H. El>pnis 



% Born in Lincoln, Nebraska. Came to Chicago in 1907. Studied 
at Art Institute of Chicago and Academy of Fine Arts. He pre- 
fers to paint landscape in oil and his hunting ground is in Cook 
County. He says the windows of the house on the hill have the 
golden windows, when we are in the valley; but when we go to the 
hill top the golden windows were right in the house in the valley 
So why run away to paint lovely things when they are so near us 
. . Studio, 6210 Ingleside Avenue, Chicago, III. 



[17] 




SONG OF SPRING 



By Gerald A. Frank 



9 Gerald A. Frank, 4 East Ohio Street, Chicago, Illinois. Studied, 
Chicago, Europe, Provincetown. . . Represented in Private Col- 
lections, Theatres, Hotels, Municipal Collections, Local Commis- 
sion Collections. . . Exhibits, All Important Museums. . . Member of 
Association of Painters and Sculptors, Chicago Galleries, All-Illinois 
Society of the Fine Arts, Art Institute Alumni. . . Treasurer, Arts 
Club of Chicago, Treasurer Playwrights Theatre; Director Romany 
Club. . . Artist Guild Prize, Thompson Prize, Peterson Prize, 
Municipal Art League Prize for Portraiture Municipal Art League 
Prize for 193 0. 



[18] 




•ITALIAUS' 



By Florence Wilkiiis Fitrst 



• Florence VC'ilkins I'urst. Home Studio, 819 Vi'cst Stephenson 
Street, Frecport, Illinois. . . Exhibited recently in the National 
Arts Club, New York City, Aigent Galleries, New York, Beloit 
College, Rockford Art Association, Congress Hotel, Chicago. . . 
"Mrs. Furst is a painter with a finely developed technique. Her 
work is among the most interesting and beautiful seen in some 
time. . . . 1 urning to the still life arrangements, one is met by 
beauty and gorgeous texture. Mrs. Furst's sense of composition is 
a keen joy. ... in the landscapes, too, one feels her unfailing tlair 
for color. Thev have atmcisphere and charm and beauty." — F.leanor 
Jewett — Chicago Tribune. 



[19] 




SCENE FROM RANDOLPH STREET 



By Rose Gidivitz 



[20] 




•REVHRIES" 



By John C, 



# John Goosscns is a painter of the Figure, Landscape and Still 
Life. Born in Norway (UpF>cr Peninsula), of Flemish parentage. 
Studied at Art Institute, Chicago, under Frederick \'. Poole, 
Dc Forest Schook, George Oberteuffer. Also at the Royal Academy 
of Fine Arts, Antwerp, Belgium, with Juliaan De N'riendt and 
Opsomer. . . Member of the Chicago Art Institute Alumni Associ- 
ation, The All-Illinois Society of The Fine Arts, American Fed- 
eration of Arts, The St. Lucas Guild, Antwerp, Belgium. . . 
Awards: Two Blue Ribbons, Aurora, Illinois, 1927. Two Red 
Ribbons, 1928, Aurora, Illinois. And Honorable Mention, Spring- 
field, Illinois, 1928. . . First one man, show at the Bankers Build- 
ing, Chicago, in the spring of 1929. . . Mr. Goossens is primarily 
a coiorist with great feeling for texture, form and depth in his 
paintings. 

[21] 





LOWER TOWN QUEBEC 



By Edward T. Gregii'ttre 



O Edward T. Gregwarc, painter, was born in 1889, at Caseville, 
Michigan. Spent boyhood at Spokane, Washington. Entered 
Chicago Academy of Fine Arts in 1911. Awarded First Scholarship. 
. . Has exhibited in all local National and International Watercolor 
Shows. . . Member of the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts, the 
Oak Park Art League, Palette and Chisel Club (president 1928), 
Chicago Painters and Sculptors Association (vice-president 1933), 
Chicago Guild of Free Lance Artists (president 1933), All-Illinois 
Art Society. . . Principal Awards, Charles Worcester Prize, Chicago, 
1925; Edward Rector Prize, Hoosier Salon, 1925; Art Review 
Prize, Art Institute, 1926; Circle Club Prize, Chicago, 1927; Gold 
Medal, Palette and Chisel Club, 1928; Silver Medal, Oak Park Art 
League, 1929; Municipal Art League Prize, Chicago, 1931; Gold 
Medal, Painters and Sculptors Association, 193 L 



[22] 




LOTUS BLOSSOMS 



By Frank Hallciibcck 



9 Frank M. Hallcnbcck. Burn and raised in Chicago. By Profes- 
sion, Landscape and Industrial Photoj;raplicr. In 1930, felt and 
responded to an overpowering urge to Etch. About a year later 
some of the members of The Business Men's Art Club, of which 
he is a member, persuaded him to "go in for color." . . Me has 
been devo'.ing all of his spare hours, since then, to oil painting, 
preferring to work in the Dunes at the south end of Lake Michigan. 



[23] 




ACROSS THE VALLEY 



By Lucie Hartrath 



• Municipal Art League Purchase Prize, 1922; Medal, Peoria, 1922. 
Picture purchased for Executive Mansion at Springfield by Gover- 
nor Emmerson, 1929. . . Member of the All-Illinois Society of the 
Fine Arts, Association of Chicago Painters and Sculptors, National 
Association Women Painters and Sculptors, Chicago Galleries Asso- 
ciation, Brown County Art Gallery Association, Arts Club, The 
Cordon. . , Represented in Collection of Arche Club, Englewood 
Woman's Club, Municipal Art League, City of Chicago, Bush 
Temple Conservatory, Bryn Mawr Woman's Club, Public Schools 
of Gary, Indiana, and Chicago; Public Library, Bedford, Indiana. 



[24] 



k 




CONSTRUCTION 



By Jess Hobby 



9 Born in L.iwrence, New York. . . Studied with Ed Grafton, 
New York; H. B. Howley Art School, New York; Mart S. 
Hazelton, Omaha; Alfred Juergens, Chicago and Oak Park. . . 
Member of All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts, Inc.; Austin, Oak 
Park and River Forest Art League; United Scenic Artists of 
U. S. . . Received $150.00 Cash Prize, 1930, donated by J. A. 
Colby & Son, at Austin, O. P. and R. F. Art League Exhibit. . . 
Purchase Prize for Mann School, Oak Park. 



[2J} 




NEAR THE COAST OF SWEDEN 



By Charles Edward Hallhcrti 



9 Born in Gothenburg, Sweden, on January 15, 18 J 5. . . He is 
represented at the National Museum in Stockholm, Sweden; The 
Gothenburg Museum, Goteborg, Sweden; in Vaxjo, Sweden; in 
Oakland Museum, Oakland, California, also John Morton Memorial, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. . . He had a painting exhibited at the 
World's Fair at St. Louis, 1904; one painting in the Illinois Build- 
ing at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in 1917. . . Mr. Hallberg has 
exhibited his paintings in the Chicago Artists' Exhibition at the Art 
Institute for many years and has won many prizes. . . Is a member 
of the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts, Inc. 



[26] 




I ROM AUTUMN GARUMN 



By Bcsiir HiUtroiii 



• Born in Sweden. Studied in Sweden, New York, Chicago 
Academy of Fine Arts. . . I'xiiibited at Chicago Art Institute, 
All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. . . "Swedish-American Artist." 
. . Illinois Athletic Womans Club, Womans Club of I^vanston, 
Miami Womans Club, Miami, Florida; Gotenberg, Sweden. . . Repre- 
sented at Morton Memorial Museum, Philadelphia, Pa.; The Illinois 
State Museum, Springfield, Illinois; Anderson Galleries, Chicago, 
Illinois; All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts. . . Awards: 1st Prize for 
water colors (Swedish-American Artist); 2nd Prize, oil (Swedish- 
American artist). 



[27] 




"STUDIO ARRANGEMENT" 



By Josephine Jeiisik Hiilierson 



9 Mrs. Josephine Jensik Halverson, born in Chicago of Bohemian 
descent. . . Affiliated with the All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts, 
Austin, Oak Park and River Forest Art League and Technic Arts 
League. . . Has studied with the following instructors: Carl Krafft, 
John Noff and John Spelman. 



[28] 




I ALL Bi AUTILS 



By Emily Brtison Johnwn 



% Emily Benson of Danville, Illinois, has for several years spiecial- 
izcd in floral paintings. She began her art studies at the 
Academy of I-'ine Arts, Chicago, in 1915. Since then she has studied 
with various instructors, and exhibited at art centers throughout 
the country. Exhibits with and is a member of the All-Illinois 
Society of the Fine Arts. 



[29] 




WILLIAM D. PLENJEY 



By Bvauford Floyd Jones 



® Beauford Floyd Jones, a Chicago artist, is a graduate of the Art 
Institute of Chicago, has exhibited at various exhibitions at the 
Stevens and Congress Hotels under the auspices of the All-Illinois 
Society of the Fine Arts, of which he is a member. He has also 
exhibited at the Hoosier Salon and has a one-man show at the 
Allerton Galleries each spring. He has painted several altar-pieces 
for churches in Chicago and vicinity. . . Studio, 75 3 North Dear- 
born Street. 



[30} 




PREPARING THL HLRRIXG' 



By Louis Jensen 



9 Louis Jensen of Chicaso, who is best known as a marine painter, 
was born in Denmark, on the Island of Bornholm. His home 
was on the rocky rugged coast of this beautiful island in the 
Baltic Sea. His ancestors and his father were seafaring men and 
fisherfolk, and his mind from childhood was filled with the sagas 
of the seas, and early in life he too learned to know and to love 
the ocean in all its moods. . . After having been in America some 
years, he went to Bornholm and built a studio in the house where 
he was born, and he returns there frequently to paint the subjects 
he loves. . . Mr. Jensen studied in Denmark, and at the Art 
Academy, and the Art Institute of Chicago. He is a member of 
many Art Associations, including the All-Illinois Society of the 
Fine Arts. 



[31] 




THE DOCK 



By Carl R. Krafft 



9 Carl R. Krafft. Member of Chicago Association of Painters and 
Sculptors, Grand Central Art Galleries, New York, Allied Artists 
of America, Chicago Galleries Association, Oak Park Art League, 
Society of Ozark Painters and the All-Illinois Society of the Fine 
Arts. . . Exhibited at the National Academy, New York; Pennsyl- 
vania Academy, Philadelphia; Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Cor- 
coran Gallery, Washington; Chicago Art Institute; Museums of St. 
Louis, Cincinnati, Los Angeles, etc., and the All-Illinois Society of 
the Fine Arts. . . Awards by Englewood Woman's Club prize, Art 
Institute, 1915; Municipal Art League prize. Art Institute, 1916; 
Fine Arts Building prize. Artist Guild, 1917; Logan Medal (Second), 
Art Institute, 1920; Bronze Medal, Illinois Artists Exposition, Peo- 
ria, 1920; Silver Medal of the Chicago Society of Artists, 1921; 
Bronze Medil, Central States Fair, Aurora, 1922; First Logan Medal 
($500), Art Institute, 1925; Harry Frank prize. Figure Composi- 
tion, Art Institute, 1925; Gold Medal of Honor, Allied Artists of 
America, N. Y., 1926; Prizes at Chicago Galleries, 1926, 1927, 
1929 and 1930. Studio, 416 N. Harvey Ave., Oak Park, 111. 



[32} 




DESPLAINES RIVER 



By Edward E. Kibhee 



% Edward E. Kibbee was born at Buffalo, New York, and is now a 
resident of Maywood, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. He received 
his education in New York, St. Louis and Chicago. Studied at the 
Chicago Art Institute under Antonin Sterba and Allen St. John. 
Worked and studied with numerous painters. Member of the 
Austin, Oak Park and River Forest Art League. Secretary of the 
Maywood Arts Club and member of the All-Illinois Society of the 
Fine Arts. Has exhibited in various galleries and art shows of 
Chicago and vicinity. He is particularly interested in landscap>e 
composition and is represented in many private collections. 



[33] 




THE HONORABLE J. W. HOUSTON 



By Robert P. Kilbcrt 



© Robert P. Kilbert. Painter of murals, portraits and landscapes. 
A pioneer student of the Art Institute of Chicago; studied in 
Paris and Munich; a former instructor of the old Chicago Art 
Academy which was affiliated with the Julian Academy of Paris. 
He is a life member of the Chicago Art Institute, and a member 
of the Art Institute Alumni Association; the Palette and Chisel 
Club; the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts; the American Fed- 
eration of Art, and the Municipal Art League. . .In 1929 he estab- 
lished the Treasure Hill Art Academy, a summer school which is 
nestled in the beautiful hills of Bridgman, Michigan, and active 
during the months of July and August. 



[34] 



MIXICO 



By Uj^ Killy 



9 Mr. Kelly was born in Jcflfcrsonvillc, Indiana, and after attend- 
ing Sthuols in Kentucky, he entered UePauw University. Ironi 
there, he went to New York and completed his course in the 
National Academy of Design, ^^"ith this preparation, he went to 
Italy for study, and traveled extensively in F-urope and North 
Africa. He supplemented rhis with travel in America and finally 
settled in Calilornia, where he spent five years painting. Eventually, 
he returned to Chicago, and began the establishment of the South 
Shore Art School, which is now a well-known institution. His last 
trip was to Mexico, where he spent his time painting. . . Since 
settling permanently in Chicago, Mr. Kelly has had three one-man 
shows. At the Allerton House, he exhibited his California land- 
scapes March 5-17, 1927. At Revell's Gallery, he exhibited, under 
the auspices of the All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts, a collection of 
New Orleans paintings, during the month of January, 1931. At 
Marshall Field & Co. he exhibited paintings of Mexico, October 
3-15, 1932. . . Mr. Kelly exhibited at the Art Institute, and ex- 
hibits annually with the Floosier Salon and the All-Illinois Society 
of Fine Arts. 



r-H] 




FRANCES By Charles H. Kelhier 

# Charles H. Kellner who was born in Czechoslovakia in 1890, 
became an American citizen in 1911. During the time Mr. 
Kellner served in the American Army, he won the art scholarship 
as well as the first prize in portraiture at the A.E.F. Art School 
in Bellevue, Paris. These winning sketches are in possession of the 
American Government, Washington, D. C. . . In Paris, Mr. Kellner 
studied under such masters as Harry B. Lachman and Zaraga. In 
America, he was schooled at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and 
the Chicago Art Institute. . . Mr. Kellner is a member of the 
Palette and Chisel Club and the All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts. 
One of his works is part of the permanent collection of the Vander- 
poel Museum. . . Mr. Kellner is a former exhibitor of the Grand 
Palais of Paris and the Art Institute of Chicago. 

[36] 












PlONl HR HOME 



By Cora B. Minr 



Cora B. Miner has resided in Illinois since cliildhood. After 
graduating from the Art Department of Valparaiso University, 
she attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, and the Applied 
Art School of Chicago. She has studied with lidward J. F. Tim- 
mons, Frederic M. Grant and is now a pupil of John A. Spelman. 
. . She has been supervising Art in the Sycamore Public Schools 
for the past eight years. . . ^X'hile a member of the All-Illinois 
Society of the Fine Arts, Inc., she has had paintings in three annual 
exhibitions, alsi; showing in the UeKalb Haish Memorial Library. 



[37] 




MRS. HERMON DUNLAP SMITH 



By Biicll Mullen 



9 Buell Mullen was born in Chicago and has lived there since. 
Studied at the British Academy, via Margutta, Rome. Took pri- 
vate lessons in drawing with Lipinsky, portraiture with Petrucci 
and Cucquier of Belgium. Has exhibited at the Salon, Gruppo 
Moderno, Chicago Art Institute, All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts, 
No-Jury, Arts Club, Evanston Women's Club, Highland Park 
Women's Club, Chicago Artists and North Shore Art League. 



[38] 




MLLOUIAN" 



By ii«,i;r;/i" A. Montgomery 



9 The abt)vo paintin); is an informal portrait ot the artist's wife 
and is representative of his work. Mr. Eugene A. Montgomery 
is primarily a pKjrtrait artist and has enjoyed the good fortune of 
pleasing his patrons in his characterizations of tliem. His specialty 
is childrens' portraits. . . Mr. Montgomery is a Chicago artist, 
originally from Port Arthur, Texas, and has done the greater part 
of his studying at the Art Institute of Chicago, and is a member 
of the All-Illinois Society of the I-ine Arts. 



[39] 




'THE SHAWL" 



Irma Bratton Mars 



% Recently identified with the All-Illinois Societies of Fine Arts, 
her memberships in other societies include: The Chicago Gal- 
leries Association and The Iowa Art Guild. After graduating from 
the Gumming School of Art, Des Moines, she joined the faculty 
of the State University of Iowa. Further studies in design were 
made at Cooper Union, New York. Oil, pastel, and monochrome 
portraits have become her major and she is especially recognized 
for her pastel drawings of children. 



[40] 




"EVENING" By Lane K. Newberry 

# Lane K. Newberry is following out an idea, a rather refreshing 
procedure in this day of general aimlcssness in art. Of Mormon 
descent, and steeped in childhood in Mormon tradition, Newberry, 
since reaching his art maturity, has set himself the paint job of 
recording on canvas the landscape relics of the sojourn of the 
early Mormons in Illinois in and around Nauvoo, their early Zion 
before they moved on west to their permanent Canaan. . . Interest 
in these localities of a century back spread to others unconnected 
with Mormonism, as, for instance, the Lincoln country, and New- 
berry has amassed an interesting and valuable gallery of ""Portraits 
of Historical Spots." These were exhibited the past winter in 
Chicago, in the Florentine Room, Congress Hotel, under auspices 
of the All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts. Newberry, now in his mid- 
thirties, studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and the 
Art Institute of Chicago. Rudolph >X'^cisenborn and Edmund 
Giesbert gave him special encouragement. Though he has had 
radical instruction, his tastes persist conservative. He is interested 
in the objective picture, with only a dash of subjective interpreta- 
tion. . . Newberry was born in a village near Fort Madison, Iowa, 
of Mormon extraction on both sides. His father's mother was a 
cousin of Joseph Smith, founder of Mormonism and who selected 
Nauvoo as the Zion in the wilderness. Lane's father was Captain 
Newberry of the Steamer Hope, a Mississippi boat used as a lighter 
over the Des Moines rapids, and a friend of .Mark Twain's. Lane's 
mother was born in Salt Lake City. . . Among Newberry's pictures 
to attract particular attention because of their historical value arc 
"Joseph Smith's First Home," erected at Nauvoo about 1820; "City 
Hotel, Nauvoo," built by the Mormons, and "Tavern at Fullersburg" 
(Hinsdale), where the dancer, Lois Fuller, was born. 

C. J. BULLILT. 
[41] 




[42] 




■JOB HUNTER" 



By Jjiins L. NuIjii 



9 James I.. Nolan is well-known in Chicago's south side art circles 
and is regarded as one of the very promising younger artists. 
His works include a number of portraits of persons well-known in 
Chicago's political, religious and social life and a series of character 
studies and Indiana landscapes. Educated at the Art Institute of 
Chicago, he studied under such celebrated artists as Wellington J. 
Reynolds, George Oberteuffer, F. De Forrest Schook, Francis Chapin 
and later under Louis Ritman. Mr. Nolan at present is associated 
in the studio ol James T. McBurncy, the mural painter. His works 
have been exhibited in a number of Chicago area exhibits, and is 
a member oi the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. 



[43] 




ANDERS J. WEIGEN, M.D. 



By Carl Olsen 



# Born in Wannas, Sweden, 1893. Entered Chicago Art Institute, 
1918. Three-year Academic, then Assistant Teacher to Frederick 
Poole in Still Life Class for 3 years. Is a member of All-Illinois 
Society of the Fine Arts, Inc.; Illinois Academy Fine Arts; 
S.A.A.S., C.B.M.A.C., Swedish Art Society. . . Is represented in 
State Museum, Springfield, Illinois, and Utlandssvenska Museum, 
Gothenborg. . . Has painted portraits of Carl Hallsthammar, Anders 
J. Weigen, M.D., Staff, Children's Memorial Hospital; Anders 
Frick, M.D., Chief of Staff, Augustana Hospital; Dr. Einar F. 
Soderwall, Northwestern University; Dr. A. L. Thomas and Theo. 
O. Roberg, M.D., Surgeon in Chief, Swedish Covenant Hospital, 
and Dr. R. G. Freedlund. 

[44} 




A Vi'HlTi: BIRD FLYING 



By K,irl Ptath, Chicago 



9 Perhaps no one has a better right to be identified with the 
subjects he paints than has this artist. Specializing in paintings 
of birds much of his material has been secured in his trips 
to tropic seas and exotic jungles and also from his maintaining an 
aviary of rare birds containing over 70 varieties of living models 
from all parts of the world. There really are birds such as he 
paints. . . His two one-man shows last year in Chicago were out- 
standing and this same exhibit is touring many of the cities of the 
south until June, 1933. He is a frequent exhibitor at the Art 
Institute and is a member of the prominent art associations of 
Chicago, including the Association of Chicago Painters and Sculp- 
tors, the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts, and the Chicago Gal- 
leries. He has also contributed scientific writings and illustrations 
to various ornithological and avicultural journals of international 
scope. 



r45] 




MRS. C. COOK 



By Helen Knuihcit Pearce 



9 Mrs. Helen Knudsen Pearce, born in Chicago, Illinois. Studied 
at the Art Institute of Chicago and at the Pennsylvania Academy 
of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, under Daniel Garber, Joseph T. 
Pierson and Roy C. Nuse. . . Studied in Provincetown, Mass., under 
Charles N. Hawthorne. . A member and an exhibitor of the All- 
Illinois Society of the Fine Arts . . Studio, 7444 Blackstone Ave. 



[46} 




w IN i I K MOUl) AT F.DGEBROOK, II.I.INOIS 



By S/.i;;/i- l*alml>l.:.i 



9 Signc Palmblad, Swedish-American artist. Widely known for 
lu-r Swedish peasant paintings. She is a graduate of Art Insti- 
tute, Chicago, graduating at the age of 5 3. . . Mrs. Palmblad also 
sf>eciali/es in landscape painting. . . She is aHiiiated with the All- 
Illinois StHriety of the Tine Arts, the Austin, Oak Park and River 
Forest Art League, the Swedish Artists and the Swedish-American 
Association. . . Studio, 1119 No. Mayfield Avenue. 



[47] 




'ITALIAN GIRL" 



By Harry Pink 



[48] 



I II 




MYRA TKMPLi: 



By Harry Pink 



[49] 




'MY MOTHER AND DAUGHTER' 



By Nan Rice 



9 Nan Rice (Mrs. Hugh Rice). Studied under Alec J. Musgrove 
of the Faculty of the Glasgow School of Art and at the Art 
Institute of Chicago. . . Is a member of the All-Illinois Society of 
the Fine Arts. . . Has exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago, 
Winnipeg Art Exhibition, the All-Illinois Society exhibitions, etc. 
Held a one-man show under the auspices of the All-Illinois Society 
of Fine Arts. 



[JO] 




'StLF PORTRAIT 



By Giisptr Riiffulo 



• Gasper J. RutTolo, born in Chicago, Illinois, on April 22, 1908, 
received his an (raining at the Art Institute of Chicago, and in 
the private ateliers of the following Masters: Celestino Pacioni, 
>X'ellington J. Reynolds and George Oberteulfer. . . Mr. Ruffolo 
has been painting professionally for the past ten years and has 
achieved a considerable reputation as a portrait painter. His works 
have been frequently exhibited in the Art Institute of Chicago 
and sundry other galleries in the state. . . Among the chief por- 
traits of Mr. Ruffolo are: Portrait of "Nonnie" (the mother of 
Robert L. Huttncr, a prominent attorney in Chicago) ; Joy Mor- 
ton, presidt-'nt of the iMorton Salt Company (now in the State 
House of Nebraska); W. t. long, president of Bakers Supplies 
Company of Chicago; C;adet Robert J. I aton of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; Dr. >X'illiam H. Sherwood, late president of Sherwood 
School of .Music of Chicago; Theodore Gary of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri; and W. O. Briggs of Detroit, Michigan. 




•TRIUMVIRATE" 



By Rachel Stearns 



9 Ever since coming to Chicago to study at the Chicago Academy 
of Fine Arts, where she completed the course as an honor 
student, Rachel Stearns has been enthusiastic about Chicago as an 
art center and the wonderful work of the All-Illinois Society of 
Fine Arts to make it such. She has made her home here for some 
time, first doing commercial work and continuing study with 
Frederick Grant and recently devoting her time to private teaching 
and painting. . . She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin 
where she assisted on the faculty of the art department and carried 
on original research work concerning the Factors of Form Per- 
ception. 



[52] 




MRS. EDWIN N. JOHNSON 



By Aiiluiiin Stcrhj 



• Antunin Su-rba, portrait painter. Studied at the Art Institute 
and the Art Academy, ChicaRO. After receiving the Gold .Medal 
of Honor at the Art Academy studied several years in Paris. On 
the faculty of the Art Institute since 1910. l-xhibited portraits at 
various important galleries viz. Corcoran Gallery, Washington, 
D. C; Pennsylvania Academy at Philadelphia; Art Institute, Chi- 
cago, etc. . . He is represented with portraits in Universities and 
Clubs. His portraits are noted for strong characterizations, dignity 
and color harnmny. . . Mr. Sterba's ability to paint quickly is made 
possible through years of thorough study. . . A member and ex- 
hibitor of the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. 



[n] 




'ARRANGEMENT MODERN" 



By Florence Ezzell S/eicnson 



9 Florence Ezzell Stevenson received her early training in art in 
her native State of Alabama. In later years she attended the 
Chicago Academy of the Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago 
and has had the privilege of valuable private instruction. . . As a 
Chicago artist, in recent years her paintings, which have been widely 
exhibited, have won much favorable recognition of well known art 
critics. Commenting on her one-man show in the Congress Hotel 
recently, under the auspices of the All-Illinois Society of the Fine 
Arts, Eleanor Jewett of the Chicago Tribune said, "She is tre- 
mendously clever in her use of color, winning pattern and move- 
ment, for instance, an arrangement of flowers, and her handling of 
still life is exciting to follow." . . Recently her "Summer Bouquet" 
was reproduced on the cover of the Literary Digest. Her paintings 
have appeared on the cover of the Art World, in the Christian 
Science Monitor and in other publications of national importance. 
. . One of her paintings hangs in the permanent gallery of the 
John Vanderpoel Art Association of which she has the honor of 
being one of the trustees. 



[H] 




BI.FSSINC. 



liy l.lizjhitb S/r,;/ St,t,m 



9 There is no royal road to Art. Only years of expH:rience bring 
the technique of a Master. VChcnever possible, I have studied as 
an apprentice with fine artists, whose technique and achievement I 
have greatly admired. Anything of worth in my work is due to 
the help of my teachers and to the One Creator. Mrs. Stevens is a 
member of thi- All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. 



[JJ] 




CANDLE LIGHT 



By Karel Siila 



9 Karel Sula, a resident of Illinois since the age of twelve, had 
some early training abroad; studied at the Art Institute of 
Chicago, and also with Audubon Tyler, Oberteuffer, and others. 
A former instructor at the Art Guild Academy, Los Angeles. . . 
Studio at 4 East Ohio Street, the Tree Studio Building. Telephone 
Delaware 1846, 

[56] 




THE HONOKAliLL 111..NRY HORNER, Governor of Illinois 



B\ Sis/cr Stjnisia 



• Portrait of Governor Henry Horner of Illinois, painted by 
Sister Stanisia, an internationally famous portrait and mural 
artist. She is the supervising director of the departments of art 
at the Longwood Academy, 9 5th Street and Beverly Hills. . . Slu- 
is one of the most productive artists in the west. She has created 
six complete sets of murals for Chicago churclies, which means 
72 separate original compositions. . . Her portrait studio in Chi- 
cago is tilled with many portraits of distinguished and prominent 
p>eople in the protcssidiial and business world. They are convincing 
works of art. 



[J7] 




'STUDIO INTERIOR" 



By Ethel Tennyson 



9 Studied at Cincinnati Art Academy, and graduate of the Art 
Institute of Chicago. Also a student of Leopold Seyffert and 
Leon Kroll. . . Exhibited at Toledo Museum of Art and the Art 
Institute of Chicago. . . Member of the Art Institute Alumni 
Association and All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. 



[J8} 




CORN BILLY'S SQUAW 



li) Biuit' 1 humpion 



• Born in Southern Illinois. Studied at the Art Institute of Chi- 
cago, Frank Holme's School of Illustration and Smith Academy, 
and did special color work with H. G. Maratta. Formerly a news- 
paper man. . . Mr. Thompson has attracted attention with his pic- 
tures, writings and lectures on the Seminole Indians of Florida. . . 
Writings include a work on pigments in collaboration with Mr. 
Maratta and a series of articles on drawing published by a news- 
paper syndicate. Has painted portraits of a number of prominent 
persons, including former Governor F. D. Sampson of Kentucky 
and former Governor Doyle F^ Carlton of Florida. . . \k' is chosen 
to paint from an old sketch the life-size portrait that hangs in the 
Nancy Hanks Memorial at Harrodsburg, Ky., of the Rev. Jesse 
Head, pioneer minister who married the parents of Abraham Lin- 
coln. . . Clubs: An early member of the Palette and Chisel Club, 
All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts, Austin, Oak Park and River 
Forest Art League, Miami Art Club. 



[59] 




XtW ORLhANb MARKLT 



By Mrs. Kii.\- A. louinji 



9 Born in Schenectady, New York. Studied at the Art Institute, 
Chicago; Hugh N. Breckeiiridge, Gloucester, Mass.; Felecie 
Waldo Howell, Gloucester, Mass.; N. Amicard Oberteuffer, Chi- 
cago. . . Exhibited at the Art Institute, Chicago; North Shore Art 
Association, Gloucester, Mass.; Milwaukee Journal, Milwaukee, Wis. 
. . Is a member and exhibits at the All-Illinois Society of the Fine 
Arts, Inc. 



[60] 




PIP STLVINSON 



By TcJ Vo^^nilJ 



9 Born in Chicago. Painter of portraits, landscapes and animals. 
She studied in the Chicago Art Institute for several years and 
one year in art schools in Paris; also in summer classes at Gloucester, 
Provincetown, Martha's Vinyard and Saugatuck, under John Jo- 
hanson, Chas. Hawthorne, Snell, and Fursman. . . A member of 
the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts. 

9 "Pep" is a thoroughbred, smooth-haired English Fox terrier. 
His full pedigree name is "lUoree I'ull-O-Pepo." . . He is loaned 
by Earle Dodds and Thomas Moody Stevenson of Beverly Hills, 
Chicago. 



[61] 




"FIVE O'CLOCK" 



By Florence White Williams 



9 Depicts the lovely brilliant liglits and long reflections of late 
afternoon in Boothbay Harbor, Maine. Its first showing was 
at a Members' Exhibit at the Chicago Galleries. . . Miss Williams 
is a member of the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts which 
awarded her its Silver Medal of 1932; the Association of Chicago 
Painters and Sculptors; South Side Art Association (past Vice-pres- 
ident and Exhibition Chairman), and American Artists' Profes- 
sional League, and represents her profession in Zonta International. 
. . She has exhibited in the Art Institute, the Corcoran in Wash- 
ington, Baltimore Museum, the All-Illinois Society of the Fine Arts, 
Detroit, Milwaukee, etc., and has had various prizes. One painting 
is owned by Rufus Dawes, President of the Century of Progress 
Fair. 



[62} 




THl. URIAM Oh FRtKUOM 



By Oitar Murtiin 



9 Oscar Mortens was born in Sweden. After graduating from the 
Technical College of Malmo he was given a scholarship for 
further study at the Academy of Art at Stockholm. After two 
years there a second scholarship was awarded and he studied at the 
Academy of Art at Berlin, Germany. . . The following several years 
were spent under various professors of France and Germany and he 
then returned to Sweden, devoting some time to architectural-orna- 
mental designs. He returned to Germany for additional study. A 
few years ago he came to Chicago where his work has been ex- 
hibited in different galleries. . . Is a member of the All-Illinois 
Society of the Fine Arts. 



[63] 



JOHN T. McCUTCHEON 



By C. Warner Williams 



[64} 



OILS 



ALBAl ADl |0. NANA I.. 

1. ('jlciiJuLis 

ai.bi:rtsma, nico a. 

2. Might Into I xVPt 

ALBRIGHT, ADAM IMORY 

3. Baiting the 1 look 

ALIV^ORTHY, jOSl I'H 

4. Madame Morel (Portrait) 

5. Mo and I hce 

APFELBRACH, ALICL H. 

(i. Sunny Vl'indow 

BAROlllV, IRANCLS A. 

7. The Brass Jar 

BARTILOTTA. S. 

8. Secluded Spot 

BKALS. ANNA I Vll.YN 

9. "Seven and a Scarf" 

Bi:CK. BENJAMIN J. 

10. China Rooster 

BIIESON, BFTTY Z. 

1 1. White Fawn 

BERGLUND. A. 

12. ^5^'inter Tide 

BERGLUNU, CARL 

1}. A Little Bit of the Ozarks 

BERGSTROM, ELIZABETH 
14. Vl'hitc Cockatoo 

BIDDLE. B. HUSTON 
1 J. Flower Shop 

BORMS. EMMA C. 

16. Old Land .Mark 

BRIERLY, J. ERNEST 

17. Mrs. Alice Newton Joiinson 

(Portrait) (Loaned) 

BRODT. GRACHENE NELL 

18. "The Chancellor" 

BURCHARD, EDV^'ARl) A. 

19. "Still-Life with Pumpkin" 

BURR, EUW. EVERETT 

20. Self-Portrait 

21. Plenty 



CA.MERON. SARAH 

22. The Japanese Lady 

CASSADV, ElilTHE JANE. 

2 3. VC'hite Roses 

C HAM , RR HARD A. 

-M. Mrs. 1 Lives 1 1. h win I I'd. tun 

COEN, ROSA 

25. Chinese Study 

CONWELL, AVERIL C:OUR INI Y 

26. Black Tulip 

DANNHAUSEN, E. G. 

27. Beautiful Salt Creek 

DOBOS, ANDREW 

28. When Ciypsy luldks Cry 

DOCTOROI r. JOHN 

2'>. Mr.. C harlcs R. Dalrymple 
(Portrait) 

ECCLES. JAMES 

30. Gills Rock 

EPPENS, WILLIAM H. 

31. Cook County, Illinois 

EWELL, HAZEL CROW 

32. F'lower Study 

EWLRT. MARGARET M. 

3 3. Orange and Black 

FIELD, JESSIE 

34. The Y'oung Chemist 

FIll.I), THOMAS V. 

3 5. Golden Days 

FIERBAUGH, MARGARET 

36. Sunflowers 

FISCHER, FLORENCE 

37. Peonies 

FORD, RUTH VAN SICKLE 

38. Down Hill 

FORSTER, FLORENCE SMITH 

39. The Red Jar 

FRANK. GERALD A. 

40. Song of Spring 

FURST, FLORENCE 

41. "Icaliana" 



[65] 



GARSON, ETTA CORBETT 

42. New Hampshire 

GARSON, O. ANDREAS 

43. A Galena House 



HIATT, ALETHA M. 

63. Mary Cassels (Portrait) 

HOBBY, JESS 

64. Construction 



GIDWITZ, ROSE 

44. Scene from Randolph Street 

GILL, ABBIE LIPTON 

45. Old Friends 

GILRUTH, MAY H. 

46. "Reading" 

(JOOSSENS, JOHN 

47. "Reverie" 

GRELL, LOUIS 

4 8. The New Prophet 

GRIFFITH, JULIA SULZER 
49. Still Life 

GREGWARE, EDWARD T. 

5 0. Lower Town — Quebec 

HALLBERG, CHARLES E. 

51. Near the Coast of Sweden 

HALLENBECK, FRANK M. 
5 2. Lotus Blossoms 

HALVERSON, J. JENSIK 

5 3. Studio Arrangement 

HARTRATH, LUCIE 

54. A.cross the Valley 

HASKINS, GRACE M. 

5 5. Spring Boquet 

HATCH, ELEANOR B. 

5 6. Yellow House, Provincetown 

HAWTHORNE, C. E. 

57. Tulips 

HELLWEG, DOLLY 

5 8. Choice Varieties 

HELMUTH, DOROTHY 

59. Tiger 

HELSTROM, BESSIE 

60. From Autumn Garden 

HEMINGWAY, HALL 

61. The High Sierras 

HENNINGS, E. MARTIN 

62. Golden Cottonwoods 



HOSTETLER, RENA 

65. Still Life 

HUMSKI, JOHN 

66. Village Shivaree 

INGERLE, RUDOLPH F. 

67. Moonrise in the Smokies 

JACKSON, ALICE MAE 

68. Flowers and Fruit 

JENSEN, HOLGER W. 

69. Court Yard — New Orleans 

JENSEN, JENNIE ALICE 

70. Indian Crafts 

JENSEN, LOUIS 

71. Preparing the Herring 

JOHNSON, EMILY BENSON 

72. Fall Beauties 

JONES, BEAUFORD FLOYD 

73. William D. Plengey (Portrait) 

JUNGE', ELEONORE 

74. The Hunter (Portrait Study) 

KEEHN, IRMA A. 

75. Reverend J. W. F. Davies 

(Portrait) 

KELLNER, CHARLES H. 

76. Frances (Portrait) (Loaned) 

KELLY, CLAY 

77. Mexico 

KERR, BLANCHE WEYBURN 

78. County Road 

KETTENHOFEN, CATHERINE 

79. Old Books 

KIBBEE, EDWARD 

80. Desplaines River 

KILBERT, ROBERT P. 

81. The Honorable John W. Hous- 

ton (Portrait) 

KINSERVIK, NORMAN E. 

82. Rockport, Massachusetts 



[66] 



KLAl'KA, JEROME J. 
8 J. Harem Girl 

KRAIFT. CARL R. 

84. The Dock 

KRAVi'HC. HARRHT B. 

85. Bron/c Mcphjril 

KRAVi'IEC, ViALTER 

86. Illinois FarniNtcad 

KRI USER. OTHELIA 

87. Portrait Study 

KRULl AARS, Villi lAM J. 

88. The Earm Yard 

KRUSE. CLARA A. 

89. Street Rctlcctions 

KUHNS. FRANK H. 

90. Early Days on the Plains 

LEAGUE. JEFFERSON 

91. Judge Mann's Garden 

LESAAR. CHARLES M. 

92. Esp>cranza 

LIDBERG. MRS. T. 

9). Blue and Silver 

LIETZ. MATTIE 

94. Fanny 

LINUS. AXEL 

95. Abraham Lincoln (Portrait) 

LOCKHART, GLADA TRENCHARD 

96. Asters and Sea Shell 

LOWELL. .MARY PHILP 

97. Flowers and Fruit 

LOWES. SADIE H. 

98. From My Window 

LUNDGREN. MARTIN 

99. Pikes Peak, Colorado 

LYNCH. ANNA 

100. Still Life 

McCLELLAND. MAURINE 

101. Garden Gladioli 

McCRACKEN. CAROLYN B. 

102. The Urn and Bittersweet 

McDonnell, john 

10). Fisherman's Lane 



MtCRATH, JAMES T. 

104. My Mother (Portrait) 

MACFARLAND. RUTH BROWN 

105. Still Life 

MADSEN. WII 1 1AM MAGNUS 

106. Autumn 

MARS. IRMA BRATTON 

107. The Shawl (Portrait ) 

MASON. ALICE 

108. Anemones 

109. Mary D. (Portrait) 

Mil I AKI), i 1 1/AIU 111 Bt)YNTON 
1 I.I. Red and Blue 

MINER, CORA B. 

111. Pioneer I lonie 

MILTON. JOHN 

112. On the Banks of Des Plamcs 

MINGHI, CHARLES 

113. Lake Superior 

MOESSEL. JULIUS 

114. Eva 

MONTGOMERY, EUGENE A. 

115. Melodian 

MORROW, ELOISE 

116. Mary (Portrait) 

MULLEN, BUELL 

117. Mrs. Hcrmon Dunlap Smith 

(Portrait) (Loaned) 

NARBUTAS, VINCENT P. 

118. Sunday Festivity in Lithuania 

NEWBERRY, LANE K. 

119. Brantons Tavern 

120. ILvening 

NEWMAN, BERENICE M. 

121. Prunus Subhirtella-Pcndula 

(Cherry) 

MC HOI SON, EDW. H. 

122. River Scene 

NOLAN, J. L. 

12). "Job-Hunter" 

OLSEN, CARL 

124. Anders J. \X'ciKcn, M. D. 
(Portrait) (Loaned) 



[67] 



O'SANNEM 

125. Wisconsin Farmstead 



SCOVEL, MARY C. 

147. Cascade — Bond Falls 



PALMBLAD, SIGNE 

126. Winter-Mood at Edgebrook, 

Illinois 

PEARCE, HELEN KNUDSEN 

127. Mrs. C. Cook (Portrait) 

PERRY, JAMES RAYMOND 

128. Twin Spires 

PEYRAUD, ELIZABETH K. 

129. A Portrait 

PEYRAUD, F. C. 

13 0. November 

PINK, HARRY 

131. Italian Girl 

132. Myra Temple (Portrak) 

PINNEY, C. C. 

13 3. Green Jar 

PLATH, KARL 

134. A White Bird Flying 

PLEIMLING, WINNIFRED 
13 5. Flowers 

POOLE, FREDERICK VICTOR 
13 6. Rest 
137. Still Life 

POULL, MARY B. 

13 8. Grandmother's Bouquet 

PRIDE, RICHARD 

13 9. On the Des Plaines 

RICE, NAN 

140. My Mother and My Daughter 

RICHARD, JACOB 

141. Los Angeles Vicinity 

ROETH, ESTHER 

142. Autumn 

RUFFOLO, GASPER J. 

143. Artist at Work (Myself) 

RUST, MARGERITE J. 

144. Little Boy 

SCHMID, ALBERT A. 

145. Winter Morning 

SCHROETER, MAX 

146. A Landscape (Germany) 



SHIPPEN, UINTAH K. 

148. The Temple 

SIGFUS, S. I. 

149. Farm in Winter 

SIMMONS, G. HARMON 
15 0. Feeding Time 

SISTER MARY ISABEL (DON) 

15 1. (Villa Marie) Lilac Time 

SISTER STANISIA 

152. The Honorable Henry Horner, 

Governor of Illinois (Loaned j 

SLUTZ, HELEN BEATRICE 

153. Miss Josephine Burke (Portrait) 

SMITH, MARSHALL D. 

15 4. High French Doorway, Old 
New Orleans 

SOELLNER, OSCAR D. 

15 5. House of Grand Detour 

SPELMAN, JOHN A. 
15 6. Gull Rocks 

ST. PIERRE, A. CHARLES 
15 7. Still Life 

STEARNS, RACHEL 
1 5 8. Triumvirate 

STEFFEN, CHARLOTTE EITEL 
15 9. Still Life 

STEINBERG, N. P. 

160. Mandarin 

STERBA, ANTONIN 

161. Mrs. Edwin N. Johnson (Por- 

trait) 

STEVENS, CLARA HATCH 

162. Lake Odessa, Col. 

STEVENS, ELIZABETH STREET 

163. Blessing 

STEVENSON, FLORENCE EZZELL 

164. "Arrangement Moderne" 

SULA, KAREL 

165. Portrait by Candlelight 

TENNYSON, ETHEL 

166. Studio Interior 



[68} 



THOMPSON. BRUCE 

167. Corn Billy's Squjw 

TOLSON. NORMAN 

168. Two Sisters 

TO>5('NStND. KATK A. 

1 69. French .Mirkct — New Orleans 

170. TencnicfU I louse — New Orleans 

VOGNILU. TKD 

171. Pep. Stevenson 

Vk ARNACUT. CRF.WKS 

172. .Mrs. Peter Kowic/ek (Portrait) 

(Loaned) 

Vt'AYCOTT. HEDLEY 

17}. The Bli/./ard from My Studio 
Vl'indow 



>M!1TI.. JOSEPHINE 
I74. Hif-h Tide 

WILDER. TO.M 

I7{. Oaks in Autumn Mode 

U'lIIAS. I I ISABETH HETLESAIER 

I7(>. Ruins of Cathedral, llamar, 
Norway 

WILLIAMS. EWART L. 

177. Solitude 

Vi'll LIAMS. FLORENCE WHITE 

178. Five O'clock 

WINKLER, AGNES CLARK 

179. View at Coranado Beach 

YOUNG. E. GOl.UY 

180. Beside Still Vi'jters 



PASTELS AND WATERCOLORS 



BYER, SAMUEL 

181. Day Before Holiday 

BLANQUET, LOUIS 

182. Rebeca (Nude) 

BOETTCHER, ROSE KRIEGER 
18). Old Gate, Peking 

184. Summer Palace, Peking 

BRANDT, HENRY 

185. On Humboldt Boulevard. Chi- 

cago (Watercolor and Tem- 
pera) 

BURNHAM, ANITA WILLETS 

186. Chicago River in 1907 

BURNHAM, CAROL-LOU 

187. Playing Fountain. Paris 

CHASE, RICHARD A. 

188. The Old Farm 

189. Morning Sunshine 

CUMMINGS. JANET 

190. Still Life 

DALRYMPLE. FREDERIC 

191. Meshes 

192. Old Willow 

DESCHERMEYER, HEDWIG J. 

19). A Japanese Lady (Pastel) 



UE VILLIERE. LOUISE 
194. Dusk 

FORSTER, FLORENCE SMITH 

19$. Vera Mirova (A Portrait De- 
sign) 

GOSLEE. DEAN H. 

196. Fall 

GRANGE. CON 

197. Spanish Cottage Number 1 

198. Spanish Cottage Number 2 

GRIFFITH. JULIA SULZER 

199. Landscape 

HALL. THO.MAS 

200. Ocean Dusk 

HART, •POP" 

201. Arabs Assembling to Fete 

202. Market Plaza, Mexico 

HEADLAND. V. V. 

20). West of the Water Tower 

HELLMUTH, MARY 

204. Pepito at Fiesta 
20(. Katinka 

JONES, BEAUFORD FLOYD 
206. Belmont Harbor 



[69] 



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